LOWER lotharingia, nobility

  v3.0 Updated 24 July 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 2

Chapter 1.                MARCH of ANTWERP. 6

Chapter 2.                COMTES d'ARDENNE. 9

A.         COMTES d'ARDENNE.. 10

B.         COMTES de BASTOGNE.. 18

C.        COMTES de DURBUY.. 21

D.        COMTES de LA ROCHE.. 23

E.         COMTES de MONTAIGU.. 26

F.         GRAFEN von SALM.. 33

G.        GRAFEN von SALM (VIANDEN) 43

H.        GRAFEN von VIANDEN.. 44

Chapter 3.                GRAFEN von BONN. 52

Chapter 4.                COMTES et CHÂTELAINS de CAMBRAI 55

A.         COMTES de CAMBRAI 55

B.         CHÂTELAINS de CAMBRAI 63

Chapter 5.                COUNTY of CONDROZ. 73

A.         COMTES de CLERMONT. 73

B.         COMTES de HUY.. 77

Chapter 6.                GRAFEN von EIFEL. 84

Chapter 7.                GRAFEN von HATTUARIA. 86

A.         GRAFEN von HATTUARIA.. 86

B.         GRAFEN von WASSENBERG.. 89

Chapter 8.                COMTES de HESBAIE. 90

A.         COMTES de HESBAIE.. 90

B.         COMTES de DURAS.. 94

C.        COMTES de DURAS (LOOZ) 95

D.        COMTES de GREZ. 101

E.         COMTES de LOOZ. 102

F.         COMTES de MOHA.. 129

Chapter 9.                COMTES de LIEGE (LUIHGAU) 130

Chapter 10.              GRAVEN van MAASGAU (MASAU) 133

Chapter 11.              GRAFEN von TUBALGO. 142

Chapter 12.              GRAFEN von ZÜLPICH. 143

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

Lotharingia was an entirely artificial political creation and its name an artificial composition.  Emperor Lothaire I, son of the Carolingian Emperor Louis I "the Pious" became king of Lotharingia under the division of imperial territories agreed by the treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843.  The newly created kingdom covered a wide strip of land which stretched from the North Sea coast southwards to Italy, and included present-day Belgium, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Germany west of the river Rhine, the French provinces of Alsace, Lorraine, Burgundy and Provence, Switzerland and parts of northern Italy, as well as the imperial cities of Aachen, Pavia and Rome.  The kingdom was divided between the sons of Emperor Lothaire after he abdicated in 855, the territory called Lotharingia then being restricted to present-day Belgium, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Germany west of the Rhine, the French provinces of Alsace, Lorraine, and Switzerland.  Lotharingia was further divided between the East and West Frankish kingdoms in 870 following the death without direct male heirs of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia[1].  The boundary was marked by the river Maas/Meuse and its tributary the Ourche in the south.  This division proved to be a temporary arrangement, but it set the scene for conflict between France and Germany over Lotharingia which was to last many years.  Lotharingia was in effect integrated into the East Frankish kingdom (Germany) after the death in 900 of Zwentibold, last independent king of Lotharingia, but this was challenged by Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks.  After the deposition of King Charles III in 923, German influence in the territory of Lotharingia predominated.  According to Thietmar of Merseburg, Heinrich I King of Germany secured the release of King Charles from prison and in return was rewarded with "the right hand of St Denis and the entire kingdom of the Lotharingians"[2].  For the rest of the 10th century, this was a source of bitter dispute with the French kings who constantly attempted to invade Lotharingia to reassert control. 

 

The duchies of Upper and Lower Lotharingia were created in 959 in response to local rebellions and in order to assert greater local control from Germany.  At the outset, it is more accurate to describe the new rulers as "associate" dukes who governed under the central authority of Bruno Duke of Lotharingia (brother of the German king and also archbishop of Köln).  In common with most administrative arrangements concerning Lotharingia, the division between the Upper and Lower duchies was artificial and poorly reflected natural, geographic, national and linguistic boundaries, although Upper Lotharingia corresponded roughly to the ecclesiastical province of Trier and Lower Lotharingia to the archbishopric of Köln. 

 

The 870 treaty which divided the territory between the east and west Frankish kingdoms provides the best starting point for identifying the counties which developed within the kingdom of Lotharingia.  The treaty sets out an apparently exhaustive list of the administrative entities which were allocated to the brothers Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, cathedral towns, abbeys and counties. 

 

The counties in the Lower Lotharingian duchy are set out in several different documents in Medieval Lands, being too numerous for a single file.  The northern-most counties, in the ancient duchy of Frisia, the county of Holland and its neighbouring counties, all located in the territory of what is now The Netherlands, are described in the document HOLLAND.  Moving further south to present-day Belgium, the counties of Brabant and Louvain which evolved into the duchy of Brabant are shown in the document BRABANT, LOUVAIN.  The families of the counts of Hainaut, Namur and their respective vassals are set out in the two documents HAINAUT and NAMUR.  The counts and dukes of Limburg, a later creation, are shown in LIMBURG.  Other counts are referred to in contemporary primary source documentation without reference to their geographical counties, so cannot be categorised geographically: these individuals are set out in the Lotharingian chapter of the document GERMANY EARLY NOBILITY.  The present document shows the remaining early medieval counties in Lower Lotharingia, in northern France, eastern Belgium and Germany west of the river Rhine.  These are all small counties, some of which were short-lived and whose boundaries are difficult to define precisely.  Assignment of counts to these counties was in many cases of short duration, with many changes and exchanges of territories (including between the Lower and Upper Lotharingian duchies) which renders satisfactory reconstruction of the comital families extremely challenging.  What is clear is that a finite group of local higher nobility enjoyed power in both Upper and Lower Lotharingia, linked by family relationships many of which will never be confirmed precisely because of insufficient information in surviving primary sources.  Onomastics is of some use in identifying possible connections, but the number of permutations through both male and female lines is generally too numerous to render precise identification anything other than speculative.  This difficulty is increased because of the changes in comital assignments which make it impossible to assess with any accuracy the extent to which appointments were hereditary within the same families. 

 

Another important question is whether the counts in these minor counties were counts "of" the counties (implying territorial exclusivity) or counts "in" the counties (which could involve some form of territorial division within each county).  In other words, the extent to which the "county" in early medieval times represented a coherent administrative unit with recognised jurisdictional and territorial boundaries.  The conclusion that a particular count "ruled" a particular county is based in many cases on a single phrase in a contemporary charter which asserts that a specific property was located (for example) "in pago Blesinsi in comitatu Odacri comitis", in accordance with the generally used formulation.  However, this description does not guarantee that (in this case) Comte Odacre ruled in all parts of "pagus Blesensis".  In fact, the wording could equally be interpreted as indicating that his jurisdiction was limited to the area surrounding his castle, which happened to include the property in question.  In addition, many cases can be found where an individual count is recorded in charters in more than one county at approximately the same time.  Research into the early pagi/counties in neighbouring Saxony and Franconia (see the documents GERMANY EARLY NOBILITY, SAXONY DUKES & ELECTORS, and FRANCONIA, NOBILITY) suggests that more than one count ruled at the same time in the larger counties, the counties of Grabfeld and Wormsgau being the obvious examples.  This suggests that calling the local divisions "counties", as if they constituted fully functioning administrative units under a single central authority, may misrepresent the situation.  Unfortunately there is insufficient surviving primary source data to provide a definitive answer to this question, but it is undoubtedly one which deserves further attention. 

 

A single French county is identified in Lower Lotharingia, Cambrai which is referred to as "Cameracensem" in the 870 treaty.  In Germany west of the Rhine, five counties are represented, the 870 treaty referring to but not naming "in Ribuarias comitatus quinque", which Vanderkindere identifies as Jülich, Zülpich, Eifel, Bonn and Köln[3].  The remaining counties in Lower Lotharingia lie in the eastern part of what is today Belgium.  The March of Antwerp, in the north of Belgium and extending into southern Netherlands, was previously the county of Toxandrie ("Texandrum" in the 870 treaty).  To the east of Toxandrie, the county of Maasgau or Masau (divided into "Masau subterior" and "Masau superior" in the 870 treaty) was located on both banks of the river Maas/Meuse, from Maastricht in the south to the county of Teisterbant in the north.  The county of Tettuaria lay on the right bank of the Maas to the east of Maasgau, and north-east of the Ripuarian counties of western Germany.  The county of Hesbaie ("in Hasbanio comitatus IV" in the 870 treaty, which Vanderkindere suggests were Avernas, which later became the county of Looz, "Brunengeruz" also known as Brugeron or Hougaerde, Louvain and "Haspinga") was south of a line from the river Demer in the west to the town of Maaseik in the east, west and north of the river Maas/Meuse as far as the river Dyle in the west.  It included the city of Liège, although a county of Liège ("Liugas" in the 870 treaty) also existed for a brief time.  The counties of Duras, Grez and Aarschot developed in the territory of the county of Hesbaie in the 11th and 12th centuries.  The county of Condroz ("Condrust" in the 870 treaty) lay to the south of the river Meuse and the west of the river Ourthe, where the county of Huy developed in the mid-10th century, and the counties of Clermont and Durbuy in the late 11th century.  The counties of Ardenne and Bastogne ("Arduenna" in the 870 treaty) were located in south-east Belgium, in the area in which the county of Montaigu developed in the mid-11th century, the counties of Bouillon, La Roche and Salm at the end of the 11th century, and Vianden and Clervaux in the 12th century. 

 

By categorising the Lotharingian counties geographically, one should not lose sight of the powerful authority of a handful of noble families which acquired territories scattered throughout the whole area of the ancient kingdom of Lotharingia and whose influence was paramount in the development of the territory and on the wider international political scene in western Europe.  Of particular note are:

  • the Matfried family which dominated the west German Ripuarian counties in Lower Lotharingia from the 9th century and extended their influence southwards into Bidgau, Woevre, Bliesgau and Chaumont, and especially the county of Metz in Upper Lotharingia, and whose descendants eventually succeeded as dukes of Lorraine, the duchy which evolved from the rump of the duchy of Upper Lotharingia. 
  • the Reginar family which extended their centre of activity from the Maasgau into the county of Hainaut, both in Lower Lotharingia, and whose descendants ruled the duchy of Brabant which emerged in the late 12th century. 
  • the descendants of Wigerich [III] who ruled Bidgau in Upper Lotharingia but extended their influence westwards to Ardenne and southwards to Verdun, and ruled as dukes in both Upper and Lower Lotharingia, until the extinction of the two branches of the family in the male line in 1033 and 1076. 
  • less well-known, and less long-lasting, the power-base of Ansfrid [II], count of Hesbaie, Huy and Teisterbant in the latter part of the 11th century, whose paternal uncle held fifteen different counties according to Thietmar, although both the uncle's precise identity and the identity of his counties are uncertain. 
  • the family of the counts of Holland, which increased their power-base by acquiring control over many of the counties in the former duchy of Frisia. 
  • the descendants of Siegfried, whose original power-base was Bidgau but who acquired Luxembourg and large areas in Ardenne, and who eventually were elevated to the imperial throne, and as a result of judicious dynastic marriages extended their control to Bohemia in the early 14th century and Hungary in the late 14th century, until their extinction in the senior male line in 1437. 

The other important factor in the development of both Upper and Lower Lotharingia was the gradual acquisition of temporal power and territory by the archbishoprics of Köln and Trier, and the bishoprics of Cambrai, Liège, Metz, Toul, Utrecht and Verdun.  This resulted in the suppression of many previously autonomous and powerful counties (for example Verdun in Upper Lotharingia) and the splintering of the territories of others (particularly those in Ripuarian western Germany). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    MARCH of ANTWERP

 

 

The territory around and to the east of Antwerp was originally part of the pagus Toxandria, which lay south of the river Maas in what is now the southern part of the Netherlands, and east of the river Escaut and north of the river Dyle in northern Belgium.  To the east, the county appears to have been bound by the marshes of Peel which marked the border with the county of Masau[4].  The pagus transformed into a county of the same name, as shown by the division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks which allocated "…comitatum Texandrum…" to King Charles[5].  Ecclesiastically, jurisdiction was split between the bishop of Cambrai in the western part of the county (equivalent to the doyenné of Antwerp, which extended to the east as far as Turnhout and Geel, and which originally formed the pagus Renensium or Riensis) and the bishop of Liège in the east[6].  Confirmation of its independent existence as a county in the 9th century is provided by the testament of Eberhard Marchese of Friulia (who died in 866) which names "Scelleburd…in comitatu Tassandrio"[7], suggesting that he may have been count in the area at the time.  "Otto…imperator augustus" confirmed the donations to the convent of Nivelles including "hereditas sancta Gertrudis…in pago Tessandrio super fluvio Struona in villa…Bergon" by charter dated 24 Jan 966[8].  The Chronicon Laureshamense describes the church of Empel, near Bois-le-Duc, as "in pago Dehsendron in præsidatu Ansfridi comitis", referring to its foundation by the bishop of Liège dated to 969[9], which confirms Ansfrid [II] (later Comte de Huy) as the first known count in the area.  Nicholas states that Emperor Otto II established marches on the right bank of the river Schelde from Valenciennes in the south to Antwerp in the north to counter the perceived threat from France during the early part of the reign of Arnoul II Count of Flanders[10].  The timing of the establishment of the march of Valenciennes is open to debate.  Ansfrid resigned his counties and was appointed bishop of Utrecht in 995.  It is not known whether he had already resigned Toxandria, or whether the march was created in parallel with his county, similar to the march of Valenciennes in the south of the county of Hainaut (see the document HAINAUT).  The first mention of Antwerp as a county is the charter of Heinrich II King of Germany dated 1008, which names Gozelon, of the family of the comtes de Verdun, as count of Antwerp[11].  This charter does not specify that Antwerp was a march and, if we consider that protection against the French provided the original reason for the establishment of the marches in western Lower Lotharingia, Antwerp was too far from the border with France for this to have been a pressing need in its case.  Nevertheless, Gozelon is referred to with the title marchio before he was installed as duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1023.  By the mid-11th century, the countship of the march of Antwerp seems to have been definitively attached to the duchy of Lower Lotharingia, and subsequently appears to have become settled with the dukes of Limburg, although this is not without doubt. 

 

 

1.         ANSFRID [II], son of LAMBERT [Comte de Huy] & his wife [--- van der Betuwe] ([945/50]-3 May 1010).  The Catalogo Abbatum Gemblacensium names "nobilem virem Lambertum" and "Anfrido, filio eiusdem Lamberti"[12].  Thietmar names Count Ansfrid who "sprung from the high lineage of his ancestors", specifying that he was brought up by Bruno Archbishop of Köln, became sword-bearer of Emperor Otto when the latter entered Rome, and founded the abbey of Thorn[13].  His birth date is estimated consistent with this report.  "Gerberga…Francorum regina" donated "alodo…Marsnam in comitatu Masaugo" to Reims Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "comitibus Emmone et Ansfrido", for the souls of "senioris nostri piæ memoriæ Gisleberti suique…patris…et matris Rageneri et Albradæ", by charter dated 10 Feb 968, signed by "Arnulfi comitis…Emmonis comitis, Ansfridi comitis…"[14].  The Chronicon Laureshamense describes the church of Empel, near Bois-le-Duc, as "in pago Dehsendron in præsidatu Ansfridi comitis", referring to its foundation by the bishop of Liège dated to 969[15], which confirms Ansfrid [II] (later Comte de Huy) as the first known Comte de Toxandria.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, added paragraph introduced by "Et pergit interpolator Hoiensis" referred to above, names "Ansfredi comitis" as the descendant of "Liethardus", specifying that he was Comte de Huy during the time of "Nothgeri Leodicensis episcopi"[16], the latter being bishop of Liège between 972 and 1007[17].  The Annales Colonienses specify that "Ansfridus comes laicus suscepto clericatu successit" in 995[18].  Thietmar records that he became a monk after the death of his wife and was appointed Bishop of Utrecht[19].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the election of "Ansfridus, qui pridem de seculari comite clericus attonsus est" as bishop of Utrecht, that he donated his lands "in comitatu Teysterbancie" and that he died "1007 V Non Mai"[20]Vincentius Bellovacensis names "Anfridus, qui cum fuisset comes Bratuspantium"[21].  The chronicle of Alpertus names "Ansfridi episcopus Traiectenses", his daughter "abbatissa Tornensis monasterii" and "consanguineusque eius…Unruoch comes"[22].  Beke's Egmondscii Necrologium records the death "1008 V Non Mai" of "Anfridus ultimus comes Hoyensis", stating that he gave his county to the church of Liège, and specifying that he was also "comes Teysterbancie"[23]

 

 

1.         GOZELON, son of GODEFROI Comte de Verdun & his wife Mechtild of Saxony ([968/73]-19 Apr 1044, bur Münsterbilsen).  "Adalberonem…episcopum, Fredericum et Herimannum comites, Godefridum atque Gozelonem" are named (in order) as the five sons of "comiti Godefrido" and "Mathildis Saxoniæ comitissa" in the Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium, which specifies that Godefroi and Gozelon succeeded as dukes[24].  He is named, and his parentage given, in the Annalista Saxo[25]Count in the March of Antwerp.  "Henricus…rex" granted property "inter flumina…Nitæ…Thila…Wauerwald in comitatu Gotizonis comitis qui Antwerk dicitur situm" to "nostrum bestiarum Baldrico sanctæ Leodicensis ecclesiæ presul nec non Baldrico comiti" by charter dated 12 Sep 1008[26].  "Ducis Godefridi eiusque fratris…marchionis Gozelonis" are named as present with Adalbold bishop of Utrecht at Driel, in an undated charter dated to before 1023, relating to the donation of Wamel[27].  He succeeded his brother in 1023 as GOZELON I Duke of Lower Lotharingia.  Wipo, in his description of the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024, names him "Gozilo Duke of the Ripuarians"[28].  He succeeded in 1033 as GOZELON I Duke of Upper Lotharingia.  "Adelaydis comitissa uxor quondam…Ludouici comitis" donated property "per manum Gozelonis ducis atque Godefridi…et pro eius amore Dominique Frederici prefati ducis fratris" to Verdun Saint-Vanne by charter dated to [1038/40], subscribed by "dux Gozelo et eius filius Godefridus"[29].  The Chronicon of Bernold records the death in 1044 of "Gozzilo dux Lotharingorum"[30].  The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "19 Apr" of "Gozlinus dux"[31].  Heinrich III King of Germany regranted "comitatum…in Thrente" to the bishop of Utrecht by charter dated 22 May 1046, which specifies that the grant was made "post obitum Gozlini ducis nostre"[32]

 

 

1.         BAUDOUIN, son of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1030]-Hasnon Abbey 17 Jul 1070).  The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[33].  Baudouin's father sent him to be educated at the court of Emperor Heinrich III, who installed him as count in the march of Antwerp in [1045], although this was taken away in [1050] after his father opposed the emperor[34].  He succeeded in 1055 as BAUDOUIN I Comte de Hainaut, by right of his wife.  He succeeded his father in 1067 as BAUDOUIN VI Count of Flanders.   

 

 

1.         FREDERIC, son of FRIEDRICH Graf [im Moselgau], Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy [Luxembourg] & his wife [--- von Hammerstein] [Konradiner] (-28 Aug 1065, bur Stablo).  He was installed by Heinrich III King of Germany as FREDERIC Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1046.  He was installed as count in the march of Antwerp, after this was recaptured from Baudouin V Count of Flanders by Emperor Heinrich III in 1049.  Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    COMTES d'ARDENNE

 

 

A.      COMTES d'ARDENNE

 

 

The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks divided "…comitatum…de Arduenna…" between King Ludwig and King Charles[35].  The line of demarcation was the river Ourthe which cuts through Ardenne.  The northern county included the abbey of Stavelot, and the southern county, which evolved into the county of Bastogne, the monastery of Saint-Hubert[36].  On the death of Gozelon Comte de Bastogne in [1028], it is assumed that the county reverted to his cousins the dukes of Lower Lotharingia[37].  At the end of the 11th century, the county of Salm emerged in the east of the county of Ardennes, the county of La Roche in the north, and the county centred on the castle of Bouillon in the southern[38].  The counties of Vianden and Clervaux emerged in the 12th century. 

 

 

1.         WIGERICH [II] (-after [14 Jan 877]).  Count Wigerich [II] is included in the present chapter because of his name, which suggests a close family connection with count Wigerich [III] (see below), but the precise family relationship has not been established and no evidence has been found concerning the county which he ruled.  An agreement between Agilmaro Archbishop of Vienne and "Wigerium comitem" is dated 853, naming as present "Gairardus quoque comes, Fulhcradus comes, Arnulfus comes, Autrannus comes, Begere comes, Vopoldus comes, Barnardus comes, Aldrigus comes, item Barnardus comes, Ingelramus comes, Gairangus comes"[39].  An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Chuonradus, Evrardus, Adalardus, Arnustus, Warnarius, Liutfridus, Hruodolfus, Erkingarius, Gislebertus, Ratbodus, Arnulfus, Hugo, item Chuonradus, Liutharius, Berengarius, Matfridus, Boso, Sigeri, Hartmannus, Liuthardus, Richuinus, Wigricus, Hunfridus, Bernoldus, Hatto, Adalbertus, Burchardus, Christianus, Leutulfus, Hessi, Herimannus, item Hruodulfus, Sigehardus"[40].  An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "Arnulfus comes, Gislebertus, Letardus, Matfridus, Widricus, Gotbertus, Adalbertus, Ingelgerus, Rainerus" as those willing to support the emperor's son if he travels across the Meuse[41].  It is not known whether "Widricus" refers to Wigerich [II] or Wigerich [III] (who died in [916/19], see below), although 877 seems early for this to apply to Wigerich [III].  m [EVA, daughter of ---.  The Historia Walciodorensis monasterii names "Berta filiam Wederici comitis et Eva" as wife of "comes Ebroinus"[42].  Assuming that this ancestry is correct (bearing in mind the dubious nature of this source), it is chronologically more consistent if Berta was the daughter of Wigerich [II] rather than of Wigerich [III] and therefore that Eva was the wife of the former.]  Wigerich [II] & his wife had [one] child: 

a)         [BERTA .  The Historia Walciodorensis monasterii names "Berta filiam Wederici comitis et Eva" as wife of "comes Ebroinus", specifying that her dowry was "Florinas"[43].  Assuming that this ancestry is correct (bearing in mind the dubious nature of this source), it is chronologically more consistent if Berta was the daughter of Wigerich [II] than Wigerich [III].  m EBROIN, son of BOVO "Sin Barba" & his wife --- (-12 Sep ----).] 

 

 

1.         ODACRE [Odoacar] (-after [901/02])Graf von Bliesgau: Robert Bishop of Metz granted property "in pago Blesinsi in comitatu Odacri comitis in villa…Letoltingos…" to Kloster Neumünster by charter dated 17 Feb 893[44].  King Zwentibold donated property of "…Odacrus…comes in pago Treuerens" to St Maximin, Trier by charter dated 28 Jan 897[45]Regino records that in 897 "Stephanus, Odacar, Gerardus et Matfridus comites" had their honours confiscated, and the reconciliation of "Stephanus, Gerhardus et Matfridus" with King Zwentibold soon after[46].  Regino records that in 898 Zwentibold King of Lotharingia banished "Reginarium ducem…sibi fidissimum et unicum consiliarium" who went with "Odacro comite et quibusdam aliis, cum mulieribus et parvulis" to "Durfos" (near "Mosa fluvius") where they were besieged[47]Regino names "Odacar comes" in 899[48]Comte d'Ardenne 901-902.  His name suggests a family connection with Baudouin Count of Flanders whose father bore the same name. 

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known. 

1.         FREDERIC (-Trier 23 Oct 942, bur Trier).  The Vita Iohannis Gorziensis names "Fridericus…infantulus quidem monasterio sancti Humberti…mancipatus" as "patruus…domni Adelberonis", adding that he shunned the monastic vocation but later retired to the abbey of Gorze, and afterwards became abbot at Saint-Hubert[49].  Nothing is known of his life outside the monasteries, apart from his advising his nephew Adalbero [I] Bishop of Metz. 

2.         WIGERICH [III] (-[19 Jan 916/919], bur Abbaye de Saint-Glossinde, Metz).  "Zuendeboldus…rex" donated property to the church of Trier by charter dated 23 Jan 899 which names "Richquinus et Widiacus…comites nostri"[50].  He was given the right to coin money in part of the archbishopric of Trier in 902[51].  Ludwig "das Kind" King of Germany restored property taken by "Conradus et Gebehartus comites" to the church of Trier with the consent of "Wigerici comitis" by charter dated 19 Sep 902[52]Graf von Bidgau: the monastery of St Maximin exchanged property "in pago Nedinse in comitatu Liutardi in loco…Burmeringas" for property "in pago Bedinse in comitatu Widrici…villa…Eslingis" with "Roricus" (vassal of Trier) by charter dated 1 Jan 909, subscribed by "Widrici comitis"[53]Comte d'Ardenne.  Charles III “le Simple” King of the West Franks donated the abbeys of Hastières and Saint-Rombaut to Liège Saint-Lambert, granting the enjoyment for life to "comes Windricus...uxoris eius...Cunegundis et unius filiorum ipsorum...nostri nepotis Adelberonis", by charter dated to [915][54]Comes palatii of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks in 916.  King Charles III restored Kloster Süsteren to the abbey of Prüm by charter dated 19 Jan 916 which names "fidelium nostrorum…Widricus comes palatii, Richuuinus comes, Gislebertus, Matfridus, Beringerius comites, Theodericus comes, Reinherus comes, Erleboldus"[55]m ([907/09]) as her first husband, CUNIGONDE, daughter of --- & his wife Ermentrud --- ([895]-after [930/40]).  Her parentage and first marriage are indicated by the charter dated to [915] under which Charles III “le Simple” King of the West Franks donated the abbeys of Hastières and Saint-Rombaut to Liège Saint-Lambert, granting the enjoyment for life to "comes Windricus...uxoris eius...Cunegundis et unius filiorum ipsorum...nostri nepotis Adelberonis"[56].  She married secondly ([916/19]) as his second wife, Richwin [Richizo] Comte [de Verdun].  Her first and second marriages are confirmed by the Vita Iohannis Gorziensis which names "episcopo…Adalberone" (her son by her first husband) and "vitrico…eius Richizone" (her second husband)[57].  She probably married thirdly ---.  Her parentage is confirmed more specifically because the mother of Siegfried Count of Luxembourg is named "Cynigund", daughter of "Irmindrud" daughter of Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, in an 11th century genealogy which traces the ancestry of Siegfried's daughter Empress Kunigunde[58].  The family relationship between Count Siegfried and the descendants of Wigerich [III] is confirmed by a reference in one of Gerbert's letters to Siegfried being patruus of the Wigerich's grandson Gozelo[59].  However, Siegfried´s birth is estimated to [930/40] which indicates that he could not have been the son either of Wigerich or Cunigonde's second husband Richwin.  The only explanation which is consistent with all the sources is that Cunigonde married for a third time after the death of her second husband and that she was the mother of Siegfried by her third marriage.  Wigerich [III] & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         FREDERIC ([910/15]-[Jun/Jul] 978).  Duke Frederic's parentage is deduced from the charter of "Otto…imperator augustus" dated 3 Jun 960, under which property was donated to Kloster St Petrus at Metz and which names "compater noster Adalbero…sanctæ Mettensis ecclesiæ presul [et] germano suo Friderico duce"[60], read together with the diploma of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks which granted the abbey of Hastières to the church of Liège which names the parents of Adalberon[61].  He was installed as FREDERIC I Duke of Upper Lotharingia in 959. 

-        DUKES of UPPER LOTHARINGIA

b)         ADALBERO ([910/15]-26 Apr 962, bur église de l'Abbaye de Gorze, [Moselle])Charles III “le Simple” King of the West Franks donated the abbeys of Hastières and Saint-Rombaut to Liège Saint-Lambert, granting the enjoyment for life to "comes Windricus...uxoris eius...Cunegundis et unius filiorum ipsorum...nostri nepotis Adelberonis", by charter dated to [915][62]Bishop of Metz 940.  "Otto…imperator augustus" donated property to Kloster St Petrus at Metz by charter dated 3 Jun 960 which names "compater noster Adalbero…sanctæ Mettensis ecclesiæ presul [et] germano suo Friderico duce"[63]

c)         GISELBERT (-24 Nov before 965, bur église de l'Abbaye de Gorze, [Moselle]).  "Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini" subscribed the charter dated 943 which refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier[64].  As Frederic is known to have been the brother of Adalbero [I] Bishop of Metz, whose parents are known (see above), it is assumed that all five individuals were sons of Wigerich [III] and Cunegonde (although it is also possible that some or all of them were uterine brothers born from the second marriage of Cunegonde).  Comte in the Ardennes in 963.  Property "in comitatu Giselberti comitis in pago Arduenne in villa…Viulna" was among that exchanged by "Sigefridus comes de nobili genere natus" with St Maximin for the castle of Luxembourg by charter dated 17 Apr 963[65].  The necrology of Gorze records the death "VIII Kal Dec" of "Gislebertus comes qui dedit nobis V mansos de terra"[66]m HADWIDE, daughter of --- (-23 Feb after 965).  “Hadewidis quondam coniunx Gisleberti comitis necnon et filius eiusdem Gautfridus” donated property “in pago et comitatu Moslinsi in loco…Daganem” to Gorze Abbey by charter dated 939 (misdated), which notes that Giselbert was buried in the abbey[67].  Gislebert & his wife had one child: 

i)          GODEFROI .  “Hadewidis quondam coniunx Gisleberti comitis necnon et filius eiusdem Gautfridus” donated property “in pago et comitatu Moslinsi in loco…Daganem” to Gorze Abbey by charter dated 939[68].  938/65. 

d)         SIEGBERT (-after [14 Jul 947]).  "Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini" subscribed the charter dated 943 which refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier[69].  As Frederic is known to have been the brother of Adalbero [I] Bishop of Metz, whose parents are known (see above), it is assumed that all five individuals were sons of Wigerich [III] and Cunegonde (although it is also possible that some or all of them were uterine brothers born from the second marriage of Cunegonde).  "Otto…rex" granted property "in pago Lere in comitatu Heinrici comitis…in pago autem Hasagovue in comitatu Livtolfi…in pago Agartinga in comitatu Sigiberti" to Kloster Engern by charter dated 14 Jul 947[70].  No Siegbert, other than the son of Wigerich [III], has been identified to whom this can refer. 

e)         GOZELON ([before 915]-[12 Oct 942/16 Feb 943] [19 Oct 942]).  His parentage is indicated by the charter dated 943 which refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" (the wording implying that he was then deceased) and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier of property "Hunzelinesdorph", subscribed by "Ogonis abbatis, Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini"[71].  As Frederic is known to have been the brother of Adalbero [I] Bishop of Metz, whose parents are known (see above), it is assumed that all five individuals were sons of Wigerich [III] and Cunegonde (although it is also possible that some or all of them were uterine brothers born from the second marriage of Cunegonde). 

-        see below

f)          LIUTGARDE (-after 960).  "Liutgardis" donated property "in comitatu Nithegowe cui Godefridus comes preesse", which she inherited from "parentibus meis Wigerico et Cunegunda", to St Maximin at Trier "pro remedio…parentum meorum, seniorum quoque meorum Alberti et Everhardi vel filiorum meorum" by charter dated 8 Apr 960[72].  The identity of Liutgarde´s second husband “Everhardi” is not known with certainty.  Eberhard [IV] Graf im Nordgau appears to have been the only contemporary Count Eberhard.  The hypothesis is accepted by Poull[73] and Europäische Stammtafeln[74].  Rösch is more cautious, referring to Liutgarde's second husband as "Eberhard" without citing his origin[75].  Wegener assumes that the wording of the 960 charter means that "Alberti et Everhardi" were Liutgard's successive husbands and that both were deceased at the date of the charter[76], although this is not necessarily the only interpretation of the text.  He argues that Liutgarde's second husband could not therefore have been Eberhard [IV] Graf im Nordgau, who died in [972/73], and suggests that he was Eberhard Duke of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger].  However, as the last reference to Duke Eberhard is in 938, this would mean that he was Luitgarde's first husband, which appears unlikely if the order of the names of her two husbands in the charter is chronological.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines provides some interesting corroboration for Liutgarde's marriage to Graf Eberhard [IV] by recording "comes Hugo de Daburg, pater sancti Leonis pape" as "consobrinus" of "imperator Conradus"[77].  If the origin of Liutgarde's two husbands were as shown here, Hugo [VIII] Graf von Egisheim would have been second cousin once removed of Emperor Konrad, the emperor being the great-grandson of Liutgarde by her supposed first marriage, while Hugo would have been her grandson by her second marriage.  m firstly ADALBERT Graf [von Metz], son of MATFRIED Graf im Metzgau & his wife Landtsint --- (-killed in battle 27 Jan or 10 Feb 944).  m secondly EBERHARD, son of ---, same person as…?  EBERHARD [IV] Graf im Nordgau, son of HUGO [V] Graf im Nordgau [Etichonen] & his wife Hildegard --- (-18 Dec [972/73]). 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the family of Wigerich [III] has not been established but there is clearly a family connection as discussed below.  In addition, the supposed wife of Wigerich [II] was named Eva (see above). 

 

1.         EVA (-after 21 Apr 958).  "Eva comitissa et filius meus Udelricus…Remorum Archiepiscopus" donated "villam meam Layum…in comitatu Culvomontisse", granted to her by her husband as dower, to the abbey of Metz Saint-Arnoul, in memory of "conjugis mei Hugonis…comitis, filiique nostri…comitis Arnulphi", on the instigation of "Adelberonis Metensium episcopi meique consanguinei", by charter dated 16 Aug 950, subscribed by "Frederici ducis, Sigifridi comitis, Gisleberti comitis, Thiæberti palatini comitis…"[78].  Three subscribers can be identified as the sons of Wigerich [III] Comte d'Ardenne, which suggests that Eva was closely related either to Wigerich or his wife Cunigonde.  This document must be considered at least partially spurious in light of the date which predated the appointment of Eva´s son as archbishop by eight years.  "Udelricus filius Evæ comitissæ, de fortissimo Francorum germine procreatus, in primo teneræ ætatis meæ flore paterna fueram gratia privatus, materna…cum unico fratre…Arnulpho…contentus" confirmed the donation of "fiscum…villam nostram Laium in comitatu Calvomontinse sitam" to Metz St Arnulf, naming "patre meo Hugone" and recording the death of his brother, by charter dated 21 Apr 958[79]m HUGUES Comte de Chaumont, son of --- (-before 950). 

 

 

GOZELON, son of WIGERICH [III] Graf im Bidgau & his wife Cunegundis --- ([before 915]-[12 Oct 942/16 Feb 943][80] [19 Oct 942]).  His parentage is indicated by the charter dated 943 which refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" (the wording implying that he was then deceased) and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier of property "Hunzelinesdorph", subscribed by "Ogonis abbatis, Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini"[81].  As Frederic is known to have been the brother of Adalbero [I] Bishop of Metz, whose parents are known (see above), it is assumed that all five individuals were sons of Wigerich [III] and Cunegonde (although it is also possible that some or all of them were uterine brothers born from the second marriage of Cunegonde).  His birth date is estimated from his wife having given birth to four children before he died.  He received the villa of Varangéville from his supposed brother Adalbéron and subscribed one of the latter's charters dated 15 Mar 942[82].  The necrology of the church of Reims records the death "XIV Kal Nov" of "Godefridus comes pater Adalberonis archiepiscopi[83]

m UDA, daughter of GERHARD Graf [Matfriede] & his wife Oda of Saxony (-after 18 May 963).  A charter dated 943 refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" (the wording implying that he was then deceased) and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier of property "Hunzelinesdorph", subscribed by "Ogonis abbatis, Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini"[84].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  "Otto…rex" confirmed a donation of property "Dauantri in pago…Hamalant in comitatu Wichmanni comitis…" inherited by "Uda nostra nepta" by charter dated 28 Aug 960[85].  "Uda…comitissa" donated property "in pago Rizzigowi cui Egylolfus comes" to St Maximin at Trier "pro remedio…seniorique mei Gozlini necnon filiorum meorum Henrici…et Reginheri, Godefridi quoque et Adalberonis" by charter dated 18 May 963 witnessed by "Sigefrido comite, Richwino comite"[86]

Comte Gozelon & his wife had four children:

1.         REGINAR (-before [985]).  A charter dated 943 refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" (the wording implying that he was then deceased) and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier of property "Hunzelinsdorph", subscribed by "Ogonis abbatis, Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini"[87].  "Uda…comitissa" donated property "in pago Rizzigowi cui Egylolfus comes" to St Maximin at Trier "pro remedio…seniorique mei Gozlini necnon filiorum meorum Henrici…et Reginheri, Godefridi quoque et Adalberonis" by charter dated 18 May 963 witnessed by "Sigefrido comite, Richwino comite"[88].  965.  Comte de Bastogne

-        COMTES de BASTOGNE

2.         HENRI (-6 Sep ----).  "Rodulfus filius quondam…comitis Rodulfi et eius…coniugis Evæ" donated property "res…meæ…in pago et in comitatu Virdunensi…Geldulfi villa" for the souls of "senioris mei Wigfridi episcopi et parentis mei Ottonis, Gisleberti quondam comitis fratris" to Verdun Saint-Vanne by charter dated to [960], subscribed by "Gotdefridi comitis et fratris eius Heinrici"[89].  "Uda…comitissa" donated property "in pago Rizzigowi cui Egylolfus comes" to St Maximin at Trier "pro remedio…seniorique mei Gozlini necnon filiorum meorum Henrici…et Reginheri, Godefridi quoque et Adalberonis" by charter dated 18 May 963 witnessed by "Sigefrido comite, Richwino comite"[90].  The necrology of the church of Reims records the death "VIII Id Sep" of "Henricus comes frater Adalberonis archiepiscopi"[91]

3.         GODEFROI (-after 3 Sep [998 or after], bur Gent St Peter).  His parentage is proved by the charter dated 6 Apr 997 by which "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the rights of "monasterio super fluvium Mose" founded by "Gotefridi comitis nostrique fidelis…et coniux sua pro anime sui fratris Alberonis"[92].  He was installed as Comte de Verdun before [960]: "Rodulfus filius quondam…comitis Rodulfi et eius…coniugis Evæ" donated property "res…meæ…in pago et in comitatu Virdunensi…Geldulfi villa" for the souls of "senioris mei Wigfridi episcopi et parentis mei Ottonis, Gisleberti quondam comitis fratris" to Verdun Saint-Vanne by charter dated to [960], subscribed by "Gotdefridi comitis et fratris eius Heinrici"[93]

-        COMTES de VERDUN

4.         ADALBERO (-23 Jan 989).  "Uda…comitissa" donated property "in pago Rizzigowi cui Egylolfus comes" to St Maximin at Trier "pro remedio…seniorique mei Gozlini necnon filiorum meorum Henrici…et Reginheri, Godefridi quoque et Adalberonis" by charter dated 18 May 963 witnessed by "Sigefrido comite, Richwino comite"[94].  Canon at Metz.  He was appointed Archbishop of Reims in 969.  The Annales Remenses record in 967 that, after the death of "Odalrico", "Adalbero archiepiscopus" was appointed[95].  The Annales Mosomagenses record the ordination in 969 of “Adalbero Remorum archiepiscopus[96].  He was appointed arch-chancellor of Lothaire King of the West Franks in 969.  However, after the king captured his brother Godefroi Comte de Verdun, Adalbero defied Lothaire, appointed his nephew Adalberon as bishop of Verdun without the king's permission, and was summoned to an assembly at Compiègne 11 May 985 on charges of treason, although the assembly was never held.  He was summoned again in Mar 987, postponed to May 987, and acquitted as Hugues "Capet" had assumed the presidency of the assembly following the accidental death of Louis V King of the West Franks[97].  The Annales Mosomagenses record the death in 989 of “Adalbero Remorum archiepiscopus[98].  The necrology of Reims records the death “X Kal Feb” of “domnus Adalbero archiepiscopus[99].  "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the rights of "monasterio super fluvium Mose" founded by "Gotefridi comitis nostrique fidelis…et coniux sua pro anime sui fratris Alberonis" by charter dated 6 Apr 997[100].  "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the rights and property of Kloster Mouzon donated by (among others) "dux Fredericus pro anima Ottonis…[et] Godefridus comes et coniux sua Mathildis pro anima sui fratris Adalberonis archiepiscopi" by charter dated 1023[101]

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de BASTOGNE

 

 

1.         OTBERT (-after 6 Apr 907).  Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks confirmed donations by "Otberto et uxori suæ Hildigarde" to Kloster Prüm of property "in pago Iulicense…et in pago Eiflense…in pago Bunnense…in pago Meginennse" by charter dated 20 Oct 871[102]Comte de Bastogne.  A charter dated 6 Apr 907 records an agreement between "Harduinem" and "comitem Otbertum et uxorem eius Helitrudam…atque comitem Rainerum" concerning transfer of property "villa Wanbaise in comitatu Bastoniense" to the abbey of Stavelot[103]m firstly HILDEGARDE, daughter of ---.  Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks confirmed donations by "Otberto et uxori suæ Hildigarde" to Kloster Prüm of property "in pago Iulicense…et in pago Eiflense…in pago Bunnense…in pago Meginennse" by charter dated 20 Oct 871[104]m secondly HELITRUD, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 6 Apr 907 records an agreement between "Harduinem" and "comitem Otbertum et uxorem eius Helitrudam…atque comitem Rainerum" concerning transfer of property "villa Wanbaise in comitatu Bastoniense" to the abbey of Stavelot[105]

 

 

1.         REGINAR, son of GOZELON [Comte d'Ardenne] & his wife Uda --- (-before [985]).  A charter dated 943 refers to "Gozlines…miles…ex nobilissimis regni Chlotarii ducens prosapia" (the wording implying that he was then deceased) and the donation by "uxor eius Uda et filius eius…Regingerus" to St Maximin at Trier of property "Hunzelinsdorph", subscribed by "Ogonis abbatis, Friderici, Gisilberti, Sigeberti fratrum predicti Gozlini"[106].  "Uda…comitissa" donated property "in pago Rizzigowi cui Egylolfus comes" to St Maximin at Trier "pro remedio…seniorique mei Gozlini necnon filiorum meorum Henrici…et Reginheri, Godefridi quoque et Adalberonis" by charter dated 18 May 963 witnessed by "Sigefrido comite, Richwino comite"[107].  965.  Comte de Bastogne.  A letter of Gerbert dated to [985] names "comes Reinharius"[108].  It is not clear from the context whether this refers to Reginar, son of Gozelon, or Reginar [IV] Comte de Hainaut (see the document HAINAUT).  However, a later letter names "Hainao Reniero"[109] which suggests that the latter is correct.  As the former letter also names two of Reginar's sons, it is possible that their father Reginar son of Gozelon had died before that date.  m ---.  The name of Reginar's wife is not known.  Reginar & his wife had three children: 

a)         BARDO .  A letter of Gerbert dated 985 names "episcopus Laudunensis Adalbero" and "frater Gocilo", adding that "filio fratris Barde" was given as hostage[110].  Richer records that "Belgicæ dux Theodericus, necnon et vir nobilis ac strenuous Godefridus, Sigefridus quoque vir illustris, Bardo etiam et Gozilo fratres clarissimi et nominatissimi" captured Verdun in 985[111]m ---.  The name of Bardo's wife is not known.  Bardo & his wife had one child:

i)          son .  A letter of Gerbert dated 985 names "episcopus Laudunensis Adalbero" and "frater Gocilo", adding that "filio fratris Barde" was given as hostage[112]

b)         ADALBERO (-1031).  A letter of Gerbert dated 985 names "episcopus Laudunensis Adalbero" and "frater Gocilo", adding that "filio fratris Barde" was given as hostage[113]Bishop of Laon 977.  Flodoard (Continuator) records in 977 the succession of “Adalbero iuvenis...ex Lotharii natus regno” as bishop of Laon and his ordination “nonas Kal Apr” by Adalbero Archbishop of Reims[114].  Charles Duke of Lotharingia accused his sister-in-law Emma, widow of Lothaire King of the West Franks, of adultery with Adalbero Bishop of Laon[115].  Louis V King of the West Franks quarrelled with his mother, banished Adalbero Bishop of Laon, and besieged Reims[116].  “...Adalbero Laudunensis episcopus...” subscribed the charter dated to [1008] under which Robert II King of France confirmed donations to Saint-Denis[117]

c)         GOZELON (-after 19 Apr 1028, bur Saint-Hubert).  Richer records that "Belgicæ dux Theodericus, necnon et vir nobilis ac strenuous Godefridus, Sigefridus quoque vir illustris, Bardo etiam et Gozilo fratres clarissimi et nominatissimi" captured Verdun in 985[118].  Comte dans les Ardennes 965/[1028].  "Otto…imperator augustus" made donations "in regno Lothariensi…Amella et Geldulfi villas in pago Uuebra in comitatu Reginhardi comitis…Morlinga et Lazehi in pago Mosalgovve et in comitatu Sigifrid comitis…Lunglar in pago Osning in comitatu Kozilonis comitis…Uelme in pago Haspongouue in comitatu Eremfridi comitis…Ernustesvuilere in pago Bliesichgoue in comitatu Volcmari comitis" to the Kloster St Gorgonius at Gorze in accordance with the last wishes of "Cunradus filius Ruodolfi quondam comitis" killed in battle with the Sarracens, by charter dated 26 Sep 982[119]Comte de Bastogne.  Emperor Konrad II confirmed property of Liège Sainte-Croix, including “in pago Arduensi in comitatu Gozelonis de Bastonia ecclesiam de Lonchamp et in pago Condustriensi in comitatu Gozelonis de Hoie ecclesiam de Hafflangia”, by charter dated 19 Apr 1028[120].  "Comes Gozelo pater Cunegundis reclusæ" donated "mansos in Remianster…" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert by charter dated to [1028][121]m ---.  The name of Gozelon's wife is not known.  Gozelon & his wife had one child:

i)          KUNIGUNDE (-after [1028], bur Saint-Hubert).  The Chronicon S. Huberti Andaginensis records that, during the reign of Emperor Heinrich II, "Cunegondis comitissa…unica Gozelonis comitis" married "Ottoni cuidam Saxonico" but that they were divorced and that all her property reverted to the emperor, Kunigunde retiring to Saint-Hubert where she was buried "iuxta…patris sui Gozelonis"[122].  "Comes Gozelo pater Cunegundis reclusæ" donated "mansos in Remianster…" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert by charter dated to [1028][123]m (divorced) OTTO, son of ---. 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES de DURBUY

 

 

The town of Durbuy is located on the banks of the river Ourthe in the present-day Belgian province of Luxembourg, north of La Roche and south of Liège.  No reference to the county of Durbuy has been found before the late 11th century, when it was held by Henri, younger son of Albert II Comte de Namur.  It has not been ascertained whether Henri de Namur inherited the county from one of his parents or by marriage from his wife. 

 

 

HENRI [I] de Namur, son of ALBERT II Comte de Namur & his wife Regilindis of Lower Lotharingia (-after 23 Apr 1088).  The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio"[124].  The Chronicon Huberti names "Albertus comes Namucensis et Henricus Durboiensis", but does not specify their relationship[125]Comte de Durbuy.  "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed donations to St Jakob, Liège by charter dated 23 Apr 1088, at the request of "Heinrico comite de Durbui"[126]

m ---.  No reference has been found to the wife of Comte Henri. 

Comte Henri & his wife had one child: 

1.         [GODEFROI/HENRI] de Durbuy (-before 1124).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The only reference to Godefroi which has been identified is the Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis which records the marriage of "Godefrido de Durbuil, frater comitis de Namuco et comitis de Rupe" and secondly "Godefrido de Aissa"[127].   From a chronological point of view, it is unlikely that "frater comitis de Namuco" can be correct: “frater” is presumably an error for "nepos".  This appears to be confirmed by the need for an additional generation in the family of the comtes de Durbuy between Comte Henri [I] and Comte Henri [II].  However, there appears to be no certainty that the son of Comte Henri [I] was named Godefroi.  Another difficulty is presented by the Historia Andaginensis Monasterii, which records that Otbert Bishop of Liège was captured by “comite Henrico” and taken to “Durboium[128].  This passage presumably indicates that the bishop´s captor was comte de Durbuy.  As Otbert is recorded as bishop from 1091 to 1118, the text cannot refer either to Comte Henri [I] or to Comte Henri [II].  We are left therefore with conflicting sources which name the son of Comte Henri [I] as Godefroi and as Henri.  Comte de Durbuy.  [Godefroi] must have died before 1124 when his son "comes de Dorbui Heinricus adhuc puer" subscribed a charter (see below)[129]m as her first husband, ALIX de Grandpré, daughter of [HENRI [I] Comte de Grandpré & his wife Ermentrude de Joux] [Grandson].  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Henricum et Adelidem" as children of "Henricus de Grandi-prato" & his wife, specifying that Alix married firstly "Godefrido de Durbuil, frater comitis de Namuco et comitis de Rupe" and secondly "Godefrido de Aissa"[130].   From a chronological point of view, it is unlikely that "frater comitis de Namuco" can be correct: “frater” is presumably an error for "nepos".  This suggested parentage of the wife of “Godefrido de Durbuil” is far from satisfactory.  As can be seen in the document UPPER LOTHARINGIA NOBILITY, the careers of Alix´s supposed brothers extended towards the end of the 12th century, whereas Alix herself could not have been born much later than the early 1200s considering that she is recorded with three children by her first husband who must have died before 1124.  Another possibility is that Alix was the sister, not daughter, of Comte Henri [II].  She married secondly Gottfried [II] von Esch an der Sauer.  Comte [Godefroi] & his wife had three children: 

a)         RICHARD de Durbuy (-1171).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Richardum Laudunensem atque Virdunensem archidiaconum, fratrem quoque eius Henricum et sororem eius Adelidem sanctimonialem" as children of "Godefrido de Durbuil" & his wife[131].   Bishop of Verdun 1163.  The Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium (Continuatio) records that “Richardus...cognomento Infans” Albert de Marcie as bishop of Verdun, and made “transmarinum iter[132].  The Annales Sancti Vitoni Virdunensis record the death in 1171 of “Richardus electus Virdunensis” and the succession of “Arnoldus[133]

b)         HENRI [II] de Durbuy ([1115/18]-[1134/47]).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Richardum Laudunensem atque Virdunensem archidiaconum, fratrem quoque eius Henricum et sororem eius Adelidem sanctimonialem" as children of "Godefrido de Durbuil" & his wife[134].   Comte de Durbuy.  "Heinricus advocatus et filius eius Heinricus, Godefridus de Asca et comes de Dorbui Heinricus adhuc puer" subscribed the charter dated 1124 under which "Cuono…Stabulensis abbas" recounted the settlement reached over the church of Bra[135].  As can be seen above, Gottfried von Esch was Henri's stepfather.  "Henrici de Durbui" subscribed the charter dated 1134 under which "Teodericus…comes Flandrensis" confirmed previous donations to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Tournai[136].  It is suggested that Henri died before [1147/48] when Henri I "l'Aveugle" Comte de Namur is recorded as quarrelling with Richard de Durbuy Bishop of Verdun, maybe about Durbuy which would have reverted to Comte Henri as senior male heir of Henri [II][137]

c)         ALIX de Durbuy .  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Richardum Laudunensem atque Virdunensem archidiaconum, fratrem quoque eius Henricum et sororem eius Adelidem sanctimonialem" as children of "Godefrido de Durbuil" & his wife[138].   Nun. 

 

 

 

D.      COMTES de LA ROCHE

 

 

The town of La Roche is located on the banks of the river Ourthe in the present-day Belgian province of Luxembourg, north of Bastogne.  Vanderkindere suggests that the county of La Roche emerged in the north of the county of Ardenne at the end of the 11th century[139].  However, as noted below, the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records a comte de La Roche as “vice abbatis” of the abbey of Stavelot in the early 10th century.  That individual has not otherwise been identified and no further references to La Roche as a county have been found until the 12th century.  La Roche was presumably little more than a hamlet in medieval times and its existence as a separate county is difficult to explain.  No pagus of that name has been identified.  A possible explanation for the 10th century count is that he owed his title to another county elsewhere and that the same title was applied to La Roche for the purposes of describing his relationship with Stavelot.  The name Adelard/Adalhard was relatively common among the Frankish nobility in the 9th and 10th centuries (see the document FRANKS, CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY).  A family relationship between the earliest Comte Adelard and the later comtes de La Roche of the family of the comtes de Namur is suggested by a common connection with the abbey of Stavelot.  The later counts held the position of advocatus of Stavelot, presumably the same as indicated by “vice abbatis” in the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in relation to Adelard, a post which was often retained in the same families, sometimes forming part of the dowry of daughters and so subsequently descending in the female line.  In the 11th century, the post was held by members of the Luxembourg family, whose ancestry before the mid-10th century is so difficult to trace.  According to Murray, the lands which constituted the county of La Roche family were brought to the comtes de Namur by Ida of Saxony on her marriage to Albert III Comte de Namur[140].  Ida was the widow of Friedrich of Luxembourg, who was recorded as advocatus of Stavelot, and so these lands presumably formed part of her dower from her first husband. 

 

 

1.         ADELARD (-after 905).  Comte de la Roche.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 905 that "Adelardus comes de Rupe in Ardenna" was "apud Stabularius vice abbatis"[141]

 

 

HENRI de Namur, son of ALBERT III Comte de Namur & his wife Ida von Sachsen (-before 1138).  The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium names "Godefridum et Henricum comitem de Rupe" sons of "Albertus de Namurco"[142]Comte de La Roche.  Vogt of Stablo-Malmédy.  "Heinricus advocatus et filius eius Heinricus, Godefridus de Asca et comes de Dorbui Heinricus adhuc puer" subscribed the charter dated 1124 under which "Cuono…Stabulensis abbas" recounted the settlement reached over the church of Bra[143]

m MATHILDE van Limburg, daughter of HENRI [I] Graaf van Limburg et d'Arlon & his second wife Adelheid von Botenstein (-after 1148).  "Heinricus comes de Rupe" donated property to the abbey of St Hubert by charter dated 1152 which names "matris mei Mathildis comitisse et Godefridi fratris mei"[144].  Her origin is determined from a charter dated 1148 in which Wibald abbot of Stavelot names "dominis suis Heinrico de Rupe et Heinrico de Lemburch quorum alter, id est de Rupe, advocatus ecclesie nostre erat et alterius Heinrici amite filius"[145], the former being Henri [II] Comte de La Roche and the latter Hendrik II Duke of Limburg. 

Comte Henri & his wife had five children: 

1.         GODEFROI de La Roche (-after 11 Apr 1138).  "…Godefridum filium Heinrici comitis del Roche" consented to the donation by "Godefridus comes Namucensis…" to the abbey of Floreffe by charter dated 7 Jan 1125[146]Comte de La Roche.  "Godefridus de la Rotza, Heinricus frater eius" subscribed the charter dated 11 Apr 1138 under which Konrad III King of Germany confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Stavelot[147].  "Heinricus comes de Rupe" donated property to the abbey of St Hubert by charter dated 1152 which names "matris mei Mathildis comitisse et Godefridi fratris mei"[148]

2.         HENRI [II] de La Roche (-before 10 Jan 1155).  "Heinricus advocatus et filius eius Heinricus, Godefridus de Asca et comes de Dorbui Heinricus adhuc puer" subscribed the charter dated 1124 under which "Cuono…Stabulensis abbas" recounted the settlement reached over the church of Bra[149].  "Heinricus comes de Rupe" confirmed the donation of "capellam…in silva Fredier" to the abbey of Saint-Hubert, Ardenne, made by "matris mee Mathildis comitesse et Godefridi fratris mei", by charter dated 1152, subscribed by "Elizabeth comitissa conjux mea, Beatrix soror mea et Godefridus filius eius de Brida…"[150].  "Godefridus de la Rotza, Heinricus frater eius" subscribed the charter dated 11 Apr 1138 under which Konrad III King of Germany confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Stavelot[151].  Comte de La Roche 1143.  "Heinricus comes de Rupe" donated property to the abbey of St Hubert by charter dated 1152 which names "matris mei Mathildis comitisse et Godefridi fratris mei"[152].  His death before 1155 is confirmed by the charter dated 10 Jan 1155 under which Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany donated the Vogtei of Stavelot previously held by "comes Heinricus de Rupe" to abbot Wibald[153]m ELISABETH, daughter of --- (-after 1152).  "Heinricus comes de Rupe" confirmed the donation of "capellam…in silva Fredier" to the abbey of Saint-Hubert, Ardenne, made by "matris mee Mathildis comitesse et Godefridi fratris mei", by charter dated 1152, subscribed by "Elizabeth comitissa conjux mea, Beatrix soror mea et Godefridus filius eius de Brida…"[154]

3.         FREDERIC de La Roche (-30 Oct 1174).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Fredericus archidyaconus Sancti Lamberti Leodiensis, qui postea factus archiepiscopus de Tyre, et soror eius Mathildis" as children of "Albertus de Rupe"[155], although as noted below this appears to be in error for "Henricum de Rupe".  Archbishop of Tyre 1164.  

4.         MATHILDE de La Roche .  The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium names "Mathildis" daughter of "Henricum comitem de Rupe"[156].  The Chronicon Hanonense names "Mehaut" as daughter of "Henri…quens de Durbuis", her first husband "signour de Wallecourt Weri de Walecourt" and her second husband "Nicholas d'Avesnes"[157].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Mathildem filiam Henrici comitis de Roche in Ardenna" as wife of "Nicholaus filius [Walteri…de Avethnes]"[158].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Fredericus archidyaconus Sancti Lamberti Leodiensis, qui postea factus archiepiscopus de Tyre, et soror eius Mathildis" as children of "Albertus de Rupe", specifying that Mathilde married firstly "Theoderico de Walecurt" by whom she was mother of "Werricum de Rupeforti et matrem Theoderici de Hufalize, cuius filius Henricus de Hufalize", and secondly "Nicolao de Avenes"[159].  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "filius eius Nicolaus Plukellus" married "Machtildem filiam Henrici comitis de Rupe in Ardenna", whose first husband was "domini de Walecourt"[160]m firstly THIERRY de Walcourt, son of --- (-[1147/48]).  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Widrico de Walecourt" as brother of "Iacobus…de Avethnis"[161].  In a later passage, the same source names "Widricum de Wallecort et filias multas" as children of "Mathildis [filiis Henrici comitis de Roche]" & her first husband[162]m secondly (before 1150) NICOLAS d'Oisy Seigneur d'Avesnes, son of WAUTIER [I] d'Oisy & his wife Ade [Ide] de Mortagne (-[1169/71]).  

5.         BEATRIX de La Roche (-after 1152)The Chronicon Hanonense names "Beatrix" as daughter of "Henri…quens de Durbuis" and her husband "Winant le signour de Hufalise"[163], although according to Europäische Stammtafeln[164] the wife of Winand van Gronsfeld Heer van Houffalize was Beatrix de Walcourt, daughter of Thierry de Walcourt & his wife Mathilde de La Roche, who was this Beatrix's sister.  Her correct marriage is indicated by the charter dated 1152 under which "Heinricus comes de Rupe" confirmed the donation of "capellam…in silva Fredier" to the abbey of Saint-Hubert, Ardenne, made by "matris mee Mathildis comitesse et Godefridi fratris mei", subscribed by "Elizabeth comitissa conjux mea, Beatrix soror mea et Godefridus filius eius de Brida…"[165].  The primary source which confirms the name of her husband has not yet been identified.  m GERAARD van Breda, son of --- (-before 1152). 

 

 

 

E.      COMTES de MONTAIGU

 

 

The castle of Montaigu was located on the left bank of the river Ourche, opposite Marcourt near Laroche in the county of Ardenne[166].  Its territory lies in the present-day Belgian province of Luxembourg.  Although little remains of the ruins of the destroyed castle, a chapel dedicated to Saint Thibaut dominates the mountain on which it was built[167].  The comtes de Montaigu held the seigneurie de Rochefort, south of Namur, arrondissement Dinant in the present-day Belgian province of Namur, which passed by inheritance to the Walcourt family and was elevated into a county in 1494[168]

 

 

1.         GOZELON, son of --- (-1064, bur Saint Hubert).  The name Gozelon, as well as the geographical proximity, suggests a family connection with Gozelon Comte de Bastogne (see above), although Gozelon de Montaigu could not have been the son of Gozelon de Bastogne as the latter is recorded with one daughter as his heiress.  Archbishop Poppo restored the monastery of St Matheus to Trier by charter dated 2 Sep 1038, witnessed by "Dux Gozelo et comes Gozelo, comes Arnulfus, comes Sigebodo…"[169].  Avoué de Saint-Barthélémy, Liège 1043.  Comte de Montaigu 1050.  "Gosilonis comitis, Chimonis [Cunonis] et Rodulphi filiorum eius" witnessed an undated charter which records a donation to Brogne by "Heluidis"[170].  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert records the death of "Gozilo comes Bohaniæ" after violently destroying the church at Marly and his burial at Saint-Hubert[171].  It is not certain what "Bohaniæ" refers to, but this entry clearly indicates Gozelo Comte de Montaigu as the same source names his wife and children.  m (before [1040/44]) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE [Ermentrude], daughter of [WIDRICH [I] [Comte de Clermont] & his wife [Hersende ---] ([1025/35]-after 1091).  "Gislebertus comes Clarimontis" names "amite mee Ermingardi comitisse et filiis eius" in the charter dated 1091 under which he donated the church of Saint-Symphorien to Cluny[172].  Assuming that "amite" in this document is interpreted strictly, Ermengarde was the donor´s paternal aunt, although this is not beyond all doubt because of the flexible interpretation of such terms indicating relationships in contemporary documentation.  Her birth date range is estimated from her eldest son by her first marriage being born in the range [1040/50].  Archbishop Poppo of Trier confirmed the donation by "comitem Kadelonem et eius contectalem Irmingart" of hereditary property "de chorte Prümizvelt" by undated charter, dated to [1040/44], subscribed by "Duci Godefrido, Adalberto de Musel, comes Becelinus…"[173].  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert on condition that she could be buried there with her husband, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[174], her brothers being identified as the sons of Hildrad [Hezelin] Comte [de Grandpré], which suggests the identity of Ermengarde's mother as Hildrad's wife (as discussed more fully above).  Two charters indicate a close connection between Ermengarde and Bruno von Heimbach.  Hildolf Archbishop of Köln donated property "ubi ipsa [Ermentrudis] hereditariam partem cum Brunone habuerat…Strala" (Stralen near Geldern) to the abbey of Siegburg by charter dated 1076[175].  ["Ermengardis comitissa…ab avis atque atavis nobilibus" donated property "apud Villas Worommes et Longum-Campum [Woromes, Longchamp] …allodium de Rumines [Rummen]…allodium de Curinges [Curenge]…allodium…apud Gelmines et Berlinges…allodium de Brede [Brée] cum ecclesia…quos dedit Gerardo comiti" to the church of Saint-Bartholomée de Liège by charter dated 1078, witnessed by "tunc advocatus…comes Henricus de Dolvin-Castello…comes Cono de Monte-Acuto, Reginardus de Roden, Witmannus de Molenarche…"[176].  The donor of this charter has not been identified with certainty.  However, the presence of Conon Comte de Montaigu as first lay subscriber suggests that it may be his mother.]  Siegwin Archbishop of Köln noted a donation of property at Stralen by "Irmengarda comitissa", by charter dated [1079/89], which states that her parents were buried at the abbey of Rees and that she had retained rights in Aspel[177].  Ermengarde maybe married secondly Fredelon [von Esch].  The fact of Ermengarde having married at least twice is confirmed by the charter dated 1091 under which the bishop of Cambrai confirmed the donation by "Ermengardis de Monte Acuto" to the abbey of Saint-André du Cateau for the souls of her spouses ("conjugum")[178].  The identity of her other husband is suggested by the charter dated 1138 under which "Reinardus comitis de Ascha Gisleberti filius" renewed the right of the monks of Flône to take wood from his part of the forests "Clerimontis", granted previously by "pater eius et comes Lambertus"[179].  "Comes Lambertus" in this document is identified as Lambert Comte de Montaigu, who was Ermengarde´s grandson by her marriage to Gozelo Comte de Montaigu.  The father of "Reinardus comitis de Ascha Gisleberti filius" can be identified as "Gislebertus comes de Aska" who granted the right to take wood from his forests in "sus possessionis de Claromonte" to the monks of Flône, for the souls of "patris sui Fredelonis et matris suæ Ermengardis et uxoris sue Aelaidis et ipsius comitis Gisleberti", by charter dated 1131, after 18 Mar[180].  The fact that Lambert Comte de Montaigu and Giselbert Graf von Esch both shared rights in property in Clermont is best explained by the co-identity of the two persons named Ermengarde from whom they were both descended, and from whom they would have inherited these rights.  If this is correct, Gozelon would have been Ermengarde´s first husband and Fredelo her second.  Comte Gozelo & his wife had five children: 

a)         CONON de Montaigu ([1040/50]-Dalhem 1 May 1106, bur Saint-Hubert).  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert names "Conone, Rodulfo, Widone et Henrico" as the sons of "Gozilo comes Bohaniæ" & his wife[181]Comte de Montaigu

-        see below

b)         RAOUL de Montaigu .  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert names "Conone, Rodulfo, Widone et Henrico" as the sons of "Gozilo comes Bohaniæ" & his wife[182].  "Gosilonis comitis, Chimonis [Cunonis] et Rodulphi filiorum eius" witnessed an undated charter which records a donation to Brogne by "Heluidis"[183].  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[184].  1055/95. 

c)         GUY de Montaigu .  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert names "Conone, Rodulfo, Widone et Henrico" as the sons of "Gozilo comes Bohaniæ" & his wife[185].  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[186].  1064/87. 

d)         JEAN de Montaigu (-before 1112).  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[187].  Provost of St Pierre. 

e)         HENRI de Montaigu (-1124 or after).  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert names "Conone, Rodulfo, Widone et Henrico" as the sons of "Gozilo comes Bohaniæ" & his wife[188].  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[189].  Archdeacon and dechant at St Lambert, Liège 1095. 

 

 

CONON de Montaigu, son of GOZELO Comte de Montaigu & his wife Ermengarde [de Clermont] (-Dalhem 1 May 1106, bur Saint-Hubert).  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert names "Conone, Rodulfo, Widone et Henrico" as the sons of "Gozilo comes Bohaniæ" & his wife[190].  "Gosilonis comitis, Chimonis [Cunonis] et Rodulphi filiorum eius" witnessed an undated charter which records a donation to Brogne by "Heluidis"[191]Comte de Montaigu.  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[192].  "Ermengardis comitissa…ab avis atque atavis nobilibus" donated property "apud Villas Worommes et Longum-Campum [Woromes, Longchamp] …allodium de Rumines [Rummen]…allodium de Curinges [Curenge]…allodium…apud Gelmines et Berlinges…allodium de Brede [Brée] cum ecclesia…quos dedit Gerardo comiti" to the church of Saint-Bartholomée de Liège by charter dated 1078, witnessed by "tunc advocatus…comes Henricus de Dolvin-Castello…comes Cono de Monte-Acuto, Reginardus de Roden, Witmannus de Molenarche…"[193].  "…Cuono comes et filii eius…" witnessed the charter dated 1091 under which Henri de Verdun Bishop of Liège approved the foundation of Flône[194].  Albert of Aix records that "Cononem comitem de Monte Acuto, Baldwinum de Burch, Godefridum de Ascha" were sent by Godefroi de Bouillon for the first meeting with the emperor after the arrival of the crusading army in Constantinople, dated to end 1096[195].  Albert of Aix names "…Gozelo et frater eius Lamtbertus…cum patre suo Conone de Monte Acuto…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[196].  Seigneur de Rochefort.  Avoué de Dinant.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1106 of "comes Cono de Monteacute" and his burial at Saint Hubert, specifying that he returned prosperous from overseas[197], presumably indicating his participation in the First Crusade.  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert records the death "Kal Mai apud castrum Dolhem" of "comes Cono" and his burial "Dinanum"[198]

m firstly IDA de Fouron, daughter of LAMBERT [de Fouron] & his wife ---.  The Chronicle of Saint-Hubert, interpolated in the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Ida filia senioris Lamberti" as wife of "comes Cono de Monteacute"[199].  Roland says that “nous croyons découvrir le beau-père du comte Conon dans Lambert de Foron ou Fouron[200]

m secondly as her second husband, IDA [de Boulogne], widow of HERMANN [von Malsen], daughter of [EUSTACHE [II] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Ida of Lotharingia].  Europäische Stammtafeln[201] shows Ida, wife [firstly] of Hermann [von Malsen] and [secondly of Conon de Montaigu], as a possible daughter of Comte Eustache II & his wife Ida.  The only partial corroboration for this so far found is Orderic Vitalis who says that "Cono comes Alemannus" married "Duke Godfrey's sister"[202].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. 

Comte Conon & his [first/second] wife had four children: 

1.         GOZELO [II] de Montaigu (-Artesia [end 1097], bur Artesia).  Henri Bishop of Liège consecrated the altar of Notre-Dame at Dinant by charter dated 1086, witnessed by “comes Cono, filii eius Gozelo, Lambertus, Theobaldus...[203].  Albert of Aix names "…Gozelo et frater eius Lamtbertus…cum patre suo Conone de Monte Acuto…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[204].  Albert of Aix records that Robert Count of Flanders left with "Rotgero de Roseit, Gozelone filio comitis Cononis de Monte Acuto" and 1000 knights to attack Artasia, dated to late 1097 from the context, but that Gozelo died of disease and was buried there[205].  William of Tyre records the death during the early stages of the First Crusade of "Goscelo domini Cononis comitis de Monte Acuto filius"[206]

2.         LAMBERT de Montaigu (-1140 or after).  Henri Bishop of Liège consecrated the altar of Notre-Dame at Dinant by charter dated 1086, witnessed by “comes Cono, filii eius Gozelo, Lambertus, Theobaldus...[207].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Lambertus comes de Claromonte" as son of "Cono comes de Monteacute"[208].  William of Tyre records the presence at the capture of Acre in 1098 of "Lambertus filius Cononis de Monte Acuto"[209].  Albert of Aix names "…Gozelo et frater eius Lamtbertus…cum patre suo Conone de Monte Acuto…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[210].  Albert of Aix records that "comes de Oringis Reinboldus, Ludowicus de Monzuns, Lambertus filius Cononis de Monte Acuto" commanded one of the corps of men at the capture of Antioch in Jun 1098[211]Comte de Montaigu.  Comte de Clermont:  "Comes de Claromonte Lambertus" granted the right to take wood from his forests in "predicti castelli" to the monks of Flône by charter dated 1136, witnessed by "comes Arnulfus de Los, comes Gislebertus de Duras, Walterus advocatus de Barz…"[212].  Seigneur de Rochefort.  Avoué de Dinant.  Avoué de Saint-Symphorien-aux-Bois.  m ---.  No primary source has yet been identified which gives any precise information relating to Lambert´s wife or her ancestry.  Two possibilities are recorded in Europäische Stammtafeln: According to one table[213], she was Gertrud de Louvain, daughter of Henri [III] Comte de Louvain & his wife Gertrude de Flandre.  According to another table in the same series[214], she may have been --- [de Clermont, daughter of Giselbert Comte de Clermont & his wife ---].  Presumably the latter speculation is based on the charter under which Lambert Comte de Montaigu donated wood at Clermont to Flône.  However, as discussed elsewhere in the present document, the connection between Comte Lambert and Clermont is best explained by his paternal grandmother having belonged to the family of the comtes de Clermont.  Comte Lambert & his wife had three children: 

a)         CONON de Montaigu (-after 1140).  A charter dated 1140, under which the bishop of Liège confirmed possessions of Flône abbey, includes a reference to the donation of wood by "comes Gislebertus de Ais, itemque comes Lambertus de Montau" and that this donation was confirmed by "Reinardus et Cono, filii eorum"[215]

b)         GODEFROI de Montaigu (-1161).  His parentage is confirmed by reading together the documents under which he and his father granted rights in Clermont woods to Flône abbey.  Comte de Montaigu et de Clermont.  Comte de Duras.  "Godefridus de Claromonte comes de Duras" confirmed the grant of rights "in silva sua de Claro Monte" by "patris sui" to the monks of Flône, with the consent of "participe suo Reinardo", by charter dated 1157, followed by another charter dated 1157 under which Henri Bishop of Liège confirmed the grant by "Godefridus comes de Durays et Renardus de Harmala"[216].  Seigneur de Rochefort.  Burger and avoué of Dinant.  m [as her first husband,] JULIANE de Duras, daughter of OTTO [II] Comte de Duras & his wife Berthe de Ribemont (-1164).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146, which adds that the donor had bequeathed “advocatiam” and soon after that “gener eius Godefridus comes et filia Julia” donated property to the abbey[217].  Heiress of Duras.  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[218].  “Rodulphus...ecclesie beati Lamberti...in Leodio custos” notified that “domina Juliana de Duraz bone memorie comitissa et filius eius Egidius” donated “dimidium mansum allodii sui in Geldonge” to Heylissem abbey by charter dated 1164, before Nov[219].  [Europäische Stammtafeln indicates that Juliane married secondly Enguerrand d'Orbais[220].  This second marriage may be hinted at by the charter dated 1171 under which “Godefridus...dux Lotharingie et comes Bracbantie” donated “ecclesie...in Pervweiz” to Heylissem abbey, specifying that “comes de Duraz...a quo Engelrandus de Orbais...infiodatus est” was “inbeneficatus a nobis” and that “Godefridum de Sumbreffia” also donated “dimidia parte huius beneficii[221].  This document does indicate some Duras/Orbais family connection but its wording is insufficiently precise to conclude that this supposed second marriage took place.  In addition, the chronology of the Duras and Orbais families is not favourable for such a marriage.  Another charter confirms that the Brabant, Duras and Orbais families were joint donors of the church of Perwez, although the basis of their joint interest has not been ascertained: Bruno Archdeacon of Liège confirmed the donation of “ecclesie...in Peruuueis” to Heylissem abbey made by “quatuor viri nobiles quorum fundus fuit ecclesie...dux Godefridus, comes Egidius, Eigelramus, Godefridus” by charter dated 1171[222].]  Comte Godefroi & his wife had five children: 

i)          GILLES de Montaigu (-before 1193).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[223].  “Rodulphus...ecclesie beati Lamberti...in Leodio custos” notified that “domina Juliana de Duraz bone memorie comitissa et filius eius Egidius” donated “dimidium mansum allodii sui in Geldonge” to Heylissem abbey by charter dated 1164, before Nov[224].  "Cono…comes de Duras" renounced rights to revenue from properties of Flône abbey at Hottine, on the intervention of "domino Egidio fratre meo", by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "Petrus frater comitis, Henricus de Harmala…"[225]Comte de Montaigu, Comte de Duras, Comte de Clermont.  Bruno Archdeacon of Liège confirmed the donation of “ecclesie...in Peruuueis” to Heylissem abbey made by “quatuor viri nobiles quorum fundus fuit ecclesie...dux Godefridus, comes Egidius, Eigelramus, Godefridus” by charter dated 1171[226].  "Gilius quondam comes Durachiensis" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, naming "Petrus frater meus comes de Monteacuto et Cono frater meus comes Durachiensis…et avunculus noster domnus Bruno archidiaconus", by charter dated 1175[227].  “Egidius comes Geldoniensis” relinquished claims to “decimam...in parrochia Geldoniensi” donated by “Erlendis olim Geldoniensis comitissa” and confirmed by “Juliane comitisse matris mee” in favour of Heylissem abbey by charter dated to [1179][228].  Seigneur de Rochefort et de Jodoigne.  Avoué de Saint-Trond.  m (1172, divorced 1174) as her first husband, LAURETTE de Looz, daughter of LOUIS Comte de Looz et de Rieneck, Stadtgraf von Mainz & his wife Agnes von Metz (-before 1184).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.  She married secondly ([1176]) as his first wife, Thibaut de Bar Seigneur de Briey, Steinay et de Longwy, who in 1190 succeeded as Thibaut I Comte de Bar.   

ii)         PIERRE de Montaigu (-1185 or after).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[229].  Canon at Saint-Lambert, Liège 1173.  Comte de Montaigu 1175.  "Gilius quondam comes Durachiensis" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, naming "Petrus frater meus comes de Monteacuto et Cono frater meus comes Durachiensis…et avunculus noster domnus Bruno archidiaconus", by charter dated 1175[230].  "Cono…comes de Duras" renounced rights to revenue from properties of Flône abbey at Hottine, on the intervention of "domino Egidio fratre meo", by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "Petrus frater comitis, Henricus de Harmala…"[231]

iii)        CONON de Montaigu (-1189 or after).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[232].  Comte de Duras.  "Gilius quondam comes Durachiensis" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, naming "Petrus frater meus comes de Monteacuto et Cono frater meus comes Durachiensis…et avunculus noster domnus Bruno archidiaconus", by charter dated 1175[233].  "Cono comes Monti Acuti et Duraz" granted his rights in the church of Saint-Martin at Hermalle to the monks of Flône by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "Henricus de Harmala…"[234].  "Cono…comes de Duras" renounced rights to revenue from properties of Flône abbey at Hottine, on the intervention of "domino Egidio fratre meo", by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "Petrus frater comitis, Henricus de Harmala…"[235]

iv)       GERBERGE de Montaigu (-after 29 Jun 1206).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[236]Wirricus dominus de Walcourt” donated “molendinum de Goustal” to Justémont, with the consent of “conjugis meæ Gerbergæ...et filiorum meorum Wirrici, Ægidii, Theodorici et Jacobi et cæterorum”, by charter dated 29 Jun 1206[237]The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified, although it is suggested by the documents in which her husband is called comte de Montaigu et de Clermont.  m WERY de Walcourt, son of THIERRY Seigneur de Walcourt & his wife Mathilde de la Roche (-after 29 Jun 1206).  He inherited the counties of Montaigu and Clermont, the Seigneurie de Rochefort and the avouerie of Dinant from his wife’s family, while Gerard Comte de Looz inherited the county of Duras and the avouerie of Saint-Trond [Sint-Truijden][238].  

v)        CLARISSA de Montaigu .  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[239]

c)         GERTRUDE de Montaigu .  The Liber de Restauratione Sancti Martini Tornacensis records that "Evrardum", son of Richildis de Hainaut, married "filiam Lamberti Leodiensis comitis Gertrudem nomine, de qua Balduinum filium genuit"[240].  According to the Chronicon Hanoniense, "Evrardum cognomina Radonem" married "matrem Cononis et Iohannis et Radulphi" during the lifetime of his first wife[241]m firstly RAOUL de Nesle Châtelain de Bruges, son of RAOUL [I] Seigneur de Nesle & his wife Rainurde --- (-[1153/60]).  m secondly as his second wife, EVERARD [III] Radoul Châtelain de Tournai, son of EVERARD [II] Radoul Châtelain de Tournai & his wife Richilde de Hainaut (-1189 or after). 

3.         HENRI de Montaigu (-1128 or after).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Heynricus…filius Cononis comitis" as "archydiaconus ecclesiæ sancti Lamberti"[242].  Archdeacon at Liège, provost at Fosses 1111/1128. 

4.         THIBAUT de Montaigu (-after 1086).  Henri Bishop of Liège consecrated the altar of Notre-Dame at Dinant by charter dated 1086, witnessed by “comes Cono, filii eius Gozelo, Lambertus, Theobaldus...[243]

 

 

 

F.      GRAFEN von SALM

 

 

At the end of the 11th century, the county of Salm emerged in the east of the county of Ardennes[244]

 

 

HERMANN [I], son of --- [von Gleiberg] & his wife --- ([1040/55]-killed in battle 28 Sep 1088, bur Metz).  He was elected as HERMANN King of Germany by the German nobility opposed to Heinrich IV King of Germany in 1081 after the death of Rudolf von Rheinfelden.  Bruno´s De Bello Saxonico records the election of “Herimannum regem”, dated to early 1081 from the context[245].  Two sources have been identified which indicate the family origin of Hermann [anti] King of Germany.  The Chronicon of Marianus Scottus records the election by “Suevi in autumno” of “Cuonradi fratrem Herimannum, Heinrici de Lacha fratris filium” to replace “Rodulfo” as king and his installation “in nativitate Domini in Saxonia[246], and the Casus Monasterii Petrihusensis records the appointment of “Herimannum...genere Francum de Glicberg” as king in 1081[247].  Hermann is widely called “Graf von Salm” in various modern secondary sources and shown as the son of Giselbert Comte [de Luxembourg].  However, reconciling these two sources quoted above suggests that this normally accepted family origin should be reconsidered for two reasons.  Firstly, looking at the Chronicon, if King Hermann shared both parents with Conrad Comte [de Luxembourg], how could he also have been the son of the brother of Heinrich von Laach?  Secondly, looking at the Casus, how could King Hermann be “genere Francum [indicating Franconia] de Glicberg” if he was an agnatic member of the Lotharingian Luxembourg family?  Assuming that all this speculation is correct, it is possible that King Hermann was the same person as Hermann Graf von Gleiberg.  One factor which points against this hypothesis is that the father of the two sons of Hermann Graf von Gleiberg, Hermann and Dietrich, is referred to as “comitis” not “regis” in the 1095 charter which is quoted in the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY.  A less powerful magnate, he was forced for a time to flee to Denmark[248].    He defeated the troops of Heinrich IV at Bleichfelt, near Wurzburg 11 Aug 1086.  It should be noted that the theory of Hermann´s supposed Franconian origin is contradicted by Burchard´s History of St Gallen which records that "Hermannus...Rex" retired “in nativam terram suam Lotoringiam” where he died[249].  Sigebert´s Chronicle records that "Hermannus rex" retired “Lotoringiam” and was killed by stones falling from a castle wall which he approached too closely[250]

m SOPHIA, daughter of --- (-after 23 Sep 1088).  “Domina Sophya Herimanni regis relicta” donated property to Göttweig by charter dated 23 Sep 1088, witnessed by “Otto filius eiusdem regine...[251].  Other donations in the same collection were made by the family of the Markgrafen im Nordgau in Bavaria, which suggests that Sophia may have belonged to the same family or at least was of Bavarian/Austrian origin. 

Graf Hermann & his wife had two children: 

1.         HERMANN [II] von Salm ([1070/75]-[1135]).  As noted in the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY, there is a possibility that this was the same person as Hermann, son of Hermann Graf von Gleiberg who is named in a charter dated 1095.  Graf von Salm.  “Heinricus comes Coenradi piæ memoriæ comitis filius” swore to defend the church of Echternach by charter dated 1095, subscribed by “Heinricus palatinus, Herimannus Herimanni comitis filius et frater eius Theodericus…[252].  "...Herimanno Salmucensi comite et fratre eius Ottone…" subscribed a charter dated 3 Oct 1104 which confirmed the donation to Stablo made by "Rigoldus de Alfunza"[253].  Lothar King of Germany confirmed property of Duisburg by charter dated 8 May 1129 witnessed by "…Comites: Gerhardus Longus de Gelere, Arnoldus de Cliue, Hermannus de Caluerlage, Hermannus de Salmene, Otto de Rinecke, Florentius de Hollande, Gerhardus de Hostad, Bernhardus de Hildenesheim, Godefridus et Hermannus de Cuch, Adolfus de Berge…"[254].  Emperor Lothar donated property to Epternach by charter dated 24 Apr 1131 witnessed by "…Otto comes de Rinecke fraterque suus Hermannus comes de Salmis…"[255]m ([1104]) AGNES de Mousson, daughter of THIERRY Comte de Mousson & his wife Ermentrude de Bourgogne [Comté] (-after 1140).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sister of "Theodoricum de Monte Beliardi, Fredericum de Ferretes…et Renaldum Strabum comitem de Barro Ducis" as the wife of "Hermanno de Salmis", and names their sons "Henricum de Salmis et fratrem eius Theodericum abbatem sancti Pauli Virdunensis"[256].  A charter dated 1147 confirms the agreement between "comitissa Agnes et heredes de Languesten" and "Bencelinus de Turquesten cum filio suo Conone" and others relating to the abbey of Haute-Seille, with the consent of "comitissam Agnetem de Languesten cum filiis suis Henrico et Hermanno consulibus, Conrardum…comitem cum uxore sua Havyde et filio Hugone"[257].  She is named in the charter dated 1174 under which "Henricus comes de Salmis" confirmed donations to the abbey of Haute-Seille by "patrui mei comitis Hermani aviæque meæ Agnetis"[258].  A further detail is added by the charter dated 1186 under which "Henricus comes de Salmis" confirmed donations to the abbey of Haute-Seille by "Agnetem comitissam de Langesten aviam meam, Henricum patrem meum et Hermanum fratrem eius, consules"[259].  "Agnes comitissa" confirmed donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur for the soul of "comitis Godefridi mariti mei"[260], "Godefridi" presumably being a copyist's error for "Hermanni".  A charter dated to [1155] or [1160] records the foundation of the abbey of Haute-Seille by “comitissam Agnetem de Languestein cum filiis suis Henrico et Heremanno consulibus, Conrardum...comitem cum uxore sua Havyde et filio Hugone[261]Graf Hermann [II] & his wife had three children: 

a)         HERMANN [III] von Salm (-after 1147).  His origin is confirmed by the charter dated 1174 under which "Henricus comes de Salmis" confirmed donations to the abbey of Haute-Seille by "patrui mei comitis Hermani aviæque meæ Agnetis"[262]Graf von Salm.  A charter dated 1147 confirms the agreement between "comitissa Agnes et heredes de Languesten" and "Bencelinus de Turquesten cum filio suo Conone" and others relating to the abbey of Haute-Seille, with the consent of "comitissam Agnetem de Languesten cum filiis suis Henrico et Hermanno consulibus, Conrardum…comitem cum uxore sua Havyde et filio Hugone"[263]A charter dated to [1155] or [1160] records the foundation of the abbey of Haute-Seille by “comitissam Agnetem de Languestein cum filiis suis Henrico et Heremanno consulibus, Conrardum...comitem cum uxore sua Havyde et filio Hugone[264]

b)         HEINRICH [I] von Salm und Langenstein (-after 1153, bur Notre-Dame La Ronde, near Metz Cathedral).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Henricum de Salmis et fratrem eius Theodericum abbatem sancti Pauli Virdunensis" as sons of "Hermanno de Salmis" & his wife[265]Graf von Salm

-        see below

c)         DIETRICH von Salm (-22 Feb 1156).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Henricum de Salmis et fratrem eius Theodericum abbatem sancti Pauli Virdunensis" as sons of "Hermanno de Salmis" & his wife[266].  Canon, later abbé of Saint-Paul in Verdun. 

2.         OTTO ([1070/75]-murdered Burg Schönburg 1150 before 12 Nov).  The Annales Sancti Diibodi name "Otto palatinus comes de Rineke" as son of "Hermannus [rex]"[267].  “Domina Sophya Herimanni regis relicta” donated property to Göttweig by charter dated 23 Sep 1088, witnessed by “Otto filius eiusdem regine...[268].  "...Herimanno Salmucensi comite et fratre eius Ottone…" subscribed a charter dated 3 Oct 1104 which confirmed the donation to Stablo made by "Rigoldus de Alfunza"[269]Graf von Rheineck und Bentheim 1126.  Lothar King of Germany confirmed property of Duisburg by charter dated 8 May 1129 witnessed by "…Comites: Gerhardus Longus de Gelere, Arnoldus de Cliue, Hermannus de Caluerlage, Hermannus de Salmene, Otto de Rinecke, Florentius de Hollande, Gerhardus de Hostad, Bernhardus de Hildenesheim, Godefridus et Hermannus de Cuch, Adolfus de Berge…"[270]

-        GRAFEN von RHEINECK

 

 

HEINRICH [I] von Salm, son of HERMANN [II] Graf von Salm & his wife Agnès de Mousson (-after 1153, bur Notre-Dame La Ronde, near Metz Cathedral).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Henricum de Salmis et fratrem eius Theodericum abbatem sancti Pauli Virdunensis" as sons of "Hermanno de Salmis" & his wife[271].  The Triumphus Sancti Lamberti de Castro Bollonio names "comes Salmiensis Henricus natus de sorore comitis Rainaldi" when recording that he helped his maternal uncle raise the Bishop of Liège's siege of the château de Bouillon in Sep 1141[272].  In 1133, he was in dispute with his maternal uncle Etienne Bishop of Metz over the avouerie of the abbey of Senones.  He besieged Metz and was excommunicated.  He succeeded his brother [after 1140] as Graf von Salm und Langenstein.  A charter dated 1147 confirms the agreement between "comitissa Agnes et heredes de Languesten" and "Bencelinus de Turquesten cum filio suo Conone" and others relating to the abbey of Haute-Seille, with the consent of "comitissam Agnetem de Languesten cum filiis suis Henrico et Hermanno consulibus, Conrardum…comitem cum uxore sua Havyde et filio Hugone"[273].  Between Jun 1147 and 10 Aug 1149, he took part in the Second Crusade.  "Henricus comes de Langsteim" donated property to the abbey of Bongort by charter dated to [1147/54][274].  He is mentioned for the last time in a letter dated 1153 from the abbé de Stavelot[275]A charter dated to [1155] or [1160] records the foundation of the abbey of Haute-Seille by “comitissam Agnetem de Languestein cum filiis suis Henrico et Heremanno consulibus, Conrardum...comitem cum uxore sua Havyde et filio Hugone[276]

m CLEMENTIA, daughter of --- (-before 1169).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[277], the wife of Graf Heinrich [I] was named Clementia but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  According to the same source, she may have been the daughter of Albert [I] Graf von Dagsburg, although the basis for this speculation is not known.  In any case, this parentage appears unlikely from a chronological point of view if it is correct that Graf Albert died in 1098, given the likely date of Clementia's grandson's marriage in the 1180s.  If Clementia was related to the Grafen von Dagsburg, it is therefore more likely that she would have been Clementia, daughter of Hugo [XI] Graf von Dagsburg & his wife Gertrud [van Looz]. 

Graf Heinrich [I] & his wife had two children: 

1.         HEINRICH [II] von Salm (-1200).  His parentage is proved by the charter dated 1186 under which "Henricus comes de Salmis" confirmed donations to the abbey of Haute-Seille by "Agnetem comitissam de Langesten aviam meam, Henricum patrem meum et Hermanum fratrem eius, consules"[278].  He succeeded his father in [1153] as Graf von Salm.  "Henricus comes de Salmis" confirmed donations to the abbey of Haute-Seille by "patrui mei comitis Hermani aviæque meæ Agnetis" by charter dated 1174[279].  “Henricus comes de Salmis” donated partem sylvæ...Evereboch” to Haute-Seille, founded by “Agnetem comitissam de Langensten aviam meam, Henricum patrem meum et Hermannum fratrem”, with the consent of “Joatha comitissa uxor mea et filius meus Henricus”, by charter dated 1186[280]m JUTTA, daughter of ---.  “Henricus comes de Salmis” donated partem sylvæ...Evereboch” to Haute-Seille, founded by “Agnetem comitissam de Langensten aviam meam, Henricum patrem meum et Hermannum fratrem”, with the consent of “Joatha comitissa uxor mea et filius meus Henricus”, by charter dated 1186[281]"Henricus comes de Salmis", about to leave on crusade, donated property to the abbey of Haute-Seille with the consent of "uxore mea Joatha et Henrico filio meo et Joatha sponsa eius et filiabus meis Agnete et Lorathe" by charter dated 1189[282].  Richer records that "mater dicti Hanrici" (referring to Heinrich [III]) obtained "castrum de Danubrio"[283].  Graf Heinrich [II] & his wife had five children: 

a)         HEINRICH [III] von Salm (-1246, bur St Peter).  “Henricus comes de Salmis” donated partem sylvæ...Evereboch” to Haute-Seille, founded by “Agnetem comitissam de Langensten aviam meam, Henricum patrem meum et Hermannum fratrem”, with the consent of “Joatha comitissa uxor mea et filius meus Henricus”, by charter dated 1186[284]He succeeded his father in 1200 as Graf von Salm

-        see below

b)         MORITZ von Salm .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  A priest in Ronde. 

c)         FRIEDRICH CHRISTIAN von Salm (-[1246]).  Richer records that "Hanrico filio Hanrici de Danubrio dicti de Salmis" obtained the advocacies of "vallis Senoniensis et de Plannia et Vypodi-cella", referring also to "patruus eius Fridericus…de Albo-Monte"[285].  Comte de Blâmont.  m (before 1235) ELISABETH, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Friedrich & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRION .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Seigneur de Blâmont et de Dombasle, 1277. 

d)         AGNES von Salm (-after 1189).  "Henricus comes de Salmis", about to leave on crusade, donated property to the abbey of Haute-Seille with the consent of "uxore mea Joatha et Henrico filio meo et Joatha sponsa eius et filiabus meis Agnete et Lorathe" by charter dated 1189[286]

e)         LAURETTE von Salm (-after 1189).  "Henricus comes de Salmis", about to leave on crusade, donated property to the abbey of Haute-Seille with the consent of "uxore mea Joatha et Henrico filio meo et Joatha sponsa eius et filiabus meis Agnete et Lorathe" by charter dated 1189[287]

2.         ELISABETH von Salm (-after 1200).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Vianden, son of FRIEDRICH [I] Graf von Vianden & his wife --- (-after 1187). 

 

 

HEINRICH [III] von Salm, son of HEINRICH [II] Graf von Salm & his wife Jutta --- (-1246, bur St Peter).  “Henricus comes de Salmis” donated partem sylvæ...Evereboch” to Haute-Seille, founded by “Agnetem comitissam de Langensten aviam meam, Henricum patrem meum et Hermannum fratrem”, with the consent of “Joatha comitissa uxor mea et filius meus Henricus”, by charter dated 1186[288]"Henricus comes de Salmis", about to leave on crusade, donated property to the abbey of Haute-Seille with the consent of "uxore mea Joatha et Henrico filio meo et Joatha sponsa eius et filiabus meis Agnete et Lorathe" by charter dated 1189[289].  He succeeded his father in 1200 as Graf von Salm.  "H dictus comes de Salmes, J comitissa uxor mea, Henricus et Fredericus filii nostri" donated property to the abbey of Senone by charter dated 19 Feb 1219[290].  "Henricus comes de Salmis et…Ferricus filius eiusdem" confirmed their obligations to the bishop of Metz by charter dated Mar 1234[291].  He and his wife made a foundation at the abbey of Senones in Mar 1245[292].  Richer records that "comitem Henricum" oppressed the abbey of Senone, was expelled by his son (presumably referring to Heinrich), and was later buried "in ecclesia Sancti Petri" (describing his tomb)[293]

m (before 1189) JUTTA [Judith] de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY de Lorraine Sire de Bitsch [later FERRY I Duke of Lorraine] & his wife Wierchosława Ludmilla of Poland ([1171]-19 Mar after 1245, bur Senones Abbey).  "Henricus comes de Salmis", about to leave on crusade, donated property to the abbey of Haute-Seille with the consent of "uxore mea Joatha et Henrico filio meo et Joatha sponsa eius et filiabus meis Agnete et Lorathe" by charter dated 1189[294].  Richer records that "comite Henrico…dictus…de Salmis…contemporaneus noster" married "sororem Friderici ducis Lotoringie" and had two sons "primogenitum…Henricum et alium…Fridericum"[295]

Graf Heinrich [III] & his wife had seven children: 

1.         HEINRICH von Salm (-after 21 Sep 1228).  Richer records that "comite Henrico…dictus…de Salmis…contemporaneus noster" married "sororem Friderici ducis Lotoringie" and had two sons "primogenitum…Henricum et alium…Fridericum"[296].  Seigneur de Viviers.  Richer records that "comite Henrico…dictus…de Salmis…contemporaneus noster" granted "castrum de Vivario" to his son "Henricus" when he married[297].  Richer records that "Hanrico filio Hanrici de Danubrio dicti de Salmis" obtained the advocacies of "vallis Senoniensis et de Plannia et Vypodi-cella", referring also to "patruus eius Fridericus"[298]m ([Jan/Jul] 1221) MARGUERITE de Bar, daughter of THIBAUT I Comte de Bar & his second wife Ermesinde de Bar-sur-Seine (-after 1259).  She is named, but her origin not stated, in the charter dated Jan 1221 under which "H comes de Salmis et Joeta uxor mea" consented to the château de Viviers constituting the dower of "Margaretam" on her marriage to "Henrico primogenito nostro"[299].  Richer records that "comite Henrico…dictus…de Salmis…contemporaneus noster" married "sororem Friderici ducis Lotoringie" and had two sons "primogenitum…Henricum et alium…Fridericum", and that "dictus Henricus" married "uxorem de stirpe comitis Barrensis"[300].  Heinrich & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         HEINRICH [IV] (-8 Jan 1292 or 8 Jun 1293).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Richer records that in 1251 "dominum Henricum…de Salmis" was summoned before the court of the Bishop of Metz for the damage he had done to the church of Senone[301].  He succeeded his grandfather as Graf von Salm

-        see below

b)         [SOPHIE .  She is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[302] as the possible daughter of Heinrich von Salm Seigneur de Viviers but the basis for this speculation is not known.  m DIETRICH SIEGBERT Graf von Rixingen [Werd] (-1272).]

c)         [HERMANN .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Liège St Lambert 1248.]  

Heinrich has one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

d)         son .  Richer records that "dominum Henricum…de Salmis" had "fratrem" born to "in partibus Burgundie…muliere"[303]

2.         JUTTA von Salm (-after Dec 1224).  She is named with her parents in a document dated Dec 1224[304].  

3.         AGNES von Salm (-15 Jan 1280, bur Abbey of Remiremont).  She was elected Abbess of Remiremont in 1242 in succession to her maternal aunt Agathe de Lorraine[305]

4.         LAURETTE von Salm (-after Dec 1224).  She is named with her parents in a document dated Dec 1224[306].  

5.         FRIEDRICH von Salm (-1255).  Richer records that "comite Henrico…dictus…de Salmis…contemporaneus noster" married "sororem Friderici ducis Lotoringie" and had two sons "primogenitum…Henricum et alium…Fridericum"[307].  "H dictus comes de Salmes, J comitissa uxor mea, Henricus et Fredericus filii nostri" donated property to the abbey of Senone by charter dated 19 Feb 1219[308].  Richer records that "Friderico [de Albo-monte] filio Henrici comitis" was expelled from "castro de Albo-monte" and retreated to "castrum…Piere-percie"[309].  Seigneur de Blâmont [Blankenberg].  Richer records that "comitem Henricum…filius eius Fridericus miles" continued to attack the monastery, and retained "Album-montem et superius castrum de Danubrio", specifying that "mater dicti Hanrici" had obtained the latter[310].  "Henricus comes de Salmis et…Ferricus filius eiusdem" confirmed their obligations to the bishop of Metz by charter dated Mar 1234[311].  "Ferris de Salmes" confirmed that, if he acquired "le chastel de Blanmont" by settlement with "mon coisin Henri de Salme", he would hold it as a fief from "mon…cosin Jaique evesques de Metz", by charter dated 13 Jan 1246 (O.S.)[312]

-        SEIGNEURS de BLÂMONT[313].  “Henris sires de Blanmont et Cunegons sa fame” confirmed the donation made to “nostre...ganre Jehans de Bourgongne fiz à noble baron Hugon conte de Bourgongne qui fu” and an exchange of property, naming “nostre fille Marguerite fame audit Jehan”, by charter dated May 1296[314]

6.         THOMASSE von Salm (-after 1256).  Treasurer of the abbey of Remiremont[315]

7.         [BERTHA von Salm .  Poull suggests that the wife of Simon was the daughter of Heinrich [III] Graf von Salm[316]m SIMON [IV] Sire de Parroye, son of SIMON [III] Sire de Parroye & his [first/second] wife --- .] 

 

 

HEINRICH [IV] von Salm, son of HEINRICH von Salm & his wife Marguerite de Bar (-8 Jan 1292 or 8 Jun 1293).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Richer records that in 1251 "dominum Henricum…de Salmis" was summoned before the court of the Bishop of Metz for the damage he had done to the church of Senone[317].  He succeeded his grandfather as Graf von Salm.  Graf von Bliescastel 1275.  A charter dated 19 May 1284 records an agreement between the bishop of Metz and "Henri cuens de Salmes, Henris, Jehan et Ferris fill edit conte de Salmes" relating to "la contei de Caistres"[318]

m (1242 before 12 Feb) [as her second husband,] LAURETTE von Bliescastel, [widow of --- von Rappoltstein,] daughter of HEINRICH Graf von Bliescastel & his wife Agnes von Sayn (-Sep 1269).  Theodorich Archbishop of Trier granted "castri…Hunoldisteyn" to "Metthildis et Loretta filie…consanguinei nostri Henrici bone memorie quondam comitis de Castris" by charter dated 2 Jan 1238[319].  "Agnes comitissa de Castris" granted "medietatem castri in Hunolstein" to "genero nostro viro nobili de Salmis Henrico cum Loretha filia mea eiusdem H. uxore", with the consent of "comitis Seynensis domini Henrici fratris mei", by charter dated 9 Feb 1243[320].  Heiress of Hünolstein, Bernkastel and Puttlingen. 

Heinrich [IV] & his wife had children: 

1.         HEINRICH von Salm (-[14 May/4 Aug] 1288). 

2.         JOHANN [I] von Salm (-after 1330)Graf von Salmm JEANNE de Joinville, daughter of GEOFFROY de Joinville Seigneur de Vaucouleurs & his wife --.  Johann [I] & his wife had children: 

a)         SIMON [I] von Salm (-killed in battle Crécy 26 Jul 1346)Graf von Salmm (1334) MATHILDE von Saarbrücken, daughter of SIMON von Saarbrücken & his wife Marguerite de Savoie (-after 1354).  She married secondly Johann ---.  Simon [I] & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHANN [II] von Salm (-after 1400)Graf von Salmm (after 22 May 1355) as her second husband, PHILIPPA van Valkenburg, widow of GOTTFRIED von Heinsberg Comte de Chiny, daughter of JAN van Valkenburg & his first wife Maria van Cuyk.  Johann [II] & his wife had children: 

(a)       SIMON [II] von Salm (-16 Jan 1397)Graf von Salmm as her second husband, MARIE de Luxembourg, widow of JEAN [II] de Condé Seigneur de Bailleul et de Morialmé, daughter of GUY de Luxembourg Comte de Ligny, de Roussy et de Saint-Pol & his wife Mathilde de Châtillon (-[1396]). 

(b)       JOHANN [III] von Salm (-killed in battle Bulgneville 2 Jul 1431).  Graf von Salmm firstly (20 Mar 1403) GUILLEMETTE de Vergy, daughter of GUILLAUME de Vergy & his wife Elisabeth von Rappoltstein.  m secondly (1429) as her second husband, JEANNE de Joinville, widow of HENRI d´Ogeviller, daughter of ANSEAU de Joinville Seigneur de Bonney & his wife --- (-after 1431). 

-         GRAFEN von SALM[321]

(c)       MARGARETA von Salm (-1428)m (1390) JAN [III] van Polanen Heer van Breda, son of --- (-11 Aug 1394). 

b)         LAURETTE von Salm (-[Jun 1345/1 Jun 1346])m (before 20 Jan 1314) HEINRICH [II] Graf von Sponheim, son of --- (-1322). 

c)         MATHILDE von Salm m (before 1321) GOTTFRIED [I] Graf von Leiningen, son of --- (-1344). 

d)         AGNES von Salm (-[1339/42])m FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Saarwerden, son of --- (-[23 Jun 1363/1366]). 

3.         KATHARINA [Johanna] von Salm (-after 1314)m firstly KONRAD [III] Wildgraf zu Schmidtburg, son of --- (-1305).  m secondly JOHANN Wildgraf zu Dhaun und Grumbach, son of --- (-1350). 

 

 

 

G.      GRAFEN von SALM (VIANDEN)

 

 

WILHELM von Vianden, son of FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Vianden & his wife Elisabeth von Salm (-[1210/14]).  "Elysa…comitissa Salmensis…consensu filiorum nostrorum" donated "ius patronatus ecclesie Sigendorf" to Kloster Niederprüm by charter dated 1200 witnessed by "Gerardo Prumiensi abbate, Willelmo decano maioris ecclesie Treverensis, Friderico comite Viennensi…Mehthildi comitissa Viennensi"[322]Graf von Salm

m ---.  The name of Wilhelm´s wife is not known. 

Wilhelm & his wife had children: 

1.         HEINRICH [I] (-after 1214).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Graf von Salmm ---.  The name of Heinrich´s wife is not known.  Heinrich [I] & his wife had children: 

a)         HEINRICH [II] (-[1257/21 Jul 1259])Graf von Salmm CLEMENCE de Rozoy, daughter of ROGER Seigneur de Rozoy & his wife Alix d´Avesnes (-after 1285).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "tertia filia domini Rogeri de Rosoic...Clementia" married "comiti de Salmis in Ardenna" and had one son (“Guilelmus” who married “filiam comitis Juliacensis Wilelmi”) and one daughter (who married “domino de Ayste” who predeceased his father, but had “filium...Robertum” although the land was inherited by “eius patruum dominum Joffredum”)[323].  Heinrich [II] & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILHELM [II] (-[1289/90]).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "tertia filia domini Rogeri de Rosoic...Clementia" married "comiti de Salmis in Ardenna" and had one son (“Guilelmus” who married “filiam comitis Juliacensis Wilelmi”) and one daughter (who married “domino de Ayste” who predeceased his father, but had “filium...Robertum” although the land was inherited by “eius patruum dominum Joffredum”)[324]Graf von Salm.  "…Wilhelmus de Salmis…" was among those who declared war against Sifrid Archbishop of Köln by charter dated 8 Apr 1277[325]m (before 1265) RICHARDIS von Jülich, daughter of WILHELM [III] Graf von Jülich & his wife Richardis van Gelre (-1291 or after).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "tertia filia domini Rogeri de Rosoic...Clementia" married "comiti de Salmis in Ardenna" and had one son (“Guilelmus” who married “filiam comitis Juliacensis Wilelmi”) and one daughter (who married “domino de Ayste” who predeceased his father, but had “filium...Robertum” although the land was inherited by “eius patruum dominum Joffredum”)[326]

-         GRAFEN von SALM[327]

ii)         daughter (-before 1263).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "tertia filia domini Rogeri de Rosoic...Clementia" married "comiti de Salmis in Ardenna" and had one son (“Guilelmus” who married “filiam comitis Juliacensis Wilelmi”) and one daughter (who married “domino de Ayste” who predeceased his father, but had “filium...Robertum” although the land was inherited by “eius patruum dominum Joffredum”)[328]m firstly (1247, after 31 Mar) FRIEDRICH von Vianden, son of HEINRICH [I] Graf von Vianden & his wife Marguerite de Courtenay (-(-10 Nov 1247).  m secondly HEINRICH von Esch, son of ROBERT [I] Herr von Esch & his wife Ermengarde d´Aspremont (-before Feb 1261). 

 

 

 

H.      GRAFEN von VIANDEN

 

 

1.         GERHARD von Vianden, son of --- (-after 1096).  “Gerardus cum filio cognomine meo Gerardo...et genere meo Waltero...et alterum filium meum Egilbertum” donated “villam...Geichlingen” to Epternach “per manus advocati sui comitis Wilhelmi” by charter dated 1096, witnessed by “...Gerardus de Vienna...””[329].  He founded Kloster Hosingen in 1096.  m ADELHEID, daughter of --- (-after 1096). 

 

 

1.         FRIEDRICH [I] (-after 1152).  Graf von Vianden.  Adalbero Archbishop of Trier confirmed donations to Kloster St Thomas bei Andernach by charter dated 1138 witnessed by "Fridericus comes de Vienna, Godefridus de Asche, Gerlacus de Isenburg et frater eius Remboldus…"[330].  Adalbero Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Lonnich by charter dated 1142 witnessed by "Walrammus comes de Arlo, Fridericus comes de Vianna, Gerlacus, Reinboldus, Sigefridus fratres de Isenburch, Heinricus de Cazenelinboge…"[331].  Vogt von Prüm.  m ---.  The name of Friedrich´s wife is not known.  Friedrich [I] & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         SIEGFRIED (-[1171/84]).  Graf von Vianden.  "…Sifridus comes de Vienna advocatus ecclesie, Fredericus frater ipsius comes de Salmene…" witnessed the charter dated 1171 under which the abbot of Prüm confirmed property[332]

b)         FRIEDRICH [II] (-after 1187).  "…Sifridus comes de Vienna advocatus ecclesie, Fredericus frater ipsius comes de Salmene…" witnessed the charter dated 1171 under which the abbot of Prüm confirmed property[333].  Graf von Salm.  Graf von Vianden.  "Fridericus comes de Uiane…" witnessed the charter dated 1184 under which the abbot of Springiersbach confirmed a donation by "Gerardus dominus de Helfinsten et uxor eius Agnes"[334]m ELISABETH von Salm, daughter of HEINRICH [I] Graf von Salm & his wife Clementia --- (-after 1200).  "Elysa…comitissa Salmensis…consensu filiorum nostrorum" donated "ius patronatus ecclesie Sigendorf" to Kloster Niederprüm by charter dated 1200 witnessed by "Gerardo Prumiensi abbate, Willelmo decano maioris ecclesie Treverensis, Friderico comite Viennensi…Mehthildi comitissa Viennensi"[335].  Friedrich [II] had two children: 

i)          FRIEDRICH [III] (-after 1200)Graf von Vianden.  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm confirmed that "comes Vianensis Fridericus junior filius fratris mei Friderici comitis" had resigned the patronat of Alf church, at the request of "uxoris sue Matilde" by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "…Fridericus comes, Heremannus frater eius…"[336]

-         see below

ii)         WILHELM (-[1210/14]).  "Elysa…comitissa Salmensis…consensu filiorum nostrorum" donated "ius patronatus ecclesie Sigendorf" to Kloster Niederprüm by charter dated 1200 witnessed by "Gerardo Prumiensi abbate, Willelmo decano maioris ecclesie Treverensis, Friderico comite Viennensi…Mehthildi comitissa Viennensi"[337].  Graf von Salm. 

-         GRAFEN von SALM

c)         GERHARD (-after 1210).  Abbot of Prüm.  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm confirmed that "comes Vianensis Fridericus junior filius fratris mei Friderici comitis" had resigned the patronat of Alf church, at the request of "uxoris sue Matilde" by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "…Fridericus comes, Heremannus frater eius…"[338].  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm founded Kloster Niederprüm for nuns, appointed "nobilem mulierem linea consanguinitatis nobis proximam…Sophyam" as abbess, and confirmed the donation made by "soror mea Adheleidis commitissa de Mölbach…vidua" of property "Houerode" held by "proavo, avo et patre", by charter dated 1190[339].  "Alueradis…comitissa de Molbach" donated property "in Nuinkerchen quod ad me ab avo et matre mea" to Kloster Niederprüm, in which her mother was buried, by charter dated 22 Jul 1207, witnessed by "Gerardus clericus filius comitis de Viannen, Fridericus et Gerardus clerici filii comitis de Salemene…"[340]

d)         [HERMANN (-after 1187).  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm confirmed that "comes Vianensis Fridericus junior filius fratris mei Friderici comitis" had resigned the patronat of Alf church, at the request of "uxoris sue Matilde" by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "…Fridericus comes, Heremannus frater eius…"[341].  The parentage of the two witnesses is not specified in the document.  It is uncertain whether "Fridericus comes" was Friedrich [II] or Friedrich [III].] 

e)         ADELHEID (-after 1190, bur Niederprüm).  A charter dated 24 May 1177 records the death "XII Kal Jun" of "Alberti comitis de Molbach" and the donation to the church of Grefrath made by "Aleidis uxor ipsius et Alueradis filia mea et Wilhelmus comes gener mea" for his soul[342].  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm founded Kloster Niederprüm for nuns, appointed "nobilem mulierem linea consanguinitatis nobis proximam…Sophyam" as abbess, and confirmed the donation made by "soror mea Adheleidis commitissa de Mölbach…vidua" of property "Houerode" held by "proavo, avo et patre", by charter dated 1190[343].  Her place of burial is confirmed by the charter dated 22 Jul 1207 under which [her daughter] "Alueradis…comitissa de Molbach" donated property "in Nuinkerchen quod ad me ab avo et matre mea" to Kloster Niederprüm, in which her mother was buried[344]m ADALBERT [III] Graf von Molbach, son of --- (-21 May 1177). 

 

 

FRIEDRICH [III] von Vianden, son of FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Vianden & his wife Elisabeth von Salm (-after 1200)Graf von Vianden.  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm confirmed that "comes Vianensis Fridericus junior filius fratris mei Friderici comitis" had resigned the patronat of Alf church, at the request of "uxoris sue Matilde" by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "…Fridericus comes, Heremannus frater eius…"[345].  He founded Kloster Niederehe.  "Elysa…comitissa Salmensis…consensu filiorum nostrorum" donated "ius patronatus ecclesie Sigendorf" to Kloster Niederprüm by charter dated 1200 witnessed by "Gerardo Prumiensi abbate, Willelmo decano maioris ecclesie Treverensis, Friderico comite Viennensi…Mehthildi comitissa Viennensi"[346]

m (before 1187) MECHTILD von der Neuerburg, daughter of ---.  Gerhard Abbot of Prüm confirmed that "comes Vianensis Fridericus junior filius fratris mei Friderici comitis" had resigned the patronat of Alf church, at the request of "uxoris sue Matilde" by charter dated 1187, witnessed by "…Fridericus comes, Heremannus frater eius…"[347].  "Elysa…comitissa Salmensis…consensu filiorum nostrorum" donated "ius patronatus ecclesie Sigendorf" to Kloster Niederprüm by charter dated 1200 witnessed by "Gerardo Prumiensi abbate, Willelmo decano maioris ecclesie Treverensis, Friderico comite Viennensi…Mehthildi comitissa Viennensi"[348]

Friedrich [III] & his wife had four children: 

1.         HEINRICH [I] (-[20 Aug/19 Nov] 1252)Graf von Vianden.  Marquis de Namur 1229, by right of his wife.  "Henricus marchio Namucensis et Viennæ comes et Margarita marcionissa et comitissa uxor eius" confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Grandpré by "prædecessoris ac fratris nostri Philippi bonæ memoriæ" by charter dated Aug 1231[349].  "Henricus et Margarita comitissa Viennensis" founded a monastery at Vianden, with the consent of "Philippi nostri primogeniti", as well as anniversaries for themselves "et filiorum nostrorum…Friderici et Philippi", by charter dated Jun 1248[350]m (before 1217) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Courtenay, widow of RAOUL [III] Sire d'Issoudun, daughter of PIERRE Comte d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre, Seigneur de Courtenay [later Emperor of Constantinople] & his second wife Yolande de Flandre Marquise de Namur ([1194/98]-Marienthal convent 17 Jul, 1258 or before, bur Marienthal).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "secundam filiarum eius [Namucensis comitis Petri] Sibiliam" as the wife firstly of "Radulfus de Essolduno in Bituria" and secondly of "comes Heinricus de Vienne et Ardenna".  He also cites her supposed third marriage to "Lascarus Grecus…imperator Nicee", but is here confusing her with her younger sister Marie[351].  Her birth date is estimated assuming that she was one of her parents´ older children and married aged 12 or soon afterwards.  She succeeded her first husband in 1216 as Dame de Châteauneuf-sur-Cher et de Mareuil-en-Berry.  She took possession of Namur as Marquise de Namur in 1229 on the death of her brother Henri.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that, on the death in 1229 of "comite Namucensi Henrici puero", his sister "Sibilia comitissa Vienne" occupied "castrum Namuci" against the competing claim of Fernando Count of Flanders[352].  "Henricus marchio Namucensis et Viennæ comes et Margarita marcionissa et comitissa uxor eius" confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Grandpré by "prædecessoris ac fratris nostri Philippi bonæ memoriæ" by charter dated Aug 1231[353].  She was obliged to transfer Namur to her brother Baudouin in 1237.  The testament of “Bauduins...Empereres de Romenie”, dated Jun 1247 at Namur, bequeathed “nostre terre de Namur” to “nostre enfant”, and in default to “nostre seror ainznée Marguerite Contesse de Viane...nostre seror Isabeau Dame de Montagu...nostre autre seror Agnes Princesse de Achaye[354].  "Henricus et Margarita comitissa Viennensis" founded a monastery at Vianden, with the consent of "Philippi nostri primogeniti", as well as anniversaries for themselves "et filiorum nostrorum…Friderici et Philippi", by charter dated Jun 1248[355].  She became a nun at the convent of Marienthal near Luxembourg after the death of her second husband[356].  The date of her death is indicated by the charter dated Oct 1258 under which Renulphus de Culento et Petrus de Sancto Paladio...domini de Castro-novo super scarum post decessum nobilis Margaritæ quondam uxoris domini Exoldunensis” enfranchised “villam de Castro-novo[357]Heinrich [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         FRIEDRICH (-10 Nov 1247).  "Henricus et Margarita comitissa Viennensis" founded a monastery at Vianden, with the consent of "Philippi nostri primogeniti", as well as anniversaries for themselves "et filiorum nostrorum…Friderici et Philippi", by charter dated Jun 1248[358]m ([Apr/Oct] 1247) as her first husband, --- von Salm, daughter of HEINRICH [II] Graf von Salm [Vianden] & his wife Clémence de Rozoy (-after 1261).  She married secondly Heinrich von Esch.  Friedrich & his wife had one child: 

i)          HEINRICH (early 1248-1291).  Herr von Schönecken.  m firstly JUTTA von Blankenheim, daughter of FRIEDRICH von Blankenheim & his wife --- (-after 1282).  m secondly as her second husband, BEATRICE de Houffalize, widow of HENRI de Mirwart, daughter of HENRI de Houffalize & his wife ---. 

-         von SCHÖNECKEN[359]

b)         PHILIPP [I] (-23 Apr 1273).  "Henricus et Margarita comitissa Viennensis" founded a monastery at Vianden, with the consent of "Philippi nostri primogeniti", as well as anniversaries for themselves "et filiorum nostrorum…Friderici et Philippi", by charter dated Jun 1248[360]Graf von Vianden

-        see below

c)         HEINRICH (-1267)Bishop of Utrecht 1249. 

d)         MATHILDE .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the dispensation issued by Pope Innocent IV for the marriage of "Anselmum de Keu ac Mariam natam Matildis dominæ de Posaga, natæ comitissæ Viennensis" dated 15 Aug 1253, and the marriage licence for "Maria, nate quondam Calojohanni" dated 13 Jan 1254, the documents naming "imperatore Constantinopolitano, eiusdem Matildis avunculo"[361]m IOANNES "Kaloioannes" Angelos, son of Emperor ISAAKIOS III & his second wife Margit of Hungary (-after 1240). 

2.         MECHTILD (-before 1241).  Her parentage and two marriages are confirmed by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which records that the mother of Konrad Archbishop of Köln was "sorore comitis Henrici Viennensis" and that she married secondly "Henricus frater comitis Losensis, quondam prepositus Traiectensis"[362].  "Lutharius comes de Hostaden cum uxore mea Mechtilde et filiis meis Luthario et Conrado" donated the church at Frimmersdorf to the abbey of Knechtsteden by charter dated 1210[363].  "Lutharius…comes in Hostadin" donated the church at Rommerskirchen to Knechtsteden abbey, with the consent of "uxoris nostre Mechtildis", by charter dated 1212[364].  "Lutharius comes, Methildis comitissa de Hostaden" donated property "in villa…Wieuelinchouin" to Knechtsteden abbey by charter dated Feb 1214[365]m firstly LOTHAR [I] Graf von Hochstaden, son of DIETRICH Graf von Ahr & his wife --- von Dagsburg (-1215).  m secondly (1216) HENRI de Looz, son of GERARD [II] Comte de Looz Graf von Rieneck & his wife Adelheid van Gelre (-2 Aug 1218). 

3.         FRIEDRICH [I] von der Neuerburg (-before 17 Mar 1258).  "Alueradis…comitissa de Molbach" donated property "in Nuinkerchen quod ad me ab avo et matre mea" to Kloster Niederprüm, in which her mother was buried, by charter dated 22 Jul 1207, witnessed by "Gerardus clericus filius comitis de Viannen, Fridericus et Gerardus clerici filii comitis de Salemene…"[366]m CECILIA von Isenburg, daughter of GERLACH [II] von Isenburg-Kobern & his wife --- (-1267 or after). 

-        von der NEUERBURG[367]

4.         GERHARD (-after 22 Jul 1207).  "Alueradis…comitissa de Molbach" donated property "in Nuinkerchen quod ad me ab avo et matre mea" to Kloster Niederprüm, in which her mother was buried, by charter dated 22 Jul 1207, witnessed by "Gerardus clericus filius comitis de Viannen, Fridericus et Gerardus clerici filii comitis de Salemene…"[368]

 

 

PHILIPP [I] von Vianden, son of HEINRICH [I] Graf von Vianden & his wife Marguerite de Courtenay (-23 Apr 1273).  "Henricus et Margarita comitissa Viennensis" founded a monastery at Vianden, with the consent of "Philippi nostri primogeniti", as well as anniversaries for themselves "et filiorum nostrorum…Friderici et Philippi", by charter dated Jun 1248[369]Graf von Vianden.  Heer van Perwez en Grimberghe. 

m (before 10 Mar 1262) MARIE van Perwez, daughter of GODEFROI de Louvain Heer van Perwez & his wife Alix van Grimberghe (-Sep 1289).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the testament of her brother "Godefrois sires de Perwei et de Grimberges" dated 25 Jul 1264 which names "mes seurs Marie comtesse de Vianne et Adain dame de Bruec"[370].  Vrouw van ½ Grimberghe, Ninove, Rumpst, Hoboken, Eekeren, Ingen, Havensberghe, Corroy, Frasne en Londerseel.  "Philippus comes Vianensis dominus de Grimbergis et Maria eius uxor domina dictorum locorum" donated property to Grimbergen by charter dated Jun 1266[371].  "Maria comitissa de Viana domina de Grimberg et Perweis" confirmed a sale of property to Grimbergen by "Godefridus filius noster maior natu" with the consent of "uxoris suæ Aleydis", by charter dated 1278[372].  "Maria comitissa de Viana domina de Grimberge et Nivive et Godefridus filius noster maior natu" donated property to Grimbergen, with the consent of "Philippi fratris ipsius Godefridi", by charter dated 1280[373]

Philipp [I] & his wife had three children: 

1.         GOTTFRIED [I] (-[10 Dec 1307/15 Oct 1310])Graf von Vianden.  "Maria comitissa de Viana domina de Grimberg et Perweis" confirmed a sale of property to Grimbergen by "Godefridus filius noster maior natu" with the consent of "uxoris suæ Aleydis", by charter dated 1278[374].  "Maria comitissa de Viana domina de Grimberge et Nivive et Godefridus filius noster maior natu" donated property to Grimbergen, with the consent of "Philippi fratris ipsius Godefridi", by charter dated 1280[375]m firstly (1278 or before) ALEIDIS van Oudenaarde, daughter of JAN Heer van Oudenaarde & his second wife Mathilde de Crecques.  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that the eldest daughter of "domino Johannis de Audenarde" and his second wife married "Godefrido comiti de Vienna in Ardenna"[376].  "Maria comitissa de Viana domina de Grimberg et Perweis" confirmed a sale of property to Grimbergen by "Godefridus filius noster maior natu" with the consent of "uxoris suæ Aleydis", by charter dated 1278[377]m secondly LUTGARDE de Ligny, daughter of ---.  Gottfried [I] & his first wife had three children: 

a)         PHILIPP [II] (-[1315/16])Graf von Vianden.  Heer van Grimberghe. 

-        see below

b)         MARGARETA (-1336)m as his first wife, HENRI de Flandre Heer van Ninove, son of HENRI de Flandre Conte de Lodi & his wife Margareta von Kleve (-1366). 

c)         HEINRICH (-after 1351)m ADELHEID van Valkenburg, daughter of REINOLD Heer van Valkenburg & his wife Maria van Boutershem (-1332).  Heiress of St. Vich, Dasburg and Bütgenbach[378]

2.         MARGARETA (-8 Mar 1318).  "Arnould comte de Los et de Chiny et Marguerite ma femme" granted privileges to the citizens of Chiny by charter dated 22 May 1301[379]m (27 Jul 1280) ARNAUD [V] Comte de Looz et de Chiny, son of JEAN [I] Comte de Looz & his first wife Mathilde von Jülich (-22 Aug 1327). 

3.         PHILIPP van Rumpst (-1308 or after).  "Maria comitissa de Viana domina de Grimberge et Nivive et Godefridus filius noster maior natu" donated property to Grimbergen, with the consent of "Philippi fratris ipsius Godefridi", by charter dated 1280[380]m MARIE de Cernay, daughter of ---.  Philipp & his wife had two children: 

a)         LUDWIG (-after 1325).  Canon at Utrecht. 

b)         MARIA van Rumpst .  Heiress of Rumpst and Schorisse [Escornaix].  m firstly GUILLAUME de Flandre, son of GUILLAUME de Flandre Seigneur de Dendermonde et de Crèvecœur & his wife Alix de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-1320).  He succeeded his father in 1311 as Seigneur de Dendermonde.  He succeeded as Vicomte de Châteaudun, Seigneur de Nesle-en-Picardie, by right of his mother.  m secondly (before 1324) as his first wife, ENGUERRAND de Coucy Vicomte de Meaux, son of ENGUERRAND [V] Seigneur de Coucy [Guines] & his wife Christian de Lindsay (-1344). 

 

 

PHILIPP [II] von Vianden, son of GOTTFRIED [I] Graf von Vianden & his first wife Aleidis van Oudenaarde (-[1315/16])Graf von Vianden.  Heer van Grimberghe. 

m ADELHEID von Arnsberg, daughter of LUDWIG Graf von Arnsberg & his wife Petronella von Jülich. 

Philipp [II] & his first wife had five children: 

1.         HEINRICH [II] (-murdered Famagusta Sep 1337)Graf von Viandenm ([1335/36]) as her first husband, MARIE de Namur, daughter of JEAN I Comte de Namur & his second wife Marie d'Artois (1322-before 29 Oct 1357).  She married secondly (1340, dispensation 9 Sep 1342) Thibaut de Bar Seigneur de Pierrepont.  Heinrich [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         MARIA ([1337]-21 Apr 1400)m ([23 Jul 1348]) SIMON [III] Graf von Sponheim in Kreuznach, son of WALRAM Graf von Sponheim & his wife Elisabeth von Katzenelnbogen (-30 Aug 1414).  Graf von Vianden 1349. 

2.         ADELHEID (-30 Sep 1376).  "Otto greue van Nassowe ind Aleyd van Vianden syn…husfrowe" sold half of the town of Gensberg to Walram Archbishop of Köln by charter dated 13 Feb 1345[381].  "Wilhelm…marcgreue zu Guilge" reached agreement with "unser niechten vrauwe Aleyde greuinnen van Nassauwe, yren kynden ind yren eruen, heren Frederiche heirren zu Cronenberch ind heren Goedarde heirren zu Wyltz […unserm niechten]" to divide the half share of "Wilhelme greuen zu Namen" in the inheritance of the late "unsme neiuen greue Lodewiche van Vyanden" by charter dated 23 May 1356[382].  This document was incorrectly interpreted by Walther Möller, who assumed that Friedrich Herr zu Kronenberg was one of the "kynden ind…eruen" of countess Adelheid, and therefore that she had married firstly his father Johann von Dollendorf Herr zu Kronenberg[383].  The document should more correctly be read as referring to countess Adelheid and her unnamed children.  Adelheid is called "niechte" of Wilhelm Markgraf von Jülich in the document, which indicates her maternal ancestry, Petronella von Jülich being her maternal grandmother[384]m (contract 23 Dec 1331) OTTO [II] Graf von Nassau in Dillenburg, son of HEINRICH Graf von Nassau in Siegen und Dillenburg & his wife Adelheid von Heinsberg ([1305]-killed in battle [Dec 1350/Jan 1351]). 

3.         GOTTFRIED (-after 18 Oct 1352).  Canon at Köln and Utrecht. 

4.         LUDWIG (-killed in battle 1343).  Graf von Vianden.  Provost at Münstereifel 1330, resigned 1341. 

5.         GERHARD (-before 1 Apr 1339).  m ELISABETH von Leefdael, daughter of ROGER van Leefdael & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    GRAFEN von BONN

 

 

Vanderkindere suggests that the county of Bonn was one of the five counties in Germany west of the river Rhine, the five counties "in Ribuarias comitatus quinque" referred to, but not named, in the 870 treaty, the other counties being Jülich, Zülpich, Eifel, and Köln[385].  

 

 

1.         EBERHARD, son of [EHRENFRIED Graf von Bliesgau, Comte de Charpeigne & his wife Adelgunde ---] (-after 937).  Eberhard is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[386] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf im Keldachgau (in Franconia) 904.  Graf von Bonn 913.  Flodoard records that Heinrich I King of Germany sent "Ebrardus quidam Transrhenensis" to "regnum Lotharii" to re-establish peace[387], although it is not certain to which Eberhard this refers.  "Alfuuinus ac…coniux mea Ada" donated property "…in Kuningessundere in comitatu Euerhardi comitis in villa Birgidesstal…" to the Ursulastift in Köln by charter dated 12 Mar 927, signed by "…Euerhardi comitis, Adalhardi comitis…"[388].  "Gysalbertus dux rectorque S. Traiectenses ecclesie" donated property "Gulisam…in pago [Ardunensi] in comitatu Everhardi" to Trier by charter dated 928, subscribed by "Walgeri comitis, Thiedrici comitis, Cristiani comitis, Folcoldi comitis"[389]m ---.  The name of the wife of Graf Eberhard is not known.  Graf Eberhard & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [HERMANN [I] .  Hermann is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[390] as the son of Eberhard & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf im Auelgau (in Franconia) 922/48.  "Otto…rex" ordered that the men of "pago Auga in comitatu Rethardi et in pago Netga in comitatu Dendi et Hamponis et in pago Huctigo in comitatu Herimanni" not to interfere with rights of Kloster Corvey, by charter dated 19 Apr 940[391].  Wichfrid Archbsihop of Köln confirmed the church "in villa…Pleisa in pago Aualgauense sub comitatu Herimanni comitis" by charter dated 948[392].  "Arnulfum…eiusque coniugem…Alvradam" donated property "in comitatu Herimanni in pago…Bunnoniensi" to Prüm by charter dated to [948][393]m ---.  The name of Hermann's wife is not known.  Hermann [I] & his wife had two children:

i)          [EBERHARD [II] (-10 May 966).  Eberhard is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[394] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf im Auelgau (in Franconia) 966: "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen in exchange for property "in pago Liuhgouui in comitatu Richarii…in pago Auvlgowi in comitatu Eberhardi, Limberge…" by charter dated 17 Jan 966[395]

ii)         [GOTTFRIED (-after 2 Jan 970).  Gottfried is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[396] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Bruno Archbsihop of Köln donated property "in pago Gelegoui in comitatu Gotfridi comitis in villa nel marcka Stumbele" to Köln St Cecilia by charter dated 25 Dec 962[397].  Graf im Auelgau (in Franconia).  Gero Archbsihop of Köln donated property "in pago Bonnense in comitatu Herimanni comitis in villa vel marca Ingermaresthorp…in pago…Auelgoue in comitatu Godefridi comitis in villa vel marca Roonthorp" to Kloster Gerresheim by charter dated 2 Jan 970[398]

b)         [EHRENFRIED [II] (-before 970).  Ehrenfried is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[399] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Zülpich: a charter dated 24 Jan 942 refers to property "in pago Tulpiacense in comitatu Erinfridi comitis in villa vel marka…Merlesheim"[400]Graf von Bonn: Wicfried Archbishop of Köln donated property “in pago Juliacense in comitatu Godefridi comitis in castello…Julicha…in pago…Bunnensi in comitatu Eremfridi comitis…in villa Brunheim…in comitatu…Udonis comitis in villa Reinsa” to the Ursulastift by charter dated 2 Aug 945, signed by “fratris eius Godefridi comitis…[401].  "Otto…rex" confirmed the immunities of Kloster Essen including over land "excepta in loco Ruoldinghus quam Eggihart et eius coniunx Rikilt" possessed by hereditary right and in land "in comitatu Ecberti et Cobbonis" by charter dated 15 Jan 947, signed by "Heinrici fratris regis, Herimanni ducis, Cuonradi comitis, Erenfridi comitis, Gebehardi comitis, Ekkihardi comitis, Hugonis comitis"[402]Graf von Hattuaria: "Otto…rex" confirmed the privileges of Kloster Gandersheim including property "villa Mundulinhgeim in pago Hatteri in comitatu Erenfridi" by charter dated 4 May 947[403]Graf von Tubalgo: "Otto…rex" confirmed the rights of Kloster Echternach in property "in villam…Rinera in pago Tubalgouue in comitatu Irinuridi comitis" by charter dated 4 Aug 947[404].  Graf im Ruhr-Keldachgau (in Franconia): a charter dated 950 refers to "locum in comitatu Eremfridi comitis Huppolderroth dictum" (Hubbeliath, east of Düsseldorf in the Keldachgau)[405]m RICHWARA, daughter of --- (-before 10 Jun 963).  "Herimannis…comes" donated property "in…villæ…Eilba in Maginensi pago" to Münster St Martin for the soul of "nostræ matris Rihuuare" by charter dated 10 Jun 963[406].  Graf Ehrenfried & his wife had two children:   

i)          HERMANN "Pusillus" (-16 Jul 996).  "Herimannis…comes" donated property "in…villæ…Eilba in Maginensi pago" to Münster St Martin for the soul of "nostræ matris Rihuuare" by charter dated 10 Jun 963[407].  The primary source which names his father has not yet been identified.  Graf von Bonn 970, 992 and 993.  Gero Archbishop of Köln donated property "in pago Bonnense in comitatu Herimanni comitis in villa vel marca Ingermaresthorp…in pago…Auelgoue in comitatu Godefridi comitis in villa vel marca Roonthorp" to Kloster Gerresheim by charter dated 2 Jan 970[408].  "Uuicfredus sancta Treuerice sedis archidiaconus" donated property "in pago Aiflense in comitatu Herimanni" to the abbey of St Maximin by charter dated 975[409].  Graf in Gerresheim 976.  Graf von Zülpich 981.  Pfalzgraf of Lower Lotharingia [985]/989.  Graf im Auelgau (in Franconia) 996. 

-         PFALZGRAFEN of LOTHARINGIA

ii)         [EHRENFRIED (-after 999).  Ehrenfried is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[410] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbot of Gorze.  Abbot of St Truiden 994/999. 

c)         [EBERHARD (-[3 Sep] before 964).  Eberhard is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[411] as the possible son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graaf van Drenthe en Salland.] 

          -        GRAAFEN van TEISTERBANT

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    COMTES et CHÂTELAINS de CAMBRAI

 

 

A.      COMTES de CAMBRAI

 

 

The county of Cambrai developed from the pagus Cameracensis, located to the south-east of the county of Hainaut and to the north of the counties of Artois and Vermandois.  After the Treaty of Verdun in 843, Cambrai fell within the kingdom of Lotharingia.  The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum…Cameracensem…" to King Charles[412].  The earliest recorded count of Cambrai is Raoul, son of Baudouin I Count of Flanders, who was probably installed as count in [888] as explained below.  However, it is uncertain how long Cambrai can have remained under west Frankish rule, as Arnulf King of Germany confirmed the rights of the church of Cambrai by charter dated 6 Jun 894[413], and Arnulf's son Zwentibold King of Lotharingia donated property "villam in pago Cameracensis…Liniacum" to Cambrai and its bishop by charter dated 3 Oct 898[414].  In any case, the Annales Vedastini record that Comte Raoul joined Zwentibold in 895[415].  Raoul was murdered in 896 after being captured by Héribert I Comte de Vermandois.  The next recorded count is Isaac (see below).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[416], Isaac was married to a daughter of Raoul.  The primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  It is likely that it is a speculative connection designed to explain the transmission of the county between Raoul and Isaac.  Comte Raoul was probably under 30 years old when he died, and is unlikely to have been the father of a daughter of marriageable age, even accepting that daughters of the nobility were often married as early as aged 12 at the time.  It is not known whether Isaac succeeded Raoul as count directly.  The charter dated 8 Jun 908 issued by Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany, subscribed by count Isaac, shows that he must have been an eastern Frankish nominee and was already enjoying the comital title at that date[417].  However, Isaac was in the west Frankish camp by 916 when he is named in a charter of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks[418], and he is recorded as one of King Charles's supporters in his 921 meeting with Heinrich I King of Germany[419].  Otto I King of Germany granted the abbey of Saint-Géry, to the exclusion of all lay authority, to the bishop of Cambrai by charter dated 30 Apr 948[420].  Lay jurisdiction over the county of Cambrai ended in 1007 when Heinrich II King of Germany granted the county to the bishop of Cambrai[421].  However, by that time the comte de Cambrai had also been invested as comte in the march of Valenciennes.  The Chronicon Hanoniense records that the comte de Hainaut inherited the lands of "comite Valencenensi" after the last count died without direct heirs[422]

 

 

1.         RAOUL de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders & his wife Judith of the West Franks [Carolingian] ([867/70]-murdered 17 Jun 896).  "Rodolphus Cameracensis comes" is named as third of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[423].  The Annales Blandinienses records "Rodulfus comes et abba factus est" in 882[424].  The date when he was installed as Comte de Cambrai is not known.  However, his brother Baudouin II Count of Flanders supported the election of Eudes King of France in 888, and it is suggested that Raoul's appointment must have taken place around that time.  Baudouin quarrelled with King Eudes over the succession to the lay abbacy of Saint-Bertin in 892, so it is unlikely that the king would have favoured members of the count's family with a comital appointment after this episode.  He supported his brother's attack on the county of Vermandois, captured Arras, Saint-Quentin and Péronne after 5 Jan 892, but was captured by Héribert I Comte de Vermandois and killed[425].  The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold of Lotharingia in 895[426].  The History of Waulsort monastery records that "Cameracensis comes Rodulfus…regalis consanguinitatis" invaded the territory of "quatuor Heriberti filios" with the consent of "rege Francorum…avunculo suo" but was expulsed[427], but this confuses Raoul, son of Baudouin I, with Comte Raoul [II] de Gouy.  The Annales Vedastini record that "Rodulfus comes" disrupted the peace in 896 and took the property of "Heribertus et Erkingerus", that "Odo rex" besieged "castrum sancti Quintini et Peronam" and expelled Raoul's supporters, and that Heribert killed Raoul[428].  The Annales Blandinienses record that "Rodulfus comes" was killed "IV Kal Iul 896"[429]

 

 

2.         ISAAC (-[946/30 Apr 948] or after 8 Jul 949).  Isaac's parentage is not known.  The date when he was installed as Comte de Cambrai is not known.  However, it was presumably before 8 Jun 908, the date of a charter under which "Hludowicus…rex" donated property "in pago Palanichoge in comitatu Egenonis in loco Ingilinstat" to Hatto Archbishop of Mainz after consulting "fidelium nostrorum comitum vero Burchardi, Egenonis et Ysaac"[430].  This document also suggests strongly that Isaac owed his appointment to the German king and therefore that at that time Cambrai must have been within Lotharingian jurisdiction.  Although it is not completely certain that "Ysaac comes" in this charter was Isaac Comte de Cambrai, no other Count Isaac has been identified in the early 10th century.  "Raginarius comes" and the abbot of Stavelot granted property "in pago Hasbanio in locis Honavi, Versines et Serangio" to "quidam fidelium nostrorum Harduinus" by charter dated 911, signed by "Ragenarii comitis, Issaac comitis, Macineri comitis…"[431].  "Isaac et Sigard comites" interceded for the church of Cambrai in a charter of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks dated 22 May 916[432].  The Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium records a dispute between "Isaac comes" and "Fulbertum episcopum"[433].  Flodoard's Annals record that "Berengarius" captured "Giselbertum" and only freed him after receiving "filiis Ragenarii fratris ipsius Gisleberti" as hostages, after which Giselbert ravaged the lands of "Berengarii, Ragenariique fratris sui et Isaac comitis"[434].  Flodoard also refers to "Ysaac comes" in his History of Reims[435].  "…Isaac comitis…" subscribed the charter dated 11 Sep 918 under which "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini"[436].  A document dated 7 Nov 921 recording a meeting between Charles III "le Simple" King of France and Heinrich I King of Germany names "Matfredus, Erkengerus, Hagano, Boso, Waltherus, Isaac, Ragenberus, Theodricus, Adalardus, Adelelmus" as representatives of the former[437].  Flodoard's Annals record that "Gislebertus…dux et Otho, Isaac atque Theodericus comites" offered the French crown to Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of the West Franks in 939[438].  "…Isaac comitis, Arnulfi filii eius…" signed the charter dated 8 Jul 941 (“regnante Hludowico anno VI”) under which "Arnulfus…regis…marchysus" restored property to Saint-Pierre de Gand[439].  Koch suggests that this chapter was originally dated 949 (“anno XIV”), the change having been made to make it appear that the document was an element of the reform of Gent abbey in 941[440].  The Vita S. Humberti Maricolensis names "Isaac" as comte de Cambrai in a passage dated to 946[441].  It is assumed that Isaac died before 30 Apr 948, the date of a charter under which Otto I King of Germany granted the abbey of Saint-Géry, to the exclusion of all lay authority, to the bishop of Cambrai[442], a step which the king would probably not have taken if a count of Isaac's seniority had still maintained jurisdiction in the town.  This speculation must be incorrect if it is right, as mentioned above, that the charter dated 8 Jul 941, subscribed by Isaac, should be redated to 8 Jul 949.  m ---.  The name of Isaac's wife is not known.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[443], he was married to --- de Cambrai, daughter of Raoul de Flandre Comte de Cambrai & his wife ---, but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  As noted in the Introduction, it is possible that this is a speculative connection designed to explain the transmission of the county between the two individuals.  Comte Isaac & his wife had two children: 

a)         ARNOUL [I] de Cambrai (-967).  "…Isaac comitis, Arnulfi filii eius…" signed the charter dated 8 Jul 941 under which "Arnulfus…regis…marchysus" restored property to Saint-Pierre de Gand[444].  He may be the same person as "comitis sui…Arnulfi" for whose soul "nostra soror Gerbirgis regina" donated property "Dulciacus…in pago Haginao et Crumbrigga in pago Bragbatinse" to Blandigny, the donation confirmed by "Otto…imperator augustus" by charter dated 22 Jan 966[445].]  m BERTA, daughter of [NIBELUNG Graaf van Betuwe & his wife --- de Hainaut] (-[30 Oct] ---- or 16 Jul 967).  Her origin is indicated by her son Arnoul [II] Comte de Valenciennes being recorded as a relative of Balderic [II] Bishop of Liège[446], who was Berta's brother.  The primary source which confirms her parentage more precisely has not yet been identified.  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "illustris femina domna Bertha vidua et Deo sacrata comitissa Flandrie" donated property to Saint-Trond on her deathbed for her burial there, and that after she died "Arnulfo...filio suo Flandrensi comiti" donated property in “villam Proviin in castellania Ylensi sitam iuxta fluvium Doulam...silvam...non longe a villa Merwel et unam decimam apud villam...Brustemium”, adding that Berta died “XVII Kal Aug” 967[447].  A charter dated 1146 confirms the donation and names “Regnier et Roger [frères d´Arnoul de Valenciennes]...comtes Eremfrid et Rodolphe [frère et neveu de Baldric Bishop of Utrecht]” as witnesses to the original charter[448].  The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "III Kal Nov" of "Berte comitisse qui dedit nobis Crehem"[449], which which may refer to the wife of Comte Arnoul [I] as the deaths of her son and grandson are also recorded in the same source.  Comte Arnoul [I] & his wife had [seven] children (it is not certain that all these children shared the same two parents): 

i)          ROGER (-before 29 Jun 983).  "Rodgerus" donated "Ansoldingehem villam mei" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 29 Jun 960, signed by "Arnulfi…Marchysi, Theoderici comitis, Arnulfi, itemque Arnulfi comitum, Odonis, Hugonis, Arnulfi, Raineri, Rodberti, fratrum…"[450].  In the Liber traditionum of the same monastery this donation by "Rogerius" of "hereditatis sue possessionem…Ansoldengim", signed by "Arnulfo juniore marchyso, Arnulfo et Odone et Rainero fratribus suis, Theoderico comite…", is dated 2 Oct 983[451], but the date must be incorrect in light of the next charter.  "Arnulfus comes Valentianensis" donated "hereditatem quandam sui juris Corulis…in pago Karabantensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "fratrisque sui Rodgeri defuncti", by charter dated 29 Jun 983[452]

ii)         EUDES (-after 29 Jun 960).  "Rodgerus" donated "Ansoldingehem villam mei" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 29 Jun 960, signed by "Arnulfi…Marchysi, Theoderici comitis, Arnulfi, itemque Arnulfi comitum, Odonis, Hugonis, Arnulfi, Raineri, Rodberti, fratrum…"[453].  In the Liber traditionum of the same monastery this donation by "Rogerius" of "hereditatis sue possessionem…Ansoldengim", signed by "Arnulfo juniore marchyso, Arnulfo et Odone et Rainero fratribus suis, Theoderico comite…", is dated 2 Oct 983[454], but the date must be incorrect as explained above. 

iii)        HUGUES (-after 29 Jun 960).  "Rodgerus" donated "Ansoldingehem villam mei" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 29 Jun 960, signed by "Arnulfi…Marchysi, Theoderici comitis, Arnulfi, itemque Arnulfi comitum, Odonis, Hugonis, Arnulfi, Raineri, Rodberti, fratrum…"[455]

iv)       ARNOUL [II] (-23 Oct 1012).  He is recorded as a relative of Balderic [II] Bishop of Liège[456], who was the possible nephew of Berta, supposed mother of Comte Arnoul [II].  He is named as the son of Berta: The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "illustris femina domna Bertha vidua et Deo sacrata comitissa Flandrie" donated property to Saint-Trond on her deathbed for her burial there, and that after she died "Arnulfo...filio suo Flandrensi comiti" donated property in “villam Proviin in castellania Ylensi sitam iuxta fluvium Doulam...silvam...non longe a villa Merwel et unam decimam apud villam...Brustemium”, adding that Berta died “XVII Kal Aug” 967[457].  His inheritance of the county of Cambrai indicates that Arnoul [II] was most likely also the son of Comte Arnoul [I].  "Rodgerus" donated "Ansoldingehem villam mei" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 29 Jun 960, signed by "Arnulfi…Marchysi, Theoderici comitis, Arnulfi, itemque Arnulfi comitum, Odonis, Hugonis, Arnulfi, Raineri, Rodberti, fratrum…"[458].  In the Liber traditionum of the same monastery this donation by "Rogerius" of "hereditatis sue possessionem…Ansoldengim", signed by "Arnulfo juniore marchyso, Arnulfo et Odone et Rainero fratribus suis, Theoderico comite…", is dated 2 Oct 983[459], but the date must be incorrect as explained above.  Comte de Cambrai.  Comte de la marche de Valenciennes (Comte de Hainaut).  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "comites Godefridus…[et] Arnulfus" defended Cambrai against Lothaire King of the West Franks, during the absence of Emperor Otto II in Poland, dated to 979, and against Eudes de Vermandois who had constructed Vinchy castle near the city[460].  "Arnulfus comes Valentianensis" donated "hereditatem quandam sui juris Corulis…in pago Karabantensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "fratrisque sui Rodgeri defuncti", by charter dated 29 Jun 983, signed by "Arnulfo juniore…marchyso, Theoderico comite et Arnulfo filio eius…"[461].  "…Theoderico comite, Arnulfo comite, Artoldo comite, Baldwino comite, item Arnulfo comite…" signed the charter dated 1 Apr 988 under which "Baldwinus marchysus cum matre sua Susanna" donated "villam Aflingehem…jacentem in pago Tornacinse" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, after the death of "Arnulfi marchysi"[462].  "Arnulfus comes Valencianensis et uxor sua Lietgardis cum filio suo Adalberto" donated "alodem suum…Carvin…super fluviolum Wendinium in pago Karabatensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jan 994[463].  "Arnulfus comes Valentinianensis et uxor sua Lietgardis cum filiio suo Adalberto" donated "ecclesiam in villa Materna" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 30 Sep 998[464].  Emperor Otto III confirmed rights in "castellum sancta Marie…in pago Cameracensis ac comitatu Arnolfi comitis" to the bishop of Cambrai by charter dated 21 Apr 1001[465].  Heinrich II King of Germany granted "comitatum Chameracensem" to the bishop of Cambrai by charter dated 22 Oct 1007[466].  The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "X Kal Nov" of "Arnulphi comitis que dedit nobis Viusaz"[467], which can be linked to the corresponding entry for his son's death (see below).  m LIUTGARDE, daughter of ---.  "Arnulfus comes Valencianensis et uxor sua Lietgardis cum filio suo Adalberto" donated "alodem suum…Carvin…super fluviolum Wendinium in pago Karabatensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jan 994[468].  "Arnulfus comes Valentinianensis et uxor sua Lietgardis cum filiio suo Adalberto" donated "ecclesiam in villa Materna" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 30 Sep 998[469].  She possessed the alleu de Hanret, Hesbaye[470].  Vanderkindere suggests that the wife of Arnoul Comte de Valenciennes may have been Liutgarde, daughter of Robert [I] Comte de Namur, both because the couple's son was named Albert and also because Liutgarde held property at Hanret in Darnau pagus which was divided between Namur and Brabant[471].  Comte Arnoul [II] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ALBERT (-30 Mar after 998).  "Arnulfus comes Valencianensis et uxor sua Lietgardis cum filio suo Adalberto" donated "alodem suum…Carvin…super fluviolum Wendinium in pago Karabatensi" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jan 994[472].  "Arnulfus comes Valentinianensis et uxor sua Lietgardis cum filiio suo Adalberto" donated "ecclesiam in villa Materna" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 30 Sep 998[473].  The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "III Kal Apr" of "Adelberti comitis que dedit nobis Viozaz"[474], which can be linked to the corresponding entry for his father's death (see above). 

v)        RAINIER (-after 29 Jun 960).  "Rodgerus" donated "Ansoldingehem villam mei" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 29 Jun 960, signed by "Arnulfi…Marchysi, Theoderici comitis, Arnulfi, itemque Arnulfi comitum, Odonis, Hugonis, Arnulfi, Raineri, Rodberti, fratrum…"[475].  In the Liber traditionum of the same monastery this donation by "Rogerius" of "hereditatis sue possessionem…Ansoldengim", signed by "Arnulfo juniore marchyso, Arnulfo et Odone et Rainero fratribus suis, Theoderico comite…", is dated 2 Oct 983[476], but the date must be incorrect as explained above. 

vi)       ROBERT (-after 29 Jun 960).  "Rodgerus" donated "Ansoldingehem villam mei" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 29 Jun 960, signed by "Arnulfi…Marchysi, Theoderici comitis, Arnulfi, itemque Arnulfi comitum, Odonis, Hugonis, Arnulfi, Raineri, Rodberti, fratrum…"[477]

vii)      [son .  It is likely that Hugues was the son of one of the named brothers of Arnoul [II] Comte de Cambrai shown above.  m ---.] 

(a)       [HUGUES .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified, but it is likely that Hugues was the son of one of the brothers of Arnoul [II] Comte de Cambrai.  Châtelain de Valenciennes.] 

-         CHÂTELAINS de VALENCIENNES

b)         daughter .  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that Foubert Bishop of Cambrai purported to dissolve the marriage between "filiam Isaac" and "Amulricum comitem…ex pago Heinou" on grounds of consanguinity[478], dated to [953/56] because the preceding passage in the same source discusses the Hungarian invasion in 953 and because Bishop Foubert died in 956.  No contemporary Isaac has been identified other than the Comte de Cambrai, so it is assumed that he was the father of Amaury's wife.  m ([separated [953/56]) AMAURY, son of --- (-after 12 Feb 973).  Comte de Hainaut.  [Comte de la Marche de Valenciennes]. 

 

 

1.         GODEFROI (-after 979).  "Otto…rex" granted property "villa Vuambia sitam in pago Heinia in comitatu Godefridi" held by "Engibrandus" by charter dated 13 Jun 958[479].  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "comites Godefridus…[et] Arnulfus" defended Cambrai against Lothaire King of the West Franks, during the absence of Emperor Otto II in Poland, dated to 979, and against Eudes de Vermandois who had constructed Vinchy castle near the city[480]

 

 

 

B.      CHÂTELAINS de CAMBRAI

 

 

The châtelains de Cambrai were appointed by the bishop of Cambrai, to whom the county was transferred in 1007 by Heinrich II King of Germany.  The châtellenie of Cambrai passed to the châtelains de Douai in the mid-11th century. 

 

 

1.         JEAN (-after [975]).  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Iohannes…potens tam Cameracensium quam Vermandensium genere" was appointed to the "maiordomatu" of Cambrai by the bishop, dated to the early 970s, adding that he was insubordinate and that the bishop employed "Walterus quidam Lenensis castri vasallus" to control him and eventually named the latter as replacement châtelain[481]Châtelain de Cambrai

 

 

1.         GAUTHIER [I] (-[1011]).  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that the bishop of Cambrai appointed "Walterus quidam Lenensis castri vasallus" as châtelain of Cambrai after dispossessing Jean[482]Châtelain de Cambrai.  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that, after the death of “Walterus castellanus”, “filio suo Waltero” invaded the territory of the bishopric of Cambrai and Bishop Herluin died “III Non Feb[483]m ---.  The name of Gauthier's wife is not known.  Gauthier [I] & his wife had one child: 

a)         GAUTHIER [II] (-murdered 1041).  The Chronicon Sancti Andreæ names "Walterus et pater eius Walterus et nepos eius Hugo"[484]Châtelain de Cambrai.  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that, after the death of “Walterus castellanus”, “filio suo Waltero” invaded the territory of the bishopric of Cambrai and Bishop Herluin died “III Non Feb[485].  The Annales Elnonses record that "Walterus Cameracensis castellanus" was killed while praying at the door of "ecclesiæ sanctæ Mariæ"[486].  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Gualterus Cameracensis castellanus" was murdered and left "unicumque filium cum uxore"[487]m as her first husband, ERMENTRUDE, daughter of ---.  The Annales Elnonses name "Ermentrudis" as wife of "Walterus Cameracensis castellanus"[488].  "Ermentrudis relicta Gualteri" donated property "in vico…Braceolus in pago Cameracensi…[et] in pago Attrebatensi in villa…Vitris" to the abbey of Saint-Amand by charter dated 1041[489].  The Vita Domni Lietberti names “Walterius Cameracensis Castellanus” and “uxor Ermentrudis”, adding that she married “tyrannum…Joannem Advocatum Attrebatensem” after her first husband died[490].  She married secondly Jean [I] d'Arras, who succeeded in [1046/48] as Châtelain de Cambrai.  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Gualterus Cameracensis castellanus…uxor Ermentrudis" married "tirannum quondam…Iohannem, advocatum Atrebatensem"[491].  Gauthier [II] & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          son .  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Gualterus Cameracensis castellanus" was murdered and left "unicumque filium cum uxore", adding that the son was "puer" and died soon after[492]

ii)         [ADELA (-before 1046).  Her parentage is deduced from the Chronicon Sancti Andreæ which names "Walterus et pater eius Walterus et nepos eius Hugo"[493], assuming that "nepos" should here be translated as grandson.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage more precisely, and her name, has not yet been identified.  m HUGUES Châtelain de Douai, son of --- (-1051 or after).] 

 

 

The ancestry of Jean avoué of Arras is not known.  However, he is named in two charters with Robert de Béthune (see the document FLANDERS NOBILITY) who is described in other sources as avoué of Saint-Vaast at Arras.  It is possible that they held the same avouerie jointly which suggests that they may have been closely related, maybe even brothers. 

 

1.         JEAN [I], son of --- (-after 1056).  Avoué of Arras before 1038: “...Roberti advocati, Iohannis advocati Attrebatensis, Hugonis Aldenardensis...” subscribed the charter dated 1038 under which Baudouin V Count of Flanders confirmed possessions of the abbey of Marciennes[494].  “...Iohannis advocati, Roberti advocati, Rodulfi Tornacensis, Rodulfi Gandensis, Hugonis Hauet” subscribed the charter dated 1046 under which Baudouin V Count of Flanders confirmed possessions of the abbey of Marciennes[495].  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "tirannum quondam…Iohannem, advocatum Atrebatensem" married the widow of "Gualterus Cameracensis castellanus…uxor Ermentrudis" and was appointed Châtelain de Cambrai, dated to [1046/48][496].  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that he was deposed as châtelain by bishop Liébert, after 1056[497]m as her second husband, ERMENTRUDE, widow of GAUTHIER [II] Châtelain de Cambrai, daughter of ---.  The Annales Elnonses name "Ermentrudis" as wife of "Walterus Cameracensis castellanus"[498].  The Vita Domni Lietberti names “Walterius Cameracensis Castellanus” and “uxor Ermentrudis”, adding that she married “tyrannum…Joannem Advocatum Attrebatensem” after her first husband died[499].  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Gualterus Cameracensis castellanus…uxor Ermentrudis" married "tirannum quondam…Iohannem, advocatum Atrebatensem"[500]

 

 

HUGUES [I] de Douai, son of HUGUES Châtelain de Douai & his wife Adela --- (-1111 or after).  The Chronicon Sancti Andreæ names "Walterus et pater eius Walterus et nepos eius Hugo"[501].  The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that the bishop of Cambrai installed "Hugonem Gualteri castellani defuncti nepotem…adhuc puer" as Châtelain de Cambrai, under the tutorship of "propinquum quondam Ansellum" (Anselme de Ribemont Comte d'Ostrevant)[502].  "Walterus Duacensis" bought property from "fratre suo", with the consent of "Adriana…sua uxore, eorumque filio Symone", by charter dated to [1074][503].  The Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I) names "Hugo de Osgiacho filius Hugonis castellanus Cameracensis" when recording that he was installed as châtelain de Cambrai[504].  The text also refers to "comes Robertus", which presumably refers to Robert II Count of Flanders.  As count Robert died in 1111, this passage must refer to Hugues [I].  "Gautherii, prius castellani Duacensis, modo autem clerici, Hugonis, fratris eiusdem, Cameraco, Rogeri castellani de Insula, Frimoldi de eadem Insula…" signed the charter dated 3 Feb 1097 which records the settlement of a dispute between the count of Flanders and the abbey of Saint-Martin de Tours[505]

m ADA [de Rumigny], daughter of ---.  The Gesta Cameracensium names "iuvenculam Adam neptem Richeldis Montensis comitiissæ" as wife of Hugues Châtelain de Cambrai[506].  Her family relationship with Richildis de Hainaut Ctss de Mons has not been established.  "Walterus Duacensis" bought property from "fratre suo", with the consent of "Adriana…sua uxore, eorumque filio Symone", by charter dated to [1074][507]

Hugues [I] & his wife had three children: 

1.         SIMON d'Oisy (-before his father).  "Walterus Duacensis" bought property from "fratre suo", with the consent of "Adriana…sua uxore, eorumque filio Symone", by charter dated to [1074][508]

-        OISY FAMILY[509]

2.         HUGUES [II] d'Oisy (-16 Oct after 1133)Châtelain de CambraiSire d'Oisy et de Crèvecœur.  Hugo castellanus de Cambray et dominus de Oisy” donated property to Saint-Eloi on the day “Willermus Biturniensis advocatus” married “Clementiam filiam meam”, in the presence of and confirmed by “filio meo Simone et filiabus Clementia, Matilde, Maria”, undated witnessed by “Willermus Bituniensis advocatus...[510].  He became a monk at Vaucelles.  The necrology of Béthune Saint-Barthélemy records the death “XVII Kal Nov” of “Hugonis Cameracensis[511]m HILDIARDE de Mons, daughter of GOSSUIN [I] de Mons & his wife Ermengarde --- (-31 Mar 1145).  The Annales Cameracenses record the death "II Kal Apr" in 1145 of "castellana Heldiurdis"[512].  The necrology of Béthune Saint-Barthélemy records the death “II Kal Apr” of “Heldiardis de Oisy[513].  Hugues [II] & his wife had six children: 

a)         SIMON d'Oisy (-before [1171]).  The Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I) names "Symon, castellani Hugonis filius"[514].  “Hugo castellanus de Cambray et dominus de Oisy” donated property to Saint-Eloi on the day “Willermus Biturniensis advocatus” married “Clementiam filiam meam”, in the presence of and confirmed by “filio meo Simone et filiabus Clementia, Matilde, Maria”, undated witnessed by “Willermus Bituniensis advocatus...[515]Châtelain de Cambrai.  The Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I) records the capture of Simon at Oisy by the count of Flanders[516].  "Symon Cameracensis castellanus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Saint-Amand, with the approval of "uxor mea Ada et Gilius filius meus", by charter dated 1156, witnessed by "Ade uxoris mee, Gilii filii mei, Hugonis filii mei, Heldiardis filie mee, Matheldis filie mee…"[517].  "Ada de Firmitate Ansculfi" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the consent of "domini Symonis sponsi mei vicecomitis Meldis…filiorum nostrorum Gilonis…et Hugonis et filiæ Matildis", by charter dated to [1160][518].  "Simon vicecomes Meldensis…etiam Ada vicecomitissa" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, for the soul of "filii nostri Gilonis", with the consent of "filii nostri Hugo et Petrus et filia nostra Heldealdis", by charter dated to [1164][519].  "Simon Firmitatis Ansculfi vicecomes et uxor mea Ada" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the support of "filiis et filiabus meis Hugone et Petro, necnon Heldiarde et Mathilde", by charter dated to [1165][520]"Symon...dominus de Oisi filiusque meus Hugo" donated property to Ourscamp Notre-Dame, with the consent of “ceteri liberi mei Petrus...archidiaconus Cameracensis et Heldegardis et Mathildis, uxorque mea Ada, conjux que filii mei...Gertrudis”, by charter dated 1169[521]m ADA de la Ferté-Ancoul, daughter of GEOFFROY Vicomte de la Ferté-Ancoul[-sous-Jouarre] & his wife Constance de Vermandois (-after [1171]).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to (but does not name) the third of the daughters of "Hugonem Magnum [et] Adelaide comitissa Veromandensium" as wife of "Ioifrido de Firmitate-Galceri" and parents of "uxorem Simonis de Oisiaco"[522].  "Symon Cameracensis castellanus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Saint-Amand, with the approval of "uxor mea Ada et Gilius filius meus", by charter dated 1156, witnessed by "Ade uxoris mee, Gilii filii mei, Hugonis filii mei, Heldiardis filie mee, Matheldis filie mee…"[523].  Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated 1177 under which [her son-in-law] "Andreas dominus de Feritate Gaucherii" confirmed donations to Molesme made by "Gaucherius quondam dominus de Feritate Gaucherii…pro anima uxoris suæ Elizabeth…Elias filius eius"[524].  "Ada de Firmitate Ansculfi" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the consent of "domini Symonis sponsi mei vicecomitis Meldis…filiorum nostrorum Gilonis…et Hugonis et filiæ Matildis", by charter dated to [1160][525].  "Simon Firmitatis Ansculfi vicecomes et uxor mea Ada" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the support of "filiis et filiabus meis Hugone et Petro, necnon Heldiarde et Mathilde", by charter dated to [1165][526]"Symon...dominus de Oisi filiusque meus Hugo" donated property to Ourscamp Notre-Dame, with the consent of “ceteri liberi mei Petrus...archidiaconus Cameracensis et Heldegardis et Mathildis, uxorque mea Ada, conjux que filii mei...Gertrudis”, by charter dated 1169[527].  "Ada Meldensium vicecomitissa" made her testament, for the souls of "mariti mei, Gilonis filii mei", with the consent of "filius meus Hugo Cameracensis castellanus…Petrus Cameracensis archidiaconus filius meus, Andreas de Firmitate Gaucheri et Heldiardis uxor sua filia mea", by charter dated to [1171][528].  Simon & his wife had five children: 

i)          GILLES d'Oisy (-killed in battle 1164).  "Symon Cameracensis castellanus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Saint-Amand, with the approval of "uxor mea Ada et Gilius filius meus", by charter dated 1156, witnessed by "Ade uxoris mee, Gilii filii mei, Hugonis filii mei, Heldiardis filie mee, Matheldis filie mee…"[529].  "Ada de Firmitate Ansculfi" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the consent of "domini Symonis sponsi mei vicecomitis Meldis…filiorum nostrorum Gilonis…et Hugonis et filiæ Matildis", by charter dated to [1160][530].  "Simon vicecomes Meldensis…etiam Ada vicecomitissa" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, for the soul of "filii nostri Gilonis", with the consent of "filii nostri Hugo et Petrus et filia nostra Heldealdis", by charter dated to [1164][531]

ii)         HUGUES [III] d'Oisy (-29 Aug 1189).  "Symon Cameracensis castellanus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Saint-Amand, with the approval of "uxor mea Ada et Gilius filius meus", by charter dated 1156, witnessed by "Ade uxoris mee, Gilii filii mei, Hugonis filii mei, Heldiardis filie mee, Matheldis filie mee…"[532].  "Ada de Firmitate Ansculfi" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the consent of "domini Symonis sponsi mei vicecomitis Meldis…filiorum nostrorum Gilonis…et Hugonis et filiæ Matildis", by charter dated to [1160][533].  "Simon vicecomes Meldensis…etiam Ada vicecomitissa" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, for the soul of "filii nostri Gilonis", with the consent of "filii nostri Hugo et Petrus et filia nostra Heldealdis", by charter dated to [1164][534].  "Simon Firmitatis Ansculfi vicecomes et uxor mea Ada" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the support of "filiis et filiabus meis Hugone et Petro, necnon Heldiarde et Mathilde", by charter dated to [1165][535]"Symon...dominus de Oisi filiusque meus Hugo" donated property to Ourscamp Notre-Dame, with the consent of “ceteri liberi mei Petrus...archidiaconus Cameracensis et Heldegardis et Mathildis, uxorque mea Ada, conjux que filii mei...Gertrudis”, by charter dated 1169[536].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated [Jun/Aug] 1208 under which "Margareta uxor Galterii de Averna comitissa palatina Burgundie" confirmed an agreement between "Willelmum militem de Monasteriis" and Saint-Martin-des-Champs which also names "Hugo de Oysi filius Symonis vicecomitis, olim maritus meus"[537]Châtelain de Cambrai.  "Ada Meldensium vicecomitissa" made her testament, for the souls of "mariti mei, Gilonis filii mei", with the consent of "filius meus Hugo Cameracensis castellanus…Petrus Cameracensis archidiaconus filius meus, Andreas de Firmitate Gaucheri et Heldiardis uxor sua filia mea", by charter dated to [1171][538].  "…Hugonis de Oisi…" signed the charter dated [24 Apr/12 Jun] 1177 under which Philippe Count of Flanders declared that his older sister renounced the inheritance of her brother [539].  He became a monk at Messines in [1177].  "Hugo de Oisiaco vicecomes Meldensis, castellanus Cameracensis" donated property to "ecclesiam B. Mariæ de Pratis", for the soul of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ", by charter dated 1189[540].  The necrology of the Prieuré de Collinances records the death "29 Aug" of "vicecomes Hugo"[541]m firstly (after 1158) as her second husband, GERTRUDE de Flandre, divorced wife of HUMBERT III Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie, daughter of THIERRY I Count of Flanders & his second wife Sibylle d'Anjou (-3 Mar after 1186).  The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Philippum, Matheum, Petrum et tres filias" as the children of "Theodericus filius ducis Alsatie [et] Sibillam", not naming the daughters but specifying that "quarum primogenita nupsit Amico comiti Intermontano"[542].  The Flandria Generosa names (in order) "Gertrudem et Margaretam" as the two daughters of Count Thierry & his second wife[543].  The Flandria Generosa, in a later manuscript, names "Gertrudis primogenita" and her first husband "comiti de Moriana", from whom she was separated, and her second husband "Hugoni de Oisi", specifying that she later became a nun at "Mencinis"[544].  Philippe Count of Flanders, on the point of leaving on crusade, declared that "sororis mee Gertrudis quondam Morianensis comitisse" had renounced her inheritance before becoming a nun, by charter dated [24 Apr/12 Jun] 1177[545].  She became a nun at Messines [1177].  m secondly ([1183]) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT V Comte de Blois et de Chartres & his second wife Alix de France (-12 Jul 1230).  "…Filiis quoque et filiabus meis Theobaldo et Ludovico atque Henrico, Margarita et Ysabella" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus Blesensis comes, Francie senesscalus" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun by charter dated 1183[546].  "Hugo vicecomes Meldensis" donated property to Cavea monastery, with the consent of "domina Margarete uxore mea", by charter dated to [1185][547].  Her first marriage is confirmed by the charter dated [Jun/Aug] 1208 under which "Margareta uxor Galterii de Averna comitissa palatina Burgundie" confirmed an agreement between "Willelmum militem de Monasteriis" and Saint-Martin-des-Champs which also names "Hugo de Oysi filius Symonis vicecomitis, olim maritus meus"[548].  "Hugo de Oisiaco vicecomes Meldensis, castellanus Cameracensis" donated property to "ecclesiam B. Mariæ de Pratis", for the soul of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ", by charter dated 1189[549].  She married secondly ([1190]) Otto von Staufen Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, [Hohenstaufen], and thirdly (after 1200) Gauthier [II] Seigneur d'Avesnes.  William of Tyre (Continuator) records "la fille dou conte Thibaut de Blois" being the wife of "Otes dus de Borgoigne"[550].  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "dominus Galterus filius [Jacobi] primogeniti" married "Margareta comitatus Blesensis hærede"[551].  She succeeded her nephew in 1218 as Ctss de Blois, Vicomtesse de Châteaudun.  "Margareta uxor Galterii de Averna comitissa palatina Burgundie" confirmed an agreement between "Willelmum militem de Monasteriis" and Saint-Martin-des-Champs by charter dated [Jun/Aug] 1208 which also names "Hugo de Oysi filius Symonis vicecomitis, olim maritus meus"[552].  The necrology of the abbey of Vauduisant records the death "IV Id Jul" of "comitisse Blesensis Marguerite"[553]

iii)        PIERRE d'Oisy (-[1177/79]).  "Simon vicecomes Meldensis…etiam Ada vicecomitissa" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, for the soul of "filii nostri Gilonis", with the consent of "filii nostri Hugo et Petrus et filia nostra Heldealdis", by charter dated to [1164][554].  "Simon Firmitatis Ansculfi vicecomes et uxor mea Ada" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the support of "filiis et filiabus meis Hugone et Petro, necnon Heldiarde et Mathilde", by charter dated to [1165][555].  Archdeacon 1169.  "Symon...dominus de Oisi filiusque meus Hugo" donated property to Ourscamp Notre-Dame, with the consent of “ceteri liberi mei Petrus...archidiaconus Cameracensis et Heldegardis et Mathildis, uxorque mea Ada, conjux que filii mei...Gertrudis”, by charter dated 1169[556].  "Ada Meldensium vicecomitissa" made her testament, for the souls of "mariti mei, Gilonis filii mei", with the consent of "filius meus Hugo Cameracensis castellanus…Petrus Cameracensis archidiaconus filius meus, Andreas de Firmitate Gaucheri et Heldiardis uxor sua filia mea", by charter dated to [1171][557].  Elected Bishop of Cambrai 1177. 

iv)       HILDIARDE d'Oisy (-before 1177).  "Symon Cameracensis castellanus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Saint-Amand, with the approval of "uxor mea Ada et Gilius filius meus", by charter dated 1156, witnessed by "Ade uxoris mee, Gilii filii mei, Hugonis filii mei, Heldiardis filie mee, Matheldis filie mee…"[558]"Simon vicecomes Meldensis…etiam Ada vicecomitissa" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, for the soul of "filii nostri Gilonis", with the consent of "filii nostri Hugo et Petrus et filia nostra Heldealdis", by charter dated to [1164][559].  "Simon Firmitatis Ansculfi vicecomes et uxor mea Ada" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the support of "filiis et filiabus meis Hugone et Petro, necnon Heldiarde et Mathilde", by charter dated to [1165][560]"Symon...dominus de Oisi filiusque meus Hugo" donated property to Ourscamp Notre-Dame, with the consent of “ceteri liberi mei Petrus...archidiaconus Cameracensis et Heldegardis et Mathildis, uxorque mea Ada, conjux que filii mei...Gertrudis”, by charter dated 1169[561].  Vicomtesse de Meaux.  "Andreas Firmitatis Gaucherii hereditario jure protector et dominus" donated property to "Sosmensis" monastery, with the consent of "Hildeardis uxor mea", by charter dated 1169[562].  "Ada Meldensium vicecomitissa" made her testament, for the souls of "mariti mei, Gilonis filii mei", with the consent of "filius meus Hugo Cameracensis castellanus…Petrus Cameracensis archidiaconus filius meus, Andreas de Firmitate Gaucheri et Heldiardis uxor sua filia mea", by charter dated to [1171][563]m ANDRE de Montmirail Seigneur de la Ferté-Gaucher (-before 1180).  Their son André de Montmirail inherited the Châtellenie de Cambrai[564]

v)        MATHILDE d'Oisy .  "Symon Cameracensis castellanus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Saint-Amand, with the approval of "uxor mea Ada et Gilius filius meus", by charter dated 1156, witnessed by "Ade uxoris mee, Gilii filii mei, Hugonis filii mei, Heldiardis filie mee, Matheldis filie mee…"[565].  "Ada de Firmitate Ansculfi" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the consent of "domini Symonis sponsi mei vicecomitis Meldis…filiorum nostrorum Gilonis…et Hugonis et filiæ Matildis", by charter dated to [1160][566].  "Simon Firmitatis Ansculfi vicecomes et uxor mea Ada" donated property to "Radoliensis" monastery, with the support of "filiis et filiabus meis Hugone et Petro, necnon Heldiarde et Mathilde", by charter dated to [1165][567]"Symon...dominus de Oisi filiusque meus Hugo" donated property to Ourscamp Notre-Dame, with the consent of “ceteri liberi mei Petrus...archidiaconus Cameracensis et Heldegardis et Mathildis, uxorque mea Ada, conjux que filii mei...Gertrudis”, by charter dated 1169[568]

b)         CLEMENCE d'Oisy (-23 Jun after [1165]).  “Hugo castellanus de Cambray et dominus de Oisy” donated property to Saint-Eloi on the day “Willermus Biturniensis advocatus” married “Clementiam filiam meam”, in the presence of and confirmed by “filio meo Simone et filiabus Clementia, Matilde, Maria”, undated witnessed by “Willermus Bituniensis advocatus...[569].  "Guilelmus jure hereditario Betuniensis advocatus" donated property to the church of Saint-Pry, with the consent of "Clementia uxore mea filioque meo Roberto", by charter dated to [1138][570].  "Robertum Bethunensium advocatum et matrem meam Clemenciam" confirmed donations to the priory of Saint-Pry-lez-Béthune, with the consent of "uxore mea Adelide et sorore mea Maltide et Roberto filio meo", by charter dated to [1165][571].  “Clementiæ dominæ de Chokes, matri Roberti advocati de Bethunia” donated “terram…Mansus” to "abbas S. Johannis de Chokes", with the consent of "filio eius Roberto Betuniensi advocato et uxore eius Adelide et filiis eius Roberto, Baldewyno, Willermo et filia eius Clementia"[572].  The necrology of Béthune Saint-Barthélemy records the death “IX Kal Jul” of “Clementia mater Roberti Rufi[573]m GUILLAUME [I] de Béthune, son of ROBERT [IV] “le Gros” Seigneur de Béthune & his wife --- ([1080/95]-20 Mar 1138). 

c)         MATHILDE d´Oisy .  “Hugo castellanus de Cambray et dominus de Oisy” donated property to Saint-Eloi on the day “Willermus Biturniensis advocatus” married “Clementiam filiam meam”, in the presence of and confirmed by “filio meo Simone et filiabus Clementia, Matilde, Maria”, undated witnessed by “Willermus Bituniensis advocatus...[574]

d)         MARIE d´Oisy .  “Hugo castellanus de Cambray et dominus de Oisy” donated property to Saint-Eloi on the day “Willermus Biturniensis advocatus” married “Clementiam filiam meam”, in the presence of and confirmed by “filio meo Simone et filiabus Clementia, Matilde, Maria”, undated witnessed by “Willermus Bituniensis advocatus...[575]

e)         ERMENGARDE d'Oisy .  The Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I) refers to "Symon…sororis suæ…uxor Gerardi" but does not name his sister[576]m GERARD [I] de Saint-Aubert dit Maufilastre, avocat de Saint-Aubert et de Busigny, son of --- (-killed in battle 6 Jul 1137). 

f)          GONDREA d'Oisy .  amita of Robert de Béthune. 

3.         SIMON d'Oisy .  1111. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    COUNTY of CONDROZ

 

 

A.      COMTES de CLERMONT

 

 

The county of Condroz was the successor of the pagus Condrustensis.  The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum …Condrust…" to King Charles[577].  No record has yet been found in the primary sources so far consulted of any comtes de Condroz.  The castle of Huy was located within the county of Condroz, which lay south of the river Meuse and west of the river Ourthe.  The county of Huy emerged in part of the territory of the ancient county of Condroz, probably in the early 10th century, and included some localities in the neighbouring county of Hesbaie[578].  The castle of Clermont was situated on the right bank of the river Meuse in the county of Condroz, near Liège.  It emerged as the base of a county in the late 11th century[579]

 

 

1.         WIDRICH [I] (-[before 1062]).  [Comte] [de Clermont].  "Widricus" names "patris mei…Widrici in castello Clarimontis" by charter dated 1062[580]m ---.  The name of Widrich's wife is not known with certainty.  However, it is possible that she was Hersende, separated wife of Hildrad [Hezelin] Comte [de Grandpré], daughter of ---, whom he would have married in [1020/25].  The line of argument for this identification is complex and depends on the correctness of several assumptions.  Firstly, it is assumed, as explained below, that Giselbert Comte de Clermont was the grandson of Widrich [I].  Secondly, it is assumed that Ermengarde, wife of Gozelon Comte de Montaigu, was the paternal aunt of Giselbert Comte de Clermont, as indicated by the latter´s charter for Cluny dated 1091, quoted below[581].  Thirdly, in a charter dated 1064, "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[582], her brothers being identified as three of the sons of Hildrad [Hezelin] Comte [de Grandpré].  Fourthly, Comte Hildrad´s wife is named in the charter dated 1020, under which "Hildradus cognomento Hescelinus comes" donated property for "Hercendis uxoris mee, Richardi quoque filii mei quem ad clericatus" to Verdun Saint-Vanne[583].  Fifthly, the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Gerardus episcopus…nepte" was the wife of "Hezelino", and that the couple separated after eight years of marriage[584].  Sixthly, it is assumed that this was the same wife of Comte Hildrad [Hezelin] who is named in the 1020 document (the chronology appears favourable) and that she was the mother not only of Hildrad´s son Richard (named in the 1020 document) but also of his three sons who are named in the 1064 document.  "Hildradus cognomento Hescelinus comes" donated property "Bolruuel" for "Hercendis uxoris mee, Richardi quoque filii mei quem ad clericatus" to Verdun Saint-Vanne by charter dated 1020, subscribed by "Albrici nepotis mei"[585].  It is conceded that the argument is shaky and could fail if any one of these assumptions was incorrect.  Nevertheless, it is felt to be a sufficiently interesting possibility to include in the present document.  The precise parentage of Hersende is unknown.  However, as noted above, her possible relationship to Gérard Bishop of Cambrai, who was the son of Arnaud Seigneur de Florennes, is indicated by the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium which records that "Gerardus episcopus…nepte" was the wife of "Hezelino".  Gérard was elected bishop in 1010 but it is unlikely that he was born much earlier than 990, bearing in mind that his mother was the daughter of Godefroi Comte de Verdun whose marriage is dated to [963].  It is therefore probable that "nepte" in Gesta should be translated as a more remote family relationship than "niece": any children of Gerard's brothers and sisters could not have been born earlier than 1005, whereas Hildrad's son Richard (presumably born from his marriage with the bishop's niece) was assigned to be a cleric at Verdun Saint-Vanne in 1020.  It is possible that the bishop's relationship with Hersende was through his mother's family, the comtes de Verdun.  Widrich [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         WIDRICH [II] (-after 1062).  "Widricus" names "patris mei…Widrici in castello Clarimontis" by charter dated 1062[586]m ---.  The name of Widrich's wife is not known.  Widrich [II] & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          [GISELBERT (-after 1091).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified, but the common references to Clermont, as well as the favourable chronology, suggests that Giselbert and his brother were sons of Widrich [II].   Comte de Clermont.  "Gislebertus comes Clarimontis et frater meus Herimannus atque uxor mea Leugardis" donated the church of Saint-Symphorien to Cluny by charter dated 1091[587]m LONGARDE, daughter of --- (-after 1091).  "Gislebertus comes Clarimontis et frater meus Herimannus atque uxor mea Leugardis" donated the church of Saint-Symphorien to Cluny by charter dated 1091[588].] 

ii)         [HERMANN (-after 1091).  "Gislebertus comes Clarimontis et frater meus Herimannus atque uxor mea Leugardis" donated the church of Saint-Symphorien to Cluny by charter dated 1091[589].] 

b)         [ERMENGARDE [Ermentrude] ([1025/35]-after 1091).  "Gislebertus comes Clarimontis" names "amite mee Ermingardi comitisse et filiis eius" in the charter dated 1091 under which he donated the church of Saint-Symphorien to Cluny[590].  Assuming that "amite" in this document is interpreted strictly, Ermengarde was the donor´s paternal aunt, although this is not beyond all doubt because of the flexible interpretation of such terms indicating relationships in contemporary documentation.  Her birth date range is estimated from her eldest son by her first marriage being born in the range [1040/50].  Archbishop Poppo of Trier confirmed the donation by "comitem Kadelonem et eius contectalem Irmingart" of hereditary property "de chorte Prümizvelt" by undated charter, dated to [1040/44], subscribed by "Duci Godefrido, Adalberto de Musel, comes Becelinus…"[591].  "Ermentrudis de Harenzey" donated "allodium…Sumey" to Ardenne Saint-Hubert on condition that she could be buried there with her husband, for the soul of "mariti mei Gozolonis", with the consent of "filiis meis…Cunone comite Rodulfo Guidone Joanne Henrico et fratribus meis Hezelino comite et Rainaldo et Balduino", by charter dated 1064[592], her brothers being identified as the sons of Hildrad [Hezelin] Comte [de Grandpré], which suggests the identity of Ermengarde's mother as Hildrad's wife (as discussed more fully above).  Two charters indicate a close connection between Ermengarde and Bruno von Heimbach.  Hildolf Archbishop of Köln donated property "ubi ipsa [Ermentrudis] hereditariam partem cum Brunone habuerat…Strala" (Stralen near Geldern) to the abbey of Siegburg by charter dated 1076[593].  ["Ermengardis comitissa…ab avis atque atavis nobilibus" donated property "apud Villas Worommes et Longum-Campum [Woromes, Longchamp] …allodium de Rumines [Rummen]…allodium de Curinges [Curenge]…allodium…apud Gelmines et Berlinges…allodium de Brede [Brée] cum ecclesia…quos dedit Gerardo comiti" to the church of Saint-Bartholomée de Liège by charter dated 1078, witnessed by "tunc advocatus…comes Henricus de Dolvin-Castello…comes Cono de Monte-Acuto, Reginardus de Roden, Witmannus de Molenarche…"[594].  The donor of this charter has not been identified with certainty.  However, the presence of Conon Comte de Montaigu as first lay subscriber suggests that it may be his mother.]  Siegwin Archbishop of Köln noted a donation of property at Stralen by "Irmengarda comitissa", by charter dated [1079/89], which states that her parents were buried at the abbey of Rees and that she had retained rights in Aspel[595].  The fact of Ermengarde having married at least twice is confirmed by the charter dated 1091 under which the bishop of Cambrai confirmed the donation by "Ermengardis de Monte Acuto" to the abbey of Saint-André du Cateau for the souls of her spouses ("conjugum")[596].  The identity of her other husband is suggested by the charter dated 1138 under which "Reinardus comitis de Ascha Gisleberti filius" renewed the right of the monks of Flône to take wood from his part of the forests "Clerimontis", granted previously by "pater eius et comes Lambertus"[597].  "Comes Lambertus" in this document is identified as Lambert Comte de Montaigu, who was Ermengarde´s grandson by her marriage to Gozelo Comte de Montaigu.  The father of "Reinardus comitis de Ascha Gisleberti filius" can be identified as "Gislebertus comes de Aska" who granted the right to take wood from his forests in "sus possessionis de Claromonte" to the monks of Flône, for the souls of "patris sui Fredelonis et matris suæ Ermengardis et uxoris sue Aelaidis et ipsius comitis Gisleberti", by charter dated 1131, after 18 Mar[598].  The fact that Lambert Comte de Montaigu and Giselbert Graf von Esch both shared rights in property in Clermont is best explained by the co-identity of the two persons named Ermengarde from whom they were both descended, and from whom they would have inherited these rights.  If this is correct, Gozelon would have been Ermengarde´s first husband and Fredelo her second.  m [firstly] GOZELON Comte de Montaigu, son of --- (-1064, bur Saint Hubert).  [m secondly (after 1064) FREDELON [von Esch], son of --- (-27 Aug [1083/85]).] 

c)         [MATHILDE [von Ehrenbreitstein] (-before 3 Aug 1101, bur Prüm St Salvator).  The necrology of Siegburg records “pridie Non Jun” that “Bruno comes et uxor eius Mathilda de Erenbreitstein” donated “prædium in Gulse[599].  Anno Archbishop of Köln founded Siegburg abbey and listed its properties, including the donation of "Flatlena...decimationem...in Zulpiaco que in beneficio fuerat Sicconis comitis" made by "Mathilda Brunonis quondam coniuge", by charter dated to [1064][600].  Anno Archbishop of Köln confirmed possessions of Siegburg abbey, including the donation of "Flattena...decimationem...in Zulpiaco, quæ in beneficio fuerat Sicconis comitis" made by "Mathilda Brunonis quondam coniuge", by charter dated 1064[601].  Emperor Heinrich IV restored "predium…Prümizfelt quidam comes Bruno de Hengebach…tradidit…cum uxore sua Mathilde", taken by "comes Henricus de Lintburc", to the abbey of Prüm (where Matilda was buried) by charter dated 3 Aug 1101[602].  No direct indication has been found that Mathilde, wife of Bruno von Heimbach, was the sister of Ermengarde Ctss de Montaigu.  However, the reference to "Prümizfelt" in the 1101 charter which names Mathilde and her husband suggests a close relationship as the same place is named in the undated charter, dated to [1040/44], under which "comitem Kadelonem [Gozelon Comte de Montaigu] et eius contectalem Irmingart" donated hereditary property "de chorte Prümizvelt"[603].  The absence of any reference to Bruno and Ermentrude being siblings suggests that a relationship by marriage is a more likely possibility.  If this is correct, one explanation is that Prümizvelt was inherited by supposed sisters Ermengarde and Mathilde from one of their parents.  Indeed, if this was not the case, it is difficult to explain why his wife Mathilde would have been named in the 1101 charter with Bruno.  If Ermengarde and Mathilde were sisters, it is not certain that they shared the same father: the reference to Mathilde “von Ehrenbreitstein” indeed suggests that their fathers were different.  m BRUNO von Hengebach, son of --- (-25 Feb [1063/64]).] 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de HUY

 

 

The history of the comtes de Huy is confused by two family sub-groups which are named only in the Vita Meingoldi Comitis[604] and an addition to the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium[605].  The Vita Meingoldi is evidently unreliable as a source and, in any case, appears to confuse "Meingold Comte de Huy" with Megingoz [II] Graf im Wormsgau (see the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY).  The information on these alleged families is added here for the sake of completeness, but should be treated with caution.  However, the possibility that there is a nugget of historically accurate information contained in these narratives cannot be excluded altogether, particularly because of the suggestion in the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium that Lietard, alleged son of Meingold, was ancestor of later comtes de Huy[606]

 

The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that Ansfrid [III] Comte de Huy, Graaf van Teisterbant, who was installed as bishop of Utrecht in 994, was descended from Emperor Charlemagne[607].  This affiliation has not been traced. 

 

 

 

1.         [GUILLAUME Comte de Huym as her first husband, GEILA, daughter of ALBERIC & his wife ---.  The Vita Meingoldi Comitis records that "dux Albricus…Geilam sororem suam" married "comiti Willelmo" and, after he was killed, "Meingoldo" who inherited "patrimonium uxoris suæ ex comite Willelmo et duce Albrico"[608].  She married secondly (8 Feb ---) Manegold, who thereby acquired the county of Huy.  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium includes an added paragraph introduced by "Et pergit interpolator Hoiensis" which specifies that "comitatus itaque Hoyensis" came from Mangold's wife "Geile…que fuit uxor Guillelmi comitis Hoyensis"[609].  Guillaume & his wife had [one] child:] 

a)         [LIETARD .  The Vita Meingoldi Comitis records that "comiti Willelmo" and "uxor Geila" had "octo annorum…puerum Liethardum" when his father was killed, adding that he was brought up by his stepfather[610].  It should be noted that, according to the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, Lietard was the son of Geila by her second husband (see below)[611].] 

 

 

1.         [--- .  m ---, sister of ARNULF King of Germany, [daughter of --- & his wife Liutswindis ---] ([840/50]-).  The Vita Meingoldi Comitis records the life of "Meingoldus de nobili prosapia Francorum et Anglorum" whose mother was "soror regis Arnulfi"[612].  However, the same source embellishes this by adding that "Hugo rex Anglorum" married "rex Arnulfus…unicam germanam" by whom he had "filium…Meingoldus, filiam…Adheliz…coniugem Oswaldus rex Nordanimbrorum"[613], which adds little to its credibility.  --- & his wife had one child:] 

a)         [MEINGOLD ([865/70]-).  The Vita Meingoldi Comitis records the life of "Meingoldus de nobili prosapia Francorum et Anglorum" whose mother was "soror regis Arnulfi"[614].  However, the same source embellishes this by adding that "Hugo rex Anglorum" married "rex Arnulfus…unicam germanam" by whom he had "filium…Meingoldus, filiam…Adheliz…coniugem Oswaldus rex Nordanimbrorum"[615], which adds little to its credibility.  Comte de Huy.  A marginal addition in the Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records that "hic temporibus…VI Id Feb…comes Maingolidus" succeeded in "Hoya" [Huy, near Liège], specifying that he was "ex sorore nepos Arnulphi imperatoris" and that Huy came to him from his wife[616].  The dating is expanded by an addition in square brackets ["hic temporibus [scilicet anno Domini 860, anno primo Ludovici secundi] VI Id Feb…"].  The origin of this addition is unclear in the edition.  It is especially curious as the chapters of the Gesta on the same page recount events in the early years of the 10th century.  The editor appears to think little of the factual accuracy of the statement as he adds in a footnote "hæc omnia prorans fabulosa esse"[617].  The Vita Meingoldi Comitis records that Meingold was killed[618]m (8 Feb ---) as her second husband, GEILA, widow of GUILLAUME Comte de Huy, daughter of ALBERIC & his wife ---.  The Vita Meingoldi Comitis records that "dux Albricus…Geilam sororem suam" married "comiti Willelmo" and, after he was killed, "Meingoldo" who inherited "patrimonium uxoris suæ"[619].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium includes an added paragraph introduced by "Et pergit interpolator Hoiensis" which specifies that "comitatus itaque Hoyensis" came from Mangold's wife "Geile…que fuit uxor Guillelmi comitis Hoyensis"[620].  Manegold [I] & his wife had one child:] 

i)          [LIETARD .  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, added paragraph introduced by "Et pergit interpolator Hoiensis" referred to above, names "Liethardus" as son of "comes Maingolidus" & his wife, specifying that he succeeded as Comte de Huy and that "Ansfredi comitis" was among their descendants[621].  It should be noted that, according to the Vita Meingoldi Comitis, Lietard was the son of Geila by her first marriage[622].] 

 

 

[Six] brothers and sisters, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT [Rudbrecht] ([910/15]-19 May 956).  Thietmar refers to the "paternal uncle [of Count Ansfrid] Robert Archbishop of Trier"[623].  Archbishop of Trier 930.  The Annales Sancti Maximini Trevirensis record the ordination in 931 of "Ruodperti episcopi"[624].  The Gesta Treverorum records that "Rubertus archiepiscopus" came from "regno quod Lotharingium vocatur" adding that "soror eius imperatori in matrimonio iuncta fuit"[625].  The Monumenta Germaniæ editor adds a comment that the consecration of "Rotbertum regum Saxonicorum fuisse propinquum" was proposed by "fratres Ballerini" and that he was "nepotem Brunonem archiepiscopum"[626].  The Continuator of Regino records the death in 956 from plague of “Ruodbertus archiepiscopus Treverensis et Hadamarus abbas Fuldensis[627]

2.         [ANSFRID [II] (-after 969).  Thietmar refers to the "like-named paternal uncle ("patruo") of Count Ansfrid" who held fifteen countships[628].  "Otto…rex" granted property "Cassallo…in pago Masalant in comitatu Ruodolfi" to "vassallo nostro Ansfrid" at the request of "nostri fidelis Conradis ducis" by charter dated 7 Oct 950[629].  "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "in comitatu Ansfridi comitis…curtam Feldrike" to "comite…Uuidergeld" by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated end-968[630].  A charter of Lorsch dated 969 refers to property "in pago Dehsendron in præfidatu Ansfridi comitis"[631].]  [same person as…?  EHRENFRIED (-1 Nov ----).  Vanderkindere suggests that Ansfrid [II] was the maternal, not paternal, uncle of Ansfrid [III], and that he was the same person as Ehrenfried, son of Ricfrid[632], which would require a loose interpretation of Thietmar who refers to the "like-named paternal uncle ("patruo") of Count Ansfrid" who held fifteen countships[633].  It also assumes that Ehrenfried, son of Ricfried, was the same person as Ehrenfried, count in several different counties, who is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[634] as son of Eberhard Graf im Bonngau and ancestor of the Pfalzgrafen von Lothringen (see the document GERMANY EARLY NOBILITY).] 

3.         [LAMBERT (-after [960/75]).  According to Miræus, Lambert was the son of "Ragineri I et Alberadæ, frater Ragineri II Longicolli, Hannoniæ comitis", although he cites no primary source which provides the basis for this statement[635].  No primary source has yet been found which confirms the parentage of Lambert.  However, the name of his son suggests a family connection with the comtes de Huy, although it is recognised that this could have been through the female line, maybe through Lambert´s wife and the mother of Ansfrid [III].  Comte de Louvain.  Advocate of Gembloux abbey.  "Otho…Rex Lothariensis et Francigenum" appointed "Lamberto comiti Lovaniensi" to the advocacy of Gembloux by charter dated to 948 (aspects of this document suggest that it may be spurious in some form)[636].  A manuscript Catalogo Abbatum Gemblacensium records that "nobilum virum Lambertum" donated "medietatem ecclesia de Wiettine in pago Masaw" to Gembloux and to "eiusque advocato…Aufrido filio Lamberti", undated[637].  It should be noted that this passage is not included in the manuscript Catalogus Abbatum Gemblacensium which is reproduced in the Monumenta Germanica Scriptores series, presumably from a different source[638].  His date of death is estimated very approximately on the basis that this entry in the Catalogo indicates that Lambert had relinquished the advocacy of Gembloux in favour of his son, who must therefore already have been adult at the time.]  m ---.  The name and origin of Lambert's wife are not known.  Vanderkindere suggests that she was ---, daughter of Ricfried Graaf van Betuwe, for onomastic reasons and considering the origins of the counties which were inherited by Ansfrid [III].  Lambert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ANSFRID [III] ([945/50]-3 May 1010).  A manuscript Catalogo Abbatum Gemblacensium records that "nobilum virum Lambertum" donated "medietatem ecclesia de Wiettine in pago Masaw" to Gembloux and to "eiusque advocato…Aufrido filio Lamberti", undated[639].  Thietmar names Count Ansfrid who "sprung from the high lineage of his ancestors", specifying that he was brought up by Bruno Archbishop of Köln, became sword-bearer of Emperor Otto when the latter entered Rome, and founded the abbey of Thorn[640].  His birth date range is estimated for consistency with this statement, Bruno being archbishop between 953 and 965.  The Chronicon Laureshamense describes the church of Empel, near Bois-le-Duc, as "in pago Dehsendron in præsidatu Ansfridi comitis", referring to its foundation by the bishop of Liège dated to 969[641], which confirms that Ansfrid was Comte de Toxandria (in the area of Antwerp).  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium, added paragraph introduced by "Et pergit interpolator Hoiensis" referred to above, names "Ansfredi comitis" as the descendant of "Liethardus", specifying that he was Comte de Huy during the time of "Nothgeri Leodicensis episcopi"[642], the latter being bishop of Liège between 972 and 1007[643]Graaf van Teisterbant.  "Otto…imperator augustus" made donations "in regno Lothariensi…Uelme in pago Haspongouue in comitatu Eremfridi comitis…" to Kloster St Gorgonius at Gorze in accordance with the last wishes of "Cunradus filius Ruodolfi quondam comitis" killed in battle by the Sarracens, by charter dated 26 Sep 982[644].  Vanderkindere suggests that Ehrenfried, named in the 982 charter, was the same person as Ansfrid [III] Comte de Huy[645].  "Otto…rex" gave property "villa Medemelacha…in comitatu Frisie" to "nostro Ansfrido comite" by charter dated 26 Jun 985[646].  "Otto…rex" granted property in "comitatum Hoiensem quod…Ansfridus comes…tenebat" to the bishop of Liège by charter dated 7 Jul 985[647]Bishop of Utrecht [994/95].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Anffridus" was installed as eighteenth bishop of Utrecht in 994, was "grawe van Tysterbant, van dye Houbenten und herre van Holmina", and was descended from Emperor Charlemagne[648].  The Annales Colonienses specify that "Ansfridus comes laicus suscepto clericatu successit" in 995[649].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 997 that "Ansfridus…comes Bratuspanticus" was tonsured and became bishop of Utrecht[650].  Thietmar records that he became a monk after the death of his wife and was appointed bishop of Utrecht[651].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the election of "Ansfridus, qui pridem de seculari comite clericus attonsus est" as bishop of Utrecht, that he donated his lands "in comitatu Teysterbancie" and that he died "1007 V Non Mai"[652]Vincentius Bellovacensis names "Anfridus, qui cum fuisset comes Bratuspantium"[653].  The chronicle of Alpertus names "Ansfridi episcopus Traiectenses", his daughter "abbatissa Tornensis monasterii" and "consanguineusque eius…Unruoch comes"[654].  Beke's Egmondscii Necrologium records the death "1008 V Non Mai" of "Anfridus ultimus comes Hoyensis", stating that he gave his county to the church of Liège, and specifying that he was also "comes Teysterbancie"[655]m HERESWIND [Hilzondis], daughter of --- Graaf van Strijen & his wife --- (bur Thorn).  Thietmar names Hereswind as wife of Ansfrid, recording that she fell sick at her estate called Gilze, and died travelling to Thorn where she was buried[656].  "Hilzondis comitissa terræ de Strijen" donated property to Thorn abbey, with the consent of "domini mei Ansfredi", by charter dated 1 Jun 992 which states that she and "filia mea Benedicta" lived at the abbey[657].  Comte Ansfrid [III] & his wife had one child: 

i)          BENEDICTA .  Thietmar records that Ansfrid installed his daughter as abbess of Thorn[658].  The chronicle of Alpertus names "Ansfridi episcopus Traiectenses", his daughter "abbatissa Tornensis monasterii" and "consanguineusque eius…Unruoch comes"[659].  "Hilzondis comitissa terræ de Strijen" donated property to Thorn abbey, with the consent of "domini mei Ansfredi", by charter dated 1 Jun 992 which states that she and "filia mea Benedicta" lived at the abbey[660]

4.         daughter .  The Gesta Treverorum records that "Rubertus archiepiscopus" came from "regno quod Lotharingium vocatur" adding that "soror eius imperatori in matrimonio iuncta fuit"[661].  As explained further below, it is possible that the husband of this sister of Robert Archbishop of Trier was the same person as the possible sister who married the unnamed son of Eberhard Graaf van Veluwe[662].  The existence of a possible relationship between this family and the Ottonian emperors is confirmed by the Vita Richardi abbatis S Vidoni Virdunensis which names "comes Lietardus, Ottonis imperator consanguineus"[663], although the “comes Lietardus” in question has not positively been identified.  m ---, relative of Emperor Otto I, son of ---.   

5.         [--- .  The chronicle of Alpertus names "Ansfridi episcopus Traiectenses", his daughter "abbatissa Tornensis monasterii" and "consanguineusque eius…Unruoch comes"[664].  Unruoch was the grandson of Eberhard Graaf van Veluwe en Salland, which suggests that Unruoch's father may have married a relative of Ansfrid.  The precise relationship between Unruoch and Ansfrid has not been traced; it is shown here as through Ansfrid's hypothetical sister only for the purposes of marking the hyperlink.  Assuming that this is correct, it is possible that this sister was the same person as the unnamed sister shown above as married to the relative of Emperor Otto I: the emperor´s mother and the wife of Eberhard Graaf van Veluwe were sisters[665]m [--- [van Teisterbant], son of EBERHARD Graaf van Veluwe en Salland & his wife Amalrada ---.] 

6.         [daughter .  No reference has been found to the name or origin of the wife of Comte Reginar [II].  However, the fact that the name Lietard was introduced into the Hainaut family after this marriage suggests that she may have been related to the family of the comtes de Huy, in which this name was used regularly.  This would also explain why her grandson became comte de Louvain, which formed part of the territories relinquished by Ansfrid [II] Comte de Huy when he was appointed bishop of Utrecht in 995.  Dhondt suggests that the wife of Reginar [III] was the sister of Comte Ansfrid [II], whose father was named Lambert (see above), the name given by Reginar [III] to his younger son.  In addition to the onomastic arguments, Dhondt comments that the voogdij of Gembloux abbey passed from Ansfrid [II] to Lambert [I] de Hainaut[666].  This provides an additional argument for a family relationship between the comtes de Huy and the comtes de Hainaut.  However, Dhondt´s suggestion does not explain the introduction of the name Lietard into the Hainaut family.  On balance, it appears more likely that such a family connection was through the wife of Reginar [II] rather than the wife of Reginar [III].  If this is correct, it is possible that the wife of Reginar [II] was the paternal aunt of Ansfrid [II].  m REGINAR [II] Comte de Hainaut, son of REGINAR [I] "Langhals/Longneck" Graf im Maasgau & his wife Alberade --- ([885/900]-932 or after).] 

 

 

1.         GOZELON (-after 19 Apr 1028).  Comte de HuyEmperor Konrad II confirmed property of Liège Sainte-Croix, including “in pago Arduensi in comitatu Gozelonis de Bastonia ecclesiam de Lonchamp et in pago Condustriensi in comitatu Gozelonis de Hoie ecclesiam de Hafflangia”, by charter dated 19 Apr 1028[667]same person as...?  GOZELON (-after [1035]).  Comte [d’Engis].  A charter dated to [1035] records an agreement between the abbots of Metz Saint-Martin and Stablo exchanging various matters, made “apud Dinillam ubi colloguium...inter imperatorum Cuonradum et Heinricum regem Francorum”, witnessed by “Becelinus comes de Biendeburch, Godefridus comes de Amblavia, Gozilo comes de Engeis, Gerardus Flameus...[668].  Roland points out that the village of Engis is situated between Huy and Liège, on the left bank of the river Meuse opposite Clermont[669]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    GRAFEN von EIFEL

 

 

The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…in Ribuarias comitatus quinque…" to King Ludwig[670].  Vanderkindere identifies these five counties as Jülich, Zulpich, Eifel, Bonn and Köln[671].  Matfried [II] is recorded in charters dated between 844 and 856 as Graf in Eifel.  A charter dated 846 concerns property in Jülich and also names Matfried, but it is unsure from the wording that this means that Matfried was also Graf von Jülich.  The charter dated 15 Jun 943, under which "Ramengarius et uxor ipsius Achalgarda" donated property "in pago et in comitatu Biedensi in villa Uualesuuilere…et in pago Heflinse in comitatu…Tulpiciacensi in villa Nammerestorp…in Bettilonis villa et in campo Zulpilesloch"[672], suggests that Eifel had merged into the county of Zulpich by that date. 

 

 

1.         MATFRIED [II] ([820]-after 18 Sep 882).  A close family connection between Matfried [II] and Matfried [I] is suggested by the name.  This is confirmed by the letter dated 878 from Pope John VIII to "Mactefrido illustri comiti" referring to Engeltrud wife of Boso (who was the daughter of Matfried [I]) as "proxime vestre"[673], although this wording suggests a more remote relationship than father and son.   "Hlotharius…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Lugdunense" to "cuidam vassallo…Immoni", at the request of "Matfredus…comes vel ministerialis noster", by charter dated 15 Dec 843[674]Graf von Eifel: "Hlotharius…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Eiflense…in villa…Bettinga" to "cuidam fideli nostro Fulcrado", at the request of "Matfridus…ministerialis noster", by charter dated 17 Feb 844[675].  "Hlotharius…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Riboariense in comitatu Iuliacense" to "vassallo…Matfredi…comitis, Hrotgario", at the request of "ministerialis nostri Matfridi…comitis", by charter dated 7 May 846[676].  "Hlotharius…imperator augustus" donated property "in pago Eiflinse in comitatu Matfridi" to Kloster Prüm by charter dated 28 Jan 855[677].  "Hlotharius…rex" donated property "in pago Eiflinse in comitatu Matfridi" at the request of "Adalardus et Matfridus…comites" to "vassallo præfati Matfridi Otberto" by charter dated 28 Jun 856[678].  An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Chuonradus, Evrardus, Adalardus, Arnustus, Warnarius, Liutfridus, Hruodolfus, Erkingarius, Gislebertus, Ratbodus, Arnulfus, Hugo, item Chuonradus, Liutharius, Berengarius, Matfridus, Boso, Sigeri, Hartmannus, Liuthardus, Richuinus, Wigricus, Hunfridus, Bernoldus, Hatto, Adalbertus, Burchardus, Christianus, Leutulfus, Hessi, Herimannus, item Hruodulfus, Sigehardus"[679].  An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "Arnulfus comes, Gislebertus, Letardus, Matfridus, Widricus, Gotbertus, Adalbertus, Ingelgerus, Rainerus" as those willing to support the emperor's son if he travels across the Meuse[680].  Pope John VIII wrote a letter to "Mactefrido illustri comiti" dated 878 referring to the property of the two daughters of Count Boso in upper Italy & his wife Engeltrud "proxime vestre"[681].  "Hildebertus filius quondam Berengarii comitis" donated property "res…mee in comitatu Vuabrinse prope fluvio…Cherus villam…Beuram" for "germano meo Berengario" to Verdun Sainte-Vanne by charter dated 18 Sep 882, subscribed by "Stephanus comes, Matfridus comes, Witpertus comes"[682]

 

 

2.         ALBUIN (-after 15 Oct 910)Graf von Eifel: "Zuendeboldus…rex" gave "villa…Tontondorp…in pago Efflinse in comitatu…Albuini" to Kloster Prüm by charter dated 16 Oct 898[683].  Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany confirmed a donation of property including "…in pago ac in comitatu Lummensi…cuius nunc adest comes Perengarius" to the church of Tongern at the request of "Kepehardus et Reginharius comites" and with the consent of "Albuini eo tempore illius comitis" by charter dated 18 Jan 908[684].  Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany granted property "in pago et comitatu Albinse" to "vassallis Hugonis comitis…Bernardo seu Rathfrido ac Reginando" by charter dated 15 Oct 910[685]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 7.    GRAFEN von HATTUARIA

 

 

A.      GRAFEN von HATTUARIA

 

 

The county of Hattuaria lay between the rivers Maas and Rhine north of Moilla, on both banks of the river Niers, to the south of the county of Tubalgo[686].  The territory was attributed to the Grafen von Wassenberg in the second half of the 11th century[687]

 

 

1.         EHRENFRIED [II], son of [EBERHARD Graf von Bonn & his wife ---]  (-before 970).  Ehrenfried is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[688] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Zülpich: a charter dated 24 Jan 942 refers to property "in pago Tulpiacense in comitatu Erinfridi comitis in villa vel marka…Merlesheim"[689]Graf von Bonn: a charter dated 945 refers to "in pago Bunnensi in comitatu Eremfridi comitis in villa Brunheim"[690].  "Otto…rex" confirmed the immunities of Kloster Essen including over land "excepta in loco Ruoldinghus quam Eggihart et eius coniunx Rikilt" possessed by hereditary right and in land "in comitatu Ecberti et Cobbonis" by charter dated 15 Jan 947, signed by "Heinrici fratris regis, Herimanni ducis, Cuonradi comitis, Erenfridi comitis, Gebehardi comitis, Ekkihardi comitis, Hugonis comitis"[691]Graf von Hattuaria: "Otto…rex" confirmed the privileges of Kloster Gandersheim including property "villa Mundulinhgeim in pago Hatteri in comitatu Erenfridi" by charter dated 4 May 947[692]Graf von Tubalgo: "Otto…rex" confirmed the rights of Kloster Echternach in property "in villam…Rinera in pago Tubalgouue in comitatu Irinuridi comitis" by charter dated 4 Aug 947[693].  Graf im Ruhr-Keldachgau: a charter dated 950 refers to "locum in comitatu Eremfridi comitis Huppolderroth dictum" (Hubbeliath, east of Düsseldorf in the Keldachgau)[694].     

 

 

Brother and sister, parents not known: 

1.         GOTTFRIEDGraf von Hattuariam ---.  The name of Gottfried's wife is not known.  Gottfried & his wife had two children: 

a)         GOTTFRIED .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Hattuaria

b)         daughter (-18 May ----)Alpertus refers to "Wicmannus" marrying "præfecti Godefridi, avunculi Balderici, filiam", without giving her name; nor is it clear to which Wichmann this refers, apart from it being chronologically impossible for it to have been the same Wichmann whose daughter is recorded in the same passage as marrying "Baldericus" at an earlier date[695].  Wichmann's wife is named "Remmod" in Europäische Stammtafeln[696] but the basis for this is not known.  m ([1006]) WICHMANN [IV], son of [EKBERT [I] "der Einäugige" & his wife ---] (-murdered Upladen 9 Oct 1016, bur Verden). 

2.         sister .  m ---.  Two children: 

a)         BALDRIC (-Burg Heimbach 5 Jun 1021).  Graafen von Drenthe.  Alpertus refers to "Wicmannus" marrying "præfecti Godefridi, avunculi Balderici, filiam"[697].  Assuming that "avunculus" is used in its strict sense, this would mean that Gottfried was Baldric's maternal uncle.  The Vita Meinwerci records a donation to Paderborn by "Baldericus comes" with the consent of "suæ contectalis Athelæ", in the presence of "Meinwerco episcopo…Heinrici imperatoris…Bernhardi ducis, Liudolfi, Thiederici, Wicmanni comitum"[698].  "Henricus…rex" donated property "in pago Thrient…in comitatu Baldrici" to the church of Utrecht by charter dated 24 Apr 1006[699].  "Henricus…rex" granted property "inter flumina…Nitæ…Thila…Wauerwald in comitatu Gotizonis comitis qui Antwerk dicitur situm" to "nostrum bestiarum Baldrico sanctæ Leodicensis ecclesiæ presul nec non Baldrico comiti" by charter dated 12 Sep 1008[700].  "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property to Kloster Boppard "quod Paldricus comes in Pochpartun nobis tradidit" by charter dated 1021[701].  The work of Thiodericus names "Baldricus comes de Oplathe vel Houberch" and records his death "Non Iun" without specifying the year[702].  Thietmar records that "Berthold, Liuthar's son" killed Baldric "a most excellent vassal of Count Wichmann" at Burg Monreberg in [1 Apr] 1017[703], although it is not clear that this is the same Baldric given the contrast with Thietmar's early uncomplimentary descriptions of Baldric, husband of Adela. 

-        GRAAFEN van DRENTHE

b)         daughter .  Alpertus refers to an unnamed sister of "Baldricus" and one of her sons being forced into a monastery, the others being abducted "ex parte Wicmanni"[704], which appears to refer to Wichmann [III] son of [Ekbert "der Einäugige"] (see SAXONY), who was killed in 1016.  A later passage in the same source clarifies that she was a widow at the time, and states that she sought refuge with "Geverhardus", whom she later married[705]m firstly --- (-before 1016).  m secondly (before 1016) GEBHARD, son of --- (-killed in battle Hengibach after 5 Jun 1021).  Alpertus records that "Geverhardus" held Hengibach castle, de iure uxoris, and that he was killed after the death of Baldric while trying to recapture it[706].  She and her first husband had [more than three] children: 

i)          sons .  Alpertus refers to an unnamed sister of "Baldricus" and one of her sons being forced into a monastery, the others being abducted "ex parte Wicmanni"[707], which appears to refer to Wichmann [IV] son of [Ekbert "der Einäugige"] (see the document SAXONY, DUKES & ELECTORS), who was killed in 1016. 

 

 

 

B.      GRAFEN von WASSENBERG

 

 

1.         GERHARD "Flamens" .  The Annales Rodenses record that "in Flandriensi provintia duo nobiles germani fratres…alter Gerardus et alter…Rutgerus" were exiled from "Anthonium [Antoing]…iuxta flumen Xelda" and were granted "Wasenberch…[et] Clive" respectively by the emperor[708]Graf von Wassenberg.  1033/1053.  "Chuonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property "quam Herimannus comes in istis tribus pagis Auga, Netega, Hessiga habet" to the church of Paderborn.  An undated charter, placed in the compilation among charters dated 1032, records the meeting between Nanther Abbot of Metz St Martin and Poppo Abbot of Stablo, Malmedy and Trier St Maximin (arranged at Deville by Emperor Konrad II and Henri I King of France), witnessed by "Becelinus comes de Biendeburch, Godefridus comes de Amblavia, Gozilo comes de Engeis, Gerardus Flamens"[709]m ---.  The name of Gerhard's wife is not known.  Gerhard & his wife had one child:

a)         DIETRICH "Flamens" (-1082, bur Saint-Hubert).  The Chronicon Huberti names "Theodericum filius Gerardi Flamensis" when specifying that "Godefridus" captured the county after his death in 1082[710]m ---.  The name of Dietrich's wife is not known.  Dietrich & his wife had three children: 

i)          GERHARD (-[before 1129 or 24 Oct [1131]]).  The Chronicon Huberti names "Gerardus et Gozwinus filius eius [=Theodericum]" in 1082[711]Graf von Wassenberg 1087.  Graaf van Gelre 1096.  "…Gerardi comitis de Gelre et fratris eius Henrici…" witnessed the charter dated 1096 under which "Ida Boloniensis comitissa" donated property in "Genapia" to Afflighem abbey[712]

-         GRAVEN van GELRE

ii)         HEINRICH von Krieckenbeck (-before 1138).  "…Gerardi comitis de Gelre et fratris eius Henrici…" witnessed the charter dated 1096 under which "Ida Boloniensis comitissa" donated property in "Genapia" to Afflighem abbey[713].  Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed the dismissal of "comes Gerhardus et frater eius Heinricus" from the Vogteischaft of Kloster Siegburg by charter dated 5 Apr 1118 witnessed by "Comes Gerhardus et frater eius Heinricus, Comes Adolfus de Monte, Comes Adolfus de Saphenberg, Comes Gerhardus de Iuliaco, Gerhardus iunior filius Gerhardi, Gerhardus de Caesle, Arnulfus de Odenkirche"[714]m ---.  The name of Heinrich's wife is not known.  Heinrich & his wife had [one possible child]:

(a)       [REINER [I] von Krieckenbeck .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1164.] 

iii)        GOSWIN [I] .  The Chronicon Huberti names "Gerardus et Gozwinus filius eius [=Theodericum]" in 1082[715].  1104.  Herr von Heinsberg 1085. 

-         HERREN von HEINSBERG

2.         RUTGER [I] (-before 1051).  The Annales Rodenses record that "in Flandriensi provintia duo nobiles germani fratres…alter Gerardus et alter…Rutgerus" were exiled from "Anthonium [Antoing]…iuxta flumen Xelda" and were granted "Wasenberch…[et] Clive" respectively by the emperor[716]Graf von Kleve 1020/50. 

-        GRAFEN von KLEVE

 

 

 

 

Chapter 8.    COMTES de HESBAIE

 

 

A.      COMTES de HESBAIE

 

 

The county of Hesbaie, successor to the pagus Hasbaniensis, lay in what is today eastern Belgium, south of a line from the river Demer in the west to the town of Maaseik in the east, west and north of the river Maas/Meuse as far as the river Dyle in the west.  It included the city of Liège.  The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum…in Hasbanio comitatus IV…" to King Charles[717], although the reference to four counties within Hesbaye suggests that Hesbaye was a geographical entity and not a county itself.  Vanderkindere suggests that these four counties can be identified geographically by quartering the Hesbaie into four approximately equal parts[718], but his hypothesis appears to be based on a logical interpretation of the geography rather than any contemporary documentation.  He suggests that these four counties were Avernas (in the north-east of Hesbaie, first named in a charter dated to after 956[719], and which was later known as the county of Looz), "Brunengeruz" (in the south-west of Hesbaye, also known as Brugeron or Hougaerde, named in a charter dated [988] under which Otto III King of Germany confirmed properties of the church of Liège including "comitatum de Brunengeruuz"[720]), Louvain (in the north-west, first named in 1003[721]) and "Haspinga" ("comitatum Arnoldi comitis nomine Haspinga in pago Haspingowi" granted by Heinrich III King of Germany to the church of Liège Saint-Lambert by charter dated 24 Jan 1040[722], which by elimination would have to be in the south-east).  No reference to these four counties, or any ruling counts, apart from in the county of Hesbaie itself, has been found which is contemporary to the 870 agreement.  Hesbaie is first mentioned in 715: the third continuator of the Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium names "Robertus comes vel dux Hasbanie"[723], who can be identified with the ancestor of the Robertiner Grafen in Wormsgau, alleged ancestors of the Capetian kings of France (see FRANCONIA NOBILITY).  The ancestors of the wife of Emperor Louis I were also recorded in the county of Hesbaie.  However, it appears unlikely that they were related to Robert [I] for the reasons explained in the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY.  There are indications that, by the late 9th or early 10th centuries, the Reginar family of Hainaut had acquired interests in the county of Hesbaie.  Guillaume de Jumièges describes how "Rainier au long cou duc de Hasbaigne et du Hainaut et Radbold prince de Frise" fought the Viking Rollo but were forced back to their castles[724].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois Fontaines also refers to "Rainerus Hainonensium comes et Hasbanii dux" fighting the Vikings, dated to 876[725].  It is not certain that these can be considered reliable authorities, particular because of the reference to "dux", for which no other indications have been found that this was an officially sanctioned title in the Reginar family at that time.  However, other sources indicate that Reginar [I] held property in the county, including the abbey of St Servatius at Maastricht[726].  Rudolf, grandson of Reginar [I], is also recorded as count in Hesbaie in the mid-10th century.  No other direct references have been found to counts of Hesbaie in the 8th or 9th centuries.  The counties of Duras, Grez and Aarschot developed in the 11th and 12th centuries in the area of the former county of Hesbaie, which disappeared from the records.  In addition, the seigneurie of Moha evolved as a county within the territory of the former county of Hesbaie because it was held by a count.  The counts of Duras, Grez, Looz and Moha are shown in the present chapter, as well as the counts of Hesbaie.  The counties of Aarschot and Louvain are dealt with in the document BRABANT, LOUVAIN. 

 

 

1.         ROBERT [I], son of LAMBERT [II] comes in Neustria and Austrasia & his wife --- ([700/10]-before 764)Comte de Hesbaie.  The third continuator of the Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium names "Robertus comes vel dux Hasbanie" in 715, and quotes a charter dated 7 Apr 742 under which "Robertus comes, filius condam Lamberti" donated property "in villa…Sarcinio…in pago Hasbaniensi…[et] Halon, Scaffnis, Felepa et Marholt" to St Trudon[727].  Comes palatinus 741/42.  Graf im Oberrheingau und Wormsgau [750]. 

 

 

1.         EKKEHARD (-killed in battle Toulouse 844).  The Annales Bertiniani record "Etkardus quoque et Ravanus comites" among those killed in 844 at the siege of Toulouse against Pepin II King of Aquitaine and "filii Etkardi comitis duo, item Eokardus, Guntardus et Richuinus comites" among those captured[728]same person as…?  EGGEBARD (-after [834]).  [Comte de Hesbaie].  The Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that Lothar captured his father Emperor Louis in "pagum Hasbaniensem", where "Eggebardus comes et alii illius proceres pagi" tried to procure his release [in 834][729].  It is possible that "Eggebardus" is a transcription error for "Eggehardus".  No other reference to a count Eggebard has been found.   

 

 

1.         RUDOLF, son of REGINAR [II] Comte de Hainaut & his wife (-after 24 Jan 966).  His parentage is confirmed by Flodoard recording, in 944, that "Hugo dux" requested "Herimann[us]…qui missus erat…" to besiege "castella Ragnarii ac Rodulfi fratrum, Ludowici regis fidelium"[730], on the assumption that "Ragnarii" refers to Count Reginar [III].  "Otto…rex" confirmed the possession of Kloster Süsteren by Prüm abbey by charter dated 1 Jun 949, signed by "Cuonradus dux, Herimannus dux, Hezzo comes, Godefridus comes, Rudolfus comes, Reginherus comes"[731], the order of subscribers' names suggesting that Rudolf may have been considered senior to Reginar although it is not certain that this inevitably means that he was older.  Graf von Maasgau: "Otto…rex" granted property "Cassallo…in pago Masalant in comitatu Ruodolfi" to "vassallo nostro Ansfrid" at the request of "nostri fidelis Conradis ducis" by charter dated 7 Oct 950[732]Comte de Hesbaie: "Otto…rex" granted Kloster Alden-Eyck "in pago Huste in comitatu Ruodulphi" to the bishopric of Liège by charter dated 4 Jul 952[733].  "Otto…imperator augustus" confirmed the donations to the convent of Nivelles by "Regenarius comes" of property "in pago Ardenna super fluvia Aisna in comitatu Waudricia in villa Villaro" and by "predicti Regenarii filius nomine Liechardus in pago Hasbanensi in villa Gingolonham" and by "Rodolphus comes villa Lentlo" by charter dated 24 Jan 966[734].  The charter dated 17 Jan 966, under which "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "curtem Galmina…que quondam Rudolfi erat…in pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen[735], describes how Rudolf's property was confiscated, presumably at the same time as his brother Reginar [III] was banished, and granted to Werner. 

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WERNER [Garnier] (-killed in battle 973)Graf von Zülpich: Bruno archbishop of Köln confirmed an exchange of property "Baldau, quam Sigifredus comes…acquireret" for "in villa Nohas…in pago Heislensi in comitatu Tulpiaco" between the abbot of Stavelot and "comite Warnero fideli nostro" by charter dated 953 "regnante rege Ottone fratre nostro, anno xviii, Godefrido duce"[736]Comte de Hesbaye: "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen in exchange for property "in pago Liuhgouui in comitatu Richarii…in pago Auvlgowi in comitatu Eberhardi, Limberge…" by charter dated 17 Jan 966[737].  "Warneri comitis…" witnessed the charter dated 968 under which Gérard Bishop of Toul donated various churches to the abbey of Bouxières[738]Comte de Hainaut 973.  The Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium records that "Raineri", who had been banished by "archiepiscopus Bruno", was succeeded by "primum Richario nobili viro, sed hoc defuncto Warnero et Raynaldo, quibus etiam defunctis, Godefrido atque Arnulfo comitibus"[739].  Sigebert's Chronica records that "Raginerus et Lantbertus" (sons of Reginar [III] Comte de Hainaut) returned from exile in 973 and killed "Guarnero et Rainaldo", who occupied their father's county, "apud Perronam" and besieged "super Hagnam fluvium castello Buxude"[740].  Thietmar records that "Lantbertus, Reinherii filius…cum fratre…Reingerio" killed "Wirinharium et eius germanum Reinzonem"[741]

2.         RENAUD (-killed in battle Peronne 973).  The Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium records that "Raineri", who had been banished by "archiepiscopus Bruno", was succeeded by "primum Richario nobili viro, sed hoc defuncto Warnero et Raynaldo, quibus etiam defunctis, Godefrido atque Arnulfo comitibus"[742].  Sigebert's Chronica records that "Raginerus et Lantbertus" (sons of Reginar [III] Comte de Hainaut) returned from exile in 973 and killed "Guarnero et Rainaldo", who occupied their father's county, "apud Perronam" and besieged "super Hagnam fluvium castello Buxude"[743].  Thietmar records that "Lantbertus, Reinherii filius…cum fratre…Reingerio" killed "Wirinharium et eius germanum Reinzonem"[744]

 

 

1.         FOLCWIN (-after 30 Aug 974)Comte de Hesbaye: "Otto…imperator augustus" returned property "Turninas vocatum in pago Haspanensi et in comitatu Folchuuini comitis Hoio situm" to Kloster Stablo by charter dated 30 Aug 974[745].

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de DURAS

 

 

The counties of Duras, Grez and Aarschot developed in the 11th and 12th centuries in the area of the former county of Hesbaie, which disappeared from the records. 

 

 

1.         ---.  [Comte de Duras.]  m HERLENDIS, daughter of --- (-after 2 Nov 1023).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Herlendis comitissa, mater Godefridi comitis Duratii" when recording her donation to the abbey in 1021 for the soul of "filii sui primogeniti Adelberonis, Metensis ecclesie primicerii"[746].  “Godefridus comes cum matre sua Herlinda” donated “medietatem ville Witra” to Saint-Trond, for the soul of “filii sui Adalberonis”, by charter dated 2 Nov 1023, the dating clause of which records “ipsiusque monasterii advocato tunc existente Gisleberto eiusdem domine Herlinde filio[747].  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[748].  --- & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [ADALBERO (-before 1021).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Herlendis comitissa, mater Godefridi comitis Duratii" when recording her donation to the abbey in 1021 for the soul of "filii sui primogeniti Adelberonis, Metensis ecclesie primicerii"[749].  Primicier of Metz.  It appears unlikely that the eldest son of a count should be destined for the church.  It is therefore possible that Adalbero was the son of Herlendis by a former marriage.  “Godefridus comes cum matre sua Herlinda” donated “medietatem ville Witra” to Saint-Trond, for the soul of “filii sui Adalberonis”, by charter dated 2 Nov 1023, the dating clause of which records “ipsiusque monasterii advocato tunc existente Gisleberto eiusdem domine Herlinde filio[750].] 

b)         GODEFROI (-after 2 Nov 1023).  Comte de Duras.  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Herlendis comitissa, mater Godefridi comitis Duratii" when recording her donation to the abbey in 1021[751].  “Godefridus comes cum matre sua Herlinda” donated “medietatem ville Witra” to Saint-Trond, for the soul of “filii sui Adalberonis”, by charter dated 2 Nov 1023, the dating clause of which records “ipsiusque monasterii advocato tunc existente Gisleberto eiusdem domine Herlinde filio[752]

c)         GISELBERT (-after 2 Nov 1023).  “Godefridus comes cum matre sua Herlinda” donated “medietatem ville Witra” to Saint-Trond, for the soul of “filii sui Adalberonis”, by charter dated 2 Nov 1023, the dating clause of which records “ipsiusque monasterii advocato tunc existente Gisleberto eiusdem domine Herlinde filio[753]Comte de Duras.  [“Comitibus hiis: Hecelone, Henrico, Gisilberto, Sibodone, Arnulfo” subscribed the charter dated 1029 under which Poppo Archbishop of Trier deplored damage caused to monasteries and donated “ecclesiam Longuion” to the abbey of Notre-Dame-des-Martyrs[754].  It is not certain whether “Gisilberto” was Giselbert Comte de Duras or Giselbert Comte de Looz.]  m ---.  The name of Giselbert's wife is not known.  Giselbert & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [ODA (-before 1101).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "comes Otto et filius eius Gislebertus de Durachio" donated “allodii...in villa...Meldreges, non longe a villa Lencholt” for the soul of “uxoris suæ Odæ...matris[755].  Mantelius suggests that Oda was the daughter of Giselbert Comte de Duras and transmitted the avouerie of Saint-Trond (held by her father) to her descendants[756].  No primary source has been identified which confirms that this is correct, but it appears to be logical.  Baerten points out that, assuming that Oda was heiress of the county of Duras, she could have been the daughter of either Giselbert or of his predecessor and older brother Godefroi[757]m OTTO de Looz, son of [GISELBERT Comte de Looz] & his wife [Liutgarde de Namur] (-1101 or after).] 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES de DURAS (LOOZ)

 

 

OTTO de Looz, son of [GISELBERT Comte de Looz] & his wife [Liutgarde de Namur] (-before 1088).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Emmonem et Ottonem fratrem eius" as sons of Liutgarde, daughter of Albert [I] Comte de Namur[758].  From a chronological point of view, it is not possible for Emmo and his brother to have been the children of Otto de Looz who, as stated above, is recorded in another source as the husband of Liutgarde de Namur.  No primary source has been identified which confirms that Emmo and Otto were the sons of Comte Giselbert, although this suggested parentage would fit the chronology of the family.  “...Ottonis advocati et fratris eius Emmonis comitis de Los, Alberti comitis de Musal...” signed the charter dated 1059 under which “Fredericus...Lothariencium dux” donated a serf to Saint-Trond[759].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Ottonem comitem Durachii, fratrem Emmonis comitis de Los" when recording his installation in 1060 as subadvocatus of Saint-Trond[760]

m ODA, daughter of [GISELBERT Comte de Duras & his wife ---].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "comes Otto et filius eius Gislebertus de Durachio" donated “allodii...in villa...Meldreges, non longe a villa Lencholt” for the soul of “uxoris suæ Odæ...matris[761].  Mantelius suggests that Oda was the daughter of Giselbert Comte de Duras and transmitted the avouerie of Saint-Trond (held by her father) to her descendants[762].  No primary source has been identified which confirms that this is correct, but it appears to be logical.  Baerten points out that, assuming that Oda was heiress of the county of Duras, she could have been the daughter of either Giselbert or of his predecessor and older brother Godefroi[763]

Comte Otto & his wife had two children: 

1.         GISELBERT (-before 1138).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Otto frater Emmonis" as father of "Gislebertum de Duraz"[764].  "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed donations to St Jakob, Liège by charter dated 23 Apr 1088, at the request of "Heinrico comite de Durbui", witnessed by "comite Cuonrado et Gileberto filio comitis Ottonis de Los…"[765].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Durachiensis comes Gyslebertus"[766]Comte de Duras.  “Gislebertus comes et advocatus...” signed the charter dated 1088 under which “Heldeboldus” donated “filiam meam...Conegunt” to Saint-Trond[767].  “Comite et advocato Giselberto...filio eius Ottone, comite, Teoderico de Los...” signed the charter dated 1 Apr 1108 by which “Froweken” declared herself of the family of Saint-Trond[768].  "Comes de Claromonte Lambertus" granted the right to take wood from his forests in "predicti castelli" to the monks of Flône by charter dated 1136, witnessed by "comes Arnulfus de Los, comes Gislebertus de Duras, Walterus advocatus de Barz…"[769].  Sous-avocat of St Truido.  m firstly GERTRUD, daughter of --- (-1114, bur Abbey St Trudo).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "comitissa Gertrude" as wife of "advocato nostro Gisleberto", naming "comite Arnulfo et Theoderico fratre eius", and specifying her burial in the abbey[770]m secondly (after 1114) ODA de Chiny, daughter of OTTO [II] Comte de Chiny & his wife Alix de Namur.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Comte Giselbert & his first wife had [nine] children: 

a)         OTTO [II] (-1147).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Ottone et Gisleberto" as sons of "advocato nostro Gisleberto" and his wife Gertrude[771].  “Comite et advocato Giselberto...filio eius Ottone, comite, Teoderico de Los...” signed the charter dated 1 Apr 1108 by which “Froweken” declared herself of the family of Saint-Trond[772]Comte de Duras.  “Advocatus comes Otto..” signed the charter dated 1138 under which Folcard abbot of Saint-Trond renewed letters by which “Johannes de Trudenelegen” transferred “Mariam matrem Johannis de Hales” to Saint-Trond[773].  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146, which adds that the donor had bequeathed “advocatiam” and soon after that “gener eius Godefridus comes et filia Julia” donated property to the abbey[774].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records a dying donation of "comes Otto" in 1147 and his burial in the abbey[775]m as her first husband, BERTHE de Ribemont, daughter of GODEFROI [II] de Ribemont Châtelain de Valenciennes Seigneur de Bouchain & his wife Yolande van Geldern.  The Chronicon Hanoniense records that "Yoandis comitissa vidua" married secondly "Godefrido de Bochesin castellano Valencenensi", by whom she was mother of "filium…Godefridum et filiam Bertam [uxorem] comiti de Duraz, deinde nupsit Egidio de Sancto Oberto a quo filium…Gerardum et filiam…[uxorem] Nicholao de Barbencione"[776].  She married secondly Gilles de Saint-Aubert.  Comte Otto & his wife had one child: 

i)          JULIANE (-1164).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146, which adds that the donor had bequeathed “advocatiam” and soon after that “gener eius Godefridus comes et filia Julia” donated property to the abbey[777].  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “decimam...de Molembisul” made by “Erlendis quondam Geldoniensis comitissa viro suo defuncto” to Heylissem abbey, which was confirmed by “Juliane comitisse uxoris Godefridi comitis” with the consent of “filiis et filiabus suis Egidio, Petro, Conone, Gerberga et Claritia” for the soul of “viri sui comitis Godefridi”, by charter dated 1164, before 12 May[778].  “Rodulphus...ecclesie beati Lamberti...in Leodio custos” notified that “domina Juliana de Duraz bone memorie comitissa et filius eius Egidius” donated “dimidium mansum allodii sui in Geldonge” to Heylissem abbey by charter dated 1164, before Nov[779].  [Europäische Stammtafeln indicates that Juliane married secondly Engurrand d’Orbais[780].  This second marriage may be hinted at by the charter dated 1171 under which “Godefridus...dux Lotharingie et comes Bracbantie” donated “ecclesie...in Pervweiz” to Heylissem abbey, specifying that “comes de Duraz...a quo Engelrandus de Orbais...infiodatus est” was “inbeneficatus a nobis” and that “Godefridum de Sumbreffia” also donated “dimidia parte huius beneficii[781].  This document does indicate some Duras/Orbais family connection but its wording is insufficiently precise to conclude that this supposed second marriage took place.  In addition, the chronology of the Duras and Orbais families is not favourable for such a marriage.  Another charter confirms that the Brabant, Duras and Orbais families were joint donors of the church of Perwez, although the basis of their joint interest has not been ascertained: Bruno Archdeacon of Liège confirmed the donation of “ecclesie...in Peruuueis” to Heylissem abbey made by “quatuor viri nobiles quorum fundus fuit ecclesie...dux Godefridus, comes Egidius, Eigelramus, Godefridus” by charter dated 1171[782].]  m [firstly] GODEFROI Comte de Montaigu et de Clermont, son of LAMBERT Comte de Montaigu & his wife --- (-1161 or after).  [m secondly ENGUERRAND d'Orbais, son of BERNARD d´Orbais & his wife Ida de Coucy (-1185 or after).] 

b)         [CONON .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Seigneur d'Autreppes et de Diepenbeck.  Canon at Liège, St Lambert 1135/55.] 

c)         GISELBERT .  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Ottone et Gisleberto" as sons of "advocato nostro Gisleberto" and his wife Gertrude[783]

d)         GERARD (-1174).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Otto comes, frater eiusdem Gerardi", when recording the latter's appointment as Abbot of St Truido in 1145[784].  “Gerardus...abbas Sancti Trudonis” reacquired from Saint-Trond “allodium...de Aleym”, which “pater meus Otto comes Durachiensis” had donated and was claimed by “Arnulphus nepos meus”, by charter dated 1150[785].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records his resignation as abbot in 1155[786].  

e)         THIERRY (-1183 or after).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146[787].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "frater eius Theodericus canonicus Sancti Lamberti et Bruno, qui post archidiaconatum eiusdem ecclesiæ meruit" as witnessing the donation of "comes Otto" in 1147[788].  Provost at Huy 1130/53.  Canon at Liège, St Lambert 1141/58.  Archdeacon 1167/83. 

f)          BRUNO (-1177 or after).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146[789].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "frater eius Theodericus canonicus Sancti Lamberti et Bruno, qui post archidiaconatum eiusdem ecclesiæ meruit" as witnessing the donation of "comes Otto" in 1147[790].  Canon at Liège, St Lambert 1149.  "Gilius quondam comes Durachiensis" donated property to the Knights Hospitallers, naming "Petrus frater meus comes de Monteacuto et Cono frater meus comes Durachiensis…et avunculus noster domnus Bruno archidiaconus", by charter dated 1175[791]

g)         [daughter .  Alexander´s mother was the sister of the donor in the charter quoted below, assuming that “nepos” can be interpreted in that document as nephew.]  m --- Herr von Oehren, son of ---.  One child: 

i)          ALEXANDER (-Rome 9 Aug 1167, bur Liège).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146, witnessed by “...Alexander prepositus et archidiaconus...[792].  Provost and archdeacon.  “Alexander...prepositus et archidiaconus Leodiensis ecclesie” established the rights of “ecclesie de Alost” by charter dated 1160[793].  Henri Bishop of Liège confirmed “ecclesia parrochyalis...beate Marie...in opido burgi Sancti Trudonis...[et] ecclesia de Myeles” to Saint-Trond, with the consent of and at the request of “Alexandri archydiaconis”, by charter dated 1163[794]Bishop of Liège 1164.  The Aegidii Aurævallensis Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium records the succession of “Alexander secundus filius nobili domini de Orreo iuxta Treveris, prepositus maioris ecclesie” after the death of Bishop Henri, and his death “V Id Aug” 1167 from plague during the siege of Rome by Emperor Friedrich I and his burial “Leodii...in maiori ecclesia[795].  “Heinricus...major in Leodio prepositus et archidiaconus” confirmed an agreement between the abbot of Saint-Trond and “Arnulfus...de Felpa”, which had been agreed with “pie memorie domini Alexandri majoris prepositi postea...episcopi”, by charter dated 1177[796]

h)         [--- .  Arnoul´s mother was the sister of the donor in the charter quoted below, assuming that “nepos” can be interpreted in that document as nephew.  It is not known whether this daughter was the same person who was the mother of Alexander who is shown above.]  m ---.  The name of Arnoul´s father is not known.  [As noted below, Klaversma suggests that Arnoul was the same person as Arnulf van Kortessem (who may have been the son of Mainer van Kortessem)[797].  Piot notes that “Mainerus de Corterices” is named in a document dated 1067, “Mainerus de Corterec” in 1092, “Memerus de Cortereces” in 1101, and “Memery de Curtereceis” in 1143[798].  It is clear that these entries must refer to at least three different individuals of the same name.]  One child: 

i)          ARNOUL (-after 1150).  Henri Bishop of Liège approved the donation of “possessionis sue Aleym” made to Saint-Trond by “comes Otto Duracheinsis”, with the consent of “fratrum suorum Theoderici et Brunonis et nepotum suorum Alexandri prepositi et Arnulfi”, by charter dated 1146, witnessed by “...Arnulfus de Curtrice...[799].  “Gerardus...abbas Sancti Trudonis” reacquired from Saint-Trond “allodium...de Aleym”, which “pater meus Otto comes Durachiensis” had donated and was claimed by “Arnulphus nepos meus”, by charter dated 1150[800]same person as...?  ARNULF van Kortessem [near Hasselt, Limburg Province, Belgium] (-after 1154).  Klaversma suggests that Arnoul was the same person as Arnulf van Kortessem (who may have been the son of Mainer van Kortessem) who is named as witness in the document quoted above[801].  It is not clear from the document in question that the witness was the same person as the relative of the donor who is named in the body of the charter.  "Arnoldus de Curtertho..." witnessed the charter dated 1154 under which "Ludovicus...comes in Los" donated "allodium nostrum in Barebergh" to Averboden[802].  It has not been ascertained whether Arnulf was related to Roger van Kortessem and his sister Ida who are named in the following charter: Gerardus...comes de Los dominaque matre mea Agneta comitissa filioque eius Hugone fratre meo” granted privileges to “ville nostre de Brustemie”, with the consent of “Rogero...de Curtereces et sorore eius Yda”, by charter dated 1175[803]

2.         BOVO de Duras .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  m ---.  The name of Bovo´s wife is not known.  Bovo & his wife had five children: 

a)         SIMON de Waha .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Liège, St Lambert 1103. 

b)         JULIEN (-1127 or after).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Seigneur de Waha.  1102/27.  m MATHILDE de Fronville, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Julien & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUY .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Liège, St Lambert 1118/47. 

c)         HUGEL de Waha .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Châtelain de Mirwart.  m CLEMENTIA de Chiny, daughter of ARNAUD [II] Comte de Chiny & his first wife Adela de Ramerupt [Roucy].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Hugel & his wife had one child: 

i)          LAMBERT .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Liège, St Lambert 1196/1223. 

d)         BOVO .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Liège, St Lambert [1108]. 

e)         JEAN .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbot of St Hubert. 

 

 

 

D.      COMTES de GREZ

 

 

The counties of Duras, Grez and Aarschot developed in the 11th and 12th centuries in the area of the former county of Hesbaie, which disappeared from the records.  The comtes de Grez are recorded with the comital title only at the end of the 11th century.  It is likely that the county was incorporated into Brabant[804], presumably in the early 12th century. 

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         HENRI de Grez (-after 1099).  "…Heinricus et frater eius Warnerus de Greys…" witnessed the charter dated 1091 under which Henri de Verdun Bishop of Liège approved the foundation of Flône[805]Comte de Grez.  “Henricus comes de Greis, Steppo de Brucsella et frater eius Walterus, Eustacius de Corbeka, Sigerus et Franco frater eius…Franco castellanus de Brucsella…” witnessed the charter dated 1099 under which the abbot of Afflighem acquired the church of Frasne[806]

2.         GARNIER [Warner] de Grez (-22 Jul 1100, bur Josaphat Sainte-Marie).  "…Heinricus et frater eius Warnerus de Greys…" witnessed the charter dated 1091 under which Henri de Verdun Bishop of Liège approved the foundation of Flône[807]Comte de Grez.  "…Comes Warnerus de Greis…" signed the charter dated 14 Jun 1096 under which Otbert Bishop of Liège declared having bought "castellum de Covino" from "comite Balduino de Mont"[808].  William of Tyre names "Garins comte de Grez" among those who left on the First Crusade with Robert Count of Flanders[809].  Albert of Aix records that "Godefridus dux regni Lotharingiæ…fraterque eius uterinus Baldewinus, Warnerus de Greis cognatus ipsius Ducis, Baldewinus pariter de Burch, Reinhardus comes de Tul, Petrus…frater ipsius, Dodo de Cons, Henricus de Ascha ac frater illius Godefridus" left for Jerusalem in Aug 1096[810].  William of Tyre names "comes Garnerus cognomento de Gres…dominorum ducis et comitis consanguineus"[811], indicating Godefroi de Bouillon princeps of Jerusalem.  The exact relationship between Garnier de Grez and the family of the Comtes de Boulogne is not known.  Albert of Aix names "…Warnerus de Greis castello…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[812].  Albert of Aix records "Petrus de Stadeneis, Reinardus de Tul frater eius, Warnerus de Greis, Henricus de Ascha, Reinardus de Hamersbach, Walterus de Domedart" as those who guarded Adhémar Bishop of Le Puy into the mountains towards the port of Simeon after finding the holy lance, dated to mid-1098 from the context[813].  In defiance of Patriarch Daibert, Godefroi's household, under the leadership of his kinsman Warner Comte de Grez [Gray], assured the succession of his brother Baudouin by seizing the citadel of Jerusalem.  Despite Warner's death 22 Jul 1100, this show of defiance continued into the Autumn when Robert Bishop of Lydda retrieved Baudouin from Edessa to secure his succession.  Albert of Aix records the death of "Warnerus…cognatus" soon after Duke Godefroi died, and his burial "in valle Josaphat in porticu basilicæ sanctæ Mariæ virginis" on the eighth day after the death of the duke[814]m ADELAIDE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Garnier & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRI de Grez .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

 

E.      COMTES de LOOZ

 

 

Vanderkindere states that the county of Avernas, to the west of Waremme, was the predecessor of the county of Looz, and suggests that it was one of the four original component counties in Hesbaye which are recorded in the treaty of Meersen dated 870[815].  As an indication that this hypothesis is correct, he cites a charter dated 946 (redated to after 956 by Vanderkindere) which notes an exchange of property, including "villa Lens in comitatu Avernas temporibus Rodulphi comitis" [identified as the ancestor of the comtes de Looz, see below] held by "Goderamnus", between Trier Cathedral and Maastricht St Servatius[816].  The county of Looz itself is referred to in the charter of Baldric Bishop of Liège dated 1016 which records that the advocacy of the church was given to "fratri meo Gisleberto, comitis…de Los"[817], although it is likely that this document was a later forgery.  Baerten, after studying the fiefs held by the comtes de Looz, assesses that in the 13th/14th centuries the county of Looz covered the territory situated between the duchy of Brabant, the principality of Liège and the river Meuse north of the river Geer, and therefore included large parts of Hesbaye, Masau and Taxandria[818].  Baerten also lists in detail various enclaves, belonging principally to Liège, within the county and speculates on its precise extent in the 11th and 12th centuries. 

 

The reconstruction of the early generations of this family is shaky as the primary sources on which it is based are confused and contradictory, as can be seen from the extracts quoted below.  The issue is further confused by Mantelius whose reconstruction of the early generations is inconsistent with the primary sources[819].  The chronology suggests that what is shown in the present document could be an accurate representation, but this cannot be guaranteed.  It is not known whether other primary sources exist, which have not yet been identified, which could clarify the position. 

 

 

1.         RUDOLF, son of NIBELUNG Graaf van Betuwe & his wife --- de Hainaut .  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 24 Jun 943 under which [his paternal uncle] “Baldricus...Traiectensis ecclæsie...presul...per manus advocati mei Folberti”, addressing [Rudolf´s mother as] “nobilissime probateque Deo sacrate” [unnamed], granted “res...de abbatia...Hereberc...mansos...Rura, Liethorp, Linne, Sulethum, Flothorp, Ascolon, Malicalieol, Curnelo” to “filius vester...Baldricus in vita sua...post eum Rodulfus frater suus”, for the souls of “genitoris nostri Raineri comitis et insuper Nevelungi senioris vestri[820].  Mantelius says that Rudolf was the son of Reginar II Comte de Hainaut, cited in charters until 24 Jan 966 (see the document HAINAUT)[821].  He does not cite the primary source on which he bases this assertion, but his work on the early generations of the Looz family does not inspire confidence as his reconstruction is inconsistent in other details with the primary sources which are quoted in the present document.  m ---.  The name and origin of Rudolf's wife is not known.  Vanderkindere suggests that she was ---, daughter of Immo Comte de Hesbaye, to explain the transmission of the name Immo into this family[822].  While this cannot be the only explanation for the introduction of the name into the Looz family, Vanderkindere also cites the charter dated 1078 under which "Ermengardis comitissa" donated property among which "…allodium…apud Gelmines [Jamine]..." to the church of Saint-Barthélemy de Liège[823], the same property which had been granted to her father Comte Immo, and suggests that the donor was somehow connected with the same family.  Widukind records that "Immo" offered "unicam filiam" to "Ansfrid" as a means of capturing the latter[824]

 

 

2.         [OTTO (-[before 1016]).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ" as wife of "Ottonis comitis de Los"[825].  No other reference to this Comte Otto has been found.  Otto and his wife are not shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[826].  From a chronological point of view, an additional generation between Rudolf (967) and Giselbert ([1044/46]) would not be surprising.  If Otto did exist, and was the father of the sons shown below, he would have died before 1016, the date of the charter in which they are named (see below).  The name Otto appears in later generations of the Looz family, which gives some credence to its being the name of an earlier ancestor.  [According to Mantelius, the father of Giselbert and Baldric [III] Bishop of Liège was "Ludovicus de Los Rudolfi comitis secundo genitus" (no primary source cited)[827].  No trace of this person has been found in the primary sources so far consulted in the preparation of the present document.]  m ---.  The name of Otto´s wife is not known.  [The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ" as wife of "Ottonis comitis de Los" and the couple as parents of "Baldricus secundus"[828].  If this is correct, Otto´s wife was Liutgarde de Namur, daughter of Albert [I] Comte de Namur & his wife Ermengardis of Lower Lotharingia [Carolingian].  However, it appears chronologically impossible for a daughter of Comte Albert [I] (whose marriage is dated to 990) to have been the mother of Baldric [III] Bishop of Liège (installed as bishop in 1008).  Another variation is provided by the Vita Arnulfi which names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis", and adds that Liutgarde was the mother of "Emmonem et Ottonem fratrem eius", although without naming Liutgarde´s husband[829].  From a chronological point of view, this version is more coherent but, if correct, Liutgarde´s husband would have been Giselbert not Otto.]  [Otto] & his wife had three children: 

a)         GISELBERT (-[1044/46]).  His relationship to the Looz family is confirmed by the Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium which names "Baldricus secundus…frater Ghiselbertus", when recording the former's installation as Bishop of Liège, read together with another part of the same passage which names "Baldricus secundus…filius Ottonis comitis de Los ex Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ…"[830].  As noted above, no other reference has been found to the father of Giselbert and Baldric being named Otto.  Europäische Stammtafeln shows Giselbert and his brothers as sons of Rudolf[831], although from a chronological point of view this seems unlikely to be correct.  Comte de Looz

-        see below

b)         BALDRIC [III] (-29 Jul 1018, bur Monastery St Jacobi).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Baldricus secundus…filius Ottonis comitis de Los ex Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ, Ottonis prefati ducis filie, progenitus, frater Ghiselbertus", when recording his installation as Bishop of Liège[832]Bishop of Liège 1008.  The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the death in 1008 of “Notgerus Laudovicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Baldricus[833].  Sigebert's Chronica records the appointment in 1008 of "Baldricus Leodicensium episcopus"[834].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that “Baldricus” succeeded Notger as bishop of Liège[835].  The Continuatio Gemblacensis of Sigebert's Chronica records in 1015 that "Baldricus episcopus” acquired “Florinensem abbatiam[836].  "Baldricus…Leodiensis ecclesiæ sacerdos" founded the abbey of Liège Saint-Jacques, in the presence of "fratribus meis Gisleberto…comite de Los et Arnulfo", by charter dated 1016, witnessed by "…Arnulfus comes frater comitis Gisleberti"[837].  Thietmar records the death “IV Kal Aug...in Tiele” of “Baldericus Leodicensis episcopus[838].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the death of "Baldricus secundus" specifying that he was buried "in cripta monasterii sancti Iacobi"[839].  The Annales Quedlinburgenses record the death in 1018 of “Baldricus Leodicensis episcopus” and the succession of “Fulmodo[840].  The Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensis records that Baldric died “ipso dia eademque hora qua prælium apud Flardenges” [Vlaerdingen][841]

c)         ARNAUD (-before 1040).  "Baldricus…Leodiensis ecclesiæ sacerdos" founded the abbey of Liège Saint-Jacques, in the presence of "fratribus meis Gisleberto…comite de Los et Arnulfo", by charter dated 1016, witnessed by "…Arnulfus comes frater comitis Gisleberti"[842].  Comte [de Hesbaie]. 

 

 

GISELBERT, son of [Comte OTTO & his wife ---] (-[1044/46]).  His relationship to the Looz family is confirmed by the Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium which names "Baldricus secundus…frater Ghiselbertus", when recording the former's installation as Bishop of Liège, read together with another part of the same passage which names "Baldricus secundus…filius Ottonis comitis de Los ex Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ…"[843].  As noted above, no other reference has been found to the father of Giselbert and Baldric being named Otto.  Europäische Stammtafeln shows Giselbert and his brothers as sons of Rudolf[844], although from a chronological point of view this seems unlikely to be correct.  Comte de Looz.  "Baldricus…Leodiensis ecclesiæ sacerdos" founded the abbey of Liège Saint-Jacques, in the presence of "fratribus meis Gisleberto…comite de Los et Arnulfo", by charter dated 1016, witnessed by "…Arnulfus comes frater comitis Gisleberti"[845].  [“Comitibus hiis: Hecelone, Henrico, Gisilberto, Sibodone, Arnulfo” subscribed the charter dated 1029 under which Poppo Archbishop of Trier deplored damage caused to monasteries and donated “ecclesiam Longuion” to the abbey of Notre-Dame-des-Martyrs[846].  It is not certain whether “Gisilberto” was Giselbert Comte de Duras or Giselbert Comte de Looz.]  A charter dated 1031, which records that "Godeschalkus præpositus" founded the church of Saint-Barthélemy near Liège, states that “Baldricus episcopus” had granted “allodium de Butines...de Aila” to “fratris sui Gisleberti comtiis de Lon[847].  "Chonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed property "in Alsatia et in comitatibus Gisilberti et Wezilonis comitum" to Kloster Peterlingen by charter dated 1027[848].  "Domina Adelaydis comitissa uxor quondam Hludovici comitis" donated property to Verdun Saint-Vanne by undated charter, subscribed by "Gislebertus comes"[849]

m ---.  The identity of the wife of Comte Giselbert has not been established beyond doubt.  The Vita Arnulfi names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis", and adds that Liutgarde was the mother of "Emmonem et Ottonem fratrem eius", although without naming Liutgarde´s husband[850].  From a chronological point of view, it appears likely that Emmo and Otto were the sons of Giselbert, although no primary source has so far been found which names their father.  If this is correct, Giselbert´s wife was Liutgarde de Namur, daughter of Albert [I] Comte de Namur & his wife Ermengardis of Lower Lotharingia [Carolingian].  As discussed above, another version is provided by the Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium which names "Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ" as wife of "Ottonis comitis de Los" and the couple as parents of "Baldricus secundus"[851].  However, as discussed above, this appears chronologically impossible.  Until more information comes to light, it appears preferable to assume that Liutgarde was the mother of Emmo and Otto which, if correct, means that she was probably the wife of Giselbert. 

Comte Giselbert & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         [EMMO [Immo] (-17 Jan 1078).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Emmonem et Ottonem fratrem eius" as sons of Liutgarde, daughter of Albert [I] Comte de Namur[852].  From a chronological point of view, it is not possible for Emmo and his brother to have been the children of Otto de Looz who, as stated above, is recorded in another source as the husband of Liutgarde de Namur.  No primary source has been identified which confirms that Emmo and Otto were the sons of Comte Giselbert, although this suggested parentage would fit the chronology of the family.  Comte de Looz.] 

-        see below

2.         [OTTO (-before 1088).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Emmonem et Ottonem fratrem eius" as sons of Liutgarde, daughter of Albert [I] Comte de Namur[853].  From a chronological point of view, it is not possible for Emmo and his brother to have been the children of Otto de Looz who, as stated above, is recorded in another source as the husband of Liutgarde de Namur.  No primary source has been identified which confirms that Emmo and Otto were the sons of Comte Giselbert, although this suggested parentage would fit the chronology of the family.  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Ottonem comitem Durachii, fratrem Emmonis comitis de Los" when recording his installation in 1060 as subadvocatus of Saint-Trond[854].

-        COMTES de DURAS

3.         [HERMAN (-after 1047).  "Hermannus frater comitis de Los archidiaconus Leodiensis" founded seven canonicates at the church of Looz in 1047[855].  Archdeacon of Liège.  Assuming that the death date of Comte Giselbert is correctly shown above, it is likely that Herman was the brother of Comte Emmo.] 

 

 

EMMO [Immo], son of [GISELBERT Comte de Looz] & his wife [Liutgarde de Namur] (-17 Jan 1078).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Emmonem et Ottonem fratrem eius" as sons of Liutgarde, daughter of Albert [I] Comte de Namur[856].  From a chronological point of view, it is not possible for Emmo and his brother to have been the children of Otto de Looz who, as stated above, is recorded in another source as the husband of Liutgarde de Namur.  No primary source has been identified which confirms that Emmo and Otto were the sons of Comte Giselbert, although this suggested parentage would fit the chronology of the family.  Comte de Looz.  “...Ottonis advocati et fratris eius Emmonis comitis de Los, Alberti comitis de Musal...” signed the charter dated 1059 under which “Fredericus...Lothariencium dux” donated a serf to Saint-Trond[857].  The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "XVII Kal Feb" of "Emononis comitis"[858]

m ---.  The identity of the wife of Comte Emmo has not been established beyond doubt.  The Annalista Saxo names "Bertrada, soror Suanehildis comitisse de castro quod dicitur Lon in Hasbania, cuius filius fuit Arnoldus comes Mogotiensis prefectus" as wife of Graf Dietrich (identified as Dietrich I Graf von Katlenburg)[859].  As noted in the document HOLLAND, no primary source has been identified which indicates that Bertrada was the daughter of Dirk III Count of Holland.  Nevertheless, from a chronological point of view Count Dirk is the most likely father, assuming that Bertrada was a member of that family.  "Arnoldus comes Mogotiensis prefectus" in this passage must be identified as Arnaud [I] Comte de Looz, who is recorded as the son of Emmo Comte de Looz.  If that is correct, the wife of Emmo was Suanehildis of Holland, daughter of Dirk III "Hierosolymita" Count of Holland & his wife Othelindis [von Haldensleben] (-31 Mar [1100]).  From a chronological point of view, the suggestion is feasible: the birth of the children of Count Dirk III must be dated to [1010/35], while Comte Emmo´s children were probably born in [1040/60].  The necrology of Liège Saint-Jacques points to this being the correct solution when it records the death 31 Mar of “Spannehildis comitissima de Los” and her donation[860].  Verdonk indicates that she died in 1100 on a pilgrimage to Rome[861].  [The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that "comitis Arnoldi Lossensis" descended "ex parte matris" from "Cliviæ comitibus"[862], which would be inconsistent with this hypothesis but, as pointed out below, Klaversma notes that this source is a 17th century forgery and is therefore unreliable[863].] 

Comte Emmo & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         [SOPHIE ([1044/46]-[1065]).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Arnulfum comitem de Lo et Sophiam ducissam de Hungaria…et ducissam de Hui" as the children of Emmo Comte de Looz, adding that Sophie was the mother of "regem de Hungaria"[864].  This manuscript, written at Oudenbourg abbey, is dated to 1220[865].  This is late to be reliable.  In addition, the document represents the ancestors of Comte Emmo in a way which is inconsistent with earlier primary sources.  "Ducissam de Huy" has not yet been identified.  Sophie is identified as the first wife of King Géza in Europäische Stammtafeln[866].  Kerbl, in his analysis concerning Géza I's [second] Byzantine marriage, does not mention this supposed first marriage[867].  If it is correct, the marriage presumably took place while Géza was a hostage at the imperial court, which Kerbl dates to [1062/63][868].  This is consistent with Sophie having been born in [1044/46], which is somewhat earlier than the expected birth dates of Emmo´s other children.  As the county of Looz was among the temporal possessions of the Bishop of Liège and, as such, part of the duchy of Lower Lotharingia under the suzerainty of the German emperor, it would not be improbable for a daughter of the comte de Looz to have been staying at the imperial court and for her marriage to have been arranged with another noble visitor.  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that "Sophia de Los, Hungariæ regina, comitis Arnoldi Lossensis soror" sent letters to her brother after hearing that he intended to found Averboden abbey[869].  This report is clearly anachronistic as the abbey in question was founded in 1135, when Sophie de Looz could not possibly have been queen of Hungary.  The question remains whether Sophie´s supposed marriage to King Géza I is based on speculation, suggested by an as yet unidentified secondary source which was trying to make some sense of the passages in the Vita Arnulfi and the Vita Andreæ by identifying the most likely Hungarian king who could have been Sophie´s husband.  Until further sources come to light, it has been decided to show Sophie de Looz in square brackets.  Whatever the truth of the matter, the chronology of the births of King Géza´s older children suggests that their mother could not have been the Byzantine wife whom he married in [1066/75].  m ([1062]) as his first wife, GÉZA I King of Hungary, son of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland ([in Poland] [1044/45]-25 Apr 1077, bur Vac).] 

2.         ARNAUD [I] ([1050/60]-after 1125).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Arnulfum comitem de Lo et Sophiam ducissam de Hungaria…et ducissam de Hui" as the children of Emmo Comte de Looz[870].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "nepote suo [=Gislebertus] comite Arnulfo de Los"[871], although another passage names "Arnulfus comes de Los, nepos Ghislberti comitis de Durachio"[872] suggesting that the former also refers to Count Arnaud's cousin not his grandfather.  Comte de Looz

-        see below

3.         THIERRY de Looz (-after 1 Apr 1125).  "...Comes Arnoldus de Lon, frater eius Theodericus..." witnessed the charter dated 1096 under which "Ida...filii mei ducis Godefridi" donated property to Münster-Bilsen abbey[873].  “Comite et advocato Giselberto...filio eius Ottone, comite, Teoderico de Los...” signed the charter dated 1 Apr 1108 by which “Froweken” declared herself of the family of Saint-Trond[874].  "Arnulfus comes Lonensis et frater eius Theodericus" subscribed the charter dated 1111 under which "Otbertus…Leodiensis episcopus" declared that the church of Lixhe belonged to Liège Saint-Paul[875].  "...Arnulfo comite de Los, advocato Sancti Jacobi...Theodericus frater comitis Arnulphi..." witnessed the charter dated 1 Apr 1125 under which Emperor Heinrich V confirmed a donation to Liège Saint-Jacques made by "Guda mulier nobilis"[876].  [Graaf van Horn.]  [The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that in 1131 "Walravium Limburgi comitem, Lotharingiæ inferioris ducem" wished to install "fratrem suum Henricum in præpositura sancti Lamberti Leodii", which was opposed by "Rainerum de Los præpositum de Fosse, Arnoldi comitis Lossensis fratrem natu minorem, et Theodoricum de Los primum dominum de Hornes", and that Emperor Lothaire appointed "Hermannum de Hornes S. Gereonis præpositum dicti Raineri nepotem, Guidonem de Limburgo sancti Lamberti canonicum etiam dicti Hermanni nepotem…Godefridum comitem de Vianden" to arbitrate the dispute[877].  Klaversma notes that this source is a 17th century forgery and is therefore unreliable[878].]  m ---.  The name of Thierry's wife is not known.  Thierry & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [THIERRY (-after 1147).  Graaf van Horn.  "Theodoricus dominus Hornensis" acknowledged receipt of money from "Arnulphum dominum et avunculum comitem Lossensem" and also holding the castle of Horn from him, by charter dated 1147, witnessed by "Theodorici comitis de Hostade, generi nostri Godefridi comitis Durasii, Giselberti subadvocati sancti Trudonis, Alberonis Lossensis et Arnoldi domini de Stinvort, fratrum et cognatorum nostrorum…"[879].] 

b)         [HERMAN (-31 Jan 1156, bur Utrecht Cathedral).  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that in 1131 "Walravium Limburgi comitem, Lotharingiæ inferioris ducem" wished to install "fratrem suum Henricum in præpositura sancti Lamberti Leodii", which was opposed by "Rainerum de Los præpositum de Fosse, Arnoldi comitis Lossensis fratrem natu minorem, et Theodoricum de Los primum dominum de Hornes", and that Emperor Lothaire appointed "Hermannum de Hornes S. Gereonis præpositum dicti Raineri nepotem, Guidonem de Limburgo sancti Lamberti canonicum etiam dicti Hermanni nepotem…Godefridum comitem de Vianden" to arbitrate the dispute[880].  Klaversma, noting that this source is a 17th century forgery, concludes that Herman probably belonged to the genus Horninga and was not a member of the Horn family[881].  Archdeacon of St Lambert, Liège 1136.  Provost of St Gereon, Köln 1149/51.  Bishop of Utrecht 1150.] 

c)         [--- .  m ---.  One child:] 

i)          [GUY van Limburg .  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that in 1131 "Walravium Limburgi comitem, Lotharingiæ inferioris ducem" wished to install "fratrem suum Henricum in præpositura sancti Lamberti Leodii", which was opposed by "Rainerum de Los præpositum de Fosse, Arnoldi comitis Lossensis fratrem natu minorem, et Theodoricum de Los primum dominum de Hornes", and that Emperor Lothar appointed "Hermannum de Hornes S. Gereonis præpositum dicti Raineri nepotem, Guidonem de Limburgo sancti Lamberti canonicum etiam dicti Hermanni nepotem…Godefridum comitem de Vianden" to arbitrate the dispute[882].] 

4.         [RENAUD .  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that in 1131 "Walravium Limburgi comitem, Lotharingiæ inferioris ducem" wished to install "fratrem suum Henricum in præpositura sancti Lamberti Leodii", which was opposed by "Rainerum de Los præpositum de Fosse, Arnoldi comitis Lossensis fratrem natu minorem, et Theodoricum de Los primum dominum de Hornes", and that Emperor Lothaire appointed "Hermannum de Hornes S. Gereonis præpositum dicti Raineri nepotem, Guidonem de Limburgo sancti Lamberti canonicum etiam dicti Hermanni nepotem…Godefridum comitem de Vianden" to arbitrate the dispute[883].  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that "Reginaldum fratrem suum præpositum de Fosse" sent donations to "comitis Arnoldi Lossensis" after hearing that he intended to found Averboden abbey[884].] 

 

 

ARNAUD [I] de Looz, son of EMMO Comte de Looz & his wife [Suanehildis of Holland] ([1050/60]-after 1 Apr 1125).  The Vita Arnulfi names "Arnulfum comitem de Lo et Sophiam ducissam de Hungaria…et ducissam de Hui" as the children of Emmo Comte de Looz[885].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "nepote suo [=Gislebertus] comite Arnulfo de Los"[886], although another passage names "Arnulfus comes de Los, nepos Ghislberti comitis de Durachio"[887] suggesting that the former also refers to Count Arnaud's cousin not his grandfather.  Comte de Looz.  Vogt of St Pierre, Liège 1086.  "...Comes Arnoldus de Lon, frater eius Theodericus..." witnessed the charter dated 1096 under which "Ida...filii mei ducis Godefridi" donated property to Münster-Bilsen abbey[888].  "…Arnulfus comes de Loz…" witnessed the charter dated 1091 under which Henri de Verdun Bishop of Liège approved the foundation of Flône[889].  Stadtgraf und Vogt von Mainz: “Arnoldus Urbanus Comes...” witnessed the charter dated 11 May 1108 under which Archbishop of Mainz confirmed the foundation of Kloster Disibodenberg[890].  "Arnulfus comes Lonensis et frater eius Theodericus" subscribed the charter dated 1111 under which "Otbertus…Leodiensis episcopus" declared that the church of Lixhe belonged to Liège Saint-Paul[891].  "Comes Arnoldus, comes Emicho, comes Berhtolfus, Embricho camerarius et filii eius Salman et Embricho…" witnessed the charter dated 1112 under which Ceizolf Provost of St Johann at Mainz donated property[892].  Graf von Rieneck 1115.  "Ludowicus de Turingia comes, Arnoldus urbis comes, Sigehardus comes, Bertolfus comes, Ludewicus comes, Gozwinus comes…" witnessed the charter dated 20 Jun 1118 under which Adalbert Archbishop of Mainz donated property "in placito Ludwici comitis" to Kloster St Johannes auf dem Bischofsberge, after the death of "Hildrudis vidue Wulferici ministerialis nostri"[893].  "Arnoldus comes, Gerlahus comes, Embricho vicedominus…" witnessed the charter dated 1119, before 15 Aug, under which Adalbert Archbishop of Mainz granted property to Stift St Maria at Mainz[894].  "...Arnulfo comite de Los, advocato Sancti Jacobi...Theodericus frater comitis Arnulphi..." witnessed the charter dated 1 Apr 1125 under which Emperor Heinrich V confirmed a donation to Liège Saint-Jacques made by "Guda mulier nobilis"[895].  "Comes Arnulfus de Los et filius eius Arnolfus" witnessed a charter of Adalbéron Bishop of Liège dated 1125[896].  Daris suggests that this is the last known mention of Comte Arnaud [I] and that the other later sources which name Comte Arnaud refer to his son Comte Arnaud [II] (see below)[897].  He bases his speculation on the career of Arnaud [I], whose first mention he dates to 27 Mar 1082 (no source cited), which he assesses to have been too long if he had survived until after 1136.  This suggestion is consistent with the chronology of the succeeding generations of the Looz family which, as can be seen below, appears more cogent with an additional generation inserted between Arnaud [I] and Louis [I]. 

m AGNES von Mainz, daughter of GERHARD Graf von Mainz & his wife Hedwig von Bliescastel.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified, although it is indicated in the sources quoted above in which her husband is named as Graf von Mainz. 

Arnaud [I] & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         ARNAUD (-after 1125).  "Comes Arnulfus de Los et filius eius Arnolfus" witnessed a charter of Adalbéron Bishop of Liège dated 1125[898].  [same person as…?  ARNAUD [II] ([1095/1105]-11 Apr, after 1136).  Comte de Looz.  As noted above, Daris suggests that there were two comtes de Looz named Arnaud, basing his argument on chronology which appears to be cogent[899].  "…Comitis Arnulfi [comte de Looz], Arnulfi de Arescloth…" witnessed the charter dated 1131, before 18 Mar, under which Alexander Bishop of Liège donated property to Flône[900].  "…Arnoldus Moguntinus comes…" witnessed the charter dated 1132, after 13 Sep, under which Adalbert Archbishop of Mainz donated property "in pago…Weitereibia…in comitatu Sigefridi comitis de Nuringes" to Mainz cathedral[901].  "Arnoldus…comes de Los cum Lodovico filio meo" founded Averboden abbey by charter dated 1135[902].  Alexander Bishop of Liège confirmed the foundation of Averboden abbey by "comes Ernulfus de Los assensu…Ernulfi de Arscot, Ernulfi de Dist, Cunonis de Repe…" by undated charter, dated to [1136][903].  "Arnoldus…comes de Los cum Lodovico filio meo" donated property to Averboden abbey, which they had founded, by undated charter, dated to [1136][904].  Alexander Bishop of Liège confirmed the foundation of Averboden abbey by "comes Ernulfus de Los", with the consent of "Ernulfi de Arscot, Ernulfi de Dist, Cunonis de Repe", by undated charter, dated to [1136][905].  "Comes de Claromonte Lambertus" granted the right to take wood from his forests in "predicti castelli" to the monks of Flône by charter dated 1136, witnessed by "comes Arnulfus de Los, comes Gislebertus de Duras, Walterus advocatus de Barz…"[906]m [ALEIDE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 under which her supposed grandson "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property which supplemented the donation made by "Arnoldo comite de Los et Aleide avis meis", for the souls of "patris mei Johannis de Los domini de Ghoer…"[907].  Borman suggests that this charter, whose authenticity was first doubted in 1808, was written in [1720] in an attempt to convince the Corswarem family of their alleged descent from the comtes de Looz[908].  While the existence of her alleged son and grandson Jean and Robert cannot be verified by other sources, it is possible that the forger of the document used the correct name of the wife of Arnaud [II] Comte de Looz to support the authenticity of his production.  No primary source has yet been identified which confirms that this speculation is correct.]  Comte Arnaud [II] & his wife had [five] children:

a)         LOUIS [I] ([1125/30]-11 Aug 1171).  "Arnoldus…comes de Los cum Lodovico filio meo" founded Averboden abbey by charter dated 1135[909]Comte de Looz.  Stadtgraf von Mainz 1159/62.  Graf von Rieneck 1155/59.  Vogt von Averbode. 

-        see below

b)         GERARD (-after 1138).  A charter dated to [1138/44] records the ratification of the exchange of property between "Godescalcus…frater comitis Gerhardi de Lo" and the church of Rees[910].  Graf von Rieneck 1136/1139. 

c)         GOTTSCHALK (-after 1138).  A charter dated to [1138/44] records the ratification of the exchange of property between "Godescalcus…frater comitis Gerhardi de Lo" and the church of Rees, witnessed by "…Otto comes, Adolfus comes, Kristian de Wieflinchovin, Engelbertus de Hornin…"[911]

d)         IMAGINE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbess of Süsteren 1174. 

e)         [JEAN de Looz .  His parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which his son "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property which supplemented the donation made by "Arnoldo comite de Los et Aleide avis meis", for the souls of "patris mei Johannis de Los domini de Ghoer, matris mee Sophie…"[912].  Seigneur de Ghoer.  m SOPHIE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which her son "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property for the souls of "patris mei Johannis de Los domini de Ghoer, matris mee Sophie…"[913].  Jean & his wife had one child:] 

i)          [ROBERT de Ghoer (-after 23 Jun 1180).  His parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem", on his deathbed, donated revenue from property "in territorio de Borchworm, de Corswarem, de Villa nova, et Beticoven" supplementing the donation made by "Arnoldo comite de Los et Aleide avis meis", for the souls of "patris mei Johannis de Los domini de Ghoer, matris mee Sophie, uxoris mee Marie…Arnoldi de Diest patris sui et dictorum locorum domini", with the consent of "filiorum meorum Arnoldi clerici, Fastrati et Roberti militum et filiarum mearum Iduberge et Begghe", witnessed by "…Arnoldus de Diest et Arnoldus filius suus milites cognati mei…"[914].  This document shows that Robert inherited his rights in Berlo and Château-Saint-Etienne at Corswarem from his father-in-law.  m MARIE van Diest, daughter of ARNOUT [II] van Diest & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which her husband "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property for the souls of "…uxoris mee Marie…Arnoldi de Diest patris sui et dictorum locorum domini", witnessed by "…Arnoldus de Diest et Arnoldus filius suus milites cognati mei…"[915].  Robert & his wife had five children:] 

(a)       [FASTRAD .  His parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property with the consent of "filiorum meorum Arnoldi clerici, Fastrati et Roberti militum et filiarum mearum Iduberge et Begghe"[916].] 

(b)       [ROBERT .  His parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property with the consent of "filiorum meorum Arnoldi clerici, Fastrati et Roberti militum et filiarum mearum Iduberge et Begghe"[917].] 

(c)       [ARNOLD .  His parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property with the consent of "filiorum meorum Arnoldi clerici, Fastrati et Roberti militum et filiarum mearum Iduberge et Begghe"[918].] 

(d)       [IDUBERGE .  Her parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property with the consent of "filiorum meorum Arnoldi clerici, Fastrati et Roberti militum et filiarum mearum Iduberge et Begghe"[919].] 

(e)       [BEGGHE .  Her parentage is confirmed only by the spurious charter dated 23 Jun 1180 (probably written in [1720], as noted above) under which "Robertus de Ghoer miles, dominus in Bierlos et Castri Stephani in Corswarem" donated revenue from property with the consent of "filiorum meorum Arnoldi clerici, Fastrati et Roberti militum et filiarum mearum Iduberge et Begghe"[920].] 

2.         [BEATRIX [de Looz] (-after 1132).  The Vita Andreæ, first abbot of Averboden, in the Chronicle written by Nicolas Hogeland Abbot of Middelburg, records that "dominam Beatricem de Los, comitissam de Aerschot" sent donations to "comitis Arnoldi Lossensis" after hearing that he intended to found Averboden abbey[921].  This is the only reference yet found to the the wife of Arnout Graaf van Aarschot.  If it is correct, it must refer to Graaf Arnout [III] who witnessed the charter dated to [1136] by which Alexander Bishop of Liège confirmed the foundation of Averboden abbey by "comes Ernulfus de Los"[922].  Although the source does not specify the relationship between Beatrix and Arnaud Comte de Looz, the chronology suggests that they could have been brother and sister.  In line with the speculation of Daris concerning the existence of two comtes de Looz named Arnaud, from a chronological point of view it appears likely that Beatrix was the sister of Comte Arnaud [II].  However, the Vita Andreæ is a late source and is not reliable on all points of detail.  The extent to which the report is accurate is therefore difficult to assess.  m ARNOUT [III] Graaf van Aarschot, son of --- ([1080/1100]-after [1136]).] 

 

 

LOUIS [I] de Looz, son of ARNAUD [II] Comte de Looz, Graf von Rieneck & his wife [Aleide ---] ([1125/30]-11 Aug 1171).  "Arnoldus…comes de Los cum Lodovico filio meo" founded Averboden abbey by charter dated 1135[923].  "Arnoldus…comes de Los cum Lodovico filio meo" donated property to Averboden abbey, which they had founded, by charter dated 1135[924]Comte de Looz.  "Ludovicus…comes in Los" confirmed donations to Averboden abbey, including the donation by "comes de Duras…Godinus", by undated charter, dated 1154[925].  The Annales Sancti Disibodi (Continuatio) name "…Luodewicus comes de Lohim…" among those present with the king when he celebrated Christmas at Worms in 1155[926].  Stadtgraf von Mainz 1159/62.  Graf von Rieneck 1155/59.  Vogt von Averbode. 

m AGNES von Metz, daughter of FOLMAR [VIII] Graf von Metz und Homburg & his wife Mechtild von Dagsburg (-before 1180).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   Heiress of Longwy.  "Agnes…Comitissa de Los…quam filii mei" donated the hospital of Grathem to the abbey of Villers by charter dated 1174 which names "domino nostro Ludovico comite"[927].  “Gerardus...comes de Los dominaque matre mea Agneta comitissa filioque eius Hugone fratre meo” granted privileges to “ville nostre de Brustemie”, with the consent of “Rogero...de Curtereces et sorore eius Yda”, by charter dated 1175[928]

Comte Louis [I] & his wife had seven children: 

1.         AGNES (-26 Mar 1191, bur Scheyern).  Wegener cites a source dated [1156/58] which names "Otto pal. comes" and his wife Agnes[929].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not so far been identified.  If it is correct, the date of her marriage suggests that she was one of her parents´ older children.  The necrology of Scheftlarn records the death "VII Kal Apr" of "Agnes ducissa"[930].  The necrology of Undensdorf records the death "VII Kal Apr" of "Agnes ducissa Bavarie"[931].  The necrology of Weltenburg records the death "VII Kal Mar" of "Agnes ducissa"[932]m ([1156/58] or before) OTTO von Wittelsbach, son of OTTO [IV] von Scheyern Pfalzgraf von Wittelsbach & his wife Heilika von Pettendorf (-Pfullendorf 11 Jul 1183, bur Scheyern).  Pfalzgraf 1149.  Duke of Bavaria 1180. 

2.         ARNAUD .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1147-1155, 1159. 

3.         GERARD [II] ([1145/50]-after 1194)Comte de Looz 1171/82.  “Gerardus...comes de Los dominaque matre mea Agneta comitissa filioque eius Hugone fratre meo” granted privileges to “ville nostre de Brustemie”, with the consent of “Rogero...de Curtereces et sorore eius Yda”, by charter dated 1175[933].  Graf von Rieneck 1179/87. 

-        see below

4.         HUGUES (-after 1175).  “Gerardus...comes de Los dominaque matre mea Agneta comitissa filioque eius Hugone fratre meo” granted privileges to “ville nostre de Brustemie”, with the consent of “Rogero...de Curtereces et sorore eius Yda”, by charter dated 1175[934].  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the death in [1172] (which must be incorrectly dated in light of the charter dated 1175 quoted above) of "Hugo…etate quidam inferior… frater eiusdem Gerardi [=Gerardus comes Lonensis", and refers to his surviving wife without giving her name[935]m --- (-after 1175).  The name of the wife of Hugues is not known.  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the death in [1172] (which must be incorrectly dated in light of the charter dated 1175 quoted above) of "Hugo…etate quidam inferior… frater eiusdem Gerardi [=Gerardus comes Lonensis", and refers to his surviving wife without giving her name[936]

5.         BONNE (-after 1200).  "Gerardus…comes de Los" donated property to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, with the consent of "uxoris nostre et heredum nostrorum", by charter dated 1194 witnessed by "Aleidis uxor nostra comitissa de Los, Ludovicus filius noster, Guda soror nostra de Grymberghe, Ysmena soror nostra quandoque Lotharingiæ ducissa…"[937].  "Walterus Bertholdus…cum coniuge mea Guda filiisque Waltero et Sophia uxore sua et Egidio" confirmed a donation to Everbode by charter dated 1200[938]m WALTER [III] Berthout Heer van Grimbergen, son of WALTER [II] Berthout Heer van Mechelen & his wife Margareta van Grimbergen (-1201). 

6.         IMAGINE (-5 Jun 1214).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium refers to "Godefrido Lovanensi duce" as "sororio suo [=Gerardus comes Lonensis]"[939], but does not name his wife.  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that "Godefridus" married "Ymaynam, filiam comitis Lossensis" after his first wife died[940].  "Godefridus…Dux et Marchio Lotharingie", at the request of "uxoris nostre Imaine ducisse Lotharingie", confirmed the donations to Averboden by "frater eius comes Gerardus de Loen", by charter dated 1188[941].  "Gerardus…comes de Los" donated property to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, with the consent of "uxoris nostre et heredum nostrorum", by charter dated 1194 witnessed by "Aleidis uxor nostra comitissa de Los, Ludovicus filius noster, Guda soror nostra de Grymberghe, Ysmena soror nostra quandoque Lotharingiæ ducissa…"[942].  Abbess of Münsterbilsen 1203.  The necrology of Everbode records the death "pridiæ non Iun" of "Imainæ quondam ducisse Brabantiæ et abbatissæ Bilisiæ"[943]m (1172 or after) as his second wife, GODEFROI VII Duke of Lower Lotharingia, son of GODEFROI VI Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Duke of Louvain & his wife Lutgardis von Sulzbach (1142-10 Aug 1190, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre).   

7.         LAURETTE (-before 1184).  The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Loreta filia comitis de Los" as wife of "Theobaldus comes de Monceons"[944].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Loretam filiam comitis Ludovici, sororem comitis Geraudi Losensis dyocesis Leodiensis" as first wife of "comes Barri Theobaldus"[945].  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  Heiress of Longwy.  m firstly (divorced 1174) GILLES Comte de Duras, de Montaigu et de Clermont, son of GODEFROI Comte de Montaigu, de Clermont et de Duras & his wife Juliane de Duras (-before 1193).  m secondly ([1176]) as his first wife, THIBAUT de Bar Seigneur de Briey, Steinay and Longwy, son of RENAUD II Comte de Bar & his wife Agnes de Blois ([1160]-12/13 Feb 1214, bur Saint-Mihiel).  He succeeded his brother in 1190 as THIBAUT I Comte de Bar

 

 

GERARD [II] de Looz, son of LOUIS [I] Comte de Looz & his wife Agnes von Metz ([1145/50]-after 1194).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Comte de Looz 1171/82.  “Gerardus...comes de Los dominaque matre mea Agneta comitissa filioque eius Hugone fratre meo” granted privileges to “ville nostre de Brustemie”, with the consent of “Rogero...de Curtereces et sorore eius Yda”, by charter dated 1175[946].  Graf von Rieneck 1179/87.  Vogt of Mainz St Peter and of the church of St Peter & St Alexander at Aschaffenburg: "Gerhardus Moguntine civitatis Prefectus et Aschaffenburgensis ecclesie advocatus, per manum uxoris mee Adelheidis" sold property "in Bessenbach et Hegebach sitas" to the archbishopric of Mainz by charter dated 28 Mar 1187[947].  "Godefridus…Dux et Marchio Lotharingie", at the request of "uxoris nostre Imaine ducisse Lotharingie", confirmed the donations to Averboden by "frater eius comes Gerardus de Loen", by charter dated 1188[948].  "Gerardus…comes de Los" donated property to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, with the consent of "uxoris nostre et heredum nostrorum", by charter dated 1194 witnessed by "Aleidis uxor nostra comitissa de Los, Ludovicus filius noster, Guda soror nostra de Grymberghe, Ysmena soror nostra quandoque Lotharingiæ ducissa…"[949]

m (before 1179) ADELHEID van Gelre, daughter of HEINRICH Graaf van Gelre & his wife Agnes von Arnstein.  "Gerhardus Moguntine civitatis Prefectus et Aschaffenburgensis ecclesie advocatus, per manum uxoris mee Adelheidis" sold property "in Bessenbach et Hegebach sitas" to the archbishopric of Mainz by charter dated 28 Mar 1187[950].  "Gerardus…comes de Los" donated property to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, with the consent of "uxoris nostre et heredum nostrorum", by charter dated 1194 witnessed by "Aleidis uxor nostra comitissa de Los, Ludovicus filius noster, Guda soror nostra de Grymberghe, Ysmena soror nostra quandoque Lotharingiæ ducissa…"[951].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1179/1213. 

Comte Gérard [II] & his wife had [ten] children: 

1.         LOUIS [II] (-29/30 Jul 1218).  "Gerardus…comes de Los" donated property to Ardenne Saint-Hubert, with the consent of "uxoris nostre et heredum nostrorum", by charter dated 1194 witnessed by "Aleidis uxor nostra comitissa de Los, Ludovicus filius noster, Guda soror nostra de Grymberghe, Ysmena soror nostra quandoque Lotharingiæ ducissa…"[952].  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1213 under which "Louis comte de Looz" confirmed a donation to Herckenrode by "son père Gérard comte de Looz"[953]Comte de Looz.  "Henricus dux Lotharingiæ et marchio et…Luduicus comes de Lon" agreed to divide "terram de Mussal" if "comes de Dasborc" died without heirs by charter dated 1197[954].  He claimed to succeed his wife in 1203 as LODEWIJK I Count of Holland, deposed in 1206.  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Wilhelmus comes Orientalis Frisie" conspired after the death of his brother Count Dirk VII in 1203, with the support of "Florencius frater suus Traiectensis prepositus, Otto comes de Benthem ipsius patruus" and others, against "Ludovicum comitem de Loon…ac Adelheidim Hollandie viduam", in a later passage recording that "Ludovicus comes de Loen" was defeated and expelled from Holland[955].  "Ludewicus comes de Lon et Heinricus prepositus Traiectensis et Arnoldus frater eius et Ada comitissa" donated property to Eberbach, at the request of "fratris nostri Gerhardi comitis de Renecken", by charter dated 1213[956].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1218 of "comes de Los Ludovicus"[957]m (Dordrecht [5] Nov 1203) ADA of Holland, daughter of DIRK VII Count of Holland & his wife Adelheid von Kleve ([1188]-after 12 Mar 1226).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names "Adelheidim et Adam" as the two daughters of Count Dirk VII & his wife, specifying that Ada was betrothed to "Ludovicus comes de Loon" against the wishes of the people of Holland[958].  The Annales Egmundani record the betrothal in 1203 of "filiam suam [=Theodericus comes Hollandiæ] Ada" to "comiti de Lone", specifying that the county was transferred to the latter[959].  The Gesta Episcopum Traiectensium refers to "Theoderico comite Hollandie filia sua unica" when recording her marriage to "Lodowico comiti de Loen" after her father's death[960].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Ludovicus de Loon" came "ab Holtena Dordracum" where his marriage to "Adelheidis comitisse…Adam puellam de regali stirpe progenita" immediately after her father's death and before he was buried[961].  She succeeded her father in 1203 as ADA Ctss of Holland, but was deposed by her uncle the same year.  "Ludewicus comes de Lon et Heinricus prepositus Traiectensis et Arnoldus frater eius et Ada comitissa" donated property to Eberbach, at the request of "fratris nostri Gerhardi comitis de Renecken", by charter dated 1213[962].  "Domina Ada comitissa de Los et domina Y. de Heinsberghe…" witnessed a charter dated 1220 under which Dirk [I] Heer van Heinsberg in favour of Herkenrode abbey[963].  "Hinricus comes Seinensis et uxor eius Mechtildis et Ada quondam comitissa de Lois" donated "quicquid iuris habebant in bonis Conradi militis de Molandino" to the Knights Templars, except for advocatius of "S. Gertrudis in Brole" which Graf Heinrich did not renounce, by charter dated 12 Mar 1226[964]

2.         GERARD [III] (-[15 May/24 Oct] 1216).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 10 May 1213 which confirmed the sale by "Gerhardo comite de Rinecke" of property "in Ingelheim et Isenheim" to Eberbach convent, approved by "fratres comitis memorati, Ludwicus comes de Lon et…Heinricus Trajectensis et Aschaffenburg prepositus atque Ada comitissa"[965].  Graf von Rieneck. 

-        see below.  

3.         ARNAUD [III] (-[12 Feb/20 Sep] 1221).  "Ludewicus comes de Lon et Heinricus prepositus Traiectensis et Arnoldus frater eius et Ada comitissa" donated property to Eberbach, at the request of "fratris nostri Gerhardi comitis de Renecken", by charter dated 1213[966].  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1218 under which "Louis comte de Looz" confirmed a donation to Herckenrode, with the consent of "ses frères Henri et Arnold"[967].  Graf von Rieneck 1213/21.  Comte de Looz 1218/20.  m (1206) as her first husband, ALEIDIS de Brabant, daughter of HENRI I "le Guerroyeur" Duke of Brabant & his first wife Mathilde de Flandre (-[1261/67]).  The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ refers to the third of the four daughters of "Henricus dux" as the wife of "comes de Alvernia" and mother of "Robertum comitem Bolonie et Alvernie et fratres eius et sorores"[968].  She married secondly ([1 Feb 1224/3 Feb 1225]) as his second wife, Guillaume [X] Comte d'Auvergne.  "Willelmus…comes Arverniæ et Aleydis quondam comitissa de Los" renounced an inheritance from "dominus dux Lotharingiæ", presumably in connection with their forthcoming marriage although the document does not specify this, by charter dated 1 Feb 1224[969].  She married thirdly (before Dec 1251) as his second wife, Arnold [III] Heer van Wesemaal Marshall of Brabant.  Her third marriage is confirmed by a letter dated 1260 from "Ernoul chevalier Sire de Wesemale et Alys que fu contesse d´Auvergne sa femme" granted their rights in the county of Boulogne to "nostre cousine germaine la contesse Mahaut de Boloigne"[970]

4.         HENRI (-2 Aug 1218).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 10 May 1213 which confirmed the sale by "Gerhardo comite de Rinecke" of property "in Ingelheim et Isenheim" to Eberbach convent, approved by "fratres comitis memorati, Ludwicus comes de Lon et…Heinricus Trajectensis et Aschaffenburg prepositus atque Ada comitissa"[971].  "Ludewicus comes de Lon et Heinricus prepositus Traiectensis et Arnoldus frater eius et Ada comitissa" donated property to Eberbach, at the request of "fratris nostri Gerhardi comitis de Renecken", by charter dated 1213[972].  Canon of St Lambert at Liège.  Provost of the Franciscans at Maastricht [1200]/1213.  Provost of St Alexander at Aschaffenburg 1209/1216.  "Gerhardus comes de Renekken…domine Cunegundis comitisse uxoris sue" donated property to Eberbach, with the consent of "suorum heredum…Ludewici comitis de Lon et domini Heinrici Traiectensis et Aschaffenburgensis prepositi", by charter dated 1213, witnessed by "Ludewicus filius Gerhardi comitis"[973].  Graf von Hochstaden 1214.  Comte de Duras 1216.  Comte de Looz 1218.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1218 of "comes de Los Ludovicus cum fratre suo Henrico"[974]m ([1214]) as her second husband, MECHTILD von Vianden, widow of LOTHAR [I] Graf von Hochstaden, daughter of FRIEDRICH [III] Graf von Vianden [Sponheim] & his wife Mechtild von der Neuerburg (-before 1241).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that the mother of Konrad Archbishop of Köln was "sorore comitis Henrici Viennensis" and that she married secondly "Henricus frater comitis Losensis, quondam prepositus Traiectensis"[975].  Comte Henri & his wife had one child: 

a)         IMAGINE (-21 Oct 1270).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Ymainam abbatissam de Salesines" as daughter of the mother of Konrad Archbishop of Köln "sorore comitis Henrici Viennensis" and her second husband "Henricus frater comitis Losensis, quondam prepositus Traiectensis"[976].  Abbess of Salzinnes 1239.  Abbess of Georgenthal 1239/58.  Abbess of Flines 1261. 

5.         THIERRY (-1207 or after).  "…Theodoricus frater comitis de Lon…" witnessed the charter dated 1197 under which "Henricus dux Lotharingiæ et marchio et…Luduicus comes de Lon" agreed to divide "terram de Mussal" if "comes de Dasborc" died without heirs[977].  Seneschal of Nicomedia 1204. 

6.         GUILLAUME (-killed in battle Russion, Thrace Jan 1206).  Crusader 1203.  Villehardouin records that "Dietrich von Los", governor of Rousion, left "his brother Vilain" in command of his army after returning to Constantinople, and that he was killed in battle there soon after[978]

7.         IMAGINE [Ismenia] (-after Aug 1244).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "castellano Sancti-Audomari domino Wilelmoprimogenitus Wilelmus" married "sororem comitis Lossensis Imaginam" but died childless[979].  "Willelmus S. Aud. castellanus et Ismenia uxor mea" abandoned marshes to the abbey of Saint-Bertin by charter dated Apr 1208[980].  "Guillemus S. Aud. castellanus et Ysmena uxor mea" exempted the inhabitants of Fauquemberghes from taxes after a fire by charter dated May 1222[981].  Her date of death is set by a charter dated Aug 1244 under which Guillaume Châtelain de Saint-Omer made arrangements for the dower of his wife if his brother predeceased her[982]m (before Apr 1208) GUILLAUME [V] Châtelain de Saint-Omer, son of GUILLAUME [IV] Châtelain de Saint-Omer Seigneur de Fauquemberques & his first wife Ida d'Avesnes ([1170/71]-[Mar 1245/1 Aug 1247]). 

8.         MATHILDE (-1249 or after).  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1231 under which "Arnold comte de Looz et de Chiny" confirmed exemptions of the abbey of Munsterbilsen at the request of "l´abbesse Mathilde, fille du précédent comte de Looz"[983].  Abbess of Münsterbilsen 1220/49. 

 

 

GERARD [III] de Looz, son of GERARD [II] Comte de Looz Graf von Rieneck & his wife Adelheid van Gelre (-[15 May/24 Oct] 1216).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 10 May 1213 which confirmed the sale by "Gerhardo comite de Rinecke" of property "in Ingelheim et Isenheim" to Eberbach convent, approved by "fratres comitis memorati, Ludwicus comes de Lon et…Heinricus Trajectensis et Aschaffenburg prepositus atque Ada comitissa"[984].  Graf von Rieneck.  "Gerhardus comes de Rynecke" donated "decimam in Laufaba", granted to him by his father, to the church of Aschaffenburg by charter dated 1188 which names "fratrem meum L. comitem de Lon"[985].  "Ludewicus comes de Lon et Heinricus prepositus Traiectensis et Arnoldus frater eius et Ada comitissa" donated property to Eberbach, at the request of "fratris nostri Gerhardi comitis de Renecken", by charter dated 1213[986].  "Gerhardus comes de Renekken…domine Cunegundis comitisse uxoris sue" donated property to Eberbach, with the consent of "suorum heredum…Ludewici comitis de Lon et domini Heinrici Traiectensis et Aschaffenburgensis prepositi", by charter dated 1213, witnessed by "Ludewicus filius Gerhardi comitis"[987]

m (1204) KUNIGUNDE von Zimmern, daughter of SIBODO [III] Graf von Zimmern & his wife ---.  "Gerhardus comes de Renekken…domine Cunegundis comitisse uxoris sue" donated property to Eberbach, with the consent of "suorum heredum…Ludewici comitis de Lon et domini Heinrici Traiectensis et Aschaffenburgensis prepositi", by charter dated 1213, witnessed by "Ludewicus filius Gerhardi comitis"[988].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1216. 

Comte Gérard [III] & his wife had five children: 

1.         LOUIS [Ludwig] (-before 11 Aug 1236).  "Gerhardus comes de Renekken…domine Cunegundis comitisse uxoris sue" donated property to Eberbach, with the consent of "suorum heredum…Ludewici comitis de Lon et domini Heinrici Traiectensis et Aschaffenburgensis prepositi", by charter dated 1213, witnessed by "Ludewicus filius Gerhardi comitis"[989].  Graf von Rieneck.  m as her first husband, ADELHEID von Henneberg, daughter of POPPO [VII] Graf von Henneberg & his first wife Elisabeth [von Wildburg] (-before 1259).  She married secondly Heinrich Graf von Stolberg

-        GRAFEN von RIENECK[990].  "Ludewicus, Gerhardus et Sybodo fratres comites de Ryenecke" sold "bonorum…in Masbach" to the church of Aschaffenburg by charter dated 1246[991]

2.         ARNAUD [IV] (-[24 Nov 1272/Feb 1273]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Comte de Looz [1220]. 

-        see below

3.         GERARD (-before 17 Jan 1272).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

4.         BERTOLD .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Würzburg 1240. 

5.         IMAGINE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  1219/50.  m GOSWIN [III] Heer van Born, son of ---.  1216/90. 

 

 

ARNAUD [IV] de Looz, son of GERARD [III] de Looz Graf von Rieneck & his wife Kunigunde von Zimmern (-[24 Nov 1272/Feb 1273]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Comte de Looz [1220].  Comte de Chiny [1228].  “Arnulphus comes de Chinneo et de Loz” notified an agreement between Orval abbey and “dominum Ludemarum de Firmitate et Jacobum de Staueles milites” concerning “nemore Belloniscampaniæ”, in the presence of “domini Egidii de Rupeforti”, by charter dated 1230[992].  "Arnoldus…comes de Los et de Chiny" confirmed donations to Averboden by charter dated 1232[993].  "Arnoux cuens de Los et de Chisni" acknowledged "Phelippe contesse de Bar…et Thiebaut son fil" as his suzerains in respect of "la terre de Chisni…que je tieng de par ma femme Jehanne la contesse" by charter dated Feb 1240[994]

m (before 1230) JEANNE de Chiny, daughter of LOUIS [IV] Comte de Chiny & his wife Mathilde d'Avesnes (-17 Jan 1271).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "Joanna" as oldest of the three daughters of "comiti de Cisneio" and his wife "Machtildem", adding that Jeanne married "comiti Lossensi Arnulfo" and naming their four sons and two daughters[995].  "Arnoux cuens de Los et de Chisni" acknowledged "Phelippe contesse de Bar…et Thiebaut son fil" as his suzerains in respect of "la terre de Chisni…que je tieng de par ma femme Jehanne la contesse" by charter dated Feb 1240[996].  "Arnous comte de Los et de Chiny et Jehanne comtesse des memes lieux" declared having given a dowry to "Nicholon chevalier seigneur de Kyening" for his marriage to "leur fille Julienne" by charter dated 1267[997].  The necrology of Orval records the death “XVI Kal Feb” of “Joanna comitissa de Chiny” and her donation of “molendinum de Herbeval[998]

Comte Arnaud [IV] & his wife had [ten] children: 

1.         JEAN [I] (-19 Jan 1278).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1247 under which "Jean fils ainé d´Arnold comte de Looz" confirmed the purchase of property by the abbey of Orienten[999].  He succeeded his father in [1272/73] as Comte de Looz et de Chiny.  m firstly ([1258]) MATHILDE von Jülich, daughter of WILHELM Graf von Jülich & his wife Richardis van Gelre.  m secondly ISABELLE de Condé, daughter of JACQUES Seigneur de Condé & his wife Agnès de Rœulx (-after 1280).  "Nichols de Condeit Sire de Moriames" recorded disputes between "Arnous Cuens de Los" and "madame Isabeau masseur et Jean et Jacquemin ses fils" and that "Arnous" had granted his possessions "en la terre de Warc, Agimont et Givet" to "Jean et Jacquemin ses freres enfans susdite" in return for their renunciation of claims "en la comté de Los", by charter dated Apr 1280[1000].  Comte Jean [I] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ARNOUL [V] (-22 Aug 1327).  He succeeded his father in 1278 as Comte de Looz et de Chiny.  "Nichols de Condeit Sire de Moriames" recorded disputes between "Arnous Cuens de Los" and "madame Isabeau masseur et Jean et Jacquemin ses fils" and that "Arnous" had granted his possessions "en la terre de Warc, Agimont et Givet" to "Jean et Jacquemin ses freres enfans susdite" in return for their renunciation of claims "en la comté de Los", by charter dated Apr 1280[1001].  "Arnould comte de Los et de Chiny et Marguerite ma femme" granted privileges to the citizens of Chiny by charter dated 22 May 1301[1002]m (27 Jul 1280) MARGARETA von Vianden, daughter of PHILIPP [I] Graf von Vianden & his wife Marie van Perwez [Brabant] (-8 Mar 1318).  "Arnould comte de Los et de Chiny et Marguerite ma femme" granted privileges to the citizens of Chiny by charter dated 22 May 1301[1003].  Comte Arnoul [V] & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          LOUIS [III] (-22 Apr 1336).  He succeeded his father in 1327 as Comte de Looz et de Chiny.  m ([25 Jan/22 May] 1313) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Lorraine, widow of GUY de Flandre Graf van Zeeland, daughter of THIBAUT II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Isabelle de Rumigny (-1 Oct [1348/1349], bur [Abbaye d'Orval]).  The necrology of Orval records the death “Kal Oct” of “domina Margareta de Lotharingia comitissa de Los et Chiney” and her donation[1004]

ii)         MATHILDE de Looz (-1313).  "Theodericus dominus de Heinsberg…cum…Godefridi militis filii nostri et Mechtildis uxoris sue" appointed the deacon of the church at Heinsberg by charter dated 22 Dec 1301[1005].  "Godefridus dominus de Heynsbergh et de Blankenbergh necnon Mechtildis de Los eius legitima" confirmed the right of "Arnoldus d. de Randenroyde et…Katherina eiusdem legitima" to repurchase "duo molendina sua…in…villa de Linghe" by charter dated 15 Mar 1307[1006].  Her son inherited the counties of Looz and Chiny after the death of her brother.  m (before 1299) GOTTFRIED Herr von Heinsberg, son of DIETRICH Herr von Heinsberg [Sponheim] & his wife Jeanne de Louvain (-1331). 

iii)        [GUILLAUME de Looz (-after Oct 1317).  Pope John XXII issued a dispensation for the marriage of "Villermo nato…comitis Lassensis" and "Ysabela nata…Raynaldi comitis Gelrie" despite 4o consanguinity dated 22 Oct 1317[1007].  It is assumed that Guillaume was the son of Arnoul [V] who was the ruling comte de Looz at the date of this document, although it does not name the proposed bridegroom´s father.  If this is correct, Guillaume presumably predeceased his older brother.  Betrothed (Papal dispensation 22 Oct 1317) to ISABELLA van Gelre, daughter of REINALD I Graaf van Gelre & his second wife Marguerite de Flandre (before Aug 1299-Köln 1354).  Pope John XXII issued a dispensation for the marriage of "Villermo nato…comitis Lassensis" and "Ysabela nata…Raynaldi comitis Gelrie" despite 4o consanguinity dated 22 Oct 1317[1008].] 

iv)       [MARIE de Looz (-1325).  A register of fiefs compiled in 1408 by André de Maubeuge records that “Geert” married firstly “Marie des graven dochter van Loon[1009].  The Chronicon Diestense records that “Gerardus primogenitus...domini Arnoldi” married firstly “Mariam filiam comitis de Loen” who died in 1325 “sabbato post festum purificacionis beate Marie virginis[1010].  These sources do not name Marie’s father.  From a chronological point of view, it seems more likely that she was the daughter of Arnoul [V] Comte de Looz than of his father Jean [I] (who is named as her father in Europäische Stammtafeln[1011]).  Jean Duke of Brabant confirmed an agreement between “Gérard seigneur de Diest marquis d’Anvers” and the inhabitants of Diest confirming a franchise charter, by charter dated 24 Jun 1307, sealed by “Marie van Loen dame de Diest, Jean de Diest chanoine de Cambrai, Thomas et Arnoul de Diest qu’on appelle de Westphalie, frères[1012].  "Gerardus dominus de Diest et castellanus Antverpiensis…necnon…domina Johanna de Flandria eius coniunx" founded the church of Zeelhem, for the souls of "dominæ Mariæ piæ memoriæ dominæ quondam de Diest", by charter dated 1 Feb 1328[1013]m (before 24 Jun 1307) as his first wife, GERHARD Heer van Diest, son of ARNOUT [V] Heer van Diest, Borchgraeve van Antwerpen & his wife Isabelle de Mortagne (-1333).] 

Comte Jean [I] & his second wife had two children: 

b)         JEAN de Looz (-Brescia 1311).  "Nichols de Condeit Sire de Moriames" recorded disputes between "Arnous Cuens de Los" and "madame Isabeau masseur et Jean et Jacquemin ses fils" and that "Arnous" had granted his possessions "en la terre de Warc, Agimont et Givet" to "Jean et Jacquemin ses freres enfans susdite" in return for their renunciation of claims "en la comté de Los", by charter dated Apr 1280[1014]m (1284) as her second husband, MARIE de Nesle Dame de Warcq et de Gernomont, widow of ALBERT de Longueval, daughter of JEAN [II] de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy & his wife Marie van Oudeaarde (-after 1328).  Jean & his wife had children: 

i)          JEAN de Looz (-after 1323).  Seigneur d´Agimont et d´Hemricourt.  m (before 1307) MATHILDE de Walhain Dame de Walhain, d´Eghezée et d´Hemricourt, daughter of GODEFROY de Walhain & his wife Marie d´Hemricourt (-1323). 

-         SIRES d´AGIMONT[1015]

ii)         LOUIS de Looz dit d´Agimont (-1345 or after)Seigneur de Neuf-Château en Ardennes et de Warcq.  m YOLANDE van Oudenaarde, daughter of ARNOULD van Oudenaarde Heer van Lummen & his wife Alix de Dammartin-Warfusée (-after 1377).  Heiress of Lummen.  Advocate of Hesbaie.  Louis & his wife had one child: 

(a)       MARIE de Looz (-25 Sep 1410, bur Liège Sainte-Croix).  Heiress of Lummen.  m (before 30 Jan 1351, Papal dispensation 25 May 1362) EBERHARD von der Mark Herr zu Arenberg, son of ENGELBERT [II] Graf von der Mark & his second wife Mechtild von Arberg (-1387). 

iii)        MARGUERITE de Looz m (Papal dispensation 22 Mar 1329) NICOLAS de Barbançon Seigneur de Villiers-Sire-Nicole et de Braine-l´Alleud, son of NICOLAS de Barbançon Seigneur de Villiers-Sire-Nicole et de Braine-l´Alleud & his first wife Alexandrine de Ruès Dame d´Hussignies et de Boussut-lez-Walcourt (-[1331/45]). 

c)         JACQUEMIN de Looz .  "Nichols de Condeit Sire de Moriames" recorded disputes between "Arnous Cuens de Los" and "madame Isabeau masseur et Jean et Jacquemin ses fils" and that "Arnous" had granted his possessions "en la terre de Warc, Agimont et Givet" to "Jean et Jacquemin ses freres enfans susdite" in return for their renunciation of claims "en la comté de Los", by charter dated Apr 1280[1016]

2.         --- de Looz Betrothed (Feb 1246) to CATHERINE de Lorraine, daughter of MATHIEU II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Catherine de Limbourg (-after 1279).  The marriage contract between "Arnous cuens de Lous et de Chieney et…Jehenne la comtesse sa femme…nostre ansnei fil apres nostre fil le premier ainé" and "Maheu duc de Lorreigne et Marchis…sa fille Catherine" is dated Feb 1246[1017]

3.         [son .  "Ad petitionem…comitis de Losz: filium suum" is named in a charter dated 5 Jul 1251 which lists canons at Trier cathedral[1018].  It is not known whether this son is the same person as one of the other sons of Comte Arnaud [IV] who are named in the present document.] 

4.         LOUIS de Looz (-[16 Sep/3 Dec] 1299)"Lois fis le comte de Los et de Chinei, sires d´Estables et…Jehenne sa femme dame de Blanmont" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Orval made by "Arnous cuens de Los et de Chinei notre pere et Jehenne sa femme comtesse…notre mere" by charter dated Feb 1258[1019].  A charter dated 1267 records the division of territories between "Loys, Arnolz der prevos de Boloigne, Henry et Gérars freires, tui fil le conte de Loz et de Chigney", naming "nostre père Arnolz cuens de Loz et de Chisney et notre mère Jehanne contesse", under which "Arnolz" received "la terre de Ware", "Henriz…la terre d´Angimont", and "Gerars…Chavancey le Chastel"[1020].  "Louis comte de Chiny et Jeanne d´Anis de Blamont comtesse du même lieu" founded the priory of Sussy in the county of Chiny by charter dated 1286[1021]m (before Feb 1258) as her second husband, JEANNE de Bar, widow of FREDERIC Seigneur de Blamont [Salm], daughter of HENRI II Comte de Bar & his wife Philippa de Dreux [Capet] (-31 Aug, before Aug 1299, bur Orval).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "dominam de Albo-monte, germanam comitis Barrensis Theobaldi, relictam domini Henrici de Salmis" married "Ludovicus [comes] de Chini"[1022].  "Lois fis le comte de Los et de Chinei, sires d´Estables et…Jehenne sa femme dame de Blanmont" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Orval made by "Arnous cuens de Los et de Chinei notre pere et Jehenne sa femme comtesse…notre mere" by charter dated Feb 1258[1023].  "Louis comte de Chiny et Jeanne d´Anis de Blamont comtesse du même lieu" founded the priory of Sussy in the county of Chiny by charter dated 1286[1024].  The necrology of Orval records the death “pridie Kal Sep” of “Joanna comitissa de Chiney et domina de Blanmont” and her donation of “mansum in Ivodio[1025]

5.         ARNAUD de Looz .  A charter dated 1267 records the division of territories between "Loys, Arnolz der prevos de Boloigne, Henry et Gérars freires, tui fil le conte de Loz et de Chigney", naming "nostre père Arnolz cuens de Loz et de Chisney et notre mère Jehanne contesse", under which "Arnolz" received "la terre de Ware", "Henriz…la terre d´Angimont", and "Gerars…Chavancey le Chastel"[1026].  Seigneur de Ware. 

6.         HENRI de Looz .  A charter dated 1267 records the division of territories between "Loys, Arnolz der prevos de Boloigne, Henry et Gérars freires, tui fil le conte de Loz et de Chigney", naming "nostre père Arnolz cuens de Loz et de Chisney et notre mère Jehanne contesse", under which "Arnolz" received "la terre de Ware", "Henriz…la terre d´Angimont", and "Gerars…Chavancey le Chastel"[1027].  Seigneur d´Agimont. 

7.         GERARD de Looz (-after Apr 1284).  A charter dated 1267 records the division of territories between "Loys, Arnolz der prevos de Boloigne, Henry et Gérars freires, tui fil le conte de Loz et de Chigney", naming "nostre père Arnolz cuens de Loz et de Chisney et notre mère Jehanne contesse", under which "Arnolz" received "la terre de Ware", "Henriz…la terre d´Angimont", and "Gerars…Chavancey le Chastel"[1028].  Seigneur de Chauvency: “Gérard de Loz seigneur de Chauvency” acknowledged holding “sa ville d’Olizy” from “son...frère Louis comte de Chiny” by charter dated Apr 1284[1029]

8.         ELISABETH de Looz (-before 1251).  The Chronicle of Baudouin d´Avesnes records that "Thomas", son of "Thomas dominus de Veruin ex Mathilde primogenita filia comitis de Retest", married "Ysabellam filiam comitis Losensis Arnulphi", who died childless[1030]m as his first wife, THOMAS de Coucy Seigneur de Vervins, son of THOMAS de Coucy Seigneur de Vervins & his wife Mathilde de Rethel (-before 1276). 

9.         ALEIDIS de Looz (-after 1268).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriages has not yet been identified.   m firstly (after 1254) as his second wife, DIRK Heer van Valkenburg, son of DIRK [I] Heer van Valkenburg & his first wife Isolda van Limburg (-killed in battle Köln 14 Oct 1268).  m secondly (after 1268) as his first wife, ALBERT van Voorne Burchgraeve van Seeland, son of --- (-Dec 1287). 

10.      [MARGUERITE de Looz (-before 1275).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed only by a monumental inscription at the Carmelite Abbey in Brussels which records the death of her son "monseinour ly cuens Geerarts sire de Hornes, Wiert, Altena, etc., grand-veneur héréditable de l´Empire…fieulx à monseinour ly cuens Willaumes, sire des dits lieux, et à madame Marguerite, fiele a ly cuens Arnould de Looz"[1031].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed only by a monumental inscription at the Carmelite Abbey in Brussels which records the death of her son "monseinour ly cuens Geerarts sire de Hornes, Wiert, Altena, etc., grand-veneur héréditable de l´Empire…fieulx à monseinour ly cuens Willaumes, sire des dits lieux, et à madame Marguerite, fiele a ly cuens Arnould de Looz"[1032].  This inscription is discussed in detail by van de Boel who suggests that it is unreliable as a later production[1033].  The language clearly indicates that the inscription is not contemporary.  However, it is not known whether it might have been based on information from earlier reliable sources.  This possibility should not be dismissed as other parts of the same inscription, relating to other members of the Horn family, are corroborated by other documentation.  A connection between the Looz and Horn families is indicated by the confirmation given by Arnaud [V] Comte de Looz to Geraard van Horn for his grant of property to his wife (see below).  However, the document in question does not specify any family relationship between the two, in contrast to the case of one of the witnesses whom Comte Arnaud describes as “nostrum consanguineum”.  It is possible, therefore, that the confirmation was given only because Comte Arnaud was Geraard´s suzerain.  The chronology of the Looz family indicates that it is possible for a daughter of Comte Arnaud [V] to have married Willem [IV] van Horn.  m [as his first wife,] WILLEM [IV] Heer van Horn, son of WILLEM [III] Heer van Horn & his wife --- (-killed in battle Zierickzee 1304, bur Keysersbosch).] 

 

 

 

F.      COMTES de MOHA

 

 

Vanderkindere states that the county of Moha, whose territory was situated on the right bank of the river Mehaigne within the pagus of Hesbaie, was originally a seigneurie which adopted the status of a county because it was held by the counts of Dachsburg in Alsace[1034].  It was not one of the four original counties which developed in the pagus of Hesbaie nor a pagus itself.  The seigneurs de Moha are shown in this document, until the acquisition by Albert [II] of the counties of Egisheim and Dachsburg as a result of his marriage with the heiress of those counties.  Later counts of Moha are shown in the document ALSACE.  After the death in 1212 of the last count of Dachsburg and Egisheim of the family of the seigneurs de Moha, his territories were inherited by his nephew Henri I Duke of Brabant, as shown by the undated charter under which "Adelbertus…comes Metensis et de Dasbourch" appointed "nepotem meum ducem Lotharingiæ" as his heir "de castro meo Dasbourgh et abbatia de Hessen, de castro Gerbaden, abbatia de Altorf, de castro de Drotein, de castro Albapai, de abbatia et advocatia de Herbreheym…comitatu et advocatia…de Metis…allodium de Musal et Waleve"[1035].  Prior to this, Moha had been claimed by the counts of Looz as well as the dukes of Brabant, a settlement of the dispute being agreed in 1197, the date of a charter under which "Henricus dux Lotharingiæ et marchio et…Luduicus comes de Lon" agreed to divide "terram de Mussal" if "comes de Dasborc" died without heirs[1036].  This latter arrangement was presumably superseded by the testament which appointed the duke of Brabant as sole heir to Moha. 

 

 

1.         ALBERT [I] de Moha (-after 1059).  Archbishop Poppo of Trier confirmed the donation by "comitem Kadelonem et eius contectalem Irmingart" by undated charter, placed in the compilation with charters dated [1040/44], subscribed by "Duci Godefrido, Adalberto de Musel, comes Becelinus…"[1037]Comte de Moha: “...Ottonis advocati et fratris eius Emmonis comitis de Los, Alberti comitis de Musal...” signed the charter dated 1059 under which “Fredericus...Lothariencium dux” donated a serf to Saint-Trond[1038]

 

2.         ALBERT [II] [de Moha] (-24 Aug 1098).  It is possible that Albert [II] was the son of Albert [I] but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified.  Graf von Egisheim und Dachsburg 1089.  Comte de Moha: "Albertus comes de Musau" donated property "ecclesias unam in Monte Sancti Martini et alteram in Villari" to the church of Verdun Sainte-Vanne by charter dated 10 May 1096[1039].  The necrology of Verdun Saint-Vanne records the death "IX Kal Sep" of "Albertus comes Dasburgensis qui nobis cellam Montis Sancti Martini…dedit"[1040]

-        GRAFEN von EGISHEIM und DACHSBURG

 

 

 

 

Chapter 9.    COMTES de LIEGE (LUIHGAU)

 

 

The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum…Liugas, quod de ista parte est…" to King Ludwig, and "…comitatum…Liugas, quod de ista parte est Mosæ et pertinet ad Veosatum…" to King Charles[1041], demonstrating that the county of Liège straddled both banks of the river Meuse.  It is likely that the county formed part of the territories of Reginar [I] Comte de Hainaut, which were confiscated by Emperor Arnulf in 898 and granted to Comte Sieghard.  The county was probably part of the lands restored to Reginar's son Giselbert (later duke of Lotharingia) in the early 920s.  Vanderkindere suggests that it was granted to his vassal Immo after duke Giselbert's death[1042].  The later history of the county of Liège is unclear.  However, it is apparent that the county soon lost its authority to the bishops of Liège and to the abbots of Stavelot. 

 

 

 

1.         SIEGHARD (-after 915)Comte de Liège.  Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany confirmed the property of Stift Kievermunt, including "in pago Leuchia in comitatu Sigarhardi in villa…Uuandria", at the request of "Gebehardus comes", by charter dated 9 Oct 902[1043].  Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany confirmed the church of Liège's holding of the abbey of Lobbes "in pago ac in comitatu Hainuense" in the presence of "comes…Sigohardus", by charter dated 18 Jan 908[1044].  The date when Sigard was installed as Comte de Hainaut is uncertain but it probably occurred after 898 when Regino records that Comte Reginar [I] was deprived of his lands by Zwentibold King of Lotharingia[1045].  It is assumed that Sieghard retained at least part of the county after Reginar was rehabilitated by King Ludwig IV, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified.  A charter dated 915 records a donation "ad Tectis villam in pago Luviensi atque in comitatu Sichardi" to Liège Saint-Lambert[1046]

 

 

1.         IMMO [II] (-[11 Jun 958/17 Jan 966]).  Vanderkindere suggests that the county of Liège was granted to his vassal Immo after duke Giselbert's death in 939[1047].  [Comte de Liège].  Widukind names "comitem…Immonem" as a vassal of Giselbert Duke of Lotharingia[1048].  "Otto…rex" granted property to "cuidam fideli nostro Rabangar" at the request of "Ymmonis…comitis" by charter dated 15 May 945[1049].  "Otto…rex" granted property confiscated from "Ymmo in villa Castra et in pago Darnegouue ac in comitatu Rotberti comitis", at the request of "Godefridi comitis", to "fideli nostro Tietboldo" by charter dated 11 Jun 958[1050].  The precise nature and extent of Immo's revolt is not known.  However, the appointment of associate-dukes of Lotharingia by Bruno, Archbishop of Köln and Duke of Lotharingia, followed shortly afterwards.  This suggests that the rebellion may have been extensive and required considerable force to suppress.  "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "curtem Galmina [Jamine]…que quondam Rudolfi erat…in pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen in exchange for property "in pago Liuhgouui in comitatu Richarii…in pago Auvlgowi in comitatu Eberhardi, Limberge…" by charter dated 17 Jan 966[1051]m ---.  The name of Immo's wife is not known.  Graf Immo & his wife had one child: 

a)         daughter .  Widukind records that "Immo" offered "unicam filiam" to "Ansfrid" as a means of capturing the latter[1052].  Vanderkindere suggests that Immo's daughter married Rudolf, the name "Immo" being transmitted into Rudolf's family[1053].  While this cannot be the only explanation for the introduction of the name into the Looz family, Vanderkindere also cites the charter dated 1078 under which "Ermengardis comitissa" donated property among which "…allodium…apud Gelmines [Jamine]..." to the church of Saint-Barthélemy de Liège[1054], the same property which had been granted to her father Comte Immo, and suggests that the donor was somehow connected with the same family.  m [RUDOLF Graf, son of NIBELUNG Graf in der Betuwe & his wife --- de Louvain (-967 or after).]

 

 

1.         RICHER (-[12 Feb/15 Mar] 973).  The Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium records that "Raineri", who had been banished by "archiepiscopus Bruno", was succeeded by "primum Richario nobili viro, sed hoc defuncto Warnero et Raynaldo, quibus etiam defunctis, Godefrido atque Arnulfo comitibus"[1055]Comte de Hainaut [964].  "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "in loco Uillare…terram olim Godefridus bone memorie dux noster" to the convent of Saint-Ghislain (in Hainaut) at the request of "Richarius comes" by charter dated 2 Jun 965[1056]Comte de Liège.  "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen in exchange for property "in pago Liuhgouui in comitatu Richarii…in pago Auvlgowi in comitatu Eberhardi, Limberge…" by charter dated 17 Jan 966[1057].  Emperor Otto I donated property to the monastery at Crespin, at the request of "Richizonis atque Amelrici comitum", by charter dated 12 Feb 973[1058].  "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "quod eatenus Richarius comes in beneficium…habuisse" to Kloster Echternach by charter dated 15 Mar 973[1059]

 

 

1.         DIEPOLD (-after 27 Apr 1072).  Comte in the county of Liège.  Heinrich III King of Germany donated property acquired from "Heinrico duce adiacens Giminiaco et Haruia in comitatu Tioboldi" to Aachen Marienstift by charter dated 8 Aug 1042[1060].  Heinrich IV King of Germany confirmed the donation by his father of property "capellam in monte Luouesberth…cum predio in villis Haruia et Vals in pago Leuua et in comitatu Tietbaldi sito" to Aachen Marienstift by charter dated 4 Mar 1059[1061]Comte in the county of Ardenne.  Heinrich IV King of Germany donated property "Herne in pago Hardvenne in comitatu…Diepoldi" to Aachen Marienstift by charter dated 27 Apr 1072[1062]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 10.  GRAVEN van MAASGAU (MASAU)

 

 

Both banks of the Maas valley, from Maastricht to the county of Teisterbant and as far as the county of Tettuaria on the right bank, comprised two counties, Upper and Lower Maasgau (or Masau).  The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…comitatum…Masau subterior…[et] Masau superior…" between King Ludwig King Charles[1063].  Giselbert was installed as count in Maasgau, probably in the late 830s/early 840s, although no record has been found to indicate whether the county was still divided into two parts at that time and if so which of the parts was ruled by Giselbert.  He was dispossessed briefly, between 846 and 849, after his dispute with Emperor Lothaire concerning his abduction of the emperor's daughter.  Giselbert was also appointed count in Darnau, identified in the area of Namur, before 863.  It is assumed that he retained his interests in Maasgau. 

 

The origin of Count Giselbert is unknown.  He is one of many aristocrats who appear suddenly in contemporary sources, but whose elevated status in imperial court circles is best explained by existing aristocratic connections which are unrecorded in the surviving primary source documentation.  In the specific case of Giselbert, he was sufficiently influential to have had access to the emperor's daughter, whom he married although the marriage was at first unsanctioned by her father.  The similarity of the name "Reginar", given to many of his descendants, to the Nordic "Ragnar" suggests Viking connections, especially bearing in mind the increasing number of Viking raids south of Frisia from [825/30] and Frankish concessions of territory in the low countries to Danish leaders[1064].  The Annales Hanoniæ of Jacques de Guise suggest a different origin, although this is not a wholly reliable source[1065].  Chapter VIII of the Annales includes a summarised descent of the counts of Hainaut from the Merovingian King Clovis, expanded with commentary in Chapters IX to XIV.  The earlier generations are evidently pure fantasy, starting with an invented younger son of Clovis named "Albericus" supposedly married to the sister of the Roman Emperor Zenon.  The last link in the chain before the Annales pass to the counts named Reginar is Manassès Comte de Rethel, whom Jacques de Guise states was father or uncle of "Raginerus", but this is uncorroborated in any other source and is unlikely to be correct. 

 

After Giselbert's death, the influence of his family suffered a temporary eclipse.  Arnulf King of Germany granted the abbey of St Servatius "in comitatu Maselant" to Trier cathedral by charter dated 1 Jul 889[1066], a loss of property which, it is suggested, would have been unlikely if the family had maintained their authority throughout Giselbert's territories.  Vanderkindere suggests that the dispute concerning jurisdiction over St Servatius may have been the cause of Reginar [I]'s rupture with Zwentibold King of Lotharingia in 898[1067].  The fortunes of the Reginar family revived in the early years of the 10th century.  Reginar [I] must have resumed possession of Maasgau after his reconciliation with Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany as his death is recorded at Meerssen, near Maastricht, in the county of Maasgau.  Reginar's son Giselbert [II] is also recorded as holding extensive lands in Maasgau, before he was elevated to the position of duke of Lotharingia in 928.  Gislebert [II] was created dux (in effect duke of Lotharingia) in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, whose daughter he married.  The rise of Giselbert [II] was cut short by his own lawlessness.  Maasgau was inherited by Duke Giselbert's nephew, Rudolf, but he and his brother Reginar [III] were disgraced and banished to Bohemia in [958] by Bruno Duke of Lotharingia.  It is probable that by that time the county of Maasgau had ceased to exist as an entity as several different counts are recorded as holding property in the area: Nibelung, son of Ricfried Graaf van Betuwe, received Ruremonde, Linne, Vlodrop and Melick from Baldric Bishop of Utrecht[1068], several areas were held by Comte Ansfrid [III], the future bishop of Utrecht, while much of the former county probably passed into ecclesiastical hands.  The lordships of Cuyk (see the document HOLLAND & FRISIA), Horn (see DUTCH NOBILITY), and Kessel (see LOWER RHINE, NOBILITY) emerged on the left bank of the Maas and Wassenberg, Valkenburg (see LIMBURG) and Heinsberg (see LOWER RHINE, NOBILITY) on the right bank[1069]

 

 

1.         GISELBERT [I], son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877, maybe after 6 Sep 885).  Giselbert's origin is unknown.  However, Viking connections are suggested by his supposed son's name, similar to the Nordic "Ragnar", especially bearing in mind the increasing number of Viking raids south of Frisia after [825/30] and Frankish concessions of territory in the low countries to Danish leaders[1070].  Another possibility is that Giselbert was related to Reginar [Reginhere] son of Meginhere.  Graf von Maasgau.  Nithard names "Giselbert count of the Maasgau" ("comes Mansuariorum") as one of the supporters of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks against his half-brother Emperor Lothaire[1071].  He was obliged to leave his county, attributed to him by Emperor Lothaire after the treaty of Verdun in 843[1072].  Giselbert supported Pépin King of Aquitaine, but after the latter fell from power found refuge with Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks.  He abducted and married Emperor Lothaire's daughter without her father's consent (see below), but was finally pardoned by the emperor in 849 and authorised to return to his lands.  An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Gislebertus…"[1073].  Comte in Darnau: "Ansfridus…comes…et Hildiwardus filius meus" donated property "in pago Darnau, in marca vel villa Sodoia…super fluvium Geldiun, in comitatu Giselberti" to Lorsch by charter dated 5 Oct 863[1074].  An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "Arnulfus comes, Gislebertus, Letardus, Matfridus, Widricus, Gotbertus, Adalbertus, Ingelgerus, Rainerus" as those willing to support the emperor's son if he travels across the Meuse[1075].  Emperor Karl III granted property "in pago Condruscio…Alnith" to "Gislebertus…comes…fidelis suis Teodone" by charter dated 6 Sep 885[1076].  Although it is not certain that this refers to Count Giselbert [I], no other contemporary individual of the same name has so far been identified.  m (Aquitaine 846) --- of Lotharingia, daughter of Emperor LOTHAIRE I & his wife Ermengarde de Tours ([825/30]-).  The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[1077].  The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[1078].  The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[1079].  Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[1080].  Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[1081].  Count Giselbert [I] & his wife had [two] children:

a)         [REGINAR [I] "Langhals/Longneck" ([850]-Meerssen [25 Aug 915/19 Jan 916]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified, although his naming his son Giselbert suggests that this affiliation is probably correct.  The Annales Hanoniæ name "Rignerius Montensis comes" (although the reference to his being Comte de Mons appears to be anachronistic) as the ally of "Francone episcopo Leodiensi" against the Vikings in 870, and in a later undated passage "Raginerus" fighting "cum Frissonibus in Walacria contra Rollonem"[1082], although it is unclear from the context whether these references are to "Raginerus dictus Longi-colli".  The date when Reginar was installed as Comte de Hainaut is uncertain but was probably during the last quarter of the 9th century, certainly after the date of the 877 agreement for his county would then not have been "across the Meuse".] 

          -        see below

b)         [ALBERT ([860]-after [928/36]).  "Albertus" donated "villam…Aldanias…in pago Arduennense" to Stavelot by charter dated 3 Oct [932], which names "fratre meo Raginero, dux Gislebertus consanguineus meus"[1083].] 

 

 

REGINAR [I] "Langhals/Longneck", son of GISELBERT [I] Graf van Maasgau & his wife --- of Lotharingia ([850]-Meerssen [25 Aug 915/19 Jan 916]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The Annales Hanoniæ name "Manicherius filius [Albonis]" (in a later passage clarified to be "Manicerius Registensis dominus") as "pater aut avunculus primi Ragineri" and "Raginerus dictus Longi-colli filius eius"[1084], which, as explained in the Introduction, must be incorrect.  The Annales Hanoniæ name "Rignerius Montensis comes" (although the reference to his being Comte de Mons appears to be anachronistic) as the ally of "Francone episcopo Leodiensi" against the Vikings in 870, and in a later undated passage "Raginerus" fighting "cum Frissonibus in Walacria contra Rollonem"[1085], although it is unclear from the context whether these references are to "Raginerus dictus Longi-colli".  Guillaume de Jumièges describes how "Rainier au long cou duc de Hasbaigne et du Hainaut et Radbold prince de Frise" fought the Viking Rollo but were forced back to their castles[1086].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois Fontaines also refers to "Rainerus Hainonensium comes et Hasbanii dux" fighting the Vikings, dated to 876[1087].  An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "Arnulfus comes, Gislebertus, Letardus, Matfridus, Widricus, Gotbertus, Adalbertus, Ingelgerus, Rainerus" as those willing to support the emperor's son if he travelled across the Meuse[1088], although it is curious that "Giselbertus…Rainerus" should both be included if one was the father of the other.  The date when Reginar was installed as Comte de Hainaut is uncertain but was probably during the last quarter of the 9th century, certainly after the date of the 877 agreement for his county would then not have been "across the Meuse".  "Ragenarius comes…et coniuge mea Hersenda" confirmed the donation of revenue from "Sathanacense atque Mousense" to Saint-Dagobert de Stenay made by "Carolus…Augustus Imperiali" by charter dated to after 886[1089].  The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold of Lotharingia in 895[1090]The Breve Chronicon Epternacense names “Reinerus” as abbot of Echternach from 897 to 915[1091]Regino records that in 898 Zwentibold King of Lotharingia banished "Reginarium ducem…sibi fidissimum et unicum consiliarium" who went with "Odacro comite et quibusdam aliis, cum mulieribus et parvulis" to "Durfos" (near "Mosa fluvius") where they were besieged[1092].  The passage appears to be the only indication that Reginar was granted the title duke.  Reginar was presumably rehabilitated after King Zweintibold was murdered, as shown by the following charter.  Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of Germany confirmed an exchange of property between Kloster Stablo and "Reginarius comes" by charter dated 10 Sep 902[1093].  King Ludwig IV also confirmed an exchange of property involving "Reganarius comes" by charter dated 20 Oct 906[1094], and a donation of property "…in pago ac in comitatu Hainuense" to the church of Tongern at the request of "Kepehardus et Reginharius comites" by charter dated 18 Jan 908[1095].  "Raginarius comes" and the abbot of Stavelot granted property "in pago Hasbanio in locis Honavi, Versines et Serangio" to "quidam fidelium nostrorum Harduinus" by charter dated 911, signed by "Ragenarii comitis, Issaac comitis, Macineri comitis…"[1096].  Reginar was installed as marchio by Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks in 915.  Lay-abbot of St Servatius at Maastricht before May 898, and of Stablo and Malmédy 900-902.  Richer records the death of "Ragenerus vir consularis et nobilis cognomento Collo-Longus" at "apud Marsnam palatium"[1097]

m [firstly] HERSENDA, daughter of ---.  "Ragenarius comes…et coniuge mea Hersenda" confirmed the donation of revenue from "Sathanacense atque Mousense" to Saint-Dagobert de Stenay made by "Carolus…Augustus Imperiali" by charter dated to after 886[1098]

m [secondly] ALBERADA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 10 Feb 968 under which her daughter-in-law "Gerberga…Francorum regina" donated "alodo…Marsnam in comitatu Masaugo" to Reims Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "comitibus Emmone et Ansfrido", for the souls of "senioris nostri piæ memoriæ Gisleberti suique…patris…et matris Rageneri et Albradæ"[1099].  The estimated birth date of her son Giselbert suggests that Alberada may have been her husband´s second wife, assuming that the charter which names his other wife Hersenda can be dated to soon after 886 (see above).  Another possibility is that both documents refer to the same person, one or other having incorrectly represented her name.  Maybe heiress of Hainaut[1100].  Guillaume de Jumièges describes how the wife of "Rainier au long cou" returned captured prisoners to Rollo and paid him gold, silver and all the taxes of the duchy, but does not name her[1101]

Count Reginar [I] & his [second] wife had three children:

1.         GISELBERT [II] ([885/900]-drowned in the Rhine, near Andernach 2 Oct 939).  Richer records that "Gisleberto eius filio" succeeded on the death of "Ragenerus vir consularis et nobilis cognomento Collo-Longus"[1102].  The Miraculæ S. Maximi names "Gisilbertus admodum iuvenis dux", in a passage dated to the early 10th century[1103].  Abbot of Stablo 915/925.  On the death of Giselbert's father in [915/16], Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks refused to install Giselbert as marchio[1104].  Giselbert rebelled against King Charles III in 918 and took refuge with Heinrich Duke of Saxony (later king of Germany).  Flodoard records in 920, in relation to the dispute between "Hilduinum episcopum et Richarium abbatem" relating to “episcopatu Tungrensi”, that “Gisleberto” (who at first supported the appointment of “Hilduinum” as bishop) had left “Karolo rege” and been appointed “principi” by “plurimi Lotharienses[1105]The Breve Chronicon Epternacense records that “Giselbertus filius eius” succeeded “Reinerus” as abbot of Echternach in 924, although the dating of this passage appears faulty[1106]King Charles III "le Simple" restored Kloster Susteren to the abbey of Prüm by charter dated 19 Jan 916 which names "fidelium nostrorum…Widricus comes palatii, Richuuinus comes, Gislebertus, Matfridus, Beringerius comites, Theodericus comes, Reinherus comes, Erleboldus"[1107].  Giselbert rebelled against King Charles III in 918, and sought help from Heinrich of Saxony (later king of Germany).  He later opposed Heinrich after his accession in Germany, and maybe planned to install himself as independent ruler in Lotharingia in 920[1108].  Richer records that Giselbert was awarded the vacant properties "Traiectum, Iuppilam, Harstalium, Marsnam, Littam, Capræmontem" after he returned to favour[1109].  Widukind records that "Isilberhtum…adolescentem" was "nobili genere ac familia antiqua natus" when Heinrich I King of Germany betrothed his daughter to him, maybe dated to [925][1110].  Flodoard's Annals record that "Berengarius" captured "Giselbertum" and only freed him after receiving "filiis Ragenarii fratris ipsius Gisleberti" as hostages, after which Giselbert ravaged the lands of "Berengarii, Ragenariique fratris sui et Isaac comitis"[1111].  The king's forces under Eberhard [Konradiner] secured Lotharingia's submission to German overlordship in 925[1112].  Abbot of St Maximin at Trier 925/934.  Created dux in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, effectively creating him GISELBERT Duke of Lotharingia.  Liutprand names him "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" when recording his marriage[1113].  "Gysalbertus dux rectorque S. Traiectenses ecclesie" donated property "Gulisam…in pago [Ardunensi] in comitatu Everhardi" to Trier by charter dated 928, subscribed by "Walgeri comitis, Thiedrici comitis, Cristiani comitis, Folcoldi comitis"[1114].  "Heinricus…rex" granted property to the canons of Crespin at the request of "Gisleberti ducis" by charter dated 24 Oct 931[1115].  He took part in a campaign of pillaging along the Rhine with Eberhard ex-Duke of Franconia and Heinrich, brother of Otto I King of Germany, and was drowned[1116].  Flodoard's Annals record that "Gislebertus…dux et Otho, Isaac atque Theodericus comites" offered the French crown to Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of the West Franks in 939[1117].  Regino records that "Gisalbertus" was drowned in the Rhine in 939[1118]m ([928/929]) as her first husband, GERBERGA of Germany, daughter of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde [Immedinger] (Nordhausen [913/14]-Reims 5 May 984, bur Abbaye de Reims).  Richer records the marriage of "Gisleberto eius filio [Rageneri…Collo-Longus]" and "Heinrici Saxoniæ ducis filiæ Gerbergæ"[1119].  Liutprand states that the wife of "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" was "regis sororem"[1120].  As her marriage to Giselbert coincided approximately with her husband being created dux, it is assumed that the marriage was arranged as part of the terms confirming Giselbert's submission to King Heinrich.  Gerberga married secondly (end 939) Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of France.  Flodoard names her "Gerbergam" when recording her second marriage[1121].  Her second husband gave her the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Laon in 951, taken from his mother on her second marriage.  Abbess of Notre Dame de Soissons in 959[1122].  "Gerberga…Francorum regina" donated "alodo…Marsnam in comitatu Masaugo" to Reims Saint-Rémy, confirmed by "comitibus Emmone et Ansfrido", for the souls of "senioris nostri piæ memoriæ Gisleberti suique…patris…et matris Rageneri et Albradæ", by charter dated 10 Feb 968, signed by "Arnulfi comitis…Emmonis comitis, Ansfridi comitis…"[1123].  Count Giselbert [II] & his wife had four children:

a)         ALBERADE ([929/30]-).  "Mathilde et Alberada" are named as daughters of "Gerberga" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that Alberade was mother of Ermentrudis but does not name Alberada's husband[1124].  Two epitaphs in the church of Saint-Rémy, Marly relate to "Ragenolde" and "Albrada", although neither refers to each other[1125].  Bouchard highlights the absence of proof that the husband of Alberade of Lotharingia was Ragenold Comte de Roucy[1126].  The parentage of the couple's children is deduced by a combined reading of the different sources which refer to them.  However, none of these sources name both parents, so the marriage of Alberade and Ragenold is not without all doubt.  Alberade is named in a letter to Poppo of Stablo[1127]m RAGENOLD Comte de Roucy, son of --- (-10 May 967, bur Saint-Rémy). 

b)         HADUIDIS (before [934]-).  The Liber Memoriales of Remiremont records a donation by "Dumnus Gislibertus dux…Dumna Girberga, Ainricus, Haduidis…", undated but dated to [934][1128], which suggests that the last two were children of the first two, although this is not without doubt.  [m ---.  As mentioned below, nothing is known about the possible husband of Haduidis.] 

i)          [GUY (-after 991).  The Acta Concilii Remensis ad Sanctum Basolum (dated to 991) quotes Bruno Bishop of Langres referring to "…meumque consobrinum comitem Guidonem"[1129].  This Comte Guy has not otherwise been identified.  If "consobrinus" is used in its strict sense, he must have been the son of Bishop Bruno's maternal aunt.  Of these, the sister of Lothaire King of France, uterine sister of bishop Bruno's mother, was Mathilde Queen of Burgundy, who is not known to have had a son named Guy, and in any case her sons would presumably not have been referred to as "comes".  Guy is not one of the known sons of Gerberga Ctss de Vermandois, the bishop's maternal aunt of the full blood, and in any case it would presumably only have been Gerberga's oldest son Héribert who would have been called "comes".  This leaves only Haduidis (or an otherwise unrecorded sister) as the possible mother of Guy.  If this is correct, nothing is known of her marriage.] 

c)         HENRI (before [934]-[943/45]).  The Liber Memoriales of Remiremont records a donation by "Dumnus Gislibertus dux…Dumna Girberga, Ainricus, Haduidis…", undated but dated to [934][1130].  [Duke of Lotharingia 943].  Widukind records that "Conrado" was installed as Duke of Lotharingia after the deaths of "Oddone, Lothariorum præside, ac regis nepote Heinrico"[1131].  It is suggested that "regis nepote Heinrico" was the son of Giselbert Duke of Lotharingia, and so nephew of Otto I King of Germany.  If this is correct, it appears from this passage that he was briefly installed as Duke of Lotharingia before dying soon afterwards. 

d)         GERBERGA ([935]-after 7 Sep 978).  Settipani names her as the wife of Comte Albert, and gives her parentage, but does not cite the primary source on which this is based.  A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "Albertus comes, Girberga comitissa, Harbertus, Otto, Lewultus, Girbertus, Gondrada, Ricardus, Harbertus comes…", the first four individuals named apparently being Comte Albert, his wife and three sons, and the last named maybe his brother or nephew[1132].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage more precisely has not yet been identified.  m ([949/54]) [as his second wife,] ALBERT [I] Comte de Vermandois, son of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (-8 Sep 987).

2.         REGINAR [II] ([885/900]-932 or after).  The Annales Hanoniæ name "Raginerus" as son of "Raginerus dictus Longi-colli"[1133].  The primary source which confirms that Reginar [II] was Comte de Hainaut has not yet been identified, but this is probably correct. 

a)         REGINAR [III] (920-973).  The Annales Hanoniæ name "Raginerus" as son of "Raginerus [filius Ragineri dicti Longi-colli]"[1134].  "Otto…rex" confirmed the possession of Kloster Süsteren by Prüm abbey by charter dated 1 Jun 949, signed by "Cuonradus dux, Herimannus dux, Hezzo comes, Godefridus comes, Rudolfus comes, Reginherus comes"[1135].  He succeeded his father as Comte de Hainaut, although the date he took control of the county is not known. 

          -        COMTES de HAINAUT

b)         RUDOLF (-after 24 Jan 966).  His parentage is confirmed by Flodoard recording, in 944, that "Hugo dux" requested "Herimann[us]…qui missus erat…" to besiege "castella Ragnarii ac Rodulfi fratrum, Ludowici regis fidelium"[1136], on the assumption that "Ragnarii" refers to Count Reginar [III] (see above).  "Otto…rex" confirmed the possession of Kloster Süsteren by Prüm abbey by charter dated 1 Jun 949, signed by "Cuonradus dux, Herimannus dux, Hezzo comes, Godefridus comes, Rudolfus comes, Reginherus comes"[1137], the order of subscribers' names suggesting that Rudolf may have been considered senior to Reginar although it is not certain that this inevitably means that he was older.  Graf von Maasgau: "Otto…rex" granted property "Cassallo…in pago Masalant in comitatu Ruodolfi" to "vassallo nostro Ansfrid" at the request of "nostri fidelis Conradis ducis" by charter dated 7 Oct 950[1138]Comte de Hesbaie: "Otto…rex" granted Kloster Alden-Eyck "in pago Huste in comitatu Ruodulphi" to the bishopric of Liège by charter dated 4 Jul 952[1139].  "Otto…imperator augustus" confirmed the donations to the convent of Nivelles by "Regenarius comes" of property "in pago Ardenna super fluvia Aisna in comitatu Waudricia in villa Villaro" and by "predicti Regenarii filius nomine Liechardus in pago Hasbanensi in villa Gingolonham" and by "Rodolphus comes villa Lentlo" by charter dated 24 Jan 966[1140].  The charter dated 17 Jan 966, under which "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "curtem Galmina…que quondam Rudolfi erat…n pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen[1141], describes that Rudolf's property was confiscated, presumably at the same time as his brother Reginar [III] was banished. 

c)         other children: COMTES de HAINAUT

3.         daughter.  Flodoard's Annals refers to the wife of "Berengarius" as "sororem [Gislebertum]" but does not name her[1142]m BERENGAR Comte de Namur, son of --- (-before 946). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 11.  GRAFEN von TUBALGO

 

 

South of the river Waal, lay the county of Duffel (Dubla or Tubalgo) east of Rijkswald, in the area in which the town of Kleve later developed[1143].  The county lay north of the county of Hattuaria and subsequently formed part of the county of Kleve[1144]

 

 

1.         EHRENFRIED [II], son of [EBERHARD Graf von Bonn & his wife ---] (-before 970).  The Ehrenfried is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[1145] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Zülpich: a charter dated 24 Jan 942 refers to property "in pago Tulpiacense in comitatu Erinfridi comitis in villa vel marka…Merlesheim"[1146]Graf von Bonn: a charter dated 945 refers to "in pago Bunnensi in comitatu Eremfridi comitis in villa Brunheim"[1147].  "Otto…rex" confirmed the immunities of Kloster Essen including over land "excepta in loco Ruoldinghus quam Eggihart et eius coniunx Rikilt" possessed by hereditary right and in land "in comitatu Ecberti et Cobbonis" by charter dated 15 Jan 947, signed by "Heinrici fratris regis, Herimanni ducis, Cuonradi comitis, Erenfridi comitis, Gebehardi comitis, Ekkihardi comitis, Hugonis comitis"[1148]Graf von Hattuaria: "Otto…rex" confirmed the privileges of Kloster Gandersheim including property "villa Mundulinhgeim in pago Hatteri in comitatu Erenfridi" by charter dated 4 May 947[1149]Graf von Tubalgo: "Otto…rex" confirmed the rights of Kloster Echternach in property "in villam…Rinera in pago Tubalgouue in comitatu Irinuridi comitis" by charter dated 4 Aug 947[1150].  Graf im Ruhr-Keldachgau: a charter dated 950 refers to "locum in comitatu Eremfridi comitis Huppolderroth dictum" (Hubbeliath, east of Düsseldorf in the Keldachgau)[1151]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 12.  GRAFEN von ZÜLPICH

 

 

The division of Lotharingian territories agreed 8 Aug 870 between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and his half-brother Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks allocated "…in Ribuarias comitatus quinque…" to King Ludwig[1152].  Vanderkindere identifies these five counties as Jülich, Zülpich, Eifel, Bonn and Köln[1153].  Zülpich was acquired before 1124 by the archbishopric of Köln, as shown by the charter of that date under which Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln founded a church "in castro meo episcopali…Zulpiacum", witnessed by "Paganus comes, Theodericus comes de Ara, Herimannus de Hengebach, Theodericus et frater eius Adelgerus de Gladebach…"[1154]

 

 

1.         EHRENFRIED [II], son of [EBERHARD Graf von Bonn & his wife ---] (-before 970).  Ehrenfried is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[1155] as the son of Ehrenfried & his wife, but the primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Zülpich: a charter dated 24 Jan 942 refers to property "in pago Tulpiacense in comitatu Erinfridi comitis in villa vel marka…Merlesheim"[1156]Graf von Bonn: a charter dated 2 Aug 945 refers to property "in pago Bunnensi in comitatu Eremfridi comitis in villa Brunheim"[1157].  "Otto…rex" confirmed the immunities of Kloster Essen including over land "excepta in loco Ruoldinghus quam Eggihart et eius coniunx Rikilt" possessed by hereditary right and in land "in comitatu Ecberti et Cobbonis" by charter dated 15 Jan 947, signed by "Heinrici fratris regis, Herimanni ducis, Cuonradi comitis, Erenfridi comitis, Gebehardi comitis, Ekkihardi comitis, Hugonis comitis"[1158]Graf von Hattuaria: "Otto…rex" confirmed the privileges of Kloster Gandersheim including property "villa Mundulinhgeim in pago Hatteri in comitatu Erenfridi" by charter dated 4 May 947[1159]Graf von Tubalgo: "Otto…rex" confirmed the rights of Kloster Echternach in property "in villam…Rinera in pago Tubalgouue in comitatu Irinuridi comitis" by charter dated 4 Aug 947[1160].  Graf im Ruhr-Keldachgau: a charter dated 950 refers to "locum in comitatu Eremfridi comitis Huppolderroth dictum" (Hubbeliath, east of Düsseldorf in the Keldachgau)[1161]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WERNER [Garnier] (-killed in battle 973)Graf von Zülpich: Bruno archbishop of Köln confirmed an exchange of property "Baldau, quam Sigifredus comes…acquireret" for "in villa Nohas…in pago Heislensi in comitatu Tulpiaco" between the abbot of Stavelot and "comite Warnero fideli nostro" by charter dated 953 "regnante rege Ottone fratre nostro, anno xviii, Godefrido duce"[1162]Comte de Hesbaye: "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "in pago Haspengewe in comitatu Werenherii qua postmodum fideli nostro comiti Immoni condonavimus" to the Marienkapelle, Aachen in exchange for property "in pago Liuhgouui in comitatu Richarii…in pago Auvlgowi in comitatu Eberhardi, Limberge…" by charter dated 17 Jan 966[1163]Comte de Hainaut 973.  The Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium records that "Raineri", who had been banished by "archiepiscopus Bruno", was succeeded by "primum Richario nobili viro, sed hoc defuncto Warnero et Raynaldo, quibus etiam defunctis, Godefrido atque Arnulfo comitibus"[1164].  Sigebert's Chronica records that "Raginerus et Lantbertus" (sons of Reginar [III] Comte de Hainaut) returned from exile in 973 and killed "Guarnero et Rainaldo", who occupied their father's county, "apud Perronam" and besieged "super Hagnam fluvium castello Buxude"[1165].  Thietmar records that "Lantbertus, Reinherii filius…cum fratre…Reingerio" killed "Wirinharium et eius germanum Reinzonem"[1166]

2.         RENAUD (-killed in battle Peronne 973).  The Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium records that "Raineri", who had been banished by "archiepiscopus Bruno", was succeeded by "primum Richario nobili viro, sed hoc defuncto Warnero et Raynaldo, quibus etiam defunctis, Godefrido atque Arnulfo comitibus"[1167].  Sigebert's Chronica records that "Raginerus et Lantbertus" (sons of Reginar [III] Comte de Hainaut) returned from exile in 973 and killed "Guarnero et Rainaldo", who occupied their father's county, "apud Perronam" and besieged "super Hagnam fluvium castello Buxude"[1168].  Thietmar records that "Lantbertus, Reinherii filius…cum fratre…Reingerio" killed "Wirinharium et eius germanum Reinzonem"[1169]

 

 

1.         BRUNO von Hengebach (-25 Feb [1063/64])Graf in Zülpich.  Theoduin Bishop of Liège confirmed that “Bruno comes de Hengebach” donated “libertatis predium in Harvia” to Liège Sainte-Croix by charter dated 1063[1170].  The necrology of Siegburg records “pridie Non Jun” that “Bruno comes et uxor eius Mathilda de Erenbreitstein” donated “prædium in Gulse[1171].  The Memorial Book of Köln St Maria records the death “V Kal Mar” of “Bruno de Hengbach” and his donation including “de decimatione ville in Dutlo[1172].  Emperor Heinrich IV restored "predium…Prümizfelt quidam comes Bruno de Hengebach…tradidit…cum uxore sua Mathilde", taken by "comes Henricus de Lintburc", to the abbey of Prüm by charter dated 3 Aug 1101[1173]m MATHILDE [von Ehrenbreitstein], daughter of [WIDRICH] [I] [Comte de Clermont] & his wife [Hersende ---] (-before 3 Aug 1101, bur Prüm St Salvator).  The necrology of Siegburg records “pridie Non Jun” that “Bruno comes et uxor eius Mathilda de Erenbreitstein” donated “prædium in Gulse[1174].  Anno Archbishop of Köln founded Siegburg abbey and listed its properties, including the donation of "Flatlena...decimationem...in Zulpiaco que in beneficio fuerat Sicconis comitis" made by "Mathilda Brunonis quondam coniuge", by charter dated to [1064][1175].  Anno Archbishop of Köln confirmed possessions of Siegburg abbey, including the donation of "Flattena...decimationem...in Zulpiaco, quæ in beneficio fuerat Sicconis comitis" made by "Mathilda Brunonis quondam coniuge", by charter dated 1064[1176].  Emperor Heinrich IV restored "predium…Prümizfelt quidam comes Bruno de Hengebach…tradidit…cum uxore sua Mathilde", taken by "comes Henricus de Lintburc", to the abbey of Prüm (where Mathilde was buried) by charter dated 3 Aug 1101[1177].  No direct indication has been found that Mathilde, wife of Bruno von Heimbach, was the sister of Ermengarde Ctss de Montaigu.  However, the reference to "Prümizfelt" in the 1101 charter which names Mathilde and her husband suggests a close relationship as the same place is named in the undated charter, dated to [1040/44], under which "comitem Kadelonem [Gozelon Comte de Montaigu] et eius contectalem Irmingart" donated hereditary property "de chorte Prümizvelt"[1178].  The absence of any reference to Bruno and Ermentrude being siblings suggests that a relationship by marriage is a more likely possibility.  If this is correct, one explanation is that Prümizvelt was inherited by supposed sisters Ermengarde and Mathilde from one of their parents.  Indeed, if this was not the case, it is difficult to explain why his wife Mathilde would have been named in the 1101 charter with Bruno.  If Ermengarde and Mathilde were sisters, it is not certain that they shared the same father: the reference to Mathilde “von Ehrenbreitstein” indeed suggests that their fathers were different. 

 

 

 

BECCELINComte [de Bidbourg].  A charter dated to [1035] records an agreement between the abbots of Metz Saint-Martin and Stablo exchanging various matters, made “apud Dinillam ubi colloguium...inter imperatorum Cuonradum et Heinricum regem Francorum”, witnessed by “Becelinus comes de Biendeburch, Godefridus comes de Amblavia, Gozilo comes de Engeis, Gerardus Flameus...[1179]

 

 

GODEFROIComte [d’Amblève].  A charter dated to [1035] records an agreement between the abbots of Metz Saint-Martin and Stablo exchanging various matters, made “apud Dinillam ubi colloguium...inter imperatorum Cuonradum et Heinricum regem Francorum”, witnessed by “Becelinus comes de Biendeburch, Godefridus comes de Amblavia, Gozilo comes de Engeis, Gerardus Flameus...[1180].  Heinrich III King of Germany confirmed properties of Stablo, including “sextam...de Amblavia et Tumbis a comite Godefrido de Zingeis”, by charter dated “Non Jun” 1040[1181]



[1] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, pp. 193-5. 

[2] Warner, D. A. (trans.) The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg (2001) (Manchester University Press), 1. 23, p. 84. 

[3] Vanderkindere, A. (1902) La formation territoriale des principautés belges au moyen-âge (Brussels), Vol. II, p. 243. 

[4] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 119. 

[5] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, p. 195. 

[6] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, pp. 119-20. 

[7] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 120, citing "Miræus I, 20". 

[8] D O I 318, p. 432.   

[9] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 393. 

[10] Nicholas, D. (1992) Medieval Flanders (Longman), p. 44. 

[11] D H II 186, p. 221. 

[12] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 109, quoting Miræus I, 41, no. 3 ex MS Catalogo Abbatum Gemblacensium

[13] Warner, D. A. (trans.) The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg (2001) (Manchester University Press), 4.31 and 4.32, pp. 174 and 175, footnote 103 stating that Ansfrid's father was a brother of Queen Mathilde but no corroboration of this has been found. 

[14] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723) Opera diplomatica et historica, 2nd edn. (Louvain), Tome I, XXXVII, p. 48. 

[15] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 393. 

[16] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[17] Grote, H. (1877) Stammtafeln (reprint Leipzig, 1984), p. 496. 

[18] Annales Colonienses 995, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[19] Thietmar 4.35, pp. 176-7. 

[20] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannis de Beke (The Hague), 40, p. 75, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006). 

[21] Duaci (ed.) (1624) Vincentius Bellovacensis Speculum Historiale, lib. 24, cap. 157, quoted in Chronologia Johannes de Beke 40, p. 75. 

[22] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I 16, MGH SS IV, p. 708. 

[23] Beka's Egmondscii Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 106. 

[24] Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium, continuatio 9, MGH SS IV, p. 48. 

[25] Annalista Saxo 1037. 

[26] D H II 186, p. 221. 

[27] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 123, citing "Heda, edit. 1643, 100; cf. S. Muller, 81". 

[28] Mommsen, T. E. and Morrison, K. F. (trans.) (1962) Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York), "Wipo, On the election and consecration of Conrad II (1024)", from "The Deeds of Conrad II (Gesta Chuonradi II imperatoris)", reproduced in Hill, pp. 192-201.  . 

[29] Bloch, H. (ed.) ´Die älteren Urkunden des Klosters S. Vanne zu Verdun´, Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für lothringische Geschichte und Altertumskunde, 10th year, 1898 (“Verdun Saint-Vanne (1898)”), XXXVII, p. 443. 

[30] Bernoldi Chronicon 1044, MGH SS V, p. 425. 

[31] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Lüneburg. 

[32] D H III 152, p. 192. 

[33] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306. 

[34] Nicholas (1992), pp. 49-50. 

[35] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, pp. 194-5. 

[36] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 230. 

[37] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 238. 

[38] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 242. 

[39] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 343. 

[40] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469. 

[41] Karoli II Imp. Conventus Carisiacensis, MGH LL 1, p. 537. 

[42] Historia Walciodorensis monasterii 1, MGH SS XIV, p. 505. 

[43] Historia Walciodorensis monasterii 1, MGH SS XIV, p. 505. 

[44] Beyer, H. (ed.) (1860) Urkundenbuch zur Geschichte der, jetzt die Preussischen Regierungsbezirke Coblenz und Trier bildenden Mittelrheinischen Territorien (Coblenz), Vol. I, (“Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch I”), 134, p. 141, consulted at <http:/www.rlb.de/mrHist/> (12 Dec 2007). 

[45] D Zw 13, 39. 

[46] Reginonis Chronicon 897, MGH SS I, p. 607. 

[47] Reginonis Chronicon 898, MGH SS I, p. 608. 

[48] Reginonis Chronicon 899, MGH SS I, p. 601. 

[49] Vita Iohannis Gorziensis 55, MGH SS IV, p. 352. 

[50] D Zw 27, p. 65. 

[51] Gade, J. A. (1951) Luxemburg in the Middle Ages (Leiden), p. 48. 

[52] D LK 17, p. 120. 

[53] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 153, p. 216. 

[54] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723) Opera diplomatica et historica, 2nd edn. (Louvain), Tome II, II, p. 805. 

[55] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 159, p. 222. 

[56] Miraeus (Le Mire) (1723), Tome II, II, p. 805. 

[57] Vita Iohannes Gorziensis 105, MGH SS IV, p. 367. 

[58] Tabula Genealogica ex Codice Bibl. Regiæ Monacensis, MGH SS II, p. 314. 

[59] Havet, J. (ed.) (1889) Lettres de Gerbert 983-997 (Paris), 52, p. 48, and Epistola XXXV, RHGF IX, p. 283. 

[60] D O I 210, p. 289.   

[61] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Presses Universitaires de Nancy), p. 8. 

[62] Miraeus (Le Mire) (1723), Tome II, II, p. 805. 

[63] D O I 210, p. 289.   

[64] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[65] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 211, p. 271. 

[66] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 268. 

[67] D´Herbomez, A. (ed.) (1898) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Gorze, Mettensia II (Paris) ("Gorze"), 98, p. 181. 

[68] Gorze 98, p. 181. 

[69] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[70] D O I 91, p. 173. 

[71] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[72] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 206, p. 266. 

[73] Poull (1994), p. 10. 

[74] ES I.2 200B. 

[75] Rösch (1977), p. 141.

[76] Wegener, W. (1965/67) Genealogischen Tafeln zur mitteleuropäischen Geschichte (Verlag Degener), p. 73. 

[77] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1024, MGH SS XXIII, p. 782. 

[78] Calmet, A. (1748) Histoire de Lorraine (Nancy), Tome II, Preuves, col. cxcvi-cxcviii. 

[79] Calmet (1748), Tome II, Preuves, col. ccvii. 

[80] ES I.2 202. 

[81] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[82] Poull (1994), p. 9. 

[83] Varin, P. (1844) Archives législatives de la ville de Reims (Paris) Seconde Partie, Statuts, Vol. I, p. 96. 

[84] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[85] D O I 216, p. 298. 

[86] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 212, p. 272. 

[87] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[88] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 212, p. 272. 

[89] Verdun Saint-Vanne (1898), XIV, p. 400. 

[90] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 212, p. 272. 

[91] Varin (1844) Statuts, Vol. I, p. 91. 

[92] D O III 238, p. 655. 

[93] Verdun Saint-Vanne (1898), XIV, p. 400. 

[94] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 212, p. 272. 

[95] Annales Remenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 82. 

[96] Annales Mosomagenses, MGH SS III, p. 160. 

[97] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 327. 

[98] Annales Mosomagenses, MGH SS III, p. 161. 

[99] Varin (1844) Statuts, Vol. I, p. 65. 

[100] D O III 238, p. 655. 

[101] D H II 492, p. 626. 

[102] D LD 141, p. 197. 

[103] Halkin, J. and Roland, C. J. (eds.) (1909) Recueil des Chartes de l'abbaye de Stavelot-Malmédy, Tome I (Brussels) (“Stavelot”), 50, p. 120. 

[104] D LD 141, p. 197. 

[105] Stavelot 50, p. 120. 

[106] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 179, p. 241. 

[107] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 212, p. 272. 

[108] Gerbert 58, p. 56. 

[109] Gerbert 59, p. 58. 

[110] Gebert 58, p. 56. 

[111] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris), III.CIII, p. 126. 

[112] Gebert 58, p. 56. 

[113] Gebert 58, p. 56. 

[114] Flodoard (Continuator) 977, MGH SS III, p. 408. 

[115] McKitterick (1983), p. 325.   

[116] McKitterick (1983), p. 327. 

[117] RHGF, Tome X, XIX, p. 591. 

[118] Richer III.CIII, p. 126. 

[119] D O II 280, p. 325. 

[120] DD K II, p. 161. 

[121] Kurth, G. (ed.) (1903) Chartes de l´abbaye de Saint-Hubert en Ardenne (Brussels) ("Ardenne Saint-Hubert"), Tome I, X, p. 11. 

[122] Chronicon S. Huberti Andaginensis 58, MGH SS VIII, p. 597. 

[123] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, X, p. 11. 

[124] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, pp. 300-1. 

[125] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 77 (96), MGH SS VIII, p. 610. 

[126] D H IV 398, p. 526. 

[127] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, pp. 255-6. 

[128] Historia Andaginensis Monasterii, 110, Veterum Scriptorum, Tome IV, col. 1002. 

[129] Stavelot I, 143, p. 289. 

[130] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, pp. 255-6. 

[131] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, pp. 255-6. 

[132] Laurentii Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium Continuatio, 3, MGH SS VIII, p. 518. 

[133] Annales Sancti Vitoni Virdunensis, MGH SS VIII, p. 527. 

[134] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, pp. 255-6. 

[135] Stavelot I, 143, p. 289.  

[136] Herbomez, A. d' (ed.) (1898) Chartes de l'abbaye de Saint-Martin de Tournai, Tome I (Brussels), I, p. 54. 

[137] Rousseau, F. (ed.) (1936) Actes des Comtes de Namur de la Première Race 946-1196 (Brussels) ("Namur"), p. cxxviii. 

[138] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, pp. 255-6. 

[139] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 242. 

[140] Murray, A. V. (2000) The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: a dynastic history 1099-1125 (Prosopographica & Genealogica), p. 17. 

[141] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 905, MGH SS XXIII, p. 753. 

[142] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, p. 301. 

[143] Stavelot I, 143, p. 289. 

[144] Namur, 33, p. 70. 

[145] Stavelot I, 208, p. 413. 

[146] Namur 7, p. 77. 

[147] Stavelot I, 164, p. 534. 

[148] Namur 33, p. 70. 

[149] Stavelot I, 143, p. 289. 

[150] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XCI, p. 115. 

[151] Stavelot I, 164, p. 534. 

[152] Namur 33, p. 70. 

[153] Stavelot I, 240, p. 461. 

[154] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XCI, p. 115. 

[155] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 853. 

[156] Genealogica comitum Buloniensium MGH SS IX, p. 301. 

[157] Chronicon Hanonense quod dicitur Balduini Avennensis 47, MGH SS XXV, p. 420. 

[158] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 511. 

[159] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 853. 

[160] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, p. 560. 

[161] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 536. 

[162] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 512. 

[163] Chronicon Hanonense quod dicitur Balduini Avennensis 47, MGH SS XXV, p. 420. 

[164] ES VII 112. 

[165] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XCI, p. 115. 

[166] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 220. 

[167] Roland, C. ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’, Annales de la Société Archéologique de Namur, Tome 20 (Namur, 1893), p. 68. 

[168] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), pp. 63-9. 

[169] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 310, p. 365. 

[170] Lahaye, L. (ed.) ´Chartes de l´abbaye de Brogne´, Bulletin de la comisión royale d´histoire, Tome LXXVI (Brussels, 1907) ("Brogne"), 1, p. 665. 

[171] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[172] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny ( Paris), Tome V, 3659, p. 5. 

[173] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 324, p. 377. 

[174] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[175] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 168, quoting Lacomblet I, no. 228. 

[176] Foppens, J. F. (1748) Diplomatum Belgicorum nova collectio, sive supplementum ad opera diplomatica Auberti Miræi (Brussels), Tome IV, Pars IV, V, p. 505.  

[177] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, pp. 169-70, quoting Lacomblet I, no. 242. 

[178] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 167, quoting Le Glay Glossaire de Cambrésis, p. 20. 

[179] Evrard, M. (ed.) ´Documents relatifs à l´abbaye de Flône´, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XXIII (Louvain, 1892) ("Flône"), X, p. 296. 

[180] Flône, VII, p. 292. 

[181] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[182] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[183] Brogne, 1, p. 665. 

[184] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[185] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[186] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[187] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[188] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[189] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[190] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[191] Brogne, 1, p. 665. 

[192] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[193] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, V, p. 505. 

[194] Flône, I, p. 282. 

[195] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber II, Cap. XI, p. 306. 

[196] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXIII, p. 317. 

[197] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1106, MGH SS XXIII, p. 816. 

[198] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andeginensis 18 (26), MGH SS VIII, p. 578. 

[199] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1106, MGH SS XXIII, p. 816. 

[200] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), p. 110. 

[201] ES VIII 35. 

[202] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Book IX, p. 167, the editor in footnote 5 identifying him as Conan count of Montacute.  She is not listed among the children of Eustache III Comte de Boulogne & his wife Ida of Lotharingia given in Orderic Vitalis, Vol. V, Book IX, p. 175. 

[203] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), p. 98. quoting Collégiale de Dinant, cartulaire dit Livre rouge, fol. 249, aux Archives de l’Etat à Namur. 

[204] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXIII, p. 317. 

[205] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber III, Cap. XXVIII and XXIX, pp. 358-9. 

[206] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), (“WT”) IV.VII, p. 165. 

[207] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), p. 98. quoting Collégiale de Dinant, cartulaire dit Livre rouge, fol. 249, aux Archives de l’Etat à Namur. 

[208] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1101, MGH SS XXIII, p. 815. 

[209] WT VI.XVII, p. 263. 

[210] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXIII, p. 317. 

[211] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IV, Cap. XLVII, p. 422. 

[212] Flône, VIII, p. 294. 

[213] ES I.2 236. 

[214] ES VII 109. 

[215] Flône, XIII, p. 303. 

[216] Flône, XXIII and XXV, pp. 323 and 326. 

[217] Piot, C. (1870) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Trond (Brussels), Tome I (“Saint-Trond”), LI, p. 68. 

[218] ‘Documents relatifs à l’abbaye norbertine de Heylissem’, Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XXIV (Louvain, 1893) (“Heylissem”), XIV, p. 205. 

[219] Heylissem, XVII, p. 210. 

[220] ES VIII 25. 

[221] Heylissem, XXI, p. 214. 

[222] Heylissem, XXII, p. 216. 

[223] Heylissem, XIV, p. 205. 

[224] Heylissem, XVII, p. 210. 

[225] Flône, XXXII, p. 337. 

[226] Heylissem, XXII, p. 216. 

[227] Miraeus (Le Mire), A. (1723) Opera diplomatica et historica, 2nd edn. (Louvain), Tome II, Supplement, Pars III, LXVIII, p. 1181. 

[228] Heylissem, XXXI, p. 234. 

[229] Heylissem, XIV, p. 205. 

[230] Miraeus (1723), Tome II, Supplement, Pars III, LXVIII, p. 1181. 

[231] Flône, XXXII, p. 337. 

[232] Heylissem, XIV, p. 205. 

[233] Miraeus (1723), Tome II, Supplement, Pars III, LXVIII, p. 1181. 

[234] Flône, XXX, p. 333. 

[235] Flône, XXXII, p. 337. 

[236] Heylissem, XIV, p. 205. 

[237] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), p. 344, footnote 1. 

[238] ES VII 109. 

[239] Heylissem, XIV, p. 205. 

[240] Herimanni, Liber de Restauratione Sancti Martini Tornacensis 34, MGH SS XIV, p. 287. 

[241] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 506. 

[242] Rodulfi, Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium XI.13, MGH SS X, p. 303. 

[243] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), p. 98. quoting Collégiale de Dinant, cartulaire dit Livre rouge, fol. 249, aux Archives de l’Etat à Namur. 

[244] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 242. 

[245] Bruno De Bello Saxonico 130, MGH SS V, p. 384. 

[246] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, 1103/1081, MGH SS V, p. 562. 

[247] Casus Monasterii Petrihusensis, MGH SS XX, Liber II, 39, p. 647. 

[248] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 67. 

[249] Du Chesne, A. (1631) Histoire généalogique de la maison royale de Dreux (Paris), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 46. 

[250] Du Chesne (1631) Dreux, Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 47. 

[251] Monumenta Boica, Vol. XXIX, Pars altera, Codex Pataviensis, p. 55. 

[252] Veterum Scriptorum II, col. 78. 

[253] Simon, J. (1865) Die Geschichte des reichständischen Hauses Ysenburg und Büdingen, Band III Das Ysenburg und Büdingensche Urkundenbuch (Frankfurt) ("Isenburg Urkundenbuch"), III, p. 4. 

[254] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1840) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band I (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 305, p. 200. 

[255] Hontheim, J. N. von (1750) Historia Trevirensis Diplomatica et Pragmatica, Tome I ("Trier Diplomatica (Hontheim)"), CCCXLIII, p. 516. 

[256] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1158, MGH SS XXIII, p. 844. 

[257] Viellard, L. (1884) Documents et mémoire pour server à l´histoire du territoire de Belfort (Besançon), 198, p. 250. 

[258] Erpelding, D. (ed.) (1979) Actes des Princes Lorrains, 1ère série: Princes Laïques, II. Les Comtes, B. Actes des Comtes de Salm (préédition, Nancy) (“Salm”), 4, p. 12. 

[259] Salm 7, p. 18. 

[260] Salm 1, p. 7, headed "suspect" in the compilation. 

[261] Calmet (1757), Tome V, Preuves, col. ccclv. 

[262] Salm 4, p. 12. 

[263] Viellard (1884), 198, p. 250. 

[264] Calmet (1757), Tome V, Preuves, col. ccclv. 

[265] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1158, MGH SS XXIII, p. 844. 

[266] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1158, MGH SS XXIII, p. 844. 

[267] Annales Diibodi 1082, MGH SS XVI, p. 8.  

[268] Monumenta Boica, Vol. XXIX, Pars altera, Codex Pataviensis, p. 55. 

[269] Simon, J. (1865) Die Geschichte des reichständischen Hauses Ysenburg und Büdingen, Band III Das Ysenburg und Büdingensche Urkundenbuch (Frankfurt) ("Isenburg Urkundenbuch"), III, p. 4. 

[270] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 305, p. 200. 

[271] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1158, MGH SS XXIII, p. 844. 

[272] Triumphus Sancti Lamberti de Castro Bollonio 19, MGH SS XX, p. . 

[273] Viellard (1884), 198, p. 250. 

[274] Salm 2, p. 9. 

[275] Poull, G. (1991) La Maison ducale de Lorraine (Presses universitaires de Nancy), p. 85. 

[276] Calmet (1757), Tome V, Preuves, col. ccclv. 

[277] ES IV 92. 

[278] Salm 7, p. 18. 

[279] Salm 4, p. 12. 

[280] Calmet (1757), Tome VI, Preuves, col. liv. 

[281] Calmet (1757), Tome VI, Preuves, col. liv. 

[282] Salm 8, p. 20. 

[283] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 31, MGH SS XXV, p. 318. 

[284] Calmet (1757), Tome VI, Preuves, col. liv. 

[285] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 32, MGH SS XXV, p. 318. 

[286] Salm 8, p. 20. 

[287] Salm 8, p. 20. 

[288] Calmet (1757), Tome VI, Preuves, col. liv. 

[289] Salm 8, p. 20. 

[290] Salm 22, p. 38. 

[291] Marichal, P. (ed.) (1903-05) Cartulaire de l´évêché de Metz, Mettensia IV (Paris) ("Metz Evêché"), 141, p. 334. 

[292] Poull (1991), p. 48. 

[293] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 29, MGH SS XXV, p. 317. 

[294] Salm 8, p. 20. 

[295] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 28, MGH SS XXV, p. 316. 

[296] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 28, MGH SS XXV, p. 316. 

[297] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 28, MGH SS XXV, p. 316. 

[298] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 32, MGH SS XXV, p. 318. 

[299] Salm 24, p. 41. 

[300] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 28, MGH SS XXV, p. 316. 

[301] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ V, 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 334. 

[302] ES IV 92. 

[303] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ V, 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 334. 

[304] Poull (1991), p. 48. 

[305] Poull (1991), p. 48. 

[306] Poull (1991), p. 48. 

[307] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 28, MGH SS XXV, p. 316. 

[308] Salm 22, p. 38. 

[309] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 29, MGH SS XXV, p. 317. 

[310] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ IV, 31, MGH SS XXV, p. 318. 

[311] Metz Evêché, 141, p. 334. 

[312] Metz Evêché, 186, p. 400. 

[313] ES IV 95. 

[314] Chapellier, J. C., Chevreux, P. E. & Gley, G. (eds.) (1884) Documents rares ou inédits de l’histoire des Vosges (Epinal) (“Documents Vosges”), Tome VIII, p. 21. 

[315] Poull (1991), p. 48. 

[316] Poull, G. (1972) Les Sires de Parroye (Les cahiers d'histoire, de biographie et de généalogie no. 6) p. 38, cited in Poull (1991), p. 48. 

[317] Richeri Gesta Senoniensis Ecclesiæ V, 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 334. 

[318] Metz Evêché, 12, p. 13. 

[319] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch III, 609, p. 466. 

[320] Codex diplomaticus Rheno-Mosellanus, Theil II, 105, p. 200. 

[321] ES IV 93. 

[322] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 183, p. 224. 

[323] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, pp. 561. 

[324] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, pp. 561. 

[325] Kremer (1781), Band III, Urkunden Jülich, CXXXIII, p. 150. 

[326] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, pp. 561. 

[327] ES VII 39. 

[328] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, pp. 561. 

[329] Neyen, A. (1851) Histoire de la ville de Vianden et de ses comtes (Luxembourg), Preuves, I, p. iii. 

[330] Günther, W. (ed.) (1822) Codex diplomaticus Rheno-Mosellanus (Coblenz), Theil I, 121, p. 247. 

[331] Codex diplomaticus Rheno-Mosellanus, Theil I, 130, p. 264. 

[332] Beyer, H., Eltester, L. & Goerz, A. (eds.) (1865) Urkundenbuch zur Geschichte der, jetzt die Preussischen Regierungsbezirke Coblenz und Trier bildenden Mittelrheinischen Territorien (Coblenz), Vol. II, (“Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II”), 6, p. 42. 

[333] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 6, p. 42. 

[334] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 65, p. 105. 

[335] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 183, p. 224. 

[336] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 89, p. 127. 

[337] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 183, p. 224. 

[338] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 89, p. 127. 

[339] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 108, p. 150. 

[340] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 228, p. 266. 

[341] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 89, p. 127. 

[342] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 462, p. 325. 

[343] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 108, p. 150. 

[344] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 228, p. 266. 

[345] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 89, p. 127. 

[346] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 183, p. 224. 

[347] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 89, p. 127. 

[348] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 183, p. 224. 

[349] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, Diplomata Belgica, Liber II, XC, p. 306. 

[350] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, LXII, p. 554. 

[351] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1217, MGH SS XXIII, p. 906. 

[352] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1229, MGH SS XXIII, p. 924. 

[353] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, Diplomata Belgica, Liber II, XC, p. 306. 

[354] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), Preuves, p. 138. 

[355] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, LXII, p. 554. 

[356] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 459. 

[357] La Thaumassière (1679), p. 155. 

[358] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, LXII, p. 554. 

[359] ES VII 35, extinct in the male line in 1370. 

[360] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, LXII, p. 554. 

[361] McDaniel, G. ´On Hungarian-Serbian Relations in the 13th Century: John Angelos and Queen Jelena´, Ungarn-Jahrbuch, Vol. 12 (1982/83), pp. 43-50, available at <http://www.feefhs.org/links/Serbia/jelena.html> (consulted 19 Jul 2010), quoting Berger, E. (ed.) (1897) Les Registres d´Innocent IV (Paris), Vol. 3, 6862, p. 289, and 7178, p. 351. 

[362] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1238, MGH SS XXIII, p. 943. 

[363] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 32, p. 18. 

[364] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 41, p. 22. 

[365] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band II, 46, p. 24. 

[366] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 228, p. 266. 

[367] ES VII 36. 

[368] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch II, 228, p. 266. 

[369] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, LXII, p. 554. 

[370] Butkens, C. (1724) Trophées tant sacrés que profanes du duché de Brabant (The Hague), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 229, "Extraict des chartes de l´abbaye de Grimberge".  

[371] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[372] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[373] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[374] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[375] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[376] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, p. 561. 

[377] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[378] ES VII 35. 

[379] Jeantin, M. (1851) Les Chroniques de l´Ardenne et des Woëpvres, Tome I (Paris, Nancy), p. 157. 

[380] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, Preuves, p. 231, "Extraicts des chartes de Grimberge". 

[381] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1853) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band III (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 419, p. 330. 

[382] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band III, 554, p. 465. 

[383] Möller, W. ´Ein Beitrag zur Genealogie der Grafen von Vianden und zur Vererbung con der Neuerburg´, Annuaire de la Société héraldique luxembourgeoise (1950).  (information provided by Bert M. Kamp in a private email to the author dated 16 May 2010).  

[384] Berg, A. ´Wer war der Gemahl der Erbtochter Lucie von der Neuerburg´, Genealogie (1980), pp. 180-81, and Kamp, B. M. ´De moeder van Adelheid van Vianden´, De Nederlandsche Leeuw (1998), cols. 266-77 (information supplied by Bert M. Kamp, in a private email to the author dated 16 May 2010). 

[385] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 243. 

[386] ES I.2 200. 

[387] Flodoardi Annales 926, MGH SS III, pp. 376-7. 

[388] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 87, p. 47. 

[389] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 169, p. 233. 

[390] ES I.2 200. 

[391] D O I 27, p. 113. 

[392] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 103, p. 59. 

[393] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 186, p. 248. 

[394] ES I.2 200. 

[395] D O I 316, p. 429. 

[396] ES I.2 200. 

[397] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 105, p. 60. 

[398] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 111, p. 66. 

[399] ES I.2 200. 

[400] Ennen, L. & Eckertz, G. (eds.) (1860) Quellen zur Geschichte der Stadt Köln, Band I (Köln) ("Köln Quellen"), 10, p. 462. 

[401] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1860) Archiv für die Geschichte des Niederrheins (Düsseldorf) (“Niederrheinisches Urkundenbuch“), Tome IV.1, 604, p. 761.  

[402] D O I 85, p. 166. 

[403] D O I 89, p. 171. 

[404] D O I 93, p. 175. 

[405] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 248, and Köln Quellen, Band I, 11, p. 464. 

[406] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 213, p. 272. 

[407] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 213, p. 272. 

[408] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 111, p. 66. 

[409] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 245, p. 301. 

[410] ES I.2 200. 

[411] ES I.2 200. 

[412] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, p. 195. 

[413] DD Arn 127, p. 188. 

[414] DD Zw 23, p. 60. 

[415] Annales Vedastini 895, MGH SS I p. 529. 

[416] ES II 5. 

[417] D LK 60, p. 189. 

[418] RHGF IX, LXI, p. 528. 

[419] Karoli III et Heinrici I pactum ad Bonnam castrum, MGH LL 1, p. 567. 

[420] D O I 100, p. 182. 

[421] D H II 142, p. 168. 

[422] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 490. 

[423] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Bertin (Paris), p. 11. 

[424] Annales Blandinienses 882, MGH SS V, p. 24. 

[425] Rösch (1977), p. 118. 

[426] Annales Vedastini 895, MGH SS I p. 529. 

[427] Historia Walciodorensis Monasterii 6, MGH SS XIV, p. 508. 

[428] Annales Vedastini 896, MGH SS II, p. 530.  . 

[429] Annales Blandinienses 896, MGH SS V, p. 24. 

[430] D LK 60, p. 189. 

[431] Veterum Scriptorum II, p. 38. 

[432] RHGF IX, LXI, p. 528. 

[433] Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium I.74, MGH SS VII, p. 426. 

[434] Flodoardi Annales 924, MGH SS III, p. 373. 

[435] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ IV, XIX, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 410. 

[436] Fayen, A. (1906) Cartulaire de la ville de Gand, Chartes et documents T. I, Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis (Gand) ("Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis"), 60, p. 52. 

[437] Karoli III et Heinrici I pactum ad Bonnam castrum, MGH LL 1, p. 567. 

[438] Flodoardi Annales 939, MGH SS III, p. 386. 

[439] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 65, p. 68. 

[440] Koch, A. C. F. (1970) Oorkondenboek van Holland en Zeeland, p. 60, citing Laporte, J. ‘Gérard de Brogne à Saint-Wandrille et à Saint-Riquier´, Revue bénédictine, LXX (1960), p. 161 [neither source consulted, information provided by Kees Nieuwenhuijsen in a private email to the author dated 8 Jun 2012]

[441] Ex Vita S. Humberti Maricolensis 19, MGH SS XV.2, p. 797. 

[442] D O I 100, p. 182. 

[443] ES II 5. 

[444] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 65, p. 68. 

[445] D O I 317, p. 431. 

[446] Namur, p. xxxvii. 

[447] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia Pars I, 14, MGH SS X, p. 379. 

[448] Piot, C. (1870) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Trond, Tome I, p. 72 [not yet consulted], cited in Baerten, J. ‘Les origines des comtes de Looz et la formation territoriale du comté’, Revue belge de philologie et d´histoire, Tome 43, fasc. 2 (1965), p. 464. 

[449] Marchandisse, A. (ed.) (1991) L'obituaire de la cathédrale Saint-Lambert de Liège (Brussels) ("Liège Saint-Lambert"), p. 150. 

[450] Lokeren, A. van (1868) Chartes et documents de l´abbaye de Saint Pierre au Mont Blandin à Gand (Gand) ("Gand Saint-Pierre") 28, p. 32. 

[451] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 92, p. 90. 

[452] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 93, p. 91. 

[453] Gand Saint-Pierre 28, p. 32. 

[454] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 92, p. 90. 

[455] Gand Saint-Pierre 28, p. 32. 

[456] Namur, p. xxxvii. 

[457] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia Pars I, 14, MGH SS X, p. 379. 

[458] Gand Saint-Pierre 28, p. 32. 

[459] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 92, p. 90. 

[460] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium I, 101 and 103, p. 443. 

[461] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 93, p. 91. 

[462] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92. 

[463] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 101, p. 95. 

[464] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 104, p. 98. 

[465] D O III 399, p. 832. 

[466] D H II 142, p. 168. 

[467] Liège Saint-Lambert, p. 145. 

[468] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 101, p. 95. 

[469] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 104, p. 98. 

[470] Namur, p. xxxvii. 

[471] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 85. 

[472] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 101, p. 95. 

[473] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 104, p. 98. 

[474] Liège Saint-Lambert, p. 44. 

[475] Gand Saint-Pierre 28, p. 32. 

[476] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 92, p. 90. 

[477] Gand Saint-Pierre 28, p. 32. 

[478] Gesta Episcorum Cameracensium I.71, MGH SS VII, p. 427. 

[479] D O I 195, p. 275.   

[480] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium I, 101 and 103, MGH SS VII, p. 443. 

[481] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium I, 93, MGH SS VII, pp. 438-9. 

[482] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium I, 93, MGH SS VII, pp. 438-9. 

[483] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium, Lib. I, 117, 118, MGH SS VII, p. 453. 

[484] Chronicon Sancti Andreæ, Castri Cameracensis I.6, MGH SS VII, p. 528. 

[485] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium, Lib. I, 117, 118, MGH SS VII, p. 453. 

[486] Annales Elnonenses Maiores 1041, MGH SS V, pp. 12-13. 

[487] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 2, MGH SS VII, p. 489. 

[488] Annales Elnonenses Maiores 1041, MGH SS V, pp. 12-13. 

[489] Duvivier, C. (1898) Actes et documents anciens interéssant la Belgique (Brussels), p. 31. 

[490] Vita Domni Lietberti Episcopi Cameracensis VIII, Spicilegium II, p. 140. 

[491] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 2, MGH SS VII, p. 490. 

[492] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 2, MGH SS VII, pp. 489-90. 

[493] Chronicon Sancti Andreæ, Castri Cameracensis I.6, MGH SS VII, p. 528. 

[494] Du Chesne, A. (1639) Histoire généalogique de la maison de Béthune (Paris), Preuves, p. 5. 

[495] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 7. 

[496] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 2, MGH SS VII, p. 490. 

[497] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 7-8, MGH SS VII, p. 493. 

[498] Annales Elnonenses Maiores 1041, MGH SS V, pp. 12-13. 

[499] Vita Domni Lietberti Episcopi Cameracensis VIII, Spicilegium II, p. 140. 

[500] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 2, MGH SS VII, p. 490. 

[501] Chronicon Sancti Andreæ, Castri Cameracensis I.6, MGH SS VII, p. 528. 

[502] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium Continuatio 8, MGH SS VII, p. 493. 

[503] Brassart, F. (1877) Histoire du Château et de la Châtellenie de Douai, Preuves (Douai), XI, p. 15. 

[504] Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I), 5, p. 117. 

[505] Brassart (1877), XXII, p. 35. 

[506] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium continuatio 20, MGH SS VII, p. 495. 

[507] Brassart (1877), XI, p. 15. 

[508] Brassart (1877), XI, p. 15. 

[509] ES XIII 99A, which gives no details. 

[510] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 23. 

[511] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 26. 

[512] Annales Cameracenses 1145, MGH SS XVI, p. 516. 

[513] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 26. 

[514] Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I), p. 164. 

[515] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 23. 

[516] Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I), p. 223. 

[517] Brassart (1877), LXXVII, p. 123. 

[518] Toussaints du Plessis (1731) Histoire de l´église de Meaux (Paris), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCI, p. 49. 

[519] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCII, p. 49. 

[520] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CV, p. 54. 

[521] Peigné-Delacourt, M. (ed.) (1865) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Notre-Dame d'Ourscamp (Amiens) ("Ourscamp Notre-Dame") DCCCXVII, p. 494. 

[522] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[523] Brassart (1877), LXXVII, p. 123. 

[524] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CXXXVIII, p. 63. 

[525] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCI, p. 49. 

[526] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CV, p. 54. 

[527] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCCXVII, p. 494. 

[528] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CXXI, p. 60. 

[529] Brassart (1877), LXXVII, p. 123. 

[530] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCI, p. 49. 

[531] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCII, p. 49. 

[532] Brassart (1877), LXXVII, p. 123. 

[533] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCI, p. 49. 

[534] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCII, p. 49. 

[535] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CV, p. 54. 

[536] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCCXVII, p. 494. 

[537] Depoin, J. (ed.) (1917) Recueil de chartes et documents de Saint-Martin-des-Champs, monastère parisien (Paris) ("Paris St Martin-des-Champs"), III, 672, p. 273. 

[538] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CXXI, p. 60. 

[539] Duvivier, C. (1903) Actes et documents anciens interéssant la Belgique, Nouvelle série (Brussels), 46, p. 89. 

[540] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, Notitia Ecclesiarum Belgii, CXV, p. 718. 

[541] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Collinances, p. 201.       

[542] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, Continuatio Leidensis et Divionensis, MGH SS IX, p. 307. 

[543] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis), MGH SS IX, p. 326.   

[544] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 1, MGH SS IX, p. 327.   

[545] Duvivier (1903), 46, p. 89. 

[546] Belfort, A. de (ed.) (1881) Archives de la Maison-Dieu de Châteaudun (Paris, Châteaudun) (“Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu”), XXV, p. 20. 

[547] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CLXIII, p. 75. 

[548] Paris St Martin-des-Champs III, 672, p. 273. 

[549] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, Notitia Ecclesiarum Belgii, CXV, p. 718. 

[550] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”) XXIV.IX, p. 118. 

[551] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF XIII, p. 560. 

[552] Paris St Martin-des-Champs III, 672, p. 273. 

[553] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Vauduisant, p. 55.       

[554] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCII, p. 49. 

[555] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CV, p. 54. 

[556] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCCXVII, p. 494. 

[557] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CXXI, p. 60. 

[558] Brassart (1877), LXXVII, p. 123. 

[559] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCII, p. 49. 

[560] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CV, p. 54. 

[561] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCCXVII, p. 494. 

[562] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CXV, p. 58. 

[563] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CXXI, p. 60. 

[564] ES XIII 99A. 

[565] Brassart (1877), LXXVII, p. 123. 

[566] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, XCI, p. 49. 

[567] Toussaints du Plessis (1731), Tome II, Pièces justificatives, CV, p. 54. 

[568] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCCXVII, p. 494. 

[569] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 23. 

[570] Haigneré, D. (ed.) (1886) Les chartes de Saint-Bertin d´après le grand cartulaire de Dom Charles-Joseph Dewitte (Saint-Omer) ("Saint-Bertin (Grand Cartulaire)"), Tome I, 175, p. 71. 

[571] Saint-Bertin (Grand Cartulaire), Tome I, 248, p. 113. 

[572] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes V, 50, p. 16. 

[573] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 26. 

[574] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 23. 

[575] Du Chesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 23. 

[576] Gesta Pontificum Cameracensium (Gesta Burchardi I), p. 203. 

[577] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, p. 195. 

[578] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 214. 

[579] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 221. 

[580] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 221, quoting "Analectes XVI, 9". 

[581] Cluny Tome V, 3659, p. 5. 

[582] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[583] Verdun Saint-Vanne (1898), XXVII, p. 427. 

[584] Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium III, 33, MGH SS VII, p. 479. 

[585] Verdun Saint-Vanne (1898), XXVII, p. 427. 

[586] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 221, quoting "Analectes XVI, 9". 

[587] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1878) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny ( Paris) Tome V 3659, p. 5. 

[588] Cluny Tome V, 3659, p. 5. 

[589] Cluny Tome V, 3659, p. 5. 

[590] Cluny Tome V, 3659, p. 5. 

[591] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 324, p. 377. 

[592] Ardenne Saint-Hubert, Tome I, XVIII, p. 19. 

[593] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 168, quoting Lacomblet I, no. 228. 

[594] Foppens (1748), Tome IV, Pars IV, V, p. 505. 

[595] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, pp. 169-70, quoting Lacomblet I, no. 242. 

[596] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 167, quoting Le Glay Glossaire de Cambrésis, p. 20. 

[597] Flône, X, p. 296. 

[598] Flône, VII, p. 292. 

[599] Annalen des historischen Vereins für den Niederrhein, VIII (Köln, 1860), Necrologium Sigebergense, p. 223. 

[600] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 202, p. 129. 

[601] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 203, p. 130. 

[602] D H IV 471, p. 639. 

[603] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 324, p. 377. 

[604] Vita Meingoldi Comitis, MGH SS XV.1, p. 558. 

[605] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[606] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[607] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, p. 65. 

[608] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 6-7, MGH SS XV.1, p. 558. 

[609] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[610] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 6-7, MGH SS XV.1, pp. 558-9. 

[611] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[612] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 1, MGH SS XV.1, p. 557. 

[613] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 1 and 2, MGH SS XV.1, pp. 557-8. 

[614] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 1, MGH SS XV.1, p. 557. 

[615] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 1 and 2, MGH SS XV.1, pp. 557-8. 

[616] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[617] MGH SS XXV, p. 40 footnote 10, which quotes "Dummler, Ostfranskisches Reich II, 358". 

[618] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 21, MGH SS XV.1, p. 562. 

[619] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 6-7, MGH SS XV.1, p. 558. 

[620] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[621] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[622] Vita Meingoldi Comitis 6-7, MGH SS XV.1, pp. 558-9. 

[623] Thietmar 4.31, p. 174. 

[624] Annales S. Maximini Trevirensis 931, MGH SS II, p. 213. 

[625] Gesta Treverorum 29, MGH SS VIII, p. 168, manuscripts B and C. 

[626] MGH SS VIII, p. 168 footnote 12, which cites "Jahrbücher I, 1, p. 60" and "Opera Ratherii, p. 208 n. 22". 

[627] Continuator Reginonis, 956, MGH SS I, p. 623. 

[628] Thietmar 4.31, p. 174. 

[629] D O I 128, p. 209. 

[630] D O I 370, p. 507. 

[631] Codex Laureshamensis (1768), Tome I, LXXV, p. 127. 

[632] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 295. 

[633] Thietmar 4.31, p. 174. 

[634] ES I.2 200. 

[635] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XXXII, p. 41 footnote (3). 

[636] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XXXII, p. 41. 

[637] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XXXII, p. 41 footnote (3). 

[638] MGH SS XIII, Catalogus Abbatum Gemblacensium, pp. 291-2. 

[639] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, XXXII, p. 41 footnote (3). 

[640] Thietmar 4.31 and 4.32, pp. 174 and 175, footnote 103 stating that Ansfrid's father was a brother of Queen Mathilde but no corroboration of this has been found. 

[641] Chronicon Laureshamense, MGH SS XXI, p. 393. 

[642] Ægidii Aurenvallenses, Gesta Episcoporum Leodiensium II 40, MGH SS XXV, p. 51. 

[643] Grote (1877), p. 496. 

[644] D O II 280, p. 325. 

[645] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 215. 

[646] D O III 14, p. 410. 

[647] D O III 16, p. 413. 

[648] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, p. 65. 

[649] Annales Colonienses 995, MGH SS I, p. 99. 

[650] Sigeberti Chronica 997, MGH SS VI, p. 353. 

[651] Thietmar 4.35, pp. 176-7. 

[652] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 40, p. 75. 

[653] Duaci (ed.) (1624) Vincentius Bellovacensis Speculum Historiale, lib. 24, cap. 157, quoted in Chronologia Johannes de Beke 40, p. 75. 

[654] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I 16, MGH SS IV, p. 708. 

[655] Beka's Egmondscii Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 106. 

[656] Thietmar 4.34, p. 176. 

[657] Habets, J. (ed.) (1889) Archieven van het kapitel der hoogadellijke rijksabdij Thorn, Eerste Deel ("Thorn"), 3, p. 6. 

[658] Thietmar 4.32, p. 175, footnote 105 stating that she was named Benedicta. 

[659] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I 16, MGH SS IV, p. 708. 

[660] Thorn, 3, p. 6. 

[661] Gesta Treverorum 29, MGH SS VIII, p. 168, manuscripts B and C. 

[662] Raf Ceustermans, in a private email to the author dated 11 Aug 2011. 

[663] Vita Richardi abbatis S Vidoni Virdunensis 9, MGH SS XI, p. 285. 

[664] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I 16, MGH SS IV, p. 708. 

[665] Raf Ceustermans, in a private email to the author dated 11 Aug 2011. 

[666] Dhondt, J. ´Het Onstaan van het hertogdom Brabant´, Brabants Heem V (1953), p. 77. 

[667] DD K II, p. 161. 

[668] Veterum Scriptorum, Tome II, col. 56, and D K II 189, p. 251

[669] Roland ‘Les seigneurs et comtes de Rochefort’ (1893), p. 82. 

[670] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, p. 194. 

[671] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 243. 

[672] Mittlerheinisches Urkundenbuch I, 180, p. 242. 

[673] MGH Epistola VII 111, p. 102, and 129, p. 114, quoted in Hlawitschka, E. Die Anfänge des Hauses Habsburg-Lothringen, Genealogische Untersuchungen zur Geschichte Lothringens und des Reiches im 9. 10 and 11 Jahrhundert (Saarbrücken, 1969), p. 159.  . 

[674] D Lo I 83, p. 204. 

[675] D Lo I 84, p. 206 (marked "Verunechtet?" in the compilation). 

[676] D Lo I 96, p. 233. 

[677] D Lo I 137, p. 307. 

[678] D Lo II 5, p. 389. 

[679] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469. 

[680] Karoli II Imp. Conventus Carisiacensis, MGH LL 1, p. 537. 

[681] MGH Epistola VII 111, p. 102, and 129, p. 114, quoted in Hlawitschka (1969), p. 159.  . 

[682] Verdun Saint-Vanne (1898), p. 384. 

[683] D Zw 25, p. 62. 

[684] D LK 57, p. 183. 

[685] D LK 76, p. 212. 

[686] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, pp. 277 and 304. 

[687] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 305. 

[688] ES I.2 200. 

[689] Köln Quellen, Band I, 10, p. 462. 

[690] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 248, quoting Lacomblet IV, no. 604. 

[691] D O I 85, p. 166. 

[692] D O I 89, p. 171. 

[693] D O I 93, p. 175. 

[694] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 248, and Köln Quellen, Band I, 11, p. 464. 

[695] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I.1, MGH SS IV, p. 702.  The date 1006 is in the margin of I.8, p. 704, another passage referring to his marriage. 

[696] ES VIII 131a. 

[697] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum I.1, MGH SS IV, p. 702.  The date 1006 is in the margin of I.8, p. 704, another passage referring to his marriage. 

[698] Vita Meinwerci Episcopi Paderbornensis 134, MGH SS XI, p. 134, undated but other paragraphs suggest the range [1008/1017]. 

[699] D H II 112, p. 137. 

[700] D H II 186, p. 221. 

[701] D H II 438, p. 560. 

[702] Thioderici Aeditui Tuitiensis Opuscula, MGH SS XIV, p. 564. 

[703] Thietmar 7.53, p. 346. 

[704] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum II.8, MGH SS IV, p. 713. 

[705] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum II.10 and 11, MGH SS IV, p. 714. 

[706] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum II.18, MGH SS IV, p. 718. 

[707] Alpertus, De Diversitate Temporum II.8, MGH SS IV, p. 713. 

[708] Annales Rodenses, MGH SS XVI, p. 689. 

[709] Veterum Scriptorum, Tome II, col. 56, and D K II 189, p. 251. 

[710] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 42 (54), MGH SS VIII, p. 591. 

[711] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 42 (54), MGH SS VIII, p. 591. 

[712] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, LXVII, p. 77. 

[713] Miraeus (1723), Tome I, LXVII, p. 77. 

[714] Niederrheins Urkundenbuch, Band I, 286, p. 187. 

[715] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 42 (54), MGH SS VIII, p. 591. 

[716] Annales Rodenses, MGH SS XVI, p. 689. 

[717] MGH LL Capitularia regum Francorum II, p. 195. 

[718] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, pp. 130-1. 

[719] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I, 184, p. 246. 

[720] D O III 45, p. 445. 

[721] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 131, citing "Butkens, I, pr. 22". 

[722] D H III 35, p. 44. 

[723] Gestorum Abbatum Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia, I, 7, MGH SS X, p. 371. 

[724] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1826) Histoire des ducs de Normandie, par Guillaume de Jumiège (Paris) (“WJ”), II.8, p. 38. 

[725] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 998, MGH SS XXIII, p. 749. 

[726] Vanderkindere (1902), Vol. II, p. 133, citing "Martène, Coll., II, 38". 

[727] Gestorum Abbatum Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia, I, 7, MGH SS X, p. 371. 

[728] Annales Bertiniani II 844. 

[729] Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 50, MGH SS II, p. 637. 

[730] Flodoardi Annales 944, MGH SS III, p. 390. 

[731] D O I 111, p. 194. 

[732] D O I 128, p. 209. 

[733] D O I 154, p. 235. 

[734] D O I 318, p. 432.