BOHEMIA

  v3.1 Updated 26 August 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                DUKES of BOHEMIA 915-1197 (PŘEMYSLID) 3

Chapter 2.                KINGS of BOHEMIA 1158-1306 (PŘEMYSLID) 22

Chapter 3.                KING of BOHEMIA 1307-1310 (GÖRZ-TIROL) 40

Chapter 4.                KINGS of BOHEMIA (LUXEMBOURG) 41

Chapter 5.                KINGS of BOHEMIA 1437-1457 (HABSBURG) 51

Chapter 6.                KING of BOHEMIA 1458-1471 (PODIEBRAD) 52

Chapter 7.                KING of BOHEMIA 1469-1471 (HUNYADI) 53

Chapter 8.                KINGS of BOHEMIA 1471-1525 (JAGIELLON) 53

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The Slavs began to occupy what was to become Bohemia, left unpopulated by the Germanic Quadi and Marcomanni, in the 6th century as part of their movement westwards[1].  They posed little threat to the Franks as their territory was isolated by the natural barriers formed by the Erzgebirge and Böhmerwald mountains.  Einhard's Annales record a council at Frankfurt in 822 attended by legates from "orientalium Sclavorum, id est Abodritorum, Soraborum, Wiltzorum, Beheimorum, Marvanorum, Prĉdenecentorum et in Pannonia residentium Avarum"[2].  Fourteen of their duces were baptised at the court of Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks in 845[3].  There is some confusion between Bohemia and Moravia in primary sources during the mid-9th century.  For example, the Annales Fuldenses record that a military expedition was sent to "Bohemia" in 857 although, as the text names the Moravian duke, it is likely that Moravia was intended[4].  It is possible that Bohemia did not exist at that time as a separate entity but that the territory was subject to Moravian domination. 

 

The first identified reference to Bohemia as a separate unit is in the Gesta Francorum which names "Zventisla, Witislavi, Heriman, Spoitamor, Moyslan, Goriwei" as the dukes of the Bohemians in 872[5].  The same list is given in the Annales Fuldenses, also in 872[6].  It is not clear what independent status these named individuals may have enjoyed.  However, as the text singles out none of them as overall leader, it is likely that they were local chiefs probably reporting to the Moravian duke.  At any rate, in the later 9th century, Bohemia was still subject to the overlordship of the Moravians from whom they received missionaries[7].  The Chronica Boemorum names "Premizl" as the first of the dynasty which was later known by his name, and his successors "Nezamizl", "Mnata", "Vogen", "Unezlau", "Crezomisl", "Neclan" and "Gostivit"[8].  It is not known whether this list represents actual historical figures.  The first known direct ancestor of the later dukes of Bohemia was Bořiwoj, alleged son of Gostiwit, whose baptism by Methodius Bishop of Moravia is recorded in the Chronica Boemorum and the Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, see Chapter 1.  His descendants continued to rule Bohemia until the death in 1306 of the last descendant in the male line. 

 

Vladislav II Duke of Bohemia was crowned as king of Bohemia in 1158 (see Chapter 2).  The royal title was not inherited by his sons.  His younger son Duke Přemysl Otakar I was crowned king in 1198, and his descendants continued to rule as kings.  After King Wenzel III was murdered in 1306, Albrecht I King of Germany engineered the succession as king of Bohemia of his son Rudolf III Duke of Austria, who had married King Wenzel´s stepmother.  King Rudolf died later in 1307, at which time Heinrich von Görz, son of Meinhard II Duke of Carinthia, was appointed to succeed (see Chapter 3).  After King Heinrich´s succession as duke of Carinthia in 1310, the Bohemian crown passed to Jean Comte de Luxembourg, elected as Jan King of Bohemia, who at the same time married the older sister of King Wenzel III (see Chapter 4).  The Luxembourg dynasty retained the Bohemian throne until the death in 1437 of King Zikmund.  The Luxembourg kings of Bohemia leveraged their territorial strength along the western and eastern borders of the Holy Roman Empire to acquire a position of considerable power in Germany.  King Jan imposed Bohemian suzerainty on Silesia in 1327 and in 1334 installed his son Karl as Markgraf of Moravia.  Three years after Karl succeeded his father, he was crowned as king of Germany and in 1355 as Emperor Karl IV.  The Bohemian crown passed to the Habsburg dynasty in 1437 (see Chapter 5).  In 1458, the crown passed to a Bohemian nobleman Jiři Podiebrad (Chapter 6), although his succession was challenged by Mátyás Hunyadi King of Hungary who also assumed the title king of Bohemia (Chapter 7) but was deposed in 1471 at the same time as the death of King Jiři Podiebrad, at which time the Bohemian throne passed to the Jagiellon kings of Poland (Chapter 8). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    DUKES of BOHEMIA 915-1197 (PŘEMYSLID)

 

 

BOŘIWOJ, son of --- ([852/53]-[900]).  The Chronica Boemorum names Gostivit as the father of Borwoy, and records that the latter was the first duke to be baptised by Methodius Bishop of Moravia, during the reign of Svatopluk King of Moravia[9].  He founded the town of Prague[10].  Dux.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records that "Borzywoy primus Dux christianus in Boemia" was baptised "cum coniuge sua beata Ludmilla Martyre" in 894[11]

m ([874/75]) LUDMILLA, daughter of SLAVIBOR ze Pšova [Prince of Pšov or Prince of the Sorbs] (860-murdered Burg Tetin 15 Sep 921, bur Prague St Georg).  The Chronica Boemorum names "filia Zlavoboris comitis de castello Psov, nomine Ludmila" as wife of "Borivoy"[12].  She was strangled[13].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records that "Borzywoy primus Dux christianus in Boemia" was baptised "cum coniuge sua beata Ludmilla Martyre" in 894[14].  She was canonised. 

Duke Bořiwoj & his wife had two children: 

1.         SPYTIHNĔV (875-915).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Spitigneum et Wratizlaum" as sons of "Borivoy", specifying that the former succeeded his father[15].  He succeeded his father in [900] as SPYTIHNĔV Duke of the Bohemians

2.         VRATISLAV (888-killed in battle 13 Feb 921).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Spitigneum et Wratizlaum" as sons of "Borivoy", specifying that the latter succeeded on the death of his older brother[16].  "Wratizlav" is named as younger brother of "Zpuytignev" in the Vita Vencezslavi[17].  He succeeded his brother in 915 as VRATISLAV I Duke of the Bohemians.  The Gesta Hungarorum records that, after settling in Pannonia, the Magyars (although the text does not give them this name) raided Moravia and Bohemia and killed "Waratizlao" in battle[18]m ([906]) DRAHOMIRA, daughter of --- from Stodor (-after 935).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Dragomir de durissima gente Luticensi…ex provincial nomine Stodor" as wife of "Wratizlav"[19].  Regent for her son.  She was sent into exile[20].  Duke Vratislav & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         WENZEL ([907]-murdered Altbunzlau 28 Sep 935[21], bur 4 Mar ---- Prague St Veit).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Wincezlaum…et Bolezlaum" as sons of Wratislav and Dragomir[22].  "Vencezlaum" is named as son of "Wratizlav" in the Vita Vencezslavi[23].  He succeeded his father in 921 as WENZEL I Duke of the Bohemians.  Heinrich I King of Germany led a successful campaign against Bohemia in 929 when Duke Wenzel did homage to the king[24].  He was murdered by his brother Boleslav "929 Kal Oct" according to the Chronica Boemorum[25]

b)         BOLESLAV (-15 Jul [973/76]).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Wincezlaum…et Bolezlaum" as sons of Wratislav and Dragomir[26].  He succeeded in 935 after murdering his brother as BOLESLAV I "der Grausame" Duke of the Bohemians

-        see below

c)         [SPYTIHNĔV] (-young).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

d)         PRIBISLAVA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m (before 938) ---. 

e)         daughter.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m ---. 

f)          daughter.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m ---. 

 

 

BOLESLAV of Bohemia, son of VRATISLAV I Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Drahomira ze Stodor ([908/10]-15 Jul [967]).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Wincezlaum…et Bolezlaum" sons of Wratislav and Dragomir[27].  His birth date range is estimated from the birth date of his second son and the estimated birth date of Boleslav's older brother.  "Bolezlav" is named as younger brother of "Vencezlaum" in the Vita Vencezslavi, which specifies that he was "mentis perversitate et actuum qualitate execrandus, diabolico tactu instinctus"[28].  He succeeded in 935, after murdering his brother, as BOLESLAV I "der Grausame" Duke of the Bohemians.  His accession marked the start of a period of hostile relations with the empire until Otto I King of Germany forced Duke Boleslav to pay tribute fourteen years later, and placed him, according to Thietmar, "in the custody of his brother Heinrich Duke of Bavaria"[29].  The Bohemians helped King Otto to defeat the Hungarians at Lechfeld near Augsburg in 955, and afterwards crossed the Carpathian mountains and occupied Krakow and Silesia[30].  In 965, Duke Boleslav formed an alliance with Mieszko I Prince of Poland, confirmed by the marriage of the latter to Boleslav's daughter[31].  Duke Boleslav supported the rebellion of Heinrich II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria against his cousin Emperor Otto II in [974/75].  After the latter confiscated the duke's territories, ex-Duke Heinrich fled to Bohemia and took refuge with Duke Boleslav[32].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death of Boleslav "967 Id Iul"[33].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 967 of "Boleslaus Sacuus filius Wratislai"[34]

m BIAGOTA, daughter of ---.  The Chronica Boemorum names "Ztrahquaz" as wife of Boleslav[35]

Duke Boleslav I & his wife had four children: 

1.         BOLESLAV ([927/28]-7 Feb 999).  The Chronica Boemorum names "secundus Bolezlaus dux" as son of Boleslav[36].  His birth date range is estimated from the birth date of his younger brother, and assuming that the birth date range of their father is accurate.  He succeeded his father in [967] as BOLESLAV II "der Fromme" Duke of the Bohemians.  Emperor Otto II founded a bishopric in Prague in 975[37].  Duke Boleslav supported Heinrich "den Zänker" ex-Duke of Bavaria in his rebellion against Otto III King of Germany in 984[38].  He founded Lundenburg abbey in 993.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 999 of "Boleslaus Pius filius Boleslai Sacui", adding that he created the bishopric of Prague and founded the monasteries of "sanctum Georgium et in Breunowia et in Insula"[39]m HEMMA, daughter of --- (-1005 or 1006).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Hemmam" as wife of "secundus Bolezlaus dux", without giving her origin, and records her death in 1006 in a later passage[40].  Thietmar records that she was sent into exile with her son Jaromir and the latter's unnamed younger brother[41], which appears to be dated to 1003.  [Duke Boleslav has been suggested as the possible husband of Ĉlfgifu of Wessex, daughter of Edward "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ĉlfleda ---.  Hroswitha of Gandersheim describes her as "Adiva … younger in years and likewise inferior in merit" to her older sister Eadgyth, whom she accompanied to Germany to provide an alternative choice of bride for Otto of Germany[42].  According to William of Malmesbury, she married "a certain Duke near the Alps"[43], who has not been identified.  It seems improbable chronologically that her husband could have been Duke Boleslav.  Although the duke's birth date is not known, his younger brother Strakhvas was born 28 Sep 929[44].  It therefore seems unlikely that Boleslaw could have been born much earlier than 925 at the earliest, whereas Ĉlfgifu was probably born in the range [910/15] assuming that she was of marriageable age when she went to Germany with her sister.]  Duke Boleslav II & his wife had five children: 

a)         WENZEL (-young).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Wencezlaum et Bolezlaum" as the two sons of "secundus Bolezlaus dux" and Hemma, specifying that the former died young[45]

b)         BOLESLAV (-1037).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Wencezlaum et Bolezlaum" as the two sons of "secundus Bolezlaus dux" and Hemma, specifying that the latter succeeded his father[46].  He succeeded in 999 as BOLESLAV III Duke of the Bohemians, but was deposed in May 1002 in favour of his brother.  Thietmar records that Boleslav fled to "Markgraf Heinrich" after he was deposed[47].  He was restored in Feb 1003 by Boleslaw of Poland, but deposed again, blinded and sent into exile later the same year by Bolesław who engineered his own election as Duke of Bohemia[48].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1037 of "Boleslaus filius Boleslai, dictus Mitis" who had been captured and blinded by "Mezconem Ducem Poloniĉ"[49].  m [PREDSLAVA, daughter of ---.  Europäische Stammtafeln[50] names "Predslava" as the wife of Duke Boleslaw III but does not give her origin.  This suggests that there is a primary source which records her name, but this source has not been identified.  According to Baumgarten[51], the wife of Duke Boleslav III was Predslava of Kiev, daughter of Vladimir I "Velikiy/the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev.  There is no indication about the date of such a marriage if it ever took place.  Information concerning Duke Boleslav and Predslava of Kiev which is available from primary sources shows that [999/1002] and after [1018] are the most likely dates.  However, a careful analysis of such information also shows difficulties which cast considerable doubt over the likelihood of such a marriage.  If the marriage took place in [999/1002], during Duke Boleslav's brief period of rule in Bohemia, Predslava must have been born in the late 970s/early 980s, maybe the daughter of Grand Prince Vladimir by his first wife Rogneda of Polotsk (married [978], separated [986]).  However, three pieces of information apparently relating to Predslava show that she was still living at the court of Kiev during the period [1015/18] and that she was probably unmarried at the time.  These are: firstly, the Russian Primary Chronicle which records that Predslava, sister of Iaroslav, warned the latter to be on his guard against Svyatopolk in 1015[52], secondly the Polish Chronicon which records that Bolesław I Prince of Poland asked for her hand in marriage in [1017] which was refused[53], and thirdly another passage in the Primary Chronicle which records that Boleslav of Poland fled from Kiev in 1018 with Iaroslav's two (unnamed) sisters[54].  If the marriage took place after [1018], after Predslava had been taken to Poland, the probable age difference between Predslava and Duke Boleslav would have been pronounced, and Boleslav's apparent lack of political influence at the time must have reduced his marriage prospects.  Concerning the age difference, if Predslava was still considered marriageable by Boleslaw I Prince of Poland in [1017], it is likely that she was born somewhat later than [978/86] (in which case she would have been the daughter of Grand Prince Vladimir by one of his concubines).  Duke Boleslav's date of birth is unknown.  However, his paternal uncle is recorded as having been born in 929 and the likely birth date range of his paternal aunt was [940/45].  It is therefore unlikely that Duke Boleslav's father was born much later than the 930s.  Even if his father married late, it is therefore improbable that Duke Boleslav himself was born much later than [970].  The question of Duke Boleslav's political status probably represents a more serious obstacle.  By [1018], fifteen years had passed since he was blinded and sent into exile.  No information has been found in the primary sources about his activity during this period, which suggests that he fell into obscurity.  It is not known whether Boleslav spent all his years of exile in Poland and, if so, under what conditions he lived.  However, according to Europäische Stammtafeln[55], he died in a Polish prison.  It is not known how long he had been in prison, but his absence from the Bohemian scene during the early 1030s, when his younger brother Duke Jaromir was restored and deposed in Bohemia for a third time, suggests that ex-Duke Boleslav may have been dismissed as a possible successor in Bohemia due to a lengthy period of imprisonment.  His blindness may also have been considered an insuperable handicap.  A previous edition of Europäische Stammtafeln[56] shows Predslava as daughter of Grand Prince Vladimir, presumably based on the Baumgarten article.  It also shows that the couple had an unnamed daughter who married "--- von Wřsovec (-1003)", such an assertion being highly improbable from a chronological point of view.] 

c)         JAROMIR (-murdered 4 Nov [1038/39]).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Udalricus et Iaromir" as two other sons of "secundus Bolezlaus dux" & his wife[57].  Thietmar records that "the duke of the Bohemians castrated his brother Jaromir and wanted to suffocate the younger brother in his bath" before sending them both into exile with their mother[58].  He succeeded his brother in May 1002 as JAROMIR Duke of the Bohemians, he was deposed in Feb 1003 and took refuge in Bavaria.  Thietmar records that Duke Wlodowej died and "the brothers who had been expelled along with their mother were recalled by the repentant Bohemians" but that Boleslaw of Poland expelled them again[59].  He was restored by Heinrich II King of Germany who drove out Bolesław of Poland, dated to 7 Sep 1004[60].  He was deposed again 12 Apr 1012 by his brother Oldrich who installed himself as duke, having lost the confidence of King Heinrich II[61].  Jaromir was restored for the third time in 1033, but deposed once more in 1034.  He was castrated and blinded in 1034[62].   The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1038 pridie Non Nov" of "Iaromir"[63].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1039 of "Iaromyr…filius Bolesali" blinded by "fratrem Odalricum"[64]

d)         OLDRICH (-9 Nov 1042).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Udalricus et Iaromir" as two other sons of "secundus Bolezlaus dux" & his wife, specifying that the former was brought up learning German at the court of Emperor Heinrich II[65].  Thietmar records that "the duke of the Bohemians castrated his brother Jaromir and wanted to suffocate the younger brother in his bath" before sending them both into exile with their mother[66].  He succeeded after deposing his brother in 1012 as OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians.  He was deposed in 1033.  He was restored as joint duke with his brother later in the same year.  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "V Id Nov" of "Oudalricus"[67].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1042 of "Odalricus…filius Boleslai" captured and blinded by "Mezconem Ducem Poloniĉ"[68]m ---.  The Chronica Boemorum refers to the childless marriage of "Oudalricus", but does not name his wife[69]Mistress (1): BOZENA, daughter of --- (-1052).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Bozena" as the mother of "Braziclau", son of "Oudalricus", and in a later passage records her death in 1052[70].  Duke Oldrich had [two] illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

i)          BŘETISLAV (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055)The Chronica Boemorum names "Bozena" as the mother of "Braziclau", son of "Oudalricus"[71].  Duke of Moravia 1025-1031.  He succeeded in 1034 as BŘETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians

-         see below.

ii)         VRATISLAV .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Prague 1055. 

e)         LUTA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  [1026]. 

2.         STRAHKVAS (28 Sep 929-996).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Ztrahquaz frater ducis [=secundus Bolezlaus]"[72].  A monk at Regensburg as CHRISTIAN.  He was a candidate for the bishopric of Prague in 995[73]

3.         DOBRAWA [Dobroslawa] ([940/45]-977).  Thietmar names "the sister of Boleslav the Elder…Dobrawa" as the wife of Mieszko of Poland[74].  Bearing in mind that Dobrawa gave birth to [four] children, it is unlikely that she was born much earlier than [940/45].  The Annales Kamenzenses record that "Mesco…rex Polanorum" married "Danbrovcam filiam ducis Boemie" in 965[75].  The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Mesico" married "christianisimam mulierem de Bohemia, Dubraucam" in 966 and converted to Christianity[76].  The Chronicĉ Polanorum names "unam christianissimam de Bohemia Dubrovcam nomine" as wife of "Meschonem"[77].  Her marriage was arranged to confirm the alliance between her father and her prospective husband.  After her arrival in Poland, she converted Prince Mieszko to Christianity and was instrumental in the conversion of the whole country in 966[78].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death in 977 of "Dubrauca" wife of "Poloniensi duci"[79]m ([965/66]) as his [second] wife, MIESZKO of Poland, son of ZIEMOMYSŁ & [Gorka] ([922]-25 May 992).  He succeeded in 966 as MIESZKO I Prince of Poland.  One child: 

a)         WLADIWOY of Poland (-[Jan/Mar] 1003).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded in 1002 as VLADIVOY Duke of the Bohemians.  Thietmar records that the Bohemians "secretly called Wlodowej from Poland" after Duke Boleslav was deposed and "was unanimously elected in his place because of his consanguinity"[80].  Thietmar records that Duke Wlodowej died and "the brothers who had been expelled along with their mother were recalled by the repentant Bohemians"[81]

4.         MLADA .  The Chronica Boemorum names "Mlada soror germana" of "secundus Bolezlaus dux"[82].  She obtained permission from Pope John XIII in Rome in 967 to found a Benedictine convent in Prague, named abbey of St Georg, where she became abbess as MARIA[83]

 

 

BŘETISLAV of Bohemia, illegitimate son of OLDRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his mistress Bozena --- (-Chrudim 10 Jan 1055, bur Prague St Veit[84]).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Braziclau" as son of "Oudalricus" and his mistress Bozena[85].  The Annalista Saxo records "Bracilaus, Boemie ducis Odolrici filius" kidnapping "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde" from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[86].  Duke of Moravia 1025-1031.  He succeeded in 1034 as BŘETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians.  The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "IV Id Jan" of "Brazislaus dux"[87].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1055 of "Bretislaus…filius Odalrici"[88]

m (Olmütz after 1021) as her first husband, JUDITH von Schweinfurt, daughter of HEINRICH von Schweinfurt Markgraf auf dem Nordgau & his wife Gerberga von Gleisberg ([1010/15]-2 Aug 1058, bur [1061 or after] Prague St Veit).  The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam, sororem Ottonis de Suinvorde, filiam…marchionis Heinrici" when recording that she was kidnapped by her future husband from the monastery of St Peter and St Paul "super montem Hasunkun"[89].  In a later passage, her death is recorded "IV Non Aug" as well as her later burial in Prague by her son Vratislav.  The same source also specifies that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son Duke Spytihnĕv and married "Petri regi Ungariorum" to spite him[90].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1058 IV Non Aug" of "Iudita coniunx Bracizlavi, ductrix Boemorum", specifying that she had been expelled from Bohemia by her son "Spitigneus", that to spite her son she had married "Petro regi Ungarorum", and that her son Wratizlas had brought back her body to be buried next to her husband in Prague[91].  She married secondly (after Jan 1055) [as his second wife,] Péter ex-King of Hungary

Duke Břetislav & his wife had six children: 

1.         SPYTIHNĔV (1031-28 Jan 1061).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[92].  The Annalista Saxo names "Spitigneus dux de Boemia" and gives his parentage[93].  The Chronica Boemorum records his birth in 1031[94].  Duke of Moravia 1049-1054.  He succeeded his father in 1055 as SPYTIHNĔV II Duke of the Bohemians.  The Chronica Boemorum records his death "V Kal Feb 1061"[95].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1061 of "Spitigneus…filius Bretislai, dilatator Ecclesiĉ Pragensis"[96]m HIDDA von Eilenburg, daughter of DIETRICH I Graf von Eilenburg [Wettin] & his wife Mathilde von Meissen .  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "filios: Fridericum, Dedonem, Thiemonem, Geronem, Conradum, Riddagum, et filiam Hiddam" as children of "comes Tidericus", specifying that Hidda married "duci Boemico"[97].  Duke Spytihnĕv & his wife had two children: 

a)         SVATIBOR FRIEDRICH (-murdered 23 Feb 1086).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Guntherum patriarcham et matrem Wichmanni de Cella" as children of "duci Boemico" and his wife Hidda[98].  Patriarch of Aquileia 1084.  

b)         daughter.  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Guntherum patriarcham et matrem Wichmanni de Cella" as children of "duci Boemico" and his wife Hidda[99].  The primary source which confirms her husband's name has not yet been identified.  m WICHMANN von Cella, son of ---. 

2.         VRATISLAV ([1032]-14 Jan 1093).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[100].  The Annalista Saxo names "Wratizlao duce" as another son of Judith von Schweinfurt, specifying that he brought his mother's body back to Prague for burial[101].  Duke of Olmütz 1054-1059.  He succeeded his brother in 1061 as VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians.  He was declared King of Bohemia in 1085 or 1086.   

-        see below

3.         KONRAD (-6 Sep 1093).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[102].  The Annalista Saxo names three brothers "Wratizlai, Conradi et Ottonis"[103].  Fürst von Znaim 1054.  Duke of West Moravia [Brno] 1061-1092.  The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[104].  He succeeded his brother in 1092 as KONRAD II Duke of the Bohemians.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Chonradus" succeeded in 1093 after the death of "Wratizlaus rex" but died after seven months[105]

-        MARKGRAFEN of MORAVIA

4.         JAROMIR GEBHARD (-Gran, Hungary 26 Jun 1090).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[106].  Chancellor of Emperor Heinrich IV 11 Jun 1077-Jul 1084.  Bishop of Prague 15 Jun 1068-1073, deposed 1073, restored 1074-1090. 

5.         OTTO of Bohemia (-9 Jul [1086 or 1087], bur Graditz).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[107].  The Annalista Saxo names three brothers "Wratizlai, Conradi et Ottonis"[108].  The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[109]

-        MARKGRAFEN of MORAVIA

6.         DYMUDIS .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1055. 

 

 

VRATISLAV of Bohemia, son of BŘETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt ([1032]-14 Jan 1093).  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Spitignev, Wratislaw, Conradus, Iaromir, Otto" as the five sons of "Bracizlaus [et] Iuditha"[110].  The Annalista Saxo names "Wratizlao duce" as another son of Judith von Schweinfurt, specifying that he brought his mother's body back to Prague for burial[111].  Herzog von Olmütz 1054-1059.  He succeeded his brother in 1061 as VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians.  The extent of Bohemian integration in imperial affairs is demonstrated by the grants by "Heinricus…rex" of "comitatum Histrie" and "marchiam Carniole" to the church of Aquileia at the request of "ducibus autem Writizlao Boemie ac Liudolfo Carintie, Cuonone quoque palatino comite et Tieboldo marchione" by two charters dated 11 Jun 1077[112].  The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[113].  Vratislav was declared King of Bohemia at Prague 15 Jun 1085 or 1086.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "rex Wratislaus factus est" in 1086 and that in 1087 "dux Boemie…Wratislaus" was anointed as king and "uxor eius Zuslava" as queen[114].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1093 "Wratizlaus rex" and his succession by "Chonradus"[115].  The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1093 of "Fratizlaus dux Boemiĉ" when he fell from his horse while hunting[116].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1093 of "Wratislaus…filius Bretislai, fundator Ecclesiĉ Wissegradensis…primus Rex Boemiĉ"[117]

m firstly MARIA, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 

m secondly (1057) ADELHEID of Hungary, daughter of ANDRÁS I King of Hungary & his second wife Anastasia Iaroslavna of Kiev ([1040]-27 Jan 1062).  The Annalista Saxo refers to the wife of Duke Vratislav as "filia Andree regis Ungarie", but does not name her[118].  The Chronica Boemorum names "Adleyta" as the wife of Vratislav of Bohemia but does not give her origin[119].  Her birth date is estimated from her having given birth to four known children before her death.  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1062 VI Kal Feb" of "ductrix Adleyth mater Iudithĉ et Ludmilĉ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec"[120]

m thirdly ([1062/63]) SWIĘTOSLAWA [Svatana] of Poland, daughter of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1048]-1 Sep 1126).  The Annalista Saxo records the marriage of Duke Vratislav with "Zuatavam, Kazimer ducis Polanorum filiam", after the death of his Hungarian wife[121].  The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage of "Wratislaus dux" and "Zustavam, Kazimir Poloniorum ducis natam, Bloezlai vero et Uladizlai germanam" after the death of "ductrix Adleyth"[122].  The Chronicĉ Polanorum refers to an unnamed daughter of King Kazimierz who married "regi Bohemiĉ"[123].  The Annales Gradicenses record that in 1087 "dux Boemie…Wratislaus" was anointed as king and "uxor eius Zuslava" as queen[124].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ; records the death "Kal Sep 1126" of "Zvatava regina mater Sobezlai ducis"[125].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1126 of "Zuatava regina"[126]

Duke Vratislav II & his second wife had four children:

1.         BRĔTISLAV (-murdered 22 Dec 1100[127]).  The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam et Ludmilam filias et Brazilaum iuniorem et Wratislaum" as children of Duke Vratislav & his Hungarian wife[128].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Iudithĉ et Ludmilĉ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec" as children of "ductrix Adleyth"[129].  He succeeded his uncle in 1092 as BRĔTISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Bracizlaus" succeeded as king in 1093 after the death of "Chuonrado" who had reigned seven months[130].  The Chronica Boemorum records his murder "XI Kal Ian" and his burial "in sancti Wencezlai ecclesiĉ"[131].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1099 of "dux Boemie Bracizlaus iunior", although in a subsequent passage it records that "dux Bracizlaus" was killed in 1101[132].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1100 of "Bretislau…filius Wratislai, per Wrsowczones" killed while hunting[133]m (Sep 1094) LIUTGART von Bogen, daughter of ADALBERT [I] [von Bogen] --- & his wife Liutgard von Regensburg (-after [1120]).   The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage in Sep 1094 of "dux Bracizlaus" with "matronam de Bavaria nominee Lukarth"[134].  Her parentage is suggested by the donation of property to Oberaltaich by "Ductrix Luitgart soror Adelberti Comitis"[135], the same source recording numerous donations by Adalbert and his family which demonstrate that he was Graf von Bogen.  Duke Brĕtislav II & his wife had one child: 

a)         BRĔTISLAV (-8 Mar [1131 or after]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Blinded 20 Jun 1130[136]

2.         JUDITH (-25 Dec 1086).  The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam et Ludmilam filias et Brazilaum iuniorem et Wratislaum" as children of Duke Vratislav & his Hungarian wife[137].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Iudithĉ et Ludmilĉ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec" as children of "ductrix Adleyth"[138].  In the same passage, the chronicler records that one of Duke Vratislav's daughters, unnamed and without specifying by which marriage, married "duci Polonico"[139].  The Chronicĉ Polanorum refers to the wife of King Władysław as "filiam Wratislavi Bohemici regis"[140].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1085 VIII Kal Ian" of "Iuditha coniux Wladizlai ducis Poloniorum, quĉ fuit filia Wratizlai ducis Boemorum"[141].  The Annales Capituli Cracoviensis record the death in 1086 of "Iudith mater sua [Bolezslaus tertius]"[142].  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum records that she died from the effects of childbirth[143]m ([1080]) as his first wife, WŁADYSŁAW I HERMAN Prince of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ I KAROL "Odnowiciel/the Renewer" Prince of Poland & his wife Dobronega Maria Vladimirovna of Kiev ([1043]-4 Jun 1102).  

3.         VRATISLAV (-killed 19 Nov 1061).  The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam et Ludmilam filias et Brazilaum iuniorem et Wratislaum" as children of Duke Vratislav & his Hungarian wife[144].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Iudithĉ et Ludmilĉ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec" as children of "ductrix Adleyth"[145]

4.         LUDMILA .  The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhitam et Ludmilam filias et Brazilaum iuniorem et Wratislaum" as children of Duke Vratislav & his Hungarian wife[146].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Iudithĉ et Ludmilĉ, similiter Bracislai iunioris et Wratislai, qui in primo flore iuventutis occidit XIII Kal Dec" as children of "ductrix Adleyth"[147].  Nun.  The Chronica Boemorum records that "soror eius [=Bracizlai] Ludmila" was a nun "in sancti Wencezlai ecclesiĉ"[148]

Duke Vratislav II & his third wife had five children:

5.         BOLESLAV (-11 Aug 1091).  The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bolezlaum, Borivoi, Wladizlaum et Sobezlaum" as the four children of Duke Vratislav by his Polish wife[149].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Boleslavum, Borivoy, Wladizlaum, Sobezlavum" as the four children of "Zustavam, Kazimir Poloniorum ducis natam" and "Wratislaus dux"[150].  Duke of Olmütz.  

6.         BOŘIWOJ ([1065]-2 Feb 1124, bur Prague St Veit).  The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bolezlaum, Borivoi, Wladizlaum et Sobezlaum" as the four children of Duke Vratislav by his Polish wife[151].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Boleslavum, Borivoy, Wladizlaum, Sobezlavum" as the four children of "Zustavam, Kazimir Poloniorum ducis natam" and "Wratislaus dux"[152].  He succeeded his brother in 1100 as BOŘIWOJ II Duke of the Bohemians[153].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "dux Bracizlaus" was killed in 1101 and succeeded by "frater eius Borivoy"[154].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "ducem Borivoy" was put to flight after "Theutonici cum filiis Chuonradi" invaded Bohemia and installed "seniorem eorum fratrem…Udalricum" as duke[155].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "dux Borivoy" went to the aid of "imperatori Heinrico" in 1105[156].  Haverkamp, on the other hand, says that he supported the future Emperor Heinrich V in the latter's rebellion against his father in 1105/06[157].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Borivoy" was expelled in 1107 "diabolo suadente" and replaced by "Zuatopluk" as duke, but that in 1110 he returned to Prague and Visegrad[158].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Borivoy" was expelled in 1116 and replaced by "fratre Wladizlao", restored again in 1118, but expelled for the third time in 1120[159].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "1124 Nonis bis binis mense Plutonis" of "dux Borovoy", and his burial in Prague[160].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death "1124 III Non Feb" of "dux Borivoy" in Hungary[161].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1124 of "Borzywoy…filius Bretislai"[162]m GERBERGA [Helbirg] of Austria, daughter of LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria & his wife Ida von Ratelberg (-13 Jul 1142).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis refers to three (unnamed) sisters of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie", specifying that the third daughter married "dux Boemiĉ Pozwaius"[163].  The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage "XV Kal Nov 1100" of "Borivoy, frater ducis Bracizlai" with "Helbirk, orientalis marchionis Lupoldi sororem"[164].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records the death "III Id Iul 1142" of "Kerberk coniunx Boriwoy"[165].  Duke Bořiwoj II & his wife had six children: 

a)         JAROMIR (-before 1135).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  m ---.  The name of Jaromir's wife is not known.  Jaromir & his wife had one child: 

i)          HEINRICH [Konrad] (-1167).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

b)         SPYTIHNĔV (-3 Jan 1157).  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ names "Spitigneus filius Boriwoy ducis" when recording his pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1141 with "Mirozlau, Mukar"[166].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records the death "V Id Ian 1157" of "Spitigneus dux"[167]

c)         LEOPOLD .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Lupoldus dux" was enthroned in Moravia in 1135, but expelled in 1137[168].  1143.  

d)         BOLESLAV .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1146.  

e)         ALBRECHT (-7 Apr before 1124).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

f)          RICHSA (-27 Feb before 1124).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

7.         VLADISLAV (-12 Apr 1125, bur Prague St Maria).  The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bolezlaum, Borivoi, Wladizlaum et Sobezlaum" as the four children of Duke Vratislav by his Polish wife[169].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Boleslavum, Borivoy, Wladizlaum, Sobezlavum" as the four children of "Zustavam, Kazimir Polonioru m ducis natam" and "Wratislaus dux"[170].  He succeeded in 1109 as VLADISLAV I Duke of the Bohemians.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Borivoy" was expelled in 1116 and replaced by "fratre Wladizlao", but that Borivoy returned in 1117 only to be replaced again in 1120 in favour of "Wladizlaus"[171].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "II Id Apr 1125" of "Wladizlaus", and his burial place[172].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death "1125 II Id Apr" of "dux Wladizlaus pius et misericors ac humilis"[173].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1125 of "Wladislaus…filius Bretislai", adding that he founded "monasterium in Kladruby"[174]m ([1110]) RICHINZA von Berg, daughter of HEINRICH I Graf von Berg & his wife Adelheid von Mochental (-27 Sep 1125).  Berthold's  Chronicon of Zwiefalten names (in order) "Richinza ductrix Boemiĉ, Sophia ductrix Moraviĉ, Salome ductrix Poloniĉ" as sisters of "Heinricus comes [et] Rapot", specifying in the subsequent paragraph that Richinza was "uxor Vlatizlaus qui et Lauzlan dux Boemiĉ"[175].  Duke Vladislav I & his wife had four children: 

a)         SVATANA [Liutgarda] (-19 Feb after 1126).  The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage in Jul 1124 of "dux Wladizlaus natam suam primogenitam Suatavam" with "Fridrico"[176].  The primary source which confirms her husband's identity and parentage has not yet been identified.  m (Jul 1124) as his first wife, FRIEDRICH [IV] Domvogt von Regensburg, son of FRIEDRICH [III] Domvogt von Regensburg & his wife Liutgard --- (-11 Apr 1148, bur Jerusalem).  He died on the Second Crusade. 

b)         VLADISLAV (-18 Jan 1174, bur Strahow).  His parentage is confirmed by the Annales Gradicenses which record that "Wladizlaus filius Sobezlai ducis" was enthroned in Moravia after the expulsion of "Lupoldus dux"[177].  He succeeded in 1140 as VLADISLAV II Duke of Bohemia.  Crowned King of Bohemia at Regensburg 18 Jan 1158.   

-        see below, Chapter 3. KINGS of BOHEMIA

c)         DYPOLD [I] (-14/15 Aug 1167).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ names "Theobaldum et Henricum" as brothers of Duke Vladislav, recording that they rebelled against their brother in 1142 in Moravia[178].  Duke of Moravia. 

-        DUKES of MORAVIA

d)         HEINRICH (-after 1169).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ names "Theobaldum et Henricum" as brothers of Duke Vladislav, recording that they rebelled against their brother in 1142 in Moravia[179]m MARGARETA, daughter of --- (-before 19 Jan 1186).  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  Heinrich & his wife had three children: 

i)          ELISABETH .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Nun. 

ii)         MARGARETA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Nun. 

iii)        HEINRICH BŘETISLAV (-15 Jun 1197).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Archbishop of Prague 1182-1197.  He succeeded in 1193 as HEINRICH BŘETISLAV Duke of Bohemia.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1198 of "Bretislaus alias Henricus…qui et Episcopi Pragensis"[180]

8.         SOBĚSLAV UDALRICH ([1075]-14 Feb 1140).  The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bolezlaum, Borivoi, Wladizlaum et Sobezlaum" as the four children of Duke Vratislav by his Polish wife[181].  The Chronica Boemorum names (in order) "Boleslavum, Borivoy, Wladizlaum, Sobezlavum" as the four children of "Zustavam, Kazimir Poloniorum ducis natam" and "Wratislaus dux"[182].  He succeeded in 1125 as SOBĚSLAV I UDALRICH Duke of the Bohemians.  The Annales Gradicenses record the succession of "dux Sobezlaus…iunior etate" on the death of "dux Wladizlaus pius et misericors ac humilis"[183].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "domnus Sobezlaus" replaced "[Otto] Moraviensis princeps" as Duke of Moravia after the latter was killed "XIV Kal Mar 1126"[184].  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records the death "1140 XVI Kal Mar" of Duke Sobeslav[185].  The necrology of Pernegg records the death "XVI Kal Mar 1140" of "Sobieslaus dux Boemiĉ"[186]m ([1123]) ADELHEID of Hungary, daughter of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev ([1105/07]-15 Sep 1140).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ names "ductrix Adleyta" as wife of "dux Sobezlaus", specifying that she was retained in Hungary in 1137 for the reburial of "patrem suum Almum" who had died in Greece[187].  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records the death "1140 XVII Kal Oct" of "ductrix Adleyta"[188].  Duke Sobĕslav I Udalrich & his wife had five children: 

a)         VLADISLAV (-1165).  The necrology of St Florian names "ducis de Poemia Odalrici et ux eius Adelheidis et filii eius Ladezlai" on "Kal Nov"[189], although it is not clear to what this date refers.  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ names "avunculum suum Bela qui regnabat in Ungaria" when recording that "puer Wladislaus" fled to his uncle from Siwobost where Duke Wladislav celebrated Christmas in 1141[190].  1138.  m ([1152/55]) --- von Brandenburg, daughter of ALBRECHT I "dem Bären" Graf von Ballenstedt Markgraf von Brandenburg & his wife Sophie von Winzenburg.  The Vincentii Pragensis Annales record the marriage in 1155 of "Wladizlaus dux" and "filiam marchionis Alberti de Saxonia"[191]

b)         SOBĚSLAV (1128-9 Jan 1180).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records that "Lutherius rex" acted as godfather to "filium ducis Sobezlai" on Easter day 1128[192].  In prison 1147-1161.  He succeeded in 1173 as SOBĚSLAV II Duke of Bohemia.  He was deposed in 1178.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in exile of "Sobieslaw II" after reigning for one year[193]m ([1173/77]) as her first husband, ELŹBIETA of Poland, daughter of MIESZKO III "Stary/the Old" Prince of Greater Poland & his first wife Erszébet of Hungary ([1152]-2 Apr 1209, bur Kloster Dobrilugk).  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to, but does not name, the daughters of Mieszko III, naming (first in the list) "dux Boemorum Sobeslaus" as his son-in-law[194].  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Elizabeth filiam Meseconis ducis Polonie, viduam Zibizlai ducis Bohemie" as wife of "Conradus marchio filius Dedonis"[195].  She married secondly Konrad II von Landsberg Markgraf der Niederlausitz [Wettin].  The Genealogica Wettinensis records the death in 1209 of "Elizabeth marchionissa"[196].  The Chronicon Montis Serreni names "Elizabeth marchionissa…soror Wlodizlai ducis" as wife of "Conradi marchionis" when recording her death "1209 IV Non Apr" and her burial "Doberluge"[197]

c)         MARIA .  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records the marriage in 1138 of "dux Sobezlaus filiam suam Mariam" with "filio Leupoldi orientalis marchionis" specifying that it was celebrated in "Moravia in Olomucensi parte"[198].  The primary source which names her husband has not yet been identified.  However, it appears that Leopold is the only son to whom the text can refer.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  m firstly (29 Sep 1138) LEOPOLD IV Markgraf of Austria, son of LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria & his second wife Agnes of Germany [Staufen] (-Niedraltaich 18 Oct 1141).  Duke of Bavaria 1139.  m secondly (after 1141) as his second wife, HERMANN III Markgraf von Baden and Verona, son of HERMANN II Markgraf von Baden & his wife Judith [von Dillingen] (-after 12 Jul 1153, bur Backnang Stiftskirche). 

d)         ULRICH (1134-18 Oct 1177).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded in 1165 as ULRICH Duke of the Bohemians.  Duke of Moravia 1176.  m firstly CECILIA von Thüringen, daughter of LUDWIG I Landgraf of Thuringia & his wife Hedwig von Gudensberg.  The Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ names (in order) "Cecilia…Iutha…Adelheidis…Mechtildis" as the four daughters of "Ludewicus lantgravius" and his wife Hedwig, specifying that Cecilia married "Udelrico duci Boemie"[199]m secondly as her first husband, SOPHIA von Meissen, daughter of OTTO "der Reicher" Markgraf von Meissen [Wettin] & his wife Hedwig von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt].  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "filios Albertum et Tidericum et filias Adela et Sophiam" as children of "Otho Misnensis marchio" & his wife, naming "Olrico duci Bohemie" as first husband of Sophie and "burcgravio de Regensburc" as her second husband[200].  She married secondly Heinrich [IV] Burggraf von Regensburg.  Duke Ulrich & his second wife had one child:

i)          AGNES .  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Agnetem Gerbestadensem monacham" as daughter of "Olrico duci Bohemie" & his wife[201].  Nun at Gerbstedt. 

e)         WENZEL (1137-in prison [1192]).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records that "filius Bolezlai Wladislaw" stood godfather to "infantem filium ducis Sobezlai…Wencezlaus" who was baptised at the castle of Nemci[202].  He succeeded in 1191 as WENZEL II Duke of Bohemia.  He was imprisoned by Albrecht Markgraf von Meissen[203].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records that "Wenceslaus" ruled for three months and was expelled by "Przyemysl"[204]

9.         JUDITH (-17 Dec 1108).  The Annalista Saxo records that one of Duke Vratislav's daughters, unnamed and without specifying by which marriage, married "Wicbertus senior"[205].  The Annales Pegavienses name "Iuditha, Vratizlai regis filia" as wife of "Wicpertus", specifying in a later passage that she died "1109 XVI Kal Ian…in suo patrimonio Budissin"[206].  Heiress im Nisangau und im Gau Budissin [Bautzen][207].  The Genealogica Wettinensis records the death "1109 XVI Kal Jan" of "Iudita uxor Wiperti marchionis"[208]m ([1085]) as his first wife, WIPRECHT II von Groitzsch, son of WIPRECHT I im Balsamgau & his wife Sigena von [Gross-]Leinungen heiress of Morungen und Gatersleben (-Pegau 22 May 1124, bur Kloster Pegau).  Burggraf von Magdeburg 1118.  Markgraf der Lausitz and Markgraf von Meissen 1123.  The Chronica Boemorum records the death of "gener Wratizlai regis Wicbertus"[209]

 

 

1.         KONRAD OTTO, son of KONRAD [II] Markgraf of Moravia & his wife Marija of Serbia (-near Naples 9 Sep 1191).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Duke of Moravia 1174.  Duke of Znaim 1177.  Markgraf of Moravia 1182-1187.  He succeeded in 1189 as KONRAD I OTTO Duke of Bohemia.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1190 "in Apulia" of "Conradus de Moravia"[210]

 

 

1.         SVATOPLUK of Moravia, son of OTTO Duke of Moravia at Brno and Olmütz & his wife Ludmilla [Euphemia] of Hungary (-murdered 21 Sep 1109).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Eufemia" as wife of "Ottonis" and mother of "Suatopluc et Otto"[211].  The Annalista Saxo names "Suatopluk et Otto" as sons of Otto[212].  Duke of Moravia at Olmütz [1095].  He succeeded in 1107 as SVATOPLUK II Duke of Bohemia.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Borivoy" was expelled in 1107 "diabolo suadente" and replaced by "Zuatopluk" as duke of Bohemia[213].  The Annales Corbeienses record that "Dux Boemicus Zuetobold" was killed in 1109[214]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    KINGS of BOHEMIA 1158-1306 (PŘEMYSLID)

 

 

VLADISLAV of Bohemia, son of VLADISLAV I Duke of Bohemia & his wife Richinza [Richsa] von Berg (-18 Jan 1174, bur Strahow).  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Wladizlaus filius Sobezlai ducis" was enthroned in Moravia after the expulsion of "Lupoldus dux"[215].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ; records the succession in 1140 of "Wladizlaus filius Wladizlai ducis"[216].  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ names "Theobaldum et Henricum" as brothers of Duke Vladislav, recording that they rebelled in 1142 against their brother in Moravia[217].  He founded Kloster Strahov in 1139.  He succeeded in 1140 as VLADISLAV II Duke of Bohemia.  He left Germany in May 1147 with Konrad III King of Germany on the Second Crusade[218].  He was crowned King of Bohemia at Regensburg 18 Jan 1158.  The necrology of Windberg records the death "XV Kal Feb" of "Wlatizlaus dux Boemie"[219].  The necrology of Pernegg records the death "XV Kal Feb" of "Wladislaus II rex Boemiĉ"[220].  

m firstly (1140) GERTRUD of Austria, daughter of LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria & his second wife Agnes of Germany [Staufen] (1120-4/5 Aug 1150).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Gerdrudis" as third daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Lazlau duci Boemiĉ"[221].  She founded Kloster Doxan in 1143[222].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ records the death in 1150 of "Gertrudis ducissa Boemiĉ"[223].  The Annales Palidenses record the death in 1150 of "Agnes soror Conradi regis uxor Bohemia ducis"[224], "Agnes" being an error for "Gertrud".  The necrology of Windberg records the death "Non Aug" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Boemie"[225].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "Non Aug" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Boemie"[226]

m secondly (1153) JUTTA von Thüringen, daughter of LUDWIG I Landgraf of Thuringia & his wife Hedwig von Gudensberg (-9 Sep after 1174).  The Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ names (in order) "Cecilia…Iutha…Adelheidis…Mechtildis" as the four daughters of "Ludewicus lantgravius" & his wife Hedwig, specifying that Jutta married "eiusdem provincie [=Boemie] regis" and naming her sons "regem Odakarum et…comitem Heinricum"[227]

King Vladislav & his first wife had five children:

1.         FRIEDRICH (-25 Mar 1189).  The Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariĉ names "Fridericus dux Boemie, frater Otakari Regis Boemie"[228].  Duke of Olmütz 1169.  He succeeded in 1172 as FRIEDRICH Duke of Bohemia, was deposed in 1173, and restored briefly in 1178.  Duke of Moravia 1180.  The necrology of Windberg records the death "VIII Kal Apr" of "Fridricus dux Boemie"[229].  The necrology of Oberaltaich records the death "VIII Kal Apr" of "Fridericus dux Boemie"[230].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death in 1188 of "Fridericus Dux…filius Wladislai"[231]m (after 20 Jan 1157) ERSZÉBET of Hungary, daughter of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev ([1144/45]-24 Oct after 1189).  The Continuatio Cosmĉ records the marriage in 1157 of "Friderico filio eiusdem ducis [=Wladizlai ducis]" and "filiam Ungarici regis" but does not name her, specifying that "Heinricus frater Wladizlai ducis" brought her back to Bohemia for the marriage "XIII Kal Feb"[232].  "Elisabeth ducis Bohemie uxor" founded a church in Bohemia for the Knights Hospitallers, who had been favoured by "Eurosine matre mee", by charter dated 1186 which names "frater meus Henricus Pragensis episcopus" [identified as her husband´s paternal first cousin, who succeeded in 1193 as Heinrich Břetislav Duke of Bohemia, indicating that "frater" in this passage was probably used in an ecclesiastical sense][233].  The necrology of Oberaltaich records the death "IX Kal Nov" of "Elizabeth ducissa"[234].  Duke Friedrich & his wife had six children: 

a)         SOPHIE (-24 May 1195, bur Altzelle).  The Genealogica Wettinensis refers to the wife of "Albertus marchio filius eius [Ottonis marchionis]" as "filiam Friderici ducis Bohemie, fratris Odacari" but does not name her[235].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m (Aussig 23 Apr 1186) ALBRECHT I Markgraf von Meissen, son of OTTO "der Reiche" Markgraf von Meissen [Wettin] & his wife Hedwig von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt] ([1158]-Krummenhennersdorf 1195, bur Altzelle).  He succeeded his father 1190 as ALBRECHT "der Stolze" Markgraf von Meissen.    

b)         LUDMILA ([1170]-4 Aug 1240, bur Seligenthal).  The Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariĉ names "Ludmilam" as daughter of "Fridericus dux Boemie", her first husband "Albertus comes de Bogen" and her second husband "Ludwicus dux Bawarie"[236].  The De Advocatis Altahensibus names "Ludmila" as wife of "Adalbertum comitem"[237].  "Ludomia ducissa Bawarie" founded Kloster Seligenthal (near Landshut), with the consent of "filio meo Ottone…duce Bawarie et palatino comite Reni", for the souls of "maritorum meorum defunctorum…Ludewici ducis Bawarie et Adelberti comitis de Bogen" and "filiorum meorum…ducis et Adelberti comitis", by charter dated 1232[238].  The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "Non Aug 1240" of "domina Ludemia ducissa fundatrix nostra"[239].  The necrology of Fürstenfeld records the death "Non Aug" of "Ludmilla avia fundatoris nostri"[240]m firstly (before 25 Jul 1189) ADALBERT [IV] Graf von Bogen, son of BERTOLD [II] Graf von Bogen & his second wife Liutgard von Burghausen (11 Jul 1165-20 Dec 1197).  m secondly (end Oct 1204) LUDWIG I Duke of Bavaria, son of OTTO I Duke of Bavaria [Wittelsbach] & his wife Agnes van Looz (23 Nov 1173-murdered Kelheimer Bridge 15 Sep 1231, bur Scheyern). 

c)         VLADISLAV (-before 1180).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

d)         OLGA (-after 21 Jul 1163).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

e)         MARGARETA (-28 Jul 1183).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

f)          HELENA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  She adopted the name EIRENE in Byzantium.  m (1164) --- Petraloiphas-Komnenos, son of ALEXIOS Petraliphas & his wife Anna Komnenos. 

2.         AGNES (-7 Jun 1228).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbess of St Georg, Prague 1224. 

3.         SVATOPLUK (-after 15 Oct 1169).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  m ([1164]) ODOLA [Helwich] of Hungary, daughter of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev.  She is named as the wife of Svatopluk in Europäische Stammtafeln[241], but the primary source which confirms this has not yet been identified. 

4.         VOJTECH ADALBERT (-Apr 1203).  The Annales Mellicenses record the installation in 1164 of "Adalbertus filius regis Boemiĉ" as Archbishop of Salzburg[242].  The Vita Gebehardi names "Adilbertum filium regis Boeniĉ Ladizlai et Gerdrudis sororis…Chunradi archiepiscopi et Heinrici ducis Austriĉ" when recording his installation as Archbishop of Salzburg in succession to his maternal uncle[243].  Archbishop of Salzburg 1168, deposed 1174, restored 1183.  

5.         [daughter .  Baumgarten cites a Russian source in which Prince Iziaslav is recorded as addressing the king of Bohemia as the father-in-law of one of his (unnamed) children[244].  Baumgarten suggests that some corroboration is provided by a visit by Vladislav II King of Bohemia to Kiev and the presence of Iaroslav at the Bohemian court in 1165 which suggests that he may have been the child in question[245]m IAROSLAV Iziaslavich Prince of Vladimir in Volynia, son of IZIASLAV II Mstislavich Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife --- of Lithuania (-1175).  He succeeded in 1172 as IAROSLAV Grand Prince of Kiev.] 

King Vladislav & his second wife had three children:

6.         PŘEMYSL OTAKAR (before 1170-15 Dec 1230).  The Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ names "regem Odakarum et…comitem Heinricum" as the sons of "Iutha [filia Ludewici lantgravii]" and "eiusdem provincie [=Boemie] regis"[246].  He succeeded in 1192 as PŘEMYSL OTAKAR I Duke of Bohemia, deposed 1193, restored 1197.  Crowned PŘEMYSL OTAKAR I King of Bohemia 15 Aug 1198 at Mainz. 

-        see below

7.         VLADISLAV HEINRICH (-12 Aug 1222).  The Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ names "regem Odakarum et…comitem Heinricum" as the sons of "Iutha [filia Ludewici lantgravii]" and "eiusdem provincie [=Boemie] regis"[247].  Duke of Olmütz 1193-1194 and 1197-1222.  Duke of Bohemia 22 Jun-6 Dec 1197.  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the death in 1222 of "Wladislaus dux Moraviĉ, frater regis Prziemysl"[248]m  HEILWIG, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 

8.         RICHSA [Richza] (-19 Apr 1182, bur Klosterneuburg).  The Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera in 1177 records the marriage of "Heinricus frater [Liupoldus]" and "Richzam filiam Wazlay regis Boemorum", and the death in 1182 of "Richza, uxor Heinrici ducis"[249].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "VII Id Jan" of "Reiza regis Boemiĉ filia, Henrici tertii ducis Mellicensis ux" and her burial with her husband "in capitulo no"[250].  The necrology of St Andreas records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Richza ducissa"[251].  The Auctarium Sancrucense records that "Reiza uxore sua [=Heinricus dux de Medlico]" was buried in "Sancte Crucis" with her husband[252].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Reihtza filia regis Boemie" and her donation of "Roreinwisen"[253]m (Eger 1177) HEINRICH Markgraf of Austria Herzog von Mödling, son of HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Duke of Austria & his second wife Theodora Komnene (-[Aug/Sep] 1223, bur Heiligenkreuz). 

 

 

PŘEMYSL OTAKAR of Bohemia, son of WLADISLAW II King of Bohemia & his second wife Jutta of Thuringia (before 1170-15 Dec 1230).  The Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ names "regem Odakarum et…comitem Heinricum" as the sons of "Iutha [filia Ludewici lantgravii]" and "eiusdem provincie [=Boemie] regis"[254].  He succeeded in 1192 as PŘEMYSL OTAKAR I Duke of Bohemia, deposed 1193, restored 1197.  He was crowned PŘEMYSL OTAKAR I King of Bohemia 15 Aug 1198 at Mainz. 

m firstly (1187, divorced [1198/99]) ADELHEID von Meissen, daughter of OTTO "der Reicher" Markgraf von Meissen [Wettin] & his wife Hedwig von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt] (-Meissen 1 Feb 1211).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "filios Albertum et Tidericum et filias Adela et Sophiam" as children of "Otho Misnensis marchio" & his wife, naming "Odacarus qui postea fuit dux Bohemie" as husband of Adelheid and specifying that they were separated for consanguinity[255].  A 13th century genealogy names "Albertum, Dyetricum et Adelam filiam" as children of "[Otto] marchioni de Missin" & his wife "[filia] Alberti de Hanhalde marchionis", specifying that Adela married "rex Boemie Otaker"[256]

m secondly ([1198/99]) KONSTANCIA of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing ([1180]-Kloster Tichnowitz 6 Dec 1240).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the marriage of "Constantiam sororem regis Ungariĉ" and "rex Prziemysl" in 1199 after he had repudiated his first wife[257].  She founded Kloster Tichnowitz in 1232.  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the death "Id Dec 1240" of "Constantia regina"[258]

King Přemysl Otakar I & his first wife had four children:

1.         VRATISLAV (-before 1209).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Vredislaum et filias tres" as children of "Odacarus qui postea fuit dux Bohemie" and his wife Adelheid[259].  1201. 

2.         MARGARETA (-Ribe 24 May 1212, bur Ringsted Church).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Vredislaum et filias tres" as children of "Odacarus qui postea fuit dux Bohemie" and his wife Adelheid, specifying that one daughter married "regi Dacie"[260].  The Icelandic Annals record the marriage in 1205 of "Valdemarus rex Danorum" and "Margaretam regis Boemiĉ filiam" who was called "Dagmöam" by the Danes[261].  The Annales Ryenses record the marriage in 1205 of "rex Waldemarus" and "Daghmar filiam regis Boemiĉ", and in a later passage the death in 1212 of "Margareta regina" specifying that she was known as Dagmar "propter prĉcipuam formĉ pulchritudinem"[262].  A 13th century genealogy refers to the two daughters of "rex Boemie Otaker" and his wife Adelheid, specifying that "unam" married "rex Dacie"[263].  She was known as DAGMAR in Denmark.  The Icelandic Annals record the death in 1212 of "Margareta Dagmö, regina Danorum"[264]m (Lübeck 1205) VALDEMAR II "Sejr/the Conqueror" King of Denmark, son of VALDEMAR I "den Store/the Great" King of Denmark & his wife Sofia Volodarovna of Novgorod [Rurikid] ([28 Jun] 1170-Vordingborg 28 Mar 1241, bur Ringsted Church).  

3.         BOŽISLAWA (-6 Feb [1238 or before]).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Vredislaum et filias tres" as children of "Odacarus qui postea fuit dux Bohemie" and his wife Adelheid, specifying that one daughter (mentioned second in the text) married "Heinrico comiti de Orthenberc"[265].  A 13th century genealogy refers to the two daughters of "rex Boemie Otaker" and his wife Adelheid, specifying that "alteram" married "Henricus de Hortenberch"[266]m as his first wife, HEINRICH I Graf von Ortenberg, son of RAPOTO [I] von Sponheim Graf von Ortenberg & his wife Elisabeth von Sulzbach (-15 Feb [1241]).

4.         HEDWIG .  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Vredislaum et filias tres" as children of "Odacarus qui postea fuit dux Bohemie" and his wife Adelheid, specifying that one daughter (mentioned third in the text) was "canonisata…in Gerinrode"[267].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Nun at Gernrode.  

King Přemysl Otakar I & his second wife had nine children:

5.         VRATISLAV ([1200]-before 1209).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

6.         JUTTA (-2 Jun 1230).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  "Berenhardus…dux Carinthie" donated property to Viktring, with the consent of "sponse mee domine Iute ducisse", by charter dated 18 Mar 1213[268]m (before 18 Mar 1213) BERNHARD Duke of Carinthia, son of HERMANN II Duke of Carinthia [Sponheim] & his wife Agnes of Austria [Babenberg] (-4 Jan 1256).  

7.         ANNA ([1201/04]-23 Jun 1265, bur St Clara, Treibnitz).  The Notĉ Sanctĉ Clarĉ name "Anna ducissa, filia regis Bohemis, coniunx ducis Henrici", specify that she found the monastery of St Clara, died in 1265 and was buried in the monastery[269]m ([1214/18]) HEINRICH of Lower Silesia, son of HEINRICH I Duke of Lower Silesia, Krakow and Greater Poland [Piast] & his first wife Hedwig von Andechs-Merano ([1196/1204]-killed in battle near Liegnitz 9 Apr 1241).  He succeeded his father in 1238 as HEINRICH II Duke of Lower Silesia, Krakow and Greater Poland. 

8.         AGNES (-young).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

9.         WENZEL (1205-Počáply 23 Sep 1253, bur Prague Agnes Kloster).  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ names "Wenceslaus filius Prziemisl"[270].  Crowned associate king 6 Feb 1228.  He succeeded his father 1230 as WENZEL I King of Bohemia

-        see below.  

10.      VLADISLAV (1207-10 Feb 1228).  Markgraf of Moravia 1224-1228.  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the death in 1225 of "Wladislaus marchio Moraviĉ, frater regis Wenceslai"[271]

11.      PŘEMYSL (1209-16 Oct 1239).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Markgraf of Moravia 1228-1239.  m (before 25 Sep 1232) as her first husband, MARGARETA von Andechs-Merano, daughter of OTTO I Duke of Merano, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne [Andechs] & his first wife Beatrix de Bourgogne-Comté (-18 Oct 1271).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.  She married secondly (2 Jun 1240) as his second wife, Friedrich Graf von Truhendingen

12.      BLAŽENA (1210-Milan 24 Oct 1281, bur Chiavarelle).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Known as "Wilelma Boema"[272].  

13.      ANEZKA [Agnes] (1211-Prague St Franciscus 2 Mar 1282).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records that "Agnes filia regis Prziemysl" became a Franciscan nun in 1233[273].  Nun at St Franciscus at Prague 1234, later Superior.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death "VI Non Mar" in 1281 (O.S.) of "Agnes filia Przyemisl dicti Ottagari Regis Boemiĉ et filia Constantiĉ sororis Andreĉ Regis Ungariĉ", adding that she founded "hospitale in pede Pontis Pransensis Cruceiferorum" with her brother King Wenzel[274].  She was canonized 12 Nov 1989. 

 

 

WENZEL of Bohemia, son of PŘEMYSL OTAKAR I King of Bohemia & his second wife Konstancia of Hungary (1205-Počáply 23 Sep 1253, bur Prague Agnes Kloster).  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ names "Wenceslaus filius Prziemisl"[275].  He was crowned associate King of Bohemia 6 Feb 1228.  He succeeded his father in 1230 as WENZEL I King of Bohemia.  Investiture at Melfi in 1231.  Bohemia, threatened by the expansionist policy of Friedrich II Duke of Austria, led the group of princes requesting imperial intervention, which led to imposition of direct imperial rule in Austria in 1236.  This move impelled King Wenzel into forming an anti-imperial alliance with Duke Friedrich, under which territories north of the Danube were transferred from Austria to Bohemia.  The alliance was joined by Otto Duke of Bavaria.  King Wenzel and Duke Otto withdrew from the diet at Eger in Jun 1239, resolving to elect an anti-king of Germany [276].  In 1251, Bohemia invaded and occupied most of Austria, which had been under direct imperial rule since the death of Duke Friedrich II in 1246[277].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the death "X Kal Oct 1253" of "rex Wenceslaus"[278]

m (1228) KUNIGUNDE von Staufen, daughter of PHILIPP Duke of Swabia King of Germany & his wife Maria [Eirene] Angelina ([Feb/Mar] 1202-13 Sep 1248, bur Prague St Veit).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the marriage of "Cunegundis filia regis Philippi" and "Wenceslao filio regis Prziemysl"[279].  The Annales Marbacenses record that one of the four daughters of King Philipp (third in the list) married "regi Boemie"[280].  The Cronica Domus Sarensis records the marriage of "Wentzeslaus rex quartus" and "filia regis Phylippi…Chunigundis"[281].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the death "Id Sep 1248" of "regina Cunegundis"[282]

King Wenzel I & his wife had five children: 

1.         VLADISLAV (-3 Jan 1247).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Wladislaum et Przesemysl" as the two sons of "Rex Wencezslaus", adding that Vladislav held "Morauiĉ Marchionatum"[283].  Markgraf of Moravia, Duke of Troppau.  Duke of Austria 1246-1247, by right of his wife.  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the death in 1247 of "Wladislaus filius regis Wenceslai"[284]m (dispensation 4o 8 Dec 1244, 1246 soon after 15 Jun) as her first husband, GERTRUD of Austria Herzogin von Mödling, daughter of HEINRICH "dem Grausamen" Duke of Austria & his wife Agnes of Thuringia ([1228]-24 Apr 1288).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records that "Wladislao filio regis Bohemiĉ" married "filia…Henrici quondam ducis Austriĉ" in 1246[285].  She succeeded her uncle in 1246 as Titular Dss of Austria and Styria, although the duchies had escheated to the emperor after her uncle's death and came under direct imperial administration[286].  The Annales Mellicenses in 1246 record the marriage of "Gerdrudem, filiam ducis Heinrici" and "filius regis Boemorum" and in 1248 her marriage to "Hermannus marchio de Badem"[287].  The Continuatio Garstensis records her third marriage in 1252 with "rex Ruscie", specifying that it was arranged by Béla King of Hungary[288].  The Continuatio Florianensis names her third husband "Romanus rex Russie"[289].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal May" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Austrie filia ducis Henrici et nepta Leupoldi ducis"[290].  She married secondly (mid 1248) Hermann VI Markgraf von Baden, and thirdly (27 Jul 1252, divorced 1253) as his first wife, Roman Danilovich Prince of Slonim.    

2.         PŘEMYSL OTAKAR (1233-killed in battle Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278, bur Znaim Minoriten).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Wladislaum et Przesemysl" as the two sons of "Rex Wencezslaus"[291].  He succeeded his father in 1253 as OTAKAR PŘEMYSL II King of Bohemia

-        see below

3.         BEATRIX [Božena] ([1230/31]-Breslau 27 May 1290, bur Breslau Klarissenkloster).  The Cronica Principum Saxonie names "Beatricem filiam regis Boemie" as wife of "Otto III"[292].  An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee names "Ottonis et Beatrice uxoris eius" among donors to the monastery[293].  The Notĉ Sanctĉ Clarĉ record the death "1290 VI Kal Iun" of "Beatrix marchionissa Brandburgensis" specifying that she was sister of "Anna ducissa, filia regis Bohemis, coniunx ducis Henrici"[294]m (before Jun 1243) OTTO III Markgraf von Brandenburg, son of ALBRECHT II Markgraf von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt] & his wife Mathilde von Landsberg [Wettin] ([1209/16]-Brandenburg am Havel 9 Oct 1267, bur Strausberg Dominican church).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ names "Ottoni marchioni" as "genero suo [=rex Prziemysl]" and his wife "sorori suĉ de Bramburk, Czaslaw"[295]

4.         AGNES (-10 Aug 1268, bur Altzelle).  The Notĉ Sanctĉ Clarĉ name "Anna ducissa, filia regis Bohemis, coniunx ducis Henrici" when recording the death of her sister Beatrix[296], although Anna is presumably an error for Agnes.  The primary source which confirms her name and marriage has not yet been identified.  The Annales Veterocellenses record the death "1268 VI Id Oct" of "marchionissa Agnes"[297]m (1244) as his second wife, HEINRICH "der Erlauchtete" Markgraf von Meissen und der Niederlausitz, son of DIETRICH "der Bedröngte" Markgraf von Meissen und der Niederlausitz [Wettin] & his wife Jutta von Thüringen ([21 May/23 Sep] 1218-1288 before 8 Feb, bur Kloster Altzelle). 

5.         daughter (-before 1248, bur Prague St Franziskus-Kirche).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

 

 

PŘEMYSL OTAKAR of Bohemia, son of WENZEL I King of Bohemia & his wife Kunigunde von Hohenstaufen (1233-killed in battle Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278, bur Znaim Minoriten).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Wladislaum et Przesemysl" as the two sons of "Rex Wencezslaus"[298].  Associate king of Bohemia 31 Jul 1248-Nov 1249.  Markgraf of Moravia 1251.  He succeeded as OTAKAR Duke of Austria and Steiermark in 1251.  He succeeded his father in 1253 as OTAKAR PŘEMYSL II King of Bohemia.  Crowned 1261.  His possession of the duchies of Austria and Styria was legalised in 1262 by Richard of Cornwall King of Germany[299].  "Otakarus…rex Boemiĉ, dux Austriĉ et Stiriĉ et marchio Moraviĉ" founded Kloster Goldenkron by charter dated 1263[300].  "Otacharus…rex Boemorum dux Austrie et Styrie et marchio Moravie" confirmed the foundation of Kloster Hohenfurt by "Wockonis quondam marschalci regni nostri" by charter dated 17 Jul 1264[301].  King Richard appointed Otakar as protector of the royal domains east of the Rhine 7 Jan 1267[302].  He succeeded in 1269 as OTAKAR Duke of Carinthia, .  In 1274, King Otakar ignored demands for the return to imperial jurisdiction of the duchies of Austria, Carinthia and Styria.  This proposal had been made in line with the policy of Rudolf I King of Germany, promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274, under which all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245 were to be returned to the empire.  In accordance with the procedures established, the duchies were deemed forfeited after a year and a day[303].  King Rudolf declared war on Bohemia, and King Otakar was obliged to abdicate under the temporary peace of 21 Nov 1276, which was confirmed by treaty 6 May 1277.  Rudolf's position was confirmed definitively after he defeated King Otakar at the battle of Marchfeld near Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278.  The Notĉ Altahenses record that "Otakarus rex Boemie" was killed in battle "1278 VII Kal Sep"[304]

m firstly (Hainburg 11 Feb 1252, dispensation 3o and 4o 5 Jul 1253, repudiated 1261) as her second husband, MARGARETA of Austria, widow of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, daughter of LEOPOLD VI Duke of Austria [Babenberg] & his wife Theodora --- (-Burg Krumau am Kamp 2 Oct 1267, bur Lilienfeld).  The Annales Mellicenses in 1226 record the marriage of "Margaretam filiam Liupoldi ducis Austrie" and "Heinricus filius imperatoris Friderici"[305].  The Notĉ Sancti Emeranni record the marriage in 1225 at Nürnberg of "Heinricus rex" and "Constantiam filiam Liupoldi ducis Austrie"[306].  She was crowned Queen of Germany 28 Mar 1227 at Aachen.  She lived in a Dominican convent at Trier after the death of her first husband[307].  The Continuatio Garstensis records the second marriage "apud Heimburch" of "Margaretam viduam regis Heinrici, filiam ducis Leupoldi" and "Otakarus marchio Moravie"[308].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the marriage "in Henburk III Id Feb 1252" of "Prziemysl filius regis Wenceslai" and "Margaretham viduam filiam Leupoldi ducis Austriĉ"[309].  The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1252 of "Ottakarus Rex Boemiĉ" and "Margaretham, quondam Romanorum Regina"[310].  "Margareta domina regni Boemie ducissa Austrie et Styrie marchionissa Moravie" granted "comitiam in Rakz" to "Wocconi de Rosenberch" by charter dated 1260[311].  The Altahenses Annales record that "Otaker rex" repudiated his first wife "sine iudicio ecclesie"[312].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records that "regina Margareta" left Bohemia for Austria "XV Kal Nov 1261"[313].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "IV Kal Nov" of "Margareta quondam regina Romanorum filia ducis Leupoldi" and her burial next to her father "in Campo Liliorum"[314].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Kal Nov" of "Margareta filia ducis Liupoldi regina Romanorum ducissa Austrie et Stirie"[315]

m secondly (Pressburg 25 Oct 1261) as her first husband, KUNIGUNDA [Kunguta] Rostislavna, daughter of ROSTISLAV Mikhailovich ex-Grand Prince of Kiev, ex-Prince of Galich, Ban of Mačva & his wife Anna of Hungary (1245-9 Sep 1285, bur Prague Erlöserkirche).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the marriage "VIII Kal Nov 1261" of "Cunegundem filiam Hostislai ducis Bulgarorum" and the king "in castello Ungarias…Possen"[316].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the second marriage of "Rex Przsemysl" and "Chungundam, Regis de Mazouia filiam"[317].  The Altahenses Annales record the marriage in 1261 of "Otaker rex" and "Chunigundem filiam Regis Ruscie, neptem Bele regis Ungarie ex filia"[318].  She married secondly (Prague 2 Jun 1284) as his second wife, Zaviš von Rosenberg zu Skalitz und Falkenstein (-beheaded Schloß Frauenberg 24 Aug 1290, bur Hohenfurt).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the second marriage of "rex Wencezslaus…mater…eius" and "quondam Baronem…Zauissium" by whom she had a son "in Moravia…Iohannes" who joined "ordine Cruciferorum Christo"[319]

Mistress (1): --- Palczierzik, daughter of ---.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "filium…Nicolaum, et postea filias plures" as the children of "Rex Przsemysl" and his mistress named "Palczierzik"[320]

Mistress (2): AGNES von Kuenring, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 

King Otakar Přemysl II & his second wife had four children: 

1.         HEINRICH (1262-1263).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

2.         KUNIGUNDE (Jan 1265-27 Nov 1321, bur Prague St Veit).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the baptism of "Rex Przsemysl…filiĉ suĉ primogenitĉ" in 1265[321].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records that "filia Regis…Chungundis" became a nun "ad sanctum Franciscum" in 1276, but that she was later taken from the monastery by her brother and married to "Duci Mazouiĉ", after whose death she became "Abbatissa ad sanctum Georgium in castro Pragensis"[322].  The primary source which confirms her first betrothal has not yet been identified.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death in 1321 of "Regis Przemysl filia, Abbatissa ad sanctum Georgium in castro Pragensi…Chunegundis" and her burial in the monastery[323]Betrothed ([1276]) to HARTMANN von Habsburg Graf von Kiburg, son of RUDOLF I Graf von Habsburg King of Germany & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg [Zollern] (Rheinfelden 1263-drowned between Breisach and Strasbourg 21 Dec 1281, bur Basel Münster).  m (1291, divorced before 19 Dec 1302) as his second wife, BOLESŁAW II Prince of Plock, son of SIEMOWIT I Prince of Mazovia [Piast] & his wife Pereiaslava Daniilovich of Galich (after 1251-20 Apr 1313).  He succeeded his brother in 1294 as BOLESŁAW II Prince of Mazovia.  

3.         AGNES (5 Sep 1269-Prague 17 May 1296, bur Prague, Clarissan convent).  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ records the birth "Non Sep 1269" of "regi Otakaro filia", but does not name her[324].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1278 of "Wencezslaus filius regis Boemiĉ" and "filiam Domini Rudolphi Electi" and of "filius Electi filiam Regis Boemiĉ"[325].  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notĉ Historicĉ record that "rex Rudolfus…filium suum dominum Hartmudum [error for Rudolfum]" married "sororem regis Bohemie"[326].  After her husband died, she lived at Schloß Brugg im Aargau until 1295, thereafter becoming a nun at the Clarissan convent of Prague.  The Chronicon Francisci records the death "XVI Kal Jun" in 1296 of "Domina Agnes soror Regis Boemiĉ, Ducissa Austriĉ, relicta Ducis Rudolphi Romanorum Regis filii" and her burial "in Ecclesia sanctĉ Clarĉ ordinis fratrum minorem apud sanctum Franciscum in Praga"[327]m (contract Iglau 1278, Mar 1289) RUDOLF II von Habsburg ex-Duke of Austria, son of RUDOLF I Graf von Habsburg King of Germany & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg (1270-Prague 10 May 1290, bur Prague Burg, transferred 1293 to St Veit’s Cathedral). 

4.         WENZEL (17 Sep 1271-21 Jun 1305, bur Prague Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beatorum Martyrum Cozmĉ et Damiani" in 1271 of "Wencezslaus…Rex Boemiĉ"[328].  He succeeded in 1283 as WENZEL II King of Bohemia.  Imperial Elector 1289.  Crowned King of Bohemia 2 Jun 1297.  King of Poland 1300. 

-        see below

King Otakar Přemysl II had seven illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

5.          NIKOLAUS ([1255]-25 Jul 1318)The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "filium…Nicolaum, et postea filias plures" as the children of "Rex Przsemysl" and his mistress named "Palczierzik", adding that he was later invested as "Dux Opauiĉ"[329].  He was legitimated 6 Oct 1360, but excluded from succession to the throne of Bohemia 20 Oct 1260.  Herr von Troppau 4 Jul 1269.  Ritter 1273.  He was installed in 1281 as NIKOLAUS I Duke of Troppau

-           DUKES of TROPPAU

6.          [AGNES] . The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "filium…Nicolaum, et postea filias plures" as the children of "Rex Przsemysl" and his mistress named "Palczierzik"[330].  The primary source which confirms her name and marriage has not yet been identified.  m [BAVOR III] Herr von Strakonicz, son of ---. 

7.          daughterThe Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "filium…Nicolaum, et postea filias plures" as the children of "Rex Przsemysl" and his mistress named "Palczierzik"[331].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m --- Herr von Wartenberg, son of ---.  

8.          daughterThe Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "filium…Nicolaum, et postea filias plures" as the children of "Rex Przsemysl" and his mistress named "Palczierzik"[332].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m ([1276]) WOK Herr von Krawarz, son of --- (-[1329]).  

9.          JESEK ([1265/70]-26 Aug 1296, bur Wysehrad).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Priest at Wysehrad 1290.  

10.       ELISABETHThe Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "filium…Nicolaum, et postea filias plures" as the children of "Rex Przsemysl" and his mistress named "Palczierzik"[333].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m VIKARD Herr von Polna Burggraf of Brno.  1303.  

11.       daughter.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m (after May 1277) --- Herr von Weitra, son of ---. 

King Otakar Přemysl II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):   

12.       ELISABETH .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m (1275) HEINRICH [V] von Kuenring, (-Troppau Jul 1281).  Herr zu Weitra 1280. 

 

 

WENZEL of Bohemia, son of OTOKAR PŘEMYSL II King of Bohemia & his second wife Kunigunde [Kunguta] Rostislavna of Mačva [Rurikid] (17 Sep 1271-21 Jun 1305, bur Prague Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beatorum Martyrum Cozmĉ et Damiani" in 1271 of "Wencezslaus…Rex Boemiĉ"[334].  "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et…domni Wencezlai in regno Boemiĉ tutor" confirmed properties of Kloster Goldenkron by charter dated 6 Jan 1281[335].  He succeeded in 1283 as WENZEL II [Václav] King of Bohemia.  "Vencezlaus…dominus et hĉres regni Boemiĉ et marchionatus Moraviĉ" confirmed the foundation of Kloster Goldenkron by "domini Otakari quondam regis Boemiĉ patris nostri" by charter dated 10 Jan 1284[336].  Rudolf I King of Germany issued a royal declaration 4 Mar 1289 confirming the Bohemian king's right to an electoral vote[337].  King Wenzel sought domination over Poland: he claimed suzerainty over the lands of Heinrich IV "Probus" Duke of Breslau, Prince of Krakow who had been murdered in 1290, obtained from Przemysł II Prince of Greater Poland his renunciation of claims to the duchy of Krakow in 1291, and gained the feudal allegiance of several other Silesian princes.  He was accepted by the population as Duke of Krakow and Sandomir, and captured Wladysław "Lokietek" and forced him to renounce his claims to the duchy[338].  He was crowned King of Bohemia 2 Jun 1297.  In early 1300, he occupied Greater Poland, Pomorze and Kujavia, forcing Wladysław "Lokietek" into exile[339].  After obtaining support from Albrecht I King of Germany and arranging his own betrothal to the daughter of the previous Polish king, he was crowned at Gniezno in Sep 1300[340] as WACLAW King of Poland.  Pope Boniface VIII ordered him to renounce the title 10 Jun 1302, denying him the right to the crown[341].  The Notĉ Altahenses record the death "1305 XIII Kal Iul" of "Wenzeslaus Bohemorum rex"[342].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XI Kal Iul" in 1305 of King Wenzel and his burial "in Aula Regia"[343]

m firstly (contract Iglau 1278, Eger 24 Jan 1285) GUTA von Habsburg, daughter of RUDOLF I King of Germany Duke of Austria & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg (13 Mar 1271-Prague 18 Jun 1297, bur Prague St Veit).  The Chonicon Colmariense records the betrothal in 1278 of a daughter of King Rudolf I to "regina Bohemiĉ…filius"[344].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1278 of "Wencezslaus filius regis Boemiĉ" and "filiam Domini Rudolphi Electi" and of "filius Electi filiam Regis Boemiĉ"[345].  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "circa festum beatĉ Gerdrudis" in 1271 of "Dominam Gutam Reginam Boemiĉ"[346].  It appears that Guta used her good influence to try to improve relations between her husband and her brother Albrecht I.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XIV Kal Jul" in 1297 of "Domina Guta Regina" in childbirth and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi circa sepulchrum Regis Ottakari"[347]

m secondly (betrothed Jul 1300, 26 May 1303) as her first husband, RYKSA ELŹBIETA of Poland, daughter of PRZEMYSŁ I Prince of Poznan, Kalisch and Gniezien [Piast] & his wife Elisabeth von Schlesien [Piast] (1 Sep 1288-Königgrätz 19 Oct 1335, bur Brno, Cistercian Kloster Marienkirche).  The Annales Polonorum record the birth "1288 in die sancti Egidii" of a daughter to "ducissa Polonie nomine Richca, uxor ducis Primislii secundi"[348].  The Chronica principum Polonie names "Elizabet filia ducis Kalisiensis" as the second wife of "Wenczeslai regis Bohemie"[349].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1300, and the marriage three years later, of King Wenzel and "Elizabeth filia Regis Poloniĉ", aged 13[350].  She married secondly (shortly after 8 Sep 1306, maybe 6 Oct 1306) as his second wife, Rudolf III Duke of Austria and Steiermark.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage of "Albertus Rex Romanorum…Rudolphus filius suus" and "Elizabeth relictam Regis Wencezslai"[351].  After Wenzel III King of Bohemia was murdered in 1306, Rudolf’s father forced his succession 18 Jan 1307 as RUDOLF King of Bohemia, at which time he abdicated as Duke of Austria and Steiermark in favour of his younger brother.  She [married] thirdly (1319) Heinrich de Lipa.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the relationship in 1319 between "Henricus de Lipa" and "Dominam Elizabeth novercam…Reginĉ", adding that they caused much scandal[352]

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of King Wenzel's mistress is not known. 

King Wenzel II & his first wife had ten children: 

1.         PŘEMYSL OTAKAR (6 May 1288-10 Nov 1288, bur Prague St Veit).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beati Iohannis ante Portam Latinam" in 1288 of "Domino Regi filius primogenitus Przsemysl sive Ottakarus" and his death "in die sanctĉ Elisabeth" and burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi"[353]

2.         WENZEL (6 Oct 1289-murdered Olmütz [Olomouc] 4 Aug 1306, bur Olmütz, transferred to Prague Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in octaua beati Michaelis" in 1289 of "duo Gemini Wencezslaus et Agnes" to King Wenzel and his wife[354].  He was chosen as King of Hungary in 1301 by part of the Hungarian nobility opposed to the succession of Charles Robert d'Anjou, and crowned VENCEL/LÁSZLÓ King of Hungary also in 1301.  The ensuing civil war ended in 1304 when Wenzel agreed to leave Hungary[355].  He succeeded his father in 1305 as WENZEL III King of Bohemia.  He also claimed to succeed his father as king of Poland, gained support from Albrecht I King of Germany, and was preparing an expedition against Wladysław "Lokietek" when he was murdered[356].  The Chronicon Francisci records that "Wencezslaus Boemiĉ, Ungariĉ et Poloniĉ Rex" was killed "in Olomucz" in 1306 and buried there, but brought back by "sororem suam Elizabeth ad Aulam Regiam" for reburial[357]Betrothed to ERSZÉBET of Hungary, daughter of ANDRÁS III King of Hungary & his first wife Fennena of Kujavia (1292-1336).  Honemann refers to this betrothal[358]m (5 Oct 1305) as her first husband, VIOLA ELISABETH von Teschen, daughter of MIESZKO I Duke of Teschen [Piast] & his wife --- ([1287/91]-21 Sep 1317).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage "III Non Oct" in 1305 of "Rex Wencezslaus Iuvenis, Ungariĉ, Boemiĉ et Poloniĉ" and "Pbiolca filia Ducis de Tessyn"[359].  She married secondly (before 1315) Peter [I] Herr von Rosenberg zu Krumau, Satzau und Zbirow (-Hohenfurt 14 Oct 1347).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records that "Dominus Petrus de Rosenberch" repudiated his wife "filiam Henrici de Lipa" and married "Dominam Fiolam, Wencezslai Regis iuvenis relictam"[360]

3.         AGNES (6 Oct 1289-soon after 1296, bur Prague Erlöserkirche).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in octaua beati Michaelis" in 1289 of "duo Gemini Wencezslaus et Agnes" to King Wenzel and his wife[361]

4.         ANNA (15 Oct 1290-3 Sep 1313, bur Bogen Dominican Church).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "Id Oct" in 1290 of "Anna…filia" to King Wenzel and his wife[362]m (13 Feb 1306) HEINRICH VI von Görz Graf von Tirol, son of MEINHARD II Duke of Carinthia [MEINHARD IV Graf von Görz und Tirol] & his wife Elisabeth von Bayern (-Schloß Tirol 2 Apr 1335, bur Stams).  He succeeded in 1307 as HEINRICH King of Bohemia, deposed 1310.  He succeeded in 1310 as HEINRICH II Duke of Carinthia.  

5.         ELISKA [Elisabeth] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beatorum Martyrum Fabiani et Sebastiani" in 1292 of "Elizabeth filia" to King Wenzel and his wife[363].  The Chronicon Francisci records that "sororem suam Elizabeth" returned the body of "Wencezslaus Boemiĉ, Ungariĉ et Poloniĉ Rex" for reburial after he was killed[364].  The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1310 of "Elizabeth filiam Regis Boemiĉ" and "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius", adding that he was installed as king of Bohemia[365].  The Gesta Baldewini de Luczenburch records the marriage of "Rex Bohemiĉ Wenczeslaus…filia Elizabeth" and "Henrici Regis…Iohannem filium"[366].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage in 1310 "in Spiram" of "Rex Romanorum…filio suo primogenito" and "Elizabeth"[367].  Her marriage was arranged by Heinrich King of Germany as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[368].  Her husband appointed her regent in Bohemia in [1317] but, unable to cope with the growing instability, she fled with her children to the castle of Ellenbogen[369]m (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) as his first wife, JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH VI] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred 1346 to Luxembourg St Marie).  He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311.  Titular King of Poland.  He succeeded his father 1313 as Comte de Luxembourg. 

-        see below, Chapter 5.  KINGS of BOHEMIA, HOUSE of COMTES de LUXEMBOURG

6.         GUTA (4 Mar 1293-3 Aug 1294, bur Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in translatione beati Wencezslai Martyris" in 1293 of "Domina Guta filia" to King Wenzel and his wife, and her death "in die inventionis sancti Stephani" in 1294 and her burial "in Aula Regis"[370]

7.         JOHANN (26 Feb 1294-1 Mar 1294, bur Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "IV Kal Mar" in 1294 of "Iohannes filius" to King Wenzel and his wife and his death "quarto die" and burial "in Aula Regis"[371]

8.         JOHANN (21 Mar 1295-6 Dec 1296, bur Franciscan monastery of St Clement).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "in die beati Benedicti Abbatis" in 1295 of "Iohannes secundus filius" to King Wenzel and his wife, and his death "in die beati Nicolai" and burial "ad sanctum Clementum apud Prĉdicatores"[372]

9.         MARGARETA ([Apr/May] 1296-Grez 7/8 Apr 1322, bur Prague Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "XI Kal Mar" in 1296 of "Margaretha filia" to King Wenzel and his wife[373].  The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Boleslao" married "dominam Margaretham, filiam domini Wenceslai regis Bohemie"[374].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records that the wives of "Regis…Iohannis et Ducis Wratislauiensis" were "Regis Wencezslai filiĉ"[375].  The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death "1322 VI Id Apr" of "Margaretha uxor eius [=Bolezlai] filia Wenzesclai regis Bohemie"[376].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "in Grecz" in 1322 of "Domina Margaretha, Wencezslai Sexti Regis Boemiĉ filia" and "Boleslai Ducis Sleziĉ de Lignycz" and her burial "in Aula Regia"[377]m  ([1308/1310]) as his first wife, BOLESLAW von Breslau, son of HEINRICH V "the Fat" Duke of Liegnitz [Piast] & his wife Elźbieta of Poland [Piast] (23 Sep 1291-21 Apr 1352).  He succeeded in 1311 as BOLESLAW III Duke of Breslau, Liegnitz and Brieg

10.      GUTA (Prague 21 May 1297----, bur Prague Klarissenkloster).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XIV Kal Jul" in 1297 of "Domina Guta Regina" in childbirth but does not name her child[378]

King Wenzel II & his second wife had one child:

11.      AGNES (15 Jun 1305-[1336/before 4 Jan 1337]).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth of "filiam…Agnetem" to King Wenzel and his wife "Elizabeth filia Regis Poloniĉ"[379].  The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Heinricum…ducatus Jaurensis" married "dominam Agnetham filiam Wenczeslai regis Bohemie…ex secunda uxore sua Elizabet filia ducis Kalisiensis" but died without heirs[380].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage of "Dominus Henricus, filius Domini Bulkonis Ducis Sleziĉ de Swidnicz" and "Agnetem…Domini Wencezslai Regis…filiam…ex Domina Elizabeth Regina sua secunda coniuge" who was aged 12 at "civitatem Grecz"[381]m (1319) HEINRICH I Duke of Jauer, son of BOLKO I Duke of Jauer und Schweidnitz [Piast] & his wife Beatrix von Brandenburg (-[6 Mar/15 May] 1346).  No children. 

King Wenzel II had two illegitimate children by Mistress (1): 

12.       JOHANN WOLKO (-27 Sep 1351).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records that "dominum Iohannem fratrem suum bastardum…Prĉpostium Wissegradensem" was refused investment as Bishop of Prague after the death of King Wenzel because of his illegitimacy[382]Provost at Wyshehrad 1310-1334.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records that "Iohannes, Wencezslai Regis Sexti filius…illegitimus, regni Boemiĉ Cancellarius et Wyssegradensis Prĉpositus" was captured by the king at Prague in 1322 and deprived of his positions[383]Canon at Bamberg Cathedral 1327.  Bishop of Olmütz 1334-1351. 

13.       ELISABETH .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   Nun at Frauenthal until 1332.  Benedictine nun at St Georg in Prague 1332. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    KING of BOHEMIA 1307-1310 (GÖRZ-TIROL)

 

 

1.         HEINRICH von Görz, son of MEINHARD II Duke of Carinthia [MEINHARD IV Graf von Görz und Tirol] & his wife Elisabeth von Bayern (-Schloß Tirol 2 Apr 1335, bur Stams).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded in 1307 as HEINRICH King of Bohemia, until 1310.  He succeeded his brother in 1310 as HEINRICH Duke of Carinthia

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    KINGS of BOHEMIA (LUXEMBOURG)

 

 

JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HEINRICH VII King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH VI] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Château de Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred to Münster Abbey, transferred 25 Aug 1946 to Luxembourg, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame).  The Chronicon Francisci names "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius" when recording his marriage[384].  He was raised in France from [1305].  He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311 at Prague.  He was named Vicar General of the empire by his father in 1312.  He continued to claim the Polish throne after his accession as Bohemian king, as successor to King Václav II.  He succeeded his father in 1313 as JEAN Comte de Luxembourg, but confided the government of the county to his uncle Baudouin Archbishop of Trier[385].  His appointment of German officials in Bohemia triggered the discontent of the Bohemian nobles, headed by Henry of Lipa who was imprisoned.  King Jan absented himself from Bohemia to support Emperor Ludwig in his war against Friedrich Duke of Austria, leaving his wife as regent[386].  King Jan invaded Silesia in early 1327 and imposed Bohemian suzerainty on most of the Silesian dukes between 1327 and 1329[387].  Peace with Poland was reached at Trenčin 24 Aug 1335 under which King Jan renounced his claim to the Polish crown and Kazimierz III King of Poland recognised Bohemian suzerainty over Silesia[388].  He was named Captain General and Lieutenant of the King of France in Languedoc at Estrepilly after 30 Nov 1338.  He was created Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yèvres by the king of France.  A failed operation to restore his failing sight left him completely blind in 1340[389].  The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the death "in Anglia…in vigilia sancti Rufi" in 1346 of "Rex Iohannes"[390]

m firstly (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) ELISKA [Elisabeth] of Bohemia, daughter of WENZEL II King of Bohemia & his first wife Guta of Austria [Habsburg] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal).  The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1310 of "Elizabeth filiam Regis Boemiĉ" and "Iohannes, Henrici Imperatoris filius", adding that he was installed as king of Bohemia[391].  The Gesta Baldewini de Luczenburch records the marriage of "Rex Bohemiĉ Wenczeslaus…filia Elizabeth" and "Henrici Regis…Iohannem filium"[392].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage in 1310 "in Spiram" of "Rex Romanorum…filio suo primogenito" and "Elizabeth"[393].  This marriage was arranged by Heinrich King of Germany as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[394].  Her husband appointed her regent in Bohemia in [1317] but, unable to cope with the growing instability, she fled with her children to the castle of Ellenbogen[395].  The necrology of Raitenhaslach records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Elisabeth regine Bohemie"[396]

m secondly (contract Château du Bois de Vincennes Dec 1334, dispensation 3o Avignon 9 Jan 1335) as her first husband, BEATRIX de Bourbon, daughter of LOUIS de Clermont Duc de Bourbon, Comte de Clermont & his wife Marie de Hainaut [Avesnes] (-Danvillers 15 Dec 1383, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.   She married secondly ([1347]) Eudes [VI] Sire de Grancey et de Pierrepont (-after 27 Jul 1380). 

Mistress (1):  ---.  The name of King Jan's mistress is not known. 

King Jan & his first wife had seven children:

1.         MARGARETA (8 Jun 1313-Prague 11 Jul 1341, bur Königsaal)The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth in 1313 of "Dominĉ Elizabeth…filiam primogenitam…Margaretham"[397].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1322 of "Iohannes Rex…Margaretham maiorem filiam suam" and "Henrico duci Bauariĉ"[398].  The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "V Id Jul 1341" of "domina Margareta ducissa Bawarie, dominus Iohannis regis Bohemie filia"[399].  The necrology of Baumburg records the death "V Id Jul 1341" of "Margareta ducissa Bauarie ux di Hainrici ducis"[400].  The necrology of Windberg records the death "V Id Jul 1340" of "Margareta ducissa Bawarie"[401]m (Betrothed 1322, Straubing 12 Feb 1328) HEINRICH II Duke of Bavaria-Landshut, son of STEFAN I "der Ältere" joint Duke of Lower Bavaria & his wife Jutta von Schweidnitz [Piast] (29 Sep 1305-Landshut 1 Sep 1339, bur Kloster Seligenthal).  Betrothed (1340) to KAZIMIERZ III "Wielki/the Great" King of Poland, son of WŁADYSŁAW I "Łokietek/the Short" King of Poland & his wife Jadwiga of Poland (30 Apr 1310-Krakow 5 Nov 1370, bur Krakow Cathedral).  This betrothal was arranged by Margareta's brother Karl to counterbalance Hungarian influence in Poland after the Hungarian queen (the sister of King Kazimierz) was designated the king's heir presumptive.  Margareta died before the marriage could take place[402]

2.         GUTA (Prague 20 May 1315-Abbaye de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône, Val-d'Oise 3 or 11 Sep 1349, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Guta" as second daughter of "Regina"[403].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1322 of "Iohannes Rex…Gutam…filiam…minorem" and "Friderico Marchioni Misnensi"[404]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage 28 Jul 1332 “à Melun-sur-Sainne“ of “Jehan dit de France de l´aage de xv ans ou environ filz de Philippe le roy de France” and “ma dame Bonne fille Jehan le roy de Behangne“[405]She was known as BONNE in France, and called Duchesse de Normandie.  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "III Non Sep" of "domina Bona filia regis Bohemie quondam ducissa Normannie"[406][407]Betrothed (contract broken 1322) to KAZIMIERZ of Poland, son of WŁADYSŁAW I "Łokietek/the Short" King of Poland & his wife Jadwiga of Poland (30 Apr 1310-Krakow 5 Nov 1370, bur Krakow Cathedral).  He succeeded his father in 1333 as KAZIMIERZ III "Wielki/the Great" King of PolandBetrothed (1322, contract broken before May 1323) to FRIEDRICH von Meissen, son of FRIEDRICH I "dem Freidigen" Markgraf von Meissen & his second wife Elisabeth von Lobdeburg-Arnshaugk (Gotha 1310-Wartburg 18 Nov 1349, bur Altzelle).  He succeeded his father in 1323 as FRIEDRICH II "der Ernsthafte" Markgraf von Meissen and Landgraf of Thuringia.  m (Notre-Dame de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 28 Jul 1332) as his first wife, JEAN de France Duc de Normandie, Comte d'Anjou et de Maine, son of PHILIPPE VI King of France & his first wife Jeanne "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne [Capet] (Château de Gué-de-Mauny, Le Mans, Sarthe 26 Apr 1319-Savoy Hotel, London 8 Apr 1364, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Installed as Comte de Poitou [Jan/26 May] 1344.  Created Duc de Guyenne 11 Sep 1345.  He succeeded his father in 1350 as JEAN II "le Bon" King of France.  

3.         WENZEL of Bohemia (Prague 14 May 1316-Prague 29 Nov 1378, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth "pridie Id Mar" in 1316 of "Regi et Reginĉ primogenitus filius…Wencezslaus"[408].  He adopted the name KARL at his confirmation in Paris in 1323[409].  Elected KARL IV King of Germany in 1346.  He succeeded his father in 1346 as KARL King of Bohemia.  Crowned Emperor KARL IV at Rome 5 Apr 1355. 

-        see below

4.         PŘEMYSL OTAKAR (22 Nov 1318-20 Apr 1320, bur Prague Königsaal).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth in 1318 of "secundus filius Regi Iohanni…Przsemysl", and in a later passage his death "XII Kal Mai" in 1320 and burial "in Aula Regia"[410]

5.         JOHANN HEINRICH (Melnik 12 Feb 1322-12 Nov 1375, bur Brno Kloster St Thomas).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth in 1322 of "Regi Boemiĉ filius tertius…ex Regina Elizabeth…Iohannes…Henricus"[411].  Markgraf of Moravia 1349. 

-        MARKGRAFEN of MORAVIA

6.         ANNA (Cham 27 Mar 1323-3 Sep 1338, bur Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth in 1323 "in die Paschĉ" of "duas gemellas filias Annam et Elizabeth in Cambia Bauariĉ" to "Elizabeth Regina"[412].  The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Non Sep" of "Anna ducisse Austrie et Stirie"[413].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1338 III Non Sep" of "Anna ducissa Austrie, Stirie et Karinthie conthuralis ducis Ottonis, necnon filia Iohannis regis Bohemie" and her burial "in Novo Monte"[414]m (Znaim 16 Feb 1335) as his second wife, OTTO Duke of Austria, son of ALBRECHT I Duke of Austria, King of Germany & his wife Elisabeth von Görz-Tirol (Vienna 23 Jul 1301-Vienna 26 Feb 1339, bur Vienna Augustinerkirche, transferred to Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery). 

7.         ELISABETH (27 Mar 1323-Cham Aug 1324, bur Königsaal).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth in 1323 "in die Paschĉ" of "duas gemellas filias Annam et Elizabeth in Cambia Bauariĉ" to "Elizabeth Regina"[415]

King Jan & his second wife had one child:  

8.         WENZEL (Prague 25 Feb 1337-Luxembourg 8 Dec 1383).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Wenceslao filio Regis Boemiĉ ultimo genito"[416].  He succeeded in 1353 as WENZEL Comte de Luxembourg, after his half-brother King Karl resigned the county in his favour, Luxembourg was elevated into a duchy by his brother at Metz 13 Mar 1354[417]

-        DUKES of LUXEMBOURG

King Jan had two illegitimate children by Mistress (1): 

9.          NIKOLAUS von Luxemburg (Luxembourg early 1322-29 Jul 1358).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Dominus Nicolaus, Patriarcha Aquilegensis, filius quondam Iohannis Regis Boemiĉ"[418]Canon at Toul cathedral before 1328.  Canon at Prague, and of St Kastor at Koblenz 1328.  Canon at Maastricht St Servaes 1328.  Canon of St Paul at Trier 1329.  Canon of St Lambert at Liège 1344.  Provost at Saaz and canon at Wyšehrad.  Anti-bishop of Naumburg 1350.  Patriarch of Aquileia 1351-1358. 

10.       HEINRICH von Brüssel .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Monk 1357. 

 

 

WENZEL of Bohemia, son of JAN I King of Bohemia [JEAN I Comte de Luxembourg] & his first wife Eliska [Elisabeth] of Bohemia [Přemyslid] (Prague 14 May 1316-Prague 29 Nov 1378, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth "pridie Id Mar" in 1316 of "Regi et Reginĉ primogenitus filius…Wencezslaus"[419].  He adopted the name KARL at his confirmation in Paris in 1323[420].  His father nominated him as representative in Lombardy in 1331/1332 after a successful Italian campaign[421].  His father installed him as Markgraf of Moravia in 1334.  He assumed the regency of Bohemia in 1340 after his father became blind[422].  He was elected KARL IV King of Germany at Rhena 11 Jul 1346 after the deposition of Emperor Ludwig IV, and was crowned at Bonn 26 Nov 1346.  He succeeded his father in 1346 as KARL King of Bohemia, crowned at Prague 2 Nov 1347, and as Comte de Luxembourg (the latter despite his father having bequeathed the county to his younger half-brother Wenzel, in whose favour Karl resigned it in 1353[423]).  His election as King of Germany was confirmed at Frankfurt-am-Main 17 Jun 1349, and he was crowned a second time at Aachen 25 Jul 1349.  He was crowned as King of Italy at Milan 6 Jan 1355.  He was crowned as Emperor KARL IV at Rome 5 Apr 1355.  The Golden Bull of 1356, a collection of diverse laws and ordinances, represented the initial stage in defining a constitution for the empire, its main purpose being to confirm the procedure for royal elections.  These included the right of the king of Bohemia to cast his vote before the other secular electors[424].  Emperor Karl was crowned king of Burgundy at Arles 4 Jun 1365, the last time that a German king was crowned as such[425].  Under the agreement of Fürstenwalde 18 Aug 1373, Emperor Karl acquired the mark of Brandenburg from Markgraf Otto V, including a second electoral vote for his family along with a further residence at Tangermünde[426].   

m firstly (Prague 8 Jan 1329) BLANCHE [Marguerite] de Valois, daughter of CHARLES de France Comte de Valois & his third wife Mahaut de Châtillon Ctss de Saint-Pol (1317-Prague 1 Aug 1348, bur Prague St Veit).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1323 of "Wencezslaus Regis primogenitus" and "Blancza, soror fratris Philippi Regis de stirpe regia"[427].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the coronation in 1347 of Karl and "sua coniunx, Domina Blanca"[428].  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death of "Blanche de Valois femme de l'aisné fils du roy de Boheme marquise de Moravie" on "VIII Kal Oct"[429].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death "in die ad vincula sancti Petri" in 1348 of "Regina Blancza, coniunx Domini Karoli" and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi"[430]

m secondly (contract Bacharach [4] Mar 1349, May 1349) ANNA Pfalzgräfin, daughter of RUDOLF II Pfalzgraf am Rhein & his first wife Anna von Görz [Tirol] (26 Sep 1329-Prague 2 Feb 1353, bur Prague St Veit).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage in 1349 of "Dominus Karolus, Romanorum et Boemiĉ Rex" and "Annam filiam Comitis Palatini Reni", adding that he dowry was "civitatem et districtum Sulczbach cum pluribus castris"[431].  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven records the marriage in May 1349 of "Karolus Romanorum rex" and "filia ducis Rudolfi…frater ducis Ruperti comitis Palatini Reni"[432].  She was crowned Queen of Germany 26 Jul 1349 at Aachen.  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death "in vigilia Purificationis beatĉ Virginis" in 1352 (O.S.) of "Domina Anna, filia Comitis Palatini de Reno, coniunx Domini Karoli" and her burial "in ecclesia Pragensi"[433]

m thirdly (Buda 27 May 1353) ANNA von Schweidnitz heiress of Schweidnitz and Jauer, daughter of HEINRICH II Duke of Schweidnitz [Piast] & his wife Katharina --- (1339-11 Jul 1362, bur Prague St Veit).  The Chronica principum Polonie names "Bolkonem et Heinricum fratrem eius" as the two sons of Bernhard, adding that Heinrich was father of "domine Anne, imperatricis quondam et regine Bohemie"[434].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage "in Ungariam" in 1353 of "Dominus Karolus" and "Annam filiam olim Bernhardi [error for Heinrici] Ducis Swidnicensis, filiam unicam, hĉredem illius ducatus et terrarium Sleziĉ"[435].  This marriage was agreed between her uncle Duke Bolko and Karl I King of Bohemia to regularise Bohemia's eventual control over Schweidnitz and Jauer, the only territories in Silesia not by then under Bohemian control[436].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death "in Octaua sancti Procopii" in 1362 of "Imperatrix Anna" and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi"[437]

m fourthly (Krakow 21 May[438] 1363) ELISABETH von Pommern, daughter of BOGISLAW V Duke of Pomerania in Hinterpommern & his first wife Elźbieta of Poland (1347-15 Apr 1393, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the birth in 1347 of "Elizabetha Imperatrix Romanorum et Regina Bohemiĉ"[439].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage of "Imperator" and "Elizabeth filiam filiĉ Kazimiri Regis Poloniĉ" and her coronation[440].  This marriage was proposed by the bride's maternal grandfather, Kazimierz III King of Poland, as part of his mediation between Lajos King of Hungary (his nominated heir in Poland) and Emperor Karl IV, the Emperor also being anxious to extend his control over Pomerania[441].  She was a woman of unusual physical strength and, at festivities organised by her husband, would break and bend swords, large knives and iron horse shoes[442].  The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the death in 1393 of "Elizabeth Imperatrix vidua Caroli Imperatoris"[443]

King Karl & his first wife had three children:

1.         son ([1334]-).  Knoll refers to the betrothal of the grandson of Jan King of Bohemia to Elźbieta, daughter of Kazimierz III King of Poland, agreed 19 Nov 1335 between the two kings to confirm their alliance[444]

2.         MARGARETA (24 May 1335-1349 before 7 Oct).  "Gio. Re di Boemia" appointed representatives to negotiate the marriage between "la figlia di Carlo suo figlio" and "Amedeo di Savoia figlio del Conte Aymone" by charter dated 7 Mar 1337[445].  The contract of marriage between "Amedeo figlio del Conte Aimone di Savoia" and "Margarita figlia di Carlo figlio di Gio. Re di Boemia" is dated 7 Mar 1338[446].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Betrothed (contract 7 Mar 1338) to AMEDEE de Savoie, son of AYMON "le Pacifique" Comte de Savoie & his wife Violanta di Monferrato (Château de Chambéry 4 Jan 1334-Santo Stefano, near Castropignano, Apulia 1 Mar 1383, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe).  He later succeeded as AMEDEE VI Comte de Savoiem (contract 3 Aug 1342) as his first wife, LAJOS I "Nagy/the Great" King of Hungary and Poland, son of KÁROLY I King of Hungary [Anjou-Capet] & his third wife Elźbieta of Poland (4/5 Mar 1326-Tarnow/Tyrnau 10/11 Sep 1382, bur Székesfehérvár, church of Notre Dame).  

3.         KATHARINA (Prague Aug 1342-Perchtoldsdorf 26 Apr 1395, bur Vienna St Stefan).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage in 1353 of "Rudolfus Dux Austriĉ" and "Katherina, filia Domini Karoli"[447].  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Rudolf as "kayser Karls tochter des vierten"[448].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage "feria quinta ante Iudica" in 1366 of "Dominus Imperator filiam suam seniorem…ex Domina Blancza…Katherinam, relictam olim Rudolfi Ducis Austriĉ" and "Ottoni Marchioni Brandenburgensi"[449]m firstly (Vienna 13 Jul 1356) RUDOLF IV Duke of Austria, son of ALBRECHT II “der Weise” Duke of Austria & his wife Johanna von Pfirt (1339-Milan 27 Jul 1365, bur Vienna St Stefan).  m secondly (Prague 19 Mar 1366) OTTO V "der Paule" Herzog in Bayern Markgraf von Brandenburg, son of Emperor LUDWIG IV King of Germany, Duke of Bavaria Pfalzgraf bei Rhein & his second wife Marguerite de Hainaut [Avesnes] Ctss de Hainaut, Holland and Zeeland (Munich 1340 or 1342-Schloß Wolfstein an der Isar 15 Nov 1379, bur Seligenthal). 

King Karl & his second wife had one child:

4.         WENZEL [Václav] (17 Jan 1350-28 Dec 1351, bur Prague St Veit).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the birth in 1350 of "filium primogenitum Wenceslaum" to "Dominus Karolus, Romanorum et Boemiĉ Rex" and his wife "Annam filiam Comitis Palatini Reni", and his death "secundo ĉtatis suĉ" and burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi", adding in a later passage that he died "die Innocentum" in 1351[450]Betrothed (Dec 1350) to ANNA von Schweidnitz heiress of Schweidnitz and Jauer, daughter of HEINRICH II Duke of Schweidnitz [Piast] & his wife Katharina --- (1339-11 Jul 1362, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit), who later married Václav's father as his third wife. 

King Karl & his third wife had two children:

5.         ELISABETH (Prague 19 Mar 1358-Vienna 4 Sep 1373, bur Kloster Gaming, North Austria).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage "feria quinta ante Iudica" in 1366 of "Dominus Imperator filiam suam secundam Elizabeth…ex Domina Anna Swidnicensi filia" and "Alberto Duci Austriĉ seniori"[451].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death "circa festum Nativitatis beatĉ Virginis" in 1373 of "filia Domini Imperatoris…Elizabeth" wife of "Albertus Dux Austriĉ" childless[452].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1373 XIII Kal Oct" of "Elizabeth ducissa Austrie…filia imperatoris Karuli hic sepultus"[453]m (19 Mar 1366) as his first wife, ALBRECHT III "mit dem Copfen" Duke of Austria, son of ALBRECHT II "Dem Weise" Duke of Austria & his wife Jeanne de Ferrette (Vienna 9 Sep 1348-Laxenburg 29 Aug 1395, bur Vienna St Stefan).  

6.         WENZEL (Nürnberg 26 Feb 1361-Schloß Konratitz 16 Aug 1419, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the birth "in civitate Nuremberga" in 1361 of "filius Wenceslaus" to "Domina Anna Imperatrice" and his baptism "in crastino beati Mathiĉ Apostoli"[454].  He was crowned as WENZEL IV King of Bohemia 15 Jun 1363, during the lifetime of his father.  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death 28 Jul 1368 of "Bolko Dux Sleziĉ, Dominus Swidnicensis, absque liberis" and the succession of his great nephew Wenzel of Bohemia to his lands[455].  He succeeded in 1373 as WENZEL II Markgraf of Brandenburg, until 1378.  He was elected WENZEL King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 10 Jun 1376, crowned at Aachen 21 Jul 1376.  He succeeded his uncle in 1383 as WENZEL II Duc de Luxembourg et Comte de Chiny.  King Wenzel supported Pope Urban VI at the start of the Great Western Schism in 1378, but from the 1390s the electors pressed him to undertake an expedition to Italy and devote himself to ending the schism[456].  He was deposed as king of Germany at an assembly of princes held at Oberlahnstein 20 Aug 1400, which maintained that Wenzel had compromised the empire by tolerating Giangaleazzo Visconti (who had conquered important towns in Lombardy), had failed to end the schism, and led an "unseemly" way of life[457].  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ records the death "feris IV post Assumptionem beatĉ Virginis Mariĉ…in novo castro prope Pragam dicto Wenczlstein" in 1419 of "Dominus Wenceslavus, Romanorum et Boemiĉ Rex" and his burial "in Aula Regis", later transferred "ad Ecclesiam Pragensem"[458]m firstly (Nürnberg 17 Nov 1370) JOHANNA von Bayern, daughter of ALBRECHT Duke of Bavaria-Straubing [later ALBERT Count of Holland and Zeeland, Comte de Hainaut] & his first wife Margareta von Brieg [Piast] ([1361]-31 Dec 1386, bur Königsaal).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage "in Nuremburga" 17 Nov 1370 of "Domina Iohanna filia Alberti Ducis Bauariĉ et Comitis terrĉ Holandiĉ…filia filiĉ Ludwici Ducis Sleziĉ et Domini Legnicensis" and "Domino…Wenceslao Regi Boemiĉ"[459].  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that the third (unnamed) daughter of "Albertus palatinus Reni, dux Bavarie" and his wife "Margaretam filiam Ludovici ducis de Briga ex Polonia" married "Wenzelao regi Bohemie"[460].  The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the death in 1387 of "Iohanna prima Regina Wenceslai Roman. et Boemiĉ Regis coniunx"[461]m secondly (Prague 2 May 1389) SOPHIA von Bayern, daughter of JOHANN II Duke of Bavaria-Munich & his wife Katharina von Görz (1376-Pressburg 26 Sep 1425, bur Pressburg Cathedral).  Crowned Queen of Bohemia 15 Mar 1400. 

King Karl & his fourth wife had six children:

7.         ANNA (Prague 11 Jul 1366-Sheen Castle near Richmond, Surrey 7 Aug 1394, bur Westminster Abbey).  The Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi records the birth in 1366 of "primogenita Anna Regina Angliĉ"[462].  A charter dated 26 Dec 1380 records negotiations for the marriage between “dominam Annam natam quondam...Karoli nuper Romanorum Imperatoris et regis Bohemiĉ” and “Rex”[463].  The contract for the marriage between “domina Anna...Romanorum et Bohemiĉ regis soror” and “Richardo eregi Angliĉ et Franciĉ” is dated 2 May 1381[464].  She was crowned Queen of England 22 Jan 1382 at Westminster Abbey.  The Annals of Bermondsey record the death “1394…7 Jun” of “Anna regina Angliĉ uxor regis Ricardi secundi” and her burial “apud Westmonasterium”[465].  The Chronicle of Adam de Usk records the death “in festo Pentecostes...in manerio de Schene juxta Braynfort super Thamesiam” 1394 of “domina Anna Anglie regina” and her burial “in crastino ad Vincula Sancti Petri”[466].  She died of the plague.  m (contract 2 May 1381, St Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster 14, 20 or 22 Jan 1382) as his first wife, RICHARD II King of England, son of EDWARD Prince of Wales "the Black Prince" & his wife Joan Ctss of Kent (Bordeaux [6] Jan 1367-Pontefract Castle, Yorkshire, probably murdered 6 Jan or 14 Feb 1400, bur King’s Langley Church, Hertfordshire, transferred 1413 to Westminster Abbey).  

8.         SIGMUND (Prague 15 Feb 1368-Znaim/Znojmo 9 Dec 1437, bur Nagyvárad [today Oradea, Romania]).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the birth 15 Feb 1368 of "Domino Imperatori…ex Domina Elizabeth Imperatrice sua coniuge, filius tertius in ordine…Zigismundus"[467].  The Chronica principum Polonie name "Sigismundo marchioni Brandeburgensi" as son of "domini Karoli imperatoris…ex domina Elizabeth imperatrice"[468].  He succeeded in 1378 as SIGMUND Markgraf von Brandenburg until 1395 and again from 1411 to 1415.  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records that "Lodwicus rex Ungarorum…filiam suam primogenitam" married "Sigismundo filio Karoli imperatoris" who thereby acquired the kingdom of Hungary[469].  He was elected ZSIGMOND King of Hungary in 1386.  He succeeded his younger brother Johann in 1396 in Neumark und Lausitz, territories which he sold to the Knights of the Teutonic Order in 1402[470].  Elected SIGMUND King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 14 Sep 1410, confirmed 21 Jul 1411 after the death of his cousin Jobst Markgraf of Moravia, crowned at Aachen 8 Nov 1414.  He was elected ZIKMUND King of Bohemia at Hradschin 28 Jul 1410, crowned at Prague 27 Jul 1420 after the death of his older half-brother King Wenzel IV, when he also succeeded as SIGISMOND Duc de Luxembourg.  He was crowned King of Italy at Milan 25 Nov 1431.  He was crowned Emperor SIGMUND at Rome 31 May 1433.  He designated his son-in-law as his successor in both Hungary and Bohemia.    

-        KINGS of HUNGARY

9.         JOHANN (Prague 22 Jun 1370-Kloster Neuzelle 1 Mar 1396, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the birth 22 Jun 1370 "in castro Pragensi" of "filius Domino…Imperatori ex coniuge sua Domina Elizabeth…Iohannes"[471].  Herzog von Görlitz.  He succeeded his brother in 1378 as JOHANN Markgraf of Brandenburg, in der Neumark und Lausitz.  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records that "Sigismundo filio Karoli imperatoris…hujus frater Johannes dux Gorliczensis" died "in monasterio Celle nove" and was buried "ad Pragam…in sepulcris majorum suorum"[472]

-        COMTES de LUXEMBOURG

10.      KARL (13 Mar 1372-24 Jul 1373).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the birth in 1372 of "Domina Elizabeth Imperatrix…filium…Karolus" and in a later passage his death "in vigilia Iacobi" in 1373[473]

11.      MARGARETA (29 Sep 1373-4 Jun 1410, bur Ofen)The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the birth "in festo sancti Michaelis" in 1373 of "Donino Imperatori filia…Margaretha"[474]m ([1381]) JOHANN von Nürnberg, son of FRIEDRICH V joint Burggraf von Nürnberg & his wife Elisabeth von Meissen (-Plassenburg 11 Jun 1420, bur Kloster Heilsbronn).  He succeeded on the abdication of his father in 1397 as JOHANN III joint Burggraf von Nürnberg, jointly with his brother. 

12.      HEINRICH ([Aug] 1377-[1378]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    KINGS of BOHEMIA 1437-1457 (HABSBURG)

 

 

ALBRECHT of Austria, son of ALBRECHT IV "das Weltwunder" Duke of Austria im Land ob und unter der Enns & his wife Johanna [Sophia] von Bayern (Vienna 10 Aug 1397-Neszmély near Esztergom 27 Oct 1439, bur Székesfehérvár).  He succeeded his father in 1404 as ALBRECHT V Duke of Austria im Land ob und unter der Enns.  Designated by his father-in-law as his successor in both Hungary and Bohemia, he was elected ALBERT King of Hungary 18 Dec 1437, crowned 1 Jan 1438 at Székesfehérvár, and elected ALBRECHT King of Bohemia 27 Dec 1437 at Prague, crowned 29 Jun 1438 at Prague.  He was also elected ALBRECHT II King of the Romans at Frankfurt-am-Main 18 Mar 1438.  He was organising an army for a campaign against the Ottomans when he died from dysentery. 

1.         other children: see AUSTRIA.    

2.         LADISLAUS Archduke of Austria (posthumously Komárom [today Komárno, Slovakia] 22 Feb 1440-Prague 23 Nov 1457, bur Prague St Veit).  He succeeded at birth as LADISLAUS Duke of Austria.  He was crowned LÁSZLÓ V King of Hungary but forced to abandon Hungary until 1444.  He was crowned LADISLAUS King of Bohemia 28 Oct 1453. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    KING of BOHEMIA 1458-1471 (PODIEBRAD)

 

 

JIŘI [Georg] [von Podiebrad], son of VIKTORYN [Vitek] von Kunštát & his wife Anna von Wartenberg [Wartemberk] (23 Apr 1520-Prague 22 Mar 1471, bur Podiebrad).  Freiherr von Kunštát zu Podiebrad.  Regent of Bohemia 1439-1453, and 1457-1458.  Graf von Glatz 1455.  He was appointed JIŘI Duke of Münsterberg in 1456.  He was elected JIŘI von Podiebrad King of Bohemia in 1458, also Markgraf of Moravia, Markgraf der Ober- und Niederlausitz and primary Duke of Silesia.  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records the election of "Georgii de Podebrat in regem Bohemie" and his coronation 6 May 1458 "cum conthorali sua Johanna"[475]

m firstly ([1440/41]) KUNIGUNDE Freiin von Sternberg, daughter of SMILO Freiherr von Sternberg zu Konopischt und Brandeis an der Elbe & his wife Barbara Freiin von Pardubicz (18 Nov 1422-19 Nov 1449, bur Podiebrad). 

m secondly ([1450/51]) JOHANNA von Rožmital zu Blatna, daughter of JOHANN von Rožmital zu Blatna & his wife Ludmilla Bawor von Strakonicz (before 1432-Melnik 12 Nov 1475, bur Prague).  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records the election of "Georgii de Podebrat in regem Bohemie" and his coronation 6 May 1458 "cum conthorali sua Johanna"[476]

King Jiři & his first wife had six children: 

1.         BOCZEK (15 Jul 1442-28 Sep 1496, bur Glatz).  At Liticz. 

2.         VIKTORYN (29 May 1443-Teschen 30 Aug 1500, bur Glatz).  Titular Markgraf of Moravia.  Created Reichsfürst at Brno 11 Jun 1459.  He was installed in 1462 as VIKTORYN Duke of Münsterberg and Troppau, Graf von Glatz, Herr zu Kolin.  He resigned as Duke of Troppau in 1485. 

-        DUKES of MÜNSTERBERG

3.         BARBARA ([1444/47]-after 1469)m firstly (1460) HEINRICH Freiherr von Lipa (-1469 after 29 Jul).  Landeshauptmann of Moravia.  m secondly JOHANN Albrecht Freiherr Krzinecky von Ronow (-before 1487). 

4.         GINDRZYCH [Heinrich] (15 May 1448-24 Jun 1498, bur Glatz).  He was installed in 1462 as HEINRICH "der Ältere" Duke of Münsterberg, Graf von Glatz.  Fürst von Frankenstein 1472.  Duke of Oels 1495.   

-        DUKES of MÜNSTERBERG

5.         KATHARINA (11 Nov 1449-8 Mar 1464, bur Buda).  Twin with Zdena.  Her marriage was arranged by her father as the price for releasing her future husband from his custody in Prague[477]m (contract 1 May 1461, 1463) MÁTYÁS Hunyadi "Corvinus" King of Hungary, son of JÁNOS Hunyadi & his wife Erszebet Szilágyi de Horogszeg (Kolozsvár 1440-Klausenburg, Vienna 6 May 1490, bur Székesfehérvár Cathedral).  He was elected MATTHIAS rival King of Bohemia in 1469, deposed 1471. 

6.         ZDENA (11 Nov 1449-1 Feb 1510, bur Meissen)m (contract 11 Nov 1459, 11 May 1464) ALBRECHT Duke of Saxony [Wettin] (-12 Sep 1500, bur Meissen). 

King Jiři & his second wife had five children:

7.         GINDRZYCH [Heinrich] (17 May 1452-11 Jul 1492, bur Glatz).  He was installed in 1462 as HEINRICH "Hynek" Duke of Münsterberg, Graf von Glatz.  Herr von Podiebrad und Kolin 1472. 

-        DUKES of MÜNSTERBERG

8.         FRIEDRICH ([1453/54]-before 31 Jul 1459). 

9.         JIŘI [Georg] ([1454/55]-[31 Jul 1459/7 Dec 1462]).  Graf von Glatz 1459. 

10.      LUDMILLA (16 Oct 1456-20 Jan 1503)m (5 Nov 1474) FRIEDRICH I Duke of Liegnitz and Brieg, son of JOHANN II Duke of Lüben [Piast] & his wife Hedwig von Brieg [Piast] (3 May 1446-9 May 1488). 

11.      JAN (after 1456-before 31 Jul 1459). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 7.    KING of BOHEMIA 1469-1471 (HUNYADI)

 

 

MÁTYÁS Hunyadi, son of JÁNOS Hunyadi & his wife Erszebet Szilágyi de Horogszeg (Kolozsvár 1440-Klausenburg, Vienna 6 May 1490, bur Székesfehérvár Cathedral).  He was elected MÁTYÁS "Corvinus"[478] King of Hungary in 1458.  In 1469, he conquered Moravia, Silesia and Lusatia, and adopted the title MATTHIAS King of Bohemia in opposition to King Jiři Podiebrad.  He was deposed in 1471.   

 

 

 

 

Chapter 8.    KINGS of BOHEMIA 1471-1525 (JAGIELLON)

 

 

WŁADISŁAW of Poland, son of KAZIMIERZ IV "the Great" King of Poland & his wife Elisabeth Adss of Austria (Krakow 1 Mar 1456-Buda 13 Mar 1516).  He succeeded in 1471 as LADISLAUS II King of Bohemia.  He was elected as ULÁSZLÓ II King of Hungary and Croatia in 1490. 

1.         ANNA (Prague 23 Jul 1503-Prague 27 Jan 1547, bur Prague St Veit).  Her betrothal was agreed to seal her father's second agreement with Emperor Maximilian in [1506] regarding the eventual Habsburg succession to the Hungarian throne[479]m (Linz 27 May 1526) FERDINAND I Archduke of Austria, son of PHILIPP Archduke of Austria, FELIPE I King of Castile & his wife doña Juana "la Loca" de Castilla y Aragón Queen of Castile (Alcalá de Henares, near Madrid 10 Mar 1503-Vienna 25 Jul 1564, bur Prague St Veit).  He was elected FERDINÁND King of Hungary in 1526.  He was also elected FERDINAND I King of Bohemia at Prague 23 Oct 1526, crowned 24 Feb 1527 at Prague St Veit.  He was elected FERDINAND I King of Germany in 1531.  He was crowned Emperor FERDINAND I at Frankfurt-am-Main 14 Mar 1558.   

-        ARCHDUKES of AUSTRIA, KINGS of HUNGARY

2.         LAJOS (1 Jul 1506-killed in battle Mohacs 29 Aug 1526, bur Székesfehérvár).  His birth dispelled the crisis with the Habsburgs triggered by the 1505 assembly as it effectively postponed their eventual succession to the Hungarian throne in accordance with the terms of the 1491 treaty[480].  He succeeded his father in 1516 as LAJOS II King of Hungary, LUDWIG II King of Bohemia

 

 

 



[1] Dzięcioł, Witold (1963) The Origins of Poland (Veritas, London), p. 32. 

[2] Einhardi Annales 822, MGH SS, p. 209. 

[3] Reuter, T. (1991) Germany in the early middle ages c.800-1056 (Longman), p. 81. 

[4] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 857, MGH SS I, p. 370. 

[5] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 872, MGH SS I, p. 384. 

[6] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 871, MGH SS I, p. 384. 

[7] Reuter (1991), p. 81. 

[8] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.9, MGH SS IX, p. 39. 

[9] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.10, MGH SS IX, p. 39.  The date "871" is inserted in the margin by the editor, although the text I.14, p. 44, records the baptism taking place in 884. 

[10] ES I.2 176. 

[11] Pelzel, F. M. and Dobrowsky, J. (eds.) (1784) Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II (Prague), Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, p. 427. 

[12] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45. 

[13] ES I.2 176. 

[14] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 427. 

[15] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, pp. 44-5. 

[16] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, pp. 44-5. 

[17] Gumpoldi Vita Vencezlavi ducis Bohemiĉ 2 and 3, MGH SS IV, p. 214. 

[18] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 34, p. 87. 

[19] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45. 

[20] ES I.2 176. 

[21] Widukind 2.3, pp. 68-70, cited in The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, trans. David A. Warner (Manchester University Press, 2001), p. 90, footnote 8.  The date 929 is given in the late 10th/early 11th century Chronik des Cosmas, which according to Degener, p. 12a, is unreliable. 

[22] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45. 

[23] Gumpoldi Vita Vencezlavi ducis Bohemiĉ 3, MGH SS IV, p. 214. 

[24] Reuter (1991), p. 144, and Thietmar, p. 90, footnote 8. 

[25] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.17, MGH SS IX, p. 46.  Footnote 18 corrects the date to 935. 

[26] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45. 

[27] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.15, MGH SS IX, p. 45. 

[28] Gumpoldi Vita Vencezlavi ducis Bohemiĉ 15, MGH SS IV, p. 210. 

[29] Thietmar 2.2, p. 90. 

[30] Dzięcioł (1963), p. 322. 

[31] Dzięcioł (1963), pp. 130-1. 

[32] Thietmar 3.7, p. 132. 

[33] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.21, MGH SS IX, p. 48. 

[34] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[35] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronic a Boemorum I.17, MGH SS IX, p. 46. 

[36] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.21, MGH SS IX, p. 48. 

[37] Cosmas Pragensis Chronica Boemorum, I, c. 22, cited in Dzieciel, p. 184. 

[38] Thietmar 4.5, p. 153. 

[39] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[40] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.32 and 39, MGH SS IX, pp. 55 and 62. 

[41] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221. 

[42] Hroswitha of Gandersheim, Gesta Ottonis, quoted in Hill, B. H. (1972) Medieval Monarchy in Action: The German Empire from Henry I to Henry IV (London), p. 122. 

[43] Sharpe, Rev. J. (trans.), revised Stephenson, Rev. J. (1854) William of Malmesbury, The Kings before the Norman Conquest (Seeleys, London, reprint Llanerch, 1989) II, 126, p. 110. 

[44] ES I.I 176. 

[45] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.32, MGH SS IX, p. 55. 

[46] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.32, MGH SS IX, p. 55. 

[47] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221. 

[48] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56, and Thietmar 5.29, p. 224.  . 

[49] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[50] ES I.2 176. 

[51] N de Baumgarten Saint Wladimir et la conversion de la Russie (Orientalia Christiana LXXIX 1932), p. 120, cited in Wegener, W. (1965/67) Genealogischen Tafeln zur mitteleuropäischen Geschichte (Verlag Degener), p. 12a. 

[52] Cross, S. H. and Sherbowitz-Wetzor, O. P. (trans. & eds.) (1973) The Russian Primary Chronicle, Laurentian Text (Cambridge, Massachusetts) 1015, p. 131. 

[53] Gallus Chronicon, I, 7, quoted in Dzięcioł (1963), p. 223.

[54] Russian Primary Chronicle (1973) 1018, p. 132. 

[55] ES I.2 176. 

[56] ES I 54. 

[57] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56. 

[58] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221. 

[59] Thietmar 5.28, p. 224. 

[60] Thietmar 6.12, p. 246, and Reuter (1991), p. 260. 

[61] Thietmar 6.71, p. 285. 

[62] ES I.2 176. 

[63] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.42, MGH SS IX, p. 65. 

[64] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[65] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.36, MGH SS IX, p. 58. 

[66] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221. 

[67] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.42, MGH SS IX, p. 65. 

[68] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[69] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56. 

[70] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34 and II.13, MGH SS IX, pp. 56 and 75. 

[71] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34 and II.13, MGH SS IX, pp. 56 and 75. 

[72] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.30, MGH SS IX, p. 54. 

[73] ES I.2 176. 

[74] Thietmar 4. 55, p. 191. 

[75] Pertz, G. H. (ed.) (1866) Annales Poloniĉ, Scriptores rerum Germanicarum in usum scholarum (Hannover), Annales Kamenzenses, p. 7.  

[76] Chronica principum Poloniĉ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 47. 

[77] Chronicĉ Polanorum I.5, MGH SS IX, p. 428. 

[78] Dzięcioł (1963), pp. 130-1. 

[79] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.27, MGH SS IX, p. 51. 

[80] Thietmar 5.23, p. 221. 

[81] Thietmar 5.28, p. 224. 

[82] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.22, MGH SS IX, p. 48. 

[83] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.22, MGH SS IX, pp. 48-9. 

[84] Annalista Saxo 1058 specifies that his wife was buried next to Duke Břetislav. 

[85] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.34, MGH SS IX, p. 56. 

[86] Annalista Saxo 1021. 

[87] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301. 

[88] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[89] Annalista Saxo 1021. 

[90] Annalista Saxo 1058. 

[91] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 78. 

[92] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67. 

[93] Annalista Saxo 1058. 

[94] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum I.41, MGH SS IX, p. 64. 

[95] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.17, MGH SS IX, p. 79. 

[96] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[97] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 227 and 228. 

[98] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 228. 

[99] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 228. 

[100] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67. 

[101] Annalista Saxo 1058. 

[102] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67. 

[103] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[104] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89. 

[105] Annales Gradicenses 1093, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[106] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67. 

[107] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67. 

[108] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[109] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89. 

[110] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.1, MGH SS IX, p. 67. 

[111] Annalista Saxo 1058. 

[112] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 295 and 296, pp. 386 and 389. 

[113] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89. 

[114] Annales Gradicenses 1086 and 1087, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[115] Annales Gradicenses 1093, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[116] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562. 

[117] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[118] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[119] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.16, MGH SS IX, p. 77. 

[120] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, pp. 79-80. 

[121] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[122] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[123] Chronicĉ Polanorum I.19, MGH SS IX, p. 438. 

[124] Annales Gradicenses 1087, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[125] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1126 MGH SS IX, p. 157. 

[126] Annales Gradicenses 1126, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[127] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[128] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[129] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[130] Annales Gradicenses 1093, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[131] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.13, MGH SS IX, p. 107. 

[132] Annales Gradicenses 1099 and 1101, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[133] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[134] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.3, MGH SS IX, p. 103. 

[135] Monumenta Oberaltacensia, Codex Traditionum IX, Monumenta Boica Vol. XII, p. 25. 

[136] ES I.2 177. 

[137] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[138] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[139] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[140] Chronicĉ Polanorum I.30, MGH SS IX, p. 442. 

[141] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.36, MGH SS IX, p. 91. 

[142] Annales Capituli Cracoviensis 1086, MGH SS XIX, p. 588. 

[143] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 559. 

[144] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[145] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[146] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[147] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[148] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.13, MGH SS IX, p. 107. 

[149] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[150] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[151] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[152] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[153] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[154] Annales Gradicenses 1101, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[155] Annales Gradicenses 1099, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[156] Annales Gradicenses 1099, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[157] Haverkamp, A. (1988) Medieval Germany 1056-1273 (Oxford University Press), p. 125. 

[158] Annales Gradicenses 1107 and 1110, MGH SS XVII, pp. 648 and 649. 

[159] Annales Gradicenses 1116, 1118 and 1120, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[160] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.54, MGH SS IX, p. 127. 

[161] Annales Gradicenses 1124, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[162] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 428. 

[163] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[164] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.12, MGH SS IX, p. 106. 

[165] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 159. 

[166] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1141, MGH SS IX, p. 158. 

[167] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1157, MGH SS IX, p. 160. 

[168] Annales Gradicenses 1135 and 1137, MGH SS XVII, p. 650, footnote 53 of the edition commenting that this was the son of Duke Borivoy. 

[169] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[170] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[171] Annales Gradicenses 1116, 1117 and 1120, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[172] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.58, MGH SS IX, p. 130.  . 

[173] Annales Gradicenses 1125, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[174] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[175] Bertholdi, Zwifaltensis Chronicon 12 and 13, MGH SS X, p. 103. 

[176] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.56, MGH SS IX, p. 128. 

[177] Annales Gradicenses 1137, MGH SS XVII, p. 650. 

[178] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 147. 

[179] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 147. 

[180] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[181] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[182] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.20, MGH SS IX, p. 80. 

[183] Annales Gradicenses 1125, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[184] Annales Gradicenses 1126, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[185] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 145. 

[186] Necrologium Canonicarum Perneccensium, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 562. 

[187] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 143. 

[188] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 146. 

[189] Necrologium Monasterii S Floriani, Passau Necrologies I, p. 259. 

[190] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 146.  This event is recorded first in the paragraph dealing with 1141, it is therefore assumed to relate to Christmas 1140, particularly as King Béla died in Feb 1141. 

[191] Vincentii Pragensis Annales, MGH SS XVII, p. 665. 

[192] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 133. 

[193] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[194] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 562. 

[195] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 230. 

[196] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 230. 

[197] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1209, MGH SS XXIII, p. 176. 

[198] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 144, the date "Sep 29" being inserted in the margin by the editor. 

[199] Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ 10, MGH SS XXIV, p. 822. 

[200] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229, footnote 48 specifying that her second husband was "Heinrico IV". 

[201] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[202] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 144. 

[203] ES I.2 177. 

[204] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[205] Annalista Saxo 1061. 

[206] Annales Pegavienses 1090 and 1109, MGH SS XVI, pp. 242 and 248. 

[207] ES I.2 177. 

[208] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[209] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.56, MGH SS IX, p. 128, undated but the editor has inserted "1124 May 22" in the margin.  . 

[210] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[211] Cosmĉ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.9, MGH SS IX, p. 105. 

[212] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[213] Annales Gradicenses 1107, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[214] Annales Corbeienses, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 42. 

[215] Annales Gradicenses 1137, MGH SS XVII, p. 650. 

[216] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1140, MGH SS IX, p. 158. 

[217] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmĉ MGH SS IX, p. 147. 

[218] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 2, p. 259. 

[219] Necrologium Windbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 383. 

[220] Necrologium Canonicarum Perneccensium, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 562. 

[221] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[222] ES I.2 177. 

[223] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1150, MGH SS IX, p. 160. 

[224] Annales Palidenses 13, 1150, MGH SS XVI, p. 85. 

[225] Necrologium Windbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 383. 

[226] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[227] Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ 10, MGH SS XXIV, p. 822. 

[228] Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariĉ et Agnetis Ducissĉ, MGH SS XVII, p. 376. 

[229] Necrologium Windbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 383. 

[230] Necrologium Altahĉ Superioris , Regensburg Necrologies, p. 224. 

[231] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[232] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmĉ 1157, MGH SS IX, p. 160. 

[233] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariĉ (Buda), Tome II, p. 230. 

[234] Necrologium Altahĉ Superioris , Regensburg Necrologies, p. 224. 

[235] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[236] Genealogia Ottonis II Ducis Bavariĉ et Agnetis Ducissĉ, MGH SS XVII, p. 376. 

[237] De Advocatis Altahensibus, MGH SS XVII, p. 374. 

[238] Monumenta Seeligenthalensis, Diplomatarium Miscellum I, Monumenta Boica Vol. XV, p. 443. 

[239] Necrologium Sĉldentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360. 

[240] Necrologium Fürstenfeldense, Freising Necrologies, p. 97. 

[241] ES II 154.. 

[242] Annales Mellicenses 1168, MGH SS IX, p. 504. 

[243] Gesta Archiepiscoporum Salisburgensium, Vita Gebehardi et successorum eius 27, MGH SS XI, p. 47. 

[244] Baumgarten, N. de 'Généalogies et mariages occidentaux des Rurikides Russes du X au XIII siècles´, Orientalia Christiana Vol. IX - 1, No. 35, May 1927 (reprint, Pont. Institutum Orientalium Studiorum, Rome) (“Baumgarten (1927)”), p. 26, citing chron. II 45.   

[245] Baumgarten (1927), p. 26, citing Pálacky, Geschichte Böhmens I 452.   

[246] Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ 10, MGH SS XXIV, p. 822. 

[247] Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ 10, MGH SS XXIV, p. 822. 

[248] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1222, MGH SS IX, p. 171. 

[249] Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera 1177 and 1182, MGH SS IX, pp. 541 and 542. 

[250] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[251] Necrologiĉ Canoniĉ ad Sanctum Andream, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 347. 

[252] Auctarium Sancrucense 1223, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[253] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[254] Historia Brevis Principum Thuringiĉ 10, MGH SS XXIV, p. 822. 

[255] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[256] Cod Giessensis Nr. 176, fol. 234, included as Genealogiĉ Comitum et Marchionum sĉc XII et XIII, in MGH SS XXIV, p. 78. 

[257] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1199, MGH SS IX, p. 169. 

[258] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1240, MGH SS IX, p. 171. 

[259] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[260] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[261] Íslenzkir Annálar sive Annales Islandici (Copenhagen, 1847) ("Annales Islandici"), 1204, p. 85. 

[262] Annales Ryenses 1205 and 1212, MGH SS XVI, p. 405. 

[263] Cod Giessensis Nr. 176, fol. 234, included as Genealogiĉ Comitum et Marchionum sĉc XII et XIII, in MGH SS XXIV, p. 78. 

[264] Annales Islandici, 1212, p. 91. 

[265] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[266] Cod Giessensis Nr. 176, fol. 234, included as Genealogiĉ Comitum et Marchionum sĉc XII et XIII, in MGH SS XXIV, p. 78. 

[267] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 229. 

[268] Jaksch, A. von (ed.) (1906) Monumenta historica ducatus Carinthiĉ, Band IV, Die Kärntner Geschichtsquellen 1202-1262 (Part I) ("Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1906)"), Part I, 1682, p. 64. 

[269] Notĉ Monialium Sanctĉ Clarĉ Wratislaviensium, MGH SS XIX, p. 534. 

[270] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[271] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1225, MGH SS IX, p. 171. 

[272] ES I.2 177. 

[273] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1233, MGH SS IX, p. 171. 

[274] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[275] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 429. 

[276] Bayley, C. C. (1949) The Formation of the German College of Electors in the mid-Thirteenth Century (Toronto), pp. 7-9. 

[277] Bayley (1949), p. 29. 

[278] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1253, MGH SS IX, p. 175. 

[279] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1207, MGH SS IX, p. 170. 

[280] Annales Marbacenses 1201, MGH SS XVII, p. 170. 

[281] Cronica Domus Sarensis, MGH SS XXX.1, p. 682. 

[282] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1248, MGH SS IX, p. 172. 

[283] Pelzel, F. M. and Dobrowsky, J. (eds.) (1784) Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II (Prague), Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput I, p. 18. 

[284] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1247, MGH SS IX, p. 172. 

[285] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1246, MGH SS IX, p. 172. 

[286] Bayley (1949), p. 21. 

[287] Annales Mellicenses 1246 and 1248, MGH SS IX, p. 508. 

[288] Continuatio Garstensis 1252, MGH SS IX, p. 599. 

[289] Continuatio Florianensis , MGH SS IX, p. 747. 

[290] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[291] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput I, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 18. 

[292] Cronica Principum Saxonie , MGH SS XXV, p. 479. 

[293] Codex Brandenburgensis, Dritte Abteilung - Die Altmark, Band 22, XXIV Kloster Arendsee, I, p. 1. 

[294] Notĉ Monialium Sanctĉ Clarĉ Wratislaviensium, MGH SS XIX, p. 534. 

[295] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annales Otakariani, 1264, MGH SS IX, p. 186. 

[296] Notĉ Monialium Sanctĉ Clarĉ Wratislaviensium, MGH SS XIX, p. 534. 

[297] Annales Veterocellenses 1268, MGH SS XVI, p. 43. 

[298] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput I, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 18. 

[299] Haverkamp (1988), p. 262. 

[300] Pangerl, M. (ed.) (1872) Urkundenbuch des ehemaligen Cistercienstiftes Goldenkron in Böhmen, Fontes rerum Austriacarum, 2 Abtheilung, Diplomataria et Acta, Band XXXVII (Vienna) ("Goldenkron"), I, p. 1. 

[301] Pangerl, M. (ed.) (1865) Urkundenbuch des Cistercienstiftes zu Hohenfurt in Böhmen, Fontes rerum Austriacarum, 2 Abtheilung, Diplomataria et Acta, Band XXII (Vienna) ("Hohenfurt"), XV, p. 21. 

[302] Bayley (1949), p. 193. 

[303] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), pp. 94-5. 

[304] Notĉ Altahenses 1278, MGH SS XVII, p. 422. 

[305] Annales Mellicenses 1226, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[306] Notĉ Sancti Emeranni 1228, MGH SS XVII, pp. 574 and 575. 

[307] Haverkamp (1988), p. 262. 

[308] Continuatio Garstensis 1253, MGH SS IX, p. 600. 

[309] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1252, MGH SS IX, p. 173. 

[310] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 6. 

[311] Hohenfurt, VII, p. 9. 

[312] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1261, MGH SS XVII, p. 402. 

[313] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1261, MGH SS IX, p. 178. 

[314] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[315] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[316] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1261, MGH SS IX, p. 178. 

[317] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 24. 

[318] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1261, MGH SS XVII, p. 402. 

[319] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput V, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 33. 

[320] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 23. 

[321] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 24. 

[322] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 29. 

[323] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput VIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 130. 

[324] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmĉ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1269, MGH SS IX, p. 180. 

[325] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 28. 

[326] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notĉ Historicĉ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 475. 

[327] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[328] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11. 

[329] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 23. 

[330] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 23. 

[331] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 23. 

[332] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 23. 

[333] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput II, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 23. 

[334] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11. 

[335] Goldenkron, V, p. 21. 

[336] Goldenkron, VIII, p. 29. 

[337] Bayley (1949), p. 188. 

[338] Knoll, P. W. (1972) The Rise of the Polish Monarchy: Piast Poland in East Central Europe 1320-1370 (University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London), p. 18. 

[339] Knoll (1972), p. 22. 

[340] Knoll (1972), p. 22. 

[341] Knoll (1972), p. 24. 

[342] Notĉ Altahenses 1305, MGH SS XVII, p. 423. 

[343] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 68. 

[344] Chronicon Colmariense, MGH SS XVII, p. 252. 

[345] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 28. 

[346] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11. 

[347] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 54. 

[348] Annales Polonorum I 1288, MGH SS XIX, p. 650. 

[349] Stenzel, G. A. (ed.) (1835) Scriptores Rerum Silesiacarum, Erster Band (Breslau) Chronicon principum Poloniĉ, (“Chronica principum Poloniĉ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I”) I, p. 123. 

[350] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 58. 

[351] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 73. 

[352] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 121-2. 

[353] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 11-12. 

[354] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[355] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 209. 

[356] Knoll (1972), p. 25. 

[357] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7. 

[358] Honemann, V. 'A Medieval Queen and her Stepdaughter: Agnes and Elizabeth of Hungary', Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 111. 

[359] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 70. 

[360] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXIX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 100. 

[361] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[362] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[363] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[364] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7. 

[365] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7. 

[366] Gesta Venerabilis Domini Domini Baldewini de Luczenburch Treverensis Archiepiscopi, Liber 2, V, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, pp. 116-7. 

[367] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 79. 

[368] Leuschner (1980), p. 104. 

[369] Gade, J. A. (1951) Luxemburg in the Middle Ages (Leiden), pp. 136-7. 

[370] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[371] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[372] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[373] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[374] Chronica principum Poloniĉ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 125. 

[375] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXVI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 91. 

[376] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 551. 

[377] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 130. 

[378] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 54. 

[379] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 58. 

[380] Chronica principum Poloniĉ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 122. 

[381] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 104. 

[382] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 66. 

[383] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 131. 

[384] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7. 

[385] Gade (1951), p. 136. 

[386] Gade (1951), p. 136. 

[387] Knoll (1972), pp. 61-2. 

[388] Knoll (1972), p. 73. 

[389] Gade (1951), pp. 153-4, and Leuschner (1980), p. 104. 

[390] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 451. 

[391] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 7. 

[392] Gesta Venerabilis Domini Domini Baldewini de Luczenburch Treverensis Archiepiscopi, Liber 2, V, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber I, Collectio Veterum, pp. 116-7. 

[393] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 79. 

[394] Leuschner (1980), p. 104. 

[395] Gade (1951), pp. 136-7. 

[396] Necrologium Raitenhaslacense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 260. 

[397] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXVII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 94. 

[398] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 131. 

[399] Necrologium Sĉldentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360. 

[400] Necrologium Baumburgense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 236. 

[401] Necrologium Windbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 383. 

[402] Knoll (1972), pp. 110-1. 

[403] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput I, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 115. 

[404] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 131. 

[405] Hellot, A. (ed. (1884) Chronique Parisienne anonyme du XIV siècle (Nogent) (“Chronique Parisienne”), 230, p. 150. 

[406] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[407] Rowell, S. C. (1994) Lithuania Ascending: A Pagan Empire within East-Central Europe (Cambridge University Press), p. 232. 

[408] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXIX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 101. 

[409] Leuschner (1980), p. 149. 

[410] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IV and VII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 121 and 128. 

[411] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 130. 

[412] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput XI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 134. 

[413] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[414] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicĉ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[415] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput XI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 134. 

[416] Pelzel, F. M. and Dobrowsky, J. (eds.) (1784) Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II (Prague), Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, p. 332. 

[417] Gade (1951), pp. 171-2. 

[418] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 362. 

[419] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XXIX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 101. 

[420] Leuschner (1980), p. 149. 

[421] Leuschner (1980), p. 151. 

[422] Leuschner (1980), p. 151. 

[423] Gage (1951), pp. 167 and 171. 

[424] Leuschner (1980), pp. 157-8. 

[425] Leuschner (1980), p. 162. 

[426] Leuschner (1980), p. 162. 

[427] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput XI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 134. 

[428] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 343. 

[429] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[430] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 347. 

[431] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 349. 

[432] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 73. 

[433] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 357-8. 

[434] Chronica principum Poloniĉ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 122. 

[435] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 359. 

[436] Knoll (1972), p. 205. 

[437] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 373. 

[438] Knoll (1972), p. 214. 

[439] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 451. 

[440] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 373. 

[441] Knoll (1972), p. 214. 

[442] Leuschner (1980), p. 151. 

[443] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 455. 

[444] Knoll (1972), p. 78, citing Boczek, A. et al (eds.) (1836-1903) Codex diplomaticus et epistolaris Moraviĉ, 15 vols. (Olomouc and Brno), VII, no. 90, and Ludewig J. P. (ed.) (1720-41) Reliquiĉ manusciptorum omnis aevi diplomatum ac monumentorum ineditorum adhuc…, 12 vols. (Frankfurt, Leipzig and Halle), V, 592, commenting that the date is incorrectly given as 1305. 

[445] The Inventory of the State Archives of Turin, consulted at <http://ww2.multix.it/asto/asp/inventari.asp> (2 Feb 2006) ("State Archives"), volume 102, page 52, fascicule 1. 

[446] State Archives, volume 102, page 52, fascicule 2. 

[447] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 358. 

[448] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicĉ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[449] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 388. 

[450] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 349 and 357. 

[451] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 388. 

[452] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 420. 

[453] Notĉ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicĉ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[454] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 372. 

[455] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 399. 

[456] Leuschner (1980), pp. 181 and 183. 

[457] Leuschner (1980), p. 183. 

[458] Cronica Principum Regni Boemiĉ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 434. 

[459] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 408. 

[460] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 80. 

[461] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 455. 

[462] Chronicon Bohemicum Anonymi, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 453. 

[463] Rymer, T. (1740) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literĉ 3rd Edn (London), Tome III, Pars III, p. 110. 

[464] Rymer (1740), Tome III, Pars III, p. 113. 

[465] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Bermundeseia, p. 482. 

[466] Thompson, E. M. (1904) Chronicon Adĉ de Usk 1377-1421, 2nd edn (London) (“Chronicon Adĉ de Usk”), p. 8. 

[467] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 395. 

[468] Chronica principum Poloniĉ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 155. 

[469] Stenzel, G. A. (ed.) (1835) Scriptores Rerum Silesiacarum, Erster Band (Breslau) ("Silesiacarum Scriptores I"), p. 217. 

[470] Grote, H. (1877) Stammtafeln (reprint Leipzig, 1984), p. 224. 

[471] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 406. 

[472] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 217. 

[473] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 415 and 420. 

[474] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiĉ Pragensis, Liber IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 420. 

[475] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 340. 

[476] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 340. 

[477] Lázár (1996), p. 65. 

[478] Named after the raven which was the family's heraldic emblem. 

[479] Fine (1994), p. 593. 

[480] Fine (1994), p. 593.