untitled ENGLISH nobility A - C

v4.1 Updated 13 October 2019

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

ABITOT. 2

ALBINI (AUBIGNY) 10

AMUNDEVILLE. 16

ATON. 23

AVENELL. 29

AVRANCHES. 34

BAGOT. 37

BASKERVILLE. 43

BAYEUX. 47

BEAUCHAMP. 50

BELMEIS. 88

BIDUN. 93

BISSET. 100

BOCLAND. 106

BOHUN (of MIDHURST, SUSSEX) 109

BOLEBEC. 111

BOTEREL. 121

BRITO (ALBINI BRITO) 122

BRITO. 130

BRIWERE. 133

BURDETT. 139

CAUZ. 142

CHANDOS. 145

CHAWORTH (CHAOURCES) 150

CHESNEY. 162

CLARE. 175

CLINTON. 184

CORBET. 189

COURCY. 199

CRASSUS. 206

CRISPIN. 211

 

 

 

ABITOT

 

 

Loyd indicates that “Abitot” is the same place as Abbetot, which is located in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Le Havre, canton Saint-Romain[1]

 

 

[Three] brothers: 

1.         ROBERT le Despencer (-after [1086]).  Round states that "Robert the Despencer" was the brother of "Urse de Abetot" who succeeded the former in his lands in Lincolnshire.  He does not cite the primary source which confirms the family relationship, although he does refer to "Ingoluesmaera" (part of the property the subject of the [1095/1100] writ, see below) being the same as "Gundelsmere" which was held by Robert le Despencer in Domesday Book[2].  Domesday Book records “Robert Despenser” holding Childswickham in Gloucestershire [Worcestershire]; Knightwick in Worcestershire; and several properties in Leicestershire[3]"...Robert, Dispensator..." witnessed the charter dated to [1086] which notified a plea held by William I King of England concerning William de Briouse and the abbey of Holy Trinity, Fécamp[4]. 

2.         URSE [I] de Abitot (-[1100/10]).  Round states that "Robert the Despencer" was the brother of "Urse de Abetot" who succeeded the former in his lands in Lincolnshire, but does not cite the primary source which confirms the family relationship[5]"Urse de Abetot" witnessed the undated charter under which William I King of England granted four manors to Chertsey St Peter[6].  William I King of England notified "Urse de Abetot" and the bishop of Worcester of his donation of "Leng" to the church of Evesham by undated charter[7].  Domesday Book records “Urse d’Abetot” holding Sezincote in Gloucestershire; and "Urse the sheriff" holding numerous properties from the churches of Worcester, Westminster St Peter, St Mary of Pershore, from the bishop of Bayeux, as well as his own holdings from the king, in Worcestershire[8].  Sheriff of Worcester: "…Urso vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated 20 May 1089 under which Wulfstan Bishop of Worcester granted property at Alveston to the monks[9]"…Eudo dapifer, Ivo dapifer, Hanno dapifer, Rotbertus de Oili, Urso de Abetot…Hugo de Portu, Rogerus de Busleio, Ranulfus Peverellis, Aiulfus vicecomes, Alveradus de Lincoln, Ernulfus de Hesding" witnessed the charter dated 27 Jan 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the status of Bath abbey[10].  “…Ursone de Abetot…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[11].  A writ addressed to Robert Bishop of Lincoln and Osbert Sheriff of Lincolnshire, dated to [1095/1100], sanctioned an exchange of lands between "Ur de Abet" and "Rotb de Laceio de Ingoluesmaera", witnessed by "R. fil Haim"[12]"…Ursonis de Abetot…" witnessed the undated charter under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Bermondsey abbey[13]m ADELISA, daughter of ---.  Ellis says that "Athelisa the viscountess" witnessed the charter of Urse de Abitot to Malvern priory, but does not cite the primary source in question[14].  Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "terram que fuit Adelize uxoris Ursonis de Abbetot sicut ipsa Adeliza eam ei concessit" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1123/Jul 1129][15].  Urse & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER de Abitot .  Henry I King of England instructed "Waltero vicecomiti Gloec et Rogero vicecomiti de Wirecestr et Hugoni de Legrec" that the monks of Worcester Cathedral should enjoy quiet enjoyment, by charter dated to [Jun 1109/Aug 1111] or [Jul/Oct 1113][16].  Ellis says that "Roger d’Abitot" son of Urse de Abitot "having killed one of the household of Henry I was banished", but does not cite the primary source in question[17].  The banishment must be dated to [1114], as Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Rogeri de Wygrecestra", in and around the town of Worcester, to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug][18]

b)         [EMMELINE] .  Round states that the wife of Walter de Beauchamp was the daughter of Urse de Abitot but he does not cite the corresponding primary source which confirms that this is correct[19].  Ellis says that "Emmeline Roger’s sister was wife of Walter de Beauchamp, who obtained the fief of Urso and the shrievalty of Worcestershire, which Henry I confirmed to him, together wih the office of one of the king’s dispensers which Robert brother of Urso had formerly held, and the land given him by Adelisa the widow of Urso"[20].  If this information is all correct, it appears to establish Emmeline’s parentage and marriage.  However, Ellis cites none of the corresponding primary sources.  The relevant charters are set out in the Beauchamp cartulary: (1) Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Rogeri de Wygrecestra", in and around the town of Worcester, to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug][21]; (2) Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "vicecomitatum de Wigresestrasia" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [Dec 1113/Apr 1116][22]; and (3) Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "terram que fuit Adelize uxoris Ursonis de Abbetot sicut ipsa Adeliza eam ei concessit" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1123/Jul 1129][23].  The documents do not explicitly state that Walter’s wife was the daughter of Urse de Abitot and brother of Roger de Abitot, but this is a reasonable implication.  The latest date of her marriage is assessed from the dating of the first of these charters.  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.   m (before [1114]) WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, son of --- (-[1130/May 1133]). 

3.         [OSBERT de Abitot (-before Oct 1113).  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto de Abetot et ministris [et] forestariis de foresta de Feccham" that he had granted a fox-hunting licence in his forest in Feckenham to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1110/16][24].  Sheriff of Worcester.  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto vicecomiti et omnibus forestariis de Wirecestrasera" that he had granted a wolf-hunting licence in his forest in Worcestershire to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1106/13][25].  It is more likely that Osbert was the brother of Urse de Abitot rather than his son.  The charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug], under which King Henry I granted the land of Roger de Abitot to [his brother-in-law] Walter de Beauchamp suggests that Roger was his father’s oldest son and heir.  If that is correct, it is likely that Roger would have been the preferred appointee as sheriff of Worcester, after his father, assuming that one of Urse’s sons would have been chosen.  This case is reminiscent of the appointment of Durand as sheriff of Gloucester, in succession to his brother Roger [de Pitres], passing over Roger’s son Walter de Gloucester who is recorded as sheriff after Durand (see the document ENGLAND EARLS - GLOUCESTER).  In the Abitot case, it is possible that Urse’s son was too young to have been appointed sheriff after his father died and that his father’s younger brother was chosen as "caretaker" sheriff by the king.  Osbert must have died before Oct 1113, the latest date of a charter which names Roger as sheriff (see above).] 

 

 

1.         URSE [II] .  He is named as father of Robert in the charter quoted below.  Loyd indicates that there is no other place named “Abetot” in Normandy other than the one with which the Abitot family is connected.  The suggestion is that Robert FitzUrse was in some way connected with the Abitot family, especially given that Urse is not a common name[26].  If that is correct, there appear to be two possibilities to explain the family relationship.  Firstly, Robert could have been an older son of Urse [I] whom his father had left in charge of family properties in Normandy.  If that is correct, Robert presumably predeceased his father as no further reference to him has been found.  It does not appear likely that Robert was a younger son of Urse [I]: the banishment of Roger, son of Urse [I], and the grant of his properties by King Henry I to his brother-in-law Walter [I] de Beauchamp, indicates that any brother of Roger then living would also have been disinherited and would be unlikely to have been permitted to retain property in Normandy.  Secondly, Robert could have belonged to another branch of the same family (maybe the senior line) which had retained the family properties in Normandy when its cousins left for England.  The donation dated [?1128] referred to below supports the hypothesis that another branch of the Abitot family remained in Normandy where they held property.  m ---.  The name of Urse’s wife is not known.  Urse [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT FitzUrseW. de Tancervilla camerarius regis” made numerous donations to Boscherville, including “in Abetot…ecclesiam et decimam et terram…inter ecclesiam et domum Roberti filii Ursi”, by undated charter (dated to the reign of King Henry I)[27].  It is likely that this is the same donation which is referred to in a charter dated to [1177/82] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of Saint-Georges de Boscherville, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Habetot..." made by “Rodulfus Willelmi regis magister” with the consent of King Henry I[28].  If that is correct, the original donation may have been made during the reign of King William II, in which case the later charter quoted above would have been a confirmation of this original.  The earlier the date of the original donation, the less likely that Robert FitzUrse was the same person as Robert de Abitot (shown below), which is suggested by Loyd[29]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Abitot .  An inspeximus dated 16 May 1316 reproduces a charter of King Henry II which confirms donations made to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including land donated by “Leza uxor Roberti de Abbetot” and which “ipse Robertus posuit super altare[30].  Round summarises a charter under which “Rabel the chamberlain son of William the chamberlain” donated property to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including “the land that Lesza wife of Robert de Abetot gave them at her death and which Robert placed upon the altar[31].  Round dates the charter to [?1128], referring to a “vidimus of 1467 in archives. Trans. Vol. I. fo. 22”.  It is unclear whether he based his calendar entry on a document dated [1128] or only the vidimus.  Whatever the case, the donation is clearly the same as the one referred to in the 16 May 1316 inspeximus, although the text of the charter quoted in the latter does not refer to the death of Leza.  Loyd suggests that Robert de Abitot may have been the same person as Robert, son of Urse [II], who is shown above[32].  Whether this suggestion is correct depends on the dating of the charter in which Robert FitzUrse is named (see above).  In any case, the [?1128] charter does support the hypothesis that a possibly older branch of the Abitot family remained in Normandy, where they continued to hold property, after their cousins left for England.  m LEZA, daughter of ---.  An inspeximus dated 16 May 1316 reproduces a charter of King Henry II which confirms donations made to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including land donated by “Leza uxor Roberti de Abbetot” and which “ipse Robertus posuit super altare[33].  Round summarises a charter under which “Rabel the chamberlain son of William the chamberlain” donated property to Sainte-Barbe d’Auge, including “the land that Lesza wife of Robert de Abetot gave them at her death and which Robert placed upon the altar[34]

 

 

The following four individuals, named in charters with William [II] de Beauchamp (grandson of Urse [I] de Abitot) or his relatives, were probably related to the Abitot family but the information available is insufficient to enable the precise relationships to be traced.  They were probably descendants of Osbert, brother of Urse [I] de Abitot, or another otherwise unrecorded brother. 

 

1.         ALEXANDER de Abitot .  "…Alexandro de Abitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[35].  "…Alexandro Dapitot, Osberto de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[36]

 

2.         JOHN de Abitot (-after [1223/24]).  "…Johanne Dapitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[37].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Ada de Duderhill, Petro de Bello Campo, et Johanne de Abbitot, (Gast) Galfrido de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane filie Willelmi de Bello Campo et [nepos/nepte] mee"[38].  "Johannes de Abetot" donated land in Alkerton [in Eastington, Gloucestershire] to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Alexandri filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [early Henry III], witnessed by "domino Osberto de Abetot"[39].  "Johannes de Abetot" granted the service of "Henrici filii mei" to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory by charter dated to [1223/24], witnessed by "domino Waltero de Bellocampo…"[40]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         ALEXANDER de Abitot (-after [1250/69]).  "Johannes de Abetot" donated land in Alkerton [in Eastington, Gloucestershire] to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Alexandri filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [early Henry III], witnessed by "domino Osberto de Abetot"[41].  "Alexander de Abbitot" issued a quitclaim to "domino meo Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to "terram…in Hyndelip que vocatur Oldebur" by charter dated to [1250/69][42]

b)         HENRY de Abitot .  "Johannes de Abetot" granted the service of "Henrici filii mei" to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory by charter dated to [1223/24], witnessed by "domino Waltero de Bellocampo…"[43]

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Abitot .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Ada de Duderhill, Petro de Bello Campo, et Johanne de Abbitot, (Gast) Galfrido de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane filie Willelmi de Bello Campo et [nepos/nepte] mee"[44]

 

4.         OSBERT de Abitot .  "…Alexandro Dapitot, Osberto de Abbitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[45].  "Domino Guydone de Bello Campo, Osberto de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1213/36] under which "Johannes Archent" granted "terram meam in Stolton apud la Hethe", granted by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" to "Roberto patri meo", to "Hugoni de Duntesburn"[46].  "Johannes de Abetot" donated land in Alkerton [in Eastington, Gloucestershire] to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Alexandri filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [early Henry III], witnessed by "domino Osberto de Abetot"[47].  If these last two charters were issued in the early part of the date ranges, the witness Osbert de Abitot in both could be the same person as witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97]. 

 

 

The following persons were presumably descendants of the earlier members of the Abitot family but no indication has been found of the precise family relationships. 

 

1.         ROBERT de Abitotm MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A charter dated to [1239/May 1266] records that "Matildam que fuit uxor Roberti Dappetot" agreed with "Jacobum de Bello Campo" to transfer to him "totam terram meam…nomine dotis in villa de Acton" in return for an allowance of corn and clothing[48].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Abitot .  "…Johanne Dapetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1232/43] under which "Roculf de Chirchelench" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo, filio et heredi Walteri de Bello Campo" relating to "terram meam in campo de Chirchelench…vocatur la Hey" in return for a loan to repay the Jews[49].  "Johannes Dapetot filius Roberti Dapetot de Acton" issued a quitclaim of "totam terram meam in villa de Acton" to "domino meo domino Jacobo de Bello Campo" in return for money to pay a Jew, by charter dated to [1239/May 1266][50].  "…Willelmo de Abbetot, militibus…Johanne de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/69] under which "Johannes de Thorndon" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "de eodem Willelmo in villa de Stolton"[51]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Abitot .  "…Willelmo de Abbetot, militibus…Johanne de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/69] under which "Johannes de Thorndon" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "de eodem Willelmo in villa de Stolton"[52].  "Dominis Willelmo Dabitot de Crombe…militibus, Galfrido Dabitot de Hindelep…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/50] under which "Ricardus de Bruly" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "in villa de Wych et Wytton"[53]

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Abitot (-after [1261/69]).  "Dominis Willelmo Dabitot de Crombe…militibus, Galfrido Dabitot de Hindelep…" witnessed the charter dated to [1236/50] under which "Ricardus de Bruly" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo" relating to land he held "in villa de Wych et Wytton"[54].  "…Galfrido Dapitot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1258/69] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum de la Holte…cum advocatione ecclesie eiusdem" to "Johanni filio meo"[55].  "…Galfrido Dapetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1261/69] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench"[56]

 

 

 

ALBINI (AUBIGNY)

 

 

Loyd specifies that “Saint-Martin d’Aubigny” is in the present-day French département of Manche, arrondissement Coutances, canton Periers[57]

 

 

GUILLAUME d'Aubigny, son of ---.  1056.  Seigneur d'Aubigny. 

m (before 1048) ---, sister of GRIMAULT de Plessis, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 

Guillaume & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         ROGER d'Aubigny (-after [1081]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  "…Rogerii de Albiniaco, filiique sui Rualoc…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[58]m AMICE, daughter of ---.  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Roger de Albineio and Amicia his wife with the consent of their sons William and Nigel" by charter dated 1126[59].  “Wilielmus comes Sussexiæ” confirmed donations to Boxgrove Priory by his predecessors “Rogerus de Albineio, et Willelmus Pincerna…et Willielmi patris mei filii reginæ Aeliz, et Matildis matris meæ” to Boxgrove Priory by undated charter, which names “domina Avicia, uxor Rogeri de Albineio…et filiorum suorum Willielmi et Nigelli[60].  Roger & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         RUALOC d'Aubigny (-after 1084).  "…Rogerii de Albiniaco, filiique sui Rualoc…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[61]

b)         WILLIAM "Pincerna" d'Aubigny (-1139).  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Roger de Albineio and Amicia his wife with the consent of their sons William and Nigel" by charter dated 1126[62].  Lord of Old Buckenham, Norfolk.  He distinguished himself at the battle of Tinchebrai 1106[63].  "…Willelmo de Albineyo pincerna et Nigello de Albineyo frater suo…" witnessed the charter of Henry I King of England dated 2 Feb [1111/16] under which the king donated the manor of "Winterworda" to the archbishop of Rouen[64].  Brother of Nigel d'Aubigny, according to Orderic Vitalis he remained loyal to King Henry I during the rebellion of 1118[65].  He was Master Butler ["Pincerna"] of the household of King Henry I.  Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester, for the souls of “...fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Hunfridi”, by undated charter[66].  The Chronica Johannis de Oxenedes records the death in 1139 of “Willelmus pincerna regis fundator cœnobii de Wymundeham[67]m MATILDA Bigod, daughter of ROGER le Bigod & his [second] wife Adelise de Tosny (-[1121/33]).  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suæ Matilidis filiæ…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[68].  William & his wife had five children: 

i)          WILLIAM d'Aubigny (after 1100-Waverley Abbey 12 Oct 1176, bur Wymondham, Norfolk).  A memorandum of the foundation of Wymondham Priory records that “Willielmus de Albaneio, pincerna regis Henrici” had “unum filium Willielmum comitem Arundeliæ[69].  He was created Earl of Arundel in [1138/39]. 

-         EARLS of ARUNDEL

ii)         NELE [Nigel] d'Aubigny .  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suæ Matilidis filiæ…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[70]

iii)        OLIVER d'Aubigny .  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suæ Matilidis filiæ…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[71].  "Willelmus de Albiniaco" donated “ecclesias de villa...Ham” to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1132/51], witnessed by “...Olivarius frater Willelmi de Albiniaco et Radulfus de Haia et Engerannus de Sai...[72]

iv)       ROLAND d'Aubigny .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

v)        OLIVA d'Aubigny (-bur Boxgrove Priory)Wilielmus Cicestriæ comes” donated property “ecclesiæ de Bisintona quam Radulphus de Haia dedit ecclesiæ sanctæ Trinitatis” to Boxgrove Priory, dated the day “ipse Radulphus” was betrothed to “uxorem suam Olivam sororem…meam”, subscribed by “Radulfus filius Savari…[73].  “Wilielmus comes Arundelli” donated property “Bessesola..[et] Winkingas” to Boxgrove Priory, for the souls of “Adelizæ reginæ…Olivæ sororis meæ, et Olyvæ filiæ meæ, et Agathæ, quæ ibi iacent”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Godfridus filius comitis[74].  Her brother settled dower in Sussex on her[75]m RALPH de la Haye of Halnaker, Sussex, son of ROBERT de la Haye & his wife Muriel ---. 

c)         NELE [Nigel] de Albini (-21 or 26 Nov 1129)Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester, for the souls of “...fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Hunfridi”, by undated charter[76].  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Roger de Albineio and Amicia his wife with the consent of their sons William and Nigel" by charter dated 1126[77].  "…Willelmo de Albineyo pincerna et Nigello de Albineyo frater suo…" witnessed the charter of Henry I King of England dated 2 Feb [1111/16] under which the king donated the manor of "Winterworda" to the archbishop of Rouen[78].  Henry I King of England granted him Montbrai, in Normandy, the forfeited lands of Robert de Mowbray Earl of Northumberland[79].  He repudiated his first wife after the death of her brother Gilbert de Laigle[80].  Henry I King of England confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by "Nigel de Albineio" by charter dated to [1124/35], witnessed by “Nigello de Albineio[81]m firstly (after 1107, repudiated) as her second husband, MATHILDE de Laigle, former wife of ROBERT de Mowbray Earl of Northumberland, daughter of RICHER de l'Aigle & his wife Judith d’Avranches of Chester (-[after Oct 1155][82]).  She is named and her parentage given by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her first marriage[83].  Her second marriage took place with the dispensation of Pope Paschal II, granted although her first husband was still living[84].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Mathildi de Aqila" in Dorsetshire and exempted in Staffordshire[85]m secondly (Jun [1118]) GUNDRED de Gournay, daughter of GERARD de Gournay & his wife Edith de Warenne ([1100/05]-after 1155).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[86].  Orderic Vitalis records the marriage in Jun [1118] of "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco...sorore sua...Gundrea...consilio regis" to “Nigello de Albinneio[87].  In another passage she is named as second wife of Nigel d'Aubigny[88].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gunderede uxori Nig de Albin" in Leicestershire[89].  ”Gundreda, uxor Nigelli de Albini” donated property to the Hospital of St Leonard, York by undated charter which names “Rogero de Molbray filio suo[90].  An undated charter notes the donation of ”Hospitale Sancti Michaelis Archangeli” to Whitby Monastery, at the request of “Dominam Gundredam uxorem Nigelli de Albini” for the soul of “Rogero de Moubray filio eorum[91].  Nele & his second wife had one child:

i)          ROGER de Mowbray (-[late 1187/1188], bur Tyre).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[92]

-         MOWBRAY

d)         son .  The 1130 Pipe Roll suggests that Humphrey’s father must have been another son of Roger d’Aubigny, as it records "Alan de Linc" returning for the dowry he gave to "Unfr de Albin cum filia sua" in Lincolnshire[93]m ---.  One child: 

i)          HUMPHREY de Albini (-before 1129)Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester, for the souls of “...fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Hunfridi”, by undated charter[94]m --- de Lincoln, daughter of ALAN of Lincoln & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alan de Linc" returning for the dowry he gave to "Unfr de Albin cum filia sua" in Lincolnshire[95]

e)         [ANSGOTAnsgotus camerarius regis” donated “decimam...in hameletto...Modingham...in parochiis de Eltham et Chisilhersta” to Rochester, for the souls of “...uxoris mee et fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Humfredi”, by undated charter[96].  The phrasing of the sentence which describes those for whose souls this donation is made is the same as in the undated charter under which Willielmus de Albeneio pincerna regis” donated “decimam de villa...Elham” to Rochester (see above)[97].  This suggests that one document has been copied from the other.  The possibility that the documentation is in some way flawed cannot therefore be excluded.  If the lists are authentic in both documents, Ansgot must have been another brother of William de Albini.  In that case, he may have been the same person as the father of Samson de Albini who is shown below.  m ---.  Ansgotus camerarius regis” donated “decimam...in hameletto...Modingham...in parochiis de Eltham et Chisilhersta” to Rochester, for the souls of “...uxoris mee et fratris mei Nigelli et nepotis mei Humfredi”, by undated charter[98].] 

f)          son .  m ---.  One child: 

i)          SAMSON de Albini .  Chaplain to his uncle Nigel de Albini[99].  “Rogerus de Moubray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “patris mei Nigelli et matris meæ Gundredæ…et uxoris meæ Adeliz”, by undated charter witnessed by “Samsone de Albineio[100].  “Rogerus de Mowbray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, with the consent of “Sampsone de Albeneio” to whom “Nigellus pater meus” had granted the property in question, by undated charter[101].  “S de Albinneio” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “Nigelli de Albinneio”, by undated charter which names “Rogerus filius meus[102]m ---.  The name of Samson's wife is not known.  Samson & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ROGER de Albini .  “S de Albinneio” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “Nigelli de Albinneio”, by undated charter which names “Rogerus filius meus[103]

2.         [NELE [Nigel] d'Aubigny of Cainhoe (-[1100]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  His possible origin was discussed by Loyd[104]Domesday Book records “Nigel d’Aubigny” holding Turville in Desborough Hundred and Towersey in Ixhill Hundred in Buckinghamshire and numerous properties in Bedfordshire[105].]  m AMICE de Ferrers, daughter of HENRY de Ferrers & his wife Bertha ---.  “Robertus comes junior de Ferariis” confirmed donations to Tutbury by “avus meus Henricus…Egenulfus patruus meus…Robertus pater meus”, naming “Nigellus de Albiniaco et Amicia filia avi mei[106].  Nele & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRY de Albini (-after 1130).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his father in [1100] at Cainhoe.  “Henricus de Albineio et domina Cecilia uxor eius” donated property to Sopwell monastery by undated charter[107].  He was a benefactor of Abingdon Abbey in 1107 and made a grant to Thetford attested by his sister Adelisa[108][109]m CECILIA, daughter of [PATRICK [I] de Chaources [Chaworth] & his wife Mathilde de Hesdin].  “Henricus de Albineio et domina Cecilia uxor eius” donated property to Sopwell monastery by undated charter[110].  Her parentage is indicated by military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, which record knights’ fees of "Pagani de Muntdublel" in Gloucestershire including [Cecilia’s son] "Nigellus de Albieno i manerium de xxl…de matrimonio matris suæ", which immediately follows the note that "comes Patricius" [identified as Patrick Earl of Salisbury, whose mother is recorded as Sibyl de Chaources] also held knights’ fees "de matrimonio matris suæ"[111].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[112].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Robertus de Albineio" confirmed the donation of "terram…in Stretona" by "pater meus Henricus", witnessed by "Cecilia matre mea, Nigello fratre meo…Willielmo filio Nigelli"[113].  Henry & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT de Albini (-1191).  He succeeded his father before [1140/46] when he gave the hermitage of Modry to St Albans[114].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Robertus de Albineio" confirmed the donation of "terram…in Stretona" by "pater meus Henricus", witnessed by "Cecilia matre mea, Nigello fratre meo…Willielmo filio Nigelli"[115].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[116]m ---.  The name of Robert's wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child:

(a)       ROBERT de Albini (-before 5 Nov 1226).  “Robertus filius Roberti de Albineio” confirmed donations of property to Sopwell monastery by “Henricus avus meus sive Robertus pater meus” by undated charter, witnessed by “Nigello de Albineio, Willielmo fratre eius[117]m ---.  The name of Robert's wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had four children:

(1)       ROBERT de Albini (-before 3 Jun 1234). 

(2)       JOAN de Albini (-before 12 Jan 1241).  The sheriff of Bedfordshire was ordered to permit the execution of the testament of Joan de Beauchamp, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Beauchamp”, dated 12 Jan 1241[118]m  GEOFFREY de Beauchamp, son of --- (-[before 12 Jan 1241]). 

(3)       ISABEL de Albini

(4)       ASCELINA de Albini (-after 1241)The marriage of Asceline d’Aubigny, sister of Robert deceased, was granted to Amaury de Saint-Amand, to the use of Ralph de Saint-Amand his son, dated 3 Jun 1234[119].  Half of land formerly of Joan de Beauchamp in Eastcotts” was granted to “Ralph de St Amand...and Ascelina his wife, one of Joan’s heirs”, dated [Jan] 1241[120]m RALPH de Saint-Amand, son of AMAURY [I] de Saint-Amand & his first wife --- (-after 1241). 

ii)         NIGEL de Albini .  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Robertus de Albineio" confirmed the donation of "terram…in Stretona" by "pater meus Henricus", witnessed by "Cecilia matre mea, Nigello fratre meo…Willielmo filio Nigelli"[121].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[122]

iii)        AMICIA de Albini .  “Robertus de Albineio et Cecilia mater sua” donated property to Sopwell monastery when “Amiciam puellam, sororem ipsius Roberti et Ceciliæ filiam” became a nun there, by undated charter which also names “Henricus de Albineio pater Amiciæ[123].  A nun at Sopwell after 1140[124]

b)         ADELISA de Albini .  She, her husband and their son Hugh made a grant to Thetford priory, mentioned in a confirmation charter of King Henry II dated [1160], and as "Adelisa de Albeni" making another grant to Thetford so that she could be buried there.  She was mentioned as sister of Henry in his grant to Thetford[125]m RICHARD FitzOsbert, son of ---. 

3.         [RICHARD .  “Nigellus de Albeneyo” donated property to “domino Richardo fratri meo abbati de S. Albano” by undated charter dated to the reign of William I King of England[126].  Abbot of St Alban’s.] 

 

 

 

AMUNDEVILLE

 

 

Loyd specifies that “Mondeville” is in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Caen[127].  The family was studied by C. T. Clay[128]

 

 

1.         JOSCELIN de Amundeville (-[5 Apr] after 1085).  "…Hugo de Port, Wido Oillei, Richard de Corcei, Geoffrey Martel…Robert Malet, Ivelin de Amundivilla…Bernard de Neufmarché, Vigerius filius Ursonis, Radulfus filius Odonis, Ricuardus de Torcei, Eustachius his brother…Radulfus filius Anseredi, Rannulfus vicecomes, Rodbertus filius Ascelini" witnessed the charter dated 1085 which records the settlement between Gulbert de Alfait and the abbey of Fécamp[129]. 

 

2.         JOHN de Amundeville (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Johs de Amundevilla" in Yorkshire, Northumberland for "Hectona et Hasteleia"[130]

 

 

1.         JOSCELIN de Amundeville (-5 Apr ----).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “Non Apr” of “Goslanus de Amundavill dapifer[131].  The name of the husband of Beatrix Paynell is indicated by the record of her own death in the obituary of Lincoln Cathedral (see below).  m BEATRIX Paynell, daughter of --- (-11 Nov ----).  Her parentage and marriage are assumed from the undated charter under which "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[132].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[133].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “III Id Nov” of “Beatrix uxor Goslani dapiferi[134].  Five children: 

a)         WALTER de Amundeville (-20 Dec late 1166).  According to Domesday Descendants, Walter was the son of Joscelin de Amundeville and Beatrice Paynel (no corresponding primary source cited)[135].  King Stephen granted land "domu Walti de Amunduulla de Chinierbi…in Chinierbi et in Osgotebi et in Ouresbi" to William Earl of Lincoln by charter dated to [1139/40], witnessed by "Ric fil Ursi…"[136].  "…Walterus de Amundauilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [1150/55] under which "Philippus de Kime" confirmed the donations made by "patris mei" of the churches of Bullington and Langton by Wragby[137].  The Pipe Roll 1161/62 records "Walter de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[138].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[139].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “XIII Kal Jan” of “Walterus de Amundevilla[140]m HAWISE, daughter of --- (-20 Feb [1163]).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “X Kal Mar” of “Hawisa uxor Walteri de Amundavilla[141]Domesday Descendants records that Walter de Amundeville made a grant of rent at Kirkby to the church of Lincoln for the anniversary of the death of wife Havise in Mar 1163[142]

b)         WILLIAM de Amundeville (-[22 Jul] [1168]).  "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[143].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[144].  “Willielmus de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla”, for the soul of "…uxoris meæ Agnetis", by undated charter witnessed by "…Willielmo de Amundevilla…"[145].  The approximate date of his death is indicated by the 1168/69 Pipe Roll in which "Helyas de Amundeuilla…pro Willo fratre suo…[et] pro Walto fratre suo" accounted for land in Lincolnshire[146].  It is confirmed by the entry for his widow in the same roll (see below).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “XI Kal Aug” of “Willelmus de Amundevilla[147]m as her first husband, AGNES, daughter of --- (-after 1214).  “Willielmus de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla”, for the soul of "…uxoris meæ Agnetis", by undated charter[148].  "Agnes de Amundeuill" accounted "p recto hndo de catall dni sui de diuisa sua" in Lincolnshire in the 1168/69 Pipe Roll[149].  According to Domesday Descendants, Agnes, wife of William de Amundeville, answered a plea relating to her second husband Theobald Hautein in 1214[150].  She married secondly Theobald Hautein.  William & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [MATILDA de Amundeville .  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “XI Kal Aug” of “Willelmus de Amundevilla” and on “VIII Kal Aug” that “Matilda eius filius” donated annual payments[151].  It is uncertain that any daughter of this William de Amundeville would have been old enough to have donated property on her father’s death, considering his wife’s date of death.  It is therefore not certain that these two entries can refer to this William Amundeville.] 

c)         ELIAS de Amundeville (-after [1176/77]).  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[152].  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[153].  “Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” founded Melsa Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hingeram”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Elia de Mundevilla…[154].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Elias de Amundeville iv milites" in Lincolnshire in [1167/68][155].  "Helyas de Amundeuilla…pro Willo fratre suo…[et] pro Walto fratre suo" accounted for land in Lincolnshire in the 1168/69 Pipe Roll[156].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Helias de Amondeville" with one knight "in baillia de Gaureio…in servitium de Wareio"[157].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Helyas de Amundeuill…pro Willelmo fratre suo…[et] pro Waltero fratre suo" in Lincolnshire[158]m ---.  The name of Elias’s wife is not known.  Elias & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOSCELIN de Amundeville (-1214).  “Goslanus de Amundevilla, Eliæ filius” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “Walteri de Amundevilla […avunculi mei] et Eliæ patris mei”, for the souls of "…aviæ meæ Beatricis", by undated charter witnessed by "…Willielmo de Amundevilla…"[159].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Helyas de Amundevill…pro se et Iosleno filio suo" in Lincolnshire[160].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Joslenus de Amundeuill" in Lincolnshire[161].  According to Domesday Descendants, the heir of Agnes, widow of William de Amundeville, in 1214 was "Robert son of Margery, daughter of Jollan de Amundeville, a nephew of William" (no corresponding primary source cited)[162]m ---.  The name of Joscelin’s wife is not known.  Joscelin & his wife had one child: 

(1)       MARGERY de Amundeville .  According to Domesday Descendants, the heir of Agnes, widow of William de Amundeville, in 1214 was "Robert son of Margery, daughter of Jollan de Amundeville, a nephew of William" (no corresponding primary source cited)[163]m ---. 

ii)         ALICE de Amundeville (-after 22 Jun 1202).  "Alic filia Elye de Amundeville" paid a fine for recognition that "Elyas pater eius dedit ei villam de Winterton ad se maritand" and that "post obitum patris sui…Jollan frater eiusdem Alic" disseised her, in Nottinghamshire, dated 1200[164].  “Alice de Amundevile” claimed half a knight’s fee at Wimundestorp from “Jollan de Amundevill”, which refers to “Elias de Amundeville her father”, dated 22 Jun 1202[165]m ---. 

d)         RALPH de Amundeville .  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[166].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de Mondeville" holding one knight’s fee from "Willelmi de Percy" in Yorkshire in 1166[167].  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[168]m ---.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH de Amundeville (-after 1194).  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[169].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Radulfus de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[170]

e)         ADAM de Amundeville .  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Priory by charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[171].  “Elias de Amundevilla” confirmed donations to Ellesham made by “mater mea carnalis Beatrix…et frater meus Walterus de Amundevilla” by undated charter witnessed by "Radulfo de Amundevilla et Ada de Amundevilla fratribus meis, Jorsleno et fratre suo Willielmo de Evermo nepotibus meis, Radulfo de Amundevilla filio Radulfi fratris mei…"[172].

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Amundeville (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Mondeville" holding five knights’ fees from the bishop of Durham in Yorkshire in 1166[173]

 

2.         ROBERT de Amundeville (-before 1194).  “Robert de Amundeuill” donated donated land “in Swyney Wethteng…which Hugh Painil and Gilbert Eniot sometime held”, to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[174].  The reference to Hugh Paynell suggests that Robert de Mundeville was descended from Hugh’s sister (and therefore from one of the brothers of Walter de Amundeville (who died late 1166, see above), but the precise relationship has not yet been traced.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Amundeville (-after 1194).  “William de Amundeuill son of Robert de Amundeuill” confirmed his father’s donation of land “in the territory of Scotelthorp” to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[175].  “W. de Amundeuill” granted land “in the vill of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill his sister" by undated charter[176].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[177].  "…Willelmo de Amundeuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[178]

b)         AGNES de Amundeville .  “W. de Amundeuill” granted land “in the vill of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill his sister" by undated charter[179].  “Matilda pincerna formerly wife of Geoffrey pincerne of Scotelthorp” granted land “in the field of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill sister of Dom. William de Amundeuill" by undated charter[180].  “Matilda la Butiller of Scotelthorp in widowhood” granted land “in the field of Scotelthorp” to "Agnes de Amundeuill daughter of Robert de Amundeuill" by undated charter, witnessed by "William de Amundeuill…"[181].  Agnes later donated the same land to Bridlington priory[182]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Amundeville (-after 1171).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Amundeville i m" in Northumberland in [1161/62][183].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Amundeville xx s" in Northumberland in [1171/72][184]

 

4.         ROGER de Amundeville (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Rogerus de Amondeville" with one knight "in baillia de Tenerchebraio" and one knight in his own service[185]

 

5.         ELIAS de Amundeville (-after 12 Oct 1218).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Elias de Amundevill" in Lincolnshire[186].  "Elias de Amundeville" paid a fine "for having a writ to attaint…the jurors of an assize" in a case against "Augustine de Blakenham" in Suffolk, dated 12 Oct 1218[187]

 

6.         JOHN de Amundeville (-after 1208).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Durham, dated to [1208/10]: "Johannes de Amundevill" held land in "wapentac de Sadberge"[188].  

 

7.         GEOFFREY de Amundeville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Mondeville…Robertus de Mondeville" holding half of one knight’s fee "in Northamtona", and one "in Funtel", respectively, in Wiltshire in [1210/12][189]

 

8.         ROBERT de Amundeville (-after 1227).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Mondeville…Robertus de Mondeville" holding half of one knight’s fee "in Northamtona", and one "in Funtel", respectively, in Wiltshire in [1210/12][190].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Mandevile" holding 14 and three parts knights’ fees in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][191].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Robertus de Amuneville" held "de dono Regis Henrici in Button i militem"[192].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Mandevill" held "Winemeresham…de baronia sua de Merswd…in hundredo de Karenton" in Somerset[193].  "Robertus de Amundevill" paid a fine for the liberation of "Adam filium suum" as hostage who was given, dated [Mar] 1216[194].  Henry III King of England, at the request of "Willelmi de Putot", waived certain payments from "Roberto de Amenevill, cujus filiam idem Willelmus habet in uxorem" in 1227[195]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         ADAM de Amundeville (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Robertus de Amundevill" paid a fine for the liberation of "Adam filium suum" as hostage who was given, dated [Mar] 1216[196]

b)         daughter (-after 1227).  Henry III King of England, at the request of "Willelmi de Putot", waived certain payments from "Roberto de Amenevill, cujus filiam idem Willelmus habet in uxorem" in 1227[197]m WILLIAM de Putot, son of --- (-after 1227). 

 

9.         PETER de Amundeville (-after 22 Apr 1216).  "Petrus de Amundevill" made a fine after making peace with the king, in Lincolnshire, dated 22 Apr 1216[198]

 

 

 

ATON

 

 

1.         GERARD de Atonm ---.  The name of Gerard’s wife is not known.  Gerard & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH de Aton .  "Hugo filius Girardi de Atona" donated land "in Atona…in Larelandis…Whitflat…Gretlandis" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto de Stuteville…"[199]same person as…?  HUGH de Atonm ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Aton .  "Johannes filius Hugonis de Atona" granted the homage and service of "Nicholai filii Petri de Atona" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Dno Roberto de Stutevilla…"[200].  "Johannes de Atona" donated land "de Yrtona" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atona…"[201]

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Aton .  "Johannes de Atona" donated land "de Yrtona" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atona…"[202].  "Johannes de Atun filis Willelmi Senioris filii Gilberti de Atun" donated land "in Wicham" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atun…"[203].  "Laurentius filius Daniel de Atona" committed to paying five shillings annually to the infirmary at Whitby by undated charter witnessed by "…Gilberto de Atona…"[204]

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Bardleby (-after 1166).  “In Eborac[i]sira…Gilbertus de Barduleby dimidium militem…” is listed in a return of fees held in Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and north of the Tees by Hugh Bishop of Durham dated 1166[205].  The editor of Early Yorkshire Charters suggests that he was the same person as “Gilbert de Aton of Ayton in Pickering Lythe [who] held 2 car. in Barlby, 2 car. in Menethorpe and 1 car. in Newton by Gardham[206].  This is probably correct as the manor of Barlby was still held by William Lord Aton in 1385 (see below).  same person as…?  GILBERT de Aton .  The editor of Early Yorkshire Charters states that "Gilbert de Barduleby/Atun" was the father of William de Aton but he cites no corresponding primary source[207].  Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Rievaulx abbey, including the donation of "pratum de Torp" made by "Gileberti de Aton et Willelmi filii eius", confirmed by charter dated 10 Jul 1252[208]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Aton (-after [1185/95]).  The editor of Early Yorkshire Charters states that “William de Aton” was the son of "Gilbert de Barduleby/Atun" but he cites no corresponding primary source[209].  Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Rievaulx abbey, including the donation of "pratum de Torp" made by "Gileberti de Aton et Willelmi filii eius", confirmed by charter dated 10 Jul 1252[210].  “Willelmus de Aton” granted land "ab Holsike usque ad Brerflet…de Barthelby…" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Alani", with the consent of "Gilberti filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [1185/95][211]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [five] children: 

i)          GILBERT de Aton (-1235).  “Willelmus de Aton” granted land "ab Holsike usque ad Brerflet…de Barthelby…" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Alani", with the consent of "Gilberti filii et heredis mei", by charter dated to [1185/95][212].  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[213]

-         see below

ii)         JOHN de Aton .  "Johannes de Atun filis Willelmi Senioris filii Gilberti de Atun" donated land "in Wicham" to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "Gilberto de Atun…"[214].  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[215]

iii)        [WILLIAM de Aton .  William’s parentage has not been traced.  However, from a chronological point of view it is possible that he was another son of William de Aton.]  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOHN de Aton .  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[216]

iv)       [ROBERT de Aton .  Robert’s parentage has not been traced.  However, from a chronological point of view it is possible that he was another son of William de Aton.]  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       WILLIAM de Aton .  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[217]

v)        ALICE de Aton .  “William de Aton” granted rent in Barlby to "Hugh de Langthwaite in marriage with Alice his daughter", undated[218]m HUGH de Langthwaite, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         DANIEL de Atonm ---.  The name of Daniel’s wife is not known.  Daniel & his wife had one child: 

a)         LAWRENCE de Aton .  "Laurentius filius Daniel de Atona" committed to paying five shillings annually to the infirmary at Whitby by undated charter witnessed by "…Gilberto de Atona…"[219]

 

 

GILBERT de Aton, son of WILLIAM de Aton & his wife --- (-1235).  “Gilbertus de Atun” confirmed the grant of land "in territorio de Atun quam Willelmus filius Ckar tenuit de Willelmo patre meo" to "Roberto filio Roberti filii Ckar" by charter dated to [1195/1215], witnessed by "Johanne fratre domini Gilberti de Atun, Johanne filio Willelmi de Atun…Willelmo filio Roberti de Atun…"[220].  His descendants were the heirs to the Vescy estates in Lincolnshire after the extinction of the descendants of Eustace de Vescy[221]

m MARGERY de Vescy, daughter of WARIN de Vescy & his wife ---.  A manuscript of Malton Priory names “Marjoriæ filiæ et hæredi” of “Warino de Vesci”, and records the descent of “Gilbertus de Aton” from her[222].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Margeria de Vescy" holding land[223].  

Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Aton .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         GILBERT de Aton (-before 1285[224]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

b)         WILLIAM de Aton .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m ISABEL de Veer, daughter of SIMON de Veer of Goxhill, Lincolnshire and Sproatley, Holderness & his wife Ada Bertram.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.     William & his wife had one child: 

i)          GILBERT de Aton ([1288/89]-after 10 Apr 1350).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

-         see below

ii)         --- de Atonm ---.  One child: 

(a)       ALICE de Aton (-after Apr 1358).  The testament of "Gilbert de Aton" is dated 10 Apr 1350, requests burial "a Watton", makes bequests to "William mon fitz…Alice de Aton ma Nece"[225]

c)         [ISABEL de Aton (-before 17 Jun 1321).  The Complete Peerage quotes a writ dated 17 Jun 1321 which refers to property in Swyndene, Yorkshire granted by "Gilbertus de Aton" to "Isabelle de Aton et heredibus de corpore ipsius Isabelle" which passed on her death to "domini Johannis filii domini Rogeri Darcy militis…fil et her eiusdem Isabelle"[226].  The wording of this document is consistent with Isabel being the sister of Gilbert although the document does not specify the relationship.  m ROGER Darcy of Oldcotes and Styrrup, Nottinghamshire, son of --- (-before 12 May 1284).] 

 

 

GILBERT de Aton, son of WILLIAM de Aton & his wife Isabel de Veer ([1288/89]-after 10 Apr 1350).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…Domino Willielmo de Aton…Domino Gilberto de Aton…"[227].  The testament of "Gilbert de Aton" is dated 10 Apr 1350, requests burial "a Watton", makes bequests to "William mon fitz…Alice de Aton ma Nece"[228]

m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known. 

Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Aton (-[29 Sep 1385/Mar 1389]).  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…Domino Willielmo de Aton…Domino Gilberto de Aton…"[229].  A charter dated [Mar] 1349 (presumably O.S.) records an agreement between the abbot of Selby and “monsieur William de Aton chevauler fitz et heir monsieur Gilbert de Aton[230]He was summoned to parliament in 1371 whereby he is held to have become Lord Aton.  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[231].  He died before his son-in-law Edward St John[232]m [firstly] (after 1350) ISABEL Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his wife Idonia de Clifford (-[before 25 May 1368]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[233].  Her marriage is suggested by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…William d’Aton my nephew…" as one of his beneficiaries[234].  As the testator names his other two sisters, it is suggested that Isabel must have died before the date of the will.  [m secondly (before Oct 1374) --- de Poynings, daughter of MICHAEL de Poynings Lord Poynings & his wife Joan --- (after 1348-after 28 Oct 1374).  The testament of "Thomas Lord Poynings", dated 28 Oct 1374, names "Lady D’Aton my sister" among his beneficiaries[235].  It is likely that this entry refers to an otherwise unrecorded second wife of William Lord Aton, who was alive at that date and whose wife would therefore have been the only "Lady d’Aton".  It seems incorrect, as assumed in the Complete Peerage[236], that she was the same person as Margaret, wife of Lord Aton’s son William, as the latter’s wife would not have borne the title during the lifetime of her husband’s father.]  William & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Aton (-before 1389).  The testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, names "…William d’Aton my nephew…" as one of his beneficiaries[237]m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after 1396). 

b)         ANASTASIA de Atonm EDWARD St John, son of --- (-7 Mar 1389). 

c)         KATHERINE de Atonm as his second wife, RALPH Eure of Witton Castle, co Durham, son of --- (-10 Mar 1422).  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[238]

d)         ELIZABETH de Aton (-before 1 May 1402).  The testament of "Elizabeth nuper uxor Johannis Conyers militis", proved 1 May 1402, chooses burial "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorum infra civitatem Ebor." appoints "Waltero de Weston" as her heir[239]m firstly WILLIAM Playce, son of ---.  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[240]m secondly (before 29 Sep 1385) JOHN Conyers of Sockburn, co Durham, son of --- (-before 6 Mar 1395).  William Lord Aton granted his manor of Barlby to "Ralph Eure, John Conyers, and William Playce" by charter dated 29 Sep 1385[241]

 

 

 

AVENELL

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Avenell .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Willelmus Avenel" with "feodum dimidii militis" held from "abbatia de Burch" [in Hampshire][242].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo Auenello" in Buckinghamshire and in Bedfordshire, Warwickshire[243]

 

2.         ROBERT Avenell .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob Auenello" in Suffolk[244]

 

3.         RANDULF Avenell .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ranfi Auenelli" in Sussex[245]m ALICE, daughter of ---.  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ[246].  Randulf & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         MATILDA Avenell (-21 Sep 1173).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” had “unicam filiam…Matildam” who died[247].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges”, and died “IX Kal Oct 1173[248].  As noted in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY-AVRANCHES, BAYEUX, COTENTIN, charter evidence indicates that the wife of Robert FitzEdith was Mathilde d’Avranches, daughter of Matilda Avenell, not Matilda Avenell herself.  Matilda’s supposed second marriage, as reported in the Ford Abbey document, is therefore assumed to be incorrect.  m (after 1130) as his second wife, ROBERT d’Avranches, son of [WILLIAM FitzWimund d’Avranches & his wife ---] (-before 1142). 

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM Avenell (-after [1172]).  "Willelmus Auenel et Helewisa coniunx mea filia Walchelini Waard et heredes nostri" donated land "in Oxenfordia" to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1152/70][249].  "R[ichard] Avenel" donated the church of Saint-George-en-Bauptois to Blanchelande abbey, with the consent of “his brother William and his [William’s] son Richard”, by charter dated to [1151/57][250].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus Avenel i m" in Northamptonshire in [1161/62][251].  The Pipe Roll 1161/62 records "Hugh Gubion renders his account; for the scutage of William Avenel of Biart" in Northamptonshire[252].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus Avenel" with five knight "Regi…de vicecomitatu de Cerenciis" and one knight "de comitatu Mortonii"[253].  "Symon Mauleuerer et Gilibertus Avenel" confirmed the donation of "terram de Hungerigge in territorio de Molle" to Melrose abbey made by "Helene filie Symonis de Lindesie", confirmed by "Willi Auenel patris mei", by undated charter[254].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardi fratris Willelmi Avenel", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][255]m HELOISE, daughter of WALKELIN Ward & his wife ---.  "Helewisa fila Walchelini Waard primogenita, uxor Willelmi Auenel" donated land "in villa de Etona" to Eynsham abbey, with the consent of "filio…meo Walchelino", by charter dated to [1140/60][256].  "Willelmus Auenel et Helewisa coniunx mea filia Walchelini Waard et heredes nostri" donated land "in Oxenfordia" to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1152/70][257].  William & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         RICHARD Avenell .  "R[ichard] Avenel" donated the church of Saint-George-en-Bauptois to Blanchelande abbey, with the consent of “his brother William and his [William’s] son Richard”, by charter dated to [1151/57][258]

b)         [WALKELIN .  "Helewisa fila Walchelini Waard primogenita, uxor Willelmi Auenel" donated land "in villa de Etona" to Eynsham abbey, with the consent of "filio…meo Walchelino", by charter dated to [1140/60][259].  Nothing in this document confirms that Walkelin was the son of William Avenell.  He may have been his mother’s son by an earlier marriage.] 

c)         GILBERT Avenell (-before 1194).  "Symon Mauleuerer et Gilibertus Avenel" confirmed the donation of "terram de Hungerigge in territorio de Molle" to Melrose abbey made by "Helene filie Symonis de Lindesie", confirmed by "Willi Auenel patris mei", by undated charter[260]m AMICE, daughter of --- (-after 1194).  "Amicia [uxor] Gilbti Avenel" replaced her husband in a lawsuit against "Mathm fil Odon de Eston" in 1194[261]

2.         RICHARD Avenell (-after 1157).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[262].  "R[ichard] Avenel" donated the church of Saint-George-en-Bauptois to Blanchelande abbey, with the consent of “his brother William and his [William’s] son Richard”, by charter dated to [1151/57][263].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardi fratris Willelmi Avenel", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][264]

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY Avenell (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Galfridus Avenel" held three parts of one knight’s fee from "Roberti filii Regis" in Devon[265]

 

2.         NICHOLAS Avenell (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Walterus" held "tenementum illud Nicholaus Avenel…Scapewalle cum filia et hærede prædicti Willelmi [=Willelmus filius Reginaldi]" in Devon[266]

 

3.         RALPH Avenell (-after 1176).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Radulfus Auenel…in Sandherst" in Gloucestershire[267]

 

4.         PAIN Avenell (-after 1194).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Paganus Auenel" in Herefordshire[268]

 

5.         WILLIAM Avenell (-[1194]).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         ISABEL Avenell (-before 10 Apr 1226).  "Elisabeth q fuit uxor Sim Basset" paid a fine for "hereditate sua…dissaisita…post mortem predicti Simoni viri sui" in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, dated 1205[269].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Elizabet que fuit uxor Simonis Basset" held "feodum dimidii militis…de honore de Notingham"[270].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records one and a half knights’ fees escheated from "Ysabele Avenel" in "Haddone…[et] in Basselonde…[de honore] Piperelli de Notingham" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire in [1211/12][271].  "William Basset, son and heir of Elizabeth Avenel" was granted "full seisin of [her] land held of the king in the honour of Peverel in the county of Buckinghamshire", dated 10 Apr 1226[272]m SIMON Basset, son of WILLIAM Basset & his wife --- (-1205). 

 

6.         JOHN Avenell (-after Mar 1197).  The Rotuli Curiæ Regis record a claim in Nov/Dec 1194 by "Johi Avenel" against "Urso de Limes" relating to land “in Bergas” in Sussex[273].  “Ailric clericum” claimed land “in Bilesham” from “Johem Auenell” in Mar 1197[274]

 

7.         WALTER Avenell (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Rogerus filius Renfrey et Walterus Avenel et uxor Hugonis de Nevill" holding parts of "Gamegeya"[275].  

 

8.         ROBERT Avenellm EVA, daughter of ---.  "Laurencius Auenel filius et heres Eue quondam sponse Roberti Auenel patris mei defuncti" donated property to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[276].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         LAWRENCE Avenell .  "Laurencius Auenel filius et heres Eue quondam sponse Roberti Auenel patris mei defuncti" donated property to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[277]

 

9.         RALPH Avenell (-before 1220).  m SABINE, daughter of ---.  “Herbm fil Wulwini” claimed land “in Bulesham” from “Sabinam Auenel et Willm Auenel fil eius” in 1220[278].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Avenell (-before 5 May 1236).  "William Avenel" made a fine for "having the land formerly of Ralph Avenel his father…with the bailiwick and castle of Bicknor" in Somerset, dated 22 Nov 1223[279].  A writ after the death of "William Avenel", dated "5 May 20 Hen III", records "Dulcie his daughter is his heir"[280]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          DULCIE Avenell .  A writ after the death of "William Avenel", dated "5 May 20 Hen III", records "Dulcie his daughter is his heir"[281]same person as...?  CECILIE Avenell (-1247).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "Cecilia filia Willelmi Avenel est de donatione domini regis et est maritanda et est in custodia Willelmi de Cantilupo per dominum regum..."[282].  The similarity of the names Dulcie/Cecilie suggests a mistranscription in one or other of these sources. 

 

10.      WILLIAM Avenell (-[before Oct 1205]).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         OLIVER Avenell (-before [Mar] 1226).  An order of King John dated to [Oct] 1205 liberated "Willo Avenel…Oliverum Avenell filium suum obsidem suum" and transferred his custody to the bishop of London[283].  "Oliver Avenel and Agnes his wife, daughter and heiress of Odo of Wanstrow" paid a fine for "the relief of half a knight’s fee…in Merston which falls to Agnes by inheritance" in Somerset, dated 1 Feb 1222[284].  An order dated to [Mar] 1226 confiscated "all the lands…formerly of Oliver Avenel who is dead…saving to Agnes his wife her reasonable maintenance…" in Wiltshire[285]m AGNES, daughter of ODO of Wanstrow & his wife --- (-after [Mar] 1226).  "Oliver Avenel and Agnes his wife, daughter and heiress of Odo of Wanstrow" paid a fine for "the relief of half a knight’s fee…in Merston which falls to Agnes by inheritance" in Somerset, dated 1 Feb 1222[286].  An order dated to [Mar] 1226 confiscated "all the lands…formerly of Oliver Avenel who is dead…saving to Agnes his wife her reasonable maintenance…" in Wiltshire[287]

 

11.      NICHOLAS Avenell (-[1221/22])m as her first husband, MABEL Malet, daughter of WILLIAM Malet & his [first wife ---].  She married secondly (before 18 Nov 1223) Hugues de Vivonne.  Her second marriage is confirmed by an order dated 18 Nov 1223 placing "in respite…the demand…from Hugh de Vivonne…for the debt that William Malet, father of the wife of Vivon, owed the king"[288]

 

 

 

AVRANCHES

 

 

[Two possible brothers.  The name “Rualon” suggests a Breton origin.]

1.         RUALON d’Avranches (-[1130/34]).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that Henry I King of England notified "Hugoni de Boclanda et Willielmo vicecomiti de Oxeneford" that he had granted "manerium...de Estantona" [Stanton Harcourt] to "Rualucus de Abrincis", undated[289].  Johnson & Cronne date this charter to [May 1101][290].  Lord of Folkestone, de iure uxoris.  Sheriff of Kent.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rualon de Abrinc...qd fuit int eu et Hasc de Taneia" among “Nova Placita et Nove Conventiones” in Essex and “Rualon de Abrinc” returning for “terra Atson de Sco Audoeno” in Kent, and naming “Rualon vicec” in Kent[291]m MATHILDE de Muneville, daughter of NELE de Muneville & his wife Emma d’Arques.  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[292].  Rualon & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM d’Avranches (-[1177]).  Lord of Folkestone.  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[293]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          SIMON [I] d’Avranches (-1203)Domesday Descendants records his parentage but does not cite the primary source which confirms the information[294]

-         see below

b)         MATILDA [Felicia] d’AvranchesDomesday Descendants records her parentage and marriage but does not cite the primary source which confirms the information[295]m HUMPHREY de Millières, son of ---. 

2.         [TURGIS d’Avranches .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Turgis de Abrinc" accounting for “terra et uxore Hug de Albtiuilla et filium suum habet in custodia” in Kent[296].  The common connection with Kent suggests that Turgis may have been closely related to Rualon d’Avranches, maybe they were brothers.] 

 

 

SIMON [I] d’Avranches, son of WILLIAM [I] d’Avranches & his wife --- (-1203)Domesday Descendants records his parentage but does not cite the primary source which confirms the information[297]

m CECILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[298].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Cecilia de Avranch est de donacione domini regis et valet terra sua lv"[299]

Simon [I] & his wife had three children: 

1.         WILLIAM [II] d’Avranches (-6 Nov 1230).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[300]m MATILDA de Bocland, daughter of WILLIAM de Bocland & his wife Matilda de Say (-after 1218)---.  Bracton lists a claim by "Willelmus de Aurenches et Matillis uxor eius, Johannes de Bouilla et Hauissia uxor eius" against "Robertum de Ferrariis et Johannam uxorem eius", dated 1218, for "hereditate Willelmi de Boclonde patris earum", noting that "Matillis et Cecilia [error for Hawisia] sunt sorores sororis [error for uxoris] sue [=predicti Willelmi]"[301].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM [III] d’Avranches (-2 Jan 1236).  His parentage is shown in The Complete Peerage[302].  The primary source which confirms this information has not yet been identified. 

b)         MATILDA d’Avranches (-before 6 Apr 1263).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[303].  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches"[304].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her…" and names her heirs[305]m as his second wife, HAMON de Crèvecœur, son of ROBERT de Crèvecœur & his wife --- (-before 6 Apr 1263). 

2.         SIMON [II] d’Avranches (-after 28 Oct 1242).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[306].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1235/36 "Seimonis de Averenches" holding "quarta parte militis in Retkot" Oxfordshire, and in a later passage "Simonis de Avereng’" holding "quarta parte unius feodi...in Radcote que fuit Willelmi de Boclande"[307].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1242/43 "Simon de Averenches" holding "in Redcot quartam partem feodi unius militis in capite de rege" in Oxfordshire[308].  m (after 1225) as her second husband, JOANNA de Bocland, widow of ROBERT de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Bocland & his wife Matilda de Say (-before 16 Nov 1251).  A table in The Complete Peerage shows that Joanna married secondly Geoffrey d’Avranches[309].  This is incorrect, her actual second husband being Geoffrey’s brother Simon d’Avranches, as shown by the following document which links Redcot in Oxfordshire (recorded as held by Simon d’Avranches following Joanna’s father, see above) with Joanna de Ferrers née de Bocland[310]A writ dated 16 Nov "37 Hen III", after the death of "Joan de Ferres alias de Ferrers", names as her heir "John de Everenges alias de Averenges her son aged 23", and names Brumpton manor in Somerset, and Redcot and Grafton in Oxfordshire as her properties[311].  Simon & his wife had one child:

a)         JOHN d’Avranches ([1227/28]-before 13 Nov 1257).  A writ dated 16 Nov "37 Hen III", after the death of "Joan de Ferres alias de Ferrers", names as her heir "John de Everenges alias de Averenges her son aged 23"[312].  A writ dated 13 Nov "42 Hen III", after the death “Thursday before St. Martin last” of "John de Avereng’ alias de Aferenges, de Averyng’", names as his heirs "his daughters Joan aged 9, Margaret aged 6, and Elizabeth aged 3" and provides for “Amice late the wife of the said John[313]m (before 1247) AMICE, daughter of --- (-after 4 Feb 1261).  A writ dated 13 Nov "42 Hen III", after the death “Thursday before St. Martin last” of "John de Avereng’ alias de Aferenges, de Averyng’", names as his heirs "his daughters Joan aged 9, Margaret aged 6, and Elizabeth aged 3" and provides for “Amice late the wife of the said John[314].  John & his wife had three children: 

i)          JOANNA d’Avranches ([1247/48]-).  A writ dated 13 Nov "42 Hen III", after the death “Thursday before St. Martin last” of "John de Avereng’ alias de Aferenges, de Averyng’", names as his heirs "his daughters Joan aged 9, Margaret aged 6, and Elizabeth aged 3" and provides for “Amice late the wife of the said John[315]

ii)         MARGARET d’Avranches ([1250/51]-).  A writ dated 13 Nov "42 Hen III", after the death “Thursday before St. Martin last” of "John de Avereng’ alias de Aferenges, de Averyng’", names as his heirs "his daughters Joan aged 9, Margaret aged 6, and Elizabeth aged 3" and provides for “Amice late the wife of the said John[316]

iii)        ELIZABETH d’Avranches ([1253/54]-).  A writ dated 13 Nov "42 Hen III", after the death “Thursday before St. Martin last” of "John de Avereng’ alias de Aferenges, de Averyng’", names as his heirs "his daughters Joan aged 9, Margaret aged 6, and Elizabeth aged 3" and provides for “Amice late the wife of the said John[317]

3.         GEOFFREY d’Avranches (-after 21 Nov 1216).  Henry III King of England ordered "Petro de Maulay" to release "Cecilie de Abbrincis et Willelmo de Abbrincis filio suo, Simonem fratrem ipsius Willelmi, laicum", but retain "Gaufrido fratre ipsius Willelmi clerico et Matillide filia ipsius Willelmi", dated 21 Nov 1216[318]

 

 

 

BAGOT

 

 

1.         BAGOT (-after 1129).  "…Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1122/25] under which "Nicholaus filius Roberti de Stafford…et Mathildi uxori mee" donated Idlicote "quod Gaufridus de Clintona de me tenebat" to Kenilworth priory[319]The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Bagot" accounting for money from a tenant in Staffordshire[320]m ---.  The name of Bagot´s wife is not known.  Bagot & his wife had one child: 

a)         HERVEY Bagot (-after 1166).  "…Herveus filius Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1130] under which "Nicolaus filius Roberti de Stafford et Robertus primogenitus et heres meus" donated "ecclesiam Sancti Wlfadi de Stanis" to Kenilworth priory[321]"…Hereveo Bagod, Johanne Bagod…" witnessed the charter dated to [1155/59] under which "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations made to Erdaury priory by "patris mei Nicholai de Stafford"[322]"…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[323]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hervicus Bagot" held three knights´ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[324]m ---.  The name of Hervey´s wife is not known.  Hervey & his wife had three children: 

i)          HERVEY Bagot (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory)"…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[325]

-         STAFFORD FAMILY (BAGOT)

ii)         ROGER Bagot (-after 1194).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[326]"Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[327]Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit” and for the salvation of “mea et Roehais uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Roberto de Verdun, Waltero de Canvile, Ada de Aldithelee...Willielmo Pantouf, Radulpho de Biseche, Rogero Bagot, Philippo de Draicote, Milone de Verdun[328]"Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[329]"Herveius Bagot" granted revenue "in Brideleia" to "Thomæ Noel", with the consent of "Milisantæ uxoris meæ et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1194/95], witnessed by "…Willelmo Bagot de Blumeshull, William Bagot de Holedale, Rogero Bagot fratre Hervei Bagot…"[330]

iii)        HERVEY Bagot (-after [1185/90]).  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[331]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bagot (-after 1166).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[332]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Bagot" held three parts of one knight´s fee from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[333]

 

2.         ROBERT Bagot (-after 1166).  "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Aviciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1155], witnessed by "Roberto Bagot…"[334]"…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[335]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Bagod" held part of [one knight´s fee] from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[336]

 

3.         JOHN Bagot (-after [1155/59]).  "…Hereveo Bagod, Johanne Bagod…" witnessed the charter dated to [1155/59] under which "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations made to Erdaury priory by "patris mei Nicholai de Stafford"[337]m ---.  The name of John´s wife is not known.  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Bagot (-after 1182).  "…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[338]

b)         RICHARD Bagot"…Herveus Bagot, Herveus et Rogeri filii sui, Willelmus Bagot, Robertus Bagot, Willelmus et Ricardus filii Johannis Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1158/65] under which "Robertus de Stapford" confirmed the release of a claim by "Robertus Cappe et Symon frater eius" against "Willelmo de Rydeware"[339]

 

4.         JOHN Bagot of Blymhill, Staffordshire (-after 1166).  It is not known whether John Bagot of Blymhill was the same person as John Bagot who is shown above.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ranulfus de Beumeis" held three knights´ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire, of which two were held by "Johannes Bigod"[340].  Bridgeman identifies the two fees held by John Bagot as Blymhill and Brineton[341]m [IVETTE, daughter of --- (-after 1182).  "Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[342].]  It is not known with certainty that Ivette was the wife of John Bagot of Blymhill.  However, the charter dated 1176 under which "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed land to Buildwas abbey was agreed with the consent of "my mother…"[343], showing firstly that William´s mother was still alive at that date (consistent with the 1182 charter) and that John Bagot had an eldest son named William as did Ivette.  John & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM Bagot of Blymhill (-after 1194).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[344].  ["Juhetam assensu…Willelmi Bagot heredis sui" and "Willelmum de Rydeware" settled a dispute concerning land held from her by charter dated 1182, witnessed by "…Henrico Bagot…Rogero Bagot"[345].  As noted above, it is not certain that this document relates to William Bagot of Blymhill and his mother.]  "Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[346]"Herveius Bagot" granted revenue "in Brideleia" to "Thomæ Noel", with the consent of "Milisantæ uxoris meæ et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1194/95], witnessed by "…Willelmo Bagot de Blumeshull, William Bagot de Holedale, Rogero Bagot fratre Hervei Bagot…"[347]m ---.  The name of William´s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [JOHN Bagot of Blymhill (-1224 or before).  "John Bagot and Hamo de Weston" were indicted at the Forest Assizes of Mar 1209 for "receiving Marksmen and Hounds at Blymhill and Weston"[348].  He and his descendants are shown in Eyton[349]m MARGERY, daughter of WARIN de Burwardsley & his wife --- (-before 10 May 1259).  Margaret Bagot gave "half a mark for summoning Roger Martel before the Justices at Westminster to acquit her of the service which Milisent de Stafford demands of her for her freehold in Blumenhul and Brunton" in 1223/24[350].  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[351].  John & his wife had five children: 

(a)       SARAH Bagot (-before 10 May 1259).  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[352].  It appears likely that this daughter was her parents´ oldest child in view of the age of her sister Philippa recorded in the same document (although that age must be underestimated, see below).  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Sarah married "William de Ipstanes"[353]m WILLIAM de Ipstones, son of ---. 

(b)       MARGARET Bagot .  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Margaret married "Ralph de Coven"[354]m firstly RALPH de Covene, son of ---.  m secondly WILLIAM de Drayton, son of ---. 

(c)       JOAN Bagot .  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Joan married "Richard de Pycheford"[355]m RICHARD de Pycheford, son of ---. 

(d)       ELIZABETH Bagot .  "Elizabeth daughter of John Bagot of Blumenhul and…Phelippa daughter of the same John de Blumenhul, being in full age and in our maidenhood" granted "all our right in Blakemor" to "Ralph de Coven", undated, witnessed by "…John Bagot of Brunton…Richard Bagot of the same vill"[356]

(e)       PHILIPPA Bagot (-after 10 May 1259).  "Elizabeth daughter of John Bagot of Blumenhul and…Phelippa daughter of the same John de Blumenhul, being in full age and in our maidenhood" granted "all our right in Blakemor" to "Ralph de Coven", undated, witnessed by "…John Bagot of Brunton…Richard Bagot of the same vill"[357].  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[358].  Philippa´s age in this document must be under-estimated in view of the estimated date of death of her father.  A plea heard in early 1333 records that "John Bagod" had been seized with the manor of Blymhill and was succeeded by "Sarra, Margaret, Joan, and Philippa his daughters", adding that Philippa married "Geoffrey de Bromleye"[359]m GEOFFREY de Bromley, son of ---. 

b)         ROGER Bagot (-after 1176).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[360]

c)         JOHN Bagot (-after 1176).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[361]

d)         THOMAS Bagot (-after 1176).  "William, son of John Bagoth" confirmed the donation of land "beyond the Rivulet, from the boundaries of Westune to the boundaries of Broctune" to Buildwas abbey in accordance with the convention agreed by "my father", with the consent of "my mother, and my brothers, Roger, John and Thomas", by charter dated 1176[362]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM Bagot of Hyde (-after [1194]).  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[363]"Herveus Bagot" donated "villam de Draitun et molendino" to Stafford St Thomas, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Milisent et heredum meorum", by charter dated 1194, witnessed by "…Toma Noel, Adam de Aldithel…Rogero Bagot, Willielmo Bagot de Blumenhull, William Bagot de la Hide…"[364]"Herveius Bagot" granted revenue "in Brideleia" to "Thomæ Noel", with the consent of "Milisantæ uxoris meæ et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1194/95], witnessed by "…Willelmo Bagot de Blumeshull, William Bagot de Holedale, Rogero Bagot fratre Hervei Bagot…"[365]

2.         HERVEY Bagot (-after [1185/90]).  "Herveius Bagod" enfeoffed "Alexandro de Stantone" with land at Oakley by charter dated to [1185/90], witnessed by "Willelmo Bagot de Hida, Herveio fratre eius…Herveo fratre domini…Hugone Bagod"[366]

 

 

1.         INGELRAM Bagot .  "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to the reign of King Henry II under which "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei"[367]

 

 

 

 

BASKERVILLE

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Baskerville (-after 1109).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Robertus de Baskevilla", on returning from Jerusalem, donated "unam hidam extra muros eiusdem civitatis", in 1109 "rege Henrico confirmante, tempore Petri abbatis" [abbot from 1104 to 1113][368]

 

2.         ROGER de Baskerville (-after [1123]).  "…Rog de Bascuilla…" subscribed the charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[369]

 

3.         BERNARD de Baskerville (-[1148/57]).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "unam hidam terræ in Cumba" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1171] made by "Bernardus de Baskevyle", confirmed by "Walterus [et] Robertus de Baskevyle"[370].  "Walterus de Baskerevilla" confirmed the donation of land "in Cumba" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Hugardus [presumably an error for Bernardus] de Baskerevilla patruus meus" in 1157, by undated charter[371]

4.         --- de Baskervillem ---.  Two children: 

a)         WALTER de Baskerville (-after 1157).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "unam hidam terræ in Cumba" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1171] made by "Bernardus de Baskevyle", confirmed by "Walterus [et] Robertus de Baskevyle"[372].  "Walterus de Baskerevilla" confirmed the donation of land "in Cumba" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Hugardus de Baskerevilla patruus meus" in 1157, by undated charter[373]

b)         ROBERT de Baskerville (-after 1176).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "unam hidam terræ in Cumba" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1171] made by "Bernardus de Baskevyle", confirmed by "Walterus [et] Robertus de Baskevyle"[374].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Baskerville" holding 8 knights’ fees under "Hugonis de Lascy" in Hereford[375].  "Robertus de Baskerevilla" confirmed the donation of land "in Cumba" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Hugardus de Baskerevilla", with the consent of "Walterum fratrem meum", by undated charter[376].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Robertus de Baskeruill" in Herefordshire[377]

 

 

1.         RALPH de Baskerville (-after 1176).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de Baskerville" holding one knight’s fee under "Ada de Port" in Hereford[378].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "in Stodesden…Radulfus de Baskeruill" in Shropshire and "Radulfus de Baskeruill" in Herefordshire[379].  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Herdesleia" made by "Radulfi de Baskervill"[380].  

 

2.         NESTA [de Baskerville] (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nesta de Bascherville" holding "servientem cum lancea" from the Serjeantie in Wales[381].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nesta de Bescharville" holding "per serjantariam i peditis in exercitu Walliæ" in [1210/12][382]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Baskerville (-before Oct 1213).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 17 Nov 1195 in a claim by "Galfredus de Longo Campo" against "Walterus de Bascreuill" concerning "tota hereditate Emme de Sancto Ligo matris ipsii Galfridi…villa de Easton et villa de Kenpelee"[383].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus de Baskerville" holding knights’ fees "Oretop in Irchenfeld" in Hereford in [1210/12][384]m firstly ---.  m [secondly] (before 4 Apr 1211) as her third husband, ISOLDA Pantulf, widow firstly of HUGH de Montpinçon, and secondly of WALTER de Tattershall, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Pantulf of Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire & his wife Joan de Goldington (-after 1267).  "Isolda q fuit ux Walteri de Baskvill" paid a fine for "dote sua" in Leicestershire, dated 1213[385].  She married fourthly (1213) Henry Bisset.  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[386].  She married fifthly as his second wife, Amaury [I] de Saint-Amand.   

 

 

1.         RALPH de Baskervillem ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS de Baskerville (-after 1210).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Tomas de Baskeruill…in Standon versus Milonem Pichard" in Herefordshire, adding that the property was invaded "post primam coronationem Henrici R" by "Radulfo patre suo Philippo de Braiose, per quem Milo tenet"[387].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Bascherville" holding land in Shropshire in [1210/12][388]

 

2.         AIMERY de Baskerville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Aimerus de Bascherville" holding one half of one knight’s fee in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][389]

 

3.         WALTER de Baskerville (-before 24 May 1244).  A writ dated 24 May "28 Hen III" after the death of "Walter de Baskervill" names "Walter de Baskerville his son…his heir" and records "Orcope manor in Urchenefeld" in Hereford[390]m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

a)         WALTER de Baskerville (-before 22 Feb 1286).  A writ dated 24 May "28 Hen III" after the death of "Walter de Baskervill" names "Walter de Baskerville his son…his heir" and records "Orcope manor in Urchenefeld" in Hereford[391].  "Walter de Baskervill" was granted rights in "his manor of Horcop in Hirchinkefeld" dated 24 Feb 1253[392]Edward I King of England pardoned Waltero de Baskerville” for his part in the death of “Henrici de Alamannia” by charter dated 12 Sep 1274[393].  A writ dated 22 Feb "14 Edw I", after the death of "Walter de Baskervill", names "Roger his son aged 24 at the gule of August 13 Edw I is his next heir"[394]m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROGER de Baskerville ([1261/62]-).  A writ dated 22 Feb "14 Edw I", after the death of "Walter de Baskervill", names "Roger his son aged 24 at the gule of August 13 Edw I is his next heir"[395]

 

 

 

BAYEUX

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Bayeux (-after 1091).  "…Rotberti de Belmont, Rodulfi de Bec, Willelmi filii Girardi, Rogerii fratris Rodulfi, Gisleberti Crispini, Rotberti filii Alvuardi, Rotberti Marmion, Rodulfi Taisson, Rotberti Herneis, Ricardi de Baiocas…" witnessed the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[396]

 

2.         RANULF de Bayeux (-1154).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rann [de] Baioc" in Dorset, Northamptonshire, Suffolk and Lincolnshire[397].  "Rannulfus de Baiocis et Margareta sponsa eius" confirmed "Alano de Repinghale et heredi suo de propria uxore sua" by charter dated to [1140][398].  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[399].  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][400].  “Randulfus de Bajocis” recorded that his wife became a nun in the foundation charter of Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, witnessed by "…Hereberto nepote meo…"[401]m (before 1129) MARGARET de Lincoln, daughter of ALAN de Lincoln & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rann Baioc" declaring returns for "filia Alani Linc" in Lincolnshire[402].  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[403].  Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei"[404].  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][405].  “Randulfus de Bajocis” recorded that his wife became a nun in the foundation charter of Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, witnessed by "…Hereberto nepote meo…"[406].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Alanus de Lincolnia" previously held property "in Catebi et in Kaillestorp…et in Wicham…in Kaillesterna…" in Lincolnshire and that "Ranulfus de Baiocis heres Alani de Lincolnia" granted part of it to "Rogero Punchardon" whose heirs still held it[407].  Ranulf & his wife had seven children: 

a)         HUGH de Bayeux (-1196).  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[408].  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][409].  “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Alano de Bajocis fratre meo…"[410].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire, among which "Alanus frater meus" holding two fees[411]m firstly GEVA, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her first husband, ELEANOR, daughter of ---.  She married secondly William de Tilebroc, and secondly Thomas of Beckering.  Hugh & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

i)          MATILDA de Bayeux (-1219).  m RICHARD de Sanford, son of --- (-1219). 

ii)         JOAN de Bayeux .  Nun at Sixle. 

b)         ALAN de Bayeux (-after 1201).  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[412].  “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Alano de Bajocis fratre meo…"[413].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire, among which "Alanus frater meus" holding two fees[414]m JOAN, daughter of ---.  Alan & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Lincoln (-after 1219). 

c)         WILLIAM de Bayeux (-after 1154).  "Randulfus de Baiwes et Margareta sponsa eius et Hugo heres eorum atque Willelmus frater eius" donated land in Cabourne to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to [1143/47][415].  "Hugonem de Baiocis" granted land in Kelsterne and Thoresway, Lincolnshire to "Willelmo de Baiocis fratri meo" by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II[416]

d)         ROBERT de Bayeux (-after 29 Sep 1191).  m --- de Rouellé, daughter of RALPH de Rouellé & his wife ---. 

e)         MATILDA de Bayeuxm RICHARD de Verly, son of ---. 

f)          --- de Bayeux .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire and his grants "in maritagio Willelmus de Ver et Gilbertus de Sancto-Laudo cum duabus sororibus meis"[417]m WILLIAM de Ver, son of ---. 

g)         --- de Bayeux .  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the fees of "Hugo de Baiocis" in Lincolnshire and his grants "in maritagio Willelmus de Ver et Gilbertus de Sancto-Laudo cum duabus sororibus meis"[418]m GILBERT de Saint-Lo, son of ---. 

3.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         HERBERT .  “Randulfus de Bajocis” recorded that his wife became a nun in the foundation charter of Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, witnessed by "…Hereberto nepote meo…"[419]

 

 

1.         JOSCELIN de BayeuxThe 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Joscelinde Baioc" owing ".xl. m p heredit uxoris sue" in Dorset/Somerset[420]m --- (-before [1164/65]).  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Joscelinde Baioc" owing ".xl. m p heredit uxoris sue" in Dorset/Somerset, presumably indicating that his wife had recently died[421]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Bayeux (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Willelmus de Baiocis" paid a fine for the liberation of "Beatricia filia sua primogenita" as hostage, dated [Mar] 1216[422]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [two or more] children: 

a)         BEATRICE de Bayeux (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Willelmus de Baiocis" paid a fine for the liberation of "Beatricia filia sua primogenita" as hostage, dated [Mar] 1216[423]

b)         daughter (s) .  The existence of at least one other daughter is shown by the ordered dated [Mar] 1216 under which "Willelmus de Baiocis" paid a fine for the liberation of "Beatricia filia sua primogenita" as hostage[424]

 

 

 

BEAUCHAMP

 

 

A.      BEAUCHAMP of WARWICKSHIRE, BEDFORDSHIRE

 

 

1.         HUGH de Beauchamp ([1050/60]-[1114]).  His birth date range is suggested by his absence from any charters of King William I, which indicates that he may have come of age in the latter part of the king’s reign.  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Beauchamp” holding land in Bengeo in Hertford Hundred in Hertfordshire; Linslade and Soulbury in Cottesloe Hundred and Lathbury in Bunsty Hundred in Buckinghamshire; and numerous properties in Bedfordshire[425].  William II King of England confirmed to "Hugh of Beauchamp and all his barons of Bucks" that Gilbert Abbot of Westminster had proved his title to land granted by King William I, by charter dated to [1087/95][426].  "…Hugo de Beauchamp…" witnessed the undated charter under which King William II instructed Ramsey abbey to return fugitives if found[427].  "Hugh de Beauchamp, Ralph Paganel" witnessed the charter dated to [1094/1100] under which William II King of England granted a market to St Mary of Thorney[428].  m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the Chronicon Rameseiensis which records a donation which names "quatuor ex hominibus Simonis de Bellocampo et Mahald matris eius", dated to [1124/30][429].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1124/30] names "Simonis de Bello Campo et Mahald matris eius"[430].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

a)         SIMON de Beauchamp (-[1137]).  "…Simone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[431].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1124/30] names "Simonis de Bello Campo et Mahald matris eius"[432].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Symon de Belcapo" in Bedfordshire[433].  Orderic Vitalis records that Bedford castle had been granted to "Rodberti de Bello Campo…frater eius", presumably referring to Simon as the same paragraph records his daughter’s marriage[434].  "…Simundus de Belecamp…" witnessed the charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] which records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone"[435]m ---.  The name of Simon’s wife is not known.  Simon & his wife had one child: 

i)          daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugoni cognomento Pauperi" married "filiam Simonis de Bello Campo"[436]m HUGH de Beaumont, son of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] (-after 1140).  A favourite of King Stephen who gave him the castle and barony of Bedford in 1138, thereby creating him Earl of Bedford.  He was ejected from Bedford by his wife’s first cousins, the sons of Robert Beauchamp.  He appears to have lapsed into poverty and was probably degraded from his peerage[437]

b)         ROBERT de Beauchamp (-before 1130).  Orderic Vitalis records that Bedford castle had been granted to "Rodberti de Bello Campo…frater eius" (the latter referring to Simon de Beauchamp)[438].  He presumably died before the 1129/30 Pipe Roll in which his son is named.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          MILES [I] de Beauchamp (-after [1141/42]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Miloni de Belcampo" in Buckinghamshire[439].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that King Stephen besieged "Milonem de Bellocampo" in the castle of Bedford, dated to [1140/42][440].  Orderic Vitalis records that "filii Rodberti de Bello Campo" held the castle of Bedford against King Stephen[441].  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] witnessed by "…Milo de Belloc’…"[442].  "…Milone de Bellocampo…" witnessed the charter dated [25/31] Jul 1141 under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina" confirmed various properties to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" [William [I] de Beauchamp, son of Walter [I] de Beauchamp, see Part B. of this chapter below][443]

ii)         PAYN de Beauchamp (-1156).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Lord of Bedford.  “Paganus de Bellocampo et uxor eius Rohaisa comitissa” founded Chicksand priory, for the soul of “…Simonis de Bellocampo…”, by undated charter dated to [1150][444].  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[445].  “Paganum et comitissam Roheis…sponsa mea” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “dominella Elena…Ivo Taillebois…[446]m (after 1144) as her second husband, ROHESE de Vere, widow of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of AUBREY de Vere, Chamberlain of England & his wife Adelisa de Clare ([1105/10]-after 1166, bur Chicksand Priory).  “G de Magnavilla et Roeisa uxor eius” donated property to Hurley Priory, Berkshire by undated charter[447].  “Paganus de Bellocampo et uxor eius Rohaisa comitissa” founded Chicksand priory, for the soul of “…Simonis de Bellocampo…”, by undated charter dated to [1150][448].  “Paganum et comitissam Roheis…sponsa mea” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “dominella Elena…Ivo Taillebois…[449].  A manuscript document narrating the foundation of Newenham Priory names “Paganus de Bello-campo” as its founder, his wife “Roisia”, and their son “Simon de Bellocampo[450].  Payn & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       [HELEN .  “Paganum et comitissam Roheis…sponsa mea” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “dominella Elena…[451].  It is probable that "dominella Elena", as first in the list of subscribers, was closely related to the donors, possibly their daughter.  If this is correct, the absence of the couple’s known son Simon suggests that Helen must have been their oldest suriviving child.] 

(b)       SIMON de Beauchamp (-1207).  A manuscript document narrating the foundation of Newenham Priory names “Paganus de Bello-campo” as its founder, his wife “Roisia”, and their son “Simon de Bello-campo[452].  Lord of Bedford. 

-         see below

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known.  From a chronological point of view, they could have been otherwise unrecorded sons of Hugh de Beauchamp (see above).  However, it is not known whether Hugh was the only member of the Beauchamp family who came to England from Normandy.  The connection with the Peveril family (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY P-S), suggested by the name William Peveril [I] de Beauchamp, has not been traced. 

1.         WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire ([1080/95]-[1130/May 1133]).  His birth date is estimated very broadly based on his marriage before 1114.  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto de Abetot et ministris [et] forestariis de foresta de Feccham" that he had granted a fox-hunting licence in his forest in Feckenham to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1110/16][453]

-        BEAUCHAMP of ELMLEY, WORCESTERSHIRE

2.         WILLIAM Peveril [I] de Beauchamp (-[1151/57]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Peur de Belcapo" in Gloucestershire[454].  "…Willelmo de Bellocampo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1142/46] under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina et Henricus filius comitis Andegavie" confirmed the rights of "Unfrido de Buhun" in the lands he held on the death of her father[455].  "Willelmus Peuerel de Bellocampo, frater Walteri de Bellocampo" donated "uillam…Chodestun" {Cutsdean} to Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Willelmo Peuerel herede meo", by charter dated to [1149/57][456].  A charter dated to [1151/57] confirmed the previous donation and that, after the death of "Peuerellus de Bellocampo", "Guuillelmus Peuerel ipsius filius et heres" confirmed his father’s donation[457]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Peveril [II] de Beauchamp (-after 1166).  "Willelmus Peuerel de Bellocampo, frater Walteri de Bellocampo" donated "uillam…Chodestun" {Cutsdean} to Worcester Cathedral priory, with the consent of "Willelmo Peuerel herede meo", by charter dated to [1149/57][458].  A charter dated to [1151/57] confirmed the previous donation and that, after the death of "Peuerellus de Bellocampo", "Guuillelmus Peuerel ipsius filius et heres" confirmed his father’s donation[459].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Peverel de Bello Campo…Stephanus de Bello Campo" each holding two knights’ fees from "Hamo filius Meinfelin" in Buckinghamshire[460]

 

 

The parents of Oliver de Beauchamp are not known.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been another son of Robert, son of Hugh de Beauchamp (see above). 

1.         OLIVER de Beauchamp ([1110/25]-before 1157).  “Oliveri de Bello-campo” is named as father of “Hugo de Bello-campo” in an undated charter for Thorney monastery[461].  No other reference to Oliver has been found.  His estimated birth date range is suggested from his son Hugh being, presumably, of age when he is named in the 1157 Pipe Roll.  This range is consistent with his having been a younger brother of Payn de Beauchamp Lord of Beauchamp, son of Robert de Beauchamp, as also is his son’s holding land in Bedfordshire. 

-        OTHER BEAUCHAMP FAMILIES

 

 

1.         MURIEL de Beauchamp (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Murieli de Belcapo" in Leicestershire[462]

 

 

SIMON de Beauchamp, son of PAYN de Beauchamp & his wife Rohese de Vere (-1207).  A manuscript document narrating the foundation of Newenham Priory names “Paganus de Bello-campo” as its founder, his wife “Roisia”, and their son “Simon de Bello-campo[463].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Bello Campo xxxvi l et in perdonis Hugoni de Bello Campo xxxi s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1161/62][464].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Simonis de Bello Campo" in Bedfordshire[465].  William Earl of Essex confirmed the donation of "villa de Kahingeham" to "Ernulfo de Mandavilla fratri meo" by undated charter, witnessed by "Comite Albrico, Simone de Bellocampo, Gaufrido de Say…"[466].  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Newenham Priory, including a donation by “Simon de Bello-campo[467].  "Willelmus comes de Essex" confirmed a donation of land in Aby and South Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Otueli avunculus meus" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1166/75] witnessed by "Simone de Bello Campo…"[468].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Bello Campo xlv l xv s viii d" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1171/72][469].  "…Simone de Bello Campo…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[470].  "Sim d Bell Capo" and Cormeilles abbey are named in a lawsuit about "loco suo Laur" in Worcestershire in 1194[471].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Simon de Bello Campo" paying "xlv l xv s viii d" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[472]

m as her first husband, ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-before 1225).  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[473].  She married secondly Nicholas de Kenet.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" against "Nicholaum de Kenet" for the return of "manerium de Sheldelegha" which was the dower of "Ysobellam de Bello Campo uxorem suam matrem predicti Willelmi", which he claimed reverted to him after his mother died as she had no heirs by her second husband[474]

Simon & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Beauchamp (-1260).  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[475].  Lord of Bedford.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Bello Campo" holding 45 knights’ fees in Bedfordshire in [1210/12][476].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “domini Willelmi de Bellocampo…per consilium dominæ Idæ de Bellocampo” imposed a new prior at Newham, dated to 1247[477].  The Annals of Dunstable record further persecutions of Newham priory by “W de Bellocampo patronus loci et domina Hida uxor sua”, dated to 1254[478].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus de Bellocampo senior” died in 1260[479]m firstly ([20 Jun] 1207) GUNNORA de Lanvalay, daughter of [WILLIAM [I] de Lanvalay & his wife Gunnora de Saint-Clair] (-before [1220]).  King John confirmed "villam de Bromeleg cum advocatione ecclesie", donated by "Willelmus de Lanval…in maritagium cum Gunnora sorore ipsius Willelmi de Lunval", to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" by charter dated 20 Jun 1207[480].  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[481].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[482]m secondly ([1220]) as her second husband, IDA de Longespee, widow of RALPH [III] de Somery, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela Ctss of Salisbury (after 1206-after 1260).  William Earl of Salisbury granted the manor of Belcham to "William de Beauchamp…with Ida his daughter, who was the wife of Ralph de Sumeri" dated 1220[483].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “domini Willelmi de Bellocampo…per consilium dominæ Idæ de Bellocampo” imposed a new prior at Newham, dated to 1247[484].  The Annals of Dunstable record further persecutions of Newham priory by “W de Bellocampo patronus loci et domina Hida uxor sua”, dated to 1254[485].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus de Bellocampo senior” died in 1260 and that "domina Ida" received her dower[486].  William & his first wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-before 1232).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johanni de Burgo et Hawisie uxori eius" against "Willelmus de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "medietatis ville Hamertone", which belonged to them after the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo filius ipsius Willelmi et heres Gunnore quondam uxoris ipsius Willelmi"[487]

William & his second wife had six children: 

b)         SIMON de Beauchamp (-before 1260).  m ISABEL, daughter of --- (-before 4 Oct 1295).  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs the descendants of Simon’s sisters as shown below[488].  Simon & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOAN de Beauchamp

c)         WILLIAM de Beauchamp (-Aug 1262).  "William son of William de Bello Campo of Bedford" was granted "free warren in his demesne lands in Lynchlad, co Buckingham" dated 25 Sep 1251[489].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “W[illelmus] de Bellocampo” died in 1262[490].  A writ dated 6 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "William de Bello Campo de Bedeford" records that "he died on Sunday after the Assumption of the Blessed May", that "Dilewyk manor [Bedford] is held by Lady Ida de Bello Campo for life", but names no heir[491]

d)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-killed in battle Evesham 1265).  The Annals of Oseney name “Johannes de Bello Campo” among those who were killed at the battle of Evesham[492].  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of his heirs[493]

e)         MATILDA de Beauchamp (-before Apr 1273).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Matildam, filiam Willielmi de Bello-campo[494].  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands[495].  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon…"[496]m firstly ROGER de Mowbray, son of WILLIAM de Mowbray & his wife Avice --- (-[Axholme] [Nov 1266], bur [Pontefract, Friars Church]).  m secondly ROGER Le Strange, son of --- (-1311). 

f)          BEATRICE de Beauchamp (-before 30 Sep 1285).  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands[497].  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon, Joan the wife of Ralph Paynel, aged 30, daughter of Ela sister of the said Simon, Isabel the wife of Simon de Pateshulle aged 24, daughter of Ida daughter of the same Ela, and Elizabeth the wife of John de Horbur aged 34, daughter of the same Ela, are parceners with the heirs of the body of Beatrice sometime sister of the said Simon", adding that Beatrice had married "first to Thomas son of Otto, who had by her a son named Otto now deceased, and a daughter named Maud now aged 26 years and the wife of John Botetourte…after the death of the said Thomas she was married to William de Montecanyso of Edwardestone who had by her a son named William, who if he survives as the jury believe, is 12 years old and more"[498]m firstly (before 1263) THOMAS FitzOtes of Mendlesham, Suffolk, son of OTES FitzWilliam & his wife Margaret --- ([before 1230]-before 23 Mar 1274).  m secondly (before Jun 1278) WILLIAM [II] de Munchensy, son of WILLIAM [I] de Munchensy & his wife Joan de Crek ([1229/30]-[27 Apr/14 May] 1302). 

g)         ELA de Beauchamp (-before 10 Jan 1267).  By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands and, in respect of the third part, placed "Johannam, Idam et Isabellam filias Ele Wake et heredes predicte Johanne de tertia parte" in the custory of "Edwardo primogenito suo" as guardians[499]m as his first wife, BALDWIN Wake, son of HUGH Wake & his wife Joan de Stuteville ([1237/38]-before 10 Feb 1282). 

2.         [ROBERT Beauchamp (-after 6 May 1248).  "Robert de Bello Campo son of Simon" was granted "the demesne lands of his manors of Stokes under Hamden and Easthacche…[and] of a yearly fair at the manor of Great Merston" dated 6 May 1248[500].] 

 

 

B.      BEAUCHAMP of ELMLEY, WORCESTERSHIRE

 

 

The parentage of Walter de Beauchamp has not been confirmed in any of the primary sources which have been consulted during the preparation of the present document.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been the son of Hugh de Beauchamp (see Part A).  However, it is not known whether Hugh was the only member of the Beauchamp family who came to England from Normandy.  A hint about his family relationships is provided by the charter dated [25/31] Jul 1141 under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina" confirmed, among other property, the property of "suorum proximorum parentum qui contra me fuerint in werra mea", to Walter’s son "Willelmo de Bello Campo"[501].  The "proximorum parentum" in question have not been identified, and unfortunately the document does not specify the properties which were granted to William de Beauchamp.  Miles [I] de Beauchamp (see Part A. of the present chapter, above) is excluded as he witnessed the same document and therefore must also have been a supporter of Empress Matilda. 

 

 

WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, son of --- ([1080/95]-[1130/May 1133]).  His birth date is estimated very broadly based on his marriage before 1114.  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto de Abetot et ministris [et] forestariis de foresta de Feccham" that he had granted a fox-hunting licence in his forest in Feckenham to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1110/16][502].  Henry I King of England notified "Osberto vicecomiti et omnibus forestariis de Wirecestrasera" that he had granted a wolf-hunting licence in his forest in Worcestershire to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1106/13][503].  Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Rogeri de Wygrecestra", in and around the town of Worcester, to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1114, after 15 Aug][504].  Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "vicecomitatum de Wigresestrasia" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [Dec 1113/Apr 1116][505].  "…Walto de Bello Campo…" subscribed the charter date [3/10] Jun 1123 under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of "Edrici fil Chetelli" to "Walto de Gloec"[506].  Henry I King of England notified the bishop of Worcester that he had granted "terram que fuit Adelize uxoris Ursonis de Abbetot sicut ipsa Adeliza eam ei concessit" to "Waltero de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1123/Jul 1129][507].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walto de Belcapo" in Wiltshire (two entries) and in Gloucestershire[508]

m (before Aug 1114) [EMMELINE], daughter of URSE de Abitot & his wife Adelisa ---.  Round states that the wife of Walter de Beauchamp was the daughter of Urse de Abitot but he does not cite the corresponding primary source which confirms that this is correct[509].  Ellis says that "Emmeline Roger’s sister was wife of Walter de Beauchamp, who obtained the fief of Urso and the shrievalty of Worcestershire, which Henry I confirmed to him, together wih the office of one of the king’s dispensers which Robert brother of Urso had formerly held, and the land given him by Adelisa the widow of Urso"[510].  If this information is all correct, it appears to establish Emmeline’s parentage and marriage.  The corresponding sources are set out in the Beauchamp cartulary, and quoted above under Emmeline’s husband’s entry.  The documents do not explicitly state that Walter’s wife was the daughter of Urse de Abitot and brother of Roger de Abitot, but this is a reasonable implication.  The latest date of her marriage is assessed from the dating of the first of these charters.  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  

Walter [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         WILLIAM [I] de Beauchamp (-1170, bur Worcester).  Henry I King of England confirmed the inheritance by "Willelmo filio Walteri de Bello Campo, dispensario meo" of "terram totam patris sui" by charter dated to [1130/May 1133][511].  "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina" confirmed "hereditario jure castellum de Wigorn…vicecomitatum Wygorn…quam pater eius Walterus de Bellocampo…Robertus dispensator, frater Ursonis de Abbetot…manerium de Bekeford…Westonam et Luffenham in Roteland", as well as the property of "suorum proximorum parentum qui contra me fuerint in werra mea", to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" by charter dated [25/31] Jul 1141[512].  “…Waltero de Clifford…Osberto filio Hugonis, Willielmo de Bealchamp…” witnessed the undated charter, dated to [1155], which records the donation by “Rogerus comes Herefordiæ” to Brecknock priory[513].  The 1156 Pipe Roll records "Wills. de Bellocampo" at the head of the return for Worcestershire, and the 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls "Wills de Bello Capo" at Trentham in Staffordshire with revenue of ₤30[514].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “Willelmus de Bello Campo” was captured by “Radulpho de Mandeville” in 1151[515].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Willelmus de Bello Campo vii milites…Walterus de Bello Campo, dimidium militum" among those providing military service for Westminster abbey in Worcestershire, and also record the knight fee-holders under "Willelmus de Bello Campo" in Worcestershire[516].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1170 of “Willelmus de Bello Campo” and his burial “ad ostium capituli Wigorniæ[517]m [BERTHA de Briouse, daughter of [WILLIAM [II] de Briouse & his wife Bertha of Hereford].  According to Domesday Descendants, the wife of William [I] de Beauchamp was "Bertha, daughter of William II de Braose"[518].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified but, if it is correct, the chronology of her husband’s family suggests that she must have been one of her parents’ older children.  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that "according to an early 14th century inquest, he married Berta, a daughter of the marcher lord William de Braose c. 1140 and received with her lands in three villages in south Gloucestershire", but noting that the jurors incorrectly state that Bertha was the wife of the great-grandfather of Guy Earl of Warwick who would have been William [II] de Beauchamp[519].  Given the birth of William [II] de Beauchamp’s children in the mid-1190s, it does not appear possible for their mother to have been the daughter of William [II] de Briouse.  A connection between the Briouse and Beauchamp families is indicated by the claim brought by Amice (wife of William [II] de Beauchamp) in 1198 against William de Briouse, presumably identifiable as William [III] de Briouse.  The implication is that the land in Oxfordshire, subject of the claim, was inherited by Amice’s infant son (on behalf of whom she was presumably acting) from Briouse ancestors.  If that is correct, a likely explanation is that the land was inherited from the infant’s maternal grandmother, having been brought to William [I] de Beauchamp on his marriage.  Nevertheless the chronology is not ideal, considering the dating of the marriage of William [I]’s father to before Aug 1114 (which suggests that William [I] must have been considerably older than his wife if she was the daughter of William [II] de Briouse) and the birth of his grandson William [II] in [1194/96].]  William & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] de Beauchamp (-1197).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus de Bello Campo[520]

-        see below

b)         ROBERT de Beauchamp (-after 1209).  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro et Johanne fratribus meis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[521].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro de Bello Campo, Waltero fratre Willelmi de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[522].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[523].  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that the custody of William [III] de Beauchamp, son of William [II] ("Wilekin de Beauchamp") was transferred in 1209 to "the free tenants of the honour, headed by Robert de Beauchamp, a brother of William [II]…for four years"[524]

c)         PETER de Beauchamp (-after [1194/95]).  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro et Johanne fratribus meis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[525].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro de Bello Campo, Waltero fratre Willelmi de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[526].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[527].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "de firma de Brochton Petri de Bellocamp de dimidio anno" in Worcestershire[528]

d)         JOHN de Beauchamp .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro et Johanne fratribus meis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo"[529].  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[530]

e)         [WALTER de Beauchamp .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro de Bello Campo, Waltero fratre Willelmi de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Odo de Salewarp" granted land to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo"[531].  This is the only one of the series of charters, naming William [II] de Beauchamp and his brothers, which names a brother Walter.  It is possibility that "Waltero" in this document is an error for "Johanne" who is named in all the other documents.  It should be borne in mind that the Beauchamp cartulary, in which this charter is reproduced, was compiled in 1395/96 and contains "innumerable errors"[532].] 

f)          [EMMA (-after Sep 1192).  According to Dugdale, the wife of Ralph de Sudeley was the daughter of William de Beauchamp of Elmley[533], but the primary source on which this information is based has not been traced.  m RALPH de Sudeley, son of JOHN de Sudeley & his wife Grace de Tracy (-before 29 Sep 1192).] 

2.         [WALTER [II] de Beauchamp (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Willelmus de Bello Campo vii milites…Walterus de Bello Campo, dimidium militum" among those providing military service for Westminster abbey in Worcestershire[534].  No confirmation has yet been found that Walter [II] was the brother of William [I] de Beauchamp.  However, their names are nearly adjacent in the listing, and Walter is a name used in William’s family.  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[535].] 

3.         MATILDA de Beauchamp .  Her marriage and parentage are confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Robert Marmion, neveu de Guillaume de Beauchamp" made a declaration concerning a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and the charter dated 1224 under which "Robert Marmion le jeune, fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp" donated property to the same abbey[536]m as his first wife, ROBERT Marmion [V], son of ROBERT Marmion [IV] & his wife --- (-before [1217]). 

 

 

3.         IVO de Beauchamp .  "Roberto de Bello Campo, Petro [et] Johanne de Bello Campo, fratribus [meis], Ivone de Bello Campo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1170/97] under which "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land to "Roberto de Argent"[537]

 

 

WILLIAM [II] de Beauchamp, son of WILLIAM [I] de Beauchamp & his wife Bertha de Briouse (-1197).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Bello Campo" paying "lxx s de militibus, quos tenet de Rege in diversis comitatius, vii milites" in Worcestershire[538].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmo de Bello Campo" paying "vii l de toto sentagio quod promisit domino Regi" in Worcestershire[539].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1197 of “Willelmus de Bello Campo[540]

m AMICE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that it is clear from the cartulary of Westwood priory that "Amice (or Avice) ‘lady of Salwarpe’ was the mother of William [II]’s heir and other children"[541].  The Rotuli Curiæ Regis record a claim in 1198 by "Amic de Bello Campo" against "Will de Brause" relating to land in Oxfordshire[542].  Amice was presumably acting in the name of her infant son, presumably in relation to land in which he has inherited an interest from the Briouse family, which provides a further indication of the identity of his paternal grandmother noted above. 

[Mistress (1): --- de Salwarpe, sister of Odo de Salwarpe, daughter of ---.  The identity of the mother of Juliana, daughter of William [II] de Beauchamp, is suggested by the three charters quoted below.  The implication of the documents is that Juliana was illegitimate, and that the grant of property made by William [II] de Beauchamp to Odo de Salwarpe under the first document amounted to compensation for getting his sister pregnant, on the understanding that the property in question would later be transmitted to his [illegitimate] daughter, the transfer being effected by the second document and confirmed by the third.  However, see the reference under Amice, wife of William [II] de Beauchamp, to her being “lady of Salwarpe” which, if correct, suggests that this possible mistress may have been the same person as his wife.]

William [II] & his wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM [III] de Beauchamp ([1194/96]-[1210/11]).  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that William [III] de Beauchamp, son of William [II], was in the custody of William [III] de Briouse in 1200[543].  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that the custody of "Wilekin de Beauchamp" was transferred in 1209 to "the free tenants of the honour, headed by Robert de Beauchamp, a brother of William [II]…for four years"[544].  The period of four years remaining while William [III] was still a minor indicates that he was born in the last years of his father’s life. 

2.         WALTER [III] de Beauchamp ([1195/97]-14 Apr 1236).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus de Bello Campo" holding 207 knights’ fees "in Uptone, Stanes, Graftone, Ayntone, Chedeleswale, Kokesaye, Benetlega, Pancevot, Bouresdale, Costone, Dunclere" in Worcestershire in [1210/12][545].  The Annals of Worcester record the death “die Sancti Guthlaci” in 1235 of “Walterus de Bello Campo[546].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “XVIII Kal Mai” in 1236 of “W de Bellocampo[547]m firstly (after 1212) JOAN Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [III] de Mortimer & his [second] wife Isabel de Ferrers (-1225).  The Annals of Worcester record that “Rogerus de Mortuo Mari…filiam suam” married “Waltero de Bello Campo[548].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1225 of “Johanna de Mortuo Mari uxor Willelmi de Bello Campo[549]m secondly ANGHARAD, daughter of --- (-[1280/83]).  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary records that "Angaret" was the mother of Walter [II]’s son Hugh, and suggests that she may also have been the mother of his sons Thomas, Walter and John[550].  Her parentage is not known, but her name indicates Welsh origin.  A lay subsidy roll for Worcester dated [1280] records "Domina Augereta de Bello Campo" in Bengeworth[551].  Walter [III] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [IV] de Beauchamp (-[7 Jan/21 Apr] 1269, bur Worcester Franciscan Church)"Roculf de Chirchelench" issued a quitclaim to "domino Willelmo de Bello Campo, filio et heredi Walteri de Bello Campo" relating to "terram meam in campo de Chirchelench…vocatur la Hey" in return for a loan to repay the Jews, by charter dated to [1232/43][552].  Sheriff of Worcester: "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" [presumably the donor’s maternal grandmother] by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[553].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[554]An undated writ "53 Hen III", after the death of "William de Bello Campo, of Elmelye" names "Wykewauer manor [Gloucester]" but no heir[555]m ISABEL Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Mauduit of Hanslope, Berkshire & his wife Alice of Warwick (-after 7 Jan 1269).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", which names her son "William de Bello Campo the younger, son of his sister Isabel deceased who was married to William de Bello Campo the elder, age variously stated as 26 and more, and 30 and more,, is his heir"[556].  "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[557].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[558].  William [IV] & his wife had eight children: 

i)          WILLIAM [V] de Beauchamp ([1237/41]-Elmley 5 or 9 Jun 1298, bur 22 Jun 1298 Worcester Franciscan Church)The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[559]The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[560]A writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", names "William de Bello Campo the younger, son of his sister Isabel deceased who was married to William de Bello Campo the elder, age variously stated as 26 and more, and 30 and more, is his heir"[561]He succeeded his maternal uncle in Jan 1267 as Earl of Warwick.  He succeeded his father in 1268 at Elmley and as hereditary Sheriff of Worcestershire. 

-         EARLS of WARWICK

ii)         JOHN de Beauchamp of Holt (-[1261/7 Jan 1269]).  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum de la Holte…cum advocatione ecclesie eiusdem" to "Johanni filio meo", with default to "Waltero fratri suo minori", by charter dated to [1258/69][562].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench", except the part granted to "Bartholomeo de Sudleya et Johanne filie mee", to "Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" (in default to "Johanni filio meo") by charter dated to [1261/69][563].  He is not named in his father’s testament dated 7 Jan 1268 so presumably died before that date. 

iii)        WALTER de Beauchamp of Alcester (-after 7 Jan 1269).  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum de la Holte…cum advocatione ecclesie eiusdem" to "Johanni filio meo", with default to "Waltero fratri suo minori", by charter dated to [1258/69][564].  "Walterus filius Willelmi de Bello Campo" issued a quitclaim relating to "terra…in Schirrevelench" granted to him by his father by charter dated to [1259/69], witnessed by "Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[565].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[566]same person as...?  WALTER de Beauchamp m ALICE de Tosny, daughter of RAOUL [VI] de Tosny & his wife Pernel de Lacy.  Pope Nicholas IV granted dispensation to “Walter de Bello Campo” and “Alice daughter of Ralph de Tonny to remain in the marriage they contracted in ignorance that they were related in the fourth degree of kindred”, and declared “their offspring legitimate”, dated 23 Sep 1289[567]

iv)       JOAN de Beauchamp (-after 1298).  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "in liberum maritagium cum Johanna filia mea…terre…in villa de Schirrevelench" to "Bartholomeo de Sutley" by charter dated 8 Sep 1254, witnessed by "dominis Rogero de Somery, Willelmo de Oddyngesell, Willelmo Maudut, Girardo Talebot…Willelmo Corbet…Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[568].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench", except the part granted to "Bartholomeo de Sudleya et Johanne filie mee", to "Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" by charter dated to [1261/69][569].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[570]m (Betrothed 8 Sep 1254) BARTHOLOMEW de Sudeley, son of [RALPH de Sudeley & his wife Imenia ---] (-29 Jun 1280 or before[571]). 

v)        ISABEL de Beauchamp (-after 7 Jan 1269).  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[572]

vi)       MARGARET de Beauchamp (-after 1284).  A genealogical table in the introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary names "Isabel, Margaret, Sibil (unmarried 1269), Sarah (unmarried 1269)" as daughters of William [IV] de Beauchamp but cites no primary source which provides the basis for the information[573].  A document dated 1249 records a claim by “William de Bello Campo of Elmeleye” against “Henry Hose tenant for the manor of Titecumbe” [Tidcombe, Wiltshire], and the subsequent agreement between the two whereby “Henry has given William the marriage of Hubert his first-born son [...a minor] to...Margery, William’s daughter” with “dower...the manor of Tateswyk” [Tatwick, Somerset][574].  She is not named in her father’s 7 Jan 1268 testament.  Inquiries following a writ dated 11 Jul "12 Edw I", in the presence of “Margaret late the wife of...Hubert [Huse]”, found that "Margaret, Maud and Isabel...daughters and next heirs of Hubert Huse" were "aged 18 at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptis 12 Edw I...15 at Christmas 12 Edw I and...13 at the feast of St Nicholas" respectively[575].  King Edward III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to restore to “Henry Esturmy and John Corney, moiety of manor of Tidcombe which William de Beauchamp of Elmele gave to Henry Huse, Hubert his son, Margaret Hubert’s wife and heirs. Henry is entitled as son of Margaret daughter of Hubert and Margaret, John as son of Isabella daughter of Hubert and Margaret”, dated 1375[576]m (contract 1249) HUBERT Hussey [Hose/Husee], son of HENRY Hussey & his wife --- (-before 12 Jul 1275).  Inquiries following a writ dated 26 Oct "13 Edw I" after the death of “Maud daughter of Hubert Husee” name "Margaret wife of...Henry Esturmy aged 24 and Isabel daughter of the said Hubert aged 14, sisters of the said Maud, are her next heirs"[577]

vii)      SIBYLLA de Beauchamp (-after 7 Jan 1269).  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[578]

viii)     SARAH de Beauchamp (-after Jul 1317)A genealogical table in the introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary names "Isabel, Margaret, Sibil (unmarried 1269), Sarah (unmarried 1269)" as daughters of William [IV] de Beauchamp but cites no primary source which provides the basis for the information[579].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  m (after 7 Jan 1269) RICHARD [VI] Talbot, son of GILBERT Talbot & his wife Gwenthlian of Dynevor ([1249/50]-before 3 Sep 1306). 

b)         JAMES de Beauchamp (-[late Sep/early Oct] 1296).  The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary indicates that Walter [III]’s wife Joan was probably the mother of his son James[580].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "manerium de Acton et centum solidos annui redditus in villa Wigorn…" to "Jacobo fratri meo" by charter dated to [1239/41][581].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" issued a quitclaim to "domino Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" relating to "manerio suo de Acton" by charter dated to [1239/69][582].  "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[583].  "Walterus filius Willelmi de Bello Campo" issued a quitclaim relating to "terra…in Schirrevelench" granted to him by his father by charter dated to [1259/69], witnessed by "Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[584].  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted "totum manerium meum in Schirrevelench et Chirchelench", except the part granted to "Bartholomeo de Sudleya et Johanne filie mee", to "Jacobo de Bello Campo fratri meo" (in default to "Johanni filio meo") by charter dated to [1261/69][585].  The Annals of Worcester record the burial "Non Oct" 1296 of “Jacobus de Bello Campo miles…in senectute bona, amicus ecclesiæ Wygorniæ[586]

Walter [III] & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

c)         THOMAS de Beauchamp (-before 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][587].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][588]

d)         WALTER de Beauchamp (-before 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][589].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][590]

e)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-before 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][591].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][592]

Walter [III] & his second wife had one child: 

f)          HUGH de Beauchamp (-after 1283).  "Rogerus filius Rogeri Roculf de Chirchlench" granted the service of "Henrici filii Radulfi Budde de Chirchlengh de una virgata de terre in Chirchleng" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Walteri de Bello Campo", in default to "Walteri fratre suo…Johanni fratri suo…Hugonis fratri suo", in return for a loan, by charter dated to [1247/Sep 1258][593].  "Rogerus [filius Rogeri] Roculf de Chirchlench" granted "pratum de Ebbewell" to "Thome de Bello Campo filio domini Thome [error for Walteri] de Bello Campo" in return for annual rent, in default to "Waltero de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Johanni de Bello Campo fratri suo propinquiori…Hugoni de Bello Campo fratre suo propinquiori", by charter dated to [mid-13th century][594].  "Rogerus Roculf filius Rogeri Rokulf de Chirchelench" issued a quitclaim to "Hugoni filio Walteri de Bello Campo" relating to money which the latter paid him annually from land "quas idem Hugo de Bello Campo de me tenet", by charter dated to [1251/83][595]

William [II] had one [probably illegitimate] child by [Mistress (1)]: 

3.          JULIANA .  "Willelmus de Bello Campo" granted land previously held by "magister Alvricus cocus" to "Odoni de Salewarp fideli meo" by charter dated to [1170/97][596].  "Odo de Salewarp" granted "totam terram meam de Stolton" to "Juliane [nepote/nepte] mee filie Willelmi de Bello Campo" by charter dated to [1170/97][597].  "Odo de Salewarp" confirmed "totam terram…in villa de Stoltoni que fuit Alvrici coci cum terra de Sudwode" to "Juliane filie Willelmi de Bello Campo et [nepos/nepte] mee" by charter dated to [1170/97][598]

 

 

1.         GUY de Beauchamp (-after [1213/36]).  "Domino Guydone de Bello Campo, Osberto de Abbetot…" witnessed the charter dated to [1213/36] under which "Johannes Archent" granted "terram meam in Stolton apud la Hethe", granted by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" to "Roberto patri meo", to "Hugoni de Duntesburn"[599]

 

 

C.      OTHER BEAUCHAMP FAMILIES

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Beauchamp (-after [1140]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Belcapo" exempted in Staffordshire[600].  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[601]m ADELINE, daughter of ---.  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[602].  Richard & his wife had four children: 

a)         STEPHEN de Beauchamp (-20 Nov 1184)Domesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[603].  “Ricardus de Bellocampo” donated "ecclesiam de Lamerseia" to Colne Priory, Essex, with the consent of "Adelinæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Pagano de Bellocampo, Stephano et Waltero de Bellocampo"[604].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Stephanus de Bellocampo" held two knights’ fees from "Willelmus de Bello Campo" in Worcestershire[605].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Peverel de Bello Campo…Stephanus de Bello Campo" each holding two knights’ fees from "Hamo filius Meinfelin" in Buckinghamshire[606]m firstly ---.  The name of Stephen’s first wife is not known.  m secondly ISOLDE de Ferrers, daughter of [ROBERT de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Margaret [Peverel] (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Bernewelle…de feodo comitis” held by “Ysowda, que fuit uxor Stephani de Bello-Campo, et filia comitis de Ferrariis”, adding that she has “i filium et v filias[607].  It is assumed that Isolde was the daughter of Robert Earl of Derby (died before 1160) but it is not impossible that she was the daughter of Robert’s father.  Stephen & his first wife had two children: 

i)          RICHARD de Beauchamp (-before 20 Nov 1184). 

ii)         WALTER de Beauchamp (-before 20 Nov 1184). 

Stephen & his second wife had six children (referred to, but not named, in the Rotuli de Dominabus 1185, see above): 

iii)        ISOLDA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[608].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[609]m RICHARD de Subire, son of --- (-before 1227). 

iv)       MATILDA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[610].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[611]m WILLIAM de Wascoil, son of --- ([20 Nov 1227/1228]). 

v)        ALINA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[612].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[613]m RALPH de Ardern, son of --- (-after 1228). 

vi)       daughter . 

vii)      IDONEA de Beauchamp (-after 1228).  A charter dated 20 Nov 1227 records the surrender of "land in Cothes, late of Stephen de Bello Campo" by "Isold de Bello Campo --- and Maud his wife, Ralph de Arderne and Alince his wife, and Idonea late the wife of Henry de Alento…the said Isold, Maud, Aline and Idonea being the sisters and heirs of the said Stephen" and its regrant to "Stephen de Segrave"[614].  Henry III King of England returned land "in Cotes, que fuit Stephani de Bello Campo" to "Isolde de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Ricardi de Subire, et Matildi de Bello Campo que fuit uxor Willelmi de Wascoil, et Radulfo de Ardern et Alicie uxori eius, et Idonee que fuit uxor Henrici de Alneto...sorores et heredes ipsius Stephani", who granted the land to “Stephano de Sedgrave”, dated 1228[615]m HENRY de Aulnay, son of --- (-before 1228). 

viii)     STEPHEN de Beauchamp ([1180]-1216).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Stephanus de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees "de honore Peverelli de Londonia" in Suffolk, in Essex, Hertfordshire, and "Cotes per i brachetum cum ligamine" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, [1210/12][616]

b)         ANSELM de BeauchampDomesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[617]

c)         GEOFFREY de BeauchampDomesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[618]

d)         ROBERT de BeauchampDomesday Descendants cites a charter of Colne which names "Stephen, Anselm, Geoffrey and Robert" as sons of Richard de Beauchamp[619]

 

2.         ROGER de Beauchamp (-after 1166).  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[620].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Bello Campo" held one half of one knight’s fee from "comitis Albrici" in Essex[621]

 

 

OLIVER de Beauchamp, son of --- ([1110/25]-before 1157).  “Oliveri de Bello-campo” is named as father of “Hugo de Bello-campo” in an undated charter for Thorney monastery[622].  No other reference to Oliver has been found.  His estimated birth date range is suggested from his son Hugh being, presumably, of age when he is named in the 1157 Pipe Roll.  This range is consistent with his having been a younger brother of Payn de Beauchamp Lord of Beauchamp, son of Robert de Beauchamp, as also is his son’s holding land in Bedfordshire.  The primary source which confirms that this affiliation is correct has not been found. 

m ---.  The name of Oliver’s wife is not known. 

Oliver & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         HUGH de Beauchamp of Eaton Scoton, Bedfordshire (-after 1190).  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Hug. de Bellocampo" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones"[623].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "in perdonis Hugoni de Bello Campo" in Huntingdonshire in [1158/59][624].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Bello Campo xxxvi l et in perdonis Hugoni de Bello Campo xxxi s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1161/62][625].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hugo de Bello Campo" held knights’ fees "de honore de Etone" in Buckinghamshire from "Gilbertus de Bolebec"[626].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo de Bello Campo" with one knight "Regi de comitatu Mortonii…de vicecomitatu de Cerenciis"[627].  “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Oliveri de Bellocampo” founded Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...Rogero de Bellocampo...[628]Willielmus de Bello-campo, filius Johannis de Bello-campo” renewed a donation of property to Thorney Monastery by “Hugo de Bello-campo, filius Oliveri de Bello-campo” by undated charter[629].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Milo de Bello Campo, Hugo de Bello Campo" paying "xv s, i militem" and "xx s, ii milites", respectively, in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[630].  The fact that their names are adjacent suggests a close family relationship, maybe brothers.  [m firstly ---.  No proof has been found of this supposed first marriage.  However, the charter of Hugh’s known wife Philippa de Trailly is witnessed only by her sons Miles and Richard.  The omission of Hugh’s other children, who were probably alive at the date of the charter, suggests that they may have been born from an earlier marriage.]  m [secondly] PHILIPPA de Trailly, daughter of GEOFFREY de Trailly & his wife ---.  Philippa donated the land of her maritagium in Southill and Broom, Bedfordshire to Wardon abbey, for the souls of her father Geoffrey de Trailly and Hugh de Beauchamp her deceased husband, by undated charter witnessed by “Miles and Richard de Beauchamp her sons[631].  Hugh & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

a)         OLIVER de Beauchamp (-before 5 Jun 1200).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that King Henry II granted "Melleburn" in Derbyshire to "Hugoni de Bello Campo" and that after the death of the latter it was held by "Hugo filius eius", but claimed by "Oliverus frater suus primogenitus"[632].  Oliver must have died before 5 Jun 1200, the date of a confirmation by King John of the grant made by his son "Hug de Bellocampo" of "terram…in Chelardeston" to "Willelmo fil Gaufr…in maritagio cum Olyva sorore predicti Hug" by charter dated 5 Jun 1200[633]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[634].  Oliver & his wife had four children: 

i)          HUGH de Beauchamp (-before 3 May 1217).  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[635].  King John confirmed property of "Rob de Braybroc", including property donated by "Hug de Bello Campo fil Oliv", by charter dated 25 Jul 1208[636].  “Hugh de Beauchamp son of Oliver” confirmed the donation to Wardon abbey made by “his grandfather Hugh de Beauchamp” by undated charter[637].  "Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for relief of "the land formerly of Hugh de Beauchamp his brother which falls to him by inheritance…[in] Bedfordshire", dated 3 May 1217[638]

ii)         ROGER de Beauchamp (-before 6 Dec 1221).  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[639].  His parentage is confirmed by an order dated to [Mar] 1224 which restored land "she held in dower of the gift of the same Roger in Sandy" Bedfordshire to "Matilda who was the wife of Roger de Beauchamp…which had been taken into the king’s hand by reason of the debt of Hugh de Beauchamp grandfather of the aforesaid Roger whose heir he is"[640], read together with the source quoted above which names Hugh as son of Hugh Beauchamp and Oliver as older brother of the younger Hugh.  “Rogerus de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo” confirmed the donations to Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire made by “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo”, as well as a donation made with the consent of “fratre meo Hugone de Bellocampo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...[641]"Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for relief of "the land formerly of Hugh de Beauchamp his brother which falls to him by inheritance…[in] Bedfordshire", dated 3 May 1217[642].  "John son of William, nephew and heir of Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for the lands of "Eton and Sandon…formerly of Roger his uncle" in Bedfordshire, dated 6 Dec 1221[643]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  An order dated to [Mar] 1224 restored land "she held in dower of the gift of the same Roger in Sandy [Sandon?]" Bedfordshire to "Matilda who was the wife of Roger de Beauchamp…which had been taken into the king’s hand by reason of the debt of Hugh de Beauchamp grandfather of the aforesaid Roger whose heir he is"[644]

iii)        HENRY de Beauchamp .  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[645]

iv)       OLIVA de Beauchamp (-before Dec 1221).  Farrer names Agnes as the wife of Oliver de Beauchamp, and their children “Hugh, Roger and Henry, and a daughter Olive”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[646].  King John confirmed the grant made by "Hug de Bellocampo" of "terram…in Chelardeston" to "Willelmo fil Gaufr…in maritagio cum Olyva sorore predicti Hug" by charter dated 5 Jun 1200[647].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Oliverus frater suus primogenitus" settled a claim against "de Bello Campo…Hugo" by returning "Chelardeston" which Oliver granted to "Willelmo filio Gaufridi cum filia sua in maritagio"[648].  Her son was heir to her brother Roger de Beauchamp, as shown by the order dated 6 Dec 1221 which records that "John son of William, nephew and heir of Roger de Beauchamp" paid a fine for the lands of "Eton and Sandon…formerly of Roger his uncle" in Bedfordshire[649].  She must have died before that date otherwise she would have been Roger’s heir.  m (before 5 Jun 1200) WILLIAM FitzGeoffrey, son of GEOFFREY FitzWilliam [Mandeville] & his wife ---. 

b)         HUGH de Beauchamp (-[1212/1216]).  "Hug de Bello Campo et Alienor ux eius" paid a fine for "de Stocton…versus Willm de Eyneford" in Huntingdonshire, dated 1205[650].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bello Campo, Milo de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees and "c solidatas terræ in escambium de Meleburne", respectively, "de feodis domini Regis" in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][651].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees "in Etone" in Bedfordshire in [1210/12][652].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that King Henry II granted "Melleburn" in Derbyshire to "Hugoni de Bello Campo" and that after the death of the latter it was held by "Hugo filius eius", but claimed by "Oliverus frater suus primogenitus"[653].  m (before 1205) ELEANOR, daughter of ---.  "Hug de Bello Campo et Alienor ux eius" paid a fine for "de Stocton…versus Willm de Eyneford" in Huntingdonshire, dated 1205[654]

c)         ALDA (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Cokesdune maritagium eius” held by “Alda que est filia Hugonis de Bello-Campo et fuit uxor Willelmi Maubanc”, adding that she has “iv filias quarum primogenita est xvi annorum et in custodia Hugonis de Bello-Campo[655]m WILLIAM Maubanc, son of --- (-before 1185). 

Hugh & his [second] wife had two children: 

d)         MILES de Beauchamp (-after 1210)The Annals of Bermondsey record that “dominus Milo de Bello Campo” donated “molendinum de Bedford” to the abbey in 1181, with the consent of “Pagani de Bello Campo heredis[656]The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Milo de Bello Campo, Hugo de Bello Campo" paying "xv s, i militem" and "xx s, ii milites", respectively, in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[657].  The fact that their names are adjacent suggests a close family relationship, maybe they were brothers.  Philippa donated the land of her maritagium in Southill and Broom, Bedfordshire to Wardon abbey, for the souls of her father Geoffrey de Trailly and Hugh de Beauchamp her deceased husband, by undated charter witnessed by “Miles and Richard de Beauchamp her sons[658].  "Milo de Bello Campo" paid a fine for land in Bedford, dated 1199[659].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bello Campo, Milo de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees and "c solidatas terræ in escambium de Meleburne", respectively, "de feodis domini Regis" in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][660]m AMABEL de Bidun, daughter of JOHN de Bidun & his wife Alice Mauduit (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…secundam Milo de Bello-campo…[661].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" against "Amabilem de Bidona" concenring "terre…in Latebyria"[662].  Farrer records that Amabil de Bidun and Miles her son and heir confirmed an undated charter, dated to after 1226, under which Sibyl, daughter of Miles, donated property to Northampton St. Andrew[663].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[664].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Amabel…had an heir Miles de Bello Campo who is living"[665]Milo & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          [PAYN de Beauchamp (-after 1181).  The Annals of Bermondsey record that “dominus Milo de Bello Campo” donated “molendinum de Bedford” to the abbey in 1181, with the consent of “Pagani de Bello Campo heredis[666].  The document does not specify that Payn was Milo’s son but this appears likely.] 

ii)         MILES de Beauchamp (-[1265]).  Farrer records that Amabil de Bidun and Miles her son and heir confirmed an undated charter, dated to after 1226, under which Sibyl, daughter of Miles, donated property to Northampton St. Andrew[667].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Amabel…had an heir Miles de Bello Campo who is living"[668].  A writ dated 24 Dec "53 Hen III", after the death of "Miles de Bello Campo", names "Richard his son, aged 30 and more, is his heir", adding that Miles died "4 years ago"[669]m ---.  The name of Miles’s wife is not known.  Miles & his wife had two children: 

(a)       RICHARD de Beauchamp (before 1239-).  A writ dated 24 Dec "53 Hen III", after the death of "Miles de Bello Campo", names "Richard his son, aged 30 and more, is his heir"[670]

(b)       JOHN de Beauchamp (before 1239-).  A writ dated 24 Dec "53 Hen III", after the death of "Miles de Bello Campo", names "Richard his son, aged 30 and more, is his heir", adding that "Lavenden [Buckingham]…came into the hands of John de Bello Campo, brother of the said Richard, after the death of the said Miles 4 years ago"[671]

iii)        SIBYL de Beauchamp .  Farrer records that Sibyl, daughter of Miles, donated property to Northampton St. Andrew by undated charter, dated to after 1226[672]

e)         RICHARD de Beauchamp (-after 1231)Philippa donated the land of her maritagium in Southill and Broom, Bedfordshire to Wardon abbey, for the souls of her father Geoffrey de Trailly and Hugh de Beauchamp her deceased husband, by undated charter witnessed by “Miles and Richard de Beauchamp her sons[673].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[674].]  m SARAH de Bidun, daughter of JOHN de Bidun & his wife Alice Mauduit.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…tertiam Ricardus de Bello-campo…[675].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[676].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa"[677].  Richard & his wife had five children: 

i)          RICHARD de Beauchamp (-[1232/36]). 

ii)         HUGH de Beauchamp (-before 1236). 

iii)        ISABEL de Beauchamp (-after 14 Dec 1255).  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa" and that "Isabel is living"[678]m HENRY de Souleby, son of ---. 

iv)       MATILDA de Beauchamp (-before 14 Dec 1255).  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa" and that "Maud is dead, leaving a daughter Sarah married to Robert de Walton"[679]m ---. 

v)        PHILIPPA de Beauchamp (-before 14 Dec 1255).  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa" and that "Philippa is dead, leaving a son John de Kroxton"[680]m --- de Croxton, son of ---. 

2.         [NICHOLAS de Beauchamp .  “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Oliveri de Bellocampo” founded Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...Rogero de Bellocampo...[681].  His prominent place in the witness list of this document suggests that Nicholas may have been the brother or other close relative of the donor.  Rogerus de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo” confirmed the donations to Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire made by “Hugo de Bellocampo filius Holiveri de Bellocampo”, as well as a donation made with the consent of “fratre meo Hugone de Bellocampo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...[682].  It is not certain that this document can refer to the same Nicholas, assuming that the reconstruction of this family which is presented here is correct.] 

3.         [ROGER de BeauchampHugo de Bellocampo filius Oliveri de Bellocampo” founded Bushmead priory, Bedfordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Nicholao de Bellocampo...Rogero de Bellocampo...[683].  Further down in the witness list, Roger could have been a close relative of the donor, maybe a younger brother.] 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Bello Campo" holding one knight’s fee "in Sapy et Pyrie" in Hereford in [1210/12][684]

 

 

1.         JOHN de Beauchampm ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Beauchamp .  “Willielmus de Bello-campo, filius Johannis de Bello-campo” renewed a donation of property to Thorney Monastery by “Hugo de Bello-campo, filius Oliveri de Bello-campo” by undated charter[685].

 

 

1.         --- de Beauchamp m MATILDA de Limesey, daughter of GEOFFREY de Limesey & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis"[686].  One child: 

a)         ELIAS de Beauchamp (-[1226/27]).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis"[687].  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[688].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Elias de Bello Campo" held "ii milites"[689].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Elyas de Bello Campo" holding two knights’ fees in "Fukeswrth" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and five "de baronia Walteri de Bolebeck" in Buckinghamshire, in [1210/12][690]m (before 21 May 1203) CONSTANCE de Bolebec, daughter of HUGH de Bolebec of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire & his wife ---.  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[691].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Elias & his wife had one child: 

i)          son .  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[692].  Henry III King of England granted "custodiam terre et heredis Elye de Bello Campo cum maritagio eiusdem heredis" to "Johanni de Offinton, servienti...H. de Burg comitis Kancie" dated 10 May 1228[693]

b)         WILLIAM de Beauchamp .  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis", and that "Matillis mater sua" had "plures…filios…Willelmum primogenitum et Johannem et Andream"[694]

c)         JOHN de Beauchamp (-after 25 Sep 1216).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis", and that "Matillis mater sua" had "plures…filios…Willelmum primogenitum et Johannem et Andream"[695].  King John issued an order relating to "Hugonem de Polested qui est in persona nostra apud Windlesor p Johe de Bello Campo fratre Elye de Bello Campo" dated 25 Sep 1216[696]

d)         ANDREW de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis", and that "Matillis mater sua" had "plures…filios…Willelmum primogenitum et Johannem et Andream"[697].  King John confirmed land "juris eis descendit ex parte Roberti Basset et…in Tenford et Purston" to "Andr de Bellocampo et Eve de Gray uxoris eius" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[698].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Andreas de Bello Campo" held land "de Walengi"[699].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Andreas de Bello Campo" holding one knight’s fee "de honore de Wallingforde" in Northamptonshire in [1210/12][700]m as her second husband, EVA de Grey, widow of RALPH Murdac, daughter of JOHN de Grey & his wife --- (-before Jun 1246).  King John confirmed land "juris eis descendit ex parte Roberti Basset et…in Tenford et Purston" to "Andr de Bellocampo et Eve de Gray uxoris eius" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[701].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Johannes filius Andree de Bello Campo debet...esse in custodia domini regis et Eva de Gray mater eius habet custodiam eius et terre sue de Asington per dominum Falk...et ipsa Eva est maritanda"[702].  Andrew & his wife had one child:

i)          JOHN Beauchamp .  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Johannes filius Andree de Bello Campo debet...esse in custodia domini regis et Eva de Gray mater eius habet custodiam eius et terre sue de Asington per dominum Falk...et ipsa Eva est maritanda"[703].  "John de Beauchamp" was granted delay in repaying to the Exchequer "for Andrew de Beauchamp his father, for a prest that King John…made to him in Poitou", dated 3 Oct 1228[704].  "John de Bello Campo, son and heir of Andrew de Bello Campo" was granted "land at Alsinton", made to his father by King John, dated 31 Jan 1230[705]

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Beauchamp"Robertus de Wall" donated land "in Goseford" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1194), witnessed by "Hugone de Morevill…Ricardo de Beauchamp…"[706]

 

 

Three siblings: 

1.         ROGER de Beauchamp (-after 1210).  "Rogerus de Bellocampo" donated land "in Leseschalis" to St Bees by undated charter[707].  “Rogerus de Bellocampo” chose burial in Wetherhal priory, Cumberland and donated “totam terram meam de Cringeldic” by undated charter[708]m (1201) as her second husband, GRACE, widow of THOMAS FitzGospatrick, daughter of ---.  "Rog de Bello Campo et Grecia q fuit uxor Thom fil Gospatric" made a fine for "custodia terre et heredis Thom fil Gospatric et p maritaghndo ipsius heredis" in Westmoreland & Cumberland, dated 1201[709]

2.         ALICE de Beauchamp .  “Aliciam de Bellocampo et Amabillam sororem eius” settled a dispute with Wetherhal priory concerning land “in Cringeldic”, donated by "Rogeri de Bellocampo fratris prædictorum Aliciæ et Amabillæ", by undated charter[710]

3.         AMIBILIS de Beauchamp .  “Aliciam de Bellocampo et Amabillam sororem eius” settled a dispute with Wetherhal priory concerning land “in Cringeldic”, donated by "Rogeri de Bellocampo fratris prædictorum Aliciæ et Amabillæ", by undated charter[711]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Beauchamp m MATILDA de Lucy, daughter of GEOFFREY de Lucy & his wife --- (-after 1230).  Her parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[712].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   William & his wife had children: 

a)         MATILDA de Beauchamp [de Lucy] (-before 19 Jul 1243).  "Ricardus de Ripar" made a fine to marry "Matilld de Lucy dña de Angr", dated 19 Jan 1214[713].  King John granted a licence for "Matillid de Angr uxori Ric de Ripar" relating to her inheritance dated 17 Jun 1216[714].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Matillis de Lucy domina de Angre, maritata est Ricardo de Ripe per Regem Johannem..."[715].  An undated writ after the death of "Maud de Lucy" fails to decide whether her heir was "B. de Ripariis her younger son" or "the son of Richard de Ripariis who was the son of her elder son and who died before her decease", adding that "the son of the said Richard was 4 years old on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary 27 [or 28?] Hen III"[716]m firstly ([1194/95]) GEOFFREY de Lascelles, son of GEOFFREY de Cella Seneschal of Poitou & his wife --- (-before end Mar 1204).  m secondly (after 19 Jan 1214) as his third wife, RICHARD de Rivers, son of --- (-[4 Dec 1221/15 Mar 1222]). 

 

 

1.         --- de Beauchampm DENISE, daughter of --- (-before 1214).  "Thom de Bello Campo" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt Dyonis matris sue" in Essex, dated 1214[717].  One child: 

a)         THOMAS de Beauchamp .  "Thom de Bello Campo" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt Dyonis matris sue" in Essex, dated 1214[718]

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY de Beauchamp , son of --- (-[before 12 Jan 1241]).  The sheriff of Bedfordshire was ordered to permit the execution of the testament of Joan de Beauchamp, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Beauchamp”, dated 12 Jan 1241[719].  The wording of the order suggests, but does not state directly, that Geoffrey was deceased at the time.  It is assumed that Geoffrey and his wife had no children as her sister was named as one of her heirs (see below).  m JOAN de Albini, daughter of ROBERT de Albini & his wife --- (-before 12 Jan 1241).  The sheriff of Bedfordshire was ordered to permit the execution of the testament of Joan de Beauchamp, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Beauchamp”, dated 12 Jan 1241[720].  Half of land formerly of Joan de Beauchamp in Eastcotts” was granted to “Ralph de St Amand...and Ascelina his wife, one of Joan’s heirs”, dated [Jan] 1241[721]

 

 

D.      BEAUCHAMP FAMILIES of SOMERSET

 

 

According to The Complete Peerage, the Beauchamp family of Somerset was unrelated to the Beauchamp family of Warwickshire[722]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (-after 1176).  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Rob. de Bellocapo" in Somerset[723].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Bello Campo xxxiv m xvii milites" in Somerset in [1160/61][724].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Robertus de Bello Campo" in Somerset[725].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Robertus de Bellocampo" in Dorset and Somerset[726]m MURIEL, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants cites the Life of Wulfric of Haselbury which names "Muriel" as the wife of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch[727]

 

2.         ROBERT de Beauchamp (-before 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hubertus de Burgo" holding 17 knights’ fees "cum hærede R. de Bello Campo" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][728].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hubertus de Burgo" held "Stok de domino rege cum herede Roberti de Bello Campo per servicium ii militum de feodo Moretonie…hundredum de Tinterell" in Somerset[729].  It is assumed that these entries refers to Hubert de Burgh, future Earl of Kent.  As Hubert at that date still appears to have been married to Beatrice de Warenne, it is assumed that he was holding these knights’ fees by virtue of the right to arrange the marriage of the heiress, not that he was married to her himself.  Another problem is identifying the "R. de Beauchamp" to whom the entry refers, especially as Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset is recorded with male issue (see below).  [m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Emma de Bello Campo" one third part of one knight’s fee from "honor de Kincestone" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][730].  The identity of Emma has not been ascertained.  However, it is possible that she was the widow of "R. de Beauchamp" who is recorded in Dorset, Somerset (see above).]  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- de Beauchamp Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[731]m SIMON de Vautort, son of --- (-1199). 

 

 

1.         SIMON de Vautort, son of --- (-1199).  "Simon de Valtort…with his brother Nicholas" donated land "in Babbekari" to Montacute priory, for the welfare of "his wife and of his lord Robert de Bello Campo", by undated charter[732]m --- de Beauchamp, daughter of ROBERT de Beauchamp & his wife [Emma ---].  Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[733].  Simon & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (-1251).  Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[734].  "Robert de Bello Campo son of Simon" granted commercial rights in Merston free from tolls to Bruton by undated charter[735].  A writ dated 16 Dec "31 Hen III", after the death of "Nicia de Clinton" names "William de Parys knt her son is her heir" and "Aston township" in Buckinghamshire "Robert de Bello Campo holds in dower with Alice his wife 40 l land and Lady Eva de Clynton holds 20 l land in dower"[736].  An undated writ, after the death of "Robert de Bello Campo the elder", names "Robert his son aged --- is his heir" and lists manors in Somerset "Stokes…Merstan…Scepton…Hacche…Compton"[737]m ALICE de Mohun, daughter of REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his wife Alice Briwere.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Beauchamp .  An undated writ, after the death of "Robert de Bello Campo the elder", names "Robert his son aged --- is his heir" and lists manors in Somerset "Stokes…Merstan…Scepton…Hacche…Compton"[738].  "Robert de Bello Campo son of Simon" granted commercial rights in Merston free from tolls to Bruton by undated charter, later confirmed by "Robert son of Robert de Beauchamp son of Simon"[739]

ii)         JOHN de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (before 1249-Hatch 24 Oct 1283, bur Stoke under Hamden[740]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Inquisitions dated "Wednesday before Christmas Day 12 Edw I" following the death of "John de Bello Campo” name “John his son aged 10 on the feast of St James 11 Edw I is his next heir...Cecily late the wife of the said John...one of the sisters [mistake for daughters] and heirs of William de Fortibus[741]m (1273 or before) CECILE de Vivonne, daughter of GUILLAUME de Vivonne "de Fortibus" & his wife Matilda de Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1256/57]-Stoke under Hamden 10 Jan 1320[742]).  Henry III King of England granted, 2 Aug 1259, "the wardship of the lands late of William de Fortibus" to "Ingram de Percy, Peter de Chauuvent and Imbert de Muntferaunt" and the marriages of the deceased’s four daughters, to Peter the marriage of "one of the remaining three as he shall choose" (10 March 1262 = Cecily)[743]Her parentage is confirmed by the Somersetshire Pleas for 15 Jul 1269 which include a record that "Aunsell de Gurnay and his wife Sibyl" warranted "Emery de Roche Chaward, son of Emery de Roche Chaward, and Joan his wife, Sibyl, Mabel and Cecily, the daughters and heirs of William de Fortibus" relating to land in "Corfton"[744]Her marriage is confimed by a petition to the king dated to [1281] by "Peter de St Hillare" relating to land at Corston, Somerset which names "Aunsel de Gunney, Sibyl wife of Aunsel de Gunney, Reginald father of Aunsel de Gunney, Joan wife of Reginald de Gunney, Guy de Rochicheward, Sibyl wife of Guy de Rochicheward, John de Beauchamp, Cecily wife of John de Beauchamp, Fulk de Archiake, Mabel wife of Fulk de Archiake, William de Forz"[745]Inquisitions dated "Wednesday before Christmas Day 12 Edw I" following the death of "John de Bello Campo” name “John his son aged 10 on the feast of St James 11 Edw I is his next heir...Cecily late the wife of the said John...one of the sisters [mistake for daughters] and heirs of William de Fortibus[746]John & his wife had four children: 

(a)       JOHN de Beauchamp (25 Jul 1274-1336 after 20 Oct).  Inquisitions dated "Wednesday before Christmas Day 12 Edw I" following the death of "John de Bello Campo” name “John his son aged 10 on the feast of St James 11 Edw I is his next heir...Cecily late the wife of the said John...one of the sisters [mistake for daughters] and heirs of William de Fortibus[747]He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Beauchamp.  m JOAN, daughter of [--- Chenduit & his wife ---] (-9 Feb 1327). 

-         LORDS BEAUCHAMP (of Somerset)[748]

(b)       ROBERT de Beauchamp (-1303). 

(c)       ELEANOR de Beauchamp (-after 18 Nov 1341)m FULK FitzWarin [VI] Lord FitzWarin, son of FULK FitzWarin [V] & his wife Margaret de la Pole (-before 6 Jun 1336). 

(d)       BEATRICE de Beauchamp (-before Oct 1347).  A writ after the death of "Beatrice late the wife of Peter Corbet of Caus", dated "30 Aug 21 Edw III", names "Thomas Corbet…from whom issued Peter, Alice the elder daughter and Emma the younger", that "Peter" inherited, and after his death "Peter his son" who married "the aforesaid Beatrice" who devised the manor of Bynweston to "one John Corbet"[749]m firstly (3 May 1298) PIERS [II] Corbet, son of PIERS [I] Corbet & his first wife Joan de Mortimer ([1269/70]-before 29 Jan 1322).  m secondly JOHN de Leyburn Lord Leyburn, son of ---. 

2.         NICHOLAS de Vautort"Simon de Valtort…with his brother Nicholas" donated land "in Babbekari" to Montacute priory, for the welfare of "his wife and of his lord Robert de Bello Campo", by undated charter[750]

 

 

 

BELMEIS

 

 

Loyd suggests that this family originated in Beaumais-sur-Dive in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Falaise, canton Morteaux, located in the Hiesmois, where Roger de Montgommery was vicomte, with whom the Belmeis family was connected in Shropshire.  He discounts Beaumais in Seine-Maritime, arrondissement Dieppe, canton Offranville[751]

 

 

[Four] siblings: 

1.         RICHARD de Belmeis (-16 Jan 1128, bur St Osyth).  Bishop of London 1108.  King Henry I notified that "he has granted to R. de Belmeis the see of London" by charter dated 24 May 1108[752].  Eadmer records the election of "Ricardum…Pentecostes" as bishop of London and his consecration "apud Pagaham…VII Kal Aug"[753].  An inscription at St Osyth records the burial of "Richardus Beauveis cognomine Rufus, London. Episcopus…obiit xvi januarii MCXXVII" (O.S.?)[754]

2.         WALTER de Belmeis (-after [Sep 1112/Jun 1113]).  King Henry I confirmed the possessions of St George of Boscherville, including the donation of land by "Walterus de Belmes", by charter dated to [Sep 1112/Jun 1113][755]m [as her second husband,] ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  As noted below, Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record that “Magister Radulfus de Langeford et Ricardus de Belmeis fratres et concanonici, clericique domestici” were summoned as potential successors to “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ” in 1138[756].  Their different names suggest that Ralph and Richard may have been uterine brothers, not necessarily born from the same father.  The order of their names suggests that Ralph was older than Richard, maybe born from an earlier marriage of their mother.  Walter & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         PHILIP de Belmeis of Tong, Shropshire (-after May 1145).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[757].  “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[758]m as her first husband, MATILDA de Rumilly, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-after 1189[759])"Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[760].  “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[761]She married secondly ([1150]) Hugh [II] de Mortimer.  The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[762]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[763]; (2) Roger Mortimer’s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[764]; (3) the undated charter under which Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire (quoted above)[765].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that she was “Matildem Longespey, filiam Willielmi Longespey, ducis Normanniæ[766] but this is confused and cannot possibly be correct.  Philip & his wife had three children: 

i)          PHILIP de Belmeis (-[1154/59]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[767].  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[768]Roger Mortimer granted rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis" by undated charter[769].  "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[770]

ii)         RANULPH de Belmeis (-[1166/67]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[771]Roger Mortimer granted rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis" by undated charter[772]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ranulfus de Beumeis" held three knights’ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire, of which two were held by "Johannes Bigod"[773]The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records the sheriff accounting for "Twanga terra Rand de Bealmes", indicating his recent death[774]"William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[775]

iii)        ADELICIA de Belmeis (-1190 or after).  “Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridus vicecomitis” donated "ecclesiam de Essebi" to Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire, for the salvation of “uxoris meæ Aliciæ et puerorum nostrorum” and for the souls of "Philippi de Beumeis senioris et Philippi junioris et cæterorum filiorum eius", by undated charter[776].  "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[777].  "Roger de Mortimer…Dame Adheliza de Belmes, William de Belmes her son, Philip de Belmes his brother…" witnessed the charter dated to [1185/90] under which “Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridus vicecomitis” donated "ecclesiam de Essebi" to Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire[778]m ALAN [I] la Zouche [ALAIN de Porhoët], son of GEOFFROY Vicomte de Porhoët & his wife Hawise --- (-1190). 

b)         RICHARD de Belmeis (-4 May 1162).  King Henry I confirmed a grant of land to "Richard de Belmeis, nephew of Richard Bp of London" by charter dated [26 Aug] 1127[779].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record that “Magister Radulfus de Langeford et Ricardus de Belmeis fratres et concanonici, clericique domestici” were summoned as potential successors to “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ” in 1138 and describes the controversy regarding the election of the successor, adding that “Ricardus Lundoniensis episcopus” had appointed “Ricardo filio fratris sui Walteri de Belmeis” as archdeacon even though he had hardly been an adolescent[780].  Bishop of London 1152.  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1152 that “Ricardus de Belmeis” was consecrated at Canterbury “a Theobaldo archiepiscopo[781].  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[782].  The 1156 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Bealmes" owing in relation to a dispute with "Alanum de Vppedun" in Shropshire[783].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Bealmes" owing in Shropshire[784].  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record the death “IV Non Mai” in 1162 of “Ricardus secundus Lundoniensis episcopus[785]

c)         [RALPH de Langford (-[1160]).  Dean of St Paul’s 1138.  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record that “Magister Radulfus de Langeford et Ricardus de Belmeis fratres et concanonici, clericique domestici” were summoned as potential successors to “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ” in 1138 and describes the controversy regarding the election of the successor[786].  Their different names suggest that Ralph and Richard may have been uterine brothers, not necessarily born from the same father.  The order of their names suggests that Ralph was older than Richard, maybe born from an earlier marriage of their mother.] 

3.         [WILLIAM de BelmeisKing Henry I confirmed the possessions of Bermondsey, St Saviour, including "Widford [co. Herts] which Ivo de Grandmesnil exchanged for Enderby [Andresberia] [co. Leics] given by William Belmeis", by undated charter (marked spurious), witnessed by "…Richard Bp of London…"[787].  The relationship between the bishop and William de Belmeis is not stated.  It is possible that they were brothers or first cousins.] 

4.         ADELINE de Belmeis .  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum names “Willielmus decanus Lundoniæ filius Adelinæ sororis [Ricardus Lundoniensis episcopus][788].  The identity of Adeline’s husband is not known.  Brooke states that “there is no reason to doubt” that [her son] William Dean of St Paul’s “is to be identified with William de Mareni[789]m --- [de Mareni], son of ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM [de Mareni] (-[28/29] Apr 1138).  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum names “Willielmus decanus Lundoniæ filius Adelinæ sororis [Ricardus Lundoniensis episcopus][790].  Dean of St Paul’s.  Brooke states that William Dean of St Paul’s, cited as such for the first time in 1111, and adds that “there is no reason to doubt that he is to be identified with William de Mareni[791].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record the death in 1138 of “Willielmi decani Lundoniæ[792]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT de Belmeis (-after [1152/59]).  "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[793].  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[794]

2.         WILLIAM de Belmeis (-after [1152/59]).  "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[795]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Belmeis .  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Walt de Bealmes" accounting in Huntingdonshire under "Nova Placita et Noue Conventiones"[796]

 

2.         RICHARD de BelmeisThe 1166/67 Pipe Roll records "Ric de Bealmes" accounting for "Dunnincton" in Staffordshire[797]

 

 

 

BIDUN

 

 

 

1.         HALENALD de Bidun (-before 1156).   The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Norfolk & Suffolk, dated 1212, which record that "Halnad de Bidun" held “in Sypeden [Shipden] quartam partem feodi i militis de dono Henrici Regis antiqui[798].  “Halnath de Bidon...” witnessed the charter under which “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse Abbey, Lincolnshire, dated to the reign of King Stephen[799].  A charter of Richard I King of England dated 3 Jul 1190 confirmed donations to Thornton abbey including the donation of “ecclesiam de Garton” made by “Hanelaci de Bydon[800].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen. de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[801].  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[802]m firstly SARA, daughter of ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, under which "Matillis de Rochefordia" claimed "ecclesiam de Tumbestona...advocacionem" from "Robertum de Tumbestona", recording that the abbot of Lavendon stated that the advocacy of the church had belonged to "Johannis de Bidun" who had donated it to the abbey, and that the plaintiff said that "Sarre de Bidun matris predicti Johannis" had donated property[803]m secondly ANNETA, daughter of ---.  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[804].  Halenald & his first wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Bidun (-before 1184).  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[805].  "…Joh[ann]e de Bid[un], Halenall fr[atr]e suo…" witnessed the charter dated 7 Jun 1153 under which "H- udx Normann et Aquit et comes Andeg" restored offices to "Will[elm]o Maledocto cam[erario] meo"[806].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, under which "Matillis de Rochefordia" claimed "ecclesiam de Tumbestona...advocacionem" from "Robertum de Tumbestona", recording that the abbot of Lavendon stated that the advocacy of the church had belonged to "Johannis de Bidun" who had donated it to the abbey, and that the plaintiff said that "Sarre de Bidun matris predicti Johannis" had donated property[807].  The 1155/56 Pipe Roll records "Johs de Bidun" paying 40 shillings in respect of an unspecified offence, being afterwards pardoned by writ of the queen[808].  A charter of Henry III King of England dated 26 May 1227 records the foundation of Lavendon Abbey, Buckinghamshire by “Johannis de Bidun fundatoris” and his donations[809]m ALICE Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM [II] Mauduit & his wife Matilda de Hanslope ([1134]-after 1184).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Morcote” held by “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit...L annorum”, adding that she has “iv filias” and naming their husbands[810].  Another section of the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “domina de Lateburia que fuit uxor Johannis de Bidune et soror camerarii de Hameslepe” and “terra sua in Lateberia”, with “iv filias maritatas et i est maritanda[811].  John & his wife had five children: 

i)          JOHN de Bidun (-before 1184).  His parentage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which names “uxor que fuit Johannis de Bidune junioris"[812]m (1184 or before) MATILDA, daughter of THOMAS FitzBernard & his wife Eugenia Picot ([1173/74]-before 11 Nov 1255).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor que fuit Johannis de Bidune junioris, Matillis…x annorum…filia Thome filii Bernardi” and “terra sua in Kirkebi”, and "Ewgenia Picot…filia Radulfi Picot de Kancia et uxor Thome filii Bernardi…xxx annorum" and her "iii filios…x annorum…viii annorum…iii annorum [et] filiam dedit Dominus Rex filio Johannis de Bidun"[813].  Another section of the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Stowe que est dos Matillidis de Bidune...filia Thome filii Bernardi” and “Eugenia uxor Thome filii Bernardi[814].  She married secondly --- de Rochford.  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda"[815]

ii)         AMICE de Bidun (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “primogenitam…Hugo de Clinton…[816].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[817].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia who had three daughters, Amabel, Isabel and Agnes…"[818]m HENRY de Clinton, son of GEOFFREY de Clinton & his wife Agnes of Warwick (-[1214/16]). 

iii)        AMABEL de Bidun (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…secundam Milo de Bello-campo…[819].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Willelmus de Bello Campo" against "Amabilem de Bidona" concerning "terre…in Latebyria"[820].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[821].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Amabel…had an heir Miles de Bello Campo who is living"[822]m MILES de Beauchamp, son of HUGH de Beauchamp & his [second] wife Philippa de Trailly (-after 1210). 

iv)       SARAH de Bidun .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…tertiam Ricardus de Bello-campo…[823].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[824].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Sarah had three daughters, Isabel, Maud and Philippa"[825]m RICHARD de Beauchamp, son of HUGH de Beauchamp & his [second] wife Philippa de Trailly (-after 1231). 

v)        MATILDA de Bidun (-after 1231).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that the daughters of “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit” married “…quartam Gaufridus filius Gaufridi[826].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Vis-de-Luco que fuit filia Johannis de Bidune” and her property with one son “qui est cum Rege...xxii annorum[827].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[828].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Maud…had a son Robert son of Geoffrey, who is dead leaving a son Thomas son of Robert"[829]m GEOFFREY FitzGeoffrey, son of ---. 

vi)       ERMENGARDE [Ermesinde] de Bidun (-after 1231).  A charter of Henry III King of England dated 26 May 1227 records the foundation of Lavendon Abbey, Buckinghamshire by “Johannis de Bidun fundatoris” and the donation of “terram de Bruneswude” made by “Ermingardæ filiæ Joh. de Bidun[830].  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which Aldulf de Gatesden, with the consent of “Armerdgard” his wife, confirmed this donation to Lavendon[831].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[832].  A writ dated 11 Nov "39 Hen III", after the death of "Maud de Rocheford, sometime the wife of John de Bydun", states that "John Bidun died without heirs of his body and had five sisters…Amicia…Amabel…Sarah…Maud…Ermigerda" adding that "Ermigerda…had a son Richard de Gatesden who is living [altered by interlineation to "two sons John and Richard, John de Gatesden the elder is dead, and had a son John who is living"]"[833]m ALDULF de Gatesden, son of --- (-before 1225). 

John had [one probably illegitimate daughter by an unknown mistress]: 

vii)      MATILDA de Bidun (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Vis-de-Luco que fuit filia Johannis de Bidune” and her property with one son “qui est cum Rege...xxii annorum[834].  From a chronological point of view, it is not possible for this daughter to have been the same person as Matilda, wife of Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey who is named above.  She is either the daughter of John by an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage, or illegitimate which seems more likely as she was not named in any of the documents relating to the family inheritances.  Another possibility is that her father was a different John de Bidun.  m --- Vis-de-Lu, son of --- (-before 1185). 

Halenald & his [first/second] wife had seven children: 

b)         SIMON de Bidun .  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[835]

c)         HALENALD de Bidun (-before 1185).  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[836].  "…Joh[ann]e de Bid[un], Halenall fr[atr]e suo…" witnessed the charter dated 7 Jun 1153 under which "H. dux Normann et Aquit et comes Andeg" restored offices to "Will[elm]o Maledocto cam[erario] meo"[837].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Haneladus de Bidun, i militem de Walintone" in Berkshire, and "Alenaldus de Bidun vii milites" in Norfolk, in 1166[838].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[839]m (1162) as her second husband, AGNES, widow of WARIN [I] de Munchensy, daughter of PAYN FitzJohn of Ewyas, co. Hereford, Sheriff of Hereford and Shropshire & his wife Sibyl de Lacy (-after 1190).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[840].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Agnes de Montchanesi" paying "xiii s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[841]

d)         TRIAN de Bidun (-after 1176).  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[842].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[843]m AGNES Picot, daughter of RALPH Picot & his wife ---.  “Radulphus de Bidun” donated land at “Tikenham” to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, on condition that they should receive “me et matrem meam Agnetam et dominum meum Johannem de Binchion fraternitatem”, by undated charter[844].  An undated charter records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[845].  Trian & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH de Bidun .  “Radulphus de Bidun” donated land at “Tikenham” to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, on condition that they should receive “me et matrem meam Agnetam et dominum meum Johannem de Binchion fraternitatem”, by undated charter[846].  An undated charter records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[847]

e)         WALTER de Bidun .  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[848]

f)          ALURIC de Bidun .  Farrer records that Halenald de Bidun became a monk at St. Andrew’s, Northampton when he donated revenue from a mill at Cotes, for the souls of himself, Anneta his wife and John his son, by undated charter witnessed by his sons John, Simon, Halenald, Trian, Walter the clerk and Aluric the priest[849]

g)         AMICE de Bidun ([1124/25]-after 1185).  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Trianno fratre meo…"[850].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Amicia de Limesia…lx annorum…filia Haveladi de Bid[une]”, adding that she has “ii filios milites quorum primogenitus…Johannes de Limesia…[et] plures…filias[851]m GERARD de Limesey, son of ALAN de Limesay & his wife --- (-after 1161). 

h)         SIBYL de Bidun .  Her parentage is confirmed by an undated charter which records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[852].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Sibilla de Ros" held fees in Oxfordshire during the reign of King Henry I and now held fees from "Manasser Arsic"[853]m GEOFFREY de Ros, son of ---. 

 

1.         WALTER de Bidun .  Chancellor of Scotland.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Amicabilis de Wuttona" against "abbatem de Lauendena" concerning "ecclesiam de Wuttona…advocacionem", claimed by "Ricardus de Bello Campo" and which, according to "ipsi Amicabilis et Ricardus", was granted by "Johannes de Bidun pater predicte Amicabilis et Sarre uxoris predicti Ricardi" to "Walterum de Bidun", and that "Halnacus pater ipsius Johannis" had presented the church to "Walterus de Bidun qui fuit cancellarius Regis Scocie" and "post mortem Walteri de Bidun" to "predictus Walterum", while the abbot summoned "Amiciam de Clingtona filiam predicti Johannis de Bidun…Ermiceda de Bidun et Robertus filius Galfridi"[854]

 

 

 

BISSET

 

 

The Bisset family of East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire is recorded in charters of Thurgarton priory and founded the house of lepers in Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire.  Loyd points out that the family acquired by marriage Cany in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime, arrondissement Yvetot, canton Cany, which suggests that the Bisset family itself may have originated from the same area[855]The editor of the Beauly cartulary suggests that Henry Bisset, recorded in Scotland in the late 12th century (see the document UNTITLED SCOTTISH NOBILITY), was a member of the same Bisset family[856].  The precise relationship has not been traced.  The mid-14th century Scalacronica records that William King of Scotland, after his release from captivity in England in 1174, returned to Scotland with "plusours dez filz pusnes dez seygnours Dengleterre" and granted them lands, naming in its list "…lez Biseys…"[857].  The charters of Lannoy abbey, in the county of Beauvais, indicate that the Bisset family held land in Briostel in the same county. 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bisset (-after 1136).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willelmo Bisete" holding land in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire[858].  “Domini eorum Willelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” confirmed the donation of land “in territorio de Briostel...et mansuram in terra Teoleti” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] made by “Lambertus de Bretesel et filii eius Renoldus et Rogerius” by charter dated 1136[859].  “Guillelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” donated “in territorio de Briostel...medietatem” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] by undated charter[860]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[861].  William & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         MANASSER Bisset (-before [1176/77]).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll records payments "in terris…Manaserii Biset…in Rochesburn" in Hampshire, suggesting the death of Manasser shortly before[862]

-        see below

b)         WILLIAM Bisset "Carpentarius" .  “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, with the consent of “Henrici Bisset filii mei et Manasseri Biset fratris mei et Ernulfi Biset nepotis mei”, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[863]m SUSANNA, daughter of ---.  “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[864].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRY Bisset .  “Henricus Biseth” donated “ecclesiam de Athelington” to Thurgarton Priory by undated charter, later confirmed by “Willielmus de Beuvero et Albreia uxor eius[865].  “Henricus Bisset” confirmed a donation to Thurgarton by “Hugonis de Caysneto”, for the souls of "Willielmi Carpentarii patris mei et matris meæ Susannæ et…Albreæ Biset uxoris meæ", by undated charter[866]m AUBREYE de Vescy, daughter of RICHARD FitzEustace & his wife Aubreye de Lisours.  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Saram et Aubreiam” as the daughters of “Richardus constabularius Cestriæ” and his wife, adding that Aubreye married “Henrico Biset[867]Henricus Bisset” confirmed a donation to Thurgarton by “Hugonis de Caysneto”, for the souls of "Willielmi Carpentarii patris mei et matris meæ Susannæ et…Albreæ Biset uxoris meæ", by undated charter[868]

c)         ANSOLD Bisset (-after 1166).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his brother “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[869].  “Domini eorum Willelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” confirmed the donation of land “in territorio de Briostel...et mansuram in terra Teoleti” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] made by “Lambertus de Bretesel et filii eius Renoldus et Rogerius” by charter dated 1136[870].  “Guillelmus Bisete et Ansoldus filius eius” donated “in territorio de Briostel...medietatem” [on which Lannoy abbey was built] by undated charter[871].  “Stephanus filius Engelrami vicecomitis de Albamarla” donated property “in terra de Moncellis...[et] in territorio Maisniliorum et Vaccariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Ansoldus Bisete [...domini sui], similiter et Franco frater Stephani”, by charter dated 1155[872].  “...Ansoldus Biset...Arnulfus Biset, Robertus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1166 under which Guillaume Comte d’Aumâle confirmed the renunciation by “Wicardus de Egla” in favour of Lannoy abbey[873]m ---.  The name of Ansold’s wife is not known.  Ansold & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRY Bisset (-after 1154).  “Henricus Bisete” confirmed donation of “medietatem territorii de Briostel” made to Lannoy abbey by “avus meus Willelmus Bisete et pater meus Ansoldus Bisete” by charter dated 1154[874].  His family connection is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, for the souls of "patris mei Willielmi Bisset et matris meæ Hawisæ et uxoris meæ Susannæ et…fratris mei Henrici Bisset et Ausoldi fratris mei et Henrici nepotis mei", by undated charter[875]

d)         [--- .  It is possible that the father of Ernulf was one of the other named sons of William Bisset who are shown above.  m ---.]  Two children: 

i)          ERNULF Bisset (-after [1176/77]).  “Willielmus Carpentarius” donated “molendinum meum de Cliva” to Thurgarton Priory, with the consent of “Henrici Bisset filii mei et Manasseri Biset fratris mei et Ernulfi Biset nepotis mei”, by undated charter[876].  “...Ansoldus Biset...Arnulfus Biset, Robertus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1166 under which Guillaume Comte d’Aumâle confirmed the renunciation by “Wicardus de Egla” in favour of Lannoy abbey[877].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ærnulfus Biset" in Kent[878]

ii)         ROBERT .  “...Ansoldus Biset...Arnulfus Biset, Robertus frater eius...” witnessed the charter dated 1166 under which Guillaume Comte d’Aumâle confirmed the renunciation by “Wicardus de Egla” in favour of Lannoy abbey[879]

 

2.         WALTER Bisset (-before 1204).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Walterus Bisset" in Herefordshire[880].  "Nigell Pincebec et Alic uxor eius" paid a fine for "custodia terre et heredis Walt Biset vs Rob de Tresgoz et Sibill ux eius", in Herefordshire, dated 1204[881]

 

3.         ANSELM Basset (-after 1194).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Anselmus Biset" in London & Middlesex[882]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Bisset (-before 1221).  m AVICE, daughter of --- (-after 1221).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1221, by "Auicia que fuit uxor Willelmi Bisset" against "Willelmum Britonem" relating to land "in Thekene"[883]

 

 

MANASSER Bisset, son of WILLIAM Bisset & his wife Hawise --- (-before [1176/77]).  Henry II King of England confirmed donations made to the leper hospital at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire by “Manesserus Biset pro Alicia uxore sua de cujus hæreditate manerium illud est” by undated charter[884].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll records payments "in terris…Manaserii Biset…in Rochesburn" in Hampshire, suggesting the death of Manasser shortly before[885]

m ALICE de Falaise Dame de Cany, daughter of ---.  Henry II King of England confirmed donations made to the leper hospital at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire by “Manesserus Biset pro Alicia uxore sua de cujus hæreditate manerium illud est” by undated charter[886].  Loyd indicates that Alice was the sister and heir of Gilbert de Falaise Seigneur de Cany[887]Adelitia de Caneio uxor Manasses Biset” confirmed the donation of “Nemus Haudap quod Ricardus de Morevilla tenebat de me” to Jumièges, for the souls of “mee meique mariti Manasses”, by charter dated to [1150][888].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Alueua uxor Manseri" in Dorset and Somerset[889], although it is not known whether this entry relates to the widow of Manasser Bisset.  The necrology of Longueville records the death 15 May of “domino Giliberto de Falesia, condam domino de Caneio et...domina Adalacia sorore sua”, adding that “dicta...domiona” donated “x acras terræ de exarto sui nemoris d’Eschalunc” for her anniversary and that of “Manaserii Biseti mariti sui” and that “ipsa et maritus suus et filius eorum Henricus” confirmed the donations of “dicti Gilliberti[890].  The necrology of Longueville records the death 7 Jan of “domino Galtero de Caneiro...helemosinarius et subprior hujus loci per spatium XL annorum et ultra, et...Emelina de Caneio matre ipsius Galteri[891]

Manasser & his wife had two children: 

1.         HENRY Bisset (-before 9 Dec 1213).  "Henry Bisset" donated the church of Bradley to the canons of Nutley, Berkshire, for the souls of "Manser his father, Alice his mother and Isoud his wife"[892].  “Henricus Bisset” confirmed an agreement between “domum de Brumore” and “mulieres leprosas et fratres” of Maiden Bradley concerning “ecclesia de Rocheburna”, donated by “Manasserus Biset pater meus”, by undated charter[893].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "de firma de Kydeministr Henrici Biset de quarta parte anni" in Worcestershire[894].  "Henr Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Kideministr et Sandhurst" in Worcestershire, dated 1199[895].  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[896]m (1213) as her third husband, ISOLDA Pantulf, widow firstly of HUGH de Montpinçon, secondly of WALTER de Tattershall, and thirdly of WALTER de Baskerville, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Pantulf of Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire & his wife Joan de Goldington (-after 1267).  As Iseult’s earlier marriages can be dated to the late 12th century, her age suggests that she must have been Henry’s second wife.  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[897].  She married fifthly as his second wife, Amaury [I] de Saint-AmandBracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[898]

2.         JOHN Bisset ([1165/75]-1241).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim recorded by Bracton, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[899], read together with the source quoted above under which his brother Henry donated property to Nutley for his named parents and his wife.   "John Byset" was granted the "manor of Kideministre" dated 4 Mar 1238[900].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Johannes Biset et Alicia uxor eius” owing “de Oblatis” in Devon[901].  Matthew Paris names "…Johannes Bisset, summus justiciarius forestæ…" among those who died in 1241[902].  [m firstly ---.  No direct information has been found concerning John’s supposed first marriage.  However, if it is correct, as suggested by the sources which name him, his brother Henry, and Henry’s wife Iseult, that he was the son of Manasser Biset, John must have been born in the 1170s at the latest.  If that is correct, the date of his known marriage to Alice Basset in [1223] is late for a first marriage.]  m [secondly] (1223 or before) as her third husband, ALICE Basset, widow firstly of WILLIAM Malet of Curry Malet, repudiated wife (secondly) of H--- de Chaceporc, daughter of THOMAS Basset [II] of Headington & his wife Philippa Malbank (-[1263]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[903].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Johannes Biset et Alicia uxor eius” owing “de Oblatis” in Devon[904].  John & his [second] wife had three children: 

a)         MARGARET Bisset (-Dec 1256 or before).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[905]m ([1237/39]) RICHARD de Rivers, son of RICHARD de Rivers & his third wife Maud de Beauchamp (-before 25 Apr 1243). 

b)         ELA Bisset .  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[906]m (before 1249) ---. 

c)         ISABEL Bisset (-before 1279).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[907].  Her marriage is shown in The Complete Peerage, which does not cite the corresponding primary source[908]m (before 1249) as his first wife, HUGH du Plessis, son of JOHN du Plessis & his first wife Christiana de Sanford (-before 7 Jul 1292). 

 

 

 

BOCLAND

 

 

 

1.         HUGH de Bocland .  Orderic Vitalis names "Goisfredus de Clintona, Radulfus Basset et Hugo de Bocalanda…" among those who were "de ignobili stirpe" and whom King Henry I raised "de pulvere" (from the dust)[909]

 

2.         GEOFFREY de Bocland (-after 6 Aug 1205).  King John confirmed "ecclesiam de Tenham" to "Gaufr de Bocland" by charter dated 6 Aug 1205[910]William Bishop of Lincoln confirmed the donation of ecclesie de Walcre”, held by “Galfridus de Boclanda” during his lifetime, to Colchester St. John made by “Willelmi de Lanvalei filii Willelmi de Lanvalei” by undated charter[911].  “Willelmus de Lamualey” donated “terram...Eddrihichescroft de feodo de Stanweia...” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido de Boclond, Brienno Arsic, Johanne de Lamualei, Willelmo de Lamualei...Galfrido fratre meo......[912]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Bocland (-1175)m as her second husband, MATILDA, widow of PETER de Ludgershall, daughter of ---.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Cristiana de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Westlega” made to Colchester St. John by [her grandson] “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawisie sororis Galfridi filii Petri quondam justiciarii Anglie[913].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Gaufridus de Lucy" against "priorem de Suwic" for "ecclesiam de Walewrthe…advocacionem", stating that "Gaufridus de Mandeuilla" had given it to him "Galfridus filius Petri frater ipsius Juliane", while the prior claimed that a document of "Matillidis de Boclande et Roberti filii Petri fratris…primogeniti Gaufridi filii Petri" proved the donation to the priory[914].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Bocland, of Buckland, Berkshire (-1216).  William is shown as the son of Hugh de Bocland in The Complete Peerage[915].  The primary source which confirms this affiliation has not yet been identified.  "Robertus de Ferrariis" paid a fine for marrying "Johanna filia Willelmi de Boclaund cum terris…que fuerunt eiusdem Willelmi", with saving for "matri ipsius Johanne q fuit ux predicti Willelmi…dote et maritagio suo", dated [Apr] 1216[916]m MATILDA de Say, daughter of WILLIAM de Say of Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire and Saham, Norfolk & his wife --- (-[1222]).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matildam” as younger daughter of “Willielmum de Say”, adding that she married “Willielmus de Bokeland[917].  “Matildis de Say, filia Willielmi de Say” confirmed donations to Waldon abbey “post mortem Willielmi de Bocland domini mei” by undated charter[918].  Bracton lists a claim by "Matillis de Say" against "Willelmum de Mandeuilla comitem Essexie", dated 1218, for "medietatem manerii de Plesseto [Essex]…et…Enefend…in Middlesexia…" seised of "Willelmus de Say pater ipsius Matillidis et Beatrice matris ipsius Gaufridi"[919].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Matildis de Say” died in 1222[920], although it is not known with certainty that this refers to the wife of William de Boclande.  William & his wife had three children: 

i)          MATILDA de Bocland (-after 1218)Bracton lists a claim by "Willelmus de Aurenches et Matillis uxor eius, Johannes de Bouilla et Hauissia uxor eius" against "Robertum de Ferrariis et Johannam uxorem eius", dated 1218, for "hereditate Willelmi de Boclonde patris earum", noting that "Matillis et Cecilia [error for Hawisia] sunt sorores sororis [error for uxoris] sue [=predicti Willelmi]"[921]m WILLIAM [II] d’Avranches, son of SIMON [I] d’Avranches & his wife Cecilia --- (-6 Nov 1230). 

ii)         HAWISE de Bocland (-before [Apr] 1226).  Bracton lists a claim by "Willelmus de Aurenches et Matillis uxor eius, Johannes de Bouilla et Hauissia uxor eius" against "Robertum de Ferrariis et Johannam uxorem eius", dated 1218, for "hereditate Willelmi de Boclonde patris earum", noting that "Matillis et Cecilia [error for Hawisia] sunt sorores sororis [error for uxoris] sue [=predicti Willelmi]"[922].  “Hawisia de Bovilla filia Willielmi de Bocland” donated property to Waldon abbey “in viduitate…mea” by undated charter[923].  An order dated to [Apr] 1226 confiscated "all the land that Hawise, who was the wife of John de Boville, held of the king in chief…on the day…she…died" in Buckinghamshire[924]m JOHN de Boville, son of ---. 

iii)        JOANNA de Bocland (-before 16 Nov 1251).  "Robertus de Ferrariis" paid a fine for marrying "Johanna filia Willelmi de Boclaund cum terris…que fuerunt eiusdem Willelmi", with saving for "matri ipsius Johanne q fuit ux predicti Willelmi…dote et maritagio suo", dated [Apr] 1216[925].  Bracton lists a claim by "Willelmus de Aurenches et Matillis uxor eius, Johannes de Bouilla et Hauissia uxor eius" against "Robertum de Ferrariis et Johannam uxorem eius", dated 1218, for "hereditate Willelmi de Boclonde patris earum", noting that "Matillis et Cecilia [error for Hawisia] sunt sorores sororis [error for uxoris] sue [=predicti Willelmi]"[926].  A writ ordered pardon of a fine that "Robert de Ferrers had made…with the king’s father" for marrying "Joan daughter of William of Buckland", dated 9 May 1221[927].  A table in The Complete Peerage shows that she married secondly Geoffrey d’Avranches[928].  This is incorrect, her actual second husband being Geoffrey’s brother Simon d’Avranches, as shown by the following document which links Redcot in Oxfordshire (recorded as held by Simon d’Avranches following Joanna’s father) with Joanna de Ferrers née de Bocland[929]A writ dated 16 Nov "37 Hen III", after the death of "Joan de Ferres alias de Ferrers", names as her heir "John de Everenges alias de Averenges her son aged 23", and names Brumpton manor in Somerset, and Redcot and Grafton in Oxfordshire as her properties[930]m firstly ROBERT de Ferrers, son of [WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Sibyl ---] (-4 Dec 1225).  m secondly SIMON d’Avranches, son of SIMON [I] d’Avranches & his wife Cecilia --- (-after 28 Oct 1242). 

b)         HAWISE de Bocland (-before 19 Jul 1233).  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi” donated “terre in manerio meo de Walcra...” to Colchester St. John, for the salvation of “mea et Hawisie uxoris mee” and the souls of “patris mei Willelmi et matris mee Gunnore”, by undated charter[931].  “Hawisa de Lanualei filia Hugonis de Boclonde in...viduitate mea” donated property “in villa de Tatcheworde” to Colchester St. John by undated charter[932].  “Cristiana de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Westlega” made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawisie sororis Galfridi filii Petri quondam justiciarii Anglie” by undated charter[933].  “Reimundus de Burgo” confirmed the donation of property made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawise uxoris eiusdem”, confirming the confirmation made by “Cristina de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe sponsa mea in...viduitate sua", by undated charter[934].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[935].  “Johannes de Burgo” confirmed a donation to Colchester St. John made by “Hawisa de Lamualei filia Hugonis de Boclonde” by undated charter[936]m WILLIAM [III] de Lanvalay of Walkern, Northamptonshire, son of WILLIAM [I] de Lanvalay & his wife Gunnora de Saint-Clair ([1168/73]-[20 Jun 1207/1209]). 

 

 

 

BOHUN (of MIDHURST, SUSSEX)

 

 

FRANCO de Bohun, son of GELDUIN FitzSavary & his wife Estrangia --- (-after 31 Mar 1190).  King Richard I confirmed "Ford, Climpling, Rustinton, Presteton and Lovinto…in the county of Sussex" to "Francus de Bohun", to hold in the same way as "Savaric son of Savaric, heir of Enjulger de Bohon" had held, by charter dated 31 Mar 1190[937].  His descendants were the Bohun family of Midhurst, Ford and Hustington in Sussex, which is set out in Europäische Stammtafeln[938].  The family became extinct in the senior male line in 1492 and in a junior male line (the Bohun family of Westhall, Suffolk) in 1780. 

m ROHAIS, daughter of --- (-after 1195). 

Franco & his wife had two children: 

1.         ENGELGER de Bohun (-[1218/19]). 

2.         SAVARY de Bohun of Midhurst, Ford & Huntington, Sussex (-before 11 Apr 1246)m CECILY, daughter of GEOFFREY FitzPiers Earl of Essex & his second wife Aveline de Clare (-1253).  Savary & his wife had one child:

a)         FRANCIS de Bohun of Midhurst, Sussex (-14 Sep 1273).  A document dated Saturday after St. Denis "1 Edw I", after the death of "Franco alias Francius de Boun", names "Sir John de Boun his son aged 26 is his next heir", and refers to “Storemenistre” in Dorset “held...of the inheritance of Sibyl sometime his wife...which Thomas de Boun his son now has[939]m firstly SIBYL de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Agnes of Chester.  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that "Sibilla de Bohun quarta filia" was mother of "Johanne, Johannes"[940].  The Annals of Ireland record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “quarta, Sibilla de Bohun, uxor domini Francisci de Bohun, domini de Midhurst…[941].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[942].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[943]m secondly NICOLE de la Chapelle, daughter of --- (-after 5 Oct 1273).  Francis & his first wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN de Bohun ([1246/47]-28 Sep 1284).  A document dated Saturday after St. Denis "1 Edw I", after the death of "Franco alias Francius de Boun", names "Sir John de Boun his son aged 26 is his next heir"[944].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Oct "12 Edw I", after the death of "John de Bohun alias de Boun of the county of Sussex”, name “John his son aged 9 at Whitsunday in that year is his heir”, found that he died “on the eve of St. Michael 12 Edw I”, and name “Joan his wife” from whom he inherited “Nytimbre” in Sussex[945]m JOAN, daughter of ---.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Oct "12 Edw I", after the death of "John de Bohun alias de Boun of the county of Sussex”, name “Joan his wife” from whom he inherited “Nytimbre” in Sussex[946].  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOHN de Bohun ([1274/75]-).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Oct "12 Edw I", after the death of "John de Bohun alias de Boun of the county of Sussex”, name “John his son aged 9 at Whitsunday in that year is his heir[947]

ii)         THOMAS de Bohun .  A document dated Saturday after St. Denis "1 Edw I", after the death of "Franco alias Francius de Boun", refers to “Storemenistre” in Dorset “held...of the inheritance of Sibyl sometime his wife...which Thomas de Boun his son now has[948]

 

 

 

BOLEBEC

 

 

Loyd records “Bolbec” in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Le Havre, canton Bolbec[949]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Bolebec of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire (-after 1085).  "Rogerius Porchet...atque filiis meis Lamberto...Roberto atque Guillelmo...et...Hugo de Bolebec...[et] Walterius Sisland et Willelmus Duncius...Richardus Fraisnel...Ada de Raphetot" donated the church of Bolbec Saint-Michel to Bernay abbey, with the consent of "Walterus Gifardus", by charter dated 1061 "ante...regem Willelmum" (which shows that it is midated)[950].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Bolbec” holding Lower Hartwell and Great Kimble in Stone Hundred and other properties from Walter Giffard, as well as properties held direct from the king, in Buckinghamshire[951]m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         WALTER de Bolebec (-[1142]).  "…Gualtio de Bolebec…" witnessed the charter dated to [1119/24] under which "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso[952].  "…W. de Bolebec…" witnessed the charter dated 1133 under which Henry I King of England confirmed his father’s lands to "Willo fil Udardi de Baenb"[953].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Walterus de Bolebech…et Heileunis uxor sua et Hugo filius suus", dated to [1133/35][954].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone", witnessed by "Robertus de Humfrancville et Eustachius filius Johannis et Walterus Espec et Simundus de Belecamp et Waucelinus Mamot…"[955].  "…Waltero de Bolebech…" witnessed the undated charter under which David I King of Scotland confirmed "ecclesiam de Lohworuara" to the church of Glasgow[956].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[957]m firstly ELEANOR, daughter of ---.  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Walterus de Bolebech…et Heileunis uxor sua et Hugo filius suus", dated to [1133/35][958].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone"[959].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Helewisa uxor Walteri de Bolebech", dated to 1134[960].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[961]m secondly SIBYLLA, daughter of --- (-after 1142).  “Walterus de Bolebek” confirmed the advocacy of the church of St. Andrew, Hedon, for the soul of "patris mei Walteri", by undated charter, witnessed by "domina mea et matre Sibilla, Hugone de Bolibek fratre meo…"[962].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[963].  Walter & his first wife had one child: 

i)          HUGH de Bolebec of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire (-[1165/66]).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[964].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Walterus de Bolebech…et Heileunis uxor sua et Hugo filius suus", dated to [1133/35][965].  A charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone"[966].  “Walterus de Bolebek” confirmed the advocacy of the church of St. Andrew, Hedon, for the soul of "patris mei Walteri", by undated charter, witnessed by "domina mea et matre Sibilla, Hugone de Bolibek fratre meo…"[967].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Hugo de Bolebech filius Walteri", dated to 1134[968].  “Hugo de Bolebock” founded Woburn abbey, Bedfordshire, recorded in a charter dated 1145, and confirmed by a charter of King John dated 3 Jan [1200/01][969].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Walteri de Bolebec" granted to him by the king "post mortem Hugonis de Bolbec fratris sui" in Buckinghamshire[970]The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records "Walt de Bolebec" owing a fine for "custodia terre nepotis sui" in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire, indicating the recent death of Walter’s brother[971]m ---.  Hugh & his wife had three children: 

(a)       WALTER de Bolebec (-1190).  The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records "Walt de Bolebec" owing a fine for "custodia terre nepotis sui" in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire, indicating the recent death of Walter’s brother, father of the unnamed nephew who must still have been a minor at that date[972]The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Custodianship of the minor Walter was transferred to Renaud de Courtenay: the 1167/68 Pipe Roll records Renaud de Courtenay in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire owing for “mil. Walti de Bolebec qui est in custodia eius” and in Kent “de feod Walti de Bolebek[973].  Similar entries occur in the 1168/69, 1169/70 and 1170/71 Pipe Rolls.  The reason for the change in custodianship has not been ascertained.  m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ISABEL de Bolebec (-[1206/07).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m as his first wife, AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of AUBREY [III] de Vere Earl of Oxford & his third wife Agnes de Essex ([1163 or later][974]-1214 before Oct, bur Colne Priory). 

(b)       ISABEL de Bolebec (-3 Feb 1245, bur Oxford, Church of the Preaching Friars).  Her two marriages are confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Robertus de Ver" held "manerium de Cliston" in Devon "de dote cum Isabella uxore sua que fuit uxor Henrici de Nunant", adding that King Henry I had first granted the manor to "Rogero de Nunant antecessori suo"[975].  Henry III King of England granted custody of "terre et heredis ipsius Roberti et filii ipsius Ysabelle" to "Ysabelle de Bolebec que fuit uxor R. de Ver quondam comitis Oxonie" dated [Nov] 1221[976].  The primary source which confirms her parentage more precisely has not yet been identified.   m firstly HENRY de Nonant, son of --- (-1206).  m secondly ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of AUBREY de Vere [III] Earl of Oxford & his third wife Agnes de Essex (-before 25 Oct 1221, bur Hatfield Priory). 

(c)       CONSTANCE de Bolebec .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[977]m (before 21 May 1203) ELIAS de Beauchamp, son of --- de Beauchamp & his wife Matilda de Limesey (-[1226/27]). 

Walter & his second wife had one child: 

ii)         WALTER de Bolebec of Styford, Northumberland (-after 1176).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[978].  “Walterus de Bolebek” confirmed the advocacy of the church of St . Andrew, Hedon, for the soul of "patris mei Walteri", by undated charter, witnessed by "domina mea et matre Sibilla, Hugone de Bolibek fratre meo…"[979].  "…Waltero de Bolebec…" witnessed the undated charter under which David I King of Scotland donated "toftam in Beruwic" to the priory of the Isle of May[980]The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records "Walt de Bolebec" owing a fine for "custodia terre nepotis sui" in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire[981]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Walteri de Bolebec" in Northumberland[982].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Walteri de Bolebec" granted to him by the king "post mortem Hugonis de Bolbec fratris sui" in Buckinghamshire[983].  “Walterus de Bolebek” founded Blanchland abbey, Northumberland by undated charter, witnessed by "domina mea et matre Sibilla, Hugone de Bolibek fratre meo…"[984].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Walteri de Bolebech de Okinton" in Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire[985]m ---.  Walter & his wife had three children: 

(a)       WALTER de Bolebec (-1205).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[986].  "Hugo de Bolebec" paid a fine for "tota baronia q fuit Walteri de Bolebec fratris sui cuius heres ipse est" in Northumberland, dated 1205[987]m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after 1206).  "Margareta de Bolebec q fuit uxor Walteri de B" paid a fine to marry whom she will without the king’s licence, in Northumberland, dated 1206[988]

(b)       HUGH de Bolebec (-1240)The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[989]

-         see below

(c)       daughter ([1173/74]-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “filia Walteri de Bolebec…ix annorum…in custodia comitis Albrici” and her land “de Hwitchirche…de feodo Walteri de Bolebec” in Buckinghamshire[990]

b)         [HERBERT de Bolebec (-before 1166).  The parentage of Herbert is not known, but it is probable that he was a younger son of Walter de Bolbec of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Gilbertus de Bolebec", held by "Herbertus pater meus" in the reign of King Henry I, in Buckinghamshire[991].]  m ---.  The name of Herbert’s wife is not known.  Herbert & his wife had one child: 

i)          GILBERT de Bolebec (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Gilbertus de Bolebec", held by "Herbertus pater meus" in the reign of King Henry I, in Buckinghamshire[992]Gilbertus de Bolebec filius Hereberti de Bolbec” confirmed the rights of Rochester “in ecclesia de Eye”, donated by “pater meus”, by undated charter[993]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       --- de Bolebec ([1162/63]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “filius Gilleberti de Bolebec…xviii annorum et in custodia Willelmi de Charpunville” and his land “in Eia” in Buckinghamshire[994]

 

 

1.         HENRY de Bolebec (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Bolebec" held one part of one knight’s fee from "Roberti Marmiun" in Warwickshire[995]

 

2.         RALPH de Bolebec (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus de Bolebech" held one quarter of one knight’s fee from "honoris de Wartre" in Yorkshire[996]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Bolebec (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Bolebec" holding one quarter of one knight’s fee in Yorkshire in [1210/12][997]

 

2.         HERBERT de Bolebec (-after 1210).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Herbertus de Boleb" held "feodum unius militis"[998].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Herebertus de Bolebec" holding one knight’s fee in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][999]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Bolebecm ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER de Bolebec .  A charter of King Henry III confirmed donations to Rosedale Nunnery, Yorkshire by “Rogerus de Bolebek”, confirming the donations of "Willielmus de Bolebek pater suus"[1000]

b)         ROHESE de Bolebec .  A charter of King Henry III confirmed donations to Rosedale Nunnery, Yorkshire by “Roesia de Bolebek filia Willielmi de Bolebek"[1001].

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Bolebec (-before 18 Jun 1247).  A writ dated 18 Jun "31 Hen III", after the death of "Gilbert de Bolebec alias de Bolebek" names "Erbertus his son is his heir" and "Kingesheye town…1 knight’s fee" in Buckinghamshire[1002]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had two children: 

a)         HERBERT de Bolebec (-before 17 Aug 1268).  A writ dated 18 Jun "31 Hen III", after the death of "Gilbert de Bolebec alias de Bolebek" names "Erbertus his son is his heir" and "Kingesheye town…1 knight’s fee" in Buckinghamshire[1003].  A writ dated 17 Aug "52 Hen III", after the death of "Herbert de Bolebek", names "Gilbert Bolebek, his brother by the same father and mother, is his heir and of full age"[1004]

b)         GILBERT de Bolebec (-after 1268).  A writ dated 17 Aug "52 Hen III", after the death of "Herbert de Bolebek", names "Gilbert Bolebek, his brother by the same father and mother, is his heir and of full age"[1005]

 

 

HUGH de Bolebec, son of WALTER de Bolebec & his wife --- (-1240).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Walterus de Bolebech, Sibilla uxor eius, Walterus de Bolebech pater eius, Helvwis mater eius, Hugh de Boleb frater eius, Walt et Hugo fil eius"[1006].  "Hugo de Bolebec" paid a fine for "tota baronia q fuit Walteri de Bolebec fratris sui cuius heres ipse est" in Northumberland, dated 1205[1007].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Bolebec" holding "baroniam de Morpat" with four knights’ fees in Northumberland in [1210/12][1008].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Hugo de Bolbec" holding "baroniam de Stiphord" in Northumberland which had been granted by King Henry I to "antecessores sui"[1009].  

m CECILIA de Vescy, daughter of WILLIAM de Vescy & his wife Burga de Stuteville ([1170/75]-).  An undated charter relating to Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland names ”Eustachium de Vescy, Matildam et Ceceliam” as the children of “Willielmus de Vescy senior” and his wife “sororem domini Roberti de Stutevill, domini de Cnarsburg, nomine Burgam”, adding that Cecilia married “Hugoni de Bolbek seniori, qui genuit Walterum de Bolbek, qui Hugonem juniorem, qui Feliciam matrem domini Johannis de Lancastria[1010]

Hugh & his wife had one child: 

1.         HUGH de Bolebec An undated charter relating to Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland records that Cecilia de Vescy married “Hugoni de Bolbek seniori, qui genuit Walterum [error for Hugoni] de Bolbek, qui Hugonem juniorem, qui Feliciam matrem domini Johannis de Lancastria[1011]The primary source which names the parents of Hugh has not yet been identified.  However, as noted above, the fact that his granddaughter Philippa married Roger de Lancaster suggests that Hugh may have been the same person as "Walter" who is named in the Alnwick Abbey charter which is quoted above as the son of Hugh de Bolebec.]  m as her first husband, MARGERY de Montfichet, daughter of RICHARD de Montfichet & his wife Millicent ---.  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa, from Margery issued Hugh de Bolebek"[1012].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1013].  She married secondly Piers de Faucomberge.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH de Bolebec (-before 23 Oct 1262).  An undated charter relating to Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland records that Cecilia de Vescy married “Hugoni de Bolbek seniori, qui genuit Walterum de Bolbek, qui Hugonem juniorem, qui Feliciam matrem domini Johannis de Lancastria[1014].  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa, from Margery issued Hugh de Bolebek, who had four daughters married to Roger de Lacastre, Nicholas Corbet, Hugh de Laval and Walter de Huntercumbe"[1015].  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters, Philippa aged 23 and more married to Roger de Launcastre, Margery aged 21 and more married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice age variously stated as 16 and 17 and more married to Walter son of William de Huntercumb alias Hountercumbe, and Maud aged 13 and 1 month who is at Angerton with lady Teffan alias Thephan her mother…are his heirs" and lists his manors in Northumberland[1016].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1017]m TIPHAINE, daughter of --- (-after Oct 1262).  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "…and Maud aged 13 and 1 month who is at Angerton with lady Teffan alias Thephan her mother…are his heirs"[1018].  Hugh & his wife had four children: 

i)          PHILIPPA de Bolebec ([1238/39]-[1292/Aug 1293]).  An undated charter relating to Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland records that Cecilia de Vescy married “Hugoni de Bolbek seniori, qui genuit Walterum de Bolbek, qui Hugonem juniorem, qui Feliciam matrem domini Johannis de Lancastria[1019].  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters, Philippa aged 23 and more married to Roger de Launcastre…are his heirs"[1020].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1021]A writ dated 1 Sep "22 Edw I", after the death of "Philippa late the wife of Roger de Lancaster", names as heir "John de Lancaster her son aged 24 or more...30"[1022]m ROGER [II] de Lancaster, son of [ROGER [I] de Lancaster & his wife ---] (-[Jun/Aug] 1292). 

ii)         MARGERY de Bolebec ([1240/41]-before Feb 1301).  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters…Margery aged 21 and more married to Nicholas Corbet…are his heirs"[1023].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1024]m firstly NICHOLAS Corbet, son of WILLIAM de Dunbar & his wife Christiana de Corbet (-before 25 Dec 1280).  m secondly (royal licence 1 Nov 1281) as his second wife, RALPH FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM FitzRalph & his wife Joan --- (-11 Feb 1317, bur Neasham Priory).  He was summoned to parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Fitzwilliam. 

iii)        ALICE de Bolebec ([1245/46]-).  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters…Alice age variously stated as 16 and 17 and more married to Walter son of William de Huntercumb alias Hountercumbe…are his heirs"[1025].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1026]m WALTER de Huntercombe, son of WILLIAM de Huntercombe & his wife ---. 

iv)       MATILDA de Bolebec (Sep 1249-before 24 Feb 1281).  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters…and Maud aged 13 and 1 month who is at Angerton with lady Teffan alias Thephan her mother…are his heirs"[1027].  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa, from Margery issued Hugh de Bolebek, who had four daughters married to Roger de Lacastre, Nicholas Corbet, Hugh de Laval and Walter de Huntercumbe"[1028].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1029].  Under a writ dated 24 Feb "9 Edw I" Hugh de Laval complained of lands taken into the king’s hands after the death of "Maud sometime the wife of Hugh de Valle alias Laval", naming "Philippa the wife of Roger de Lancaster and Margery late the wife of Nicholas Corbet are her next heirs and of full age” and noting that “the said Hugh begot four sons of the said Maud, who died before her death[1030]m ([Oct 1262/1267]) HUGH de Laval, son of --- (-after 24 Feb 1281). 

 

 

 

BOTEREL

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Boterel [I] (-[1165/75]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus de Boterellis" held one knight’s fee from the bishop of Exeter in Devon and twelve knights’ fees from "comitis Reginaldi" in Cornwall[1031]m (1140 or after) ALICE Corbet, daughter of ROBERT [I] Corbet & his [second] wife --- ([1115/20]-).  Eyton states that "Alice, daughter and eventual co-heir of Robert fitz Corbet married William Botterell of Cornwall", adding that the marriage must be dated to after 1140 as on her marriage her nephew Renaud Earl of Cornwall gave her property at "Cracunton and Bidun", both in Cornwall, which he assesses would only have been his after his installation as earl in that year[1032]Renaud Earl of Cornwall issued a charter for William de Boterel which names his mother "matertere mee Aliz Corbet"[1033].  However, if this is correct, it is extremely unlikely that Alice could have been born from the same marriage of her father as her sister Sibyl.  William [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         WILLIAM Boterel [II] (-[1211]).  "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ" which he had granted to "Willielmo de Boterells in Cornubia, patri…predicti Willielmi" on his marriage, by charter dated to [1163/75], witnessed by "Nicholao filio meo…Herberto filio Herberti, Baldwino et Ricardo nepotibus meis, Willelmo de Vernun, Willielmo fratre meo…"[1034].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Willelmus de Boterell" in Devonshire[1035].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Boterellis vii l x s pro xii militibus de minutis feodis" in Cornwall in [1186/87][1036].  “Willielmus de Boterell” confirmed the donation, for the soul of “Willielmi filii mei”, by “domina Isabella de Say uxor mea” of the church of St George, Clun to Wenlock Priory, by undated charter witnessed by “Brientio de Say…Hugone Peverell…[1037].  "Will’s de Boterell" paid a fine for "in Cornub…Penhell…et dimid villa de Alencestr", dated 1199[1038].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Boterellis" holding one half of one knight’s fee in Shropshire, and 12 knights’ fees in Cornwall, in [1210/12][1039].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Petrus filius Herberti et Willelmus de Boterellis" holding "tres partes" in Warwickshire in [1210/12][1040].  "William de Botreaux" paid a fine for "having seisin of the lands formerly of William de Botreaux his father" in Cornwall, dated [Dec] 1220[1041]m firstly ([1171]) as her third husband, ISABEL de Say, widow firstly of WILLIAM FitzAlan, and secondly of GEOFFREY de Vere, daughter of ELIAS de Say Lord of Clun, Shropshire & his wife --- (-[1199][1042]).  m secondly ([1203/04]) as her second husband, ALBREDA Waleran, widow of JOHN de Ingeham, daughter of --- (-1270).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset, dated 1219, which includes "Albreda de Boterall...de donacione domini regis et terra sua de Ceddene valet c.s"[1043].  

-        BOTREAUX Family of Cornwall and Alcestre[1044]

b)         REYNOLD Boterel

c)         [ROBERT Boterel (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Boterellis" paying "lx s, iii milites" in Shropshire[1045].] 

 

 

 

BRITO (ALBINI BRITO)

 

 

The origins of this family were discussed by Round[1046].  He suggests that they originated from Saint-Aubin d’Aubigné, in the present-day French département of Ille-et-Vilaine. 

 

 

1.         MAIN .  [Seigneur de Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné].  "Main pater Willelmi de Albinico, Adelisa, Hunfredus de Buun avunculus eius…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc…" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey[1047].  Main and his wife are named as parents of William [I] de Albini Brito in Domesday Descendants, which does not cite the corresponding primary source reference[1048]m ADELISA [de Bohun], daughter of ---.  "Main pater Willelmi de Albinico, Adelisa, Hunfredus de Buun avunculus eius…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc…" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey[1049].  The chronology of the Albini Brito family (descended from Adelisa and her husband) is difficult to determine precisely, but it appears possible that "Hunfredus de Buun", who is named in the Thorney list as "avunculus" of William [I] de Albini Brito, was Humphrey [II] de Bohun, in which case William’s mother may have been Humphrey’s sister who is named Adela in the 1130 Pipe Roll.  Main & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [I] de Albini Brito (-after 1148)"Main pater Willelmi de Albinico, Adelisa, Hunfredus de Buun avunculus eius…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc…" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey[1050].  Matthew Paris records the prowess of "Willelmus de Albeneio Brito" at the battle of Tinchebrai in 1106[1051].  "…Willo de Albin Brit…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[1052].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Robertus filius Walteri et Avelina uxor eius" donated "ecclesiam de Nortone", as previously donated by "Elmelina mater Avelinæ ante plures annos", in 1126, and the subsequent paragraph records that "Willelmus Brito" donated "ecclesiam de Nortone" with the consent of "rege Henrico seniore…tempore [Willelmi] abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131][1053].  "W. de Alb Britone" witnessed the charter dated to [1125/29] under which Henry I King of England confirmed a donation to Thorney abbey[1054].  He owned part of the fee of Belvoir before his mother-in-law held it, The Complete Peerage concluding therefore that the marriage may have been arranged to settle rival claims[1055].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Albin brit" in Essex, Hertfordshire, Northamptonshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, in the honour of Berkeley in Rutlandshire, and in Northamptonshire[1056].  "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…[1057].  "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Ceciliæ uxoris meæ et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…[1058]m CECILY Bigod, daughter of ROGER le Bigod & his [second] wife Adelise de Tosny (-after 1136).  Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated 23 Apr [1430] under which her descendant “Thomas dominus de Ros, de Hamelake, de Trussebout et de Beavoir” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire made by "antecessores nostros…Robertum de Toteneio, Willielmum de Toteneyo filium suum, Agnetem de Toteneio filiam dicti Roberti de Toteneyo, Henricum de Rya filium Huberto de Rya, Agnetem de Toteneyo, Willielmum de Albeneio primum, Willielmum de Albeneio secundum, Willielmum de Albeneio tertium, Willielmum de Albeneio quartum, Ywynum de Albeneyo, Heliam de Albeneyo et uxores eorundem, Isabellam filiam domini Willielmi de Albeneio quæ fuit uxor domini de Ros, domini de Beauvoire et de Hamelake"[1059], the connection with Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir, her maternal grandfather, being established through her marriage.  She inherited Belvoir from her mother.  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey[1060].  "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…[1061].  "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Ceciliæ uxoris meæ et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…[1062].  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1063].  “Willielmus de Albineio” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon de Radulphi de Albineio fratris mei", by undated charter[1064].  William [I] & his wife had six children: 

i)          WILLIAM [II] de Albini Brito (-1168).  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey, another entry in the same folio reading "Willm de Albenico, Cecilia uxor ei[us], Willm, Rodbt, Roger filii ei[us], Matildis, Basilia filie ei[us]…"[1065].  "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…[1066].  "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Ceciliæ uxoris meæ et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…[1067].  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1068].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held by "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1069]m MATILDA de Senlis, daughter of ROBERT FitzRichard & his wife Matilda de Senlis (-after 1185).  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1070].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Sainlis que fuit filia Roberti filii Ricardi et mater Willelmi de Albineio” and “terra sua in Hungertone et in Winewelle[1071].  William [II] & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       WILLIAM [III] de Albini Brito (-before 15 May 1236).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Sainlis que fuit filia Roberti filii Ricardi et mater Willelmi de Albineio” and “terra sua in Hungertone et in Winewelle[1072]

-         see below

(b)       [MATILDA de Albini ([1160/65]-after 1210)A charter dated 1200 records the foundation of Inchaffray Abbey by "Gilbertus filius Ferthead…comes de Stradern et…Matilidis filia Willelmi de Aubengni comitissa", for the soul of "Gillecrist primogeniti nostri ibidem quiescentis"[1073].  No more precise information has been found about the parentage of Matilda, first wife of Gilbert Earl of Strathearn.  From a chronological point of view, it is possible that "Willelmi de Aubengni" was William de Albini Brito, who died in 1168.  If this is correct, Matilda must have been born not long before her father’s death as she gave birth to her last child after Oct 1198.  It appears that William, son of William who died in 1168, would have been too young to have been Matilda’s father.  "…M. comitissa de Stratherr, Malisio fratre comitis, Ferthet filio comitis, Matilda filia comitis…Dunecano filio Malihs…" subscribed the charter dated to [1200] under which "Gilbertus comes de Stratheren" donated property to Inchaffray Abbey[1074].  "…Malisio fratre comitis, Matilda comissa…Willelmo, Fertet, Roberto, Fergus, Malisio, Gillecrist filiis meis…" subscribed the charter dated to [1203/08] under which "Gilebertus comes de Stradhern" donated property to Inchaffray Abbey[1075].  "…M. fratre meo, M. comitissa, Roberto filio et herede meo et aliis filiis meis…" subscribed the charter dated 1210 under which "G. comes de Strathern" donated "ecclesiam sancti Beani de Foulis" to Inchaffray Abbey[1076].  m as his first wife, GILBERT Earl of Strathearn, son of FERTETH Earl of Strathearn & his wife Ethen --- ([1150 or before]-1223).] 

ii)         ROGER de Albini Brito .  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey, another entry in the same folio reading "Willm de Albenico, Cecilia uxor ei[us], Willm, Rodbt, Roger filii ei[us], Matildis, Basilia filie ei[us]…"[1077].  "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…[1078]

iii)        MATILDA de Albini Brito .  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey, another entry in the same folio reading "Willm de Albenico, Cecilia uxor ei[us], Willm, Rodbt, Roger filii ei[us], Matildis, Basilia filie ei[us]…"[1079]

iv)       ROBERT de Albini Brito (-after 1166).  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey, another entry in the same folio reading "Willm de Albenico, Cecilia uxor ei[us], Willm, Rodbt, Roger filii ei[us], Matildis, Basilia filie ei[us]…"[1080].  "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…[1081].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Albenny frater suus" held 15 knights’ fees from "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1082]same person as…?  ROBERT de Tosny .  “Robertus de Toteneia” donated property to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, confirmed by "Willielmus de Albeneio frater meus et dominus", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Rogerus Bigot"[1083].  The identity of the donor is uncertain, but he may have been the same person as Robert de Albini Brito, son of William [I] de Albini Brito, assuming that he adopted the name Tosny from his maternal grandmother’s family. 

v)        BASILIA de Albini Brito .  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey, another entry in the same folio reading "Willm de Albenico, Cecilia uxor ei[us], Willm, Rodbt, Roger filii ei[us], Matildis, Basilia filie ei[us]…"[1084]

vi)       RALPH de Albini Brito (-Acre 1191).  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1085]m ([1181/82]) as her third husband, SIBYLLA de Valognes, widow firstly of ROBERT de Ros, and secondly of WILLIAM de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire, daughter of --- (-after 1212, bur Nun Appleton Priory).  Her third marriage is confirmed by the 1181/82 Pipe Roll which records "Radulfus de Alben" accounting for ".cc. m pro ducenda matre Ebrardi de Ros" in Yorkshire[1086]Ralph & his wife had three children: 

(a)       MATILDA de Albini BritoDomesday Descendants names Matilda wife of William de Colleville as the oldest of the three daughters of Ralph de Albini Brito and his wife[1087]m WILLIAM de Colleville, son of ---. 

(b)       ALICE de Albini BritoDomesday Descendants names Alice wife of Stephen de Markham as the second of the three daughters of Ralph de Albini Brito and his wife[1088]m STEPHEN de Markham, son of ---. 

(c)       GUNNORA de Albini Brito Domesday Descendants names Gunnora, wife first of Robert de Gant and secondly of Nicholas de Stuteville, as the youngest of the three daughters of Ralph de Albini Brito and his wife[1089].  A charter of King Richard I dated 7 Sep 1189 confirmed donations to Vaudey abbey among which by “Roberti de Gant et Gundredæ uxoris eius[1090]m firstly as his second wife, ROBERT de Gand, son of WALTER van Gent & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre (-[1191/92], bur Vaudey Abbey).  m secondly NICHOLAS [III] de Stuteville, son of NICHOLAS [II] de Stuteville & his wife Ida --- (-after 1219). 

 

 

WILLIAM [III] de Albini Brito, son of WILLIAM [II] de Albini Brito & his wife Matilda de Senlis (-before 15 May 1236).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Sainlis que fuit filia Roberti filii Ricardi et mater Willelmi de Albineio” and “terra sua in Hungertone et in Winewelle[1091].  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1092].  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1093]

m firstly MARGERY, daughter of ODINEL [II] de Prudhoe & his wife ---.  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1094].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  The name of her father suggests a family relationship with the Umfraville, later Earls of Angus. 

m secondly (after [1196/98]) as her second husband, AGATHA Trussebut, widow of HAIMO de Wolverton, daughter of WILLIAM [II] Trussebut & his wife Albereda d’Harcourt (-1247).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[1095].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha"[1096].  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1097].  “William of Belvoir” made a fine for relief of lands formerly of “William d’Aubigny his father”, saving to “Agatha, who was the wife of the same William, her rightful dower”, dated 15 May 1236[1098]

William [III] & his first wife had four children: 

1.         WILLIAM [IV] de Albini Brito (-before 14 Sep 1242).  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1099].  “William of Belvoir” made a fine for relief of lands formerly of “William d’Aubigny his father”, saving to “Agatha, who was the wife of the same William, her rightful dower”, dated 15 May 1236[1100].  A charter of “Thomas dominus de Ros, de Hamelake, de Trussebout et de Beavoir” dated 23 Apr [1430] confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire made by "antecessores nostros…Robertum de Toteneio, Willielmum de Toteneyo filium suum, Agnetem de Toteneio filiam dicti Roberti de Toteneyo, Henricum de Rya filium Huberto de Rya, Agnetem de Toteneyo, Willielmum de Albeneio primum, Willielmum de Albeneio secundum, Willielmum de Albeneio tertium, Willielmum de Albeneio quartum, Ywynum de Albeneyo, Heliam de Albeneyo et uxores eorundem, Isabellam filiam domini Willielmi de Albeneio quæ fuit uxor domini de Ros, domini de Beauvoire et de Hamelake"[1101].  The lands of “William d’Aubigny” in Lincolnshire were ordered to be taken into the king’s hands following his death, dated 14 Sep 1242[1102]m ISABEL, daughter of ---.  “Isabella d’Aubigny” made a fine for “marrying herself to whomever she will wish”, dated 13 Jan 1243[1103]William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ISABEL de Albini (-15 Jun 1301, bur Newstead, near Stamford).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that "Robertum de Roos" married “Isabellam hæredem D’Albany[1104]"Robert de Ros and Isabel his wife" were granted rights "in the manor of Belver by all bounds by which William de Albiniaco, father of the said Isabel who is his heiress, held…" dated 3 Jul 1252[1105].  A writ dated 4 Jun "13 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Ros of Beuveyr alias Beuvayr", names "Isabel sometime his wife, daughter and heir of William de Aubeny who is 52 years of age"[1106]m ([5 Jun 1243/17 May 1244]) ROBERT de Ros, son of WILLIAM de Ros & his wife Lucy --- (-17 May 1285, bur Kirkham). 

2.         ODINEL de Albini Brito .  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1107]

3.         ROBERT de Albini Brito .  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1108]

4.         NICHOLAS de Albini Brito .  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[1109].

 

 

 

BRITO

 

 

1.         THURSTAN Brito (-after [1127]).  "…Turstin Brito, Will Brito, Hunfrid Brito, Rodb Brito…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[1110]

 

 

The donation of the church of Norton to Gloucester St Peter by Aveline de Hesdin and her husband Robert FitzWalter and by William de Brito suggests shared ownership of the property inherited from a common ancestor, but the precise family connection if any has not been traced. 

 

1.         WILLIAM Brito (-after [1127]).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Robertus filius Walteri et Avelina uxor eius" donated "ecclesiam de Nortone", as previously donated by "Elmelina mater Avelinæ ante plures annos", and the subsequent paragraph records that "Willelmus Brito" donated "ecclesiam de Nortone" with the consent of "rege Henrico seniore…tempore [Willelmi] abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131][1111].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Willelmus Brito et Ermilda uxor eius" donated "unam hidam in Standyssch quam ipsa Ermilda clamabat", dated "tempore Willelmi abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131], and that "Nicholaus de Sancta Brigida" relinquished his claim over "una virgata terræ de Standyssch quam Galfridus Despensator tenuit, et postea Philippus Carbonel, tempore Thomæ Carbonel abbatis"[1112].  "Willelmus Brito et Ernilda uxor mea" donated land "in Stanedis" to Gloucester St Peter by undated charter, dated to [1113/30][1113].  "…Turstin Brito, Will Brito, Hunfrid Brito, Rodb Brito…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[1114]m ERNILDA, daughter of ---.  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Willelmus Brito et Ermilda uxor eius" donated "unam hidam in Standyssch quam ipsa Ermilda clamabat", dated "tempore Willelmi abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131], and that "Nicholaus de Sancta Brigida" relinquished his claim over "una virgata terræ de Standyssch quam Galfridus Despensator tenuit, et postea Philippus Carbonel, tempore Thomæ Carbonel abbatis"[1115].  "Willelmus Brito et Ernilda uxor mea" donated land "in Stanedis" to Gloucester St Peter by undated charter, dated to [1113/30][1116]

 

 

1.         HUMPHREY Brito (-after [1127]).  "…Turstin Brito, Will Brito, Hunfrid Brito, Rodb Brito…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[1117]

 

2.         ROBERT Brito (-after [1127]).  "…Rob Brito…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[1118].  "…Turstin Brito, Will Brito, Hunfrid Brito, Rodb Brito…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[1119]

 

3.         JOHN Brito .  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[1120]

 

 

Two possible brothers: 

1.         WALTER Brito (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from the king by "Walterus Brito" in Somerset[1121]

2.         [WILLIAM Brito (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Brito" held one knight’s fee from "Walterus Brito" in Somerset[1122].] 

 

 

1.         RICHARD Brito (-after [1172]).  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus de Traci, Reginaldus filius Ursi, Hugo de Morevilla, Ricardus Brito” murdered the archbishop at Canterbury in 1171 and relate the subsequent events in detail[1123]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "militum…Richardus Brito, Hugo de Morevilla, Renaldus Ursus et Guillelmus de Traci" as the murderers of Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury[1124].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Ricardus Brito" with two knights "de feodo de Spineto…de Baiocasino"[1125]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         ROBERT Brito (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Brito, Radulfus Brito" held one knight’s fee each from "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1126]

2.         RALPH Brito (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Brito, Radulfus Brito" held one knight’s fee each from "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1127]

 

 

1.         ALAN Brito (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alanus Brito" held one half of one knight’s fee from "comitis Albrici" in Essex[1128]

 

2.         WALTER Brito (-before 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Ricardus Briwere" holding 15 knights’ fees "de terra quæ fuit Walteri Bretonis de honore de Hoccecumbe" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1129]

 

3.         RICHARD Brito (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus Brito" held "medietatem de Lie et de Cherch…de honore de Richemond" in Hampshire[1130].  

 

 

 

BRIWERE

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de BriwereKing John confirmed the grant of "foresta nostra de la Bera", granted by King Henry I to "Willelmus Briwerr avus eius", to "Willelmo Briwere" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[1131]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD de Briwere (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardus filius Willelmi Bruerre" now held "baroniam" in Somerset in which "Walterus Brito" held knights’ fees from the king[1132]

b)         --- de Briwere (-before 21 Mar 1200).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 21 Mar 1200 under which King John confirmed the grant of "foresta nostra de la Bera", granted by King Henry I to "Willelmus Briwerr avus eius", to his son "Willelmo Briwere"[1133]

-        see below

 

2.         GUIFAR de Briwere (-after Sep 1151).  "…Guferio de Bruere…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Fontenay at the request of "Jordani Taxonis"[1134]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Briwere (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Bruerre" held one half a knight’s fee in Chesterfield from "Radulfi filii Willelmi" in Derbyshire[1135]

 

 

--- de Briwere, son of WILLIAM de Briwere & his wife --- (-before 21 Mar 1200).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 21 Mar 1200 under which King John confirmed the grant of "foresta nostra de la Bera", granted by King Henry I to "Willelmus Briwerr avus eius", to his son "Willelmo Briwere"[1136]

m ---.  The name of his wife is not known. 

[Five] children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Briwere (-24 Nov 1226).  King John confirmed the grant of "foresta nostra de la Bera", granted by King Henry I to "Willelmus Briwerr avus eius", to "Willelmo Briwere" by charter dated 21 Mar 1200[1137].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus Bruere" holding (unspecified) knights’ fees "Burbeche" in Wiltshire, and land "Stokes et Siteleshangre quæ fuerunt Gerardi de Mauqu[eney]" in Northamptonshire, in [1210/12][1138].  Matthew Paris names “...Willelmus Briwere...” among the "consiliarios iniquissimos” of King John[1139].  A charter which records the foundation of Motisfont Priory, Hampshire states that “dominus Willielmus Briwer, fundator ecclesiæ de Mottesfount” died "VIII Kal Dec", lists his donations including the donation of land "in Muchelmares" and revenue from land "in villa de Burbache" for the soul of "Beatricis uxoris suæ qui obiit IX Kal Apr"[1140]m BEATRICE, daughter of --- (-24 Mar ----).  A charter which records the foundation of Motisfont Priory, Hampshire states that “dominus Willielmus Briwer, fundator ecclesiæ de Mottesfount” donated land "in Muchelmares" and revenue from land "in villa de Burbache" for the soul of "Beatricis uxoris suæ qui obiit IX Kal Apr"[1141].  The Complete Peerage states that Dugdale calls the wife of William de Briwere "Beatrice de Valle, says she was the mistress of Rainald Earl of Cornwall", but does not cite a primary source on which this information is based[1142].  The chronology does not appear to favour the subsequent marriage of the mistress of Earl Renaud to William de Briwere.  The marriages of the latter’s children are recorded in the first decade of the 13th century, their births being therefore estimated to [1185/1200].  Even if Earl Renaud’s mistress gave birth to the earl’s illegitimate son in the last decade of his life (when he would have been in his sixties), it is unlikely that she could have continued bearing children into the later 1190s.  William & his wife had seven children: 

a)         RICHARD de Briwere (-after 10 Dec 1213).  "Willelmus de Briwerr" paid a fine for "heritenda filia Hug de Morevill cum tota hereditate sua qu id Hugo tenuit die q fuit vivus et mortuus" and for the marriage of "ipsie file ad op Ric filii sui […Ric Briwerr fil ipsius Willmi] vel si parentes ipsi puelle ad h assensint ad op Ric Gernon nepotis sui si eid Willo placuit", dated 1201[1143].  "…W Briw…Ric Briw" witnessed the charter dated 25 Nov 1207 under which King John granted "ecclesiam Sci Johis Bapt de Ivelcestr" to "Johi capellano"[1144].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Ricardus Briwere" holding 15 knights’ fees "de terra quæ fuit Walteri Bretonis de honore de Hoccecumbe" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1145].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus Briwer" held "de domino rege feudum I militis in hundredo de Katesaisse de honore de Blakedon…Ivelcestr" in Somerset[1146].  King John confirmed "manerium…de Cestres et Derebisr et Brumiton et Withinton" to "Ricardo Briwer fil W. Briw", at the request of "W. Briw patris sui", by charter dated 10 Dec 1213[1147]

b)         GRACE de Briwere (-before 1215).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that Reginaldus de Brews” married filiam domini Willielmus de la Bruere[1148].  A manuscript recording the heirs of William de Briouse records that “Willielmus de Breus” married "Graciam primogenitam et unam hæredum Willielmi Briwere"[1149]m as his first wife, REYNOLD de Briouse, son of WILLIAM [III] de Briouse & his wife Mathilde de Saint-Valéry Dame de la Haye (-[5 May 1227/9 Jun 1228])

c)         JOAN de Briwere (-before 12 Jun 1233, bur Sandown Hospital, Surrey)The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Willelmi de Percy cum filiabus suis...filiarum et heredum Johanne que fuit uxor Willelmi de Percy"[1150]m as his first wife, WILLIAM de Percy, son of HENRY de Percy & his wife Isabel de Brus ([1196/98]-shortly before 28 Jul 1245, bur Sawley Abbey, his heart bur at Sandown Hospital with his first wife)

d)         ALICE de Briwere Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of her son "William Paynel alias Painel" which names the manor of "…Huffeculm…with 10 l land which Fulk Painel gave to William Briwer the elder…but afterwards William Brewer the younger…bestowed the said land upon William Painel, father of this one, in free marriage with Alice his sister" in Devon[1151].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[1152].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Alicie de Moyun"[1153]m firstly REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset, son of WILLIAM de Mohun & his wife Lucy --- (-1213).  m secondly WILLIAM Paynell of Bampton, Devon, son of FULK Paynell & his wife Aude --- (-1228). 

e)         MARGARET de Briwere (-1237)Margeria de la Ferte” donated property to Motisfont priory, for the souls of "domini Willielmi Briwerre patris mei et Beatricis matris meæ", confirmed donations by her father and by "Willielmus Briwer frater meus", including land held by "Johannes Briwerre patruus meus tenuit in Motesfunt…"[1154].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Rogero de Clare et Alicie uxori eius" against "Margeria de Feritate" accusing her of selling assets "in dotem de hereditate ipsius Alicie in Essingham ad exhereditacionem ipsius Alicie", the defendant stating that changes were made by "Galfridus de Say viri sui" before their divorce, and that the damage was caused by "Odon Danmartin primi viri sui"[1155].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[1156].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "[porcio] Margar de Affert"[1157]m firstly as his second wife, EUDES [IV] de Dammartin, son of [EUDES [III] de Dammartin & his wife ---] (-after 1212).  m secondly WILLIAM de la Ferté, son of MATTHEW de la Ferté & his wife Gundred Paynell.  Paganus de Chavorciis” donated property to Motisfont priory, for the souls of "domini Willielmi Briwerre fundatoris eorum et domini Willielmi de Feritate patris uxoris nostræ", by undated charter[1158]m thirdly (divorced) GEOFFREY [V] de Say, son of GEOFFREY [III] de Say & his wife Alice de Chesney ([1180/82]-Poitou 1230 before 26 Aug, bur Dover, Hospital of St Mary)

f)          WILLIAM de Briwere (-14 Feb 1233)Henry III King of England notified "W. Briwerr juniori" of the death of "W. comes de Insula" and requested him to take custody of "castrum de Carebroc" until a decision about its custodianship dated [Sep] 1217[1159].  Henry III King of England ordered "Willelmus Brewer junior…" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Devonie" dated [Jul] 1219[1160].  Henry III King of England notified the Knights Templars at Acre that "W. Exoniensis episcopus nepos suus" had deposited money for the credit of "Willelmus Briwer" dated [Nov] 1226[1161].  A charter which records the foundation of Motisfont Priory, Hampshire lists the donations made by “dominus Willielmus Briwer, fundator ecclesiæ de Mottesfount” and records that "Willielmus Brewer filius" confirmed his father’s donations and died "XVI Kal Mar"[1162]m JOAN de Vernon, daughter of WILLIAM de Vernon [Reviers] Earl of Devon & his wife Mabile de Meulan (-after 1233).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Johannam…Willielmi Brewer et Mariam Roberti de Courtney…uxores” as the two daughters of ”Willielmum de Vernona” & his wife, adding that Joan was childless[1163].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, which names "Johanne que fuit uxor predicti Willelmi Briwere"[1164]

g)         ISABEL de Briwere (-[1226/10 Jun 1233])"Willelmus Briwer" paid a fine for "custodia terre et heredum Fobti de Dovr…et…custodia dotis Roes de Dovr" dated 1204[1165].  King John confirmed "custodia terre et heredum Fobti de Dover" to "Willelmo Briw" with "maritagium eosdem heredum" by charter dated 6 Jan 1206[1166].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by [her son] "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[1167].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "[po]rcio Hugonis Wak"[1168]m firstly ([1203/04]) FULBERT de Dover, son of JOHN de Dover & his wife Rohese --- (-[1204/05]).  m secondly  BALDWIN Wake, son of BALDWIN Wake & his wife Agnes de Hommet (-before 20 Jul 1213)

2.         JOHN de Briwere (-before 22 Mar 1205).  “Margeria de la Ferte” donated property to Motisfont priory, for the souls of "domini Willielmi Briwerre patris mei et Beatricis matris meæ", confirmed donations by her father and by "Willielmus Briwer frater meus", including land held by "Johannes Briwerre patruus meus tenuit in Motesfunt…"[1169].  King John confirmed "feod i militis in Meldesham…" held by "Johs Briwerr…cum filia et herede Willi de Danmartin" to "Willelmo Briw" by charter dated 22 Mar 1205[1170]m (before 28 Feb 1200) as her first husband, GALIENA de Dammartin, daughter of WILLIAM de Dammartin & his wife --- (-after 1228).  King John confirmed that "Johannes Briewerr" held "terram q fuit Willi de Danmartin…cum Galiena filia eiusdem" by charter dated 28 Feb 1200[1171].  King John confirmed "feod i militis in Meldesham…" held by "Johs Briwerr…cum filia et herede Willi de Danmartin" to "Willelmo Briw" by charter dated 22 Mar 1205[1172].  She married secondly ([16 Mar 1215]) Robert de Burgate.  King John granted "feodum uni militis in Heldesham quod Johannes Briwer teneit cum predicta filia et herede Willelmi de Danmartin" to "Willelmo Briwerr" on the marriage of "Roberto de Burgat" and "Galienam filiam et heredem Willelmi Danmartin" dated 16 Mar 1215[1173].  She married thirdly Ernald de Mandeville

3.         [PETER de Rivallis (-23 Nov ----).  A charter which records the foundation of Motisfont Priory, Hampshire lists the donations made by “dominus Willielmus Briwer, fundator ecclesiæ de Mottesfount” and records that "dominus Petris de Rivallis frater fundatoris", who was called "The holy man in the Wall" and to whom miracles were attributed, donated large sums of money and died "IX Kal Dec"[1174].  The different name from William de Briwere suggests that Peter may have been his uterine brother, born from a second marriage of their mother.] 

4.         [son .  It is not known whether the father of William/Richard Briwere was one of the known brothers of William de Briwere who are shown above.]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM [Richard] de Briwere .  John King of England granted "ecclesiam de Bramton" to "Ricardo Briwere clerico nepoti Willelmi Briwere" by order dated 15 Sep 1208[1175].  "Willelmus Briwe clericus nepos Willelmi Briwe" had letters of presentation "de ecclesia de Bramton", undated[1176].  Clearly these two documents refer to the same person but it is not known whether Richard or William was his actual name. 

5.         [daughter .  If the term “nepos” in the source quoted below should be interpreted in its sense of nephew, Richard Gernon was the son of William de Briwere’s sister.]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         RICHARD Gernon (-after 1212).  "Willelmus de Briwerr" paid a fine for "heritenda filia Hug de Morevill cum tota hereditate sua qu id Hugo tenuit die q fuit vivus et mortuus" and for the marriage of "ipsie file ad op Ric filii sui […Ric Briwerr fil ipsius Willmi] vel si parentes ipsi puelle ad h assensint ad op Ric Gernon nepotis sui si eid Willo placuit", dated 1201[1177].  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Gernon accounts for 600 marks for having Johanna the younger daughter of Hugh de Moreville, with the reasonable share falling to her of her father’s land"[1178].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[1179].  m ([1201/05]) JOAN de Morville, daughter of HUGH de Morville & his wife Christiana de Stuteville.  "Willelmus de Briwerr" paid a fine for "heritenda filia Hug de Morevill cum tota hereditate sua qu id Hugo tenuit die q fuit vivus et mortuus" and for the marriage of "ipsie file ad op Ric filii sui […Ric Briwerr fil ipsius Willmi] vel si parentes ipsi puelle ad h assensint ad op Ric Gernon nepotis sui si eid Willo placuit", dated 1201[1180].  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Gernon accounts for 600 marks for having Johanna the younger daughter of Hugh de Moreville, with the reasonable share falling to her of her father’s land"[1181]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Briwere m CHRISTIANA de Lascelles, daughter of DUNCAN de Lascelles & his wife Christiana ---.  The Pipe Roll 1211 records that "Willelmus Briwerre" paid a fine for "maritagio Cristiane filie Dunekani de Lascel cum medietate vlle de Burnham" before Michaelmas 1211[1182].  

 

2.         RALPH de Briwere (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de Briwere" holding "x libratas in Gamelingehey…de serjanteriis et terris sine servitio" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][1183].

 

 

 

BURDETT

 

 

Two [probable] brothers: 

1.         ROBERT Burdet (-[1 Jul 1077/1086]).  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll states that "two brothers…came to England at the conquest, Robert and Hugh" without citing the primary source which confirms their relationship[1184].  “Ivo filius Hugonis de Grentismaisnilo…Robertus Burdet…” witnessed the charter dated 1 Jul 1077 under which "Gosfredus de Wirchia…uxorisque meæ Aluevæ" founded Monks Kirby priory and donated it to Angers Saint-Nicolas[1185]m --- (-after 1086).  The primary source which confirms the name of Robert Burdet’s wife has not yet been identified.   Domesday Book records "the wife of Robert Burdet" holding land in Ratcliffe on the Wreake in Leicestershire of Robert de Bucy[1186].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         son (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records "the son of Robert Burdet" holding land in Braunstone and in Gaulby in Leicestershire of Hugues de Grantmesnil[1187]

2.         [HUGH Burdet (-after 1086).  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll states that "two brothers…came to England at the conquest, Robert and Hugh" without citing the primary source which confirms their relationship[1188].  Domesday Book records "Hugh Burdet" holding land in Rearsby, Welby, Sysonby, and Lowesby in Leicestershire of Countess Judith[1189].] 

 

 

Parents not identified.  It is likely that Robert was born in the late 11th or early 12th century.  From a chronological point of view, it is possible that he was the grandson of either Robert or Hugh Burdet, shown above, assuming that he belonged to the same family: 

1.         ROBERT Burdet [de Culei/de Aquilone] (-[14 Jul 1157/6 Jun 1158])"Comes Rotro" granted property in Zaragoza to Subiano by charter dated Apr 1123 witnessed by "…Robertus Bodeth…"[1190]Orderic Vitalis records that "Normannus eques Rodbertus de Cueleio cognomento Burdeth" decided to establish himself in Spain and settled in "urbem…Terracona"[1191]Conde de Tarragona"Ollegarius…Tarrachonensis metropolis dispensator" installed "Roberte" as "civitatis principem" of "civitatem Tarraconæ", granted to the bishop by "bonæ memoriæ Gelasius et Calixtus Romani pontifices", by charter dated 14 Mar 1128[1192]

-        TARRAGONA

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         RICHARD Burdet (-after 1175).  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Ricardus Burdet…Willelmus frater eius" accounting for forest in Huntingdonshire/Cambridgeshire[1193]

2.         WILLIAM Burdet (-before 1185).  "…Willelmo Burdet…" witnessed the charter dated to [1155/59] under which Robert Earl of Leicester donated the abbey of Nuneaton to Fontevraud[1194].  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll states, quoting partly Dugdale, that "William, who flourisht in Henry II’s time…held of the Earl of Warwick and founded Aucote Priory [near Seckingdon, Warwickshire] in 1159" after killing his wife who had been accused of adultery during her husband’s absence on "a journey to the Holy Land for subduing the Infidells in those parts", without citing the corresponding primary source[1195].  “Willielmus Burdet” donated "terram…in Avecota" for founding a priory by undated charter witnessed by "Roberto comite Lecestriæ"[1196].  “Willielmus Burdet et Hugo filius eius” donated “Stantonam”, held from “Yonis de Harecurt”, to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire) by undated charter[1197].  "…Willelmo Burdet…" witnessed the charter dated to 1155 or [1163/Mar 1166] under which Henry II King of England granted the right to a fair to the nuns of Eaton[1198].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Burdet" held on half a knight’s fee from "Willelmus de Bello Campo" in Worcestershire[1199].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Burdet" held "iv carucatas in Radesclive" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[1200].  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Ricardus Burdet…Willelmus frater eius" accounting for forest in Huntingdonshire/Cambridgeshire[1201]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll states that William Burdet killed his wife who had been accused of adultery during his absence on crusade, without citing the corresponding primary source[1202].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH BurdetThe Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Hugh and Richard as the sons of William Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1203].  “Willielmus Burdet et Hugo filius eius” donated “Stantonam”, held from “Yonis de Harecurt”, to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire) by undated charter[1204]

b)         RICHARD Burdet (-1223).  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Hugh and Richard as the sons of William Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1205]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Burdet .  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names William as the son of Richard Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1206].  “Dominus Willielmus Burdet miles” confirmed donations to the hospital of Burton Lazars by his predecessors, including donation of land "in territorio de Neuton…ecclesiam de Louseby et ecclesiam de Gauby et post obitum Roberti Burdet filii mei ecclesiam de Haselbech" by "Willielmus Burdet…militis", by charter dated Jul 1298[1207]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had four children: 

(a)       RICHARD Burdet .  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Richard, Robert, William and Hugh as the sons of William Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1208]

(b)       ROBERT Burdet .  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Richard, Robert, William and Hugh as the sons of William Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1209].  “Dominus Willielmus Burdet miles” confirmed donations to the hospital of Burton Lazars by his predecessors, including donation of land "in territorio de Neuton…ecclesiam de Louseby et ecclesiam de Gauby et post obitum Roberti Burdet filii mei ecclesiam de Haselbech" by "Willielmus Burdet…militis", by charter dated Jul 1298[1210]

(c)       WILLIAM Burdet .  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Richard, Robert, William and Hugh as the sons of William Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1211]

(d)       HUGH Burdet .  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Richard, Robert, William and Hugh as the sons of William Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1212]m ELIZABETH Touchet, daughter of ---.  The Duchess of Cleveland’s Battle Abbey Roll names Elizabeth Touchet as the wife of Hugh Burdet but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1213].  Hugh & his wife had one child:

(1)       WILLIAM Burdet .  “Dominus Willielmus Burdet miles” confirmed donations to the hospital of Burton Lazars by his predecessors, including donation of land "in territorio de Neuton juxta Louseby" by "Willielmus Burdet miles, filius Hugonis Burdet" for the souls of "…Aliciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated Jul 1298[1214].  “Dominus Willielmus Burdet miles” confirmed donations to the hospital of Burton Lazars by his predecessors, including the confirmation by "Willielmus Burdet, filius Hugonis Burdet" of the donation of "patronatus in ecclesia de Haselbech…et…in territorio de Neuton…et ecclesiam de Louseby et ecclesiam de Galby" made by "Willielmus Burdet avus meus", by charter dated Jul 1298[1215]m ALICE, daughter of ---.  “Dominus Willielmus Burdet miles” confirmed donations to the hospital of Burton Lazars by his predecessors, including donation of land "in territorio de Neuton juxta Louseby" by "Willielmus Burdet miles, filius Hugonis Burdet" for the souls of "…Aliciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated Jul 1298[1216]

 

 

 

CAUZ

 

 

1.         --- .  m --- (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Calz cum matre sua" and "Robt de Calz & Walts fil suus" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[1217].  One child: 

a)         ROBERT [I] de Cauz (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Calz cum matre sua" and "Robt de Calz & Walts fil suus" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[1218]m ISABEL de Ferrers, daughter of ROBERT de Ferrers [later Earl of Derby] & his wife Hawise ---.  Her parentage and marriage are recorded in Domesday Descendants[1219].  Robert [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          WALTER de Cauz .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Calz cum matre sua" and "Robt de Calz & Walts fil suus" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[1220]

ii)         ROBERT [II] de Cauz (-1168).  Domesday Descendants records his parentage but does not cite the corresponding source reference[1221].  The Templars and “Radulfum filium Stephani” settled a dispute concerning “unam carucatam terre in Roueston” which “Galfridus de Cauz” had given to “Albrede de Lisuriis uxori sue in dotem” and “terram que fuit Roberti fratris Gaufridi de Cauz in Ruueston”, dated 12 Nov 1177[1222]m SIBYL Basset, daughter of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel ([before 1135]-after 1185).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…L annorum et amplius”, adding that the land was “de baronia Radulfi filii Stephani[1223].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       MATILDA de Cauz (-before 14 May 1224).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “terra eius in Riscinton” held by “uxor que fuit Roberti de Caux et mater uxoris Radulfi filii Stephani, Cambellani domini regis, filia Ricardi Basset et soror Willelmi Basset…L annorum et amplius”, adding that the land was “de baronia Radulfi filii Stephani[1224].  An order dated 14 May 1224 confiscated "all land formerly of Matilda de Caux, who was the wife of Ralph son of Stephen, who is dead"[1225].  "John of Birkin, heir of Matilda de Caux" made a fine for "his relief of the lands formerly of Matilda…custody of the forest of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire", dated 25 May 1224[1226]m firstly ADAM FitzPeter Lord of Birkyn, son of ---.  m secondly (1185) as his second wife, RALPH FitzStephen, son of STEPHEN FitzHerbert & his wife --- (-before 1 Feb 1222). 

iii)        GEOFFREY de Cauz (-[before 12 Nov 1177]).  The Templars and “Radulfum filium Stephani” settled a dispute concerning “unam carucatam terre in Roueston” which “Galfridus de Cauz” had given to “Albrede de Lisuriis uxori sue in dotem” and “terram que fuit Roberti fratris Gaufridi de Cauz in Ruueston”, dated 12 Nov 1177[1227]m (after 1168) as her third husband, AUBREYE de Lisours, widow firstly of RICHARD FitzEustache, and secondly of WILLIAM de Clairfait, daughter of ROBERT de Lisours & his wife Aubreye [de Lacy] (-after Sep 1200).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that “Albreda vel Aubreia, filia Roberti Lisours, soror ex parte matris” succeeded on the death of “Robertus Lacy” and that she married “Richardus constabularius Cestriæ[1228]Domesday Descendants records her second marriage but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1229]Her third marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 12 Nov 1177 under which the Templars and “Radulfum filium Stephani” settled a dispute concerning “unam carucatam terre in Roueston” which “Galfridus de Cauz” had given to “Albrede de Lisuriis uxori sue in dotem” and “terram que fuit Roberti fratris Gaufridi de Cauz in Ruueston[1230].  She married fourthly ([1178]) William FitzGodric.  "Willelmus filius Godrici" paid a fine for his marriage with "matre Johannis constabularii" in 1178[1231]A charter dated 1194 records a final agreement relating to a dispute between Albredam de Lisores et Rogerum constabularium Cestrie nepotem suum” concerning the land of “Roberti de Lasci”, also naming “Roberti de Lisores patris ipsius Albrede” and “Willelmus filius prefate Albrede[1232]

 

 

1.         ROGER de Cauz .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Rogerus de Caux" holding "falconem" from the Serjeantie in Berkshire in [1210/12][1233]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         EMMA de Cauz (-after 2 Nov 1230)Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, which involved "Johannem de Segraue et Emmam uxorem eius filiam et heredem…Rogeri de Cauz"[1234].  King Henry III granted "maritagium Emme de Cauz que fuit uxor Johannis de Sedgrave, filii ipsius Stephani" to "Stephano de Sedgrave" dated 2 Nov 1230[1235]m firstly JOHN de Segrave, son of STEPHEN de Segrave & his [first/second wife Rohese le Despencer/Ida Hastings] (-before Nov 1230).  m secondly (after 2 Nov 1230) as his second wife, JOHN de Grey of Shirland, Derbyshire, son of HENRY de Grey & his wife Isolda --- (-before 18 Mar 1266). 

 

 

 

CHANDOS

 

 

Loyd says that this family originated in Candos in the present-day French département of Eure, arrondissement Pont-Audemer, canton Montfort-sur-Risle, commune Illeville-sur-Montfort[1236]

 

 

1.         ROBERT [I] de Chandos (-1120, bur Goldcliff).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et de Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusberie records that in 1113 "dominus Robertus de Candos" founded "ecclesiam de Goldcliva"[1237].  A charter of King Edward I records that "Robertus de Candos" founded Goldcliff priory, Monmouthshire, with the consent of "Isabellæ uxoris meæ" witnessed by "Wineboldo de Baalun, Rogero filio suo"[1238].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et de Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusberie records that "dominus Robertus de Candos" died in 1120 and was buried "in...ecclesia de Goldcliva"[1239]m ISABEL, daughter of --- (-after 1113).  A charter of King Edward I records that "Robertus de Candos" founded Goldcliff priory, Monmouthshire, with the consent of "Isabellæ uxoris meæ" witnessed by "Wineboldo de Baalun, Rogero filio suo", dated to 1113[1240].  Robert [I] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT [II] de Chandos (-after Jan 1153, bur Beaumont en Vexin).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et de Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusberie records that "dominus Robertus de Candos" and "uxore sua...Isabella" had “tres filios...Robertus, Rogerus et Godardus[1241].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Candos” was castellan of Gisors, dated to 1123 from the context, and names “religiosa Ysabel uxor eius[1242].  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed donations to Goldcliff priory by "Robertus de Candos" for the soul of "uxoris sue Isabel et filiorum suorum", confirmed by "Rannulfus", and another donation by "Isabel…de Candos et Robertus filius eius…concessione Walteri filii predicte Isabel" by charter dated to [1153/54][1243].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Candos" used to hold one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) now held by "Walterus filius eius"[1244].  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed donations by "Robertus de Candos…Rogerus…de Candos…Walterus de Candos" to the priory of Sainte-Marie-Madeleine de Goldcliff, in confirmation of donations by "Robertus de Candos" during the reign of King Henry I for the soul of "uxoris sue Isabel et filiorum suorum" by charter dated [Jan/Aug] 1153[1245]m (before 1123) ISABELLE Giffard, daughter of [WALTER Giffard Earl of Buckingham & his wife Agnes de Ribemont] (-after 1130, bur Beaumont in Vexin).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Candos” was castellan of Gisors, dated to 1123 from the context, and names “religiosa Ysabel uxor eius[1246].  The Historia cœnobiii Mortui-Maris records that "Robertus de Candos, Gisortii castellanus et Isabella eius uxor, Walteri Giffardi Longævillæ comitis soror" built the monastery of "Bellomonte in Wilcassino Normannico" in 1130 and was buried there "cum quodam filiorum…primogenitus"[1247].  The identity of "Walteri Giffardi Longævillæ comitis" has not been established beyond doubt, so the parentage of Isabelle is not certain.  From a chronologicial point of view, it appears unlikely that she was the sister of Walter Giffard who died in 1102, given that her husband was still recorded in 1153.  It therefore appears more likely that Isabelle was the sister of Walter Giffard who died in 1164.  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed donations to Goldcliff priory by "Robertus de Candos" for the soul of "uxoris sue Isabel et filiorum suorum", confirmed by "Rannulfus", and another donation by "Isabel…de Candos et Robertus filius eius…concessione Walteri filii predicte Isabel" by charter dated to [1153/54][1248].  A charter of King John dated 22 Apr 1201 records donations to Goldcliff priory, Monmouthshire, including the donation made by "Isabellæ de Candos et Roberti filii eius, concessione Walteri filii ipsius Isabellæ"[1249].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Chandos .  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed donations to Goldcliff priory by "Robertus de Candos" for the soul of "uxoris sue Isabel et filiorum suorum", confirmed by "Rannulfus", and another donation by "Isabel…de Candos et Robertus filius eius…concessione Walteri filii predicte Isabel" by charter dated to [1153/54][1250].  A charter of King John dated 22 Apr 1201 records donations to Goldcliff priory, Monmouthshire, including the donation made by "Isabellæ de Candos et Roberti filii eius, concessione Walteri filii ipsius Isabellæ"[1251]

ii)         WALTER de Chandos (-after 1166).  Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed donations to Goldcliff priory by "Robertus de Candos" for the soul of "uxoris sue Isabel et filiorum suorum", confirmed by "Rannulfus", and another donation by "Isabel…de Candos et Robertus filius eius…concessione Walteri filii predicte Isabel" by charter dated to [1153/54][1252].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Candos" used to hold one knight’s fee from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) now held by "Walterus filius eius"[1253].  A charter of King John dated 22 Apr 1201 records donations to Goldcliff priory, Monmouthshire, including the donation made by "Isabellæ de Candos et Roberti filii eius, concessione Walteri filii ipsius Isabellæ"[1254]

b)         ROGER de Chandos .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et de Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusberie records that "dominus Robertus de Candos" and "uxore sua...Isabella" had “tres filios...Robertus, Rogerus et Godardus[1255]

c)         GODARD de Chandos .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et de Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusberie records that "dominus Robertus de Candos" and "uxore sua...Isabella" had “tres filios...Robertus, Rogerus et Godardus[1256]

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Chandos (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Ricardus de Champdos xl vii milites et dimidium" in Hereford in [1160/61][1257].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Ricardus de Candos" in Herefordshire[1258]

 

 

[Two brothers:] 

1.         ROGER de Chandos (-after 1176).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Candos, Hugo de Candos" held two and one knights’ fees, respectively, "de novo feodo" from "Ricardus de Candos" in Herefordshire[1259].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Rogerus de Candos" in Gloucestershire[1260].  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "Bonesull Chenecestria et Felileiam, quicquid Aldredus tenebat, cum…terræ in Hopa" made by "Rog de Candos et Rob fil eius"[1261]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT de Chandos (-[1211/3 Nov 1220]).  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "Bonesull Chenecestria et Felileiam, quicquid Aldredus tenebat, cum…terræ in Hopa" made by "Rog de Candos et Rob fil eius", the donation of "ecclesiam de Brokwordyn" by "Roberti de Candos", and the donation of "in Brocwordyn…terræ" by "Rogeri de Candos junioris"[1262].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Chamdos xiii m et xxii d" in Hereford in [1167/68][1263].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Chamdos" paying "vi l xi s viii d" in Herefordshire[1264].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Robertus de Chamdos" paying "xiiii l xl d" in Herefordshire, and also in Gloucestershire[1265].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Chandos" holding 13 knights’ fees in Hereford in [1210/12][1266].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Robertus de Chandos" held "in Brockwrth et Baginden, Sipton iii milites"[1267].  m SARAH, daughter of --- (-after [1226/28]).  Henry III King of England issued an order to "Saire que fuit uxor Roberti de Chaundos" granting custody of property of the heirs of Robert de Chandos to "Willelmus de Cantilupo" dated 3 Nov 1220[1268].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Hereford, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Rogerus filius Roberti de Chandos est de donacione domini regis et est in custodia Walteri de Clifford per Willelmum de Cantulup...Sarra mater eius est de donatione domini regis et est maritanda..."[1269].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROGER de Chandos .  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Hereford, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Rogerus filius Roberti de Chandos est de donacione domini regis et est in custodia Walteri de Clifford per Willelmum de Cantulup...Sarra mater eius est de donatione domini regis et est maritanda..."[1270]

b)         ROGER de Chandos (-after 1196).  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "Bonesull Chenecestria et Felileiam, quicquid Aldredus tenebat, cum…terræ in Hopa" made by "Rog de Candos et Rob fil eius", the donation of "ecclesiam de Brokwordyn" by "Roberti de Candos", and the donation of "in Brocwordyn…terræ" by "Rogeri de Candos junioris"[1271].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Rogero filio Rogeri de Candos" in Gloucestershire[1272].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Rogerus de Chamdos" paying "xl s, ii milites" in Gloucestershire[1273]

2.         [HUGH de Chandos (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Candos, Hugo de Candos" held two and one knights’ fees, respectively, "de novo feodo" from "Ricardus de Candos" in Herefordshire[1274].  The contiguity of their names suggests that Roger and Hugh were closely related, maybe brothers, but the primary source which confirms any family relationship has not been identified.] 

 

 

1.         MATILDA de Chandos (-[1210/17]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Philippus de Columbers, xl per Matildem de Champdos" in Dorset, Somerset in [1186/87][1275].  "Matill de Chandos" paid a fine for "terre sue pro passagio suo" in Somerset and Dorset, dated 1205[1276].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "domina Matillis de Chandos" held "Piriton de domino rege, pertinet ad baroniam de Staweie" in Somerset[1277].  "Matillid de Candos" paid a fine for "hereditatem suam versus Rad Morin juniore…Philippum de Columbariis quondam virum ipsius Matillid" in Somerset, dated 4 Nov 1213[1278].  Henry III King of England issued an order dated to [early] 1217 relating to the lands "que fuit Matillidis de Chandos, in comitatibus Dorsete et Sumersete…"[1279]m PHILIP de Columbiers, son of --- (-1186). 

 

 

 

CHAWORTH (CHAOURCES)

 

 

The common use of the name Patrice indicates that the Chaources/Chaworth family in England was descended from the family of the seigneurs de Sourches in Maine (see the document MAINE NOBILITY).  The parentage of Patrice [III], ancestor of the English family set out below, is uncertain.  An English source dated to the reign of King William II confirms that his father’s name was Patrick/Patrice.  The chronology of the family suggests that this was probably Patrice [II], although this affiliation cannot be confirmed beyond all doubt.  "Patricius de Cadurcis" donated land "apud Ameneye de feodo suo…[et] apud Ameneye Sancti Nicholai" to Gloucester St Peter, with the confirmation of "rege Henrico seniore", by undated charter but dated to "tempore Willelmi abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131][1280]

 

 

PATRICK [III] [renumbered [I] for the purposes of the present document] de Chaources [Chaworth], son of [PATRICE [II] de Chaources & his wife ---] (-after 1133).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Patricius de Cadurcis filius Patricii" donated the mill at Horcote in villa de Kynermaresforde" with the consent of "rege Henrico seniore…tempore Willelmi abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131] and that "Patricius de Cadurcis" donated "tria molendina in Kynemerefforde" confirmed by "rex Willielmus junior…tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][1281].  It is uncertain whether "Patricius de Cadurcis" who made the earlier donation (undoubtedly Patrice [III]) was the same person as "Patricius de Cadurcis filius Patricii" who made the later donation.  The latter could also have been Patrick [II] (see below).  If Patrice [III] was the son of another Patrice, the chronology suggests that his father was Patrice [II], although this affiliation cannot be confirmed beyond all doubt.  He succeeded his father-in-law at Weston, near Bath, and at Kempsford in Gloucestershire.  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Ernulphus de Hesdyng" donated "ecclesiam de Heythrop, Lynkbolt…et ecclesiam de Kynemerforde", confirmed by "Patricius de Cadurcis et Matilda uxor eius", and by "hæredum suorum" in "quatuor cartæ", in the fourth of which "Paganus filius Patricii" donated "decimam domini sui de Kynermerforde", that "Johannes episcopus" confirmed and donated "quatuor marcas annuas in ecclesia de Kynermerforde", with the confirmation of "Rex Henricus senior…tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][1282].  "Patricius" donated "v hidas terræ de Westona" to Bath St Peter, for the souls of "…Hamelini et Winebaldi de Baalun…ac…Arnulfi de Hesding…et Warini clerici mei", by charter dated 14 Sep 1100, witnessed by "Hamelinus et Winebaldus de Baalun…"[1283].  [“Patricius Caurtiarum dominus…et Paganus filius meus” donated land at “Brullon, de Bernei, de Sancto Medardo de Balardone” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture by charter dated to [1100][1284].  Although the Latin name of the donor is somewhat different from the usual rendering of "Chaources", the last property listed is the same as one donated by an earlier member of the Chaources family which suggests that the donor was Patrick [I].]  "…Patricius de Caorgis…" subscribed a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1101 for Bath St Peter[1285].  Henry I King of England confirmed that "Patricius de Cadurcis" donated land "de Amenel et…de Kenemereforde" to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated to [1100/12][1286].  “Patricius de Cadurcis et uxor mea Mathildis” donated “ecclesiam de Dedintona” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, for the soul of “Ernulfi de Hodine”, by charter dated to [1120][1287]A manuscript which lists donations to Gloucester St Peter includes a record of the donation by "Ernulphus de Hesdyng", confirmed by Patricius de Cadurcis et Matildis uxor eius”, of “ecclesiam de Kynermerforde", and the later donation by "Paganus filius Patricii"[1288].  "Patricius de Caurz…" subscribed a charter dated 28 Jun 1121 under which "Willelmus filius regis" donated "terra…Grenta de Stoca" to Bath St Peter[1289].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Patricius de Chaurcis avus Pagani de Mundublel" held fees in Gloucestershire during the life of King Henry I[1290].  "Patricius de Cadurcis" donated land "apud Ameneye de feodo suo…[et] apud Ameneye Sancti Nicholai" to Gloucester St Peter, with the confirmation of "rege Henrico seniore", by undated charter but dated to "tempore Willelmi abbatis"[1291].  "Patricius de Cadurcis" donated "molendinum de Horcote" to Gloucester St Peter, undated "tempore Willelmi abbatis"[1292].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Patric de Cadurc" in Oxfordshire and in Wiltshire[1293].  "Patricius de Cadurcis et Matilda uxor mea" donated "unam virgatam in Kynemereforde" to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated 1133[1294]m (before 14 Sep 1100) MATHILDE, daughter and co-heiress of ARNOUL de Hesdin & his wife Emmeline [de Ballon] (-after 1133).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Ernulphus de Hesdyng" donated "ecclesiam de Heythrop, Lynkbolt…et ecclesiam de Kynemerforde", confirmed by "Patricius de Cadurcis et Matilda uxor eius", and by "hæredum suorum" in "quatuor cartæ", in the fourth of which "Paganus filius Patricii" donated "decimam domini sui de Kynermerforde", that "Johannes episcopus" confirmed and donated "quatuor marcas annuas in ecclesia de Kynermerforde", with the confirmation of "Rex Henricus senior…tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][1295].  The date of her marriage is set by the charter dated 14 Sep 1100 under which her husband donated property for the soul of his father-in-law, although the document does not specify the relationships between the parties.  “Patricius de Cadurcis et uxor mea Mathildis” donated “ecclesiam de Dedintona” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, for the soul of “Ernulfi de Hodine”, by charter dated to [1120][1296].  "Patricius de Cadurcis et Matilda uxor mea" donated "unam virgatam in Kynemereforde" to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated 1133[1297].  Patrick [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         [PAGAN de Chaources (-after [1100]).  “Patricius Caurtiarum dominus…et Paganus filius meus” donated land at “Brullon, de Bernei, de Sancto Medardo de Balardone” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture by charter dated to [1100][1298].  Although the Latin name of the donor is somewhat different from the usual rendering of "Chaources", the last property listed is the same as one donated by an earlier member of the Chaources family which suggests that the donor was Patrick [I].  If that is correct, it is possible that Pagan was the same person as Patrick [II], before he had been baptised.] 

2.         PATRICK [II] de Chaources (-before [1142]).  Bracton lists a claim by "[Willelmus Comes] Sarr et Ela [uxor eius]" against "Paganum de Chawtesteford in comitatu Gloucestrie" dated 1218, recording that "Patricius de Chawrtes antecessor eiusdem Pagani" gave a manor (unnamed) "[in maritagium] --- Sibilla sua" from whom it descended to "Patricio filio suo et de ipse Patricio --- [patri ipsius] Ele et de ipso Willelmo predicte Ele"[1299].  His independent existence is also confirmed by the undated charter under which [his grandson] "Patricius de Cadurcis" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam…de Kinemereforde" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Patricius proavus meus […et uxor eius Matilda]…et Paganus pater meus"[1300].  His name is confirmed by a manuscript which lists donations to Gloucester St Peter, including a record of the donation by "Ernulphus de Hesdyng", confirmed by Patricius de Cadurcis et Matildis uxor eius”, of “ecclesiam de Kynermerforde", and the later donation by "Paganus filius Patricii"[1301].  A charter dated 1155, under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of "Pat-cii de Cadurcis avi sui" in England to [his son] "Pagano de Monte Dublelli"[1302], suggests that Patrick [II] never entered into possession of these lands.  It is possible that this was the result of forfeiture at some time, or because Patrick [II] had predeceased his father.  In the latter case, the 1155 confirmation could have coincided with Pagan having reached the age of majority.  [The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Patricius de Cadurcis filius Patricii" donated the mill at Horcote in villa de Kynermaresforde" with the consent of "rege Henrico seniore…tempore Willelmi abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131] and that "Patricius de Cadurcis" donated "tria molendina in Kynemerefforde" confirmed by "rex Willielmus junior…tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][1303].  As noted above, it is uncertain whether "Patricius de Cadurcis" who made the earlier donation (undoubtedly Patrice [III]) was the same person as "Patricius de Cadurcis filius Patricii" who made the later donation.  The latter could also have been Patrick [II].]  m GUIBURGE [de Mondoubleau], daughter of --- & his wife [--- de Mondoubleau] (-after 1151).  A charter dated to [1142] records that Geoffroy Duke of Normandy and Comte d’Anjou donated “terciam partem…in decima de Bellasilva…de Pagano de Monte Dublello et de Guib[erta] matre eius que de feodo meo est” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture[1304].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  "Payen de Sourches et Guiburge sa mère" founded Tyronneau abbey at Saint-Aignan, canton of Marolles-les-Braux in 1151[1305].  Patrick [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         PAGAN [I] de Chaources [de Mondoubleau] ([1133/36]-[1166/72]).  A charter dated to [1142] records that Geoffroy Duke of Normandy and Comte d’Anjou donated “terciam partem…in decima de Bellasilva…de Pagano de Monte Dublello et de Guib[erta] matre eius que de feodo meo est” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture[1306].  "Payen de Sourches et Guiburge sa mère" founded Tyronneau abbey at Saint-Aignan, canton of Marolles-les-Braux in 1151[1307].  The involvement of Pagan’s mother suggests that Pagan had not yet then reached the age of majority.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of "Pat-cii de Cadurcis avi sui" in England to "Pagano de Monte Dublelli" by charter dated 1155[1308].  Pagan’s birth date is estimated on the assumption that this 1155 confirmation coincided with his reaching the age of majority.  A manuscript which lists donations to Gloucester St Peter includes a record of the donation by "Ernulphus de Hesdyng", confirmed by Patricius de Cadurcis et Matildis uxor eius”, of “ecclesiam de Kynermerforde", and the later donation by "Paganus filius Patricii"[1309].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Ernulphus de Hesdyng" donated "ecclesiam de Heythrop, Lynkbolt…et ecclesiam de Kynemerforde", confirmed by "Patricius de Cadurcis et Matilda uxor eius", and by "hæredum suorum" in "quatuor cartæ", in the fourth of which "Paganus filius Patricii" donated "decimam domini sui de Kynermerforde", that "Johannes episcopus" confirmed and donated "quatuor marcas annuas in ecclesia de Kynermerforde", with the confirmation of "Rex Henricus senior…tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][1310].  "Paganus de Cadurcis filius Patricii de Cadurcis" donated "decimas…de Kynemereforde" to Gloucester St Peter, for the soul of "fratris mei Hugonis de Cadurcis", by undated charter[1311].  "Paganus de Cadurcis" donated revenue from "molendino apud Walleford" to Gloucester St Peter, undated[1312].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record knights’ fees held by "Paganus de Mundblei" in Gloucestershire and that he granted "unum manerium" to "Hugoni de Chaurcis fratri suo"[1313].  “Paganus de Cadurcis”, after killing "cuiusdam monachi in territorio de Brulone", donated "in Anglia ecclesiam de Dodingothone…Brusline decimas…in parrochia Sancti Medardi de Baladone" to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, confirmed by "duo filii sui Patricius et Hugo", by charter dated 27 May 1167[1314]m ---.  The name of Pagan’s wife is not known.  Pagan [I] & his wife had three children: 

i)          PATRICK [III] de Chaources ([1155/60]-after [1200]).  “Paganus de Cadurcis”, after killing "cuiusdam monachi in territorio de Brulone", donated "in Anglia ecclesiam de Dodingothone…Brusline decimas…in parrochia Sancti Medardi de Baladone" to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, confirmed by "duo filii sui Patricius et Hugo", by charter dated 27 May 1167[1315]

-         see below.   

ii)         HUGH de Chaources (-after 27 May 1167).  “Paganus de Cadurcis”, after killing "cuiusdam monachi in territorio de Brulone", donated "in Anglia ecclesiam de Dodingothone…Brusline decimas…in parrochia Sancti Medardi de Baladone" to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, confirmed by "duo filii sui Patricius et Hugo", by charter dated 27 May 1167[1316]

iii)        GEOFFROY .  Patrick [III] donated revenue from Malicorne, Sourches and Brûlon to the nuns of Fontaine-Saint-Martin, except for an annual payment to Cécile one of the nuns, in the presence of “Payen fils aîné de Patrice...Geoffroy de Brûlon frère de Patrice, Agnès femme de Patrice, Payen, Hugues, Patrice, Geoffroy fils de Patrice”, by charter dated to [1190/1214][1317]

b)         HUGH de Chaources (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record knights’ fees held by "Paganus de Mundblei" in Gloucestershire and that he granted "unum manerium" to "Hugoni de Chaurcis fratri suo"[1318].  "Paganus de Cadurcis filius Patricii de Cadurcis" donated "decimas…de Kynemereforde" to Gloucester St Peter, for the soul of "fratris mei Hugonis de Cadurcis", by undated charter[1319]

3.         SIBYL de Chaources (----, bur Bradenstoke Priory[1320]).  The Book of Lacock records that “Walterus de Saresburia” married “Sibillam de Cadurcia[1321].  The date of her marriage can be estimated very approximately from the likely birth date of her son William.  Bracton lists a claim by "[Willelmus Comes] Sarr et Ela [uxor eius]" against "Paganum de Chawtesteford in comitatu Gloucestrie" dated 1218, recording that "Patricius de Chawrtes antecessor eiusdem Pagani" gave a manor (unnamed) "[in maritagium] --- Sibilla sua" from whom it descended to "Patricio filio suo et de ipse Patricio --- [patri ipsius] Ele et de ipso Willelmo predicte Ele"[1322]m ([1115/20]) WALTER de Salisbury, son of EDWARD de Salisbury & his wife --- (-1147). 

4.         [CECILIA .  “Henricus de Albineio et domina Cecilia uxor eius” donated property to Sopwell monastery by undated charter[1323].  Her parentage is indicated by military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, which record knights’ fees of "Pagani de Muntdublel" in Gloucestershire including [Cecilia’s son] "Nigellus de Albieno i manerium de xxl…de matrimonio matris suæ", which immediately follows the note that "comes Patricius" [identified as Patrick Earl of Salisbury, whose mother is recorded as Sibyl de Chaources] also held knights’ fees "de matrimonio matris suæ"[1324].  “Robertus de Albeneio” founded “cellæ de Moddry” (later known as Beaulieu) by undated charter which names “Henricus de Albineio, pater huius Roberti…et mater sua Secilia…Nigellus frater suus[1325]m HENRY de Albini, son of NELE [Nigel] de Albini of Cainhoe & his wife Amice de Ferrers (-after 1130).] 

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Chaources (-after 1176).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Chaurcis" held one knight’s fee from "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1326].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Robertus de Chaurcis" in Warwickshire and Leicestershire[1327]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Chaources (-before 21 Feb 1204).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Chaorceiis" in Dorset, Somerset in [1186/87][1328].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Chaorcis" paying "xx s, i militem" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[1329]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Chaources (-after 1210).  King John confirmed "maneria de Marnham et Wadewurth…que fuerunt Willelmi patris sui" to "Rob de Chaurciis" by charter dated 21 Feb 1204[1330].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in the honour of Tickhill, dated to [1208/13]: "Robertus de Chauurces" held "i feudum"[1331].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Chaurces" holding two parts of knights’ fees "in Norham de…honore de Tikehulle" and one third part "in Wadewrthe" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire in [1210/12][1332]

 

2.         HUGH de Chaworth (-before Nov 1228).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Chawreis" holding one knight’s fee "in Swindone de escaeta Regis" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][1333].  An order dated 28 Nov 1228 decided that "Payn de Chaworth is not the heir of Hugh de Chaworth", that "he does not hold any lands formerly of the same Hugh in Toddington", and that he is therefore not reponsible for Hugh’s debts, dated 28 Nov 1228[1334].  [An undated charter, dated to the papacy of Innocent III, records an agreement between Gloucester St Peter and "R. Bardulf" concerning "ecclesiæ de Fayreforde…decimis…terræ de Middeltone quam Hugo de Chaurces quondam tenuit…ad ecclesiam suam de Kynemereforde pertinentes"[1335].  It is not known with certainty to which Hugh de Chaworth this document relates.]  [m ELEANOR, daughter of --- (-after 1247).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "dicunt quod Alienora que fuit Hugonis de Chawrth est de donatione regis et est maritanda..." with land in “Hundredum de Langel[1336].  It has not been confirmed that Eleanor’s husband was the same Hugh de Chaworth who is named in 28 Nov 1228.]

 

 

PATRICK [III] de Chaources, son of PAGAN [I] de Chaources & his wife --- ([1155/60]-after [1200]).  “Paganus de Cadurcis”, after killing "cuiusdam monachi in territorio de Brulone", donated "in Anglia ecclesiam de Dodingothone…Brusline decimas…in parrochia Sancti Medardi de Baladone" to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, confirmed by "duo filii sui Patricius et Hugo", by charter dated 27 May 1167[1337].  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Patricius de Cadurcis" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam…de Kinemereforde" made to Gloucester St Peter by "Patricius proavus meus […et uxor eius Matilda]…et Paganus pater meus"[1338].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Patricius de Chaorcis xix l, de novo dimidiam marcam" in Gloucestershire in [1171/72][1339].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Patricius de Chaurcis" paying "vi l v s, xii milites et dimidium" in Gloucestershire[1340].  The Pipe Roll at Michaelmas 1194 records “Margareta de Bohun” liable for scutage in respect of her knights in Gloucestershire and “Patricius de Chaurcis” owing for the same scutage (both in respect of the army in Wales)[1341].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Patriciis de Chaorciis" paying "xii l, xii milites" in Gloucestershire[1342].  Patrick [III] donated rights in the forest of Sourches to the abbey of Champagne, with the consent of his wife Agnes, by charter dated to the early 12th century[1343].  Patrick [III] donated revenue from Malicorne, Sourches and Brûlon to the nuns of Fontaine-Saint-Martin, except for an annual payment to Cécile one of the nuns, in the presence of “Payen fils aîné de Patrice...Geoffroy de Brûlon frère de Patrice, Agnès femme de Patrice, Payen, Hugues, Patrice, Geoffroy fils de Patrice”, by charter dated to [1190/1214][1344]

m AGNES, daughter of --- (-before 1212).  Patrick [III] donated rights in the forest of Sourches to the abbey of Champagne, with the consent of his wife Agnes, by charter dated to the early 12th century[1345].  [There is a possibility that Agnes was related to the Bohun family:  the daughter of Humphrey [III] de Bohun and his wife Margaret of Gloucester.  As noted above, the Pipe Roll at Michaelmas 1194 records “Margareta de Bohun” liable for scutage in respect of her knights in Gloucestershire and “Patricius de Chaurcis” owing for the same scutage (both in respect of the army in Wales)[1346].  “Margareta de Bohun” could be either Margaret of Gloucester (wife of Humphrey [III] de Bohun) or Margaret of Huntingdon (wife of Humphrey [IV]).  A link between either of these Margarets de Bohun and Patrick [III] de Chaources has not otherwise been unidentified.  One possibility is that Patrick’s wife was the daughter of one of them and that he held the property jointly with his mother-in-law.  If that is correct, the chronology would suggest that Patrick’s wife was the daughter of Humphrey [IV].]  Patrick [III] donated revenue from Malicorne, Sourches and Brûlon to the nuns of Fontaine-Saint-Martin, except for an annual payment to Cécile one of the nuns, in the presence of “Payen fils aîné de Patrice...Geoffroy de Brûlon frère de Patrice, Agnès femme de Patrice, Payen, Hugues, Patrice, Geoffroy fils de Patrice”, by charter dated to [1190/1214][1347].  Her date of death is set by the charter dated 1212 under which [her son] Patrick donated revenue from the mill at Le Gravier to Fontaine-Saint-Martin for the anniversary of “Agnès sa mère[1348]

Patrick [III] & his wife had [five] children: 

1.         PAIN [Pagan] [II] de Chaworth (-1237).  Patrick [III] donated revenue from Malicorne, Sourches and Brûlon to the nuns of Fontaine-Saint-Martin, except for an annual payment to Cécile one of the nuns, in the presence of “Payen fils aîné de Patrice...Geoffroy de Brûlon frère de Patrice, Agnès femme de Patrice, Payen, Hugues, Patrice, Geoffroy fils de Patrice”, by charter dated to [1190/1214][1349].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from the king in Hertfordshire, dated to [1204/12]: "Paganus de Chaurcis" held land "in Wilie et Linlege"[1350].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Paganus de Chaurcis" holding one knight’s fee "in Linleye et Wilia" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][1351].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Devon, dated 1219, which includes "Paganus de Chawrth" holding "manerium de Aufinton per Regem Johannem cum filia Willelmi de La Ferte…in hundredo de Stanberg" in Somerset[1352].  “Paganus de Chavorciis” donated property to Motisfont priory, for the souls of "domini Willielmi Briwerre fundatoris eorum et domini Willielmi de Feritate patris uxoris nostræ", by undated charter[1353].  Bracton lists a claim by "[Willelmus Comes] Sarr et Ela [uxor eius]" against "Paganum de Chawtesteford in comitatu Gloucestrie" dated 1218, recording that "Patricius de Chawrtes antecessor eiusdem Pagani" gave a manor (unnamed) "[in maritagium] --- Sibilla sua" from whom it descended to "Patricio filio suo et de ipse Patricio --- [patri ipsius] Ele et de ipso Willelmo predicte Ele"[1354].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Devon, dated 1219, which includes "Paganus de Chawrth tenet manerium de Aufinton per Regem Johannem cum filia Willelmi de La Ferte"[1355].  An order dated 28 Nov 1228 decided that "Payn de Chaworth is not the heir of Hugh de Chaworth", that "he does not hold any lands formerly of the same Hugh in Toddington", and that he is therefore not reponsible for Hugh’s debts, dated 28 Nov 1228[1356].  "Paganus de Cadurciis" donated revenue from "Welforde" to Gloucester St Peter, for the souls of "Adæ filii mei et…meæ et Gundredæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[1357]m (before 1216) G