england, earls created 1207-1466

  v3.0 Updated 27 May 2014

 

RETURN TO INDEX

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 2

Chapter 1.                WINCHESTER. 2

A.         EARLS of WINCHESTER 1207-1264 (QUINCY) 3

B.         EARLS of WINCHESTER 1322-1326 (LE DESPENCER) 15

Chapter 2.                MARCH. 26

A.         EARLS of MARCH 1328-1425 (MORTIMER) 26

B.         MORTIMER of ATTLEBOROUGH, NORFOLK.. 58

Chapter 3.                SUFFOLK. 59

A.         EARLS of SUFFOLK 1337-1382 (UFFORD) 60

B.         EARLS of SUFFOLK 1385-1492 (POLE) 62

Chapter 4.                STAFFORD. 69

A.         STAFFORD FAMILY (TOSNY) 69

B.         STAFFORD FAMILY (BAGOT) 74

C.        EARLS of STAFFORD 1351-1562 (STAFFORD) 84

Chapter 5.                WESTMORELAND. 86

A.         NEVILLE FAMILY.. 86

B.         EARLS of WESTMORELAND 1397-1523 (NEVILLE) 103

Chapter 6.                RIVERS. 112

A.         WYDEVILLE FAMILY.. 112

B.         EARLS RIVERS 1466-1491 (WYDEVILLE) 114

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

This document sets out the families of the English earldoms which were created between 1207 and 1466, in approximate chronological order of their first creation.  Two companion documents show the families of earls whose earldoms were created between the Norman Conquest and 1122, and between 1138 and 1143. 

 

An important stage in the evolution of the English nobility resulted from the development of popular representation during the reigns of King Henry III and King Edward I.  Many local feudal lords were summoned to attend parliament, their attendance being considered as transforming their local title into a formal national title, although it does not appear that this was accompanied by any particular creation or investiture process.  It was among these new lords that subsequent monarchs found candidates for new earldoms, Winchester (1207), March (1328), Suffolk (1337), Stafford (1351), and Westmoreland (1397). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    WINCHESTER

 

 

The Quincy (also spelt Quency) family may have derived its name from Cuinchy, Pas-de-Calais, on the border between the counties of Artois and Flanders[1].  Saher de Quincy (died [1156/58]) is first recorded in the 1120s in England.  He evidently soon rose to prominence, judging by his marriage to Matilda de Senlis of the family of the earls of Huntingdon.  The origin of the family is unknown.  The key may lie in the unusual first name "Saher".  The name is recorded in the Cambrai area in the early 11th century: the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium states that, after the death of Herluin Bishop of Cambrai, “Seiherum fratrem [eius]” [Saher] was sent to the emperor to protest about the invasion of episcopal territory by “Walterus [castellanus][2].  No other information has been found which indicates the origin of the brothers Saher and Herluin (see BISHOPS of CAMBRAI).  A couple of possibilities regarding the etymology of the name Saher can be suggested.  There is some similarity to the Portuguese or Galician "Soeiro", numerous references to which are found among the Portuguese nobility from the late 11th/early 12th centuries.  Alternatively, a connection with the Near East is possible: "saher" means "dawn" in modern Arabic, and "Saher" is one of the Jewish surnames listed by Zubatsky & Berent[3]

 

Saher de Quincy's younger son, Robert, settled in Scotland, presumably because of his family relationship with William "the Lion" King of Scotland[4].  Robert's son, Saher, was still serving King William in 1200 but entered the service of John King of England soon afterwards.  He must, however, have had contacts with England before that time as he married his English wife before 1190.  Saher settled permanently in England in early 1204 and was created Earl of Winchester, presumably as a reward for loyal service to the English king, some time during 1206 or early 1207.  The earldom of Winchester reverted to the crown on the death, without male issue, of Roger de Quincy in 1264.  It was revived in 1322 in favour of Hugh Le Despencer (senior), one of the favourites of King Edward II, but was forfeited when he was hanged in 1326.  It was revived again in 1472 by King Edward IV in favour of Louis de Bruges, a Flemish nobleman, as a reward for welcoming the king when he fled England during the brief restoration of Henry IV in 1471.  Louis's son and successor, Jean de Bruges, resigned the earldom of Winchester to King Henry VII in 1500. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of WINCHESTER 1207-1264 (QUINCY)

 

 

SAHER [I] de Quincy, son of --- (-[1156/57]).  He held land at Long Buckley, Northamptonshire in [1124/29][5].  “Seherus de Quinci” donated property to Dunmow Priory, for the soul of “Saheri filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “Richardus, et Quincy…[6].  His date of death is indicated by the 1157 Pipe Roll which records "Sahero de Quenci" in Northamptonshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", presumably referring to his son who had newly inherited his father´s lands[7]

m (after 1136) as her second husband, MATILDA de Senlis, widow of ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare, daughter of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Matilda [Maud] of Huntingdon (-[1157/63]).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi[8].  A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1112 of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and “Matildam de Sancto Lisio”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[9].  The Complete Peerage records her second marriage, citing Hatton´s Book of Seals for “proof of this marriage”, and in a later passage that “her charter of dower lands in Essex and London, bearing her seal, is witnessed by her sons Walter FitzRobert and Saher[10].  The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records "Matildi de Seinliz" in Essex and Hertfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", suggesting that this related to her dower land soon after the death of her husband[11].  A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1140 of “Matildis de Sancto Licio uxor Roberti filii Ricardi”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[12]

Saher [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         SAHER [II] ([1138]-[1190/92]).  “Seherus de Quinci” donated property to Dunmow Priory, for the soul of “Saheri filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “Richardus, et Quincy…[13].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Saerius de Quincy" held one and one half knights´ fees from "Roberti de Chokes" in Northamptonshire[14]m (1163) as her second husband, ASCELINE Peverel, widow of GEOFFREY de Waterville [Wateville], daughter of ROBERT [Pain] Peverel & his wife [Adelisia ---] (-before 1190).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina de Waterville” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Asceline was mother of “duæ filiæ…Ascelina de Waterville et Matildis de Diva[15].  "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera" donated Bradford mill, donated by "dominus Walchelinus Maminot" for the soul of "Rogeri de Haia", to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1141/48], witnessed by "…Matilla mea conjuge, Matilla de Dovera mea sorore, Acelina mea sorore…"[16].  "G. de Waltervilla" granted his part of "Herchalun…et…meam partem de feudo Hugonis de Laci" to "Willielmo de Hetlehe", with the consent of "Acelinæ uxoris meæ et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1155/62], which names "Hamo Piperellus avunculus uxoris meæ"[17].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   Saher [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         SAHER [III] (-[1190/92]).  Benedict of Peterborough names "…Saerus de Quincy juvenis…" among the original supporters of Henry the young king against his father King Henry II[18].  "…Seherio de Quince juniori…" witnessed the charter dated to [1173] under which King Henry, son of King Henry II, confirmed privileges of the church of Préaux[19]

2.         ROBERT ([1140]-after 1200).  He went to Scotland and through his first marriage obtained lands in Fife, Perth and Lothian, and was granted the castle of Forfar by his cousin (through his mother) William "the Lion" King of Scotland.  He accompanied Richard I King of England on crusade in 1190 and participated in the capture of Antioch in Jul 1191[20].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "in perdonis Roberto de Quency, xl s de scutagio suo de Bukkeby" in Northamptonshire and granted delay in payment per brevia in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[21].  "…Robertus de Quinci, Seierus de Quinci…" were the first two lay witnesses (signing before the members of the donors´ family) of the charter dated 1200 which records the foundation of Inchaffray Abbey by "Gilbertus filius Ferthead…comes de Stradern et…Matilidis filia Willelmi de Aubengni comitissa"[22].  The connection between the Quincy family and the earls of Strathearn has not yet been established.  m firstly ([1160/70], separated) as her first husband, ORABILIS, daughter of NES of Mar & his wife --- (-before 30 Jun 1203).  "Nesius filius Willi et Orabile filia sua heres" donated "ecclesiam de Losresc" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter[23].  Her first marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory[24].  She married secondly [Morgund] Earl of Mar.  Her second marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Orabilis comitissa de Mar filia Nesii filii Willi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Lochres" made by "pater meus Nesius filius Willi" to St Andrew´s priory, witnessed by "Duncano comite de Fif…"[25].  The question of the precise identity of Orabilis´s second husband is discussed in the document SCOTLAND MORMAERS, EARLS & LORDS.  She married thirdly Adam of Fife.  Her third marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which "Nesius filius Willelmi" donated "ecclesiam de Lochres" to St Andrew´s priory witnessed by "Dunecano comite de Fif…Adam filio Dunec et Horabili sponsa sua…"[26].  There seems little doubt that the witness was Orabilis, daughter of the donor, and her third husband as the name is so unusual.  "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated property to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Patricio filio Nesii, Dunc filio Elin…"[27].  "Orabilis filia et heres Dñi Nesii" donated "Davach ictar Hathyn" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…G. com de Mar…Patricio filio Nesii, Duncan filio Emelin…"[28].  Pope Innocent III confirmed the possessions of Inchaffray Abbey, including the donation of land "in territorio de Gasgt" by "quondam Orable matris Seer de Quinci", by bull dated 30 Jun 1203[29].  Orabilis presumably died before her first husband, given the undated charter under which her son "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew´s priory which was witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…"[30]m secondly as her first husband, EVA, daughter of ---.  "Eua quondam uxor Roberti de Quinci" donated property "de Edmundesten" to Melrose abbey, for the souls of "dominorum meorum Robti de Quinci et Walteri de Berkeley et Rolandi fratris mei et Johis filii mei et Christine sororis mee", to Melrose abbey by undated charter[31].  Eva was the sister of Christine, wife of William de Brus of Annandale (see the document SCOTLAND KINGS) and second wife of Patrick Earl of Dunbar (see SCOTLAND, MORMAERS, EARLS & LORDS).  She married secondly Walter de Berkeley.  Robert & his first wife had one child: 

a)         SAHER [IV] de Quincy ([1165/70]-Damietta 3 Nov 1219, bur Acre)"…Robertus de Quinci, Seierus de Quinci…" were the first two lay witnesses of the charter dated 1200 which records the foundation of Inchaffray Abbey by "Gilbertus filius Ferthead…comes de Stradern et…Matilidis filia Willelmi de Aubengni comitissa"[32].  He was created Earl of Winchester before 10 Feb 1207. 

-        see below

3.         [JUETA [Judith] .  Domesday Descendants suggests that "Jueta [Judith] wife of Robert fitz Lancelin, to whose son William and grandson Rainald Saher II de Quency restored a fee at Childerley" was the daughter of Saher [I] de Quincy[33]m ROBERT, son of LANCELIN & his wife ---.] 

 

 

SAHER [IV] de Quincy, son of ROBERT de Quincy & his first wife Orabilis of Mar ([1165/70]-Damietta 3 Nov 1219, bur Acre).  "…Robertus de Quinci, Seierus de Quinci…" were the first two lay witnesses of the charter dated 1200 which records the foundation of Inchaffray Abbey by "Gilbertus filius Ferthead…comes de Stradern et…Matilidis filia Willelmi de Aubengni comitissa"[34].  "…Seier de Quinci…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey[35].  "Seerus de Quinci" confirmed the donation of "Davac Icthar Hathyn" made by "matris mea" to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter witnessed by "…Roberto de Quincy patre meo…Constant et Patricio filiis Nesii avi mei…"[36].  He was created Earl of Winchester before 10 Feb 1207.  "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "ecclesiam de Gasc" to Inchaffray Abbey, for the souls of "patris nostri bone memorie Roberti de Quency et…matris nostre Orable et…Roberti de Quency primogeniti nostri et…Margarete uxoris nostre" by charter dated to [1210/13][37].  "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory, with the consent of "Robert filii mei", by undated charter[38].  He supported the barons against King John and was one of the 25 men chosen in Jun 1215 to enforce obedience of Magna Carta, being excommunicated by the Pope in Dec 1215.  He went with Robert FitzWalter to invite Louis de France to England in early 1216, his lands being seized by King John as a consequence and granted to William Marshal, son of the Earl of Pembroke.  He returned to the allegiance of King Henry III in Sep 1217 and his lands were restored to him 29 Sep 1217.  "Saherus de Quinc[y] comes Wintonie" confirmed a donation of property "in territorio de Gask" to Inchaffray Abbey by charter dated to [1218][39].  "Seyerus de Quinci comes Wintonie" donated revenue from "molendino meo de Locres" to St Andrew´s priory, with the consent of "Rogeri filii et heredis mei", by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Rogero de Quinci herede meo, Simone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Simonis de Quinci"[40].  He joined the Crusade in 1219 and died at the siege of Damietta[41].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “comes Wintoniæ” took the cross in 1219 but died, adding in a later passage that he died in 1220[42].  The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the death in 1220 of "Saerus de Quenci comes Wintoniensis" while on pilgrimage to Jerusalem[43].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1220 of “Saerus de Quinci comes Wintoniensis[44]

m (before 1190) MARGARET of Leicester, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester & his wife Pernelle de Grantmesnil ([before 1172][45]-12 Jan or 12 Feb 1235).  A history of the foundation of St Mary´s abbey, Leicester names “Amiciam primogenitam…et Margaritam juniorem” as the two daughters of “Robertus” and his wife “Petronillam filiam Hugonis de Grantmenyl”, adding that Margaret married “Sayero de Quincy[46].  "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "ecclesiam de Gasc" to Inchaffray Abbey, for the souls of "patris nostri bone memorie Roberti de Quency et…matris nostre Orable et…Roberti de Quency primogeniti nostri et…Margarete uxoris nostre" by charter dated to [1210/13][47].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Margareta comitissa Wint” owing “ut Hawisia filia sua maritetur Hugoni f. et heredi R. de Veer comitis Oxon” in Essex/Hertfordshire[48].  A charter of King Edward I confirmed donations to Garendon Abbey among which by “Margareta…comitissa Wyntoniæ, soror Roberti comitis Leycestriæ[49]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "12 Jan" of "Margarita comitissa Wintonyæ"[50]

Saher [IV] & his wife had [eight] children: 

1.         ROBERT ([1187/90][51]-London 1217).  "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "ecclesiam de Gasc" to Inchaffray Abbey, for the souls of "patris nostri bone memorie Roberti de Quency et…matris nostre Orable et…Roberti de Quency primogeniti nostri et…Margarete uxoris nostre" by charter dated to [1210/13][52].  The husband of Hawise of Chester was, according to the Complete Peerage, either Robert son of Robert de Quincy[53] (about whose existence there appears to be no other evidence) or Robert eldest son of Saher de Quincy Earl of Winchester[54].  However, the (undated) charter of Saher Earl of Winchester, relating to the grant of Bukby, Grantesset, Bradcham and Herdwick resolves the matter conclusively as it clearly states that Hawise was the wife of his eldest son Robert[55].  "Seherus de Quency comes Wintonie" donated "totam terram de Duglyn", held by "Nesus filius Willelmi avus meus" to Cambuskenneth priory, with the consent of "Robert filii mei", by undated charter[56].  Robert was excommunicated with his father in Dec 1215.  The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1217 of “Robertus de Quinci, filius Seeri de Quinci[57].  He was accidentally poisoned through medicine prepared by a Cistercian monk[58]m (before 1208) HAWISE of Chester, daughter of HUGH Earl of Chester & his wife Bertrade de Montfort ([1175/81][59]-[6 Jun 1241/3 Mar 1243).  The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestriæ" had four sisters, of whom "quarta…Hawisia" married "Roberto de Quenci"[60].  Ctss of Lincoln [Apr 1231/1232] on the resignation of her brother of this earldom in her favour[61].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         MARGARET (before 1208[62]-Hampstead Mar 1266, bur Clerkenwell, Church of the Hospitallers).  The Annales Londonienses name "Margaretam…comitissa Lincolniæ" as the daughter of "Hawisia…de Roberto de Quency"[63].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1221 that “Johannes constabularius Cestrie” married “filiam Roberti de Quenci neptam domini Ranulphi comitis Cestrie[64].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records that “Johanni de Laci constabulario Cestriæ” married “Roberto de Quincy…filiam Margaretam comitissam Lincolniæ[65].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that “Johannes de Lacy primus comes Lincolniæ” married “Margaretam filiam Roberti Quincy comitis Wintoniæ nepotem Ranulphi comitis Cestriæ” after the death of his first wife[66].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage “circa Epiphaniam Domini” in 1241 of “Walterus Marescallus comes” and “comitissam Lincolniæ…Margeriam, uxorem quondam Johannis comitis Lincolniæ[67].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[68].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[69].  "Margery countess of Lincoln and Pembroke and Richard de Wilteshir and their heirs" were granted "a yearly fair at their manor of Chelebiry" dated 7 Jun 1252[70].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1266 of “Margareta comitissa Lincolniæ[71].  The Annals of Winchester record the death “apud Hamstede” in 1266 of “Margareta comitissa Lyncollniæ[72]m firstly (1221, before 21 Jun) as his second wife, JOHN de Lacy, son of ROGER de Lacy & his wife Maud de Clare ([1192]-22 Jul 1240, bur Stanlaw, later transferred to Whalley).  He was created Earl of Lincoln in 1232.  m secondly (6 Jan 1242) WALTER Marshal Earl of Pembroke, son of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel Ctss of Pembroke (after 1198-1245).  m thirdly (before 7 Jun 1252) RICHARD de Wiltshire, son of ---. 

2.         ROGER de Quincy (-25 Apr 1264, bur [Brackley]).  "Seyerus de Quinci comes Wintonie" donated revenue from "molendino meo de Locres" to St Andrew´s priory, with the consent of "Rogeri filii et heredis mei", by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Rogero de Quinci herede meo, Simone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Simonis de Quinci"[73].  "Rogerus de Quinci filius Seyeri comitis Wintonie" confirmed his father´s donation of a mill to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Dño Seyero patre meo comite Wintonie, Symone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Gilleberto clerico, Symonis de Quinci, Henrico clerico, Symonis de Quinci"[74].  He succeeded his father in 1219 as Earl of Winchester, but was not recognised as such until after his mother's death[75].  "Rogerius de Quinci" confirmed donations of land "in territorio de Gasc", where the men of "domini patris mei comitis Wintonie" pastured animals, to Inchaffray Abbey by charter dated to [1220], witnessed by "Gilberto comite de Stratherne, Roberto et Fergus filiis suis…"[76].  He succeeded his father-in-law in 1234 as hereditary Constable of Scotland, de iure uxoris.  "Rogerus de Quency constabularius Scocie et Elena uxor eius filia quondam Alani de Galweya" recognised the rights of the church of Glasgow to "villam de Edeluestune" by undated charter[77].  "Rogerus de Quincy" donated "boscum nostrum de Gleddiswod" to Dryburgh monastery, for the souls of "nostre et Alyenore sponse mee et…Alani de Galwythya et Helene filie sue quondam sponse nostro", by undated charter[78].  John of Fordun´s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death in 1264 of "Rogerus de Quinci comes Wincestriæ"[79].  An undated writ "48 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Quency earl of Winchester", records that he died "on the day of St Mark the Evangelist" and names "Henry de Lascy aged 14 on the day of the Epiphany next, is his heir"[80].  Another writ dated 2 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Quency alias de Quinsy sometime earl of Winchester", records further details about his landholdings[81].  His earldom reverted to the crown on his death.  m firstly HELEN of Galloway, daughter of ALAN Lord of Galloway & his [first/second wife --- de Lacy/--- of the Isles] (-after 21 Nov 1245, bur Brackley).  The Annales Londonienses name "Eleyn countesse de Wynton" as eldest of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei", naming "Margarete countesse de Ferreres et Eleyne la Zusche et la countesse de Bougham" as her three daughters[82].  Earl Roger's first marriage with the daughter of Alan of Galloway is recorded by Matthew Paris[83].  The Liber Pluscardensis records that the eldest daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" married "Rogerus de Quinci comes Wintoniæ"[84].  "Elena quondam filia Alani de Galeweya" donated "villam de Edeluestune" to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[85].  "Rogerus de Quency constabularius Scocie et Elena uxor eius filia quondam Alani de Galweya" recognised the rights of the church of Glasgow to "villam de Edeluestune" by undated charter[86]m secondly (before 5 Jun 1250) as her second husband, MATILDA de Bohun, widow of ANSELM Marshal Earl of Pembroke, daughter of HUMPHREY de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Mathilde de Lusignan (-Groby, Lincolnshire 20 Oct 1252, bur Brackley80).  A charter dated 19 Jan 1246 mandates the grant to "Matilda who was the wife of Anselm Marshall…[of] 60 librates of land in Ireland, for her maintenance until the king shall cause her dower to be assigned to her out of Anselm´s lands"[87].  Her death is recorded by Matthew Paris, who states that she was daughter of the Earl of Hereford but does not give her own name, that she was her husband's second wife[88]m thirdly (before 5 Dec 1252) as her second husband, ELEANOR Ferrers, widow of WILLIAM de Vaux, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshal of Pembroke (-before 20 Oct 1274, bur Leeds Priory).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that "Alianora sexta filia" was "comitissa de Wintonia" and died childless[89].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[90].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the Annals of Ireland which record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “quinta, Elianora de Varis, quæ fuit uxor comitis Wintonie…[91].  Matthew Paris records her husband's remarriage soon after the death of his second wife, but does not name his third wife[92].  "Rogerus de Quincy" donated "boscum nostrum de Gleddiswod" to Dryburgh monastery, for the souls of "nostre et Alyenore sponse mee et…Alani de Galwythya et Helene filie sue quondam sponse nostro", by undated charter[93].  She married thirdly (1267) as his second wife, Roger de Leyburn.  King Edward I ordered the the escheator of Ireland to take all the lands of the deceased "Alianora widow of Roger de Quency earl of Winchester" into the hands of the king by charter dated 25 Oct 1274[94].  Earl Roger & his first wife had three children:

a)         MARGARET de Quincy (-before 12 Mar 1281).  The Annales Londonienses name "Margarete countesse de Ferreres et Eleyne la Zusche et la countesse de Bougham" as the three daughters of "Eleyn countesse de Wynton"[95].  A charter dated 3 Dec 1274 records the homage of "Margaret de Ferariis countess of Derby, eldest daughter and one of the heirs of Roger de Quency earl of Wynton" for her part of the lands "lately held in dower by Alianora de Vaux late countess of Wynton widow of the said Roger"[96].  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death 15 Apr of "Margaret de Ferrariis countess of Derbeye" name her son “William de Ferrariis...[97]m ([1238]) as his second wife, WILLIAM de Ferrers, son of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Agnes of Chester (-May 1254, bur Merevale Abbey).  He succeeded his father in 1247 as Earl of Derby. 

b)         ELENA de Quincy (-before 20 Aug 1296)The Annales Londonienses name "Margarete countesse de Ferreres et Eleyne la Zusche et la countesse de Bougham" as the three daughters of "Eleyn countesse de Wynton", naming "Roger la Zusche" as son of "Eleyne la Zusche" and "de Roger, Aleyn"[98].  A charter dated 3 Dec 1274 records the homage of "Elena la Zusche another daughter and heir of Roger [de Quency earl of Wynton]" for her part of the lands "lately held in dower by Alianora de Vaux late countess of Wynton widow of the said Roger"[99]m ALAN la Zouche [Justiciar of Ireland], son of ROGER la Zouche & his wife Margaret --- (-killed in battle London 10 Aug 1270). 

c)         ELIZABETH de Quincy .  The Annales Londonienses name "Margarete countesse de Ferreres et Eleyne la Zusche et la countesse de Bougham" as the three daughters of "Eleyn countesse de Wynton"[100].  A charter dated 3 Dec 1274 records the partition of the lands "lately held in dower by Alianora de Vaux late countess of Wynton widow of the said Roger" agreed by "Alexander Comyn earl of Buchan and Elizabeth his wife the third daughter of Roger [de Quency earl of Wynton]" for her part of the lands[101]m ALEXANDER Comyn Earl of Buchan, son of WILLIAM Comyn Earl of Buchan & his wife Margaret Ctss of Buchan (-before 6 Apr 1290).  

3.         HAWISE ([1200/12]-3 Feb after 1263, bur Earl's Colne).  "Margaret countess of Winchester" made a fine for the marriage of "Hawise her daughter…to Hugh, son and heir of R. de Vere, formerly earl of Oxford", dated [Feb] 1223[102].  Her birth date range is estimated based on her having given birth to her son in [1240], although it seems unlikely that she would have been much older than her husband.  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Margareta comitissa Wint” owing “ut Hawisia filia sua maritetur Hugoni f. et heredi R. de Veer comitis Oxon” in Essex/Hertfordshire[103]m (after 11 Feb 1223) HUGH de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Isabel de Bolebec ([1210]-before 23 Dec 1263, bur Earl's Colne). 

4.         LORETA .  The Complete Peerage names “Lorette m William de Valoynes of Panmure, co. Forfar, chamberlain of Scotland” as sister of Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester but does not cite the corresponding source[104].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m WILLIAM de Valoignes of Panmure, co. Forfar, Chamberlain of Scotland, son of PHILIP de Valoignes & his first wife --- (-1219). 

5.         [--- de Quincy .  Her parentage and marriage are suggested by the order dated 3 Feb 1223 under which King Henry III delivered "to Roger de Quency...the ward of the land of Sibilla de Valeines in Torpenno...the custody of which pertains to Roger by reason of Eustace de Stuteville, son and heir of said Sibilla, being in ward of Roger[105].  Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester was the brother of Loreta, wife of William de Valoignes (see above), who was the older brother of Sibylla.  However, that relationship would not have justified Roger’s wardship of Sibylla’s minor son after she died.  Many examples have been noted of a father marrying, as his second wife, the sister of the wife of his son and this may be another such case.  m as his second wife, PHILIP de Valoignes, son of son of ROGER de Valognes & his wife Agnes --- (-5 Nov 1215, bur Melrose Abbey).] 

6.         ROBERT ([1217/19]-Aug 1257).  The Complete Peerage names him as younger brother of Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester but does not cite the corresponding source[106].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   He is named “Roberto [de Quinci]” in the Annals of Dunstable when recording his marriage[107].  His birth date range is suggested on the assumption that he was born after the death of his older brother also called Robert, although his mother would have been over 45 years old at the time.  m (1237 before 5 Dec) as her second husband, HELEN of Wales, widow of JOHN "the Scot" Earl of Huntingdon and Chester, daughter of LLYWELLYN ap Iorwerth Fawr ("the Great") Prince of Wales & his second wife Joan [illegitimate daughter of John King of England] (-1253 before 24 Oct).  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Johannes comes Cestriæ” died in 1237 and “eius uxor…filia Lewelini” married “Roberto [de Quinci]” against her father´s wishes[108].  A writ after the death of "Eleanor, sometime the wife of John Earl of Chester", dated "the eve of St Martin 38 Hen III", records the "partition of her lands between Si J. de Bayllol, Robert de Brus, and Henry de Hasting, the heirs of the said earl"[109].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

a)         ANNE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   A nun. 

b)         JOAN de Quincy (-25 Nov 1284).  An undated writ "48 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Quency earl of Winchester", records that "Joan, wife of Humphrey de Boum the younger of full age, and Hawis, within age, daughters of the late Robert de Quency" were his heirs in the manor of "Styventon alias Steventon [Bedford]"[110]A writ dated 15 Dec "12 Edw I", after the death of "Joan late the wife of Humphrey de Boun alias de Bohun", records that she died "on Thursday the feast of St Katherine 12 Edw I" and that "Hawis her sister, late the wife of Baldwin Wake, is her next heir and of full age"[111]m as his second wife, HUMPHREY [VI] de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [V] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his first wife Maud de Lusignan (-Beeston Castle, Cheshire 27 Oct 1265, bur Combermere Abbey). 

c)         HAWISE ([1250]-before 27 Mar 1285).  An undated writ "48 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Quency earl of Winchester", records that "Joan, wife of Humphrey de Boum the younger of full age, and Hawis, within age, daughters of the late Robert de Quency" were his heirs in the manor of "Styventon alias Steventon [Bedford]"[112]A writ dated 15 Dec "12 Edw I", after the death of "Joan late the wife of Humphrey de Boun alias de Bohun", records that she died "on Thursday the feast of St Katherine 12 Edw I" and that "Hawis her sister, late the wife of Baldwin Wake, is her next heir and of full age"[113]m (before 5 Feb 1268) as his second wife, BALDWIN Wake, son of HUGH Wake & his wife Joan de Stuteville ([1237/38]-before 10 Feb 1282). 

7.         JOHN .  He is named in the Brackley charters[114].  His position in the order of birth of his siblings is unknown, but he may have been older than his brother Robert (the younger) if the speculation about the latter's date of birth (see above) is correct. 

8.         ORABILIS .  A manuscript relating to Ranton Priory, Staffordshire records that “Ricardo de Harecourt” married “Orabillam sororem Rogeri de Quinci”, and lists their descendants[115]m RICHARD de Harcourt, son of WILLIAM de Harcourt of Ellenhall, Staffordshire & his wife Alice Noel. 

 

 

The relationship between the following persons and the main Quincy family has not yet been identified: 

 

1.         SERLO de Quincy (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Serlo de Quency" holding "Winterburnestoke et Netherhavene, Hakenestone, Chisingebiry de Rege" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][116]

 

2.         SIMON [I] de Quincy .  "Seyerus de Quinci comes Wintonie" donated revenue from "molendino meo de Locres" to St Andrew´s priory, with the consent of "Rogeri filii et heredis mei", by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Rogero de Quinci herede meo, Simone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Simonis de Quinci"[117].  "Rogerus de Quinci filius Seyeri comitis Wintonie" confirmed his father´s donation of a mill to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Dño Seyero patre meo comite Wintonie, Symone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Gilleberto clerico, Symonis de Quinci, Henrico clerico, Symonis de Quinci"[118].  It appears from these documents that there were three individuals all named Simon de Quincy. 

 

3.         SIMON [II] de Quincy .  "Rogerus de Quinci filius Seyeri comitis Wintonie" confirmed his father´s donation of a mill to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Dño Seyero patre meo comite Wintonie, Symone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Gilleberto clerico, Symonis de Quinci, Henrico clerico, Symonis de Quinci"[119].  It appears from this document that there were three individuals all named Simon de Quincy. 

 

4.         SIMON [III] de Quincy .  "Rogerus de Quinci filius Seyeri comitis Wintonie" confirmed his father´s donation of a mill to St Andrew´s priory by undated charter, dated to [1217/18], witnessed by "Dño Seyero patre meo comite Wintonie, Symone de Quinci persona de Louchres, Patricio filio Nesii…Gilleberto clerico, Symonis de Quinci, Henrico clerico, Symonis de Quinci"[120].  It appears from this document that there were three individuals all named Simon de Quincy. 

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of WINCHESTER 1322-1326 (LE DESPENCER)

 

 

No indication has been found that the families of Simon and Thurstan Le Despencer, and of Richard Le Despencer, both shown below, were related to the Despencer family whose head was later created earl of Winchester. 

 

 

1.         --- .  m ---, niece of Rainald Abbot of Abingdon, daughter of ---.  Her family origin is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Anskilli…filio…eius…Willelmo" married "sororem Simonis Dispensatoris regis et neptem…abbatis [Rainaldus]"[121].  Two children: 

a)         SIMON Le Despencer (-before 1154).  The Chronicle of Abingdon names "Simon regis Henrici dispensator, quia propinquus erat Willelmi, Rainaldi abbatis filii", detailing his agreement with the abbey concerning "ecclesiam de Mercham" and other places[122]m ---.  Simon & his wife had two children: 

i)          THURSTAN Le Despencer (-[1177]).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Turstinus filius…Simonis" confirmed the donation of "ecclesia de Mercham", which he had wrongly taken back, to the abbey, dated to [1135/54] from the context[123]

-         see below

ii)         daughter .  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Simon…filiam" married "militi…Waltero filio Hingam" and that her father granted him "villam Tademertum"[124]m WALTER, son of HINGAM & his wife ---. 

b)         daughter .  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Anskilli…filio…eius…Willelmo…Suvecurdam" married "sororem Simonis Dispensatoris regis et neptem…abbatis [Rainaldus]"[125]m WILLIAM de Seacourt, son of ANSKETIL de Seacourt & his wife ---. 

 

 

THURSTAN Le Despencer, son of SIMON Le Despencer & his wife --- (-[1177]).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Turstinus filius…Simonis" confirmed the donation of "ecclesia de Mercham", which he had wrongly taken back, to the abbey, dated to [1135/54] from the context[126]

m ---.  The name of Thurstan´s wife is not known. 

Thurstan & his wife had two children: 

1.         AMAURY Le Despencer (-[1198/1212]).  "Almaricus Dispensator domini regis" confirmed the donation of "molendino de Dailintona", after the death of "Walterii de Cheisneto patris Amabilis uxoris mee…assensu Eue uxoris eius", to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1186/95][127].  King John confirmed "terra de Wordy et de Stanleia", which King Henry II had granted to "Waltero fratri suo", to "Almarico Dispensatori fil Turstan fratri Walteri fil Turstan heredi eiusdem Walteri" by charter dated 24 Apr 1205[128].  The Testa de Nevill records that "Almaricus Dispensator" held land "in Ewelm" in Oxfordshire in 1198[129].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "heredes Aumari Dispensatoris qui sunt in custodia Thome Bluet" owed property to the king in Oxfordshire[130].  m firstly AMABILIS de Chesney, daughter of WALTER de Chesney & his wife Eva de Broc.  "Almaricus Dispensator domini regis" confirmed the donation of "molendino de Dailintona", after the death of "Walterii de Cheisneto patris Amabilis uxoris mee…assensu Eue uxoris eius", to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1186/95], confirmed by a separate charter by "Eua de Broc…mariti mei Walterii de Cheisn"[131]m secondly ADA, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Ada que fuit uxor Almarici Dispensarii" holding land Bampton in Oxfordshire[132].  Amaury & his first wife had two children: 

a)         THURSTAN Le Despencer (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Thurstinus le Despenser" holding land "in Magna Rolendrich…in hundredo de Chadelintona" in Oxfordshire[133].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Thurstanus le Despenser" against "abbatem de Abbendonia" relating to land for which "eidem Thurstano et Almaricus pater suus" had done homage to the abbey[134].  "Thurstan Despencer" made a fine "for having confirmation of the lands of Worthy and Stanley, which King Henry, the king´s grandfather, gave to Walter uncle of the aforesaid Thurstan, whose heir he is", dated [Feb] 1229[135].  The name "Walter" suggests that Thurstan´s uncle in this document was his maternal uncle. 

b)         daughter .  King John confirmed "manerium…de Ofsprig" to "Petro de Stok…qui exient de filia Aumaric Despensatoris ux sua" by charter dated 1 May 1205[136]m PETER de Stokes, son of ---. 

2.         WALTER Le Despencer (-before 24 Apr 1205).  King John confirmed "terra de Wordy et de Stanleia", which King Henry II had granted to "Waltero fratri suo", to "Almarico Dispensatori fil Turstan fratri Walteri fil Turstan heredi eiusdem Walteri" by charter dated 24 Apr 1205[137]

 

 

1.         RICHARD Le Despencer (-before 1221).  m ALBREDA, daughter of --- (-after 1221).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1221, by "Albreda que fuit uxor Ricardi le Despenser" against "Philippum filium Radulfi presbiteri" for land "in Suttona ut dotem suam", naming "heredes predicti Ricardi…Aliciam, Elizabeth, Isoldam et Agatham, que sunt in custodia ipsius Albrede"[138].  Richard & his wife had four children: 

a)         ALICE Le Despencer .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1221, by "Albreda que fuit uxor Ricardi le Despenser" against "Philippum filium Radulfi presbiteri" for land "in Suttona ut dotem suam", naming "heredes predicti Ricardi…Aliciam, Elizabeth, Isoldam et Agatham, que sunt in custodia ipsius Albrede"[139]

b)         ELIZABETH Le Despencer .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1221, by "Albreda que fuit uxor Ricardi le Despenser" against "Philippum filium Radulfi presbiteri" for land "in Suttona ut dotem suam", naming "heredes predicti Ricardi…Aliciam, Elizabeth, Isoldam et Agatham, que sunt in custodia ipsius Albrede"[140]

c)         ISOLDA Le Despencer .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1221, by "Albreda que fuit uxor Ricardi le Despenser" against "Philippum filium Radulfi presbiteri" for land "in Suttona ut dotem suam", naming "heredes predicti Ricardi…Aliciam, Elizabeth, Isoldam et Agatham, que sunt in custodia ipsius Albrede"[141]

d)         AGATHA Le Despencer .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1221, by "Albreda que fuit uxor Ricardi le Despenser" against "Philippum filium Radulfi presbiteri" for land "in Suttona ut dotem suam", naming "heredes predicti Ricardi…Aliciam, Elizabeth, Isoldam et Agatham, que sunt in custodia ipsius Albrede"[142]

 

 

THOMAS Le Despencer .  "…Thomas dispensatore…" witnessed the charter dated to the reign of King Henry II under which "Bertram de Verdum" granted land at Long Whatton, Leicestershire to "Wauchelino filio Baldewini et Aeliz uxori sue", which was held by "mater uxoris predicti Walchelini" during the reign of King Henry I[143]

m ---.  The name of Thomas´s wife is not known. 

Thomas & his wife had four children: 

1.         THOMAS (-before 1218).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records three knights´ fees escheated from "Thomas Dispensator cum filia et hærede Hugonis de Insula" in "[Ly]bernby in Norhamtesira…in Lubestorp in Leyecestresira…in Torp in Notinghamsira…[de honore] Piperelli de Notingham" in [1211/12][144]m --- de Lisle, daughter of HUGH de Lisle & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Red Book of the Exchequer which records three knights´ fees escheated from "Thomas Dispensator cum filia et hærede Hugonis de Insula" in "[Ly]bernby in Norhamtesira…in Lubestorp in Leyecestresira…in Torp in Notinghamsira…[de honore] Piperelli de Notingham" in [1211/12][145]

2.         HUGH (-[23 Feb/30 May] 1238).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo Dispensator" holding land from "honor Peverelli" in Leicestershire in [1210/12][146].  Henry III King of England granted custody of land of "Johannis de Sancto Johanne", during the minority of his heirs, to "Galfrido Dispensario" and granted the marriage of "dictorum heredum" to "Hugoni Dispensario fratri ipsius Galfridi" dated [Apr] 1230[147].  Of Loughborough, Leicestershire.  m ---.  The name of Hugh´s wife is not known.   Hugh & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         PERNELL .  King Henry III granted custody of lands of "Galfridi le Sauvage" to "Hugo Dispensator", who had married "filiam ipsius Hugonis", dated 4 Nov 1230[148]m GEOFFREY le Sauvage of Hints, son of --- (-before 4 Nov 1230). 

b)         HUGH (1223 or before-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265, bur Evesham Abbey)m (1260 or before) as her first husband, ALINE Basset, daughter and heiress of PHILIP Basset of Wycombe, Buckinghamshire & his first wife Hawise de Lovaine of Little Easton, Essex ([1242/50]-before 11 Apr 1281).  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", names "Aline his daughter, wife of Roger Bygod earl of Norfolk, marshal of England, late the wife of Hugh le Despensir, age variously stated as 22 and more, 24 and more, 26 and 30 and more, is the heir"[149].  She married secondly (before 29 Oct 1271) as his first wife, Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk.  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death of "Aline la Despensere daughter and heir of Philip Basset, alias Aveline countess of Norfolk alias Aline countess Marescall" name “Hugh son of Hugh le Despencer age [...20 in the first week of March last] is next heir[150].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

i)          HUGH (1261-1326).  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death of "Aline la Despensere daughter and heir of Philip Basset, alias Aveline countess of Norfolk alias Aline countess Marescall" name “Hugh son of Hugh le Despencer age [...20 in the first week of March last] is next heir[151].  Lord le Despencer 1295.  He was created Earl of Winchester in 1322.  The earldom was forfeited on his death. 

-         see below

ii)         ELEANOR Le Despencer (-30 Sep 1328, bur Cowick near Exeter).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “Hugonem de Courtnay primum” married “Elianoram filiam…domini Hugonis le Despencer primi, patris etiam domini Hugonis le Despencer…postea comitis Winton[152].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records the death ”1328 II Kal Oct” of “Hugonem de Courtnay primum…[vidua] domina Alianora” and her burial “prope maritum…apud Cowick[153]m HUGH de Courtenay of Okehampton, son of JOHN de Courtenay & his wife Isabel de Vere of the Earls of Oxford (-Colecombe 28 Feb 1292, bur Cowick near Exeter). 

3.         ROHESE .  The Complete Peerage records her parentage and marriage[154]m as his first wife, STEPHEN de Segrave, son of GILBERT de Segrave & his wife ---- (-Leicester Abbey 1241). 

4.         GEOFFREY (-1251).  Henry III King of England granted custody of land of "Johannis de Sancto Johanne", during the minority of his heirs, to "Galfrido Dispensario" and granted the marriage of "dictorum heredum" to "Hugoni Dispensario fratri ipsius Galfridi" dated [Apr] 1230[155].  King Henry III granted custody of lands of "Johannis de Sancto Johanne" to "Galfrido Dispensario…et Emma uxor eius", until the majority of his heirs, dated 21 Dec 1231[156].  Of Martley.  m ([Apr] 1230) as her second husband, EMMA d'Harcourt, widow of JOHN de St John of Stanton, daughter of RICHARD d'Harcourt & his wife --- (-after 1265).  King Henry III granted custody of lands of "Johannis de Sancto Johanne" to "Galfrido Dispensario…et Emma uxor eius", until the majority of his heirs, dated 21 Dec 1231[157].  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN (-before 5 May 1275).  A writ dated 5 May "3 Edw I", after the death of "John le Despencer..." names "Hugh son of Hugh le Dispenser aged 14 on 1 March last is his next heir", refers to Marthley manor “the gift of King Henry to the said John´s father”, the manors of “Kastel Carleton, Caueneby...all held of the inheritance of his wife deceased...Joan...without heir...daughter of Robert le Lou”, commenting they had no child “surviving[158].  The naming of Hugh as his heir suggests that John was the younger brother of Hugh´s father, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified.  m JOAN, daughter of ROBERT le Lou of Castle Carlton & his wife --- (-before 1266).  A writ dated 5 May "3 Edw I", after the death of "John le Despencer..." names "Hugh son of Hugh le Dispenser aged 14 on 1 March last is his next heir", refers to the manors of “Kastel Carleton, Caueneby...all held of the inheritance of his wife deceased...Joan...without heir...daughter of Robert le Lou”, commenting they had no child “surviving[159].  John & his wife had children: 

i)          children (-before 1275).  A writ dated 5 May "3 Edw I", after the death of "John le Despencer..." names "Hugh son of Hugh le Dispenser aged 14 on 1 March last is his next heir", refers to the manors of “Kastel Carleton, Caueneby...all held of the inheritance of his wife deceased...Joan...without heir...daughter of Robert le Lou”, commenting they had no child “surviving[160].   

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

HUGH Le Despencer, son of HUGH Le Despencer & his wife Aline Basset (1261-executed Bristol Castle 27 Nov 1326).  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death of "Aline la Despensere daughter and heir of Philip Basset, alias Aveline countess of Norfolk alias Aline countess Marescall" name “Hugh son of Hugh le Despencer age [...20 in the first week of March last] is next heir[161].  A writ dated 5 May "3 Edw I", after the death of "John le Despencer..." names "Hugh son of Hugh le Dispenser aged 14 on 1 March last is his next heir"[162].  Lord le Despencer 1295.  He was created Earl of Winchester in 1322.  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Hugo primus” was killed “apud Brystolliam VI Kal Nov in castello 1326[163].  The earldom was forfeited on his death. 

m (1286 of before) as her second husband, ISABEL de Beauchamp, widow of PATRICK de Chaworth, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Matilda FitzJohn (-before 30 May 1306). 

Hugh & his wife had five children: 

1.         HUGH (-executed Hereford 24 Nov 1326, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  Lord le Despencer 1314.  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Hugo secundus, camerarius Regis Edwardi de Karnarvan et maritus dominæ Elianoræ de Clare” was killed “1326 in vigilia sanctæ Andreæ apostolic apud Herefordiam”, hanged, drawn and quartered without trial, and buried “in nostra ecclesia[164]m (Westminster 1306 after 14 Jun) as her first husband, ELEANOR de Clare, daughter of GILBERT de Clare Earl of Gloucester & his second wife Joan of England ([1292]-30 Jun 1337).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Elianoram, Elizabetham, et Margaretam” as the three daughters of “Gilbertus secundus” and his wife “Johanna de Acres, filia regis Edwardi primi”, adding that Eleanor married “Hugoni le Despenser, filio domini Hugonis le Despenser comitis Wintoniæ[165].  King Edward II, for “affectionem quam ad promotionem...nepotis regis Gilberti filii Hugonis le Despencer junioris”, granted “manerium de Melton Moubray...in comitatu Leycestriæ quod fuit Johannis de Moubray...et manerium de Sonyngdon...in comitatu Bedfordiæ quod fuit de Bartholomæi de Badelsmere” to “nepti suæ Alianoræ uxori eiusdem Hugonis” by charter dated 7 Jul 1322[166].  She married secondly as his second wife, William la Zouche Lord Zouche.  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Eleonora uxor eiusdem” (referring to “Hugo secundus, camerarius Regis Edwardi de Karnarvan et maritus dominæ Elianoræ de Clare”) died “II Kal Jul 1337”, and also refers to her second marriage to “domino Willielmo le Sowch” by whom she was mother of “Hugonem Souch[167].  Hugh & his wife had five children: 

a)         HUGH (1308-8 Feb 1349, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Hugonem tertium et Edwardum” as the sons of “Hugoni le Despenser, filio domini Hugonis le Despenser comitis Wintoniæ” & his wife, adding in a later passage that he died “VI Id Feb 1348” and was buried in Tewkesbury abbey[168].  Lord Le Despencer 1338.  m (before 27 Apr 1341) as her second husband, ELIZABETH de Montagu, widow of GILES de Badlesmere, daughter of WILLIAM de Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katharine de Grandison (-Astley, Hampshire 31 May 1359, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  King Edward III requested papal dispensation for the marriage between “Hugonem le Despenser” and “Elizabeth filiam...comitis Sarum et marescalli Angliæ” is dated 6 Mar 1340[169].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Hugo tertius” married “Elizabetha filia comitis Sarum” but was childless[170].  She married thirdly (1354) as his second wife, Guy de Briene Lord Briene.  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “1359…apud Asteley in comitatu Hamptoniæ…ultimo die mensis Maii” of “domina Elizabeth…filia quondam Willielmi de Monte-acuto comitis Sarum, ac uxor Guidonis de Bryene militis, et relicto Hugone tertio le Despencer” and her burial with her first husband in Tewkesbury abbey[171]

b)         ISABEL ([1312]-).  The Chronicle of Lanercost records that "comes Arundeliæ" married "filiam domini Hugonis, junioris"[172]m (1321, annulled 1344) as his first wife, RICHARD FitzAlan, son of EDMUND FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alice de Warenne ([1313]-Arundel 24 Jan 1376, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex).  He was restored as Earl of Arundel in 1330, known as "Copped Hat". 

c)         EDWARD (-killed in battle Morlaix 30 Sep 1342).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Hugonem tertium et Edwardum” as the sons of “Hugoni le Despenser, filio domini Hugonis le Despenser comitis Wintoniæ” & his wife[173].  Of Buckland, Buckinghamshire. 

-        see below

d)         ELIZABETH (-13 Jul 1389, bur London St Botolph´s)m (1338) MAURICE de Berkeley, son of THOMAS de Berkeley Lord Berkeley & his first wife Margaret Mortimer of the Earls of March (1330-Berkeley Castle 8 Jun 1368, bur Bristol St Augustine´s).  He succeeded his father in 1361 as Lord Berkeley. 

e)         GILBERT Le Despencer .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Eleonora uxor eiusdem” (referring to “Hugo secundus, camerarius Regis Edwardi de Karnarvan et maritus dominæ Elianoræ de Clare”) was mother of “Hugonis tertii, et Edwardi primi, et Gilbert le Despencer” by her first husband[174].  King Edward II, for “affectionem quam ad promotionem...nepotis regis Gilberti filii Hugonis le Despencer junioris”, granted “manerium de Melton Moubray...in comitatu Leycestriæ quod fuit Johannis de Moubray...et manerium de Sonyngdon...in comitatu Bedfordiæ quod fuit de Bartholomæi de Badelsmere” to “nepti suæ Alianoræ uxori eiusdem Hugonis” by charter dated 7 Jul 1322[175]

2.         ALINE (-before 28 Nov 1353).  m (1302) EDWARD Burnell, son of PHILIP Burnell of Condover, Shropshire & his wife Matilda FitzAlan of the Earls of Arundel ([1282]-1315 before 1 Sep).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1311, whereby he is held to have become Lord Burnell. 

3.         ISABEL (-4/5 Dec 1334).  King Edward II pardoned “Radulphus de Montehermerii” for marrying “Isabellam quæ fuit uxor Johannis de Hastinges defuncti” without royal consent by charter dated 12 Aug 1319[176]m firstly (after Oct 1305) as his second wife, JOHN de Hastings Lord Hastings, son of HENRY de Hastings & his wife Joan Cantelou (Allesley, Warwickshire 6 May 1262-10 Feb 1313).  m secondly (before 10 Nov 1318) as his second wife, RALPH de Monthermer Lord Monthermer, son of --- ([1261/62]-5 Apr 1325, bur Salisbury, Grey Friars Church). 

4.         PHILIP (-1313).  m as her first husband, MARGARET, daughter and heiress of RALPH de Goushill [Goxhill] & his wife --- (1294-1349).  She married secondly John de Ros.  Descendants extinct in the male line 1424. 

5.         MARGARET m (Dec 1313 or after) JOHN de Saint-Amand, son of AMAURY [II] de Saint-Amand & his wife --- ([1276/83]-before 25 Jan 1330).  He was summoned to parliament in 1313 whereby he is held to have become Lord St Amand. 

 

 

EDWARD Le Despencer, son of HUGH Le Despencer Lord Le Despencer & his wife Eleanor de Clare of the Earls of Gloucester (-killed in battle Morlaix 30 Sep 1342).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Hugonem tertium et Edwardum” as the sons of “Hugoni le Despenser, filio domini Hugonis le Despenser comitis Wintoniæ” & his wife[177].  Of Buckland, Buckinghamshire.  

m (Groby 20 Apr 1335) ANNE de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers of Groby, Leicestershire, Lord Ferrers & his wife Ellen --- (-8 Aug 1367).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Edwardus…primus, frater Hugonis tertii” married “Anna filia domini de Ferrers[178]

Edward & his wife had four children: 

1.         EDWARD (Essendine 24 Mar 1336-Llanblethian, co. Glamorgan 11 Nov 1375, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Edwardum secundum, Thomam, Henricum, et Gilbertum secundum” as children of “Edwardus…primus, frater Hugonis tertii” and his wife “Anna filia domini de Ferrers”, adding in a later passage that “Edwardus secundus” died “in Cambria apud Lanblethian in die sancti Martini 1375” and was buried at Tewkesbury abbey[179].  Lord Le Despencer 1357.  The will of "Edward Lord Despenser Lord of Glamorgan and Morgannock", dated 6 Nov 1375, chose burial “in the abbey of Tewksbury”, bequeathed property to “Elizabeth my wife...Ralf de Ferrers my uncle...John d´Odingsells[180]m (before 2 Aug 1354) ELIZABETH Burghersh, daughter and heiress of BARTHOLOMEW Burghersh Lord Burghersh & his first wife Cecily de Weland of Blaxhall and Cockfield, Suffolk (before 1347-26 Jul 1409, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” married “dominam Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Borowashe”, adding in a later passage that she died “die sanctæ Annæ 1409” and was buried in Tewkesbury abbey[181].  The will of "Edward Lord Despenser Lord of Glamorgan and Morgannock", dated 6 Nov 1375, chose burial “in the abbey of Tewksbury”, bequeathed property to “Elizabeth my wife...Ralf de Ferrers my uncle...John d´Odingsells[182].  The will of "Elizabeth de Burghersh Lady Despenser", dated 4 Jul 1409, chose burial “in the church of Our Lady at Tewksbury betwixt my...husband Edward Lord Despenser and my son Thomas le Despenser”, bequeathed property to “the Lady Morley my daughter...the Lady Margaret Ferrers my daughter...Philippa my daughter...Elizabeth daughter to the aforesaid Margaret[183].  Edward & his wife had eight children: 

a)         EDWARD (-bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Edwardum tertium…Hugonem” as sons of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, adding that Edward died at Cardiff aged 12 (“duodenus”) and was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey[184]

b)         HUGH (-bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Edwardum tertium…Hugonem” as sons of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, adding that Hugh died after he was born and was buried with his brother (at Tewkesbury Abbey)[185]

c)         CICELY (-bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Cecilia…Elizabeth…Annam…et Margaretam” as the four daughters of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, born after their two older brothers, adding that Cecilia died young was buried with them (at Tewkesbury Abbey)[186]

d)         ANNE (-30/31 Oct 1426).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Cecilia…Elizabeth…Annam…et Margaretam” as the four daughters of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, born after their two older brothers, adding that Anne married “Hugoni Hastings et post Thomas Morley[187].  The will of "Elizabeth de Burghersh Lady Despenser", dated 4 Jul 1409, bequeathed property to “the Lady Morley my daughter...the Lady Margaret Ferrers my daughter...Philippa my daughter...Elizabeth daughter to the aforesaid Margaret[188]m firstly (before 1 Nov 1376) HUGH de Hastinges, son of HUGH de Hastinges & his wife [Margaret de Everingham] (-Spain 6 Nov 1386).  m secondly (1390) as his second wife, THOMAS de Morley Lord Morley of Morley, Norfolk, Marshal of England, son of WILLIAM de Morley Lord Morley & his wife Cicely Bardolph (-24 Sep 1416, bur Norwich, Church of the Austin Friars). 

e)         ELIZABETH (-10/11 Apr 1408, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Cecilia…Elizabeth…Annam…et Margaretam” as the four daughters of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, born after their two older brothers, adding that Elizabeth was “dominam de la Sowch et relictam domini Johannis de Arundell[189].  The will of "Elizabeth Lady Zouche", dated 4 Apr 1408, chose burial “in the abbey of Tewkesbury where the bodies of my brothers are buried”, bequeathed property to “Edmund and Thomas my sons[190]m firstly (before 1387) JOHN d'Arundel Lord Arundel, son of JOHN d'Arundel Lord Arundel & his wife Eleanor Baroness Mautravers (30 Nov 1364-14 Aug 1390, bur Missenden Abbey).  m secondly WILLIAM la Zouche Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, son of WILLIAM La Zouche Lord Zouche & his wife Elizabeth de Ros (-13 May 1396). 

f)          MARGARET (-3 Nov 1415, bur Merivale Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Cecilia…Elizabeth…Annam…et Margaretam” as the four daughters of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, born after their two older brothers, adding that Margaret married “domino Roberto de Ferrers” and died “III Non Nov 1415” and was buried “apud Merivale[191].  The will of "Elizabeth de Burghersh Lady Despenser", dated 4 Jul 1409, bequeathed property to “the Lady Morley my daughter...the Lady Margaret Ferrers my daughter...Philippa my daughter...Elizabeth daughter to the aforesaid Margaret[192]m as his second wife, ROBERT Ferrers, son of JOHN Ferrers & his wife Elizabeth de Stafford (Staffordshire 31 Oct 1357 or 1359-12/13 Mar 1413, bur Merevale Abbey). 

g)         PHILIPPA (-after 4 Jul 1409).  The will of "Elizabeth de Burghersh Lady Despenser", dated 4 Jul 1409, bequeathed property to “the Lady Morley my daughter...the Lady Margaret Ferrers my daughter...Philippa my daughter...Elizabeth daughter to the aforesaid Margaret[193]

h)         THOMAS (1373-beheaded Bristol 13 Jan 1400, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestriæ” as the last child of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, adding in a later passage that he was killed “apud Bristoliam…feria tertia post festum sancti Hilarii 1399” and was buried in Tewkesbury abbey[194].  He succeeded his father in 1375 as Lord Despenser.  He was created Earl of Gloucester 29 Sep 1397, forfeited 3 Nov 1399. 

-        see below

2.         THOMAS .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Edwardum secundum, Thomam, Henricum, et Gilbertum secundum” as children of “Edwardus…primus, frater Hugonis tertii” and his wife “Anna filia domini de Ferrers[195]

3.         HENRY .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Edwardum secundum, Thomam, Henricum, et Gilbertum secundum” as children of “Edwardus…primus, frater Hugonis tertii” and his wife “Anna filia domini de Ferrers[196]

4.         GILBERT .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Edwardum secundum, Thomam, Henricum, et Gilbertum secundum” as children of “Edwardus…primus, frater Hugonis tertii” and his wife “Anna filia domini de Ferrers[197]

 

 

THOMAS Le Despencer, son of EDWARD Le Despenser & his wife Elizabeth Burghersh (1373-beheaded Bristol 13 Jan 1400, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestriæ” as the last child of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, adding in a later passage that he was killed “apud Bristoliam…feria tertia post festum sancti Hilarii 1399” and was buried in Tewkesbury abbey[198].  He succeeded his father in 1375 as Lord Despenser.  He was created Earl of Gloucester 29 Sep 1397, forfeited 3 Nov 1399.  He was tried for complicity in the murder of the Duke of Gloucester, forfeited his assets.  He plotted to seize King Henry IV, was seized at Bristol and beheaded. 

m ([16 Apr 1378/7 Nov 1389]) CONSTANCE of York, daughter of EDMUND "of Langley" Duke of York & his first wife [Infanta] doña Isabel de Castilla ([1374]-28 Nov 1416, bur Reading Abbey 1420).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestriæ”, last child of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, married “dominam Constantiam filiam domini Edmundi de Langley, filii regis Edwardi tertii et ducis Eboracensis”, adding in a later passage that Constance married secondly “domino Thomæ comiti de Arundell” by whom she was mother of “filiam…Elianoram” who married “Hugoni domino de Audley” and had “filium…Jacobum[199].  This last passage is inconsistent with other sources regarding the paternity of Constance´s daughter Eleanor and the identity of Eleanor´s husband.  After her husband's death, she became the mistress ([1405]) of Edmund de Holand Earl of Kent.  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death in 1417 of “domina Constancia, mater…dominæ Isabellæ” and her burial “apud monasterium de Reding 1420[200]

Thomas & his wife had five children: 

1.         EDWARD (-young). 

2.         RICHARD (1396-Merton, Surrey 7 Oct 1414, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Ricardum, Elizabetham et Isabellam” as the children of “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestriæ” and his wife “dominam Constantiam filiam domini Edmundi de Langley, filii regis Edwardi tertii et ducis Eboracensis”, adding in a later passage that Richard died 7 Oct 1414 aged 18 “apud Merton” and was buried in Tewkesbury abbey[201].  He succeeded his paternal grandmother as Lord Burghersh in 1409.  m (after 23 May 1412) as her first husband, ELEANOR Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his second wife Joan Beaufort (-1472).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “primam filiam domini Radulphi comitis de Westmerland…Elizabetham” as the wife of “dominus Ricardus tertius le Despencer”, adding that she married secondly “domino Henrico Percy comiti de Northumbria[202]

3.         HUGH (-1401). 

4.         ELIZABETH ([1398]-young Cardiff ----, bur Cardiff St Mary).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Ricardum, Elizabetham et Isabellam” as the children of “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestriæ” and his wife “dominam Constantiam filiam domini Edmundi de Langley, filii regis Edwardi tertii et ducis Eboracensis”, adding that Elizabeth died young at Cardiff and was buried “in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ ibidem[203]

5.         ISABEL (Cardiff 26 Jul 1400-Friars Minoresses, London 27 Dec 1439, bur 13 Jan 1440 Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Ricardum, Elizabetham et Isabellam” as the children of “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestriæ” and his wife “dominam Constantiam filiam domini Edmundi de Langley, filii regis Edwardi tertii et ducis Eboracensis”, adding that Isabel was born seven months after the death of her father “apud Kardyf in die sanctæ Annæ 1400”, that she inherited the Despencer lordship after the death of her brother, and that she married “dominus Ricardus de Bellocampo, filius et hæres domini Willielmi Bewchamp et dominus de Abergeveni, in die VII dormientium 1411…apud Theokes[204].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that, after the death of her first husband, “dominam Isabellam comitissam Wigorniæ” had Papal dispensation to marry “dominus Richardus Bewchampe V comes Warwichiæ, et filius patris Ricardi quarti comitis Wigorniæ” whom she married “1423 XXVI die Nov”, and that she died “VI Kal Jan” following the death of her second husband and was buried “Id Jan” in Tewkesbury abbey[205].  The will of "Richard Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 9 Aug 1435, bequeathed property to “Isabel now my wife...Henry my son...[206].  The will of "Isabel Beauchamp Countess of Warwick", dated 1 Dec 1439, chose burial “in the abbey of Tewksbury[207]m firstly (Tewkesbury 27 Jul 1411) RICHARD Beauchamp Lord Abergavenny, son of HENRY Beauchamp Lord Abergavenny & his wife Joan FitzAlan of Arundel ([1397]-18 Mar 1422, bur 25 Apr 1422 Tewkesbury Abbey).  He was created Earl of Worcester Feb 1421.  m secondly (Hanley Castle, Worcestershire 26 Nov 1423) as his second wife, RICHARD Beauchamp Earl of Warwick, son of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Margaret Ferrers of Groby (25 or 28 Jan 1382-Rouen 30 Apr 1439, bur 4 Oct 1439 Warwick, St Mary's). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    MARCH

 

 

According to the Complete Peerage, Roger [I] de Mortemer came from Mortemer-sur-Eaulne, near Neufchâtel-en-Brai (upstream of Dieppe on the river Béthune, in the eastern part of the Pays de Caux) in Normandy, which it says must be distinguished from "Mortemer-en-Lions, the site of the abbey of the same name"[208].  Le Prévost is more specific, stating that he was from "Mortemer-en-Brai, sur la rivière d´Eaulne" and adding "on voit encore l´emplacement du château" (writing in 1840)[209].  Roger [I] is recorded by Orderic Vitalis as having led "omnes Caletenses" (from the Pays de Caux) at the battle of Mortemer against the French in 1054 but that his castle was confiscated after he had helped the escape of one of the French prisoners[210].  Although Roger was later reconciled with the king and recovered some of his lands, the castle of Mortemer remained with the Warenne family.  The descendants of Roger [I] continued to bear the name "Mortimer", derived from the castle, despite its early confiscation. 

 

There has been considerable debate about the ancestry of Roger [I] de Mortemer.  The first question relates to the possible relationship between Roger [I] de Mortemer and William de Warenne 1st Earl of Surrey.  This issue is discussed in the Complete Peerage which concludes that "its exact nature has not at present been discovered"[211].  The fact of the family relationship is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who, in a passage recounting an alleged death-bed speech of William I King of England, records that the castle of Mortemer, confiscated from Roger [I] de Mortemer after the battle of Mortemer in 1054, was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius"[212].  In addition to this, Robert de Torigny, in his description of abbeys in Normandy, records that "Rogerius de Mortuo Mari, filius Walterii de Sancto Martino, frater vero primi Willermi de Warenna" founded "monasterium Sancti Victoris"[213].  A third source, Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius” [although an undated charter quoted in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, which records a sale of property by “Hugo de Flamenvilla”, indicates that Raoul´s second wife was the mother of his son Guillaume][214].  The second source is clearly incorrect as regards the parentage of William de Warenne, whose father is confirmed in other primary sources as Raoul de Warenne (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, WARENNE).  It is also clear that Roger [I] de Mortemer (already holder of a castle in 1054) must have been considerably older than William de Warenne, and so could hardly have been his brother.  Stapleton proposed in 1846 that Roger [I] de Mortimer and Raoul de Warenne, father of William de Warenne 1st Earl of Surrey, were brothers, arguing that, because they are both mentioned in charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in connection with the same property (see below), they had probably inherited it jointly[215]

 

Stapleton also proposed that Roger [I] de Mortemer was the same person as Roger, son of "Bishop Hugues".  The question of the identity of Bishop Hugues is discussed in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY.  Roger, son of the bishop, is named in three charters, two of which name his father as Bishop Hugues.  Firstly, "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…" witnessed an undated charter which records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ"[216].  Secondly, "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[217].  Thirdly, "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi", sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by charter dated 1074[218].  The Complete Peerage dismisses Stapleton´s hypothesis[219].  It argues firstly that the wife of Roger [I] de Mortemer is named Hawise in primary sources, compared with Oda as the wife of Roger, son of the bishop, and also that the bishop´s son is recorded with children named Guillaume and Hugues, whereas Roger [I]´s heir was named Ralph, although it would not be beyond the stretch of imagination to combine the two families, with Roger having married twice.  The third difficulty proposed by the Complete Peerage is harder to dismiss.  This is that the 1074 charter quoted above implies that Roger, father of Guillaume, was already deceased at the time of the sale of their property to Raoul de Warenne, whereas sources demonstrate that Roger [I] de Mortemer was still alive in 1078.  A further difficulty with Stapleton´s hypothesis is that, if it was correct, the same person would have been referred to in the sources sometimes as "filius episcopi" and sometimes as "de Mortuomari".  Such dual appellations are unusual.  Different primary sources at the time usually refer to the same individual by the same name and epithet, presumably reflecting the style by which he was normally known among his contemporaries.  If a person was known by two names, the style "X qui et Y" was usually adopted in the sources.  One possible explanation for this apparent exception to normal practice is that, after the confiscation of his castle, "Rogerius de Mortuomari" became known as "Rogerius filius episcopi", although this does not appear consistent with the survival of the name Mortimer among Roger´s descendants long after the castle was lost. 

 

Roger de Mortimer Lord Mortimer, descended from Roger [I] de Mortemer, was created Earl of March in 1328, presumably through the influence of Queen Isabella, widow of King Edward II, who was his mistress.  He was captured and executed in 1330, whereupon his lands and honours were forfeited.  In 1354, Roger Mortimer, grandson of the earlier Roger, obtained a reversal of his grandfather´s attainder and was restored to the earldom of March.  On the death without direct heirs in 1425 of Edmund Mortimer Earl of March, the earldom passed to his nephew Richard Duke of York, son of Richard “of Conisburgh” Earl of Cambridge (son of Edmund “of Langley” Duke of York, a younger son of King Edward III) and his wife the deceased earl´s sister Anne. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of MARCH 1328-1425 (MORTIMER)

 

 

1.         ROGER [I] de Mortemer (-[1078/86]).  Seigneur de Mortemer-sur-Eaulne, near Neufchâtel-en-Brai, Normandy.  [same person as…?  ROGER, son of HUGUES d´Ivry Bishop of Bayeux & his [wife/mistress ---] (-after [1037/55]).  The question of the possible co-identity of Roger [I] de Mortemer and Roger, son of the bishop, is discussed in the Introduction to the present chapter.]  Roger de Mortemer was related to the Warenne family but the precise relationship has not been determined, as discussed further in the Introduction above.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" led the Norman forces ("Caletorum catervam" = troops from the pays de Caux) who defeated Eudes, brother of Henri I King of France ("Odonem fratrem suum") "apud Mortuum-mare" in 1054[220].  In a later passage, recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, the same source records that "Rogerium de Mortuomari et omnes Caletenses" had defeated the French troops "apud Mortuum-Mare" but that "Rogerius princeps" helped the escape of "Rodulfus…comes" (identified more precisely in another passage as "Radulfum comitem de Monte-Desiderii") to whom he had done homage, for which treachery Roger was exiled and his lands confiscated, including "castrum…Mortui Mari" which was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius"[221].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rogero de Mortuomari" contributed 120 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[222], which suggests that he had been fully reconciled with the future William I King of England by that time.  He acquired land at Wigmore which had been forfeited by Roger Earl of Hereford in 1075[223].  "…Rotberto de Bello Monte, Henrici de Bello Monte, Rotberti Gifordi, Rogerii de Mortuo Mari, Goiffridi de Calvo Monte, Radulfi dapiferi, Mauricii cancellarii, Willelmi de Warenna, Gundrede uxoris W. de Warenna" subscribed the undated charter under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by William de Warenne of the church of St Pancras to the monastery of Cluny[224], dated to [1078/81] by the Complete Peerage[225].  Roger is not named in Domesday Book in 1086.  m HAWISE, daughter of --- (-after her husband).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that "Rogier de Mortemer" married "la Contesse de Glochestre que Jehan de la Chapelle avoit amée" after the conquest of England[226].  "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery)[227].  As her husband is not named in the grant, it is likely that she outlived him.  Roger de Mortemer & his wife had one child: 

a)         RALPH [I] de Mortemer [Mortimer] (-5 Aug after [1115/18]).  "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery)[228].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Wigmore, and of other land in Herefordshire and Shropshire. 

-        see below

 

 

1.         [HUGH [I] de Mortemer (-after 1066).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "Hue de Mortemer…son parent par son pere" his "Connestable d´Angleterre" after the conquest of England[229].  As discussed further in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, Hugh de Mortemer would have been the same person as Hugues, son of Roger "filius Episcopi", if the latter was the same person as Roger [I] de Mortemer (see the Introduction to the present chapter).  In that case, the reference to "son parent par son père" in the Chronique de Normandie would be explained because both King William and Hugh de Mortemer would have descended from Sprota, who was firstly mistress of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie] (ancestor of King William) and, after his death, married Esperling de Pitres who was the paternal grandfather of Hugues d´Ivry Bishop of Evreux.] 

 

 

RALPH [I] de Mortemer [Mortimer], son of ROGER [I] de Mortemer & his wife Hawise --- (-5 Aug after [1115/18]).  "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery)[230].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Wigmore, and of other land in Herefordshire and Shropshire.  Domesday Book records “Ralph de Mortimer” holding land in Buddlesgate and Barton Hundreds in Hampshire; land in Berkshire including Brimpton in Thatcham Hundred; Idbury in Oxfordshire; Wigmore castle and other properties in Herefordshire; numerous places in Shropshire[231].  Florence of Worcester records that "Beornardus de Novo Mercatu, Rogerius de Laceio…Rawlfus de Mortuo Mari…cum hominibus comitis Rogeri de Scrobbesbyria" threatened Worcester with an army of Normans and Welsh, dated to [1088][232]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Aucensium comes et Gauterius Gifardus et Radulfus de Mortuomari” and nearly all the seigneurs who lived “trans Sequanam usque ad mare” joined King William II against his brother Robert Duke of Normandy and received considerable sums to fortify their castles, dated to [1089/90][233]"Stephen count of Aumâle" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Paris with the consent of "Hauisa his wife and her father Ralf de Mortuomari" for the souls of "…Milesenda his wife deceased" by charter dated to [1100][234].  Orderic Vitalis named "…Radulfus de Mortuomari" among the supporters of King Henry I in 1104[235]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that it was founded by “Radulpho de Mortuomari”, adding in a later passage that he died “pridie Non Aug 1100[236].  The year is incorrect, as shown by Orderic Vitalis´s record of Ralph in 1104.  The Lindsey Survey, dated to [1115/18], records "Ralph de Mortimer" holding land in Wootton[237].  It is possible that Ralph survived much later than this date, although no later record has been found which names him.  This possibility appears to be corroborated by the manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey which records  that “Radulpho de Mortuomari…filium juniorem…Willielmum” was installed by his father as “dominum de Netherleye[238].  This passage, assuming that it is accurate, shows that Ralph must have survived at least until William was of the age to have been granted this property.  If Ralph [I] did survive after 1104, it would extend the possible range during which his son Hugh [II] could have been born, which could contribute towards resolving the chronological difficulties associated with Hugh´s life which are discussed in more detail below.  Ralph was certainly dead some time before 1130, the dating of a charter under which "Giroldus abbas S. Luciani Bellovacensis" confirmed the foundation of the abbey by Ralph´s son-in-law "Stephano comiti Albæmarlensi", witnessed by his son "…Hugone de Mortuomari…"[239].  Hugues Archbishop of Rouen confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux, including property "apud Wellas" {Veules, commune de Saint-Valéry} in "feudo Hugonis de Mortuo mari" and property "apud Sanctum Victorem ex dono Radulfi de Mortuo mari et filii eius Hugonis", by charter dated 1137[240]

m firstly MELISENDE, daughter of --- (-before 30 Mar 1088).  "Stephen count of Aumâle" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Paris with the consent of "Hauisa his wife and her father Ralf de Mortuomari" for the souls of "…Milesenda his wife deceased" by charter dated to [1100][241]

m secondly (before 30 Mar 1088) MABEL, daughter of ---.  She is named as Ralph's wife in her attestation of a charter for the abbey of Jumièges 30 Mar 1088 for Ralph FitzAnsered, also attested by her husband[242]

[m thirdly ---.  The chronology of the life of Hugh [II] de Mortimer, died in [1180/81] suggests that he must have been born late in the last decade of the 11th century at the earliest or more probably early in the 12th century.  This is several years after Mabel was recorded as wife of Ralph [I] de Mortimer.  One possibility is that Hugh and his brothers were born from an otherwise unrecorded third marriage of their father.  It should be noted that no primary source has been found which names Hugh´s mother.] 

Ralph [I] & his first wife had one child:

1.         HAWISE (before 1088[243]-).  "Stephen count of Aumâle" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Paris with the consent of "Hauisa his wife and her father Ralf de Mortuomari" for the souls of "…Milesenda his wife deceased" by charter dated to [1100][244]m (before [1100]) ETIENNE Comte d'Aumâle, son of EUDES de Troyes Comte d´Aumâle [Blois-Champagne] & his wife Adelais de Normandie Ctss d'Aumâle (before 1070-before 1130, maybe [1127]). 

Ralph [I] & his [second/third] wife had [four] children: 

2.         HUGH [II] de Mortimer (-Cleobury [26 Feb] [1180/81], bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulpho de Mortuomari…filium suum Hugonem[245]

-        see below

3.         WILLIAM .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulpho de Mortuomari…filium juniorem…Willielmum”, later installed by his father as “dominum de Netherleye[246].  "…Vuillelmum fratrem meum…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[247]

4.         ROGER [II] de Mortimer (-before 1175).  The Complete Peerage suggests that Roger de Mortimer was the son of Hugh [II] de Mortimer, adding that he died "in 1153 when his brother Hugh had succeeded him"[248].  However, if we assume, as shown in the present document that there was only one Hugh [II] de Mortimer, the following entries would all be consistent with Roger having been his brother.  The date of his supposed death in 1153 appears only to be based on the assumption, which is made in the Complete Peerage, that Hugh [II] died before that date.  That assumption is incorrect as shown by the passage in William of Newburgh which is quoted below under the paragraph which deals with Hugh [II].  William of Malmesbury names "Roger de Mortimer" as commander of King Stephen's forces at Malmesbury, dated to 1139[249].  "…Rogero de Mortuo Mari…" witnessed a charter dated 1150 under which King Stephen confirmed property of Christ Church, Hampshire, confirmed by a charter dated 27 Nov 1313[250].  “H. de Mortuomari” donated property to Kington St Michael, for the soul of “Rogeri fratris mei”, by undated charter[251].  Rotrou Archbishop of Rouen confirmed past donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux, including the donations by "Hugonis de Mortuo Mari" for the souls of "patris sui Radulfi…et…fratris sui Rogeri", by charter dated 1175[252]

5.         [--- .  The parent of William may have been either William or Roger who are named above, or another otherwise unidentified son or daughter of Ralph [I] de Mortimer.  m ---]  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM (-after 1179).  "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[253].  It is unlikely that "nepote" in this passage should be interpreted as grandson as Hugh [II] de Mortimer was unlikely in 1179 to have had grandsons who were old enough to have witnessed charters.  It is assumed therefore that William was the son of one of Hugh´s siblings. 

 

 

HUGH [II] de Mortimer, son of RALPH [I] de Mortimer & his [second/third wife Mabel ---/---] (-Cleobury [26 Feb] [1180/81], bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulpho de Mortuomari…filium suum Hugonem[254].  Ralph is named as the father of Hugh in other sources which are quoted below.  Debate surrounding Hugh [II] de Mortimer has focussed on whether there was one individual named Hugh Mortimer or two, father and son, during the 12th century.  The difficulty is that Hugh [II]´s career would have been unusually long if there had been only one person named Hugh.  Eyton proceeds on the assumption that there was only one Hugh [II] de Mortimer, who was the father of Roger de Mortimer (who died in 1214)[255].  He bases this on the manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey, which is quoted throughout this section of the present document, although he does suggest that the document is unreliable[256].  More recently, Paul Remfry has also suggested that there was only one Hugh [II] de Mortimer[257].  All the sources which are quoted below suggest a continuous career of one individual, there being no hint about a succession from father to son during the period in question.  The Complete Peerage, on the other hand, suggests that it "would seem a chronological impossibility" if there had been only one Hugh de Mortimer, considering that Ralph [I] de Mortimer was already married to his second wife in 1088 and that his supposed grandson Roger de Mortimer died in 1214[258].  It is true that, if we assume that Hugh [II] was born in the last years of the 11th century, he must have been in his late eighties or early nineties if he died in [1180/81].  However, this assumes that (1) Ralph [I]´s second wife was the mother of Hugh [II], and (2) that Ralph [II] died at the beginning of the 12th century.  Neither of these assumptions would be correct if Hugh [II] was born from an otherwise unrecorded third marriage of Ralph [I], and if Ralph [I] survived some years after his last appearance in the sources in 1104.  Both of these possibilities are discussed further above.  Another apparent indication that there must have been two persons named Hugh de Mortimer is the dating of Hugh´s known marriage.  This marriage with Matilda, widow of Philip de Belmeis, could not have taken place much before 1150 (her first husband was living in 1145).  At that time, Hugh [II] would have been in his fifties if he had been born at the turn of the century.  The chronology is thus difficult, but certainly not an "impossibility".  Two other facts point to Hugh [II] having a long career.  Firstly, William of Newburgh refers to Hugh as "nobilem annis jam plurimis" in 1155[259].  Secondly, the Anglo-Norman history of the foundation of Wigmore abbey records that "Hugh de Mortimer" died "at a good old age". 

Hugh´s first documented appearance in the sources dates to before 1130: "…Hugone de Mortuomari…" witnessed the charter under which "Giroldus abbas S. Luciani Bellovacensis" confirmed the foundation of the abbey by "Stephano comiti Albæmarlensi"[260].  Although the document is undated, its wording suggests that Etienne Comte d´Aumâle was still alive at the time, therefore dating it to before 1130.  Hugues Archbishop of Rouen confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated 1137, including property "apud Wellas" {Veules, commune de Saint-Valéry} in "feudo Hugonis de Mortuo mari" and property "apud Sanctum Victorem" donated by "Radulfi de Mortuo mari et filii eius Hugonis", the property described in an earlier part of the same document as "de feudo Hugonis de Mortuo mari"[261].  "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations made "tam a patre meo Radulfo, quam ab avo meo Rogerio" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux, and other past donations including all donations of property in England "antequam duxissem uxorem", by undated charter issued "in communi expeditione Domini Normannie", witnessed by "Hugonem et Vuillelmum filios meos…Ricardum de Altifago…Renaldum de Vassumvilla…Brianim de Jai et Heliam patrem eius…Vuillelmum fratrem meum…"[262].  In 1144, he initiated the reconquest of the Marches conquered by the Welsh after the death of King Henry I, capturing Rhys ap Howel in 1145, killing Meredith ap Madog in 1146, and blinding the former in 1148[263].  The Annales Cambriæ record that "Hugo de Mortuo Mari" captured "Resum filium Hoeli" in 1145, killed "Maredut filium Madauc filium Ithuert" in 1146, and blinded "Resum filium Hoeli" in prison in 1148[264].  William of Newburgh records that "Hugonem de Mortuomari virum fortem et nobilem annis jam plurimis" ("annis jam plurimis" indicating that the passage refers to Hugh [I]) refused to surrender "castro de Brigia" to King Henry II, dated to 1155[265].  Robert de Torigny records that "Hugo de Mortuo Mari, vir arrogantissimus et de se præsumens" fortified "castella sua" against the king, who captured and destroyed "Bruge, Wigemore, Cleoberei", in 1155, but adding in a later passage in the same year that "Non Jul…Hugo de Mortuo Mari" made peace with the king and "castellis Bruge et Wigemore" were returned[266].  The Complete Peerage says that Hugh [II] "seems to have died in the period [1148/50]"[267].  However, the passage from William of Newburgh, quoted above, indicates that Hugh [II] survived into the reign of King Henry II.  “H. de Mortuomari” donated property to Kington St Michael, for the soul of “Rogeri fratris mei”, by undated charter[268].  "Hugo de Mortuo Mari" founded Wigmore abbey by charter witnessed by "the Lord Hugh de Lacy, the Lord Robert Corbet, the Lord Robert Rowles…" (undated, but the names of the witnesses suggest dating to the 1170s), the charter quoted in a charter of King Henry VIII dated 1509[269].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo de Mortuo Mari" with 5 knights and 13 knights and one half in his own service[270].  "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[271].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that Hugh died “26 Feb 1185[272].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1185 of “Hugo de Mortuo Mari, fundator abbathiæ de Wiggemore” and his burial “ad ostium capituli Wigorniæ[273].  An Anglo-Norman history of the foundation of Wigmore abbey records that "Hugh de Mortimer" died "at Cleobury at a good old age and full of good works" ("en bone veleste et pleine de bones eovres"), was buried at Wigmore, and succeeded by his son Roger who "was held in the king´s keeping for the death of one named Cadwallan"[274]

m ([1150]) as her second husband, MATILDA de Rumilly, widow of PHILIP de Belmeis, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-after 1189[275]).  The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[276]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[277]; (2) Roger Mortimer´s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[278]; (3) “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[279].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that she was “Matildem Longespey, filiam Willielmi Longespey, ducis Normanniæ[280] but this is confused and cannot possibly be correct.  The undated charter, under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed various donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux and other past donations including all donations of property in England "antequam duxissem uxorem"[281], indicates that Hugh married only once. 

Hugh [II] & his wife had four children: 

1.         HUGH [III] de Mortimer (-killed Warwick [1180]).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugonem, Radulphum et Willielmum” as the other sons of Hugh[282].  "Hugonem et Vuillelmum filios meos…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[283].  "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[284].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Hugonem”, son of Hugh, was killed in a tournament “apud Wygorniam[285]m FELICIA de Saint-Saëns, daughter of ---.  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Hugonem”, son of Hugh, married “dominam Feliciam de sancto Sydonio[286]

2.         RALPH .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugonem, Radulphum et Willielmum” as the other sons of Hugh[287].  Ralph presumably died before his brothers Hugh and William as he did not witness the document under which their father confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux. 

3.         WILLIAM .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugonem, Radulphum et Willielmum” as the other sons of Hugh, adding that William was captured as “miles in bello partibus transmarinis”, died childless and was buried there[288].  "Hugonem et Vuillelmum filios meos…Ricardum de Altifago…Renaldum de Vassumvilla…Brianum de Jai et Heliam patrem eius…Vuillelmum fratrem meum…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[289]

4.         ROGER [III] de Mortimer (-24 Jun 1215 or before 19 Aug 1214, bur Wigmore).  "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[290].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “filium suum Rogerum [ex Matilda filia Willielmi Longespeye]” succeeded on the death of his father Hugh[291]

-        see below

 

 

1.         ROGER de Mortimer (-before 21 Jun 1249).  Henry III King of England conscripted "…Rogerus de Mortuo Mari…" for service "in Wasconiam" dated 17 Mar 1226[292].  A writ dated 21 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Mortuo Mari alias de Mortimer" names "Bruge Walteri manor, excepting the castle" in Somerset but names no heir[293]

 

2.         HUGH de Mortimer (-after 30 Jun 1230).  A charter dated 30 Jun 1230 relates to a claim by "Hugo de Mortimer et Agnes uxor eius, Agatha et Isabella sorores ipsius Agnetis" against "Nicholaum de Wicheford…Ricardum de Sutton" relating to land "in Flintham…in Sutton…in Hoveringham…in Thurgarton…"[294]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 30 Jun 1230 relates to a claim by "Hugo de Mortimer et Agnes uxor eius, Agatha et Isabella sorores ipsius Agnetis" against "Nicholaum de Wicheford…Ricardum de Sutton" relating to land "in Flintham…in Sutton…in Hoveringham…in Thurgarton…"[295]

 

 

ROGER [III] de Mortimer, son of HUGH [II] de Mortimer & his wife Matilda de Rumilly (-24 Jun 1215 or before 19 Aug 1214, bur Wigmore).  "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[296].  An Anglo-Norman history of the foundation of Wigmore abbey records the death of "Hugh de Mortimer" and succession of his son Roger who "was held in the king´s keeping for the death of one named Cadwallan" but later released[297].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “filium suum Rogerum [ex Matilda filia Willielmi Longespeye]” succeeded on the death of his father Hugh[298].  “Rogerus de Mortuomari…et dominæ Isabellæ uxoris meæ” donated property to Kington St Michael by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippo de Mortuomari…[299].  "Rogerus de Mortuomari" donated "terram Sancte-Columbe" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo…"[300].  "…Rogerio de Mortuo Mari…" subscribed the charter dated to [1182/89] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barbery[301].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Rogerus de Mortumer" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire and in Berkshire[302].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Rogerus de Mortuo Mari" holding "Sorendene per i feodum" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][303].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Rogerus de Mortuo Mari" held "Lechelad et Langeleg de hereditate uxoris sue"[304].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the death “VIII Kal Jul 1215” of “domini Rogeri[305]

[m firstly MILLICENT, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Sibyl ---.  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Milesaunt filia --- comitis Derbeyæ” was the first wife of “domini Rogeri[306].  This has not been corroborated from other primary sources, but, if it is correct, her father must have been William 3rd Earl of Derby.  Eyton suggests that there may have been confusion in the source with Melisende, wife of Roger´s paternal great-grandfather Ralph Mortimer, and with Roger´s known wife Isabel who was also Ferrers[307].] 

m [secondly] as her first husband, ISABEL de Ferrers, daughter of WALKELIN de Ferrers & his wife --- (-before 29 Apr 1252, bur Lechlade).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Isabella…filia domini de Ferrers de Lechlade” was the second wife of “domini Rogeri”, adding that she became a nun “apud Lechelade” and was buried there[308].  "Ysabell de Mortuomar" paid a fine for "seisina manerioris de Lichelad et de Langebg q fuerunt Hug de Ferr fratris sui de dono Walkeln patris eorum" in Gloucestershire, dated 1204[309].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Rogerus de Mortuo Mari" held "Lechelad et Langeleg de hereditate uxoris sue"[310].  “Rogerus de Mortuomari…et dominæ Isabellæ uxoris meæ” donated property to Kington St Michael by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippo de Mortuomari…[311].  She married secondly as his second wife, Piers FitzHerbert of Blaen Llyfni.  An order dated [Apr] 1225 delayed repayment from "Peter fitz Herbert and Isabella his wife" of a "debt of Henry de Ferrers brother of the same Isabella"[312].   "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[313]

Roger [III] & his [first] wife had one child: 

1.         HUGH [IV] Mortimer of Wigmore (-10 Nov 1227, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugo” as son of “Rogero” and his first wife, adding that he supported King John and in a later passage that he was killed in a tournament “IV Id Nov 1227”, dying without children, and was buried “in abbathia de Wyggemore[314].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in Nov 1227 of “Hugo de Mortuo-Mari[315]m (before [1209/10]) ELEANOR [Annora], daughter of WILLIAM de Briouse & his wife Mathilde de Saint-Valéry Dame de la Haie (-after 26 Jan 1241).  A charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king´s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “consanguineus de Galweya...Dunecanus de Karyc” had “apud Cracfergus” at some point (presumably in [1209/10]) captured “Matildis de Haya...et filiam suam uxorem filii Rogeri de Mortimer et...Willelmum juniorem et uxorem suam et duos filios suos[316].  King Henry III granted property "in Cherleton et in Chiriton, quam Willelmus de Breusa pater predicte Annore ei dedit in maritagio" to "Annore que fuit uxor Hugonis de Mortuo Mari" dated 28 Sep 1232[317]

Roger [III] & his [second] wife had four children: 

2.         RALPH [II] Mortimer of Wigmore (-6 Aug 1246, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Radulphus frater eius” succeeded on the death of “Hugo”, adding that he was born from his father´s second marriage, built “duo castra…Kevencles et Knoclas”, died “VIII Id Aug 1247” and was buried “in abbathia de Wygemore[318].  "Ralph de Mortimer" made a fine "for having seisin of the lands formerly of Hugh de Mortimer, his brother", dated [Nov] 1227[319].  The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1246 of "Radulphus de Mortuo Mari"[320]m (1230) as her second husband, GWLADUS Ddu ("Dark-eyed"), widow of REYNOLD de Briouse, illegitimate daughter of LLYWELLYN ap Iorwerth Fawr ("the Great") Prince of Wales & his mistress --- (-Windsor 1251).  The Annals of Worcester record that “Radulphus de Mortuomari” married “filiam Lewelini, conjugem quondam Reginaldi de Breusa” in 1230[321].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Radulphus” married “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam”, who brought her husband “omnibus terries de Kery et Kedewyn[322].  Ralph [II] & his wife had five children: 

a)         ROGER [IV] de Mortimer ([Cwmaron Castle] [1231]-Kingsland, Herefordshire before 5 Oct 1282, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum de Mortuomari primogenitum, Petrum Johannem fratrem ordinis Minorum, domus sive conventus Salopiæ, et Hugonem dominum de Cheilmersh” as the children of “Radulphus” and his wife “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam[323]

-        see below

b)         PETER .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum de Mortuomari primogenitum, Petrum Johannem fratrem ordinis Minorum, domus sive conventus Salopiæ, et Hugonem dominum de Cheilmersh” as the children of “Radulphus” and his wife “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam[324]

c)         JOHN .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum de Mortuomari primogenitum, Petrum Johannem fratrem ordinis Minorum, domus sive conventus Salopiæ, et Hugonem dominum de Cheilmersh” as the children of “Radulphus” and his wife “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam[325]

d)         JOAN .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m (1253 or before) as his first wife, PIERS Corbet, son of THOMAS Corbet of Caus, Shropshire & his wife Isabel de Dunstanville née de Vautort (-1300 before 10 Aug).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Corbet. 

e)         HUGH Mortimer of Chelmarsh (-before Jun 1273, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum de Mortuomari primogenitum, Petrum Johannem fratrem ordinis Minorum, domus sive conventus Salopiæ, et Hugonem dominum de Cheilmersh” as the children of “Radulphus” and his wife “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam”, adding that Hugh was buried “in medio capellæ beatæ Mariæ viriginis” (in Wigmore abbey from the context)[326].  Sheriff of Shropshire and Staffordshire.  m (after 26 May 1250) AGATHA de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshal (-21 May 1306).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that "Agatha septima filia" married "Hugoni de Mortuomari domino de Chelmershe, qui fuit filius Rodulphi de Mortuo-mari domini de Wigmor"[327].  The Annals of Ireland record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “sexta, Agatha de Mortimer, uxor domini Hugonis de Mortimer…[328].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[329].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[330].  They had descendants extinct in the male line in 1401[331].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN Mortimer .  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Johannes de Mortimer" who died childless and "Henricus Mortymer" as the children of "Hugoni de Mortuomari domino de Chelmershe…" and his wife[332]

ii)         HENRY Mortimer (-Oct 1317).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Johannes de Mortimer" who died childless and "Henricus Mortymer" as the children of "Hugoni de Mortuomari domino de Chelmershe…" and his wife (and records three generations of Henry´s descendants)[333]m CONSTANCE, daughter of --- (-after 1318).  Their descendants are shown by Eyton[334]

3.         ROBERT (-before [Jul] 1219).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Robertum et Philippum” as sons of “domini Rogeri” and his second wife[335].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166 (but added later), record that "Robertus de Mortuo mari" held 23 knights´ fees "in honore Castelli Ricardi" with "filia Hugonis de Say hærede Osberti filii Hugonis" in Herefordshire[336].  "Rogerus de Mortuomari" donated "terram Sancte-Columbe" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo…"[337].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "honor Piperelli de Londonia" paying "li milites et vi pars…in diversis comitatibus", of which "in perdonis…Roberto de Mortuo Mari, x s", in Essex, Hertfordshire[338].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Mortimer" holding 23 knights´ fees in Hereford in [1210/12][339].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in 1219 of “Robertus de Mortimer[340]m ([6 May 1209/Jun 1211]) as her second husband, MARGERY de Say, widow of HUGH de Ferrers of Lechlade, daughter of HUGH [II] de Say & his wife Mabel --- (-1230).  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166 (but added later), record that "Robertus de Mortuo mari" held 23 knights´ fees "in honore Castelli Ricardi" with "filia Hugonis de Say hærede Osberti filii Hugonis" in Herefordshire[341].  The sheriff of Essex was ordered to cause "Margaret de Say, who was the wife of Robert de Mortimer" to have "the rightful dower of the lands formerly of Robert her former husband", dated to [Jul] 1219[342].  She married thirdly (Royal licence 23 Nov 1219) William de Stuteville.  Henry III King of England consented to the marriage of "Margaretam que fuit uxor Roberti de Mortuo Mari" and "Willelmus de Stutevill" dated 23 Nov 1219[343].  "William de Stuteville" paid a fine to marry "Margaret who was the wife of Robert de Mortimer", dated to [Nov] 1219[344].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1230 of “Margerie de Say[345].  Inquisitiones dated 20 May 1259 record that "William de Scoteville" held the manors of Wychbold and Cotheridge in Worcestershire from "Margery his wife" and name "Hugh de Mortuo Mari son of the said Margery" as her next heir and of full age[346].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH de Mortimer ([1218/19]-before 28 Nov 1274).  Inquisitions dated 20 May 1259 record that "William de Scoteville" held the manors of Wychbold and Cotheridge in Worcestershire from "Margery his wife" and name "Hugh de Mortuo Mari son of the said Margery" as her next heir and of full age[347].  Lord of Richard´s Castle.  Inquisitions dated Dec 1275 record that "Hugh de Mortuo Mari of Richard´s Castle" held the manors of Wychbold, Cotheridge and Home Castle in Worcestershire and name "Robert de Mortuo Mari…his son and next heir…of the age of 22 years and more"[348].  He and his descendants are discussed by Eyton[349]m ---.  The name of Hugh´s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Mortimer of Richard´s Castle, Herefordshire ([1251/52]-7 Apr 1287, bur Worcester Cathedral).  Inquisitions dated Dec 1275 record that "Hugh de Mortuo Mari of Richard´s Castle" held the manors of Wychbold, Cotheridge and Home Castle in Worcestershire and name "Robert de Mortuo Mari…his son and next heir…of the age of 22 years and more"[350]m JOYCE la Zouche, daughter of WILLIAM la Zouche & his wife Maud --- (-bur 13 Mar 1290).  Her parentage and marriage are recorded in the Complete Peerage, which does not cite the relevant primary source[351].  Eyton says that William Zouche was "alleged" ancestor of "Zouche of Mortimer", which suggests there is some doubt about Joyce´s parentage, but does not explain his comment[352].  On the other hand, the Complete Peerage states that "William´s identity is proved by the descent of the manor of King´s Nympton, Devon, which was granted to him by Roger his father in 1237/38 and was held by his grandson and representative Hugh Lord Mortimer…at his death in 1304"[353].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

(a)       HUGH de Mortimer (-20 Jul 1304, bur 15 Aug Worcester Cathedral).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1297 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mortimer.  m ([before 1290]) MATILDA, niece of William le Marshal, daughter of --- (-15 Feb 1308 or before).  The Complete Peerage calls her “a niece of William le Marshal”, adding that she was probably a relative of Queen Eleanor of Castile whose son called her “nostre...cosine Dame Maud de Mortimer of Chastel Richard” in correspondence[354].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

(1)       JOAN de Mortimer (Caerphilly Castle 24 Nov 1291-before 12 Jan 1241).  Heiress of Richard´s Castle, Herefordshire.  m firstly (before 12 Aug 1305) THOMAS de Bykenore, son of --- (-[1316]).  m secondly (1317) RICHARD Talbot, son of RICHARD Talbot & his wife Sarah de Beauchamp (-1328).  He succeeded to Richard's Castle, de iure uxoris

(2)       MARGARET de Mortimer (14 Sep 1295-[Dec 1345])m firstly (1309 or before) GEOFFREY de Cornwall, son of RICHARD de Cornwall & his wife Joan St Owen (-before Jun 1335).  m secondly WILLIAM de Evereys, son of --- (-before 6 Mar 1337). 

(b)       WILLIAM de Mortimer (-28 Feb 1337, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  He adopted the name La Zouche.  He was summoned to Parliament in 1323 whereby he is held to have become Lord Zouche. 

-         LORDS ZOUCHE

4.         PHILIP .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Robertum et Philippum” as sons of “domini Rogeri” and his second wife[355]

5.         [356]JOAN (-1225).  The Annals of Worcester record that “Rogerus de Mortuo Mari…filiam suam” married “Waltero de Bello Campo[357].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1225 of “Johanna de Mortuo Mari uxor Willelmi de Bello Campo[358]m (after 1212) as his first wife, WALTER [III] de Beauchamp, son of WILLIAM [II] de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire & his wife Amice --- ([1195/97]-14 Apr 1236). 

 

 

ROGER [IV] de Mortimer, son of RALPH [II] Mortimer of Wigmore & his wife Gwladus Ddu of Wales ([Cwmaron Castle] [1231]-Kingsland, Herefordshire before 5 Oct 1282, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum de Mortuomari primogenitum, Petrum Johannem fratrem ordinis Minorum, domus sive conventus Salopiæ, et Hugonem dominum de Cheilmersh” as the children of “Radulphus” and his wife “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam[359].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[360].  He played an active part in the battle of Evesham in which Simon de Montfort was killed and was rewarded with the county and honour of Oxford, forfeited by Robert de Vere[361].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus” died “in vigilia apostolorum Simonis et Jude apude Kyngestone 1282” and was buried “in abbathia de Wyggemore[362].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 5 Nov "10 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Mortuo Mari the elder” name “Edmund his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...Maud his wife...[363]

m (1247) MATILDA de Briouse, daughter of WILLIAM de Briouse & his wife Eve Marshal of the Earls of Pembroke (-before 23 Mar 1301).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Matilda married “Rogero de Mortuomari, domino de Wyggemore[364].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Matilda, Alianora et Eva" as the three daughters of "Willielmo de Brewes" and his wife "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva", adding that Matilda married "domino Rogero de Mortuo-mari domino de Wigmore"[365].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rog. (secundus)…Radulphi et Gwladusæ filius” married “Matildem de Brewys, filiam domini Willielmi de Brewys domini de Breghnoc[366].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[367].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king´s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[368].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 5 Nov "10 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Mortuo Mari the elder” name “Edmund his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...Maud his wife...[369]

Roger [IV] & his wife had seven children: 

1.         RALPH (-before 10 Aug 1274).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulphum primogenitum militem” as son of “domina Matilda…[et] Rogero de Mortuomari”, adding that he predeceased his father[370].  He succeeded his uncle Hugh de Mortimer of Chelmarsh 23 Jan 1273 as sheriff of Shropshire and Staffordshire[371]

2.         EDMUND [I] de Mortimer of Wigmore (before 1251-Wigmore Castle 17 Jul 1304, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulphum primogenitum…Edmundum…Rogerum dominum de Chirke, Galfridum militem…et Willielmum militem” as sons of “domina Matilda…[et] Rogero de Mortuomari[372].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mortimer. 

-        see below

3.         ROGER Mortimer of Chirk (-Tower of London 3 Aug 1326, bur Bristol).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulphum primogenitum…Edmundum…Rogerum dominum de Chirke, Galfridum militem…et Willielmum militem” as sons of “domina Matilda…[et] Rogero de Mortuomari”, adding that Roger died “in  prisona regis Edwardi tertii infra Turrim Londini…3 Aug 1336” and was buried at Wigmore[373].  He built the castle of Chirk on land he was granted in 1282[374].  He was summoned to parliament 6 Feb 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mortimer.  He took part in the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster in 1321, surrendered to King Edward II at Shrewsbury 22 Jan 1322, and was imprisoned for life in the Tower of London.  All his possessions were forfeited.  m LUCY de Wafre, daughter of ROBERT de Wafre & his wife --- (-before Aug 1324).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum dominum de Chirke” married “Luciam filiam domini Roberti de Wafre[375].  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER Mortimer (-before Oct 1333).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum” as son of “Rogerum dominum de Chirke” and his wife “Luciam filiam domini Roberti de Wafre”, adding that he was the heir of his maternal grandfather[376]m JOAN de Tubervyle, daughter of ---.  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum”, son of “Rogerum dominum de Chirke”, married “Johannam de Tubervyle[377].  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Mortimer (-after Nov 1361).  He petitioned for his father's inheritance as heir to his grandfather, but he released all his claims to Roger de Mortimer Earl of March 30 Aug 1359 in London[378]

4.         GEOFFREY de Mortimer (-before 1282, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulphum primogenitum…Edmundum…Rogerum dominum de Chirke, Galfridum militem…et Willielmum militem” as sons of “domina Matilda…[et] Rogero de Mortuomari”, adding that Geoffrey predeceased his father and was buried at Wigmore[379]

5.         WILLIAM de Mortimer of Bridgewater (-before Jun 1297).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulphum primogenitum…Edmundum…Rogerum dominum de Chirke, Galfridum militem…et Willielmum militem” as sons of “domina Matilda…[et] Rogero de Mortuomari[380]m as her first husband, HAWISE de Muscegros, daughter and heiress of ROBERT de Muscegros of Stowell, Somerset & his wife --- (1276-[1340/50]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and three marriages has not yet been identified.   She married secondly (licence 1300) John de Ferrers Lord Ferrers, and thirdly (after 1312) John de Bures

6.         MARGARET (-[Sep 1296/97], bur Ipswich, Grey Friars).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Alice de Sanford ([24 Jun 1257]-17 Apr 1331, bur Earls Colne). 

7.         ISABEL (-after 1300).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and second and third marriages has not yet been identified.   Hearings following the death of "John son of Alan of Arundel", dated “2 Edw I”, record that "Isabel late the wife of the said John" claimed her dower, naming “Roger de Mortuomari guardian of the said John´s heir[381]m firstly JOHN FitzAlan Lord of Clun and Oswestry, son of JOHN FitzAlan Lord of Clun and Oswestry & his wife Maud le Botiller (14 Sep 1246-18 Mar 1272, bur Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire).  m secondly (before 1373) RALPH d'Arderne, son of ---.  m thirdly (Poling, Sussex 2 Sep 1285) ROBERT de Hastang, son of --- (-after 1 Apr 1292). 

 

 

EDMUND [I] de Mortimer of Wigmore, son of ROGER [IV] de Mortimer of Wigmore & his wife Matilda de Briouse (before 1251-Wigmore Castle 17 Jul 1304, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulphum primogenitum… Edmundum…Rogerum dominum de Chirke, Galfridum militem…et Willielmum militem” as sons of “domina Matilda…[et] Rogero de Mortuomari”, adding that he died “in castro suo de Wygemore VII Kal Aug 1304” and was buried “in…abbathia de Wygmore[382].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edmundus de Mortuomari” as son of “Rogero de Mortuomari, domino de Wyggemore” & his wife[383].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 5 Nov "10 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Mortuo Mari the elder” name “Edmund his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...Maud his wife...[384].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mortimer. 

m (before 1286) MARGUERITE de Fiennes, daughter of GUILLAUME [II] de Fiennes & his wife Blanche de Brienne (-1334).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” married “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that she was “dominæ Alianoræ reginæ Angliæ…consanguineam[385]

Edmund [I] & his wife had eight children: 

1.         ROGER [V] de Mortimer (25 Apr or 3 May 1287-executed Tyburn, London 29 Nov 1330, bur Shrewsbury, Church of the Grey Friars).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum primum comitem” as son of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania[386].  He succeeded his father in 1304 as Lord Mortimer.  He was created Earl of March in 1328. 

-        see below

2.         MATILDA (–before 1316).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that Matilda married “Teobaldo de Verdun, domino medietatis de Lodelowe, filio Johannis de Verdon et Margeriæ filiæ Gilberti de Lacy[387].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records the first marriage of "Theobaldo Verdon" and "Matildam filiam domini Edmondi de Mortuo Mari", and names their children "Johannes et Willilemus et iii filiæ…Johanna, Elizabetha et Margeria"[388]m (29 Jul 1302) as his first wife, THEOBALD de Verdun Lord Verdun, son of JOHN de Verdun & his wife Margery de Lacy (-27 Jul 1316, bur Croxden Abbey, Staffs). 

3.         JOAN .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that Joan was a nun “in prioratu de Lyngbroke[389]

4.         JOHN (-Wigmore 3 Jan 1319, bur Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that John was killed by “Johannes de Leyburne” in a tournament “III Non Jan 1318 apud Wigorniam” and buried in Wigmore abbey[390]

5.         ELIZABETH .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that Elizabeth was a nun “in prioratu de Lyngbroke[391]

6.         HUGH .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that Hugh was “rector de veteri Radnore[392].  Rector of Old Radnor. 

7.         WALTER .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that Walter was “rector de Kingstane[393].  Rector of Kingston. 

8.         EDMUND .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerus primogenitus…Matilda…Johanna…Johannes, Elizabetha…Hugo…Walterus…et Edmundus” as children of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”, adding that Edmund was “rector de Hodnet, thesaurarius ecclesiæ cathedralis Eborum[394].  Rector of Hodnet. 

Edmund [I] had one possible illegitimate daughter by an unknown mistress: 

9.          [ISOLDA de Mortimer (before 1273[395]-after 1336).  According to the Complete Peerage[396], Isolda was the daughter of Edmund Mortimer and his wife Margaret de Fiennes.  However, this is chronologically impossible if Isolda gave birth to her son Hugh Audley in [1289][397].  It is therefore assumed that Isolt was Edmund Mortimer's illegitimate daughter, although no proof has been found that this is correct.  Another possibility is that she was Edmund's sister[398].  Her name suggests a Welsh origin.  Edmund Mortimer gave her and her first husband the manor of Arley, Staffordshire[399]m firstly ([1282/87]) WALTER de Ballon of Much Marcle, Herefordshire, son of JOHN de Ballon & his first wife --- (-[1287/88]).  m secondly ([1288/89]) HUGH de Audley, son of JAMES de Audley of Heleigh, Staffordshire & his wife Ela Longespee ([1267]-[Wallingford Castle] [Nov 1325/Mar 1326]).  He was summoned to parliament 15 May 1321, whereby he is held to have become Lord Audley.] 

 

 

ROGER [V] de Mortimer, son of EDMUND [I] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer & his wife Margaret de Fiennes (25 Apr or 3 May 1287-executed Tyburn, London 29 Nov 1330, bur Shrewsbury, Church of the Grey Friars).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Rogerus primus comes Marchiæ” as son of “Edmundus de Mortuomari[400].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum primum comitem” as son of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania[401].  He succeeded his father in 1304 as Lord Mortimer.  He took possession of Meath in Ireland, inherited from his wife, 28 Oct 1308.  He was appointed the king's lieutenant in Ireland 23 Nov 1316 and crossed to Ireland from Haverfordwest with a great army in Feb 1317.  He opposed the Despencer family and joined the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster in 1321, surrendered to the king at Shrewsbury 22 Jan 1322 with his uncle Roger, and was sent to the Tower of London.  He escaped 1 Aug 1324 and fled to France where he became the lover of Queen Isabelle, who went there in the spring 1325, and together they landed near Ipswich 24 Sep 1326 where they were joined by other opponents of the Despencers who were captured and executed[402].  He was created Earl of March [25/31] Oct 1328.  King Edward III led a conspiracy to rid himself of Mortimer who was captured at Nottingham Castle 18 Oct 1330, condemned to death and his lands forfeited.  The Annals of Bermondsey record that “Rogerus Mortymer…comitem Marchiæ” was hanged “Londoniæ in vigilia Sancti Andreæ Apostoli” in 1330[403].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum primum comitem” was buried “ad Fratres Minores Salopiæ…in vigilia S. Andreæ apostolic 1331[404]

m (before 6 Oct 1306) JOAN de Geneville, daughter and co-heiress of PETER de Geneville [Joinville] of Walterstone & his wife Jeanne de Lusignan (2 Feb 1286-19 Oct 1356).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum primum comitem” married “dominæ Johannæ filiæ domini Petri de Genyville, filii domini Galfridi de Genyville, domini de Trym[405].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannæ, Matildi et Beatrici” as the children of “Petro Genevyle”, adding that “Johanna” married “domino Rogero de Mortuomari[406].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Joannam, Matildam et Beatricem" as the children of "Petro de Genyvile" and his wife, adding that Jeanne married "Rogero de Mortuomari primo comiti Marchiæ"[407]

Mistress (1): (1325/1330) ISABELLE de France, wife of EDWARD II King of England, daughter of PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France & his wife doña Juana I Queen of Navarre (Paris 1292-Castle Rising, Norfolk or Hertford Castle 21 Nov 1358, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). 

Roger [V] & his wife had twelve children: 

1.         EDMUND [II] de Mortimer (-Stanton Lacy 16 Dec 1331).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edmundus” as son of “Rogerus primus comes Marchiæ[408].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam…et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Edmund died “apud Staunton-Lacy XVII Kal Jan 1331[409].  He was summoned to Parliament 20 Nov 1331, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mortimer.  m (Earnwood, Kinlet 27 Jun 1316) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Badlesmere, daughter of BARTHOLOMEW de Badlesmere Lord Badlesmere & his wife Margaret de Clare ([1313]-8 Jun 1355).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Edmundum primogenitum”, son of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, married “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei…de Badelesmere et de Ledys[410].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the marriage of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere”, previously married to “domino Edmundo de Mortuomari[411].  She married secondly (licence 1335) William de Bohun, later created Earl of Northampton.  Edmund [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER [VI] de Mortimer (Ludlow 11 Nov 1328-Rouvray 26 Feb 1360, bur in France, transferred to Wigmore).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Rogerus” as son of “Edmundus”, son of “Rogerus primus comes Marchiæ[412].  He was granted Wigmore Castle by King Edward III in 1342 at the request of his stepfather William Earl of Northampton, and thereafter appears to have been rehabilitated completely, serving the king loyally[413].  He was summoned to parliament 20 Nov 1348 as Lord Mortimer of Wigmore.  In 1354 he obtained a reversal of the sentence against his paternal grandfather and was restored as Earl of March.  He died while on active campaign in France.  m PHILIPPA de Montagu, daughter of WILLIAM de Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katherine Grandison (-5 Jan 1382, bur Bisham).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum primogenitum”, son of “Edmundum”, married “Philippa…filia domini Willielmi Mountagu comitis Sarum[414].  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[415].  Roger [VI] & his wife had one child: 

i)          EDMUND [III] Mortimer "the Good" (Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire 1 Feb 1352-Cork, Dominican Friary 27 Dec 1381, bur Cork, Dominican Friary, later transferred to Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “apud Langonith in vigilia Purificacionis beatæ Mariæ Virginis 1351” of “Edmundus”, son of “Rogeri et Philippæ[416].  He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of March.    

-         see below

b)         JOHN (-young).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum primogenitum et Johannem” as sons of “Edmundum primogenitum” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei…de Badelesmere et de Ledys”, adding that John died “puer[417]

2.         ROGER .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam…et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius[418][419]m (licence Feb 1321) JOAN le Botiller, daughter of EDMUND le Botiller [Butler] of Ireland & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 

3.         GEOFFREY (-[1372/5 May 1376]).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam…et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Geoffroy was “comitem Jubmensem et dominum de Cowyth[420].  Seigneur de Couhé: Watson identifies "Cowyth" as Couhé in Poitou, inherited from Geoffroy´s maternal grandmother[421].  He was arrested with his father in 1330[422]m [JEANNE de Lezay], daughter of [SIMON [IV] Seigneur de Lezay & his second wife Jeanne de Cherchemont.  Watson names "Jane de Lezay" as wife of Geoffrey without citing the corresponding primary source on which the information is based, although suggesting that she was the daughter of Simon [IV] Seigneur de Lezay by his second wife, highlighting that her son Jean de Mortemer was recorded in 1379 as guardian of Simon de Lezay, great-grandson of Simon [IV][423].  This last piece of information is found in Père Anselme, who cites no source either[424].  Geoffrey & his wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN de Mortemer (-after 28 Dec 1408).  Seigneur de Couhé.  "Jean de Mortemer seigneur de Couhé et Jean de Mortemer son fils" acknowledged receipt of funds from Louis Duc de Bourbon by charter dated 28 Dec 1408[425].  Watson identifies the sum in question as having been due to Indie de l´Isle-Jourdain, wife of Jean de Mortemer, under an agreement made between her mother and Jean-Jourdain Comte de l´Isle-Jourdain[426].  However, these details are not included in the document extract published by Lecoy de la Marche and Watson does not indicate his source.  m INDIE de l´Isle-Jourdain, daughter of BERNARD JOURDAIN [III] Seigneur de l´Isle-Jourdain & his third wife Sédille de Durfort (posthumously [1340/41]-[10 May 1398/28 Dec 1408]).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but does not cite the corresponding primary source[427]

-        SEIGNEURS de COUHE[428]

b)         JEANNE de Mortemer .  Her parentage and marriage are stated by Watson[429]m JEAN Seigneur de l´Isle-Bouchard, son of ---. 

4.         JOHN (-killed Shrewsbury after 1328).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that John was killed in a tournament “apud Salopiam[430].  He was granted castles and lands in Ireland by his parents 27 Aug 1328.  same person as...?  JOHN .  John Mortimer, father of Roger who is named in the 1 May 1380 will quoted below, has not been identified.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been the same person as John, the testator´s paternal great-uncle.  If that is correct, Roger would probably have been a young child when his father died.  m ---.  The name of John´s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER (-after 1 May 1380).  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[431]

5.         KATHERINE (-[4 Aug/6 Sep] 1369, bur Warwick, St Mary's).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Katherine married “domino Thomæ de Bellocampo comiti Warwykie[432].  King Edward II requested papal dispensation for the marriage between “Guidonem de Bello Campo nuper comitem Warenæ defunctum...Thomam filium et hæredem prædicti comitis adhuc infra ætatem” and “Rogerum de Mortuo Mari dominum de Wygemor...unam de filiabus prædicti Roger”, related “in quarto et tertio gradu prohibito”, by charter dated 7 Feb 1319[433].  The will of "Agnes de Hastings Countess of Pembroke", dated 10 Oct 1367, chose burial “in the church of the Minories without Aldgate, London”, bequeathed property to “John de Hastings my son...Joan my daughter the benefit of the marriage of Ralph de Greystock...Elizabeth Beauchamp...Philipp. Chamberlayne, and Catherine Countess of Warwick my sister[434].  The will of "Katherine Countess of Warwick", dated 4 Aug 1369, chose burial “where the Earl my husband shall appoint”, bequeathed property to “the Earl my husband...Thomas my son...William my other son...Maud de Clifford my daughter...Philippa de Stafford my daughter...my daughter Alice...Margaret Montfort my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Elizabeth the daughter of my son Guy...[435]m (Papal dispensation 19 Apr 1319) THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick, son of GUY de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his second wife Alice de Tosny (14 Feb 1314-Calais 13 Nov 1369, bur Warwick, St Mary's). 

6.         JOAN (-[1337/51]).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Joan married “domino Jacobo de Audeley[436]m (before 13 Jun 1330) as his first wife, JAMES Lord Audley, son of NICHOLAS Lord Audley & his wife Joan Martin (Knesale, Nottinghamshire 8 Jan 1313-Heleigh 1 Apr 1386, bur Hulton Abbey). 

7.         AGNES (-25 Jul 1368, bur Church of the Minories without Aldgate, London).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam… Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Agnes married “domino Johanni Hastyngs comiti Pembrochiæ[437].  The will of "Agnes de Hastings Countess of Pembroke", dated 10 Oct 1367, chose burial “in the church of the Minories without Aldgate, London”, bequeathed property to “John de Hastings my son...Joan my daughter the benefit of the marriage of Ralph de Greystock...Elizabeth Beauchamp...Philipp. Chamberlayne, and Catherine Countess of Warwick my sister[438]m firstly (after 17 Feb 1327) LAWRENCE Hastings Earl of Pembroke, son of JOHN de Hastings Lord Hastings & his wife Juliana de Leybourne (Allesley, Warwickshire 20 Mar 1320-Abergavenny 30 Aug 1348, bur Abergavenny).  m secondly JOHN de Hakelut, son of ---. 

8.         MARGARET (after 1307-5 May 1337, Bristol St Augustine´s).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Margaret married “Thomæ filio Mauricii de Berkley[439]m (before 25 Jul [1320], Papal dispensation to remain married Sep 1329) as his first wife, THOMAS de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley Lord Berkeley & his first wife Eve la Zouche of Haringworth ([1292]-27 Oct 1361, bur Berkeley Church).  He succeeded his father in 1326 as Lord Berkeley. 

9.         MATILDA (-after Aug 1345).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Maud married “Johannis de Chorleton…Hawysiæ dominæ de Powys…Johanni filio eorum[440]m (before 13 Apr 1319) JOHN Cherleton, son of JOHN Cherleton Lord Cherleton of Powys & his wife Hawise de la Pole (-1360 before 30 Aug).  He succeeded his father in 1353 as Lord Cherleton of Powys. 

10.      BLANCHE (-1347).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Blanche married “domino Petro de Graunson[441]m (before 10 Jun 1330) PIERS de Grandson, son of WILLIAM de Grandson of Ashperton, Herefordshire Lord Grandison & his wife Sibylla de Tresgoz of Ewyas Harold (-10 Aug 1358). 

11.      BEATRICE (-16 Oct 1383).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Beatrice married “Edwardo filio et hæredi domini Thomæ Brotherton comitis marescalli” and after the death of her first husband “domino Thomæ de Breusa[442]m firstly (Hereford [May/Jun] 1328) EDWARD of Norfolk, son of THOMAS "of Brotherton" Earl of Norfolk & his first wife Alice Halys ([1320]-before Aug 1334).  m secondly ([1334]/before 13 Sep 1337) THOMAS de Brewes, son of PIERS de Brewes of Tetbury & his wife Agnes --- (8 Sep 1301-9 or 16 Jun 1361).  He succeeded as Lord Brewes in 1348. 

 

 

EDMUND [III] Mortimer "the Good", son of ROGER [VI] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Philippa de Montagu of Salisbury (Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire 1 Feb 1352-Cork, Dominican Friary 27 Dec 1381, bur Cork, Dominican Friary, later transferred to Wigmore).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “apud Langonith in vigilia Purificacionis beatæ Mariæ Virginis 1351” of “Edmundus”, son of “Rogeri et Philippæ[443].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edmundus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ” as son of “Rogerus[444].  He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of March.  Earl of Ulster, Lord of Connaught, and Lord of Clare in Suffolk 1368, by right of his wife, having livery of her inheritance 24 Aug 1369 when she came of age.  Marshal of England, resigned 1376.  He sided with the Prince of Wales and the clergy, against John of Gaunt and the Barons.  He was appointed to the Council of Regency on the accession of King Richard II.  Appointed King's Lieutenant in Ireland 22 Oct 1379, arriving in Ireland 15 May 1380[445].  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, chose burial “with the body of my wife...in the church of the abbey of Wigmore”, and bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[446].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the death “in festo S. Johannis Evangelistæ…1381…apud Cork in Hibernia” of “Edmundus” and his burial at Cork[447]

[448]Betrothed (1354) to ALICE FitzAlan, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster ([1350]-17 Mar 1416). 

m (Queen’s Chapel, Reading Abbey before 5 May 1364) PHILIPPA of Clarence, daughter of LIONEL Duke of Clarence & his first wife Elizabeth de Burgh Ctss of Ulster (Eltham Palace, Kent 16 Aug 1355-[21 Nov 1378/9 Feb 1381], bur Cork, Ireland, later transferred to Wigmore, Herefordshire).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Philippa” as only daughter of “Leonellus filius secundus Regis Edwardi tertii” and his wife Elizabeth, adding that she married “domino Edmundo comiti Marchiæ” and naming her descendants[449].  She succeeded her mother in 1363 as Ctss of Ulster.  A charter dated 5 Mar 1364 records that “filio nostro Leonello duci Clarenciæ...consanguineam nostram comitissam Marchiæ filiam ipsius ducis” was brought from Ireland to England[450].  The will of "Philippa de Mortimer Countess of March", dated 21 Nov 1378, proved 9 Feb 1381, chose burial “in the Conventual Church of the Holy Trinity in the Priory of Bustelesham Montagu...near the body of my...father”, bequeathed property to “Edmond my son[451]

Edmund [III] Mortimer Earl of March & his wife had four children:

1.         ELIZABETH Mortimer (Usk, Monmouthshire 12 Feb 1371-20 Apr 1417, bur Trotton, Sussex).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Elizabetha primogenita” as daughter of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua”, adding that she was born “apud Uske XII Feb 1371”, married “domino Henrico Percy, filio domini Henrici comitis Northumbriæ[452].  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[453]m firstly (before 10 Dec 1379) HENRY Percy “Hotspur”, son of HENRY Percy Earl of Northumberland & his first wife Margaret de Neville (20 May 1364-killed in battle Shrewsbury 21 Jul 1403, bur Whitchurch, transferred Nov 1403 to York Minster).  m secondly as his second wife, THOMAS de Camoys Lord Camoys, son of JOHN de Camoys & his wife --- (-28 Mar 1421, bur Trotton). 

2.         ROGER [VII] Mortimer (Usk, Monmouthshire 11 Apr 1374-killed in battle against the Irish Kenlis 20 Jul 1398, bur Wigmore, Herefordshire).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Rogerus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ” as son of “Edmundus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ[454].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “III Id Apr…1374” of “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes”, son of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua[455].  He succeeded his mother as Earl of Ulster.  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[456].  He succeeded his father in 1381 as Earl of March.  He was proclaimed heir presumptive of the English crown in Oct 1385 by King Richard II.  Appointed Lieutenant in Ireland 23 Jul 1392, renewed for three years Apr 1397.  Summoned to Parliament 15 Oct 1397, he was greeted by a great popular welcome.  King Richard had by then become suspicious of him, and ordered the Duke of Surrey to go to Ireland and capture him[457].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes” was killed “apud Kenles in Hibernia…in festo St Margaretæ virginis 1398” and was buried at Wigmore abbey[458]m ([7 Oct 1388]) ELEANOR de Holand, daughter of THOMAS de Holand Earl of Kent & his wife Alice FitzAlan ([1373]-6 or 18 Oct 1405).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes” married “dominæ Elianoræ filiæ domini Thomæ Holland comitis Kanciæ[459].  She married secondly (after [19/30] Jun 1399) Edward Cherleton, who later succeeded as Lord Cherleton.  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Eleanor Countess of the March, after wed to the Lord Powis [of] Charlton" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent" and mother of "Anne Countess of Cambridge" and of "Jocosa Lady Tiptoft, married John, Lord Tiptoft"[460].  Roger [VII] & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         ANNE Mortimer (27 Dec 1390-Sep 1411, bur King’s Langley Church, Hertfordshire).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Annæ et Alianoræ” as the daughters of “Rogerus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ”, adding that Anne married “domino Ricardo comiti Cantabrigiæ[461].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that Anne was born “in die S. Johannis evangelistæ, in natale Domini, anno regni regis Ricardi secundi xii[462].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Eleanor Countess of the March, after wed to the Lord Powis [of] Charlton" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent" and mother of "Anne Countess of Cambridge" and of "Jocosa Lady Tiptoft, married John, Lord Tiptoft"[463]m ([May 1406], dispensation 10 Jun 1408) as his first wife, RICHARD of York "of Conisburgh", son of EDMUND "of Langley" Duke of York & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Castilla (Conisburgh Castle, Yorkshire [Sep] [1375/76]-executed Southampton Green, Hampshire 5 Aug 1415, bur Southampton, Chapel of God’s House).  He was created Earl of Cambridge 1 May 1414. 

b)         EDMUND [IV] Mortimer (New Forest, Hampshire 6 Nov 1391-Trim Castle, co Meath 18 Jan 1425, bur Collegiate Church of Stoke Clare, Suffolk).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edm. comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ et Rogerus frater eiusdem Edmundi” as the sons of “Rogerus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ”, adding that they both died childless[464].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that Edmund was born “apud le New-Forest VIII Id Nov anno regni regis Ricardi secundi xv[465].  He succeeded his father 1398 as Earl of March and Ulster.  The rightful heir to the throne on the death of King Richard II, he was kept imprisoned with his brother at Windsor by King Henry IV, transferred 1402 to Berkhamsted Castle.  King Henry V released him on his accession in 1413, and gave him livery of his estates.  He was one of the commission which condemned his brother-in-law Richard Earl of Cambridge for treason in 1415.  Having served in the army which conquered Normandy, he was appointed the King's Lieutenant in Normandy 2 Jun 1418.  He was a member of the Council of Regency on the accession of King Henry VI.  Appointed Lieutenant of Ireland 9 May 1423, leaving for Ireland in Feb 1423/4.  He died of plague in Ireland[466]m ([1415]) as her first husband, ANNE Stafford, daughter of EDMUND Earl of Stafford & his wife Anne of Gloucester Ctss of Buckingham ([1398/1403]-20 or 24 Sep 1432, bur St Katherine by the Tower, London).  She married secondly (before 6 Mar 1427) John de Holand Earl of Huntingdon, who succeeded in 1444 as Duke of Exeter. 

c)         ROGER Mortimer (Nethewood 23 Apr 1393-[1409/10]).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edm. comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ et Rogerus frater eiusdem Edmundi” as the sons of “Rogerus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ”, adding that they both died childless[467].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that Roger was born “apud Nethewoode IX Kal Apr anno regni regis Ricardi secundi xvi” and was buried “apud prioratum de Stoke[468].  He was kept imprisoned with his brother at Windsor by King Henry IV, transferred 1402 to Berkhamsted Castle. 

d)         ELEANOR Mortimer ([1395]-after Jan 1414).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Annæ et Alianoræ” as the daughters of “Rogerus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ”, adding that Eleanor died childless[469].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that Eleanor married “--- Courtney, primogeniti comitis Devoniæ[470].  She became a nun after her husband’s death.  m ([13 May 1406/20 Nov 1409]) EDWARD Courtenay, Lord Courtenay, son of EDWARD Courtenay Earl of Devon & his wife Matilda --- ([1388]-[Aug/Sep] 1418). 

e)         [ALICE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.]  

3.         PHILIPPA Mortimer (Ludlow Castle, Shropshire 21 Nov 1375-Halnaker, Sussex 24 Sep 1401, bur Boxgrove Priory, near Lewes, Sussex).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Philippa” as daughter of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua”, adding that she was born “apud Loddelowe XXI Nov 1375”, married “domino Radulpho Hastynges comiti Pembrochiæ, postea Ricardo comiti Arundelliæ et ultimo --- domino St John[471].  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[472].  The Chronicle of Adam de Usk records the death “VII Kal Oct...aput Halnakyt juxta Cicestriam” of “domina Philippa...comitis Marchie filia...xxiv etatis sue annum attingens” and her burial “in prioratu de Bosgrove”, adding that he had first married “juveni...comiti Penbrochie aput Wotstok in hastiludio perempto”, secondly “comiti Arundelle decapitato”, and thirdly “domino de Seynt John[473].  Her third marriage is confirmed by the will of "Thomas Poynings Lord St John", dated 6 Mar 1428, which chose burial “within the quire of the priory of Boxgrave in Sussex on the north part of the tomb of Lady Philippa sometime Countess of Arundel my wife[474].  She had no children by any of her three marriages.  m firstly ([1385]) as his second wife, JOHN Hastings Earl of Pembroke, son of JOHN de Hastings Earl of Pembroke & his second wife Anne de Mauny (11 Nov 1372-Woodstock 30/31 Dec 1389, bur Hereford, church of the Friars Preachers, transferred after Mar 1391/2 to church of the Grey Friars, London).  He succeeded his father in 1375 as Earl of Pembroke, and his mother in 1384 as Lord Mauny.  He was killed while practising for a tournament.  m secondly (15 Aug 1390) as his second wife, RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey, son of RICHARD FitzAlan "Copped Hat" Earl of Arundel & his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster (1346-beheaded Cheapside 21 Sep 1397, bur church of the Augustine Friars, Bread Street, London).  He succeeded his father 1376 as Earl of Arundel.  A member of the Council of Regency on the accession of King Richard II.  He took an active part against the King with the Duke of Gloucester.  Despite obtaining a pardon for his political offences in 1394, he was arrested 12 Jul 1297 and found guilty of treason.  All his honours were forfeited.  m thirdly ([Apr 1398/24 Nov 1399]) as his second wife, THOMAS de Poynings Lord St John of Basing, son of LUKE de Poynings & his wife Isabel de St John Baroness St John of Basing (-7 Mar 1429). 

4.         EDMUND Mortimer (Ludlow Castle, Shropshire 9 Nov 1376-Harlech Castle [1409], before 13 May 1411).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “apud Loddelowe V Id Nov…1376” of “Edmundus”, son of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua[475].  The will of "Philippa de Mortimer Countess of March", dated 21 Nov 1378, proved 9 Feb 1381, chose burial “in the Conventual Church of the Holy Trinity in the Priory of Bustelesham Montagu...near the body of my...father”, bequeathed property to “Edmond my son[476].  The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...[477].  He was taken prisoner by Owen Glendower, whose daughter he married.  m ([Nov 1402]) KATHERINE Glendower, daughter of OWAIN Glyndwr [Glendower] & his wife Margaret Hanmer (-before 1 Dec 1413, bur London, St Swithun’s Church).  Edmund & his wife had [five or more] children: 

a)         LIONEL (-young).

b)         daughter (-1413).

c)         daughter (-1413).

d)         [more daughters (-young, before 1413).] 

Earl Edmund had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:

5.          JOHN (-1424).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified. 

 

 

 

B.      MORTIMER of ATTLEBOROUGH, NORFOLK

 

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Mortimer (-[13 Apr 1216/21 Sep 1217]).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 18 Nov 1191 in a claim by "Robertus de Mortuo Mari" against Lewes Priory[478]m ALICE de Munchensy, daughter of WARIN de Munchensy & his wife Agnes --- (-after 1192).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter of Agnes [FitzPayn] [widow of Warin de Munchensy] which is witnessed by her son-in-law Robert de Mortimer and her daughter Alice[479].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Mortimer (-after 1242).  An order of King John dated 12 May 1202 granted "terram q fuit Henri fratris sui in balla de Monteforti" to "Willelmo de Mortuo Mari"[480].  Bracton lists a lawsuit dated 1218 involving "Priorissa de Campese" who claimed that "terre…in Thotintona" was donated by "Willelmi de Mortuo Mari…Roberto de Mortuo Mari patri predicti Willelmi"[481]m ---.  The name of William´s wife is not known.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "heres Oliveri de Eyncurt" held land "in Blankena" in Lincolnshire which "Willellmus de Mortuo Mari tenet de dote uxoris sue de dono domini regis"[482].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Mortimer (-[1263/65]).  m ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(1)       WILLIAM de Mortimer (-12 Nov 1297, bur Attleborough).  m as her first husband, ALICE, daughter of ---.  She married secondly ([14 Jan 1298]) John de Thorp

-       MORTIMER of ATTLEBOROUGH[483]

b)         HENRY de Mortimer (-before 12 May 1202).  An order of King John dated 12 May 1202 granted "terram q fuit Henri fratris sui in balla de Monteforti" to "Willelmo de Mortuo Mari"[484].

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    SUFFOLK

 

 

Robert de Ufford Lord Ufford was created Earl of Suffolk by King Edward III in 1337.  On the death in 1382 of his son William Ufford Earl of Suffolk, without surviving direct heirs, the earldom reverted to the crown.  It was revived in 1385 by King Richard II in favour of Michael de la Pole.  His descendant William de la Pole Earl of Suffolk was created Marquess of Suffolk in 1444 and Duke of Suffolk in 1448.  Edmund de la Pole Duke of Suffolk surrendered the dukedom in 1493, but retained the earldom of Suffolk until he was attainted in 1504 for his part in an alleged projected rebellion.  The dukedom of Suffolk was revived in 1514 in favour of Charles Brandon Viscount Lisle, who in 1515 married Mary sister of King Henry VIII. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of SUFFOLK 1337-1382 (UFFORD)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

ROBERT de Ufford, son of --- (-before 9 Sep 1298).  He had interests in Ufford, Suffolk[485]

m firstly (before 12 May 1273) as her second husband, MARY, widow of WILLIAM de Say, daughter of --- (-after 10 Aug 1280). 

m secondly (before [1286/87]) JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 18 Nov 1307). 

Robert de Ufford & his first wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT de Ufford (11 Jun 1279-9 Sep 1316 or before).  He was summoned to Parliament 4 Mar 1309, whereby he is held to have become Lord Ufford.  m (before 1298) CECILY de Valoignes, daughter of ROBERT de Valoignes & his wife Eva Tregoz née --- ([1280/81]-16 Jul 1325).  Robert & his wife had six children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Ufford (-[1311/9 Sep 1316). 

b)         ROBERT de Ufford (9 Aug 1298-4 Nov 1369).  He succeeded his father in 1316 as Lord Ufford.  He was created Earl of Suffolk 16 Mar 1337. 

-        see below

c)         RALPH de Ufford (-Kilmainham, Ireland 9 Apr 1346, bur Campsey Abbey, Suffolk).  Chief Justice of Ireland 1344.  m (before 8 Aug 1343) as her second husband, MATILDA de Lancaster, widow of WILLIAM de Burgh Earl of Ulster, daughter of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Maud Chaworth ([1310]-[Bruisyard Abbey, Suffolk] 5 May 1377, bur Campsey Abbey, Suffolk).  She fled to England with her daughter after the murder of her first husband.  She became a canoness at the Augustine Abbey of Campsey, Suffolk, [8 Aug 1347/25 Apr 1348].  She transferred to the Poor Clares at Bruisyard Abbey, Suffolk 1364.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          MATILDA (-[Great Bentley] 25 Jan 1413, bur Bruisyard, Suffolk).  The will of "Thomas Vere Earl of Oxford and Chamberlain of England", dated 1 Aug 1371, chose burial “in the priory of Colne”, bequeathed property to “Maud my wife...Robert my son...Alberic de Vere my brother...[486].  She took part in the 1404 conspiracy in Essex against King Henry IV and was put in the Tower, but pardoned 16 Nov 1404[487].  The will of "Maud Countess of Oxford", dated 20 Jan 1412, chose burial “in the nuns´ church at Bruseyard[488]m (before 10 Jun 1350) THOMAS de Vere, son of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Maud de Badlesmere ([1336/37]-Great Bentley, Essex [12/18] Sep 1371, bur Colne Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of Oxford. 

d)         EDMUND de Ufford (-after 29 Jun 1368).  The will of "Robert de Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 29 Jun 1368, bequeathed property to “William my eldest son...Edmund d´Ufford my...brother...my...sister de Brews...Thomas d´Ufford...Edmond my cousin, Robert d´Ufford the lesser...Dame Joan de Loudham...John de Brez my nephew...Giles de Brewz...my niece Doxen[489]

e)         daughter (-after 29 Jun 1368).  The will of "Robert de Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 29 Jun 1368, bequeathed property to “William my eldest son...Edmund d´Ufford my...brother...my...sister de Brews...Thomas d´Ufford...Edmond my cousin, Robert d´Ufford the lesser...Dame Joan de Loudham...John de Brez my nephew...Giles de Brewz...my niece Doxen[490].  m --- de Brewes, son of ---. 

f)          --- .  m ---.  One child: 

i)          EDMUND .  The will of "Robert de Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 29 Jun 1368, bequeathed property to “William my eldest son...Edmund d´Ufford my...brother...my...sister de Brews...Thomas d´Ufford...Edmond my cousin, Robert d´Ufford the lesser...Dame Joan de Loudham...John de Brez my nephew...Giles de Brewz...my niece Doxen[491]

2.         THOMAS de Ufford (-killed in battle Bannockburn 24 Jun 1314, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk)m (before 2 Dec 1308) as her second husband, EVA de Clavering, widow of THOMAS Audley, daughter of JOHN de Clavering Lord Clavering & his wife Hawise de Tibetot (-30 Sep 1369, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  The manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Evam...cognomen...Clavering” as the child of “Johannem”, son of “Robertum filium Rogeri”, adding that she had “filiam...Evam, quæ nunc se clamat advocatricem domus de Sibeton, de Langley, sanctæ Fidis et de Bliburg” who married firstly “Thomæ de Audele” who died childless and secondly “militi Radulfo de Ufford” (by whom she had “tres filios...dominos Johannem, Robertum et Edmundum milites”), thirdly “Jacobo de Audele”, and fourthly “Roberto Benhalle militi” who died childless[492].  According to Burke's Dormant and Extinct Peerages[493], the second husband of Eva de Clavering was Ralph de Ufford, who married Matilda de Lancaster, but this is clearly impossible from a chronological point of view (see above).  Secondary sources identify her husband as Thomas de Ufford, son of Robert de Ufford and his first wife Mary, but the primary source on which this information is based has not been identified.  Thomas & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN de Ufford .  The manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “tres filios...dominos Johannem, Robertum et Edmundum milites” as the children of Eva and her second husband “militi Radulfo de Ufford[494]

b)         ROBERT de Ufford .  The manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “tres filios...dominos Johannem, Robertum et Edmundum milites” as the children of Eva and her second husband “militi Radulfo de Ufford[495]same person as...?  ROBERT de Ufford (-after 11 Jun 1381).  The will of "William d´Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 11 Jun 1381, bequeathed property to “Isabel my wife...my sister Dame Maud d´Ufford...my nephew Willoghby Lord Eresby...my nephew Scales and my niece his wife...my cousin of Kardeston...my cousin Robert Ufford...Richard le Scroop...[496]

c)         EDMUND de Ufford .  The manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “tres filios...dominos Johannem, Robertum et Edmundum milites” as the children of Eva and her second husband “militi Radulfo de Ufford”, adding that she was succeeded by her son Edmund and giving details of several generations of his descendants[497]m (before Jul 1338) as her second husband, ALICE, widow of JOHN de Multon Lord Multon, daughter of --- (-before 25 Oct 1339). 

 

 

ROBERT de Ufford, son of ROBERT de Ufford Lord Ufford & his wife Cecily de Valognes (9 Aug 1298-4 Nov 1369, bur [Campsey Priory]).  He succeeded his father in 1316 as Lord Ufford.  He was created Earl of Suffolk 16 Mar 1337.  The will of "Robert de Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 29 Jun 1368, chose burial “in the abbey of Campesse in Suffolk”, bequeathed property to “William my eldest son...Edmund d´Ufford my...brother...my...sister de Brews...Thomas d´Ufford...Edmond my cousin, Robert d´Ufford the lesser...Dame Joan de Loudham...John de Brez my nephew...Giles de Brewz...my niece Doxen[498]

m (21 Oct 1329 or before) as her second husband, MARGARET de Norwich, widow of THOMAS de Cailly Lord Cailly, daughter of WALTER de Norwich & his wife --- (-2 Apr 1368). 

Earl Robert & his wife had seven children: 

1.         ROBERT de Ufford (-before 29 Jun 1368).  He was summoned to parliament 25 Feb 1342.  m (before 20 Aug 1337) as her second husband, ELIZABETH de Botetourt, widow of WILLIAM Latimer Lord Latimer, daughter of JOHN de Botetourt Lord Botetourt & his wife Matilda FitzOtes of Mendlesham, Suffolk (-11 Apr 1384, bur Newnham, Priory Church). 

2.         THOMAS (-before 4 Nov 1369)[499][m ELIZABETH de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Catherine de Mortimer.] 

3.         CECILY de Ufford (-before 20 Mar 1372).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the will of [her brother] "William d´Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 11 Jun 1381, which bequeathed property to “Isabel my wife...my sister Dame Maud d´Ufford...my nephew Willoghby Lord Eresby...my nephew Scales and my niece his wife...my cousin of Kardeston...my cousin Robert Ufford...Richard le Scroop...[500]m (before 1349) JOHN de Willoughby, son of JOHN de Willoughby Lord Willoughby & his wife Joan Roscelyn of Edgefield, Norfolk (Eresby Manor before 6 Jan 1329-20 Mar 1372, bur Spilsby, Lincolnshire). 

4.         CATHERINE de Ufford .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the will of [her brother] "William d´Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 11 Jun 1381, which bequeathed property to “Isabel my wife...my sister Dame Maud d´Ufford...my nephew Willoghby Lord Eresby...my nephew Scales and my niece his wife...my cousin of Kardeston...my cousin Robert Ufford...Richard le Scroop...[501]m (before 6 May 1335) ROBERT de Scales Lord Scales, son of ROBERT de Scales Lord Scales & his wife Egeline --- (-13 Aug 1369). 

5.         WILLIAM ([1339]-15 Feb 1382, bur Campsey Priory).  The will of "Robert de Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 29 Jun 1368, bequeathed property to “William my eldest son...Edmund d´Ufford my...brother...my...sister de Brews...Thomas d´Ufford...Edmond my cousin, Robert d´Ufford the lesser...Dame Joan de Loudham...John de Brez my nephew...Giles de Brewz...my niece Doxen[502].  He succeeded his father in 1369 as Earl of Suffolk.  The earldom of Suffolk reverted to the crown on his death.  The will of "William d´Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 11 Jun 1381, chose burial “at Campasse”, bequeathed property to “Isabel my wife...my sister Dame Maud d´Ufford...my nephew Willoghby Lord Eresby...my nephew Scales and my niece his wife...my cousin of Kardeston...my cousin Robert Ufford...Richard le Scroop...[503]m firstly (before 3 Feb 1363) JOAN de Montagu, daughter of EDWARD de Montagu Lord Montagu & his first wife Alice of Norfolk (Bungay, Suffolk 2 Feb 1349-before 12 Jun 1376).  m secondly (12 Jun 1376 or before) as her second husband, ISABEL de Beauchamp, widow of JOHN Le Strange Lord Strange, daughter of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer (-29 Sep 1416, bur Campsey Priory).  The will of "William d´Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 11 Jun 1381, bequeathed property to “Isabel my wife...my sister Dame Maud d´Ufford...my nephew Willoghby Lord Eresby...my nephew Scales and my niece his wife...my cousin of Kardeston...my cousin Robert Ufford...Richard le Scroop...[504].  She became a nun 21 Mar 1382.  The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 1 Apr 1400, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...my daughter Beauchamp...my brother of Bergavenny...my sisters of Suffolk and Clifford and...my niece Katherine Beauchamp the nun at Shouldham[505].  The will of "Isabel d´Ufford Countess of Suffolk", dated 26 Sep 1416, chose burial “in the abbey of Campesse near my husband[506].  Earl William & his first wife had five children:

a)         ROBERT (-[1 Aug] 1375)m ([28 Oct 1371]) ELEANOR FitzAlan, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun (-1375). 

b)         THOMAS (-1375). 

c)         WILLIAM (-1375). 

d)         EDWARD (-1375). 

e)         MARGARET (-1375). 

6.         WALTER (-1360)m (1351) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Montagu, daughter of EDWARD Montagu Lord Montagu & his first wife Alice of Norfolk (1344-1361). 

7.         MARGARET (-before 1368)m (1344) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Ferrers Lord Ferrers of Groby, son of HENRY de Ferrers Lord Ferrers of Groby & his wife Isabel de Verdon (1333-1371). 

8.         MATILDA (-after 11 Jun 1381).  The will of "William d´Ufford Earl of Suffolk", dated 11 Jun 1381, bequeathed property to “Isabel my wife...my sister Dame Maud d´Ufford...my nephew Willoghby Lord Eresby...my nephew Scales and my niece his wife...my cousin of Kardeston...my cousin Robert Ufford...Richard le Scroop...[507]

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of SUFFOLK 1385-1492 (POLE)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

WILLIAM de la Pole, son of ---.  Merchant at Hull. 

m as her first husband, ELENA, daughter of ---.  She married secondly John Rotenheryng of Hull. 

William & his wife had three children: 

1.         RICHARD (-1345).  m ---.  The name of Richard´s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM (-1366).  m MARGARET Peverel, daughter of ---.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN m (contract 21 Oct 1362) JOAN Cobham, daughter of JOHN Lord Cobham & his wife Margaret de Courtenay (-1388).  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOAN (-13 Jan 1434, bur Cobham).  Baroness Cobham.  m firstly RICHARD Hemenhale, son of ---.  m secondly RICHARD Braybrooke, son of ---.  m thirdly NORMAN Hawberk, son of ---.  m fourthly JOHN Oldcastle, son of ---.  m fifthly JOHN Harpeden, son of ---. 

2.         WILLIAM (-21 Jun 1366).  Wool merchant[508].  A charter of King Edward III confirmed the foundation of Kingston-upon-Hull priory, naming “Willielmo de la Pole seniori iam defuncto” as founder and “Michael de la Pole filius et hæres præfati Willielmi[509]m CATHERINE de Norwich, daughter of WALTER de Norwich & his wife --- (-28 Jan 1382).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “pater noster et dominus D. Willielmus de la Pole miles, iam defunctus…Katerinæ de la Pole matris nostræ…[510].  William & his wife had six children; 

a)         MICHAEL ([1330]-Paris 5 Sep 1389, bur Kingston-upon-Hull, Church of the Carthusians).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “Walteri et Thomæ fratrum nostrorum militum, ac Blanchiæ sororis nostræ nuper uxoris…domini Richardi le Scrop…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “pater noster et dominus D. Willielmus de la Pole miles, iam defunctus…Katerinæ de la Pole matris nostræ…Katerinæ consortis nostræ…domini Edmundi fratris nostri ac Michaelis filii et hæredis nostri[511].  He was summoned to Parliament 20 Jan 1366, whereby he is held to have become Lord de la Pole.  He was created Earl of Suffolk 6 Aug 1385. 

-        see below

b)         EDMUND (-1417).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “…domini Edmundi fratris nostri…[512].  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Edmund de la Pole" as the son of "Katherine de la Pole"[513].  The will of "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, appointed “the said Katherine my wife and Edmund my uncle” as executors[514]m firstly ELIZABETH de Handle, daughter of RICHARD de Handle & his wife --- ([1369]-).  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Elizabeth , dau and h of Richard de Handle" as the first wife of "Edmund de la Pole"[515]m secondly (1370) [MATILDA Lovet, daughter of JOHN Lovet of Buckinghamshire & his wife --- or MATILDA Sackville, daughter of ANDREW Sackville & his wife Joan ---].  Manuscript sources are contradictory regarding the name of Edmund de la Pole´s [second] wife.  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Matilda, dau of John Lovet of co. Bucks" as the second wife of "Edmund de la Pole"[516].  On the other hand, the Rawlinson manuscript names "Matildis filia et cohe. Andreæ Sackuile qui ob. 13 E. III & Johannæ sororis & cohe. Johis" as the [only] wife of "Edus de la Poole, capitaneus Calisii frater Michis. primi, co. Suff."[517].  Edmund & his first wife had two children: 

i)          ELIZABETH de la Pole (14 Jul 1362-).  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Elizabeth de la Pole, born 14 July 1362, Katherine de la Pole, born 1369" as the daughters of "Edmund de la Pole" and his first wife[518]

ii)         KATHERINE de la Pole (1369-).  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Elizabeth de la Pole, born 14 July 1362, Katherine de la Pole, born 1369" as the daughters of "Edmund de la Pole" and his first wife[519]

Edmund & his second wife had two children: 

iii)        WALTER de la Pole (1371-).  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Walter de la Pole, b. 1371, Cecily de la Pole, b. 1373" as the children of "Edmund de la Pole" and his second wife[520].  The Rawlinson manuscript names "Waltus de la Poole" as the son of "Edus de la Poole" and his wife "Matildis filia et cohe. Andreæ Sackuile qui ob. 13 E. III & Johannæ sororis & cohe. Johis"[521]m ELIZABETH de Bradestone, daughter and heiress of THOMAS de Bradestone & his wife ---.  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Elizabeth , dau of Thomas de Bradeston, Knt" as the wife of "Walter de la Pole"[522].  The Rawlinson manuscript names "Eliz. filia et heres Tho. Braileston Dni de Winterborn" as the wife of "Waltus de la Poole"[523].  Walter & his wife had two children: 

(a)       EDMUND de la Pole (1391-).  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Edmund de la Pole, b. 15 Ric II" as the son of "Walter de la Pole" and his wife[524]

(b)       MARGARET de la Pole .  The Rawlinson manuscript names "Margarete" as the daughter of "Waltus de la Poole" and her husband "Thomas Ingeldsthorpe"[525]

iv)       CECILY de la Pole (1373-).  Manuscript notes in a 14th century psalter record "Walter de la Pole, b. 1371, Cecily de la Pole, b. 1373" as the children of "Edmund de la Pole" and his second wife[526]

c)         WALTER .  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “Walteri et Thomæ fratrum nostrorum militum…”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “pater noster et dominus D. Willielmus de la Pole miles, iam defunctus…Katerinæ de la Pole matris nostræ…[527]

d)         THOMAS .  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “Walteri et Thomæ fratrum nostrorum militum…”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “pater noster et dominus D. Willielmus de la Pole miles, iam defunctus…Katerinæ de la Pole matris nostræ…[528]

e)         BLANCHE (-after 1378).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Blanchiæ sororis nostræ nuper uxoris…domini Richardi le Scrop…”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[529]m (before 21 Feb 1352) RICHARD Scrope of Bolton in Wensleydale, Yorkshire son of HENRY Scrope & his wife Margaret --- ([1326/27]-30 May 1403, bur Easby Abbey).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1370 whereby he is held to have become Lord Scrope. 

f)          MARGARET m (1344) ROBERT Neville of Hornby, son of ROBERT Neville & his first wife Joan de Atherton (-1413). 

3.         JOHN

 

 

MICHAEL de la Pole, son of WILLIAM de la Pole & his wife Catherine --- ([1330]-Paris 5 Sep 1389, bur Kingston-upon-Hull, Church of the Carthusians).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “Walteri et Thomæ fratrum nostrorum militum, ac Blanchiæ sororis nostræ nuper uxoris…domini Richardi le Scrop…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “pater noster et dominus D. Willielmus de la Pole miles, iam defunctus…Katerinæ de la Pole matris nostræ…Katerinæ consortis nostræ…domini Edmundi fratris nostri ac Michaelis filii et hæredis nostri[530].  A charter of King Edward III confirmed the foundation of Kingston-upon-Hull priory, naming “Willielmo de la Pole seniori iam defuncto” as founder and “Michael de la Pole filius et hæres præfati Willielmi[531].  He was summoned to parliament 20 Jan 1366, whereby he is held to have become Lord de la Pole.  He was created Earl of Suffolk 6 Aug 1385.  He was accused of high treason and fled the country in Dec 1387.  He was attainted and all his honours forfeited 13 Feb 1388[532].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Dñs Michael del Pole, Dña Katerina, uxor eius"[533].  His place of burial is confirmed by the will of [his son] "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, which chose burial “in the church of the Carthusians at Kingston-upon-Hull betwixt the tomb of my father and mother...[534]

m KATHERINE Wingfield, daughter of JOHN Wingfield of Wingfield, Suffolk & his wife Eleanor de Glanville ([1348]-before 1 Oct 1386, bur Kingston-upon-Hull, Church of the Carthusians).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “…Katerinæ consortis nostræ…domini Edmundi fratris nostri ac Michaelis filii et hæredis nostri[535].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Dñs Michael del Pole, Dña Katerina, uxor eius"[536].  Her place of burial is confirmed by the will of [her son] "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, which chose burial “in the church of the Carthusians at Kingston-upon-Hull betwixt the tomb of my father and mother...[537]

Michael & his wife had one child: 

1.         MICHAEL (1367 or before-Harfleur 18 Sep 1415, bur Wingfield).  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory by charter dated 18 Feb 1378, which names “…Katerinæ consortis nostræ…ac Michaelis filii et hæredis nostri[538].  He was restored to his father's dignities 28 Jan 1398, thereby succeeding as Earl of Suffolk.  The will of "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, chose burial “in the church of the Carthusians at Kingston-upon-Hull betwixt the tomb of my father and mother...[or] the Collegitate Church of Wyngefeld”, bequeathed property to “Katherine my wife...a coronet which belonged to the Earl of Stafford her father...my son a little primer which belonged to John de la Pole his brother”, and appointed “the said Katherine my wife and Edmund my uncle” as executors[539].  He died at the siege of Harfleur[540]m (contract 1 Feb 1383, before 23 Nov 1383) CATHERINE Stafford, daughter of HUGH Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Philippa Beauchamp of Warwick (-8 Apr 1419, bur Wingfield).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 21 Sep 1385, bequeathed property to “my sister Roos...Margaret de Nevill my daughter...Katherine de la Pole my daughter...Joane my daughter...my sister Charleton...Dame Joane d´Engayne my cousin[541].  The will of "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, bequeathed property to “Katherine my wife...a coronet which belonged to the Earl of Stafford her father...my son a little primer which belonged to John de la Pole his brother”, and appointed “the said Katherine my wife and Edmund my uncle” as executors[542].  Michael & his wife had six children: 

a)         ISABEL (-8 Feb 1467).  m (5 Feb 1403 or before) THOMAS Morley, son of ROBERT Morley & his wife Isabel --- ([1392/93]-6 Dec 1435, bur Hingham, Norfolk).  He succeeded his grandfather in 1416 as Lord Morley. 

b)         PHILIPPA (-before 1386).  m as his first wife, HUGH Burnell, son of NICHOLAS Burnell (formerly Haudlo) Lord Burnell & his wife Mary --- ([1346/47]-27 Nov 1420, bur Hales Abbey, Shropshire).  He succeeded his father in 1383 as Lord Burnell. 

c)         MICHAEL ([1394/95]-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur [Ewelme, Oxfordshire]).  He succeeded his father in 1415 as Earl of Suffolkm (before 24 Nov 1403) ELIZABETH Mowbray, daughter of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (-after 1 Dec 1423).  She became a nun at Bruisyard, Suffolk before 17 Jan 1420.  Michael & his wife had three children: 

i)          KATHERINE (6 May 1410-).  She became a nun at Bruisyard, Suffolk 9 May 1423. 

ii)         ELIZABETH (22 Jul 1411-before 12 Jul 1422). 

iii)        ISABEL (4 Jun 1415-before 12 Jul 1422).  

d)         WILLIAM (Cotton, Suffolk 16 Oct 1396-murdered off Dover 2 May 1450, bur Wingfield).  He succeeded his brother in 1415 as Earl of Suffolk.  He was created Marquess of Suffolk 14 Sep 1444, Earl of Pembroke 23 Feb 1447 and Duke of Suffolk 2 Jun 1448.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Willelmus del Pole dux Southfolch, Dña Alicia uxor eiusdem, Johannes del Pole filius eorundem, Magister Thomas del Pole"[543].  The will of "William de la Pole Marquess of Suffolk", dated 17 Jan 1449, chose burial “in the Charter-house at Hull[544]m (licence 11 Nov 1430) as her third husband, ALICE Chaucer, widow firstly of JOHN Philip and secondly of THOMAS Montagu Earl of Salisbury, daughter and heiress of THOMAS Chaucer of Ewelme, Oxfordshire & his wife Matilda de Burghersh ([1404]-20 May or 9 Jun 1475, bur Ewelme, Oxfordshire).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Willelmus del Pole dux Southfolch, Dña Alicia uxor eiusdem, Johannes del Pole filius eorundem, Magister Thomas del Pole"[545].  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          ANNE de la Pole m GAILLARD [IV] de Durfort Seigneur de Duras, son of GAILLARD [III] de Durfort Seigneur de Duras & his wife Indie de La Lande (-[4 Feb/28 May] 1481). 

ii)         JOHN (27 Sep 1442-[29 Oct 1491/27 Oct 1492], bur Wingfield).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Willelmus del Pole dux Southfolch, Dña Alicia uxor eiusdem, Johannes del Pole filius eorundem, Magister Thomas del Pole"[546].  He succeeded his father in 1450 as Duke of Suffolk

-         see below

William had one possible illegitimate daughter by [MALYNE de Cay]: 

iii)        [547]JOAN ([Mar/Apr] 1430-).  m THOMAS Stonor of Stonor, Oxfordshire, son of ---. 

e)         THOMASm ---.  The name of Thomas´s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

i)          KATHERINE (-1488).  m firstly (1438) as his second wife, MILES de Stapleton, son of --- (-1466).  m secondly RICHARD Harcourt, son of --- (-1486). 

f)          JOHN (-before 1 Jul 1415).  The will of "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, bequeathed property to “Katherine my wife...a coronet which belonged to the Earl of Stafford her father...my son a little primer which belonged to John de la Pole his brother[548]m MARIE dite de Sicile, daughter of ---. 

g)         ELIZABETH de la Polem firstly EDWARD Burnell, son of --- (-Honfleur 1415).  m secondly ([1425]) THOMAS Kerderston, son of ---.  Elizabeth & her second husband had one child: 

i)          MARGARET .  According to Hansen, Margaret, wife of Jean de Foix, was the daughter of Elizabeth de la Pole, widow of Edward Burnell (who died at Honfleur in 1415), by her second husband Thomas Kerderston whom she married in [1425][549]m ([1440]) JEAN de Foix Comte de Candale, Captal de Buch, son of GASTON [IV] de Foix Vicomte de Benauge, Comte de Longueville & his wife Marguerite d´Albret (-1485).  He was created Earl of Kendal for services to England but relinquished the title. 

 

 

JOHN de la Pole, son of WILLIAM de la Pole Duke of Suffolk & his wife Alice Chaucer (27 Sep 1442-[29 Oct 1491/27 Oct 1492], bur Wingfield).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Willelmus del Pole dux Southfolch, Dña Alicia uxor eiusdem, Johannes del Pole filius eorundem, Magister Thomas del Pole"[550].  He succeeded his father in 1450 as Duke of Suffolk

m firstly ([28 Jan/7 Feb] 1450, Papal dispensation 18 Aug 1450, annulled before 24 Mar 1453) as her first husband, MARGARET Beaufort, daughter of JOHN Beaufort Duke of Somerset & his wife Margaret de Beauchamp (Bletsoe Castle, Bedfordshire 31 May 1443-Abbot’s House, Cheyney Gates, Westminster Abbey 29 Jun 1509, bur Westminster Abbey). 

m secondly (Aug 1461) ELIZABETH of York, daughter of RICHARD Duke of York & his wife Cecily Neville of Westmoreland (Rouen 22 Apr 1444-[7 Jan 1503/3 May 1504], bur Wingfield Church, Suffolk).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Elizabeth Duchess of Suffolk" as mother of "Edmond Earl of Suffolk, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Anne"[551]

Duke John & his second wife had twelve children: 

1.         JOHN ([1462]-killed in battle Stoke 16 Jun 1487).  He was created Earl of Lincoln 13 Mar 1467.  He was declared heir presumptive to the throne of England by King Richard III in [May] 1485[552].  A manuscript calendar records that “John therl of Lïcolñ” was killed “xvi day of Juyn…1487…ï batail at Stoke bisyde Newark[553]m MARGARET FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of THOMAS FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Margaret Wydeville (-after 1493). 

a)         EDWARD (-young). 

2.         ANNE (-after 1495).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Elizabeth Duchess of Suffolk" as mother of "Edmond Earl of Suffolk, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Anne"[554].  Nun at Sion Abbey. 

3.         CATHERINE .  [m as his first wife, WILLIAM Stourton, son of WILLIAM Stourton Baron Stourton & his wife Margaret Chidlock of Chidlock, Dorset ([1457]-17 Feb 1524).  He succeeded his nephew in 1487 as Baron Stourton.] 

4.         ELIZABETH (-after 31 Dec 1489, bur Hallingbury, Essex).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Elizabeth Duchess of Suffolk" as mother of "Edmond Earl of Suffolk, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Anne"[555]m (Wingfield, Suffolk) HENRY Lovel Lord Morley, son of WILLIAM Lovel Lord Morley & his wife Eleanor Morley Baroness Morley ([1466]-killed in battle Dixmude 13 Jun 1489, bur Calais). 

5.         EDWARD (-before 8 Oct 1485).  Archdeacon at Richmond. 

6.         EDMUND ([1471/72]-executed Tower Hill 4 May 1513, bur London, Church of the Minories without Aldgate).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Elizabeth Duchess of Suffolk" as mother of "Edmond Earl of Suffolk, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Anne"[556].  He succeeded his father in 1492 as Duke of Suffolk.  He surrendered his dukedom in 1493, but retained the earldom of Suffolk.  He was outlawed at Ipswich 26 Dec 1502 and attainted Jan 1504.  He fled abroad but was captured and imprisoned in the Tower of London in Mar 1506.  m (before 10 Oct 1496) MARGARET Scrope, daughter of RICHARD Scrope & his wife Eleanor Washbourne (-Feb 1515, bur London, Church of the Minories without Aldgate).  Edmund & his wife had one child: 

a)         ELIZABETH .  Nun at Aldgate, London. 

7.         HUMPHREY (1 Aug 1474-before 15 Feb 1513).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Elizabeth Duchess of Suffolk" as mother of "Edmond Earl of Suffolk, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Anne"[557].  Prebendary at St Paul's, resigned 1509.  He became Rector of Hingham, Norfolk[558]

8.         GEOFFREY (-after 1499, bur [Baberham][559]). 

9.         WILLIAM ([1478]-Tower of London after Oct 1539).  He was attainted with his brother in 1504.  He was imprisoned in the Tower where he remained until his death.  m ([1497') as her third husband, CATHERINE Stourton, widow firstly of WILLIAM Berkeley of Beverston, Gloucestershire and secondly of HENRY Grey Lord Grey [of Codnor], daughter of WILLIAM Lord Stourton & his wife Margaret Chidiock (-London 25 Nov 1521). 

10.      RICHARD (-killed in battle Pavia 24 Feb 1525, bur Pavia, Church of St Augustine).  He was attainted with his brother Jan 1504, but assumed the title Duke of Suffolk [before 1510].  He also claimed the English throne. 

11.      DOROTHY

12.      daughter (-young). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    STAFFORD

 

 

Ralph de Stafford Lord Stafford was created Earl of Stafford in 1351 by King Edward III.  His descendant Humphrey Earl of Stafford was created duke of Buckingham in 1444 after which the two titles were held jointly by his descendants until 1521 when they were forfeited when Edward Stafford Duke of Buckingham and Earl of Stafford was beheaded. 

 

 

 

A.      STAFFORD FAMILY (TOSNY)

 

 

ROBERT [I], son of ROGER [I] de Tosny & his [second wife Godechildis ---] (-1088, bur [Evesham Abbey]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1130] under which Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Conches, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Octona" made by "Robertus de Stafort filius Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "filio meo Nicholao"[560].  Robert´s connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford[561].  No indication has been found of the identity of Robert [III]´s mother, but assuming that he was legitimate the chronology suggests that he must have been born from his father´s [second] marriage.  Domesday Book records “Robert of Stafford” holding Denchworth in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire; “Robert de Tosny” holding Miswell in Tring Hundred and Barwythe in Danish Hundred in Hertfordshire; "Robert of Stafford" holding land in Oxfordshire; Stoneton in Northamptonshire [Warwickshire]; numerous properties in Warwickshire; and Staffordshire[562].  The entries in Hertfordshire precede those which record the holdings of Raoul de Tosny in Hertfordshire, which suggests that they refer to the Robert Tosny/Stafford who was Raoul´s brother.  "Robertus de Stafford…monachus factus in infirmitate mea" donated Wrottesley and Loynton to Evesham abbey, for "conjuge mea et filio meo Nicholao", by charter dated 1088[563].  ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[564]

m [AVICE de Clare], daughter of --- (-after 1088, bur [Stone priory]).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names “Avice de Clare” as the wife of Robert and records their burial at Stone[565].  It is far from certain that this information is accurate.  No person of that name has yet been identified, and the name "Clare" only appears to have been used by the descendants of Robert de Brionne from the early 12th century (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C). 

Robert [I] & his wife had one child: 

1.         NICHOLAS de Stafford (-1138 or after, bur Stone Priory).  "Nicholaus filius Roberti de Stafford…et Mathildi uxori mee" donated Idlicote to Kenilworth priory by charter dated to [1122/25][566].  Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Conches, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Octona" made by "Robertus de Stafort filius Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "filio meo Nicholao", by charter dated to [1130][567].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Nicolaus fil Rob de Statford" as security for a debt in Staffordshire[568].  “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[569].  ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[570]m MATILDA, daughter of --- (-bur Stone).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names “Maude Moolte” as the wife of Nicholas and records their burial at Stone[571].  "Nicholaus filius Roberti de Stafford…et Mathildi uxori mee" donated Idlicote to Kenilworth priory by charter dated to [1122/25][572].  Matilda´s parentage is unknown.  The Stone Priory table suggests a link with a family named "Moult", but the probable late dating of the source suggests that the information may not be reliable.  Domesday Descendants states that Matilda was "probably the daughter of Ralph I de Limesey" without specifying any reasoning[573].  This speculation is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Radulfus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, with the consent of “Hadwisiæ uxori suæ”, witnessed by "Raerus filius domini, Robertus de Statford nepos domini…"[574], on the assumption that "Robertus de Statford" was the same person as Robert [II] de Stafford, Matilda´s son.  If that is correct, she was Matilda de Limesey, daughter of Ralph [I] de Limesey & his wife ---.  Matilda is also recorded in relation to land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire.  Firstly, "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire, held from her by "Toruerdus le mutere et Gilebertus filius eius", to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[575].  Secondly, "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", by charter dated to the end-12th century, another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[576].  "Matilda de Hamby" was therefore the god-daughter of Matilda, wife of Nicholas de Stafford.  Presumably Theddlethorpe entered the Stafford family through Matilda´s marriage and later passed to Matilda´s grandson "Radulfus de Suleya" junior (see below).  It appears probable that the second parcel of land in Theddlethorpe, granted to Matilda de Hamby by "Haraldus frater eius", formed part of the same property which, if correct, would have been held jointly by Ralph "de Suleya" and Harold.  As noted in the first charter, Matilda de Hamby was the daughter of Robert FitzGilbert.  It appears unlikely that Matilda, wife of Nicholas, was related to "Toruerdus le mutere et Gilebertus filius eius" who held land from her.  On the other hand, it seems equally unlikely that "Radulfus de Suleya" junior would have confirmed the grant of land by Harold to his sister Matilda de Hamby unless there had been some family connection.  One explanation could be that Matilda held the land jointly with an unknown relative who had transferred his/her share to Harold.  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stone Priory, among which a donation by “Matildis de Stafford” with the consent of “Roberti de Stafford”, by undated charter[577].  Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT [II] de Stafford (-[1178/84], bur Stone Priory).  “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford” by undated charter[578].  "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Aviciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1155], witnessed by "Roberto Bagot…"[579].  The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Robert de Stafford" first in the list under Staffordshire[580].  “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[581].  "Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus" confirmed the donation of Wrottesley and Loynton to Evesham abbey made by "Rodbertus avus meus et pater meus Nicholaus" by charter dated to [1161/65][582].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from Richard Bishop of Coventry in Staffordshire, and also record the sixty knights fees held from "Roberti de Staffordia" in Stafford[583].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Stafford lx m" in Staffordshire in [1167/68][584].  ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[585].  "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[586]m AVICE, daughter of --- (-bur Stone).  "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Aviciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1155], witnessed by "Roberto Bagot…"[587].  "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[588].  It is unclear from the wording of this document whether Avice was alive or deceased at the time.  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names “Avice” as the wife of Robert and records their burial at Stone[589].  Robert [II] & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT [III] de Stafford (-[1193/29 Sep 1194]).  "Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus" confirmed the donation of Wrottesley and Loynton to Evesham abbey made by "Rodbertus avus meus et pater meus Nicholaus" by charter dated to [1161/65][590].  "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[591].  ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[592].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Stafford" paying "xxx l, lx milites" in Staffordshire[593].  He was in Jerusalem in 1190.  m BASILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1221).  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  

ii)         NICHOLAS de Stafford (-after 1183).  "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[594].   

iii)        MILLICENT de Stafford (-before Jan 1225, bur Stone Priory).  “Herveus…dominus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “Robertus de Tony et Nicolaus filius suus de Stafford et Robertus filius eius” by undated charter which names “dominus Robertus de Stafford, pater uxoris meæ[595].  Her name is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent[596]m (before 1193) HERVEY Bagot, son of --- (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory).  He adopted the name “Stafford”. 

b)         JOHN de Stafford .  "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[597]

c)         --- de Stafford .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to the end-12th century under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[598]m RALPH "de Suleya", son of ---.  No other record has so far been found of a "Suleya/Suleye" family.  It is uncertain which English surname is represented by the Latin "Suleya".  However, it is similar to "Sudeley" and one possibility is that "Radulfus de Suleya" senior was the same person as Ralph [I] de Sudeley, son of John de Sudeley & his wife --- (-before 29 Sep 1192).  The chronology appears favourable for this co-identity, but its likelihood depends on establishing a connection between the Sudeley family and Theddlethorpe.  No such connection has yet been identified.  [Two] children: 

i)          RALPH "de Suleya" .  "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", by charter dated to the end-12th century, another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea", the second charter being witnessed by "Ricardo de Suleya…"[599]

ii)         [RICHARD "de Suleya" .  "Ricardo de Suleya…" witnessed one version of the charter under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi"[600].  It is probable that Richard was closely related to the confirmant, maybe his younger brother.] 

 

 

1.         ALAN de Stafford (-after 1160).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Alanus de Stafford dimidiam marcam i quartam" in Northamptonshire in [1160/61][601]

 

2.         ROGER de Stafford (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Staffordia" held land in Dorset from the abbot of St Edward´s[602]

 

3.         JORDAN de Stafford (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Jordanus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from "Alvredi de Lincolnia" in Dorset and one from "Willelmi Malech" [Malet] in Somerset[603]

 

 

 

B.      STAFFORD FAMILY (BAGOT)

 

 

1.         BAGOT (-after 1129).  "…Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1122/25] under which "Nicholaus filius Roberti de Stafford…et Mathildi uxori mee" donated Idlicote "quod Gaufridus de Clintona de me tenebat" to Kenilworth priory[604].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Bagot" accounting for money from a tenant in Staffordshire[605]m ---.  The name of Bagot´s wife is not known.  Bagot & his wife had one child: 

a)         HERVEY Bagot (-after 1166).  "…Herveus filius Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1130] under which "Nicolaus filius Roberti de Stafford et Robertus primogenitus et heres meus" donated "ecclesiam Sancti Wlfadi de Stanis" to Kenilworth priory[606].  "…Hereveo Bagod, Johanne Bagod…" witnessed the charter dated to [1155/59] under which "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations made to Erdaury priory by "patris mei Nicholai de Stafford"[607].  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[608].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hervicus Bagot" held three knights´ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[609]m ---.  The name of Hervey´s wife is not known.  Hervey & his wife had three children: 

i)          HERVEY Bagot (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[610]

-         see below

ii)         ROGER Bagot (-after 1194).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[611].  "Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[612].  “Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit” and for the salvation of “mea et Roehais uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Roberto de Verdun, Waltero de Canvile, Ada de Aldithelee...Willielmo Pantouf, Radulpho de Biseche, Rogero Bagot, Philippo de Draicote, Milone de Verdun[613].  "Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[614].  "Herveius Bagot" granted revenue "in Brideleia" to "Thomæ Noel", with the consent of "Milisantæ uxoris meæ et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1194/95], witnessed by "…Willelmo Bagot de Blumeshull, William Bagot de Holedale, Rogero Bagot fratre Hervei Bagot…"[615]

iii)        HERVEY Bagot (-after [1185/90]).  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[616]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bagot (-after 1166).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[617].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Bagot" held three parts of one knight´s fee from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[618]

 

2.         ROBERT Bagot (-after 1166).  "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Aviciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1155], witnessed by "Roberto Bagot…"[619].  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[620].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Bagod" held part of [one knight´s fee] from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[621]

 

3.         JOHN Bagot (-after [1155/59]).  "…Hereveo Bagod, Johanne Bagod…" witnessed the charter dated to [1155/59] under which "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations made to Erdaury priory by "patris mei Nicholai de Stafford"[622]m ---.  The name of John´s wife is not known.  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Bagot (-after 1182).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[623]

b)         RICHARD Bagot .  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[624]

 

4.         JOHN Bagot of Blymhill, Staffordshire (-after 1166).  It is not known whether John Bagot of Blymhill was the same person as John Bagot who is shown above.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ranulfus de Beumeis" held three knights´ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire, of which two were held by "Johannes Bigod"[625].  Bridgeman identifies the two fees held by John Bagot as Blymhill and Brineton[626]m [IVETTE, daughter of --- (-after 1182).  "Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[627].]  It is not known with certainty that Ivette was the wife of John Bagot of Blymhill.  However, the charter dated 1176 under which "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed land to Buildwas abbey was agreed with the consent of "my mother…"[628], showing firstly that William´s mother was still alive at that date (consistent with the 1182 charter) and that John Bagot had an eldest son named William as did Ivette.  John & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM Bagot of Blymhill (-after 1194).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[629].  ["Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[630].  As noted above, it is not certain that this document relates to William Bagot of Blymhill and his mother.]  "Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[631].  "Herveius Bagot" granted revenue "in Brideleia" to "Thomæ Noel", with the consent of "Milisantæ uxoris meæ et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1194/95], witnessed by "…Willelmo Bagot de Blumeshull, William Bagot de Holedale, Rogero Bagot fratre Hervei Bagot…"[632]m ---.  The name of William´s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [JOHN Bagot of Blymhill (-1224 or before).  "John Bagot and Hamo de Weston" were indicted at the Forest Assizes of Mar 1209 for "receiving Marksmen and Hounds at Blymhill and Weston"[633].  He and his descendants are shown in Eyton[634]m MARGERY, daughter of WARIN de Burwardsley & his wife --- (-before 10 May 1259).  Margaret Bagot gave "half a mark for summoning Roger Martel before the Justices at Westminster to acquit her of the service which Milisent de Stafford demands of her for her freehold in Blumenhul and Brunton" in 1223/24[635].  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[636].  John & his wife had five children: 

(a)       SARAH Bagot (-before 10 May 1259).  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[637].  It appears likely that this daughter was her parents´ oldest child in view of the age of her sister Philippa recorded in the same document (although that age must be underestimated, see below).  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Sarah married "William de Ipstanes"[638]m WILLIAM de Ipstones, son of ---. 

(b)       MARGARET Bagot .  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Margaret married "Ralph de Coven"[639]m firstly RALPH de Covene, son of ---.  m secondly WILLIAM de Drayton, son of ---. 

(c)       JOAN Bagot .  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Joan married "Richard de Pycheford"[640]m RICHARD de Pycheford, son of ---. 

(d)       ELIZABETH Bagot .  "Elizabeth daughter of John Bagot of Blumenhul and…Phelippa daughter of the same John de Blumenhul, being in full age and in our maidenhood" granted "all our right in Blakemor" to "Ralph de Coven", undated, witnessed by "…John Bagot of Brunton…Richard Bagot of the same vill"[641]

(e)       PHILIPPA Bagot (-after 10 May 1259).  "Elizabeth daughter of John Bagot of Blumenhul and…Phelippa daughter of the same John de Blumenhul, being in full age and in our maidenhood" granted "all our right in Blakemor" to "Ralph de Coven", undated, witnessed by "…John Bagot of Brunton…Richard Bagot of the same vill"[642].  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[643].  Philippa´s age in this document must be under-estimated in view of the estimated date of death of her father.  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Philippa married "Geoffrey de Bromleye"[644]m GEOFFREY de Bromley, son of ---. 

b)         ROGER Bagot (-after 1176).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[645]

c)         JOHN Bagot (-after 1176).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[646]

d)         THOMAS Bagot (-after 1176).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[647]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM Bagot of Hyde (-after [1194]).  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[648].  "Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[649].  "Herveius Bagot" granted revenue "in Brideleia" to "Thomæ Noel", with the consent of "Milisantæ uxoris meæ et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1194/95], witnessed by "…Willelmo Bagot de Blumeshull, William Bagot de Holedale, Rogero Bagot fratre Hervei Bagot…"[650]

2.         HERVEY Bagot (-after [1185/90]).  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[651]

 

 

1.         INGELRAM Bagot .  "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to the reign of King Henry II under which "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei"[652]

 

 

HERVEY Bagot, son of HERVEY Bagot & his wife --- (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[653].  ["Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[654].  It is possible that "Henrico" in this document is an error for "Herveo" as no other reference to a Henry Bagot has been found.]  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[655].  "Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[656].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "de his qui non habent capitals honores…Hervi Bagod" paying "xx s viii d" in Oxfordshire[657].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Herueus Bagot…habenda baronia Roberti de Stafford que est hereditas uxoris ipsius Heruei que fuit soror predicti Roberti" in Staffordshire[658].  He adopted the name Stafford.  “Herveus…dominus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “Robertus de Tony et Nicolaus filius suus de Stafford et Robertus filius eius” by undated charter which names “dominus Robertus de Stafford, pater uxoris meæ[659].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hervicius Bagot" holding "xiii de parvis feodis Mortoniæ" in Warwickshire in [1210/12][660]

m (before 1193) MILLICENT de Stafford, daughter of ROBERT de Stafford & his wife Avice --- (-before Jan 1225, bur Stone Priory).  “Herveus…dominus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “Robertus de Tony et Nicolaus filius suus de Stafford et Robertus filius eius” by undated charter which names “dominus Robertus de Stafford, pater uxoris meæ[661].  Her name is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent[662].  "---" [name omitted] made a fine "de voluntate et assensu Milisente q fuit ux Hervei Bagot", the order specifying that "ipsa Milisenta" donated "in vita sua tercia parte toci terre sue…cum Petronilla sorore com de Ferrar" whom "Herveus de Stafford" married and naming "Willelmo filio suo qd de primogenito", dated 1214[663]

Hervey & his wife had seven children:

1.         WILLIAM de Stafford (-before 1214).  “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent”, by undated charter[664].  "---" [name omitted] made a fine "de voluntate et assensu Milisente q fuit ux Hervei Bagot", the order specifying that "ipsa Milisenta" donated "in vita sua tercia parte toci terre sue…cum Petronilla sorore com de Ferrar" whom "Herveus de Stafford" married and naming "Willelmo filio suo qd de primogenito", dated 1214[665]

2.         HERVEY Bagot de Stafford (-[Nov 1236/12 May 1237], bur Stone Priory).  “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent”, by undated charter[666].  A letter addressed to King John by Thomas Erdinton in 1215 lists rebels in Shropshire and Staffordshire, including "Robertus Marmiun…et Herveus Bagot qui fecit se vicecomitem Stafford per barones…et duo fratres predicti Hervei…Willelmus et Radulfus…cum Fulcone filio Warini"[667].  "Herveus de Stafford" confirmed the property of Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Petronillæ uxoris meæ et…patris mei Hervei et Milisantæ matris meæ", by charter dated to [1217/37], witnessed by "…Domino Willelmo de Stafford…"[668]m (1214 or before) PETRONILLA de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Sibyl de Briouse (-after her husband, bur Stone Priory).  "---" [name omitted] made a fine "de voluntate et assensu Milisente q fuit ux Hervei Bagot", the order specifying that "ipsa Milisenta" donated "in vita sua tercia parte toci terre sue…cum Petronilla sorore com de Ferrar" whom "Herveus de Stafford" married, dated 1214[669].  "Herveus de Stafford" confirmed the property of Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Petronillæ uxoris meæ et…patris mei Hervei et Milisantæ matris meæ", by charter dated to [1217/37], witnessed by "…Domino Willelmo de Stafford…"[670].  Hervey & his wife had two children: 

a)         HERVEY de Stafford (-before 7 Oct 1241).  m MABEL, daughter of RICHARD de Mucegros & his wife --- (-after Apr 1242). 

b)         ROBERT de Stafford (-before 4 Jun 1261).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, records “Robert”, son of Hervey, as founder of Stone priory[671]

-        see below

3.         HAWISE .  "Herveius Bagot" reached agreement with "Thomam de Erdinton", including releasing the latter from marrying "filiæ primogenitæ nostræ Hawisiæ, vel alterius filiæ nostræ, vel tertiæ", with the consent of "dominæ Milisandæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1197], witnessed by "Willelmo filio Alani, Hugone Pantolfe, Roberto Corbet, Johanne Extraneo, Radulfo Basset…William Bagot…"[672]

4.         daughter .  "Herveius Bagot" reached agreement with "Thomam de Erdinton", including releasing the latter from marrying "filiæ primogenitæ nostræ Hawisiæ, vel alterius filiæ nostræ, vel tertiæ", with the consent of "dominæ Milisandæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1197][673]

5.         daughter .  "Herveius Bagot" reached agreement with "Thomam de Erdinton", including releasing the latter from marrying "filiæ primogenitæ nostræ Hawisiæ, vel alterius filiæ nostræ, vel tertiæ", with the consent of "dominæ Milisandæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1197][674]

6.         WILLIAM Bagot (-after 1215).  A letter addressed to King John by Thomas Erdinton in 1215 lists rebels in Shropshire and Staffordshire, including "Robertus Marmiun…et Herveus Bagot qui fecit se vicecomitem Stafford per barones…et duo fratres predicti Hervei…Willelmus et Radulfus…cum Fulcone filio Warini"[675].  "Herveus de Stafford" confirmed the property of Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Petronillæ uxoris meæ et…patris mei Hervei et Milisantæ matris meæ", by charter dated to [1217/37], witnessed by "…Domino Willelmo de Stafford…"[676]

7.         RALPH Bagot (-after 1215).  A letter addressed to King John by Thomas Erdinton in 1215 lists rebels in Shropshire and Staffordshire, including "Robertus Marmiun…et Herveus Bagot qui fecit se vicecomitem Stafford per barones…et duo fratres predicti Hervei…Willelmus et Radulfus…cum Fulcone filio Warini"[677]

 

 

ROBERT de Stafford, son of HERVEY Bagot de Stafford & his wife Pernell de Ferrers (-before 4 Jun 1261).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, records “Robert”, son of Hervey, as founder of Stone priory[678]

m firstly ALICE Corbet, daughter of THOMAS Corbet of Caus, Shropshire & his wife ---.  A writ after the death of "Beatrice late the wife of Peter Corbet of Caus", dated "30 Aug 21 Edw III", names "Thomas Corbet…from whom issued Peter, Alice the elder daughter and Emma the younger", that "Alice" married "Robert de Staff[ord]" and "from them issued Nicholas who was her heir" and "from him came Edmund who had issue the present Ralph de Staff[ord]"[679]

m secondly JOAN, daughter of --- (-after her husband).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names "Jone and Jone" as the two wives of “Robert”, son of Hervey[680]

Robert & his first wife had --- children: 

1.         NICHOLAS de Stafford (-Deresloyn [Droslan] Castle, Wales [1 Aug] 1287, bur Stone).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names "Nicholas" as son of “Robert”, son of Hervey[681].  A writ after the death of "Beatrice late the wife of Peter Corbet of Caus", dated "30 Aug 21 Edw III", names "Thomas Corbet…from whom issued Peter, Alice the elder daughter and Emma the younger", that "Alice" married "Robert de Staff[ord]" and "from them issued Nicholas who was her heir" and "from him came Edmund who had issue the present Ralph de Staff[ord]"[682]m ---, daughter of [GEOFFREY de Langley & his wife ---].  Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

a)         EDMUND de Stafford (15 Jul 1273-12 Aug 1308, bur Stafford, Church of Friars Minors).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names "Edmond" as son of “Nicholas[683].  A writ after the death of "Beatrice late the wife of Peter Corbet of Caus", dated "30 Aug 21 Edw III", names "Thomas Corbet…from whom issued Peter, Alice the elder daughter and Emma the younger", that "Alice" married "Robert de Staff[ord]" and "from them issued Nicholas who was her heir" and "from him came Edmund who had issue the present Ralph de Staff[ord]"[684].  He was summoned to parliament 6 Feb 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Stafford.  m (1298 or before) as her first husband, MARGARET Basset, daughter of RALPH Basset of Drayton & his wife Hawise --- (-17 Mar 1337, bur Tysoe, Warwickshire).  She married secondly Thomas de Pype.  Edmund & his wife had two children: 

i)          RALPH de Stafford (24 Sep 1301-31 Aug 1372, bur Tonbridge).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names "Raufe…Earl of Stafford" as son of “Edmond[685].  He succeeded his father in 1308 as Lord Stafford.  He was created Earl of Stafford 5 Mar 1351.   

-         see below

ii)         RICHARD de Stafford .  “Radulphus comes Stafford et dominus de Tonebrugge” donated property to Cold Norton Priory, for the soul of “Margaretæ uxoris nostræ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hugone de Stafford filio et hærede nostro, Ricardo de Stafford fratre nostro, Johanne de Peyto consanguineo nostro…[686]

2.         EDMUND

 

 

 

C.      EARLS of STAFFORD 1351-1562 (STAFFORD)

 

 

RALPH de Stafford, son of EDMUND de Stafford Lord Stafford & his wife Margaret Basset (24 Sep 1301-31 Aug 1372, bur Tonbridge).  A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names "Raufe…Earl of Stafford" as son of “Edmond[687].  He succeeded his father in 1308 as Lord Stafford.  A writ after the death of "Beatrice late the wife of Peter Corbet of Caus", dated "30 Aug 21 Edw III", names "Thomas Corbet…from whom issued Peter, Alice the elder daughter and Emma the younger", that "Alice" married "Robert de Staff[ord]" and "from them issued Nicholas who was her heir" and "from him came Edmund who had issue the present Ralph de Staff[ord]"[688].  He was created Earl of Stafford 5 Mar 1351. 

m firstly ([1326/27]) KATHERINE Hastang, daughter of JOHN Hastang of Chebsey, Staffordshire & his wife Eve ---. 

m secondly (before 6 Jul 1336) MARGARET de Audley, daughter of HUGH de Audley Earl of Gloucester & his wife Margaret de Clare (-after 28 Jan 1348, bur Tonbridge).  She succeeded her father as Baroness Audley.  “Radulphus comes Stafford et dominus de Tonebrugge” donated property to Cold Norton Priory, for the soul of “Margaretæ uxoris nostræ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hugone de Stafford filio et hærede nostro, Ricardo de Stafford fratre nostro, Johanne de Peyto consanguineo nostro…[689]

Earl Ralph & his second wife had five children: 

1.         RALPH (-1347 or before)m (1 Nov 1344) as her first husband, MATILDA of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Isabel de Beaumont ([4 Apr 1339/1341]-in England 10 Apr 1362, bur Rijnsburg Abbey).  

2.         BEATRICE (-13 or 14 Apr 1415).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that “Thomas”, son of “Willielmus de Roos”, married “Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ”, by whom he was father of “Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam[690].  The will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 6 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my sisters Roos and Charlton and Dame Elizabeth Stafford[691]m firstly (1350) MORICE FitzThomas, son of MORICE FitzThomas Earl of Desmond & his second wife Margaret O'Brien (1336-1358).  He succeeded his father in 1356 as Earl of Desmondm secondly (Royal licence 1 Jan 1359) THOMAS de Ros Lord Ros, son of WILLIAM de Ros Lord Ros & his Margery de Badlesmere (Stoke Albany, Northamptonshire 13 Jan 1337-Uffington, Lincolnshire 8 Jun 1384).  m thirdly (before 20 Aug 1385) RICHARD de Burley (-23 May 1387). 

3.         JOAN (-before 1397).  The will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 6 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my sisters Roos and Charlton and Dame Elizabeth Stafford[692]m firstly JOHN Cherleton Lord Cherleton, son of JOHN Cherleton Lord Cherleton & his wife Matilda de Mortimer ([1333/34]-13 Jul 1374).  m secondly (before 16 Nov 1379) as his second wife, GILBERT Talbot Lord Talbot, daughter of RICHARD Talbot Lord Talbot & his wife Elizabeth Comyn of Badenoch ([1332]-Roales, Spain 24 Apr 1387). 

4.         HUGH (-1386, bur Stone Priory).  “Radulphus comes Stafford et dominus de Tonebrugge” donated property to Cold Norton Priory, for the soul of “Margaretæ uxoris nostræ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hugone de Stafford filio et hærede nostro, Ricardo de Stafford fratre nostro, Johanne de Peyto consanguineo nostro…[693].  He succeeded his father in 1372 as Earl of Stafford.  The will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 6 Apr 1385, chose burial “in the Priory of Stone”, bequeathed property to “my sisters Roos and Charlton and Dame Elizabeth Stafford” and appointed “my cousin the Archbishop of Canterbury, my brother the Earl of Warwick...” among his executors[694].  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 15 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my daughter Joan [to] be well and fitly married...my three sons William, Edmund and Hugh...Thomas my son[695].  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 21 Sep 1385, bequeathed property to “my sister Roos...Margaret de Nevill my daughter...Katherine de la Pole my daughter...Joane my daughter...my sister Charleton...Dame Joane d´Engayne my cousin[696]m PHILIPPA de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer.  The will of "Katherine Countess of Warwick", dated 4 Aug 1369, bequeathed property to “the Earl my husband...Thomas my son...William my other son...Maud de Clifford my daughter...Philippa de Stafford my daughter...my daughter Alice...Margaret Montfort my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Elizabeth the daughter of my son Guy...[697].  Hugh & his wife had six children: 

a)         THOMAS (1368 or before-Westminster 4 Jul 1392, bur Stone, Staffordshire).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 15 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my daughter Joan [to] be well and fitly married...my three sons William, Edmund and Hugh...Thomas my son[698].  He succeeded his father in 1386 as Earl of Staffordm ([1390], not consummated) as her first husband, ANNE of Gloucester, daughter of THOMAS "of Woodstock" Duke of Gloucester (Apr 1383-16 Oct 1438, bur Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire).  She married secondly (before 28 Jun 1398) her first husband's brother, Edmund Earl of Stafford, and thirdly (before 20 Nov 1405) William Bourchier, who was created Comte d'Eu 10 Jun 1419. 

b)         WILLIAM (-1395).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 15 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my daughter Joan [to] be well and fitly married...my three sons William, Edmund and Hugh...Thomas my son[699].  He succeeded his brother in 1392 as Earl of Stafford

c)         MARGARET (-9 Jun 1396, bur Brancepath).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" married "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[700].  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 21 Sep 1385, bequeathed property to “my sister Roos...Margaret de Nevill my daughter...Katherine de la Pole my daughter...Joane my daughter...my sister Charleton...Dame Joane d´Engayne my cousin[701]m as his first wife, RALPH Neville, son of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Maud Percy ([1364]-Raby Castle 21 Oct 1425, bur Staindrop, co Durham).  He succeeded his father in 1388 as Lord Neville.  He was created Earl of Westmoreland 29 Sep 1397. 

d)         CATHERINE (-8 Apr 1419, bur Wingfield).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 21 Sep 1385, bequeathed property to “my sister Roos...Margaret de Nevill my daughter...Katherine de la Pole my daughter...Joane my daughter...my sister Charleton...Dame Joane d´Engayne my cousin[702].  The will of "Michael de la Pole Earl of Suffolk", dated 1 Jul 1415, bequeathed property to “Katherine my wife...a coronet which belonged to the Earl of Stafford her father...my son a little primer which belonged to John de la Pole his brother”, and appointed “the said Katherine my wife and Edmund my uncle” as executors[703]m (contract 1 Feb 1383, before 23 Nov 1383) MICHAEL de la Pole, son of MICHAEL de la Pole Earl of Suffolk & his wife Catherine Wingfield (1367 or before-Harfleur 18 Sep 1415, bur Wingfield).  He was restored to his father's honours in 1398, thereby succeeding as Earl of Suffolk

e)         JOAN (1371-[30 Sep/1 Oct] 1442).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 15 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my daughter Joan [to] be well and fitly married...my three sons William, Edmund and Hugh...Thomas my son[704].  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 21 Sep 1385, bequeathed property to “my sister Roos...Margaret de Nevill my daughter...Katherine de la Pole my daughter...Joane my daughter...my sister Charleton...Dame Joane d´Engayne my cousin[705].  The will of "Elizabeth Juliers Countess of Kent", dated 20 Apr 1411, proved 29 Jun 1411, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors in the city of Winchester in the tomb of John late Earl of Kent late my husband”, bequeathed property to “my...sister Alice Countess of Kent...Joan Countess of Kent[706]m (1392) THOMAS de Holand, son of THOMAS de Holand Earl of Kent & his wife Anne FitzAlan of Arundel ([1371]-beheaded 7/8 Jan 1400, bur Cirencester Abbey).  He succeeded his father in 1397 as Earl of Kent, Lord Woodstock, Holand and Wake.  He was created Duke of Surrey 29 Sep 1397. 

f)          EDMUND (2 Mar 1378-killed in battle Shrewsbury 21 Jul 1403, bur Stafford, Church of the Austin Friars).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 15 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my daughter Joan [to] be well and fitly married...my three sons William, Edmund and Hugh...Thomas my son[707].  He succeeded his brother in 1395 as Earl of Stafford.  Appointed Constable of England 21 Jul 1403.  m (before 28 Jun 1398) as her second husband, his sister-in-law, ANNE of Gloucester, widow of THOMAS Earl of Stafford, daughter of THOMAS "of Woodstock" Duke of Gloucester & his wife Eleanor de Bohun (Apr 1383-16 Oct 1438, bur Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire).  She married thirdly (before 20 Nov 1405) William Bourchier, who was created Comte d'Eu 10 Jun 1419.  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, chose burial “in ye churche of L’Anthony byside Gloucestre”, appointed “my sones Thomas bysshop of Worcestre, Henry Erle of Eue, Will Bougchiers, John Bourghiers...” and required “my...sone Humfrey Erle of Stafford” to oversee execution of the will[708].  Edmund & his wife had three children: 

i)          ANNE ([1398/1403]-20 or 24 Sep 1432, bur St Katherine by the Tower, London).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living[709]m firstly ([1415]) EDMUND [IV] Mortimer Earl of March, son of ROGER [VII] Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Eleanor de Holand (New Forest, Hampshire 6 Nov 1391-Trim Castle, co Meath 18 Jan 1425, bur Collegiate Church of Stoke Clare, Suffolk).  m secondly (before 15 Jul 1427) as his first wife, JOHN de Holand, son of JOHN de Holand Duke of Exeter & his wife Elizabeth of Lancaster (Dartington, Devon 29 Mar 1395-5 Aug 1447 bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower).  He was created Duke of Exeter 6 Jan 1444. 

ii)         daughter. 

iii)        HUMPHREY (1402-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460, bur Northampton, Grey Friars).  He succeeded his father in 1403 as Earl of Stafford.  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, required “my...sone Humfrey Erle of Stafford” to oversee execution of the will[710].  He was created Duke of Buckingham 14 Sep 1444. 

-         DUKES of BUCKINGHAM

g)         HUGH (-after 15 Apr 1385).  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 15 Apr 1385, bequeathed property to “my daughter Joan [to] be well and fitly married...my three sons William, Edmund and Hugh...Thomas my son[711]

5.         ELIZABETH (1333 or after-7 Aug 1375)m firstly (contract 12 Mar 1347) FULK Le Strange, son of JOHN Le Strange Lord Strange & his wife Ankaret Boteler of Wem, Shropshire ([1330/31]-30 Aug 1349).  He succeeded his father in 1349 as Lord Lestrange.  m secondly JOHN Lord Ferrers, son of ROBERT Ferrers & his first wife Margaret --- (1331-killed in battle Najera 1367).  m thirdly as his first wife, REGINALD de Cobham (Lord Cobham of Sterborough), son of REGINALD de Cobham Lord Cobham (of Sterborough) & his wife Joan de Berkeley (1348-6 Jul 1403, bur Lingfield). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    WESTMORELAND

 

 

Ralph Neville Lord Neville was created Earl of Westmoreland in 1397 by King Richard II.  His descendants continued to hold the title until 1571. 

 

 

 

A.      NEVILLE FAMILY

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Neville (-after [1115/18]).  He held land at Walcot, Lincolnshire in 1086[712].  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Gislebertus de Nevila" holding land in Lincolnshire from "abbatia de Burch"[713]

 

2.         RALPH de Neville .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Radulfus de Nevila" holding land in Lincolnshire and Hampshire from "abbatia de Burch"[714]

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Neville of Walcot, Lincolnshire (-after [1145/46]). 

 

4.         GILBERT de Neville (-before 1169).  King Henry II gave him the barony of Ashby, Lincolnshire[715].  Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire by ”Gilberti de Nevill et Alani de Nevill fratris sui” by undated charter, which confirmed donations by “Galfredi de Nevill…Galfridi filii Alani de Nevill…Henrici de Nevill…Ernisii de Nevill…Hugonis de Nevill[716].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Gile de Neville v m" in Lincolnshire in [1161/62][717]m ---.  The name of Gilbert´s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had three children: 

a)         GEOFFROY de Neville (-before 1193).  Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire by ”Gilberti de Nevill et Alani de Nevill fratris sui” by undated charter, which confirmed donations by “…Galfridi filii Alani de Nevill…[718].  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[719]m ([1169/Nov 1176]) EMMA de Bulmer, daughter of BERTRAND de Bulmer & his wife [720]Emma Fossard of Mulgrave (-before 1208).  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Galfrido de Neuill qui habet filiam…Bertram [de Bulemer] cum hereditate" in Yorkshire[721].  Geoffrey & his wife had two children: 

i)          HENRY de Neville (-before 3 Mar 1227).  King John confirmed the grant of "in Askebi et in Thienthon" to "Henr de Nevill", as granted by King Henry II to "Gaufr de Nevill patri eiusdem Henrici", by charter dated 7 Aug 1199[722].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus de Neville" holding 3 knights´ fees "de Suttone" in Yorkshire in [1210/12][723]m ALICE, daughter of ---.  "Alice who was the wife of Henry de Neville" made a fine "for having licence to marry whom she wishes", dated to 3 Mar 1227[724]

ii)         ISABEL de Neville (-before May 1254).  "Robert fitz Maldred, who has to wife Isabella, sister and heiress of…Henry de Neville" paid homage to the king "for the lands formerly of Henry de Neville", dated to [Mar] 1227[725].  She was heiress of her brother Henry de Neville.  m firstly ROBERT FitzMaldred Lord of Raby and Brancepeth, co. Durham, son of DOLFIN FitzUhtred & his wife --- (-[25 Jun 1242/26 May 1248]).  m secondly (before 26 May 1248) GILBERT de Brakenberg, son of ---. 

b)         WILLIAM .  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[726]

c)         WALTER de Neville (-after 1194).  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[727]

-        see below

5.         ALAN de Neville of Ashby, Lincolnshire (-[1177/78]).  Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire by ”Gilberti de Nevill et Alani de Nevill fratris sui” by undated charter[728].  Judge of the Court of Exchequer[729].  Ancestor of the LORDS NEVILLE of Essex, created by writ 1311, extinct in the male line 1358[730]

 

 

1.         JOHN de Neville (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Johannes de Neville" held one knight fee "in Seorene" in Kent[731]

 

2.         ERNIS de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[732].  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Philippo Escrop…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla, Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[733]m ---.  The name of Ernis´s wife is not known.  Ernis & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[734].  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[735]

b)         WALTER de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[736].  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[737]

3.         ALAN de Neville .  "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel" by charter dated to the late 12th century[738]

4.         HUGH de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[739].  "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel" by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Ernisio de Neuilla, Willelmo de Amundeuilla, Willelmo filio Warin, Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Philippo Escrop…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla, Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…"[740]

 

5.         GILBERT de Neville .  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[741]

 

6.         RALPH de Neville of Museton .  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[742]

 

7.         GEOFFREY de Nevillem ---.  The name of Geoffrey´s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD de Neville .  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[743]

 

8.         ROBERT de Nevillem ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         PETER de Neville .  "Petrus de Neuilla filius Roberti de Neuilla" donated land in Ulceby to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by charter dated to the late 12th century[744]

 

9.         HUGH de Neville (-before 1199).  m EMMA de Hommet, daughter of --- (-before 1208).  "Henr de Nevill" paid a fine for "saisina feod trium militum…in Raskel et in Sutton qui fuit Emme de Humez matris sue" in Yorkshire, dated 1208[745].  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRY Neville (-after 1210).  "Henr fil Hug de Novill" paid a fine for "saisina terre…patris suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1199[746].  King John confirmed "de soka de Thancastra…terre in Kermitton et in Croxton…", granted by King Henry II to "predicto Hugo", to "Henr de Nevill filio Hug de Nevill" by charter dated 13 Apr 1200[747].  "Henr de Nevill" paid a fine for "saisina feod trium militum…in Raskel et in Sutton qui fuit Emme de Humez matris sue" in Yorkshire, dated 1208[748].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus filius Hugonis de Neville" holding one knight´s fee in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][749]

 

10.      HUGH de Neville (-before [Mar] 1229).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "…Hugo de Neville…" was granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Kent and in Essex, Hertfordshire[750].  King John confirmed "unam feriam singulis annis apud Wakering" to "Hug de Nevill et Johe ux sue" by charter dated 30 Apr 1200[751].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Neville, Grassus" holding one knight´s fee "in Durintone" in Wiltshire, three "in Magna Totham de honore Gloucestriæ" in Essex, Hertfordshire, and "ii hidas et dimidiam in Wassingele per serjantariam eundi cum Rege in Walliam" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, in [1210/12][752]m JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 6 Dec 1224).  King John confirmed "unam feriam singulis annis apud Wakering" to "Hug de Nevill et Johe ux sue" by charter dated 30 Apr 1200[753].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Rogerus filius Renfrey et Walterus Avenel et uxor Hugonis de Nevill" holding parts of "Gamegeya"[754].  Her family origin is indicated by an order dated 6 Dec 1224 which required the confiscation of "the vill of Newnham that Gundrea de Warenne held in dower, which is an inheritance partible between Joan wife of Hugh de Neville, and Margaret wife of Falkes de Bréauté", with savings for "the executors of the testament of the same Gundrea"[755].  It is not clear from this source whether Joan was the daughter or the granddaughter of the deceased.  As the second heiress Margaret can be shown to be the granddaughter, it is possible that Joan was also a granddaughter, born from an older daughter.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         ERNIS Neville .  "Ernisius son of Hugh Neville Crassus" made a fine for "his relief of one knight´s fee that Hugh held of the king in chief in Durrington" Wiltshire, dated [Mar] 1229[756]

11.      [ALICE de Neville (-after 13 Apr 1216).  "Alic uxor Petri de Adelakeston, soror Hugonis de Nevill" paid a fine for "terris…ipsius Pet de Adhelakeston viri sui", with "Hug de Nevill" acting as guarantor, in Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire, dated 13 Apr 1216[757].  As more than one Hugh de Neville was recorded at the time, the identity of Alice´s brother is uncertain.  m PETER de Adelakestone, son of --- (-before Apr 1216).] 

 

12.      HUGH de Neville (-after 10 May 1229).  "Hugh de Neville" was pardoned by the king for payment "by which Hugh made fine with King John" because "he permitted Peter Bishop of Winchester to enclose the park of Taunton without warrant", dated 10 May 1229[758]

 

13.      JOEL de Neville (-[1196/1208]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Joelendus de Neville" held one knight fee "in Sorne" in Kent[759].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "…Jolland de Neville…" was granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Kent[760].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Jollandus de Neville" among those granted delay for payment "per brevia" in Kent[761].  King John confirmed "manerium de Sornes" to "Jolano de Neuvill" by charter dated 24 Aug 1199[762].  "Joelinus de Nouilla" donated land near Ailby to Greenfield priory, with the consent of "heredis mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, sealed by "Iollani de Nevile"[763]m ---.  The name of Joel´s wife is not known.  Joel & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Neville .  "Johannes de Nevill" paid a fine for "terris q fuerunt Jollan de Nevill patris sui", dated 1208[764]

 

14.      ROGER de Neville (-after 1217).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neville, Letitia de Pinkeyni, Serlo de Marcy" holding one knight´s fee each "in Elmedene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][765].  King John confirmed "totum essartum de Rokingeham qd Hug de Nevill essartavit dum castellum de Rokingeh fuit in custodia sua" to "Rogero de Nevill", as well as "partea communa in pastura eiusdem ville ad avia sua pascenda", by charter dated 25 Jun 1215[766].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Leticia de Lucy, Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neovill, Ema de Marcy" holding "iv milites…in Heaumedon, Dubenhog, La Lee, Crawell"[767].  

 

15.      THOMAS de Neville m --- de Hosdenc, daughter of RALPH de Hosdenc & his wife ---.  The Pipe Roll 1211 records that "Tomas de Nevill" held four and a half knights´ fees "cum herede Radulfi de Hosdeng" before Michaelmas 1211[768].  

 

16.      WILLIAM de Neville (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Rogerus de Monte Begonis, Simon filius Walteri, Alexander de Nevill" held land which was from "Willelmi de Nevill" in Cumberland, which King Henry I had granted to "Ade filio Swein, antecessori predictorum"[769].  m as her second husband, AMABEL, widow of ALEXANDER de Crèvecœur, daughter of ADAM FitzSwein & his wife ---. 

 

 

WALTER de Neville, son of GILBERT de Neville & his wife --- (-after 1194).  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[770].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Walterus de Neville" paying "xii l xii milites" in Lincolnshire[771].  "Walterus de Nevilla…et Ceciliam uxorem meam" donated a fishery in the river Ancolne to Bullington priory by charter dated to the late 12th century[772]

m CECILIA de Crèvecœur, daughter of [RENAUD de Crèvecœur & his wife ---] (-after 1204).  "Walterus de Nevilla…et Ceciliam uxorem meam" donated a fishery in the river Ancolne to Bullington priory by charter dated to the late 12th century, sealed by "Walteri de Nevila…Cecilie de Crevecwer"[773].  The document does not name Cecilia´s parents, but the chronology of the references to the Crèvecœur family in Lincolnshire suggests that Cecilia may have been the daughter of Alexander de Crèvecœur.  This would also explain the transmission of the name Alexander into the Neville family.  Her parentage is confirmed by the order dated 1204 which is quoted below.  "Alex de Crevequor" paid a fine relating to "xiv feod milit et dimid versus Cecil de Crevequor" in Lincolnshire, dated 1201[774].  "Cecil´ de Crevequor" paid a fine for "hereditate sua un dissaisita fuit p perceptu dñi Reg, et uñ Alex de Neovil fil suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[775].  "Cecilia de Crevequor" paid a fine for "terre…in Harpeswell et Herdewic qu´s Amabil q fuit uxor Alex de Crevequor tenuit in dote ex dono ipsius Alex et q ad ipsam Cecil q fuit fil eidsdem Alex et hs ipsa et jure hereditario deb revti", in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[776].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hugo filius Radulfi" held property "de baronia Cecillie de Crevequer, in Askebi, Sumerdebi et Enderbi et Teford et Hamringham et Willeton" in Lincolnshire[777].  

Walter & his wife had one child: 

1.         ALEXANDER de Neville (-[1212/27]).  "Cecil´ de Crevequor" paid a fine for "hereditate sua un dissaisita fuit p perceptu dñi Reg, et uñ Alex de Neovil fil suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[778].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Rogerus de Monte Begonis, Simon filius Walteri, Alexander de Nevill" held land which was from "Willelmi de Nevill" in Cumberland, which King Henry I had granted to "Ade filio Swein, antecessori predictorum"[779].  m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Margeria que fuit uxor Alexandri de Nevill est in custodia Ricardi de Alazun per regem pro terra de Redburn"[780].  "Margaret who was the wife of Alexander de Neville" paid a fine for "a pone against Thomas son of William concerning land in Mirfield" in Yorkshire, dated 26 Jan 1227[781].  Alexander & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN de Neville (-before [Oct] 1230).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Johannes filius Alexandri de Nevill in Redburn est in custodia Ricardi de Alazun per dominum regem..."[782].  A charter dated [Oct] 1230 records the death of "Johannes primogenitus filius Alexandri de Nevill" and grants custody of "Alexandri filii et heredis predicti Alexandri de Nevill" to "Ricardo de Alencun"[783]

b)         ALEXANDER de Neville (-before 12 Jul 1249).  A charter dated [Oct] 1230 records the death of "Johannes primogenitus filius Alexandri de Nevill" and grants custody of "Alexandri filii et heredis predicti Alexandri de Nevill" to "Ricardo de Alencun"[784].  A writ dated 12 Jul "33 Hen III", after the death of "Alexander de Nevill" names "Alexander his son, aged 12 and more, is his heir" and his manors "Nunington…Mirfeud town  [York]…Kirketon Soke [Lincoln"[785]m ---.  The name of Alexander´s wife is not known.  Alexander & his wife had one child: 

i)          ALEXANDER de Neville ([1235/36]-).  A writ dated 12 Jul "33 Hen III", after the death of "Alexander de Nevill" names "Alexander his son, aged 12 and more, is his heir"[786]

c)         CLEMENTIA de Neville .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1236, by "Alexander de Neouilla filius et heres Alexandri de Neouilla" which names "Clemencie filie predicti Alexandri" as wife of "Willelmus frater…Ricardi [de Alenzun"[787]m WILLIAM de Alenzun, son of ---. 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

GEOFFREY FitzRobert, son of ROBERT FitzMaldred & his wife Isabel de Neville (-1242).  He assumed the name Neville, after his mother's family.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Neville" holding the hides of land "in Greftone" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][788]

m JOAN, daughter of --- (-after Nov 1247). 

Geoffrey & his wife had four children: 

1.         ROBERT de Neville (-1282).  m firstly ---.  m secondly (1273) as her second husband, IDA, widow of ROGER Bertram of Milford, daughter of ---.  Robert & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT (-6 Aug 1271, bur Coverham)m ([1260]) MARY, daughter of RALPH FitzRandulf of Middleham & his wife Anastasia de Percy (-1320).  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire records that “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” married “Maria…domina de Midelham” who was eldest sister of “domina de Welle et de Snape…uxor Roberti de Tatershall”, daughters of “Radulfus filius Ranulfi[789].  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Mariam, Johannam" as the children of "Radulphum filium Ranulphi" and his wife "Anastasia filia Wilelmi domini de Percy", adding that Mary married "Roberti domini de Neuile et de Raby"[790].  Robert & his wife had eight children: 

i)          RANDOLPH (-18 Apr 1331, bur Coverham).  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire names “Ranulphum…de Nevile primogenitum” as the eldest of the three sons of “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” and his wife[791].  Lord Neville of Raby 1305. 

-         see below

ii)         ROBERT .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[792]

iii)        RALPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[793]

iv)       MARGARET .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[794]m GILBERT de Wa---ton, son of ---. 

v)        JOAN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[795]

vi)       ANASTASIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[796]

vii)      HENRY .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[797]

viii)     RANDOLPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[798]

b)         JOHN

2.         AGNES (-[16 Jun 1285/20 Jul 1293]).  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[799]m firstly as his second wife, RICHARD de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire, son of JOSCELIN de Louvain & his wife Agnes de Percy (-1244).  m secondly (before 12 Nov 1251) as his second wife, JOHN [II] Deincourt, son of OLIVER [II] de Aincourt & his wife Nicole --- (-1257). 

3.         GEOFFREY (-before 1285).  m MARGARET, daughter of JOHN de Lungvillers & his wife --- (-1319).  Geoffrey & his wife had five children: 

a)         JOHN Neville of Hornby (1269-[1309]).  m PERNEL, daughter of --- (-[1346/49]). 

i)          JOHN (-1335). 

b)         GEOFFREY

c)         ROBERTm ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT (before 1312-1342).  m firstly JOAN, daughter of HENRY de Atherton & his wife ---.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH de St Lawrence, widow of ROGER de Kirkby, daughter of THOMAS de St Lawrence & his wife ---.  Robert & his first wife had six children: 

(a)       ROBERT (-1413)m (1344) MARGARET de la Pole, daughter of WILLIAM de la Pole & his wife Catherine --- .  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(1)       THOMAS Neville of Hornby, Lincolnshire (-before 1387).  m ---.  The name of Thomas´s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a.         MARGARET Neville ([Jan 1377] or [1383]-[1413/26] probably before 9 Apr 1424, bur Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk).  Her place of burial is confirmed by the will of [her husband] "Thomas Duke of Exeter", dated 29 Dec 1426, which chose burial “with Margaret my wife in the chapel of the Blessed Virgin annexed to the church of St Edmund´s Bury in the diocese of Norwich[800].  The will of "Margaret Duchess of Exeter", proved 15 May 1458, chose burial “in the chapel of the college of St Katherine beside the Tower of London”, appointed “Thomas Tirrell Knt my executor and my nephew the Earl of Warwick supervisor[801]m (before 15 Feb 1404) THOMAS Beaufort, son of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his third wife Katharine Swynford née Roët (-East Greenwich Manor, Kent 31 Dec 1426, bur Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk).  Created Earl of Dorset 5 Jul 1412, and Duke of Exeter 18 Nov 1416. 

(b)       JOHN

(c)       GILES

(d)       THOMAS

(e)       WILLIAM

(f)        GILBERT

d)         EDMUND

e)         WILLIAM

4.         JOHN .  Clerk. 

 

 

RANDOLPH Neville, son of ROBERT Neville & his wife Mary FitzRandolph of Middleham (-18 Apr 1331, bur Coverham).  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire names “Ranulphum…de Nevile primogenitum” as the eldest of the three sons of “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” and his wife[802].  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[803].  Lord Neville of Raby 1305. 

m firstly EUPHEME, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoger Lord FitzRoger & his wife ---. 

m secondly MARGERY, daughter of JOHN de Thweng & his wife ---. 

Lord Randolph & his first wife had twelve children: 

1.         ROBERT (-1319).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[804].  "The peacock of the north".  m ELLEN, daughter of ---. 

2.         ANASTASIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[805]

3.         RALPH ([before 1291]-5 Aug 1368, bur Durham).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[806].  Lord Neville.  m (1327) as her second husband, ALICE de Audley, widow of RALPH de Greystoke Lord Greystoke, daughter of HUGH de Audley & his wife Isolt de Mortimer (-1374).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulfum de Neuille" married "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[807].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[808].  Lord Ralph & his wife had ten children: 

a)         MARGARET (-May 1372).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[809].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that “Willielmus”, son of “Willielmus de Roos”, married “Margaretam filiam domini Radulphi de Nevill”, and died childless “in terra sancta” where he was buried[810]m firstly (before 8 May 1341) WILLIAM de Ros, son of WILLIAM de Ros & his wife Margery de Badlesmere (Frieston, Lincolnshire 19 May 1329-before 3 Dec 1352).  m secondly (Brancepeth 12 Jul 1358) as his first wife, HENRY de Percy, son of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his first wife Mary of Lancaster (10 Nov 1341-killed in battle Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster 19 Feb 1408, bur York Minster).  He succeeded his father in 1368 as Lord Percy.  He was created Earl of Northumberland in 1377. 

b)         CATHERINE (-1361).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[811]m (before 1339) WILLIAM de Dacre, son of RANDOLF de Dacre Lord Dacre of Gilsland & his Margaret de Multon of Gilsland, Cumberland ([1319]-18 Jul 1361, bur Lanercost Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1339 as Lord Dacre. 

c)         EUPHEMIA (-[Oct/Nov] 1393).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[812]m firstly (1343) ROBERT Clifford Lord Clifford, son of ROBERT de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Isabel de Berkeley ([1327/28]-France 1345 before 7 Nov).  m secondly (early 1347) REGINALD de Lucy, son of THOMAS Lord Lucy & his wife Margaret de Multon (-[1362/65]).  m thirdly WALTER de Heslarton, son of ---. 

d)         JOHN (1341-1388).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[813].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[814].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Henricus Percy, Comes Northumbriæ Henricus, Thomas, Radulphus filii eius, Gilbertus Umfranville, Comes Dangus, Dñs Johannes Neuylle, Dñs Radulphus filius eius"[815]m firstly MATILDA Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his wife Idonia de Clifford (-before 18 Feb 1378).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of “Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[816].  Her marriage is indicated by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…Dame Margaret de Ferrers my sister…Maud Nevill my sister…" among his beneficiaries[817].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[818]m secondly ELIZABETH, daughter and heiress of WILLIAM Lord Latimer & his wife ---.  John & his first wife had six children:

i)          ALICE (-20 Jun 1433).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[819]m WILLIAM Deincourt Lord Deincourt, son of WILLIAM Deincourt & his wife Margaret de Welle of Well, Lincolnshire (26 Dec 1357-15/16 Oct 1381). 

ii)         MATILDA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[820]m WILLIAM Le Scrope, son of ---. 

iii)        RALPH (1364-1425).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Henricus Percy, Comes Northumbriæ Henricus, Thomas, Radulphus filii eius, Gilbertus Umfranville, Comes Dangus, Dñs Johannes Neuylle, Dñs Radulphus filius eius"[821].  He succeeded his father in 1388 as Lord Neville.  He was created Earl of Westmoreland 29 Sep 1397. 

-         see below

iv)       IDONIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[822]

v)        ELEANOR (-after 1441).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[823]m RALPH de Lumley Lord Lumley, son of MARMADUKE de Lumley & his second wife Margaret de Holand (-executed Jan 1400). 

vi)       THOMAS (-14 Mar 1407, bur Worksop Priory).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[824]m firstly (before 1 Jul 1379) JOAN de Furnivalle, daughter of WILLIAM de Furnivalle Lord Furnivalle & his Thomasine de Dagworth of Dagworth, Suffolk née --- (1368-before 1401, bur Worksop Priory).  She succeeded as Baroness Furnivalle, suo iurism secondly ([8 Mar/4 Jul] 1401) as her second husband, ANKARET Lestrange Baroness Strange, widow of RICHARD Talbot Lord Talbot, daughter of JOHN Lestrange Lord Strange of Blackmere & his wife Mary FitzAlan of Arundel ([1361]-1 Jun 1413).  Thomas & his first wife had one child: 

(a)       MATILDA Neville ([1392]-[1423], bur Worksop Priory, Nottinghamshire).  She succeeded as Baroness Furnivalle, suo iurism (12 Mar 1407) as his first wife, JOHN Talbot, son of RICHARD Talbot Lord Talbot & his wife Ankaret Lestrange Baroness Strange (1384-killed in battle Castillon, Dordogne 17 Jul 1453, bur St Alkmund's, Whitchurch, Shropshire).  He succeeded his niece in 1421 as Lord Talbot, Lord Strange.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury 20 May 1442. 

John & his second wife had one child:

vii)      JOHN (-1430).  Lord Latimer. 

e)         ROBERT .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[825]

f)          ALEXANDER (-1352).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[826].  Archbishop of York. 

g)         THOMAS .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[827]

h)         WILLIAM .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[828]

i)          RALPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[829].  Ancestor of the NEVILLE family of Thornton Bridge. 

j)          ELEANOR .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[830]m GEOFFREY Le Scrope, son of HENRY Le Scrope Lord Scrope (of Masham) & his Joan [Agnes] --- [1342]-killed in battle siege of Piskre Castle, Lithuania 1362, bur Königsberg Cathedral). 

4.         MARY .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[831]

5.         ALEXANDRA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[832]

6.         JOHN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[833]

7.         JOAN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[834]

8.         MARGARET .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[835]

9.         ALICE .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[836]

10.      THOMAS .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[837]

11.      ANASTASIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[838]

12.      WILLIAM .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[839]

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of WESTMORELAND 1397-1523 (NEVILLE)

 

 

RALPH Neville, son of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Matilda Percy ([1364]-Raby Castle 21 Oct 1425, bur Staindrop, co Durham).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Henricus Percy, Comes Northumbriæ Henricus, Thomas, Radulphus filii eius, Gilbertus Umfranville, Comes Dangus, Dñs Johannes Neuylle, Dñs Radulphus filius eius"[840].  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[841].  He succeeded his father in 1388 as Lord Neville.  He was created Earl of Westmoreland 29 Sep 1397.  He was an active supporter of Henry of Lancaster in his bid for the throne.  King Henry IV made him Marshal of England for life 30 Sep 1399, though he resigned this office in favour of his son-in-law John Earl of Norfolk in 1413 or before.  He was appointed a member of the council of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Protector of the Realm Dec 1422. 

m firstly MARGARET Stafford, daughter of HUGH Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Philippa de Beauchamp of Warwick (-9 Jun 1396, bur Brancepath).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" married "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[842].  A codicil to the will of "Hugh Earl of Stafford", dated 21 Sep 1385, bequeathed property to “my sister Roos...Margaret de Nevill my daughter...Katherine de la Pole my daughter...Joane my daughter...my sister Charleton...Dame Joane d´Engayne my cousin[843]

m secondly (before 29 Nov 1396) as her second husband, JOAN Beaufort, widow of ROBERT Ferrers of Willisham, daughter of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his third wife Katharine Swynford née de Roët ([1379]-Howden, Yorkshire 13 Nov 1440, bur Lincoln Cathedral).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" married "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[844].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Joan, wife firstly of Ferrers Baron of Ousley, and secondly of Ralph Earl of Westmoreland" as daughter of "John Duke of Lancaster" and mother (by her first husband) of "Baroness of Greystoke" and (by her second husband of "Cecily Duchess of York…"[845]

Earl Ralph & his first wife had eight children: 

1.         MATILDA (-Oct 1438, bur Scarborough, Church of the Friars Preachers).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[846]m (before 6 Aug 1400) PIERS de Mauley Lord Mauley, son of PIERS de Mauley & his wife Margery de Sutton ([1378]-6 Sep 1415). 

2.         ALICE .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[847]m firstly THOMAS Grey of Heton, son of ---.  m secondly GILBERT Lancaster, son of ---. 

3.         PHILIPPA (-before 1458).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[848]m (before 1399) THOMAS de Dacre Lord Dacre of Gilsland, son of WILLIAM de Dacre Lord Dacre & his wife [Joan Douglas] (Naworth Castle 27 Oct 1387-5 Jan 1458, bur Lancercost Priory). 

4.         JOHN ([1387]-1420).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[849].  Lord Neville.  m (1394) ELIZABETH de Holand, daughter of THOMAS de Holand Earl of Kent & his wife Alice FitzAlan of Arundel (-1423).  John & his wife had three children: 

a)         RALPH (1406-1484).  He succeeded his grandfather in 1425 as Earl of Westmorelandm firstly (contract 7 May 1426, dispensation after marriage 28 Nov 1426) as her second husband, ELIZABETH Percy, widow of JOHN de Clifford Lord Clifford, daughter of HENRY Percy "Hotspur" & his wife Elizabeth Mortimer of the Earls of March (-26 Oct 1437).  m secondly (1442) MARGARET Cobham, daughter of REGINALD Cobham & his wife --- (-[1466/71]).  Earl Ralph & his first wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN (-7 Mar 1450).  Lord Neville.  The will of "John Neville Knight sonne and heire to Rauf Erle of Westmerland", dated 1 Dec 1449, proved 30 Mar 1451, chose burial “in the church of Hautenprice”, bequeathed property to “my wife Ann[850]m (1441) as her first husband, ANNE de Holand, daughter of JOHN de Holand Duke of Exeter & his first wife Anne Stafford (-26 Dec 1486).  The will of "John Neville Knight sonne and heire to Rauf Erle of Westmerland", dated 1 Dec 1449, proved 30 Mar 1451, chose burial “in the church of Hautenprice”, bequeathed property to “my wife Ann[851].  She married secondly (1452), her first husband's uncle, John Neville, and thirdly as his second wife, James Douglas Earl of Douglas

Earl Ralph & his second wife had one child: 

ii)         MARGARET (-young). 

Earl Ralph had one possible illegitimate son: 

iii)        [GEORGE Neville m (after 1483) as her second husband, MARY, widow of ANTHONY Wydeville Earl Rivers, daughter of HENRY FitzLewis & his wife Elizabeth Beaufort. 

b)         JOHN (-killed in battle Towton 1461).  Lord Neville.  m (1452) as her second husband, ANNE de Holand, widow of JOHN Neville Lord Neville, daughter of JOHN de Holand Duke of Exeter & his first wife Anne Stafford (-26 Dec 1486).  She thirdly as his second wife, James Douglas Earl of Douglas.  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH (1456-1523).  Earl of Westmorelandm (1473) ISABEL, daughter of ROGER Booth & his wife ---.  Ancestors of the later EARLS of WESTMORELAND. 

c)         THOMAS

5.         ELIZABETH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[852]

6.         ANNE Neville .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[853]m (before 3 Feb 1413) GILBERT Umfraville of Harbottle, son of THOMAS Umfraville of Harbottle & his wife Agnes --- (Harbottle Castle 18 Oct 1390-killed in battle Baugé, Anjou 22 Mar 1421). 

7.         RALPH (-1458).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[854]m MARY Ferrers, daughter and heiress of ROBERT Ferrers & his wife Joan Beaufort ([1394]-1458). 

8.         MARGARET (-[4 Mar 1463/3 Mar 1464], bur Clare, Suffolk, Church of the Austin Friars).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[855]m firstly (before 31 Dec 1413) RICHARD Le Scrope Lord Scrope (of Bolton), son of ROGER Le Scrope Lord Scrope & his wife Margaret Tibetot (31 May 1394-29 Aug 1420).  m secondly (before 5 Nov 1427) WILLIAM Cressener of Sudbury, Suffolk, son of ---. 

Earl Ralph & his second wife had fourteen children: 

9.         JOAN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[856].  Nun.  Abbess at Barking. 

10.      RICHARD (1400-killed in battle Wakefield 30 Dec 1460, bur Bisham).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[857].  He was allowed the title Earl of Salisbury from 1428. 

-        EARLS of SALISBURY

11.      KATHERINE ([1402/03]-after 1483).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[858].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Katherine Duchess of Norfolk, m John Duke of Norfolk, m Thomas Strangeways" as sister of "Richard Earl of Salisbury" and mother (by her first husband) of "John Duke of Norfolk, father of John Duke of Norfolk" and (by her second husband) of "Jane first wedded to William Willoughby, after to the Marquess of Berkeley" (also listing two children of the last named by her first husband)[859].  The will of "John Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal and of Nottingham, Marshal of England", dated 19 Oct 1432, proved 14 Feb 1433, bequeathed property to “Katherine wife...[860].  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Jan 1464 (O.S.) “maritagium diabolicum” of “Katerina ducissa Norffolchiæ juvencula ætatis fere iiixx annorum” and “Johannis Widevile fratri reginæ ætatis xx annorum[861]m firstly (licence Raby 12 Jan 1412) JOHN Mowbray Earl of Norfolk, son of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (1392-Epworth [19 Oct] 1432, bur Epworth Priory).  He was restored as Duke of Norfolk 30 Apr 1425.  m secondly THOMAS Strangeways, son of ---.  m thirdly (after 1442) as his second wife, JOHN Beaumont Viscount Beaumont, son of HENRY Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Elizabeth Willoughby ([1408/09]-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460).  m fourthly (after 1464) JOHN Wydeville, son of RICHARD Wydeville Earl Rivers & his wife Jacquette de Luxembourg ([1445]-executed Kenilworth 12 Aug 1469). 

12.      HENRY (-young).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[862]

13.      THOMAS (-young).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[863]

14.      CUTHBERT (-young).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[864]

15.      ELEANOR (-1472).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “primam filiam domini Radulphi comitis de Westmerland…Elizabetham” as the wife of “dominus Ricardus tertius le Despencer”, adding that she married secondly “domino Henrico Percy comiti de Northumbria[865].  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[866].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Joan, wife firstly of Ferrers Baron of Ousley, and secondly of Ralph Earl of Westmoreland" as daughter of "John Duke of Lancaster" and mother (by her second husband) of "…Eleanor Countess of Northumberland…"[867]m firstly (after 23 May 1412) RICHARD Le Despencer Lord Burghersh, son of THOMAS le Despencer Earl of Gloucester & his wife Constance of York (1396-Merton, Surrey 7 Oct 1414, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  m secondly (1414) HENRY Percy Earl of Northumberland, son of HENRY Percy "Hotspur" Lord Percy & his wife Elizabeth Mortimer (1393-killed in battle St Albans 1455). 

16.      ROBERT (-1457).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[868].  Bishop of Salisbury and Durham. 

17.      WILLIAM (-[Alnwick] 9 Jan 1463, bur Guisborough Priory).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[869].  The will of "Richard Neville Earl of Salisbury", dated 10 May 1458, bequeathed property to “my eldest son Richard Earl of Warwick...my son George...my daughter Alice...my daughter Eleanor...my daughter Katherine...my daughter Margaret...my daughter the Countess of Arundel...my brother Lord William Fauconberg...Alice my wife Countess of Salisbury[870].  He was created Earl of Kent in 1461.  m (before 28 Apr 1422) as her first husband, JOAN Baroness Faucomberge, daughter of THOMAS de Faucomberge of Skelton Lord Fauconberge & his second wife Joan Brounflete of Londesborough, Yorkshire (Skelton, Yorkshire 18 Oct 1406-11 Dec 1490).  According to the Complete Peerage, she was “a fool and idiot from birth[871].  She married secondly (Pardon for marrying without royal licence 14 Mar 1463) John Berwyke.  William & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOAN ([1435]-after 22 Feb 1472).  m (before 1463) EDWARD Bethum of Beetham, Westmoreland, son of --- (-22 Feb 1472). 

b)         ELIZABETH ([1435]-before 1488).  m (before 1463) as his first wife, RICHARD Strangways of West Harlsey, Yorkshire, son of --- (-13 Apr 1488). 

c)         ALICE (1437-before 1490).  m (before 1463) JOHN Conyers, son of JOHN Conyers of Hornby, Yorkshire & his wife --- (-killed in battle Edgecote Field 26 Jul 1469). 

William had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

d)         THOMAS Fauconbridge (-executed [Sep] 1471). 

e)         WILLIAM (-after 1482). 

18.      ANNE (-20 Sep 1480, bur Pleshy, Essex).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[872].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Joan, wife firstly of Ferrers Baron of Ousley, and secondly of Ralph Earl of Westmoreland" as daughter of "John Duke of Lancaster" and mother (by her second husband) of "…Anne Duchess of Buckingham…"[873].  The will of "Ann Dutchess of Bucks", proved 31 Oct 1480, chose burial “in the Collegiate Church of Plessy”, ordered masses for the soul of “my...husband Humphrey late Duke of Buckingham”, bequeathed property to “my daughter Beaumond...my son of Wiltshire...my daughter of Richmond...my daughter Mountjoy...my daughter Beaumond´s son Edward Knyvet[874]m firstly (before 18 Oct 1424) HUMPHREY Stafford Earl of Stafford, son of EDMUND de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Anne of Gloucester (1402-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460, bur Northampton, Grey Friars).  He was created Duke of Buckingham.  m secondly (1467 before 25 Nov) as his second wife, WALTER Blount Lord Mountjoy, son of THOMAS Blount & his [first wife Margaret Gresley] ([1420]-1 Aug 1474, bur London Church of the Grey Friars). 

19.      JOHN (-young).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[875]

20.      GEORGE (-30/31 Dec 1469, bur Well, Yorkshire).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[876].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1432 whereby he is held to have become Lord Latimer.  m (before 13 Feb 1437) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Beauchamp, daughter and heiress of RICHARD de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his first wife Elizabeth Berkeley Baroness Berkeley ([1417]-before 2 Oct 1480).  She married secondly Thomas Wake of Blisworth (-20 May 1476).  George & his wife had four children: 

a)         HENRY (-killed in battle Edgecote Field 26 Jul 1469, bur Warwick, Beauchamp Chapel)m JOAN Bourchier, daughter of JOHN Bourchier Lord Berners & his wife Margaret Berners (-7 Oct 1470).  The will of "Jane widow of Henry Nevil Knight", dated 1470, bequeathed property to “my sons Lord Latimer and Thomas Nevill, my father John Bourchier Knight Lord Bernres, Margery my mother, my brothers Thomas and Humphrey Bourchier, Elizabeth wife of Robert Welles my sister[877].  Henry & his wife had two children: 

i)          RICHARD (1468-Snape Castle, Yorkshire [12/28] Dec 1530, bur Well, Yorkshire).  He succeeded his grandfather in 1469 as Lord Latimer.  The will of "Jane widow of Henry Nevil Knight", dated 1470, bequeathed property to “my sons Lord Latimer and Thomas Nevill, my father John Bourchier Knight Lord Bernres, Margery my mother, my brothers Thomas and Humphrey Bourchier, Elizabeth wife of Robert Welles my sister[878]m firstly ([1490]) ANNE Stafford, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford of Grafton, Worcestershire & his wife --- (-bur Well, Yorshire).  m secondly (licence 5 Jul 1522) as her second husband, MARGARET, widow of JAMES Strangwicke, daughter of ---.  Richard & his first wife had fifteen children: 

(a)       JOHN (17 Nov 1493-London 2 Mar 1543).  He succeeded his father in 1530 as Lord Latimer.  m firstly DOROTHY Vere, daughter of GEORGE Vere of the Earls of Oxford & his wife Margaret Stafford (-7 Feb 1527, bur Well, Yorkshire).  m secondly (Snape 20 Jul 1528) ELIZABETH Musgrave, daughter of EDWARD Musgrave & his wife Joan Ward.  m thirdly (1533) as her second husband, CATHERINE Parr, widow of EDWARD Burgh, daughter of THOMAS Parr of Kendal & his wife Maud Green (Kendal Castle, Westmoreland or Blackfriars, London [1512/14]-Sudely Castle, Gloucestershire in childbirth 7 Sep 1548, bur Sudely Castle Chapel).  She married thirdly (Hampton Court Palace 12 Jul 1543) as his fifth wife, Henry VIII King of England.  She married fourthly ([Apr/May] 1547) Thomas Seymour Baron Sudely

(b)       fourteen children. 

ii)         THOMAS (-1546).  The will of "Jane widow of Henry Nevil Knight", dated 1470, bequeathed property to “my sons Lord Latimer and Thomas Nevill, my father John Bourchier Knight Lord Bernres, Margery my mother, my brothers Thomas and Humphrey Bourchier, Elizabeth wife of Robert Welles my sister[879].  Ancestor of the later LORDS LATIMER. 

b)         THOMAS

c)         CATHERINEm firstly OLIVER Sutton [Dudley] , son of --- (-Edgecote 1469).  m secondly JAMES Radcliffe, son of ---. 

d)         JOAN .  

21.      CICELY (Raby Castle, co Durham 3 May 1415-Berkhamstead Castle, Hertfordshire 31 May 1495, bur Collegiate Church of Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[880].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Joan, wife firstly of Ferrers Baron of Ousley, and secondly of Ralph Earl of Westmoreland" as daughter of "John Duke of Lancaster" and mother (by her first husband) of "Baroness of Greystoke" and (by her second husband of "Cecily Duchess of York…"[881].  She became a Benedictine nun.  m (before 18 Oct 1424) RICHARD Duke of York, son of RICHARD "of Conisburgh" Earl of Cambridge & his first wife Anne Mortimer (21 Sep 1411-killed in battle Wakefield 30 Dec 1460, bur Pontefract, transferred 30 Jul 1476 to Collegiate Church of Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire). 

22.      EDWARD (-18 Oct 1476).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[882].  He succeeded as Lord Abergavenny, de iure uxorism firstly (before 18 Oct 1424) ELIZABETH de Beauchamp Baroness Abergavenny, daughter of RICHARD de Beauchamp Earl of Worcester & his wife Isabel Le Despencer (Hanley Castle, Worcestershire 16 Sep 1415-18 Jun 1448, bur Coventry, Carmelites).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the birth “apud Hanleyam XVI die Sep. 1415” of “filiam Elizabetham” to “dominus Ricardus quartus de Bellocampo…et domina Isabella uxor eius”, adding that she later married “domino Edwardo Nevill juniori filio comitis de Westmerland” by whom she was mother of “Georgius[883].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “XIV Kal Jul” of “domina Elizabetha, filia domini Ricardi quarti comitis Wigorniæ” aged 32 and her burial “apud ecclesiam fratrum Carmelitarum de Coventry[884]m secondly (1448) CATHERINE Howard, daughter of ROBERT Howard of Stoke Neyland, Suffolk & his wife Margaret Mowbray of Norfolk (-1478). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    RIVERS

 

 

The Wydeville family originated in Northamptonshire and also acquired properties in Bedfordshire by marriage.  According to the Complete Peerage, Richard Wydeville (died 1469) was in 1435 a knight “in the Regent´s court”, indicating John of Lancaster Earl of Bedford, who had been appointed regent of France in 1422[885].  Presumably, it was there that he made the acquaintance of the regent´s wife, whom he married after the regent died in Sep 1435.  The family´s fortunes were further favoured when Richard´s eldest daughter married Edward IV King of England in 1464, a marriage which was unequal in terms of nobility but which triggered a flush of high profile matrimonial connections between her numerous brothers and sisters and members of the highest levels of the English aristocracy.  The family fortunes, however, were short-lived and did not long survive the death of King Edward IV.  In addition, none of the queen´s brothers had any children which meant that the male line became extinct in her generation. 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been verified, unless otherwise indicated below.  The information shown below is taken mainly from the Complete Peerage, which includes numerous references to primary sources which could be followed up[886].  However, it is not considered a priority in the preparation of Medieval Lands to verify these sources as the family falls outside the main scope of the work.  In any case, there is no reason to suppose that the sources have been interpreted incorrectly for the purpose of incorporation of the information in the Complete Peerage.  Outline information on the family is included here especially because of its important connections with other noble families, both English and European, from the mid-15th century. 

 

 

 

A.      WYDEVILLE FAMILY

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Wydeville (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Widuilla" in Dorsetshire and Yorkshire/Northumberland (twice)[887]

 

2.         RICHARD de Wydeville (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardus de Wiville" held five knights´ fees from "Rogeri de Munbray" in Yorkshire[888]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Wydeville (-after 1167).  "…Willo de Widuill…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/67] under which the monks of Leicester abbey authorised the establishment of the church of St Mary the Less, Leicester[889].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Wivill dimidiam marcam de feodo de Wartre" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][890]m ---.  The name of William´s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- de Wydeville (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "filius Willelmi de Wiville" held one half knight´s fee from "honoris de Wartre" in Yorkshire[891]

 

4.         RICHARD de Wydeville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Ricardus de Wiville" holding one half of one knight´s fee in Yorkshire in [1210/12][892]

 

5.         ROBERT de Wydeville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Wyville" holding two and one half knights´ fees from "honor comitis Leycestriæ" in Leicestershire in [1210/12][893]

 

6.         RICHARD de Wydeville of Grafton, Northamptonshire ([1310]-[after Jul 1378]).  m firstly ---.  The name of Richard´s family is not known.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH Lyons, widow of NICHOLAS Chetwode, daughter of JOHN Lyons of Warkworth & his wife ---.  Richard & his first wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Wydeville ([1341/43]-[after 8 Sep 1403]).  m firstly KATHERINE Fermbrand, daughter of [JOHN Fermbrand of Biddenham, Bedfordshire & his wife ---].  m secondly (before 1379) as her second husband, ISABEL, widow of ROBERT Passelaw of Drayton Parslow, daughter of ---.  John & his first wife had one child: 

i)          THOMAS (-1435, bur Bromham, Bedfordshire).  m firstly ELIZABETH, daughter of ---.  m secondly ALICE, daughter of ---. 

John & his second wife had one child: 

ii)         RICHARD Wydeville of Grafton (-[Dec 1441]).  m ---, daughter of [JOHN Bedlisgate & his wife --- Beauchamp of Wellington, Somerset] (-after 1448).  Richard & his wife had one child: 

(a)       RICHARD Wydeville ([1405]-beheaded 12 Aug 1469).  Lord de Ryvers 1448.  He was created Earl Rivers in 1466. 

-         see below

 

 

 

B.      EARLS RIVERS 1466-1491 (WYDEVILLE)

 

 

RICHARD Wydeville, son of RICHARD Wydeville & his wife Joan Bedlisgate ([1405]-beheaded 12 Aug 1469).  He was created Baron and Lord de Ryvers 9 May 1448, and Earl Rivers 24 May 1466. 

m ([6 Feb 1436/23 Mar 1437]) as her second husband, JACQUETTE de Luxembourg, widow of JOHN Duke of Bedford, daughter of PIERRE de Luxembourg Comte de Saint-Pol & his wife Margherita del Balzo ([1416/17]-30 May 1472). 

Richard & his wife had fifteen children: 

1.         ELIZABETH (Grafton Regis [1437]-St Saviour’s Abbey, Bermondsey 8 Jun 1492, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Queen Elizabeth" as daughter of "Richard Earl Rivers" and mother of "The Queen that now is" and of "Thomas Marquess of Dorset"[894].  A manuscript records the marriage “in festo Apostolorum Philippi et Jacobi” of “rex Edwardus” and “Elizabetham filiam domini de Rivaye et ducisse Bedfordie[895].  She was crowned Queen of England 26 May 1465 at Westminster Abbey.  Her second marriage was declared null and void 25 Jun 1483 by the Act of Parliament “Titulus Regius”, their children becoming illegitimate, but recognised as valid once more Oct 1485 by the first Parliament of King Henry VII.  m firstly JOHN Grey of Groby, son of EDWARD Grey of Ruthin & his wife Elizabeth Ferrers Lady Ferrers of Groby (-killed in battle St Albans 17 Feb 1461).  m secondly (Manor of Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire 1 May 1464) EDWARD IV King of England, son of RICHARD Duke of York & his wife Cecily Neville (Rouen 28 Apr 1442-Palace of Westminster 9 Apr 1483, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor). 

2.         ANNE ([1438]-30 Jul 1489, bur Warden, Bedfordshire).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Anne Lady Bouchier" as daughter of "Richard Earl Rivers" and mother of "Henry Earl of Essex" and of "Lady Ferrers of Chartley"[896]m firstly [as his second wife,] WILLIAM Bourchier Viscount Bourchier, son of HENRY Bourchier Earl of Essex & his wife Isabel of York (-killed in battle Barnet 14 Apr 1471).  m secondly EDWARD Wingfield, son of ---.  m thirdly (before 26 Jun 1480) as his first wife, GEORGE Grey, son of EDMUND Grey Lord Grey of Ruthin Earl of Kent & his wife Katherine Percy of the Earls of Northumberland (-Ampthill 16 Dec 1503).  He succeeded his father in 1490 as Earl of Kent, Lord Grey of Ruthin. 

3.         MARGARET ([1439]-before 6 Mar 1491, bur Arundel).  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Oct 1464 “apud Radingiam” of “dominum Matreves filium et hæredum comitis Arundelliæ” and “Margaretam sororem reginæ Elizabethæ[897]m (Reading Oct 1464) THOMAS FitzAlan, son of WILLIAM Fitzalan Earl of Arundel & his wife Joan Neville of Salisbury (1450-Downly Park, Singleton, Sussex 25 Oct 1524, bur Arundel).  He succeeded his father in 1487 as Earl of Arundel. 

4.         ANTHONY ([1440]-beheaded Pontefract 25 Jun 1483).  He succeeded his father in 1469 as Earl Rivers.  The will of "Anthony Woodville Earl Rivers", dated 23 Jun 1483, bequeathed “lands as were my Lady Scales my first wife´s to my brother Edward Woodville[898]m firstly as her second husband, ELIZABETH Baroness Scales, widow of HENRY Bourchier Lord Scales, daughter of THOMAS Lord Scales & his wife Esmania Whalesburgh of Cornwall ([1446]-2 Sep 1473).  The will of "Anthony Woodville Earl Rivers", dated 23 Jun 1483, bequeathed “lands as were my Lady Scales my first wife´s to my brother Edward Woodville[899]m secondly (before Oct 1480) as her first husband, MARY Lewes, daughter and heiress of HENRY Lewes & his wife Elizabeth Beaufort.  She married secondly George Neville. 

5.         MARY ([1443]-before 1481).  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage in Sep 1466 “apud Wyndesore” of “filium et hæredum domini Herberd” and “Mariam sororem reginæ Elizabethæ” and between “juveneem dominum de Lysle” and “filiam eiusdem domini Herberti[900]m (Windsor Sep 1466) as his first wife, WILLIAM Herbert, son of WILLIAM Herbert Lord Herbert (later Earl of Pembroke) & his wife Anne Devereux of Bodenham, Herefordshire ([1455]-16 Jul 1491, bur Tintern Abbey).  He succeeded his father in 1469 as Earl of Pembroke and Lord Herbert.  He resigned the earldom of Pembroke in 1479 and was created Earl of Huntingdon. 

6.         JOHN ([1445]-executed Kenilworth 12 Aug 1469).  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Jan 1464 (O.S.) “maritagium diabolicum” of “Katerina ducissa Norffolchiæ juvencula ætatis fere iiixx annorum” and “Johannis Widevile fratri reginæ ætatis xx annorum[901]m (Jan 1465) as her fourth husband, KATHERINE Neville, widow firstly of JOHN Mowbray Earl of Norfolk, secondly of THOMAS Strangeways, and thirdly of JOHN Beaumont Viscount Beaumont, daughter of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his second wife Joan Beaufort (-after 1483).  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Jan 1464 (O.S.) “maritagium diabolicum” of “Katerina ducissa Norffolchiæ juvencula ætatis fere iiixx annorum” and “Johannis Widevile fratri reginæ ætatis xx annorum[902]

7.         LIONEL ([1446]-1484). 

8.         EDWARD (-1488).  The will of "Anthony Woodville Earl Rivers", dated 23 Jun 1483, bequeathed “lands as were my Lady Scales my first wife´s to my brother Edward Woodville[903]

9.         RICHARD (-6 Mar 1491).  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the death in Sep (1467 from the context) of “frater Robertus Botylle prior Sancti Johannis de Jerusalem in Anglia, apud Clerkenwelle” and “maximaque turbatio” because King Edward IV wished to appoint “Ricardum Widevile militem fratrem reginæ Elizabethæ[904].  He succeeded as Earl Rivers in 1485 when his attainder was reversed. 

10.      THOMAS m ANNE Holand, daughter of ---. 

11.      JOHN (-young). 

12.      LEWIS (-young). 

13.      KATHERINE (-before 1513).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Katherine Duchess of Buckingham" as daughter of "Richard Earl Rivers" and mother of "Edward Duke of Buckingham"[905].  The Annales of William Wyrcester record that “rex” married “Henricum ducem Bukes” to “sororem reginæ Elizabethæ” in 1466 to the secret displeasure of “comitis Warrwici[906]m firstly (1466) HENRY Stafford Duke of Buckingham, son of HUMPHREY Stafford Lord Stafford & his wife Margaret Beaufort (posthumously 4 Sep 1455-executed Salisbury 2 Nov 1483).  m secondly (before 1483) JASPER Tudor Earl of Pembroke, son of OWEN Tudor & his wife Catherine de France ([1431]-1495).  Duke of Bedford 1485.  m thirdly RICHARD Wingfield of Kimbolton Castle, Huntingdonshire (1468-1525). 

14.      MARTHAm JOHN Bromley

15.      JOAN .  The Annales of William Wyrcester record in 1466 that “Gray Ruffin filius et hæres comitis Kanciæ” married “aliam sororem reginæ[907]m (1466) ANTHONY Grey of Ruthin, son of EDMUND Grey Lord Grey of Ruthin Earl of Kent & his wife Katherine Percy of the Earls of Northumberland (-[15 May/27 Nov] 1480, bur St Albans Abbey). 

 



[1] Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (2002) Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166. II. Pipe Rolls to Cartæ Baronum (Boydell) (“Domesday Descendants”), p. 652. 

[2] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium, Lib. I, 121, MGH SS VII, p. 454. 

[3] Zubatsky, D. and Berent I. (1993) Sourcebook for Jewish Genealogies and Family Histories

[4] His mother was one of the older half-sisters of the king's father. 

[5] CP XII/2 745, and Domesday Descendants, p. 652. 

[6] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, II, p. 148. 

[7] Hunter, J. (ed.) (1844) The Great Rolls of the Pipe for the second, third and fourth years of the reign of King Henry II 1155-1158 (London) ("Pipe Roll") 4 Hen II (1157), Northamptonshire, p. 142. 

[8] Dugdale Monasticon V, Davintre Priory, Northamptonshire, I, De prima Fundatione eiusdem, p. 178. 

[9] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147. 

[10] CP XII/2 745, footnote e, citing Loyd, L. C. & Stenton, D. M. (1950) Christopher Hatton´s Book of Seals (Clarendon), no. 282 note [not yet consulted], and CP XII/2 746, footnote c quoting Loyd & Stenton (1950), no. 145. 

[11] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Essex and Hertfordshire, p. 133. 

[12] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis necnon Fundatorum et Benefactorum eiusdem domus, p. 147. 

[13] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Dunmow Parva Priory, Essex, II, p. 148. 

[14] Hall, H. (ed.) (1896) The Red Book of the Exchequer (Liber rubeus de Scaccario) (London) ("Red Book Exchequer"), Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 334. 

[15] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[16] Eyton, R. W. (1859) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. IX, p. 65, quoting "original deed, late in possession of Mr. George Morris of Shrewsbury". 

[17] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 75, quoting "the late Mr. George Morris´s deeds". 

[18] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1847) Gesta Regis Henrici Secundi Benedicti Abbatis, The Chronicle of the reigns of Henry II and Richard I 1169-1192, known commonly under the name of Benedict of Peterborough (London) (“Benedict of Peterborough”) Vol. I 1173, p. 46. 

[19] Round, J. H. (ed.) (1899) Calendar of Documents preserved in France illustrative of the history of Great Britain and Ireland Vol I 918-1206 (London) 349, p. 118. 

[20] CP XII/2 747. 

[21] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 82 and 91. 

[22] Lindsay, W. A., Dowden, D. Thomson, J. M. (eds.) (1907) Charters, Bulls and other documents relating to the Abbey of Inchaffray, Publications of the Scottish History Society Vol. LVI (Edinburgh) ("Inchaffray"), IX, p. 6. 

[23] Bannatyne Club (1841) Liber Cartarum Prioratus Sancti Andree in Scotia (Edinburgh) ("St Andrew´s Priory"), p. 254. 

[24] Fraser, W. (ed.) (1872) Registrum Monasterii S. Marie de Cambuskenneth (Edinburgh) ("Cambuskenneth"), 70, p. 92. 

[25] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 287. 

[26] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 287. 

[27] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 290. 

[28] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 290. 

[29] Inchaffray, XXI, p. 19. 

[30] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 291. 

[31] Bannatyne Club (1837) Liber Sancte Marie de Melros: Munimenta Vetustiora Monasterii Cisterciensis de Melros (Edinburgh) ("Melrose Liber"), Tome I, 49, p. 40. 

[32] Inchaffray, IX, p. 6. 

[33] Domesday Descendants, p. 652. 

[34] Inchaffray, IX, p. 6. 

[35] Dowden, J. (ed.) (1903) Chartulary of the Abbey of Lindores, Publications of the Scottish History Society Vol. XLII (Edinburgh) ("Lindores"), II, p. 2. 

[36] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 291. 

[37] Inchaffray, Appendix, IV A, p. 157. 

[38] Cambuskenneth, 70, p. 92. 

[39] Inchaffray, XXXVIII, p. 31. 

[40] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 255. 

[41] CP XII/2 749-50. 

[42] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Dunstaplia, pp. 56 and 60. 

[43] Stevenson, J. (ed.) (1875) Radulphi de Coggeshall Chronicon Anglicanum (London), p. 188. 

[44] MP, Vol. III, 1220, p. 60. 

[45] Estimated from the estimated birth date of her first known child Robert. 

[46] Dugdale Monasticon VI, St Mary, Leicester Abbey, XVI, Historia Fundationis, p. 466. 

[47] Inchaffray, Appendix, IV A, p. 157. 

[48] Jobson, A. & Slade, C. F. (eds.) (2008) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the seventh year of the reign of King Henry III (London) (“Pipe Roll 7 Henry III”), p. 32. 

[49] Dugdale Monasticon V, Garendon Abbey, Leicestershire, II, p. 331. 

[50] RHGF XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 484. 

[51] Birth date estimated from the estimated birth date of his daughter Margaret. 

[52] Inchaffray, Appendix, IV A, p. 157. 

[53] CP XII/2 748 footnote g. 

[54] CP VII 679. 

[55] Quoted in Ormerod, G. The History of the County Palatine and City of Chester, 2nd ed. Thomas Helsby (1882), Vol 1, p. 28. 

[56] Cambuskenneth, 70, p. 92. 

[57] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1865) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales de Wintonia, Annales de Waverleia (London), Annales de Waverleia, p. 289. 

[58] CP XII/2 751 footnote d. 

[59] Birth date range estimated from the birth dates of her older siblings and the date of death of her father. 

[60] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1882) Annales Londonienses and Annales Paulini (London), Annales Londonienses, p. 126. 

[61] CP III 168. 

[62] Estimated on Margaret having given birth to her first known child in [1221/25]. 

[63] Annales Londonienses, p. 127. 

[64] Christie, R. C. (ed.) (1887) Annales Cestrienses or Chronicle of the Abbey of St Werburg at Chester, Record Society [of] Lancashire and Cheshire Vol. XIV, (“Annales Cestrienses”), p. 50. 

[65] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Priory, Lincolnshire XI, Hugonis primi Comitis Cestriæ…, p. 218.   

[66] Dugdale Monasticon V, Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire VI, Historia Laceiorum, p. 534.   

[67] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1864) Annales Monastici Vol. I, Annales de Margan, Annales de Theokesberia, Annales de Burton (London), Annales de Theokesberia, p. 121. 

[68] Sweetman, H. S. (ed.) (1875) Calendar of Documents relating to Ireland preserved in the Public Record Office 1171-1251 (Vol. I) (London), 2949, p. 439. 

[69] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[70] Maxwell Lyte, H. C. (ed.) (1903) Calendar of the Charter Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol. I, Henry III 1226-1257 (London) ("Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257"), p. 393. 

[71] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1869) Annales Monastici Vol. IV, Annales de Oseneia, Chronicon Thomæ Wykes, Annales de Wigornia (London), Annales de Wigornia, p. 456. 

[72] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1865) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales de Wintonia, Annales de Waverleia (London), Annales de Wintonia, p. 104. 

[73] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 255. 

[74] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 256. 

[75] CP XII/2 751. 

[76] Inchaffray, XLII, p. 36. 

[77] Innes, C. (ed.) (1843) Registrum Episcopatus Glasguensis (Edinburgh) ("Glasgow Bishopric"), Tome I, 168, p. 138. 

[78] Bannatyne Club (1847) Liber S. Marie de Dryburgh: Registrum Cartarum Abbacie Premonstratensis de Dryburgh (Edinburgh) ("Dryburgh"), 138, p. 99. 

[79] Goodall, W. (ed.) (1759) Joannis de Fordun Scotichronicon cum Supplementis et Continuatione Walteri Boweri, Vols. I, II (Edinburgh) ("Joannis de Fordun (Goodall)"), Vol. II, Lib. X, Cap. XVIII, p. 102. 

[80] Maxwell Lyte, H. C. (ed.) (1904) Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III (London), 587, p. 187. 

[81] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 776, p. 254. 

[82] Annales Londonienses, p. 126. 

[83] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (London) (“MP”), Vol. V, 1252, p. 341. 

[84] Skene, F. J. H. (ed.) (1877) Liber Pluscardensis, Historians of Scotland Vol. VII (Edinburgh) Vol. I, Liber VII, CX, p. 73. 

[85] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 167, p. 138. 

[86] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 168, p. 138. 

[87] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2804, p. 419. 

[88] MP, Vol. V, 1252, p. 341. 

[89] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[90] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[91] Gilbert, J. T. (ed.) (1884) Chartularies of St Mary´s Abbey, Dublin, with the Register of its House at Dunbrody and Annals of Ireland (London), Annals of Ireland, Vol. II, p. 314. 

[92] MP, Vol. V, 1252, p. 341. 

[93] Dryburgh, 138, p. 99. 

[94] Bain, J. (1884) Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland preserved in the Public Record Office (Scottish Record Office) ("Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain)"), Vol. II, 32, p. 8. 

[95] Annales Londonienses, p. 126. 

[96] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 36, p. 9. 

[97] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 413, p. 237. 

[98] Annales Londonienses, p. 126. 

[99] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 36, p. 9. 

[100] Annales Londonienses, p. 126. 

[101] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 36, p. 9. 

[102] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/18, 7 Hen III, 83. 

[103] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 32. 

[104] CP XII/2 751 footnote e. 

[105] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 848, p. 150. 

[106] CP XII/2 751 footnote e. 

[107] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 146. 

[108] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 146. 

[109] Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II Henry III (London, 1904), Vol. I, 312, p. 82. 

[110] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 587, p. 187. 

[111] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 534, p. 323. 

[112] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 587, p. 187. 

[113] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 534, p. 323. 

[114] CP XII/2 751 footnote e, citing Macray, W. D. (1909) The Collection of Brackley Deeds at Magdalen College Oxford, p. 11 (not yet consulted). 

[115] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Ranton Priory, Staffordshire, VIII, Nomina Antecessorum Domini Willielmi de Harecourt, p. 258. 

[116] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 489. 

[117] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 255. 

[118] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 256. 

[119] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 256. 

[120] St Andrew´s Priory, p. 256. 

[121] Stevenson, J. (ed.) (1858) Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon (London) ("Abingdon Chronicle"), Vol. II, p. 37. 

[122] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 166. 

[123] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 184. 

[124] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 183. 

[125] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 37. 

[126] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 184. 

[127] Salter, H. E. (ed.) (1907) Eynsham Cartulary, Vol. I, Oxford Historical Society Vol. XLIX (Oxford) ("Eynsham"), 82, p. 80. 

[128] Duffus Hardy, T. (ed.) (1837) Rotuli Chartarum in Turri Londinensi, Vol. I, Part I 1199-1216 (London) ("Rotuli Chartarum"), 5 John, p. 126. 

[129] Public Record Office (1920) Liber Feodum, The Book of Fees commonly called Testa de Nevill (London) ("Testa de Nevill"), Part I, p. 11. 

[130] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 103. 

[131] Eynsham, 82 and 83, p. 80. 

[132] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 251. 

[133] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 252. 

[134] Maitland, F. W. (ed.) (1887) Bracton´s Note Book, a Collection of Cases…annotated…by Henry of Bratton (London) ("Bracton´s Note Book"), Vol. III, 967, p. 19. 

[135] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 124. 

[136] Rotuli Chartarum, 6 John, p. 148. 

[137] Rotuli Chartarum, 5 John, p. 126. 

[138] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. III, 1964, p. 708. 

[139] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. III, 1964, p. 708. 

[140] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. III, 1964, p. 708. 

[141] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. III, 1964, p. 708. 

[142] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. III, 1964, p. 708. 

[143] Stenton, F. M. (ed.) (1920) Documents illustrative of the social and economic history of the Danelaw from various collections (London) ("Stenton (Danelaw, 1920)"), 464, p. 342. 

[144] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones de honoribus exchætis…factæ anno XIII Regis Johannis, p. 584. 

[145] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones de honoribus exchætis…factæ anno XIII Regis Johannis, p. 584. 

[146] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 551. 

[147] Maxwell Lyte, H. C. (ed.) (1903) Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III preserved in the Public Record Office 1225-1232 (London), p. 333. 

[148] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 413. 

[149] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 807, p. 272. 

[150] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 389, p. 227. 

[151] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 389, p. 227. 

[152] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 380. 

[153] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 380. 

[154] CP XI 601, cting Nichols, J. (1795) The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, Vol. II, Part I, Appendix, p. 113 [not yet consulted]

[155] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 333. 

[156] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 456. 

[157] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 456. 

[158] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 101, p. 71. 

[159] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 101, p. 71. 

[160] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 101, p. 71. 

[161] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 389, p. 227. 

[162] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 101, p. 71. 

[163] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[164] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[165] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[166] Rymer, T. (1745) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literæ 3rd Edn (London), Tome II, Pars II, p. 51. 

[167] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[168] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[169] Rymer (1740), Tome II, Pars IV, p. 71. 

[170] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[171] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[172] Maitland Club (1839) Chronicon de Lanercost (Edinburgh) ("Lanercost Chronicle"), 1326, p. 256. 

[173] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[174] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[175] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars II, p. 51.  

[176] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 181. 

[177] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[178] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[179] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[180] Nicolas, N. H. (1826) Testamenta Vetusta, Vol. I (London), p. 99. 

[181] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[182] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 99. 

[183] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 174. 

[184] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[185] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[186] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[187] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[188] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 174. 

[189] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[190] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 172. 

[191] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[192] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 174. 

[193] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 174. 

[194] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[195] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[196] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[197] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[198] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[199] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[200] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, pp. 62-3.   

[201] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[202] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[203] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[204] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[205] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 63.   

[206] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 231. 

[207] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 239. 

[208] CP IX 266. 

[209] Le Prévost, A. (1840) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. III, p. 236, footnote 5. 

[210] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, II, p. 160, and XV, pp. 236-7. 

[211] CP IX Appendix A, p. 3. 

[212] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, pp. 236-7. 

[213] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Tome II, p. 201. 

[214] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[215] Stapleton, Archæological Journal, Vol. III (1846), pp. 1-26, cited in CP IX Appendix A, p. 6 footnote e. 

[216] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXVII, p. 435. 

[217] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442. 

[218] Deville, A. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité du Mont de Rouen, Collection des cartularies de France Tome III (same volume as Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin) (Paris) ("Rouen Sainte-Trinité"), XXXV, p. 440. 

[219] CP IX Appendix A, p. 7. 

[220] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. I, Liber I, p. 184.  

[221] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, II, p. 160, and XV, pp. 236-7. 

[222] Giles, I. A. (ed.) (1845) Scriptores rerum gestarum Willelmi Conquestoris (London) Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 22. 

[223] Domesday Descendants, p. 602, although it is not clear on what this statement is based.  No date for the acquisition is given in CP IX 266-7.  It is therefore presumably unclear whether the land was awarded to Roger de Mortemer or to his son Ralph. 

[224] Cluny, Tome IV, 3559, p. 688. 

[225] CP IX 267 footnote b. 

[226] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 240. 

[227] Robillard de Beaurepaire, C. de (ed.) ´Recueil de chartes concernant l´abbaye de Saint-Victor-en-Caux´, Mélanges, documents publiés et annotés par MM Ch. de Beaurepaire, Paul le Cacheux, A. Héron et Hipplyte Sauvage, 5ème série (Rouen, 1898) ("Caux Saint-Victor"), II.3, p. 382. 

[228] Caux Saint-Victor, II.3, p. 382. 

[229] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 240. 

[230] Caux Saint-Victor, II.3, p. 382. 

[231] Domesday Translation, Hampshire, XXIX, pp. 112-3, Berkshire, XLVI, pp. 155-6, Oxfordshire, XXX, p. 436, Herefordshire, IX, p. 506, Shropshire, VI, pp. 713-4. 

[232] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Tomus II (London) (“Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon”), p. 24. 

[233] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IX, p. 319. 

[234] Round (1899) 1264, p. 459. 

[235] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber XI, X, p. 199. 

[236] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, pp. 348 and 349. 

[237] Waters, R. E. C. (1882) A Roll of the Owners of Land in Parts of Lindsey in Lincolnshire in the reign of Henry I (reprinted from the Associated Architectural Societies´ Reports and Papers, 1882, Vol. XVI, Part ii), p. 31.  Horace Round is highly critical of Waters´s edition (Round, J. H. (1909) Feudal England (London), The Lindsey Survey (1115-1118), p. 182-3), but there appears no reason to doubt the accuracy of the names of the persons which are recorded. 

[238] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[239] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Rotomagensis, XVI, p. 21. 

[240] Caux Saint-Victor, I, p. 363. 

[241] Round (1899) 1264, p. 459. 

[242] Haskins, C. H. (1918) Norman Institutions (Cambridge, Mass, Harvard UP), p. 290, quoted in CP IX 268. 

[243] When her father was already married to Hawise's stepmother. 

[244] Round (1899) 1264, p. 459. 

[245] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[246] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[247] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[248] CP IX 269-70 footnote i. 

[249] Giles, J. A. (1895) William of Malmesbury´s Chronicle of the Kings of England (London), The Modern History, Book II, , p. 503. 

[250] Calendar of the Charter Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol. III (London, 1908), p. 234. 

[251] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Kington St Michael Nunnery, Wiltshire, III, p. 399.   

[252] Caux Saint-Victor, VI, p. 396. 

[253] Caux Saint-Victor, p. 412. 

[254] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[255] Eyton, R. W. (1857) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. IV, pp. 200-6. 

[256] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349, and Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 205 commenting that the "French Chronicle of the Mortimers…seems to be a much more authentic document than the Latin Historia Fundationis". 

[257] Remfry, P. M. (2009) The Early Mortimers of Wigmore, 1066 to 1181, chart "Descendants of Roger filii Episcopi Mortimer", consulted at <http://www.castles99.ukprint.com/Essays/earlymort.htm> (28 Nov 2009).  

[258] CP IX 270 footnote i (continuation from previous page). 

[259] ("William of Newburgh"), Liber II, Cap. IV, p. 105. 

[260] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Rotomagensis, XVI, p. 21. 

[261] Caux Saint-Victor, I, p. 363. 

[262] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[263] CP IX 268-9. 

[264] Williams ab Ithel, J. (ed.) (1860) Annales Cambriæ (London), pp. 43-4. 

[265] ("William of Newburgh"), Liber II, Cap. IV, p. 105. 

[266] Robert de Torigni, Tome I, pp. 293-4. 

[267] CP IX 269. 

[268] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Kington St Michael Nunnery, Wiltshire, III, p. 399.   

[269] ´Wigmore Abbey´, Archæologia Cambrensis, Series IV, Vol. II (no. VII, Jul 1871), p. 212. 

[270] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 631. 

[271] Caux Saint-Victor, p. 412. 

[272] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[273] Annales de Wigornia, p. 385. 

[274] Wright, T. (1852) The History of Ludlow (Ludlow), Appendix to Section V, History of the Foundation of Wigmore Abbey, p. 123, the author/translator commenting on p. 96 that the version in Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, II, p. 344, "is printed with great inaccuracy". 

[275] CP IX 272 states that she was alive during the reign of King Richard I. 

[276] CP IX 271, footnote e. 

[277] Journal of British Archæological Association, Vol. XXIV, p. 29, from a plea roll of Easter 28 Hen III, and Chetham Society, Vol. LXXXIV N. S. (1915), p. 41 (neither yet consulted). 

[278] Farrer, Honors and Knights Fees, Vol. II, p. 51 (not yet consulted). 

[279] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire, III, p. 262. 

[280] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[281] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[282] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[283] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[284] Caux Saint-Victor, p. 412. 

[285] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[286] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[287] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[288] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[289] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[290] Caux Saint-Victor, p. 412. 

[291] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349. 

[292] Maxwell Lyte, H. C. (ed.) (1901) Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III preserved in the Public Record Office 1215-1225 (London), p. 574. 

[293] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 147, p. 36. 

[294] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 365. 

[295] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 365. 

[296] Caux Saint-Victor, p. 412. 

[297] Wright (1852), Appendix to Section V, History of the Foundation of Wigmore Abbey, pp. 124-5. 

[298] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 349.  

[299] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Kington St Michael Nunnery, Wiltshire, IV, p. 399.   

[300] Caux Saint-Victor, III, p. 384. 

[301] Berger, E. (ed.) (1920) Recueil des actes de Henri II roi d´Angleterre et duc de Normandie (Paris) ("Actes Henri II"), Tome II, DCCL, p. 392. 

[302] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 85 and 94. 

[303] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 488. 

[304] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 50. 

[305] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[306] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[307] Eyton, R. W. (1857) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. IV, p. 207, citing Stapleton Rot Norman., II, cxxi, cxxii. 

[308] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[309] Duffus Hardy, T. (ed.) (1835) Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus in Turri Londinensi asservati tempore Regis Johannis (London) ("Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus"), 6 John, p. 209. 

[310] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 50. 

[311] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Kington St Michael Nunnery, Wiltshire, IV, p. 399.   

[312] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/22, 9 Hen III, 154. 

[313] Mason, E. (ed.) (1980) The Beauchamp Cartulary Charters 1100-1268 (London, Pipe Roll Society NS 43) ("Beauchamp"), 43, p. 23. 

[314] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[315] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 69. 

[316] Rymer (1745), Tome I, p. 52. 

[317] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 501. 

[318] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[319] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/27, 12 Hen III, 31. 

[320] Annales Cambriæ, p. 86. 

[321] Annales de Wigornia, p. 421. 

[322] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[323] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[324] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[325] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[326] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[327] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[328] Annals of Ireland, Chartulary of Dublin St Mary´s Vol. II, p. 314. 

[329] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2949, p. 439. 

[330] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[331] An outline pedigree is given at CP IV 199. 

[332] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[333] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[334] Eyton (1856), Vol. III, p. 44. 

[335] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[336] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 287. 

[337] Caux Saint-Victor, III, p. 384. 

[338] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 78. 

[339] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 497. 

[340] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 64. 

[341] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 287. 

[342] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 321. 

[343] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 223. 

[344] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/12, 4 Hen III, 19. 

[345] Annales de Wigornia, p. 421. 

[346] Inquisitiones Worcestershire VII, p. 4, 43 Hen III, no. 23. 

[347] Inquisitiones Worcestershire VII, p. 4, 43 Hen III, no. 23. 

[348] Inquisitiones Worcestershire VIII, p. 21, 3 Edw I, no. 42. 

[349] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, pp. 303 and 316-21. 

[350] Inquisitiones Worcestershire VIII, p. 21, 3 Edw I, no. 42. 

[351] CP XII/2 957. 

[352] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 208. 

[353] CP XII/2 957, footnote c, citing Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 221, p. 144. 

[354] CP IX 265, footnote a. 

[355] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[356] CP IX 273. 

[357] Annales de Wigornia, p. 400. 

[358] Annales de Wigornia, p. 418. 

[359] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[360] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2949, p. 439. 

[361] CP IX 278-9. 

[362] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[363] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 446, p. 265. 

[364] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[365] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[366] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 350. 

[367] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2949, p. 439. 

[368] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[369] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 446, p. 265. 

[370] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[371] CP IX 281. 

[372] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[373] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[374] CP IX 251. 

[375] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[376] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[377] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[378] CP IX 255-6. 

[379] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[380] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[381] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 91, p. 64. 

[382] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[383] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[384] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 446, p. 265. 

[385] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[386] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[387] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[388] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 270.   

[389] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[390] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[391] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[392] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[393] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[394] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[395] Birth date estimated from the birth of her son in [1289]. 

[396] CP I 347, although she is not listed among the children of Edmund Mortimer and his wife Margaret de Fiennes in CP IX 283 footnote m.   

[397] CP I 346. 

[398] She is not listed among the children of Roger de Mortimer in CP IX 281 footnote c. 

[399] CP I 347 footnote e, where Edmund is called "her father" but this is chronologically impossible, as shown above, if the birth date of her son is correct.   

[400] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[401] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[402] CP VIII 434-38. 

[403] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Bermundeseia, p. 473. 

[404] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[405] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 351. 

[406] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 136. 

[407] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 270.   

[408] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[409] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[410] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[411] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135. 

[412] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[413] CP VIII 443. 

[414] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 353. 

[415] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110. 

[416] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 353. 

[417] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[418] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[419] CP VIII 441 footnote e. 

[420] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[421] Watson, G. W. ´Geoffrey de Mortemer and his descendants´, Forsyth Harwood, H. W. (ed.) (1906) The Genealogist, New Series, Vol. XXII (London), p. 2. 

[422] CP VIII 441 footnote e. 

[423] Watson ´Geoffrey de Mortemer and his descendants´, p. 5. 

[424] Anselme, Père & Du Fourny (1725) Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de France, des pairs, grands officiers de la Couronne, de la maison du roy et des anciens du Royaume, 3rd edn. (Paris) ("Père Anselme"), Tome III, p. 86, citing no primary source. 

[425] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (1874) Titres de la maison ducale de Bourbon (Paris), Tome II, 4771, p. 172. 

[426] Watson ´Geoffrey de Mortemer and his descendants´, p. 5. 

[427] Père Anselme, Tome II, p. 708. 

[428] Extinct in the male line after 1559, see Watson ´Geoffrey de Mortemer and his descendants´, pp. 6-16. 

[429] Watson ´Geoffrey de Mortemer and his descendants´, p. 5. 

[430] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[431] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110. 

[432] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[433] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 169. 

[434] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 71. 

[435] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 78. 

[436] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[437] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[438] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 71. 

[439] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[440] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[441] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[442] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[443] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 353. 

[444] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[445] CP VIII 446-7. 

[446] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110. 

[447] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 353. 

[448] CP VIII 445. 

[449] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[450] Rymer (1740), Tome III, Pars II, p. 85. 

[451] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 101. 

[452] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 354. 

[453] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110. 

[454] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[455] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 354. 

[456] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110.  

[457] CP VIII 448-9. 

[458] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 355. 

[459] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 354. 

[460] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. II, p. 296. 

[461] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[462] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 355. 

[463] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. II, p. 296. 

[464] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[465] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 355. 

[466] CP VIII 451-3. 

[467] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[468] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 355. 

[469] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134. 

[470] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 355. 

[471] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 354. 

[472] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110. 

[473] Thompson, E. M. (1904) Chronicon Adæ de Usk 1377-1421, 2nd edn (London) (“Chronicon Adæ de Usk”), p. 54. 

[474] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 214. 

[475] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 354. 

[476] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 101. 

[477] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 110. 

[478] Pipe Roll Society (1894) Feet of Fines of the reign of Henry II and of the first seven years of Richard I 1182 to 1196 (London), 10, p. 8. 

[479] CP IX 245, footnote j, citing Cartulary of Godstow, Exch. K. R., Misc. Books, Ser. I, xx, fo. 28. 

[480] Duffus Hardy, T. (ed.) (1835) Rotuli Litterarum Patentium in Turri Londinensi asservati, Vol. I, Pars 1 (London) ("Rotuli Litterarum Patentium"), 3 John, p. 10. 

[481] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. II, 21, p. 20. 

[482] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 178. 

[483] CP IX 248-50. 

[484] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 3 John, p. 10. 

[485] CP XII/2 148-9. 

[486] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 87.  

[487] CP X 227. 

[488] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 182. 

[489] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 73. 

[490] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 73. 

[491] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 73. 

[492] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[493] Burke's Dormant and Extinct Peerages, p. 543. 

[494] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[495] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[496] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 114. 

[497] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 637.   

[498] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 73. 

[499] According to CP XII/1 432 footnote I, Thomas de Ufford "is said to have married Elizabeth, sister of [his brother] William's second wife Isabel". 

[500] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 114. 

[501] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 114. 

[502] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 73. 

[503] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 114. 

[504] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 114. 

[505] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 153. 

[506] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 193. 

[507] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 114. 

[508] CP XII/1 434 footnote d. 

[509] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, I, p. 20.   

[510] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[511] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[512] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[513] Round, J. H. ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, Selby, W. D. (ed.) The Genealogist New Series, Vol. III (1886, London), p. 112. 

[514] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[515] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[516] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[517] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112, quoting Rawlinson MSS. B. 313, fo. 54 (pencil). 

[518] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[519] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[520] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[521] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112, quoting Rawlinson MSS. B. 313, fo. 54 (pencil). 

[522] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[523] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112, quoting Rawlinson MSS. B. 313, fo. 54 (pencil). 

[524] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[525] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112, quoting Rawlinson MSS. B. 313, fo. 54 (pencil). 

[526] Round ´Note on the de la Pole Pedigree´, p. 112. 

[527] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.    

[528] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[529] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[530] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[531] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, I, p. 20.   

[532] CP XII/1 439-40. 

[533] Surtees Society (1841) Liber Vitæ Ecclesiæ Dunelmensis (London, Edinburgh, 1841) (“Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis”), folio 68b, p. 114. 

[534] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[535] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[536] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[537] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[538] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[539] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[540] CP XII/1 442. 

[541] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[542] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[543] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[544] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 256. 

[545] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[546] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[547] CP XII/1 446-7 footnote k. 

[548] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[549] Hansen, C. M. ´Suffolk´s niece, the identity of Margaret, the wife of Jean de Foix, Earl of Kendal, Captal de Buch, K.G.´, Genealogist´s Magazine Vol. 22, no. 10 (Jun 1988).  [Information provided by Bert M. Kamp in a private email to the author dated 7 Dec 2008]. 

[550] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[551] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. IV, p. 297. 

[552] CP VII 689. 

[553] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXVII (MS. Reg. 2 A. XVIII.a), p. 278. 

[554] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. IV, p. 297. 

[555] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. IV, p. 297. 

[556] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. IV, p. 297. 

[557] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. IV, p. 297. 

[558] CP XII/1 Appendix I, p. 22. 

[559] CP XII/1 Appendix I, p. 24. 

[560] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128, 131. 

[561] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire I, p. 994.   

[562] Domesday Translation, Berkshire, XLII, p. 154, Hertfordshire, XXI, p. 382, Oxfordshire, XXVII, pp. 433-4, Northamptonshire, XXVII, p. 609, Warwickshire, XXII, pp. 664-5, Staffordshire, XI, pp. 680-4. 

[563] Eyton, R. W. (ed.) ´The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Wm Salt Archæological Society (ed.) (1881) Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. II (Birmingham), Series I, no. II, p. 182. 

[564] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.   

[565] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[566] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. I, p. 195. 

[567] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128, 131. 

[568] Hunter, J. (ed.) (1833) Magnum rotulum scaccarii vel magnum rotulum pipæ de anno 31 regni Henrici primi (London) ("Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30)"), Staffordshire, p. 73. 

[569] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, IV, p. 232. 

[570] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.   

[571] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[572] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. I, p. 195. 

[573] Domesday Descendants, p. 716. 

[574] Dugdale Monasticon III, Hertford Priory, II, p. 300.   

[575] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 483, p. 353. 

[576] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 484 and 485, pp. 353-4. 

[577] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, VI, p. 232. 

[578] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire I, p. 994.   

[579] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XV, p. 236. 

[580] Pipe Roll 3 Hen II (1156), Staffordshire, pp. 97 and 160. 

[581] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, IV, p. 232. 

[582] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Series I, no. V, p. 193. 

[583] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 263 and 264. 

[584] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42. 

[585] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.   

[586] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259. 

[587] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XV, p. 236. 

[588] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259. 

[589] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[590] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Series I, no. V, p. 193. 

[591] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259. 

[592] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.   

[593] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 71. 

[594] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259. 

[595] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire II, p. 995.   

[596] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXIII, p. 249. 

[597] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 483, p. 353. 

[598] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 484 and 485, pp. 353-4. 

[599] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 484 and 485, pp. 353-4. 

[600] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 485, p. 354. 

[601] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 25. 

[602] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 214. 

[603] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 215 and 227. 

[604] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. I, p. 195. 

[605] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Staffordshire, p. 73. 

[606] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. IV, p. 204. 

[607] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XVI, p. 238. 

[608] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[609] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 266. 

[610] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[611] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[612] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIII, p. 257. 

[613] Dugdale Monasticon V, Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, II, p. 662. 

[614] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVI, p. 263. 

[615] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVII, p. 266. 

[616] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXV, p. 261. 

[617] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[618] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 267. 

[619] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XV, p. 236. 

[620] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[621] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 268. 

[622] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XVI, p. 238. 

[623] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[624] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[625] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 266. 

[626] Bridgeman, G. T. O. ´Some Account of the Manor & Parish of Blymhill in the County of Staffo rd´, Wm Salt Archæological Society (ed.) (1880) Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. I (Birmingham), p. 291. 

[627] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIII, p. 257. 

[628] Eyton, R. W. (1855) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. II, p. 264, footnote 4, quoting (in translation) Blakeway MSS from Mytton´s Collections. 

[629] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 264, footnote 4, quoting (in translation) Blakeway MSS from Mytton´s Collections. 

[630] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIII, p. 257. 

[631] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVI, p. 263. 

[632] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVII, p. 266. 

[633] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 186, citing Placita Forestæ, Salop, No. ii, memb. 1. 

[634] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, pp. 12-13 and 25-31. 

[635] Bridgeman ´Parish of Blymhill´, p. 292, citing Fines and Amerciaments, 8 Hen III. 

[636] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 431, p. 118. 

[637] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 431, p. 118. 

[638] Wrottesley, G. (ed.) ´Extracts from the Plea Rolls of the Reign of Edward III`, Wm Salt Archæological Society (ed.) (1890) Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. XI, Part 1 (Birmingham), De Banco, Easter 7 Edw III, p. 43. 

[639] Wrottesley ´Plea Rolls of Edward III`, De Banco, Easter 7 Edw III, p. 43. 

[640] Wrottesley ´Plea Rolls of Edward III`, De Banco, Easter 7 Edw III, p. 43. 

[641] Bridgeman ´Parish of Blymhill´, p. 293, quoting (in translation) Blakeway´s MS extracts of deeds of the Newport family in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

[642] Bridgeman ´Parish of Blymhill´, p. 293, quoting (in translation) Blakeway´s MS extracts of deeds of the Newport family in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

[643] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 431, p. 118. 

[644] Wrottesley ´Plea Rolls of Edward III`, De Banco, Easter 7 Edw III, p. 43. 

[645] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 264, footnote 4, quoting (in translation) Blakeway MSS from Mytton´s Collections. 

[646] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 264, footnote 4, quoting (in translation) Blakeway MSS from Mytton´s Collections. 

[647] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 264, footnote 4, quoting (in translation) Blakeway MSS from Mytton´s Collections. 

[648] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXV, p. 261. 

[649] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVI, p. 263. 

[650] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVII, p. 266. 

[651] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXV, p. 261. 

[652] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 483, p. 353. 

[653] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XIX, p. 247. 

[654] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIII, p. 257. 

[655] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXV, p. 261. 

[656] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVI, p. 263. 

[657] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 84. 

[658] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Staffordshire, p. 41. 

[659] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire II, p. 995.   

[660] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 550. 

[661] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire II, p. 995.   

[662] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXIII, p. 249. 

[663] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 16 John, p. 530. 

[664] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXIII, p. 249. 

[665] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 16 John, p. 530. 

[666] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXIII, p. 249. 

[667] Eyton (1859), Vol. X, p. 326, quoting Vincent´s Collections, Vol. III, p. 98. 

[668] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXXI, p. 274. 

[669] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 16 John, p. 530. 

[670] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXXI, p. 274. 

[671] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[672] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIX, p. 270. 

[673] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIX, p. 270. 

[674] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIX, p. 270. 

[675] Eyton (1859), Vol. X, p. 326, quoting Vincent´s Collections, Vol. III, p. 98. 

[676] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXXI, p. 274. 

[677] Eyton (1859), Vol. X, p. 326, quoting Vincent´s Collections, Vol. III, p. 98. 

[678] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[679] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Edward III, 50, p. 34. 

[680] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[681] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[682] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Edward III, 50, p. 34. 

[683] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[684] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Edward III, 50, p. 34. 

[685] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[686] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Cold Norton Priory, Oxfordshire, V, p. 421. 

[687] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231. 

[688] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Edward III, 50, p. 34. 

[689] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Cold Norton Priory, Oxfordshire, V, p. 421. 

[690] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievall Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[691] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 118. 

[692] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 118. 

[693] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Cold Norton Priory, Oxfordshire, V, p. 421. 

[694] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 118. 

[695] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[696] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[697] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 78. 

[698] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[699] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[700] FitzHerbert, R. H. C. ´Original Pedigree of Tailbois and Neville´, Selby, W. D. (ed.) The Genealogist New Series, Vol. III (1886, London), p. 109. 

[701] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[702] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[703] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 189. 

[704] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[705] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[706] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 179. 

[707] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[708] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 237. 

[709] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 255. 

[710] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 237. 

[711] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[712] CP IX 491. 

[713] Stapleton, T. (ed.) (1849) Chronicon Petroburgense (London), Appendix, Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo, p. 171. 

[714] Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo, p. 175. 

[715] Domesday Descendants, pp. 610-1. 

[716] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire I, p. 870.   

[717] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 32. 

[718] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire I, p. 870.   

[719] Farrer, W. (ed.) (1914-1916) Early Yorkshire Charters (Edinburgh), Vol. II, 790, p. 132. 

[720] Domesday Descendants, p. 358.  According to CP IX 493, it is uncertain that Emma's mother was Emma Fossard. 

[721] Pipe Roll Society, Vol. XXV (1904) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 22nd year of King Henry II (London) ("Pipe Roll 22 Hen II (1175/76)"), Yorkshire, p. 100. 

[722] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 10. 

[723] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 491. 

[724] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 125. 

[725] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 146. 

[726] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  790, p. 132. 

[727] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  790, p. 132. 

[728] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire I, p. 870.   

[729] CP IX 478. 

[730] His descendants are set out in CP IX 478-86. 

[731] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 197. 

[732] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[733] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[734] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[735] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[736] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[737] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[738] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[739] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[740] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[741] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[742] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[743] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[744] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 314, p. 236. 

[745] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 423. 

[746] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 11. 

[747] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 45. 

[748] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 423. 

[749] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 517. 

[750] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 79 and 95. 

[751] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 54. 

[752] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 482, 503 and 531. 

[753] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 54. 

[754] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 243. 

[755] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/22, 9 Hen III, 27. 

[756] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 156. 

[757] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 592. 

[758] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 197. 

[759] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 197. 

[760] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 79. 

[761] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 97. 

[762] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 12. 

[763] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Greenfield, 137, p. 90. 

[764] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 428. 

[765] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 500. 

[766] Rotuli Chartarum, 17 John, p. 209. 

[767] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 240. 

[768] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 17 footnote 1, quoting Pipe Roll, 13 John, Buckingham and Bedford. 

[769] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 199. 

[770] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  790, p. 132. 

[771] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 84. 

[772] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 99, p. 65. 

[773] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 99, p. 65. 

[774] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 113. 

[775] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 199. 

[776] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 213. 

[777] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 167. 

[778] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 199. 

[779] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 199. 

[780] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 360. 

[781] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 83. 

[782] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 360. 

[783] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 405. 

[784] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 405. 

[785] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 154, p. 38. 

[786] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 154, p. 38. 

[787] Bracton´s Note Book, Vol. III, 1187, p. 202. 

[788] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 484. 

[789] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 921.   

[790] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[791] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 921.   

[792] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[793] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[794] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[795] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[796] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[797] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[798] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[799] Martin, M. T. (ed.) (1911) The Percy Chartulary (Surtees Society), III, p. 4. 

[800] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 207. 

[801] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 293. 

[802] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 921.   

[803] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 33. 

[804] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[805] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[806] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[807] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[808] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[809] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[810] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievall Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[811] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[812] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[813] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[814] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[815] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[816] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[817] Nicolas, N. H. (1826) Testamenta Vetusta Vol. I (London), p. 84. 

[818] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[819] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 108. 

[820] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 108. 

[821] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[822] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 108. 

[823] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 108. 

[824] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 108. 

[825] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[826] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[827] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[828] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[829] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[830] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 107. 

[831] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[832] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[833] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[834] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[835] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[836] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[837] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[838] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[839] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 34. 

[840] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[841] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 108. 

[842] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[843] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 119. 

[844] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[845] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. III, p. 297. 

[846] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[847] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[848] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[849] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[850] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 264. 

[851] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 264. 

[852] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[853] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[854] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[855] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 109. 

[856] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[857] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[858] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[859] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. III, p. 300. 

[860] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 223. 

[861] Stevenson, J. (ed.) (1864) Letters and Papers illustrative of the Wars of the English in France during the reign of Henry VI King of England (London), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1464, p. [783]. 

[862] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[863] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[864] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[865] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[866] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[867] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. III, p. 298. 

[868] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[869] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[870] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 286. 

[871] CP V 281. 

[872] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[873] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. III, p. 298. 

[874] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 356. 

[875] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[876] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[877] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 309. 

[878] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 309. 

[879] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 309. 

[880] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[881] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. III, p. 297. 

[882] FitzHerbert ´Tailbois and Neville´, p. 110. 

[883] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 63.   

[884] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 64.   

[885] CP XI 19. 

[886] CP XI 15-25. 

[887] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Dorsetshire, p. 15, Yorkshire, Northumberland, pp. 26 and 29. 

[888] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 419. 

[889] Round, J. H. (ed.) (1888) Ancient Charters Royal and Private prior to A.D. 1200 (London) ("Ancient Charters (Round)"), Part I, 37, p. 59. 

[890] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 40. 

[891] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 436. 

[892] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 492. 

[893] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 552. 

[894] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. 1, p. 296. 

[895] Gairdner, J. (1880) Three Fifteenth Century Chronicles (Camden Society), A Brief Latin Chronicle, from MS Arundel 5, College of Arms, p. 180. 

[896] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. 1, p. 296. 

[897] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1464, p. [783]. 

[898] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 379. 

[899] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 379.  

[900] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1466, p. [786]. 

[901] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1464, p. [783]. 

[902] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1464, p. [783]. 

[903] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 379. 

[904] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, p. [791]. 

[905] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XL, Harleian MS 1074, No. 1, p. 296. 

[906] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1466, p. [785]. 

[907] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1466, p. [785].