BURGUNDY duchy, dukes

  v2.2 Updated 02 March 2013

 

RETURN TO INDEX

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 2

Chapter 1.            9th CENTURY DUKES of BURGUNDY. 4

Chapter 2.            DUKES of BURGUNDY [918]-956. 5

A.       DUKES of BURGUNDY 918-952. 5

RICHARD 890-921, RAOUL 921-936. 5

B.       DUKE of BURGUNDY 936-956. 5

Chapter 3.            DUKES of BURGUNDY (CAPET) [956]-1361. 5

A.       DUKES of BURGUNDY [956]-1031. 5

EUDES [956]-965, HENRI 965-1002, ROBERT 1002-1016, HENRI 1016-1031. 5

B.       DUKES of BURGUNDY 1032-1361. 5

ROBERT I 1032-1076, HUGUES I 1076-1093. 5

EUDES I 1093-1103. 5

HUGUES II 1103-1143. 5

EUDES II 1143-1162. 5

HUGUES III 1162-1192. 5

EUDES III 1192-1218. 5

HUGUES IV 1218-1272. 5

ROBERT II 1272-1306, HUGUES V 1306-1315. 5

EUDES IV 1315-1350, PHILIPPE I 1350-1361. 5

Chapter 4.            DUKES of BURGUNDY (VALOIS) 5

PHILIPPE II 1363-1404. 5

JEAN 1404-1419. 5

PHILIPPE III 1419-1467, CHARLES 1467-1477. 5

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The duchy of Burgundy covered the territory between the Saône and Loire rivers, south of Troyes and north of Lyon.  It included the episcopal dioceses of Autun, Chalon-sur-Saône, Langres, Mâcon (all within the archdiocese of Lyon), Auxerre and Nevers (within the archdiocese of Sens).  The dioceses of Sens and Troyes, previously considered part of Burgundy, were by the 12th century generally accepted as part of the county of Champagne[1].  All these territories lay within the kingdom of the West Franks, as established under the 843 Treaty of Verdun, and were separate from the adjacent county of Burgundy which was part of the kingdom of Lotharingia and subsequently subject to imperial jurisdiction.  The capital of the duchy of Burgundy was Dijon, the dukes also holding the title of counts of Autun. 

 

Apart from an isolated 9th century reference to a duke of Burgundy which has not been corroborated (see Chapter 1), the first recorded ruler of the territory which later evolved into the duchy of Burgundy was Richard, brother of King Boson [of Provence] (see Chapter 2).  He established his capital at Autun and was installed as Comte d'Auxerre in 886.  Over the following years, the other Burgundian counties submitted to him, with the exception of Mâcon.  Although his authority over the area appears to have been unchallenged, we should probably not consider him as the founder of a unified "Duchy of Burgundy", but the suzerain of the various counties in question who happened to bear the title "duke".  Richard is referred to variously with the titles "comes", "marchio", and "dux" in primary sources.  The strategic importance of the area is confirmed by Richard's son Raoul being chosen to succeed as king of France in 923. 

 

After the death of Duke Giselbert in 956, the duchy of Burgundy passed to the Capet family, with whom it remained until the extinction in the male line of the senior ducal line in 1361.  Under Duke Robert I, installed as duke by his brother Henri I King of France in 1032, the duchy evolved into a powerful independent state separate from the kingdom of France.  It was not until the reigns of Louis VII and Philippe II Kings of France that the dukes started to swear allegiance on a regular basis to the French kings as their feudal lords. 

 

The early dukes of Burgundy became closely associated with the Benedictine abbey of Cluny, founded in 910 near Mâcon, as can be seen from the numerous donations involving members of the family over the years.  In the mid-11th century, the monks of Cluny expanded their activities to include the Iberian peninsula: Alfonso VI King of Castile and Leon granted the Cluniac order its first monastic house in Castile at San Isidro de Dueñas 29 May 1073, and doubled the annual census payment to Cluny in 1077[2].  The Burgundian dukes followed in the wake of the monks to fight in the Spanish crusades against the Moors.  They arranged marriages with the Castilian royal family which had a long-term impact on the political development of the Iberian peninsula.  Constance, daughter of Duke Robert I, married King Alfonso VI and gave birth to Urraca Queen of Castile, who later married Raymond de Bourgogne-Comté and was ancestor of all later Castilian monarchs.  Henri, youngest brother of Dukes Hugues I and Eudes I, married the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI and was installed as count of Portugal by his father-in-law, his descendants creating the kingdom of Portugal which they ruled until the early 20th century.  One of the younger sons of Duke Robert I, after fighting in the Iberian wars, sought his fortune in Sicily.  He was appointed regent for the infant count Roger, and married one of the count's sisters, but any dreams of Burgundian domination of Sicily ended abruptly when he was poisoned by his mother-in-law. 

 

After this promising entry into the arena of European politics in the late 11th century, the duchy of Burgundy appears to have stagnated during the 12th and 13th centuries.  Presumably this is attributable partly to the personalities of its rulers, although the sources so far consulted give little insight into the personal qualities of the dukes.  Territorial constraints must also have played a part.  Burgundian expansion to the east was blocked by the boundary with the Holy Roman Empire, to the north-west by the Capetian French monarchs, and to the south-west by the duchy of Aquitaine, which passed into English hands in the mid-12th century.  It must also be said that the Burgundian dukes rarely fully exploited the possibilities offered by dynastic marriages, in contrast to the dukes of Aquitaine who propelled themselves to centre stage after the 1043 marriage of the sister of Duke Guillaume VII to the future Emperor Heinrich III.  Most 12th and 13th century Burgundian marriage alliances were with the first tier of local Burgundian nobility, or with the families of adjacent counties or duchies such as Champagne and Lorraine.  The striking exception was the marriage of the sister of Duke Eudes II to Roger II King of Sicily, but this ended prematurely by the bride's death in childbirth.  One of the reasons for the limited horizon of the dukes' marriage policy may have been the necessity of maintaining internal control over the powerful local Burgundian nobility.  A glance at the companion document BURGUNDY DUCHY, NOBILITY shows the number of local noble families which achieved prominence, including the counts of Chalon, Mâcon, Nevers and Tonnerre, and the seigneurs de Beaujeu, Semur, Salins, Toucy and Vergy.  An example of one of these apparently obscure marriages is that of Duke Eudes III in 1199 to the heiress of Vergy, presumably dictated by an urgent security need to acquire control over the fortress of Vergy, unsuccessfully besieged in the 1180s by the duke's father, to the south of Dijon.  The Capetian kings of France also acquired territorial interests within the duchy of Burgundy when Alix Ctss de Mâcon, daughter of Géraud [II] Comte de Mâcon, sold the counties of Mâcon and Vienne to the French king after her husband died in 1239, diluting the power of the Burgundian dukes. 

 

On the death of Duke Philippe I in 1361, the duchy of Burgundy was inherited by Jean II King of France who was the nearest male heir.  In 1363, King Jean installed his son as Philippe II Duke of Burgundy, the first duke of the Valois family.  His reign witnessed a remarkable turnaround in the fortunes of the territory, accompanied by an expansion of the duke's political influence northwards which was a consequence of his marriage to the heiress of Flanders.  Reaping the benefits of a century of dynastic marriages, by the time he died Duke Philippe was through his wife ruler of Flanders, Artois, Nevers, and the county of Burgundy, and a few weeks after his death his widow also inherited the duchies of Brabant and Limburg.  The counties of Hainaut, Holland, Frisia and Zeeland were added in 1433, and the duchy of Gelre in 1472.  By another dynastic twist, all the Burgundian territories in the Low Countries passed to the Habsburg family as a result of the marriage of Marie, daughter and heiress of the last Valois duke of Burgundy, to Archduke Maximilian in 1477.  Burgundy itself was incorporated into the French crown. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    9th CENTURY DUKES of BURGUNDY

 

 

A single reference to a duke of Burgundy has been identified in the late 9th century.  However, it appears anachronistic and should be treated with caution. 

 

 

1.         [HUGUES .  m ---.  The name of Hugues´s wife is not known.  Hugues & his wife had two children:] 

a)         [HUGUES .  The Gestis Consulum Andegavensium names "Hugo Dux Burgundiæ, filius alterius Hugonis" was "ex parte matris suæ [Fulco] consanguineus"[3].  [Duke of Burgundy.]  This is the only reference so far identified to a duke of Burgundy in the late 9th century and should presumably therefore be treated with caution.] 

b)         [other child: see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY.] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    DUKES of BURGUNDY [918]-956

 

 

 

A.      DUKES of BURGUNDY 918-952

 

 

RICHARD 890-921, RAOUL 921-936

 

RICHARD, son of comte BUVINUS [Bouvin] & his wife --- d'Arles (-[31 Aug or 1 or 29 Sep] 921, bur Abbaye de Sainte-Colombe de Sens, Yonne).  The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[4].  Gingins-la-Sarra suggests that Richard was the uterine brother of King Boson, their mother having married secondly Theoderic [VI] “le Trésorier” Comte d´Autun (see the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY)[5].  He refers to the testament dated to [Jan 876] of Ekkehard Comte d´Autun, possibly the brother of Theoderic [VI], which names "…Theoderico et Richardo filio eius…" among the beneficiaries[6].  He identifies “Richardo” with the future duke of Burgundy, although there seems to be no basis for assuming that this co-identity is correct other than the name.  The name Richard is well-established in the Bosonid family, which does not appear to be the case in the Theoderic/Nibelung family to which Theoderic [VI] belonged, where it was probably recently introduced through Theoderic´s wife (Settipani suggests that she was the sister of King Boson´s father[7]).  In addition, Richard Duke of Burgundy named one of his sons Boson, although this is not conclusive for establishing his paternity as the name also appears in Duke Richard´s maternal line.  On the other hand, none of the typical names of the Theoderic/Nibelung family appear among the descendants of Duke Richard.  In any case, the chronology does not appear favourable.  Richard is named as count in 876 (see below).  If he had been King Boson´s uterine brother, he could not have been more than ten years old at the time, which is incompatible with his bearing the comital title.  Gingins-la-Sarra´s hypothesis cannot be dismissed entirely.  However, it is a convoluted interpretation of the otherwise simple statement in the Annales Bertiniani that Richard was King Boson´s brother.  Unless further information comes to light in other sources, it is suggested that the simple explanation is the best.  An agreement dated Feb 876 of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks names "Bosonis…ducis et sacri palatii archiministri atque imperiali missi, Richardi comitis…" as present in Italy with the king, although it fails to specify the family relationship between them[8].  "Richardus comes" is named as present in a charter dated 4 Sep 876 under which Emperor Charles II "le Chauve" granted property "villam…Piredus in pago Senonico"[9].  He presumably assumed the role of his brother Boson as missus in Italy in early 877, when the latter was recalled by Emperor Charles II.  "Richardi comitis, Teutbaldi comitis, Bernardi comitis" subscribed the charter dated 25 Jul 879 under which "Boso…et coniunx mea Hirmingardi proles imperiales" donated property "in pago Laticense…in villa Lantinus" to the abbey of Montiérender[10]Comte d'Autun.  At first sight, this might appear to provide the missing connection with Theoderic [VI], who was also Comte d´Autun.  However, it is recorded that King Boson disputed Theoderic´s right to the county, in which case it is unlikely that he would have awarded it to Theoderic´s son.  Richard established himself in the future duchy of Burgundy, north of his brother's realm, with his capital at Autun.  “Carlomannus…Rex” restored property “villam Taniacum” to the church of Autun, at the request of “Richardi Comiti Augustodensis”, by charter dated 1 Dec 880, the text ending with “Theodoricus Comes ambasciavit[11].  He was invested as lay abbot of Saint-Symphorien by Carloman King of the East Franks in 880.  He led the Carolingian army which besieged his brother King Boson at Vienne in 882.  The counties in Burgundy, except Mâcon, submitted to him.  He succeeded his wife's uncle Hugues l'Abbé as Comte d'Auxerre in 886.  He was later known as RICHARD "le Justicier" Duke of Burgundy, although it is unlikely that he was considered at the time as founder of a unified duchy of Burgundy as such, rather as the suzerain of various counties who held the title "duke".  "Richardo marchione…eius filiis Rodulpho, Hugone atque Bosone…comitibus" were present at the restitution of property at "Tiliniaco et Canavis" by charter dated 5 Sep 901[12].  Guillaume de Jumièges records that Rollo besieged “Carnotenam urbem” [Chartres] but was forced to withdraw by "Richardus Burgundionum dux...cum...Antelmus episcopus"[13].  A charter dated 5 Sep 918 records the restitution of “res Sancti Nazarii sitas in villa...Canavas ad Tiliniacum” to the church of Autun, in the presence of “Domno Richardo...Marchione...et...illius filiis Rodulfo atque Bozone[14].  The death of "Richardus marchio de Burgundia" is recorded by Flodoard in 921[15].  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death "II Kal Sep 921" of "Ricardus comes"[16].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death "Kal Sep" of "Richardus dux Burgundiæ", and his burial "in basilica sanctæ Columbæ"[17].  The sacrementaire of Sens cathedral records the death "III Kal Oct" of "Ricardi comitis"[18].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 1 Sep of "Richardus comes"[19]

m ([887/88]) ADELAIS, daughter of CONRAD Marquis of Transjurania [Welf] & his wife Waldrada --- (-after 14 Jul 929).  "Adeleth…comitissa" donated property "villam Poligniacum in comitatu Warasco" to Autun naming "filii mei Hugonis comitis" by charter dated 24 Apr 922, subscribed by "Hugo comes, Rodulphus comes, Boso comes" and witnessed by "Wallonis comitis…"[20].  Her origin is deduced by her being named as sister of "Rodulfi regis" (Rudolf I King of Burgundy) in the latter's 10 Jun 888 charter[21], as well as in her own 14 Jan 929 grant to Cluny, the 929 charter also naming "Richardi principis domni mei"[22].  After her husband died, she retired to a monastery.  She transferred the monastery of Roman-Moutier to the monastery of Cluny by charter dated 14 Jul 929[23]

[Mistress (1): ---.  As mentioned below, it is likely that Duke Richard's son Gebuin was illegitimate.  If this is correct, the name of his mistress is not known.] 

Duke Richard & his wife had [four] children:

1.         RODOLPHE [Raoul] (-Auxerre, Yonne 15/16 Jan 936, bur église de l'abbaye de Sainte-Colombe de Sens).  Flodoard names "Rodulfo filio Richardi"[24].  A charter dated 5 Sep 918 records the restitution of “res Sancti Nazarii sitas in villa...Canavas ad Tiliniacum” to the church of Autun, in the presence of “Domno Richardo...Marchione...et...illius filiis Rodulfo atque Bozone[25].  He is named "Rodulfo rex filio meo" in the grant of "Adeleydis comitissa soror Rodulfi" to Cluny dated 14 Jun 929[26].  Rodulfus Glaber names "Rodulfus, Richardi ducis Burgundiæ filius"[27].  He succeeded his father in 921 as RAOUL Duke of Burgundy.  He was elected as RAOUL King of France in 923 to succeed his father-in-law, consecrated by Gauthier Archbishop of Sens at the abbey of Saint-Médard de Soissons.  Flodoard records in 923 that, after King Charles III had retreated "trans Mosam", “Rodulfum...regem...[filius Richardi]” was elected and consecrated “apud urbem Suessonicam[28].  Flodoard records in 936 (as the second report in that year) the death of “rex Rodulfus” and his burial “Senonis apud sanctam Columbam[29].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Rodulfo rege", specifying his burial "in basilica aanctæ Columbæ"[30].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 14 Jan of "Rodulphus rex"[31]m ([911/19]) EMMA, daughter of ROBERT "le Fort" Marquis en Neustrie, Comte de Paris [later Robert I King of France] & his [first/second wife ---] (-2 Nov 934).  Flodoard names "Emma regis Rotberti filia" when recording that she obliged Seulf Archbishop of Reims to consecrate her queen at Reims in 923 in the absence of her husband fighting[32].  Rodulfus Glaber names "Emmam…sororem…magni Hugonis" as wife of "Rodulfus, Richardi ducis Burgundiæ filius", suggesting that she was instrumental in persuading her brother to support her husband's accession as king[33].  "Emme nostri imperii consortis" and "Emma coniux mea" is named in the charters of "Rodolfus Francorum rex" dated 21 Jun 931 and 1 Jul 931[34].  Flodoard records the death of "Emma regina" at the end of his passage dated 934[35].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "IV Non Nov" of "domna Emma regina"[36].  King Raoul & his wife had two children:

a)         LOUIS (-before 14 Jun 929).  The Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon records that "Rodulfo rege…filius eius Ludovicus…ex Emma regina" died before his father, the latter dying "absque liberis"[37].  He must have died before his paternal grandmother's 929 grant to Cluny as he is not named among the witnesses, unlike his presumed sister. 

b)         [JUDITH (-([14 Jun 929/935]).  "Juditte filie Rodulfe regis" witnessed the grant of "Adeleydis comitissa soror Rodulfi" to Cluny dated 14 Jun 929[38].  Settipani assumes that this indicates that she was the daughter of Raoul King of France, but this is not beyond doubt.  The charter in fact refers to three individuals named "Rodulfi regis", the donor's brother Rudolf I King of Burgundy, her nephew Rudolf II King of Burgundy, and her son.  The last named is referred to in the witness list, in a later position than the entry naming Judith, as "augusti Rodulfi regis", which may suggest that he was a different "Rodulfi regis" from the one who was Judith's father.  If Judith had been the daughter of Rudolf I King of Burgundy, it is most likely that she would have been named "soror Rodulfe regis" in the subscription, referring to her living brother.  The most likely possibility is that she was the daughter of Rudolf II King of Burgundy, presumably his oldest child and the only one who at the date of the charter was considered old enough to have witnessed the document.  If it is correct that Judith was the daughter of Raoul King of France, she must have predeceased her father if the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon is right when it says that he died "absque liberis"[39].] 

2.         [ERMENGARDE .  Ermengarde, wife of Giselbert, has been accepted as the daughter of Duke Richard since Du Chesne in 1625[40].  More recently this affiliation has been challenged, in particular because she is not mentioned in her supposed mother's will[41].  In addition, if it is correct that Giselbert's mother was the daughter of King Boson (see the document BURGUNDIAN NOBILITY), she would have been her husband's first cousin, which seems unlikely to have been accepted by the church.  "Ermengars" sold land in Colonicas (pago Matisconense), with her husband "Gillevertus", by charter dated May 926[42].  "Gislebertus…comes Heduensis" granted property to "suo fidele Guitbaldus…nec non eius coniuge Rutrudis" by charter dated 11 Dec 934, signed by "Gisleberti comitis, Ermengardi, Adaledis filiam eorum…"[43]m (before May 926) GISELBERT, son of MANASSES Comte de Vergy & his wife --- (-956).  He became GISELBERT Duke of Burgundy, after Raoul and Hugues "le Noir" ceded him their rights to Burgundy in [936].  After his death, Lothaire King of France took direct control of his part of Burgundy[44].] 

3.         HUGUES "le Noir" (-17 Dec 952, bur Besançon).  Flodoard names "Hugo filius Richardi"[45].  Comte in the area outre-Saône, the future Franche-Comté, before 914.  "Hugo inclitus comes et marchio, nosterque fidelis et propinquus" is named in the charter of Emperor Louis III [de Provence] (his first cousin) dated 920[46].  "Ugonem comte palatio filius Ricardi" is named in a charter dated 18 Jan 926 in which Bertagia challenges an inheritance[47].  He is named "Huguone aliis quoque filiis meis" in the grant by "Adeleydis comitissa soror Rodulfi" to Cluny dated 14 Jun 929, listed before Boson[48].  Comte de Mâcon from 931.  "Hugonis frater meus" is named by "Rodulfus Francorum rex" in the latter's 1 Jul 931 charter[49].  "Hugo...comes et marchio" donated property "in comitatu Belnensi...in uilla...Nolliacus et...in uilla Crisentiaco", for the souls of “genitoris nostri Richardi et Adheleidis”, in the presence of “Gilbertus comes, Albericus comes et filius eius Leotaldus et Adso noster fidelis”, by charter dated 1 Sep 936, subscribed by “...Roberti uicecomitis...[50]Comte et Marquis de Provence 936.  After the death of his brother King Raoul in 936, he and Hugues "le Blanc/le Grand" Capet, and his possible brother-in-law Giselbert, divided Burgundy between them.  He was seen by Hugues "le Grand" Capet as a potentially too powerful candidate for the French throne after his brother's death in 936, prompting Hugues to recall the future King Louis IV "d'Outremer" from England, whom Hugues "le Noir" refused to recognise as king until 938[51].  He is named "nostri principes…alter Hugo dux scilicet Burgundionum" in a charter of "Ludovicus rex" dated 1 Jul 946[52].  The Chronicon Floriacensi records the death in 952 of "Ugo Dux Burgundionum et Alanus Brittonum"[53]

4.         BOSON (-Sep 935, bur Reims, église de l'abbaye de Saint-Rémi).  Flodoard names "Boso filius Richardi"[54].  A charter dated 5 Sep 918 records the restitution of “res Sancti Nazarii sitas in villa...Canavas ad Tiliniacum” to the church of Autun, in the presence of “Domno Richardo...Marchione...et...illius filiis Rodulfo atque Bozone[55].  He is named "Bosone aliis quoque filiis meis" in the grant of "Adeleydis comitissa soror Rodulfi" to Cluny dated 14 Jun 929, listed after Hugues[56].  Comte in Upper Burgundy, lay abbot of Moyenmoutiers.  He was killed at the siege of Saint-Quentin, Aisne against Hugues "le Grand" Capet[57]m ([928], separated) as her first husband, BERTA d'Arles, daughter of BOSO Comte d'Arles, later Marchese of Tuscany, & his wife Willa --- (-after 18 Aug 965).  "Bertam, Willam, Richildam et Gislam" are named (in order) as the four daughters of Boso and Willa by Liutprand[58], who in a later passage names Berta as "Bosonis Arelatensis comitis viduæ" and mentions her marriage soon after the death of her first husband to Raymond, by virtue of which she was deemed guilty of incest[59].  She married secondly ([936]) Raymond Comte de Rouergue Marquis de Septimanie, who became Duke of Aquitaine in 936. 

Duke Richard had one child [probably illegitimate] by [Mistress (1)]: 

5.          GEBUIN .  "Giboinus germanus suus", apparently referring to Hugues "le Noir", is named in a charter dated 18 Jan 926[60].  It is likely that he was illegitimate as he is mentioned in none of the sources which list the other brothers of Hugues.  same person as …?  GEBUIN .  There is no direct proof of co-identity of the two persons named Gebuin, but the chronology is favourable and the unusual name indicates that it is probably correct. 

-        COMTES de DIJON, COMTES d'ATUYER

 

 

 

B.      DUKE of BURGUNDY 936-956

 

 

GISELBERT, son of MANASSES Comte [de Vergy] & his wife Ermengarde --- (-Paris after Easter 956).  The parentage of Giselbert is confirmed by a combination of documents:  "Hirmingardis comitissa…Walonis filii eius, Gilleberti filii eius alterius" subscribed the testament of "Heriveus…Æduorum episcopus" dated 1 Nov 919 which names "genitricis nostræ domnæ Hirmingardis venerabilis comitissæ et fratrum nostrorum…domnus Walo pius Præsul et noster avunculus"[61]; the Vita Sanctii Viventii Presbyteri names "Manasses…filius Gislebertus eiusdem Burgundiæ Dux"[62]; "Warulfus…virum nobilem…filio equivoco eius Warulfo" petitioned "Ermengardis comitisse…seu filii eius Gisleberti comitis" for some donated property of Saint-Marcel-lès-Chalon by charter dated Jun 924[63].  Flodoard records that in 924 "Raginardus" captured "castellum…Mons sancti Iohannis" supported by "nepotum suorum, Walonis et Gisleberti", but that "Rodulfi rex" recaptured the castle later in the same year[64].  "Gisleberto comiti" is named in a charter of "Vuarulfo" dated 5 Jun 926[65].  Comte d´Autun: "Gislebertus…comes Heduensis" granted property to "suo fidele Guitbaldus…nec non eius coniuge Rutrudis" by charter dated 11 Dec 934, signed by "Gisleberti comitis, Ermengardi, Adaledis filiam eorum…"[66].  "Hugo...comes et marchio" donated property "in comitatu Belnensi...in uilla...Nolliacus et...in uilla Crisentiaco", for the souls of “genitoris nostri Richardi et Adheleidis”, in the presence of “Gilbertus comes, Albericus comes et filius eius Leotaldus et Adso noster fidelis”, by charter dated 1 Sep 936, subscribed by “...Roberti uicecomitis...[67].  He became GISELBERT Duke of Burgundy, after his possible brothers-in-law Raoul and Hugues "le Noir" ceded him their rights to Burgundy in [936].  The Annales Nivernenses record the death "apud Parisius post pascha 956" of "Gislebertus comes"[68].  The Chronico Senonensi Sanctæ Columbæ records that "Gisleberto Principe Burgundionum" died "feria tertia post Pascha"[69].  After Giselbert died, Lothaire King of the West Franks asserted control over the duchy of Burgundy[70]

m (before May 926) ERMENGARDE, daughter of ---.  "Ermengars" sold land in Colonicas (pago Matisconense), with her husband "Gillevertus", by charter dated May 926[71].  According to Du Chesne in 1625[72], she was Ermengarde, daughter of Richard "le Justicier" Duke of Burgundy.  More recently this affiliation has been challenged, in particular because she is not mentioned in her supposed mother's will[73].  In addition, if it is correct that Giselbert's mother was the daughter of King Boso (see the document BURGUNDIAN NOBILITY), she would have been her husband's first cousin, which seems unlikely to have been accepted by the church.  "Gislebertus…comes Heduensis" granted property to "suo fidele Guitbaldus…nec non eius coniuge Rutrudis" by charter dated 11 Dec 934, signed by "Gisleberti comitis, Ermengardi, Adaledis filiam eorum…"[74]

Duke Giselbert & his wife had [three] children:

1.         ADELAIS [Wera] ([930/35]-).  "Gislebertus…comes Heduensis" granted property to "suo fidele Guitbaldus…nec non eius coniuge Rutrudis" by charter dated 11 Dec 934, signed by "Gisleberti comitis, Ermengardi, Adaledis filiam eorum…"[75].  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 956 of "Gislebertus comes Burgundionum", names "filia Leudegarde", "aliam…filiam…Werram", and the latter's marriage to "Robertus comes Trecassinorum"[76].  "Trecassine urbis comitem Robertum" donated land to "Gratianum abbatem monasterii Sancti Petri Dervensis" by charter dated 6 Aug 959, signed by "Adelais comitisse, Erberti filii eorum, Walterii vicecomitis"[77].  It is unclear why these two sources refer to the wife of Comte Robert by different names, as "Adelais comitisse" who signed the 959 charter must have been the same person as the wife of Robert named in 956 because the former document also refers to "Erberti filii eorum".  It is possible that the reference to "Werram" is a transcription error as no other reference to this name has so far been found in other contemporary French sources.  Her birth date range is estimated from her own daughter's estimated birth date of [950].  m (before 950) ROBERT Comte de Meaux, son of HERIBERT II Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (-after 19 Jun 966).  He became Comte de Troyes in 956 on the death of his father-in-law, by right of his wife. 

2.         LIETGARDE (-after 958).  A manuscript, whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, refers to the wife of Duke Otto as daughter of Giselbert without giving her name[78].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also refers to the wife of "Otto [filius Hugo rex]…dux Burgundie" as "filiam Gisleberti" without naming her[79].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis refers to "filiam Gisleberti ducis Burgundiæ" as the wife of "Ottoni, filio Hugonis Magni", when recording his succession to his father-in-law's dukedom[80].  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 956 of "Gislebertus comes Burgundionum", names "filia Leudegarde", "aliam…filiam…Werram", and the latter's marriage to "Robertus comes Trecassinorum"[81].  This document appears to indicate that Lietgarde was the older daughter.  However, if that is correct it is unclear why Adelais was the only daughter who subscribed the charter dated 11 Dec 934 (see above).  It is assumed that Lietgarde was the name of the wife of Duke Eudes, although this is not without doubt in view of the uncertainty relating to the name of the other daughter being "Werram" (see above).  The Annales Nivernenses record that in 958 "Rodulfus Divioni comes" captured the château of Beaune from "seniori sui Optonis" and kidnapped his wife "filiam Gisleberti", but that the castle was recaptured by Otton "Kal Maias"[82].  Bouchard states that Comte Rodolphe married Lietgardis, although the basis for this is not known[83]m ([Easter] 955) OTTON [Eudes], son of HUGUES "le Grand" Capet Duc des Francs & his third wife Hedwig of Saxony ([945]-22/23 Feb 965, bur Saint-Germain d’Auxerre).  Comte d’Auxerre.  On the death of his father-in-law in 956, Lothaire King of France installed Eudes in Burgundy at Beaune.  He was installed as EUDES Duke of Burgundy in 960[84]

3.         [ADELAIS (-after 18 Oct 984).  It has been suggested that Adelais Ctss de Chalon was the sister of "Wera" Ctss de Meaux[85] but this is far from certain.  Another theory is proposed in a 17th century source which refers to "Wera" as "Adelaide-Wera" and at the same time suggests that Adelais Ctss de Chalon was her daughter[86].  However, this would mean that both wives of Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou were sisters which, if this had been the case, would probably have been mentioned in contemporary sources.  Another suggestion is that Adelais Ctss de Chalon was the same person as Wera-Adelais Ctss de Meaux.  However, this is even more unlikely chronologically considering the estimated birth date of Wera-Adelais and the fact that Adelais de Chalon gave birth to at least one child by her second husband, Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou, after her marriage in 979.  It would also mean that Comte Geoffroy married, as his second wife, his first wife's mother, which is unlikely to have been accepted by the church.  m firstly [as his second wife,] LAMBERT Comte de Chalon, son of ROBERT Vicomte de Dijon & his wife Ingeltrude (-22 Feb 979).  m secondly (2 or 9 Mar 979) as his second wife, GEOFFROY I “Grisegonelle” Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES II Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge [de Maine] (-21 Jul 987).] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    DUKES of BURGUNDY (CAPET) [956]-1361

 

 

 

A.      DUKES of BURGUNDY [956]-1031

 

 

Hugues "le Grand", father of the future Hugues Capet King of France, succeeded Duke Giselbert (see Chapter 2) as Duke of Burgundy in 956.  His sons succeeded as dukes of Burgundy in turn, until Robert, grandson of King Hugues, was created duke by his brother Henri I King of France in 1032.  The dukes of Burgundy who were also kings of France are shown here in outline form only to demonstrate how the title descended through the family.  For more details, follow the hyperlinks to the document FRANCE CAPETIAN KINGS. 

 

 

EUDES [956]-965, HENRI 965-1002, ROBERT 1002-1016, HENRI 1016-1031

 

HUGUES “le Grand”, son of ROBERT I King of France & his second wife Béatrix de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([898]-Dourdan, Essonne Jun 956).  He was granted lordship over Burgundy and Aquitaine.  He was only able to subjugate the former, and succeeded Duke Giselbert as Duke of Burgundy in Apr 956. 

1.         HUGUES ([940]-Les Juifs, near Prasville, Eure-et-Loire 24 Oct 996, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc des Francs 960.  He was elected HUGUES King of France by an assembly of nobles at Senlis 29 May 987. 

a)         ROBERT (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur St Denis).  He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France.  He claimed the duchy of Burgundy on the death of his paternal uncle Duke Henri in 1002, but took 12 years to complete its conquest in the face of opposition from Otto-Guillaume Comte de Bourgogne[87]

i)          HENRI ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  His father installed him as Duke of Burgundy 25 Jan 1016 after completing his conquest of the duchy[88].  He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France

-         KINGS of FRANCE.

ii)         ROBERT ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l’Abbaye, Côte d’Or).  His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030, he was created ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother Henri I King of France. 

-         see below, Part B

2.         OTTON [Eudes] ([945]-22/23 Feb 965, bur Saint-Germain d’Auxerre).  The Historia Francorum Senonensis names (in order) "Hugo, Otto et Heinricus" as the three sons of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum…ex filia Odonis regis"[89].  Comte d’Auxerre.  On the death of his father-in-law in 956, Lothaire King of France installed Eudes as Duke of Burgundy at Beaune.  "Otto filius Hugonis" was installed as Duke of Burgundy in 960[90].  Flodoard records the death in 965 of "Otto filius Hugonis qui Burgundiæ præerat"[91].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 23 Feb 963 of "Otto Burgundiæ Marchio"[92]m ([Easter] 955) LIETGARDE, daughter of GISELBERT Duke of Burgundy, Comte d'Autun & his wife Ermengarde [of Burgundy] (-after 958).  A manuscript, whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, refers to the wife of Duke Otto as daughter of Giselbert without giving her name[93].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also refers to the wife of "Otto [filius Hugo rex]…dux Burgundie" as "filiam Gisleberti" without naming her[94].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis refers to "filiam Gisleberti ducis Burgundiæ" as the wife of "Ottoni, filio Hugonis Magni", when recording his succession to his father-in-law's dukedom[95].  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records the death in 956 of "Gislebertus comes Burgundionum", names "filia Leudegarde", "aliam…filiam…Werram", and the latter's marriage to "Robertus comes Trecassinorum"[96].  It is assumed that Lietgardis was the name of the wife of Duke Eudes, although this is not without doubt in view of the uncertainty relating to the name of the other daughter being "Werram".  The Annales Nivernenses record that in 958 "Rodulfus Divioni comes" captured the château of Beaune from "seniori sui Optonis" and kidnapped his wife "filiam Gisleberti", but that the castle was recaptured by Otton "Kal Maias"[97].  Bouchard states that Comte Rodolphe married Lietgarde, although the basis for this is not known[98]

3.         EUDES ([948]-Château de Pouilly-sur-Saône 15 Oct 1002)The Historia Francorum Senonensis names (in order) "Hugo, Otto et Heinricus" as the three sons of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum…ex filia Odonis regis"[99].  Flodoard names "Hugonem et Oddonem clericum" as brothers of "Otto filius Hugonis", when he records that the rectores of Burgundy named them as his successors[100].  He adopted the name HENRI, and the title Duke of Burgundy.  He possessed the counties of Autun, Beaune and Avallon, and was suzerain of the Counts of Chalon, Tonnerre, Nevers and Auxerre, and probably of the Counts of Mâcon and Oscheret[101].  King Lothaire confiscated the counties of Langres and Dijon in 967 and gave them to the Bishop of Langres[102].  Duke Henri married the widow of the ex-king of Italy who had sought refuge in Autun in 971 and adopted her son by her first marriage, Otto-Guillaume, who later became Comte de Bourgogne et de Mâcon.  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, records the death in 1002 of "dux Burgundie Henricus"[103].  Rodulfus Glaber records the death of "dux Heinricus" in the third year of the millennium at "Castrum Pulliacum super Ararim" in Burgundy and his burial at Auxerre in Oct[104].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 15 Oct of "Henricus Burgundiæ marchio"[105]m firstly ([973]) as her second husband, GERBERGE, widow of ADALBERTO II di Ivrea ex-King of Italy, daughter of --- ([945]-11 Dec [987/91]).  Her name and her two marriages are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, which names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that her son was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus"[106].  Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date of her son in [960/62].  The Vita of Hugues Comte de Chalon refers to his (unnamed) sister as having married the Duke of Burgundy[107].  Chronologically, this refers most probably to Duke Henri who died in 1002, although the original of the document has not yet been consulted to check whether the wording supports this conclusion.  Gerberge's origin has not yet been corroborated in the other primary sources so far consulted.  If the Vita is correct she was Gerberge, daughter of Lambert Comte de Chalon, but this raises several problems.  Firstly, on the death without direct heirs in 1039 of her supposed brother Hugues Comte de Chalon, the county was inherited by the comparatively obscure children of his younger sister Mathilde, apparently ignoring the superior claims of Gerberge's own numerous descendants, among whom were the powerful counts palatine of Burgundy who, one would have thought, would not have missed the opportunity of acquiring another county.  Rodulfus Glaber does record that "Hugo filius Lanberti Cabilonensis comitisepiscopus Autissioderi" was an opponent of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius"[108], which could explain why Bishop Hugues favoured his nephew by his younger sister to succeed to his county.  Nevertheless, after the bishop's death, his past opposition to Comte Otto-Guillaume may have provided an excuse for his son to intervene in the Chalon succession if he had a legitimate claim.  Secondly, considering the likely birth date of her son, Gerberge's first marriage must have taken place while her husband and father-in-law were still reigning kings of Italy.  They were under continuous pressure from Otto I King of Germany and it is likely that Adalberto's marriage could have brought additional political support.  It is not clear how the relatively obscure count of Chalon could have provided this.  Thirdly, after the death in 978 of Lambert Comte de Chalon, and his widow's second marriage to Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, no record has been found in the primary sources so far consulted of Henri Duke of Burgundy intervening to prevent Comte Geoffroy taking control of the county of Chalon, which would have been the likely course of action if his wife was the deceased count's oldest child.  Fourthly, Gerberge's estimated birth date creates serious chronological problems if she was the daughter of Lambert's only known wife Adelais.  In conclusion, considerable doubt therefore appears to subsist on this origin of Gerberge, although no alternative can as yet be proposed if we are to respect the wording of the Vita.  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 11 Dec of "Gerberga comitissa uxor Henrici ducis"[109]m secondly (before Jun 992, repudiated 996 before 24 Oct) GERSENDE de Gascogne, daughter of GUILLAUME Sanchez Comte de Gascogne & his wife Urraca de Navarra.  This second marriage is deduced from the evidence provided by three charters.  "Domnus Hugo comes atque mater sua Adeleidis" donated property "in pago Cabilonensi" to the abbey of Paray-le-Moniale by an undated charter signed by "Hugo comes, Adeleidis matris suæ, Mauritii filii eius, Enrici ducis, Garlindis uxoris eius"[110].  "Henrici ducis…[et] dominæ Garsindis comitissæ" and "Henricus dux, Gersindis ducatrix" are named in two charters of Saint-Symphorien d'Autun dated Jun 991 or 992 and 10 May 993 respectively[111].  Her parentage is confirmed by the Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis which notes that "Gimbaldum Comitem, patrem Ugonis Episcopi" donated property "ecclesiam S. Johannis, Cablisa" to the convent of Condom and also "nobilissima femina Gavarsens…eius videlicet neptis, soror Sanctii Guasconiæ Comitis" after returning from "quadam provincia Burgundia…ubi maritum habuerat"[112].  Bouchard suggests that Garlindis/Garsindis are name variants of "Gerberga", the wife of Duke Henri named in earlier sources (and assumed to be his first wife)[113].  However, this appears unlikely to be correct as the suffix root elements of these names "-sendis" and "-berga" are not normally interchangeable and appear separately with different prefix roots in many different contemporary names[114].  It therefore appears likely that "Gersende" was a different person from "Gerberge".  Bouchard also highlights that the only allusion to the origin of Duke Henri's supposed second wife is a satirical poem written about Landry Comte de Nevers which includes an obscure reference to a wife who felt distressed and "sought Gascony"[115].  She also comments that the context of the poem implies that, in any case, it was Landry's wife to whom this refers[116].  However, it does not appear that she was aware of the passage in the Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis, quoted above, which appears to confirm Gersende´s parentage conclusively.  Duke Henri [Eudes] had [two] illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:

a)         EUDES (-after 25 Aug 1005).  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Odo vicecomes Belnensis" as son of "Henrici ducis Burgundie, frater ex matre Guillelmi Ottonis"[117].  The absence of any reference to his claiming the succession to the duchy of Burgundy indicates that he was illegitimate rather than Duke Henri's son by his first wife.    

-           VICOMTES de BEAUNE

b)         [HENRI (-before 1023).  Seigneur de Vergy.  J. Richard suggests that Henri Seigneur de Vergy was the illegitimate son of Henri Duke of Burgundy[118].  He asserts that the transfer of the seigneurie de Vergy from Henri's son Humbert to Jean, son of Eudes Vicomte de Beaune, indicates a close family relationship, which he assumes to be one of first cousins.  However, Vergy was recorded in the hands of Jean several years before the death of Humbert, suggesting a transfer by sale rather than inheritance.  In any case, the natural heir to Vergy if it had passed by inheritance would have been Geoffroy Comte de Mâcon, son of Humbert's sister Elisabeth.  The same author links the father of Bishop Humbert with the Henri who signed a charter at Flavigny in 992, along with other Burgundian lords. 

-           SEIGNEURS de VERGY.] 

 

 

 

B.      DUKES of BURGUNDY 1032-1361

 

 

ROBERT I 1032-1076, HUGUES I 1076-1093

 

ROBERT de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 8 or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d’Or).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and his wife Constance[119].  Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[120].  His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father.  His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030.  He was installed as ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I.  Comte d'Auxerre in 1040, when he conquered the county after Hugues Bishop of Auxerre died in 1039.  He lost it after the 1060 council of Autun which ended his war with Nevers[121]Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...[122].  “Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][123].  “Robertus dux et duo filii mei Hugo et Henricus” renounced rights to revenue from land “in Gilliaco” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 2 Feb 1053[124]The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Robertus…dux Burgundie"[125].  The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[126]

m firstly ([1033], repudiated [1048/50]) HELIE de Semur, daughter of DALMAS [I] Seigneur de Semur-en-Brionnais & his wife Aramburge --- ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055).  "Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius"[127].  The date of the marriage is deduced from the charter, dated to [1034], which is subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon[128]Robertus Burgundie dux” renounced rights “in villa...Gilliacus...” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 22 Sep 1040, subscribed by “...Elie conjugis eius...[129]"Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…"[130]Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][131]Her parentage is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand[132].  The "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius", but do not make the link with Duke Robert[133].  "Robertus dux et uxor sua Hylia" donated money to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[134].  She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean Abbot of Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[135].  She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation[136].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[137]

m secondly ([1049]) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow of GEOFFROY II "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais, daughter of FOULQUES III "Nerra/the Black" Comte d’Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde de Metz ([1018]-murdered church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d'Or).  The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[138].  Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[139].  The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[140].  She was murdered with her husband. 

Duke Robert I & his first wife had three children: 

1.         HUGUES de Bourgogne ([1034]-killed in battle [1059/60]).  "Hugonis ducis filii, bone indolis pueri" is named in a charter of "Robertus dux Burgundionum" dated [1032/39][141].  "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…seu filiorum nostrorum Hugonis…atque Heinrici"[142].  He was killed during the war with Nevers[143]Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][144].  “Robertus dux et duo filii mei Hugo et Henricus” renounced rights to revenue from land “in Gilliaco” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 2 Feb 1053[145]

2.         HENRI de Bourgogne "le Damoiseau" ([1035]-27 Jan [1070/74]).  "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…seu filiorum nostrorum Hugonis…atque Heinrici"[146].  He is named as first born son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that Henri died in his father's lifetime leaving three sons whom he names[147]Robertus dux Burgundiorum cum uxore mea Helia” donated “terram...Villare Bichet...in pago Belnensi” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, with the consent of “filiorum nostrorum Hugonis et Henrici”, by charter dated to [1043/44][148].  “Robertus dux et duo filii mei Hugo et Henricus” renounced rights to revenue from land “in Gilliaco” in favour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated 2 Feb 1053[149]"Henricus Roberti ducis filius Burgundie" granted rights in the forest of Saint-Julien to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[150]m --- (-6 Jul 1074 or after, bur Besançon, Saint-Etienne).  The wife of Henri de Bourgogne has not been identified with certainty.  Abbé Maurice Chaume[151] suggested that she was a relative of Ramón Borell I Conde de Barcelona, pointing out the use of the name "Borel" by her son and grandson Dukes Eudes I and Hugues II.  Szabolcs de Vajay[152]  proposed more specifically that she was --- de Barcelona, daughter of Berenguer Ramón I "el Curvo" Conde de Barcelona & his third wife Guisle de Ampurias, married while her husband and his father were in Barcelona on crusade in Spain.  There appears to be nothing to support the suggestion that her first name was Sibylla.  Jean Richard[153] suggested that the wife of Henri de Bourgogne was possibly named Clémence, a name used by her descendants, and that she may have originated from Poitiers.  There does not appear to be any direct proof to support any of these theories.  Henri de Bourgogne & his wife had seven children:

a)         HUGUES de Bourgogne ([1056/57]-Cluny, Saône-et-Loire 29 Aug 1093, bur Abbaye de Cluny, Chapelle de Sainte-Marie).  He is named as son of Henri by Orderic Vitalis[154].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated [21 Mar 1076/24 Jan 1077] which names "Hugo…post decessum Rotberti ducis" and which specifies that Robert was "patris Heinrici genitoris nostri"[155].  He succeeded his grandfather in 1076 as HUGUES I Duke of Burgundy, although the former intended Hugues's uncle Robert de Bourgogne as his successor.  Orderic Vitalis records that Hugues succeeded in expelling Robert, along with his younger brother Simon, from Burgundy[156].  "Hugo Burgundionum dux" made a donation to Cluny dated 19 Feb 1078, subscribed by "Oddonis fratris eius, Rotberti alterius fratris eius"[157].  Duke Hugues left for Spain in [1078/79] to fight the Moors, helping Sancho I King of Aragon to take the kingdom of Navarre.  Orderic Vitalis records that he abdicated as duke in favour of his younger brother Eudes, and became a monk at Cluny[158], dated to [Oct/Nov] 1079. 

b)         EUDES de Bourgogne ([1060]-Tarsus, Cilicia 23 Mar 1103, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux, Côte-d'Or, Chapelle Saint-Georges).  He is named as son of Henri by Orderic Vitalis[159].  He succeeded in 1079 on the abdication of his brother as EUDES I "Borel" Duke of Burgundy

-        see below.

c)         ROBERT de Bourgogne (1059-Châtillon-sur-Seine, Côte d'Or 18 Sep 1111, bur Abbaye de Molesmes, near Langres).  He is named as son of Henri by Orderic Vitalis[160].  "Hugo Burgundionum dux" made a donation to Cluny dated 19 Feb 1078, subscribed by "Oddonis fratris eius, Rotberti alterius fratris eius"[161].  Clerk at Langres 1077, archdeacon 1080.  Bishop of Langres 1085, after the death of Renaud de Bar.  "Odo dux Burgundie" confirmed a donation by "frater meus domnus Hugo" to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "fratres mei Robertus archidiaconus, Henricus puer, Beatrix et Helia sorores mee" by charter dated to [1081/84][162].  "Odo dux Burgundie" donated the village of Marcenay to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "omnes eius fratres et sorores Robertus, Henricus, Beatrix, Helia" by charter dated to [1080/83][163].  Robert took part in the war in Spain against the Moors, with his two brothers Eudes and Henri, in 1087.  He became a Benedictine monk at Molesmes, being a friend of St Bruno who founded the Order of Chartreux[164].  The cartulary of Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon includes a funerary elogy of the life of "Roberti Lingonensis episcopi…regum Franciæ ac ducum Burgundiæ stirpe genitus" dated 19 Oct 1111[165]

d)         BEATRIX de Bourgogne (-before 1110).  "Odo dux Burgundie" confirmed a donation by "frater meus domnus Hugo" to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "fratres mei Robertus archidiaconus, Henricus puer, Beatrix et Helia sorores mee" by charter dated to [1081/84][166].  "Odo dux Burgundie" donated the village of Marcenay to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "omnes eius fratres et sorores Robertus, Henricus, Beatrix, Helia" by charter dated to [1080/83][167].  "Beatrix soror Rotberti Lingonensis episcopi" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated to [1085/1106][168].  "…Widone filio predicti Widonis et uxore eius Beatrice et filiis eorum Roberto et Widone" consented to the donation by "Oddo et Albertus fratres" to the abbey of Saint-Etienne de Vignory by charter dated to [1081/1112][169].  "Domina Beatrix uxor domini Widonis de Wannulriaco" donated property to Molesme by charter dated [1111/12] which names "fratris sui Roberti Linguonensis episcopi"[170]m (after 1082) GUY [III] Sire de Vignory, son of GUY [II] Sire de Vignory & his wife Hildegarde --- (-before 1126). 

e)         HELIE de Bourgogne (-after [1081/84]).  "Odo dux Burgundie" confirmed a donation by "frater meus domnus Hugo" to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "fratres mei Robertus archidiaconus, Henricus puer, Beatrix et Helia sorores mee" by charter dated to [1081/84][171].  "Odo dux Burgundie" donated the village of Marcenay to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "omnes eius fratres et sorores Robertus, Henricus, Beatrix, Helia" by charter dated to [1080/83][172].  Nun.   

f)          RENAUD de Bourgogne ([1064]-10 Jan 1092).  Monk at the abbey of Saint Pierre at Flavigny, abbot from [1084/85].  The necrology of Flavigny records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Rainaldus frater ducis abbas Flaviniacensis"[173]

g)         HENRI de Bourgogne ([1069/72]-killed in battle Astorga León 1 Nov 1112, bur Braga Cathedral).  "Heynricus frater meus" witnessed the donation to Cluny of "Oddo dux Burgundie"[174].  An indication of his age is given in the charter dated to [1081/84] under which "Odo dux Burgundie" confirmed a donation by "frater meus domnus Hugo" to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "fratres mei Robertus archidiaconus, Henricus puer, Beatrix et Helia sorores mee"[175].  His parentage is confirmed by an early 12th century document at Fleury which records that "Ainrico uni filiorum, filio…ducis Roberti" married "alteram filiam…non ex coniugali" of Alfonso VI King of Castile[176].  He took part in the war in Spain against the Moors, with his two brothers Eudes and Robert, in 1087.  His aunt Queen Constance invited him to the court of Castile.  Señor de Braga [1093].  He was installed as HENRIQUE Conde de Portugal in [1093] or [1095] by Alfonso VI King of Castile.   

-        KINGS of PORTUGAL

3.         CONSTANCE de Bourgogne ([1045]-[Jan/Feb] or [3 Apr/25 Oct] 1093, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo).  The Chronicon Trenorciensi records that "Constantiæ…filia Roberti Ducis" married firstly "Hugonis Cabilonensis Comitis" and secondly "Hispaniæ Rex Adefonsus"[177].  A charter dated 5 Aug 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum"[178].  "Infanta donna Urraka Regis domni Adefonsi filia" names her mother "Constantie regina" in her donation to Cluny dated 22 Feb 1117 "Spanish Era"[179], although the date was presumably AD as 1117 Spanish Era was equivalent to 1079 AD.  An early 12th century document at Fleury records that "filiam Roberti ducis Bugundionem…Constantiam" married Alfonso VI King of Castile and was mother of a daughter who married "Raymundo comiti"[180].  The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Queen Constance" as the second of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[181].  Her second marriage date is estimated based on the likely estimated death date of her first husband in [Nov/early Dec] 1079 and her subscribing a document dated 25 Dec 1079 at Dueñas with her second husband[182].  Queen Constance was instrumental in having the Roman rite replace the Visigothic rite in the churches of Castile.  "Adefonsus…Hispaniarum rex…cum coniuge mea Constantia regina" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1 May 1092[183].  The date of her death is fixed by her last known mention in a charter dated 25 Jul 1093 and a donation by King Alfonso to the monastery of Sahagún dated 25 Oct 1093, which does not include Queen Constanza's name in the subscription list[184].  Pérez´s history of Sahagún monastery, published in 1782, states that "Doña Berta…Reyna…está enterrada no lejos de Doña Constanza en la Capilla" of the monastery, but does not quote the inscription which confirms this statement[185]m firstly (1065) HUGUES [II] Comte de Chalon-sur-Saône, son of THIBAUT Comte de Chalon & his wife Ermentrude--- (-in Spain [Nov/early Dec] 1079).  m secondly (late 1079 or 8 May 1081) as his third wife, ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León, son of FERNANDO I King of Castile & his wife Sancha de León (Compostella [1036] or before Jun 1040-29 or 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). 

Duke Robert & his [first/second] wife had two children:

4.         ROBERT de Bourgogne (-poisoned [1113]).  He is named as son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis[186].  Jean Richard suggests that Robert was the son of Duke Robert by his second marriage[187].  Given his active career in the early 12th century, a birth date in the 1050s is more likely than in the late 1030s/early 1040s, but there appears to be no surviving primary source which points either way.  Orderic Vitalis records that he was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy by his father, after the death of his older [half-]brother, but was dispossessed by his nephew Duke Hugues I[188].  A charter dated 5 Aug 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum", subscribed by "Rotberti avunculi ducis fratris Reginæ", the charter signed at León[189].  Orderic Vitalis records that he "made a friendly alliance" with Adelaida, widow of Roger I Count of Sicily, who arranged his marriage and appointed him co-regent for her son[190].  He was murdered by his mother-in-law with a poisoned draught after Count Roger II came of age[191].  His death date is estimated from Orderic Vitalis recording that "for ten years he defended the principality [Sicily] vigourously against all attacks"[192]m (1102 or 1103) [SIBYLLE] of Sicily, daughter of ROGER I Count of Sicily & his second wife Eremburge de Mortain.  Orderic Vitalis records that Adelaida, widow of Roger I Count of Sicily, arranged the marriage of "her daughter" (unnamed) to Robert de Bourgogne whom she appointed co-regent for her son[193].  Kerrebrouck says that Sibylle was the possible name of this daughter and that she was born from his third marriage[194], presumably reading the passage in Orderic Vitalis literally.  It seems more likely chronologically that she was the daughter of Count Roger's second marriage. 

5.         SIMON de Bourgogne (-after 1087).  He is named as son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis[195].  He was expelled from Burgundy with his brother Robert.  Bouchard speculates that "Simon" was an error for "Hugh", who is not mentioned by Orderic Vitalis.  However, as Hugues had been dead for some time when Orderic wrote his chronicle such an omission may not be surprising[196].  

Duke Robert & his second wife had one child: 

6.         AUDEARDE [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne (-after 1120, bur Poitiers, [église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf]).  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guido comes" and "Aldeardim filiam Roberti ducis Burgundiæ" after he repudiated his previous wife[197].  Her precise parentage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[198]m (Mar 1069, separated 1076) as his third wife, GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Agnès de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] (1023-Chizé near Niort, Poitou 25 Sep 1086, bur Poitiers, église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf).

 

 

EUDES I 1093-1103

 

EUDES de Bourgogne, son of HENRI de Bourgogne & his wife --- ([1060]-Tarsus, Cilicia 23 Mar 1103, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux, Côte-d'Or, Chapelle Saint-Georges).  He is named as son of Henri by Orderic Vitalis[199].  "Hugo Burgundionum dux" made a donation to Cluny dated 19 Feb 1078, subscribed by "Oddonis fratris eius, Rotberti alterius fratris eius"[200].  He succeeded in 1079 on the abdication of his brother as EUDES I "Borel"[201] Duke of Burgundy.  He led the expedition to Spain to fight the Moors in 1087, accompanied by his brothers Robert and Henri, but was defeated at Tudela in Navarre.  "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum", by charter dated 5 Aug 1087 at León, subscribed by "Rotberti avunculi ducis fratris Reginæ"[202].  He made large donations to the monastery of Cîteaux in 1098.  "Odo dux Burgundie", on the point of leaving for Jerusalem, donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon "in memorie Hugonis ducis fratris mei…Robertus dux avus meus" by charter dated 1101[203].  He went to Palestine end-1100 with Etienne Comte de Blois and Hugues Comte de Vermandois, but was betrayed by Emperor Alexios and fell into the hands of the Muslims[204].  "Hugo dux Burgundie filius Odonis ducis" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1102 which specifies that his father died "in itinere Hierosolimitano"[205], presumably misdated if the date of death of Duke Eudes is correctly stated here.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "X Kal Apr" of "Odo dux Burgundie"[206]

m (1080) SIBYLLE de Bourgogne, daughter of GUILLAUME II "le Grand" Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Etiennette --- ([1065]-after 1103).  "Sybilla uxor mea" witnessed the donation to Cluny of "Oddo dux Burgundie", also witnessed by "Wilelmus comes…genitor iam dicte uxoris mee"[207].  Her origin is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis[208].  Nun at the abbey of Fontevraud. 

Duke Eudes I & his wife had four children:

1.         HELIE de Bourgogne ([1080]-28 Feb 1141).  She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and names her eldest son by each marriage[209].  The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[210].  A bull of Pope Pascal II dated 4 Feb 1107 names "Bertrannus comes" and comments that he had been "propter uxorem abiectam et multiplicata adulteria iamdiu excommunicationi subiectus"[211].  The document gives no more details of these charges, which from the context appear to have been brought some time before the date of the bull, whose main purpose was a threat of further excommunication against Bertrand for having attacked the monastery of Saint-Gilles.  She accompanied her husband to Palestine[212].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias[213].  "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[214]m firstly (Jun 1095) as his second wife, BERTRAND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND IV "de Saint-Gilles" Comte de Toulouse & his first wife --- [de Provence] ([1065]-in Palestine 21 Apr 1112).  Regent for his father in Toulouse from Oct 1096, when the latter left for Palestine.  He succeeded his father in 1105 as BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse.  He conquered Tripoli 12 Jun 1109, declaring himself BERTRAND Count of Tripolim secondly ([late 1112/1115]) [as his second wife,] GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu, son of ROBERT [II] Comte d'Alençon Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury & his wife Agnès Ctss de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171, bur La Hoguette, Calvados, église abbatiale de Saint-André). 

2.         [FLEURINE de Bourgogne (-murdered near Philomelum, Asia Minor [1097]).  Albert of Aix records that "Florina…filia ducis Burgundiæ", widow of "Philippensium principi", accompanied the expedition of "Danorum regis filius Sueno" across Asia Minor "sperans post triumphum Fidelium tanto tamque nobili sociari marito" but that they were attacked between Philomelum and Pherna and killed[215].  The dating of the supposed expedition to 1097 is consistent with the context of the passage.  Albert of Aix appears to be the only source which gives any information relating to her.  She is not mentioned in any of the Burgundian sources which have so far been consulted during the preparation of the present document.  If she did exist, the chronology dictates that Eudes I must have been the duke of Burgundy who was her father.  There appears to be no satisfactory way of identifying her husband "Philippensium principis".  The text of Albert of Aix does not clearly indicate her betrothal to Svend of Denmark, although secondary sources assume that it took place.  It is of course not impossible that Albert´s report is garbled and that, when he left on crusade in late 1100 (see above), Duke Eudes took with him one of his daughters whom he married to a local dignitary.  If that is correct, the expedition during which she was killed must have been different from the one reported by Albert of Aix and the connection with Svend of Denmark (whose participation in the 1097 expedition is also recorded by William of Tyre[216]) doubtful.  Kerrebrouck doubts that Fleurine, who "died in Palestine [1102], married to a Macedonian Lord", existed[217]m --- "Philippensium principis" (-before 1097).]  [Betrothed (1097) to SVEND Svendsen of Denmark, son of [SVEND II Estridsen King of Denmark & his first wife Gunhild Sveinsdatter] ([1053]-murdered near Philomelum, Asia Minor 1097).] 

3.         HUGUES de Bourgogne ([1085]-soon after 6 Feb 1143, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[218].  He succeeded his father in 1103 as HUGUES II "Borel/le Pacifique" Duke of Burgundy

-        see below

4.         HENRI de Bourgogne ([1087]-9 Mar 1131, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  "Hugonis filii mei, Henrici filii mei" subscribed the charter dated 1101 under which "Odo dux Burgundie", on the point of leaving for Jerusalem, donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon[219].  "Odo dux Burgundiæ" granted compensation for his actions to Cluny by charter dated 1101 in which he names "filiorumque suorum, Hugonis, Heinrici"[220].  Cistercian monk at the abbey of Cîteaux[221].  "Hugo dux Burgundie" donated serfs to Dijon Saint-Etienne, for the soul of "patris meis Odonis" and with the consent of "fratre meo Henrico", by charter dated 1103[222].  The Chronicle of St Bèze records a donation by "Hugo dux Burgundiæ" signed by "Heinrici fratris ducis", dated 1113[223]

 

 

HUGUES II 1103-1143

 

HUGUES de Bourgogne, son of EUDES I "Borel" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Sibylle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1085]-soon after 6 Feb 1143, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[224].  "Hugonis filii mei, Henrici filii mei" subscribed the charter dated 1101 under which "Odo dux Burgundie", on the point of leaving for Jerusalem, donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon[225].  "Odo dux Burgundiæ" granted compensation for his actions to Cluny by charter dated 1101 in which he names "filiorumque suorum, Hugonis, Heinrici"[226].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "dux Hugo filius ducis Odonis" as father of "Lingones…episcopus Galterus [et] episcopum Eduensem Henricum"[227].  He was appointed regent in Burgundy by his father end-1100 before leaving for Palestine.  He succeeded his father in 1103 as HUGUES II "le Pacifique" Duke of Burgundy.  "Hugo dux Burgundie filius Odonis ducis" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1102, which specifies that his father died "in itinere Hierosolimitano"[228], presumably misdated if the date of death of Duke Eudes is correctly stated above.  "Hugo dux Burgundie" donated serfs to Dijon Saint-Etienne, for the soul of "patris meis Odonis" and with the consent of "fratre meo Henrico", by charter dated 1103[229].  He helped Louis VI King of France against Henry I King of England in Normandy in 1109.  He commanded the advance guard in Champagne ready to defend France from the threatened attack by Emperor Heinrich V in 1124.  He acquired the county of Grignon and the Châtelet de Chalon.  He is called "Hugone Borrello duce Burgundie" in a Molesme charter[230].  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[231]

m ([1116]) MATHILDE de Mayenne, daughter of GAUTHIER Seigneur de Mayenne & his wife Aline [de Beaugency] (-Beaune, Côte-d'Or or château de Méduan, near Magny-lès-Villers 8 Feb after 1162, bur Notre Dame de Beaune).  As "domina Mathildis de Meduana" she is named as the wife of Duke Hugues in three charters, and the necrology of Beaune names her mother "Aelina"[232].  "Hugo Burgundie dux" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated [1113/19] which names "Mathilde coniugis mei et filio mei Oddonis"[233].  "Hugo…dux Burgundie et coniunx mea Mahaldis" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated [1119][234].  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[235].  "Henricus Eduensis ecclesie presul" donated property to Grosbois abbey and founded an anniversary for "fratrisque sui Raimundi consulis" by charter dated 28 Jun 1156 witnessed by "Odo dux Burgundie, Maltrix mater eius…"[236].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VI Id Feb" of "Mathildis ducissa Burgundie"[237]

Duke Hugues II & his wife had [twelve] children: 

1.         [CLEMENCE de Bourgogne (1117[238]-).  The primary source which confirms her name, parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  She is not named among the daughters of Duke Hugues II who are listed by Ernest Petit[239].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, the first wife of Geoffroy [III] is not known, referred to only as "B…1151"[240], but this presumably can be identified with Geoffroy's second wife who is referred to as such in his charter dated 1151.  Some secondary sources say that Clémence de Bourgogne was the second wife of Hervé [III] Sire de Donzy, son of Geoffrey [III], but this is difficult to sustain chronologically considering her supposed birth date.  m as his first wife, GEOFFROY [III] Sire de Donzy, son of HERVE [II] Sire de Donzy & his wife --- de La Ferté-Milon (-1157).] 

2.         AIGELINE [Aline] de Bourgogne ([1118]-after 1167).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, one of the sisters (named second in the list of sisters) of "Lingones…episcopus Galterus [et] episcopum Eduensem Henricum" as "mater comitis Gerardi, filii Hugonis de Wandanimonte"[241].  “Hugonis comitis Vaudemontani” donated “piscationem ad Saxeium” to Toul, with the consent of “Aigelinæ coniugis suæ et Gerardi filii”, by undated charter[242]m ([1130]) as his first wife, HUGUES [I] Comte de Vaudémont, son of GERARD [I] de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont & his second wife Hedwig von Egisheim (-1155, bur Priory of Belval, near Portieux, Vosges).  He participated in the Second Crusade 1147-1149 led by Louis VII King of France[243]

3.         EUDES de Bourgogne ([1120]-26 or 27 Sep 1162, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[244].  He succeeded his father in 1143 as EUDES II Duke of Burgundy.   

-        see below

4.         HUGUES "Rufus/le Roux" de Bourgogne ([1122]-23 or 24 Apr 1171).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Hugo Rufus" as brother of "Lingones…episcopus Galterus [et] episcopum Eduensem Henricum"[245].  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[246].  Seigneur du Châtelet-Chalon et de Meursault, by grant of his father (who had bought Châtelet-Chalon from Savaric Comte de Chalon[247]).  "Willelmus comes Cabilonis et Huo filius ducis Burgundie" donated property to la Ferté by charter dated 1147[248].  Seigneur de Navilly by right of his second wife.  "Hugo rufus ducis Burgundie filius, Cabilonensis Castelluli dominus" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated 1168 before 17 Oct[249].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VIII Kal Mai" of "Hugo frater ducis Burgundie"[250]m firstly ([1149]) ISABELLE de Chalon, daughter of [GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Chalon & his wife ---] (-15 Jun before 1166).  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1186 under which her son "Guillelmus Cabilonensis" confirmed a donation to Ferté-sur-Grosne made by "pater eius Huo et avunculus eius atque avus, comites Cabilonenses"[251].  The document does not name Isabelle´s father, but the date of her marriage indicates her birth in [1130/35], which suggests that she must have been the daughter of Comte Guillaume [II].  The necrology of Beaune records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Ysabel comitissa et uxor Hugonis fratris ducis Burgundie"[252]m secondly ([1166/71]) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Navilly, widow of THIBAUT de la Roche, daughter of GAUTHIER de Neublans Seigneur de Navilly & his wife Mathilde de la Ferté [Châtillon-Dijon].  "Margarita filia Galterii de Navillei" confirmed donations to la Ferté-sur-Grosne after the death of "mariti mei Teobaldi de Rocha" by charter dated 1166, which also records donations by "soror mea Andrea et maritus eius Hugo de Palluelo"[253].  “Garoldus miles de Frontanai” donated property “in territoriis de Chillei et de Amestei et de Clus et de Vigouz” to La Ferté-sur-Grosne, in the presence of “Huonis patrui ducis, qui duxerat in conjugio filiam Valterii domini castri Navilliaci”, by charter dated to [1166/69], witnessed by “Huo patruus ducis, Stephanus de Neblas dominus castri eiusdem, Vido dominus castri Virduni...[254].  Hugues de Bourgogne & his first wife had two children: 

a)         SIBYLLE de Bourgogne ([1150]-[1201]).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to "Hugo Rufus" as father of "domne de Monteregali"[255].  Dame de Meursault, which she received from her father as her dowry.  "Ansericus de Monteregali" donated property to the church of Notre-Dame de Montréal, for the soul of "Alaydis uxoris meæ" and with the consent of "Ansericus et Johannes filii mei et Sybilla predicti Anserici uxor", by charter dated 1170[256].  Her name and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated to [1172/75] which records an agreement between the abbey of Cîteaux and "domnus Ansericum de Monte regali" and a donation by "Ansericum in vita uxoris sue Sibille"[257].  "Ansericus dominus Montis Regalis" confirmed the donations to Molesme by "pater meus Ansericus de Montemirabili", with the consent of "uxor mea Sibilla et filii mei Ansericus, Johannes, Milo", by charter dated 1183[258].  "Ansericus dominus Montis Regalis" granted customs exemptions to the Chartreux monks of Lugny, for the soul of "Sibille uxoris mee", with the consent of "filiis nostris Anserico et Johanne", by charter dated 1184[259].  "Ansericus de Monte-Regali" donated property to the abbey of Pontigny with the support of "Sybilla uxor mea et Ansericus et Johannes filii mei" by charter dated 1186[260].  “Sibilla Montisregali domina” donated property to Pontigny, for the soul of “domini Anserici quondam mariti mei”, with the consent of “Milo filius”, by charter dated 1197[261]m (Aug 1170) ANSERIC [II] Seigneur de Montréal Sénéchal de Bourgogne, son of ANSERIC [I] Seigneur de Montréal et de Montmirail[262] & his wife Adelaide de Pleurre (-Acre 1191). 

b)         GUILLAUME de Bourgogne dit de Chalon (-after 1186).  Seigneur du Châtelet-Chalon 1171.  "Guillelmus Cabilonensis" confirmed a donation to Ferté-sur-Grosne made by "pater eius Huo et avunculus eius atque avus, comites Cabilonenses", by charter dated 1186[263]

5.         ROBERT de Bourgogne ([1122]-18 Jul 1140).  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[264].  Deacon at Langres.  Archdeacon at Autun.  Bishop of Autun 1140. 

6.         HENRI de Bourgogne (-1 Mar 1170, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux, Côte-d'Or)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "episcopum Eduensem Henricum" as brother of "Lingones…episcopus Galterus"[265].  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[266].  Archdeacon at Autun, 1143.  Elected Bishop of Autun 1148.  Seigneur de Flavigny.  

7.         RAYMOND de Bourgogne ([1125]-28 Jun 1156, bur Cîteaux).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Remundus" as brother of "Lingones…episcopus Galterus [et] episcopum Eduensem Henricum"[267].  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[268].  Comte de Grignon, Seigneur de Vitteaux, by grant of his father 1143.  Seigneur de Montpensier by right of his wife.  "Henricus Eduensis ecclesie presul" donated property to Grosbois abbey and founded an anniversary for "fratrisque sui Raimundi consulis" by charter dated 28 Jun 1156 witnessed by "Odo dux Burgundie, Maltrix mater eius…"[269].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "IV Kal Jul" of "Raimundus frater ducis Burgundie"[270]m ([1140]) as her first husband, AGNES de Thiern dame de Montpensier-en-Auvergne, daughter of GUY de Thiern Seigneur de Montpensier & his wife ---.  The primary source which precisely confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Her two marriages are deduced from the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which names "Agnes de Montepancerii in Alvernia" as the mother of "domni de Belloioco Wichardi" (her son by her second marriage) and specifies that she was also mother of "Mathilde comitisse Nivernensis"[271].  "Agnes comitissa de Monte Pancero et de Grinnumniaco" donated property to Cîteaux for the anniversaries of "domini mei Raimundi filiique nostris Hugonis" by charter dated to after 28 Jun 1156[272].  She married secondly ([1160]) Humbert [IV] Sire de Beaujeu.  Raymond de Bourgogne & his wife had two children:

a)         HUGUES de Bourgogne (-1156 or before, bur Cîteaux).  "Agnes comitissa de Monte Pancero et de Grinnumniaco" donated property to Cîteaux for the anniversaries of "domini mei Raimundi filiique nostris Hugonis" by charter dated to after 28 Jun 1156[273].  In her donation to Cîteaux by charter dated 1182, "Matildis comitissa" refers to a donation by "patrem meum Raymundum" to "ecclesie cisterciensi" specifying that both he and her (unnamed) brother, his son, were buried there[274]

b)         MATHILDE de Bourgogne (1150-17 Dec [1219], bur Abbaye de Fontevraud).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Remundus" as father of "Mathildis comitisse Nivernensis"[275].  She succeeded her father as Ctss de Grignon, Dame de Vitteaux, and her mother as Dame de Montpensier.  She succeeded her second husband in 1175 as Ctss de Tonnerre.  Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1177 of "Petrus frater Philippi comitis Flandrensium" and "comitissa Nivernensis quæ fuerat uxor domini Isoldunensis castri"[276].  The Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorenses records that, after the death of "Guido comes", his wife "Mathildis" married "Petro Flandrensis" and after his death "Roberto", stating that they were separated for consanguinity soon after their marriage[277].  "Matilidis comitissa" confirmed a previous donation to Cîteaux by "Agnes mater mea comitissa" for the soul of "patris mei Raimundi" with the consent of "filii mei Odo et Guillermus et Agnes et Ida" by charter dated 1179[278].  "Mathildis comitissa Nivernensis" donated property to Jully-les-Nonnains for the soul of "Guillelmi filii mei" and for the anniversaries of "…comitis Guidonis, comitis Petri, domini Odonis de Yxolduno" (her first three husbands) by charter dated 1182[279].  "Matildis comitissa" donated property to Cîteaux for the souls of "Guidonis comitis Nivernensis, Petri Flandrensis et Odonis" with the consent of "filie mee Agnes…filia comitis Guidonis et Sibilla filia comitis Petri flandrensis" by charter dated 1182[280].  After the annulment of her fourth marriage, she became a nun at Fontevraud.  "Hugo…dux Burgundiæ et Albonii comes" confirmed "[cum] assensu filiorum meorum Oddonis et Alexandri" the concession to Cluny by "consanguineæ meæ Matildi comitissæ Tornodori" by charter dated 1186[281].  “Odo dominus Exolduni”, on leaving for Jerusalem, confirmed the privileges of “burgensibus Exoldunensis castri” by charter dated 1190, witnessed by “domina M. comitissa Tornodori…[282]m firstly (before 15 Apr 1165) EUDES [II] Seigneur d'Issoudun, son of RAOUL [II] Sire d'Issoudun & his wife Alix --- (-1167).  m secondly (1168) GUY [I] Comte de Nevers d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, son of GUILLAUME [IV] Comte de Nevers et d'Auxerre & his wife Ida von Sponheim [Carinthia] ([1149]-Tonnerre, Yonne 18 Oct 1175).  He refused to do homage to Hugues III Duke of Burgundy, was defeated and imprisoned at Beaune in April 1174[283]m thirdly (1176) PIERRE de Flandre, son of THIERRY I Count of Flanders & his second wife Sibylle d'Anjou (-1176 before Aug).  m fourthly ([1177/80], annulled on grounds of consanguinity 1181) as his first wife, ROBERT [II] de Dreux, son of ROBERT de France Comte de Dreux & his wife Agnès de Baudemont (-28 Dec 1218).  He succeeded his father in 1188 as Comte de Dreux, de Braine et de Longueville. 

8.         SIBYLLE de Bourgogne ([1126]-Salerno 19 Sep 1150, bur Monastery of the Trinity de la Cava de Tirreni).  The Annals of Romoald name "Sibiliam sororem ducis Burgundie" as the second wife of "rex Rogerius", specifying that she died at Salerno soon after their marriage and was buried "apud Caream"[284].  The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that King Roger married "Sibiliam sororem ducis Burgundiæ" and that she died soon after at Salerno and was buried "apud Caveam", dated from the context to after the death of the king´s oldest son (in 1149)[285].  A short anonymous Chronicle of Cassino records the death of "Sybilla regina" in 1150[286].  The Annales Casinenses record the death in 1151 of "Sibilla regina"[287].  Chalandon states that King Roger´s second wife died in childbirth, which he dates to 19 Sep 1151[288]m (1149) as his second wife, ROGER II King of Sicily, son of ROGER I Count of Sicily & his third wife Adelaida di Savona [Monferrato] (22 Dec 1095-Palermo 26 Feb 1154, bur Palermo Cathedral).

9.         [DUCISSA de Bourgogne ([1128]-)Raymundus de Granceio de quo in fedo tenebat et uxor eius Ducissa...coram Gisleberto canonico fratre ipsius Raymundi” consented to the donation made by “Pontius miles de Sancto Lupo uxorque sua Lancenna” to Dijon Saint-Etienne by undated charter[289].  Her parentage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[290].  The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  It is possible that it is speculative, on the assumption that "Ducissa" indicates a connection with the family of the dukes of Burgundy, which is not necessarily the case.  She is not named among the daughters of Duke Hugues II who are listed by Ernest Petit[291].  Dame de Saint-Julien.  m RAYMOND de Grancey, son of HUGUES de Grancey & his wife ---.] 

10.      AREMBURGE de Bourgogne .  A charter dated Apr 1279 records a donation to Dijon Saint-Bénigne made by Hugo dux Burgundie” when he placedfiliam meam Aremburgem” at Larrey monastery, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Mathildis ac filiorum meorum Odonis, Roberti, Henrici atque Hugonis[292]

11.      GAUTHIER de Bourgogne (-Lugny 7 Jan 1180, bur Chartreuse monastery of Lugny, Côte d'Or).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "episcopus Galterus" as brother of "Odonis Burgundie ducis" when recording his appointment as Bishop of Langres[293].  His parentage is confirmed by two charters dated [1172/75] of "Galterius…lingonensis episcopus" which name "Hugonis ducis Burgundie nepotis mei", the second of which also names "mater mea Mathildis ducissa…dominus Hugo frater meus"[294].  “Hugo dux Burgundiæ” donated land in “Flagit et Verne” to Vergy Saint-Vincent, with the consent of “uxore sua Mathilde cum omnibus filiis suis Odone, Hugone, Roberto, Henrico, Raimundo, Walterio”, by charter dated 20 Oct 1131[295]Archbishop of Besançon end 1161, forced to resign after being persecuted by Emperor Friedrich "Barbarossa".  Canon and Archdeacon at Langres, elected Bishop of Langres end 1163.  Comte de Langres 1178/79, by grant of his nephew Duke Hugues III.  He became a Chartreuse monk at Lugny, near Recey-sur-Ourse, Côte d'Or[296]

12.      MATHILDE de Bourgogne ([1135]-before 29 Sep 1173).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, one of the sisters (named first in the list of sisters) of "Lingones…episcopus Galterus [et] episcopum Eduensem Henricum" as "mater Guilelmi de Montepessulano domni"[297].  The contract of marriage between "Guillelmus Montispessulani dominus" and "Mathildem sororem Ducis Burgundiæ" is dated 25 Feb 1157, and names "Guillelmus de Tortosa frater meus"[298]Under his testament dated 29 Sep 1173, "Guillelmus dominus Montispessulani, filius quondam Sibilie" states that his wife Mathilde was already deceased and requests payment of her debts[299]m (contract Montpellier 25 Feb 1157) GUILLAUME [VII] Seigneur de Montpellier, son of GUILLAUME [VI] Seigneur de Montpellier & his wife Sibila del Vasto (-[29 Sep 1172/May 1173], bur Abbaye de Granselve).

 

 

EUDES II 1143-1162

 

EUDES de Bourgogne, son of HUGUES II "Borel/le Pacifique" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Mathilde de Mayenne ([1120]-26 or 27 Sep 1162, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  His father's 1131 gift to the Cistercians of La Bussière was consented to by "all his sons" (in order) Eudes, Hugues, Robert, Henri, Raymond and Gauthier[300].  "Hugo Burgundie dux" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated [1113/19] which names "Mathilde coniugis mei et filio mei Oddonis"[301].  He succeeded his father in 1143 as EUDES II Duke of Burgundy.  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death "mense Sep 1162" of "Odo dux Burgundiæ, relinquens filium Hugonem"[302].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the deaths "VI Kal Oct" of "Hugo et Odo duces Burgundie"[303].  The necrology of Molesme records the death "V Kal Oct" of "Odo dux Burgundie"[304]

m (1145) MARIE de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT IV "le Grand/le Vieil" Comte de Blois & his wife Mathilde von Sponheim [Carinthia] (1128-11 Mar or 7 Aug [1190], bur Abbaye de Fontevraud).  William of Tyre records her as sister of Etienne de Champagne Comte de Sancerre, but does not name her[305].  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the mother of Hugues Duke of Burgundy as "filie comitis Theobaldi comitis Campanie"[306].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Maria Burgundie ducissa, secunda Agnes Barri Ducis comitissa, tertia quedam ducissa in partibus remotis, hanc postea duxit Guilelmus Goez in dyocesi Carnotensi, quarta comitis Mathildis Pertici, quinta monialis Fontis Ebraldi, sexta Adela Francorum regina" as the six daughters of "comes Campanie Theobaldus"[307].  She was regent for her son during his minority from Sep 1162 to Apr 1165.  "Maria ducissa Burgundie" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated [1171/72] which specifies that she was acting while "Hugo dux Burgundie filius meus" was on a journey to Jerusalem[308].  After 1165 she became a nun at Fontevraud, and was abbess in 1174.  A list of foundations at Troyes records the memory "13 Mar" of "Marie fille du Thibaut comte de Champagne et femme d'Eudes duc de Bourgogne", adding that she was buried at Fontevraud where she died "le 11 de ce mois"[309]

Duke Eudes II & his wife had [four] children:

1.         ALIX de Bourgogne ([1146]-Fontevraud 1192, bur Abbaye de Fontevraud).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Pars Altera Chronici Lemovicensis of Geoffroy de Vigeois which records that "nobilis Ebo de Charento" with "Gaucherio de Salis qui fuit filius Geraldi de Mania" with "nuru sua, quæ fuit uxor Archambaldi de Borbon et soror ducis Burgundiæ" invaded Limoges, dated to 1182[310].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  Nun at Fontevraud, abbess in [1190] after her mother.  m firstly ([1164]) ARCHAMBAUD "le Jeune" de Bourbon, son of ARCHAMBAUD VI Sire de Bourbon & his wife Agnès de Savoie (29 Jun 1140-26 Jul 1169).  m secondly EUDES de Deols Seigneur de Châteaumeillant, son of EBBO [II] Sire de Deols & his wife Denise d'Amboise (-[1208]). 

2.         HUGUES de Bourgogne ([1148]-Acre 25 Aug 1192, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  William of Tyre calls him "dux Burgundiæ Henricus junior" when recording his arrival in Palestine in 1171 with his maternal uncle Etienne de Champagne Comte de Sancerre[311].  He succeeded his father in 1162 as HUGUES III Duke of Burgundy

-        see below

3.         MATHILDE de Bourgogne (-22 Jul 1220, bur Abbaye de Bouchet, near Limais).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "sorore ducis Burgundie" as wife of "Roberti [comitis Alvernie]" but does not name her[312].  A charter dated May 1201 records disputes between "dominum Robertum…Claromontensem episcopum et Guidonem…comitem Arverniæ", mediated by "domino Odone…duce Burgundiæ" and naming "domina Mathildis mater eius"[313].  Dame de Limais, by grant as dowry.  She ceded Limais to Hervé de Nevers in Jun 1210.  m ROBERT IV Comte d'Auvergne et de Clermont, son of GUILLAUME VIII "le Vieux" Comte d'Auvergne & his wife Anne de Nevers (-1194, bur Abbaye de Bouchet, near Limais).

4.         [--- de Bourgogne.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  She is not named among the children of Duke Eudes II who are listed by Ernest Petit[314]m ROBERT Sire de Boisleux, en Artois.  1187.]

 

 

HUGUES III 1162-1192

 

HUGUES de Bourgogne, son of EUDES II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marie de Blois ([1148]-Acre 7 or 25 Aug 1192, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  William of Tyre calls him "dux Burgundiæ Henricus junior" when recording his arrival in Palestine in 1171 with his maternal uncle Etienne de Champagne Comte de Sancerre[315].  He succeeded his father in 1162 as HUGUES III Duke of Burgundy, under the regency of his mother until Apr 1165.  After helping Louis VII King of France against the rebel Guillaume Comte de Chalon, the king granted him part of the county of Chalon in 1166.  He bought the county of Langres from Guy III Comte de Saulx in 1178, and ceded it to his uncle Gauthier de Bourgogne Bishop of Langres in 1179[316].  He went to Palestine with his maternal uncle Etienne de Champagne Comte de Sancerre in 1171[317].  Comte d'Albon by right of his second wife.  "Hugo Burgundie dux et Albonii comes" donated property to the Templars at Beaune, with the support of "Beatricis uxoris mee et…filiorum meorum Odonis, Alexandri et Dalphini", by charter dated Dec 1188[318].  He took part in the Third Crusade with Philippe II "Auguste" King of France.  After the king's return to France, Duke Hugues was appointed Constable of the French armies in Jul 1191[319].  He marched south of Acre with Richard I King of England, but returned to Acre in 1192 following disputes with the other crusader leaders[320].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1191 records the death of "dux Burgundie Hugo" and his burial "apud Templarios"[321].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VIII Id Aug" of "Hugo dux Burgundie qui obit ultra mare"[322].  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death "mense Sep 1162" of "Odo dux Burgundiæ, relinquens filium Hugonem"[323]

m firstly (1165, repudiated 1183) ALIX de Lorraine, daughter of MATHIEU I Duke of Lorraine & his wife Bertha [Judith] von Staufen ([1145]-4 Mar before 1200).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aaliz filia Mosellanorum ducis Mathei" as wife of "dux Hugo filius ducis Odonis", although he is referring to Duke Hugues II not Duke Hugues III which is clearly incorrect[324].  In a later passage, the same source correctly names "Aaliz mater ducis Burgundie Odonis uxor…Hugonis et Iutta mater comitis Stephani avia…Iohannis Cabilonensis" as sisters of "dux Symon et Fredericus de Bites et comes Matheus Tullensis et Theodericus"[325].  "Hugo dux Burgundie…Aeliz ducissa Burgundie cum Odone filio meo" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated 1171[326].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also records the repudiation of Alix by her husband[327].  “Bertha…Lotharingorum ducissa…et filii mei Theodericus, Simon Dux et Marchio, Fredericus, et junior eorum Matthæus, soror quoque ipsorum Aleidis Ducissa Burgundiæ” donated property to Mont Saint-Trinité, for the soul of "viri mei nobilis ducis Matthæi", by charter dated to [1177][328].  She returned to Lorraine after her repudiation.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "IV Non Mar" of "domina Alaydis quondam ducissa Burgundie"[329]

m secondly (Saint-Gilles-en-Languedoc 1 Sep 1183) as her second husband, BEATRIX de Viennois Ctss d´Albon, widow of ALBERIC "Taillefer" de Toulouse Comte de Saint-Gilles, daughter of GUIGUES [VII] Comte d'Albon, Dauphin & his wife Beatrix --- (1161-Château de Vizille, Isère 15 Dec 1228, bur Abbaye de Ayes, near Grenoble).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by a chronicle written by "Guillaume, chanoine de l´église cathédrale de Grenoble" which records that "filiam filii sui" (referring to Marguerite, paternal grandmother of Beatrix) married "comitem S. Ægidii"[330].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the wife of "Albrico Tailhefer comite Sancti Egidii" was "filia senioris Dalfini" and her second marriage to "dux"[331].  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the marriage of Duke Hugues with "Beatricem, filiam Delfini comitis Alboni apud Sanctum Egidium"[332].  She married thirdly (1193) Hugues Seigneur de Coligny-le-Neuf.  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.  Valbonnais cites the testament of "la duchesse Beatrix" dated 1228 which names "son héritier le Dauphin André son fils…Matilde sa fille aînée femme de Jean Comte de Chalon…Marguerite son autre fille épouse d´Amedée fils du comte de Savoye"[333]

Duke Hugues III & his first wife had [four] children:

1.         EUDES de Bourgogne (1166-Lyon 15 Jun or 6 Jul 1218, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  "Hugo dux Burgundie…Aeliz ducissa Burgundie cum Odone filio meo" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated 1171[334].  He succeeded his father in 1192 as EUDES III Duke of Burgundy

-        see below

2.         ALEXANDRE de Bourgogne ([1172/78]-6 Sep 1205).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Odonem et Alexandrum" as sons of "dux" by his first wife "Aaliz"[335].  "Hugo…dux Burgundiæ et Albonii comes" confirmed "[cum] assensu filiorum meorum Oddonis et Alexandri" the concession to Cluny by "consanguineæ meæ Matildi comitissæ Tornodori" by charter dated 1186[336].  Seigneur de Montagu et de Chagny. 

-        SEIGNEURS de MONTAGU

3.         MARIE de Bourgogne ([1175]-after 1219).  “Simon dominus castri de Synemuro” made an agreement with the abbey of Autun Saint-Martin, confirmed by “ducissa uxor sua et frater eius Dalmatius”, by charter dated 1190 relating to property previously held by “dominus Gaufridus Dalmacii[337].  "Domnus Symon de Sine Muro" donated property to la Ferté-sur-Grosne, before leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of "uxor eius et Dalmatius frater suus", by charter dated 1190[338].  "Maria soror ducis Burgundie" confirmed donations to the abbey of Saint-Loque [Sept-Fons], made by "dominus Simon de Sinemuro maritus meus", by charter dated 1219[339]m (1190 or before) SIMON [I] Seigneur de Semur, Sire de Luzy, son of [DALMAS [II] Seigneur de Semur & his wife --- de Bourbon-Lancy] (-in Palestine 1219). 

4.         [ALIX de Bourgogne ([1177]-).  Petit names Alix as fourth child of Duke Hugues III by his first marriage, adding that she married firstly Béraud Seigneur de Mercœur and secondly Robert I Comte de Clermont, without citing any primary sources[340].   This fits with no other information which is available and should be treated with caution.] 

Duke Hugues III & his second wife had [three] children:

5.         ANDRE de Bourgogne (1184-14 Mar 1237, bur Grenoble, église collégiale de Saint-André).  The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus names "Octavium et Andream" as the two sons of "Beatrice relictis Tallifer" and "Hugo Burgundiæ dux"[341].  "Hugo Burgundie dux et Albonii comes" donated property to the Templars at Beaune, with the support of "Beatricis uxoris mee et…filiorum meorum Odonis, Alexandri et Dalphini", by charter dated Dec 1188[342].  Comte de Gap et d'Embrun by right of his first wife in 1202.  He succeeded his mother in 1228 as Comte d'Albon.   

-        DAUPHINS de VIENNOIS

6.         MATHILDE de Bourgogne ([1190]-26 Mar before 1242).  “Joannes comes Cabilonensis” sold property “apud Cabilonem”, received from “Odo dux Burgundie...in maritagio Mathildis sororis” on their marriage, to Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy by charter dated 1232[343].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VII Kal Apr" of "Matildis comitissa Cabilonensis soror Odonis…ducis Burgundie"[344]m (Jan 1214) as his first wife, JEAN d'Auxonne, son of ETIENNE III Comte dAuxonne [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Béatrice de Chalon (1190-30 Aug 1267, bur Abbaye de Bourguignon-lès-la Charité, Haute-Saône).  Comte Palatin de Bourgogne [1224].  He succeeded his mother in 1227 and his father in 1241 as JEAN [I] "l'Antique/le Sage" Comte d'Auxonne et de Chalon, Sire de Salins.

7.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne ([1192]-[1228/30] or [1242]).  The testament of "Guigo Dalphinus, Vienn. et Albonis comitis", dated 27 Jun 1267, confirmed donations made by "…matertera Margarita vel Domina Ducissa avia mea…meæ amitæ quondam comitissæ Sabaudiæ"[345].  It is not clear from this document whether "matertera Margarita" and "meæ amitæ quondam comitissæ Sabaudiæ" refer to the same person as they are named in the context of two separate donations in different parts of the testament.  The use of "matertera" and "amitæ" as two different terms to express the relationship "aunt" suggests that they may have been different individuals.  Valbonnais assumes that they were the same person, "Marguerite sœur du dauphin André" who married "Amé fils de Thomas Comte de Savoie", and adds that "la duchesse Beatrix" named "son héritier le Dauphin André son fils…Matilde sa fille aînée femme de Jean Comte de Chalon…Marguerite son autre fille épouse d´Amedée fils du comte de Savoye" in her testament dated 1228[346].  If the suggested second marriage of Comte Amedée is correctly shown in the document SAVOY, Marguerite de Bourgogne must have died in [1228/30].  If it is incorrect, her date of death is estimated to [1242].  m (1222) as his first wife, AMEDEE de Savoie, son of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Marguerite [Béatrix] de Genève (Montmélian, Savoie 1197-Montmélian 24 Jun or 13 Jul 1253, bur Hautecombe, abbaye royale de Sainte-Marie).  He succeeded his father in 1233 as AMEDEE IV Comte de Savoie

 

 

EUDES III 1192-1218

 

EUDES de Bourgogne, son of HUGUES III Duke of Burgundy & his first wife Alix de Lorraine (1166-Lyon 15 Jun or 6 Jul 1218, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  "Hugo dux Burgundie…Aeliz ducissa Burgundie cum Odone filio meo" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated 1171[347].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Odonem et Alexandrum" as sons of "dux" by his first wife "Aaliz"[348].  "Hugo Burgundie dux et Albonii comes" donated property to the Templars at Beaune, with the support of "Beatricis uxoris mee et…filiorum meorum Odonis, Alexandri et Dalphini", by charter dated Dec 1188[349].  "Hugo…dux Burgundiæ et Albonii comes" confirmed "[cum] assensu filiorum meorum Oddonis et Alexandri" the concession to Cluny by "consanguineæ meæ Matildi comitissæ Tornodori" by charter dated 1186[350].  He governed Burgundy during his father's absence on Crusade from Jun 1190.  “Odo filius Hugonis ducis Burgundie” granted privileges to the abbey of Autun Saint-Martin by charter dated 1191[351].  He succeeded his father in 1192 as EUDES III Duke of Burgundy.  He acquired the powerful fortress of Vergy by his second marriage in 1199.  He renounced any rights over the duchy of Lorraine in 1203.  He commanded a division at the battle of Bouvines in 1213.  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death in 1218 of "Oddo dux Burgundie cruce signatus…filius ducisse Lotoringie"[352].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1218 of "dux Odo Burgundie" and his burial "apud Cistercium"[353].  The 13th century obituary of the Eglise primatiale de Lyon records the death "II Non Jul" of "Odo dux Burgundie canonicus huius ecclesie qui dedit Sancto Stephano calicem argenteum deauratum et vestimentum sacerdotale…"[354].  The necrology of Molesme records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Odo dux Burgundie"[355].  He died on his way to rejoin the Crusades[356]

m firstly (Feb 1194, divorced on grounds of consanguinity 1195) as her second husband, Infanta dona MAFALDA de Portugal Ctss of Flanders, widow of PHILIPPE Count of Flanders, daughter of dom AFONSO I King of Portugal & his wife Mathilde [Mafalda] de Savoie (1157-drowned off Furnes, West Flanders 16 May 1218, bur Abbaye de Clairvaux, Jura).  The Flandria Generosa specifies that on her (first) marriage she was given "Insulam et Duacum et plures…villas…iacentes, Caslethuin, Watenes, Bergas, Burburgium, totamque maritimmam regionem"[357].  The Flandria Generosa names "Mathildis regine Portusequalis" as wife of Count Philippe, specifying that she arranged the repatriation of her husband's body to "Claramvallem"[358].  After the death of her first husband, she received her widow's portion in southern and coastal Flanders but increased taxes so much that she provoked rebellions at Veurne [Furnes] and the castellany of Bourbourg[359].  A charter dated 1195 records an agreement between the French king and "M. regina comitissa Flandrie" which records that the latter promised not to remarry after separating from "Odone duce Burgundie"[360].  The Flandria Generosa records that she was "amita" of "Fernando filio regis Portusequalis" and instrumental in arranging his marriage to her first husband's great-niece Jeanne Ctss of Flanders[361].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1218 of "comitissa vetus de Flandria relicta comitis Philippi" and her burial next to her husband at Clairvaux[362].  She died when her carriage accidentally fell into a marsh near Furnes[363]

m secondly (Summer 1199) ALIX de Vergy, daughter of HUGUES Seigneur de Vergy & his wife Gisle de Trainel (1182-Prenois-en-Montage 15 Feb or 8 Mar 1251, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  A charter dated 1197 records that "Huo dominus Virgeii" donated property to the Templars, with the consent of "domina Gilla uxor dicti Huonis, Guillermus, Huo filii sui, Alais et Nicholeta filie sue"[364].  "Odo dux Burgundie" confirmed the donation by "domina Egidia, mater Alaidis uxoris mee ducisse Burgundie" to Colunge by charter dated Apr 1213[365].  Her origin is further deduced from the necrology of Cîteaux which records the death "XVI Kal Jan" of "Hugo Vergiaci pater ducissa"[366].  Her parentage is further confirmed by a charter dated 1 Sep 1236 in which “Hugo dux Burgundie” names “matrem meam et Guillermum de Vergeio, avunculum meum[367].  She governed Burgundy on the death of her husband for her son until his majority in 1231.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "XV Kal Mar" of "Alix ducissa Burgundie"[368].  The necrology of Autun Saint-Martin records the death “II Kal Mar” of “Aalis de Vergy, uxor Odonis ducis Burg., mater Hugonis ducis[369]

Duke Eudes III & his second wife had three children:

1.         JEANNE de Bourgogne ([1200]-shortly after 1222, bur Abbaye de Foucarmont)The Chronique des comtes d´Eu, written in 1390, records that Alix Ctss d´Eu married "son filz [Raoul de Yssouldun] à la fille du duc de Bourgongne" in 1222, but that she died soon afterwards[370]The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m (1222) as his first wife, RAOUL [II] de Lusignan Comte d'Eu, son of RAOUL de Lusignan dit d'Issoudun Comte d'Eu & his wife Alix Ctss d'Eu (-[1/2] Sep 1246). 

2.         HUGUES de Bourgogne (9 Mar 1213-château de Villaines-en-Duesmois, Côtes d'Or 27 or 30 Oct 1272, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth "Anno 1212 VII Idus Marcii, VI feria ante mediam noctem anno bisextili" of "Hugo filius Oddonis ducis de domina de Vergerie"[371].  He succeeded his father in 1218 as HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy

-        see below

3.         BEATRIX de Bourgogne ([1216]-).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the book of fees of the church of Lyon which records “domino de Villars et de Thoiré” holding “tota terra Montisregalis quæ est ultra Sagonam...usque ad Gebennas” which he received “in dotem suæ uxoris sororis ducis Burgundiæ[372].  Dame de Montréal, d´Arbent et de Martignat.  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Dame de Montréal, d´Arbent et de Martignat.  m as his first wife, HUMBERT [III] Sire de Thoire et Villars, son of ETIENNE [II] Sire de Thoire et Villars & his wife Beatrix de Faucigny (-14 May 1301, bur Saint-Claude).

 

 

HUGUES IV 1218-1272

 

HUGUES de Bourgogne, son of EUDES III Duke of Burgundy & his second wife Alix de Vergy (9 Mar 1213-château de Villaines-en-Duesmois, Côtes d'Or 27 or 30 Oct 1272, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth "Anno 1212 VII Idus Marcii, VI feria ante mediam noctem anno bisextili" of "Hugo filius Oddonis ducis de domina de Vergerie"[373].  He succeeded his father in 1218 as HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy, under the regency of his mother until 1231.  He acquired Salins in Feb 1225 from Josseran [V] Grossus de Brancion and his wife Marguerite de Vienne, and exchanged it for Chalon 15 Jun 1237 with Jean Comte de Bourgogne.  He left on Crusade 1239-1242 and 1248-1250.  Otto III Duke of Merano Comte Palatin de Bourgogne gave him possession of the county of Burgundy for 5 years 29 Mar 1242, and his sister Béatrice Gräfin von Orlamünde (Otto's heiress) sold her rights to the county to Duke Hugues IV at Strasbourg in 1265.  After trying to enforce his rights, he renounced any claim to the county of Burgundy by agreement with Jean de Chalon at Saint-Jean-de-Losne 20 Apr 1270[374].  "Hugo dux Burgundie" requested the abbot of Cluny to recognise the rights of “Ph Sabaudie et Burgundie comiti et A. comitisse uxori sue” in “comitatu Burgundie…cessionis nobis facte a domina B, comitissa Orlemunde, sorore dicte A. comitissa”, by charter dated Apr 1270[375].  He bought the titular rights to the kingdom of Thessaloniki from the exiled Emperor Baudouin II of Constantinople in Paris in Jan 1266, for 13,000 livres tournois[376].  The bishop of Langres approved an agreement between Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy and “messire Jean de Montreal chevalier” under which the latter transferred his rights in the castles and lands of “Montreal et Chastelgirard” in return for “la Mote de Athées...et...la terre de Montréal hors la ville”, with the consent of “dame Marguerite sa femme, Guiot leur fils, Ieannette, Agnelez et Beatrix leurs filles”, by charter dated 9 Oct 1269[377].  Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] named him Captain and Vicar-General of the kingdom of Sicily [11 Nov] 1270.  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, with the consent of “liberorum meorum...Odonis primogeniti mei quondam comitis Nivernensis, Ioannis quondam domini Borbonensis et Roberti filii mei”, appointed “dictum Robertum filium meum” as his heir and listed all his castles, bequeathed property “in civitato Eduensi” to “filiæ Odonis primogeniti mei”, castles “Charrolles...Saluamento...Montissancti Vincentii...Dundano et...Arth...Sineuigneis” to “Beatrix filia quondam Ioannis filii mei”, specified castles to “Hugonem filium meum”, dowry to “Beatrix filia mea”, dowry for “Ysabellam filiam meam” for her marriage to “domino Roberto de Flandria comiti Nivernensi...filium dicti Roberti primogenitum contrahendi”, dowry for “Margaretam filiam meam” for her marriage to “Ioanni filio quondam...Ioannis comitis Burgundie domini Salinensis defuncti”, for “Ioannam filiam meam, quam intendo ponere in Religionem”, bequeathed property to “filiam meam...dominam Alasiam ducissam Brabantie” and “Margaretam filiam meam vicecomitissam Lemovicensem”, and to “Beatrix uxor mea[378].  He transferred the duchy to Robert, his third son, 23 Oct 1272, retaining the usufruct.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "III Kal Nov 1272" of "Hugo dux Burgundie quondam filius Odonis"[379]

m firstly (1229) YOLANDE de Dreux Ctss d'Ossone, daughter of ROBERT III Comte de Dreux & his wife Aliénore de Saint-Valéry ([1212]-30 Oct 1248, bur Cîteaux).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1229 of "dux Hugo Burgundie" and "comitis Roberti di Brana filia" but does not name her[380].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "III Kal Nov 1248" of "Huolandis ducissa Burgundie"[381]

m secondly (contract Nov 1258) BEATRICE de Champagne, Infanta doña BEATRIZ de Navarra, daughter of THIBAUT IV Comte de Champagne, TEOBALDO I King of Navarre & his wife Marguerite de Bourbon ([1242]- château de Villaines-en-Duesmois, Côtes d'Or 1295 after Jul).  A charter dated Nov 1258 confirms the marriage between “Hue duc de Bourgoigne” and “Thiebaut…foy de Navarre, de Champaigne et de Brie cuens palatins…demoiselle Biatrix nostre serour[382].  Dame de l'Isle-sous-Montréal.  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed property to “Beatrix uxor mea[383].  She renounced any claim to the succession of her brother 2 Sep 1273.  After her husband died, she retired to the château de l'Isle-sur-Serein.  She quarrelled with her stepson Robert Duke of Burgundy, and asked for protection from Philippe II "Auguste" King of France[384].  An arrêt of Parliament dated 1 Nov 1292 ordered compensation to “Odo Bezors miles dominus de Villa-Arnulphi...et Agnete eius uxore” for transferring their part of “castro et castellaniæ Iusulæ subtus Montem-Regalem” which they had received under the succession of “defuncti Iohannis de Monteregali militis quondam patris dictæ Agnetis”, which he had inherited from “defuncto Anserico quondam domino Montisregalis”, to “Beatrice ducissa relicta Hugonis ducis Burgundiæ”, while providing for “Guido de Monteregali armiger filius Ioannis de Monteregali quondam militis...et...Beatrice relicta Iacobi domini de Rocha de Breine, sorore dicti Guidonis[385].  “Guiot de Montreal escuyer” renounced his claims over “la chastellenie de l´île soubs Montreal” derived from “le decés de Jean de Montreal son pere et de Anseric seigneur de Montreal son oncle” in favour of “Beatrix veuve de Hugues Duc de Bourgongne” by charter dated May 1293[386]

Duke Hugues IV & his first wife had five children:

1.         EUDES de Bourgogne (1230-Acre 4 Aug 1266, bur Acre, cemetery of St Nicolas).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, with the consent of “liberorum meorum...Odonis primogeniti mei quondam comitis Nivernensis, Ioannis quondam domini Borbonensis et Roberti filii mei”, appointed “dictum Robertum filium meum” as his heir, bequeathed property “in civitato Eduensi” to “filiæ Odonis primogeniti mei[387].  Sire de Bourbon in 1249, by right of his wife.  Comte de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre 1257-1262, by right of his wife.  He left on Crusade in 1265.  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death, at the start of the paragraph concerning 1267, of "Oddo, primogenitus ducis Burgundie" specifying that he died "in partibus transmarinus"[388].  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "II Non Aug 1266" of "Odo quondam comes Nivernensis"[389]m (contract Feb 1237, Feb 1248) MATHILDE de Bourbon, daughter and co-heiress of ARCHAMBAUD [IX] Sire de Bourbon [Dampierre] & his wife Yolande de Châtillon heiress of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre ([1234/35]-[Mar/Sep] 1262).  The marriage contract of “Odet et de Jean enfans de Hugues Duc de Bourgongne” and “Mahaut et Agnes filles d´Archembaut seigneur de Bourbon et de sa femme suer de Gaucher de Chastillon” is dated Feb 1237[390].  She succeeded her father in 1249 as Dame de Bourbon.  The executors of the testament of "feu Archambaud de Bourbon" required "Eudes sire de Bourbon mari de Mathilde fille dudit Archambaud" to return certain pigs, by charter dated 9 Apr 1252[391]She succeeded her great-grandmother Mathilde de Courtenay in 1257 as Ctss de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre.  Eudes de Bourgogne & his wife had four children:

a)         YOLANDE de Bourgogne ([1248/49]-2 Jun 1280, bur Nevers, église Saint-François).  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Yolendem filiam Odonis comitis Nivernensis et viduam Iohannis filii Ludovici regis Francie" as second wife of "Robertus primogenitus Guidonis", specifying that her husband obtained the county of Nevers by this marriage[392].  The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon names "Yolandem filiam Odonis comites Nivernensis et viduam Iohannis filii Ludovici…regis Francie" as [second] wife of "Robertus primogenitus Guidonis et Mathilde"[393].  The marriage contract between “Oedes fiuz le Duc de Bourgongne, cuens de Nevers et sires de Bourbon...Yolent nostre ainznée fille” and “Loys...roi de France...monseigneur Iehan son fil” is dated 8 Jun 1258[394].  Baronne de Donzy, Dame de Saint-Aignan, by grant as her dowry.  On the death of her mother in 1262, she claimed to succeed to the counties of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre as the eldest daughter, but they were split between the three sisters by arrêt du parlement 1 Nov 1273, under which Yolande became Ctss de Nevers.  Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy, in light of dispute between “Ioannem filium...Ludovici Franc. regis et...neptem nostram Yolendim eius uxorem, filiam primogeniti filii nostri Odonis”, and himself, ordered that Yolande be returned to her father until her husband was 21 years old by charter dated May 1266[395].  She claimed to succeed her grandfather as Dss of Burgundy in 1272, as the most senior member of the family, but Philippe III King of France, who was appointed arbitrator, found in favour of her uncle Duke Robert II.  An arrêt of the Parliament dated 1 Nov 1273 addressed “dominus Ioannes de Cabilone miles...de parte Aalesin uxorem suam...Yolandim comitissam Niverrnensem [...Robertum de Flandria eius maritum] et Margaretam reginam Siciliæ sorores suas” in respect of the succession of “Mathildis quondam comitissæ Nivernensis matris suæ”, ordered the partition of “Nivernensi, Altissiodorensi et Tornodorensi comitatib.”, under which Nevers was granted to Yolande, Tonnerre to Marguerite, and Auxerre to Alix[396]m firstly (contract Vincennes 8 Jun 1258, Jun 1265) JEAN “Tristan” de France, son of LOUIS IX King of France & his wife Marguerite de Provence (Damiette, Egypt 8 Apr 1250-Tunis 2 or 3 Aug 1270, bur Saint-Denis).  Comte de Nevers in 1265, by right of his wife.  He claimed to inherit the counties of Auxerre and Tonnerre on the death of his father-in-law.  Comte de Valois et de Crépy Mar 1268.  He died of dysentery on crusade in Tunis.  m secondly (contract Auxerre Mar 1272) as his second wife, ROBERT de Flandre Seigneur de Béthune et de Dendermonde [Termonde], son of Guy de Dampierre Count of Flanders & his first wife Mathilde de Béthune Dame de Béthune ([1249]-Ypres 17 Sep 1322, bur Ypres St Martin, transferred to Ypres Cathedral).  Comte de Nevers, in right of his wife.  He succeeded his father in 1305 as ROBERT III Count of Flanders.  

b)         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne ([1249/50]-château de Tonnerre 5 Sep 1308, bur Tonnerre, église de l'Hôpital).  The charter dated May 1266, under which Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy ordered that his granddaughter Yolande be returned to her father, notes that “alias tres filias suas Margaretam, Alesiam et Ioannam” were under their father´s guardianship[397].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records the marriage of King Charles and "la fille du conte de Nevers, niece le duc de Borgoigne" in 1268, around the time of the execution of Konradin[398].  The Istoria of Saba Malaspina records that Charles I King of Sicily married "filia ducis [Burgundiæ]"[399]Ctss de Tonnerre, Dame de Montmirail et du Perche.  An arrêt of the Parliament dated 1 Nov 1273 addressed “dominus Ioannes de Cabilone miles...de parte Aalesin uxorem suam...Yolandim comitissam Niverrnensem [...Robertum de Flandria eius maritum] et Margaretam reginam Siciliæ sorores suas” in respect of the succession of “Mathildis quondam comitissæ Nivernensis matris suæ”, ordered the partition of “Nivernensi, Altissiodorensi et Tornodorensi comitatib.”, under which Nevers was granted to Yolande, Tonnerre to Marguerite, and Auxerre to Alix[400].  After the death of her husband, she returned to France and retired to Tonnerre where she founded a hospital 9 Apr 1293.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1308 of "Margareta Siciliæ regina relicta primi Karoli regis Siciliæ fratrisque sancti Ludovici"[401]m (by proxy Trani 18 Jan 1268, in person [12 Oct/18 Nov] 1268) as his second wife, CHARLES I King of Sicily, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla y León (posthumously [21] Mar 1227-Foggia 7 Jan 1285, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).  No issue.  

c)         ALIX de Bourgogne (1251-1279).  The charter dated May 1266, under which Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy ordered that his granddaughter Yolande be returned to her father, notes that “alias tres filias suas Margaretam, Alesiam et Ioannam” were under their father´s guardianship[402].  An arrêt of the Parliament dated 1 Nov 1273 addressed “dominus Ioannes de Cabilone miles...de parte Aalesin uxorem suam...Yolandim comitissam Niverrnensem [...Robertum de Flandria eius maritum] et Margaretam reginam Siciliæ sorores suas” in respect of the succession of “Mathildis quondam comitissæ Nivernensis matris suæ”, ordered the partition of “Nivernensi, Altissiodorensi et Tornodorensi comitatib.”, under which Nevers was granted to Yolande, Tonnerre to Marguerite, and Auxerre to Alix[403].  Ctss d'Auxerre, Dame de Saint-Aignan et de Montjay.  Jehans de Chalons sires de Roichefort et cuens d´Auceure et...Aaliz de Nevers contesse d´Auceure fame audit Jehan” transferred “la grange des Jarries” to “madame Agnes la dame de Brageloigne” by charter dated Jul 1274[404]m (église de Lantenay, Côte d'Or 1 Nov 1268) as his second wife, JEAN [II] de Chalon Seigneur de Rochefort, son of JEAN [I] "le Sage/l'Antique" Comte de Chalon [Bourgogne-Comté] & his second wife Isabelle de Courtenay (1243-before 10 Nov 1309).  Comte d'Auxerre, by right of his wife.

d)         JEANNE de Bourgogne ([1253]-1271).  The charter dated May 1266, under which Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy ordered that his granddaughter Yolande be returned to her father, notes that “alias tres filias suas Margaretam, Alesiam et Ioannam” were under their father´s guardianship[405]

2.         JEAN de Bourgogne ([1231]-Moulins, Allier 17 Sep 1267).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, with the consent of “liberorum meorum...Odonis primogeniti mei quondam comitis Nivernensis, Ioannis quondam domini Borbonensis et Roberti filii mei”, appointed “dictum Robertum filium meum” as his heir[406].  Sire de Bourbon 1262, in right of his wife.  Seigneur de Charolais.  m (contract Feb 1237, Feb 1248) as her first husband, AGNES de Bourbon, daughter and co-heiress of ARCHAMBAUD [IX] Sire de Bourbon [Dampierre] & his wife Yolande de Châtillon heiress of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre (1237-Foggia, Apulia [5 Sep 1287/30 Jun 1288], bur Champaigue-en-Bourbonnais, église des Cordeliers).  The marriage contract of “Odet et de Jean enfans de Hugues Duc de Bourgongne” and “Mahaut et Agnes filles d´Archembaut seigneur de Bourbon et de sa femme suer de Gaucher de Chastillon” is dated Feb 1237[407]Her two marriages are confirmed by the Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis which records that "rex Franciæ fratrem suum Robertum comitem Clarimontis" married her daughter "filiam dominæ de Borbone uxoris quondam fratris ducis Burgundiæ Roberti et post comitis Attrebatensis Roberti"[408].  "Archambaud sire de Bourbon, ayant promis de donner sa fille Agnès en mariage à Jean fils du duc de Bourgogne" authorised "son oncle Guillaume de Dampierre et son beau-frère Béraud de Mercœur" to transfer her to her bridegroom, by charter dated Aug 1248[409]She succeeded her sister in 1262 as Dame de Bourbon.  She married secondly (before 13 Jun 1277) as his second wife, Robert [II] Comte d'Artois.  Jean de Bourgogne & his wife had one child:

-        SIRES de BOURBON

3.         ALIX de Bourgogne ([1233]-20 Oct 1273, bur Louvain, Dominican Church).  The Annales Parchenses records the marriage in 1253 of "Heinricus dux" and "filiam ducis Burgundie…Aeliden"[410].  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that "Henricus tertius…in ducatu Lotharingie" married "Aleidem filiam Hugonis ducis Burgundie"[411].  Regent of Brabant 1261-1268 during the minority of her son.  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed property to “filiam meam...dominam Alasiam ducissam Brabantie[412].  She corresponded with St Thomas Aquinas, who dedicated his Du Gouvernement du Prince to her[413].  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "XIII Kal Nov" of "domina Aalipdis ducissa Brabancie mater domine Marie…regina Francie"[414].  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records the death in 1262 (misdated) of "ducissa…Aleydis de Burgundia…fundatrix monasteriorum tam in Lovanio quam in Oudergheem" and her burial with her husband "apud Fratres Predicatores"[415]m (1251 after 21 Jul) HENRI III " le Pacifique/le Débonnaire" Duke of Brabant, son of HENRI II Duke of Brabant & his first wife Marie of Germany [Hohenstaufen] (-Louvain 28 Feb or 1 Mar 1261, bur Louvain, Dominican Church). 

4.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (-27 Aug 1277).  The marriage contract between “Guillelmus dominus Montis Sancti Johannis...Guillelmo filio meo primogenito” and “dominum meum Hugonem ducem Burgundiæ...Margaretam filiam suam” is dated [4] Jun 1239[416].  Dame de Molinot, by grant of her father as dowry, in return for her first husband transferring his rights to Vergy to her father.  The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis names "Margarita filia Ducis Burgundiæ" as wife of "Guidonem Probem"[417].  Her subjects at Molinot rebelled against her in 1265, her father helping her to crush the revolt[418].  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed property to “Margaretam filiam meam vicecomitissam Lemovicensem[419].  An anonymous Chronicon of Saint-Marcial records that "Margarita filia ducis Burgundie et vicecomitissa Lemovicensis" subjugated the castle of Limoges in 1274[420]A fragment written by Bernard Guidonis records that "domina Margarita vicecomitissa Lemovicensis, filia ducis Burgundiæ, relicta...domini Guidonis vicecomitis Lemovicensis" founded the monastery "locum Sancti Pardulphi in Petragoricensi diœcesi, in confinio Lemovicensi"[421]An anonymous Chronicon of Saint-Marcial records the death "mense Augusti die Veneris pos festum beati Bartholomei" of "Margarita vicecomitissa Lemovicensis"[422]m firstly (after 4 Jun 1239) GUILLAUME [III] de Mont-Saint-Jean Seigneur de Mont-Saint-Jean, Salmaise, Thoisy and part of Vergy, son of GUILLAUME [II] Seigneur de Mont-Saint-Jean & his wife Marie des Barres (-[1256]).  m secondly (1258) as his second wife, GUY [VI] Vicomte de Limoges, son of GUY [V] Vicomte de Limoges & his second wife Ermengarde de Barry (-Brantôme, Dordogne 13 Aug 1263, bur Limoges, église Saint-Martial). 

5.         son (1236-).  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth in 1236 of "filius Hugonis ducis Burgundie", without giving his name[423].  It is not known whether this is a son of Duke Hugues who is otherwise unrecorded or whether it refers to one of his other sons whose estimated birth dates may have been incorrect. 

6.         ROBERT de Bourgogne ([1245/48]-Vernon-sur-Seine, Eure 21 Mar 1306, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, with the consent of “liberorum meorum...Odonis primogeniti mei quondam comitis Nivernensis, Ioannis quondam domini Borbonensis et Roberti filii mei”, appointed “dictum Robertum filium meum” as his heir and listed all his castles[424].  He succeeded his father in 1272 as ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy

-        see below

Duke Hugues IV & his second wife had five children:

7.         HUGUES "Huguenin" de Bourgogne (-1288 after Jan, bur Veausse Priory).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed numerous castles to “Hugonem filium meum[425].  He received many properties under the testament of his father, but his brother Duke Robert only let him keep Montréal and some smaller areas.  “Hugo dux Burgundie” granted numerous properties including “castrum Montis Regalis” to “filio nostro Hugonino” by charter dated 24 Oct 1272[426].  The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas[427]m (1280, consummated Oct 1280, Papal dispensation ordered 15 May 1282) MARGUERITE de Salins dame de Montréal, daughter of JEAN [I] "l'Antique" Comte de Chalon [later Sire de Salins] & his third wife Laure de Commercy (11 Sep 1263 or before-1328).  A charter of “Robers dux de Bourgoingne” dated Mar 1300 records that “l´eschoite damoisele Biatrix, jadis dame de Monreal” fell to “Merguerite nostre…suer et mons. Jehan de Chalon signour d´Allay son mari” and names “messires Hugues de Bourgoigne, pere de ladite Biatrix…Marguerite fame doudit Hugue[428].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Hugues de Bourgogne & his wife had two children: 

a)         BEATRIX de Bourgogne ([1281]-1291).  A charter of “Robers dux de Bourgoingne” dated Mar 1300 records that “l´eschoite damoisele Biatrix, jadis dame de Monreal” fell to “Merguerite nostre…suer et mons. Jehan de Chalon signour d´Allay son mari” and names “messires Hugues de Bourgoigne, pere de ladite Biatrix[429].  She succeeded her father in 1288 as Dame de Montréal. 

b)         son (1284-young).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

8.         BEATRIX de Bourgogne (-Cognac [Jul 1328/31 May 1329], bur Angoulême, église des Cordeliers).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed dowry to “Beatrix filia mea[430].  An anonymous Chronicon of Saint-Marcial records the marriage in 1276 of "Hugo Bruni comes Marchie" and "filiam ducis Burgundie, sororem vicecomitisse Lemovicensis" at Paris[431].  The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas[432].  “Jehans de Chalon, sires d´Arlay, et Marguerite sa fame, et Biatrix de Bourgoingne comtesse de La Marche et d´Angoulesme, suer de ladite Marguerite” issued a charter dated to [1305] relating to the purchase of “la chestellenie de Lylle souz Monreaul[433].  Dame de Grignon Feb 1302.  She was called la Comtesse de La Marche.  m (Paris 1 Jul 1276) HUGUES [XIV] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême, Sire de Fougères, son of HUGUES [XIII] Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême & his wife Jeanne dame de Fougères (25 Jun 1259-Angoulême 1 Nov 1303, bur Angoulême, église des Cordeliers).  

9.         ISABELLE de Bourgogne (-after 20 Nov 1294).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed dowry to “Ysabellam filiam meam” for her marriage to “domino Roberto de Flandria comiti Nivernensi...filium dicti Roberti primogenitum contrahendi[434].  The Ellenhardi Chronicon records the marriage in 1284 "in civitate Basilicasi…intra festum Pentecostes et festum Iohannis baptiste" of King Rudolf and "Elisabetam filiam ducis Ottonis senioris Burgundie dicti de Tygun apud Rymilisberg"[435].  The Annales Colmarienses record the marriage "in Rumarico monte in festo sancte Agate" of "rex Ruodolphus" and "uxorem Gallicam" in 1284[436].  She adopted the name AGNES in 1284.  The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas[437].  Dame de Vieux-Château et d´Aigney-le Duc by grant 20 Nov 1294[438].  According to Du Chesne, Isabelle married “Pierre de Chambly le jeune seigneur de Chambly[439].  This statement is proved incorrect by a document dated May 1321 which records that “Pierre de Chambli seigneur de Neaufle fils de Pierre seigneur de Chambli” had married “Isabeau fille de Jean de Bourgogne fils de Hugues de Vienne et d´Alis de Méranie comtesse palatine de Bourgogne” and that Isabelle “sœur de Henri de Bourgogne fils du susdit Jean” was present when the latter reached agreement with Jeanne Queen of France regarding “le château de Montrond près de Besançon[440]Betrothed (before Sep 1272) to CHARLES de Flandre, son of ROBERT de Flandre Comte de Nevers, later ROBERT III Count of Flanders & his first wife Blanche d'Anjou ([1266]-1277, aged 11).  m (Basel 5 Feb or 6 Mar 1285) as his second wife, RUDOLF I King of Germany, son of ALBRECHT IV "dem Weise" Graf von Habsburg & his wife Heilwig von Kiburg (Burg Limburg, Upper Rhine 1 May 1216-Germersheim near Speyer 15 Jul 1291, bur Speyer Cathedral). 

10.      MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (-after 1300).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed dowry for “Margaretam filiam meam” for her marriage to “Ioanni filio quondam...Ioannis comitis Burgundie domini Salinensis defuncti[441].  The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas[442].  “Jehans de Chalon, sires d´Arlay, et Marguerite sa fame, et Biatrix de Bourgoingne comtesse de La Marche et d´Angoulesme, suer de ladite Marguerite” issued a charter dated to [1305] relating to the purchase of “la chestellenie de Lylle souz Monreaul[443].  Dame de Vitteaux 1294, by grant of her half-brother Duke Robert as part of the succession of her brother Huguenin.  A charter of “Robers dux de Bourgoingne” dated Mar 1300 records that “l´eschoite damoisele Biatrix, jadis dame de Monreal” fell to “Merguerite nostre…suer et mons. Jehan de Chalon signour d´Allay son mari” and names “messires Hugues de Bourgoigne, pere de ladite Biatrix[444]m (contract before 26 Sep 1272, 1280) as his first wife, JEAN de Chalon Seigneur d'Arlay, son of JEAN [I] "l'Antique" Comte Palatin de Bourgogne et de Chalon & his third wife Laure de Commercy (1259-before 30 Oct 1315).   

11.      JEANNE de Bourgogne (-30 Aug before 1285).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, bequeathed property for “Ioannam filiam meam, quam intendo ponere in Religionem[445].  The necrology of Mont-Saint-Catherine at Provins records the death on 30 Aug of "soror Johanna…Hugonis quondam ducis Burgundie filia"[446].  Nun.  

 

 

ROBERT II 1272-1306, HUGUES V 1306-1315

 

ROBERT de Bourgogne, son of HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his first wife Yolande de Dreux ([1245/48]-Vernon-sur-Seine, Eure 21 Mar 1306, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Hugo dux Burgundiæ”, dated Sep 1272, with the consent of “liberorum meorum...Odonis primogeniti mei quondam comitis Nivernensis, Ioannis quondam domini Borbonensis et Roberti filii mei”, appointed “dictum Robertum filium meum” as his heir and listed all his castles[447].  He received the duchy of Burgundy from his father 23 Oct 1272, the latter retaining the usufruct.  He succeeded his father in 1272 as ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy.  His succession was challenged by Robert III Count of Flanders and Robert Comte de Clermont, in the name of their wives, daughters of Robert's deceased older brothers.  Philippe III King of France was appointed arbitrator, and found in favour of Duke Robert II.  He bought the Vicomté de Dijon in 1276.  He planned the annexation of the county of Burgundy by betrothing his son Jean to the heiress, but the marriage did not take place.  After disputing the succession of Viennois, following the death in 1282 of Jean de Bourgogne Dauphin de Viennois, he assigned his rights to Jean's sister Anne and her husband Humbert de la Tour du Pin 25 Jan and 23 Feb 1286.  Philippe IV King of France appointed him Lieutenant at Lyon in 1294, and Governor of Franche-Comté in Jan 1297, and granted him Pontailler-sur-Saône in Mar 1303.  He held the first place in the Council of the king of France.  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), established “Hugue mon fil...au Duchesme de Borgoigne, au Contée de Chalon, en la terre de Monreaul”, bequeathed property to “Odoz mes fils...Loys...li enfans de quoi ma...famme Agnes...est grosse, se il est fils”, and provided dowries for “Blanche ma premiere fille...Marguerite...Iehanne”, and appointed “...monseignour Guillaume seignor de Montagu, Iehan de Vergy seignor de Fouvenz et Liebaut seignor de Beffroimont mes...cosins...” among the executors[448].  By virtue of his will 25 Mar 1298, the duchy of Burgundy ceased to be a family possession, becoming a state with territorial unity. 

m (contract 20 Oct 1272, [Mar] 1273) AGNES de France, daughter of LOUIS IX King of France & his wife Marguerite de Provence (1260-château de Lantenay, Côte d'Or 19 or 20 Dec 1325, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the fourth daughter of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" married "au duc de Bourgoigne"[449]She was regent of Burgundy during the minority of her son Duke Hugues from 1306 until 9 Nov 1311.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "XIII Kal Jan" of "Agnes ducissa Burgundiæ filia Ludovici regis Francorum"[450]

Duke Robert II & his wife had [eleven] children:

1.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (-young).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

2.         JEAN de Bourgogne (before 22 Sep 1279-[1283]).  The marriage contract between “Robert Duc de Bourgogne...Jean fils dudit Duc Robert” and “Othon Comte de Bourgongne Palatin sire de Salins...Alix fille dudit Comte Othon” is dated [3 Mar] 1280 [N.S.][451]Betrothed (contract Abbaye de Bèze 3 Mar 1280) to ALIX de Bourgogne-Comté, daughter and heiress of OTHON V Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his first wife Philippa de Bar (-after 31 Jan 1285).  The marriage contract between “Robert Duc de Bourgogne...Jean fils dudit Duc Robert” and “Othon Comte de Bourgongne Palatin sire de Salins...Alix fille dudit Comte Othon” is dated [3 Mar] 1280 [N.S.][452]

3.         BLANCHE de Bourgogne ([1288]-Dijon 27 or 28 Jul 1348, bur Dijon, église des Cordeliers).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), provided dowries for “Blanche ma premiere fille...Marguerite...Iehanne[453]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1307 of "filius Sabaudie comitis Eduardus" and "sororem reginæ Navarræ...filiam ducis Burgundiæ"[454]"Ugone Duca di Borgogna" promised to pay "Edoardo di Savoia figlio Primogenito emancipato del Conte Amedeo di Savoia" the dowry of "Bianca di Borgogna sua Sorella future Sposa del detto Edoardo" dated "la festa di S. Dionigi 1307"[455].  An agreement dated 27 Sep 1307 refers to the dowry of "Bianca Primogenita del Duca di Borgogna futuro Sposa di Edoardo [figlio Primogenito…del…Conte Amedeo di Savoia"[456]The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "VI Kal Aug" of "domina Blancha quondam comitissa de Sabaudia"[457]m (Papal dispensation 21 Jun 1298, contract Paris 27 Sep 1307, château de Montbard, Côte d'Or 18 Oct 1307) EDOUARD de Savoie, son of AMEDEE V Comte de Savoie & his first wife Sibylle de Baugé (Baugé 8 Feb 1284-Gentilly near Paris 4 Nov 1329, bur église abbatiale de Hautecombe).  He succeeded his father in 1323 as EDOUARD "le Libéral" Comte de Savoie.  

4.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (1290-Château-Gaillard from tuberculosis 30 Apr 1315, bur Vernon, église des Cordeliers).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), provided dowries for “Blanche ma premiere fille...Marguerite...Iehanne[458]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage "die Jovis post festum sancti Matthæi apostoli" in 1305 of "Ludovicus primogenitus regis Francorum" and "Margaretam primogenitam ducis Burgundie"[459]Hugues dux de Bourgoigne” promised to pay “quatre mile livres de tornois fors” to “nostre…uncle mons. Jehan de Chalon signour d´Allay” less the sum owed to “adit roy mon signour dou marriage de madame la reyne de Navarre nostre…suer[460].  The primary source which confirms name has not yet been identified.  Accused of adultery in 1314, she was imprisoned at Château-Gaillard where she died soon after.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Margareta Navarræ regina juvencula et Blancha regis Navarræ Karoli fratris junioris uxor" were accused of adultery respectively with "Philippo et Galtero de Alneto fratribus militibus" in 1314[461]The allegations against her, and her sisters-in-law, were the subject of la Ballade des dames du temps jadis by François Villon[462]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1315 of "Margareta quondam Navarræ regina" and her burial "Vernone in ecclesia fratrum Minorem"[463].  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death in Apr 1315 of "uxor prima Ludovici regis Franciæ, filia ducis Burgundiæ" held "in privata custodia"[464]m (contract Abbey of Longchamps 28 Feb 1299/1300, contract Vincennes 28 Mar 1301, Corbeil, Essonne 23 Sep 1305) as his first wife, LOUIS de France, son of PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France & his wife Juana I Queen of Navarre Ctss de Champagne (Paris 4 Oct 1289-Château du Bois de Vincennes 5 Jun 1316, bur Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his mother in 1305 as LUIS I King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne.  He succeeded his father in 1314 as LOUIS X "le Hutin" King of France

5.         JEANNE "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne ([1293/94]-Montargis, Loiret or Hôtel de Nesle, Paris 12 Dec 1349, bur Saint-Denis).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), provided dowries for “Blanche ma premiere fille...Marguerite...Iehanne[465].  She was invested with Courtenay at Fontainebleau in July 1313.  Crowned Queen with her husband at Notre Dame de Reims 29 May 1328.  A forceful person, she exercised great influence over her husband, who named her Regent during his absence in August 1338.  Her nephew Henri IV Comte de Bar appointed her Regent of the county of Bar under his will 30 Nov 1344, during the minority of his son after his death.  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Dec" of "domina Johanna quondam regina Francie mater…domini Johannis regis Francie"[466].  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "II Id Dec" of "domine Johanne filia ducis Burgundie quondam regine Francie"[467]m (treaty Sens, Yonne 24 Mar 1303, Fontainebleau end Jul 1313) as his first wife, PHILIPPE de Valois, son of CHARLES de France Comte de Valois & his first wife Marguerite of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (1293-Abbaye de Coulombs, near Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir 22 Aug 1350, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Comte du Maine 1315.  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Comte de Valois.  He was named Regent of the Kingdom in 1328 on the death of his cousin Charles IV, pending the birth of the Queen’s child.  He succeeded his cousin in 1328 as PHILIPPE VI "le Fortuné" King of France

6.         HUGUES de Bourgogne (1294-château d'Argilly, Côte d'Or early May 1315, bur 12 May Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), established “Hugue mon fil...au Duchesme de Borgoigne, au Contée de Chalon, en la terre de Monreaul[468].  “Hugues dux de Bourgoigne” promised to pay “quatre mile livres de tornois fors” to “nostre…uncle mons. Jehan de Chalon signour d´Allay” less the sum owed to “adit roy mon signour dou marriage de madame la reyne de Navarre nostre…suer[469].  He succeeded his father in 1306 as HUGUES V Duke of Burgundy, under the regency of his mother until 9 Nov 1311.  Betrothed (contract Sens 15 Apr 1303, Papal dispensation 3 Jun 1307, renounced due to ill-health, confirmed 6 Apr 1312) CATHERINE de Valois, heiress of Constantinople, daughter of CHARLES de France Comte de Valois & his second wife Catherine de Courtenay, titular Empress of Constantinople (1303-Naples Oct 1346).  Betrothed (contract Paris 6 Apr 1313) to JEANNE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE de France Comte de Poitiers [later PHILIPPE V King of France] & his wife Jeanne I Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne (1 or 2 May 1308-10 or 15 Aug 1347, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Fontenay).  She later married his brother Eudes. 

7.         EUDES de Bourgogne (1295-Sens, Yonne 3 Apr 1349, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), bequeathed property to “Odoz mes fils...Loys...li enfans de quoi ma...famme Agnes...est grosse, se il est fils[470].  He succeeded his brother in 1315 as EUDES IV Duke of Burgundy.   

-        see below

8.         LOUIS de Bourgogne (1297-2 Aug 1316, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), bequeathed property to “Odoz mes fils...Loys...li enfans de quoi ma...famme Agnes...est grosse, se il est fils[471].  Seigneur de Gray, under the testament of his father, exchanged for Duesme.  At the same time he became titular Prince of Achaia, his future wife transferring her rights to him at Paris 6 Apr 1313.  His brother Duke Hugues V transferred his rights to Thessaloniki to Louis at the time of his marriage, whereby he became titular King of Thessaloniki.  "Ser Ludoycus Princeps Achaie, dominus Mahalda principissa eius uxor" are included in the list of Barons "de Romania" with whom Venice maintained relations in 1313[472], demonstrating that the republic of Venice continued to recognise their titles and positions even though they were not present in Greece.  Seigneur de Braine-le-Comte et de Hal, by right of his wife.  He opposed the succession of his brother Eudes as Duke of Burgundy in 1315, but submitted at Volnay 3 Jul 1315.  Louis landed at Patras in Apr 1316 to claim his principalities in Greece, defeated his rival Infante Fernando de Mallorca at Manolada 5 Jul 1316, but died soon after, allegedly poisoned by Giovanni Orsini Count of Kefalonia[473]m (contract 6 Apr 1313, 31 Jul 1313) as her second husband, MATHILDE de Hainaut, widow of GUY II de la Roche Duke of Athens, daughter and heiress of FLORENT de Hainaut [Avesnes] Seigneur de Braine-le-Comte et de Hal & his wife Isabelle de Villehardouin Titular Pss of Morea (29 Nov 1293-Aversa 1331).  This marriage was arranged by Philippe Principe di Tarento [Anjou-Sicily] to appease Hugues V Duke of Burgundy, who was betrothed to Catherine de Valois at the time Filippo married her as his second wife[474].  Philippe of Sicily Principe di Tarento transferred his rights to Morea to her, which she transferred to her second husband.  She married thirdly (Mar 1318, Papal dispensation 29 Mar 1318, divorced 1321) Jean of Sicily Conte di Gravina, and fourthly (bigamously, divorced) Hugo de La Palice

9.         MARIE de Bourgogne (1298, after 25 Mar-before 1336, bur Bar, église Saint-Maxe).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), bequeathed property to “Odoz mes fils...Loys...li enfans de quoi ma...famme Agnes...est grosse, se il est fils[475].  The unborn child was presumably Marie.  A charter dated 13 Jun 1306 records the marriage between “Hugues dux de Bourgoigne…Marie nostre…suer” and “Eduard de la contée de Barz[476]m (contract Bar-sur-Aube, Aube 13 Jun 1306, château de Montbard 11 Feb 1310) EDOUARD I Comte de Bar, son of HENRI III Comte de Bar & his wife Eleanor of England (Apr 1296-Famagusta, Cyprus 11 Nov 1336, bur Famagusta). 

10.      [--- de Bourgogne (-1308 or after)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis which records the betrothal in 1308 of "Robertus Philippi Atrebatensis filius" and "Blancham alteram filiarum quondam ducis Burgundie"[477].  This record has not been explained.  Blanche, daughter of Robert II Duke of Burgundy, was already married to Edouard de Savoie in 1308.  Assuming that Robert d´Artois was betrothed to a daughter of Duke Robert II, she must have been an otherwise unrecorded daughter who, presumably, died young soon after the betrothal, as records have been identified which indicate that all his other known daughters were already betrothed or married at that date.  Betrothed (1308) to ROBERT III d'Artois Comte de Beaumont-le-Roger, son of PHILIPPE d’Artois Seigneur de Conches & his wife Blanche de Bretagne (1287-[Brest], Brittany end-Oct 1342, bur London, St Paul's)]

11.      ROBERT de Bourgogne ([15 Aug 1304/3 Mar 1305]-Dijon 13 or 19 Oct 1334, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  Comte de Tonnerre, the dowry of his wife.  He fought against the Dauphin de Viennois, allied to his brother-in-law Edouard Comte de Savoie, was captured at Varey 7 Aug 1325 and imprisoned until liberated by treaty at Paris 17 Oct 1328.  He was well known for his love of books[478].  The necrology of Maizières records the death "XIV Kal Nov" of "domini Roberti fratris ducis Burgundiæ comitisque de Tornodoro"[479]m (Chalon-sur-Saône 16 Jun 1321) JEANNE de Chalon Ctss de Tonnerre, daughter of GUILLAUME "le Grand" de Chalon Comte d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Eléonore de Savoie (1300-26 Oct 1360, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).

 

 

EUDES IV 1315-1350, PHILIPPE I 1350-1361

 

EUDES de Bourgogne, son of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France (1295-Sens, Yonne 3 Apr 1349, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Roberz Dux de Borgoigne”, dated 25 Mar 1298 (N.S.), bequeathed property to “Odoz mes fils...Loys...li enfans de quoi ma...famme Agnes...est grosse, se il est fils[480].  Seigneur de Saint-Romain, by the testament of his father.  He succeeded his brother in 1315 as EUDES IV Duke of Burgundy.  He opposed the succession of Philippe V King of France, supporting the rights of his ward Jeanne de France, daughter of King Louis X, but reached agreement with the new king 27 Mar 1318.  He succeeded his brother Louis in 1316 as titular King of Thessaloniki, Prince of Achaia, and objected when Robert King of Naples took Achaia, and sold his rights 14 Apr and 7 Oct 1321 to Louis de Bourbon and Philippe Principe di Tarento.  Comte Palatin de Bourgogne et Comte d'Artois by right of his wife in 1330.  The testament of “Eudes Dux de Bourgoigne, Conte d´Artois et de Bourgoigne Palatins et Sires de Salins”, dated 12 Oct 1346, appointed as his heir “Philippes de Bourgoigne fil de son...fil Philippes” and in default “Jehanne de Bourgongne fille de sondit fil Philippes...sa...suer Madame Blanche de Boúrgoigne Comtesse de Savoye...sa suer Madame Jehanne de Bourgoigne Royne de France[481]

m (contract Nogent-sur-Seine, Aube 29 Sep 1316, Paris 18 Jun 1318) JEANNE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE de France Comte de Poitiers [later PHILIPPE V King of France] & his wife Jeanne I Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne (1 or 2 May 1308-10 or 15 Aug 1347, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Fontenay).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "rex Franciæ...filias...quarum majorem natu" married "duci Burgundiæ", in a later passage recording the marriage "in festo Trinitatis"[482]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage “le jour de la feste de la Trinité Nostre Seigneur à Paris au palaiz royal” of “le duc de Bourgongne” and “Jehanne l´ainsnée fille du roy de France et de Navarre”, dated to 1318 from the context[483]The testament of "Mathildis comitssa Attrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatina ac domina Salinensis", dated 24 Mar 1328, chooses burial "in ecclesia B. Mariæ Regalis prope Pontifaram" at the foot of "genitoris mei Roberti quondam comitis Atrebatensis" or "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorem apud Parisius" next to "Roberti…filii mei", appoints as her heir in Artois "Johannam…filiam meam…Reginam Francie et Navarræ" and in default "filiam meam Johannam ducissam Burgundiæ eiusdem Reginæ primogenitam", donated property for the soul of "domini et mariti mei Othonis quondam comitis Atrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatini ac domini Salinensis", and makes other bequests[484].  She succeeded her mother in 1330 as Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne et Ctss d'Artois. 

Duke Eudes IV & his wife had seven children:

1.         son (stillborn early Jun 1322, bur Abbaye de Val-des-Choues, Essarois, Côte d'Or). 

2.         PHILIPPE "Monsieur" de Bourgogne (10 Nov 1323-château d'Aiguillon, near Agen, Lot-et-Garonne 10 Aug 1346, bur Fontenay, église de l'Abbaye cistercienne).  Comte d'Artois.  Comte Palatin de Bourgogne on his marriage, but he did not take possession.  Comte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne, by right of his wife.  He died after falling from his horse at the siege of château d'Aiguillon.  m (contract Arras, Pas-de-Calais 26 Sep 1338, Vincennes Nov 1338) as her first husband, JEANNE Ctss d'Auvergne et de Boulogne, daughter of GUILLAUME [XI] Comte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne & his wife Marguerite d'Evreux (8 May 1326-Vadans, Haute-Saône 29 Sep 1360, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She was regent of the duchy and county of Burgundy and the seigneurie de Salins, for her son, until her death.  She married secondly (13 Feb 1350) Jean de Valois Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne, who succeeded in 1350 as JEAN II "le Bon" King of France.  Philippe de Bourgogne & his wife had three children:

a)         JEANNE de Bourgogne (1344-château de Larrey-en-Montagne, near Châtillon, Côte d'Or 11 Sep 1360, bur Fontenay, église de l'Abbaye cistercienne).  The testament of “Eudes Dux de Bourgoigne, Conte d´Artois et de Bourgoigne Palatins et Sires de Salins”, dated 12 Oct 1346, appointed as his heir “Philippes de Bourgoigne fil de son...fil Philippes” and in default “Jehanne de Bourgongne fille de sondit fil Philippes...[485].  The marriage contract between "Amey comte de Savoie, Duc de Chablais et d´Aouste, et Marquis d´Italie" and "madamisselle Johanne fille su Monsieur Philippe de Bourgoigne" is dated 16 Jun 1347, in the presence of "Madame Blanche de Bourgogne contesse de Savoie"[486].  This betrothal became one of the issues of dispute in the Count of Savoy's complex relationship with the kings of France, who were anxious to avoid Burgundy falling under the influence of Savoy, and was eventually resolved by the Treaty of Paris in Jan 1355[487].  The betrothal must have been terminated before 30 Mar 1354, the date of letters from Jean II King of France which claimed the return of Jeanne de Bourgogne, following an agreement with Amédée VI Comte de Savoie[488]Betrothed (Montréal en Auxois 8 Jun 1348, broken Nov 1354, renewed Paris 5 Jan 1355) to AMEDEE VI Comte de Savoie, son of AYMON "le Pacifique" Comte de Savoie & his wife Violanta di Monferrato (Château de Chambéry 4 Jan 1334-Santo Stefano, near Castropignano, Apulia 1 Mar 1383, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe).  

b)         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (1345-young, bur Fontenay, église de l'Abbaye cistercienne).   

c)         PHILIPPE de Bourgogne (château de Rouvres, Côte d'Or end Aug 1346-château de Rouvres 21 Nov 1361, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The testament of “Eudes Dux de Bourgoigne, Conte d´Artois et de Bourgoigne Palatins et Sires de Salins”, dated 12 Oct 1346, appointed as his heir “Philippes de Bourgoigne fil de son...fil Philippes[489].  Called "Philippe Monsieur" from [1348].  He succeeded his grandfather in 1349 as PHILIPPE I "de Rouvres" Duke of Burgundy, under the regency of his mother until her death in 1360.  He succeeded his paternal grandmother in 1347 as Comte Palatin de Bourgogne et d'Artois, and in 1360 as Comte d'Auxonne et de Chalon.  He succeeded his mother in 1360 as Comte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne.  He was declared of age and took possession of his lands at Calais 20 Oct 1360.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "XI Kal Jan" of "Philippus dux Burgundiæ"[490].  On his death, Jean II "le Bon" King of France inherited the duchy of Burgundy, as the nearest male heir.  m (Papal dispensation 31 Jan 1357, contract Paris 21 Mar 1357, Arras, église Saint-Vaast 14 May 1357, not consummated) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Flandre, daughter of LOUIS III "de Mâle" Count of Flanders & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Mâle, near Bruges 1350, chr 13 Apr 1350-Arras 16 or 20 Mar 1405, bur Lille, église Saint-Pierre).  The marriage contract between “Philippes Duc de Bourgongne” and “Marguerite de Flandres” is dated 21 Mar 1356 (O.S.)[491].  She married secondly (Gent 19 Jun 1369) Philippe de France, later Philippe II Duke of Burgundy.  She succeeded her father in 1383 as MARGUERITE III Ctss of Flanders

3.         JEAN de Bourgogne (Jul 1324-before 1328, bur Abbaye de Val-des-Choues, Essarois, Côte d'Or). 

4.         son (-end 1330, bur Abbaye de Val-des-Choues, Essarois, Côte d'Or).

5.         son (1330-young, bur Abbaye de Val-des-Choues, Essarois, Côte d'Or).

6.         daughter (-young, bur Abbaye de Val-des-Choues, Essarois, Côte d'Or).

7.         son (Villiers-le-Duc, Côte d'Or end 1335-young, bur Abbaye de Val-des-Choues, Essarois, Côte d'Or).

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    DUKES of BURGUNDY (VALOIS)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, except where otherwise stated. 

 

 

PHILIPPE II 1363-1404

 

PHILIPPE de France, son of JEAN II "le Bon" King of France (Pontoise 15 Jan 1342-Hall 27 Apr 1404, bur Dijon).  Duc de Touraine 1360-1364.  He was installed as PHILIPPE II "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy at Germiny-sur-Marne 6 Sep 1363, first pair de France.  With his three brothers, he was regent during the minority of his nephew Charles VI King of France.  Comte de Mortagne 1380-1385.  Count of Flanders and Artois, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Comte de Nevers, de Rethel, d'Etampes et de Gien 1383.  Comte de Charolais 1390.  Regent of Brittany 1399-1404, during the minority of Jean VI Duke of Brittany. 

m (by proxy 12 Apr 1369, in person Ghent 19 Jun 1369) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Flandre, widow of PHILIPPE I "de Rouvres" Duke of Burgundy, daughter of LOUIS II "de Mâle" Count of Flanders & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Mâle, near Bruges 1350, chr 13 Apr 1350-Arras 16 or 20 Mar 1405, bur Lille, église Saint-Pierre).  The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the marriage of "filiam comitis nostri Ludovici de Male Margaretam" and "Philippus filius regis Francie"[492].  She succeeded her father in 1383 as MARGUERITE III Ctss of Flanders, Artois, Nevers and Rethel, Ctss Palatine of Burgundy.  Dss of Brabant and Limburg, Markgravine of Antwerp, Dame de Malines 1404. 

Mistress (1): MARIE d'Auberchicourt, daughter of --- (-1401). 

Duke Philippe II & his wife had nine children:

1.         JEAN de Bourgogne (Dijon 28 May 1371-murdered Pont-de-Yonne 10 Sep 1419, bur Dijon).  The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon names (in order) "Iohannem ducem Burgundie et Flandrie,Anthonium ducem Brabancie, Philippum ducem de Nevers et Reteers" as the three sons of "Philippus filius regis Francie" & his wife[493].  He succeeded his father in 1404 as JEAN "Sans Peur" Duke of Burgundy, pair de France, Count of Flanders, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne. 

-        see below

2.         CHARLES de Bourgogne (Mar 1372-13 Jul 1373).

3.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (Oct 1374-Le Quesnoy 8 Mar 1441, bur Le Quesnoy, église des Dominicains)Ctss de Mortagne 1385.  m (Cambrai 12 Apr 1385) WILHELM von Bayern-Straubing, son of ALBRECHT Duke of Bavaria-Straubing [later ALBERT Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland] & his first wife Margareta von Brieg [Piast] (5 Apr 1365-château de Bouchain 30 May 1417, bur Valenciennes).  He succeeded his father in 1404 as GUILLAUME VI Comte de Hainaut, WILLEM V Count of Holland, WILHELM II Graf von Straubing. 

4.         LOUIS de Bourgogne (May 1377-10 Jan 1378, bur Citeaux).  

5.         CATHERINE de Bourgogne (Montbard Apr 1378-Grey-sur-Saône 24 Jan 1425, bur Dijon)m firstly (Dijon May 1392, Vienna 15 Aug 1393) LEOPOLD von Habsburg, son of LEOPOLD III Duke of Austria and Steiermark & his wife Verde [Viridis] Visconti of Milan (1371-Vienna 3 Jun 1411, bur Vienna St Stefan).  Graf von Tirol 1396-1406.  He succeeded his brother in 1404 as LEOPOLD IV "der Stolze" Duke of Steiermark, and 1406 as Duke of Inner Austriam secondly (before 1419) as his second wife, MAXIMIN "Schassmann" von Rappoltstein in Rappoltstein.  1390/1451. 

6.         BONNE de Bourgogne (1379-Arras 10 Sep 1399, bur Arras)Betrothed to JEAN de Bourbon, son of LOUIS II "le Bon" Duc de Bourbon & his wife Anne Dauphine d'Auvergne Ctss de Forez (Mar 1381-in prison London 5 Jan 1434, bur Priory of Souvigny).  He succeeded his father in 1410 as JEAN I Duc de Bourbon

7.         MARIE de Bourgogne (Dijon Sep 1386-Château de Thonon-les-Bains 2 Oct 1422, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe).  The contract of marriage between "Philippe fils du Roi de France Duc de Bourgoigne…Marie fille…" and "Amey Comte de Savoye Duc de Chablais…Amey fils" is dated 11 Nov 1386[494]m (contract Sluis, Zeeland 11 Nov 1386, Chalon-sur-Saône 30 Oct 1393, in person Arras May 1401) AMEDEE de Savoie, son of AMEDEE VII "le Comte Rouge" Comte de Savoie & his wife Bonne de Berry (Chambéry 4 Sep 1383-Geneva 7 Jan 1451, bur Ripallo).  He succeeded his father in 1391 as AMEDEE VIII Comte de Savoie.  Created Duc de Savoie by Sigismund King of Germany in 1417. 

8.         ANTOINE de Bourgogne (Aug 1384-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Tervueren St Jan).  The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon names (in order) "Iohannem ducem Burgundie et Flandrie,Anthonium ducem Brabancie, Philippum ducem de Nevers et Reteers" as the three sons of "Philippus filius regis Francie" & his wife[495].  Duke of Brabant and Limburg, Mgf van Antwerpen 1404, confirmed 1406.  Comte de Rethel at Paris 26 Aug 1405. 

-        DUKES of BRABANT

9.         PHILIPPE de Bourgogne (Villaines-en-Duesmois Oct 1389-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Estelan near Rethel).  The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon names (in order) "Iohannem ducem Burgundie et Flandrie,Anthonium ducem Brabancie, Philippum ducem de Nevers et Reteers" as the three sons of "Philippus filius regis Francie" & his wife[496].  Comte de Nevers et de Rethel, Baron de Donzy 1404. 

-        COMTES de NEVERS

Duke Philippe II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

10.       HENRI du Risoir (1360-1409)m firstly ALEYDE de Dijon, daughter of --- (-1385).  m secondly IDA van Maldeghem, daughter of ---. 

-        Du RISOIR

 

 

JEAN 1404-1419

 

JEAN de Bourgogne, son of PHILIPPE II "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite III Ctss of Flanders (Dijon 28 May 1371-murdered Pont-de-Yonne 10 Sep 1419, bur Dijon).  He succeeded his father in 1404 as JEAN "Sans Peur" Duke of Burgundy, first pair de France, Count of Flanders, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne.  Regent of France 1408.  The necrology of Vauvert records the death "XVIII Kal Oct" of "Joannes dux Burgundie"[497]

m (Cambrai 12 Apr 1385, dispensation Genoa 5 Apr 1386) MARGUERITE de Hainaut, daughter of ALBRECHT von Bayern-Straubing [later ALBERT Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland] & his first wife Margareta von Brieg [Piast] (1363-Dijon 23/24 Jan 1423, bur Dijon).  The Oude Kronik van Brabant names "…secunda Margareta…" wife of "Johanni duci Burgundie, primogenitor ducis Philippi" as the daughter of "Albertus palatinus Reni, dux Bavarie" and his wife "Margaretam filiam Ludovici ducis de Briga ex Polonia"[498]

Mistress (1): AGNES de Croy, daughter of JEAN [I] de Croy Seigneur de Renty & his wife ---.

Mistress (2): MARGARETA van Borsselen, daughter of --- (-1420). 

Duke Jean & his wife had eight children:

1.         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (1390-Paris 2 Feb 1441, bur Paris église des Carmélites).  Created Dss de Guyenne, Ctss de Gien, de Montargis, de Dun-le-Roy et de Fontenay-le-Comte at Paris 9 Mar 1424.  Betrothed to CHARLES de France Dauphin de Viennois, son of son of CHARLES VI King of France & his wife Isabelle [Elisabeth] von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1392-Paris 13 Jan 1401, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  m firstly (contract Paris 5 May 1403, Notre-Dame de Paris 30 Aug 1404, consummated Jun 1409) LOUIS de France Dauphin de Viennois Duc de Guyenne, son of CHARLES VI King of France & his wife Isabelle [Elisabeth] von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 22 Jan 1397-Hôtel de Bourbon, Paris 18 Dec 1415, bur Notre-Dame de Paris, transferred to l'église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  m secondly (Dijon 10 Oct 1423) as his first wife, ARTHUR de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, Comte de Dreux, son of JEAN V "le Vaillant" Duke of Brittany & his third wife Infanta doña Juana de Navarra (Château Succinio near Vannes 24 Aug 1393-Château Nantes 26 Dec 1458).  He succeeded in 1457 as ARTHUR III Duke of Brittany

2.         CATHERINE de Bourgogne (1391-Ghent 1414).  Demoiselle de Guise.  Betrothed (1408, contract repudiated [1410]) to PHILIPPE d'Orléans Comte de Vertu, son of LOUIS de France Duc d'Orléans & his second wife Valentina Visconti of Milan (Asnières-sur-Oise, Val d'Oise [21/24] Jul 1396-Beaugency, Loiret 1 Sep 1420, bur Paris église des Célestins).  Betrothed (contract 22 Oct 1407, contract repudiated Nov 1413) to LOUIS d'Anjou, son of LOUIS II Duc d'Anjou titular King of Sicily [Valois-Capet] & his wife Infanta doña Violanta de Aragón (Angers 25 Sep 1403-Cosenza, Calabria 12 Nov 1434, bur Cosenza).  Called "Monsieur de Guise".  He succeeded his father in 1417 as LOUIS III Duc d'Anjou, Titular King of Sicily and Jerusalem.   

3.         MARIE de Bourgogne (1393-Monreberg near Kalkar 30 Oct 1463, bur Kloster Grawe, near Wesel)m (Arras 22 Jul 1406) as his second wife, ADOLF Graf von Kleve, son of ADOLF [I] Graf von Kleve & his wife Margareta von Jülich (-23 Sep 1448, bur Wesel Dominican Church).  Duke of Kleve 1417. 

4.         ISABELLE de Bourgogne (-Rouvre 18 Sep 1412)m (Arras 22 Jul 1406) as his first wife, OLIVIER de Blois-Châtillon Comte de Penthièvre, son of JEAN [I] de Blois-Châtillon Comte de Penthièvre & his wife Marguerite de Clisson (-Avesnes 28 Sep 1433).  

5.         PHILIPPE de Bourgogne (Dijon 30 Jun 1396-Bruges 15 Jun 1467, bur Dijon)He succeeded his father in 1419 as PHILIPPE III "le Bon" Duke of Burgundy.   

-        see below

6.         JEANNE de Bourgogne (Bouvres Oct 1399-young).  

7.         ANNE de Bourgogne (Arras 1404-Hôtel de Bourgogne, Paris 14 Nov 1432, bur Church of the Celestines, Paris, later transferred to the Chartreuse de Champnol, Dijon).  The necrology of the Celestins de Paris records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "domine Anne sororis…principis Phillippi ducis Burgundie et uxoris…principis Johannis ducis Bethfordis et comitis Kandalle"[499].  She died in childbirth.  m (by proxy Montbar 13 or 17 Apr 1423, contract Troyes 18 May 1423, in person Troyes Cathedral 14 Jun 1423) as his first wife, JOHN of Lancaster Duke of Bedford, son of HENRY IV King of England & his first wife Mary de Bohun (20 Jun 1389-Rouen 15 Sep 1435, bur Rouen Cathedral).  Regent of France 1422-1435. 

8.         AGNES de Bourgogne (1407-Château de Moulins, Allier 1 Dec 1476, bur Priory of Souvigny)m (contracts 1 Aug 1418 and 16 Apr 1427, in person Autun 17 Sep 1425) CHARLES de Bourbon Comte de Clermont, son of JEAN I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Marie de Berry Dss d'Auvergne (1401-Château de Moulins 4 Dec 1456, bur Priory of Souvigny).  He succeeded his father in 1434 as CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon

Duke Jean had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

9.          JEAN bâtard de Bourgogne (Dijon 1404-Malines 27 Apr 1479, bur Brussels).  Bishop of Cambrai.  Illegitimate children by MARGARETA Absaloens, daughter of ---.

-        Descendants of JEAN de BOURGOGNE, Bishop of CAMBRAI

Duke Jean had three illegitimate children by Mistress (2): 

10.       GUY bâtard de Bourgogne (-killed in battle Calais 1436).  Heer van Kruybeke.  m JOHANNA, illegitimate, daughter of ALBERT Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland & his mistress ---.   Guy & his wife had one child: 

a)         PHILIPPE de Bourgogne .  Heer van Kruybeke.  m ANNA van Baenst, daughter of ---. 

11.       ANTOINE bâtard de Bourgogne  .

12.       PHILIPOTTE bâtarde de Bourgogne .  Dame de Joncy.  m (30 Jul 1429) ANTOINE de Rochebaron Baron de Berze-le-Chatel, son of ---. 

 

 

PHILIPPE III 1419-1467, CHARLES 1467-1477

 

PHILIPPE de Bourgogne, son of JEAN "Sans-Peur" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite de Hainaut (Dijon 31 Jul 1396-Bruges 15 Jun 1467, bur Dijon église des Chartreux).  He succeeded his father in 1419 as PHILIPPE III "le Bon" Duke of Burgundy, first pair de France.  Regent of France 1419.  Count of Flanders, Artois and Charolais, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Seigneur de Malines 1419.  Marquis de Namur 1421, confirmed 1428.  He founded the Order of the Golden Fleece at Bruges 10 Jan 1430.  Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland and Seeland, Mgf van Antwerpen 1433.  Comte d'Auxerre, de Mâcon, de Vermandois, d'Amiens, de Ponthieu, d'Eu et de Boulogne 1435.  Duc de Luxembourg 1443-1451. 

m firstly (contract Paris 5 May 1403 and 14 Feb 1405, Paris Jun 1409) MICHELLE de France, daughter of CHARLES VI "le Bien-Aimé" King of France & his wife Isabelle [Elisabeth] von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Paris 11 Jan 1395-Gent 8 Jul 1422, bur Gent St Bavo). 

m secondly (Moulins-les-Engelbert 30 Nov 1424) as her second husband, BONNE d´Artois, widow of PHILIPPE de Bourgogne Comte de Nevers et de Rethel, daughter of PHILIPPE d'Artois Comte d'Eu & his wife Marie de Berry ([1395]-Dijon 17 Sep 1425, bur Dijon, église des Chartreux).  She died in childbirth. 

m thirdly (contract Lisbon 24 Jul 1429, by proxy Lisbon 25 Jul 1429, in person Bruges 7 Jan 1430) Infanta dona ISABEL de Portugal, daughter of dom JOÃO I King of Portugal & his wife Philippa of Lancaster (Evora 21 Feb 1397-Aire, Pas-de-Calais 17 Dec 1472, bur Dijon église des Chartreux). 

Mistress (1): CATHERINE Schaers, daughter of . 

Mistress (2): JEANNE de Presles, daughter of . 

Mistress (3): JEANNE Chastellain, daughter of .

Mistress (4): CATHERINE Thiefries, daughter of .

Mistress (5): MATILDA van Praest, daughter of . 

Mistress (6): JACQUELINE van Steenberghe, daughter of . 

Mistress (7): --- de Belleval, daughter of . 

Mistress (8): MARIE MARGUERITE Scupelins, daughter of .

Mistress (9): CELINE de Harlay, daughter of . 

Mistress (10): ISABELLE de la Vigne, daughter of .

Mistress (11): JEANETTE de Mairesse, daughter of .

Duke Philippe III & his second wife had one child:

1.         child (Dijon 17 Sep 1425-). 

Duke Philippe III & his third wife had three children:

2.         ANTOINE de Bourgogne (Brussels 30 Sep 1430-5 Feb 1432, bur Brussels).  Comte de Charolais.  

3.         JOSSE de Bourgogne (Ghent 24 Apr 1432-after 6 May 1432).  Comte de Charolais. 

4.         CHARLES de Bourgogne (Dijon 11 Nov 1433-killed in battle Nancy 5 Jan 1477, bur 1512 Bruges église de Notre-Dame).  Comte de Charolais.  He succeeded his father in 1467 as CHARLES "le Hardi/le Téméraire" Duke of Burgundy, de Lorraine, de Luxembourg and Limburg, Count of Flanders, Artois, Charolais, Hainaut, Holland, Friesland and Seeland, Seigneur de Malines, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Mgf van Antwerpen, Comte de Nevers, de Mâcon, d'Auxerre, de Vermandois, d'Amiens, de Ponthieu, d'Eu et de Boulogne, Seigneur de Salins.  Comte de Mortagne 1468.  Duke of Gelre, Graaf van Zütphen 1472.  m firstly (Betrothed 1438, St Omer 19 May 1440) CATHERINE de France, daughter of CHARLES VII King of France & his wife Marie d'Anjou (1428-Brussels 30 Jul 1446, bur Brussels St Gudula).  m secondly (Lille 30 Oct 1454, contract Moulins 12 Nov 1454) his first cousin, ISABELLE de Bourbon, daughter of CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Agnès de Bourgogne [Valois] (1436-Antwerp 26 Sep 1465, bur Antwerp, Abbaye Saint-Michel).  m thirdly (by proxy Brussels 16 Feb 1468, in person Brussels 9 Jul 1468) MARGARET of York, daughter of RICHARD Duke of York & his wife Cecily Neville (Fotheringhay Castle 3 May 1446-Mechelen 16 Apr or 28 Nov 1503, bur Mechelen, Church of the Cordeliers).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Cecily Duchess of York" as mother of "Margaret, wedded to Charles Duke of Burgundy"[500].  Duke Charles & his second wife had one child:

a)         MARIE de Bourgogne (Brussels 13 Feb 1457-Bruges 27 Mar 1482, bur Bruges).  She succeeded her father in 1477 as Dss de Brabant, Limburg, Luxembourg, Ctss of Flanders, Artois, Hainaut, Holland, Seeland and Friesland, Dame de Malines, Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne, Mgfn van Antwerpen, Dame de Salins.  She died after falling from her horse.  m (Ghent 19 Aug 1477) as his first wife, MAXIMILIAN von Habsburg, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH III King of the Romans, Duke of Inner Austria & his wife Infanta dona Leonor de Portugal (Burg zu Neustadt 22 Mar 1459-Wels 12 Jan 1519).  Duke of Burgundy 20 Aug 1477, by right of his wife.  He was elected MAXIMILIAN I King of the Romans 16 Feb 1486 at Nürnberg, crowned 9 Apr 1486 at Aachen.  He succeeded his father in 1493 as MAXIMILIAN I Archduke of Austria.  He was elected Emperor 4 Feb 1508 at Trient. 

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

5.          CORNELIUS bâtard de Bourgogne (-killed in battle Rupelmonde 16 Jun 1452).  Heer van Beveren.  Cornelius had two illegitimate children by MARGARETA Corbaulde, daughter of ---.

a)         HIERONYMUS bâtard de Bourgogne .  A priest.  Hieronymus had one illegitimate child by MARGUERITE, daughter of ---.

i)          ANTOINE .  Legitimated 1530. 

b)         JEAN bâtard de Bourgogne (-killed in battle Guinegate 1479).  Heer van Elverdinghe.  m MARIE de Halewyn, daughter of ---.  Jean & his wife had two children:  

i)          ISABELLE de Bourgogne (-Vlamertinghe 12 Nov 1504, bur Ghent)m (1487) LODEWIJK [III] van Vlaanderen Heer van Praet, son of LODEWIJK [II] van Vlaanderen Heer van Praet & his wife Louise de Bruges (-1 Jan 1490).

ii)         MARGUERITE de Bourgogne (-1542).  m firstly ARNOULD de Trazegnies, son of ---.  m secondly (1494) CHARLES de Gruytere, son of --- (-after 1556)

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate son by Mistress (2): 

6.          ANTOINE "le Grand" bâtard de Bourgogne (1421-Château Tournehem near Calais 5 May 1504, bur Tournehem-en-Artois)Comte de la Roche et de Grandpre, Heer van Beveren. 

-        Descendants of ANTOINE de BOURGOGNE

Duke Philippe III had two illegitimate children by Mistress (3): 

7.          MARIE bâtarde de Bourgogne (1426-1462).  m (Brussels 12 Nov 1447) PIERRE de Bauffremont Comte de Charny (-1473)

8.          DAVID bâtard de Bourgogne (Utrecht 1427-Wijk bij Duurstede 16 Apr 1496, bur Wijk).  Bishop of Utrecht.  

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate son by Mistress (4):  

9.          BAUDOUIN de Bourgogne dit de Lille (Lille 1445-Brussels May 1508, bur Fallais).  Vicomte d'Orbec, Sire de Falais. 

-                 Descendants of BAUDOUIN de BOURGOGNE

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate son by Mistress (5):   

10.       PHILIPPE bâtard de Bourgogne (1464-Wijk bij Duurstede 7 Apr 1524).  Legitimated 1505.  Grand Admiral of Flanders.  Governor of Geldern and Kortrijk.  Bishop of Utrecht.  Philippe had four illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:    

a)         JEAN bâtard de Bourgogne

b)         PHILIPPE bâtard de Bourgogne .

c)          OLIVIER bâtard de Bourgogne (-after 1532).  

d)         BAUDOUIN bâtard de Bourgogne

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (6):   

11.       ANNE bâtarde de Bourgogne (-Château Souburg 18 Jan 1508)m firstly (Le Quesnoy 1457) ADRIAAN van Borsselen, son of --- (-1468).  m secondly (Bruges 21 Jun 1470) as his second wife, ADOLF von Kleve-Ravenstein, son of ADOLF II Duke of Kleve & his second wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] (28 Jun 1425-18 Sep 1492, bur Brussels Franciscan Priory).  Lieutenant General of Burgundy.  Captain General of Hainaut 1477-1482. 

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate son by Mistress (7): 

12.       RAPHAEL bâtard de Bourgogne dit de Mercatel (1463-Bruges 3 Aug 1508).  Bishop of Rosen.   Raphael had two iIllegitimate children by unknown mistresses:

a)         ANTOINE bâtard de Mercatel

b)         RAPHAEL bâtard de Mercatel (-1597).  Raphael had one iIllegitimate child by an unknown mistress:  

i)          ANNE de Mercatelm PIERRE Choppart, son of ---. 

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate son by Mistress (8):  

13.       JEAN bâtard de Bourgogne (1438-Brussels 25 Jan 1499).  Priest at Bruges.  Jean had one illegitimate child by JEANNE de Spontin, daughter of ---.

a)         ARNAUD de Bourgogne .  At Rothuyn

Jean had one illegitimate child by ISABEAU de Pré, daughter of ---.

b)         JACQUES de Bourgogne (-Middelburg after 20 Oct 1525).  A monk. 

Duke Philippe III had two illegitimate children by Mistress (9):  

14.       MARIE bâtarde de Bourgogne (-after 1467).  A nun.  

15.       CATHERINE bâtarde de Bourgognem (28 Jun 1460) HUMBERT de Luyrieux, son of --- (-Savigny 1483/1523)

Duke Philippe III had one illegitimate child by Mistress (10): 

16.       MARGUERITE bâtarde de Bourgogne .

Duke Philippe III had two illegitimate children by Mistress (11): 

17.       ANTOINE bâtard de Bourgogne

18.       JOSSE bâtard de Bourgogne

Duke Philippe III had twelve illegitimate children by unknown mistresses: 

19.       PHILIPPE bâtard de Bourgogne (-young).  

20.       CORNELIE bâtarde de Bourgognem ADRIAAN de Toulongeon Seigneur de Mornay (-1432). 

21.       MADELEINE bâtarde de Bourgognem ([1486]) BOMPAR Seigneur de l'Aage Baron d'Ales. 

22.       MARIE bâtarde de Bourgogne (-after 1467).  A nun.  

23.       CATELINE bâtarde de Bourgogne (-after 1515).  Abbess of Galilee in Ghent. 

24.       CATHERINE bâtarde de Bourgogne .

25.       JOSSINE bâtarde de Bourgognem JEAN d'Ailly vidame d'Amiens (-1492). 

26.       YOLANDE bâtarde de Bourgogne (-3 Nov 1470).  m (The Hague 1 Jun 1456) JEAN d'Ailly vidame d'Amiens (-1492). 

27.       JEROME bâtard de Bourgogne .  1467

28.       BAUDOUIN bâtard de Bourgogne .  1467

29.       ARTHUR bâtard de Bourgogne .  1467

30.       ARTHUR bâtard de Bourgogne .  1467

31.       ANDRE bâtard de Bourgogne .  1467

 

 



[1] Bouchard, C. B. (1987) Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy 980-1198 (Cornell University Press), p. 31. 

[2] Reilly, B. F. (1988) The Kingdom of León-Castilla under King Alfonso VI 1065-1109 (Princeton University Press), Chapter 5, p. 95, in the Library of Iberian Resources Online, consulted at <http://libro.uca.edu/alfonso6/alfonso.htm> (7 Dec 2002). 

[3] Gestis Consulum Andegavensium, RHGF IX, p. 29. 

[4] Annales Bertiniani III 882. 

[5] Gingins-la-Sarra, F. de (1851) Les Bosonides (Lausanne), p. 39. 

[6] Prou, M. & Vidier, A. (eds.) (1907) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire ("Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire") XXV, p. 59. 

[7] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 366. 

[8] Karoli II Conventus Ticinensis, MGH LL 1, p. 528. 

[9] RHGF VIII, CCLXV, p. 654. 

[10] Poupardin, R. (ed.) (1920) Recueil des actes des rois de Provence 855-928 (Paris) ("Recueil Actes Provence") 16, p. 31. 

[11] RHGF IX, p. 418. 

[12] Charmasse, A. de (ed.) (1865) Cartulaire de l'église d'Autun (Autun, Reprint, Geneva 1978) ("Autun"), Vol. I, 22, p. 35. 

[13] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber II, XV, p. 230. 

[14] Plancher, U. (ed.) (1739) Histoire générale et particulière de Bourgogne (Dijon), Tome I, Preuves, XIX, p.xvi.   

[15] Flodoard, 921, MGH SS III, p. 369. 

[16] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 921, MGH SS V, p. 40. 

[17] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[18] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise cathédrale de Sens, Sacrementaire Sénonais des ix-x siècles, p. 2.       

[19] L'abbé Lebeuf (1855) Mémoires concernant l'histoire civile et ecclésiastique d'Auxerre et de son ancient diocese (Auxerre) (“Histoire d´Auxerre”), Tome IV, p. 17. 

[20] Autun, Vol. I, 10, p. 14. 

[21] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny (Paris), Tome I, 33, p. 39. 

[22] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[23] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[24] Flodoard, 922, MGH SS III, p. 369. 

[25] Plancher (1739), Tome I, Preuves, XIX, p.xvi.   

[26] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[27] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) I.6, p. 15. 

[28] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 372. 

[29] Flodoard 936, MGH SS III, p. 383. 

[30] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[31] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 9. 

[32] Flodoard, 923, MGH SS III, p. 372. 

[33] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.6, p. 15. 

[34] Cluny, Tome I, 396, p. 379, and I.397, p. 381. 

[35] Flodoard, 935, MGH SS III, p. 382. 

[36] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 277.       

[37] Abbé E. Bougaud (ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon ( Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 126. 

[38] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[39] Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 126. 

[40] Du Chesne, A. (1625) Histoire généalogique de la maison de Vergy (Paris), p. 40, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 384 footnote 153. 

[41] Settipani (1993), p. 384. 

[42] Cluny, Tome I, 268, p. 260. 

[43] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 38, p. 58. 

[44] Settipani (1993), p. 411. 

[45] Flodoard, 922, MGH SS III, p. 369. 

[46] Cluny, Tome I, 223, p. 213. 

[47] Cluny, Tome I, 256, p. 247. 

[48] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[49] Cluny, Tome I, 397, p. 381. 

[50] Deleage, A. (1936) Recueil des actes du prieuré de Saint-Symphorien Autun de 696 à 1300 (Autun) (“Autun Saint-Symphorien”), 7. 

[51] Settipani (1993), pp. 384-5. 

[52] Cluny, Tome I, 688, p. 640. 

[53] Ex Chronico Floriacensi, RHGF VIII, p. 254. 

[54] Flodoard, 923, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[55] Plancher (1739), Tome I, Preuves, XIX, p.xvi.   

[56] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[57] Settipani (1993), pp. 385-6. 

[58] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.10, MGH SS III, p. 318. 

[59] Liudprandi Antapodosis V.31 and 32, MGH SS III, p. 336. 

[60] Cluny, Tome I, 256, p. 247. 

[61] RHGF IX, p. 717. 

[62] Vita Sanctii Viventii Presbyteri, RHGF IX, p. 131. 

[63] Canat de Chizy, P. (ed.) (1894) Cartulaire du prieuré de Saint-Marcel-lès-Chalon (Châlons-sur-Saone) ("Saint-Marcel-lès-Chalon") 28, p. 53. 

[64] Flodoardi Annales 925, MGH SS III, pp. 373 and 374. 

[65] Cluny, Tome I, 271, p. 265. 

[66] Courtois, J. (ed.) (1908) Chartes de l´abbaye de Saint-Etienne de Dijon, VIII, IX, X et XI siècles (Dijon) ("Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I]"), 38, p. 58. 

[67] Autun Saint-Symphorien, 7. 

[68] Annales Nivernenses 956, MGH SS XIII, p. 89. 

[69] Chronico Senonensi Sanctæ Columbæ 955, RHGF IX, p. 41. 

[70] Settipani (1993), p. 411. 

[71] Cluny, Tome I, 268, p. 260. 

[72] Du Chesne, A. (1625) Histoire généalogique de la maison de Vergy (Paris), p. 40, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 384 footnote 153. 

[73] Settipani (1993), p. 384. 

[74] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 38, p. 58. 

[75] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 38, p. 58. 

[76] Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon 956, p. 135, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 232 footnote 299, although this reference does not appear in the edition consulted. 

[77] Lalore, C. (ed.) (1890) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Montiéramey, Collection des principaux cartularies du diocèse de Troyes Tome VII (Paris, Troyes) ("Montiéramey") 14, p. 19. 

[78] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) (1969) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Clarendon Press), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 346. 

[79] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 958, MGH SS XXIII, p. 767. 

[80] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[81] Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon 956, p. 135, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 232 footnote 299, although this reference does not appear in the edition consulted. 

[82] Annales Nivernenses 956, MGH SS XIII, p. 89. 

[83] Bouchard (1987), p. 307. 

[84] Settipani (1993), p. 411. 

[85] Lot, F. (1891) Les derniers Carolingiens (Paris), pp. 323-34, and Poupardin, R. (1907) Le royaume de Bourgogne (888-1038): Etude sur les origines du royaume d'Arles (Paris), pp. 206 and 417, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 309. 

[86] Duchesne, A. Histoire de Vergy, p. 46, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 307. 

[87] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 55. 

[88] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55. 

[89] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[90] Flodoard 961, MGH SS III, p. 405. 

[91] Flodoard 965, MGH SS III, p. 406. 

[92] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 11. 

[93] Chibnall (1969), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 346. 

[94] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 958, MGH SS XXIII, p. 767. 

[95] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[96] Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon 956, p. 135, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 232 footnote 299, although this reference does not appear in the edition consulted. 

[97] Annales Nivernenses 956, MGH SS XIII, p. 89. 

[98] Bouchard (1987), p. 307. 

[99] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[100] Flodoard 965, MGH SS III, p. 406. 

[101] Settipani (1993), p. 411. 

[102] Settipani (1993), p. 411. 

[103] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1002, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778. 

[104] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum II.15, p. 79. 

[105] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 19. 

[106] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1002, MGH SS XXIII, p. 778. 

[107] Bouchard (1987), p. 267. 

[108] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107. 

[109] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 21. 

[110] Chevalier, U. (ed.) (1891) Cartulaire du Prieuré de Paray-le-Monial et visites de l'ordre de Cluny (Paris, Montbéliard) ("Paray-le-Moniale") 193, p. 97. 

[111] Déléage, A. (ed.) (1936) Recueil des actes du prieuré de Saint-Symphorien d'Autun de 696 à 1300 (Autun) ("Autun Saint-Symphorien") 15 and 17, pp. 37 and 42. 

[112] Ex Historia Abbatiæ Condomensis, RHGF XI, p. 395. 

[113] Bouchard (1987), p. 268. 

[114] Names with the root "Ermen-" provide the most obvious examples. 

[115] Rythmus Satyricus De temporibus Rotberti Regis, Veterum Analectorum III, p. 533. 

[116] Adalbero of Laon Rhythmus satyricus 14-15, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 268.

[117] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1005, MGH SS XXIII, p. 779. 

[118] Richard, J. 'Origines féodales.  Les Chalon, les Vergy et la Puisaye d'après une charte du XI siècle', Annales de Bourgogne, 18 (1946), pp. 112-119, 115, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 413. 

[119] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[120] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64. 

[121] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554. 

[122] Poupardin, R. (1909) Recueil des chartes de l´abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés (Paris) (“Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés”), Tome I, LV, p. 87. 

[123] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87. 

[124] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LIX, p. 95. 

[125] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[126] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386. 

[127] Cluny, Tome IV, 2949, p. 149. 

[128] Petit, E. (1885) Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race Capétienne (Paris), Vol. I, 21, p. 362. 

[129] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LV, p. 87. 

[130] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104. 

[131] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87. 

[132] Hildeberti Vita S Hugonis chap. 2, par. 9, quoted in Petit, Vol. I, p. 167 footnote 2.  The relevant passage has not been found in Vita, auctore Hildeberto Cenomanensi Episcopo, Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 159, cols. 859-894. 

[133] Richard, J. (ed.) (1957) Le cartulaire de Marcigny-sur-Loire 1045-1144 (Dijon) ("Marcigny-sur-Loire") 2, p. 1. 

[134] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 91, p. 108. 

[135] Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 257. 

[136] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554. 

[137] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 13. 

[138] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203. 

[139] Halphen, L. & Poupardin, R. (eds.) (1913) Chroniques des Comtes d´Anjou et des Seigneurs d´Amboise (Paris), p. 247. 

[140] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386. 

[141] Cluny, Tome IV, 2888, p. 82. 

[142] Chevrier, G. and Chaume, M. (eds.) (1986) Chartes et documents de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon des origines à 1300 (Dijon) ("Dijon Saint-Bénigne") II, 324, p. 104. 

[143] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554. 

[144] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87. 

[145] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LIX, p. 95. 

[146] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104. 

[147] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) (1969) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Clarendon Press), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.  

[148] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LVII, p. 87. 

[149] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LIX, p. 95. 

[150] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 82, p. 101. 

[151] Chaume, M. 'En marge des croisades bourgignonnes d'Espagne', Annales de Bourgogne, t. IX (1937), p. 72, and Chaume, M. 'Les premières croisades bourgignonnes au-delà des Pyrénées', Annales de Bourgogne, t. XVIII (1946), pp. 161-5, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 4.   

[152] Vajay, S. de 'Etiennette, dite de Vienne, comtesse de Bourgogne. Bourgogne, Lorraine et Espagne au XI siècle', Annales de Bourgogne, t. XXXII (1960), p. 259 note 3, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 4. 

[153] Richard, J. 'Sur les alliances familiales des ducs de Bourgogne aux XII et XIII siècles', Annales de Bourgogne, t. XXX (1958), pp. 39-42, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 4. 

[154] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[155] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 347, p. 126. 

[156] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[157] Cluny, Tome IV, 3518, p. 638. 

[158] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[159] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[160] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[161] Cluny, Tome IV, 3518, p. 638. 

[162] Laurent, J. (ed.) (1911) Cartulaires de l'abbaye de Molesme (Paris) ("Molesme"), Vol. II, 6, p. 12. 

[163] Molesme, Vol. II, 12, p. 19. 

[164] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 559. 

[165] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 431, p. 207. 

[166] Molesme, Vol. II, 6, p. 12. 

[167] Molesme, Vol. II, 12, p. 19. 

[168] Molesme, Vol. II, 103, p. 107. 

[169] Dangien, F. (ed.) (1882) Cartulaire du Prieuré de Saint-Etienne de Vignory ("Vignory Saint-Etienne") V, p. 38. 

[170] Molesme, Vol. I, 220, p. 204. 

[171] Molesme, Vol. II, 6, p. 12. 

[172] Molesme, Vol. II, 12, p. 19. 

[173] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et Divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis, Necrologium, MGH SS VIII, p. 285. 

[174] Cluny, Tome IV, 3516, p. 632, dated "avant 1078" in this edition, although this would appear incorrect as Duke Eudes only succeeded his brother in 1079. 

[175] Molesme, Vol. II, 6, p. 12. 

[176] Godefroy, T. (1610) De l'origine des roys de Portugal yssus en ligne masculine de la maison de France (Paris), quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 16, which says that this chronicle fragment was first published at Frankfurt in 1596. 

[177] Ex Chronico Trenorciensi, RHGF XI, p. 112. 

[178] Chifflet, P. F. (1644) Histoire de l´abbaye royale et de la ville de Tournus (Dijon), Preuves, p. 331.  

[179] Cluny, Tome IV, 3533, p. 654, dated 1117 "Spanish Era". 

[180] Godefroy, T. (1610) De l'origine des roys de Portugal yssus en ligne masculine de la maison de France (Paris), quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 16, which says that this chronicle fragment was first published at Frankfurt in 1596. 

[181] Chronicon Regum Legionensium: Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester UP), p. 87. 

[182] Referred to by Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, footnote 58. 

[183] Alamo, J. del (ed.) (1950) (Madrid) Colección diplomatica de San Salvador de Oña 822-1284, Tomo I 822-1214 ("San Salvador de Oña (1950)") I, 99, p. 127. 

[184] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 240. 

[185] Pérez, J., Romualdo Escalona, F. (1782) Historia del real monasterio de Sahagun (Madrid) ("Sahagún (Pérez)"), Lib. II, cap. V.2, p. 72. 

[186] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[187] Richard, J. (ed.) (1957) Le cartulaire de Marcigny-sur-Loire 1045-1144 (Dijon), p. 14. 

[188] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[189] Chifflet (1644), Preuves, p. 331. 

[190] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 429, the editor in footnote 6 highlighting the absence of corroboration in Italian chronicles for this statement. 

[191] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 433. 

[192] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 433. 

[193] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 429. 

[194] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 555. 

[195] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[196] Bouchard (1987), p. 257. 

[197] Marchegay, P. and Mabille, E. (eds.) (1869) Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou (Paris) Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 404. 

[198] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247. 

[199] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[200] Cluny, Tome IV, 3518, p. 638. 

[201] Named after his maternal great grandfather, if the theory concerning the Barcelona origin of the mother of Duke Eudes I is correct. 

[202] Chifflet (1644), Preuves, p. 331. 

[203] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 398, p. 173. 

[204] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 561. 

[205] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 402, p. 180. 

[206] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[207] Cluny, Tome IV, 3516, p. 632, dated "avant 1078" in this edition, although this would appear incorrect if Duke Eudes succeeded his brother in 1079. 

[208] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[209] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[210] Devic, Dom C., Dom Vaissete, Dulaurier, E. (1875) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738. 

[211] L'abbé Goiffon (ed.) (1882) Bullaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Gilles (Nîmes) ("Bullaire de Saint-Gilles"), XXV, p. 44. 

[212] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 561. 

[213] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311. 

[214] Marilier, J. (ed.) (1961) Chartes et documents concernant l'abbaye de Cîteaux 1098-1182 (Rome) ("Cîteaux") 113, p. 104. 

[215] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber III, Cap. LIV, p. 377. 

[216] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) IV.XX, p. 185. 

[217] Brenner, S. O. (1978) Nachkommen Gorms des Alten I-XVI Generation (Dansk Historisk Haandbogsforlag), p. 4, and Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 563, footnote 19.  

[218] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[219] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 398, p. 173. 

[220] Cluny, Tome V, 3809, p. 156. 

[221] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 562.  Bouchard (1987), p. 259, suggests that this is a deduction based solely on gifts for his brother's soul by Duke Hugues II at Cistercian houses. 

[222] Bièvre Poulailler, A. (ed.) (1912) Chartes de l´abbaye de Saint-Etienne de Dijon, 1098-1140 (Dijon) ("Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome II]"), 13, p. 17. 

[223] Chronicle of St Bèze, p. 427. 

[224] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431. 

[225] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 398, p. 173. 

[226] Cluny, Tome V, 3809, p. 156. 

[227] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[228] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 402, p. 180. 

[229] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome II], 13, p. 17. 

[230] Molesme, Vol. II, 173, p. 321. 

[231] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), Preuves, p. 35. 

[232] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 567 footnote 7. 

[233] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 438, p. 212. 

[234] Cîteaux 67, p. 80. 

[235] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[236] Petit, E. (1888) Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race Capétienne (Paris), Vol. II, 355, p. 268. 

[237] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[238] ES II 20. 

[239] Petit, Vol. II, p. 45. 

[240] ES III 435. 

[241] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[242] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 48. 

[243] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 566. 

[244] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[245] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[246] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[247] Duby, G. (ed.) (1953) Recueil des pancartes de l'abbaye de la Ferté-sur-Grosne 1113-1178 (Gap) ("La Ferté-sur-Grosne") 82, p. 90. 

[248] Petit, Vol. II, 300, p. 240. 

[249] Cîteaux 182, p. 148. 

[250] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[251] Petit, E. (1891) Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race Capétienne (Paris), Vol. III, 741, p. 265. 

[252] Abbé Boudrot (ed.) Obituaire de Beaune, p. 174, quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 568, footnote 14. 

[253] Duby, G. (ed.) (1953) Recueil des pancartes de l'abbaye de La Ferté-sur-Grosne 1113-1178 (Paris), 260, p. 204. 

[254] La Ferté-sur-Grosne, 263, p. 205. 

[255] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[256] Yonne, Tome II, 206, p. 223. 

[257] Cîteaux 211, p. 170. 

[258] Petit, Vol. II, 677, p. 415. 

[259] Petit, Vol. III, 725, p. 260. 

[260] Quantin, M. (ed.) (1860) Cartulaire general de l'Yonne (Auxerre) ("Yonne") Tome II, 358, p. 369. 

[261] Chastellux, H. P. C. de (1869) Histoire génealogique de la maison de Chastellux (Auxerre), Pièces justificatives, LVIII, p. 288. 

[262] By right of his wife, whose first husband was Seigneur de Montmirail, according to Bouchard (1987), p. 338.   

[263] Petit, Vol. III, 741, p. 265. 

[264] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[265] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[266] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[267] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[268] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[269] Petit, Vol. II, 355, p. 268. 

[270] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[271] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1222, MGH SS XXIII, p. 912. 

[272] Cîteaux 150, p. 122. 

[273] Cîteaux 150, p. 122. 

[274] Cîteaux 248, p. 196. 

[275] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[276] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Vol. II, p. 64. 

[277] Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorensis, RHGF XVIII, p. 249. 

[278] Cîteaux 237, p. 187. 

[279] Petit, E. (ed.) (1881) Cartulaire du Prieuré de Jully-les-Nonains (Auxerre) ("Jully-les-Nonnains") 1182, p. 25. 

[280] Cîteaux 248, p. 196. 

[281] Cluny, Tome V, 4309, p. 669. 

[282] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 380, p. 164. 

[283] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 565. 

[284] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 425. 

[285] Cronica di Romualdo Guarna arcivescovo Salernitano (Chronicon Romualdi II archiepiscopi Salernitani) ("Romualdo Guarna"), Re, G. del (ed.) (1845) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 1 (Napoli), p. 16. 

[286] Anonymi monachi Cassinensis breve chronicon ("Cassinensis breve chronicon"), Re, G. del (1845) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 1 (Naples), p. 467. 

[287] Annales Casinenses 1151, MGH SS XIX, p. 310. 

[288] Chalandon, F. (1907) Histoire de la domination normande en Italie et en Sicile (Paris), Tome I, pp. 5-6, citing Amari (1854) Storia dei Musulmani di Sicilia (Florence), Tome II, p. 106, citing Necrol. Pan, in Forschungen, Tome XVIII, p. 474. 

[289] Pérard (1664), p. 112.  

[290] ES II 20. 

[291] Petit, Vol. II, p. 45. 

[292] Plancher (1739), Tome I, Preuves, CCII, p. cix. 

[293] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[294] Cîteaux 210 and 211, pp. 169 and 170. 

[295] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 35. 

[296] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 565-6. 

[297] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[298] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 526 and Devic, Dom C. & Dom Vaissete (1840-42) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome IV, Preuves, CLXI, p. 479. 

[299] Arch. municipales de Montpellier, Germain, A. (1884-86) Liber instrumentorum memorialium. Cartulaire des Guillems de Montpellier (Montpellier), no. XCVI, p. 184.  [J.-C. Chuat]

[300] Bouchard (1987), p. 259. 

[301] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 438, p. 212. 

[302] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1162, MGH SS V, p. 45. 

[303] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[304] Petit, Vol. V, p. 393. 

[305] WT XX.XXV, p. 988. 

[306] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1190, MGH SS V, p. 46. 

[307] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841. 

[308] Cîteaux 206, p. 165. 

[309] Troyes Necrologies, 2 Obituaire de Saint-Etienne, III Fondations établies en l'église royale de Troyes, p. 271. 

[310] Gaufredi Prioris Vosiensis, Pars Altera Chronici Lemovicensis XXI, RHGF XVIII, p. 219. 

[311] WT XX.XXV, p. 988. 

[312] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 877. 

[313] Baluze, S. (1708) Histoire généalogique de la maison d´Auvergne (Paris) ("Baluze (1708) Auvergne"), Tome II, p. 78. 

[314] Petit, Vol. II, p. 134. 

[315] WT XX.XXV, p. 988. 

[316] Gallia Christiana Tome IV, 71, p. 187, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 353. 

[317] WT XX.XXV, p. 988. 

[318] Petit, Vol. III, 784, p. 279. 

[319] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 571-2. 

[320] Runciman, S. (1952) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books, 1978), Vol. 3, p. 62. 

[321] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1191, MGH SS XXIII, p. 868. 

[322] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[323] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1162, MGH SS V, p. 45. 

[324] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1161, MGH SS XXIII, p. 845. 

[325] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1193, MGH SS XXIII, p. 870. 

[326] Cîteaux 198, p. 159. 

[327] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1184, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858. 

[328] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723) Opera diplomatica et historica, 2nd edn. (Louvain), Tome I, Donationes Belgicæ, Liber I, LXXI, p. 395. 

[329] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[330] Chorier, N. (1641) Histoire générale de Dauphiné (Grenoble, republished 1878 Valence) Tome I, p. 616 (which does not cite the source). 

[331] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1184, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858. 

[332] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1183, MGH SS V, p. 46. 

[333] Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné et des princes qui ont porté le nom de Dauphins (Geneva), Tome II, p. 9, footnote n, citing "Archives Cam. Cartæ Dalphinatus ab an. 1220 ad an. 1230". 

[334] Cîteaux 198, p. 159. 

[335] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1184, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858. 

[336] Cluny, Tome V, 4309, p. 669. 

[337] Bulliot, J.-G. (1849) Essai historique sur l´abbaye de Saint-Martin d´Autun, Tome II, Chartes et pièces justificatives (Autun) ("Autun Saint-Martin") 23, p. 49. 

[338] Petit, Vol. III, 845, p. 304. 

[339] Hoffman, G. (ed.) (1731) Nova scriptorum ac monumentorum collectio, Tome I, Sam. Guichenoni Bibliothecam Sebusianam et Paridis de Crassis diarium cur. rom (Leipzig) ("Bibliotheca Sebusiana"), Centuria I, XII, p. 48. 

[340] Petit, Vol. III, p. 72. 

[341] Terrebasse, A. de (ed.) (1844) Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus (Vienne) ("De Allobrogibus") VIII, p. 427. 

[342] Petit, Vol. III, 784, p. 279. 

[343] Guillaume, J. B. (1757) Histoire généalogique des Sires de Salins (Besançon), Tome I, Preuves, p. 122. 

[344] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[345] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 732, p. 407, and Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné et des princes qui ont porté le nom de Dauphins (Geneva), Tome II, I, p. 3. 

[346] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, p. 9, footnote n, citing "Archives Cam. Cartæ Dalphinatus ab an. 1220 ad an. 1230". 

[347] Cîteaux 198, p. 159. 

[348] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1184, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858.  

[349] Petit, Vol. III, 784, p. 279. 

[350] Cluny, Tome V, 4309, p. 669. 

[351] Autun Saint-Martin 149, p. 266. 

[352] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1218, MGH SS V, pp. 49-50. 

[353] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1218, MGH SS XXIII, p. 907. 

[354] Obituaires de Lyon I, Eglise primatiale de Lyon.     

[355] Petit, Vol. V, p. 369. 

[356] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 575. 

[357] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 9, MGH SS IX, p. 329. 

[358] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 8, MGH SS IX, p. 329. 

[359] Nicholas, D. (1992) Medieval Flanders (Longman), p. 74. 

[360] Teulet, A. (ed.) (1863) Layettes du trésor des chartes (Paris), Vol. I, 428, p. 181. 

[361] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 13 and 14, MGH SS IX, pp. 330-1. 

[362] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1218, MGH SS XXIII, p. 907. 

[363] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 575. 

[364] Petit, Vol. III, 963, p. 354. 

[365] Petit, Vol. III, 1277, p. 442. 

[366] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[367] Prost, B. and Bougenot, S. (eds.) (1904) Cartulaire de Hugues de Chalon (1220-1319) (Lon-le-Saunier) (“Hugues de Chalon”), 40, p. 36. 

[368] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[369] Autun Saint-Martin, Extrait du nécrologe de Saint-Martin d´Autun, p. 381. 

[370] RHGF XXIII, Chronique des comtes d´Eu, p. 443. 

[371] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1212, MGH SS V, p. 49. 

[372] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 82. 

[373] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1212, MGH SS V, p. 49. 

[374] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 577-8. 

[375] Cluny, Tome VI, 5156, p. 599. 

[376] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople (2e edition Paris), p. 489. 

[377] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 77. 

[378] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[379] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[380] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1229, MGH SS XXIII, p. 924. 

[381] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[382] Hugues de Chalon 522, p. 378. 

[383] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[384] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 578. 

[385] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 82. 

[386] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 83. 

[387] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[388] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1267, MGH SS V, p. 50. 

[389] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[390] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 84. 

[391] Huillard-Bréholles, J. L. A. (1867) Titres de la Maison ducale de Bourbon (Paris), Tome I, 321, p. 66. 

[392] Iohannis de Thielrode Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ MGH SS IX, p. 335. 

[393] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon, MGH SS XXV, p. 575. 

[394] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 84. 

[395] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 85. 

[396] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 88. 

[397] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 85. 

[398] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”) XXXIV.VII, p. 453. 

[399] Istoria di Saba Malaspina, IV, XX, Re, G. del (ed.) (1868) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 2 (Naples), p. 291. 

[400] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 88. 

[401] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597. 

[402] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 85. 

[403] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 88. 

[404] Quantin, M. (1873) Recueil de pièces pour faire suite au Cartulaire Général de l´Yonne, XIII siècle (Auxerre, Paris) (“Yonne (suite)”), 682, p. 344. 

[405] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 85. 

[406] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[407] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 84. 

[408] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 514. 

[409] Huillard-Bréholles (1867), Tome I, 300, p. 62. 

[410] Annales Parchenses 1253, MGH SS XVI, p. 607. 

[411] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 65. 

[412] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[413] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 578-9. 

[414] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[415] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 66. 

[416] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 74. 

[417] Ex Chronico Gaufredi Vosiensis, 41, RHGF XII, p. 426. 

[418] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 579. 

[419] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[420] Duplès-Agier, H. (ed.) (1874) Chroniques de Saint-Martial de Limoges (Paris) Anonymum S Martialis Chronicon, p. 172. 

[421] RHGF XXI, Fragmenta Bernardi Guidonis de Ordine Prædicatorum, p. 749. 

[422] Anonymum S Martialis Chronicon, Chroniques de Saint-Martial de Limoges, p. 176. 

[423] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1236, MGH SS V, p. 50. 

[424] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[425] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[426] Hugues de Chalon 500, p. 360. 

[427] Hugues de Chalon 547, p. 414. 

[428] Hugues de Chalon 545, p. 410. 

[429] Hugues de Chalon 545, p. 410. 

[430] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[431] Anonymum S Martialis Chronicon, Chroniques de Saint-Martial de Limoges, p. 174. 

[432] Hugues de Chalon 547, p. 414. 

[433] Hugues de Chalon 405, p. 276. 

[434] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[435] Ellenhardi Chronicon, Gesta Invictissim domini Rudolfi Romanorum regis 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 127. 

[436] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 211. 

[437] Hugues de Chalon 547, p. 414. 

[438] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 580. 

[439] Du Chesne (1628), p. 84. 

[440] Depoin, J. ‘La maison de Chambly sous les capétiens direct’, Bulletin philologique et historique (1914), p. 153, available at <http://fmg.ac/FMG/Scanned_Sources/Depoin/S-0823.pdf> (25 Feb 2013), quoting analysis by Dom Villevieille, Ms. fr. 31908, fol. 76. 

[441] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[442] Hugues de Chalon 547, p. 414. 

[443] Hugues de Chalon 405, p. 276. 

[444] Hugues de Chalon 545, p. 410. 

[445] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[446] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Cordelières de Mont-Saint-Catherine, à Provins, p. 888. 

[447] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 78. 

[448] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[449] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[450] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[451] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 120. 

[452] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 120. 

[453] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[454] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597. 

[455] State Archives, volume 102, page 32.2, fascicule 3. 

[456] State Archives, volume 104, page 41, fascicule 24.7. 

[457] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[458] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[459] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 592. 

[460] Hugues de Chalon 548, p. 415. 

[461] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 609. 

[462] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 589 footnote 36. 

[463] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 613. 

[464] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 724. 

[465] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[466] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[467] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 824. 

[468] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[469] Hugues de Chalon 548, p. 415. 

[470] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[471] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[472] Hopf, C. (1873) Chroniques gréco-romanes inédites ou peu connues (Berlin), Introduction, p. xxiv, and Dynastæ Græciæ, p. 178. 

[473] Miller, W. (1908) The Latins in the Levant.  A History of Frankish Greece (1204-1566) (Cambridge and New York), p. 256. 

[474] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 240. 

[475] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[476] Hugues de Chalon 577, p. 442. 

[477] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 598. 

[478] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 587. 

[479] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye de Maizières, p. 624.       

[480] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 101. 

[481] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 125. 

[482] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 618 and 620. 

[483] Hellot, A. (ed. (1884) Chronique Parisienne anonyme du XIV siècle (Nogent) (“Chronique Parisienne”), 21, p. 33. 

[484] Foppens, J. F. (1748) Diplomatum Belgicorum nova collectio, sive supplementum ad opera diplomatica Auberti Miræi (Brussels), Tome IV, Pars II, CXVIII, p. 267. 

[485] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 125. 

[486] State Archives, volume 102, page 59, fascicule 1, and Guichenon, S. (1780) Histoire généalogique de la royale maison de Savoie (Turin) ("Guichenon (Savoie)"), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 220. 

[487] Marie José (1956) La Maison de Savoie, Les Origines, Le Comte Vert, Le Comte Rouge (Paris, Albin Michel), pp. 87-99. 

[488] State Archives, volume 102, page 59, fascicule 2.2. 

[489] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 125. 

[490] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[491] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 127. 

[492] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 583. 

[493] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 583. 

[494] State Archives, volume 102, page 72, fascicule 1, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 342. 

[495] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 583. 

[496] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon 19, MGH SS XXV, p. 583. 

[497] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chartreux de Vauvert, p. 703. 

[498] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 80. 

[499] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Celestins de Paris, p. 714. 

[500] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. IV, p. 297.