untitled ENGLISH NOBILITY A - C

v3.0 Updated 28 May 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 3

ABITOT. 4

AINCOURT (DEINCOURT) 11

ALBINI (AUBIGNY) 17

AMUNDEVILLE. 24

ATON. 32

AVENELL. 37

AVRANCHES. 42

BADLESMERE. 45

BARDOLF. 47

BASKERVILLE. 56

BASSET. 59

BAYEUX. 96

BEAUCHAMP. 99

BEAUMONT. 138

BELMEIS. 141

BERKELEY. 146

BIDUN. 172

BISSET. 179

BOCLAND. 185

BOHUN (of MIDHURST, SUSSEX) 188

BOLEBEC. 189

BOTEREL. 199

BOTETOURT. 200

BRIOUSE (BRAOSE/BREWES) 203

BRITO (ALBINI BRITO) 226

BRITO. 234

BRIWERE. 237

BURDETT. 243

BURGHERSH. 247

CAMVILLE. 248

CAUNTELO. 256

CAUZ. 263

CHANDOS. 266

CHAWORTH (CHAOURCES) 270

CHERLETON. 283

CHESNEY. 284

CLARE. 298

CLIFFORD. 307

CLINTON. 322

COBHAM.. 327

CORBET. 332

COURCY. 338

CRASSUS. 346

CRISPIN. 350

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The five documents UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY set out English noble families in the post-conquest period who were granted no title of nobility, at least not before the late 13th century.  It represents a selection of these families, chosen only because they were the ones for whom records were found in the primary sources so far consulted.  The scope of this document is being expanded as further sources are studied.  It should be emphasised that the reconstructions in this document do not generally include outlines from secondary sources.  The objective is to expand the reconstructions based only on primary sources, to avoid perpetuating errors.  The present document shows the families whose names start with the letters A to C. 

 

William I King of England granted extensive estates to Norman barons as a reward for their part in the conquest of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom.  The complexity of this task implies the swift implementation of a sophisticated bureaucracy.  The resulting network of local feudal lordships not only enabled the king to assert rapid control over every part of the country but also created a network of local power bases for these influential immigrants.  The grants were personal from the king and were therefore also revocable at the king's will.  There are numerous examples of changes in local control which followed forfeiture imposed as punishment for various transgressions. 

 

Few earldoms were created during the post-conquest period.  However, the earls represented only a small proportion of the English nobility.  The vast majority of English nobles were the numerous local feudal lords who held no formal title but whose nobility was not in doubt.  This had two results.  Firstly, it meant that the pool of noble marriage partners available for the earls and their immediate families was considerably extended outside their own limited family groups.  The resulting exogamous pattern of marriages was reflected in the marriage policies of the English royal family which, in addition to European dynastic marriages, did not hesitate to marry into English families of the lesser nobility.  Secondly, it provided opportunity for advancement to many other families besides those of the principle earls.  Even if they never made the transition to earldom, many such families enjoyed great influence, as shown by frequent marriages with the first-tier nobility.  A notable example is provided by the Tosny family. 

 

 

 

ABITOT

 

 

Loyd indicates that “Abitot” is the same place as Abbetot, which is located in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Le Havre, canton Saint-Romain[1]

 

 

[Three] brothers: 

1.         ROBERT le Despencer .  Round states that "Robert the Despencer" was the brother of "Urse de Abetot" who succeeded the former in his lands in Lincolnshire.  He does not cite the primary source which confirms the family relationship, although he does refer to "Ingoluesmaera" (part of the property the subject of the [1095/1100] writ, see below) being the same as "Gundelsmere" which was held by Robert le Despencer in Domesday Book[2].  Domesday Book records “Robert Despenser” holding Childswickham in Gloucestershire [Worcestershire]; and several properties in Leicestershire[3]

2.         URSE [I] de Abitot (-[1100/10]).  Round states that "Robert the Despencer" was the brother of "Urse de Abetot" who succeeded the former in his lands in Lincolnshire, but does not cite the primary source which confirms the family relationship[4].  "Urse de Abetot" witnessed the undated charter under which William I King of England granted four manors to Chertsey St Peter[5].  William I King of England notified "Urse de Abetot" and the bishop of Worcester of his donation of "Leng" to the church of Evesham by undated charter[6].  Domesday Book records “Urse d’Abetot” holding Sezincote in Gloucestershire; and "Urse the sheriff" holding numerous properties from the churches of Worcester, Westminster St Peter, St Mary of Pershore, from the bishop of Bayeux, as well as his own holdings from the king, in Worcestershire[7].  Sheriff of Worcester: "…Urso vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated 20 May 1089 under which Wulfstan Bishop of Worcester granted property at Alveston to the monks[8].  "…Eudo dapifer, Ivo dapifer, Hanno dapifer, Rotbertus de Oili, Urso de Abetot…Hugo de Portu, Rogerus de Busleio, Ranulfus Peverellis, Aiulfus vicecomes, Alveradus de Lincoln, Ernulfus de Hesding" witnessed the charter dated 27 Jan 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the status of Bath abbey[9].  “…Ursone de Abetot…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[10].  A writ addressed to Robert Bishop of Lincoln and Osbert Sheriff of Lincolnshire, dated to [1095/1100], sanctioned an exchange of lands between "Ur de Abet" and "Rotb de Laceio de Ingoluesmaera", witnessed by "R. fil Haim"[11].  "…Ursonis de Abetot…" witnessed the undated charter under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Bermondsey abbey[12]m ADELISA, daughter of ---.  Ellis says that "Athelisa the viscountess" witnessed the charter of Urse de Abitot to Malvern priory, but does not cite the primary source in question[13].  Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "terram que fuit Adelize uxoris Ursonis de Abbetot sicut ipsa Adeliza eam ei concessit" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1123/Jul 1129][14].  Urse & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER de Abitot .  Henry I King of England instructed "Waltero vicecomiti Gloec et Rogero vicecomiti de Wirecestr et Hugoni de Legrec" that the monks of Worcester Cathedral should enjoy quiet enjoyment, by charter dated to [Jun 1109/Aug 1111] or [Jul/Oct 1113][15].  Ellis says that "Roger d’Abitot" son of Urse de Abitot "having killed one of the household of Henry I was banished", but does not cite the primary source in question[16].  The banishment must be dated to [1114], as Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Rogeri de Wygrecestra", in and around the town of Worcester, to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug][17]

b)         [EMMELINE] .  Round states that the wife of Walter de Beauchamp was the daughter of Urse de Abitot but he does not cite the corresponding primary source which confirms that this is correct[18].  Ellis says that "Emmeline Roger’s sister was wife of Walter de Beauchamp, who obtained the fief of Urso and the shrievalty of Worcestershire, which Henry I confirmed to him, together wih the office of one of the king’s dispensers which Robert brother of Urso had formerly held, and the land given him by Adelisa the widow of Urso"[19].  If this information is all correct, it appears to establish Emmeline’s parentage and marriage.  However, Ellis cites none of the corresponding primary sources.  The relevant charters are set out in the Beauchamp cartulary: (1) Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Rogeri de Wygrecestra", in and around the town of Worcester, to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug][20]; (2) Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "vicecomitatum de Wigresestrasia" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [Dec 1113/Apr 1116][21]; and (3) Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "terram que fuit Adelize uxoris Ursonis de Abbetot sicut ipsa Adeliza eam ei concessit" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1123/Jul 1129][22].  The documents do not explicitly state that Walter’s wife was the daughter of Urse de Abitot and brother of Roger de Abitot, but this is a reasonable implication.  The latest date of her marriage is assessed from the dating of the first of these charters.  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.   m (before [1114]) WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, son of --- (-[1130/May 1133]). 

3.         [OSBERT de Abitot (-before Oct 1113).  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto de Abetot et ministris [et] forestariis de foresta de Feccham" that he had granted a fox-hunting licence in his forest in Feckenham to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1110/16][23].  Sheriff of Worcester.  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto vicecomiti et omnibus forestariis de Wirecestrasera" that he had granted a wolf-hunting licence in his forest in Worcestershire to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1106/13][24].  It is more likely that Osbert was the brother of Urse de Abitot rather than his son.  The charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug], under which King Henry I granted the land of Roger de Abitot to [his brother-in-law] Walter de Beauchamp suggests that Roger was his father’s oldest son and heir.  If that is correct, it is likely that Roger would have been the preferred appointee as sheriff of Worcester, after his father, assuming that one of Urse’s sons would have been chosen.  This case is reminiscent of the appointment of Durand as sheriff of Gloucester, in succession to his brother Roger [de Pitres], passing over Roger’s son Walter de Gloucester who is recorded as sheriff after Durand (see the document ENGLAND EARLS - GLOUCESTER).  In the Abitot case, it is possible that Urse’s son was too young to have been appointed sheriff after his father died and that his father’s younger brother was chosen as "caretaker" sheriff by the king.  Osbert must have died before Oct 1113, the latest date of a charter which names Roger as sheriff (see above).] 

 

 

1.         URSE [II] .  He is named as father of Robert in the charter quoted below.  Loyd indicates that there is no other place named “Abetot” in Normandy other than the one with which the Abitot family is connected.  The suggestion is that Robert FitzUrse was in some way connected with the Abitot family, especially given that Urse is not a common name[25].  If that is correct, there appear to be two possibilities to explain the family relationship.  Firstly, Robert could have been an older son of Urse [I] whom his father had left in charge of family properties in Normandy.  If that is correct, Robert presumably predeceased his father as no further reference to him has been found.  It does not appear likely that Robert was a younger son of Urse [I]: the banishment of Roger, son of Urse [I], and the grant of his properties by King Henry I to his brother-in-law Walter [I] de Beauchamp, indicates that any brother of Roger then living would also have been disinherited and would be unlikely to have been permitted to retain property in Normandy.  Secondly, Robert could have belonged to another branch of the same family (maybe the senior line) which had retained the family properties in Normandy when its cousins left for England.  The donation dated [?1128] referred to below supports the hypothesis that another branch of the Abitot family remained in Normandy where they held property.  m ---.  The name of Urse’s wife is not known.  Urse [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT FitzUrseW. de Tancervilla camerarius regis” made numerous donations to Boscherville, including “in Abetot…ecclesiam et decimam et terram…inter ecclesiam et domum Roberti filii Ursi”, by undated charter (dated to the reign of King Henry I)[26].  It is likely that this is the same donation which is referred to in a charter dated to [1177/82] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of Saint-Georges de Boscherville, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Habetot..." made by “Rodulfus Willelmi regis magister” with the consent of King Henry I[27].  If that is correct, the original donation may have been made during the reign of King William II, in which case the later charter quoted above would have been a confirmation of this original.  The earlier the date of the original donation, the less likely that Robert FitzUrse was the same person as Robert de Abitot (shown below), which is suggested by Loyd[28]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Abitot .  An inspeximus dated 16 May 1316 reproduces a charter of King Henry II which confirms donations made to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including land donated by “Leza uxor Roberti de Abbetot” and which “ipse Robertus posuit super altare[29].  Round summarises a charter under which “Rabel the chamberlain son of William the chamberlain” donated property to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including “the land that Lesza wife of Robert de Abetot gave them at her death and which Robert placed upon the altar[30].  Round dates the charter to [?1128], referring to a “vidimus of 1467 in archives. Trans. Vol. I. fo. 22”.  It is unclear whether he based his calendar entry on a document dated [1128] or only the vidimus.  Whatever the case, the donation is clearly the same as the one referred to in the 16 May 1316 inspeximus, although the text of the charter quoted in the latter does not refer to the death of Leza.  Loyd suggests that Robert de Abitot may have been the same person as Robert, son of Urse [II], who is shown above[31].  Whether this suggestion is correct depends on the dating of the charter in which Robert FitzUrse is named (see above).  In any case, the [?1128] charter does support the hypothesis that a possibly older branch of the Abitot family remained in Normandy, where they continued to hold property, after their cousins left for England.  m LEZA, daughter of ---.  An inspeximus dated 16 May 1316 reproduces a charter of King Henry II which confirms donations made to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including land donated by “Leza uxor Roberti de Abbetot” and which “ipse Robertus posuit super altare[32].  Round summarises a charter under which “Rabel the chamberlain son of William the chamberlain” donated property to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including “the land that Lesza wife of Robert de Abetot gave them at her death and which Robert placed upon the altar[33]

 

 

The following four individuals, named in charters with William [II] de Beauchamp (grandson of Urse [I] de Abitot) or his relatives, were probably related to the Abitot family but the information available is insufficient to enable the precise relationships to be traced.  They were probably descendants of Osbert, brother of Urse [I] de Abitot, or another otherwise unrecorded brother. 

 

1.         ALEXANDER de Abitot .  "…Alexandro de Abitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[34].  "…Alexandro Dapitot, Osberto de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[35]

 

2.         JOHN de Abitot (-after [1223/24]).  "…Johanne Dapitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[36].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Ada de Duderhill, Petro de Bello Campo, et Johanne de Abbitot, (Gast) Galfrido de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane filie Willelmi de Bello Campo et [nepos/nepte] mee"[37].  "Johannes de Abetot" donated land in Alkerton [in Eastington, Gloucestershire] to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Alexandri filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [early Henry III], witnessed by "domino Osberto de Abetot"[38].  "Johannes de Abetot" granted the service of "Henrici filii mei" to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory by charter dated to [1223/24], witnessed by "domino Waltero de Bellocampo…"[39]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         ALEXANDER de Abitot (-after [1250/69]).  "Johannes de Abetot" donated land in Alkerton [in Eastington, Gloucestershire] to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Alexandri filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [early Henry III], witnessed by "domino Osberto de Abetot"[40].  "Alexander de Abbitot" issued a quitclaim to "domino meo Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to "terram…in Hyndelip que vocatur Oldebur" by charter dated to [1250/69][41]

b)         HENRY de Abitot .  "Johannes de Abetot" granted the service of "Henrici filii mei" to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory by charter dated to [1223/24], witnessed by "domino Waltero de Bellocampo…"[42]

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Abitot .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Ada de Duderhill, Petro de Bello Campo, et Johanne de Abbitot, (Gast) Galfrido de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane filie Willelmi de Bello Campo et [nepos/nepte] mee"[43]

 

4.         OSBERT de Abitot .  "…Alexandro Dapitot, Osberto de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[44].  "Domino Guydone de Bello Campo, Osberto de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1213/36] under which "Johannes Archent" granted "terram meam in Stolton apud la Hethe", granted by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" to "Roberto patri meo", to "Hugoni de Duntesburn"[45].  "Johannes de Abetot" donated land in Alkerton [in Eastington, Gloucestershire] to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Alexandri filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [early Henry III], witnessed by "domino Osberto de Abetot"[46].  If these last two charters were issued in the early part of the date ranges, the witness Osbert de Abitot in both could be the same person as witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97]. 

 

 

The following persons were presumably descendants of the earlier members of the Abitot family but no indication has been found of the precise family relationships. 

 

1.         ROBERT de Abitotm MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated to [1239/May 1266] records that "Matildam que fuit uxor Roberti Dappetot" agreed with "Jacobum de Bello Campo" to transfer to him "totam terram meam…nomine dotis in villa de Acton" in return for an allowance of corn and clothing[47].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Abitot .  "…Johanne Dapetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1232/43] under which "Roculf de Chirchelench" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo, filio et heredi Walteri de Bello Campo" relating to "terram meam in campo de Chirchelench…vocatur la Hey" in return for a loan to repay the Jews[48].  "Johannes Dapetot filius Roberti Dapetot de Acton" issued a quitclaim of "totam terram meam in villa de Acton" to "domino meo domino Jacobo de Bello Campo" in return for money to pay a Jew, by charter dated to [1239/May 1266][49].  "…Willelmo de Abbetot, militibus…Johanne de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/69] under which "Johannes de Thorndon" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "de eodem Willelmo in villa de Stolton"[50]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Abitot .  "…Willelmo de Abbetot, militibus…Johanne de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/69] under which "Johannes de Thorndon" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "de eodem Willelmo in villa de Stolton"[51].  "Dominis Willelmo Dabitot de Crombe…militibus, Galfrido Dabitot de Hindelep…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/50] under which "Ricardus de Bruly" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "in villa de Wych et Wytton"[52]

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Abitot (-after [1261/69]).  "Dominis Willelmo Dabitot de Crombe…militibus, Galfrido Dabitot de Hindelep…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/50] under which "Ricardus de Bruly" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "in villa de Wych et Wytton"[53].  "…Galfrido Dapitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1258/69] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum de la Holte…cum advocatione ecclesie eiusdem" to "Johanni filio meo"[54].  "…Galfrido Dapetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1261/69] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench"[55]

 

 

 

 

AINCOURT (DEINCOURT)

 

 

The Complete Peerage states that Aincourt is a village in “the Vexin normand[56].  Loyd specifies that “Ancourt” is in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Dieppe, canton Offranville[57]The list of fees held from Philippe II King of France includes “terra Oliveri de Eincuria, unum feodum apud Eincuriam” among the “Ballivia Caletensis, alias domini Gaufridi de Capella[58].  If this entry refers to Oliver [II] de Aincourt, it is curious that he continued to hold property both in England and in France even after King John lost Normandy to the French king. 

 

 

1.         WALTER [I] de Aincourt (-[1103]).  The epitaph of his son William indicates that Walter was "consanguinei Remigii episcopi Lincolniensis" but his precise relationship to Remy Bishop of Lincoln has not been ascertained.  Domesday Book records “Walter d'Aincourt” holding land in Morton, Old Brampton, Pilsley, Holmesfield, Elmton and Stony Houghton in Derbyshire; land in Flawborough, Staunton-in-the-Vale, Cotham, East Stoke, Hockerton, Knapthorpe, Bulcote…Granby, in Nottinghamshire; land in Wombwell, West Melton, Toftes and Rawmarsh in Yorkshire West Riding; land in Belton and Great Gonerby Hundreds, in Old Somerby, Humby, Westhorpe, Houghton, Sudwelle, land in the hundreds of Swinstead, Burton-le-Googles, and Branston, in Blankney, and land in Potterhanworth Hundred, all in Lincolnshire[59].  He was related to Remy Bishop of Lincoln, according to the epitaph which records the death of his son "Wi[llelmus] filius Walteri Aiencuriensis consanguinei Remigii episcopi Lincolniensis…"[60].  An undated charter of King Henry II confirms the possessions of York St Mary and lists donations including the donations of “ecclesiam [in Beltona]…decimas suas de Hanawarda et de Blankanaie et de Coreby et de Cotes et de Turgaston et de Greneby et de Hikalinga et de Cnapthorp et de Cartune” made by “Walterus de Daincourt[61]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  An undated charter of King Henry II confirms the possessions of York St Mary and lists donations including the donations made by "Walterus de Daincourt" and the donation of “unam carucatam terræ quæ fuit Brutinæ in Corby et silvam…decimam de domino de Abbingtuna et de Lins et de Thudesham et decimam Ribaldi de Pikenham de altera Lins, et decimam de Herinthorp, decimam Normanni de Fliccaburh, decimam Gerrardi in Apelby et Gamesthorp et terram…Northuuda juxta Burtunam in Lincolschira” made by “Matildis uxor eius[62].  Richard Sharp suggests that she was Mathilde, [illegitimate] daughter of Alain "Rufus" de Bretagne Lord of Richmond & his mistress Gunhild ---[63].  This is based on her apparent royal ancestry which is indicated in the epitaph which records the death of [her son] "Wi[llelmus] filius Walteri Aiencuriensis…regia styrpe progenitus"[64].  It should be noted that the epitaph ("Wi[llelmus] filius Walteri Aiencuriensis consanguinei Remigii episcopi Lincolniensis…prefatus Willelmus regia styrpe progenitus") distinguishes between Walter’s relationship with the bishop of Lincoln and William’s being “regia styrpe progenitus”, which indicates that the latter connection must come from his mother’s family.  Some of the property which she donated to York St Mary was previously held by Alain "Rufus" (including Little Abington in Cambridgeshire, which he had acquired with the lands of "Eddeva Pulcra").  Walter [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         RALPH de Aincourt (-1158 or before).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad fil Walti" returning in Lincolnshire for "terra Godwini"[65]Radulfus de Ayncourt” founded Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire, for the soul of “Basiliæ mulieris meæ”, by undated charter[66]m firstly BASILIE, daughter of ---.  Radulfus de Ayncourt” founded Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire, for the soul of “Basiliæ mulieris meæ”, by undated charter[67]m secondly as her second husband, MATILDA, widow of RALPH FitzOdo, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriages has not yet been identified.   Ralph & his first wife had [two] children: 

i)          WALTER [II] de Aincourt (-1168).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1161/62, records knights’ fees of "Walterus de Aencort xxvi I, iii s, iii d" in Lincolnshire, in 1167/68 "Walterus de Aencort xxxiii l, vi s, viii d, de novo v m" in Lincolnshire[68].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "carta Walteri de Ainecurt" in Lincolnshire[69].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "Walterus de Daencurt ii milites" in Yorkshire[70]m AGNES Basset, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Walter [II] & his wife had [two] children: 

(1)       JOHN [I] de Aincourt (-6 Nov 1183).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

-         see below

(2)       [WALTER de Aincourt .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1186/87, records knights’ fees of "Walterus de Aencurt xx s" in Oxfordshire[71].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1190/91, records knights’ fees of "Walterus de Aencurt xvii l, X s – xxxv milites" in Lincolnshire[72].  The precise parentage of Walter has not been ascertained.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been another son of Walter [II].]   

ii)         [RALPH de Aincourt .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "Radulfus de Ainecurt iii milites" holding in "carta Walteri de Ainecurt" in Lincolnshire[73].  The precise parentage of Ralph has not been ascertained.  However, it appears likely that he held his land from his near relative, maybe his brother or first cousin.] 

b)         WILLIAM de Aincourt (-30 Oct [1088/98]).  An epitaph records the death "III [Ka]l Nov", while at the court of King William II, of "Wi[llelmus] filius Walteri Aiencuriensis consanguinei Remigii episcopi Lincolniensis…prefatus Willelmus regia styrpe progenitus"[74]

 

 

JOHN [I] de Aincourt, son of WALTER [II] de Aincourt & his wife --- (-6 Nov 1183).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Oliverus filius Johannis de Eincurt xxiv annorum…nepos Radulfi Murdac”, adding that “Johannes de Eincurt obiit elapsis ii annis ad festum sancti Leonardi” and referring to the dower of "domina Aliz uxor Johannis de Eincurt…in Blangenia"[75]

m ALICE Murdac, daughter of --- Murdac & his wife --- de Chesney (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Oliverus filius Johannis de Eincurt xxiv annorum…nepos Radulfi Murdac”, adding that “Johannes de Eincurt obiit elapsis ii annis ad festum sancti Leonardi” and referring to the dower of "domina Aliz uxor Johannis de Eincurt…in Blangenia"[76]

John [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         OLIVER [I] de Aincourt ([1161/62]-1201 or before).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Oliverus filius Johannis de Eincurt xxiv annorum…nepos Radulfi Murdac”, adding that “Johannes de Eincurt obiit elapsis ii annis ad festum sancti Leonardi”, and referring to revenue "de Langho…de Branntone…de Blangenia"[77].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1186/87, records knights’ fees of "Oliverus de Aencurt xxxv l" in Lincolnshire[78].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1194/95 and 1196/97, records "Oliver de Aencurt" among "isti habuerunt quietantiam per brevia" in Lincolnshire[79]Oliverus de Aincurta” donated land “in Braunceton...sicut Walterus de Eyncaria avus meus dedit” to Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire by undated charter[80]The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1201/12, records knights’ fees of "Oliverus de Aencurt xl milites; in xiii, xxxv per episcopum Norwicensem" in Lincolnshire[81].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "Oliverus de Ainecurt ii milites" in Yorkshire[82].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "honor Oliveri de Encurt" in Lincolnshire[83].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "Oliverus de Aencurt ccv milites" in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire[84]m firstly ---.  The name of Olvier’s first wife is not known.  The marriage is indicated by the description of the lawsuit, extracts quoted below, which involved Oliver [I]’s wife Amabel and his son Oliver [II], which is inconsistent with Amabel having been Oliver [II]’s mother.  m secondly as her first husband, AMABEL, daughter of --- (-after 10 Feb 1219).  Amabel married secondly Henry Le Eueske: “Henry Le Eueske and Amabilla his wife” claimed parts of manors in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Buckinghamshire from “Oliver de Aincurt” on the basis that they were “of the inheritance of Oliver de Aincurt father of the said Oliver and late the husband of Amabilla, in Branston Lincolnshire”, dated 10 Feb 1219[85].  Oliver [I] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         OLIVER [II] de Aincourt (-after 1231).  “Henry Le Eueske and Amabilla his wife” claimed parts of manors in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Buckinghamshire from “Oliver de Aincurt” on the basis that they were “of the inheritance of Oliver de Aincurt father of the said Oliver and late the husband of Amabilla, in Branston Lincolnshire”, dated 10 Feb 1219[86].  The list of fees held from Philippe II King of France includes “terra Oliveri de Eincuria, unum feodum apud Eincuriam” among the “Ballivia Caletensis, alias domini Gaufridi de Capella[87].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[88]m NICOLE, daughter of ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[89].  Nicole was presumably closely related to the La Haye family.  The document quoted above does not specify the relationship.  Oliver [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN [II] Deincourt of Blankney, Lincolnshire (-before 14 Oct 1257).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

-         see below

2.         [JOHN de Aincourt .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1201/12, records knights’ fees of "Johannes de Eyncurt et Hugo de Stiventone i militem" in Derbyshire "de honore de Tikehulle"[90].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1211/12, records "Johannes de Eyncurt et Radulfus de Willeby i militem, quilibet dimidium" in "honor de Tykehulle" in Derbyshire[91]. The precise parentage of John has not been ascertained.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been another son of John [I].] 

3.         [ROGER de Aincourt .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "Rogerus de Eincurt ii milites" holding in "honor Oliveri de Encurt" in Lincolnshire[92].  The precise parentage of Roger has not been ascertained.  However, it appears likely that he held his land from his near relative, maybe his brother or first cousin.] 

 

 

1.         GERVAIS de Aincourt (-after [1189]).  “Helewis filia Willelmi de Lancastr” confirmed to “Gileberto fratri meo...terras quas pater meus” had given him “Slegil...et Sockebroc et Tyrerhge...et totam terram de Paterickedale” by charter dated to [1189], witnessed by “......Roberto de Pinkenei...Gervas de Aencurt...[93]

 

2.         RALPH de Aincourt (-after [1225/26]).  A charter dated to [1357] confirmed an agreement dated to [1225/26] between “dominum Willelmum de Lancastre” and “dominum Thomam filium Willelmi” [Greystoke] concerning fisheries “in essaveria de Ulleswatr”, and another agreement between “dominus Willus de Lancastre et Radulphus de Ayncurt et Rogerus de Lancastre et dominus Thomas filius Willelmi” concerning “stangno de Stayneton”, and also notes that “Ketell filius Aldred” donated “2 bovatas terre et molendinum de Barton” to the hospital of St. Nicholas and that “Wills filius Gilberti” confirmed the donation made by “predictus Ketel avunculus eius[94]

 

 

JOHN [II] Deincourt of Blankney, Lincolnshire, son of OLIVER [II] de Aincourt & his wife Nicole --- (-before 14 Oct 1257).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[95]

m firstly ---. 

m secondly (before 12 Nov 1251) as her second husband, AGNES de Neville, widow of RICHARD de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire, daughter of GEOFFREY de Neville of Raby, co. Durham & his wife Joan --- (-[16 Jun 1285/20 Jul 1293]).  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[96]

John [II] & his second wife had one child: 

1.         EDMUND Deincourt (-6 Jan 1327).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Deincourtm ISABEL de Mohun, daughter of REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his second wife Isabel de Ferrers of the Earls of Derby.  Edmund & his wife had one child:  

a)         JOHN Deincourt (-before 1327).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had children: 

i)          WILLIAM Deincourt (-2 Jun 1364).  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Deincourt

-         see below.  

 

 

WILLIAM Deincourt, son of JOHN Deincourt & his wife --- (-2 Jun 1364).  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Deincourt

m (before 26 Mar 1326) MILLICENT La Zouche, daughter of WILLIAM La Zouche Lord Zouche (of Harringworth, Northamptonshire) & his wife Maud Lovel of Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire (-22 Jun 1379). 

William & his wife had children:

1.         WILLIAM Deincourt (-before 1364).  m MARGARET de Welle, daughter of ADAM de Welle of Well, Lincolnshire, Lord Welle & his wife ---.  William & his wife had children: 

a)         WILLIAM Deincourt (26 Dec 1357-15/16 Oct 1381).  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Deincourtm ALICE Neville, of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Matilda Percy (-20 Jun 1433).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[97].  William & his wife had children: 

i)          RALPH Deincourt (24 Jun 1380-7 Nov 1384). 

ii)         JOHN Deincourt (Middleham, Yorkshire 28 Feb 1382-11 May 1406)Lord Deincourtm (before 17 Feb 1401) JOAN Grey, daughter and heiress of ROBERT Grey Lord Grey (of Rotherfield, Oxfordshire) & his first wife Joan --- (Rotherfield [20] Jul 1386-20 Nov 1408).  John & his wife had three children: 

(a)       WILLIAM Deincourt ([1402/03]-5 Sep 1422)Lord Deincourtm (licence 3 Jan 1418) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Beaumont, daughter of HENRY de Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Elizabeth Willoughby of Eresby (-[20 or 27] Jul 1447).  She married secondly (Papal mandate for dispensation 15 Jul 1427) as his second wife, Richard Hastinges of Newton Harcourt, Leicestershire.  She married thirdly as his second wife, Thomas Neville of Brancepeth, co. Durham. 

(b)       ALICE Deincourt (25 Feb 1404-10 Feb 1474).  m firstly (before 3 Nov 1423) WILLIAM Lovell Lord Lovell (of Titchmarsh), son of JOHN Lovel Lord Lovel & his wife [Eleanor Zouche of Haringworth] (-13 Jun 1455).  m secondly (Royal licence 8 Jan 1463) as his second wife, RALPH Boteler Lord Sudeley, son of --- (-2 May 1473). 

(c)       MARGARET Deincourt (21 Sep 1405-16 Sep 1454, bur Tattershall).  m (before 3 Nov 1423) RALPH Cromwell Lord Cromwell, son of ---. 

 

 

 

 

ALBINI (AUBIGNY)

 

 

Loyd specifies that “Saint-Martin d’Aubigny” is in the present-day French département of Manche, arrondissement Coutances, canton Periers[98]

 

 

GUILLAUME d'Aubigny, son of ---.  1056.  Seigneur d'Aubigny. 

m (before 1048) ---, sister of GRIMAULT de Plessis, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 

Guillaume & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         ROGER d'Aubigny (-after [1081]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  "…Rogerii de Albiniaco, filiique sui Rualoc…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[99]m AMICE, daughter of ---.  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Roger de Albineio and Amicia his wife with the consent of their sons William and Nigel" by charter dated 1126[100].  “Wilielmus comes Sussexiæ” confirmed donations to Boxgrove Priory by his predecessors “Rogerus de Albineio, et Willelmus Pincerna…et Willielmi patris mei filii reginæ Aeliz, et Matildis matris meæ” to Boxgrove Priory by undated charter, which names “domina Avicia, uxor Rogeri de Albineio…et filiorum suorum Willielmi et Nigelli[101].  Roger & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         RUALOC d'Aubigny (-after 1084).  "…Rogerii de Albiniaco, filiique sui Rualoc…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[102]

b)         WILLIAM "Pincerna" d'Aubigny (-1139).  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Roger de Albineio and Amicia his wife with the consent of their sons William and Nigel" by charter dated 1126[103].  Lord of Old Buckenham, Norfolk.  He distinguished himself at the battle of Tinchebrai 1106[104].  "…Willelmo de Albineyo pincerna et Nigello de Albineyo frater suo…" witnessed the charter of Henry I King of England dated 2 Feb [1111/16] under which the king donated the manor of "Winterworda" to the archbishop of Rouen[105].  Brother of Nigel d'Aubigny, according to Orderic Vitalis he remained loyal to King Henry I during the rebellion of 1118[106].  He was Master Butler ["Pincerna"] of the household of King Henry I.  Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester, for the souls of “...fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Hunfridi”, by undated charter[107].  The Chronica Johannis de Oxenedes records the death in 1139 of “Willelmus pincerna regis fundator cœnobii de Wymundeham[108]m MATILDA Bigod, daughter of ROGER le Bigod & his [second] wife Adelise de Tosny (-[1121/33]).  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suæ Matilidis filiæ…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[109].  William & his wife had five children: 

i)          WILLIAM d'Aubigny (after 1100-Waverley Abbey 12 Oct 1176, bur Wymondham, Norfolk).  A memorandum of the foundation of Wymondham Priory records that “Willielmus de Albaneio, pincerna regis Henrici” had “unum filium Willielmum comitem Arundeliæ[110].  He was created Earl of Arundel in [1138/39]. 

-         EARLS of ARUNDEL

ii)         NELE [Nigel] d'Aubigny .  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suæ Matilidis filiæ…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[111]

iii)        OLIVER d'Aubigny .  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suæ Matilidis filiæ…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[112].  "Willelmus de Albiniaco" donated “ecclesias de villa...Ham” to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1132/51], witnessed by “...Olivarius frater Willelmi de Albiniaco et Radulfus de Haia et Engerannus de Sai...[113]

iv)       ROLAND d'Aubigny .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

v)        OLIVA d'Aubigny (-bur Boxgrove Priory)Wilielmus Cicestriæ comes” donated property “ecclesiæ de Bisintona quam Radulphus de Haia dedit ecclesiæ sanctæ Trinitatis” to Boxgrove Priory, dated the day “ipse Radulphus” was betrothed to “uxorem suam Olivam sororem…meam”, subscribed by “Radulfus filius Savari…[114].  “Wilielmus comes Arundelli” donated property “Bessesola..[et] Winkingas” to Boxgrove Priory, for the souls of “Adelizæ reginæ…Olivæ sororis meæ, et Olyvæ filiæ meæ, et Agathæ, quæ ibi iacent”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Godfridus filius comitis[115].  Her brother settled dower in Sussex on her[116]m RALPH de la Haye of Halnaker, Sussex, son of ROBERT de la Haye & his wife Muriel ---. 

c)         NELE [Nigel] de Albini (-21 or 26 Nov 1129)Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester, for the souls of “...fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Hunfridi”, by undated charter[117].  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Roger de Albineio and Amicia his wife with the consent of their sons William and Nigel" by charter dated 1126[118].  "…Willelmo de Albineyo pincerna et Nigello de Albineyo frater suo…" witnessed the charter of Henry I King of England dated 2 Feb [1111/16] under which the king donated the manor of "Winterworda" to the archbishop of Rouen[119].  Henry I King of England granted him Montbrai, in Normandy, the forfeited lands of Robert de Mowbray Earl of Northumberland[120].  He repudiated his first wife after the death of her brother Gilbert de Laigle[121].  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by "Nigel de Albineio" by charter dated to [1124/35], witnessed by “Nigello de Albineio[122]m firstly (after 1107, repudiated) as her second husband, MATHILDE de Laigle, former wife of ROBERT de Mowbray Earl of Northumberland, daughter of RICHER de l'Aigle & his wife Judith d’Avranches of Chester (-[after Oct 1155][123]).  She is named and her parentage given by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her first marriage[124].  Her second marriage took place with the dispensation of Pope Paschal II, granted although her first husband was still living[125].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Mathildi de Aqila" in Dorsetshire and exempted in Staffordshire[126]m secondly (Jun [1118]) GUNDRED de Gournay, daughter of GERARD de Gournay & his wife Edith de Warenne ([1100/05]-after 1155).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[127].  Orderic Vitalis records the marriage in Jun [1118] of "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco...sorore sua...Gundrea...consilio regis" to “Nigello de Albinneio[128].  In another passage she is named as second wife of Nigel d'Aubigny[129].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gunderede uxori Nig de Albin" in Leicestershire[130].  ”Gundreda, uxor Nigelli de Albini” donated property to the Hospital of St Leonard, York by undated charter which names “Rogero de Molbray filio suo[131].  An undated charter notes the donation of ”Hospitale Sancti Michaelis Archangeli” to Whitby Monastery, at the request of “Dominam Gundredam uxorem Nigelli de Albini” for the soul of “Rogero de Moubray filio eorum[132].  Nele & his second wife had one child:

i)          ROGER de Mowbray (-[late 1187/1188], bur Tyre).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[133]

-         EARLS of NORFOLK. MOWBRAY

d)         son .  The 1130 Pipe Roll suggests that Humphrey’s father must have been another son of Roger d’Aubigny, as it records "Alan de Linc" returning for the dowry he gave to "Unfr de Albin cum filia sua" in Lincolnshire[134]m ---.  One child: 

i)          HUMPHREY de Albini (-before 1129)Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester, for the souls of “...fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Hunfridi”, by undated charter[135]m --- de Lincoln, daughter of ALAN of Lincoln & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alan de Linc" returning for the dowry he gave to "Unfr de Albin cum filia sua" in Lincolnshire[136]

e)         [ANSGOTAnsgotus camerarius regis” donated “decimam...in hameletto...Modingham...in parochiis de Eltham et Chisilhersta” to Rochester, for the souls of “...uxoris mee et fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Humfredi”, by undated charter[137].  The phrasing of the sentence which describes those for whose souls this donation is made is the same as in the undated charter under which Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester (see above)[138].  This suggests that one document has been copied from the other.  The possibility that the documentation is in some way flawed cannot therefore be excluded.  If the lists are authentic in both documents, Ansgot must have been another brother of William de Albini.  In that case, he may have been the same person as the father of Samson de Albini who is shown below.  m ---.  Ansgotus camerarius regis” donated “decimam...in hameletto...Modingham...in parochiis de Eltham et Chisilhersta” to Rochester, for the souls of “...uxoris mee et fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Humfredi”, by undated charter[139].] 

f)          son .  m ---.  One child: 

i)          SAMSON de Albini .  Chaplain to his uncle Nigel de Albini[140].  “Rogerus de Moubray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “patris mei Nigelli et matris meæ Gundredæ…et uxoris meæ Adeliz”, by undated charter witnessed by “Samsone de Albineio[141].  “Rogerus de Mowbray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, with the consent of “Sampsone de Albeneio” to whom “Nigellus pater meus” had granted the property in question, by undated charter[142].  “S de Albinneio” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “Nigelli de Albinneio”, by undated charter which names “Rogerus filius meus[143]m ---.  The name of Samson's wife is not known.  Samson & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ROGER de Albini .  “S de Albinneio” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “Nigelli de Albinneio”, by undated charter which names “Rogerus filius meus[144]

2.         [NELE [Nigel] d'Aubigny of Cainhoe (-[1100]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  His possible origin was discussed by Loyd[145]Domesday Book records “Nigel d’Aubigny” holding Turville in Desborough Hundred and Towersey in Ixhill Hundred in Buckinghamshire and numerous properties in Bedfordshire[146].]  m AMICE de Ferrers, daughter of HENRY de Ferrers & his wife Bertha ---.  “Robertus comes junior de Ferariis” confirmed donations to Tutbury by “avus meus Henricus…Egenulfus patruus meus…Robertus pater meus”, naming “Nigellus de Albiniaco et Amicia filia avi mei[147].  Nele & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRY de Albini (-after 1130).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his father in [1100] at Cainhoe.  “Henricus de Albineio et domina Cecilia uxor eius” donated property to Sopwell monastery by undated charter[148].  He was a benefactor of Abingdon Abbey in 1107 and made a grant to Thetford attested by his sister Adelisa[149][150]m CECILIA, daughter of [PATRICK [I] de Chaources [Chaworth] & his wife Mathilde de Hesdin].  “Henricus de Albineio et domina Cecilia uxor eius” donated property to Sopwell monastery by undated charter[151].  Her parentage is indicated by military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, which record knights’ fees of "Pagani de Muntdublel" in Gloucestershire including [Cecilia’s son] "Nigellus de Albieno i manerium de xxl…de matrimonio matris suæ", which immediately follows the note that "comes Patricius" [identified as Patrick Earl of Salisbury, whose mother is recorded as Sibyl de Chaources] also held knights’ fees "de matrimonio matris suæ"[152].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[153].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Robertus de Albineio" confirmed the donation of "terram…in Stretona" by "pater meus Henricus", witnessed by "Cecilia matre mea, Nigello fratre meo…Willielmo filio Nigelli"[154].  Henry & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT de Albini (-1191).  He succeeded his father before [1140/46] when he gave the hermitage of Modry to St Albans[155].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Robertus de Albineio" confirmed the donation of "terram…in Stretona" by "pater meus Henricus", witnessed by "Cecilia matre mea, Nigello fratre meo…Willielmo filio Nigelli"[156].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[157]m ---.  The name of Robert's wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child:

(a)       ROBERT de Albini (-before 5 Nov 1226).  “Robertus filius Roberti de Albineio” confirmed donations of property to Sopwell monastery by “Henricus avus meus sive Robertus pater meus” by undated charter, witnessed by “Nigello de Albineio, Willielmo fratre eius[158]m ---.  The name of Robert's wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had four children:

(1)       ROBERT de Albini (-before 3 Jun 1234). 

(2)       JOAN de Albini (-before 12 Jan 1241).  The sheriff of Bedfordshire was ordered to permit the execution of the testament of Joan de Beauchamp, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Beauchamp”, dated 12 Jan 1241[159]m  GEOFFREY de Beauchamp, son of --- (-[before 12 Jan 1241]). 

(3)       ISABEL de Albini

(4)       ASCELINA de Albini (-after 1241)The marriage of Asceline d’Aubigny, sister of Robert deceased, was granted to Amaury de Saint-Amand, to the use of Ralph de Saint-Amand his son, dated 3 Jun 1234[160].  Half of land formerly of Joan de Beauchamp in Eastcotts” was granted to “Ralph de St Amand...and Ascelina his wife, one of Joan’s heirs”, dated [Jan] 1241[161]m RALPH de Saint-Amand, son of AMAURY [I] de Saint-Amand & his first wife --- (-after 1241). 

ii)         NIGEL de Albini .  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Robertus de Albineio" confirmed the donation of "terram…in Stretona" by "pater meus Henricus", witnessed by "Cecilia matre mea, Nigello fratre meo…Willielmo filio Nigelli"[162].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[163]

iii)        AMICIA de Albini .  “Robertus de Albineio et Cecilia mater sua” donated property to Sopwell monastery when “Amiciam puellam, sororem ipsius Roberti et Ceciliæ filiam” became a nun there, by undated charter which also names “Henricus de Albineio pater Amiciæ[164].  A nun at Sopwell after 1140[165]

b)         ADELISA de Albini .  She, her husband and their son Hugh made a grant to Thetford priory, mentioned in a confirmation charter of King Henry II dated [1160], and as "Adelisa de Albeni" making another grant to Thetford so that she could be buried there.  She was mentioned as sister of Henry in his grant to Thetford[166]m RICHARD FitzOsbert, son of ---. 

3.         [RICHARD .  “Nigellus de Albeneyo” donated property to “domino Richardo fratri meo abbati de S. Albano” by undated charter dated to the reign of William I King of England[167].  Abbot of St Alban’s.] 

 

 

 

 

AMUNDEVILLE

 

 

Loyd specifies that “Mondeville” is in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Caen[168].  The family was studied by C. T. Clay[169]

 

 

1.         JOSCELIN de Amundeville (-[5 Apr] after 1085).  "…Hugo de Port, Wido Oillei, Richard de Corcei, Geoffrey Martel…Robert Malet, Ivelin de Amundivilla…Bernard de Neufmarché, Vigerius filius Ursonis, Radulfus filius Odonis, Ricuardus de Torcei, Eustachius his brother…Radulfus filius Anseredi, Rannulfus vicecomes, Rodbertus filius Ascelini" witnessed the charter dated 1085 which records the settlement between Gulbert de Alfait and the abbey of Fécamp[170]

 

2.         JOHN de Amundeville (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Johs de Amundevilla" in Yorkshire, Northumberland for "Hectona et Hasteleia"[171]

 

 

1.         JOSCELIN de Amundeville (-5 Apr ----).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “Non Apr” of “Goslanus de Amundavill dapifer[172].  The name of the husband of Beatrix Paynell is indicated by the record of her own death in the obituary of Lincoln Cathedral (see below).  m BEATRIX Paynell, daughter of --- (-11 Nov ----).  Her parentage and marriage are assumed from the undated charter under which "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[173].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[174].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “III Id Nov” of “Beatrix uxor Goslani dapiferi[175].  Five children: 

a)         WALTER de Amundeville (-20 Dec late 1166).  According to Domesday Descendants, Walter was the son of Joscelin de Amundeville and Beatrice Paynel (no corresponding primary source cited)[176].  King Stephen granted land "domu Walti de Amunduulla de Chinierbi…in Chinierbi et in Osgotebi et in Ouresbi" to William Earl of Lincoln by charter dated to [1139/40], witnessed by "Ric fil Ursi…"[177].  "…Walterus de Amundauilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [1150/55] under which "Philippus de Kime" confirmed the donations made by "patris mei" of the churches of Bullington and Langton by Wragby[178].  The Pipe Roll 1161/62 records "Walter de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[179].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[180].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “XIII Kal Jan” of “Walterus de Amundevilla[181]m HAWISE, daughter of --- (-20 Feb [1163]).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “X Kal Mar” of “Hawisa uxor Walteri de Amundavilla[182]Domesday Descendants records that Walter de Amundeville made a grant of rent at Kirkby to the church of Lincoln for the anniversary of the death of wife Havise in Mar 1163[183]

b)         WILLIAM de Amundeville (-[22 Jul] [1168]).  "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[184].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[185].  “Willielmus de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla”, for the soul of "…uxoris meæ Agnetis", by undated charter witnessed by "…Willielmo de Amundevilla…"[186].  The approximate date of his death is indicated by the 1168/69 Pipe Roll in which "Helyas de Amundeuilla…pro Willo fratre suo…[et] pro Walto fratre suo" accounted for land in Lincolnshire[187].  It is confirmed by the entry for his widow in the same roll (see below).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “XI Kal Aug” of “Willelmus de Amundevilla[188]m as her first husband, AGNES, daughter of --- (-after 1214).  “Willielmus de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla”, for the soul of "…uxoris meæ Agnetis", by undated charter[189].  "Agnes de Amundeuill" accounted "p recto hndo de catall dni sui de diuisa sua" in Lincolnshire in the 1168/69 Pipe Roll[190].  According to Domesday Descendants, Agnes, wife of William de Amundeville, answered a plea relating to her second husband Theobald Hautein in 1214[191].  She married secondly Theobald Hautein.  William & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [MATILDA de Amundeville .  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “XI Kal Aug” of “Willelmus de Amundevilla” and on “VIII Kal Aug” that “Matilda eius filius” donated annual payments[192].  It is uncertain that any daughter of this William de Amundeville would have been old enough to have donated property on her father’s death, considering his wife’s date of death.  It is therefore not certain that these two entries can refer to this William Amundeville.] 

c)         ELIAS de Amundeville (-after [1176/77]).  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[193].  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[194].  “Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” founded Melsa Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hingeram”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Elia de Mundevilla…[195].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Elias de Amundeville iv milites" in Lincolnshire in [1167/68][196].  "Helyas de Amundeuilla…pro Willo fratre suo…[et] pro Walto fratre suo" accounted for land in Lincolnshire in the 1168/69 Pipe Roll[197].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Helias de Amondeville" with one knight "in baillia de Gaureio…in servitium de Wareio"[198].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Helyas de Amundeuill…pro Willelmo fratre suo…[et] pro Waltero fratre suo" in Lincolnshire[199]m ---.  The name of Elias’s wife is not known.  Elias & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOSCELIN de Amundeville (-1214).  “Goslanus de Amundevilla, Eliæ filius” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “Walteri de Amundevilla […avunculi mei] et Eliæ patris mei”, for the souls of "…aviæ meæ Beatricis", by undated charter witnessed by "…Willielmo de Amundevilla…"[200].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Helyas de Amundevill…pro se et Iosleno filio suo" in Lincolnshire[201].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Joslenus de Amundeuill" in Lincolnshire[202].  According to Domesday Descendants, the heir of Agnes, widow of William de Amundeville, in 1214 was "Robert son of Margery, daughter of Jollan de Amundeville, a nephew of William" (no corresponding primary source cited)[203]m ---.  The name of Joscelin’s wife is not known.  Joscelin & his wife had one child: 

(1)       MARGERY de Amundeville .  According to Domesday Descendants, the heir of Agnes, widow of William de Amundeville, in 1214 was "Robert son of Margery, daughter of Jollan de Amundeville, a nephew of William" (no corresponding primary source cited)[204]m ---. 

ii)         ALICE de Amundeville (-after 22 Jun 1202).  "Alic filia Elye de Amundeville" paid a fine for recognition that "Elyas pater eius dedit ei villam de Winterton ad se maritand" and that "post obitum patris sui…Jollan frater eiusdem Alic" disseised her, in Nottinghamshire, dated 1200[205].  “Alice de Amundevile” claimed half a knight’s fee at Wimundestorp from “Jollan de Amundevill”, which refers to “Elias de Amundeville her father”, dated 22 Jun 1202[206]m ---. 

d)         RALPH de Amundeville .  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[207].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de Mondeville" holding one knight’s fee from "Willelmi de Percy" in Yorkshire in 1166[208].  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[209]m ---.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH de Amundeville (-after 1194).  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[210].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Radulfus de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[211]

e)         ADAM de Amundeville .  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[212].  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[213].

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Amundeville (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Mondeville" holding five knights’ fees from the bishop of Durham in Yorkshire in 1166[214]

 

2.         ROBERT de Amundeville (-before 1194).  “Robert de Amundeuill” donated donated land “in Swyney Wethteng…which Hugh Painil and Gilbert Eniot sometime held”, to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[215].  The reference to Hugh Paynell suggests that Robert de Mundeville was descended from Hugh’s sister (and therefore from one of the brothers of Walter de Amundeville (who died late 1166, see above), but the precise relationship has not yet been traced.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Amundeville (-after 1194).  “William de Amundeuill son of Robert de Amundeuill” confirmed his father’s donation of land “in the territory of Scotelthorp” to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[216].  “W. de Amundeuill” granted land “in the vill of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill his sister" by undated charter[217].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[218].  "…Willelmo de Amundeuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[219]

b)         AGNES de Amundeville .  “W. de Amundeuill” granted land “in the vill of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill his sister" by undated charter[220].  “Matilda pincerna formerly wife of Geoffrey pincerne of Scotelthorp” granted land “in the field of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill sister of Dom. William de Amundeuill" by undated charter[221].  “Matilda la Butiller of Scotelthorp in widowhood” granted land “in the field of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill daughter of Robert de Amundeuill" by undated charter, witnessed by "William de Amundeuill…"[222].  Agnes later donated the same land to Bridlington priory[223]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Amundeville (-after 1171).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Amundeville i m" in Northumberland in [1161/62][224].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Amundeville xx s" in Northumberland in [1171/72][225]

 

4.         ROGER de Amundeville (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Rogerus de Amondeville" with one knight "in baillia de Tenerchebraio" and one knight in his own service[226]

 

5.         ELIAS de Amundeville (-after 12 Oct 1218).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Elias de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[227].  "Elias de Amundeville" paid a fine "for having a writ to attaint…the jurors of an assize" in a case against "Augustine de Blakenham" in Suffolk, dated 12 Oct 1218[228]

 

6.         JOHN de Amundeville (-after 1208).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Durham, dated to [1208/10]: "Johannes de Amundevill" held land in "wapentac de Sadberge"[229].  

 

7.         GEOFFREY de Amundeville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Mondeville…Robertus de Mondeville" holding half of one knight’s fee "in Northamtona", and one "in Funtel", respectively, in Wiltshire in [1210/12][230]

 

8.         ROBERT de Amundeville (-after 1227).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Mondeville…Robertus de Mondeville" holding half of one knight’s fee "in Northamtona", and one "in Funtel", respectively, in Wiltshire in [1210/12][231].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Mandevile" holding 14 and three parts knights’ fees in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][232].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Robertus de Amuneville" held "de dono Regis Henrici in Button i militem"[233].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Mandevill" held "Winemeresham…de baronia sua de Merswd…in hundredo de Karenton" in Somerset[234].  "Robertus de Amundevill" paid a fine for the liberation of "Adam filium suum" as hostage who was given, dated [Mar] 1216[235].  Henry III King of England, at the request of "Willelmi de Putot", waived certain payments from "Roberto de Amenevill, cujus filiam idem Willelmus habet in uxorem" in 1227[236]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         ADAM de Amundeville (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Robertus de Amundevill" paid a fine for the liberation of "Adam filium suum" as hostage who was given, dated [Mar] 1216[237]

b)         daughter (-after 1227).  Henry III King of England, at the request of "Willelmi de Putot", waived certain payments from "Roberto de Amenevill, cujus filiam idem Willelmus habet in uxorem" in 1227[238]m WILLIAM de Putot, son of --- (-after 1227). 

 

9.         PETER de Amundeville (-after 22 Apr 1216).  "Petrus de Amundevill" made a fine after making peace with the king, in Lincolnshire, dated 22 Apr 1216[239]

 

 

 

 

ATON

 

 

1.         GERARD de Atonm ---.  The name of Gerard’s wife is not known.  Gerard & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH de Aton .  "Hugo filius Girardi de Atona" donated land "in Atona…in Larelandis…Whitflat…Gretlandis" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto de Stuteville…"[240]same person as…?  HUGH de Atonm ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Aton .  "Johannes filius Hugonis de Atona" granted the homage and service of "Nicholai filii Petri de Atona" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Dno Roberto de Stutevilla…"[241].  "Johannes de Atona" donated land "de Yrtona" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atona…"[242]

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Aton .  "Johannes de Atona" donated land "de Yrtona" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atona…"[243].  "Johannes de Atun filis Willelmi Senioris filii Gilberti de Atun" donated land "in Wicham" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atun…"[244].  "Laurentius filius Daniel de Atona" committed to paying five shillings annually to the infirmary at Whitby by undated charter witnessed by "…Gilberto de Atona…"[245]

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Bardleby (-after 1166).  “In Eborac[i]sira…Gilbertus de Barduleby dimidium militem…” is listed in a return of fees held in Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and north of the Tees by Hugh Bishop of Durham dated 1166[246].  The editor of Early Yorkshire Charters suggests that he was the same person as “Gilbert de Aton of Ayton in Pickering Lythe [who] held 2 car. in Barlby, 2 car. in Menethorpe and 1 car. in Newton by Gardham[247].  This is probably correct as the manor of Barlby was still held by William Lord Aton in 1385 (see below).  same person as…?  GILBERT de Aton .  The editor of Early Yorkshire Charters states that "Gilbert de Barduleby/Atun" was the father of William de Aton but he cites no corresponding primary source[248].  Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Rievaulx abbey, including the donation of "pratum de Torp" made by "Gileberti de Aton et Willelmi filii eius", confirmed by charter dated 10 Jul 1252[249]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Aton (-after [1185/95]).  The editor of Early Yorkshire Charters states that “William de Aton” was the son of "Gilbert de Barduleby/Atun" but he cites no corresponding primary source[250].  Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Rievaulx abbey, including the donation of "pratum de Torp" made by "Gileberti de Aton et Willelmi filii eius", confirmed by charter dated 10 Jul 1252[251].  “Willelmus de Aton” granted land "ab Holsike usque ad Brerflet…de Barthelby…" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Alani", with the consent of "Gilberti filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [1185/95][252]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [five] children: 

i)          GILBERT de Aton (-1235).  “Willelmus de Aton” granted land "ab Holsike usque ad Brerflet…de Barthelby…" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Alani", with the consent of "Gilberti filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [1185/95][253].  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[254]

-         see below

ii)         JOHN de Aton .  "Johannes de Atun filis Willelmi Senioris filii Gilberti de Atun" donated land "in Wicham" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atun…"[255].  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[256]

iii)        [WILLIAM de Aton .  William’s parentage has not been traced.  However, from a chronological point of view it is possible that he was another son of William de Aton.]  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOHN de Aton .  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[257]

iv)       [ROBERT de Aton .  Robert’s parentage has not been traced.  However, from a chronological point of view it is possible that he was another son of William de Aton.]  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       WILLIAM de Aton .  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[258]

v)        ALICE de Aton .  “William de Aton” granted rent in Barlby to "Hugh de Langthwaite in marriage with Alice his daughter", undated[259]m HUGH de Langthwaite, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         DANIEL de Atonm ---.  The name of Daniel’s wife is not known.  Daniel & his wife had one child: 

a)         LAWRENCE de Aton .  "Laurentius filius Daniel de Atona" committed to paying five shillings annually to the infirmary at Whitby by undated charter witnessed by "…Gilberto de Atona…"[260]

 

 

GILBERT de Aton, son of WILLIAM de Aton & his wife --- (-1235).  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[261].  His descendants were the heirs to the Vescy estates in Lincolnshire after the extinction of the descendants of Eustace de Vescy[262]

m MARGERY de Vescy, daughter of WARIN de Vescy & his wife ---.  A manuscript of Malton Priory names “Marjoriæ filiæ et hæredi” of “Warino de Vesci”, and records the descent of “Gilbertus de Aton” from her[263].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Margeria de Vescy" holding land[264].  

Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Aton .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         GILBERT de Aton (-before 1285[265]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

b)         WILLIAM de Aton .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m ISABEL de Veer, daughter of SIMON de Veer of Goxhill, Lincolnshire and Sproatley, Holderness & his wife Ada Bertram.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.     William & his wife had one child: 

i)          GILBERT de Aton ([1288/89]-after 10 Apr 1350).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

-         see below

ii)         --- de Atonm ---.  One child: 

(a)       ALICE de Aton (-after Apr 1358).  The testament of "Gilbert de Aton" is dated 10 Apr 1350, requests burial "a Watton", makes bequests to "William mon fitz…Alice de Aton ma Nece"[266]

c)         [ISABEL de Aton (-before 17 Jun 1321).  The Complete Peerage quotes a writ dated 17 Jun 1321 which refers to property in Swyndene, Yorkshire granted by "Gilbertus de Aton" to "Isabelle de Aton et heredibus de corpore ipsius Isabelle" which passed on her death to "domini Johannis filii domini Rogeri Darcy militis…fil et her eiusdem Isabelle"[267].  The wording of this document is consistent with Isabel being the sister of Gilbert although the document does not specify the relationship.  m ROGER Darcy of Oldcotes and Styrrup, Nottinghamshire, son of --- (-before 12 May 1284).] 

 

 

GILBERT de Aton, son of WILLIAM de Aton & his wife Isabel de Veer ([1288/89]-after 10 Apr 1350).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…Domino Willielmo de Aton…Domino Gilberto de Aton…"[268].  The testament of "Gilbert de Aton" is dated 10 Apr 1350, requests burial "a Watton", makes bequests to "William mon fitz…Alice de Aton ma Nece"[269]

m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known. 

Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Aton (-[29 Sep 1385/Mar 1389]).  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…Domino Willielmo de Aton…Domino Gilberto de Aton…"[270].  A charter dated [Mar] 1349 (presumably O.S.) records an agreement between the abbot of Selby and “monsieur William de Aton chevauler fitz et heir monsieur Gilbert de Aton[271].  He was summoned to parliament in 1371 whereby he is held to have become Lord Aton.  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[272].  He died before his son-in-law Edward St John[273]m [firstly] (after 1350) ISABEL Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his wife Idonia de Clifford (-[before 25 May 1368]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of “Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[274].  Her marriage is suggested by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…William d’Aton my nephew…" as one of his beneficiaries[275].  As the testator names his other two sisters, it is suggested that Isabel must have died before the date of the will.  [m secondly (before Oct 1374) --- de Poynings, daughter of MICHAEL de Poynings Lord Poynings & his wife Joan --- (after 1348-after 28 Oct 1374).  The testament of "Thomas Lord Poynings", dated 28 Oct 1374, names "Lady D’Aton my sister" among his beneficiaries[276].  It is likely that this entry refers to an otherwise unrecorded second wife of William Lord Aton, who was alive at that date and whose wife would therefore have been the only "Lady d’Aton".  It seems incorrect, as assumed in the Complete Peerage[277], that she was the same person as Margaret, wife of Lord Aton’s son William, as the latter’s wife would not have borne the title during the lifetime of her husband’s father.]  William & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Aton (-before 1389).  The testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, names "…William d’Aton my nephew…" as one of his beneficiaries[278]m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after 1396). 

b)         ANASTASIA de Atonm EDWARD St John, son of --- (-7 Mar 1389). 

c)         KATHERINE de Atonm as his second wife, RALPH Eure of Witton Castle, co Durham, son of --- (-10 Mar 1422).  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[279]

d)         ELIZABETH de Aton (-before 1 May 1402).  The testament of "Elizabeth nuper uxor Johannis Conyers militis", proved 1 May 1402, chooses burial "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorum infra civitatem Ebor." appoints "Waltero de Weston" as her heir[280]m firstly WILLIAM Playce, son of ---.  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[281]m secondly (before 29 Sep 1385) JOHN Conyers of Sockburn, co Durham, son of --- (-before 6 Mar 1395).  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[282]

 

 

 

 

AVENELL

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Avenell .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Willelmus Avenel" with "feodum dimidii militis" held from "abbatia de Burch" [in Hampshire][283].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo Auenello" in Buckinghamshire and in Bedfordshire, Warwickshire[284]

 

2.         ROBERT Avenell .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob Auenello" in Suffolk[285]

 

3.         RANDULF Avenell .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ranfi Auenelli" in Sussex[286]m ALICE, daughter of ---.  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ[287].  Randulf & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         MATILDA Avenell (-21 Sep 1173).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” had “unicam filiam…Matildam” who died[288].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges”, and died “IX Kal Oct 1173[289].  As noted in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, charter evidence indicates that the wife of Robert FitzEdith was Mathilde d’Avranches, daughter of Matilda Avenell, not Matilda Avenell herself.  Matilda’s supposed second marriage, as reported in the Ford Abbey document, is therefore assumed to be incorrect.  m (after 1130) as his second wife, ROBERT d’Avranches, son of [WILLIAM FitzWimund d’Avranches & his wife ---] (-before 1142). 

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM Avenell (-after [1172]).  "Willelmus Auenel et Helewisa coniunx mea filia Walchelini Waard et heredes nostri" donated land "in Oxenfordia" to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1152/70][290].  "R[ichard] Avenel" donated the church of Saint-George-en-Bauptois to Blanchelande abbey, with the consent of “his brother William and his [William’s] son Richard”, by charter dated to [1151/57][291].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus Avenel i m" in Northamptonshire in [1161/62][292].  The Pipe Roll 1161/62 records "Hugh Gubion renders his account; for the scutage of William Avenel of Biart" in Northamptonshire[293].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus Avenel" with five knight "Regi…de vicecomitatu de Cerenciis" and one knight "de comitatu Mortonii"[294].  "Symon Mauleuerer et Gilibertus Avenel" confirmed the donation of "terram de Hungerigge in territorio de Molle" to Melrose abbey made by "Helene filie Symonis de Lindesie", confirmed by "Willi Auenel patris mei", by undated charter[295].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardi fratris Willelmi Avenel", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][296]m HELOISE, daughter of WALKELIN Ward & his wife ---.  "Helewisa fila Walchelini Waard primogenita, uxor Willelmi Auenel" donated land "in villa de Etona" to Eynsham abbey, with the consent of "filio…meo Walchelino", by charter dated to [1140/60][297].  "Willelmus Auenel et Helewisa coniunx mea filia Walchelini Waard et heredes nostri" donated land "in Oxenfordia" to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1152/70][298].  William & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         RICHARD Avenell .  "R[ichard] Avenel" donated the church of Saint-George-en-Bauptois to Blanchelande abbey, with the consent of “his brother William and his [William’s] son Richard”, by charter dated to [1151/57][299]

b)         [WALKELIN .  "Helewisa fila Walchelini Waard primogenita, uxor Willelmi Auenel" donated land "in villa de Etona" to Eynsham abbey, with the consent of "filio…meo Walchelino", by charter dated to [1140/60][300].  Nothing in this document confirms that Walkelin was the son of William Avenell.  He may have been his mother’s son by an earlier marriage.] 

c)         GILBERT Avenell (-before 1194).  "Symon Mauleuerer et Gilibertus Avenel" confirmed the donation of "terram de Hungerigge in territorio de Molle" to Melrose abbey made by "Helene filie Symonis de Lindesie", confirmed by "Willi Auenel patris mei", by undated charter[301]m AMICE, daughter of --- (-after 1194).  "Amicia [uxor] Gilbti Avenel" replaced her husband in a lawsuit against "Mathm fil Odon de Eston" in 1194[302]

2.         RICHARD Avenell (-after 1157).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[303].  "R[ichard] Avenel" donated the church of Saint-George-en-Bauptois to Blanchelande abbey, with the consent of “his brother William and his [William’s] son Richard”, by charter dated to [1151/57][304].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardi fratris Willelmi Avenel", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][305]

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY Avenell (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Galfridus Avenel" held three parts of one knight’s fee from "Roberti filii Regis" in Devon[306]

 

2.         NICHOLAS Avenell (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Walterus" held "tenementum illud Nicholaus Avenel…Scapewalle cum filia et hærede prædicti Willelmi [=Willelmus filius Reginaldi]" in Devon[307]

 

3.         RALPH Avenell (-after 1176).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Radulfus Auenel…in Sandherst" in Gloucestershire[308]

 

4.         PAIN Avenell (-after 1194).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Paganus Auenel" in Herefordshire[309]

 

5.         WILLIAM Avenell (-[1194]).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         ISABEL Avenell (-before 10 Apr 1226).  "Elisabeth q fuit uxor Sim Basset" paid a fine for "hereditate sua…dissaisita…post mortem predicti Simoni viri sui" in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, dated 1205[310].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Elizabet que fuit uxor Simonis Basset" held "feodum dimidii militis…de honore de Notingham"[311].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records one and a half knights’ fees escheated from "Ysabele Avenel" in "Haddone…[et] in Basselonde…[de honore] Piperelli de Notingham" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire in [1211/12][312].  "William Basset, son and heir of Elizabeth Avenel" was granted "full seisin of [her] land held of the king in the honour of Peverel in the county of Buckinghamshire", dated 10 Apr 1226[313]m SIMON Basset, son of WILLIAM Basset & his wife --- (-1205). 

 

6.         JOHN Avenell (-after Mar 1197).  The Rotuli Curiæ Regis record a claim in Nov/Dec 1194 by "Johi Avenel" against "Urso de Limes" relating to land “in Bergas” in Sussex[314].  “Ailric clericum” claimed land “in Bilesham” from “Johem Auenell” in Mar 1197[315]

 

7.         WALTER Avenell (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Rogerus filius Renfrey et Walterus Avenel et uxor Hugonis de Nevill" holding parts of "Gamegeya"[316].  

 

8.         ROBERT Avenellm EVA, daughter of ---.  "Laurencius Auenel filius et heres Eue quondam sponse Roberti Auenel patris mei defuncti" donated property to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[317].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         LAWRENCE Avenell .  "Laurencius Auenel filius et heres Eue quondam sponse Roberti Auenel patris mei defuncti" donated property to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[318]

 

9.         RALPH Avenell (-before 1220).  m SABINE, daughter of ---.  “Herbm fil Wulwini” claimed land “in Bulesham” from “Sabinam Auenel et Willm Auenel fil eius” in 1220[319].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Avenell (-before 5 May 1236).  "William Avenel" made a fine for "having the land formerly of Ralph Avenel his father…with the bailiwick and castle of Bicknor" in Somerset, dated 22 Nov 1223[320].  A writ after the death of "William Avenel", dated "5 May 20 Hen III", records "Dulcie his daughter is his heir"[321]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          DULCIE Avenell .  A writ after the death of "William Avenel", dated "5 May 20 Hen III", records "Dulcie his daughter is his heir"[322]same person as...?  CECILIE Avenell (-1247).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "Cecilia filia Willelmi Avenel est de donatione domini regis et est maritanda et est in custodia Willelmi de Cantilupo per dominum regum..."[323].  The similarity of the names Dulcie/Cecilie suggests a mistranscription in one or other of these sources. 

 

10.      WILLIAM Avenell (-[before Oct 1205]).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         OLIVER Avenell (-before [Mar] 1226).  An order of King John dated to [Oct] 1205 liberated "Willo Avenel…Oliverum Avenell filium suum obsidem suum" and transferred his custody to the bishop of London[324].  "Oliver Avenel and Agnes his wife, daughter and heiress of Odo of Wanstrow" paid a fine for "the relief of half a knight’s fee…in Merston which falls to Agnes by inheritance" in Somerset, dated 1 Feb 1222[325].  An order dated to [Mar] 1226 confiscated "all the lands…formerly of Oliver Avenel who is dead…saving to Agnes his wife her reasonable maintenance…" in Wiltshire[326]m AGNES, daughter of ODO of Wanstrow & his wife --- (-after [Mar] 1226).  "Oliver Avenel and Agnes his wife, daughter and heiress of Odo of Wanstrow" paid a fine for "the relief of half a knight’s fee…in Merston which falls to Agnes by inheritance" in Somerset, dated 1 Feb 1222[327].  An order dated to [Mar] 1226 confiscated "all the lands…formerly of Oliver Avenel who is dead…saving to Agnes his wife her reasonable maintenance…" in Wiltshire[328]

 

11.      NICHOLAS Avenell (-[1221/22])m as her first husband, MABEL Malet, daughter of WILLIAM Malet & his [first wife ---].  She married secondly (before 18 Nov 1223) Hugues de Vivonne.  Her second marriage is confirmed by an order dated 18 Nov 1223 placing "in respite…the demand…from Hugh de Vivonne…for the debt that William Malet, father of the wife of Vivon, owed the king"[329]

 

 

 

 

AVRANCHES

 

 

[Two possible brothers:]

1.         RUALON d’Avranches (-[1130/34]).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that Henry I King of England notified "Hugoni de Boclanda et Willielmo vicecomiti de Oxeneford" that he had granted "manerium...de Estantona" [Stanton Harcourt] to "Rualucus de Abrincis", undated[330].  Johnson & Cronne date this charter to [May 1101][331].  Lord of Folkestone, de iure uxoris.  Sheriff of Kent.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rualon de Abrinc...qd fuit int eu et Hasc de Taneia" among “Nova Placita et Nove Conventiones” in Essex and “Rualon de Abrinc” returning for “terra Atson de Sco Audoeno” in Kent, and naming “Rualon vicec” in Kent[332]m MATHILDE de Muneville, daughter of NELE de Muneville & his wife Emma d’Arques.  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[333].  Rualon & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM d’Avranches (-[1177]).  Lord of Folkestone.  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[334]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          SIMON [I] d’Avranches (-1203)Domesday Descendants records his parentage but does not cite the primary source which confirms the information[335]

-         see below

b)         MATILDA [Felicia] d’AvranchesDomesday Descendants records her parentage and marriage but does not cite the primary source which confirms the information[336]m HUMPHREY de Millières, son of ---. 

2.         [TURGIS d’Avranches .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Turgis de Abrinc" accounting for “terra et uxore Hug de Albtiuilla et filium suum habet in custodia” in Kent[337].] 

 

 

SIMON [I] d’Avranches, son of WILLIAM [I] d’Avranches & his wife --- (-1203)Domesday Descendants records his parentage but does not cite the primary source which confirms the information[338]

m CECILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[339].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Cecilia de Avranch est de donacione domini regis et valet terra sua lv"[340]

Simon [I] & his wife had three children: 

1.         WILLIAM [II] d’Avranches (-6 Nov 1230).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[341]m MATILDA de Bocland, daughter of WILLIAM de Bocland & his wife Matilda de Say (-after 1218)---.  Bracton lists a claim by "Willelmus de Aurenches et Matillis uxor eius, Johannes de Bouilla et Hauissia uxor eius" against "Robertum de Ferrariis et Johannam uxorem eius", dated 1218, for "hereditate Willelmi de Boclonde patris earum", noting that "Matillis et Cecilia [error for Hawisia] sunt sorores sororis [error for uxoris] sue [=predicti Willelmi]"[342].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM [III] d’Avranches (-2 Jan 1236).  His parentage is shown in The Complete Peerage[343].  The primary source which confirms this information has not yet been identified. 

b)         MATILDA d’Avranches (-before 6 Apr 1263).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[344].  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches"[345].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her…" and names her heirs[346]m as his second wife, HAMON de Crèvecœur, son of --- (-before 6 Apr 1263). 

2.         SIMON [II] d’Avranches .  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[347]

3.         GEOFFREY d’Avranches (-after 26 Nov 1236).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[348]m (after 1225) as her second husband, JOANNA de Bocland, widow of ROBERT de Ferrers, daughter of daughter of WILLIAM de Bocland & his wife Matilda de Say (-16 Nov 1251).  Her second marriage is shown in The Complete Peerage[349].  The primary source which confirms this information has not yet been identified.  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN d’Avranches (-8 Nov 1257).  His parentage is shown in The Complete Peerage[350].  The primary source which confirms this information has not yet been identified.  m AMICE, daughter of --- (-after 4 Feb 1261).  Her marriage is shown in The Complete Peerage[351].  The primary source which confirms this information has not yet been identified.

 

 

 

 

BADLESMERE

 

 

1.         GUNCELIN de Badlesmere .  The Complete Peerage names “Guncelin or Gunselm B. of Badlesmere…Justice of Chester” as the father of Bartholomew de Badlesmere but does not cite the primary source on which the information is based[352]m JOAN, daughter of RALPH FitzBernard of Kingsdown, Kent & his wife ---.  Guncelin & his wife had two children: 

a)         BARTHOLOMEW de Badlesmere of Badlesmere & Chilham Castle, Kent (-1322).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1309 whereby he is deemed to have become Lord Badlesmere.  m (before 30 Jun 1308) as her second husband, MARGARET de Clare, widow of GILBERT de Umfraville, daughter of THOMAS de Clare Lord of Thomond, Connaught & his wife Juliana FitzMaurice (-late 1333)Inquisitions made after a writ dated 10 Apr "14 Edw II", after the death of "Thomas son of Richard de Clare", name "Margaret the wife of Bartholomew de Badelesmere and Maud the wife of Robert de Welle, aunts of the said Thomas and sisters of the said Richard are his next heirs and aged 30 or more[353].   King Edward III ordered the restoration of her lands to “Margaretæ quæ fuit uxor Bartholomæi de Badelesmere” by charter dated 22 Feb 1327[354]Bartholomew & his wife had five children: 

i)          MARGERY de Badlesmere (-after 31 May 1356).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Willielmus de Roos" married "Margeriam de Badilsmere"[355].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[356]m firstly WILLIAM de Ros Lord Ros (of Helmsley), son of WILLIAM de Ros Lord Ros (of Helmsley) & his wife Matilda de Vaux (-3 Feb 1343, bur Kirkham).  m secondly (royal licence 6 Mar 1351) THOMAS de Arundel, son of ---.  m thirdly as his third wife, JOHN Avenell, son of ---. 

ii)         MATILDA de Badlesmere ([1308/10]-Earl's Colne [24] May 1366, bur Colne Priory).  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[357].  The will of "John de Vere Earl of Oxford", dated 2 Nov 1358, bequeathed property to “Maud my wife...Maud my daughter for her marriage[358]m firstly ROBERT FitzPayn, son of ---.  m secondly JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of ALFONSO de Vere & his wife [Joan Foliot] ([12 Mar 1312]-Reims 12/24 Jan 1360, bur Colne Priory).  He inherited the lordship of Badlesmere, Kent by right of his wife and thereby assumed the barony of Badlesmere without royal grant.  However, a House of Lords inquiry 5 Apr 1626 found that the barony had been in abeyance between the four sisters and co-heirs of Giles de Badlesmere[359]

iii)        ELIZABETH de Badlesmere ([1313]-after 31 May 1356).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Edmundum primogenitum”, son of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, married “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei…de Badelesmere et de Ledys[360].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the marriage of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere”, previously married to “domino Edmundo de Mortuomari[361].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356 and made “with the leave of my husband”, chose burial “in the quire of the church of the Friars Preachers, London”, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[362]m firstly (Earnwood, Kinlet 27 Jun 1316) EDMUND [II] Mortimer, son of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer [later Earl of March] & his wife Joan de Geneville [Joinville] (-Stanton Lacy 16 Dec 1331).  Lord Mortimer 1331.  m secondly (licence 1335) WILLIAM de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Elizabeth of England (Caldecot [1312]-16 Sep 1360, bur Walden Abbey, Essex).  Earl of Northampton 1337. 

iv)       GILES de Badlesmere (18 Oct 1314-[7 Apr/22 Jun] 1338)m (after Feb 1328) as her first husband, ELIZABETH Montagu, daughter of WILLIAM Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Catherine Grandson (-Ashley, Hampshire 31 May 1359, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Hugo tertius” married “Elizabetha filia comitis Sarum” but was childless[363]She married secondly (before May 1341) Hugh le Despencer Lord DespencerKing Edward III requested papal dispensation for the marriage between “Hugonem le Despenser” and “Elizabeth filiam...comitis Sarum et marescalli Angliæ” is dated 6 Mar 1340[364]She married thirdly (before 10 Jul 1350) Guy Lord BryanThe Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “1359…apud Asteley in comitatu Hamptoniæ…ultimo die mensis Maii” of “domina Elizabeth…filia quondam Willielmi de Monte-acuto comitis Sarum, ac uxor Guidonis de Bryene militis, et relicto Hugone tertio le Despencer” and her burial with her first husband in Tewkesbury abbey[365]

v)        MARGARET de Badlesmere (-[3 Dec 1344/4 Dec 1347]).  m (before 24 Jul 1337) as his first wife, JOHN Tybotot Lord Tybotot, son of PAYN Tybotot Lord Tybotot & his wife Agnes de Ros of Helmsley (20 Jul 1313-13 Apr 1367). 

b)         MAUD Badlesmere (-after 2 Jan 1306)m ROBERT Burghersh, son of REYNOLD Burghersh of Burghersh, Sussex, Chiddingstone, Kent & his wife --- (-[2 Jul/8 Oct] 1306). 

 

 

 

BARDOLF

 

 

1.         HUGUES [I] Bardolf (-after 1053).  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Hugo Bardulfus" was captured in the battle at Château d’Arques, dated to 25 Oct 1053[366]

 

2.         WILLIAM [I] Bardolfm ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         daughter .  A book of fees records that “Ivo de Tailbois” held “baroniam de Hephall cum uxore sua…filia Will de Bardulf”, previously held by the latter, granted by William I King of England[367]m as his first wife, IVO Taillebois, son of --- (-[1094/95], bur Spalding). 

 

3.         EUDES Bardolf (-after 1084).  "...Odonis Bardol..." witnessed the charter dated 1084 under which “Roger de Albineio” donated property to Lessay[368]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bardolf .  A bull of Pope Alexander III dated 27 May 1163 confirms donations to the priory of St Faith, Horsham, Norfolk including the donation of land “in Frecaham et in Spicafurda” made by “Willielmus Bardulfus"[369]

 

 

1.         HAMELIN Bardolf (-[1161/62]).  King Henry II confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “ecclesiam Sancte Trinitatis de Bungeye” made by “Hamelini Bardulfi et ex concessione Hugonis Bardulfi heredis sui[370].  The 1159/60 Pipe Roll names "Hamelin Bardul" in Lincolnshire[371].  The 1160/61 Pipe Roll names "Hamel Bardul" in Lincolnshire[372].  He is not listed in the 1162/63 Pipe Roll in Lincolnshire. 

 

2.         ROBERT Bardolf (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Bardulf" held one knight fee "in Hou" in Kent[373].  If it is correct, as noted below, that Hugh [I] Bardolf was the son of Hamelin Bardolf, it is likely that Robert was the brother of Hamelin as Hugh [I] is also noted holding property in Hoo, Kent. 

 

 

1.         HUGH [I] Bardolf ([before 1135]-[1200]).  Hugh [I] was heir to Hamelin Bardolf, as confirmed by a charter of King Henry II (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291) which confirmed donations to Barlings, including the donation of “ecclesiam Sancte Trinitatis de Bungeye” made by “Hamelini Bardulfi et ex concessione Hugonis Bardulfi heredis sui[374].  The document does not state that Hugh [I] was Hamelin’s son: the family relationship may have been more remote.  His birth date is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adult when first recorded during the mid-1150s.  "Hugone Bardol…" witnessed the undated charter, dated to the early part of the reign of King Henry II, under which "R. de Haia" granted land at Authorpe, Lincolnshire to "Herberto filio Aelart"[375].  The 1157/58 Pipe Roll names "Hug Bardul" among “Nova Placita et Nove Convent” in Lincolnshire[376]. The 1160/61 Pipe Roll names "Hug Bardul" among “Nova Placita et Nove Convent” in Lincolnshire[377].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo Bardulfus ii milites, Doun Bardulf i militem" holding land from Richard de Hay in Lincolnshire in 1166[378].  "…Hugone Bardulfi" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/1188] under which Henry II King of England donated property to the lepers of Mont-aux-Malades[379].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Hugo Bardulf" paying "xx s de i feodo in Hou, i milites" in Kent[380].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Hugo Bardulfus" among those granted delay for payment "per brevia" in Kent[381].  His career is discussed by Clay[382].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “terre in campis de Risum” made by “Hugonis Bardulfi senioris et ex concessione H. filii sui[383]m [firstly] ISABEL, daughter of ---.  The Complete Peerage shows Hugh, his wife Isabel and their children, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[384].  An order dated 27 Jan 1229 confirmed donations to St Mary, Berlinges, including the donation of "Carleton by Lincoln, part of the marriage portion of Isabella his mother..." made by "Robert Bardulf"[385].  [m secondly as her first husband, AMABILIS de Limesey, daughter of --- (-after 27 May 1205).  She married secondly John de Briouse.  "Amabil q fuit ux Hug Bard" paid a fine to marry where she will without licence of the king "quamdiu sit vidua pro morte Johannis de Braosa quondam viri sui" in Warwickshire, dated 1205[386].  King John confirmed "Amabli de Limisy [q fuit ux H Bard]" freedom to marry whom she will, naming "Johis de Breos quondam viri sui", by charter dated 27 May 1205[387].  "Amable de Limesie…post obitum Johannis de Brawose quondam viri mei" confirmed grants of land to "Benedicto filio Murielis", in accordance with earlier grants made by "Gaufridi de Limesie et Johannis de Limesie antecessorum meorum" to "Alexandro filio Thony" who held the land "tempore Radulfi de Limesie et predictorum Gaufridi et Johannis de Limesie", by charter dated to [1224/Jun 1225][388].] Hugh [I] & his [first] wife had six children: 

a)         HUGH Bardolf .  The Complete Peerage shows Hugh as the older son of Hugh Bardolf and his wife Isabel, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[389].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “terre in campis de Risum” made by “Hugonis Bardulfi senioris et ex concessione H. filii sui[390]Robertus Bardulp” donated “terram...Elwruetche...” to Hoo St Werburg, for the soul of “Hugonis fratris mei”, by undated charter[391]

b)         ROBERT Bardolf of Great Carlton, Lincolnshire and Hoo, Kent (-before 1 Jul 1225).  The Complete Peerage shows Hugh, his wife Isabel and their children, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[392].  King John confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “terram suam in Scoftorna...[et] in Carletona juxta Lincolniam...[et] in Wraggeby...” made by “Roberti Bard[393].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Bardulfe" holding one knight’s fee in Kent in [1210/12][394]Robertus Bardulp” donated “terram...Elwruetche...” to Hoo St Werburg, for the soul of “Hugonis fratris mei”, by undated charter[395].  An order dated 27 Jan 1229 confirmed donations to St Mary, Berlinges, including the donation of "Carleton by Lincoln, part of the marriage portion of Isabella his mother..." made by "Robert Bardulf"[396]

c)         daughter (-before 1 Jul 1225).  The Complete Peerage shows her parentage and marriage, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[397].  It is assumed that she died before 1 Jul 1225 when “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui[398]m RICHARD Foliot, son of ---. 

d)         daughter (-before 1 Jul 1225).  m ---.  One child: 

i)          ISOLDA (-after 1 Jul 1225).  There are contrary indications concerning the parentage of Isolda.  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[399].  This source suggests that Isolda de Grey was the daughter of the second sister of Robert Bardulf, and co-heir of her uncle.  On the other hand, Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Henry de Grey married "Ysolda...daughter of Hugh Bardolf, sister and one of the co-heirs of Robert Bardolf", that in 1235 she was “remarried to...Reginald de Meandre”, and that in 1246 “Richard de Gray son and heir of Isolda de Gray” swore homage to King Henry III, although he does not cite the source reference[400].  The birth date of Hugh [I] Bardolf (father of Robert Bardolf) is estimated to before 1135 (see above).  Hugh’s children would presumably therefore have been born in [1160/80].  If that date range is correct, the date of Isolda’s second marriage, and also the chronology of the Grey family, suggest that Isolda was more probably Hugh’s granddaughter than his daughter.  Another possibility is that the wife of Henry de Grey was Robert’s sister and that “Isold de Gray” who is named in the 1 Jul 1225 source was the couple’s daughter.  However, in that case, it is unclear why Isolda’s son Richard would not have been named as the Grey representative of the heirs who are named in 1 Jul 1225.  On balance, it appears more likely that Isolda was Robert Bardolf’s niece, although if that is correct there is no indication of her father’s family.  m firstly HENRY de Grey of Gray’s Thurrock and Codnor[401], son of ---.  m secondly (before 1235) REGINALD de Meandre, son of ---. 

e)         daughter (-before 1 Jul 1225).  m --- Paynell, son of ---.  One child: 

i)          RALPH Paynell .  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[402]

f)          MATILDA Bardolf (-after 1 Jul 1225).  Her parentage is confirmed by by the charter dated 1 Jul 1225 under which “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from [her son] “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti[403]m ---.  One child: 

i)          ROBERT Lupus .  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[404]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         DOON [I] Bardolf (-after 1166).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[405].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo Bardulfus ii milites, Doun Bardulf i militem" holding land from Richard de Hay in Lincolnshire in 1166[406]

2.         THOMAS [I] Bardolf (-after 1157).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[407]

 

 

1.         THOMAS [II] Bardolf (-[1190/97]).  It is possible that Thomas [II] Bardolf was the same person as Thomas [I] Bardolf.  "Thomas Bardul" donated rent from “his mill of Elwadeston on the Derwent with his daughter Mathildis made a nun there by consent of his wife Rohais, mother of Mathildis, of whose inheritance was the mill” to Caen Holy Trinity by charter dated to [1170/87][408].  “Thomas Bardolf et Roeis uxor eius” settled a dispute with the monks of Bardenay, dated 12 Mar 1176[409].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of Bec abbey, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Bernouville" made by “Thome Bardolfi et Rohais uxoris sue”, by charter dated to [1181/89][410].  "…Thoma Bardulfi" subscribed the charter dated Feb 1187 under which Henry II King of England granted duty exemptions to the Cistercians of Dunes[411].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "honor Piperelli de Londonia" paying "li milites et vi pars…in diversis comitatibus", of which "in perdonis Thomæ Bardulfo, x s", in Essex, Hertfordshire[412].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony"[413]m ROHESE, daughter of RALPH Hanselyn & his wife ---.  "Thomas Bardul" donated rent from “his mill of Elwadeston on the Derwent with his daughter Mathildis made a nun there by consent of his wife Rohais, mother of Mathildis, of whose inheritance was the mill” to Caen Holy Trinity by charter dated to [1170/87][414].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", names "Rohais...daughter and heir of Ralph Halselinus [...Hanselyn], a baron of Nottinghamshire", adding that she and her husband gave "the church of Bernouville near Gisors" to the abbey of Bec, but he does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[415].  “Thomas Bardolf et Roeis uxor eius” settled a dispute with the monks of Bardenay, dated 12 Mar 1176[416].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of Bec abbey, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Bernouville" made by “Thome Bardolfi et Rohais uxoris sue”, by charter dated to [1181/89][417].  Thomas & his wife had eight children: 

a)         HUGH [II] Bardolf .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Thomas Bardolf was dead in 1197 when "his barony in England was in the custody of Hugh Bardolf...his son", but he does not cite the source reference[418]

b)         DOON [II] Bardolf (-before 29 Jul 1203).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Doon Bardolf, son of Thomas Bardolf and his wife Rohese, in 1173 commanded "the new castle of Drincourt (Neufchatel-en-Bray) when besieged by the young King Henry" with his brother Thomas, but he does not cite the source reference[419]

-        see below

c)         THOMAS [III] Bardolf .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Doon Bardolf, son of Thomas Bardolf and his wife Rohese, in 1173 commanded "the new castle of Drincourt (Neufchatel-en-Bray) when besieged by the young King Henry" with his brother Thomas, but he does not cite the source reference[420]

d)         daughter .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", and that [after the loss of Normandy] King John gave "partem Willelmi Bacun et partem Roberti de Sancto Remigio" to "Thomæ filio Bernardi" to whom he later gave "Aliciæ de Jarpenville" in marriage[421]m ROBERT de Saint-Rémy, son of ---. 

e)         daughter .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", and that [after the loss of Normandy] King John gave "partem Willelmi Bacun et partem Roberti de Sancto Remigio" to "Thomæ filio Bernardi" to whom he later gave "Aliciæ de Jarpenville" in marriage[422]m WILLIAM Bacon, son of ---. 

f)          daughter .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", which "Baldewinus de Thony" still held in [1210/12][423]m BALDWIN de Tosny, son of RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk & his wife Ada de Chaumont ([1169]-after 1210). 

g)         ROHESE Bardolf (-after 1224).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", states that "a fourth sister Rohese" [referring to the three daughters of Thomas Bardolf shown above] was "first the wife of Henry de la Pommeraie and secondly of John Russell", but he does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[424]m firstly as his second wife, HENRY [II] de la Pomerai, son of HENRY [I] de la Pomerai & his wife Rohese --- (-1207).  m secondly JOHN Russell, son of --- (-1224). 

h)         MATILDA Bardolf .  "Thomas Bardul" donated rent from “his mill of Elwadeston on the Derwent with his daughter Mathildis made a nun there by consent of his wife Rohais, mother of Mathildis, of whose inheritance was the mill” to Caen Holy Trinity by charter dated to [1170/87][425].  Nun at Caen Holy Trinity. 

 

 

DOON [II] Bardolf, son of THOMAS [II] Bardolf & his wife Rohese --- (-before 29 Jul 1203).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Doon Bardolf, son of Thomas Bardolf and his wife Rohese, in 1173 commanded "the new castle of Drincourt (Neufchatel-en-Bray) when besieged by the young King Henry" with his brother Thomas, but he does not cite the source reference[426].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Dohun Bardulf" paying "xliii s" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire[427].  King John granted custody of "heredem Dun Bard" to “Waltero de Sancto Joh militi...et...J. de Patell” dated 29 Jul 1203[428].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "hæres Dodonis Bardulf" holding 25 knights’ fees in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire in [1210/12][429].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Dodo Bardolf" held property "de rege in Hamringham" in Lincolnshire[430].  

m as her second husband, BEATRICE de Warenne, widow of RALPH ---, daughter of WILLIAM de Warenne of Wormegay, Norfolk & his first wife Beatrix de Pierrepont (-before 12 Dec 1214).  She married thirdly Hubert de Burgh, who was later created Earl of Kent.  Her second and third marriages are confirmed by a receipt dated 22 Jul 1227  for payment of a fine by Hubert de Burgh for "Beatrice de Warenna late his wife, by whom he had children" to have the lands of "William de Warenna her father and…her dower of the lands of Dodo Bardolf, formerly her husband"[431].  Her third marriage is suggested by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Gaufridus de Merlai" held "quoddam feodum in Illington" in Norfolk "de Huberto de Burgo per heredum Willelmi de Warenne uxorem suam", adding that Henry II King of England had granted the property to "Reginaldo de Warrenn"[432].  

Doon & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM Bardolf of Wormegay, Norfolk and Shelford, Nottinghamshire (before 29 Jul 1203-1275).  King John granted custody of "heredem Dun Bard" to “Waltero de Sancto Joh militi...et...J. de Patell” dated 29 Jul 1203[433]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Bardolf (-1 Dec 1289).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[434]m JULIANE de Gournay, daughter of HUGUES [VI] de Gournay of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire & his second wife Mathilde --- ([1235/39]-1295).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[435].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          HUGH Bardolf ([29 Sep 1259]-Sep 1304).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[436].  He was summoned to parliament in 1298 whereby he is held to have become Lord Bardolf.  m (before 1282) ISABEL Aguillon, daughter of ROBERT Aguillon & his first wife Joan Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1257/59]-before 28 May 1323).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 17 Feb "14 Edw I" following the death of "Robert Aguylun” name “Lady Isabel his daughter whom Hugh Bardolf married aged 28 at the feast of the Annunciation in the said year [...aged 24 and more] is his next heir...Margaret de Ripariis late the wife of Robert Aguillon in dower[437]

-         LORDS BARDOLF[438]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bardolf (-before 1206).  King John confirmed land "in Hepedale et in Kokedale", which "Will fil Will patre predicte Elysabeth tenuit", to "Willelmo Bardulf et Elysabeth uxori sue" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[439]m as her first husband, ELIZABETH, daughter of WILLIAM FitzWilliam & his wife --- (-after 1212).  King John confirmed land "in Hepedale et in Kokedale", which "Will fil Will patre predicte Elysabeth tenuit", to "Willelmo Bardulf et Elysabeth uxori sue" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[440].  "Elizabeth q fuit uxor Willi Bard" paid a fine to marry where she will, in Northumberland, dated 1206[441].  She married secondly Ivo Taillebois.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Yvo Taylebois" holding "baroniam de Ephal[ton] cum uxore W[illelmi] Badulfi" with one knight’s fee from King John in Northumberland in [1210/12][442].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Yvo Tailleboys" holding "baroniam de Hephale cum uxore qui fuit Willelmi Bardolf quam habet de dono domini Regis Johannis" in Northumberland[443].  

 

2.         HUGH Bardolf (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Surrey, dated 1219, which includes "Hugo Bardolf qui habet in uxorem Isabellam filiam et heredem Roberti Aguillon"[444]m (before 1219) ISABEL Aguillon, daughter of ROBERT Aguillon & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Surrey, dated 1219, which includes "Hugo Bardolf qui habet in uxorem Isabellam filiam et heredem Roberti Aguillon"[445]

 

 

 

 

BASKERVILLE

 

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Baskerville (-after 1109).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Robertus de Baskevilla", on returning from Jerusalem, donated "unam hidam extra muros eiusdem civitatis", in 1109 "rege Henrico confirmante, tempore Petri abbatis" [abbot from 1104 to 1113][446]

 

2.         ROGER de Baskerville (-after [1123]).  "…Rog de Bascuilla…" subscribed the charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[447]

 

3.         BERNARD de Baskerville (-[1148/57]).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "unam hidam terræ in Cumba" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1171] made by "Bernardus de Baskevyle", confirmed by "Walterus [et] Robertus de Baskevyle"[448].  "Walterus de Baskerevilla" confirmed the donation of land "in Cumba" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Hugardus [presumably an error for Bernardus] de Baskerevilla patruus meus" in 1157, by undated charter[449]

4.         --- de Baskervillem ---.  Two children: 

a)         WALTER de Baskerville (-after 1157).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "unam hidam terræ in Cumba" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1171] made by "Bernardus de Baskevyle", confirmed by "Walterus [et] Robertus de Baskevyle"[450].  "Walterus de Baskerevilla" confirmed the donation of land "in Cumba" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Hugardus de Baskerevilla patruus meus" in 1157, by undated charter[451]

b)         ROBERT de Baskerville (-after 1176).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "unam hidam terræ in Cumba" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1171] made by "Bernardus de Baskevyle", confirmed by "Walterus [et] Robertus de Baskevyle"[452].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Baskerville" holding 8 knights’ fees under "Hugonis de Lascy" in Hereford[453].  "Robertus de Baskerevilla" confirmed the donation of land "in Cumba" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Hugardus de Baskerevilla", with the consent of "Walterum fratrem meum", by undated charter[454].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Robertus de Baskeruill" in Herefordshire[455]

 

 

1.         RALPH de Baskerville (-after 1176).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de Baskerville" holding one knight’s fee under "Ada de Port" in Hereford[456].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "in Stodesden…Radulfus de Baskeruill" in Shropshire and "Radulfus de Baskeruill" in Herefordshire[457].  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Herdesleia" made by "Radulfi de Baskervill"[458].  

 

2.         NESTA [de Baskerville] (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nesta de Bascherville" holding "servientem cum lancea" from the Serjeantie in Wales[459].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nesta de Bescharville" holding "per serjantariam i peditis in exercitu Walliæ" in [1210/12][460]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Baskerville (-before Oct 1213).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 17 Nov 1195 in a claim by "Galfredus de Longo Campo" against "Walterus de Bascreuill" concerning "tota hereditate Emme de Sancto Ligo matris ipsii Galfridi…villa de Easton et villa de Kenpelee"[461].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus de Baskerville" holding knights’ fees "Oretop in Irchenfeld" in Hereford in [1210/12][462]m firstly ---.  m [secondly] (before 4 Apr 1211) as her third husband, ISOLDA Pantulf, widow firstly of HUGH de Montpinçon, and secondly of WALTER de Tattershall, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Pantulf of Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire & his wife Joan de Goldington (-after 1267).  "Isolda q fuit ux Walteri de Baskvill" paid a fine for "dote sua" in Leicestershire, dated 1213[463].  She married fourthly (1213) Henry Bisset.  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[464].  She married fifthly as his second wife, Amaury [I] de Saint-Amand.  

 

 

1.         RALPH de Baskervillem ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS de Baskerville (-after 1210).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Tomas de Baskeruill…in Standon versus Milonem Pichard" in Herefordshire, adding that the property was invaded "post primam coronationem Henrici R" by "Radulfo patre suo Philippo de Braiose, per quem Milo tenet"[465].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Bascherville" holding land in Shropshire in [1210/12][466]

 

2.         AIMERY de Baskerville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Aimerus de Bascherville" holding one half of one knight’s fee in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][467]

 

3.         WALTER de Baskerville (-before 24 May 1244).  A writ dated 24 May "28 Hen III" after the death of "Walter de Baskervill" names "Walter de Baskerville his son…his heir" and records "Orcope manor in Urchenefeld" in Hereford[468]m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

a)         WALTER de Baskerville (-after 12 Sep 1274).  A writ dated 24 May "28 Hen III" after the death of "Walter de Baskervill" names "Walter de Baskerville his son…his heir" and records "Orcope manor in Urchenefeld" in Hereford[469].  "Walter de Baskervill" was granted rights in "his manor of Horcop in Hirchinkefeld" dated 24 Feb 1253[470].  Edward I King of England pardoned “Waltero de Baskerville” for his part in the death of “Henrici de Alamannia” by charter dated 12 Sep 1274[471]

 

 

 

 

BASSET

 

 

William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that the name "Basset" derives from the old French "basset" meaning of low stature[472].  Loyd indicates that the family originated in Montreuil-au-Houlme in the present-day French département of Orne, arrondissement Argentan, canton Briouze[473].  This is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records the campaign led by Geoffroy Comte d’Anjou in Normandy in 1136 and notes that he attacked “arcem de Mosterolo” (identified by Le Prévost as Montreuil-au-Houlme), which “Ricardus…cognomento Bassetus, cujus in Anglia vivente Henrico rege potentia, utpote capitalis justiciarii, magna fuerat” held “in parvo feudo, quod parentum successivo jure in Normannia obtinuerat” and where he built “ex quadris lapidibus turrim apud Mosterolum” which was captured by “Guillelmus de Monte Pincionis” after King Henry I died[474]Rising from relatively modest beginnings (if Orderic Vitalis is to be believed when he includes Ralph Basset among those whom Henry I King of England raised "from the dust"[475]), by the end of the 13th century the family had established the three major baronial lines of Basset of Great Weldon in Northamptonshire, Basset of Sapcote in Leicestershire, and Basset of Drayton Basset in Staffordshire.  Reedy adds that "today more English villages are known by this particular family name than by any other", naming places in Berkshire, Essex, Hampshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Wiltshire and Yorkshire[476]

 

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         RALPH Basset, son of --- (-after 1124).  Orderic Vitalis names "Goisfredus de Clintona, Radulfus Basset et Hugo de Bocalanda…" among those who were "de ignobili stirpe" and whom King Henry I raised "de pulvere" (from the dust)[477].  Henry of Huntingdon names "Ralph Basset and his son Richard, justices of all England"[478].  Henry I King of England confirmed property ot Eynsham abbey by charter dated 25 Dec 1109, including the donation of "decimam suam de Strattona" by "Gillebertus Basset" and "decimam suam de una hida de Estelai" by "Radulfus Basset"[479].  "…Radulfo Basset" witnessed the charter dated 1113 granted by Henry I King of England in favour of Thorney abbey[480].  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[481].  "…Rad Basset…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[482].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer, see the document ENGLAND EARLS created 1207-1466, Chapter 1.B] donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church[483].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records in 1124 that "Ralph Basset held a court of the king’s thanes at Hundehoh in Leicestershire and hanged there more thieves than ever before"[484].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus Basset" used to hold one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) now held by "hæres Radulfi Basset junioris"[485].  It is possible that "Radulfus Basset" was the paternal uncle of "Radulfi Basset junioris" although no proof has been found that this is correct.  Another possibility is that "Radulfus", referring to the senior Basset, was an error for "Richardus" who is recorded elsewhere as the father of "Radulfi Basset junioris" (see above).  m A---, daughter of --- (-after 1120).  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[486].  Ralph & his wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         RICHARD Basset (-1144 or before).  Henry of Huntingdon names "Ralph Basset and his son Richard, justices of all England"[487].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ricardus…Basset" held "parvo feudo" in "Mosterolo" {Montreuil-au-Houlme, Orne, arr. Argentan, canton Briouze} which his father had obtained in Normandy, when reporting that Guillaume de Montpinçon took the castle as a base against the Angevins (dated to 1136)[488], which suggests that Richard was his father’s oldest son.  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[489].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere", by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[490].  Henry I King of England recorded that "Nicholaus Basset" had quitclaimed him lands held of him "in capite…Mixeb et Wilaviston et…in Neuiton et Vivilcote", and that he had granted the lands to "Ricardo Basset", by charter dated to [1129/30][491].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ric bass" (two entries) in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire, in Surrey/Cambridge/Huntingdonshire, in Essex/Hertfordshire, and exempt in Staffordshire[492].  "…Ricard[us] Basset…" witnessed the charter dated to [Apr/21 Nov] 1136 under which King Stephen confirmed churches in Exeter[493]m ([1120/23]) MATILDA, daughter of GEOFFREY Ridel & his wife Geva ---.  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere", by charter dated to [1120/23][494].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter under which Empress Matilda granted property held by "pater eius Ricardus Basset…[et] Galfridi Ridel avi sui" to "Galfrido Ridel filio Ricardi Basset", dated to [1144/46][495].  Richard & his wife had five children: 

i)          RALPH Basset of Drayton Basset, Staffordshire (-1160).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Eynsham abbey, including the donations by "Gisleberti Basset decimam de Stratona…Radulfi Basset decimam…de Estlaia" by charter dated 20 Dec [1159/61][496]

-         BASSET of DRAYTON BASSET, STAFFORDSHIRE

ii)         GEOFFREY Ridel (-1180).  Empress Matilda granted property held by "pater eius Ricardus Basset…[et] Galfridi Ridel avi sui" to "Galfrido Ridel filio Ricardi Basset" by charter dated to [1144/46], witnessed by "…Walchelino Maminot [et] Rogero filio"[497].  

-         RIDEL

iii)        WILLIAM Basset of Sapcote, Leicestershire (-[1185]).  His parentage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…[498].  "…Willo Basset…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/67] under which the monks of Leicester abbey authorised the establishment of the church of St Mary the Less, Leicester[499].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Basset" held two knights’ fees from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[500]

-         BASSET of SAPCOTE, LEICESTERSHIRE

iv)       SIBYL Basset ([before 1135]-after 1185).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…L annorum et amplius”, adding that the land was “de baronia Radulfi filii Stephani[501]m ROBERT [II] de Cauz, son of ROBERT [I] de Cauz & his wife Isabel de Ferrers (-1168). 

v)        MATILDA Basset .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the charter date to [1160] under which [her brother] "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo", which notes that "ipse Johannes filius Johannis" swore homage to the grantor and gave him a gold ring[502].  William Reedy assumes that "Johanni fratri meo" was the grantor’s brother-in-law John de Stuteville[503].  This appears to be confimed as correct by the undated charter under which "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed that "Johanni de Stutevilla" did homage to him by on the same day, witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset, W. Basset…R. de Stutevill, Nicolaus de Stutevill…"[504].  "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…"[505]m JOHN de Stuteville, son of JOHN de Stuteville [d’Estouteville] & his wife Agnes --- (-after [1160]). 

b)         THURSTAN Basset [I] (-after 1166).  His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer, see the document ENGLAND EARLS created 1207-1466, Chapter 1.B) donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church, and in a later passage that [his son] "Ricardus itaque Basset (filius Turstini filii Radulfi prædicti" revived the claim against the monastery "cum patre mortuo" relating to "terræ de Chedeleswrtha" which was settled[506].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[507]

-        see below

c)         daughters .  The existence of these daughters is confirmed by the charter dated to [1120/23] under which Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere"[508]

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage of the following members of the family have not been identified.  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, suggests that Robert, Osmund and Gilbert were possible brothers of Ralph Basset[509].  He does not provide the basis for his speculation, but from a chronological point of view it is reasonable.  Reedy does not place the two individuals named William Basset, who are shown below, in his genealogical table. 

 

1.         ROBERT Basset (-after 1142).  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[510].  "Comite de Clara, et Cadwaldro rege Walliarum, Roberto Basset, Gaufrido Dispensario…" witnessed the charter dated 1142 under which Ranulf Earl of Chester confirmed the rights of Shrewsbury abbey over land between the Ribble and Mersey rivers[511]

 

2.         OSMUND Basset .  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, suggests that Osmund may have been the brother of Ralph Basset[512].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[513].  "[Abbas] Willelmus" and the monks of St Benet of Hulme leased the manor of Heigham to "Richardo Basset" for life by charter dated to [1127/34], witnessed by "…Osmundo Basset…"[514]same person as…?  OSMUND Basset of Ipsden (-after 1166).  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that Osmund, father of John Basset, was the same person as Osmund Basset, possible brother of Ralph Basset (see above)[515].  From a chronological point of view, this would imply a long active life if it is correct that Osmund was still alive in 1166.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[516]m as her second husband, BASILIA, widow of LUVET de Brai, daughter of ---.  Her marriages are stated in Domesday Descendants[517].  Osmund & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN Basset .  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1225, noted by Bracton, by "Henricus de Oilly" against "Willelmum Basset" for "feodum dim. militis…in Hispedena", the defendant claiming that "Briennius filius Comitis" granted half to "Osemundo Basset avo istius Willelmi Basset" who passed it to "Johannis Basset patri istius Willelmi Basset"[518]m MELISENDE, daughter of ---.  She is named as wife of John in a charter of Missenden abbey[519].  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Basset (-after 26 Feb 1208).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmo Basset f Johannis Basset lxx s in manerio de Aclay de dimidio anno" in "honoris de Warengeford preter Wicumbam"[520].  King John confirmed "feud i militis…in Okléé" to "Willo Basset fil et heredi Johis Basset fil Osmundi Basset", and "pereatis de Cecylia de Dunestanvill quondam uxore sua villam de Menelidam" which "Alanus de Dunestanvill pater ipsius Cecilie dedit ei ad se maritandam", by charter dated 26 Feb 1208[521].  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1225, by "Henricus de Oilly" against "Willelmum Basset" for "feodum dim. militis…in Hispedena", the plaintiff claiming that it was held by "Matillis de Oylli […Briennius filius Comitis…uxor sua]…tempore H. Regis patris Imperatricis" who died without heirs, inherited by "Roberto de Oylli…Henrici de Oylli patri istius Henrici", while the defendant claimed that "Briennius filius Comitis" granted half to "Osemundo Basset avo istius Willelmi Basset" who passed it to "Johannis Basset patri istius Willelmi Basset"[522]m CECILY de Dunstanville, daughter of ALAN de Dunstanville & his wife --- (-before 26 Feb 1208).  King John confirmed "feud i militis…in Okléé" to "Willo Basset fil et heredi Johis Basset fil Osmundi Basset", and "pereatis de Cecylia de Dunestanvill quondam uxore sua villam de Menelidam" which "Alanus de Dunestanvill pater ipsius Cecilie dedit ei ad se maritandam", by charter dated 26 Feb 1208[523]

b)         ALICE Basset .  Her parentage and marriage are stated in Domesday Descendants[524]m ROBERT FitzWale, son of ---. 

 

 

3.         GILBERT Basset (-after 25 Dec 1109).  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, suggests that Gilbert may have been the brother of Ralph Basset[525].  Henry I King of England confirmed property ot Eynsham abbey by charter dated 25 Dec 1109, including the donation of "decimam suam de Strattona" by "Gillebertus Basset" and "decimam suam de una hida de Estelai" by "Radulfus Basset"[526]

 

4.         WILLIAM Basset (-after 1120).  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[527]

 

5.         WILLIAM Basset (-1134).  Abbot of St Benet of Hulme.  The Chronicle of John of Oxenedes records the death in 1126 of "Conradus abbas sancti Benedicti de Hulmo" and the succession of "Willelmus cognomento Basseth"[528].  "[Abbas] Willelmus" and the monks of St Benet of Hulme leased the manor of Heigham to "Richardo Basset" for life by charter dated to [1127/34], witnessed by "…Osmundo Basset…"[529].  The Chronicle of John of Oxenedes records the death in 1134 of "Willelmus Basseth abbas sancti Benedicti de Hulmo"[530]

 

6.         MILO Basset (-after [Oct 1138/Sep 1139]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Milon bass" in Norfolk/Suffolk[531].  "…Milon Basseth…" witnessed two charters dated to [Oct 1138/Sep 1139] under which Queen Matilda and King Stephen, respectively, donated property to the Templars[532]

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage of the following members of the family have not been identified.  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that Nicholas and Thurstan were sons of Ralph Basset[533].  He does not provide the basis for his speculation, but from a chronological point of view it is reasonable. 

 

1.         NICHOLAS Basset (-before 1166).  William Reedy states that Nicholas Basset was the brother of Richard Basset but cites no primary source which supports this statement[534].  Henry I King of England recorded that "Nicholaus Basset" had quitclaimed him lands held of him "in capite…Mixeb et Wilaviston et…in Neuiton et Vivilcote", and that he had granted the lands to "Ricardo Basset", by charter dated to [1129/30][535].  An undated charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Elstow including that of “terræ in Oxineford” by “Nicholai Basset” and land "in Avintona" by "Richardi Basset"[536]m ---.  The name of Nicholas’s wife is not known.  Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

a)         NICHOLAS Basset (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[537]

 

 

1.         GILBERT Basset (-after 1166).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Eynsham abbey, including the donations by "Gisleberti Basset decimam de Stratona…Radulfi Basset decimam…de Estlaia" by charter dated 20 Dec [1159/61][538].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[539]

 

 

 

B.      BASSET of DRAYTON BASSET, STAFFORDSHIRE

 

 

RALPH Basset, son of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel (-1160).  "Radulfus Basset filius Ricardi Basset" confirmed the donation of "terram de Niwebold…de feodo de Colestona" to Eynsham abbey made by "Radulfus Basset auus meus" by charter dated to [1144/63], witnessed by "Ricardus abbas Legrec, Robertus frater eius, Adel uxor mea, Thomas de Sais et Willelmus et Robertus filii eius…"[540].  "Galfridus Ridel" granted Colston "de feodo meo quæ fuit Gevæ Ridel avæ nostræ…Draituna", which "Radulfus Basset avus meus et Ricardus Basset pater noster" had granted, to "Radulfo Basset fratri meo", as well as other grants naming "Matildis Ridel matris meæ", by charter dated to [1150][541].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Eynsham abbey, including the donations by "Gisleberti Basset decimam de Stratona…Radulfi Basset decimam…de Estlaia" by charter dated 20 Dec [1159/61][542].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus Basset" used to hold one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) now held by "hæres Radulfi Basset junioris"[543].  The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records that "Wills Basset…ipsi Willo" made payment "p debito Rad fris sui" in Leicestershire[544]

[m ---.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "uxor Radulfi Bassat" held "viii carucatas de dote sua in Rakendale et in Wileis" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[545].] 

m ALICE, daughter of ---.  “Radulfus Basset” donated property to Canwell priory, for the souls of “Aliciæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willielmo Basset…"[546].  "Radulfus Basset filius Ricardi Basset" confirmed the donation of "terram de Niwebold…de feodo de Colestona" to Eynsham abbey made by "Radulfus Basset auus meus" by charter dated to [1144/63], witnessed by "…Adel uxor mea…"[547]

Ralph & his wife had one child: 

1.         RALPH Basset (-1211).  “Radulfus Basset” confirmed donations to Canwell priory by “Geua Ridel et pater meus Radulfus Basset”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willielmo Basset…"[548].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus filius Radulfi Baiset" held "vii carucatas et dimidiam in Dicutone" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[549].  "…Thoma Basset" subscribed the charter dated to May [1175/79] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the lepers of Saint-Lazare de Jerusalem[550]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  However, the following charter suggests that she may have been Isabel de Pattingham: "Dominam Isabel de Patingham…cum assensu heredum suorum" donated "assartum in Chyltun" to the nuns of Brewood, in exchange for land "in Patingham…de dono Radulfo Bassed", by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "…Radulfo Bassed juvene et Ricardo fratre suo…"[551].  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         RALPH Basset (-[1254/61]).  "Dominam Isabel de Patingham…cum assensu heredum suorum" donated "assartum in Chyltun" to the nuns of Brewood, in exchange for land "in Patingham…de dono Radulfo Bassed", by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "…Radulfo Bassed juvene et Ricardo fratre suo…"[552].  A charter dated 15 Sep 1221 records a final settlement between "Rogerum filium Radulfi" and "Radulfum Basset" relating to land in Willowes, Leicestershire which Roger had claimed from "Aliciam Basset aviam ipsius Radulfi"[553]m ISABEL, daughter of ---.  “Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[554].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH Basset (-4 Aug 1265).  “Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[555]m as her first husband,  MARGARET de Somery, daughter of ROGER [IV] de Somery of Dudley, Worcestershire & his first wife Nicole de Albini of the Earls of Arundel (-before 18 Sep 1289).  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Margaret married "Radulpho de Basset juniori"[556].  “Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[557].  She married secondly (before 26 Jan 1271) Ralph de Cromwell of Cromwell, Nottinghamshire and West Hallam, Derbyshire.  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[558].  Ralph & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       RALPH Basset (-31 Dec 1299, bur Drayton).  He was summoned to parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Basset.  m HAWISE, daughter of ---. 

-         see below

(b)       [MAUD .  The Complete Peerage states that John Lord Grey of Wilton married secondly “Maud, who is said to have been da. of Ralph Basset of Drayton by Margaret...de Somery” but does not provide the basis for this speculation[559]m as his second wife, JOHN de Grey Lord Grey (of Wilton), son of REYNOLD de Grey Lord Grey (of Wilton) & his second wife Emma de Cauz ([1267/68]-28 Oct 1323).] 

b)         RICHARD Basset .  "Dominam Isabel de Patingham…cum assensu heredum suorum" donated "assartum in Chyltun" to the nuns of Brewood, in exchange for land "in Patingham…de dono Radulfo Bassed", by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "…Radulfo Bassed juvene et Ricardo fratre suo…"[560]

 

 

RALPH Basset, son of RALPH Basset & his wife Margaret de Somery (-31 Dec 1299, bur Drayton).  He was summoned to parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Basset

m HAWISE, daughter of ---. 

Ralph & his wife had three children: 

1.         RALPH Basset (-25 Feb 1343)Lord Basset (of Drayton).  m (settlement 27 Mar 1304) JOAN de Grey, daughter of JOHN de Grey Lord Grey [of Wilton and Ruthin] & his first wife Anne de Ferrers (-1353, before 5 Apr).  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         RALPH Basset (-[1335])m as her first husband, ALICE Audley, daughter of NICHOLAS Audley Lord Audley & his wife Catherine Giffard (-after 1343).  She married secondly Hugh Mainill.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH Basset ([1334/35]-10 May 1390, bur Lichfield Cathedral)Lord Basset (of Drayton).  The will of "Ralph Basset of Drayton Knight", dated 17 Jan 1389, chose burial “in the cathedral church of Lichfield”, bequeathed property to “Joan my wife[561]m firstly ([May] 1338) JOAN Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer.  m secondly JEANNE de Bretagne, daughter of JEAN IV Duke of Brittany & his wife Jeanne de Flandre ([1341]-8 Nov 1402, bur Lavendon Abbey, Buckinghamshire).  The testament of “Jehan Duc de Bretainge Comte de Montfort et de Richemont”, dated 21 Oct 1385, bequeathed property to “nostre...sœur de pere et de mere la Dame de Basset[562].  She was granted Richmond, jointly with Anthony de Rise and Nicholas de Alderwych, 23 Apr 1398, but this grant was ignored or resumed by King Henry IV.  King Richard II confirmed “comitatum castrum villam et honorem Richemundie” to “Johanne que fuit uxor Radulphi Basset de Drayton chivaler sorori...fratris nostri Johannis Ducis Britannie et comitis Richemund, Antonio Rick et Nicholao Alderwich” by charter dated 20 Apr 1398[563]

b)         MARGARET Basset, daughter of RALPH Basset Lord Basset of Drayton & his wife Joan de Grey of Wilton (-after 1 Dec 1347).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the second marriage of “Johannes de Bohun comes”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Margaretam filiam domini Radulphi Basset” after the death of his first wife[564]m as his second wife, JOHN de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex, son of HUMPHREY de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Elizabeth of England (St Clements 23 Nov 1306-Kirkby Thore, co. Westmoreland 20 Jan 1336, bur Stratford Abbey near London). 

2.         MARGARET Basset (-17 Mar 1337, bur Tysoe, Warwickshire)m firstly (1298 or before) EDMUND de Stafford, son of NICHOLAS de Stafford & his wife --- [de Langley] (15 Jul 1273-12 Aug 1308, bur Stafford, Church of Friars Minors).  m secondly THOMAS de Pype, son of ---. 

3.         MAUD Bassetm WILLIAM Herriz, son of ---. 

 

 

 

C.      BASSET of HEADINGTON and WALLINGFORD, OXFORDSHIRE

 

 

William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that the following brothers and sister were children of Gilbert Basset, whom he identifies as the possible brother of the first Ralph Basset (see Part A above)[565].  He does not indicate the primary source on which this statement is based. 

 

1.         THOMAS Basset [I] of Headington, Oxfordshire (-after [1180/82]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Thomas Basset" in Oxfordshire in [1171/72][566]m ALICE de Dunstanville, daughter of [ALAN de Dunstanville & his wife ---] (-after 1186).  Oswald Barron names Alice as daughter of Alan de Dunstanville and records her marriage to Thomas Basset, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[567].  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 20 Mar 1200 under which King John confirmed the grant of "manerium de Scaudeford", which "fuit Walteri de Dunestanvill avunculi sui, sic jus et liberum maritagium Aelic matris ipsius Gilberti", to her son "Gilberto Basset"[568].  Thomas [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         GILBERT Basset [I] (-[1205/06]).  "Thomas Basset", with the consent of "Gilleberti primogeni filii mei", granted "Cumtonam…cuius medietas fuit maritagium matris mee, altera…medietatis…fuit maritagium uxoris mee matris eorum" to "Alano filio meo fratri suo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Walterus de Dunstanvill, Alanus de Dunstanvill, Fulco Basset…Thomas Basset juvenis…"[569].  "Gillebertus Basset" conceded Compton Basset, Wiltshire to "Alano fratri meo", at the request of "Thome Basset patris mei et Aliz de Dunstanvill matris mee", by charter dated to [1180/82], witnessed by "…Walterus de Dunstanvill, Alanus de Dunstanvill, Fulco Basset…Thomas Basset juvenis…"[570].  "Gilebertus Basset" granted land at Bicester and other properties to the prior of Bicester, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Egeline et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1182/85], witnessed by "…Egelina uxore mea, Aliz Basset…Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[571].  The Roll of Honour dated [1186/87] records that "Gilberto Basset…Alano Basset" held land in the honour of Walingford[572].  "Gillebertus Basset" confirmed land at Cowley to "Waltero filio Tostani de Coveleia" by charter dated to [1180/1205], witnessed by "Toma Basset, Alano Basset…"[573].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Gilbertus Basset" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[574].  King John confirmed the grant of "manerio suo de Strafford" to "Gilberto Basset et Eggelin uxori eius" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[575].  A charter of King Edward II records that “Gilebertus Basset” founded Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Egelinæ et liberorum nostrorum", witnessed by "uxore mea Egelina, Aliz. Basset, Henrico de Curtenay, Roberto Damary, Hugone Drunald, Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[576]m AIGELINE de Courtenay, daughter of RENAUD de Courtenay & his second wife Hawise d’Avranches (-after 1219).  "Gilebertus Basset" granted land at Bicester and other properties to the prior of Bicester, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Egeline et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1182/85], witnessed by "…Egelina uxore mea, Aliz Basset, Henrico de Curten…Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[577].  King John confirmed the grant of "manerio suo de Strafford" to "Gilberto Basset et Eggelin uxori eius" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[578].  The presence of Aigeline in the grant suggests that the property in question had previously been held by her family.  A charter of King Edward II records that “Gilebertus Basset” founded Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Egelinæ et liberorum nostrorum", witnessed by "uxore mea Egelina…"[579].  "Aquilina de Curt" donated "totam terram meam de Swthona" to Bicester priory, for the souls of "patris mei Reginaldi de Curt et…matris mee et…sponsi mei Gilleberti Basset et filii mei Thome Basset", by charter dated to [1205/06], witnessed by "Robert de [C]urt, Thoma Basset…"[580].  "Eglina de Curthenai" donated half her dower in her manor of Wretchwick, Oxfordshire, which "predictus Gilbertus Basset bone memorie" retained when "predictam Eustaciam Basset" married "Thome de Verdun", to Bicester priory by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "Ricardo de Campvill, Eustacia Basset uxore ipsius, Thoma Basset, Alano Basset…"[581].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Oxfordshire, dated 1219, which includes "Egelina de Curtenai" holding land "in Craumerse…hundredo de Langetroe…[et] in Burnecestre…in hundredo de Pockedelau"[582].  Gilbert [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          THOMAS Basset (-young).  "Aquilina de Curt" donated "totam terram meam de Swthona" to Bicester priory, for the souls of "patris mei Reginaldi de Curt et…matris mee et…sponsi mei Gilleberti Basset et filii mei Thome Basset", by charter dated to [1205/06], witnessed by "Robert de [C]urt, Thoma Basset…"[583]

ii)         EUSTACHIA Basset (-after [1211/16]).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Gillebertus Basset…pro filia sua maritanda Tome de Verdun" in Oxfordshire[584].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Nicholaus de Verdun" against "Andream de Bradeshulla" relating to property held by "Ricardum de Kaumvilla et Eustachiam uxorem eius…dotem ipsius Eustachie de dono ipsius Thome de Kaumuilla [error for Verdun] fratris primogeniti ipsius Nicholai et primi viri ipsius Eustachie" and which was previously held by "Bertramus de Verdun pater suus et Thomas de Verdun frater suus"[585].  "Eglina de Curthenai" donated half her dower in her manor of Wretchwick, Oxfordshire, which "predictus Gilbertus Basset bone memorie" retained when "predictam Eustaciam Basset" married "Thome de Verdun", to Bicester priory by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "Ricardo de Campvill, Eustacia Basset uxore ipsius, Thoma Basset, Alano Basset…"[586]m firstly ([1194]) THOMAS de Verdun, son of BERTRAM de Verdun & his [first wife Matilda de Ferrers/second wife Rohese ---] (-1199).  m secondly ([1199]) RICHARD de Camville, son of GERARD de Camville & his wife Nicole de la Haye (-after 12 Feb 1217). 

b)         THOMAS Basset [II] of Headington, Oxfordshire (-1220).  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[587].  Thomas was most likely his parents’ second son, as shown by the order of witness names in the charter dated to [1180/1205] under which [his brother] "Gillebertus Basset" confirmed land at Cowley to "Waltero filio Tostani de Coveleia", witnessed by "Toma Basset, Alano Basset…"[588].  "Thom Basset" paid a fine for the marriage of "fil sua fil com de Warwic" in Oxfordshire and Warwickshire, dated 1205[589].  Matthew Paris names “...Thomas Basset” among the "consiliarios iniquissimos” of King John[590]m PHILIPPA, daughter of WILLIAM FitzHugh Malbank & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Thomas [II] & his wife had three children: 

i)          PHILIPPA Basset (-before 29 Nov 1265, bur Bicester Priory).  "Thom Basset" paid a fine for the marriage of "fil sua fil com de Warwic" in Oxfordshire and Warwickshire, dated 1205[591].  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[592].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[593].  An order dated 11 Oct 1227 records a lawsuit against "Henricum comitem Warewici et Philippam uxorem eius et Thomam filium ipsius comitis…"[594].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1231, by "Thome Basset" which names "Ricardus Suward…et Philippam comitissam Warwici uxorem eius"[595]m firstly (after 1205) as his second wife, HENRY Earl of Warwick, son of WALERAN Earl of Warwick & his first wife Margaret --- ([1190]-1229 before 17 Oct).  m secondly (before 4 Nov 1229, divorced 1242) RICHARD Siward, son of ---. 

ii)         JOANNA Basset (-after 1230).  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[596].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[597]m REGINALD de Vautort, son of --- (-1246). 

iii)        ALICE Basset (-[1263]).  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[598].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[599].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Johannes Biset et Alicia uxor eius” owing “de Oblatis” in Devon[600]m firstly [as his second wife,] WILLIAM Malet, son of GILBERT Malet & his wife Alice (-1215).  m secondly (before 1221, annulled) H--- de Chaceporc, son of ---.  m thirdly (1223 or before) JOHN Bisset, son of MANASSER Biset & his wife Alice --- (-1241). 

c)         ALAN Basset (-1231).  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[601]

-        see below

d)         [ISABEL .  The 1181/82 Pipe Roll records "Wido de Creon" accounting "pro habenda uxore que fuit Alberti Gresle" in Lincolnshire[602].  A genealogy of the founders of Freston Priory records that "monsieur Wythe de Croune" married "une Isabelle"[603].  The primary source which confirms that Isabel was the daughter of Thomas Basset has not yet been identified.  m firstly ALBERT de Gresley, son of --- (-[1179]).  m secondly GUY de Craon, son of MAURICE de Craon & his wife Clarice ---.] 

2.         JOAN Basset .  William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, states that Joan, sister of Thomas Basset, married Aubry de Dammartin as her third husband[604]m firstly ---.  m secondly ---.  m thirdly [as his second wife,] AUBRY de Dammartin, son of ---. 

 

 

The parentage of the following person has not been confirmed.  However, his association in charters with the family of Thomas Basset of Headington suggests that he may have been another of Thomas’s brothers. 

 

1.         FULK Basset (-after [1180/82]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[605].  "Fulco Basset" granted quitrents in Oxford to "Toraldo cordewanerio et Thome filio Widonis", in return for "quatuor libras sterlingorum" to "mihi Fulcone" and "unum anulum aureum" to "Ysout uxori mee", by charter dated to [1185/1205][606].  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[607]m ISOLDE, daughter of ---.  "Fulco Basset" granted quitrents in Oxford to "Toraldo cordewanerio et Thome filio Widonis", in return for "quatuor libras sterlingorum" to "mihi Fulcone" and "unum anulum aureum" to "Ysout uxori mee", by charter dated to [1185/1205][608]

 

 

ALAN Basset, son of THOMAS Basset [I] of Headington, Oxfordshire & his wife Alice de Dunstanville (-1231).  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[609].  "Thomas Basset", with the consent of "Gilleberti primogeni filii mei", granted "Cumtonam…cuius medietas fuit maritagium matris mee, altera…medietatis…fuit maritagium uxoris mee matris eorum" to "Alano filio meo fratri suo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Walterus de Dunstanvill, Alanus de Dunstanvill, Fulco Basset…Thomas Basset juvenis…"[610].  The Roll of Honour dated [1186/87] records that "Gilberto Basset…Alano Basset" held land in the honour of Walingford[611].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alanus Basset" held one knight fee "in Wokinges et Mapeldorwelle…ex dono Regis Ricardi" in Surrey, and one knight fee in Wycombe, Berkshire[612].  This entry must be redated to after 1189 if it is correct that the knight fees were granted by King Richard I.  King John confirmed that “Waltero de Dunstanvill” had granted the manor of Winterbourne to “Alan Basset”, under a charter confirmed by King Richard I, by charter dated 10 Apr 1200[613].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alanus Basset" holding "Berwike…de feodo Adæ de Port" and two knights’ fees "de honore Walingforde…in Wottone" in Wiltshire, and land "in Wokinges" in Surrey, in [1210/12][614].  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "…Alanum Basset" from custody dated 21 Dec 1216[615].  A charter dated 1217 records that "Alanum Basset" granted the manor of Yarlington, Somerset to "Isobel quondam uxorem Willelmi de Monte Acuto" [as her dower] by charter dated 1217, witnessed by "Gilberto Basset, Warino Basset…"[616]

m firstly ALICE de Grey, daughter of --- (-before 15 Apr 1206).  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, names "Alice de Gray" as the first wife of Alan Basset and mother of the children as shown below[617].  He does not cite the primary source which confirms that this is correct. 

m secondly (before 16 Apr 1206) ALINE de Gai, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 16 Apr 1206 records a final settlement between "Thomam filium Ricardi et Aliciam uxorem suam" and "Alanum Basset et Alinam uxorem suam" relating to one knight’s fee in Broad Town, Wiltshire[618].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Alanus Basset de hereditate uxoris sue ii milites" among the tenants of the honour of Wallingford[619].  

Alan & his first wife had five children: 

1.         THOMAS Basset (-1230 or before).  King Henry III granted "terram quam Thomas Basset frater ipsius Gilberti habuit in Kertlinton" to “Gilberto Basset...fratri et heredi ipsius Thome” dated 1230[620].  "Gilbert Basset" was granted "land of Kertlinton…as the king had granted it to Thomas Basset, brother of the said Gilbert" dated 4 May 1235[621]

2.         GILBERT Basset [II] (-31 Jul 1241).  King Henry III granted "terram quam Thomas Basset frater ipsius Gilberti habuit in Kertlinton" to “Gilberto Basset...fratri et heredi ipsius Thome” dated 1230[622].  "Gilbert Basset" was granted "rent which Alan Basset his [father] used to pay yearly to the exchequer", dated 30 Sep 1230[623].  "Gilbert Basset" was granted "land of Kertlinton…as the king had granted it to Thomas Basset, brother of the said Gilbert" dated 4 May 1235[624].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, by "Gregorius de la Dun" against "Giliberto Basset" concerning an agreement with "Alanum Basset patrem eiusdem Giliberti"[625].  Matthew Paris names "…Gilbertus Basset, cujus casum sinistrum præscripsimus…" among those who died in 1241[626]m (before 18 Jun 1240) as her first husband, ISABEL de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshall of the Earls of Pembroke (-before 26 Nov 1260).  A charter dated 18 Jun 1240 records that "the town of Greywell" was given "as a marriage portion to Gilbert Basset with Isabel daughter of William de Ferrariis, the earl’s [G. Marshal Earl of Pembroke] niece"[627].  She married secondly (1243 or before) as his second wife, Reynold de Mohun.  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator” and in 1260 of “Isabella Basset uxor Reginaldi prædicti[628].  A writ dated 26 Nov "45 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel Basset" names "William son of Reginald de Moun and the said Isabel, age variously stated as 6 and 7, is her heir"[629]

3.         WARIN Basset (-Cardiff Castle 1233).  A charter dated 1217 records that "Alanum Basset" granted the manor of Yarlington, Somerset to "Isobel quondam uxorem Willelmi de Monte Acuto" [as her dower] by charter dated 1217, witnessed by "Gilberto Basset, Warino Basset…"[630].  Henry III King of England appointed judges in a claim by "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and "Mauricium de Borham tenentem de…terre…in Heles et…in Bradeford" dated 18 Apr 1229[631].  A charter dated 6 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and the dean of Exeter relating to the advowson of the church of Veryan which they had "ex dono Johannis de Monte Acuto patris predicte Katerine"[632].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1233 of "Warinus Basset in obsidione et insultu castri de Kaerdif[633]m KATHARINE de Montagu, daughter of JOHN de Montagu & his wife Lucy --- (25 Nov ---- -after 6 Apr 1231).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmo de Monte Acuto fratri eiusdem Johannis" against "Johannes de Monte Acuto et Lucia uxor eius" claiming that "garciam Katerinam…filiam et heredem eorum" was not the daughter of John and his wife, while the bishop of Winchester stated that Lucy’s daughter was born "in vigilia S. Katerine, unde vocata fuit Katerina"[634].  Henry III King of England appointed judges in a claim by "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and "Mauricium de Borham tenentem de…terre…in Heles et…in Bradeford" dated 18 Apr 1229[635].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, by "Warinus Basset et Katerina uxor eius" against "abbatem de Gresten" concerning "terre…in Merse" of which "Johannes […de Monte Acuto] pater ipsius Katerine" was seised[636].  A charter dated 6 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and the dean of Exeter relating to the advowson of the church of Veryan which they had "ex dono Johannis de Monte Acuto patris predicte Katerine"[637]

4.         PHILIP Basset (-29 Oct 1271, bur Stanley, Wilts).  "Philip Basset son of Alan Basset" was granted "land in Saham…", dated 9 Mar 1235[638].  A charter of King Edward II records that “Philippus Basset miles” confirmed the foundation of Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…Fulconis Basset quondam Londoniensis episcopi fratris mei"[639].  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", names "Aline his daughter, wife of Roger Bygod earl of Norfolk, marshal of England, late the wife of Hugh le Despensir, age variously stated as 22 and more, 24 and more, 26 and 30 and more, is the heir", adding that Philip died "on the morrow of SS Simon and Jude last"[640]m firstly HAWISE de Lovaine of Little Easton, Essex, daughter of MATHIEU de Lovaine & his wife Muriel ---.  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", records "Wykes manor in the hundred of Tendring [Essex]…of the inheritance of Helewise his wife, in chief of Matthew de Luviayn"[641]m secondly ([25 Nov 1254/23 Mar 1255]) as her second husband, ELA Longespee, widow of THOMAS de Warwick Earl of Warwick, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela of Salisbury (-9 Feb 1298, bur Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire).  The Book of Lacock names “Isabellam de Vescy…Elam…Idam de Camyle” as the daughters of “Guillelmus Longespe ex…Ela”, adding that Ela married “Comes Warwik, et postea Philippus Basset” but was childless[642].  Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation to “Ela de Warwick of the diocese of Worcester to contract marriage with Philip son of Alan knight who is connected with her in the third degree of affinity”, dated 13 Nov 1254[643].  Pope Alexander IV issued an indult to “Philip knight son of Alan deceased of the diocese of London and his wife Ela de Warwec...to remain in the marriage they have contracted notwithstanding that they are related in the fourth degree of consanguinity”, dated 23 Mar 1255[644].  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", records "Clinton Aston manor [Buckingham] held in exchange from William Muntagu for the life of the said Philip and Lady Ella his wife"[645].  The Chroniculum of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the death in 1300 of “domina Ela comitissa Warwici” and her burial “Oseneye[646].  Philip & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ALINE Basset ([1242/50]-before 11 Apr 1281).  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", names "Aline his daughter, wife of Roger Bygod earl of Norfolk, marshal of England, late the wife of Hugh le Despensir, age variously stated as 22 and more, 24 and more, 26 and 30 and more, is the heir"[647].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 23 Sep "2 Edw I" following the death of "Hawis de London" name “Payn de Cadurciis her son is her next heir and of full age[648].  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death of "Aline la Despensere daughter and heir of Philip Basset, alias Aveline countess of Norfolk alias Aline countess Marescall" name “Hugh son of Hugh le Despencer age [...20 in the first week of March last] is next heir[649]m firstly (1260 or before) HUGH Le Despencer, son of HUGH Le Despencer & his wife --- (1223 or before-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265, bur Evesham Abbey).  m secondly (before 29 Oct 1271) as his first wife, ROGER Bigod Earl of Norfolk, of HUGH Bigod & his wife Joan de Stuteville ([1243/46]-6 Dec 1306). 

b)         MARGERY Basset (-before 19 Oct 1271).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   She predeceased her father as she is not named in the inquisitions following his death.  m JOHN FitzJohn of Shere, son of JOHN FitzGeoffrey of Shere, Surrey & his wife Isabel --- (-Lambeth [6 Nov] 1275). 

5.         FULK Basset .  Bishop of London.  A charter of King Edward II records that “Philippus Basset miles” confirmed the foundation of Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…Fulconis Basset quondam Londoniensis episcopi fratris mei"[650]

Alan & his second wife had two children: 

6.         ALINE Basset .  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Aluina que fuit uxor Drogonis de Monte Acuto est de donatione domini regis", adding that "est in custodia Alani Basset per Regem Johannem et est maritanda et terra sua in Pideltun valet xx.l"[651].  "Alan Basset" made a fine "by Richard Talbot" for marrying "Aline who was the wife of Drogo de Montagu…without the king’s licence", dated [Oct] 1224[652]m firstly DREUX de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu & his wife Isabel --- (-before 1219).  m secondly ([1219/24]) RICHARD [V] Talbot of Linton, son of GILBERT Talbot of Linton & his wife --- (-before 13 Apr 1234). 

7.         --- Basset (-[after 11 May 1226]).  William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, states that Alan Basset paid a fine to marry his daughter to the son and heir of William de Lanvalay in [1212/14][653].  It does not appear that this marriage was completed.  [Betrothed ([1212/14]) WILLIAM [IV] de Lanvalay, son of WILLIAM [II] de Lanvalay & his wife Hawise de Bocland ([after 1190]-[1214/18 May 1216])]. 

 

 

1.         ALAN Basset [of Ipsden, Oxfordshire] .  A charter dated 21 Nov 1235 records a final settlement between "Willelmum de Engelfeld" and "Alanum Bassat" relating to one knight’s service from holdings in Bepton, Sussex, and Penwith, Reskajeage, and Tehidy, Cornwall[654].  A charter dated 1 Jul 1241 records a final settlement between "Gilbertum de Basevil" and "Alanum Bassat" relating to land in Bepton, Sussex and land in Cornwall "quam Isabella que fuit uxor predicti Alani de Dunstanvill tenet in dotem" which was inherited by Gilbert from "Alani de Dunstanvill avunculi predictorum Gilberti et Alani"[655].  This last document indicates that Alan Basset of Ipsden must have been a descendant of Thomas Basset of Headington, whose wife was the sister of Alan de Dunstanville. 

 

 

 

D.      BASSET of CHADDLEWORTH, BERKSHIRE

 

 

THURSTAN Basset [I], son RALPH Basset & his wife --- (-after 1166).  His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer] donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church, and in a later passage that [his son] "Ricardus itaque Basset (filius Turstini filii Radulfi prædicti" revived the claim against the monastery "cum patre mortuo" relating to "terræ de Chedeleswrtha" which was settled[656].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[657].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[658]

m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known. 

Thurstan [I] & his wife had one child: 

1.         RICHARD Basset (-after 1210).  His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer] donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church, and in a later passage that [his son] "Ricardus itaque Basset (filius Turstini filii Radulfi prædicti" revived the claim against the monastery "cum patre mortuo" relating to "terræ de Chedeleswrtha" which was settled[659].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ricardus Basset et Turstinus filius eius" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire[660].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Ricardus Basset" paying "vii l x s, xv milites" in Northamptonshire[661].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "Ricardus Basset" paid "xv l, xv milites" in Northamptonshire[662].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Ricardus Basset…pro foresta pro patre suo" in Northamptonshire[663].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Richardus Basset" holding "xv milites" in Northamptonshire, and 7 in Leicestershire, in [1210/12][664]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

a)         THURSTAN Basset [II] (-[1210/22]).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ricardus Basset et Turstinus filius eius" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire[665].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Turstanus Basset" holding one half of one knight’s fee in Bedfordshire in [1210/12][666]m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known.  Thurstan & his wife had six children: 

i)          ISABELLA Basset (-[24 Oct/11 Dec] 1225).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[667].  "Thomas de Venuz" made a fine for marrying "Isabella, who was the wife of Robert Mauduit…if she will consent to this", dated 24 Oct 1225[668].  It is not certain that this second marriage took place as Isabella died soon after the date of the document.  "William Mauduit" paid homage to the king for "the lands that Isabella Basset, mother of the said William, whose heir he is, held in chief in his bailiwick", dated 11 Dec 1225[669]m [firstly] ROBERT [II] Mauduit, son of WILLIAM [III] Mauduit & his wife Isabelle de Senlis (-[1217/Jun 1222]).  [m secondly (after 24 Oct 1225) THOMAS de Venuz, son of ---.] 

ii)         JOAN Basset (-after [Jan] 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Robert of Burnby and Joan his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[670]m ROBERT of Burnby, son of ---. 

iii)        EGELINE Basset (-after [Jan] 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Richard Burdun and Egelina his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[671].  "Egelina Basset que fuit uxor Ricardi Burdun" granted her land at Letcombe Basset to "Ricardo Lungespee filio meo" by charter dated [1232/1258][672].  m RICHARD Burdun, son of ---. 

iv)       ALICE Basset (-after [Jan] 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…John le Brun and Alice his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[673]m JOHN le Brun, son of ---. 

v)        MATILDA Basset (-after 5 Feb 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Robert of Burnby and Joan his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223, adding that the "rest of the lands formerly of Thurstan which fall to Matilda and Laurencia, daughters of Thurstan, who married after Thurstan’s death without the assent…of the king" are to be taken into the king’s hands[674].  "Bartholomew de Rakinton and Matilda his wife, who is one of the daughters and heiresses of Thurstan Basset" made a fine "for having the rightful portion…of the inheritance of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 5 Feb 1223[675]m BARTHOLOMEW de Rakinton, son of ---. 

vi)       LAURENCIA Basset (-after 5 Feb 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Robert of Burnby and Joan his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223, adding that the "rest of the lands formerly of Thurstan which fall to Matilda and Laurencia, daughters of Thurstan, who married after Thurstan’s death without the assent…of the king" are to be taken into the king’s hands[676].  "Ralph of Weedon junior and Laurencia his wife, who is one of the daughters and heiresses of Thurstan Basset" made a fine "for having the rightful portion…of the inheritance of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 5 Feb 1223[677]m RALPH of Weedon, son of RALPH of Weedon & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

E.      BASSET of SAPCOTE, LEICESTERSHIRE

 

 

WILLIAM Basset of Sapcote, Leicestershire, son of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel (-[1185]).  His parentage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…[678].  "…Willo Basset…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/67] under which the monks of Leicester abbey authorised the establishment of the church of St Mary the Less, Leicester[679].  The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records that "Wills Basset…ipsi Willo" made payment "p debito Rad fris sui" in Leicestershire[680].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Basset" held two knights’ fees from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[681]

m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known. 

William & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         SIMON Basset (-1205).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Simonis Basset" in Warwickshire and Leicestershire[682].  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[683]m ISABEL Avenell, daughter of WILLIAM Avenell & his wife --- (-before 10 Apr 1226).  "Elisabeth q fuit uxor Sim Basset" paid a fine for "hereditate sua…dissaisita…post mortem predicti Simoni viri sui" in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, dated 1205[684].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Elizabet que fuit uxor Simonis Basset" held "feodum dimidii militis…de honore de Notingham"[685].  "William Basset, son and heir of Elizabeth Avenel" was granted "full seisin of [her] land held of the king in the honour of Peverel in the county of Buckinghamshire", dated 10 Apr 1226[686].  Simon & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM Basset (-before 22 Jun 1249).  "Willelmus de Hanred" confirmed land in Barton Seagrave, Northamptonshire, held by "Symon Basset…de Ricardo patre meo", to "Willelmo Basset filio Symonis Basset", by charter dated to [1205/10], witnessed by "…Johanne Basset…"[687].  "William Basset, son and heir of Elizabeth Avenel" was granted "full seisin of [her] land held of the king in the honour of Peverel in the county of Buckinghamshire", dated 10 Apr 1226[688].  This document shows that William must have been his parents’ oldest surviving child.  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[689].  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[690]

b)         JOHN Basset (-before 1249).  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[691]

c)         REYNOLD Basset (-after 17 Mar 1226).  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[692].  Henry III King of England conscripted "…Reginaldus Basset…" for service "in Wasconiam" dated 17 Mar 1226[693]

d)         MATILDA Basset .  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[694].  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Robertum de Acle et Matillidem uxorem eius" and "Robertum Basset" relating to land at Scalford and Ab Kettleby, Lincolnshire against "Alanum Basset"[695]m ROBERT de Oakley, son of REYNOLD de Oakley & his wife ---. 

2.         [REYNOLD Basset .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Reginaldus Basset" in Warwickshire and Leicestershire[696].] 

 

 

1.         RALPH Basset of Sapcote .  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[697].  A charter dated 10 Apr 1239 records a final settlement between "Julianam que fuit uxor Roberti de Chaucumbe" and "Radulfum Basset et Milesentam uxorem eius" relating to land in Strubby, Lincolnshire, the marriage portion of "ipsius Juliane", in return for which "Gilbertus de Segrave et Amabilia uxor eius, soror predicte Milesente et particeps hereditatis Roberti de Chaucumbe" granted land in Chacombe, Northamptonshire to Ralph and Melisende[698]m (before 30 Sep 1231) MELISENDE de Chaucombe, daughter of ROBERT de Chaucombe & his [first wife ---].  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[699].  A charter dated 10 Apr 1239 records a final settlement between "Julianam que fuit uxor Roberti de Chaucumbe" and "Radulfum Basset et Milesentam uxorem eius" relating to land in Strubby, Lincolnshire, the marriage portion of "ipsius Juliane", in return for which "Gilbertus de Segrave et Amabilia uxor eius, soror predicte Milesente et particeps hereditatis Roberti de Chaucumbe" granted land in Chacombe, Northamptonshire to Ralph and Melisende[700].  The wording of this last document suggests that Juliana was not the mother of the two sisters who, if this is correct, must have been born from an earlier marriage of their father.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         SIMON Basset .  Wrottesley shows Simon as son of "Ralph Basset temp. Hen. 3" from a plea relating to the church of Cheadle, Staffordshire[701]m ---.  The name of Simon’s wife is not known.  Simon & his wife had one child: 

i)          SIMON Basset .  Wrottesley shows "Simon who had granted the advowson of the church by fine, levied in 20 E. 2 to Hervey de Staunton" as the son of Simon Basset, in a claim brought by "Isabella formerly the wife of Simon Basset (of Sapcote)" relating to the church of Cheadle, Staffordshire[702]m ISABELLA, daughter of ---.  Wrottesley shows "Simon who had granted the advowson of the church by fine, levied in 20 E. 2 to Hervey de Staunton" as the son of Simon Basset, in a claim brought by "Isabella formerly the wife of Simon Basset (of Sapcote)" relating to the church of Cheadle, Staffordshire[703]

 

2.         ROBERT Basset (-after 1 May 1233).  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Robertum de Acle et Matillidem uxorem eius" and "Robertum Basset" relating to land at Scalford and Ab Kettleby, Lincolnshire against "Alanum Basset"[704].  A charter dated 13 Jun 1238 records a final settlement between "Robertum Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" relating to a quarter of one knight’s fee in Adstock, Buckinghamshire, given to William by "Elizabethe Avenel avie predicti Roberti cuius heres ipse est"[705].  The last passage indicates that Robert was the son of the oldest surviving son of Simon Basset, presumably William Basset (see above) but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified. 

 

3.         ALAN Basset of North Luffenham, Rutland (-before 20 Jan 1247).  A charter dated 15 Sep 1221 records a final settlement between "Amabilem que fuit uxor Ricardi de Foxton" and "Alanum Basset et Amiciam uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton, Market Harbourough, Scalford and Gumley, Leicestershire[706].  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Robertum de Acle et Matillidem uxorem eius" and "Robertum Basset" relating to land at Scalford and Ab Kettleby, Lincolnshire against "Alanum Basset"[707]m AMICE, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 15 Sep 1221 records a final settlement between "Amabilem que fuit uxor Ricardi de Foxton" and "Alanum Basset et Amiciam uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton, Market Harbourough, Scalford and Gumley, Leicestershire[708].  A charter dated 20 Jan 1247 records a final settlement between "Johannam Basset" and "Willelmum de Mesnill et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton and lands "que fuerunt Amicie que fuit uxor Alani Basset, matris predictarum Johanne et Agnete"[709].  Alan & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOAN Basset .  A charter dated 20 Jan 1247 records a final settlement between "Johannam Basset" and "Willelmum de Mesnill et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton and lands "que fuerunt Amicie que fuit uxor Alani Basset, matris predictarum Johanne et Agnete"[710]

b)         AGNES Basset .  A charter dated 20 Jan 1247 records a final settlement between "Johannam Basset" and "Willelmum de Mesnill et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton and lands "que fuerunt Amicie que fuit uxor Alani Basset, matris predictarum Johanne et Agnete"[711]m WILLIAM de Maisnil, son of ---. 

 

4.         WILLIAM Basset .  A charter dated 13 Jun 1238 records a final settlement between "Robertum Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" relating to a quarter of one knight’s fee in Adstock, Buckinghamshire, given to William by "Elizabethe Avenel avie predicti Roberti cuius heres ipse est"[712]

 

 

 

F.      BASSET of WELDON, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

 

 

RICHARD Basset, son of GEOFFREY Ridel [Basset] & his first wife Amice --- (-1217).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[713].  A charter dated 3 Apr 1201 records an agreement between "Ricardum Basset filium Galfridi Ridel" and the prior of Launde for the latter to surrender charters received from "Galfrido Ridel", except for the foundation charter from "Ricardi Basset fundatoris" and later confirmations[714]

m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known. 

Richard & his wife had three children: 

1.         RALPH Basset (-before 17 Feb 1258).  "Eudo filius Augustini de Holinton" issued a quitclaim to "domino meo Eadulfo filio Ricardi Basset" relating to lands in Hollington by charter dated to [1217/41][715].  The prior of St Andrew’s, Northampton granted land in Northampton to "Radulfo Basset filio Ricardi Basset de Weledon" by charter dated to [1228/38], witnessed by "…Radulfo Ridel…"[716].  A writ after the death of "Ralph Basset of Welledon alias Welesden", dated "17 Feb 42 Hen III", records "Richard his son aged 30 and more is his heir"[717]m ---.  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD Basset ([1226/28]-before 1 Jul 1276).  A writ after the death of "Ralph Basset of Welledon alias Welesden", dated "17 Feb 42 Hen III", records "Richard his son aged 30 and more is his heir"[718].  A writ dated 1 Jul "4 Edw I", following the death of "Richard Basset of Weledon" names "Ralph his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...aged 32 and more[719]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH Basset ([1243/46]-).  A writ dated 1 Jul "4 Edw I", following the death of "Richard Basset of Weledon" names "Ralph his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...aged 32 and more[720]

b)         ORABILIS .  "Radulfus Basset de Weldon" granted "partem terre mee in villa de Madle" to "Orabele filie mee" by charter dated to [1250/58][721]

2.         RICHARD Basset .  "Ricardo Basset fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1217/41] under which "Willelmus cocus de Weled" quitclaimed land in Weldon to "domino meo Radulfo Basset"[722]

3.         MATILDA Basset (-after 25 Mar 1248).  "Matilda Basset" granted land "in Langepyn" to "Willelmo de Camera de Weledon…quam tenui de domino Radulfo Basset fratre meo" by charter dated 25 Mar 1248[723]

 

 

 

G.      BASSET FAMILIES in YORKSHIRE

 

 

1.         EMMA (-after 29 Jan 1200).  A charter dated 29 Jan 1200 records a settlement agreed between "Hugonem de Vabadun" and "Emmam Basset" concerning "terre…in Elvet" {Kirk Ella, Yorkshire, East Riding}[724]

 

2.         ROBERT Basset .  "Adam de Warrum" granted land in Hundgate in the Marsh and Havergate to "Roberto Basset et Aliz sorori mee uxori eius" by charter dated to [1170/84][725].  King Richard I confirmed donations to Rievaulx abbey, including the donation of "toftas et domos Eboraci in Mersc" made by "Roberti Basseth et Jerhemiæ Archidiaconi et Johannis nepotis eius", by charter dated 17 Sep 1189[726]m ALICE de Warrum, daughter of --- (-after 12 Nov 1201).  "Adam de Warrum" granted land in Hundgate in the Marsh and Havergate to "Roberto Basset et Aliz sorori mee uxori eius" by charter dated to [1170/84][727].  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][728].  A charter dated 12 Nov 1201 records a settlement agreed between "Aliciam Basset" and "Henricum de Puteaco" concerning "villa de Yockeflet" {Yokefleet, Yorkshire, East Riding}[729].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

a)         HUGH Basset .  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][730]

b)         ISOUDE Basset .  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][731]

c)         HELEN Basset .  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][732]

 

3.         REYNOLD Basset .  He founded the chapel at Hinderskelfe[733].  He is named as father of William and Peter Basset in the charter dated to [1170/85] which is quoted below.  m ---.  Reynold & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Basset .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus Basset" holding two knights’ fees "de feodo Albredæ de Insula" in Norfolk in 1166[734].  "Willelmi Basset" confirmed the donation of Hinderskelfe chapel to Kirkham abbey, made by "Petrus Basset frater suus", by charter dated to [1170/85][735].  "…Willelmo Basset…" witnessed the undated charter, dated to the reign of King Richard I, under which "Willelmus de Vesci" surrender rights in the Waste below Pickering in favour of Rievaulx abbey[736]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          REYNOLD Basset (-before 14 Mar 1227).  Reynold Basset recovered land at Hinderskelfe from Walter Basset in 1204[737].  Reynold Basset released his rights in Hinderskelfe chapel to Kirkham and confirmed donations by his grandfather Reynold[738].  A charter dated 6 Oct 1207 records a final settlement between "Reginaldum Basset" and "Walterum Basset" relating to land in Castle Howard {Yorkshire, North Riding} and Scagglethorpe {Yorkshire, East Riding}[739]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 14 Mar 1227 records a final settlement between "Matildam Basset" and "Robertum de Leycestr" relating to land in Scagglethorpe, Yorkshireshire "quod fuit Reginaldi Basset quondam viri sui"[740]

ii)         [ROBERT Basset .  He is named as father of Reynold Basset in the charter dated 1 Jul 1201 which is quoted below, but the primary source which confirms that he was the son of William Basset has not yet been identified.]  m ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       REYNOLD Basset (-after 1 Jul 1201).  A charter dated 1 Jul 1201 records a final settlement between the abbot of Combe and "Reginaldum Basset…filius Roberti Basset" relating to the latter’s claim to land at Harbury, agreed for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Ysabelle"[741]m ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-after 1 Jul 1201).  A charter dated 1 Jul 1201 records a final settlement between the abbot of Combe and "Reginaldum Basset…filius Roberti Basset" relating to the latter’s claim to land at Harbury, agreed for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Ysabelle"[742]

iii)        ALICE Basset .  Ralph de Frytheby, son of Ralph son of William, married Alice Basset, sister of Reynold Basset and her husband "seems to have been the heir of the Basset inheritance"[743]m RALPH de Frytheby, son of RALPH FitzWilliam & his wife ---. 

b)         PETER Basset .  "Petrus Basset" confirmed a donation of land to Kirkham, made by "Rainaldus Basset…pater meus", for the souls of "uxoris mee et filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et…fratris et domini mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1170/85], witnessed by "…Nicolao filio meo, Ailwino uxore mea…"[744]m AILWINE, daughter of ---.  "Petrus Basset" confirmed a donation of land to Kirkham, made by "Rainaldus Basset…pater meus", for the souls of "uxoris mee et filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et…fratris et domini mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1170/85], witnessed by "…Nicolao filio meo, Ailwino uxore mea…"[745].  Peter & his wife had children: 

i)          NICHOLAS Basset .  "Petrus Basset" confirmed a donation of land to Kirkham, made by "Rainaldus Basset…pater meus", for the souls of "uxoris mee et filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et…fratris et domini mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1170/85], witnessed by "…Nicolao filio meo, Ailwino uxore mea…"[746]same person as…?  NICHOLAS Basset (-after [Jul] 1219).  A charter dated 20 Aug 1202 records a final settlement between "Nicholaum Basset" and "Johannem filium Alani" relating to land in Ganthorpe, Yorkshire[747].  A charter dated 26 May 1214 records a final settlement between "Nicholas Basset and Basilia his wife" and "Walter Crispin" relating to land in Barton upon Humber, Lincolnshire which belonged to Basilia[748].  A charter dated 25 Nov 1218 records a final settlement between "Nicholaum Basset et Basiliam uxorem suam" and "Hawisiam de Weinflet" relating to land in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire[749].  Henry III King of England ordered "…Nicholaus Basset…" to enquire into the state of the forests "Eboraci" dated [Jul] 1219[750]m BASILIA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 26 May 1214 records a final settlement between "Nicholas Basset and Basilia his wife" and "Walter Crispin" relating to land in Barton upon Humber, Lincolnshire which belonged to Basilia[751].  A charter dated 25 Nov 1218 records a final settlement between "Nicholaum Basset et Basiliam uxorem suam" and "Hawisiam de Weinflet" relating to land in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire[752]

ii)         other children . 

 

 

1.         WALTER Basset (-after 6 Oct 1207).  Reynold Basset recovered land at Hinderskelfe from Walter Basset in 1204[753].  A charter dated 6 Oct 1207 records a final settlement between "Reginaldum Basset" and "Walterum Basset" relating to land in Castle Howard {Yorkshire, North Riding} and Scagglethorpe {Yorkshire, East Riding}[754]

 

2.         WILLIAM Basset (-after 17 Nov 1208).  A charter dated 24 Feb 1204 records a settlement agreed between "Willelmum Basset et Alienoram uxorem eius" and "Matheum clericum" concerning "terre…in Rillinton" {Rillington, Yorkshire, East Riding} which had been "dotem ipsius Alienore ex dono Johannis de Rillinton quondam viri sui"[755].  A charter dated 17 Nov 1208 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Elianorem uxorem suam" and the brothers of the Hospital of Jerusalem relating to land in Rillington[756]m as her second husband, ELEANOR, widow of JOHN de Rillington, daughter of --- (-after 17 Nov 1208).  A charter dated 24 Feb 1204 records a settlement agreed between "Willelmum Basset et Alienoram uxorem eius" and "Matheum clericum" concerning "terre…in Rillinton" {Rillington, Yorkshire, East Riding} which had been "dotem ipsius Alienore ex dono Johannis de Rillinton quondam viri sui"[757].  A charter dated 17 Nov 1208 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Elianorem uxorem suam" and the brothers of the Hospital of Jerusalem relating to land in Rillington[758]

 

3.         GUY Basset (-after 10 May 1226).  A charter dated 10 May 1226 records a final settlement between "Widonem Basset" and "Alanum de Flaunvill" relating to land in Skewsby, Yorkshireshire[759]

 

4.         PETER Basset (-after 17 Jun 1240).  A charter dated 17 Jun 1240 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Mauleverer et Margeriam uxorem eius" and "Petrum Basset" relating to land in Swinton, Masham, Yorkshire[760]

 

 

 

H.      OTHER BASSET FAMILIES

 

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         OSMUND Basset .  "Osmundus Basseth" donated "duo molendina de Wodeforde" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Roberti Folioth nepotis et hæredis mei", for the souls of "mea et Ingridæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[761]m INGRID, daughter of ---.  "Osmundus Basseth" donated "duo molendina de Wodeforde" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Roberti Folioth nepotis et hæredis mei", for the souls of "mea et Ingridæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[762]

2.         sister .  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Osmundus Basseth" donated "duo molendina de Wodeforde" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Roberti Folioth nepotis et hæredis mei", for the souls of "mea et Ingridæ uxoris meæ"[763]m --- Foliot, son of ---.  One child: 

 

 

1.         RALPH Basset (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset" holding four parts and one knight’s fee respectively from "honor comitis Leycestriæ" in Leicestershire in [1210/12][764]

 

2.         WILLIAM Basset (-before [1194/95]).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Basset (-before 22 Jun 1249).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "redditu de Mederingeham Willelmi f Willelmi Basset de quarta parte anni" in Lincolnshire[765].  A charter dated 1 Jul 1202 records a settlement agreed between "William Basset and his wife Matilda" and "Roger prior of Kyme" concerning "the advowson of the church of Metheringham" {Lincolnshire}[766].  Henry III King of England ordered "…Willelmus Basset filius Willelmi Basset…" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Dereby" dated [Jul] 1219[767].  A writ dated 22 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Basset" names "Robert Basset son of John Basset, his nephew is his heir and of full age" and "Adestok [Buckingham]…Germundestorp [Lincoln] held of the inheritance of Maud his wife"[768]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 1 Jul 1202 records a settlement agreed between "William Basset and his wife Matilda" and "Roger prior of Kyme" concerning "the advowson of the church of Metheringham" {Lincolnshire}[769].  A writ dated 22 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Basset" names "Robert Basset son of John Basset, his nephew is his heir and of full age" and "Adestok [Buckingham]…Germundestorp [Lincoln] held of the inheritance of Maud his wife"[770]

b)         JOHN Basset (-before 22 Jun 1249).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Basset .  A writ dated 22 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Basset" names "Robert Basset son of John Basset, his nephew is his heir and of full age"[771]

 

3.         WILLIAM Basset (-after 12 Nov 1205).  A charter dated 27 Jun 1204 records a final settlement between "Aziliam que fuit uxor Roberti Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" concerning "dote ipsius Azilie…in Draitun et in Merston"[772].  A charter dated 12 Nov 1205 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Aliciam uxorem suam" and "Radulfum de Puteham" relating to land in Drayton Beauchamp and land bordering on the meadow of "Thurstani Basset"[773]m ALICE, daughter of --- (-after 12 Nov 1205).  A charter dated 12 Nov 1205 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Aliciam uxorem suam" and "Radulfum de Puteham" relating to land in Drayton Beauchamp and land bordering on the meadow of "Thurstani Basset"[774]

4.         ROBERT Basset (-before 27 Jun 1204).  m AZILIA, daughter of --- (-after 27 Jun 1204).  A charter dated 27 Jun 1204 records a final settlement between "Aziliam que fuit uxor Roberti Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" concerning "dote ipsius Azilie…in Draitun et in Merston"[775]

 

 

1.         THOMAS Basset (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas Basset" holding one knight’s fee "in Wycheforde" in Devonshire in [1210/12][776]

 

2.         RICHARD Basset (-after 21 Sep 1227).  A charter dated 21 Sep 1227 records a final settlement between "Matheum personam ecclesie de Sutton" and "Ricardum Basset" relating to land in Sutton, Northamptonshire[777].    

 

 

Two possible brothers: 

1.         ROBERT Basset (-after 7 Dec 1227).  A charter dated 7 Dec 1227 records a final settlement between "Muriellam que fuit uxor Johannis Basset" and "Robertum Basset" relating to her dower in Milton Ernest, Bedfordshire, Rushton, Northamptonshire, and Ketton, Rutland[778]

2.         JOHN Basset (-before 7 Dec 1227).  m MURIEL, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 7 Dec 1227 records a final settlement between "Muriellam que fuit uxor Johannis Basset" and "Robertum Basset" relating to her dower in Milton Ernest, Bedfordshire, Rushton, Northamptonshire, and Ketton, Rutland[779]

 

 

1.         ANDREW Basset (-after 27 Apr 1231).  A charter dated 27 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Andream Basset" and the prioress of Littlemore, Sandford, Oxfordshire relating to land at Leverton, Berkshire[780]

 

2.         REYNOLD Basset (-after 1 May 1233).  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Lucam de Columb et Amicabilem uxorem eius, Radulfum filium Johannis et Isabellam uxorem eius, Warinum de Brageham et Agnetem uxorem eius" and "Reginaldum Basset et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to the manor of Iffley, Oxfordshire "de heredibus ipsarum Amicabilis, Isabelle et Agnetis"[781]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Lucam de Columb et Amicabilem uxorem eius, Radulfum filium Johannis et Isabellam uxorem eius, Warinum de Brageham et Agnetem uxorem eius" and "Reginaldum Basset et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to the manor of Iffley, Oxfordshire "de heredibus ipsarum Amicabilis, Isabelle et Agnetis"[782]

 

3.         HENRY Basset (-after 14 Jan 1241).  A charter dated 14 Jan 1241 records a final settlement between the archdeacon of Berkshire and "Henricum Basset" relating to the advowson of the church of North Moreton, Berkshire[783]m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN Basset .  A writ after the death of "Thomas Earl of Warwick", dated "25 Aug 26 Hen III", records one fee at Northmorton, Berkshire held by "John, son and heir of Henry Basset"[784].

 

 

 

 

BAYEUX

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Bayeux (-after 1091).  "…Rotberti de Belmont, Rodulfi de Bec, Willelmi filii Girardi, Rogerii fratris Rodulfi, Gisleberti Crispini, Rotberti filii Alvuardi, Rotberti Marmion, Rodulfi Taisson, Rotberti Herneis, Ricardi de Baiocas…" witnessed the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[785]

 

2.         RANULF de Bayeux (-1154).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rann [de] Baioc" in Dorset, Northamptonshire, Suffolk and Lincolnshire[786].  "Rannulfus de Baiocis et Margareta sponsa eius" confirmed "Alano de Repinghale et heredi suo de propria uxore sua" by charter dated to [1140][787].  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[788].  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][789].  “Randulfus de Bajocis” recorded that his wife became a nun in the foundation charter of Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, witnessed by "…Hereberto nepote meo…"[790]m (before 1129) MARGARET de Lincoln, daughter of ALAN de Lincoln & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rann Baioc" declaring returns for "filia Alani Linc" in Lincolnshire[791].  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[792].  Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei"[793].  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][794].  “Randulfus de Bajocis” recorded that his wife became a nun in the foundation charter of Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, witnessed by "…Hereberto nepote meo…"[795].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Alanus de Lincolnia" previously held property "in Catebi et in Kaillestorp…et in Wicham…in Kaillesterna…" in Lincolnshire and that "Ranulfus de Baiocis heres Alani de Lincolnia" granted part of it to "Rogero Punchardon" whose heirs still held it[796].  Ranulf & his wife had seven children: 

a)         HUGH de Bayeux (-1196).  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[797].  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][798].  “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Alano de Bajocis fratre meo…"[799].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire, among which "Alanus frater meus" holding two fees[800]m firstly GEVA, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her first husband, ELEANOR, daughter of ---.  She married secondly William de Tilebroc, and secondly Thomas of Beckering.  Hugh & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

i)          MATILDA de Bayeux (-1219).  m RICHARD de Sanford, son of --- (-1219). 

ii)         JOAN de Bayeux .  Nun at Sixle. 

b)         ALAN de Bayeux (-after 1201).  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[801].  “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Alano de Bajocis fratre meo…"[802].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire, among which "Alanus frater meus" holding two fees[803]m JOAN, daughter of ---.  Alan & his wife had one child:  

i)          JOHN de Lincoln (-after 1219). 

c)         WILLIAM de Bayeux (-after 1154).  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][804].  "Hugonem de Baiocis" granted land in Kelsterne and Thoresway, Lincolnshire to "Willelmo de Baiocis fratri meo" by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II[805]

d)         ROBERT de Bayeux (-after 29 Sep 1191).  m --- de Rouellé, daughter of RALPH de Rouellé & his wife ---. 

e)         MATILDA de Bayeuxm RICHARD de Verly, son of ---. 

f)          --- de Bayeux .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire and his grants "in maritagio Willelmus de Ver et Gilbertus de Sancto-Laudo cum duabus sororibus meis"[806]m WILLIAM de Ver, son of ---. 

g)         --- de Bayeux .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire and his grants "in maritagio Willelmus de Ver et Gilbertus de Sancto-Laudo cum duabus sororibus meis"[807]m GILBERT de Saint-Lo, son of ---. 

3.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         HERBERT .  “Randulfus de Bajocis” recorded that his wife became a nun in the foundation charter of Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, witnessed by "…Hereberto nepote meo…"[808]

 

 

1.         JOSCELIN de Bayeux .  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Joscelinde Baioc" owing ".xl. m p heredit uxoris sue" in Dorset/Somerset[809]m --- (-before [1164/65]).  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Joscelinde Baioc" owing ".xl. m p heredit uxoris sue" in Dorset/Somerset, presumably indicating that his wife had recently died[810]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Bayeux (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Willelmus de Baiocis" paid a fine for the liberation of "Beatricia filia sua primogenita" as hostage, dated [Mar] 1216[811]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [two or more] children: 

a)         BEATRICE de Bayeux (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Willelmus de Baiocis" paid a fine for the liberation of "Beatricia filia sua primogenita" as hostage, dated [Mar] 1216[812]

b)         daughter (s) .  The existence of at least one other daughter is shown by the ordered dated [Mar] 1216 under which "Willelmus de Baiocis" paid a fine for the liberation of "Beatricia filia sua primogenita" as hostage[813]

 

 

 

 

BEAUCHAMP

 

 

A.      BEAUCHAMP of WARWICKSHIRE, BEDFORDSHIRE

 

 

1.         HUGH de Beauchamp ([1050/60]-[1114]).  His birth date range is suggested by his absence from any charters of King William I, which indicates that he may have come of age in the latter part of the king’s reign.  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Beauchamp” holding land in Bengeo in Hertford Hundred in Hertfordshire; Linslade and Soulbury in Cottesloe Hundred and Lathbury in Bunsty Hundred in Buckinghamshire; and numerous properties in Bedfordshire[814].  William II King of England confirmed to "Hugh of Beauchamp and all his barons of Bucks" that Gilbert Abbot of Westminster had proved his title to land granted by King William I, by charter dated to [1087/95][815].  "…Hugo de Beauchamp…" witnessed the undated charter under which King William II instructed Ramsey abbey to return fugitives if found[816].  "Hugh de Beauchamp, Ralph Paganel" witnessed the charter dated to [1094/1100] under which William II King of England granted a market to St Mary of Thorney[817]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the Chronicon Rameseiensis which records a donation which names "quatuor ex hominibus Simonis de Bellocampo et Mahald matris eius", dated to [1124/30][818].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1124/30] names "Simonis de Bello Campo et Mahald matris eius"[819].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

a)         SIMON de Beauchamp (-[1137]).  "…Simone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[820].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1124/30] names "Simonis de Bello Campo et Mahald matris eius"[821].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Symon de Belcapo" in Bedfordshire[822].  Orderic Vitalis records that Bedford castle had been granted to "Rodberti de Bello Campo…frater eius", presumably referring to Simon as the same paragraph records his daughter’s marriage[823].  "…Simundus de Belecamp…" witnessed the charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] which records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone"[824]m ---.  The name of Simon’s wife is not known.  Simon & his wife had one child: 

i)          daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugoni cognomento Pauperi" married "filiam Simonis de Bello Campo"[825]m HUGH de Beaumont, son of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] (-after 1140).  A favourite of King Stephen who gave him the castle and barony of Bedford in 1138, thereby creating him Earl of Bedford.  He was ejected from Bedford by his wife’s first cousins, the sons of Robert Beauchamp.  He appears to have lapsed into poverty and was probably degraded from his peerage[826]

b)         ROBERT de Beauchamp (-before 1130).  Orderic Vitalis records that Bedford castle had been granted to "Rodberti de Bello Campo…frater eius" (the latter referring to Simon de Beauchamp)[827].  He presumably died before the 1129/30 Pipe Roll in which his son is named.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          MILES [I] de Beauchamp (-after [1141/42]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Miloni de Belcampo" in Buckinghamshire[828].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that King Stephen besieged "Milonem de Bellocampo" in the castle of Bedford, dated to [1140/42][829].  Orderic Vitalis records that "filii Rodberti de Bello Campo" held the castle of Bedford against King Stephen[830].  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] witnessed by "…Milo de Belloc’…"[831].  "…Milone de Bellocampo…" witnessed the charter dated [25/31] Jul 1141 under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina" confirmed various properties to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" [William [I] de Beauchamp, son of Walter [I] de Beauchamp, see Part B. of this chapter below][832]

ii)         PAYN de Beauchamp (-1156).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Lord of Bedford.  “Paganus de Bellocampo et uxor eius Rohaisa comitissa” founded Chicksand priory, for the soul of “…Simonis de Bellocampo…”, by undated charter dated to [1150][833].  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[834].  “Paganum et comitissam Roheis…sponsa mea” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “dominella Elena…Ivo Taillebois…[835]m (after 1144) as her second husband, ROHESE de Vere, widow of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of AUBREY de Vere, Chamberlain of England & his wife Adelisa de Clare ([1105/10]-after 1166, bur Chicksand Priory).  “G de Magnavilla et Roeisa uxor eius” donated property to Hurley Priory, Berkshire by undated charter[836].  “Paganus de Bellocampo et uxor eius Rohaisa comitissa” founded Chicksand priory, for the soul of “…Simonis de Bellocampo…”, by undated charter dated to [1150][837].  “Paganum et comitissam Roheis…sponsa mea” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “dominella Elena…Ivo Taillebois…[838].  A manuscript document narrating the foundation of Newenham Priory names “Paganus de Bello-campo” as its founder, his wife “Roisia”, and their son “Simon de Bellocampo[839].  Payn & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       [HELEN .  “Paganum et comitissam Roheis…sponsa mea” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “dominella Elena…[840].  It is probable that "dominella Elena", as first in the list of subscribers, was closely related to the donors, possibly their daughter.  If this is correct, the absence of the couple’s known son Simon suggests that Helen must have been their oldest suriviving child.] 

(b)       SIMON de Beauchamp (-1207).  A manuscript document narrating the foundation of Newenham Priory names “Paganus de Bello-campo” as its founder, his wife “Roisia”, and their son “Simon de Bello-campo[841].  Lord of Bedford. 

-         see below

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known.  From a chronological point of view, they could have been otherwise unrecorded sons of Hugh de Beauchamp (see above).  However, it is not known whether Hugh was the only member of the Beauchamp family who came to England from Normandy.  The connection with the Peveril family (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY P-S), suggested by the name William Peveril [I] de Beauchamp, has not been traced. 

1.         WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire ([1080/95]-[1130/May 1133]).  His birth date is estimated very broadly based on his marriage before 1114.  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto de Abetot et ministris [et] forestariis de foresta de Feccham" that he had granted a fox-hunting licence in his forest in Feckenham to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1110/16][842]

-        BEAUCHAMP of ELMLEY, WORCESTERSHIRE

2.         WILLIAM Peveril [I] de Beauchamp (-[1151/57]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Peur de Belcapo" in Gloucestershire[843].  "…Willelmo de Bellocampo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1142/46] under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina et Henricus filius comitis Andegavie" confirmed the rights of "Unfrido de Buhun" in the lands he held on the death of her father[844].  "Willelmus Peuerel de Bellocampo, frater Walteri de Bellocampo" donated "uillam…Chodestun" {Cutsdean} to Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Willelmo Peuerel herede meo", by charter dated to [1149/57][845].  A charter dated to [1151/57] confirmed the previous donation and that, after the death of "Peuerellus de Bellocampo", "Guuillelmus Peuerel ipsius filius et heres" confirmed his father’s donation[846]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Peveril [II] de Beauchamp (-after 1166).  "Willelmus Peuerel de Bellocampo, frater Walteri de Bellocampo" donated "uillam…Chodestun" {Cutsdean} to Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Willelmo Peuerel herede meo", by charter dated to [1149/57][847].  A charter dated to [1151/57] confirmed the previous donation and that, after the death of "Peuerellus de Bellocampo", "Guuillelmus Peuerel ipsius filius et heres" confirmed his father’s donation[848].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Peverel de Bello Campo…Stephanus de Bello Campo" each holding two knights’ fees from "Hamo filius Meinfelin" in Buckinghamshire[849]

 

 

The parents of Oliver de Beauchamp are not known.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been another son of Robert, son of Hugh de Beauchamp (see above). 

1.         OLIVER de Beauchamp ([1110/25]-before 1157).  “Oliveri de Bello-campo” is named as father of “Hugo de Bello-campo” in an undated charter for Thorney monastery[850].  No other reference to Oliver has been found.  His estimated birth date range is suggested from his son Hugh being, presumably, of age when he is named in the 1157 Pipe Roll.  This range is consistent with his having been a younger brother of Payn de Beauchamp Lord of Beauchamp, son of Robert de Beauchamp, as also is his son’s holding land in Bedfordshire. 

-        OTHER BEAUCHAMP FAMILIES

 

 

1.         MURIEL de Beauchamp (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Murieli de Belcapo" in Leicestershire[851]

 

 

SIMON de Beauchamp, son of PAYN de Beauchamp & his wife Rohese de Vere (-1207).  A manuscript document narrating the foundation of Newenham Priory names “Paganus de Bello-campo” as its founder, his wife “Roisia”, and their son “Simon de Bello-campo[852].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Bello Campo xxxvi l et in perdonis Hugoni de Bello Campo xxxi s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1161/62][853].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Simonis de Bello Campo" in Bedfordshire[854].  William Earl of Essex confirmed the donation of "villa de Kahingeham" to "Ernulfo de Mandavilla fratri meo" by undated charter, witnessed by "Comite Albrico, Simone de Bellocampo, Gaufrido de Say…"[855].  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Newenham Priory, including a donation by “Simon de Bello-campo[856].  "Willelmus comes de Essex" confirmed a donation of land in Aby and South Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Otueli avunculus meus" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1166/75] witnessed by "Simone de Bello Campo…"[857].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Bello Campo xlv l xv s viii d" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1171/72][858].  "…Simone de Bello Campo…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[859].  "Sim d Bell Capo" and Cormeilles abbey are named in a lawsuit about "loco suo Laur" in Worcestershire in 1194[860].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Simon de Bello Campo" paying "xlv l xv s viii d" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[861]

m as her first husband, ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-before 1225).  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[862].  She married secondly Nicholas de Kenet.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" against "Nicholaum de Kenet" for the return of "manerium de Sheldelegha" which was the dower of "Ysobellam de Bello Campo uxorem suam matrem predicti Willelmi", which he claimed reverted to him after his mother died as she had no heirs by her second husband[863]

Simon & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Beauchamp (-1260).  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[864].  Lord of Bedford.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Bello Campo" holding 45 knights’ fees in Bedfordshire in [1210/12][865].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “domini Willelmi de Bellocampo…per consilium dominæ Idæ de Bellocampo” imposed a new prior at Newham, dated to 1247[866].  The Annals of Dunstable record further persecutions of Newham priory by “W de Bellocampo patronus loci et domina Hida uxor sua”, dated to 1254[867].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus de Bellocampo senior” died in 1260[868]m firstly ([20 Jun] 1207) GUNNORA de Lanvalay, daughter of [WILLIAM [I] de Lanvalay & his wife Gunnora de Saint-Clair] (-before [1220]).  King John confirmed "villam de Bromeleg cum advocatione ecclesie", donated by "Willelmus de Lanval…in maritagium cum Gunnora sorore ipsius Willelmi de Lunval", to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" by charter dated 20 Jun 1207[869].  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[870].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[871]m secondly ([1220]) as her second husband, IDA de Longespee, widow of RALPH [III] de Somery, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela Ctss of Salisbury (after 1206-after 1260).  William Earl of Salisbury granted the manor of Belcham to "William de Beauchamp…with Ida his daughter, who was the wife of Ralph de Sumeri" dated 1220[872].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “domini Willelmi de Bellocampo…per consilium dominæ Idæ de Bellocampo” imposed a new prior at Newham, dated to 1247[873].  The Annals of Dunstable record further persecutions of Newham priory by “W de Bellocampo patronus loci et domina Hida uxor sua”, dated to 1254[874].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus de Bellocampo senior” died in 1260 and that "domina Ida" received her dower[875].  William & his first wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-before 1232).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johanni de Burgo et Hawisie uxori eius" against "Willelmus de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "medietatis ville Hamertone", which belonged to them after the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo filius ipsius Willelmi et heres Gunnore quondam uxoris ipsius Willelmi"[876]

William & his second wife had six children: 

b)         SIMON de Beauchamp (-before 1260).  m ISABEL, daughter of --- (-before 4 Oct 1295).  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs the descendants of Simon’s sisters as shown below[877].  Simon & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOAN de Beauchamp

c)         WILLIAM de Beauchamp (-Aug 1262).  "William son of William de Bello Campo of Bedford" was granted "free warren in his demesne lands in Lynchlad, co Buckingham" dated 25 Sep 1251[878].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “W[illelmus] de Bellocampo” died in 1262[879].  A writ dated 6 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "William de Bello Campo de Bedeford" records that "he died on Sunday after the Assumption of the Blessed May", that "Dilewyk manor [Bedford] is held by Lady Ida de Bello Campo for life", but names no heir[880]

d)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-killed in battle Evesham 1265).  The Annals of Oseney name “Johannes de Bello Campo” among those who were killed at the battle of Evesham[881].  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of his heirs[882]

e)         MATILDA de Beauchamp (-before Apr 1273).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Matildam, filiam Willielmi de Bello-campo[883].  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands[884].  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon…"[885]m firstly ROGER de Mowbray, son of WILLIAM de Mowbray & his wife Avice --- (-[Axholme] [Nov 1266], bur [Pontefract, Friars Church]).  m secondly ROGER Le Strange, son of --- (-1311). 

f)          BEATRICE de Beauchamp (-before 30 Sep 1285).  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands[886].  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon, Joan the wife of Ralph Paynel, aged 30, daughter of Ela sister of the said Simon, Isabel the wife of Simon de Pateshulle aged 24, daughter of Ida daughter of the same Ela, and Elizabeth the wife of John de Horbur aged 34, daughter of the same Ela, are parceners with the heirs of the body of Beatrice sometime sister of the said Simon", adding that Beatrice had married "first to Thomas son of Otto, who had by her a son named Otto now deceased, and a daughter named Maud now aged 26 years and the wife of John Botetourte…after the death of the said Thomas she was married to William de Montecanyso of Edwardestone who had by her a son named William, who if he survives as the jury believe, is 12 years old and more"[887]m firstly (before 1263) THOMAS FitzOtes of Mendlesham, Suffolk, son of OTES FitzWilliam & his wife Margaret --- ([before 1230]-before 23 Mar 1274).  m secondly (before Jun 1278) WILLIAM [II] de Munchensy, son of WILLIAM [I] de Munchensy & his wife Joan de Crek ([1229/30]-[27 Apr/14 May] 1302). 

g)         ELA de Beauchamp (-before 10 Jan 1267).  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands and, in respect of the third part, placed "Johannam, Idam et Isabellam filias Ele Wake et heredes predicte Johanne de tertia parte" in the custory of "Edwardo primogenito suo" as guardians[888]m as his first wife, BALDWIN Wake, son of HUGH Wake & his wife Joan de Stuteville ([1237/38]-before 10 Feb 1282). 

2.         [ROBERT Beauchamp (-after 6 May 1248).  "Robert de Bello Campo son of Simon" was granted "the demesne lands of his manors of Stokes under Hamden and Easthacche…[and] of a yearly fair at the manor of Great Merston" dated 6 May 1248[889].] 

 

 

 

B.      BEAUCHAMP of ELMLEY, WORCESTERSHIRE

 

 

The parentage of Walter de Beauchamp has not been confirmed in any of the primary sources which have been consulted during the preparation of the present document.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been the son of Hugh de Beauchamp (see Part A).  However, it is not known whether Hugh was the only member of the Beauchamp family who came to England from Normandy.  A hint about his family relationships is provided by the charter dated [25/31] Jul 1141 under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina" confirmed, among other property, the property of "suorum proximorum parentum qui contra me fuerint in werra mea", to Walter’s son "Willelmo de Bello Campo"[890].  The "proximorum parentum" in question have not been identified, and unfortunately the document does not specify the properties which were granted to William de Beauchamp.  Miles [I] de Beauchamp (see Part A. of the present chapter, above) is excluded as he witnessed the same document and therefore must also have been a supporter of Empress Matilda. 

 

 

WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, son of --- ([1080/95]-[1130/May 1133]).  His birth date is estimated very broadly based on his marriage before 1114.  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto de Abetot et ministris [et] forestariis de foresta de Feccham" that he had granted a fox-hunting licence in his forest in Feckenham to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1110/16][891].  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto vicecomiti et omnibus forestariis de Wirecestrasera" that he had granted a wolf-hunting licence in his forest in Worcestershire to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1106/13][892].  Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Rogeri de Wygrecestra", in and around the town of Worcester, to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug][893].  Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "vicecomitatum de Wigresestrasia" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [Dec 1113/Apr 1116][894].  "…Walto de Bello Campo…" subscribed the charter date [3/10] Jun 1123 under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of "Edrici fil Chetelli" to "Walto de Gloec"[895].  Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "terram que fuit Adelize uxoris Ursonis de Abbetot sicut ipsa Adeliza eam ei concessit" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1123/Jul 1129][896].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walto de Belcapo" in Wiltshire (two entries) and in Gloucestershire[897]

m (before Aug 1114) [EMMELINE], daughter of URSE de Abitot & his wife Adelisa ---.  Round states that the wife of Walter de Beauchamp was the daughter of Urse de Abitot but he does not cite the corresponding primary source which confirms that this is correct[898].  Ellis says that "Emmeline Roger’s sister was wife of Walter de Beauchamp, who obtained the fief of Urso and the shrievalty of Worcestershire, which Henry I confirmed to him, together wih the office of one of the king’s dispensers which Robert brother of Urso had formerly held, and the land given him by Adelisa the widow of Urso"[899].  If this information is all correct, it appears to establish Emmeline’s parentage and marriage.  The corresponding sources are set out in the Beauchamp cartulary, and quoted above under Emmeline’s husband’s entry.  The documents do not explicitly state that Walter’s wife was the daughter of Urse de Abitot and brother of Roger de Abitot, but this is a reasonable implication.  The latest date of her marriage is assessed from the dating of the first of these charters.  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  

Walter [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         WILLIAM [I] de Beauchamp (-1170, bur Worcester).  Henry I King of England confirmed the inheritance by "Willelmo filio Walteri de Bello Campo, dispensario meo" of "terram totam patris sui" by charter dated to [1130/May 1133][900].  "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina" confirmed "hereditario jure castellum de Wigorn…vicecomitatum Wygorn…quam pater eius Walterus de Bellocampo…Robertus dispensator, frater Ursonis de Abbetot…manerium de Bekeford…Westonam et Luffenham in Roteland", as well as the property of "suorum proximorum parentum qui contra me fuerint in werra mea", to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" by charter dated [25/31] Jul 1141[901].  “…Waltero de Clifford…Osberto filio Hugonis, Willielmo de Bealchamp…” witnessed the undated charter, dated to [1155], which records the donation by “Rogerus comes Herefordiæ” to Brecknock priory[902].  The 1156 Pipe Roll records "Wills. de Bellocampo" at the head of the return for Worcestershire, and the 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls "Wills de Bello Capo" at Trentham in Staffordshire with revenue of ₤30[903].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “Willelmus de Bello Campo” was captured by “Radulpho de Mandeville” in 1151[904].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Willelmus de Bello Campo vii milites…Walterus de Bello Campo, dimidium militum" among those providing military service for Westminster abbey in Worcestershire, and also record the knight fee-holders under "Willelmus de Bello Campo" in Worcestershire[905].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1170 of “Willelmus de Bello Campo” and his burial “ad ostium capituli Wigorniæ[906]m BERTHA de Briouse, daughter of [WILLIAM [II] de Briouse & his wife Bertha of Hereford].  According to Domesday Descendants, the wife of William [I] de Beauchamp was "Bertha, daughter of William II de Braose"[907].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified but, if it is correct, the chronology of her husband’s family suggests that she must have been one of her parents’ older children.  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that "according to an early 14th century inquest, he married Berta, a daughter of the marcher lord William de Braose c. 1140 and received with her lands in three villages in south Gloucestershire", but noting that the jurors incorrectly states that Bertha was the wife of the great-grandfather of Guy Earl of Warwick who would have been William [II] de Beauchamp[908].  Given the birth of William [II] de Beauchamp’s children in the mid-1190s, it does not appear possible for their mother to have been the daughter of William [II] de Briouse.  William & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] de Beauchamp (-1197).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus de Bello Campo[909]

-        see below

b)         ROBERT de Beauchamp (-after 1209).  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro et Johanne fratribus meis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[910].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro de Bello Campo, Waltero fratre Willelmi de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[911].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[912].  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that the custody of William [III] de Beauchamp, son of William [II] ("Wilekin de Beauchamp") was transferred in 1209 to "the free tenants of the honour, headed by Robert de Beauchamp, a brother of William [II]…for four years"[913]

c)         PETER de Beauchamp (-after [1194/95]).  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro et Johanne fratribus meis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[914].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro de Bello Campo, Waltero fratre Willelmi de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[915].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[916].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "de firma de Brochton Petri de Bellocamp de dimidio anno" in Worcestershire[917]

d)         JOHN de Beauchamp .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro et Johanne fratribus meis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[918].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[919]

e)         [WALTER de Beauchamp .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro de Bello Campo, Waltero fratre Willelmi de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[920].  This is the only one of the series of charters, naming William [II] de Beauchamp and his brothers, which names a brother Walter.  It is possibility that "Waltero" in this document is an error for "Johanne" who is named in all the other documents.  It should be borne in mind that the Beauchamp cartulary, in which this charter is reproduced, was compiled in 1395/96 and contains "innumerable errors"[921].] 

f)          [EMMA (-after Sep 1192).  According to Dugdale, the wife of Ralph de Sudeley was the daughter of William de Beauchamp of Elmley[922], but the primary source on which this information is based has not been traced.  m RALPH de Sudeley, son of JOHN de Sudeley & his wife Grace de Tracy (-before 29 Sep 1192).] 

2.         [WALTER [II] de Beauchamp (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Willelmus de Bello Campo vii milites…Walterus de Bello Campo, dimidium militum" among those providing military service for Westminster abbey in Worcestershire[923].  No confirmation has yet been found that Walter [II] was the brother of William [I] de Beauchamp.  However, their names are nearly adjacent in the listing, and Walter is a name used in William’s family.  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[924].] 

3.         MATILDA de Beauchamp .  Her marriage and parentage are confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Robert Marmion, neveu de Guillaume de Beauchamp" made a declaration concerning a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and the charter dated 1224 under which "Robert Marmion le jeune, fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp" donated property to the same abbey[925]m as his first wife, ROBERT Marmion [V], son of ROBERT Marmion [IV] & his wife Elisabeth de Rethel (-after 29 Sep 1194). 

 

 

3.         IVO de Beauchamp .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[926]

 

 

WILLIAM [II] de Beauchamp, son of WILLIAM [I] de Beauchamp & his wife Bertha de Briouse (-1197).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Bello Campo" paying "lxx s de militibus, quos tenet de Rege in diversis comitatius, vii milites" in Worcestershire[927].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmo de Bello Campo" paying "vii l de toto sentagio quod promisit domino Regi" in Worcestershire[928].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus de Bello Campo[929]

m AMICE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that it is clear from the cartulary of Westwood priory that "Amice (or Avice) ‘lady of Salwarpe’ was the mother of William [II]’s heir and other children"[930].  The Rotuli Curiæ Regis record a claim in 1198 by "Amic de Bello Campo" against "Will de Brause" relating to land in Oxfordshire[931]

[Mistress (1): --- de Salwarpe, sister of Odo de Salwarpe, daughter of ---.  The identity of the mother of Juliana, daughter of William [II] de Beauchamp, is suggested by the three charters quoted below.  The implication of the documents is that Juliana was illegitimate, and that the grant of property made by William [II] de Beauchamp to Odo de Salwarpe under the first document amounted to compensation for getting his sister pregnant, on the understanding that the property in question would later be transmitted to his [illegitimate] daughter, the transfer being effected by the second document and confirmed by the third.  However, see the reference under Amice, wife of William [II] de Beauchamp, to her being “lady of Salwarpe” which, if correct, suggests that this possible mistress may have been the same person as his wife.]

William [II] & his wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM [III] de Beauchamp ([1194/96]-[1210/11]).  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that William [III] de Beauchamp, son of William [II], was in the custody of William [III] de Briouse in 1200[932].  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that the custody of "Wilekin de Beauchamp" was transferred in 1209 to "the free tenants of the honour, headed by Robert de Beauchamp, a brother of William [II]…for four years"[933].  The period of four years remaining while William [III] was still a minor indicates that he was born in the last years of his father’s life. 

2.         WALTER [III] de Beauchamp ([1195/97]-14 Apr 1236).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus de Bello Campo" holding 207 knights’ fees "in Uptone, Stanes, Graftone, Ayntone, Chedeleswale, Kokesaye, Benetlega, Pancevot, Bouresdale, Costone, Dunclere" in Worcestershire in [1210/12][934].  The Annals of Worcester record the death “die Sancti Guthlaci” in 1235 of “Walterus de Bello Campo[935].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “XVIII Kal Mai” in 1236 of “W de Bellocampo[936]m firstly (after 1212) JOAN Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [III] de Mortimer & his [second] wife Isabel de Ferrers (-1225).  The Annals of Worcester record that “Rogerus de Mortuo Mari…filiam suam” married “Waltero de Bello Campo[937].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1225 of “Johanna de Mortuo Mari uxor Willelmi de Bello Campo[938]m secondly ANGHARAD, daughter of --- (-[1280/83]).  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary records that "Angaret" was the mother of Walter [II]’s son Hugh, and suggests that she may also have been the mother of his sons Thomas, Walter and John[939].  Her parentage is not known, but her name indicates Welsh origin.  A lay subsidy roll for Worcester dated [1280] records "Domina Augereta de Bello Campo" in Bengeworth[940].  Walter [III] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [IV] de Beauchamp (-[7 Jan/21 Apr] 1269, bur Worcester Franciscan Church).  "Roculf de Chirchelench" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo, filio et heredi Walteri de Bello Campo" relating to "terram meam in campo de Chirchelench…vocatur la Hey" in return for a loan to repay the Jews, by charter dated to [1232/43][941].  Sheriff of Worcester: "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" [presumably the donor’s maternal grandmother] by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[942].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[943].  An undated writ "53 Hen III", after the death of "William de Bello Campo, of Elmelye" names "Wykewauer manor [Gloucester]" but no heir[944]m ISABEL Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Mauduit of Hanslope, Berkshire & his wife Alice of Warwick (-after 7 Jan 1269).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", which names her son "William de Bello Campo the younger, son of his sister Isabel deceased who was married to William de Bello Campo the elder, age variously stated as 26 and more, and 30 and more,, is his heir"[945].  "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[946].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[947].  William [IV] & his wife had eight children: 

i)          WILLIAM [V] de Beauchamp ([1237/41]-Elmley 5 or 9 Jun 1298, bur 22 Jun 1298 Worcester Franciscan Church).  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[948].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[949].  A writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", names "William de Bello Campo the younger, son of his sister Isabel deceased who was married to William de Bello Campo the elder, age variously stated as 26 and more, and 30 and more, is his heir"[950].  He succeeded his maternal uncle in Jan 1267 as Earl of Warwick.  He succeeded his father in 1268 at Elmley and as hereditary Sheriff of Worcestershire. 

-         EARLS of WARWICK

ii)         JOHN de Beauchamp of Holt (-[1261/7 Jan 1269]).  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum de la Holte…cum advocatione ecclesie eiusdem" to "Johanni filio meo", with default to "Waltero fratri suo minori", by charter dated to [1258/69][951].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench", except the part granted to "Bartholomeo de Sudleya et Johanne filie mee", to "Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" (in default to "Johanni filio meo") by charter dated to [1261/69][952].  He is not named in his father’s testament dated 7 Jan 1268 so presumably died before that date. 

iii)        WALTER de Beauchamp of Alcester (-after 7 Jan 1269).  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum de la Holte…cum advocatione ecclesie eiusdem" to "Johanni filio meo", with default to "Waltero fratri suo minori", by charter dated to [1258/69][953].  "Walterus filius Willelmi de Bello Campo" issued a quitclaim relating to "terra…in Schirrevelench" granted to him by his father by charter dated to [1259/69], witnessed by "Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[954].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[955]same person as...?  WALTER de Beauchamp m ALICE de Tosny, daughter of RAOUL [VI] de Tosny & his wife Pernel de Lacy.  Pope Nicholas IV granted dispensation to “Walter de Bello Campo” and “Alice daughter of Ralph de Tonny to remain in the marriage they contracted in ignorance that they were related in the fourth degree of kindred”, and declared “their offspring legitimate”, dated 23 Sep 1289[956]

iv)       JOAN de Beauchamp (-after 1298).  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "in liberum maritagium cum Johanna filia mea…terre…in villa de Schirrevelench" to "Bartholomeo de Sutley" by charter dated 8 Sep 1254, witnessed by "dominis Rogero de Somery, Willelmo de Oddyngesell, Willelmo Maudut, Girardo Talebot…Willelmo Corbet…Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[957].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench", except the part granted to "Bartholomeo de Sudleya et Johanne filie mee", to "Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" by charter dated to [1261/69][958].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[959]m (Betrothed 8 Sep 1254) BARTHOLOMEW de Sudeley, son of [RALPH de Sudeley & his wife Imenia ---] (-29 Jun 1280 or before[960]). 

v)        ISABEL de Beauchamp (-after 7 Jan 1269).  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[961]

vi)       MARGARET de Beauchamp (-after 1284).  A genealogical table in the introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary names "Isabel, Margaret, Sibil (unmarried 1269), Sarah (unmarried 1269)" as daughters of William [IV] de Beauchamp but cites no primary source which provides the basis for the information[962].  A document dated 1249 records a claim by “William de Bello Campo of Elmeleye” against “Henry Hose tenant for the manor of Titecumbe” [Tidcombe, Wiltshire], and the subsequent agreement between the two whereby “Henry has given William the marriage of Hubert his first-born son [...a minor] to...Margery, William’s daughter” with “dower...the manor of Tateswyk” [Tatwick, Somerset][963].  She is not named in her father’s 7 Jan 1268 testament.  Inquiries following a writ dated 11 Jul "12 Edw I", in the presence of “Margaret late the wife of...Hubert [Huse]”, found that "Margaret, Maud and Isabel...daughters and next heirs of Hubert Huse" were "aged 18 at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptis 12 Edw I...15 at Christmas 12 Edw I and...13 at the feast of St Nicholas" respectively[964].  King Edward III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to restore to “Henry Esturmy and John Corney, moiety of manor of Tidcombe which William de Beauchamp of Elmele gave to Henry Huse, Hubert his son, Margaret Hubert’s wife and heirs. Henry is entitled as son of Margaret daughter of Hubert and Margaret, John as son of Isabella daughter of Hubert and Margaret”, dated 1375[965]m (contract 1249) HUBERT Hussey [Hose/Husee], son of HENRY Hussey & his wife --- (-before 12 Jul 1275).  Inquiries following a writ dated 26 Oct "13 Edw I" after the death of “Maud daughter of Hubert Husee” name "Margaret wife of...Henry Esturmy aged 24 and Isabel daughter of the said Hubert aged 14, sisters of the said Maud, are her next heirs"[966]

vii)      SIBYLLA de Beauchamp (-after 7 Jan 1269).  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[967]

viii)     SARAH de Beauchamp (-after Jul 1317).  A genealogical table in the introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary names "Isabel, Margaret, Sibil (unmarried 1269), Sarah (unmarried 1269)" as daughters of William [IV] de Beauchamp but cites no primary source which provides the basis for the information[968]m (after 7 Jan 1269) RICHARD [VI] Talbot, son of GILBERT Talbot & his wife Gwenthlian of Dynevor ([1249/50]-before 3 Sep 1306). 

b)         JAMES de Beauchamp (-[late Sep/early Oct] 1296).  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary indicates that Walter [III]’s wife Joan was probably the mother of his son James[969].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "manerium de Acton et centum solidos annui redditus in villa Wigorn…" to "Jacobo fratri meo" by charter dated to [1239/41][970].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" issued a quitclaim to "domino Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" relating to "manerio suo de Acton" by charter dated to [1239/69][971].  "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[972].  "Walterus filius Willelmi de Bello Campo" issued a quitclaim relating to "terra…in Schirrevelench" granted to him by his father by charter dated to [1259/69], witnessed by "Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[973].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench", except the part granted to "Bartholomeo de Sudleya et Johanne filie mee", to "Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" (in default to "Johanni filio meo") by charter dated to [1261/69][974].  The Annals of Worcester record the burial "Non Oct" 1296 of “Jacobus de Bello Campo miles…in senectute bona, amicus ecclesiæ Wygorniæ[975]

Walter [III] & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

c)         THOMAS de Beauchamp (-before 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][976].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][977]

d)         WALTER de Beauchamp (-before 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][978].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][979]

e)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-before 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][980].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][981]

Walter [III] & his second wife had one child: 

f)          HUGH de Beauchamp (-after 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][982].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][983].  "Rogerus Roculf filius Rogeri Rokulf de Chirchelench" issued a quitclaim to "Hugoni filio Walteri de Bello Campo" relating to money which the latter paid him annually from land "quas idem Hugo de Bello Campo de me tenet", by charter dated to [1251/83][984]

William [II] had one [probably illegitimate] child by [Mistress (1)]: 

3.          JULIANA .  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land previously held by "magister Alvricus cocus" to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo" by charter dated to [1170/97][985].  "Odo de Salewarp" granted "totam terram meam de Stolton" to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1170/97][986].  "Odo de Salewarp" confirmed "totam terram…in villa de Stoltoni que fuit Alvrici coci cum terra de Sudwode" to "Juliane filie Willelmi de Bello Campo et [nepos/nepte] mee" by charter dated to [1170/97][987]

 

 

1.         GUY de Beauchamp (-after [1213/36]).  "Domino Guydone de Bello Campo, Osberto de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1213/36] under which "Johannes Archent" granted "terram meam in Stolton apud la Hethe", granted by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" to "Roberto patri meo", to "Hugoni de Duntesburn"[988]

 

 

 

C.      OTHER BEAUCHAMP FAMILIES

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Beauchamp (-after [1140]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Belcapo" exempted in Staffordshire[989].  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[990]m ADELINE, daughter of ---.  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[991].  Richard & his wife had four children: 

a)         STEPHEN de Beauchamp (-20 Nov 1184)Domesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[992].  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[993].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Stephanus de Bellocampo" held two knights’ fees from "Willelmus de Bello Campo" in Worcestershire[994].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Peverel de Bello Campo…Stephanus de Bello Campo" each holding two knights’ fees from "Hamo filius Meinfelin" in Buckinghamshire[995]m firstly ---.  The name of Stephen’s first wife is not known.  m secondly ISOLDE de Ferrers, daughter of [ROBERT de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Margaret [Peverel] (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Bernewelle…de feodo comitis” held by “Ysowda, que fuit uxor Stephani de Bello-Campo, et filia comitis de Ferrariis”, adding that she has “i filium et v filias[996].  It is assumed that Isolde was the daughter of Robert Earl of Derby (died before 1160) but it is not impossible that she was the daughter of Robert’s father.  Stephen & his first wife had two children: 

i)          RICHARD de Beauchamp (-before 20 Nov 1184). 

ii)         WALTER de Beauchamp (-before 20 Nov 1184). 

Stephen & his second wife had six children (referred to, but not named, in the Rotuli de Dominabus 1185, see above): 

iii)        ISOLDA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[997].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[998]m RICHARD de Subire, son of --- (-before 1227). 

iv)       MATILDA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[999].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[1000]m WILLIAM de Wascoil, son of --- ([20 Nov 1227/1228]). 

v)        ALINA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[1001].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[1002]m RALPH de Ardern, son of --- (-after 1228). 

vi)       daughter . 

vii)      IDONEA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[1003].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[1004]m HENRY de Aulnay, son of --- (-before 1228). 

viii)     STEPHEN de Beauchamp ([1180]-1216).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Stephanus de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees "de honore Peverelli de Londonia" in Suffolk, in Essex, Hertfordshire, and "Cotes per i brachetum cum ligamine" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, [1210/12][1005]

b)         ANSELM de BeauchampDomesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[1006]

c)         GEOFFREY de BeauchampDomesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[1007]

d)         ROBERT de BeauchampDomesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[1008]

 

2.         ROGER de Beauchamp (-after 1166).  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[1009].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Bello Campo" held one half of one knight’s fee from "comitis Albrici" in Essex[1010]

 

 

OLIVER de Beauchamp, son of --- ([1110/25]-before 1157).  “Oliveri de Bello-campo” is named as father of “Hugo de Bello-campo” in an undated charter for Thorney monastery[1011].  No other reference to Oliver has been found.  His estimated birth date range is suggested from his son Hugh being, presumably, of age when he is named in the 1157 Pipe Roll.  This range is consistent with his having been a younger brother of Payn de Beauchamp Lord of Beauchamp, son of Robert de Beauchamp, as also is his son’s holding land in Bedfordshire.  The primary source which confirms that this affiliation is correct has not been found. 

m ---.  The name of Oliver’s wife is not known. 

Oliver & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         HUGH de Beauchamp of Eaton Scoton, Bedfordshire (-after 1190).  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Hug. de Bellocampo" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones"[1012].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "in perdonis Hugoni de Bello Campo" in Huntingdonshire in [1158/59][1013].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Bello Campo xxxvi l et in perdonis Hugoni de Bello Campo xxxi s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1161/62][1014].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hugo de Bello Campo" held knights’ fees "de honore de Etone" in Buckinghamshire from "Gilbertus de Bolebec"[1015].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo de Bello Campo" with one knight "Regi de comitatu Mortonii…de vicecomitatu de Cerenciis"[1016].  “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Oliveri de Bellocampo” founded Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...Rogero de Bellocampo...[1017]Willielmus de Bello-campo, filius Johannis de Bello-campo” renewed a donation of property to Thorney Monastery by “Hugo de Bello-campo, filius Oliveri de Bello-campo” by undated charter[1018].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Milo de Bello Campo, Hugo de Bello Campo" paying "xv s, i militem" and "xx s, ii milites", respectively, in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1019].  The fact that their names are adjacent suggests a close family relationship, maybe brothers.  [m firstly ---.  No proof has been found of this supposed first marriage.  However, the charter of Hugh’s known wife Philippa de Trailly is witnessed only by her sons Miles and Richard.  The omission of Hugh’s other children, who were probably alive at the date of the charter, suggests that they may have been born from an earlier marriage.]  m [secondly] PHILIPPA de Trailly, daughter of GEOFFREY de Trailly & his wife ---.  Philippa donated the land of her maritagium in Southill and Broom, Bedfordshire to Wardon abbey, for the souls of her father Geoffrey de Trailly and Hugh de Beauchamp her deceased husband, by undated charter witnessed by “Miles and Richard de Beauchamp her sons[1020].  Hugh & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

a)         OLIVER de Beauchamp (-before 5 Jun 1200).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that King Henry II granted "Melleburn" in Derbyshire to "Hugoni de Bello Campo" and that after the death of the latter it was held by "Hugo filius eius", but claimed by "Oliverus frater suus primogenitus"[1021].  Oliver must have died before 5 Jun 1200, the date of a confirmation by King John of the grant made by his son "Hug de Bellocampo" of "terram…in Chelardeston" to "Willelmo fil Gaufr…in maritagio cum Olyva sorore predicti Hug" by charter dated 5 Jun 1200[1022]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[1023].  Oliver & his wife had four children: 

i)          HUGH de Beauchamp (-before 3 May 1217).  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[1024].  King John confirmed property of "Rob de Braybroc", including property donated by "Hug de Bello Campo fil Oliv", by charter dated 25 Jul 1208[1025].  “Hugh de Beauchamp son of Oliver” confirmed the donation to Wardon abbey made by “his grandfather Hugh de Beauchamp” by undated charter[1026].  "Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for relief of "the land formerly of Hugh de Beauchamp his brother which falls to him by inheritance…[in] Bedfordshire", dated 3 May 1217[1027]

ii)         ROGER de Beauchamp (-before 6 Dec 1221).  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[1028].  His parentage is confirmed by an order dated to [Mar] 1224 which restored land "she held in dower of the gift of the same Roger in Sandy" Bedfordshire to "Matilda who was the wife of Roger de Beauchamp…which had been taken into the king’s hand by reason of the debt of Hugh de Beauchamp grandfather of the aforesaid Roger whose heir he is"[1029], read together with the source quoted above which names Hugh as son of Hugh Beauchamp and Oliver as older brother of the younger Hugh.  “Rogerus de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo” confirmed the donations to Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire made by “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo”, as well as a donation made with the consent of “fratre meo Hugone de Bellocampo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...[1030]"Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for relief of "the land formerly of Hugh de Beauchamp his brother which falls to him by inheritance…[in] Bedfordshire", dated 3 May 1217[1031].  "John son of William, nephew and heir of Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for the lands of "Eton and Sandon…formerly of Roger his uncle" in Bedfordshire, dated 6 Dec 1221[1032]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  An order dated to [Mar] 1224 restored land "she held in dower of the gift of the same Roger in Sandy [Sandon?]" Bedfordshire to "Matilda who was the wife of Roger de Beauchamp…which had been taken into the king’s hand by reason of the debt of Hugh de Beauchamp grandfather of the aforesaid Roger whose heir he is"[1033]

iii)        HENRY de Beauchamp .  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[1034]

iv)       OLIVA de Beauchamp (-before Dec 1221).  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[1035].  King John confirmed the grant made by "Hug de Bellocampo" of "terram…in Chelardeston" to "Willelmo fil Gaufr…in maritagio cum Olyva sorore predicti Hug" by charter dated 5 Jun 1200[1036].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Oliverus frater suus primogenitus" settled a claim against "de Bello Campo…Hugo" by returning "Chelardeston" which Oliver granted to "Willelmo filio Gaufridi cum filia sua in maritagio"[1037].  Her son was heir to her brother Roger de Beauchamp, as shown by the order dated 6 Dec 1221 which records that "John son of William, nephew and heir of Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for the lands of "Eton and Sandon…formerly of Roger his uncle" in Bedfordshire[1038].  She must have died before that date otherwise she would have been Roger’s heir.  m (before 5 Jun 1200) WILLIAM FitzGeoffrey, son of GEOFFREY FitzWilliam [Mandeville] & his wife ---. 

b)         HUGH de Beauchamp (-[1212/1216]).  "Hug de Bello Campo et Alienor ux eius" paid a fine for "de Stocton…versus Willm de Eyneford" in Huntingdonshire, dated 1205[1039].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bello Campo, Milo de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees and "c solidatas terræ in escambium de Meleburne", respectively, "de feodis domini Regis" in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][1040].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees "in Etone" in Bedfordshire in [1210/12][1041].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that King Henry II granted "Melleburn" in Derbyshire to "Hugoni de Bello Campo" and that after the death of the latter it was held by "Hugo filius eius", but claimed by "Oliverus frater suus primogenitus"[1042].  m (before 1205) ELEANOR, daughter of ---.  "Hug de Bello Campo et Alienor ux eius" paid a fine for "de Stocton…versus Willm de Eyneford" in Huntingdonshire, dated 1205[1043]

c)         ALDA (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Cokesdune maritagium eius” held by “Alda que est filia Hugonis de Bello-Campo et fuit uxor Willelmi Maubanc”, adding that she has “iv filias quarum primogenita est xvi annorum et in custodia Hugonis de Bello-Campo[1044]m WILLIAM Maubanc, son of --- (-before 1185). 

Hugh & his [second] wife had two children: 

d)         MILES de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  The Annals of Bermondsey record that “dominus Milo de Bello Campo” donated “molendinum de Bedford” to the abbey in 1181, with the consent of “Pagani de Bello Campo heredis[1045].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Milo de Bello Campo, Hugo de Bello Campo" paying "xv s, i militem" and "xx s, ii milites", respectively, in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1046].  The fact that their names are adjacent suggests a close family relationship, maybe they were brothers.  Philippa donated the land of her maritagium in Southill and Broom, Bedfordshire to Wardon abbey, for the souls of her father Geoffrey de Trailly and Hugh de Beauchamp her deceased husband, by undated charter witnessed by “Miles and Richard de Beauchamp her sons[1047].  "Milo de Bello Campo" paid a fine for land in Bedford, dated 1199[1048].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bello Campo, Milo de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees and "c solidatas terræ in escambium de Meleburne", respectively, "de feodis domini Regis" in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][1049]m AMABEL de Bidun, daughter of JOHN de Bidun & his wife Alice Mauduit (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…secundam Milo de Bello-campo…[1050].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" against "Amabilem de Bidona" concenring "terre…in Latebyria"[1051].  Farrer records that Amabil de Bidun and Miles her son and heir confirmed an undated charter, dated to after 1226, under which Sibyl, daughter of Miles, donated property to Northampton St. Andrew[1052].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1053].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Amabel…had an heir Miles de Bello Campo who is living"[1054].  Milo & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          [PAYN de Beauchamp (-after 1181).  The Annals of Bermondsey record that “dominus Milo de Bello Campo” donated “molendinum de Bedford” to the abbey in 1181, with the consent of “Pagani de Bello Campo heredis[1055].  The document does not specify that Payn was Milo’s son but this appears likely.] 

ii)         MILES de Beauchamp (-[1265]).  Farrer records that Amabil de Bidun and Miles her son and heir confirmed an undated charter, dated to after 1226, under which Sibyl, daughter of Miles, donated property to Northampton St. Andrew[1056].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Amabel…had an heir Miles de Bello Campo who is living"[1057].  A writ dated 24 Dec "53 Hen III", after the death of "Miles de Bello Campo", names "Richard his son, aged 30 and more, is his heir", adding that Miles died "4 years ago"[1058]m ---.  The name of Miles’s wife is not known.  Miles & his wife had two children: 

(a)       RICHARD de Beauchamp (before 1239-).  A writ dated 24 Dec "53 Hen III", after the death of "Miles de Bello Campo", names "Richard his son, aged 30 and more, is his heir"[1059]

(b)       JOHN de Beauchamp (before 1239-).  A writ dated 24 Dec "53 Hen III", after the death of "Miles de Bello Campo", names "Richard his son, aged 30 and more, is his heir", adding that "Lavenden [Buckingham]…came into the hands of John de Bello Campo, brother of the said Richard, after the death of the said Miles 4 years ago"[1060]

iii)        SIBYL de Beauchamp .  Farrer records that Sibyl, daughter of Miles, donated property to Northampton St. Andrew by undated charter, dated to after 1226[1061]

e)         RICHARD de Beauchamp (-after 1231).  Philippa donated the land of her maritagium in Southill and Broom, Bedfordshire to Wardon abbey, for the souls of her father Geoffrey de Trailly and Hugh de Beauchamp her deceased husband, by undated charter witnessed by “Miles and Richard de Beauchamp her sons[1062].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1063].]  m SARAH de Bidun, daughter of JOHN de Bidun & his wife Alice Mauduit.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…tertiam Ricardus de Bello-campo…[1064].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1065].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa"[1066].  Richard & his wife had five children: 

i)          RICHARD de Beauchamp (-[1232/36]). 

ii)         HUGH de Beauchamp (-before 1236). 

iii)        ISABEL de Beauchamp (-after 14 Dec 1255).  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa" and that "Isabel is living"[1067]m HENRY de Souleby, son of ---. 

iv)       MATILDA de Beauchamp (-before 14 Dec 1255).  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa" and that "Maud is dead, leaving a daughter Sarah married to Robert de Walton"[1068]m ---. 

v)        PHILIPPA de Beauchamp (-before 14 Dec 1255).  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa" and that "Philippa is dead, leaving a son John de Kroxton"[1069]m --- de Croxton, son of ---. 

2.         [NICHOLAS de Beauchamp .  “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Oliveri de Bellocampo” founded Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...Rogero de Bellocampo...[1070].  His prominent place in the witness list of this document suggests that Nicholas may have been the brother or other close relative of the donor.  Rogerus de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo” confirmed the donations to Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire made by “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo”, as well as a donation made with the consent of “fratre meo Hugone de Bellocampo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...[1071].  It is not certain that this document can refer to the same Nicholas, assuming that the reconstruction of this family which is presented here is correct.] 

3.         [ROGER de BeauchampHugo de Bellocampo filius Oliveri de Bellocampo” founded Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...Rogero de Bellocampo...[1072].  Further down in the witness list, Roger could have been a close relative of the donor, maybe a younger brother.] 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Bello Campo" holding one knight’s fee "in Sapy et Pyrie" in Hereford in [1210/12][1073]

 

 

1.         JOHN de Beauchampm ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Beauchamp .  “Willielmus de Bello-campo, filius Johannis de Bello-campo” renewed a donation of property to Thorney Monastery by “Hugo de Bello-campo, filius Oliveri de Bello-campo” by undated charter[1074].

 

 

1.         --- de Beauchamp m MATILDA de Limesey, daughter of GEOFFREY de Limesey & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis"[1075].  One child: 

a)         ELIAS de Beauchamp (-[1226/27]).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis"[1076].  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[1077].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Elias de Bello Campo" held "ii milites"[1078].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Elyas de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees in "Fukeswrth" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and five "de baronia Walteri de Bolebeck" in Buckinghamshire, in [1210/12][1079]m (before 21 May 1203) CONSTANCE de Bolebec, daughter of HUGH de Bolebec of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire & his wife ---.  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[1080].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Elias & his wife had one child: 

i)          son .  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[1081].  Henry III King of England granted "custodiam terre et heredis Elye de Bello Campo cum maritagio eiusdem heredis" to "Johanni de Offinton, servienti...H. de Burg comitis Kancie" dated 10 May 1228[1082]

b)         WILLIAM de Beauchamp .  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis", and that "Matillis mater sua" had "plures…filios…Willelmum primogenitum et Johannem et Andream"[1083]

c)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-after 25 Sep 1216).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis", and that "Matillis mater sua" had "plures…filios…Willelmum primogenitum et Johannem et Andream"[1084].  King John issued an order relating to "Hugonem de Polested qui est in persona nostra apud Windlesor p Johe de Bello Campo fratre Elye de Bello Campo" dated 25 Sep 1216[1085]

d)         ANDREW de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis", and that "Matillis mater sua" had "plures…filios…Willelmum primogenitum et Johannem et Andream"[1086].  King John confirmed land "juris eis descendit ex parte Roberti Basset et…in Tenford et Purston" to "Andr de Bellocampo et Eve de Gray uxoris eius" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[1087].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Andreas de Bello Campo" held land "de Walengi"[1088].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Andreas de Bello Campo" holding one knight’s fee "de honore de Wallingforde" in Northamptonshire in [1210/12][1089]m as her second husband, EVA de Grey, widow of RALPH Murdac, daughter of JOHN de Grey & his wife --- (-before Jun 1246).  King John confirmed land "juris eis descendit ex parte Roberti Basset et…in Tenford et Purston" to "Andr de Bellocampo et Eve de Gray uxoris eius" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[1090].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Johannes filius Andree de Bello Campo debet...esse in custodia domini regis et Eva de Gray mater eius habet custodiam eius et terre sue de Asington per dominum Falk...et ipsa Eva est maritanda"[1091].  Andrew & his wife had one child:

i)          JOHN Beauchamp .  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Johannes filius Andree de Bello Campo debet...esse in custodia domini regis et Eva de Gray mater eius habet custodiam eius et terre sue de Asington per dominum Falk...et ipsa Eva est maritanda"[1092].  "John de Beauchamp" was granted delay in repaying to the Exchequer "for Andrew de Beauchamp his father, for a prest that King John…made to him in Poitou", dated 3 Oct 1228[1093].  "John de Bello Campo, son and heir of Andrew de Bello Campo" was granted "land at Alsinton", made to his father by King John, dated 31 Jan 1230[1094]

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Beauchamp .  "Robertus de Wall" donated land "in Goseford" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1194), witnessed by "Hugone de Morevill…Ricardo de Beauchamp…"[1095]

 

 

Three siblings: 

1.         ROGER de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  "Rogerus de Bellocampo" donated land "in Leseschalis" to St Bees by undated charter[1096].  “Rogerus de Bellocampo” chose burial in Wetherhal priory, Cumberland and donated “totam terram meam de Cringeldic” by undated charter[1097]m (1201) as her second husband, GRACE, widow of THOMAS FitzGospatrick, daughter of ---.  "Rog de Bello Campo et Grecia q fuit uxor Thom fil Gospatric" made a fine for "custodia terre et heredis Thom fil Gospatric et p maritaghndo ipsius heredis" in Westmoreland & Cumberland, dated 1201[1098]

2.         ALICE de Beauchamp .  “Aliciam de Bellocampo et Amabillam sororem eius” settled a dispute with Wetherhal priory concerning land “in Cringeldic”, donated by "Rogeri de Bellocampo fratris prædictorum Aliciæ et Amabillæ", by undated charter[1099]

3.         AMIBILIS de Beauchamp .  “Aliciam de Bellocampo et Amabillam sororem eius” settled a dispute with Wetherhal priory concerning land “in Cringeldic”, donated by "Rogeri de Bellocampo fratris prædictorum Aliciæ et Amabillæ", by undated charter[1100]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Beauchamp m MATILDA de Lucy, daughter of GEOFFREY de Lucy & his wife --- (-after 1230).  Her parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[1101].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   William & his wife had children: 

a)         MATILDA de Beauchamp [de Lucy] (-before 19 Jul 1243).  "Ricardus de Ripar" made a fine to marry "Matilld de Lucy dña de Angr", dated 19 Jan 1214[1102].  King John granted a licence for "Matillid de Angr uxori Ric de Ripar" relating to her inheritance dated 17 Jun 1216[1103].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Matillis de Lucy domina de Angre, maritata est Ricardo de Ripe per Regem Johannem..."[1104].  An undated writ after the death of "Maud de Lucy" fails to decide whether her heir was "B. de Ripariis her younger son" or "the son of Richard de Ripariis who was the son of her elder son and who died before her decease", adding that "the son of the said Richard was 4 years old on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary 27 [or 28?] Hen III"[1105]m firstly ([1194/95]) GEOFFREY de Lascelles, son of GEOFFREY de Cella Seneschal of Poitou & his wife --- (-before end Mar 1204).  m secondly (after 19 Jan 1214) as his third wife, RICHARD de Rivers, son of --- (-[4 Dec 1221/15 Mar 1222]). 

 

 

1.         --- de Beauchampm DENISE, daughter of --- (-before 1214).  "Thom de Bello Campo" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt Dyonis matris sue" in Essex, dated 1214[1106].  One child: 

a)         THOMAS de Beauchamp .  "Thom de Bello Campo" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt Dyonis matris sue" in Essex, dated 1214[1107]

 

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Beauchamp , son of --- (-[before 12 Jan 1241]).  The sheriff of Bedfordshire was ordered to permit the execution of the testament of Joan de Beauchamp, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Beauchamp”, dated 12 Jan 1241[1108].  The wording of the order suggests, but does not state directly, that Geoffrey was deceased at the time.  It is assumed that Geoffrey and his wife had no children as her sister was named as one of her heirs (see below).  m JOAN de Albini, daughter of ROBERT de Albini & his wife --- (-before 12 Jan 1241).  The sheriff of Bedfordshire was ordered to permit the execution of the testament of Joan de Beauchamp, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Beauchamp”, dated 12 Jan 1241[1109].  Half of land formerly of Joan de Beauchamp in Eastcotts” was granted to “Ralph de St Amand...and Ascelina his wife, one of Joan’s heirs”, dated [Jan] 1241[1110]

 

 

 

D.      BEAUCHAMP FAMILIES of SOMERSET

 

 

According to The Complete Peerage, the Beauchamp family of Somerset was unrelated to the Beauchamp family of Warwickshire[1111]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (-after 1176).  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Rob. de Bellocapo" in Somerset[1112].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Bello Campo xxxiv m xvii milites" in Somerset in [1160/61][1113].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Robertus de Bello Campo" in Somerset[1114].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Robertus de Bellocampo" in Dorset and Somerset[1115]m MURIEL, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants cites the Life of Wulfric of Haselbury which names "Muriel" as the wife of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch[1116]

 

2.         ROBERT de Beauchamp (-before 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hubertus de Burgo" holding 17 knights’ fees "cum hærede R. de Bello Campo" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1117].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hubertus de Burgo" held "Stok de domino rege cum herede Roberti de Bello Campo per servicium ii militum de feodo Moretonie…hundredum de Tinterell" in Somerset[1118].  It is assumed that these entries refers to Hubert de Burgh, future Earl of Kent.  As Hubert at that date still appears to have been married to Beatrice de Warenne, it is assumed that he was holding these knights’ fees by virtue of the right to arrange the marriage of the heiress, not that he was married to her himself.  Another problem is identifying the "R. de Beauchamp" to whom the entry refers, especially as Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset is recorded with male issue (see below).  [m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Emma de Bello Campo" one third part of one knight’s fee from "honor de Kincestone" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1119].  The identity of Emma has not been ascertained.  However, it is possible that she was the widow of "R. de Beauchamp" who is recorded in Dorset, Somerset (see above).]  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- de Beauchamp Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[1120]m SIMON de Vautort, son of --- (-1199). 

 

 

1.         SIMON de Vautort, son of --- (-1199).  "Simon de Valtort…with his brother Nicholas" donated land "in Babbekari" to Montacute priory, for the welfare of "his wife and of his lord Robert de Bello Campo", by undated charter[1121]m --- de Beauchamp, daughter of ROBERT de Beauchamp & his wife [Emma ---].  Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[1122].  Simon & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (-1251)Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[1123].  "Robert de Bello Campo son of Simon" granted commercial rights in Merston free from tolls to Bruton by undated charter[1124].  A writ dated 16 Dec "31 Hen III", after the death of "Nicia de Clinton" names "William de Parys knt her son is her heir" and "Aston township" in Buckinghamshire "Robert de Bello Campo holds in dower with Alice his wife 40 l land and Lady Eva de Clynton holds 20 l land in dower"[1125].  An undated writ, after the death of "Robert de Bello Campo the elder", names "Robert his son aged --- is his heir" and lists manors in Somerset "Stokes…Merstan…Scepton…Hacche…Compton"[1126]m ALICE de Mohun, daughter of REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his wife Alice Briwere.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Beauchamp .  An undated writ, after the death of "Robert de Bello Campo the elder", names "Robert his son aged --- is his heir" and lists manors in Somerset "Stokes…Merstan…Scepton…Hacche…Compton"[1127].  "Robert de Bello Campo son of Simon" granted commercial rights in Merston free from tolls to Bruton by undated charter, later confirmed by "Robert son of Robert de Beauchamp son of Simon"[1128]

ii)         JOHN de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (before 1249-Hatch 24 Oct 1283, bur Stoke under Hamden[1129]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Inquisitions dated "Wednesday before Christmas Day 12 Edw I" following the death of "John de Bello Campo” name “John his son aged 10 on the feast of St James 11 Edw I is his next heir...Cecily late the wife of the said John...one of the sisters [mistake for daughters] and heirs of William de Fortibus[1130]m (1273 or before) CECILE de Vivonne, daughter of GUILLAUME de Vivonne "de Fortibus" & his wife Matilda de Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1256/57]-Stoke under Hamden 10 Jan 1320[1131]).  Henry III King of England granted, 2 Aug 1259, "the wardship of the lands late of William de Fortibus" to "Ingram de Percy, Peter de Chauuvent and Imbert de Muntferaunt" and the marriages of the deceased’s four daughters, to Peter the marriage of "one of the remaining three as he shall choose" (10 March 1262 = Cecily)[1132].  Her parentage is confirmed by the Somersetshire Pleas for 15 Jul 1269 which include a record that "Aunsell de Gurnay and his wife Sibyl" warranted "Emery de Roche Chaward, son of Emery de Roche Chaward, and Joan his wife, Sibyl, Mabel and Cecily, the daughters and heirs of William de Fortibus" relating to land in "Corfton"[1133].  Her marriage is confimed by a petition to the king dated to [1281] by "Peter de St Hillare" relating to land at Corston, Somerset which names "Aunsel de Gunney, Sibyl wife of Aunsel de Gunney, Reginald father of Aunsel de Gunney, Joan wife of Reginald de Gunney, Guy de Rochicheward, Sibyl wife of Guy de Rochicheward, John de Beauchamp, Cecily wife of John de Beauchamp, Fulk de Archiake, Mabel wife of Fulk de Archiake, William de Forz"[1134].  Inquisitions dated "Wednesday before Christmas Day 12 Edw I" following the death of "John de Bello Campo” name “John his son aged 10 on the feast of St James 11 Edw I is his next heir...Cecily late the wife of the said John...one of the sisters [mistake for daughters] and heirs of William de Fortibus[1135].  John & his wife had four children: 

(a)       JOHN de Beauchamp (25 Jul 1274-1336 after 20 Oct).  Inquisitions dated "Wednesday before Christmas Day 12 Edw I" following the death of "John de Bello Campo” name “John his son aged 10 on the feast of St James 11 Edw I is his next heir...Cecily late the wife of the said John...one of the sisters [mistake for daughters] and heirs of William de Fortibus[1136].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Beauchamp.  m JOAN, daughter of [--- Chenduit & his wife ---] (-9 Feb 1327). 

-         LORDS BEAUCHAMP (of Somerset)[1137]

(b)       ROBERT de Beauchamp (-1303). 

(c)       ELEANOR de Beauchamp (-after 18 Nov 1341).  m FULK FitzWarin [VI] Lord FitzWarin, son of FULK FitzWarin [V] & his wife Margaret de la Pole (-before 6 Jun 1336). 

(d)       BEATRICE de Beauchamp (-before Oct 1347).  A writ after the death of "Beatrice late the wife of Peter Corbet of Caus", dated "30 Aug 21 Edw III", names "Thomas Corbet…from whom issued Peter, Alice the elder daughter and Emma the younger", that "Peter" inherited, and after his death "Peter his son" who married "the aforesaid Beatrice" who devised the manor of Bynweston to "one John Corbet"[1138]m firstly (before 17 Aug 1302) PIERS Corbet, son of PIERS Corbet & his first wife Joan de Mortimer ([1269/70]-before 29 Jan 1322).  m secondly JOHN de Leyburn Lord Leyburn, son of ---. 

2.         NICHOLAS de Vautort .  "Simon de Valtort…with his brother Nicholas" donated land "in Babbekari" to Montacute priory, for the welfare of "his wife and of his lord Robert de Bello Campo", by undated charter[1139]

 

 

 

BEAUMONT

 

 

HENRY de Beaumont, son of LOUIS de Brienne Vicomte de Beaumont & his wife Agnes de Beaumont (-before 10 Mar 1340)Lord Beaumont 1309.  Constable of England 1322.  He was summoned to parliament in England in 1334 as Earl of Buchan, although this was never recognised in Scotland.  “Henry de Bello Monte Earl of Buchan [Boghane] and Murref and Constable of Scotland and Isabella, who was the wife of Dom. John de Vescy” issued an undated charter which recites earlier donations to Bridlington priory[1140]

m (before 14 Mar 1310) ALICE Comyn, daughter of ALEXANDER Comyn & his wife Joan --- (-1349 before 10 Aug).  John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records that "David", eldest son of "Johannem…Comyn…filiam" and her husband "David comiti Atholiæ", married "filiam Henrici de Bellomonte…ex filia primogenita…comitis Johannis de Buchan"[1141].  Andrew Wyntoun’s Cronykil records that "Alysandyre", son of "Willame" son of "Alysawndyr that Erle wes off Buchane", had two daughters, the elder of which married "Henry de Bewmownt"[1142]

Henry & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN Beaumont (-[10/25] May 1342).  He succeeded his father as Lord Beaumontm (before Jun 1337) as her first husband, ELEANOR of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Matilda Chaworth ([1318]-Arundel Castle, Sussex 11 Jan 1372, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex).  While her first husband was still alive, and before Earl Richard's annulment of his first marriage, she lived with her future second husband.  She married secondly (Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Bucks 5 Feb 1345, Papal dispensation 4 Mar 1345) as his second wife, Richard Fitzalan Earl of Arundel "Copped hat".  John & his wife had children: 

a)         HENRY Beaumont (Brabant [1339/40]-17 Jun 1368, bur Sempringham, Lincolnshire)Lord Beaumontm as her first husband, MARGARET de Vere, daughter of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Matilda Badlesmere (-15 Jun 1398, bur Newgate Grey Friars).  She married secondly Nicholas de Lorain of Penshurst, Kent.  She married thirdly John Devereux, who was summoned to Parliament in 1384 whereby he is held to have become Lord Devereux.  Henry & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Beaumont ([1359/60]-Stirling 9 Sep 1396, bur Sempringham)Lord Beaumont

-         see below

2.         ELIZABETH Beaumont (-27 Oct 1400, bur [Hulton Abbey]).  The will of "Elizabeth Lady Audley", dated 30 Sep 1400, chose burial “in the quire of Hilton Abbey”, bequeathed property to “my...Lord Thomas the king’s son...my...niece Joan de Beaumond...to her marriage...Joan de Audley...[1143]m (settlement [1330/31]) NICHOLAS Audley, son of JAMES Audley Lord Audley & his first wife Joan Mortimer ([1328]-22 Jul 1391).  He succeeded his father in 1386 as Lord Audley. 

3.         ISABEL Beaumont (-Leicester 1361, bur Newark Abbey, Leicester).  The will of "Henry Duke of Lancaster Earl of Derby, Lincoln and Leicester, Steward of England, Lord of Brigerak and Beaufort", dated 15 Mar 1360, requested that “my wife Lady Isabell, our sisters and our brothers” to attend his funeral[1144]m ([1337]) HENRY "of Grosmont", son of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Maud Chaworth (Grosmont Castle, Monmouthshire [1300]-Leicester Castle 24 Mar 1361, bur Newark Abbey, Leicester).  He succeeded his father as Earl of Lancaster in 1345. 

4.         CATHERINE Beaumont (-11 Nov 1368).  John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records that "David", eldest son of "Johannem…Comyn…filiam" and her husband "David comiti Atholiæ", married "filiam Henrici de Bellomonte…ex filia primogenita…comitis Johannis de Buchan"[1145]m DAVID of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl, son of DAVID of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl & his wife Joan Comyn (Newcastle-on-Tyne 1 Feb 1309-killed in battle Killblane 30 Nov 1335). 

5.         AGNES de Beaumont (-after 1359)m ([Jul 1343]) as his second wife, THOMAS de Lucy Lord Lucy, son of ANTHONY de Lucy Lord Lucy & his wife Elizabeth --- (-London 5 Dec 1365). 

 

 

JOHN Beaumont, son of HENRY Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Margaret de Vere of the Earls of Oxford ([1359/60]-Stirling 9 Sep 1396, bur Sempringham)Lord Beaumont

m CATHERINE Everingham, daughter of THOMAS Everingham of Laxton, Nottinghamshire & his wife --- (-1426). 

John & his wife had children: 

1.         HENRY Beaumont ([1379/80]-Jun 1413, bur Sempringham)Lord Beaumontm ELIZABETH Willoughby, daughter of WILLIAM Willoughb Lord Willoughby (of Eresby) & his wife --- (-before 12 Nov 1428).  Henry & his wife had children: 

a)         ELIZABETH de Beaumont (-[20 or 27] Jul 1447)m firstly (licence 3 Jan 1418) WILLIAM Deincourt Lord Deincourt, son of JOHN Deincourt Lord Deincourt & his wife Joan Grey ([1402/03]-5 Sep 1422).  m secondly (Papal mandate for dispensation 15 Jul 1427) as his second wife, RICHARD Hastinges of Newton Harcourt, Leicestershire, son of --- ([1382/83]-10 Sep 1436).  m thirdly as his second wife, THOMAS Neville of Brancepeth, co. Durham, son of --- (-22 Feb 1458). 

b)         JOHN Beaumont ([1408/09]-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460)Lord Beaumont.  He was created Viscount Beaumont in 1440.  m firstly ([24 Jul 1425/3 Jul 1436]) ELIZABETH Philip, daughter of WILLIAM Philip Lord Bardolf & his wife Joan Bardolf (-before 30 Oct 1441).  m secondly (after 1442) as her third husband, KATHERINE Neville, widow firstly of JOHN Mowbray Earl of Norfolk and secondly of THOMAS Strangeways, daughter of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his second wife Joan Beaufort ([1402/03]-after 1483).  She married fourthly (after 1464) John Wydeville.  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Jan 1464 (O.S.) “maritagium diabolicum” of “Katerina ducissa Norffolchiæ juvencula ætatis fere iiixx annorum” and “Johannis Widevile fratri reginæ ætatis xx annorum[1146].  John & his first wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM Beaumont (Edenham, Lincolnshire 23 Apr 1438-19 Dec 1507).  Lord Bardolf.  He succeeded his father in 1460 as Viscount Beaumont.  m firstly (before 4 Mar 1461, divorced 1477) as her first husband, JOAN Stafford, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford Duke of Buckingham & his wife Anne Neville of Westmoreland (-after 31 Oct 1480).  She married secondly ([1477]) as his third wife, William Knyvett.  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Jane m 1 Lord Beaumont, m William Knyvett" as daughter of "Anne Duchess of Buckingham", and mother (by her second husband) of "Edward Knyvett, Charles"[1147].  The will of "Ann Dutchess of Bucks", proved 31 Oct 1480, bequeathed property to “my daughter Beaumond...my son of Wiltshire...my daughter of Richmond...my daughter Mountjoy...my daughter Beaumond’s son Edward Knyvet[1148]m secondly as her first husband, ELIZABETH Scrope, daughter of RICHARD Scrope & his wife Eleanor Washbourne (-26 Jun 1537, bur Wivenhoe).  She married secondly ([28 Nov 1508/10 Apr 1509]) as his second wife, John de Vere Earl of Oxford

ii)         JOAN Beaumont (-5 Auf 1466).  m JOHN Lovel Lord Lovel, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         JOHN Beaumont of Sherwell, Dorset .  m ---.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         MATILDA Beaumont m as his third wife, HUGH de Courtenay of Goodrington and Stancombe, Devon, son of EDWARD de Courtenay of the Earls of Devon & his wife Emmeline Dawnay (-5/6 Mar 1425). 

 

 

 

 

BELMEIS

 

 

Loyd suggests that this family originated in Beaumais-sur-Dive in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Falaise, canton Morteaux, located in the Hiesmois, where Roger de Montgommery was vicomte, with whom the Belmeis family was connected in Shropshire.  He discounts Beaumais in Seine-Maritime, arrondissement Dieppe, canton Offranville[1149]

 

 

[Four] siblings: 

1.         RICHARD de Belmeis (-16 Jan 1127, bur St Osyth).  Bishop of London 1108.  King Henry I notified that "he has granted to R. de Belmeis the see of London" by charter dated 24 May 1108[1150].  Eadmer records the election of "Ricardum…Pentecostes" as bishop of London and his consecration "apud Pagaham…VII Kal Aug"[1151].  An inscription at St Osyth records the burial of "Richardus Beauveis cognomine Rufus, London. Episcopus…obiit xvi januarii MCXXVII"[1152]

2.         WALTER de Belmeis (-after [Sep 1112/Jun 1113]).  King Henry I confirmed the possessions of St George of Boscherville, including the donation of land by "Walterus de Belmes", by charter dated to [Sep 1112/Jun 1113][1153]m [as her second husband,] ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  As noted below, Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record that “Magister Radulfus de Langeford et Ricardus de Belmeis fratres et concanonici, clericique domestici” were summoned as potential successors to “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ” in 1138[1154].  Their different names suggest that Ralph and Richard may have been uterine brothers, not necessarily born from the same father.  The order of their names suggests that Ralph was older than Richard, maybe born from an earlier marriage of their mother.  Walter & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         PHILIP de Belmeis of Tong, Shropshire (-after May 1145).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1155].  “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[1156]m as her first husband, MATILDA de Rumilly, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-after 1189[1157]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1158].  “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[1159].  She married secondly ([1150]) Hugh [II] de Mortimer.  The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[1160]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[1161]; (2) Roger Mortimer’s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[1162]; (3) the undated charter under which “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire (quoted above)[1163].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that she was “Matildem Longespey, filiam Willielmi Longespey, ducis Normanniæ[1164] but this is confused and cannot possibly be correct.  Philip & his wife had three children: 

i)          PHILIP de Belmeis (-[1154/59]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1165].  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[1166].  Roger Mortimer granted rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis" by undated charter[1167].  "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[1168]

ii)         RANULPH de Belmeis (-[1166/67]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1169].  Roger Mortimer granted rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis" by undated charter[1170].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ranulfus de Beumeis" held three knights’ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire, of which two were held by "Johannes Bigod"[1171].  The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records the sheriff accounting for "Twanga terra Rand de Bealmes", indicating his recent death[1172].  "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[1173]

iii)        ADELICIA de Belmeis (-1190 or after).  “Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridus vicecomitis” donated "ecclesiam de Essebi" to Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire, for the salvation of “uxoris meæ Aliciæ et puerorum nostrorum” and for the souls of "Philippi de Beumeis senioris et Philippi junioris et cæterorum filiorum eius", by undated charter[1174].  "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[1175].  "Roger de Mortimer…Dame Adheliza de Belmes, William de Belmes her son, Philip de Belmes his brother…" witnessed the charter dated to [1185/90] under which “Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridus vicecomitis” donated "ecclesiam de Essebi" to Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire[1176]m ALAN la Zouche [ALAIN de Porhoët], son of GEOFFROY Vicomte de Porhoët & his wife Hawise --- (-1190). 

b)         RICHARD de Belmeis (-4 May 1162).  King Henry I confirmed a grant of land to "Richard de Belmeis, nephew of Richard Bp of London" by charter dated [26 Aug] 1127[1177].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record that “Magister Radulfus de Langeford et Ricardus de Belmeis fratres et concanonici, clericique domestici” were summoned as potential successors to “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ” in 1138 and describes the controversy regarding the election of the successor, adding that “Ricardus Lundoniensis episcopus” had appointed “Ricardo filio fratris sui Walteri de Belmeis” as archdeacon even though he had hardly been an adolescent[1178].  Bishop of London 1152.  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1152 that “Ricardus de Belmeis” was consecrated at Canterbury “a Theobaldo archiepiscopo[1179].  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[1180].  The 1156 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Bealmes" owing in relation to a dispute with "Alanum de Vppedun" in Shropshire[1181].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Bealmes" owing in Shropshire[1182].  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record the death “IV Non Mai” in 1162 of “Ricardus secundus Lundoniensis episcopus[1183].  

c)         [RALPH de Langford (-[1160]).  Dean of St Paul’s 1138.  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record that “Magister Radulfus de Langeford et Ricardus de Belmeis fratres et concanonici, clericique domestici” were summoned as potential successors to “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ” in 1138 and describes the controversy regarding the election of the successor[1184].  Their different names suggest that Ralph and Richard may have been uterine brothers, not necessarily born from the same father.  The order of their names suggests that Ralph was older than Richard, maybe born from an earlier marriage of their mother.] 

3.         [WILLIAM de Belmeis .  King Henry I confirmed the possessions of Bermondsey, St Saviour, including "Widford [co. Herts] which Ivo de Grandmesnil exchanged for Enderby [Andresberia] [co. Leics] given by William Belmeis", by undated charter (marked spurious), witnessed by "…Richard Bp of London…"[1185].  The relationship between the bishop and William de Belmeis is not stated.  It is possible that they were brothers or first cousins.] 

4.         ADELINE de Belmeis .  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum names “Willielmus decanus Lundoniæ filius Adelinæ sororis [Ricardus Lundoniensis episcopus][1186].  The identity of Adeline’s husband is not known.  Brooke states that “there is no reason to doubt” that [her son] William Dean of St Paul’s “is to be identified with William de Mareni[1187]m --- [de Mareni], son of ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM [de Mareni] (-[28/29] Apr 1138).  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum names “Willielmus decanus Lundoniæ filius Adelinæ sororis [Ricardus Lundoniensis episcopus][1188].  Dean of St Paul’s.  Brooke states that William Dean of St Paul’s, cited as such for the first time in 1111, and adds that “there is no reason to doubt that he is to be identified with William de Mareni[1189].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record the death in 1138 of “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ[1190]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT de Belmeis (-after [1152/59]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1191].  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[1192]

2.         WILLIAM de Belmeis (-after [1152/59]).  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[1193]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Belmeis .  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Walt de Bealmes" accounting in Huntingdonshire under "Nova Placita et Noue Conventiones"[1194]

 

2.         RICHARD de Belmeis .  The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Bealmes" accounting for "Dunnincton" in Staffordshire[1195]

 

 

 

 

BERKELEY

 

 

A.      BERKELEY

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ROGER [I] de Berkeley (-1093).  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and records the donation by “Rogerus de Berchelaico cum uxore sua Rissa[1196].  Domesday Book records “Roger of Berkeley” holding Foxley and Easton Grey in Wiltshire; Coberley, Dodington and Siston in Gloucestershire[1197]The Complete Peerage states that he became a monk at Gloucester 17 Jan 1091 and died in 1093 (no sources cited)[1198]m RISSA, daughter of ---.  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and records the donation by “Rogerus de Berchelaico cum uxore sua Rissa[1199].  Roger [I] & his wife had [one] child: 

a)         [daughter .  A charter of King Stephen dated [22 Mar/22 Dec] 1136 which confirmed the possessions of Shaftesbury Abbey refers to the donation by "Aluredum de Foxlegh" of land given "cum filia Rogerii de Berkelaio"[1200].  It is likely that the document refers to a daughter of Roger [I] de Berkeley, as no record has been found of Roger [II] having had children, and as the donations recorded in the document appear to be earlier than the time of Roger [III].  m ALURED de Foxleigh, son of ---.] 

2.         RALPH de Berkeley (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records “Ralph the brother of this Roger [Berkeley]” holding Wapley and Leonard Stanley in Gloucestershire[1201]

 

 

[Three] brothers.  It is possible that they were children either of Roger [I] de Berkeley, or of Ralph de Berkeley, but no primary source which confirms that this is correct has been identified.  Ellis suggests that Roger [II] may have been the son of Ralph de Berkeley, and Eustace the probable son of Roger [I] de Berkeley, although apparently without any primary source basis[1202].   

1.         ROGER [II] de Berkeley (-Sep 1131).  The Complete Peerage records that Roger [II] de Berkeley began building the castle of Berkeley in 1117 (no sources cited)[1203].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "in dnio Reg…terra Rogi de Berchelai" in Gloucestershire, and a reference to the land of "Rogi de Berchelai" in Berkeley[1204]

2.         --- de Berkeley .  His parentage is confirmed by the letter written by his son “Willielmus de Berkeley et fundator Kingswode” to Pope Innocent II recalling that Henry I King of England had granted land to "patruo nostro Rogero de Berkeley"[1205]m ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Berkeley (-after [1141]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records the return of "Will’s de Berchelai…de firma de Berchelai"[1206].  “Willielmus de Berkeley et fundator Kingswode” wrote to Pope Innocent II recalling that Henry I King of England had granted land to "patruo nostro Rogero de Berkeley"[1207]Domesday Descendants dates the foundation to 1139 (no source cited)[1208].  This is presumably based on the commentary in Dugdale’s Monasticon, which cites no corresponding primary source[1209].  According to the Complete Peerage, Roger [III] de Berkeley was the son of Roger [II] de Berkeley (no sources cited)[1210].  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire records that “Willielmus de Berkeley” donated the priory to Tintern abbey, in the early years of the reign of King Stephen[1211].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Will’s de Berchelai" in [Rutland][1212]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had children: 

i)          ROGER [III] de Berkeley (-after 1177).  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire names “Rogero de Berkeleye, hærede…Willelmi de Berkeley[1213]

-         see below

3.         [EUSTACHE of NympesfieldThe Complete Peerage records that Roger [II] de Berkeley was the brother of Eustache of Nympesfield, although it is not stated whether they were born from the same father (no sources cited)[1214].] 

 

 

ROGER [III] de Berkeley, son of WILLIAM de Berkeley & his wife --- (-after 1177).  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire names “Rogero de Berkeleye, hærede…Willelmi de Berkeley[1215]

m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  The undated charter, dated to [late 12th century], under which “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[1216], suggests that Roger [III] may have married twice, with Roger [IV] and his brother Philip born from the first marriage and Alice, Henry and Thomas from the second. 

Roger [III] & his wife had seven children: 

1.         ROGER [IV] de Berkeley (-after 1194).  “R. de Berkeley” noted the foundation of Kingswood priory by "Willielmus de Berckley" for the soul of King Henry I, and that the priory was transferred "ad Tettebiriam" with the consent of "patris mei R. de Berckley", by undated charter[1217].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Berkelai" held one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset, that "Rogerus de Berckelaio" held two from "Willielmi comitis Gloucestriæ" in Gloucestershire, and also list the knights’ fees held from "Rogerus de Berch[elai]" in Gloucestershire[1218].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Berkeley c s" in Gloucestershire in [1167/68][1219].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Berclay vii l x s" in Gloucestershire in [1171/72][1220].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90], witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[1221].  “Rogerus de Berkley…pro me ipso et uxore mea et liberis meis” donated property to Kingswood by charter dated 10 Mar 1188[1222].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Rogerus de Berkelay" paying "lxxv s, vii milites et dimidium" in Gloucestershire[1223].  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[1224].  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[1225].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Berkelay" paying "vii l x s, vii milites et dimidium" in Gloucestershire[1226]Betrothed ([1153/54]) to ---, daughter of ROBERT FitzHarding & his wife Eva ---.  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1227].  It is not known whether this betrothal proceeded to a marriage.  m firstly ---.  The two marriages of Roger [IV] de Berkeley are confirmed by the undated charter under which he “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum"[1228]m secondly ---.  The two marriages of Roger [IV] de Berkeley are confirmed by the undated charter under which he “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum"[1229].  Roger [IV] & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[1230]

b)         ROGER [V] de Berkeley (-1220). 

2.         --- de Berkeleym ---.  [Two children]: 

a)         ROBERT de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[1231].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[1232]

b)         [RICHARD de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[1233].] 

3.         PHILIP de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[1234].  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[1235]

4.         OLIVER de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[1236]Domesday Descendants cites a charter of the Earls of Gloucester according to which Oliver was the son of Roger [III] de Berkeley[1237]

5.         ALICE de Berkeley (-after 1190).  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1238].  Smyth quotes a late 15th century manuscript which records (in translation) an agreement dated to [1153/54] for the betrothals of (1) "Morice the sonne and eire of Sr Robert fitz Herding" to "Alice the daughter of Roger de Berkeley Baron of Dursley", and (2) "the son and eire of Roger de Berkeley Baron of Durseley" to "one of the [two] daughters of Sr Robertt fitz Herding" and (if both daughters died) to "the daughter of Hew of Hasele nece to the sayd Sr Robert fitz Herding"[1239]m MAURICE de Berkeley, son of ROBERT FitzHarding & his wife Eva --- (-16 Jun 1190, bur Brentford church, Middlesex). 

6.         HENRY de Berkeley .  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[1240]

7.         THOMAS de Berkeley .  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[1241]

 

 

1.         ROGER de Berkeley .  "Gilbertus de Haya" confirmed the donation of "terciam partem piscarie…de Glesbanin…[et] de Rugesablun" to Lindores Abbey, made by "bone memorie David de Haya pater meus", for the soul of "…Edoyne uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Dominis Rogero de Berkeley…"[1242]

 

 

 

B.      BERKELEY (FITZHARDING)

 

 

1.         EALDNOTH (-killed in battle Somerset 1068).  Staller to King Edward the Confessor[1243].  Florence of Worcester records that "Haroldi regis filii Godwinus, Eadmundus, Magnus" returned from Ireland and landed in Somerset where they were defeated, when "Eadnothus qui fuit Haroldi regis stallarius" was killed in the battle, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[1244].  m ---.  The name of Ealdnoth’s wife is not known.  Ealdnoth & his wife had one child: 

a)         HARDING (-6 Nov after 1100).  William of Malmesbury records that "Ednodus" (whose death he describes as above) was "pater Herdingi qui adhuc superest"[1245].  As William of Malmesbury records events until 1142, it is possible that Harding survived considerably later than 1100, although it is of course not known when precisely the passage just quoted was written.  ["…Herding…" witnessed the charter dated 1067 under which William I King of England donated property to the bishop of Wells[1246].  The chronology suggests that it is unlikely that this entry relates to the same person named Harding.]  m ---.  The name of Harding’s wife is not known.  Harding & his wife had seven children: 

i)          NICHOLAS FitzHarding (-[1167/71]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nicholaus filius Herding" with "ii et dimidium" knights’ fees in Somerset in [1160/61][1247].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nicholaus Herding" with "i et dimidium" knights’ fees "de feodo de Monte Acuto" in Somerset in [1167/68][1248].  He died before [1171/72] when the Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus filius Nicholai" with "i et dimidium" knights’ fees "de feodo de Monte Acuto" in Somerset[1249]m ---, niece of Roger Bishop of Salisbury, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her family origin and marriage has not yet been identified.   Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

(a)       HENRY [de Meriet] .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus filius Nicholai" with "i et dimidium" knights’ fees "de feodo de Monte Acuto" in Somerset in [1171/72][1250].  Ancestor of the Meriet family of Meriet, Somerset[1251]

ii)         ROBERT FitzHarding ([1094/96]-5 Feb 1171, bur Bristol St Augustine).  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[1252]

-         see below

iii)        ELIAS FitzHarding (-after [1153/54]).  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1253].  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[1254].  “Ricardus Foliot” granted “terram de Accatona et terram de Hanam et...de Hamtona” to “Mauricio filio Roberti filio Hardingi” by charter dated to before 1173, witnessed by “...Jurdano filio Hardingi et Helya filio Hardingi...[1255]

iv)       JORDAN FitzHarding (-after [1153/54]).  Henri Duke of Normandy [later King Henry II] granted “manerium Betthone...et...terre in manerio de Berkelai” to “Rodberto filio Hard[ingi]” by charter dated to [1153], witnessed by “...Jordanus frater Rodberti et Jordanus et David nepotes eius...[1256].  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1257].  “Ricardus Foliot” granted “terram de Accatona et terram de Hanam et...de Hamtona” to “Mauricio filio Roberti filio Hardingi” by charter dated to before 1173, witnessed by “...Jurdano filio Hardingi et Helya filio Hardingi...[1258]

v)        AGNES (-20 Jul ----).  Smyth records the deaths of the three sisters Agnes (20 Jul), Matilda (22 Mar), and Cecily (25 Nov) all recorded in the necrology of Bristol St Augustine[1259]m HUGH de Haseley, son of --- (-after [1153/54]).  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Hugo de Hasela...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1260].  One child: 

(a)       daughter .  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Hugo de Hasela...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1261]

vi)       MATILDA (-22 Mar ----).  Smyth records the deaths of the three sisters Agnes (20 Jul), Matilda (22 Mar "Matilda filia Hardingi"), and Cecily (25 Nov) all recorded in the necrology of Bristol St Augustine[1262]

vii)      CECILY (-25 Nov ----).  Smyth records the deaths of the three sisters Agnes (20 Jul), Matilda (22 Mar), and Cecily (25 Nov) all recorded in the necrology of Bristol St Augustine[1263]

 

 

1.         HARDINGm DENISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Jun 1205 under which King John confirmed donations to "Galfr Vitulo", including the donation of "Hunteneford" made by "Rob de B’kelay cum Matilda filia Harding…in liberum maritagium" and revenue "ex parte Harding patris eiusdem Matild…et terre…ex parte Dionisie matris eius in eadem villa"[1264].  Harding & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATILDA .  King John confirmed donations to "Galfr Vitulo", including the donation of "Hunteneford" made by "Rob de B’kelay cum Matilda filia Harding…in liberum maritagium" and revenue "ex parte Harding patris eiusdem Matild…et terre…ex parte Dionisie matris eius in eadem villa", by charter dated 27 Jun 1205[1265]m GEOFFREY Veel, son of ---. 

 

 

ROBERT FitzHarding, son of HARDING & his wife --- ([1094/96]-5 Feb 1171, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Henri Duke of Normandy [later King Henry II] granted “manerium Betthone...et...terre in manerio de Berkelai” to “Rodberto filio Hard[ingi]” by charter dated to [1153], witnessed by “...Jordanus frater Rodberti et Jordanus et David nepotes eius...[1266].  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[1267].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[1268].  Dugdale’s Monasticon records that Robert FitzHarding and his wife were buried in St Augustine’s Bristol (no corresponding source quoted)[1269]

m EVA, daughter of --- (-12 Mar 1171 or 1173, bur Bristol St Augustine).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[1270].  Dugdale’s Monasticon records that the nunnery of St Mary at St Michael’s on the Hill in Bristol was founded by “Eva…widow to Robert Fitzharding” who became the first prioress, during the reign of King Henry II, adding that she died in 1173 and was buried next to her husband in St Augustine’s Bristol (no corresponding source quoted)[1271].  The Complete Peerage states that she died 12 Mar 1170 (O.S.) (no corresponding source cited)[1272]

Robert & his wife had [eight] children: 

1.         MAURICE de Berkeley (-16 Jun 1190, bur Brentford church, Middlesex).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[1273].  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[1274].  “Ricardus Foliot” granted “terram de Accatona et terram de Hanam et...de Hamtona” to “Mauricio filio Roberti filio Hardingi” by charter dated to before 1173, witnessed by “...Jurdano filio Hardingi et Helya filio Hardingi...[1275].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[1276].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[1277].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Mauricius de Berkelay c s, Nicholaus frater eius" in Gloucestershire in [1186/87][1278].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Mauricius de Berkelay" paying "l s, v milites" in Gloucestershire[1279]m ([1153/54]) ALICE de Berkeley, daughter of ROGER [III] de Berkeley & his wife ---.  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1280].  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas", lands in Berkeley "which she bought of William Heiron" to "William her sonne"[1281].  Maurice & his wife had [seven] children: 

a)         MATILDA de Berkeley .  Smyth states that "the daughter of…lord Maurice was married to Osbert Gifford kt, by whome hee had issue, Osbert Gifford and others, which Osbert became servant to King Henry the third in the eighth year of his raigne", citing a charter at Berkeley, close roll and fine roll records[1282].  The chronology of the Giffard family suggests that Matilda must have been one of her parents’ older children and that her husband must have been Elias.  This suggested identification of her husband appears to be corroborated by the charter dated to after 1220 under which “Thomas de Berkeley” granted “the reversion of the land in Foxcote which his wife Lucy holds in dower” to “Osbert Gyffard his nephew” [who is identified as Osbert [II] Giffard, son of Elias Giffard][1283]m ELIAS [III] Giffard, son of ELIAS [II] Giffard & his wife Bertha --- (-after 1190). 

b)         ROBERT de Berkeley ([1164/65]-13 May 1220, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas"[1284].  “Robert de Berkelaia” donated land Kingswood Abbey, for his soul and that of “his wife Juliana”, by charter dated 11 Jun 1200[1285].  King John confirmed "Berkelay et Berkelay Herness", as granted by King Henry II to "avuo suo Rob fil Harding", to "Rob fil Maurice de Berkelay" by charter dated 18 Apr 1200[1286].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Berkeley" holding "xxx l in Beiministre…de dominico Rege" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1287]m firstly (before 11 Jun 1200) JULIANE de Pont de l’Arche, daughter of ROBERT de Pont de l’Arche & his wife Matilda Marshal of the Earls of Pembroke (-15 Nov 1217, bur Bristol St Augustine).  “Robert de Berkelaia” donated land Kingswood Abbey, for his soul and that of “his wife Juliana”, by charter dated 11 Jun 1200[1288].  “John de Wodeford” granted land in Nibley, Gloucestershire (“in Nubbeleia”), which he had recovered “contra Dom. Margaretam quondam uxorem Othonis fil. Willelmi”, to “Dom. Juliana de Ponte Arche wife of Robert de Berkeleia” by charter dated to [1200][1289].  Smyth records that "the first wife of Lord Robert was Julian de Ponte Arche daughter of William de Pontelargo o Pontearche and necce to…Willm Earl Marischall the elder Earle of Pembroke", records her death "15 Nov in the second year of Kinge Henry the third", and her burial at Bristol St Augustine, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[1290].  According to Dugdale, Robert de Berkeley married "Julian, daughter of William de Pontearch, niece to William Marshal Earl of Pembroke"[1291]m secondly (1218) as her first husband, LUCY, daughter of --- (-18 Jan 1234, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth records that "the second wife [of Lord Robert] was Lucy whom hee maryed not above two yeares before his death", that she married secondly "Hugh de Gurney sonne of Hugh", died 18 Jan 1234 and was buried at Bristol St Augustine, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[1292].  She married secondly as his first wife, Hugues [VI] de Gournay of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Gloucestershire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Lucia que fuit uxor Roberti de Berkelay est maritata Hugoni de Gurney. Terra eius valet c.l"[1293]

c)         THOMAS de Berkeley ([1170]-29 Nov 1243, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas", lands in Berkeley "which she bought of William Heiron" to "William her sonne"[1294].  "Thomas of Berkeley, brother and heir of Robert of Berkeley" owed a fine for "his relief of the lands formerly of Robert", dated [Aug] 1220[1295]

-        see below

d)         MAURICE de Berkeley .  “Aleis de Berkele” granted all her land at Berkeley to “Thomas her son” by charter dated to [1200], witnessed by “...Maurice and Henry de Berkeley her sons...[1296].  Smyth records that "his brother Lord Robert" granted "Foxcote Manor" to "Maurice the third sonne" on his marriage[1297]m ---.  The name of Maurice’s wife is not known.  Maurice & his wife had one child: 

i)          THOMAS de Berkeley (-7 Jan [1260/70]).  Smyth records that "Maurice had issue Thomas" who received "his lands of Hineton and Came" from his father but died "without issue…7 Jan towards the end of King Henry the third"[1298]

e)         WILLIAM de Berkeley .  “Maurice de Berkeley” granted “the moiety of his land of Gosinton” to “William his son”, with the consent of “Robert his son and heir”, by charter dated to 1185/89, witnessed by “...Henry, Elias his brothers...[1299].  “Aaleis de Berkeley” granted “her burgage in Berkeley which she bought from Philip Heirun” to “William her son” by charter dated to [1190/1200], witnessed by “...Philip de Berkeley, Henry de Berkeley...[1300]

f)          HENRY de Berkeley .  “Aleis de Berkele” granted all her land at Berkeley to “Thomas her son” by charter dated to [1200], witnessed by “...Maurice and Henry de Berkeley her sons...[1301].  Smyth indicates that the Berkeley family of Scotland (see the document SCOTLAND UNTITLED NOBILITY) was descended from "Henry and Richard the fifth and sixth sonnes" of Maurice de Berkeley and his wife Alice de Berkeley[1302].  The specific source on which he relies for this information is unclear.  From a chronological point of view, it appears unlikely to be correct as the births of Maurice and Alice’s younger children can probably be dated to after [1170], later than the probable dates of the earliest charters in which the Scottish Berkeleys are named. 

g)         [RICHARD de Berkeley .  Smyth indicates that the Berkeley family of Scotland (see the document SCOTLAND UNTITLED NOBILITY) was descended from "Henry and Richard the fifth and sixth sonnes" of Maurice de Berkeley and his wife Alice de Berkeley[1303].  The specific source on which he relies for this information is unclear.  From a chronological point of view, it appears unlikely to be correct as the births of Maurice and Alice’s younger children can probably be dated to after [1170], later than the probable dates of the earliest charters in which the Scottish Berkeleys are named.] 

2.         HENRY de Berkeley .  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[1304].  “Maurice de Berkeley” granted “the moiety of his land of Gosinton” to “William his son”, with the consent of “Robert his son and heir”, by charter dated to 1185/89, witnessed by “...Henry, Elias his brothers...[1305].  Deacon of Mortain.  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[1306].  Archdeacon of Exeter. 

3.         NICHOLAS de Berkeley (-5 May 1189).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[1307].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[1308]

-        see below

4.         ROBERT “Juvenis” de Berkeley (-[1195]).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[1309].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[1310].  “John Earl of Mortaigne” confirmed to “Robert son of Robert Fitzharding” the “will of Were” [Somerset] which “Juliana de Bantona granted to his father Robert Fitzharding” by undated charter[1311].  Robert made a fine for the inheritance of Alice Paynell (mother of his second wife) in 1193[1312]m firstly HAWISE de Gournay, daughter of ROBERT de Gournay of Barrow, Somerset & his wife Hawise --- (-after 1188).  Stapleton names “Hawisia, daughter and heiress of Robert de Gurnay of Barrow in [Somerset]” as the first wife of Robert FitzHarding and mother of his daughter “Eva de Gurnay”, but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[1313].  Her name and parentage are confirmed by Stapleton in a later passage which names “Roger de Peauton” as second husband of [her daughter] Eva, adding that while married to him she confirmed her donation to Bermondsey monastery of the church of Inglishcombe which had earlier been donated by “Hawisia her grandmother, widow of Robert de Gurnay, and [by] Hawisia her own mother[1314].  "Hathewisia de Gurneio" noted that "Alexander de Bidicumba" had sold “totam terram suam de Cliveware...quam Robertus de Gurneio pater meus ei...dedit” to “Thome filio Willelmi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Matheo de Gurneio...[1315].  Hawise is last named in the 1188 Pipe Roll[1316]m secondly ([1188/93]) AVICE de Gand, daughter of ROBERT de Gand & his first wife Alice Paynell.  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire names “Aviciam” as daughter of “Roberto de Ganth” and his wife Alice, adding that she married ”Roberto filio Roberti Arding de Bristow”, by whom she had “filium…Mauricium” who died childless, leaving “Andreæ Luterel per matrem suam, quæ fuit de parentelli Paynellorum” as his heir[1317].  “R de Gaunt” donated property to Bridlington convent, for the souls of “comitis Gilberti…et…Adeliz uxoris mee et Aviz filie mee” by charter dated to [1156/75][1318].  “Robertus de Gaunt et Aeliz Paganella uxor sua et Avicia filia eorum” donated property to the hospital of St John of Jerusalem by charter dated to [1166/77], witnessed by “…Henrico de Gaunt…[1319].  Robert made a fine for the inheritance of Alice Paynell (mother of his second wife) in 1193[1320].  Robert & his first wife had one child: 

a)         EVA (-before 1213).  Stapleton names “Hawisia, daughter and heiress of Robert de Gurnay of Barrow in [Somerset]” as the first wife of Robert FitzHarding and mother of his daughter “Eva de Gurnay”, but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[1321].  "Mauricius de Gant" paid a fine "loco Eve sororis sue…pro habenda terra q hereditarie eandem Evam…et Thom fil Willi quondam viri sui" in Gloucestershire and Somerset, dated 1213[1322].  King John confirmed "manerium de Barewe", which he had "in vita sua ex concessione Eve de Gornay sororis sue", to "Mauricio de Gant" by charter dated 28 Jul 1214[1323].  The name "de Gournay" applied to Eva could suggest that she only shared one parent with Maurice de Gant, presumably their mother, but this hypothesis appears disproved by the record quoted below which names Robert de Gournay as heir of Maurice de Gant.  m firstly THOMAS FitzWilliam of Harptree, son of WILLIAM & his wife --- (-before 1213).  "Hathewisia de Gurneio" noted that "Alexander de Bidicumba" had sold “totam terram suam de Cliveware...quam Robertus de Gurneio pater meus ei...dedit” to “Thome filio Willelmi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Matheo de Gurneio...[1324]m secondly ROGER de Peauton, son of ---.  Stapleton names “Roger de Peauton” as second husband of Eva, adding that while married to him she confirmed her donation to Bermondsey monastery of the church of Inglishcombe which had earlier been donated by “Hawisia her grandmother, widow of Robert de Gurnay, and [by] Hawisia her own mother”, without citing the corresponding primary sources[1325].  Eva & her first husband had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Gournay (-1269).  The 1227 Pipe Roll records "Robertus de Gurnaco filius et hæres Thomæ de Harpetrie" and "Robertus de Gurnay hæres Evæ de Gurnay" making returns[1326].  Stapleton quotes (in translation) the donation by “Robert de Gurnay, son and heir of Eva de Gurnay” of the advowson of Inglishcombe church to Bermondsey monastery, for the souls of “Thomas my father, Eva my mother, Hawisia de Gurnay my grandmother”, dated 1227[1327].  "Robertus de Gurnay heres Mauricii de Gaunt" protested that “juris...in tribus hundredis de Beminstr, Hareclive et de Porbir” reverted to “Thomam de Berkel” after the death of Maurice, but his claim was rejected, dated 1230[1328].  His claim was presumably dismissed because these properties were the subject of the charter dated to the reign of King John under which “Maurice de Gant” granted “the three hundreds...Bedminster, Portbury and Hareclive” [in Somerset], which “Robert Fitzharding gave to Robert Juvenis his father”, to “Thomas de Berkeley” provided the grantor died without an heir[1329]

Robert & his second wife had one child: 

b)         MAURICE de Gant (-1230).  “Maurice de Gant” granted “the three hundreds...Bedminster, Portbury and Hareclive” [in Somerset], which “Robert Fitzharding gave to Robert Juvenis his father”, to “Thomas de Berkeley” provided the grantor died without an heir, by charter dated to the reign of King John[1330].  This grant is linked to the Inspeximus of “Thomas de Berkelay” of the grant of “three hundreds of Portbury, Bedminster and Hareclive” made by “his grandfather Robert Fitzharding to Robert his son” and of their grant to “Dom. Maurice de Gant, the heir of Robert uncle to the said Thomas”, undated (but presumably dated to after the death of Maurice de Gant as it no doubt relates to the challenge to his inheritance by his nephew Robert de Gournay, see below)[1331].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Mauricius de Gant" holding one and one half knights’ fees in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1332].  "Mauricius de Gant" paid a fine "loco Eve sororis sue…pro habenda terra q hereditarie eandem Evam…et Thom fil Willi quondam viri sui" in Gloucestershire and Somerset, dated 1213[1333].  King John confirmed "manerium de Barewe", which he had "in vita sua ex concessione Eve de Gornay sororis sue", to "Mauricio de Gant" by charter dated 28 Jul 1214[1334].  “Mauritius de Gant” donated revenue from land "in manerio de Dersleia…quam emi de Margareta matertera mea quæ fuit uxor Othonis filii Willielmi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Matildis uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto filio Walteri, Saero de Quenci comite Wintoniæ, Henrico de Boun…"[1335].  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire names “Aviciam” as daughter of “Roberto de Ganth” and his wife Alice, adding that she married ”Roberto filio Roberti Arding de Bristow”, by whom she had “filium…Mauricium” who died childless, leaving “Andreæ Luterel per matrem suam, quæ fuit de parentelli Paynellorum” [he was descended from a younger brother of Maurice’s maternal grandfather] as his heir[1336].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1230 of “Mauricius de Gaunt[1337]m firstly MATILDA de Oilly, daughter of HENRY de Oilly & his first wife Sibylla --- (-before 1220).  The Fine Rolls record the marriage of “Maurice de Gaunt” and “the daughter of Henry de Oilly”, dated Jun “John 15[1338].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Henricus de Oylly" against "Mauricius de Gaunt" for "terre…in Westona" which was granted to Maurice with "Matillidem uxorem eius que fuit filia ipsius Henrici…ipsa defuncta…sine herede"[1339].  “Mauritius de Gant” donated revenue from land "in manerio de Dersleia…quam emi de Margareta matertera mea quæ fuit uxor Othonis filii Willielmi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Matildis uxoris meæ", by undated charter[1340]m secondly ([1220/21]) as her second husband, MARGARET Crassus, widow of RALPH [II] de Somery of Dudley, Worcestershire, daughter of WILLIAM [III] Crassus & his wife [--- Marshall] (-after 14 Jun 1247).  Stapleton dates the marriage to “prior to the fifth year of Henry III when Maurice de Gaunt paid scutage of Byham for the manor of Bradfield in Berkshire to Percival de Sumery[1341].  Her second marriage is indicated by two sources relating to Staffordshire, where Ralph [II] de Somery had been granted land by King John.  Firstly, King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Staffordshire to permit “Maurice de Gant” to collect scutage from knights’ fees he holds in his bailiwick of the land “he holds in dower of Margaret his wife”, dated [Sep] 1224[1342].  Secondly, the Assize Rolls for 1228 record that eight persons were summoned to show cause why they intruded into “a carucate of land which Alan de Englefeld held, the custody of whose lands after his death belonged to Maurice de Gant and Margaret his wife...the land formed part of the dower of Margaret[1343].  Alan de Englefield was Margaret’s son-in-law (see below).  Several other sources have been identified which name Margaret, none of which makes the connection between Ralph de Somery and Maurice de Gant.  Three of these sources clearly refer to the widow of Ralph de Somery: (1) “Roger de Sumeri” confirmed an agreement between “Margaret his mother” and “William de Englefeld” [his nephew, son of his sister Isabel] concerning a grant and exchange of lands “at Bradfield”, Berkshire[1344], undated, but presumably dateable to after Roger’succession to the family estates following the death of his nephew Nicholas (before 4 Jul 1229); (2) and (3) two sets of entries in the Testa de Nevill, Berkshire fees in [1235/36] which include " i.m de i. feodo in Englefeud de feodo de Sumeri et...quarta parte unius feodi Nicholai le Butiler de eodem honore [=honore de Walingeford?] et i.m de i. feodo Margerie de Sumery in Cumton Beucamp de eodem honore et i.m. de i. feodo eiusdem Margerie in Idesleg...et...in Adecote...Watindeden...Stanford...Yngelpenne de eodem honore"[1345], and Berkshire fees in [1242/43] which name "Rogerus de Sumery in Bradefeld i. feodum...Margareta de Sumeri in Bradefeld unum feodum predicti Rogeri...Willelmus de Englefeld in Englefeld unum feodum de eodem feodo"[1346].  Two further sources clearly refer to the wife of Maurice de Gant: firstly, Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Somerset, notwithstanding the order of seisin in favour of "Walter de Everm", to give seisin of "maneriis de Cantokesheved et de Hivis [Quantockshead and Huish]...que fuerunt Mauricii de Gant quondam viri sui" to "Margarete de Sumery" as dower, by order dated 1231[1347], and secondly “Margaret de Somery” reached agreement with “Henry de Gaunt rector of the almonry of St Mark’s Hospital, Billeswick” on the tithes of the mill of East Quantoxhead, Somerset and other matters by charter dated 14 Jun 1247[1348].  Two more sources are inconclusive: the Plea Rolls for 1233 include a claim in Oxfordshire by “John de Beauchamp” against “Margery de Sumery, in a plea of land and wardship[1349], and an undated order, in 1237, records “Assizes taken...in...Worcestershire” from “Margaret de Somery[1350].  Thomas Stapleton made a detailed study of the life of Maurice de Gant in the mid-19th century but all the sources to which he refers are inconclusive regarding the parentage of Maurice de Gant’s second wife[1351].  It is somewhat surprising that Maurice would have married the widow of Ralph [II] de Somery who, although she had proven her child-bearing capacity, must have been nearly 40 years old by [1220].  Stapleton dates the Margaret de Somery/Maurice de Gant marriage to “prior to the fifth year of Henry III [Nov 1220/Nov 1221] when Maurice de Gaunt paid scutage of Byham for the manor of Bradfield in Berkshire to Percival de Sumery[1352].  

5.         ELIAS .  “Maurice de Berkeley” granted “the moiety of his land of Gosinton” to “William his son”, with the consent of “Robert his son and heir”, by charter dated to 1185/89, witnessed by “...Henry, Elias his brothers...[1353]

6.         daughter .  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Hugo de Hasela...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[1354].  It is not known whether this betrothal proceeded to a marriage.  Betrothed ([1153/54] to ROGER de Berkeley, son of ROGER [III] de Berkeley & his wife --- (-after 1194). 

7.         ALDEVA .  It is possible that Aldeva was the second daughter of Robert who is mentioned in the betrothal agreement of her sister (see above).  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed land in Combe, in Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire given by "Nigellus" to "uxori sue Ald[eve] filie Roberti filii Hard[ingi] in dotalicium") by charter dated to [Jun 1153/Apr 1154][1355]m NIGEL, son of ---. 

8.         [MARGARET (-after [1200]).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the undated charter under which “Mauritius de Gant” donated revenue from land "in manerio de Dersleia…quam emi de Margareta matertera mea quæ fuit uxor Othonis filii Willielmi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s[1356].  The word “matertera” is normally translated by “maternal aunt”.  However, it is unlikely that Margaret was the sister of Avice de Gant, mother of Maurice de Gant, who appears to have been the only child by her father’s first marriage.  In addition, Margaret’s husband and Margaret herself are named in charters of the FitzHarding/Berkeley family which are quoted in this section.  It is more likely therefore that Margaret was Maurice’s paternal aunt.  “John de Wodeford” granted land in Nibley, Gloucestershire (“in Nubbeleia”), which he had recovered “contra Dom. Margaretam quondam uxorem Othonis fil. Willelmi”, to “Dom. Juliana de Ponte Arche wife of Robert de Berkeleia” by charter dated to [1200][1357]m OTES FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM & his wife --- (-before [1200]).] 

 

 

NICHOLAS de Berkeley, son of ROBERT FitzHarding & his wife Eva --- (-5 May 1189).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[1358].  Smyth quotes an undated charter under which "Robt fil Hard" granted "Hullam et Nimdesfeld" to "Nichol fil meo", produced by "Nicholaus son of Ralph great grandchilde of ye sayd Nicholaus sonne of this Lord Robert in the fifteenth of King Edward the first"[1359].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[1360].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[1361].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Mauricius de Berkelay c s, Nicholaus frater eius" in Gloucestershire in [1186/87][1362].  The 1189/90 Pipe Rolls record that "Nichol fil Robti fil Harding" paid in respect of his lawsuit against "Aeliz uxorem Robti Giffard" relating to "terra de Stanbrige" in Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire[1363]

m ALICE [de Teckenham, daughter of GUY de Teckenham & his wife ---].  “Nicholas son of Robert” donated land at Bristol to Bristol St Augustine, with the consent of “Henry his son and heir”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “...Ala wife of the said Nicholas, Henry his son, Jordan the latter’s brother...[1364].  Smyth records that Nicholas married "Ala daughter and coheire of Guido als Wido sonne of Tecius lord of Tykenham, by which marriage his estate in Tykenham and in divers…lands in…Somersett, Cambridge etc was greatly advanced", but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[1365]

Nicholas & his wife had six children: 

1.         HENRY de Berkeley .  “Nicholas son of Robert” donated land at Bristol to Bristol St Augustine, with the consent of “Henry his son and heir”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “...Ala wife of the said Nicholas, Henry his son, Jordan the latter’s brother...[1366]

2.         ROGER de Berkeley (-1230).  Smyth records that "Rogerus filius Nicholaii filii Robti filii Hardingi" paid 500 marcs "pro habendis terris patris sui" in 1189[1367].  Smyth records that Roger paid a fine to marry "Hawisia mother of Raph de Somery" in [1196/97][1368].  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[1369]m ([1196/97]) as her second husband, HAWISE Paynell, widow of JOHN de Somery, daughter of RALPH Paynell of Dudley & his wife --- (-after 1210).  “Hawys Paganella” confirmed donations to Tykford Priory by "Johannes de Sumeri vir meus" by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Sumeri filio meo[1370].   Smyth records that Roger paid a fine to marry "Hawisia mother of Raph de Somery" in [1196/97][1371].  “Hawis Paynel” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “domini mei Rogeri de Berkele”, for the soul of “Gervasii Paynel fratris mei”, by undated charter[1372].   Hawise must have survived her son Ralph [II] de Somery, as shown by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240 which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", and passed from her to her grandsons: "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[1373].  Roger & his wife had one child:   

a)         NICHOLAS de Berkeley (-before 26 May 1262).  A writ dated 26 May "46 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas son of Roger", names "Ralph his son is his heir and of full age" and "Hulle and Ninndesfeld manors held of the king in chief" in Gloucester and "Tikneham manor held of the earl Marshal" in Somerset[1374]m SIBYLLA, daughter of ---.  Smyth records that Nicholas married "Sibill heire to the manor of Elmore"[1375].  Nicholas & his wife had one child:  

i)          RALPH (-1291).  A writ dated 26 May "46 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas son of Roger", names "Ralph his son is his heir and of full age" and "Hulle and Ninndesfeld manors held of the king in chief" in Gloucester and "Tikneham manor held of the earl Marshal" in Somerset[1376]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

(a)       NICHOLAS ([6 Dec] [1261]-1312).  [A writ dated 17 Apr "11 Edw I" summoned a jury at Huntingdon to enquire whether "Nicholas son of Ralph…who was born and baptised at Oeverton (alias Everton) and is in the king’s wardship" was of full age, and confirmed that he was of full age[1377].  It is not certain whether this document relates to the same Nicholas son of Ralph.]  Smyth quotes an undated charter under which "Robt fil Hard" granted "Hullam et Nimdesfeld" to "Nichol fil meo", produced by "Nicholaus son of Ralph great grandchilde of ye sayd Nicholaus sonne of this Lord Robert in the fifteenth of King Edward the first"[1378]

3.         JORDAN de Berkeley .  “Nicholas son of Robert” donated land at Bristol to Bristol St Augustine, with the consent of “Henry his son and heir”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “...Ala wife of the said Nicholas, Henry his son, Jordan the latter’s brother...[1379].  Smyth names "Roger, Jordan and Ala" as the children of Nicholas de Berkeley and his wife, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[1380]

4.         [--- de Berkeley .  The father of Maurice de Berkeley may have been one of the other sons of Nicholas de Berkeley who are named above, maybe either Henry or Jordan.]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         MAURICE de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[1381]

5.         ALICE de Berkeley .  Smyth names "Roger, Jordan and Ala marryed to Ralph Bloet" as the children of Nicholas de Berkeley and his wife, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[1382]m RALPH Bloet, son of ---. 

6.         EUSTACE de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[1383]

7.         OLIVER de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[1384]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         NICHOLAS de Berkeley (-before 12 Jan [1263]).  A writ dated 12 Jan "47 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas de Berkeleye", names "Giles de Berkeleye his brother aged 22 on the day of St John the Baptist 46 Hen III is his heir" and "Eldresfelde" in Worcester[1385]

2.         GILES de Berkeley ([1240]-).  A writ dated 12 Jan "47 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas de Berkeleye", names "Giles de Berkeleye his brother aged 22 on the day of St John the Baptist 46 Hen III is his heir" and "Eldresfelde" in Worcester[1386]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Berkeley .  The parentage of William has not been ascertained.  It would be chronologically consistent if he was another son of Robert de Berkeley and his wife Eva.  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Berkeley (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus filius Willelmi de Berkelega" holding one knight’s fee "in Eldresfeud" in Worcestershire in [1210/12][1387]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM de Berkeley (-[8 May 1196/1200]).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 8 May 1196 in a claim by "Willelmus de Berklai" against "Rob de Bklai fratrem suum tenente de feudum dim militis in Portbi et…quarta parte feudi uni militi in Gosington"[1388].  "Rob de Bikeleya" paid a fine for "custodia terre…Willi de Bikeleya fratris ipsius Rob" in Devonshire, dated 1200[1389]

2.         ROBERT de Berkeley (-after 1200).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 8 May 1196 in a claim by "Willelmus de Berklai" against "Rob de Bklai fratrem suum tenente de feudum dim militis in Portbi et…quarta parte feudi uni militi in Gosington"[1390].  "Rob de Bikeleya" paid a fine for "custodia terre…Willi de Bikeleya fratris ipsius Rob" in Devonshire, dated 1200[1391]

 

 

THOMAS de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley & his wife Alice de Berkeley ([1170]-29 Nov 1243, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas", lands in Berkeley "which she bought of William Heiron" to "William her sonne"[1392].  "Thomas of Berkeley, brother and heir of Robert of Berkeley" owed a fine for "his relief of the lands formerly of Robert", dated [Aug] 1220[1393]

m JOAN [de Somery], daughter of [RALPH [II] de Somery of Dudley, Worcestershire & his wife Margaret Crassus] (-after 1273).  Smyth records that Thomas married "Jone daughter of Sr Raph de Somery lord of Campden in Gloucestershire necce to Willm Marshall Earle of Pembrooke", and that she died during the reign of King Edward I, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[1394].  "Joan de Berkele…and…Maurice de Berkele her son" were granted rights in "their manors of Wutton and Kamme, co Gloucester" dated 2 Aug 1252[1395]

Thomas & his wife had eight children: 

1.         MAURICE de Berkeley (1218-4 Apr 1281, bur Bristol St Augustine).  "Joan de Berkele…and…Maurice de Berkele her son" were granted rights in "their manors of Wutton and Kamme, co Gloucester" dated 2 Aug 1252[1396]m (before 12 Jul 1247) ISABEL, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoy & his wife Rohese de Dover (-7 Jul [1276/77], bur Abbey of St Augustine, Bristol).  The Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester names "Richard fiz le rei…Ion" and  "the erles daoughter of Wareine" his mother, adding that "Sire Morisse of Berkeleye" married his daughter[1397].  King Henry III granted her certain manors 10 Aug 1264 "out of compassion for the poverty of his niece"[1398].  Maurice & his wife had two children: 

a)         MAURICE de Berkeley (-Kenilworth 1279).  He was killed in a tournament[1399]

b)         THOMAS de Berkeley (Berkeley 1245-Berkeley 23 Jul 1321).  He was summoned to parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Berkeley. 

-        see below

2.         MARGARET de Berkeley (-after 1265)m firstly JOHN FitzMatthew, son of MATTHEW FitzHerbert & his wife Joan Patric (-before 19 Jan 1261).  m secondly (before 18 Oct 1265) ANSEL Basset of Winford and Saltford, Somerset, son of --- (-Stoke 2 Oct 1280). 

 

 

THOMAS de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley & his wife Isabel [FitzRoy] (Berkeley 1245-Berkeley 23 Jul 1321).  He was summoned to parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Berkeley

m (1267) JOAN de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his second wife Margaret de Quincy of the Earls of Winchester (-19 Mar 1310, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Thomas & his wife had children: 

1.         MAURICE de Berkeley ([Apr 1281]-31 May 1326, bur Wallingford, transferred to Bristol St Augustine’s)Lord Berkeleym firstly (1289) EVE La Zouche, daughter of EON La Zouche of Haringworth & his wife Millicent de Cantelou (-5 Dec 1314, bur Portbury, Somerset).  m secondly ([1316]) ISABEL de Clare, daughter of GILBERT de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hereford & his first wife Alice de Lusignan (10 Mar 1263-after 1322).  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “VI Id Mar” in 1262 of “filia Isabella” to “Gilberto de Clare filio Ricardi comitis Gloucestriæ…de uxore sua Alicia filia comitis Marchiæ[1400].  Maurice & his first wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS de Berkeley ([1292]-27 Oct 1361, bur Berkeley Church)Lord Berkeleym firstly (before 25 Jul [1320], Papal dispensation to remain married Sep 1329) MARGARET de Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [VI] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Philippa de Montagu of Salisbury (after 1307-5 May 1337, Bristol St Augustine’s).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem… Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Margaret married “Thomæ filio Mauricii de Berkley[1401]m secondly (Charfield, Gloucestershire 30 May 1347) as her second husband, KATHARINE Clivedon, widow of PIERS le Veel of Tortworth, Gloucestershire, daughter of JOHN Clivedon of Charfield, Gloucestershire & his wife (-13 Mar 1385, bur Berkeley).  Thomas & his first wife had children: 

i)          MAURICE de Berkeley (1330-Berkeley Castle 8 Jun 1368, bur Bristol St Augustine’s).  He succeeded his father in 1361 as Lord Berkeley

-         see below

ii)         JOAN de Berkeley (-2 Oct 1369).  The will of "Joan de Cobham of Starburghe", dated 13 Aug 1369, chose burial “in the churchyard of St Mary Overhere in Southwark”, bequeathed property to “Henry Grey and Dame Joan his wife and to that Joane my daughter, to Joane daughter to that Joane” and a conditional bequest to “Reginald my son” relating to property “sold...to my husband in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father[1402]m REGINALD de Cobham, son of REGINALD de Cobham & his wife Joan d’Evere (-7 Oct 1361, bur Lingfield).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1347 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cobham (of Sterborough). 

b)         ISABEL de Berkeley (-25 Jul 1362)m firstly (Berkeley Castle Jun 1328) ROBERT [II] de Clifford, son of ROBERT [I] de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Matilda de Clare (5 Nov 1305-20 May 1344).  m secondly (before 9 Jun 1345) THOMAS Musgrave, son of ---. 

2.         MARGARET Berkeley (-after 4 May 1320)m firstly (before 7 Feb 1284) THOMAS FitzMorice, son of MORICE FitzJohn & his wife Matilda de Barry ([Apr 1261]-Knockainy, co. Limerick 4 Jun 1298, bur Tralee Dominican Church, co. Kerry).  m secondly (before 5 Apr 1299) REYNOLD Rosel [Russel], son of ---. 

 

 

MAURICE de Berkeley, son of THOMAS de Berkeley Lord Berkeley & his first wife Margaret Mortimer of the Earls of March (1330-Berkeley Castle 8 Jun 1368, bur Bristol St Augustine’s).  He succeeded his father in 1361 as Lord Berkeley

m (1338) ELIZABETH Le Despencer, daughter of HUGH le Despencer Lord le Despencer & his wife Eleanor de Clare of the Earls of Gloucester (-13 Jul 1389, bur London St Botolph’s). 

Maurice & his wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Berkeley (Berkeley Castle 5 Jan 1353-13 Jul 1417, bur Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire)Lord Berkeley.  The will of "Thomas Lord Berkley", dated 2 Feb 1415, bequeathed property to “my daughter the Countess of Warwick[1403]m (Nov 1367) MARGARET de Lisle Baroness Lisle, daughter of WARIN de Lisle Lord Lisle & his wife Margaret Pipard (-20 Mar 1392, bur Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire).  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         ELIZABETH Berkeley (after 1385-28 Dec 1422, bur Kingswood Abbey, Gloucestershire).  The will of "Thomas Lord Berkley", dated 2 Feb 1415, bequeathed property to “my daughter the Countess of Warwick[1404].  Baroness Berkeley, Baroness Lisle.  The will of "Richard Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 9 Aug 1435, required a tomb to be erected “in the abbey of Kinswood, Gloucestershire on the grave of Elizabeth my first wife[1405]m (covenant Sep 1392, before 5 Oct 1397) as his first wife, RICHARD de Beauchamp, son of THOMAS de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Margaret Ferrers (25 or 28 Jan 1382-Rouen 30 Apr 1439, bur 4 Oct 1439 Warwick, St Mary's).  He succeeded his father in 1401 as Earl of Warwick

2.         JAMES de Berkeley (-13 Jun 1405, bur Bristol St Augustine).  The will of "James Lord Berkley", dated 20 May 1404, chose burial “in the abbey of St Augustine’s near Bristol”, bequeathed property to “James my son” and appointed “Isabel my wife and James my said son” as executors[1406]m ELIZABETH Bluet, daughter of JOHN Bluet of Raglan, Monmouthshire & his wife --- (-after 20 May 1404).  The will of "James Lord Berkley", dated 20 May 1404, bequeathed property to “James my son” and appointed “Isabel my wife and James my said son” as executors[1407].  James & his wife had children: 

a)         JAMES de Berkeley (Raglan [1394]-Berkeley Castle Nov 1463, bur Berkeley).  The will of "James Lord Berkley", dated 20 May 1404, bequeathed property to “James my son” and appointed “Isabel my wife and James my said son” as executors[1408]Lord Berkeleym firstly (contract 9 Apr 1410) --- St John, daughter of JOHN St John & his wife ---.  m secondly (1415) --- Stafford, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford of Hook, Dorset & his wife ---.  m thirdly ([1423/24]) as her second husband, ISABEL Mowbray, widow of HENRY Ferrers, daughter of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (-27 Sep 1452, bur Gloucester Grey Friars).  m fourthly (settlement 25 Jul 1457) as her first husband, JOAN Talbot, daughter of JOHN Talbot Earl of Shrewsbury & his first wife Matilda Neville Baroness Furnivalle.  She married secondly (before 26 May 1474) Edmund Hungerfold

-        LORDS BERKELEY, VISCOUNTS BERKELEY, EARLS of BERKELEY[1409]

 

 

 

 

BIDUN

 

 

 

1.         HALENALD de Bidun (-before 1156).   The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Norfolk & Suffolk, dated 1212, which record that "Halnad de Bidun" held “in Sypeden [Shipden] quartam partem feodi i militis de dono Henrici Regis antiqui[1410].  “Halnath de Bidon...” witnessed the charter under which “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse Abbey, Lincolnshire, dated to the reign of King Stephen[1411].  A charter of Richard I King of England dated 3 Jul 1190 confirmed donations to Thornton abbey including the donation of “ecclesiam de Garton” made by “Hanelaci de Bydon[1412].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen. de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[1413].  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1414]m firstly SARA, daughter of ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, under which "Matillis de Rochefordia" claimed "ecclesiam de Tumbestona...advocacionem" from "Robertum de Tumbestona", recording that the abbot of Lavendon stated that the advocacy of the church had belonged to "Johannis de Bidun" who had donated it to the abbey, and that the plaintiff said that "Sarre de Bidun matris predicti Johannis" had donated property[1415]m secondly ANNETA, daughter of ---.  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1416].  Halenald & his first wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Bidun (-before 1184).  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1417].  "…Joh[ann]e de Bid[un], Halenall fr[atr]e suo…" witnessed the charter dated 7 Jun 1153 under which "H- udx Normann et Aquit et comes Andeg" restored offices to "Will[elm]o Maledocto cam[erario] meo"[1418].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, under which "Matillis de Rochefordia" claimed "ecclesiam de Tumbestona...advocacionem" from "Robertum de Tumbestona", recording that the abbot of Lavendon stated that the advocacy of the church had belonged to "Johannis de Bidun" who had donated it to the abbey, and that the plaintiff said that "Sarre de Bidun matris predicti Johannis" had donated property[1419].  The 1155/56 Pipe Roll records "Johs de Bidun" paying 40 shillings in respect of an unspecified offence, being afterwards pardoned by writ of the queen[1420].  A charter of Henry III King of England dated 26 May 1227 records the foundation of Lavendon Abbey, Buckinghamshire by “Johannis de Bidun fundatoris” and his donations[1421]m ALICE Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM Mauduit & his wife Matilda de Hanslope ([1134]-after 1184).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Morcote” held by “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit...L annorum”, adding that she has “iv filias” and naming their husbands[1422].  Another section of the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “domina de Lateburia que fuit uxor Johannis de Bidune et soror camerarii de Hameslepe” and “terra sua in Lateberia”, with “iv filias maritatas et i est maritanda[1423].  John & his wife had five children: 

i)          JOHN de Bidun (-before 1184).  His parentage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which names “uxor que fuit Johannis de Bidune junioris"[1424]m (1184 or before) MATILDA, daughter of THOMAS FitzBernard & his wife Eugenia Picot ([1173/74]-before 11 Nov 1255).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor que fuit Johannis de Bidune junioris, Matillis…x annorum…filia Thome filii Bernardi” and “terra sua in Kirkebi”, and "Ewgenia Picot…filia Radulfi Picot de Kancia et uxor Thome filii Bernardi…xxx annorum" and her "iii filios…x annorum…viii annorum…iii annorum [et] filiam dedit Dominus Rex filio Johannis de Bidun"[1425].  Another section of the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Stowe que est dos Matillidis de Bidune...filia Thome filii Bernardi” and “Eugenia uxor Thome filii Bernardi[1426].  She married secondly --- de Rochford.  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda"[1427]

ii)         AMICE de Bidun (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “primogenitam…Hugo de Clinton…[1428].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1429].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia who had three daughters, Amabel, Isabel and Agnes…"[1430]m HENRY de Clinton, son of GEOFFREY de Clinton & his wife Agnes of Warwick (-[1214/16]). 

iii)        AMABEL de Bidun (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…secundam Milo de Bello-campo…[1431].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" against "Amabilem de Bidona" concerning "terre…in Latebyria"[1432].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1433].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Amabel…had an heir Miles de Bello Campo who is living"[1434]m MILES de Beauchamp, son of HUGH de Beauchamp & his [second] wife Philippa de Trailly (-after 1210). 

iv)       SARAH de Bidun .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…tertiam Ricardus de Bello-campo…[1435].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1436].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa"[1437]m RICHARD de Beauchamp, son of HUGH de Beauchamp & his [second] wife Philippa de Trailly (-after 1231). 

v)        MATILDA de Bidun (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…quartam Gaufridus filius Gaufridi[1438].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Vis-de-Luco que fuit filia Johannis de Bidune” and her property with one son “qui est cum Rege...xxii annorum[1439].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1440].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Maud…had a son Robert son of Geoffrey, who is dead leaving a son Thomas son of Robert"[1441]m GEOFFREY FitzGeoffrey, son of ---. 

vi)       ERMENGARDE [Ermesinde] de Bidun (-after 1231).  A charter of Henry III King of England dated 26 May 1227 records the foundation of Lavendon Abbey, Buckinghamshire by “Johannis de Bidun fundatoris” and the donation of “terram de Bruneswude” made by “Ermingardæ filiæ Joh. de Bidun[1442].  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which Aldulf de Gatesden, with the consent of “Armerdgard” his wife, confirmed this donation to Lavendon[1443].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1444].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Ermigerda…had a son Richard de Gatesden who is living [altered by interlineation to "two sons John and Richard, John de Gatesden the elder is dead, and had a son John who is living"]"[1445]m ALDULF de Gatesden, son of --- (-before 1225). 

John had [one probably illegitimate daughter by an unknown mistress]: 

vii)      MATILDA de Bidun (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Vis-de-Luco que fuit filia Johannis de Bidune” and her property with one son “qui est cum Rege...xxii annorum[1446].  From a chronological point of view, it is not possible for this daughter to have been the same person as Matilda, wife of Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey who is named above.  She is either the daughter of John by an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage, or illegitimate which seems more likely as she was not named in any of the documents relating to the family inheritances.  Another possibility is that her father was a different John de Bidun.  m --- Vis-de-Lu, son of --- (-before 1185). 

Halenald & his [first/second] wife had seven children: 

b)         SIMON de Bidun .  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1447]

c)         HALENALD de Bidun (-before 1185).  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1448].  "…Joh[ann]e de Bid[un], Halenall fr[atr]e suo…" witnessed the charter dated 7 Jun 1153 under which "H. dux Normann et Aquit et comes Andeg" restored offices to "Will[elm]o Maledocto cam[erario] meo"[1449].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Haneladus de Bidun, i militem de Walintone" in Berkshire, and "Alenaldus de Bidun vii milites" in Norfolk, in 1166[1450].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[1451]m (1162) as her second husband, AGNES, widow of WARIN [I] de Munchensy, daughter of PAYN FitzJohn of Ewyas, co. Hereford, Sheriff of Hereford and Shropshire & his wife Sibyl de Lacy (-after 1190).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1452].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Agnes de Montchanesi" paying "xiii s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1453]

d)         TRIAN de Bidun (-after 1176).  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1454].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[1455]m AGNES Picot, daughter of RALPH Picot & his wife ---.  “Radulphus de Bidun” donated land at “Tikenham” to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, on condition that they should receive “me et matrem meam Agnetam et dominum meum Johannem de Binchion fraternitatem”, by undated charter[1456].  An undated charter records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[1457].  Trian & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH de Bidun .  “Radulphus de Bidun” donated land at “Tikenham” to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, on condition that they should receive “me et matrem meam Agnetam et dominum meum Johannem de Binchion fraternitatem”, by undated charter[1458].  An undated charter records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[1459]

e)         WALTER de Bidun .  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1460]

f)          ALURIC de Bidun .  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[1461]

g)         AMICE de Bidun ([1124/25]-after 1185).  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Trianno fratre meo…"[1462].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Amicia de Limesia…lx annorum…filia Haveladi de Bid[une]”, adding that she has “ii filios milites quorum primogenitus…Johannes de Limesia…[et] plures…filias[1463]m GERARD de Limesey, son of ALAN de Limesay & his wife --- (-after 1161). 

h)         SIBYL de Bidun .  Her parentage is confirmed by an undated charter which records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[1464].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Sibilla de Ros" held fees in Oxfordshire during the reign of King Henry I and now held fees from "Manasser Arsic"[1465]m GEOFFREY de Ros, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         WALTER de Bidun .  Chancellor of Scotland.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[1466]

 

 

 

 

BISSET

 

 

The Bisset family of East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire is recorded in charters of Thurgarton priory and founded the house of lepers in Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire.  Loyd points out that the family acquired by marriage Cany in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime, arrondissement Yvetot, canton Cany, which suggests that the Bisset family itself may have originated from the same area[1467]The editor of the Beauly cartulary suggests that Henry Bisset, recorded in Scotland in the late 12th century (see the document UNTITLED SCOTTISH NOBILITY), was a member of the same Bisset family[1468].  The precise relationship has not been traced.  The mid-14th century Scalacronica records that William King of Scotland, after his release from captivity in England in 1174, returned to Scotland with "plusours dez filz pusnes dez seygnours Dengleterre" and granted them lands, naming in its list "…lez Biseys…"[1469].  The charters of Lannoy abbey, in the county of Beauvais, indicate that the Bisset family held land in Briostel in the same county. 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bisset (-after 1136).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willelmo Bisete" holding land in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire[1470].  “Domini eorum Willelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” confirmed the donation of land “in territorio de Briostel...et mansuram in terra Teoleti” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] made by “Lambertus de Bretesel et filii eius Renoldus et Rogerius” by charter dated 1136[1471].  “Guillelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” donated “in territorio de Briostel...medietatem” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] by undated charter[1472]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[1473].  William & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         MANASSER Bisset (-before [1176/77]).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll records payments "in terris…Manaserii Biset…in Rochesburn" in Hampshire, suggesting the death of Manasser shortly before[1474]

-        see below

b)         WILLIAM Bisset "Carpentarius" .  “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, with the consent of “Henrici Bisset filii mei et Manasseri Biset fratris mei et Ernulfi Biset nepotis mei”, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[1475]m SUSANNA, daughter of ---.  “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[1476].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRY Bisset .  “Henricus Biseth” donated “ecclesiam de Athelington” to Thurgarton Priory by undated charter, later confirmed by “Willielmus de Beuvero et Albreia uxor eius[1477].  “Henricus Bisset” confirmed a donation to Thurgarton by “Hugonis de Caysneto”, for the souls of "Willielmi Carpentarii patris mei et matris meæ Susannæ et…Albreæ Biset uxoris meæ", by undated charter[1478]m AUBREYE de Vesci, daughter of RICHARD FitzEustace & his wife Aubreye de Lisours.  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Saram et Aubreiam” as the daughters of “Richardus constabularius Cestriæ” and his wife, adding that Aubreye married “Henrico Biset[1479].  “Henricus Bisset” confirmed a donation to Thurgarton by “Hugonis de Caysneto”, for the souls of "Willielmi Carpentarii patris mei et matris meæ Susannæ et…Albreæ Biset uxoris meæ", by undated charter[1480]

c)         ANSOLD Bisset (-after 1166).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his brother “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[1481].  “Domini eorum Willelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” confirmed the donation of land “in territorio de Briostel...et mansuram in terra Teoleti” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] made by “Lambertus de Bretesel et filii eius Renoldus et Rogerius” by charter dated 1136[1482].  “Guillelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” donated “in territorio de Briostel...medietatem” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] by undated charter[1483].  “Stephanus filius Engelrami vicecomitis de Albamarla” donated property “in terra de Moncellis...[et] in territorio Maisniliorum et Vaccariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Ansoldus Bisete [...domini sui], similiter et Franco frater Stephani”, by charter dated 1155[1484].  “...Ansoldus Biset...Arnulfus Biset, Robertus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1166 under which Guillaume Comte d’Aumâle confirmed the renunciation by “Wicardus de Egla” in favour of Lannoy abbey[1485]m ---.  The name of Ansold’s wife is not known.  Ansold & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRY Bisset (-after 1154).  “Henricus Bisete” confirmed donation of “medietatem territorii de Briostel” made to Lannoy abbey by “avus meus Willelmus Bisete et pater meus Ansoldus Bisete” by charter dated 1154[1486].  His family connection is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[1487]

d)         [--- .  It is possible that the father of Ernulf was one of the other named sons of William Bisset who are shown above.  m ---.]  Two children: 

i)          ERNULF Bisset (-after [1176/77]).  “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, with the consent of “Henrici Bisset filii mei et Manasseri Biset fratris mei et Ernulfi Biset nepotis mei”, by undated charter[1488].  “...Ansoldus Biset...Arnulfus Biset, Robertus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1166 under which Guillaume Comte d’Aumâle confirmed the renunciation by “Wicardus de Egla” in favour of Lannoy abbey[1489].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ærnulfus Biset" in Kent[1490]

ii)         ROBERT .  “...Ansoldus Biset...Arnulfus Biset, Robertus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1166 under which Guillaume Comte d’Aumâle confirmed the renunciation by “Wicardus de Egla” in favour of Lannoy abbey[1491]

 

2.         WALTER Bisset (-before 1204).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Walterus Bisset" in Herefordshire[1492].  "Nigell Pincebec et Alic uxor eius" paid a fine for "custodia terre et heredis Walt Biset vs Rob de Tresgoz et Sibill ux eius", in Herefordshire, dated 1204[1493]

 

3.         ANSELM Basset (-after 1194).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Anselmus Biset" in London & Middlesex[1494]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bisset (-before 1221).  m AVICE, daughter of --- (-after 1221).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1221, by "Auicia que fuit uxor Willelmi Bisset" against "Willelmum Britonem" relating to land "in Thekene"[1495]

 

 

MANASSER Bisset, son of WILLIAM Bisset & his wife Hawise --- (-before [1176/77]).  Henry II King of England confirmed donations made to the leper hospital at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire by “Manesserus Biset pro Alicia uxore sua de cujus hæreditate manerium illud est” by undated charter[1496].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll records payments "in terris…Manaserii Biset…in Rochesburn" in Hampshire, suggesting the death of Manasser shortly before[1497]

m ALICE de Falaise Dame de Cany, daughter of ---.  Henry II King of England confirmed donations made to the leper hospital at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire by “Manesserus Biset pro Alicia uxore sua de cujus hæreditate manerium illud est” by undated charter[1498].  Loyd indicates that Alice was the sister and heir of Gilbert de Falaise Seigneur de Cany[1499]Adelitia de Caneio uxor Manasses Biset” confirmed the donation of “Nemus Haudap quod Ricardus de Morevilla tenebat de me” to Jumièges, for the souls of “mee meique mariti Manasses”, by charter dated to [1150][1500].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Alueua uxor Manseri" in Dorset and Somerset[1501], although it is not known whether this entry relates to the widow of Manasser Bisset.  The necrology of Longueville records the death 15 May of “domino Giliberto de Falesia, condam domino de Caneio et...domina Adalacia sorore sua”, adding that “dicta...domiona” donated “x acras terræ de exarto sui nemoris d’Eschalunc” for her anniversary and that of “Manaserii Biseti mariti sui” and that “ipsa et maritus suus et filius eorum Henricus” confirmed the donations of “dicti Gilliberti[1502].  The necrology of Longueville records the death 7 Jan of “domino Galtero de Caneiro...helemosinarius et subprior hujus loci per spatium XL annorum et ultra, et...Emelina de Caneio matre ipsius Galteri[1503]

Manasser & his wife had two children: 

1.         HENRY Bisset (-before 9 Dec 1213).  "Henry Bisset" donated the church of Bradley to the canons of Nutley, Berkshire, for the souls of "Manser his father, Alice his mother and Isoud his wife"[1504].  “Henricus Bisset” confirmed an agreement between “domum de Brumore” and “mulieres leprosas et fratres” of Maiden Bradley concerning “ecclesia de Rocheburna”, donated by “Manasserus Biset pater meus”, by undated charter[1505].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "de firma de Kydeministr Henrici Biset de quarta parte anni" in Worcestershire[1506].  "Henr Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Kideministr et Sandhurst" in Worcestershire, dated 1199[1507].  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[1508]m (1213) as her third husband, ISOLDA Pantulf, widow firstly of HUGH de Montpinçon, secondly of WALTER de Tattershall, and thirdly of WALTER de Baskerville, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Pantulf of Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire & his wife Joan de Goldington (-after 1267).  As Iseult’s earlier marriages can be dated to the late 12th century, her age suggests that she must have been Henry’s second wife.  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[1509].  She married fifthly as his second wife, Amaury [I] de Saint-Amand.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[1510]

2.         JOHN Bisset ([1165/75]-1241).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim recorded by Bracton, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[1511], read together with the source quoted above under which his brother Henry donated property to Nutley for his named parents and his wife.   "John Byset" was granted the "manor of Kideministre" dated 4 Mar 1238[1512].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Johannes Biset et Alicia uxor eius” owing “de Oblatis” in Devon[1513].  Matthew Paris names "…Johannes Bisset, summus justiciarius forestæ…" among those who died in 1241[1514].  [m firstly ---.  No direct information has been found concerning John’s supposed first marriage.  However, if it is correct, as suggested by the sources which name him, his brother Henry, and Henry’s wife Iseult, that he was the son of Manasser Biset, John must have been born in the 1170s at the latest.  If that is correct, the date of his known marriage to Alice Basset in [1223] is late for a first marriage.]  m [secondly] (1223 or before) as her third husband, ALICE Basset, widow firstly of WILLIAM Malet of Curry Malet, repudiated wife (secondly) of H--- de Chaceporc, daughter of THOMAS Basset [II] of Headington & his wife Philippa Malbank (-[1263]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[1515].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Johannes Biset et Alicia uxor eius” owing “de Oblatis” in Devon[1516].  John & his [second] wife had three children: 

a)         MARGARET Bisset (-Dec 1256 or before).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[1517]m ([1237/39]) RICHARD de Rivers, son of RICHARD de Rivers & his third wife Maud de Beauchamp (-before 25 Apr 1243). 

b)         ELA Bisset .  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[1518]m (before 1249) ---. 

c)         ISABEL Bisset (-before 1279).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[1519].  Her marriage is shown in The Complete Peerage, which does not cite the corresponding primary source[1520]m (before 1249) as his first wife, HUGH du Plessis, son of JOHN du Plessis & his first wife Christiana de Sanford (-before 7 Jul 1292). 

 

 

 

 

BOCLAND

 

 

 

1.         HUGH de Bocland .  Orderic Vitalis names "Goisfredus de Clintona, Radulfus Basset et Hugo de Bocalanda…" among those who were "de ignobili stirpe" and whom King Henry I raised "de pulvere" (from the dust)[1521]

 

2.         GEOFFREY de Bocland (-after 6 Aug 1205).  King John confirmed "ecclesiam de Tenham" to "Gaufr de Bocland" by charter dated 6 Aug 1205[1522].  William Bishop of Lincoln confirmed the donation of “ecclesie de Walcre”, held by “Galfridus de Boclanda” during his lifetime, to Colchester St. John made by “Willelmi de Lanvalei filii Willelmi de Lanvalei” by undated charter[1523].  “Willelmus de Lamualey” donated “terram...Eddrihichescroft de feodo de Stanweia...” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido de Boclond, Brienno Arsic, Johanne de Lamualei, Willelmo de Lamualei...Galfrido fratre meo......[1524]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Bocland (-1175)m as her second husband, MATILDA, widow of PETER de Ludgershall, daughter of ---.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Cristiana de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Westlega” made to Colchester St. John by [her grandson] “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawisie sororis Galfridi filii Petri quondam justiciarii Anglie[1525].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Gaufridus de Lucy" against "priorem de Suwic" for "ecclesiam de Walewrthe…advocacionem", stating that "Gaufridus de Mandeuilla" had given it to him "Galfridus filius Petri frater ipsius Juliane", while the prior claimed that a document of "Matillidis de Boclande et Roberti filii Petri fratris…primogeniti Gaufridi filii Petri" proved the donation to the priory<