NORMANdy, nobility

v3.0 Updated 23 May 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 4

Chapter 1.                ALENÇON. 7

A.         SIRES d'ALENÇON (SEIGNEURS de BELLÊME) 7

B.         SIRES d'ALENÇON, COMTES d'ALENÇON, MONTGOMMERY-PONTHIEU.. 16

C.        FAMILY of BALDRIC.. 21

D.        FAMILY of GIROIE.. 25

E.         GRANTMESNIL. 40

F.         LA FERTE-MACE.. 55

G.        SEIGNEURS de MONTGOMMERY.. 56

H.        SEIGNEURS de MONTPINÇON.. 69

I.      SEIGNEURS de MOULINS-la-MARCHE.. 70

I.      SEIGNEURS de PONT-ECHANFREY.. 75

Chapter 2.                ARQUES. 76

A.         VICOMTES d´ARQUES, SEIGNEURS de LONGUEVILLE (GIFFARD) 76

B.         FLAITEL. 83

Chapter 3.                AUMÂLE. 87

A.         SIRES d'AUMÂLE.. 87

B.         COMTES d'AUMÂLE (BLOIS-CHAMPAGNE) 87

C.        COMTES d'AUMÂLE (FORZ) 95

D.        COMTE d'AUMÂLE (BETHUNE) 97

E.         VICOMTES d'AUMÂLE.. 99

Chapter 4.                AVRANCHES, MORTAIN. 101

A.         COMTES d´AVRANCHES.. 101

B.         COMTES de MORTAIN, VICOMTES de CONTEVILLE.. 103

C.        VICOMTES d'AVRANCHES.. 112

D.        SEIGNEURS de GRANVILLE.. 118

E.         SEIGNEURS d´ORVAL. 118

F.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-JEAN.. 119

Chapter 5.                BAYEUX. 123

A.         COMTES de BAYEUX.. 123

B.         VICOMTES du BESSIN (BAYEUX) 130

C.        SEIGNEURS d´AUNAY-sur-ODON (SAY) 136

D.        SIRES de CREULLY.. 138

E.         SEIGNEURS de CREVECŒUR.. 141

F.         SEIGNEURS du HOMMET. 159

G.        SEIGNEURS d´IVRY (GOËL) 164

Chapter 6.                CAUX. 170

A.         SEIGNEURS d´AUFFAY.. 171

B.         SEIGNEURS d´ESTOUTEVILLE.. 174

C.        FAMILY of GUNNORA, mistress of RICHARD I Comte de NORMANDIE.. 186

D.        SEIGNEURS de GOURNAY.. 193

E.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAËNS.. 204

F.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-VALERY.. 206

G.        SEIGNEURS de TANCARVILLE.. 219

H.        WARENNE.. 224

Chapter 7.                COTENTIN. 231

A.         VICOMTES de COTENTIN, SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAUVEUR.. 232

B.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAUVEUR (TAISSON) 238

C.        SEIGNEURS de BARNEVILLE.. 244

D.        SEIGNEURS de BRICQUEBEC (BERTRAN) 244

E.         FAMILY of THURSTAN HALDUP.. 251

F.         SEIGNEURS de LA HAYE.. 252

G.        SEIGNEURS de PREAUX.. 253

Chapter 8.                EU. 260

A.         COMTES d'EU 996-, descendants of GEOFFROY de Brionne. 260

B.         COMTES d'EU, descendants of GUILLAUME d'HIEMOIS.. 265

C.        COMTES d'EU (LUSIGNAN) 278

D.        COMTES d'EU (BRIENNE) 282

E.         COMTES d'EU (CAPET) 287

F.         VICOMTES d'EU.. 291

Chapter 9.                EVREUX. 292

A.         COMTES d'EVREUX, family of DUKES of NORMANDY.. 292

B.         COMTES d'EVREUX (MONTFORT-l'AMAURY) 298

C.        SIRES d´HARCOURT. 313

D.        SEIGNEURS de LAIGLE (L'AIGLE) 323

E.         SEIGNEURS de TOSNY.. 331

F.         SEIGNEURS de VERNON, SEIGNEURS de REVIERS.. 346

Chapter 10.              MEULAN. 349

A.         COMTES de MEULAN.. 349

B.         COMTES de MEULAN, SEIGNEURS de BEAUMONT-le-ROGER.. 353

C.        VICOMTES de MEULAN.. 367

Chapter 11.              PERCHE, MORTAGNE. 372

Chapter 12.              ROUEN. 388

A.         VICOMTES de ROUEN.. 388

B.         SEIGNEURS de BEC-CRESPIN.. 390

C.        SEIGNEURS de GUITRY.. 391

C.        SEIGNEURS de MONTFORT-sur-RISLE (BASTEMBOURG) 392

D.        SEIGNEURS de MONTFORT-sur-RISLE (GAND) 397

E.         SEIGNEURS de NEUFMARCHE.. 399

F.         SEIGNEURS de PONT-AUDEMER, SEIGNEUR de VIEILLES.. 401

G.        SEIGNEURS de TOURVILLE.. 404

H.        OTHER NOBILITY in NORMANDY.. 405

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

Charles III King of the West Franks granted land around Rouen to Viking raiders in [911], the territory evolving over the following century into the duchy of Normandy.  The Viking leader Rollo accepted baptism with the name Robert.  He and his descendants are shown in the document NORMANDY DUKES.  The present document shows other noble families who developed in the duchy of Normandy. 

 

The earliest counties in Normandy were granted by the dukes as appanages to junior members of their family: Robert Bishop of Evreux, younger son of Richard I Duke of Normandy, was invested with the county of Evreux in the late 10th century by his father (see Chapter 9); the counties of Eu and Hiémois were granted to Robert´s illegitimate half-brothers Geoffroy and Guillaume by their other half-brother Duke Richard II (Chapter 8); and the county of Talou was granted in the mid-11th century by Duke Guillaume II to his uncle Guillaume, who transformed the territory into the county of Arques after constructing the castle of that name on his land, although no further counts are recorded as he died childless.  The Norman counties were not co-extensive with the earlier pagi into which the territory of the future Norman duchy had previously been divided.  It is assumed that this was due to the strong central authority of the early Norman dukes who granted small landholdings to their followers, rather than creating counties, and thereby established a network of direct vassals which was a precursor to the fully fledged feudal system which Duke Guillaume II applied in England after the conquest.  Several chapters in this document group these Norman viscountships and lordships geographically: Arques (Chapter 2), Avranches (Chapter 4), Caux (Chapter 6), Cotentin (Chapter 7), and Rouen (Chapter 12).  Many of these minor Norman fief-holders found fortune in England after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy rewarded them with land grants.  The Vicomtes d'Avranches received the earldom of Chester; the head of the Giffard family was created earl in Buckinghamshire; Guillaume FitzOsbern became earl of Hereford; Roger de Montgommery was created earl of Shrewsbury in 1074; and William de Warenne was created earl of Surrey in 1088.  This process was pursued during the first half of the 12th century, with William d'Aubigny being created earl of Arundel in [1138/39] and Robert de Ferrières earl of Derby in 1138.  The descendants of these families established themselves principally in England (they are hyperlinked from this document to the corresponding ENGLISH NOBILITY documents) and finally cut all ties with their Norman properties when the duchy of Normandy was acquired by the Capetian kings in the early 13th century. 

 

The other Norman counties developed close to the borders of, or even outside, the territory of the duchy of Normandy.  The county of Alenço n (Chapter 1) was located in the south of the duchy, close to the border with Maine.  It evolved into a county, in an apparently accidental way, in the second half of the 12th century when the inheritance of Guillaume Comte de Ponthieu was divided between his sons.  His eldest son Jean received his father´s Norman lands, including the lordship of Alençon which came into the family from his paternal great-grandmother.  He retained his father´s comital title and applied it to Alençon, presumably with the acquiescence of his suzerain Henry II King of England, although no reference to a formal re-grant of the lordship as a county has been found.  The county of Aumâle (Chapter 3), in the extreme north-east corner of the duchy, just south of the county of Eu, developed in a similar way.  Adelais, half-sister of Duke Guillaume II, was married to the count of Montreuil, whose main territory was located to the north of Normandy but included the lordship of Aumâle just within the Norman borders.  After the death of her husband, she retained his comital title which she applied to Aumâle, again it would seem without any formal regrant.  She brought the new “county” to her third husband Eudes Comte de Troyes, who was disinherited of his paternal inheritance and sought refuge in Normandy, where he and his descendants were accepted as counts of Aumâle as direct vassals of the dukes.  The county of Bayeux (Chapter 5) was an anomalous case.  Raoul d´Ivry, uterine half-brother of Richard I Duke of Normandy, seems to have been recognised with the title count by his half-brother and to have applied it to the castle of Ba yeux which he constructed.  The title did not survive his death and no further comtes de Bayeux are recorded.  The county of Meulan (Chapter 10) developed outside Norman territory in the Vexin near Paris.  It is shown in this document because the counts were vassals of the Norman dukes by the end of the 11th century, presumably in respect of territories which were granted to them in Normandy itself.  The county of Mortain (Chapter 4.B) was located in the south-west corner of the duchy of Normandy close to the border with Brittany and was granted to the son of Mauger, younger son of Richard I Duke of Normandy.  It was closely associated with the county of Corbeil, south of Paris and well outside Norman territory, which was also held by Mauger through his marriage.   The counties of Mortagne and Perche (Chapter 11) were located in the south of Norman territory close to the border with Maine, and first developed as such in the mid-11th century. 

 

By the time these counties had evolved within the duchy of Normandy, Norman central administration was so firmly established in the heart of the duchy that the original pagi had, in most cases, become something of an irrelevance in the establishment of county boundaries.  The following information relating to the pagi in Normandy has been extracted from Auguste Le Prévost´s study written in the mid-19th century[1]

  • The diocese of Rouen, in the north-eastern part of the duchy, included four pagi:  (1) the pagus Tellau (Talou) was located to the north-east of Rouen, bordered by the pagus Vimnau (Vimeu) to the north-east, the sea to the north-west, the pagus Caletensis (Caux) to the west, and the pagus Rotomagensis to the south-east.  As noted above, it was granted as a county to Guillaume, younger son of Richard II Duke of Normany, in [1040] and shortly afterwards evolved into the county of Arques;  (2) the pagus Caletensis (pays de Caux) lay west of the pagus Tellau, and later included the territory of the Warenne family;  (3) the pagus Rotomagensis (Roumois), centred on the city of Rouen, was located south of the pagi Tellau and Caletensis, north of the diocese of Evreux, and extended to the west as far as the river Risle; and (4) the western part of the pagus Vilcassinus (le Vexin), west of the river Epte, also lay within the territory of the future duchy of Normandy. 
  • The diocese of Evreux, south of Rouen, included two pagi:  (1) the pagus Ebroicinus extended to the south as far as the river Avre and the pagi Durcassinus and Carnotinus, and was bound on the west by the river Charentonne and the pagus Lexoviensis, and (2) the western extension of the pagus Madriacensis (le pays de Madrie), the river Eure forming the boundary between the two. 
  • The diocese of Lisieux contained only the pagus Lexoviensis (le Lieuvin), bound on the north by the river Charentonne and the sea, on the east by the river Risle, and on the west by the river Dive.  It included the lands later granted to Giroie and his family, and the doyennés of Gacé and Montreuil. 
  • The diocese of Bayeux comprised only the pagus Bajocassinus (le Bessin). 
  • The diocese of Coutances occupied the Cherbourg peninsula and comprised the pagus Constantinus (Cotentin), bound on the north and west by the sea and on the east by the river Vire, and the pagus Coriovallensis which existed briefly in the north around the town of Cherbourg. 
  • South of the Cotentin, lay the diocese of Avranches, which included the pagus Abricantinus (Avranchin), next to the duchy of Brittany. 
  • Finally, the diocese of Séez, to the south of Bayeux and Lisieux, included, approximately from west to east, the pagus Oximensis (Hiémois), the pagus Sagiensis (Séez) where the county of Alençon later evolved, the pagus Epicensis, and the pagus Corbonensis (Corbonnais) which developed into the county of Perche. 

 

In addition to the prominent noble families in Normandy which are shown in this document, there was a multititude of nobles of a lower order in Normandy, and even non-nobles, whose descendants emerged as powerful forces in the overseas territories which the Normans later conquered, in particular England and southern Italy.  In most of these cases, the surviving records are insufficient to trace their ancestry in Normandy for more than a single generation.  It is therefore difficult to generalise about the precise status of these families in the duchy before they emigrated.  Examples of such families who settled in England after the Norman conquest are Briouse, Lacy, Malet, Peveril, Say and Taillebois (see the UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY documents), about whom next to nothing is known in Normandy.  In the case of the emigrants to southern Italy, the prominent Hauteville family (see SICILY/NAPLES, COUNTS & KINGS) left no trace in Normandy.  Considering the impact of the Normans on the development of southern Italy and Sicily in the 11th and 12th centuries, it is surprising that so few of the emigrating noble families can be traced to the Norman nobility set out in this document.  The only examples are Armand de Mortain, of the family of the Comtes d'Eu (see Chapter 9) who was ancestor of the Conti di Montescaglioso (extinct in the male line in the mid-12th century, see SICILY/NAPLES NOBILITY), and the various members of the Grantmesnil family (see Chapter 2.E) who left no traceable male descents in southern Italy after the first generation.  An obvious conclusion is that the armies who accompanied the Norman leaders to southern Italy were, like their leaders the Hauteville family, composed almost exclusively of lower nobility or even non-nobles.  A parallel can be drawn with the majority of the western European settlers who were rewarded with lordships in the kingdom of J erusalem and the other crusader principalities and counties after participating in the First Crusade, few of whose families were prominent among the nobility in their countries of origin. 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    ALENÇON

 

 

A.      SIRES d'ALENÇON (SEIGNEURS de BELLÊME)

 

 

The diocese of Séez, to the south of Bayeux and Lisieux, included, approximately from west to east, the pagus Oximensis (Hiémois), the pagus Sagiensis (Séez) where the county of Alençon later evolved, the pagus Epicensis, and the pagus Corbonensis (Corbonnais) which developed into the county of Perche.  The diocese of Lisieux contained only the pagus Lexoviensis (le Lieuvin), bound on the north by the river Charentonne and the sea, on the east by the river Risle, and on the west by the river Dive.  It included the lands later granted to Giroie and his family, and the doyennés of Gacé and Montreuil[2].  All these areas are grouped together in the present document. 

 

Bellême was a fief held directly from the French crown[3].  The seigneurs de Bellême acquired the lordship of Alençon, located in the south of the duchy of Normandy close to the border with the county of Maine.  The process whereby the lordship of Alençon evolved into the county of Alençon appears to have been accidental, occurring in the second half of the 12th century when the inheritance of Guillaume Comte de Ponthieu was divided between his sons.  His eldest son Jean received his father´s Norman lands, including the lordship of Alençon which had been brought into the family by his paternal great-grandmother, and had retained his father´s comital title and applied it to Alençon, presumably with the acquiescence of his suzerain Henry II King of England (no reference to a formal regrant of the lordship as a county has been identified). 

 

 

1.         FULCOIN .  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette for the souls of "patris mei Fulconii et matris meæ Rothais" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[4]m ROTHAIS, daughter of ---.  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…duorum avunculorum, Seinfredi episcopi et Guillelmi, atque cognatorum Guillelmi clerici, Roberti, Sutsardi, rursusque Guillelmi laïci", for the souls of "patris mei Fulconii et matris meæ Rothais" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[5].  If “avunculorum” in this charter can be interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncles, Rothais, mother of the donor Ives, was the sister of the brothers Seinfred Bishop of Le Mans and Guillaume.  Fulcoin & his wife had three children: 

a)         IVES (-after 12 Oct 997).  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…duorum avunculorum, Seinfredi episcopi et Guillelmi, atque cognatorum Guillelmi clerici, Roberti, Sutsardi, rursusque Guillelmi laïci", for the souls of "patris mei Fulconii et matris meæ Rothais" by charter dated 12 Oct 997, witnessed by "Hugonis comitis, Radulfi vicecomitis"[6]

b)         BILEHENDIS (-after 12 Oct 997).  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[7].  

c)         EREMBURGIS (-after 12 Oct 997).  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[8]

 

 

Given the many examples of quasi-hereditary episcopal appointments in the 10th/11th centuries (see for example the documents REIMS ARCHBISHOPRIC and TOURS ARCHBISHOPRIC), a close family relationship between the preceding family and the family of Ives Seigneur de Bellême is suggested because Ives de Bellême´s son Avesgaud succeeded Bishop Seinfrid, probable maternal uncle of Ives who founded l´Abbayette in 997, as bishop of Le Mans.  This is supported by the Actus pontificum Cenomannis which records the installation of "Avesgaudus, nepos ipsius" as bishop of Le Mans after the death of "Segenfrido" (in [997])[9].  Assuming that Guillaume of Jumièges correctly reports the events involving Ives de Bellême, dated to [942/43], as quoted below, it appears unlikely that he was the same person as the founder of l´Abbayette: an adult career spanning more than fifty years appears improbable at that time.  The chronology of the successive bishops of Le Mans also appears incompatible with Bishop Avesgaud having been the great-nephew of Bishop Seinfrid: 

-   Bishop Seinfrid (born before [940/50]?), appointed as bishop in 971. 

-   Bishop Avesgaud (born before [960/70]?), appointed in [997]. 

-   Bishop Gervais (de Château-du-Loir, nephew of Bishop Avesgaud, born 1007), appointed as bishop in 1036. 

A more likely possibility is that the family relationship between Bishops Seinfrid and Avesgaud was through the female line: for example, from a chronological point of view, it would be possible for Godehildis, wife of Ives de Bellême, to have been the sister of Rothais, mother of Ives who founded l´Abbayette.  

 

 

1.         IVES [de Creil] .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Louis IV King of the West Franks, after the death of Richard´s father, marched on Rouen, was received by “Rodulphus et Bernardus atque Anslech totius Normannici ducatus tutores”, and captured Richard, who was taken to Laon but was freed by “Osmundus...consilio cum Yvone patre Willelmi de Belismo” and taken to “Silvanectis” where “Bernardus...comes” protected “nepotem suum Richardum[10].  If correctly reported, this event must be dated to [942/43].  Orderic Vitalis reports the same event, recording that "Osmundus, pueri pædagogus, per Ivonem de Credolio, regis balistarium" freed the captive[11], but makes no connection with Guillaume de Bellême.  Le Prévost suggests that “Credolio” in this passage was Creil near Senlis.  Seigneur de Bellême {Mortagne, Orne}, du Saosnais, du Passais et de Sées.  "Ivo...in castro meo Bellismo" founded Notre-Dame de Bellême, for the souls of himself "conjugisque mee Godehildis, sive filiis meis vel genitoribus meis", by undated charter[12].  André de Fleury´s Vita Gauzlini records that “Ivo Belesmensis” donated “Magniacum” to Fleury, but that after his death “Willelmus eius filius” reclaimed the property[13].  This passage has been taken in secondary sources as indicating that Ives died after [1005], when Gaucelin became abbot of Fleury.  However, it is not evident from the text that Ives made his donation during the abbacy of Gaucelin, rather it may have been the diversion of the property by his son which took place while Gaucelin was abbot.  From a chronological point of view, it would be surprising if Ives was still alive in [1005], assuming that the reports of Guillaume de Jumiéges and Orderic Vitalis, quoted above, accurately report his participation in events in [942/43].  [m firstly ---.  This first marriage is suggested by the distinction between “soror” and “germana”, terms used by Ives’s son Avesgaud to describe his two sisters in the charter dated [1100] quoted below.  Use of both terms in ther same document suggests that a distinction was intended.  If that is correct, Avesgaud’s “soror” Hildeburge would have been born from a different marriage of his father, whereas his “germana” Godehildis would have been his full sister.  Another possibility is that the two terms were used indiscriminately by the author of the document to add literary variety to his text and were not intended to indicate different meanings.]  m [secondly] GODEHILDIS, daughter of ---.  "Ivo" founded Notre-Dame de Bellême, for the souls of himself "conjugisque mee Godehildis, sive filiis meis vel genitoribus meis", by undated charter, confirmed after his death by "Willelmus et Godehildis mater mea"[14].  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records the installation of [her son] "Avesgaudus, nepos ipsius" as Bishop of Le Mans after the death of "Segenfrido" (in [997])[15].  This suggests that Godehildis may have been the sister of Bishop Seinfrid.  Ives & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

a)         HILDEBURGE de Bellême (-27 Oct ----).  The possibility that Hildeburge was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of her father is discussed above.  Avesgaud Bishop of Le Mans gave the church of Parigné-l'Evèque and Loué to "unam Hildeburgi sorori suæ primogenitæ et alteram Godehilde germanæ suæ secundæ" by charter dated [1000][16].  [Her son] Bishop Gervais names "avunculi mei Avesgaudi…genitoris cum genetrice mea Haimonis et Hildeburga" in his testament dated [1040/47], which also specifies that "avunculi mei domini Avesgaudi episcopi" died "apud Verdunis VI Kal Nov" on returning from Jerusalem, that "sororis eius, matris mee Hyldeburge" died the same day that "patris mei Haimonis" died "XVIII Kal Feb", and that he was ordained "XIV Kal Jan"[17]m (1006 or before) HAMON [Hamelin] de Château-du-Loir, son of --- (-15 Jan [1030]). 

Ivo & his [second] wife had four children:

b)         GUILLAUME de Bellême (-[1031]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Robert II Duke of Normandy besieged “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who had rebelled, and forced his submission (although he rebelled again later)[18].  Seigneur de Bellême.  Sire d'Alençon

-        see below

c)         IVES de Bellême (-after [1031]).  "Avesgaudus…Cenomannensium presul, meusque frater Ivo" donated property to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [995/1032][19].  "Rotberti filii Wilelmi, Ivo suus avunculus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by undated charter[20].  Abelin lists his donations of property at Le Mans to Marmoutier by charter dated [1064/10 May 1065], naming "Ivonis de Belismo [et] filiis illius Guilelmo, Avesgaudo præsule atque Ivone"[21]

d)         AVESGAUD de Bellême (-Verdun 27 Oct 1035)Abelin lists his donations of property at Le Mans to Marmoutier by charter dated [1064/10 May 1065], naming "Ivonis de Belismo [et] filiis illius Guilelmo, Avesgaudo præsule atque Ivone"[22]Bishop of Le Mans [997].  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records the installation of "Avesgaudus, nepos ipsius" as Bishop of Le Mans after the death of "Segenfrido" (in [997])[23].  "Avesgaudus…Cenomannensium presul, meusque frater Ivo" donated property to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [995/1032][24].  Bishop Gervais names "avunculi mei Avesgaudi…genitoris cum genetrice mea Haimonis et Hildeburga" in his testament dated [1040/47], which also specifies that "avunculi mei domini Avesgaudi episcopi" died "apud Verdunis VI Kal Nov" on returning from Jerusalem, that "sororis eius, matris mee Hyldeburge" died the same day that "patris mei Haimonis" died "XVIII Kal Feb", and that he was ordained "XIV Kal Jan"[25]

e)         GODEHILDIS de Bellême .  Avesgaud Bishop of Le Mans gave the church of Parigné-l'Evèque and Loué to "unam Hildeburgi sorori suæ primogenitæ et alteram Godehilde germanæ suæ secundæ" by charter dated [1000][26].  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  "Rodulfus…Cenomannus vicecomes…mee bone coniugis Godehelt…filio Rodulfo" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans by charter dated to [994][27].  No direct proof has been identified that this is the same Godehildis, but it appears likely to be correct.  m [firstly] ALBERT [I] de la Ferté-en-Beauce {la Ferté-Vidame, Eure-et-Loir}, son of ---.  [m secondly RAOUL [II] Vicomte du Maine, son of --- (-before 1014).]  Godehildis & her [first] husband had one child: 

i)          ALBERT [II] de la Ferté-en-Beauce Motey names Albert as son of Godehildis and her first husband, stating that he became a monk at Jumièges after his wife died and was elected abbé de Saint-Etienne et de Saint-Mesmin near Orléans, but cites no primary source[28].  Abbot at Micy.  m (before 989) --- de Châteaudun, daughter of HUGUES Vicomte de Châteaudun & his wife Hildegarde du Perche.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Albert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ARNOUL de la Ferté-en-Beauce (-1053)"Arnulphus ex nobili Alençoniorum et Bellismensium comitum genere, nepos Avesgaudi et consobrinus Gervasii" was elected archbishop of Tours[29]Archbishop of Tours 1023. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [I] de Bellême, son of IVES Seigneur de Bellême & his wife Godehildis --- (-[1031]).  André de Fleury´s Vita Gauzlini records that “Ivo Belesmensis” donated “Magniacum” to Fleury, but that after his death “Willelmus eius filius” reclaimed the property, and in a later passage that “Willelmus Belesmensis” donated “abbatiam Longeilegium” [Lonlay, Le Mans][30].  Sire d'Alençon.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Robert II Duke of Normandy besieged “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who had rebelled, and forced his submission (although he rebelled again later)[31].  "Ivo" founded Notre-Dame de Bellême, for the souls of himself "conjugisque mee Godehildis, sive filiis meis vel genitoribus meis", by undated charter, confirmed after his death by "Willelmus et Godehildis mater mea"[32].  He founded the abbey of Dame-Marie [1023/26][33]Europäische Stammtafeln[34] inserts an additional generation between "Guillaume de Belesme, fils d'Yves" and the four brothers who are reported by Guillaume de Jumièges as his sons: "Guillaume [I] "Talvas" "princeps" de Bellême, Sire d'Alençon, 1004-1013 iuvenis, erbaut Domfront, gründet um 1020 abbaye de Lonlay (-Domfront [1031], bur Notre-Dame-sur-l'Eau" recording his wife as "Mathilde, [1020]".  From a chronological point of view, this appears unlikely to be correct, especially if the two brothers Ives Bishop of Sées and Robert were sons of the older Guillaume as shown in the same table of Europäische Stammtafeln (see below).  The primary sources on which this is based have not yet been identified, but until more information emerges it appears preferable to show this family as reported by Guillaume de Jumièges.  La Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie records that Robert II Duke of Normandy granted Alençon to "à Belesme ung seigneur nommé Guillaume" who rebelled against the duke who besieged the castle and captured Guillaume[35]

m MATHILDE Dame de Condé-sur-Noireau, daughter of ---.  La Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie states that the mother of the sons of "à Belesme ung seigneur nommé Guillaume" was "Mehault du lignaige de Guennelon"[36].  The primary source which confirms her family origin more precisely has not yet been identified. 

Guillaume & his wife had five children: 

1.         WARIN [Guérin] de Bellême (-murdered 1026).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons, adding that Warin beheaded “Gunherium de Belismo militem” and was strangled[37].  Seigneur de Domfront.  m ---.  The name of Guérin's wife is not known.  Guérin & his wife had one child: 

a)         ADELISE de Bellême .  Her parentage is suggested by Orderic Vitalis who records that the great-grandfather of Rotrou [III] Comte du Perche was Guerin "quem dæmones suffocaverunt"[38].  It is also suggested by the reference in the same source to her son Geoffroy having a justified claim to Domfront, a castle which had been constructed by Adelise´s paternal grandfather.  The source which confirms her name has not been identified.  m ROTROU [I] Vicomte de Châteaudun, son of GEOFFROY Vicomte de Châteaudun & his wife Helvis [Elisabeth] de Corbon (-1 Mar [1080]).  Comte de Mortagne 1058. 

Guérin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

b)         RAOUL de Bellême (-after 28 May 1053).  Ives Bishop of Sées confirmed the sale of the church of Courgains, with the consent of "fratre episcopi Willelmo, et Oliverio et Warino et Rodulfo episcopi nepotibus", by charter dated 28 May 1053[39].  A later charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[40]

2.         FOULQUES de Bellême (-killed in battle forest of Blavon [1027/35], bur Notre-Dame de Bellême).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons, adding that their father during a later rebellion sent “filios suos Fulconem atque Robertum” to pillage Normandy, that they were defeated “intra saltum Blavonis” where Foulques was killed and Robert wounded[41]

3.         ROBERT de Bellême (-murdered Château de Ballon [1031/35]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons, adding that their father during a later rebellion sent “filios suos Fulconem atque Robertum” to pillage Normandy, that they were defeated “intra saltum Blavonis” where Foulques was killed and Robert wounded[42].  Sire de Bellême.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus Willelmi Belesmensis potestatis hæres et crudelitatis” was captured during an expedition “ultra Sartem a Cenomanensibus” and imprisoned for two years “apud Balaum castrum” where he was killed by the sons of “Walterium de Sordenia...militem” in revenge for the murder of their father, possibly dated to the early 1030s from the context of the passage[43].  "Rotberti filii Wilelmi, Ivo suus avunculus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by undated charter[44].  Robert had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

a)         GUERIN (-after 1067).  Ives Bishop of Sées confirmed the sale of the church of Courgains, with the consent of "fratre episcopi Willelmo, et Oliverio et Warino et Rodulfo episcopi nepotibus", by charter dated 28 May 1053[45].  A charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[46].  "Warino et Willelmus nepotibus Ivonis episcopi…" subscribed the charter dated 6 Dec 1067 which recorded that the church of Saint-Martin de Bellême was granted to Marmoutier[47]. 

b)         GUILLAUME (-after 1067).  A charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[48].  "Warino et Willelmus nepotibus Ivonis episcopi…" subscribed the charter dated 6 Dec 1067 which recorded that the church of Saint-Martin de Bellême was granted to Marmoutier[49]. 

4.         GUILLAUME [II] "Talvas" de Bellême (-after [1050/54])Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons[50].  "Guillelmus de Belismo" founded the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême by charter dated to [1023/27][51].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talvacius frater eius” succeeded after “Robertus Willelmi Belesmensis potestatis hæres et crudelitatis” was killed, adding that he was worse than his brothers in his crimes (“cunctis fratribus suis in omnibus flagitiis deterior fuit”)[52]Sire d'Alençon.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” succeeded “Roberti fratris sui” with the help particularly of “Willelmi filii Geroii[53].  "…Willelmus filius Guillelmi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1042] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli"[54].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus cognomento Talavicius Willermi Belesmensis filius” invited Guillaume Giroie to his marriage, where he was blinded, emasculated, and his ears cut off[55].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus...filius eius” [referring to Guillaume [II] “Talvas”] rebelled against his father whom he expelled and sent into exile[56].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talavatius”, after he was exiled, arranged the marriage of “filiam suam...Mabiliam” to “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri” who received him in his household[57]m firstly HILDEBURGE, daughter of ARNOUL & his wife ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[58]m secondly --- de Beaumont, daughter of RAOUL [V] de Beaumont Vicomte du Maine & his first wife Emma de Montevrault Dame de Lude.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married secondly “filiam Rodulfi vicecomitis de Bellomonte[59].  Guillaume [II] & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ARNOUL de Bellême (-murdered).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[60].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus...filius eius” [referring to Guillaume [II] “Talvas”] rebelled against his father whom he expelled and sent into exile, but was later strangled in his bed[61]

b)         MABILE (-murdered Bures 2 Dec 1079, bur 5 Dec 1079 Troarn).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[62].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ivo filius Willermi Belesmensis...neptem...Mabiliam” married "Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici Oximensium vicecomes" who through her obtained "magnam partem possessionis Willermi Belesmensis", adding that Mabile was "a forceful and worldly woman, cunning, garrulous and extremely cruel" (“potens et sæcularis, callida et loquax, nimiumque crudelis”)[63].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talavatius”, after he was exiled, arranged the marriage of “filiam suam...Mabiliam” to “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri” who received him in his household[64].  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][65].  Orderic Vitalis records that she was murdered by Hugh Bunel, son of Robert "de Jalgeio" from whom she had taken his castle, who found her "relaxing in bed after a bath [and] struck off her head with his sword"[66].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[67]m ([1050/54]) ROGER [II] de Montgommery, son of ROGER [I] de Montgommery Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey).  Sire d'Alençon.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury in 1074. 

Guillaume [II] had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

c)          OLIVIER de Mesle (-after 28 May 1053).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus...filius eius” [referring to Guillaume [II] “Talvas”] rebelled against his father whom he expelled and sent into exile, but was later strangled in his bed, it being suspected that he was killed “ab Olivaro germano suo[68].  It is assumed that he was illegitimate as the same source in another passage names the two children of Guillaume [II] by his first wife.  Ives Bishop of Sées confirmed the sale of the church of Courgains, with the consent of "fratre episcopi Willelmo, et Oliverio et Warino et Rodulfo episcopi nepotibus", by charter dated 28 May 1053[69].  A later charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[70].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he left descendants known as "Oison"[71], but the primary source which confirms this statement has not yet been identified. 

5.         IVES de Bellême (-5 Apr 1070, bur Sées).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[72], he was the son of Guillaume de Bellême, son of "Guillaume de Belesme, fils d'Yves", the table specifying that he was "Sagiensis episcopus Wilhelmi scilicet domini de Bellismo filius" and "avunculus Rodberti filii Guillelmi".  From a chronological point of view, this appears unlikely to be correct.  Bishop of Sées 1035.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ivo filius Willermi Belesmensis” in "diebus Willermi ducis Normanniæ" held "Sagiensem episcopatum", and succeeded to “hæreditario jure ex paterna...Belesmense oppidum” after the deaths of “fratribus suis Warino et Rodberto atque Willermo[73].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ivo patruus eius Sagiensis episcopus” inherited “Belesmiæ castrum” after the death of [his nephew] Arnoul[74].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ivo...Sagiensis episcopus” besieged “Richardus atque Robertus et Avesgotus filii Willelmi cognomine Sorengi” in the church of Saint-Gervais, which they had occupied after they had devastated “omnem circa Sagium patriam”, and forced them to flight, the following chapter describing how each of the three brothers died[75].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Ivone...Sagiensium præsule”, “Rodbertus Huberti de Ria filius” was appointed and was bishop for twelve years, dated to 1070[76]

Guillaume [I] had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

6.          SIFRIDUS de Bellême .  A charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale of the church of Courgains, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[77]Seigneur d'Escures, du Bouillon, de la Chapelle-près-Sées et de Congé. 

 

 

 

B.      SIRES d'ALENÇON, COMTES d'ALENÇON, MONTGOMMERY-PONTHIEU

 

 

ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême", son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery Sire d'Alençon, Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury & his wife Mabile d'Alençon ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 8 May [1131 or later], bur [Wareham Castle]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[78].  He is referred to as his mother's "first-born son" by Orderic Vitalis, who says his "name is now a byword for his cruelty to the wretched peasantry"[79].  Sire de Bellême et Sire d'Alençon.  3rd Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury. 

1.         GUILLAUME "Talvas" de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171).  He is named, and his parentage given, by Orderic Vitalis[80].  He succeeded his father [4 Mar 1106/1110][81] as Comte de Ponthieu

a)         JEAN [I] de Ponthieu (-24 Feb 1191).  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[82]Comte d'Alençon

-        see below

b)         other children: see PONTHIEU.  

2.         other children: see PONTHIEU.  

 

 

JEAN [I] de Ponthieu, son of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] (-24 Feb 1191).  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[83]Comte d'Alençon.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes comes filius eius" in the lands which he held from the English king "in Normannia et in Cenomannensi pago"[84].  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[85].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[86]

m BEATRIX du Maine, daughter of HELIE d'Anjou Comte du Maine & his wife Philippa du Perche .  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi…Johannes comes filius eius" and "filiam comitis Heliæ fratris comitis Gaufridi Andegavorum et ducis Normannorum"[87].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi et Beatricia uxor mea atque Johannes filius meus" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by charter dated [1158/71][88]

Comte Jean & his wife had six children: 

1.         JEAN [II] d'Alençon (-6 May 1191, bur Perseigne).  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[89].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi et Beatricia uxor mea atque Johannes filius meus" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by charter dated [1158/71][90].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[91].  He succeeded his father in 1191 Comte d'Alençon

2.         ROBERT d'Alençon (-Morteville 8 Sep 1217, bur Perseigne).  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[92].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[93].  He succeeded his brother in 1191 as Comte d'Alençon.  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont records the death of “Robertum comitem Alencheii…apud…manerium suum…Morteveille prope La Val[94]m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m secondly (after 1191) as her second husband, JEANNE de Preuilly Dame de la Guerche et de Bouchet, widow of HUGUES [V] "Callidus" Vicomte de Châteaudun, daughter of GOSBERT de Preuilly Seigneur du Bouchet & his wife Adela de Preuilly [Vendôme] (-before Sep 1201).  "G comes Castriduni et A uxor mea" donated property to the abbey of Bécheron by charter dated 1212 in which he names "dominus Jobertus de Guerchia avus meus et Johanna mater mea filia ipsius, comitissa d'Alençon"[95].  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont records the marriage of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[96].  A charter dated Dec 1221 (error for before Sep 1201) of "Arturus dux Britannie comes Andegavensis, Cenomanensis et Richemontis" confirmed donations made to Perseigne abbey, including a donation made by "Johanna pie recordationis quondam comitissa de Alenchone et domina de Bocheto", witnessed by "domina Constancia matre mea…"[97]m thirdly (before 1215) as her first husband, EMMA de Laval, daughter of GUY [V] Sire de Laval & his wife Avise de Craon ([1197/98]-27 Apr 1264, bur Abbaye de Clermont).  "Guido dominus sextus de Lavalle" donated property to Olivet priory, for the soul of "Ozannæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated to [1205], witnessed by "Haoys uxore mea, Guido filius meus, Emma filia mea"[98].  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont record the marriage of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and “Emmam filiam Guidonis domini de La Val” after the death of his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[99].  "Robertus comes d´Alencon et dominus Lavallis et Emma uxor eius filia Guidonis de Lavalle et hæres Lavallis" exchanged property with "Yvoni Franco et dominæ Haoys uxori suæ" by charter dated Feb 1216[100].  She married secondly (before 1215) as his second wife, Mathieu [II] "le Grand" Sire de Montmorency, and thirdly (1231) Jean Sire de Toucy.  "Matheus de Montemorenciaco, conestabularius Franciæ et Emma, eius uxor, comitissa de Alanconio et domina Lavallensis" ratified a donation by "dominus Ivo Francus et uxor eius Advisia de Lavalle" to Bellebranche, for the salvation of "domini Guydonis de Lavalle" and for "Hugonis filii sui", by charter dated 1218[101].  "Ama comitissa de Alenceon" donated property to Notre-Dame, Paris for the soul of "domini Mathei de Monte Morenciaco mariti mei defuncti" by charter dated 1230[102].  "Joannes dominus de Toceio miles" confirmed commitments made for his marriage to "Emmam comitissam de Alenchon et dominam de Lavalle" by charter dated 1231[103].  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “27 Apr...circa 1280“ of "dominæ Emmæ comitissæ Alençonio, dominæ de Valle Guyonis, domini Guillelmi de Bellomonte [error] uxoris” and that “domini Guidonis de Laval filii eorum primogeniti” confirmed their donations[104].  Comte Robert & his second wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN [III] d'Alençon (-8 Jan 1212, bur Perseigne).  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Joannem et Matildam” as the children of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[105]m (1205) as her first husband, ALIX de Roye, daughter of BARTHELEMY de Roye & his wife Petronille de Montfort (-26 Jan 1226).  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont records that “Joannem”, son of “Robertum comitem Alencheii”, married “Aaliz filiam domini Bartholomæi de Roye” but died childless[106].  Philippe II King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “comitem Robertum Alenchonii...Johannis filii” and “Barth. de Roia...Aaliz filiæ” by charter dated 1205[107].  She married secondly (before 1214) Raoul de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the necrology of Joyenval which records the death of [her son] "domini Joannis de Nigella filii dominæ Aelidis de Roya” and his donation which was confirmed by his mother[108]

b)         MATHILDE d'Alençon .  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Joannem et Matildam” as the children of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia”, adding that Matilda married “comiti Blesensi Theobaldo[109]m (before 19 Sep 1213) as his first wife, THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois et de Clermont, son of LOUIS Comte de Blois & his wife Catherine Ctss de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-16 or 22 Apr 1218). 

Comte Robert & his third wife had one child: 

c)         ROBERT d'Alençon (posthumously 1217-before Jan 1220).  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Robertus” as the posthumous son of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” by his wife “Emmam filiam Guidonis domini de La Val[110]

3.         GUILLAUME d'Alençon (-1203).  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[111].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[112].  Seigneur de la Roche-Mabile.  m CECILE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 

4.         ALIX d'Alençon (-after 1220).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1235 under which her son "Hamericus vicecomes de Castro Heraudi" confirmed privileges granted to Perseigne abbey by "Guillermi quondam comitis Pontivii et Roberti comitis Alenchonis et Sagonensis domini…avunculi nostri"[113].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Dame de Montgommery et de Sonois.  m ([1170/76]) as his second wife, HUGUES [II] Vicomte de Châtellerault, son of AIMERY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Amauberge [Dangeureuse] --- (-before 1176). 

5.         HELIE [Ela] d'Alençon (-after May 1233).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by three charters read together.  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi, Ala uxor quondam Roberti filii Ernesii, et Robertus Malet" relinquished "castrum de Esseio" in return for "terram et redditus apud Escocheium" by charter dated to [1220][114].  The family relationship between the three participants is explained in another charter dated to [1220] which records that “Hemerico vicecomiti Castri-Eraudi, Alæ uxori Roberti Ernesii et Roberto Malet, Roberti comitis Alenconii heredibus" assigned property for "castri de Esseio"[115].  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi et Hela soror Roberti quondam comitis de Alencon et Robertus Malet" relinquished "forestam…Escoves et hayam de Ferraria et forestam de Chaumont et forestam de Ruppe-Heolydis, usque in Sarton…de dominio de Alenconio" by charter dated Jan 1220 (probably O.S.)[116][117]m ([1180/90]) ROBERT [VI] FitzErneis, son of ROBERT [V] FitzErneis & his wife --- (-before [1220]). 

6.         PHILIPPA d'Alençon (-before 1223).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and first and third marriages has not yet been identified.  Her second marriage is indicated by two charters.  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi, Ala uxor quondam Roberti filii Ernesii, et Robertus Malet" relinquished "castrum de Esseio" in return for "terram et redditus apud Escocheium" by charter dated to [1220][118].  The family relationship between the three participants is explained in another charter dated to [1220] which records that “Hemerico vicecomiti Castri-Eraudi, Alæ uxori Roberti Ernesii et Roberto Malet, Roberti comitis Alenconii heredibus" assigned property for "castri de Esseio"[119]m firstly as his second wife, WILLIAM de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, son of WILLIAM de Roumare & his wife Agnès d'Aumâle (-[1198], bur [Revesby]).  m secondly GUILLAUME [III] Malet de Graville, son of MATTHEW de Graville & his wife --- (-[Sep 1214/Oct 1215]).  m thirdly (before Oct 1215) as his [first] wife, GUILLAUME de Préaux, son of --- (-1223). 

 

 

 

C.      FAMILY of BALDRIC

 

 

Three siblings, parents not known: 

1.         BALDRIC (-before 1053).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldrico Teutonico” came “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II] and that together they held “honorem de Balgenzaio[120].  "Guillermus Normannorum dux" confirmed the properties of Saint-Evroul, including “terram de Balchencei sicut tenuerat Baldricus eius comitis arcearius” bought from “Ernaldo...Willelmi filio consenciente Roberto suo avunculo et jubente comite Willelmo” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Malgerii archiepiscopi...” [which dates the document to 1037/53][121]m ---, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Gislebertus comes Brionnæ nepos Ricardi ducis Normannorum" married "neptem suam" to “Baldrico Teutonico”, who had come “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II][122].  Her exact parentage is not known.  Baldric & his wife had [eight or more] children: 

a)         NICOLAS de Baqueville (-after [1048/63]).  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[123].  “Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...fiius meus Rogerius” donated “ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei quam pater meus in honore Sancti Petri construxit” to Saint-Wandrille, for the soul of “mee uxoris que in...Fontanella...iacet”, by charter dated to [1032/47][124].  Robert Abbot of Saint-Wandrille confirmed the purchase of “terre...Lebecors” from “Nicholao Baldrici filio coram uxore sua Geretrude filiisque” by charter dated to [1048/63], subscribed by “Willelmi comitis, Nicholay[125]m firstly --- (bur Saint-Wandrille).  “Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...fiius meus Rogerius” donated “ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei quam pater meus in honore Sancti Petri construxit” to Saint-Wandrille, for the soul of “mee uxoris que in...Fontanella...iacet”, by charter dated to [1032/47][126].  “...Nicholaus filius Baldrici...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][127]m secondly GERTRUDE, daughter of ---.  Robert Abbot of Saint-Wandrille confirmed the purchase of “terre...Lebecors” from “Nicholao Baldrici filio coram uxore sua Geretrude filiisque” by charter dated to [1048/63], subscribed by “Willelmi comitis, Nicholay[128].  The chronology of the charters quoted in this section indicate that Gertrude must have been the second wife of Nicolas.  Nicolas & his first wife had one child: 

i)          ROGER de Baqueville .  “Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...fiius meus Rogerius” donated “ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei quam pater meus in honore Sancti Petri construxit” to Saint-Wandrille, for the soul of “mee uxoris que in...Fontanella...iacet”, by charter dated to [1032/47][129]m ---, daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...altera” married “Nicolao de Bascheritivilla” among whose descendants were “Willelmus Martellus et Walterus de Sancto Martino[130]

b)         FOULQUES de Aunou (-after Oct 1066).  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[131].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Fulcone Dauno" contributed 40 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[132]

c)         ROBERT de Courcy .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[133]

-        COURCY

d)         RICHARD de Neufville .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[134]

e)         BAUDRY de Bauquencey .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[135]m BILLEHELDIS, daughter of --- (-after [1093]).  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[136].  “Hugo comes Cestrensis atque Ermentrudis comitissa” donated property to St Werburgh, Chester, and records other donations including that “Billeheld uxor Baldrici” donated “Pecfortunam”, by charter dated to [1093][137].  Baudry & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Bauquencey .  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[138].

ii)         BAUDRY de Bauquencey .  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[139]

f)          VIGER de Apulia .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[140].  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[141]m ---.  The name of Viger´s wife is not known.  Viger & his wife had one child: 

i)          FOULQUES .  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[142]

g)         GUNNORA .  The De nobili genere Crispinorum records that "Gislebertus…Crispini cognomen" married "senioris Fulconis de Alnou germanam…Gonnorem"[143]m GILBERT Crispin, son of ---. 

h)         daughters .  Orderic Vitalis records that Baldric and his wife had "plures filiæ"[144]

2.         VIGER .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldrico Teutonico” came “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II] and that together they held “honorem de Balgenzaio[145]

3.         ELISABETH .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldrico Teutonico” married “Elizabeth sororem suam” to “Fulconi de Bona-Valle...militi” and granted “ecclesiam Sancti Nicolai quam pater suus construxerat[146]m FOULQUES de Bonneval, son of ---.  Foulques & his wife had two children:

a)         GUILLAUME de Bonneval .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldricus et Wigerius et Willermus de Bona-Valle” confirmed the charter under which “Fulco” offered “Teodericum filium suum”, who had been baptised by “Teodericus abbas”, to Ouche Saint-Evroul and donated “ecclesiam Sancti Nicolai[147]

b)         THIERRY de Bonneval .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldricus et Wigerius et Willermus de Bona-Valle” confirmed the charter under which “Fulco” offered “Teodericum filium suum”, who had been baptised by “Teodericus abbas”, to Ouche Saint-Evroul and donated “ecclesiam Sancti Nicolai”, adding that Thierry lived for 57 years as a monk[148]

 

 

 

D.      FAMILY of GIROIE

 

 

Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” was said to have descended “ex nobili Francorum et Britonem prosapia[149]

 

 

ABBO "le Breton/Brito", son of --- .  He is named only by Orderic Vitalis who records his grandson "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[150]

m ---.  The name of Abbo's wife is not known. 

Abbo & his wife had one child: 

1.         ARNAUD "le Gros" de Courcerault [near Mortagne, Orne] .  He is named only by Orderic Vitalis who records his son "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[151]m ---.  The name of Arnold's wife is not known.  If the description of her son by Orderic Vitalis is accurate, she was probably of Frankish origin.  Arnold & his wife had [three] children:

a)         GIROIE [Geroius] (-before 1035).  Orderic Vitalis names "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[152]

-        see below

b)         HILDIARD .  Orderic Vitalis records "tres filii et undecim filiæ" born to “Geroio...Hildiardi sorori eius”, who married “honorabilibus viris” and gave birth to “multos filios” who spread terror in the armies “in Gallia et Anglia atque Apulia[153]m ---. 

c)         [---.  m ---.] 

i)          [---.  m ---.] 

(a)       GUY "Bollein" .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua” lived “in pago Corboniensi” and entered “Willermum filium suum” at Ouche, encouraged by “Rodberti abbatis cognati...sui[154]m HODIERNA, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua” lived “in pago Corboniensi” and entered “Willermum filium suum” at Ouche, encouraged by “Rodberti abbatis cognati...sui[155].  Guy & his wife had four children: 

(1)       NORMAN .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua[156]

(2)       GAUTHIER .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua[157]

(3)       GEOFFROY .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua[158]

(4)       GUILLAUME dit Gregoire .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua”, recording that their father entered “Willermum filium suum...novem annorum” at Ouche, encouraged by “Rodberti abbatis cognati...sui”, adding that at the time of writing Guillaume had already passed 54 years as a monk and continued to live as such[159]

 

 

GIROIE [Geroius], son of ARNAUD "le Gros" & his wife --- (-before 1035).  Orderic Vitalis names "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[160].  He fought with Guillaume de Bellême against Herbert Comte du Maine[161].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" allied himself with “Willermo Belesmensi” and fought successfully against “Herbertum Cenomannensium comitem[162].  Seigneur d'Echauffour et de Montreuil: Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" was betrothed to “Normannorum...miles...Helgo unicam filiam suam” with “Monasteriolum ac Escalfoium” [Montreuil et Echauffour] agreed as dowry, properties which were transferred to him after her father died, that she herself died before the marriage could take place, but that “Willermus Belesmensis” took Giroie to “Ricardum ducem Normanniæ” who granted “totam terram Helgonis hæreditario jure” to him at Rouen[163].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” went with “Belesmensi Willelmo” to the court of “Richardi Ducis” who granted him “in Normannia duo municipia Monasteriolum et Escalfoum” [Montreuil and Echaufour][164].  His death is dated by a passage in Orderic Vitalis who records that, after Giroie died, "Gislebertus...comes Brionniæ" attacked “Monsteriolum” but that “Rodbertus dux” [ruled from 1027-1035] reconciled the parties[165]

Betrothed to ---, daughter of HEUGON [Helgo] & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" was betrothed to “Normannorum...miles...Helgo unicam filiam suam” with “Monasteriolum ac Escalfoium” [Montreuil et Echauffour] agreed as dowry, properties which were transferred to him after her father died, that she herself died before the marriage could take place, but that “Willermus Belesmensis” took Giroie to “Ricardum ducem Normanniæ” who granted “totam terram Helgonis hæreditario jure” to him at Rouen[166]

m ([1005/10]) GISLA, daughter of THURSTAN de Bastembourg & his wife ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “ex his filiorum et nepotum militaris turma propagata est, quæ Barbaris in Anglia vel Apulia seu Trachia vel Syria nimio terrori visa est” [“from these children and grandchildren sprang a race of knights who became the terror of the barbarians in England, Apulia, Thrace and Syria”][167].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais[168].  Her marriage can probably be dated to [1005/10]: Orderic Vitalis records that Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights, in another passage making it clear that he died before the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy (who died in 1035)[169]

Giroie & his wife had eleven children: 

1.         ARNAUD de Montreuil (-[1035/40]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “Ernaldus et Fulcoius” died with “Giselberto comite[170].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding that when Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights[171].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after Giroie died, "Gislebertus...comes Brionniæ" attacked “Monsteriolum” but that “Rodbertus dux” [ruled from 1027-1035] reconciled the parties, adding that Arnaud was "accidentally thrown against the sharp corner of a step during a friendly wrestling match with another young athlete at Montreuil…and after breaking three ribs, died within three days"[172]m ---.  The name of Arnaud's wife is not known.  Arnaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-after [1050/56]).  “Willemi filii Ernoldi de Mosteriolo, qui dedit S. Trinitati decimam totius eiusdem Guiardivillæ, presbyterum et ecclesiam alodii jure”, subscribed a charter for Fauroux dated to [1050/56][173]

2.         GUILLAUME (-Gaeta, Apulia 5 Feb ----).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[174].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding that when Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights[175].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” succeeded “Roberti fratris sui” with the help particularly of “Willelmi filii Geroii[176].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentemaisnil...cum fratre suo Hugone” with “Willelmus Geroii filius” restored “monasterii sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum” [Ouche de Saint-Evroul][177].  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Geroii monachus Becci et nepotes eius Robertus et Hugo de Grentemaisnil" restored "monasterium Sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum"[178].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[179].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Willelmus et nepotes sui Robertus et Hugo de Grentimenti" restored "monasterium sancti Ebrulfi" and donated “villam Russerie” to Bec[180].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmi filii Geroii” attended the second marriage of “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius”, against the advice of “Rodulfus...frater eius cognomento Clericus...et Mala-corona”, after which he was blinded and mutilated, three years later becoming a monk at Bec”[181].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus cognomento Talavicius Willermi Belesmensis filius” invited Guillaume Giroie to his marriage, where he was blinded, emasculated, and his ears cut off[182].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Monsteriolo et Ernaldus de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy and settled in Apulia[183].  Orderic Vitalis records that he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem twice, renouncing the world and taking monastic vows at the abbey of Bec after his second journey[184].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroianus Willelmus” died “apud Caietam Non Feb” while “in Apuliam missus est[185]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "5 Feb" of "Guillelmus filius Geroii fundator hujus cœnobii"[186]m firstly HILTRUDE, daughter of FULBERT de Beina & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume married firstly “Hiltrudem filiam Fulberti de Beina”, who had built “castrum Aquilæ” during the time of “Ricardi ducis[187]m secondly EMMA, daughter of WALKELIN de Tannée & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume married secondly “Emmam, Walchelini de Taneto filiam[188].  Guillaume & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ARNAUD d'Echaufour (-murdered I Jan [1065]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Ernaldum de Escalfoio” as the son of Guillaume and his first wife “Hiltrudem filiam Fulberti de Beina[189].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ernaldo...Willermi filio" donated "terram de Balgenzaio...et partem terræ Escalfo...et Exartum Henrici et decimam molendini de Esaclfo...terram Altæripæ...et terram de Doith Mulsat" to Ouche, with the consent of “Rodberto avunculo suo[190].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus Willermi Geroiani filius” succeeded “in loco patrui sui” after the death of Robert senior [dated to 1060/61] and continued to rebel against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, although peace was restored soon afterwards whereupon the duke restored him in “Monasteriolum et Escalfoium ac Sanctum Serenicum, totamque patrum suorum hæreditatem[191].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume who exiled “milites Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio atque Ernaldum de Escalfoio”, dated to [1059/61], adding that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio” revenged himself by ravaging “Lexoviensem pagum” for three years[192].  Orderic Vitalis records the return from Apulia of “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” who was pardoned by Duke Guillaume who promised the return of his property, that “Mabilia Talavacii filia” prepared poison for him which was drunk by “Gislebertus frater Rogerii de Monte-Gomerici” who died three days later “apud Raimalastum”, that she succeeded a second time in poisoning him with the help of “Rogerium militem cognomento Gulafram...Ernaldi cubicularius” whom she had seduced, and that he died “Kal Jan” dated to [1064] from the context[193]m EMMA, daughter of THURSTAN Haldup & his wife --- (-[1095]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, who after her husband died retired “ad Eudonem fratrem suum Normannici ducis dapiferum” (who was a lord “in pago Constantino”) and lived “pene xxx annis” in her widowhood[194].  Arnaud & his wife had [eight or more] children: 

i)          GUILLAUME (-[1115/25]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Guillaume on reaching adolescence joined the court of Philippe I King of France and became “regis...armiger” and afterwards left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem”, living nearly 40 years “inter Winilos[195]m firstly ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume, son of Arnaud d´Echaufour, left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem[196]m secondly ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume, son of Arnaud d´Echaufour, left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem[197].  Guillaume & his second wife had children: 

(a)       children .  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume, son of Arnaud d´Echaufour, left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem[198]

ii)         RENAUD ([1058/59]-[1115/16]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Renaud became a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul three months before his father died aged five years old, was named “Benedictus”, and remained there for 52 years[199]

iii)        PETRONILLE .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Petronille became a nun “in cœnobio S. Mariæ Andegavis[200]

iv)       GEVA .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Geva became a nun at Caen Holy Trinity[201]

v)        other children .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias[202]

Guillaume & his second wife had one child: 

b)         GUILLAUME (-Rome after Sep 1068).  Orderic Vitalis names “Willermum” as the son of Guillaume and his second wife “Emmam, Walchelini de Taneto filiam”, adding that later in Apulia he was known as “bonus Normannus[203].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[204].  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche, in seeking his restoration as abbot sought help from “Willermum de Mosterolo consobrinum suum”, who had conquered “Campaniam”, and granted him “medietatem antiquæ urbis...Aquina[205].  His father-in-law installed him as Duke of Gaeta in [1064], but he rebelled and attempted to repudiate his wife in order to marry Maria, widow of Duke Atenulf I[206].  Orderic Vitalis records that he became commander of the papal army which was victorious in Campania[207].  Amatus records that he gave two churches to Montecassino in Sep 1068[208].  Amatus records that he died in Rome from "a burning fever"[209]m ([1060/62]) --- di Capua, daughter of RICHARD I Prince of Capua & his wife Frédésende de Hauteville.  Amatus records the marriage of the daughter of Richard to "an exceptional knight, small in stature, who was very robust, strong, valiant…his adopted son…William" with the counties of Aquino, Marsia and Campagna as dowry[210]

3.         EREMBURGE .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[211].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that “primogenita...filiarum Heremburgis” married “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi” by whom she had “Willelmus et Radulfus” who later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[212].  As the second marriage of her younger sister Hawise can be dated to [1040], and because Hawise had six children by her first marriage, it is likely that Eremburge married much earlier, say in [1020/30].  If that is correct, she must have been one of the older children of her parents.  m ([1020/30]) WALKELIN de Pont-Echanfrey, son of ---. 

4.         HAWISE .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[213].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Hawise married firstly “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio”, by whom she had “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias”, and secondly “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” by whom she had “Judith” who later married “Rogerii comitis Siciliæ[214].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes...Willelmus...frater eius” married “Hadevisam filia Geroii relictam Roberti de Grentemaisnil[215].  As Hawise had six children by her first husband, it is unlikely that she was born much later than 1015 and must therefore have been one of her parents´ older children.  m firstly ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of --- (-killed in battle 17 Jun [1040]).  m secondly (after 17 Jun [1040]) GUILLAUME d'Evreux, son of ROBERT Comte d'Evreux Archbishop of Rouen [Normandy] & his mistress Herleva ---.  He is named by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was "son of Archbishop Robert"[216]

5.         FOULQUES (-murdered [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “Ernaldus et Fulcoius” died with “Giselberto comite[217].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Foulques inherited “medietatem Monasterioli” and that “post mortem Rodberti ducis” he was killed “cum compatre suo Gislberto comite[218].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[219].  These deaths can probably be dated to [1040].  Foulques had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

a)         GIROIEOrderic Vitalis names "Geroium et Fulcoium ex concubina" as the two sons of Foulques, son of Giroie[220].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[221]

b)         FOULQUESOrderic Vitalis names "Geroium et Fulcoium ex concubina" as the two sons of Foulques, son of Giroie[222].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[223]

6.         RAOUL "Malacorona/ill-tonsured" (-19 Jan [1068]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[224].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Raoul became a monk at Marmoutier “sub Alberto abbate” (abbot from 1037 to 1064) and died six years later[225].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmi filii Geroii” attended the second marriage of “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius”, against the advice of “Rodulfus...frater eius cognomento Clericus...et Mala-corona”, after which he was blinded and mutilated, three years later becoming a monk at Bec”[226].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the departure of “Rodberti abbatis [Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche]” (dated to [1061]), “Rodulfus Mala-Corona avunculus eius” left Ouche Saint-Evroul and went to Marmoutier, where he died “XIV Kal Feb” seven years later[227]

7.         ROBERT (-6 Feb [1060/61], bur St-Evroul d´Ouche).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[228].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Robert held “castrum S. Serenici[229].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[230].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ernaldo...Willermi filio" donated "terram de Balgenzaio...et partem terræ Escalfo...et Exartum Henrici et decimam molendini de Esaclfo...terram Altæripæ...et terram de Doith Mulsat" to Ouche, with the consent of “Rodberto avunculo suo[231].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[232].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodberti Geroii filius” rebelled against “Willermum ducem”, joined “Andagavensibus” and fortified “castra sua: Sanctum...Serenicum et Rupem Ialgiensem” [Saint-Céneri-le-Giroie and La Roche d´Igé near Bellême], dated to [1060], but records that he died “VIII Id Feb” five days after eating two poisoned apples which he had snatched from his wife´s hand[233].  Another passage in the same source records that Robert held out in "castrum sancti Serenici" against “Willermum ducem...anno ducatus eiusdem ducis xxv” [1060/61] and repeats the story of his death[234].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after at first refusing, Duke Guillaume permitted the return of Robert´s body for burial at Ouche[235]m ADELAIDE, daughter of --- (-after [1060/61]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Willermus dux" granted “Adelaidem consobrinam suam” in marriage to Robert, son of Giroie[236].  The passage in Orderic Vitalis, which records that her husband died five days after eating a poisoned apple which he had snatched from his wife´s hand, clarifies that she outlived him[237].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT (-after Jun 1119).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum” as the son of Robert, son of Giroie, and his wife “Adelaidem”, adding that “now fights for Henry I King of England” (qui nunc Henrico regi Anglorum militat”)[238].  It is unclear why Robert did not succeed to his properties on the death of his father: Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus Willermi Geroiani filius” succeeded “in loco patrui sui” after the death of Robert senior and pursued the rebellion[239].  Son of Robert Giroie according to Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he "spent many years with his relatives in Apulia" and was "consobrinus" of Robert III Duke of Normandy, who restored to him the castle of Saint-Céneri previously held by his father which he retained "for about 36 years afterwards"[240].  His castle was attacked "without warning" by Robert de Bellême, triggering open warfare in which Robert Giroie laid waste the country around Alençon for three months, but during his absence Robert de Bellême sacked the castle in [Jul 1092][241].  Seigneur de Saint-Cenery [located south-west of Alençon, near the forest of Ecouves]: "Avesgaudus filius Fulcaudi" donated "ecclesia Sancti Simphoriani et Sancte Marie de Conedrario" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated 1 May 1103, which names "uxor mea Brita…et Robertus de Sancto Celerino gener meus…filia…mea Felicia ipsius Roberti uxor"[242].  A charter dated to [1110] confirms the donation by "Robertus, Giroi filius" of revenue at "Conedrarium", donated by "Avesgaudus socer eius" when he became a monk, to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans, with the consent of "Britta uxor…dicti Avesgaudi et Felicia filia eorum, exor prefati Roberti"[243].  He rebelled against Henry I King of England in Jul [1118], supported by Foulques IV Comte d'Anjou, but was pardoned in Jun 1119 at the request of Comte Foulques[244]m firstly RADEGUNDE, daughter of --- (-1092).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of "Geroianus…Radegundis uxor eius" and "Guillelmus infans filius eius" who was a hostage to "Rodbertus Belesmensis", in the same year that the castle of Saint-Céneri was plundered by Robert de Bellême[245]m secondly (after 1092) FELICIE de Connerré, daughter of AVESGAUD Seigneur de Connerré & his wife Brita ---.  "Avesgaudus filius Fulcaudi" donated "ecclesia Sancti Simphoriani et Sancte Marie de Conedrario" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated 1 May 1103, which names "uxor mea Brita…et Robertus de Sancto Celerino gener meus…filia…mea Felicia ipsius Roberti uxor"[246].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[247].  A charter dated to [1110] confirms the donation by "Robertus, Giroi filius" of revenue at "Conedrarium", donated by "Avesgaudus socer eius" when he became a monk, to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans, with the consent of "Britta uxor…dicti Avesgaudi et Felicia filia eorum, uxor prefati Roberti"[248].  Robert & his first wife had one child:

i)          GUILLAUME (-1092 or after).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of "Geroianus…Radegundis uxor eius" and "Guillelmus infans filius eius" who was a hostage to "Rodbertus Belesmensis" allegedly poisoned by his captor, in the same year that the castle of Saint-Céneri was plundered by Robert de Bellême[249]

Robert & his second wife had six children:

ii)         GUILLAUME .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[250].  He and his brother inherited Saint-Céneri from their father[251]

iii)        ROBERT .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[252].  He and his brother inherited Saint-Céneri from their father259

iv)       MATHIEU .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[253]

v)        AGATHA .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[254]

vi)       DAMETA .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[255]same person as…?  DAMETA .  A Norman woman.  Her son granted her the manor of Chelsea for an annual rent of £4[256].  There is no proof that this co-identity is correct.  However, the chronology is favourable and no other person with this name has yet been found in the primary sources consulted during the preparation of the present document.  Mistress of: ETIENNE de Blois Comte de Mortain, son of ETIENNE Comte de Blois & his wife Adela of England (Blois [1096/97]-Dover 25 Oct 1154, bur Faversham Abbey, Kent).  He succeeded in 1135 as STEPHEN King of England

vii)      AVELINE .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[257]

8.         HUGUES (-[1040/50]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[258].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in as later passage that Hugues “juventute florens” was mortally wounded during the siege of “castro S. Scolasticæ[259]

9.         GIROIE (-[1050/60]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[260].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Giroie “primo flore juventutis” raided “prædam in terra Lexoviensis ecclesie” [Lisieux] and died after returning to Montreuil “in amentiam” [in a fit of madness][261].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[262]

10.      EMMA .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[263].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Emma married “Rogerio de Merula” by whom she had “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum[264]m ROGER de Merlerault, son of ---.  Roger & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus” as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[265].   

b)         GUILLAUME de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum”, as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[266].   m ---.  The name of Guillaume's wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

i)          RAOUL de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum”, as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[267].  

ii)         ROGER de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum”, as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[268].  

11.      ADELAIS .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[269].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that "quarta filia [Geroii] Adelais" married "Salomoni de Sablolio", by whom she had "Rainaldum" adding that "cujus proles…Lisiardus" is now a supporter of Henry I King of England in Anjou[270]m SALOMON de Sablé, son of ---. 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the Giroie family has not been established.  She may have been related to Arnaud d´Echaufour through the female line, so could have belonged to the families either of Arnaud´s mother or of his paternal grandmother Gisla de Montfort-sur-Risle. 

 

1.         RICHEREDA, daughter of --- (bur Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle[271]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Engenulfus et Richuereda uxor eius" donated the deceased´s horse to Ouche after "Rogerius primogenitus Engenulfi de Aquila filius" was killed, dated to [1059/61][272].  Her relationship with the Giroie family is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Ernaldus" [Arnaud d´Echaufour, son of Guillaume Giroie, see above] received "equum consobrini sui Rogerii" [her son] from “Rodberto abbate” [Robert de Grantmesnil, abbot of Ouche], dated to [1059/61][273].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "domina matre mea Richoereda…"[274]m ENGENULF de Laigle [de l'Aigle], son of --- (-killed in battle Hastings 17 Oct 1066, bur Monastery of Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle). 

 

 

The precise relationships between the following individuals and the main Giroie family have not yet been ascertained: 

 

1.         ROBERT Geroie (-after [1172/78]).  Seigneur de Saint Serein, d´Echauffour et de Montreuil.  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Evroul , at the request of "fidelis mei Roberti Geroiani domini Sancti Serenici Eschalfoii et Musterelli et W. filii sui primogeniti et Geroii de Musterello" by charter dated [1172/78][275]m ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-after [1172/78]).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Evroul , at the request of "fidelis mei Roberti Geroiani domini Sancti Serenici Eschalfoii et Musterelli et W. filii sui primogeniti et Geroii de Musterello" by charter dated [1172/78][276]

2.         [GEROIE de Montreuil (-after [1172/78]).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Evroul , at the request of "fidelis mei Roberti Geroiani domini Sancti Serenici Eschalfoii et Musterelli et W. filii sui primogeniti et Geroii de Musterello" by charter dated [1172/78][277].  The precise relationship between Geroie de Montreuil and Robert Geroie has not yet been identified.] 

 

 

 

E.      GRANTMESNIL

 

 

ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of --- (-killed in battle 17 Jun [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentesmaisnil” died in the same battle as “Rogerius [de Toenia][278]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "17 Jun" of "Robertus de Grentemesnil"[279]

m as her first husband, HAWISE, daughter of GIROIE & his wife Gisla de Bastembourg (-10 May ----).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes...Willelmus...frater eius” married “Hadevisam filia Geroii relictam Roberti de Grentemaisnil[280].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Hawise married firstly “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio”, by whom she had “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias”, and secondly “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” by whom she had “Judith” who later married “Rogerii comitis Siciliæ[281].  She married secondly Guillaume d'Evreux [Normandie].  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "10 May" of "Haudvisa mater Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[282]

Robert & his wife had [seven] children: 

1.         HUGUES de Grantmesnil ([1025]-in England 22 Feb 1098, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[283]

-        see below

2.         ROBERT de Grantmesnil (-St Euphemia 12 Dec [1082]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[284].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[285].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentemaisnil...cum fratre suo Hugone” with “Willelmus Geroii filius” restored “monasterii sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum[286].  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Geroii monachus Becci et nepotes eius Robertus et Hugo de Grentemaisnil" restored "monasterium Sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum"[287].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Willelmus et nepotes sui Robertus et Hugo de Grentimenti" restored "monasterium sancti Ebrulfi" and donated “villam Russerie” to Bec[288].  Orderic Vitalis records that “nepotes sui Hugo et Rotbertus” founded “apud Nuceretum villam suam prope Grentemaisnilium...cœnobium”, inspired by “Willermi filii Geroii avunculi sui[289].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus et Hugo et Ernaldus filii Rodberti de Grentemaisnilio" donated "in Nucereto ecclesia...villa...Solengiacus, in Oillei...Anglisca...villa...ecclesia...Villaris...in monasterio de Waiprato...decimam de Buinna, et in Belmeis tertiam partem molendini...unum hospitem in Collavilla" and numerous other named properties to Ouche[290].  Abbot of Saint-Evroul d´Ouche: Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertum de Grentemaisnilio” was elected abbot of Ouche in 1059[291].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume and the resignation “VI Kal Feb” [1061] of “Rodbertus Uticensium abbas” following complaints about him, adding in a later passage that Robert went “ad parentes suos in Apuliam”, before returning to Normandy with two Papal legates to reclaim his abbey unsuccessfully[292].  Abbot of St Euphemia in Calabria: Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche, in seeking his restoration as abbot sought help from “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” who invited him and his monks to install themselves permanently there and granted “ecclesiam Sanctæ Eufemiæ...super littus Adriatici maris” to him, dated to [1061/63][293].  Malaterra records the marriage "apud Sanctum Martinum" of "abbatum Sanctæ Euphemiæ Robertum…Judicta sorore sua" and Count Roger[294].  Orderic Vitalis records that in 1077 “Goisfredus nepos Eustachii Bolonensium comitis nepos” was appointed bishop of Chartres, in opposition to “Rodbertus...abbas frater Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio[295].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus abbas Sanctæ Eufemiæ” was poisoned by “quidam genere Saracenus, arte pistoria Brixensi cœnobio” and died “II Id Dec”, dated to [1082][296]

3.         ARNAUD de Grantmesnil .  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[297].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus et Hugo et Ernaldus filii Rodberti de Grentemaisnilio" donated "in Nucereto ecclesia...villa...Solengiacus, in Oillei...Anglisca...villa...ecclesia...Villaris...in monasterio de Waiprato...decimam de Buinna, et in Belmeis tertiam partem molendini...unum hospitem in Collavilla" and numerous other named properties to Ouche[298].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Monsteriolo et Ernaldus de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy and settled in Apulia[299]Europäische Stammtafeln dates his journey to Italy in [1050][300], although the basis for this speculation is not known.  Malaterra names "iuvenis…Arnaldus…frater iuvenculæ uxoris eius [Rogerii comitis Siciliæ]"[301]

4.         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[302]same person as…?  AGNES de Grantmesnil (-29 Sep ----).  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "29 Sep" of "Agnes soror Hugonis de Grentemesnil"[303]

5.         ADELISE de Grantmesnil (-after [1068/69]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[304].  Her marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnil, qui præsidatum Gewissorum, id est Guentanæ regionis” [presumably Hampshire] and “sororius eius Unfridus de Telliolo...Hastingas...custodiendum” returned to Normandy wanting to rejoin their wives, dated to [1068/69][305].  Orderic Vitalis names [her son] “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” whose “pater...fuit filius Amfridi de progenie Dacorum, Adeliza...mater eius soror Hugonis de Grentemaisnil de...stirpe Geroianorum[306]m HONFROI de Tilleul, son of AMFRID & his wife --- (-after [1068/69]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” whose “pater...fuit filius Amfridi de progenie Dacorum, Adeliza...mater eius soror Hugonis de Grentemaisnil de...stirpe Geroianorum[307].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnil, qui præsidatum Gewissorum, id est Guentanæ regionis” [presumably Hampshire] and “sororius eius Unfridus de Telliolo...Hastingas...custodiendum” returned to Normandy wanting to rejoin their wives, dated to [1068/69][308].  Honfroi & his wife had three children: 

a)         ARNAUD de Tilleul (-after [1090/95]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Drogo filius Goisfredi de Novo-Mercato et Rogerius Erneisi de Coluncis filius nepos Guillelmi de Guarenna et Ernaldus Unfridi de Telliolo filius, nepos ex sorore Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio" donated revenue[309]Monk at Ouche Saint-Evroult.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus monachus Unfridi filius” had “in adolescentia” left the knighthood and became a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul where he lived for nearly 50 years[310].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” made donations to “Uticense cœnobium” where “fratres sui Ernaldus et Rogerius” were monks[311].  Orderic Vitalis records that “aliquot annos” after the death of “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” [Robert of Rhuddlan, son of Onfroi de Tilleul and his wife Adelise de Grantmesnil], “Ernaldus monachus Unfridi filius” went to England to bring back “ossa Rodberti fratris sui” to Normandy where they were buried at Ouche Saint-Evroul[312]

b)         ROBERT of Rhuddlan (before [1046/48]-killed in battle Hormaheva [1087], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” whose “pater...fuit filius Amfridi de progenie Dacorum, Adeliza...mater eius soror Hugonis de Grentemaisnil de...stirpe Geroianorum[313]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” went “dum puer erat cum patre suo in Angliam” and served “Eduardo regi” who knight him, before returning to Normandy, and that after “Senlacio bello” he went again “cum Hugone consobrino suo, Richardi de Abrincis cognomento Goz filio” to England where, after Hugues received “comitatus Cestrensis”, he was made “militiæ eius et totius provinciæ gubernator” and granted “oppidum...apud Rodelentum” which King William had built “contra Guallos[314].  Robert´s birth date is estimated from his being knighted by King Edward before his death in 1066.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugues de Grantmesnil et nepos suus Robert de Ruddlan” witnessed the charter dated to [1081] under which William I King of England confirmed the possessions of Ouche[315].  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugo de Grentemaisnil...ac Rodbertus de Rodelento nepos eius” among the followers of “Odo...palatinus Cantiæ consul[316].  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Hugo...juvenis...Hugonis de Grantemaisnil filius et cognatus eius Rodbertus de Rodelento”, dated to 1087 from the context[317]Orderic Vitalis records that “aliquot annos” after the death of “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius”, “Ernaldus monachus Unfridi filius” went to England to bring back “ossa Rodberti fratris sui” to Normandy where they were buried at Ouche Saint-Evroul[318]

c)         ROGERMonk at Ouche Saint-Evroult.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” made donations to “Uticense cœnobium” where “fratres sui Ernaldus et Rogerius” were monks[319]

6.         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[320].  [same person as...?  EMMA .  Orderic Vitalis records that “duæ sorores uterinæ Rodberti abbatis [Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche] Judith et Emma” had been left “apud Uticum in capella sancti Ebrulfi...sub sacro velamine”, that when they learnt that “Rodbertum fratrem suum” was established in Apulia with “secular power” (“sæculari potentia”) they left for Italy where they both married, Judith marrying “Rogerius Siciliæ comes” and Emma marrying “aliusque comes, cujus nomen no recolo”, dated to [1061/63][321].  The reference to Judith and Emma being “sorores uterinæ” suggests that they did not share the same father as Robert.  However, in another passage, the same source names Judith as the child (implicitly “only child”) of “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” and his wife[322].  It is therefore unclear whether Emma was one of Robert´s full sisters or half-sisters, although the order of the names of the two sisters suggests that Emma was younger than Judith and therefore born from the same marriage of their mother.  m ---.] 

7.         [--- .  The name and parentage of the wife of Richard “le Goz” Vicomte d´Avranches is not known.  She is called “Emma” in the Complete Peerage[323], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  A manuscript relating to St Werburgh´s Chester records that “Hugo Lupus filius ducis Britanniæ et nepos Gulielmi magni ex sorore” transformed the foundation into a monastery[324].  This suggests that Hugues´s mother may have been a uterine sister of King William, and therefore daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, no indication has been in other primary sources which supports the contention that Hugues was the son of a duke of Brittany.  It is assumed therefore that both lines of his parentage have been romanticised in this document to improve his status and reputation.  Another possibility is that she was related to the Grantmesnil family: Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” [Robert of Rhuddlan, son of Onfroi de Tilleul and his wife Adelise de Grantmesnil] went “cum Hugone consobrino suo, Richardi de Abrincis cognomento Goz filio” to England[325].  If the relationship is correct as indicated by Orderic, from a chronological point of view she could have been another daughter of Hugues de Grantmesnil, maybe the same person as the unnamed third daughter who is shown above.  m (before [1047]) RICHARD "le Goz" Vicomte d´Avranches, son of Vicomte THURSTAN “le Goz” & his wife --- (-after 1082).] 

 

 

HUGUES  de Grantmesnil, son of ROBERT de Grantmesnil & his wife Hawise --- ([1025][326]-in England 22 Feb 1098, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[327].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentemaisnil...cum fratre suo Hugone” with “Willelmus Geroii filius” restored “monasterii sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum[328].  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Geroii monachus Becci et nepotes eius Robertus et Hugo de Grentemaisnil" restored "monasterium Sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum"[329].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Willelmus et nepotes sui Robertus et Hugo de Grentimenti" restored "monasterium sancti Ebrulfi" and donated “villam Russerie” to Bec[330].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[331].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus et Hugo et Ernaldus filii Rodberti de Grentemaisnilio" donated "in Nucereto ecclesia...villa...Solengiacus, in Oillei...Anglisca...villa...ecclesia...Villaris...in monasterio de Waiprato...decimam de Buinna, et in Belmeis tertiam partem molendini...unum hospitem in Collavilla" and numerous other named properties to Ouche[332].  Orderic Vitalis records that “nepotes sui Hugo et Rotbertus” founded “apud Nuceretum villam suam prope Grentemaisnilium...cœnobium”, inspired by “Willermi filii Geroii avunculi sui[333].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume who exiled “milites Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio atque Ernaldum de Escalfoio”, dated to [1059/61][334], the same source recording in a later passage that Duke Guillaume recalled “Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio”, dated to [1063][335].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Hugo de Grentemasinilio et Rogerius de Molbraio...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[336].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Grenmesnil" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[337].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Hugo de Grentemaisnilio et Guillermus de Garenna...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[338].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[339].  Sheriff of Leicester: Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted the command of "municipatum Legrecestræ" to "Hugoni...de Grentemaisnilio"[340].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnil, qui præsidatum Gewissorum, id est Guentanæ regionis” [presumably Hampshire] and “sororius eius Unfridus de Telliolo...Hastingas...custodiendum” returned to Normandy wanting to rejoin their wives, dated to [1068/69][341].  "…Hugonis de Grentemaisnil…" witnessed a charter dated to [1077] under which William I King of England granted property to the abbey of Saint-Etienne de Caen[342].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Grantmesnil” holding land in Thundridge, Braughing Hundred, in Hertfordshire from the bishop of Bayeux, and land in Ware also in Hertfordshire; Pebworth, Broad Marston, Upper Quinton, Lower Quinton, Weston-on-Avon and Willicote in Gloucestershire, numerous properties in Leicestershire[343].  He fought Robert de Bellême and his castle of Courcy was besieged by Robert III Duke of Normandy in 1091[344].  Orderic Vitalis records that in 1098 “Hugo de Grentemaisnil” fell ill in England, became a monk, and died “VIII Kal Mar”, his body being returned to Normandy for burial at Ouche[345]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "21 Feb" of "Hugo de Grentesmesnil comes Leecestriæ, fundator hujus cœnobii, monachus nostræ congregationis"[346]

m ([before 1060]) ADELISE de Beaumont, daughter of IVES [II] Comte de Beaumont & his first wife Judith --- ([before 1045]-Rouen 11 Jul 1091, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” married “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[347].  The date of her marriage is estimated based on the estimated birth date of the couple´s oldest known son.  Domesday Book records “Adeliza wife of Hugh de Grandmesnil” holding Broxbourne in Hertford Hundred in Hertfordshire; land in Shelton, Houghton Conquest and Chalton in Bedfordshire[348].  She owned Peatling Magna, in the possession of Leofric in 1086 in Domesday Book[349].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “Rotomagi V Id Jul” of “Adeliza...Ivonis de Bellomonte comitis, de Judæa genetrice, filia”, wife of Hugues de Grantmesnil, seven years before her husband died and her burial at Ouche, adding that she and her husband has six sons and six daughters[350]

Hugues & his wife had twelve children: 

1.         ROBERT de Grantmesnil ([before 1060]-1 Jun [1136], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[351].  Considering that Robert's younger brother Guillaume was considered of marriageable age before [1081] (see below), it is unlikely that Robert was born later than [1060], although this would mean that he was probably in his fifties at the time of his first marriage (considering the estimated birth date range of his first wife) which seems surprising.  “…Rotberti de Grentemaisnillo, Ivonis de Grentemaisnillo…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[352].  "…Robert de Grentone-Maisnil…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[353].  "Robert de Grantemsnil et Robert de sancto Serenico" confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul made by "their progenitors Hugh and Robert de Grentemesnil" by charter dated to [1127/28][354].  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[355]m [firstly] [as her second husband,] EMMA d´Estouteville, [widow of ERRAND Sire d'Harcourt[356],] daughter of ROBERT [I] d'Estouteville & his wife [Beatrix ---] (-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married secondly “Emmam Rodberti de Stotevilla filiam[357].  The chronology of these families suggests that Emma must have been Robert´s first wife not his second.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[358].  La Roque states that “une généalogie de la maison d´Estouteville” names Errand´s wife as “Emme et la comprend entre ceux du sang...[de] Robert d´Estouteville”, suggesting that she was the same person who later married “Hugues de Grentesmesnil[359].  The passage is somewhat garbled and in any case La Roque does not provide a citation reference to the source in question or quote it in his “Preuves”.  It is suggested that, until further documentation comes to light, this supposed marriage of Errand should be treated with caution.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[360]m [secondly] LUCY, daughter of SAVARY de Beaumont-au-Maine & his wife Muriel de Bohun.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married thirdly “Luciam Savarici filii Cani filiam[361].  Given the likely chronology of Robert´s wife Agnes, it is probable that Lucy was his second rather than his first wife.  m [thirdly] AGNES [Aveline], daughter of RANULF "le Meschin" Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] [later Earl of Chester] & his wife Lucy --- ([1098/1105]-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married firstly “Agnetem Ranulfi Bajocensis filiam[362].  Her birth date range is estimated from the likely marriage date of her parents.  If that range is correct, it is more likely that Agnes was Robert´s third wife than his first.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[363].  Robert de Grantmesnil & his [first] wife had one child:

a)         ROBERT .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[364]

Robert de Grantmesnil & his [first/second] wife had [two] children: 

b)         AGNES de Grantmesnil (-after 1115).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert had recently married "Agnete filia Rodberti de Gretemaisnilio" when he was banished from Normandy by Henry I King of England, and left with her for Apulia[365].  The chronology suggests that she was born either from her father´s first or second marriage.  m ([1115]) ROBERT Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, son of GUILLAUME Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche & his first wife Albreda [de Moulins]. 

c)         [HUGUES de Grantmesnil .  "Hugues de Grantmesnil" is named as father of Pernel in an account of the foundation of Leicester Abbey, but the Complete Peerage casts doubt on the accuracy of this as the same source gives details of Pernel's inheritance from him which are clearly incorrect[366].  No other reference to this person has been found.  As noted below, Pernel was most likely descended from the senior branch of the Grantmesnil family as she brought the Norman honour of Grantmesnil to her husband, but she may have been the daughter of Robert de Grantmesnil's daughter Agnes.]  m ---.  The name of Hugues´s wife is not known.  Hugues & his wife had [one] child:   

i)          [PERNEL [Petronille] (-1 Apr 1212).  Pernel is named as great-granddaughter of Hugues de Grantmesnil in the [1190/1204] charter of her son Robert FitzPernel to the abbey of St Evroul[367].  Her father is named Hugh de Grantmesnil in an account of the foundation of Leicester Abbey, but the Complete Peerage casts doubt on the accuracy of this as mentioned above[368].  Robert de Torigny records that her husband gained the Norman honour of Grantmesnil through his marriage[369], which suggests that Pernel, as heiress, was descended from the oldest son of Hugues de Grantmesnil senior.  It is possible that she was the daughter of Agnes, daughter of Robert de Grantmesnil.  Considering that Orderic Vitalis does not name Hugues (supposed brother of Agnes) although he is so thorough in naming other members of this family, this is the most likely possibility.  "Robertus filius comitis Legrece" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe for the soul of "uxoris mee Petronille" by charter dated [1153/67][370].  "Petronilla comitissa Leircestrie" confirmed the exchange of land with Nuneaton priory made by "Robertus comes Leircestrie filius meus", who gave land in Belgrave in return for land in Dadlington which had been donated by "sponsus meus Robertus comes…cum filia mea pie memorie Hawis", by charter dated to after 1189[371].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from the king in Hertfordshire, dated to [1204/12]: "comitissa de Leicestria" held "Wares"[372].  The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "1 Apr" of "Petronilla comitissa Leicestriæ"[373].  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "1 Apr" of "Petronilla comitissa Leycestriæ"[374]m (before [1155/59]) ROBERT de Beaumont "ès Blanchemains", son of ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester & his wife Amicie de Gaël (-Durazzo 1190).  He succeeded his father in 1168 as Earl of Leicester.] 

2.         GUILLAUME [I] de Grantmesnil (-[before 1114]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[375].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I offered “neptem suam Rodberti...Moritolii comitis filiam” in marriage to Guillaume de Grantmesnil, who refused and left for Apulia[376]Europäische Stammtafeln states that he was in Apulia from 1081[377], although the basis for this is not known as it is not possible to date the passage in Orderic which is quoted above.  Orderic Vitalis states that he was "avunculus" of Arnoul de Montpinçon, whose "acquisitions" inspired the latter to set out for Apulia[378].  Orderic Vitalis also records that he took part in Robert Guiscard's campaign against Durazzo in 1081 and that he was summoned by Duke Robert to his deathbed[379].  He was granted land in the valleys of the Crati, the Coscile and at Cotrone[380], although it is not known whether this refers to part of the "fifteen castles" of his wife's dowry (see below) or whether they were grants made to Guillaume in his own right before his marriage.  Either way, it is clear that Guillaume's career in Apulia must have been particularly successful for him to have risen from a relatively obscure background and to have made such a prominent marriage.  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jun [1098] “Willelmus...de Grentemaisnil et Albericus frater eius, Guido Trussellus et Lambertus Pauper”, fearing for their safety if the Turks recaptured Antioch, escaped from the city by attaching ropes to the walls, after which they were all to their shame called “furtivi Funambuli” for the rest of their lives[381].  Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus Carpentarius, Willelmusque alter, quondam familiaris et domesticus imperatoris Constantinopolis, qui et sororem Boemundi principis Siciliæ uxorem duxerat", escaped "out of fear" from Antioch to Alexandretta, believing that the crusading army was doomed after it was besieged by Kerbogha atabeg of Mosul, dated to mid-1098 from the context[382].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume died in Apulia after returning “de Antiochia[383].  From the context, the date of his death appears to have been before 1114.  Europäische Stammtafeln[384] refers to "1130" but the source to which this relates has not so far been found.  m (Apulia [1088/1089]) MABEL of Apulia, daughter of ROBERT "Guiscard/Weasel" de Hauteville Duke of Apulia & his second wife Sichelgaita of Salerno.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerus...Crumena id est bursa [dux] Calabriæ” arranged the marriage of “Mabiliam sororem suam” to “Guillelmo de Grentemaisnil”, after reaching a settlement with his [half-brother] Marco Bohemond, dated to [1088/89][385]In a later passage, Orderic names her "Mabiliam...Curta-Lupa" and specifies that her dowry consisted of fifteen castles[386].  "La contessa Mabilia, vedova del protosebasta Guglielmo di Grantmesnil ed il figlio Guglielmo" donated the church of San Pietro di Bragalla to Cava by charter dated Sep 1117[387].  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [II] de Grantmesnil (-[3 Oct] 1117 or after).  Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum et Rodbertum” as the two sons of Guillaume de Grantmesnil and his wife[388].  He succeeded his father but did not long survive him[389].  "La contessa Mabilia, vedova del protosebasta Guglielmo di Grantmesnil ed il figlio Guglielmo" donated the church of San Pietro di Bragalla to Cava by charter dated Sep 1117[390].  [m AGATHA, daughter of --- (-3 Oct ----).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[391], Agatha was the first wife of Guillaume [I] de Grantmesnil.  However, the necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Non Oct" of "Willelmus de Grandmesnil et uxor eius Agatha"[392].  This recording of dual names in necrologies normally reflects the death of the husband, and a subsequent donation by the widow in his memory.  This is inconsistent with Agatha being the wife of Guillaume [I].  It is therefore suggested that Agatha may have been the wife of Guillaume [II], although it is possible that the entry refers to an altogether different Guillaume and his wife.] 

b)         ROBERT de Grantmesnil (-after 1129).  Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum et Rodbertum” as the two sons of Guillaume de Grantmesnil and his wife[393].  He abandoned his fiefs after a dispute about military service and returned to his kinsfolk north of the Alps in 1129[394]

3.         HUGUES de Grantmesnil (-[1087], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[395].  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Hugo...juvenis...Hugonis de Grantemaisnil filius et cognatus eius Rodbertus de Rodelento”, dated to 1087 from the context[396].  In a later passage, the same source records that “Hugo...miles” died “in juventute” and was buried at Ouche[397]

4.         IVES de Grantmesnil (-after 1102).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[398].  “Ivo filius Hugonis de Grentismaisnilo…Robertus Burdet…” witnessed the charter dated 1 Jul 1077 under which "Gosfredus de Wirchia…uxorisque meæ Aluevæ" founded Monks Kirby priory and donated it to Angers Saint-Nicolas[399].  “…Rotberti de Grentemaisnillo, Ivonis de Grentemaisnillo…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[400].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Ivo et Albericus filii Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy in Sep 1096 with “Rodbertus dux Normannorum” on the First Crusade[401].  He held his father's honour in England "for a little while" but later pledged it to Robert Comte de Meulan.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father, “Ivo” inherited “paternum honorem in Anglia” but that during the reign of King Henry I he pledged them to “Rodberto consuli de Mellento” to finance two journeys to Jerusalem, that during the first journey he suffered much “apud Antiochiam”, and that he died during the second journey[402]m --- de Gand, daughter of GILBERT van Gent & his wife Alice de Montfort-sur-Risle.  Orderic Vitalis records that Ives de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married “in Anglia Gislberti de Ganda filiam[403].  Ives & his wife had two children: 

a)         IVES de Grantmesnil (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names "duo elegantes filii Yvonis de Grentemaisnil" among those who drowned in the White Ship in 1120[404]

b)         --- de Grantmesnil (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names "duo elegantes filii Yvonis de Grentemaisnil" among those who drowned in the White Ship in 1120[405]

5.         AUBREY de Grantmesnil (-after [Jul] 1097).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[406].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Ivo et Albericus filii Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy in Sep 1096 with “Rodbertus dux Normannorum” on the First Crusade[407].  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jun [1098] “Willelmus...de Grentemaisnil et Albericus frater eius, Guido Trussellus et Lambertus Pauper”, fearing for their safety if the Turks recaptured Antioch, escaped from the city by attaching ropes to the walls, after which they were all to their shame called “furtivi Funambuli” for the rest of their lives[408].  A later passage in the same source records that “Albericus...ætate junior” studied in boyhood, but abandoned “clericatu, ad militiam” and that he wounded “Tancredum Odonis Boni Marchisi filius” who as a result limped for the rest of his life[409]

6.         son .  Orderic Vitalis records Hugues de Grantmesnil and his wife had six sons and six daughters, but does not mention the exploits of the sixth son and sixth daughter[410]

7.         ADELINE de Grantmesnil (-[1110/11]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Adeline married “Rogerio de Ibreio[411].  Domesday Book records “the wife of Roger d´Ivry” holding land in Islip, Kiddington and Oddington in Oxfordshire[412].  She died soon after making grants to Abingdon Abbey in [1110/11][413].  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that the latter was then mourning “sororem...suam Adelinam” who had recently died[414]m ROGER Seigneur d'Ivry, son of [ROBERT d´Ivry & his wife Albreda ---] (-after 24 Apr 1089). 

8.         HAWISE de Grantmesnil .  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Hawise died unmarried[415]

9.         ROHESE de Grantmesnil .  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Rohese married “Roberto de Curceio[416]m ROBERT de Courcy, son of RICHARD de Courcy & his wife --- (-after 1102). 

10.      MATHILDE de Grantmesnil (-Jaffa).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[417].  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that the latter was then mourning “sororem...suam Adelinam” who had recently died[418].  Orderic Vitalis records that Mathilde, after the death of her first husband, fell in love with “tironem exulantem Mathiellum” and went with him to Jerusalem, but they both died in the same year, he “in Apulia”, she “Joppe[419]m [firstly] HUGUES de Montpinçon, son of RAOUL de Montpinçon & his wife Adelisa --- (-Rouen 7 Mar ----, bur St Evroul).  He died aged 60[420].  [m secondly MATHIEU, son of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Mathilde, after the death of her first husband, fell in love with “tironem exulantem Mathiellum” and went with him to Jerusalem, but they both died in the same year, he “in Apulia”, she “Joppe[421].] 

11.      AGNES de Grantmesnil (-14 Sep ----).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Agnes married “Guillelmo de Saia[422]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "14 Sep" of "Agnes filia Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[423]m GUILLAUME de Say, son of ---. 

12.      daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records Hugues de Grantmesnil and his wife had six sons and six daughters, but does not mention the exploits of the sixth son and sixth daughter[424]

 

 

The precise relationship between the following individuals and the main Grantmesnil family has not yet been ascertained: 

 

1.         --- de Grantmesnilm EMMA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her daughter "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey[425].  Two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Grantmesnil .  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his sister "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey[426]

b)         BEATRIX de Grantmesnil .  "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey, in return for a horse for "son fils Guillaume de Rye", by undated charter witnessed by "Guillaume de Creully, Henri de Pont-Audemer, Michel Belet et Julien de Rye"[427]m --- de Rie, son of ---. 

 

 

 

F.      LA FERTE-MACE

 

Loyd indicates that La Ferté-Macé is located in the present-day French département of Orne, arrondissement Alençon, canton La Ferté-Macé[428]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME [I] de la Ferté-Macé (-1053 or after).  “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated “æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Berlo...æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Habletvilla...æcclesiam...Sancti Petri de Guaiolo...duas æcclesias de Magniaco et de Firmitate” to Tours Saint-Julien, for the souls of “meæ uxorisque et omnium filiorum meorum”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum, genetricisque ipsorum, dominique mei Ivonis Oximorum presulis...et cum auctoritate Willelmi Normannorum principis, Rogeriique, mei senioris”, by charter dated 1053, which specifies that “post mortem Guillelmi...Guillelmo filio eius” confirmed these donations, subscribed by “Hivonis pontificis Sagiarum quod est Oxismorum, Willelmi principis, Maidelindis uxoris eius, Willelmi comitis de Archis, Willelmi qui hoc donum fecit, filii eius, Guidonis comitis de Brionnia, Rotgerii de Bellomonte...[429]The document does not name the donor as Guillaume de la Ferté-Macé, but this is confirmed by a charter dated 1083 which confirmed donations to Tours Saint-Julien, including the donation of “æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Berlou --- ecclesiam Sancti Petri de Guaiolia --- ecclesias de Mauniaco et de Firmitate” made by “Willelmus de Firmitate”, and of property “in Hablotvilla” made by “avis autem supradicti Willelmi”, subscribed by “...Willelmi de Firmitate...[430]m --- (-after 1053).  The name of Guillaume´s wife is not known.  Her date of death (as well as the fact that she was the mother of the donor´s sons named below) is confirmed by the charter dated 1053 under which [her husband] “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated properties (as specified above) to Tours Saint-Julien, for the souls of “meæ uxorisque et omnium filiorum meorum”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum, genetricisque ipsorum...[431].  Guillaume [I] & his wife had children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [II] de la Ferté-Macé (-before 1083). A charter dated 1053 records that “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated properties (as specified above) to Tours Saint-Julien, and that “post mortem Guillelmi...Guillelmo filio eius” confirmed these donations[432]m ---.  The precise identity of Guillaume´s wife has not been ascertained, but the following source indicates that she was related to the Conteville family.  Planché refers to a charter which names “William [of Ferté Macé]” (presumably indicating Guillaume [III] de la Ferté-Macé) as “nephew of Bishop Odo” (no precise citation reference, but a later passage describes the document as “the charter of an archbishop of Tours, temp. St Louis”)[433].  The reference to this charter has not been found, but “nephew” presumably indicates “nepos”, which if used in its strict sense would indicate that Guillaume [II]´s wife was --- de Conteville, daughter of HERLUIN de Conteville & his [first/second wife Herlève ---/Fredesendis ---].  However, given the notoriously imprecise nature of the term, the precise relationship could be more remote.  Guillaume [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME [III] de la Ferté-Macé (-after 1083).  A charter dated 1083 confirmed donations to Tours Saint-Julien, including the donation of “æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Berlou --- ecclesiam Sancti Petri de Guaiolia --- ecclesias de Mauniaco et de Firmitate” made by “Willelmus de Firmitate”, and of property “in Hablotvilla” made by “avis autem supradicti Willelmi”, subscribed by “...Willelmi de Firmitate...[434]

b)         sons .  Their parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1053 under which [their father] “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated properties (as specified above) to Tours Saint-Julien, for the souls of “meæ uxorisque et omnium filiorum meorum”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum, genetricisque ipsorum, dominique mei Ivonis Oximorum presulis...et cum auctoritate Willelmi Normannorum principis, Rogeriique, mei senioris”, by charter dated 1053[435]

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de MONTGOMMERY

 

 

ROGER [I] de Montgommery, son of --- (-[before 1048]).  Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois.  He witnessed a charter of Robert I Duke of Normandy for the abbey of Saint Wandrille dated [1031/32].  In [1028/35] he restored to the Abbey of Jumièges the market at Vimoutiers which he had taken from the monks[436].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“ had been exiled to Paris “pro perfidia sua” when [his son] “Willelmo Rogerii de Montegumeri filio” murdered “Osbernus...Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius[437]

m JOSCELINE, daughter of --- & his wife Sainsfrida [Senfrie][438] .  Josceline, her husband and her mother are named in a letter of Ives Bishop of Chartres to Henry I King of England dated 1114 which explains the consanguinity between the king and Hugues de Châteauneuf, who wanted to marry one of the king's illegitimate daughters[439]

Roger & his wife had [six] children: 

1.         HUGUES de Montgommery (-killed in battle 7 Feb[440] [1035/before 1048], bur Troarn401).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father´s exile[441].  He witnessed his father's charter for the abbey of Jumièges397.  He was killed during the troubles in Normandy during the minority of Duke Guillaume II[442].  Vicomte d'Hiémois.  [m JOSCELINE de Bolbec, daughter of OSBERN de Bolbec & his wife Wevia ---.  Josceline and her marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[443].  This is presumably based on Robert de Torigny, continuation of William of Jumièges[444], the unreliability of this part of whose chronicle is discussed in the Complete Peerage[445].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quintam” married “Hugo de Monte-gummerici” by whom she had “Rogerius pater Roberti de Bellismo[446].  There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct as Osbern de Bolbec´s wife and Hugues de Montgommery´s mother would have been first cousins.] 

2.         ROBERT de Montgommery (-before his father).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father´s exile[447]

3.         ROGER [II] de Montgommery (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father´s exile[448].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury in 1074.  Sire d'Alençon. 

-        see below

4.         GUILLAUME de Montgommery (-killed in battle [1035/before 1048]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father´s exile[449].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Osbernus...procurator principalis domus, Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius“ was killed while sleeping “in cubiculo ducis cum ipso in valle Rodoili” by “Willelmo Rogerii de Montegumeri filio”, dated to early in the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context, adding that the murderer was subsequently killed by “Barno...de Glotis præpositus Osberni” in revenge for the crime[450]

5.         GILBERT de Montgommery (-murdered [1064]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father´s exile[451].  Orderic Vitalis records the return from Apulia of “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” who was pardoned by Duke Guillaume who promised the return of his property, that “Mabilia Talavacii filia” prepared poison for him which was drunk by “Gislebertus frater Rogerii de Monte-Gomerici” who died three days later “apud Raimalastum”, dated to [1064] from the context[452]

6.         [--- .  The identity of Amieria´s parents is not known.  She is shown as the daughter of Gilbert in Europäische Stammtafeln[453], but this may be no more than speculation.  The word "neptis" may indicate a more remote family relationship than niece.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         [AMIERIAOrderic Vitalis reports that Roger de Montgommery married "Amieriam neptem suam" to "Warino autem Calvo", who was "a man small in body but great in spirit", to whom he granted “præsidatum Scrobesburiæ[454].  Her second marriage is confirmed by a manuscript which recites the history of the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey and records donations including that of "Reginaldus frater Warini vicecomes…villam…Lega", adding in a later passage that "Reinaldus…post mortem Warini vicecomitis uxorem illius, cum honore, suscepit"[455].  Eyton interprets "frater" in this document as meaning "brother-in-law or rather husband of Warin´s widow"[456] but, assuming that the extract quoted above reflects the facts, such an interpretation is unnecessary as Rainald was both Warin´s brother and second husband of Warin´s widow.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius...Scrobesburiensis comes” donated properties to Ouche, including confirmation of the donation of “in ecclesia de Bailol altare sancti Leonardi et unam partem decimæ eiusdem villæ cum terra” donated by “Rainaldus de Bailol et Amieria uxor eius neptis mea”, undated but dated to after his second marriage[457].  The date of death of Amieria´s first husband and the date of her second marriage is indicated by Domesday Book which records "Raynaldus" as "vicecomes" of Shropshire[458]m firstly WARIN [Guérin] "the Bald/le Chauve", son of --- (-[25 Feb 1083/1086]).  A manuscript reciting the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records donations including by "Warinus vicecomes…in villa…Tugfort" and “uxor…illius post eius obitum…domum…in civitate”, with the consent of "filiis suis"[459].  Orderic Vitalis records that “V Kal Mar” in 1083 “Rogerius comes” declared to “Guarinum vicecomitem et Picotem de Saia cæterosque proceres suos” his intention of founding the abbey of Saint-Pierre[460]m secondly (before 1086) her first husband´s brother, RAINALD de Bailleul [Bailleul-en-Gouffern], son of ---.  "Rainaldus" donated “Dodefort” to Shrewsbury abbey for the soul of "Warini antecessoris sui"[461].  Domesday Book records "Raynaldus" as "vicecomes" of Shropshire[462].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius...Scrobesburiensis comes” donated properties to Ouche, including confirmation of the donation of “in ecclesia de Bailol altare sancti Leonardi et unam partem decimæ eiusdem villæ cum terra” donated by “Rainaldus de Bailol et Amieria uxor eius neptis mea”, undated but dated to after his second marriage[463].  He must have ceased to be Sheriff in the early 1100s as a manuscript reciting the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records that "Alanus filius Fladaldi" held “honorem vicecomitis Warini” after "filium eius"[464].]  Amieria & her first husband had one child: 

i)          HUGH (-[1102/10]).  A manuscript reciting the history of the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records donations including that of "Hugo filius eiusdem Warini"[465].  Sheriff of Shropshire.  A manuscript reciting the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records that "Alanus filius Fladaldi" held “honorem vicecomitis Warini” after "filium eius"[466].  As the death of Alan FitzFlaald is dated to before 1114, it is assumed that Hugh died early in the 1100s, probably without issue. 

 

 

ROGER [II] de Montgommery, son of ROGER [I] Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey[467]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father´s exile[468].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rogerum de Montgommeri" as son of "Iosceline"[469].  His father's name is confirmed by the charter dated to [1079/82] under which "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased"[470].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montgommery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Monte-Gomeri, Oximensis vicecomes” expelled the canons from Troarn, where they had been installed by “Rogerius pater suus[471].  "…Rogerii de Monte Gomerici…" witnessed the charter dated to [1055] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[472].  "…Willelmi filii Osberti, Rotgerii de Monte Golmerii, Richardis vicecomitis Abrinchensis…" witnessed the charter dated [1055/56] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "in pago…Constantino, villam…Flotomannum" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[473].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rogerius de Bellomonte et Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[474].  A charter dated 1066 records his pardoning the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen for a calumny[475].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rogero de Montgumeri" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[476].  He remained in Normandy at the time of the Norman invasion of England in 1066 to assist Duchess Mathilde to govern the duchy, but accompanied King William I to England in Dec 1067: Orderic Vitalis records that, when King William returned to England, 6 Dec 1067, he appointed “Mathildi conjugi suæ filioque suo Rodberto adolescenti” to govern Normandy (“principatum Neustriæ”), adding that the king took with him “Rogerium de Monte-Gomerici” whom he had appointed as “tutorem Normanniæ...cum sua conjuge” when he had left for England for the first time and that King William granted “primo Cicestram et Arundellum...post aliquot tempus Scrobesburiensem” to Roger[477].  [Earl] of Chester and Arundel.  Earl of Shrewsbury.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici”, after the fall of “Geroiana progenies”, held “totum patrimonium Excalfoii et Monasterioli” for about 26 years[478].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "le Conte Rogier de Montgomery et Guillaume le filz Osber" his two "Marechaulx d´Engleterre" after the conquest of England[479].  He became Sire d´Alençon, de iure uxoris, after the death in 1070 of her paternal uncle Ives Bishop of Seés.  As "Rogerus comes Salosberiensis" he witnessed a charter of King William I giving the barony of Plessis to the church of Bayeux dated 24 Dec 1074[480].  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][481].  Orderic Vitalis records that “V Kal Mar” in 1083 “Rogerius comes” declared to “Guarinum vicecomitem et Picotem de Saia cæterosque proceres suos” his intention of founding the abbey of Saint-Pierre[482].  He allied himself with Robert Duke of Normandy at the time of the latter's rebellion against King William II in 1089[483].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Monte-gumerii pater Roberti de Belesmo” founded “in honorem sancti Martini ecclesias duas, unam in Sagiensis urbis suburbio, alteram in vico suo Troardo” and “tertiam...apud Almanachias ad opus sanctiomonialium[484].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “VI Kal Aug” in 1094 “Rogerius...comes” and his burial at Shrewsbury abbey[485]

m firstly ([1050/54]) MABILE d'Alençon, daughter of GUILLAUME "Talvas" Sire d'Alençon & his first wife Hildeburge --- (-murdered Bures 2 Dec 1079, bur 5 Dec 1079 Troarn).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[486].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talavatius”, after he was exiled, arranged the marriage of “filiam suam...Mabiliam” to “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri” who received him in his household[487].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ivo filius Willermi Belesmensis...neptem...Mabiliam” married "Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici Oximensium vicecomes" who through her obtained "magnam partem possessionis Willermi Belesmensis", adding that Mabile was "a forceful and worldly woman, cunning, garrulous and extremely cruel" (“potens et sæcularis, callida et loquax, nimiumque crudelis”)[488].  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][489].  Orderic Vitalis records that she was murdered by Hugh Bunel, son of Robert "de Jalgeio" from whom she had taken his castle, who found her "relaxing in bed after a bath [and] struck off her head with his sword"[490].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[491]

m secondly ADELAIS du Puiset [de Breteuil], daughter of ERARD [I] Comte de Breteuil, Vicomte de Chartres & his wife Humberge ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his first wife, “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” married secondly “Adelaisam Ebrardi de Pusacio...filiam”, by whom he had “unum...filium...Ebrardum...inter regales capellanos usque hodie...in aula Guillelmi et Henrici, Angliæ regum” for about 26 years[492]

Earl Roger & his first wife had ten children:

1.         ROGER de Montgommery (-[before 1060/62]).  "Rogerii, Mabiliæ…Rogeri pueri filii Rogerii, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed an undated charter for Saint Martin de Sées[493].  

2.         ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême" ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 1 or 8 May 1118 or [after 1129], bur [Wareham Castle]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[494].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[495].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum...de Belesmia primogenitum filium suum [referring to Mabile]” and adds that "cujus crudelitas in diebus nostris super miseras plebes nimium efferbuit"[496].  "…Rogerus de Monte Gomeri…Robertus filius Rogeri de Monte Gomeri…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[497].  He witnessed a charter for Saint Martin de Sées with his brother Roger448, and a charter for Saint Aubin of Angers in [1060/62] without Roger[498], suggesting that the latter had died by then.  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][499].  Orderic Vitalis records the rebellion of Robert, son of King William I, and his departure from Normandy accompanied by “Rodbertus de Bellismo et Guillelmus de Britolio, Rogerius Ricardi de Benefacta filius, Rodbertus de Molbraio et Guillelmus de Molinis, Guillelmus de Ruperia”, dated to [1077/78], and their journeys during five years of exile[500].  He succeeded his mother in 1079 as Sire de Bellême et d'Alençon.  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[501].  He rebelled against William II King of England in 1088, crossed to England but was besieged at Rochester Castle and in Jun 1088 forced to surrender[502]Orderic Vitalis records “Edgarus Adelinus et Robertus Belesmensis atque Guillelmus de Archis monachus Molismensis” as the advisers of Robert [III] Duke of Normandy, dated to [1089][503]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Belesmensis” built “Furcas...castellum et...Castellum Gunterii...super Olnam fluvium ad Curbam” and attacked all his neighbours, dated to [1090][504].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[505].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Rodbertus...filius eius” obtained “totum feudum eius in Normannia”, adding that he was “crudelis et superbus” and committed “innumeras iniquitates[506].  He succeeded his younger brother in 1098 as Earl of Shrewsbury after a payment of £3000[507].  He succeeded his father-in-law in Oct 1100 as Comte de Ponthieu.  Florence of Worcester records that "Scrobbesbyriensis comes Rotbertus de Beleasmo" rebelled against Henry I King of England in [1101], was deprived of all his honours and estates in England, and retired to Normandy[508].  The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo[509].  Florence of Worcester records that "Rotbertus de Beleasm" fought with Robert Duke of Normandy against King Henry I at Tinchebrai in [1106], was captured, but later escaped and fled[510].  He helped Helias de Saint-Saens protect Guillaume, son of Robert "Curthose" ex-Duke of Normandy, after Henry I King of England ordered the arrest of the boy[511].  He was arrested in 1112, imprisoned at Cherbourg and all his lands and honours forfeited.  He was imprisoned at Wareham Castle, Dorset from Jul 1113[512].  The Annals of Margan record the death “Kal Mai” in 1118 of “Robertus comes de Belesme[513].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records payments made "in libatione Robti de Belismo" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[514].  This suggests a pension or maintenance in some form, although it is not certain that it relates to Robert de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury. 

-        COMTES de PONTHIEU

3.         HUGUES de Montgommery ([1053/59]-Anglesey 31 Jul 1098, bur [17 Aug 1098] Shrewsbury Abbey[515]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[516].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[517].  The Annales Cambriæ record that "de Mungumeri Hugo" laid waste to "Keredigiaun" in 1072[518].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the murder of his mother [in 1079], “Hugo de Monte-Gomerici” unsuccessfully pursued the assassins with 16 knights[519].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[520].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[521]Earl of Shrewsbury: Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Hugo...de Monte-Gomerici [filius eius]” obtained “comitatum Scrobesburiæ”, but that after a few years he was killed by “Magno fratre regis Northwigenarum” and buried “Scrobesburiensis conventus[522].  Florence of Worcester records that "comites Hugo de Legecastra et Hugo de Scrobbesbyria" invaded Anglesey in [1098], mutilating or massacring many of the inhabitants of the island, and that "comes Hugo de Scrobbesbyrie" was killed by an arrow discharged by Magnus King of Norway during a raid on the Welsh coast[523].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Hugh was killed in Anglesey "by pirates from oversea"[524], or (according to Orderic Vitalis) transfixed with a spear by Magnus brother of the king of Norway on the seashore and died instantly[525].  "Arnulf son of earl Roger" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees for the souls of "his father Roger and his brother Hugh who was slain that year" by charter dated 27 Aug 1098[526]

4.         ROGER de Montgommery "le Poitevin" (-1123).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[527].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[528].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[529].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[530].  “Rogerus comes Pictavensis” founded the priory of Lancaster, for the salvation of “Rogeri Seroberie patris sui matrisque sue Mabilie cometisse”, and donated “duos mansiones Audecliua et Neutona...cum dignitate et consuetudinibus quas ipse habebat et Amfridum de Monte Gomerii” and other specified properties, by undated charter witnessed by “predictus comes et filia eius Sibilla et G. Vicecomes...[531].  “Amfridus de Monte Gomerii”, who is named in this document, has not otherwise been traced.  Roger was a considerable landowner in England especially in Lancashire but was banished in 1102 with his brother Robert and retired to Poitou[532]Comte de la Marche in 1113, de iure uxoris.  [m firstly ---.  No direct evidence has been found about this possible first marriage.  However, Roger’s daughter Sibylle witnessed the charter which records her father’s foundation of the priory of Lancaster (see above) without any of the donor’s other known children.  This suggests that she was Roger’s oldest and probably only child at the time, possibly born from an earlier marriage.]  m [secondly] (before 1091) ALMODIS de la Marche, daughter of AUDEBERT [II] Comte de la Marche & his wife Ponce --- (-[1117/29]).  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "Boso comes de Marchia" was killed "Confolento castro" in 1091 and was succeeded by "Aumodis soror sua", wife of "Rotgerio comite"[533].  "Rotgerius comes et Almodis comitissa" donated property to the abbey of Charroux by charter dated [1090/1100][534].  She succeeded as Ctss de La Marche in 1098. 

-        COMTES de LA MARCHE

5.         PHILIPPE de Montgommery "Grammaticus" (-Antioch 1099).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[535].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[536].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[537].  Florence of Worcester records that "Philippum Rogeri Scrobbesbyriensis comitis filium" was imprisoned in [1096] for his part in the conspiracy which planned to place his son on the English throne[538].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Philippus” went on pilgrimage [on the First Crusade] with “Rodberto duce” [Robert [III] Duke of Normandy] and died “Antiochiæ[539]m ---.  The name of Philippe's wife is not known.  Philippe & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATHILDE de Montgommery .  Daughter of Philippe, Orderic Vitalis records that she succeeded her paternal aunt as Abbess of Almenèches in 1113[540]

6.         ARNOUL de Montgommery (-after 1119).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[541].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[542].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[543].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[544].  "Arnulf son of earl Roger" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees for the souls of "his father Roger and his brother Hugh who was slain that year" by charter dated 27 Aug 1098[545].  He obtained the comitatus of Pembroke but was apparently not an Earl.  The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo[546].  He was banished from England with his brother Robert[547].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he went to Scotland and was ancestor of the MONTGOMMERIE family in Scotland[548], but the following charter indicates that he was still active in the Maine/Anjou area twenty years later.  “Berlaius de Monasteriolo et Geraudus filius eius, Hernulfus de Monte Gomeri” witnessed the charter dated to [1118/26] which records that “Herbertum de Wircha generum Goffirdi de Asceio” confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Médard de Vernie to Angers Saint-Nicolas by “Goffridus de Asceio et uxor sua filia Willelmi de Verneia[549]m (1102) LAFRACOTH of Munster, daughter of MURTACH O'Brien King of Munster & his wife ---.  She is named daughter "of an Irish king named Murchertach" by Orderic Vitalis[550].  The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Muirchertach Ua Briain made a marriage alliance with the French and with the Norsemen” in 1102[551]

7.         EMMA de Montgommery (-4 Mar 1113).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[552].  Abbess of Almenèches: Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[553].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the abbey was burnt in [1102], she fled to Saint-Evroul, returning the following year and dying about ten years later[554]

8.         MATHILDE de Montgommery (-[1085], bur abbaye de Grestain).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[555].  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[556]m (before 1066) as his first wife, ROBERT Comte de Mortain, son of HERLUIN Vicomte de Contéville & his first wife Herlève --- (after 1038-8 Dec after [1087/91],  bur abbaye de Grestain).

9.         MABILE de Montgommery (-after 1132).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[557].  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[558].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Novocastello nepos et hæres Alberti Ribaldi...gener Rogerii comitis” married "Mabiliam sororem Roberti Belesmensis"[559].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mabilla" daughter (presumably a mistake for wife) of "Rogerum de Montgommeri" and her daughter "alteram Mabillam uxorem Gervasii" and the latter's son "Hugo de Castro novo" whose proposed marriage with the daughter of Henry I King of England was opposed by "Yvo Carnetensis episcopus" on the grounds of consanguinity, his ancestry being explained by Alberic[560].  "Domna Mabilia uxor domni Gervasii de Novo Castello" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/29][561].  "Hugo Castrinovi dominus" confirmed donations to the monastery of Saint-Vincent, with the consent of "uxore mea Alberedi et matre mea senior iam detenta Mabilia et filiis meis Hugone, Gervasio et Galeranno", by charter dated 1132[562]m GERVAISE Seigneur de Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais, son of ---.  "Gervasius miles" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin des Champs with the consent of "Mabilia uxor sua et Hugone primogenito suo" by charter dated [1106/09][563].  "Gervasius et uxor eius Mabilia" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 1107 with the consent of "filiis eorum Hugone, Petro, Gervasio, Guascone et filia Mabilia"[564]

10.      SIBYLLE de Montgommery .  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[565].  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[566], recording in a later passage the marriage ofRodberto...Haimonis filio” and “Sibiliam Rogerii comitis filiam” (although a conclusion about the dating of the event cannot be drawn from the context of the wording)[567]The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that ”Robertum filium Haymonis, dominum de Astramervilla in Normannia” married “Sibillam sororem Roberti de Belismo, comitis Salopiæ[568].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  m firstly ROBERT FitzHamon Lord of Glamorgan, son of HAMON & his wife --- (-Newbury Mar 1107).  m secondly JEAN Sire de Raimes, son of ---.

Earl Roger & his second wife had one child:  

11.      EVERARD de Montgommery (-before [1135/36]).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his first wife, “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” married secondly “Adelaisam Ebrardi de Pusacio...filiam”, by whom he had “unum...filium...Ebrardum...inter regales capellanos usque hodie...in aula Guillelmi et Henrici, Angliæ regum” for about 26 years[569]

Earl Roger had one [Illegitimate] son by an unknown mistress: 

12.       HUGUES de Montgommery .  He witnessed a writ of King Henry I as brother of Robert de Bellême[570].  It is assumed that he was illegitimate as it would be unusual for him to bear the same first name as an older full brother, although there are isolated examples of this practice in other families.  An alternative possibility is that his name was incorrectly recorded in the writ and that he is in fact the same person as one of Robert's other surviving brothers. 

 

 

 

H.      SEIGNEURS de MONTPINÇON

 

 

1.         RAOUL [I] de Montpinçon (-13 Feb ----, bur Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” donated “quinque molendinorum: trium...de Jort...quarti de loco...Hurtavent...et quinti de Monte-Pincionis, duasque garbas decimæ villanorum de Guadreslogiis, medietatemque decimæ de Spanaio, et apud Ermentrudis-Villam duas acras prati” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, and died “Id Feb” and was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations[571]m ADELISA, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations[572].  Raoul [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGUES de Montpinçon (-Rouen 7 Mar ----, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations[573].  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that Hugues died at Rouen “jam sexagenarius...Non Mar” and was buried at Ouche[574]m [as her first husband,] MATHILDE de Grantmesnil, daughter of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelise de Beaumont (-bur Jaffa).  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that the latter was then mourning “sororem...suam Adelinam” who had recently died[575].  She [married secondly] Mathieu ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Mathilde, after the death of her first husband, fell in love with “tironem exulantem Mathiellum” and went with him to Jerusalem, but they both died in the same year, he “in Apulia”, she “Joppe[576].  The text implies that Mathilde and Mathieu did not marry.  Hugues & his wife had three children: 

i)          RAOUL [III] de Montpinçon (-bur Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia[577].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis”, “filii eius: Radulfus et Guillelmus ac Arnulfus” donated property to Ouche[578].  Orderic Vitalis records that Raoul [III] de Montpinçon married “filiam Ranulfi cancellarii regis Henrici” but died soon afterwards and was buried at Ouche[579]m ---, daughter of RANULF Chancellor & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Raoul [III] de Montpinçon married “filiam Ranulfi cancellarii regis Henrici” but died soon afterwards and was buried at Ouche[580]

ii)         GUILLAUME de Montpinçon .  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis”, “filii eius: Radulfus et Guillelmus ac Arnulfus” donated property to Ouche, and that Guillaume inherited “patrium jus in Normannia” after the death of his brother Raoul [III][581].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ricardus…Basset" held "parvo feudo" in "Mosterolo" {Montreuil-au-Houlme, Orne, arr. Argentan, canton Briouze} which his father had obtained in Normandy, when reporting that Guillaume de Montpinçon took the castle as a base against the Angevins (dated to 1136)[582]

iii)        ARNOUL de Montpinçon .  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis”, “filii eius: Radulfus et Guillelmus ac Arnulfus” donated property to Ouche, adding that Arnoul went to Apulia on the expedition of “Guillelmi de Grentemaisnil avunculi sui”[583]

b)         RAOUL [II] de Montpinçon .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations, adding that Raoul [II] died “in via Jerusalem peregrinus[584]

 

 

 

I.        SEIGNEURS de MOULINS-la-MARCHE

 

 

1.         GUITMUND de Moulins .  Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche.  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "Guillelmi comitis, Guillelmi filii Osberti, Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[585]m EMMA, daughter of ---.  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[586].  Guitmund & his wife had nine children: 

a)         RAOUL de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[587]

b)         ROBERT de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[588]

c)         ANTOINE de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[589]

d)         GUITMUND de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[590]

e)         HUGUES de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[591]

f)          ALAIN de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[592]

g)         GUILLAUME de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[593]

h)         TORESGAUD de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[594]

i)          ALBREDA de Moulins .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married "Albereda Guidmundi filia (ex cujus patrimonio erat)" but divorced her on grounds of consanguinity[595].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[596]m (divorced) as his first wife, GUILLAUME, son of GAUTHIER de Falaise & his wife --- (-19 Oct [1100], bur Saint-Evroul).  Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, de iure uxoris

 

 

1.         GAUTHIER de Falaisem ---.  The name of Gauthier´s wife is not known.  Gauthier & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-19 Oct [1100], bur Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus [de Molinis]" was the son of "Gaulterii de Falesia", adding that he obtained "honore Molinensi" by his marriage[597]Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, de iure uxoris.  Orderic Vitalis records the rebellion of Robert, son of King William I, and his departure from Normandy accompanied by “Rodbertus de Bellismo et Guillelmus de Britolio, Rogerius Ricardi de Benefacta filius, Rodbertus de Molbraio et Guillelmus de Molinis, Guillelmus de Ruperia”, dated to [1077/78], and their journeys during five years of exile[598].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[599].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis" donated "ecclesiam de Maheru…in castro…de Molinis…ecclesiam S. Laurentii" to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Albreda uxore sua", undated[600].  Orderic Vitalis records the death "in castro suo XIV Kal Nov" of "Guillelmus [de Molinis]", and his burial "in capitulo Uticensi"[601]m firstly (divorced) ALBREDA de Moulins, daughter of GUITMUND de Moulins & his wife Emma ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married "Albereda Guidmundi filia (ex cujus patrimonio erat)" but divorced her on grounds of consanguinity[602].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[603]m secondly DODA de Meulan, daughter of GALERAN [III] Comte de Meulan & his [first/second wife Oda ---/Adelais ---].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married secondly "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[604].  Guillaume & first wife had two children: 

i)          GUILLAUME de Moulins-la-MarcheOrderic Vitalis names "Guillelmum et Rodbertum" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis" and his wife "Albereda Guidmundi filia"[605].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[606].  Guillaume presumably died young as a later passage records that his brother Robert succeeded their father. 

ii)         ROBERT de Moulins-la-Marche (-after [1120/25]).  Orderic Vitalis names "Guillelmum et Rodbertum" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis" and his wife "Albereda Guidmundi filia"[607].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[608]Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus…filius eius" confirmed his parents´ donations to Saint-Evroul after succeeding his father[609].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after holding his father´s honor for 15 years, Robert attacked "Engerrannum cognomento Oisonem" [Enguerrand l'Oison], was banished from Normandy by Henry I King of England, and left with his recently married wife for Apulia, where he died wandering several years[610]m ([1115]) AGNES de Grantmesnil, daughter of ROBERT de Grantmesnil & his [first/second wife Emma d´Estouteville/Lucy de Beaumont].  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert had recently married "Agnete filia Rodberti de Gretemaisnilio" when he was banished from Normandy by Henry I King of England, and left with her for Apulia[611].  The chronology suggests that she was born either from her father´s first or second marriage. 

Guillaume & his second wife had two children: 

iii)        SIMON de Moulins-la-Marche (-[1119/29])Orderic Vitalis names "Simonem et Hugonem" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" and his second wife "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[612]Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after succeeding his brother, Simon confirmed his predecessors´ donations to saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Adelina conjuge sua"[613].  Orderic Vitalis records that Henry II King of England installed "Radulfus Rufus et Simon de Molinis" at Evreux after capturing the castle, dated to 1119[614]m as her first husband, ADELISE de Montfort, daughter of HUGUES [III] Seigneur de Montfort-en-Risle & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after succeeding his brother, Simon confirmed his predecessors´ donations to saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Adelina conjuge sua"[615].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  She married secondly (before 1130) Robert de Vere, who was Constable of England in 1142.  “Robertus de Ver constabularius regis Angliæ et Adeluda filia Hugonis de Monteforte uxor mea” donated property to Monks Horton by charter dated to [1140/44] witnessed by “Gaufrido de Ver et Roberto fratre suo...[616]

iv)       HUGUES de Moulins-la-MarcheOrderic Vitalis names "Simonem et Hugonem" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" and his second wife "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[617]

 

 

 

I.        SEIGNEURS de PONT-ECHANFREY

 

 

1.         WALKELIN de Pont-Echanfrey, son of --- .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[618]m ([1020/30]) EREMBURGE, daughter of GIROIE & his wife Gisla de Montfort-sur-Risle.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[619].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that “primogenita...filiarum Heremburgis” married “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi” by whom she had “Willelmus et Radulfus” who later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[620].  As the second marriage of her younger sister Hawise can be dated to [1040], and because Hawise had six children by her first marriage, it is likely that Eremburge married much earlier, say in [1020/30].  If that is correct, she must have been one of the older children of her parents.  Walkelin & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Pont-Echanfrey .  Orderic Vitalis names “Willelmus et Radulfus” as the sons of “primogenita...filiarum [Geroii] Heremburgis” and her husband “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that they later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[621]m POTARFRANDA, daughter of ODERISIO [II] Conte di Marsi & his wife ---.  Amatus names "Potarfranda" as sister of Bishop Atto who had promised her in marriage to "William's [=Guillaume de Montreuil] nephew who was called Mostrarole"[622]

b)         RAOUL [I] de Pont-EchanfreyOrderic Vitalis names “Willelmus et Radulfus” as the sons of “primogenita...filiarum [Geroii] Heremburgis” and her husband “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that they later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[623]

 

 

1.         RAOUL [II] de Pont-Echanfrey (-after 1130).  The chronology suggests that Raoul [II] de Pont-Echanfrey was not the same person as Raoul [I].  He may have been his grandson.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de ponte Erchenfr" in Surrey[624].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Ponte Erchenfr et Richelda uxor sua" in Norfolk[625]m RICHILDE, daughter of --- (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Ponte Erchenfr et Richelda uxor sua" in Norfolk[626]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    ARQUES

 

 

A.      VICOMTES d´ARQUES, SEIGNEURS de LONGUEVILLE (GIFFARD)

 

 

The pagus Tellau (Talou), within the episcopal diocese of Rouen, was located north-east of Rouen and was bordered by the pagus Vimnau (Vimeu) to the north-east, the sea to the north-west, the pagus Caletensis (Caux) to the west, and the pagus Rotomagensis to the south-east[627].  The county of Talou was granted in the mid-11th century by Duke Guillaume II to his uncle Guillaume, who transformed the territory into the county of Arques after constructing the castle of that name on his land, although no further counts are recorded as he died childless.  It is assumed that after that time the nobility in the territory of the former county were direct vassals of the dukes of Normandy. 

 

 

Three brothers, parents unknown, but their names suggest a Viking origin: 

1.         OSBERN de Bolbec, son of --- (-bur [Saint-Etienne de Fontaines]).  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1026], subscribed by "…Osbernus frater comitisse, Hunfredus frater eius…"[628].  It is assumed that "comitisse" in this document refers to Gunnor, wife of Richard [II] Duke of Normandy, and that "frater comitisse" should be interpreted as "brother-in-law".  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Osbernus Giffardus, Haduisa eius conjunx" among the deceased at "sancti Stephani Fontanensis", presumably indicating that they were buried there[629].  It is assumed that "Osbernus Giffardus" refers to Osbern de Bolbec given that his son used the name Giffard.  “...Osbernus avunculus comitis, Walterius fr. eius...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][630]m [firstly] [AVELINE], sister of GUNNORA [mistress of Richard I Duke of Normandy], daughter of ---.  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[631].  She and her three sisters, as well as their husbands, are named by Robert de Torigny[632].  On the other hand, the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Turketillus…frater…Turulphi, cuius filius Hasculfus d´Harcourt” married “aliam sororem…comitissæ Gunnoræ” by whom he was father of “duos…filios…Walterum de Giffard primogenitum…[633].  As noted below, another primary source indicates that the wife of "Osbernus Giffardus" (assumed to refer to Osbern de Bolbec given that his son used the name Giffard) was named Hawise[634].  It is not known whether Osbern was married twice or whether all the sources cited refer to the same person, one or other mistaking the name.  [m secondly HAWISE, daughter of --- (-bur [Saint-Etienne de Fontaines]).  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Osbernus Giffardus, Haduisa eius conjunx" among the deceased at "sancti Stephani Fontanensis", presumably indicating that they were buried there[635].  It is supposed that "Osbernus Giffardus" refers to Osbern de Bolbec, given that his son used the name Giffard.  If this is correct, Hawise was presumably his second wife, unless "Aveline" is an error for "Hawise" in Guillaume de Jumièges and Robert de Torigny which names Osbern´s supposed first wife.  Osbern & his [first/second] wife had four children: 

a)         GAUTHIER Giffard (-before 1085).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[636].  “...Walterius Gyfardus...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][637].  Seigneur de Longueville, Normandy.  "…Walterius Giffardus…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[638].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Waltero Giffardo" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[639].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Galterius Giphardus et Radulphus Toenites...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[640].  He received grants of 107 lordships (48 in Buckinghamshire) as his reward[641].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[642].  Orderic Vitalis states that the king "gave [Walter Giffard] the county of Buckinghamshire", in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[643]m ERMENGARDE, daughter of GERARD Flaitel & his wife ---.  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli[644].  [The necrology of Longueville records the death 13 May of “domina Hermengauda comitissa condam hujus loci” and her confirmation of the donation made by “illos de Saukervilla” of “molendino de Longa Villa[645].  It is not certain whether this entry refers to the wife of Gauthier Giffard or to the wife of his grandson Walter Giffard.]  Gauthier & his wife had [five or more] children: 

i)          WALTER Giffard (-in England 15 Jul 1102, bur Longueville, Normandy[646]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum...[647].  He succeeded his father in his lands.  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Buchingeham" to "Gualterio...cognomento Gifardo"[648].  Domesday Book records land held by “Walter Giffard” in West Hanney in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire[649]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Aucensium comes et Gauterius Gifardus et Radulfus de Mortuomari” and nearly all the seigneurs who lived “trans Sequanam usque ad mare” joined King William II against his brother Robert Duke of Normandy and received considerable sums to fortify their castles, dated to [1089/90][650]He was created Earl of Buckingham [after 1093] by King William II, although known contemporarily as Earl Giffard[651]

-         EARLS of BUCKINGHAM

ii)         WILLIAM Giffard .  Bishop of Winchester.  The History of the foundation of St John´s abbey, Colchester names “Rohaisam…soror Willielmi Giffardi episcopi Wintoniæ” as wife of “Ricardi…filius Gilberti comitis[652].  "…Willelmi Giffardi episcopi…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[653]

iii)        ROHESE Giffard (-after 1113, bur [Colchester]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum et filias plures” of whom “una...Rohais” married “Richardo filio comitis Gisleberti[654].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gisleberti comitis [filium] Ricardum” married “Roaldem Gualterii Gifardi filiam[655].  Domesday Book records “Rohais wife of Richard son of Gilbert” holding Standon in Braughing Hundred in Hertfordshire[656].  According to the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, ”Rohesia” married secondly “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normanniæ” after the death of “Ricardo filio comitis Gisleberti” and that they were both buried “tempore Henrici primi” in “castrum Clecestriæ…cœnobio in honore sancti Johannis” which Eudo constructed[657].  According to the Complete Peerage, this genealogy is “probably erroneous” but it does not explain the basis for the doubts[658].  From a chronological point of view, the connection would be tight, assuming that the death date of Richard FitzGilbert is correctly estimated to [1090] and the birth of Rohese´s granddaughter by her alleged second marriage, Beatrix, is correctly assessed at [1105].  This supposed second parentage is disproved by sources quoted in the section dealing with Eudes de Rie.  m [firstly] RICHARD FitzGilbert de Brionne, son of GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" Comte d'Eu & his wife --- (before 1035-[1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire).  [Incorrect supposed second marriage: m secondly EUDES de Rie dapifer, son of HUBERT [I] de Rie & his wife ---(-1 Mar 1120, bur Colchester).] 

iv)       daughters .  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum et filias plures” of whom “una...Rohais” married “Richardo filio comitis Gisleberti[659]

v)        [AMFRIDA (-2 Jan [1099/1100]).  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "tempore S. Anselmi abbatis Becci tres matronæ nobiles…Basilia uxor Hugonis de Gornaco, et Amfrida neptis ipsius Basiliæ, et Eva uxor Guillelmi Crispini" entered Bec and lived at the abbey, adding that they died on three consecutive Sundays "Amfrida Basiliæ neptis...minor...ætate, virgo…IV Non Jan, qua sepulta…Basilia domina eius…XVII Kal Feb…tertia Eva…X Kal Feb...post mortem...viri sui Guillermi Crispini...Beccique usque ad finem vitæ...perseuerauit"[660].  Gurney dates the passage to [1099/1100][661].  The parentage of Amfrida is uncertain.  However, Ermengarde is the only sibling of Basilie Flaitel who is known to have had children, so it is possible that she was the daughter of Gauthier Giffard.] 

b)         GODEFROI Giffard .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[662]Vicomte d'Arques, which he presumably inherited from his father-in-law  “Willelmus...comes filius...Ricardi Normannorum quondam ducis” restored “insulam in fluvio magno Secane...Belcinaca...ecclesias eciam Vatheuille et Brotonii” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1032/47], subscribed by “Godofredi vicecomitis, comitis, Walterus filius, Lambertus, Willelmus, Osbernus[663]m --- de Rouen, daughter of GOZELIN Vicomte de Rouen et d´Arques & his wife Emmeline ---.  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1080 which relates that "Gozelinus vicecomes de Archis…cum coniuge sua et filiis" founded Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and donated property, and that "Willelmus de Archis heres defuncti…avi sui Gozelini" confirmed the donation[664].  "Grandfather" must be "maternal grandfather" as the paternal ancestors of Guillaume d'Arques are confirmed by Guillaume de Jumièges (see above and below).  Godefroi & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          GUILLAUME d'Arques (-[1090]).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[665].  "Guillelmus et Gislebertus filii Godefredi Archarum vicecomitis" donated land in Montvilla to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1059[666]Vicomte d'Arques.  Lord of Folkestone[667].  A charter dated 1080 relates that "Gozelinus vicecomes de Archis…cum coniuge sua et filiis" founded Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and donated property, and that "Willelmus de Archis heres defuncti…avi sui Gozelini" confirmed the donation[668].  [Orderic Vitalis records “Edgarus Adelinus et Robertus Belesmensis atque Guillelmus de Archis monachus Molismensis” as the advisers of Robert [III] Duke of Normandy, dated to [1089][669].  It is possible that the third named person was Guillaume Vicomte d´Arques but no other record has been found that he became a monk at Molesme in Burgundy before he died.]  m BEATRIX Malet, daughter of GUILLAUME [I] Malet & his wife Esilia [Crespin].  “Beatrix soror Roberti Malet” donated property to Eye priory, for the souls of “fratrum meorum Roberti Maleth et Gilberti Malet”, by undated charter[670].  Brown indicates that Beatrix donated Redlingfield to Eye by undated charter which confirms her as husband of "William vicomte of Arques"[671].  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "Beatrix post mortem domini sui Willielmi de Archis" of "terram dotis suæ de Newenton" by undated charter[672].  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

(a)       MATHILDE d'Arques .  Guillaume de Jumièges records "Mathildis" as the daughter of “Willelmi de Archis”, adding that she married “Willelmus camerarius de Tancarvilla” by whom she had “filium Rabellum qui ei successit[673]m GUILLAUME [I] de Tancarville, son of RAOUL [I] de Tancarville & his wife Avicia --- (-1129). 

(b)       EMMA d'Arques (-after 1140).  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[674].  “Manasses Gisnensis comes et Emma uxor eius…filia Willielmi de Arras” founded Redlingfield priory by charter dated 1120, witnessed by “Widonis fratris mei, Rosæ filiæ meæ[675].  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium names "Emmam filiam Roberti camerarii de Tancarvilla in Normannia, viduam Odonis de Folkestane in Anglia" as wife of "Manasses"[676], which appears to be incorrect.  "Manasses Gisnensium comes et Emma comitissa" granted the administration of the church of Saint-Léonard to Saint-Bertin by charter dated 1129[677].  According to Domesday Descendants she became a nun at Saint-Leonard de Guines after the death of her second husband[678]m firstly NELE de Muneville, son of --- (-1103).  Lord of Folkestone.  m secondly (before 1106) MANASSES Comte de Guines, son of BAUDOUIN Comte de Guines & his wife Adela [Christina] [of Holland] (-Ardres 1137).  Emma & her first husband had one child: 

(1)       MATHILDE de Muneville .  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[679]m RUALON d´Avranches, son of --- (-[1130/34]). 

ii)         GISELBERT d'Arques (-after 1059).  "Guillelmus et Gislebertus filii Godefredi Archarum vicecomitis" donated land in Montvilla to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1059[680]

iii)        [OSBERN d'Arques .  He is named in Europäische Stammtafeln[681] as possible son of Godefroi Giffard but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  Domesday Book records “Osbern d´Arques” holding numerous properties in Yorkshire[682].]  m ---.  The name of Osbern's wife is not known.  Osbern & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       GUILLAUME .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

(b)       GISELBERT (-1112).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Guillelmo Ebroicensium episcopo”, “Balduinus ducis capellanus” was appointed and was bishop for seven years, dated to 1070, and was in turn succeeded by “Gislebertus Osberni filius canonicus et archidiaconus Lexoviensis” who was bishop for more than 30 years[683]Bishop of Evreux [684]

c)         [JOSCELINE de Bolbec .  Josceline and her marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[685].  This is presumably based on Robert de Torigny, continuation of William of Jumièges[686], the unreliability of this part of whose chronicle is discussed in the Complete Peerage[687].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quintam” married “Hugo de Monte-gummerici” by whom she had “Rogerius pater Roberti de Bellismo[688].  There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct as Osbern de Bolbec´s wife and Hugues de Montgommery´s mother would have been first cousins.]  m HUGUES de Montgommery Vicomte d'Hiémois, son of ROGER I Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-killed in battle 7 Feb [1035/before 1048], bur Troarn). 

2.         HUNFRED .  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1026], subscribed by "…Osbernus frater comitisse, Hunfredus frater eius…"[689]

3.         GAUTHIER .  “...Osbernus avunculus comitis, Walterius fr. eius...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][690]

 

 

 

B.      FLAITEL

 

 

1.         GERARD Flaitel (-[1047]).  “Ricardus princeps et dux Normannorum, filius Ricardi seniroris” donated “villam...Fontes in Braio...Brendelcurt cum ecclesia...æcclesiam de Nouobosco, æcclesiam de Bosmesnil...” to Saint-Wandrille, at the request of “Yvonis...militis”, by charter dated to [1024], subscribed by “Riccardi principis Normannorum, Papie comitisse, Roberti archipresulis fratris eiusdem principis, Yvonis militis...Hugonis Baiocensis episcopi, Girardi Flagitelli...[691].  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[692]m ---, daughter of ---.  The name of Gérard´s wife is not known.  The wife of Gérard Flaitel may have been the sister of Radbod Bishop of Sées: Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus Radbodi Sagiensis episcopi filius...consobrinus Guillelmi præsulis Ebroicensium, filii Girardi Fleitelli” succeeded Lanfranc “in Cadomensi ecclesia” when the latter was appointed archbishop of Canterbury, dated to 1070, adding that Gullaume was appointed archbishop of Rouen nine years later[693].  Gérard & his wife had [seven] children: 

a)         GUILLAUME Flaitel (-1066).  Orderic Vitalis names "…Willermus episcopus Ebroicensis, filius Gerardi Fleitelli…" among the subscribers of a charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy dated to [1050][694]Bishop of Evreux 1046.  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[695].  "Willelmus…Ebrocassine civitatis episcopus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Wandrille, in memory of "patris mei Girardi" and for the souls of "fratrum meorum", by undated charter[696].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Guillelmo Ebroicensium episcopo”, “Balduinus ducis capellanus” was appointed and was bishop for seven years, dated to 1070, and was in turn succeeded by “Gislebertus Osberni filius canonicus et archidiaconus Lexoviensis” who was bishop for more than 30 years[697]

b)         ANSCHER Flaitel (-after [1047]).  “...Anscherius filius Gerardi Flagitel...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][698].  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[699]

c)         ROBERT Flaitel (-after [1047]).  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[700]

d)         [son[s]  (-[after 1047]).  "Willelmus…Ebrocassine civitatis episcopus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Wandrille, in memory of "patris mei Girardi" and for the souls of "fratrum meorum", by undated charter[701].] 

e)         [ALBERT .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Avesgotus” invaded “Cambeiam super Albertum Girardi Fleitelli filium”, after Ives Bishop of Seés had expelled Avesgod and his brothers from the church of Saint-Gervais, and was killed[702].  It is not known whether “Albertum” in this passage represents an error for one of the other sons of Gérard Flaitel who are named above.  No other reference to Albert has been found.] 

f)          ERMENGARDE .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli[703].  [The necrology of Longueville records the death 13 May of “domina Hermengauda comitissa condam hujus loci” and her confirmation of the donation made by “illos de Saukervilla” of “molendino de Longa Villa[704].  It is not certain whether this entry refers to the wife of Gauthier Giffard or to the wife of his son Walter Giffard.]  m GAUTHIER Giffard, son of OSBERN de Bolbec & his [first/second wife [Aveline] ---/Hawise ---] (-before 1085). 

g)         BASILIE (-16 Jan [1099/1100]).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli” and that “alteram...Basiliam relictam Rodulphi de Waceio” married [secondly] “Hugo de Gornaco[705].  "Domino meo Hugone Gurnacensi et filio eius Girardo et uxore eius Basilia" consented to the donation by "Radulfus cognomine Havoth" to Jumièges by charter dated to [1040][706], although presumably the document is misdated.  Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury wrote to "Basiliæ amicæ Filiæ in Domino", dated to after 1093[707].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "tempore S. Anselmi abbatis Becci tres matronæ nobiles…Basilia uxor Hugonis de Gornaco, et Amfrida neptis ipsius Basiliæ, et Eva uxor Guillelmi Crispini" entered Bec and lived at the abbey, adding that they died on three consecutive Sundays "Amfrida Basiliæ neptis...minor...ætate, virgo…IV Non Jan, qua sepulta…Basilia domina eius…XVII Kal Feb…tertia Eva…X Kal Feb...post mortem...viri sui Guillermi Crispini...Beccique usque ad finem vitæ...perseuerauit"[708].  Gurney dates the passage to [1099/1100][709].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Hugonis de Gornaco et Girardi filii…Girardi de Gornaio et Basilie matris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][710]m firstly RAOUL de Gacé, son of ROBERT Comte d'Evreux Archbishop of Rouen [Normandy] & his mistress Herleva --- (-1051).  m secondly HUGUES [III] Seigneur de Gournay, son of --- (- [1093]). 

 

 

1.         ROBERT Flaitel .  His precise relationship with “domnus Stephanus de Haimonis Villa avunculus eius”, whose donation to Chartres Saint-Père was confirmed by [his son] "Philippus filius Roberti Flagelli nepos domni Nivelonis" by charter dated to [1101/29][711], has not yet been ascertained.  "...Robertus Flagellum..." witnessed the undated charter, placed in the cartulary among charters dated to the early 12th century, under which “Hugo filius Balduini” settled a dispute with Saint-Père de Chartres[712]m --- de Fréteval, daughter of [FOUCHER Seigneur de Fréteval & his wife Hildeburge Goët].  Her parentage is indicated and her marriage confirmed by the charter dated to [1101/29] under which [her son] "Philippus filius Roberti Flagelli nepos domni Nivelonis" settled a dispute with Saint-Père de Chartres concerning “decime Haimonis Ville” and confirmed a donation of land made by “domnus Stephanus de Haimonis Villa avunculus eius[713].  It is not known whether this person was the same as one of the named daughters of Foucher de Fréteval who are shown in the document CENTRAL FRANCE NOBILITY.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         PHILIPPE (-after 1119).  "Philippus filius Roberti Flagelli nepos domni Nivelonis" settled a dispute with Saint-Père de Chartres concerning “decime Haimonis Ville” and confirmed a donation of land made by “domnus Stephanus de Haimonis Villa avunculus eius” by charter dated to [1101/29][714].  "Roscelinus nepos Nivelonis, Fulcherius frater Roscelini, Philippus nepos Nivelonis" witnessed the charter dated 1119 recording an agreement between the monks of "Majoris Monasterii" and "Nivelonem de Fracte Valle"[715]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    AUMÂLE

 

 

A.      SIRES d'AUMÂLE

 

 

The lordship of Aumâle was located in the extreme north-eastern corner of the duchy of Normandy, just south of the county of Eu, centred on the town of Aumâle on the river Bresle.  It passed to the family of the Comtes de Ponthieu following the marriage of Berthe, heiress of Aumâle, to Hugues de Ponthieu.  Their son Enguerrand was Sire d'Aumâle as well as Comte de Montreuil.  On his death in 1053, his widow Adelais, illegitimate daughter of Robert II Duke of Normandy, styled herself as countess, but applied the title to the territory of Aumâle rather than Montreuil, apparently without any formal regrant.  Adelais brought the new “county” to her third husband Eudes Comte de Troyes, who was disinherited of his paternal inheritance and sought refuge in Normandy where he and his descendants were accepted as counts of Aumâle as vassals of the dukes.  The king of France captured the castle of Aumâle in 1196, and awarded the title to Renaud de Dammartin Comte de Boulogne in Dec 1204. 

 

 

1.         GUERINFRID, son of ---.  Sire d'Aumâle.  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d´Auchy narrates the church´s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum” and “Addelidis comitissa supradicti Engueranni et supradicte Adelidis filia…Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[716]m ---.  The name of Guerinfrid's wife is not known.  Guerinfrid & his wife had one child: 

a)         BERTHE d'Aumâle .  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d´Auchy narrates the church´s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[717]m HUGUES [de Ponthieu], son of ENGUERRAND Comte [de Ponthieu] & his first wife --- (-killed 20 Nov 1052, bur Saint-Riquier).  Comte de Montreuil.  Their children inherited Aumâle. 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d'AUMÂLE (BLOIS-CHAMPAGNE)

 

 

EUDES de Troyes, son of ETIENNE I Comte de Troyes [Blois] & his wife Adela --- (-after [1115/18]).  "Odo puer nepos comiti Tethberti" witnessed a charter dated to [6 Dec 1047/31 Aug 1055] under which the canons of St Maurice d'Angers temporarily relinquished certain rights in the church of Joué[718].  He succeeded his father in [1048] as Comte de Troyes.  He succeeded as Comte d’Aumâle, de iure uxoris.  He was disinherited before 1071 and sought refuge in Normandy.  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[719].  He was granted the lordship of Holderness in [1087] by William I King of England, following the forfeiture of Drogo de La Beuvrière[720].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “manerium Horneshay et ecclesiam…et Marram eius piscaturam et Thorp ibi juxta” by “Odo comes et Stephanus filius eius[721]Orderic Vitalis records that “primus Normannorum Stephanus de Albamarla filius Odonis Campaniæ comitis” fortified “castellum suum super Aucium flumen” at the expense of William II King of England and placed there a garrison against “ducem” [Robert III Duke of Normandy], dated to [1089/90][722]Florence of Worcester records that "comitem Odonem de Campania…Stephani patrem" was imprisoned in [1096] for his part in the conspiracy which planned to place his son on the English throne[723].  He lost the lordship of Holderness.  Albert of Aix names "…Stephanus de Albemarla filius Udonis comitis de Campania…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[724].  "…Stephanus de Albamarla…" subscribed a charter dated 8 Aug 1111 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the episcopate of Somerset at Bath[725].  He is referred to as “comes Odo” in the Lindsey survey 1115/18. 

m ([1060]) as her third husband, ADELAIS de Normandie, widow firstly of ENGUERRAND [II] Comte de Montreuil Sire d’Aumâle and secondly of LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens, illegitimate daughter of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- (-[1082/84]).  Robert de Torigny names "Aeliz" as the daughter of Duke Robert II "de alia concubina" from Herleve[726].  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d´Auchy names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[727].  She retained the title Comtesse d'Aumâle after her first marriage.  Her second marriage is deduced from the same charter of Saint-Martin d´Auchy which also names “Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[728].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[729].  William I King of England donated various properties to the abbey of La Trinité de Caen, including "burgum de Hulmo" with the consent of "Adelisa amita mea…cujus hereditas erat sed et comitissa A. de Albamarla…in vita sua", by charter dated 1082[730]

Comte Eudes III & his wife had one child:

1.         ETIENNE de Troyes (before 1070-before 1130, maybe [1127]).  Albert of Aix names "Stephanus de Albemarla filius Udonis comitis de Campania" among those present with Adhémar Bishop of Le Puy on the First Crusade[731].  He succeeded his mother in [1082/84] as Comte d’Aumâle.  Florence of Worcester records that "Northymbrensis comes Rotbertus de Mulbrei et Willelmus de Owe" conspired against William II King of England in [1095], planning to place "filium amitæ illius Stephanus de Albamarno" on the English throne[732].  "Stephanus comes de Alba marla" donated "ecclesiam S. Martini de Alciaco" to the monks of Beauvais Saint Lucien, naming "mater mea Adelidis comitissa", by charter dated 14 Jul 1096[733].  William of Tyre names Etienne Comte d'Albemarle among those who left on the First Crusade in 1096 with Robert Count of Flanders[734].  He was granted the lordship of Holderness in 1102.  Orderic Vitalis reports that he supported Baudouin VII Count of Flanders and Guillaume "Clito" de Normandie against Henry I King of England in 1118[735].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “manerium Horneshay et ecclesiam…et Marram eius piscaturam et Thorp ibi juxta” by “Odo comes et Stephanus filius eius” and of “Fulfordam…” by “Stephanus (de Albemarla)[736].  “Stephanus, Albermarlensis comes” founded Saint-Martin, Aumâle by undated charter which names “mater mea Adeliza…Willielmi regis Angliæ avunculi mei[737]m (before [1100]) HAWISE de Mortimer, daughter of RALPH [I] de Mortimer of Wigmore, Herefordshire & his first wife Mélisende --- (before 1088[738]-).  "Stephen count of Aumâle" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Paris with the consent of "Hauisa his wife and her father Ralf de Mortuomari" for the souls of "…Milesenda his wife deceased" by charter dated to [1100][739].  Comte Etienne & his wife had [seven] children:

a)         GUILLAUME "le Gros" d'Aumâle (-20 Aug 1179, Abbey of Thornton, co Lincoln).  A manuscript genealogy of the Comtes d´Aumâle names “Willielmus le Groos” as son of “Stephani filii Odonis[740].  He succeeded his father as Comte d’Aumâle, Lord of Holderness.  "…Waleranni comitis de Mellent, Willielmi de Albemara, Simonis de Silvanecta…" witnessed the charter dated Easter 1136 under which Stephen King of England granted the manor of Bishop´s Sutton, Hampshire to Winchester cathedral[741].  “Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” founded Melsa Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hingeram”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hingeram fratre comitis[742].  Richard Prior of Hexham´s De Gestis Regis Stephani et de Bello Standardii records that King Stephen created "Willelmum de Albamarla" as "in Eboracensi…[comes]" after the battle of the Standard in Aug 1138[743].  The continuator of Simeon of Durham names "Willemus de Albamarla comes…" as the leaders of the English contingent at the battle of the Standard[744].  "Willelmo comite Ebor[aci]…" witnessed the charter dated to [1138/43] under which Stephen King of England granted Furness Abbey, Lancashire to Savigny abbey[745].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Thornton Abbey records that it was founded in 1139 by “Willielmus Grose comes Albermarliæ”, and that “cognati sui Wallevi, prioris de Kyrkham…fratris Simonis comitis Northamtoniæ” arranged the arrival of the first monks[746].  The relationship between the two was through Judith de Lens, maternal grandmother of Waltheof, who was uterine sister of Guillaume´s father.  "…W[illelmo] com[ite] de Albarm[arla]…" witnessed the charter dated Christmas 1141 under which Stephen King of England granted property to "Gauf[edo] comiti de Essexa"[747].  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire, records that the abbey was founded by "Willielmus le Gros…comes Albemarliæ et dominus de Holdernesse" adding that he was "quasi dominus totius provinciæ Eboracensis"[748].  "Willelmus comes Albemarlie" confirmed donations to St Bees, for the souls of "…antecessorum uxoris mee Cecilie", by undated charter[749].  Benedict of Peterborough records the death in 1179 of "Willelmus comes Albemarliæ" and his burial "in abbatia sua de Tornetuna"[750].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Thornton Abbey records the death “XIII Kal Sep” in 1180 of “comes et…monasteriorum fundator Willielmus Grose[751]m CICELY Lady of Skipton, daughter of WILLIAM FitzDuncan of Scotland & his second wife Alice Lady of Skipton (-before 1190).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “prima…Cecilia…secunda Amabilla…tertia Alicia” as the three daughters of “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, and his wife Alice, adding that Cicely received the honor of Skipton and married “Willielmo le Grossus comiti Albemarliæ[752].  "Willelmus comes Albemarlie" confirmed donations to St Bees, for the souls of "…antecessorum uxoris mee Cecilie", by undated charter[753].  "Cecilia comitissa Albamarlie" donated land "inter Esc et Duden…Kirkesantan et Haverigg…et Thueites" to St Bees, and confirmed the donation of "ecclesia de Gosford" made by "W[illelmi] fratris mei", by undated charter[754].  Comte Guillaume & his wife had [two] children:

i)          HAWISE d'Aumâle (-11 Mar 1214).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[755].  The Chronicle of Meaux names "Hawisiam" as the only daughter of "Willielmus le Groos" and his wife "Ceciliam…filiam Willielmi filii Dunnekan", adding that she married firstly "Willielmo de Mandavilla", secondly "Baldewino de Betoyn comiti Insulæ", and thirdly "Willielmum de Fortibus primum"[756].  She succeeded her father in 1179 as Ctss d’Aumâle and Lady of Holderness.  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus comes de Magnavilla" and "filia Willermi comitis Albæ Marlæ" together with the county of Aumâle in 1179[757].  Ralph de Diceto records that "Willelmus de Magna-villa comes Essexiæ" married "Hadewisam comtis Albimarlæ primogenitam…apud Pleizet in Essexia XIX Kal Feb" in 1180 and was granted his father-in-law´s county[758].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[759].  "Ric de Luci fil Reginaldi de Luci" paid a fine for "terra sua de Copland et in Cautebige" relating to a claim against "B. com Albemarl et uxore sua et versus Rob de Curtenay et Alic uxorem suam", dated 1200[760].  “Hawisia comitissa Albemarlæ” donated property to Garendon Abbey, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi de Mandevill comitis Essex”, by undated charter which refers to “post mortem domini mei Baldewini de Betunia…Willielmi comitis Albemarle patris mei[761].  The necrology of Choques records the death “V Id Mar” of “Hadwidis comitissa Albæmarlæ[762]m firstly (Pleshy, Essex 14 Jan 1180) WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex, son of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex & his wife Rohese de Vere (-[Rouen/Gisors/Le Vaudreuil] Normandy 14 Nov 1189, bur Abbey of Mortemer).  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in 1180, de iure uxorism secondly (after 3 Jul 1190) GUILLAUME de Forz, son of --- (-1195).  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle, de iure uxorism thirdly (before Jul 1196) BAUDOUIN de Béthune Seigneur de Choques [en-Artois], son of ROBERT [V] “le Roux” Seigneur de Béthune & his wife Adelaide --- (-Burstwick, Holderness 13 or 14 Oct 1212, bur Abbey of Meaux[763]).  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in [1195/96], de iure uxoris

ii)         [AMICE .  By order dated 4 Nov 1278, "John de Aston" relinquished his claim, in return for four knights´ fees, to "his right in the earldom of Albemarle and in all the lands in England that at any time belonged to Alina de Fortibus, John de Fortibus, Thomas de Fortibus, William de Fortibus, and William le Gros sometime earl of Albemarle and to Hawisia his daughter" and "with all the right of Amice, Constance and Ranulph, John´s ancestors, and of others his and their ancestors, both in England and in Normandy"[764].  The Complete Peerage states that "John d´Eston [Eshton, Yorkshire]" claimed descent from "Avice, daughter as he averred" of Guillaume "le Gros" Comte d´Aumâle[765].  The order dated 4 Nov 1278 indicates his descent, presumably through Constance, supposed daughter of Amice, and Ranulph, supposed son of Constance (although these relationships are not specified in the order).  No indication has been found of the identity of the supposed husbands of Amice or of her supposed daughter Constance.  Sir C. G. Young suggested that the whole claim by John de Ashton was a fiction to give the king "a colourable pretence for retaining the honour in his own hands, as by admitting the fictitious claim, and then purchasing it from him, he shut out the real claim that might have been justly made by Wivelby (see below)"[766].  Young also points out that, if the claim had been valid, John de Ashton would have been the heir to all the honour of Albemarle and all the lands in Craven which were inherited from Amice´s supposed mother, and that it seems incredible that he would have relinquished such wealth for compensation which was valued at only one hundred pounds annually.] 

Comte Guillaume had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

iii)        GEOFFROY .  "Cecilia comitissa Albamarlie" donated land "inter Esc et Duden…Kirkesantan et Haverigg…et Thueites" to St Bees, and confirmed the donation of "ecclesia de Gosford" made by "W[illelmi] fratris mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "Galfrido filio comitis…"[767].  Geoffroy must have been illegitimate as there is no record of his having inherited the county of Aumâle from his father. 

b)         ENGUERRAND d’Aumâle (-after 1150).  “Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” founded Melsa Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hingeram”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hingeram fratre comitis[768].  The chronology, as well as the names of the individuals concerned, suggests that Enguerrand may have been the same person as Enguerrand Vicomte d´Aumâle who, with his son Etienne, is named in a charter of Lannoy abbey dated 1155 (see Part E below). 

c)         [--- .  m ---.  One possible child:] 

i)          [EUPHEMIE .  Her origin is indicated by the charter dated to [1150/60] under which “W. comes Albemarle” granted property to “Eufemie nepti mee uxori Roberti de Brus[769].  Domesday Descendants speculates that she was the daughter of Guillaume´s brother Enguerrand[770], although there seems no reason to choose one of his brothers over any of the others.  Another possibility is that she was the daughter of Guillaume´s sister Mathilde, whose husband Guermond de Picquigny is recorded with a sister named Euphemie.  “Robertus de Brus” notified his donation to the hospital of St Peter, York by charter dated to [1150/70], witnessed by “domina Eufemia…[771]m ROBERT de Brus Lord of Annandale, son of ROBERT de Brus Lord of Skelton and Annandale & his first wife Agnes de Payanell (-after [1170/90]).] 

d)         ETIENNE d’Aumâle (-after 1150).  “Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” donated property to Melsa Abbey, for the souls of “Hingeram fratris mei et Stephani[772].  This document does not state that Etienne was another brother of Guillaume but this is implied from the text.  Sir C. G. Young recorded that "Wivelby" (referring to Philip de Wyvelesby[773]) proved his descent from Etienne (incorrectly called "Simon" in the Complete Peerage[774]), brother of Guillaume "le Gros" Comte d´Aumâle[775]

e)         daughter .  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[776]m RICHARD de Gerberoy, son of ---. 

f)          ADELISE d'Aumâle (-before [1168][777]).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[778].  "Adeliza daughter of [Stephen] count Albemaris" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Engelger her husband and Robert Bertrand her son" by charter dated to [1151/77][779]m firstly ROBERT [II] Bertran Seigneur de Briquebec, son of ROBERT [I] Bertran "le Tors" & his wife Suzanne ---.  m secondly as his second wife, INGELGER de Bohun, son of RICHARD de Meri & his wife Lucie --- (-[1172]). 

g)         MATHILDE d'Aumâle (-after [1160/65]).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[780].  She is named in her husband's [1160/65] grant to Southwick Priory for the souls of his and her parents[781]m GERARD de Picquigny Vidame d'Amiens, son of GUERMOND [II] de Picquigny Vidame d'Amiens & his wife Beatrix [de Saint-Valéry] (-1178 or after, bur Abbaye du Gard). 

h)         AGNES d’Aumâle .  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[782].  Secondary sources often indicate that Agnes´s husband was in fact Adam [I] de Brus.  This conclusion is based not only on the assumption that the manuscript history mistook "Petro" for "Adam", but also that it reversed the order of Agnes´s marriages: the birth date of Isabel, daughter of Adam [II] de Brus (son of Adam [I]), estimated to [1168/70] on the basis of her first marriage in [1180], suggests the likelihood that Adam [II] was born before 1143 (approximate date of Agnes´s marriage to William de Roumare) rather than after 1151 (date of death of William de Roumare).  As a general principle, it appears preferable to find ways of confirming that a primary source is factually correct rather than justifying why it is in error.  No other primary source has yet been identified which names Agnes as the wife of Adam, or as the mother of his children.  In addition, as noted in the document SCOTLAND KINGS, Peter [I] de Brus was named in a charter dated to [1155/65].  It is therefore possible that the manuscript history is factually correct and that Agnes d´Aumâle married Peter as her second husband, presumably as his second wife considering his likely age by that time.  While waiting for other primary source information to emerge, this appears to be a safer interim conclusion compared with assuming that the manuscript history made two factual errors, relating to the name of Agnes´s Brus husband and to the order of her marriages.  m firstly (after 1143) WILLIAM de Roumare, son of WILLIAM Seigneur de Roumare & his wife Hawise de Reviers (-1151).  m secondly (after 1151) [as his second wife,] PETER [I] de Brus, son of --- (-after [1155/65]). 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES d'AUMÂLE (FORZ)

 

 

Stapleton states that "the surname de Fortibus" was derived from "Fors, a commune in the canton of Prahecq, arrondissement of Niort, departement of Deux Sèvres, in Poitou"[783].  Unfortunately, he purports to justify this statement by quoting the charter dated Feb 1233 (O.S.) under which “A[lix] comitissa Augi” confirmed that she relinquished "terram de Forzex eschæta Guillelmi quondam domini de Forz et comitis Aubemarle" to Louis IX King of France[784], which makes no mention of the location of "terram de Forz".  No indication has yet been found of any connection between Guillaume de Forz and the village of Fors, which lies due south of Niort in the département of Deux-Sèvres, although the charter dated Feb 1233 which is quoted above does suggest a geographical connection with a place named Forz/Fors.  The editor of the published edition of the Layette du Trésor des Chartes, in which the charter appears, assumes that what he refers to as "la terre des Forts" was in Normandy.  This would certainly explain how Alix Ctss d´Eu obtained an interest in the property, the county of Eu being adjacent to the county of Aumâle in north-east Normandy.  In addition, his marriage to the heiress of the county of Aumâle could best be explained if Guillaume de Forz was a powerful nobleman in the county.  On the other hand, an origin in Poitou is suggested by Roger of Hoveden who names "Willelmum de Forz de Ulerum"[785], presumably indicating the island of Oléron, due west of Rochefort in the present-day French département of Charente-Maritime.  The origin of this family in Oléron appears confirmed by a charter dated 4 May 1150 under which Bernard Bishop of Saintes settled a dispute between Notre-Dame de Saintes and "Willelmum Aimerici quendam baronem de Holerone" concerning "decime...terre...de Bonamia", which the bishop found that “Gauterius de Forz avus eius” had donated when “Aiteldem filiam suam” had entered the monastery as a nun, by charter dated 4 May 1150[786].  It is assumed that Guillaume [II] [de Forz] who is shown below was descended from the same “Forz” family who were barons of Oléron (see the document POITOU, BARONS d´OLERON), although the precise descent has not been confirmed.  It should be noted that other primary sources refer to Guillaume and his family as "de Fortibus", rather than "de Forz".  This recalls Guillaume de Vivonne "de Fortibus", son of Hugues de Vivonne seneschal of Gascony (see POITOU, SEIGNEURS de VIVONNE).  In the case of Guillaume de Vivonne, there is no indication that the name "de Fortibus" was used in any other way than as a personal nickname which was not transmitted to any of his descendants.  In his case, it is likely that the name was the ablative plural form of the Latin adjective fors/fortis, used in a nominal sense to indicate that the person in question was "among the strongest".  There appears to have been no family relationship between the Vivonne and Forz families. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [II] [de Forz] [Fortibus] (-1195)Roger of Hoveden records that Richard I King of England appointed "Girardum Auxiensem archiepiscopum, et Bernardum episcopum de Baonia, et Robertum de Sablun, et Ricardum de Camvilla, et Willelmum de Forz de Ulerum" as "ductores et constabularios totius navigii sui" at Chinon, dated to Jun 1190[787].  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle, de iure uxoris.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus des Forz" paying "vi l de honore de Sciptone, xii milites…[et] x l de feodo Albæ Marlæ" in Yorkshire[788].  “Willielmus de Forz comes Albemarliæ” confirmed the donations to Pontefract Priory made by “domina Aaliz de Rumelli” by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo Britone tunc dapifero, Willielmo Painel…[789].  He accompanied Richard I King of England on crusade[790].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Fortibus" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire[791].  Roger of Hoveden records the death in 1195 of "Willelmus de Forz comes Albemarliæ"[792].  “A[lix] comitissa Augi” confirmed that she relinquished "terram de Forzex eschæta Guillelmi quondam domini de Forz et comitis Aubemarle" to Louis IX King of France by charter dated Feb 1233 (O.S.)[793]m (after 3 Jul 1190) as her second husband, HAWISE Ctss d'Aumâle, widow of WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of GUILLAUME "le Gros" Comte d'Aumâle, Lord of Holderness & his wife Cicely Lady of Skipton [Scotland] (-11 Mar 1214).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[794].  The Chronicle of Meaux names "Hawisiam" as the only daughter of "Willielmus le Groos" and his wife "Ceciliam…filiam Willielmi filii Dunnekan", adding that she married firstly "Willielmo de Mandavilla", secondly "Baldewino de Betoyn comiti Insulæ", and thirdly "Willielmum de Fortibus primum"[795].  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus comes de Magnavilla" and "filia Willermi comitis Albæ Marlæ" together with the county of Aumâle in 1179[796].  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[797].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[798].  She married thirdly (before Jul 1196) Baudouin de Bethune Seigneur de Choques [en-Artois], who succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle [1195/96], de iure uxoris.  “Hawisia comitissa Albemarlæ” donated property to Garendon Abbey, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi de Mandevill comitis Essex”, by undated charter which refers to “post mortem domini mei Baldewini de Betunia…Willielmi comitis Albemarle patris mei[799].  The king of France captured the castle of Aumâle in 1196, and gave the title to Renaud de Dammartin Comte de Boulogne in Dec 1204.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Forz (-29 Mar 1241).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[800]

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY - FORZ

 

 

 

D.      COMTE d'AUMÂLE (BETHUNE)

 

 

BAUDOUIN de Béthune, son of ROBERT [V] "le Roux" Seigneur de Béthune & his wife Adelaide --- (-Burstwick, Holderness 13 or 14 Oct 1212, bur Abbey of Meaux[801]).  "Robertus de Betunia, Atrebatensis advocatus…advocatus de Warneston et Adhelis uxor mea et filii mei Robertus, Willelmus, Balduinus" confirmed the possessions of Warneton abbey by charter dated 1177[802].  “Robertus de Betuna advocatus Atrebati” donated “terram meam de Messewalla”, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Roberti, Willielmi, Balduini, Johannis, Cononi", to Faversham Abbey, Kent by undated charter, dated to the reign of Henry II King of England[803].  Seigneur de Choques [en-Artois].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Baldewinus de Betun" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[804].  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in [1195/96], de iure uxoris.  The king of France captured the castle of Aumâle in 1196, and gave the title to Renaud de Dammartin Comte de Boulogne in Dec 1204.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes Baldwi de Betun" held land "in Timelb et in Langetun et in Cuningesb" in Lincolnshire[805].  The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1213 of “Baldwinus comes de Aubemare[806].  The necrology of Béthune Saint-Barthélemy records the death “III Id Oct” of “Baldevinus comes Albamalliæ filius Roberti Rufi advocati[807].  The necrology of Choques records the death “Prid Id Oct” of “Balduinus de Bethunia comes Albamarlæ[808]

m (before Jul 1196) as her third husband, HAWISE Ctss d'Aumâle, widow firstly of WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex and secondly of GUILLAUME de Forz Comte d´Aumâle, daughter of GUILLAUME "le Gros" Comte d'Aumâle, Lord of Holderness & his wife Cicely Lady of Skipton [Scotland] (-11 Mar 1214).  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus comes de Magnavilla" and "filia Willermi comitis Albæ Marlæ" together with the county of Aumâle in 1179[809].  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[810].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[811].  “Hawisia comitissa Albemarlæ” donated property to Garendon Abbey, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi de Mandevill comitis Essex”, by undated charter which refers to “post mortem domini mei Baldewini de Betunia…Willielmi comitis Albemarle patris mei[812].  The necrology of Choques records the death “V Id Mar” of “Hadwidis comitissa Albæmarlæ[813]

Baudouin & his wife had two children: 

1.         ALIX de Béthune (-[1216], bur London, St Paul's Cathedral).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Bauduins li cuens d´Aubemalle…[et] Havy la contesse sa feme" had "une fille…Aalis" who married "Guillemin le frère Guillaume le mareschal le conte de Pembroc"[814].  King John confirmed "maritagium de Willelmo filio Willelmi Marescall com de Pembroke" and "Alicia filia B. de Bettun comitis de Albamar", providing that William should marry "alteram filiam predicti comitis" if Alix died, and that Alix should marry "Ric junior filius suus" should William die, by charter dated 9 Jul 1204[815].  Dame de Choques.  m (contract 9 Jul 1214) as his first wife, WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke, son of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare Ctss of Pembroke (Normandy [1190]-6 Apr 1231, bur 15 Apr 1231 Temple Church, London). 

2.         daughter (-after 9 Jul 1204).  Her existence is confirmed by the charter dated 9 Jul 1204 under which King John confirmed "maritagium de Willelmo filio Willelmi Marescall com de Pembroke" and "Alicia filia B. de Bettun comitis de Albamar", providing that William should marry "alteram filiam predicti comitis" if Alix died, and that Alix should marry "Ric junior filius suus" should William die[816]

Baudouin had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

3.          --- de Béthune (-after 1216).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre names "un chevalier qui fu fils le conte d´Aubemalle, le boin chevalier" at the siege of Farnham in 1216[817]

 

 

 

E.      VICOMTES d'AUMÂLE

 

 

The chronology, as well as his own name and that of his son, suggests that Enguerrand Vicomte d´Aumâle who is shown below may have been the same person as Enguerrand, second son of Etienne de Troyes Comte d´Aumâle (see Part B above). 

 

 

1.         ENGUERRAND (-after 1155).  Vicomte d´AumâleIngelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[818]m ---.  The name of Enguerrand´s wife is not known.  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

a)         FRANCO (-after 1155).  Ingelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[819]Stephanus filius Engelrami vicecomitis de Albamarla” donated property “in terra de Moncellis...[et] in territorio Maisniliorum et Vaccariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Ansoldus Bisete [...domini sui], similiter et Franco frater Stephani”, by charter dated 1155[820]m ---.  The name of Franco´s wife is not known.  Franco & his wife had two children: 

i)          MATHIEU (-after 1150).  Ingelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[821]

ii)         ENGUERRAND d´Aumâle (-after 1224).  “Ingerranus de Albemarle” confirmed donations “in territorio de Moncellis” to Lannoy, including by “Franconis patris mei et Stephani patrui mei”, with the consent of “Aeliz uxoris mei et Ingelranni filii mei”, by charter dated 1211[822]m ALIX, daughter of --- (-after [1210]).  “Ingerranus de Albemarle” confirmed donations “in territorio de Moncellis” to Lannoy, including by “Franconis patris mei et Stephani patrui mei”, with the consent of “Aeliz uxoris mei et Ingelranni filii mei”, by charter dated 1211[823].  “Eremburgis filia domini Ingerranni vicecomitis Albemalle” donated revenue “apud Blangiel” to Lannoy, with the consent of “domini Ingerranni patris mei et Ingerranni filii mei primogeniti”, by charter dated 1224[824].  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

(1)       ENGUERRAND .  “Ingerranus de Albemarle” confirmed donations “in territorio de Moncellis” to Lannoy, including by “Franconis patris mei et Stephani patrui mei”, with the consent of “Aeliz uxoris mei et Ingelranni filii mei”, by charter dated 1211[825]

(2)       EREMBURGE (-after 1224).  “Eremburgis filia domini Ingerranni vicecomitis Albemalle” donated revenue “apud Blangiel” to Lannoy, with the consent of “domini Ingerranni patris mei et Ingerranni filii mei primogeniti”, by charter dated 1224[826]m ---. 

b)         ETIENNE (-after 1155).  Ingelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[827]Stephanus filius Engelrami vicecomitis de Albamarla” donated property “in terra de Moncellis...[et] in territorio Maisniliorum et Vaccariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Ansoldus Bisete [...domini sui], similiter et Franco frater Stephani”, by charter dated 1155[828]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    AVRANCHES, MORTAIN

 

 

A.      COMTES d´AVRANCHES

 

 

South of the Cotentin in the south-west corner of the duchy of Normandy, lay the diocese of Avranches, which included the pagus Abricantinus (Avranchin) next to the duchy of Brittany[829].  The first count, Robert, was an illegitimate son of Richard I Comte de Normandie.  In the mid-11th century, the county (then referred to as Mortain) was recorded in the hands of Guillaume Comte de Corbeil, son of Mauger, a younger son of Duke Richard I.  Guillaume was banished in 1063 by Duke Guillaume II who appointed his uterine half-brother Robert to the county.  Henry I King of England deprived Guillaume, son of Robert Comte de Mortain, of the county after the battle of Tinchebrai in [1106].  Thereafter the territory remained under the direct control of the kings of England until Normandy was captured by the Capetian kings of France in the early 13th century.  The early counts of Avranches/Mortain were studied by Potts[830]

 

 

 

ROBERT, illegitimate son of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his mistress --- (-after [1015])Comte d´Avranches.  His parentage is established by André de Fleury´s Vita Gauzlini which records that “Rotbertus Abricatinensium comes” held “de sui jure patrimonii ecclesiam sancti Hylarii”, that after his death it was held by “eius filius Richardus” who was banished “a proprio avunculo Richardo” [Richard II Duke of Normandy][831].  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][832]

m firstly BILELDIS, daughter of --- (-before [1015]).  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][833]

m secondly ASCELINE, daughter of --- (-after [1015]).  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][834]

Robert & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

1.         GUILLAUME .  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][835]

2.         ROBERT .  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][836]

3.         RICHARD .  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][837]Comte d´Avranches.  André de Fleury´s Vita Gauzlini records that “Rotbertus Abricatinensium comes” held “de sui jure patrimonii ecclesiam sancti Hylarii”, that after his death it was held by “eius filius Richardus” who was banished “a proprio avunculo Richardo” [Richard II Duke of Normandy][838]. 

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME "Guerlenc" de Corbeil, son of MAUGER de Normandie Comte de Corbeil & his wife Germaine de Corbeil (-1067).  His parentage is established by Orderic Vitalis who calls him "son of Count Mauger" when recording his banishment[839]Comte de CorbeilGuillelmus comes Corboilensis” donated the church of Corbeil Saint-Jean-Baptiste to Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, in the presence of “Nanterus Corboilensis vicecomes”, by charter dated 26 May 1043[840].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Werlencus de stirpe Richardi magni comes...Moritolii” plotted rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, as reported to the duke by “tyro de familia sua...Robertus Bigot”, and that the duke expelled him to Apulia and granted his county to “Robertum fratrem suum[841].  Orderic Vitalis calls him "son of Count Mauger" and says he was Comte de Mortain, banished by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "on some trivial pretexts"[842] in 1063.  “…Walterius comes Pontisariensis, Willelmus comes Corboilensis, Ivo comes Bellomontensis, Walerannus comes Melledensis” are named among those present at the opening of the reliquary of Saint-Denis, dated 9 Jun 1053[843]m ---.  The name of Guillaume's wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had three children:

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de MORTAIN, VICOMTES de CONTEVILLE

 

 

Le Prévost states that Conteville was “Conteville-sur-mer, près l´embouchure de la Risle [Eure]” and that the properties of Herluin de Conteville in the area were later referred to as “l´honneur de Saint-Mère-Eglise” and, after being united with Saint-Pierre-du-Châtel, “Notre-Dame-du-Châtel[844]

 

 

HERLUIN, son of --- (-[1066], bur Grestain).  [Vicomte] de Conteville.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Herluinus...de Contavilla” married “Herlevam Rodberti ducis concubinam[845].  He founded the abbey of Grestain after 1050[846].  It is possible that either Herluin or his wife were related to an ancestor of Robert of Rhuddlan (see above): Orderic Vitalis names “Roberto de Rodelento nepos eius” among the followers of “Odo...palatinus Cantiæ consul[847].  The relationship between the two families has not been traced. 

m firstly ([after 1035]) HERLEVE, mistress of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy, daughter of FULBERT & his wife [Doda/Duwa] --- (-[1050]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[848].  The dating of her marriage is in doubt: William of Malmesbury records that it took place “ante patris [referring to Robert II Duke of Normandy] obitum[849].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Herluinus...de Contavilla” married “Herlevam Rodberti ducis concubinam[850].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of Duke Guillaume as "filia…Herbertus pelliparius et uxor eius Doda sive Duwa", specifying that the family was from Chaumont in the diocese of Liège but moved to Falaise although others said that they were from Huy, and specifies her marriage to "Herlewino de Vado comitis"[851].  Orderic Vitalis calls her "Duke Robert's concubine", and specifies her marriage, referring to her husband as stepfather to Duke Guillaume[852].  She presumably died before her husband founded the abbey of Grestain as she is not referred to in the abbey's confirmation charter dated 14 Nov 1189[853].  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Herluinus de Contevilla…et Herleve uxor eius" were buried in "mon. Sanctæ Mariæ Gresteni"[854]

m secondly FREDESENDIS, daughter of ---.  She is named as the wife of Herluin in the confirmation charter of the abbey of Grestain, dated 14 Nov 1189[855]

Vicomte Herluin & his first wife had three children:

1.         EUDES [Odo] ([1036/38]-[Antioch/Palermo] [2/6] Jan 1097, bur Palermo Cathedral)Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[856].  The birth date of Eudes is estimated on the assumption that Guillaume of Jumièges is correct (which is not beyond doubt, as noted above).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[857].  Florence of Worcester names Eudes as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[858]Bishop of Bayeux 1050 (when Eudes must have been an adolescent, assuming that his birth date is correctly estimated as shown above).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the death of “Hugo filius Rodulphi comitis Baiocensis episcopus”, Guillaume II Duke of Normandy appointed “Odoni fratri suo” to the bishopric of Bayeux, a position he held for nearly 50 years[859].  He is said to have taken an active part in the preparation of the Norman invasion of England and was present at the battle of Hastings 23 Oct 1066.  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Odone episcopo de Baiocis" contributed 120 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[860].  His half-brother William I King of England rewarded him with a grant of over 500 manors in England and created him Earl of Kent in 1067[861].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[862].  Florence of Worcester records that King William left "fratrumque suum Odonem Baiocensem episcopum et Willelmum filium Osberni quem in Herefordensi provincia comitum" when he went to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][863].  He was one of the leaders of the force which suppressed the rebellion of the earls of Norfolk and Hereford in 1075[864].  He began scheming to become Pope, sending great gifts to influential men in Rome, but was arrested by King William and sent to Normandy where he was a prisoner in Rouen between 1082 and 1087[865].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William captured “Odoni fratri suo...in insula Vecta” and held him in prison for four years “pro nimietate sua[866].  He was released by King William on his deathbed[867].  Although King William II restored Eudes to his earldom, he was one of the leaders of the rebellion in 1088 which sought to put Robert Duke of Normandy on the English throne[868].  He was banished from England and all his honours and possessions forfeited.  He became chief adviser to Duke Robert in Normandy[869].  Orderic Vitalis records that Bishop Eudes died “in urbem Panormitanam, quam vulgo Palernam vocant” and that “Gislebertus Ebroicensis episcopus” buried him “in metropolitana sanctæ Dei genetricis Mariæ basilica”, adding that he had been appointed “ab adolescentia sua” (which supports that the theory that he was born after the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy, as discussed above)[870].  William of Malmesbury records that he left on the First Crusade with Robert III Duke of Normandy and died “Antiochiæ, in obsidione Christianorum[871].  The necrology of Jumièges records the death 2 Jan of “Odo episcopus[872].  Bishop Eudes had one illegitimate son: 

a)         JEAN de Bayeux (-1131).  Son of Eudes bishop of Bayeux according to Orderic Vitalis, who records that Jean gave King Henry news of the death of his nephew Guillaume "Clito" Count of Flanders in 1128[873].  Orderic Vitalis records that he lived at the court of Henry I King of England where he was held in esteem for his eloquence and probity[874]

2.         ROBERT de Mortain ([after 1038]-8 Dec after [1087/91], bur abbaye de Grestain).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[875].  Florence of Worcester names Robert as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[876].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[877].  Orderic Vitalis records that he was installed as Comte de Mortain in 1063 by his half-brother Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, after he dispossessed Guillaume Werlenc[878].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Werlencus de stirpe Richardi magni comes...Moritolii” plotted rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, as reported to the duke by “tyro de familia sua...Robertus Bigot”, and that the duke expelled him to Apulia and granted his county to “Robertum fratrem suum[879].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rodbertus comes Moritoliensis, Willermi ducis uterinus frater...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[880].  King William I granted him nearly all the land of Cornwall as a reward for his participation at the battle of Hastings in 1066, but he does not seem to have been created Earl of Cornwall, continuing to be referred to as "comes Moritoniensis"[881].  "Robertus Moretonii comes frater Villelmi Anglorum regis et Normannorum principis" granted property to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire by charter dated 9 Jan 1083[882].  He joined his brother Eudes in the 1088 rebellion against King William II but was pardoned[883]The necrology of the church of Mortain records the death "8 Dec" of "Robertus comes Moretonii fundator istius ecclesie"[884]m firstly (before 1066) MATHILDE de Montgommery, daughter of ROGER Sire de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois [later Earl of Shrewsbury] & his first wife Mabel d'Alençon (-[1085], bur abbaye de Grestain).  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[885].  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" by charter dated to [1087/91][886].  “Willielmus comes Moritonii” founded Montacute Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti comitis et matris meæ Mathillidis comitissæ”, by undated charter[887]m secondly ALMODIS, daughter of ---.  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son" by charter dated to [1087/91], which specifies that "William his other son has promised to grant it if Almodis should leave no heir"[888].  Earl Robert & his first wife had [seven] children: 

a)         ROBERT .  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son" by charter dated to [1087/91], which specifies that "William his other son has promised to grant it if Almodis should leave no heir"[889]

b)         GUILLAUME de Mortain (-Bermondsey after 1140).  Orderic Vitalis refers to him as nepos of Robert III Duke of Normandy[890].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Guilelmi" as son of "Robertum comitem Moretonii"[891].  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis"[892].  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son…and William his other son" by charter dated to [1087/91][893].  He succeeded his father as Comte de Mortain, and in the latter's lands in Cornwall.  He unsuccessfully claimed the earldom of Kent on the death of his uncle Eudes[894].  “Willielmus comes Moritonii” founded Montacute Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti comitis et matris meæ Mathillidis comitissæ”, by undated charter[895].  "…Willelmi comitis de Moritun…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[896].  Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmus comes de Moreteon" rebelled against Henry I King of England, who confiscated all his English lands in [1104][897].  Florence of Worcester also records that "comes Willelmus de Moretonio" fought with Robert Duke of Normandy against King Henry I at Tinchebrai in [1106], was captured, but later escaped and fled[898].  Orderic Vitalis records that he was imprisoned for many years and all his honours forfeited[899].  He became a Cluniac monk at Bermondsey in 1140.  m ADELISA, daughter of --- (-after [1100/06]).  William count of Mortain confirmed a donation to Marmoutier Saint-Martin by charter dated to [1100/06], signed by "…Guillelmi comitis Moritolii, Adilidis comitisse de M[oritolio]"[900]

c)         [daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I offered “neptem suam Rodberti...Moritolii comitis filiam” in marriage to Guillaume de Grantmesnil, who refused and left for Apulia[901].  It is probable that this daughter was the same person as one of the other daughters of Robert who are named below.] 

d)         DENISE de Mortain ([1065/70]-1090).  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned second) married "Guido de Laval"[902].  A charter dated to [1085] records that "Guy II fils de Hamon" withdrew claims against Ronceray relating to property donated by his father by charter dated to [1085] which names "Denise son épouse" and is witnessed by "Hugues, frère de Guy II"[903].  A charter dated to [1080/90] records that "Guidone de Valle" sold "boscum…Monduluet" to "domnus Rivallonus monachus" at Marmoutier, with the consent of "Hugo frater eius…et Dionisia uxor eius"[904].  "Guido de Lavalle" donated the priory of Parné to the church of Saint-Nicholas d'Angers "pro salute sua et uxoris sue Dionisie" by charter dated [1080/90][905].  A charter dated 1090 records that "Guido junior" succeeded "in paternum…honorem" on the death of "Haimonis senioris de Valle Guidonis" and that when, after some time, "supradicti domni Guidonis conjugem" died, he granted further rights to Marmoutier when she was buried "juxta patrem suum Haimonem"[906]m [as his second wife,] GUY [II] Sire de Laval, son of HAMON Sire de Laval & his wife Hersende --- (before [1037/38]-after 1105, bur Marmoutier). 

e)         EMMA de Mortain (-after [1126/27]).  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned third) married "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii"[907].  Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1114 under which her daughter “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis[908].  “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea...Petro episcopo...[909].  This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[910]m (before 1080) as his second wife, GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse, son of PONS Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Almodis de la Marche (-killed in battle Huesca 1094). 

f)          [SIBYLLE (-after 1134).  An undated charter records the return of property to Notre-Dame de Saintes by "Willelmus comes Pictavensis", stating that on the same day "abbatissa Florentia” accepted “Sibillam materteram comitisse...factam post abbatissam” into her monastery[911].  This charter is dated to [1100/07] in the compilation, but the document in the form in which it has survived must be a later production given the reference to the subsequent appointment of Sibylle as abbess.  There appears to be no way of dating the original return of the property in question.  In the charter, “comitisse” would have been Philippa de Toulouse, wife of Guillaume IX Duke of Aquitaine, and so her “matertera” would have been the sister of Emma de Mortain, wife of Guillaume IV Comte de Toulouse.  Abbess of Notre-Dame de Saintes, she is named in charters dated 1122, 1130, 1131 and 1134[912].  “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea, et Arembergi de Volvent monacha...Petro episcopo...[913].  This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”: it is likely that the bishop of Saintes would have been involved in transactions relating to Notre-Dame de Saintes) is named in a document dated 1127[914].  Although the term “amita” would normally indicate paternal aunt, it is assumed that in this case it was used in the broader sense of maternal great-aunt which is consistent with the relationship posited from the earlier charter dated to [1100/07] which is quoted above.  If Sibylle´s family is correctly identified, she was probably younger than her supposed sister Emma as it would be normal for the daughter of a noble family to enter religion at a young age if she was destined for an ecclesiastical career.]

g)         AGNES de Mortain (-[maybe after 1126/27]).  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned first) married "Andreas de Vitreio"[915].  A charter dated to [1110] records that "Andreas dominus Vitriaci castri et frater eius Philippus et uxor ipsius Andreæ…Agnes, cum filiis suis Roberto, Gervasio et Elia" confirmed the foundation of Sainte-Croix de Vitré[916].  [It is possible that Agnes de Mortain was “Agnete amita mea” in the following charter: “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea, et Arembergi de Volvent monacha...Petro episcopo...[917].  The charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Duke Guillaume X succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[918].  The donor in the document is identified as Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine.  As discussed in more detail above, there are good arguments for identifying “abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” as his great-aunt, sister of his grandmother Emma de Mortain.  The key to identifying the subscribers to the document appears to be the presence of the donor´s maternal grandmother who would, it seems, not normally be involved in a donation by the duke of Aquitaine unless she had some interest in the property donated.  If that is correct, “Agnete amita mea” would, logically, have subscribed only if she also had an interest in the same property.  The best explanation is that the three subscribers were sisters who were the only surviving representatives of the Mortain family and joint holders of an interest in the properties donated.  The main difficulty with this hypothesis is that Agnes´s husband was still alive at the time: it is therefore unclear why he would not have subscribed the document in place of his wife.  The churches in question have not been identified.  It should be pointed out that it is not obvious how the Mortain or Montgommery families, based in Normandy, would have held interests in churches which were presumably located in the Saintonge area of the duchy of Aquitaine.  Another possibility is that the subscriber of the [1126/27] charter was Agnes, [probably illegitimate] daughter of Guillaume VIII Duke of Aquitaine, who succeeded Sibylle as abbess of Notre-Dame de Saintes in [1134/37] (see the document AQUITAINE DUKES).  However, in that case the potential common interest in the donated properties would not apply and it is then difficult to understand the reason for Agnes subscribing the document.]  m ANDRE [I] Seigneur de Vitré, son of ROBERT [I] Seigneur de Vitré & his wife Berthe de Craon (-after 1139). 

Earl Robert & his second wife had one child:

h)         ROBERT de Mortain .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

Vicomte Herluin & his [first/second] wife had [one child]:

3.         [daughter .  The precise identity of the mother of Guillaume [III] de la Ferté-Macé has not been ascertained, but the following source indicates that she was related to the Conteville family.  Planché refers to a charter which names “William [of Ferté Macé]” (presumably indicating Guillaume [III] de la Ferté-Macé) as “nephew of Bishop Odo” (no precise citation reference, but a later passage describes the document as “the charter of an archbishop of Tours, temp. St Louis”)[919].  The reference to this charter has not been found, but “nephew” presumably indicates “nepos”, which if used in its strict sense would indicate that Guillaume [II]´s wife was the daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, given the notoriously imprecise nature of the term, the precise relationship could be more remote.  m [GUILLAUME [II] de la Ferté-Macé, son of GUILLAUME [I] de la Ferté-Macé & his wife --- (-before 1083)].]    

Vicomte Herluin & his second wife had [three] children:

4.         RAOUL de Conteville (-after 1089).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[920].  "…Rodulfus filius Herluini…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[921].  He is referred to as the son of Herluin in the charter of confirmation of the abbey of Grestain, dated 14 Nov 1089, the implication of the text being that he was the son of Hilduin's wife Fredesendis[922].  Domesday Book records “Ralph fitzHerluin” holding Shimpling from Roger Bigod in Norfolk[923]m ---.  The name of Raoul's wife is not known.  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)         BERNARD FitzRaoul .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1092/93. 

5.         JEAN de Conteville .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1089. 

6.         [RICHARD FitzHerluin (-after 1082).  "…Richard fitz Herluin…" witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England donated property to the abbey of la Trinité de Caen[924].] 

 

 

 

C.      VICOMTES d'AVRANCHES

 

 

ANSFRID, son of --- .  His name and that of his son suggest that this family was of Viking origin, which is confirmed by Guillaume of Jumièges who names [his son] “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis[925]

m ---.  The name of Ansfrid's wife is not known. 

Ansfrid & his wife had one child: 

1.         THURSTAN "le Goz" (-[1045/55]).  Vicomte.  "Ricardi filii Gulberti, Nigelli vicecomitis…Storstingi vicecomitis" signed the charter dated 1027 (redated to [1017]) in which "secundus nominis mei Normannorum dux Ricardus" confirmed donations to Fécamp abbey[926].  "…Torstingus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[927].  "…Turstingi vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[928].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[929].  "Turstin vicecomes" witness the donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen of "Gozelinus vicecomes" dated [1038/50][930].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis, Godefredi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[931].  "…Turstinci vicecomitis…Turstinci Gazel…Richardi filii Turstinci, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[932].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis” rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy at “Falesiæ castellum”, which was attacked by the duke´s forces led by “Rodulfus Waceiensis magister militum”, and was forced to flee into exile, dated to early during the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context[933]m ---.  The name of Thurstan's wife is not known.  Thurstan & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD "le Goz" (-after 1082).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ricardus Turstini filius” served Duke Guillaume II loyally after his father “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis” rebelled and was forced to flee into exile[934].  "…Turstinci vicecomitis…Turstinci Gazel…Richardi filii Turstinci, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[935]Vicomte d'Avranches.  "…Richardi filii Torestini…" witnessed the charter dated to [1055] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[936].  "…Willelmi filii Osberti, Rotgerii de Monte Golmerii, Richardis vicecomitis Abrinchensis…" witnessed the charter dated [1055/56] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "in pago…Constantino, villam…Flotomannum" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[937].  "…Ricardus vicecomes Abrincatinus…" witnessed the charter dated 1064 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy settled a claim in favour of the monks of Marmoutier relating to property donated by "Guido de Valle"[938].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Richart d´Avrenchin" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[939].  "Richardi filii Torsteingoiz" witnessed a charter of William I King of England dated 1069[940].  "Ricardo filio Turstini Guz et Guillelmo Caritate, Fulkoque filio Gerardi Budel atque Radulfo de Ollei" are named as present in the charter dated 30 Nov 1074 under which Odo Bishop of Bayeux bought "la terre de Chernet" from "Herberto de Agnellis", with the consent of "suo domino Radulfo de Conchis"[941]m (before [1047]) ---.  The name of Richard´s wife is not known.  She is called “Emma” in the Complete Peerage[942], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  A manuscript relating to St Werburgh´s Chester records that “Hugo Lupus filius ducis Britanniæ et nepos Gulielmi magni ex sorore” transformed the foundation into a monastery[943].  This suggests that Hugues´s mother may have been a uterine sister of King William, and therefore daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, no indication has been in other primary sources which supports the contention that Hugues was the son of a duke of Brittany.  It is assumed therefore that both lines of his parentage have been romanticised in this document to improve his status and reputation.  Another possibility is that she was related to the Grantmesnil family: Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” [Robert of Rhuddlan, son of Onfroi de Tilleul and his wife Adelise de Grantmesnil] went “cum Hugone consobrino suo, Richardi de Abrincis cognomento Goz filio” to England[944]If the relationship is as indicated by Orderic, from a chronological point of view Richard´s wife could have been --- de Grantmesnil,  daughter of Robert de Grantmesnil & his wife Hawise ---.  Richard & his wife had four children: 

i)          HUGUES d'Avranches "Lupus"[945] ([1047]-St Werburg's Abbey, Chester 27 Jul 1101).  Orderic Vitalis records that King William granted “Cestrensem consulatum” to “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” after Gerbod returned to Flanders, dated to 1071[946], whereby he is held to have become Earl of Chester. 

-         EARLS of CHESTER

ii)         MARGUERITE [Maud] d'Avranches (-after [1098]).  She is named "Mathilda soror Hugonis comitis" by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her son[947].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[948]m RANULF Vicomte du Bessin, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin & his wife Alix de Normandie (-after [1098]). 

iii)        HELISENDE d'Avranches .  Her marriage is referred to by Orderic Vitalis, who says that she was the sister of Hugh Earl of Chester but does not give her name[949].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] Comte d'Eu, son of ROBERT Comte d'Eu & his first wife Beatrix --- (-2 Jan after 1096). 

iv)       JUDITH d'Avranches .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” married “Judith filiam Ricardi Abrincatensis cognomento Goz, sororem...Hugonis Cestrensium comitis[950].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[951].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "…Judiht uxore mea, filia Richardi de Abrincis et sorore Hugonis comitis Cestrensis"[952].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[953]m RICHER de Laigle, son of ENGENULF & his wife Richereda --- (-killed in battle Sainte-Suzanne 18 Nov 1085, bur Monastery of St Sulpice-sur-Risle).        

b)         ROBERT .  "…Turstinci vicecomitis…Turstinci Gazel…Richardi filii Turstinci, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[954]

 

 

1.         GUITMUND [Wimund] .  Vicomte.  "…Vuitmundus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[955].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[956]m ---.  The name of Wimund´s wife is not known.  Wimund & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM FitzWimund d'Avranches (-[1087]).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Guillelmus de Abrincis filius Witmundi”, dated to 1087 from the context[957]m ---.  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT d'Avranches (-before 1142).    He is shown as son of William FitzWimund in the Complete Peerage, and as avunculus of Fulk Paynell[958], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Abrinc" in Devonshire accounting to the king for his malevolence for his marriage to "filia Geldewini de Dol"[959]m firstly HAWISE de Dol, daughter of GELDUIN de Dol & his wife Noga de Tinteniac.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Abrinc" in Devonshire accounting to the king for his malevolence for his marriage to "filia Geldewini de Dol"[960]Domesday Descendants mentions that she is named Hawise in one of the charters of her husband "for the Mont"[961].  m secondly (after 1130) MATILDA Avenell, daughter of RANDULF Avenell & his wife Alice --- (-21 Sep 1173).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” had “unicam filiam…Matildam” who died[962].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges”, and died “IX Kal Oct 1173[963].  As noted below, charter evidence indicates that the wife of Robert FitzEdith was Mathilde d´Avranches, daughter of Matilda Avenell, not Matilda Avenell herself.  Matilda´s supposed second marriage, as reported in the Ford Abbey document, is therefore assumed to be incorrect.  Robert & his second wife had four children: 

(a)       HAWISE d´Avranches ([after 1132]-1 Aug 1209).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis” and that she married “Reginaldo de Courtenay” as “uxor eius secunda[964].  Hawise must have been born after 1132 at the earliest as her father is recorded in [1129/30] with his first wife.  The suggested date of her marriage is based on the approximate marriage date of her son Robert in [1174/75].  m ([1150/55]) as his second wife, RENAUD Seigneur de Courtenay, son of MILON Seigneur de Courtenay & his second wife Ermengarde de Nevers ([1105/20]-27 Sep 1194). 

(b)       MATHILDE d´Avranches ).  "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[965].  The heirship of Mathilde to “Ricardi filii Baldewini” (who was a member of a younger branch of the Brionne/Eu family, see above) was through her maternal grandmother, who is recorded as a sister of the brothers Robert and Richard.  "Robertus filius Regis Henrici" donated "duos ferlingos in manerio meo Calvalegiæ juxta Cobbalegiam" to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis de Abrinco uxoris meæ", by charter dated 1162[966].  The parentage of the wife of Robert FitzEdith is confirmed by a claim, dated 1222, which is recorded by Bracton: "Matillis de Curteney" sued "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Ocumptona", "Robertus" claiming that the land was "hereditas Matillidis de Aueregnes" who had "duas filias…Hawisiam matrem suam primogenitam […filia Gaufridi de Crimes primi viri Matillidis de Auerenches] et…Matillidem", while the claimant Matilda asserted that she had the land in question "ex dono Roberti filii Regis patris eiusdem Matillidis et secundi viri predicte Matillidis de Auerenches"[967].  A different parentage is indicated by the Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey which records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges[968].  Matilda, daughter of Ranulf Avenell, was the mother of Mathilde d´Avranches.  The two charters quoted above indicate that this supposed second marriage of Matilda is not correct.  The identity of Mathilde´s first husband is uncertain.  Bracton´s report of the 1222 lawsuit which is quoted above identifies him as "Gaufridi de Crimes primi viri Matillidis de Auerenches".  However, another claim recorded by Bracton, also dated 1222, identifies him differently: "Matillis de Curtenay" claimed against "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Chamelegha", the defendant stating that "Robertus filius Regis…Matillidem de Auerenches uxorem suam" held the land which was inherited by "Hawisie filie sui matri eiusdem Roberti de Curtenay que fuit filia Willelmi de Curcy viri eiusdem Matillidis"[969].  No other information has yet been found which would resolve this inconsistency.  Another outstanding point concerns the date of death of Matilda Avenell, as wife of Robert FitzEdith, as reported in the Ford Abbey document.  It is assumed that the date does in fact refer to Matilda Avenell and not to Mathilde d´Avranches, although the point is not beyond all doubt.  If that is correct, no indication has been found of the date of death of Mathilde d´Avranches.  m firstly [GEOFFROY de Crimes/GUILLAUME de Curcy], son of ---.  m secondly (before 1162) [as his second wife,] ROBERT FitzRoy, illegitimate son of HENRY I King of England & his mistress Edith --- (-31 May [1172]). 

(c)       daughter .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis[970]

(d)       daughter .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis[971]

ii)         [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are shown in the Complete Peerage, presumably because her supposed brother Robert d´Avranches is described as avunculus of her son Fulk Paynell[972], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  m WILLIAM Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert, son of [WILLIAM Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert and Hambye & his wife ---] (-after [1145]).] 

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de GRANVILLE

 

 

This was Granville in the Cotentin, Normandy {arr. Avranches, Manche} which was a fief of the abbey of Saint-Michel. 

 

 

1.         RENAUD de Granville (-after [1054]).  Seigneur de Granville"Hilger de Ardevone, Thescelin his brother, Reginald de Grandivalle and Ralf de Sancto-Johanne" are named as "St. Michael´s men" present in the charter dated to [1054] under which "William Pichenoht" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel, witnessed by "…Ricardi vicecomitis, Hilgerii de Ardevone, Thescelini fratris eius, Raginaldi de Grandivilla, Radulfi de Sancto Johanne"[973]A charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, confirmed in a charter of King William I dated 1080, confirmed the foundation of Caen Sainte-Trinité and its possessions, including the donation of “quam habebat in Grainvilla, pro filia sua ibi facta monacha” made by “Rogerius de Molbray” witnessed by “Drogo de Sancto Vigore et Rainaldus de Glanvilla[974]

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS d´ORVAL

 

 

1.         RENAUD [I] d´Orval (-after 1126).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Rainaldus de Aureavalle" by charter dated 1126, witnessed by "Roberto de Haia, Rogero de Sancto Johanne, Hugone de Aureavalle…"[975]

 

2.         HUGUES d´Orval (-after 1126).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Rainaldus de Aureavalle" by charter dated 1126, witnessed by "Roberto de Haia, Rogero de Sancto Johanne, Hugone de Aureavalle…"[976]

 

3.         RENAUD [II] d´Orval m MURIEL de Saint-Jean, daughter of ROGER de Saint-Jean & his wife Cecilia de La Haye.  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex records that “Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” married “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle” by whom she had "filiam…Mabiliam" who married "Adæ de Port"[977].  Renaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         MABILE d´Orval ).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Mabiliam" as the daughter of “Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” and her husband “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle”, adding that she married "Adæ de Port"[978]m as his first wife, ADAM de Port, son of JOHN de Port & his wife Maud --- ([1150/55]-[25 Jun/28 Jul] 1213). 

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-JEAN

 

 

According to The Complete Peerage, this was Saint-Jean-le-Thomas in the Cotentin, Normandy {arr. Avranches, Manche} which was a fief of the abbey of Saint-Michel[979]

 

 

1.         RAOUL de Saint-Jean (-after Oct 1066).  Seigneur de Saint-Jean.  "Hilger de Ardevone, Thescelin his brother, Reginald de Grandivalle and Ralf de Sancto-Johanne" are named as "St. Michael´s men" present in the charter dated to [1053] under which "William Pichenoht" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel, witnessed by "…Ricardi vicecomitis, Hilgerii de Ardevone, Thescelini fratris eius, Raginaldi de Grandivilla, Radulfi de Sancto Johanne"[980].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de S. Jehan" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[981]

 

2.         OLIVIER de Saint-Jean (-after 1093).  The Gwentian Chronicle records that "Oliver St John" was granted "the lordship of Aberbernant" by Robert FitzHamon after the defeat of Rhys ap Tewdwr in Wales in 1093[982]

 

 

[Five] siblings, parents not known.  The chronology may be too extended for them to have been the sons of Raoul de Saint-Jean who is shown above: 

1.         THOMAS de Saint-Jean (-[1123/30]).  Seigneur de Saint-Jean.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Thomam de Sancto Johanne" ineffectively blockaded Tinchebrai on behalf of Henry I King of England in 1106[983].  He and his family were studied by Gerville[984].  "…Th. de Sancto Johanne…" witnessed the charter dated 1108 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Holy Trinity, London[985].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that King Henry I appointed "Thoma de Sancto Johanne ac Ricardo de Monte" as "Oxenefordscire vicecomitibus" at Oxford in 1111[986].  Matthew of Paris quotes a charter dated 1116 of King Henry I which records his grant of Biscot, Bedfordshire to the abbey of St Albans, witnessed by "…Adam de Port, Thomas de Sancto Johanne, Willelmus frater eius, Hugo de Gornaio"[987].  A charter dated to [1121] records that "Thomas de Sancto Johanne" had constructed his castle at Saint-Jean with wood taken from land of the abbey of Saint-Michel and records his donation in settlement of their claim, signed by "Thoma, Johanne fratre eius et Rogerio…"[988].  A charter dated to [1123/29] records a donation by King Henry I to Mont-Saint-Michel, witnessed by "…Thoma de Sancto Johanne"[989]

2.         GUILLAUME de Saint-Jean .  Matthew of Paris quotes a charter dated 1116 of King Henry I which records his grant of Biscot, Bedfordshire to the abbey of St Albans, witnessed by "…Adam de Port, Thomas de Sancto Johanne, Willelmus frater eius, Hugo de Gornaio"[990]

3.         JEAN de Saint-Jean (-[1149/53]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rogerius de Sancto Johanne et Johannes frater eius" defended the castle of La Motte-Gautier against Foulques V Comte d´Anjou for Henry I King of England in 1118[991].  A charter dated to [1121] records that "Thomas de Sancto Johanne" had constructed his castle at Saint-Jean with wood taken from land of the abbey of Saint-Michel and records his donation in settlement of their claim, signed by "Thoma, Johanne fratre eius et Rogerio…"[992].  The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire records that King Stephen granted “illi de Kingswode Haseldene…terras Reginaldo de sancto Walerico” to "Johanne de sancto Johanne", in the early years of his reign[993]m ---.  The name of Jean´s wife is not known.  Jean & his wife had three children: 

a)         THOMAS de St John (-after 1166).  Domesday Descendants states that Thomas, Roger and William were the sons of Jean de Saint-Jean, adding that William was rector of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[994]

b)         ROGER de St JohnDomesday Descendants states that Thomas, Roger and William were the sons of Jean de Saint-Jean, adding that William was rector of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[995]

c)         WILLIAM de St JohnDomesday Descendants states that Thomas, Roger and William were the sons of Jean de Saint-Jean, adding that William was rector of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[996]

4.         ROGER de Saint-Jean (-1130 or before).  A charter dated to [1121] records that "Thomas de Sancto Johanne" had constructed his castle at Saint-Jean with wood taken from land of the abbey of Saint-Michel and records his donation in settlement of their claim, signed by "Thoma, Johanne fratre eius et Rogerio…"[997].  A charter dated 1121 confirmed the possessions of Lewes Priory including the donation of "…ecclesiam de Cunctona…" by "Rogeri de Sco Johe"[998].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rogerius de Sancto Johanne et Johannes frater eius" defended the castle of La Motte-Gautier against Foulques V Comte d´Anjou for Henry I King of England in 1118[999].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "filii Rogi de sco Johe…relevat tre patis sui" in Hampshire[1000]m CECILIA de la Haye, daughter of ROBERT de la Haye & his wife Muriel --- (-[1162/77]).  Her parentage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1111 under which her maternal grandfather “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery[1001].  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex states that “Roberti di Haya…Ceciliam filiam suam” married “Rogero de sancto Johanne[1002].  Roger & his wife had three children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Saint-Jean (-[Sep 1201/Sep 1202]).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names “Willielmum et Robertum de sancto Johanne” as the sons of “Rogero de sancto Johanne” and his wife[1003].  Henry II King of England confirmed the donation of revenue from "manerio de Contona" [Compton] to Fontevraud by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater suus" by charter dated to [1169][1004].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater eius et Oliva uxor Willelmi", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][1005].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne" in Sussex[1006]m firstly ([1154/62]) as her second husband, OLIVE de Penthièvre, widow of HENRI Seigneur de Fougères, daughter of ETIENNE de Bretagne Comte de Penthièvre, Lord of Richmond & his wife Havise de Guingamp.  Her two marriages are confirmed by the charter dated 1174 under which "Olive daughter of Count Stephen" donated the church of Bennington to the abbey of Sauvigny, with the consent of "Guillelmus de Sancto Johanne maritus meus and Ralf de Filgeriis and her other sons"[1007].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater eius et Oliva uxor Willelmi", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][1008]m secondly (before 1187) GODEHEUT, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1187 under which "William de Sancto Johanne and Robert his brother and Godeheldis wife of William" confirmed the donations to Boxgrave priory by "his grandfather Robert de Haia and his father Robert de Sancto Johanne"[1009]

b)         ROBERT de Saint-Jean (-after [1169]).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names “Willielmum et Robertum de sancto Johanne” as the sons of “Rogero de sancto Johanne” and his wife[1010].  “Robertus de sancto Johanne” donated land “in Walborgetune" to Boxgrove priory, with the consent of "domini Willielmi fratris mei”, for the soul of "…uxoris meæ…", by undated charter[1011].  Henry II King of England confirmed the donation of revenue from "manerio de Contona" [Compton] to Fontevraud by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater suus" by charter dated to [1169][1012].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater eius et Oliva uxor Willelmi", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][1013]m ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  She is referred to in the charter quoted above. 

c)         MURIEL de Saint-Jean .  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex records that “Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” married “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle” by whom she had "filiam…Mabiliam" who married "Adæ de Port"[1014]m RENAUD d´Orval, son of ---. 

5.         [ALIX de Saint-JeanDomesday Descendants names "Richard de Monte (Mont-Saint-Michel) and Alice, sister of John of St John" as the parents of Gilbert de Monte[1015].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “heres Gilberti de Monte…xv annorum” was "nepos Thome de Sancto Johanne et Johannis de Sancto Johanne et Hugonis de Plugenet et Willelmi Fossard"[1016].  The information is not precise enough to ascertain the precise relationship, but presumably a sister of John and Thomas de Saint-Clair married one parent or one grandparent of Gilbert de Mont.  m RICHARD de Mont, son of ---.] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    BAYEUX

 

 

A.      COMTES de BAYEUX

 

 

The diocese of Bayeux comprised only the pagus Bajocassinus (le Bessin), in which the county of Bayeux later developed[1017].  Raoul d´Ivry, uterine half-brother of Richard I Duke of Normandy, seems to have been recognised with the title count by his half-brother, which is generally applied to the castle of Bayeux which he constructed.  The title, however, did not survive his death and no further counts of Bayeux are recorded. 

 

 

1.         ESPERLENG de Pîtres, son of --- m SPROTA, daughter of --- .  From Brittany.  Sprota was previously the concubine or wife of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” and that they had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures[1018].  Esperling & his wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         RAOUL d'Ivry ([942/50]-after 1011).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus dux primus” consulted “Rodulfo comite suo equidem uterino fratre” about his succession before he died[1019].  It is assumed that he was born after the death of Comte Guillaume I, but it is unlikely that he was born much later than 945 if it is correct that the birth of his older half-brother Richard can be dated to [1032] (see the document NORMANDY DUKES).  Comte [de Bayeux].  [m firstly ALBREDA, daughter of --- (-murdered ----).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore”, adding that it was reported that “præfata matrona” beheaded “Lanfredum architectum” after the castle was finished so that he could not build a similar structure for anyone else, and tried to expel her husband who killed her[1020].  It is not certain that “Albereda” in Orderic´s passage was the same person as “Eremburgam” in Guillaume de Jumièges.  It is curious that Orderic does not state in his text that Hugues Bishop of Bayeux and Jean Archbishop of Rouen were the children of “Albereda”: the omission would best be explained if they were born from another marriage of Raoul and “Eremburgam” their mother was a different person from “Albereda”.  If this speculation is correct, the chronology of the children of Raoul suggests that they were born later in his life, presumably from a second marriage if he did marry twice, in which case Albreda would have been his first wife.]  m [secondly] [as her first husband,] EREMBURGE [de Caville/Cacheville], daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[1021].  Comte Raoul & his [second] wife had four children: 

i)          HUGUES d'Ivry (-Oct 1049).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[1022].  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Bishop of Bayeux 1015.  Hugues had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses: 

-         see below

ii)         EMMA d'Ivry .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that one of the daughters of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Osberno de Crepon de qua natus est Willelmus filius Osberni[1023].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60], signed by "…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…"[1024].  "Osberni frater eius [Willelmi]" witnessed a charter dated 1038 or after[1025].  After her husband died, she became abbess of St Amand at Rouen[1026]m OSBERN de Crepon, son of HERFAST & his wife --- (-murdered [1038/42]). 

iii)        daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[1027]m RICHARD de Beaufour, son of ---.  Richard & his wife had [four or more] children: 

(a)       ROBERT de Beaufour .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[1028].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus...de Bellofago” towards the end of his life became a monk at Bec, where “filii eius Richardus et Willelmus” also entered religion[1029]m ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

(1)       RICHARD de Beaufour .  “Robertus...de Bellofago” towards the end of his life became a monk at Bec, where “filii eius Richardus et Willelmus” also entered religion[1030]

(2)       GUILLAUME de Beaufour .  “Robertus...de Bellofago” towards the end of his life became a monk at Bec, where “filii eius Richardus et Willelmus” also entered religion[1031]

(b)       daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[1032]m as his first wife, HUGUES [II] de Montfort, son of HUGUES [I] de Montfort-sur-Risle & his wife --- (-1088 or after). 

(c)       daughters .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[1033]

iv)       JEAN d'Ivry (-1079).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[1034].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore[1035].  Considering the date of his death, Jean must have been considerably younger than his brother Hugues.  One possibility is that he was born from a second unrecorded marriage of his mother.  Bishop of Avranches 1061.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Lanfrancum Cadomensem abbatem” was appointed to succeed after the death of “Maurilius Rotomagensis archiepiscopus” but refused the task and pressed for the appointment of “Joannem Abrincatensium præsulem...filius Radulphi comitis Bajocensium...frater...uterinus Ricardi senioris ducis Normannorum” (who had held that post for seven years and three months, and was archbishop for ten years), even travelling to Rome to obtain Papal consent[1036]Archbishop of Rouen 1069.  Guillaume of Jumièges records the death “V Id Aug” 1067 of “Maurilius...archiepiscopus Rotomagensis” and the appointment of “Ioannes Abrincatinæ urbis præsul...comitis Rodulphi filius” as his successor[1037].  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records that "Joannes filius Rodulfi comitis fratris Ricardi" succeeded as Archbishop of Rouen in 1069, having been bishop of Avranches for seven years and three months[1038].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “XVI Kal Aug” 1077 of "Hugo Lexoviensis episcopus", the subsequent dispute about his place of burial with “Johanni archiepiscopo” who refused to accept the king´s decision at Rouen and, while returning from there by mule, was struck down by a violent seizure, after which he survived for two years without being able to speak[1039].  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records the death in 1079 of "Joannes Rothomag. Archiepiscopus"[1040].  Orderic Vitalis records the death in 1079 of “Johannes archiepiscopus” after governing for eight years and his burial "in baptisterio basilicæ ad Aquilonem", and also records his epitaph[1041]

b)         daughters .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” and that they had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures” who were later married in Normandy with noblemen[1042]

 

 

HUGUES d'Ivry, son of RAOUL d´Ivry Comte [de Bayeux] & his wife Aubrée [de Caville/Cacheville] (-Oct 1049).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[1043].  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Bishop of Bayeux 1015.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Hugo Rodulfi comitis filius, Baiocasinæ urbis præsul” secretly stocked “Ibrilicum castrum” and sought help from France to defend it, but was unable to re-enter the castle besieged by Robert II Duke of Normandy and left in exile[1044].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore[1045]

[m ---.  The name of Hugues´s possible wife or mistress is not known.]   

Hugues & his [wife/mistress] had [two] [illegitimate] children.  No direct proof has been found that Hugues Bishop of Bayeux was the father of Roger (Orderic Vitalis confirms that he was the father of Albreda, see below).  The other candidate is Hugues Bishop of Lisieux, son of Guillaume de Normandie Comte d´Eu and his wife Lesceline.  However, the chronology of the two families suggests that Hugues Bishop of Lisieux must have been born in [1010/20], while the birth of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux must be placed much earlier considering that his father´s birth can probably be estimated to [942/50] (see above).  The charter of Saint-Trinité de Rouen dated 1074 shows that the bishop´s grandson was old enough to have sold property before 1074, which could place his birth in [1040/50].  This birth date range is more consistent with the older of the two bishops being his grandfather, although it would not exclude descent from Hugues Bishop of Lisieux.  In addition, the family of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux has more connections with the pays de Caux, the location of all the properties referred to in the three charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in which the bishop´s son is named.  The bishop of Bayeux´s mother is recorded as having constructed the castle of Ivry, and his sister Emma, wife of Osbern de Crepon dapifer, is named in several charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in connection with property in the pays de Caux

1.         [ROGER (-after [1037/55]).  An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[1046].  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[1047].]  m ODA, daughter of ---.  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[1048].  [same person as…?  ROGER [I] de Mortemer (-[1078/86]).  Stapleton proposed in 1846 that Roger [I] de Mortemer was the same person as Roger, son of "Bishop Hugues"[1049].  The Complete Peerage dismisses Stapleton´s hypothesis[1050].  It argues firstly that the wife of Roger [I] de Mortemer is named Hawise in primary sources, compared with Oda as the wife of the bishop´s son, and also that the bishop´s son is recorded with children named Guillaume and Hugues, whereas Roger [I]´s heir was named Ralph, although it would not be beyond the stretch of imagination to combine the two families, with Roger having married twice.  The third difficulty proposed by the Complete Peerage is harder to dismiss.  This is that the 1074 charter of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen which is quoted below implies that Roger, father of Guillaume, was already deceased at the time of the sale of their property to Raoul de Warenne, whereas sources demonstrate that Roger [I] de Mortemer was still alive in 1078.  A further difficulty with Stapleton´s hypothesis is that, if it was correct, the same person would have been referred to in the sources sometimes as "filius episcopi" and sometimes as "de Mortuomari".  Such dual appellations are unusual.  Different primary sources at the time usually refer to the same individual by the same name and epithet, presumably reflecting the style by which he was normally known among his contemporaries.  If a person was known by two names, the style "X qui et Y" was usually adopted in the sources.  One possible explanation for this apparent exception to normal practice is that, after the confiscation of his castle, "Rogerius de Mortuomari" became known as "Rogerius filius episcopi", although this does not appear consistent with the survival of the name Mortimer among Roger´s descendants long after the castle was lost.]  Roger & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-[after 1074]).  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[1051].  "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[1052]

b)         HUGUES .  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[1053]same person as…?  HUGH de Mortemer (-after 1066).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "Hue de Mortemer…son parent par son pere" his "Connestable d´Angleterre" after the conquest of England[1054].  This co-identity would be the consequence if Roger, son of Bishop Hugues, was the same person as Roger [I] de Mortemer, the possibility of which is discussed above.  If it was correct, the reference to "son parent par son père" would be explained because both King William and Hugh de Mortemer would have descended from Sprota, who was firstly mistress of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie] (ancestor of King William) and, after his death, married Esperling de Pitres who was the paternal grandfather of Hugues d´Ivry Bishop of Evreux. 

2.         ALBREDA .  Chibnall speculates that the grandmother of Ascelin Goël may have been the daughter of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux, which could have provided her grandson with a claim to Ivry by inheritance[1055], assuming that her supposed illegitimacy presented no obstacle.  This parentage and first marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[1056] but it is not known whether based on a specific primary source or on Chibnall´s speculation.   Her parentage and [second] marriage are confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Radulfus tiro filius Alberti de Crevento” attacked “Guitmundum monachum...Manlia venientem in valle Guidonis” who returned on foot to Pacy and begged “Albertum” to protect him from “filium sibi”, on which “Alberada uxor eius” burst into tears, adding in a later passage that she was “Hugonis Bajocensis episcopi filia[1057].  The date of her [second] marriage is estimated because her son died in [1070] when he was a young adult, assuming that the report of his activities by Orderic Vitalis is factually correct.  [m firstly ROBERT d'Ivry, son of --- (-[before 1050 or 1060]).]  m [secondly] ([1050] or [1060]) ALBERT de Cravent, son of --- (-[after 1070 or after 1080], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albertus” donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul (in 1070, see below for a discussion about why this date may be incorrect) but that soon afterwards Albert died and was buried at Ouche, whereupon “heredes...Guido...gener eius, Ebrardi de Rui filius, et Radulfus de Cunella [whose family relationship with the deceased had not been traced], aliique” confirmed this donation[1058].  Albreda & her [second] husband had two children: 

a)         RAOUL de Cravent (-[before 1070 or 1080]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus tiro filius Alberti de Crevento” attacked “Guitmundum monachum...Manlia venientem in valle Guidonis”, who returned on foot to Pacy and begged “Albertum” to protect him from “filium sibi”, on which “Alberada uxor eius” burst into tears, adding in a later passage that Raoul repented before he died, after which Albert in 1070 donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul[1059].  There must be some doubt about the date of this event because Orderic Vitalis records Geoffroy Bishop of Chartres in the dating clause, although in another passage he records the appointment of Bishop Geoffroy in 1077[1060].  Le Prévost suggests that the donation should be redated to 1080[1061]

b)         daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Albertus” donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul (in 1070, see below for a discussion about why this date may be incorrect) but that soon afterwards Albert died and was buried at Ouche, whereupon “heredes...Guido...gener eius, Ebrardi de Rui filius, et Radulfus de Cunella [whose family relationship with the deceased had not been traced], aliique” confirmed this donation[1062]m GUY de Rui, son of EVRARD de Rui & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

B.      VICOMTES du BESSIN (BAYEUX)

 

 

ANSCHITIL, son of ---.  Vicomte.  His name suggests a Viking origin.  "…Anschitillus Baiocacensis vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[1063]

m ---.  The name of Anschitil's wife is not known. 

Anschitil & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         RANULF (-killed in battle Val-es-Dunes 1047).  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli", by charter dated to [1042][1064]Vicomte du Bessin (Bayeux).  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Randulfum Baiocensium vicecomitem" supported "Guido filius Burgundionum comitis" in his rebellion, dated to [1047][1065].  "…Rannulfi filii Ascelini" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1066].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ranulfum Bajocensem ac Haymonem Dentatum et Nigellum de Constantino" rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy at the battle "apud Vallesdunas"[1067]m ALIX de Normandie, illegitimate daughter of RICHARD III Duke of Normandy & his mistress ---.  Robert of Torigny names "Nicolaum…duas filias Papiam…uxorem Walterii de Sancto Walerico et Aeliz uxorem Ranulfi vicecomitis de Baiocis" as the children of "Ricardo secundo duce Normannum filio primi Ricardi"[1068].  Vicomte Ranulf & his wife had one child: 

a)         RANULF [Ralph] "le Meschin" (-after [1098])Vicomte du Bessin (Bayeux).  "…Ranulfus vicecomes Baiocensis…" witnessed the charter dated 1064 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy settled a claim in favour of the monks of Marmoutier relating to property donated by "Guido de Valle"[1069].  "…Rannulfus filius Rannulfi vicecomitis…Rannulfus vicecomes" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[1070].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[1071]m MARGUERITE [Mathilde] d'Avranches, daughter of RICHARD Vicomte d'Avranches & his wife --- (-after [1098]).  She is named "Mathilda soror Hugonis comitis" by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her son[1072].  Her husband is named in another passage, as father of his son Guillaume[1073].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[1074].  Vicomte Ranulf & his wife had four children: 

i)          RICHARD (after [1098]).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[1075].  As Richard is named in this source together with his brother´s wife, his date of death is estimated based on his brother´s estimated marriage date.  “R de Meschin, Richerio vicecomiti Karleoli” donated property to Wetherall priory, Cumberland, for the soul of “…Richard fratris mei…et uxoris meæ Luciæ…”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Osberto vicecomite, Walteof filio Cospatricii comitis, Forno Sigulfi filio, Chetello Ectredi filio…[1076]

ii)         RANULF du Bessin (-17 or 27 Jan 1129, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  Orderic Vitalis names him and his mother[1077].  "…Rannulfus filius Rannulfi vicecomitis…Rannulfus vicecomes" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[1078].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[1079].  He succeeded his father as Vicomte du Bessin (Bayeux).  He was appointed Vicomte d'Avranches in 1120 after the death of his first cousin Richard d'Avranches, and also obtained the grant of the county palatine of Chester thereby becoming Earl of Chester (upon which he surrendered the lordship of Carlisle). 

-         EARLS of CHESTER

iii)        WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin (-[1130/35]).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that William I King of England granted “totam terram de comitatu Cumbriæ” to “Ranulpho de Meschines, et Galfrido fratri eiusdem…et Willielmo fratri eorundem terram de Copland[1080]

-         see below

iv)       GEOFFROY of Gillesland .  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that William I King of England granted “totam terram de comitatu Cumbriæ” to “Ranulpho de Meschines, et Galfrido fratri eiusdem Ranulphi totum comitatum Cestriæ, et Willielmo fratri eorundem terram de Copland”, adding that Geoffroy died without heirs and was succeeded by his brother Ranulf[1081]

2.         [HONFROI (-after [1060]).  "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1082].  It is not certain that Honfroi was the brother of Ranulf son of Anschitil, but no other person with the latter name has yet been identified.] 

3.         [FREDESENDE .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Fredesend amite Ran[nulfi] vicecomitis" of "Osbertivillam", by charter dated to [1180/82][1083].  If "amita" is interpreted strictly in this document, Frédésende would have been Ranulf´s paternal aunt, but this is not beyond doubt.] 

 

 

WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Mathilde] d'Avranches (-[1130/35][1084]).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that William I King of England granted “totam terram de comitatu Cumbriæ” to “Ranulpho de Meschines, et Galfrido fratri eiusdem…et Willielmo fratri eorundem terram de Copland[1085].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillaume son of Ralph the vicomte" was present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[1086].  “Ranulfus Meschinus” donated property to Wetherhal priory, Cumberland by undated charter, witnessed by “uxore mea Lucia et Willelmo fratre meo…[1087].  “Ranulphus comes Cestriæ” records donations to Chester St Werburgh in an undated charter which names “Hugonis comitis avunculi mei”, including a donation by “Willielmus Meschin frater meus” with the consent of “Ranulphi comitis et Ranulphi filii sui[1088].  It is suggested that the mention of “Hugonis comitis avunculi mei” means that this document relates to the brother of Ranulf who was invested as Earl of Chester in 1120.  “Willielmus filius Randulfi” donated property to the priory of St Bee, Cumberland by undated charter[1089].  He was given the barony of Egremont, Cumberland by King Henry I[1090].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Chirkbibeceoch…et ecclesiam S. Begæ” by “Willielmus Meschin” and "villam de Ananderdale et…terræ in Egermond" by "Radulphus filius eius"[1091].  Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, de iure uxoris.  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee´s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[1092].  “Willielmus de Meschines et Cecilia uxor mea” founded Bolton Priory by undated charter[1093].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Ricardus de Lucy" holding "Coupland" in Cumberland, adding that King Henry I had first granted it to "Willelmo Messchin antecessori predicti Ricardi"[1094].  

m as her first husband, CECILY de Rumilly, daughter and heiress of ROBERT de Rumilly [Romilly] of Skipton & his wife ---.  “Willielmus de Meschines et Cecilia uxor mea” founded Bolton Priory by undated charter[1095].  “Cecilia de Romeli” donated property to Bolton Priory by undated charter which names “gener meus Willielmus nepos regis Scotiæ Duncani[1096].  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee´s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[1097].  She married secondly[1098], as his second wife, Henry de Tracy of Barnstaple. 

William & his wife had five children: 

1.         RANULF de Rumilly (-[1135/40]).  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee´s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[1099].  "Ranulfus Meschinus filius Willelmi Meschin" confirmed the donation of land "in Wirchintuna" donated by "Chetellus filius Heltredi" to St Bees by undated charter[1100].  “Ranulphus Meschinus, filius Willielmi, filii Ranulphi” confirmed donations of property to the priory of St Bee, Cumberland, on the advice of “Fulconis avunculi mei…”, by undated charter[1101].  He succeeded his father, but on his death soon after was succeeded by his sisters as co-heiresses[1102].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Chirkbibeceoch…et ecclesiam S. Begæ” by “Willielmus Meschin” and "villam de Ananderdale et…terræ in Egermond" by "Radulphus filius eius"[1103]

2.         MATTHEW de Rumilly (-[after 1141/42]).  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] including a grant to "Matheus de Rumilli" of "terram patris sui quam Gaufridus de Turevill tenet"[1104].  The primary source which confirms his parentage more precisely has not yet been identified. 

3.         ALICE de Rumilly .  A manuscript genealogy of William de Forz Comte d´Aumâle names “Aliciam de Rumeleya” as daughter of “Willielmus de Mechines primus hæres de Sciptun in Craven”, adding that she married “Willielmo filio Duncan” and was buried “apud Fontes[1105].  A different version of her parentage is provided by the Cronicon Cumbriæ which records that “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, married “Aliciam filiam Roberti de Romeney, domini de Skipton in Craven” and his wife “filiam Willielmi de Meschinis domini de Coupland[1106].  Lady of Skipton.  “Willielmus filius Dunecani nepos regis Scotiæ…et Aeliz de Rumeili uxor mea” confirmed donations of property to Bolton Priory by undated charter[1107].  "Aelicia de Rumelli…in libera potestate viduitatis mee" confirmed the donations to St Bees made by "pater meus Willelmus Meschinus et frater meus Ranulfus" by undated charter[1108].  "Aelicia de Rumelli" confirmed the donations to St Bees made by "dominus meus Willelmus nepos regis Scocie" by undated charter[1109].  “Aaliz de Rumelli” donated property to Pontefract Priory, with the consent of “Willielmi filii mei”, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi filii Dunecani”, by undated charter[1110].  Dugdale summarises donations to Southwark priory, including the donation of “cheese at Badleking in the manor of Kingston Lisle in Berkshire” made by "Alexander Fitzgerald" and confirmed by "Alice de Rumeley, wife of Alexander"[1111]m firstly (1138) [as his second wife,] WILLIAM FitzDuncan, son of DUNCAN II King of Scotland & his wife Ethelreda of Northumberland ([1091/94]-[1153/54]).  m secondly ALEXANDER FitzGerold, son of ROBERT FitzGerold & Alice his wife --- (-1178). 

4.         MATILDA de Rumilly (-after 1189[1112]).  “Philippus de Belmeis” founded Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[1113].  The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[1114]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[1115]; (2) Roger Mortimer´s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[1116]; (3) the charter of Philip de Belmeis, her first husband, quoted above.  m firstly PHILIP de Belmeis of Tong, Shropshire, son of [1117]WALTER de Belmeis & his wife --- (-after May 1145).  m secondly ([1150]) HUGH [II] de Mortimer, son of RALPH [I] de Mortimer & his [second/third wife Mabel ---/---] (-Cleobury [26 Feb] [1180/81], bur Wigmore). 

5.         AVICE de Rumilly (-[1179][1118]).  “Amicia filia Cecilie de Rumilli” confirmed donations to the canons of St Mary, for the soul of “Willelmi de Curci filii mei”, by charter dated to [1138/50], witnessed by “Willelmo de Curci filio meo…[1119].  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam[1120].  “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…[1121].  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights´ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[1122]m firstly ([1125]) WILLIAM de Courcy, son of WILLIAM de Courcy [Curcy] & his wife Emma de Falaise (-before 1130).  m secondly WILLIAM Paynell of Drax, son of RALPH Paynell & his [first wife ---] (-[1147]).  [1123]m thirdly (before 1153) WALTER de Percy, son of ALAN de Percy & his wife Emma de Gand . 

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS d´AUNAY-sur-ODON (SAY)

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Say The Complete Peerage refers to this Guillaume de Say but does not establish his relationship with the later Say family (Barony created by writ in 1313, see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY)[1124].  Such a connection is likely given the unique name (according to The Complete Peerage, there is only one place of this name in Normandy about 2 miles south-east of Argentan[1125]).  m AGNES de Grantmesnil, daughter of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife --- (-14 Sep ----).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Agnes married “Guillelmo de Saia[1126]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "14 Sep" of "Agnes filia Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[1127]

 

2.         JORDAN de Say (-after 15 Jul 1131)Domesday Descendants suggests that he was the son of Guillaume de Say[1128], see above.  Seigneur d´Aunay-sur-Odon {Calvados}.  "…Jordano de Say…" witnessed the charter dated 1108 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Holy Trinity, London[1129].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Jordano de Sai" in Oxfordshire[1130].  According to Gallia Christiana, the abbey of Aunay was founded 15 Jul 1131 by Jordan “de Saio prope Argentomum” and Lucy his wife[1131].  "Iordanus de Sai" donated "ecclesiam de Sulethorn" to Eynsham abbey, for the soul of "filii Willelmi" on his burial at the monastery, by charter dated to [before 1161][1132].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Jordani de Saio et Lucie uxoris sue" confirmed by "Richardi de Humetis constabularii et Agnetis uxoris eius", by charter dated to [1181/89][1133]m LUCY [de Rumilly], daughter of [ROBERT de Rumilly of Skipton] & his wife [Cecilia ---].  According to Gallia Christiana, the abbey of Aunay was founded 15 Jul 1131 by Jordan “de Saio prope Argentomum” and Lucy his wife[1134]Domesday Descendants says that Robert de Rumilly was "doubtless father also of Lucy wife of Jordan de Sai", but does not explain the reasoning[1135].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Jordani de Saio et Lucie uxoris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][1136].  Jordan & his wife had five children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Say (-bur Eynsham).  "Iordanus de Sai" donated "ecclesiam de Sulethorn" to Eynsham abbey, for the soul of "filii Willelmi" on his burial at the monastery, by charter dated to [before 1161][1137]

b)         ENGUERRAND de Say .  "Willelmus de Albiniaco" donated “ecclesias de villa...Ham” to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1132/51], witnessed by “...Olivarius frater Willelmi de Albiniaco et Radulfus de Haia et Engerannus de Sai...[1138].  "…Engueranno de Sayo…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[1139]

c)         GILBERT de SayDomesday Descendants names "Gilbert and Peter" as sons of Jordan de Say without citing the corresponding primary source[1140]

d)         PIERRE de SayDomesday Descendants names "Gilbert and Peter" as sons of Jordan de Say without citing the corresponding primary source[1141]

e)         AGNES de Say .  Her parentage and marriage are referred to in Domesday Descendants[1142].  Richard du Hommet donated property to Aunay with the consent of "uxore mea Agnete et filiis meis Willelmo, Engerranno et Jordano" by undated charter[1143].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][1144]m RICHARD du Hommet, son of ROBERT & his wife --- (-1181). 

 

 

 

D.      SIRES de CREULLY

 

 

RICHARD FitzRobert, son of ROBERT Fitzroy Earl of Gloucester & his wife Mabel [Maud or Sibylle] FitzRobert ([1120/35]-1175).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his son "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados[1145].  He succeeded his mother as Sire de Creully.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[1146]

m --- de Montfort, daughter of HUGUES van Gent Seigneur de Montfort-en-Risle & his wife Adeline de Beaumont ([1125/40]-).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[1147]

Richard & his wife had eight children: 

1.         PHILIPPE de Creully (-[before May 1219]).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[1148]Sire de Creully.  "Philippe de Creully, fils de Richard, fils du comte de Creully" confirmed donations to the priory of Sainte-Barbe by "Roger Malfilastre, Thomas Malfilastre son frère, et le fils dudit Thomas…", by undated charter[1149].  "Philippus de Croileio miles…dicti Ricardi hæres" confirmed the donations of the mills at Mesnilbuye to the church of Bayeux made by "Ricardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ pater meus" by charter dated to [1184/1218][1150].  "Ricardus de Croilleio" confirmed the donations of the mills at Mesnilbuye to the church of Bayeux made by "Ricardus filius comitis pater meus…Philippus de Croilleio frater meus primogenitus" by charter dated to [1184/1218][1151]m ---.  The name of Philippe´s wife is not known.  Philippe & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are suggested by a charter dated May 1219 under which "Gillebertus de Tilleriis dominus de Croleio" granted land "in parochia de Maton" to "Petro de Telleio"[1152], confirmed by "Ricardus de Croleio miles" by charter dated Sep 1220[1153]m GILBERT de Tillières, son of GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières & his wife Eléonore de Vitré (-after Sep 1220).  Sire de Creully, de iure uxoris.] 

2.         RICHARD de Creully (-after 1234).  "Ricardus de Croilleio" confirmed the donations of the mills at Mesnilbuye to the church of Bayeux made by "Ricardus filius comitis pater meus…Philippus de Croilleio frater meus primogenitus" by charter dated to [1184/1218][1154].  "Ricardus de Croleio miles" confirmed the grant of land "in parochia de Maton" to "Petro de Telleio" made by "Gilleberti de Theleriis" by charter dated Sep 1220[1155].  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter[1156].  "Guillaume Acaria…assisté de Richard et Raoul de Creully frères" confirmed the donation to the Maison-Dieu de Lisieux made by "Hugues et Guillaume La Prevost…" by charter dated Apr 1232[1157].  "Richard de Creully" confirmed a donation to the abbey of Aunay made by "Tustin de Lanteuil" by charter dated 1234[1158].  The possible descendants of Richard de Creully have been studied by Thierry Le Hête[1159]

3.         ROGER de Creully (-before 1248).  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Nicolas de Creully, Godefroi de Creully…"[1160].  "Roger de Creully fils du comte de Glocestre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues, for the health of "son frère Philippe", by undated charter, witnessed by "ses frères Robert et Henri de Creully…Réginald fils de la comtesse"[1161].  “Rogerus filius Ricardi de Croileio” donated rights “in decima de Manereio” to Jumièges by charter dated to [1198/1213][1162]m as her second husband, LUCIE de Reviers, widow of ENGUERRAND de Camprond, daughter of --- (-after 1248).  "Lucie de Reviers, veuve du seigneur Roger de Creully chevalier" donated produce from her mill La Fosse to Sainte-Marie de Longues, with the consent of "son fils Guillaume", by charter dated 1248[1163].  Her first marriage is confirmed by an undated charter under which "Guillaume de Montfort" granted produce from his mill at La Fosse to "Enguérand de Campo-Rotondo et à Lucie sa femme"[1164], confirmed by the charter dated 1248 under which "Guillaume de Campo Rotundo chevalier seigneur de Jore" confirmed the previous donation by "sa mère Lucie de Reviers"[1165]

4.         ROBERT de Creully .  "Roger de Creully fils du comte de Glocestre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues, for the health of "son frère Philippe", by undated charter, witnessed by "ses frères Robert et Henri de Creully…Réginald fils de la comtesse"[1166].  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter[1167]

5.         GUILLAUME de Creully .  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter[1168]

6.         HENRI de Creully .  "Roger de Creully fils du comte de Glocestre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues, for the health of "son frère Philippe", by undated charter, witnessed by "ses frères Robert et Henri de Creully…Réginald fils de la comtesse"[1169]

7.         RAOUL de Creully (-after Apr 1232).  Joan Queen of Sicily bequeathed 30 marcs to "Ralf de Crolly" under her testament dated 1199[1170].  "Guillaume Acaria…assisté de Richard et Raoul de Creully frères" confirmed the donation to the Maison-Dieu de Lisieux made by "Hugues et Guillaume La Prevost…" by charter dated Apr 1232[1171]

8.         daughter .  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Ingerannus Patric filius eius [Guillermi Patric]" and "filiam Richardi filii comitis"[1172]m ENGUERRAND Patric, son of GUILLAUME Patric & his wife ---. 

 

 

1.         NICOLAS de Creully .  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Nicolas de Creully, Godefroi de Creully…"[1173].  The fact that Nicolas witnessed, but did not consent to this donation, suggests that he was not the full brother of the named four brothers.  The names of his sons suggest a close family connection with Richard FitzRobert, but maybe Nicolas was Richard´s illegitimate son.  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[1174]m ---.  The name of Nicolas´s wife is not known.  Nicolas & his wife had three children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Creully .  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[1175].  "Guillaume fils aîné de Nicolas de Creully" donated land at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter[1176]

b)         PHILIPPE de Creully .  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[1177]

c)         NICOLAS de Creully .  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[1178]

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS de CREVECŒUR

 

 

Crèvecœur is a canton in the present-day French département of Oise.  It was located on the borders with the duchy of Normandy and, as can be seen below, many members of the Crèvecœur families were closely associated with Normandy and were granted land in England in the 12th century by the English kings.  There appear to have been several different families who adopted the name Crèvecœur, and between whom no family connection has yet been established.  In addition, Seigneurs de Crèvecœur are recorded from the mid-12th century, descended from the family of the seigneurs de Breteuil (see the document PARIS REGION NOBILILTY).  Hugues de Breteuil, brother of Valéran [III] Sire de Breteuil, is recorded as seigneur de Crèvecœur from about the 1150s.  No indication has been found about how Hugues acquired the seigneurie.  In particular, no relationship has yet been traced with any of the earlier Crèvecœur families.  One possibility is that Hugues was born from his father´s second wife Ivette, whose family origin is not known but who may have had some connection with Crèvecœur.  The seigneurs de Crèvecœur are shown at the end of the present section after the other Crèvecœur families.  The seigneurie was held by members of the same family until the marriage in the early 16th century of Louise de Crèvecœur, heiress of François de Crèvecœur, to Guillaume Gouffier de Bonnivet. 

 

 

1.         HAMON de Crèvecœur (-1119 or before).  Domesday Descendants names "Haimo de Crèvecœur, Calvados, arr. Lisieux, cant. Mézidon, whom he succeeded by 1119" as the father of Robert de Crèvecœur but does not cite the primary source which confirms this information[1179]m ---.  The name of Hamon´s wife is not known.  She was presumably the sister of Hamon dapifer, assuming that “avunculi mei” in the following document is correctly translated as maternal uncle:  Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde...” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter[1180].  Hamon & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT de Crèvecœur (-[1154/56]).  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo"[1181].  "…Roberto de Crevecor…" witnessed the charter dated 1121 under which Henry I King of England granted "totam dotem matris sue…terram de Sceldedena et de Herleia et dominicum managium suum de Wintonia extra portam civitatis" to "Willelmo Maledocto"[1182].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robto de Crepacor" in Kent[1183]Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde, ecclesia de Chettham...de Renham...de Gutherste...de Lamberherste...de Farlege...de Terstane” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter witnessed by “Roysa uxore mea, Elya fratre meo, Hamone filio Vitalis...[1184]m ROHESE, daughter of ---.  Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde, ecclesia de Chettham...de Renham...de Gutherste...de Lamberherste...de Farlege...de Terstane” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter witnessed by “Roysa uxore mea, Elya fratre meo, Hamone filio Vitalis...[1185].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo"[1186].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          HELIE de Crèvecœur .  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo"[1187]

ii)         DANIEL de Crèvecœur (-1177).  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes other charters which record that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo" and that "Daniel de Crevequer" confirmed the donations made by "pater meus Robertus"[1188].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Daniel de Crevequor viii l" in Kent in [1161/62] and "xi l i m" in [1167/68][1189].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the names of those providing knights for military service with "Danielis de Crevequer" in Kent[1190].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Daniel de Crevequer" held [one] knights fee in Sussex under the Earl of Arundel[1191].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Daniel de Creuecuer" in Kent[1192]m ISABEL, daughter of ---.  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Daniel de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent for the soul of "sororis meæ Gunnoræ, quas tenuit uxor Wyse, et Edstanus" and made another donation for the soul of "Isabellæ uxoris meæ"[1193].  Daniel & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ROBERT de Crèvecœur (-after [1210/12])Rodbertus de Crevequer” confirmed the donation of “duas terras...Techesto Rochester, made by “Helyas filius Hamonis” with the consent of “patris mei Danielis de Crevequer et mater eius Roeis”, by undated charter[1194]

-         see below.    

iii)        GUNNOR de Crèvecœur .  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Daniel de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent for the soul of "sororis meæ Gunnoræ, quas tenuit uxor Wyse, et Edstanus" and made another donation for the soul of "Isabellæ uxoris meæ"[1195]m --- Wyse, son of ---. 

b)         HELIE de CrèvecœurRobertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde, ecclesia de Chettham...de Renham...de Gutherste...de Lamberherste...de Farlege...de Terstane” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter witnessed by “Roysa uxore mea, Elya fratre meo, Hamone filio Vitalis...[1196].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Helias de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent[1197].  It is not known whether this last document refers to the brother of Robert de Crèvecœur.  same person as...?  HELIE de Crèvecœur .  The chronology suggests that Hélie de Crèvecœur who is named in the following document was the same person as the brother of Robert de Crèvecœur, but this has not been confirmed beyond doubt.  An undated charter records that “in tempore Henrici regis primiElyas de Crevequer” donated “ecclesie de Serres...advocacionem” to the canons of Leeds priory who donated it to “clericum suum Radulfum Pykot” who resigned his position and became a knight, that “Emma filie et heredes dicti Elye” later confirmed her father´s donation, and that later still “Hamo...dominus medietatis manerii de Serres” further confirmed the donation[1198]m ---.  The name of Hélie´s wife is not known.  Hélie & his wife had one child: 

i)          EMMA de Crèvecœur .  An undated charter records that “in tempore Henrici regis primiElyas de Crevequer” donated “ecclesie de Serres...advocacionem” to the canons of Leeds priory who donated it to “clericum suum Radulfum Pykot” who resigned his position and became a knight, that “Emma filie et heredes dicti Elye” later confirmed her father´s donation, and that later still “Hamo...dominus medietatis manerii de Serres” further confirmed the donation[1199]

 

 

1.         AVICE de Crèvecœur ([1114/15]-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Avicia de Crievequor…lxx annorum”, her fee "i militis…de feodo comitis Legrecestrie…in Croxton", and names “Robertus de Bouesbez filius filii sui…heres eius…xxii annorum” and records that she also had three daughters "quas Dominus Rex maritavit"[1200]m --- de Bousbes, son of ---. 

 

2.         HUGUES de Crèvecœur (-after [1133]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records knights of the church of Bayeux in [1133], "Hugo de Crevequer" with five knights[1201]m ---.  The name of Hugues´s wife is not known.  Hugues & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Crèvecœur (-after Jan 1153).  "…Willielmo de Crivecuer…" witnessed the charter dated [Jan/Aug] 1153 under which Henry Duke of Normandy donated property to Flexley abbey[1202].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Barbe-en-Auge, including donations by "Willelmi de Crievecuer", by charter dated to [1185/89][1203]

 

 

ROBERT de Crèvecœur, son of DANIEL de Crèvecœur & his wife Isabel (-after [1210/12])Rodbertus de Crevequer” confirmed the donation of “duas terras...Techesto Rochester, made by “Helyas filius Hamonis” with the consent of “patris mei Danielis de Crevequer et mater eius Roeis”, by undated charter[1204].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus filius Danielis de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent[1205].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Crevequer" paying "vii l, xiv milites" in Kent[1206].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "…Robertus de Crevequor…" was granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Kent[1207].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Crevequor" paying "xiv l…xiv milites" in Kent[1208].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Crevequor" holding one and three quarters knights´ fees (location unspecified), one quarter "in Dene", one "in Cheveninges", one "in Fotescraye", as well as twelve other unspecified knights´ fees, in Kent in [1210/12][1209]

m ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known. 

Robert & his wife had one child: 

1.         HAMON de Crèvecœur (-before 6 Apr 1263).  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Hamo de Crevequer" confirmed the donations to Leeds priory in Kent made by "Roberti de Crevequer atavi mei, vel Danielis avi mei vel Roberti patris mei", witnessed by "…domino Roberto de Crevequer filio meo…"[1210].  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Hamo de Crevequoer" dated 11 Jun 1217[1211].  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Robert de Creuker, son of Hamo de Creweker the younger, and nepos of the said Hamo deceased aged 24 and more is his heir…[to] Bokingefaud manor [Kent]", and "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[1212]m firstly ---.  The name of Hamon´s first wife is not known.  This first marriage is indicated by the documents quoted below.  m secondly MATILDA d´Avranches, daughter of WILLIAM d´Avranches & his wife Matilda de Bocland (-before 6 Apr 1263).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches"[1213].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her…" and names her heirs as noted below[1214].  Hamon & his first wife had three children: 

a)         HAMON de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[1215]m ---.  The name of Hamon´s wife is not known.  The charters quoted below under her son Robert suggest that she may have been heiress of the Cressy family.  Hamon & his wife had children: 

i)          ROBERT de Crèvecœur ([1238/39]-after 5 Jun 1293).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Robert de Creuker, son of Hamo de Creweker the younger, and nepos of the said Hamo deceased aged 24 and more is his heir…[to] Bokingefaud manor [Kent]"[1216].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus filius Hammonis de Crevequer junioris" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent 3 Dec 1272[1217].  “Robertus de Creuequer, dominus manerii quod fuit Hugonis de Cressy in villa de Trottesclyve” confirmed land “in Parva Wrotham” to Willelmo le Ken servienti meo” by charter dated [1272/73][1218].  “Robertus de Creuquer filius Hamonis de Creuquer junioris” donated his rights “in manerio de Trottesclyve”, which had belonged to Stephani de Cressy”, to Rochester by charter dated 2 Jun 1278[1219].  “Robertus de Creuquer...et Iseude uxori mee” settled a dispute with “dominum Rogerium Leyburne” relating to maneria sua de Trottesclyve et de Flete”, from the reversion of the dowry of “Ermentruda que fuit uxor Stephani de Cressy...per manum domini Willelmi de Stoteville tunc mariti sui”, by charter dated 5 Jun 1293[1220]m ISOLDA, daughter of --- (-after 5 Jun 1293).  “Robertus de Creuquer...et Iseude uxori mee” settled a dispute with “dominum Rogerium Leyburne” relating to maneria sua de Trottesclyve et de Flete”, from the reversion of the dowry of “Ermentruda que fuit uxor Stephani de Cressy...per manum domini Willelmi de Stoteville tunc mariti sui”, by charter dated 5 Jun 1293[1221]

ii)         JOHN de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[1222]

iii)        THOMAS de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[1223]

b)         MATTHEW de Crèvecœur ([1222/23]-after 1263).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[1224]

c)         ROBERT de Crèvecœur ([1232/33]-).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[1225]

Hamon & his second wife had five children:

d)         WILLIAM de Crèvecœur (-before 6 Apr 1263).  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body"[1226]m as her first husband, MABEL, daughter of FULK [IV] FitzWarin & his [first/second] wife [--- de Clifford/Constance de Tosny] (-before 24 May 1297).  She married secondly as his first wife, John de Tregoz, later Lord Tresgoz.  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body"[1227]

e)         AGNES de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[1228].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body", names as heirs of "[the said Maud] Juliana daughter of John son of Agnes one of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 23 and more, John de Lenham son of Iseut the second of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 60 and more"[1229]m JOHN de Sandwich, son of ---. 

f)          ISOLDA de Crèvecœur (-before 1263).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[1230].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body", names as heirs of "[the said Maud] Juliana daughter of John son of Agnes one of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 23 and more, John de Lenham son of Iseut the second of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 60 and more"[1231]m NICHOLAS de Lenham, son of ---. 

g)         ELEANOR de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[1232]m BERTRAM de Criel, son of ---. 

h)         ISABEL de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[1233]m HENRY de Gaunt, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         PIERRE de Crèvecœur (-before 1175).  “Willelmus [...cum uxore mea et liberis cum fratribus...meis] et Petrus [...cum Girardo et ceteris fratribus...meis] vicedomini Gerboreti” confirmed the donation of “terram suam de Ursimonte” made to Lannoy abbey by “...Petrus de Crevecor cum uxore sua Emelina et filio suo Waltero...” by charter dated 1160[1234]m EMMELINE, daughter of --- (-after 1175).  “Willelmus [...cum uxore mea et liberis cum fratribus...meis] et Petrus [...cum Girardo et ceteris fratribus...meis] vicedomini Gerboreti” confirmed the donation of “terram suam de Ursimonte” made to Lannoy abbey by “...Petrus de Crevecor cum uxore sua Emelina et filio suo Waltero...” by charter dated 1160[1235].  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[1236].  Pierre & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         GAUTHIER (-after 1211).  “Willelmus [...cum uxore mea et liberis cum fratribus...meis] et Petrus [...cum Girardo et ceteris fratribus...meis] vicedomini Gerboreti” confirmed the donation of “terram suam de Ursimonte” made to Lannoy abbey by “...Petrus de Crevecor cum uxore sua Emelina et filio suo Waltero...” by charter dated 1160[1237].  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[1238].  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1239].  “Galterus de Crepicordio” donated property “in territorio de Copemont” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Petri filii sui”, by charter dated 1211[1240]m MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1241].  Gauthier & his wife had six children: 

i)          PIERRE .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1242].  “Galterus de Crepicordio” donated property “in territorio de Copemont” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Petri filii sui”, by charter dated 1211[1243].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[1244]m ALINE, daughter of ---.  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[1245]

ii)         GUY .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1246].  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[1247].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[1248]m MARGUERITE, daughter of ---.  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina” by charter dated 1221[1249]

iii)        CLEMENCE .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1250].  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[1251].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[1252]m ADAM de Bovereches, son of ---. 

iv)       ERMENGARDE .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1253].  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[1254]m GARIN, son of ---. 

v)        AUBREYE .  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[1255]m GUILLAUME Patin, son of ---. 

vi)       GERARD .  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina” by charter dated 1221[1256].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[1257]m ALINE, daughter of ---.  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina” by charter dated 1221[1258]

b)         PHILIPPE .  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[1259].  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][1260]

c)         [--- .  m ---.]  Two children: 

i)          GERVAIS .  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[1261]

ii)         ROGER .  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[1262].

 

 

1.         HUGUES de Crèvecœur (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Hugo de Crevequer, i militem" among those providing military service for William Earl of Gloucester in Kent[1263]Hugo de Crevecuer” donated “terre...de feodo de Crevecuer apud Riencort” inherited from “Ascelino de Bules et...uxore eius Freessent” to Saint-Just-en-Chaussée by undated charter (12th century)[1264]

 

 

1.         RENAUD de Crèvecœur (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Reginaldus de Crevequer viii m et dimidiam" in Lincolnshire in [1161/62][1265].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Reginaldus Crevequer" held one half of one knight´s fee from "comitis Simonis" in Lincolnshire[1266]m MATILDA, daughter of --- ([1124/25]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis que fuit uxor Reginaldi de Crievequeor…lx annorum et amplius” and her land "de Redburne"[1267].  Renaud & his wife had four children: 

a)         SIMON de Crèvecœur (-before 1185).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Crevequer xiii l x s" in Lincolnshire in [1171/72][1268].  “Alexander de Creuequer” donated land "in Culgait" to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Symone de Creuequer…"[1269]m --- de Goxhill, daughter of ROBERT FitzErneis de Goxhill & his wife Adeline Ingram (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, her land "in Huddintune…de feodo Walteri de Neville", adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage naming her mother "filie Johannis Ingelram" and specifying that her younger son was 4 years old, and that "post mortem Simonis de Crievequor terra de Hakenton fuit in manu Domini Regis"[1270].  Simon & his wife had four children: 

i)          son ([1179/80]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage specifying that her younger son was 4 years old[1271]

ii)         son ([1180/81]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage specifying that her younger son was 4 years old[1272]

iii)        two daughters .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage specifying that her younger son was 4 years old[1273]

b)         ALEXANDER de Crèvecœur (-before 1204).  “Alexander de Creuequer” donated land "in Culgait" to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "Adam de Mortegeg, Warino, Symone de Creuequer…"[1274].  "Alex de Crevequor" paid a fine relating to "xiv feod milit et dimid versus Cecil de Crevequor" in Lincolnshire, dated 1201[1275].  "Alexander de Creuequer" donated land in Hackthorn and Redbourne "in feudo Symonis filii Willlemi" to Bullington Priory, in exchange for land donated by "pater meus Reginaldus", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II[1276].  [The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alexander de Crevequer" holding three and one half knights´ fees in "honor de Crevequer" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][1277].]  m firstly ---.  The name of Alexander´s first wife is not known.  This first marriage is suggested by the order dated 1204, quoted below, which appears to indicate that the mother of Alexander´s daughter Cecilia was not Amabel.  m secondly as her first husband, AMABEL, daughter of ADAM FitzSwein & his wife ---.  Her parentage is indicated by the undated charter under which [her husband] “Alexander de Creuequer” donated "molendinum meum de Culgait" to Wetherhal priory[1278] and another undated charter [her supposed father] “Adam filius Suani” also donated "molendinum meum de Culgait" to Wetherhal[1279].  "Cecilia de Crevequor" paid a fine for "terre…in Harpeswell et Herdewic qu´s Amabil q fuit uxor Alex de Crevequor tenuit in dote ex dono ipsius Alex et q ad ipsam Cecil q fuit fil eidsdem Alex et hs ipsa et jure hereditario deb revti", in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[1280].  She married secondly William de Neville.  Alexander & his first wife had one child: 

i)          CECILIA de Crèvecœur (-after 1212).  "Walterus de Nevilla…et Ceciliam uxorem meam" donated a fishery in the river Ancolne to Bullington priory by charter dated to the late 12th century, sealed by "Walteri de Nevila…Cecilie de Crevecwer"[1281].  The document does not name Cecilia´s parents, but the chronology of the references to the Crèvecœur family in Lincolnshire suggests that Cecilia may have been the daughter of Alexander de Crèvecœur.  This would also explain the transmission of the name Alexander into the Neville family.  Her parentage is confirmed by the order dated 1204 which is quoted below.  "Alex de Crevequor" paid a fine relating to "xiv feod milit et dimid versus Cecil de Crevequor" in Lincolnshire, dated 1201[1282].  "Cecil´ de Crevequor" paid a fine for "hereditate sua un dissaisita fuit p perceptu dñi Reg, et uñ Alex de Neovil fil suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[1283].  "Cecilia de Crevequor" paid a fine for "terre…in Harpeswell et Herdewic qu´s Amabil q fuit uxor Alex de Crevequor tenuit in dote ex dono ipsius Alex et q ad ipsam Cecil q fuit fil eidsdem Alex et hs ipsa et jure hereditario deb revti", in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[1284].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hugo filius Radulfi" held property "de baronia Cecillie de Crevequer, in Askebi, Sumerdebi et Enderbi et Teford et Hamringham et Willeton" in Lincolnshire[1285].  m WALTER de Neville, son of GILBERT de Neville & his wife --- (-after 1194). 

c)         AMABLE de Crèvecœur .  "Amable de Creuequer" donated land "de Hactorn…iuxta Alexandrum de Creuequer in parte", of Bullington priory, for the souls of "patrum et matrum nostrorum…viri mei Hugonis de Chene", by charter dated to late in the reign of King Henry II[1286]m HUGH de Chesney, son of ---. 

d)         GILBERT de Crèvecœur .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

1.         RENAUD de Crèvecœur (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Reginaldus de Crevequer" held property "in Blesebi in Houtton…in Snelleslund et Suntorp et Reresbi" in Lincolnshire[1287].  

 

2.         ISABELLE de Crèvecœur (-after Apr 1217).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Isabella de Crevequer…cum Reginaldo de Cornhill viro suo" dated 12 Apr 1217[1288]m REGINALD de Cornhill, son of --- (-after Apr 1217). 

 

 

HUGUES de Breteuil, son of ERARD [III] Sire de Breteuil & his [first/second] wife [Beatrix de Coucy/Ivette ---] (-[28] Mar 1184, bur Abbaye de Breteuil)Odon Bishop of Beauvais confirmed donations to Lannoy, including the donation of property “in villa et in terra Teoleti” made by “Everardus Britolii dominus et filii eius Walerannus, Everardus et Hugo”, by charter dated 1140[1289]Seigneur de Crèvecœur.  As noted in the introduction to the present section, no indication has yet been found about how Hugues acquired the seigneurie de Crèvecœur.  One possibility is that he was the son of his father´s second wife, whose family origin is unknown but who may have been related to the earlier Crèvecœur families who are shown above.  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1290]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179, witnessed by "Manasserus de Britolio…"[1291]"Aelidis comitissa Claromontis et domina Britulli" confirmed the donation to the church of Breteuil by "Hugo de Crepicordio frater patris mei Galeranni" for the soul of "Petronille filie sue" and confirmed after his death by "Heverardus eius filius successor et heres" by charter dated 1194[1292]

m (before 1157) ADA de Gerberoy, daughter of HELIE [II] Vidame de Gerberoy & his wife Martine ---.  Hugo de Britolio, Galeranus frater eius, Ada uxor Hugonis” subscribed a charter dated 1157 which records a donation to Beaupré[1293]Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1160, which records a donation to Beaupré made by Gérard de Caigny”, subscribed by “Hugo de Britulio, gener ipsius Helye vicedomini Gerboredensis[1294]Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1295]

Hugues & his wife had five children: 

1.         ERARD de Crèvecœur (-[1183/90]).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1296]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179[1297]Seigneur de Crèvecœur.  "Aelidis comitissa Claromontis et domina Britulli" confirmed the donation to the church of Breteuil by "Hugo de Crepicordio frater patris mei Galeranni" for the soul of "Petronille filie sue" and confirmed after his death by "Heverardus eius filius successor et heres" by charter dated 1194[1298]

2.         ENGUERRAND de Crèvecœur (-[1204/05]).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1299]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179[1300]Seigneur de Crèvecœur.  “Ingelramus de Crevecuer” donated property to Beauvais Saint-Lucien, with the consent of “uxoris Clementiæ”, by charter dated 1190[1301]m as her first husband, CLEMENCE de Gerberoy, daughter of PIERRE [III] de Gerberoy & his wife Juliana de Gerberoy.  “Ingelramus de Crevecuer” donated property to Beauvais Saint-Lucien, with the consent of “uxoris Clementiæ”, by charter dated 1190[1302].  Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated 1240 under which [her son] “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais[1303].  She married secondly Eudes de Ronquerolles.  “Clementia de Crevecuer”, in the absence of “domino Odone milite ad præsens marito meo” on pilgrimage to the Holy Land, confirmed a donation by “Giroldus de Crevecuer” of property held from “Ingelrani quondam mariti mei”, by charter dated Jul 1220[1304].  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN de Crèvecœur (-1240).  Seigneur de CrèvecœurJoannes de Crevecor” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Ingerranus de Crevecor pater meus...et domina Clementia mater mea” by charter dated 1219[1305].  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[1306]Guillelmus de Bello saltu miles dominus Brithulii” [presumably acting in his capacity as head of the Breteuil family] confirmed the donation of “medietatem terre in terra Alodiorum” made to Beaupré by “bone memorie Ingeranno de Crepicordio milite et domina Clementia quondam eius uxore” and by “dominus Johannes de Crepicordio miles eorum filius heres terre...et Aelis uxor dicti Johannis” by charter dated 1231[1307]Joannes de Crepicordio et dominus” confirmed the donation to Beauvais Saint-Lucien made by “Vuilelmus, Petrus, Ricardus et Petronilla soror eorumdem de Tilloel...” by charter dated 1239[1308].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[1309]m ALIX, daughter of ---(-1279).  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[1310].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[1311].  Jean & his wife had three children: 

i)          RENAUD de Crèvecœur (-1282).  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[1312].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[1313]

-         SEIGNEURS de CREVECŒUR

ii)         EUDES de Crèvecœur (-after 1240).  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[1314].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[1315]

iii)        ISABELLE de Crèvecœur .  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[1316]

b)         GUY (-after Oct 1250).  “Guido de Crepicordio miles filius dominæ Clementiæ de Crepicordio” donated property to Beauvais Hôtel-Dieu by charter dated Oct 1250[1317]

3.         MATHILDE de Crèvecœur (-after 1179).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1318]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179[1319]

4.         SARA de CrèvecœurHugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1320]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179, witnessed by "Manasserus de Britolio…"[1321]Nun at Variville 1179. 

5.         PETRONILLE de Crèvecœur (-before 1194).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[1322].  "Aelidis comitissa Claromontis et domina Britulli" confirmed the donation to the church of Breteuil by "Hugo de Crepicordio frater patris mei Galeranni" for the soul of "Petronille filie sue" and confirmed after his death by "Heverardus eius filius successor et heres" by charter dated 1194[1323]

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS du HOMMET

 

 

1.         SIMON du Hommet (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Sym de Humez" in Essex[1324]

 

2.         ROBERTDomesday Descendants says that he is recorded as "nepos episcopi", and is said to have been the grandson [nephew?] of Odo Bishop of Bayeux but that "the evidence is slight and ambiguous"[1325]m ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  It is suggested that she was related to the Verdun family as shown by the following charter which records that Bertram de Verdun was brought up by [her son] Richard du Hommet: “Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit”, by undated charter[1326].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD du Hommet (-20 Feb 1181).  Connétable de Normandie.  "Ricardo de Humez constabulario…Roberto de Dunstanvilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/54] under which Henri Duke of Normandy ceded the former house of "Conani thesaurarii" to Bayeux until his heirs paid a debt[1327].  "Ricardus de Humez constabularius, Richardus de Haia…Robertus de Dunstanvilla…" witnessed the charter dated under which Henri Duke of Normandy notified a judgment relating to the house of the late "Conani thesaurarii" by charter dated to [1152/54][1328].  Richard de Bohon Bishop of Coutances notified "…Ricardo de Hometo constabulo regis…" that he had placed a priest of the church of Thaon by charter dated to [1164][1329].  "Guillelmus de Humeto" confirmed the donation to Bayeux of the church of Hérils by "Roberti de Novo Burgo" by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Humeto…"[1330].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardi de Humez" held two knights fees in Sussex under the Earl of Arundel[1331].  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius Henrici regis Angliæ” donated the church of St. Andrew, Stanford to Stanford Nunnery by charter dated 3 Feb 1170[1332].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Ricardus de Humeto" with 3 and a half knights "de honore de Hummeto" and 18 knights in his own service[1333].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][1334].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1181 of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis", adding that he had lived one and a half years as a monk "in abbatia de Alneto" [Aunay] which he had built and that he left "filios suos heredes suæ terræ…Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum"[1335]m AGNES de Say, daughter of JORDAN de Say & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are referred to in Domesday Descendants[1336].  Richard du Hommet donated property to Aunay with the consent of "uxore mea Agnete et filiis meis Willelmo, Engerranno et Jordano" by undated charter[1337].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][1338].  Richard & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          GUILLAUME du Hommet .  Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum" as the sons and heirs of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis" when recording his death[1339].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][1340].  "Guillelmus de Humeto" confirmed the donation to Bayeux of the church of Hérils by "Roberti de Novo Burgo" by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Humeto…"[1341].  Connétable de Normandie.  Henry II King of England confirmed "Willelmo de Humetis constabulariam meam" in his office previously held by "Ricardus de Humetis pater suus" by charter dated 1180[1342].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Willelmus de Homez" paying "xx s, i militem" in Hampshire[1343].  "Willelmus de Humeto constabularius Normanniæ" donated half the church of Louvières to Bayeux, in the presence of "Jordano filio meo episcopo Lexoviensi", by charter dated to [1202/05], which names "Ricardi patris mei"[1344].  “Willielmus de Humeth” donated property to Stanford Nunnery, confirmed by King John by charter dated 22 Nov [1199/1205][1345]m LUCIE, daughter of ---.  "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "domini mei Willelmi de Humetis et Ricardi filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…"[1346].  “Lucia uxor domini Willielmi de Humet constabularii domini regis” donated "terra mea de Bradecrofd" to Stanford Nunnery, with the consent of "domini mei Willielmi et Ricardi filii mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Jordano de Humet, Ricardo de Humet, Willielmo de Sae, Henrico fratre suo…"[1347].  Guillaume & his wife had three children: 

(a)       RICHARD du Hommet .  "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "domini mei Willelmi de Humetis et Ricardi filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…"[1348].  “Lucia uxor domini Willielmi de Humet constabularii domini regis” donated "terra mea de Bradecrofd" to Stanford Nunnery, with the consent of "domini mei Willielmi et Ricardi filii mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Jordano de Humet, Ricardo de Humet, Willielmo de Sae, Henrico fratre suo…"[1349]m GILLE de la Haye, daughter of RICHARD de la Haye & his wife Mathilde [de Vernon].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[1350]

(b)       JORDAN du Hommet .  "Willelmus de Humeto constabularius Normanniæ" donated half the church of Louvières to Bayeux, in the presence of "Jordano filio meo episcopo Lexoviensi", by charter dated to [1202/05], which names "Ricardi patris mei"[1351]

(c)       AGNES du Hommet (-before 12 Nov 1223).  King John confirmed "terra de Wichenson [Winchendon, Buckinghamshire] q Willelmus de Humet pater suus dedit ei in maritagium per manu H. Reg patris nostri" to "Agneti Wak" by order dated 23 Mar 1207[1352].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Agnes Wake" holding "medietatem de Winchende" in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][1353].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1221, by "abbas de Nutelegha" against "Agnetem Wace" for "medietatem manerii de Winchendona" which she said "Willelmus de Humet pater suis dedit ei in maritagium"[1354].  An order dated 12 Nov 1223 relates to payment of the fine made by "Ranulf de Vernay", while Agnes was still alive, for marrying "Agnes Wake…without the licence…of the king"[1355]m firstly (before 1189) BALDWIN Wake, son of HUGH Wake & his wife Emma de Clare (-before Nov 1198).  m secondly RANULPH de Vernay, son of ---. 

ii)         ENGUERRAND du Hommet .  Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum" as the sons and heirs of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis" when recording his death[1356].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum" and of "Engueranni de Humetis…concessu Cecilie uxoris sue et Henrici filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/89][1357]m CECILE de Semilly, daughter of GUILLAUME de Semilly & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/98] under which her son "Willelmus de Similleio, filius Enguerrandi de Humeto" confirmed the donation of the church of Pert to Bayeux by "Willelmus de Similleio avus noster" with the consent of "Ceciliæ filiæ et hæredis suæ et matris nostræ"[1358].  "Cæcilia filia Willelmi de Similleio" confirmed the donation of the church of Pert to Bayeux by "Willelmus de Similleio pater meus" by charter dated to [1181/98][1359].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Engueranni de Humetis…concessu Cecilie uxoris sue et Henrici filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/89][1360].  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

(a)       GUILLAUME de Semilly [de Say] .  "Willelmus de Similleio, filius Enguerrandi de Humeto" confirmed the donation of the church of Pert to Bayeux by "Willelmus de Similleio avus noster" with the consent of "Ceciliæ filiæ et hæredis suæ et matris nostræ", by charter dated to [1181/98], later confirmed by Henri Bishop of Bayeux[1361].  "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire[1362]

(b)       HENRI du Hommet .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Engueranni de Humetis…concessu Cecilie uxoris sue et Henrici filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/89][1363].  "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire[1364]

iii)        JORDAN du Hommet .  Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum" as the sons and heirs of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis" when recording his death[1365].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][1366].  "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire[1367]

iv)       [AGATHA du Hommet .  Her first marriage and parentage are confirmed by the Chronicon Savigniacensis Monasterii which records the death "XVIII Kal Jul" in 1212 of "Gaufridus dominus Filgeriarum, filius Willelmi et Agathæ, filiæ Willelmi de Humeto"[1368].  The primary source which confirms that Richard was her father has not yet been identified, but from a chronological point of view this appears likely to be correct.  Her second marriage is indicated by the charter dated Mar [1230/31] under which “Fulco Paganelli” gave security to Louis IX King of France on behalf of “Radulpho de Filgeriis nepoti meo” relating to “terram suam in Normannia[1369]m firstly GUILLAUME de Fougères, son of RAOUL [II] Seigneur de Fougères & his wife Mathilde --- (-7 Jun 1187).  m secondly FULK [II] Paynel[1370], son of FULK [I] Paynell of Hambye & his wife Lesceline de Subligny (-after 25 Jun 1215).] 

 

 

1.         JORDAN du Hommet (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Jordanus de Humeto" with 3 knights "de feodo de Cliville" and 13 knights in his own service[1371]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME du Hommet (-23 Aug ----).  Constable of France.  The necrology of Péronne records the death "23 Aug" of "domini Willelmi de Humeto, connestabularii Normanniæ, cujus uxor domum istam fundavit"[1372]m EUSTACHE, daughter of --- (-4 May 1254).  The necrology of Péronne records the death "4 May 1254" of "domina Eustachia, fundatrix istius domus"[1373]

 

2.         --- du Hommetm JEANNE de Coulonges, daughter of --- (-3 Oct 1299).  The necrology of Péronne records the death "3 Oct 1299" of "domina Johanna de Colonciis condam domina de Humeto" and her donation[1374]

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS d´IVRY (GOËL)

 

 

1.         ROBERT d'Ivry, son of --- (-[before 1050]).  If the speculation about the parentage of his wife is correct as discussed below, Robert must have died before [1050/1060] (the precise date depends on the dating of a donation to Ouche made by Albreda´s supposed second husband, about which there is some doubt, see below) as his wife´s son by her supposed second marriage died in [1070 or 1080] when he was a young adult.  m as her first husband, ALBREDA, daughter of ---.  Chibnall speculates that she may have been Albreda, [illegitimate] daughter of Hugues d'Ivry Bishop of Bayeux & his [wife/mistress ---], which may have provided her grandson with a claim to Ivry by inheritance[1375], assuming that her supposed illegitimacy presented no obstacle.  This parentage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[1376] but it is not known whether this is based on a specific primary source or on Chibnall´s speculation.   She married [secondly] ([1050] or [1060]) Albert de Cravent: Orderic Vitalis who records that “Radulfus tiro filius Alberti de Crevento” attacked “Guitmundum monachum...Manlia venientem in valle Guidonis” who returned on foot to Pacy and begged “Albertum” to protect him from “filium sibi”, on which “Alberada uxor eius” burst into tears, adding in a later passage that Raoul repented before he died, after which Albert in 1070 donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul[1377].  There must be some doubt about the date of this event because Orderic Vitalis records Geoffroy Bishop of Chartres in the dating clause, although in another passage he records the appointment of Bishop Geoffroy in 1077[1378].  Le Prévost suggests that the donation should be redated to 1080[1379].  Robert & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         ROBERT d'Ivry .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  m HILDEBURGE de Gallardon, daughter of HERVE Seigneur de Gallardon & his wife Beatrix --- (-3 Jun [1116 or after], bur Pontoise Saint-Martin).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Hildiburgis…de nobili prosapia in pago Carnotensi Castro Galardone exorta”, her parents “pater…Herveus Castri Galardonis dominus…genetrix…Beatrix”, and her husband “Roberto Ibriensi”, adding that she refused to remarry after her husband died[1380].  "Femina Hildeburgis de nobili prosapia in pago Carnotensi castro Galardone exorta" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise by charter dated during the reign of Philippe I King of France which names "pater…Hervæus Castri Galardonis…dominus…genitrix…Beatrix" and specifies that she married "Roberto Ibriensi" by whom she had three sons "primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelmus…milites…tertius Robertus clericus"[1381].  "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][1382].  The former document records the death of "Hildeburgis sanctimonialis…III Non Iun" and her burial "in ecclesia S Martini Pontisariensis".  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis records the death “III Non Iun” of “Hildiburgis Sanctimonialis” and her burial “in ecclesia beati Martini Pontisariensis[1383].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          ASCELIN Goël (-after [1116]).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis[1384].  "Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[1385].  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Goellus de Breherii-valle" seized the castle of Ivry-la-Bataille (Eure) from Guillaume de Breteuil and surrendered it to Robert [III] Duke of Normandy[1386]Orderic Vitalis records that, two years after the death of King William I [1089], “Ascelinus cognomento Goellus” captured “arcem Ibreii” from “Guillelmo Bretoliensi domino suo” and surrendered it to Duke Robert who resold it to Guillaume de Breteuil for “MD libras”, triggering a lengthy war[1387]The same source records that, during the course of the war, “Guillelmum Bretoliensem” was captured and imprisoned, after which he agreed to the marriage of “Isabel filiam suam” to “Goello” as part of the peace agreement, dated to [1092][1388]The resulting war with Guillaume ended with the latter's capture and agreement to Ascelin's marriage to his daughter[1389].  Another untraced family connection of Ascelin is indicated by a charter dated 1066 under which "Richardus Herluini filius, comitis Galerani Mellenti nepos" [vicomte de Meulan] donated property to Coulombs[1390], and a note in the cartulary of Coulombs, following this charter, which records that "Richardus" became a monk "cum filiis [Jordanum et Robertum]" at Coulombs where "habuerunt quemdam cognatum Ascelinum cognomento Goellum", and a second note that "Ascelinus Goellus" was the heir after the death of Richard´s sons Jourdain and Robert[1391].  "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][1392]m ([1092]) ISABEL de Breteuil, [illegitimate] daughter of GUILLAUME de Breteuil & [his mistress ---] (-after [1116]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmum Bretoliensem” agreed to the marriage of “Isabel filiam suam” to “Goello” as part of the peace agreement between them, dated to [1092][1393]The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Elisabeth” as wife of “Goellus[1394].  She must have been illegitimate as the chronicler says in another passage that her father's marriage was childless[1395], unless she was born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage of her father.  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[1396].  "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][1397].  Ascelin & his wife had [five or more] children: 

(a)       ROBERT d'Ivry (-after 1118).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Robertus et Wiltinus” as sons of “Goellus” and his wife “Elisabeth[1398].  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[1399].  "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][1400].  "Robert son of Ascelin Goël" joined the rebellion against Henry I King of England in 1118, but rejoined the king who committed the castle of Ivry to him to guarantee his loyalty[1401]m ---, daughter of ---.  Raoul "le Rouge" de Pont-Echanfray was brother-in-law of Robert Goël, according to Orderic Vitalis[1402]

(b)       GUILLAUME "Lovel" d'Ivry (-after 1153).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Robertus et Wiltinus” as sons of “Goellus” and his wife “Elisabeth[1403].  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[1404].  "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][1405].  Son of Ascelin according to Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he inherited the castle of Ivry after the death of his brother Robert and records his marriage[1406].  He rebelled against Henry I King of England in Sep 1123, with his brothers-in-law Waléran de Meulan, Hugues de Montfort and Hugues de Châteauneuf[1407].  Robert of Torigny records "discordia inter Symonem comitem Ebroicensem" and "filios Ascelini Goelli, scilicet et Willermum Lupellum et Rogerium Balbosum" in 1153[1408]m ([1120]) MATHILDE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet].  Orderic Vitalis records Waleran Comte de Meulan having three sisters (whom he does not name), one of whom he married to "Guillaume Lovel son of Ascelin"[1409].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. 

(c)       brothers .  Orderic Vitalis records that they were given as hostages to Henry I King of England to guarantee the good conduct of their brother Robert[1410]

(d)       ROGER "Balbosus" (-after 1153).  Robert of Torigny records "discordia inter Symonem comitem Ebroicensem" and "filios Ascelini Goelli, scilicet et Willermum Lupellum et Rogerium Balbosum" in 1153[1411]

Ascelin had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

(e)        ROBERT (-after [1116]).  "Roberti Bastardi Rufi filii eiusdem Goelli, Gauterii de Sparnone fratris eiusdem Roberti" subscribed the charter dated [1116] under which "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[1412]

(f)         [GAUTHIER (-after [1116]).  "Roberti Bastardi Rufi filii eiusdem Goelli, Gauterii de Sparnone fratris eiusdem Roberti" subscribed the charter dated [1116] under which "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[1413].  It is assumed that Gauthier was also the son of Ascelin Goël, although the wording of this charter does not exclude the possibility that he was the uterine brother of Robert.] 

ii)         GUILLAUME Goël .  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis[1414].  "Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[1415].  He was tried by Guillaume de Breteuil for having "done an injury to a certain woman at Pacy", providing the pretext for his brother's attack on Ivry[1416]

iii)        ROBERT .  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis[1417].  "Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[1418]

b)         [ROGER d'Ivry (-after 24 Apr 1089).  No information has so far been found on the parentage of Roger, but presumably he was closely connected to Robert d'Ivry, husband of Aubrée.  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Pincerna of William I King of England.  He founded the abbey of Ivry-la-Balluis[1419].  An undated manuscript records that “Robertus de Oili” built "castellum Oxonii” in 1072 and that "Robertus de Oili et Rogerus de Iveri" built the church of St George in Oxford castle in 1074[1420].  Domesday Book records land held by “Roger d´Ivry” in Bucklebury, Eagle, Blewbury and Gainfield Hundreds in Berkshire, land in Ixhill, Mursley and Rowley Hundreds in Buckinghamshire, and "Robert d´Oilly and Roger d´Ivry" holding Stowe in Buckinghamshire from the bishop of Bayeux in Buckinghamshire and Arncott from the abbot of Abingdon St Mary in Oxfordshire, "Roger d´Ivry" other properties in Oxfordshire[1421].  His parentage has not yet been ascertained, but from a chronological point of view he could have been the son of Guillaume d´Ivry.  The joint activities with Robert de Oilly suggest a family relationship.  He held Cottisford from his father-in-law in 1086 in Domesday Book[1422].]  m ADELINE de Grantmesnil, daughter of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelisa [Aelis] de Beaumont-sur-Oise (-[1110/11]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Adeline married “Rogerio de Ibreio[1423].  Domesday Book records “the wife of Roger d´Ivry” holding land in Islip, Kiddington and Oddington in Oxfordshire[1424].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "nobilis...matrona Athelina de Hiuerio" donated land "apud...Faineote" to Abingdon in [1110/11] and that “filia eiusdem Adeliz” later confirmed the donation[1425].  She died soon after making grants to Abingdon Abbey in [1110/11][1426].  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          ADELISE d'Ivry (-after [Jun] 1133).  Daughter and heiress of Roger d'Ivry and Adelina de Grantmesnil, she is named in her mother's grants to Abingdon Abbey in [1110/11].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "nobilis...matrona Athelina de Hiuerio" donated land "apud...Faineote" to Abingdon in [1110/11] and that “filia eiusdem Adeliz” later confirmed the donation[1427].  King Henry I confirmed the donation of "the manor of Rowington in Warwickshire" to Reading St Mary made by “Adelicia de Evereio”, by charter dated [Jun] 1133[1428].  Domesday Descendants says that this is the last recorded reference to her[1429]

c)         [HUGUES d´Ivry (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Hugh d´Ivry” holding Ambrosden from the king in Oxfordshire[1430].  No information has so far been found on the parentage of Hugues, but presumably he was closely connected to Robert d'Ivry, husband of Aubrée.] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    CAUX

 

 

The pagus Caletensis (pays de Caux), in the episcopal diocese of Rouen, lay west of the pagus Tellau [Talou, later the county of Arques][1431].  It did not correspond with any of the known medieval counties which developed later in the duchy of Normandy.  It is assumed that all the nobles who are shown below were direct vassals of the dukes of Normandy. 

 

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS d´AUFFAY

 

 

GILBERT d'Auffay, son of RICHARD de Heugleville & his wife Ada --- (-15 Aug 1087, bur Sainte-Marie d´Ouche).  He helped his "consanguineus" William I King of England pacify the country after the 1066 invasion, but refused offers of estates in England and returned to Normandy[1432].  Orderic Vitalis records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “Beatricis conjugis suæ”, dated 1079, witnessed by “Bernardus de Novo-Mercato...Rodbertus de Huglevilla...[1433].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gulberto” died “XVIII Kal Sep” [year not specified, but from the context soon after the donation to Ouche Saint-Evroul which he made (see above)] and was buried at Ouche[1434].  In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records the death “XIX Kal Sep” of “cognatus eiusdem [referring to William I King of England] Guilbertus Alfagiensis filius Ricardi de Huglevilla”, during the time when King William was unwell, and his burial “in ecclesia Sanctæ Mariæ ubi sex monachos ex Uticensi cœnobio constituerat[1435]

m BEATRIX de Valenciennes, daughter of CHRISTIAN de Valenciennes & his wife --- (-4 Jan [1091], bur Sainte-Marie d´Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” married “Beatricem filiam Christiani de Valencenis...Mathildis reginæ consobrina[1436].  Beatrix´s father has not otherwise been identified and the relationship between Beatrix and Queen Mathilde has not been traced.  Orderic Vitalis records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “Beatricis conjugis suæ”, dated 1079, witnessed by “Bernardus de Novo-Mercato...Rodbertus de Huglevilla...[1437].  Orderic Vitalis records that Beatrix died “II Non Jan” three years after her husband[1438].  In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records the burial “II Non Jan” of “Beatrix uxor eius [referring to Guilbertus Alfagiensis filius Ricardi de Huglevilla]”, four years later during which she was a nun “in ecclesia Sanctæ Mariæ ubi sex monachos ex Uticensi cœnobio constituerat” and her burial there[1439]

Gilbert & his wife had three children: 

1.         GAUTHIER d'Auffay (-27 May ----[3 years after his wife]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Gualterium et Hugonem atque Beatricem” as the children of “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” and his wife[1440].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Gulberto”, “Gualterius filius eius” confirmed his father´s donation to Ouche Saint-Evroul[1441].  Orderic Vitalis in a later passage says that he was "handsome but lacking in wisdom…easily dominated by Godmund and other false teachers…[and] dissipated his inheritance"[1442].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “VI Kal Jun” of “Gualterius” nearly three years after his wife died[1443]m AVISE, daughter of HERBRAND de Sauqueville & his wife --- (-22 Feb ----).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after he married “Aviciam Herbranni de Salchevilla filiam”, “Gualterius” further confirmed his father´s donation to Ouche Saint-Evroul and added “decimam...teleonei de Alfagio[1444].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Aviciam, Herbranni filiam” had “tres fratres...milites: Jordanum et Guillelmum atque Rodbertum” who helped her husband maintain his property, that she and her husband had “filios et filias numero xii...quorum majorem partem immatura mors in infantia”, and that she died “VIII Kal Feb” after 15 years of marriage[1445].  Gauthier & his wife had twelve children: 

a)         RICHARD d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years, adding that Richard died aged 12 and was succeeded by “Jordanus...frater eius[1446]

b)         JORDAN d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years, adding that Richard died aged 12 and was succeeded by “Jordanus...frater eius[1447].  King Henry I gave him Norton Ferris in Kilmington, Somerset on his marriage[1448]m (after 1121) JULIANA, daughter of GODESCHALK & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I arranged the marriage of “Jordanus” and “Julianam Godeschalchi filiam” who had come “cum Adelide regina de Lovennensi regione in Angliam[1449].  “Godeschalk” has not been identified in the nobility in Brabant/Louvain at the time.  Jordan & his wife had one child: 

i)          RICHARD d'Auffay .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  "…Ricardum de Altifago…Renaldum de Vassumvilla…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[1450]m ---.  The name of Richard's wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JEAN d'Auffay .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

c)         GAUTHIER d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years[1451].  He is called consanguineus of Roger son of Richard [de Clare] by Orderic Vitalis[1452], but this relationship has not been traced. 

d)         ELIAS d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years[1453]

e)         eight other children .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Aviciam, Herbranni filiam” and her husband had “filios et filias numero xii...quorum majorem partem immatura mors in infantia[1454]

2.         HUGUES d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis names “Gualterium et Hugonem atque Beatricem” as the children of “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” and his wife[1455].  Monk at Saint-Evroul. 

3.         BEATRIX d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis names “Gualterium et Hugonem atque Beatricem” as the children of “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” and his wife[1456]

 

 

1.         RICHARD d´Auffay .  "…Richardo de Aufay…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[1457]

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS d´ESTOUTEVILLE

 

 

According to Le Prévost, this family originated in "Etouteville-sur-Mer, canton d´Yerville"[1458], situated in the Pays de Caux about 30 kilometers north-west of Rouen.  This family has been studied by Gabriel de la Morandière[1459].  He appears to clarify adequately the relationship between the Estouteville family in Normandy and the Stuteville family in England.  However, his account of the descent of the various branches of the English Stuteville family is confused and contradictory (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY P-S). 

 

 

[Three] siblings, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT [I] d´Estouteville (-after 1106).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[1460].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] d´Estouteville and his family[1461].  Orderic Vitalis quotes a charter, dated to [1066/89], witnessed by "…Rodbertus de Stotavilla…"[1462].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land in “Edelyngthorp…Harton…et decimas de dominio suo de Cukewald et Honingham, Kirkeby, Buttercram et Strayngham et Langtuna et…in Cucewald” by “Robertus de Stutavilla”, as well as land "in Mitona" by "Robertus de Maisnil et Robertus de Stutaville"[1463].   Orderic Vitalis names "…Rodbertum de Stotavilla…" among the supporters of Robert III Duke of Normandy in 1105, among those who were captured at the battle of Tinchebrai in 1106, and who were condemned to life imprisonment[1464]m BEATRICE, daughter of ---.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…"[1465].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[1466].  Morandière states that "Robert I le vieux d´Estouteville et son autre sœur Amaurie ont épousé Blanche et Alain, enfants de Guéthénoc Sire de Rieux" (who he says was descended from a younger son of Alain I Duke of Brittany, who died in 907) but cites no primary source on which the information is based[1467].  It is not impossible that "Blanche" was an error for "Beatrice", but no other corroboration has yet been found for her alleged parentage.  Morandière´s work does not appear convincing in relation to the early generations of the Estouteville family and it is suggested that the information should be treated with caution.  Robert [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         EMMA d´Estouteville (-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[1468].  The chronology of her marriages suggests that she must have been considerably older than her brother Robert, maybe born from an earlier marriage of their father.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married secondly “Emmam Rodberti de Stotevilla filiam[1469].  The chronology of these families suggests that Emma must have been Robert´s first wife not his second.  La Roque states that “une généalogie de la maison d´Estouteville” names Errand´s wife as “Emme et la comprend entre ceux du sang...[de] Robert d´Estouteville”, suggesting that she was the same person who later married “Hugues de Grentesmesnil[1470].  The passage is somewhat garbled and in any case La Roque does not provide a citation reference to the source in question or quote it in his “Preuves”.  It is suggested that, until further documentation comes to light, this supposed marriage of Errand should be treated with caution.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[1471][m firstly ERRAND Sire d'Harcourt, son of ANSCHETIL d´Harcourt & his wife --- (-after 1078).]  m [secondly] as his [first] wife, ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelise de Beaumont-sur-Oise ([before 1060]-1 Jun [1136], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul). 

b)         ROBERT [II] d´Estouteville (-after Aug 1138).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[1472].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[1473]

-        see below

c)         RALPH d´Estouteville .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[1474].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[1475]

d)         WILLIAM d´Estouteville .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[1476].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[1477]

2.         [MATHILDE d´Estouteville (-after [1101]).  Morandière states that "Maude d´Estouteville, femme de Gilbert Talebot" was granted the fief of Shrewsbury confiscated from Robert de Montgommery (dated to [1101]), adding that she was the sister of Robert [I] d´Estouteville[1478].  The reference to the transfer of the Montgommery fief of Shrewsbury to the Talbot family is evidently anachronistic.  No other reference has been found to Mathilde and her supposed husband.  Until further corroboration comes to light, it is suggested that this information should be treated with caution.  m GILBERT Talbot, son of --- (-after [1101]).] 

3.         [AMAURIE d´Estouteville .  Morandière states that "Robert I le vieux d´Estouteville et son autre sœur Amaurie ont épousé Blanche et Alain, enfants de Guéthénoc Sire de Rieux" (who he says was descended from a younger son of Alain I Duke of Brittany, who died in 907) but cites no primary source on which the information is based[1479]m ALAIN Sire de Rieux, son of GUETHENOC Sire de Rieux & his wife ---.] 

 

 

ROBERT [II] d´Estouteville, son of ROBERT [I] d´Estouteville & his wife Béatrice --- (-after Aug 1138).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[1480].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[1481].  Orderic Vitalis names "…Rodbertus juvenis de Stotevilla…" among those who defended the castle of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dive and were captured, dated to [1106][1482].  Simeon of Durham names "…Robertus de Stuthavilla…" among the leaders of the English contingent at the battle of the Standard (dated to Aug 1138)[1483]

[m firstly (before 1106) JEANNE Talbot, daughter of --- Talbot Baron de Cleuville & his wife ---.  Morandière states that "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" married "avant le désastre de Tinchebray…Jehanne Talebot heritière de l´aisné des surnommés Talebot, barons de Cleuville", naming her grandfather "Richard Talebot…compagnon de son voisin Grondebœuf à Hastings" but not her father, adding that she died early leaving a son "Nicholas d´Estouteville"[1484].] 

m [secondly] ERNEBURG, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", for the souls of "Roberti de Stutevilla avi mei et Roberti patris mei et Erneburgæ matris meæ et Helewisæ uxoris meæ"[1485]

Robert [II] & his [first wife] had [one child]: 

1.         [NICOLAS [I] d´Estouteville (-22 Apr 1177)Morandière names "Nicholas d´Estouteville" as the son of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his first wife "Jehanne Talebot" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1486].  Père Anselme names "Nicolas I sire d´Estouteville et de Vallemont, baron de Cleuville" as the oldest son of Robert [II] d´Estouteville without naming his mother, and without citing a primary source[1487].] 

-        see below

Robert [II] & his [second] wife had [nine] children: 

2.         ROBERT [III] d´Estouteville (-1183).  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", for the souls of "Roberti de Stutevilla avi mei et Roberti patris mei et Erneburgæ matris meæ et Helewisæ uxoris meæ", with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1488]

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY, STUTEVILLE

3.         [RICHARD d´Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[1489].  Père Anselme records that "Eustache et Richard d´Etouteville, s´établirent en Angleterre" and that they were the two younger sons of Robert [II] d´Estouteville without naming their mother, and without citing a primary source[1490].] 

4.         [WILLIAM d´Estouteville (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willemus de Stuteville" with one knight "de feodo de Dodeavulle…in baillia Willelmi de Malepalet"[1491]m EMMA, daughter of ---.] 

5.         [OSMOND d´Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[1492].] 

6.         [PATRICK d´Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[1493].] 

7.         JOHN d´Estouteville (-after 1166).  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[1494].  The Thorney Liber Vitæ records John as son of Robert [II] d´Estouteville and his wife Eremburg, and his wife Agnes[1495].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Johannes de Stuteville" held "ix carucatas terræ in Cheteleby et in Hollewelle et in Herdeby et in Hevintone" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[1496]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  The Thorney Liber Vitæ records John as son of Robert [II] d´Estouteville and his wife Eremburg, and his wife Agnes[1497].  Domesday Descendants suggests that she was "probably daughter of Waleran, son of Hugh and Matilda"[1498].  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN de Stuteville (-after [1160]).  "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo" by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Richardus Basset, W. Basset…Hugo Ridel…" and which notes that "ipse Johannes filius Johannis" swore homage to the grantor and gave him a gold ring[1499].  William Reedy assumes that "Johanni fratri meo" was the grantor´s brother-in-law John de Stuteville[1500].  This appears to be confimed as correct by the undated charter under which "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed that "Johanni de Stutevilla" did homage to him by on the same day, witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset, W. Basset…R. de Stutevill, Nicolaus de Stutevill…"[1501].  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1502]m MATILDA Basset, daughter of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel.  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the charter date to [1160] under which [her brother] "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo", which notes that "ipse Johannes filius Johannis" swore homage to the grantor and gave him a gold ring[1503]

b)         ROGER de Stuteville (-after [1183/84]).  Domesday Descendants names "John and Roger" as the sons of John d´Estouteville[1504].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Stoteville xxxvii s vi d de militibus quos habet de feodo Adæ de Brus" in Yorkshire in [1171/72][1505].  The 1169/70 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stutevill" in Northumberland[1506].  The 1173/74 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stutevill" in Northumberland[1507].  The 1174/75 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stutteville" in Northumberland and “rebuilding the mill burned at Colebrige by the Scots war[1508].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stuteville" in Northumberland[1509].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Rogerus de Stutewille et uxor eius, Anselmus filius eius"[1510].  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1511].  The 1183/84 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stuteville" rendering his account in Northumberland “in lands granted to the K. of Scotland, 10 l in Tindale[1512]m ---.  The name of Roger´s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          ANSELM de Stuteville .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Rogerus de Stutewille et uxor eius, Anselmus filius eius"[1513]

8.         [EUSTACHE d´Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[1514].  Père Anselme records that "Eustache et Richard d´Etouteville, s´établirent en Angleterre" and that they were the two younger sons of Robert [II] d´Estouteville without naming their mother, and without citing a primary source[1515].] 

9.         --- d´Estouteville .  Domesday Descendants records that "Robert de Daville" married a daughter of Robert [II] d´Estouteville as his first wife (marrying secondly Juliana de Montfort)[1516]m as his first wife, ROBERT de Daville, son of ---. 

10.      [BURGA [de Stuteville] (-after 1166)Domesday Descendants names "Burga de Stuteville" as the wife of William Pantulf, but does not cite the primary source which confirms her family origin[1517].  If this affiliation is correct, the chronology suggests that Burga was the daughter of Robert [II] d´Estouteville and his second wife, named after her mother.  Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury confirmed donations to Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire made by “Willielmus Pantulf…de Bredun”, and including other donations made by “…Burgæ quondam uxoris Willielmi Pantulf de Bredun”, by undated charter[1518].  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[1519]m WILLIAM [II] Pantulf, son of [IVO Pantulf & his [second] wife Alice de Verdun] (-after 1166).] 

 

 

NICOLAS [I] d´Estouteville, son of ROBERT [II] d´Estouteville & his [first wife Jeanne Talbot] (-22 Apr 1177).  Morandière names "Nicholas d´Estouteville" as the son of "Robert II le jeune d´Estouteville" and his first wife "Jehanne Talebot" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1520].  Père Anselme names "Nicolas I sire d´Estouteville et de Vallemont, baron de Cleuville" as the oldest son of Robert [II] d´Estouteville without naming his mother, and without citing a primary source[1521].  "…Nicholao de Stotavilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" donated property to the abbey of Mortemer[1522].  "Nicolaus de Stotevilla" founded the abbey of Valmont, with the consent of "Roberti filii mei", for the souls of "…Iulianæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter[1523], the foundation dated to 1169 in Gallia Christiana[1524].  “Nicholao de Stotevilla…Roberto de Stotevill” witnessed the undated charter under which Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Le Valasse[1525].  Round dates this document to [1166/67][1526].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Nicholaus de Stuteville" with one knight "de feodo de logis et prato…in baillia Willelmi de Malepalet" and "vii hospitibus quos habet apud Fiscanum"[1527].  "…Nicolao de Stutevilla…Roberto de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Valasse[1528].  The necrology of Valmont records the death 22 Apr of "Nicholai primi fundatoris"[1529]Domesday Descendants records that Nicholas died in 1177 but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1530].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…", by charter dated to [1181/83][1531]

m JULIANE, daughter of --- (-5 Nov ----).  "Nicolaus de Stotevilla" founded the abbey of Valmont, with the consent of "Roberti filii mei", for the souls of "…Iulianæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter[1532], the foundation dated to 1169 in Gallia Christiana[1533].  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[1534].  Père Anselme names "Julienne, que l´on dit fille de Gaucher de Thorotte" as the wife of Nicholas d´Estouteville, without citing a primary source[1535].  The necrology of Valmont records the death 5 Nov of "Julianæ primæ fundatricis"[1536]

Nicolas [I] & his wife had five children: 

1.         ROBERT d´Estouteville (-[1185]).  "Nicolaus de Stotevilla" founded the abbey of Valmont, with the consent of "Roberti filii mei", for the souls of "…Iulianæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter[1537], the foundation dated to 1169 in Gallia Christiana[1538].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[1539].  "…Nicolao de Stutevilla…Roberto de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Valasse[1540].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][1541].  "Eustachio de Stuteville, Willelmo de Stuteville, Ansel de Stuteville…" subscribed the charter dated to [1177/89] under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Lillebonne to the abbey of Valmont, for the soul of "Roberti de Stuteville"[1542]m LEONIE, daughter of --- (-after 1210).  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][1543].  Père Anselme names "Leonelle dame de Rames, sœur et héritière de Robert seigneur de Rames" as the wife of Robert d´Estouteville, without citing a primary source[1544].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Leonia de Stuteville" paying "ii m et dimidiam de parte sua de honore de Brunne" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire[1545].  The same record lists "Gilbertus Peche" as paying "dimidiam de honore de Brunne", which suggests a family relationship between the two which has not yet been traced.  "Leonia que fuit uxor Rob de Stutevill" paid a fine for "seisina tota terra sua…disseisita pro perceptu dñi Reg occoe filii eiusd Leon q est in Norm…et pro…manerio de Barton", in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, dated 1204[1546].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Leonia de Stuteville" holding half of one knight´s fee "in Biham…honor de Reimes" in Essex, Hertfordshire, and 15 in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, in [1210/12][1547].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Leoyna de Stuteville et Illaria Trussebute et Gulbertus Peche" holding land in "honor Peverelli de Dovere" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][1548].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

a)         HENRI d´Estouteville (-1231).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

-        see below

b)         EUSTACHE d´Estouteville .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

c)         SAMSON d´Estouteville (-after 1216).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

2.         NICOLAS [II] d´Estouteville (-after [1187/88]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[1549].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][1550].  Morandière quotes (in translation) an undated charter under which "Nicholas [d´Estouteville]" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "mon épouse Hodierne…mon frère Robert", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1551].  "Nicholaus de Stutevilla" donated land "in Dregg" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Bartholomeo de Stutevilla…"[1552].  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1553].  The 1187/88 Pipe Roll records "William de Lindeseia owes 40 marks for having the right in the K’s court against Henry the clerk of Appelby, the Countess of Albemarle, and Nicholas de Stuteville in Uckemanebi and Blendherseta, and Wuering, and Leventona, and Laweswater, and Bekyrmet and Stapelthein" in Cumberland[1554]m HODIERNE, daughter of ---.  Morandière quotes (in translation) an undated charter under which "Nicholas [d´Estouteville]" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "mon épouse Hodierne…mon frère Robert", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1555].  Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

a)         R[OBERT] de Stuteville .  "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla"[1556]

b)         THOMAS de Stuteville .  "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla"[1557]

3.         GUILLAUME d´Estouteville (-before 1210).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[1558].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89], signed by "…Willelmo de Stutevilla…Anselmo de Stutevilla"[1559].  "Eustachio de Stuteville, Willelmo de Stuteville, Ansel de Stuteville…" subscribed the charter dated to [1177/89] under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Lillebonne to the abbey of Valmont, for the soul of "Roberti de Stuteville"[1560].  Morandière quotes (in translation) an undated charter under which "Guillaume [d´Estouteville]" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "…mon frère Richard", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1561].  [m HELENE de Ponthieu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Beatrix de Saint-Pol.  Père Anselme records "Guillaume d´Estouteville", son of Nicolas [I] d´Estouteville, adding "à qui l´on donne femme, mais sans preuve, Helene de Ponthieu, on la dit fille de Jean I comte de Ponthieu et de Beatrix de S. Paul sa troisième femme"[1562].] 

4.         RICHARD d´Estouteville .  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[1563].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][1564]

5.         EUSTACHE d´Estouteville .  Père Anselme names "Eustache" as the youngest son of Nicholas d´Estouteville, without citing a primary source[1565]

 

 

HENRI d´Estouteville, son of ROBERT d´Estouteville & his wife Léonie --- (-1231).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   "Leonia que fuit uxor Rob de Stutevill" paid a fine for "seisina tota terra sua…disseisita pro perceptu dñi Reg occoe filii eiusd Leon q est in Norm…et pro…manerio de Barton", in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, dated 1204[1566]

m MATHILDE d´Eu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte d'Eu & his wife Alice d'Aubigny of Arundel.  “Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert´s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre