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champagne nobility

SENS & joigny

 

v4.1 Updated 20 November 2017

 

RETURN TO INDEX

 

RETURN TO CHAMPAGNE NOBILITY INTRODUCTION

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                SENS. 2

A.         COMTES de SENS 817-882. 2

B.         VICOMTES et COMTES de SENS [882]-1015. 3

C.        VICOMTES de SENS.. 9

Chapter 2.                NOBILITY in SENS. 12

A.         SEIGNEURS de COURTENAY.. 12

B.         SEIGNEURS de COURTENAY 1161-1303 (CAPET) 33

C.        SEIGNEURS de CHAMPIGNELLES (CAPET-COURTENAY) 38

Chapter 3.                JOIGNY. 49

A.         COMTES de JOIGNY.. 49

B.         COMTES de JOIGNY (NOYERS) 61

C.        COMTES de JOIGNY (LA TREMOÏLLE, CHALON) 63

D.        VICOMTES de JOIGNY.. 64

Chapter 4.                NOBILITY in JOIGNY. 66

A.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-FLORENTIN.. 66

 

 

 

The counties of Sens and Joigny were located west of Troyes, east of Gâtinais and Melun, and north of Auxerre, in the south-western part of the medieval county of Champagne.  They evolved in the pagus Senonicus which straddled the river Yonne, from its confluence with the Seine in the north and with the Armançon and Serein in the south, and was centred on the archiepiscopal city of Sens. 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    SENS

 

 

Sens is situated west of Troyes in the present-day French département of Yonne.  It lay within the pagus Senonicus, the largest of the five pagi within the archiepiscopal province of Sens[1].  Comtes de Sens are recorded in primary sources from the early 9th century until 1015 when the county became part of the domaine royale of the Capetian kings. 

 

 

 

A.      COMTES de SENS 817-882

 

 

1.         ARNOUL, illegitimate son of Emperor LOUIS I & his mistress --- ([794]-after [Mar/Apr] 841).  The Chronicon Moissacense names "quartum…filium [Ludovici]…ex concubina…Arnulfum" recording that his father gave him the county of Sens[2]Comte de Sens 817.   He was a supporter of his half-brother Emperor Lothaire in [Mar/Apr] 841[3]

 

 

1.         RUDOLF [I], son of WELF [I] Graf in Swabia & his wife Heilwig --- (-15 Oct 866).  Thegan names (in order) "Chuonradum et Ruodolfum" brothers of Empress Judith[4].  He was given the abbeys of Saint-Riquier and Jumièges, through the influence of his sister Empress Judith.  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Rodolphe…du sang imperial…oncle du glorieux roi Charles" succeeded abbé Louis as lay abbot of Saint-Riquier[5].  He and his brother Conrad were forcibly tonsured in [Apr 830] by their sister's stepson, Lothar, then in revolt against his father, and sent to Aquitaine "to be held by Pepin"[6].  The Annales Alamannicorum record "Hruodolfus frater Iudith Augustæ" among those who swore allegiance in 864[7]Comte de Sens.  The Annales Bertiniani record the death in 866 of "Rodulfus Karoli regis avunculus"[8].  The Adonis Continuatio records the death in 866 of "avunculus quoque eius [Carolo, Ludovici filii"] Radulfus, consiliarius primusque palatii"[9].  Two contemporary Epitafia commemorate "nobilis…Rhuodulfus", the second recording his death "Idus octavo"[10]m HRUODUN, daughter of --- (-after 867).  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  Comte Rudolf [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         CONRAD (-882, bur Sens, Sainte-Colombe).  Comte de Paris, Comte de Sens.  The Chronicon Senonensi records that "Conradus comes, germanus eius [Guelphem]" succeeded his brother in 881 but died the same year and was buried in the same place[11]

b)         WELF (-881, bur Sens, Sainte-Colombe).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Guelfon…du sang royal" succeeded Helgaud as lay abbot of Saint-Riquier[12].  Abbot of Sainte-Colombe-de-Sens.  The Chronicon Senonensi records the death of "abbas hujus Monasterii Guelpho ex prosapia regali" in 881 and his burial "in Basilica S. Columbæ"[13]

c)         HUGO .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Rector of Saint-Saulve Valenciennes in 867. 

d)         RUDOLF [II] .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf in Augstgau.

 

 

 

B.      VICOMTES et COMTES de SENS [882]-1015

 

 

1.         WARNER [Garnier], son of --- (-killed in battle 6 Dec 924)Vicomte de Sens.  Comte de Troyes 895/96.  The Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that "Warnerius vicecomes Senonum" was killed fighting "Paganos in monte Chalo…8 Id Dec [924]"[14]m TEUTBERGA d'Arles, daughter of THIBAUT Comte d'Arles & his wife Berta of Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([880/90][15]-before Sep 948).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  She is named "matris mee Theotberg" in the Sep 948 donation to Cluny of her son "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" made for her soul[16], presumably indicating that she was then deceased.  Warner & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         HUGUES de Troyes ([900/05]-before 948).  "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" names his brothers "pro anima fratrum meorum Hugonis, Richard et Bosonis" in his Sep 948 donation to Cluny for their souls[17], presumably indicating that all three were then deceased.  His birth date range is estimated from the estimated birth date range of his mother, and the fact that he was the father of two sons in 927.  [Comte Palatin de Bourgogne 927.]  "Hugo comes et coniux mea Wila necnon et filius eius Boso" donated property to Montiéramey by charter dated Apr [927], signed by "Hugonis comitis, Wilæ uxoris eius, Bosonis filii eius, Warnerii ipsorum filii"[18]m firstly ---.  The name of Hugues’s first wife is not known but her existence is confirmed by the charter of her husband dated Apr [927] (quoted above) which distinguishes the parentage of his two sons, his son Boso being born from this first marriage.  m secondly (before 927) WILLA, daughter of [LUDWIG of Burgundy [Kingdom] & his wife ---] ([905/07]-[967/86] or after)  The Vita of archbishop Thibaut names "coniugem…Burgundionis regis nepotem…Wiltermam" as wife of Hugues and mother of the archbishop[19].  Her name indicates that, assuming that this source correctly records her relationship to the kings of Burgundy, she was almost certainly a descendant of King Rudolf I & his wife of the same name.  If this is correct, "neptis" could be interpreted either as granddaughter (in relation to King Rudolf I) or as niece (in relation to King Rudolf II).  Chronologically this is also consistent with her estimated birth date range, based on the birth of her two children before 927 and her husband's own estimated birth date range.  In either case, she must have been the daughter of Ludwig of Burgundy or of one of his sisters.  Both of Ludwig's known or supposed sisters are excluded as they are each already recorded as having a daughter named Willa, neither of whom could have been the husband of Hugues de Troyes.  It is of course possible that Willa, wife of Hugues, was the daughter of another sister who is unrecorded elsewhere.  "Hugo comes et coniux mea Wila necnon et filius eius Boso" donated property to Montiéramey by charter dated Apr [927], signed by "Hugonis comitis, Wilæ uxoris eius, Bosonis filii eius, Warnerii ipsorum filii"[20].  "Willa comitissa" donated "alodum situm in pago Belnense" to Montiéramey, for the soul of "senioris mei Hugonis, memor filiorum nostrorum Theutboldi archiepiscopi et Hucberti seu Warnerii defuncti", by charter dated to [970/86], subscribed by "Theutboldi archiepiscopi, Huberti comitis…Adeleidæ comitissæ…Eriberti comitis…"[21].  Hugues & his first wife had one child: 

i)          BOSO de Troyes (-after Apr [927]).  "Hugo comes et coniux mea Wila necnon et filius eius Boso" donated property to Montiéramey by charter dated Apr [927], signed by "Hugonis comitis, Wilæ uxoris eius, Bosonis filii eius, Warnerii ipsorum filii"[22]

Hugues & his second wife had three children: 

ii)         GARNIER de Troyes .  "Hugo comes et coniux mea Wila necnon et filius eius Boso" donated property to Montiéramey by charter dated Apr [927], signed by "Hugonis comitis, Wilæ uxoris eius, Bosonis filii eius, Warnerii ipsorum filii"[23].  "Willa comitissa" donated "alodum situm in pago Belnense" to Montiéramey, for the soul of "senioris mei Hugonis, memor filiorum nostrorum Theutboldi archiepiscopi et Hucberti seu Warnerii defuncti", by charter dated to [970/86], subscribed by "Theutboldi archiepiscopi, Huberti comitis…Adeleidæ comitissæ…Eriberti comitis…"[24]

iii)        THIBAUT de Troyes ([after 927]-1001).  The Vita of archbishop Thibaut names his parents: "pater…Hugo: Francorum genere clarus: inter primos palatii, non infimus" and his "coniugem…Burgundionis regis nepotem…Wiltermam"[25]Archbishop of Vienne 967/986.  "Willa comitissa" donated "alodum situm in pago Belnense" to Montiéramey, for the soul of "senioris mei Hugonis, memor filiorum nostrorum Theutboldi archiepiscopi et Hucberti seu Warnerii defuncti", by charter dated to [970/86], subscribed by "Theutboldi archiepiscopi, Huberti comitis…Adeleidæ comitissæ…Eriberti comitis…"[26]

iv)       HUMBERT de Troyes ([after 927]-).  "Willa comitissa" donated "alodum situm in pago Belnense" to Montiéramey, for the soul of "senioris mei Hugonis, memor filiorum nostrorum Theutboldi archiepiscopi et Hucberti seu Warnerii defuncti", by charter dated to [970/86], subscribed by "Theutboldi archiepiscopi, Huberti comitis…Adeleidæ comitissæ…Eriberti comitis…"[27]same person as…?  HUMBERT (-after [995]).  Comte [de Belley].  Manteyer suggests that Humbert, son of Hugues de Troyes, was the same person as Comte Humbert [de Belley], whom he identifies as the possible father of Humbert [I] "blancis manibus" Comte de Maurienne and ancestor of the counts of Savoy[28].  As discussed in BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY, Humbert Comte [de Belley] could also have been the same person as the son of Charles Constantin Comte de Vienne and, in any case, it is unlikely that he was the father of Comte Humbert [I] de Maurienne. 

b)         RICHARD de Troyes (-before 948).  "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" names his brothers "pro anima fratrum meorum Hugonis, Richard et Bosonis" in his Sep 948 donation to Cluny for their souls[29], presumably indicating that all three were then deceased.  Comte de Troyes.  Vicomte de Sens. 

c)         MANASSES de Troyes (-[962/63]).  "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" made a donation of "Juliacum cum tribus ecclesiis in pago Cabilonensi" dated Sep 948 to Cluny "pro anima matris mee Theotberg" and "pro anima fratrum meorum Hugonis, Richard et Bosonis"[30].  "Warnerio" is named as father, and "Teutberga" as mother, of "Manasses archiepiscopus Arelatensis, postea Mediolanus" in a charter dated [1032/39][31].  Archbishop of Arles after 913, although this date appears early bearing in mind the likely birth date range of his mother.  Bishop of Triento 933-957.  Archbishop of Vienne 935-948.  Archbishop of Milan 950/960. 

d)         BOSO de Troyes (-before Sep 948).  "Manases archiepiscopus Arelatensis" names his brothers "pro anima fratrum meorum Hugonis, Richard et Bosonis" in his Sep 948 donation to Cluny for their souls[32], presumably indicating that all three were then deceased. 

e)         [FROMOND (-13 Aug 948).  The Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that "Frotmundus vicecomes Senonum" captured "castellum S Columbæ" in 942[33].  There is no proof that Fromond Vicomte de Sens was the son of Warnarius.  His absence from the lists of sons of Warnarius in the charters cited above suggests that he may not have been related.  However, no other Vicomte de Sens is named in the Chronico between the death of Warnarius recorded in 924 and this entry for Fromond.  Vicomte de Sens

-        see below.] 

f)          [TEUTBERGA (-after 960).  The origin of the wife of Charles Constantin is not known.  However, her name suggests a connection with the family of the Comtes de Troyes and it has been suggested[34] that she was the daughter of Garnier Vicomte de Sens.  m CHARLES CONSTANTIN Comte de Vienne, son of Emperor LOUIS III King of Italy [Provence] & his wife Adelais --- ([905/10][35]-after 962).] 

 

 

FROMOND [I], son of [WARNER [Garnier] Vicomte de Sens & his wife Teutberga d'Arles] (-13 Aug 948).  The Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that "Frotmundus vicecomes Senonum" captured "castellum S Columbæ" in 942[36].  There is no proof that Fromond was the son of Warnarius and his absence from the lists of brothers in the charters cited above suggests that he may not have been related.  However, no other Vicomte de Sens is named in the Chronico between the death of Warnarius recorded in 924 and this entry for Fromond.  Vicomte de Sens.  The sacrementaire of Sens cathedral records the death "Id Aug 948" of "Frothmundus comes Senonensis"[37].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Magloire records the death "II Id Aug" of "Fromundus comes"[38]

m ---.  The name of Fromond's wife is not known. 

Fromond [I] & his wife had two children: 

1.         RENARD [I] de Sens (-6 Jan 996 or [999], bur Sens Sainte-Colombe).  The Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis names "Frotmundo Vicecomite, Rainaldus filius qui Vetulus appellatur" when recording that he succeeded his father as Comte de Sens[39].  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ records the death of "Rainaldus comes vetulus" and his burial "in basilica sanctæ Columbæ virginis"[40].  The Annales sanctæ Columbæ Senonenses record the death "996 VIII Id Ian" of "…nardus comes civitatis Sennensis"[41]Comte de Sensm ---.  The name of Renard's wife is not known.  Renard [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         FROMOND [II] de Sens (-1012, bur Saint-Eracle).  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Frotmundus filius eius [=Rainaldus comes]" when recording that he succeeded on the death of his father[42]Comte de SensRodulfus Glaber records that Fromond was "a man of straightforward simplicity"[43]The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death of “Frotmundus comes” in 1012, adding in a later passage that he was buried “in capitulo sancti Eraclii[44]m --- de Roucy, daughter of RAGENOLD Comte [de Roucy] & his wife Alberade de Hainaut.  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ mentions "filiam Rainoldi comitis Remorum", without naming her, as wife of "Frotmundus"[45].  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Frotmundus” married “filiam Rainaldi Remoru Comitis[46].  Fromond [II] & his wife had four children: 

i)          RENARD [II] de Sens (-1055, bur Sainte-Colombe).  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Rainardus filius eius” succeeded on the death of “Frotmundo Senonum Comite[47].  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Rainardus…infidelium nequissimus" as son of "Frotmundo comite Senonum" when recording that he succeeded on the death of his father, his persecution of the church and his escape from the town of Sens in 1015 "fugiens nudus"[48]Comte de SensRodulfus Glaber names "Rainardus" as son and successor of Fromond, recording that he "despoiled the glory of the church as energetically as he could" and "ordered his whole entourage to place before his name…the title King of the Jews"[49]Rainardus...Senonum comes” renounced rights “in villa...Villaris Rest...” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated to [1012/31][50]The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that the citizens of Sens returned the town to Robert II King of France “1016 X Kal Mai” and that “Comes fugiens nudus evasit” and sought refuge with “Odonem Comitem” (presumably Eudes II Comte de Blois) with whom he built “castrum Monsteriolum…super Sequanæ fluvium” (Montereau)[51].  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1055 of “Comes Rainardus, filius Frotmundi” and his burial “in capitulo sanctæ Columbæ”, adding that after his death Henri I King of France held the town[52]m ([1023]) JUVILLA, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  Renard [II] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       FROMOND [III] de Sens .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Comte de Sensm GISBERTE, daughter of ---.  "Frotmundus urbis Senonicæ comes et uxor eius Gisberta" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Rémy by charter dated 1058, subscribed by "…Rainardi filii eius"[53].  Fromond [III] & his wife had one child: 

(1)       RENARD [III] de Sens"Frotmundus urbis Senonicæ comes et uxor eius Gisberta" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Rémy by charter dated 1058, subscribed by "…Rainardi filii eius"[54]

ii)         FROMOND de Sens (-Orléans after May 1016).  The Historia Regum Francorum records that "Frotmundus frater eius [=Rainardus]" and his army entered Sens after his brother fled naked but was captured by King Robert and put in chains[55].  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “frater eius Frotmundus” defended “urbis turrim” for many days after Robert II King of France took the town but was eventually imprisoned at Orléans where he died[56]

iii)        BRUNO de Sens (-1032 or after).  The Historia Regum Francorum records that "Frotmundus filius Rainaldi comitis" wished to have his son "Brunonem clericum" consecrated bishop of Sens[57].  Archdeacon.  "Bruno Archid. nepos Domni Brunonis Episcopi" witnessed a charter included in the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon[58], the bishop being Bruno's maternal uncle.  He was treasurer at Langres in the 1030s[59]

iv)       RENAUD (-[1016/24]).  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Leothericus Archiepiscopus” granted “Abbatiam quoque sanctæ Mariæ quæ est extra muros urbis” to “Frotmundo Comiti” for “filii sui Rainaldi Clerici” to be installed as abbot[60].  Abbé de Sainte-Marie du Charmier.  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death of “Rainaldus archidiaconus” who held “Abbatiam sanctæ Mariæ…in beneficio”, dated to [1016/24] from the context[61]

b)         ALIX de Sens .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "comes de Brena super Albam Engelbertus" as "comitissam Ioviniaci viduam de primo marito"[62].  She died before her husband, as the same passage refers to her son-in-law inheriting Joigny after her death and subsequently building the first castle of Joinville with the help of his father-in-law.  m firstly GEOFFROY de Joigny, son of ---.  m secondly as his second wife, ENGELBERT [II] Comte de Brienne, son of [ENGELBERT [I] Comte [de Brienne] & his wife ---] (-1008 or after). 

2.         daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis which names "domnus Sewinus magnæ nobilitatis vir ex sorore nepos ipsius Rainaldi"[63]m ---, son of ---. 

 

 

 

C.      VICOMTES de SENS

 

 

1.         MAINARD (-after 18 Oct 1032, bur Sens Saint-Pierre-le-Vif).  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Mainardum Clericum…ipsius ecclesiæ Thesaurarium” donated property to the monastery of Saint-Pierre, a later passage naming “Daimberto Vicecomite et patre eius Mainardo supra memorato[64]m ---.  Mainard & his wife had one child: 

a)         DAIMBERT (-[18 Oct 1032/1062], bur Sens Saint-Pierre-le-Vif).  Vicomte de Sens.  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Odone comitis, Daimberto Vicecomite et patre eius Mainardo supra memorato” resisted Gelduin Archbishop of Sens when he attempted to enter Sens after his ordination “XV Kal Nov” in 1032[65]

b)         MAINARD (-Mar 1062, bur Sens Saint-Pierre-le-Vif)Bishop of Troyes 1034.  Archbishop of Sens 1052.  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Mainardus Trecacensis Episcopus” was installed as archbishop after Gelduin was deposed from the archbishopric after 18 years[66].  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death in 1062 of “Mainardus Archiepiscopus” after 12 years, three months and eight days in office, and his burial “iuxta patrem suum Mainardum et Dainbertum Vicecomitem fratrem suum…in capitulo sancti Petri[67]

 

 

1.         GUERIN [I] de SensVicomte de Sens.  1074. 

 

2.         MANASSES de Sens .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Vicomte de Sens.  1114.  m MARGUERITE de Montlhéry, daughter of MILON [I] "le Grand" Seigneur de Montlhéry & his wife Lithuaise Vicomtesse de Troyes.  The Continuation de l’Histoire d’Aimonus names "matrem Simonis de Breiis, matrem Guidonis de Dominapetra, matrem Hugonis de Planceio, matrem Milonis de Erucio, matrem Salonis vicecomitis Senonensis" as the daughters of "Milo [de Brayo, frater Guidonis Rubei]"[68]The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Manassès & his wife had three children: 

a)         SALON [I] de Sens (-5 Apr 1168).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Vicomte de Sens.  "Salo vicecomes Senonensis, frater Rainardi, abbati…ecclesie Sancti-Johannis evangeliste" renewed his brother’s earlier donation to the abbey by charter dated to [1130][69]The necrology of the Leprosery at Sens records the death "Id Jan" of "Salo vicecomes"[70]m ELISABETH, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Salon [I] & his wife had three children: 

i)          GUERIN [II] de Sens (-[24 Jan] before 1180).  A charter dated 1164 records a dispute involving "Rainardum comitem Joignaci" and the abbey of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre, witnessed by "ex parte…comitis: Garinus filius vicecomitis Senonensis"[71]Vicomte de Sens.  "Garinus Senonensis vicecomes" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Colombe by charter dated 1165[72]Fiefs in “la Chastelerie de Brai”, under Henri I Comte de Champagne, include “…li viscontes de Sens…[73].  "Garinus…Senonico urbis vicecomes" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-le-Vif by charter dated 1167[74].  Guillaume Archbishop of Reims states, in a charter dated 1180, that "Garinus vicecomes" died without issue and that "Galerannus qui defuncti Garini sororem in uxorem duxit" donated property to the chapter of Sens[75].  The necrology of the Leprosery at Sens records the death "IX Kal Feb" of "Garinus vicecomes"[76]

ii)         BOUCHARD de Sens .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

iii)        ERMESENDE de Sens (-19 Feb, after [1204/05])The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  "Ermesendis vicecomitissa Senonensis" renounced rights over the property of the priory of Cannes at Blennes with the consent of "Buchardus filius meus" by charter dated 1 Jan/25 Apr 1204 or 1 Jan/10 Apr 1205[77].  The necrology of Notre-Dame aux Nonnains records the death "19 Feb" of "vicecomitissa Senonensis", one manuscript naming her "Hermensandis comitissa"[78]m firstly --- de Vendeuvre, son of ---.  m secondly (before 1180) GALERAN, son of ---.  Guillaume Archbishop of Reims states, in a charter dated 1180, that "Garinus vicecomes" died without issue and that "Galerannus qui defuncti Garini sororem in uxorem duxit" donated property to the chapter of Sens[79]

b)         RENAUD de Sens .  "Salo vicecomes Senonensis, frater Rainardi, abbati…ecclesie Sancti-Johannis evangeliste" renewed his brother’s earlier donation to the abbey by charter dated to [1130][80]Abbé de Saint-Jean de Sens. 

c)         MANASSES de Sens .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    NOBILITY in SENS

 

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS de COURTENAY

 

 

Courtenay is situated about 20 kilometres south-west of Sens, and about the same distance north-west of Joigny, in the present-day French département of Loiret (on the border with Yonne), arrondissement Montargis, canton Courtenay. 

 

 

1.         ATHON .  Châtelain de Châteaurenard.  The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Atho filius cuiusdam Gastellarii de Castro-Rainardo" and adds that he acquired "castrum Cortinaci", married "quondam nobilem dominam" by whom he had "Joscelinum de Cortinaco"[81]m ---.  The name of Athon's wife is not known.  Athon & his wife had [two] children:

a)         JOSCELIN [I] de Courtenay ([1034]-after 1065)The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" as son of "Atho filius cuiusdam Gastellarii de Castro-Rainardo"[82]Seigneur de Courtenay

-        see below

b)         [daughter .  As the mother of "Adam", her parentage and marriage are suggested by the charter dated to [1116/18] which records that "Robertus Bonet" became a monk at Néronville priory and donated "terram quam habebat a Sed ultra flumen Feure (aliàs Fuhure)" with the consent of "Milo de Curtiniaco et Adam nepos eius, de quorum beneficio eratFulco vicecomes [Foulques Vicomte de Château-Landon] de cujus beneficio erat…Garnerius frater Ade et uxor eius Ulgesendis cum filiis suis Herveo et Adam de quorum beneficio erat"[83].  "Adam nepos eius" can be identified as "Adam filius Stephani" who is named in other charters of Néronville dated between [1085] and [1122/42][84], and as Adam de Chailly who was ancestor of later vicomtes de Melun (see PARIS REGION NOBILITY).  Presumably based on these data points, Burke’s Peerage shows "Etienne de Courtenay" as the son of Joscelin [I] Seigneur de Courtenay and his first wife, and as the father of "Adam de Chailly"[85].  There are two major difficulties with this supposed parentage proposed by Burke’s.  Firstly, if Etienne had been an older son of Joscelin [I], he would have inherited the seigneurie de Courtenay in place of his supposed younger brother Milon de Courtenay.  Secondly, as noted above, "Adam filius Stephani" is first named in a document dated to [1085], which places his birth in [1060/65] bearing in mind that he is named in other documents until 1141.  This means that he could not have been the grandson of Joscelin [I] de Courtenay.  Nevertheless, the [1116/18] charter does indicate a family connection between Adam de Chailly and Milon de Courtenay.  The word nepos, notoriously difficult to translate precisely, could mean a relationship more remote than "nephew".  One possibility, therefore, is that the relationship was based on a family connection in the previous generation, possibly through an otherwise unrecorded sister of Joscelin [I] de Courtenay who married the father of Adam de Chailly.  The presence of the names of Milon de Courtenay and "Adam nepos eius" in the [1116/18] charter could be explained if the property which was the subject of the donation had been part of the dowry of Adam’s mother, and was then held by her son Adam as vassal of the seigneurs de Courtenay of whom Milon was then the senior representative.  An alternative possibility is that the relationship between Milon and Adam was through Milon’s mother’s family.  In any event, it is possible that Adam de Chailly’s mother was named HERSENDE.  This is suggested by the charter dated [1090] which records that "Roscelinus de Monsterollo atque Stephanus filius Heldoini et Hersendis uxor eius…Stephanus filius Goscelini et uxor eius Hersendis" consented to donations of properties to Néronville made by "miles…Dimo"[86].  The question of the identity of these two individuals named Etienne is discussed more fully in the document PARIS REGION NOBILITY in relation to [Hersende]’s husband, although this debate is irrelevant when considering the question of [Hersende]’s name as the wives of both persons (assuming that they were two different individuals) were named Hersende.  This possible name of Adam de Chailly’s mother appears corroborated by Burke’s Peerage, in its highly suspect summary of the early generations of the Courtenay family, which names "Hersent de Montereau" as Adam’s mother[87].  As with all data in Burke’s, no information is given on the primary source on which the statement is based.  m (before [1060/65]) ETIENNE, son of [HELDUIN] & his wife --- (-after [1090]).]  

 

 

JOSCELIN [I] de Courtenay, son of ATHON [Châtelain de Châteaurenard] & his wife --- ([1034]-after 1065)The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" as son of "Atho filius cuiusdam Gastellarii de Castro-Rainardo"[88]Seigneur de Courtenay

m firstly ([1060]) [HILDEGARDE] de Château-Landon, daughter of GEOFFROY [II] "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais & his wife Ermengarde d'Anjou .   The Historia of Monk Aimon records the marriage of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" and "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole" by whom he had one daughter, who was mother of two sons "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio"[89].  She is named in Burke’s Peerage but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified[90].  It may represent a misinterpretation of a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[91]

m secondly ISABELLE de Montlhéry, daughter of GUY "le Grand" Seigneur de Montlhéry & his wife Hodierne de Gometz-la-FertéThe Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Brayo et Guidonem Rubeum, Comitissam quoque Reiteste, et Bonam-vecinam de Pontibus, Elizabeth etiam uxorem Joscelini de Corteciniaco, insuper dominam de Puisat, et dominam de S. Galerico" as the children of "Guidonem" and his wife, stating in a later passage that "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico" was the second wife of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco"[92].  It appears chronologically more probable that Isabelle was the daughter of Guy rather than his son Milon, but this is not without doubt.  A charter dated 1133 records a donation to the abbey of Saint-Jean de Sens by "Milo de Curteno", adding that his widowed mother had become a nun there and that “frater eius Rainaudus” was buried there[93], which confirms that Milon was the son of his father’s second marriage.  William of Tyre specifies that the mother of Joscelin de Courtenay Count of Edessa was the sister of the mother of Baudouin de Bourg, later Baudouin II King of Jerusalem, according to the testimony of her granddaughter concerning the consanguinity between Amaury I King of Jerusalem and his first wife which provided the basis for the annulment of their marriage in 1162[94]

Joscelin [I] & his first wife had one child: 

1.         [VAINDEMONDE] de Courtenay Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Historia of Monk Aimon, which names "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio" as the two sons of the daughter of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" by his wife "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole"[95].  She is named Vaindemonde in Europäische Stammtafeln[96], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  m RENARD [II] Comte de Joigny, son of GEOFFROY Comte de Joigny & his wife ---. 

Joscelin [I] & his second wife had five children:

2.         HODIERNE de Courtenay .  Hodierne is named as the daughter of Joscelin [I] and his first wife in Burke’s Peerage, and wife of Geoffroy de Joinville, but the primary source on which it is based has not yet been identified[97]The Historia of Monk Aimon records the mother of Guy and Renard de Joigny as the only child of Joscelin by his first wife, which suggests that Hodierne must have been born from her father’s second marriage[98].  "Geoffroy senex sire de Joinville", with the consent of "Geoffroy son fils et de Hodierne sa bru", donated property to the church of Vaucouleurs, by charter dated to [1070/80][99]m (1080) GEOFFROY [II] Seigneur de Joinville, son of GEOFFROY [I] Seigneur de Joinville & his wife Blanche de Reynel (-before 1101). 

3.         MILON de Courtenay (-after 1138, bur Fontaine-Jean)The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Cortiniaco, Joscelinum Comitem Edesse, Gaufridum Chapalii" as the children of "Joscelinum de Cortiaco" and his wife "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico"[100]Seigneur de Courtenay.  "Milo de Curtiniaco" confirmed the donation by "Robertus Bonet" to the priory of Néronville of a grange "apud Lanci", with the consent of "Elisabeth uxor Milonis", by charter dated to [1110/16][101].  A charter dated to [1116/18] records that "Robertus Bonet" became a monk at Néronville and donated "terram quam habebat a Sed ultra flumen Feure (aliàs Fuhure)" with the consent of "Milo de Curtiniaco et Adam nepos eius, de quorum beneficio eratFulco vicecomes [Foulques Vicomte de Château-Landon] de cujus beneficio erat…Garnerius frater Ade et uxor eius Ulgesendis cum filiis suis Herveo et Adam de quorum beneficio erat"[102]A charter dated to [1120/39] records donations for the foundation of the abbey of Notre-Dame des Echarlis, including a donation in the presence of "Milo de Curtiniaco et uxor eius Elisabeth et filii eorum Willelmus, Joscelinus, Rainaldus"[103].  A charter dated 1133 records a donation to the abbey of Saint-Jean de Sens by "Milo de Curteno", adding that his widowed mother had become a nun there and that “frater eius Rainaudus” was buried there[104].  "Urso Milidunensis vicecomes atque sua uxor" acknowledged that they had no rights in land of Saint-Maur-les-Fossés by charter dated 1085, the same document recording that "vicecomes Adam" claimed these rights of his predecessor "cuius filiam in conjugium habebat" and from whom he inherited the viscomté dated 1138, the latter witnessed by "Matheus de Monmorenci, Milo de Cortenai…"[105].  His burial place is confirmed by the charter dated 1225 under which [his grandson] “Robertus de Curtiniaco” chose burial at Fontaine-Jean, where “dominus Milo Curtiniacensis” was buried[106].  [m firstly ---.  This first marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[107], but the primary source on which it is based has not yet been identified.]  m [secondly] (before [1110/16]) ELISABETH de Nevers, daughter of RENAUD [II] Comte de Nevers et d'Auxerre & his first wife [Ita Raymonde] de Forez et de Lyon (before 1085-after [1120/39]).  The Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum records that the daughter of "Guillelmus…[filios]…Renaldum" and his first wife married "Miloni de Curteniaco"[108]The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury records that “Milonem de Cortinaco” married “sorore comitis Nivernensis[109].  "Milo de Curtiniaco" confirmed the donation by "Robertus Bonet" to the priory of Néronville of a grange "apud Lanci", with the consent of "Elisabeth uxor Milonis, videntibus Rainardo comite…", by charter dated to [1110/16][110]A charter dated to [1120/39] records donations for the foundation of the abbey of Notre-Dame des Echarlis, including a donation in the presence of "Milo de Curtiniaco et uxor eius Elisabeth et filii eorum Willelmus, Joscelinus, Rainaldus"[111].  Milon & his [second] wife had three children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Courtenay (-[1147/48]).  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis[112]A charter dated to [1120/39] records donations for the foundation of the abbey of Notre-Dame des Echarlis, including a donation in the presence of "Milo de Curtiniaco et uxor eius Elisabeth et filii eorum Willelmus, Joscelinus, Rainaldus"[113]Seigneur de CourtenayThe History of Louis VII King of France names "…Willermus de Cortiniaco, Reinaldus de Monteargiso…"  among those who accompanied King Louis VII on crusade in 1147[114].  Guillaume may have died during the course of the crusade as no further record is found of him, while his brother Renaud is recorded in France in 1149. 

b)         JOSCELIN de Courtenay (-[before 1148]).  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis[115]A charter dated to [1120/39] records donations for the foundation of the abbey of Notre-Dame des Echarlis, including a donation in the presence of "Milo de Curtiniaco et uxor eius Elisabeth et filii eorum Willelmus, Joscelinus, Rainaldus"[116].  Joscelin presumably predeceased his brother Guillaume, as their younger brother Renaud is recorded in France (presumably holding the family lands, although this is not stated in the corresponding source) in 1149. 

c)         RENAUD de Courtenay ([1105/20]-[27 Sep 1194]).  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis[117]Seigneur de Courtenay

-        see below

4.         JOSCELIN de Courtenay (-[Aleppo] 1131, before 1 Oct)The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Cortiniaco, Joscelinum Comitem Edesse, Gaufridum Chapalii" as the children of "Joscelinum de Cortiaco" and his wife "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico"[118]William of Tyre refers to "Joscelinus de Cortenay vir nobilis de Francia de regione dicitur Gastineis" as "consobrinus" of Baudouin du Bourg Count of Edessa, later Baudouin II King of Jerusalem, when he records his arrival in Edessa in 1102 after being called from France by Baudouin[119].  In a later passage, he specifies that his mother was the sister of Baudouin de Bourg's mother, according to the testimony of her granddaughter concerning the consanguinity between Amaury I King of Jerusalem and his first wife which provided the basis for the annulment of their marriage in 1162[120].  He went to Syria after the First Crusade, maybe during the crusade of 1101.  William of Tyre refers to him as "consanguineus" of Count Baudouin when they were both captured the following year[121]He arrived in Palestine, probably with the contingent led by Guillaume II Comte de Nevers.  On his arrival, Baudouin II Count of Edessa enfeoffed him with land west of the Euphrates, with his capital at Turbessel[122].  In Summer 1103, he took part in the raid against the territory of Aleppo led by Bohémond I Prince of Antioch and captured Muslimiye.  In 1104, he captured Marash[123].  He was captured with Baudouin II Count of Edessa by Soqman, Ortokid Prince of Mardin, after the battle of Harran in 1104, released in 1107 but exchanged himself with Baudouin Count of Edessa to ensure the latter's release although released again within a few months[124].  Suspected by Count Baudouin of wishing to supplant him as Count of Edessa, he was imprisoned in 1112 and subsequently went southwards where he was enfeoffed as Prince of Galilee by Baudouin I King of Jerusalem[125].  He succeeded in 1118 as JOSCELIN I Count of Edessa, chosen by Baudouin II shortly after he became king of Jerusalem.  He was captured by Balak near Saruj Sep 1122 and imprisoned in the fortress of Khartpert.  The Frankish prisoners seized control of the fortress Aug 1123, and he escaped to call for support[126].  In 1128, he raided villages in Antioch's territory in reprisal for Bohémond II Prince of Antioch's denunciation of the agreement concerning his second wife's dowry[127].  He died from wounds received in an accident while besieging a small castle north-east of Aleppo[128].  The Histoire Universelle of Vartan le Grand records that "[Josselin le Jeune] seigneur de Hrom-Gla" was captured by Moslems while hunting and taken to Aleppo where he died[129]

-        COUNTS of EDESSA

5.         GEOFFROY "Charpalu" de Courtenay (-killed in battle Montferrand near Raphania, Tripoli [1137]).  The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Cortiniaco, Joscelinum Comitem Edesse, Gaufridum Chapalii" as the children of "Joscelinum de Cortiaco" and his wife "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico"[130]William of Tyre records the siege and capture of “in finibus Tripolitanus supra civitate Raphaniam in monte situm præsidium...Mons-Ferrandus”, during the course of which “Gaufridus Charpalu, domini Joscelini senioris Edessani comitis frater” was killed, dated to 1137[131]

6.         RENAUD de Courtenay (-before 1133, bur Sens Saint-Jean).  A charter dated 1133 records a donation to the abbey of Saint-Jean de Sens by "Milo de Curteno", adding that his widowed mother had become a nun there and that “frater eius Rainaudus” was buried there[132]

 

 

The most difficult problem associated with Renaud de Courtenay, shown below, is deciding whether Renaud Seigneur de Courtenay, son of Milon Seigneur de Courtenay, who is recorded in French sources until 1149  (“French Renaud”) was the same person as Renaud de Courtenay who is recorded in England between [1160/61] and 1194 (“English Renaud”).  Several factors favour this co-identity:

·           Similar ages.  The birth of French Renaud’s mother can be dated to a few years before 1085, when her own mother is named with her presumed second husband or, if that second marriage is incorrect (the possibility of which is discussed further in BURGUNDY DUCHY NOBILITY), when she must have been deceased.  French Renaud was her third known son, therefore probably born in [1105/20].  The birth of French Renaud’s daughter Elisabeth, dated to [1140/45], suggests that he was probably born in the later part of that range.  The birth of Guillaume, first son of English Renaud, can also be dated to [1140/45] which suggests that his father was probably born around the same time as French Renaud.  English Renaud’s death is dated to 1194 which, if the suggested birth date ranges are correct, would not be inconsistent with the birth of French Renaud in, say, [1112/20]. 

·           No overlap.  French Renaud is last recorded in France in 1149.  English Renaud is first recorded in England in [1160/61].  The chronology of the births of the children of French Renaud and English Renaud also appears to match, especially considering that one source states that English Renaud’s first son Guillaume was born to his father’s first wife who, from a chronological point of view, could have been the same person as French Renaud’s known wife.  A potential difficulty with this argument is an apparent reference to French Renaud’s wife in 1155, but this mention has not been verified as correct. 

·           No other obvious parentage for English Renaud.  No reference to the Courtenay family in England has been found before [1160/61], for example in the 1129 Pipe Roll and or in the charters of Kings Henry I and Stephen which are reproduced in the Regesta Regum Anglorum series.  It is a safe assumption that English Renaud arrived in England from France shortly before [1160/61] and that he was related to the French Courtenay family.  From a chronological point of view, English Renaud could have been the son of one of Milon de Courtenay’s younger brothers.  The eldest known brother Joscelin can probably be dismissed, as his known descendants are described fully in crusader sources.  Of the other two known brothers, no record has been found of their having married and having had children. 

·           English Renaud’s daughter.  She is named filie Regin de Crtinni” in London/Middlesex in the [1166/67] Pipe Roll, when she must have been of age.  No reference has been found to her marriage or descendants, or indeed to any other daughter of English Renaud.  It is possible that she was the same person as Elisabeth, daughter of French Renaud and married to Pierre de France, who held some interest in England at that time through her father. 

·           “Guillaume de Courtenay” in France in 1160.  “Willelmus de Cortiniaco...”, signing first in the subscription list, witnessed the charter dated 24 Nov 1160 under which “Petrus dominus Curtiniaci et uxor mea Elisabeth” confirmed donations made by “antecessorum nostrorum...dominus Milo et filii eius” to Fontaine-Jean abbey[133].  It is unlikely that the witness was Guillaume de Courtenay, older brother of Milon de Courtenay, who most likely died during the 1147 Second Crusade.  In addition, the body of the document refers to “dominus Milo et filii eius”: if the witness had been one of Milon’s sons, the fact would probably have been mentioned.  The only other known Guillaume de Courtenay at the time was the oldest son of English Renaud, whose existence is confirmed (as well as his death before that date) by the 1194 Pipe Roll entry which is quoted below.  If Guillaume, son of English Renaud, was born during the early part of the date range [1140/45] (see above), he would recently have come of age in 1160.  If his father was French Renaud, he would have been the senior male representative of the previous Courtenay dynasty apart from French Renaud himself (assuming, for this part of the discussion, that he was still alive).  In that case, the donors may have considered it prudent to involve him in the confirmation to avoid future challenges.  Guillaume de Courtenay is named in a second charter: “Petrus de Curtiniaco frater regis” confirmed donations made to Fontaine-Jean abbey by “Guillelmus de Curtiniaco” on leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of “uxoris mei Elisabeth”, by undated charter[134].  Again, it is unlikely that this document refers to Milon’s son Guillaume, who is known to have left for Jerusalem on the Second Crusade, as ex post facto confirmation of his donations at that time would have been unnecessary especially as the 1160 document confirmed all donations which he would have made (“dominus Milo et filii eius”).  If that is correct, it is likely that the donor Guillaume was the same person who witnessed the 1160 charter and therefore also possibly the son of English Renaud. 

·           English Renaud’s status in England.  English Renaud and his family are recorded with landholdings in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire, Kent, Devon, Dorset/Somerset, and Northamptonshire, as well as Sutton in Berkshire, in Pipe Rolls during the reign of King Henry II.  English Renaud is also recorded as the guardian of the minor Walter de Bolebec in the 1160s.  The wives of his sons Guillaume and Robert belonged to prominent families.  All these factors indicate that English Renaud held a certain amount of status in the land-holding class in England, consistent with a prominent family origin. 

·           The alleged confiscation of French Renaud’s assets in France.  Modern secondary sources state that French Renaud quarrelled with the French king who confiscated his assets and awarded them to his brother Pierre de France on marrying French Renaud’s daughter Elisabeth.  They also state that French Renaud left for England where he was granted Sutton in Berkshire by King Henry II.  No primary sources have been identified which confirm all these statements.  Documents dated to 1149 confirm a dispute between French Renaud and the French king.  The delay before English Renaud’s first appearance in [1160/61] suggests that this may not have been the dispute which triggered the supposed confiscation, if the story is true.  Taken with all the other indications, a serious dispute followed by confiscation provides the best explanation for the changes in fortune of the Courtenay family in the mid-12th century, even though there is no proof. 

Some factors which do not support the supposed co-identity are:

·           The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury.  This source records that Pierre de France received the lands of [French] Renaud on marrying his daughter, adding that “quia non erat alius hæres superstes” (“as there was no other surviving heir”)[135].  The Continuator does not state explicitly that French Renaud had died, although this seems to be implied by the wording of the relevant paragraph.  The story told by the Continuator appears straightforward, with no hint of a dispute or of confiscation of property, until the other factors listed above are considered.  If the Continuator can be dated to [1200], it is possible that the existence of French Renaud’s disinherited sons may have been long forgotten by then, especially if they had settled in England and cut ties with France. 

·           Onomastics.  The names Milon and Joscelin, typical of the French Courtenay family, are not found among English Renaud’s known descendants, although the existence of only a limited number of his descendants can be confirmed by primary source material. 

·           The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey.  This source names “domini Flori filii regis Franciæ Lodovici cognomento Grossi” as the father of English Renaud[136].  There is no record of the existence of such a person and, assuming that “filii” was an error for “fratris”, no other evidence that Fleuri, son of Philippe I King of France (see FRANCE CAPETIAN KINGS), had any connection with the Courtenay family.  The Historia includes many pieces of information which are disproved by other primary sources or are otherwise unreliable. 

On balance, taking all these factors into consideration, the existence of a single Renaud de Courtenay, to whom all the sources quoted below refer, seems likely.  It also results in a reconstruction of his family which is consistent with all sources so far identified and appears to be credible as shown below. 

 

RENAUD de Courtenay, son of MILON Seigneur de Courtenay & his [second] wife Elisabeth de Nevers ([1105/20]-[27 Sep 1194]).  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis[137]A charter dated to [1120/39] records donations for the foundation of the abbey of Notre-Dame des Echarlis, including a donation in the presence of "Milo de Curtiniaco et uxor eius Elisabeth et filii eorum Willelmus, Joscelinus, Rainaldus"[138].  Seigneur de Montargis: the History of Louis VII King of France names "…Willermus de Cortiniaco, Reinaldus de Monteargiso…"  among those who accompanied King Louis VII on crusade in 1147[139].  Renaud is recorded in France in 1149 (see below), so presumably he returned from the crusade before the king, maybe to claim his family’s lands if his older brother Guillaume died overseas as suggested above.  Seigneur de Courtenay, de Montargis, de Châteaurenard, de Champignelles, de Tanlay, de Charny, et de Chante-cocq[140]Thibaut Comte de Blois wrote two letters to Suger informing him that “Raginaldus de Cortiniaco” had taken money from the king’s merchants, requested his support in avenging the outrage, and offered his help in case an army was sent against Renaud[141].  The letters are undated, but Lecoy de la Marche dates them to 1149, presumably because of the king’s continuing absence on crusade during which time Suger exercised the government of the realm[142]Burke’s Peerage states that Louis VII King of France quarrelled with Renaud while on the Second Crusade, confiscated his French possessions, and bestowed them on his younger brother Pierre whom he married to Renaud’s daughter Elisabeth[143].  It has not been possible to trace primary sources which justify all these statements.  As discussed in more detail in the introduction to the present section, the story of a quarrel and confiscation does provide the best explanation for the changes which occurred in the Courtenay family.  No further primary source has been identified which names Renaud in France after 1149. 

Burkes’s Peerage records that Henry II King of England granted the lordship of Sutton, Berkshire to “Renaud de Courtenay” in 1161[144]This statement is confirmed by the 1160/61 Pipe Roll which names "Regin de Curtenai…in Sutton" in Berkshire[145] (Renaud is not named in Sutton in the Pipe Roll for 1159/60[146]) and by a later document in the Testa de Nevill: a writ of King John dated 1212 records that "Robertus de Curtenay" held "terre in Sutton" in Berkshire which King Henry II had granted to "Reginaldo de Curtenay avo suo"[147].   The question of the probable co-identity of “French Renaud” and “English Renaud” is discussed in the introduction to this section dealing with Renaud and his family.  Renaud is listed in Sutton, Berkshire in each of the later Pipe Rolls between [1161/62] and [1189/90][148]The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records “filie Regin de Crtinni” in London/Middlesex[149].  The 1167/68 Pipe Roll records Renaud de Courtenay in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire (“Hildestona...Wottesdona”), in the same counties owing for “mil. Walti de Bolebec qui est in custodia eius”, in Essex/Hertfordshire, in Kent “de feod Walti de Bolebek”, and in Sutton in Berkshire[150]Renaud is listed in Pipe Rolls in 1168/69, 1169/70, 1170/71, 1175/76 in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire, in 1168/69 in Cambridgeshire/Huntingdonshire, and from 1175/76 in Devon and Dorset/Somerset.  In addition, Renaud’s son Robert is named from 1174/75 in Pipe Rolls in Northamptonshire.  "…Raginaldo de Cortenaio" subscribed the charter dated to [1169] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the donation of revenue from "manerio de Contona" [Compton, Devon] to Fontevraud by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater suus"[151].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records the death “V Kal Oct 1194” of “Reginaldus de Courtenay[152].  Although this is not always a reliable source, corroboration for the date is provided by the 1194 Pipe Roll which records the fine made by Renaud’s presumed son "Robertus de Curtenay" to hold Sutton in Berkshire "pro habendo manerio suo in pace quod dominus R pater dedit patri suo salvo iure heredum Willelmi primogeniti fratris sui"[153]

m firstly ([1135/40]) [HELVISE], daughter of [FERRY de Donjon & his [first] wife ---] ([1120/25]-[after 1155]).  The identification of the family origin of the wife of “French Renaud” appears to be based only on the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, which records that "domina de Monte-Argisi fuit soror vel neptis illius [=Guilelmus…archiepiscopus Bituricensis]" and names her as the wife of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo"[154], assuming for the moment that “neptis” described the relationship not “soror”.  Guillaume Archbishop of Bourges is often referred to in secondary sources as "Guillaume de Donjon", although this name is not used in his Vita[155], but he may have belonged to the Berruier family: La Saussaye, in his early 17th century work on the bishops of Orléans names "Geraldus Berruyerius, frater beati Gulielmi Bituricensis archiepiscopi" as the father of Philippe Berruier who was bishop of Orléans from 1221 to 1236, citing “Historia Ecclesiæ Bituricensis” (a work which has not been identified)[156].  The primary source which confirms beyond doubt that the archbishop was the full brother of Gérard Berruier has not yet been identified.  Bouchet says that “on apprend de quelques chartes que [Renaud] épousa la sœur de Guy du Donjon”, but he does not cite the charters in question although he says in a later passage that she “vivoit l’an 1148 et 1155”, presumably indicating the dates of two of the charters[157]The Scripta de Feodis records the holdings of “domini Guidonis et Petri de Donjone fratrum beati Guillermi Bituricensis quondam archiepiscopi” and their holdings”[158], clearly showing that the archbishop was the brother of Guy and Pierre de Donjon.  Reading all these documents together, we can identify a list of brothers and sisters: [Hawise] wife of Renaud de Courtenay (born [1120/25]), Guy de Donjon, Pierre de Donjon (born [1145/50]), Guillaume Archbishop of Bourges, Gérard Berruier.  Clearly the chronology dictates that all five could not have shared the same mother and father.  The suggested explanation is that Ferry [I] de Donjon (see PARIS REGION NOBILITY) was the father of Renaud de Courtenay’s wife by a first marriage, and the father of Guy and Pierre de Donjon by a second marriage; after he died (date maybe estimated to after 1174), his widow married secondly the father of Gerard Berruier.  The precise identification of the father of Archbishop Guillaume (Ferry [I] de Donjon or --- Berruier?) is not necessary for the purposes of this explanation.  A continuing close family connection between the Donjon and Courtenay families is indicated by (among other documents) the charter dated Nov 1217 under which Gui du Donjon chevalier” guaranteed the loyalty of “Robert de Courtenai” to the king[159].  French Renaud’s wife is named “Helvise” in Europäische Stammtafeln[160], but the primary source on which this name is based has not yet been identified. 

A different origin of the wife of Renaud de Courtenay is suggested by Kerrebrouck who names her “Moenée d’Arthel”, citing an article by Estournet[161].  The only reference so far found to this person is Gallia Christiana which states that [Guillaume Archbishop of Bourges, who is referred to above] “Guillelmus Archesiis vico Nivernensis pagi natus ex illustri genere” had “matrem...Maeniam” who had “frater Guillelmus archidiaconus Suessionensis...dictus...Eremita” who educated him[162]Gallia cites no primary source on which its statements are based.  Arthel is a small commune situated in canton Prémery, arrondissement Cosne-Cours.sur-Loire, in the present-day département of Nièvre.  No other contemporary reference to a family “d’Arthel” has been found.  The explanation for “d’Arthel” in relation to Moenée is probably provided by references to “Saint Guillaume d’Arthel” being born at Arthel (these can be found in various websites relating to the commune[163]).  These references provide no help in identifying this saint, but he was probably the same person as Archbishop Guillaume.  The same section of Gallia Christiana also states that “Guillelmus de Donjeon ex comitibus Nivernensis oriundus, Mathildis comitissæ Nivernensis dominæ Donziaci avunculus (forte patruus)” [also identified as Archbishop Guillaume] had “fratrem...Baldudinum de Hiere” who donated property to “Sacro-Portui seu Barbello Cisterciensis ordinis...monasterio” when leaving for Jerusalem with the consent of “A. uxore et I & Ferrico filiis”, and also “duos alios...fratres...ex reg. cameræ computorum Paris. Guidonem et Petrum de Dijon (Donjeon)”, also without citing primary sources[164].  “Balduinum de Hiere” is identified as Baudouin de Dijon (“Hiere” has not yet been identified, maybe Yerre), first husband of Amicie de Breteuil, and therefore presumably the oldest son of Ferry [I] de Dijon.  The references to Guy and Pierre de Donjon lead us back to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, which as noted above records that "domina de Monte-Argisi fuit soror vel neptis illius [=Guilelmus…archiepiscopus Bituricensis]" and names her as the wife of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo"[165].  The argument in favour of “Moenée” is presumably based on choosing “soror” as the correct relationship in this passage, rather than “neptis”.  From a chronological point of view, the “soror” case is more difficult to sustain than the “neptis”.  The birth of Elisabeth de Courtenay (Alberic’s “domina de Monte-Argisi”) is estimated to [1140/45].  As noted above, the birth of Pierre de Donjon (who, based on the “soror” argument would also have been the brother of Elisabeth de Courtenay) is estimated to [1145/50]: he is named with his wife and five children in 1179, which renders any later birth unlikely.  However, Elisabeth’s father Renaud de Courtenay was clearly alive between 1140 and 1149 and probably married to Elisabeth’s mother throughout that period.  A second marriage of her mother to Ferry [I] de Dijon is therefore improbable.  Could Elisabeth’s mother have been the first wife of Ferry [I]?  That possibility also appears unlikely as pushing Pierre de Donjon’s birth back to [1135/40] appears unlikely to be correct as he is named in a source dated Feb 1226.  It would also require stretching Moenée’ s child-bearing period beyond normal limits if the later Berruier birth is taken into account.  The “soror” argument as an interpretation of Alberic’s passage falls apart completely if French Renaud was the same person as English Renaud, considering the Berruier marriage, but this line of reasoning only leads us back to the French Renaud/English Renaud discussion. 

m secondly ([1150/55]) HAWISE d’Avranches, daughter of ROBERT d’Avranches & his wife Mathilde Avenill ([after 1132]-1 Aug 1209)The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis” and that she married “Reginaldo de Courtenay” as “uxor eius secunda[166].  Hawise must have been born after 1132 at the earliest as her father is recorded in [1129/30] with his first wife.  The identification of the husband of Hawise as “French Renaud” assumes that he was the same person as “English Renaud” (see above for a discussion of this question).  The suggested date of her marriage is based on the approximate marriage date of her son Robert in [1174/75].  According to Burke’s Peerage, the second wife of Renaud de Courtenay was "Maud Dame du Sap, daughter of Robert FitzRoy by his w Maud d’Avranches"[167].  However, this appears to confuse her with the wife of Guillaume de Courtenay, eldest son of Renaud by his first marriage (see below), assuming that the primary sources quoted below correctly record the relationships which are shown here. 

Renaud & his first wife had four children: 

1.         ELISABETH de Courtenay ([1140/45]-14 Sep after 1205).  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis”, adding that “Rainaudus” was father of “uxorem Petri fratris domini regis et uxorem Avalonis de Seleniaco[168]A Historia Regum Francorum records that "Petrus", son of Louis VI King of France, married "filiam Rainaldi de Curtiniaco cum…terra illius"[169]The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Petrus” as sixth son of “rex Ludovicus” and his wife “Adalaidem filiam Humberti comitis de Mauriana”, adding that he married “filiam Rainaldi de Corteniaco” and had his land as there was no other surviving heir (“et terram ipsius habuit cum ea, quia non erat alius hæres superstes”)[170]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "domina de Monte-Argisi fuit soror vel neptis illius [=Guilelmus…archiepiscopus Bituricensis]" as the wife of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo", "Monte-Argisi" being identified as "Montargis, département Loiret" by the editor of the MGH edition[171].  Her birth date range, estimated from the possible dates of her marriage and births of her children, suggests that she must have been one of her parents’ older children.  Dame de Courtenay.  “Petrus dominus Curtiniaci et uxor mea Elisabeth” confirmed donations made by “antecessorum nostrorum...dominus Milo et filii eius” to Fontaine-Jean abbey by charter dated 24 Nov 1160, witnessed by “Willelmus de Cortiniaco...[172]The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records “filie Regin de Crtinni” in London/Middlesex[173].  As discussed above in the introduction to the present section, it is possible that this entry relates to Elisabeth.  "Petrus regis frater et Curtiniacensis dominus" donated property to the abbey of Fontaine-Jean by charter dated 1170, with the support of "uxor mea Isabel et primogenitus meus Petrus"[174].  The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "XVIII Kal Oct" of "Helysabeth mater Petri comitis Autisiodorensis"[175]m (before 24 Nov 1160) PIERRE de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne ([1126]-Palestine 10 Mar [1180/10 Apr 1183]).  He succeeded as Seigneur de Courtenay, de Montargis, de Châteaurenard, de Champignelles, de Tanlay, de Charny et de Charenton, by right of his wife. 

-        SEIGNEURS de COURTENAY (CAPET)

2.         daughter .  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis”, adding that “Rainaudus” was father of “uxorem Petri fratris domini regis et uxorem Avalonis de Seleniaco[176]m AVALON Seigneur de Seignelay, son of ---. 

3.         GUILLAUME de Courtenay ([1140/45]-after [1167/68], maybe before 1170)The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Reginaldo de Courtenay…filio suo Willielmo de Courtenay de priore conjuge in Normannia primogenito” when recording his marriage[177].  Although parts of the Historia are unreliable and inconsistent with information in other primary sources, the chronology of Guillaume’s life suggests that he was born in the early 1140s and that therefore he could have been the son of Renaud, son of Milon, by his first marriage.  As noted in the introduction to the present section, some doubt about whether Renaud had surviving sons is introduced by the Continuator of Aimon of Fleury which records that Pierre, son of Louis VI King of France, received the lands of Renaud de Courtenay on his marriage to his daughter, adding that “quia non erat alius hæres superstes” (“as there was no other surviving heir”)[178], although if dated to [1200] it is possible that the existence of sons may have been long forgotten by then especially if they had settled in England and lost ties with France.  [“Willelmus de Cortiniaco...”, signing first in the subscription list, witnessed the charter dated 24 Nov 1160 under which “Petrus dominus Curtiniaci et uxor mea Elisabeth” confirmed donations made by “antecessorum nostrorum...dominus Milo et filii eius” to Fontaine-Jean abbey[179].  As discussed in the introduction to the present section, it is possible that the witness was the son of “English Renaud”.]  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Cortenay xvi l x d de honore patris sui et lvi s pro iv militibus et iv parte" in Dorset, Somerset in [1167/68][180].  [Guillaume may have left for Jerusalem, possibly dated to [1167/70]: Petrus de Curtiniaco frater regis” confirmed the donation of “quadraginta solidos” annually made to Fontaine-Jean abbey for lighting a candle by “Guillelmus de Curtiniaco” on leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of “uxoris mei Elisabeth”, by undated charter[181].  The donor Guillaume has not been identified beyond doubt but, as in the case of the 1160 charter quoted above, it is possible that he was Guillaume son of English Renaud.  If that is correct, it is possible that Guillaume retained some interests in France after his father’s possible disgrace or that he was granted property by his supposed brother-in-law Pierre.  Guillaume may have died during his journey as no further reference to him has been found: the wording of the document would be consistent with the confirmation being made after Guillaume had died, although the text does not specify that he was deceased.  Guillaume de Courtenay is not named in the charter of Pierre de Courtenay dated 1170 (see below), suggesting that he died before that date.]  The 1194 Pipe Roll records "Robertus de Curtenay" in Berkshire "pro habendo manerio suo in pace quod dominus R pater dedit patri suo salvo iure heredum Willelmi primogeniti fratris sui"[182], demonstrating that Guillaume de Courtenay was his father’s oldest son, was deceased at the date of the entry, and that he had left surviving heirs.  m MATILDA, daughter of ROBERT FitzEdith [illegitimate son of Henry I King of England] & his [second] wife Mathilde d’Avranches (-1224).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Matildam” as the daughter of “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho”, adding that she married “Reginaldo de Courtenay…filio suo Willielmo de Courtenay de priore conjuge in Normannia primogenito[183]Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Matillis de Curteney" (1) against "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Ocumptona", which records that "Robertus" claimed that the land was "hereditas Matillidis de Aueregnes" who had "duas filias…Hawisiam matrem suam primogenitam […filia Gaufridi de Crimes primi viri Matillidis de Auerenches] et…Matillidem", the claimant Matilda replying that she had the land in question "ex dono Roberti filii Regis patris eiusdem Matillidis et secundi viri predicte Matillidis de Auerenches", and (2) against "Reginaldum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Chaunelega"[184].  Guillaume & his wife had [---] children: 

a)         children (-[after 1194]).  The 1194 Pipe Roll records "Robertus de Curtenay" in Berkshire "pro habendo manerio suo in pace quod dominus R pater dedit patri suo salvo iure heredum Willelmi primogeniti fratris sui"[185], demonstrating that Guillaume de Courtenay did leave surviving heirs, although it is not known whether in 1194 they were his children or grandchildren.  It is possible that Renaud, named below, was one of these heirs. 

b)         [RENAUD de Courtenay (-after [1184/1204]).  "…Reginaldo de Curtenai filio Willelmi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1184/1204] under which "Gilbertus Basset et Egelina uxor sua" donated land in Waddesdon and Westcott, Buckinghamshire, to Bicester priory[186].  No other Guillaume has been identified of the right age who could have been the father of Renaud who witnessed this charter.  This Renaud could not have been the same person as [Renaud] de Courtenay, father of Robert ancestor of the earls of Devon (who is shown next), assuming that the 1212 writ and other extracts quoted below correctly describes the relationships in the Courtenay family.] 

4.         [RENAUD] de Courtenay (-[1194]).  His parentage is confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which states that the father of Robert de Courtenay was the son of Renaud de Courtenay: a writ of King John dated 1212 records that "Robertus de Curtenay" held "terre in Sutton" in Berkshire which King Henry II had granted to "Reginaldo de Curtenay avo suo"[187].   This person is called Renaud in secondary sources, but the primary source which confirms his name has not yet been identified.  The chronology, as well as the details included in Bracton relating to the claims which name his wife, suggests that the father of Robert de Courtenay, ancestor of the earls of Devon, could not have been the same person as Guillaume, son of Renaud de Courtenay, who is named above.  It is also unlikely that he was the same person as Renaud [son of Guillaume], assuming that the family relationships are correctly described in the 1212 writ quoted above.  If these assumptions are correct, it is surprising that the heirs of [Renaud] were not mentioned, along with the heirs of Guillaume, in the 1194 Pipe Roll entry which records the entry into possession of Sutton by his [half-]brother Robert.  [Renaud] presumably predeceased his father and his half-brother Robert.  m (1178 or before) HAWISE Lady of Okehampton, daughter of [GEOFFROY de Crimes/GUILLAUME de Curcy] & his wife Mathilde d'Avranches (-31 Jul 1219).  Two versions of her parentage are recorded.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Matillis de Curteney" against "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Ocumptona", which records that "Robertus" claimed that the land was "hereditas Matillidis de Aueregnes" who had "duas filias…Hawisiam matrem suam primogenitam […filia Gaufridi de Crimes primi viri Matillidis de Auerenches] et…Matillidem"[188].  However, another claim recorded by Bracton, also dated 1222, by "Matillis de Curtenay" against "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Chamelegha" states that "Robertus filius Regis…Matillidem de Auerenches uxorem suam" held the land which was inherited by "Hawisie filie sui matri eiusdem Roberti de Curtenay que fuit filia Willelmi de Curcy viri eiusdem Matillidis"[189].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hawisa de Curtenay" holding three knights’ fees in Devonshire in [1210/12][190].  The sheriff of Devon was ordered "to take into the king’s hand…lands…formerly of Hawise de Courtenay, who is dead as the king has heard", dated 14 Aug 1219[191].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 11 May "2 Edw I" following the death of [her grandson] "John de Corteney alias de Curtenay" record that “Hawis de Curtenay gave to [Forde abbey]...land of Hargrave...and Robert de Curtenay her son and heir confirmed the gift[192]Renaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Courtenay (-26 Jul 1242, bur Forde Abbey, Devon)The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Curtenay" held "terre in Sutton" in Berkshire which King Henry II had granted to "Reginaldo de Curtenay avo suo"[193].  The 1194 Pipe Roll quoted below indicates that Sutton passed to Robert de Courtenay, son of Renaud de Courtenay by his second marriage, on the death of his father.  Robert, son of [Renaud], son of Renaud, may have been by-passed because of his young age, but would have inherited Sutton after the death of his uncle (or of his uncle’s son William, assuming that the latter survived his father).  Gui du Donjon chevalier” guaranteed the loyalty of “Robert de Courtenai” to the king by charter dated Nov 1217[194]

-        EARLS of DEVON

Renaud & his second wife had [three] children:

5.         ROBERT de Courtenay ([1150/55]-[1207/09]).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Robertum…de Courtnay” as son of “Reginaldo de Courtenay” and “vicecomitissa domina Hawisia uxore sua” [described earlier in the same paragraph as his father’s second wife], although the source then conflates him with his nephew Robert de Courtenay, ancestor of the earls of Devon (see above), by stating that “dictus Robertus de Courtnay dictorum Reginaldi et Hawisiæ filius et hæres legitimus” obtained “totum honorem de Okehampton jure hæreditario...castellum Exoniæ...totius comitatus Devoniæ[195].  The 1174/75 Pipe Roll records “Robto de Curtenai” in the fee of “Regin fil Ursi” (father of his first wife, which helps to date their marriage) in Northamptonshire[196].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Sutton, Berkshire.  Robert de Courtenay is also named in Essex/Hertfordshire in the 1176/77 Pipe Roll, and in Northamptonshire in the 1177/78, 1180/81 and 1186/87 Pipe Rolls[197].  The 1194 Pipe Roll records "Robertus de Curtenay" in Northamptonshire, and in Berkshire "pro habendo manerio suo in pace quod dominus R pater dedit patri suo salvo iure heredum Willelmi primogeniti fratris sui"[198].  Sheriff of CumberlandThe Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 8 Dec 1195 in a claim by "Walterus Pipard" against "Rob de Curtenai…loco Alic de Rumilie ux sue" concerning land "in Croumse"[199]"Robertus de Curtenei" donated revenue from "molendino…de Kokermuth" to St Bees, with the advice of "uxoris mee Aaliz de Rumeleie", to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Curtenei…"[200]Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Johannes de Neovilla" against "Willelmum priorem de Cuwyc" for "ecclesiam de Alfinctona…aduocacionem", the defendant stating that "Hawisia de Curtenay…matris ipsius Roberti" granted the advocacy of the church to "Henricum de Curtenay […quondam] in ligia viduitate sua" who donated it to "ecclesie de Cuwyk", while the claimant stated that "Robertus de Curtenay quondam dominus feodi illius" gave "manerium de Alfinctona in maritagium cum filia sua ipsi Johanni" and that he gave it to "Johannem de Curtenay" who relinquished it[201]m firstly ([1174/75] or before) MATILDA, daughter of REYNOLD FitzUrse of Bulwick & his wife Beatrice de Limesay.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Ricardus filius Ursy antecessor eorum" had "unum filium…Reginaldum et duas filias Margeriam et Mabiliam", that Reynold had "unam filiam…Matillidem…[qui] habuit unum filium Willelmum de Curtenay qui obiit…tempore Regis J…sine herede corpore suo"[202].  The 1174/75 Pipe Roll records “Robto de Curtenai” in the fee of “Regin fil Ursi” (father of his first wife, which helps to date their marriage) in Northamptonshire[203]m secondly (before 8 Dec 1195) as her second husband, ALICE FitzDuncan Lady of Cockermouth and Allerdale, widow of GILBERT Pipard Sheriff of Gloucester and Hereford, daughter of WILLIAM FitzDuncan [of Scotland] & his second wife Alice de Rumilly (before [1153/54][204]-[6 Mar or 18 Mar] [1212/1215], bur [Gisburne Priory])The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “prima…Cecilia…secunda Amabilla…tertia Alicia” as the three daughters of “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, and his wife Alice, adding that Alice received “Aspatrike, et baronia de Allerdale et libertate de Cokermouth” and married “Gilberto Pipard” and secondly “Roberto de Courtenay”, but died childless[205].  Co-heiress of her brother.  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 8 Dec 1195 in a claim by "Walterus Pipard" against "Rob de Curtenai…loco Alic de Rumilie ux sue" concerning land "in Croumse"[206]"Robertus de Curtenei" donated revenue from "molendino…de Kokermuth" to St Bees, with the advice of "uxoris mee Aaliz de Rumeleie", to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Curtenei…"[207]Alicia de Rumely, filia Willielmi filii Duncani” donated property to Gysburn Priory, for the souls of “maritorum meorum Gilberti Pypard et Roberti de Curtenay”, by undated charter[208].  The obituary of Gisburne priory records the death “II Non Mar” of "Aliciæ de Rumley"[209].  Robert & his first wife had two children:

a)         WILLIAM de Courtenay (-18 Jan before [1212])"Robertus de Curtenei" donated revenue from "molendino…de Kokermuth" to St Bees, with the advice of "uxoris mee Aaliz de Rumeleie", to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Curtenei…"[210]His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Ricardus filius Ursy antecessor eorum" had "unum filium…Reginaldum et duas filias Margeriam et Mabiliam", that Reynold had "unam filiam…Matillidem…[qui] habuit unum filium Willelmum de Curtenay qui obiit…tempore Regis J…sine herede corpore suo"[211]Of Bulwick, Upminster and Morle.  Lord of Montgommery 30 Jun 1207.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Curtenay" holding one and one half knights’ fees in Northamptonshire in [1210/12][212]m as her first husband, ADA de Dunbar, daughter of PATRICK Earl of Dunbar & his first wife Ada of Scotland.  "P. comes de Dunbar et P. filius eius" donated property which "Willo de Curteneya et A. uxori ei teneant…de Home" to Kelso monastery by charter dated to [1200][213]She married secondly Theobald de LascellesBracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Theobaldus de Lasceles…et Ada uxore eius" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo" for "terre…in Bulewico" which was "dotem ipsius Ade unde Willelmus de Curtenay quondam vir suus"[214].  "Ada de Curtenay filia Patricis comitis de Dumbar" donated property "in territorio de Home" to Kelso monastery, for the souls of "maritorum meorum", by charter dated to [1230][215][She is alleged to have married thirdly William FitzPatrick "of Greenland", but as pointed out in the document SCOTTISH NOBILITY, this supposed third marriage is dubious.] 

b)         daughter .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Johannes de Neovilla" against "Willelmum priorem de Cuwyc" for "ecclesiam de Alfinctona…aduocacionem", the defendant stating that "Hawisia de Curtenay…matris ipsius Roberti" granted the advocacy of the church to "Henricum de Curtenay […quondam] in ligia viduitate sua" who donated it to "ecclesie de Cuwyk", while the claimant stated that "Robertus de Curtenay quondam dominus feodi illius" gave "manerium de Alfinctona in maritagium cum filia sua ipsi Johanni" and that he gave it to "Johannem de Curtenay" who relinquished it[216]m JOHN de Neuville, son of --- (-after 1231). 

6.         AIGELINE de Courtenay (-after 1219).  The chronology dictates that Aigeline must have been her father’s daughter by his second marriage.  "Gilebertus Basset" granted land at Bicester and other properties to the prior of Bicester, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Egeline et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1182/85], witnessed by "…Egelina uxore mea, Aliz Basset…Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[217]King John confirmed the grant of "manerio suo de Strafford" to "Gilberto Basset et Eggelin uxori eius" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[218].  The presence of Aigeline in the grant suggests that the property in question had previously been held by her family.  A charter of King Edward II records that “Gilebertus Basset” founded Bicester priory, Oxfordshire, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Egelinæ et liberorum nostrorum", witnessed by "uxore mea Egelina…"[219].  "Aquilina de Curt" donated "totam terram meam de Swthona" to Bicester priory, for the souls of "patris mei Reginaldi de Curt et…matris mee et…sponsi mei Gilleberti Basset et filii mei Thome Basset", by charter dated to [1205/06], witnessed by "Robert de [C]urt, Thoma Basset…"[220]The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Oxfordshire, dated 1219, which includes "Egelina de Curtenai" holding land "in Craumerse…hundredo de Langetroe…[et] in Burnecestre…in hundredo de Pockedelau"[221].  m GILBERT Basset [I], son of THOMAS Basset [I] of Headington, Oxfordshire & his wife Alice de Dunstanville (-[1205/06]). 

7.         [HENRY de Courtenay (-before 1231).  "Gilebertus Basset" granted land at Bicester and other properties to the prior of Bicester, for the soul of "mee et uxoris mee Egeline et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated to [1182/85], witnessed by "…Egelina uxore mea, Aliz Basset, Henrico de Curten…Thoma Basset, Fulcone Basset…"[222].  The witness list of this document suggests that Henry de Courtenay may have been another child of Renaud de Courtenay by his second marriage, and therefore the brother of the grantor’s wife.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Johannes de Neovilla" against "Willelmum priorem de Cuwyc" for "ecclesiam de Alfinctona…aduocacionem", the defendant stating that "Hawisia de Curtenay…matris ipsius Roberti" granted the advocacy of the church to "Henricum de Curtenay […quondam] in ligia viduitate sua" who donated it to "ecclesie de Cuwyk", while the claimant stated that "Robertus de Curtenay quondam dominus feodi illius" gave "manerium de Alfinctona in maritagium cum filia sua ipsi Johanni" and that he gave it to "Johannem de Curtenay" who relinquished it[223].] 

 

 

The relationship between the following individuals and the Courtenay family has not yet been established: 

 

1.         EUSTACHIE de Courtenay (-after 7 Sep 1223).  "Eustac de Curtenay" paid a fine for "manerio de Tynewik" in Devonshire, dated 1205[224].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Eustacia de Curtenay" held "Cumtun" in Surrey[225].  An order was made 7 Sep 1223 to suspend the demand for repayment by "Eustachia de Courtenay for debts of the Jews…[as] she holds nothing of the lands formerly of William son of Ancelin, formerly her husband, who owed those debts, except by way of dower"[226]m WILLIAM, son of ANCELIN & his wife --- (-before 1223). 

 

2.         JOHN de Courtenay .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Johannes de Neovilla" against "Willelmum priorem de Cuwyc" for "ecclesiam de Alfinctona…aduocacionem", the defendant stating that "Hawisia de Curtenay…matris ipsius Roberti" granted the advocacy of the church to "Henricum de Curtenay […quondam] in ligia viduitate sua" who donated it to "ecclesie de Cuwyk", while the claimant stated that "Robertus de Curtenay quondam dominus feodi illius" gave "manerium de Alfinctona in maritagium cum filia sua ipsi Johanni" and that he gave it to "Johannem de Curtenay" who relinquished it[227]

 

3.         JOHN de Courtenay .  He may have been the same person as the John de Courtenay who is referred to by Bracton in the 1231 claim, and named above.  A charter records an assize held a die Pasche” 1238 records a claim by “H. prior Meritone” against “Johannem de Curtenay et Matildem uxorem eius” relating to “ecclesiam de Reyers[228]m (before 2 Jan 1234) as her second husband, MATILDA de Camville, widow of NELE de Mowbray, daughter of ROGER de Caneville & his wife --- (-before 6 Oct 1240).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Nigellum”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “filiam Rogeri de Canevilla[229].  A charter records an assize held a die Pasche” 1238 records a claim by “H. prior Meritone” against “Johannem de Curtenay et Matildem uxorem eius” relating to “ecclesiam de Reyers[230].  The primary source which confirms that Matilda, wife of John de Courtenay, was the same person as the wife of Nele de Mowbray has not yet been identified. 

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS de COURTENAY 1161-1303 (CAPET)

 

 

PIERRE [I] de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne ([1126]-Palestine 10 Mar [1180/10 Apr 1183]).  William of Tyre names him as brother of Louis VII King of France, when recording his arrival in Palestine in 1179[231].  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Petrus” as sixth son of “rex Ludovicus” and his wife “Adalaidem filiam Humberti comitis de Mauriana”, adding that he married “filiam Rainaldi de Corteniaco” and had his land as there was no other surviving heir (“et terram ipsius habuit cum ea, quia non erat alius hæres superstes”)[232].  He succeeded as Seigneur de Courtenay, de Montargis, de Châteaurenard, de Champignelles, de Tanlay, de Charny et de Charenton, by right of his wife.  “Petrus dominus Curtiniaci et uxor mea Elisabeth” confirmed donations made by “antecessorum nostrorum...dominus Milo et filii eius” to Fontaine-Jean abbey by charter dated 24 Nov 1160, witnessed by “Willelmus de Cortiniaco...[233].  “Petrus...Ludovici Francorum regis frater” granted privileges to Montargis, with the consent of “uxoris suæ Helisabeth et Petri filii sui”, by charter dated 1170[234].  “Petrus regis frater et Curtiniacensis dominus” confirmed donations to Fontaine-Jean abbey, with the consent of “uxor mea Ysabel et primogenitus meus Petrus”, by charter dated 1170, witnessed by “Ex parte domini et pueri...[235].  “Petrus de Curtiniaco frater regis” confirmed donations made to Fontaine-Jean abbey by “Guillelmus de Curtiniaco” on leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of “uxoris mei Elisabeth”, by undated charter[236].  “Petrus frater regis dominus de Monteargi et de Curtiniaco” donated property to Fontaine-Jean abbey on leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of “uxor mea Ysabel et filius meus Petrus”, by charter dated 1179[237]The necrology of La Cour-Dieu records the death “VI Id Mar” of “Petrus de Curtiniaco[238]A charter dated “die festivo de Ramis palmarum” [=10 Apr] 1183 records that “Petrus de Curtiniaco regis Galliæ Philippi patruus” when he was alive donated “villam...Heruauuilla” to Notre-Dame la Royalle de Rosoy, with the consent of “Elisabeth uxor eius et Petrus eorundem maior filius et alii...Robertus, Philippus, Willelmus[239]

m (before 24 Nov 1160) ELISABETH de Courtenay, daughter and heiress of RENAUD Seigneur de Courtenay & his first wife Helvis de Donjon ([1140/45]-14 Sep after 1205)A Historia Regum Francorum records that "Petrus", son of Louis VI King of France, married "filiam Rainaldi de Curtiniaco cum…terra illius"[240]The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Petrus” as sixth son of “rex Ludovicus” and his wife “Adalaidem filiam Humberti comitis de Mauriana”, adding that he married “filiam Rainaldi de Corteniaco” and had his land as there was no other surviving heir (“et terram ipsius habuit cum ea, quia non erat alius hæres superstes”)[241]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "domina de Monte-Argisi fuit soror vel neptis illius [=Guilelmus…archiepiscopus Bituricensis]" as the wife of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo", "Monte-Argisi" being identified as "Montargis, département Loiret" by the editor of the MGH edition[242]Petrus dominus Curtiniaci et uxor mea Elisabeth” confirmed donations made by “antecessorum nostrorum...dominus Milo et filii eius” to Fontaine-Jean abbey by charter dated 24 Nov 1160, witnessed by “Willelmus de Cortiniaco...[243]The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records “filie Regin de Crtinni” in London/Middlesex[244].  As discussed above in the introduction to section showing Elisabeth’s father, it is possible that this entry relates to Elisabeth.  Petrus...Ludovici Francorum regis frater” granted privileges to Montargis, with the consent of “uxoris suæ Helisabeth et Petri filii sui”, by charter dated 1170[245].  “Petrus regis frater et Curtiniacensis dominus” confirmed donations to Fontaine-Jean abbey, with the consent of “uxor mea Ysabel et primogenitus meus Petrus”, by charter dated 1170, witnessed by “Ex parte domini et pueri...[246].  “Petrus de Curtiniaco frater regis” confirmed donations made to Fontaine-Jean abbey by “Guillelmus de Curtiniaco” on leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of “uxoris mei Elisabeth”, by undated charter[247].  “Petrus frater regis dominus de Monteargi et de Curtiniaco” donated property to Fontaine-Jean abbey on leaving for Jerusalem, with the consent of “uxor mea Ysabel et filius meus Petrus”, by charter dated 1179[248].  “Elisabeth domina de Curteneto mater Petri comitis Nivernensis” donated money to Paris Notre-Dame, for the anniversary of “Petri mariti meio”, and a further donation to the Knights Hospitallers after she died, by charter dated 1189[249].  Bouchet states that Elisabeth confirmed donations to “l’ abbaye des Escharlis” in 1205 “qui est le dernier Acte qu’on touve d’elle[250]The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "XVIII Kal Oct" of "Helysabeth mater Petri comitis Autisiodorensis"[251]

Pierre [I] & his wife had eleven children: 

1.         PIERRE [II] de Courtenay ([after 1158]-Epirus after Jun 1219)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as sons of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo" & his wife[252]Petrus regis frater et Curtiniacensis dominus” confirmed donations to Fontaine-Jean abbey, with the consent of “uxor mea Ysabel et primogenitus meus Petrus”, by charter dated 1170, witnessed by “Ex parte domini et pueri...[253], indicating that Pierre [II] was still a child at the time.  Bouchet says that “on peut dire avec quelque forte certitude [que Pierre] n’avoit pour lors tout au plus que douze ans, puisque d’ordinaire on ne se sert point du terme puer pour exprimer une jeunesse au delà de cet âge[254].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Courtenay.  A charter dated “die festivo de Ramis palmarum” [=10 Apr] 1183 records that “Petrus de Curtiniaco regis Galliæ Philippi patruus” when he was alive donated “villam...Heruauuilla” to Notre-Dame la Royalle de Rosoy, with the consent of “Elisabeth uxor eius et Petrus eorundem maior filius et alii...Robertus, Philippus, Willelmus[255]Comte de Nevers 1184-1192.  "Petrus Nivernensis comes et Curtiniaci dominus" donated property to the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem by charter dated 1150 [presumably misdated, assuming that the reference “Nivernensis comes” is correct, which indicates that the donor was Pierre [II] not Pierre [I]] "apud Curtiniacum in castro meo"[256]Comte d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre 1199.  Marquis de Namur 1213.  He succeeded his brother-in-law Henri de Flandres in 1216 as PIERRE I Emperor of Constantinople.  Crowned by the Pope in Rome, he was captured in Epirus by Despot Theodoros Angelos while travelling to Constantinople. 

-        CONSTANTINOPLE LATIN EMPIRE

2.         daughter The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia"[257].  This daughter’s husband has not otherwise been identified, nor has his supposed connection with Hungary been explained.  m --- de la Marche, son of ---. 

3.         ALIX de Courtenay ([1160/65]-12 Feb 1218)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Alix married firstly "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum" and secondly "Engolismensi comitis" by whom she was mother of "Isabellam modernam Anglie reginam"[258].  "Willermus comes Joviniaci" donated property to the abbey of Pontigny by charter dated 1180 with the consent of "uxor mea Aaleit et frater meus Gaucherius"[259].  “Alix Engolismensis comitissa" swore homage to Philippe II King of France by charter dated 1204[260].  The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "Id Feb" of "Alesis comitissa Angolismensis"[261]A charter dated 13 Jul 1245 records the enquiry into the consanguinity between dominus Raymundus comes Tholosanus” and “Margaritam filiam domini comitis Marchie”, and states that “dominus Petrus de Cortaniaco” was father of “dominam Adalmues comitissam Engolismensem”, who was mother of “dominam Ysabellem, uxorem…comitis Marchie[262]m firstly ([1178], divorced 1186) as his first wife, GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Joigny, son of RENARD [IV] Comte de Joigny & his wife Adelaide de Nevers (-15 Feb 1220).  m secondly (1186) AYMAR I Comte d'Angoulême, son of GUILLAUME VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême & his second wife Marguerite de Turenne ([1160]-Limoges 16 Jun 1202).  

4.         EUSTACHIE de Courtenay (-6 Apr after 1235).  The chronology of her first marriage is too uncertain to speculate sensibly on the date of Eustachie’s birth.  "Eustachia uxor defuncti Guillelmi de Brena" confirmed her husband’s deathbed donation to Quincy by charter dated 1199[263].  "Guillelmus de Chanlite" confirmed the donation of “pasturas suas de Lagnia” to Quincy abbey made by “Hugo de Lagnia...”, with the support of “uxore mea Eustachia”, by charter dated 1200[264].  Dame de Placy-sur-Armancon.  Eustachia comitissa Sacricesaris” recorded that “filius meus...bone memorie Andreas de Brena” had requested her and “fratri meo Willelmo de Tanlay” to carry out his last wishes, and founded an anniversary for him at Auxerre Saint-Etienne where he was buried, by charter dated May 1215[265].  “Eustachia comitissa Sacricesariensis” donated property to Senan priory, in accordance with the wishes of “Willelmus Sacricesariensis maritus meus” before leaving “ad subsidium Terre-Sancte cum domino Petro germano meo, tunc comite Autissiodorensi”, by charter dated 1218[266]Eustachia comitissa Sacricæsariensis” noted that “Willemus Sacricæsariensis maritus meus”, on leaving for “terræ sanctæ cum domino Petro germano meo tunc comite Autissiodorensi nunc autem Imperatore Constantinopolitano”, requested her to donate property to the priory of Sens Saint-Etienne by charter dated 1223[267]The necrology of La Chartreuse de Bellary records the death "6 Apr" of "Eustache comtesse de Sancerre"[268]m firstly GUILLAUME de Brienne, son of ERARD [III] Seigneur de Brienne & his wife Agnes de Montbéliard [Montfaucon] (-[1194/99], bur Auxerre St-Etienne).  m secondly (1200) as his third wife, GUILLAUME de Champlitte, son of EUDES [I] "le Champenois" & his wife Sibylle --- (-[1209/10]).  Vicomte de Dijon.  Prince of Achaia 1205.  m thirdly ([1211]) as his third wife, GUILLAUME Comte de Sancerre, son of ETIENNE [I] Comte de Sancerre [Champagne-Blois] & his wife Alix [Mathilde] de Donzy (-Epirus 1217). 

5.         CLEMENCE de Courtenay The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Clémence was mother of "Guidonis de Tyero in Alvernia"[269]m (before 1185) GUY [V] Seigneur de Thiern, son of GUY [IV] Seigneur de Thiern & his wife --- (-after 1185). 

6.         ROBERT de Courtenay (-Palestine 5 Oct 1239)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as sons of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo" & his wife[270]Seigneur de Champignelles, de Châteaurenard, de Charny-en-Gâtinais et de Conches 1205.  Grand Bouteiller de France 1223. 

-        SEIGNEURS de CHAMPIGNELLES

7.         PHILIPPE de Courtenay (-[before Apr 1183]).  A charter dated “die festivo de Ramis palmarum” [=10 Apr] 1183 records that “Petrus de Curtiniaco regis Galliæ Philippi patruus” when he was alive donated “villam...Heruauuilla” to Notre-Dame la Royalle de Rosoy, with the consent of “Elisabeth uxor eius et Petrus eorundem maior filius et alii...Robertus, Philippus, Willelmus[271].  A charter dated 2 Feb 1186 records that a similar donation, using exactly the same wording as the 1183 document[272].  It should be noted that neither of these documents specify that Philippe de Courtenay was alive when they were issued.  No later reference to Philippe has been found.  It is possible that he predeceased his father. 

8.         --- de CourtenayThe Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia"[273].  The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified.  Bouchet states that her husband le seigneur de Charros en Berry [est] nommé Aymon dans une charte de l’abbaye de la Prée de l’an 1193” (but does not provide the precise citation reference) and also gives some other details about the Charost family (which have not been verified)[274].  The primary source which confirms her husband’s name has not been identified.  m [AIMON [III]] Seigneur de Charost, son of ---. 

9.         CONSTANCE de Courtenay ([1168]-after 1231)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that the daughter of Constance was "domna de Marla" and mother of "abbatem Theobaldum de Sarnaio"[275]Dame de Châteaufort.  The primary source which confirms her two marriages more precisely has not yet been identified.  Bouchet names her two husbands as firstly “[le] seigneur de Chasteau-fort près Paris” and secondly “Guillaume seigneur de la Ferté-Arnaud et de Ville-preux”, implying in his sentence that “ainsi qu’escrit Alberic” which is not the case[276].  The precise identity and parentage of Constance’s first husband has not been ascertained.  He is shown as “Gasce de Poissy” in some modern secondary sources.  "Willermus dominus Firmitatis" donated property "aput Sanctum Nunnum" to Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, with the consent of "uxoris mee Constancie…Symon gener meus et Aaliz filia mea uxor predicti Symonis", by charter dated 1208[277].  "Matildis domina Malliaci" confirmed the donation to Vaux de Cernay of “census Castrifortis quem ego et Mabilia domina Mondeville soror mea nunc tenemus” made by “bone memorie Constancia mater mea” by charter dated Sep 1253[278]m firstly [GASCE de Poissy], son of ---.  m secondly GUILLAUME Seigneur de la Ferté-Arnaud et de Villepreux, son of ERNAUD Seigneur de la Ferté-Arnaud & his wife Alix --- (-before Apr 1226). 

10.      GUILLAUME de Courtenay (-[Apr 1233/1248], bur Abbaye de Quincey near Langres)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as sons of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo" & his wife[279]Seigneur de Tanlay et de Mailly-le-Château, de iure uxoris

-        SEIGNEURS de TANLAY

11.      AGNES de Courtenay .  Philippe II King of France approved the donations to “les religieuses de l’Hospice d’Orléans” made by “son oncle Pierre de Courtenai pour sa fille Agnès qui avait fait profession dans ce monastère” by charter dated [17 Apr 1183/31 Mar 1184][280].  Nun at Orléans. 

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS de CHAMPIGNELLES (CAPET-COURTENAY)

 

 

Champignelles is located about 20 kilometres south of Courtenay, in the present-day French département of Yonne, arrondissement Auxerre, canton Bléneau.  It lies 10 kilometres west of Toucy and, from the point of view of categorisation in Medieval Lands, could be shown either in the present document or in the document Auxerre in the Burgundy Duchy group.  As Champignelles was a Courtenay family property, it seems appropriate to link the family with their Courtenay ancestors. 

 

 

ROBERT de Courtenay, son of PIERRE de France Seigneur de Courtenay & his wife Elisabeth de Courtenay (-Palestine 5 Oct 1239)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as sons of "Petro de Cortenaio regis Philippi patruo" & his wife[281]A charter dated “die festivo de Ramis palmarum” [=10 Apr] 1183 records that “Petrus de Curtiniaco regis Galliæ Philippi patruus” when he was alive donated “villam...Heruauuilla” to Notre-Dame la Royalle de Rosoy, with the consent of “Elisabeth uxor eius et Petrus eorundem maior filius et alii...Robertus, Philippus, Willelmus[282]Seigneur de Champignelles, de Châteaurenard, de Charny-en-Gâtinais et de Conches.  Robertus de Curteneio dominus de Champignoliis” confirmed donations to Fontaine-Jean made by “pater meus Petrus de Curteneio”, with the consent of “frater meus Petrus comes Nivernensis et Guillelmus Curtiniacensis frater meus”, by charter dated 1197[283].  Seigneur de Mehun: Robert de Courtenay Seigneur de Mehun et Mahault nostre femme” confirmed “la coustume de Lorris” to the inhabitants “de Mehun” made by “bonæ memoriæ comes Stephanus pater meus” by charter dated 11 Jul 1209[284].  “Robertus de Cortiniaco dominus de Cellis sancti Eusicii” enfranchised the men “apud Cellas” by charter dated Oct 1216[285].  “Robertus de Curtiniaco miles et Mathildis uxor mea” donated “decimas ultra campum...Coivre in territorio de Campignoliisto the parish of Villeneuve by charter dated Jan 1218 (O.S.)[286]Grand Bouteiller de France 1223.  “Robertus de Curtiniaco” chose burial at Fontaine-Jean, where “dominus Milo Curtiniacensis” was buried, by charter dated 1225[287]Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which after their father’s death “Petrus primogenitus filius” would receive “baroniam de Conchis” reserving revenue to “Robertus, Johannes et Guillelmus, clerici, filii nobilis antedicti” and “dote Mathildis matris prædicti primogeniti filii” and would receive “baroniam de Magduno et Cellas et Chantecoq” after the death of his mother, while “prædictus Philippus” would receive “Champinolium, Castrum-Regnardi et Charniacum”, by charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[288].  The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records the death “III Non Oct” of “Robertus de Courteneyo, miles, pater domini Roberti de Corteneyo, quondam episcopi Aurelianensis[289]

m firstly ([1200]) CONSTANCE [de Toucy], daughter of --- (-[20 Nov] ----).  The primary source which confirms her origin and marriage has not yet been identified.  The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records the death “XII Kal Dec” of “uxor nobilis viri Roberti de Courteneyo[290].  She is not named, so it is not possible to link this entry with certainty to the first wife of Robert de Courtenay.  However, as Robert’s death is recorded in the same necrology, this could be correct. 

m secondly (before 11 Jul 1209) as her second husband, MATHILDE de Mehun Dame de Mehun-sur-Yevre, widow of JEAN [III] de Beaugency-sur-Loire, daughter of PHILIPPE de Mehun Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yevre & his wife --- (-1240, bur Mehun).  A manuscript history of the Coucy family, dated 1303, names “Pierre et li autre Robert” as the sons of “frere du Roy Louis...Pierre...de Courtenay”, adding that Robert married “la Dame de Mehun[291].  Bouchet records her parentage more precisely “Mahaud fille unique de Philippes Seigneur de Mehun sur Yevre et de Selles en Berry, sorty d’un puisné de la maison de Vierzon...” but does not cite the primary source on which he bases his information[292].  La Thaumassière records her descent from Humbaud de Vierzon Seigneur de Mehun (see CENTRAL FRANCE)[293].  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  Robert de Courtenay Seigneur de Mehun et Mahault nostre femme” confirmed “la coustume de Lorris” to the inhabitants “de Mehun” made by “bonæ memoriæ comes Stephanus pater meus” by charter dated 11 Jul 1209[294].  “Robertus de Curtiniaco miles et Mathildis uxor mea” donated “decimas ultra campum...Coivre in territorio de Campignoliisto the parish of Villeneuve by charter dated Jan 1218 (O.S.)[295]Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which “Petrus primogenitus filius” would receive “baroniam de Magduno et Cellas et Chantecoq” after the death of his mother by charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[296]

Robert & his first wife had [two] children: 

1.         BLANCHE de Courtenay Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated Mar 1221 (probably O.S.) under which “Robertus de Curtiniaco" confirmed that "gener meus Ludovicus filius comitis Sacri-Cesaris" swore homage to Philippe II King of France[297].  The date of her marriage indicates that Blanche must have been born from her father’s first marriage.  m (before 1220) as his first wife, LOUIS [I] Comte de Sancerre, son of GUILLAUME [I] Comte de Sancerre [Champagne-Blois] & his second wife Marie de Charenton (-1268)

2.         [daughter .  King Philippe II permitted son cousin Robert de Courtenai” to grant revenue “sur la prévôté de Nonancourt et...sur la terre de Foucherolles et de Hanemont” as dowry “à sa fille Agnès, fille de Constance, que le fils aîné de Guillaume du Fresne devait épouser”, by charter dated Aug 1218[298].  It is possible that this daughter was the same as Blanche who is named above.  If this was an infant betrothal, it is possible that this daughter was born from the second marriage of her father.  Betrothed ([Aug 1218]) to --- du Fresne, son of GUILLAUME du Fresne & his wife ---.] 

Robert & his second wife had seven children: 

3.         PIERRE de Courtenay (-1250)Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which after their father’s death “Petrus primogenitus filius” would receive “baroniam de Conchis” reserving revenue to “Robertus, Johannes et Guillelmus, clerici, filii nobilis antedicti” and “dote Mathildis matris prædicti primogeniti filii” and would receive “baroniam de Magduno et Cellas et Chantecoq” after the death of his mother, while “prædictus Philippus” would receive “Champinolium, Castrum-Regnardi et Charniacum”, by charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[299].  Seigneur de Conches.  Petrus de Cortiniaco dominus de Conches” promised to pay Louis IX King of France in respect of property inherited from “domini Galcheri de Jovigniaco quondam fratris uxoris meæby charter dated May 1249[300]m (before May 1249) as her first husband, PETRONILLE de Joigny, daughter of GAUTHIER de Joigny Seigneur de Châteaurenard & his second wife Amicie de Montfort.  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1249 under which [her husband] Petrus de Cortiniaco dominus de Conches” promised to pay Louis IX King of France in respect of property inherited from “domini Galcheri de Jovigniaco quondam fratris uxoris meæ[301]Petronilla de Curtiniaco domina Castri-Renardi” confirmed the donation made to “sororibus Sancti Dominici iuxta Montem-Argi”, made by “domina et mater mea Amicia de Iouiniaco...bonæ memoriæ Galcherus de Iouigniaco quondam frater meus”, by charter dated Jul 1251[302]She married secondly (Dec 1252) Henri [II] Seigneur de SullyHenricus dominus Soliaci miles” acknowledged receipt of “terram heredis defuncti Petri de Curtineio...in Normannia”, by charter dated Nov 1253[303].  The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[304].  Pierre & his wife had one child: 

a)         AMICIE de Courtenay (1250-Rome 1275, bur Rome).  Dame de Conches-en-Ouches.  Dame de Mehun.  The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[305]Pope Urban IV granted a dispensation for the marriage of “Amaicia nata quondam Petri de Cortenayo” and “Roberto comiti Attrebatensi” dated 5 Dec 1261[306]The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1275 at Rome of "comes Attrebati Robertus...uxore sua...filia...Petri de Cortenajo militis"[307]m (contract Paris 13 Jun 1259, Papal dispensation 5 Dec 1261, 1262) as his first wife, ROBERT Comte d’Artois, son of ROBERT I “le Bon/le Vaillant” Comte d'Artois & his wife Mathilde de Brabant (posthumously Sep 1250-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson). 

4.         PHILIPPE de Courtenay (-[1245/46]).  Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which after their father’s death “prædictus Philippus” would receive “Champinolium, Castrum-Regnardi et Charniacum”, by charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[308]

5.         ROBERT de Courtenay (-8 Aug 1279).  Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which after their father’s death “Petrus primogenitus filius” would receive “baroniam de Conchis” reserving revenue to “Robertus, Johannes et Guillelmus, clerici, filii nobilis antedictiby charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[309].  Bishop of Orléans.  The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[310]

6.         JEAN de Courtenay (-before 10 Sep 1276)Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which after their father’s death “Petrus primogenitus filius” would receive “baroniam de Conchis” reserving revenue to “Robertus, Johannes et Guillelmus, clerici, filii nobilis antedictiby charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[311]The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[312]Archbishop of Reims 1263.  The testament of Guillelmus de Cortiniaco miles dominus de Champignoliarum”, dated 10 Sep 1276, donated property for the soul of “Margaretæ dominæ de Vinisiaco quondam uxoris meæ” and referred to “domum meam parisiensem” which he had bought from the executors of “Johannis bonæ memoriæ quondam archiepiscopi Remensis fratris mei[313]

7.         GUILLAUME [I] de Courtenay (-[Sep 1276/Jun 1280])Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories, under which after their father’s death “Petrus primogenitus filius” would receive “baroniam de Conchis” reserving revenue to “Robertus, Johannes et Guillelmus, clerici, filii nobilis antedictiby charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[314].  Seigneur de Venisy.  “Guillaume de Courtenay seigneur de Venisy du chef de sa femme Marguerite de Chalon veuve en premières noces d’Henri de Brienne” sold a house “près du château de Venisy”, with the consent of “Gui Ragot seigneur de Champlost”, by charter dated Nov 1255[315]Seigneur de ChampignellesGuillelmus de Curtiniaco miles et dominus de Champignoliis...et Margareta uxor mea” confirmed the donation of part of the “nemoris de Burceio”, another part of which had been donated by “nobili muliere Ermensendi de Codretto”, made to Fontaine-Jean abbey, by “dominus Robertus de Curtiniaco quondam pater meus...[et] defunctus Philippus quondam frater meusby charter dated Apr 1256[316]The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[317]The testament of Guillelmus de Cortiniaco miles dominus de Champignoliarum”, dated 10 Sep 1276, donated property for the soul of “Margaretæ dominæ de Vinisiaco quondam uxoris meæ” and referred to “domum meam parisiensem” which he had bought from the executors of “Johannis bonæ memoriæ quondam archiepiscopi Remensis fratris mei[318]The testament of “Guillielmus de Cortiniaco miles dominus Champignoliarum”, dated Sep 1276, donated property for the soul of “dominæ Margaretæ dominæ de Vinisiaco quondam uxoris meæ[319]m firstly (Nov 1250) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Salins, widow of HENRI de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt et de Venisy, daughter of JEAN "l'Antique/le Sage" Seigneur de Salins [Bourgogne-Comté] & his first wife Mathilde de Bourgogne [Capet] (-[1259/64]).  “Guillaume de Courtenay seigneur de Venisy du chef de sa femme Marguerite de Chalon veuve en premières noces d’Henri de Brienne” sold a house “près du château de Venisy”, with the consent of “Gui Ragot seigneur de Champlost”, by charter dated Nov 1255[320]Guillelmus de Curtiniaco miles et dominus de Champignoliis...et Margareta uxor mea” confirmed the donation of part of the “nemoris de Burceio”, another part of which had been donated by “nobili muliere Ermensendi de Codretto”, made to Fontaine-Jean abbey, by “dominus Robertus de Curtiniaco quondam pater meus...[et] defunctus Philippus quondam frater meusby charter dated Apr 1256[321]m secondly (before Dec 1264) as her second husband, AGNES de Toucy, widow of GUILLAUME de Culant, daughter of ANSERIC [II] de Toucy Seigneur de Bazarne & his wife Guillerme de Montfaucon.  Guido de Thociaco dominus Bacernæ et Regnaudus frater meus dominus Campi-Pretiosi milites” and “domino Guillelmo de Curtiniaco et...Agnete eius uxore domina de Charenton sorore nostra” divided the succession of Agnes de Bazarne by charter dated Dec 1264[322].  Guillaume [I] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ISABELLE de Courtenay (-1296).  The marriage contract between “Guillelmus de Cortenayo miles dominus de Champineules...Ysabellam filiam meam quondam filiam defunctæ Margaretæ quondam uxoris meæ” and “Guillelmum de Borbonio...dominum de Becçayo” is dated 23 Oct 1270[323]A charter dated 22 Dec 1291 records repayment of a debt by "Isabelle de Courtenay dame de Bessay et de Guillaume son fils"[324]m (contract 23 Oct 1270) GUILLAUME de Bourbon Seigneur de Beçay, son of GUILLAUME de Bourbon Seigneur de Beçay & his wife Marguerite Dame de Boisrosier (-before Dec 1291). 

Guillaume [I] & his second wife had four children (confirmed in the case of Jean by the charter dated Apr 1302 quoted below, the dates of the careers of the other children suggest that they were all born from their father’s second marriage): 

b)         ROBERT de Courtenay (-3 Mar 1323, bur Reims)Seigneur de ChampignellesRobertus de Curtigniaco dominus castri de Champignoliis” confirmed donations to Fontaine-Jean made by “quondam avus meus Robertus de Curtigniaco buticularius Franciæ...quondam patruus meus Philippus de Curtigniaco...pater meus Guillermus de Curtigniaco” by charter dated Jun 1280[325]Robert et Iehans de Cortenay freres” agreed the inheritance of “Pierre de Cortenay jadis nostre frere” by charter dated 9 Oct 1290[326]Archbishop of Reims 1299.  The testament of “Robert de Courtenay...chapelain de la Vierge” is dated 1314[327]

c)         JEAN [I] de Courtenay (-[12 Jan 1317/end Nov 1318]).  “Robert et Iehans de Cortenay freres” agreed the inheritance of “Pierre de Cortenay jadis nostre frere” by charter dated 9 Oct 1290[328]Seigneur de ChampignellesJehan de Courtenay chevalier Seigneur de Champignelles et de la Ferté la Loupiere” confirmed “les coustumes de Lorris” to the inhabitants “en la...chastellenie de la Ferté” made by “bonne memoires Estienne, Guillaume et Louis comtes de Sancerre, Guillaume de Courtenay et Agnes sa femme mes feu pere et mere et seigneurs de laditte Ferté” by charter dated Apr 1302[329]Iohannes de Curteneyo dominus de Champignellis” founded a chapel “infra castrum nostrum de Champignellis” by charter dated Feb 1317[330]m (contract Gien Oct 1290) JEANNE de Sancerre Dame de Saint-Brisson et de Châtillon-sur-Loing, daughter of ETIENNE [III] de Sancerre Seigneur de Saint-Brisson & his wife Pernelle de Milly (-[11 Jan 1301/Apr 1313]).  The marriage contract of “Iohans de Courtenay Sires de Champignelles” and “damoisele Iohanne de Sancerre fille de...Etienne de Sancerre Seigneur de Saint Briçom chevalier” is dated Oct 1290[331].  Jean & his wife had eight children:

i)          JEAN [II] de Courtenay (-4 Dec 1334).  “Iehans de Chalon cuens d’Auceurre, de Tonneure et sires de Rochefort” granted property “en la terre de la mote de lez Champigneles...”, inherited from “bonne memoire madame Mahaut de Courtenay jadis comtesse de Tyete nostre cousine”, to “Iehan de Courtenay ainsné fiulz de nostre...neueu monseigneur Iehan de Courtenay sires de Champigneles et de Saint Briçon” is dated [24/30] Nov 1308[332]Seigneur de Champignelles

-         see below

ii)         PHILIPPE de Courtenay .  “Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[333].  Seigneur de la Ferté de la Loupière.  A charter dated [1/7] Oct 1331 records reimbursement to “Monsieur Iehan de Courtenay sire de Champignelles, monsieur Philippe de Courtenay sire de la Ferté de la Loupiere chevaliers, Robert de Courtenay preuost de Lille, Guillaume de Courtenay vidame de Reims, Estienne de Courtenay preuost de l’eglise de Reims et Pierre de Courtenay sire de la Villeneuve de la Genet escuyer tois freres” from the succession of their maternal grandmother[334]

iii)        MARGUERITE de Courtenay (-before 1335).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m as his first wife, ROBERT de Châtillon-en-Bazois, son of JEAN [II] de Châtillon-en-Bazois & his wife --- (-1353). 

iv)       ROBERT de Courtenay .  “Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[335].  Provost at Lille.  A charter dated [1/7] Oct 1331 records reimbursement to “Monsieur Iehan de Courtenay sire de Champignelles, monsieur Philippe de Courtenay sire de la Ferté de la Loupiere chevaliers, Robert de Courtenay preuost de Lille, Guillaume de Courtenay vidame de Reims, Estienne de Courtenay preuost de l’eglise de Reims et Pierre de Courtenay sire de la Villeneuve de la Genet escuyer tois freres” from the succession of their maternal grandmother[336]

v)        GUILLAUME de Courtenay .  “Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[337].  Vidame de Reims.  A charter dated [1/7] Oct 1331 records reimbursement to “Monsieur Iehan de Courtenay sire de Champignelles, monsieur Philippe de Courtenay sire de la Ferté de la Loupiere chevaliers, Robert de Courtenay preuost de Lille, Guillaume de Courtenay vidame de Reims, Estienne de Courtenay preuost de l’eglise de Reims et Pierre de Courtenay sire de la Villeneuve de la Genet escuyer tois freres” from the succession of their maternal grandmother[338]

vi)       ETIENNE de Courtenay .  “Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[339].  Provost at Reims.  A charter dated [1/7] Oct 1331 records reimbursement to “Monsieur Iehan de Courtenay sire de Champignelles, monsieur Philippe de Courtenay sire de la Ferté de la Loupiere chevaliers, Robert de Courtenay preuost de Lille, Guillaume de Courtenay vidame de Reims, Estienne de Courtenay preuost de l’eglise de Reims et Pierre de Courtenay sire de la Villeneuve de la Genet escuyer tois freres” from the succession of their maternal grandmother[340]

vii)      PIERRE de Courtenay .  “Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[341].  Seigneur de la Villeneuve de la Genet.  A charter dated [1/7] Oct 1331 records reimbursement to “Monsieur Iehan de Courtenay sire de Champignelles, monsieur Philippe de Courtenay sire de la Ferté de la Loupiere chevaliers, Robert de Courtenay preuost de Lille, Guillaume de Courtenay vidame de Reims, Estienne de Courtenay preuost de l’eglise de Reims et Pierre de Courtenay sire de la Villeneuve de la Genet escuyer tois freres” from the succession of their maternal grandmother[342]

-         SEIGNEURS de la FERTE-LOUPIERE[343].

viii)     JEANNE de Courtenay .  “Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[344]

d)         PIERRE de Courtenay (-before 9 Oct 1290).  “Robert et Iehans de Cortenay freres” agreed the inheritance of “Pierre de Cortenay jadis nostre frere” by charter dated 9 Oct 1290[345]

e)         --- de Courtenay .  The marriage contract between “Petrus de Curteneio armiger...sororem suam” and “primogenitum domini Radulphi de Stratis Franciæ marescalli” is dated 1282[346].  An arrêt of parliament dated 1 Nov 1285 relates to the marriage contract between “primogenitum Radulphi de Stratis quondam Franciæ Marescalli et dominam de Cloya olim contracti” and assigns dower to “Reginaldus de Tria miles modo maritus dictæ dominæ[347]m firstly (contract 1282) --- de Sores, son of RAOUL de Sores surnommé d’Estrée & his wife ---.  m secondly (before 1 Nov 1285) RENAUD de Trie, son of ---. 

8.         RAOUL de Courtenay (-1271)Robertus de Curtigniaco, Buticularius Franciæ, Petro, Philippo et Radulpho filiis suis” agreed a division of their territories by charter dated Mar 1236 (O.S.)[348]The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[349].  Seigneur d’Illiers.  He was installed as Conte di Chieti in 1269 by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] as a reward for his part in the conquest of the kingdom.  m as her second husband, ALIX de Montfort Ctss de Bigorre, widow of JOURDAIN ESCHIVAT [III] de Chabanais, daughter of GUY de Montfort & his wife Pétronille de Comminges Ctss de Bigorre ([1217/20]-1255).  Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated Dec 1276 under which her son "Eschivatus comes Bigorre dominus de Chabanesio" confirmed the donation of half the county of Bigorre, in furtherance of the agreement made by "Petronilla quondam comitissa Bigorre avia mea" with the consent of "Aalipdis matris mee filie dicte comitisse" and the marriage contract between "dictam dominam Aalipdem matrem meam" and "dominum Radulphum de Courtenayo", to "soror mea Mathildis de Courtenayo filia dictorum Radulfi et Aalipdis"[350]Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATHILDE de Courtenay ([1254]-Naples 1303)"Eschivatus comes Bigorre dominus de Chabanesio" confirmed the donation of half the county of Bigorre, in furtherance of the agreement made by "Petronilla quondam comitissa Bigorre avia mea" with the consent of "Aalipdis matris mee filie dicte comitisse" and the marriage contract between "dictam dominam Aalipdem matrem meam" and "dominum Radulphum de Courtenayo", to "soror mea Mathildis de Courtenayo filia dictorum Radulfi et Aalipdis" by charter dated Dec 1276[351]Ctss di Chieti, dame de Pandy et de Neuvy.  Her marriage was arranged by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet][352]A charter dated 1297 records the appointment of arbitrators in the dispute between "Mathildis de Courtenaio comitissa Theati uxor…domini Philippi de Flandria, filii…comitis Flandrensis" and "Lora vicecomitissa Turenne domina de Cabanesio soror dicte domine Mathildis" concerning the county of Bigorre, which they had sold to "domina Johanna regina Francie et Navarre"[353].  A charter dated 1 Mar 1298 records the decision of the arbitrators in the dispute between "domina Matildim comitissam Theauti" and "dominam Loram vicecomitissam Turenne dominam de Cabanesio sororem dicte domine Mathildis" concerning the county of Bigorre, deciding that if the county was ever recovered from "domina Johanna regina Francie et Navarre" it should be held by both parties according to their respective shares[354]She returned to Flanders with her husband in May 1303[355]m (contract Wijnendaele 1284 before 25 Jun) as his first wife, PHILIPPE de Flandre Conte di Teano, son of GUY Count of Flanders & his first wife Mathilde de Béthune ([1263]-in Italy Nov 1318). 

9.         ISABELLE de Courtenay (-22 Sep 1257).  “Joannes comes Burgundiæ dominus Salinensis” donated property to the abbey of la Charité, with the consent of “uxoris nostræ Elizabeth et filiorum meorum Hugonis, Joannis et Roberti”, by charter dated Aug 1245[356].  “Henricus Soliaci dominus et Guillerma domina de Baysernis et de Campo petroso” confirmed to “Iohanni comitis in Burgundia et domino de Salins atque Ysabelli uxori suæ” the grant of “casale de Lapau de Baloeme et nemus...ratione dotalitii prædictæ Ysabellis quæ fuit uxor nobilis quondam viri Reginaldi de Montefalconis iuvenis defuncti” to ”Odoni de Trossebois militi” by charter dated 1252[357].  The necrology of the Cordeliers de Salins records the death X Kal Oct” of “domina Elizabeth quondam nobilis comitissa Cabilonensis[358]A charter dated 2 Jan 1261 of “Jehans cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” names “la contesse Ysabel, nostre seconde fame…fille mons. Robert de Courtenay[359]m firstly RENAUD [III] de Montfaucon, son of RENAUD Seigneur de Montfaucon [en Berry] & his wife Mathilde Dame de Charenton.  m secondly ([1242/43]) as his second wife, JEAN [I] "l'Antique/le Sage" Comte d'Auxonne et de Chalon, Seigneur de Salins, son of ETIENNE III Comte dAuxonne [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Béatrice de Chalon (1190-30 Aug 1267, bur Abbaye de Bourguignon-lès-la Charité, Haute-Saône). 

 

 

JEAN [II] de Courtenay, son of JEAN [I] de Courtenay Seigneur de Champignelles & his wife Jeanne de Sancerre Dame de Saint-Brisson et de Châtillon-sur-Loing (-4 Dec 1334).  “Iehans de Chalon cuens d’Auceurre, de Tonneure et sires de Rochefort” granted property “en la terre de la mote de lez Champigneles...”, inherited from “bonne memoire madame Mahaut de Courtenay jadis comtesse de Tyete nostre cousine”, to “Iehan de Courtenay ainsné fiulz de nostre...neueu monseigneur Iehan de Courtenay sires de Champigneles et de Saint Briçon” is dated [24/30] Nov 1308[360]Messire Iehans, messire Philippes chevaliers, Roberts, Guillaume, Estiennes et Pierres clercs [...damoiselle Iehanne seur desdits freres]...enfans de...Iehan de Courtenay jadis seigneur de Champignelles chevalier et de feu madame Iehanne de Sancerre jadis sa femme” divided the succession of their parents by charter dated [end Nov/4 Dec] 1318[361]Seigneur de ChampignellesA charter dated [1/7] Oct 1331 records reimbursement to “Monsieur Iehan de Courtenay sire de Champignelles, monsieur Philippe de Courtenay sire de la Ferté de la Loupiere chevaliers, Robert de Courtenay preuost de Lille, Guillaume de Courtenay vidame de Reims, Estienne de Courtenay preuost de l’eglise de Reims et Pierre de Courtenay sire de la Villeneuve de la Genet escuyer tois freres” from the succession of their maternal grandmother[362]

m ([1328]) MARGUERITE de Saint-Vérain Dame de Blénau, de la Brosse et de Maupas, daughter of PHILIPPE de Saint-Vérain & his wife Jeanne de Joigny (-after 1363).  “Marguerite de S. Verain dame de Champignelles et de saint Briçon et femme iadis...feu monsieur Iehan de Courtenay iadis seigneur de Champignelles et de saint Briçon” swore allegiance to “monsieur le comte de Sancerre” for her territories in the name of her children by charter dated [early Jul] 1335[363]

Jean [II] & his wife had three children: 

1.         JEAN [III] de Courtenay (-Château de Champalement Jun 1392, bur Champignelles)Seigneur de Champignelles et de Saint-Brisson.  m (1368) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Thianges, widow of HUGUES Seigneur de l’Espinasse, daughter of GUY [I] de Thianges Seigneur de Champalement & his wife Marguerite de Fontenay (-after 21 Nov 1392). 

2.         PIERRE [II] de Courtenay (-Château de Champignelles 12 Mar 1394, bur Champignelles).  Seigneur de de Bleneau et de Nully.  He succeeded his brother as Seigneur de Champignelles et de Saint-Brisson.  m AGNES de Melun Dame d’Esprenne en Brie, daughter of JEAN [III] de Melun Seigneur de la Borde & his wife Isabelle de Guerchy (-after 7 Mar 1414).  Pierre [II] & his wife had children: 

a)         PIERRE [III] de Courtenay (-early 1411).  Seigneur de Champignelles et de Saint-Brisson.  m (contract 17 May 1405) as her first husband, JEANNE Braque, daughter of BLANCHET Braque Seigneur de Saint-Maurice-sur-Laveron, de Châtillon-sur-Loing et de Courcelles-le-Roy & his wife --- (-after 1469).  She married secondly (contract 26 Nov 1413) Jean [II] Lourdin Seigneur de Saligny, de la Mothe-Saint-Jean, du Rousset et de la Grange [en Berry].  Pierre [III] & his wife had one child: 

i)          JEAN [IV] de Courtenay (-after 1 Aug 1472, bur Châtillon-sur-Loing Saint-Pierre)Seigneur de Champignelles, de Saint-Brisson, de Saint-Maurice-sur-Laveron, de Dannemarie en Puisaye, de Meleroy et de Courcelles-le-Roy.  m firstly (1435) ISABELLE de Châtillon, daughter of JACQUES de Châtillon Seigneur de Dampierre, Amiral de France & his wife Jeanne de la Rivière.  m secondly as her second husband, MARGUERITE David, widow of ETIENNE de Vignolles “la Hire” Seigneur de Montmorillon, daughter of HENRI David Seigneur de Longueval & his wife Jeanne de Lisac Dame de Droisy (-after 24 Aug 1469).  

b)         JEAN de Courtenay (-1460).  Seigneur de Bleneau.  m (contract 12 Jan 1423) CATHERINE de l’Hôpital, daughter of FRANÇOIS de l’Hôpital Seigneur de Soisy aux Loges & his wife Catherine Lorfèvre (-before 17 Dec 1457). 

-        SEIGNEURS de CHAMPIGNELLES[364].

3.         ALIX de Courtenay (-after 20 May 1342).  She was named with her brothers in an arrêt of the parlement de Paris 20 May 1342[365]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    JOIGNY

 

 

 

A.      COMTES de JOIGNY

 

 

Joigny lies about 20 kilometres south of Sens, and about the same distance north of Auxerre in the duchy of Burgundy, in the present-day French département of Yonne. 

 

 

1.         GEOFFROY de Joigny, son of --- (-[6 Mar] [Nov 1035/1 Mar 1042])Edouard de Saint-Phalle suggests that he was Geoffroy, nepos of Gauthier Comte de Gâtinais, referring to the letter dated to [997] in which Abbon abbé de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire requested Pope Gregory V to order "…Quauz---, nepos Wal--- comitis de Castro Nantonis" to cease his activities (presumably against the monastery) under threat of excommunication, by letter dated [997][366].  He bases his theory on the donation dated Nov 1035 by Geoffroy de Joigny's son, Gilduin Archbishop of Sens, to the same abbey.  The necrology of Saint-Etienne, Troyes records the death "6 Mar" of "Gaufridi de Jooigny"[367], although it is not known whether this entry refers to this Geoffroy.  m as her first husband, ALIX de Sens, daughter of RENARD [I] Comte de Sens & his wife ---.  She married secondly as his second wife, Engelbert [II] Comte de Brienne.  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  “Gaufridus comes” renounced rights over the village of Migennes which “domnus Gaufridus pater meus” had appropriated, in favour of the monastery of Notre-Dame et de Saint-Julien d’Auxerre at the request of “matris meæ Adhelaidis” and with the consent of “fratrum meorum Gilduini…archiepiscopi Senonensis et Rainardi”, by charter dated 1 Mar 1042[368].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "comes de Brena super Albam Engelbertus" as "comitissam Ioviniaci viduam de primo marito"[369].  She died before her husband, as the same passage refers to her son-in-law inheriting Joigny from her after her death and subsequently building the first castle of Joinville with the help of his father-in-law.  Geoffroy & his wife had three children: 

a)         GEOFFROY de Joigny (-after 1080).  Comte de Joigny.  “Gaufridus comes” renounced rights over the village of Migennes which “domnus Gaufridus pater meus” had appropriated, in favour of the monastery of Notre-Dame et de Saint-Julien d’Auxerre at the request of “matris meæ Adhelaidis” and with the consent of “fratrum meorum Gilduini…archiepiscopi Senonensis et Rainardi”, by charter dated 1 Mar 1042[370].  "Gaufridus Jauviaci comes" founded the priory of Notre-Dame de Joigny, with the consent of "uxore mea et liberis Gaufredo atque Rainaldo", by charter dated 1080[371]m --- (-after 1080).  The name of Geoffroy's wife is not known.  "Gaufridus Jauviaci comes" founded the priory of Notre-Dame de Joigny, with the consent of "uxore mea et liberis Gaufredo atque Rainaldo", by charter dated 1080[372].  Geoffroy & his wife had two children: 

i)          GEOFFROY de Joigny (-after 1080).  "Gaufridus Jauviaci comes" founded the priory of Notre-Dame de Joigny, with the consent of "uxore mea et liberis Gaufredo atque Rainaldo", by charter dated 1080[373]

ii)         RENARD [II] de Joigny (-after [1096])"Gaufridus Jauviaci comes" founded the priory of Notre-Dame de Joigny, with the consent of "uxore mea et liberis Gaufredo atque Rainaldo", by charter dated 1080[374].  "Letericus, Margaudi fliius" donated property to the priory of Notre-Dame de Joigny by charter dated to [1082/85], confirmed by "Rainardus Gaufridi filius comitis"[375]Comte de JoignyWilliam of Tyre records that he joined the First Crusade in 1096[376]m [VAINDEMONDE] de Courtenay, daughter of JOSCELIN [I] Seigneur de Courtenay & his first wife Isabelle de Montlhéry.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Historia of Monk Aimon, which names "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio" as the two sons of the daughter of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" by his wife "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole"[377].  She is named Vaindemonde in Europäische Stammtafeln[378], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  Renard & his wife had two children: 

(a)       GUYAccording to the Historia of Monk Aimon, "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio" were the two sons of the daughter of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" by his wife "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole"[379]

(b)       RENARDAccording to the Historia of Monk Aimon, "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio" were the two sons of the daughter of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" by his wife "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole"[380]same person as…?  RENARD [III] (-1150)Comte de Joignym [firstly/secondly] WANDALMODE de Beaujeu, daughter of HUMBERT [II] Seigneur de Beaujeu & his wife Auxilia ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m [firstly/secondly] ALIX de Blois, daughter ETIENNE Comte de Blois & his wife Adela of England.  Alice is shown by Weir[381] as the youngest daughter of Comte Etienne and the wife of "Renaud III Comte de Joigny" (who has not been identified) but the primary source on which this is based has not been found.  La Thaumassière names “Alix femme de Regnaud IV Comte de Joigny” as youngest daughter of Etienne Comte de Blois and his wife, but does not cite the source on which this information is based[382]

b)         RENARD .  “Gaufridus comes” renounced rights over the village of Migennes which “domnus Gaufridus pater meus” had appropriated, in favour of the monastery of Notre-Dame et de Saint-Julien d’Auxerre at the request of “matris meæ Adhelaidis” and with the consent of “fratrum meorum Gilduini…archiepiscopi Senonensis et Rainardi”, by charter dated 1 Mar 1042[383]Comte de Joignym ([1040/42], separated) as her second husband, AELIS de Bar-sur-Aube, widow of RENAUD de Semur-en-Brionnais, daughter and heiress of NOCHER [II] Comte de Bar-sur-Aube et de Vitry-en-Perthois & his wife --- (-1053).  The Acta Sanctorum commentary on the life of St Simon de Valois records that "Rodulpho (Simonis genitori)" married three wives, firstly "Adela, Nocheri Barrensis ad Albam comitis filia, Notheri comitis Suessionum neptis, Archardi proneptis" who had previously married "Rainaldum de Sinemuro, Rainardum comitem de Jooniaco, Rotgerium de Wangionis ripa"[384].  She married thirdly ([1041/43], separated) as his second wife, Roger [I] avoué de Vignory, and fourthly ([1041/45]) as his first wife, Raoul [III] Comte de Valois

c)         GILDUIN (-after 3 Oct 1049)Archbishop of Sens 1032.  Gaufridus comes” renounced rights over the village of Migennes which “domnus Gaufridus pater meus” had appropriated, in favour of the monastery of Notre-Dame et de Saint-Julien d’Auxerre at the request of “matris meæ Adhelaidis” and with the consent of “fratrum meorum Gilduini…archiepiscopi Senonensis et Rainardi”, by charter dated 1 Mar 1042[385]He donated property in Gâtinais to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, in the presence of his father Geoffroy, by charter dated Nov 1035[386].  He was deposed as archbishop for simony in 1049 by the council of Reims. 

 

 

1.         RENARD [IV] de Joigny (-[1164/72])Comte de JoignyA charter dated 1164 records a dispute involving "Rainardum comitem Joignaci" and the abbey of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre, witnessed by "ex parte…comitis: Garinus filius vicecomitis Senonensis"[387]m ADELAIDE de Nevers, daughter of GUILLAUME [IV] Comte de Nevers & his wife Ida von Sponheim [Carinthia].  A charter dated 1161 records the settlement between the abbey of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre and "comes Joviniacensis, Rainardus", witnessed by "comitissa Joviniaci, Aalaidis…filia…comitis Nivernensis"[388].  "Adelaidis comitissa Joviniaci" confirmed the donation of property to the abbey of Dilo by "dominus meus Rainardus comes maritus meus" by charter dated 1172[389].  Renard [IV] & his wife had four children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [I] de Joigny (-15 Feb 1220).  "Willelmus comes Joigniaci" recognised the rights of the abbey of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre, in memory of "Regnaudus pater meus", by charter dated 1210[390]Comte de Joigny

-        see below

b)         GAUCHER de Joigny (-before Nov 1237).  "Willelmus comes Joviniaci" granted fishing rights to Pontigny, later approved by "uxor mea Aalait et frater meus Gaucherius”, by charter dated [18 Sep 1180/24 Mar 1181][391].  "Gaucherus de Joviniaco et dominus de Rameruco" confirmed the donation to Montiéramy made by “Andreas dominus de Rameruco cujus uxorem post eius obitum desponsavi” by charter dated 1195[392].  Seigneur de Châteaurenard.  Seneschal of Nevers.  “Dominus Gaucherus de Jovigniaco et domina Aelicia de Venesiaco uxor eius et dominus Erardus de Brena ipsius Aelicie filius” confirmed the donation made by “Milo de Pogiaco et Helisabeth uxor sua” to Sens Maison-Dieu by charter dated Aug 1207[393].  “Gaucherus de Joviniaco dominus Venisiaci...et uxor mea A. et filius eius E. de Brena” relinquished rights in the forest of Saint-Etienne in favour of Pontigny abbey by charter dated 1211[394].  “...Barons...Gaucher de Joigny frère du comte...” is named among the nobles in Champagne who confirmed the decision by Blanche Ctss de Champagne to allow succession of fiefs in the female line by charter dated 1212[395]Galcherus de Jovigniaco et...Amicya uxor dicti Galcheri” donated property to Escharlis abbey by charter dated Apr 1229[396].  “Galcherus de Jovigniaco…et uxorem meam Amiciam” noted a land transfer by “Matildis comitissa Nivernensis” before her marriage to “Guidonem comitem Forensem”, by charter dated 18 May 1231[397]m firstly (1195 or before) as her second husband, ADELAIS de Venisy, widow of ANDRE de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt, daughter of ANSEAU de Venisy & his wife Isabelle de Nangis [Capet] (-[20 Mar 1221/Nov 1222]).  Documents dated Jul 1213 and Aug 1213, relating to the consanguinity between Erard de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt and his wife Philippa of Jerusalem, records "rex Franciæ…Grossus rex fratrem…Florium…filia Isabellis de Nangies…domina de Venisiaco", adding that her daughter was "domina de Venisiaco, mater…[Erardum de Rameruco] [Erardum de Brena]", another document in the series clarifying that Isabelle was the mother of "Aalaidis dominæ Venisiaci…mater…Erardi"[398]Dame de Venisy.  "Gaucherus de Joviniaco et dominus de Rameruco" confirmed the donation to Montiéramy made by “Andreas dominus de Rameruco cujus uxorem post eius obitum desponsavi” by charter dated 1195[399].  “Dominus Gaucherus de Jovigniaco et domina Aelicia de Venesiaco uxor eius et dominus Erardus de Brena ipsius Aelicie filius” confirmed the donation made by “Milo de Pogiaco et Helisabeth uxor sua” to Sens Maison-Dieu by charter dated Aug 1207[400].  “Gaucherus de Joviniaco dominus Venisiaci...et uxor mea A. et filius eius E. de Brena” relinquished rights in the forest of Saint-Etienne in favour of Pontigny abbey by charter dated 1211[401]m secondly (before May 1226) AMICIE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON [V] Seigneur de Montfort & his wife Alix de Montmorency (-20 Feb 1253).  Galcherus de Jovigniaco et...Amicya uxor dicti Galcheri” donated property to Escharlis abbey by charter dated Apr 1229[402].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  “Galcherus de Jovigniaco…et uxorem meam Amiciam” noted a land transfer by “Matildis comitissa Nivernensis” before her marriage to “Guidonem comitem Forensem”, by charter dated 18 May 1231[403].  Mathilde Ctss de Nevers confirmed the donation of "villa sue de Nannaio, Autissiodorensis diecesis" made to the chapter of Auxerre by “Amicie relicte bone memorie Galteri de Joigniaco et Galterii filii eorumdem” by charter dated May 1241[404]Gauthier & his second wife had two children: 

i)          PETRONILLE (-1289).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1249 under which [her husband] Petrus de Cortiniaco dominus de Conches” promised to pay Louis IX King of France in respect of property inherited from “domini Galcheri de Jovigniaco quondam fratris uxoris meæ[405].  Dame de Sully et de Châteaurenard.  Petronilla de Curtiniaco domina Castri-Renardi” confirmed the donation made to “sororibus Sancti Dominici iuxta Montem-Argi”, made by “domina et mater mea Amicia de Iouiniaco...bonæ memoriæ Galcherus de Iouigniaco quondam frater meus”, by charter dated Jul 1251[406].  “Henricus dominus Soliaci miles” acknowledged receipt of “terram heredis defuncti Petri de Curtineio...in Normannia”, by charter dated Nov 1253[407].  The marriage contract between “Robertus filius bonæ memoriæ Roberti comitis Attrebatensis” and “Amicia filia quondam Petri de Curtigniaco” is dated 13 Jun 1259,  and names “Petronilla uxor Henrici de Soliaco dictæ Amiciæ mater...Robertus Aurelianensis episcopus, Radulphus, Ioannes, Guillelmus de Curtigniaco fratres, patrui dictæ Amiciæ, Simon de Monteforti comes Leycestriæ avunculus dictæ Amiciæ[408]m firstly (before May 1249) PIERRE de Courtenay Seigneur de Conches, son of ROBERT de Courtenay Seigneur de Champignelles & his second wife Mathilde de Mehun (-1250).  m secondly (Dec 1252) HENRI [II] Seigneur de Sully, son of HENRI [I] Seigneur de Sully & his first wife Marie de Dampierre (-in Italy 1269). 

ii)         GAUCHER (-before May 1249).  Mathilde Ctss de Nevers confirmed the donation of "villa sue de Nannaio, Autissiodorensis diecesis" made to the chapter of Auxerre by “Amicie relicte bone memorie Galteri de Joigniaco et Galterii filii eorumdem” by charter dated May 1241[409]Monk.  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated May 1249 under which [his brother-in-law] Petrus de Cortiniaco dominus de Conches” promised to pay Louis IX King of France in respect of property inherited from “domini Galcheri de Jovigniaco quondam fratris uxoris meæ[410]

c)         AGNES (-1202 or after).  Dame de Ramerupt "Symon dominus Bellifortis" donated property to Chapelle-aux-Planches by charter dated 1182 in which he names "Agnes uxor mea et dominus Hugo Brecarum frater meus", witnessed by "Erardus comes Brenensis"[411].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and her second marriage has not yet been identified.  m firstly (before 1172) SIMON de Broyes Seigneur de Beaufort, son of SIMON [I] Seigneur de Broyes & his wife Félicité de Brienne (-1187 or after).  m secondly HENRI d'Arzillières, son of ---. 

d)         HELISENDE de Joigny (-26 Feb after 1226).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Her first marriage is indicated by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which records the departure on crusade in 1219 of "comes Milo de Barro super Sequanam cum filio suo Galthero et cum Iohanne de Arceis filiastro suo"[412].  "Johannes de Arcies", leaving for Jerusalem, donated rights to the churches of Escharlis and Fontaine-Jean, with the consent of "Helissanz uxor mea", by charter dated 1189[413].  “Milo comes Barri super Sequanam” confirmed a purchase by the people of Bar, with the consent of “uxoris mee Helissendis”, by charter dated [29 Mar/17 Apr] 1199[414].  "Helisendi uxore sua et Galtherio filio suo" consented to the donation by "Milo comes Bari super Secanam" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun confirmed by charter dated 12 Oct 1199[415].  "Milo comes Barri super Sequanam" made donations to the abbey of Mores by charter dated 1210, with the consent of "uxoris mee Elissendis et filii mei Gaucherii"[416].  "Milo comes Barri super Sequanam" confirmed donations to the abbey of Mores by charter dated 1206[417].  "Millo comes Barri super Secanam et Elixanda uxor mea et Gaucherus filius meus" founded the Hospital of Bar-sur-Seine by charter dated 1210[418].  "Milo comes Barri super Sequanam et Elissendis comitissa et Galaherius filius eorum" confirmed donations to the abbey of Mores by charter dated Feb 1218, with the consent of "uxoris mee Elissendis et filii mei Gaucherii"[419].  “Helisendis comitissa Barri super Secanam” donated her rights in “domo monachorum de Vilael" to "abbatem…Majoris Monasterii", for the souls of "Milonis mariti mei, comitis Barri, et filiorum meorum Johannis et Gaucherii", by charter dated [30 Mar/18 Apr] 1226[420].  The necrology of the Abbaye des Clairets records the death "IV Kal Mar" of "Helisendis…comitissa Barri super Sequanam"[421]m firstly JEAN de Montréal Seigneur d’Arcis-sur-Aube, son of ANSERIC [I] Seigneur de Montréal & his wife Alaidis de Pleurre (-Acre 7 Jul 1189).  m secondly (before 1198) MILON Comte de Bar-sur-Seine, son of HUGUES [IV] du Puiset Comte de Bar-sur-Seine & his wife Petronille Ctss de Bar-sur-Seine (-Damietta 17/18 Aug 1219). 

2.         HELWIDE (-1214 or after).  The primary source which confirms her origin has not yet been identified.  Abbess of Saint-Julien, Auxerre. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [I] de Joigny, son of RENARD [IV] Comte de Joigny & his wife Adelaide de Nevers (-15 Feb 1220)Comte de Joigny.  "Willelmus comes Joviniaci" granted fishing rights to Pontigny, later approved by "uxor mea Aalait et frater meus Gaucherius”, by charter dated [18 Sep 1180/24 Mar 1181][422].  "Willelmus comes Joigniaci" recognised the rights of the abbey of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre, in memory of "Regnaudus pater meus", by charter dated 1210[423].  The necrology of Sens cathedral records the death "X Kal Jan" of "Guillelmus comes Joveigniaci"[424]

m firstly ([1178], divorced 1186) as her first husband, ALIX de Courtenay, daughter of PIERRE [I] Seigneur de Courtenay [Capet] & his wife Elisabeth de Courtenay ([1160/65]-12 Feb 1218).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem et Robertum de Cortenaio et quondam Guillemum" as "Alaydis...alia mater Hugonis de Marchia in Hungaria, tertia Clementia…quarta domna de Charrosio in Bituria, quinta Constantia", specifying that Alix married firstly "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum" and secondly "Engolismensi comitis" by whom she was mother of "Isabellam modernam Anglie reginam"[425].  "Willelmus comes Joviniaci" granted fishing rights to Pontigny, later approved by "uxor mea Aalait et frater meus Gaucherius”, by charter dated [18 Sep 1180/24 Mar 1181][426].  She married secondly (1186) Aymar I Comte d'Angoulême.  The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "Id Feb" of "Alesis comitissa Angolismensis"[427]

m secondly BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-11 May, 1226 or after).  Beatrix comitissa Jovigniaci...Willelmum filium meum” swore hommage to Blanche comtesse de Champagne by charter dated 19 Apr 1222[428].  According to La Thaumassière, she was the daughter of Guillaume I Comte de Sancerre, but he does not cite the source on which this information is based[429]Comitissa Joigniaci Beatrix...et Guillelmus primogenitus eius” granted protection to “Stephanus Bocheri præpositus Joigniaci homo meus...et Elisabeth uxorem eiusby charter dated 2 Dec 1222[430].  The necrology of Sens cathedral records the death "V Id May" of "Beatrix comitissa Jovigniaci"[431]

Guillaume [I] & his first wife had one child: 

1.         PIERRE (-Apr 1222).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the sisters of "comitem Petrum Autissiodorensem…Alaydis...", married firstly to "comitis Guillemo Ioviniaci" by whom she was mother of "comitem Petrum"[432].  “Petrus de Joigniaco” appointed Blanche comtesse de Champagne as guarantor relating to land granted to him by “dominum et patrem meum Willermum comitem Jovigniaci” by charter dated Aug 1208[433]Comte de Joigny.  "Guillelmus comes Joviniaci" settled a dispute with Pontigny concerning a donation made by "fratris mei P[etri] quondam comitis Joviniaci" and confirmed a donation made by “bone memorie Guillelmi patris mei”, with the consent of “Elysabeth uxor mea”, by charter dated 1231[434]m ELISABETH, daughter of --- (-before 31 Mar 1222).  

Guillaume [I] & his second wife had two children: 

2.         GUILLAUME [II] (-before Apr 1248)Beatrix comitissa Jovigniaci...Willelmum filium meum” swore hommage to Blanche comtesse de Champagne by charter dated 19 Apr 1222[435]Comte de JoignyComitissa Joigniaci Beatrix...et Guillelmus primogenitus eius” granted protection to “Stephanus Bocheri præpositus Joigniaci homo meus...et Elisabeth uxorem eiusby charter dated 2 Dec 1222[436].  "Guillelmus comes Joviniaci" settled a dispute with Pontigny concerning a donation made by "fratris mei P[etri] quondam comitis Joviniaci" and confirmed a donation made by “bone memorie Guillelmi patris mei”, with the consent of “Elysabeth uxor mea”, by charter dated 1231[437].  "Guillelmus comes Jovigniaci" and Pontigny agreed adjustments to revenue donated by "nobilis viri defuncti Petri quondam comitis Joviniaci...Guillelmus comes Jovigniaci pater ipsorum Guillelmi et Petri", with the consent of “Helysabeth uxor sua”, by charter dated Mar [1231/32][438]m (before Jun 1230) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Noyers, daughter of MILON [VII] Seigneur de Noyers & his wife Agnes de Brienne (-after 1278).  "Guillelmus comes Joviniaci" settled a dispute with Pontigny concerning a donation made by "fratris mei P[etri] quondam comitis Joviniaci" and confirmed a donation made by “bone memorie Guillelmi patris mei”, with the consent of “Elysabeth uxor mea”, by charter dated 1231[439].  "Guillelmus comes Jovigniaci" and Pontigny agreed adjustments to revenue donated by "nobilis viri defuncti Petri quondam comitis Joviniaci...Guillelmus comes Jovigniaci pater ipsorum Guillelmi et Petri", with the consent of “Helysabeth uxor sua”, by charter dated Mar [1231/32][440].  She married secondly (after 1255) Jean [III] Seigneur d’Arcis-sur-Aube.  Guillaume [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME [III] (-1261 or after)Comte de Joigny

-        see below

3.         BLANCHE (-after Oct 1252)"Blancha domina Virsionis" granted rights of passage to Bourges cathedral, for an anniversary for "domini Guillelmi quondam domini Virsionis", by charter dated Oct 1252[441]m firstly as his second wife, GUILLAUME [I] de Chauvigny Seigneur de Châteauroux, son of ANDRE [I] de Chauvigny Seigneur de Chauvigny & his wife Denise de Déols (-[Jan/Mar] 1234)m secondly GUILLAUME [II] de Vierzon, son of HERVE [II] Seigneur de Vierzon & his second wife Marie de Dampierre (-[1250/Oct 1252]).   

 

 

GUILLAUME [III] de Joigny, son of GUILLAUME [II] Comte de Joigny & his wife Elisabeth de Noyers (-1261 or after)Comte de Joigny

m firstly (1248) AGNES de Châteauvillain, daughter of SIMON [I] Seigneur de Châteauvillain [Broyes] & his wife Alix ---.  Her name is confirmed by the marriage contract between [her husband] Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis”, dated 8 Nov 1257, under which Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitis[442]

m secondly (contract 8 Nov 1257) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Mello, daughter of GUILLAUME de Mello & his wife --- (-1301 or after).  The marriage contract between Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis” is dated 8 Nov 1257, names “Guidoni Altissiod. episcopo patruo eiusdem Isabellis et tutor ipsius legitimo” in favour of whom Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitiswhen they reached 12 years of age and of “patris ipsarum, vel Joannis filii ipsius comitis, fratris earundam[443].  She married secondly (before 25 Jul 1276) Humbert de Beaujeu Seigneur de MontpensierJehan cuens de Jougny et...Marie comtesse de Jougny femme de ce dit Jehan” confirmed the disenfranchisement of the inhabitants of Coulanges-les-Vineuses et la Baroche by charter dated 1279, which names “Humbert de Biaujey connestable de France, sieur de Montpencier et de Sainct-Morise et...Isabeau connestablesse de France jadis contesse de Jougny, et...Berault de Marcuil père de ladite Marie contesse de Jougny nostre femme...et...monseignour de Chasteau-Villain nostre oncle[444]

Guillaume [III] & his first wife had four children: 

1.         JEAN [I] de Joigny (-killed in battle 1283).  His parentage is confirmed by the marriage contract between [his father] Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis”, dated 8 Nov 1257, under which [his father] Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitiswhen they reached 12 years of age and of “patris ipsarum, vel Joannis filii ipsius comitis, fratris earundam[445]Comte de JoignyJehan cuens de Jougny et...Marie comtesse de Jougny femme de ce dit Jehan” confirmed the disenfranchisement of the inhabitants of Coulanges-les-Vineuses et la Baroche by charter dated 1279, which names “Humbert de Biaujey connestable de France, sieur de Montpencier et de Sainct-Morise et...Isabeau connestablesse de France jadis contesse de Jougny, et...Berault de Marcuil père de ladite Marie contesse de Jougny nostre femme...et...monseignour de Chasteau-Villain nostre oncle[446]m (before 1279) MARIE de Mercœur, daughter of BERAUD [VI] Seigneur de Mercœur & his wife Beatrix de Bourbon.  Jehan cuens de Jougny et...Marie comtesse de Jougny femme de ce dit Jehan” confirmed the disenfranchisement of the inhabitants of Coulanges-les-Vineuses et la Baroche by charter dated 1279, which names “Humbert de Biaujey connestable de France, sieur de Montpencier et de Sainct-Morise et...Isabeau connestablesse de France jadis contesse de Jougny, et...Berault de Marcuil père de ladite Marie contesse de Jougny nostre femme...et...monseignour de Chasteau-Villain nostre oncle[447].  1297.  Jean [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN [II] “Blondel” de Joigny (-1324)Comte de Joigny.  1305.  m firstly (1297) AGNES de Brienne, daughter of HUGUES Comte de Brienne Conte di Lecce Regent of Athens & his first wife Isabelle of Athens.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Gautier et Agnes" as the children of "Hugue…cuens de Brene" and his wife "Ysabeau la fille dou duc d'Athanes, qui avoit esté feme dou seignor de Karitaine"[448].  The Istoria of Marino Sanudo Torsello records that "[la] figliola" of "il conte de Brenna" and his wife "la figlia del signor della Rocia" married "al conite Altino da Campagna"[449]The primary source which confirms her marriage more precisely has not yet been identified.  m secondly ALIXENDE de Mercœur, daughter of BERAUD [VII] Seigneur de Mercœur & his wife Blanche de Salins (-23 Sep 1336).  Jean [II] & his first wife had one child: 

i)          JEANNE (-2 Sep 1336).  The Istoria of Marino Sanudo Torsello records that the wife of "miser Carlo figlio de miser Carlo de Vallois consobrino del Rè di Francia" was "[la] figliola…[del] conite Altino da Campagna" and his wife "la figliola…[del] conte di Brenna"[450]Ctss de Joigny.  The necrology of the Hôpital de Joigny records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "domine Johanne quondam comitisse Alençonii et Joigniaci et fundatricis istius hospitalis"[451]m (contract Apr 1314) as his first wife, CHARLES [II] de Valois, son of CHARLES de France Comte de Valois & his first wife Marguerite of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (1297-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  He succeeded in Apr 1326 as Comte d'Alençon et de Perche. 

b)         ISABELLE (-[1295/97]).  The Chronicle of Lanercost records that "rex Norwagiæ…frater" married "filiam comitis de Clermunth"[452]. The marriage contract between "Maria comitissa Jugniaci…Ysabellim filiam nostram" and "Hatuinum ducem Norwegiæ germanum…E. Norwegiæ regis" is dated Nov 1295[453]m ([1295/97]) as his first wife, HAAKON Magnusson of Norway, son of MAGNUS IV "Lagabøte/Lagabæter/the Law-reformer" King of Norway & his wife Ingeborg of Denmark (Tönsberg [10 Apr] 1270-Tönsberg 8 May 1319, bur Oslo, Maria Church).  He succeeded his brother in 1299 as HAAKON V King of Norway

2.         ISABELLE (-after 8 Nov 1257).  Her parentage is confirmed by the marriage contract between [her father] Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis”, dated 8 Nov 1257, under which [her father] Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitiswhen they reached 12 years of age and of “patris ipsarum, vel Joannis filii ipsius comitis, fratris earundam[454]

3.         JEANNE (before 1257-).  Her parentage is confirmed by the marriage contract between [her father] Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis”, dated 8 Nov 1257, under which [her father] Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitiswhen they reached 12 years of age and of “patris ipsarum, vel Joannis filii ipsius comitis, fratris earundam[455].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  m as his second wife, GUILLAUME d’Antigny Seigneur de Sainte-Croix, son of HENRI d’Antigny Seigneur de Sainte-Croix & his wife --- (-8 Oct 1287). 

4.         AGNES (before 1257-).  Her parentage is confirmed by the marriage contract between [her father] Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis”, dated 8 Nov 1257, under which [her father] Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitiswhen they reached 12 years of age and of “patris ipsarum, vel Joannis filii ipsius comitis, fratris earundam[456]

Guillaume [III] & his second wife had one child: 

5.         GUILLAUME (-before Aug 1322).  Seigneur de Saint-Maurice.  m ADELA de Montagu, daughter of ---.  1322. 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de JOIGNY (NOYERS)

 

 

JEAN de Noyers, son of MILON [X] Seigneur de Noyers & his third wife Jeanne de Montbéliard Dame de Foissy (1323-killed in battle Brignais 10 May 1361, bur Joigny)Comte de Joigny.  A manuscript records that “Monseigneur Mile seingnieur de Noyers boutillier de France” was sent by the king to meet the king of England, accompanied by “Jehan de Noyers conte de Jooigny et seingnieur d’Antigny son fils”, in Dec 1338[457]Seigneur de Vendeuvre, de Pouilly, de Montaiguillon et de Villenaux.  The testament of Miles de Noyers maréchal de France, made 1 May 1340, divided his territories “entre ses deux fils qui lui restoient, le 3o...Gauthier étant mort”, naming “Mile de Noyers son fils ainé, qu’il nomme sire de Montcornet” receiving Noyers, “Jean de Noyers son second fils...comte de Joigny...Vendeuvre, de Louvois et Paiens...[458]A charter dated 1364 records an agreement between "Milonem de Noeriis scutiferum tam nomine suo quam ut habentem ballum Erardi de Noeriis minoris annis, Ioannam et Ceciliam de Noeriis maiores annis, liberos quondam domini de Montecorneti" andOdonem dominum de Granceio ad causam Matildis suæ uxoris” relating to succession matters, stating that “quondam defunctus Milo dominus de Noeriis eorum avus” had “septem liberos...Milonem de Noeriis dominum de Montecorneti eorum patrem, Ioannem de Noeriis comitem de Ioigniaco, Gaucherum de Noeriis, dominam de Castrovillani, dominam de Granceyo, Ioannam et Helissant moniales monasterii Iotrensis[459]

m firstly (before 1344) as her second husband, JEANNE de Joinville Dame de Rimaucourt, widow of AUBERT [VII] de Hangest Seigneur de Genlis, daughter of ANSEAU de Joinville Sénéchal de Champagne & his first wife Laura von Saarbrücken (-after 10 Jan 1345).  "Jean de Hangest chevalier frère et héritier d’Aubert de Hangest" sold property to Philippe VI King of France, saving revenue for "Jeanne de Joinville veuve d’Aubert", by charter dated Nov 1338[460].  "Le duc de Normandie fils du roi de France" granted compensation to "Anseau de Joinville" for “la garde du fils de feu Aubert de Hangest seigneur de Genlis son gendre” by charter dated 1338[461].  The Parlement of Paris ordered "Henri de Joinville" to pay "à sa sœur Jeanne comtesse de Joigny veuve d’Aubert de Hangest" the sum due “au jour de la rédaction du contrat de mariage de Jeanne avec Aubert de Hangest seigneur de Genlis...daté du 20 novembre 1335” from the succession of “Anseau de Joinville” by charter dated 10 Jan 1345)[462]

m secondly MARGUERITE de Melun, daughter of JEAN [II] Vicomte de Melun Comte de Tancarville & his wife Jeanne Crespin (-1 Apr ----).  The necrology of the Abbaye du Jard records the death "Kal Apr" of "domine Margarete de Meleduno condam domnina de Fiennez et comitissa de Joygniaco" and her donation[463].  She married secondly (before 1365) Robert de Fiennes Seigneur de Tingry

Jean & his first wife had three children: 

1.         MILON (-Château de Grancey 20 Oct 1376)Comte de Joigny.  Père Anselme records that Guy Seigneur de Choiseul divided “à cause de sa femme...la seigneurie de Montaiguillon” with “Miles de Noyers chevalier comte de Joigny et Jean de Noyers seigneur de Rimaucourt”, inherited from their parents, by charter dated 11 Jun 1361[464]m as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Ventadour, widow of JEAN de Vienne Seigneur de Sainte-Croix, daughter of BERNARD Comte de Ventadour & his wife Marguerite de Beaumont (-7 Dec 1399, bur abbaye de la Bussière).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriages without citing any source on which the information is based[465]Milon & his wife had three children: 

a)         JEAN [III] de Joigny (-Paris 28 Jan 1393).  Comte de Joigny.  Bouteiller de Bourgogne. 

b)         LOUIS de Joigny (-3 Jul 1416).  Comte de JoignySeigneur d’Antigny. 

c)         MARGUERITE de Joigny (-1423)Dame de Joigny, de Pouilly, d’Antigny.  m firstly (after 1372) JACQUES [II] de Vienne Seigneur de Longvy et de Marigny-sur-Ouche, son of --- (-killed in battle Nikopolis 28 Sep 1396).  m secondly (before 1409) GUY de la Trémoïlle Baron de Bourbon-Lancy, son of GUILLAUME de la Trémoille & his wife Marie de Mello (-[1424/38]).  Comte de Joigny

2.         JEAN (-Apr 1412).  Père Anselme records that Guy Seigneur de Choiseul divided “à cause de sa femme...la seigneurie de Montaiguillon” with “Miles de Noyers chevalier comte de Joigny et Jean de Noyers seigneur de Rimaucourt”, inherited from their parents, by charter dated 11 Jun 1361[466].  Seigneur de Rimaucourt et de Vandeuvre.  m as her second husband, JEANNE de La Fauche, widow of HUMBERT de Bauffremont Seigneur de Bulgnéville, daughter of HUGUES de La Fauche & his wife Jeanne d’Anglure (-before Mar 1406).  Jean & his wife had children: 

a)         JEAN de Joigny (-[1408]).  Seigneur de Montcornet.  m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean & his wife had two children: 

i)          JEANNE de Joigny (-before 27 Sep 1433)m (before 18 Sep 1421) ANTOINE Comte de Gruyère, son of RODOLPHE de Gruyère Seigneur de Montsalvens & his wife Antoinette de Salins dame de Montferrand et de Vaugrenant ([1395]-[27 Sep 1433/22 May 1434]). 

ii)         CHARLOTTE de Joigny m GUILLAUME de Villersexel Seigneur de Clairvaux-en-Montagne, son of --- (-1472).  

b)         ISABELLE de Joigny (-after 1446).  Dame de Vendeuvre.  m DREUX [VI] de Mello Seigneur de Saint-Bris et de Bligny, son of DREUX [V] de Mello Seigneur de Saint-Bris & his wife Marguerite de Saint-Verain Dame de Jussy (-[1414/17]). 

c)         AGNES de Joigny (-[21 Oct 1419/5 Mar 1420]).  Dame de Rimaucourt.  m JEAN [I] d’Aigremont Seigneur d’Aigremont [Choiseul], son of --- (-before 1463). 

d)         GUILLAUME de Joigny dit de Watefalle m (before 1400) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Poitiers, widow of GEOFFROY de Charny Seigneur de Montfort et de Lirey, daughter of CHARLES [I] de Poitiers Seigneur de Saint-Vallier & his wife --- (-25 Jul 1418, bur Dijon). 

e)         RENAUD de Joigny (-[1411]).  Seigneur de Rimaucourt et de Vandeuvre-sur-Barse.  

3.         JEANNE ([after 1344]-[3 Mar 1404/1407]).  Dubois names “Jeanne de Joigny” as the wife of Guy de Choiseul but does not cite the primary source on which he bases his information[467].  Père Anselme records that Guy Seigneur de Choiseul divided “à cause de sa femme...la seigneurie de Montaiguillon” with “Miles de Noyers chevalier comte de Joigny et Jean de Noyers seigneur de Rimaucourt”, inherited from their parents, by charter dated 11 Jun 1361[468].  A letter dated 4 Feb 1661 records epitaphs then in the church of Morimond, including “Monseigneur Guy de Choiseul chevalier et Madame Jeanne de Noyers sa femme Dame dudit Choiseul fille de feu le Conte Jehan de Joigny, niepce du bon comte Henry de Vaudemont seigneur de Joinville“ [no dates of death][469].  The basis for this date has not been traced, but the following sources show that it is incorrect.  Guy de Choiseul and Jeanne de Noyers his wife are named in charters dated 1390, 1 Jan 1393, 30 May 1399 and 3 Mar 1404 (N.S.)[470].  She died before 1407, the date of the charter in which her four children refer to her as deceased.  m (before 11 Jun 1361) GUY Seigneur de Choiseul, son of GAUTHIER Seigneur de Choiseul & his wife --- (-[14 Aug 1413/1418], bur Morimond). 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES de JOIGNY (LA TREMOÏLLE, CHALON)

 

 

The following reconstruction of this family is an outline which shows selected family members only, mainly for hyperlinking to other families studied in Medieval Lands.  The information has not been verified against primary source documentation, unless otherwise stated. 

 

 

GUY de la Trémoïlle, son of GUILLAUME de la Trémoille & his wife Marie de Mello (-[1424/38]).  Baron de Bourbon-Lancy.  Comte de Joigny, de iure uxoris

m (before 1409) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Noyers Dame de Joigny, de Pouilly et d’Antigny, widow of JACQUES [II] de Vienne Seigneur de Longvy et de Marigny-sur-Ouche, daughter of (-1423). 

Guy & his wife had three children: 

1.         LOUIS de la Trémoïlle (-[1467])Comte de Joignym firstly (contract 17 May 1436) PHILIPPA de Montagu, daughter of JEAN [II] de Montagu Seigneur de Couches & his wife Jeanne de Mello Dame de la Ferté-Chaudron.  m secondly (8 Jun 1456) ANNE de Chauvigny, daughter of GUY [III] de Chauvigny Seigneur de Châteauroux, Vicomte de Brosse & his wife Catherine de Laval

2.         JEANNE de la Trémoïlle (-1454, bur Vezelay).  The county of Joigny was inherited by her son (see below).  m (1424) as his first wife, JEAN de Chalon Seigneur de Vitteaux, son of JEAN de Chalon Seigneur d’Arlay & his wife Marie de Baux Pss d’Orange (-1462). 

3.         CLAUDE de la Trémoïlle (-1438, bur Thulley).  Dame d’Antigny.  m (15 Jan 1434) CLAUDE de Vergy Seigneur d’Autrey, son of JEAN de Vergy Seigneur d’Autrey et d’Arc & his wife Antoinette de Salins Dame de Vaugrenant et de Montferrand. 

 

 

CHARLES de Chalon, son of JEAN de Chalon Seigneur de Vitteaux & his first wife Jeanne de la Trémoïlle .  Seigneur de Vitteaux.  He succeeded his maternal uncle 1467 as Comte de Joigny

m as her second husband, JEANNE de Banquetin, widow of ARTUS de Châtillon Seigneur de la Ferté-en-Ponthieu, daughter of JACQUES de Banquetin Seigneur de Beaupré & his wife Marie de Mailly (-after 1495). 

Charles & his wife had one child: 

1.         CHARLOTTE de Chalon (-after 24 Oct 1525)Ctss de Joigny, Dame de Vitteaux.  m firstly ([9 Sep 1480]) ADRIEN de Sainte-Maure Comte de Nesle, son of CHARLES de Sainte-Maure Comte de Nesle & his wife [Madeleine de Luxembourg] (-4 Aug 1504).  Comte de Joigny, de iure uxorism secondly (1507) FRANÇOIS de Tourzel Seigneur de Precy, son of --- . 

 

 

 

D.      VICOMTES de JOIGNY

 

 

Three brothers: 

1.         ISNARD (-after [1166/67]).  Vicomte de Joigny.  "Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci et Bovo et Guilduinus clericus fratres ejus" donated "pratum et terram inter Crientun et Ermenzun" to Pontigny by charter dated [25 Mar 1157/24 Mar 1158][471]Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][472]m EMERILLE, daughter of --- (-after [1166/67]).  “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][473].  Isnard & his wife had five children: 

a)         JULDUIN .  “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][474]

b)         ISNARD .  “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][475]

c)         RAINAUD .  “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][476]

d)         GUY .  “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][477]

e)         VICINE .  “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci” confirmed the rights of Pontigny in his lands, with the consent of “ejus uxor Emerilla et filii ejus...Julduinus, Isnardus, Rainaudus, Guido, Vicina”, by charter dated [1166/67][478]

2.         BOVO"Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci et Bovo et Guilduinus clericus fratres ejus" donated "pratum et terram inter Crientun et Ermenzun" to Pontigny by charter dated [25 Mar 1157/24 Mar 1158][479]

3.         GELDUIN .  "Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci et Bovo et Guilduinus clericus fratres ejus" donated "pratum et terram inter Crientun et Ermenzun" to Pontigny by charter dated [25 Mar 1157/24 Mar 1158][480]

 

 

1.         --- (-after [1172]).  Vicomte de JoignyThe Feoda Campanie dated [1172] includes “…vicecomes Joviniaci post comitem Joviniaci…” in De Sancto Florentino[481]

 

2.         JEAN (-after Oct 1225).  Vicomte de Joigny.  "Johannes vicecomes Jovigniaci" donated harvest to Pontigny, with the consent of “Jaquinus filius dicti vicecomitis...et Edelina...uxor eiusdem vicecomitis”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1220/24 Mar 1221][482].  "Johannes vicecomes Jovigniaci" donated "decimam...in parrochia de Brione” to Pontigny, with the consent of “Edelina...uxor eiusdem vicecomitis...Jaquinus filius eiusdem vicecomitis”, by charter dated Oct 1225[483]m ADELINE, daughter of --- (-after Oct 1225).  "Johannes vicecomes Jovigniaci" donated harvest to Pontigny, with the consent of “Jaquinus filius dicti vicecomitis...et Edelina...uxor eiusdem vicecomitis”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1220/24 Mar 1221][484].  "Johannes vicecomes Jovigniaci" donated "decimam...in parrochia de Brione” to Pontigny, with the consent of “Edelina...uxor eiusdem vicecomitis...Jaquinus filius eiusdem vicecomitis”, by charter dated Oct 1225[485].  Jean & his wife had one child: 

a)         JACQUIN .  "Johannes vicecomes Jovigniaci" donated harvest to Pontigny, with the consent of “Jaquinus filius dicti vicecomitis...et Edelina...uxor eiusdem vicecomitis”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1220/24 Mar 1221][486].  "Johannes vicecomes Jovigniaci" donated "decimam...in parrochia de Brione” to Pontigny, with the consent of “Edelina...uxor eiusdem vicecomitis...Jaquinus filius eiusdem vicecomitis”, by charter dated Oct 1225[487]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    NOBILITY in JOIGNY

 

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-FLORENTIN

 

 

1.         --- de Saint-Florentin (-before [1172]).  Vicomte de Saint-Florentinm --- (-after [1201]).  The Feoda Campanie dated [1172] includes “...Milo de Noiers. Vicecomitissa sancti Florentini tenet tertiam partem, Milo de Pogiaco tertiam, Guido de Montmor tertiam…” in De Trecis et de Insulis[488].  The Feoda Campanie dated [1201] includes “…vicecomitissa Sancti Florentini ligia de suo dotario et…apud Jassiam, et castellum eius est jurabile...” in De Trecis et Insulis[489]

 

2.         --- de Saint-Florentin Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  “...Barons...le vicomte de Saint-Florentin...” is named among the nobles in Champagne who confirmed the decision by Blanche Ctss de Champagne to allow succession of fiefs in the female line by charter dated 1212[490]m --- de Pleurs, daughter of --- (-after 1229).  The Feoda Campanie dated 1229 includes “...Galcherus de Sancto Florentino…apud Plaiostrum et in castellaria Plaiotri ex parte matris sue…” in Milites de Dotalitio[491].  One child: 

a)         GAUCHER de Saint-Florentin (-after 1229).  Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  The Feoda Campanie dated 1229 includes “...Galcherus vicecomes Sancti Florentini…apud Jauges…” in Milites de Dotalitio[492].  The Feoda Campanie dated 1229 includes “...Galcherus de Sancto Florentino…apud Plaiostrum et in castellaria Plaiotri ex parte matris sue…” in Milites de Dotalitio[493]

 

3.         GUILLAUME de Saint-Florentin (-after Apr 1273).  “Guillaume de Saint-Florentin écuyer et Aliénor sa femme” sold their rights “sur le village, le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur la Vacherie sous Ervy, sur le Breuil près Monthiérault, sur le Breuil de Chessy, sur des fiefs...à Chamblain, à Davrey” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Apr 1273[494]m ELEONORE, daughter of ---.  “Guillaume de Saint-Florentin écuyer et Aliénor sa femme” sold their rights “sur le village, le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur la Vacherie sous Ervy, sur le Breuil près Monthiérault, sur le Breuil de Chessy, sur des fiefs...à Chamblain, à Davrey” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Apr 1273[495]

 

4.         GAUCHER de Saint-Florentin (-after Sep 1273).  “Gaucher de Saint-Florentin chevalier” sold his rights “sur le village, le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur les prés du Breuil, de Monthiérault et de Chessy, sur divers fiefs à Chamblain et à la Vacherie” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Sep 1273[496]

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Longnon (1885), p. 107. 

[2] Chronicon Moissacense 817, MGH SS I, p. 312. 

[3] Settipani (1993), p. 255. 

[4] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 36, MGH SS II, p. 597. 

[5] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, III.IX, p. 122. 

[6] Nithard, I.3, p. 131. 

[7] Annales Alamannicorum continuation Sangallensis prima 864, MGH SS I, p. 50, alternative text quoted in footnote 1. 

[8] Annales Bertiniani III 866. 

[9] Adonis Continuatio Prima, Auctore Anonymo 866, MGH SS II, p. 324. 

[10] Carmina Centulensia CXLI and CXLII, MGH Poetæ latini ævi Carolini III, pp. 352 and 353. 

[11] Chronico Senonensi Sanctæ Columbæ 881, RHGF IX, p. 40. 

[12] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, III.XI, p. 128. 

[13] Chronico Senonensi Sanctæ Columbæ 881, RHGF IX, p. 40. 

[14] Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, RHGF IX, p. 34. 

[15] Birth date range estimated from the marriage date of her parents. 

[16] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681. 

[17] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681. 

[18] Giry 'Etudes carolingiens' (1896), no. 27, p. 135. 

[19] Mathieu 'Recherches sur la reine Guille de Bourgogne et l'impératice Engelberge' (2000), p. 173, quoting Manteyer, (1899), Notes additionnelles (Paris, 1901), p. 265. 

[20] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes' (1896), no. 27, p. 135. 

[21] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes' (1896), no. 31, p. 136. 

[22] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes' (1896), no. 27, p. 135. 

[23] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes' (1896), no. 27, p. 135. 

[24] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes' (1896), no. 31, p. 136. 

[25] Mathieu 'Recherches sur la reine Guille de Bourgogne et l'impératice Engelberge' (2000), p. 173, quoting Manteyer, (1899), Notes additionnelles (Paris, 1901), p. 265. 

[26] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes' (1896), no. 31, p. 136. 

[27] Giry 'Etudes carolingiennes', no. 31, p. 136. 

[28] Marie-José, p. 30, citing Manteyer (1899), p. 126. 

[29] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681. 

[30] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681. 

[31] Cluny, Tome IV, 2888, p. 82. 

[32] Cluny, Tome I, 726, p. 681. 

[33] Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, RHGF IX, p. 34. 

[34] Rösch (1977), p. 133.  Settipani (1993), p. 381 footnote 128, highlights the absence of proof. 

[35] Birth date range estimated on the basis of his having been a young adult or adolescent at the time of the 924 charter in which he is named. 

[36] Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, RHGF IX, p. 34. 

[37] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise cathédrale de Sens., Sacrementaire Sénonais des ix-x siècles, p. 2.       

[38] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Magloire, p. 391.       

[39] Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, RHGF IX, p. 35. 

[40] Hugonis Floriacensis, Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ, MGH SS IX, p. 369, undated but "999?" is added in the margin. 

[41] Annales sanctæ Columbæ Senonenses 996, MGH SS I, p. 105. 

[42] Hugonis Floriacensis, Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ, MGH SS IX, p. 369, undated but "999?" is added in the margin. 

[43] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.20, p. 129. 

[44] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, pp. 473 and 474. 

[45] Hugonis Floriacensis, Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ, MGH SS IX, p. 369. 

[46] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 473. 

[47] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 474. 

[48] Hugonis Floriacensis, Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ, MGH SS IX, p. 369. 

[49] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.20, p. 129. 

[50] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LIII, p. 84. 

[51] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 474. 

[52] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 475. 

[53] Yonne, Tome II, 9, p. 11. 

[54] Yonne, Tome II, 9, p. 11. 

[55] Historia Regorum Francorum 31, MGH SS IX, p. 404. 

[56] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 474. 

[57] Historia Regorum Francorum 30, MGH SS IX, p. 404. 

[58] Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, p. 295. 

[59] Bouchard (1987), p. 394. 

[60] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 474. 

[61] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 474. 

[62] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1055, MGH SS XXIII, p. 790. 

[63] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 472. 

[64] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 475. 

[65] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 475. 

[66] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 475. 

[67] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 476. 

[68] Duchesne (Dreux, Broyes et Châteauvillain) (1631), Broyes et Châteauvillain, Preuves, p. 11, quoting Continuation de l’Histoire d’Aimoinus, Livre V, chap. XLVII. 

[69] Yonne, Tome I, CLIV, p. 273. 

[70] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Léproserie du Popelin à Sens, p. 971. 

[71] Yonne, Tome II, 150, p. 165. 

[72] Yonne, Tome II, 164, p. 182. 

[73] Longnon (1879), p. 22. 

[74] Yonne, Tome II, 164, p. 182. 

[75] Yonne, Tome II, 299, p. 318. 

[76] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Léproserie du Popelin à Sens, p. 971. 

[77] Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Tome III, 625, p. 230. 

[78] Troyes Necrologies, 5 Obituaire de Notre-Dame aux Nonnains, p. 417. 

[79] Yonne, Tome II, 299, p. 318. 

[80] Yonne, Tome I, CLIV, p. 273. 

[81] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[82] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[83] Néronville, XXXI, p. 325. 

[84] Néronville, IV, V, XX, XXXI, and LII, pp. 305, 306, 317, 325 and 338. 

[85] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[86] Néronville, VI, p. 307. 

[87] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[88] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[89] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[90] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[91] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247. 

[92] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 275. 

[93] Yonne, Tome I, CLXXII, p. 294. 

[94] William of Tyre, XIX.IV, p. 889. 

[95] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[96] ES III 629. 

[97] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[98] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[99] Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 10, p. 243, citing Arch. de la Côte d'Or, H 251, and Duchesne, vol. 20, p. 338. 

[100] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 275. 

[101] Néronville, XXX, p. 323. 

[102] Néronville, XXXI, p. 325. 

[103] Yonne, Tome I, CXXVIII, p. 237. 

[104] Yonne, Tome I, CLXXII, p. 294. 

[105] Duchalais ‘Charte inédite 1138 vicomtes de Melun’ (1845), p. 239. 

[106] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 29. 

[107] ES III 629. 

[108] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF XII, p. 316. 

[109] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[110] Néronville, XXX, p. 323. 

[111] Yonne, Tome I, CXXVIII, p. 237. 

[112] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[113] Yonne, Tome I, CXXVIII, p. 237. 

[114] Molinier (1887), X, p. 159. 

[115] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[116] Yonne, Tome I, CXXVIII, p. 237. 

[117] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[118] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 275. 

[119] William of Tyre, X.XXIV, p. 437. 

[120] William of Tyre, XIX.IV, p. 889. 

[121] William of Tyre, X.XXX, p. 446. 

[122] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, p. 38. 

[123] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, p. 39. 

[124] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, pp. 43 and 111-12. 

[125] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, p. 124. 

[126] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, pp. 161-4. 

[127] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, p. 181. 

[128] Runciman (1952/1978), Vol. 2, p. 185. 

[129] Vartan, p. 434. 

[130] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 275. 

[131] William of Tyre, XIV.XXV, p. 645. 

[132] Yonne, Tome I, CLXXII, p. 294. 

[133] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 6. 

[134] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 8. 

[135] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Lib. V, Cap. LI, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4.  

[136] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[137] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[138] Yonne, Tome I, CXXVIII, p. 237. 

[139] Molinier (1887), X, p. 159. 

[140] Bouchet (1661), p. 10. 

[141] Duchesne, Historia Francorum Scriptores, Tome IV, Epistola CXIV, CXVI, p. 530. 

[142] Lecoy de la Marche (1867), Appendice, Indication des lettres adressées à l’abbé Suger par différents personnages, p. 303. 

[143] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[144] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833, and Domesday Descendants, p. 429. 

[145] Pipe Roll 7 Hen II (1160/61), Berkshire, p. 52. 

[146] Pipe Roll 6 Hen II (1159/60), Berkshire, p. 21. 

[147] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 107. 

[148] Pipe Roll 1 Rich I (1189/90), p. 179.  The page numbers of the entries in the earlier published Pipe Rolls have been omitted, but can easily be checked by interested readers in the indexes to each volume. 

[149] Pipe Roll 13 Hen II (1166/67), London/Middlesex, p. 1. 

[150] Pipe Roll 14 Hen II (1167/68), pp. 10, 11, 44, 154, 200. 

[151] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCLXXXII, p. 430. 

[152] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[153] Pipe Roll 6 Rich I (1194/95), Berkshire, p. 253. 

[154] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[155] Acta Sanctorum, Jan I, Vita S. Guilielmi Archiepiscopi Bituricensis, Alia Vita, p. 636. 

[156] La Saussaye (1615), I, p. 487, citing Historia Ecclesiæ Bituricensis (no precise citation reference). 

[157] Bouchet (1661), p. 11. 

[158] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Scripta de Feodem ad Regem spectantibus, 294, p. 670. 

[159] Delisle (1856), 1781, p. 393. 

[160] ES III 629. 

[161] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 453, citing Estournet, G. ‘Les chevaliers de Donjon’, Annales de la Société historique et archéologique du Gâtinais 38 (1926), pp. 29-64, 75-135 [not yet consulted].  

[162] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 61. 

[163] For example <http://www.nievre-tourisme.com/tourisme/visite-du-village-d-arthel.htm?itm:n%23_104597> [27 Aug 2012]. 

[164] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, cols. 60-61. 

[165] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[166] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[167] Burke’s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[168] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[169] Ex Libro III Historie Regum Francorum, RHGF XII, p. 219. 

[170] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Lib. V, Cap. LI, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[171] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[172] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 6. 

[173] Pipe Roll 13 Hen II (1166/67), London/Middlesex, p. 1. 

[174] Yonne 204, p. 222. 

[175] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 177.       

[176] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[177] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[178] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Lib. V, Cap. LI, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[179] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 6. 

[180] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42. 

[181] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 8. 

[182] Pipe Roll 6 Rich I (1194/95), Berkshire, p. 253. 

[183] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[184] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 170, p. 137. 

[185] Pipe Roll 6 Rich I (1194/95),, Berkshire, p. 253. 

[186] Basset Charters, 190, p. 127. 

[187] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 107. 

[188] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 170, p. 137. 

[189] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1569, p. 450. 

[190] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 556. 

[191] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 365a. 

[192] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 71, p. 50. 

[193] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 107. 

[194] Delisle (1856), 1781, p. 393. 

[195] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[196] Pipe Roll 21 Hen II (1174/75), Northamptonshire, pp. 41 and 42. 

[197] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), p. 149, Pipe Roll 24 Hen II (1177/78), p. 54, Pipe Roll 27 Hen II (1180/81), p. 72, and Pipe Roll 33 Hen II (1186/87), p. 105.

[198] Pipe Roll 6 Rich I (1194/95), Northamptonshire, p. 75, Berkshire, p. 253. 

[199] Feet of Fines 1182-1196 (1894), 89, p. 73. 

[200] St Bees, 453, p. 449. 

[201] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 516, p. 404. 

[202] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 86, p. 76. 

[203] Pipe Roll 21 Hen II (1174/75), Northamptonshire, pp. 41 and 42. 

[204] The estimated date of death of her father. 

[205] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[206] Feet of Fines 1182-1196 (1894), 89, p. 73. 

[207] St Bees, 453, p. 449. 

[208] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Gysburn Priory, Yorkshire, XIV, p. 271. 

[209] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. IV (1837), Ex Calendario…Prioratui de Gisburna, p. 261. 

[210] St Bees, 453, p. 449. 

[211] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 86, p. 76. 

[212] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 532. 

[213] Kelso, Tome I, 294, p. 238. 

[214] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 96, p. 85. 

[215] Kelso, Tome I, 129, p. 99. 

[216] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 516, p. 404. 

[217] Basset Charters, 186, p. 121. 

[218] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 39. 

[219] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Burcester Priory, Oxfordshire, I, p. 434. 

[220] Basset Charters, 192, p. 128. 

[221] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 252 and 253. 

[222] Basset Charters, 186, p. 121. 

[223] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 516, p. 404. 

[224] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 293. 

[225] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 72. 

[226] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/18, 7 Hen III, 263. 

[227] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 516, p. 404. 

[228] Registrum Roffense, p. 596. 

[229] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[230] Registrum Roffense, p. 596. 

[231] William of Tyre, XXI.XXX, p. 1058. 

[232] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Lib. V, Cap. LI, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[233] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 6. 

[234] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 7. 

[235] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 7. 

[236] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 8. 

[237] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 10. 

[238] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Abbaye de la Cour-Dieu, Extraits des deux obituaires, p. 170. 

[239] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 11. 

[240] Ex Libro III Historie Regum Francorum, RHGF XII, p. 219. 

[241] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Lib. V, Cap. LI, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[242] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[243] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 6. 

[244] Pipe Roll 13 Hen II (1166/67), London/Middlesex, p. 1. 

[245] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 7. 

[246] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 7. 

[247] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 8. 

[248] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 10. 

[249] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 12. 

[250] Bouchet (1661), p. 15, citing “Tableaux Généalogiques du R. P. L’Abbé” (no precise citation reference) [not yet consulted]. 

[251] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 177.       

[252] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[253] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 7. 

[254] Bouchet (1661), p. 29. 

[255] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 11. 

[256] Yonne Tome I, CCCXXII, p. 472. 

[257] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[258] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[259] Yonne 295, p. 314. 

[260] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 741, p. 272. 

[261] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928. 

[262] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 3367, p. 574.  

[263] Petit, Vol. II, 698, p. 466. 

[264] Petit, Vol. II, 699, p. 466. 

[265] Yonne (suite), 164, p. 75. 

[266] Yonne (suite), 199, p. 89. 

[267] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 16. 

[268] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Chartreuse de Bellary, p. 457.       

[269] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[270] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[271] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 11. 

[272] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 12. 

[273] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[274] Bouchet (1661), p. 26. 

[275] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[276] Bouchet (1661), p. 26. 

[277] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, CLVIII, p. 171. 

[278] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, Part 2, DXXXIV, p. 494. 

[279] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[280] Delisle (1856), 84, p. 21. 

[281] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[282] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 11. 

[283] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 25. 

[284] La Thaumassière (1679), p. 425. 

[285] La Thaumassière (1679), p. 83. 

[286] Yonne (suite), 225, p. 99. 

[287] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 29. 

[288] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[289] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 107. 

[290] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 123. 

[291] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 24. 

[292] Bouchet (1661), p. 104. 

[293] La Thaumassière (1689), pp. 375-8. 

[294] La Thaumassière (1679), p. 425. 

[295] Yonne (suite), 432, p. 197. 

[296] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[297] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 1528, p. 543. 

[298] Delisle (1856), 1842, p. 405. 

[299] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[300] Yonne (suite), 528, p. 250. 

[301] Yonne (suite), 528, p. 250. 

[302] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 34. 

[303] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 35. 

[304] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[305] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[306] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 35. 

[307] RHGF, Tome XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 500. 

[308] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[309] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[310] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[311] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[312] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[313] Yonne (suite), 690, p. 348. 

[314] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[315] Petit, Vol. IV, 2846, p. 427. 

[316] Yonne (suite), 560, p. 264. 

[317] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[318] Yonne (suite), 690, p. 348. 

[319] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 63. 

[320] Petit, Vol. IV, 2846, p. 427. 

[321] Yonne (suite), 560, p. 264. 

[322] Yonne (suite), 617, p. 302. 

[323] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 70. 

[324] Huillard-Bréholles (1867), Tome I, 875, p. 156. 

[325] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 65. 

[326] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 71. 

[327] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 68. 

[328] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 71. 

[329] La Thaumassière (1679), p. 435. 

[330] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 79. 

[331] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 74. 

[332] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 90. 

[333] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[334] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 103. 

[335] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[336] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 103. 

[337] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[338] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 103. 

[339] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[340] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 103. 

[341] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[342] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 103. 

[343] ES III.1 58-60, Père Anselme, Tome I, pp. 509-10. 

[344] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[345] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 71. 

[346] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 69. 

[347] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 71. 

[348] Yonne (suite), 382, p. 171. 

[349] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[350] Merlet ‘Procès’ (1857), Pièces Justificatives, X, p. 318, quoting Cartulaire de Bigorre, ch. 21, 24. 

[351] Merlet ‘Procès’, Pièces Justificatives, X, p. 318, quoting Cartulaire de Bigorre, ch. 21, 24. 

[352] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 472. 

[353] Merlet ‘Procès’, Pièces Justificatives, XII, p. 321, quoting Cartulaire de Bigorre, ch. 34. 

[354] Merlet ‘Procès’, Pièces Justificatives, XIII, p. 321, quoting Cartulaire de Bigorre, ch. 35. 

[355] Gent, p. 48. 

[356] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 141. 

[357] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 58. 

[358] Chifflet Beatrix (1656), Preuves, p. 81. 

[359] Hugues de Chalon 532, p. 392. 

[360] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 90. 

[361] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 95. 

[362] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 103. 

[363] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 107. 

[364] ES III.1 58-60, Père Anselme, Tome I, pp. 492-508. 

[365] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 489. 

[366] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais' (2000), p. 233 (no source citation). 

[367] Troyes Necrologies, 2 Obituaire de Saint-Etienne, p. 219. 

[368] Yonne, Tome I, XCIII, p. 178. 

[369] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1055, MGH SS XXIII, p. 790. 

[370] Yonne, Tome I, XCIII, p. 178. 

[371] Yonne, Tome II, 34, p. 34. 

[372] Yonne, Tome II, 34, p. 34. 

[373] Yonne, Tome II, 34, p. 34. 

[374] Yonne, Tome II, 34, p. 34. 

[375] Yonne, Tome II, 35, p. 36. 

[376] ES III 629. 

[377] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[378] ES III 629. 

[379] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[380] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[381] Weir (2002), p. 51. 

[382] La Thaumassière (1689), p. 389. 

[383] Yonne, Tome I, XCIII, p. 178. 

[384] Acta Sanctorum, September VIII, p. 720. 

[385] Yonne, Tome I, XCIII, p. 178. 

[386] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais' (2000), p. 233, citing Lot, F. (1891) Les derniers Carolingiens (Paris), p. 116. 

[387] Yonne, Tome II, 150, p. 165. 

[388] Yonne, Tome II, 121, p. 130. 

[389] Yonne, Tome II, 220, p. 236. 

[390] Histoire d’Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 70. 

[391] Pontigny, 274, p. 299. 

[392] Montiéramy 109, p. 139. 

[393] Yonne (suite), 63, p. 28. 

[394] Yonne (suite), 103, p. 46. 

[395] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome V, 815, p. 72, full list of signatories at Tome IV, Part II, p. 558, footnote (b). 

[396] Yonne (suite), 369, p. 166. 

[397] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2133, p. 204. 

[398] Patrologia Latina, Vol. CCXVI, Innocentii III PP Regestorum Lib. XVI, IX, X and XII, cols. 979 and 982. 

[399] Montiéramy 109, p. 139. 

[400] Yonne (suite), 63, p. 28. 

[401] Yonne (suite), 103, p. 46. 

[402] Yonne (suite), 369, p. 166. 

[403] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2133, p. 204. 

[404] Histoire d’Auxerre, Tome IV, 173, p. 101. 

[405] Yonne (suite), 528, p. 250. 

[406] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 34. 

[407] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 35. 

[408] Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 56. 

[409] Histoire d’Auxerre, Tome IV, 173, p. 101. 

[410] Yonne (suite), 528, p. 250. 

[411] Chapelle-aux-Planches 29, p. 29. 

[412] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1219, MGH SS XXIII, p. 908. 

[413] Yonne, Tome II, 391, p. 399. 

[414] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes V, 118, p. 41. 

[415] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu XLVI, p. 31. 

[416] Mores 67, p. 78. 

[417] Mores 56, p. 74. 

[418] Arbois de Jubainville (1855), p. 288. 

[419] Mores 67, p. 78. 

[420] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes V, 300, p. 98. 

[421] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye des Clairets, p. 281.       

[422] Pontigny, 274, p. 299. 

[423] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 70. 

[424] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise cathédrale de Sens, Obituaire du xiii siècle, p. 2.       

[425] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[426] Pontigny, 274, p. 299. 

[427] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 928. 

[428] Yonne (suite), 278, p. 121. 

[429] La Thaumassière (1689), p. 422. 

[430] Yonne (suite), 284, p. 124. 

[431] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise cathédrale de Sens, Obituaire du xiii siècle, p. 2.       

[432] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[433] Yonne (suite), 72, p. 33. 

[434] Pontigny, 190, p. 237. 

[435] Yonne (suite), 278, p. 121. 

[436] Yonne (suite), 284, p. 124. 

[437] Pontigny, 190, p. 237. 

[438] Pontigny, 255, p. 286. 

[439] Pontigny, 190, p. 237. 

[440] Pontigny, 255, p. 286. 

[441] Toulgoët-Treanna (1884), Pièces Justificatives, XXXVIII, p. 496. 

[442] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[443] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[444] Yonne (suite), 701, p. 356. 

[445] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[446] Yonne (suite), 701, p. 356. 

[447] Yonne (suite), 701, p. 356. 

[448] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[449] Hopf (1873), Marino Sanudo Torsello Historia del Regno di Romania, II, p. 117. 

[450] Hopf (1873), Marino Sanudo Torsello Historia del Regno di Romania, II, p. 117. 

[451] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôpital de Joigny, p. 989. 

[452] Lanercost Chronicle, 1295, p. 169. 

[453] Baluze (1708) Auvergne, Tome II, p. 340. 

[454] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[455] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[456] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[457] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), Pièces Justificatives, XV, p. 323. 

[458] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), Pièces Justificatives, XVI, p. 342. 

[459] Duchesne (Dreux, Broyes et Châteauvillain) (1631), Dreux, Broyes et Châteauvillain, Preuves, p. 45. 

[460] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 894, p. 445, citing Arch. nat. J 149 no. 68. 

[461] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 895, p. 446, citing Arch. nat. J 396 no. 20. 

[462] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 909, p. 449, citing Arch. nat. X i A 10, f 66 r. 

[463] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye du Jard, p. 41.      

[464] Père Anselme, Tome IV, p. 821 (no citation reference to the source). 

[465] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 812. 

[466] Père Anselme, Tome IV, p. 821 (no citation reference to the source). 

[467] Dubois (1852), Notes et pièces justificatives, page 13, p. 455. 

[468] Père Anselme, Tome IV, p. 821 (no citation reference to the source). 

[469] Le Cabinet Historique, Tome X (1864), Maison de Choiseul, pp. 253-4. 

[470] Poissonnier (1990), nrs. CCCLXXXVI, CCLXXIX, CCCLXXXVIII, CCCXCVI. 

[471] Pontigny, 125, p. 188. 

[472] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[473] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[474] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[475] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[476] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[477] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[478] Pontigny, 37, p. 112. 

[479] Pontigny, 125, p. 188. 

[480] Pontigny, 125, p. 188. 

[481] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 1ère Partie, p. 10. 

[482] Pontigny, 301, p. 317. 

[483] Pontigny, 300, p. 316. 

[484] Pontigny, 301, p. 317. 

[485] Pontigny, 300, p. 316. 

[486] Pontigny, 301, p. 317. 

[487] Pontigny, 300, p. 316. 

[488] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 1ère Partie, p. 72. 

[489] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 3ème Partie, p. 95. 

[490] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome V, 815, p. 72, full list of signatories at Tome IV, Part II, p. 558, footnote (b). 

[491] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 6ème Partie, p. 156. 

[492] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 6ème Partie, p. 152. 

[493] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 6ème Partie, p. 156. 

[494] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome VI, 3752, p. 83. 

[495] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome VI, 3752, p. 83. 

[496] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome VI, 3782, p. 89.