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köln archbishopric

  v3.2 Updated 20 May 2015

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                ARCHBISHOPS of KÖLN 784-1508. 2

Chapter 2.                BISHOPS of LIEGE. 18

Chapter 3.                BISHOPS of MINDEN. 44

Chapter 4.                BISHOPS of MÜNSTER. 45

Chapter 5.                BISHOPS of OSNABRÜCK. 45

Chapter 6.                BISHOPS of PADERBORN. 45

Chapter 7.                BISHOPS of UTRECHT. 45

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

A review of the families of the princes, dukes and counts who ruled Germany in medieval times would be incomplete without documents devoted to the major archbishoprics.  The bishopric of Köln was elevated to the status of archbishopric during the reign of Charles I King of the Franks in the late 8th century, and eventually enjoyed ecclesiastic jurisdiction over the bishoprics of Cambrai, Liège, Minden, Münster, Osnabrück, Paderborn and Utrecht.  Under the terms of the 843 Treaty of Verdun, which settled the disputes between the sons of Emperor Lous I "le Pieux", the territory of the archbishopric of Köln fell partly within the kingdom of Lotharingia and partly within the province of Franconia which formed part of the kingdom of the East Franks.  Along with the archbishops of Mainz and Trier, the archbishops of Köln played an important role in the election of successive kings of Germany.  In particular, the archbishop of Köln was responsible for issuing the 13 Jan 1257 electoral decree, at the time of the election of Richard Earl of Cornwall in 1257, which marked an important stage in formalising the electoral process[1].  By the mid-12th century, the archbishops of Köln, Mainz and Trier had firmly established themselves as the spiritual representatives in the electoral process.  Electoral procedures, the unity of the seven electors including the three archbishops, and the right of election by the majority, were laid down definitively in the Golden Bull of 1356, which is described in some detail by Leuschner[2]

 

By the judicious acquisition of land, through purchase, donation and inheritance, the three archbishoprics of Köln, Mainz and Trier consolidated a powerful temporal, in addition to ecclesiastical, position of power.  The archbishopric of Köln held extensive territory mainly along the western bank of the river Rhine, stretching from the town of Duisberg in the north to north-west of Koblenz in the south, lying between the counties of Jülich to the west and Berg to the east.  In addition, it held numerous other isolated territories scattered throughout the lower Rhine basin on both banks of the river.  The archbishops of Köln were elected mainly from prominent noble families in the lower Rhine area, although as will be seen below in the present document the precise family connections of many of the archbishops cannot be traced with certainty.  The suspicion is that the reigning archbishops frequently groomed their successors from among the members of their own family, often related through the female rather than the male line.  If sufficient information on family relationships was available in primary source documentation, it is expected that it would reveal extensive informal "dynasties" of archbishops which included a limited number of noble families.  In the case of the archbishopric of Köln, such family connections with noble families in the area of the lower Rhine basin, especially the comital families of Altena, Berg, Heinsberg, Hochstaden, Jülich, and Mark, can be demonstrated clearly.  It is probable that a similar pattern would emerge in relation to the more important lower level ecclesiastical appointments within each archbishopric. 

 

The present document shows the archbishops of Köln between 784 and 1274.  The listing is not strictly chronological in the case of the incumbents which can be linked by family group. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    ARCHBISHOPS of KÖLN 784-1508

 

 

1.         HILDBOLD (-3 Sep 819).  Archbishop of Köln 784. 

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         HATHABOLD (-840).  Archbishop of Köln 819.  The Annales Colonienses Brevissimi record that "Hadebaldo" took "episcopatum Coloniæ" in 819[3].  

2.         REGIGARD (-before 3 Jan [841]).  “Lutbertus electus episcopus ad Coloniæ urbis” and “genitor meus Hasbald” donated property “in pago Auelgawe...” to Bonn St Cassius, for the souls of “avunculi mei Hathabaldi archiepiscopi...et genitricis meæ Regigardæ”, by charter dated “III Non Jan anno secundo regnante Luthario rege[4].  This charter is presumably dated to 841 (N.S.) as the future Emperor Lothaire was installed as king in the area east of the river Meuse by his father at Worms 28 May 839 (see the document LOTHARINGIA KINGS & DUKES).  m HASBOLD, son of --- (-after 3 Jan [841]).  “Asbaldus” donated “ecclesiam...foras muros Bonnensis civitatis in loco...Basilica secus fluvium Gummia”, which “domnus Athabaldus archiepiscopus” had granted him, to Bonn St Cassius by charter dated “XIV Kal Mai anno XIX regnante...Luduico...imperatore[5].  Hasbold & his wife had one child: 

a)         LIUTBERT (after 841).  Archbishop of Köln 840.  “Lutbertus electus episcopus ad Coloniæ urbis” and “genitor meus Hasbald” donated property “in pago Auelgawe...” to Bonn St Cassius, for the souls of “avunculi mei Hathabaldi archiepiscopi...et genitricis meæ Regigardæ”, by charter dated “III Non Jan anno secundo regnante Luthario rege[6].  He was deposed in 841. 

 

 

1.         HILDUIN, son of --- (-27 Sep 849)Archbishop of Köln 842.  The Annales Colonienses Brevissimi record that "Hilduinus" took "episcopatum Coloniæ" in 842[7].  Hilduin is named in two charters of Emperor Lothaire I dated 843 and 848 “vocatus archiepiscopus[8].  Lot argues that Archbishop Hilduin was the same person as Hilduin Abbot of Saint-Denis[9].  It is correct that a charter dated 841, under which Emperor Lothaire authorised “Hilduinus...abba” to install a market “in Valle Tillina, in loco Haenohim, super lacum Cumensem” the profits to belong exclusively to “ecclesiam Sancti Dionysii[10], indicates that Abbé Hilduin had defected to Emperor Lothaire.  However, the subject-matter of the document indicates that he was still connected to Saint-Denis at that time.  In addition, the Chronicon Sancti Martini Coloniensis records that “Heynianus” [mistake for “Hilduinus”] became abbot of Köln St Martin in 819, adds that he later became “archiepiscopus Colonie”, that he died in 849, and gives details of his donation recorded “V Kal Oct[11].  This source indicates that, if the co-identity was correct, Hilduin would have held the abbacies of Saint-Denis and Köln St Martin at the same time. 

 

 

1.         GÜNTHER, son of --- (-after 871)Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Colonienses Brevissimi record "Guntarius episcopus Coloniæ XII Kal Mai" in 850[12].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "dominus Radbodus" was elected Bishop of Utrecht after the death of Bishop Egilbold and specifies that "Radbodus rex Frisie predictus ipsius matris attavus" and that "Guntarius archiepiscopus Coloniensis eius avunculus"[13].  The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records that the concubine of "Lotharius" was "Waldradam, sororem Guntheri archiepiscopi Coloniensis" and that her brother encouraged Lothaire to leave his legitimate wife for Waldrada, for which he was excommunicated by the Pope[14].  He was deposed in 863 by Pope Nicholas I.

 

 

1.         WILLIBERT (-11 Sep 889).  Archbishop of Köln:  The Annales Fuldensis record the appointment of “Willibertum presbyterum iussu Hludowici regis” as archbishop of Mainz in 870[15].  The Annales Colonienses Brevissimi record "XVII Kal Feb Willibertus episcopus" in 870[16].  Regino records the death in 890 of “Williberto episcopo[17].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “III Id Sep” of “Willibertus archiepiscopus[18]

 

 

1.         HERMANN [I] (-11 Apr 925)Archbishop of Köln 890.  Regino records the death in 890 of “Williberto episcopo” and the appointment of “Herimannus” as archbishop of Köln[19].  Chancellor of Zwentibold King of Lotharingia.  Regino records in 923 the death of “Herimannus...Coloniensis episcopus[20].

 

 

1.         WICFRID, son of GERHARD Graf [Duke] & his wife Oda of Saxony (-9 Jul 953).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 2 Aug 945, relating to roperty "in pago Juliacense in comitatu Godefridi comitis", subscribed by "Wichfridi archiepiscopi…fratris eius Godefridi comitis"[21].  Abbot of St Ursula at Köln.  Deacon 922.  Archbishop of Köln 925.  Regino records in 923 the death of “Herimannus...Coloniensis episcopus” and the appointment of “Wigfridus[22].  The Continuator of Regino records the death in 953 of “Wigfridus Coloniensis ecclesiæ archiepiscopus” and the appointment of “Brun frater regis[23].  Archchancellor 950.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 953 of "Wicfridus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Bruno"[24].  Flodoard records in 953 the death of “Wicfredus Coloniensis antistes” and the ordination of “Bruno frater regis Ottonis” to whom “rex Otto” also granted “regnum Lothariense[25].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “VII Id Jul” of “Wifridus archiepiscopus[26]

 

 

1.         BRUNO [I], son of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde (May 925-Reims 11 Oct 965, bur Köln St Pantaleon).  Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[27].  "Brun archiepiscopus Agrippinæ civitatis" is named "frater imperatoris", when recording his death in 965[28].  Chancellor of Germany 940-953.  "Otto…rex" granted property to the church of Cambrai at the request of "germani nostri Brunonis et Cuonradi ducis atque Herimanni ducis" by charter dated 30 Apr 948[29].  Abbot of Lorsch 948/50.  Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Colonienses record the death in 953 of "Wicfridus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Bruno"[30].  Flodoard records in 953 the death of “Wicfredus Coloniensis antistes” and the ordination of “Bruno frater regis Ottonis” to whom “rex Otto” also granted “regnum Lothariense[31].  The Continuator of Regino records the death in 953 of “Wigfridus Coloniensis ecclesiæ archiepiscopus” and the appointment of “Brun frater regis”, adding that the latter acquired “totius Lothariensis regni ducatum et regimen cum episcopatu[32].  Thietmar records that he was installed as BRUNO Duke of Lotharingia by his brother King Otto[33].  According to Thietmar of Merseburg, Archbishop Bruno plotted against his brother, offering the crown of Germany to his brother-in-law Hugues "le Grand", but repented of his scheme and was forgiven by King Otto[34].  In 959, Bruno divided Lotharingia into Upper and Lower Lotharingia, installing comte Frederic (husband of his niece Béatrix de France) as Duke of the former[35].  The Continuator of Regino records the death “V Id Oct” in 965 of “Brun...archiepiscopus germanus imperatoris[36].  Thietmar records the death of Archbishop Bruno on 11 Oct "in the thirteenth year after his ordination"[37].  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 965 of "Bruno archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Poppo"[38].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “V Id Oct” of “Bruno archiepiscopus[39]

 

 

1.         FOLKMAR (-18 Jul [966]).  The Continuator of Regino records the death “V Id Oct” in 965 of “Brun...archiepiscopus germanus imperatoris” and the appointment of “Folchmarus[40].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “XV Kal Aug” of “Volcmarus archiepiscopus[41]

 

 

1.         POPPO (-967).  Archbishop of Köln 965.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 965 of "Bruno archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Poppo"[42].  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 967 of "Poppo archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Gero"[43]

 

 

1.         GERO (-28 Jun 976).  Archbishop of Köln 967.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 967 of "Poppo archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Gero"[44].  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 975 of "Gero archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Warinus"[45].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “IV Kal Jul” of “Gero archiepiscopus” and his donation of “obedientarius de Leghenich et Scotorum...[46]

 

 

1.         WARIN (-21 Oct 985).  Archbishop of Köln 976.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 975 of "Gero archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Warinus"[47].  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 985 of "Warinus Coloniensis archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Evergerus"[48].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “XI Kal Oct” of “Warinus archiepiscopus[49]

 

 

1.         EBERGAR (-11 Jun 999).  Archbishop of Köln 985.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 985 of "Warinus Coloniensis archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Evergerus"[50].  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 999 of "Evergerus Coloniensis archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Herebertus archiepiscopus"[51].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “III Id Jun” of “Euergerus archiepiscopus[52]

 

 

1.         HUGO (-12 Jun ----).  The necrology of Deutz records the death “II Id Jun” of “Hugo comes pater s Heriberti[53]m TIETWIDIS, daughter of --- (-20 Jan ----).  The necrology of Deutz records the death “XIII Kal Feb” of “Tietwich mater s Heriberti[54].  Hugo & his wife had five children: 

a)         LUITFRIED (-28 Jan ----).  The necrology of Deutz records the death “V Kal Feb” of “Luitfridus frater s Heriberti[55]

b)         GEZEMANN (-4 Mar ----).  The necrology of Deutz records the death “IV Non Mar” of “Gezemann frater s Heriberti[56]

c)         REINMAR (-24 Jun ----).  The necrology of Deutz records the death “VIII Kal Jul” of “Reinmarus frater s Heriberti[57]

d)         HERIBERT [von Rotenburg] (-16 Mar 1021).  The Vita Heriberti Archiepiscopi Coloniensis names "Heribertus…Wormacensium progenie" and "pater eius Hugo…mater…Tietwidis, alto Alemanniæ comitum", as well as "ipsa genitricem Immam generatam ab…Regimbaldo comite" who had with her sisters been captured "ab Hungris"[58]Archbishop of Köln 999.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 999 of "Evergerus Coloniensis archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Herebertus archiepiscopus"[59].  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 1021 of "Herebertus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Pilegrinus"[60].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “XVII Kal Apr” of “Heriberti archiepiscopi[61].  The Memorial Book of Köln St Maria records the death “XVII Kal Apr” of “Heriberti episcopi” and his donation of revenue from “processionem Tuicii de curte Merheim[62]

e)         HEINRICH (-[16] Nov ----).  Bishop.  The necrology of Deutz records the death “XVIII Kal Nov” of “Heinricus episcopus frater s Heriberti[63]

 

 

1.         PILGRIM (-25 Aug 1036).  Archbishop of Köln 1021.  The Annales Colonienses record the death in 1021 of "Herebertus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Pilegrinus"[64].  The Annales Brunwilarenes record the death in 1036 of "Piligrinus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Hermannus"[65].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “VIII Kal Sep” of “Pelegrimus archiepiscopus[66]

 

 

1.         HERMANN [II], son of Pfalzgraf EZZO & his wife Mathilde of Germany ([995/1010]-Köln 11 Feb 1056, bur Köln Cathedral).  The Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio names the three sons (in order) "Hermannus, Otto, Ludolphus" of "Herenfridus comes palatinus, qui post Ezo nominatus est" and his wife "Mathilde filia Magni Ottonis"[67]Herimannus names "Herimannus, Ottonis secundi imperatoris ex filia nepos" when recording his installation as Archbishop of Köln in 1036[68].  Imperial Chancellor for Italy 1034/37.  Vogt von Brauweiler.  Provost at Köln Cathedral 1033. Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Brunwilarenes record the death in 1036 of "Piligrinus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Hermannus"[69].  "Herimannus secundi Ottonis imperatoris filie…domne Mathilde beate memorie filius" donated property to Köln St Severin by charter dated 8 Sep 1043[70].  Abbot of St Ursula at Köln.  Archchancellor of the Roman Church 1049.  The Annales Necrologici Prumienses record the death in 1056 of “Heriman archiepiscopus[71].  The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1056 of "Herimannus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Anno"[72].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “III Id Feb” of “Herimannus archiepiscopus qui dedit Scolte et Barre...[73]

 

 

1.         ANNO von Steusslingen, son of WALTER von Steusslingen & his wife Engela --- ([1010]-Köln 4 Dec 1075, bur Siegburg Abbey).  The Vita Annonis names "Anno…ex Alamannorum populis" and "pater eius Walterus, mater Engela"[74].  Provost of St Simon and St Juda at Goslar 1054-1056.  Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1056 of "Herimannus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Anno"[75].  The Annales Necrologici Prumienses record the death in 1075 of “Anno archiepiscopus[76].  The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1075 of "Anno archiepiscopus"[77]

 

 

1.         HILDOLF (-20 Jul 1079).  The Annales Brunwilarenes record the death in 1075 of "Anno archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Hildulfus"[78].  The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1078 of "Hildolfus episcopus sine pallio" and the succession of "Sigewinus"[79]

 

 

1.         SIGWIN (-31 May 1089).  The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1078 of "Hildolfus episcopus sine pallio" and the succession of "Sigewinus"[80].  The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1089 of "Sigwinus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Hermannus III"[81].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “II Kal Jun” of “Sigewinus archiepiscopus[82].  The Memorial Book of Köln St Maria records the death “II Kal Jun” of “Segewinus archiepiscopus[83]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         HERMANN von Hochstaden, son of --- (-21 Nov 1099)Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1078 of "Sigwinus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Hermannus III"[84].  Hermann [III] Archbishop of Köln confirmed a donation to Kloster Deutz by charter dated to [1094], witnessed by "Gerhardo de Hostath fratre meo, Harper de Randerode, Hermanno de Dicco…Hermanno advocato Colonie simulque Othone et Amelrico fratribus eius…"[85].  The Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1098 of "Herimannus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Fridericus"[86].  The Annales Necrologici Prumienses record the death in 1099 of “Herimannus Coloniensis archiepiscopus[87].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “XI Kal Dec” of “Herimannus archiepiscopus” and his donation[88]

2.         GERHARD [I] von Hochstaden (-after 1096).  Graf von Hochstaden.  children: 

a)         GERHARD [II] (-after 1145).  Graf von Hochstaden.  children: 

i)          ADELHEID von Hochstaden .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m OTTO Graf von Ahr, son of --- (-before 1162).  children: 

(a)       DIETRICH (-[1194/22 Jan 1197]).  Graf von Hochstaden.  children: 

(1)       LOTHAR [I] von Ahr (-1215).  Graf von Hochstaden.  children: 

a.         KONRAD von Hochstaden, son of LOTHAR [I] Graf von Hostaden & his wife Mechtild von Vianden (-28 Sep 1261).  "Lutharius comes de Hostaden cum uxore mea Mechtilde et filiis meis Luthario et Conrado" donated the church at Frimmersdorf to the abbey of Knechtsteden by charter dated 1210[89]Archbishop of Köln 1238.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the election of Konrad Archbishop of Köln in 1238[90].  Konrad Archbishop of Köln donated property to Brauweiler abbey, for the souls of "bone memorie domini Lotharii patris nostri, olim comitis Hostadensis, ac domine Methildis matris nostre", by charter dated 1241[91].  Konrad Archbishop of Köln names "consanguineus noster vir nobilis Theodericus de Limburg super Lenam…consanguineus noster Gozwinus decanus Coloniensis…consanguineus noster Philippus thesaurarius Coloniensis" in a charter dated 21 Feb 1247 (presumably O.S.)[92]

 

 

1.         FRIEDRICH [I] von Sponheim, son of ENGELBERT [I] von Sponheim Graf im Kraichgau, im Pustertal und von Sponheim & his wife Hedwig --- (-25 Oct 1131).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Fredericus [primus] frater comitis Engelberti" when recording the election of his [great] nephew as Archbishop of Köln[93]Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Brunwilarenses record the death in 1098 of "Herimannus archiepiscopus" and the succession of "Fridericus"[94].  Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1131 of "Frittericus Coloniæ archiepiscopus” and the succession of “domnus Bruno ex clero sancti Petri” as archbishop in 1132[95]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         ADOLF [II] von Berg, son of ADOLF [I] Graf von Berg & his wife Adelheid von Laufen (-12 Oct after 1160).  Graf von Berg.  children: 

a)         EBERHARD von Berg (-23 Jan 1180, bur Altenberg).  Graf von Altena.  children: 

i)          ADOLF von Altena, son of EBERHARD von Berg Graf von Altena & his [first/second] wife [--- von Kleve/Adelheid von Arnsberg] (-15 Apr 1220)Archbishop of Köln 1193.  The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records the election of "adhuc Brunone vivente…filius fratris eius Adolphus" as archbishop of Köln[96].  Adolf [I] Archbishop of Köln donated property to Kloster Füssenich by charter dated 1197 witnessed by "…fratres nostri comites Arnoldus et Fridericus de Althena"[97].  Adolf Archbishop of Köln  confirmed the rights of “frater noster germanus Arnoldus comes in Althena…uxoris sue…matrone Methildis et liberorum suorum”, with the consent of "Everhardo filio utriusque iam comite", by charter dated 1200[98].  He was excommunicated in 1205 for crowning Philipp as king of Germany, but submitted to Pope Innocent III in 1208.  Adolf Archbishop of Köln confirmed that “consanguineus noster Adolfus comes de Altena” had freed “predium in Kalveswinkele” from obligations by charter dated 1213, witnessed by “...comes Fridericus...dominus Hermannus de Altena...Heinricus frater comitis...[99]

b)         FRIEDRICH von Berg, son of ADOLF [II] Graf von Berg & his second wife [Irmgard von Sponheim/--- von Schwarzenberg] (-Pavia 15 Dec 1158, bur Kloster Altenberg).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Fredericus…secundus de sorore superioris Frederici" when recording his election as Archbishop of Köln[100].  Provost of St Georg, Köln 1135/36.  Elected Bishop of Utrecht 1150.  Archbishop of Köln 1156.  The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records the election of "Fridericus prepositus sancti Georgii, filius fratris Brunonis" as archbishop of Köln[101].  He died after falling from his horse[102]

c)         ENGELBERT von Berg (-Brančevo, Serbia Jul 1189).  Graf von Berg.  children: 

i)          ENGELBERT [I] von Berg, son of ENGELBERT Graf von Berg & his wife Margareta van Limburg ([1185/86]-murdered near Gevelsberg 7 Nov 1225, bur Köln Cathedral).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the election of "domnus Engelbertus filius comitis Engelberti de Monte Veteri frater comitis Adolfi" as Archbishop of Köln in 1216[103].  Provost of St Georg, Köln 1198/1218.  Provost of Köln Cathedral 1203/06 and 1208/16.  Provost of St Severin, Köln 1210/16.  "Adolphus comes de Berge" donated revenue to Siegburg abbey, with the consent of "fratris nostri Engilberti maioris domus in Colonia prepositi", by charter dated 1211[104].  Provost of St Marien, Aachen, of St Marien at Deventer and of St Walburgis at Zütphen 1213/18.  Archbishop of Köln 1216.  The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records the election of "Engelbertus ecclesie sancti Petri prepositus et filius Engelberti comitis de Monte, qui frater fuerat secundum carnem…archiepiscoporum Friderici et Brunonis secundi" as archbishop of Köln[105].  Regent of the Grafschaft Berg 1218.  Imperial Administrator and Guardian of Heinrich King of Germany 1220.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "archiepiscopus Coloniensis Engelbertus" was killed "1225 VII Id Nov" by "cognato suo Frederico comite de Ysenberg"[106].  The Chronica Minor Auctore Minorita Erphordiensi records that "Engilbertus Coloniensis archiepiscopus" was killed in 1225 by "comite Friderico de Ysinburg"[107].  The Annales Spirenses record that "Engilbertus Coloniensis archiepiscopus" was killed "1225 VII Id Nov"[108].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “VII Id Nov” of “Engelbertus archiepiscopus” and his donation of revenue “in Werda prope Knechtsteden...[109]

d)         BRUNO [III] von Berg, son of ADOLF [II] Graf von Berg & his second wife [Irmgard von Sponheim/--- von Schwarzenberg]  (-23 Apr 1196, bur Altenberg).  Provost of St Georg, Köln 1156/91.  Provost of St Apostelen 1160/66.  Kustos of Köln Cathedral before 1179.  Provost of Köln Cathedral 1168/92.  Archbishop of Köln 1192, resigned 1193.  The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records the election of "Bruno maior prepositus" as archbishop of Köln, adding that he was the brother of archbishop Friedrich, next to whom he was later buried[110].  Monk at Altenberg. 

2.         BRUNO von Berg, son of ADOLF [I] Graf von Berg & his wife Adelheid von Laufen (-Trani [29] May 1137, bur Bari San Niccolò).  Provost of St Kastor at Koblenz 1119.  Canon at Trier Cathedral.  Provost of St Gereon at Köln 1127.  Elected Bishop of Trier 1130.  Archbishop of Köln 1131.  Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1131 of "Frittericus Coloniæ archiepiscopus” and the succession of “domnus Bruno ex clero sancti Petri” as archbishop in 1132[111].  The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records the election of "Bruno…e Francia" as archbishop of Köln, recording in a later passage that a later archbishop was "Fridericus prepositus sancti Georgii, filius fratris Brunonis", adding that Bruno died a few days after Emperor Lothar at Bari and was buried there[112].  The Annales Brunwilarenes record the death in 1137 of "Bruno archiepiscopus in Apulia in expeditione regia constitutus" and the succession of "Hugo"[113]

 

 

1.         HUGO von Sponheim, son of STEPHAN Graf [von Sponheim] & his wife Sophie --- (-1 Jul 1137)Archbishop of Köln: the Annales Brunwilarenes record the death in 1137 of "Bruno archiepiscopus in Apulia in expeditione regia constitutus" and the succession of "Hugo", followed "eodem tempore" by the death of Hugo and the succession of "Arnoldus"[114]

 

 

1.         ARNOLD [I], son of --- (-3 Apr 1151)Archbishop of Köln 1137.  The Annales Brunwilarenes record the death in 1137 of "Bruno archiepiscopus in Apulia in expeditione regia constitutus" and the succession of "Hugo", followed "eodem tempore" by the death of Hugo and the succession of "Arnoldus"[115].  Arnold [I] Archbishop of Köln donated the church at Mühlgau, where "Alberti fratris nostri" was buried, to Köln St Severin by charter dated 1139[116].  Arnold [I] Archbishop of Köln records that "Walterus de Hengebach consanguinitatis propinquitate nobis iunctus...nepotum nostrum" returned property donated to Köln St. Martin by charter dated 1147[117].  Archbishop Arnold records that “Adalberto cognato meo Bunnensis ecclesie advocato” granted “turrim...in castro Drachenfels” to the archbishopric as a fief by charter dated 1149[118]

 

 

1.         ARNOLD von Wied, son of MEFRID Graf von Wied & his wife --- (-14 May 1156)Archbishop of Köln 1151.  Emperor Friedrich I granted protection to "venerabilis memorie Arnoldi Coloniensis archiepiscopi, sororem eius Hadewigam Asnidensis monasterii abbatissam et Burkardum fratrem eius de Wide" by charter dated 17 Sep 1156[119].

 

 

1.         REINOLD von Dassel, son of [REINOLD [I] von Dassel & his wife ---] (-Italy 14 Aug 1167).  Imperial Chancellor.  Archbishop of Köln 1159.  A continuator of Sigebert records the death in 1166 of "Rainaldi archiepiscopi Colonie" and the succession of "Philippus archidiaconus eius, filius Gozvini de Falconis monte"[120].

 

 

1.         PHILIPP [I] von Heinsberg, son of GOSWIN [III] Herr von Heinsberg und Valkenburg & his wife Adelheid von Sommerschenburg (-Naples 13 Aug 1191, bur Köln Cathedral).   A continuator of Sigebert records the death in 1166 of "Rainaldi archiepiscopi Colonie" and the succession of "Philippus archidiaconus eius, filius Gozvini de Falconis monte"[121].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the election in 1167 as Archbishop of Köln of "Philippus…filius Gossuin de Heynesberch"[122].  Archdeacon of Liège 1155/67.  Deacon at Köln Cathedral 1156.  Provost of St Lambert at Liège 1165/67.  Archbishop of Köln 1168.  Alexander Bishop of Liège confirmed the donation made by "domnus Gozwinus secundus Henesbergensis et uxor eius Aleidis" to the church at their castle, with the consent of "filiis eius Philippo…archiepiscopo, Gozwino, Godefrido", by charter dated 13 Mar 1165 (but redated to [1167/68])[123].  Imperial Chancellor for Italy 1168/1187.  Philipp Archbishop of Köln confirmed the foundation of a church "in castro suo Henesbergis" by "Oda matrona venerabilis memorie consensu filiorum suorum Gerardi et Goswini", and the donation by "predictus…Gozwinus post obitum matris" with the advice of "uxore sua Aleide…matrona consensu filiorum suorum Gozwini, Herimanni, Godefridi, Philippi", by charter dated 1170[124].  Philipp Archbishop of Köln settled the dispute between the abbey of Rolduc and "fratrem meum Gozwinum…et…filium eius Gozwinus" by charter dated 1175[125].  Philipp Archbishop of Köln confirmed the foundation of the church at Heinsberg by "pater carnalis Gozwinus…secundus de Heinsberg et…mater mea Adeleidis", with the consent of "fratribus meis Gozwino, Herimanno, Godofrido, sororibusque Uda, Methide, Salome", and various donations including the donation made by "Hezelo…et Gertrudis soror mea ex patre", by charter dated 1180[126].  The Kalendarium of Köln Cathedral records the death “Id Aug” of “Philippus archiepiscopus Coloniensis[127]

 

 

1.         BRUNO [IV] von Sayn, son of EBERHARD [I] Graf zu Sayn & his wife --- von Isenburg (-12 Nov 1208)Archbishop of Köln 1205.

 

 

1.         DIETRICH [I] von Hengebach, son of --- (-12 May 1224)Archbishop of Köln 1208-1212. 

 

 

1.         HEINRICH [I] von Müllenark, son of --- (-26 Mar 1238)Archbishop of Köln 1225.  “C...Coloniensis ecclesie major prepositus” confirmed a donation to Kloster Fröndenberg, at the request of “domini Henrici Coloniensis archiepiscopi et fratris eius domini H. de Mulenarken”, by charter dated 1235[128]

 

 

1.         ENGELBERT [II] van Valkenburg, son of DIRK [I] Heer van Valkenburg, Herr von Heinsberg & his wife Isolda --- (-17 Nov 1274)Archbishop of Köln 1261.  Engelbert Archbishop of Köln issued a charter dated 16 Apr 1271 which names "bone memorie Th. domini de Valkenburg fratris nostri…Walramus filius fratris nostri predicti…nostro…consanguineo Th. domino de Heinesberg"[129].  "Richardus…romanorum rex" refers to "E. Coloniensi archiepiscopi" as "affinis nostri" in a charter dated 13 Sep 1271[130]

 

 

1.         SIEGFRIED von Westerburg, son of ---  (-7 Apr 1297).  Archbishop of Köln 1275. 

 

 

1.         WICBOLD von Holte, son of WICBOLD von Holte & his wife --- (-26 Mar 1304)Archbishop of Köln 1297. 

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         HEINRICH [II] von Virneburg, son of HEINRICH [I] Graf von Virneburg & his wife Ponzetta --- (-5 Jan 1332).  Pope Boniface VIII wrote to "Henrico de Virneburg clerico Treverensis diocesis, consanguineo capellano et familiari Adolfi regis Romanorum" dated 24 Nov 1295[131]Archbishop of Köln 1304.  Heinrich Archbishop of Köln agreed the marriage of "Ottone comite Cleuensi" and "Mechtildem filiam quondam Roperti comitis de Virnenborg fratris nostri" by charter dated 1 Aug 1308[132]

2.         ROBERT [II] Graf von Virneburg.  Children: 

a)         JOHANN von Virneburg (-1363).  "Roprecht grave von Virnenburgh ind von Wede" pledged the Herrschaft Wied, with the consent of "…unsers eirsamen broders heren Henrichs des ertzbuschoffs von Mentze ind Gerhartz unsers broders des chorbuschoffs von Trier ind Johans unsers broders des proistes von Sante…", by charter dated 8 May 1329[133].  Provost in Xanten.  Archbishop of Köln 1362. 

 

 

1.         WILHELM [IV] Graf von Jülich.  Children: 

a)         GERHARD Graf von Jülich.  Children: 

i)          WALRAM von Jülich ([1303/04]-Paris 14 Jul 1349, bur Köln Cathedral)Archbishop of Köln 1332.  Levoldus’s mid-14th century Chronica Comitum de Marka records the death in 1349 of “archiepiscopus Coloniensis dominus Walramus de Iuliaco” in Paris and his burial “in maiori ecclesia[134]

b)         KATHARINA von Jülichm JOHANN von Arberg Burggraf von Köln.  Children: 

i)          MECHTILD von Arbergm ENGELBERT [II] Graf von der Mark.  Children: 

(1)       ADOLF [III] Graf von der Mark.  Children: 

(a)       ADOLF [II] von der Mark, son of ADOLF [III] Graf von der Mark & his wife Margareta von Kleve (1334-Kleve 7 Sep 1394, bur Kleve)Archbishop of Köln 1363.  Graf von Kleve.  "Adolph greue van Cleue" and "Diderich van der Marke gebroedere" agreed to share "der graesscap van der Marke" after the death of "onse…broder…Engelbrecht greue van der Marke" by charter dated 14 May 1380[135]

(2)       ENGELBERT [III] von der Mark, son of (-26 Aug 1368)Archbishop of Köln 1364. 

 

 

1.         WILHELM von Gennep, son of --- (-15 Sep 1362)Archbishop of Köln 1349.  Levoldus’s mid-14th century Chronica Comitum de Marka records the death in 1349 of “archiepiscopus Coloniensis dominus Walramus de Iuliaco” and the succession of “dominus Wilhelmus de Genepe canonicus Coloniensis[136]

 

 

1.         FRIEDRICH [III] von Saarwerden, son of --- (-8 Apr 1414)Archbishop of Köln 1370. 

 

 

1.         DIETRICH [II] von Mörs, son of --- (-14 Feb 1463)Archbishop of Köln 1414. 

 

 

1.         RUPRECHT Pfalzgraf, son of LUDWIG III "der Bärtige" Kurfürst und Pfalzgraf von der Pfalz, Herzog in Bayern & his second wife Mathilde de Savoie (Heidelberg 27 Feb 1427-in prison in Blankenstein 16 Jul 1480, bur Bonn St Martin).  Canon at Köln cathedral 1442.  Provost at Würzburg cathedral 1448-1460.  Provost at Strasbourg Cathedral 1458-1463.  Archbishop of Köln 1463. 

 

 

1.         HERMANN [IV] von Hessen, son of LUDWIG III "der Friedsame" Landgraf Herr von Hessen & his wife Anna von Sachsen (1450-Poppelsdorf 19 Oct 1508, bur Köln Cathedral).  Canon at Mainz Cathedral 1461.  Canon at Köln Cathedral 1463.  Provost at Worms Cathedral 1467/68.  Provost at Fritzlar 1468, resigned 1472.  Deacon of St Gereon at Köln 1470-1480.  Elected Bishop of Hildesheim 1471-72.  Coadjutor of Köln 1473.  Scholasticus at Worms Cathedral 1478/79.  Archbishop of Köln 1480.  Coadjutor of Paderborn 1495.  Bishop of Paderborn 1498. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    BISHOPS of LIEGE

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the family origin of Bishop Franco. 

 

1.         FRANCO (-901).  Bishop of Liège 852.  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 852 of "Harcharius episcopus Leodicensis" and the succession of "Franco"[137].  Hincmar names “...Franco episcopus sancti Landberti...” as one of the bishops present when Lothaire II King of Lotharingia accepted the return of his wife Teutberga in 865[138]Regino records in 869 that “Francone episcopo Tungrensis” ordained "Hilduinum abbatem" in “Aquis palatio” as part of the process of pressing his candidature as archbishop of Köln[139].  The Annales Lobienses record in 870 that "Franco episcopus" sent legates to the Pope after King Lothaire divorced his wife and remarried[140].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records in 890 that "Franco episcopus” acquired “abbatiam Lobiensem et preposituram Fossensem” for the bishopric of Liège[141].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 901 of "Franco Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of "Stephanus"[142]

 

 

Brother and sister, parents not yet identified.  Assuming the information concerning Plectrude´s marriage is correct as shown below, the family had comital connections.  The name Stefan is associated with the family of the Matfriede family of Grafen von Metz (see the document UPPER LOTHARINGIA NOBILITY) and earlier, with the family of the 8th and 9th century Comtes de Paris (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY).  Bishop Stefan´s earlier association with the church of Metz could also indicate a connection with the comital family of Metz.  If that is correct, it is likely that Stefan was closely related to his successor Bishop Richer.  Gallia Christiana states that Bishop Stefan was “Salinenis seu Salmensis comitis filius” but cites no source on which the statement is based[143]

 

1.         STEFAN (-19 May [918/19], bur Liège Saint-Lambert).  Bishop of Liège 901.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Stephanum...Metensis æcclesiæ...canonicus” was appointed bishop of Liège in succession to Franco[144].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 901 of "Franco Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of "Stephanus"[145].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Stephanum” in 904[146], although this date is inconsistent with the details concerning Bishop Stefan´s death which are recorded in the same source (see below).  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 920 of "Stephanus episcopus Leodicensium"[147].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “XIV Kal Jun...regnante Conrardo Romanorum imperatore...primo” of “Stephanus episcopus” after holding office for 18 years and his burial “in cripta sancti Lamberti[148]

2.         PLECTRUDE .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which names [her son] “sanctus Gerardus fundator et primus abbas cenobii sancti Petri Broniensis, filius Namurcensis comitis de Plictrude sorore ipsius Stephani[149]m STANTIOComte de Namur”, son of --- (-after 918).  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium names [his son] “sanctus Gerardus fundator et primus abbas cenobii sancti Petri Broniensis, filius Namurcensis comitis de Plictrude sorore ipsius Stephani[150].  The title attributed in this source to Plectrude´s husband is anachronistic as it is uncommon to find geographical epithets attributed to comital titles in contemporary primary sources in the late 9th/early 10th centuries.  The early counts of the castle of Namur are shown in the document NAMUR.  No indication has been found of a connection between that family and the husband of Plectrude.  It is not impossible that his county, assuming that the information in Aegidius´s Gesta is correct, was close to but not centred on the castle of Namur.  Another indication about his origin is provided by Mabillon who names “Stantio...ex prosapia Haganonis Austrasiorum ducis” as the father of Gérard and husband of Plectrude, but provides no indication of the primary source on which the statement is based[151].  “Gerardus” donated property “in pago Lomacensi in loco...Bronium super fluvium Bornom” to found a monastery, with the consent of “patre meo Stantione et fratre meo Widone”, by charter dated 918[152].  Stantio & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUY (-after 918).  “Gerardus” donated property “in pago Lomacensi in loco...Bronium super fluvium Bornom” to found a monastery, with the consent of “patre meo Stantione et fratre meo Widone”, by charter dated 918[153]

b)         GERARD (-5 Oct 959).  Abbot of Brogne Saint-Pierre.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium names “sanctus Gerardus fundator et primus abbas cenobii sancti Petri Broniensis, filius Namurcensis comitis de Plictrude sorore ipsius Stephani[154].  “Gerardus” donated property “in pago Lomacensi in loco...Bronium super fluvium Bornom” to found a monastery, with the consent of “patre meo Stantione et fratre meo Widone”, by charter dated 918[155].  Mabillon records the death “III Non Oct” in 959 of “Gerardus Broniensis abbas”, but provides no indication of the primary source on which the statement is based[156].  (Del Marmol, E. ‘Notice sur l´abbaye de Brogne ou de Saint Gérard’, Annales archéologiques de Namur, Tome V (with pièces justificatives). 

 

 

Bishop Richer was a member of the Matfride family which provided an archbishop of Köln and bishops of Verdun.  As noted above, the family name “Stefan” suggests the possibility that Bishop Richer was closely related to his predecessor Bishop Stefan. 

 

1.         RICHER, son of --- [von Metz] & his wife --- (-23 Jul 945, bur Liège Saint-Pierre).  Abbot of Prüm [892]: Regino records the death in 892 of “Farabertus abba Prumensis cœnobii” and the election of "Richarium, fratrem Gerhardi et Mathfridi" as his successor[157]Bishop of Liège [920].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Richario” was appointed bishop of Liège in succession to Stefan[158].  Flodoard records in 920 a dispute between "Hilduinum episcopum et Richarium abbatem" relating to “episcopatu Tungrensi”, the king granting the bishopric to Richer[159].  The same source continues by recording that “Herimannus...archiepiscopus” [archbishop of Köln] appointed “Hilduinus”, who at first was also supported by “Gisleberto” (who had left “Karolo rege” and been appointed “principi” by “plurimi Lotharienses”).  Sigebert's Chronica records in 921 that, after the death of "Stephano Leodicensium episcopo", “Richarius” was ordained bishop “a Karolo per auctoritatem papæ Romani”, rejecting “Hilduino qui pecunia data duci Gisleberto ambiebat ab eo sibi dari episcopatum[160].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Richarius...abbas Prumiensis et Stabulensis a rege Francorum Karolo Simplico electus per auctoritatem pape Iohannis...decimi[161].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 920 of "Stephanus episcopus Leodicensium" and the dispute between "Hilduinum et Richarium" over which should succeed, Hilduin being supported by "Gisleberti ducis" and Richer by "Karolus" as well as the Pope, and record the election of "Richarius" in 922[162].  Flodoard records in 922 the return from Rome of "Richarius" after his ordination by “Iohanne papa” [Pope John X], who excommunicated “Hilduino[163].  Flodoard records in 933 that “Richarius episcopus Tungrensis” invaded “castellum Bernardi comitis”, which he had built “apud Harceias in pago Porcinse”, because it was situated “in suæ ecclesiæ terra[164].  The Annales Stabulenses record the death in 945 of "Richeri episcopi"[165].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 945 of "Richarius Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of "Uhogo"[166].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “X Kal Aug” 945 of “Richarius” after holding office for 24 years and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Petri[167].  The Liber Memorialis of Remiremont records the death "X Kal Aug" of "Richerus episcopus"[168].

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the family origin of Bishop Hugues/Hugo.  It is not even known whether he was of Germanic or French origin.  The name Hugues/Hugo is of course closely associated with the families of the Grafen im Nordgau (in which the names Gerhard and Matfried are also found, indicating a possible connection with the Matfriede family of Bishop Richer) and the Grafen im Sundgau, both in Alsace (see the document ALSACE), and with the future Capet kings of France (see FRANCE CAPETIAN KINGS). 

 

1.         HUGUES/HUGO (-11 Apr 947).  Provost of Trier St Maximin.  Abbot of Trier St Maximin 934.  The Continuator of Regino records the election in 934 of “ecclesia sancti Maximini...Ougo antea præpositus, abba[169]Bishop of Liège 945.  Flodoard records in 946 that, after the death of “Richario Tungrensium præsule”, “rex Otho” granted “idem episcopium” to “Hugoni abbati monasterii sancti Maximini[170].  The Continuator of Regino records the death in 945 of “Richarius episcopus”,and the succession of “Ougo Treverencis abbas in episcopatu[171].  Flodoard records the succesion in 945, after the death of “Richario Tungrensium præsule”, of “Hugoni abbati monasterio sancti Maximini[172].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 945 of "Richarius Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of "Uhogo"[173].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Hugonem” was appointed bishop of Liège in succession to Richer[174].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 947 of "Uhogo episcopus" and the succession of "Farebertus"[175].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “III Id Apr” 947 of “Hugo[176].  The necrology of Trier St Maximin commemorates “VII Kal Feb Ogo abbas hujus loci postea Tungrensis episcopus[177]

 

 

It is likely that the family of Bishop Farabert was related in some way to the Matfriede family of his predecessor Bishop Richer.  This is indicated by Richer´s predecessor as abbot of Prüm also bearing the name Farabert, assuming the correctness of the hypothesis that successors to ecclesiastical positions were at that time often closely related to their predecessors. 

 

1.         FARABERT (-892).  Regino records the death “IV Id Jul” 886 of “Ansbaldus abba Prumensis cœnobii” and the succession “VIII Id Aug” of "Farabertus venerabilis pater"[178].  Abbot of Prüm.  Regino records the death in 892 of “Farabertus abba Prumensis cœnobii” and the election of "Richarium, fratrem Gerhardi et Mathfridi" [the future Richer Bishop of Liège, see above] as his successor[179]

2.         [--- .  Their names indicate that Farabert Bishop of Liège was closely related to Farabert Abbot of Prüm.  The precise relationship is not known.  For presentational purposes only in the present document, Bishop Farabert is shown as the nephew of Abbot Farabert.  There is no precise indication of respective birth dates of either.  The description of the abbot as “venerabilis” in the source quoted below may suggest a certain degree of maturity when he was appointed to the abbacy.  However, the chronology shows that his successor Richer, the future bishop of Liège, must have been relatively young when he was appointed in 892 as his death is dated to 945.  This isolated case cannot be used to argue that an abbatial appointment was considered at the time as one of the first steps in an ecclesiastical career.  However, if that were the case, it is possible that Bishop Farabert would have belonged to the generation subsequent to Abbot Farabert, in which case it is not impossible that one of the parents of the former was the sibling of the latter.]  m ---.  [One child]: 

a)         [FARABERT (-28 Aug 953).  Bishop of Liège 947.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Farabertus ex abbate Prumiensi” was appointed bishop of Liège in succession to Hugues[180].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 947 of "Uhogo episcopus" and the succession of "Farebertus"[181].  The Annales Stabulenses record the election in 947 of "Farabertus"[182].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 953 of "Farabertus Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of "Ratherius"[183].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “V Kal Sep” 953 of “Farabertus[184].  The necrology of Brogne records the death "V Kal Sep" of "domnus Farabertus episcopus" and his donation[185].] 

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the family origin of Bishop Rather.  The only clue is provided by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which records his origin as “ex nostris partibus oriundus” (see below).  Rather was the name of a count in the circle of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia in the mid-9th century: the Annales Bertiniani record that "de comitibus Milo, Ratharius, Herlandus, Theutmarus, Weremboldus, Rocolfus, comes" witnessed the agreement dated 865 under which Lothaire II King of Lotharingia agreed to take his wife Theutberga back[186] (see the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY).  No indication has yet been found of his family connections. 

 

1.         RATHER (-Laub 974).  Bishop of Verona.  Sigebert's Chronica records in 928 that "Ratherius Lobiensis monachus...cum Hilduino, qui in Lotharingia episcopatum Leodicensem olim ambierat" went to Italy where he was appointed “Veronæ episcopus” by “regem...Hugone[187]Bishop of Liège 953.  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 953 of "Farabertus Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of "Ratherius"[188].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 954 that, after "Farabertum", Bruno Archbishop of Köln appointed “Ratherius bis episcopatu Veronensi depulsus” as “Leodicensium episcopus[189].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Ratherius ex nostris partibus oriundus[190].  The Annales Lobienses record that "Ratherio" was expelled and "Baldricus" succeeded to "Leodicensium episcopium"[191].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 956 that, after "Ratherio ab episcopatu Leodicensium eiecto", “Baldricus annuente avunculo suo Raginero comite Montinese” was appointed bishop[192].  Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 974 "apud Lobias" of “Ratherius de quo hoc monosticum: Veronæ presul, sed ter Ratherius exul[193]

 

 

Baldric [I] was the first bishop of Liège who belonged to the family of the future comtes de Looz.  The holdings of that family in the late 9th and early 10th centuries were located in the Rhine estuary area, in the territory which later evolved as the duchy of Lower Lotharingia, in contrast to the Matfriede (whose members included Bishop Richer and possibly some of his predecessors as explained above) who operated in Upper Lotharingia. 

 

1.         BALDRIC [I], son of NIBELUNG Graaf van Betuwe & his wife --- de Hainaut (-20 Apr 959, bur Liège St Jacques).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 24 Jun 943 under which [his paternal uncle] “Baldricus...Traiectensis ecclæsie...presul...per manus advocati mei Folberti”, addressing [Baldric´s mother as] “nobilissime probateque Deo sacrate” [unnamed], granted “res...de abbatia...Hereberc...mansos...Rura, Liethorp, Linne, Sulethum, Flothorp, Ascolon, Malicalieol, Curnelo” to “filius vester...Baldricus in vita sua...post eum Rodulfus frater suus”, for the souls of “genitoris nostri Raineri comitis et insuper Nevelungi senioris vestri[194].  Abbot of Lobbes.  The Gesta Abbatum Gemblacensium records that "Raginero comiti…Longicollus…primi Baldrici Leodicensium episcopi avunculus" granted his nephew the benefice of "abbatiam Lobiensem"[195]Bishop of Liège 955.  The Gesta Abbatum Gemblacensium records the installation of "Baldricus" as bishop of Liège in 955[196].  The Annales Lobienses record that "Ratherio" was expelled and "Baldricus" succeeded to "Leodicensium episcopium"[197].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 956 that, after "Ratherio ab episcopatu Leodicensium eiecto", “Baldricus annuente avunculo suo Raginero comite Montinese” was appointed bishop[198].  The Annales Stabulenses record the death in 959 of "Baldricus episcopus" and the succession of "Everacrus"[199].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 959 of "Baldricus Leodicensium episcopus" and the successsion of "Everacrus"[200]

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the precise family origin of Bishop Everaclus.  As noted below, the Vita Evracli records that he was "Saxonum…sanguine…oriundus" without giving any specific details.  No other reference has been found to the name “Everacrus/Everaclus”, although the first element “Ever-“ is reminiscent of “Eber-“ in Eberhard and Eberwin, the latter being the name of a count around Merseburg in the late 9th century (see the document GERMANY, EARLY NOBILITY).  The second element “-acrus” recalls “-acer” in Odacre/Odoacar, the name found in a 9th/10th century Lotharingian comital family. 

 

1.         EVERACRUS [Everaclus] (-27 Oct 971, bur Liège Saint-Martin).  Bishop of Liège 959.  The Annales Stabulenses record the death in 959 of "Baldricus episcopus" and the succession of "Everacrus"[201].  The Annales Lobienses record the death in 959 of "Baldricus Leodicensium episcopus" and the successsion of "Everacrus"[202].  The Vita Evracli records that "Evraclus" was "Saxonum…sanguine…oriundus"[203].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 960 that, after "Baldricum", “Euraclus” was appointed “episcopus Leodicensium” and founded two monasteries in the town “ad titulum sancti Pauli apostoli, et ad titulum sancti Martini episcopi[204].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Everacrus cisalpinæ Veronæ præpositus quæ vulgo Bunna dicitur” was appointed bishop of Liège in succession to Baldric[205].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Everacrus [episcopus]” died after 12 years in office and was buried “in æcclesia beati Martini[206].  The Annales Lobienses record the death "VI Kal Nov" 971 of "domnus Everacrus Leodicensium episcopus"[207]

 

 

[Two brothers].  Bishop Notger was almost certainly a member of the Ekkehard/Notger family who provided several ecclesiastical dignitaries to the abbey of Sankt-Gallen in present-day northern Switzerland.  As shown below, the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records the bishop as “genere quidem Alamannus”, and the Annales Hildesheimensis name him “Nohtgerus prepositus monasterii beati Galli, Leodicensis præsul” when recording his death (see below).  The family in Swabia is mentioned by the Annales Sangallenses Maiores, which record the death in 912 of “Notkerus magister” and the installation in 971 (973) of “Notkerus abba[208], and in greater detail by the Ekkehardi IV. Casus S. Galli[209].  An outline reconstruction of the family of Notger Abbot of Sankt-Gallen, comprising the agnatic and cognatic descendants of Ekkehard [I] who are named in the Ekkehardi IV. Casus S. Galli, is attempted by the editor of the MGH SS edition of the source but no mention is made either of Notger Bishop of Liège or of a “prepositus” of Sankt-Gallen of that name[210].  None of the charters of Sankt-Gallen name a “prepositus” named Notger: a charter dated [2 Feb 968/1 Feb 969] names “Adalberonis præpositi[211], which leaves little time for Notger to have succeeded as prepositus before his election as bishop of Liège in 972.  Bishop Notger came from outside the mainly Lotharingian-based circle which had provided earlier bishops of Liège.  The reason for this choice of an outsider for the episcopal seat is unclear.  His election occurred in 972, one year before the death of the childless Burkhard III Duke of Swabia.  In 973, Emperor Otto II appointed his own nephew Otto as duke of Swabia.  One speculative possibility is that the Saxon imperial dynasty was already extending its control over Swabia in the previous year, and that the appointment of a Swabian ecclesiastic as a Lotharingian-based bishop formed part of a wider plan to bring the Swabian noble class more closely into the imperial fold. 

 

[Two siblings:] 

1.         NOTGER (-10 Apr 1007, bur Liège Saint-Paul).  Bishop of Liège 972.  The Annales Stabulenses record the succession in 972 of "Notgerus…episcopus"[212].  The Annales Lobienses record the installation "IX Kal Mai apud Bonnam" 972 of "dominus…Notkerus"[213].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Nokerus genere quidem Alamannus” succeeded as bishop of Liège after the death of Everaclus[214].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records the death of “Notkero episcopo” after 36 years in office[215].  The Annales Stabulenses record the death in 1007 of "Notkerus episcopus"[216].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “VI Id Apr” 1107 of Notger and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Pauli[217].  The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the death in 1008 of “Notgerus Laudovicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Baldricus[218].  The Annales Hildesheimenses record the death in 1008 of “Nohtgerus prepositus monasterii beati Galli, Leodicensis præsul[219]

2.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         ROBERT (-9 Mar ----).  Gallia Christiana names “Robertus Notkeri episcopi nepos Leod. ecclesiæ præpositus” and records his death “VI Id Mar”, but cites no source on which the statements are based[220]

 

 

Bishop Baldric [II] was related to Bishop Baldric [I] but, as explained in the document LOWER LOTHARINGIA NOBILITY, the precise relationship is unclear as there are difficulties in accurately reconstructing the early generations of the family of the future Comtes de Looz. 

 

1.         BALDRIC [III], son of [Comte OTTO [Looz] & his wife ---] (-29 Jul 1018, bur Monastery St Jacobi).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Baldricus secundus…filius Ottonis comitis de Los ex Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ, Ottonis prefati ducis filie, progenitus, frater Ghiselbertus", when recording his installation as Bishop of Liège[221]Bishop of Liège 1008.  The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the death in 1008 of “Notgerus Laudovicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Baldricus[222].  Sigebert's Chronica records the appointment in 1008 of "Baldricus Leodicensium episcopus"[223].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Baldricus” succeeded Notger as bishop of Liège[224].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records in 1015 that "Baldricus episcopus” acquired “Florinensem abbatiam[225].  "Baldricus…Leodiensis ecclesiæ sacerdos" founded the abbey of Liège Saint-Jacques, in the presence of "fratribus meis Gisleberto…comite de Los et Arnulfo", by charter dated 1016, witnessed by "…Arnulfus comes frater comitis Gisleberti"[226].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the death of "Baldricus secundus" specifying that he was buried "in cripta monasterii sancti Iacobi"[227].  Thietmar records the death “IV Kal Aug...in Tiele” of “Baldericus Leodicensis episcopus[228].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that Baldric died “ipso dia eademque hora qua prælium apud Flardenges” [Vlaerdingen][229].  The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the death in 1018 of “Baldricus Leodicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Fulmodo[230]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known.  No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the precise family origin of Bishop Wolbodo.  As noted below, the Vita Wolbodonis records that he was "genus ex Flandria" without giving specific details. 

 

1.         WOLBODO (-21 Apr 1021).  Bishop of Liège 1018.  The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the death in 1018 of “Baldricus Leodicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Fulmodo[231].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “domini Walpodo”, who had been trained “apud Ulterius Traiectum”, succeeded Baldric as bishop of Liège[232].  The Vita Wolbodonis records "Wolbodo genus ex Flandria" was "Saxonum…sanguine…oriundus"[233].  “Vilpodo...Leodiensis ecclesiæ episcopus” confirmed possessions of the church of Gemblais by charter dated to after 1018[234].  The Vita Wolbodonis records the death "XI Kal Mai" 1021 of "Walbodo"[235].  The necrology of Brogne records "XI Kal Mar...anniversarium domni episcopi Wilbodonis"[236]

2.         son .  His family relationship with Bishop Wolbodo is confirmed by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which records that [his grandson] “Guolbodo abbas ecclesie beati Laurentii” was “episcop[i] sancti Wolbodonis...proximus...illum referens patris patruum[237]m ---.  One child: 

a)         son .  His parentage is confirmed by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which records that [his son] “Guolbodo abbas ecclesie beati Laurentii” was “episcop[i] sancti Wolbodonis...proximus...illum referens patris patruum[238]m ---, daughter of ---.  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which records that [her son] “Guolbodo abbas ecclesie beati Laurentii” was “episcop[i]...Reginardi...affinis...istum referens matris sue fuisse avunculum[239].  One child: 

i)          WOLBODO .  Abbot of Liège Saint-Laurent [1070].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records that “Guolbodo abbas ecclesie beati Laurentii” was “episcoporum sancti Wolbodonis et Reginardi proximus...et affinis, illum referens patris patruum, istum referens matris sue fuisse avunculum[240]

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the precise family origin of Bishop Durand.  As noted below, the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that he was "natus...ex humile genere", indicating a non-noble origin, without giving specific details. 

 

1.         DURAND (-23 Jan 1024, bur Liège Saint-Laurent).  Bishop of Liège 1021.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Durandus natus...ex humile genere” succeeded Wolbodo as bishop of Liège[241].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records that “Godescalcus [maioris ecclesie prepositi]...filius...castellani de Morelmez” had been elected bishop and went to the emperor “pro regalibus suis” only to find that they had already been given to Durand[242].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Durandus” was buried “apud Sanctum Laurentium[243].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “X Kal Feb” 1024 of Durand and his burial “extra ecclesiam sancti Laurentii[244]

 

 

[Three] siblings, parents not known.  No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the precise family origin of Bishop Reginhard.  As noted below, the Vita Reginardi records that he was "in territorio Colonie Agripinensis…genere".  Counts named Reginhard are recorded in Bavaria, Franconia and Swabia in the 10th century and in Bavaria in the mid-11th century (see GERMANY, EARLY NOBILITY). 

 

1.         REGINHARD (-1036 or 1037).  Canon at Bonn.  Bishop of Liège 1024.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Reginhardus...prælatus canonicæ apud Veronam” succeeded Durand as bishop of Liège[245].  The Vita Reginardi records that "Reginardus" was "in territorio Colonie Agripinensis…genere"[246].  “Reginhardus Leodicensium...episcopus”, through “advocati Wigeri”, donated property to the church of Saint-Laurent by charter dated 3 Nov 1034, witnessed by “...Nizo thesaurarius ex prosapia mea...[247].  The Chronicon Sancti Laurentii Leodiensis records the death in 1036 of “dominus Reginardus...Leodiensis episcopus[248].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1037 of "Raginardus episcopus” and the succession of “Nihardus[249].  The Vita Reginardi records the death "V Non Dec" 1036 of "Reginardus"[250]

2.         daughter .  m ---.  One child: 

a)         NITHARD (-1042).  The Vita Reginardi records that "Reginardus" was "in territorio Colonie Agripinensis…genere"[251].  “Reginhardus Leodicensium...episcopus”, through “advocati Wigeri”, donated property to the church of Saint-Laurent by charter dated 3 Nov 1034, witnessed by “...Nizo thesaurarius ex prosapia mea...[252]Bishop of Liège [1037].  The Chronicon Sancti Laurentii Leodiensis records the succession of “Nithardus nepos domni Reginardi ex sorore, custos Sancti Lamberti” as bishop of Liège[253].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Nithardus custos maioris æcclesiæ” succeeded Rainard as bishop of Liège, holding office for four years[254].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1037 of "Raginardus episcopus” and the succession of “Nihardus”, and in 1042 the death of “Nihardus episcopus[255]

3.         [---.  His or her family origin is confirmed by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which records that [his/her grandson] “Guolbodo abbas ecclesie beati Laurentii” was “episcop[i]...Reginardi...affinis...istum referens matris sue fuisse avunculum[256].  It is not known whether this grandparent of Abbot Wolbodo was the same person as the mother of Bishop Nithard who is shown above.]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         daughter .  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium which records that [her son] “Guolbodo abbas ecclesie beati Laurentii” was “episcop[i]...Reginardi...affinis...istum referens matris sue fuisse avunculum[257]m ---, son of ---. 

 

 

Two brothers.  No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the family origin of Bishop Wazo.  As noted below, he had been chaplain of Emperor Konrad II and owed his appointment as bishop to the emperor. 

 

1.         WAZO (-8 Jul 1047 or 1048, bur Liège Saint-Lambert).  Bishop of Liège 1042.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “domnus Wazo” succeeded Nithard as bishop of Liège, who had been “capellanus primus sub Nokero”, “apud imperatorem Cuonradum...capellanum”, and provost at Liège, and was appointed by Emperor Konrad II[258].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "VIII Id Jul" in 1047 of "Wazo Leodiensis episcopus"[259].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “VIII Id Jul” 1048 of “episcopus Wazo” and his burial “extra ecclesiam sancti Lamberti[260].  The necrology of Brogne records the death "VIII Id Jul" of "Wasonis episcopi"[261]

2.         WENZO (-after 1059).  Abbot of Florennes.  The Chronicon Sancti Laurentii Leodiensis records that “Wazo fuit frater Wensonis abbatis de Florinis[262]

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the precise family origin of Bishop Theodoin.  As noted below, the Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records that he was “de Bawaria oriundus” without giving more details.  In addition, the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines states that he was "consanguineus imperatoris", but if this is correct his precise relationship with the Salian imperial family cannot be traced.  While “Theodo” was the name of several early dukes of Bavaria, no name similar to Theodoin has been identified among the nobility which is recorded in Bavaria in the 10th and 11th centuries. 

 

1.         THEODOIN (-23 Jun 1075, bur Huy Notre-Dame).  Bishop of Liège 1048.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "Episcopo Wazoni Theodunus" was "natione Noricus id est de Bavaria consanguineus imperatoris"[263].  The Chronicon Sancti Laurentii Leodiensis records that “Theoduinus” succeeded Wazo as bishop of Liège, and adds that he founded “basilicam sanctæ Dei genitricis Mariæ...in Hoyo” where he was buried[264].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Theoduinus...de Bawaria oriundus[265].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “IX Kal Jul” 1075 of Theodoin and his burial “Hoii...in ecclesia beate Marie[266]

 

 

The primary sources are contradictory regarding the parentage of Bishop Henri.  The Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium names "Heinricus venerabilis Leodiensium præsul" as brother of "Fredericus comes Tullensis"[267].  On the other hand, the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium names "Heinricum…Virdunensem archidiaconum…filium…Frederici comitis Tullensis"[268].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "Henricus episcopus [Leodiensis]" was "ex una parte cognatus ducis Godefridi"[269], but this relationship has not been identified. 

 

1.         HENRI de Toul, son of --- (-31 May 1091, bur Huy Notre-Dame)Bishop of Liège 1075.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records that “dux Bullonil Godefridus” supported the candidature of “Henricum cognatum suum Virdunensem archidiaconum...filium...Frederici comitis Tullensis” to succeed Theodoin as bishop of Liège[270].  Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1091 of "Heinricus Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of “Otbertus ex clero eiusdem æcclesiæ[271].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “pridie Kal Jun” 1091 of Bishop Henri and his burial “Hoii in ecclesia beate Marie[272].  The necrology of Verdun Cathedral records the death "Pridie Kal Mai" of "Henricus episcopus Leodiensis"[273]

 

 

No primary source has yet been identified which indicates the family origin of Bishop Otbert. 

 

1.         OTBERT (-31 Jan 1118, bur Liège Saint-Lambert).  Bishop of Liège 1091.  Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1091 of "Heinricus Leodicensium episcopus" and the succession of “Otbertus ex clero eiusdem æcclesiæ[274].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Obertus...canonicus in ecclesia sancti Lamberti et prepositus ecclesie sancte Crucis[275].  “Obertus...Leodiensis episcopus” granted privileges to the church of Aincourt Saint-Pierre by charter dated 1112, witnessed by “...Reinerus advocatus et filius eius Rogerus...[276].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records “contentio magna inter Obertum Leodiensem episcopum et comitem Lovaniensem [...Godefridum] de comitatu de Brunengeruz, quem tenet comes Namucensis ab episcopo Leodiensi” (describing the geographical limits of the county in question) and the settlement in favour of the comte de Louvain confirmed by charter dated 1099[277].  “Reginhardus Leodicensium...episcopus”, through “advocati Wigeri”, donated property to the church of Saint-Laurent by charter dated 3 Nov 1034, witnessed by “...Nizo thesaurarius ex prosapia mea...[278].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “pridie Kal Feb” 1118 of Bishop Otbert after holding office for 18 years and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Lamberti[279]

 

 

Three siblings.  Between 1119 and 1238, there were six bishops of Liège who were descended in the female line from the family of the comtes de Namur.  In addition, Bishop Adalbero [I], who is shown below separately, was also related to the group through the marriage of his brother into the same family. 

 

1.         FREDERIC de Namur, son of ALBERT III Comte de Namur & his wife Ida von Sachsen (-27 May or 30 Jun 1121 or 1122, bur Liège Saint-Lambert).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Frederici [episcopus]…frater eius Namucensis comes Godefridus"[280].  The Vita Friderici Episcopi Leodiensis records that Bishop Frédéric was "ex prosapia Pipini et Caroli magni…loco Namucensi editus, patre Alberto matre Ida, qui Albertus eiusdem Namucensis castelli comes opulentus", specifying that he was his parents´ third son[281].  Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1121 of "domnus Fredericus episcopus"[282]Bishop of Liège 1119.  Orderic Vitalis records the installation of "Frederick brother of Herman count of Namur" as Bishop of Liège in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II and his death less than three years later, poisoned by his rivals[283].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the death "1121 VI Kal Iunii" of "episcopus Fredericus"[284].  The Vita Friderici Episcopi Leodiensis records the death in 1122 of "Fredericus"[285].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “II Kal Jul” 1121 of Bishop Frédéric and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Lamberti[286].  The necrology of Brogne records the death "VI Kal Jun" of "domnus Fredericus episcopus"[287]

2.         ALIX de Namurm OTTO [II] Comte de ChinyChildren: 

a)         ADALBERO [II] de Chiny (-[26] Mar 1145)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "quoque episcopus Albero Leodiensis", stating that he recovered "Bullonium per beatum Lambertum", and his sister "comitissa Lovaniensis que comiti Lovanii peperit primum Godefridum comitem", specifying that they were "de prosapia Namucensi"[288], the latter expression being one used by Alberic to indicate maternal ancestry.  The passage follows that dealing with the family of Alix de Namur and her husband "comiti Ottoni de Chisneio", although the parentage of the Bishop of Liège and his sister is not specified precisely.  Bishop of Liège 1136.  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1136 of "domnus Alexander Leodicensium episcopus” and the succession of “domnus Adelbero ex clero Mettensi” as bishop[289].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Alberonem...secundum primicerium Metensis ecclesie, iuvenem...de prosapia Namucensi...sororis sue filius esset dux Lovanii Godefridus filius predicti G. ducis[290].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records war in 1140 between "Alberonem episcopum Leodicensem” and “Heinricum comitem Namucensem” after the comte de Namur invaded “opidum...Fossis” and burnt the town and “monasterio beati Foillani[291].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1145 of "Adelbero Leodicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Heinricus...ex clero sancti Lamberti, secundus huius nominis presul[292].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death in 1155 [error for 1145] of Bishop Adalbero “Ortide” after holding office for 15 years and his burial “Ortine...VI Kal Apr[293]

b)         IDA de Chinym GODEFROI V Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain.  Child: 

i)          GODEFROI VI Duke of Lower Lotharingia.  Child: 

(1)       GODEFROI VII Duke of Lower Lotharingia.  Children: 

(a)       ADALBERT de Brabant ([1166]-murdered Reims 24 Nov 1192, bur Reims Cathedral).  The Oude Kronik van Brabant names "Henricum…et Albertum" as the two children of "Godefridus" and his wife "Margaretam filiam Henrici comitis Lymburgensis"[294].  The Annales Egmundani record that "Albertus frater ducis de Luwon qui episcopus consecratus erat" was killed in 1193[295].  Archdeacon of St Lambert at Liège 1177/83.  Provost of St Jean et St Pierre at Liège 1184/89.  "Godefridus dux Lotharingie" returned property to Aachen St Maria, in the presence of "filiis meis Heinrico milite, Alberto clerico", by charter dated Sep 1185[296].  Elected Bishop of Liège 1191, installed 1192.  The Vita Alberti Leodiensis Episcopi records that “Albertus Leodiensis archidiaconus frater Henrici Lothoringie ducis” succeeded “Radulphi Leodiensi episcopo[297].  The Annales Parchenses record that "Albertus filius ducis Godefridi, Leodiensis episcopus" was killed in 1191 at Reims[298].  The Continuatio Aquicinctina of Sigebert's Chronica records that “Autbertus Leodicensis episcopus” was killed “[XII] Kal Dec” in 1192 “extra urbem Remensem[299]

3.         GODEFROI Comte de NamurChildren: 

a)         CLEMENCE de Namurm KONRAD Herzog von Zähringen.  Children: 

i)          RUDOLF von Zähringen (-Herdern (near Freiburg) 5 Aug 1191, bur St Peter im Schwarzwald).  The Genealogia Zaringorum names (in order) "Berchtoldus…secundus Rudolfus Leodiensis episcopus…tertius…Adalbertus…Hugo quartus" as the four sons of "Conradus" and his wife[300].  The Annales Sancti Diibodi record the election of "Ruodolfum filium Conradi ducis de Zeringen" to the bishopric at Mainz in 1160[301].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the election of "Rodulfus frater Bertoldi Cyringie ducis et Conradi et Alberto" as Bishop of Liège in 1168, through the intervention of "avunculo suo comite Namucensis Henrico"[302]Bishop of Liege 1167.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Radulphus...frater...Bertoldi Cyringie ducis et Conrardi et Alberti, mediante avunculo suo comite Namucensi Henrico” after the death of Bishop Alexander [II][303].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Bertoldem ducem Cheringiorum…et Radulphum Leodiensem episcopum…et Hugonem comitem" as the three sons of "ducissam…Ciringiorum [filiam Godefridi comitis Namurcensi]", recording that Rudolf was previously elected "in archiepiscopatu Mangontiense"[304].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death in 1191 “vitiatum veneno ferculum sive poculum” of “Radulphus Leodiensis episcopus[305].  The Genealogia Zaringorum records that Rudolf accompanied Emperor Friedrich I on his expedition to Jerusalem, died on his return "in villa sua Herdra" in 1190, and was buried in the family sepulchre[306].  The necrology of St Peter im Schwarzwald records the burial "Non Aug" of "Ruodolfi ducis de Zaeringen et epi Leodiensis anno 1190"[307]

b)         BEATRIX de Namurm ITHIER Comte de Rethel.  Children: 

i)          CLEMENCE de Rethelm HUGUES de Pierrepont.  Children: 

(1)       HUGUES de Pierrepont (-Huy 12 Apr 1229, bur Liège Saint-Lambert).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Robertum de Petraponte, patrem comitis Iohannis de Rocheio, Galterum de Wasnou, episcopum Hugonem Leodiensem et Margaretam domnam de Eppa, matrem alterius episcope Leodiensis nomine Iohannis" as the children of "Clementia, alii dicunt Agatha, [uxor] nobili Hugoni de Wasnou"[308]Bishop of Liège 1200.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1200 that different factions supported the election of three candidates at Liège after the death of Bishop Albert: "domnum Conrardum monachum adhuc novitium de Villariis...post...abbas Clarevallis et cardinalis...Henricum archidyaconum qui dicebatur de Iacia...Hugonis eiusdem ecclesie prepositum...filius...Hugonis de Wasnadio frater Roberti de Petraponte et Galtheri de Wasnadio quorum mater...Clementia filia comitis Guitherii Reytestensis de prosapia Namucensi" (without naming the principal supporters of each candidate), but that Hugues prevailed and held office for 29 years[309].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1227 that “Hugo Leodiensis episcopus” was elected as archbishop of Reims but refused, and that “archidyaconus Remensis Henricus”, who had the previous year renounced his election as bishop of Châlons, was chosen following a second election and consecrated “in octavia pasche[310].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1227 that “episcopus Hugo Leodiensis” exchanged “villam de Maderiis” for “oppido Sancti Trudonis et...duabus abbatiis Walciodoro et Hasteriis” with “episcopo Metensi[311].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that “Hugo Leodiensis episcopus” became infirm “in castro Hoyensi”, died “pridie Id Apr”, and was buried “Leodium...in ecclesia beati Lamberti”, and quotes his epitaph “Francia me genuit, cathedravit Legia...Hugo fui Petraponte satus[312].  The necrology of Brogne records the death "II Id Apr" of "domnus Hugo Leodiensis episcopus"[313]

(2)       MARGUERITE de Pierrepontm GUILLAUME Seigneur d´Eppa.  Child: 

(a)       JEAN d´Eppa (-Dinant 30 Apr 1238).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Robertum de Petraponte, patrem comitis Iohannis de Rocheio, Galterum de Wasnou, episcopum Hugonem Leodiensem et Margaretam domnam de Eppa, matrem alterius episcope Leodiensis nomine Iohannis" as the children of "Clementia, alii dicunt Agatha, [uxor] nobili Hugoni de Wasnou"[314]Bishop of Liège 1229.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1229 the election of “Iohannes maioris ecclesie prepositus, filius Margarete sororis eiusdem” as bishop of Liège after the death of “Hugo Leodiensis episcopus[315].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death “II Kal Mai in castro Dyonato” in 1238 of “Iohannes Leodiensis episcopus” during his siege of “castrum Pilansvaccum” in revenge for “Galerannus domnus de Poylevache filius quondam ducis Galerani de Lemborch” attacking the bishop[316].

 

 

1.         ADALBERO [I] de Louvain, son of HENRI [II] Comte de Louvain & his wife Adela [Adelheid] in der Betuwe (-1 Jan 1128, bur Liège St Gilles).  The Gesta abbatum Trudonensium names "frater ducis Godefridi Lovanii, Adelbero primicerius Mettis"[317].  Primicerius of Metz 1075.  Bishop of Liège 1123. Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records the appointment in 1123 of "domnus Adelbero ex clero sancti Stephani Mettenis" as “Leodicensium...episcopus[318].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “domnus Albero primicerius ex clero Sancti Stephani Metensis, frater ducis Lovaniensis Godefridi[319].  Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1128 of "domnus Adelbero episcopus Leodicensium” and the succession of “domnus Alexander archidiaconus ex clero sancti Lamberti” as bishop of Liège[320].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “in circumcisione Domini” 1128 of Bishop Adalbero and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Egidii in Publico Monte iuxta Leodium[321]

2.         GODEFROI V Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain.  m IDA de Chiny, daughter of OTTO [II] Comte de Chiny & his second wife Alix de Namur.  Great-grandparents of Bishop Adalbert who was killed in 1192. 

 

 

1.         ALEXANDER [I] von Jülich, son of GERHARD [III] Graf von Jülich & his wife --- (-6 Jul 1136, bur Saint-Gille near Liège).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Nicolas de Mons Bishop of Cambrai was "nepos of Alexander v Ouren bishop of Liège"[322].  The primary source on which this statement is based has not yet been identified.  Bishop of Liège 1128.  Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1128 of "domnus Adelbero episcopus Leodicensium” and the succession of “domnus Alexander archidiaconus ex clero sancti Lamberti” as bishop of Liège[323].  Anselm of Gembloux´s continuation of Sigebert's Chronica records a battle "apud Duratium” [Duras] between “Alexandrum Leodicensem episcopum et Godefridum Lovaniensem comitem[324].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1136 of "domnus Alexander Leodicensium episcopus” and the succession of “domnus Adelbero ex clero Mettensi” as bishop[325].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “pridie Non Jul” 1135 of Bishop Alexander and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Egidii in Publico Monte[326].  [The necrology of Brogne records the death "VII Id Mar" of "domnus Alexander episcopus"[327].  This date is inconsistent with the dates of death recorded in Aegidius´s Gesta for both Bishops Alexander [I] and Alexander [II].  It is not certain to whom the entry relates.]

 

 

1.         HENRI [II], son of --- (-Pavia 6 Oct 1164, bur Liège)Bishop of Liège 1145.  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records the death in 1145 of "Adelbero Leodicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Heinricus...ex clero sancti Lamberti, secundus huius nominis presul[328].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “domnus Henricus prepositus et archidiaconus maioris ecclesie[329].  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica from Anchin records in 1150 the dispute between "Henricum episcopum Leodicensem” and “Henricum comitem Namurcensem[330].  “Hyllinus...Trevirorum...minister...Anselmus frater noster uterinus” donated “partes hereditatis sue in Falemannia [...cum privilegium...fratris nostri domini Henrici Leodiensis episcopi]” to Waulsort by charter dated 1164[331].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “apud Papiam...pridie Non Oct” 1164 and the return of his bones “carne detracta” for burial “Leodium...in maiori ecclesia...III Kal Oct[332]

 

 

1.         ALEXANDER [II], son of --- Herr von Oehren & his wife --- de Duras (-Rome 9 Aug 1167, bur Liège).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi”, by charter dated 1146, witnessed by “...Alexander prepositus et archidiaconus...[333].  Provost and archdeacon.  “Alexander...prepositus et archidiaconus Leodiensis ecclesie” established the rights of “ecclesie de Alost” by charter dated 1160[334].  Henri Bishop of Liège confirmed “ecclesia parrochyalis...beate Marie...in opido burgi Sancti Trudonis...[et] ecclesia de Myeles” to Saint-Trond, with the consent of and at the request of “Alexandri archydiaconis”, by charter dated 1163[335]Bishop of Liège 1164.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Alexander secundus filius nobili domini de Orreo iuxta Treveris, prepositus maioris ecclesie” after the death of Bishop Henri, and his death “V Id Aug” 1167 from plague during the siege of Rome by Emperor Friedrich I and his burial “Leodii...in maiori ecclesia[336]

 

 

1.         SIMON van Limburg, of HENDRIK III Duke of Limburg & his wife Sophie [von Saarbrücken] ([1177]-[1 Jul 1195], bur Rome, Lateran Church)Bishop of Liège 1193/95, deposed.  A continuator of Sigebert records in 1193 that "Symonem filium ducis Ardennensis" was installed as bishop of Liège after Emperor Heinrich VI attempted to impose "comitem de Ostada…Lotharium fratrem eius" as bishop[337].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1194 the election of "apud Leodium Symon ducis Henrici de Lemborgh filius frater Galeranni, consobrinus episcopi Alberti nuper defuncti", the counter-election supported by “Balduino comite...apud Namucem” of “archidyaconus Albertus de Cuic” who gained control of “castrum de Hoio” but did not enter Liège for two years, the journey made by both candidates to Rome where “Symon” was poisoned, died “Kal Aug...cum multi sue ecclesie canonici” and was buried “in ecclesia Lateranensi[338].  The Continuatio Aquicinctina of Sigebert's Chronica records in 1195 that Pope Celestine III annulled the election of “Symonis Leodicensis” and confirmed “Autberti”, but that rumours reached Liège that the latter had died in Rome, whereupon “canonicum Philippi de Falconis monte filium[339].  Cardinal.  "Sophia ducissa de Lenburch" founded an anniversary at Liège cathedral, for the soul of "filii mei Simonis", by undated charter[340]

 

 

The appointment of Albert van Kuyc as bishop of Liège was fraught with difficulties, as explained below. 

 

1.         ALBERT van Kuyc, son of HERMAN van Kuyc & his wife --- (-[2/3] Feb 1200, bur Liège Saint-Lambert).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1194 the election of "apud Leodium Symon ducis Henrici de Lemborgh filius frater Galeranni, consobrinus episcopi Alberti nuper defuncti", the counter-election supported by “Balduino comite...apud Namucem” of “archidyaconus Albertus de Cuic” who gained control of “castrum de Hoio” but did not enter Liège for two years, the journey made by both candidates to Rome where “Symon” was poisoned, died “Kal Aug...cum multi sue ecclesie canonici” and was buried “in ecclesia Lateranensi[341].  The Continuatio Aquicinctina of Sigebert's Chronica records in 1195 that Pope Celestine III annulled the election of “Symonis Leodicensis” and confirmed “Autberti”, but that rumours reached Liège that the latter had died in Rome, whereupon “canonicum Philippi de Falconis monte filium[342].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1194 that, after the death in Rome of "Symonem" his supporters elected “archidyaconum Ottonem...fratrem Gosuini de Monte Falconis, primo in prepositum et post in episcopum” in opposition to “archidyaconus Hugo nepos prepositi defuncti frater Roberti de Petraponte domni”, that Otto soon died, but that “Albertus” had remained in Rome, accepted bribes from Romans, and had already been able to secure the annulment of Otto´s consecration[343]Bishop of Liège [1195/96].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1196 that "Albertus de Cuik" returned from Rome and entered Liège as “consecratus episcopus”, and held office for four years[344].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1200 of "apud Leodium Albertus episcopus qui dicebatur de Cuic" and the succession of “magister Fulco” who arrived at Liège but died in the same year[345].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death in 1200 “apud Leodium” of “Albertus episcopus” and his burial “in ecclesia sancti Lambert...III Non Feb[346].  The necrology of Brogne records the death "IV Non Feb" of "domnus Albertus episcopus frater nostre societatis"[347]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Savoie, son of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Marguerite [Beatrix] de Genève ([1201]-poisoned Viterbo 1 Nov 1239, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe).  A charter dated 1224 records an agreement between "Thomæ com. Sabaud " and the bishop of Sion, witnessed by "ipse Thomas comes, Amedeus primogenitus illius, Comitissa uxor Thomæ, eorum quatuor filii clerici…Willelmus, Thomas, Petrus et Bonifacius"[348].  Elected Bishop of Valence 1224.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "alter filiorum eius [comitis Thome de Sabaudia] Guilelmus" was elected bishop of Valence[349].  "M. comitissa Sabaudie et marchisa in Ytalia et…Amedeus, Aymo, W. electus Valentinus, Thomas, Petrus, Bonifacius et Philippus filii Thome Comitis Sab. et marchionis in Ytalia" confirmed donations to Hautecombe abbey by charter dated 26 Feb 1231[350].  He was named in the Feb 1233 testament of his brother Pierre[351].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “electus Valenciæ, avunculus reginæ nostræ” arrived in England in 1237 and was made the king´s principle adviser (“consiliarius regis principalis”) and granted the honor of Richmond[352].  Matthew of Paris records that he was adviser to Henry III King of England but left the country after quarrelling with the barons, but was permitted to return by the king[353], which represents the earliest reference in this source to the problems caused by relations of Queen Eléonore.  The king proposed his election as Bishop of Winchester in 1238, but the church council elected Ralph Neville, whose election was quashed by the Pope after intervention by the king[354].  He was elected Bishop of Liège in 1238.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the election “in crastino sancti Iohannis” in 1238 of the new bishop of Liège, where “primicerius Metensis Iacobus...prepositus Leodiensis et frater ducis de Nanceio” supported the candidacy of “preposito Ottoni Aquensi”, while “archdyaconus...Galtherus frater comitis de Retest” supported “fratri comitis Flandrie...electo Valentie Guillelmo”.  The same source records that “ille de Traiecto vel de Aquis” was elected first by “Conradum Coloniensem electum et per Conradum filium imperatoris et per ipsum imperatorem”, while “electus Valencie” was visiting Cremona where he also received “regalia sua ab imperatore”.  Both candidates then went to Rome where the Pope annulled the election of “pontifex Traiectensem Ottonem” and confirmed “electum Valentie Guillelmum” as bishop of Liège[355].  Matthew Paris records the death "die omnium Sanctorum…venenatus Viterbii" in 1239 of "Guillelmus de Sabaudia electus Valentinus"[356].  The Chronicle of Hautecombe records the death in 1239 of "dominus Guillermus de Sabaudia electus Valencie" and his burial "III Non Mai" (presumably in 1240)[357].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “in partibus Transalpinis” in Oct 1239 of Bishop Guillaume and his burial “in civitate Florentia[358].  The testament of "Philippi de Sabaudia electi Lugdunensis", dated 26 May 1256, names "Petrus de Sabaudia frater et Beatrix comitissa Provinciæ" as his heirs, chooses burial at Hautecombe, and founds an anniversary at Valence for the soul of "defuncti fratris sui Willelmi, electi illius ecclesiæ"[359]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Thourotte, son of JEAN [II] de Thourotte Châtelain de Noyon & his wife Odette de Dampierre-sur-Aube (-Fosse 16 Oct 1246, bur Aulne, transferred Clairvaux).  “Johannes castellanus Noviomi et Thorote” donated revenue to Saint-Amand for the anniversary of “Odote uxoris mee”, with the consent of “Guido filius meus primogenitus et filii mei Willelmus, Johannes, Radulfus, Walterus et Robertus et filie mei Aelis, Ermengardis et Helwidis”, by charter dated 1212[360].  Bishop of Laon.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Guidonem et Iohannem de Torota" as the children of "Alaydis [filia comitem de Brana Robertum domnum]" and her third husband, specifying that Jean was father of "Iohannis et Rodulfi Virdunensis et Roberti Ledodiensis episcoporum"[361]Bishop of Langres 1232.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1232 of “episcopus Lingonensis magister Hugo de Monte Regali” and the succession of “Robertus de Torota frater Radulfi Virdunensis episcopi[362].  The testament of “Johannes castellanus Noviomensis et Thorote”, dated 27 Dec 1235, appointed as executors “Viridunensis Lingonensis Epos filios meos...[363]Bishop of Liège 1240.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Robertum...Lingonensem episcopum [...quondam canonicus Sancti Lamberti et abbas Sancte Marie Leodiensis]...vir nobilis genere cuius fratres erant domnus Radulphus Virdunensis episcopus et domnus Iohannes de Torota ballivus Campanie” in 1240 “apud Alnam monasterium Cysterciensis ordinis”, and later transfer “ad Claramvallem[364].  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the death “castrum Fossense...XVII Kal Nov” 1246 of Bishop Guillaume and his burial “apud Alnam monasterium Cysterciensis ordinis[365]

 

 

1.         HENDRIK van Gelre, son of GERHARD III Graaf van Gelre & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (-Franchimont 23 Apr 1285).  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop names "Otto…Henderick" as the two sons of "Gherrit…grave van Gelre" and his wife, adding that Hendrik became bishop of Liège[366]Bishop of Liège 1247.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Henricus...etate adolescens...frater...Ottonis comitis Guelrensis” in 1247[367].  "Henricus…Leodensis electus" issued a judgment by charter dated 7 May 1253 which names "Ottonem comitem Ghelrie nostrum fratrem"[368]

 

 

1.         JEAN d´Enghien, son of SOHIER Seigneur d´Enghien & his wife Alix van Zotteghem (-24 Aug 1281).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "Joannes, episcopus Tornacensis" as third son of "Sigerus…de Enghien" and his wife, adding that he was appointed bishop of Liège at the council of Lyon in 1274[369]Bishop of Tournai 1267.  Bishop of Liège 1274. 

 

 

1.         JEAN [II] de Flandre, son of GUY Count of Flanders & his wife Mathilde de Béthune ([1250]-Anhève 14 Apr 1292, bur Flines-lez-Raches).  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names (in order) "Robertum, Willelmum, Iohannem episcopum Leodiensum, Balduinem et Philippum" the sons of "Guido…ex Mathilde filia Roberti Tenremontensis"[370].  The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1291 of "Iohannes, filius Guidonis comitis Flandrie et Mathildis de Bethunia eius coniugis, episcopus Leodiensis" specifying his burial at "Felinis" {Flines-lez-Raches, near Douai}[371].  Provost of St Donat at Bruges 1270.  Provost of St Pierre at Lille 1274/77.  Bishop of Metz 1279.  The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensium (Continuatio) records the succession of “filius comitis Flandrensis dominus Johannes” who was later transferred “ad Leodiensem ecclesiam[372]Bishop of Liège 1282.  A letter dated 13 Oct 1291 bears his seal[373].  The Biographie Nationale de Belgique records his death 14 Apr 1292 at Anhève but does not cite the corresponding primary source[374].  The early 17th century artist Antoine Succa sketched some details of his monument[375]

 

 

1.         HUGUES "le Sourd" de Salins, son of JEAN [I] "le Sage" Seigneur de Salins [Bourgogne-Comté] & his third wife Lauretta de Commercy (-23 Jun 1312)A charter dated 9 Jul 1309 confirms the marriage between “Jehans de Chalon sires d´Allay…Ysabel sa fille” and “messires Loys de Savoie sires de Waut”, and also names “l´arcevesque de Besençon, frère doudit Jehan”[376].  Archdeacon of Laon 1296.  He was appointed Bishop of Liège 12 Dec 1295 by Pope Boniface VIII, he entered Liège 24 Aug 1296.  Following disputes in Liège, the Pope transferred him to become Archbishop of Besançon 11 Dec 1301. 

 

 

1.         GUY de Hainaut, son of JEAN d´Avesnes Comte de Hainaut & his wife Aleidis of Holland ([1253]-28 May 1317, bur Utrecht Cathedral).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names "Guidoni fratri suo" after recording the succession in 1299 of "Iohannes comes Hannoniensis filius Adelheydis sororis Wilhelmi regis" as Count of Holland[377].  Archdeacon 1281/92.  Provost of St Lambert 1282/1301.  He was elected Bishop of Liège in 1292.  Bishop of Utrecht 1301-1317.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "greve Jan van Henegouen, Hollant, Selant…synnen broeder Guido, tresorier bynnen Luik" was installed as forty-second bishop of Utrecht in 1301, died 29 Mar 1317 and was buried in Utrecht cathedral[378]

 

 

1.         ADOLF von der Marck, son of EBERHARD [I] Graf von der Mark & his first wife Irmgard von Berg (Aug 1288-Liège 3 Nov 1344, bur Liège St Lambert).  "Everhardus comes de Marka, Engelbertus miles eius primogenitus, Adolfus, Cunradus, Margareta, Yrmengardis, Katerina, Kunegundis, liberi et heredes eiusdem comitis" renounced their rights to part of the county of Berg, in favour of "Wilhelmo comite de Monte", by charter dated 20 May 1298[379]Bishop of Liège

 

2.         JAN van Arkel, son of JAN [IV] Heer van Arkel & his second wife Katharina von Virneburg (-Liège 1 Jul 1377).  Willem III Count of Holland granted property “binnen Berghen ende Berchambocht...” to “onsen...Ridder Heren Janne Here van Arkel end Janne sinen broeder” by charter dated 18 Jul 1330[380]Bishop of Utrecht 1342.  Bishop of Liège 1364. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    BISHOPS of MINDEN

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    BISHOPS of MÜNSTER

 

 

 

1.         HERMANN (-1042).  Bishop of Münster .  The Annales Necrologici Prumienses record the death in 1042 of “Herimannus episcopus[381]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    BISHOPS of OSNABRÜCK

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    BISHOPS of PADERBORN

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 7.    BISHOPS of UTRECHT

 

 

 

1.         ALFRICH (-845).  Bishop of Utrecht 838. 

 

 

1.         ECKHARD (-847).  Bishop of Utrecht 845. 

 

 

1.         LUDGAR (-856).  Bishop of Utrecht 847. 

 

 

1.         HUNGAR (-866).  Bishop of Utrecht 856. 

 

 

1.         ODWALT (-900).  Bishop of Utrecht 866. 

 

 

1.         EGILBALD (-901).  Bishop of Utrecht 900. 

 

 

1.         RATBOD, son of --- (-30 Nov 917).  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop names "Radeboldus der Vriessen" as ancestor of the mother of "Radeboldus", installed as fourteenth bishop of Utrecht in 901, and "die byscop van Collen" as his mother´s brother[382]Bishop of Utrecht 901.  The Vita Radbodi records that he was "ab…Francorum parentibus…patriam rustice Lomochanum"[383], which Vanderkindere takes to be a reference to the pagus Lommensis, later Namur[384].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "dominus Radbodus" was elected Bishop of Utrecht after the death of Bishop Egilbold and specifies that "Radbodus rex Frisie predictus ipsius matris attavus" and that "Guntarius archiepiscopus Coloniensis eius avunculus"[385].  Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "917 III Kal Dec" of "sanctus Radbodus 14 episcopus Traiectensis"[386].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Radeboldus" bishop of Utrecht died in 927[387]

 

 

1.         BALDRIC [I], son of RICFRIED [Dodo] Graaf van Betuwe & his wife Herensinda --- (-27 Dec 975, bur Utrecht St Salvator).  The Memorial of "Ricfridus hoc nomine Dodo vocatus…comes" names "presul Baldricus…preses Rodolphus…rector Yrimfredus pariterque comes Nevelongus" as his children and "Herisindæ" as their mother[388]Bishop of Utrecht 917.  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Baldricus…filius…Rixfridi comitis Clivensis" was elected Bishop of Utrecht after the death of bishop Radbod, which it dates to 917[389].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Baldericus van Clewe", who was installed as fifteenth bishop of Utrecht in 927, was "een broeder van den grawe van Clewe"[390].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "977 VI Id Jan" of Bishop Baldric[391].

 

 

1.         VOLKMAR [Poppo], son of BERN [Athelbero] Pfalzgraf [von Sachsen] & his wife --- (-10 Dec 990, bur Utrecht St Martin).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Imperial Chancellor 975.  Bishop of Utrecht 976. 

 

 

1.         BALDWIN (-995).  Bishop of Utrecht 991.

 

 

1.         ANSFRID, son of LAMBERT & his wife --- ([945/50]-3 May 1010).  A manuscript Catalogo Abbatum Gemblacensium records that "nobilum virum Lambertum" donated "medietatem ecclesia de Wiettine in pago Masaw" to Gembloux and to "eiusque advocato…Aufrido filio Lamberti", undated[392].  Thietmar names Count Ansfrid who "sprung from the high lineage of his ancestors", specifying that he was brought up by Bruno Archbishop of Köln, became sword-bearer of Emperor Otto when the latter entered Rome, and founded the abbey of Thorn[393].  His birth date range is estimated for consistency with this statement, Bruno being archbishop between 953 and 965.  The Chronicon Laureshamense describes the church of Empel, near Bois-le-Duc, as "in pago Dehsendron in præsidatu Ansfridi comitis", referring to its foundation by the bishop of Liège dated to 969[394], which confirms that Ansfrid was Comte de Toxandria (in the area of Antwerp).  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, added paragraph introduced by "Et pergit interpolator Hoiensis" referred to above, names "Ansfredi comitis" as the descendant of "Liethardus", specifying that he was Comte de Huy during the time of "Nothgeri Leodicensis episcopi"[395], the latter being bishop of Liège between 972 and 1007[396]Graaf van Teisterbant.  "Otto…imperator augustus" made donations "in regno Lothariensi…Uelme in pago Haspongouue in comitatu Eremfridi comitis…" to Kloster St Gorgonius at Gorze in accordance with the last wishes of "Cunradus filius Ruodolfi quondam comitis" killed in battle by the Sarracens, by charter dated 26 Sep 982[397].  Vanderkindere suggests that Ehrenfried, named in the 982 charter, was the same person as Ansfrid [III] Comte de Huy[398].  "Otto…rex" gave property "villa Medemelacha…in comitatu Frisie" to "nostro Ansfrido comite" by charter dated 26 Jun 985[399].  "Otto…rex" granted property in "comitatum Hoiensem quod…Ansfridus comes…tenebat" to the bishop of Liège by charter dated 7 Jul 985[400]Bishop of Utrecht [994/95].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Anffridus" was installed as eighteenth bishop of Utrecht in 994, was "grawe van Tysterbant, van dye Houbenten und herre van Holmina", and was descended from Emperor Charlemagne[401].  The Annales Colonienses specify that "Ansfridus comes laicus suscepto clericatu successit" in 995[402].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 997 that "Ansfridus…comes Bratuspanticus" was tonsured and became bishop of Utrecht[403].  Thietmar records that he became a monk after the death of his wife and was appointed bishop of Utrecht[404].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the election of "Ansfridus, qui pridem de seculari comite clericus attonsus est" as bishop of Utrecht, that he donated his lands "in comitatu Teysterbancie" and that he died "1007 V Non Mai"[405]Vincentius Bellovacensis names "Anfridus, qui cum fuisset comes Bratuspantium"[406].  The chronicle of Alpertus names "Ansfridi episcopus Traiectenses", his daughter "abbatissa Tornensis monasterii" and "consanguineusque eius…Unruoch comes"[407].  Beke's Egmondscii Necrologium records the death "1008 V Non Mai" of "Anfridus ultimus comes Hoyensis", stating that he gave his county to the church of Liège, and specifying that he was also "comes Teysterbancie"[408]

 

 

1.         ADELBOLD, son of --- [van Teisterbant] & his wife [--- van Huy] (-after 21 Jul 1026).  His parentage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[409], but the primary source which confirms this has not yet been identified.  Bishop of Utrecht 1012. 

 

 

1.         BERNHOLD (-1054).  Bishop of Utrecht 1027.

 

 

1.         WILHELM (-1076).  Bishop of Utrecht 1054. 

 

 

1.         KONRAD (-1099).  Bishop of Utrecht 1076.  The Annales Necrologici Prumienses record the death in 1099 of “Cuonradus Traiectensis episcopus[410]

 

 

1.         BURKHARD von Lechsgemünd, son of KUNO Graf von Lechsgemünd and his wife Mathilde von Horburg [Achalm] (-16 May 1112, bur Utrecht St Martin).  Berthold's  Chronicon of Zwiefalten names (in order) "Ottonem comitem, Counonem Horburgensem, Burchardum episcopum Traioctensem, Bertholdo" as children of "Counoni comiti de Lechisimundi" and his wife "Mahtilt soror Liutoldi comitis"[411].  Ortlieb's Chronicon of Zwiefalten names "duo fratres germani Burchart et Otto filii sororis eius [=Counono comite cum frater eius Liutoldus comes] Mahthildis de Horeburc"" when recording a donation "in memoriam Bouch avunculus eorum", the latter not yet having been identified[412].  Provost at Strasbourg Cathedral 1089.  Bishop of Utrecht 1100. 

 

1.         GODBALD (-1127).  Bishop of Utrecht 1112.

 

 

1.         ANDREAS van Kuyc, son of HERMANN [van Malsen] & his wife Ida --- (-23 Jun 1139, bur Utrecht cathedral).  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Andreas van Cuck" was installed in 1128 as twenty-fifth bishop of Utrecht and was the son "des graven van Cucks…Hermen"[413].  Provost at Emmerich.  Archdeacon and provost of St Lambert, Liège.  Bishop of Utrecht 1128.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that Andreas Bishop of Utrecht died in 1138 and was buried in Utrecht cathedral[414]

 

 

1.         HERIBERT (-1150).  Bishop of Utrecht 1138. 

 

 

1.         HERMAN, son of [THIERRY de Looz & his wife ---] (-31 Jan 1156, bur Utrecht Cathedral).  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that in 1131 "Walravium Limburgi comitem, Lotharingiæ inferioris ducem" wished to install "fratrem suum Henricum in præpositura sancti Lamberti Leodii", which was opposed by "Rainerum de Los præpositum de Fosse, Arnoldi comitis Lossensis fratrem natu minorem, et Theodoricum de Los primum dominum de Hornes", and that Emperor Lothaire appointed "Hermannum de Hornes S. Gereonis præpositum dicti Raineri nepotem, Guidonem de Limburgo sancti Lamberti canonicum etiam dicti Hermanni nepotem…Godefridum comitem de Vianden" to arbitrate the dispute[415].  Klaversma, noting that this source is a 17th century forgery, concludes that Herman probably belonged to the genus Horninga and was not a member of the Horne family[416].  Archdeacon of St Lambert, Liège 1136.  Provost of St Gereon, Köln 1149/51.  Bishop of Utrecht 1150. 

 

 

1.         GODFRIED van Renen, son of GODFRIED [van Renen] & his wife Sophia van Bemmel (-27 May 1178).  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Godffridus van Rennen" was installed in 1156 as twenty-eighth bishop of Utrecht, died 27 May 1178 and was buried in Utrecht cathedral[417]Bishop of Utrecht 1156.  Bishop Godfried´s testament dated 9 Apr 1178 names "pater meus Godefridus de Renen" and refers to the distribution of his possessions "de Brabantia" to his three sons "Theoderico, Gerlaco et Arnoldo clerico" and to "Hugoni fratri meo, et michi Godefrido, et sorori Helewigi"[418]

 

 

1.         BOUDEWIJN van Holland, son of DIRK VI Count of Holland & his wife Sophie von Rheineck (-[21/30] Apr 1196, bur Utrecht).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Florencium succedentem Hollandie principem, Ottonem de Benthem comitem, Balduinem pontificum, Theodricum antistitem, Peregrinum presidem, Sophiam abbatissam, Hadewigim sanctimonialem et Petronellam…domicellam" as the children of Count Dirk VI & his wife[419].  The Annales Egmundani name "Baldwinum præpositum" as brother of "Florentii comitis Hollandensis"[420].  Provost at St Maria in Utrecht.  Bishop of Utrecht 1178.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Balderich van Hollant…grave Floris van Hollants broeder" was installed as twenty-ninth bishop of Utrecht in 1178, died 21 Apr 1196, and was buried at Utrecht[421].  Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "1196 II Kal Mai" of "Balduinus filius Theoderici comitis Hollandie Traiecetensis episcopus"[422]

2.         DIRK van Holland (-Pavia 28 Aug 1197, bur Pavia).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Florencium succedentem Hollandie principem, Ottonem de Benthem comitem, Balduinem pontificum, Theodricum antistitem, Peregrinum presidem, Sophiam abbatissam, Hadewigim sanctimonialem et Petronellam…domicellam" as the children of Count Dirk VI & his wife[423]Bishop of Utrecht 1196.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Dirrick van Hollant" was installed as thirty-first bishop of Utrecht in 1198, but died four months later at "Padua", adding that he was buried there[424].  Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "1197" of "Theodericus frater Balduini precedentis episcopus Traiectensis"[425]

3.         FLORIS III Count of Holland.  children: 

a)         WILLEM I Count of Holland.  children: 

i)          OTTO van Holland (-3 Apr 1249, bur Utrecht Cathedral).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Florencium Hollandie comitem, Ottonem Traiectensem pontificem, Wilhelmum presidium, Adam abbatissan Rinesburgensem et Richardim…monialem" as the children of Count Willem & his first wife[426].  Regent of Holland 1238-39.  Bishop of Utrecht 1245.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto des graven van Hollant sonne" was installed as thirty-sixth bishop of Utrecht in 1233, died 4 Apr 1249 and was buried in Utrecht cathedral[427].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "1249 II Non Apr" of "Otto Traiectensis episcopus" and his burial "apud ecclesiam maiorem"[428]

 

 

1.         ARNOLD von Isenburg, son of --- (-1197).  Bishop of Utrecht 1196.

 

 

1.         DIETRICH von Ahr, son of ULRICH Graf von Ahr & his wife --- (-5 Dec 1212)Bishop of Utrecht 1198. 

2.         HEILWIG von Ahrm BERNHARD [II] Herr zur Lippe.  Children: 

a)         OTTO von Lippe, son of BERNHARD [II] Herr zur Lippe & his wife Heilwig von Ahr (-murdered near Coevorden 28 Jul 1227, bur Utrecht St Martin).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comes Bernardus de Lippa in Westfalia" had three sons who were bishops "archiepiscopum Gerardum Bremensem et episcopum Ottonem Uttraiectensem et episcopus Bernardum Padeburnensem"[429].   Canon at Utrecht cathedral 1204, provost 1205/1215.  Bishop of Utrecht 1215.  The Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium names "Otto secundus maior Traiectensis prepositus, frater Hermanni de Lippia" when recording his election as Bishop of Utrecht in 1215[430].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto van der Lyppe", brother of "Hermen van der Lyppe", was installed in 1214 as thirty-fourth bishop of Utrecht[431].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Otto secundus natus de Lippe maior prepositus" was elected bishop of Utrecht and appointed "Hermanno fratri suo" to govern his properties[432].  Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records that "Otto de Lippa episcopus Trajectensis XXXIV" was killed "V Kal Aug" in 1225[433]

 

 

1.         OTTO van Gelre, son of OTTO I Graaf van Gelre & his wife Richardis of Bavaria (-Vorthusen Mar 1215, bur Utrecht cathedral).  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop names "Otto…byscop van Uttert" as the second son of "Otto…grave van Gelre" and his wife[434].  Provost of Xanten.  Bishop of Utrecht 1213.  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "dominus Adulfus Coloniensis, Otto Monasteriensis et Gerardus Osnaburgensis fratres et pontifices, Wilhelmus Hollandie ac Otto Gelrie comites" met in Utrecht and elected "Otto Xanctensis prepositus…frater [error for filius] eiusdem comitis Gelrie et sororius prefati comitis Hollandie…iuvenis" as bishop of Utrecht, but that he died "1205 apud Vorthusen febre pulsatus VII Kal Apr" and was buried at Utrecht[435].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto van Ghelre" was installed as thirty-third bishop of Utrecht in 1210, although he was no older than eighteen years old, died in 1213 and was buried in Utrecht cathedral[436]

 

 

1.         WILBRAND von Wildeshausen, son of HEINRICH [II] Graf von Oldenburg & his wife Beatrix von Hallermund (-Zwolle 27 Jul 1235, bur Utrecht St Servatius).  A narrative of the foundation of Loccum names “Burchardum, Henricum…Engelmarum…Wilbrandum” as the four sons of “Beatrix soror Adelheydis comitissa”, daughters of “comite Willebrando antiquo de Halremunt”, adding that Wilbrand was the first bishop of Paderborn and later was bishop of Utrecht[437].  Canon at Hildesheim Cathedral 1211, provost [1219/20]/1226.  Bishop of Paderborn 1225/1227.  Administrator of Osnabrück 1226.  Bishop of Utrecht 1227.  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Florencius Hollandie comes" arranged the election of "suo consanguineo domino Wilbrando Paderburnensi pontifice filio comitis de Oldenburch" as Bishop of Utrecht[438].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "heer Wyllebrant byscop van Paterborne", son of "des grave van Oldenborghe", was installed in 1227 as thirty-fifth bishop of Utrecht[439]

 

 

1.         GOSWIN van Amstel, son of --- (-1250).  Bishop of Utrecht 1249. 

 

 

1.         HEINRICH von Vianden, son of HEINRICH [I] Graf von Vianden & his wife Marguerite de Courtenay (-1267).  Bishop of Utrecht 1249. 

 

 

1.         JOHANN von Nassau, son of HEINRICH [II] "der Reiche" Graf von Nassau & his wife Mechtild van Gelre (-Deventer 13 Jul 1309, bur Deventer St Lebuinus).  "Heinricus comes de Nassowe et Mectildis comitissa" donated "ecclesiam in Inferi[ori] Diffenbach" to Kloster Arnstein by charter dated 1247, witnessed by "…filiorum nostrorum Walerami, Ottonis, Henrici, Gerardi, Johannis"[440].  Archdeacon at Liège 1262/1266.  Elected Bishop of Utrecht 1267, resigned 1290.  Provost of the Franciscans at Maastricht 1273.  Johann had [four] illegitimate children by unknown mistresses (the primary sources which confirm this information have not yet been identified): 

 

 

1.         JAN van Sierk, son of --- (-1296).  Bishop of Utrecht 1288.

 

 

1.         WILLEM Berthout, son of WALTER [V] Berthout Heer van Mechelen & his wife Marie d´Auvergne (-killed in battle 4 Jul 1301)Bishop of Utrecht 1296.  "Willelmus…episcopus Trajectensis" confirmed a donation to Pitsenburg by "quondam Sophia domicella de Breda, soror mea bonæ memoriæ" under her testament by charter dated 1299[441]

 

 

1.         GUY de Hainaut, son of JEAN d´Avesnes Comte de Hainaut & his wife Aleidis of Holland ([1253]-28 May 1317, bur Utrecht Cathedral).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names "Guidoni fratri suo" after recording the succession in 1299 of "Iohannes comes Hannoniensis filius Adelheydis sororis Wilhelmi regis" as Count of Holland[442].  Archdeacon 1281/92.  Provost of St Lambert 1282/1301.  He was elected Bishop of Liège in 1292.  Bishop of Utrecht 1301-1317.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "greve Jan van Henegouen, Hollant, Selant…synnen broeder Guido, tresorier bynnen Luik" was installed as forty-second bishop of Utrecht in 1301, died 29 Mar 1317 and was buried in Utrecht cathedral[443].

 

 

1.         JAN van Arkel, son of JAN [IV] Heer van Arkel & his second wife Katharina von Virneburg (-Liège 1 Jul 1377).  Willem III Count of Holland granted property “binnen Berghen ende Berchambocht...” to “onsen...Ridder Heren Janne Here van Arkel end Janne sinen broeder” by charter dated 18 Jul 1330[444]Bishop of Utrecht 1342.  Bishop of Liège 1364. 

 



[1] Bayley, C. C. (1949) The Formation of the German College of Electors in the mid-Thirteenth Century (Toronto), p. 160. 

[2] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), pp. 155-61. 

[3] Annales Colonienses Brevissimi 819, MGH SS I, p. 97. 

[4] Perlbach, M. ‘Aus einem verlorenen Codex traditionum der Bonner Münsterkirche St Cassius und Florentius’, Neues Archiv der Gesellschaft für ältere deutsche Geschichtskunde, Tome XIII (Hannover, 1888) (“Bonn St Cassius”), 16, p. 156. 

[5] Bonn St Cassius, 27, p. 160. 

[6] Bonn St Cassius, 16, p. 156. 

[7] Annales Colonienses Brevissimi 842, MGH SS I, p. 97. 

[8] Lot ‘Hilduin’, Le Moyen Âge (1903), pp. 251 and 264. 

[9] Lot, F. ‘De quelques personnages du IX siècle qui ont porté le nom de Hilduin’, Le Moyen Âge (1903), p. 270. 

[10] Tardif (1866), 139, p. 94. 

[11] Chronicon Sancti Martini Coloniensis, MGH SS II, p. 214. 

[12] Annales Colonienses Brevissimi 850, MGH SS I, p. 97. 

[13] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 34, p. 63. 

[14] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 272. 

[15] Annalium Fuldensium pars tertia, 870, MGH SS I, p. 382. 

[16] Annales Colonienses Brevissimi 870, MGH SS I, p. 97. 

[17] Reginonis Chronicon, 890, MGH SS I, p. 602. 

[18] Lacomblet, T. J. (1857) Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins (Düsseldorf), Band II, p. 17. 

[19] Reginonis Chronicon, 890, MGH SS I, p. 602. 

[20] Continuator Reginonis, 923, MGH SS I, p. 616. 

[21] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1858) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins IV 604, p. 761, and Oediger, F. W. Registen I, 335, quoted in Hlawitschka (1969), p. 56. 

[22] Continuator Reginonis, 923, MGH SS I, p. 616. 

[23] Continuator Reginonis, 953, MGH SS I, p. 622. 

[24] Annales Colonienses 953, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[25] Flodoard 953, MGH SS III, p. 402. 

[26] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 15. 

[27] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 430. 

[28] Annales Hildesheimenses 965, MGH SS III, p.60. 

[29] D O I 100, p. 182. 

[30] Annales Colonienses 953, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[31] Flodoard 953, MGH SS III, p. 402. 

[32] Continuator Reginonis, 953, MGH SS I, p. 622. 

[33] Thietmar 2.23, p. 108. 

[34] Thietmar 2.23, p. 109. 

[35] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Presses Universitaires de Nancy), p. 10. 

[36] Continuator Reginonis, 965, MGH SS I, p. 628. 

[37] Thietmar 2.23, p. 109. 

[38] Annales Colonienses 965, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[39] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 18. 

[40] Continuator Reginonis, 965, MGH SS I, p. 628. 

[41] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 15. 

[42] Annales Colonienses 965, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[43] Annales Colonienses 967, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[44] Annales Colonienses 967, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[45] Annales Colonienses 975, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[46] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 15. 

[47] Annales Colonienses 975, MGH SS I, p. 98. 

[48] Annales Colonienses 985, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[49] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 17. 

[50] Annales Colonienses 985, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[51] Annales Colonienses 999, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[52] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 14. 

[53] Lacomblet, T. J. (1865) Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins (Düsseldorf), Band V, p. 266. 

[54] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band V, p. 265. 

[55] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band V, p. 265. 

[56] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band V, p. 265. 

[57] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band V, p. 266. 

[58] Lantberti Vita Heriberti Archiepiscopi, 1, MGH SS IV, p. 741. 

[59] Annales Colonienses 999, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[60] Annales Colonienses 1021, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[61] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 11. 

[62] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 50. 

[63] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band V, p. 266. 

[64] Annales Colonienses 1021, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[65] Annales Brunwilarenes 1036, MGH SS II, p. 216. 

[66] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 17. 

[67] Brunwilarensis Monasterii Fundatio 5, MGH SS XI, p. 398. 

[68] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1036, MHG SS V, p. 122. 

[69] Annales Brunwilarenes 1036, MGH SS II, p. 216. 

[70] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 179, p. 111. 

[71] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 221. 

[72] Annales Brunwilarenses 1056, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[73] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 10. 

[74] Vita Annonis Archiepiscopi Coloniensis, 1, MGH SS XI, p. 467. 

[75] Annales Brunwilarenses 1056, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[76] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 222. 

[77] Annales Brunwilarenses 1075, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[78] Annales Brunwilarenes 1075, MGH SS II, p. 216. 

[79] Annales Brunwilarenses 1078, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[80] Annales Brunwilarenses 1078, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[81] Annales Brunwilarenses 1089, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[82] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 13. 

[83] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 51. 

[84] Annales Brunwilarenses 1089, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[85] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 250, p. 161. 

[86] Annales Brunwilarenses 1098, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[87] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 223. 

[88] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 19. 

[89] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 32, p. 18. 

[90] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1238, MGH SS XXIII, p. 943. 

[91] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 261, p. 135. 

[92] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 323, p. 168. 

[93] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1158, MGH SS XXIII, p. 844. 

[94] Annales Brunwilarenses 1098, MGH SS I, p. 100. 

[95] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1131, 1132, MGH SS VI, p. 384. 

[96] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 279. 

[97] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 559, p. 390. 

[98] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band IV, 643, p. 789. 

[99] Wilmans, R. (ed.) (1871) Westfälisches Urkundenbuch, Band III (Münster) (“Westfälisches Urkundenburch Band III (1871)”), 79, p. 41. 

[100] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1158, MGH SS XXIII, p. 844. 

[101] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 276. 

[102] ES XVIII 2. 

[103] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1216, MGH SS XXIII, p. 904. 

[104] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 34, p. 19. 

[105] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 280. 

[106] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1225, MGH SS XXIII, p. 916. 

[107] Chronica Minor Auctore Minorita Erphordiensi 1225, MGH SS XXIV, p. 197. 

[108] Annales Spirenses 1225, MGH SS XVII, p. 84. 

[109] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 18. 

[110] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 279. 

[111] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1131, 1132, MGH SS VI, p. 384. 

[112] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, pp. 275 and 276. 

[113] Annales Brunwilarenes 1137, MGH SS II, p. 216. 

[114] Annales Brunwilarenes 1137, MGH SS II, p. 216. 

[115] Annales Brunwilarenes 1137, MGH SS II, p. 216. 

[116] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 335, p. 225. 

[117] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 359, p. 246. 

[118] Günther, W. (ed.) (1822) Codex diplomaticus Rheno-Mosellanus (Coblenz), Vol. I, 148, p. 318. 

[119] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 389, p. 270. 

[120] Sigeberti Continuatio Aquicinctina 1166, MGH SS VI, p. 412. 

[121] Sigeberti Continuatio Aquicinctina 1166, MGH SS VI, p. 412. 

[122] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1167, MGH SS XXIII, p. 849. 

[123] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 409, p. 281. 

[124] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 436, p. 305. 

[125] Ernst (1847), Tome VI, LXIV, p. 152. 

[126] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 476, p. 336. 

[127] Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band II, p. 16. 

[128] Staatsarchiv Münster (ed.) (1908) Westfälisches Urkundenbuch, Band VII (Münster) (“Westfälisches Urkundenburch Band VII (1908)”), 430, p. 187. 

[129] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 607, p. 357. 

[130] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 618, p. 365. 

[131] Rheinlande Vatikanischen, Band I, 14, p. 6. 

[132] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band III, 64, p. 47. 

[133] Iwanski (1912), Beilage I, IX, p. 57. 

[134] Monumenta Germaniæ Historica, Scriptores Rerum Germanicarum, Nova Series, Tome VI (Berlin, 1929), Chronica Comitum de Marka, p. 86. 

[135] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band III, 846, p. 741. 

[136] Chronica Comitum de Marka, p. 86. 

[137] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 232. 

[138] Hincmari Remenis Annales, 865, MGH SS I, p. 469. 

[139] Reginonis Chronicon 869, MGH SS I, p. 581. 

[140] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 232.  

[141] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Gemblacense 890, MGH SS VI, p. 391. 

[142] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 233. 

[143] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, col. 836. 

[144] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 20, MGH SS VII, p. 200. 

[145] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 233. 

[146] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 39, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[147] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 233. 

[148] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 41, MGH SS XXV, p. 52. 

[149] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[150] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[151] Mabillon, J. (1706) Annales ordinis sancti Benedicti (Paris), Tome III, Lib. XLII, XVIII, 918, p. 359

[152] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, col. 551. 

[153] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, col. 551. 

[154] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[155] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, col. 551. 

[156] Annales ordinis sancti Benedicti, Tome III, Lib. XLVII, XVIII, 959, p. 542

[157] Reginonis Chronicon 892, MGH SS I, p. 604. 

[158] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 20, MGH SS VII, p. 200. 

[159] Flodoard 920, MGH SS III, p. 369. 

[160] Sigeberti Chronica 921, MGH SS VI, p. 346. 

[161] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 42, MGH SS XXV, p. 52. 

[162] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 233. 

[163] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[164] Flodoard 933, MGH SS III, p. 381. 

[165] Annales Stabulenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 42. 

[166] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[167] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 42, MGH SS XXV, p. 52. 

[168] Liber Memorialis de Remiremont, quoted in Hlawitschka (1969), p. 73. 

[169] Continuator Reginonis, 934, MGH SS I, p. 617. 

[170] Flodoard 945, MGH SS III, pp. 392-3. 

[171] Continuator Reginonis, 945, MGH SS I, p. 619. 

[172] Flodoardi Annales, 945, MGH SS III, p. 393. 

[173] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[174] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 23, MGH SS VII, p. 201. 

[175] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[176] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 43, MGH SS XXV, p. 53. 

[177] Hontheim, J. N. von (1757) Prodromus Historiæ Treverensis, Pars posterior, Necrologium S. Maximini, p. 968. 

[178] Reginonis Chronicon 886, MGH SS I, p. 596. 

[179] Reginonis Chronicon 892, MGH SS I, p. 604. 

[180] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 23, MGH SS VII, p. 201. 

[181] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[182] Annales Stabulenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 42. 

[183] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[184] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 44, MGH SS XXV, p. 53. 

[185] Barbier, J. (ed.) ´Obituaire de l´abbaye de Brogne ou de Saint-Gérard´, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVIII (2e série, Tome II) (Louvain, 1882) ("Brogne Necrology"), p. 338. 

[186] Annales Bertiniani III 865. 

[187] Sigeberti Chronica 928, MGH SS VI, p. 347. 

[188] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[189] Sigeberti Chronica 954, MGH SS VI, p. 349. 

[190] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 45, MGH SS XXV, p. 53. 

[191] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[192] Sigeberti Chronica 956, MGH SS VI, p. 349. 

[193] Sigeberti Chronica 974, MGH SS VI, p. 352. 

[194] Sloet, L. (1872) Oorkondenbock der graafschappen Gelre en Zutphen, Vol. I, p. 79. 

[195] Gesta Abbatum Gemblacensium 14, MGH SS VIII, p. 530. 

[196] Gesta Abbatum Gemblacensium 15, MGH SS VIII, p. 531. 

[197] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[198] Sigeberti Chronica 956, MGH SS VI, p. 349. 

[199] Annales Stabulenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 43. 

[200] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[201] Annales Stabulenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 43. 

[202] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[203] Reineri Vita Euracli, MGH SS XX, p. 562. 

[204] Sigeberti Chronica 960, MGH SS VI, p. 350. 

[205] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 24, MGH SS VII, p. 201. 

[206] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 24, MGH SS VII, p. 202. 

[207] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[208] Annales Sangallenses Maiores, MGH SS I, pp. 77 and 79. 

[209] Ekkehardi IV. Casus S. Galli, Cap. 9, MGH SS II, p. 118, and other pages

[210] MGH SS II, p. 118 footnote 95. 

[211] Wartmann, H. (1882) Urkundenbuch der Abtei Sanct Gallen, Teil III (St Gallen), 811, p. 27. 

[212] Annales Stabulenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 43. 

[213] Annales Lobienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 234. 

[214] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 25, MGH SS VII, p. 203. 

[215] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 30, MGH SS VII, p. 206. 

[216] Annales Stabulenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 43. 

[217] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 58, MGH SS XXV, p. 63. 

[218] Annales Quedlinburgenses, 1008, MGH SS III, p. 79. 

[219] Annales Hildesheimenses, 1008, MGH SS III, p. 93. 

[220] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, col. 913. 

[221] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia 1007, MGH SS X, p. 382. 

[222] Annales Quedlinburgenses, 1008, MGH SS III, p. 79. 

[223] Sigeberti Chronica 1008, MGH SS VI, p. 354. 

[224] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 31, MGH SS VII, p. 206. 

[225] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Gemblacense 1015, MGH SS VI, p. 391. 

[226] Foppens, J. F. (1734) Diplomatum Belgicorum nova collectio, sive supplementum ad opera diplomatica Auberti Miræi (Brussels), Tome III, Pars II, XVII, p. 297. 

[227] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia 1017, MGH SS X, p. 382. 

[228] Thietmari Chronicon, Liber VIII, 13, MGH SS III, p. 869. 

[229] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 31, MGH SS VII, p. 207. 

[230] Annales Quedlinburgenses, 1018, MGH SS III, p. 84. 

[231] Annales Quedlinburgenses, 1018, MGH SS III, p. 84. 

[232] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 32, MGH SS VII, p. 207. 

[233] Reineri Vita Wolbodonis Episcopi Leodiensis, 1, MGH SS XX, p. 565. 

[234] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, Instrumenta, col. 150. 

[235] Reineri Vita Wolbodonis Episcopi Leodiensis, 18, MGH SS XX, p. 569. 

[236] Brogne Necrology, p. 314. 

[237] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 12, MGH SS XXV, p. 89. 

[238] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 12, MGH SS XXV, p. 89. 

[239] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 12, MGH SS XXV, p. 89. 

[240] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 12, MGH SS XXV, p. 89. 

[241] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 36, MGH SS VII, p. 209. 

[242] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 71, MGH SS XXV, p. 68. 

[243] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 37, MGH SS VII, p. 209. 

[244] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 71, MGH SS XXV, p. 69. 

[245] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 37, MGH SS VII, p. 209. 

[246] Reineri Vita Reginardi, 18, MGH SS XX, p. 578. 

[247] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, Instrumenta, XXIII, col. 165. 

[248] Ruperti Chronicon S. Laurentii Leodiensis, 37, MGH SS VIII, p. 275. 

[249] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Gemblacense 1037, MGH SS VI, p. 391. 

[250] Reineri Vita Reginardi, 1, MGH SS XX, p. 571. 

[251] Reineri Vita Reginardi, 18, MGH SS XX, p. 578. 

[252] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, Instrumenta, col. 165. 

[253] Ruperti Chronicon S. Laurentii Leodiensis, 38, MGH SS VIII, p. 275. 

[254] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 38, MGH SS VII, p. 210. 

[255] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Gemblacense 1037, 1042, MGH SS VI, p. 391. 

[256] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 12, MGH SS XXV, p. 89. 

[257] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 12, MGH SS XXV, p. 89. 

[258] Anselmi Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis, 39, 40, 43, 45, 49, MGH SS VII, pp. 210, 216, 219. 

[259] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1047, MGH SS XXIII, p. 788. 

[260] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber II, 110, MGH SS XXV, p. 75. 

[261] Brogne Necrology, p. 328. 

[262] Ruperti Chronicon S. Laurentii Leodiensis, 39, MGH SS VIII, p. 275. 

[263] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1048, MGH SS XXIII, p. 788. 

[264] Ruperti Chronicon S. Laurentii Leodiensis, 40, MGH SS VIII, p. 275. 

[265] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 1, MGH SS XXV, p. 78. 

[266] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 10, MGH SS XXV, p. 88. 

[267] Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium 7, MGH SS X, p. 494. 

[268] Ægidii Aurevallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium III.11, MGH SS XXV, p. 88. 

[269] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1070, MGH SS XXIII, p. 798. 

[270] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 11, MGH SS XXV, p. 88. 

[271] Sigeberti Chronica 1091, MGH SS VI, p. 366. 

[272] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 13, MGH SS XXV, p. 90. 

[273] Aimond, C. 'Le nécrologe de la cathédrale de Verdun', Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für lothringische Geschichte und Altertumskunde Year 21 (second part) (1910), p. 224. 

[274] Sigeberti Chronica 1091, MGH SS VI, p. 366. 

[275] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 14, MGH SS XXV, p. 91. 

[276] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, Instrumenta, col. 152. 

[277] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 15, MGH SS XXV, p. 91. 

[278] Gallia Christiana, Tome III, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 168. 

[279] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 18, MGH SS XXV, p. 94. 

[280] Rodulfi, Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium XI.4, MGH SS X, p. 299. 

[281] Vita Friderici Episcopi Leodiensis, 5, MGH SS XII, p. 504. 

[282] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1121, MGH SS VI, p. 377. 

[283] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, pp. 253-4. 

[284] Rodulfi, Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium XI.12, MGH SS X, p. 302. 

[285] Vita Friderici Episcopi Leodiensis, 10, MGH SS XII, p. 506. 

[286] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 21, MGH SS XXV, p. 96. 

[287] Brogne Necrology, p. 321. 

[288] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 

[289] Continuatio Gemblacensis Sigeberti Chronica 1136, MGH SS VI, p. 385. 

[290] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 25, MGH SS XXV, p. 100. 

[291] Continuatio Gemblacensis Sigeberti Chronica 1140, MGH SS VI, p. 387. 

[292] Continuatio Gemblacensis Sigeberti Chronica 1145, MGH SS VI, p. 389. 

[293] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 29, MGH SS XXV, p. 101. 

[294] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 61. 

[295] Annales Egmundani 1193, MGH SS XVI, p. 470. 

[296] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 494, p. 347. 

[297] Vita Domini Alberti Leodiensis Episcopi, 1, MGH SS XXV, p. 139. 

[298] Annales Parchenses 1191, MGH SS XVI, p. 606. 

[299] Sigeberti Continuatio Aquicinctina 1192, MGH SS VI, p. 429. 

[300] Genealogica Zaringorum 6, MGH SS XIII, p. 736. 

[301] Annales Diibodi Continuatio 1160, MGH SS XVI, p. 29. 

[302] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 850. 

[303] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 37, MGH SS XXV, p. 108. 

[304] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 508. 

[305] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 46, MGH SS XXV, p. 113. 

[306] Genealogica Zaringorum 6, MGH SS XIII, p. 736. 

[307] Necrologium minus monasterii S Petri Nigræ Silvæ, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 334. 

[308] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852. 

[309] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1200, MGH SS XXIII, p. 878. 

[310] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1227, MGH SS XXIII, p. 919. 

[311] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1227, MGH SS XXIII, p. 920. 

[312] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1229, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 923-4. 

[313] Brogne Necrology, p. 313. 

[314] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 852. 

[315] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1229, MGH SS XXIII, p. 924. 

[316] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1238, MGH SS XXIII, p. 943. 

[317] Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium 17, MGH SS X, p. 304. 

[318] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1123, MGH SS VI, p. 376. 

[319] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 22, MGH SS XXV, p. 97. 

[320] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1128, MGH SS VI, p. 381. 

[321] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 22, MGH SS XXV, p. 97. 

[322] ES XIII 135 B. 

[323] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1128, MGH SS VI, p. 381. 

[324] Anselmi Gemblacensis continuatio Sigeberti Chronica 1129, MGH SS VI, p. 381. 

[325] Continuatio Gemblacensis Sigeberti Chronica 1136, MGH SS VI, p. 385. 

[326] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 24, MGH SS XXV, p. 99. 

[327] Brogne Necrology, p. 306. 

[328] Continuatio Gemblacensis Sigeberti Chronica 1145, MGH SS VI, p. 389. 

[329] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 30, MGH SS XXV, p. 103. 

[330] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Aquicinense 1150, MGH SS VI, p. 396. 

[331] Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVI (Louvain, 1879), Documents Waulsort, XVIII, p. 32. 

[332] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 33, MGH SS XXV, p. 107. 

[333] Piot, C. (1870) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Trond (Brussels), Tome I (“Saint-Trond”), LI, p. 68. 

[334] Saint-Trond, LXXI, p. 94. 

[335] Saint-Trond, LXXIX, p. 105. 

[336] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 36, MGH SS XXV, p. 108. 

[337] Sigeberti Continuatio Aquicinctina 1193, MGH SS VI, p. 430. 

[338] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1194, MGH SS XXIII, p. 871. 

[339] Sigeberti Continuatio Aquicinctina 1195, MGH SS VI, p. 432. 

[340] Ernst (1847), Tome VI, LXXVII, p. 164. 

[341] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1194, MGH SS XXIII, p. 871. 

[342] Sigeberti Continuatio Aquicinctina 1195, MGH SS VI, p. 432. 

[343] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1194, MGH SS XXIII, p. 871. 

[344] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 873. 

[345] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1200, MGH SS XXIII, p. 878. 

[346] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 74, MGH SS XXV, p. 116. 

[347] Brogne Necrology, p. 299. 

[348] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 58, p. 25. 

[349] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1232, MGH SS XXIII, p. 930. 

[350] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 76, p. 34. 

[351] State Archives, volume 104, page 1, fascicule 1. 

[352] Annales de Dunstaplia, pp. 145-6. 

[353] MP, Vol. III, 1237, pp. 387-8. 

[354] MP, Vol. III, 1238, pp. 491 and 495. 

[355] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1238, MGH SS XXIII, p. 943. 

[356] MP, Vol. III, 1239, p. 623. 

[357] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 128, p. 64. 

[358] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 103, MGH SS XXV, p. 126. 

[359] Wurstenberger (1858), Vol. IV, 430, p. 209. 

[360] Saint-Amand, LIII, p. 202. 

[361] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846. 

[362] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1232, MGH SS XXIII, p. 930. 

[363] Saint-Amand, LXXI, p. 217. 

[364] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 105, MGH SS XXV, p. 128. 

[365] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 105, MGH SS XXV, p. 128. 

[366] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 111. 

[367] Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Liber III, 107, MGH SS XXV, p. 129. 

[368] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 390, p. 208. 

[369] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, p. 561. 

[370] Iohannis de Thielrode Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ MGH SS IX, p. 335. 

[371] Annales Blandinienses 1291, MGH SS V, p. 34. 

[372] Gesta Episcoporum Mettensium Continuatio tertia, 4, MGH SS X, p. 551. 

[373] Archives départementales du Nord, AND B-3229, information provided by Dominque Delgrange in a private email to the author dated 23 Mar 2011. 

[374] Biographie Nationale de Belgique, Tome X (Bruxelles, 1888/1889), p. 348 [available at Internet Archive (24 Mar 2011)]. 

[375] Catalogue Bibliothèque royale, Bruxelles, exposition 1977, information provided by Dominque Delgrange in a private email to the author dated 23 Mar 2011. 

[376] Hugues de Chalon 518, p. 373. 

[377] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255. 

[378] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, pp. 231 and 251-2. 

[379] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 988, p. 582. 

[380] Mieris (1754), Tweede deel, p. 500. 

[381] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 220. 

[382] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 50. 

[383] Vita Radbodi, MGH SS XV.1, p. 569. 

[384] Vanderkindere, Vol. 2, p. 198. 

[385] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 34, p. 63. 

[386] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 105. 

[387] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 51. 

[388] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 295. 

[389] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 35a, p. 67. 

[390] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 51. 

[391] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 35c, p. 69. 

[392] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XXXII, p. 41 footnote (3). 

[393] Thietmar 4.31 and 4.32, pp. 174 and 175, footnote 103 stating that Ansfrid's father was a brother of Queen Mathilde but no corroboration of this has been found. 

[394] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 393. 

[395] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[396] Grote (1877), p. 496. 

[397] D O II 280, p. 325. 

[398] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 215. 

[399] D O III 14, p. 410. 

[400] D O III 16, p. 413. 

[401] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 65. 

[402] Annales Colonienses 995, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[403] Sigeberti Chronica 997, MGH SS VI, p. 353. 

[404] Thietmar 4.35, pp. 176-7. 

[405] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 40, p. 75. 

[406] Duaci (ed.) (1624) Vincentius Bellovacensis Speculum Historiale, lib. 24, cap. 157, quoted in Chronologia Johannes de Beke 40, p. 75. 

[407] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I 16, MGH SS IV, p. 708. 

[408] Beka's Egmondscii Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 106. 

[409] ES I.2 201. 

[410] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 223. 

[411] Bertholdi, Zwifaltensis Chronicon 19, MGH SS X, p. 106. 

[412] Ortliebi Zwifaltensis Chronicon I.8, MGH SS X, p. 77. 

[413] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 121. 

[414] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 122. 

[415] Wouters (1849), Annexes, Vita B. Andreæ primi abbatis Averbodiensis monasterii, XIII, p. 147. 

[416] Klaversma ´De geschlachten van Altena en Horne tot ca. 1300´, PSAHL, tome 114 (1978), p. 37, and. 38 footnote 155 (information provided by Ed von Gohren in a private email to the author dated 27 Sep 2011).  

[417] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, pp. 135 and 141. 

[418] Coldeweij & Dael (1993), quoting Muller & Bouman (1920), I, p. 499. 

[419] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 52, p. 101. 

[420] Annales Egmundani 1167, MGH SS XVI, p. 466. 

[421] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, pp. 141 and 152. 

[422] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 110. 

[423] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 52, p. 101. 

[424] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 155. 

[425] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 110. 

[426] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 61, p. 141. 

[427] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, pp. 197 and 200. 

[428] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 70i, p. 197. 

[429] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1207, MGH SS XXIII, p. 887. 

[430] Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium 18, MGH SS XXIII, p. 410. 

[431] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, pp. 162-3. 

[432] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 65a, p. 161. 

[433] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 110. 

[434] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 110. 

[435] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 64, p. 159. 

[436] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 162. 

[437] Calenberger Urkundenbuch III (Stift Loccum) I, p. 4. 

[438] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 67, p. 171, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006). 

[439] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, p. 174. 

[440] Arnstein an der Lahn, 22, p. 24. 

[441] Butkens (1724), Vol. II, p. 66, "Extraict des chartes de Pitsenbourg". 

[442] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255. 

[443] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, pp. 231 and 251-2. 

[444] Mieris (1754), Tweede deel, p. 500.