ENGLISH lords A - C

v4.2 Updated 25 May 2020

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

LORDS AUDLEY. 2

LORDS BADLESMERE. 10

LORDS BARDOLF. 12

BASSET. 23

A.         ORIGINS.. 23

B.         LORDS BASSET of DRAYTON BASSET, STAFFORDSHIRE.. 30

C.        BASSET of HEADINGTON and WALLINGFORD, OXFORDSHIRE.. 34

D.        BASSET of CHADDLEWORTH, BERKSHIRE.. 45

E.         BASSET of SAPCOTE, LEICESTERSHIRE.. 47

F.         BASSET of WELDON, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.. 52

G.        BASSET FAMILIES in YORKSHIRE.. 53

H.        OTHER BASSET FAMILIES.. 57

LORDS BEAUMONT. 60

BERKELEY. 63

A.         BERKELEY.. 63

B.         BERKELEY (FITZHARDING) 68

C.        LORDS BERKELEY.. 85

LORDS BOTETOURT. 88

LORDS BOURCHIER. 91

BREWES (BRIOUSE/BRAOSE) 93

A.         ORIGINS.. 93

B.         LORDS BREWOSE.. 114

C.        LORDS BREWES.. 116

LORDS BURGHERSH. 117

LORDS CAMVILLE. 119

LORDS CAUNTELO. 129

LORDS CHERLETON. 137

CLIFFORD. 138

A.         ORIGINS.. 139

B.         LORDS CLIFFORD.. 151

LORDS COBHAM.. 154

 

 

 

LORDS AUDLEY

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

1.         GAMAL (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Gamal” holding Balterley, Audley and Talke in Staffordshire; Cheadle and Mottram St Andrew in Cheshire[1]

 

2.         LIULF .  He was granted the manors of Audley and Talke, Staffordshire.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Liulf de Aldredeslega" compounding for the death of "Gamel" in Staffordshire (Nova Placita)[2]m --- de Stanley, daughter of ---.  Adam, son of Liulf de Audley, granted Stanley, Staffordshire to William de Stanley, son of Adam de Stanley the grantor’s avunculus, in exchange for Talk o’ the Hill, undated but during the reign of King Stephen[3].  If avunculus is interpreted strictly in this source, Adam de Audley’s mother was the sister of Adam de Stanley.  Liulf & his wife had one child:

a)         ADAM de Audley (-[1203/11).  Adam, son of Liulf de Audley, granted Stanley, Staffordshire to William de Stanley, son of Adam de Stanley the grantor’s avunculus, in exchange for Talk o’ the Hill, undated but during the reign of King Stephen[4].  “Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit” and for the salvation of “mea et Roehais uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Roberto de Verdun, Waltero de Canvile, Ada de Aldithelee...Willielmo Pantouf, Radulpho de Biseche, Rogero Bagot, Philippo de Draicote, Milone de Verdun[5].  "Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[6].  Ancestor of the Lords Audley[7]m EMMA, daughter of ROBERT FitzOrm & his wife ---.  Adam & his wife had two children: 

i)          ADAM de Audley (-1212 or before).  He was constable to Hugh de Lacy Earl of Ulster[8]

ii)         HENRY de Audley ([1175]-1246 before Nov).  He bought the manors of Egmond and Newport in Shropshire and built the castles of Heleigh, Staffordshire and Red Castle, Shropshire[9]m BERTRADE Mainwaring, daughter of RALPH Mainwaring [Mesnilwarin], seneschal of Chester & his wife Amicia of Chester (-after 1249).  “Radulfus de Meidnilwar” granted “Smelewde...et Snellest...et dimid Pichemere...” to “Henrico de Alditelegh in liberum maritagium cum Bertrea filia mea” by undated charter, witnessed by “Ran com Cestr, Hug com Ultoniæ...[10].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by inquisitions after a writ dated 22 Apr "4 Edw I", following the death of [her grandson] "Henry de Audidelegh..." which record the manor of “Smalewode...given to Henry de Audithele grandfather of the said Henry” by “Thomas [error for Ralph?] de Meynwaryn as free marriage[11].  Henry & his wife had four children: 

(a)       RALPH (-before 1240).  According to the Complete Peerage[12], Ralph was "very possibly" James's older brother. 

(b)       ALICE (after 1217-after 1265).  An order dated 1228 notified that the king had granted "scutagium feodroum i militis et dimidii", held by "Petrus de Monte Forti qui filiam suam duxit in uxorem", to “Henrico de Aldithel[13]m (1228) PIERS [I] de Montfort of Preston, co. Rutland, son of THURSTAN [III] de Montfort & his wife [--- de Cauntelo] ([1205/07]-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265). 

(c)       JAMES Audley of Heleigh, Staffordshire ([1220]-[11 Jun] 1272)

-         see below

(d)       EMMA m firstly HENRY Touchet, son of ---.  m secondly GRUFFYDD Maelor [II] Lord of North Powys, son of MADOG Prince of Northern Powys & his wife Isota --- (-1269). 

 

 

1.         WALTER de Audley (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Walterus de Audley" held one knight’s fee from "Hunfridi de Boun" in Wiltshire[14].

 

 

1.         ADAM de Audley (-after 1219).  "…Dño Ada de Audelee…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Johannes de Scot comes Cestrie et de Huntedon" confirmed the donations to St Andrew’s priory made by "pater noster comes David", undated but presumably dated to soon after his father’s death (in 1219)[15]

 

 

JAMES Audley of Heleigh, Staffordshire, son of HENRY de Audley & his wife Bertred Mainwaring ([1220]-[11 Jun] 1272).  The Complete Peerage records that he died by "breaking his neck"[16]

m ELA Longespee, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee & his wife Idoine de Camville (-before 22 Nov 1299).  The Book of Lacock names “Guill Lungespee tertium, Ric’um, Elam et Edmundum” as the children of “Guill Lungespee secundus” & his wife, adding that Ela married “Jacobus de Audele[17].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 25 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "William de Auditheleye...” name “Nicholas his brother is his next heir and of full age...Ela his mother...Lucy late the wife of Henry de Audethele[18]

James Audley & his wife had six children: 

1.         JAMES de Audley (1250-before 22 Nov 1274).  A writ dated 22 Nov "2 Edw I", after the death of "James de Aldithele alias Audithele..." names "Henry his brother aged 22 and more is his next heir" and orders the delivery “to Maud late the wife of J. de Audel in tenancy the manor of Ford [by way of dower][19]m as her first husband, MATILDA, daughter of --- (-[Apr] 1276).  A writ dated 22 Nov "2 Edw I", after the death of "James de Aldithele alias Audithele..." names "Henry his brother aged 22 and more is his next heir" and orders the delivery “to Maud late the wife of J. de Audel in tenancy the manor of Ford [by way of dower][20].  She married secondly John Deivill Lord Deivill.  Inquisitions after a writ dated 22 Apr "4 Edw I", following the death of "Henry de Audidelegh..." record the manor of “Austanesfelt...held by Maud late the wife of James de Audedele of the said Henry in dower who died eight days and more after the said Henry[21]

2.         HENRY de Audley ([1251/52]-before 22 Apr 1276).  A writ dated 22 Nov "2 Edw I", after the death of "James de Aldithele alias Audithele..." names "Henry his brother aged 22 and more is his next heir"[22].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 22 Apr "4 Edw I", following the death of "Henry de Audidelegh..." name "William de Audithele his brother aged 22 on the day of St Luke 3 Edw I is his next heir”, record the manor of “Smalewode...given to Henry de Audithele grandfather of the said Henry” by “Thomas de Meynwaryn as free marriage”, the manor of “Austanesfelt...held by Maud late the wife of James de Audedele of the said Henry in dower who died eight days and more after the said Henry”, and a writ “for...the assignment of dower to Lucy late the wife of the said Henry[23]m as her first husband, LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 1303).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 22 Apr "4 Edw I", following the death of "Henry de Audidelegh..." record a writ “for...the assignment of dower to Lucy late the wife of the said Henry[24].  She married secondly (before 1281) William Rithre Lord Rithre

3.         WILLIAM de Audley (18 Oct 1253-killed in battle Wales before 25 Dec 1282).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 22 Apr "4 Edw I", following the death of "Henry de Audidelegh..." name "William de Audithele his brother aged 22 on the day of St Luke 3 Edw I is his next heir[25].  The Book of Lacock names “Guillelmum de Audele…Nich’um de Audele” as the children of “Jacobus de Audele” and his wife Ela, adding that William was drowned “apud Snowdoun in guerra Walliæ[26].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 25 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "William de Auditheleye...” name “Nicholas his brother is his next heir and of full age...Ela his mother...Lucy late the wife of Henry de Audethele[27]

4.         JOAN (-after 13 May 1264).  King Henry III granted “the wardship of the lands and heirs of John son of Robert de Bello Campo, a minor deceased, who married Joan daughter of the said James, who is near her time or has already given birth to an heir” 13 May 1264[28]m JOHN de Beauchamp, son of ROBERT de Beauchamp & his wife Alice --- ([after 1244?]-before 13 May 1264).  King Henry III granted “the wardship of the lands and heirs of Robert de Bello Campo tenant in chief, saving to Alice late his wife her dower” 25 Oct 1263[29]

5.         NICHOLAS de Audley (before 1258-28 Aug 1299).  The Book of Lacock names “Guillelmum de Audele…Nich’um de Audele” as the children of “Jacobus de Audele” and his wife Ela, adding that William was drowned “apud Snowdoun in guerra Walliæ[30].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 25 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "William de Auditheleye...” name “Nicholas his brother is his next heir and of full age...Ela his mother...Lucy late the wife of Henry de Audethele[31]m (1299 or before) CATHERINE Giffard, daughter of JOHN Giffard Lord Giffard of Brimpsfield & his first wife Matilda de Clifford (1272-after 1322).  The Book of Lacock names “Catharinam filiam Johannis Giffard” as wife of “Nich’um de Audele”, son of “Jacobus de Audele[32].  She became a nun at Ledbury[33].  Nicholas & his wife had four children: 

a)         THOMAS Audley (1288-[8 Jul/14 Dec] 1307, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk)m as her first husband, EVA de Clavering, daughter of JOHN de Clavering Lord Clavering & his wife Hawise de Tibetot (-30 Sep 1369, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Evam...cognomen...Clavering” as the child of “Johannem”, son of “Robertum filium Rogeri”, adding that she had “filiam...Evam, quæ nunc se clamat advocatricem domus de Sibeton, de Langley, sanctæ Fidis et de Bliburg” who married firstly “Thomæ de Audele” who died childless and secondly “militi Radulfo de Ufford”, thirdly “Jacobo de Audele”, and fourthly “Roberto Benhalle militi” who died childless[34].  She married secondly (before 2 Dec 1308) Thomas de Ufford.  After her second husband was killed at the battle of Bannockburn, Eva lived with, but did not marry, her first husband's first cousin James Audley.  She married thirdly Robert de Benhale Lord Benhale

b)         NICHOLAS Audley (11 Nov 1289-1316 before 6 Dec).  He was summoned to Parliament 8 Jan 1313, whereby he is held to have become Lord Audleym (1312) as her second husband, JOAN Martin, widow of HENRY de Lacy Earl of Lincoln, daughter of WILLIAM Martin Lord Martin & his wife Eleanor de Mohun née FitzPiers (-[Feb 1320/1 Aug 1322]).  Her second marriage is confirmed by inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok which name "Philip de Columbariis and Eleanor his wife" and "Johanna sister of the said Eleanor", who was mother of "James d’Audelee", as daughters and heiresses of "William Martyn chevalier"[35].  Lord Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

i)          JAMES Audley (Knesale, Nottinghamshire 8 Jan 1313-Heleigh 1 Apr 1386, bur Hulton Abbey).  Inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok name "Philip de Columbariis and Eleanor his wife" and "Johanna sister of the said Eleanor" who was mother of "James d’Audelee"[36].  He succeeded his father in 1316 as Lord Audley.  The will of "James Audley Lord of Rony Castle and of Heleigh", dated 1385, chose burial “in the quire of my abbey at Hilton...if I die in the Marches...”, bequeathed property to “Nicholas my son...Foulk Fitzwarren and Philip his uncle...Margaret Hillary my daughter...[37]m firstly (before 13 Jun 1330) JOAN Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Joan de Geneville (-[1337/51]).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Joan married “domino Jacobo de Audeley[38]m secondly (before Dec 1351) ISABEL, daughter of [ROGER Le Strange Lord Strange of Knokyn & his wife ---] (-after 1366).  Lord James & his first wife had four children: 

(a)       NICHOLAS Audley ([1328]-22 Jul 1391).  The will of "James Audley Lord of Rony Castle and of Heleigh", dated 1385, bequeathed property to “Nicholas my son...Foulk Fitzwarren and Philip his uncle...Margaret Hillary my daughter...[39].  Inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok name "Nicholas d’Audelee Chivaler" as son and heir of "James d’Audelee"[40].  He succeeded his father in 1386 as Lord Audleym (settlement [1330/31]) ELIZABETH Beaumont, daughter of HENRY Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Alice Ctss of Buchan (-27 Oct 1400, bur [Hulton Abbey]).  The will of "Elizabeth Lady Audley", dated 30 Sep 1400, chose burial “in the quire of Hilton Abbey”, bequeathed property to “my...Lord Thomas the king’s son...my...niece Joan de Beaumond...to her marriage...Joan de Audley...[41]

(b)       ROGER (-after 1352). 

(c)       JOAN Audley (-after 30 Sep 1400).  Inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok name "Johanna another of the sisters of [Nicholas d’Audelee Chivaler]" and her grandson "John Tochet son of John" as heirs of Nicholas[42].  The will of "Elizabeth Lady Audley", dated 30 Sep 1400, bequeathed property to “my...Lord Thomas the king’s son...my...niece Joan de Beaumond...to her marriage...Joan de Audley...[43]m JOHN Tuchet of Markeaton, Derbyshire (-killed in battle Rochelle 1371).  Their grandson John Tuchet was summoned to Parliament in 1405 as Lord Audley. 

(d)       MARGERY Audley ([1345]-1411).  The will of "James Audley Lord of Rony Castle and of Heleigh", dated 1385, bequeathed property to “Nicholas my son...Foulk Fitzwarren and Philip his uncle...Margaret Hillary my daughter...[44].  Inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok name "Margaret…one of the sisters of Nicholas [d’Audelee Chivaler]" who married "Roger Hillary knight" as heirs of Nicholas[45]m (1353 or before) ROGER Hillary, son of ---. 

Lord James & his second wife had five children: 

(e)       MARGERY Audley .  The will of "James Audley Lord of Rony Castle and of Heleigh", dated 1385, bequeathed property to “Nicholas my son...Foulk Fitzwarren and Philip his uncle...Margaret Hillary my daughter...[46].  Inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok name "Margaret the third sister of Nicholas [d’Audelee Chivaler]" and her grandson "Fulk Fitz Waryn son of Fulk" as heirs of Nicholas[47]m FULK FitzWarin [VIII] Lord FitzWarin, son of FULK FitzWarin [VII] Lord FitzWarin & his wife --- (Whittington 2 Mar 1341-12 Feb 1374). 

(f)        THOMAS Audley (-before 1391). 

(g)       ROWLAND Audley (-before 1391). 

(h)       JAMES Audley (-before 1391). 

(i)         KATHERINE Audleym THOMAS Spigurnel, son of ---. 

c)         ALICE (-after 1343)m firstly RALPH Basset of Drayton, son of RALPH Basset Lord Basset of Drayton & his wife Joan de Grey of Wilton and Ruthin (-[1335]).  m secondly HUGH Mainill, son of --- (-after 1343).  

d)         ELA de Audley m firstly GRUFFYDD, son of OWEN de la Pole & his wife Joanna Corbet (1291-1309).  m secondly JAMES de Perrers, son of ---.  m thirdly PIERS Corbet, son of ---. 

6.         HUGH de Audley ([1267]-[Wallingford Castle] [Nov 1325/Mar 1326]).  He was summoned to Parliament 15 May 1321, whereby he is held to have become Lord Audley.  He joined the rebellion of the Earl of Lancaster in 1322, but surrendered and was held prisoner in Wallingford Castle[48]m (before 7 Jan 1293) as her second husband, ISOLDA de Mortimer, widow of WALTER de Ballon of Much Marcle, Herefordshire, [illegitimate] daughter of [EDMUND [I] de Mortimer of Wigmore, Herefordshire & his mistress ---] (-after 1336).  According to the Complete Peerage[49], Isolda was the daughter of Edmund [I] de Mortimer and his wife Margaret de Fiennes but this is chronologically impossible if her son Hugh was born in [1289].  It is therefore assumed that Isolda was Edmund de Mortimer's illegitimate daughter, although no proof has been found that this is correct.  Another possibility is that she was Edmund's sister[50].  Her first name suggests a Welsh origin.  Edmund de Mortimer gave her and her first husband the manor of Arley, Staffordshire[51].  Lord Hugh & his wife had three children: 

a)         JAMES Audley of Stratton Audley (-before 1 Mar 1334, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk)Mistress: (after 24 Jun 1314) EVA de Clavering, widow firstly of THOMAS Audley and secondly of THOMAS de Ufford, daughter of JOHN de Clavering Lord Clavering & his wife Hawise de Tibetot (-30 Sep 1369, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Evam...cognomen...Clavering” as the child of “Johannem”, son of “Robertum filium Rogeri”, adding that she had “filiam...Evam, quæ nunc se clamat advocatricem domus de Sibeton, de Langley, sanctæ Fidis et de Bliburg” who married firstly “Thomæ de Audele” who died childless and secondly “militi Radulfo de Ufford”, thirdly “Jacobo de Audele”, and fourthly “Roberto Benhalle militi” who died childless[52].  She married thirdly Robert de Benhale Lord Benhale.  James had four illegitimate children by his mistress: 

i)          PETER Audley (-1359).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “duos filios et duas filias...Jacobum et Petrum, Annam et Hawisiam” as the children of “Evam...” and “Jacobo de Audele[53]

ii)         JAMES Audley (-Fontenay, Poitou 1369, bur Poitiers).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “duos filios et duas filias...Jacobum et Petrum, Annam et Hawisiam” as the children of “Evam...” and “Jacobo de Audele[54].  Governor of Aquitaine and seneschal of Poitou.  He was one of the founder members of the Order of the Garter[55]

iii)        ANNEA manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “duos filios et duas filias...Jacobum et Petrum, Annam et Hawisiam” as the children of “Evam...” and “Jacobo de Audele[56]

iv)        HAWISEA manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “duos filios et duas filias...Jacobum et Petrum, Annam et Hawisiam” as the children of “Evam...” and “Jacobo de Audele[57]

b)         HUGH Audley ([1289][58]-10 Nov 1347, bur Tonbridge Priory).  He was summoned to Parliament 30 Nov 1317, whereby he is held to have become Lord Audley.  He was created Earl of Gloucester 16 Mar 1337.  m (Windsor 28 Apr 1317) as her second husband, MARGARET de Clare, widow of PIERS Gavaston Earl of Cornwall, daughter of GILBERT de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hereford & his second wife Joan of England ([1293]-9 Apr 1342).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Elianoram, Elizabetham, et Margaretam” as the three daughters of “Gilbertus secundus” and his wife “Johanna de Acres, filia regis Edwardi primi”, adding in a later passage that “domina Isabella [error for Margareta] tertia filia Gilberti secundi” married “domino Hugoni de Audley[59].  Lord Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          MARGARET Audley (-after 28 Jan 1348, bur Tonbridge).  She succeeded her father as Baroness Audleym (before 6 Jul 1336) as his second wife, RALPH de Stafford Lord Stafford, son of EDMUND de Stafford Lord Stafford & his wife Margaret Basset (24 Sep 1301-31 Aug 1372, bur Tonbridge). 

c)         ALICE (-13 Jan 1375, bur Durham Cathedral Church).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulfum de Neuille" married "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[60].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[61]m firstly (1317) RALPH de Greystoke of Greystoke, son of ROBERT FitzRalph & his wife Elizabeth --- (15 Aug 1299-Gateshead 14 Jul 1323, bur Durham Cathedral Church).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1322 whereby he is held to have become Lord Greystoke.  m secondly (1327) RALPH Neville of Raby Lord Neville, son of RANDOLPH Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Eupheme --- ([before 1291]- 5 Aug 1368, bur Durham). 

 

 

 

LORDS BADLESMERE

 

 

1.         GUNCELIN de Badlesmere (-before 13 Apr 1301).  The Complete Peerage names “Guncelin or Gunselm B. of Badlesmere…Justice of Chester” as the father of Bartholomew de Badlesmere but does not cite the primary source on which the information is based[62]A writ dated 13 Apr "29 Edw I", after the death “Guncelinus de Badlesmere", names as his heir "Bartholomew his son aged 26"[63]m JOAN, daughter of RALPH FitzBernard of Kingsdown, Kent & his wife ---.  She is not named in her husband’s inquisition, suggesting that she predeceased him.  Guncelin & his wife had two children: 

a)         BARTHOLOMEW de Badlesmere of Badlesmere & Chilham Castle, Kent (-1322)A writ dated 13 Apr "29 Edw I", after the death “Guncelinus de Badlesmere", names as his heir "Bartholomew his son aged 26"[64]He was summoned to Parliament in 1309 whereby he is deemed to have become Lord Badlesmerem (before 30 Jun 1308) as her second husband, MARGARET de Clare, widow of GILBERT de Umfraville, daughter of THOMAS de Clare Lord of Thomond, Connaught & his wife Juliana FitzMaurice (-late 1333)Inquisitions made after a writ dated 10 Apr "14 Edw II", after the death of "Thomas son of Richard de Clare", name "Margaret the wife of Bartholomew de Badelesmere and Maud the wife of Robert de Welle, aunts of the said Thomas and sisters of the said Richard are his next heirs and aged 30 or more[65].   King Edward III ordered the restoration of her lands to “Margaretæ quæ fuit uxor Bartholomæi de Badelesmere” by charter dated 22 Feb 1327[66]Bartholomew & his wife had five children: 

i)          MARGERY de Badlesmere (-after 31 May 1356).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Willielmus de Roos" married "Margeriam de Badilsmere"[67].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[68]m firstly WILLIAM de Ros Lord Ros (of Helmsley), son of WILLIAM de Ros Lord Ros (of Helmsley) & his wife Matilda de Vaux (-3 Feb 1343, bur Kirkham).  m secondly (royal licence 6 Mar 1351) THOMAS de Arundel, son of ---.  m thirdly as his third wife, JOHN Avenell, son of ---. 

ii)         MATILDA de Badlesmere ([1308/10]-Earl's Colne [24] May 1366, bur Colne Priory).  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[69].  The will of "John de Vere Earl of Oxford", dated 2 Nov 1358, bequeathed property to “Maud my wife...Maud my daughter for her marriage[70]m firstly ROBERT FitzPayn, son of ---.  m secondly JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of ALFONSO de Vere & his wife [Joan Foliot] ([12 Mar 1312]-Reims 12/24 Jan 1360, bur Colne Priory).  He inherited the lordship of Badlesmere, Kent by right of his wife and thereby assumed the barony of Badlesmere without royal grant.  However, a House of Lords inquiry 5 Apr 1626 found that the barony had been in abeyance between the four sisters and co-heirs of Giles de Badlesmere[71]

iii)        ELIZABETH de Badlesmere ([1313]-after 31 May 1356).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Edmundum primogenitum”, son of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, married “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei…de Badelesmere et de Ledys[72].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the marriage of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere”, previously married to “domino Edmundo de Mortuomari[73].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356 and made “with the leave of my husband”, chose burial “in the quire of the church of the Friars Preachers, London”, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[74]m firstly (Earnwood, Kinlet 27 Jun 1316) EDMUND [II] Mortimer, son of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer [later Earl of March] & his wife Joan de Geneville [Joinville] (-Stanton Lacy 16 Dec 1331).  Lord Mortimer 1331.  m secondly (licence 1335) WILLIAM de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Elizabeth of England (Caldecot [1312]-16 Sep 1360, bur Walden Abbey, Essex).  Earl of Northampton 1337. 

iv)       GILES de Badlesmere (18 Oct 1314-[7 Apr/22 Jun] 1338)m (after Feb 1328) as her first husband, ELIZABETH Montagu, daughter of WILLIAM Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Catherine Grandson (-Ashley, Hampshire 31 May 1359, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Hugo tertius” married “Elizabetha filia comitis Sarum” but was childless[75]She married secondly (before May 1341) Hugh le Despencer Lord DespencerKing Edward III requested papal dispensation for the marriage between “Hugonem le Despenser” and “Elizabeth filiam...comitis Sarum et marescalli Angliæ” is dated 6 Mar 1340[76]She married thirdly (before 10 Jul 1350) Guy Lord BryanThe Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “1359…apud Asteley in comitatu Hamptoniæ…ultimo die mensis Maii” of “domina Elizabeth…filia quondam Willielmi de Monte-acuto comitis Sarum, ac uxor Guidonis de Bryene militis, et relicto Hugone tertio le Despencer” and her burial with her first husband in Tewkesbury abbey[77]

v)        MARGARET de Badlesmere (-[3 Dec 1344/4 Dec 1347]).  m (before 24 Jul 1337) as his first wife, JOHN Tybotot Lord Tybotot, son of PAYN Tybotot Lord Tybotot & his wife Agnes de Ros of Helmsley (20 Jul 1313-13 Apr 1367). 

b)         MAUD Badlesmere (-after 2 Jan 1306)m ROBERT Burghersh, son of REYNOLD Burghersh of Burghersh, Sussex, Chiddingstone, Kent & his wife --- (-[2 Jul/8 Oct] 1306). 

 

 

 

LORDS BARDOLF

 

 

1.         HUGUES [I] Bardolf (-after 1053).  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Hugo Bardulfus" was captured in the battle at Château d’Arques, dated to 25 Oct 1053[78]

 

2.         [WILLIAM Bardolf .  A book of fees records that “Ivo de Tailbois” held “baroniam de Hephall cum uxore sua…filia [error for uxor in view of other sources quoted below] Will de Bardulf”, previously granted to [a different, from the context] “Will Bardolf” by William I King of England[79].  No other document has been found which names this supposed earliest William Bardolf.  His existence cannot be confirmed.] 

 

3.         EUDES Bardolf (-after 1084).  "...Odonis Bardol..." witnessed the charter dated 1084 under which “Roger de Albineio” donated property to Lessay[80]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM [I] Bardolf .  A bull of Pope Alexander III dated 27 May 1163 confirms donations to the priory of St Faith, Horsham, Norfolk including the donation of land “in Frecaham et in Spicafurda” made by “Willielmus Bardulfus"[81]

 

 

1.         HAMELIN Bardolf (-[1161/62]).  King Henry II confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “ecclesiam Sancte Trinitatis de Bungeye” made by “Hamelini Bardulfi et ex concessione Hugonis Bardulfi heredis sui[82].  The 1159/60 Pipe Roll names "Hamelin Bardul" in Lincolnshire[83].  The 1160/61 Pipe Roll names "Hamel Bardul" in Lincolnshire[84].  He is not listed in the 1162/63 Pipe Roll in Lincolnshire. 

 

2.         ROBERT Bardolf (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Bardulf" held one knight fee "in Hou" in Kent[85].  If it is correct, as noted below, that Hugh [I] Bardolf was the son of Hamelin Bardolf, it is likely that Robert was the brother of Hamelin as Hugh [I] is also noted holding property in Hoo, Kent. 

 

 

1.         HUGH [I] Bardolf ([before 1135]-[1200]).  Hugh [I] was heir to Hamelin Bardolf, as confirmed by a charter of King Henry II (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291) which confirmed donations to Barlings, including the donation of “ecclesiam Sancte Trinitatis de Bungeye” made by “Hamelini Bardulfi et ex concessione Hugonis Bardulfi heredis sui[86].  The document does not state that Hugh [I] was Hamelin’s son: the family relationship may have been more remote.  His birth date is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adult when first recorded during the mid-1150s.  "Hugone Bardol…" witnessed the undated charter, dated to the early part of the reign of King Henry II, under which "R. de Haia" granted land at Authorpe, Lincolnshire to "Herberto filio Aelart"[87].  The 1157/58 Pipe Roll names "Hug Bardul" among “Nova Placita et Nove Convent” in Lincolnshire[88]. The 1160/61 Pipe Roll names "Hug Bardul" among “Nova Placita et Nove Convent” in Lincolnshire[89].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo Bardulfus ii milites, Doun Bardulf i militem" holding land from Richard de Hay in Lincolnshire in 1166[90].  "…Hugone Bardulfi" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/1188] under which Henry II King of England donated property to the lepers of Mont-aux-Malades[91].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Hugo Bardulf" paying "xx s de i feodo in Hou, i milites" in Kent[92].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Hugo Bardulfus" among those granted delay for payment "per brevia" in Kent[93].  His career is discussed by Clay[94].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “terre in campis de Risum” made by “Hugonis Bardulfi senioris et ex concessione H. filii sui[95]m [firstly] ISABEL, daughter of ---.  The Complete Peerage shows Hugh, his wife Isabel and their children, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[96].  An order dated 27 Jan 1229 confirmed donations to St Mary, Berlinges, including the donation of "Carleton by Lincoln, part of the marriage portion of Isabella his mother..." made by "Robert Bardulf"[97].  [m secondly as her first husband, AMABILIS de Limesey, daughter of --- (-after 27 May 1205, maybe after [1224/Jun 1225]).  She married secondly (after [1200]) John de Briouse.  "Amabil q fuit ux Hug Bard" paid a fine not to be constrained to marry and agreed to marry only with the consent of the king "quamdiu sit vidua pro morte Johannis de Braosa quondam viri sui", in Warwickshire, dated 27 May 1205[98].  The significance of the phrase in which John de Briouse is named in this document is difficult to determine.  The literal translation presents no problems: “for so long as she may be a widow because of the death of her late husband John de Briouse”.  Her marriage to John obviously took place before May 1205, but does this phrase mean that he was already dead?  Read literally, if Amabilis was already John’s widow, she would only cease to be such if she died or remarried.  Remarriage would breach the term imposed by the king, if without his consent.  The reference to John would therefore seem irrelevant for the purposes of the document: if he was already dead, why not simply write “Amabil q fuit ux Johannis de Braosa”?  Another possibility is that the document was anticipating what would happen if her current husband (John) died at some time in the future.  The wording is consistent with that case as well, i.e. John would become “quondam” in the future but was not so in 1205.  However, it seems unlikely that King John would impose a condition contingent on a future event, when he could easily impose another fine in the future when that event happened.  Another factor is introduced by the charter dated [1224/Jun 1225] which is quoted below: if John had died before May 1205, why would Amabilis wait 20 years before issuing the confirmation (unless that document was in fact reporting events which happened years earlier)?  Neither of these possibilities seems to provide a satisfactory explanation for the wording of the 27 May 1205 charter.  Until further evidence comes to light, the only safe conclusions are that Amabilis died after 27 May 1205, maybe after [1224/Jun 1225], and that her second husband died before 1224, maybe before 27 May 1205.  "Amable de Limesie…post obitum Johannis de Brawose quondam viri mei" confirmed grants of land to "Benedicto filio Murielis", in accordance with earlier grants made by "Gaufridi de Limesie et Johannis de Limesie antecessorum meorum" to "Alexandro filio Thony" who held the land "tempore Radulfi de Limesie et predictorum Gaufridi et Johannis de Limesie", by charter dated to [1224/Jun 1225][99].]  Hugh [I] & his [first] wife had six children: 

a)         HUGH Bardolf .  The Complete Peerage shows Hugh as the older son of Hugh Bardolf and his wife Isabel, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[100].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “terre in campis de Risum” made by “Hugonis Bardulfi senioris et ex concessione H. filii sui[101]Robertus Bardulp” donated “terram...Elwruetche...” to Hoo St Werburg, for the soul of “Hugonis fratris mei”, by undated charter[102]

b)         ROBERT Bardolf of Great Carlton, Lincolnshire and Hoo, Kent (-before 1 Jul 1225).  The Complete Peerage shows Hugh, his wife Isabel and their children, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[103].  King John confirmed donations to Barlings (confirmed by Inspeximus dated 12 Jun 1291), including the donation of “terram suam in Scoftorna...[et] in Carletona juxta Lincolniam...[et] in Wraggeby...” made by “Roberti Bard[104].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Bardulfe" holding one knight’s fee in Kent in [1210/12][105]Robertus Bardulp” donated “terram...Elwruetche...” to Hoo St Werburg, for the soul of “Hugonis fratris mei”, by undated charter[106].  An order dated 27 Jan 1229 confirmed donations to St Mary, Berlinges, including the donation of "Carleton by Lincoln, part of the marriage portion of Isabella his mother..." made by "Robert Bardulf"[107]

c)         daughter (-before 1 Jul 1225).  The Complete Peerage shows her parentage and marriage, citing the Cartulary of Barlings[108].  It is assumed that she died before 1 Jul 1225 when “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui[109]m RICHARD Foliot, son of ---. 

d)         daughter (-before 1 Jul 1225).  m ---.  One child: 

i)          ISOLDA (-after 1 Jul 1225).  There are contrary indications concerning the parentage of Isolda.  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[110].  This source suggests that Isolda de Grey was the daughter of the second sister of Robert Bardulf, and co-heir of her uncle.  On the other hand, Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Henry de Grey married "Ysolda...daughter of Hugh Bardolf, sister and one of the co-heirs of Robert Bardolf", that in 1235 she was “remarried to...Reginald de Meandre”, and that in 1246 “Richard de Gray son and heir of Isolda de Gray” swore homage to King Henry III, although he does not cite the source reference[111].  The birth date of Hugh [I] Bardolf (father of Robert Bardolf) is estimated to before 1135 (see above).  Hugh’s children would presumably therefore have been born in [1160/80].  If that date range is correct, the date of Isolda’s second marriage, and also the chronology of the Grey family, suggest that Isolda was more probably Hugh’s granddaughter than his daughter.  Another possibility is that the wife of Henry de Grey was Robert’s sister and that “Isold de Gray” who is named in the 1 Jul 1225 source was the couple’s daughter.  However, in that case, it is unclear why Isolda’s son Richard would not have been named as the Grey representative of the heirs who are named in 1 Jul 1225.  On balance, it appears more likely that Isolda was Robert Bardolf’s niece, although if that is correct there is no indication of her father’s family.  m firstly HENRY de Grey of Gray’s Thurrock and Codnor[112], son of ---.  m secondly (before 1235) REGINALD de Meandre, son of ---. 

e)         daughter (-before 1 Jul 1225).  m --- Paynell, son of ---.  One child: 

i)          RALPH Paynell .  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[113]

f)          MATILDA Bardolf (-after 1 Jul 1225).  Her parentage is confirmed by by the charter dated 1 Jul 1225 under which “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from [her son] “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti[114]m ---.  One child: 

i)          ROBERT Lupus .  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[115]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         DOON [I] Bardolf (-after 1166).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[116].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo Bardulfus ii milites, Doun Bardulf i militem" holding land from Richard de Hay in Lincolnshire in 1166[117]

2.         THOMAS [I] Bardolf (-after 1157).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[118]

 

 

1.         THOMAS [II] Bardolf (-[1190/97]).  It is possible that Thomas [II] Bardolf was the same person as Thomas [I] Bardolf.  "Thomas Bardul" donated rent from “his mill of Elwadeston on the Derwent with his daughter Mathildis made a nun there by consent of his wife Rohais, mother of Mathildis, of whose inheritance was the mill” to Caen Holy Trinity by charter dated to [1170/87][119].  “Thomas Bardolf et Roeis uxor eius” settled a dispute with the monks of Bardenay, dated 12 Mar 1176[120].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of Bec abbey, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Bernouville" made by “Thome Bardolfi et Rohais uxoris sue”, by charter dated to [1181/89][121].  "…Thoma Bardulfi" subscribed the charter dated Feb 1187 under which Henry II King of England granted duty exemptions to the Cistercians of Dunes[122].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "honor Piperelli de Londonia" paying "li milites et vi pars…in diversis comitatibus", of which "in perdonis Thomæ Bardulfo, x s", in Essex, Hertfordshire[123].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony"[124]m ROHESE, daughter of RALPH Hanselyn & his wife ---.  "Thomas Bardul" donated rent from “his mill of Elwadeston on the Derwent with his daughter Mathildis made a nun there by consent of his wife Rohais, mother of Mathildis, of whose inheritance was the mill” to Caen Holy Trinity by charter dated to [1170/87][125].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", names "Rohais...daughter and heir of Ralph Halselinus [...Hanselyn], a baron of Nottinghamshire", adding that she and her husband gave "the church of Bernouville near Gisors" to the abbey of Bec, but he does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[126].  “Thomas Bardolf et Roeis uxor eius” settled a dispute with the monks of Bardenay, dated 12 Mar 1176[127].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of Bec abbey, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Bernouville" made by “Thome Bardolfi et Rohais uxoris sue”, by charter dated to [1181/89][128].  Thomas & his wife had eight children: 

a)         HUGH [II] Bardolf .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Thomas Bardolf was dead in 1197 when "his barony in England was in the custody of Hugh Bardolf...his son", but he does not cite the source reference[129]

b)         DOON [II] Bardolf (-before 29 Jul 1203).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Doon Bardolf, son of Thomas Bardolf and his wife Rohese, in 1173 commanded "the new castle of Drincourt (Neufchatel-en-Bray) when besieged by the young King Henry" with his brother Thomas, but he does not cite the source reference[130]

-        see below

c)         THOMAS [III] Bardolf .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Doon Bardolf, son of Thomas Bardolf and his wife Rohese, in 1173 commanded "the new castle of Drincourt (Neufchatel-en-Bray) when besieged by the young King Henry" with his brother Thomas, but he does not cite the source reference[131]

d)         daughter .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", and that [after the loss of Normandy] King John gave "partem Willelmi Bacun et partem Roberti de Sancto Remigio" to "Thomæ filio Bernardi" to whom he later gave "Aliciæ de Jarpenville" in marriage[132]m ROBERT de Saint-Rémy, son of ---. 

e)         daughter .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", and that [after the loss of Normandy] King John gave "partem Willelmi Bacun et partem Roberti de Sancto Remigio" to "Thomæ filio Bernardi" to whom he later gave "Aliciæ de Jarpenville" in marriage[133]m WILLIAM Bacon, son of ---. 

f)          daughter .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", which "Baldewinus de Thony" still held in [1210/12][134]m BALDWIN de Tosny, son of RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk & his wife Ada de Chaumont ([1169]-after 1210). 

g)         ROHESE Bardolf (-after 1224).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", states that "a fourth sister Rohese" [referring to the three daughters of Thomas Bardolf shown above] was "first the wife of Henry de la Pommeraie and secondly of John Russell", but he does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[135]m firstly as his second wife, HENRY [II] de la Pomerai, son of HENRY [I] de la Pomerai & his wife Rohese --- (-1207).  m secondly JOHN Russell, son of --- (-1224). 

h)         MATILDA Bardolf .  "Thomas Bardul" donated rent from “his mill of Elwadeston on the Derwent with his daughter Mathildis made a nun there by consent of his wife Rohais, mother of Mathildis, of whose inheritance was the mill” to Caen Holy Trinity by charter dated to [1170/87][136].  Nun at Caen Holy Trinity. 

 

 

DOON [II] Bardolf, son of THOMAS [II] Bardolf & his wife Rohese --- (-before 29 Jul 1203).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Doon Bardolf, son of Thomas Bardolf and his wife Rohese, in 1173 commanded "the new castle of Drincourt (Neufchatel-en-Bray) when besieged by the young King Henry" with his brother Thomas, but he does not cite the source reference[137].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Dohun Bardulf" paying "xliii s" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire[138].  King John granted custody of "heredem Dun Bard" to “Waltero de Sancto Joh militi...et...J. de Patell” dated 29 Jul 1203[139].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "hæres Dodonis Bardulf" holding 25 knights’ fees in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire in [1210/12][140].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Dodo Bardolf" held property "de rege in Hamringham" in Lincolnshire[141].  

m as her second husband, BEATRICE de Warenne, widow of RALPH ---, daughter of WILLIAM de Warenne of Wormegay, Norfolk & his first wife Beatrix de Pierrepont (-before 12 Dec 1214).  She married thirdly Hubert de Burgh, who was later created Earl of Kent.  Her second and third marriages are confirmed by a receipt dated 22 Jul 1227  for payment of a fine by Hubert de Burgh for "Beatrice de Warenna late his wife, by whom he had children" to have the lands of "William de Warenna her father and…her dower of the lands of Dodo Bardolf, formerly her husband"[142].  Her third marriage is suggested by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Gaufridus de Merlai" held "quoddam feodum in Illington" in Norfolk "de Huberto de Burgo per heredum Willelmi de Warenne uxorem suam", adding that Henry II King of England had granted the property to "Reginaldo de Warrenn"[143].  

Doon & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM Bardolf of Wormegay, Norfolk and Shelford, Nottinghamshire (before 29 Jul 1203-1275).  King John granted custody of "heredem Dun Bard" to “Waltero de Sancto Joh militi...et...J. de Patell” dated 29 Jul 1203[144]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Bardolf (-1 Dec 1289).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[145]m JULIANE de Gournay, daughter of HUGUES [VI] de Gournay of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire & his second wife Mathilde --- ([1235/39]-1295).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[146].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          HUGH Bardolf ([29 Sep 1259]-Sep 1304).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[147].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1298 whereby he is held to have become Lord Bardolf.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "32 Edw I" after the death of "Hugh Bardolf” name “Thomas his son aged 21 on the day of St Francis last is his next heir” and record land “of the inheritance of Isabel his wife...who still survives...after the death of Robert Aguilloun her father[148]m (before 1282) ISABEL Aguillon, daughter of ROBERT Aguillon & his first wife Joan Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1257/59]-before 28 May 1323).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 17 Feb "14 Edw I" following the death of "Robert Aguylun” name “Lady Isabel his daughter whom Hugh Bardolf married aged 28 at the feast of the Annunciation in the said year [...aged 24 and more] is his next heir...Margaret de Ripariis late the wife of Robert Aguillon in dower[149].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "32 Edw I" after the death of "Hugh Bardolf” record land “of the inheritance of Isabel his wife...who still survives...after the death of Robert Aguilloun her father[150].  Hugh & his wife had children: 

(a)       THOMAS Bardolf (4 Oct 1282-15 Dec 1328).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "32 Edw I" after the death of "Hugh Bardolf” name “Thomas his son aged 21 on the day of St Francis last is his next heir[151].  He succeeded his father as Lord Bardolfm ([25 Nov/12 Dec] 1304) [as her first husband,] AGNES, daughter of --- (([1282/83]-Ruskington, Lincolnshire 11 Dec 1357, bur Ruskington All Saints).  Williams discusses Agnes, wife of Thomas Lord Bardolf, as another possible child of Guillaume de Grandson by his first wife[152].  If he is correct, she was Agnes de Grandson, daughter of Guillaume de Grandson Lord Grandson & his first wife [Jeannette de Gruyère].  Blomefield records that “the lord Bardolf” [indicating Thomas] married “Agnes, daughter of the Lord Grandison[153].  Williams notes an order dated 8 Aug 1337 which confirms Agnes’s foreign birth in “Almain” (=”Alemannia”, referring to Swabia, which could have included Grandson lands in modern-day Switzerland): protection granted to “Agnes, late the wife of Thomas Bardolf, who by birth of the parts of Almain[154].  Williams discusses background to her marriage and suggests the likely date as shown below[155].  She may have married secondly (15 Feb 1329) Sir Walter de Cokesey of Cooksey [Worcestershire].  Williams notes her possible second marriage[156]

-         LORDS BARDOLF[157]

 

 

No indication has been found of the precise relationship between the following individuals and the main Bardolf family. 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bardolf (-before 1206).  King John confirmed land "in Hepedale et in Kokedale", which "Will fil Will patre predicte Elysabeth tenuit", to "Willelmo Bardulf et Elysabeth uxori sue" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[158].  His date of death is indicated by the 1206 record which is quoted below under his wife.  m (after 1206) as her [first/second] husband, ELIZABETH, daughter of [WILLIAM FitzWilliam & his wife ---] (-before 6 Jul 1255).  There is some doubt about Elizabeth’s parentage.  On the one hand, Ragg records the sheriff accounting for receipts from “William son of William” in the Pipe Roll for Northumberland from 1177, ending before 1198 when “William Bardolf” rendered accounts for “taking to wife her who was the wife of William son of William, and for being allowed to place out in marriage three daughters of her and of William son of William[159].  The text of the 1198 Pipe Roll entry has not been checked.  On the other hand, King John confirmed land "in Hepedale et in Kokedale", which "Will fil Will patre predicte Elysabeth tenuit", to "Willelmo Bardulf et Elysabeth uxori sue" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[160].  Until more information comes to light, judging which version is correct would be speculative.  "Elizabeth q fuit uxor Willi Bard" paid a fine to marry where she will, in Northumberland, dated 1206[161].  She married [secondly/thirdly] ([1206/10]) Ivo Taillebois [II].  A book of fees records that “Ivo de Tailbois” held “baroniam de Hephall cum uxore sua…filia [error for uxor, see other sources quoted below] Will de Bardulf”, previously granted to [a different, from the context] “Will Bardolf” by William I King of England[162].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Yvo Taylebois" holding "baroniam de Ephal[ton] cum uxore W[illelmi] Badulfi" with one knight’s fee from King John in Northumberland in [1210/12][163].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Yvo Tailleboys" holding "baroniam de Hephale cum uxore qui fuit Willelmi Bardolf quam habet de dono domini Regis Johannis" in Northumberland[164].  Ragg states that “Elizabeth who was the wife of Ivo Tailbois” paid for the king’s writ in 1214[165].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "uxor Ivonis Talleboys" holding land in Northumberland[166].  An inquisition following a writ dated 6 Jul "40 Hen III", after the death of "Elizabeth Taylebois alias Taylboes", names "Robert Taylboes her son aged 40 at least is her heir" and lists one unspecified knight’s fee in Northumberland[167]

 

2.         HUGH Bardolf (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Surrey, dated 1219, which includes "Hugo Bardolf qui habet in uxorem Isabellam filiam et heredem Roberti Aguillon"[168]m (before 1219) ISABEL Aguillon, daughter of ROBERT Aguillon & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Surrey, dated 1219, which includes "Hugo Bardolf qui habet in uxorem Isabellam filiam et heredem Roberti Aguillon"[169]

 

 

 

BASSET

 

 

William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that the name "Basset" derives from the old French "basset" meaning of low stature[170].  Loyd indicates that the family originated in Montreuil-au-Houlme in the present-day French département of Orne, arrondissement Argentan, canton Briouze[171].  This is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records the campaign led by Geoffroy Comte d’Anjou in Normandy in 1136 and notes that he attacked “arcem de Mosterolo” (identified by Le Prévost as Montreuil-au-Houlme), which “Ricardus…cognomento Bassetus, cujus in Anglia vivente Henrico rege potentia, utpote capitalis justiciarii, magna fuerat” held “in parvo feudo, quod parentum successivo jure in Normannia obtinuerat” and where he built “ex quadris lapidibus turrim apud Mosterolum” which was captured by “Guillelmus de Monte Pincionis” after King Henry I died[172]Rising from relatively modest beginnings (if Orderic Vitalis is to be believed when he includes Ralph Basset among those whom Henry I King of England raised "from the dust"[173]), by the end of the 13th century the family had established the three major baronial lines of Basset of Great Weldon in Northamptonshire, Basset of Sapcote in Leicestershire, and Basset of Drayton Basset in Staffordshire.  Reedy adds that "today more English villages are known by this particular family name than by any other", naming places in Berkshire, Essex, Hampshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Wiltshire and Yorkshire[174]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         RALPH Basset [I], son of --- (-after 1124).  Orderic Vitalis names "Goisfredus de Clintona, Radulfus Basset et Hugo de Bocalanda…" among those who were "de ignobili stirpe" and whom King Henry I raised "de pulvere" (from the dust)[175].  Henry of Huntingdon names "Ralph Basset and his son Richard, justices of all England"[176].  Henry I King of England confirmed property ot Eynsham abbey by charter dated 25 Dec 1109, including the donation of "decimam suam de Strattona" by "Gillebertus Basset" and "decimam suam de una hida de Estelai" by "Radulfus Basset"[177].  "…Radulfo Basset" witnessed the charter dated 1113 granted by Henry I King of England in favour of Thorney abbey[178].  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[179].  "…Rad Basset…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[180].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer, see the document ENGLAND EARLS created 1207-1466, Chapter 1.B] donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church[181].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records in 1124 that "Ralph Basset held a court of the king’s thanes at Hundehoh in Leicestershire and hanged there more thieves than ever before"[182].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus Basset" used to hold one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) now held by "hæres Radulfi Basset junioris"[183].  It is possible that "Radulfus Basset" was the paternal uncle of "Radulfi Basset junioris" although no proof has been found that this is correct.  Another possibility is that "Radulfus", referring to the senior Basset, was an error for "Richardus" who is recorded elsewhere as the father of "Radulfi Basset junioris" (see above).  m A---, daughter of --- (-after 1120).  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[184].  Ralph [I] & his wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         RICHARD Basset (-1144 or before).  Henry of Huntingdon names "Ralph Basset and his son Richard, justices of all England"[185].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ricardus…Basset" held "parvo feudo" in "Mosterolo" {Montreuil-au-Houlme, Orne, arr. Argentan, canton Briouze} which his father had obtained in Normandy, when reporting that Guillaume de Montpinçon took the castle as a base against the Angevins (dated to 1136)[186], which suggests that Richard was his father’s oldest son.  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[187].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere", by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[188].  Henry I King of England recorded that "Nicholaus Basset" had quitclaimed him lands held of him "in capite…Mixeb et Wilaviston et…in Neuiton et Vivilcote", and that he had granted the lands to "Ricardo Basset", by charter dated to [1129/30][189].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ric bass" (two entries) in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire, in Surrey/Cambridge/Huntingdonshire, in Essex/Hertfordshire, and exempt in Staffordshire[190].  "…Ricard[us] Basset…" witnessed the charter dated to [Apr/21 Nov] 1136 under which King Stephen confirmed churches in Exeter[191]m ([1120/23]) MATILDA, daughter of GEOFFREY Ridel & his wife Geva ---.  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere", by charter dated to [1120/23][192].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter under which Empress Matilda granted property held by "pater eius Ricardus Basset…[et] Galfridi Ridel avi sui" to "Galfrido Ridel filio Ricardi Basset", dated to [1144/46][193].  Richard & his wife had five children: 

i)          RALPH Basset of Drayton Basset, Staffordshire (-1160).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Eynsham abbey, including the donations by "Gisleberti Basset decimam de Stratona…Radulfi Basset decimam…de Estlaia" by charter dated 20 Dec [1159/61][194]

-         BASSET of DRAYTON BASSET, STAFFORDSHIRE

ii)         GEOFFREY Ridel (-1180).  Empress Matilda granted property held by "pater eius Ricardus Basset…[et] Galfridi Ridel avi sui" to "Galfrido Ridel filio Ricardi Basset" by charter dated to [1144/46], witnessed by "…Walchelino Maminot [et] Rogero filio"[195]

-         RIDEL

iii)        WILLIAM Basset of Sapcote, Leicestershire (-[1185]).  His parentage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…[196].  "…Willo Basset…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/67] under which the monks of Leicester abbey authorised the establishment of the church of St Mary the Less, Leicester[197].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Basset" held two knights’ fees from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[198]

-         BASSET of SAPCOTE, LEICESTERSHIRE

iv)       SIBYL Basset ([before 1135]-after 1185).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…L annorum et amplius”, adding that the land was “de baronia Radulfi filii Stephani[199]m ROBERT [II] de Cauz, son of ROBERT [I] de Cauz & his wife Isabel de Ferrers (-1168). 

v)        MATILDA Basset .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the charter date to [1160] under which [her brother] "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo", which notes that "ipse Johannes filius Johannis" swore homage to the grantor and gave him a gold ring[200].  William Reedy assumes that "Johanni fratri meo" was the grantor’s brother-in-law John de Stuteville[201].  This appears to be confimed as correct by the undated charter under which "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed that "Johanni de Stutevilla" did homage to him by on the same day, witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset, W. Basset…R. de Stutevill, Nicolaus de Stutevill…"[202].  "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…"[203]m JOHN de Stuteville, son of JOHN de Stuteville [d’Estouteville] & his wife Agnes --- (-after [1160]). 

b)         THURSTAN Basset [I] (-after 1166).  His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer, see the document ENGLAND EARLS created 1207-1466, Chapter 1.B) donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church, and in a later passage that [his son] "Ricardus itaque Basset (filius Turstini filii Radulfi prædicti" revived the claim against the monastery "cum patre mortuo" relating to "terræ de Chedeleswrtha" which was settled[204].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[205]

-        see below

c)         daughters .  The existence of these daughters is confirmed by the charter dated to [1120/23] under which Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere"[206]

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage of the following members of the family have not been identified.  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, suggests that Robert, Osmund and Gilbert were possible brothers of Ralph [I] Basset[207].  He does not provide the basis for his speculation, but from a chronological point of view it is reasonable.  Reedy does not place the two individuals named William Basset, who are shown below, in his genealogical table. 

 

1.         ROBERT Basset (-after 1142).  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[208].  "Comite de Clara, et Cadwaldro rege Walliarum, Roberto Basset, Gaufrido Dispensario…" witnessed the charter dated 1142 under which Ranulf Earl of Chester confirmed the rights of Shrewsbury abbey over land between the Ribble and Mersey rivers[209]

 

2.         OSMUND Basset .  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, suggests that Osmund may have been the brother of Ralph Basset[210].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[211].  "[Abbas] Willelmus" and the monks of St Benet of Hulme leased the manor of Heigham to "Richardo Basset" for life by charter dated to [1127/34], witnessed by "…Osmundo Basset…"[212]same person as…?  OSMUND Basset of Ipsden (-after 1166).  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that Osmund, father of John Basset, was the same person as Osmund Basset, possible brother of Ralph Basset (see above)[213].  From a chronological point of view, this would imply a long active life if it is correct that Osmund was still alive in 1166.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[214]m as her second husband, BASILIA, widow of LUVET de Brai, daughter of ---.  Her marriages are stated in Domesday Descendants[215].  Osmund & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN Basset .  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1225, noted by Bracton, by "Henricus de Oilly" against "Willelmum Basset" for "feodum dim. militis…in Hispedena", the defendant claiming that "Briennius filius Comitis" granted half to "Osemundo Basset avo istius Willelmi Basset" who passed it to "Johannis Basset patri istius Willelmi Basset"[216]m MELISENDE, daughter of ---.  She is named as wife of John in a charter of Missenden abbey[217].  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Basset (-after 26 Feb 1208).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmo Basset f Johannis Basset lxx s in manerio de Aclay de dimidio anno" in "honoris de Warengeford preter Wicumbam"[218].  King John confirmed "feud i militis…in Okléé" to "Willo Basset fil et heredi Johis Basset fil Osmundi Basset", and "pereatis de Cecylia de Dunestanvill quondam uxore sua villam de Menelidam" which "Alanus de Dunestanvill pater ipsius Cecilie dedit ei ad se maritandam", by charter dated 26 Feb 1208[219].  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1225, by "Henricus de Oilly" against "Willelmum Basset" for "feodum dim. militis…in Hispedena", the plaintiff claiming that it was held by "Matillis de Oylli […Briennius filius Comitis…uxor sua]…tempore H. Regis patris Imperatricis" who died without heirs, inherited by "Roberto de Oylli…Henrici de Oylli patri istius Henrici", while the defendant claimed that "Briennius filius Comitis" granted half to "Osemundo Basset avo istius Willelmi Basset" who passed it to "Johannis Basset patri istius Willelmi Basset"[220]m CECILY de Dunstanville, daughter of ALAN de Dunstanville & his wife --- (-before 26 Feb 1208).  King John confirmed "feud i militis…in Okléé" to "Willo Basset fil et heredi Johis Basset fil Osmundi Basset", and "pereatis de Cecylia de Dunestanvill quondam uxore sua villam de Menelidam" which "Alanus de Dunestanvill pater ipsius Cecilie dedit ei ad se maritandam", by charter dated 26 Feb 1208[221]

b)         ALICE Basset .  Her parentage and marriage are stated in Domesday Descendants[222]m ROBERT FitzWale, son of ---. 

 

 

3.         GILBERT Basset (-after 25 Dec 1109).  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, suggests that Gilbert may have been the brother of Ralph Basset[223].  Henry I King of England confirmed property ot Eynsham abbey by charter dated 25 Dec 1109, including the donation of "decimam suam de Strattona" by "Gillebertus Basset" and "decimam suam de una hida de Estelai" by "Radulfus Basset"[224]

 

4.         WILLIAM Basset (-after 1120).  "Radulfus Basset et uxor eius A." donated land "in villa…Chinalton" by charter dated 1120 witnessed by "…Willelmus Basset et Ricardus Basset"[225]

 

5.         WILLIAM Basset (-1134).  Abbot of St Benet of Hulme.  The Chronicle of John of Oxenedes records the death in 1126 of "Conradus abbas sancti Benedicti de Hulmo" and the succession of "Willelmus cognomento Basseth"[226].  "[Abbas] Willelmus" and the monks of St Benet of Hulme leased the manor of Heigham to "Richardo Basset" for life by charter dated to [1127/34], witnessed by "…Osmundo Basset…"[227].  The Chronicle of John of Oxenedes records the death in 1134 of "Willelmus Basseth abbas sancti Benedicti de Hulmo"[228]

 

6.         MILO Basset (-after [Oct 1138/Sep 1139]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Milon bass" in Norfolk/Suffolk[229].  "…Milon Basseth…" witnessed two charters dated to [Oct 1138/Sep 1139] under which Queen Matilda and King Stephen, respectively, donated property to the Templars[230]

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage of the following members of the family have not been identified.  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that Nicholas and Thurstan were sons of Ralph Basset[231].  He does not provide the basis for his speculation, but from a chronological point of view it is reasonable. 

 

1.         NICHOLAS Basset (-before 1166).  William Reedy states that Nicholas Basset was the brother of Richard Basset but cites no primary source which supports this statement[232].  Henry I King of England recorded that "Nicholaus Basset" had quitclaimed him lands held of him "in capite…Mixeb et Wilaviston et…in Neuiton et Vivilcote", and that he had granted the lands to "Ricardo Basset", by charter dated to [1129/30][233].  An undated charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Elstow including that of “terræ in Oxineford” by “Nicholai Basset” and land "in Avintona" by "Richardi Basset"[234]m ---.  The name of Nicholas’s wife is not known.  Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

a)         NICHOLAS Basset (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[235]

 

 

1.         GILBERT Basset (-after 1166).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Eynsham abbey, including the donations by "Gisleberti Basset decimam de Stratona…Radulfi Basset decimam…de Estlaia" by charter dated 20 Dec [1159/61][236].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[237]

 

 

B.      LORDS BASSET of DRAYTON BASSET, STAFFORDSHIRE

 

 

RALPH Basset, son of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel (-1160).  "Radulfus Basset filius Ricardi Basset" confirmed the donation of "terram de Niwebold…de feodo de Colestona" to Eynsham abbey made by "Radulfus Basset auus meus" by charter dated to [1144/63], witnessed by "Ricardus abbas Legrec, Robertus frater eius, Adel uxor mea, Thomas de Sais et Willelmus et Robertus filii eius…"[238].  "Galfridus Ridel" granted Colston "de feodo meo quæ fuit Gevæ Ridel avæ nostræ…Draituna", which "Radulfus Basset avus meus et Ricardus Basset pater noster" had granted, to "Radulfo Basset fratri meo", as well as other grants naming "Matildis Ridel matris meæ", by charter dated to [1150][239].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Eynsham abbey, including the donations by "Gisleberti Basset decimam de Stratona…Radulfi Basset decimam…de Estlaia" by charter dated 20 Dec [1159/61][240].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus Basset" used to hold one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) now held by "hæres Radulfi Basset junioris"[241].  The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records that "Wills Basset…ipsi Willo" made payment "p debito Rad fris sui" in Leicestershire[242]

[m ---.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "uxor Radulfi Bassat" held "viii carucatas de dote sua in Rakendale et in Wileis" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[243].] 

m ALICE, daughter of ---.  “Radulfus Basset” donated property to Canwell priory, for the souls of “Aliciæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willielmo Basset…"[244].  "Radulfus Basset filius Ricardi Basset" confirmed the donation of "terram de Niwebold…de feodo de Colestona" to Eynsham abbey made by "Radulfus Basset auus meus" by charter dated to [1144/63], witnessed by "…Adel uxor mea…"[245]

Ralph & his wife had one child: 

1.         RALPH Basset (-1211).  “Radulfus Basset” confirmed donations to Canwell priory by “Geua Ridel et pater meus Radulfus Basset”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willielmo Basset…"[246].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus filius Radulfi Baiset" held "vii carucatas et dimidiam in Dicutone" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[247].  "…Thoma Basset" subscribed the charter dated to May [1175/79] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the lepers of Saint-Lazare de Jerusalem[248]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  However, the following charter suggests that she may have been Isabel de Pattingham: "Dominam Isabel de Patingham…cum assensu heredum suorum" donated "assartum in Chyltun" to the nuns of Brewood, in exchange for land "in Patingham…de dono Radulfo Bassed", by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "…Radulfo Bassed juvene et Ricardo fratre suo…"[249].  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         RALPH Basset (-[1254/61]).  "Dominam Isabel de Patingham…cum assensu heredum suorum" donated "assartum in Chyltun" to the nuns of Brewood, in exchange for land "in Patingham…de dono Radulfo Bassed", by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "…Radulfo Bassed juvene et Ricardo fratre suo…"[250].  A charter dated 15 Sep 1221 records a final settlement between "Rogerum filium Radulfi" and "Radulfum Basset" relating to land in Willowes, Leicestershire which Roger had claimed from "Aliciam Basset aviam ipsius Radulfi"[251]m ISABEL, daughter of ---.  “Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[252].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH Basset (-4 Aug 1265).  “Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[253]m as her first husband,  MARGARET de Somery, daughter of ROGER [IV] de Somery of Dudley, Worcestershire & his first wife Nicole de Albini of the Earls of Arundel (-before 18 Sep 1289).  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Margaret married "Radulpho de Basset juniori"[254].  “Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[255].  She married secondly (before 26 Jan 1271) Ralph de Cromwell of Cromwell, Nottinghamshire and West Hallam, Derbyshire.  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[256].  Ralph & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       RALPH Basset (-31 Dec 1299, bur Drayton).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Bassetm HAWISE, daughter of ---. 

-         see below

(b)       [MAUD .  The Complete Peerage states that John Lord Grey of Wilton married secondly “Maud, who is said to have been da. of Ralph Basset of Drayton by Margaret...de Somery” but does not provide the basis for this speculation[257]m as his second wife, JOHN de Grey Lord Grey (of Wilton), son of REYNOLD de Grey Lord Grey (of Wilton) & his second wife Emma de Cauz ([1267/68]-28 Oct 1323).] 

b)         RICHARD Basset .  "Dominam Isabel de Patingham…cum assensu heredum suorum" donated "assartum in Chyltun" to the nuns of Brewood, in exchange for land "in Patingham…de dono Radulfo Bassed", by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "…Radulfo Bassed juvene et Ricardo fratre suo…"[258]

 

 

RALPH Basset, son of RALPH Basset & his wife Margaret de Somery (-31 Dec 1299, bur Drayton).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Basset

m HAWISE, daughter of ---. 

Ralph & his wife had three children: 

1.         RALPH Basset (-25 Feb 1343)Lord Basset (of Drayton).  m (settlement 27 Mar 1304) JOAN de Grey, daughter of JOHN de Grey Lord Grey [of Wilton and Ruthin] & his first wife Anne de Ferrers (-1353, before 5 Apr).  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         RALPH Basset (-[1335])m as her first husband, ALICE Audley, daughter of NICHOLAS Audley Lord Audley & his wife Catherine Giffard (-after 1343).  She married secondly Hugh Mainill.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH Basset ([1334/35]-10 May 1390, bur Lichfield Cathedral)Lord Basset (of Drayton).  The will of "Ralph Basset of Drayton Knight", dated 17 Jan 1389, chose burial “in the cathedral church of Lichfield”, bequeathed property to “Joan my wife[259]m firstly ([May] 1338) JOAN Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer.  m secondly JEANNE de Bretagne, daughter of JEAN IV Duke of Brittany & his wife Jeanne de Flandre ([1341]-8 Nov 1402, bur Lavendon Abbey, Buckinghamshire).  The testament of “Jehan Duc de Bretainge Comte de Montfort et de Richemont”, dated 21 Oct 1385, bequeathed property to “nostre...sœur de pere et de mere la Dame de Basset[260].  She was granted Richmond, jointly with Anthony de Rise and Nicholas de Alderwych, 23 Apr 1398, but this grant was ignored or resumed by King Henry IV.  King Richard II confirmed “comitatum castrum villam et honorem Richemundie” to “Johanne que fuit uxor Radulphi Basset de Drayton chivaler sorori...fratris nostri Johannis Ducis Britannie et comitis Richemund, Antonio Rick et Nicholao Alderwich” by charter dated 20 Apr 1398[261]

b)         MARGARET Basset, daughter of RALPH Basset Lord Basset of Drayton & his wife Joan de Grey of Wilton (-after 1 Dec 1347).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the second marriage of “Johannes de Bohun comes”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Margaretam filiam domini Radulphi Basset” after the death of his first wife[262]m as his second wife, JOHN de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex, son of HUMPHREY de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Elizabeth of England (St Clements 23 Nov 1306-Kirkby Thore, co. Westmoreland 20 Jan 1336, bur Stratford Abbey near London). 

2.         MARGARET Basset (-17 Mar 1337, bur Tysoe, Warwickshire)m firstly (1298 or before) EDMUND de Stafford, son of NICHOLAS de Stafford & his wife --- [de Langley] (15 Jul 1273-12 Aug 1308, bur Stafford, Church of Friars Minors).  m secondly THOMAS de Pype, son of ---. 

3.         MAUD Bassetm WILLIAM Herriz, son of ---. 

 

 

C.      BASSET of HEADINGTON and WALLINGFORD, OXFORDSHIRE

 

 

William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, indicates that the following brothers and sister were children of Gilbert Basset (died after 25 Dec 1109, see Part A above), whom he identifies as the possible brother of the Ralph Basset [I][263].  He does not indicate the primary source on which this statement is based. 

 

1.         THOMAS Basset [I] of Headington, Oxfordshire (-after [1180/82]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Thomas Basset" in Oxfordshire in [1171/72][264]m ALICE de Dunstanville, daughter of [ALAN de Dunstanville & his wife ---] (-after 1186).  Oswald Barron names Alice as daughter of Alan de Dunstanville and records her marriage to Thomas Basset, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[265].  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 20 Mar 1200 under which King John confirmed the grant of "manerium de Scaudeford", which "fuit Walteri de Dunestanvill avunculi sui, sic jus et liberum maritagium Aelic matris ipsius Gilberti", to her son "Gilberto Basset"[266].  Thomas [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         GILBERT Basset [I] (-[1205/06]).  "Thomas Basset", with the consent of "Gilleberti primogeni filii mei", granted "Cumtonam…cuius medietas fuit maritagium matris mee, altera…medietatis…fuit maritagium uxoris mee matris eorum" to "Alano filio meo fratri suo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Walterus de Dunstanvill, Alanus de Dunstanvill, Fulco Basset…Thomas Basset juvenis…"[267].  "Gillebertus Basset" conceded Compton Basset, Wiltshire to "Alano fratri meo", at the request of "Thome Basset patris mei et Aliz de Dunstanvill matris mee", by charter dated to [1180/82], witnessed by "…Walterus de Dunstanvill, Alanus de Dunstanvill, Fulco Basset…Thomas Basset juvenis…"[268].  "Gilebertus Basset" granted land at Bicester and other properties to the prior of Bicester, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Egeline et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1182/85], witnessed by "…Egelina uxore mea, Aliz Basset…Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[269].  The Roll of Honour dated [1186/87] records that "Gilberto Basset…Alano Basset" held land in the honour of Walingford[270].  "Gillebertus Basset" confirmed land at Cowley to "Waltero filio Tostani de Coveleia" by charter dated to [1180/1205], witnessed by "Toma Basset, Alano Basset…"[271].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Gilbertus Basset" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[272].  King John confirmed the grant of "manerio suo de Strafford" to "Gilberto Basset et Eggelin uxori eius" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[273].  A charter of King Edward II records that “Gilebertus Basset” founded Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Egelinæ et liberorum nostrorum", witnessed by "uxore mea Egelina, Aliz. Basset, Henrico de Curtenay, Roberto Damary, Hugone Drunald, Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[274]m AIGELINE de Courtenay, daughter of RENAUD de Courtenay & his second wife Hawise d’Avranches (-after 1219).  "Gilebertus Basset" granted land at Bicester and other properties to the prior of Bicester, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Egeline et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1182/85], witnessed by "…Egelina uxore mea, Aliz Basset, Henrico de Curten…Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[275].  King John confirmed the grant of "manerio suo de Strafford" to "Gilberto Basset et Eggelin uxori eius" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[276].  The presence of Aigeline in the grant suggests that the property in question had previously been held by her family.  A charter of King Edward II records that “Gilebertus Basset” founded Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Egelinæ et liberorum nostrorum", witnessed by "uxore mea Egelina…"[277].  "Aquilina de Curt" donated "totam terram meam de Swthona" to Bicester priory, for the souls of "patris mei Reginaldi de Curt et…matris mee et…sponsi mei Gilleberti Basset et filii mei Thome Basset", by charter dated to [1205/06], witnessed by "Robert de [C]urt, Thoma Basset…"[278].  "Eglina de Curthenai" donated half her dower in her manor of Wretchwick, Oxfordshire, which "predictus Gilbertus Basset bone memorie" retained when "predictam Eustaciam Basset" married "Thome de Verdun", to Bicester priory by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "Ricardo de Campvill, Eustacia Basset uxore ipsius, Thoma Basset, Alano Basset…"[279].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Oxfordshire, dated 1219, which includes "Egelina de Curtenai" holding land "in Craumerse…hundredo de Langetroe…[et] in Burnecestre…in hundredo de Pockedelau"[280].  Gilbert [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          THOMAS Basset (-young).  "Aquilina de Curt" donated "totam terram meam de Swthona" to Bicester priory, for the souls of "patris mei Reginaldi de Curt et…matris mee et…sponsi mei Gilleberti Basset et filii mei Thome Basset", by charter dated to [1205/06], witnessed by "Robert de [C]urt, Thoma Basset…"[281]

ii)         EUSTACHIA Basset (-after [1211/16]).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Gillebertus Basset…pro filia sua maritanda Tome de Verdun" in Oxfordshire[282].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Nicholaus de Verdun" against "Andream de Bradeshulla" relating to property held by "Ricardum de Kaumvilla et Eustachiam uxorem eius…dotem ipsius Eustachie de dono ipsius Thome de Kaumuilla [error for Verdun] fratris primogeniti ipsius Nicholai et primi viri ipsius Eustachie" and which was previously held by "Bertramus de Verdun pater suus et Thomas de Verdun frater suus"[283].  "Eglina de Curthenai" donated half her dower in her manor of Wretchwick, Oxfordshire, which "predictus Gilbertus Basset bone memorie" retained when "predictam Eustaciam Basset" married "Thome de Verdun", to Bicester priory by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "Ricardo de Campvill, Eustacia Basset uxore ipsius, Thoma Basset, Alano Basset…"[284]m firstly ([1194]) THOMAS de Verdun, son of BERTRAM de Verdun & his [first wife Matilda de Ferrers/second wife Rohese ---] (-1199).  m secondly ([1199]) RICHARD [III] de Camville, son of GERARD de Camville & his wife Nicole de la Haye (-after 12 Feb 1217). 

b)         THOMAS Basset [II] of Headington, Oxfordshire (-1220).  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[285].  Thomas was most likely his parents’ second son, as shown by the order of witness names in the charter dated to [1180/1205] under which [his brother] "Gillebertus Basset" confirmed land at Cowley to "Waltero filio Tostani de Coveleia", witnessed by "Toma Basset, Alano Basset…"[286].  "Thom Basset" paid a fine for the marriage of "fil sua fil com de Warwic" in Oxfordshire and Warwickshire, dated 1205[287].  Matthew Paris names “...Thomas Basset” among the "consiliarios iniquissimos” of King John[288]m PHILIPPA, daughter of WILLIAM FitzHugh Malbank & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Thomas [II] & his wife had three children: 

i)          PHILIPPA Basset (-before 29 Nov 1265, bur Bicester Priory).  "Thom Basset" paid a fine for the marriage of "fil sua fil com de Warwic" in Oxfordshire and Warwickshire, dated 1205[289].  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[290].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[291].  An order dated 11 Oct 1227 records a lawsuit against "Henricum comitem Warewici et Philippam uxorem eius et Thomam filium ipsius comitis…"[292].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1231, by "Thome Basset" which names "Ricardus Suward…et Philippam comitissam Warwici uxorem eius"[293]m firstly (after 1205) as his second wife, HENRY Earl of Warwick, son of WALERAN Earl of Warwick & his first wife Margaret --- ([1190]-1229 before 17 Oct).  m secondly (before 4 Nov 1229, divorced 1242) RICHARD Siward, son of ---. 

ii)         JOANNA Basset (-after 1230).  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[294].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[295]m REGINALD de Vautort, son of --- (-1246). 

iii)        ALICE Basset (-[1263]).  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[296].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[297].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Johannes Biset et Alicia uxor eius” owing “de Oblatis” in Devon[298]m firstly [as his second wife,] WILLIAM Malet, son of GILBERT Malet & his wife Alice (-1215).  m secondly (before 1221, annulled) H--- de Chaceporc, son of ---.  m thirdly (1223 or before) JOHN Bisset, son of MANASSER Biset & his wife Alice --- (-1241). 

c)         ALAN Basset (-1231).  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[299]

-        see below

d)         [ISABEL .  The 1181/82 Pipe Roll records "Wido de Creon" accounting "pro habenda uxore que fuit Alberti Gresle" in Lincolnshire[300].  A genealogy of the founders of Freston Priory records that "monsieur Wythe de Croune" married "une Isabelle"[301].  The primary source which confirms that Isabel was the daughter of Thomas Basset has not yet been identified.  m firstly ALBERT de Gresley, son of --- (-[1179]).  m secondly GUY de Craon, son of MAURICE de Craon & his wife Clarice ---.] 

2.         JOAN Basset (-[1160/62]).  Malcolm IV King of Scotland donated “villam P[iddington] in Oxenfordscire” to Oxford St. Frideswide, noting that “Iohanna...soror Thome Bassett” was tenant for life, by charter dated to [1159][302].  King Henry II confirmed the donation of “villam de Pydentona in Oxenfordscira” to Oxford St. Frideswide made by King Malcolm IV, noting “Iohanna soror Thome Bassett” as tenant for life, by charter dated to [1160][303].  William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, states that Joan, sister of Thomas Basset, married Aubry de Dammartin as her third husband[304].  The identity of Joan’s third husband as Aubry [II] Comte de Dammartin is indicated by his later holding of Piddington in Oxfordshire which the documents quoted here show was held by Joan Basset.  The third husband of Joan Basset could not have been Aubry [I], father of Comte Aubry [II], as her husband was called “comes” in these documents.  If this suggested identity is correct, Joan must have died soon after [1160].  Joan’s first marriage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1160] under which the abbot of Missenden surrendered rights in Piddington, donated by “Albrici comitis de Damartyn & Iohane de Pidingtona, que fuit sponsa Guidonis de Riala”, to Oxford St. Frideswide[305].  The primary source which confirms Joan’s second marriage has not been identified.  "Aubri Count of Dammartin" confirmed the grant of Musewell to Missenden abbey made by “Guy and Joan de Ryhale”, with the consent of “his son and heir Renaud”, by charter dated to [1175][306]m firstly GUY FitzPain de Ridale, son of ---.  m secondly ([1152]) SIMON de Gerardmoulins, son of ---.  m thirdly [as his first wife,] AUBREY [II] Comte de Dammartin, son of AUBRY [I] & his wife ---. 

 

 

The parentage of the following person has not been confirmed.  However, his association in charters with the family of Thomas Basset of Headington suggests that he may have been another of Thomas’s brothers. 

 

1.         FULK Basset (-after [1180/82]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[307].  "Fulco Basset" granted quitrents in Oxford to "Toraldo cordewanerio et Thome filio Widonis", in return for "quatuor libras sterlingorum" to "mihi Fulcone" and "unum anulum aureum" to "Ysout uxori mee", by charter dated to [1185/1205][308].  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[309]m ISOLDE, daughter of ---.  "Fulco Basset" granted quitrents in Oxford to "Toraldo cordewanerio et Thome filio Widonis", in return for "quatuor libras sterlingorum" to "mihi Fulcone" and "unum anulum aureum" to "Ysout uxori mee", by charter dated to [1185/1205][310]

 

 

ALAN Basset, son of THOMAS Basset [I] of Headington, Oxfordshire & his wife Alice de Dunstanville (-1231).  "Thomas Bass" granted "manerium meum de Comptun cum terra de Berewic" to "Alano filio meo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Waltero de Dunstanvile, Alano de Dunstanvile, Fulcone Basset…Thoma Basset juvene…"[311].  "Thomas Basset", with the consent of "Gilleberti primogeni filii mei", granted "Cumtonam…cuius medietas fuit maritagium matris mee, altera…medietatis…fuit maritagium uxoris mee matris eorum" to "Alano filio meo fratri suo" by charter dated to [1180/82?], witnessed by "…Walterus de Dunstanvill, Alanus de Dunstanvill, Fulco Basset…Thomas Basset juvenis…"[312].  The Roll of Honour dated [1186/87] records that "Gilberto Basset…Alano Basset" held land in the honour of Walingford[313].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alanus Basset" held one knight fee "in Wokinges et Mapeldorwelle…ex dono Regis Ricardi" in Surrey, and one knight fee in Wycombe, Berkshire[314].  This entry must be redated to after 1189 if it is correct that the knight fees were granted by King Richard I.  King John confirmed that “Waltero de Dunstanvill” had granted the manor of Winterbourne to “Alan Basset”, under a charter confirmed by King Richard I, by charter dated 10 Apr 1200[315].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alanus Basset" holding "Berwike…de feodo Adæ de Port" and two knights’ fees "de honore Walingforde…in Wottone" in Wiltshire, and land "in Wokinges" in Surrey, in [1210/12][316].  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "…Alanum Basset" from custody dated 21 Dec 1216[317].  A charter dated 1217 records that "Alanum Basset" granted the manor of Yarlington, Somerset to "Isobel quondam uxorem Willelmi de Monte Acuto" [as her dower] by charter dated 1217, witnessed by "Gilberto Basset, Warino Basset…"[318]

m firstly ALICE de Grey, daughter of --- (-before 15 Apr 1206).  William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, names "Alice de Gray" as the first wife of Alan Basset and mother of the children as shown below[319].  He does not cite the primary source which confirms that this is correct. 

m secondly (before 16 Apr 1206) ALINE de Gai, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 16 Apr 1206 records a final settlement between "Thomam filium Ricardi et Aliciam uxorem suam" and "Alanum Basset et Alinam uxorem suam" relating to one knight’s fee in Broad Town, Wiltshire[320].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Alanus Basset de hereditate uxoris sue ii milites" among the tenants of the honour of Wallingford[321].  

Alan & his first wife had five children: 

1.         THOMAS Basset (-1230 or before).  King Henry III granted "terram quam Thomas Basset frater ipsius Gilberti habuit in Kertlinton" to “Gilberto Basset...fratri et heredi ipsius Thome” dated 1230[322].  "Gilbert Basset" was granted "land of Kertlinton…as the king had granted it to Thomas Basset, brother of the said Gilbert" dated 4 May 1235[323]

2.         GILBERT Basset [II] (-31 Jul 1241).  King Henry III granted "terram quam Thomas Basset frater ipsius Gilberti habuit in Kertlinton" to “Gilberto Basset...fratri et heredi ipsius Thome” dated 1230[324].  "Gilbert Basset" was granted "rent which Alan Basset his [father] used to pay yearly to the exchequer", dated 30 Sep 1230[325].  "Gilbert Basset" was granted "land of Kertlinton…as the king had granted it to Thomas Basset, brother of the said Gilbert" dated 4 May 1235[326].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, by "Gregorius de la Dun" against "Giliberto Basset" concerning an agreement with "Alanum Basset patrem eiusdem Giliberti"[327].  Matthew Paris names "…Gilbertus Basset, cujus casum sinistrum præscripsimus…" among those who died in 1241[328]m (before 18 Jun 1240) as her first husband, ISABEL de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshall of the Earls of Pembroke (-before 26 Nov 1260).  A charter dated 18 Jun 1240 records that "the town of Greywell" was given "as a marriage portion to Gilbert Basset with Isabel daughter of William de Ferrariis, the earl’s [G. Marshal Earl of Pembroke] niece"[329].  She married secondly (1243 or before) as his second wife, Reynold de Mohun.  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator” and in 1260 of “Isabella Basset uxor Reginaldi prædicti[330].  A writ dated 26 Nov "45 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel Basset" names "William son of Reginald de Moun and the said Isabel, age variously stated as 6 and 7, is her heir"[331]

3.         WARIN Basset (-Cardiff Castle 1233).  A charter dated 1217 records that "Alanum Basset" granted the manor of Yarlington, Somerset to "Isobel quondam uxorem Willelmi de Monte Acuto" [as her dower] by charter dated 1217, witnessed by "Gilberto Basset, Warino Basset…"[332].  Henry III King of England appointed judges in a claim by "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and "Mauricium de Borham tenentem de…terre…in Heles et…in Bradeford" dated 18 Apr 1229[333].  A charter dated 6 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and the dean of Exeter relating to the advowson of the church of Veryan which they had "ex dono Johannis de Monte Acuto patris predicte Katerine"[334].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1233 of "Warinus Basset in obsidione et insultu castri de Kaerdif[335]m KATHARINE de Montagu, daughter of JOHN de Montagu & his wife Lucy --- (25 Nov ---- -after 6 Apr 1231).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmo de Monte Acuto fratri eiusdem Johannis" against "Johannes de Monte Acuto et Lucia uxor eius" claiming that "garciam Katerinam…filiam et heredem eorum" was not the daughter of John and his wife, while the bishop of Winchester stated that Lucy’s daughter was born "in vigilia S. Katerine, unde vocata fuit Katerina"[336].  Henry III King of England appointed judges in a claim by "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and "Mauricium de Borham tenentem de…terre…in Heles et…in Bradeford" dated 18 Apr 1229[337].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, by "Warinus Basset et Katerina uxor eius" against "abbatem de Gresten" concerning "terre…in Merse" of which "Johannes […de Monte Acuto] pater ipsius Katerine" was seised[338].  A charter dated 6 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and the dean of Exeter relating to the advowson of the church of Veryan which they had "ex dono Johannis de Monte Acuto patris predicte Katerine"[339]

4.         PHILIP Basset (-29 Oct 1271, bur Stanley, Wilts).  "Philip Basset son of Alan Basset" was granted "land in Saham…", dated 9 Mar 1235[340].  A charter of King Edward II records that “Philippus Basset miles” confirmed the foundation of Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…Fulconis Basset quondam Londoniensis episcopi fratris mei"[341].  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", names "Aline his daughter, wife of Roger Bygod earl of Norfolk, marshal of England, late the wife of Hugh le Despensir, age variously stated as 22 and more, 24 and more, 26 and 30 and more, is the heir", adding that Philip died "on the morrow of SS Simon and Jude last"[342]m firstly HAWISE de Lovaine of Little Easton, Essex, daughter of MATHIEU de Lovaine & his wife Muriel ---.  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", records "Wykes manor in the hundred of Tendring [Essex]…of the inheritance of Helewise his wife, in chief of Matthew de Luviayn"[343]m secondly ([25 Nov 1254/23 Mar 1255]) as her second husband, ELA Longespee, widow of THOMAS de Warwick Earl of Warwick, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela of Salisbury (-9 Feb 1298, bur Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire).  The Book of Lacock names “Isabellam de Vescy…Elam…Idam de Camyle” as the daughters of “Guillelmus Longespe ex…Ela”, adding that Ela married “Comes Warwik, et postea Philippus Basset” but was childless[344].  Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation to “Ela de Warwick of the diocese of Worcester to contract marriage with Philip son of Alan knight who is connected with her in the third degree of affinity”, dated 13 Nov 1254[345].  Pope Alexander IV issued an indult to “Philip knight son of Alan deceased of the diocese of London and his wife Ela de Warwec...to remain in the marriage they have contracted notwithstanding that they are related in the fourth degree of consanguinity”, dated 23 Mar 1255[346].  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", records "Clinton Aston manor [Buckingham] held in exchange from William Muntagu for the life of the said Philip and Lady Ella his wife"[347].  The Chroniculum of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the death in 1300 of “domina Ela comitissa Warwici” and her burial “Oseneye[348].  Philip & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ALINE Basset ([1242/50]-before 11 Apr 1281).  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", names "Aline his daughter, wife of Roger Bygod earl of Norfolk, marshal of England, late the wife of Hugh le Despensir, age variously stated as 22 and more, 24 and more, 26 and 30 and more, is the heir"[349].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 23 Sep "2 Edw I" following the death of "Hawis de London" name “Payn de Cadurciis her son is her next heir and of full age[350].  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death of "Aline la Despensere daughter and heir of Philip Basset, alias Aveline countess of Norfolk alias Aline countess Marescall" name “Hugh son of Hugh le Despencer age [...20 in the first week of March last] is next heir[351]m firstly (1260 or before) HUGH Le Despencer, son of HUGH Le Despencer & his wife --- (1223 or before-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265, bur Evesham Abbey).  m secondly (before 29 Oct 1271) as his first wife, ROGER Bigod Earl of Norfolk, of HUGH Bigod & his wife Joan de Stuteville ([1243/46]-6 Dec 1306). 

b)         MARGERY Basset (-before 19 Oct 1271).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   She predeceased her father as she is not named in the inquisitions following his death.  m JOHN FitzJohn of Shere, son of JOHN FitzGeoffrey of Shere, Surrey & his wife Isabel --- (-Lambeth [6 Nov] 1275). 

5.         FULK Basset .  Bishop of London.  A charter of King Edward II records that “Philippus Basset miles” confirmed the foundation of Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…Fulconis Basset quondam Londoniensis episcopi fratris mei"[352]

Alan & his second wife had two children: 

6.         ALINE Basset .  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Aluina que fuit uxor Drogonis de Monte Acuto est de donatione domini regis", adding that "est in custodia Alani Basset per Regem Johannem et est maritanda et terra sua in Pideltun valet xx.l"[353].  "Alan Basset" made a fine "by Richard Talbot" for marrying "Aline who was the wife of Drogo de Montagu…without the king’s licence", dated [Oct] 1224[354]m firstly DREUX de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu & his wife Isabel --- (-before 1219).  m secondly ([1219/24]) RICHARD [V] Talbot of Linton, son of GILBERT Talbot of Linton & his wife --- (-before 13 Apr 1234). 

7.         --- Basset (-[after 11 May 1226]).  William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, states that Alan Basset paid a fine to marry his daughter to the son and heir of William de Lanvalay in [1212/14][355].  It does not appear that this marriage was completed.  [Betrothed ([1212/14]) WILLIAM [IV] de Lanvalay, son of WILLIAM [II] de Lanvalay & his wife Hawise de Bocland ([after 1190]-[1214/18 May 1216])]. 

 

 

1.         ALAN Basset [of Ipsden, Oxfordshire] .  A charter dated 21 Nov 1235 records a final settlement between "Willelmum de Engelfeld" and "Alanum Bassat" relating to one knight’s service from holdings in Bepton, Sussex, and Penwith, Reskajeage, and Tehidy, Cornwall[356].  A charter dated 1 Jul 1241 records a final settlement between "Gilbertum de Basevil" and "Alanum Bassat" relating to land in Bepton, Sussex and land in Cornwall "quam Isabella que fuit uxor predicti Alani de Dunstanvill tenet in dotem" which was inherited by Gilbert from "Alani de Dunstanvill avunculi predictorum Gilberti et Alani"[357].  This last document indicates that Alan Basset of Ipsden must have been a descendant of Thomas Basset of Headington, whose wife was the sister of Alan de Dunstanville. 

 

 

D.      BASSET of CHADDLEWORTH, BERKSHIRE

 

 

THURSTAN Basset [I], son RALPH Basset [I] & his wife A--- (-after 1166).  His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer] donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church, and in a later passage that [his son] "Ricardus itaque Basset (filius Turstini filii Radulfi prædicti" revived the claim against the monastery "cum patre mortuo" relating to "terræ de Chedeleswrtha" which was settled[358].  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset" by charter dated to [1120/23] witnessed by "…Roberti Basset et Osmundi Basset et Turstini Basset…"[359].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Nicholaus Basset, x milites, Gilbertus Basset, vii milites, Turstanus Basset, vi milites et ii partes milites…Osmundus Basset, i militem et quartam partem militis…Fulco Basset i militem" as feeholders in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[360]

m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known. 

Thurstan [I] & his wife had one child: 

1.         RICHARD Basset (-after 1210).  His parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Abingdon which records that "Turstinus" [=Thurstan Le Despencer] donated "ecclesiam de Mercham" to "cuidam ex regis clericis (Radulfo…de Tamewrtha)", after recording the dispute between Thurstan and Abingdon monastery concerning that church, and in a later passage that [his son] "Ricardus itaque Basset (filius Turstini filii Radulfi prædicti" revived the claim against the monastery "cum patre mortuo" relating to "terræ de Chedeleswrtha" which was settled[361].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ricardus Basset et Turstinus filius eius" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire[362].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Ricardus Basset" paying "vii l x s, xv milites" in Northamptonshire[363].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "Ricardus Basset" paid "xv l, xv milites" in Northamptonshire[364].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Ricardus Basset…pro foresta pro patre suo" in Northamptonshire[365].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Richardus Basset" holding "xv milites" in Northamptonshire, and 7 in Leicestershire, in [1210/12][366]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

a)         THURSTAN Basset [II] (-[1210/22]).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ricardus Basset et Turstinus filius eius" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire[367].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Turstanus Basset" holding one half of one knight’s fee in Bedfordshire in [1210/12][368]m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known.  Thurstan & his wife had six children: 

i)          ISABELLA Basset (-[24 Oct/11 Dec] 1225).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[369].  "Thomas de Venuz" made a fine for marrying "Isabella, who was the wife of Robert Mauduit…if she will consent to this", dated 24 Oct 1225[370].  It is not certain that this second marriage took place as Isabella died soon after the date of the document.  "William Mauduit" paid homage to the king for "the lands that Isabella Basset, mother of the said William, whose heir he is, held in chief in his bailiwick", dated 11 Dec 1225[371]m [firstly] ROBERT [II] Mauduit, son of WILLIAM [III] Mauduit & his wife Isabelle de Senlis (-[1217/Jun 1222]).  [m secondly (after 24 Oct 1225) THOMAS de Venuz, son of ---.] 

ii)         JOAN Basset (-after [Jan] 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Robert of Burnby and Joan his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[372]m ROBERT of Burnby, son of ---. 

iii)        EGELINE Basset (-after [Jan] 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Richard Burdun and Egelina his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[373].  "Egelina Basset que fuit uxor Ricardi Burdun" granted her land at Letcombe Basset to "Ricardo Lungespee filio meo" by charter dated [1232/1258][374]m RICHARD Burdun, son of ---. 

iv)       ALICE Basset (-after [Jan] 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…John le Brun and Alice his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[375]m JOHN le Brun, son of ---. 

v)        MATILDA Basset (-after 5 Feb 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Robert of Burnby and Joan his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223, adding that the "rest of the lands formerly of Thurstan which fall to Matilda and Laurencia, daughters of Thurstan, who married after Thurstan’s death without the assent…of the king" are to be taken into the king’s hands[376].  "Bartholomew de Rakinton and Matilda his wife, who is one of the daughters and heiresses of Thurstan Basset" made a fine "for having the rightful portion…of the inheritance of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 5 Feb 1223[377]m BARTHOLOMEW de Rakinton, son of ---. 

vi)       LAURENCIA Basset (-after 5 Feb 1223).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…Robert of Burnby and Joan his wife, sister of Isabella…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223, adding that the "rest of the lands formerly of Thurstan which fall to Matilda and Laurencia, daughters of Thurstan, who married after Thurstan’s death without the assent…of the king" are to be taken into the king’s hands[378].  "Ralph of Weedon junior and Laurencia his wife, who is one of the daughters and heiresses of Thurstan Basset" made a fine "for having the rightful portion…of the inheritance of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 5 Feb 1223[379]m RALPH of Weedon, son of RALPH of Weedon & his wife ---. 

 

E.      BASSET of SAPCOTE, LEICESTERSHIRE

 

 

WILLIAM Basset of Sapcote, Leicestershire, son of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel (-[1185]).  His parentage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…[380].  "…Willo Basset…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/67] under which the monks of Leicester abbey authorised the establishment of the church of St Mary the Less, Leicester[381].  The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records that "Wills Basset…ipsi Willo" made payment "p debito Rad fris sui" in Leicestershire[382].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Basset" held two knights’ fees from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[383]

m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known. 

William & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         SIMON Basset (-1205).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Simonis Basset" in Warwickshire and Leicestershire[384].  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[385]m ISABEL Avenell, daughter of WILLIAM Avenell & his wife --- (-before 10 Apr 1226).  "Elisabeth q fuit uxor Sim Basset" paid a fine for "hereditate sua…dissaisita…post mortem predicti Simoni viri sui" in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, dated 1205[386].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Elizabet que fuit uxor Simonis Basset" held "feodum dimidii militis…de honore de Notingham"[387].  "William Basset, son and heir of Elizabeth Avenel" was granted "full seisin of [her] land held of the king in the honour of Peverel in the county of Buckinghamshire", dated 10 Apr 1226[388].  Simon & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM Basset (-before 22 Jun 1249).  "Willelmus de Hanred" confirmed land in Barton Seagrave, Northamptonshire, held by "Symon Basset…de Ricardo patre meo", to "Willelmo Basset filio Symonis Basset", by charter dated to [1205/10], witnessed by "…Johanne Basset…"[389].  "William Basset, son and heir of Elizabeth Avenel" was granted "full seisin of [her] land held of the king in the honour of Peverel in the county of Buckinghamshire", dated 10 Apr 1226[390].  This document shows that William must have been his parents’ oldest surviving child.  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[391].  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[392]

b)         JOHN Basset (-before 1249).  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[393].  

c)         REYNOLD Basset (-after 17 Mar 1226).  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[394].  Henry III King of England conscripted "…Reginaldus Basset…" for service "in Wasconiam" dated 17 Mar 1226[395]

d)         MATILDA Basset .  "Symon Basset" granted land in Scalford, Leicestershire to "Roberto filio Reginaldi de Acle cum filia mea Matilda in liberali maritagio", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo et Reginaldo fratre eius Basset…"[396].  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Robertum de Acle et Matillidem uxorem eius" and "Robertum Basset" relating to land at Scalford and Ab Kettleby, Lincolnshire against "Alanum Basset"[397]m ROBERT de Oakley, son of REYNOLD de Oakley & his wife ---. 

2.         [REYNOLD Basset .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Reginaldus Basset" in Warwickshire and Leicestershire[398].] 

 

 

1.         RALPH Basset of Sapcote .  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[399].  A charter dated 10 Apr 1239 records a final settlement between "Julianam que fuit uxor Roberti de Chaucumbe" and "Radulfum Basset et Milesentam uxorem eius" relating to land in Strubby, Lincolnshire, the marriage portion of "ipsius Juliane", in return for which "Gilbertus de Segrave et Amabilia uxor eius, soror predicte Milesente et particeps hereditatis Roberti de Chaucumbe" granted land in Chacombe, Northamptonshire to Ralph and Melisende[400]m (before 30 Sep 1231) MELISENDE de Chaucombe, daughter of ROBERT de Chaucombe & his [first wife ---].  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[401].  A charter dated 10 Apr 1239 records a final settlement between "Julianam que fuit uxor Roberti de Chaucumbe" and "Radulfum Basset et Milesentam uxorem eius" relating to land in Strubby, Lincolnshire, the marriage portion of "ipsius Juliane", in return for which "Gilbertus de Segrave et Amabilia uxor eius, soror predicte Milesente et particeps hereditatis Roberti de Chaucumbe" granted land in Chacombe, Northamptonshire to Ralph and Melisende[402].  The wording of this last document suggests that Juliana was not the mother of the two sisters who, if this is correct, must have been born from an earlier marriage of their father.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         SIMON Basset .  Wrottesley shows Simon as son of "Ralph Basset temp. Hen. 3" from a plea relating to the church of Cheadle, Staffordshire[403]m ---.  The name of Simon’s wife is not known.  Simon & his wife had one child: 

i)          SIMON Basset .  Wrottesley shows "Simon who had granted the advowson of the church by fine, levied in 20 E. 2 to Hervey de Staunton" as the son of Simon Basset, in a claim brought by "Isabella formerly the wife of Simon Basset (of Sapcote)" relating to the church of Cheadle, Staffordshire[404]m ISABELLA, daughter of ---.  Wrottesley shows "Simon who had granted the advowson of the church by fine, levied in 20 E. 2 to Hervey de Staunton" as the son of Simon Basset, in a claim brought by "Isabella formerly the wife of Simon Basset (of Sapcote)" relating to the church of Cheadle, Staffordshire[405]

 

2.         ROBERT Basset (-after 1 May 1233).  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Robertum de Acle et Matillidem uxorem eius" and "Robertum Basset" relating to land at Scalford and Ab Kettleby, Lincolnshire against "Alanum Basset"[406].  A charter dated 13 Jun 1238 records a final settlement between "Robertum Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" relating to a quarter of one knight’s fee in Adstock, Buckinghamshire, given to William by "Elizabethe Avenel avie predicti Roberti cuius heres ipse est"[407].  The last passage indicates that Robert was the son of the oldest surviving son of Simon Basset, presumably William Basset (see above) but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified. 

 

3.         ALAN Basset of North Luffenham, Rutland (-before 20 Jan 1247).  A charter dated 15 Sep 1221 records a final settlement between "Amabilem que fuit uxor Ricardi de Foxton" and "Alanum Basset et Amiciam uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton, Market Harbourough, Scalford and Gumley, Leicestershire[408].  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Robertum de Acle et Matillidem uxorem eius" and "Robertum Basset" relating to land at Scalford and Ab Kettleby, Lincolnshire against "Alanum Basset"[409]m AMICE, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 15 Sep 1221 records a final settlement between "Amabilem que fuit uxor Ricardi de Foxton" and "Alanum Basset et Amiciam uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton, Market Harbourough, Scalford and Gumley, Leicestershire[410].  A charter dated 20 Jan 1247 records a final settlement between "Johannam Basset" and "Willelmum de Mesnill et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton and lands "que fuerunt Amicie que fuit uxor Alani Basset, matris predictarum Johanne et Agnete"[411].  Alan & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOAN Basset .  A charter dated 20 Jan 1247 records a final settlement between "Johannam Basset" and "Willelmum de Mesnill et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton and lands "que fuerunt Amicie que fuit uxor Alani Basset, matris predictarum Johanne et Agnete"[412]

b)         AGNES Basset .  A charter dated 20 Jan 1247 records a final settlement between "Johannam Basset" and "Willelmum de Mesnill et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to land in Foxton and lands "que fuerunt Amicie que fuit uxor Alani Basset, matris predictarum Johanne et Agnete"[413]m WILLIAM de Maisnil, son of ---. 

 

4.         WILLIAM Basset .  A charter dated 13 Jun 1238 records a final settlement between "Robertum Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" relating to a quarter of one knight’s fee in Adstock, Buckinghamshire, given to William by "Elizabethe Avenel avie predicti Roberti cuius heres ipse est"[414]

 

 

F.      BASSET of WELDON, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

 

 

RICHARD Basset, son of GEOFFREY Ridel [Basset] & his first wife Amice --- (-1217).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[415].  A charter dated 3 Apr 1201 records an agreement between "Ricardum Basset filium Galfridi Ridel" and the prior of Launde for the latter to surrender charters received from "Galfrido Ridel", except for the foundation charter from "Ricardi Basset fundatoris" and later confirmations[416]

m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known. 

Richard & his wife had three children: 

1.         RALPH Basset (-before 17 Feb 1258).  "Eudo filius Augustini de Holinton" issued a quitclaim to "domino meo Eadulfo filio Ricardi Basset" relating to lands in Hollington by charter dated to [1217/41][417].  The prior of St Andrew’s, Northampton granted land in Northampton to "Radulfo Basset filio Ricardi Basset de Weledon" by charter dated to [1228/38], witnessed by "…Radulfo Ridel…"[418].  A writ after the death of "Ralph Basset of Welledon alias Welesden", dated "17 Feb 42 Hen III", records "Richard his son aged 30 and more is his heir"[419]m ---.  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD Basset ([1226/28]-before 1 Jul 1276).  A writ after the death of "Ralph Basset of Welledon alias Welesden", dated "17 Feb 42 Hen III", records "Richard his son aged 30 and more is his heir"[420].  A writ dated 1 Jul "4 Edw I", following the death of "Richard Basset of Weledon" names "Ralph his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...aged 32 and more[421]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH Basset ([1243/46]-).  A writ dated 1 Jul "4 Edw I", following the death of "Richard Basset of Weledon" names "Ralph his son aged 30 and more is his next heir...aged 32 and more[422]

b)         ORABILIS .  "Radulfus Basset de Weldon" granted "partem terre mee in villa de Madle" to "Orabele filie mee" by charter dated to [1250/58][423]

2.         RICHARD Basset .  "Ricardo Basset fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1217/41] under which "Willelmus cocus de Weled" quitclaimed land in Weldon to "domino meo Radulfo Basset"[424]

3.         MATILDA Basset (-after 25 Mar 1248).  "Matilda Basset" granted land "in Langepyn" to "Willelmo de Camera de Weledon…quam tenui de domino Radulfo Basset fratre meo" by charter dated 25 Mar 1248[425]

 

 

G.      BASSET FAMILIES in YORKSHIRE

 

 

1.         EMMA (-after 29 Jan 1200).  A charter dated 29 Jan 1200 records a settlement agreed between "Hugonem de Vabadun" and "Emmam Basset" concerning "terre…in Elvet" {Kirk Ella, Yorkshire, East Riding}[426]

 

2.         ROBERT Basset .  "Adam de Warrum" granted land in Hundgate in the Marsh and Havergate to "Roberto Basset et Aliz sorori mee uxori eius" by charter dated to [1170/84][427].  King Richard I confirmed donations to Rievaulx abbey, including the donation of "toftas et domos Eboraci in Mersc" made by "Roberti Basseth et Jerhemiæ Archidiaconi et Johannis nepotis eius", by charter dated 17 Sep 1189[428]m ALICE de Warrum, daughter of --- (-after 12 Nov 1201).  "Adam de Warrum" granted land in Hundgate in the Marsh and Havergate to "Roberto Basset et Aliz sorori mee uxori eius" by charter dated to [1170/84][429].  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][430].  A charter dated 12 Nov 1201 records a settlement agreed between "Aliciam Basset" and "Henricum de Puteaco" concerning "villa de Yockeflet" {Yokefleet, Yorkshire, East Riding}[431].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

a)         HUGH Basset .  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][432]

b)         ISOUDE Basset .  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][433]

c)         HELEN Basset .  "Alicia Basset", with the consent of "Hugonis filii mei et heredis mei et filiarum mearum…Ysoude et Helene", granted land at Patricpool in the parish of St Benet to "Thome de Languath" for educating her son Hugh, by charter dated to [1190/1210][434]

 

3.         REYNOLD Basset .  He founded the chapel at Hinderskelfe[435].  He is named as father of William and Peter Basset in the charter dated to [1170/85] which is quoted below.  m ---.  Reynold & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Basset .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus Basset" holding two knights’ fees "de feodo Albredæ de Insula" in Norfolk in 1166[436].  "Willelmi Basset" confirmed the donation of Hinderskelfe chapel to Kirkham abbey, made by "Petrus Basset frater suus", by charter dated to [1170/85][437].  "…Willelmo Basset…" witnessed the undated charter, dated to the reign of King Richard I, under which "Willelmus de Vesci" surrender rights in the Waste below Pickering in favour of Rievaulx abbey[438]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          REYNOLD Basset (-before 14 Mar 1227).  Reynold Basset recovered land at Hinderskelfe from Walter Basset in 1204[439].  Reynold Basset released his rights in Hinderskelfe chapel to Kirkham and confirmed donations by his grandfather Reynold[440].  A charter dated 6 Oct 1207 records a final settlement between "Reginaldum Basset" and "Walterum Basset" relating to land in Castle Howard {Yorkshire, North Riding} and Scagglethorpe {Yorkshire, East Riding}[441]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 14 Mar 1227 records a final settlement between "Matildam Basset" and "Robertum de Leycestr" relating to land in Scagglethorpe, Yorkshireshire "quod fuit Reginaldi Basset quondam viri sui"[442]

ii)         [ROBERT Basset .  He is named as father of Reynold Basset in the charter dated 1 Jul 1201 which is quoted below, but the primary source which confirms that he was the son of William Basset has not yet been identified.]  m ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       REYNOLD Basset (-after 1 Jul 1201).  A charter dated 1 Jul 1201 records a final settlement between the abbot of Combe and "Reginaldum Basset…filius Roberti Basset" relating to the latter’s claim to land at Harbury, agreed for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Ysabelle"[443]m ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-after 1 Jul 1201).  A charter dated 1 Jul 1201 records a final settlement between the abbot of Combe and "Reginaldum Basset…filius Roberti Basset" relating to the latter’s claim to land at Harbury, agreed for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Ysabelle"[444]

iii)        ALICE Basset .  Ralph de Frytheby, son of Ralph son of William, married Alice Basset, sister of Reynold Basset and her husband "seems to have been the heir of the Basset inheritance"[445]m RALPH de Frytheby, son of RALPH FitzWilliam & his wife ---. 

b)         PETER Basset .  "Petrus Basset" confirmed a donation of land to Kirkham, made by "Rainaldus Basset…pater meus", for the souls of "uxoris mee et filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et…fratris et domini mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1170/85], witnessed by "…Nicolao filio meo, Ailwino uxore mea…"[446]m AILWINE, daughter of ---.  "Petrus Basset" confirmed a donation of land to Kirkham, made by "Rainaldus Basset…pater meus", for the souls of "uxoris mee et filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et…fratris et domini mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1170/85], witnessed by "…Nicolao filio meo, Ailwino uxore mea…"[447].  Peter & his wife had children: 

i)          NICHOLAS Basset .  "Petrus Basset" confirmed a donation of land to Kirkham, made by "Rainaldus Basset…pater meus", for the souls of "uxoris mee et filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et…fratris et domini mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1170/85], witnessed by "…Nicolao filio meo, Ailwino uxore mea…"[448]same person as…?  NICHOLAS Basset (-after [Jul] 1219).  A charter dated 20 Aug 1202 records a final settlement between "Nicholaum Basset" and "Johannem filium Alani" relating to land in Ganthorpe, Yorkshire[449].  A charter dated 26 May 1214 records a final settlement between "Nicholas Basset and Basilia his wife" and "Walter Crispin" relating to land in Barton upon Humber, Lincolnshire which belonged to Basilia[450].  A charter dated 25 Nov 1218 records a final settlement between "Nicholaum Basset et Basiliam uxorem suam" and "Hawisiam de Weinflet" relating to land in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire[451].  Henry III King of England ordered "…Nicholaus Basset…" to enquire into the state of the forests "Eboraci" dated [Jul] 1219[452]m BASILIA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 26 May 1214 records a final settlement between "Nicholas Basset and Basilia his wife" and "Walter Crispin" relating to land in Barton upon Humber, Lincolnshire which belonged to Basilia[453].  A charter dated 25 Nov 1218 records a final settlement between "Nicholaum Basset et Basiliam uxorem suam" and "Hawisiam de Weinflet" relating to land in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire[454]

ii)         other children . 

 

 

1.         WALTER Basset (-after 6 Oct 1207).  Reynold Basset recovered land at Hinderskelfe from Walter Basset in 1204[455].  A charter dated 6 Oct 1207 records a final settlement between "Reginaldum Basset" and "Walterum Basset" relating to land in Castle Howard {Yorkshire, North Riding} and Scagglethorpe {Yorkshire, East Riding}[456]

 

2.         WILLIAM Basset (-after 17 Nov 1208).  A charter dated 24 Feb 1204 records a settlement agreed between "Willelmum Basset et Alienoram uxorem eius" and "Matheum clericum" concerning "terre…in Rillinton" {Rillington, Yorkshire, East Riding} which had been "dotem ipsius Alienore ex dono Johannis de Rillinton quondam viri sui"[457].  A charter dated 17 Nov 1208 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Elianorem uxorem suam" and the brothers of the Hospital of Jerusalem relating to land in Rillington[458]m as her second husband, ELEANOR, widow of JOHN de Rillington, daughter of --- (-after 17 Nov 1208).  A charter dated 24 Feb 1204 records a settlement agreed between "Willelmum Basset et Alienoram uxorem eius" and "Matheum clericum" concerning "terre…in Rillinton" {Rillington, Yorkshire, East Riding} which had been "dotem ipsius Alienore ex dono Johannis de Rillinton quondam viri sui"[459].  A charter dated 17 Nov 1208 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Elianorem uxorem suam" and the brothers of the Hospital of Jerusalem relating to land in Rillington[460]

 

3.         GUY Basset (-after 10 May 1226).  A charter dated 10 May 1226 records a final settlement between "Widonem Basset" and "Alanum de Flaunvill" relating to land in Skewsby, Yorkshireshire[461]

 

4.         PETER Basset (-after 17 Jun 1240).  A charter dated 17 Jun 1240 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Mauleverer et Margeriam uxorem eius" and "Petrum Basset" relating to land in Swinton, Masham, Yorkshire[462]

 

 

H.      OTHER BASSET FAMILIES

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         OSMUND Basset .  "Osmundus Basseth" donated "duo molendina de Wodeforde" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Roberti Folioth nepotis et hæredis mei", for the souls of "mea et Ingridæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[463]m INGRID, daughter of ---.  "Osmundus Basseth" donated "duo molendina de Wodeforde" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Roberti Folioth nepotis et hæredis mei", for the souls of "mea et Ingridæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[464]

2.         sister .  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Osmundus Basseth" donated "duo molendina de Wodeforde" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Roberti Folioth nepotis et hæredis mei", for the souls of "mea et Ingridæ uxoris meæ"[465]m --- Foliot, son of ---.  One child: 

 

 

1.         RALPH Basset (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset" holding four parts and one knight’s fee respectively from "honor comitis Leycestriæ" in Leicestershire in [1210/12][466]

 

2.         WILLIAM Basset (-before [1194/95]).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Basset (-before 22 Jun 1249).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "redditu de Mederingeham Willelmi f Willelmi Basset de quarta parte anni" in Lincolnshire[467].  A charter dated 1 Jul 1202 records a settlement agreed between "William Basset and his wife Matilda" and "Roger prior of Kyme" concerning "the advowson of the church of Metheringham" {Lincolnshire}[468].  Henry III King of England ordered "…Willelmus Basset filius Willelmi Basset…" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Dereby" dated [Jul] 1219[469].  A writ dated 22 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Basset" names "Robert Basset son of John Basset, his nephew is his heir and of full age" and "Adestok [Buckingham]…Germundestorp [Lincoln] held of the inheritance of Maud his wife"[470]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 1 Jul 1202 records a settlement agreed between "William Basset and his wife Matilda" and "Roger prior of Kyme" concerning "the advowson of the church of Metheringham" {Lincolnshire}[471].  A writ dated 22 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Basset" names "Robert Basset son of John Basset, his nephew is his heir and of full age" and "Adestok [Buckingham]…Germundestorp [Lincoln] held of the inheritance of Maud his wife"[472]

b)         JOHN Basset (-before 22 Jun 1249).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Basset .  A writ dated 22 Jun "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Basset" names "Robert Basset son of John Basset, his nephew is his heir and of full age"[473]

 

3.         WILLIAM Basset (-after 12 Nov 1205).  A charter dated 27 Jun 1204 records a final settlement between "Aziliam que fuit uxor Roberti Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" concerning "dote ipsius Azilie…in Draitun et in Merston"[474].  A charter dated 12 Nov 1205 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Aliciam uxorem suam" and "Radulfum de Puteham" relating to land in Drayton Beauchamp and land bordering on the meadow of "Thurstani Basset"[475]m ALICE, daughter of --- (-after 12 Nov 1205).  A charter dated 12 Nov 1205 records a final settlement between "Willelmum Basset et Aliciam uxorem suam" and "Radulfum de Puteham" relating to land in Drayton Beauchamp and land bordering on the meadow of "Thurstani Basset"[476]

4.         ROBERT Basset (-before 27 Jun 1204).  m AZILIA, daughter of --- (-after 27 Jun 1204).  A charter dated 27 Jun 1204 records a final settlement between "Aziliam que fuit uxor Roberti Basset" and "Willelmum Basset" concerning "dote ipsius Azilie…in Draitun et in Merston"[477]

 

 

1.         THOMAS Basset (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas Basset" holding one knight’s fee "in Wycheforde" in Devonshire in [1210/12][478]

 

2.         RICHARD Basset (-after 21 Sep 1227).  A charter dated 21 Sep 1227 records a final settlement between "Matheum personam ecclesie de Sutton" and "Ricardum Basset" relating to land in Sutton, Northamptonshire[479].    

 

 

Two possible brothers: 

1.         ROBERT Basset (-after 7 Dec 1227).  A charter dated 7 Dec 1227 records a final settlement between "Muriellam que fuit uxor Johannis Basset" and "Robertum Basset" relating to her dower in Milton Ernest, Bedfordshire, Rushton, Northamptonshire, and Ketton, Rutland[480]

2.         JOHN Basset (-before 7 Dec 1227).  m MURIEL, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 7 Dec 1227 records a final settlement between "Muriellam que fuit uxor Johannis Basset" and "Robertum Basset" relating to her dower in Milton Ernest, Bedfordshire, Rushton, Northamptonshire, and Ketton, Rutland[481]

 

 

1.         ANDREW Basset (-after 27 Apr 1231).  A charter dated 27 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Andream Basset" and the prioress of Littlemore, Sandford, Oxfordshire relating to land at Leverton, Berkshire[482]

 

2.         REYNOLD Basset (-after 1 May 1233).  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Lucam de Columb et Amicabilem uxorem eius, Radulfum filium Johannis et Isabellam uxorem eius, Warinum de Brageham et Agnetem uxorem eius" and "Reginaldum Basset et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to the manor of Iffley, Oxfordshire "de heredibus ipsarum Amicabilis, Isabelle et Agnetis"[483]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 1 May 1233 records a final settlement between "Lucam de Columb et Amicabilem uxorem eius, Radulfum filium Johannis et Isabellam uxorem eius, Warinum de Brageham et Agnetem uxorem eius" and "Reginaldum Basset et Agnetem uxorem eius" relating to the manor of Iffley, Oxfordshire "de heredibus ipsarum Amicabilis, Isabelle et Agnetis"[484]

 

3.         HENRY Basset (-after 14 Jan 1241).  A charter dated 14 Jan 1241 records a final settlement between the archdeacon of Berkshire and "Henricum Basset" relating to the advowson of the church of North Moreton, Berkshire[485]m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN Basset .  A writ after the death of "Thomas Earl of Warwick", dated "25 Aug 26 Hen III", records one fee at Northmorton, Berkshire held by "John, son and heir of Henry Basset"[486].

 

 

 

LORDS BEAUMONT

 

 

HENRY de Beaumont, son of LOUIS de Brienne Vicomte de Beaumont & his wife Agnes de Beaumont (-before 10 Mar 1340)Lord Beaumont 1309.  Constable of England 1322.  He was summoned to Parliament in England in 1334 as Earl of Buchan, although this was never recognised in Scotland.  “Henry de Bello Monte Earl of Buchan [Boghane] and Murref and Constable of Scotland and Isabella, who was the wife of Dom. John de Vescy” issued an undated charter which recites earlier donations to Bridlington priory[487]

m (before 14 Mar 1310) ALICE Comyn, daughter of ALEXANDER Comyn & his wife Joan --- (-1349 before 10 Aug).  John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records that "David", eldest son of "Johannem…Comyn…filiam" and her husband "David comiti Atholiæ", married "filiam Henrici de Bellomonte…ex filia primogenita…comitis Johannis de Buchan"[488].  Andrew Wyntoun’s Cronykil records that "Alysandyre", son of "Willame" son of "Alysawndyr that Erle wes off Buchane", had two daughters, the elder of which married "Henry de Bewmownt"[489]

Henry & his wife had children: 

7.         JOHN Beaumont (-[10/25] May 1342).  He succeeded his father as Lord Beaumontm (before Jun 1337) as her first husband, ELEANOR of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Matilda Chaworth ([1318]-Arundel Castle, Sussex 11 Jan 1372, bur Lewes Priory, Sussex).  While her first husband was still alive, and before Earl Richard's annulment of his first marriage, she lived with her future second husband.  She married secondly (Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Bucks 5 Feb 1345, Papal dispensation 4 Mar 1345) as his second wife, Richard Fitzalan Earl of Arundel "Copped hat".  John & his wife had children: 

a)         HENRY Beaumont (Brabant [1339/40]-17 Jun 1368, bur Sempringham, Lincolnshire)Lord Beaumontm as her first husband, MARGARET de Vere, daughter of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Matilda Badlesmere (-15 Jun 1398, bur Newgate Grey Friars).  She married secondly Nicholas de Lorain of Penshurst, Kent.  She married thirdly John Devereux, who was summoned to Parliament in 1384 whereby he is held to have become Lord Devereux.  Henry & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Beaumont ([1359/60]-Stirling 9 Sep 1396, bur Sempringham)Lord Beaumont

-         see below

8.         ELIZABETH Beaumont (-27 Oct 1400, bur [Hulton Abbey]).  The will of "Elizabeth Lady Audley", dated 30 Sep 1400, chose burial “in the quire of Hilton Abbey”, bequeathed property to “my...Lord Thomas the king’s son...my...niece Joan de Beaumond...to her marriage...Joan de Audley...[490]m (settlement [1330/31]) NICHOLAS Audley, son of JAMES Audley Lord Audley & his first wife Joan Mortimer ([1328]-22 Jul 1391).  He succeeded his father in 1386 as Lord Audley. 

9.         ISABEL Beaumont (-Leicester 1361, bur Newark Abbey, Leicester).  The will of "Henry Duke of Lancaster Earl of Derby, Lincoln and Leicester, Steward of England, Lord of Brigerak and Beaufort", dated 15 Mar 1360, requested that “my wife Lady Isabell, our sisters and our brothers” to attend his funeral[491]m ([1337]) HENRY "of Grosmont", son of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Maud Chaworth (Grosmont Castle, Monmouthshire [1300]-Leicester Castle 24 Mar 1361, bur Newark Abbey, Leicester).  He succeeded his father as Earl of Lancaster in 1345. 

10.      CATHERINE Beaumont (-11 Nov 1368).  John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records that "David", eldest son of "Johannem…Comyn…filiam" and her husband "David comiti Atholiæ", married "filiam Henrici de Bellomonte…ex filia primogenita…comitis Johannis de Buchan"[492]m DAVID of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl, son of DAVID of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl & his wife Joan Comyn (Newcastle-on-Tyne 1 Feb 1309-killed in battle Killblane 30 Nov 1335). 

11.      AGNES de Beaumont (-after 1359)m ([Jul 1343]) as his second wife, THOMAS de Lucy Lord Lucy, son of ANTHONY de Lucy Lord Lucy & his wife Elizabeth --- (-London 5 Dec 1365). 

 

 

JOHN Beaumont, son of HENRY Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Margaret de Vere of the Earls of Oxford ([1359/60]-Stirling 9 Sep 1396, bur Sempringham)Lord Beaumont

m CATHERINE Everingham, daughter of THOMAS Everingham of Laxton, Nottinghamshire & his wife --- (-1426). 

John & his wife had children: 

1.         HENRY Beaumont ([1379/80]-Jun 1413, bur Sempringham)Lord Beaumontm ELIZABETH Willoughby, daughter of WILLIAM Willoughb Lord Willoughby (of Eresby) & his wife --- (-before 12 Nov 1428).  Henry & his wife had children: 

a)         ELIZABETH de Beaumont (-[20 or 27] Jul 1447)m firstly (licence 3 Jan 1418) WILLIAM Deincourt Lord Deincourt, son of JOHN Deincourt Lord Deincourt & his wife Joan Grey ([1402/03]-5 Sep 1422).  m secondly (Papal mandate for dispensation 15 Jul 1427) as his second wife, RICHARD Hastinges of Newton Harcourt, Leicestershire, son of --- ([1382/83]-10 Sep 1436).  m thirdly as his second wife, THOMAS Neville of Brancepeth, co. Durham, son of --- (-22 Feb 1458). 

b)         JOHN Beaumont ([1408/09]-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460)Lord Beaumont.  He was created Viscount Beaumont in 1440.  m firstly ([24 Jul 1425/3 Jul 1436]) ELIZABETH Philip, daughter of WILLIAM Philip Lord Bardolf & his wife Joan Bardolf (-before 30 Oct 1441).  m secondly (after 1442) as her third husband, KATHERINE Neville, widow firstly of JOHN Mowbray Earl of Norfolk and secondly of THOMAS Strangeways, daughter of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his second wife Joan Beaufort ([1402/03]-after 1483).  She married fourthly (after 1464) John Wydeville.  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Jan 1464 (O.S.) “maritagium diabolicum” of “Katerina ducissa Norffolchiæ juvencula ætatis fere iiixx annorum” and “Johannis Widevile fratri reginæ ætatis xx annorum[493].  John & his first wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM Beaumont (Edenham, Lincolnshire 23 Apr 1438-19 Dec 1507).  Lord Bardolf.  He succeeded his father in 1460 as Viscount Beaumont.  m firstly (before 4 Mar 1461, divorced 1477) as her first husband, JOAN Stafford, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford Duke of Buckingham & his wife Anne Neville of Westmoreland (-after 31 Oct 1480).  She married secondly ([1477]) as his third wife, William Knyvett.  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Jane m 1 Lord Beaumont, m William Knyvett" as daughter of "Anne Duchess of Buckingham", and mother (by her second husband) of "Edward Knyvett, Charles"[494].  The will of "Ann Dutchess of Bucks", proved 31 Oct 1480, bequeathed property to “my daughter Beaumond...my son of Wiltshire...my daughter of Richmond...my daughter Mountjoy...my daughter Beaumond’s son Edward Knyvet[495]m secondly as her first husband, ELIZABETH Scrope, daughter of RICHARD Scrope & his wife Eleanor Washbourne (-26 Jun 1537, bur Wivenhoe).  She married secondly ([28 Nov 1508/10 Apr 1509]) as his second wife, John de Vere Earl of Oxford

ii)         JOAN Beaumont (-5 Auf 1466).  m JOHN Lovel Lord Lovel, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         JOHN Beaumont of Sherwell, Dorset .  m ---.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         MATILDA Beaumont m as his third wife, HUGH de Courtenay of Goodrington and Stancombe, Devon, son of EDWARD de Courtenay of the Earls of Devon & his wife Emmeline Dawnay (-5/6 Mar 1425). 

 

 

 

BERKELEY

 

 

A.      BERKELEY

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ROGER [I] de Berkeley (-1093).  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and records the donation by “Rogerus de Berchelaico cum uxore sua Rissa[496].  Domesday Book records “Roger of Berkeley” holding Foxley and Easton Grey in Wiltshire; Coberley, Dodington and Siston in Gloucestershire[497]The Complete Peerage states that he became a monk at Gloucester 17 Jan 1091 and died in 1093 (no sources cited)[498]m RISSA, daughter of ---.  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and records the donation by “Rogerus de Berchelaico cum uxore sua Rissa[499].  Roger [I] & his wife had [one] child: 

a)         [daughter .  A charter of King Stephen dated [22 Mar/22 Dec] 1136 which confirmed the possessions of Shaftesbury Abbey refers to the donation by "Aluredum de Foxlegh" of land given "cum filia Rogerii de Berkelaio"[500].  It is likely that the document refers to a daughter of Roger [I] de Berkeley, as no record has been found of Roger [II] having had children, and as the donations recorded in the document appear to be earlier than the time of Roger [III].  m ALURED de Foxleigh, son of ---.] 

2.         RALPH de Berkeley (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records “Ralph the brother of this Roger [Berkeley]” holding Wapley and Leonard Stanley in Gloucestershire[501]

 

 

[Three] brothers.  It is possible that they were children either of Roger [I] de Berkeley, or of Ralph de Berkeley, but no primary source which confirms that this is correct has been identified.  Ellis suggests that Roger [II] may have been the son of Ralph de Berkeley, and Eustace the probable son of Roger [I] de Berkeley, although apparently without any primary source basis[502].   

1.         ROGER [II] de Berkeley (-Sep 1131).  The Complete Peerage records that Roger [II] de Berkeley began building the castle of Berkeley in 1117 (no sources cited)[503].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "in dnio Reg…terra Rogi de Berchelai" in Gloucestershire, and a reference to the land of "Rogi de Berchelai" in Berkeley[504]

2.         --- de Berkeley .  His parentage is confirmed by the letter written by his son “Willielmus de Berkeley et fundator Kingswode” to Pope Innocent II recalling that Henry I King of England had granted land to "patruo nostro Rogero de Berkeley"[505]m ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Berkeley (-after [1141]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records the return of "Will’s de Berchelai…de firma de Berchelai"[506].  “Willielmus de Berkeley et fundator Kingswode” wrote to Pope Innocent II recalling that Henry I King of England had granted land to "patruo nostro Rogero de Berkeley"[507]Domesday Descendants dates the foundation to 1139 (no source cited)[508].  This is presumably based on the commentary in Dugdale’s Monasticon, which cites no corresponding primary source[509].  According to the Complete Peerage, Roger [III] de Berkeley was the son of Roger [II] de Berkeley (no sources cited)[510].  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire records that “Willielmus de Berkeley” donated the priory to Tintern abbey, in the early years of the reign of King Stephen[511].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Will’s de Berchelai" in [Rutland][512]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had children: 

i)          ROGER [III] de Berkeley (-after 1177).  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire names “Rogero de Berkeleye, hærede…Willelmi de Berkeley[513].  

-         see below

3.         [EUSTACHE of NympesfieldThe Complete Peerage records that Roger [II] de Berkeley was the brother of Eustache of Nympesfield, although it is not stated whether they were born from the same father (no sources cited)[514].] 

 

 

ROGER [III] de Berkeley, son of WILLIAM de Berkeley & his wife --- (-after 1177).  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire names “Rogero de Berkeleye, hærede…Willelmi de Berkeley[515]

m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  The undated charter, dated to [late 12th century], under which “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[516], suggests that Roger [III] may have married twice, with Roger [IV] and his brother Philip born from the first marriage and Alice, Henry and Thomas from the second. 

Roger [III] & his wife had seven children: 

1.         ROGER [IV] de Berkeley (-after 1194).  “R. de Berkeley” noted the foundation of Kingswood priory by "Willielmus de Berckley" for the soul of King Henry I, and that the priory was transferred "ad Tettebiriam" with the consent of "patris mei R. de Berckley", by undated charter[517].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Berkelai" held one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset, that "Rogerus de Berckelaio" held two from "Willielmi comitis Gloucestriæ" in Gloucestershire, and also list the knights’ fees held from "Rogerus de Berch[elai]" in Gloucestershire[518].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Berkeley c s" in Gloucestershire in [1167/68][519].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Berclay vii l x s" in Gloucestershire in [1171/72][520].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90], witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[521].  “Rogerus de Berkley…pro me ipso et uxore mea et liberis meis” donated property to Kingswood by charter dated 10 Mar 1188[522].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Rogerus de Berkelay" paying "lxxv s, vii milites et dimidium" in Gloucestershire[523].  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[524].  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[525].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Berkelay" paying "vii l x s, vii milites et dimidium" in Gloucestershire[526]Betrothed ([1153/54]) to ---, daughter of ROBERT FitzHarding & his wife Eva ---.  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[527].  It is not known whether this betrothal proceeded to a marriage.  m firstly ---.  The two marriages of Roger [IV] de Berkeley are confirmed by the undated charter under which he “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum"[528]m secondly ---.  The two marriages of Roger [IV] de Berkeley are confirmed by the undated charter under which he “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum"[529].  Roger [IV] & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[530]

b)         ROGER [V] de Berkeley (-1220). 

2.         --- de Berkeleym ---.  [Two children]: 

a)         ROBERT de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[531].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[532]

b)         [RICHARD de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[533].] 

3.         PHILIP de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[534].  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[535]

4.         OLIVER de Berkeley .  “Rogerus de Berkley” donated property to the priory of Kingswood held "de Rogero patre meo", for the souls of "…uxorum mearum", referring to a grant by "Willielmus de Berkley" to "patri meo", by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto de Berkleya nepote meo, Philippo et Olivero fratribus meis et Willielmo filio meo…"[536]Domesday Descendants cites a charter of the Earls of Gloucester according to which Oliver was the son of Roger [III] de Berkeley[537]

5.         ALICE de Berkeley (-after 1190).  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[538].  Smyth quotes a late 15th century manuscript which records (in translation) an agreement dated to [1153/54] for the betrothals of (1) "Morice the sonne and eire of Sr Robert fitz Herding" to "Alice the daughter of Roger de Berkeley Baron of Dursley", and (2) "the son and eire of Roger de Berkeley Baron of Durseley" to "one of the [two] daughters of Sr Robertt fitz Herding" and (if both daughters died) to "the daughter of Hew of Hasele nece to the sayd Sr Robert fitz Herding"[539]m MAURICE de Berkeley, son of ROBERT FitzHarding & his wife Eva --- (-16 Jun 1190, bur Brentford church, Middlesex). 

6.         HENRY de Berkeley .  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[540]

7.         THOMAS de Berkeley .  “Aaleis de Berkele” granted land in Slimbridge to “Elias son of Toke her nurse and servant”, with the consent of “her son Robert de Berkele”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “Roger de Berkele, Philip his brother...Henry de Berkele and Thomas her brothers...[541]

 

 

1.         ROGER de Berkeley .  "Gilbertus de Haya" confirmed the donation of "terciam partem piscarie…de Glesbanin…[et] de Rugesablun" to Lindores Abbey, made by "bone memorie David de Haya pater meus", for the soul of "…Edoyne uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Dominis Rogero de Berkeley…"[542]

 

 

B.      BERKELEY (FITZHARDING)

 

 

1.         EALDNOTH (-killed in battle Somerset 1068).  Staller to King Edward the Confessor[543].  Florence of Worcester records that "Haroldi regis filii Godwinus, Eadmundus, Magnus" returned from Ireland and landed in Somerset where they were defeated, when "Eadnothus qui fuit Haroldi regis stallarius" was killed in the battle, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[544].  m ---.  The name of Ealdnoth’s wife is not known.  Ealdnoth & his wife had one child: 

a)         HARDING (-6 Nov after 1100).  William of Malmesbury records that "Ednodus" (whose death he describes as above) was "pater Herdingi qui adhuc superest"[545].  As William of Malmesbury records events until 1142, it is possible that Harding survived considerably later than 1100, although it is of course not known when precisely the passage just quoted was written.  ["…Herding…" witnessed the charter dated 1067 under which William I King of England donated property to the bishop of Wells[546].  The chronology suggests that it is unlikely that this entry relates to the same person named Harding.]  m ---.  The name of Harding’s wife is not known.  Harding & his wife had seven children: 

i)          NICHOLAS FitzHarding (-[1167/71]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nicholaus filius Herding" with "ii et dimidium" knights’ fees in Somerset in [1160/61][547].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nicholaus Herding" with "i et dimidium" knights’ fees "de feodo de Monte Acuto" in Somerset in [1167/68][548].  He died before [1171/72] when the Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus filius Nicholai" with "i et dimidium" knights’ fees "de feodo de Monte Acuto" in Somerset[549]m ---, niece of Roger Bishop of Salisbury, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her family origin and marriage has not yet been identified.   Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

(a)       HENRY [de Meriet] .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus filius Nicholai" with "i et dimidium" knights’ fees "de feodo de Monte Acuto" in Somerset in [1171/72][550].  Ancestor of the Meriet family of Meriet, Somerset[551]

ii)         ROBERT FitzHarding ([1094/96]-5 Feb 1171, bur Bristol St Augustine).  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[552]

-         see below

iii)        ELIAS FitzHarding (-after [1153/54]).  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[553].  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[554].  “Ricardus Foliot” granted “terram de Accatona et terram de Hanam et...de Hamtona” to “Mauricio filio Roberti filio Hardingi” by charter dated to before 1173, witnessed by “...Jurdano filio Hardingi et Helya filio Hardingi...[555]

iv)       JORDAN FitzHarding (-after [1153/54]).  Henri Duke of Normandy [later King Henry II] granted “manerium Betthone...et...terre in manerio de Berkelai” to “Rodberto filio Hard[ingi]” by charter dated to [1153], witnessed by “...Jordanus frater Rodberti et Jordanus et David nepotes eius...[556].  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[557].  “Ricardus Foliot” granted “terram de Accatona et terram de Hanam et...de Hamtona” to “Mauricio filio Roberti filio Hardingi” by charter dated to before 1173, witnessed by “...Jurdano filio Hardingi et Helya filio Hardingi...[558]

v)        AGNES (-20 Jul ----).  Smyth records the deaths of the three sisters Agnes (20 Jul), Matilda (22 Mar), and Cecily (25 Nov) all recorded in the necrology of Bristol St Augustine[559]m HUGH de Haseley, son of --- (-after [1153/54]).  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Hugo de Hasela...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[560].  One child: 

(a)       daughter .  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Hugo de Hasela...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[561]

vi)       MATILDA (-22 Mar ----).  Smyth records the deaths of the three sisters Agnes (20 Jul), Matilda (22 Mar "Matilda filia Hardingi"), and Cecily (25 Nov) all recorded in the necrology of Bristol St Augustine[562]

vii)      CECILY (-25 Nov ----).  Smyth records the deaths of the three sisters Agnes (20 Jul), Matilda (22 Mar), and Cecily (25 Nov) all recorded in the necrology of Bristol St Augustine[563]

 

 

1.         HARDINGm DENISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Jun 1205 under which King John confirmed donations to "Galfr Vitulo", including the donation of "Hunteneford" made by "Rob de B’kelay cum Matilda filia Harding…in liberum maritagium" and revenue "ex parte Harding patris eiusdem Matild…et terre…ex parte Dionisie matris eius in eadem villa"[564].  Harding & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATILDA .  King John confirmed donations to "Galfr Vitulo", including the donation of "Hunteneford" made by "Rob de B’kelay cum Matilda filia Harding…in liberum maritagium" and revenue "ex parte Harding patris eiusdem Matild…et terre…ex parte Dionisie matris eius in eadem villa", by charter dated 27 Jun 1205[565]m GEOFFREY Veel, son of ---. 

 

 

ROBERT FitzHarding, son of HARDING & his wife --- ([1094/96]-5 Feb 1171, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Henri Duke of Normandy [later King Henry II] granted “manerium Betthone...et...terre in manerio de Berkelai” to “Rodberto filio Hard[ingi]” by charter dated to [1153], witnessed by “...Jordanus frater Rodberti et Jordanus et David nepotes eius...[566].  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[567].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[568].  Dugdale’s Monasticon records that Robert FitzHarding and his wife were buried in St Augustine’s Bristol (no corresponding source quoted)[569]

m EVA, daughter of --- (-12 Mar 1171 or 1173, bur Bristol St Augustine).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[570].  Dugdale’s Monasticon records that the nunnery of St Mary at St Michael’s on the Hill in Bristol was founded by “Eva…widow to Robert Fitzharding” who became the first prioress, during the reign of King Henry II, adding that she died in 1173 and was buried next to her husband in St Augustine’s Bristol (no corresponding source quoted)[571].  The Complete Peerage states that she died 12 Mar 1170 (O.S.) (no corresponding source cited)[572]

Robert & his wife had [eight] children: 

1.         MAURICE de Berkeley (-16 Jun 1190, bur Brentford church, Middlesex).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[573].  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[574].  “Ricardus Foliot” granted “terram de Accatona et terram de Hanam et...de Hamtona” to “Mauricio filio Roberti filio Hardingi” by charter dated to before 1173, witnessed by “...Jurdano filio Hardingi et Helya filio Hardingi...[575].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[576].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[577].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Mauricius de Berkelay c s, Nicholaus frater eius" in Gloucestershire in [1186/87][578].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Mauricius de Berkelay" paying "l s, v milites" in Gloucestershire[579]m ([1153/54]) ALICE de Berkeley, daughter of ROGER [III] de Berkeley & his wife ---.  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[580].  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas", lands in Berkeley "which she bought of William Heiron" to "William her sonne"[581].  Maurice & his wife had [seven] children: 

a)         MATILDA de Berkeley .  Smyth states that "the daughter of…lord Maurice was married to Osbert Gifford kt, by whome hee had issue, Osbert Gifford and others, which Osbert became servant to King Henry the third in the eighth year of his raigne", citing a charter at Berkeley, close roll and fine roll records[582].  The chronology of the Giffard family suggests that Matilda must have been one of her parents’ older children and that her husband must have been Elias.  This suggested identification of her husband appears to be corroborated by the charter dated to after 1220 under which “Thomas de Berkeley” granted “the reversion of the land in Foxcote which his wife Lucy holds in dower” to “Osbert Gyffard his nephew” [who is identified as Osbert [II] Giffard, son of Elias Giffard][583]m ELIAS [III] Giffard, son of ELIAS [II] Giffard & his wife Bertha --- (-after 1190). 

b)         ROBERT de Berkeley ([1164/65]-13 May 1220, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas"[584].  “Robert de Berkelaia” donated land Kingswood Abbey, for his soul and that of “his wife Juliana”, by charter dated 11 Jun 1200[585].  King John confirmed "Berkelay et Berkelay Herness", as granted by King Henry II to "avuo suo Rob fil Harding", to "Rob fil Maurice de Berkelay" by charter dated 18 Apr 1200[586].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Berkeley" holding "xxx l in Beiministre…de dominico Rege" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][587]m firstly (before 11 Jun 1200) JULIANE de Pont de l’Arche, daughter of ROBERT de Pont de l’Arche & his wife Matilda Marshal of the Earls of Pembroke (-15 Nov 1217, bur Bristol St Augustine).  “Robert de Berkelaia” donated land Kingswood Abbey, for his soul and that of “his wife Juliana”, by charter dated 11 Jun 1200[588].  “John de Wodeford” granted land in Nibley, Gloucestershire (“in Nubbeleia”), which he had recovered “contra Dom. Margaretam quondam uxorem Othonis fil. Willelmi”, to “Dom. Juliana de Ponte Arche wife of Robert de Berkeleia” by charter dated to [1200][589].  Smyth records that "the first wife of Lord Robert was Julian de Ponte Arche daughter of William de Pontelargo o Pontearche and necce to…Willm Earl Marischall the elder Earle of Pembroke", records her death "15 Nov in the second year of Kinge Henry the third", and her burial at Bristol St Augustine, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[590].  According to Dugdale, Robert de Berkeley married "Julian, daughter of William de Pontearch, niece to William Marshal Earl of Pembroke"[591]m secondly (1218) as her first husband, LUCY, daughter of --- (-18 Jan 1234, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth records that "the second wife [of Lord Robert] was Lucy whom hee maryed not above two yeares before his death", that she married secondly "Hugh de Gurney sonne of Hugh", died 18 Jan 1234 and was buried at Bristol St Augustine, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[592].  She married secondly as his first wife, Hugues [VI] de Gournay of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Gloucestershire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Lucia que fuit uxor Roberti de Berkelay est maritata Hugoni de Gurney. Terra eius valet c.l"[593]

c)         THOMAS de Berkeley ([1170]-29 Nov 1243, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas", lands in Berkeley "which she bought of William Heiron" to "William her sonne"[594].  "Thomas of Berkeley, brother and heir of Robert of Berkeley" owed a fine for "his relief of the lands formerly of Robert", dated [Aug] 1220[595]

-        see below

d)         MAURICE de Berkeley .  “Aleis de Berkele” granted all her land at Berkeley to “Thomas her son” by charter dated to [1200], witnessed by “...Maurice and Henry de Berkeley her sons...[596].  Smyth records that "his brother Lord Robert" granted "Foxcote Manor" to "Maurice the third sonne" on his marriage[597]m ---.  The name of Maurice’s wife is not known.  Maurice & his wife had one child: 

i)          THOMAS de Berkeley (-7 Jan [1260/70]).  Smyth records that "Maurice had issue Thomas" who received "his lands of Hineton and Came" from his father but died "without issue…7 Jan towards the end of King Henry the third"[598]

e)         WILLIAM de Berkeley .  “Maurice de Berkeley” granted “the moiety of his land of Gosinton” to “William his son”, with the consent of “Robert his son and heir”, by charter dated to 1185/89, witnessed by “...Henry, Elias his brothers...[599].  “Aaleis de Berkeley” granted “her burgage in Berkeley which she bought from Philip Heirun” to “William her son” by charter dated to [1190/1200], witnessed by “...Philip de Berkeley, Henry de Berkeley...[600]

f)          HENRY de Berkeley .  “Aleis de Berkele” granted all her land at Berkeley to “Thomas her son” by charter dated to [1200], witnessed by “...Maurice and Henry de Berkeley her sons...[601].  Smyth indicates that the Berkeley family of Scotland (see the document SCOTLAND UNTITLED NOBILITY) was descended from "Henry and Richard the fifth and sixth sonnes" of Maurice de Berkeley and his wife Alice de Berkeley[602].  The specific source on which he relies for this information is unclear.  From a chronological point of view, it appears unlikely to be correct as the births of Maurice and Alice’s younger children can probably be dated to after [1170], later than the probable dates of the earliest charters in which the Scottish Berkeleys are named. 

g)         [RICHARD de Berkeley .  Smyth indicates that the Berkeley family of Scotland (see the document SCOTLAND UNTITLED NOBILITY) was descended from "Henry and Richard the fifth and sixth sonnes" of Maurice de Berkeley and his wife Alice de Berkeley[603].  The specific source on which he relies for this information is unclear.  From a chronological point of view, it appears unlikely to be correct as the births of Maurice and Alice’s younger children can probably be dated to after [1170], later than the probable dates of the earliest charters in which the Scottish Berkeleys are named.] 

2.         HENRY de Berkeley .  “Robertus filius Hardingi” founded the priory of St Augustine at Bristol, during the reign of King Henry II, by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico decano Moretoniæ et Mauritio fratre eius…"[604].  “Maurice de Berkeley” granted “the moiety of his land of Gosinton” to “William his son”, with the consent of “Robert his son and heir”, by charter dated to 1185/89, witnessed by “...Henry, Elias his brothers...[605].  Deacon of Mortain.  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[606].  Archdeacon of Exeter. 

3.         NICHOLAS de Berkeley (-5 May 1189).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[607].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[608]

-        see below

4.         ROBERT “Juvenis” de Berkeley (-[1195]).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[609].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[610].  “John Earl of Mortaigne” confirmed to “Robert son of Robert Fitzharding” the “will of Were” [Somerset] which “Juliana de Bantona granted to his father Robert Fitzharding” by undated charter[611].  Robert made a fine for the inheritance of Alice Paynell (mother of his second wife) in 1193[612]m firstly HAWISE de Gournay, daughter of ROBERT de Gournay of Barrow, Somerset & his wife Hawise --- (-after 1188).  Stapleton names “Hawisia, daughter and heiress of Robert de Gurnay of Barrow in [Somerset]” as the first wife of Robert FitzHarding and mother of his daughter “Eva de Gurnay”, but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[613].  Her name and parentage are confirmed by Stapleton in a later passage which names “Roger de Peauton” as second husband of [her daughter] Eva, adding that while married to him she confirmed her donation to Bermondsey monastery of the church of Inglishcombe which had earlier been donated by “Hawisia her grandmother, widow of Robert de Gurnay, and [by] Hawisia her own mother[614].  "Hathewisia de Gurneio" noted that "Alexander de Bidicumba" had sold “totam terram suam de Cliveware...quam Robertus de Gurneio pater meus ei...dedit” to “Thome filio Willelmi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Matheo de Gurneio...[615].  Hawise is last named in the 1188 Pipe Roll[616]m secondly ([1188/93]) AVICE de Gand, daughter of ROBERT de Gand & his first wife Alice Paynell.  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire names “Aviciam” as daughter of “Roberto de Ganth” and his wife Alice, adding that she married ”Roberto filio Roberti Arding de Bristow”, by whom she had “filium…Mauricium” who died childless, leaving “Andreæ Luterel per matrem suam, quæ fuit de parentelli Paynellorum” as his heir[617].  “R de Gaunt” donated property to Bridlington convent, for the souls of “comitis Gilberti…et…Adeliz uxoris mee et Aviz filie mee” by charter dated to [1156/75][618].  “Robertus de Gaunt et Aeliz Paganella uxor sua et Avicia filia eorum” donated property to the hospital of St John of Jerusalem by charter dated to [1166/77], witnessed by “…Henrico de Gaunt…[619].  Robert made a fine for the inheritance of Alice Paynell (mother of his second wife) in 1193[620].  Robert & his first wife had one child: 

a)         EVA [de Berkeley/de Gournay] (-before 1213).  Stapleton names “Hawisia, daughter and heiress of Robert de Gurnay of Barrow in [Somerset]” as the first wife of Robert FitzHarding and mother of his daughter “Eva de Gurnay”, but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[621].  "Mauricius de Gant" paid a fine "loco Eve sororis sue…pro habenda terra q hereditarie eandem Evam…et Thom fil Willi quondam viri sui" in Gloucestershire and Somerset, dated 1213[622].  King John confirmed "manerium de Barewe", which he had "in vita sua ex concessione Eve de Gornay sororis sue", to "Mauricio de Gant" by charter dated 28 Jul 1214[623].  The name "de Gournay" applied to Eva could suggest that she only shared one parent with Maurice de Gant, presumably their mother, but this hypothesis appears disproved by the record quoted below which names Robert de Gournay as heir of Maurice de Gant.  m firstly THOMAS FitzWilliam of Harptree, son of WILLIAM FitzJohn & his wife Matilda --- (-before 1213).  "Hathewisia de Gurneio" noted that "Alexander de Bidicumba" had sold “totam terram suam de Cliveware...quam Robertus de Gurneio pater meus ei...dedit” to “Thome filio Willelmi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Matheo de Gurneio...[624]m secondly ROGER de Peauton, son of ---.  Stapleton names “Roger de Peauton” as second husband of Eva, adding that while married to him she confirmed her donation to Bermondsey monastery of the church of Inglishcombe which had earlier been donated by “Hawisia her grandmother, widow of Robert de Gurnay, and [by] Hawisia her own mother”, without citing the corresponding primary sources[625]

Robert & his second wife had one child: 

b)         MAURICE de Gant (-1230).  “Maurice de Gant” granted “the three hundreds...Bedminster, Portbury and Hareclive” [in Somerset], which “Robert Fitzharding gave to Robert Juvenis his father”, to “Thomas de Berkeley” provided the grantor died without an heir, by charter dated to the reign of King John[626].  This grant is linked to the Inspeximus of “Thomas de Berkelay” of the grant of “three hundreds of Portbury, Bedminster and Hareclive” made by “his grandfather Robert Fitzharding to Robert his son” and of their grant to “Dom. Maurice de Gant, the heir of Robert uncle to the said Thomas”, undated (but presumably dated to after the death of Maurice de Gant as it no doubt relates to the challenge to his inheritance by his nephew Robert de Gournay, see below)[627].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Mauricius de Gant" holding one and one half knights’ fees in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][628].  "Mauricius de Gant" paid a fine "loco Eve sororis sue…pro habenda terra q hereditarie eandem Evam…et Thom fil Willi quondam viri sui" in Gloucestershire and Somerset, dated 1213[629].  King John confirmed "manerium de Barewe", which he had "in vita sua ex concessione Eve de Gornay sororis sue", to "Mauricio de Gant" by charter dated 28 Jul 1214[630].  “Mauritius de Gant” donated revenue from land "in manerio de Dersleia…quam emi de Margareta matertera mea quæ fuit uxor Othonis filii Willielmi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Matildis uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto filio Walteri, Saero de Quenci comite Wintoniæ, Henrico de Boun…"[631].  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire names “Aviciam” as daughter of “Roberto de Ganth” and his wife Alice, adding that she married ”Roberto filio Roberti Arding de Bristow”, by whom she had “filium…Mauricium” who died childless, leaving “Andreæ Luterel per matrem suam, quæ fuit de parentelli Paynellorum” [he was descended from a younger brother of Maurice’s maternal grandfather] as his heir[632].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1230 of “Mauricius de Gaunt[633]m firstly MATILDA de Oilly, daughter of HENRY de Oilly & his first wife Sibylla --- (-before 1220).  The Fine Rolls record the marriage of “Maurice de Gaunt” and “the daughter of Henry de Oilly”, dated Jun “John 15[634].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Henricus de Oylly" against "Mauricius de Gaunt" for "terre…in Westona" which was granted to Maurice with "Matillidem uxorem eius que fuit filia ipsius Henrici…ipsa defuncta…sine herede"[635].  “Mauritius de Gant” donated revenue from land "in manerio de Dersleia…quam emi de Margareta matertera mea quæ fuit uxor Othonis filii Willielmi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Matildis uxoris meæ", by undated charter[636]m secondly ([1220/21]) as her second husband, MARGARET Crassus, widow of RALPH [II] de Somery of Dudley, Worcestershire, daughter of WILLIAM [III] Crassus & his wife [--- Marshall] (-after 14 Jun 1247).  Stapleton dates the marriage to “prior to the fifth year of Henry III when Maurice de Gaunt paid scutage of Byham for the manor of Bradfield in Berkshire to Percival de Sumery[637].  Her second marriage is indicated by two sources relating to Staffordshire, where Ralph [II] de Somery had been granted land by King John.  Firstly, King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Staffordshire to permit “Maurice de Gant” to collect scutage from knights’ fees he holds in his bailiwick of the land “he holds in dower of Margaret his wife”, dated [Sep] 1224[638].  Secondly, the Assize Rolls for 1228 record that eight persons were summoned to show cause why they intruded into “a carucate of land which Alan de Englefeld held, the custody of whose lands after his death belonged to Maurice de Gant and Margaret his wife...the land formed part of the dower of Margaret[639].  Alan de Englefield was Margaret’s son-in-law (see below).  Several other sources have been identified which name Margaret, none of which makes the connection between Ralph de Somery and Maurice de Gant.  Three of these sources clearly refer to the widow of Ralph de Somery: (1) “Roger de Sumeri” confirmed an agreement between “Margaret his mother” and “William de Englefeld” [his nephew, son of his sister Isabel] concerning a grant and exchange of lands “at Bradfield”, Berkshire[640], undated, but presumably dateable to after Roger’succession to the family estates following the death of his nephew Nicholas (before 4 Jul 1229); (2) and (3) two sets of entries in the Testa de Nevill, Berkshire fees in [1235/36] which include " i.m de i. feodo in Englefeud de feodo de Sumeri et...quarta parte unius feodi Nicholai le Butiler de eodem honore [=honore de Walingeford?] et i.m de i. feodo Margerie de Sumery in Cumton Beucamp de eodem honore et i.m. de i. feodo eiusdem Margerie in Idesleg...et...in Adecote...Watindeden...Stanford...Yngelpenne de eodem honore"[641], and Berkshire fees in [1242/43] which name "Rogerus de Sumery in Bradefeld i. feodum...Margareta de Sumeri in Bradefeld unum feodum predicti Rogeri...Willelmus de Englefeld in Englefeld unum feodum de eodem feodo"[642].  Two further sources clearly refer to the wife of Maurice de Gant: firstly, Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Somerset, notwithstanding the order of seisin in favour of "Walter de Everm", to give seisin of "maneriis de Cantokesheved et de Hivis [Quantockshead and Huish]...que fuerunt Mauricii de Gant quondam viri sui" to "Margarete de Sumery" as dower, by order dated 1231[643], and secondly “Margaret de Somery” reached agreement with “Henry de Gaunt rector of the almonry of St Mark’s Hospital, Billeswick” on the tithes of the mill of East Quantoxhead, Somerset and other matters by charter dated 14 Jun 1247[644].  Two more sources are inconclusive: the Plea Rolls for 1233 include a claim in Oxfordshire by “John de Beauchamp” against “Margery de Sumery, in a plea of land and wardship[645], and an undated order, in 1237, records “Assizes taken...in...Worcestershire” from “Margaret de Somery[646].  Thomas Stapleton made a detailed study of the life of Maurice de Gant in the mid-19th century but all the sources to which he refers are inconclusive regarding the parentage of Maurice de Gant’s second wife[647].  It is somewhat surprising that Maurice would have married the widow of Ralph [II] de Somery who, although she had proven her child-bearing capacity, must have been nearly 40 years old by [1220].  Stapleton dates the Margaret de Somery/Maurice de Gant marriage to “prior to the fifth year of Henry III [Nov 1220/Nov 1221] when Maurice de Gaunt paid scutage of Byham for the manor of Bradfield in Berkshire to Percival de Sumery[648].  

5.         ELIAS .  “Maurice de Berkeley” granted “the moiety of his land of Gosinton” to “William his son”, with the consent of “Robert his son and heir”, by charter dated to 1185/89, witnessed by “...Henry, Elias his brothers...[649]

6.         daughter .  The marriage contract between “Mauricius filius Rodberti filii Hardingi” and “filiam Rogeri de Berckel” (with “Slimbrugiam” as her dowry), as well as “filius Rogeri de Berckel qui heres est” and “filie Rodberti” or failing her “filiam Hugonis de Hasle neptim Rodberti filii Hardingi” (with “manerium Sistone prope Bristou” as dowry), is dated to [Nov 1153], witnessed by “...Hugo de Hasela...Helyas frater Rodberti filii Hardingi, Jordanus frater eius...[650].  It is not known whether this betrothal proceeded to a marriage.  Betrothed ([1153/54] to ROGER de Berkeley, son of ROGER [III] de Berkeley & his wife --- (-after 1194). 

7.         ALDEVA .  It is possible that Aldeva was the second daughter of Robert who is mentioned in the betrothal agreement of her sister (see above).  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed land in Combe, in Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire given by "Nigellus" to "uxori sue Ald[eve] filie Roberti filii Hard[ingi] in dotalicium") by charter dated to [Jun 1153/Apr 1154][651]m NIGEL, son of ---. 

8.         [MARGARET (-after [1200]).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the undated charter under which “Mauritius de Gant” donated revenue from land "in manerio de Dersleia…quam emi de Margareta matertera mea quæ fuit uxor Othonis filii Willielmi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s[652].  The word “matertera” is normally translated by “maternal aunt”.  However, it is unlikely that Margaret was the sister of Avice de Gant, mother of Maurice de Gant, who appears to have been the only child by her father’s first marriage.  In addition, Margaret’s husband and Margaret herself are named in charters of the FitzHarding/Berkeley family which are quoted in this section.  It is more likely therefore that Margaret was Maurice’s paternal aunt.  “John de Wodeford” granted land in Nibley, Gloucestershire (“in Nubbeleia”), which he had recovered “contra Dom. Margaretam quondam uxorem Othonis fil. Willelmi”, to “Dom. Juliana de Ponte Arche wife of Robert de Berkeleia” by charter dated to [1200][653]m OTES FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM & his wife --- (-before [1200]).] 

 

 

NICHOLAS de Berkeley, son of ROBERT FitzHarding & his wife Eva --- (-5 May 1189).  “Robert Fitzharding” notified his grant of “land of Combe” to “his brother Helyas” by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Domina Eva, Maurice, Nicholas and Robert his sons...Otho son of William...[654].  Smyth quotes an undated charter under which "Robt fil Hard" granted "Hullam et Nimdesfeld" to "Nichol fil meo", produced by "Nicholaus son of Ralph great grandchilde of ye sayd Nicholaus sonne of this Lord Robert in the fifteenth of King Edward the first"[655].  “Roger de Berkeley” confirmed a grant of land to “Maurice son of Nigel” by charter dated to [1170/90, witnessed by “Dom. Maurice de Berkeley, Nicholas his brother, Robert de Berkeley and Richard his brother...[656].  A charter of King Edward II recalls the foundation of Bristol St Augustine, quoting a charter of King Henry II which was witnessed by “…Roberto filio Hardingi, Henrico et Mauricio filiis eius…”, and a charter of "Robertus filius Hardingi" witnessed by "Henri. archid. Exon. Mauricio, Nicholao, Roberto fratribus eius…"[657].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Mauricius de Berkelay c s, Nicholaus frater eius" in Gloucestershire in [1186/87][658].  The 1189/90 Pipe Rolls record that "Nichol fil Robti fil Harding" paid in respect of his lawsuit against "Aeliz uxorem Robti Giffard" relating to "terra de Stanbrige" in Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire[659]

m ALICE [de Teckenham, daughter of GUY de Teckenham & his wife ---].  “Nicholas son of Robert” donated land at Bristol to Bristol St Augustine, with the consent of “Henry his son and heir”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “...Ala wife of the said Nicholas, Henry his son, Jordan the latter’s brother...[660].  Smyth records that Nicholas married "Ala daughter and coheire of Guido als Wido sonne of Tecius lord of Tykenham, by which marriage his estate in Tykenham and in divers…lands in…Somersett, Cambridge etc was greatly advanced", but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[661]

Nicholas & his wife had six children: 

1.         HENRY de Berkeley .  “Nicholas son of Robert” donated land at Bristol to Bristol St Augustine, with the consent of “Henry his son and heir”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “...Ala wife of the said Nicholas, Henry his son, Jordan the latter’s brother...[662]

2.         ROGER de Berkeley (-1230).  Smyth records that "Rogerus filius Nicholaii filii Robti filii Hardingi" paid 500 marcs "pro habendis terris patris sui" in 1189[663].  Smyth records that Roger paid a fine to marry "Hawisia mother of Raph de Somery" in [1196/97][664].  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[665]m ([1196/97]) as her second husband, HAWISE Paynell, widow of JOHN de Somery, daughter of RALPH Paynell of Dudley & his wife --- (-after 1210).  “Hawys Paganella” confirmed donations to Tykford Priory by "Johannes de Sumeri vir meus" by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Sumeri filio meo[666].   Smyth records that Roger paid a fine to marry "Hawisia mother of Raph de Somery" in [1196/97][667].  “Hawis Paynel” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “domini mei Rogeri de Berkele”, for the soul of “Gervasii Paynel fratris mei”, by undated charter[668].   Hawise must have survived her son Ralph [II] de Somery, as shown by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240 which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", and passed from her to her grandsons: "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[669].  Roger & his wife had one child:   

a)         NICHOLAS de Berkeley (-before 26 May 1262).  A writ dated 26 May "46 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas son of Roger", names "Ralph his son is his heir and of full age" and "Hulle and Ninndesfeld manors held of the king in chief" in Gloucester and "Tikneham manor held of the earl Marshal" in Somerset[670]m SIBYLLA, daughter of ---.  Smyth records that Nicholas married "Sibill heire to the manor of Elmore"[671].  Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH (-1291).  A writ dated 26 May "46 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas son of Roger", names "Ralph his son is his heir and of full age" and "Hulle and Ninndesfeld manors held of the king in chief" in Gloucester and "Tikneham manor held of the earl Marshal" in Somerset[672]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

(a)       NICHOLAS ([6 Dec] [1261]-1312).  [A writ dated 17 Apr "11 Edw I" summoned a jury at Huntingdon to enquire whether "Nicholas son of Ralph…who was born and baptised at Oeverton (alias Everton) and is in the king’s wardship" was of full age, and confirmed that he was of full age[673].  It is not certain whether this document relates to the same Nicholas son of Ralph.]  Smyth quotes an undated charter under which "Robt fil Hard" granted "Hullam et Nimdesfeld" to "Nichol fil meo", produced by "Nicholaus son of Ralph great grandchilde of ye sayd Nicholaus sonne of this Lord Robert in the fifteenth of King Edward the first"[674]

3.         JORDAN de Berkeley .  “Nicholas son of Robert” donated land at Bristol to Bristol St Augustine, with the consent of “Henry his son and heir”, by charter dated to [late 12th century], witnessed by “...Ala wife of the said Nicholas, Henry his son, Jordan the latter’s brother...[675].  Smyth names "Roger, Jordan and Ala" as the children of Nicholas de Berkeley and his wife, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[676]

4.         [--- de Berkeley .  The father of Maurice de Berkeley may have been one of the other sons of Nicholas de Berkeley who are named above, maybe either Henry or Jordan.]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         MAURICE de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[677]

5.         ALICE de Berkeley .  Smyth names "Roger, Jordan and Ala marryed to Ralph Bloet" as the children of Nicholas de Berkeley and his wife, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[678]m RALPH Bloet, son of ---. 

6.         EUSTACE de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[679]

7.         OLIVER de Berkeley .  “Roger de Berkele” rented a meadow “at Gosintun called Luclemede” to “Maurice de Berkele his nephew” who paid a falcon to Roger and a besant to “Hawise Painel his wife”, by charter dated to the early years of the reign of King Henry III, witnessed by “Robert de Berkele, Eustace and Oliver brothers of the grantor...William de Berkele[680]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         NICHOLAS de Berkeley (-before 12 Jan [1263]).  A writ dated 12 Jan "47 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas de Berkeleye", names "Giles de Berkeleye his brother aged 22 on the day of St John the Baptist 46 Hen III is his heir" and "Eldresfelde" in Worcester[681]

2.         GILES de Berkeley ([1240]-).  A writ dated 12 Jan "47 Hen III", after the death of "Nicholas de Berkeleye", names "Giles de Berkeleye his brother aged 22 on the day of St John the Baptist 46 Hen III is his heir" and "Eldresfelde" in Worcester[682]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Berkeley .  The parentage of William has not been ascertained.  It would be chronologically consistent if he was another son of Robert de Berkeley and his wife Eva.  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Berkeley (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus filius Willelmi de Berkelega" holding one knight’s fee "in Eldresfeud" in Worcestershire in [1210/12][683]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM de Berkeley (-[8 May 1196/1200]).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 8 May 1196 in a claim by "Willelmus de Berklai" against "Rob de Bklai fratrem suum tenente de feudum dim militis in Portbi et…quarta parte feudi uni militi in Gosington"[684].  "Rob de Bikeleya" paid a fine for "custodia terre…Willi de Bikeleya fratris ipsius Rob" in Devonshire, dated 1200[685]

2.         ROBERT de Berkeley (-after 1200).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 8 May 1196 in a claim by "Willelmus de Berklai" against "Rob de Bklai fratrem suum tenente de feudum dim militis in Portbi et…quarta parte feudi uni militi in Gosington"[686].  "Rob de Bikeleya" paid a fine for "custodia terre…Willi de Bikeleya fratris ipsius Rob" in Devonshire, dated 1200[687]

 

 

THOMAS de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley & his wife Alice de Berkeley ([1170]-29 Nov 1243, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth quotes charters under which Alice granted "her manor of Slimbridge, being her owne franke marriage" to "Robert her eldest sonne", lands "in Radclivestreet" to "her sonne Thomas", lands in Berkeley "which she bought of William Heiron" to "William her sonne"[688].  "Thomas of Berkeley, brother and heir of Robert of Berkeley" owed a fine for "his relief of the lands formerly of Robert", dated [Aug] 1220[689]

m JOAN [de Somery], daughter of [RALPH [II] de Somery of Dudley, Worcestershire & his wife Margaret Crassus] (-after 1273).  Smyth records that Thomas married "Jone daughter of Sr Raph de Somery lord of Campden in Gloucestershire necce to Willm Marshall Earle of Pembrooke", and that she died during the reign of King Edward I, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[690].  "Joan de Berkele…and…Maurice de Berkele her son" were granted rights in "their manors of Wutton and Kamme, co Gloucester" dated 2 Aug 1252[691]

Thomas & his wife had eight children: 

1.         MAURICE de Berkeley (1218-4 Apr 1281, bur Bristol St Augustine).  "Joan de Berkele…and…Maurice de Berkele her son" were granted rights in "their manors of Wutton and Kamme, co Gloucester" dated 2 Aug 1252[692].  A writ dated 5 Apr "9 Edw I", after the death of "Maurice de Berkeley", names "Thomas his son aged 30 is his next heir[693]m (before 12 Jul 1247) ISABEL, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoy & his wife Rohese de Dover (-7 Jul [1276/77], bur Abbey of St Augustine, Bristol).  The Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester names "Richard fiz le rei…Ion" and  "the erles daoughter of Wareine" his mother, adding that "Sire Morisse of Berkeleye" married his daughter[694].  King Henry III granted her certain manors 10 Aug 1264 "out of compassion for the poverty of his niece"[695].  Maurice & his wife had two children: 

a)         MAURICE de Berkeley (-Kenilworth 1279).  He was killed in a tournament[696]

b)         THOMAS de Berkeley (Berkeley 1245-Berkeley 23 Jul 1321).  A writ dated 5 Apr "9 Edw I", after the death of "Maurice de Berkeley", names "Thomas his son aged 30 is his next heir[697].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Berkeley

-        see below

2.         MARGARET de Berkeley (-after 1265)m firstly JOHN FitzMatthew, son of MATTHEW FitzHerbert & his wife Joan Patric (-before 19 Jan 1261).  m secondly (before 18 Oct 1265) ANSEL Basset of Winford and Saltford, Somerset, son of --- (-Stoke 2 Oct 1280). 

 

 

C.      LORDS BERKELEY

 

 

THOMAS de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley & his wife Isabel [FitzRoy] (Berkeley 1245-Berkeley 23 Jul 1321).  A writ dated 5 Apr "9 Edw I", after the death of "Maurice de Berkeley", names "Thomas his son aged 30 is his next heir[698].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Berkeley

m (1267) JOAN de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his second wife Margaret de Quincy of the Earls of Winchester (-19 Mar 1310, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Thomas & his wife had children: 

1.         MAURICE de Berkeley ([Apr 1281]-31 May 1326, bur Wallingford, transferred to Bristol St Augustine’s)Lord Berkeleym firstly (1289) EVE La Zouche, daughter of EON La Zouche of Haringworth & his wife Millicent de Cantelou (-5 Dec 1314, bur Portbury, Somerset).  m secondly ([1316]) ISABEL de Clare, daughter of GILBERT de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hereford & his first wife Alice de Lusignan (10 Mar 1263-after 1322).  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “VI Id Mar” in 1262 of “filia Isabella” to “Gilberto de Clare filio Ricardi comitis Gloucestriæ…de uxore sua Alicia filia comitis Marchiæ[699].  Maurice & his first wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS de Berkeley ([1292]-27 Oct 1361, bur Berkeley Church)Lord Berkeleym firstly (before 25 Jul [1320], Papal dispensation to remain married Sep 1329) MARGARET de Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer [later Earl of March] & his wife Joan de Geneville (after 1307-5 May 1337, Bristol St Augustine’s).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem… Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Margaret married “Thomæ filio Mauricii de Berkley[700]m secondly (Charfield, Gloucestershire 30 May 1347) as her second husband, KATHARINE Clivedon, widow of PIERS le Veel of Tortworth, Gloucestershire, daughter of JOHN Clivedon of Charfield, Gloucestershire & his wife (-13 Mar 1385, bur Berkeley).  Thomas & his first wife had children: 

i)          MAURICE de Berkeley (1330-Berkeley Castle 8 Jun 1368, bur Bristol St Augustine’s).  He succeeded his father in 1361 as Lord Berkeley

-         see below

ii)         JOAN de Berkeley (-2 Oct 1369).  The will of "Joan de Cobham of Starburghe", dated 13 Aug 1369, chose burial “in the churchyard of St Mary Overhere in Southwark”, bequeathed property to “Henry Grey and Dame Joan his wife and to that Joane my daughter, to Joane daughter to that Joane” and a conditional bequest to “Reginald my son” relating to property “sold...to my husband in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father[701]m REGINALD de Cobham, son of REGINALD de Cobham & his wife Joan d’Evere (-7 Oct 1361, bur Lingfield).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1347 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cobham (of Sterborough). 

b)         ISABEL de Berkeley (-25 Jul 1362)m firstly (Berkeley Castle Jun 1328) ROBERT [II] de Clifford, son of ROBERT [I] de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Matilda de Clare (5 Nov 1305-20 May 1344).  m secondly (before 9 Jun 1345) THOMAS Musgrave, son of ---. 

2.         MARGARET Berkeley (-after 4 May 1320)m firstly (before 7 Feb 1284) THOMAS FitzMorice, son of MORICE FitzJohn & his wife Matilda de Barry ([Apr 1261]-Knockainy, co. Limerick 4 Jun 1298, bur Tralee Dominican Church, co. Kerry).  m secondly (before 5 Apr 1299) REYNOLD Rosel [Russel], son of ---. 

 

 

MAURICE de Berkeley, son of THOMAS de Berkeley Lord Berkeley & his first wife Margaret Mortimer of the Earls of March (1330-Berkeley Castle 8 Jun 1368, bur Bristol St Augustine’s).  He succeeded his father in 1361 as Lord Berkeley

m (1338) ELIZABETH Le Despencer, daughter of HUGH le Despencer Lord le Despencer & his wife Eleanor de Clare of the Earls of Gloucester (-13 Jul 1389, bur London St Botolph’s). 

Maurice & his wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Berkeley (Berkeley Castle 5 Jan 1353-13 Jul 1417, bur Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire)Lord Berkeley.  The will of "Thomas Lord Berkley", dated 2 Feb 1415, bequeathed property to “my daughter the Countess of Warwick[702]m (Nov 1367) MARGARET de Lisle Baroness Lisle, daughter of WARIN de Lisle Lord Lisle & his wife Margaret Pipard (-20 Mar 1392, bur Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire).  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         ELIZABETH Berkeley (after 1385-28 Dec 1422, bur Kingswood Abbey, Gloucestershire).  The will of "Thomas Lord Berkley", dated 2 Feb 1415, bequeathed property to “my daughter the Countess of Warwick[703].  Baroness Berkeley, Baroness Lisle.  The will of "Richard Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 9 Aug 1435, required a tomb to be erected “in the abbey of Kinswood, Gloucestershire on the grave of Elizabeth my first wife[704]m (covenant Sep 1392, before 5 Oct 1397) as his first wife, RICHARD de Beauchamp, son of THOMAS de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Margaret Ferrers (25 or 28 Jan 1382-Rouen 30 Apr 1439, bur 4 Oct 1439 Warwick, St Mary's).  He succeeded his father in 1401 as Earl of Warwick

2.         JAMES de Berkeley (-13 Jun 1405, bur Bristol St Augustine).  The will of "James Lord Berkley", dated 20 May 1404, chose burial “in the abbey of St Augustine’s near Bristol”, bequeathed property to “James my son” and appointed “Isabel my wife and James my said son” as executors[705]m ELIZABETH Bluet, daughter of JOHN Bluet of Raglan, Monmouthshire & his wife --- (-after 20 May 1404).  The will of "James Lord Berkley", dated 20 May 1404, bequeathed property to “James my son” and appointed “Isabel my wife and James my said son” as executors[706].  James & his wife had children: 

a)         JAMES de Berkeley (Raglan [1394]-Berkeley Castle Nov 1463, bur Berkeley).  The will of "James Lord Berkley", dated 20 May 1404, bequeathed property to “James my son” and appointed “Isabel my wife and James my said son” as executors[707]Lord Berkeleym firstly (contract 9 Apr 1410) --- St John, daughter of JOHN St John & his wife ---.  m secondly (1415) --- Stafford, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford of Hook, Dorset & his wife ---.  m thirdly ([1423/24]) as her second husband, ISABEL Mowbray, widow of HENRY Ferrers, daughter of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (-27 Sep 1452, bur Gloucester Grey Friars).  m fourthly (settlement 25 Jul 1457) as her first husband, JOAN Talbot, daughter of JOHN Talbot Earl of Shrewsbury & his first wife Matilda Neville Baroness Furnivalle.  She married secondly (before 26 May 1474) Edmund Hungerfold

-        LORDS BERKELEY, VISCOUNTS BERKELEY, EARLS of BERKELEY[708]

 

 

 

LORDS BOTETOURT

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

 

GUY Botetourt of Ellingham, Norfolk (-[1316]). 

m ---.  The name of Guy’s wife is not known. 

Guy & his wife had [one child]: 

1.         [JOHN Botetourt ([1265]-25 Nov 1324).  According to The Complete Peerage, the parentage of John Botetourt is unknown[709].  His parentage was studied by F. N. Craig, who sets out evidence which indicates that he was the son of Guy Botetourt of Ellingham, Norfolk, his predecessor in the manors of Ellingham, Uphall and Upton[710].  [Many modern secondary sources indicate that John was an illegitimate son of Edward I King of England, based on a Hailes abbey chronicle which names him as such[711].  Michael Prestwich comments that "in general terms, the Hailes chronicle is a reliable source", but highlights that Botetourt’s name is "in a genealogical table" in the chronicle and "appears to be written over an erasure".  He concludes that "there is nothing in Botecourt’s career to suggest that he was an illegitimate son of the king" and that "in the absence of any corroborative evidence, it is difficult to credit the evidence of the genealogical table"[712].  Nevertheless, if the parentage as stated in the Hailes chronicle is incorrect, there must be some explanation for John Botetourt’s name being included, which is not otherwise obvious.]  Governor of St Briavel's Castle, Gloucestershire 1291.  The Annales Londonienses name "domini Johannes Buttetort" among the judges sitting in London in 1302[713].  He took a leading part in the Scottish wars of King Edward I.  He was summoned to Parliament in 1305, whereby he is held to have become Lord Botetourt.  Lord of Mendlesham, Suffolk, in right of his wife.  He joined the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster, and fought at the battle of Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1321/2.  m ([1 Jul 1285/Jun 1292]) MATILDA, daughter of THOMAS FitzOtes of Mendelsham, Suffolk & his wife Beatrice de Beauc hamp ([1268/69]-after 28 May 1329).  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as her surviving heirs "…with the heirs of the body of Beatrice sometime sister of the said Simon", adding that Beatrice had married "first to Thomas son of Otto, who had by her a son named Otto now deceased, and a daughter named Maud now aged 26 years and the wife of John Botetourte…"[714].  John & his wife had six children:

a)         THOMAS Botetourt (-1322)m JOAN de Somery, daughter of ROGER [V] de Somery & his wife Agnes --- ([1291/2]-after 18 Jan 1327).  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Botetourt ([1317/18]-1385, bur Halesowen).  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Botetourt

-         see below

b)         JOHN Botetourt (-1339).  Of Gestingthorp and Belchamp Otto, Essex.  m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-1276).  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Botetourtm JOAN Gernon, daughter and heiress of JOHN Gernon & his wife ---.  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOANm ROBERT Swynburne Kt, son of ---.

c)         OTES Botetourtm ---.  Otes & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Botetourtm CATHERINE Wayland, daughter of WILLIAM Wayland Kt & his wife ---.  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOAN Botetourtm JOHN Knyvet, son of JOHN Knyvet Kt & his wife ---.

d)         ROBERT Botetourt (-after 8 Jan 1326). 

e)         ELIZABETH Botetourt (-11 Apr 1384, bur Newnham, Priory Church)m firstly WILLIAM le Latimer Lord Latimer, son of WILLIAM Lord Latimer & his first wife Lucy de Thweng ([1301-1335 before 2 Nov).  m secondly (before 20 Aug 1337) ROBERT de Ufford, son of ROBERT de Ufford Earl of Suffolk & his wife Margaret de Cailly (-before 29 Jun 1368).

f)          JOAN BotetourtBetrothed to ROBERT, son of ROBERT Fitzwalter Lord of Wodeham, Essex & his wife ---. 

 

 

JOHN Botetourt, son of THOMAS Botetourt & his wife Joan de Somery ([1317/18]-1385, bur Halesowen).  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Botetourt.  The will of "John Botetort Lord of Weley", dated 24 Jun 1383, chose burial “in the abbey of Hales”, bequeathed property to “Maud my daughter abbess of Polesworth...my daughter Anneyne a nun at Elstow[715]

m firstly MAUD de Grey, daughter of JOHN de Grey Lord Grey of Rotherfield & his wife Matilda ---. 

m secondly (before 31 May 1347) JOYCE Zouche, daughter of WILLIAM Zouche [formerly Mortimer] Lord Zouche of Mortimer & his first wife Alice de Tosny (-after 4 May 1372). 

John & his first wife had two children: 

1.         ELIZABETH BotetourtBetrothed to BALDWIN Frevile of Tamworth, Staffordshire, son of --- (-1388). 

2.         JOYCE Botetourt (-1410)m firstly BALDWIN Frevile of Tamworth, Staffordshire, son of --- (-1388).  m secondly ADAM Pershall of Weston-under-Lizard, Staffordshire, son of ---. 

John & his second wife had five children: 

3.         JOHN Botetourt (-1369)m MAUD de Grey, daughter of JOHN de Grey Lord Grey of Rotherfield & his wife Maud de Burghersh.  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN Botetourt (-young). 

b)         JOYCE Botetourt (-1 Jan 1407, bur Hales Abbey, Shropshire)m (1386 before 22 May) as his second wife, HUGH Burnell Lord Burnell, son of NICHOLAS Burnell, formerly Haudlo, & his wife Maud Burnell ([1346]-27 Nov 1420, bur Hales Abbey, Shropshire).  No children. 

4.         MATILDA Botetourt .  Abbess of Polesworth.  The will of "John Botetort Lord of Weley", dated 24 Jun 1383, chose burial “in the abbey of Hales”, bequeathed property to “Maud my daughter abbess of Polesworth...my daughter Anneyne a nun at Elstow[716]

5.         AGNES Botetourt .  Nun at Elstow.  The will of "John Botetort Lord of Weley", dated 24 Jun 1383, chose burial “in the abbey of Hales”, bequeathed property to “Maud my daughter abbess of Polesworth...my daughter Anneyne a nun at Elstow[717]

6.         ALICE Botetourtm JOHN Kyriel of Eynsford, Kent, son of ---. 

7.         CATHERINE Botetourtm MAURICE Berkeley of Stoke Gifford, Gloucestershire, son of --- (-1361). 

 

 

 

LORDS BOURCHIER

 

 

According to the Complete Peerage, the name Bourchier is written in so many different ways as to render its etymology very doubtful[718].  The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

1.         JOHN Bourchier [Bugchier or Bousser], son of --- (-1329).  Of Stansted, Essex.  m HELEN, daughter and heiress of WALTER of Colchester & his wife ---.  John & his wife had two children:

a)         ROBERT (-[18 May] 1349, bur Halstead, Essex).  Lord Chancellor 14 Dec 1340.  Robert de Bourcher knight” granted rent from Stansted to “master John de Bourcher archdeacon of Essex...[his brother]” by document dated 30 Jan 1342[719]He was summoned to Parliament 20 Nov 1348, whereby he is held to have become Lord Bourchier.  He died of the plague[720]m MARGARET Prayers, daughter of THOMAS Prayers of Sible Hedingham, Essex & his wife Anne of Essex.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN (-21 May 1400).  He succeeded his father in 1349 as Lord Bourchierm ELIZABETH Coggeshall, daughter of JOHN Coggeshall & his wife ---.  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       BARTHOLOMEW (-18 May 1409, bur Halstead, Essex).  He succeeded his father in 1400 as Lord Bourchierm firstly (before 5 Jul 1396) as her second husband, MARGARET, widow of JOHN Sutton, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her third husband, IDOINE Lovey, widow firstly of EDMUND Brooksburn and secondly of JOHN Glevant, daughter of --- Lovey & his wife --- (-12 Sep 1410).  Lord Bartholomew & his second wife had one child:

(1)       ELIZABETH ([1399]-1 Jul 1433, bur Westminster Abbey).  She succeeded her father in 1409 as Baroness Bourchier, suo iurem firstly (before Sep 1410) HUGH Stafford, son of --- (-25 Oct 1420).  m secondly LEWIS Robessart, son of --- (-killed in battle near Amiens 26 Nov 1431, Westminster Abbey). 

ii)         WILLIAM Bourchier (-1375)

-         see below

b)         JOHN .  Archdeacon of Essex.  Robert de Bourcher knight” granted rent from Stansted to “master John de Bourcher archdeacon of Essex...[his brother]” by document dated 30 Jan 1342[721]

 

 

WILLIAM Bourchier, son of ROBERT Bourchier Lord Bourchier & his wife Margaret Prayers (-1375).  A manuscript calendar records the death “49 Edw 3” of “Dñi Willi de Bourgchier milit[722]

m ELEANOR de Lovayne, daughter of JOHN Lovayne [Louvain] of Little Easton and Broxted, Essex and Bildeston, Suffolk & his second wife Margaret Weston (Little Easton 27 Mar 1345-5 Oct 1397).  A manuscript calendar records the death in 1397 of “Dñe Elionore de Bourgchier[723]

William & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM Bourchier (-Troyes 28 May 1420, bur Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire).  He was appointed Constable of the Tower of London 26 Nov 1415.  He was created Comte d'Eu 10 Jun 1419.  A manuscript calendar records the death in Jun 1420 of “Dñi de Bourghr[724]m (before 20 Nov 1405) as her third husband, ANNE of Gloucester, widow firstly of THOMAS de Stafford Earl of Stafford and secondly of EDMUND de Stafford Earl of Stafford, daughter of THOMAS "of Woodstock" Duke of Gloucester & his wife Eleanor de Bohun (Apr 1383-16 Oct 1438, bur Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire).  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, chose burial “in ye churche of L’Anthony byside Gloucestre”, appointed “my sones Thomas bysshop of Worcestre, Henry Erle of Eue, Will Bougchiers, John Bourghiers...” and required “my...sone Humfrey Erle of Stafford” to oversee execution of the will[725].  William & his wife had five children:

a)         HENRY (-1483).  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, appointed “my sones Thomas bysshop of Worcestre, Henry Erle of Eue, Will Bougchiers, John Bourghiers...[726].  He was created Earl of Essex in 1461. 

-        EARLS of ESSEX

b)         THOMAS ([1405]-1486).  Bishop of Worcester.  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, appointed “my sones Thomas bysshop of Worcestre, Henry Erle of Eue, Will Bougchiers, John Bourghiers...[727].  Archbishop of Canterbury.  The will of "Humphrey Stafford Duke of Buckingham", dated 16 Aug 1460, appointed “my wife...my brother of Canterbury” as executors[728].  Cardinal 1464. 

c)         WILLIAM ([1412]-1469).  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, appointed “my sones Thomas bysshop of Worcestre, Henry Erle of Eue, Will Bougchiers, John Bourghiers...[729].  Lord Fitzwarine.  m firstly (1437) THOMASINE, daughter of RICHARD Hankeford & his wife --- (1423-1453).  m secondly as her second husband, CATHERINE Affeton, widow of HUGH Stukeley, daughter of JOHN Affeton & his wife ---.  Ancestors of LORDS FITZWARINE. 

d)         JOHN ([1415]-1474).  The will of "Anne Countess of Stafford, Bockingh, Herford and Northampton, and Lady of Breknoc", dated 16 Oct 1438, appointed “my sones Thomas bysshop of Worcestre, Henry Erle of Eue, Will Bougchiers, John Bourghiers...[730].  Baron Berners 1455.  m as her second husband, MARJORIE Berners, widow of JOHN Ferreby, daughter of RICHARD Berners & his wife --- (-1475).  Ancestors of LORDS BERNERS. 

e)         ELEANOR ([1417]-Nov 1474, bur Thetford)m (1424) JOHN Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Earl of Norfolk & his wife Katherine Neville (12 Sep 1415-6 Nov 1461, bur Thetford).  He succeeded his father in 1432 as Duke of Norfolk

 

 

 

BREWES (BRIOUSE/BRAOSE)

 

 

Briouse was a family of some importance in England during the first two centuries which followed the Norman conquest.  Loyd says that “Briouze” is located in the present-day French département of Orne, arrondissement Argentan, canton Briouze, citing the charter dated 30 Jan 1080 which is quoted below[731]It is assumed that Guillaume [I] de Briouse was among the first Normans to settle in England.  Judging by the number of his holdings listed in the Domesday Book, he must have taken an active part in the conquest and as a result found great favour with King William I: Elwes calculates that he held 28 manors in Sussex, 35 in Surrey, 47 in Hampshire, 61 in Berkshire, 72 in Wiltshire and 82 in Dorsetshire, although Bamber Castle in Sussex was his headquarters[732]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         --- [de Briouse] m GUNNORA, daughter of ---.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Gonnor matris Willelmi de Breosa" of land "in Bavent…et…in Rovres et in Cierneio et in Craissanvilla et in Quatrepuiz", by charter dated to [1180/82][733].  Stapleton says that “Gunnora, the mother of William de Briouze, was apparently another daughter of the same parentage of Alberada” (sister of Foulque d’Anet) but he provides no basis for his statement or other explanation[734][Three children]: 

a)         GUILLAUME [I] de Briouse (-[11 Dec 1093/1095]).  “…Willielmus de Brai, Bernardus de Novomercato” witnessed the charter dated to [1070] under which William King of England donated property to Battle abbey[735].  A charter dated 1073 recorded the donation by "Braiosa Willelmus" to St Nicholas of Bramber, confirmed by "Phylippo filio eius"[736].  “Willielmus de Braiosa” founded Sele Priory, with the consent of "Philippo filio meo unigenito", by charter dated 30 Jan [1075], later confirmed by "Philippi concessit uxor eius Aanor et Willielmus filius suus" by charter dated 5 Jan [no year][737].  The Chronicle of Battle Abbey records that "Willelmus cognomento de Braiosa" donated property to Battle abbey, later confirmed by "Philippus de Braiosa, coram patre suo Willelmo prædicto"[738].  "Willelmus de Braiosa" donated revenue to the church of Saints Gervaise et Protais de Briouze, for the souls of "Radulfi Waldulfi filii, Radulfique filii sui atque Gausfredi", by charter dated 30 Jan 1080[739].  “…Willielmi de Braiosa…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[740].  Domesday Book records the holdings of “William de Braose”, including in Burghbeach Hundred and Steyning Hundred, in Sussex; in Copthorne and Effingham Hundreds in Surrey; land in Neathem Hundred in Hampshire; several land-holdings in Dorset[741].  A charter dated to [1086] notifies a plea held by William I King of England concerning "William de Braiose" and Fécamp abbey[742].  A charter dated 11 Dec 1093 records the dedication of the church of Saint-Gervais de Briouze and the confirmation by "Guillelmus de Braiosa…et Philippi filii sui…Guillelmus…de Crenella nepos ipsius"[743]m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  The charter dated 13 Jan 1103, under which “Philippus de Braosa” confirmed agreement with the abbey of Fécamp witnessed by “ex parte Philippi, Robertus frater eius, Anchetilli filius...[744], suggests that Guillaume de Braose may have married, as her second husband, the widow of Anschetil d’Harcourt.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

i)          PHILIP [I] de Briouse ([1060/70]-[1131/39]).  A charter dated 1073 recorded the donation by "Braiosa Willelmus" to St Nicholas of Bramber, confirmed by "Phylippo filio eius"[745].  His birth date is estimated very approximately from the first mention of his son which is dated to [1096].  If it is correct, as suggested above, that the wife of Guillaume [I] de Briouse was a Norman, it is likely that his son Philip was born in Normandy before the conquest or in England soon afterwards.  “Willielmus de Braiosa” founded Sele Priory, with the consent of "Philippo filio meo unigenito", by charter dated 30 Jan [1075], later confirmed by "Philippi concessit uxor eius Aanor et Willielmus filius suus" by charter dated 5 Jan [no year][746].  The Chronicle of Battle Abbey records that "Willelmus cognomento de Braiosa" donated property to Battle abbey, later confirmed by "Philippus de Braiosa, coram patre suo Willelmo prædicto"[747].  A charted dated 11 Dec 1093 records the dedication of the church of Saint-Gervais de Briouze and the confirmation by "Guillelmus de Braiosa…et Philippi filii sui…Guillelmus…de Crenella nepos ipsius"[748].  "Phylippus de Braiosa" confirmed all the donations to Saint-Florent de Saumur by "pater suus Willelmus" by charter dated before 1096, witnessed by "Willelmus filius Baderonis et Paganus frater Rius…"[749].  "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", before leaving for Jerusalem, by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[750].  “Philippus de Braosa” confirmed agreement with the abbey of Fécamp by charter dated 13 Jan 1103 which names "Willielmus Philippi pater", and is witnessed by “ex parte Philippi, Robertus frater eius, Anchetilli filius...[751].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Philippus de Brausa et Willelmus Malet et Willelmus Barnard et Helias comes Cenomanniæ” were deprived of their lands in 1110, a later passage recording that Philippe de Briouse was restored in 1112[752].  A charter dated 1121 confirmed the possessions of Lewes Priory including the donation of "…Brebra salinas…" by "Ph de Braiosa"[753].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Philippo de Braiose" in Sussex[754]m ELEANOR, daughter of JUHEL de Totnes Lord of Barnstaple & his wife --- de Piquigny.  "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[755].  Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Barnstaple Priory by "Johelis avi sui" by undated charter[756].  Philip & his wife had four children: 

(a)       WILLIAM [II] de Briouse (before 5 Jan [1096]-after [1175]).  "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", before leaving for Jerusalem, by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[757]

-         see below

(b)       ROBERT de Briouse (-after [1140]).  "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…"[758]

(c)       PHILIP [II] de Briouse (-after 1177).  "Willielmus de Braiosa" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze by "Philippus de Braiosa pater eiusdem Willielmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum"[759].  "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…", later confirmed by "Willelmus dominus de Braiosa filius Philippi, avi mei filii Willelmi" witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum…"[760].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Philippus de Braosa" held two knight’s fee in Hampshire from the bishop of Winchester, as well as claiming a third which was held by "Willelmus de Braosa"[761].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Philippo de Braiosa" in Dorset and Somerset[762].  The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “three fleets of Englishmen arrived in Ireland” in 1177, those of “Hugo de Lacy…William Fitz Audeline and…Philip de Breusa (Pilip de Preis)”, adding that Philip’s went to Waterford[763].  King John confirmed "honore de Limeric" to "Willo de Braos", as King Henry II had granted it to "Philipp de Braos avunculo predicti Willlemi", by charter dated 12 Jan 1201[764]

(d)       ROGER de Briouse .  “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Abergavenny Priory by “Hamelinus de Balon et Brientius comitis filius et Walterus de Herefort et Henricus de Herefort” by undated charter, witnessed by “Rogero fratre meo…[765]

b)         [daughter .  The precise relationship between Guillaume de Briouse and Guillaume de Crenelle is not known but it is assumed from the document quoted below that the latter was the son of the former’s sister.  m ---.]  One child: 

i)          GUILLAUME de Crenelle (-after 11 Dec 1093).  A charted dated 11 Dec 1093 records the dedication of the church of Saint-Gervais de Briouze and the confirmation by "Guillelmus de Braiosa…et Philippi filii sui…Guillelmus…de Crenella nepos ipsius"[766]

c)         [daughter .  The precise relationship between Guillaume de Briouse and Herbert is not known but it is assumed from the document quoted below that the latter was the son of the former’s sister.  m ---.]  One child: 

i)          HERBERT (-after 11 Dec 1093).  A charter dated 18 Jun [1097/1100] records the donation of the church of Sevrai to "Rogero Carpito" to hold as his predecessor had done from "Guillelmus de Braiosa", witnessed by "Herberto nepote domni Guillelmi"[767]

 

 

The relationship between the following person and the main Briouse family has not been identified, but presumably he was closely related to Philip [I] de Briouse who is recording as acting as his pledge: 

1.         PAYN de Briouse (-after 1129).  "…Pagano de Braiosa…" witnessed the charter dated to [1119/24] under which "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso[768].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Pagan de Braiosa" for whom "Philipp de Braisa est plaigi" in Bedfordshire[769]

 

 

WILLIAM [II] de Briouse, son of PHILIPPE de Briouse & his wife Eleanor de Barnstaple (before 5 Jan [1096]-after [1175]).  The most difficult question relating to William [II] de Briouse is whether he in fact represents one person or two persons, father and son.  If the charter dated to [1096] is correctly dated, his life was improbably long if he was one person.  In addition, the 1157 Pipe Roll lists William among "Nova Placita et Novæ Conventiones" for the honour of Barnstaple, which suggests that the William in question had recently inherited his property rights, presumably from his father as the death of his supposed grandfather Philippe is dated to [1131/39].  This looks straightforward until we consider the charter dated [1140], which clarifies that Bertha of Gloucester was the wife of William, son of Philippe de Briouse, which appears to exclude their being two individuals named William.  "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", before leaving for Jerusalem, by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[770].  "Willielmus de Braiosa" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze by "Philippus de Braiosa pater eiusdem Willielmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum"[771].  "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…", later confirmed by "Willelmus dominus de Braiosa filius Philippi, avi mei filii Willelmi" witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum…"[772].  A charter dated [1154] records that "Willelmus de Braiosa et Willelmus de Harecourt" donated the church of Sumtinges to the Templars[773].  This joint donation suggests a family relationship between the donors, but this has not yet been traced.  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Will’s de Braiosa" owing 1000 marks for "parte sua de honore de Barnestapl" in "Nova Placita et Novæ Conventiones"[774].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Will. de Braiosa" in Herefordshire[775].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Willelmi de Brahosa de honore de Berdestaple" in Devon[776].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Breose xxviii m" in Devonshire in [1167/68][777].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willemus de Braiosa" with three knights "de Braiosa"[778].  He was Lord of Abergavenny and Brecon from [1173] by grant of his brother-in-law Mahel FitzMiles[779].  The Annales Cambriæ record that "Willielmo de Breusa" killed "Seisil filius Dinawal et Gefrei filius eius…in Abergavenni" in 1175[780].  “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Abergavenny Priory by “Hamelinus de Balon et Brientius comitis filius et Walterus de Herefort et Henricus de Herefort” by undated charter, witnessed by “Rogero fratre meo…[781]

m (before [1140]) BERTHA, daughter of MILES of Gloucester Earl of Hereford & his wife Sibylle de Neufmarché.  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Berthe married “Philippo de Brusa domino de Duelth“ (naming their descendants) and inherited “tota terra Breconiæ, Wenciæ superioris et Gower[782].  A manuscript narrating the history of Brecknock priory records that “Berte” married “Willame de Brewes”, and also lists her descendants[783].  "Willielmus de Braiosa" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze by "Philippus de Braiosa pater eiusdem Willielmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum"[784].  "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…", later confirmed by "Willelmus dominus de Braiosa filius Philippi, avi mei filii Willelmi" witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum…"[785]

William & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         WILLIAM [III] de Briouse (-Corbeil 9 Apr 1211, bur Paris, Saint-Victor).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that William was disinherited by King John[786]

-        see below

2.         [BERTHA de Briouse .  According to Domesday Descendants, the wife of William [I] de Beauchamp was "Bertha, daughter of William II de Braose"[787].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified but, if it is correct, the chronology of her husband’s family suggests that she must have been one of her parents’ older children.  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that "according to an early 14th century inquest, he married Berta, a daughter of the marcher lord William de Braose c. 1140 and received with her lands in three villages in south Gloucestershire", but noting that the jurors incorrectly state that Bertha was the wife of the great-grandfather of Guy Earl of Warwick who would have been William [II] de Beauchamp[788].  A connection between the Briouse and Beauchamp families is indicated by the claim brought by Amice (wife of William [II] de Beauchamp) in 1198 against William de Briouse, presumably identifiable as William [III] de Briouse.  The implication is that the land in Oxfordshire, subject of the claim, was inherited by Amice’s infant son (on behalf of whom she was presumably acting) from Briouse ancestors.  If that is correct, a likely explanation is that the land was inherited from the infant’s maternal grandmother, having been brought to William [I] de Beauchamp on his marriage.  Nevertheless the chronology is not ideal, considering the dating of the marriage of William [I]’s father to before Aug 1114 (which suggests that William [I] must have been considerably older than his wife if she was the daughter of William [II] de Briouse) and the birth of his grandson William [II] in [1194/96].  m WILLIAM [I] de Beauchamp, son of WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley & his wife [Emmeline] de Abitot (-1170).] 

3.         [REYNOLD de Briouse .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that William was disinherited by King John[789].  This document suggests that Reynold, son of William [II] de Briouse, was a different person from Reynold, son of William [III] de Briouse (see below), but this hypothesis has not been confirmed by any primary source.  As noted below, another source confirms that Giles Bishop of Hereford (also named as the son of William [II] in this manuscript) was the son of William [III] de Briouse, which casts doubt on the reliability of the Lanthony Abbey manuscript and therefore the likelihood of the existence of Reynold, son of William [II], as a separate person.] 

4.         SIBYL (-after 5 Feb 1228).  “Willielmus comes de Ferrariis” donated property to Tutbury Priory, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Sibillæ et liberorum meorum”, by charter which names “antecessores mei…Henricus de Ferrariis et Engenulphus et Robertus avus meus et Robertus comes pater meus[790].  “Robertus [mistake for Willielmus] comes de Ferrariis” donated property to Dore Abbey, for the souls of “Sibilla de Braosa, uxoris meæ matris W. filii mei et sua, et…Bertæ (fuit filia Milonis comitis Herefordiæ) matris uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[791].  The Complete Peerage states that this charter is considered to be a fabrication, and that there is no other proof of the parentage of William’s wife[792].  However, another document indicates Sibyl’s parentage: a charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king’s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “Willielmus de Breosa...Matildis de Heya uxor sua et W. comes de Ferar. nepos suus et Adam de Porter qui sororem suam habuit in uxorem” petitioned the king (presumably in [1209/10])[793].  While confirming that the mother of William de Ferrers Earl of Derby was the sister of William [III] de Briouse, this document does not state that she was the same daughter of William [II] de Briouse who married Adam de Port.  Confirmation of this fact awaits the emergence of a primary source which records that Adam’s second wife was named Sibyl.  m [firstly] WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl [of Derby], son of ROBERT de Ferrers Earl [of Derby] & his wife Margaret [Peverel] (-killed in battle Acre 1190 before 21 Oct).  [m secondly as his second wife, ADAM de Port, son of JOHN de Port & his wife Maud --- ([1150/55]-[26 Jun/28 Jul] 1213).] 

 

 

WILLIAM [III] de Briouse, son of WILLIAM [II] de Briouse Lord of Abergavenny, Briouse, Bramber, Brecon and Over-Gwent & his wife Bertha of Hereford (-Corbeil 9 Apr 1211, bur Paris, Saint-Victor).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that William was disinherited by King John[794].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Breose xxviii l de honore de Berdestaple" in Devonshire in [1186/87][795].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Braosa" in Sussex[796].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Willelmus de Breose" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[797].  "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…", later confirmed by "Willelmus dominus de Braiosa filius Philippi, avi mei filii Willelmi" witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum…"[798].  King John confirmed "honore de Limeric" to "Willo de Braos", as King Henry II had granted it to "Philipp de Braos avunculo predicti Willlemi", by charter dated 12 Jan 1201[799].  "Willelmus de Braosa dominus de Brechen" donated property to Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Matildis de Sancto Walerico et puerorum nostrorum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Willelmo et Philippo filiis meis"[800].  His lands were forfeited by King John in 1208[801].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Guillaumes de Brayouse" fled from King John to France[802].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1211 “apud Curbulam vigilia Sancti Laurentii” of "Willelmus de Brause senior” who had fled Ireland for France[803].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Willelmus…de Brausa” fled “apud Sorham” after his wife and son were captured and died in Paris soon afterwards[804].  The Annals of Margan record the death in 1211 of “Willielmus de Breusa senior exul in Francia[805]

m ([1170/75]) MATHILDE de Saint-Valéry, daughter of BERNARD de Saint-Valéry & his [second wife Anora ---] (-Corfe Castle 1210).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre names "fille fu Bernart de Saint-Waleri…Mehaus" as the wife of "Guillaumes de Brayouse", commenting that she once boasted about her cows to "Bauduin le conte d’Aubemalle son neveu"[806].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Matildis de S. Walerico, quondam uxoris Willielmi de Brewes” when recording the marriage of her daughter[807].  "Willelmus de Braosa dominus de Brechen" donated property to Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Matildis de Sancto Walerico et puerorum nostrorum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Willelmo et Philippo filiis meis"[808].  Matthew Paris records that "uxorem Willelmi de Brause et Willelmum filium eius cum uxore sua" were captured in 1210 at the siege of Meath, but escaped, were captured again “in insula de May”, and imprisoned at Windsor, in a later passage recording that all four died “apud Windleshores[809].  A charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king’s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “consanguineus de Galweya...Dunecanus de Karyc” had “apud Cracfergus” at some point (presumably in [1209/10]) captured “Matildis de Haya...et filiam suam uxorem filii Rogeri de Mortimer et...Willelmum juniorem et uxorem suam et duos filios suos[810].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Matildis matrona nobilis cognomento de la Haie, uxor Willelmi de Braose” was captured with “Willelmo filio suo milite…in Galwaitha” in 1210 and starved to death “apud Windeshores[811].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Mathildis uxor eius et Willielmus filius eorum” (referring to William, son of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”) were imprisoned by King John and died in prison[812].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmum de Brause juniorem et sororem eius et Matildam matrem eius” were captured in Ireland in 1210 by King John, adding that they later died in prison[813].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Mehaus sa feme [Guillaumes de Braiouse] et Guillaumes ses fils" fled from King John to Ireland where they were captured at "le castiel de Cracfergu", taken to England, and imprisoned at "el castiel del Corf" where they were starved to death[814].  The question whether "Mathilde de Saint-Valéry" and "Mathilde de la Haie" refer to the same person appears to be resolved by the 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre which records her parentage and the circumstances of her death in the same lengthy passage. 

William [III] & his wife had ten children: 

1.         MARGERY ([1175/85]-after 1255).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Walterus”, son of “Gilbertus de Lacy”, married “Margeriam filiam Matildis de S. Walerico, quondam uxoris Willielmi de Brewes[815].  This wording suggests that Margery may have been her mother’s daughter by an earlier marriage, not the daughter of William de Briouse, although no other primary source has yet been identified which suggests that Maud married twice.  Nevertheless, the Annals of Worcester record that King John exiled “Walterum de Lacy” in 1211 because he would not repudiate “uxorem suam, filiam W. de Breaus[816].  Her birth date range is estimated based firstly on her oldest son having had three children before he died in 1230, and her husband’s birth estimated to [1172].  If the range is correct, it is likely that Margery was one of her parents’s older children.  A charter of King Edward II dated 26 Jan 1326 confirmed donations to Lanthony Abbey, among which a donation by “Walterus de Lacy filius Hugonis de Lacy” for the soul of “dominæ Margeriæ uxoris meæ[817].  King John granted land "in foresta nostra de Acornebur" to "Margaret de Lascy" to build a religious house, for the souls of "W. de Breusa patris sui, Matillid matris sue et W. fratris sui", dated 10 Oct 1216[818].  "Walterus de Lacy" confirmed the donation by "Margeria uxor mea" to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire by charter dated to [1220/25], witnessed by “domino Willielmo de Lascy, domino Simone de Clifford, priore de Careswell, Egidio de Clifford…[819].  An undated charter of Henry III King of England confirmed a donation by ”Walterus de Lacy” to the Hospital of Ludlow, Shropshire, for the souls of “Margeriæ uxoris meæ…Gilberti de Lacy filii mei[820].  A charter dated 10 Oct 1241 ordered her dower to be assigned to "Margery who was the wife of Walter de Lacy"[821]m WALTER de Lacy Lord of Meath, son of HUGH de Lacy Lord of Meath & his first wife Rose de Monmouth ([1172]-before 24 Feb 1241).  

2.         LAURETTE (-Hackington 4 Mar [1266 or after]).  Her parentage is confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Willelmus de Brause" granted "manerium de Taustock" in Devon to "comiti Leycestrie in maritagium cum filia sua"[822].  Robert son of Parnel, Earl of Leicester, donated property to the abbey of Lire for the soul of Loreta his wife, by charter dated to [1190/1204][823].  She became a recluse at Hackington, near Canterbury, before Feb 1221[824]The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "4 Mar" of "Laureta comitissa"[825]m ROBERT de Breteuil "FitzPernel" Earl of Leicester, son of ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester & his wife Pernelle de Grantmesnil (-[17/20/21] Oct 1204, bur Leicester Abbey). 

3.         ELEANOR [Annor] (-after 26 Jan 1241).  A charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king’s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “consanguineus de Galweya...Dunecanus de Karyc” had “apud Cracfergus” at some point (presumably in [1209/10]) captured “Matildis de Haya...et filiam suam uxorem filii Rogeri de Mortimer et...Willelmum juniorem et uxorem suam et duos filios suos[826].  King Henry III granted property "in Cherleton et in Chiriton, quam Willelmus de Breusa pater predicte Annore ei dedit in maritagio" to "Annore que fuit uxor Hugonis de Mortuo Mari" dated 28 Sep 1232[827]m (before [1209/10]) HUGH [IV] de Mortimer of Wigmore, son of ROGER [III] de Mortimer & his [first wife Millicent de Ferrers] (-10 Nov 1227, bur Wigmore). 

4.         WILLIAM [IV] de Briouse (-Corfe 1210).  "Willelmus de Braosa dominus de Brechen" donated property to Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Matildis de Sancto Walerico et puerorum nostrorum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Willelmo et Philippo filiis meis"[828].  Matthew Paris records that "uxorem Willelmi de Brause et Willelmum filium eius cum uxore sua" were captured in 1210 at the siege of Meath, but escaped, were captured again “in insula de May”, and imprisoned at Windsor, in a later passage recording that all four died “apud Windleshores[829].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Matildis matrona nobilis cognomento de la Haie, uxor Willelmi de Braose” was captured with “Willelmo filio suo milite…in Galwaitha” in 1210 and starved to death “apud Windeshores[830].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Mathildis uxor eius et Willielmus filius eorum” (referring to William, son of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”) were imprisoned by King John and died in prison[831].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmum de Brause juniorem et sororem eius et Matildam matrem eius” were captured in Ireland in 1210 by King John, adding that they later died in prison[832].  A charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king’s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “consanguineus de Galweya...Dunecanus de Karyc” had “apud Cracfergus” at some point (presumably in [1209/10]) captured “Matildis de Haya...et filiam suam uxorem filii Rogeri de Mortimer et...Willelmum juniorem et uxorem suam et duos filios suos[833].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Mehaus sa feme [Guillaumes de Braiouse] et Guillaumes ses fils" fled from King John to Ireland where they were captured at "le castiel de Cracfergu", taken to England, and imprisoned at "el castiel del Corf" where they were starved to death[834]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king’s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “consanguineus de Galweya...Dunecanus de Karyc” had “apud Cracfergus” at some point (presumably in [1209/10]) captured “Matildis de Haya...et filiam suam uxorem filii Rogeri de Mortimer et...Willelmum juniorem et uxorem suam et duos filios suos[835].  Matthew Paris records that "uxorem Willelmi de Brause et Willelmum filium eius cum uxore sua" were captured in 1210 at the siege of Meath, but escaped, were captured again “in insula de May”, and imprisoned at Windsor, in a later passage recording that all four died “apud Windleshores[836].  This report appears to be inaccurate concerning the death of the younger William’s wife, in light of the sources quoted below in which she is named later.  [Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Matillis de Breusa" dated 13 Aug 1217, but the extract neither states the purpose or destination of the journey nor gives any further information to identify Matilda more precisely[837].]  “Matilda de Clere who was the wife of Wm de Breus” demanded “a third part of the manors of Sheiham, Braeck, Beding [and others]” from “Reginald de Breus” in 1219[838].  Elwes quotes this claim as part of the same action under which “John de Breus” demanded “the castle of Brembre” from “Reginald de Breus”.  This latter claim is summarised by Bracton, who does not include any reference to a claim by Matilda[839].  Two possible parentages of Matilda, wife of William [IV], have been proposed.  The first possibility, according to Elwes, is that William’s wife was “the daughter of Ralph and sister and coheir of John de Fay”, adding that “after her first husband Wm de Braose’s death in 1210, [she] married Roger de Clere[840].  He cites no primary source on which he bases this information.  Drake, in a short Braose pedigree, expands the information slightly when he records the wife of William [IV] as “Matilda dau. of Ralph de Fay, sister and heiress of John de Fay of Bromley, co. Surrey, d. 1249” but also cites no primary source[841].  The connection between the Fay and Clere families can be established by two claims recorded by Bracton.  Under the first, dated 1231, "Hugo de Neouilla et Beatricia uxor eius" claimed against "Rogerum de Clere et Matillidem uxorem eius" revenue from "Childerst" which Beatrix held "per Radulfum de Fay primum virum suum", the defendants stating “ad warantum Johannem de Fay filium et heredum predicti Radulfi de Fay qui presens est” that they had “ingressum in terram...per predictum Radulfum patrem suum[842].  The second, dated 1232, is a claim by "Hugo de Neouilla et Beatricia uxor eius" against "Johannem de Fay filium et heredem Radulfi de Fay" relating to land "in Brumlegha in com. Surreie" in which "Rogerus de Clere et Matillis uxor eius" had “ingressum...per Radulfum de Fay quondam virum ipsius Beatricie[843].  Bracton’s summaries do not state any relationship between Ralph de Fay and Matilda nor, more importantly, do they establish any connection with the Briouse family.  The second possibility is that William [IV] married Matilda de Clare, daughter of Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford & his wife Amice of Gloucester ([1185/90]-).  This marriage is stated in many secondary sources, but the primary source which confirms this parentage and marriage of William’s wife has not yet been identified.  If her parentage is correct, she was presumably the earl of Hertford’s daughter who married secondly (1219) Rhys ap Rhys "Gryg/the Hoarse".  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "Rhys the Hoarse married the daughter of the earl of Clare" in 1219[844].  This second possibility appears more plausible, given the generally high-profile marriages contracted by the Briouse family at the time.  In addition, a writ dated 27 Dec "46 Hen III", after the death of "Richard Lungespeye" refers to the manor of "Brumleghe" in Surrey being held by “John de Fay...after whose death it was parted between his two sisters Maud and Philippa, and from the said Maud issued a daughter Agatha...[845].  The absence in this passage of any mention of the Briouse family, who would have been the senior heirs of “Maud” if she had married William [IV] de Briouse, suggests that she could not have been his wife.  William [IV] & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         JOHN de Briouse ([1197/1201]-1232).  Henry III King of England ordered the release of "Johannes, Egidius et Philippus et Walterus filii Willelmi de Braosa" dated [Jan] 1218[846]

-        see below

b)         GILES de Briouse .  Henry III King of England ordered the release of "Johannes, Egidius et Philippus et Walterus filii Willelmi de Braosa" dated [Jan] 1218[847]

c)         PHILIP de Briouse .  Henry III King of England ordered the release of "Johannes, Egidius et Philippus et Walterus filii Willelmi de Braosa" dated [Jan] 1218[848]

d)         WALTER de Briouse (-after 8 Jul 1226).  Henry III King of England ordered the release of "Johannes, Egidius et Philippus et Walterus filii Willelmi de Braosa" dated [Jan] 1218[849].  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to a claim by the abbot of Gloucester against "Walterum de Braosa et Hawisiam uxorem eius" about "ecclesia de Hanendon" dated 8 Jul 1226[850]m (Royal licence 11 Jul 1223) HAWISE de London, daughter of THOMAS de London & his wife Eva [de Tracy] (-after 8 Jul 1226).  Henry III King of England granted licence for the marriage of "Waltero de Braosa" and "Hawisie filie et heredis…Thome de London", with "honore de Kedewelli et de Cadewathlan…maritagium", dated 11 Jul 1223[851].  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to a claim by the abbot of Gloucester against "Walterum de Braosa et Hawisiam uxorem eius" about "ecclesia de Hanendon" dated 8 Jul 1226[852]

e)         [MATILDA .  Drake, in a short Braose pedigree, records that “Loretta countess of Leicester” [daughter of William [III] de Briouse, see above] granted “the manor and advowson of Tawstock, co. Devon” to “her niece Matilda and the heirs of her body”, citing a writ dated 1391 and adding that the same document confirms that William [IV] de Briouse was the grantor’s brother[853].  He also states that Matilda, the grantee, married “Henry de Tracy Lord of Barnstaple, ob. 2 Edw I (1273-4)”, but does not cite the primary source which confirms that this marriage is correct.  However, he does record the manor of Tawstock (presumably Tavistock) was later held by the second husband of Matilda, daughter of Eva de Tracy and heir of Henry de Tracy according to the inquisitions quoted above.  From a chronological point of view, the proposal appears possible.  m HENRY de Tracy, son of OLIVER de Tracy & his [second] wife Eva [FitzWarin] (-before 21 Aug 1274).] 

5.         GILES de Briouse (-Gloucester 13 Nov 1215, bur Hereford Cathedral).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that Giles was Bishop of Hereford[854].  Giles de Briouse is more often shown in secondary sources as the son of William [III] de Briouse and his wife Mathilde, which is confirmed as correct by an order dated 10 May 1215 which confirms that "E. Epc Heford" had judgment of the fine made for "terra q fuit W. de Braiosa patris sui"[855], which must refer to William [III] who died in 1211.  This source also shows that Giles must have been his parents’ second son, inheriting his father’s lands in preference to the infant son of his deceased older brother William [IV].  Bishop of Hereford 1200.  Matthew Paris records that "Gilo de Brause" was consecrated bishop of Hereford “VIII Kal Oct apud Westmonasterium” in 1200[856].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Ægidius Herefordensis episcopus” died in 1216[857]

6.         PHILIP de Briouse .  "Willelmus de Braosa dominus de Brechen" donated property to Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Matildis de Sancto Walerico et puerorum nostrorum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Willelmo et Philippo filiis meis"[858]m as her first husband, MATILDA [Eva] de Pont de l’Arche, daughter of --- (-after 1 Sep 1227).  She married secondly William FitzWilliam Baron of Naas.  "William baron of Naas and Eva his wife" paid a fine for "having dower in the manor of Grene, which pertains to Eva of the free tenement formerly of Phillip de Braose, her former husband, in Ireland", dated 12 Sep 1220[859].  A charter dated 1 Sep 1227 records that "Matilda who was the wife of the Baron of Nas represents that the justiciary…has disseised her of her dower out of…those of Philip de Breouse her first husband" and the king’s order to restore the property to her[860]

7.         MATILDA de Briouse (-21 Dec 1209, bur Strata Florida)Her parentage is confirmed by the which Annales Cambriæ name "Griffinus…" and "Willielmoque de Breusa socero suo"[861].  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records the death in 1209 "on the feast of St Thomas the Martyr...at Llanbadarn the Great" of “Mahalt de Bruse, the mother of the sons of Gruffudd son of Rhys” and her burial “with her husband at Strata Florida[862]m (1189) GRUFFYDD ap Rhys, son of RHYS ap Gruffydd King of Deheubarth & his wife Gwenllian of Powys (-[Jul/Aug] 1201, bur Strata Florida).  He succeeded his father in 1197 as King of Deheubarth

8.         daughter .  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmum de Brause juniorem et sororem eius et Matildam matrem eius” were captured in Ireland in 1210 by King John, adding that they later died in prison[863]

9.         --- .  The identity of Leuca’s parents is not known.  Her father or mother may have been one of the other children of William [III] de Briouse who are named in this section.  m ----  One child: 

a)         LEUCA (-before 28 Aug 1236).  King Henry III granted "to Lucy wife of the late Godfrey de Kanville of all the land in Ireland which William de Breouse her late grandfather gave with her in marriage to Godfrey and which the latter held when he died" by charter dated 20 Sep 1219[864].  King Henry III ordered that "Leuca who was the wife of Geoffrey de Caunville [have] her marriage portion out of the land of her late husband in that country", adding that he had purchased it from "William de Abbetot nephew of Philip de Wigorn…10 or 12 years before he married Leuca", by charter dated to [1219/20][865].  "Ricardus de Camvill" claimed "terciam parte manerii de Clifton" from “Leucam que fuit uxor Galfridi de Camvill”, dated 1231[866].  It is assumed that she died before 28 Aug 1236 when Henry III King of England restored to "William de Canville son and heir of Geoffrey de Cannville the land of Fedemercum which Leuca mother of the said William held in dower of the gift of Geoffrey her husband"[867]m as his second wife, GEOFFREY de Canville, son of --- (-before 20 Sep 1219). 

10.      REYNOLD de Briouse (-[5 May 1227/9 Jun 1228]).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 24 Jun 1217 under which King Henry III notified those on the lands of "William de Breouse in Ireland" that "Reginald de Breouse having come to his fealty, the king restores to him all the lands which belonged to his father ere"[868].  Another version of his parentage, shown to be incorrect, by this 1217 document, is recorded in the manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey and names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that Reynold inherited all the territories of his older brothers[869].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Reginaldus frater eius” succeeded on the death of “Ægidius Herefordensis episcopus” in 1216, with the help of “Leulini Regis Walliæ” whose daughter he married[870].  Henry III King of England notified a land agreement between "Reginaldum de Braosa" and "Johannem de Braosa" dated 5 Nov 1226[871]m firstly GRACE, daughter of WILLIAM Briwere & his wife Beatrix ---.  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Reginaldus de Brews” married “filiam domini Willielmus de la Bruere[872].  A manuscript recording the heirs of William de Briouse records that “Willielmus de Breus” married "Graciam primogenitam et unam hæredum Willielmi Briwere"[873]m secondly ([1215/16]) GWLADUS Ddu, illegitimate daughter of LLEWELYN ap Iorwerth Prince of North Wales & his mistress --- (-Windsor 1251).  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Reginaldus frater eius” (referring to “Ægidius Herefordensis episcopus”) married “Leulini Regis Walliæ…filiam” in 1216[874].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Radulphus” married “Lewelinus princeps…Gwladusam Duy filiam suam”, who brought her husband “omnibus terries de Kery et Kedewyn[875].  Henry III King of England granted protection to "Gwladosa filia…[L.] principis [Norwallie] que fuit uxor Reginaldi de Brausa" dated [May] 1229[876].  Henry III King of England granted safe passage to "David filium L. principis Norwallier in veniendo ad regem ad faciendum ei homagium suum, et sororem ipsius David" dated 5 Sep 1229[877].  It is likely that this unnamed sister of David was Gwladus, coming to England with her brother before her second marriage.  She married secondly (1230) Ralph [II] de Mortimer of Wigmore.  The Annals of Worcester record that “Radulphus de Mortuomari” married “filiam Lewelini, conjugem quondam Reginaldi de Breusa” in 1230[878].  The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1251 of "Gladus filia domini Lewelini" at Windsor[879].]  Reynold & his first wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Briouse (-hanged 2 May 1230).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus de Brews quartus” as son of “Reginaldus de Brews” and his wife “filiam domini Willielmus de la Bruere[880].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Braosa" holding one knight’s fee "in Eadburgetone" in Kent in [1210/12][881].  Henry III King of England granted "honore de la Cnappe et de…Bremble", relinquished by "Reginaldus de Braosa", to "Willelmo de Braosa filio et heredi suo" dated 7 Aug 1218[882].  "Willelmi de Braosa" gave homage to King Henry III for lands "que Reginaldus de Braosa pater suus de rege tenuit in capite" dated 13 Jul 1228[883].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “W. de Breuse filius Reginaldi de Breuse” was captured by “Lewelinum” in 1228[884].  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "William Bruse was hanged by Llywelyn son of Iorewerth, having been caught in the chamber of the prince with the princess Jannet, daughter of King John and wife of the prince" in 1230[885].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus de Brause” was captured and hanged by “Leulino” in 1230[886].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “Lewelinus princeps Norwalliæ” captured and hanged “Willelmum de Breuse filium Reginaldi” after Easter in 1230[887].  The Annals of Margan record that “Lewelinus” captured and killed “Willelmum de Brewsa juniorem” in 1230, adding that it was partly motivated by his old hatred of “progenitorum suorum…Willelmi de Brewas senioris et Matildis de Sancto Walerico uxoris suæ” who had killed many Welsh people[888], which confuses William de Briouse, son of Reynold, with his cousin William de Briouse, son of William (see above).  m EVA Marshal, daughter of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel Ctss of Pembroke ([1200/10]-before 1246).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva" married "Willielmo de Brewes"[889].  If it is correct that Eva was her parents’ fifth daughter, she would have been born after [1200].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus de Brews quartus” married “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli[890].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a letter from "L. princeps" to "domino W. Marescallo comiti Penbrochiæ" assuring him that he still wishes the proposed marriage between "neptem vestram et filium nostrum David" to take place[891].  King Henry III granted "in villa de Haya" to "Eve de Braose" dated 6 Jun 1232[892].  William & his wife had four children: 

i)          ISABEL de Briouse (-1248).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Isabel married “David filio Lewelini principis Walliæ[893].  A letter from "L. princeps de Aberfrau, dominus Snauedoniæ" to "E. de Braus", dated [May] 1230, enquires whether she wishes the proposed marriage between "David filium nostrum et I. filiam vestram" to take place[894].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus de Brause…filiam suam” married “Leulino…filio”, with as her dowry “castello de Boet”, which reverted to her family after her husband died[895]m (1230) DAFYDD ap Llywelyn, son of LLYWELYN ap Iorwerth Fawr ("the Great") Prince of Wales & his second/third wife Joan [illegitimate daughter of John King of England] ([1208]-25 Feb 1246, bur Aberconway).  He succeeded his father in 1240 as DAFYDD II Prince of Wales

ii)         MATILDA de Briouse (-before 23 Mar 1301).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Matilda married “Rogero de Mortuomari, domino de Wyggemore[896].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Matilda, Alianora et Eva" as the three daughters of "Willielmo de Brewes" and his wife "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva", adding that Matilda married "domino Rogero de Mortuo-mari domino de Wigmore"[897].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rog. (secundus)…Radulphi et Gwladusæ filius” married “Matildem de Brewys, filiam domini Willielmi de Brewys domini de Breghnoc[898].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[899]m (1247) ROGER [IV] de Mortimer, son of RALPH [II] de Mortimer of Wigmore & his wife Gwladus Ddu of Wales ([Cwmaron Castle] [1231]-Kingsland, Herefordshire before 5 Oct 1282, bur Wigmore). 

iii)        EVA de Briouse (-20 Jul 1255).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Eva married “Willielmo de Cauntello[900].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Matilda, Alianora et Eva" as the three daughters of "Willielmo de Brewes" and his wife "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva", adding that "Eva tertia filia" married "Willielmo de Cantilupo", by whom she was mother of "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch"[901].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[902].  Heiress of Abergavenny.  The Annals of Dunstable record that “domina Eva uxor Willelmi de Cantilupo” died “circa festum Sanctæ Margaretæ” in 1255[903]m ([25 Jul 1238/15 Feb 1248]) WILLIAM [IV] de Cantelou, son of WILLIAM [III] de Cantelou & his [first] wife Mélisende de Gournay (Calstone, Wiltshire 25 Sep 1254, bur Studley Priory, Warwickshire). 

iv)       ELEANOR de Briouse (-bur Llanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Eleanor married “Hunfredo de Bohun quinto cum dominio de Brekenok”, corrected to “Humfredus sextus” in a later passage which also adds that the marriage took place after the death of Humphrey’s mother[904].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Matilda, Alianora et Eva" as the three daughters of "Willielmo de Brewes" and his wife "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva", adding that Eleanor married "Humfrido de Bohun vi"[905].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “…Elionor of Brewis, Ladi and heire of the land of Bricon…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[906]m (after Aug 1241) as his first wife, HUMPHREY [VI] de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [V] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his first wife Matilda de Lusignan (-Beeston Castle, Cheshire 27 Oct 1265, bur Combermere Abbey). 

 

 

The relationships between the following persons and the main Briouse family have not yet been ascertained. 

 

1.         JOHN de Briouse (-before 1224, maybe before 27 May 1205)m (after [1200]) as her second husband, AMABILIS de Limesey, widow of HUGH Bardolf, daughter of --- (-after 27 May 1205, maybe after [1224/Jun 1225]).  "Amabil q fuit ux Hug Bard" paid a fine not to be constrained to marry and agreed to marry only with the consent of the king "quamdiu sit vidua pro morte Johannis de Braosa quondam viri sui", in Warwickshire, dated 27 May 1205[907].  The significance of the phrase in which John de Briouse is named in this document is difficult to determine.  The literal translation presents no problems: “for so long as she may be a widow because of the death of her late husband John de Briouse”.  Her marriage to John obviously took place before May 1205, but does this phrase mean that he was already dead?  Read literally, if Amabilis was already John’s widow, she would only cease to be such if she died or remarried.  Remarriage would breach the term imposed by the king, if without his consent.  The reference to John would therefore seem irrelevant for the purposes of the document: if he was already dead, why not simply write “Amabil q fuit ux Johannis de Braosa”?  Another possibility is that the document was anticipating what would happen if her current husband (John) died at some time in the future.  The wording is consistent with that case as well, i.e. John would become “quondam” in the future but was not so in 1205.  However, it seems unlikely that King John would impose a condition contingent on a future event, when he could easily impose another fine in the future when that event happened.  Another factor is introduced by the charter dated [1224/Jun 1225] which is quoted below: if John had died before May 1205, why would Amabilis wait 20 years before issuing the confirmation (unless that document was in fact reporting events which happened years earlier)?  Neither of these possibilities seems to provide a satisfactory explanation for the wording of the 27 May 1205 charter.  Until further evidence comes to light, the only safe conclusions are that Amabilis died after 27 May 1205, maybe after [1224/Jun 1225], and that her second husband died before 1224, maybe before 27 May 1205.  "Amable de Limesie…post obitum Johannis de Brawose quondam viri mei" confirmed grants of land to "Benedicto filio Murielis", in accordance with earlier grants made by "Gaufridi de Limesie et Johannis de Limesie antecessorum meorum" to "Alexandro filio Thony" who held the land "tempore Radulfi de Limesie et predictorum Gaufridi et Johannis de Limesie", by charter dated to [1224/Jun 1225][908]

 

2.         INGELRAM de Briouse (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Engeram de Braosa" holding "Sturtes" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][909]

 

3.         REYNOLD de Briouse (-before 19 Jun 1222).  Henry III King of England announced the death of "Reginaldi de Braosa" and granted custody of his castles to "Willelmum de Cantilupo senescallum nostrum, Johannem de Monemue, et Rogerum de Clifford" dated 19 Jun 1222[910]

 

 

B.      LORDS BREWOSE

 

 

JOHN de Briouse, son of WILLIAM de Briouse & his wife --- ([1197/1201]-1232 before 18 Jul).  Henry III King of England ordered the release of "Johannes, Egidius et Philippus et Walterus filii Willelmi de Braosa" dated [Jan] 1218[911].  Bracton records that “Johannes de Breiusa” demanded “castrum de Brembre” from “[Reginaldus] de Breiusa”, dated 1219, stating that it had been held by “Willelmus de Breiusa avus suus” and descended by law to “Willelmo filio suo et heredi et patri ipsius Johannis” and that he was then 22 years old “vel prope xxii annorum” [which suggests that the age may have been overstated][912].  Henry III King of England notified a land agreement between "Reginaldum de Braosa" and "Johannem de Braosa" dated 5 Nov 1226[913].  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "John de Bruse died of a cruel death having been bruised by his horse" in 1232[914]

m (1219) as her first husband, MARGARET of Wales, illegitimate daughter of LLEWELYN ap Iorwerth Prince of North Wales & his mistress --- (-1272 or after, bur [Acornbury Priory, Herefordshire]).  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "John de Bruse married Margaret the daughter of Llywelyn son of Iorwerth" in 1219[915].  She married secondly Walter [III] de Clifford of Clifford Castle, Herefordshire.  "Katerina de Lacy filia Walteri de Lacy" donated land in Cofham, held by "domino Waltero de Clifford", to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, for the souls of “fratris mei…et…dicti Walteri de Clifford et Margaretæ uxoris suæ et Margaretæ filiæ ipsius” by undated charter, witnessed by "domino Willielmo de Evereus, domino Rogero de Clifford, domino Ricardo Tirel, domino Roberto de Lacy, domino Willielmo de Rachesford…"[916].  "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, also donated by "Katherinæ filiæ Walteri de Lacy", for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ” by undated charter[917].  "Margareta quondam uxor domini Walteri de Clifford" elected burial at Acornbury priory, Herefordshire by charter dated “tertia die dominica proxima ante festum sancti Thomæ apostoli” in 1260, witnessed by "…Henrico de Clifford…"[918]

John & his wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Breuse (-Findon 1290, bur Sele, Sussex).  "William de Breous son and heir of John de Breus" was granted "a yearly fair at his manor of Horsham", dated 3 Aug 1233[919].  "Domino Willilemo de Brawoso…" (presumably the donor’s stepson) witnessed the undated charter under which "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ[920].  "Willielmus de Breuse miles" confirmed a donation to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire made by “dominus Johannes de Breus pater meus"  by charter dated 22 Jan [1290][921].  He sat in the Parliament of 1290, whereby he is held to have become Lord Brewose.  Leland quotes a manuscript which records the death in 1290 "apud Findon" of "Gul de Breosa senior" and his burial "in monaster de Sele"[922]m firstly ALINE de Multon, daughter of THOMAS de Multon of Burgh-on-Sans, Cumberland & his wife Maud de Vaux.  m secondly AGNES de Moeles, daughter of NICHOLAS de Moeles [Mules] of Cadbury, Somerset & his wife ---.  m thirdly (1271 or before) MARY de Ros, daughter of WILLIAM de Ros of Helmsley, Lord Ros & his wife Isabel d’Aubigny of Belvoir (-before 23 May 1326).  William & his third wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Breuse (-before 1 May 1326).  Wrottesley shows "William, Richard ob s.p., Peter, Margaret" as the children of "William de Breouse lord of Brembre 9 E.1=Mary", in a claim brought by "Thomas de Breouse" against "Alina formerly wife of John de Moubray" for the manors of Grenestede, Wassington and Fyndon in Sussex[923]Lord Brewosem firstly ---.  m secondly ELIZABETH de Sully, daughter of RAYMUND de Sully of Sully, co. Glamorgan & his wife --- ([1295/96]-before 24 Aug 1328).  William & his first wife had two children: 

i)          ALINE de Breuse (-before 20 Jul 1331).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Roger]” married “Elianoram filiam domini Willielmi de Brewes in Wallia[924]m firstly (Swansea 1298) JOHN de Mowbray, son of ROGER de Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Rohese de Clare (4 Sep 1286-hanged York 23 Mar 1322).  m secondly  RICHARD de Peshale, son of ---. 

ii)         JOAN de Breuse (-before 23 Jun 1324)m firstly (1301 or before) JAMES de Bohun of Maddenstown, co. Kildare, son of --- (-1306).  m secondly RICHARD [VI] Foliot of Gressenhall, Norfolk, son of JORDAN [IV] Foliot Lord Foliot & his wife Margery de Neufmarché (25 Dec 1283-before 23 Jul 1317). 

b)         RICHARD de Breuse .  Wrottesley shows "William, Richard ob s.p., Peter, Margaret" as the children of "William de Breouse lord of Brembre 9 E.1=Mary", in a claim brought by "Thomas de Breouse" against "Alina formerly wife of John de Moubray" for the manors of Grenestede, Wassington and Fyndon in Sussex[925]

c)         PETER de Breuse (-[1311/12]).  Wrottesley shows "William, Richard ob s.p., Peter, Margaret" as the children of "William de Breouse lord of Brembre 9 E.1=Mary", in a claim brought by "Thomas de Breouse" against "Alina formerly wife of John de Moubray" for the manors of Grenestede, Wassington and Fyndon in Sussex[926]

-        see below

d)         MARGARET de Breuse .  Wrottesley shows "William, Richard ob s.p., Peter, Margaret" as the children of "William de Breouse lord of Brembre 9 E.1=Mary", in a claim brought by "Thomas de Breouse" against "Alina formerly wife of John de Moubray" for the manors of Grenestede, Wassington and Fyndon in Sussex[927]

2.         RICHARD de Briouse (before 1232-before 18 Jun 1292, bur Woodbridge Priory)m (before 9 Sep 1265) as her second husband, ALICE le Rus, widow of RICHARD Longespee, daughter of WILLIAM le Rus of Stinton, Norfolk & his wife Agatha de Clere of Bramley, Surrey (25 Dec 1245 or 1247-before 28 Jan 1301, bur Woodbridge Priory). 

-        BREWES Family of STINTON[928]

 

 

C.      LORDS BREWES

 

 

PIERS de Brewes of Tetbury, Gloucestershire, son of WILLIAM de Breuse Lord Brewose & his third wife Mary de Ros (-[1311/12]).  Wrottesley shows "William, Richard ob s.p., Peter, Margaret" as the children of "William de Breouse lord of Brembre 9 E.1=Mary", in a claim brought by "Thomas de Breouse" against "Alina formerly wife of John de Moubray" for the manors of Grenestede, Wassington and Fyndon in Sussex[929]

m AGNES, daughter of ---. 

Piers & his wife had two children: 

1.         THOMAS de Brewes (8 Sep 1301-9 or 16 Jun 1361).  Wrottesley shows "Thomas the plaintiff" as the son of "Peter [de Breouse]", in a claim brought by "Thomas de Breouse" against "Alina formerly wife of John de Moubray" for the manors of Grenestede, Wassington and Fyndon in Sussex[930].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1348 whereby he is held to have become Lord Brewesm ([1334] before 13 Sep 1337) as her second husband, BEATRICE Mortimer, widow of EDWARD of Norfolk, daughter of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer [later Earl of March] & his wife Joan de Geneville [Joinville] (-16 Oct 1383).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam… Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam … Matildam… Blanchiam…et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Beatrice married “Edwardo filio et hæredi domini Thomæ Brotherton comitis marescalli” and after the death of her first husband “domino Thomæ de Breusa[931].  Thomas & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN de Brewes ([1338/39]-3 Feb 1367)m (contract 15 Jan 1361) ELIZABETH Mountagu, daughter of EDWARD Mountagu Lord Mountagu & his wife --- (-before 29 Nov 1361). 

b)         THOMAS de Brewes ([1351/52]-2 Sep 1395, bur Horsham, Sussex)m as her first husband, MARGARET, daughter of --- (-12 or 20 Aug 1444).  She married secondly (royal licence 6 Jan 1396) as his second wife, William Burcestre.  She married secondly (after 22 Feb 1410) as his third wife, John Berkeley of Beverstone, Gloucestershire.  Thomas & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOAN de Brewes (1393-10 Oct 1395). 

ii)         THOMAS de Brewes (26 Aug 1395-7 Oct 1395). 

c)         BEATRICE de Brewes m WILLIAM de Say Lord Say, son of GEOFFREY de Say Lord Say & his wife Maud de Beauchamp of the Earls of Warwick (Birling 17 Jun 1340-before 7 Aug 1375). 

2.         MARY de Brewes, m firstly RALPH de Cobham Lord Cobham of Norfolk, son of JOHN de Cobham & his wife ---(-5 Feb 1326).  m secondly ([1328]) as his second wife, THOMAS "of Brotherton", son of EDWARD I King of England & his second wife Marguerite de France (Brotherton, Yorkshire 1 Jun 1300-[4 Aug/20 Sep] 1338, bur Abbey of Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk). 

 

 

 

LORDS BURGHERSH

 

 

1.         HERBERT Burghersh (-before 1262).  He is named in the petition of his grandson Robert dated 4 Apr 1299, quoted below, which clarifies that he died before his second son was disseised by Pierre de Savoie (whose departure from England is dated to 1262, see the document SAVOY).  m ---.  The name of Herbert’s wife is not known.  Herbert & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN Burghersh (-before 1262).  He is named in the petition of his grandson Robert dated 4 Apr 1299, quoted below, which clarifies that he died before his younger brother was disseised by Pierre de Savoie (whose departure from England is dated to 1262, see the document SAVOY). 

b)         REYNOLD Burghersh of Burghersh, Sussex, Chiddingstone, Kent .  He is named as brother of John Burghersh and father of Robert Burghersh in the 4 Apr 1299 petition quoted below.  m ---.  The name of Reynold’s wife is not known.  Reynold & his wife had [two] children:

i)          ROBERT Burghersh (-[2 Jul/8 Oct] 1306).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1303 whereby he is held to have become Lord Burghersh

-         see below

ii)         [--- de Burghersh .  Her parentage and marriage is indicated by the will of [presumably her grandson] "Walter Paveley Knight", dated 21 Nov 1379, which requested the erection of a stone “in the chapel of Bocton church for my grandsire and granddame, with the escutcheon of Paveley and Burghersh quarterly[932]m --- Paveley, son of ---.] 

 

 

ROBERT Burghersh, son of REYNOLD Burghersh of Burghersh, Sussex, Chiddingstone, Kent & his wife --- (-[2 Jul/8 Oct] 1306).  “Robert de Burghesshe” petitioned for property “60 acres of land in Westhamme within the liberty of the Cinque Ports” bought “of the barony of L’Aigle then in the hands of Peter de Sabaudia”, bought by “Herbert de Burghesshe his grandfather” and which after his death passed to “John his son and heir”, and after his death to “Reginald brother of the said John and father of the petitioner” who was unjustly disseised by “the said Peter”, recorded in a commission to Walter de Gloucester dated 4 Apr 1299[933].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1303 whereby he is held to have become Lord Burghersh

m MAUD Badlesmere, daughter of GUNCELIN Badlesmere & his wife Joan [FitzBernard] (-after 2 Jan 1306). 

Robert & his wife had children: 

1.         STEPHEN Burghersh ([1282/83]-[1309/10]). 

2.         BARTHOLOMEW Burghersh (-3 Aug 1355, bur Grey Friars, London)Lord Burghershm (before 11 Jun 1320) ELIZABETH de Verdun, daughter of THEOBALD [II] de Verdun of Alton, Staffordshire, Lord Verdun & his first wife Matilda de Mortimer ([1305/06]-1360, bur Grey Friars, London).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 30 Jul "10 Edw II" after the death of "Theobald de Verdon alias de Verdun” name “Elizabeth late his wife is pregnant of a living child. His daughters Joan aged 13, Elizabeth aged 10 and Margery aged 7 are his next heirs”, specifying that Elizabeth had married “Bartholomew de Burghersh[934].  Bartholomew & his wife had four children: 

a)         BARTHOLOMEW Burghersh ([1328/29]-5 Apr 1369)Lord Burghersh.  The will of "Bartholomew Burghersh Knight", dated 4 Apr 1369, chose burial “in the chapel of Walsyngham”, bequeathed property to “Margaret my wife...Walter Paveley...John Dassels[935]m firstly (before 10 May 1335) CECILY de Weyland, daughter of RICHARD de Weyland of Blaxhall and Cockfield, Suffolk & his wife --- (-after Aug 1354).  m secondly (before Aug 1366) as her second husband, MARGARET ---, widow of --- Pichard, daughter of --- (-1 Jul 1393).  The will of "Bartholomew Burghersh Knight", dated 4 Apr 1369, bequeathed property to “Margaret my wife...Walter Paveley...John Dassels[936].  She married thirdly as his first wife, William Burcester.  Bartholomew & his first wife had one child: 

i)          ELIZABETH Burghersh (before 1347-26 Jul 1409, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” married “dominam Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Borowashe”, adding in a later passage that she died “die sanctæ Annæ 1409” and was buried in Tewkesbury abbey[937].  The will of "Edward Lord Despenser Lord of Glamorgan and Morgannock", dated 6 Nov 1375, chose burial “in the abbey of Tewksbury”, bequeathed property to “Elizabeth my wife...Ralf de Ferrers my uncle...John d’Odingsells[938].  The will of "Elizabeth de Burghersh Lady Despenser", dated 4 Jul 1409, chose burial “in the church of Our Lady at Tewksbury betwixt my...husband Edward Lord Despenser and my son Thomas le Despenser”, bequeathed property to “the Lady Morley my daughter...the Lady Margaret Ferrers my daughter...Philippa my daughter...Elizabeth daughter to the aforesaid Margaret[939]m (before 2 Aug 1354) EDWARD Le Despencer, son of EDWARD Le Despencer of Buckland, Buckinghamshire & his wife Anne Ferrers of Groby (Essendine 24 Mar 1336-Llanblethian, co. Glamorgan 11 Nov 1375, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  Lord le Despencer 1357. 

b)         HENRY Burghersh (-Nov 1348)m (Aug 1347 or before) as her first husband, ISABEL de St John, daughter of HUGH de St John & his wife Mirabel --- (-[16/17] Oct 1393).  She married secondly (before 29 Jan 1349) Luke de Poynings

c)         JOAN Burghersh (-4 Oct 1404, bur Canterbury Cathedral)m (before Sep 1342) JOHN de Mohun Lord Mohun, son of JOHN de Mohun & his wife Christian de Segrave ([1319/20]-15 Sep 1375). 

d)         ELIZABETH Burghersh m (1347) MAURICE Earl of Kildare, son of THOMAS Earl of Kildare & his wife Joan de Burgh of the Earls of Ulster (-1390, bur Dublin Holy Trinity). 

 

 

 

LORDS CAMVILLE

 

 

Loyd says that this family originated in Canville-les-Deux-Eglises in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Yvetot, canton Doudeville[940]

 

 

1.         ROGER de Camville (-before 1130).  m ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "uxore Rog de Capuilla…filii eius" in Leicestershire[941].  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         WALTER de Camville .  "Rogerus de Canuilla" confirmed the donation of land at Theddingworth, Leicestershire to the abbey of St Mary de Pré, Leicester, at the request of "Walteri de Canuilla patris mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Canuilla…"[942].  “Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit” and for the salvation of “mea et Roehais uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Roberto de Verdun, Waltero de Canvile, Ada de Aldithelee...Willielmo Pantouf, Radulpho de Biseche, Rogero Bagot, Philippo de Draicote, Milone de Verdun[943]m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROGER de Camville .  "Rogerus de Canuilla" confirmed the donation of land at Theddingworth, Leicestershire to the abbey of St Mary de Pré, Leicester, at the request of "Walteri de Canuilla patris mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Canuilla…"[944]

 

2.         AGNES de Camville .  A charter of King Edward II dated 1 Dec [1319] confirmed donations to Brodholm nunnery in Nottinghamshire, including the donation of “Staynhil, Barnewode” made by “Sarra filia Petri de Gousla”, and of land “in Saxelby” made by "Petrus de Gousla pater suus et Agnes de Camvilla mater sua, et Henricus frater suus"[945]m PETER de Goxhill, son of --- (-[1166/67]). 

 

3.         WILLIAM de Camville .  "Rogerus de Canuilla" confirmed the donation of land at Theddingworth, Leicestershire to the abbey of St Mary de Pré, Leicester, at the request of "Walteri de Canuilla patris mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Canuilla…"[946]

 

 

1.         --- de Camville m [--- de Vere, daughter of AUBREY de Vere & his wife ---.  The Complete Peerage suggests that the mother of Richard de Camville must have been the daughter of Aubrey de Vere: his daughter held "Heldrinham" in 1185, which was held by Aubrey de Vere in 1086[947].]  Three children: 

a)         RICHARD [I] de Camville (-Apulia 1176).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Capvilla" in Oxfordshire[948].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Ricardo de Campville viii m" in Hampshire in [1158/59][949].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Ricardus de Campville in perdono per breve Regis" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][950].  “Richardus de Camvilla” founded Combe, Warwickshire, with the consent of “uxoris meæ et filii mei et hæredis Gerardi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Gerardo filio meo et hærede, Hugone fratre meo...[951].  “Ricardus de Camvilla” donated “terciam partem decimarum...apud Hottoth” to Jumièges, for the souls of “uxoris mee Adelicie et sequentis uxoris mee Milesente...Rogeri fratris mei”, by charter dated [5 Apr 1170/27 Mar 1171], subscribed by “Ricardi filii mei...[952].  A charter dated to [1200], recounting the history of a donation of land to Eynsham abbey, records that King [Henry I] granted “Stantonam [cum] quadam femina” to “Roberto Marmiun”, and that “post Robertum Marmiun” the king granted “predictam Milisent” to “Ricardo de Kamuilla” who died “in terra de Pulle” after which “Ricardus Ruffus precepto regis” took “Stantonam...in manu regis[953]m firstly ADELISE, daughter of ---.  “Ricardus de Camvilla” donated “terciam partem decimarum...apud Hottoth” to Jumièges, for the souls of “uxoris mee Adelicie et sequentis uxoris mee Milesente...Rogeri fratris mei”, by charter dated [5 Apr 1170/27 Mar 1171], subscribed by “Ricardi filii mei...[954]m secondly (after 1143) as her second husband, MELISENDE de Rethel, widow of ROBERT Marmion [III] of Tamworth, daughter of GERVAIS de Rethel & his wife Elisabeth de Namur ([1121/23]-after 1154).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that [her stepfather] "Clarenbaldus de Roseto" alienated the lands of “filiastram suam Gervasii filiam” and married her to "cuidam nobili Roberto Marmioni de Normannia", without giving her name[955].  The Complete Peerage names her “Elizabeth” and identifies her husband as Robert Marmion [IV] without citing any primary source on which it bases this statement[956].  From a chronological point of view, it is more likely that the husband of Gervais de Rethel’s daughter was Robert Marmion [III], considering especially that Robert [III]’s wife had three known children by her second husband whom she married after Robert died in [1143/44].  If that is correct, other sources quoted below confirm that Robert [III]’s wife was named Mélisende, not Elisabeth, presumably after her paternal grandmother.  Domesday Descendants refers to the second marriage of Mélisende, whom it calls “a kinswoman of Queen Adelicia[957].  The Victoria County History of Oxfordshire states that the queen “before 1141...gave to her kinswoman Millicent, wife of Robert Marmion, land in Stanton Harcourt and South Leigh...”, without citing the corresponding primary source[958].  White Kennett quotes the charter under which “A...regina” granted “manerium meum de Stanton” in four parts to Reading convent, to the Knights Templars, to “Milisendi cognatæ meæ uxori Roberti Marmium”, and to “Willielmo de Harestactu”, undated[959].  In light of the previous information, her second marriage is indicated by the charter dated 1154 under which Henry Duke of Normandy [the future King Henry II] confirmed Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire to "Milicenti uxori Ricardi de Camvilla in feodo et hereditate sibi…sicut regina Adelisia…in maritagium dedit" by charter dated 1154[960].  A charter dated to [1200], recounting the history of a donation of land to Eynsham abbey, records that King [Henry I] granted “Stantonam [cum] quadam femina” to “Roberto Marmiun”, and that “post Robertum Marmiun” the king granted “predictam Milisent” to “Ricardo de Kamuilla[961].  “Ricardus de Camvilla” donated “terciam partem decimarum...apud Hottoth” to Jumièges, for the souls of “uxoris mee Adelicie et sequentis uxoris mee Milesente...Rogeri fratris mei”, by charter dated [5 Apr 1170/27 Mar 1171], subscribed by “Ricardi filii mei...[962].  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney made by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[963].  Richard [I] & his second wife had three children: 

i)          MATILDA de Camville ([1145]-after 1185).  “Matildis de Ros, filia Ricardi de Canvilla…cum Beatrice filia mea” donated revenue from "molendino de Hildrikesham de maritagio meo" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the souls of "Willielmi de Ros viri mei et Willielmi filii mei", by undated charter[964].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matildis de Ros que fuit filia Ricardi de Kaunville et soror Gerardi de Kaunville” and her land “in Heldrinham…de feodo Gerardi de Kaunville”, adding that she had "de Willelmo de Ros iii filios et iv filias, primogenitus est xx annorum"[965]m WILLIAM [I] de Ros, son of GEOFFREY de Ros & his wife Sibyl de Bidun (-before 1185).  

ii)         GERARD de Camville (-1214).  “Richardus de Camvilla” founded Combe, Warwickshire, with the consent of “uxoris meæ et filii mei et hæredis Gerardi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Gerardo filio meo et hærede, Hugone fratre meo...[966].  King Richard I confirmed the inheritance by "Gerardo de Canuilla et Nicolæ uxori sue" of all her inheritance in England and Normandy from "Rob de Haia et R[ic] de Haia", including "constabularia castelli Lincoln" and land at Poupeville and Varreville, by charter dated 1189[967].  “Girardus de Camvill” confirmed the donation of revenue from "molendino de Hildrikesham de maritagio meo" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s made by "Matilda de Camvill soror mea…cum filia sua Beatricia", by undated charter[968].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Gerardus de Kamville" paying "xx s, i militem" in Oxfordshire, "Gerardus de Campville" paying "xvi l de feodo Ricardi de Haia, xvi milites" in Lincolnshire, and also paying in Berkshire[969].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Gerard de Campville" paying "xx s, i militem" in Oxfordshire[970].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Gerard de Kanville" holding one half of one knight’s fee "in Blakelande" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][971]m (after 1178) as her second husband, NICOLE de la Haye, widow of WILLIAM FitzErneis, daughter of RICHARD de la Haye & his wife Mathilde [de Vernon] (-Nov 1230).  King Richard I confirmed the inheritance by "Gerardo de Canuilla et Nicolæ uxori sue" of all her inheritance in England and Normandy from "Rob de Haia et R[ic] de Haia", including "constabularia castelli Lincoln" and land at Poupeville and Varreville, by charter dated 1189[972].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Ricardi de Hai…predecessor domine Nicollæ uxoris Gerardi [de Camvill]" in relation to landholdings in Lincolnshire[973].  Henry III King of England took "dominam Nicholaam de Haya et Ricardum de Campvill filium suum" under protection dated 12 Feb 1217[974].  Gerard & his wife had two children: 

(a)       RICHARD [III] de Camville (-after 12 Feb 1217).  Henry III King of England took "dominam Nicholaam de Haya et Ricardum de Campvill filium suum" under protection dated 12 Feb 1217[975]m ([1199]) as her first husband, EUSTACHIA Basset, widow of THOMAS de Verdun, daughter of GILBERT Basset & his wife Aigeline de Courtenay (-after [1211/15]).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Gillebertus Basset…pro filia sua maritanda Tome de Verdun" in Oxfordshire[976].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Nicholaus de Verdun" against "Andream de Bradeshulla" relating to property held by "Ricardum de Kaumvilla et Eustachiam uxorem eius…dotem ipsius Eustachie de dono ipsius Thome de Kaumuilla [error for Verdun] fratris primogeniti ipsius Nicholai et primi viri ipsius Eustachie" and which was previously held by "Bertramus de Verdun pater suus et Thomas de Verdun frater suus"[977].  "Eglina de Curthenai" donated half her dower in her manor of Wretchwick, Oxfordshire, which "predictus Gilbertus Basset bone memorie" retained when "predictam Eustaciam Basset" married "Thome de Verdun", to Bicester priory by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "Ricardo de Campvill, Eustacia Basset uxore ipsius, Thoma Basset, Alano Basset…"[978].  Richard [III] & his wife had three children: 

(1)       RICHARD de Camville (-young).  "Eglina de Curthenai" donated half her dower in her manor of Wretchwick, Oxfordshire, which "predictus Gilbertus Basset bone memorie" retained when "predictam Eustaciam Basset" married "Thome de Verdun", to Bicester priory by charter dated to [1211/16], witnessed by "Ricardo de Campvill, Eustacia Basset uxore ipsius, Thoma Basset, Alano Basset…"[979]

(2)       IDOINE de Camville (-[1 Jan 1250/1/21 Sep 1252]).  King John granted "maritagium filium Ric de Campvill que est in custodia nostra" to "fratri nostro W. com Sarr…ad opus Willelmi fil sui primogeniti de Ela ux sua comitissa Sar", by order dated 22 Apr 1216[980].  The Book of Lacock names “Idonea Candoill (esset Camvile)” as wife of “Guill Lungespee secundus[981].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est"[982]m (after 22 Apr 1216) WILLIAM Longespee, son of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela Ctss of Salisbury (before 1209-killed in battle Mansurah 7 Feb 1250). 

(3)       EUSTACHIA de Camville (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Berkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Eustachia filia Ricardi de Camvill est de donatione domini regis", adding that "nunc est in custodia comitis Saresberie et terra eius in Havintona valet x.l"[983].  Her parentage is not given, but her name and her being in the custody of the earl of Salisbury whose son was married to her presumed sister Idoine indicates that she was a younger daughter of Richard de Camville and his wife Eustachia. 

(b)       daughter .  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records that "Nichola uxor Gerardi de Canuill" owed "ccc m pro maritanda filia sua" in Lincolnshire[984]

iii)        RICHARD [II] de Camville (-1224).  “Ricardus de Camvilla” donated “terciam partem decimarum...apud Hottoth” to Jumièges, for the souls of “uxoris mee Adelicie et sequentis uxoris mee Milesente...Rogeri fratris mei”, by charter dated [5 Apr 1170/27 Mar 1171], subscribed by “Ricardi filii mei...[985].  An undated writ dated "56 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh son of James Wake", records that "King Richard enfeoffed Richard de Kaunville of [Benham] manor [Berkshire], who died in the Holy Land and John his son died in England without heir of his body", that "Gerard the elder brother of the said Richard intruded upon the manor, but the king…delivered it to Hugh Wake"[986].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Ricardus de Kamvill" held "Olmere, sed caput est alibi"[987].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset and Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "heres Ricardi de Kanvill…in custodia W. comitis Saresberie" holding land "in hundredo de Horethorn" in Somerset[988].  m ---.  The primary source which confirms the name of Richard’s wife has not been identified.  Richard [II] & his wife had two children: 

(a)       JOHN de Camville .  An undated writ dated "56 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh son of James Wake", records that "King Richard enfeoffed Richard de Kaunville of [Benham] manor [Berkshire], who died in the Holy Land and John his son died in England without heir of his body", that "Gerard the elder brother of the said Richard intruded upon the manor, but the king…delivered it to Hugh Wake"[989]

(b)       [ISABEL] de Camville .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the 1192/93 Pipe Roll which records “Robertus de Harecourt dominus de Bosewarda” owing for land “in Stanton...Horton et Sutton, in socha de Rooleya, quod eum contingit de hereditate uxoris sue; que rex Henricus [King Henry II] dedit Ricardo de Camvill [Richard [I] de Camville] et heredibus suis, quos habet de Millesent uxore eius, sicut carta domini regis Henrici testatur[990].  She is named Isabel in secondary sources but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  The earliest reference to her name “Isabel” appears to be Dugdale’s mid-17th century Antiquities of Warwickshire Illustrated which names “Isabella soror et hæres [Ric. de Camvile] ux Roberti de Harecurt de Bosworth”, citing the same 1192/93 Pipe Roll entry quoted above which does not name Robert’s wife[991].  A tomb in Worcester Cathedral records her son “Sir William de Harcourt, son of Sir Robert de Harcourt, and Isabel de Camville, an. 1209[992].  However, a letter dated 31 Dec 1805 clarifies that this monument was erected in the early 19th century[993].  The Victoria County History of Oxfordshire cites Hatton’s Book of Seals as the source which names “the elder Richard de Camville’s daughter Isabel” as Robert’s wife[994], but Hatton’s extract of the charter in question makes no reference to her name although his commentary does say that the heir of Richard de Camville was “his daughter Isabel who married Robert de Harcourt” (citing the same 1192/93 Pipe Roll)[995].  It is chronologically impossible that Robert [I]’s wife was the daughter of Richard [I] de Camville.  The error seems to be based on Nichols, who says that Robert de Harcourt married “Isabel” daughter of “Milicent, wife of Richard de Camvill [Richard [I] de Camville]”[996].  Concerning her name, Domesday Descendants says that “Milisent de Camville” was Robert [I]’s wife[997].  This is presumably based on the 1192/93 Pipe Roll quoted above.  However, a careful reading of that source indicates that the last element “sicut...testatur” applies to the whole clause “que...eius”, indicating that “Millesent uxore eius” was the wife of “Ricardo de Camvill” and was named in the document as mother of “heredibus suis”.  m ROBERT [I] de Harcourt, son of IVO d’Harcourt & his wife Rohese Peverel (-after 3 Jul 1202). 

b)         ROGER de Camville (-after 1154).  “Ricardus de Camvilla” donated “terciam partem decimarum...apud Hottoth” to Jumièges, for the souls of “uxoris mee Adelicie et sequentis uxoris mee Milesente...Rogeri fratris mei”, by charter dated [5 Apr 1170/27 Mar 1171], subscribed by “Ricardi filii mei...[998]

c)         HUGH de Camville .  “Richardus de Camvilla” founded Combe, Warwickshire, with the consent of “uxoris meæ et filii mei et hæredis Gerardi” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Gerardo filio meo et hærede, Hugone fratre meo...[999]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Camvillem ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS de Camville (-after 16 Jul 1227).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Camville" holding one knight’s fee "in Fobinghe et Senefeld" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][1000].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Thomas de Camvill" holding "iii milites in Fobbing et in Senef in Essex et in Westreham in Kent"[1001].  A confirmation was granted to "Thomas de Camvill son and heir of Hugh de Camvill" of a charter granted to him by King Henry II, dated 16 Jul 1227[1002]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Camville (-before 25 Apr 1200)m ALBREDA Marmion, daughter of --- (-after 1220).  King John confirmed "castellum et villam de Landesteph" to "G. de Camvill fil Will de Kamvill", naming "Albred Marmion matre ipsius Gaufridi", by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[1003].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Albreda Marmiun" against "Henricum de Aldithelega" for "ecclesiam de Cliftona", adding that she had custody of "terram…Gaufrido de Camuilla filio suo"[1004].  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         GEOFFREY de Camville (-before 20 Sep 1219).  King John confirmed "castellum et villam de Landesteph" to "G. de Camvill fil Will de Kamvill", naming "Albred Marmion matre ipsius Gaufridi", by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[1005]m firstly (divorced on grounds of consanguinity) FELICE, daughter of PHILIP de Worcester & his wife ---.  The Complete Peerage records her parentage and marriage but the primary source on which the information is based has not yet been identified[1006]m secondly LEUCA, daughter of --- (-before 28 Aug 1236).  King Henry III granted "to Lucy wife of the late Godfrey de Kanville of all the land in Ireland which William de Breouse her late grandfather gave with her in marriage to Godfrey and which the latter held when he died" by charter dated 20 Sep 1219[1007].  King Henry III ordered that "Leuca who was the wife of Geoffrey de Caunville [have] her marriage portion out of the land of her late husband in that country", adding that he had purchased it from "William de Abbetot nephew of Philip de Wigorn…10 or 12 years before he married Leuca", by charter dated to [1219/20][1008].  "Ricardus de Camvill" claimed "terciam parte manerii de Clifton" from “Leucam que fuit uxor Galfridi de Camvill”, dated 1231[1009].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Leuca de Kaumuilla" against "Ricardum de Kaumuilla" for "tercie partis manerii de Cliftona et membri sui de Henegetona…ad dotem suam"[1010].  It is assumed that Leuca died before 28 Aug 1236 when her dower was restored to her son (see below).  Geoffrey & his first wife had one child: 

i)          RICHARD de Canville .  "Ricardus de Camvill" claimed "terciam parte manerii de Clifton" from “Leucam que fuit uxor Galfridi de Camvill”, dated 1231[1011].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Leuca de Kaumuilla" against "Ricardum de Kaumuilla" for "tercie partis manerii de Cliftona et membri sui de Henegetona…ad dotem suam"[1012]

Geoffrey & his second wife had one child: 

ii)         WILLIAM de Camville (-1260, before 29 Sep).  Henry III King of England restored to "William de Canville son and heir of Geoffrey de Cannville the land of Fedemercum which Leuca mother of the said William held in dower of the gift of Geoffrey her husband" by charter dated 28 Aug 1236[1013]m LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 14 Aug 1284).  William & his wife had one child: 

(1)       GEOFFREY de Camville (-before 21 Sep 1308).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Camville

-         LORDS CAMVILLE[1014]

 

 

1.         ROGER de Camvillem ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATILDA de Camville (-before 6 Oct 1240).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Nigellum”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “filiam Rogeri de Canevilla[1015].  A charter records an assize held a die Pasche” 1238 records a claim by “H. prior Meritone” against “Johannem de Curtenay et Matildem uxorem eius” relating to “ecclesiam de Reyers[1016].  The primary source which confirms that Matilda, wife of John de Courtenay, was the same person as the wife of Nele de Mowbray has not yet been identified.  m firstly NELE de Mowbray, son of WILLIAM de Mowbray & his wife Avice --- (-Nantes 1230, bur Neufbourg).  m secondly (before 2 Jan 1234) JOHN de Courtenay, son of ---. 

 

 

 

LORDS CAUNTELO

 

 

Loyd says that this family originated in Canteleu in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Dieppe, canton Bacqueville, commune Luneray[1017]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Cauntelo (-after [1135]).  "…Robertus Cantelip…Waterus de Cantelupo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1135] under which "W. de Roumara" granted land of "Iuonis et Colsueni auunculorum suorum" to "Roberto nepoti comitisse"[1018]

 

2.         WALTER de Cauntelo (-after [1135]).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "Walter de Cantilupe and Emicina his wife" visited Croyland (dated to 1114)[1019].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walto de Cantu Lupi" in Lincolnshire[1020].  "…Robertus Cantelip…Waterus de Cantelupo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1135] under which "W. de Roumara" granted land of "Iuonis et Colsueni auunculorum suorum" to "Roberto nepoti comitisse"[1021]m EMICINA, daughter of --- (-after 1114).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "Walter de Cantilupe and Emicina his wife" visited Croyland (dated to 1114)[1022]

 

3.         RALPH de Cauntelo .  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Radulfus de Kantilupo, i militem, Walterus de Kantilupo, ii milites" as tenants of William de Roumare in Lincolnshire in 1166[1023]

 

4.         WILLIAM [I] de Cauntelom ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William [I] & his wife had one child: 

a)         EUPHEME (-[1153/54], bur Colne Priory).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   “Eufemia comitissa” donated property to Colne priory, with the consent of “comitis Alberici mariti mei”, by charter dated to the reign of King Stephen, witnessed by “comite Alberico, Gilberto de Veer…[1024]m ([1146/52]) as his second wife, AUBREY [III] de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of AUBREY [II] de Vere & his wife Adelisa [Alice] de Clare ([1110]-26 Dec 1194, bur Colne Priory). 

 

5.         SIMON de Cauntelo (-after 1167).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Cantilupo ii" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1167/68][1025]

 

6.         WALTER de Cauntelo (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus de Cantalupo" holding one knight’s fee "in Middestone" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][1026]

 

7.         HUGH de Cauntelo (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Cantilupo" holding one knight’s fee "in Smethtone" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][1027]

 

8.         BALDWIN de Cauntelo (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Baldwinus de Cantilupo" holding land "in Pourste cum filia Alardi filii Willelmi, per serjanteriam custodiendi necessaria Regis" in Berkshire in [1210/12][1028]m (before 1210) ---, daughter of ALARD FitzWilliam & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Baldewinus de Kantilup" held "Powrd" in Oxfordshire "de dono Regis Johannes cum filia Alardi filii Willelmi"[1029].  

 

9.         ROBERT de Cauntelo (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Cantolupo et Willelmus Aket" holding "Bartone Aaron Judæi" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][1030]

 

10.      EMMA, .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records two knights fees escheated from "Emma de Cantilupo" in "Smetindone et quodam menbro de Pebenhers in Essexa et Fineburgo et Rokeshale in Suffolceia…[de honore] Boloniæ" in [1211/12][1031]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Cauntelo (-after 3 Oct 1190).  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Radulfus de Kantilupo, i militem, Walterus de Kantilupo, ii milites" as tenants of William de Roumare in Lincolnshire in 1166[1032].  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 3 Oct 1190 in a claim by "Benedictum fil Rad de Hengsterwrth" against "Walterum de Kantelu"[1033]m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] de Cauntelo (-7 Apr 1239).  "William de Cantelupe son of Walter de Cantelupe" donated rent received "annually from Samson his free man of Leg" to Montacute priory by undated charter, witnessed by "William de Cantelupe my son and heir…Gilbert de Sai…"[1034].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Willelmus de Cantilupo" held "Eiton"[1035].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas Mauduit et Willelmus de Kantilupo" holding five knights’ fees in Shropshire, and one "in Eytone" in Bedfordshire, in [1210/12][1036].  Matthew Paris names “...Willelmus de Cantelu et Willelmus filius eius, Fulco de Canteleu...” among the "consiliarios iniquissimos” of King John[1037].  Henry III King of England ordered "Willelmus de Cantilupo senior…" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Herefordie" dated [Jul] 1219[1038].  Matthew Paris records the death "VII Id Apr” 1239 of “Willelmus de Cantelupo pater...episcopi Wigorniæ[1039]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William [II] & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          WILLIAM [III] de Cauntelo (-1251).  "William de Cantelupe son of Walter de Cantelupe" donated rent received "annually from Samson his free man of Leg" to Montacute priory by undated charter, witnessed by "William de Cantelupe my son and heir…Gilbert de Sai…"[1040]

-         see below

ii)         WALTER de Cauntelo .  Henry III King of England granted "ecclesiam de Penred" to "clericum nostrum Walterum de Cantilupo filium…Willelmi de Cantilupo" dated 20 Aug 1223[1041].  Bishop of Worcester. 

iii)        [JOHN de Cauntelo (-after 24 Jul 1236).  His probable parentage is confirmed by the following donation, summarised by Dugdale.  The chronology suggests that he was the son of William [II] rather than William [III], especially as the latter was probably the father of John de Cauntelo who married Margery de Harcourt (see below), although the question is not without doubt.  The original charter has not been located.  “Johes de Cantilupo filius Willi de Cantilupo” donated property “in Buxle” to Bordesley St Mary, Worcestershire, undated[1042]m MARGERY Comyn, daughter of WILLIAM Comyn & his wife Margery --- (-after 24 Jul 1236).  King Henry III, seeing that "Alicia de Moyun has deceived him by the suggestion that there was another lawful heir to the manor of Sturton than Margery daughter of William Cumin”, ordered the sheriff of Warwick “to give Alicia seizin as custodian to cause John de Cantilupe and the said Margery his wife to have such seizin”, dated 24 Jul 1236[1043].  Dugdale summarises the following donation, the full text of which links to the earlier donation made by her husband.  The original charter has not been located.  “Margeria de Cantilupo quondam uxor Johis de Cantilupo in libera viduitate” donated property “de Snitenfeld...” to Bordesley St Mary, Worcestershire, and confirmed a donation of land held from “Willi Comin patris mei”, undated[1044].] 

b)         ROGER de Cauntelo .  "Willelmus de Cantilupo" paid a fine for "pro Rogero de Cantilupo fratre nostro pro ux q fuit Hug de Hasting" and custody of her "iv filios et I filia…primogenit x ann", dated 1202[1045].  It does not appear that Roger married the widow of Hugh de Hastings as King John later granted "custodia…terre et heredum Hugonis de Hasting…et maritagium Helene que fuit uxor ipsius Hugonis" to "Johannis Norwic episcopo" by charter dated 14 Jul 1204[1046]

c)         FULK de Cauntelo (-before Dec 1227).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Fulco de Cantilupo" held land "manerium de Burton de domino rege"[1047].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Fulco de Cantilupo" held "terram comitisse de Pertico in custodia"[1048].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Fulco de Cantolupo" holding one and one half knights’ fees "in Burtone de honore eiusdem W[ischardi]" in Northamptonshire in [1210/12][1049].  Matthew Paris names “...Willelmus de Cantelu et Willelmus filius eius, Fulco de Canteleu...” among the "consiliarios iniquissimos” of King John[1050].  "William de Cantilupo" was granted land "in Caleston which Fulk de Cantilupo his uncle formerly held of the bail of King John" dated 20 Dec 1227[1051]

d)         [--- .  The reference to the demise of Thurstan [III]’s land to William de Cauntelo (presumably identified as William [II] de Cauntelo) by King John when Thurstan was of age (King John received the homage of "Tustan de Montiforti" and granted him his land on condition that he demised it for two years to "Willo de Cantilupo" by order dated 1205[1052]) suggests a close relationship between the two: maybe William was Thurstan’s father-in-law or brother-in-law (the chronology of the Cauntelo family is insufficiently clear to decide between these two possibilities).  The fact that King John granted the marriage of Thurstan’s older son to William de Cauntelo, and that Thurstan [III] named his younger son William, are also suggestive of a connection between the two families.  m THURSTAN [III] de Montfort, son of HENRY [II] de Montfort & his wife --- ([1183/87]-1216, before 21 Nov).] 

 

 

WILLIAM [III] de Cauntelo, son of WILLIAM [II] de Cauntelo & his wife --- (-1251).  "William de Cantelupe son of Walter de Cantelupe" donated rent received "annually from Samson his free man of Leg" to Montacute priory by undated charter, witnessed by "William de Cantelupe my son and heir…Gilbert de Sai…"[1053].  Matthew Paris names “...Willelmus de Cantelu et Willelmus filius eius, Fulco de Canteleu...” among the "consiliarios iniquissimos” of King John[1054].  Henry III King of England notified the pardon of "Willelmo de Cantilupo junioris" in return for payment of a fine dated [Oct] 1224[1055].  "William de Cantilupo" was granted land "in Caleston which Fulk de Cantilupo his uncle formerly held of the bail of King John" dated 20 Dec 1227[1056].  A charter dated 17 Dec 1243 mandated to "W[illiam] de Cantilupe seisin of all the lands which belonged to Hamo de Valoignes in Ireland…with the marriage of Hamo’s heirs"[1057].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in 1251 of “Willelmus de Cantilupo in Cathedra Sancti Petri[1058]

m [firstly] (1219) as her second husband, MELISENDE de Gournay, widow of AMAURY [VI] de Montfort Comte d’Evreux, daughter of HUGUES [V] Seigneur de Gournay & his wife [Juliane de Dammartin].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a letter which purports to be from her daughter "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" which gives a confused version of the family’s lineage: "Sr Hugh de Gornaye" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng", whose daughter "Milsent nostre mere" married "a Count de Euoyse en Normandy" by whom she had one son and one daughter, before marrying "Will de Cantelow nostre pere"[1059].  Henry III King of England granted "maneriis de Mapeldureham et Petrefeld" to "Rogero la Szuche", as granted by King John except for the dower of "Milesentie que fuit uxor comitis Ebroici", dated 14 Mar 1217[1060]

[m secondly (before 28 Aug 1236) ---, daughter of THOMAS FitzAnthony & his wife ---.  Henry III King of England pardoned "William de Cantilupe", who "married one of the daughters and heirs of Thomas Fitz Anthony", his portion of a fine which Thomas had paid to King John for custody of the land and heir of "John Fitz Thomas with the marriage of the heir" by charter dated 28 Aug 1236[1061].  It is not known whether this charter relates to the same William de Cauntelo.] 

William [III] & his [first] wife had six children: 

1.         WILLIAM [IV] de Cauntelo of Calne, Wiltshire and Aston Cantlow, Warwickshire (-Calstone, Wiltshire 25 Sep 1254, bur Studley Priory, Warwickshire).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 15 Oct "38 Hen III" after the death of "William de Cantilupo" name “George son and heir of William de Cantilupo aged[1062]m (before 15 Feb 1248) EVA de Briouse, daughter of WILLIAM de Briouse & his wife Eva Marshal (-[20/28] Jul 1255).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Eva married “Willielmo de Cauntello[1063].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Matilda, Alianora et Eva" as the three daughters of "Willielmo de Brewes" and his wife "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva", adding that "Eva tertia filia" married "Willielmo de Cantilupo"[1064].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[1065].  Heiress of Abergavenny.  The Annals of Dunstable record that “domina Eva uxor Willelmi de Cantilupo” died “circa festum Sanctæ Margaretæ” in 1255[1066].  William [IV] & his wife had three children: 

a)         MILLICENT de Cauntelo (-before 7 Jan 1299).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch" as the children of "Willielmo de Cantilupo" and his wife[1067].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Nov "1 Edw I" after the death of "George de Cantilupo" name “Milisanda the wife of Eudo la Zuche of full age and John son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges who is under age an in the king’s wardship are his next heirs...the said Milisanda and Joan being sisters of the said George[1068]m firstly (before Nov 1254) JOHN de Mohaut, son of ---.  m secondly (before 13 Dec 1273) EON la Zouche, son of ROGER la Zouche & his wife Margaret --- (-[28 Apr/25 Jun] 1279). 

b)         JOAN de Cauntelo (-before Jun 1271).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch" as the children of "Willielmo de Cantilupo" and his wife[1069].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Nov "1 Edw I" after the death of "George de Cantilupo" name “Milisanda the wife of Eudo la Zuche of full age and John son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges who is under age an in the king’s wardship are his next heirs...the said Milisanda and Joan being sisters of the said George[1070]m HENRY Hastings of Ashill, Norfolk, son of HENRY de Hastings of Ashill, Norfolk & his wife Ada of Huntingdon (-before 5 Mar 1269). 

c)         GEORGE de Cauntelo (Abergavenny 29 Mar 1252-18 Oct 1273).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch" as the children of "Willielmo de Cantilupo" and his wife[1071].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 15 Oct "38 Hen III" after the death of "William de Cantilupo" name “George son and heir of William de Cantilupo aged[1072].  Lord of Abergavenny.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Nov "1 Edw I" after the death of "George de Cantilupo" name “Milisanda the wife of Eudo la Zuche of full age and John son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges who is under age an in the king’s wardship are his next heirs...the said Milisanda and Joan being sisters of the said George”, one witness stating that George was born “at Bergeveny on Good Friday 35 or 36 Hen III[1073]m (contract ratified 1 Sep 1254) MARGARET de Lacy, daughter of EDMUND de Lacy Earl of Lincoln & his wife Alasia di Saluzzo (-after 1273, bur Pontefract Black Friars).  King Henry III confirmed the marriage contract between "Georgium filium Willielmi de Cantilupo" and "Margaritam filiam Edmundi de Lacy", dated 1254[1074]

2.         THOMAS de Cauntelo .  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" wrote to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" giving a confused version of the family’s lineage[1075].  Pope Innocent IV issued a faculty to the bishop of London to grant dispensations to “Thomas and Hugh clerks, sons of William de Cantalupo...to hold an addiitonal benefice apiece...”, dated 26 Jan 1246[1076].  Bishop of Hereford. 

3.         NICHOLAS de Cauntelo (-before 24 Sep 1266).  m as her first husband, EUSTACHIE, daughter of RALPH FitzHugh of Greasley, Nottinghamshire & Ilkeston, Derbyshire & his wife Joan ---.  Inquisitions following an undated writ after the death of "Hugh son of Ralph" name “Eustacia wife of Nicholas de Cantilupo is daughter and heir of Ralph son of Hugh and of full age[1077].  She married secondly (before Oct 1268) William de Ros of Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire.  Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [V] de Cauntelo (Lenton Abbey, Nottinghamshire 2 Apr 1262-before 6 Aug 1308).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Jul "11 Edw I", into the age of "William son of Nicholas de Cantilupo”, found that he was born “in the abbey of Lenton and baptised there on Palm Sunday 21 years ago[1078].  He was summoned to Parliament from 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Cauntelo

-        LORDS CAUNTELO[1079]

4.         HUGH de Cauntelo .  Pope Innocent IV issued a faculty to the bishop of London to grant dispensations to “Thomas and Hugh clerks, sons of William de Cantalupo...to hold an addiitonal benefice apiece...”, dated 26 Jan 1246[1080]

5.         JULIANE de Cauntelo (-after 1282).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" wrote to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" and names her son "John Tresgoos" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng", whose daughter "Milsent nostre mere" married "a Count de Euoyse en Normandy" by whom she had one son and one daughter, before marrying "Will de Cantelow nostre pere"[1081]m (before 1 Aug 1245) ROBERT [II] de Tresgoz, son of ROBERT [I] de Tresgoz & his wife Sibylla de Ewias (-before 24 Sep 1268). 

6.         AGNES de Cauntelo (-after 1279).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Agneta filia Willielmi de Cantilupo" as the wife of “Robertum”, son of "Willielmum secundum"[1082]m firstly ROBERT de St John, son of WILLIAM de St John & his wife Godeheut Paynel (-[11/25] Mar 1267).  m secondly (before 4 Jun 1271) JOHN de Turville, son of ---. 

 

 

The parentage of the following person has not been ascertained, but the chronology suggests that he may have been the son of a younger son of William [III] de Cauntelo. 

 

1.         JOHN de Cauntelo (before 18 Feb 1279)m MARGERY de Harcourt, daughter of WILLIAM [II] de Harcourt & his first wife Alice la Zouche (-before 18 Feb 1279).  Her parentage, marriage and date of death are confirmed by a writ dated 18 Feb "7 Edw I", after the death of "Henry de Penebrigg", which records Aylestone (Leicestershire) and Tong (Shropshire) “given by William de Harrecurt lord of Ayliston to his two daughters Orrabilis and Margery jointly; afterwards came Henry de Penbrugg and married the said Orrabilis, and John de Canti Lupo the said Margery...who died...without heir of their bodies, and so that manor reverted to Fulk son and heir of the said Henry and Orrabilis[1083]

 

 

 

LORDS CHERLETON

 

 

1.         ROBERT Cherleton of Cherleton, Wrockwardine, Shropshire .  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN Cherleton (-1353, bur Shrewsbury Grey Friars).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1313 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cherletonm (1309, before 26 Aug) HAWISE “Gadam/the Hardy”, daughter of OWEN de la Pole & his wife Joan Corbet (-[Aug 1345/1353], bur Shrewsbury Grey Friars).  John & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Cherleton (-1360, before 30 Aug)He succeeded his father in 1353 as Lord Cherleton of Powys. 

-         see below

 

 

JOHN Cherleton, son of JOHN Cherleton Lord Cherleton of Powys & his wife Hawise de la Pole (-1360, before 30 Aug)He succeeded his father in 1353 as Lord Cherleton of Powys. 

m (before 13 Apr 1319) MATILDA de Mortimer, daughter of ROGER de Mortimer Lord Mortimer (later Earl of March) & his wife Joan de Genevile [Joinville] (-after Aug 1345).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Maud married “Johannis de Chorleton…Hawysiæ dominæ de Powys…Johanni filio eorum[1084]

John & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN Cherleton ([1333/34]-13 Jul 1374)Lord Cherleton of Powys.  m as her first husband, JOAN de Stafford, daughter of RALPH de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his second wife Margaret de Audley (-before 1397).  She married secondly (before 16 Nov 1379) as his second wife, Gilbert Talbot Lord TalbotJohn & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN Cherleton (25 Apr 1362-Pool Castle 19 Oct 1401)Lord Cherleton of Powys.  m (before Mar 1392) ALICE FitzAlan, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun.  The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 4 Mar 1392, bequeathed property to “my...wife Philippa...hangings of the hall...with the arms of my sons the Earl Marshal, Lord Charlton and Monsr William Beauchamp...my sons Richard and Thomas...my daughter Charlton...my daughter Elizabeth...my daughter Mareschal...my daughter Margaret...my brother the Archbishop of York...my...sister of Hereford...my...sister of Kent...my mother of Norfolk...my...niece of Gloucester[1085].  [Mistress of Henry Beaufort Bishop of Lincoln.  She is said to have been the mother of Cardinal Beaufort’s supposed illegitimate daughter shown below[1086].] 

b)         EDWARD Cherleton ([1371]-14 Mar 1421).  He succeeded his brother in 1401 as Lord Cherleton of Powys.  m firstly (after [19/30] Jun 1399) as her second husband, ELEANOR de Holand, widow of ROGER [VII] Mortimer Earl of March, daughter of THOMAS de Holand Earl of Kent & his wife Alice FitzAlan ([1373]-6 or 18 Oct 1405).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes” married “dominæ Elianoræ filiæ domini Thomæ Holland comitis Kanciæ[1087].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Eleanor Countess of the March, after wed to the Lord Powis [of] Charlton" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent" and mother of "Anne Countess of Cambridge" and of "Jocosa Lady Tiptoft, married John, Lord Tiptoft"[1088].  She died in childbirth.  m secondly (before 1408) as her first husband, ELIZABETH Berkeley, daughter of JOHN Berkeley of Beverstone, Gloucestershire & his wife Elizabeth Betteshorne (-1478, before 8 Dec).  She married secondly John Sutton Lord Dudley.  Edward & his first wife had two children: 

i)          JOAN Cherleton (-17 Sep 1425)m JOHN Grey of Heton, Northumberland, son of THOMAS Grey of Heton and Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland & his wife Joan --- (-killed in battle Baugé, Anjou 22 Mar 1421)

ii)         JOYCE CherletonA manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Eleanor Countess of the March, after wed to the Lord Powis [of] Charlton" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent" and mother of "Anne Countess of Cambridge" and of "Jocosa Lady Tiptoft, married John, Lord Tiptoft"[1089]m JOHN Tiptoft, son of . 

 

 

 

CLIFFORD

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         PONS (-[before Oct 1066]).  No information is known about Pons other than his name, which appears in the patronymics attributed to his five sons.  It is assumed that he lived in Normandy.  His absence from the Norman primary sources which have so far been consulted in the preparation of this document suggests that he was of lowly birth.  His absence from English records suggests that he died before the Norman invasion in England in 1066.  m ---.  The name of Pons’s wife is not known.  It is possible that Pons married twice: the chronology of his sons appears to indicate that Walter and Drogo were considerably older than the others.  Pons & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         WALTER FitzPons (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records land held by “Walter fitzPons” in Eaton Hastings, and Odstone in Hildslow Hundred, in Berkshire, Yelford and land in Westwell and Alwoldsberie in Oxfordshire, Southrop in Gloucestershire[1090].  Domesday Book records "Walter fitz Ponce" and "Drogo fitz Ponce" as holding manors in Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, Worcestershire and Herefordshire[1091]

b)         DROGO FitzPons (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Drogo fitzPons” holding Seagry in Wiltshire; Frampton on Severn and Eastleach Martin in Gloucestershire; Hollin, Stildon, Glasshampton and Martley in Worcestershire; several properties in Herefordshire[1092]

c)         RICHARD FitzPons (-[1127/29]).  "Ricardus filius Puncii" donated “ecclesiam de Lecha" to Great Malvern monastery, Worcestershire, for the soul of "uxoris meæ Mathildis et liberorum meorum…", by undated charter, witnessed by "Simon et Osbernus fratres mei…"[1093].  "…Ricardo filio Poncii…" witnessed the charter dated 1121 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of "heredibus suis Herefordiam [parvam et] Ullingeswicam" to "Waltero de Gloec" by the bishop of Hereford[1094].  The charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato" refers to land held by "Ric fil Pontii"[1095].  A charter dated to [1127] records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1096].  Richard presumably died before [1129] as he is not named in the [1129/30] Pipe Roll.  Henry I King of England confirmed a donation to Llanthony priory which "Ricardus filius Pontii" had made with the consent of "Hugonis filii Pontii", by charter dated [1130][1097]m MATILDA, daughter of [WALTER of Gloucester & his wife Berthe ---] (-after [1127]).  A charter dated to [1127] records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1098].  Round indicates that this charter means that Matilda must have been the daughter of Walter of Gloucester, noting that Ullingswick was recorded in Domesday Book as belonging to the church of Hereford, and also that King Henry I confirmed its grant and that of Little Hereford by the bishop of Hereford to Walter of Gloucester by another charter[1099].  The fact that Matilda named two of her children after her supposed parents also indicates that this parentage is probably correct (although the name Walter was already used in the FitzPons family before Richard’s marriage).  See below under the wife of her son Walter [I] for some further speculation about Matilda’s parentage, involving the Tosny family, which appears to be incorrect.  "Ricardus filius Puncii" donated “ecclesiam de Lecha" to Great Malvern monastery, Worcestershire, for the soul of "uxoris meæ Mathildis et liberorum meorum…", by undated charter, witnessed by "Simon et Osbernus fratres mei…"[1100].  Richard & his wife had four children: 

i)          SIMON FitzRichard (-[before 1127]).  A charter of Edward III King of England records that Clifford priory, Herefordshire was founded by “Simonem filium Ricardi filii Poncii quondam dominum de Clifford antecessorem comitissæ Lincolniæ[1101].  The text does not specify which countess of Lincoln is referred to.  It is assumed that Simon was the older son of Richard as he founded the priory in his name.  "…Simo filii ei…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[1102].  He presumably died before [1127] as he did not witness the charter estimated to that date under which his father reassigned the marriage portion of his mother. 

ii)         ROGER FitzRichard (-[1127/29]).  "Rog fil Ric, Walti fr eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1103].  Roger presumably died before [1129] as he is not named in the [1129/30] Pipe Roll. 

iii)        WALTER [I] FitzRichard (-1190).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter, dated to before 1190, under which "Hugh de Say and Lucia his wife, daughter of Walter de Clifford, son of Richard fitz Poncius" donated the mill of Rochford to Haughmond Abbey[1104]

-         see below

iv)       BERTHA (-after 1167).  A charter dated to [1127] records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1105].  "Helyas Giffardus" recorded that "uxori meæ Bertæ medietatem totius manerii de Ullingwike maritagii sui" and donated the property to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated 18 Jul 1163[1106].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "ecclesiam Beatæ Mariæ de Boytone, ecclesiam Sancti Georgii de Orchestone cum capella Sancti Andreæ de Wyneterborne" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179] made by "Helias Boy Gyffard", for the soul of "Bertæ uxoris suus", later confirmed by "Walterus Giffard filius Heliæ…tempore Hamelini abbatis"[1107].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Helias Giffard junior et Berta mater eius" donated "octo libratas terræ in Willyngwyke" in exchange for "Cronham quam pater eius dederat quando factus fuerat monachus", confirmed by "Helias filius eorum", and that "Berta uxor Heliæ Giffard" donated "terras in Wllingwuke…tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179][1108]m ([1127]) ELIAS [II] Giffard, son of ELIAS [I] Giffard & his wife Ala --- (-after 1166). 

d)         SIMON FitzPons (-after [1127]).  "Ricardus filius Puncii" donated “ecclesiam de Lecha" to Great Malvern monastery, Worcestershire, for the soul of "uxoris meæ Mathildis et liberorum meorum…", by undated charter, witnessed by "Simon et Osbernus fratres mei…"[1109].  "…Symon Pontii filii, Osb fr eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1110].  He was the possible ancestor of the Poyntz family, later Lords Poyntz[1111].  

e)         OSBERN FitzPons (-after 1129).  "Osbern fitz Pontius" donated property to Pershore abbey by undated charter witnessed by "Hugh son of Osbern son of Richard, Turstin his brother"[1112].  "…Symon Pontii filii, Osb fr eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1113].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Osbto dil Poinz" in Gloucestershire[1114]m ---.  The name of Osbern’s wife is not known.  Osbern & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH .  "Osbernus filius Pontii" donated “piscatoriam…in villam…Longaneia et ecclesiam" to Pershore monastery, Worcestershire, for "filio meo Radulfo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Hugone filio Osberni filii Ricardi et Turstino fratre eius…"[1115]

f)          [HUGH FitzPons .  Henry I King of England confirmed a donation to Llanthony priory which "Ricardus filius Pontii" had made with the consent of "Hugonis filii Pontii", by charter dated [1130][1116].  This is the only reference so far found to this supposed son of Pons named Hugh.] 

 

 

WALTER [I] FitzRichard, son of RICHARD FitzPons & his wife Matilda --- (-1190).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter, dated to before 1190, under which "Hugh de Say and Lucia his wife, daughter of Walter de Clifford, son of Richard fitz Poncius" donated the mill of Rochford to Haughmond Abbey[1117].  "Rog fil Ric, Walti fr eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1118].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walto fil Ric" in Gloucestershire[1119].  A charter of Stephen King of England dated 1138 confirmed donations to Gloucester St Peter including the exchange of "manerio Esleche" for “manerio de Glasberie de Walterio de Cliffort"[1120].  "Walterus de Clifforde" confirmed the donation of "medietatem totius manerii de Ullingewike" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Berta soror mea…concessione Helyæ Giffardi filiii sui primogeniti", with the consent of "Walterus filius meus primogenitus", by charter dated 1152[1121].  “…Waltero de Clifford…Osberto filio Hugonis, Willielmo de Bealchamp…” witnessed the undated charter, dated to [1155], which records the donation by “Rogerus comes Herefordiæ” to Brecknock priory[1122].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Walto de Clifford" in Herefordshire[1123].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Walterus de Clifford…quintæ parties i militem" among those providing military service for Westminster abbey in Worcestershire, that "Walterus de Clifford" held "Corpham et Culmintone et Halam de Ernestowe et les Clives" for one knight’s fee from "Roberti de Britone" in Shropshire, and held one knight’s fee in Hereford from the bishop[1124].  Lord of the manor of Rochford in Herefordshire.  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Margaretæ uxoris meæ", for the souls of "…filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et Osberti filii Hugonis", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Waltero de Clifford juvene et Rosamunda sorore sua…"[1125].  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", confirmed by "Walterus de Clifford junior filius et hæres prædicti Walteri", by undated charter witnessed by "Osbertus filius Hugonis, Hugo de Sey, Ric de Clifford, Will. frater eius…"[1126].  "Osbern fitz Hugh" donated a virgate at Richard’s Castle to Haughmond Abbey by charter dated to [1172/85], witnessed by "Walter de Clifford, Walter his son, Hugh de Say and Lucie his wife"[1127].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Walterus de Clifford xx s in hoc comitatu" in Wiltshire in [1186/87][1128]

m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-1185 or before, bur Godstow nunnery).  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Margaretæ uxoris meæ", for the souls of "…filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et Osberti filii Hugonis", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Waltero de Clifford juvene et Rosamunda sorore sua…"[1129].  Eyton highlights that Margaret, wife of Walter [I] de Clifford, "is said, with probability, to have brought him Clifford Castle in frank-marriage, she being a daughter of Ralph de Toni, Domesday Lord of that castle"[1130].  Under this hypothesis, she would have been Margaret de Tosny, daughter of Raoul [IV] de Tosny & his wife Adelisa of Huntingdon.  Eyton implies, but does not actually state, that there is no primary source which confirms that this supposed parentage of Margaret is correct.  He also says that "an equally probable account of the mode in which Clifford Castle left the sucession of the Toni is that Maud, wife of Richard fitz Ponce, was a daughter of Ralph de Toni".  The chronology is not particularly favourable for Margaret to have been Raoul de Tosny’s daughter.  Raoul’s children must have been born in the range [1104/15], given his marriage in 1103 and the narrow possible birth date range of his wife in [1073/76].  If Margaret was Raoul’s daughter, she would have been old when she died in or before 1185, and her husband even older when he died in 1190 assuming that he was about the same age as his wife.  Let us compare this assessment with the approximate dates which can be assessed for the children of Walter [I] and his wife.  Firstly, the couple’s grandson Walter [III] first appears in the records in 1208 (see below), presumably when he was a young adult, which would place his birth in [1180/90].  At that time, his father Walter [II] would likely have been over 40/50 years old if his maternal grandfather had been Raoul de Tosny.  Secondly, Walter [I]’s great-granddaughter, granddaughter of his daughter Lucy, was probably born in [1190/96]: she was reported an infant on her first marriage in 1197, and her father died in [1196].  This would place Lucy’s birth in [1140/50], which would be on the late side if her maternal grandfather had been Raoul de Tosny (although not impossibly late).  Thirdly, when these two cases are slotted together, it appears that Lucy was very likely older than her brother Walter [II].  If that is correct, the Tosny connection is even less likely, given her estimated birth date, if she was one of her parents’ older children.  Another point to make is the absence of compatible onomastics for a Tosny marriage: none of Walter [I]’s children received typical Tosny names (Raoul/Ralph, Roger, Isabel, Adelisa, Godechilde).  Walter [I]’s grandson was named Roger, but it is likely that he was named after his maternal grandfather (see below).  A last point of confusion is the reported marriage of Isabelle, another daughter of Raoul [IV] de Tosny, with another Walter FitzRichard (who is probably identified with the son of Richard Lord of Clare and Tonbridge, see NORMANDY NOBILITY).  If Margaret had also been Raoul’s daughter, this would lead to the improbable (although not impossible) coincidence that two of his daughters would have married two different individuals with the same name.  In conclusion, the alleged Tosny connection remains something of a mystery but the proposed Tosny parentage of Margaret, wife of Walter [I], does not appear to be the ideal explanation.  “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", specifying that they were buried at Godstow, with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[1131]

Walter & his wife had six children: 

1.         [AMICE .  Eyton records that "from good but unvouched authority" Osbern FitzHugh married "Amicia daughter of Walter de Clifford"[1132]m OSBERN FitzHugh, son of HUGH FitzOsbern & his wife Eustachia de Say (-after Aug 1180).] 

2.         LUCY .  “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[1133].  "Osbern fitz Hugh" donated a virgate at Richard’s Castle to Haughmond Abbey by charter dated to [1172/85], witnessed by "Walter de Clifford, Walter his son, Hugh de Say and Lucie his wife"[1134].  "Hugh de Say and Lucia his wife, daughter of Walter de Clifford, son of Richard fitz Poncius" donated the mill of Rochford to Haughmond Abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter de Clifford junior, Richard de Clifford his brother", later confirmed by "Walter de Clifford, son of Walter, son of Richard fitz Poncius" who names Hugh de Say’s wife as his sister, witnessed by "Hugh de Say and Richard de Clifford"[1135].  "Lucia de Say daughter of Walter de Clifford" donated land in Rocheforde to Haughmond Abbey, with the consent of "her son Hugh de Say", by undated charter, witnessed by "Hugh de Say, Walter de Clifford", but later released claims of the abbey to land in Rochford with the consent of "Bartholomew de Mortimer her husband"[1136]m firstly HUGH de Say, son of HUGH FitzOsbern & his wife Eustachia de Say (-1190).  m secondly BARTHOLOMEW de Mortimer, son of --- (-before Nov 1226). 

3.         WALTER [II] de Clifford (-before 23 Jan 1221).  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", confirmed by "Walterus de Clifford junior filius et hæres prædicti Walteri", by undated charter witnessed by "Osbertus filius Hugonis, Hugo de Sey, Ric de Clifford, Will. frater eius…"[1137]

-        see below

4.         RICHARD de Clifford (-before Aug 1213).  “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[1138].  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", by undated charter witnessed by "…Ric de Clifford, Will. frater eius…"[1139].  The Pipe Roll of 1190 indicates that Richard succeeded his father to the manor of Corfham and his Shropshire estates, apparently passing over the rights of his older brother[1140].  Eyton recounts the litigation which ensued between the two brothers[1141].  King John confirmed the grant of "manerium de Corfam et Colminton" to "Waltero de Cliford…Ric de Cliford fratri suo", by charter dated 3 Aug 1199[1142].  Walter de Clifford paid a fine to King John for custody of the lands and heirs of his brother Richard in Aug 1213[1143]m LETICIA de Berkeley, daughter of --- (-after 1200).  The primary source which confirms her family origin and marriage has not yet been identified. 

-        CLIFFORD family of FRAMPTON[1144]

5.         WILLIAM de Clifford (-after [1198]).  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", by undated charter witnessed by "…Ric de Clifford, Will. frater eius…"[1145]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         WALTER de Clifford (-after 1203).  m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM de Clifford (-after 1257).  He is discussed by Eyton[1146]

b)         [WILLIAM de Clifford (-after [1225/30]).  Constable of Corfham.  According to Eyton, he was the possible ancestor of the Clifford family of Neen Sollars and Nash[1147].] 

6.         ROSAMOND (-[1174/76], bur Godstow nunnery).  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Margaretæ uxoris meæ", for the souls of "…filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et Osberti filii Hugonis", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Waltero de Clifford juvene et Rosamunda sorore sua…"[1148].  The Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis records that Rosamond Clifford became "openly and avowedly the paramour of the king" after he imprisoned Queen Eleanor following the rebellion of his sons in 1173[1149].  Eyton adds that "for an indefinite time previously she had been secretly domiciled at Woodstock" but he does not cite the primary source on which he bases this supposition[1150].  It is not known whether he draws the conclusion from the Chronicon Johannis Bromton as the original of this document has not been available in the compilation of the present document.  Eyton also suggests that the start of the king’s relationship with Rosamond can be dated to [1154] and that the king’s known illegitimate children Geoffrey Archbishop of York and William Longespee, later Earl of Salisbury, were Rosamond’s sons[1151].  However, as can be seen in the document ENGLAND KINGS, Geoffrey’s birth is estimated to [1151] and William’s to [1176], which suggests that they were not full brothers.  In any case, the name of Geoffrey’s mother is reported as Ikenai (see ENGLAND KINGS).  The uncertain chronology of the family of Walter [I] de Clifford appears to be the key to resolving the question of when Rosamond’s relationship with the king started.  As discussed above in relation to the possible parentage of Walter [I]’s wife Margaret, it appears likely that their children were born after [1140] and, in the case of their son Walter [II], probably considerably later than this date.  Rosamond’s appearance, with her brother Walter, as witness to the undated Dore abbey charter quoted above suggests that she was the only remaining unmarried daughter with her parents at the time, which in turn suggests that she was younger than her sisters.  If this is correct, her birth could be as late as [1150/60], which would render Eyton’s hypothesis untenable.  Further discussion of this problem will have to wait until more indications about the family chronology come to light.  She was known as "Fair Rosamond", although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  The Chronicon Johannis Bromton abbatis Jornalensis states that Rosamond died ("sed illa cito obiit")[1152], his wording implying that her death occurred soon after the king’s relationship with her started, suggesting the period [1174/76].  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", by undated charter[1153].  “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", specifying that they were buried at Godstow, with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[1154].  Rosamond’s corpse was removed from its burial place on the orders of Hugh Bishop of Lincoln[1155]Mistress ([1173/76]) of HENRY II King of England, son of GEOFFROY "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d'Anjou et de Maine & his wife [Empress] Matilda [Maud] of England (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). 

 

 

WALTER [II] de Clifford, son of WALTER FitzRichard de Clifford [I] & his wife Margaret --- (-before 23 Jan 1221).  "Walterus de Clifforde" confirmed the donation of "medietatem totius manerii de Ullingewike" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Berta soror mea…concessione Helyæ Giffardi filiii sui primogeniti", with the consent of "Walterus filius meus primogenitus", by charter dated 1152[1156].  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Margaretæ uxoris meæ", for the souls of "…filiorum et filiarum nostrarum et Osberti filii Hugonis", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Waltero de Clifford juvene et Rosamunda sorore sua…"[1157].  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", confirmed by "Walterus de Clifford junior filius et hæres prædicti Walteri", by undated charter witnessed by "Osbertus filius Hugonis, Hugo de Sey, Ric de Clifford, Will. frater eius…"[1158].  "Osbern fitz Hugh" donated a virgate at Richard’s Castle to Haughmond Abbey by charter dated to [1172/85], witnessed by "Walter de Clifford, Walter his son, Hugh de Say and Lucie his wife"[1159].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Walteri de Clifforde" paying "xx s, i militem" in Berkshire[1160].  King John confirmed the grant of "manerium de Corfam et Colminton" to "Waltero de Cliford…Ric de Cliford fratri suo", by charter dated 3 Aug 1199[1161].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus de Clifford" holding one half of one knight’s fee "in Aldintone" in Wiltshire, and two "apud Brige et Ulingwike" in Hereford, in [1210/12][1162]

m AGNES de Cundy, daughter of ROGER de Cundy & his wife Basilia --- (-1216 or after).  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the under charter under which “Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et filius Agnetis de Cundi” donated "locum de Nanteglas" to Dore abbey, Herefordshire[1163].  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1164]

Walter & his wife had seven or more children: 

1.         WALTER [III] de Clifford ([1180/90]-Dec 1263).  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1165].  King John sent Walter Clifford from Winchester 23 May 1208 to certify his father that his successor as sheriff of Herefordshire had been appointed[1166].  “Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et filius Agnetis de Cundi” donated "locum de Nanteglas" to Dore abbey, Herefordshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Willielmo de Breosa et Willielmo filio suo, magistro Simone, Roberto de Clifford, canonicis de Herefordia…"[1167].  "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, also donated by "Katherinæ filiæ Walteri de Lacy", for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ” by undated charter, witnessed by "domino Willilemo de Brawoso, domino Rogero de Clifford, domino Hugone de Clifford fratre ipsius, domino Roberto le Bret, domino Willielmo de Rogefored tunc vicario de Themedburi…"[1168]m (after 1232) as her second husband, MARGARET of Wales, widow of JOHN de Briouse Lord of Bramber and Gower, illegitimate daughter of LLEWELYN ap Iorwerth Prince of North Wales & his mistress --- (-1272 or after, bur [Acornbury Priory, Herefordshire]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and first marriage has not yet been identified.   "Katerina de Lacy filia Walteri de Lacy" donated land in Cofham, held by "domino Waltero de Clifford", to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, for the souls of “fratris mei…et…dicti Walteri de Clifford et Margaretæ uxoris suæ et Margaretæ filiæ ipsius” by undated charter, witnessed by "domino Willielmo de Evereus, domino Rogero de Clifford, domino Ricardo Tirel, domino Roberto de Lacy, domino Willielmo de Rachesford…"[1169].  "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, also donated by "Katherinæ filiæ Walteri de Lacy", for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ” by undated charter[1170].  "Margareta quondam uxor domini Walteri de Clifford" elected burial at Acornbury priory, Herefordshire by charter dated “tertia die dominica proxima ante festum sancti Thomæ apostoli” in 1260, witnessed by "…Henrico de Clifford…"[1171].  Walter [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATILDA de Clifford (-[Dec 1282/9 May 1285]).  "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, also donated by "Katherinæ filiæ Walteri de Lacy", for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ” by undated charter[1172].  The Book of Lacock names “Matildam filiam d’ni Walteri de Clifford” as wife of “Guill. Lungespee tertius, filius Guill. Lungespee secundi[1173].  “Matildis de Lungespe, filia et hæres domini Walteri de Clifford” confirmed donations of property to Shrewsbury abbey, by “patris mei…Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford, et Agnetis de Cundy” witnessed by “Egidio de Clifford fratre meo”, by undated charter[1174].  “Johannes Giffard dominus de Brimesfeild” donated property to Gloucester College, Oxford, for the soul of “Matildæ Longespee, quondam consortis meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “domino Johanne Giffard consanguineo meo[1175]m firstly WILLIAM Longespee, son of WILLIAM Longespee [Earl of Salisbury] & his wife Idoine de Camville (-[Dec 1256/Jan 1257]).  m secondly (1271) as his second wife, JOHN Giffard, son of ELIAS Giffard & his second wife Alice Mautravers ([1231/32]-Boyton, Wiltshire 29 May 1299, bur Malmesbury Abbey).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Giffard. 

2.         ROGER [I] de Clifford of Tenbury (-[Dec 1231]).  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1176].  Henry III King of England confirmed "terre de Helvinton, que est de feodo ipsius Sibille" to "Rogero de Clifford et Sibille de Euias uxori eius" dated [early] 1217[1177].  “Rogerus de Clifford” requested burial at Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Sibillæ uxoris meæ", next to "filium suum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Ricardo de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewyas seniore, Willielmo de Ewyas juniore, filio Sibillæ"[1178]m (after [1213/14]) as her second husband, SIBYLLA de Ewias, widow of ROBERT de Tresgoz, daughter of ROBERT de Ewias & his wife Petronilla --- (-before 1 Jul 1236).  Henry III King of England confirmed "terre de Helvinton, que est de feodo ipsius Sibille" to "Rogero de Clifford et Sibille de Euias uxori eius" dated [early] 1217[1179].  “Rogerus de Clifford” requested burial at Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Sibillæ uxoris meæ", next to "filium suum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Ricardo de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewyas seniore, Willielmo de Ewyas juniore, filio Sibillæ"[1180].  "Domina Sibilla de Ewyas filia Roberti de Ewyas" donated her mill at Ethon to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “domino Waltero de Lacy, domino Rogero de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewias…Roberto Tregoz et fratribus suis"[1181].  Roger [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER [II] de Clifford (-1286).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   "Katerina de Lacy filia Walteri de Lacy" donated land in Cofham, held by "domino Waltero de Clifford", to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, for the souls of “fratris mei…et…dicti Walteri de Clifford et Margaretæ uxoris suæ et Margaretæ filiæ ipsius” by undated charter, witnessed by "…domino Rogero de Clifford…"[1182].  "…Domino Rogero de Clifford, domino Hugone de Clifford fratre ipsius…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ[1183]m firstly ---.  m secondly ---.  Roger [II] & his first wife had one child: 

i)          ROGER [III] de Clifford (-killed 6 Nov 1282).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Clyfford the younger” name “he had a son of Isabel his wife [...[property] divided between her and Idonea the wife of Roger de Leyburne, the heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte]...Robert aged 8...[7] is his next heir[1184]

-         see below

ii)         [--- de Clifford (-before 1250).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" records that her son "John Tresgoos" married "Mabill file a noble…chevalier Foulk Fitz-Warren qui avoit a feme le soer Sr Rog de Clifford"[1185].  If this is correct, the member of the Clifford family must have been the first wife of Fulk FitzWarin [IV] as the date of the first marriage of his daughter Mabel suggests that she must have been older than her brother Fulk FitzWarin [V].  However, it is possible that this source is in error (it contains other mistakes) and that Mabel’s mother was Constance de Tosny, the known wife of Fulk FitzWarin [IV].  This is particularly likely because, if the source was correct, John de Tresgoz and his wife Mabel would have been very closely related, presumably first cousins, as Roger [II] de Clifford (who, from a chronological point of view, is the most likely candidate for the father of this Clifford daughter) and John de Tresgoz’s father were uterine brothers.  It should be noted that Constance de Tosny’s brother was also named Roger, which could account for any confusion in the source quoted above.  m as his first wife, FULK [IV] FitzWarin, son of FULK [III] FitzWarin & his first wife Matilda le Vavasour (-killed in battle Lewes 14 May 1264).] 

b)         HUGH de Clifford .  "…Domino Rogero de Clifford, domino Hugone de Clifford fratre ipsius…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ[1186]

3.         RICHARD de Clifford .  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1187].  “Rogerus de Clifford” requested burial at Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Sibillæ uxoris meæ", next to "filium suum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Ricardo de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewyas seniore, Willielmo de Ewyas juniore, filio Sibillæ"[1188]

4.         SIMON de Clifford .  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1189].  Prior of Careswell.  “…Domino Simone de Clifford, priore de Careswell, Egidio de Clifford…” witnessed the undated charter under which "Walterus de Lacy" confirmed the donation by "Margeria uxor mea" to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire[1190]

5.         GILES de Clifford (-killed [1225]).  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1191].  “…Domino Simone de Clifford, priore de Careswell, Egidio de Clifford…” witnessed the undated charter under which "Walterus de Lacy" confirmed the donation by "Margeria uxor mea" to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire[1192]

6.         BASILIA de Clifford .  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1193]

7.         daughter(s) .  The undated will of "Agnes de Clifford", with the consent of “my Lord Walter de Clifford”, bequeathed property to "Basilia my daughter...my mother…Walter my son…Roger my son, Simon my son and Giles my son...each of my daughters..."[1194]

 

 

B.      LORDS CLIFFORD

 

 

ROGER [III] de Clifford, son of ROGER [II] de Clifford & his first wife --- (-killed 6 Nov 1282).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Clyfford the younger” name “he had a son of Isabel his wife [...[property] divided between her and Idonea the wife of Roger de Leyburne, the heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte]...Robert aged 8...[7] is his next heir[1195]

m ISABEL de Vipont, daughter and co-heiress of ROBERT de Vipont & his wife Isabel FitzJohn.  A writ dated 28 Apr "53 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel, wife of Roger son and heir of Roger de Clifford, and eldest daughter and one of the heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte"[1196].  "Johannis de Vallibus, Rogerus Clifford junior et Isabella uxor eius et Rogerus de Leyburn et Idonia uxor eius" confirmed the donation to St Bees made by "Roberti de Veteri Ponti antecessoris ipsarum Isaeblle et Idonie et cujusdam Idonie uxoris predicte Roberti" by undated charter[1197].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Clyfford the younger” name “he had a son of Isabel his wife [...[property] divided between her and Idonea the wife of Roger de Leyburne, the heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte]...Robert aged 8...[7] is his next heir[1198]

Roger [III] & his wife had children: 

1.         ROBERT [I] de Clifford (-killed in battle Bannockburn 24 Jun 1314).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cliffordm (12 Nov 1295) as her first husband, MATILDA de Clare, daughter of THOMAS de Clare Lord of Thomond, Connaught & his wife Juliana FitzMaurice (-[4 Mar/24 May] 1327).  The Annals of Worcester record the marriage 12 Nov 1295 of “Robertus de Clifford” and “filiam Thomæ de Clara neptem comitis Geleberti[1199].  She married secondly (before 16 Dec 1315) Robert de Welle Lord Welle.  Inquisitions made after a writ dated 10 Apr "14 Edw II", after the death of "Thomas son of Richard de Clare", name "Margaret the wife of Bartholomew de Badelesmere and Maud the wife of Robert de Welle, aunts of the said Thomas and sisters of the said Richard are his next heirs and aged 30 or more[1200].   Robert & his wife had children: 

a)         ROGER [IV] de Clifford (21 Jan or 2 Feb 1300-executed York 23 Mar 1322).  Lord Clifford

b)         ROBERT [II] de Clifford (5 Nov 1305-20 May 1344)Lord Cliffordm (Berkeley Castle Jun 1328) as her first husband, ISABEL de Berkeley, daughter of MAURICE de Berkeley Lord Berkeley & his first wife Eve La Zouche (-25 Jul 1362).  She married secondly (before 9 Jun 1345) Thomas Musgrave.  Robert [II] & his wife had children: 

i)          ROBERT Clifford ([1327/28]-France 1345 before 7 Nov)Lord Cliffordm (1343) as her first husband, EUPHEMIA Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville Lord Neville of Raby & his wife Alice de Audley (-[Oct/Nov] 1393).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[1201].  She married secondly (early 1347) Reginald de Lucy.  She married thirdly Walter de Heslarton

ii)         ROGER [V] de Clifford (10 Jul 1333-13 Jul 1389)Lord Clifford

-         see below

c)         IDONIA [Imania] de Clifford (-24 Aug 1365, bur Beverley Minster, under the “Percy Shrine”).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records that “Henricum”, son of “Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi”, married “Idoniam de Clifford[1202].  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Imaniæ uxori meæ…"[1203]m ([1321 or before]) HENRY Percy Lord Percy, son of HENRY de Percy & his wife Eleanor --- (1301-Warkworth end Feb 1352, bur Alnwick). 

 

 

ROGER [V] de Clifford, son of ROBERT [II] de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Isabel de Berkeley (10 Jul 1333-13 Jul 1389)Lord Clifford

m MATILDA de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer (-[Jan/Feb] 1403).  Her parentage and marriage are shown in the Complete Peerage, but without citing any sources[1204].  The will of "Katherine Countess of Warwick", dated 4 Aug 1369, bequeathed property to “the Earl my husband...Thomas my son...William my other son...Maud de Clifford my daughter...Philippa de Stafford my daughter...my daughter Alice...Margaret Montfort my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Elizabeth the daughter of my son Guy...[1205].  The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 1 Apr 1400, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...my daughter Beauchamp...my brother of Bergavenny...my sisters of Suffolk and Clifford and...my niece Katherine Beauchamp the nun at Shouldham[1206]

Roger [V] & his wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Clifford ([1362/63]-18 Aug 1391)Lord Cliffordm ELIZABETH de Ros, daughter of THOMAS de Ros Lord Ros & his wife Beatrice de Stafford of the Earls of Stafford (-Mar 1424).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ"[1207].  Thomas & his wife had children:

a)         JOHN de Clifford ([1388]-killed in battle Meaux 13 Mar 1422)Lord Cliffordm ([1403/12]) as her first husband, ELIZABETH Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy "Hotspur" & his wife Elizabeth Mortimer of the Earls of March (-26 Oct 1437).  She married secondly (contract 7 May 1426, dispensation after marriage 28 Nov 1426) as his first wife, Ralph Neville Earl of Westmoreland.  John & his wife had children: 

-        LORDS CLIFFORD, EARLS of CUMBERLAND[1208].  

b)         MAUD Clifford (-26 Aug 1446, bur Roche Abbey, Yorkshire)m firstly (divorced) JOHN Neville Lord Latimer, son of ---.  m secondly ([1411/15]) as his second wife, RICHARD of York "of Conisburgh", son of EDMUND "of Langley" Duke of York & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Castilla (Conisburgh Castle, Yorkshire [Sep] [1375/76]-executed Southampton Green, Hampshire 5 Aug 1415, bur Southampton, Chapel of God’s House).  He was created Earl of Cambridge in 1414. 

2.         PHILIPPA de Clifford (-after 4 Jul 1405)m (after 10 Oct 1388) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Ferrers Lord Ferrers (of Groby), son of HENRY de Ferrers Lord Ferrers (of Groby) & his wife Joan --- (Hoo 25 Apr 1372-18 May 1445). 

 

 

 

LORDS COBHAM

 

 

1.         JOHN de Cobhamm ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         RALPH de Cobham (-5 Feb 1326).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1324 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cobham (of Norfolk).  m as her first husband, MARY de Brewes, daughter of PIERS de Brewes [Briouse] of Tetbury, Gloucestershire & his wife Agnes --- (-[17 Apr 1361/15 Jun 1362]).  She married secondly ([1328]) as his second wife, Thomas "of Brotherton" [son of Edward I King of England].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Cobham (18 Dec 1324 or 2 Jan 1325-after [1377/78]). 

 

 

1.         JOHN de Cobham of Cobham and Cowling, Kent (-1300, before 30 Mar).  m firstly JOAN de Septvans, daughter of ROBERT de Septvans & his wife ---.  m secondly JOAN de Neville, daughter of HUGH de Neville & his wife ---.  John & his first wife had children: 

a)         HENRY de Cobham ([1259/60]-Hache 25 Aug 1339, bur Stoke-under-Hamden, Somerset).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1313 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cobhamm (before Jul 1285) as her second husband, MAUD de Moreville, widow of MATTHEW de Columbers, daughter of EUDES de Moreville & his wife ---.  Henry & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Cobham (-25 Feb 1355, bur Cobham).  Lord Cobhamm firstly (1314) JOAN Beauchamp, daughter of JOHN Beauchamp Lord Beauchamp of Somerset & his wife Joan --- (-after 1343).  m secondly AGNES Stone, daughter of RICHARD Stone of Dartford, Kent & his wife ---.  John & his first wife had three children: 

(a)       JOHN de Cobham (-10 Jan 1408, bur Grey Friars London).  He succeeded his father as Lord Cobhamm ([1332/33]) MARGARET de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay Earl of Devon & his wife Margaret de Bohun (-after 28 Jan 1391, bur Cobham).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Hugo et Margareta de Courtenay, Elizabeth, Thomas, Edwardus, Johannes, Alianore, Caterina, Guenevera, Willielmus, Humfredus, Johannes et Isabella” as the children of “domino Hugoni de Cortney…comitem de Devonschire” and his wife Margaret[1209].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names ”Hugonem…quartum…Thomam, Edwardum, Johannem, Margaretam, Elizabetham, Catherinam” as the children of “Hugonem tertium” and his wife[1210].  The will of "Margaret de Courtney Countess of Devon", dated 28 Jan 1391, bequeathed property to “Margaret the daughter of my son Philip...William my son Archbishop of Canterbury...my daughter Cobham...my daughter Lutterell...my daughter Engaine...my son the Earl of Devon...my son Philip...my daughter Lady Ann Courtney...my son Peter...Joan my daughter...[1211].  John & his wife had one child: 

(1)       JOAN de Cobham (-1388)m (contract 21 Oct 1362) JOHN de la Pole of Chrishall, Essex, son of WILLIAM de la Pole of Castle Ashby & his wife Margaret Peverel. 

(b)       THOMAS de Cobham (-after 13 Jan 1367, bur Cobham St Mary Magdalen).  The will of "Thomas de Cobham", dated 13 Jan 1367, chose burial “in the parish church of St Mary Magdalen at Cobham”, bequeathed property to “my brother John de Cobham Knt Lord Cobham...my brother Reginald de Cobham parson of Coulinge...Julian my wife[1212]m JULIANA, daughter of --- (-after 13 Jan 1367).  The will of "Thomas de Cobham", dated 13 Jan 1367, chose burial “in the parish church of St Mary Magdalen at Cobham”, bequeathed property to “my brother John de Cobham Knt Lord Cobham...my brother Reginald de Cobham parson of Coulinge...Julian my wife[1213]

(c)       REGINALD de Cobham (-after 13 Jan 1367).  The will of "Thomas de Cobham", dated 13 Jan 1367, chose burial “in the parish church of St Mary Magdalen at Cobham”, bequeathed property to “my brother John de Cobham Knt Lord Cobham...my brother Reginald de Cobham parson of Coulinge...Julian my wife[1214]

John & his second wife had children: 

b)         REGINALD de Cobham of Orkesden & Eynsford, Kent .  m JOAN d’Evere, daughter of WILLIAM d’Evere & his wife ---.  Reginald & his wife had children: 

i)          REGINALD de Cobham (-7 Oct 1361, bur Lingfield).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1347 whereby he is held to have become Lord Cobham (of Sterborough).  m JOAN de Berkeley, daughter of THOMAS de Berkeley Lord Berkeley & his first wife Margaret de Mortimer of the Earls of March (-2 Oct 1369, bur Southwark St Mary Overhere).  The will of "Joan de Cobham of Starburghe", dated 13 Aug 1369, chose burial “in the churchyard of St Mary Overhere in Southwark”, bequeathed property to “Henry Grey and Dame Joan his wife and to that Joane my daughter, to Joane daughter to that Joane” and a conditional bequest to “Reginald my son” relating to property “sold...to my husband in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father[1215].  Reynold & his wife had children: 

(a)       REGINALD de Cobham (1348-6 Jul 1403, bur Lingfield)Lord Cobham (of Sterborough).  The will of "Joan de Cobham of Starburghe", dated 13 Aug 1369, chose burial “in the churchyard of St Mary Overhere in Southwark”, bequeathed property to “Henry Grey and Dame Joan his wife and to that Joane my daughter, to Joane daughter to that Joane” and a conditional bequest to “Reginald my son” relating to property “sold...to my husband in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father[1216]

-         see below

(b)       JOAN de Cobham .  The will of "Joan de Cobham of Starburghe", dated 13 Aug 1369, chose burial “in the churchyard of St Mary Overhere in Southwark”, bequeathed property to “Henry Grey and Dame Joan his wife and to that Joane my daughter, to Joane daughter to that Joane” and a conditional bequest to “Reginald my son” relating to property “sold...to my husband in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father[1217]m HENRY de Grey, son of JOHN de Grey Lord Grey (of Codnor) & his second wife Alice de Lisle (-after 1371). 

 

 

REGINALD de Cobham, son of REGINALD de Cobham Lord Cobham (of Sterborough) & his wife Joan de Berkeley (1348-6 Jul 1403, bur Lingfield)Lord Cobham (of Sterborough). 

m firstly (after 1367) as her third husband, ELIZABETH de Stafford, widow firstly of FULK Le Strange Lord Strange and secondly of JOHN Lord Ferrers, daughter of RALPH de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his second wife Margaret de Audley (1333 or after-7 Aug 1375). 

m secondly (1380, pardon for marrying without licence 10 Aug 1380, Papal absolution 11 Nov 1384) as her second husband, ELEANOR Mautravers Baroness Mautravers, widow of JOHN de Arundel Lord Arundel, daughter of JOHN Mautravers & his wife --- (1345-10 Jan 1405). 

Reginald & his second wife had children: 

1.         REGINALD Cobham of Sterborough, Kent (1381-1446, bur Lingfield).  The will of "Reginald Cobham", dated 12 Aug 1445, chose burial “in the Collegiate church of Lingfield”, bequeathed property to “Anne my wife” and appointed “Thomas Cobham Knight my son” among the executors[1218]m firstly ELEANOR Colepeper, daughter of THOMAS Colepeper of Rayal & his wife --- (-1422, bur Lingfield).  m secondly (1427 or before) as her second husband, ANNE Bardolf, widow of WILLIAM Clifford, daughter of THOMAS Bardolf Lord Bardolf & his wife Amice Cromwell (24 Jun 1389-6 Nov 1453).  The will of "Reginald Cobham", dated 12 Aug 1445, bequeathed property to “Anne my wife[1219].  Reginald & his first wife had three children: 

a)         REGINALD Cobham (-[1441/42]).  m ---.  Reginald & his wife had one child: 

i)          MARGARET Cobham (-[1466/71])m (1442) as his second wife, RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland, son of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his wife Elizabeth de Holand (1406-1484). 

b)         THOMAS Cobham (-1471, bur Lingfield).  The will of "Reginald Cobham", dated 12 Aug 1445, appointed “Thomas Cobham Knight my son” among the executors[1220].  The will of "Thomas Cobham of Starborough", dated 2 Apr 1471, proved 10 Jul 1471, chose burial “in the parish church of St Peter’s within the college of Lingfield in the county of Surrey”, bequeathed property to “Reginald my bastard son called Reginald Cobham...Ann Vere my...wife...my daughter Anne Cobham...Gervase Clifton uncle unto Reginald my bastard son[1221]m as her second husband, ANNE Stafford, widow of AUBREY de Vere, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford Earl of Stafford, Duke of Buckingham & his wife Anne Neville of the Earls of Westmoreland (-after 14 Apr 1472, bur Lingfield).  The will of "Thomas Cobham of Starborough", dated 2 Apr 1471, proved 10 Jul 1471, bequeathed property to “Reginald my bastard son called Reginald Cobham...Ann Vere my...wife...my daughter Anne Cobham...Gervase Clifton uncle unto Reginald my bastard son[1222].  The will of "Ann Vere widow", dated 12 Apr 1472, proved 2 May 1472, chose burial “in the college of Lingfield where the body of my...late husband resteth”, bequeathed property to “my brother Wiltshire...my sister Shrewsbury...my daughter Anne[1223]Mistress (1) --- Clifton, daughter of ---.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

i)          ANNE Cobham (-26 Jun 1526).  The will of "Thomas Cobham of Starborough", dated 2 Apr 1471, proved 10 Jul 1471, bequeathed property to “Reginald my bastard son called Reginald Cobham...Ann Vere my...wife...my daughter Anne Cobham...Gervase Clifton uncle unto Reginald my bastard son[1224].  The will of "Ann Vere widow", dated 12 Apr 1472, proved 2 May 1472, bequeathed property to “my brother Wiltshire...my sister Shrewsbury...my daughter Anne[1225]m firstly ([18 Jun/1 Dec] 1475) EDWARD Blount Baron Mountjoy, son of --- ([1466/67]-Nov 1475, bur Grey Friars London).  m secondly (1477) EDWARD Burgh Lord Burgh, son of --- (-20 Aug 1528). 

Thomas had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

ii)         REGINALD Cobham (-after 2 Apr 1471).  The will of "Thomas Cobham of Starborough", dated 2 Apr 1471, proved 10 Jul 1471, bequeathed property to “Reginald my bastard son called Reginald Cobham...Ann Vere my...wife...my daughter Anne Cobham...Gervase Clifton uncle unto Reginald my bastard son[1226].  . 

c)         ELEANOR Cobham (-in prison Peel Castle, Isle of Man 1454, bur [Peel Castle]).  She became Humphrey’s mistress some time before their marriage.  She was convicted of practising witchcraft in 1441, did public penance in London, and was imprisoned at Chester Castle, Kenilworth Castle and (from 1446) in Peel Castle, Isle of Man where she died.  The Vitellius A XVI Chronicle records that “after mydsomer in the moneth of Juyn, Dame Alianore Cobham the duchesse of Glowcestre was arrested for coniectyng of the kinges deth with other certeyn persones” and was “afterward...dampned as a witch and an heretyke” and imprisoned in the Isle of Man[1227]m (1428) as his second wife, HUMPHREY of Lancaster Duke of Gloucester, son of HENRY IV King of England & his first wife Mary de Bohun (3 Oct 1390-Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk 23 Feb 1447, bur 4 Mar 1447 St Albans Abbey, Hertford)

 

 

 



[1] Domesday Translation, Staffordshire, XVII, p. 687, Cheshire, p. 733. 

[2] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Staffordshire, p. 73. 

[3] CP XII/1 243, citing an extract in Dugdale Baronage Vol. II, p. 247. 

[4] CP XII/1 243, citing an extract in Dugdale Baronage Vol. II, p. 247. 

[5] Dugdale Monasticon V, Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, II, p. 662. 

[6] Eyton ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXVI, p. 263. 

[7] CP I 337-348.  

[8] CP I 337 footnote b. 

[9] CP I 337. 

[10] Amicia Tracts (1869), p. 20. 

[11] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 196, p. 121. 

[12] CP I 337 footnote e. 

[13] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 139. 

[14] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 243. 

[15] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 240. 

[16] CP I 338. 

[17] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. iv. 

[18] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 476, p. 286. 

[19] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 97, p. 67. 

[20] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 97, p. 67. 

[21] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 196, p. 121. 

[22] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 97, p. 67. 

[23] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 196, p. 121. 

[24] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 196, p. 121. 

[25] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 196, p. 121. 

[26] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. iv. 

[27] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 476, p. 286. 

[28] Patent Rolls, 48 Henry III, p. 317. 

[29] Patent Rolls, 48 Henry III, p. 292. 

[30] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. iv. 

[31] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 476, p. 286. 

[32] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. iv. 

[33] CP I 339. 

[34] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[35] Drake ‘Blanche Audley’, p. 70, translation of Chancery Inq. p.m. 15 Rich II, part 1, no. 1. 

[36] Drake ‘Blanche Audley’, p. 70, translation of Chancery Inq. p.m. 15 Rich II, part 1, no. 1. 

[37] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 117. 

[38] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[39] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 117. 

[40] Drake ‘Blanche Audley’, p. 70, translation of Chancery Inq. p.m. 15 Rich II, part 1, no. 1. 

[41] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 152. 

[42] Drake ‘Blanche Audley’, p. 70, translation of Chancery Inq. p.m. 15 Rich II, part 1, no. 1. 

[43] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 152. 

[44] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 117. 

[45] Drake ‘Blanche Audley’, p. 70, translation of Chancery Inq. p.m. 15 Rich II, part 1, no. 1. 

[46] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 117. 

[47] Drake ‘Blanche Audley’, p. 70, translation of Chancery Inq. p.m. 15 Rich II, part 1, no. 1. 

[48] CP I 347. 

[49] CP I 347. 

[50] She is not listed among the children of Roger de Mortimer in CP IX 281 footnote c. 

[51] CP I 347 footnote e, where Edmund is called "her father" but this is chronologically impossible, as shown above, if the birth date of her son is correct.   

[52] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[53] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[54] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[55] CP I 348 footnote a. 

[56] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[57] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 636.   

[58] CP I 346. 

[59] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, pp. 61 and 62.   

[60] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[61] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[62] CP I 371-2. 

[63] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 38, p. 18. 

[64] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 38, p. 18. 

[65] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. VI, Edward II, 275, p. 159. 

[66] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars II, p. 179. 

[67] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[68] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 60. 

[69] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 60. 

[70] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 62. 

[71] CP I 373-4.  

[72] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 352. 

[73] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135. 

[74] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 60. 

[75] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[76] Rymer (1740), Tome II, Pars IV, p. 71. 

[77] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 62.   

[78] Gesta Willelmi ducis Normannorum et regis Anglorum a Willelmo Pictaviensi…archidiacono, p. 94. 

[79] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, Ex Libro Feod. milit. pence Remem. Regis in Scncc., p. 553.   

[80] Round (1899) 920, p. 328. 

[81] Dugdale Monasticon III, Horsham Priory, Norfolk, IV, p. 637.   

[82] Calendar Charter Rolls, Vol. II, p. 390. 

[83] Pipe Roll 6 Hen II (1159/60), Lincolnshire, p. 46. 

[84] Pipe Roll 7 Hen II (1160/61), Lincolnshire, p. 16. 

[85] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 197. 

[86] Calendar Charter Rolls, Vol. II, p. 390. 

[87] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 480, p. 351. 

[88] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157/58), Lincolnshire, p. 137. 

[89] Pipe Roll 7 Hen II (1160/61), Lincolnshire, p. 17. 

[90] Red Book Exchequer, p. 391. 

[91] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXV, p. 280. 

[92] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 79. 

[93] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 97. 

[94] Clay, C. T. ‘Hugh Bardolf the Justice and his Family’, Lincolnshire History and Archaeology 50 (1966) [not yet consulted]. 

[95] Calendar Charter Rolls, Vol. II, p. 390. 

[96] CP V 539, footnote f from p. 538, citing Cartulary of Barlings, Cotton MSS, Faust., B I ff. 169 or 170, v, and 174 or 175, v. 

[97] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 89. 

[98] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 244, and Rotuli Chartarum, 7 John, p. 150. 

[99] Beauchamp, 95, p. 58. 

[100] CP V 539, footnote f from p. 538, citing Cartulary of Barlings, Cotton MSS, Faust., B I ff. 169 or 170, v, and 174 or 175, v. 

[101] Calendar Charter Rolls, Vol. II, p. 390. 

[102] Registrum Roffense, p. 425. 

[103] CP V 539, footnote f from p. 538, citing Cartulary of Barlings, Cotton MSS, Faust., B I ff. 169 or 170, v, and 174 or 175, v. 

[104] Calendar Charter Rolls, Vol. II, p. 391. 

[105] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 475. 

[106] Registrum Roffense, p. 425. 

[107] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 89. 

[108] CP V 539, footnote f from p. 538, citing Cartulary of Barlings, Cotton MSS, Faust., B I ff. 169 or 170, v, and 174 or 175, v. 

[109] Fine Rolls, 9 Hen III, p. 129. 

[110] Fine Rolls, 9 Hen III, p. 129. 

[111] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. xxxi. 

[112] CP VI 165. 

[113] Fine Rolls, 9 Hen III, p. 129. 

[114] Fine Rolls, 9 Hen III, p. 129. 

[115] Fine Rolls, 9 Hen III, p. 129. 

[116] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 135. 

[117] Red Book Exchequer, p. 391. 

[118] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 135. 

[119] Round (1899) 435, p. 146. 

[120] Foster (1920), Appendix II: Additions to Vols. I & II from sources outside the Public Record Office, pp. 295-306, Cyro Grapha de Edlingtona.

[121] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLIV, p. 375. 

[122] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLX, p. 275. 

[123] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 78. 

[124] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499. 

[125] Round (1899) 435, p. 146. 

[126] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. cxx, Vol. II, p. lxvi. 

[127] Foster (1920), Appendix II: Additions to Vols. I & II from sources outside the Public Record Office, pp. 295-306, Cyro Grapha de Edlingtona.

[128] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLIV, p. 375. 

[129] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. lxvi. 

[130] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. lxvi. 

[131] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. lxvi. 

[132] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499. 

[133] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499. 

[134] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499. 

[135] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. cxx. 

[136] Round (1899) 435, p. 146. 

[137] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. lxvi. 

[138] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 110. 

[139] Rotuli de Liberate, 5 John, p. 55. 

[140] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 565. 

[141] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 168. 

[142] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 54. 

[143] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 133. 

[144] Rotuli de Liberate, 5 John, p. 55. 

[145] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 772, p. 468. 

[146] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 772, p. 468. 

[147] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 772, p. 468. 

[148] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 236, p. 166. 

[149] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 604, p. 360. 

[150] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 236, p. 166. 

[151] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 236, p. 166. 

[152] Williams ‘First Marriage William de Grandison’ (Jun 2018), p. 94. 

[153] Blomefield (1807), Vol. VII, Wermegay, pp. 495. 

[154] Williams ‘First Marriage William de Grandison’ (Jun 2018), p. 94, citing Calendar of Patent Rolls, Edw. III, 3, p. 490. 

[155] Williams, D. ‘The First Marriage and issue of William de Grandison 1st Lord Grandison (d. 1335): Corrigenda et Agenda’, Foundations, Vol. 11 (2019), pp. 15-17. 

[156] Williams ‘First Marriage William de Grandison’ (Jun 2018), p. 94. 

[157] CP I 417-20. 

[158] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 51. 

[159] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 180, citing Pipe Rolls 23 Hen II and 10 Ric I. 

[160] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 51. 

[161] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 364. 

[162] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, Ex Libro Feod. milit. pence Remem. Regis in Scncc., p. 553.   

[163] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 563. 

[164] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 203. 

[165] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 181, citing “16 John” (no precise citation reference). 

[166] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 250. 

[167] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 347, p. 94. 

[168] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 274. 

[169] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 274. 

[170] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. v. 

[171] Loyd (1951), p. 12. 

[172] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. V, Liber XIII, XXVI, p. 68. 

[173] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber XI, II, p. 164. 

[174] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. v, citing Stenton, D. M. (1970) F. M. Stenton Preparatory to Anglo-Saxon England (Oxford), p. 205. 

[175] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber XI, II, p. 164. 

[176] Henry of Huntingdon, V, 17, p. 109. 

[177] Eynsham, 7, p. 36. 

[178] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, LXXXII, p. 329. 

[179] Eynsham, 100, p. 91. 

[180] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 6, p. 8. 

[181] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 187. 

[182] Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, p. 254. 

[183] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 223. 

[184] Eynsham, 100, p. 91. 

[185] Henry of Huntingdon, V, 17, p. 109. 

[186] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. V, Liber XIII, XXVI, p. 68. 

[187] Eynsham, 100, p. 91. 

[188] Basset Charters, 47, p. 24. 

[189] Basset Charters, 49, p. 26. 

[190] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, p. 10, Surrey, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, p. 43, Essex, Hertfordshire, p. 52, Staffordshire, p. 76. 

[191] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 284, p. 106. 

[192] Basset Charters, 47, p. 24. 

[193] Round (1892), p. 417. 

[194] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CXCVIII, p. 332. 

[195] Round (1892), p. 417. 

[196] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, Flazwelle Wapentak, p. 7. 

[197] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 37, p. 59. 

[198] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 397. 

[199] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, Flazwelle Wapentak, p. 7. 

[200] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 458, p. 337. 

[201] Basset Charters, 175, p. 113. 

[202] Basset Charters, 176, p. 114. 

[203] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 457, p. 336. 

[204] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, pp. 187-9. 

[205] Basset Charters, 47, p. 24. 

[206] Basset Charters, 47, p. 24. 

[207] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xxxvii. 

[208] Basset Charters, 47, p. 24. 

[209] Farrer (1902), Lancashire Chartulary, Series I, Charter VIII, p. 278. 

[210] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xxxvii. 

[211] Basset Charters, 47, p. 24. 

[212] Basset Charters, 173, p. 111. 

[213] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xxxvii. 

[214] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 308-10. 

[215] Domesday Descendants, p. 165. 

[216] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1688, p. 535. 

[217] Domesday Descendants, p. 164, citing Jenkins, J. G. (1962) Cartulary of Missenden Abbey, Vol. III, no. 658 [not yet consulted]. 

[218] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Honor de Warengeford, p. 16. 

[219] Rotuli Chartarum, 9 John, p. 175. 

[220] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1688, p. 535. 

[221] Rotuli Chartarum, 9 John, p. 175. 

[222] Domesday Descendants, p. 165. 

[223] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xxxvii. 

[224] Eynsham, 7, p. 36. 

[225] Eynsham, 100, p. 91. 

[226] John of Oxenedes, p. 47. 

[227] Basset Charters, 173, p. 111. 

[228] John of Oxenedes, p. 48. 

[229] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Norfolk/Suffolk, p. 95. 

[230] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 850 and 851, p. 313. 

[231] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xxxvii. 

[232] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. x. 

[233] Basset Charters, 49, p. 26. 

[234] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Elstow Nunnery, Bedfordshire, III, p. 413.   

[235] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 308-10. 

[236] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CXCVIII, p. 332. 

[237] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 308-10. 

[238] Eynsham, 59, p. 69. 

[239] Wrottesley ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Vol. III, Series III, p. 189. 

[240] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CXCVIII, p. 332. 

[241] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 223. 

[242] Pipe Roll 10 Hen II (1163/64), p. 28. 

[243] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 330. 

[244] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, V, p. 106.   

[245] Eynsham, 59, p. 69. 

[246] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, VI, p. 107.    

[247] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 330. 

[248] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXLIII, p. 118. 

[249] Wrottesley ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Vol. III, Series III, p. 193. 

[250] Wrottesley ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Vol. III, Series III, p. 193. 

[251] Basset Charters, 117, p. 65. 

[252] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, VII, p. 107.   

[253] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, VII, p. 107.   

[254] Annales Londonienses, pp. 126-7. 

[255] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, VII, p. 107.   

[256] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 16, p. 14. 

[257] CP VI 174. 

[258] Wrottesley ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary`, Vol. III, Series III, p. 193. 

[259] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 125. 

[260] Morice (1744), Tome I (Paris), col. 496. 

[261] Morice (1744) Preuves, Tome II, col. 681. 

[262] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 135. 

[263] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xxxviii. 

[264] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 51. 

[265] Barron ‘The Bassets’ (Oct 1904), p. 56. 

[266] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 41. 

[267] Basset Charters, 178, p. 115. 

[268] Basset Charters, 182, p. 118. 

[269] Basset Charters, 186, p. 121. 

[270] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Ex rotulo honorum anno regis Henrici xxxiii, p. 68. 

[271] Basset Charters, 183, p. 119. 

[272] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 91. 

[273] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 39. 

[274] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Burcester Priory, Oxfordshire, I, p. 434. 

[275] Basset Charters, 186, p. 121. 

[276] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 39. 

[277] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Burcester Priory, Oxfordshire, I, p. 434. 

[278] Basset Charters, 192, p. 128. 

[279] Basset Charters, 193, p. 129. 

[280] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 252 and 253. 

[281] Basset Charters, 192, p. 128. 

[282] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Oxfordshire, p. 94. 

[283] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 601, p. 463. 

[284] Basset Charters, 193, p. 129. 

[285] Basset Charters, 177, p. 114. 

[286] Basset Charters, 183, p. 119. 

[287] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 293. 

[288] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1211, p. 533. 

[289] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 293. 

[290] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/12, 4 Hen III, 152. 

[291] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1584, p. 461. 

[292] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 166. 

[293] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 513, p. 400. 

[294] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/12, 4 Hen III, 152. 

[295] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1584, p. 461. 

[296] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/12, 4 Hen III, 152. 

[297] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1584, p. 461. 

[298] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 22. 

[299] Basset Charters, 177, p. 114. 

[300] Pipe Roll 28 Hen II (1181/82), Lincolnshire, p. 57. 

[301] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Freston Priory, Lincolnshire, III, p. 126. 

[302] Oxford St. Frideswide, Vol. II, 786-7, p. 92. 

[303] Oxford St. Frideswide, Vol. II, 788, p. 93. 

[304] Basset Charters, Introduction, p. xiii, citing Salter, H. E. & Cooke, A. H. (1930) The Boarstall Cartulary (Oxford Historical Society, Vol. 87) (“Boarstall Cartulary”), pp. 69, 100, 101 and notes 2 and 3 (not yet consulted). 

[305] Oxford St. Frideswide, Vol. II, 793, p. 96. 

[306] Evans, C. F. H. 'Dammartin', Genealogists' Magazine (1965), Vol. 15, pp. 53-63, in Evans (2003), p. 80, citing Boarstall Cartulary, no. 296, and Jenkins, J. G. (1962) Cartulary of Missenden Abbey (Buckinghamshire Record Society), Vol. III, no. 634 [not yet consulted]. 

[307] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 308-10. 

[308] Basset Charters, 277, p. 188. 

[309] Basset Charters, 177, p. 114. 

[310] Basset Charters, 277, p. 188.