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NORMANdy

alençon, evreux, meulan, perche

  v4.1 Updated 06 August 2017

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                ALENÇON. 2

A.         SEIGNEURS d'ALENÇON (SEIGNEURS de BELLÊME) 2

B.         SEIGNEURS d'ALENÇON, COMTES d'ALENÇON, MONTGOMMERY-PONTHIEU.. 12

C.        FAMILY of BALDRIC.. 17

D.        FAMILY of GIROIE.. 20

E.         GRANTMESNIL. 35

F.         LA FERTE-MACE.. 50

G.        SEIGNEURS de MONTGOMMERY.. 52

H.        SEIGNEURS de MONTPINÇON.. 64

I.      SEIGNEURS de MOULINS-la-MARCHE.. 66

J.         SEIGNEURS de PONT-ECHANFREY.. 70

Chapter 2.                EVREUX. 73

A.         COMTES d'EVREUX, family of DUKES of NORMANDY.. 73

B.         COMTES d'EVREUX (MONTFORT-l'AMAURY) 79

C.        SEIGNEURS d’HARCOURT, COMTES d’HARCOURT. 95

D.        HARCOURT, SEIGNEURS de BEAUMESNIL. 118

E.         SEIGNEURS de LAIGLE (L'AIGLE) 121

F.         SEIGNEURS de TOSNY.. 129

G.        SEIGNEURS de VERNON, SEIGNEURS de REVIERS.. 147

Chapter 3.                MEULAN. 151

A.         COMTES de MEULAN.. 151

B.         COMTES de MEULAN, SEIGNEURS de BEAUMONT-le-ROGER.. 155

C.        VICOMTES de MEULAN.. 169

Chapter 4.                PERCHE, MORTAGNE. 173

 

 

 

This document groups the nobility in the southern part of the duchy of Normandy. 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    ALENÇON

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS d'ALENÇON (SEIGNEURS de BELLÊME)

 

 

The diocese of Séez, to the south of Bayeux and Lisieux, included, approximately from west to east, the pagus Oximensis (Hiémois), the pagus Sagiensis (Séez) where the county of Alençon later evolved, the pagus Epicensis, and the pagus Corbonensis (Corbonnais) which developed into the county of Perche.  The diocese of Lisieux contained only the pagus Lexoviensis (le Lieuvin), bound on the north by the river Charentonne and the sea, on the east by the river Risle, and on the west by the river Dive.  It included the lands later granted to Giroie and his family, and the doyennés of Gacé and Montreuil[1].  All these areas are grouped together in the present document. 

 

Bellême was a fief held directly from the French crown[2].  The seigneurs de Bellême acquired the lordship of Alençon, located in the south of the duchy of Normandy close to the border with the county of Maine.  The process whereby the lordship of Alençon evolved into the county of Alençon appears to have been accidental, occurring in the second half of the 12th century when the inheritance of Guillaume Comte de Ponthieu was divided between his sons.  His eldest son Jean received his father’s Norman lands, including the lordship of Alençon which had been brought into the family by his paternal great-grandmother, and had retained his father’s comital title and applied it to Alençon, presumably with the acquiescence of his suzerain Henry II King of England (no reference to a formal regrant of the lordship as a county has been identified). 

 

 

1.         FULCOIN .  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette for the souls of "patris mei Fulconii et matris meæ Rothais" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[3]m ROTHAIS, daughter of ---.  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…duorum avunculorum, Seinfredi episcopi et Guillelmi, atque cognatorum Guillelmi clerici, Roberti, Sutsardi, rursusque Guillelmi laïci", for the souls of "patris mei Fulconii et matris meæ Rothais" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[4].  If “avunculorum” in this charter can be interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncles, Rothais, mother of the donor Ives, was the sister of the brothers Seinfred Bishop of Le Mans and Guillaume.  Fulcoin & his wife had three children: 

a)         IVES (-after 12 Oct 997).  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…duorum avunculorum, Seinfredi episcopi et Guillelmi, atque cognatorum Guillelmi clerici, Roberti, Sutsardi, rursusque Guillelmi laïci", for the souls of "patris mei Fulconii et matris meæ Rothais" by charter dated 12 Oct 997, witnessed by "Hugonis comitis, Radulfi vicecomitis"[5]

b)         BILEHENDIS (-after 12 Oct 997).  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[6]

c)         EREMBURGIS (-after 12 Oct 997).  "Ivo" founded the chapel of l'Abbayette, with the consent of "duarum…sororum mearum Billehendis atque Eremburgis…" by charter dated 12 Oct 997[7].  Depoin suggests that Eremburgis married Raoul [III] Vicomte du Maine (see the document MAINE & VENDÔME)[8].  This suggestion appears to be pure speculation. 

 

 

Given the many examples of quasi-hereditary episcopal appointments in the 10th/11th centuries (see for example the documents REIMS ARCHBISHOPRIC and TOURS ARCHBISHOPRIC), a close family relationship between the preceding family and the family of Ives Seigneur de Bellême is suggested because Ives de Bellême’s son Avesgaud succeeded Bishop Seinfrid, probable maternal uncle of Ives who founded l’Abbayette in 997, as bishop of Le Mans.  This is supported by the Actus pontificum Cenomannis which records the installation of "Avesgaudus, nepos ipsius" as bishop of Le Mans after the death of "Segenfrido" (in [997])[9]Assuming that Guillaume of Jumièges correctly reports the events involving Ives de Bellême, dated to [942/43], as quoted below, it appears unlikely that he was the same person as the founder of l’Abbayette: an adult career spanning more than fifty years appears improbable at that time.  The chronology of the successive bishops of Le Mans also appears incompatible with Bishop Avesgaud having been the great-nephew of Bishop Seinfrid: 

-   Bishop Seinfrid (born before [940/50]?), appointed as bishop in 971. 

-   Bishop Avesgaud (born before [960/70]?), appointed in [997]. 

-   Bishop Gervais (de Château-du-Loir, nephew of Bishop Avesgaud, born 1007), appointed as bishop in 1036. 

A more likely possibility is that the family relationship between Bishops Seinfrid and Avesgaud was through the female line: for example, from a chronological point of view, it would be possible for Godehildis, wife of Ives de Bellême, to have been the sister of Rothais, mother of Ives who founded l’Abbayette. 

 

 

1.         IVES [de Creil] .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Louis IV King of the West Franks, after the death of Richard’s father, marched on Rouen, was received by “Rodulphus et Bernardus atque Anslech totius Normannici ducatus tutores”, and captured Richard, who was taken to Laon but was freed by “Osmundus...consilio cum Yvone patre Willelmi de Belismo” and taken to “Silvanectis” where “Bernardus...comes” protected “nepotem suum Richardum[10].  If correctly reported, this event must be dated to [942/43].  Orderic Vitalis reports the same event, recording that "Osmundus, pueri pædagogus, per Ivonem de Credolio, regis balistarium" freed the captive[11], but makes no connection with Guillaume de Bellême.  Le Prévost suggests that “Credolio” in this passage was Creil near Senlis.  Seigneur de Bellême {Mortagne, Orne}, du Saosnais, du Passais et de Sées.  "Ivo...in castro meo Bellismo" founded Notre-Dame de Bellême, for the souls of himself "conjugisque mee Godehildis, sive filiis meis vel genitoribus meis", by undated charter[12]André de Fleury’s Vita Gauzlini records that “Ivo Belesmensis” donated “Magniacum” to Fleury, but that after his death “Willelmus eius filius” reclaimed the property[13].  This passage has been taken in secondary sources as indicating that Ives died after [1005], when Gaucelin became abbot of Fleury.  However, it is not evident from the text that Ives made his donation during the abbacy of Gaucelin, rather it may have been the diversion of the property by his son which took place while Gaucelin was abbot.  From a chronological point of view, it would be surprising if Ives was still alive in [1005], assuming that the reports of Guillaume de Jumiéges and Orderic Vitalis, quoted above, accurately report his participation in events in [942/43].  [m firstly ---.  This first marriage is suggested by the distinction between “soror” and “germana”, terms used by Ives’s son Avesgaud to describe his two sisters in the charter dated [1100] quoted below.  Use of both terms in ther same document suggests that a distinction was intended.  If that is correct, Avesgaud’s “soror” Hildeburge would have been born from a different marriage of his father, whereas his “germana” Godehildis would have been his full sister.  Another possibility is that the two terms were used indiscriminately by the author of the document to add literary variety to his text and were not intended to indicate different meanings.]  m [secondly] GODEHILDIS, daughter of ---.  "Ivo" founded Notre-Dame de Bellême, for the souls of himself "conjugisque mee Godehildis, sive filiis meis vel genitoribus meis", by undated charter, confirmed after his death by "Willelmus et Godehildis mater mea"[14]The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records the installation of [her son] "Avesgaudus, nepos ipsius" as Bishop of Le Mans after the death of "Segenfrido" (in [997])[15]This suggests that Godehildis may have been the sister of Bishop Seinfrid.  Ives & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

a)         HILDEBURGE de Bellême (-27 Oct ----).  The possibility that Hildeburge was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of her father is discussed above.  Avesgaud Bishop of Le Mans gave the church of Parigné-l'Evèque and Loué to "unam Hildeburgi sorori suæ primogenitæ et alteram Godehilde germanæ suæ secundæ" by charter dated [1000][16].  [Her son] Bishop Gervais names "avunculi mei Avesgaudi…genitoris cum genetrice mea Haimonis et Hildeburga" in his testament dated [1040/47], which also specifies that "avunculi mei domini Avesgaudi episcopi" died "apud Verdunis VI Kal Nov" on returning from Jerusalem, that "sororis eius, matris mee Hyldeburge" died the same day that "patris mei Haimonis" died "XVIII Kal Feb", and that he was ordained "XIV Kal Jan"[17]m (1006 or before) HAMON [Hamelin] de Château-du-Loir, son of --- (-15 Jan [1030]). 

Ivo & his [second] wife had four children:

b)         GUILLAUME de Bellême (-[1031]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Robert II Duke of Normandy besieged “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who had rebelled, and forced his submission (although he rebelled again later)[18].  Seigneur de Bellême.  Seigneur d'Alençon

-        see below

c)         IVES de Bellême (-after [1031]).  "Avesgaudus…Cenomannensium presul, meusque frater Ivo" donated property to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [995/1032][19]"Rotberti filii Wilelmi, Ivo suus avunculus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by undated charter[20].  Abelin lists his donations of property at Le Mans to Marmoutier by charter dated [1064/10 May 1065], naming "Ivonis de Belismo [et] filiis illius Guilelmo, Avesgaudo præsule atque Ivone"[21]

d)         AVESGAUD de Bellême (-Verdun 27 Oct 1035)Abelin lists his donations of property at Le Mans to Marmoutier by charter dated [1064/10 May 1065], naming "Ivonis de Belismo [et] filiis illius Guilelmo, Avesgaudo præsule atque Ivone"[22]Bishop of Le Mans [997].  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records the installation of "Avesgaudus, nepos ipsius" as Bishop of Le Mans after the death of "Segenfrido" (in [997])[23].  "Avesgaudus…Cenomannensium presul, meusque frater Ivo" donated property to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [995/1032][24]Bishop Gervais names "avunculi mei Avesgaudi…genitoris cum genetrice mea Haimonis et Hildeburga" in his testament dated [1040/47], which also specifies that "avunculi mei domini Avesgaudi episcopi" died "apud Verdunis VI Kal Nov" on returning from Jerusalem, that "sororis eius, matris mee Hyldeburge" died the same day that "patris mei Haimonis" died "XVIII Kal Feb", and that he was ordained "XIV Kal Jan"[25]

e)         GODEHILDIS de Bellême .  Avesgaud Bishop of Le Mans gave the church of Parigné-l'Evèque and Loué to "unam Hildeburgi sorori suæ primogenitæ et alteram Godehilde germanæ suæ secundæ" by charter dated [1000][26]The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  "Rodulfus…Cenomannus vicecomes…mee bone coniugis Godehelt…filio Rodulfo" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans by charter dated to [994][27].  No direct proof has been identified that this is the same Godehildis, but it appears likely to be correct.  m [firstly] ALBERT [I] de la Ferté-en-Beauce {la Ferté-Vidame, Eure-et-Loir}, son of ---.  [m secondly RAOUL [II] Vicomte du Maine, son of --- (-before 1014).]  Godehildis & her [first] husband had one child: 

i)          ALBERT [II] de la Ferté-en-Beauce Motey names Albert as son of Godehildis and her first husband, stating that he became a monk at Jumièges after his wife died and was elected abbé de Saint-Etienne et de Saint-Mesmin near Orléans, but cites no primary source[28].  Abbot at Micy.  m (before 989) --- de Châteaudun, daughter of HUGUES Vicomte de Châteaudun & his wife Hildegarde du Perche.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Albert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ARNOUL de la Ferté-en-Beauce (-1053)"Arnulphus ex nobili Alençoniorum et Bellismensium comitum genere, nepos Avesgaudi et consobrinus Gervasii" was elected archbishop of Tours[29]Archbishop of Tours 1023. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [I] de Bellême, son of IVES Seigneur de Bellême & his wife Godehildis --- (-[1031])André de Fleury’s Vita Gauzlini records that “Ivo Belesmensis” donated “Magniacum” to Fleury, but that after his death “Willelmus eius filius” reclaimed the property, and in a later passage that “Willelmus Belesmensis” donated “abbatiam Longeilegium” [Lonlay, Le Mans][30].  Seigneur d'Alençon.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Robert II Duke of Normandy besieged “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who had rebelled, and forced his submission (although he rebelled again later)[31].  "Ivo" founded Notre-Dame de Bellême, for the souls of himself "conjugisque mee Godehildis, sive filiis meis vel genitoribus meis", by undated charter, confirmed after his death by "Willelmus et Godehildis mater mea"[32].  He founded the abbey of Dame-Marie [1023/26][33]Europäische Stammtafeln[34] inserts an additional generation between "Guillaume de Belesme, fils d'Yves" and the four brothers who are reported by Guillaume de Jumièges as his sons: "Guillaume [I] "Talvas" "princeps" de Bellême, Sire d'Alençon, 1004-1013 iuvenis, erbaut Domfront, gründet um 1020 abbaye de Lonlay (-Domfront [1031], bur Notre-Dame-sur-l'Eau" recording his wife as "Mathilde, [1020]".  From a chronological point of view, this appears unlikely to be correct, especially if the two brothers Ives Bishop of Sées and Robert were sons of the older Guillaume as shown in the same table of Europäische Stammtafeln (see below).  The primary sources on which this is based have not yet been identified, but until more information emerges it appears preferable to show this family as reported by Guillaume de Jumièges.  La Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie records that Robert II Duke of Normandy granted Alençon to "à Belesme ung seigneur nommé Guillaume" who rebelled against the duke who besieged the castle and captured Guillaume[35]

m MATHILDE Dame de Condé-sur-Noireau, daughter of ---.  La Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie states that the mother of the sons of "à Belesme ung seigneur nommé Guillaume" was "Mehault du lignaige de Guennelon"[36].  The primary source which confirms her family origin more precisely has not yet been identified. 

Guillaume & his wife had five children: 

1.         WARIN [Guérin] de Bellême (-murdered 1026).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons, adding that Warin beheaded “Gunherium de Belismo militem” and was strangled[37].  Seigneur de Domfront.  m ---.  The name of Guérin's wife is not known.  Guérin & his wife had one child: 

a)         ADELISE de Bellême .  Her parentage is suggested by Orderic Vitalis who records that the great-grandfather of Rotrou [III] Comte du Perche was Guerin "quem dæmones suffocaverunt"[38].  It is also suggested by the reference in the same source to her son Geoffroy having a justified claim to Domfront, a castle which had been constructed by Adelise’s paternal grandfather.  The source which confirms her name has not been identified.  m ROTROU [I] Vicomte de Châteaudun, son of GEOFFROY Vicomte de Châteaudun & his wife Helvis [Elisabeth] de Corbon (-1 Mar [1080]).  Comte de Mortagne 1058. 

Guérin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

b)         RAOUL de Bellême (-after 28 May 1053).  Ives Bishop of Sées confirmed the sale of the church of Courgains, with the consent of "fratre episcopi Willelmo, et Oliverio et Warino et Rodulfo episcopi nepotibus", by charter dated 28 May 1053[39].  A later charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[40]

2.         FOULQUES de Bellême (-killed in battle forest of Blavon [1027/35], bur Notre-Dame de Bellême).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons, adding that their father during a later rebellion sent “filios suos Fulconem atque Robertum” to pillage Normandy, that they were defeated “intra saltum Blavonis” where Foulques was killed and Robert wounded[41]

3.         ROBERT de Bellême (-murdered Château de Ballon [1031/35]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons, adding that their father during a later rebellion sent “filios suos Fulconem atque Robertum” to pillage Normandy, that they were defeated “intra saltum Blavonis” where Foulques was killed and Robert wounded[42].  Seigneur de Bellême.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus Willelmi Belesmensis potestatis hæres et crudelitatis” was captured during an expedition “ultra Sartem a Cenomanensibus” and imprisoned for two years “apud Balaum castrum” where he was killed by the sons of “Walterium de Sordenia...militem” in revenge for the murder of their father, possibly dated to the early 1030s from the context of the passage[43].  "Rotberti filii Wilelmi, Ivo suus avunculus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by undated charter[44].  Robert had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

a)         GUERIN (-after 1067).  Ives Bishop of Sées confirmed the sale of the church of Courgains, with the consent of "fratre episcopi Willelmo, et Oliverio et Warino et Rodulfo episcopi nepotibus", by charter dated 28 May 1053[45].  A charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[46].  "Warino et Willelmus nepotibus Ivonis episcopi…" subscribed the charter dated 6 Dec 1067 which recorded that the church of Saint-Martin de Bellême was granted to Marmoutier[47]. 

b)         GUILLAUME (-after 1067).  A charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[48].  "Warino et Willelmus nepotibus Ivonis episcopi…" subscribed the charter dated 6 Dec 1067 which recorded that the church of Saint-Martin de Bellême was granted to Marmoutier[49]. 

4.         GUILLAUME [II] "Talvas" de Bellême (-after [1050/54])Guillaume of Jumièges names “Warinum et Fulconem, Robertum et Willelmum” as the four sons of “Willelmus Belesmensis, Yvonis filius...ex castro Alentio quod beneficio tenebat iure”, who was “crudelis et cupidus” as were all his sons[50].  "Guillelmus de Belismo" founded the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême by charter dated to [1023/27][51].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talvacius frater eius” succeeded after “Robertus Willelmi Belesmensis potestatis hæres et crudelitatis” was killed, adding that he was worse than his brothers in his crimes (“cunctis fratribus suis in omnibus flagitiis deterior fuit”)[52]Seigneur d'Alençon.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” succeeded “Roberti fratris sui” with the help particularly of “Willelmi filii Geroii[53].  "…Willelmus filius Guillelmi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1042] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli"[54].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus cognomento Talavicius Willermi Belesmensis filius” invited Guillaume Giroie to his marriage, where he was blinded, emasculated, and his ears cut off[55].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus...filius eius” [referring to Guillaume [II] “Talvas”] rebelled against his father whom he expelled and sent into exile[56].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talavatius”, after he was exiled, arranged the marriage of “filiam suam...Mabiliam” to “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri” who received him in his household[57]m firstly HILDEBURGE, daughter of ARNOUL & his wife ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[58]m secondly ---, daughter of RAOUL [IV] Vicomte du Maine & his first wife Emma de Montevrault Dame de Lude.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married secondly “filiam Rodulfi vicecomitis de Bellomonte[59].  Guillaume [II] & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ARNOUL de Bellême (-murdered).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[60].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus...filius eius” [referring to Guillaume [II] “Talvas”] rebelled against his father whom he expelled and sent into exile, but was later strangled in his bed[61]

b)         MABILE (-murdered Bures 2 Dec 1079, bur 5 Dec 1079 Troarn).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[62].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ivo filius Willermi Belesmensis...neptem...Mabiliam” married "Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici Oximensium vicecomes" who through her obtained "magnam partem possessionis Willermi Belesmensis", adding that Mabile was "a forceful and worldly woman, cunning, garrulous and extremely cruel" (“potens et sæcularis, callida et loquax, nimiumque crudelis”)[63].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talavatius”, after he was exiled, arranged the marriage of “filiam suam...Mabiliam” to “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri” who received him in his household[64].  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][65].  Orderic Vitalis records that she was murdered by Hugh Bunel, son of Robert "de Jalgeio" from whom she had taken his castle, who found her "relaxing in bed after a bath [and] struck off her head with his sword"[66].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[67]m ([1050/54]) ROGER [II] de Montgommery, son of ROGER [I] de Montgommery Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey).  Seigneur d'Alençon.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury in 1074. 

Guillaume [II] had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

c)          OLIVIER de Mesle (-after 28 May 1053).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus...filius eius” [referring to Guillaume [II] “Talvas”] rebelled against his father whom he expelled and sent into exile, but was later strangled in his bed, it being suspected that he was killed “ab Olivaro germano suo[68].  It is assumed that he was illegitimate as the same source in another passage names the two children of Guillaume [II] by his first wife.  Ives Bishop of Sées confirmed the sale of the church of Courgains, with the consent of "fratre episcopi Willelmo, et Oliverio et Warino et Rodulfo episcopi nepotibus", by charter dated 28 May 1053[69].  A later charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[70].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he left descendants known as "Oison"[71], but the primary source which confirms this statement has not yet been identified. 

5.         IVES de Bellême (-5 Apr 1070, bur Sées).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[72], he was the son of Guillaume de Bellême, son of "Guillaume de Belesme, fils d'Yves", the table specifying that he was "Sagiensis episcopus Wilhelmi scilicet domini de Bellismo filius" and "avunculus Rodberti filii Guillelmi".  From a chronological point of view, this appears unlikely to be correct.  Bishop of Sées 1035.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ivo filius Willermi Belesmensis” in "diebus Willermi ducis Normanniæ" held "Sagiensem episcopatum", and succeeded to “hæreditario jure ex paterna...Belesmense oppidum” after the deaths of “fratribus suis Warino et Rodberto atque Willermo[73].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ivo patruus eius Sagiensis episcopus” inherited “Belesmiæ castrum” after the death of [his nephew] Arnoul[74].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ivo...Sagiensis episcopus” besieged “Richardus atque Robertus et Avesgotus filii Willelmi cognomine Sorengi” in the church of Saint-Gervais, which they had occupied after they had devastated “omnem circa Sagium patriam”, and forced them to flight, the following chapter describing how each of the three brothers died[75].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Ivone...Sagiensium præsule”, “Rodbertus Huberti de Ria filius” was appointed and was bishop for twelve years, dated to 1070[76]

Guillaume [I] had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

6.          SIFRIDUS de Bellême .  A charter of Abbé Avesgaud summarises the sale of the church of Courgains, stating that it was made with the consent of "episcopi Sagiensis, Ivonis nomine, et Willelmi fratris predicti Sagiensis episcopi…etiam Warino et Willelmo filiis Roberti, Olivario Willelmi filio, Radulfi filio Warini, et Seginfredo filio Willelmi de Bellisimo"[77]Seigneur d'Escures, du Bouillon, de la Chapelle-près-Sées et de Congé. 

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS d'ALENÇON, COMTES d'ALENÇON, MONTGOMMERY-PONTHIEU

 

 

ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême", son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery Seigneur d'Alençon, Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury & his wife Mabile d'Alençon ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 8 May [1131 or later], bur [Wareham Castle]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[78].  He is referred to as his mother's "first-born son" by Orderic Vitalis, who says his "name is now a byword for his cruelty to the wretched peasantry"[79].  Seigneur de Bellême et Seigneur d'Alençon.  Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury. 

1.         GUILLAUME "Talvas" de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171).  He is named, and his parentage given, by Orderic Vitalis[80].  He succeeded his father [4 Mar 1106/1110][81] as Comte de Ponthieu

a)         JEAN [I] de Ponthieu (-24 Feb 1191).  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[82]Comte d'Alençon

-        see below

b)         other children: see PONTHIEU.  

2.         other children: see PONTHIEU.  

 

 

JEAN [I] de Ponthieu, son of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] (-24 Feb 1191).  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[83]Comte d'AlençonRobert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes comes filius eius" in the lands which he held from the English king "in Normannia et in Cenomannensi pago"[84]"Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[85].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[86]

m BEATRIX du Maine, daughter of HELIE d'Anjou Comte du Maine & his wife Philippa du Perche .  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi…Johannes comes filius eius" and "filiam comitis Heliæ fratris comitis Gaufridi Andegavorum et ducis Normannorum"[87].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi et Beatricia uxor mea atque Johannes filius meus" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by charter dated [1158/71][88]

Jean [I] & his wife had six children: 

1.         JEAN [II] d'Alençon (-6 May 1191, bur Perseigne).  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[89]"Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi et Beatricia uxor mea atque Johannes filius meus" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by charter dated [1158/71][90]"Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[91].  He succeeded his father in 1191 Comte d'Alençon

2.         ROBERT d'Alençon (-Morteville 8 Sep 1217, bur Perseigne).  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[92].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[93].  He succeeded his brother in 1191 as Comte d'Alençon.  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont records the death of “Robertum comitem Alencheii…apud…manerium suum…Morteveille prope La Val[94]m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m secondly (after 1191) as her second husband, JEANNE de Preuilly Dame de la Guerche et du Bouchet, widow of HUGUES [V] "Callidus" Vicomte de Châteaudun, daughter of GOSBERT de Preuilly Seigneur du Bouchet et de la Guerche & his wife Adela de [Vendôme] (-before Sep 1201).  "G comes Castriduni et A uxor mea" donated property to the abbey of Bécheron by charter dated 1212 in which he names "dominus Jobertus de Guerchia avus meus et Johanna mater mea filia ipsius, comitissa d'Alençon"[95].  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont records the marriage of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[96].  A charter dated Dec 1221 (error for before Sep 1201) of "Arturus dux Britannie comes Andegavensis, Cenomanensis et Richemontis" confirmed donations made to Perseigne abbey, including a donation made by "Johanna pie recordationis quondam comitissa de Alenchone et domina de Bocheto", witnessed by "domina Constancia matre mea…"[97]m thirdly (before 1215) as her first husband, EMMA de Laval, daughter of GUY [V] Seigneur de Laval & his wife Avise de Craon ([1197/98]-27 Apr 1264, bur Abbaye de Clermont).  "Guido dominus sextus de Lavalle" donated property to Olivet priory, for the soul of "Ozannæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated to [1205], witnessed by "Haoys uxore mea, Guido filius meus, Emma filia mea"[98].  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont record the marriage of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and “Emmam filiam Guidonis domini de La Val” after the death of his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[99].  "Robertus comes d’Alencon et dominus Lavallis et Emma uxor eius filia Guidonis de Lavalle et hæres Lavallis" exchanged property with "Yvoni Franco et dominæ Haoys uxori suæ" by charter dated Feb 1216[100].  She married secondly (before 1215) as his second wife, Mathieu [II] "le Grand" Seigneur de Montmorency, and thirdly (1231) Jean Seigneur de Toucy.  "Matheus de Montemorenciaco, conestabularius Franciæ et Emma, eius uxor, comitissa de Alanconio et domina Lavallensis" ratified a donation by "dominus Ivo Francus et uxor eius Advisia de Lavalle" to Bellebranche, for the salvation of "domini Guydonis de Lavalle" and for "Hugonis filii sui", by charter dated 1218[101]"Ama comitissa de Alenceon" donated property to Notre-Dame, Paris for the soul of "domini Mathei de Monte Morenciaco mariti mei defuncti" by charter dated 1230[102]"Joannes dominus de Toceio miles" confirmed commitments made for his marriage to "Emmam comitissam de Alenchon et dominam de Lavalle" by charter dated 1231[103].  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “27 Apr...circa 1280“ of "dominæ Emmæ comitissæ Alençonio, dominæ de Valle Guyonis, domini Guillelmi de Bellomonte [error] uxoris” and that “domini Guidonis de Laval filii eorum primogeniti” confirmed their donations[104].  Comte Robert & his second wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN [III] d'Alençon (-8 Jan 1212, bur Perseigne).  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Joannem et Matildam” as the children of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[105]m (1205) as her first husband, ALIX de Roye, daughter of BARTHELEMY de Roye & his wife Petronille de Montfort (-26 Jan 1226).  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont records that “Joannem”, son of “Robertum comitem Alencheii”, married “Aaliz filiam domini Bartholomæi de Roye” but died childless[106].  Philippe II King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “comitem Robertum Alenchonii...Johannis filii” and “Barth. de Roia...Aaliz filiæ” by charter dated 1205[107].  She married secondly (before 1214) Raoul de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the necrology of Joyenval which records the death of [her son] "domini Joannis de Nigella filii dominæ Aelidis de Roya” and his donation which was confirmed by his mother[108]

b)         MATHILDE d'Alençon .  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Joannem et Matildam” as the children of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia”, adding that Matilda married “comiti Blesensi Theobaldo[109]m (before 19 Sep 1213) as his first wife, THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois et de Clermont, son of LOUIS Comte de Blois & his wife Catherine Ctss de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-16 or 22 Apr 1218). 

Comte Robert & his third wife had one child: 

c)         ROBERT d'Alençon (posthumously 1217-before Jan 1220).  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont names “Robertus” as the posthumous son of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” by his wife “Emmam filiam Guidonis domini de La Val[110]

3.         GUILLAUME d'Alençon (-1203).  "Johannes comes Alençonis filius Willermi Pontivorum comitis" confirmed the rights of Perseigne abbey by charter dated 10 Apr 1185, witnessed by "Johannes filius meus, Robertus filius meus, Willermus filius meus…"[111].  "Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn with the consent of "filiis meis Johanne et Roberto et Willelmo" by charter dated 1190[112].  Seigneur de la Roche-Mabile.  m CECILE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 

4.         ALIX d'Alençon (-after 1220).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1235 under which her son "Hamericus vicecomes de Castro Heraudi" confirmed privileges granted to Perseigne abbey by "Guillermi quondam comitis Pontivii et Roberti comitis Alenchonis et Sagonensis domini…avunculi nostri"[113]The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Dame de Montgommery et de Sonois.  m ([1170/76]) as his second wife, HUGUES [II] Vicomte de Châtellerault, son of AIMERY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Amauberge [Dangeureuse] --- (-before 1176). 

5.         HELIE [Ela] d'Alençon (-after May 1233)Her parentage and marriage are indicated by three charters read together.  Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi, Ala uxor quondam Roberti filii Ernesii, et Robertus Malet" relinquished "castrum de Esseio" in return for "terram et redditus apud Escocheium" by charter dated to [1220][114]The family relationship between the three participants is explained in another charter dated to [1220] which records that Hemerico vicecomiti Castri-Eraudi, Alæ uxori Roberti Ernesii et Roberto Malet, Roberti comitis Alenconii heredibus" assigned property for "castri de Esseio"[115].  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi et Hela soror Roberti quondam comitis de Alencon et Robertus Malet" relinquished "forestam…Escoves et hayam de Ferraria et forestam de Chaumont et forestam de Ruppe-Heolydis, usque in Sarton…de dominio de Alenconio" by charter dated Jan 1220 (probably O.S.)[116][117]m ([1180/90]) ROBERT [VI] FitzErneis, son of ROBERT [V] FitzErneis & his wife --- (-before [1220]). 

6.         PHILIPPA d'Alençon (-before 1223).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and first and third marriages has not yet been identified.  Her second marriage is indicated by two charters.  Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi, Ala uxor quondam Roberti filii Ernesii, et Robertus Malet" relinquished "castrum de Esseio" in return for "terram et redditus apud Escocheium" by charter dated to [1220][118]The family relationship between the three participants is explained in another charter dated to [1220] which records that Hemerico vicecomiti Castri-Eraudi, Alæ uxori Roberti Ernesii et Roberto Malet, Roberti comitis Alenconii heredibus" assigned property for "castri de Esseio"[119]m firstly as his second wife, WILLIAM de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, son of WILLIAM de Roumare & his wife Agnès d'Aumâle (-[1198], bur [Revesby]).  m secondly GUILLAUME [III] Malet de Graville, son of MATTHEW de Graville & his wife --- (-[Sep 1214/Oct 1215]).  m thirdly (before Oct 1215) as his [first] wife, GUILLAUME de Préaux, son of JEAN de Préaux & his wife --- (-1223). 

 

 

 

C.      FAMILY of BALDRIC

 

 

Three siblings, parents not known: 

1.         BALDRIC (-before 1053).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldrico Teutonico” came “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II] and that together they held “honorem de Balgenzaio[120].  "Guillermus Normannorum dux" confirmed the properties of Saint-Evroul, including “terram de Balchencei sicut tenuerat Baldricus eius comitis arcearius” bought from “Ernaldo...Willelmi filio consenciente Roberto suo avunculo et jubente comite Willelmo” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Malgerii archiepiscopi...” [which dates the document to 1037/53][121]m ---, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Gislebertus comes Brionnæ nepos Ricardi ducis Normannorum" married "neptem suam" to “Baldrico Teutonico”, who had come “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II][122].  Her exact parentage is not known.  Baldric & his wife had [eight or more] children: 

a)         NICOLAS de Baqueville (-after [1048/63]).  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[123].  “Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...fiius meus Rogerius” donated “ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei quam pater meus in honore Sancti Petri construxit” to Saint-Wandrille, for the soul of “mee uxoris que in...Fontanella...iacet”, by charter dated to [1032/47][124].  Robert Abbot of Saint-Wandrille confirmed the purchase of “terre...Lebecors” from “Nicholao Baldrici filio coram uxore sua Geretrude filiisque” by charter dated to [1048/63], subscribed by “Willelmi comitis, Nicholay[125]m firstly --- (bur Saint-Wandrille).  “Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...fiius meus Rogerius” donated “ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei quam pater meus in honore Sancti Petri construxit” to Saint-Wandrille, for the soul of “mee uxoris que in...Fontanella...iacet”, by charter dated to [1032/47][126].  “...Nicholaus filius Baldrici...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][127]m secondly GERTRUDE, daughter of ---.  Robert Abbot of Saint-Wandrille confirmed the purchase of “terre...Lebecors” from “Nicholao Baldrici filio coram uxore sua Geretrude filiisque” by charter dated to [1048/63], subscribed by “Willelmi comitis, Nicholay[128].  The chronology of the charters quoted in this section indicate that Gertrude must have been the second wife of Nicolas.  Nicolas & his first wife had one child: 

i)          ROGER de Baqueville .  “Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...fiius meus Rogerius” donated “ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei quam pater meus in honore Sancti Petri construxit” to Saint-Wandrille, for the soul of “mee uxoris que in...Fontanella...iacet”, by charter dated to [1032/47][129]m ---, daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...altera” married “Nicolao de Bascheritivilla” among whose descendants were “Willelmus Martellus et Walterus de Sancto Martino[130]

b)         FOULQUES de Aunou (-after Oct 1066).  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[131].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Fulcone Dauno" contributed 40 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[132]

c)         ROBERT de Courcy .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[133]

-        COURCY

d)         RICHARD de Neufville .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[134]

e)         BAUDRY de Bauquencey .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[135]m BILLEHELDIS, daughter of --- (-after [1093]).  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[136].  “Hugo comes Cestrensis atque Ermentrudis comitissa” donated property to St Werburgh, Chester, and records other donations including that “Billeheld uxor Baldrici” donated “Pecfortunam”, by charter dated to [1093][137].  Baudry & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Bauquencey .  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[138].

ii)         BAUDRY de Bauquencey .  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[139]

f)          VIGER de Apulia .  Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[140].  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[141]m ---.  The name of Viger’s wife is not known.  Viger & his wife had one child: 

i)          FOULQUES .  "Billeheldis uxor Baldrici de Balchenceio" donated to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “filii sui Rodbertus...dominus de honore et Baldricus”, dated to “tempore Rogerii abbatis qui abbati Serloni successit”, witnessed by “Wigerius patruus eorumdem fratrem [error for fratrum?] et filius eius Fulco...[142]

g)         GUNNORA The De nobili genere Crispinorum records that "Gislebertus…Crispini cognomen" married "senioris Fulconis de Alnou germanam…Gonnorem"[143]m GILBERT Crispin, son of ---. 

h)         daughters .  Orderic Vitalis records that Baldric and his wife had "plures filiæ"[144]

2.         VIGER .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldrico Teutonico” came “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II] and that together they held “honorem de Balgenzaio[145]

3.         ELISABETH .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldrico Teutonico” married “Elizabeth sororem suam” to “Fulconi de Bona-Valle...militi” and granted “ecclesiam Sancti Nicolai quam pater suus construxerat[146]m FOULQUES de Bonneval, son of ---.  Foulques & his wife had two children:

a)         GUILLAUME de Bonneval .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldricus et Wigerius et Willermus de Bona-Valle” confirmed the charter under which “Fulco” offered “Teodericum filium suum”, who had been baptised by “Teodericus abbas”, to Ouche Saint-Evroul and donated “ecclesiam Sancti Nicolai[147]

b)         THIERRY de Bonneval .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Baldricus et Wigerius et Willermus de Bona-Valle” confirmed the charter under which “Fulco” offered “Teodericum filium suum”, who had been baptised by “Teodericus abbas”, to Ouche Saint-Evroul and donated “ecclesiam Sancti Nicolai”, adding that Thierry lived for 57 years as a monk[148]

 

 

 

D.      FAMILY of GIROIE

 

 

Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” was said to have descended “ex nobili Francorum et Britonem prosapia[149]

 

 

ABBO "le Breton/Brito", son of --- .  He is named only by Orderic Vitalis who records his grandson "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[150]

m ---.  The name of Abbo's wife is not known. 

Abbo & his wife had one child: 

1.         ARNAUD "le Gros" de Courcerault [near Mortagne, Orne] .  He is named only by Orderic Vitalis who records his son "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[151]m ---.  The name of Arnold's wife is not known.  If the description of her son by Orderic Vitalis is accurate, she was probably of Frankish origin.  Arnold & his wife had [three] children:

a)         GIROIE [Geroius] (-before 1035).  Orderic Vitalis names "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[152]

-        see below

b)         HILDIARD .  Orderic Vitalis records "tres filii et undecim filiæ" born to “Geroio...Hildiardi sorori eius”, who married “honorabilibus viris” and gave birth to “multos filios” who spread terror in the armies “in Gallia et Anglia atque Apulia[153]m ---. 

c)         [---.  m ---.] 

i)          [---.  m ---.] 

(a)       GUY "Bollein" .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua” lived “in pago Corboniensi” and entered “Willermum filium suum” at Ouche, encouraged by “Rodberti abbatis cognati...sui[154]m HODIERNA, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua” lived “in pago Corboniensi” and entered “Willermum filium suum” at Ouche, encouraged by “Rodberti abbatis cognati...sui[155].  Guy & his wife had four children: 

(1)       NORMAN .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua[156]

(2)       GAUTHIER .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua[157]

(3)       GEOFFROY .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua[158]

(4)       GUILLAUME dit Gregoire .  Orderic Vitalis names “Normannus et Walterius [milites]...Goisfredus...et Willermus cognomento Gregorius...sacerdoti” as the children “Wido cognomento Bollein senioris Geroii pronepos cum Hodierna conjuge sua”, recording that their father entered “Willermum filium suum...novem annorum” at Ouche, encouraged by “Rodberti abbatis cognati...sui”, adding that at the time of writing Guillaume had already passed 54 years as a monk and continued to live as such[159]

 

 

GIROIE [Geroius], son of ARNAUD "le Gros" & his wife --- (-before 1035).  Orderic Vitalis names "Geroio Ernaldi Grossi de Corte Sedaldi Abonii Britonis filii filio...ex magna nobilitate Francorum et Britonum"[160].  He fought with Guillaume de Bellême against Herbert Comte du Maine[161].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" allied himself with “Willermo Belesmensi” and fought successfully against “Herbertum Cenomannensium comitem[162].  Seigneur d'Echauffour et de Montreuil: Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" was betrothed to “Normannorum...miles...Helgo unicam filiam suam” with “Monasteriolum ac Escalfoium” [Montreuil et Echauffour] agreed as dowry, properties which were transferred to him after her father died, that she herself died before the marriage could take place, but that “Willermus Belesmensis” took Giroie to “Ricardum ducem Normanniæ” who granted “totam terram Helgonis hæreditario jure” to him at Rouen[163].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” went with “Belesmensi Willelmo” to the court of “Richardi Ducis” who granted him “in Normannia duo municipia Monasteriolum et Escalfoum” [Montreuil and Echaufour][164].  His death is dated by a passage in Orderic Vitalis who records that, after Giroie died, "Gislebertus...comes Brionniæ" attacked “Monsteriolum” but that “Rodbertus dux” [ruled from 1027-1035] reconciled the parties[165]

Betrothed to ---, daughter of HEUGON [Helgo] & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" was betrothed to “Normannorum...miles...Helgo unicam filiam suam” with “Monasteriolum ac Escalfoium” [Montreuil et Echauffour] agreed as dowry, properties which were transferred to him after her father died, that she herself died before the marriage could take place, but that “Willermus Belesmensis” took Giroie to “Ricardum ducem Normanniæ” who granted “totam terram Helgonis hæreditario jure” to him at Rouen[166]

m ([1005/10]) GISLA, daughter of THURSTAN de Bastembourg & his wife ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “ex his filiorum et nepotum militaris turma propagata est, quæ Barbaris in Anglia vel Apulia seu Trachia vel Syria nimio terrori visa est” [“from these children and grandchildren sprang a race of knights who became the terror of the barbarians in England, Apulia, Thrace and Syria”][167].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais[168].  Her marriage can probably be dated to [1005/10]: Orderic Vitalis records that Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights, in another passage making it clear that he died before the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy (who died in 1035)[169]

Giroie & his wife had eleven children: 

1.         ARNAUD de Montreuil (-[1035/40]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “Ernaldus et Fulcoius” died with “Giselberto comite[170].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding that when Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights[171].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after Giroie died, "Gislebertus...comes Brionniæ" attacked “Monsteriolum” but that “Rodbertus dux” [ruled from 1027-1035] reconciled the parties, adding that Arnaud was "accidentally thrown against the sharp corner of a step during a friendly wrestling match with another young athlete at Montreuil…and after breaking three ribs, died within three days"[172]m ---.  The name of Arnaud's wife is not known.  Arnaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-after [1050/56]).  “Willemi filii Ernoldi de Mosteriolo, qui dedit S. Trinitati decimam totius eiusdem Guiardivillæ, presbyterum et ecclesiam alodii jure”, subscribed a charter for Fauroux dated to [1050/56][173]

2.         GUILLAUME (-Gaeta, Apulia 5 Feb ----).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[174].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding that when Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights[175].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” succeeded “Roberti fratris sui” with the help particularly of “Willelmi filii Geroii[176].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentemaisnil...cum fratre suo Hugone” with “Willelmus Geroii filius” restored “monasterii sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum” [Ouche de Saint-Evroul][177]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Geroii monachus Becci et nepotes eius Robertus et Hugo de Grentemaisnil" restored "monasterium Sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum"[178]Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[179].  The Chronicon d’  Abbatiæ records that "Willelmus et nepotes sui Robertus et Hugo de Grentimenti" restored "monasterium sancti Ebrulfi" and donated “villam Russerie” to Bec[180].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmi filii Geroii” attended the second marriage of “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius”, against the advice of “Rodulfus...frater eius cognomento Clericus...et Mala-corona”, after which he was blinded and mutilated, three years later becoming a monk at Bec”[181].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus cognomento Talavicius Willermi Belesmensis filius” invited Guillaume Giroie to his marriage, where he was blinded, emasculated, and his ears cut off[182].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Monsteriolo et Ernaldus de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy and settled in Apulia[183].  Orderic Vitalis records that he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem twice, renouncing the world and taking monastic vows at the abbey of Bec after his second journey[184].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroianus Willelmus” died “apud Caietam Non Feb” while “in Apuliam missus est[185]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "5 Feb" of "Guillelmus filius Geroii fundator hujus cœnobii"[186]m firstly HILTRUDE, daughter of FULBERT de Beina & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume married firstly “Hiltrudem filiam Fulberti de Beina”, who had built “castrum Aquilæ” during the time of “Ricardi ducis[187]m secondly EMMA, daughter of WALKELIN de Tannée & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume married secondly “Emmam, Walchelini de Taneto filiam[188].  Guillaume & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ARNAUD d'Echaufour (-murdered I Jan [1065]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Ernaldum de Escalfoio” as the son of Guillaume and his first wife “Hiltrudem filiam Fulberti de Beina[189].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ernaldo...Willermi filio" donated "terram de Balgenzaio...et partem terræ Escalfo...et Exartum Henrici et decimam molendini de Esaclfo...terram Altæripæ...et terram de Doith Mulsat" to Ouche, with the consent of “Rodberto avunculo suo[190].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus Willermi Geroiani filius” succeeded “in loco patrui sui” after the death of Robert senior [dated to 1060/61] and continued to rebel against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, although peace was restored soon afterwards whereupon the duke restored him in “Monasteriolum et Escalfoium ac Sanctum Serenicum, totamque patrum suorum hæreditatem[191].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume who exiled “milites Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio atque Ernaldum de Escalfoio”, dated to [1059/61], adding that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio” revenged himself by ravaging “Lexoviensem pagum” for three years[192].  Orderic Vitalis records the return from Apulia of “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” who was pardoned by Duke Guillaume who promised the return of his property, that “Mabilia Talavacii filia” prepared poison for him which was drunk by “Gislebertus frater Rogerii de Monte-Gomerici” who died three days later “apud Raimalastum”, that she succeeded a second time in poisoning him with the help of “Rogerium militem cognomento Gulafram...Ernaldi cubicularius” whom she had seduced, and that he died “Kal Jan” dated to [1064] from the context[193]m EMMA, daughter of THURSTAN Haldup & his wife --- (-[1095]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, who after her husband died retired “ad Eudonem fratrem suum Normannici ducis dapiferum” (who was a lord “in pago Constantino”) and lived “pene xxx annis” in her widowhood[194].  Arnaud & his wife had [eight or more] children: 

i)          GUILLAUME (-[1115/25]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Guillaume on reaching adolescence joined the court of Philippe I King of France and became “regis...armiger” and afterwards left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem”, living nearly 40 years “inter Winilos[195]m firstly ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume, son of Arnaud d’Echaufour, left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem[196]m secondly ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume, son of Arnaud d’Echaufour, left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem[197].  Guillaume & his second wife had children: 

(a)       children .  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume, son of Arnaud d’Echaufour, left for Apulia where he married “nobilem de genere Langobardorum”, “triginta castellorum sub Rotberto comite Lorotelli, nepote...Wiscardi”, and from a second wife had “multiplicem utriusque sexus sobolem[198]

ii)         RENAUD ([1058/59]-[1115/16]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Renaud became a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul three months before his father died aged five years old, was named “Benedictus”, and remained there for 52 years[199]

iii)        PETRONILLE .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Petronille became a nun “in cœnobio S. Mariæ Andegavis[200]

iv)       GEVA .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, adding that Geva became a nun at Caen Holy Trinity[201]

v)        other children .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias[202]

Guillaume & his second wife had one child: 

b)         GUILLAUME (-Rome after Sep 1068).  Orderic Vitalis names “Willermum” as the son of Guillaume and his second wife “Emmam, Walchelini de Taneto filiam”, adding that later in Apulia he was known as “bonus Normannus[203].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[204].  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche, in seeking his restoration as abbot sought help from “Willermum de Mosterolo consobrinum suum”, who had conquered “Campaniam”, and granted him “medietatem antiquæ urbis...Aquina[205].  His father-in-law installed him as Duke of Gaeta in [1064], but he rebelled and attempted to repudiate his wife in order to marry Maria, widow of Duke Atenulf I[206].  Orderic Vitalis records that he became commander of the papal army which was victorious in Campania[207].  Amatus records that he gave two churches to Montecassino in Sep 1068[208].  Amatus records that he died in Rome from "a burning fever"[209]m ([1060/62]) --- di Capua, daughter of RICHARD I Prince of Capua & his wife Frédésende de Hauteville.  Amatus records the marriage of the daughter of Richard to "an exceptional knight, small in stature, who was very robust, strong, valiant…his adopted son…William" with the counties of Aquino, Marsia and Campagna as dowry[210]

3.         EREMBURGE .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[211].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that “primogenita...filiarum Heremburgis” married “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi” by whom she had “Willelmus et Radulfus” who later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[212].  As the second marriage of her younger sister Hawise can be dated to [1040], and because Hawise had six children by her first marriage, it is likely that Eremburge married much earlier, say in [1020/30].  If that is correct, she must have been one of the older children of her parents.  m ([1020/30]) WALKELIN de Pont-Echanfrey, son of ---. 

4.         HAWISE .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[213].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Hawise married firstly “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio”, by whom she had “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias”, and secondly “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” by whom she had “Judith” who later married “Rogerii comitis Siciliæ[214].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes...Willelmus...frater eius” married “Hadevisam filia Geroii relictam Roberti de Grentemaisnil[215].  As Hawise had six children by her first husband, it is unlikely that she was born much later than 1015 and must therefore have been one of her parents’ older children.  m firstly ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of --- (-killed in battle 17 Jun [1040]).  m secondly (after 17 Jun [1040]) GUILLAUME d'Evreux, son of ROBERT Comte d'Evreux Archbishop of Rouen [Normandy] & his mistress Herleva ---.  He is named by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was "son of Archbishop Robert"[216]

5.         FOULQUES (-murdered [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “Ernaldus et Fulcoius” died with “Giselberto comite[217].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Foulques inherited “medietatem Monasterioli” and that “post mortem Rodberti ducis” he was killed “cum compatre suo Gislberto comite[218].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[219].  These deaths can probably be dated to [1040].  Foulques had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

a)         GIROIEOrderic Vitalis names "Geroium et Fulcoium ex concubina" as the two sons of Foulques, son of Giroie[220].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[221]

b)         FOULQUESOrderic Vitalis names "Geroium et Fulcoium ex concubina" as the two sons of Foulques, son of Giroie[222].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[223]

6.         RAOUL "Malacorona/ill-tonsured" (-19 Jan [1068]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[224].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Raoul became a monk at Marmoutier “sub Alberto abbate” (abbot from 1037 to 1064) and died six years later[225].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmi filii Geroii” attended the second marriage of “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius”, against the advice of “Rodulfus...frater eius cognomento Clericus...et Mala-corona”, after which he was blinded and mutilated, three years later becoming a monk at Bec”[226].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the departure of “Rodberti abbatis [Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche]” (dated to [1061]), “Rodulfus Mala-Corona avunculus eius” left Ouche Saint-Evroul and went to Marmoutier, where he died “XIV Kal Feb” seven years later[227]

7.         ROBERT (-6 Feb [1060/61], bur St-Evroul d’Ouche).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[228].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Robert held “castrum S. Serenici[229].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[230].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ernaldo...Willermi filio" donated "terram de Balgenzaio...et partem terræ Escalfo...et Exartum Henrici et decimam molendini de Esaclfo...terram Altæripæ...et terram de Doith Mulsat" to Ouche, with the consent of “Rodberto avunculo suo[231].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[232].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodberti Geroii filius” rebelled against “Willermum ducem”, joined “Andagavensibus” and fortified “castra sua: Sanctum...Serenicum et Rupem Ialgiensem” [Saint-Céneri-le-Giroie and La Roche d’Igé near Bellême], dated to [1060], but records that he died “VIII Id Feb” five days after eating two poisoned apples which he had snatched from his wife’s hand[233]Another passage in the same source records that Robert held out in "castrum sancti Serenici" against “Willermum ducem...anno ducatus eiusdem ducis xxv” [1060/61] and repeats the story of his death[234]Orderic Vitalis records that, after at first refusing, Duke Guillaume permitted the return of Robert’s body for burial at Ouche[235]m ADELAIDE, daughter of --- (-after [1060/61]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Willermus dux" granted “Adelaidem consobrinam suam” in marriage to Robert, son of Giroie[236].  The passage in Orderic Vitalis, which records that her husband died five days after eating a poisoned apple which he had snatched from his wife’s hand, clarifies that she outlived him[237]Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT (-after Jun 1119)Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum” as the son of Robert, son of Giroie, and his wife “Adelaidem”, adding that “now fights for Henry I King of England” (qui nunc Henrico regi Anglorum militat”)[238].  It is unclear why Robert did not succeed to his properties on the death of his father: Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus Willermi Geroiani filius” succeeded “in loco patrui sui” after the death of Robert senior and pursued the rebellion[239].  Son of Robert Giroie according to Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he "spent many years with his relatives in Apulia" and was "consobrinus" of Robert III Duke of Normandy, who restored to him the castle of Saint-Céneri previously held by his father which he retained "for about 36 years afterwards"[240].  His castle was attacked "without warning" by Robert de Bellême, triggering open warfare in which Robert Giroie laid waste the country around Alençon for three months, but during his absence Robert de Bellême sacked the castle in [Jul 1092][241].  Seigneur de Saint-Cenery [located south-west of Alençon, near the forest of Ecouves]: "Avesgaudus filius Fulcaudi" donated "ecclesia Sancti Simphoriani et Sancte Marie de Conedrario" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated 1 May 1103, which names "uxor mea Brita…et Robertus de Sancto Celerino gener meus…filia…mea Felicia ipsius Roberti uxor"[242].  A charter dated to [1110] confirms the donation by "Robertus, Giroi filius" of revenue at "Conedrarium", donated by "Avesgaudus socer eius" when he became a monk, to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans, with the consent of "Britta uxor…dicti Avesgaudi et Felicia filia eorum, exor prefati Roberti"[243]He rebelled against Henry I King of England in Jul [1118], supported by Foulques IV Comte d'Anjou, but was pardoned in Jun 1119 at the request of Comte Foulques[244]m firstly RADEGUNDE, daughter of --- (-1092).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of "Geroianus…Radegundis uxor eius" and "Guillelmus infans filius eius" who was a hostage to "Rodbertus Belesmensis", in the same year that the castle of Saint-Céneri was plundered by Robert de Bellême[245]m secondly (after 1092) FELICIE de Connerré, daughter of AVESGAUD Seigneur de Connerré & his wife Brita ---.  "Avesgaudus filius Fulcaudi" donated "ecclesia Sancti Simphoriani et Sancte Marie de Conedrario" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated 1 May 1103, which names "uxor mea Brita…et Robertus de Sancto Celerino gener meus…filia…mea Felicia ipsius Roberti uxor"[246]Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[247]A charter dated to [1110] confirms the donation by "Robertus, Giroi filius" of revenue at "Conedrarium", donated by "Avesgaudus socer eius" when he became a monk, to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans, with the consent of "Britta uxor…dicti Avesgaudi et Felicia filia eorum, uxor prefati Roberti"[248]Robert & his first wife had one child:

i)          GUILLAUME (-1092 or after).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of "Geroianus…Radegundis uxor eius" and "Guillelmus infans filius eius" who was a hostage to "Rodbertus Belesmensis" allegedly poisoned by his captor, in the same year that the castle of Saint-Céneri was plundered by Robert de Bellême[249]

Robert & his second wife had six children:

ii)         GUILLAUME .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[250].  He and his brother inherited Saint-Céneri from their father[251]

iii)        ROBERT .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[252].  He and his brother inherited Saint-Céneri from their father259

iv)       MATHIEU .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[253]

v)        AGATHA .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[254]

vi)       DAMETA .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[255]same person as…?  DAMETA .  A Norman woman.  Her son granted her the manor of Chelsea for an annual rent of £4[256]There is no proof that this co-identity is correct.  However, the chronology is favourable and no other person with this name has yet been found in the primary sources consulted during the preparation of the present document.  Mistress of: ETIENNE de Blois Comte de Mortain, son of ETIENNE Comte de Blois & his wife Adela of England (Blois [1096/97]-Dover 25 Oct 1154, bur Faversham Abbey, Kent).  He succeeded in 1135 as STEPHEN King of England

vii)      AVELINE .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroianus" married "Feliciam…Guarnerii de Coneraia filiam" as his second wife and had three sons "Guillelmum…et Rodbertum ac Matthæum" and three daughters "Agatham, Damatam et Avelinam"[257]

8.         HUGUES (-[1040/50]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[258].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in as later passage that Hugues “juventute florens” was mortally wounded during the siege of “castro S. Scolasticæ[259]

9.         GIROIE (-[1050/60]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[260].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Giroie “primo flore juventutis” raided “prædam in terra Lexoviensis ecclesie” [Lisieux] and died after returning to Montreuil “in amentiam” [in a fit of madness][261].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus”, brother of "Ernaldo...Willermi filio", donated "situm in Maisnil Bernardi in honore sancti Sulpitii" and other named properties to Ouche, with the consent of “Geroio fratre eius [referring to his paternal uncle] et cognatis...Geroio atque Fulcoio[262]

10.      EMMA .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[263].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Emma married “Rogerio de Merula” by whom she had “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum[264]m ROGER de Merlerault, son of ---.  Roger & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus” as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[265].  

b)         GUILLAUME de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum”, as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[266].   m ---.  The name of Guillaume's wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

i)          RAOUL de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum”, as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[267].  

ii)         ROGER de Merlerault .  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodulfus et Willermus”, the latter being father of “Rodulfi et Rogerii vicinorum nostrorum”, as the sons of “Rogerio de Merula” and his wife[268].  

11.      ADELAIS .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[269].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that "quarta filia [Geroii] Adelais" married "Salomoni de Sablolio", by whom she had "Rainaldum" adding that "cujus proles…Lisiardus" is now a supporter of Henry I King of England in Anjou[270]m SALOMON de Sablé, son of ---. 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the Giroie family has not been established.  She may have been related to Arnaud d’Echaufour through the female line, so could have belonged to the families either of Arnaud’s mother or of his paternal grandmother Gisla de Montfort-sur-Risle. 

 

1.         RICHEREDA, daughter of --- (bur Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle[271]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Engenulfus et Richuereda uxor eius" donated the deceased’s horse to Ouche after "Rogerius primogenitus Engenulfi de Aquila filius" was killed, dated to [1059/61][272].  Her relationship with the Giroie family is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Ernaldus" [Arnaud d’Echaufour, son of Guillaume Giroie, see above] received "equum consobrini sui Rogerii" [her son] from “Rodberto abbate” [Robert de Grantmesnil, abbot of Ouche], dated to [1059/61][273].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "domina matre mea Richoereda…"[274]m ENGENULF de Laigle [de l'Aigle], son of --- (-killed in battle Hastings 17 Oct 1066, bur Monastery of Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle). 

 

 

The precise relationships between the following individuals and the main Giroie family have not yet been ascertained: 

 

1.         ROBERT Geroie (-after [1172/78]).  Seigneur de Saint Serein, d’Echauffour et de Montreuil.  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Evroul , at the request of "fidelis mei Roberti Geroiani domini Sancti Serenici Eschalfoii et Musterelli et W. filii sui primogeniti et Geroii de Musterello" by charter dated [1172/78][275]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-after [1172/78]).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Evroul , at the request of "fidelis mei Roberti Geroiani domini Sancti Serenici Eschalfoii et Musterelli et W. filii sui primogeniti et Geroii de Musterello" by charter dated [1172/78][276]

2.         [GEROIE de Montreuil (-after [1172/78]).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Evroul , at the request of "fidelis mei Roberti Geroiani domini Sancti Serenici Eschalfoii et Musterelli et W. filii sui primogeniti et Geroii de Musterello" by charter dated [1172/78][277].  The precise relationship between Geroie de Montreuil and Robert Geroie has not yet been identified.] 

 

 

 

E.      GRANTMESNIL

 

 

ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of --- (-killed in battle 17 Jun [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentesmaisnil” died in the same battle as “Rogerius [de Toenia][278]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "17 Jun" of "Robertus de Grentemesnil"[279]

m as her first husband, HAWISE, daughter of GIROIE & his wife Gisla de Bastembourg (-10 May ----).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes...Willelmus...frater eius” married “Hadevisam filia Geroii relictam Roberti de Grentemaisnil[280].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Hawise married firstly “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio”, by whom she had “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias”, and secondly “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” by whom she had “Judith” who later married “Rogerii comitis Siciliæ[281].  She married secondly Guillaume d'Evreux [Normandie].  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "10 May" of "Haudvisa mater Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[282]

Robert & his wife had [seven] children: 

1.         HUGUES de Grantmesnil ([1025]-in England 22 Feb 1098, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[283]

-        see below

2.         ROBERT de Grantmesnil (-St Euphemia 12 Dec [1082]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[284].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[285].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentemaisnil...cum fratre suo Hugone” with “Willelmus Geroii filius” restored “monasterii sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum[286]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Geroii monachus Becci et nepotes eius Robertus et Hugo de Grentemaisnil" restored "monasterium Sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum"[287]The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Willelmus et nepotes sui Robertus et Hugo de Grentimenti" restored "monasterium sancti Ebrulfi" and donated “villam Russerie” to Bec[288].  Orderic Vitalis records that “nepotes sui Hugo et Rotbertus” founded “apud Nuceretum villam suam prope Grentemaisnilium...cœnobium”, inspired by “Willermi filii Geroii avunculi sui[289].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus et Hugo et Ernaldus filii Rodberti de Grentemaisnilio" donated "in Nucereto ecclesia...villa...Solengiacus, in Oillei...Anglisca...villa...ecclesia...Villaris...in monasterio de Waiprato...decimam de Buinna, et in Belmeis tertiam partem molendini...unum hospitem in Collavilla" and numerous other named properties to Ouche[290].  Abbot of Saint-Evroul d’Ouche: Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertum de Grentemaisnilio” was elected abbot of Ouche in 1059[291].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume and the resignation “VI Kal Feb” [1061] of “Rodbertus Uticensium abbas” following complaints about him, adding in a later passage that Robert went “ad parentes suos in Apuliam”, before returning to Normandy with two Papal legates to reclaim his abbey unsuccessfully[292].  Abbot of St Euphemia in Calabria: Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche, in seeking his restoration as abbot sought help from “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” who invited him and his monks to install themselves permanently there and granted “ecclesiam Sanctæ Eufemiæ...super littus Adriatici maris” to him, dated to [1061/63][293].  Malaterra records the marriage "apud Sanctum Martinum" of "abbatum Sanctæ Euphemiæ Robertum…Judicta sorore sua" and Count Roger[294].  Orderic Vitalis records that in 1077 “Goisfredus nepos Eustachii Bolonensium comitis nepos” was appointed bishop of Chartres, in opposition to “Rodbertus...abbas frater Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio[295].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus abbas Sanctæ Eufemiæ” was poisoned by “quidam genere Saracenus, arte pistoria Brixensi cœnobio” and died “II Id Dec”, dated to [1082][296]

3.         ARNAUD de Grantmesnil .  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[297].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus et Hugo et Ernaldus filii Rodberti de Grentemaisnilio" donated "in Nucereto ecclesia...villa...Solengiacus, in Oillei...Anglisca...villa...ecclesia...Villaris...in monasterio de Waiprato...decimam de Buinna, et in Belmeis tertiam partem molendini...unum hospitem in Collavilla" and numerous other named properties to Ouche[298].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Monsteriolo et Ernaldus de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy and settled in Apulia[299]Europäische Stammtafeln dates his journey to Italy in [1050][300], although the basis for this speculation is not known.  Malaterra names "iuvenis…Arnaldus…frater iuvenculæ uxoris eius [Rogerii comitis Siciliæ]"[301]

4.         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[302]same person as…?  AGNES de Grantmesnil (-29 Sep ----).  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "29 Sep" of "Agnes soror Hugonis de Grentemesnil"[303]

5.         ADELISE de Grantmesnil (-after [1068/69]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[304].  Her marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnil, qui præsidatum Gewissorum, id est Guentanæ regionis” [presumably Hampshire] and “sororius eius Unfridus de Telliolo...Hastingas...custodiendum” returned to Normandy wanting to rejoin their wives, dated to [1068/69][305].  Orderic Vitalis names [her son] “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” whose “pater...fuit filius Amfridi de progenie Dacorum, Adeliza...mater eius soror Hugonis de Grentemaisnil de...stirpe Geroianorum[306]m HONFROI de Tilleul, son of AMFRID & his wife --- (-after [1068/69]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” whose “pater...fuit filius Amfridi de progenie Dacorum, Adeliza...mater eius soror Hugonis de Grentemaisnil de...stirpe Geroianorum[307].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnil, qui præsidatum Gewissorum, id est Guentanæ regionis” [presumably Hampshire] and “sororius eius Unfridus de Telliolo...Hastingas...custodiendum” returned to Normandy wanting to rejoin their wives, dated to [1068/69][308].  Honfroi & his wife had three children: 

a)         ARNAUD de Tilleul (-after [1090/95]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Drogo filius Goisfredi de Novo-Mercato et Rogerius Erneisi de Coluncis filius nepos Guillelmi de Guarenna et Ernaldus Unfridi de Telliolo filius, nepos ex sorore Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio" donated revenue[309]Monk at Ouche Saint-Evroult.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus monachus Unfridi filius” had “in adolescentia” left the knighthood and became a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul where he lived for nearly 50 years[310].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” made donations to “Uticense cœnobium” where “fratres sui Ernaldus et Rogerius” were monks[311].  Orderic Vitalis records that “aliquot annos” after the death of “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” [Robert of Rhuddlan, son of Onfroi de Tilleul and his wife Adelise de Grantmesnil], “Ernaldus monachus Unfridi filius” went to England to bring back “ossa Rodberti fratris sui” to Normandy where they were buried at Ouche Saint-Evroul[312]

b)         ROBERT of Rhuddlan (before [1046/48]-killed in battle Hormaheva [1087], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” whose “pater...fuit filius Amfridi de progenie Dacorum, Adeliza...mater eius soror Hugonis de Grentemaisnil de...stirpe Geroianorum[313]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” went “dum puer erat cum patre suo in Angliam” and served “Eduardo regi” who knight him, before returning to Normandy, and that after “Senlacio bello” he went again “cum Hugone consobrino suo, Richardi de Abrincis cognomento Goz filio” to England where, after Hugues received “comitatus Cestrensis”, he was made “militiæ eius et totius provinciæ gubernator” and granted “oppidum...apud Rodelentum” which King William had built “contra Guallos[314].  Robert’s birth date is estimated from his being knighted by King Edward before his death in 1066.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugues de Grantmesnil et nepos suus Robert de Ruddlan” witnessed the charter dated to [1081] under which William I King of England confirmed the possessions of Ouche[315].  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugo de Grentemaisnil...ac Rodbertus de Rodelento nepos eius” among the followers of “Odo...palatinus Cantiæ consul[316].  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Hugo...juvenis...Hugonis de Grantemaisnil filius et cognatus eius Rodbertus de Rodelento”, dated to 1087 from the context[317]Orderic Vitalis records that “aliquot annos” after the death of “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius”, “Ernaldus monachus Unfridi filius” went to England to bring back “ossa Rodberti fratris sui” to Normandy where they were buried at Ouche Saint-Evroul[318]

c)         ROGERMonk at Ouche Saint-Evroult.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus...Rodelenti princeps” made donations to “Uticense cœnobium” where “fratres sui Ernaldus et Rogerius” were monks[319]

6.         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[320].  [same person as...?  EMMA .  Orderic Vitalis records that “duæ sorores uterinæ Rodberti abbatis [Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche] Judith et Emma” had been left “apud Uticum in capella sancti Ebrulfi...sub sacro velamine”, that when they learnt that “Rodbertum fratrem suum” was established in Apulia with “secular power” (“sæculari potentia”) they left for Italy where they both married, Judith marrying “Rogerius Siciliæ comes” and Emma marrying “aliusque comes, cujus nomen no recolo”, dated to [1061/63][321].  The reference to Judith and Emma being “sorores uterinæ” suggests that they did not share the same father as Robert.  However, in another passage, the same source names Judith as the child (implicitly “only child”) of “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” and his wife[322].  It is therefore unclear whether Emma was one of Robert’s full sisters or half-sisters, although the order of the names of the two sisters suggests that Emma was younger than Judith and therefore born from the same marriage of their mother.  m ---.] 

7.         [--- .  The name and parentage of the wife of Richard “le Goz” Vicomte d’Avranches is not known.  She is called “Emma” in the Complete Peerage[323], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  A manuscript relating to St Werburgh’s Chester records that “Hugo Lupus filius ducis Britanniæ et nepos Gulielmi magni ex sorore” transformed the foundation into a monastery[324].  This suggests that Hugues’s mother may have been a uterine sister of King William, and therefore daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, no indication has been in other primary sources which supports the contention that Hugues was the son of a duke of Brittany.  It is assumed therefore that both lines of his parentage have been romanticised in this document to improve his status and reputation.  Another possibility is that she was related to the Grantmesnil family: Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” [Robert of Rhuddlan, son of Onfroi de Tilleul and his wife Adelise de Grantmesnil] went “cum Hugone consobrino suo, Richardi de Abrincis cognomento Goz filio” to England[325].  If the relationship is correct as indicated by Orderic, from a chronological point of view she could have been another daughter of Hugues de Grantmesnil, maybe the same person as the unnamed third daughter who is shown above.  m (before [1047]) RICHARD "le Goz" Vicomte d’Avranches, son of Vicomte THURSTAN “le Goz” & his wife --- (-after 1082).] 

 

 

HUGUES  de Grantmesnil, son of ROBERT de Grantmesnil & his wife Hawise --- ([1025][326]-in England 22 Feb 1098, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias” as the children of “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife[327].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentemaisnil...cum fratre suo Hugone” with “Willelmus Geroii filius” restored “monasterii sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum[328]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Geroii monachus Becci et nepotes eius Robertus et Hugo de Grentemaisnil" restored "monasterium Sancti Ebrulfi apud Uticum"[329]The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Willelmus et nepotes sui Robertus et Hugo de Grentimenti" restored "monasterium sancti Ebrulfi" and donated “villam Russerie” to Bec[330].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus et Rotbertus filii Geroi et Hugo ac Rotbertus filii Rotberti de Grentesmaisnilio” sought the consent of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in 1050 to restore “Uticum cœnobio[331].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus et Hugo et Ernaldus filii Rodberti de Grentemaisnilio" donated "in Nucereto ecclesia...villa...Solengiacus, in Oillei...Anglisca...villa...ecclesia...Villaris...in monasterio de Waiprato...decimam de Buinna, et in Belmeis tertiam partem molendini...unum hospitem in Collavilla" and numerous other named properties to Ouche[332].  Orderic Vitalis records that “nepotes sui Hugo et Rotbertus” founded “apud Nuceretum villam suam prope Grentemaisnilium...cœnobium”, inspired by “Willermi filii Geroii avunculi sui[333].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume who exiled “milites Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio atque Ernaldum de Escalfoio”, dated to [1059/61][334], the same source recording in a later passage that Duke Guillaume recalled “Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio”, dated to [1063][335].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Hugo de Grentemasinilio et Rogerius de Molbraio...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[336].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Grenmesnil" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[337].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Hugo de Grentemaisnilio et Guillermus de Garenna...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[338].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[339].  Sheriff of Leicester: Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted the command of "municipatum Legrecestræ" to "Hugoni...de Grentemaisnilio"[340].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnil, qui præsidatum Gewissorum, id est Guentanæ regionis” [presumably Hampshire] and “sororius eius Unfridus de Telliolo...Hastingas...custodiendum” returned to Normandy wanting to rejoin their wives, dated to [1068/69][341].  "…Hugonis de Grentemaisnil…" witnessed a charter dated to [1077] under which William I King of England granted property to the abbey of Saint-Etienne de Caen[342].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Grantmesnil” holding land in Thundridge, Braughing Hundred, in Hertfordshire from the bishop of Bayeux, and land in Ware also in Hertfordshire; Pebworth, Broad Marston, Upper Quinton, Lower Quinton, Weston-on-Avon and Willicote in Gloucestershire, numerous properties in Leicestershire[343].  He fought Robert de Bellême and his castle of Courcy was besieged by Robert III Duke of Normandy in 1091[344].  Orderic Vitalis records that in 1098 “Hugo de Grentemaisnil” fell ill in England, became a monk, and died “VIII Kal Mar”, his body being returned to Normandy for burial at Ouche[345]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "21 Feb" of "Hugo de Grentesmesnil comes Leecestriæ, fundator hujus cœnobii, monachus nostræ congregationis"[346]

m ([before 1060]) ADELISE de Beaumont, daughter of IVES [II] Comte de Beaumont & his first wife Judith --- ([before 1045]-Rouen 11 Jul 1091, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” married “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[347].  The date of her marriage is estimated based on the estimated birth date of the couple’s oldest known son.  Domesday Book records “Adeliza wife of Hugh de Grandmesnil” holding Broxbourne in Hertford Hundred in Hertfordshire; land in Shelton, Houghton Conquest and Chalton in Bedfordshire[348].  She owned Peatling Magna, in the possession of Leofric in 1086 in Domesday Book[349].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “Rotomagi V Id Jul” of “Adeliza...Ivonis de Bellomonte comitis, de Judæa genetrice, filia”, wife of Hugues de Grantmesnil, seven years before her husband died and her burial at Ouche, adding that she and her husband has six sons and six daughters[350]

Hugues & his wife had twelve children: 

1.         ROBERT de Grantmesnil ([before 1060]-1 Jun [1136], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[351].  Considering that Robert's younger brother Guillaume was considered of marriageable age before [1081] (see below), it is unlikely that Robert was born later than [1060], although this would mean that he was probably in his fifties at the time of his first marriage (considering the estimated birth date range of his first wife) which seems surprising.  “…Rotberti de Grentemaisnillo, Ivonis de Grentemaisnillo…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[352].  "…Robert de Grentone-Maisnil…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[353].  "Robert de Grantemsnil et Robert de sancto Serenico" confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul made by "their progenitors Hugh and Robert de Grentemesnil" by charter dated to [1127/28][354].  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[355]m [firstly] [as her second husband,] EMMA d’Estouteville, [widow of ERRAND Seigneur d'Harcourt[356],] daughter of ROBERT [I] d'Estouteville & his wife [Beatrix ---] (-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married secondly “Emmam Rodberti de Stotevilla filiam[357].  The chronology of these families suggests that Emma must have been Robert’s first wife not his second.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[358].  La Roque states that “une généalogie de la maison d’Estouteville” names Errand’s wife as “Emme et la comprend entre ceux du sang...[de] Robert d’Estouteville”, suggesting that she was the same person who later married “Hugues de Grentesmesnil[359].  The passage is somewhat garbled and in any case La Roque does not provide a citation reference to the source in question or quote it in his “Preuves”.  It is suggested that, until further documentation comes to light, this supposed marriage of Errand should be treated with caution.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[360]m [secondly] LUCY, daughter of SAVARY de Beaumont-au-Maine & his wife Muriel de Bohun.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married thirdly “Luciam Savarici filii Cani filiam[361].  Given the likely chronology of Robert’s wife Agnes, it is probable that Lucy was his second rather than his third wife.  m [thirdly] AGNES [Aveline], daughter of RANULF "le Meschin" Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] [later Earl of Chester] & his wife Lucy --- ([1098/1105]-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married firstly “Agnetem Ranulfi Bajocensis filiam[362].  Her birth date range is estimated from the likely marriage date of her parents.  If that range is correct, it is more likely that Agnes was Robert’s third wife than his first.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[363].  Robert de Grantmesnil & his [first] wife had one child:

a)         ROBERT .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[364]

Robert de Grantmesnil & his [first/second] wife had [two] children: 

b)         AGNES de Grantmesnil (-after 1115).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert had recently married "Agnete filia Rodberti de Gretemaisnilio" when he was banished from Normandy by Henry I King of England, and left with her for Apulia[365].  The chronology suggests that she was born either from her father’s first or second marriage.  m ([1115]) ROBERT Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, son of GUILLAUME Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche & his first wife Albreda [de Moulins]. 

c)         [HUGUES de Grantmesnil .  "Hugues de Grantmesnil" is named as father of Pernel, wife of Robert de Beaumont Earl of Leicester, in an account of the foundation of Leicester Abbey, but the Complete Peerage casts doubt on the accuracy of this statement as the same source gives details of Pernel's inheritance from him which are clearly incorrect[366].  No other reference to this person has been found.  As noted below, Pernel named her father as Guillaume in a charter for Saint-Evroult Notre-Dame-du-Bois which suggests that this Hugues did not exist.]    

2.         GUILLAUME [I] de Grantmesnil (-[before 1114]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[367].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I offered “neptem suam Rodberti...Moritolii comitis filiam” in marriage to Guillaume de Grantmesnil, who refused and left for Apulia[368]Europäische Stammtafeln states that he was in Apulia from 1081[369], although the basis for this is not known as it is not possible to date the passage in Orderic which is quoted above.  Orderic Vitalis states that he was "avunculus" of Arnoul de Montpinçon, whose "acquisitions" inspired the latter to set out for Apulia[370].  Orderic Vitalis also records that he took part in Robert Guiscard's campaign against Durazzo in 1081 and that he was summoned by Duke Robert to his deathbed[371].  He was granted land in the valleys of the Crati, the Coscile and at Cotrone[372], although it is not known whether this refers to part of the "fifteen castles" of his wife's dowry (see below) or whether they were grants made to Guillaume in his own right before his marriage.  Either way, it is clear that Guillaume's career in Apulia must have been particularly successful for him to have risen from a relatively obscure background and to have made such a prominent marriage.  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jun [1098] “Willelmus...de Grentemaisnil et Albericus frater eius, Guido Trussellus et Lambertus Pauper”, fearing for their safety if the Turks recaptured Antioch, escaped from the city by attaching ropes to the walls, after which they were all to their shame called “furtivi Funambuli” for the rest of their lives[373].  Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus Carpentarius, Willelmusque alter, quondam familiaris et domesticus imperatoris Constantinopolis, qui et sororem Boemundi principis Siciliæ uxorem duxerat", escaped "out of fear" from Antioch to Alexandretta, believing that the crusading army was doomed after it was besieged by Kerbogha atabeg of Mosul, dated to mid-1098 from the context[374].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume died in Apulia after returning “de Antiochia[375].  From the context, the date of his death appears to have been before 1114.  Europäische Stammtafeln[376] refers to "1130" but the source to which this relates has not so far been found.  m (Apulia [1088/1089]) MABEL of Apulia, daughter of ROBERT "Guiscard/Weasel" de Hauteville Duke of Apulia & his second wife Sichelgaita of Salerno.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerus...Crumena id est bursa [dux] Calabriæ” arranged the marriage of “Mabiliam sororem suam” to “Guillelmo de Grentemaisnil”, after reaching a settlement with his [half-brother] Marco Bohemond, dated to [1088/89][377]In a later passage, Orderic names her "Mabiliam...Curta-Lupa" and specifies that her dowry consisted of fifteen castles[378].  "La contessa Mabilia, vedova del protosebasta Guglielmo di Grantmesnil ed il figlio Guglielmo" donated the church of San Pietro di Bragalla to Cava by charter dated Sep 1117[379].  Guillaume [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [II] de Grantmesnil (-[3 Oct], 1118 or after).  Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum et Rodbertum” as the two sons of Guillaume de Grantmesnil and his wife[380].  He succeeded his father but did not long survive him[381].  "La contessa Mabilia, vedova del protosebasta Guglielmo di Grantmesnil ed il figlio Guglielmo" donated the church of San Pietro di Bragalla to Cava by charter dated Sep 1117[382].  The possibility of his death “3 Oct” is discussed under his possible wife Agatha.  [m AGATHA, daughter of --- (-3 Oct ----).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[383], Agatha was the first wife of Guillaume [I] de Grantmesnil.  However, the necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Non Oct" of "Willelmus de Grandmesnil et uxor eius Agatha"[384].  This recording of dual names in necrologies normally reflects the death of the husband, and a subsequent donation by the widow in his memory.  This is inconsistent with Agatha being the wife of Guillaume [I].  It is therefore suggested that Agatha may have been the wife of Guillaume [II], although it is possible that the entry refers to an altogether different Guillaume and his wife.] 

b)         ROBERT de Grantmesnil (-after 1129).  Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum et Rodbertum” as the two sons of Guillaume de Grantmesnil and his wife[385].  He abandoned his fiefs after a dispute about military service and returned to his kinsfolk north of the Alps in 1129[386]

3.         HUGUES de Grantmesnil (-[1087], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[387].  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Hugo...juvenis...Hugonis de Grantemaisnil filius et cognatus eius Rodbertus de Rodelento”, dated to 1087 from the context[388].  In a later passage, the same source records that “Hugo...miles” died “in juventute” and was buried at Ouche[389]

4.         IVES de Grantmesnil (-after 1102).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[390].  “Ivo filius Hugonis de Grentismaisnilo…Robertus Burdet…” witnessed the charter dated 1 Jul 1077 under which "Gosfredus de Wirchia…uxorisque meæ Aluevæ" founded Monks Kirby priory and donated it to Angers Saint-Nicolas[391].  “…Rotberti de Grentemaisnillo, Ivonis de Grentemaisnillo…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[392].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Ivo et Albericus filii Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy in Sep 1096 with “Rodbertus dux Normannorum” on the First Crusade[393].  He held his father's honour in England "for a little while" but later pledged it to Robert Comte de Meulan.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father, “Ivo” inherited “paternum honorem in Anglia” but that during the reign of King Henry I he pledged them to “Rodberto consuli de Mellento” to finance two journeys to Jerusalem, that during the first journey he suffered much “apud Antiochiam”, and that he died during the second journey[394]m --- de Gand, daughter of GILBERT van Gent & his wife Alice de Montfort-sur-Risle.  Orderic Vitalis records that Ives de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married “in Anglia Gislberti de Ganda filiam[395].  Ives & his wife had two children: 

a)         IVES de Grantmesnil (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names "duo elegantes filii Yvonis de Grentemaisnil" among those who drowned in the White Ship in 1120[396]

b)         --- de Grantmesnil (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names "duo elegantes filii Yvonis de Grentemaisnil" among those who drowned in the White Ship in 1120[397]

5.         AUBREY de Grantmesnil (-after [Jul] 1097).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum, Guillelmum, Hugonem, Ivonem, Albericum” as the sons of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[398].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Ivo et Albericus filii Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio” among those who left Normandy in Sep 1096 with “Rodbertus dux Normannorum” on the First Crusade[399].  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jun [1098] “Willelmus...de Grentemaisnil et Albericus frater eius, Guido Trussellus et Lambertus Pauper”, fearing for their safety if the Turks recaptured Antioch, escaped from the city by attaching ropes to the walls, after which they were all to their shame called “furtivi Funambuli” for the rest of their lives[400].  A later passage in the same source records that “Albericus...ætate junior” studied in boyhood, but abandoned “clericatu, ad militiam” and that he wounded “Tancredum Odonis Boni Marchisi filius” who as a result limped for the rest of his life[401]

6.         son .  Orderic Vitalis records Hugues de Grantmesnil and his wife had six sons and six daughters, but does not mention the exploits of the sixth son and sixth daughter[402]

7.         ADELINE de Grantmesnil (-[1110/11]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Adeline married “Rogerio de Ibreio[403].  Domesday Book records “the wife of Roger d’Ivry” holding land in Islip, Kiddington and Oddington in Oxfordshire[404].  She died soon after making grants to Abingdon Abbey in [1110/11][405].  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that the latter was then mourning “sororem...suam Adelinam” who had recently died[406]m ROGER Seigneur d'Ivry, son of [ROBERT d’Ivry & his wife Albreda ---] (-after 24 Apr 1089). 

8.         HAWISE de Grantmesnil .  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Hawise died unmarried[407]

9.         ROHESE de Grantmesnil .  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Rohese married “Roberto de Curceio[408]m ROBERT de Courcy, son of RICHARD de Courcy & his wife --- (-after 1102). 

10.      MATHILDE de Grantmesnil (-Jaffa).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte[409].  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that the latter was then mourning “sororem...suam Adelinam” who had recently died[410].  Orderic Vitalis records that Mathilde, after the death of her first husband, fell in love with “tironem exulantem Mathiellum” and went with him to Jerusalem, but they both died in the same year, he “in Apulia”, she “Joppe[411]m [firstly] HUGUES de Montpinçon, son of RAOUL de Montpinçon & his wife Adelisa --- (-Rouen 7 Mar ----, bur St Evroul).  He died aged 60[412].  [m secondly MATHIEU, son of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Mathilde, after the death of her first husband, fell in love with “tironem exulantem Mathiellum” and went with him to Jerusalem, but they both died in the same year, he “in Apulia”, she “Joppe[413].] 

11.      AGNES de Grantmesnil (-14 Sep ----).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Agnes married “Guillelmo de Saia[414]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "14 Sep" of "Agnes filia Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[415]m GUILLAUME de Say, son of ---. 

12.      daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records Hugues de Grantmesnil and his wife had six sons and six daughters, but does not mention the exploits of the sixth son and sixth daughter[416]

 

 

The precise relationship of the following small family group to the main Grantmesnil family is uncertain.  Guillaume is named as father of Pernel, wife of Robert de Beaumont Earl of Leicester, in the charter for Notre-Dame-du-Bois de Saint-Evroult cited below.  He has not otherwise been identified.  As his daughter brought Grantmesnil to her husband, as noted below, Guillaume must have been senior heir of the Grantmesnil family.  There appear to be three possibilities.  (1) He could have been an otherwise unidentified son of Robert Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche and his wife Agnes de Grantmesnil, daughter of Robert de Grantmesnil.  However, in that case Pernel would have been great-great-granddaughter of Hugues de Grantmesnil, not his great-granddaughter as noted in the [1190/1204] charter cited below.  (2) Guillaume could have been the same person of Guillaume [II] de Grantmesnil, grandson of Hugues de Grantmesnil by his second son Guillaume [I], who would have inherited the family estates assuming that Agnes de Grantmesnil had died childless.  If that is correct, Guillaume [II] would have died much later than Sep 1117 (the date of the record in which he is named as noted above) considering Pernel’s estimated marriage date.  (3) He could have been the grandson of Hugues de Grantmesnil by a younger son or one of his daughters named above, in which case Guillaume’s branch of the family would have inherited Grantmesnil because all children of both Robert de Grantmesnil and Guillaume [I] de Grantmesnil died without surviving descendants.  Speculation on which possibility might be correct is fruitless without further primary source documentation which indicates the inheritance of Grantmesnil after the death of Robert de Grantmesnil in [1136]. 

 

1.         GUILLAUMEm ---.  The name of Guillaume's wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

a)         PERNEL [Petronille] (-1 Apr 1212).  Pernel is named as great-granddaughter of Hugues de Grantmesnil in the [1190/1204] charter of her son Robert FitzPernel to the abbey of St Evroul[417].  She names her father “Guillaume” in one of her charters for Notre-Dame-du-Bois de Saint-Evroult[418].  Her father is named Hugues de Grantmesnil (supposed son of Robert de Grantmesnil) in an account of the foundation of Leicester Abbey, although the Complete Peerage casts doubt on the accuracy of this document as the same source gives details of properties she inherited from her supposed father which are incompatible with this parentage[419].  Robert de Torigny records that Pernel’s husband gained the Norman honour of Grantmesnil through his marriage[420]"Robertus filius comitis Legrece" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe for the soul of "uxoris mee Petronille" by charter dated [1153/67][421]Robertus comes Legrec” confirmed property in Garendon and “in nemoribus meis de Sepehevid et de Disselai” to Garendon abbey by charter dated 1169, witnessed by “Petronilla comitissa, Willo filio meo...[422].  "Petronilla comitissa Leircestrie" confirmed the exchange of land with Nuneaton priory made by "Robertus comes Leircestrie filius meus", who gave land in Belgrave in return for land in Dadlington which had been donated by "sponsus meus Robertus comes…cum filia mea pie memorie Hawis", by charter dated to after 1189[423].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from the king in Hertfordshire, dated to [1204/12]: "comitissa de Leicestria" held "Wares"[424].  The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "1 Apr" of "Petronilla comitissa Leicestriæ"[425].  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "1 Apr" of "Petronilla comitissa Leycestriæ"[426]The necrology of Garendon abbey (Leicestershire) records the death “Kal Apr” of “Petronilla de Grantamenile uxor ipsius Roberti secundi[427]m (before [1155/59]) ROBERT de Beaumont "ès Blanchemains", son of ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester & his wife Amicie de Gaël (-Durazzo 1190).  He succeeded his father in 1168 as Earl of Leicester

 

 

The precise relationship between the following individuals and the main Grantmesnil family has not yet been ascertained: 

 

1.         --- de Grantmesnilm EMMA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her daughter "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey[428].  Two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Grantmesnil .  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his sister "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey[429]

b)         BEATRIX de Grantmesnil .  "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey, in return for a horse for "son fils Guillaume de Rye", by undated charter witnessed by "Guillaume de Creully, Henri de Pont-Audemer, Michel Belet et Julien de Rye"[430]m --- de Rie, son of ---. 

 

 

 

F.      LA FERTE-MACE

 

Loyd indicates that La Ferté-Macé is located in the present-day French département of Orne, arrondissement Alençon, canton La Ferté-Macé[431]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME [I] de la Ferté-Macé (-1053 or after).  “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated “æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Berlo...æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Habletvilla...æcclesiam...Sancti Petri de Guaiolo...duas æcclesias de Magniaco et de Firmitate” to Tours Saint-Julien, for the souls of “meæ uxorisque et omnium filiorum meorum”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum, genetricisque ipsorum, dominique mei Ivonis Oximorum presulis...et cum auctoritate Willelmi Normannorum principis, Rogeriique, mei senioris”, by charter dated 1053, which specifies that “post mortem Guillelmi...Guillelmo filio eius” confirmed these donations, subscribed by “Hivonis pontificis Sagiarum quod est Oxismorum, Willelmi principis, Maidelindis uxoris eius, Willelmi comitis de Archis, Willelmi qui hoc donum fecit, filii eius, Guidonis comitis de Brionnia, Rotgerii de Bellomonte...[432]The document does not name the donor as Guillaume de la Ferté-Macé, but this is confirmed by a charter dated 1083 which confirmed donations to Tours Saint-Julien, including the donation of “æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Berlou --- ecclesiam Sancti Petri de Guaiolia --- ecclesias de Mauniaco et de Firmitate” made by “Willelmus de Firmitate”, and of property “in Hablotvilla” made by “avis autem supradicti Willelmi”, subscribed by “...Willelmi de Firmitate...[433]m --- (-after 1053).  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Her date of death (as well as the fact that she was the mother of the donor’s sons named below) is confirmed by the charter dated 1053 under which [her husband] “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated properties (as specified above) to Tours Saint-Julien, for the souls of “meæ uxorisque et omnium filiorum meorum”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum, genetricisque ipsorum...[434].  Guillaume [I] & his wife had children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [II] de la Ferté-Macé (-before 1083). A charter dated 1053 records that “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated properties (as specified above) to Tours Saint-Julien, and that “post mortem Guillelmi...Guillelmo filio eius” confirmed these donations[435]m ---.  The precise identity of Guillaume’s wife has not been ascertained, but the following source indicates that she was related to the Conteville family.  Planché refers to a charter which names “William [of Ferté Macé]” (presumably indicating Guillaume [III] de la Ferté-Macé) as “nephew of Bishop Odo” (no precise citation reference, but a later passage describes the document as “the charter of an archbishop of Tours, temp. St Louis”)[436].  The reference to this charter has not been found, but “nephew” presumably indicates “nepos”, which if used in its strict sense would indicate that Guillaume [II]’s wife was --- de Conteville, daughter of HERLUIN de Conteville & his [first/second wife Herlève ---/Fredesendis ---].  However, given the notoriously imprecise nature of the term, the precise relationship could be more remote.  Guillaume [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME [III] de la Ferté-Macé (-after 1083).  A charter dated 1083 confirmed donations to Tours Saint-Julien, including the donation of “æcclesiam Sancte Marie de Berlou --- ecclesiam Sancti Petri de Guaiolia --- ecclesias de Mauniaco et de Firmitate” made by “Willelmus de Firmitate”, and of property “in Hablotvilla” made by “avis autem supradicti Willelmi”, subscribed by “...Willelmi de Firmitate...[437]

b)         sons .  Their parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1053 under which [their father] “Willelmus, morte pertractans” donated properties (as specified above) to Tours Saint-Julien, for the souls of “meæ uxorisque et omnium filiorum meorum”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum, genetricisque ipsorum, dominique mei Ivonis Oximorum presulis...et cum auctoritate Willelmi Normannorum principis, Rogeriique, mei senioris”, by charter dated 1053[438]

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de MONTGOMMERY

 

 

ROGER [I] de Montgommery, son of --- (-[before 1048]).  Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois.  He witnessed a charter of Robert I Duke of Normandy for the abbey of Saint Wandrille dated [1031/32].  In [1028/35] he restored to the Abbey of Jumièges the market at Vimoutiers which he had taken from the monks[439].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“ had been exiled to Paris “pro perfidia sua” when [his son] “Willelmo Rogerii de Montegumeri filio” murdered “Osbernus...Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius[440]

m JOSCELINE, daughter of --- & his wife Sainsfrida [Senfrie][441] .  Josceline, her husband and her mother are named in a letter of Ives Bishop of Chartres to Henry I King of England dated 1114 which explains the consanguinity between the king and Hugues de Châteauneuf, who wanted to marry one of the king's illegitimate daughters[442]

Roger & his wife had [six] children: 

1.         HUGUES de Montgommery (-killed in battle 7 Feb[443] [1035/before 1048], bur Troarn401).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father’s exile[444].  He witnessed his father's charter for the abbey of Jumièges397.  He was killed during the troubles in Normandy during the minority of Duke Guillaume II[445].  Vicomte d'Hiémois.  [m JOSCELINE de Bolbec, daughter of OSBERN de Bolbec & his [first/second wife Aveline ---/Hawise ---].  Josceline and her marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[446].  This is presumably based on Robert de Torigny, continuation of William of Jumièges[447], the unreliability of this part of whose chronicle is discussed in the Complete Peerage[448].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quintam” married “Hugo de Monte-gummerici” by whom she had “Rogerius pater Roberti de Bellismo[449].  There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct as Osbern de Bolbec’s wife and Hugues de Montgommery’s mother would have been first cousins.] 

2.         ROBERT de Montgommery (-before his father).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father’s exile[450]

3.         ROGER [II] de Montgommery (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father’s exile[451].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury in 1074.  Seigneur d'Alençon. 

-        see below

4.         GUILLAUME de Montgommery (-killed in battle [1035/before 1048]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father’s exile[452].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Osbernus...procurator principalis domus, Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius“ was killed while sleeping “in cubiculo ducis cum ipso in valle Rodoili” by “Willelmo Rogerii de Montegumeri filio”, dated to early in the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context, adding that the murderer was subsequently killed by “Barno...de Glotis præpositus Osberni” in revenge for the crime[453]

5.         GILBERT de Montgommery (-murdered [1064]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father’s exile[454].  Orderic Vitalis records the return from Apulia of “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” who was pardoned by Duke Guillaume who promised the return of his property, that “Mabilia Talavacii filia” prepared poison for him which was drunk by “Gislebertus frater Rogerii de Monte-Gomerici” who died three days later “apud Raimalastum”, dated to [1064] from the context[455]

6.         [--- .  The identity of Amieria’s parents is not known.  She is shown as the daughter of Gilbert in Europäische Stammtafeln[456], but this may be no more than speculation.  The word "neptis" may indicate a more remote family relationship than niece.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         [AMIERIAOrderic Vitalis reports that Roger de Montgommery married "Amieriam neptem suam" to "Warino autem Calvo", who was "a man small in body but great in spirit", to whom he granted “præsidatum Scrobesburiæ[457].  Her second marriage is confirmed by a manuscript which recites the history of the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey and records donations including that of "Reginaldus frater Warini vicecomes…villam…Lega", adding in a later passage that "Reinaldus…post mortem Warini vicecomitis uxorem illius, cum honore, suscepit"[458].  Eyton interprets "frater" in this document as meaning "brother-in-law or rather husband of Warin’s widow"[459] but, assuming that the extract quoted above reflects the facts, such an interpretation is unnecessary as Rainald was both Warin’s brother and second husband of Warin’s widow.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius...Scrobesburiensis comes” donated properties to Ouche, including confirmation of the donation of “in ecclesia de Bailol altare sancti Leonardi et unam partem decimæ eiusdem villæ cum terra” donated by “Rainaldus de Bailol et Amieria uxor eius neptis mea”, undated but dated to after his second marriage[460].  The date of death of Amieria’s first husband and the date of her second marriage is indicated by Domesday Book which records "Raynaldus" as "vicecomes" of Shropshire[461]m firstly WARIN [Guérin] "the Bald/le Chauve", son of --- (-[25 Feb 1083/1086]).  A manuscript reciting the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records donations including by "Warinus vicecomes…in villa…Tugfort" and “uxor…illius post eius obitum…domum…in civitate”, with the consent of "filiis suis"[462].  Orderic Vitalis records that “V Kal Mar” in 1083 “Rogerius comes” declared to “Guarinum vicecomitem et Picotem de Saia cæterosque proceres suos” his intention of founding the abbey of Saint-Pierre[463]m secondly (before 1086) her first husband’s brother, RAINALD de Bailleul [Bailleul-en-Gouffern], son of ---.  "Rainaldus" donated “Dodefort” to Shrewsbury abbey for the soul of "Warini antecessoris sui"[464].  Domesday Book records "Raynaldus" as "vicecomes" of Shropshire[465].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius...Scrobesburiensis comes” donated properties to Ouche, including confirmation of the donation of “in ecclesia de Bailol altare sancti Leonardi et unam partem decimæ eiusdem villæ cum terra” donated by “Rainaldus de Bailol et Amieria uxor eius neptis mea”, undated but dated to after his second marriage[466].  He must have ceased to be Sheriff in the early 1100s as a manuscript reciting the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records that "Alanus filius Fladaldi" held “honorem vicecomitis Warini” after "filium eius"[467].]  Amieria & her first husband had one child: 

i)          HUGH (-[1102/10]).  A manuscript reciting the history of the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records donations including that of "Hugo filius eiusdem Warini"[468].  Sheriff of Shropshire.  A manuscript reciting the foundation of Shrewsbury abbey records that "Alanus filius Fladaldi" held “honorem vicecomitis Warini” after "filium eius"[469].  As the death of Alan FitzFlaald is dated to before 1114, it is assumed that Hugh died early in the 1100s, probably without issue. 

 

 

ROGER [II] de Montgommery, son of ROGER [I] Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey[470]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Hugo et Robertus, Rogerius et Willelmus atque Gislebertus” as the five sons of “Rogeri[us] de Montegumeri“, adding that they had remained in Normandy during their father’s exile[471]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rogerum de Montgommeri" as son of "Iosceline"[472].  His father's name is confirmed by the charter dated to [1079/82] under which "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased"[473].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montgommery, Vicomte de l'Hiémois.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Monte-Gomeri, Oximensis vicecomes” expelled the canons from Troarn, where they had been installed by “Rogerius pater suus[474].  "…Rogerii de Monte Gomerici…" witnessed the charter dated to [1055] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[475].  "…Willelmi filii Osberti, Rotgerii de Monte Golmerii, Richardis vicecomitis Abrinchensis…" witnessed the charter dated [1055/56] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "in pago…Constantino, villam…Flotomannum" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[476].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rogerius de Bellomonte et Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[477].  A charter dated 1066 records his pardoning the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen for a calumny[478].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rogero de Montgumeri" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[479].  He remained in Normandy at the time of the Norman invasion of England in 1066 to assist Duchess Mathilde to govern the duchy, but accompanied King William I to England in Dec 1067: Orderic Vitalis records that, when King William returned to England, 6 Dec 1067, he appointed “Mathildi conjugi suæ filioque suo Rodberto adolescenti” to govern Normandy (“principatum Neustriæ”), adding that the king took with him “Rogerium de Monte-Gomerici” whom he had appointed as “tutorem Normanniæ...cum sua conjuge” when he had left for England for the first time and that King William granted “primo Cicestram et Arundellum...post aliquot tempus Scrobesburiensem” to Roger[480].  [Earl] of Chester and Arundel.  Earl of Shrewsbury.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici”, after the fall of “Geroiana progenies”, held “totum patrimonium Excalfoii et Monasterioli” for about 26 years[481].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "le Conte Rogier de Montgomery et Guillaume le filz Osber" his two "Marechaulx d’Engleterre" after the conquest of England[482].  He became Seigneur d’Alençon, de iure uxoris, after the death in 1070 of her paternal uncle Ives Bishop of Seés.  As "Rogerus comes Salosberiensis" he witnessed a charter of King William I giving the barony of Plessis to the church of Bayeux dated 24 Dec 1074[483].  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][484].  Orderic Vitalis records that “V Kal Mar” in 1083 “Rogerius comes” declared to “Guarinum vicecomitem et Picotem de Saia cæterosque proceres suos” his intention of founding the abbey of Saint-Pierre[485].  He allied himself with Robert Duke of Normandy at the time of the latter's rebellion against King William II in 1089[486].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Monte-gumerii pater Roberti de Belesmo” founded “in honorem sancti Martini ecclesias duas, unam in Sagiensis urbis suburbio, alteram in vico suo Troardo” and “tertiam...apud Almanachias ad opus sanctiomonialium[487].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “VI Kal Aug” in 1094 “Rogerius...comes” and his burial at Shrewsbury abbey[488]

m firstly ([1050/54]) MABILE d'Alençon, daughter of GUILLAUME "Talvas" Seigneur d'Alençon & his first wife Hildeburge --- (-murdered Bures 2 Dec 1079, bur 5 Dec 1079 Troarn).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married “Hildeburge...filiam Arnulfi” by whom he had “Arnulfum et Mabiliam” and whom he had strangled “a duobus parasitis[489].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus Talavatius”, after he was exiled, arranged the marriage of “filiam suam...Mabiliam” to “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri” who received him in his household[490].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ivo filius Willermi Belesmensis...neptem...Mabiliam” married "Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici Oximensium vicecomes" who through her obtained "magnam partem possessionis Willermi Belesmensis", adding that Mabile was "a forceful and worldly woman, cunning, garrulous and extremely cruel" (“potens et sæcularis, callida et loquax, nimiumque crudelis”)[491].  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][492].  Orderic Vitalis records that she was murdered by Hugh Bunel, son of Robert "de Jalgeio" from whom she had taken his castle, who found her "relaxing in bed after a bath [and] struck off her head with his sword"[493].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[494]

m secondly ADELAIS du Puiset [de Breteuil], daughter of ERARD [I] Comte de Breteuil, Vicomte de Chartres & his wife Humberge ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his first wife, “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” married secondly “Adelaisam Ebrardi de Pusacio...filiam”, by whom he had “unum...filium...Ebrardum...inter regales capellanos usque hodie...in aula Guillelmi et Henrici, Angliæ regum” for about 26 years[495]

Earl Roger & his first wife had ten children:

1.         ROGER de Montgommery (-[before 1060/62]).  "Rogerii, Mabiliæ…Rogeri pueri filii Rogerii, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed an undated charter for Saint Martin de Sées[496]

2.         ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême" ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 1 or 8 May 1118 or [after 1129], bur [Wareham Castle]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[497].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[498].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum...de Belesmia primogenitum filium suum [referring to Mabile]” and adds that "cujus crudelitas in diebus nostris super miseras plebes nimium efferbuit"[499].  "…Rogerus de Monte Gomeri…Robertus filius Rogeri de Monte Gomeri…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[500].  He witnessed a charter for Saint Martin de Sées with his brother Roger448, and a charter for Saint Aubin of Angers in [1060/62] without Roger[501], suggesting that the latter had died by then.  "Rogerius comes…et sua uxor Mabilia atque suus filius Rotbertus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Bellême by charter dated to [1070/79][502].  Orderic Vitalis records the rebellion of Robert, son of King William I, and his departure from Normandy accompanied by “Rodbertus de Bellismo et Guillelmus de Britolio, Rogerius Ricardi de Benefacta filius, Rodbertus de Molbraio et Guillelmus de Molinis, Guillelmus de Ruperia”, dated to [1077/78], and their journeys during five years of exile[503].  He succeeded his mother in 1079 as Seigneur de Bellême et d'Alençon.  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[504].  He rebelled against William II King of England in 1088, crossed to England but was besieged at Rochester Castle and in Jun 1088 forced to surrender[505]Orderic Vitalis records “Edgarus Adelinus et Robertus Belesmensis atque Guillelmus de Archis monachus Molismensis” as the advisers of Robert [III] Duke of Normandy, dated to [1089][506]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Belesmensis” built “Furcas...castellum et...Castellum Gunterii...super Olnam fluvium ad Curbam” and attacked all his neighbours, dated to [1090][507].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[508].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Rodbertus...filius eius” obtained “totum feudum eius in Normannia”, adding that he was “crudelis et superbus” and committed “innumeras iniquitates[509].  He succeeded his younger brother in 1098 as Earl of Shrewsbury after a payment of £3000[510].  He succeeded his father-in-law in Oct 1100 as Comte de Ponthieu.  Florence of Worcester records that "Scrobbesbyriensis comes Rotbertus de Beleasmo" rebelled against Henry I King of England in [1101], was deprived of all his honours and estates in England, and retired to Normandy[511].  The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo[512].  Florence of Worcester records that "Rotbertus de Beleasm" fought with Robert Duke of Normandy against King Henry I at Tinchebrai in [1106], was captured, but later escaped and fled[513].  He helped Helias de Saint-Saens protect Guillaume, son of Robert "Curthose" ex-Duke of Normandy, after Henry I King of England ordered the arrest of the boy[514].  He was arrested in 1112, imprisoned at Cherbourg and all his lands and honours forfeited.  He was imprisoned at Wareham Castle, Dorset from Jul 1113[515].  The Annals of Margan record the death “Kal Mai” in 1118 of “Robertus comes de Belesme[516].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records payments made "in libatione Robti de Belismo" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[517].  This suggests a pension or maintenance in some form, although it is not certain that it relates to Robert de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury. 

-        COMTES de PONTHIEU

3.         HUGUES de Montgommery ([1053/59]-Anglesey 31 Jul 1098, bur [17 Aug 1098] Shrewsbury Abbey[518]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[519].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[520].  The Annales Cambriæ record that "de Mungumeri Hugo" laid waste to "Keredigiaun" in 1072[521].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the murder of his mother [in 1079], “Hugo de Monte-Gomerici” unsuccessfully pursued the assassins with 16 knights[522].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[523].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[524]Earl of Shrewsbury: Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Hugo...de Monte-Gomerici [filius eius]” obtained “comitatum Scrobesburiæ”, but that after a few years he was killed by “Magno fratre regis Northwigenarum” and buried “Scrobesburiensis conventus[525]Florence of Worcester records that "comites Hugo de Legecastra et Hugo de Scrobbesbyria" invaded Anglesey in [1098], mutilating or massacring many of the inhabitants of the island, and that "comes Hugo de Scrobbesbyrie" was killed by an arrow discharged by Magnus King of Norway during a raid on the Welsh coast[526].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Hugh was killed in Anglesey "by pirates from oversea"[527], or (according to Orderic Vitalis) transfixed with a spear by Magnus brother of the king of Norway on the seashore and died instantly[528].  "Arnulf son of earl Roger" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees for the souls of "his father Roger and his brother Hugh who was slain that year" by charter dated 27 Aug 1098[529]

4.         ROGER de Montgommery "le Poitevin" (-1123).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[530].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[531].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[532].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[533].  “Rogerus comes Pictavensis” founded the priory of Lancaster, for the salvation of “Rogeri Seroberie patris sui matrisque sue Mabilie cometisse”, and donated “duos mansiones Audecliua et Neutona...cum dignitate et consuetudinibus quas ipse habebat et Amfridum de Monte Gomerii” and other specified properties, by undated charter witnessed by “predictus comes et filia eius Sibilla et G. Vicecomes...[534].  “Amfridus de Monte Gomerii”, who is named in this document, has not otherwise been traced.  Roger was a considerable landowner in England especially in Lancashire but was banished in 1102 with his brother Robert and retired to Poitou[535].  Comte de la Marche in 1113, de iure uxoris.  [m firstly ---.  No direct evidence has been found about this possible first marriage.  However, Roger’s daughter Sibylle witnessed the charter which records her father’s foundation of the priory of Lancaster (see above) without any of the donor’s other known children.  This suggests that she was Roger’s oldest and probably only child at the time, possibly born from an earlier marriage.]  m [secondly] (before 1091) ALMODIS de la Marche, daughter of AUDEBERT [II] Comte de la Marche & his wife Ponce --- (-[1117/29]).  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "Boso comes de Marchia" was killed "Confolento castro" in 1091 and was succeeded by "Aumodis soror sua", wife of "Rotgerio comite"[536].  "Rotgerius comes et Almodis comitissa" donated property to the abbey of Charroux by charter dated [1090/1100][537].  She succeeded as Ctss de La Marche in 1098. 

-        COMTES de LA MARCHE

5.         PHILIPPE de Montgommery "Grammaticus" (-Antioch 1099).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[538].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[539].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[540]Florence of Worcester records that "Philippum Rogeri Scrobbesbyriensis comitis filium" was imprisoned in [1096] for his part in the conspiracy which planned to place his son on the English throne[541]Orderic Vitalis records that “Philippus” went on pilgrimage [on the First Crusade] with “Rodberto duce” [Robert [III] Duke of Normandy] and died “Antiochiæ[542]m ---.  The name of Philippe's wife is not known.  Philippe & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATHILDE de Montgommery .  Daughter of Philippe, Orderic Vitalis records that she succeeded her paternal aunt as Abbess of Almenèches in 1113[543]

6.         ARNOUL de Montgommery (-after 1119).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[544].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[545].  "Roger ex Northmannis Northmannus son of Roger" donated property to St Martin, Troarn for the soul of "his wife Mabel lately deceased" by charter dated to [1079/82], subscribed by "Rogerii comitis, Rotberti filii eius, Hugonis, Rogerii, Philippi, Arnulfis [filiorum eius]"[546].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[547].  "Arnulf son of earl Roger" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees for the souls of "his father Roger and his brother Hugh who was slain that year" by charter dated 27 Aug 1098[548].  He obtained the comitatus of Pembroke but was apparently not an Earl.  The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo[549].  He was banished from England with his brother Robert[550].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he went to Scotland and was ancestor of the MONTGOMMERIE family in Scotland[551], but the following charter indicates that he was still active in the Maine/Anjou area twenty years later.  Berlaius de Monasteriolo et Geraudus filius eius, Hernulfus de Monte Gomeri” witnessed the charter dated to [1118/26] which records that “Herbertum de Wircha generum Goffirdi de Asceio” confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Médard de Vernie to Angers Saint-Nicolas by “Goffridus de Asceio et uxor sua filia Willelmi de Verneia[552]m (1102) LAFRACOTH of Munster, daughter of MURTACH O'Brien King of Munster & his wife ---.  She is named daughter "of an Irish king named Murchertach" by Orderic Vitalis[553].  The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Muirchertach Ua Briain made a marriage alliance with the French and with the Norsemen” in 1102[554]

7.         EMMA de Montgommery (-4 Mar 1113).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[555].  Abbess of Almenèches: Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[556].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the abbey was burnt in [1102], she fled to Saint-Evroul, returning the following year and dying about ten years later[557]

8.         MATHILDE de Montgommery (-[1085], bur abbaye de Grestain).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[558].  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[559]m (before 1066) as his first wife, ROBERT Comte de Mortain, son of HERLUIN Vicomte de Contéville & his first wife Herlève --- (after 1038-8 Dec after [1087/91],  bur abbaye de Grestain).

9.         MABILE de Montgommery (-after 1132).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[560].  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[561].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Novocastello nepos et hæres Alberti Ribaldi...gener Rogerii comitis” married "Mabiliam sororem Roberti Belesmensis"[562]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mabilla" daughter (presumably a mistake for wife) of "Rogerum de Montgommeri" and her daughter "alteram Mabillam uxorem Gervasii" and the latter's son "Hugo de Castro novo" whose proposed marriage with the daughter of Henry I King of England was opposed by "Yvo Carnetensis episcopus" on the grounds of consanguinity, his ancestry being explained by Alberic[563].  "Domna Mabilia uxor domni Gervasii de Novo Castello" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/29][564].  "Hugo Castrinovi dominus" confirmed donations to the monastery of Saint-Vincent, with the consent of "uxore mea Alberedi et matre mea senior iam detenta Mabilia et filiis meis Hugone, Gervasio et Galeranno", by charter dated 1132[565]m GERVAISE Seigneur de Châteauneuf-en-Thimerais, son of ---.  "Gervasius miles" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin des Champs with the consent of "Mabilia uxor sua et Hugone primogenito suo" by charter dated [1106/09][566].  "Gervasius et uxor eius Mabilia" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 1107 with the consent of "filiis eorum Hugone, Petro, Gervasio, Guascone et filia Mabilia"[567]

10.      SIBYLLE de Montgommery .  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[568].  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[569], recording in a later passage the marriage ofRodberto...Haimonis filio” and “Sibiliam Rogerii comitis filiam” (although a conclusion about the dating of the event cannot be drawn from the context of the wording)[570]The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that ”Robertum filium Haymonis, dominum de Astramervilla in Normannia” married “Sibillam sororem Roberti de Belismo, comitis Salopiæ[571]The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  m firstly ROBERT FitzHamon Lord of Glamorgan, son of HAMON & his wife --- (-Newbury Mar 1107).  m secondly JEAN Seigneur de Raimes, son of ---.

Earl Roger & his second wife had one child:  

11.      EVERARD de Montgommery (-before [1135/36]).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his first wife, “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” married secondly “Adelaisam Ebrardi de Pusacio...filiam”, by whom he had “unum...filium...Ebrardum...inter regales capellanos usque hodie...in aula Guillelmi et Henrici, Angliæ regum” for about 26 years[572]

Earl Roger had one [Illegitimate] son by an unknown mistress: 

12.       HUGUES de Montgommery .  He witnessed a writ of King Henry I as brother of Robert de Bellême[573].  It is assumed that he was illegitimate as it would be unusual for him to bear the same first name as an older full brother, although there are isolated examples of this practice in other families.  An alternative possibility is that his name was incorrectly recorded in the writ and that he is in fact the same person as one of Robert's other surviving brothers. 

 

 

 

H.      SEIGNEURS de MONTPINÇON

 

 

1.         RAOUL [I] de Montpinçon (-13 Feb ----, bur Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” donated “quinque molendinorum: trium...de Jort...quarti de loco...Hurtavent...et quinti de Monte-Pincionis, duasque garbas decimæ villanorum de Guadreslogiis, medietatemque decimæ de Spanaio, et apud Ermentrudis-Villam duas acras prati” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, and died “Id Feb” and was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations[574]m ADELISA, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations[575].  Raoul [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGUES de Montpinçon (-Rouen 7 Mar ----, bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations[576].  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that Hugues died at Rouen “jam sexagenarius...Non Mar” and was buried at Ouche[577]m [as her first husband,] MATHILDE de Grantmesnil, daughter of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelise de Beaumont (-bur Jaffa).  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia”, adding that the latter was then mourning “sororem...suam Adelinam” who had recently died[578].  She [married secondly] Mathieu ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Mathilde, after the death of her first husband, fell in love with “tironem exulantem Mathiellum” and went with him to Jerusalem, but they both died in the same year, he “in Apulia”, she “Joppe[579].  The text implies that Mathilde and Mathieu did not marry.  Hugues & his wife had three children: 

i)          RAOUL [III] de Montpinçon (-bur Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that, about thirty years after the burial of his father, “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis” visited Ouche with “Radulfum primogenitum suum...et Mathildem uxorem suam...Hugonis de Grentesmaisnil filia[580].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis”, “filii eius: Radulfus et Guillelmus ac Arnulfus” donated property to Ouche[581].  Orderic Vitalis records that Raoul [III] de Montpinçon married “filiam Ranulfi cancellarii regis Henrici” but died soon afterwards and was buried at Ouche[582]m ---, daughter of RANULF Chancellor & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that Raoul [III] de Montpinçon married “filiam Ranulfi cancellarii regis Henrici” but died soon afterwards and was buried at Ouche[583]

ii)         GUILLAUME de Montpinçon .  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis”, “filii eius: Radulfus et Guillelmus ac Arnulfus” donated property to Ouche, and that Guillaume inherited “patrium jus in Normannia” after the death of his brother Raoul [III][584].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ricardus…Basset" held "parvo feudo" in "Mosterolo" {Montreuil-au-Houlme, Orne, arr. Argentan, canton Briouze} which his father had obtained in Normandy, when reporting that Guillaume de Montpinçon took the castle as a base against the Angevins (dated to 1136)[585]

iii)        ARNOUL de Montpinçon .  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Hugo de Monte-Pincionis”, “filii eius: Radulfus et Guillelmus ac Arnulfus” donated property to Ouche, adding that Arnoul went to Apulia on the expedition of “Guillelmi de Grentemaisnil avunculi sui”[586]

b)         RAOUL [II] de Montpinçon .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus de Monte-Pincionis dapifer Guillelmi Magni regis Anglorum” was buried at Ouche in the presence of “duo filii eius: Hugo et Radulfus, cum Adeliza matre sua” who made further donations, adding that Raoul [II] died “in via Jerusalem peregrinus[587]

 

 

 

I.        SEIGNEURS de MOULINS-la-MARCHE

 

 

1.         GUITMUND de MoulinsSeigneur de Moulins-la-Marche.  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "Guillelmi comitis, Guillelmi filii Osberti, Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[588]m EMMA, daughter of ---.  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[589].  Guitmund & his wife had nine children: 

a)         RAOUL de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[590]

b)         ROBERT de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[591]

c)         ANTOINE de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[592]

d)         GUITMUND de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[593]

e)         HUGUES de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[594]

f)          ALAIN de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[595]

g)         GUILLAUME de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[596]

h)         TORESGAUD de Moulins .  "Guidmundus et mea uxor Emma cum nostra prole" donated "locellum sanctæ Mariæ de Plancis" and other properties including "de Molinis…me castro decimam mercati" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [before 1067], subscribed by "…Guimundi qui hanc donationem fecit, Emmæ uxoris eius, Rodulfi filii eius, Rodberti filii eius, Antonii filii eius, Guimundi filii eius, Hugonis filii eius, Alanni filii eius, Guillelmi filii eius, Toresgaudi filii eius…"[597]

i)          ALBREDA de Moulins .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married "Albereda Guidmundi filia (ex cujus patrimonio erat)" but divorced her on grounds of consanguinity[598].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[599]m (divorced) as his first wife, GUILLAUME, son of GAUTHIER de Falaise & his wife --- (-19 Oct [1100], bur Saint-Evroul).  Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, de iure uxoris

 

 

1.         GAUTHIER de Falaisem ---.  The name of Gauthier’s wife is not known.  Gauthier & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-19 Oct [1100], bur Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus [de Molinis]" was the son of "Gaulterii de Falesia", adding that he obtained "honore Molinensi" by his marriage[600]Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, de iure uxoris.  Orderic Vitalis records the rebellion of Robert, son of King William I, and his departure from Normandy accompanied by “Rodbertus de Bellismo et Guillelmus de Britolio, Rogerius Ricardi de Benefacta filius, Rodbertus de Molbraio et Guillelmus de Molinis, Guillelmus de Ruperia”, dated to [1077/78], and their journeys during five years of exile[601].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[602].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis" donated "ecclesiam de Maheru…in castro…de Molinis…ecclesiam S. Laurentii" to Saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Albreda uxore sua", undated[603].  Orderic Vitalis records the death "in castro suo XIV Kal Nov" of "Guillelmus [de Molinis]", and his burial "in capitulo Uticensi"[604]m firstly (divorced) ALBREDA de Moulins, daughter of GUITMUND de Moulins & his wife Emma ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married "Albereda Guidmundi filia (ex cujus patrimonio erat)" but divorced her on grounds of consanguinity[605].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[606]m secondly DODA de Meulan, daughter of GALERAN [III] Comte de Meulan & his [first/second wife Oda ---/Adelais ---].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married secondly "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[607].  Guillaume & first wife had two children: 

i)          GUILLAUME de Moulins-la-Marche .  Orderic Vitalis names "Guillelmum et Rodbertum" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis" and his wife "Albereda Guidmundi filia"[608].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[609].  Guillaume presumably died young as a later passage records that his brother Robert succeeded their father. 

ii)         ROBERT de Moulins-la-Marche (-after [1120/25]).  Orderic Vitalis names "Guillelmum et Rodbertum" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis" and his wife "Albereda Guidmundi filia"[610].  "Willelmus miles filius Gauterii, qui castrum teneo de Molendinis" restored "decimam omnium…de castro supradicto…feriam Planchis Ville…decimam de Terciaco…ecclesiam sancti Laurentii…juxta ripam fluminis Risli", held "tempore Guimundi antecessoris mei", to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated "Id Feb" [1090], subscribed by "Willelmus, Willelmus filius, Robertus filius, Albereda mater eorum"[611]Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus…filius eius" confirmed his parents’ donations to Saint-Evroul after succeeding his father[612].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after holding his father’s honor for 15 years, Robert attacked "Engerrannum cognomento Oisonem" [Enguerrand l'Oison], was banished from Normandy by Henry I King of England, and left with his recently married wife for Apulia, where he died wandering several years[613]m ([1115]) AGNES de Grantmesnil, daughter of ROBERT de Grantmesnil & his [first/second wife Emma d’Estouteville/Lucy de Beaumont].  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert had recently married "Agnete filia Rodberti de Gretemaisnilio" when he was banished from Normandy by Henry I King of England, and left with her for Apulia[614].  The chronology suggests that she was born either from her father’s first or second marriage. 

Guillaume & his second wife had two children: 

iii)        SIMON de Moulins-la-Marche (-[1119/29])Orderic Vitalis names "Simonem et Hugonem" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" and his second wife "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[615]Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after succeeding his brother, Simon confirmed his predecessors’ donations to saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Adelina conjuge sua"[616].  Orderic Vitalis records that Henry II King of England installed "Radulfus Rufus et Simon de Molinis" at Evreux after capturing the castle, dated to 1119[617]m as her first husband, ADELISE de Montfort-sur-Risle, daughter of HUGUES [III] Seigneur de Montfort-en-Risle & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after succeeding his brother, Simon confirmed his predecessors’ donations to saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Adelina conjuge sua"[618].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  She married secondly (before 1130) Robert de Vere, who was Constable of England in 1142.  “Robertus de Ver constabularius regis Angliæ et Adeluda filia Hugonis de Monteforte uxor mea” donated property to Monks Horton by charter dated to [1140/44] witnessed by “Gaufrido de Ver et Roberto fratre suo...[619]

iv)       HUGUES de Moulins-la-MarcheOrderic Vitalis names "Simonem et Hugonem" as the two sons of "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" and his second wife "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[620]

 

 

 

J.      SEIGNEURS de PONT-ECHANFREY

 

 

Pont-Echanfrey, a commune traversed by the River Charentonne, was named Notre-Dame-du-Hamel by the early 19th century, the ancient castle (now called Echanfré) being located on the right bank of the river[621].  

 

 

1.         WALKELIN [Guascelin] de Pont-Echanfrey, son of --- .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[622]m ([1020/30]) EREMBURGE, daughter of GIROIE & his wife Gisla de Montfort-sur-Risle.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa[623].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that “primogenita...filiarum Heremburgis” married “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi” by whom she had “Willelmus et Radulfus” who later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[624].  As the second marriage of her younger sister Hawise can be dated to [1040], and because Hawise had six children by her first marriage, it is likely that Eremburge married much earlier, say in [1020/30].  If that is correct, she must have been one of the older children of her parents.  Walkelin & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Pont-Echanfrey .  Orderic Vitalis names “Willelmus et Radulfus” as the sons of “primogenita...filiarum [Geroii] Heremburgis” and her husband “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that they later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[625]m POTARFRANDA, daughter of ODERISIO [II] Conte di Marsi & his wife ---.  Amatus names "Potarfranda" as sister of Bishop Atto who had promised her in marriage to "William's [=Guillaume de Montreuil] nephew who was called Mostrarole"[626]

b)         RAOUL [I] de Pont-EchanfreyOrderic Vitalis names “Willelmus et Radulfus” as the sons of “primogenita...filiarum [Geroii] Heremburgis” and her husband “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that they later followed “Rodbertum Wiscardum Calabriæ ducem” in “Apulia et Sicilia[627]

 

 

Two brothers, from a chronological point of view they could have been sons of Guillaume de Pont-Echanfrey or his brother Raoul [I] who are named above: 

1.         RAOUL [II] “Rufus” de Pont-Echanfrey ([1070/85]-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  “Rodulfus Rufus [de] Ponte Herchenfredi noviter miles effectus atque Guascelinus frater eius” confirmed the donations made by his predecessors to Saint-Evroul “tempore domni Rogerii abbatis” [so dated to the late 11th/early 12th century], witnessed by “ex parte Rodufi...Tigerius prepositus, Ricardus Osberni filius atque Guillelmus Gravenceon[628].  As this source specifies that Raoul [II] had recently been made a knight when he made this donation, the chronology indicates that he was a different person from Raoul [I] who is named above.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodulfus enim de Ponte Erchenfredi qui cognominatus est Rufus et Guascelinus frater eius, Simon de Aneto et Rodbertus de Manlia, cum Hugone Sine Habere, consobrino suo” joined the crusade, dated to [1106/07] from the context[629].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo enim de Pusacio [his wife’s maternal uncle] et Simon de Aneto, Rodulfus quoque de Ponte Erchenfredi et Guascelinus frater eius” accompanied Bohémond I Prince of Antioch in Apulia in 1107[630].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Pusacio et Radulfus de Ponte Erchenfredi cum Guascelino fratre suo” went to Constantinople, dated to 1109[631].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus autem Rufus” saved “Ricardi regis filii” from capture by the forces of Louis VI “le Gros” King of France at Andely in the Vexin in 1119[632].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfum Rufum” was among those drowned in the White Ship disaster in Nov 1120[633]m [firstly] --- de Lèves, daughter of [GAUCELIN [IV] de Lèves & his wife Odeline du Puiset] (-Constantinople 1109, bur Constantinople).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Pusacio et Radulfus de Ponte Erchenfredi cum Guascelino fratre suo” went to Constantinople, where “uxor Radulfi filia Goisleni de Leugis” died and was buried, dated to 1109[634].  As her husband was made a knight in the late 11th/early 12th century, the chronology suggests that his wife must have been the daughter of Gaucelin [IV] de Lèves and, if that is correct, one of her parents’ older children.  [m secondly ---.  Considering the likely birth date of Raoul [II], it is probable that he married again after the death of his known wife in 1109 but no indication has been found in the primary sources to confirm that this supposition is correct.] 

2.         GUASCELIN de Pont-Echanfrey (-1109 or after).  “Rodulfus Rufus [de] Ponte Herchenfredi noviter miles effectus atque Guascelinus frater eius” confirmed the donations made by his predecessors to Saint-Evroul “tempore domni Rogerii abbatis[635].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodulfus enim de Ponte Erchenfredi qui cognominatus est Rufus et Guascelinus frater eius...” joined the crusade, dated to [1106/07] from the context[636].  Orderic Vitalis records that “...Rodulfus quoque de Ponte Erchenfredi et Guascelinus frater eius” accompanied Bohémond I Prince of Antioch in Apulia in 1107[637].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo de Pusacio et Radulfus de Ponte Erchenfredi cum Guascelino fratre suo” went to Constantinople, dated to 1109[638]

 

 

1.         RAOUL [III] de Pont-Echanfrey (-after 1130).  The parentage of Raoul [III] de Pont-Echanfrey has not been ascertained.  If he was the son of Raoul [II], he would have been a young adult at the time of the 1130 Pipe Roll records in which he is named.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de ponte Erchenfr" in Surrey[639].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Ponte Erchenfr et Richelda uxor sua" in Norfolk[640]m RICHILDE, daughter of --- (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Ponte Erchenfr et Richelda uxor sua" in Norfolk[641]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    EVREUX

 

 

 

A.      COMTES d'EVREUX, family of DUKES of NORMANDY

 

 

The diocese of Evreux, south of Rouen, included two pagi:  (1) the pagus Ebroicinus which extended to the south as far as the river Avre and the pagi Durcassinus and Carnotinus, and was bound on the west by the river Charentonne and the pagus Lexoviensis, and (2) the western extension of the pagus Madriacensis (le pays de Madrie), the river Eure forming the boundary between the two[642].  Robert Bishop of Evreux, younger son of Richard I Duke of Normandy, was invested with the county of Evreux in the late 10th century by his father. 

 

 

ROBERT, son of RICHARD I Comte [de Normandie] & his second wife Gunnora (-1037).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum...et Robertum atque Malgerium aliosque duos” as the sons of Richard and his wife “Gunnor ex nobilissima Danorum prosapia ortam[643]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Robertus archiepiscopus Rothomagensis" as brother of "dux Normannie Richardus II"[644].  He is named as brother of Richard II Duke of Normandy by Orderic Vitalis[645].  Robert of Torigny names "Ricardum…qui ei successit et Robertum postea archiepiscopum Rothomagensium et Malgerium comitem Curbuliensem, aliosque duos" as the sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" & Gunnora[646]Comte d'Evreux.  Archbishop of Rouen 989, after his parents married to legitimise him to regularise his appointment[647].  An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Robertus archiepiscopus…ecclesie Rotomagensis et Vuillelmus et Malgerus fratres Richardi comitis…"[648].  Guillaume of Jumièges records the succession of Robert after the death of his brother, his siege of “Ebroicum...urbem” due to his enmity for “Robertum archipræsulum” who fled to “Robertum regem Francorum” before being reconciled with Duke Robert[649].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1037 of "Robertus…archiepiscopus Rothomagensis"[650]

m HERLEVA, daughter of ---.  She is called "a wife named Herleve" whom the bishop took "in his capacity as count" by Orderic Vitalis[651].  Orderic Vitalis, in another passage, says that "the practice of celibacy among the clergy was so relaxed that not only priests but even bishops freely shared their beds with concubines and openly boasted of their numerous progeny"[652].  Chibnall mentions that clerical marriage was formally prohibited in Normandy in the 1064 Council of Lisieux[653].  Ambivalence towards the marriage of senior members of the clergy in early medieval times is discussed by Taglia[654].  The author highlights the uncertainty existing before the 12th century regarding the regularity of such marriages, and the legitimacy of any children produced, the position remaining unclear until the ecumenical councils of Lateran I (1123) and Lateran II (1139) which ruled that the major holy orders were an impediment to marriage. 

Robert & his wife had three children: 

1.         RICHARD d'Evreux (-1067, bur Fontenelle, monastery of Saint-Wandrille[655]).  Orderic Vitalis names him son of "Archbishop Robert"[656].  “...Ricardus filius Roberti...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][657]Comte d'Evreux.  "Ricardus Rotberti archiepiscopi filius" donated a mill at Evreux to the abbey of Jumièges by charter dated [26 Mar 1038/14 Apr 1039][658].  "Richardus, archipræsulis Roberti filius…et uxor mea Godehyldis" founded Saint-Sauveur d’Evreux, in which "Godehylde filia mea" became a nun, by undated charter[659].  "Ricardus comes Ebroicensis" donated the church of Gravigny to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, dated [1052/66][660].  Orderic Vitalis names “Ricardus comes Ebroicensis, Rodberti archiepiscopi filius...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[661].  He took part in the battle of Hastings 14 Oct 1066[662]m (after [1040]) as her second husband, GODECHILDIS, widow of ROGER [II] de Tosny [Conches], daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes filius Roberti Archiepiscopi” married “uxore Rogerii de Toenia” by whom he had “Willelmum qui nunc Ebroicensibus principatur[663].  The Miracles of Sainte-Foy recount her being cured of a serious illness by miracle, when she was still married to her first husband[664].  Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Godehildis comitissa Ebroicæ civitatis, quondam uxor Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "seniore meo comite Richardo", dated to [1130][665].  "Richardus, archipræsulis Roberti filius…et uxor mea Godehyldis" founded Saint-Sauveur d’Evreux, in which "Godehylde filia mea" became a nun, by undated charter[666].  Comte Richard & his wife had three children: 

a)         GUILLAUME "Crespin" d'Evreux (-18 or 20 Apr 1118, bur Fontenelle, monastery of Saint-Wandrille[667]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes filius Roberti Archiepiscopi” married “uxore Rogerii de Toenia” by whom he had “Willelmum qui nunc Ebroicensibus principatur[668].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Willelmo comite Deurons" contributed 80 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[669].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Guillermus Ricardi Ebroicensis comitis filius...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[670]Comte d'Evreux.  He was taken prisoner during the siege of the castle of Sainte-Suzanne in 1085[671]Orderic Vitalis records that “comes Ebroicensis” requested Robert [III] Duke of Normandy to return “Bathventum et Nogionem, Vaceium et Craventionem, Scoceium [Bavent, near Troarn, Noyon-sur-Andelle, Gacé, Gravençon, Ecouché], aliosque fundos Radulfi patrui mei...Caput Asini” to him and grant “Pontem Sancti Petri” [Pont Saint-Pierre] to “nepoti...meo Guillelmo Bretoliensi”, which the duke agreed to, except “Scoceium” which was held by “Girardus de Gornaco...qui de eadem parentela prodierat, filius...Basiliæ Girardi Fleitelli filiæ”, dated to [1089][672]Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus” [Guillaume de Breteuil] gave “tria millia librarum” to “avunculo suo Radulpho” [Raoul [III] de Tosny] for his ransom as part of the peace settlement of the Evreux/Tosny war and appointed “Rogerium consobrinum suum Radulfi filium” [Roger [II] de Tosny] as his heir and that Guillaume Comte d’Evreux also named Roger as his heir[673].  He and his wife were exiled from Normandy to Anjou in 1112 by Henry I King of England who restored the county to them in late Feb 1113[674].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Martin de Troarn, including donations by "…Willelmi comitis Ebroicensis et Helewisie uxoris sue…", by charter dated to [1155/57][675].  He was "struck down by apoplexy" and, after his death without children, King Henry "took the county of Evreux into his own hands" because the count's nephew Amaury de Montfort "had forfeited the king's favour by his effrontery"[676]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "18 Apr" of "Willelmus comes Ebroicensis"[677].  The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "20 Apr" of "Willelmus comes Ebroicensis"[678]m HELVISE de Nevers, daughter of GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Nevers & his first wife Ermengarde Ctss de Tonnerre (-[Feb 1113/18 Apr 1118], bur Noyon[679]).  She, her father and her husband are named by Orderic Vitalis, who says she was[680].  Orderic Vitalis records the bitter dispute between “Helvisa...comitissa” and “Isabelem de Conchis”, adding that Helvise was “solers...et facunda, sed atrox et avara” and that in war she rode armed like a knight, while Isabelle was “dapsilis et audax atque jocosa...amabilis et grata[681].  "Willelmi comitis Ebroicensis, Helvisse comitisse" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Troarn by charter dated to [1100/14][682].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Martin de Troarn, including donations by "…Willelmi comitis Ebroicensis et Helewisie uxoris sue…", by charter dated to [1155/57][683]

b)         AGNES d'Evreux .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia” kidnapped “Agnetem uterinam sororem suam, Ricardi Ebroicensium comitis filiam” by night and married her to “Simoni de Monteforti”, who in exchange granted “filiam eiusdem Simonis...Isabel” to Raoul[684].  In other passages Orderic names her and specifies that she was the daughter of Richard and sister of Guillaume[685].  The date of her marriage is estimated from the marriage of her daughter which is dated to 1089.  m ([before 1070]) as his third wife, SIMON Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, son of AMAURY Seigneur de Montfort & his wife Bertrade --- (-25 Sep [1087], bur Epernon). 

c)         GODECHILDE d'Evreux .  "Richardus, archipræsulis Roberti filius…et uxor mea Godehyldis" founded Saint-Sauveur d’Evreux, in which "Godehylde filia mea" became a nun, by undated charter[686].  Nun at Evreux. 

2.         RAOUL d'Evreux (-1051).  Orderic Vitalis names him as the son of "Archbishop Robert"[687].  Seigneur de Gacé et de Varenguebec.  His properties are listed by Orderic Vitalis as “Bathventum et Nogionem, Vaceium et Craventionem, Scoceium” [Bavent, near Troarn, Noyon-sur-Andelle, Gacé, Gravençon, Ecouché][688]Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[689]Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum de Wacceio” was chosen as “tutorem” of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[690].  Robert of Torigny names "Radulfo de Waceio filio Roberti archiepiscopi Rothomagensis" as murderer of "Gislebertus filius…Godefridi"[691].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis” rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy at “Falesiæ castellum”, which was attacked by the duke’s forces led by “Rodulfus Waceiensis magister militum”, and was forced to flee into exile, dated to early during the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context[692]m as her first husband, BASILIE, daughter of GERARD Flaitel & his wife --- (-16 Jan [1099/1100]).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli” and that “alteram...Basiliam relictam Rodulphi de Waceio” married [secondly] “Hugo de Gornaco[693].  She married secondly Hugues de Gournay.  The Chronicon Beccense records a donation by "tres matronæ nobiles…Basilia uxor Hugonis de Gornaco, et Amfrida neptis ipsius Basiliæ, et Eva uxor Guillelmi Crispini", who lived at the abbey, adding that they died on three Sundays, "Amfrida…IV Non Jan…Basilia…XVII Kal Feb…Eva…X Kal Feb" [dating the passage to 1099 or 1100][694].  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT d'Evreux (-[1063]).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Rodbertus de Waceio filius Rodulphi filii Rodberti archiepiscopi” childless and the inheritance of “totam hæreditatem eius” by “Willermus dux cognatus eius”, dated to [1063] from the context[695].  Seigneur de Gacé. 

3.         GUILLAUME d'Evreux .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes...Willelmus...frater eius” married “Hadevisam filia Geroii relictam Roberti de Grentemaisnil[696].  He is named as "son of Archbishop Robert" by Orderic Vitalis[697]m (after 17 Jun [1040]) as her second husband, HAWISE, widow of ROBERT de Grantmesnil, daughter of GIROIE & his wife Gisla de Bastenbourg (-10 May ----).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes...Willelmus...frater eius” married “Hadevisam filia Geroii relictam Roberti de Grentemaisnil[698].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais”, adding in a later passage that Hawise married firstly “Rodberto de Grentemaisnilio”, by whom she had “Hugonem et Rodbertum et Ernaldum et totidem filias”, and secondly “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” by whom she had “Judith” who later married “Rogerii comitis Siciliæ[699]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "10 May" of "Haudvisa mater Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[700]Guillaume & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         JUDITH d'Evreux (-1076).  Orderic Vitalis names “Judith” who later married “Rogerii comitis Siciliæ” as the child of “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” and his wife[701].  Orderic Vitalis records that “duæ sorores uterinæ Rodberti abbatis [Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche] Judith et Emma” had been left “apud Uticum in capella sancti Ebrulfi...sub sacro velamine”, that when they learnt that “Rodbertum fratrem suum” was established in Apulia with “secular power” (“sæculari potentia”) they left for Italy where they both married, Judith marrying “Rogerius Siciliæ comes” and Emma marrying “aliusque comes, cujus nomen no recolo”, dated to [1061/63][702].  Malaterra records the marriage "apud Sanctum Martinum" of "abbatum Sanctæ Euphemiæ Robertum…Judicta sorore sua" and Count Roger[703]m (San Martino d'Agri Nov 1061) as his first wife, ROGER de Hauteville, son of TANCRED de Hauteville & his [second wife] [Fressenda] ([1031]-Mileto 22 Jun 1101, bur Mileto, Abbey of the Holy Trinity).  His brother installed him as ROGER I Count of Sicily in 1072. 

b)         [EMMA .  Orderic Vitalis records that “duæ sorores uterinæ Rodberti abbatis [Robert de Grantmesnil, ex-abbot of Ouche] Judith et Emma” had been left “apud Uticum in capella sancti Ebrulfi...sub sacro velamine”, that when they learnt that “Rodbertum fratrem suum” was established in Apulia with “secular power” (“sæculari potentia”) they left for Italy where they both married, Judith marrying “Rogerius Siciliæ comes” and Emma marrying “aliusque comes, cujus nomen no recolo”, dated to [1061/63][704].  The reference to Judith and Emma being “sorores uterinæ” suggests that they did not share the same father as Robert.  However, in another passage, the same source names Judith as the child (implicitly “only child”) of “Willermo Rodberti archiepiscopo filio” and his wife[705].  It is therefore unclear whether Emma was one of Robert’s full sisters or half-sisters, although the order of the names of the two sisters suggests that Emma was younger than Judith and therefore born from the same marriage of their mother.  m ---.] 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d'EVREUX (MONTFORT-l'AMAURY)

 

 

AMAURY [III] de Montfort, son of SIMON [I] Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d'Evreux (-[18/19] Apr [1137/38], bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[706].  He succeeded his brother after [1104] as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his maternal uncle Guillaume "Crespin" Comte d'Evreux, Amaury claimed the succession but Henry I King of England "took the county of Evreux into his own hands" because he "had forfeited the king's favour by his effrontery"[707].  He led a major rebellion and captured the town of Evreux[708].  King Henry besieged the castle but the two parties were reconciled by King Henry's nephew Thibaut Comte de Blois[709], when Amaury succeeded as Comte d'Evreux.  The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "19 Apr" of "Amauricus princeps de Monteforti"[710].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, starting with "conte Amaury…qui premier fonda l'eglise, dou fil le conte Simon le Chauf qui gist a Evreux"[711]

Betrothed (1103) to --- de Meulan, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet].  Daughter of Robert, she was betrothed by her father to Amaury nephew of Guillaume Comte d'Evreux when only one year old but "various circumstances arose which prevented the marriage" according to Orderic Vitalis[712].  The identity of the daughter is unknown, but she may have been Isabelle (see below).  She is named "Aline" in Europäische Stammtafeln[713], but the source for this is not known.  If this is correct, she was probably the same person as Robert's daughter Adeline (see below). 

m firstly ([1115], divorced 1118) RICHILDIS de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN II Comte de Hainaut & his wife Ida de Louvain ([1095]-after 1118).  Orderic Vitalis names "Richenda" as wife of Amaury de Montfort, but does not give her origin[714].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Richeldis" as daughter of "Balduino comitis Hanoniensis" and wife of "comiti Montisforti"[715]

m secondly (before 1127) AGNES de Garlande, daughter of ANSEAU de Garlande Comte de Rochefort & his wife --- de Rochefort-en-Yvelines (-after 1136).  The Chronicon Mauriniacensi records that "Stephanus Cancellarius" arranged the marriage of "nepti sua" and "Amalrico de Monteforti", adding that he dowry was "honore de Rupe-forti" [Rochefort][716].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Du Chesne suggests that the widow of Amaury [III] de Montfort Comte d’Evreux married, as her second husband and his first wife, Robert de France Seigneur de Dreux[717].  He bases this on a charter dated to [1 Nov 1183/31 Mar 1184] in which Philippe II King of France confirmed the property of Notre-Dame de Colombs, including property "in loco Campus à la Drouë" donated by "Robertus comes de Drocis et de Montfort" and "domum de là Nouë" donated by "Simon de Drocis in sua ultima voluntate"[718].  Du Chesne’s argument is that Robert Comte de Dreux could only have been entitled to "le titre de comte de Montfort, don’t le roy le rehausse" from "un mariage fait avec la douairiere de la mesme comté".  He also suggests that "Simon de Drocis", also named in the same charter, was the son of this marriage.  There are three difficulties with Du Chesne’s argument.  Firstly, Amaury [III] de Montfort was comte d’Evreux not "comte de Montfort", a title which does not appear ever to have been borne by members of his family.  Secondly, the chronology is unfavourable for the widow of Amaury [III], who was probably born in [1110/15] at the latest, to have married Robert de Dreux whose birth is estimated to [1124/26].  Thirdly, it is unlikely that Agnes would have given the name Simon to a son born from this supposed second marriage, given that she already had a son of that name by her marriage to Amaury.  In conclusion, the evidence of the [1183/84] charter alone is insufficient to corroborate this marriage. 

Amaury [III] & his first wife had one child: 

1.         daughter The Chronique de Morigny records that "Hugo de Creciaco" killed "Milonem de Monteleherico…dominum suum cognatum suum", after which he was besieged in "castrum Gumet" {Gometz}, fled "in curia Amaurici de Monte-forti…cujus et ipse Hugo filiam parvulam desponsaverat", and then became a monk, in a passage dealing with events in 1118[719]Betrothed ([1118]) to HUGUES de Crécy, son of GUY [II] "le Rouge" de Rochefort Seigneur de Rochefort-en-Yvelines & [his second wife Adelais de Crécy dame de Gournay-sur-Marne] (-31 Jul 1147)

Amaury [III] & his second wife had three children: 

2.         AMAURY [IV] de Montfort (-[1140]).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated Feb 1199 which recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", confirmed after his death by "Simon frater eius et successor"[720].  As this document names the guardian of Amaury, he must have been under-age at his father’s death and therefore born from his father’s second marriage.  He succeeded his father as Comte d'Evreux, Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury.  The abbot of Saint-Germain-des-Prés and Stephani de Garlanda”, who held “castrum Gurnaicum...in advocatione pro Amalrico Ebrocensi comite neptis sue filio”, agreed terms for renouncing certain revenues by charter dated 1138[721]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1140 of "comes Ebroicensis Amalricus" and the succession of "frater eius Symon"[722]

3.         SIMON [III] de Montfort (-12/13 Mar 1181, bur Evreux Cathedral).  Robert of Torigny records that "frater eius Symon" succeeded in 1140 on the death of "comes Ebroicensis Amalricus"[723].  He succeeded his brother as Comte d'Evreux, Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury.  During the 1159 war between Henry II King of England and Louis VII King of France, Simon handed his castles of Rochefort, Montfort and Epernon to King Henry, which forced King Louis to make a truce as his communications between Paris, Orléans and Etampes were thereby cut[724]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Simon comes Ebroicensis" and the succession "in comitatu Ebroicensis in Normannia" of "Amalricus filius eius" and "in comitatu de Rocha et in terra Francie" of "Simon alter filius eius"[725]The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, starting with "conte Amaury…qui premier fonda l'eglise, dou fil le conte Simon le Chauf qui gist a Evreux"[726]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "13 Mar" of "Symon comes Ebroicensis qui dedit c solidos" and the donation of "xl solidos" by "Amaricus filius eiusdem comitis"[727]m MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-before [31 Mar/23 Oct] 1168).  Her marriage is confirmed by a charter dated Feb 1199 which recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", confirmed after his death by "Simon frater eius et successor", and a later donation by "Simon iste comes Ebroicensis et Mahaudis uxor eius"[728].  She was related to Henri I Comte de Champagne: “Henricus Trecensium comes palatinus” donated revenue from the fair at Provins to Haute-Bruyère, for the soul of “Matillis Ebroicensis comitisse consanguinee mee”, by charter dated to [31 Mar/23 Oct] 1168[729]Simon [III] & his wife had three children: 

a)         AMAURY [V] de Montfort (-13 Mar 1182)Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Simon comes Ebroicensis" and the succession "in comitatu Ebroicensis in Normannia" of "Amalricus filius eius" and "in comitatu de Rocha et in terra Francie" of "Simon alter filius eius"[730]He succeeded his father in 1181 as Comte d'Evreux.  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1181 of “Simon comes Ebroensis socer Hugonis comitis Cestrie[731]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "13 Mar" of "Symon comes Ebroicensis qui dedit c solidos" and the donation of "xl solidos" by "Amaricus filius eiusdem comitis"[732].  From the day of his death recorded in this source, it is assumed that the year as reported in the Annales Cestrienses was O.S.  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", confirmed after his death by "Simon frater eius et successor", a later donation by "Simon iste comes Ebroicensis et Mahaudis uxor eius", and the present confirmation by "Simon de Monteforti, predictorum successor virorum et heres" with the consent of "uxore mea Eva et filiis meis Amaurico et Guidone et fratre meo Guidone"[733]m ([1170]) MABEL of Gloucester, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRobert Earl of Gloucester & his wife Avise de Beaumont (-1198).  An anonymous continuation of the Chronicle of Robert of Mont-Saint-Michel records (in order) "Comitissa Ebroicensis…uxor Guillelmi Comitis de Clara, tertia…in manu Dei et domini Regis" as the three daughters left by "Guillelmus Comes Glocestriæ" when he died[734].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Mabiliam comiti de Evereis in Normannia nuptam…Amiciam…Isabellam” as the three daughters of “comes Willielmus” and his wife[735].  Benedict of Peterborough records "uxori Amauri comitis Ebroicanum" as "Willelmus filius Roberti filii regis Henrici primi comes Gloucestriæ…filiam ipsius comitis"[736]Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1170 of "primogenitam filiam Roberti comitis Gloecestriæ" and "Amauricus primogenitus filius Symonis comitis Ebroicensis"[737].  In another passage, Robert of Torigny records the death in 1183 of "Guillermus comes Gloecestriæ" leaving three daughters as his heirs, of whom one (mentioned first) was "comitissa Ebroicensis"[738]The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in 1198 of “Mabilia comitissa Ebroici[739]Amaury [V] & his wife had one child: 

i)          AMAURY [VI] de Montfort (-[1213]).  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon"[740].  He succeeded his father in 1182 as Comte d'Evreux.  Earl of Gloucester.  m firstly (before [1194/96]) AGNES d'Amboise, daughter of HUGUES [II] Seigneur d'Amboise & his wife Mathilde de Vendôme (-after 20 Mar [1202/03]).  "Sulpicius dominus Ambaziæ et Matildis mater mea et omnes fratres et sorores Hugo…et Johannes, Helisabeth et Agnes atque Dionisia" donated property to the abbey of Fontaines-les-Blanches by charter dated 1194[741].  “Sulpice seigneur d’Amboise” confirmed that “Hugues d’Azay” had granted “la dîme de Carbonel” to “Mathilde mère de Sulpice” who had donated it to the monks of Pont-Levoy, for the soul of “son père Hugues”, confirmed by “Sulpice...Hugues, Jehan et Guillaume ses frères, par Elisabeth comtesse d’Angoulême, Agnès comtesse d’Evreux, Denise et Mathilde ses sœurs”, by charter dated 1196[742].  “Mathilde dame d’Amboise” donated property to Liget abbey, for the soul of “Hugues d’Amboise son mari”, with the consent of “Sulpice, de Hugues, Jean et Guillaume ses fils, d’Isabelle comtesse d’Angoulême, d’Agnès comtesse d’Evreux, et de Denise, ses filles”, by charter dated 1198[743].  “Sulpice seigneur d’Amboise” donated harvest to Fontaines abbey, for the soul of “Mathilde sa mère”, with the consent of “Isabelle sa femme, de Jean son fils, de Hugues, Jean et Guillaume ses frères, d’Isabelle comtesse d’Angoulême, d’Agnès comtesse d’Evreux et de Denise, ses sœurs”, by charter dated 1201[744].  “Sulpice seigneur d’Amboise” donated property to Fontaines abbey, in acknowledgement of “sa mère Mathilde” being buried there, with the consent of “Hugues, Jean et Guillaume ses frères, d’Elisabeth comtesse d’Angoulême, d’Agnès comtesse d’Evreux et de Denise, ses sœurs”, by charter dated 20 Mar 1202 (O.S.?)[745]m secondly (before 1203) as her first husband, MELISENDE de Gournay, daughter of HUGUES [V] Seigneur de Gournay & his wife Julia --- (-after 14 Mar 1217).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a letter which purports to be from her daughter "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" which gives a confused version of the family’s lineage: "Sr Hugh de Gornaye" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng", whose daughter "Milsent nostre mere" married "a Count de Euoyse en Normandy" by whom she had one son and one daughter, before marrying "Will de Cantelow nostre pere"[746].  Henry III King of England granted "maneriis de Mapeldureham et Petrefeld" to "Rogero la Szuche", as granted by King John except for the dower of "Milesentie que fuit uxor comitis Ebroici", dated 14 Mar 1217[747].  She married secondly (1219) [as his first wife,] William [III] de Cauntelo

b)         SIMON [IV] de Montfort (-1187 or before, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère)Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Simon comes Ebroicensis" and the succession "in comitatu Ebroicensis in Normannia" of "Amalricus filius eius" and "in comitatu de Rocha et in terra Francie" of "Simon alter filius eius"[748]He succeeded his father in 1181 as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury. 

-        see below.

c)         BERTRADE de Montfort ([1155]-1227).  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1169 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” married “filiam Simonis comitis Ebroensis...Bertrad” arranged by King Henry II and that she was “ipsius cognata[749]Robert of Torigny records the marriage arranged by Henry II King of England in 1170 of "Hugoni comiti Cestriæ cognate suo" and "filiam comitis Ebroicensis cognatam suam ex parte patris sui"[750]Bertreia comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated to [1169/73] under which Hugh Earl of Chester granted land at Coventry to Godfrey his homager[751].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Beltesford et Hemmingebi et Dunintone” held by “Bertia comitissa, filia comitis de Evereros, uxor Hugonis comitis Cestrie[752].  “Bertrada comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated [3 Feb 1188/15 Nov 1189] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie comes Cestrie et Richmondie” confirmed a donation to Bordesley abbey[753].  The Annals of Burton record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestriæ[754].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestrie[755]m ([1169/70]) HUGH Earl of Chester, son of RANULF de Gernon Earl of Chester & his wife Matilda of Gloucester (Kevelioc, co. Monmouth 1147-Leek, Staffordshire 30 Jun 1181, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).

4.         AGNES de Montfort (-15 Dec 1181).  Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Gualerannus comes Mellenti" as "sorore Simonis comitis Ebroicensis" but does not name her[756]"Agnes comitissa Mell." donated property "haia de Lintot" to the monastery of Montvilliers for the soul of "Almarici comitis ebroicensis patris mei…[et]…comitis Mell. Gual. domini mei…et Roberti filii mei" by undated charter[757].  "G comes Mellenti et A comitissa uxor mea" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by undated charter[758]m (1141) WALERAN de Beaumont Earl of Worcester, son of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] (1104-Préaux 9/10 Apr 1166, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre). 

 

 

Brother and sister, the precise relationship between them and the Montfort family has not yet been established: 

1.         [BERNARD (-7 Nov [before 1193])].  Abbot of Savigny.  Robert of Torigny records that "priorissa de Monte Sancti Martini…soror abbatis Savignei qui fuit nepos Simonis comitis Ebroicensis" was appointed "abbatissa Sanctæ Trinitatis Cadomi" in 1182[759]Gallia Christiana records "Bernardus II" as abbot of Savigny in 1173, his death "VII Id Nov" and burial at Savigny, but does not estimate the year[760].  The subsequent abbot Richard is recorded from 1193, but there is no indication of the date of his election.  The editor of the cartulary of Savigny quotes a charter dated 14 Mar 1196 which records an acquisition of property by "B. Saviniensis dictus abbas" and records events happening "post mortem…prædicti abbatis"[761].  It appears likely therefore that Bernard was still abbot of Savigny in 1182, but this is not beyond all doubt.  None of the sources cited give any indication about Bernard’s parentage.] 

2.         MATHILDE (-5 or 9 Dec [1198]).  Prioress of Mont-Saint-Martin.  Robert of Torigny records that "priorissa de Monte Sancti Martini…soror abbatis Savignei qui fuit nepos Simonis comitis Ebroicensis" was appointed "abbatissa Sanctæ Trinitatis Cadomi" in 1182[762].  Abbess of Holy Trinity Caen.  Neustria Pia records the death 5 or 9 Dec in [1198] of abbess "Mathildis", but gives no indication of her family origin apart from quoting the passage from Robert of Torigny[763]

 

 

SIMON [IV] de Montfort, son of SIMON [III] de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et de Rochefort & his wife Mathilde --- (-1187 or before, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Simon comes Ebroicensis" and the succession "in comitatu Ebroicensis in Normannia" of "Amalricus filius eius" and "in comitatu de Rocha et in terra Francie" of "Simon alter filius eius"[764]He succeeded his father in 1181 as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury.  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", confirmed after his death by "Simon frater eius et successor", and a later donation by "Simon iste comes Ebroicensis et Mahaudis [presumably an error for Amicia] uxor eius"[765].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…comte Simon…et de sa femme la contesse Amicie…"[766]

m (before [1170]) as her first husband, AMICIE of Leicester, daughter of ROBERT de Breteuil Earl of Leicester & his wife Pernelle de Grantmesnil (-3 or 10 Sep 1215, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "comes Symon Montisfortis et Guido frater eius" as "Guilelmum comitem Licestrie…sorore" but does not name her[767].  A history of the foundation of St Mary’s abbey, Leicester names “Amiciam primogenitam…et Margaritam juniorem” as the two daughters of “Robertus” and his wife “Petronillam filiam Hugonis de Grantmenyl”, adding that Amice married “domino Symoni de Monteforti[768].  "Simon de Monte Forti" donated money from "Rochefort" to Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, with the consent of "Amicia uxore mea", by charter dated to [1180][769].  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", confirmed after his death by "Simon frater eius et successor", and a later donation by "Simon iste comes Ebroicensis et Mahaudis [presumably an error for Amicia] uxor eius"[770].  She married secondly (before 13 Jan 1188) Guillaume [II] des Barres Comte de Rochefort, by whom she had a daughter as shown by the necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines which records the death "23 Dec" of "domina Ameza…monacha, Willelmi de Barris et comitisse Montis Fortis filia"[771].  She styled herself Ctss of Leicester after the death of her brother Robert.  She surrendered Breteuil to Philippe II King of France in 1206 in return for other lands[772].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "IV Id Sep" of "Amicia…comitissa Liecestrie et domina Montisfortis"[773].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…comte Simon…et de sa femme la contesse Amicie…"[774]

Simon [IV] & his wife had three children: 

1.         SIMON [V] de Montfort ([1170]-killed in battle Toulouse 25 Jun 1218, bur Abbey de Haute-Bruyère).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "comes Symon Montisfortis et Guido frater eius" as "Guilelmum comitem Licestrie…sorore"[775].  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", and the confirmation by "Simon de Monteforti, predictorum successor virorum et heres" with the consent of "uxore mea Eva et filiis meis Amaurico et Guidone et fratre meo Guidone"[776].  "Li cuens Symon de Monfort et Gui ses freres" left on crusade in 1202[777].  "Symon de Monteforti", leaving for Jerusalem, confirmed the privileges of the priory of Saint-Thomas d’Epernon by charter dated 1202[778].  He left on Crusade in 1202 with Renaud Comte de Dampierre, but refused to take part in the capture of the town of Zara for the Venetians or in the capture of Constantinople[779].  Villehardouin records that, after the siege of Zara, "Simon de Montfort [and]…his brother Guy de Montfort" deserted the army to join the king of Hungary[780].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Symon comes de Monteforti" as one of the leaders of the army which landed at Zadar in Oct 1203[781]After the death of his maternal uncle, he went to England and was recognised as Earl of Leicester.  He was one of the leaders of the crusade against the Albigensian heretics in 1209, and was elected their leader to govern the captured towns of Beziers and Carcassonne in Aug 1209.  He captured Albi in 1210 and Toulouse in 1211.  The titles which he used at that date are shown in the charter dated 3 Apr 1211 under which "Rogerus comes Convenarum" reached agreement with "Simone comite Leycestriensi, domino Montisfortis...Biterensi et Carcassonensi vicecomite, et domino Albiensi et Redensi"[782].  "Henricus comes Ruthenensis, comitatum Ruthenensum, Rodellam, vicecomitatum de Cambolatio" swore homage to "domino meo S...comite Leycestriensi, domino Montisfortis...Biterrensi et Carcassensi vicecomite...et domino meo Amalrico primogenito filio vestro" by charter dated 7 Nov 1214[783]He defeated the Comte de Toulouse at Castelnaudary, and adopted the titles Vicomte d'Albi, Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne and Marquis de Provence[784].  He defeated Pedro II King of Aragon at Muret 12 Sep 1213.  "Simonem comitem de Monteforti" swore homage to Philippe II King of France for "ducatu Narbonensi, comitatu Tolosano, vicecomitatu Biterrensi et Carcassonæ" by charter dated Apr 1216[785]He lost Toulouse to Comte Raymond in Sep 1217, and was killed during an unsuccessful siege of the city[786].  The Chronicle of Toulouse Saint-Saturnin records that "Simon comes Montisfortis" died "in obsidione Tolosæ, in crastinum festi Sancti Johannis Baptistæ" in 1218[787]The Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses record the death "1218 VII Kal Iul" of "Simon comes Montisforti" during the siege of Toulouse[788]The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "VII Kal Jul" of "Simon…comes Montisfortis"[789]The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…conte Simon…qui mourut en Albigeois et de la contesse Alix sa femme…"[790]m ([1190]) ALIX de Montmorency, daughter of BOUCHARD [IV] Seigneur de Montmorency & his wife Laurette de Hainaut (-25 Feb 1221, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Matheum in curia Francie nominatissimum et comitissam Montisfortis matrem comitis Almarici" as children of "Loreta [de Haynaco] [uxor] Buchardo de Montinorencei"[791].  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", and the confirmation by "Simon de Monteforti, predictorum successor virorum et heres" with the consent of "uxore mea Eva [presumably an error for Alix] et filiis meis Amaurico et Guidone et fratre meo Guidone"[792]"Symon comes Leycestrie dominus Montisfortis…Biterrenensis et Carcasonensis vicecomes" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "A comitissa uxore mea et filiis nostris A et G" by charter dated Jul 1212[793]The necrology of Port-Royal records the death "V Kal Jan" of "Alix comtesse de Montfort"[794].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…conte Simon…qui mourut en Albigeois et de la contesse Alix sa femme…"[795].  Simon [V] & his wife had [eight] children:

a)         AMAURY [VII] de Montfort (-Otranto [Apr] 1241, bur Rome, St Peter's).  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", and the confirmation by "Simon de Monteforti, predictorum successor virorum et heres" with the consent of "uxore mea Eva [presumably an error for Alix] et filiis meis Amaurico et Guidone et fratre meo Guidone"[796]"Symon comes Leycestrie dominus Montisfortis…Biterrenensis et Carcasonensis vicecomes" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "A comitissa uxore mea et filiis nostris A et G" by charter dated Jul 1212[797]The Historia Albigensium of Pierre de Vaux-Cernay names "primogenitus comitis Almaricus…utpote puer" when recording that he accompanied "Guido frater comitis" to Narbonne, dated to 1211 from the context[798]"Henricus comes Ruthenensis, comitatum Ruthenensum, Rodellam, vicecomitatum de Cambolatio" swore homage to "domino meo S...comite Leycestriensi, domino Montisfortis...Biterrensi et Carcassensi vicecomite...et domino meo Amalrico primogenito filio vestro" by charter dated 7 Nov 1214[799]He succeeded his father in 1218 as Duc de Narbonne, Comte de Toulouse, Seigneur de Montfort, the first two in opposition to Raymond VI Comte de Toulouse.  He later used the title Earl of Leicester.  He was compelled to agree settlement terms with the Comte de Toulouse and Comte de Foix 14 Jan 1224[800]He was appointed Constable of France by King Louis IX in Dec 1230, succeeding his maternal uncle Mathieu de Montmorency.  "Almaricus comes Montisfortis, Francie constabularius" donated land "in loco…Marescheria" [Marchesserie] to Notre-Dame de la Roche for anniversaries for "…Guidonis Bigorensis comitis fratris nostri", with the consent of "Beatricis uxoris nostre", by charter dated Mar 1237[801].  He fought in the Crusades in 1239, was captured at Gaza 13 Nov 1239, and died on his way home[802].  William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Amarri le conte de Montfort" among those who took part in the crusade from France which landed at Acre in 1239, and in a later passage that he was captured[803].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…comte Amaury…fils dou devant dit conte Simon et dou conte Guy de Bigorre, frere au devant dit conte Amaury…"[804]The chronicle of Evreux Saint-Taurin records the death in 1241 of "Amauricus comes Montis Fortis, Franciæ constabularius in redite de captivitate Sarracenorum" and his burial "Romæ in ecclesia Beati Petri"[805]m (Betrothed Carcassonne [1214], consummated 1222) BEATRIX de Viennois, daughter of ANDRE Comte d’Albon [Bourgogne-Capet] & his first wife Beatrix de Sabran Ctss de Gap et d'Embrun ([1205]-17 Sep after 1248).  The Historia Albigensium of Pierre de Vaux-Cernay records the betrothal of "primogenitum comitis nostri…Almaricum" and "filiam Delphini", dated to 1214 from the context[806].  The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records the marriage of "Andreas Delphinatum…et…Beatrice…Beatricem filiam" and "Amalrico comiti Montisfortis"[807]"Amalricus…dux Narbonæ, comes Tholosæ, vicecomes Biterrensis et dominus Montisfortis" donated property to the church of Embrun, relating to the dowry of "uxoris meæ filiæ comitis Dalphini", by charter dated 13 Dec 1222[808]"Almaricus comes Montisfortis, Francie constabularius" donated land "in loco…Marescheria" [Marchesserie] to Notre-Dame de la Roche for anniversaries for "…Guidonis Bigorensis comitis fratris nostri", with the consent of "Beatricis uxoris nostre", by charter dated Mar 1237[809].  The necrology of Port-Royal records the death "XV Kal Oct" of "Beatrix contesse de Montfort jadis femme de Almary conte"[810].  Amaury [VII] & his wife had five children: 

i)          JEAN de Montfort (-Cyprus 19 Sep 1249, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  Comte de Montfort.  "Johannes comes Montisfortis" donated property to the abbey of Notre-Dame de la Roche by charter dated Jun 1248 which names "bone memorie domini Almarici…patris nostri"[811].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…le conte Jean fils du conte Amaury…"[812].  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “19 Sep...circa...1254“ of "domini Joannis Montifortis comitis et dominæ Joannæ de Castilione uxoris eius[813]m (before Mar 1248) as her first husband, JEANNE de Châteaudun, daughter of GEOFFROY [VI] Vicomte de Châteaudun & his second wife Clémence des Roches (-[19 Sep 1254]).  “Clémence dame de Châteaudun et de Château-du-Loir” donated property to Bonlieu, with the consent of “sa fille Jehanne comtesse de Montfort”, for the souls of “feu Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou, de Marguerite dame de Sablé, et de Geoffroy vicomte de Châteaudun”, by charter dated Apr 1250[814].  Heiress of la Suze[815].  “Jeanne comtesse de Montfort” granted a confirmation charter dated 1251[816].  She married secondly ([1250/52]) as his first wife, Jean de Brienne dit d'Acre.  Joinville records that “l’empereris s’en alla en France” (dated to [1249] from the context) and took with him “monsignour Jehan d’Acre son frère” whom he married to “la contesce de Montfort[817].  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “19 Sep...circa...1254“ of "domini Joannis Montifortis comitis et dominæ Joannæ de Castilione uxoris eius[818].  Jean & his wife had one child: 

(a)       BEATRIX de Montfort (-4 Mar 1311, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère)Her parentage is confirmed by the list in the necrology of Haute-Bruyère of members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, which refers to "…la contesse Beatrix fille dou devant dit conte Jean…" as wife of "conte Robert de Dreux", although the text does not say that she was herself buried there[819].  She succeeded her father as Ctss de Montfort, Dame de Rochefort.  She succeeded her mother as Dame de Château-du-Loir.  Heiress of la Suze, inherited from her mother[820].  Letters dated Jun 1265 name “Marie comtesse de Dreues dame de Braine et de S. Gualery et Robers ses fius cunes de Dreux et de Montfort, Iean de Dreux son frere, et Beatrix femme d’iceluy Robert[821].  The necrology of Port-Royal records the death "IV Non Mar" of "Beatrix jadiz comtesse de Dreux et de Montfort"[822].  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “2 Apr“ of "Roberti Druidarum et Montisforti comitis et Beatricis uxoris eius” and their confirmation of donations made by “domino Almarico Montisfortensi comite[823]m (1260) ROBERT [IV] Comte de Dreux, son of JEAN [I] Comte de Dreux & his wife Marie de Bourbon ([1241]-12 Nov 1282, bur Braine St Ived) Comte de Montfort, by right of his wife. 

ii)         MARGUERITE de Montfort ([1225/35]-1284 or after).  The Chronicon Hanoniense of Baudouin d’Avesnes records that "Jehans...conte de Soissons" married "la fille le conte de Montfort...Marguerite si ot de li 3 fils et une fille"[824].  "Johannes primogenitus J[ohannis] comitis Suessionensis dominus de Cimay et...Margarita de Monteforti eius uxor" confirmed the donation made to Vaux de Cernay under the testament of “bone memorie Almarricus condam comes Montisfortis pater predicte Margarite” by charter dated Apr 1257[825]m JEAN [III] Comte de Soissons, son of JEAN [II] Comte de Soissons & his first wife Marie de Chimay (-before 8 Oct 1286).

iii)        LAURE de Montfort (-before Aug 1270, bur Abbaye Saint-Antoine-lès-Paris).  "Ferrandus domicellus de Pontivo filius regis Hyspanie et Laura filia comitis Montisfortis uxor eiusdem Ferrandi" confirmed the donation made to Vaux de Cernay by “clare memorie Johannes quondam comes Montisfortis filius...Almarici Montisfortis quondam comitis...frater noster, de assensu...Johanne uxoris sue nunc defuncte” by charter dated Dec 1257[826].  Dame d'Epernon.  "Ferrandus…regis Hyspanie filius, heres Pontivil et dominus Sparnonis ac miles et domina Laura de Monteforti eiusdem Sparnonis domina eius uxor" issued letters to the priory of Saint-Thomas d’Epernon by charter dated Feb 1261[827].  "Henricus de Grandiprato miles dominus de Lyvriaco et Laura de Monteforti eius uxor domina de Sparnone" donated property to the priory of Saint-Thomas d’Epernon by charter dated Dec 1267[828]"Henricus comes Grandi prati" confirmed donations to Notre-Dame d'Ourscamp made by “filii nostri Henrici militis domini de Livriaco et Lore de Monteforti dicti filii nostri uxoris”, with the consent of “magister Petrus de Meullento canonicus Cathalaunensis consanguineus meus et Radulfus de Passiaco avunculus meus”, by charter dated May 1267[829]m firstly (after 1256) Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla, son of FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile & his second wife Jeanne de Dammartin Ctss d'Aumâle et de Ponthieu (1238-in France before 1264).  Created Comte d’Aumâle, Baron de Montgomery et de Noyelles-sur-Mer.  m secondly (before May 1267) as his first wife, HENRI de Grandpré Seigneur de Livry, son of HENRI [V] Comte de Grandpré & his wife Isabeau de Brienne (-before 1287).

iv)       ADELA de Montfort (-28 Mar 1279)The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m SIMON [II] de Clermont Seigneur d'Ailly, son of RAOUL de Clermont Seigneur d’Ailly & his wife Gertrude de Nesle (-1 Feb 1286).

v)        PERNELLE de Montfort (-5 Dec 1275).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbess of Port-Royal.  The necrology of Port-Royal records the death "V Non Dec" of "Perronnelle de Montfort abbesse de Port Real"[830]

b)         GUY de Montfort (-killed in battle 4 Apr 1220, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", and the confirmation by "Simon de Monteforti, predictorum successor virorum et heres" with the consent of "uxore mea Eva [presumably an error for Alix] et filiis meis Amaurico et Guidone et fratre meo Guidone"[831].  "Symon comes Leycestrie dominus Montisfortis…Biterrenensis et Carcasonensis vicecomes" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe with the consent of "A comitissa uxore mea et filiis nostris A et G" by charter dated Jul 1212[832].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1220 that "Gui fils de Simon de Montfort" was killed by "le comte de Saint-Gilles"[833]The necrology of Port-Royal records the death "II Non Apr" of "le jeune Guydo de Montfort"[834].  The necrology of Haute-Bruyère lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…comte Amaury…fils dou devant dit conte Simon et dou conte Guy de Bigorre, frere au devant dit conte Amaury…"[835].  "Almaricus comes Montisfortis, Francie constabularius" donated land "in loco…Marescheria" [Marchesserie] to Notre-Dame de la Roche for anniversaries for "…Guidonis Bigorensis comitis fratris nostri", with the consent of "Beatricis uxoris nostre", by charter dated Mar 1237[836]m (13 Nov 1216) as her third husband, PETRONILLE de Comminges Ctss de Bigorre, widow firstly of GASTON VI Comte de Béarn and secondly of don NUÑO Sanchez de Aragón, daughter of BERNARD IV de Comminges & his wife Béatrix III Comtesse de Bigorre (-1251).  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that "Simon de Montfort" married "son fils Guy" to "la comtesse de Bigorre"[837].  The record of the 1503 hearing relating to the dispute over the inheritance of the county of Bigorre records that "Pétronille contesse…de Bigorre" married "feu Monsieur Messire Guy de Narbonne", adding that the marriage was recognised by the church[838].  She married fourthly ([1221/23]) Aymar de Rancon, and fifthly (1228) Boson de Mastas Seigneur de Cognac (-before 1251). 

-        COMTES de BIGORRE

c)         [daughter .]  The Historia Albigensium of Pierre de Vaux-Cernay records that "comes…Tolosanus" betrothed "filius suus" to "filiam comitis Montis-fortis" but later reneged on the promise, dated to 1209 from the context[839].  It is not known whether this daughter was the same as one of the other daughters named below.  Betrothed (1209, contract broken) to RAYMOND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND Comte de Toulouse & his third wife Joan of England (Beaucaire, Gard Jul 1197-Millau, Aveyron 27 Sep 1249, bur Fontevraud).  He succeeded his father in 1222 as RAYMOND VII Comte de Toulouse

d)         PETRONILLE de Montfort (-before 1237).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "soror…Symonis [de Montisforti]…Petronilla"[840].  A nun. 

e)         AMICIE de Montfort (-20 Feb 1253).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Galcherus de Jovigniaco et...Amicya uxor dicti Galcheri” donated property to Escharlis abbey by charter dated Apr 1229[841].  Mathilde Ctss de Nevers confirmed the donation of "villa sue de Nannaio, Autissiodorensis diecesis" made to the chapter of Auxerre by “Amicie relicte bone memorie Galteri de Joigniaco et Galterii filii eorumdem” by charter dated May 1241[842]m (before May 1226) as his second wife, GAUCHER de Joigny Seigneur de Châteaurenard, son of RENARD [IV] Comte de Joigny & his wife Adelaide de Nevers (-before Nov 1237).

f)          LAURE de Montfort (-1227 or before)The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Darsy names "Lore ou Laure de Montfort" as first wife of Gérard [III] de Picquigny, and refers to her testament under which she bequeathed property to Gard convent[843].  If her family origin is correctly stated, the chronology suggests that she was the daughter of Simon de Montfort and his wife Alix de Montmorency.  m as his first wife, GERARD [III] de Picquigny Vidame d'Amiens, son of ENGUERRAND de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Marguerite de Ponthieu (-[May 1248/Jun 1249]).

g)         SIMON de Montfort ([1208/09]-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265, bur Evesham)The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1239 that "Simon de Montfort…fils de Simon comte de Montfort" fled to England, having become the enemy of the queen of France, where King Henry gave him the earldom of Leicester and his sister's hand in marriage[844]He was granted the inheritance of his paternal grandmother in England by Henry III King of England in Aug 1231 and installed as Earl of Leicester 11 Apr 1239. 

-        EARLS of LEICESTER

h)         ROBERT de Montfort .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

2.         GUY de Montfort (-killed in battle Vareilles near Pamiers 31 Jan 1228, bur Abbaye de Haute-Bruyère).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "comes Symon Montisfortis et Guido frater eius" as "Guilelmum comitem Licestrie…sorore"[845].  Seigneur de Castres-en-Albigeois et de Ferté-Alais. 

-        SEIGNEURS de CASTRES

3.         PETRONILLE de Montfort (-3 Feb 1216).  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “3 Feb“ 1216 of "dominæ Petronillæ, domini Bartholomæi fundatoris conjugis et patruæ domini Almarici Montisfortis comitis[846]m BARTHELEMY de Roye Grand Chambrier de France, son of RORICON de Roye & his wife Adeline de Guise (-24 Jan 1237, bur Joyenval). 

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS d’HARCOURT, COMTES d’HARCOURT

 

 

Sources relating to the Harcourt family were published by La Roque in the 17th century[847].  The work is disappointing and compares unfavourably to similar studies, for instance, by Duchesne.  Many of the documents in the “Preuves”, at least for the earlier generations of the family, are manuscript transcriptions for which source references are not provided.  They are in most cases undated, but from the style and language many appear to be 16th and early 17th century copies.  Other “sources” quoted by La Roque are clearly summaries of other documents, whose accuracy cannot be verified.  Another problem with La Roque’s work is his long lists of children attributed to the heads of the Harcourt family in the 12th and 13th centuries, whose names are uncorroborated by source material (either his own “Preuves” or other sources).  These names have not been included in the reconstruction shown below unless their parentage has been corroborated by primary source documentation.  The tables showing the early generations of the Harcourt family in Europäische Stammtafeln appear to assume that the parentage of all these children is correctly reported by La Roque[848].  The branch of the family which settled in England (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K) is virtually ignored by La Roque. 

 

 

1.         ANSCHETIL d’Harcourt .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that “Turulfo de Ponte-Audomari...filius...Torf” was the brother of “Turchetillus pater Anschetilli de Harecurt[849]m ---.  The name of Anschetil’s wife is not known.  The charter dated 13 Jan 1103, under which “Philippus de Braosa” confirmed agreement with the abbey of Fécamp witnessed by “ex parte Philippi, Robertus frater eius, Anchetilli filius...[850], suggests that Anschetil’s widow may have married, as her second husband, Guillaume [I] de Briouse (-[11 Dec 1093/1095]).  Anschetil & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [ERRAND (-after 1078).  La Roque does not quote any contemporary primary sources which name Errand.  Père Anselme says that “Errand de Harcourt seigneur de Boeffey-le-Chatel” is called “seigneur, sire et baron de Harcourt” in “plusieurs histoires” [unspecified] which record that he took part in the Norman invasion of England in 1066[851]Seigneur d’Harcourt.]  [m as her first husband, EMMA d’Estouteville, daughter of ROBERT [I] d’Estouteville & his wife [Beatrix ---] (-bur Saint-Evroul[852]).  La Roque states that “une généalogie de la maison d’Estouteville” names Errand’s wife as “Emme et la comprend entre ceux du sang...[de] Robert d’Estouteville”, suggesting that she was the same person who later married “Hugues de Grentesmesnil[853].  The passage is somewhat garbled and in any case La Roque does not provide a citation reference to the source in question or quote it in his “Preuves”.  It is suggested that, until further documentation comes to light, this supposed marriage of Errand should be treated with caution.  She married secondly as his second wife, Robert de Grantmesnil.  She is named as second wife of Robert de Grantmesnil by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father[854].] 

b)         ROBERT d’Harcourt (-before 1118).  Seigneur d’Harcourt, de Cailleville, de Beauficel et de Boissey-le-Châtel.  Père Anselme says that Robert built the castle of Harcourt (undated)[855].  “Philippus de Braosa” confirmed agreement with the abbey of Fécamp by charter dated 13 Jan 1103 which names "Willielmus Philippi pater", and is witnessed by “ex parte Philippi, Robertus frater eius, Anchetilli filius...[856]m AGNES, daughter of --- (-after 1148).  Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1148 under which [her son] “Willielmus de Harvecurt” donated “totam terram Stantunie” to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire), with the consent of “Yvonis fratris mei et Agnetis matris mee[857].  Robert & his wife had [eight] children: 

i)          SIMON d’Harcourt .  “Robertus filius Ansketil, Simon filius eius” are named in the curia of Robert de Beaumont Earl of Leicester dated to [1101/18][858]

ii)         GUILLAUME d’Harcourt (-after 1154).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Rob fil Anschet" after the death of "Rob fratris sui" in Leicestershire[859].  A charter dated [1154] records that "Ph[ilippus] Baiocensis episcopus…Willelmus de Braiosa et Willelmus de Harecourt" donated the church of Sumtinges to the Templars[860]Seigneur d’Harcourt, de Cailleville, de Beauficel et de Boissey-le-Châtel.  A...regina” granted “manerium meum de Stanton” in four parts to Reading convent, to the Knights Templars, to “Milisendi cognatæ meæ uxori Roberti Marmium”, and to “Willielmo de Harestactu”, undated[861].  “Willielmus de Harvecurt” donated “totam terram Stantunie” to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire), with the consent of “Yvonis fratris mei et Agnetis matris mee”, by charter dated 1148[862].  Pope Anastasius IV (1153/54) confirmed donations to Garendon abbey, including the donation of “tertiam partem totius terre Stantune” made by “Willielmi de Haurucurth” with the consent of “Yvonis fratris sui et Agnetis matris ipsorum”, by undated charter[863]m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ROBERT [II] "le Vaillant" (-[1208]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Seigneur d’Harcourt

-         see below.  

iii)        ROBERT d’Harcourt (-before 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Rob fil Anschet" after the death of "Rob fratris sui" in Leicestershire[864]

iv)       ANSCHETIL d’Harcourt (-after 1138).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Anschetill de Herolcurt" in Leicestershire[865].  The marriage settlement of "Rogerus comes Warr…Agnetem filiam meam" and "Gaufrido camerario" is undated, witnessed by "…Roberto fratre meo et Gaufrido et Henrico…Hastecill de Haruc…Willelmus de Glint[ona]…Hug[one] de Glint[ona] et Maur[icio] fratre eius…"[866]

v)        IVO d’Harcourt (-after 1166).  “Willielmus de Harvecurt” donated “totam terram Stantunie” to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire), with the consent of “Yvonis fratris mei et Agnetis matris mee”, by charter dated 1148[867].  Pope Anastasius IV (1153/54) confirmed donations to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire), including the donation of “tertiam partem totius terre Stantune” made by “Willielmi de Haurucurth” with the consent of “Yvonis fratris sui et Agnetis matris ipsorum”, by undated charter[868]

-         HARCOURT in ENGLAND

vi)       RICHARD d’Harcourt (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardus filius Willelmi de Harcourt" held one knight’s fee in "Stantona" in Oxfordshire from "Henrici de Oyli"[869]

vii)      PHILIPPE d’Harcourt .  Bishop of Bayeux.  A charter dated [1154] records that "Ph[ilippus] Baiocensis episcopus…Willelmus de Braiosa et Willelmus de Harecourt" donated the church of Sumtinges to the Templars[870].  Henry II King of England settled a dispute with "Philippum Baiocensem episcopum" about the killing of "Beatricis neptis prædicti episcopi" by "Robertus nepos Philippi de Columbariis" by charter dated to [1154/63][871]

viii)     [--- d’Harcourtm ---.]  One child: 

(a)       BEATRIX (-before [1154/63]).  Henry II King of England settled a dispute with "Philippum Baiocensem episcopum" about the killing of "Beatricis neptis prædicti episcopi" by "Robertus nepos Philippi de Columbariis" by charter dated to [1154/63][872]

c)         [WILLIAM FitzAnschetil .  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “unum molendinum juxta Bunebroc, Colegrim…et…in Beltona” by “Willielmus Aschetilli filius[873].] 

 

 

ROBERT [II] "le Vaillant" d’Harcourt, son of GUILLAUME Seigneur d’Harcourt & his wife --- (-[1208]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Seigneur d’Harcourt.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Robertus de Harecurt" with one knight "in baillia Ranulfi de Rollancurt"[874].  "…Roberto de Haricuria…" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the monks of Bec established at the church of Pré at Rouen which had been made by a charter of King Henry I dated 1122[875].  La Roque gives an extract (in French translation) of a charter dated 1192 under which “Robert de Harcourt surnommé le Tort” donated property to the monastery of Notre-Dame de la Noë, with the consent of “Richard, Jean et Amaury de Harcourt ses enfants[876]

[m firstly [JEANNE] de Meulan, daughter of ROBERT [II] Comte de Meulan & his wife Matilda of Cornwall.  Many secondary sources name Jeanne de Meulan as the wife of Robert [II] Seigneur d’Harcourt.  This can be traced back to La Roque who states that “Jeanne de Meullent Dame d’Elbeuf…Dame de Beaumesnil, de Sainct Celerin et autres seigneuries”, daughter of Robert [II] Comte de Meulan and his wife, married “[son cousin]…Robert 2. Baron de Harcourt dit le Vaillant…par dispense[877].  La Roque adds that “ailleurs il est dit que Galeran Comte de Meulent en execution de la volonté du Comte Robert de Meulent son pere, consentit que Jeanne de Meulent sa sœur eust les seigneuries cy-dessus et donna de son chef à Richard de Harcourt son neveu, fils aisné de Jeanne de Meulent, la seigneurie d’Elbeuf, en reconnoissant toujours qu’ils estoient de la mesme race et de mesme sang[878]He cites no source which supports this statement or provides the basis for the proposed marriage.  The issue is to decide whether there could be any validity at all for this alleged marriage[879].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", dismisses La Roque’s position as unsupported[880].  He traces the ownership of Elbœuf as providing one approach to testing the question.  Stapleton quotes three documents relating to Elbœuf: firstly, the marriage contract between Waléran, son of Robert [II] Comte de Meulan, and Marguerite de Fougères, dated 1189, under which Marguerite received dower including "100 livres in Elbœuf i.e. in land and men…and [if] Waléran [died], Marguerite his wife to have her dower in its entirety"; secondly, John King of England directed the bailiffs of the Lieuvin, Vaudreuil and La Londe, by writs dated 7 Feb and 12 Feb 1203, "to cause Richard d’Harcourt to have…the land which had belonged to Margaret filia Willelmi de Feuferiis" and "to have the rent qui fuit Margarete uxoris quondam Walerani de Mellent, sororis Willelmi de Feugeriis, que est cum Britonibus"; thirdly, King John, dated 28 May 1203, made known that Robert [II] Comte de Meulan "had pledged all his land in Normandy to Us", that it would revert to Robert if the king predeceased him "except Elbœuf…which he hath granted to Richard d’Harcourt by Our consent"[881].  Stapleton assumes that Marguerite de Fougères, widow of Waléran de Meulan, was dispossessed by King John.  Marguerite is stated to be "with the Bretons" ("cum Britonibus") in the source dated 12 Feb 1203.  These events occurred during the critical period before and after the murder of Arthur Duke of Brittany (killed 3 Apr 1203), so such dispossession is plausible as part of the king’s operations against Brittany.  On the other side of the argument, the 28 May 1203 source states that Comte Robert [II] had granted Elbœuf to Richard d’Harcourt with the king’s consent, a point on which the 7 Feb and 12 Feb orders are silent.  If the transfer was a voluntary one, a close family relationship between Robert [II] de Meulan and Richard d’Harcourt would provide the best explanation for the grant.  However, in that case, Robert de Meulan must have been complicit in depriving his own daughter-in-law of her dower before making the transfer.  Such a scenario is unlikely as relations between Robert and the king were poor: an order of King John dated 2 Apr 1203 assured "R. com Melleti" that the king would end all bad feelings (“perdonavimus vobis omnem iram et malivolentiam que habemus adversus vos”) if he visited before the end of the Easter period ("si venitis ad nos infra claus Pasch pxim") and granted him safe passage[882].  The result was the 28 May 1203 order proclaiming Robert’s pledge of his lands to the king, which sounds anything but voluntary.  That document, as quoted by Stapleton, states no Meulan/Harcourt family relationship and Stapleton takes this omission as indicating that no family connection existed.  Although there are numerous examples of transfers between relatives where the documents are silent on the actual relationship, the omission is telling in this case.  Stapleton also cites the charter dated 1 May 1204, under which Robert Comte de Meulan devised his lands "ex toto to Mabiria wife of William Earl of the Isle and to have them confirmed to [her], as to his next heir [tanquam heredi meo propinquiori]"[883].  He suggests that "tanquam heredi meo propinquiori" indicates that none of Comte Robert’s other children had surviving issue (which would mean that Richard d’Harcourt could not have been Comte Robert’s grandson).  The phrase also covers the situation where there were surviving grandchildren, with Mabile being his only surviving child who was more closely related to him ("propinquiori") by one generation than the grandchildren.  Such grandchildren would include the issue of Robert’s deceased son Waléran by Marguerite de Fougères, and so the 1 May 1204 decision could have formed part of the king’s repression of Breton sympathisers.  In conclusion, political circumstances at the time suggest that the transfer of Elbœuf to Richard d’Harcourt took place against the wishes of the Meulan family, which in turn suggests that they were not related and that the alleged marriage of [Jeanne] de Meulan never took place.  While it is impossible to conclude definitively on the likelihood of La Roque being correct, his work contains many inaccuracies and is not reliable, as noted elsewhere in the present document.  By way of footnote, if the daughter of Robert [II] Comte de Meulan did marry Robert [II] Seigneur d’Harcourt, the chronology indicates that she would have been his first wife.  In addition, it is likely that her name was not Jeanne in light of the contradictory sources which refer to the wife of Guy de la Roche-Guyon, another possible daughter of Robert de Meulan,  as explained in more detail above.] 

m [secondly] EVA Crispin, daughter of JOSCELIN Crispin & his wife Isabelle de Dangu (-[before 1192], bur Mortemer-és-Lions).  The Historia cœnobiii Mortui-Maris records (during the period after "domnus Willelmus natione Anglicus" was appointed abbot of Mortemer, from the context, which appears to have been in [1179/80] judging from other parts of the same text) that "domina…Isabella de Dangu" chose burial at Mortemer and that after she died "vir eius domnus Joscelinus Crispinus et filii eorum" donated revenue "in molendino de Waltot" for her anniversary and that of "patris eius Robertus de Dangu", and also states that "Domina etiam de Harecort filia eius" donated books and other items for her own burial in the abbey[884].  Thomas Stapleton names "William, Robert and Eustace" as the sons of Joscelin Crispin and "Agnes, Eva and Emelina…the daughters…on whom Eva was lady of Harcourt", but he does not cite the primary source which confirms this information[885].  Assuming that all this information is correct, it is reasonable from a chronological point of view to suppose that the husband of Eva Crispin was Robert [II] Seigneur d’Harcourt.  The absence of any wife’s name from the charter dated 1192, quoted below, suggests that Robert may have been a widower by that date. 

Robert [II] & his [second] wife had three children: 

1.         RICHARD ([1180/83]-[8 Jun 1236/39]).  La Roque gives an extract (in French translation) of a charter dated 1192 under which “Robert de Harcourt surnommé le Tort” donated property to the monastery of Notre-Dame de la Noë, with the consent of “Richard, Jean et Amaury de Harcourt ses enfants[886].  King John confirmed the grant of "Welleboe" made to "Ric de Harac' t" by "Robtus com de Mellet" by charter dated 3 Jun 1203[887].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", quotes (in translation) a letter dated 26 Dec 1206 from John King of England addressed to Richard d’Harcourt and Jean his brother which records their intention of returning to England and the king’s promise to restore to them their English lands[888]Seigneur d’Harcourtm ([after 25 Jun 1215]) MATHILDE de Taisson, daughter of RAOUL Taisson & his wife Mathilde de La Lande-Patri (-after 28 Apr 1242).  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records that the third of the three daughters of "Raoul Tesson sire de la Roche Tesson, de Tuit, Tury, Fontenay le Marmion" was married "à J. d’Harcourt"[889].  The date of her marriage is estimated on the assumption that her oldest sister, whose marriage was arranged 25 Jun 1215, would have married first.  She obtained the barony of Saint-Sauveur under the inheritance of her father[890].  Her descendants in the male line until 1356 are discussed by Delisle[891].  Richard & his wife had three children: 

a)         JEAN [I] ([1220]-5 Nov 1288, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  The 17th century manuscript history of the Harcourt family by Jean le Feron records that “Jean de Harcourt aisné fils de Richard de Harecourt...appellé le Preudhomme de Harecourt” was born “environ” 1220[892]Seigneur d’Harcourt.  “Ioannes Haricuria dominus et Aelis eius uxor” founded “prioratum Beatæ Mariæ de Parco ordinis Augustiniani Ebroicensis diocesis” by charter dated 1257[893].  A chronicler at Evesham recorded in 1260 that land of "Johannes de Harecourt Normannus" at "Hilmedun" had been confiscated and that it was granted to "Domino Johanni filio Richardi de Harecourt Normanni"[894].  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) records the death 5 Nov 1288 of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his burial “in monasterio Parci” which he had founded with his wife[895]m (before 1240) ALIX de Beaumont, daughter of JEAN de Beaumont-en-Gâtinais Seigneur de Villemomble & his first wife --- (-4 Oct 1275, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  “Ioannes Haricuria dominus et Aelis eius uxor” founded “prioratum Beatæ Mariæ de Parco ordinis Augustiniani Ebroicensis diocesis” by charter dated 1257[896].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) records the death 5 Nov 1288 of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his burial “in monasterio Parci”, founded with his wife, and the death 4 Oct 1275 of “Æliam uxor sua” and her burial there[897].  Jean [I] & his wife had children: 

i)          RICHARD (-1269).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[898].  Seigneur de Boissey-le-Châtel.  m (after 1265) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Mello, daughter of DREUX de Mello Seigneur d’Epoisses et de Saint-Bris & his wife Heloise d’Espoisses.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and first marriage has not been identified.  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but provides no source citation[899]"Johannes...Bituricensis archiepiscopus, Aquitanie primus" attested that “consanguinea nostra Isabellis de Melloto” had given a sum of money to “domino Droconi de Melloto fratri suo” which “G...Autissiod. episcopus patruus suus” held in deposit, by charter dated 30 Nov 1269[900]She married secondly (after 30 Nov 1269) Guy [VII] de Mauvoisin Seigneur de Rosny.  “Isabelle de Mello dame de Boosny” [error for Rosny?] instructed the people of Saint-Cire to recognise “pour leur seigneur messire Drève de Mello seigneur de Saint-Brys son frère” by charter dated before 11 Jun 1285[901].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage more precisely has not been identified. 

ii)         JEAN [II] (-21 Dec 1302, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[902]Seigneur d’Harcourt

-         see below

iii)        ROBERT (-7 Mar 1315).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[903].  Bishop of Coutances 1296. 

iv)       RAOUL (-21 Sep 1307).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[904].  Archdeacon of Coutances 1288.  The necrology of Paris Notre-Dame records the death "XII Kal Jan" 1302 of "dominus Johannes dominus de Haricuria miles" and the donation of revenue made by “dominus Radulphus de Haricuria concanonicus noster ac frater et executor dicti militis” for his soul[905]

v)        GUY (-24 Apr 1336).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[906].  Bishop of Lisieux 1307. 

vi)       five daughters .  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[907]

b)         RAOUL (-21 Dec 1307).  An undated manuscript genealogy names “Raoul de Harecourt seigneur des Planches, d’Auvers, d’Avrilly et de Bray” as second son of “[le] seigneur de Harecourt et...[sa femme] la fille de messire Raoul Tesson[908].  Seigneur d’Avrilly, d’Auvers et des Planges.  m --- de Vendôme, daughter of ---.  An undated manuscript genealogy records that “Raoul de Harecourt seigneur des Planches, d’Auvers, d’Avrilly et de Bray”, second son of “[le] seigneur de Harecourt et...[sa femme] la fille de messire Raoul Tesson”, married “une des filles de Vendosme[909].  The primary source which confirms her precise relationship with the Vendôme comital family has not been identified. 

c)         ROBERT (-after 1270).  An undated manuscript genealogy names “Robert de Harecourt seigneur de Beaumesnil” as third son of “[le] seigneur de Harecourt et...[sa femme] la fille de messire Raoul Tesson[910]

-        SEIGNEURS de BEAUMESNIL

2.         JEAN d’Harcourt (-Damietta 1219).  La Roque gives an extract (in French translation) of a charter dated 1192 under which “Robert de Harcourt surnommé le Tort” donated property to the monastery of Notre-Dame de la Noë, with the consent of “Richard, Jean et Amaury de Harcourt ses enfants[911].  John King of England granted land in Rothley, Leicestershire to Jean d’Harcourt by charter dated 26 May 1203[912].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", quotes (in translation) a letter dated 26 Dec 1206 from King John to Richard d’Harcourt and Jean his brother which records their intention of returning to England and the king’s promise to restore to them their English lands[913].  Thomas Stapleton records that Jean d’Harcourt was in the service of King John in May 1215[914].  A letter dated 15 Mar 1218 from King Henry III to Hubert de Burgh records the return of "John d’Harcourt" from Normandy to England and the king’s order to give him seisin of his land in Wellingborough[915].  A letter dated 21 Oct 1219 from King Henry III to the Sheriff of Leicestershire ordered the transfer of land at Rothley granted by King John "to John d’Harcourt" to the Templars in accordance with the wishes of "the same John when lying at extremity in the host of Damietta" and ordered seisin of other land to be granted to Richard d’Harcourt[916].  This order suggests that Jean died without surviving issue. 

3.         AMAURY d’Harcourt (-after 1192).  La Roque gives an extract (in French translation) of a charter dated 1192 under which “Robert de Harcourt surnommé le Tort” donated property to the monastery of Notre-Dame de la Noë, with the consent of “Richard, Jean et Amaury de Harcourt ses enfants[917].  It is reasonable to suppose that Amaury was Robert’s son by his wife Eva Crispin, named after his paternal uncle.  Dean of Wimborne and Mortain. 

 

 

JEAN [II] d’Harcourt, son of JEAN [I] Seigneur d’Harcourt & his wife Alix de Beaumont (-21 Dec 1302, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “Richardum qui iuvenis obit, Ioannem qui patri successit, Robertum Constantiensem episcopum...Radulfum Constantiensem archidiaconum, Guidonem Lexoviensem episcopum et quinque filias” as children of “Ioannes dominus Harcuriæ octogenarius vel nonegenarius” and his wife[918]Seigneur d’Harcourt.  A register dated early Nov 1286 records the settlement between “Jean de Harcourt sire de Qualeuille et Mareschal de France” and “Dame Beatrix comtesse de Dreux et de Montfort” concerning revenue from Lillebonne “pour raison de nostre fame fille le viscomte et la viscomtesse de Chasteleraut fille et heir d’iceux[919].  "Johan saignour de Harecourt et…Johanne fame doudit Johan fille et heir…debonne memoire Johan iadis vicomte de Chatel-Heraut et saignour de Soonnays" recognised the privileges of Perseigne abbey by charter dated Mar 1291[920]Maréchal de France.  Amiral de France.  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) records the death in 1302 of “Ioannes Haricuriæ dominus cognomento Probus le Preux” after returning sick from an expedition to Sicily with Charles Comte de Valois and his burial “apud Parcum...[921].  The necrology of Paris Notre-Dame records the death "XII Kal Jan" 1302 of "dominus Johannes dominus de Haricuria miles" and the donation of revenue made by “dominus Radulphus de Haricuria concanonicus noster ac frater et executor dicti militis” for his soul[922]

[m firstly AGNES de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY III Duke of Lorraine & his wife Marguerite de Champagne Infanta de Navarra.  A manuscript history “en la Bibliotheque de Monsieur Bigot conseiller en la cour des aydes à Rouen” records that “Agnes”, second daughter of “Federic fils aisné de Mathieu...Duc de Lorraine” and his wife, married “Jean de Harcourt Comte de Harcourt en Normandie[923].  This represents the only reference so far found to this daughter and her supposed marriage.  The reliability of the source is unknown.  If it is correct, the chronology of the Lorraine family suggests that Agnes would have been a young child at the time of the marriage, which suggests that, if the arrangement was made, it was a betrothal which was never confirmed by marriage.] 

m [secondly] ([1276]) as her second husband, JEANNE Vicomtesse de Châtellerault Dame de Lillebonne, widow of GEOFFROY de Lusignan Seigneur de Jarnac et de Château-Larcher, daughter of JEAN Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Mathilde de Dammartin ([1243/47]-16 May 1315).  Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that she was an adolescent at the time of her first marriage, but young enough to have had children born after [1276] by her second husband.  "Johanna de Castro Ayraudi relicta Gaufridi de Lesigniaco" swore homage to Saint-Maixent for certain property by charter dated 4 Mar 1275 (O.S.?)[924].  Her family origin and second marriage are indicated by a charter dated 20 May 1280 in which her second husband is named “Ioannes de Haricuria ratione uxoris vicecomes Castri-Airaudi[925].  A register dated early Nov 1286 records the settlement between “Jean de Harcourt sire de Qualeuille et Mareschal de France” and “Dame Beatrix comtesse de Dreux et de Montfort” concerning revenue from Lillebonne “pour raison de nostre fame fille le viscomte et la viscomtesse de Chasteleraut fille et heir d’iceux[926].  "Jean de Harcourt chevalier et Jeanne vicomtesse de Châtellerault sa femme, fille de Jean vicomte de Châtellerault" confirmed all the donations to Saint-André-en-Gouffern made by their predecessors by charter dated 1291[927].  This document confirms that Jeanne must have been the daughter of Mathilde de Dammartin, as other donations to Saint-André-en-Gouffern which are recorded in the same source were made by the comtes de Ponthieu not by the vicomtes de Châtellerault.  "Johan saignour de Harecourt et…Johanne fame doudit Johan fille et heir…debonne memoire Johan iadis vicomte de Chatel-Heraut et saignour de Soonnays" recognised the privileges of Perseigne abbey by charter dated Mar 1291[928].  

Jean [II] & his [second] wife had three children: 

1.         JEAN [III] (-9 Nov 1329)Seigneur d’Harcourt"Jehans sires de Harecourt chevaliers et Aalis de Brebant notre…compaigne" renounced "tout le chastel…de Rochecorban" in favour of "Gerart conte de Julers et…Ysabiau sa fame, seur de nous Aalis" by charter dated 7 Oct 1307[929]A register of parliament dated 1319 records a claim by “comes Augi et uxor sua filia primogenita deffuncti Droconis de Melloto militis” against “Ioannem dominum de Haricuria militem et hæredem vicecomitissæ Castriairaudi matris suæ[930]m ALIX de Brabant, daughter of GODEFROI de Brabant Heer van Aarschot, Seigneur de Vierzon & his wife Marie de Vierzon (-[27 Mar] [1340/41], bur [Mezières-en-Brenne]).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 2 Jul 1303 under which Marie Queen of France confirmed the division of property between "Marie contesse de Julliers, Ysabiau fame Girart de Julliers, Aeliz fame Jehan d’Harcourt et Blanche fame Bertaut de Maalinnes, filles et hoirs nostre…freire monseign. Godefroy de Braban jadis sires d’Arscot" and heirs of "nostre…neveu Jehan de Braban jadis seign. de Vierson", confirming that Alix would receive "Erkenne, Boussut…Waure, Ottembourc, Nettennes"[931]Heiress of Mezières and Vaelbeke.  "Jehans sires de Harecourt chevaliers et Aalis de Brebant notre…compaigne" renounced "tout le chastel…de Rochecorban" in favour of "Gerart conte de Julers et…Ysabiau sa fame, seur de nous Aalis" by charter dated 7 Oct 1307[932]Philippe VI King of France confirmed the inheritance by "Isabel contesse de Juliers, suer aisnee et hoir seule…de Marie iadis sa suer dame de Virzon, de Luri" of "la baronie et chastelerie de Virzon, de Luri", instead of "Aelis dame de Harecourt et Loys de Touart" by charter dated 31 Jan 1331[933]She inherited Aarschot on the death of her sister Marie.  Pope Benedict XII consented to the foundation of the church of Mezières-en-Brenne by "domina de Haricuria et de Mazeriis in Brena" by letter dated 1 Mar 1338[934].  Alix’s charter dated 11 Sep 1339 records details relating to the administration of the church[935].  According to Desplanque, Alix de Brabant died "deux jours après Notre-Dame de mars vers l’an 1340 ou 1341" (27 Mar [1340/41]), adding that the same jour "le prieur de Notz l’Abbé" said a mass for her soul "dans l’Eglise du chapitre" (presumably indicating Mezières-en-Brenne) where she was buried, but he cites no primary source on which the information is based[936].  Jean [III] & his wife had children: 

a)         JEAN [IV] (-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Notre-Dame du Parc)Seigneur d’HarcourtComte d’Harcourt 1338.  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) records that “Ioannes...comes” was killed “in pugna Creciacensi” and was buried “apud Parcam[937]m (contract 22 Jul 1315) ISABELLE de Parthenay, daughter of JEAN l’Archévêque Seigneur de Parthenay & his first wife Marguerite de Meslay (-[1357]).  Père Anselme records her marriage contract dated 22 Jul 1315[938].  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) records the marriage in 1338 [which must be incorrect] of “Ioannes...comes” and “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[939]Dame de Vibraye, de Montfort-le-Rotrou, d’Aspremont et de Bonnetable.  Jean [IV] & his wife had five children: 

i)          JEAN [V] (-beheaded Rouen 8 Jan 1355).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “tres filios...Ioannem, Ludovicum et Guillelmum, duas item filias Ioannam et Ælidem” as the children of “Ioannes...comes” and his wife “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[940]Comte d’Harcourt

-         see below

ii)         LOUIS (-26 May 1388).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “tres filios...Ioannem, Ludovicum et Guillelmum, duas item filias Ioannam et Ælidem” as the children of “Ioannes...comes” and his wife “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[941]The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that “monseigneur Charles roys de Navarre et contes d’Evreux” ordered the killing of “monseigneur Charles d’Espaigne, lors connestable de France” 8 Jan 1353 (O.S.) “en la ville de Laigle en Normandie, en une hostelerie”, specifying that “monseigneur Philippe de Navarre son frere, monseigneur Jehan conte de Harecourt, monseigneur Loys de Harecourt son frere, monseigneur Godefroy de Harecourt leur oncle” were present[942].  Vicomte de Châtellerault.  m MARIE dame de la Tournelle, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme names her as wife of Louis d’Harcourt but cites no source on which the information is based[943].  Louis had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

(a)       JEAN d’Harcourt bâtard de Châtellerault (-after 11 Oct 1387).  Seigneur de la Peyrate et de la Plante.  Père Anselme notes that “le compte de Jean le Flament” records payments to him at Niort 11 Sep 1387 and at Taillebourg 11 Oct 1387[944]

iii)        GUILLAUME (-1400).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “tres filios...Ioannem, Ludovicum et Guillelmum, duas item filias Ioannam et Ælidem” as the children of “Ioannes...comes” and his wife “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[945]Seigneur de la Ferté-Imbault et de Montfort-le-Rotrou.  m firstly BLANCHE de Bray, daughter of GUILLAUME Seigneur de Bray & his wife ---.  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which the information is based[946]Dame de Bray, de Cernon, de Barenton, et de Rouilly.  m secondly as her third husband, ISABELLE de Thouars Ctss de Dreux et de Benon, widow firstly of GUY de Nesle Seigneur de Mello, and secondly of INGELGER [I] "le Grand" Seigneur d'Amboise et de Chevreuse, daughter of LOUIS Vicomte de Thouars & his first wife Jeanne Ctss de Dreux.  A charter dated 1394 records a dispute between “Guillelmum de Haricuria militem dominum de Ferritate-Imbaudi ad causam Ysabellis de Thoarcio eius uxoris dominæ de Ambazia et de Gamachiis“ and “comitem Augi et Ysabellim de Melduno eius uxorem ad causam ipsius uxoris” concerning the succession of “Ludovicus quondam miles vicecomes de Thoarcio et Ioanna eius uxor comitissa Drocensis...“, noting that Isabelle had married “Guidone de Nigella milite quondam marescallo Franciæ” to whom her parents had granted “terram de Bridiers” on 3 Aug 1351[947]m thirdly (after 1381) as her second husband, PERNELLE de Villiers Dame de Vitry-en-Brie, de la Tour de Chaumont et de Villiers-le-Sec, widow of CHARLES [I] Seigneur de Montmorency, daughter of ADAM "le Bègue" Seigneur de Villiers & his wife Alix de Méry (-[1400/15], bur Notre-Dame du Val).  Père Anselme records her parentage and two marriages but cites no source on which the information is based[948].  Her family origin and first marriage are indicated by charters quoted in the Montmorency section of the document PARIS REGION NOBILITY. 

iv)       JEANNE .  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “tres filios...Ioannem, Ludovicum et Guillelmum, duas item filias Ioannam et Ælidem” as the children of “Ioannes...comes” and his wife “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[949]

v)        ALIX .  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “tres filios...Ioannem, Ludovicum et Guillelmum, duas item filias Ioannam et Ælidem” as the children of “Ioannes...comes” and his wife “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[950]

Jean [IV] had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

vi)       CATHERINE bâtarde d’Harcourt .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage and notes her dowry “à prendre sur les terres de Bailleul et Renouart[951]m NICOLAS Seigneur de Ronnes, de Chéronvillier et de Thivray, son of JACQUES Seigneur de Ronnes & his wife Marie de Graville. 

b)         LOUIS (-after 10 Jun 1326).  Père Anselme names him as second son of Jean [III] Seigneur d’Harcourt and notes that accounts entitled “jornale thesauri” include a reference to sums paid 10 Jun 1326 “pour le palefroi et le manteau de la chevalerie et nouvelle milice de Louis de Harcourt” and a similar sum for “son frere Geofroy[952]

c)         GODEFROI (-killed in battle near Coutances Nov 1356).  The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that “monseigneur Charles roys de Navarre et contes d’Evreux” ordered the killing of “monseigneur Charles d’Espaigne, lors connestable de France” 8 Jan 1353 (O.S.) “en la ville de Laigle en Normandie, en une hostelerie”, specifying that “monseigneur Philippe de Navarre son frere, monseigneur Jehan conte de Harecourt, monseigneur Loys de Harecourt son frere, monseigneur Godefroy de Harecourt leur oncle” were present[953]Père Anselme records his death in battle in Nov 1356 “dans un combat prés Coûtances”, as a supporter of the English cause, but cites no source on which this information is based[954]

d)         ISABELLE (-before 1330).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which this information is based[955]m as his first wife, JEAN [II] de Beaumont Vicomte de Beaumont, son of ROBERT de Beaumont Vicomte de Beaumont & his wife Marie de Craon (-before 21 Feb 1355). 

e)         ALIX .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which this information is based[956].  An undated charter records that “Monsieur Jean de Harcourt Vicomte de Chastellerault” granted “le manoir d’Harcourt” to “Monsieur André de Chauvigny chevalier fils aisné de...Monsieur André de Chauvigny seigneur de châteauroux, Vicomte de Brosse et à...Dame Ælis de Harcourt femme dudit Monsieur André le jeune” on their marriage[957]m ANDRE Seigneur de Chauvigny et de Châteauroux, son of ANDRE de Chauvigny Baron de Châteauroux & his wife Jeanne de Brosse (-killed in battle Poitiers 18 Sep 1356).  

2.         JEANNE (-after 1346)Letters dated 5 Aug 1400 record a dispute between Alanum vicecomitem de Rohano dominum de Leonia” and “Ioannem de Britannia comitem Pentheuriæ et vicecomitem Lemovicensem” relating to the rights of “defunctæ Margaretæ de Alvagaro quondam aviæ suæ” in the succession of “defunctorum Henrici quondam domini de Alvagaro necnon Ioannæ de Haricuria eius uxoris patris et matris eiusdem Margaretæ et Blanchæ de Alvagaro ac Ysabellis de Alvagaro[958]m HENRI [IV] Baron d’Avaugour, de Goello et de Mayenne, son of HENRI [III] Baron d’Avaugour & his wife Marie de Beaumont-Brienne (-1331). 

3.         MARGUERITE .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriages but provides no source citation[959]m firstly ROBERT Seigneur de Boulainvilliers et de Chepoy, son of PERCIVAL de Boulainvilliers & his wife Jeanne de Sancerre.  m secondly RAOUL d’Estouteville Seigneur de Rames, son of ROBERT Seigneur d’Estouteville & his wife Marguerite dame de Hotot. 

 

 

JEAN [V] d’Harcourt, son of JEAN [IV] Seigneur d’Harcourt & his wife Isabelle de Parthenay (-beheaded Rouen 8 Jan 1355).  The manuscript history of the Harcourt family by “Monsieur le Prevost chanoine de Rouen” (dated?) names “tres filios...Ioannem, Ludovicum et Guillelmum, duas item filias Ioannam et Ælidem” as the children of “Ioannes...comes” and his wife “Isabellam de Partenay dominam de Vibraye[960]Comte d’HarcourtThe Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that “monseigneur Charles roys de Navarre et contes d’Evreux” ordered the killing of “monseigneur Charles d’Espaigne, lors connestable de France” 8 Jan 1353 (O.S.) “en la ville de Laigle en Normandie, en une hostelerie”, specifying that “monseigneur Philippe de Navarre son frere, monseigneur Jehan conte de Harecourt, monseigneur Loys de Harecourt son frere, monseigneur Godefroy de Harecourt leur oncle” were present[961]

m ([1340/41]) BLANCHE de Ponthieu Ctss d’Aumâle, daughter of JEAN de Ponthieu Comte d’Aumâle & his wife Catherine d’Artois [Capet] (-12 Apr 1387, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  She succeeded her father in 1340 as Ctss d’Aumâle, Dame de Montgomery, de Mesles-sur-Sarthe, de Gouffer, de Vigues d'Aubigny, de Noyelles-sur-Mer, de Hiermont, de Noyellette et de Pontailler.  Her parentage is indicated by a charter dated 17 May 1343 which records an agreement between “Jean comte de Harcourt” and “Catherine d’Artois sa belle-mère” regarding her dower[962].  A document relating to a lawsuit in 1344 names “dominus comes de Haricuria et de Albamarla et domina Blancha de Ponthieu eius uxor[963].  An undated document records the efforts, after the death of her husband, of “Madame Blanche de Ponthieu” regarding “la fausse et inique condamnation [de] Jean...Comte de Ponthieu son mary et à ses enfants, le plus aagé desquels n’avoit que treize ans” to reverse the confiscation of his assets, noting that she later died 12 Mar [error?] 1387 and was buried at Notre-Dame du Parc[964]

Jean [V] & his wife had eight children: 

1.         JEAN [VI] (Harcourt 1 Dec 1342-28 Feb 1389, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  A manuscript register records the birth 1 Dec 1342 “au chasteau de Harcourt” of “Jean de Harcourt...[qui] fut Comte de Harcourt et d’Aumalle[965]Comte d’Harcourt.  Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande records the death “joedi xi jour de mars”, 1387 (O.S.) from the context, of “le compte de Harecourt” who had married “l’ante du roy” by whom he had two sons[966].  A manuscript register records the death “le dernier Feburier” 1388 [presumably O.S.] of “Jean de Harcourt sixiesme du nom et Comte de Harcourt et d’Aumalle” and his burial “au chœur du Parc sous les Cloches[967]m (Château du Louvre, Paris 14 Oct 1359) CATHERINE de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE I Duc de Bourbon [Capet] & his wife Isabelle de Valois (-Paris 7 Jun 1427, bur Priory of Notre-Dame du Parc)Ayala’s Crónica de Pedro I records that another daughter “del...Duque de Borbon”, referred to third in his list, married “el Conde de Harecourt” when recording the negotiations for the marriage of her sister Blanche in 1351[968]The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the marriage 7 Oct 1359 of “Jehan conte de Harecourt, fil du conte de Harecourt qui avoit eu la teste couppée à Rouen” and “Katherine suer du duc de Bourbon, et fille du duc qui avoit esté mort en la bataille de Poitiers...suer aussi de la duchesse de Normandie, de la royne d’Espaigne et de la contesse de Savoy”, celebrated “au Louvre, près de Paris[969]A manuscript register records the death 7 Jun 1427 of “Catherine de Bourbon” and her burial at Notre-Dame du Parc[970].  Jean [VI] & his wife had children: 

a)         CHARLES (Harcourt 2 Feb 1366-1384).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt le jour de la Purification” 1366 (O.S.) of “Charles de Harcourt”, son of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon[971].  Père Anselme records his title and date of death but cites no sources on which the information is based[972].  Comte d’Aumâle.  If this title is correct, his paternal grandmother must have resigned her county in his favour during her lifetime (see above). 

b)         JEAN [VII] (Lillebonne 1370-18 Mar 1452).  A manuscript register records the birth “à l’Islebonne” 1370 of “Jean de Harcourt” [son of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon][973]Comte d’Harcourtm (contract Paris 17 Mar 1390) MARIE d’Alençon, daughter of PIERRE II Comte d'Alençon & his wife Marie Chamaillart (Château d’Essay, Orne 21 Mar 1373-before 1418)Père Anselme notes Marie’s marriage contract dated 17 Mar 1389 (O.S.?) but provides no citation reference for the document[974]A manuscript register records that “Jean de Harcourt septiesme du nom” married “Marie d’Allençon” in 1389[975]Mistress (1): PHILIPPA Noelle, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme names her as mother of Jean’s illegitimate son Jean but cites no sources on which the information is based[976].  Jean [VII] & his wife had three children: 

i)          JEAN [VIII] (9 Apr 1397-killed in battle Verneuil 17 Aug 1424, bur la Saussaye).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt” 9 Apr “avant Pasques” 1396 [presumably O.S.] of “Jean de Harcourt septiesme [error for huitiesme] du nom” [text garbled, referring to Jean [VI] as his father][977]Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande records that “le dalphin de Vyane” appointed “Jehan, Monsieur ainsné filz du compte de Harcourt” as “chapitaine du chastel et de la ville” at Rouen, dated to early 1416 from the context[978].  Comte d’Harcourt.  Comte d’Aumâle et de Mortain.  The Geste des Nobles names “...le comte d’Aumarle...” among those killed in battle “devant Verneuil” 17 Aug 1424[979]Mistress (1): MARGUERITE de Preullay Vicomtesse de Dreux, daughter of ROBERT de Preullay Seigneur de Sainte-Croix & his wife Isabelle de Gemages Vicomtesse de Dreux.  Père Anselme names her as mother of Jean’s illegitimate son Louis but cites no sources on which the information is based[980].  Jean [VIII] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

(a)       LOUIS d’Harcourt bâtard d’Aumâle (-15 Dec 1479, bur Bayeux Cathedral).  Père Anselme records his parentage and legitimation by Charles VII King of France in Apr 1441[981].  Archbishop of Narbonne 1452.  He bought the seigneuries de Fleury, de Morigny et de Ligny from Jeanne Crespin Dame du Bec Crespin et de Mauny[982].  Bishop of Bayeux 1459.  Patriarch of Jerusalem 1460. 

ii)         MARIE (Harcourt 9 Sep 1398-29 Apr 1476).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt” 9 Sep 1398 of “Marie de Harcourt” daughter of “Jean de Harcourt septiesme du nom”, naming “Anthoine de Lorraine” as her husband[983].  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage (citing no source on which the information is based) and her testament dated 12 Nov 1474[984].  Ctss d’Aumâle.  m (12 Aug 1416) ANTOINE de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont, Baron de Joinville, son of FERRY de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont & his wife Marguerite de Joinville ([1394/95]-22 Mar 1458, bur Vaudémont)

iii)        JEANNE (Châtellerault 11 Sep 1399-3 Mar 1456, bur Ancenis Cordeliers).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Chastellerault” 11 Sep 1399 of “Marie de Harcourt” daughter of “Jean de Harcourt septiesme du nom[985].  Père Anselme records her parentage and two marriages but cites no sources on which the information is based[986].  Ctss d’Harcourt.  m firstly (1414) as his second wife, JEAN [III] Seigneur de Rieux et de Rochefort, Baron d’Ancenis, son of JEAN [II] Seigneur de Rieux, Maréchal de France & his wife Jeanne de Rochefort Baronne d’Ancenis (-8 Jan 1431).  m secondly (13 Nov 1434) as his second wife, BERTRAND de Dinan Baron de Châteaubriand, Maréchal de Bretagne, son of CHARLES de Dinan Seigneur de Montafilant & his wife Jeanne de Beaumanoir. 

Jean [VII] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

iv)       JEAN bâtard d’Harcourt (-after 1481).  Père Anselme records his parentage, act of legitimation in Sep 1470, and testament (undated)[987].  Seigneur de Gironde 1475.  Sénéchal du Maine 1481. 

Jean [VII] had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:

v)        LOUIS dit Loyset d’Harcourt (-after 1454).  Père Anselme records his parentage and notes his mention in documents dated 6 Feb 1443, 1447 and 1454[988]m (12 Sep 1444) CLAUDINE du Plessis, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme records her marriage but cites no primary source on which the information is based[989]

vi)       MARIE bâtarde d’Harcourt .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage “suivant les memoires manuscrits de M. du Chesne[990]m LOUIS de Tournebu Seigneur de la Londe, son of ---.  

vii)      JEANNE bâtarde d’Harcourt .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage “suivant des memoires” (unspecified)[991]m FOULQUES de Saquainville Seigneur de Blaru, son of ---. 

c)         ISABELLE (Lillebonne 13 Jun 1371-16 Apr 1443).  A manuscript register records the birth “[à] Lislebonne” 23 Jun 1371 of “Isabeau de Harcourt” [daughter of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon] who married “Imbert de Thoure seigneur de Villars” and who “vesquit iusques en l’an 1416[992].  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the charter dated 8 Nov 1394 under which [her husband] "Humbert sire de Villars" granted “la terre du Châtelard en Bresse et le château de Boys” by way of additional dower to “Isabelle d’Harcourt sa femme[993].  Dame d’Annonay: Charles VI King of France confirmed "[le] château d’Annonay" to “la dame de Villars” and the waiver of sums due under an agreement between Jean II King of France and “Aymar de Roussillon jadis seigneur d’Annonay”, mentioning “Alice fille d’Aymar de Roussillon et femme d’Humbert seigneur de Villars”, by charter dated 29 Apr 1411[994].  It is clear from the following document that the unnamed “dame de Villars” was Isabelle Harcourt: Charles VI King of France, at the request of "consanguinea nostra Ysabellis de Haricuris domina de Villariis, Rossilhonis et Annoniaci", consented to the magistrate with jurisdiction “locus Annoniaci baroniam” to be titled “baillivu[s]” instead of “bajul[us]” by charter dated 10 Mar 1417 (N.S.)[995]Arrangements were made by "la dame de Villars" (unnamed) with “le duc de Bourbon et ses enfants” for the transfer of “la seigneurie d’Annonay”, dated to [1415][996].  The testament of "Isabelle d’Harcourt veuve de Humbert seigneur de Thoire et de Villars, dame de Roussillon, de Riverie et du Bois", dated 20 Nov 1441, appointed “Charles duc de Bourbonnais” as her heir[997]m (11 Oct 1383) as his third wife, HUMBERT [VI] Seigneur de Thoire et Villars, son of HUMBERT [V] Seigneur de Thoire et Villars & his second wife Béatrix de Chalon [Bourgogne-Comté] ([1342/43]-Trévoux 24 Jul 1423). 

d)         JEANNE (Harcourt 23 Jun 1372-before 4 Oct 1373).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt...vigile de S. Jean Baptiste” 1372 of “Jeanne de Harcourt” [daughter of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon] and “à Harcourt le jour S. François” 1373 of “autre Jeanne de Harcourt[998].  Jeanne must have died before the birth of her younger sister who was given the same name. 

e)         JEANNE (Harcourt 4 Oct 1373-16 Apr 1443).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt...vigile de S. Jean Baptiste” 1372 of “Jeanne de Harcourt” [daughter of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon] and “à Harcourt le jour S. François” 1373 of “autre Jeanne de Harcourt[999]The church of Namur Saint-Pierre acknowledged receipt of a bequest of jewels and relics made by "nostre…seigneur…Guillaumez de Flandres…ou tamps de sa vie conte de Namur, seigneur de Béthune, de Bailloel et de Petenghien en Flandres" from "madame Johanne de Harrecourt contesse et dame desdis lieux sa femme" by charter dated 6 Feb 1418[1000]Dame de Montaigle et de Béthune.  m (1393) as his second wife, GUILLAUME II Comte de Namur, son of GUILLAUME I "le Riche" Comte de Namur & his second wife Catherine de Savoie (22 Jan 1355-10 Jan 1418).  

f)          CATHERINE (Harcourt 1376-).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt” 1376 of “Catherine de Harcourt...religieuse à Poissy” [daughter of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon][1001].  Catherine presumably died young as no later reference to her has been found. 

g)         MARGUERITE (Harcourt 11 Apr 1377-).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt” 11 Apr 1377 of “Marguerite de Harcourt” [daughter of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon][1002].  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which the information is based[1003].  Dame de Longueville.  m JEAN [II] Seigneur d’Estouteville, d’Hotot et de Vallemont, son of ROBERT [VI] Seigneur d’Estouteville & his wife Marguerite de Montmorency (-[1436]). 

h)         MARIE (La Saussaye 24 Feb 1380-after 1427, bur Nideggen).  A manuscript register records the birth “à la Saussaye le jour S. Mathieu Apostre” 1379 [presumably O.S.] of “Marie de Harcourt” [daughter of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon][1004].  Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande records the marriage, in May 1405 from the context, of “le duc de Guelles” and “l’ainsnée fille du compte de Harcourt[1005].  m firstly (5 May 1405) REINALD Duke of Gelre, son of WILHELM Duke of Jülich & his wife Maria van Gelre ([1365]-Terlet near Arnhem 25 Jun 1423, bur Monnikhizen)m secondly (Köln 24 Feb 1426, Papal dispensation 8 Nov 1426) RUPRECHT von Jülich, son of ADOLF Duke of Berg and Jülich & his wife Yolande de Bar (-12 Aug 1431)

i)          LOUIS (24 Dec 1382-Nov 1422, bur Châtellerault Cordeliers).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Harcourt la nuict de Noël” 1382 of “Louis de Harcourt...fut Archevesque l’an 1408” [son of Jean [VI] de Harcourt and his wife Catherine de Bourbon][1006].  Pierre Cochon’s Chronique Normande records the death “joedi xi jour de mars”, 1387 (O.S.) from the context, of “le compte de Harecourt” who had married “l’ante du roy” by whom he had two sons[1007].  It is assumed that the second son to whom this entry refers was Louis, as his older brother Charles was already deceased at the time.  Vicomte de Châtellerault.  Archbishop of Rouen.  Mistress (1): CATHERINE d’Ablevoye, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme names “Catherine d’Ablevoye, fille libre” as the mother of Louis’s illegitimage son but cites no sources on which the information is based[1008].  Louis had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

i)          LOUIS d’Harcourt bâtard de Châtellerault (-after 1 Jul 1444).  Père Anselme records his parentage and act of legitimation at Montils-lez-Tours 1 Jul 1444 by Charles VII King of France[1009]

2.         JACQUES [I] (23 Apr 1344-22 Apr 1405, bur Mons Val-des-Ecoliers).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Cailleuille Feste Sainct Georges l’année apres” [i.e. after the birth of his older brother Jean in Dec 1342 which, taking into account the O.S./N.S. difference, must mean 1344] of “Jacques de Harcourt” who received “Mesieres et l’Isle-Sauate” under the partition dated 3 Jun 1371 and “Montgommery” 30 Dec 1376[1010].  Baron de Montgommery et d’Havré.  m (dispensation 15 Feb 1385) as her third husband, JEANNE d’Enghien, widow firstly of JACQUES [III] de Werchin, and secondly of COLART d’Auxy, daughter of GERARD [I] d’Enghien Châtelain de Mons Seigneur d’Havré & his wife --- (-12 May 1425, bur Mons Val-des-Ecoliers).  Père Anselme records her parentage and two marriages but cites no sources on which the information is based[1011]Mistress (1): JEANNE de Mons, daughter of ---.  She is named in the testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, which bequeathed property to “...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1012]Mistress (2): ---, wife of COLIN Boisel, daughter of ---.  She is named in the testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, which bequeathed property to “...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1013].  Jacques [I] & his wife had children: 

a)         PHILIPPE (-13 Oct 1414).  Baron de Montgommery.  The testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “Jean et Christophle de Harcourt mes freres...ma sœur de Creseques...ma sœur de Diqueume...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1014]m as her first husband, JEANNE d’Ailly, daughter of BAUDOUIN d’Ailly Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Jeanne de Raigneval.  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no sources on which the information is based[1015].  She married secondly Cornelius de Gavre Seigneur de Lens

b)         JACQUES [II] (-killed in battle 1428).  Baron de Montgommery.  m firstly as her second husband, LEONORE Jumelles Dame de Cresèques, widow of ROBERT Seigneur de Cresèques, daughter of --- (-after 16 Jul 1410).  Père Anselme records her family origin and two marriages (no sources cited), and her testament dated 16 Jul 1410[1016]m secondly (1417) MARGUERITE de Melun Vicomtesse de Melun, Ctss de Tancarville, daughter of GUILLAUME [IV] Vicomte de Melun Comte de Tancarville & his wife Jeanne de Parthenay (-1448 or before).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which the information is based[1017].  Jacques [II] & his second wife had two children: 

i)          MARIE (-Chousay-sur-Loire 1 Sep 1464).  Père Anselme records her marriage contract dated 6 Oct 1436[1018].  Dame de Baugency.  m (contract 6 Oct 1436, 16 Nov 1439) as his second wife, JEAN bâtard d’Orléans Comte de Dunois, illegitimate son of LOUIS de France Duc d’Orléans & his mistress Marie d’Enghien (Paris 23 Nov 1402-L'Haye 24 Nov 1468, bur Notre Dame de Cléry).  Comte de Longueville 1443.  

ii)         GUILLAUME (-27 Oct 1484).  Baron de Montgommery.  Comte de Tancarville.  Vicomte de Melun.  Vicomte de Gournay 1461.  m firstly (before 1443) PERRONELLE d’Amboise, daughter of LOUIS Seigneur d’Amboise Vicomte de Thouars & his wife Marie de Rieux (-28 Jul 1453).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which the information is based[1019].  Dame d’Amboise et de Montaignard.  m secondly (contract Rhedon 14 Jul 1454) as her second husband, YOLANDE de Laval, widow of ALAIN de Rohan Vicomte de Porhoet, daughter of GUY [XII] Comte de Laval & his wife --- (-8 Nov 1487).  Père Anselme records her parentage and first marriage (no sources cited) and the contract for her second marriage dated 14 Jul 1454[1020].  Guillaume & his second wife had two children: 

(a)       MARGUERITE (-before May 1488)m as his first wife, RENE Duc d'Alençon, son of JEAN II “le Bon” Duc d’Alençon & his second wife Jeanne d'Armagnac ([1454]-Château d’Alençon 1 Nov 1492, bur Alençon, église de Notre-Dame)

(b)       JEANNE (-8 Nov 1488, bur Notre-Dame de Montreuil-Bellay).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage contract dated 20 Jun 1471, noting that her husband left her because she was “petite, bossue et incapable d’avoir des enfants, suivant Richard de Wassebourg[1021]Ctss de Tancarville 1484.  Dame de Montreuil-Bellay et de Parthenay.  Père Anselme records her testament dated 7 Nov 1488 appointing her cousin François d’Orléans Comte de Dunois et de Longueville as her heir[1022]m (contract 20 Jun 1471, 9 Sep 1471, divorced 1475) as his first wife, RENE Comte de Vaudémont, son of FERRY Comte de Vaudémont & his wife Yolande d’Anjou (Angers 2 May 1451-10 Dec 1508, bur Nancy, église des Franciscains)He succeeded 11 Aug 1473 as RENE II Duke of Lorraine

c)         JEANThe testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “Jean et Christophle de Harcourt mes freres...ma sœur de Creseques...ma sœur de Diqueume...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1023]

d)         CHRISTOPHE .  The testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “Jean et Christophle de Harcourt mes freres...ma sœur de Creseques...ma sœur de Diqueume...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1024]

e)         daughter .  The testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “Jean et Christophle de Harcourt mes freres...ma sœur de Creseques...ma sœur de Diqueume...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1025]m --- de Creseques, son of ---. 

f)          daughter .  The testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “Jean et Christophle de Harcourt mes freres...ma sœur de Creseques...ma sœur de Diqueume...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1026]m --- de Dixmuide, son of ---. 

Jacques [I] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

g)         JEANNE bâtarde d’Harcourt .  Nun at Espargne.  The testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1027].  The most likely explanation of these two bequests is that the beneficiaries were the illegitimate siblings of the testator. 

Jacques [I] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2): 

h)         --- bâtard d’Harcourt .  The testament of “Philippes de Harcourt”, dated 13 Oct 1414, bequeathed property to “...Jehannon de Harcourt la bastarde qui est à l’abbaye d’Espargne qui fut fille Jeanne de Mons et au batard fils de la femme qui fut Colin Boisel[1028].  The most likely explanation of these two bequests is that the beneficiaries were the illegitimate siblings of the testator. 

3.         PHILIPPE (Harcourt 6 Feb 1346-after 2 Oct 1374).  A manuscript register records the birth “au chasteau de Harcourt” 6 Feb 1345 (O.S.) of “Philippes et Robert de Harcourt...d’une ventrée”, adding that Philippe received “Bonnestable et Montcolon” under the partition dated 2 Oct 1374[1029]

4.         ROBERT (Harcourt 6 Feb 1346-).  A manuscript register records the birth “au chasteau de Harcourt” 6 Feb 1345 (O.S.) of “Philippes et Robert de Harcourt...d’une ventrée[1030]

5.         CHARLES (Aumâle 18 Mar 1352-).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Aumalle” 18 Mar 1351 (O.S.) of “Charles de Harcourt[1031]

6.         FERDINAND (Aumâle 22 May 1353-).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Aumalle” 22 May 1353 of “Ferrand de Harcourt[1032]

7.         LOUIS (Cailleville 25 Oct 1354-).  A manuscript register records the birth “à Cailleuille environ minuit” 25 Oct 1354 of “Louis de Harcourt[1033]

8.         JEANNE (La Saussaye 27 Sep 1358-1412 or after).  A manuscript register records the birth “à la Saussaye” 27 Sep 1358 of “Jeanne de Harcourt[1034].  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which the information is based[1035]m (before 24 Mar 1366) RAOUL de Coucy Seigneur de Montmirail, son of GUILLAUME de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle [Guines] & his wife Isabelle de Châtillon-Saint-Pol (-after 1389). 

 

 

 

D.      HARCOURT, SEIGNEURS de BEAUMESNIL

 

 

ROBERT [I] d´Harcourt, son of RICHARD Seigneur d’Harcourt & his wife Mathilde de Taisson (-after 1270).  An undated manuscript genealogy names “Robert de Harecourt seigneur de Beaumesnil” as third son of “[le] seigneur de Harecourt et...[sa femme] la fille de messire Raoul Tesson[1036].  Seigneur de Beaumesnil.  Père Anselme records that Robert pleaded in 1270 against Pierre Comte d’Alençon and Amaury de Meulan Baron de la Queue (no primary source reference cited)[1037]

m JEANNE de Saint-Célerin, daughter of ---.  An undated manuscript genealogy records that “Robert de Harecourt seigneur de Beaumesnil”, third son of “[le] seigneur de Harecourt et...[sa femme] la fille de messire Raoul Tesson”, married “Jeanne de S. Celerin[1038]

Robert [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         ROBERT [II] d’Harcourt (-7 Mar 1315, bur Paris Notre-Dame).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Beaumesnil.  m JEANNE Dame de Villequier, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme names her as the wife of Robert [II][1039].  The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified.  Robert [II] & his wife had children: 

a)         ROBERT [III] d’Harcourt (-after 1346).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Beaumesnil.  m JEANNE de Prunelay dame de Bullon, daughter of GUY de Prunelay Seigneur d’Herbaut et de la Porte & his wife Marguerite de Macherainville.  Père Anselme names her as the wife of Robert [III][1040].  The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified.  Robert [III] & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT [IV] d’Harcourt (-after Jul 1375).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Beaumesnil.  Père Anselme cites sources dated 6 Feb 1369, 1 Feb 1371 and 1 Jul 1375 in which he is named[1041]m firstly ---.  This first marriage is indicated by the estimated birth date of Robert [IV]’s daughter Marie, compared with the birth date of his known wife Marguerite Mauvoisin.  It is confirmed by Marie’s descendants not inheriting Rosny, which Robert [V] d’Harcourt had inherited from his maternal family and which then passed to his younger sister Beatrix, and thereafter to another maternal relation.  La Roque does not mention this first marriage[1042], although his work is not consistently reliable as noted elsewhere in the present set of documents.  The identity of Robert [IV]’s first wife has been the subject of some debate.  Père Anselme names Marguerite de Marigny, daughter of Louis de Marigny & his wife Roberte de Beaumetz as this wife, citing “A. du Chesne” (without any precise citation reference)[1043].  However, Anselme records “Marguerite Mauvoisin...fille de Guy Mauvoisin seigneur de Rosny...et de Roberte de Baumés chastelaine de Bapaume” as Robert’s second wife which, if he was correct about the first marriage, would mean that she was his deceased first wife’s half-sister.  A Papal dispensation for such a second marriage would presumably have been difficult to obtain.  In addition, no indication has been found of the descendants of Robert [IV]’s first wife inheriting part of the Beaumetz properties from Roberte de Beaumetz, wife of Louis de Marigny.  Until a primary source comes to light, it is suggested that Marguerite’s supposed parentage and marriage should be treated with caution and the identity of this first wife considered as unknown.  m secondly ([after 1345]) MARGUERITE Mauvoisin, daughter of GUY [IX] Mauvoisin Seigneur de Rosny & his wife Roberte de Beaumetz ([1332/35]-).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage[1044].  The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified, although it is indicated by her son’s inheritance of Rosny from his maternal aunt Beatrix Mauvoisin (see below).  Her birth date is estimated from her parents’ marriage in [1328] and on the assumption that Marguerite was their third child.  Robert [IV] & his first wife had one child: 

(a)       MARIE d’Harcourt ([before 1340]-).  Père Anselme notes that she was the older daughter of Robert [IV] by his second wife and was heiress of Beaumesnil[1045].  For the reasons stated above, it is likely that Marie was born from an earlier marriage of her father’s.  Her birth date is estimated from her daughter’s estimated birth date and is consistent with her being the daughter of her father’s first wife.  m GUILLAUME Painel Seigneur de Milly et de Concressault, son of OLIVIER Painel & his wife Isabelle de Meulan dame de Milly.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

(1)       MARIE Painel ([before 1357]-after 1392).  Père Anselme notes that Marie, daughter of Marie d’Harcourt and her husband named above, married Guillaume de Tournebu Seigneur de Marbeuf et de Blangy, while their grandson Jean de Tournubu sold Beaumesnil to Jean de Lorraine Comte d’Harcourt in 1458[1046].  Fierville notes Marie’s marriage contract dated 15 Mar 1369 but provides no details of the contract and no citation reference[1047].  Marie’s birth date is estimated on the assumption that this cntract date is correct and that she was at least 12 years old at the time.  Fierville records that Guillaume de Tournebu and his wife donated harvest rights to Notre-Dame du Bose by charter dated 1392[1048]m (contract 15 Mar 1369) GUILLAUME de Tournebu Seigneur de Marbeuf et de Blangy, son of JEAN [I] de Tournebu Seigneur de Marbeuf & his wife Jeanne du Châtel dame du Coudray (-after 11 Oct 1417). 

Robert [IV] & his second wife had three children: 

(b)       ROBERT [V] d’Harcourt (-killed in battle Nikopolis 1396)Seigneur de Beaumesnil.  Père Anselme records that, after the death of [his maternal aunt] Beatrix Mauvoisin, Robert claimed Rosny at the Paris parlement[1049].  Seigneur de Rosny: Anselme does not record the result of this lawsuit, but Thomas states that Robert [V] succeeded his aunt and her husband Jean [III] Seigneur de La Ferté-Fresnel in Rosny, which later passed to Robert’s younger sister Beatrix[1050]m [as her first husband,] BLANCHE de Montmorency, daughter of HUGUES de Montmorency Seigneur de Beausault & his wife Jeanne d´Harcourt.  Père Anselme records her parentage, marriage, and second marriage with “Guillaume des Quesnes”[1051].  Robert [V] & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ROBERT [VI] d’Harcourt (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415).  Seigneur de Beaumesnil.  Père Anselme records his death at Agincourt “suivant Monstrelet[1052]

(c)       PIERRE d´Harcourt (-after 1394).  Père Anselme records his parentage and cites a document dated 1394 in which he is named[1053]

(d)       BEATRIX d´Harcourt (-after 1400).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage, cites a document dated 1400 in which she and her husband are named, says that the couple was childless, and also names her husband’s second wife[1054].  Thomas states that she succeeded her brother Robert [V] in Rosny which, on her death, passed to her maternal cousin Ide de Saquainville who later married Beatrix’s husband as his second wife[1055]m as his first wife, JEAN d’Ivry, son of GUILLAUME Baron d’Ivry & his wife Marie de Montmorency (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415).  Thomas records that Jehan d’Ivry, seigneur de Rosny du chef de sa femme Ide de Sacquainville dame de Rosny” was killed at Agincourt “son chastel et forteresse de Rony...[1056]Thomas quotes a manuscript which records that messire Jean d’Ivry et madame Ide de Rosny sa femme” occupied “ladite terre de Rony...jusques à la bataille d’Azincourt”, at which “ledit d’Ivry” died childless, while his wife remained at Rosny until “les Anglois vinrent à Mante...ardirent le castel...ostèrent à ladite dame sadite terre de Rony[1057]

b)         [daughter .  Père Anselme records the name and marriage of one daughter[1058].  As the primary source which identifies her parentage and marriage has not been identified, the information has not been copied into Medieval Lands.] 

2.         [other children .  Père Anselme records the names of three other children[1059].  As no primary sources have been identified relating to these children, the information has not been copied into Medieval Lands.] 

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS de LAIGLE (L'AIGLE)

 

 

1.         ENGENULF de Laigle [de l'Aigle] (-killed in battle Hastings 17 Oct 1066, bur Monastery of Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Engenulfus et Richuereda uxor eius" donated the deceased’s horse to Ouche after "Rogerius primogenitus Engenulfi de Aquila filius" was killed, dated to [1059/61][1060].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Engenous de l’Aigle" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[1061].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Engenulfus Aquilensis oppidanus” was killed in the battle of Hastings[1062]m RICHEREDA, daughter of --- (bur Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle[1063]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Engenulfus et Richuereda uxor eius" donated the deceased’s horse to Ouche after "Rogerius primogenitus Engenulfi de Aquila filius" was killed, dated to [1059/61][1064].  Her relationship with the Giroie family is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Ernaldus" [Arnaud, son of Guillaume Giroie] received "equum consobrini sui Rogerii" [her son] from “Rodberto abbate” [Robert de Grantmesnil, abbot of Ouche], dated to [1059/61][1065].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "domina matre mea Richoereda…"[1066].  Engenulf & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROGER de Laigle (-killed [1059/61]).  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of “ecclesias...in maris Constantini pagi...” made by “Roberto...Hunfredi...filio” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1035/53], subscribed by “Roberti filii Hunfredi, Rogeri fratris eius, Anscetilli, Willelmi filii Ricardi secundi Normannorum ducis, Rogerii filii Radulfi de Warethna, Rogerii filii Ragnulfi, Gilleberti Crispin, Willelmi Guiet[1067].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rogerius primogenitus Engenulfi de Aquila filius" was killed, dated to [1059/61][1068]

b)         RICHER de Laigle (-killed in battle Sainte-Suzanne 18 Nov 1085, bur Monastery of St Sulpice-sur-Risle).  Orderic Vitalis records him as son of Engenulf de Laigle.  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "domina matre mea Richoereda, Gilleberto et Roberto fratribus meis, Judiht uxore mea, filia Richardi de Abrincis et sorore Hugonis comitis Cestrensis"[1069].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” was mortally wounded in the eye by an arrow at the siege of the castle of Sainte-Suzanne and buried at the monastery of Saint-Sulpice, dated to 1085[1070]m JUDITH d'Avranches, daughter of RICHARD Goz d'Avranches & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” married “Judith filiam Ricardi Abrincatensis cognomento Goz, sororem...Hugonis Cestrensium comitis[1071].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[1072].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "…Judiht uxore mea, filia Richardi de Abrincis et sorore Hugonis comitis Cestrensis"[1073].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[1074].  Richer & his wife had [six or more] children: 

i)          GILBERT de Laigle (-[1118]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Gislebertum Aquilensem et Engenulfum et Mathildem et alios plures filios et filias” as the children of “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” and his wife[1075].  Domesday Book records the land of “Gilbert fitzRicher de l’Aigle” in Witley, Surrey[1076].  "…Gillebert de l’Aigle…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[1077].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[1078].  "…Gislebertus de Aquila…" subscribed a charter dated 8 Aug 1111 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the episcopate of Somerset at Bath[1079]m ([1092]) JULIANE du Perche, daughter of GEOFFROY Comte de Mortagne et Comte du Perche & his wife Beatrix de Ramerupt [Roucy] (-after 1132).  Orderic Vitalis names “Margaritam...Julianam” as the daughters of “Goisfredus Rotronis Mauritaniæ comitis filius” and his wife “Beatricis”, adding that Juliane married “Gisleberto de Aquila oppido[1080], in another passage describing her husband as Gislebertum Aquilensem” son of “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium[1081].  The marriage is dated from a third passage in Orderic Vitalis which records that “Goisfredus Mauritaniæ comes” granted “Julianam filiam suam” in marriage to “Gisleberto Aquilensi nepote eius” after “Gisleberto Ingenulfi de Aquila” was killed, dated to [1092][1082]"Rotrocus comes Perticensium" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron by charter dated [1119] subscribed by "Juliane soror mea, Richerii filius eius"[1083].  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Rotaldum eiusdem loci comitem et Iulainam de Aquila matrem regine Navarrensis, et Margaretam uxorem Gisleberti de Novo-burgo" as children, incorrectly, of "Rotaldo comiti de Pertica" & his wife Beatrix de Roucy, specifying that Marguerite had children "Rotaldum Ebrodiensem episcopum cum aliis liberis utriusque sexus"[1084].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[1085].  "Domine Juliane" recognised rights of Saint-Denis de Nogent  by charter dated to [1122/33], specifying that she was governing Perche while the count was absent in Spain, witnessed by "Gislebertus puer filius prefate Juliane"[1086].  Gilbert & his wife had seven children: 

(a)       RICHER de Laigle ([1095]-[24 Aug] 1176, bur Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle).  Orderic Vitalis names “Richerium et Engenulfum ac Goisfredum et Gislebertum” as the children of “Gislebertum Aquilensem” and his wife[1087].  "Rotrocus comes Perticensium" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron by charter dated [1119] subscribed by "Juliane soror mea, Richerii filius eius"[1088]He claimed his father's lands in England from King Henry but was refused on the excuse that his brothers were serving in the royal household troops and expecting the honor.  It was eventually granted to him after the intervention of his uncle Comte Rotrou, but Louis VI King of France attacked Laigle and forced Richer to hand it to him 3 Sep 1118[1089]

-         see below

(b)       ENGENULF de Laigle (-drowned 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names “Richerium et Engenulfum ac Goisfredum et Gislebertum” as the children of “Gislebertum Aquilensem” and his wife, adding that “duo medii” died “cum Willelmo Adelino Henrici regis filio” in the shipwreck[1090]

(c)       GEOFFROY de Laigle (-drowned 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names “Richerium et Engenulfum ac Goisfredum et Gislebertum” as the children of “Gislebertum Aquilensem” and his wife, adding that “duo medii” died “cum Willelmo Adelino Henrici regis filio” in the shipwreck[1091]

(d)       GILBERT de Laigle .  Orderic Vitalis names “Richerium et Engenulfum ac Goisfredum et Gislebertum” as the children of “Gislebertum Aquilensem” and his wife[1092].  "Domine Juliane" recognised rights of Saint-Denis de Nogent  by charter dated to [1122/33], specifying that she was governing Perche while the count was absent in Spain, witnessed by "Gislebertus puer filius prefate Juliane"[1093].  Seigneur du Lac. 

(e)       ROGER .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbé de Saint-Ouen, Rouen. 

(f)        GUERIN .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Monk. 

(g)       MARGUERITE de Laigle (-25 May 1141).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  "Garsias Ranimiriz" confirmed the rights and privileges of the church of Pamplona on the advice of "uxoris mee Margarite regina" by charter dated 1135[1094]m (after 1130) as his first wife, don GARCÍA VI Ramírez “el Restaurador” King of Navarre, son of RAMIRO Sánchez [de Navarra] Señor de Monzón & his wife doña Elvira [Cristina] Rodríguez de Vivar ([1105]-Lorca, Navarra 25 Nov 1150, bur Pamplona, Cathedral Santa María). 

ii)         ENGENULF de Laigle .  Orderic Vitalis names “Gislebertum Aquilensem et Engenulfum et Mathildem et alios plures filios et filias” as the children of “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” and his wife[1095]

iii)        MATHILDE de Laigle (-[after Oct 1155][1096]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Gislebertum Aquilensem et Engenulfum et Mathildem et alios plures filios et filias” as the children of “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” and his wife, adding that Mathilde married “Roberto de Molbraio comiti Nordanhumbrorum[1097].  Her second marriage took place with the dispensation of Pope Paschal II, granted although her first husband was still living[1098].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Mathildi de Aqila" in Dorsetshire and exempted in Staffordshire[1099]m firstly (1095) ROBERT de Mowbray Earl Administrator of Northumbria, son of ROGER de Montbrai & his wife ---.  m secondly (bigamously after 1107, repudiated) as his first wife, NELE de Albini, son of ROGER de Albini & his wife Amice --- (-21 or 26 Nov 1129).  He was granted Montbrai, in Normandy, the forfeited lands of her Mathilde's husband[1100], but eventually repudiated her after the death of her brother Gilbert[1101]

iv)       "several other sons and daughters".  Orderic Vitalis names “Gislebertum Aquilensem et Engenulfum et Mathildem et alios plures filios et filias” as the children of “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” and his wife[1102]

c)         GILBERT de Laigle (-Moulins-la-Marche [1092], bur Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle).  Son of Egenulf according to Orderic Vitalis, who also says that Robert III Duke of Normandy often commanded him to perform military service "because he was conspicuously courageous" and rewarded him with the castle of Exmes, which was immediately besieged by Robert de Bellême[1103].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "…Gilleberto et Roberto fratribus meis…"[1104].  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jan 1086 “Guillelmus de Warenna et Baldricus de Chitreio Nicolai filius, atque Gislebertus de Aquila”, wanting to avenge the death of “Richerii fratris sui” [Richer de Laigle], unsuccessfully attacked the besiegers of the castle of Sainte-Suzanne[1105]Orderic Vitalis records that Duke Robert granted “castrum de Eximiis” [Exmes] to “Gisleberto Ingenulfi de Aquila filio” as reward for loyal services, dated to 1091, that “Robertus Bellesmensis” unsuccessfully besieged the castle, that the following year Gilbert visited “Molinis...cum Duda eiusdem castri domina” where he was attacked and killed, and buried the next day “ad Sanctum Sulpicium[1106]

d)         ROBERT de Laigle .  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "…Gilleberto et Roberto fratribus meis…"[1107]

 

 

RICHER de Laigle, son of GILBERT de Laigle & his wife Juliana de Mortagne ([1095]-[24 Aug] 1176, bur Saint-Sulpice-sur-Risle).  He is named and his parentage given by Orderic Vitalis2095.  "Rotrocus comes Perticensium" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron by charter dated [1119] subscribed by "Juliane soror mea, Richerii filius eius"[1108]He claimed his father's lands in England from King Henry but was refused on the excuse that his brothers were serving in the royal household troops and expecting the honor.  It was eventually granted to him after the intervention of his uncle Comte Rotrou, but Louis VI King of France attacked Laigle and forced Richer to hand it to him 3 Sep 1118[1109]"Richerus…dominus de Aquila" confirmed the donation of property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by "Gerburgis mater Guillelmi Goidi de Asperis" by charter dated 1136[1110]"…Richerius de Aquila…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[1111].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Richerius de Aquila" with 5 knights and one half "de feodo de Crepo[n] in Cadamo"[1112]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1176 of "Richerius de Aquila" and the succession of "Richerius filius eius"[1113]

m BEATRIX, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  

Richer & his wife had four children: 

1.         RICHER de Laigle .  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1176 of "Richerius de Aquila" and the succession of "Richerius filius eius"[1114]m EDELINA, daughter of ---.  Gillebertus dominus de Aquila” donated property to Beigham Abbey, Sussex, for the souls of “Richerii patris mei” and for the health of “dominæ Edelinæ matris meæ…”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Edelina matre mea…[1115]. Richer & his wife had five children: 

a)         GILBERT de Laigle (-1231).  “Gillebertus dominus de Aquila” donated property to Beigham Abbey, Sussex, for the souls of “Richerii patris mei” and for the health of “dominæ Edelinæ matris meæ et Richerii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Edelina matre mea, Richerio fratre meo, Engenulfo clerico, fratre meo…[1116]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Gilbertus de Aquila" paying "xi l i m…dimidiam marcam pro milite" in Sussex[1117].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Gilbertus de Aquila" paying "xxi l xvii s vi d de parvis feodis...de quolibet milite xii s vi d" in Sussex[1118].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Gileberti de Aquila" owned "villa de Westcot…hundredum de Wudetun" in Surrey before he left for Normandy without the king’s permission[1119].  "Gillebertus dominus Aquila" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by charter dated 1211[1120]Gislebertus dominus Aquile” donated revenue to Notre-Dame de Chaise-Dieu, with the consent of Elisabet uxoris mee et Gisleberti primogeniti mei”, by charter dated 1215[1121].  His lands reverted to the crown on his death.  m ([1193]) as her second husband, ISABEL de Warenne, widow of ROBERT de Lacy, daughter of HAMELIN d’Anjou Earl of Surrey & his [second] wife Isabel de Warenne of Surrey (-before 30 Nov 1234).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Isabella” as wife of “Robertus Lacy”, adding that they were childless[1122]The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Gileberti de Aquila" married "comes Warennie…sorore sua" whose dowry was "villa de Westcot…hundredum de Wudetun" in Surrey[1123].  “Gislebertus dominus Aquile” donated revenue to Notre-Dame de Chaise-Dieu, with the consent of Elisabet uxoris mee et Gisleberti primogeniti mei”, by charter dated 1215[1124]Gilbert & his wife had two children: 

i)          GILBERT de Laigle (-after 1215).  “Gislebertus dominus Aquile” donated revenue to Notre-Dame de Chaise-Dieu, with the consent of Elisabet uxoris mee et Gisleberti primogeniti mei”, by charter dated 1215[1125]

ii)         ALICE de Laigle (-bur Norton)A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Aliciam filiam Gilberti de Aquila” as wife of “Johannes de Lacy primus comes Lincolniæ”, adding that she was buried “apud Norton[1126]m as his first wife, JOHN de Lacy Earl of Lincoln, son of ROGER de Lacy & his wife Maud de Clare ([1192]-22 Jul 1240[1127], bur Stanlaw, later transferred to Whalley)

b)         RICHER de Laigle .  “Gillebertus dominus de Aquila” donated property to Beigham Abbey, Sussex, for the souls of “Richerii patris mei” and for the health of “dominæ Edelinæ matris meæ et Richerii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Edelina matre mea, Richerio fratre meo, Engenulfo clerico, fratre meo…[1128]

c)         ENGENULF de Laigle .  “Gillebertus dominus de Aquila” donated property to Beigham Abbey, Sussex, for the souls of “Richerii patris mei” and for the health of “dominæ Edelinæ matris meæ et Richerii fratris mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Edelina matre mea, Richerio fratre meo, Engenulfo clerico, fratre meo…[1129].

d)         LUCIE de Laigle (-1 Apr after 1217)The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  "Ricardus vicecomes Sancte Susanne" granted rights to the hospice of Raillon, with the consent of "Lucie uxoris mee et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1165/77][1130].  "Radulfus vicecomes Sancte Suzanne" donated the chapel of Raillon to the abbey of Angers Saint-Aubin, for the soul of "patris mei Richardi", with the consent of "matre mea Lucia vicecomitissa", by charter dated to [1200][1131]"Lucia vicecomitissa Sancte Suzanne" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe for the soul of "domini R viri mei" with the consent of "R vicecomitis Belli Montis filii sui" by charter dated 1208[1132]The necrology of Notre-Dame-de-Beauport records the death "Kal Apr" of "matris prime uxoris comitis Alani fundatoris nostri" [Alain [I] d´Avaugour, husband of Lucie´s daughter Petronille][1133].  [According to Angot, Lucie married secondly as his second wife, Thibaut [III] Seigneur de Mathefelon, without citing any primary source on which this information is based[1134].  He dates this supposed second marriage to “avant 1205”, although his basis for this date is unclear and, if the marriage is correct, it would seem incorrect in light of the charter dated 1208 in which her supposed second husband is not named (see above).  Europäische Stammtafeln names “Luce de l’Aigle dame de Loué et de Loiron” as the second wife of Thibaut [III] but does not specify her parentage or supposed first marriage[1135].  A difficulty is that Europäische Stammtafeln dates the death of Thibaut’s second wife to “16 Dec” (implying that this date is based on a necrology entry, which has not yet been identified), while the necrology of Notre-Dame de Beauport dates the death of Richard [I]’s widow to 1 Apr, as noted above.  Until more information comes to light, it is suggested that this supposed second marriage be treated with caution.]  m [firstly] RICHARD [I] Vicomte de Beaumont, son of ROSCELIN Vicomte de Beaumont & his wife Constance [of England] (-25 Jan [1197/99], bur Etival).  [m secondly as his second wife, THIBAUT [III] Seigneur de Mathefelon, son of THIBAUT [II] Seigneur de Mathefelon & his wife Mathilde de Mayenne (-[May 1238/Dec 1239]).] 

e)         --- de Laigle Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Guillermus de Curceio" as "filia Richerii de Aquila" when recording his death in 1177[1136]m WILLIAM de Courcy, son of --- (-1177). 

2.         ROGER de Laigle .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

3.         ENGENULF de Laigle .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

4.         JULIANA de Laigle .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Laigle (-after 1167).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Aquila xiv l xi s viii d…" in Sussex in [1167/68][1137]

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de TOSNY

 

 

1.         MALAHULC .  His family origin is confirmed by Guillaume of Jumièges who names “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat[1138], suggesting that Malahulc was ancestor of the later Tosny family.  Orderic Vitalis (writing in [1113]) names Malahulc as an uncle of Rollo and ancestor of the Tosny family[1139].  He is not mentioned in the Sagas. 

 

 

1.         HUGUES de Calvacamp, son of --- .  He is named only in the Acta Archiepiscorum Rothomagensium which names his son "Radulfo…filio Hugonis de Calvacamp"[1140].  No source has been found which names him in his own capacity.  Guillaume of Jumièges names [his great-grandson] “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat[1141], which suggests that Malahulc was the ancestor of Hugues de Calvacamp, Hugues’s wife, or the wife of Raoul [I] de Tosny.  m ---.  The name of Hugues's wife is not known.  Guillaume of Jumièges names [his great-grandson] “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat[1142], which suggests that Malahulc was the ancestor of Hugues de Calvacamp, Hugues’s wife, or the wife of Raoul [I] de Tosny.  Hugues & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL [I] (-after 1 May 991).  The Acta Archiepiscorum Rothomagensium record that "Hugo" archbishop of Rouen granted "Todiniacum…in dominicatu archiepiscopi" to "fratri suo Radulfo…filio Hugonis de Calvacamp"[1143]m ---.  The name of Raoul's wife is not known.  Guillaume of Jumièges names [his great-grandson] “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat[1144], which suggests that Malahulc was the ancestor of Hugues de Calvacamp, Hugues’s wife, or the wife of Raoul [I] de Tosny.  Raoul & his wife had one child:

i)          RAOUL [II] de Tosny .  "…Rodulphi filii Rodulphi de Todeniaco…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Richardus…Normannorum comes" confirmed property of Lisieux[1145]

-         see below

b)         HUGUES (-10 Nov [989/90]).  Monk at Saint-Denis before 942.  Archbishop of Rouen 942.  The Acta Archiepiscorum Rothomagensium record that "Willelmus filius Rollonis dux Normannorum" appointed "Hugo…monachus apud sanctum Dyonisium" as archbishop of Rouen, adding that he was "prosapia clarus, sed ignobilis cunctis operibus", had "filios…quamplures", and granted "Todiniacum…in dominicatu archiepiscopi" to "fratri suo Radulfo…filio Hugonis de Calvacamp"[1146].  The dates of his appointment and death are ascertained from Orderic Vitalis who records the death of his predecessor in 942, and that Hugues held the position for 47 years[1147]Gallia Christiana records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Hugonis archiepiscopi"[1148].  [m ---.]  Hugues [& his wife] had children: 

i)          children .  Their existence is confirmed by the Acta Archiepiscorum Rothomagensium which record that "Hugo…monachus apud sanctum Dyonisium" had "filios…quamplures"[1149].  Their is no indication of their number, their names or the identity of their mother(s). 

 

 

RAOUL [II] de Tosny, son of RAOUL [I] [de Tosny] & his wife --- .  "…Rodulphi filii Rodulphi de Todeniaco…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Richardus…Normannorum comes" confirmed property of Lisieux[1150].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which he had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois (so dated to after 1004)[1151].  [The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that, after his son "Rotgerius" was killed in Normandy, “Rodulfus...pater eius” left for Jerusalem “per limina apostolorum et per Apuliam”, where “princeps qui totam Apuliam tenebat” [maybe Melus, whose death is recorded in 1020, which is inconsistent with the chronology of the life of Raoul’s supposed son Roger, as shown below] whom the Greeks wished to expel (“quem Greci de principatu suo eicere volebant”) requested him to abandon his pilgrimage to fight with him “usque in hodiernum diem manserunt ibi Normanni[1152].  How far this passage is factual is uncertain.  It is possible that there is confusion with the expedition to Apulia led by Rainulf “Drengot” and his brothers (one of whom was named Rodolphe/Raoul): the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records that "Giselbertus…qui et Buttericus…[cum] quatuor fratribus suis, Rainulfo, Asclittino, Osmundo, atque Rodulfo" arrived in Capua (after Gilbert was banished from Normandy) where they joined "Melus", dated to [1015/16] from the context[1153]Rodulfus Glaber records that "a very brave Norman called Rodulf incurred the anger of Count Richard [Richard II Comte de Normandie]" and fled to Italy, where he met Pope Benedict VIII (Pope from 1012 to 1024), fought the Greeks, and visited Emperor Heinrich II[1154].  It appears more probable that Glaber is referring to Rodolphe, brother of Rainulf “Drengot”, rather than Raoul [II] de Tosny, although the question is not beyond doubt.  There is little basis for dating the events, except a reference to Rodolfe being received "joyfully" by Count Richard in Normandy the year before the death of the Emperor (1024).  Chalandon suggests that meeting with the emperor must have taken place in Germany after Rodolphe accompanied Melus there after his defeat in southern Italy, dated to 1017[1155].] 

m ---.  The name of Raoul's wife is not known. 

Raoul [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         ROGER [I] de Tosny ([990]-killed in battle [before 17 Jun] [1040]).  His parentage is confirmed by Guillaume of Jumièges who records that Richard II Duke of Normandy appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which the duke had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois (so dated to after 1004)[1156].  Roger [I] de Tosny spent time in Spain, returned to Normandy, and was killed in rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy.  The precise chronology of these events is uncertain given the contradictions in the different primary sources as we shall see.  Two sources record Roger in Spain in [1017/20].  Firstly, the Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes (written before [1034]) records that "Normanni, duce Rotgerio" (presumably identifiable as Roger [I], although he never bore the ducal or even comital title), who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked "comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua" for the hand of her (unnamed) daughter[1157].  This episode is dated to [1017/20], when Ermesinde was acting for her son Berenguer Ramon I “el Curvo” Comte de Barcelona during his minority.  In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18.  Secondly, the early 12th century Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensis records, in a section headed 1015 but whose coverage extends into later years, that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" left Normandy with an army for Spain (“de Normannia perrexit cum exercitu in Hispaniam”) where he captured “civitates et castella...Tarraconam [Tarragona] et Gerundam [Girona]”, married “sororem Raymundi Berengerii Stephaniam[1158].  The Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensis records that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" lived in Spain “cum uxore et exercitu suo per 15 annos” before returning “ad patrem suum in Normanniam” (having left “20 viris et uxore et omnibus quæ possidebant” in Spain) to make peace “cum duce Richardo[1159].  “Duce Richardo” was either Duke Richard II or Duke Richard III, but assuming that the Chronicon’s report is accurate (which is not without doubt) Roger [I]’s return from Spain to Normandy must be dated to before Aug 1027, when Duke Richard III died.  Roger’s presence in Normandy after this date is confirmed by two charters dated during the early 1030s: firstly, "…Rogerii filii Radulfi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1160], and secondly “...Rogerii Todelensis...” witnessed the charter dated [20 Jul 1031/Jul 1032] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille[1161].  After this time, the situation becomes confused, but indications are that Roger returned to Spain: Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” (who was “totius Normanniæ signifer“) travelled “in Hispaniam” when Duke Robert II went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem (so dated to [1035]), that he returned after the accession of Duke Guillaume II but rebelled because of the new duke’s ignoble birth, destroyed property in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis”, and that the latter eventually sent his son to attack Roger who was killed with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio[1162].  Orderic Vitalis also names “...Rogerius de Hispania...” among those who rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after his accession in 1035[1163].  In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio...cum Rogerio de Toenio” fought “Rogerium de Bellomonte”, during the course of which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and “Rodbertus” mortally wounded (adding that the latter later died “XIV Kal Jul”)[1164].  Guillaume of Jumièges’s account is partly corroborated by a second extract from the Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensis which records that, after returning to Normandy, Roger attacked a neighbour but was killed (“iste Rotgerius contra quemdam vicinum faciens bellum, interfectus est”), although the chronology of the Chronicon is suspect as this passage follows the report that Roger returned to Normandy to make peace “cum duce Richardo[1165].  The Chronicon report is also confused by Roger’s father’s supposed journey to Apulia after Roger died, which as discussed above appears to contradict other sources and whose chronology is in any case suspect.  The presence of Roger [I] in Normandy in the late 1030s is noted in two charters: "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[1166], and "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…Rogerii de Conchis" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[1167].  The question of the dual identity of “Roger de Tosny”, reflected in the references to “Rodgerii filii Rodulfi" and "Rogerii de Conchis" in the latter document, is discussed below under Roger [II] de Tosny.  Roger [I]’s death is dated to [before 17 Jun] because firstly Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentesmaisnil” died in the same battle as “Rogerius [de Toenia][1168], and secondly the necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "17 Jun" of "Robertus de Grentemesnil"[1169].  The date must be considered approximate because Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio” was mortally wounded in the battle during which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and that Robert died “XIV Kal Jul” (it is not known how many dies after the battle)[1170]m ([1017/20]) [--- de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BORELL I Comte de Barcelona & his wife Ermesinde de Carcassonne].  The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes (written before [1034]) records that "Normanni, duce Rotgerio" (presumably identifiable as Roger [I], although he never bore the ducal or even comital title), who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked "comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua" for the hand of her (unnamed) daughter[1171].  This episode is dated to [1017/20], when Ermesinde was acting for her son Berenguer Ramon I “el Curvo” Comte de Barcelona during his minority.  In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18.  Europäische Stammtafeln names her “Adelaida (Papia)”[1172].  No primary source has been identified which confirms that either of these names is correct.  The early 12th century Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensi records, in a section headed 1015 but whose coverage extends into later years, that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" left Normandy with an army for Spain (“de Normannia perrexit cum exercitu in Hispaniam”) where he married “sororem Raymundi Berengerii [Ramon Berenger [I] “el Viejo” Comte de Barcelona] Stephaniam” and lived there “cum uxore et exercitu suo per 15 annos” before returning “ad patrem suum in Normanniam” (having left “20 viris et uxore et omnibus quæ possidebant” in Spain) to make peace “cum duce Richardo[1173].  The early 12th century Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that “sororem Raymundi Berengerii Stephaniam” married as her second husband “rex Hispaniæ Garsias[1174].  Based on this source, Jaime de Salazar Acha suggests that the widow of Roger [I] de Tosny was Estefanía who married García V King of Navarre[1175].  There are several reasons why this suggestion is unlikely to be correct.  Firstly, Roger [I]’s marriage is dated to [1017/20] according to Adémar de Chabannes as noted above.  If that date is correct, it is unlikely that his widow would have given birth to nine children by a second marriage, whose births are estimated between 1039 and 1054 (see the document NAVARRE KINGS).  Secondly, Estefanía is named with her husband King García in a charter dated 1040, her marriage probably being dated to a couple of years earlier, whereas Roger [I] is recorded in Normandy around the same time as noted above.  Thirdly, there are intrinsic problems associated with the Chronicon S. Petri Vivi Senonensis: the chronology of the whole passage, of which the reference to Roger’s marriage forms part, is flawed as explained earlier, and in addition Roger’s wife could not have been the sister of Ramon Berenguer [I] Comte de Barcelona (whose birth is dated to 1023, see the document CATALONIA) if his marriage is correctly dated to [1017/20].  Roger [I] & his wife had [three] children (it does not appear chronologically possible that, in addition, Berthe (who married Guy [I] Seigneur de Laval in [1010/15]) and her [two] brothers (see below) were also children of Roger [I]): 

a)         [ELBERT (-killed in battle [before 17 Jun] [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property, in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” whose son eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio[1176].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio...cum Rogerio de Toenio” fought “Rogerium de Bellomonte”, during the course of which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and “Rodbertus” mortally wounded[1177].  Assuming that these sources are accurate, there is no indication of the identity of the mother of Elbert and Elinand.  Their names are unusual, and not encountered either in the Tosny or Barcelona families, which may suggest that they were illegitimate.] 

b)         [ELINAND (-killed in battle [before 17 Jun] [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property, in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” whose son eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio[1178].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio...cum Rogerio de Toenio” fought “Rogerium de Bellomonte”, during the course of which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and “Rodbertus” mortally wounded[1179].  Assuming that these sources are accurate, there is no indication of the identity of the mother of Elbert and Elinand.  Their names are unusual, and not encountered either in the Tosny or Barcelona families, which may suggest that they were illegitimate.] 

c)         [VUASO .  “...Vuaso filius Rogerii Tothennensis...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][1180].  The name “Vuaso” (or similar) is not found in either the Tosny or Barcelona families, which may suggest that he was illegitimate.] 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and Roger [I] de Tosny is not known: 

 

1.         ANSGOT (-after [1057/58]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ansgotus Normannus...Rogerii Toenitis qui Hispanicus vocabatur cognatus” was leader of “xenodochium in confinio Baioariorum et Hunorum”, who had fought “sub ducibus Normannorum Ricardo et Rotberto” but had afterwards retired to lead a religious life, welcomed Thierry Abbot of Ouche who had left Normandy on pilgrimage to Jerusalem, dated to [1057/58][1181]

 

 

One of the most controversial issues regarding the Tosny family is whether there were two individuals named Roger de Tosny who were active during the first half of the 11th century.  Keats-Rohan raised the possibility that Roger de Tosny who travelled to Spain in [1018] (shown above as Roger [I]), was different from a younger Roger de Tosny (maybe nephew of Roger [I]) who founded Conches abbey (shown below as Roger [II])[1182].  The same theory has been espoused more recently by Jaime de Salazar Acha, although his main purpose is identifying the wife of Roger [I] as discussed above[1183].  The theory of two individuals is confirmed by the charter dated to [1040], quoted below, which is witnessed by both "Rodgerii filii Rodulfi" (assumed to be Roger [I]) and "Rogerii de Conchis" (Roger [II]).  The parentage of Roger [II] has not been ascertained, but presumably he was closely related to Roger [I].  The estimated birth date “[before 1038]” of Raoul [III], son of Roger [II] see below, suggests that Roger [II] was considerably younger than Roger [I] and therefore may have been nephew of the latter.  The fact that Roger [II] was ancestor of the later Tosny family is shown by two charters which record his descendants.  Firstly, Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the foundation by "Rogerius filius Radulphi Toteniensis" for the soul of "coniugis meæ Godehildis", by charter dated to [1130][1184].  Secondly, Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][1185]

 

1.         ROGER [II] de Tosny [Conches] (-[after 1040]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Toenio” founded “cœnobium Castellionis alias de Conchis[1186].  "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…Rogerii de Conchis" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[1187].  Roger’s place of burial is confirmed by the charter dated to [1130] under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior…", quoting the confirmation by "Radulphus de Totteneio cum Godehilde matre mea" for the burial of "patris mei Rogerii"[1188]m as her first husband, GODECHILDIS, daughter of ---.  Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the foundation by "Rogerius filius Radulphi Toteniensis" for the soul of "coniugis meæ Godehildis", dated to [1130][1189].  The Miracles of Sainte-Foy recount her being cured of a serious illness by miracle, when she was still married to her first husband[1190].  She married secondly Richard Comte d'Evreux.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes filius Roberti Archiepiscopi” married “uxore Rogerii de Toenia” by whom he had “Willelmum qui nunc Ebroicensibus principatur[1191].  Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Godehildis comitissa Ebroicæ civitatis, quondam uxor Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "seniore meo comite Richardo", dated to [1130][1192].  Roger [II] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         RAOUL [III] de Tosny ([before 1038]-24 Mar[1193] [1102], bur Conches Saint-Pierre).  “Radulphus de Tony cum Godehelde matre mea” donated property to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by undated charter[1194]

-        see below

b)         [ADELISE (-6 Oct ----, bur Abbaye de Lyre).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus...filius Osberni, propinquus ducis Willelmi” founded “duo monasteriain honorem...Mariæ unum apud Liram...alterum apud Cormelias”, adding that he buried “Adelinam filiam Rogerii de Toenio uxorem suam” at Lyre[1195].  There is no indication whether Roger [I] or Roger [II] de Tosny was the father of Adelise, or of the identity of her mother.  "Willelmo filio Osberni et…Ælicia eius uxore filia Rogeri de Thoneio" founded the abbey of Lyre by charter dated 1046[1196]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normanniæ dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis…Aelizam uxorem suam filiam Rogeri de Toeneio" was buried in the monastery of Lyre[1197]The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "6 Oct" of "Adeliz uxor Willelmi hujus loci fundatoris"[1198].  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "6 Oct" of "mater Willelmi Britolii Adeliza"[1199]m (before 1046) as his first wife, GUILLAUME FitzOsbern Seigneur de Breteuil, son of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d'Ivry (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Cormeilles).] 

c)         [ROBERT [III] de Tosny (-[1088], bur [Evesham Abbey])His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1130] under which Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Conches, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Octona" made by "Robertus de Stafort filius Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "filio meo Nicholao"[1200]Robert’s connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford[1201].  The chronology suggests that Robert’s father was Roger [II] de Tosny, although there is no indication of the identity of Robert’s mother.  Domesday Book records “Robert of Stafford” holding Denchworth in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire; “Robert de Tosny” holding Miswell in Tring Hundred and Barwythe in Danish Hundred in Hertfordshire; "Robert of Stafford" holding land in Oxfordshire; Stoneton in Northamptonshire [Warwickshire][1202].  The entries in Hertfordshire precede those which record the holdings of Raoul de Tosny in Hertfordshire, which suggests that they refer to the Robert Tosny/Stafford who was Raoul’s brother.  Lord of Stafford.]  

-        ENGLISH NOBILITY – STAFFORD

 

 

Brother and sister, and one possible additional brother, parents not known.  No primary source has yet been found which identifies the parents of these [three] siblings.  From a chronological point of view, they could have been the children of Raoul [II] de Tosny.  It appears chronologically unlikely that they were the children of Roger [I] de Tosny. 

 

1.         BERTHE .  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated [Sep/14 Oct] 1055 under which the monks of Marmoutier record the donations by "quemdam militem…Johannem pagi Cenomannensis indigenum, Widonis de Valle filium" of property "in Normannia, territorio Vilcassino…ecclesiam in villa…Guarniacus…juxta fluvium Eptæ" which "Wido pater eorum" accepted from "uxore sua Berta, Johannis et Haimonis matre"[1203].  Her connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the charter dated 1063 which records the consent given by "Rotbertum de Toeniaco, avunculum domni Johanni monachi nostri, filii Widonis de Valle" to the donations by the latter to Marmoutier, authorised by "Berengerius filius eius"[1204].  The remaining question is the identity of her father.  The date of her marriage is estimated from a charter dated 11 Nov 1039 in which her two grandsons are named (see MAINE for further details)[1205].  If this document is correctly dated (which is open to debate, as discussed further in MAINE), it is extremely unlikely for Berthe to have been the daughter of Roger [I] de Tosny [Conches].  m ([1010/15]) as his first wife, GUY [I] Seigneur de Laval, son of --- (-after 1064). 

2.         [BERENGER Hespina .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   His name suggests that he was the brother of Robert [II] de Tosny, whose son is also recorded with the name Berenger.  1050/1066.  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Lestingeham…Spaunton, in Kyrkeby-Misperton…in Dalby…in Skaldena…in Lyndesey in Bek…in Bynbruc” by “Berengerius de Todeneye[1206].]  [m ---.  The name of Berenger's wife is not known.  Berenger & his wife had one child:]

a)         [BERENGER de Tosny .  He is named in Europäische Stammtafeln[1207].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  It is possible that it results from confusion with Berenger, son of Robert [I] de Tosny.  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Finmara et…in Hunkleby et decimam suam de Dalton et juxta Chevermunt” by “Berengerius de Todenei[1208].  It is not possible to date the donations in this document.  It is not therefore known whether the donation was made by Berenger, son of Robert [I], or an otherwise unrecorded Berenger who may have been the son of Berenger Hespina.] 

3.         ROBERT [I] de Tosny (-[1088]).  His connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the charter dated 1063 which records the consent given by "Rotbertum de Toeniaco, avunculum domni Johanni monachi nostri, filii Widonis de Valle" to the donations by the latter to Marmoutier, authorised by "Berengerius filius eius"[1209].  “Robertum de Belvedeir---et A[dela]. uxor eius” founded Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1076][1210].  After the death of his wife Adela, Robert de Belvoir donated “land in Sapertune” to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "his sons William and Geoffrey"[1211].  Domesday Book records “Robert de Tosny” holding Great Rissington, Horton and Sapperton in Gloucestershire; several properties in Northamptonshire; properties in Leicestershire; North Dalton and Naburn in Yorkshire; numerous properties in Lincolnshire[1212]m ADELAIS, daughter of --- (-before 1088).  “Robertum de Belvedeir---et A[dela]. uxor eius” founded Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1076][1213].  “Agnes de Toteneio” confirmed the donation to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by "pater meus Robertus de Toteneio et mater mea Adelais", by undated charter[1214].  Robert [I] & his wife had six children: 

a)         BERENGER (-after 1086).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1063 which records the consent given by "Rotbertum de Toeniaco, avunculum domni Johanni monachi nostri, filii Widonis de Valle" to the donations by the latter to Marmoutier, authorised by "Berengerius filius eius"[1215].  Domesday Book records “Berengar de Tosny” holding land in Broughton and Horley, and "the same Berengar holds of Robert his father" in Bodicote, in Oxfordshire; "Berengar de Tosny" holding East Stoke, Syerston and land in Broadholme in Nottinghamshire; numerous properties in Yorkshire; West Allington in Lincolnshire[1216].  Berenger presumably died without direct heirs: many of the holdings which Domesday Book records in Lincolnshire in his and his father’s name were held in [1115/18] by his brother-in-law Robert de l’Isle (see below). 

b)         GUILLAUME .  After the death of his wife Adela, Robert de Belvoir donated “land in Sapertune” to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "his sons William and Geoffrey"[1217].  The brothers Guillaume and Geoffrey presumably died before [1115/18], when the Lindsay Survey records family properties in Lincolnshire held by their brother-in-law Robert de l’Isle. 

c)         GEOFFREY .  After the death of his wife Adela, Robert de Belvoir donated “land in Sapertune” to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "his sons William and Geoffrey"[1218].  The brothers Guillaume and Geoffrey presumably died before [1115/18], when the Lindsay Survey records family properties in Lincolnshire held by their brother-in-law Robert de l’Isle. 

d)         ALBREDA de Tosny (-before 1130).  “H comes Norfulc” confirmed property to the monks of Kirkstall, for the soul of “Albrede de Insula amite mee”, by charter dated to [1154/76][1219].  If amita is translated strictly in this document, Albreda was the sister of Earl Hugh’s mother, Alice de Tosny married to Roger Bigod (see below).  Her husband’s name, as well as her relationship with the Tosny family, are confirmed by the Lindsey Survey (quoted below) as her husband’s holdings were among those recorded in Domesday Book as held by Robert [I] de Tosny and his son Berenger in Lincolnshire[1220].  Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirmed possessions of Newhouse abbey, including "in Brodholm quicquid pertinet ad feudum Albrede de Tocnio", by charter dated to [1155/60][1221].  Albreda died before the taking of the 1129/30 Pipe Roll, presumably without surviving children, as her sister Adelise is there recorded in relation to their father’s land at Belvoir, Lincolnshire.  m ROBERT de l’Isle, son of --- (-after [1115/18]).  The Lindsey Survey, dated to [1115/18], records "Robert de l’Isle" holding land in Aisthorpe, South Carlton, Burton, Corringham, Bransby, Thorganby, Croxby, Binbrook, Orforth, Ludborough, and Fotherby[1222]

e)         ADELISE de Tosny (-after 1136[1223]).  Her parentage is indicated by the 1130 Pipe Roll which records "Adeliz uxor Rogi Big…tra patris sui de Belueder" in Lincolnshire[1224], which also indicates that Adelise succeeded her sister Albreda in the Belvoir estates of their father.  It is also indicated by the charter dated 23 Apr [1430] under which her descendant “Thomas dominus de Ros, de Hamelake, de Trussebout et de Beavoir” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire made by "antecessores nostros…Robertum de Toteneio, Willielmum de Toteneyo filium suum, Agnetem de Toteneio filiam dicti Roberti de Toteneyo, Henricum de Rya filium Huberto de Rya, Agnetem de Toteneyo, Willielmum de Albeneio primum, Willielmum de Albeneio secundum, Willielmum de Albeneio tertium, Willielmum de Albeneio quartum, Ywynum de Albeneyo, Heliam de Albeneyo et uxores eorundem, Isabellam filiam domini Willielmi de Albeneio quæ fuit uxor domini de Ros, domini de Beauvoire et de Hamelake"[1225], the connection between Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir, father of Adelise, being established through the marriage of her daughter Cecilia to William de Albini Brito.  "Rogerius Bigot…et uxoris mee Adalicie" donated the church of Thetford to Cluny dated [1100][1226].  “Rogerus Bygot” founded Thetford Priory, with the advice of “…uxoris meæ Adeliciæ”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[1227]m (before [1100]) as his second wife, ROGER Bigod, son of ROGER Bigod & his wife --- (-8 or 15 Sep 1107, bur Thetford[1228]). 

f)          AGNES de Tosny (-before 1127).  “Agnes de Toteneio” confirmed the donation to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by "pater meus Robertus de Toteneio et mater mea Adelais", by undated charter[1229].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of "decimas de Hokeringhe, de Swanetuna, de Depham, de Bukestuna, de Mercheshale" by "Hubertus de Ria…Agnes de Belfo uxor eius…cum Ricardo filio suo" to Holy Trinity, Norwich, at the request of "Henrici filii et heredis ipsorum", by charter dated to [1127][1230].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Henricus de Rya” confirmed the donations to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by "Roberti avi mei et Agnetis matris meæ"[1231]m firstly RALPH de Belfou [Beaufour], son of ---.  m secondly HUBERT [II] de Rie, son of HUBERT [I] de Rie & his wife --- (-before 1127).

 

 

RAOUL [III] de Tosny, son of ROGER [II] de Tosny & his wife Godechildis --- ([before 1038]-24 Mar [1102], bur Conches Saint-Pierre).  “Radulphus de Tony cum Godehelde matre mea” donated property to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by undated charter[1232].  His birth date is estimated from his active participation, as noted below, in the duke of Normandy’s war with the king of France in 1054, when he must at least have been a young adult.  According to Orderic Vitalis, he was "a man of the highest renown and knightly valour and was outstanding among the greatest nobles of Normandy for his wealth and honours"[1233].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume II Duke of Normandy sent “Radulfum de Toenia” as ambassador to meet Henri I King of France during their war[1234].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum records the war between “Henricus rex Francorum” and “Willelmi ducis Normannorum” in 1054, and records that “Rodulfus de Toenia...nuntium” reported the French king’s army’s defeat[1235].  Orderic also records that he "carried away by night" his uterine half-sister Agnes d'Evreux and gave her in marriage to Simon de Montfort, receiving in return Simon's daughter Isabel as his wife[1236].  Orderic Vitalis records disputes between his vassals and Duke Guillaume who exiled “milites Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio atque Ernaldum de Escalfoio”, dated to [1059/61][1237], the same source recording in a later passage that Duke Guillaume recalled “Rodulfum de Toenia et Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio”, dated to [1063][1238].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rodulphus de Conchis Rogerii Toenetis filius, Normannorum signifer...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[1239].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Galterius Giphardus et Radulphus Toenites...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[1240].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia qui fuit Normannorum famosus signifer”, wishing to leave “in Hispaniam”, donated property to Ouche in reparation of the damage he had previously done by supporting “Ernaldi de Excalfoio” in burning the place, and in particular donated “in Angliam...duos mansiones...in Nortfuc...Caldecota, alteram...in Wigornensi provincia...Alwintona[1241].  Odo Bishop of Bayeux bought "la terre de Chernet" from "Herberto de Agnellis", with the consent of "suo domino Radulfo de Conchis", by charter dated 30 Nov 1074[1242].  "Ralf de Conchis son of Roger de Toncio" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1080], witnessed by "Rogerus de Clara, Galterus de Hispannia, Guillelmus de Paceio, Robertus de Remileio, Geroldus Gastinellus, Gillebertus Toroldi filius, Rogerus de Mucegros, et Galterus de Calvo Monte"[1243].  Domesday Book records land held by “Ralph de Tosny” in Charlton in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire; Flamstead in Danish Hundred and Westmill in Braughing Hundred in Hertfordshire; Charingworth, Icomb, Bromsberrow, Harnhill, Ampney and Lower Swell in Gloucestershire; several properties in Worcestershire; the castle of Clifford and several other properties in Herefordshire[1244].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus” [Guillaume de Breteuil] gave “tria millia librarum” to “avunculo suo Radulpho” [Raoul [III] de Tosny] for his ransom as part of the peace settlement of the Evreux/Tosny war and appointed “Rogerium consobrinum suum Radulfi filium” as his heir[1245].  "Rodulfo de Conchis" consented to the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[1246].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “IX Kal Apr” of “Radulfus senex [=Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia]” and his burial “in cœnobio B. Petri Castellionis[1247].  Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the confirmation by "Radulphus de Totteneio cum Godehilde matre mea" for the burial of "patris mei Rogerii", dated to [1130][1248].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][1249]

m ISABELLE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury & his first wife Isabelle de Broyes.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia” kidnapped “Agnetem uterinam sororem suam, Ricardi Ebroicensium comitis filiam” by night and married her to “Simoni de Monteforti”, who in exchange granted “filiam eiusdem Simonis...Isabel” to Raoul[1250].  Her parentage is suggested by a charter dated 1160 under which Louis VII King of France confirmed donations to the abbey of Colombs near Nogent, including donations made by "Hugo Bardulfus castri Nouigenti…aliique eorum successores…Simon de Montisforti, et Radulfus iunior de Toneio et Rogerius filius eius…et Simon de Monteforti gener eius et successor"[1251].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Elizabeth...uxor et Rogerius atque Radulfus filii eius” consented to the donations to Ouche made by “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia...Normannorum...signifer[1252].  Dame de Nogent-le-Roi.  Orderic Vitalis records the bitter dispute between “Helvisa...comitissa” and “Isabelem de Conchis”, adding that Helvise was “solers...et facunda, sed atrox et avara” and that in war she rode armed like a knight, while Isabelle was “dapsilis et audax atque jocosa...amabilis et grata[1253].  After her husband died, Orderic Vitalis records that she repented "the mortal sin of luxury in which she had indulged in her youth" and became a nun at Haute-Bruyère[1254]

Raoul [III] & his wife had three children: 

1.         ROGER [III] de Tosny (-15 May [1093/95], bur Châtillon).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Elizabeth...uxor et Rogerius atque Radulfus filii eius” consented to the donations to Ouche made by “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia...Normannorum...signifer[1255].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus” [Guillaume de Breteuil] gave “tria millia librarum” to “avunculo suo Radulpho” [Raoul [III] de Tosny] for his ransom as part of the peace settlement of the Evreux/Tosny war and appointed “Rogerium consobrinum suum Radulfi filium” as his heir and that Guillaume Comte d’Evreux also named Roger as his heir[1256].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “Id Mai” of “Rogerius” [Roger [III] de Tosny] and his burial “Castellionis cum parentibus suis”, although it is difficult to identify the year from the context of the passage[1257]

2.         RAOUL [IV] de Tosny (-[1126], bur Conches Saint-Pierre).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Elizabeth...uxor et Rogerius atque Radulfus filii eius” consented to the donations to Ouche made by “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia...Normannorum...signifer[1258].  Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Radulphus junior filius Radulphi senioris de Totteneio", dated to [1130][1259].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][1260].  He succeeded his father in [1102] as Seigneur de Tosny.  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Radulfus senex [=Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia]”,  “Radulfus filius eius” succeeded in his father’s property[1261].  His date of death is calculated on the basis of Orderic Vitalis recording that, after the death of “Radulfus senex [=Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia]”, his son succeeded for about 24 years, adding that both were buried “in cœnobio B. Petri Castellionis[1262].  .  m (1103) ADELISA of Huntingdon, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1073/76]-after [1126]).  Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also gives her marriage and names her two sons and indicates she had "several daughters" without naming them[1263].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Alice younger daughter of Judith and "Rodolph de Tournay", her dowry being "the lordship of Wilchamstowe"[1264].  She inherited Walthamstow, Essex[1265].  “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiæ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “Hugonis de Toeni filii mei qui ibidem jacet sepultus…Radulphi de Toeni mariti mei…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiæ meæ Isabellæ", by undated charter[1266].  Raoul [IV] & his wife had [eight or more] children: 

a)         ROGER [IV] de Tosny ([1104]-after 29 Sep 1158).  Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris", dated to [1130][1267].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][1268].  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[1269]

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY - TOSNY

b)         HUGUES (-young, bur London Holy Trinity).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[1270].  “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiæ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “Hugonis de Toeni filii mei qui ibidem jacet sepultus…", by undated charter[1271]

c)         SIMON de Tosny .  “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiæ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiæ meæ Isabellæ", by undated charter[1272]

d)         ISABELLE de Tosny (-after [1158]).  “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiæ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiæ meæ Isabellæ", by undated charter[1273].  Isabel de Tosny widow of Walter FitzRichard donated property to Durnford, Wiltshire and to Salisbury Cathedral, confirmed by Henry II King of England by charter dated to before 1158.  m WALTER FitzRichard, son of [RICHARD Lord of Clare and Tonbridge & his wife Rohese Giffard (-1138)]. 

e)         several daughters .  Their parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who does not name them[1274]

f)          [MARGARET (-1185 or before).  Eyton highlights that Margaret, wife of Walter [I] de Clifford, "is said, with probability, to have brought him Clifford Castle in frank-marriage, she being a daughter of Ralph de Toni, Domesday Lord of that castle"[1275].  Eyton implies, but does not actually state, that there is no primary source which confirms that this supposed parentage of Margaret is correct.  He also says that "an equally probable account of the mode in which Clifford Castle left the sucession of the Toni is that Maud, wife of Richard fitz Ponce, was a daughter of Ralph de Toni".  The chronology is not particularly favourable for Margaret to have been Raoul [IV] de Tosny’s daughter.  Raoul’s children must have been born in the range [1104/15], given his marriage in 1103 and the narrow possible birth date range of his wife in [1073/76].  If Margaret was Raoul’s daughter, she would have been old when she died in or before 1185, and her husband even older when he died in 1190 assuming that he was about the same age as his wife.  Let us compare this assessment with the approximate dates which can be assessed for the children of Walter [I] and his wife.  Firstly, the couple’s grandson Walter [III] first appears in the records in 1208, presumably when he was a young adult, which would place his birth to [1180/90].  At that time, his father Walter [II] would have been over 40/50 years old if his maternal grandfather had been Raoul de Tosny.  Secondly, Walter [I]’s great-granddaughter, granddaughter of his daughter Lucy, was probably born in [1190/96]: she was reported an infant on her first marriage in 1197, and her father died in [1196].  This would place Lucy’s birth in [1140/50], which would be on the late side if her maternal grandfather had been Raoul de Tosny (although not impossibly late).  Thirdly, when these two cases are slotted together, it appears that Lucy was very likely older than her brother Walter [II].  If that is correct, the Tosny connection is even less likely, given her estimated birth date, if she was one of her parents’ older children.  Another point to make is the absence of compatible onomastics for a Tosny marriage: none of Walter [I]’s children received typical Tosny names (Raoul/Ralph, Roger, Isabel, Adelisa, Godechilde).  Walter [I]’s grandson was named Roger, but it is likely that he was named after his maternal grandfather (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY).  A last point of confusion is the reported marriage of Isabelle, another daughter of Raoul [IV] de Tosny, with another Walter FitzRichard (who is probably identified with the son of Richard Lord of Clare and Tonbridge, see above).  If Margaret had also been Raoul’s daughter, this would lead to the improbable (although not impossible) coincidence that two of his daughters married two different individuals with the same name.  In conclusion, the alleged Tosny connection of Walter [I] de Clifford remains something of a mystery but the proposed Tosny parentage of his wife Margaret does not appear to be the ideal explanation.  m WALTER FitzRichard de Clifford, son of RICHARD FitzPons & his wife Matilda --- (-1190).] 

g)         GODECHILDE de Tosny (-17 Oct after 1143).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Rogerus [comes] Warwic...fratrum suorum natus post ipsum...Robertus de Novoburgo” married “sororem Rogerii de Toenio filiam secundi Rodulfi Godechildem” by whom he had “plures filios...Henricum et fratres eius[1276].  According to Robert of Torigny[1277], this was the same Godechilde who married Baudouin de Boulogne King of Jerusalem, but he is clearly confusing her with her aunt of the same name who allegedly married Robert de Beaumont Comte de Meulan as her first husband[1278].  "Robert de Novoburgo" donated property to the abbey of Bec-Hellouin with the consent of his mother countess Margaret, his wife Godeheld and his sons Henry and Ralf, by charter dated 1143[1279]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "17 Oct" of "Godeheut uxor domini Roberti de Novo Burgo"[1280]m ROBERT de Neufbourg, son of HENRY de Beaumont Earl of Warwick & his wife Marguerite du Perche (-30 Aug [or 12 Sep] 1159). 

3.         GODECHILDE de Tosny (-Germanicea, Cilicia Oct 1097[1281]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Godehildem” as the daughter of “Radulfus...de Conchis filius Rogerii de Toenia” and his wife “filiam...Simonis [de Montefort]...Isabel”, recording that she married firstly “Rodberto...Mellentensium comiti” and secondly “Balduino filio Boloniensium consulis Eustachii[1282].  According to the Complete Peerage[1283], her first marriage is "highly improbable" as Godechilde was still a young girl when she married Baudouin de Boulogne in 1096, although it cannot be dismissed entirely as infant marriages were by no means unknown at the time.  Orderic Vitalis makes no mention of any annulment of her alleged first marriage: it is possible that it went no further than a contract of betrothal.  She left with her husband on crusade in 1096.  Albert of Aix records that Kálmán King of Hungary demanded "Baldewinum fratrem ipsius ducis…uxorem quoque familiam eius" as hostages while the crusading army crossed through Hungary[1284].  William of Tyre records the death of "Gutueram" wife of Baudouin Count of Edessa at Maresia, and her burial there[1285].  Albert of Aix records the death "in regione Meresc" of "uxor Baldewini…quam de regno Angliæ ortam eduxit…Godwera" and her burial there, dated to late 1097 from the context[1286].  [m firstly as his first wife, ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger, son of ROGER de Vieilles Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger & his wife Adeline de Meulan ([1046]-5 or 6 Jun 1118, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).]  m [secondly] ([1090/1096]) as his second wife, BAUDOUIN de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE II Comte de Boulogne & his second wife Ida of Lower Lotharingia (-Al-Arish 2 Apr 1118, bur Jerusalem, Church of the Holy Sepulchre).  He was chosen in 1100 to succeeded as BAUDOUIN I King of Jerusalem

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de VERNON, SEIGNEURS de REVIERS

 

 

Vernon is a commune within the present-day French département of Eure, arrondissement Evreux, while Reviers is a commune in the département of Calvados, canton de Creully[1287].  Guillaume de Poitou’s Gesta Guillelmi Ducis records that Wido filius Burgundionum comitis Raginaldi” held “castra Brionium et Vernonium” from Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[1288].  As Guy de Bourgogne was defeated by Duke Guillaume in 1047, the grant of Vernon castle must have been made in the early to mid-1040s, and was presumably revoked after this defeat. 

 

 

1.         OSMOND de Centville (-[after Aug 1027]).  Vicomte [de Vernon].  Guillaume of Jumièges names him “Osmundo de Centum-villis vicecomiti Vernonii” when recording his marriage (see below).  However, it is far from that in the early 11th century vicomtes in Normandy were referred to by a territorial appellation.  “Richardus vicecomes, Nigellus vicecomes, Alvredus vicecomes, Tustingus vicecomes, Vualterius vicecomes, Odo vicecomes, Sciricus vicecomes, Vuimondus vicecomes, Gofridus vicecomes, Goscelinus vicecomes, Osmundus vicecomes, Goscelinus vicecomes...” witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which “Richardus Normannorum dux” donated property to Bernay abbey[1289].  The immense number of witnesses suggests that this document is spurious in some way.  m ---, niece of Gunnora mistress of Richard I Comte [de Normandie], daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quarta” married “Osmundo de Centum-villis vicecomiti Vernonii” by whom she had “primus Fulco de Aneio, plures filiæ, quarum una mater fuit primi Balduini de Reuers” [although the latter part at least of this passage is contradicted by other primary sources][1290].  Osmond & his wife had children: 

a)         FOULQUES d’Anet .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quarta” married “Osmundo de Centum-villis vicecomiti Vernonii” by whom she had “primus Fulco de Aneio...[1291].  King Henry II confirmed the property of Bec abbey, including the donation of “manerium de Mesnillo-Simonis” made by “Fulconis de Aneto”, by undated charter[1292]

b)         ALBREDA (-before 1082, bur Guillon).  King William I confirmed the property of Caen Sainte-Trinité, including the donation of “terram quam pater suus dederat in villa...Guillon” made by “Alberada soror Fulconis...annuente eodem Fulcone” (adding that he buried his sister “illius loci...in atrio”), by charter dated 1082[1293].  King Henry II confirmed the property of Bec abbey, including the donation of “manerium de Mesnillo-Simonis” made by “Fulconis de Aneto” and of “terram de Groselers...juxta Landam sita” made by “Albredæ sororis eiusdem Fulconis”, by undated charter[1294]

c)         [GUNNORA .  Stapleton says that “Gunnora, the mother of William de Briouze, was apparently another daughter of the same parentage of Alberada” (named above) but he provides no basis for his statement or other explanation[1295]Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Gonnor matris Willelmi de Breosa" of land "in Bavent…et…in Rovres et in Cierneio et in Craissanvilla et in Quatrepuiz", by charter dated to [1180/82][1296]m --- [de Briouse], son of ---.] 

d)         daughters .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quarta” married “Osmundo de Centum-villis vicecomiti Vernonii” by whom she had “primus Fulco de Aneio, plures filiæ, quarum una mater fuit primi Balduini de Reuers” [although the latter part at least of this passage is contradicted by other primary sources, see ENGLISH UNTITLED NOBILITY - VERNON][1297]

 

 

HUGUES de Vernon, son of --- (-[1063/66]).  A charter confirms that "Guillelmus de Vernono cum patre suo…Hugone, Sancti Wandregisili monacho" sold land "apud Martinvillam" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in 1053, with the consent of "Willelmo Normannorum consule", signed by "Willelmi comitis, Mathildis comitissæ, Hugonis Vernonensis, Willelmi filii eius, Ricardi filii Gisleberti comitis…"[1298].  He is named father of "Willelmus Vernonensis" in the latter's charter dated 1066[1299].  It is assumed that Hugues died before the date of this latter charter, although the document does not mention this: as the earlier charter specifies that he was a monk the omission of this fact from the latter would be surprising if he had still been alive. 

m ---.  The name of Hugues's wife is not known. 

Hugues & his wife had two children: 

1.         RABER de Vernon (-after 29 Aug 1060).  "…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[1300]

2.         GUILLAUME de Vernon (-[4 Jun ----]).  A charter confirms that "Guillelmus de Vernono cum patre suo…Hugone, Sancti Wandregisili monacho" sold land "apud Martinvillam" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in 1053, with the consent of "Willelmo Normannorum consule", signed by "Willelmi comitis, Mathildis comitissæ, Hugonis Vernonensis, Willelmi filii eius, Ricardi filii Gisleberti comitis…"[1301].  "…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[1302].  "Willelmus Vernonensis filius Hugonis eiusque conjux Emma" donated property at "castrum Vernonense" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo rege Anglorum et duce Normannorum", by undated charter[1303].  "Willelmi Vernonensi" witnessed the undated charter of "Emma mulier de Longa Villa"[1304].  Guillaume de Vernon, his son Hugues and his wife Emma donated property to Rouen Holy Trinity, confirmed in the charter dated to [1067][1305].  [The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "4 Jun" of "Guillelmus de Reveriis senex"[1306].]  m EMMA, daughter of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d'Ivry .  "Willelmus Vernonensis filius Hugonis eiusque conjux Emma" donated property at "castrum Vernonense" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo rege Anglorum et duce Normannorum", by undated charter[1307].  Guillaume de Vernon, his son Hugues and his wife Emma donated property to Rouen Holy Trinity, confirmed in the charter dated to [1067][1308].  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter of Carisbrooke Priory, Isle of Wight which names “Johannem et Ricardum” as the two sons of “Willielmum filium Osberni marescallum…comitem Herefordiæ” who predeceased their father, and records that their inheritance went to “Ricardo de Rivers, nepoti prædicti Willielmi filii Osberni, tunc comiti Exoniæ[1309].  Guillaume & his wife had [four] children:

a)         RICHARD de Reviers (-8 Sep 1107, bur Abbey de Montebourg[1310]).  His parentage is surmised by the references to his supposed brother Hugues and the latter's parents.  Seigneur de Reviers, de Vernon et de Néhou in Normandy. 

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY - VERNON

b)         HUGUES de Reviers (-after 1089).  Guillaume de Vernon, his son Hugues and his wife Emma donated property to Rouen Holy Trinity, confirmed in the charter dated to [1067][1311].  He is assumed to be the same person as "Hugues" uncle of Baldwin de Reviers Earl of Devon named in a charter of King Henry I to the canons of Breamore[1312].  "…Hugo de Vernon…" witnessed the charter dated 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy confirmed the restoration of the monastery of Saint-Vigor near Bayeux[1313]

c)         [GAUTHIER de Vernon (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Walter de Vernon” holding Willington, Ness, Ledsham and Prenton in Cheshire[1314].  His parentage has not been ascertained.  However, he held property in Cheshire near Richard de Vernon, which suggests a family connection.  Maybe they were brothers.] 

d)         ADELISA [Alice] de ReviersThe primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Her husband's grant of land to Montebourg abbey was confirmed by her brother Richard de Reviers[1315]m as his first wife, RICHARD de Angerville, son of ---. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    MEULAN

 

 

A.      COMTES de MEULAN

 

 

The county of Meulan developed outside Norman territory in the Vexin near Paris.  The counts became vassals of the Norman dukes by the end of the 11th century, presumably in respect of territories granted to them in Normandy itself.  Meulan may have been an important fortification prior to that time, as Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Rollo" captured “Mellenti municipium” after defeating “Rainaldus totius Franciæ dux” at the river Eure[1316], maybe dateable to [900]. 

 

 

1.         GALERAN [I] [de Chartres], son of --- (-11 Nov before [985/87])Comte de Meulanm (after Oct 947) as her second husband, LIEGARDIS Ctss de Meulan et de Mantes, widow of RAOUL [II] Comte de Cambrai, daughter of --- (-12 Nov [990/91]).  "Liutgarde veuve du comte Raoul" donated property to Saint-Cyr de Nevers by charter dated Oct 947[1317].  The primary source which confirms her title and second marriage has not yet been identified.  Galéran [I] & his wife had one child: 

a)         GALERAN [II] de Meulan (-10 Apr ----).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Comte de Meulan.  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death "IV Id Apr" of "secundus Galerannus comes Mellenti benefactor noster"[1318]m ---.  The name of Galéran's wife is not known.  Galéran [II] & his wife had three children: 

i)          HUGUES [I] de Meulan (-after 25 Aug 1005).  "…Hugo filius Waleranni comitis" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1319]Comte de Meulan 998.  m --- de Valois, daughter of GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc" Comte d'Amiens, de Mantes, de Valois et du Vexin & his wife Adela ---.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "Waleranni comitis [Mellentini]" as daughter of "Gauterus Albus de Albamarla"[1320].  Yves de Chartres names "Gualterius Albus" as father of "matrem Gualeranni comitis"[1321].  Hugues & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       GALERAN [III] de Meulan (-8 Dec 1069)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Waleranni comitis [Mellentini]" as son of "filia Gauterus Albus de Albamarla"[1322]Comte de Meulan

-         see below

(b)       [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are suggested by the charter dated 1066 under which [her son] "Richardus Herluini filius, comitis Galerani Mellenti nepos" donated property to Coulombs, for the love of "fratris mei Roberti predictæ ecclesiæ abbatis, ac etiam…amitæ meæ Helvisæ reclusæ", by charter dated "apud Meullentum castrum" 1066[1323].  This assumes that the word "nepos" in this document can be interpreted in its strict sense of nephew.  m HILDUIN Vicomte [de Meulan], son of HUGUES Vicomte [de Meulan] & his wife --- (-[after 1061]).] 

ii)         LAMBERT de Meulan .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

iii)        EMMA de Meulan .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

 

 

GALERAN [III] de Meulan, son of HUGUES [I] Comte de Meulan & his wife --- de Valois (-8 Dec 1069)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Waleranni comitis [Mellentini]" as son of "filia Gauterus Albus de Albamarla"[1324].  Yves de Chartres names "Gualterius Albus" as father of "matrem Gualeranni comitis"[1325]Comte de Meulan.  Guillaume of Jumièges recounts that "comitibus Hugone...Cenomanensi ac Waleranno Mellendesi" were among those who joined the army of Eudes Comte de Blois in attempting to capture the château de Tillières {Verneuil, Eure} from Richard II Duke of Normandy, and that Hugues escaped after hiding in a sheep's stable and disguising himself as a shepherd before regaining Le Mans, an event dated to the early 1000s[1326].  "Gualerannus, Mellentis castri comes" donated a family of servants to "Sancti Petri Gisecii…Carnotensis", by undated charter, signed by "Gualeranni comitis, Hugonis primogeniti, coniugis Adelidis, Gualeranni filii, Fulcoisi filii, Teduini vicecomitis…"[1327].  “…Walterius comes Pontisariensis, Willelmus comes Corboilensis, Ivo comes Bellomontensis, Walerannus comes Melledensis” are named among those present at the opening of the reliquary of Saint-Denis, dated 9 Jun 1053[1328]

m firstly (before 1015) ODA, daughter of ---.  “Hugo comes Mellenti” founded the monastery of St Cosmus and St Damian, for the souls of “conjugis…Adelidis…genitoris mei comitis Galeranni atque Odæ genetricis meæ”, by charter dated 1067[1329].  1030. 

m secondly ADELAIS, daughter of --- (-31 May ----).  She had previously been his concubine.  "Vualeranni comitis, Hugonis filii eius, Adilais uxoris eius" subscribed a charter dated to before 1031 recording a donation to Jumièges[1330].  1031/36, 1066.  "Gualerannus, Mellentis castri comes" donated a family of servants to "Sancti Petri Gisecii…Carnotensis", by undated charter, signed by "Gualeranni comitis, Hugonis primogeniti, coniugis Adelidis, Gualeranni filii, Fulcoisi filii, Teduini vicecomitis…"[1331]

Galéran [III] & his first wife had two children: 

1.         HUGUES [III] de Meulan (-15 Oct 1081).  "Vualeranni comitis, Hugonis filii eius, Adilais uxoris eius" subscribed a charter dated to before 1031 recording a donation to Jumièges[1332].  He is named as the brother-in-law of Roger de Beaumont by Orderic Vitalis[1333].  "Gualerannus, Mellentis castri comes" donated a family of servants to "Sancti Petri Gisecii…Carnotensis", by undated charter, signed by "Gualeranni comitis, Hugonis primogeniti, coniugis Adelidis, Gualeranni filii, Fulcoisi filii, Teduini vicecomitis…"[1334]Comte de Meulan.  The charter dated Oct 1056 under which "Mellendis castelli comes Hugo natus patre Waleranno" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[1335] shows that he succeeded as comte well before his father's death, assuming that this charter is correctly dated and that Waléran's date of death is as shown above.  “Hugo comes Mellenti” founded the monastery of St Cosmus and St Damian, for the souls of “conjugis…Adelidis…genitoris mei comitis Galeranni atque Odæ genetricis meæ”, by charter dated 1067[1336]"Hugo comes Mellenti" donated the church of St Cosme to Coulombs, for the souls of "conjugis nostræ Adelaidis…genitoris mei comitis Galerani et Odæ genitricis meæ", by charter dated 1069, witnessed by "…Richardi filii Herluini"[1337]He became a monk at Bec before 1081.  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death "Id Oct" of "Hugo comes Mellenti"[1338]m ADELAIS, daughter of ---(-after 1069).  “Hugo comes Mellenti” founded the monastery of St Cosmus and St Damian, for the souls of “conjugis…Adelidis…genitoris mei comitis Galeranni atque Odæ genetricis meæ”, by charter dated 1067[1339]"Hugo comes Mellenti" donated the church of St Cosme to Coulombs, for the souls of "conjugis nostræ Adelaidis…genitoris mei comitis Galerani et Odæ genitricis meæ", by charter dated 1069[1340]

2.         ADELINE de Meulan (-8 Apr 1081, bur Abbaye du Bec).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites”, and that Roger succeeded “post Hugonem avunculum suum comes Mellentis[1341].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” was “gener Gualeranni comitis Mellentici et Hugonius sororius[1342]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to "matrem Roberti comitis Mellentini" as daughter of "Waleranni comitis [Mellentini]"[1343].  Yves de Chartres names "Gualterius Albus" as father of "matrem Gualeranni comitis" and adds that the latter was the father of "matrem Roberti comitis"[1344].  Her son inherited Meulan from her brother Hugues Comte de Meulan.  Robert count of Mellent donated property to St Pierre, Préaux for the souls of his parents Roger de Bellomonte and Adelina his wife, by charter dated to [1099][1345]m ROGER de Beaumont-le-Roger Seigneur de Beaumont et de Pont-Audemer, son of HONFROI de Vieilles & his wife Aubreye --- (-29 Nov 1094, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).  He contributed 60 ships to the fleet of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy which invaded England in 1066[1346]

Galéran [III] & his [first/second] wife had [two] children:

3.         DODA de Meulan .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus de Molinis…marchioni" married secondly "Dudam filiam Gualeranni de Mellento"[1347]m as his second wife, GUILLAUME Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, son of GAUTHIER de Falaise & his wife --- (-19 Oct [1100], bur Saint-Evroul[1348]). 

4.         [--- .  The parentage of this person is indicated by the Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ which records that "Willermus, nobili Normannorum prosapia originem...in...castro super Rislam...Monsfortis...pater eius Turstinus, mater...Albereda...Rogerii de Bello Monte patris Roberti comitis Mellenti ex uxore neptis" succeeded as third abbot of Bec[1349].  It is not known whether he/she was the same person as one of the other brothers or sisters of Adeline who are named in this section.]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         ALBREDA .  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ which records that "Willermus, nobili Normannorum prosapia originem...in...castro super Rislam...Monsfortis...pater eius Turstinus, mater...Albereda...Rogerii de Bello Monte patris Roberti comitis Mellenti ex uxore neptis" succeeded as third abbot of Bec[1350]m THURSTAN de Montfort-sur-Risle, son of [HUGUES [I] Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle & his wife ---]. 

Galéran [III] & his second wife had two children: 

5.         GALERAN de Meulan .  "Gualerannus, Mellentis castri comes" donated a family of servants to "Sancti Petri Gisecii…Carnotensis", by undated charter, signed by "Gualeranni comitis, Hugonis primogeniti, coniugis Adelidis, Gualeranni filii, Fulcoisi filii, Teduini vicecomitis…"[1351].  1066.  He left descendants, extinct in the male line in 13th century[1352]

6.         FOULQUES de Meulan .  "Gualerannus, Mellentis castri comes" donated a family of servants to "Sancti Petri Gisecii…Carnotensis", by undated charter, signed by "Gualeranni comitis, Hugonis primogeniti, coniugis Adelidis, Gualeranni filii, Fulcoisi filii, Teduini vicecomitis…"[1353]

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de MEULAN, SEIGNEURS de BEAUMONT-le-ROGER

 

 

ROGER de Vieilles "Barbatus" [de Beaumont], son of HONFROI Seigneur de Vieilles & his wife Aubrey --- (-29 Nov 1094, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).  "…Humfridus constructor eiusdem loci cum filiis suis Rogerio, Roberto, Willelmo…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1354].  As "Roger of Beaumont", he is named as the son of Honfroy de Vieilles by Orderic Vitalis[1355].  "…Rogerius filius Hunfredi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1042] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli"[1356].  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Humfridum de Vetulis” as father of “Rogeri de Bellomonte, ex quo comites de Warwike et Leicestriæ[1357].  He built the castle of Beaumont-le-Roger on the hill above Vieilles[1358].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” was “totius Normanniæ signifer“ rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” who sent “Rogerium de Bellomonti filium suum” against Roger and killed him[1359].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rogerius de Bellomonte et Rogerius de Monte-Gomerici...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[1360].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rogero de Beaumont" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[1361].  He remained in Normandy as adviser to Duchess Mathilde during the conquest[1362].  Robert son of Humphrey consented to a donation to St Pierre, Préaux, by charter dated to the reign of William I King of England[1363].  "…Rotgerius de Bello monte, Hainricus filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1364].  He witnessed charters of William I King of England until 1082[1365].  “Rogerius et filii mei Robertus et Henricus” donated “decimam tocius Brotonie” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated 13 Jan 1086[1366].  Domesday Book records “Roger de Beaumont” holding Stour Provost, Sturminster, Creech, Steeple, Church Knowle and Afflington in Dorset[1367].  He obtained the fiefdom of Brionne from Robert Duke of Normandy after surrendering the castellanship of Ivry[1368].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius...de Bellomonte filius Humfridi de Vetulis” founded “in fundo suo Pratellis duo cœnobia...unum monachorum alterum sanctimonialium[1369].  "Rogerus de Bellomonte" founded la Sainte-Trinité de Beaumont-le-Roger, with the consent of "liberis meis Roberto comite Mellentensi et Henrico comite de Warwic", by charter dated [1088/89][1370].  Orderic Vitalis records that he became a monk at Saint-Pierre de Préaux, dated to after 1090, where he was buried[1371]

m ADELINE de Meulan, daughter of GALERAN [III] Comte de Meulan & his first wife Ode --- (-8 Apr 1081, bur abbaye du Bec).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites”, and that Robert succeeded “post Hugonem avunculum suum comes Mellentis[1372].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” was “gener Gualeranni comitis Mellentici et Hugonius sororius[1373]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to "matrem Roberti comitis Mellentini" as daughter of "Waleranni comitis [Mellentini]"[1374].  Yves de Chartres names "Gualterius Albus" as father of "matrem Gualeranni comitis" and adds that the latter was the father of "matrem Roberti comitis"[1375].  Her son inherited Meulan from her brother Hugues Comte de Meulan.  Robert count of Mellent donated property to St Pierre, Préaux for the souls of his parents Roger de Bellomonte and Adelina his wife, by charter dated to [1099][1376]

Roger & his wife had three children:

1.         ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger ([1046]-5 or 6 Jun 1118, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites”, and that Robert succeeded “post Hugonem avunculum suum comes Mellentis[1377].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Henricum” as the heirs of “Rogerius...de Bellomonte”, adding that Robert inherited “comitatum de Mellento in pago Vilcasino hereditario jure post Hugonem Adelinæ matris suæ fratrem” and possessed “in Anglia comitatum Legecestriæ” which he was granted by King Henry I[1378].  He succeeded his mother's family in 1081 as Comte de Meulan.  He succeeded his father in [1090] as Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger, de Vieilles et de Pont-Audemer.  

-        see below

2.         HENRY de Beaumont ([1048]-[20 Jun] 1119, bur Préaux).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites” and that Henry received “comitatum Warwik” from “Willelmi regis in Anglia[1379].  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England constructed “castrum apud Guarevicum” [Warwick] and entrusted it to “Henrico Rogerii de Bellomonte filio”, dated to 1068[1380].  "…Rotgerius de Bello monte, Hainricus filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1381]

-        EARLS of WARWICK

3.         AUBREY de Beaumont (-1112).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbess of St Léger-de-Préaux, later Abbess of Eton[1382]

 

 

ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger, son of ROGER de Vieilles Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger & his wife Adeline de Meulan ([1046]-5 or 6 Jun 1118, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre[1383]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites”, and that Robert succeeded “post Hugonem avunculum suum comes Mellentis[1384].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rodbertus tiro Rogerii de Bellomonte filius...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[1385].  He was rewarded by William I King of England with the grant of lands, mainly in Warwickshire and Leicestershire.  He succeeded his mother's family in 1081 as Comte de Meulan.  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Henricum” as the heirs of “Rogerius...de Bellomonte”, adding that Robert inherited “comitatum de Mellento in pago Vilcasino hereditario jure post Hugonem Adelinæ matris suæ fratrem” and possessed “in Anglia comitatum Legecestriæ” which he was granted by King Henry I[1386].  “Rogerius et filii mei Robertus et Henricus” donated “decimam tocius Brotonie” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated 13 Jan 1086[1387].  Domesday Book records “the count of Meulan” holding numerous properties in Warwickshire[1388].  "Rogerus de Bellomonte" founded la Sainte-Trinité de Beaumont-le-Roger, with the consent of "liberis meis Roberto comite Mellentensi et Henrico comite de Warwic", by charter dated [1088/89][1389].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus comes Mellenti” demanded “arcem Ibreii” from Duke Robert who said that he had given “Brioniam...castrum” to Robert’s father in exchange for Ivry, that the duke imprisoned Robert and entrusted Brionne to “Rodberto Balduini filio”, dated to [1090][1390].  He succeeded his father in [1090] as Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger, de Vieilles et de Pont-Audemer.  In [before 1094], he was imprisoned by Robert III Duke of Normandy after challenging the exchange of Ivry for Brionne agreed by his father, the Duke confiscating Brionne.  He was released after the intervention of his father, and Brionne was restored to his father after being recaptured[1391].  He was granted the town of Leicester