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BURGUNDY KINGDOM

counts of burgundy

v4.0 Updated 11 April 2017

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE. 1

A.         COMTES de BOURGOGNE 1026-1200 (IVREA) 2

B.         COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE 1184-1200 (HOHENSTAUFEN) 16

C.        COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE 1211-1248 (ANDECHS-MERANO) 18

D.        COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE 1248-1330 (IVREA) 22

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE

 

 

 

A.      COMTES de BOURGOGNE 1026-1200 (IVREA)

 

 

Adalberto King of Italy fled to Burgundy after he was expelled from Italy by Emperor Otto I in the mid-960s.  After ex-King Adalberto died in 971, his widow married Henri Duke of Burgundy [Capet], who adopted as his heir Othon-Guillaume who was his wife’s son by her first marriage.  Othon-Guillaume acquired the county of Mâcon, in the southern part of the territory later governed by the dukes of Burgundy, by marrying the widow of the previous count (see the document BURGUNDY DUCHY NOBILITY).  After Duke Henri died in 1002, his adopted son unsuccessfully claimed the succession to the duchy of Burgundy.  After the death in 1032 of Rudolf III, last king of Burgundy, one branch of Othon-Guillaume's descendants established themselves to the east of the river Saône in the area around Salins and Besançon.  The county of Burgundy developed in this area some time during the 11th century, although it is difficult to be precise about the date.  According to Bouchard, the title "Comte de Bourgogne" was purely descriptive in the early years of the century and did not reflect any political reality[1]The first reference to "palatine" as a supplementary title of the counts of Burgundy occurs in the Relatio Piis Operibus Ottonis Episcopi Bambergensis which names "Agnate palatina comitissa"[2], the wife of Comte Guillaume II who died in 1125.  The precise origin of this title "palatine" has not been identified.  Usually associated with a function attached to one of the royal palaces, the counts of Burgundy may have held an unidentified position in the palace, firstly of Rudolf III King of Burgundy, and later of the Rektor of Burgundy who was appointed by the kings of Germany to act as their representative in the kingdom of Burgundy.  The county of Burgundy passed into the sphere of influence of the Capetian kingdom of France with the marriage in 1307 of its heiress to the future Philippe V King of France, although it retained its separate administrative existence until it was consolidated in 1383 into the extensive territories of Philippe II "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy [Valois].  The county of Burgundy was among the territories which passed to the Habsburg family as a result of the marriage in 1477 of Marie, daughter and heiress of Charles Duke of Burgundy, to the future Emperor Maximilian I. 

 

 

RENAUD de Mâcon, son of OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon & his first wife Ermentrude de Roucy ([990]-3/4 Sep 1057, bur Besançon)Rodulfus Glaber names "Rainaldus" as one of the sons of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and his wife[3]His mother's name is confirmed by the charter dated 1029 under which "Reinaldus comes filius Ottonis cognomento Vuilelmi…Yrmengardis coniugis" donated property "ecclesiam sancti Nicolai vallis iuxta Poliniacum" to Cluny, confirmed by "Rodulfus rex"[4].  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records a donation by "Otto comes cognomento Willelmus" with "filii eius Rainaldi" dated 1004 "pro anima Hinrici Ducis, qui eum loco filii adoptavit et genitricis sue Gerberge uxoris predicti Ducis, ac filii sui Widonis et Hermintrudis coniugis"[5]"Otto comes et uxor mea Adila" donated property to Saint-Vincent de Mâcon by two charters dated to 1015 or before (during the reign of Robert I King of France) both subscribed by "Rainaldi filii sui"[6].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rainaldus trans Saonæ fluvium Burgundionum comes” was imprisoned by “Cabilonensi comite...Hugone”, and that Richard II Duke of Normandy sent an army headed by “Richardo filio suo” [which presumably dates the event to [1016/26]] who besieged “Milinandum castrum” and forced Renaud’s release[7].  He succeeded his father in 1026 as RENAUD I Comte de Bourgogne, although at that time the "county of Burgundy" did not yet exist as such, Bouchard suggesting that the title was purely descriptive of the area in which Renaud exercised his power[8].  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, records that "filius eius [=comes Otto Guilelmus] comes Rainaldus" succeeded his father in "terram ultra Sagonnam" dividing the territory with his nephew "filius alterius filii eius Guidonis, alter comes Otto"[9].  Renaud supported Emperor Konrad II in the latter's struggle with Eudes Comte de Blois for control over the kingdom of Burgundy after the death of King Rudolf III in 1032.  "Raginaldus comes comitis Guillelmi filius" donated property to the abbey of Flavigny by charter dated 18 May 1037 subscribed by "Iudid comitisse uxoris eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius…"[10].  The Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon records that "Ludowicus comes" expelled "Reginoldum principem, reginæ Agnetis avunculum, sed Heinrico regi inimicum" from "castellum…Mons Piligardæ"[11].  Emperor Heinrich III defeated Comte Renaud in battle after the latter besieged Montbéliard, forcing him to swear allegiance to the Comte de Montbéliard at Soleure/Solothurn in 1045: Herimannus records that "Reginolf et Gerolt Burgundiones" submitted to Heinrich III King of Germany "apud Solodurum" [Solothurn] in 1045[12].  The necrology of Besançon Cathedral records the death “II Non Sep” of “Rainaldus comes[13].  The necrology of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records the death “II Non Sep” of “Rainaldus comes[14]

m [firstly] (before 1 Sep 1016) ADELAIS de Normandie, daughter of RICHARD II Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Rennes [Bretagne] ([1000]-[after 1030]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Adeliz” as the first daughter of “dux Richardus” and his wife “Goiffredum Britannorum comitem...sororem...Iudith”, adding that she married “Rainaldo Burgundionum comiti” by whom she had “Willelmum et Widonem” (the marriage is recorded in a later passage)[15].  Orderic Vitalis records her marriage and calls her amita of William I King of England[16] Rodulfus Glaber states that "filiam Richardi Rotomagensis ducis, Adeledam" married Renaud[17]"Otto comes qui nominatur Willelmus" issued a charter dated 2 Nov 1023 subscribed by "Raynardi comitis, Adheleydis uxoris eius"[18].  "Raynaldi comitis, Adheleys uxoris eius" subscribed the charter dated 1030 by which "Robertus regis Roberti filius et regis Henrici filii eius germanus…Burgundie Dux" restored property to Cluny[19]

[m secondly JUDITH, daughter of --- (-[26/27] Jul, 1037 or after).  "Raginaldus comes comitis Guillelmi filius" donated property to the abbey of Flavigny by charter dated 18 May 1037 subscribed by "Iudid comitisse uxoris eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius…"[20].  "Iudid comitisse" is assumed in traditional genealogies[21] to have been the same person as Comte Renaud’s wife Adelais.  However, it is also possible that she was Comte Renaud's second wife, Adelais having died earlier.  This may be indicated by Renaud's sons being described in the charter as "filii eius" rather than "filii eorum", although it is acknowledged that the use of these two grammatical variants is inconsistent in contemporary sources.  The necrology of Besançon Cathedral records the death “VII Kal Aug” of “Iudith comitissa[22].  The necrology of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records the death “VI Kal Aug” of “Iuditha comitissa[23].] 

Renaud I & his [first] wife had four children:

1.         GUILLAUME de Bourgogne (-12 Nov 1087, bur Besançon).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Adeliz” as the first daughter of “dux Richardus” and his wife “Goiffredum Britannorum comitem...sororem...Iudith”, adding that she married “Rainaldo Burgundionum comiti” by whom she had “Willelmum et Widonem[24].  He succeeded his father in 1057 as GUILLAUME I "le Grand" Comte de Bourgogne.     

-        see below

2.         GUY de Bourgogne (-after 1069).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Adeliz” as the first daughter of “dux Richardus” and his wife “Goiffredum Britannorum comitem...sororem...Iudith”, adding that she married “Rainaldo Burgundionum comiti” by whom she had “Willelmum et Widonem[25].  His parentage is also given by Orderic Vitalis[26].  The archbishop of Rouen and the Comte d'Arques proposed Guy as duke of Normandy, his claim being through his mother, in place of his cousin the infant Guillaume "le bâtard".  Guy remained in Normandy, where he was brought up with his cousin and was given the castles of Brionne and Vernon.  Pursuing his claim to Normandy, he tried to capture Duke Guillaume in 1046 with the help of Néel de Saint-Sauveur, Ranulf Vicomte de Bayeux and Haimon "le Dentu", but was forced to flee and was finally defeated at Le Val-lès-Dunes in 1047: Guillaume of Jumièges records that Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted “castrum Brioci” to “Widonem...filium Rainaldi Burgundionem comitis” who rebelled against the duke with “Nigellum Constantiniensem præsidem” but was defeated at “Valedunas” in 1047[27].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guy was besieged in his castle for three years, pardoned by Duke Guillaume, sought refuge temporarily at the court of Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou, and returned to Burgundy where he continually plotted to dispossess his brother over a period of ten years[28]

3.         HUGUES de Bourgogne (-after 1045).  "Raginaldus comes comitis Guillelmi filius" donated property to the abbey of Flavigny by charter dated 18 May 1037 subscribed by "Iudid comitisse uxoris eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius…"[29]

4.         FOULQUES de Bourgogne .  “Willelmus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, for the souls of “mea...necnon...Fulchonis fratris mei et Ottonis filii mei”, by undated charter[30].  Bouchard suggests that he was the same person as "Foulques de Joux"[31], who is named in the Miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis as "nobilissimus princeps in Burgundia…Falco de Jur, vel de Serrata" when recording his marriage, in its recital of the ancestry of Barthélemy Bishop of Laon[32].  However, according to Europäische Stammtafeln, the husband of Aelis de Ramerupt was Conon "Falcon" de La Sarraz [Grandson], whose death is estimated to "before 1114".  If Conon died soon before that date, it is unlikely that Bouchard’s suggestion could be correct. 

 

 

GUILLAUME de Bourgogne, son of RENAUD I Comte de Bourgogne & his [first] wife Adelais de Normandie ([1024]-12 Nov 1087, bur Besançon).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Adeliz” as the first daughter of “dux Richardus” and his wife “Goiffredum Britannorum comitem...sororem...Iudith”, adding that she married “Rainaldo Burgundionum comiti” by whom she had “Willelmum et Widonem” (the marriage is recorded in a later passage)[33].  His parentage is also given by Orderic Vitalis[34].  He succeeded his father in 1057 as GUILLAUME I "le Grand" Comte de Bourgogne.  Orderic Vitalis records that for about ten years he fought his brother Guy ex-Comte de Brionne who attempted to dispossess Guillaume[35].  He was one of the princes called upon by Pope Gregory VII in 1074 to help defend St Peter's[36].  He succeeded in 1078 as Comte de Mâcon, when his cousin Guy [II] Comte de Mâcon entered holy orders.  The necrology of Besançon Cathedral records the death “II Id Nov” of “Willelmus comes Burgundionum pater Hugonis Archiepiscopi[37]

m ([1049/57]) ETIENNETTE, daughter of --- (-after 19 Oct 1088).  Szabolcs de Vajay[38] demonstrates that his earlier hypothesis concerning a Lotharingian origin of Etiennette is incorrect[39].  According to Père Anselme, she was the daughter of Berenguer Ramón I "el Curvo" Conde de Barcelona[40], but there appears to be no contemporary documentation on which this is based.  Settipani suggests that Etiennette may have been the daughter of Bernard [II] Comte de Bigorre & his first wife Clémence, based solely on onomastics[41], but the possible motivation for a marriage between these two families is not obvious.  Some secondary sources suggest that she was “Etiennette de Vienne”[42].  However, no documentary evidence has been found which indicates a connection between her descendants and the county of Vienne before her grandson Guillaume (who died 1155, see below), which suggests that any rights to the county were acquired by the family well after Etiennette died.  Szabolcs de Vajay attributes the error connecting Etiennette with Vienne to her epitaph, which names “Allobrogum comitissa...Stephania[43], indicating that, while the Allobroges had been a Gallic tribe living around Vienne, this archaic term was used elsewhere simply to describe the county of Burgundy[44]

Guillaume I & his wife had [thirteen] children: 

1.         ERMENTRUDE de Bourgogne ([1050/55]-1106 or after, bur Autun Cathedral).  Her birth date is estimated from her possible marriage date, bearing in mind the probable dates of birth of her oldest children.  If it correct, it is likely that Ermentrude was one of her parents’ oldest children.  "Filia Wilelmi comitis de Burgundia Hermentrudis et filii sui Fridericus, Raginaudus, Theodericus" founded the Cluniac abbey of Froidefontaine by charter dated 8 Mar 1105 in which she names "suis antecessoribus…Lodewico, Sophia eius uxore, et filiis eorum Brunone, Theoderico, Lodewico, Friderico, filiabus vero Mathilde, Sophia, Beatrice, filiis autem Theoderici atque sue uxoris Hermentrudis, Lodewico, Wilelmo, Hugone", witnessed by "Henricus de Suarca cum genero suo Gerunch, Gotefridus filius avunculi eiusdem comitis [Friderici]"[45]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Ermentrudem" as wife of "Theodericum [filius comiti Montionis Ludovico]" specifying that she was heiress to Montbéliard[46].  She retired to the château de Montbéliard after the death of her husband.  She subscribed a sale act of her son Renaud in 1106[47]m ([1065]) THIERRY de Mousson, son of LOUIS Comte de Mousson & his wife Sophie of Upper Lotharingia ([1045]-1/2 Jan 1103, bur Autun Cathedral). 

2.         EUDES [Othon] de Bourgogne (-before 12 Nov 1087).  “Willelmus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, for the souls of “mea...necnon...Fulchonis fratris mei et Ottonis filii mei”, by undated charter[48]

3.         RENAUD de Bourgogne (-[Palestine 1097 or Summer 1101]).  "Rainaldus comes Matisconensis" made a donation to Cluny dated [1086] subscribed by "Willelmi patris mei"[49].  His father installed him in [1078] as Comte de Mâcon.  He succeeded his father in 1087 as RENAUD II Comte de Bourgogne.  He joined the First Crusade, appointing his younger brother Etienne as regent of Bourgogne-Comté during his absence.  Albert of Aix records that "Reinoldo duce Burgundiæ, fratre Stephani, vice ipsius Burgundiam regentis" had left for Jerusalem before the Lombard expedition, passed the winter at Antioch, and joined Welf I Duke of Bavaria on his journey to Jerusalem, but died and was buried en route[50].  If that is correct, Renaud must have died in Summer 1101.  m (before [1085], separated) REGINA [Kuniza] von Oltingen, daughter of KUNO Graf von Oltingen & his wife --- de Luxembourg (-after 12 Apr 1107).  "Regina ex prosapia non obscura…comitis Cononis filia qui frater extit Conraldi viri…in itinere Jerosolimitano defuncti, generi nimirum comitis Pictaviensis" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire where she was about to become a nun, for the foundation of the priory of Aiwaille, by charter dated 1088, which states that "me maritalis jugi sarcina exoneravit" which suggests an amicable separation from her husband[51].  The charter dated 1095 under which "Guillelmus comes" donated property to Marcigny-sur-Loire names "mater mea Cuniza Cononis filia"[52].  She is named "mater mea Regina" in her son's 1107 charter which also names her father "avi ac nutritoris mei Cononis comitis"[53].  Renaud II & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Bourgogne ([1085]-murdered after 3 Jan 1125).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 12 Sep 1095 under which "Guillelmus comes filio Rainaldi" confirmed a donation by "mater mea Cuniza Cononis filia" to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire[54].  His charter dated 1107 (see below) indicates that Guillaume was brought up by his maternal grandfather, receiving a German rather than French education, hence his subsequent nickname.  He succeeded in 1097 (when his father left on Crusade) as GUILLAUME II "l'Allemand" Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne, Comte de Mâcon.  "Comes Willelmus quem vocabant Alamannum" granted concessions relating to the town of Auxerre in Macon to Cluny by charter 1106[55].  "Willelmus Burgundionum comes et Mathicensium" confirmed previous donations by "antecessores mei…Rainaldus pater meus filius Willelmi, et ipse Willelmus filius alterius Rainaldi, et ipse Rainaldus filius alterius Willelmi et…Stephanus comes patruus meus…mater mea Regina" to Cluny by charter 1107 before 13 Aug made "pro…anime…avi ac nutritoris mei Cononis comitis"[56].  Guillaume was murdered by his barons who, it is said, claimed that he had been carried away by the devil following his abuses of church property[57]m ([1107]) AGNES von Zähringen, daughter of BERTHOLD II Herzog von Zähringen & his wife Agnes von Rheinfelden.  The Relatio Piis Operibus Ottonis Episcopi Bambergensis names "Agnate palatina comitissa", implying that she was sister of "Chuno dux"[58]This is confirmed by the Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising which names her son "Gwillehelmus…puer…ex parte patris consanguineus, Conradi vero ducis sororis filius"[59].  Guillaume II & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME de Bourgogne ([1110]-murdered Payerne Abbey 9 Feb or 1 Mar 1127, bur Cluny Priory Nirves).  A charter of Saint-Vincent-de-Mâcon dated to [1126/43] refers to "post mortem comitis Willelmi et Alemani patris alterius Willelmi"[60].  The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising names "Gwillehelmus…puer…ex parte patris consanguineus, Conradi vero ducis sororis filius"[61].  He succeeded his father in 1125 as GUILLAUME III "l'Enfant" Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne, Comte de Mâcon.  One of the Continuations of Sigebert records that "Guilelmum comitem Sedunensium" was murdered "1127 III Kal Mar" in the church of Payerne "at the instigation of demons"[62]The Annales Sancti Disibodi record that "Wilhelmus princeps Burgundiæ" was killed "a suis" in 1127[63].  The Fundatio monasterii…de Altaripa records that "pater [domini Guillelmi de Glana] Petrus et frater suus Guillelmus de Glana" were killed "V Id Feb…apud Paterniacum" in 1126 "cum…comes Viennensi qui etiam comes Solodorensis et dominus Salinensis" and that they were all buried "in prioratu Cluniacensi…in insula…in lacu de Nirvez"[64]After his death, his maternal uncle Konrad I Herzog von Zähringen claimed the county of Burgundy, and Lothar von Süpplingenburg King of Germany conferred the territory on him[65]

4.         [GUILLAUME de Bourgogne (-before 1090).  He is named in Europäische Stammtafeln[66] as the third son of Comte Guillaume but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.] 

5.         GUY de Bourgogne (Château de Quingey [1060]-Rome 13 Dec 1124, bur Rome Lateran Church).  Orderic Vitalis names his father[67], his parentage being confirmed by his own reference to his brother Hugues Archbishop of Besançon in his letters[68].  William of Tyre specifies that Pope Calixtus II was previously named "Guido", but does not specify his origin other than calling him "secundum carnem nobilis" and stating that he was "consanguineus" of Emperor Heinrich V[69].  The birth order of the children of Guillaume I Comte Palatin de Bourgogne is uncertain.  Most authorities place Guy after his brother Hugues, but if his supposed birth date is correct Guy must have been one of the older sons.  Archbishop of Vienne 1088.  Administrator of Besançon 1107/09.  A fierce critic of Pope Pascal II's capitulation to Emperor Heinrich V concerning the right to appoint bishops, Guy presided over a synod at Vienne in Sep 1112 which declared the practice of lay investiture heretic and excommunicated the emperor.  He was elected Pope CALIXTUS II by a small group of cardinals, crowned at Vienne 9 Feb 1119, his election being ratified in Rome retrospectively 1 Mar 1119.  After an attempt to negotiate a compromise with the emperor, he confirmed the prohibition of lay investiture at Reims 29/30 Oct 1119, moving on to Rome which he entered triumphantly 3 Jun 1120.  He besieged Sutri in Apr 1121 and forced the surrender of anti-Pope Gregory VIII, whom he humiliated by parading him on a camel through Rome.  From a position of power, he was able to negotiate the end to the emperor's right of spiritual investiture, while maintaining his own right of temporal investiture, agreed in the Concordat of Worms 23 Sep 1122 and ratified by the First Lateran Council in Mar 1123.  The Series Episcoporum Viennensium records the death "1124 XIV Kal Ian" of "sanctus Guido frater Stephani Burgundie principis", specifying that he had been elected archbishop of Vienne in 1088 and was buried in Rome "in ecclesia Lateranensi"[70]

6.         ETIENNE [I] "Tête-Hardi" de Bourgogne (-murdered Ascalon 27 May 1102).  He and his brothers Raimond and Hugues called themselves sons of the "most noble count William" in a late-11th century document[71].  He succeeded in [1087] as Comte de Mâcon, Seigneur de Varasque.  Albert of Aix records that "Reinoldo duce Burgundiæ, fratre Stephani, vice ipsius Burgundiam regentis" left for Jerusalem, indicating that his brother Etienne was appointed regent in the county of Burgundy in his place[72].  Etienne joined the Crusade some time after the death of his brother.  Albert of Aix records that "Stephanus…dux Burgundiæ…" joined the Lombard contingent on the second wave of the First Crusade, dated to late 1100 from the context[73].  He commanded troops with Etienne Comte de Blois which were defeated by the Turks at Marsivam.  William of Tyre records the presence at the second capture of Tortosa in 1102 of "Stephanus comes Burgundiæ"[74].  Albert of Aix records that "Conradus, Arpinus, Stephanus Blesensis itemque Stephanus de Burgundia" were captured at Ramla after being burned in a tower, and that "Stephano itemque Stephano" were beheaded, dated to mid-1102 from the context[75]m ([1090]) BEATRIX de Lorraine, daughter of GERARD IV Duke of Upper Lotharingia [Lorraine] & his wife Hadwide --- (-[1116/17]).  "Stephanus comes Burgundie et dominus de Treva" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1100] in which he refers to his wife as "filia ducis Lotharingie" but does not name her[76].  The primary source which names her has not yet been identified.  Etienne I & his wife had four children: 

a)         ISABELLE de Mâcon ([1090/95]-after 1125)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Elizabeth sororem comitis Raynaldi de Burgundia" as wife of "Hugo comes Campanie"[77], but the primary source which confirms their precise parentage has not yet been identified.  m ([1110], repudiated) as his second wife, HUGUES de Blois Comte de Troyes, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his third wife Alix de Valois ([1074]-Palestine 14 Jun 1126). 

b)         RENAUD de Mâcon (-22 Jan 1148 or 20 Jan 1149)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Elizabeth sororem comitis Raynaldi de Burgundia" as wife of "Hugo comes Campanie"[78], but the primary source which confirms their parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his father in 1102 as Comte de Mâcon, under the guardianship of his uncle Guy, who was then Archbishop of Vienne[79].  He succeeded his second cousin in 1127 as RENAUD III Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne.  He defeated Konrad I Herzog von Zähringen, who claimed Bourgogne-Comté after the death of his nephew Comte Palatin Guillaume II.  However, after refusing to swear allegiance to Emperor Lothar for his imperial lands, Renaud was captured and brought by Herzog Konrad before the emperor who confiscated these territories.  Renaud was known as "le franc-comte", the origin of the name of the area later known as Franche-Comté.  Raynaldus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, with the consent of “fratris nostri Guillermi comitis et...collateralis nostræ Agathæ Lotharingiæ ducis filiæ”, by charter dated 1148[80]The necrology of the Priory of Saint-Martin-des-Champs records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Rainaldus comes"[81].  The necrology of Macon Saint-Pierre records the death “XVIII Kal Feb” of “comes Raynaldus” and his donation of “unum censualem modium vini in villa Liviniaci[82]m ([1130]) AGATHE de Lorraine, daughter of SIMON II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Adélaïde de Hainaut.  The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the wife of Comte Renaud as "Simonis Lotharingiorum ducis filiam"[83]Raynaldus Burgundiæ comes” donated property to Besançon cathedral, with the consent of “fratris nostri Guillermi comitis et...collateralis nostræ Agathæ Lotharingiæ ducis filiæ”, by charter dated 1148[84]She was first cousin once removed of her husband but no mention of a Papal dispensation for the marriage has so far been found.  “Matheus...Lotharingorum Dux et marchio” donated property to Tart abbey, with the consent of “uxoris mee Berthe...fratris mei Balduini et Agathe sororis mee”, by charter dated 1142[85]Renaud III & his wife had one child:

i)          BEATRIX de Bourgogne ([1145]-Jouhe near Dôle 15 Nov 1184, bur Speyer).  The Continuatio Admuntensis records the marriage of Emperor Friedrich in 1156 to "Beatricem filiam Reginoldi comitis" after repudiating "filia Diepoldi marchionis"[86].  She succeeded her father in [1148/49] as BEATRIX Ctss [Palatine] de Bourgogne, under the regency of her uncle Guillaume.  The latter attempted to usurp her titles but was defeated by Emperor Friedrich I, who later married Béatrix.  One of Sigebert’s continuators states, when recording her marriage, that “filiam comitis Burgundionum Reinaldi” had been imprisoned by “patruus suus comes Wilhelmus” after her father died[87].  She was crowned empress at St Peter's, Rome 1 Aug 1167 by Pope Pascal III[88], and crowned as Queen of Burgundy at Vienne in Aug 1178.  m (Würzburg 17 Jun 1156) as his second wife, Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, son of FRIEDRICH II von Staufen Duke of Swabia & his first wife Judith of Bavaria [Welf] (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190, bur Tarsus [entrails], Antioch St Peter [flesh], Tyre Cathedral [legs]). 

-         see below, Part B

c)         GUILLAUME de Mâcon (-27 Sep 1155).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comes Renaldus [de Burgundia] fratrem comitem Guilelmum" when recording his marriage[89].  He succeeded in 1120 as Comte de Mâcon.  Comte d'Auxonne 1127.  Guillaume enjoyed some influence in Vienne as shown by the following document: Konrad III King of Germany confirmed the rights of the archbishop and chapter over Vienne, specifying that he removed (“alienamus”) “Willelmum Matisconensem comitem” [Guillaume [III] Comte de Mâcon] from “predicta urbe”, by charter dated 6 Jan 1146[90].  He joined the Second Crusade 1147-1149.  Regent of Bourgogne-Comté for his niece, he attempted to deprive her of her inheritance.   

-        COMTES de MÂCON, COMTES d'AUXONNE

d)         CLEMENCE [Marguerite] de Mâcon (-Abbaye des Ayes [28 Jan/8 Feb] 1164, bur Abbaye des Ayes)The Vita Margaritæ Albonensis comitissæ records that "Stephani Burgundiæ comitis filia, soror…Rainaldi et Guillermi, neptisque…Papæ Callixti" married "comitis Guigonis Dalphini" in celebrations conducted by "principe Guigone veteri, eiusdem Guigone patre"[91].  The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records that "Guigo secundus" married "Macildam vel Clementiam filiam Stephani seu Sophini, Burgundiæ ducis, neptem papæ Claixti secundi"[92].  She founded the Abbaye des Ayes after the death of her husband.  A monumental inscription at the abbey of Ayes, near Grenoble, records the death "VI Id Feb" in 1164 of "Margareta comitissa"[93].  The necrology of the priory of Saint-Robert records the death "VII Kal Jan" of "Margareta comitissa"[94]m ([1120]) GUIGUES [VI] d'Albon Dauphin de Viennois, son of GUIGUES [V] d'Albon Dauphin de Viennois & his wife Regina [Matilda] --- ([1090/1100]-killed in battle La Buissière 28 Jun 1142, bur Notre Dame de Grenoble). 

7.         SIBYLLE de Bourgogne ([1065]-after 1103).  "Sybilla uxor mea" witnessed the donation to Cluny of "Oddo dux Burgundie", also witnessed by "Wilelmus comes…genitor iam dicte uxoris mee"[95].  Her origin is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis[96].  Nun at the abbey of Fontevraud.  m (1080) EUDES I "Borel" Duke of Burgundy, son of HENRI de Bourgogne "le Damoiseau" & his wife --- ([1060]-Tarsus, Cilicia 23 Mar 1103, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux, Côte-d'Or, Chapelle Saint-Georges). 

8.         RAYMOND de Bourgogne ([1070]-Grajal 13/20 Sep 1107, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Raymundem in Hispania comitem" as brother of "Hugo…Bisuntinensis archiepiscopus", when recording the latter's appointment as archbishop[97], although in a later passage the same source records "comitis Raymundi" as "fratris comitis Pontii de Tolosa"[98] which is inconsistent with other sources.  "Wilelmus comes Burgundie" names "Rainaldi et Raimundi filiorum meorum" in his donation to Cluny dated [1086][99].  "Raymundus…Burgundie comes filius Willermi…comitis" donated property to Saint-Bénigne de Dijon by charter dated to [1087/92] subscribed by "Hugonis archiepiscopi Bisuntini fratris mei, Stephani comitis fratris mei"[100].  Comte d'Amous.  He joined the expedition of the Eudes I Duke of Burgundy to Spain in 1086/87, following a call from the abbey of Cluny to fight "the infidel"[101].  Reilly suggests that he was betrothed after the failure to capture Tudela in Summer 1087, when he speculates that the Burgundians would have visited the court of Castile[102].  Raymond remained in Castile following his betrothal to Infanta Urraca.  "Raymondus gener regis" confirmed the donation by "Adefonsus…Hispaniarum rex…cum coniuge mea Constantia regina" of property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1 May 1092[103].  Conde de Galicia y Coimbra [before 1093], his father-in-law transferred the newly acquired cities of Lisbon, Santarém and Cintra to him in May 1093.  Governor of the city of Toledo.  He made a mutual pact [Dec 1094/Jul 1095] with Henri de Bourgogne, Conde de Portugal, pledging to grant him Toledo (or in default, Galicia) in return for his support in securing Castile and León for Raimond[104].  Conde de Grajal Jan 1098[105].  "Raimundus comes frater comitis Stephani" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1100][106].  He established his principal stronghold in the castle of Grajal in 1102[107].  By this time, Raymond had acquired a commanding position in Castile as husband of the heir presumptive to the throne.  A funeral elegy of "domnus Raymundus comes Hispanie qui de stirpe comitum Burgundie ortus" is recorded in the cartulary of Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon in a charter dated 20 Sep 1107 which names "Hugo frater suus Bisuntinus archiepiscopus"[108]m (betrothed [Summer 1087], Toledo [1 May 1092/Jan 1093]) as her first husband, Infanta doña URRACA de Castilla y León, daughter of ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León & his third wife Constance de Bourgogne [Capet] (late 1080[109]-Saldaña 8 Mar 1126, bur León, Monastery of San Isidoro).  Condesa de Galicia 1093.  She succeeded her father in 1109 as URRACA I Queen of Castile and León. 

-        KINGS OF CASTILE

9.         HUGUES de Bourgogne (-13 Sep 1103).  He and his brothers Etienne and Raimond called themselves sons of the "most noble count William" in a late-11th century document[110]Archbishop of Besançon 1086. 

10.      GISELE de Bourgogne ([1075]-after 1133).  Her parentage is deduced from Suger saying that her daughter Adelaide, wife of Louis VI "le Gros" King of France, was the niece of Pope Calixtus II[111].  This is corroborated by "Guido Viennensis archiepiscopus" (later Pope Calixtus II) addressing a letter to "nepoti suo Amedeo comiti" (Amédée III Comte de Savoie, son of Gisèle by her first marriage) dated [1115][112]Her date of birth is estimated from her having given birth to five children by her second husband whom she married in [1105], and assuming that she was no more than 17 years old when she gave birth to her first child by her first husband.  Her second marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records the marriage of Guillaume de Normandie and the daughter of Raniero III Marchese di Monferrato, naming both the bride's parents and specifying that the marriage was arranged by the bride's uterine half-sister, Adélaïde de Maurienne Queen of France[113]m firstly ([1090]) HUMBERT II "le Renforcé" Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie, son of AMEDEE II Comte de Savoie Marchese di Susa & his wife Jeanne [de Genève] ([1072]-Moûtiers 19 Oct 1103, bur Moûtiers).  Marchese di Turino 1094.  m secondly ([1105]) RANIERI Marchese di Monferrato, son of GUGLIELMO III Marchese di Ravenna & his second wife Otta di Agledo (-[1135/37]). 

11.      CLEMENCE de Bourgogne ([1078]-[1133]).  "Clementie Flandrarum comitisse" is named as wife of "Robertus iunior" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[114].  Orderic Vitalis names her as wife of Count Robert but does not give her origin[115]Her origin is confirmed by the Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana which names "Clementiam filiam Willelmi comitis Burgundionum cognomento Testahardith" as wife of "Rodbertus Rodberti filius"[116].  Clemence could not have been born much later than 1078, given the birth of her first child (by her first husband) in 1093.  She was appointed regent in Flanders during the absence of her first husband on crusade[117].  She promoted the monastic movement and introduced Cluniac rule into several abbeys in Flanders[118].  She founded Bourbourg Abbey with her first husband in [1103].  "Balduinus Flandrensium comes et Clementia comitissa" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Bertin to Cluny made by "dominus meus Rotbertus comes", by charter 12 Apr 1112[119]She opposed the succession in 1119 of Count Charles, supporting the candidature of Guillaume d'Ypres[120].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin records the death in [1133] of "Clementia Roberti iunioris vidua" and specifies that "eatenus pene terciam partem Flandrie dotis loco tenuit"[121], although it is curious that this does not refer to her second husband who was still alive when his wife died.  m firstly (before 1092) ROBERT de Flandres, son of ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders & his wife Gertrud von Sachsen (1065-5 Oct 1111).  He succeeded his father in 1093 as ROBERT II Count of Flandersm secondly ([1125]) as his second wife, GODEFROI V Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain, son of HENRI II Comte de Louvain & his wife Adela [van Betuwe en Teisterbant] (-25 Jan 1139, bur Afflighem Abbey). 

12.      [ETIENNETTE] de Bourgogne .  Her origin is confirmed by her husband Lambert François naming "filium…Raynaldum…nepotem archiepiscopi Guidonis" in a charter dated 1095[122].  Guy de Bourgogne, after his election as Pope Calixtus II sent a letter to Diego Bishop of Compostela recommending "Robertum Franciscum levirum suum" for a mission, "Robertum" presumably being a copyist's error for "Lambertum"[123].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m LAMBERT FRANÇOIS de Valence Seigneur de Royans, de Peyrins et de Chabeuil, son of HUGUES Comte de Valence & his wife Adalasie de Peyrins.  1097/1125. 

13.      [BERTHE de Bourgogne (-early Jan 1100, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo).  The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Berta, who was of Tuscan descent" ("Bertam Tuscia oriundam") as the third of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[124].  Las crónicas anónimas de Sahagún refer to her as "otra mugger de la nacion de Lombardia llamada Berta".  The precise origin of Berthe is not known.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[125], she was the daughter of Guillaume I Comte [Palatin] de Bourgogne, Comte de Vienne et de Macon, which is inconsistent with the "Tuscan descent" reported in the Chronicon Regum Legionensium.  Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that she was the daughter of Guillaume Comte de Bourgogne[126].  Reilly does not mention this possible Burgundian origin of Berthe, implying that the Castilian king chose his third wife from outside the Burgundian circle in order to diminish the influence of the Burgundians at court.  As Berthe de Bourgogne would have been the sister of Raymond de Bourgogne who married Infanta doña Urraca, oldest legitimate daughter of King Alfonso, around the same time that King Alfonso married Queen Berta, it is surprising that the chronicles do not refer to this relationship if it is correct. The references to "Tuscia" and "Lombardia" in the chronicles could be consistent with the family of Bourgogne [Comté] having originated in northern Italy, their ancestors being Marchesi of Ivrea until 968, although this was nearly 130 years before the date of Queen Berta's marriage.  Reilly dates this marriage to "during the Christmas season of 1094", but does not state his source[127].  In a later passage, Reilly states that the first reference to Berta as queen is dated 28 Apr 1095[128].  According to Reilly, Queen Berta died shortly after the new year 1100, probably before 16 Jan[129].  In another passage, he notes that the last notice of her is dated 17 Nov 1099[130].  She was dead in 25 Jan 1100, the date of the charter under which "Adefonsus…Toletani imperii rex" donated the churches of "Sancti Facundi et Sancti Primitivi…cum sua villa…Villaverde", ceded by "comitis Monini Fernandis…in vita sua dederam uxori mee Berte regine", to Cluny, confirmed by "Raimundus totius Gallecie comes et gener regis, Urraca soror regis, Urraca regis filia et Raimundi comitis uxor, Enricus Portugalensis comes, uxor ipsius Tarasia filia regis…"[131]m ([Dec] 1094) as his fourth wife, ALFONSO VI King of Castile and Leon, son of FERNANDO I "el Magno" King of Castile and León & his wife doña Sancha de León (Compostela [1037]-Toledo 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo).] 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE 1184-1200 (HOHENSTAUFEN)

 

 

Emperor FRIEDRICH I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, son of FRIEDRICH II von Staufen Duke of Swabia & his first wife Judith of Bavaria [Welf] (1122-drowned Göks or Saleph River, Asia Minor 10 Jun 1190, bur Tarsus [entrails], Antioch St Peter [flesh], Tyre Cathedral [legs])

m (Würzburg 17 Jun 1156) BEATRIX Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne, daughter and heiress of RENAUD III Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Agathe de Lorraine ([1145]-Jouhe, near Dôle 15 Nov 1184, bur Speyer Cathedral).  The Continuatio Admuntensis records the marriage of Emperor Friedrich in 1156 to "Beatricem filiam Reginoldi comitis" after repudiating "filia Diepoldi marchionis"[132].  She succeeded her father [1148/49] as BEATRIX Ctss [Palatine] de Bourgogne, under the regency of her uncle Guillaume.  The latter attempted to usurp her titles but was defeated by Emperor Friedrich I, who later married Beatrix: one of Sigebert’s continuators states, when recording her marriage, that “filiam comitis Burgundionum Reinaldi” had been imprisoned by “patruus suus comes Wilhelmus” after her father died[133].  She was crowned empress at St Peter's, Rome 1 Aug 1167 by Pope Pascal III[134], and Queen of Burgundy at Vienne Aug 1178. 

Emperor Friedrich I & his wife had eleven children:

1.         other children: see GERMANY KINGS

2.         OTTO von Staufen ([Jun/Jul] 1170-Besançon 13 Jan 1200, bur Besançon Saint-Etienne).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names him as son of Emperor Friedrich[135]The Annales Stadenses names (in order) "Heinrici imperatoris et Conradi Suevi et Friderici ducis Sueviæ et Ottonis sine terra et Philippi" as sons of "Beatrix imperatrix" when recording her death[136]He succeeded in 1189 as OTHON I Comte Palatin de Bourgognem ([1190]) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Blois, widow of HUGUES [III] d'Oisy Châtelain de Cambrai, daughter of THIBAUT V "le Bon" Comte de Blois & his second wife Alix de France ([1170]-12 Jul 1230).  "…Filiis quoque et filiabus meis Theobaldo et Ludovico atque Henrico, Margarita et Ysabella" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus Blesensis comes, Francie senesscalus" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun by charter dated 1183[137].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records "la fille dou conte Thibaut de Blois" being the wife of "Otes dus de Borgoigne"[138].  "Margareta uxor Galterii de Averna comitissa palatina Burgundie" confirmed an agreement between "Willelmum militem de Monasteriis" and Saint-Martin-des-Champs by charter dated [Jun/Aug] 1208 which also names "Hugo de Oysi filius Symonis vicecomitis, olim maritus meus"[139]She succeeded her nephew in 1218 as Ctss de Blois et de Châteaudun.  She married thirdly Gauthier [II] d'Avesnes Seigneur de Guise.  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "dominus Galterus filius [Jacobi] primogeniti" married "Margareta comitatus Blesensis hærede"[140].  The necrology of the abbey of Vauduisant records the death "IV Id Jul" of "comitisse Blesensis Marguerite"[141].  Othon I & his wife had two children: 

a)         JEANNE de Bourgogne ([1191]-[1205/08], bur Besançon Saint-Etienne).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

b)         BEATRIX de Bourgogne ([1193]-7 May 1231, bur Langheim).  The A Monacho Novi Monasterii Hoiensis Interpolata names "Otto comes Alemannus de Burgundia…filiam unicam Beatricem" as wife of "Otto dux Meranie"[142].  The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1231 Non Mai" of "Beatrix ducissa Meranie"[143].  The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses records her death in 1232, specifying that she was buried "in Lancheim cum marito suo Ottone duce"[144].  Heiress of the county of Burgundy.  m (Bamberg 21 May 1208) as his first wife, OTTO I von Andechs Duke of Merano, son of BERTHOLD III Duke of Merano, Marchese of Istria, Graf von Andechs & his wife Agnes von Wettin (-Besançon 7 May 1234, bur Langheim).  He succeeded in 1211 as OTHON II Comte Palatin de Bourgogne.  Marchese di Istria 1228/1230. 

-        see below, Part C

Othon I had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

c)         HUGUES (-after 1203).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

 

 

C.      COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE 1211-1248 (ANDECHS-MERANO)

 

 

OTTO von Andechs, son of BERTOLD III Duke of Merano, Marchese di Istria, Graf von Andechs & his wife Agnes von Wettin (-Besançon 7 May 1234, bur Langheim).  The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Otto dux Meranie…filius ducis Pertoldi, frater Heinrici marchionis" when recording his death in 1234[145].  He succeeded in 1205 as OTTO I Duke of Merano.  He succeeded in 1211 as OTHON II Comte Palatin de Bourgogne.  He negotiated a loan of 15,000 livres from Champagne, with Bourgogne-Comté as security in 1227[146].   Marchese di Istria 1228/1230.  The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1234 Non Mai" of "Otto dux Meranie" specifying that he was buried "Lancheim"[147]

m firstly (Bamberg 1208) BEATRIX de Bourgogne, daughter of OTHON I Comte Palatin de Bourgogne [Staufen] & his wife Marguerite Ctss de Blois ([1193]-7 May 1231, bur Langheim).  The A Monacho Novi Monasterii Hoiensis Interpolata names "Otto comes Alemannus de Burgundia…filiam unicam Beatricem" as wife of "Otto dux Meranie"[148].  The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1231 Non Mai" of "Beatrix ducissa Meranie"[149].  The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses records her death in 1232, specifying that she was buried "in Lancheim cum marito suo Ottone duce"[150]

m secondly as her first husband, SOPHIE von Anhalt, daughter of HEINRICH I "der Fette" Graf von Anhalt und Aschersleben & his wife Irmgard von Thüringen (-[23 Nov 1272/5 Jan 1274]).  The Cronica Principum Saxonie names (in order) "Iuttam…Sophiam…Hedwigem" as daughters of "Henricum comitem de Anahalt" & his wife, specifying that Sophie married firstly "ducis Meranie" and secondly "comes Sifridus de Regenstein"[151]She married secondly Siegfried [I] Graf von Regenstein, and thirdly Otto von HadmerslebenThe primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified. 

Othon II & his first wife had six children:

1.         OTTO von Andechs (-Burg Niesten 19 Jun 1248, bur Langheim).  He succeeded his father in 1234 as OTHON III Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Duke of Merano.  He negotiated a loan of 15,000 livres from Champagne, with Bourgogne-Comté as security in 1237.  The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1248 XIV Kal Iul" of "Otto dux Meranie, comes palatinus Burgundie iunior" specifying that he was buried "Lancheim"[152].  The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses records that he was killed "a suis veneno"[153]Betrothed (contract 19 Jan [1225/26]) to BLANCHE de Champagne, daughter of THIBAUT IV Comte de Champagne & his second wife Agnes de Beaujeu (before 19 Jan 1225-Château de Hédé, Ille-et-Vilaine 11 Aug 1283, bur Hennebont, Morbihan, Abbaye cistercienne de Notre Dame de la Joie).  “O Meranie dux, comes Burgundie palatinus et…Beatrix uxor eius” agreed with “Theobaldum Campanie et Brye comitem palatinum” the marriage of “Othonem filium nostrum” and “Blancham filiam ipsius Theobaldi comiti Campanie” by charter dated 19 Jan 1225[154]m (1234) as her first husband, ELISABETH von Tirol, daughter of ALBRECHT IV Graf von Tirol & his wife Uta von Frontenhausen (-10 Oct 1256).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 1239 under which her husband "Otto…dux Meranie et comes palatinus Burgundie" names "soceri sui comitis Alberti de Tyrol…uxoris sue filie sepe dicti comitis"[155]She married secondly (1249) Gebhard [IV] Graf von HirschbergHer second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 4 Sep 1253 under which "Gebhardus…Comes de Hirzberch" confirmed a donation to Benedictbeuern by "Ottonis Ducis Meranie Comitis Palatini Burgundie et filii sui Ottonis Ducis" of property from "socer noster Albertus Comes de Tirol" by charter dated 4 Sep 1253[156].  Wegener cites a source dated 23 Nov 1254 which names the wife of Gebhard von Hirschberg as Elisabeth[157]

2.         AGNES (-[1 Nov 1260/7 Jan 1263], bur Sittich).  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1229 of "Fridericus filius Liuopoldi ducis" and "filiam ducis Meranie"[158].  The Continuatio Garstensis names "Fridericus dux Austrie Agnetem uxorem suam de Merania", when recording the couple's separation[159].  The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that her husband repudiated her in 1244[160].  Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation for the marriage of “Ulricum natum ducis Corinthie” and “Agnetem neptem patriarchæ Aquilegiensis relictam quondam ducis Austræ”, related “tertio affinitatis gradu”, dated 23 Dec 1248[161]m firstly (1229, divorced 1240) FRIEDRICH of Austria, son of LEOPOLD VI "der Glorreiche" Duke of Austria [Babenberg] & his wife Theodora --- ([1210]-killed in battle an der Leitha 15 Jun 1246, bur Heiligenkreuz).  He succeeded his father 1230 as FRIEDRICH II "der Streitbare" Duke of Austria and Styria.  m secondly (Papal dispensation 23 Dec 1248) as his first wife, ULRICH III Duke of Carinthia, son of BERNHARD Duke of Carinthia [Sponheim] & his wife Jutta of Bohemia (-27 Oct 1269). 

3.         BEATRIX von Andechs (-after 14 Nov 1265).  "Beatrix…comitissa de Orlemunde soror quondam Ottonis ducis Merannie et filia Ottonis ducis quondam Merannie" sold her rights "in comitatu Burgundie" to "Hugoni duci Burgondie" by charter dated 1265[162].  "Beatrix comitissa de Orlemunde filia quondam Ottonis ducis Merannie et comitis Burgundie et soror quondam Ottonis ducis Meranie et comitis Burgundie" sold her rights "in comitatu Burgundie" to "Hugoni duci Burgondie", with the consent of "domino Ottone filio suo comite de Orlamunde" and committing "Hermannus de Orlemunde dicte Beatricis filius" to agree to the sale, by charter dated 1 Aug 1265[163].  "Othonins de Borgogne fiz de noble barum Hugum Conte de Palatinz de Borgogne" consented to the sales of rights "en la comté de Borgogne" by "noble dame Biatris Comtesse d’Orlemonde, aynée serour de noble dame Alys contesse de Savoye et de Borgogne, palatinz, ma…mere" to "Hugues dux de Borgogne", noting that "messire Philippe Cuens de Savoie et de Borgogne palatinz, maris et espous de la dite Alys" confirmed his agreement after the death of Otto’s father, by charter dated Dec 1269[164].  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated Apr 1270 under which "Hugo dux Burgundie" requested the abbot of Cluny to recognise the rights of “Ph Sabaudie et Burgundie comiti et A. comitisse uxori sue” in “comitatu Burgundie…cessionis nobis facte a domina B, comitissa Orlemunde, sorore dicte A. comitissa[165]m HERMANN [II] Graf von Orlamünde Herr zu Weimar, son of SIEGFRIED [III] Graf von Orlamünde & his wife Sophie of Denmark (before 16 Jan 1194-27 Dec 1247)

4.         MARGARETA von Andechs (-18 Oct 1271)The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  "Fredericus Dominus de Truhendingen et…Margareta uxor eius" sold their rights "in toto Comitatu Burgundie…et etiam in Regno Francie" to "Hugoni Comiti Burgundie palatino et…Domine Alide eius uxori Comitisse Burgundie palatine…sorori nostre" by charter dated Feb 1261[166]m firstly (before 25 Sep 1232) PŘEMYSL Markgraf of Moravia, son of PŘEMYSL OTAKAR I King of Bohemia & his second wife Konstancia of Hungary (1209-16 Oct 1239).  m secondly (2 Jun 1240) FRIEDRICH Graf von Truhendingen, son of FRIEDRICH von Truhendingen & his wife --- (-30 Aug 1274). 

5.         ALIX [Adelheid] von Andechs (-Evian 8 Mar 1279).  The marriage contract between “Otho dux Meranie comes palatinus Burgundiæ...Alys filiam meam” and “Hugoni filio Joannis comitis Cabilonensis” is dated Feb 1230 (presumably O.S.)[167].  From among his sisters, her brother designated her as his heiress in Bourgogne-Comté in 1248, and she succeeded in 1248 as ALIX Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne.  "Fredericus burgravius de Nuremberch et…Elysabeth eius uxor" renounced their rights "in comitatu Burgundie…et in regno Francie" in favour of "Hugoni comiti Burgundie palatino et…domine Aliz comitisse Burgondie palatine", except for "advocatia Bisontina", by charter dated May 1256[168].  “Hugues cuens palatins de Bourgoigne” names “Alis nostre fame” in a charter dated Jan 1260[169].  "Beatrix…comitissa de Orlemunde soror quondam Ottonis ducis Merannie et filia Ottonis ducis quondam Merannie" sold her rights "in comitatu Burgundie" to "Hugoni duci Burgondie" by charter dated 1265[170].  "Othonins de Borgogne fiz de noble barum Hugum Conte de Palatinz de Borgogne" consented to the sales of rights "en la comté de Borgogne" by "noble dame Biatris Comtesse d’Orlemonde, aynée serour de noble dame Alys contesse de Savoye et de Borgogne, palatinz, ma…mere" to "Hugues dux de Borgogne", noting that "messire Philippe Cuens de Savoie et de Borgogne palatinz, maris et espous de la dite Alys" confirmed his agreement after the death of Otto’s father, by charter dated Dec 1269[171].  "Hugo dux Burgundie" requested the abbot of Cluny to recognise the rights of “Ph Sabaudie et Burgundie comiti et A. comitisse uxori sue” in “comitatu Burgundie…cessionis nobis facte a domina B, comitissa Orlemunde, sorore dicte A. comitissa”, by charter dated Apr 1270[172]The testament of "Alis de Sauoye et de Bergoigne, Contesse Palatine" dated Nov 1278, made with the consent of "nostre…Signor et Mary Philippe de Sauoye et de Bergoigne Comte Palatin", appoints "nostre…fils ainsnés Messire Othes de Bourgoigone Sires de Salins soit Cuens de Bergoigne" as her heir in the county, makes bequests to "nostre…fil Renalt" and names "nostre…fils Iohans"[173]m firstly (contract Feb 1231, [1 Nov 1236]) HUGUES de Chalon, son of JEAN I "l'Antique/le Sage" Comte de Chalon & his first wife Mathilde de Bourgogne [Capet] (1220-1266 after 12 Nov).  He succeeded in 1248 as HUGUES Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, by right of his wife.  m secondly (11 Jun 1267) PHILIPPE de Savoie, son of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Marguerite [Beatrix] de Genève (Aiguebelle 1207-Château de Roussillon, Bugey 16 Aug 1285, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe).  He succeeded his brother in 1268 as PHILIPPE I Comte de Savoie.  children of first marriage:

-        see below, Part D.  

6.         ELISABETH von Andechs (-18 Dec 1272)Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 3 Jul 1255 under which "Corraudus burgravii de Nuremberch et Fredericus filius eius" granted their rights "in comitatu Burgundie…et in regno Francie excepta advocatia Bisuntina", received from "Elisabeth uxore nostra sorore Ottonis quondam ducis Meranie", when agreeing the marriage of "Alis nata nostra burgravii iunioris" and "Johanne nato nobilis viri Johannis comitis Burgundie et domini Salinensis"[174].  The date of her marriage is indicated by the charter dated 24 Feb 1249 under which Wilhelm King of Germany confirmed donations in “feudi...quondam Otho Meraniæ dux in comitatu Burgundiæ” made by “Frederico Nurenburgensi Burgravio, Elizabethæ ipsius Meranii sororis viro[175].  Konrad IV King of Germany granted "castrum nostrum Crusen" {Kreusen, near Pegnitz} to "Friderici Burgravii de Nurmberc eiusque uxoris…neptis nostre" by charter dated Oct 1251[176].  "Fredericus burgravius de Nuremberch et…Elysabeth eius uxor" renounced their rights "in comitatu Burgundie…et in regno Francie" in favour of "Hugoni comiti Burgundie palatino et…domine Aliz comitisse Burgondie palatine", except for "advocatia Bisontina", by charter dated May 1356[177]m (before 24 Feb 1249) as his first wife, FRIEDRICH III Burggraf von Nürnberg, son of KONRAD I Burggraf von Nürnberg & his [first] wife Clementia --- (-1297, after 12 May). 

 

 

 

D.      COMTES PALATINS de BOURGOGNE 1248-1330 (IVREA)

 

 

HUGUES de Chalon, son of JEAN I "l'Antique/le Sage" Comte de Chalon & his first wife Mathilde de Bourgogne [Capet] (1220-1266 after 12 Nov).  “Iehanz cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” granted rights “à Grosom” to “Hugom conte palazin de Borguoigne nostre fil et à dame Alis...sa feme” by charter dated Dec 1250[178].  “Hugues cuens palatins de Bourgoigne” names “Alis nostre fame” and his father “Jehans cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” in a charter dated Jan 1260, which specifies that Hugues was his father’s “ainnel fil[179].  He succeeded in 1248 as HUGUES Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, by right of his wife.  He quarrelled with his father, who wanted to disinherit him in favour of his half-brothers.  Louis IX King of France mediated in 1256, but this did not end their mutual animosity.  "Fredericus burgravius de Nuremberch et…Elysabeth eius uxor" renounced their rights "in comitatu Burgundie…et in regno Francie" in favour of "Hugoni comiti Burgundie palatino et…domine Aliz comitisse Burgondie palatine", except for "advocatia Bisontina", by charter dated May 1256[180].  "Fredericus Dominus de Truhendingen et…Margareta uxor eius" sold their rights "in toto Comitatu Burgundie…et etiam in Regno Francie" to "Hugoni Comiti Burgundie palatino et…Domine Alide eius uxori Comitisse Burgundie palatine…sorori nostre" by charter dated Feb 1261[181].  He succeeded his father in 1263 as Seigneur de Salins.  "Beatrix…comitissa de Orlemunde soror quondam Ottonis ducis Merannie et filia Ottonis ducis quondam Merannie" sold her rights "in comitatu Burgundie" to "Hugoni duci Burgondie" by charter dated 1265[182]

m ([1 Nov 1236]) as her first husband, ALIX [Adelheid] von Andechs, daughter of OTTO II Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Duke of Merano [Andechs] & his first wife Beatrix von Staufen Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne (-Evian 8 Mar 1279).  From among his sisters, her brother designated her as his heiress in Bourgogne-Comté in 1248, and she succeeded in 1248 as ALIX Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne.  “Iehanz cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” granted rights “à Grosom” to “Hugom conte palazin de Borguoigne nostre fil et à dame Alis...sa feme” by charter dated Dec 1250[183].  "Fredericus burgravius de Nuremberch et…Elysabeth eius uxor" renounced their rights "in comitatu Burgundie…et in regno Francie" in favour of "Hugoni comiti Burgundie palatino et…domine Aliz comitisse Burgondie palatine", except for "advocatia Bisontina", by charter dated May 1256[184].  “Hugues cuens palatins de Bourgoigne” names “Alis nostre fame” in a charter dated Jan 1260[185].  "Fredericus Dominus de Truhendingen et…Margareta uxor eius" sold their rights "in toto Comitatu Burgundie…et etiam in Regno Francie" to "Hugoni Comiti Burgundie palatino et…Domine Alide eius uxori Comitisse Burgundie palatine…sorori nostre" by charter dated Feb 1261[186].  "Beatrix…comitissa de Orlemunde soror quondam Ottonis ducis Merannie et filia Ottonis ducis quondam Merannie" sold her rights "in comitatu Burgundie" to "Hugoni duci Burgondie" by charter dated 1265[187].  She married secondly (11 Jun 1267) Philippe de Savoie, who succeeded in 1268 as Philippe I Comte de Savoie.  "Othonins de Borgogne fiz de noble barum Hugum Conte de Palatinz de Borgogne" consented to the sales of rights "en la comté de Borgogne" by "noble dame Biatris Comtesse d’Orlemonde, aynée serour de noble dame Alys contesse de Savoye et de Borgogne, palatinz, ma…mere" to "Hugues dux de Borgogne", noting that "messire Philippe Cuens de Savoie et de Borgogne palatinz, maris et espous de la dite Alys" confirmed his agreement after the death of Otto’s father, by charter dated Dec 1269[188]The testament of "Alis de Sauoye et de Bergoigne, Contesse Palatine" dated Nov 1278, made with the consent of "nostre…Signor et Mary Philippe de Sauoye et de Bergoigne Comte Palatin", appoints "nostre…fils ainsnés Messire Othes de Bourgoigone Sires de Salins soit Cuens de Bergoigne" as her heir in the county, makes bequests to "nostre…fil Renalt" and names "nostre…fils Iohans"[189]

Hugues & & his wife had [thirteen] children:

1.         ELISABETH de Bourgogne (-9 Jul 1275).  “Hartmannus junior comes de Kibourc” confirmed agreement to the dowry for his marriage to “Hugo comes Burgundie palatinus et...A...uxor eius...Elisabeth filie eorumdem primogenite uxoris nostre” by charter dated 27 Jan 1254[190].  Nun at Freiburg, after the death of her husband.  m (contract 27 Jan 1254) as his second wife, HARTMANN [V] Graf von Kiburg, son of WERNER [I] Graf von Kiburg & his wife Alix [Bertha] de Lorraine (-3 Sep 1263, bur Wettingen). 

2.         OTHON de Bourgogne (before 1248-Melun 17 or 26 Mar 1303, bur Charlieu)The testament of "Alis de Sauoye et de Bergoigne, Contesse Palatine" dated Nov 1278, made with the consent of "nostre…Signor et Mary Philippe de Sauoye et de Bergoigne Comte Palatin", appoints "nostre…fils ainsnés Messire Othes de Bourgoigone Sires de Salins soit Cuens de Bergoigne" as her heir in the county, makes bequests to "nostre…fil Renalt" and names "nostre…fils Iohans"[191]He succeeded his mother in 1279 as OTHON IV Comte Palatin de Bourgogne

-        see below

3.         ETIENNE de Bourgogne (-Rome 4 Apr 1299).  Canon at Besançon.  The testament of “Stephanus de Burgundia canonicus Bisuntinus”, dated 11 May 1298, appointed “fratrem...meum Othonem comitem palatinum et dominum Salinsem” as his heir, chose burial “in eclesia B. Proto-martiris Stephani ad pedes sepulturæ bonæ memoriæ Othonis quondam comitis B. P.”, and appointed “...fratres meos dominum Joannem et dominum Hugonem de Burgundia et...Petrum de Thorasia filium quondam Hugonis domini de Thorasia” as executors[192]

4.         RENAUD de Bourgogne (-9 Aug 1322)The testament of "Alis de Sauoye et de Bergoigne, Contesse Palatine" dated Nov 1278, made with the consent of "nostre…Signor et Mary Philippe de Sauoye et de Bergoigne Comte Palatin", appoints "nostre…fils ainsnés Messire Othes de Bourgoigone Sires de Salins soit Cuens de Bergoigne" as her heir in the county, makes bequests to "nostre…fil Renalt" and names "nostre…fils Iohans"[193]Comte de Montbéliard [Mömpelgard] 1282, by right of his wife. 

-        COMTES de MONTBELIARD

5.         HENRI de Bourgogne (-in jail after 23 Jun 1340).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

6.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (-after 1260).  Nun at Fontevraud.  “La comtesse Alix” granted revenue from “Dole” to “ses filles Marguerite et Alix religieuses de Fontevrault” by charter dated 1260[194]

7.         ALIX de Bourgogne (-after 1260).  Nun at Fontevraud.  “La comtesse Alix” granted revenue from “Dole” to “ses filles Marguerite et Alix religieuses de Fontevrault” by charter dated 1260[195]

8.         JEAN de Bourgogne (-[1301/03])The testament of "Alis de Sauoye et de Bergoigne, Contesse Palatine" dated Nov 1278, made with the consent of "nostre…Signor et Mary Philippe de Sauoye et de Bergoigne Comte Palatin", appoints "nostre…fils ainsnés Messire Othes de Bourgoigone Sires de Salins soit Cuens de Bergoigne" as her heir in the county, makes bequests to "nostre…fil Renalt" and names "nostre…fils Iohans"[196]Seigneur de Montaigu [en Bourgogne], de Montrond, de Fontenoy, de Choix, de Chastelet, de Buffart, de Chislé, de Liele et de Fauvernay 1293.  Henris sires de Blanmont et Cunegons sa fame” confirmed the donation made to “nostre...ganre Jehans de Bourgongne fiz à noble baron Hugon conte de Bourgongne qui fu” and an exchange of property, naming “nostre fille Marguerite fame audit Jehan”, by charter dated May 1296[197]The testament of “Stephanus de Burgundia canonicus Bisuntinus”, dated 11 May 1298, appointed “...fratres meos dominum Joannem et dominum Hugonem de Burgundia et...Petrum de Thorasia filium quondam Hugonis domini de Thorasia” as executors[198]m (before May 1296) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Blâmont, daughter of HENRI [I] Seigneur de Blâmont & his wife Kunigunde von Leiningen (-after 23 Jun 1369).  Henris sires de Blanmont et Cunegons sa fame” confirmed the donation made to “nostre...ganre Jehans de Bourgongne fiz à noble baron Hugon conte de Bourgongne qui fu” and an exchange of property, naming “nostre fille Marguerite fame audit Jehan”, by charter dated May 1296[199]The testament of “Connigons dame de Blanmont”, dated May 1302, named “messires de Blanmont mes maris.,..ma...fille Marguerite dame de Montagu”, and bequeathed property to “Fedri mon nepveu...ma fille Marguerite...ma fille de Grancé...[200].  She married secondly ([1304/05]) as his second wife, Thiébaud Comte de Ferrette.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   [“Marguerite de Berlaimont [“il est écrit Blamont dans le titre”] veuve de Jean de Salines le jeune” transferred money due from the count of Flanders to “monseigneur Henri seigneur de Berlaimont son aïeul” to “Jean Comte de Salines son frère”, by charter dated 23 Jun 1369[201].  This document appears to relate to the widow of Jean de Bourgogne (died [1301/03]).  However, the references to “monseigneur Henri seigneur de Berlaimont son aïeul” and “Jean Comte de Salines son frère” do not appear consistent with the information in the source dated May 1296 which is quoted above.  This suggests some as yet unidentified problem with the reconstruction of her family as presented here.]  Jean & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRI de Bourgogne (-after 7 May 1340[202]).  The testament of “Hugues de Bourgogne”, dated Jun 1312, bequeathed property to “Henry de Bourgogne son neveu[203].  The primary source which confirms his parentage more precisely has not been identified.  Seigneur de Montroud et de Montaigu.  m firstly as her second husband, MATHILDE de Champlitte, widow of GAUTHIER [II] Seigneur de Montfaucon, daughter and heiress of SIMON de Champlitte Seigneur de la Marche & his wife --- (-[1330]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriages has not yet been identified.  m secondly (contract La Balme 9 Feb 1337) ISABELLE de Thoire-Villars, daughter of HUMBERT [IV] Seigneur de Thoire et de Villars & his wife Eléonore de Beaujeu [Forez].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Henri & his second wife had two children: 

i)          JEAN de Bourgogne (-6 Dec 1373).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Seigneur de Montaigu.  Seigneur de Joinville.  “Jehan de Bourgoingne monsigneur signeur de Montaguy et de Joinville...conte de Wadémont” excused “les hommes de la terre de Ruels, appartenant aux religieux de l’hôpital saint Jehan de Jhérusalem” the obligation to guard Joinville castle by charter dated “le lundi devant Pasques flories” [5 Apr] 1367[204]m firstly MARIE de Châteauvillain, daughter of JEAN [III] de Châteauvillain & his wife Marguerite de Noyers (-after 22 Oct 1366, bur Arc-en-Barrois).  Dame d’Arc-en-Barrois et de Neuilly.  The testament of “Maria de Castrovillano domicella domina...de Arcu, uxor...Joannis de Burgundia domicelli...mariti mei præsentis”, dated 22 Oct 1366, chose burial “in ecclesia de Arco”, requested tombs for herself, her parents and “domini Johannis fratris mei defunctorum”, donated property to “ecclesia B. Bercarii de Castrovillano super terram de Brecons” founded by “bonæ memoriæ domina Maria avia mea”, donated a debt owed by “dominus de Noeriis cognatus meus”, bequeathed her “villas, castellanias et fortalitia de Arcu et de Nuilleyo” to “Joannes de Burgundia...maritus meus” for his life (with the consent of “sororis meæ dominæ Joannæ dominæ de Castrovillano et Joannis de Thillo eius filii nepotis mei”), and residuary property to “dominam Iohannam de Castrovillano...sororem meam, Iohannem de Thillo prædictum et Guillelmum de Vienna eius filios nepotes meos[205]m secondly (before 5 Apr 1367) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Joinville Ctss de Vaudémont Dame de Joinville, daughter of HENRI de Joinville Comte de Vaudémont & his wife Marie de Luxembourg ([1356]-28 Apr 1417).  Her first marriage is dated from a charter dated “le lundi devant Pasques flories” [5 Apr] 1367 (O.S./N.S.?) under which “Jehan de Bourgoingne monsigneur signeur de Montaguy et de Joinville...conte de Wadémont” excused “les hommes de la terre de Ruels, appartenant aux religieux de l’hôpital saint Jehan de Jhérusalem” the obligation to guard Joinville castle[206].  She married secondly Pierre Comte de Genève, and thirdly ([4 Jun/19 Jul] 1393) Ferry de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415). 

ii)         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Dame de Montaigu [en Bourgogne], de Montrond et de Fontenoy.  Thiébault seigneur de Neufchasteil et de Fontenoy en Vosge et Marguericte de Bourgoigne dame desdits lieux sa femme” established the respective rights of the seigneur de Fontenoy and the citizens of the town by charter dated 1 Oct 1395[207]m THIEBAUT [VIII] Seigneur de Neuchâtel [en Bourgogne], son of THIEBAUT [VII] Seigneur de Neuchâtel [en Bourgogne] & his first wife Jeanne de Chalon (-1401). 

b)         ISABELLE de Bourgogne (-Chambly Aug 1323, bur Paris église des Grands Augustins).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a document dated May 1321 which records that “Pierre de Chambli seigneur de Neaufle fils de Pierre seigneur de Chambli” had married “Isabeau fille de Jean de Bourgogne fils de Hugues de Vienne et d’Alis de Méranie comtesse palatine de Bourgogne” and that Isabelle “sœur de Henri de Bourgogne fils du susdit Jean” was present when the latter reached agreement with Jeanne Queen of France regarding “le château de Montrond près de Besançon[208].  An arrêt of Parliament dated 1319 relates to litigation by “Ysabellis de Burgundia vidua Petri de Chambliaco iunioris domini de Nealpha filii Petri de Chambliaco militis domini de Chambliaco et de Parcenc, mater Ludovici et Ioanne de Chambliaco” against “Petrum de Chambliaco militem filium domini de Wirmes et Ioannæ matris suæ[209].  An epitaph of the church of the Augustins in Paris records the death in 1323 of “Ysabeau de Bourgongne Dame de Neaufle, femme de Monsieur Pierre de Chambelye le jeune seigneur de Neaufle[210]m PIERRE "le Jeune" de Chambly Seigneur de Neaufle-le-Château, son of PIERRE Le Hideux Seigneur de Chambly & his second wife Isabelle de Rosny (-1319). 

9.         HUGUES de Bourgogne (-after Jun 1312).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter under which “Renaud de Bourgogne” established the succession “du comté de Montbéliard” to “Othenin son fils encore mineur et à ses filles mariées à Orry de Ferrette et à Henri de Montfaucon”, with “Hugues de Bourgogne frère du comte Renaud” administering the county “durant cinq ans la part du jeune Othenin, composée des terres de Belfort, Héricourt et Montbéliard[211].  Seigneur de Maubuisson, d'Aspremont, de Frasans et d'Orchamps.  He was named Lieutenant General of the county of Montbéliard by Philippe IV King of France.  The testament of “Stephanus de Burgundia canonicus Bisuntinus”, dated 11 May 1298, appointed “...fratres meos dominum Joannem et dominum Hugonem de Burgundia et...Petrum de Thorasia filium quondam Hugonis domini de Thorasia” as executors[212].  The testament of “Hugues de Bourgogne”, dated Jun 1312, ordered the return of “les chasteaux d’Estobon et de Reveigne” to “Renaud Comte de Montbeliard son frere” and bequeathed him other properties, and bequeathed property to “Henry de Bourgogne son neveu[213]m firstly (contract 1287) as her second husband, BONNE de Savoie, widow of JEAN Dauphin de Viennois Comte d'Albon, daughter of AMEDEE V Comte de Savoie & his first wife Sibylle de Bâgé ([1275]-[before 1294]).  The marriage contract of "Ameys Cuens de Savoie, Marquis en Lombardie…une de nos filles" and "Hugonin de Bourgogne frere à comte de Bourgogne" is dated 1287[214]The contract dated "a la Festa de' Santi Filippo e Giacomo 1303" between "Ugone di Borgonia" and "Conte Amedeo di Savoia" settled a dispute concerning the marriage contract between the former and the latter's (unnamed) daughter[215]m secondly MARGUERITE de Ferrette, daughter of ULRIC [II] Comte de Ferrette & his wife ---.   The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 

10.      HIPPOLYTE de Bourgogne (-before 1288).  The marriage contract between "Othon IV dit Othelin fils d’Hugues de Bourgogne…une de ses sœurs Polie ou Polite" and "Aymar de Poitiers" is dated 1270 and provides "la seigneurie de Saint-Vallier" as her dowry[216].  Dame de Saint-Vallier.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 1285 which records that "Othe de Bourgogne filz de Hugues" promised "pour dot le chasteau et ville de Sainct Valzier et Osanne" to "Aimar de Poitiers" for his marriage with "Hippolyte sa seur"[217]m (4 Dec 1270) AYMAR [IV] de Poitiers Comte de Valentinois et de Diois, son of AYMAR de Poitiers Comte de Valentinois et de Diois & his first wife Sibylle de Beaujeu (-[10/19] Oct 1329). 

11.      GUYE de Bourgogne (-24 Jun 1316)"Ottone di Borgonia Signore di Salins" reached agreement with "Tomaso di Savoia" concerning the dowry payment of "Guidetta sua Sorella Moglie del sudetto Tommaso" by contract dated "15 di Pentecoste 1274"[218]Her origin is also confirmed by the testament of "Thomas de Sabaudia primogenitus…domini Thomæ de Sabaudia comitis" dated 14 May 1282 which makes bequests to "dominæ Guiæ de Burgundia consorti meæ…", and appoints as tutor for his sons with the assistance of "…dominum Othonem comitem Burgundiæ dictæ dominæ Guyæ germanum…"[219].  A charter dated 24 May 1286 records the results of a commission relating to Piemonte and declarations by "Ludovicus de Sabaudia" and by "Guia de Burgundia relicata…domini Thome de Sabaudia…filiorum nostrorum…Philippi Petri Thome Amedei et Guillelmi"[220]m (May 1274) THOMAS III Conte del Piemonte, son of THOMAS II Conte [Marchese] di Piemonte & his second wife Beatrice Fieschi ([1252]-San Ginesio 16 May 1282)

12.      AGNES de Bourgogne (-after 1266).  A charter dated Apr 1249 records that “Hugues d’Antigney sire de Paigney” had promised to marry “Phelippe mon filz l’ainsnez ou...Guillaume mon autre fils si de Phelippe deffailloit” to “Agnes la fille à...Hugon comte palazin de Bourgoigne” when he attained the age to marry, with “Henri de Paigney on frère...” acting as guarantor[221].  “Hugues cuens de Vianne sires de Paigney” granted revenue from “Saint-Albin et Aumar” at the time of the marriage of “Phillippe nostre fil” and “Agnel fille...à Hugon conte palatin de Borgoigne et Alis...” by charter dated 15 Apr 1259[222]m (Betrothed Apr 1249, [15 Apr 1259]) as his first wife, PHILIPPE de Vienne Seigneur de Pagny, son of HUGUES de Vienne Seigneur de Pagny & his wife Alix --- (-1303). 

13.      [JACQUELINE de Bourgogne .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Nun at Romorantin 1285.] 

 

 

OTHON de Bourgogne, son of HUGUES de Chalon Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Alix Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne [Andechs] (before 1248-Melun 17 or 26 Mar 1303, bur Charlieu).  "Othonins de Borgogne fiz de noble barum Hugum Conte de Palatinz de Borgogne" consented to the sales of rights "en la comté de Borgogne" by "noble dame Biatris Comtesse d’Orlemonde, aynée serour de noble dame Alys contesse de Savoye et de Borgogne, palatinz, ma…mere" to "Hugues dux de Borgogne", noting that "messire Philippe Cuens de Savoie et de Borgogne palatinz, maris et espous de la dite Alys" confirmed his agreement after the death of Otto’s father, by charter dated Dec 1269[223]The testament of "Alix di Savoia e di Borgogna Contessa Palatina" dated Nov 1278, made with the consent of "Filippo di Savoia Conte di Borgogna e Palatino suo Marito", appoints "Ottone di Lei Figlio Signore di Salino, sii Conte di Borgogna" as her heir in the county, makes bequests to "Renaldo alto di Lei Figliuolo" and names "Gioanni altro di Lei figliuolo"[224]He succeeded his mother in 1279 as OTHON IV Comte Palatin de Bourgogne.  “Othes cuens de Bourgoingne, palatins et sires de Salins” names “nostre…oncle…Jehan de Chalon, signour d’Arlay…nostre…mere Aelis, jaidis contesse de Bourgoingne” in his charter dated 27 Apr 1279[225].  "Othes cuens palatins de Bourgoigne" granted privileges to the town of Arbois by charter dated May 1282[226].  Othon transferred his assets to his daughter Jeanne as her dowry by contract at Vincennes 2 Mar 1295.  He settled in Paris.  He led French troops to victory at the battle of Cassel, but died from his wounds soon after. 

m firstly (contract Mar [1258/59], [1263]) PHILIPPA de Bar, daughter of THIBAUT II Comte de Bar & his second wife Jeanne de Toucy (-after Jun 1283).  A charter dated Mar 1258/59 records the marriage between “Hugues cuens palatins de Bourgoigne et Alix sa fame…de Othenin nostre ainnez fil” and “l’ainnée fille de Thiebaut conte de Bart[227].  “Othonino filio eiusdem primogenito” granted “castellum...Saelleres” to “domina Alis Sabaudie Burgundie comitissa palatina” in return for granted him when he married “Philippam filiam...Theobaldi comitis Baronis” by charter dated 6 Apr 1271[228].  “Henris cuens de Bar, Jehans, Thiebaus, Renaus, Erars, damoiselle Alix, damoiselle Marie” notified their consent to “nostre...meire Jehanne de Toucy dame de Pusoye“ arranging affairs, including the escheat of “damoiselle Alix nostre niece fille...Philippe contesse de Borgoingne nostre...seror qui fut”, by charter dated 7 Nov 1291[229]

m secondly (9 Jun 1291) MATHILDE d'Artois, daughter of ROBERT II "le Bon/le Noble" Comte d'Artois & his first wife Amicie de Courtenay Dame de Conches-en-Ouches (1268-Paris 27 Oct 1329, bur Maubuisson, église abbatiale).  The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records that "comes Attrebati Robertus...unicam filiam" married "Otholinus comes Burgundiæ", dating the event to [1284/85] in a later passage[230]She was invested as Ctss d'Artois after the 1302 death of her father, but her succession was disputed by her nephew Robert d'Artois.  King Philippe IV of France found in her favour 9 Oct 1309.  She received Béthune at Fontainebleau Dec 1311.  Her vassals in Artois rebelled against her in 1315.  She was accused of criminal acts but acquitted 9 Oct 1317.  "Mathildis comitissa Actrebatensis et Burgundie, palatina ac domina Salinensis" confirmed the purchase of clothes for the poor of Arbois, by "dominus noster…Philippus…Francie et Navarre rex…ac…filia nostra Johanna…regina" for the soul of "domini nostri bone memorie domini Othonis comitis Burgundie", by charter dated 20 Dec 1320[231].  The testament of "Mathildis comitssa Attrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatina ac domina Salinensis", dated 24 Mar 1328, chooses burial "in ecclesia B. Mariæ Regalis prope Pontifaram" at the foot of "genitoris mei Roberti quondam comitis Atrebatensis" or "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorem apud Parisius" next to "Roberti…filii mei", appoints as her heir in Artois "Johannam…filiam meam…Reginam Francie et Navarræ" and in default "filiam meam Johannam ducissam Burgundiæ eiusdem Reginæ primogenitam", donated property for the soul of "domini et mariti mei Othonis quondam comitis Atrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatini ac domini Salinensis", and makes other bequests[232]

Othon IV & his first wife had one child:

1.         ALIX de Bourgogne (-after 31 Jan 1285).  The marriage contract between “Robert Duc de Bourgogne...Jean fils dudit Duc Robert” and “Othon Comte de Bourgongne Palatin sire de Salins...Alix fille dudit Comte Othon” is dated [3 Mar] 1280 [N.S.][233].  “Henris cuens de Bar, Jehans, Thiebaus, Renaus, Erars, damoiselle Alix, damoiselle Marie” notified their consent to “nostre...meire Jehanne de Toucy dame de Pusoye“ arranging affairs, including the escheat of “damoiselle Alix nostre niece fille...Philippe contesse de Borgoingne nostre...seror qui fut”, by charter dated 7 Nov 1291[234]Betrothed (22 Sep 1279, contract abbaye de Bèze 3 Mar 1280) JEAN de Bourgogne, son of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France (before 22 Sep 1279-[1283]). 

Othon IV & his second wife had three children:

2.         JEANNE de Bourgogne (before 2 Mar 1291-Roye, Somme 21 Jan 1330, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in Jan 1307 "apud Corbolium" of "Philippus regis Franciæ Philippi filius secundus genitus" and "Johannam primogenitam Odonis quondam Burgundiæ comitis ex filia Roberti Attrebati comitis"[235]She succeeded her father in 1303 as JEANNE Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne.  She was accused of adultery in Spring 1314 and imprisoned in the château de Dourdan.  She was declared innocent and taken back by her husband.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Johanna...sponsa Philippi comitis Pictavensis" was accused of adultery at the same time as her sister and sister-in-law in 1314, imprisoned "apud Durdactum castrum", but found not guilty and was reconciled with her husband[236]"Mathildis comitissa Actrebatensis et Burgundie, palatina ac domina Salinensis" confirmed the purchase of clothes for the poor of Arbois, by "dominus noster…Philippus…Francie et Navarre rex…ac…filia nostra Johanna…regina" for the soul of "domini nostri bone memorie domini Othonis comitis Burgundie", by charter dated 20 Dec 1320[237].  The testament of "Mathildis comitssa Attrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatina ac domina Salinensis", dated 24 Mar 1328, chooses burial "in ecclesia B. Mariæ Regalis prope Pontifaram" at the foot of "genitoris mei Roberti quondam comitis Atrebatensis" or "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorem apud Parisius" next to "Roberti…filii mei", appoints as her heir in Artois "Johannam…filiam meam…Reginam Francie et Navarræ" and in default "filiam meam Johannam ducissam Burgundiæ eiusdem Reginæ primogenitam", donated property for the soul of "domini et mariti mei Othonis quondam comitis Atrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatini ac domini Salinensis", and makes other bequests[238]m (contract Vincennes 2 Mar 1295, Corbeil, Marne Jan 1307) PHILIPPE de France, son of PHILIPPE IV King of France & his wife Juana I Queen of Navarre ([1293]-Longchamp, near Paris 3 Jan 1322, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He was recognised Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Seigneur de Salins, by right of his wife, 26 Jun 1310.  Comte de Poitiers Dec 1311.  He was appointed regent on the death of his brother 1316, awaiting the birth of his nephew.  He succeeded his nephew in 1316 as PHILIPPE V King of France and Navarre.  

3.         BLANCHE de Bourgogne (1296-Abbaye de Maubuisson Apr 1326)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1308 of "Karolus regis Franciæ tertius filius" and "Blancham filiam secundam quondam ducis Burgundiæ Othelini"[239]She was accused and convicted of adultery.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Margareta Navarræ regina juvencula et Blancha regis Navarræ Karoli fratris junioris uxor" were accused of adultery respectively with "Philippo et Galtero de Alneto fratribus militibus" in 1314, and in a later passage under 1315 that "Blancha", while in prison, became pregnant by her jailer or according to others by her own husband ("a serviente quodam eius custodiæ deputato dicebatur...a proprio [comite] diceretur")[240]She was imprisoned at Château-Gaillard.  Boudet quotes correspondence between various members of the French royal family and Pope John XXII, dated May to Aug 1318, requesting an urgent annulment of the marriage, and insinuating (although not expressly stating) that the pregnancy was the real reason for the urgency[241]An annulment was finally granted in May 1322 on the grounds of consanguinity.  The Chronique Parisienne records the annulment of the marriage of “Blanche d’Artoiz la premiere fame Charlez le roy de France et de Navarre...enclose au Chasteau de Gaillart en Normandie”, both because of “l’esmouvement de la fornicacion et avoutrie contre elle approuvé de son amy et mal veullant Gaultier d’Annoy chevalier, frere de Philippe d’Annoy, qui pour ce furent escorchez tous vifs” and because of the consanguinity between the couple[242]The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the annulment "XIV Kal Jun" in 1322 by Pope John XXII of the marriage between "Karolus...filius quondam tertiogenitus Philippi regis" and "Blancham comitis Burgundiæ filiam"[243]She became a nun at the Abbey of Maubuisson after her repudiation.  m (before Apr 1308, annulled 19 May 1322) as his first wife, CHARLES de France, son of PHILIPPE IV King of France & his wife Juana I Queen of Navarre (Creil, Oise 18 Jun 1294-Château du Bois de Vincennes 1 Feb 1328, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Comte de La Marche 1314.  He succeeded his brother in 1322 as CHARLES IV King of France and Navarre. 

4.         ROBERT de Bourgogne (1300-[21/30] Sep 1317, bur Paris Franciscan Church).  His parentage is confirmed by the testament of his mother "Mathildis comitssa Attrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatina ac domina Salinensis", dated 24 Mar 1328, which chooses burial "in ecclesia B. Mariæ Regalis prope Pontifaram" at the foot of "genitoris mei Roberti quondam comitis Atrebatensis" or "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorem apud Parisius" next to "Roberti…filii mei"[244].  Comte de Bourgogne 1302.   The Chronique Parisienne records the death “à Paris” of “Robert d’Artoiz filz Othelin jadiz conte de Bourgongne [et] de Maheult contesse d’Artoiz, fille Robert jadiz conte d’Artoiz jadiz à Courtray ochiz” and his burial “à Paris en l’eglise des Freres Mineurs”, dated to end Sep 1317 from the context[245].  [Betrothed (after 8 May 1304) to ELEANOR of England, daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his second wife Marguerite de France ([1302/04]-Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire before 28 Aug 1310).  King Edward I appointed Johannis de Cabilone domini de Arlay et...Johannis de Baar et Ottonis de Grandisono militum” as proxies for the marriage between “Robertum (bonæ memoriæ Ottonis quondam Burgundiæ et Attrabati comitis defuncto et...dominæ Matill. Burgundiæ et Attrabati comitissæ nuper uxoris ipsius comitis filium et hæredem” and “Alianoram filiam nostram” is dated 8 May 1304[246].  It is unclear whether the negotiations proceeded as far as a betrothal.  Edward I King of England confirmed the dowry of nostre...file Alianore” by charter dated 31 Aug 1306[247]King Edward I requested papal dispensation for the marriage between Alianoram filiam nostram” and “filium...quondam comitis Burgundiæ...” dated 4 Oct 1306[248].] 

 

 

 



[1] Bouchard (1987), p. 272. 

[2] Relatio Piis Operibus Ottonis Episcopi Bambergensis 19, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1160. 

[3] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107. 

[4] Cluny, Tome IV, 2817, p. 34. 

[5] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 163. 

[6] Mâcon Saint-Vincent, 471 and 490, pp. 271 and 284. 

[7] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, XVI, p. 256. 

[8] Bouchard (1987), p. 272. 

[9] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1027, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783. 

[10] Flavigny, 15, p. 52. 

[11] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1044, MGH SS V, p. 125. 

[12] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1045, MHG SS V, p. 125. 

[13] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 207. 

[14] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 207. 

[15] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, XIII, XVI, pp. 255-6. 

[16] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 83. 

[17] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107. 

[18] Cluny, Tome III, 2782, p. 807.   

[19] Petit (1885), Vol. I, 17, p. 358. 

[20] Flavigny 15, p. 52. 

[21] For example ES II 59. 

[22] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 207. 

[23] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 207. 

[24] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, XIII, p. 255. 

[25] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, XIII, p. 255. 

[26] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book  VII, p. 83. 

[27] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVI, p. 275. 

[28] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. 2, Book IV, p. 82, and Vol. 4, Book VII, pp. 83-5. 

[29] Flavigny 15, p. 52. 

[30] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 204. 

[31] Bouchard (1987), p. 272. 

[32] Hermanni Monachi de miraculis S. Mariæ Laudunensis, Liber I, II, Patrologia Latina, Tome CLVI, col. 966. 

[33] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, XIII, XVI, pp. 255-6. 

[34] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 211. 

[35] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. 2, Book IV, p. 82, and Vol. 4, Book VII, pp. 83-5. 

[36] Bouchard (1987), p. 273, citing Caspar, E. (ed.) (1967) Das Register Gregors VII, pp. 70-1, no. 1.46 [not yet consulted]. 

[37] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 207. 

[38] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Parlons encore d'Etiennette' (2000), pp. 2-6. 

[39] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Etiennette dite de Vienne’ (1960), no. 128, appendice I, pp. 262-4. 

[40] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 411. 

[41] Settipani (2004), p. 148. 

[42] For example: Rameau ‘Les comtes héréditaires de Macon’ (1901), p. 166. 

[43] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 207. 

[44] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Parlons encore d'Etiennette' (2000), p. 3 (no citation reference to the inscription). 

[45] Cluny, Tome V, 3830, p. 190. 

[46] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1032, MGH SS XXIII, p. 784. 

[47] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Presses Universitaires de Nancy), p. 78, citing Lesort, A. (1909) Chronique et chartes de l'abbaye de Saint-Mihiel, Mettensia 27 (Paris), no. 61, pp. 216-18 [not yet consulted]. 

[48] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), p. 204. 

[49] Cluny, Tome IV, 3614, p. 776. 

[50] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XLIII, p. 583. 

[51] Marcigny-sur-Loire, 30bis, p. 26. 

[52] Marcigny-sur-Loire 102, p. 73. 

[53] Cluny, Tome V, 3862, p. 211. 

[54] Marcigny-sur-Loire 102, p. 73. 

[55] Cluny, Tome V, 3841, p. 200. 

[56] Cluny, Tome V, 3862, p. 211. 

[57] Clerc (1870), Tome 1, p. 320, quoting “Pierre-le-Vénérable”. 

[58] Relatio Piis Operibus Ottonis Episcopi Bambergensis 19, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1160. 

[59] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis 2.29, MGH SS XX, p. 413. 

[60] Mâcon Saint-Vincent 620, p. 357. 

[61] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis 2.29, MGH SS XX, p. 413. 

[62] Anselmi continuatio Sigeberti 1127, MGH SS VI, p. 380. 

[63] Annales Sancti Disibodi, MGH SS XVII, p. 23. 

[64] Veterum Scriptorum, Tome VI, Fundatio monasterii beatæ Mariæ de Altaripa, col. 318. 

[65] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 118. 

[66] ES II 59. 

[67] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 211. 

[68] Bouchard (1987), p. 274. 

[69] William of Tyre, XII.VIII, p. 522. 

[70] Series Episcoporum Viennensium, MGH SS XXIV, p. 815. 

[71] Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, Vol. II, 365, p. 143. 

[72] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XLIII, p. 583. 

[73] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. VI, p. 563. 

[74] William of Tyre VI.XVII, p. 263. 

[75] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IX, Cap. V, p. 593. 

[76] Cluny, Tome V, 3791, p. 137. 

[77] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1125, MGH SS XXIII, p. 826. 

[78] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1125, MGH SS XXIII, p. 826. 

[79] Bouchard (1987), p. 275. 

[80] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 122. 

[81] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré de Saint-Martin-des-Champs, p. 422.       

[82] Macon Saint-Pierre Necrology, p. 4. 

[83] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis 2.29, MGH SS XX, p. 413. 

[84] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 122. 

[85] Plancher (1739), Tome I, Preuves, LXII, p.xlii.   

[86] Continuatio Admuntensis 1156, MGH SS IX, p. 582. 

[87] Sigeberti Auctarium Affligemense, MGH SS VI, 1156, p. 403. 

[88] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 159. 

[89] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1190, MGH SS XXIII, p. 863. 

[90] MGH DD K III, 145, p. 262. 

[91] Ex vita Margaritæ Albonensis comitissæ, RHGF XIV, p. 427. 

[92] De Allobrogibus (1844), VIII, p. 415. 

[93] Chorier Histoire de Dauphiné Tome I, p. 616 (which does not cite the source). 

[94] Chorier Histoire de Dauphiné Tome I, p. 616, quoting necrology of priory of Saint-Robert, auprès de Grenoble (no citation reference). 

[95] Cluny, Tome IV, 3516, p. 632, dated "avant 1078" in this edition, although this would appear incorrect as Duke Eudes only succeeded his brother in 1079. 

[96] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[97] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1032, MGH SS XXIII, p. 784, although this passage is out of date order. 

[98] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143, MGH SS XXIII, p. 837. 

[99] Cluny, Tome IV, 3615, p. 776. 

[100] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 365, p. 143. 

[101] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 194, in the Library of Iberian Resources Online, consulted at <http://libro.uca.edu/alfonso6/alfonso.htm> (7 Dec 2002), and Le Hête (1995), p. 176. 

[102] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 194. 

[103] San Salvador de Oña (1950), Tomo I, 99, p. 127. 

[104] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 251. 

[105] Reilly (1988), Chapter 13, p. 276. 

[106] Cluny, Tome V, 3774, p. 125. 

[107] Reilly (1982), Chapter 1, p. 35. 

[108] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 420, p. 198. 

[109] This date is suggested by Reilly (1988), Chapter 10, p. 192. 

[110] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 365, p. 143. 

[111] Bouchard (1987), p. 275, citing Suger, 27. 

[112] Vienne Saint-André-le-Bas, Chevalier, U. (1869) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-André-le-Bas de Vienne, Collection de cartularies dauphinois Tome I (Vienne) Chartarium Viennensium 72, p. 281. 

[113] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 371. 

[114] Saint-Bertin (Guérard), II.57, p. 266. 

[115] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 163. 

[116] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306. 

[117] Runciman (1952, 1978), Vol. 1, p. 166. 

[118] Nicholas (1992), p. 58. 

[119] Cluny, Tome V, 3899, p. 249. 

[120] Nicholas (1992), p. 62. 

[121] Saint-Bertin (Guérard), II.11, p. 298. 

[122] Mémoires Valentinois et Diois, p. 153, citing Giraud, Essai historique sur Romans. Cartulaire, no. 210 [not yet consulted]. 

[123] Mémoires Valentinois et Diois, p. 157, quoting Regeste de Calixte II [not yet consulted]. 

[124] Chronicon Regum Legionensium, p. 87. 

[125] ES II 57. 

[126] Bouchard (1987), p. 273, citing Szabolcs de Vajay 'Bourgogne, Lorraine et Espagne', pp. 233-4, n. 1 [not yet consulted]. 

[127] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 247. 

[128] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 247 footnote 68. 

[129] Reilly (1988), Chapter 14, p. 296. 

[130] Reilly (1988), Chapter 1, p. 32 footnote 68. 

[131] Cluny, Tome V, 3735, p. 83. 

[132] Continuatio Admuntensis 1156, MGH SS IX, p. 582. 

[133] Sigeberti Auctarium Affligemense, MGH SS VI, 1156, p. 403. 

[134] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 159. 

[135] William of Tyre Continuator,  XXIV.IX, p. 118. 

[136] Annales Stadenses 1185, MGH SS XVI, p. 351.  

[137] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu, XXV, p. 20. 

[138] William of Tyre Continuator XXIV.IX, p. 118. 

[139] Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Vol. III, 672, p. 273. 

[140] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, p. 560. 

[141] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Vauduisant, p. 55.       

[142] A Monacho Novi Monasterii Hoiensis Interpolata, MGH SS XXIII, p. 863. 

[143] Notæ Diessenses 1231, MGH SS XVII, p. 325. 

[144] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330. 

[145] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330. 

[146] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), Cartulaire des comtes de Bourgogne, fo. 92, p. 4. 

[147] Notæ Diessenses 1234, MGH SS XVII, p. 325. 

[148] A Monacho Novi Monasterii Hoiensis Interpolata, MGH SS XXIII, p. 863. 

[149] Notæ Diessenses 1231, MGH SS XVII, p. 325. 

[150] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330. 

[151] Cronica Principum Saxonie, MGH SS XXV, p. 476. 

[152] Notæ Diessenses 1248, MGH SS XVII, p. 325. 

[153] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330. 

[154] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Vol. II, 1738, p. 64. 

[155] Tirol Neustift, CCXLVIII, p. 107. 

[156] Monumenta Benedicto-Burana, Diplomatarium Miscellum, XLI, Monumenta Boica Vol. VII, p. 126. 

[157] Monumenta Boica, Vol. VII, 126, and Monumenta Boica, Vol. II, 454 n 12, cited in Wegener (1965/67), p. 232. 

[158] Annales Mellicenses 1229, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[159] Continuatio Garstensis 1243, MGH SS IX, p. 597. 

[160] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1244, MGH SS IX, p. 727. 

[161] Berger (1897), Tome II, 4302, p. 36. 

[162] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LV, p. 84. 

[163] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LVIII, p. 87. 

[164] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIX, p. 89. 

[165] Cluny, Tome VI, 5156, p. 599. 

[166] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIV, p. 83. 

[167] Guillaume, J. B. (1757) Histoire généalogique des Sires de Salins (Besançon), Tome I, Preuves, p. 119. 

[168] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XLIII, p. 64. 

[169] Hugues de Chalon, 49, p. 40. 

[170] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LV, p. 84. 

[171] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIX, p. 89. 

[172] Cluny, Tome VI, 5156, p. 599. 

[173] State Archives, volume 104, page 27, fascicule 17, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 89. 

[174] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XLI, p. 62. 

[175] Monumenta Zollerana (1856), LI, p. 22. 

[176] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XXXVI, p. 56. 

[177] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XLIII, p. 64. 

[178] Mémoires Franche-Comté VIII (1908), XXVII, p. 31. 

[179] Hugues de Chalon 49, p. 40. 

[180] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XLIII, p. 64. 

[181] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIV, p. 83. 

[182] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LV, p. 84. 

[183] Mémoires Franche-Comté VIII (1908), XXVII, p. 31. 

[184] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XLIII, p. 64. 

[185] Hugues de Chalon 49, p. 40. 

[186] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIV, p. 83. 

[187] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LV, p. 84. 

[188] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIX, p. 89. 

[189] State Archives, volume 104, page 27, fascicule 17, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 89. 

[190] Mémoires Franche-Comté VIII (1908), XLVI, p. 46. 

[191] State Archives, volume 104, page 27, fascicule 17, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 89. 

[192] Chevalier (1767), Tome 1, Pièces justificatives, LXXX, p. 392. 

[193] State Archives, volume 104, page 27, fascicule 17, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 89. 

[194] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 343, p. 143.  

[195] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 343, p. 143.  

[196] State Archives, volume 104, page 27, fascicule 17, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 89. 

[197] Documents Vosges, Tome VIII, p. 21. 

[198] Chevalier (1767), Tome 1, Pièces justificatives, LXXX, p. 392. 

[199] Documents Vosges, Tome VIII, p. 21. 

[200] Martimprey de Romécourt ‘Blâmont’ (1890), p. 129. 

[201] Saint-Genois (1806), Tome II, p. 15. 

[202] The date of his will. 

[203] Chevalier (1767), Tome 1, Pièces justificatives, LXXXVI, p. 399. 

[204] Simonnet (1876), Acte concernant Jean de Bourgogne, p. 304. 

[205] Carnandet (1856), p. 18. 

[206] Simonnet (1876), Acte concernant Jean de Bourgogne, p. 304. 

[207] Documents Vosges, Tome II, p. 241. 

[208] Depoin ‘La maison de Chambly’ (1914), p. 153, quoting analysis by Dom Villevieille, Ms. fr. 31908, fol. 76. 

[209] Duchesne (Bourgogne) (1628), Preuves, p. 114. 

[210] Duchesne (Bourgogne) (1628), Preuves, p. 114. 

[211] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 538, p. 231. 

[212] Chevalier (1767), Tome 1, Pièces justificatives, LXXX, p. 392. 

[213] Chevalier (1767), Tome 1, Pièces justificatives, LXXXVI, p. 399. 

[214] Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 154. 

[215] State Archives, volume 102, page 29, fascicule 2. 

[216] Saint-Vallier, XIII, p. 20. 

[217] Duchesne (Valentinois), Preuves, p. 22. 

[218] State Archives, volume 102, page 13, fascicule 1. 

[219] State Archives, volume 104, pages 31-32, fascicules 19.1 and 2, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 100. 

[220] Datta (1832), Vol. 2, Documenti, VIII, p. 20. 

[221] Mémoires Franche-Comté VIII (1908), XXV, p. 29. 

[222] Mémoires Franche-Comté VIII (1908), CXV, p. 108. 

[223] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LIX, p. 89. 

[224] State Archives, volume 104, page 27, fascicule 17. 

[225] Hugues de Chalon 85, p. 65. 

[226] Arbois, 2, p. 17. 

[227] Hugues de Chalon 578, p. 442. 

[228] Mémoires Franche-Comté VIII (1908), CCXLI, p. 208. 

[229] Natalis de Wailly (1878), Tome XXVIII, 2e partie, 308, p. 215. 

[230] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, pp. 500 and 528. 

[231] Arbois, 3, p. 21. 

[232] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars II, CXVIII, p. 267. 

[233] Duchesne (Bourgogne) (1628), Preuves, p. 120. 

[234] Natalis de Wailly ‘Actes en langue vulgaire Lorraine’ (1878), Tome XXVIII, 2e partie, 308, p. 215. 

[235] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 594. 

[236] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 610. 

[237] Arbois, 3, p. 21. 

[238] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars II, CXVIII, p. 267. 

[239] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597. 

[240] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 609 and 613. 

[241] Boudet ‘Thomas de la Marche’ (1903), pp. 284-94. 

[242] Chronique Parisienne, 88, p. 71. 

[243] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 732. 

[244] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars II, CXVIII, p. 267. 

[245] Chronique Parisienne, 13, p. 30. 

[246] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 52. 

[247] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 61. 

[248] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 63.