MORAVIA

  v3.0 Updated 15 June 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                DUKES of MORAVIA (MOIMIRID) 3

Chapter 2.                MARKGRAFEN & DUKES of MORAVIA (PŘEMYSLID) 6

A.         MARKGRAFEN & DUKES of MORAVIA, at BRNO and ZNAIM.. 6

B.         DUKES of MORAVIA, at OLMÜTZ. 10

C.        DUKES of MORAVIA 1142-1190. 12

Chapter 3.                MARKGRAFEN of MORAVIA (LUXEMBOURG) 14

Chapter 4.                HERREN von KUNŠTÁT/KUNSTADT in MORAVIA. 17

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The state of Moravia was founded in the first half of the 9th century.  The earliest reference to the Slavic people called the Moravians is recorded in 822 when Einhard refers to a council at Frankfurt attended by legates from "orientalium Sclavorum, id est Abodritorum, Soraborum, Wiltzorum, Beheimorum, Marvanorum, Prædenecentorum et in Pannonia residentium Avarum"[1].  Moravia was founded some time between [830/40] by Mojmir, the members of whose family continued to rule as dukes of Moravia until the death of Duke Zwentibold in 894 (see Chapter 1).  Moravia flourished in the mid-9th century, although the primary sources record invasions by the Carolingian Franks in 846 and 869, when they deposed the ruling dukes and imposed their own nominees (although from the Moimirid dynasty) as rulers.  There is some confusion between Bohemia and Moravia in primary sources during the mid-9th century.  For example, the Annales Fuldenses record that a military expedition was sent to "Bohemia" in 857 although, as the text names the Moravian duke, it is likely that Moravia was intended[2].  It is possible that Bohemia did not then exist as a separate entity but was subject to Moravian domination. 

 

The missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius arrived in Moravia from Byzantium in 862 to spread Orthodox Christianity, translating the liturgy and parts of the gospels into Slavonic.  The Byzantine priests were expelled in the 880s and the Slavonic rite replaced by the Catholic.  After 894, the Moravian state appears to have fallen apart, resulting from quarrels between the sons of the late duke.  Emperor Arnulf installed his nominees to rule Moravia in order to protect Bavarian interests, and his successor concluded a treaty with Moravia at Regensburg in 901[3].  Moravia was destroyed by the Hungarians in 906[4].  The Gesta Hungarorum records that, after settling in Pannonia, the Magyars (although the text does not give them this name) raided Moravia and Bohemia and killed "Waratizlao" (Duke of Bohemia) in battle[5]

 

Moravia fell under Bohemian domination in the 10th and 11th centuries.  From the early 11th century, the kings of Bohemia installed their eldest sons as dukes of Moravia.  From the mid-11th century, the Bohemian installed Markgrafen and dukes of Moravia, based at Brno and Olmütz, ruled independently until the late 12th century (see Chapter 2).  However, the relationship between the two sets of rulers was tense.  The Bohemians are recorded as having expelled their cousins the Moravian dukes several times in the 12th century.  Jan I King of Bohemia, of the Luxembourg dynasty, installed his son Johann Heinrich as Markgraf of Moravia in 1349, although his son Jodok (died 1411) is the last recorded independent ruler of Moravia (see Chapter 3).  The local Moravian lords of Kunśtát were ancestors of the Bohemian king Jiři Podiebrad (see Chapter 4). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    DUKES of MORAVIA (MOIMIRID)

 

 

1.         MOJMIR (-846 or after).  He founded the state of Moravia after 822 and launched raids against the Franks who deposed him in 846, replacing him by his nephew[6]

2.         [WISTRACH (-857 or after).  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Otgarius episcopus et Hruodoltus comes palatii et Ernustus filius Ernusti ducis" were sent to Bohemia and occupied "civitatem Wiztrachi ducis", expelling "Sclaiutago filio Wiztrachi" who fled to "Rastizen…frater eius", recording that the latter had previously been banished to "apud Zistiborum Sorabum"[7].  The fact that Wistrach was the brother of Mojmir is deduced from the Annales Fuldenses recording that "Hlothario" led his army in mid-Aug 846 to "Sclavos Marahenes" and installed "Restizen, nepotem Moimari" as their duke[8], although it is possible that it was Wistrach's wife who was sister of Mojmir.]  m ---.  The name of Wistrach's wife is not known.  Wistrach & his wife had [four] children:    

a)         SCLAIUTAG (-after 857).  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Otgarius episcopus et Hruodoltus comes palatii et Ernustus filius Ernusti ducis" were sent to Bohemia and occupied "civitatem Wiztrachi ducis", expelling "Sclaiutago filio Wiztrachi" who fled to "Rastizen…frater eius" who had previously been banished to "apud Zistiborum Sorabum"[9]

b)         RASTISLAV (-869).  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Hlothario" led his army in mid-Aug 846 to "Sclavos Marahenes" and installed "Restizen, nepotem Moimari" as their duke[10].  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Otgarius episcopus et Hruodoltus comes palatii et Ernustus filius Ernusti ducis" were sent to Bohemia and occupied "civitatem Wiztrachi ducis", expelling "Sclaiutago filio Wiztrachi" who fled to "Rastizen…frater eius" who had previously been banished to "apud Zistiborum Sorabum"[11].  He extended Moravia's frontiers to the borders of the Bulgar realm on the River Tisza.  He sought military aid from Constantinople in 862, faced with a Frankish/Bulgarian alliance against him.  This was accompanied by missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius arriving in Moravia in 862[12].  Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks invaded Moravia in 869, deposed Rastislav and placed his nephew on the throne[13].  The Annales Alammanici record that "Rasticius dux a Hludowico rege Germaniæ captus est" in 870[14]

c)         [MOROT] .  The Gesta Hungarorum names "Zvataplug filius Morot" describing him as "princeps…in Polonia" and ruling "Bulgaris Messianisque" and subjugating "Pannonia post Hunnorum"[15].  There seems to be no corroborative support for Svatopluk of Moravia having ruled in Hungary, nor for his having been killed "prope fluvium Racus, iuxta Banhida" which the same paragraph of the Gesta also records.  No other corroboration has been found that Svatopluk and Zwentibold may have been the same person or, if correct, that his father was named Morot.  Although the Gesta Francorum names "Zuentiboldi nepotis Rastizi" when recording his installation as king in Moravia by Emperor Louis II[16], it is not clear whether Zwentibold's father or his mother was the sibling of Rastislav.  m ---.  The name of [Morot]'s wife is not known.  [Morot] & his wife had one child: 

i)          ZWENTIBOLD [Svatopluk] (-894).  The Annales Fuldenses name "Zwentiboldum nepotem Rastizi" in 869[17].  The Gesta Francorum names "Zuentiboldi nepotis Rastizi" when recording his installation as king in Moravia by Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks[18].  Opposition to his rule is shown by the Annales Fuldenses recording that the Slavs tried to kill "Marahenses ducem suum" in 871 and placed "presbyterum eius ducis propinquum…Sclagamarum" on the throne[19].  The precise relationship between Sclagamarus and Duke Zwentibold is not known.  He favoured the development of the Frankish church over the Orthodox.  A charter dated to [850/96] lists pilgrims from "Slavicæ nationis" to monasteries in Italy and includes "Szuentiepulc, Szuentezizna"[20], the first of the names possibly referring to Zwentibold.  The Franks concluded treaties with Moravia at Forchheim (874), Tulln (885) and Omuntesperch (890)[21].  Under Wiching, successor of Methodius, the Slavonic rite was replaced in Moravia and the Byzantine priests expelled[22].  Moravia overran the Vistulan state in southern Poland in [880], its deposed leader being baptised by St Methodius[23].  Zwentibold intervened in the long feud between the Wilhelme and Aribonen families, supporting one side or the other at different times[24].  Regino records that Arnulf King of the East Franks granted "ducatum Behemensium", previously held by "principem suæ cognationis", to "Zuendiboldo Marabensium Sclavorum regi"[25].  In 892, King Arnulf devastated Moravian lands with help from the Magyars.  The Gesta Francorum records the death of "Zuentibaldus dux Maravorum" in 894[26].  After his death, his sons quarrelled between themselves and the state fell apart[27]m SVETEŽIZNA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated to [850/96] lists pilgrims from "Slavicæ nationis" to monasteries in Italy and includes "Szuentiepulc, Szuentezizna"[28], the latter presumed to be the wife of the former.  [m ANNA of Bulgaria, daughter of BORIS I Khan of the Bulgars & his wife [Maria ---].  This possible marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[29].  The source on which the speculation is based has not been identified.]  Zwentibold & his wife had three children: 

(a)       MOJMIR (-after 899).  The Annales Fuldenses record disputes between "duos fratres gentis Marahensium, Moymirum ac Zuentibaldum" in 898, which prompted Emperor Arnulf to send "marchiones suos, Liutboldum et Arbonum comitem" to Moravia to protect the Bavarians[30].  Mojmir's parentage is assumed from the Annales Fuldenses reference to the abduction of "Zuentibaldum puerum filium antique ducis Zwentibolchi" in 899 (see below), which from the context appears to refer to the same Zwentibold who is named in 898. 

(b)       ZWENTIBOLD (-after 26 Sep 903).  The Annales Fuldenses record disputes between "duos fratres gentis Marahensium, Moymirum ac Zuentibaldum" in 898, which prompted Emperor Arnulf to send "marchiones suos, Liutboldum et Arbonum comitem" to Moravia to protect the Bavarians[31].  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Zuentibaldum puerum filium antique ducis Zwentibolchi" was abducted in 899[32].  From the context, it appears that this refers to the same Zwentibold who is named in the 898 passage.  "Arnolfus imperator augustus" gave property in "Charentariche in comitatu ipsius consanguinei nostri [Liutbaldi]…Gurca…et…in Gurcatala et in alia loco qui dicitur Zulszah" to "viro progenie bonæ nobilitatis exorto Zuentibolch…Liutbaldi…propinqui ac illustris nostri marchionis vassallo" at the request of "Iringi et Isangrimi…comitum nostrorum" by charter dated 31 Aug 898[33].  "Hludouuicus…rex" granted property in "valle…Oliupespurc comitatu Arbonis" to "Zuentipolcho propinqui nostri Liutpoldi…marchionis vassallo" by charter dated 26 Sep 903[34].  Another charter of Ludwig "das Kind" dated 24 Jun 903 which names "Liutpold dux Boemanorum"[35], confirming that Luitpold enjoyed the necessary territorial control to have been the liege of Zwentibold in Moravia. 

(c)       son .  The De Administrando Imperio of Konstantinos Porphyrogenetos records that "Moraviæ princeps Sphendoplocus" had three sons, between whom his lands were divided[36]

d)         [--- .  m ---.]  One child: 

i)          SCLAGAMARUS (-after 871).  The Annales Fuldenses record that the Slavs tried to kill "Marahenses ducem suum" (presumably referring to Zwentibold who had been installed as duke by the Germans) in 871 and placed "presbyterum eius ducis propinquum…Sclagamarum" on the throne[37].  The precise relationship between Sclagamarus and Duke Zwentibold is not known. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    MARKGRAFEN & DUKES of MORAVIA (PŘEMYSLID)

 

 

 

A.      MARKGRAFEN & DUKES of MORAVIA, at BRNO and ZNAIM

 

 

KONRAD of Bohemia, son of BŘETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt (-6 Sep 1093).  Fürst von Znaim 1054.  Duke of West Moravia [Brno] 1061-1092.  The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[38].  He succeeded his brother 1092 as KONRAD II Duke of the Bohemians.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Chonradus" succeeded in 1093 after the death of "Wratizlaus rex" but died after seven months[39]

m WIRPIRK [Hildburg], daughter of ---.  The Chronica Boemorum names "Wirpirk" as wife of "Chonradi"[40].  Her origin is not known with certainty.  It is possible that she was --- of Carniola and Istria, daughter of Ulrich I Marchese di Carniola e Istria & his wife Sophie of Hungary.  The Historia Welforum refers to the four daughters of "Sophia ex duce Maginone", specifying that "terciam…duxit dux Maravie, quartam quam Egenhardus comes de Scirin a quodam monasterio…in Ratispona abstulit"[41].  It is clear from many other sources that Sophia and her second husband Magnus of Saxony only had two daughters, Wulfhild and Eilika.  It is assumed therefore that the two other daughters referred to were her children by her first marriage with Ulrich of Istria, although the primary source which corroborates this clearly has not so far been identified.  The Moravian husband of Marchese Ulrich's daughter has generally been identified as Duke Konrad.  This appears to be supported by the onomastic evidence of the couple's son being named "Udalrich", presumably after his maternal grandfather.  However, there appears to be a chronological problem with this hypothesis.  Although his birth date is not known, the sons of Duke Břetislav appear to have been born in the [1030/40] range.  The children of Marchese Ulrich, on the other hand, were born in [1065/70], which would mean a considerable age difference between the couple if Duke Konrad was the correct Duke of Moravia.  In addition, it would be impossible for the couple's son Udalrich to have had a daughter who was already alive in 1096 (see below).  According to Wegener, the wife of Duke Konrad may have been Hildburg, daughter of Sieghard [VII] or [VIII] Graf im Chiemgau & his wife Pilihild [Diessen], but he does not explain his reasoning for this speculation or cite any primary sources[42].  This is more chronologically acceptable as any children of Graf Sieghard [VII] or [VIII] must have been born before his death in 1044. 

Duke Konrad & his wife had two children: 

1.         UDALRICH (-27 Mar 1113).  The Annalista Saxo names "Odalricus et Lutoldus" as sons of Konrad[43]Duke of Moravia at Brno.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Theutonici cum filiis Chuonradi" invaded Bohemia, put to flight "ducem Borivoy", and installed "seniorem eorum fratrem…Udalricum" as duke[44].  The Chronica Boemorum records that "Udolricus et Lutoldus filii Conradi", expelled from Moravia, recovered their lands in 1101[45].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1113 of "Udaldricus dux"[46]m ---.  The name of Udalrich's wife is not known.  However, the Historia Welforum refers to the four daughters of "Sophia ex duce Maginone", specifying that "terciam…duxit dux Maravie, quartam quam Egenhardus comes de Scirin a quodam monaterio…in Ratispona abstulit"[47].  As explained above, this reference must be to the daughters of Sophia by her first husband Ulrich Marchese of Istria.  The Moravian husband of this daughter has generally been assumed to be Duke Konrad, Udalrich's father.  However, this is not ideal from a chronological point of view, as explained above.  Another possibility is therefore that --- of Carniola and Istria, daughter of Ulrich I Marchese di Carniola e Istria & his wife Sophie of Hungary, was the wife of Duke Udalrich.  Duke Udalrich & his wife had two children: 

a)         VRATISLAV (-16 Aug or 21 Sep 1155).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records "Wratislaus filius Oedalrici" being captured by Duke Sobeslas in 1129[48]Duke of Moravia 1146.  m (1132) --- Vasilkovna, daughter of VASILKO Rostislavich Prince of Terebovl & his wife ---.   The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records the marriage of "Wratislaus dux de parte Moraviæ quæ vocatur Bruinzco, filius Dedalrici" with a wife from Russia in 1132[49].  Baumgarten refers to the wife of Duke Vratislav as the (unnamed) daughter of Vasilko, citing only an early secondary source in support[50].  Duke Vratislav & his wife had three children: 

i)          SPYTIHNĔV (-1198).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Duke of Brno 1195-1197.  

ii)         SVATOPLUK (-before 5 Jun 1201).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Duke of Brno 1195-1197.  

iii)        AGNES (-before 1197).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

b)         [NADČIA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1096]. 

2.         LUTOLD (-15 Mar 1112).  The Annalista Saxo names "Odalricus et Lutoldus" as sons of Konrad[51].  The Chronica Boemorum names "filius Conradi Lutoldus", specifying that he was "per concessum Gotfridi admissus in castrum Rakous" in 1100[52].  The Chronica Boemorum records that "Udolricus et Lutoldus filii Conradi", expelled from Moravia, recovered their lands in 1101[53]Duke of Moravia at Znaim 1101.  m IDA of Austria, daughter of LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria & his wife Ida von Ratelberg.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis refers to three (unnamed) sisters of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie", specifying that the second married "comes Liutoldus de Znoym"[54].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Duke Lutold & his wife had one child: 

a)         KONRAD [II] (-after 1161).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Conrado filio Lutoldi", when recording that he was restored in Moravia after Wladislas Duke of Bohemia expelled his brother Sobezlav in 1123[55].  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records that "Conradus filius Liutoldi" was captured by Duke Sobezlav in 1128[56].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Chonradus dux" was released from chains in 1134[57]Duke of Moravia at Znaim 1146.  Markgraf of Moravia 1146-1147.  Duke of Moravia 1160.  m (1132) MARIA of Hungary, daughter of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev (-after 1190).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records that "principi Conrado Znoymensi" married "sororem coniugis suæ [=dux Sobeslaus] videlicet reginæ" in 1132[58], a later passage in the same source naming "patrem suum Almum" in relation to "ductrix Adleyta" (wife of "dux Sobezlaus") specifying that she was retained in Hungary in 1137 for the reburial of her father who had died in Greece[59].  Duke Konrad & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          ERNST (-after 17 Sep 1156).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

ii)         KONRAD [III] OTTO (-near Naples 9 Sep 1191).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Duke of Moravia 1174.  Duke of Znaim 1177.  Markgraf of Moravia 1182-1187.  He succeeded in 1189 as KONRAD I OTTO Duke of Bohemia.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death in 1190 "in Apulia" of "Conradus de Moravia"[60]m (before 1176) HEILIKA von Wittelsbach, daughter of OTTO IV Pfalzgraf von Wittelsbach & his wife Benedikta von Donau[-Wörth] (-13 Aug after 1189).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  The necrology of Undensdorf records the death "Id Aug" of "Heilika ducisse Pohemie"[61]

iii)        [HELENA ([1140/42]-[1202/06]).  There is some contradiction about the identity of the wife of Kazimierz II.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[62], she was the daughter of Konrad Duke of Moravia [Přemyslid], although the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  According to Baumgarten, she was Ielena Rostislavna, daughter of Rostislav Mstislavich Prince of Smolensk, later Grand Prince of Kiev & his wife ---, citing in particular the Ipatiewskaia Chronicle which records that Mstislav was the first cousin of Prince Leszek "Bialy", the son of Helena[63].  Baumgarten cites Polish chronicles from which her marriage can be dated and which record that she died before [1206/07][64]m ([1163]) KAZIMIERZ of Poland, son of BOLESŁAW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen (1138-5 May 1194).  He succeeded in 1177 as KAZIMIERZ II "Sprawiedliwy/the Just" Prince of Sandomir and Krakow, and in 1186 as Prince of Kujavia and Mazovia.]   

 

 

 

B.      DUKES of MORAVIA, at OLMÜTZ

 

 

OTTO of Bohemia "der Schöne", son of BŘETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt (-9 Jul [1086 or 1087] bur Graditz).  He succeeded his brother in 1054 as Duke of Moravia at Brno, and 1061 as Duke of Olmütz.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "pater patrie Otto dux Moraviæ cum coniuge…Eufemia" built the monastery of St Stefan near "urbem Olomuc" in 1077[65].  The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[66].  The Chronica Boemorum records the death "V Id Iun" of "Otto dux Moraviæ, frater Wratizlai ducis Bohemiæ"[67].  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1086 of "Otto dux Moravie" but in a subsequent passage recording the death "1087 V Id Iun" of "pater Moravie dux Otto"[68]

m (before 1073) LUDMILLA [Euphemia] of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland (-2 Apr 1111).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Eufemia" as wife of "Ottonis" and mother of "Suatopluc et Otto" but does not give her origin[69].  She is named and her origin shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[70], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1111 of "Eufemia ductrix"[71]

Duke Otto & his wife had three children: 

1.         SVATOPLUK (-murdered 21 Sep 1109).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Eufemia" as wife of "Ottonis" and mother of "Suatopluc et Otto"[72].  The Annalista Saxo names "Suatopluk et Otto" as sons of Otto[73]Duke of Moravia at Olmütz [1095].  He succeeded in 1107 as SVATOPLUK II Duke of Bohemia.  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Borivoy" was expelled in 1107 "diabolo suadente" and replaced by "Zuatopluk" as duke of Bohemia[74].  The Annales Corbeienses record that "Dux Boemicus Zuetobold" was killed in 1109[75].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Zuatopluk" was blinded in Feb, murdered "11 Kal Oct" in 1109, and succeeded by "Wladislaus"[76]m ---.  The name of Svatopluk's wife is not known.  Duke Svatopluk & his wife had one child: 

a)         WENZEL (-1 Mar 1130).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ names "Wencezlaus filius Suatopluk" when recording that he was sent as missus to Hungary by Duke Sobeslav in 1129 to help King István against the Greeks, but died there "pridie Kal Mar" from a fever after being there four months[77]Duke of Moravia at Olmütz 1126.  The Annales Gradicenses record the death in 1130 of "Wacezlau dux Moravie"[78]

2.         OTTO [II] "Niger" (-killed 18 Feb 1126).  The Chronica Boemorum names "Eufemia" as wife of "Ottonis" and mother of "Suatopluc et Otto"[79].  The Annalista Saxo names "Suatopluk et Otto" as sons of Otto[80]Duke of Moravia at Olmütz 1107.  The necrology of Zwiefalten records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Otto dux Moravie vir ducisx Sophie"[81].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "[Otto] Moraviensis princeps" was killed "XIV Kal Mar 1126" and replaced by "domnus Sobezlaus"[82]m (after 1113) SOPHIE von Berg, daughter of HEINRICH I Graf von Berg & his wife Adelheid von Mochental (-31 May [1126]).  Berthold's  Chronicon of Zwiefalten names (in order) "Richinza ductrix Boemiæ, Sophia ductrix Moraviæ, Salome ductrix Poloniæ" as sisters of "Heinricus comes [et] Rapot", specifying in the subsequent paragraph that Sophia was "uxor Ottonis ducis"[83].  The Annales Gradicenses record the marriage in 1114 of "Otto" but do not name his wife[84].  Duke Otto & his wife had three children: 

a)         EUPHEMIA (1115-).  The Annales Gradicenses record the birth in 1115 of "Eufemia" but do not name her parents[85]same person as…?  [daughter .  Sviatopolk's marriage in Novgorod "between Christmas and Epiphany" to "a wife from Moravia" is referred to in the Novgorod Chronicle[86].  Baumgarten refers to this marriage but his commentary suggests that he has not identified the source which names the wife of Sviatopolk, and that her co-identity with Euphemia is only accepted because "de toutes les princesses de Moravie, Euphémie seule pouvait être la femme de Swiatopolk"[87].  This does not seem a satisfactory way of proceeding as it is far from clear that the Bohemian sources name all Moravian princesses at the time.  Until more information comes to light, it is preferable to place Sviatopolk´s wife in square brackets to highlight the uncertainty about her parentage.  m ([23 Dec 1143/6 Jan 1144]) SVIATOPOLK Mstislavich Prince of Polotsk, Minsk and Novgorod, son of MSTISLAV I "the Great" Vladimirovich Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife Christine of Sweden (-1154).] 

b)         OTTO [III] DETLEB (1122-12 May 1160).  The Annales Gradicenses record the birth in 1122 of "Dethleb"[88].  The Annales Gradicenses record that "Ottonis principis Moravie filium Dethleb" returned from "Ruzia" and was enthroned in Moravia in 1140[89]Duke of Moravia at Olmütz.  m DURANTIA, daughter of --- (-after 13 Dec 1160).  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  Duke Otto & his wife had seven children: 

i)          SVATAVA (-before 1160).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

ii)         VLADIMIR (1145-before 11 Dec 1200).  The Annales Gradicenses record the birth in 1145 of "filius Ottonis ducis…Wladimir"[90].  Fürst von Olmütz.  

iii)        BRĔTISLAV (-before 1201).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  At Lundenburg.  m ---.  The name of Břetislav's wife is not known.  Břetislav & his wife had one child: 

(a)       SIEGFRIED (-1227).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Canon at Olmütz. 

iv)       MARIA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1198.  

v)        DURANTIA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1198.  

vi)       EUPHEMIA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1198.  

vii)      HEDWIG (-after 16 Jan 1160).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

c)         SVATOPLUK .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1146.  

3.         BOHUSLAVA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  1078. 

 

 

 

C.      DUKES of MORAVIA 1142-1190

 

 

DYPOLD [I] of Bohemia, son of VLADISLAV I Duke of Bohemia & his wife Richinza [Richsa] von Berg (-14/15 Aug 1167).  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ names "Theobaldum et Henricum" as brothers of Duke Vladislav, recording that they rebelled against their brother in 1142 in Moravia[91]Duke of Moravia

m --- von Brandenburg, daughter of ALBRECHT I "dem Bären" Graf von Ballenstedt Markgraf von Brandenburg & his wife Sophie von Winzenburg.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 

Duke Dypold [I] & his wife had two children: 

1.         DYPOLD [II] (-21 Nov 1190).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Duke of Moravia.  The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death of "marchionis Moravie Dypoldi" specifying that he was buried in Lüben[92].  This entry is recorded in the same passage which records the death of Dypold's supposed son Boleslav (see below).  It is unclear whether the text means that both died "V Id Apr" in battle against the Tartars, but if this is so the entry presumably refers to Boleslav's brother Dypold.  m ADELHEID [Zwyslawa] von Breslau, daughter of BOLESŁAW I "dem Langen" Duke of Breslau [Piast] & his second wife Christina --- (after 1165-29 Mar before 1213).  The Chronica principum Polonie names "Henricum dictum cum barba et Conradum et filiam Adilheudim" as the children of Boleslaw and his second wife, adding that Adelheid married "marchio Moravie Dypoldus"[93].  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to "sororis sue [=Henricus dictus cum barba] Moravie marchionisse, relicte Dypoldi…Adilheidis", specifying that she died and was buried in Trebnitz[94].  Duke Dypold [II] & his wife had five children: 

a)         SOBĚSLAV (-after 1 Oct 1247).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

b)         BOLESLAV (-killed in battle Wolstadt near Liegnitz 9 Apr 1241).  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the four sons of Dypold Markgraf of Moravia & his wife Adelheid, naming (in order) "Boleslaus…Primislaus…Dypoldus", specifying that Boleslav was "occisus a paganis" and was buried in Lüben[95].  The Epytaphia ducum Slezie record the death "V Id Apr" of "Bolezlaus…filius Adelheydis filia fundatoris [=Bolezlai ducis Slezie]" specifying that he was killed in battle against the Tartars, a subsequent entry indicating that the battle on that date was at "Wolstat prope Legnitcz"[96]

c)         OTTO (-1225).  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the four sons of Dypold Markgraf of Moravia & his wife Adelheid, naming (in order) "Boleslaus…Primislaus…Dypoldus", specifying that Dypold was a canon at Magdeburg[97], although presumably "Dypoldus" is an error for Otto as no record has yet been found which confirms that the son named Dypold followed a religious career.  Canon at Magdeburg. 

d)         PŘEMYSL .  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the four sons of Dypold Markgraf of Moravia & his wife Adelheid, naming (in order) "Boleslaus…Primislaus…Dypoldus", specifying that Přemysl was buried in Trebnitz[98]

e)         DYPOLD [III] BOŘYWOJ (-Magdeburg [1235/36], bur Magdeburg).  The Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum refers to the four sons of Dypold Markgraf of Moravia & his wife Adelheid, naming (in order) "Boleslaus…Primislaus…Dypoldus", specifying that Dypold was a canon at Magdeburg[99], although presumably "Dypoldus" is an error for Otto as no record has yet been found which confirms that the son named Dypold followed a religious career.  The Chronica principum Polonie names "Adilheydis…filius…quartus…Dypoldus", adding that he died and was buried in Magdeburg[100]m ADELA, daughter of BOLESLAV Vys & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 

2.         HEDWIG (-Kloster Brehna 19 Feb 1210, bur Kloster Brehna).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Hetwigem filiam Dipoldi cuiusdam nobilis de Boemia, qui fuit patruus Odacari ducis Bohemie" as wife of "Fridericus comes de Brene", and records her death in 1210[101].  The Chronicon Montis Serreni records that "Hedwigis comitissa vidua Friderici comitis de Brene" founded "monasterium femininum in villa Brene…XVIII Kal Sep [1201]"[102].  The Chronicon Montis Serreni records the death "1210 XI Kal Mar" of "Hethwigis comitissa de Brene" and her burial at Brehna[103].  She founded Kloster Brehna after 1182.  m FRIEDRICH [I] Graf von Brehna, son of KONRAD [I] "der Grosse" Graf von Wettin, Brehna, Camburg und Eilenburg, Markgraf der Ober- und Niederlausitz & his wife Luitgard von Elchingen ([27 Feb 1142/19 May 1145]-4 Jan 1191, bur Petersberg). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    MARKGRAFEN of MORAVIA (LUXEMBOURG)

 

 

JOHANN HEINRICH of Bohemia, son of JAN I King of Bohemia [JEAN I Comte de Luxembourg] & his first wife Eliska [Elisabeth] of Bohemia [Přemyslid] (Melnik 12 Feb 1322-12 Nov 1375, bur Brno Kloster St Thomas).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the birth in 1322 of "Regi Boemiæ filius tertius…ex Regina Elizabeth…Iohannes…Henricus"[104].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Karolus…fratrem suum Iohannem…Comitis Tyrolis"[105].  Graf von Tirol, by right of his first wife, 1335-1341.  Markgraf of Moravia 1349.  The Cronica Principum Regni Boemiæ records the death "in die Quinque Fratrum" in 1375 of "Dominus Iohannes, Marchio Moraviæ, germanus Domini Karoli"[106]

m firstly (14/16 Sep 1330, divorced 1341) as her first husband, MARGARETA "Maultasch" von Görz-Tirol, daughter of HEINRICH II Duke of Carinthia & his wife Anna of Bohemia [Přemyslid] ([1318]-Vienna 3 Oct 1369, bur Vienna Minoriten zum Heiligen Kreuz).  She succeeded in 1335 as Gräfin von Tirol.  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven records the divorce in Nov 1341 of "filia ducis Heinrici Carinthie sive comitis Tyrolis" and "Iohanni filio Iohannis regis Bohemie" and her marriage "in die sancte Scholastice" in Feb 1342 to "marchioni Brandenburgensi"[107].  Her divorce was arranged by Emperor Ludwig IV who then arranged her second marriage with his son[108].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records that "Karolus…fratrem suum Iohannem…Comitis Tyrolis" repudiated his wife, after she conspired against him with her illegitimate son Albert, and that she married "Ludwico, filio Bauri, Marchionis Brandeburgensi"[109].  She married secondly (Schloß Tirol 10 Feb 1342) Ludwig of Bavaria, Duke of Carinthia, Markgraf von Brandenburg, who succeeded in 1347 as LUDWIG V "der Brandenburger" joint Duke of Bavaria.  The burials of Minoritenkirche, Vienna records the death in 1369 of "Margareta marchionissa de Tyrolis in Athaso"[110]

m secondly (1350) MARGARETA von Troppau, daughter of NIKOLAUS II Herzog von Troppau und Ratibor [Přemyslid] & his first wife Anna von Ratibor [Piast] ([1330]-[1363]).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage in 1350 of "Dominus Karolus, Romanorum et Boemiæ Rex…fratri suo germano Iohanni" and "Margaretham, filiam Nicolai Ducis Oppauiæ"[111]

m thirdly (Vienna Feb 1364) as her second husband, MARGARETA of Austria, widow of MEINHARD Duke in Bavaria in Oberbayern, daughter of ALBRECHT II “der Weise” Duke of Austria & his wife Jeanne de Ferrette (Vienna 1346-Brno 14 Jan 1366, bur Brno Kloster St Thomas). 

m fourthly (dispensation 4o Viterbo 25 Aug 1367) ELISABETH von Oettingen, daughter of ALBRECHT Graf von Oettingen & his wife Adelheid von Ortenburg [in Carinthia] (-Vienna 3 Apr 1409). 

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of Johann Heinrich's mistress is not known. 

Markgraf Johann Heinrich & his second wife had seven children:

1.         KATHARINA (1353-1378 before 17 Feb).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Katherinam…et Elizabeth" as the two daughters of "Iohanni" and his wife "Margaretham, filiam Nicolai Ducis Oppauiæ", adding that Katharina married "Duci de Falkenberch"[112]m (before 2 Feb 1372) HEINRICH Duke of Falkenberg, son of BOLESLAW Duke of Falkenberg [Piast] & his wife Euphemia von Breslau [Piast] (-14 Sep 1382, bur Glogau St Bartholomäus). 

2.         JODOK [Jobst] (1354-Spielberg near Brno 18 Jan 1411, bur Brno St Thomas).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Iodocum, Iohannem…Sobieslaw et Procopium" as the three sons of "Iohanni" and his wife "Margaretham, filiam Nicolai Ducis Oppauiæ"[113].  He succeeded his father in 1375 as Markgraf of Moravia.  He succeeded in 1388 as JOBST Markgraf von Brandenburg.  Duc de Luxembourg 1386-1402.  Regent of Bohemia 1394.  Elected JOBST King of Germany in 1410.  m firstly (1372) ELISABETH von Oppeln, daughter of WLADISLAW Duke of Oppeln [Piast] & his first wife Elisabeth Bassaraba ([1360]-[1374]).  m secondly (1374) AGNES [114][von Oppeln, daughter of BOLESLAW II Duke of Oppeln [Piast] & his wife Elisabeth von Schweidnitz [Piast] (-before 9 Sep 1411).  

3.         ELISABETH ([1355]-20 Nov 1400, bur Meissen Cathedral).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Katherinam…et Elizabeth" as the two daughters of "Iohanni" and his wife "Margaretham, filiam Nicolai Ducis Oppauiæ", adding that Elisabeth married "Marchioni Misnensi"[115]m (1366) WILHELM I "der Einäugige" joint Markgraf von Meissen, son of FRIEDRICH II "der Ernsthafte" Markgraf von Meissen & his wife Mechtild von Bayern (Dresden 19 Dec 1343-Grimma 10 Feb 1407, bur Meissen Cathedral). 

4.         child ([1356/58]-young). 

5.         JOHANN SOBJESLAW ([1356/58]-murdered Udine 12 Oct 1394).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Iodocum, Iohannem…Sobieslaw et Procopium" as the three sons of "Iohanni" and his wife "Margaretham, filiam Nicolai Ducis Oppauiæ"[116]Markgraf of Moravia 1375.  Bishop of Litomysl/Leitomischl 1380.  Bishop of Olmütz 1387.  Deacon of Prague Cathedral 1387.  Patriarch of Aquileia 1389-1394.  

6.         PROKOP ([1356/58]-24 Sep 1405).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon names "Iodocum, Iohannem…Sobieslaw et Procopium" as the three sons of "Iohanni" and his wife "Margaretham, filiam Nicolai Ducis Oppauiæ"[117]Markgraf of Moravia 1375.  Pfandherr der Mark Brandenburg 1388.  Prokop had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

a)         GEORG (-1457).  Benedictine monk. 

7.         ANNA (-before 1405)m PETER von Sternberk (-1397). 

Markgraf Johann Heinrich had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

8.          JOHANN von Mähren (1345-[8 Apr 1380/20 Sep 1381]).  Provost at Wyšehrad 1368.  Canon of St Peter at Brno until 1380. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    HERREN von KUNŠTÁT/KUNSTADT in MORAVIA

 

 

VIKTORYN [Vitek] von Kunštát, son of --- (1403-1 Jan 1457).  at Padubice, Navarov, Litic and Náchod. 

m ANNA von Wartenberg [Wartemberk], daughter of JAN Herr von Wartemberk Burggraf von Glatz ([1403]-). 

Viktoryn & his wife had three children: 

1.         JIŘI [Georg] (23 Apr 1520-Prague 22 Mar 1471, bur Podiebrad).  Freiherr von Kunštát zu Podiebrad.  Regent of Bohemia 1439-1453, and 1457-1458.  Graf von Glatz 1455.  Herzog von Münsterberg 1456.  He was elected JIŘI von Podiebrad King of Bohemia 1458, also Markgraf of Moravia, Markgraf der Ober- und Niederlausitz and primary Duke of Silesia.   

-        KINGS of BOHEMIA

2.         ELIŠKA (-[13 Jan 1501])m firstly JINDŘICH Berka von Duba und Leipa.  m secondly MIKLÁŠ von Kolowratm thirdly JAN Krzinecký von Ronow zu Kunstberg und Nimburg (-before 1487).  m fourthly SIEGMUND Herr von Wartenberg zu Kamnice (-20 Dec 1518). 

3.         MARKÉTAm BOČEK von Seeberg und Plana . 

 

 

 



[1] Einhardi Annales 822, MGH SS, p. 209. 

[2] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 857, MGH SS I, p. 370. 

[3] Reuter, T. (1991) Germany in the early middle ages c.800-1056 (Longman), p. 83. 

[4] Dzięcioł, Witold (1963) The Origins of Poland (Veritas, London), p. 105. 

[5] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP) 34, p. 87. 

[6] Reuter (1991), p. 82. 

[7] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 857, MGH SS I, p. 370. 

[8] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364. 

[9] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 857, MGH SS I, p. 370. 

[10] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364. 

[11] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 857, MGH SS I, p. 370. 

[12] Reuter (1991), p. 83. 

[13] Dzięcioł (1963), p. 44. 

[14] Annales Alammanicicorum continuatio Sangallensis prima 870, MGH SS I, p. 51. 

[15] Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum 23, pp. 75-7. 

[16] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 862, MGH SS I, p. 374. 

[17] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 869, MGH SS I, p. 381. 

[18] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 862, MGH SS I, p. 374. 

[19] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 871, MGH SS I, p. 383. 

[20] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1878) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb) ("Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium"), Vol. VII, 194, p. 382. 

[21] Reuter (1991), p. 83. 

[22] Dzięcioł (1963), p. 44. 

[23] Dzięcioł (1963), pp. 102-4. 

[24] Reuter (1991), pp. 82-3. 

[25] Reginonis Chronicon 890, MGH SS I, p. 601. 

[26] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 894, MGH SS I, p. 409. 

[27] Kosztolnyik, Z. J. (2002) Hungary under the Early Árpáds, 890s to 1063 (East European Monographs, Boulder, distributed by Columbia University Press, New York), pp. 6-7. 

[28] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 194, p. 382. 

[29] ES II 167. 

[30] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 898, MGH SS I, p. 413. 

[31] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 898, MGH SS I, p. 413. 

[32] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 899, MGH SS I, p. 414. 

[33] D Arn 162, p. 245. 

[34] D LK 27, p. 135. 

[35] D LK 20, p. 125. 

[36] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1840) Constantini Porphyrogeniti De Thematibus et De Administrando Imperio, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) 41, p. 175. 

[37] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 871, MGH SS I, p. 383. 

[38] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89. 

[39] Annales Gradicenses 1093, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[40] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.45, MGH SS IX, p. 99. 

[41] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463. 

[42] Wegener, W. (1965/67) Genealogischen Tafeln zur mitteleuropäischen Geschichte (Verlag Degener), p. 94. 

[43] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[44] Annales Gradicenses 1099, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[45] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.14, MGH SS IX, p. 108. 

[46] Annales Gradicenses 1113, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[47] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 15, MGH SS XXI, p. 463. 

[48] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 134. 

[49] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 138. 

[50] Baumgarten, N. de 'Généalogies et mariages occidentaux des Rurikides Russes du X au XIII siècles´, Orientalia Christiana Vol. IX - 1, No. 35, May 1927 (reprint, Pont. Institutum Orientalium Studiorum, Rome) (“Baumgarten (1927)”), p. 41, citing Reusner (1592) Basilikon opus Genealogicum Catholicum, p. 136.   

[51] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[52] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.12, MGH SS IX, p. 106. 

[53] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.14, MGH SS IX, p. 108. 

[54] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[55] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.51, MGH SS IX, p. 125. 

[56] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 134. 

[57] Annales Gradicenses 1134, MGH SS XVII, p. 650. 

[58] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 140. 

[59] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 143. 

[60] Pelzel, F. M. and Dobrowsky, J. (eds.) (1784) Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II (Prague), Cronica Principum Regni Bavariæ, p. 429. 

[61] Necrologium Undensdorfense, Freising Necrologies, p. 172. 

[62] ES I.2 179. 

[63] Baumgarten (1927), p. 40, citing Ipatiewskaia Chronicle, p. 489, and also Codex dypl. Wielk. III N 2020, Kodex dypl. Kat. Krak. I N 4, Dlugosz, Hist. Pol. II 73. 

[64] Baumgarten (1927), p. 40, citing Monum. Polon, II 21, 22, II 834, II 915 (marriage date), and Kod. dypl. Malop. I N 3 (date of death). 

[65] Annales Gradicenses 1077, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[66] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89. 

[67] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.38, MGH SS IX, p. 93. 

[68] Annales Gradicenses 1086 and 1087, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[69] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.9, MGH SS IX, p. 105. 

[70] ES II 154. 

[71] Annales Gradicenses 1111, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[72] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.9, MGH SS IX, p. 105. 

[73] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[74] Annales Gradicenses 1107, MGH SS XVII, p. 648. 

[75] Annales Corbeienses, Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, Tome I, p. 42. 

[76] Annales Gradicenses 1109, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[77] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 134. 

[78] Annales Gradicenses 1130, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[79] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.9, MGH SS IX, p. 105. 

[80] Annalista Saxo 1100. 

[81] Necrologium Zwifaltense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 240. 

[82] Annales Gradicenses 1126, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[83] Bertholdi, Zwifaltensis Chronicon 12 and 13, MGH SS X, p. 103. 

[84] Annales Gradicenses 1114, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[85] Annales Gradicenses 1115, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[86] Michell, R. and Forbes, N (trans.) (1914) The Chronicle of Novgorod 1016-1471 (London) (“Novgorod Chronicle”) 1143, p. 18. 

[87] Baumgarten (1927), p. 25.  

[88] Annales Gradicenses 1122, MGH SS XVII, p. 649. 

[89] Annales Gradicenses 1140, MGH SS XVII, p. 651. 

[90] Annales Gradicenses 1145, MGH SS XVII, p. 651. 

[91] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 147. 

[92] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, p. 550. 

[93] Stenzel, G. A. (ed.) (1835) Scriptores Rerum Silesiacarum, Erster Band (Breslau) Chronicon principum Poloniæ, (“Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I”) I, p. 98. 

[94] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568. 

[95] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568. 

[96] Epytaphia ducum Slezie, MGH SS XIX, pp. 550 and 551. 

[97] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568. 

[98] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568. 

[99] Chronicon Polono-Silesiacum, MGH SS XIX, p. 568. 

[100] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 105. 

[101] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 230. 

[102] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 168. 

[103] Chronicon Montis Serreni 1210, MGH SS XXIII, p. 178. 

[104] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 130. 

[105] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 329. 

[106] Cronica Principum Regni Bavariæ, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 433. 

[107] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 36. 

[108] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), p. 114. 

[109] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 329. 

[110] Notæ de Sepulchris Patrum Minorum S Crucem Vindobonæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 166. 

[111] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 354-5. 

[112] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 355. 

[113] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 355. 

[114] ES III 17. 

[115] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 355. 

[116] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 355. 

[117] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 355.