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NORTHERN FRANCE

AMIENS, MONTREUIL, PONTHIEU

  v4.3 Updated 20 November 2017

 

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RETURN TO NORTHERN FRANCE INTRODUCTION

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                COMTES d'AMIENS. 2

A.         COMTES d’AMIENS.. 2

B.         COMTES d’AMIENS (SEIGNEURS de BOVES) 8

C.        CHÂTELAINS d’AMIENS.. 21

D.        VIDAMES d’AMIENS (PICQUIGNY) 26

E.         VIDAMES d’AMIENS, SEIGNEURS d’AILLY et de PICQUIGNY.. 41

F.         SEIGNEURS de CROY.. 46

G.        SEIGNEURS d’ENCRE.. 47

H.        SEIGNEURS de HANGEST. 49

I.      SEIGNEURS de RAINEVAL. 59

Chapter 2.                COMTES de MONTREUIL. 59

Chapter 3.                COMTES de PONTHIEU. 65

A.         COMTES de PONTHIEU.. 65

B.         COMTES de PONTHIEU (BELLÊME-MONTGOMMERY) 67

C.        COMTES de PONTHIEU (DAMMARTIN) 79

D.        COMTES de PONTHIEU (CASTILE) 83

E.         SEIGNEURS de CAYEUX.. 86

F.         VICOMTES de DOULLENS.. 102

 

 

 

This document groups noble families located north of the duchy of Normandy, situated in the south-western part of the area categorised as Northern France in Medieval Lands.  The area corresponds approximately to the present-day French département of Somme. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    COMTES d'AMIENS

 

 

 

A.      COMTES d’AMIENS

 

 

1.         ANGILWIN (-after 30 Mar [850/51]).  [Comte d’Amiens].  Angilvin is not accorded the comital title in the document which is quoted below.  However, the extent of the donation, and the fact that the property in question had been granted to him directly by the Carolingian monarch, suggests that he may have exercised comital jurisdiction in Amiens.  No further information relating to Angilwin has been found apart from this charter.  “Angilguinus et conjunx mea Rumildis” donated property, “quas quondam Ludovicus imperator et Karolus rex” had granted them “jure proprietario...in pago Ambianense in villa...Fontanas super fluvio Salam”, and named serfs to Amiens Cathedral “ubi...preest...Helmeradus episcopus” by charter dated 30 Mar [850/51][1].  m RUMILDE, daughter of ---.  Angilguinus et conjunx mea Rumildis” donated property, “quas quondam Ludovicus imperator et Karolus rex” had granted them “jure proprietario...in pago Ambianense in villa...Fontanas super fluvio Salam”, and named serfs to Amiens cathedral by charter dated 30 Mar [850/51][2]. 

 

 

1.         GAUTHIER [I] ([before 925]-after 987).  Two possible parentages of Gauthier [I] have been suggested.  Firstly, Edouard de Saint-Phalle suggests that he was Gauthier, son of Raoul [I] Comte [d'Ostrevant][3].  This possible parentage is also shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[4].  The primary source which suggests that this might be the case has not been identified.  The second possibility is that he was the same person as Gauthier Comte de Dreux: the editor of the compilation of Chartres charters suggests that "Walterius…comitis Waleranni filius" (Gauthier Comte de Dreux) inherited "comes Velcassinus" (Vexin) from his father, and "Ambianensis" (Amiens) from "matre autem Eldegarde" (acquiring Dreux from his wife's family)[5].  The primary sources on which this information is based have not been identified.  However, two facts suggest that this second hypothesis may be correct.  Firstly, Gauthier Comte de Dreux is also recorded with a wife named Eva (although the necrology entries quoted here and in PARIS REGION NOBILITY (Comtes de Dreux) suggest that there were two countesses of that name at the time).  Secondly, the castle of Mantes, occupied by the descendants of Gauthier Comte d'Amiens, was near Dreux.  One possible resolution of the problem is signposted by Seversmith who states that Gauthier [I] was the son of "Raoul de Gouy" whose wife he names "Eldearde"[6].  As will be seen above, the wife of Waleran, supposed father of Gauthier [I] under the second possible case, is named "Eldegardis".  If Seversmith is correct, it is possible that Eldegardis married firstly Raoul [I] Comte [d’Ostrevant] and secondly Gauthier Comte de Dreux, and that Gauthier [I] was the son of her first marriage.  It should be noted that the charter dated to before 967 under which Eldegardis made a donation for the soul of her husband Waleran, with the consent of "Walterio comite filio meo", does not specify that Gauthier was Waleran’s son[7], although the omission of an earlier husband from the document would be surprising if that husband had been Gauthier’s father.   "Wauterii comitis, Walterii et Radulfi filiorum eius" subscribed a charter dated 975 under which "Hugo Francorum dux" restored the abbey of Saint-Jean to the abbey of Sainte-Croix d'Orléans[8]Comte d'Amiens.  A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[9].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XIX Kal Feb" of "Gualterii comitis"[10]m firstly EVA, daughter of --- (-[19 Jan or 23 Nov] ----).  Aeva” donated “alodum...Fulloni Campum et Mansum Roberti in villa Ludolmis in pago Castrinse” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, for the souls of “meæ...senioris mei Walterii”, by undated charter[11]The necrology of the abbey of Sainte-Colombe records the death "XIV Kal Feb" of "Eve comitisse"[12]m secondly ADELA, daughter of ---.  A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "…Walterius comes, Adela comitissa…"[13].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[14], she was Adela d'Anjou, daughter of Foulques [I] "le Roux" Comte d'Anjou & his wife Roscilla [de Loches] (after 909-).  The primary source on which this is based has not been identified; it is possible that it is speculative, based on one of her sons being named Foulques.  Comte Gauthier [I] & his [first/second] wife had five children: 

a)         GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc" (-after 1017).  A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[15]Comte d'Amiens et du Vexin. 

-        see below

b)         RAOUL .  "Wauterii comitis, Walterii et Radulfi filiorum eius" subscribed a charter dated 975 under which "Hugo Francorum dux" restored the abbey of Saint-Jean to the abbey of Sainte-Croix d'Orléans[16].  A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[17]

c)         GUY (-[995]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Bishop of Soissons [970].  Adalberon Archbishop of Reims founded abbatia Mosomagensis by charter dated 972, subscribed by “Wido Suessionensis ecclesiæ episcopus...[18].  "...Widonis Suessionensis episcopi..." subscribed the charter dated 987 under which Hugues King of France issued orders at the request of “Mangaudus ex monasterio Corbeiæ[19]

d)         GODEFROY .  A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[20]

e)         FOULQUES .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  same person as...?  FOULQUES (-[1030]).  Bishop of Amiens [993].  According to Gallia Christiana, Bishop Foulques was “Galterii comitis Ambianorum...ex Aleide Crespeia natu minor” (no primary source cited)[21].  “...Fulco Ambianensis episcopus...” subscribed the charter dated to [1008] under which Robert II King of France confirmed donations to Saint-Denis[22]

 

 

GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc", son of GAUTHIER [I] Comte d'Amiens & his [first/second] wife [Eva---/Adela ---] (-after 1017).  "Wauterii comitis, Walterii et Radulfi filiorum eius" subscribed a charter dated 975 under which "Hugo Francorum dux" restored the abbey of Saint-Jean to the abbey of Sainte-Croix d'Orléans[23].  A charter of "Hugo…Francorum rex" confirming the privileges of the monastery of Corvey dated 987 is subscribed by "Walteri comitis Ambianensis ac filiorum eius Walteri, Gotfredi, Rodulfi"[24]Comte de Mantes.  "Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[25]Comte d'Amiens et du Vexin.   

m ADELA, daughter of ---.  "Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[26]

Comte Gauthier [II] & his wife had four children: 

1.         RAOUL de Mantes (-1060)"Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[27]Comte de Valois et d'Amiens. 

-        COMTES de VALOIS

2.         DREUX [Drogo] de Mantes (-[13 Aug] [1035])"Walterius comes" donated property "prope nostrum castellum…Medanta" to "Carnotensi monasterio Sancti Petri", for the soul of "coniugis mee Adelidis filiorumque meorum", by charter to [1006], signed by "Walterii comitis, Rodulfi filii eius, Drogonis filii eius…"[28].  He succeeded his father as Comte de MantesComte d'Amiens.  "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[29].  “Droco...comes Wilcassianensium” restored “villam...Calceatus in Wlcassino” [Chaussy-en-Vexin] to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated 7 Apr 1024[30].  Robert II King of France confirmed to the abbot of Saint-Germain and Saint-Vincent that he had forced noster comes Drogo...cum duobus fratribus Fulcone...et Rodulfo necnon uxore cum filiis supramemorati Drogonis” to renounce rights to revenue from “in villa...Domni Martini...” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated [1 Jan/1 Mar]1031[31]He accompanied Robert II Duke of Normandy to Jerusalem and died on the journey[32].  According to Orderic Vitalis, Henri I King of France took back the Vexin after the death of Comte Drogo[33].  The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "X Kal Aug" of "Drogo comes"[34]m ([1025 or before]) as her first husband, GODGIFU [Goda] of England, daughter of ÆTHELRED II "the Unready" King of England & his second wife Emma de Normandie (-before 1049).  Her parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who says that Godgifu went into exile in Normandy with her brother[35] in 1013.  According to Orderic Vitalis, her first marriage was arranged by Robert II Duke of Normandy[36], indicating that she probably did not return to England.  This information is suspect, assuming that the charter of "Robertus Rex", which names "Comes Drogo…cum duobus fratribus Fulcone…et Rodulpho necnon uxore cum filiis supra memorati Drogonis", is correctly dated to 1025 as Duke Robert did not succeed as duke until 1027[37].  Another possibility is that Drogo's children at that date were born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage.  There is no indication of the birth dates of his known children shown below, but the fact that none of them was given a typically Anglo-Saxon name also suggests that Godgifu may not have been the mother of all of them (although she is attested as mother of the son Raoul, see below).  "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[38].  Godgifu married secondly ([1036]) as his first wife, Eustache [II] Comte de Boulogne.  Her second marriage is referred to by Florence of Worcester[39].  Comte Drogo & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL de Mantes ([1025/30]-21 Dec 1057, bur Peterborough).  His parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis37.  Florence of Worcester calls Raoul the "son of King Edward's sister"[40].  "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[41].  Simeon of Durham names "earl Rodulph the son of king Eadward's sister Goda" in 1051[42].  Earl of Hereford. 

-        EARLS of HEREFORD, Families of SUDELEY and TRACY

b)         GAUTHIER [III] de Mantes (before [29 Mar 1030/10 Apr 1031]-poisoned Falaise [2 Aug] 1063).  His parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis, who lists him after his brother Raoul[43].  "Drogo comes" agreed to donate property to Jumièges by charter dated to [29 Mar 1030/10 Apr 1031] subscribed by "Walterii filius eius"[44].  "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[45].  He succeeded his father in 1035 as Comte de Mantes

-        COMTES de MANTES

3.         FOULQUES de Mantes .  Robert II King of France confirmed to the abbot of Saint-Germain and Saint-Vincent that he had forced noster comes Drogo...cum duobus fratribus Fulcone...et Rodulfo necnon uxore cum filiis supramemorati Drogonis” to renounce rights to revenue from “in villa...Domni Martini...” to Saint-Germain-des-Prés by charter dated [1 Jan/1 Mar]1031[46]"Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissæ, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[47]same person as...?  FOULQUES de Mantes (-1058)Bishop of Amiens .  According to Gallia Christiana, Bishop Foulques was “nepos” of his predecessor (no primary source cited)[48].  Orderic Vitalis names Foulques as third son of Dreux Comte de Mantes and his wife Godgifu of England and specifies that he was Bishop of Amiens[49].  Foulques Bishop of Amiens is named in charters from early in the reign of Henri King of France.  It is difficult to determine which of these charters may relate to his predecessor, also named Foulques. However, if they relate to Bishop Foulques who died in 1058 it is unlikely that Orderic Vitalis was correct about his parentage.  It is possible, therefore, that Bishop Foulques was the brother of Dreux Comte de Mantes, who is named below, not his son.  Henri I King of France granted privileges to Amiens, with the consent of “Fulcone Ambianensi et Gualtero comite”, by charter dated 1057[50]. 

4.         daughter The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "Waleranni comitis [Mellentini]" as daughter of "Gauterus Albus de Albamarla"[51].  Yves de Chartres names "Gualterius Albus" as father of "matrem Gualeranni comitis"[52]m HUGUES Comte de Meulan, son of GALERAN [II] Comte de Meulan & his wife --- (-after 25 Aug 1005). 

 

 

1.         GUY (-after [1091/94]).  Comte d’Amiens.  A charter dated to [1091/94] records the donation by "comites Ambianis Guido…et Ivo" of their possessions in "vicecomitatus de villa Duri et Sancti Mauricii" to Amiens Cathedral, although the document is suspect as the language is atypical of charters of the time[53]

 

2.         YVES (-after [1091/94]).  Comte d’Amiens.  A charter dated to [1091/94] records the donation by "comites Ambianis Guido…et Ivo" of their possessions in "vicecomitatus de villa Duri et Sancti Mauricii" to Amiens Cathedral, although the document is suspect as the language is atypical of charters of the time[54]

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d’AMIENS (SEIGNEURS de BOVES)

 

 

1.         HUGUES [de Boves] .  Ducange suggests that Hugues, who is only named in the charter dated 1117 which is cited below, could only have claimed that the "bourg du château de Crespy" (the subject of the dispute) belonged to him if he was related to the comtes d’Amiens who are shown in Part A of the present chapter[55]m ---.  The name of Hugues’s wife is not known.  Hugues & his wife had one child: 

a)         DREUX [Drogo] de Boves (-[1071/76]).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1117 which records a dispute between the monks of Saint-Arnoul de Crespy and [his son] "miles Ingelrannus" who claimed "quoddam burgum in suburbio castri situm" [château de Crespy] possessed "tam a avo suo quam a suo patre Drogone", and granted to his mother as dower, while the monks claimed that "Walterus…comes Ambianensis simul et Crespeiensis cum uxore sua Adela" [Gauthier [II] "le Blanc" Comte d’Amiens, see part A above] had donated the land, as confirmed by Robert II King of France and others, and that "Hugo avus eius" who had invaded the place with violence had later relinquished it, retaining "mansuram suam" in return for an annual payment[56].  Seigneur de Boves.  "Drogonis de Bova, Nevelonis de Bova" subscribed the charter dated 1042 under which "Theobaldus et Stefanus frater meus germanus" [Thibaut III Comte de Blois and Etienne Comte de Troyes] donated "alodium nostrum…in pago Ambianensi super fluvium Iseræ…Crissiacum…[et] Gaudiaco et Rivaria" {Croissy, Gouy en Amiénois}, for the soul of "patris nostri Odonis comitis"[57].  "Drogo Bovensis, Robertus filius eius, Oilardus miles ipsius" subscribed the charter dated 1069 under which "Rodulphus…Ambianensis comes" regulated rights of the vicomtes in the lands of the monks of Saint-Firmin and donated property to the church of Amiens[58].  Guy Bishop of Amiens names "Drogonis Bovensis…uxor illius ac filii Ingelrannus…et Robertus, Ansellusque", in the presence of "Eustachius vicedominus, Guermundus frater eius", in an undated charter relating to "advocatione et vicecomitatu Costency"[59]m --- (-after [1071/76]).  The name of Dreux's wife is not known.  She outlived her husband according to the charter dated 1117 which is cited above.  Dreux & his wife had four children: 

i)          ENGUERRAND [I] de Boves (-[1117]).  Guy Bishop of Amiens names "Drogonis Bovensis…uxor illius ac filii Ingelrannus…et Robertus, Ansellusque", in the presence of "Eustachius vicedominus, Guermundus frater eius", in an undated charter relating to "advocatione et vicecomitatu Costency"[60].  Seigneur de Boves et de la Fère-sur-Oise. 

-         see below

ii)         ROBERT de Boves .  Guy Bishop of Amiens names "Drogonis Bovensis…uxor illius ac filii Ingelrannus…et Robertus, Ansellusque", in the presence of "Eustachius vicedominus, Guermundus frater eius", in an undated charter relating to "advocatione et vicecomitatu Costency"[61].  "Drogo Bovensis, Robertus filius eius, Oilardus miles ipsius" subscribed the charter dated 1069 under which "Rodulphus…Ambianensis comes" regulated rights of the vicomtes in the lands of the monks of Saint-Firmin and donated property to the church of Amiens[62].  A charter dated 28 Nov 1131 records the donation of "Cais" to the monastery of Lihons Saint-Pierre by "bone memorie Ingelrannus de Fara et Anselmus clericus frater eius et Robertus tertius frater, annuente Mathildi sorore sua" and the later confirmation by "Robertus de Cais, prefati Anselmi filius"[63]

iii)        ANSEAU de Boves .  Guy Bishop of Amiens names "Drogonis Bovensis…uxor illius ac filii Ingelrannus…et Robertus, Ansellusque", in the presence of "Eustachius vicedominus, Guermundus frater eius", in an undated charter relating to "advocatione et vicecomitatu Costency"[64].  1069.  A charter dated 28 Nov 1131 records the donation of "Cais" to the monastery of Lihons Saint-Pierre by "bone memorie Ingelrannus de Fara et Anselmus clericus frater eius et Robertus tertius frater, annuente Mathildi sorore sua" and the later confirmation by "Robertus de Cais, prefati Anselmi filius"[65]m ---.  The name of Anseau’s wife is not known.  Anseau & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ROBERT de Cais .  A charter dated 28 Nov 1131 records the donation of "Cais" to the monastery of Lihons Saint-Pierre by "bone memorie Ingelrannus de Fara et Anselmus clericus frater eius et Robertus tertius frater, annuente Mathildi sorore sua" and the later confirmation by "Robertus de Cais, prefati Anselmi filius"[66]

iv)       MATHILDE de Boves .  A charter dated 28 Nov 1131 records the donation of "Cais" to the monastery of Lihons Saint-Pierre by "bone memorie Ingelrannus de Fara et Anselmus clericus frater eius et Robertus tertius frater, annuente Mathildi sorore sua" and the later confirmation by "Robertus de Cais, prefati Anselmi filius"[67]

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the main Boves family has not been traced, but his name following that of Dreux de Boves in the witness list of the charter quoted below suggests a close relationship: 

1.         NIVELONG de Boves (-after 1042).  "Drogonis de Bova, Nevelonis de Bova" subscribed the charter dated 1042 under which "Theobaldus et Stefanus frater meus germanus" [Thibaut III Comte de Blois and Etienne Comte de Troyes] donated "alodium nostrum…in pago Ambianensi super fluvium Iseræ…Crissiacum…[et] Gaudiaco et Rivaria" {Croissy, Gouy en Amiénois}, for the soul of "patris nostri Odonis comitis"[68]

 

 

ENGUERRAND [I] de Boves, son of DREUX [Drogo] de Boves & his wife --- (-[1117]).  Guy Bishop of Amiens names "Drogonis Bovensis…uxor illius ac filii Ingelrannus…et Robertus, Ansellusque", in the presence of "Eustachius vicedominus, Guermundus frater eius", in an undated charter relating to "advocatione et vicecomitatu Costency"[69].  Seigneur de Boves et de la Fère-sur-Oise.  Comte d'Amiens 1085: "Enguerrand comte d’Amiens et avoué de Boves" is named in a charter of the abbey of Saint-Acheul dated 1085[70]Seigneur de Coucy [1085].  "…Ingelrannus de Codiciaco…et Thomas filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated 1086 which confirmed property of the church of Reims[71].  The date when Enguerrand [I] acquired Coucy is difficult to establish precisely.  The Vita Sancti Arnulfi Suessionensis Episcopi records that "vir nobilis, militiæ actibus implicitus…Guido" married "uxorem…Ermengardem" and records that "Albricus frater eius, Cotidiaci dominus" was captured and expelled "per consilium suæ coniugis Avelinæ"[72].  The source does not specify who expelled Aubry from Coucy, but it is likely that it was Enguerrand.  Aubry is named for the last time in 1079 in French sources in connection with Coucy, so it is likely that his expulsion occurred after that date.  Presumably Enguerrand was acting to claim Coucy in the name of his wife, heiress of Coucy as suggested below.  Vicomte de Coucy 1095[73].  Suger's Vita Ludovici records that "Thomam de Marna" was besieged by "pater eius Engerrannus de Bova" at "castrum…Mons Acutus…in pago Laudunensi"[74].  A charter dated 1117 records a dispute between the monks of Saint-Arnoul de Crespy and [his son] "miles Ingelrannus" who claimed "quoddam burgum in suburbio castri situm" [château de Crespy] possessed "tam a avo suo quam a suo patre Drogone", and granted to his mother as dower, while the monks claimed that "Walterus…comes Ambianensis simul et Crespeiensis cum uxore sua Adela" [Gauthier [II] "le Blanc" Comte d’Amiens, see part A above] had donated the land, as confirmed by Robert II King of France and others, and that "Hugo avus eius" who had invaded the place with violence had later relinquished it, retaining "mansuram suam" in return for an annual payment[75]

m (repudiated) as her second husband, ADA de Marle, divorced wife of AUBRY [de Beaumont-sur-Oise] Vicomte de Coucy, daughter of LETARD de Roucy Seigneur de Marle & his wife ---.  Elinand Bishop of Laon donations made by "Albricus de Cociaco castro…cum uxore sua Adela et matre eius Malthilde" by charter dated 3 Nov 1059[76]Her parentage and second marriage are indicated by the Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis which names "Letaldus de Marla…filiam nomine Adam" as mother of "Thomam de Marla"[77], read together with the sources which indicate that Thomas was the son of Enguerrand [I] de Bove Comte d’Amiens.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "filia…Letardi domni de Marla…Ada" as mother of "Thomam de Cocy"[78].  It is assumed that "Adela" in the first source is the same person as "Ada" in the second and third sources, but this is not beyond all doubt.  [Heiress of Coucy]: as Coucy passed from her first husband to her second husband, it is supposed that Ada was heiress of Coucy, although no primary source has yet been identified which confirms that this speculation is correct. 

Mistress (1): SIBYLLE de Porcien, wife of GODEFROI de Namur, daughter of ROGER Comte de Porcien & his wife Ermengarde ---.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Sibiliam filiam comitis Rogerii Porcensis" as wife of "comes Godefridus de Namuco"[79]The Chronicon Huberti names "filiam suo [=Rogerus Porcensium comes] Sibillam" as wife of "Godefrido filio Alberti comitis Namucensis"[80].  Guibert de Nogent records that "Ingelrannus" abducted "filia…Rogeri comitis Porcensis", wife of "Namurensi…comiti Godefrido" and in a later passage that the couple had a daughter[81]

Enguerrand [I] & his first wife had two children:

1.         THOMAS de Coucy ([1070/75]]-[1130/31])The Annales Lobienses name "Letaldus de Marla…filiam nomine Adam" as mother of "Thomam de Marla"[82]Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle, Comte d'Amiens

-        see below

2.         BEATRIX de Boves (-1144)Malbrancq records her parentage and marriage[83], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  m [as his second wife,] ADAM Châtelain d’Amiens, son of --- (-1125 or after). 

Enguerrand had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

3.          daughter .  Guibert de Nogent records that "Ingelrannus" abducted "filia…Rogeri comitis Porcensis", wife of "Namurensi…comiti Godefrido" and in a later passage that the couple had a daughter[84]

 

 

THOMAS de Coucy, son of ENGUERRAND [I] de Boves Seigneur de Coucy & his first wife Ada de Marle [Roucy] ([1070/75]-[1130/31])The Annales Lobienses name "Letaldus de Marla…filiam nomine Adam" as mother of "Thomam de Marla"[85]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "filia…Letardi domni de Marla…Ada" as mother of "Thomam de Cocy"[86]Guibert de Nogent names "Thomam, Ingelranni filium"[87]"…Ingelrannus de Codiciaco…et Thomas filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated 1086 which confirmed property of the church of Reims[88].  William of Tyre records "…Thomas de Feria…" among those who joined the contingent led by Hugues Comte de Vermandois on the First Crusade in 1096[89].  Suger's Vita Ludovici records that "Thomam de Marna" was besieged by "pater eius Engerrannus de Bova" at "castrum…Mons Acutus…in pago Laudunensi"[90]Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle, Comte d'Amiens.  In 1117, Louis VI "le Gros" King of France confiscated the county of Amiens and granted it to Adelais Ctss de Vermandois[91].  Suger's Vita Ludovici also records that "Thomam de Marna" was eventually captured and died in captivity[92]The Breve Chronicon Buciliensis records that in 1120 “Thomas dominus de Fara et de Marla” confirmed the donations to Bucilly made by “Engelrannus eius pater[93]The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1128 that "Louis roi des Français fit marcher une armée contre Thomas de Marle seigneur de Coucy", who was captured by "Raoul comte de Vermandois" and handed mortally wounded to the king[94]

m firstly ([1100], repudiated) IDA de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN II Comte de Hainaut & his wife Ida de Louvain ([1085]-after [1105]).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to "sororem Balduini comitis Hainoensis" as wife of "Thomam de Marla"[95].  The Chronicon Hanoniense refers to a second unnamed sister of "comitis Hainoniensis" who married "Thome de Marla"[96]The Annales Lobienses refer to "sororem Balduini comitis Hainoensis" as wife of "Thomam de Marla"[97].  The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified. 

m secondly ---.  This second marriage is indicated by Suger's Vita Ludovici which records that "Thomam de Marna" acquired "castrum…Mons Acutus in pago Laudunensi, occasione cuiusdam matrimonii"[98].  Tardif suggests that she was "probablement la fille de Roger de Montaigu et d’Ermengarde", adding that the couple were separated soon afterwards on the grounds of consanguinity (no primary source cited which provides the basis for the statement)[99]

m thirdly MELISENDE de Crécy, daughter of GUY Seigneur de Crécy-sur-Serre & his wife --- (-after 1147).  The Annales Lobienses name "de terra Ambianensi…Milesendem" as wife of "Thomam de Marla" after he repudiated his first wife[100]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the second wife of "Thomas de Coci" as "domna de Bovis"[101].  Tardif records Thomas’s third marriage with "Milesende de Crécy, héritière de Guy seigneur de Crécy-sur-Serre", adding that her dowry was "les deux châteaux de Crécy et de Nouvion-l’Abbesse, dépendant tous deux de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean de Laon" (no primary source cited which provides the basis for the statement)[102].  A charter dated 16 Apr 1131 records the restoration of “Erlons et manso sancti Lamberti” to Laon Saint-Vincent, subscribed by “Gerardi vicedomini, Nicholai castellani...domine Milesendis, Ingelranni filii eius...[103]

Thomas & his first wife had two children:

1.         IDA de Coucy (-after 1161)The Annales Lobienses refer to the two daughters of "Thomam de Marla" & his wife, specifying that one (unnamed, mentioned first) married "Alardo de Cymaco" by whom she was mother of "Gilonem" and after his death "Bernardo de Urbais", by whom she was mother of "Engelranum"[104].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Ydam" as one of the daughters of "Thome de Marla" & his wife "comitis Hainoniensis soror" specifying that she married "Alardo de Cymaco agnomine Poliere, pari Castri Montensis" by whom she was mother of "Engelramum"[105]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Basilia" as one of the two daughters of "Thomam de Cocy", specifying that her husband was "Alardo de Cimay"[106].  “Engelrannum de Orbais nobilem virum cum matre sua Ida nobili femina” settled disputes with Waulsort concerning “villam...Roserias”, for “patrique suo Bernardo et matri Ide orationes”, by charter dated 17 Sep 1160[107].  “...Ide de Cimai...Gilii de Cimai...” subscribed the charter dated 1161 under which the monks of Saint-Sépulcre transferred “de Villerel...molendini” to Baudouin IV Comte de Hainaut[108]m firstly ALARD [IV] de Chimay, son of ---.  m secondly BERNARD d'Orbais, son of SIGER d’Orbais & his wife --- (-before 1155). 

2.         BEATRIX de Coucy (-after 1156)The Annales Lobienses refer to the two daughters of "Thomam de Marla" & his wife, specifying that one (unnamed, mentioned second) married "Evrardus de Bretullie" by whom she was mother of "Evrardum et Gualerannum cum aliis"[109]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the other of the two daughters of "Thomam de Cocy" as the husband was "Everardus de Bretulio"[110].  "Ebrardus Britulensium dominus" names his wife Beatrix and his sons “Galeran et Ebrard” in a charter in favour of Charlis abbey[111].  Pope Lucius II ordered an enquiry into the consanguinity between “Ebrardus de Britolio”, who had just returned from Jerusalem, and “filiam...Thomæ de Marna”, presumably with a view to regularising Erard’s second marriage, dated 16 Jun 1144[112]m ERARD [III] de Breteuil, son of VALERAN [II] Seigneur de Breteuil & his wife Ivette [Judith] --- (-killed in battle Laodicea 1147). 

Thomas & his third wife had four children: 

3.         ENGUERRAND [II] de Coucy (-after 1147)The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Ingelrannum de Marla et Robertum Bovensem et filiam nomine matris" as children of "Thomam de Marla" and his wife Mélisende[113]Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle. 

-        SEIGNEURS de COUCY

4.         ROBERT de Coucy (-Acre 19 Jun 1191)The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Ingelrannum de Marla et Robertum Bovensem et filiam nomine matris" as children of "Thomam de Marla" by his wife Mélisende[114].  Seigneur de Boves.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Ingelrannum…et Robertum Bovensem" as sons of "Thomas de Coci" and his "secundo uxor domna de Bovis", specifying that Robert was "virem crudelem"[115].  A charter dated 1146 records an agreement between the canons of Amiens Sainte-Marie and "Robertum de Bova, filium Thome" regarding various properties and rights[116].  Roger of Hoveden names “...Robertus de Boiues...” among those who died at the siege of Acre[117]m BEATRIX de Saint-Pol, daughter of HUGUES [III] "Candavène" Comte de Saint-Pol & his [first wife ---/second wife Marguerite de Clermont] (-after 1192).  “Ingerranus de Bova” donated property from "Robertus pater meus hereditatem meam" to Amiens, with the consent of “Beatrice matre mea et Roberto fratre meo”, by charter dated 1192[118].  The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Non Mar" of "Beatricis sororis Hugonis comitis de Sancto Paulo et uxoris Roberti domini de Bova et matris Thomæ præpositi huius ecclesiæ"[119].  It is assumed that either “sororis” in this entry is an error or the name “Hugonis”.  The chronology suggests that Beatrix was the daughter of Comte Hugues [III].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln Beatrix was the daughter of Hugues [III] by his second marriage[120].  There appears to be no definite indication about the identity of her mother, although the chronology appears to favour Marguerite de Clermont.  Robert & his wife had four children: 

a)         ENGUERRAND [II] de Boves (-before 1224).  Seigneur de Boves.  “Ingerranus de Bova” donated property from "Robertus pater meus hereditatem meam" to Amiens, with the consent of “Beatrice matre mea et Roberto fratre meo”, by charter dated 1192[121].  “Ingelrannus de Bova...Robertus frater meus” reached agreement with the church of Amiens, with the consent of "uxor eius Maria et heredes eiusdem Roberti", by charter dated 1201[122].  "Enguerran de Boves et…Adde sa femme" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Thomas, de Robert et de Hugues freres dudit Enguerran", by undated charter[123].  "Ingelrannus dominus Bovæ" accepted the arbitrage of a dispute involving the priory of Saint-Leu d’Esserent concerning revenue from Ailly, with the consent of "uxor mea Ada et Robertus et Thomas et Hugo fratres mei", by charter dated May 1202[124].  Villehardouin records that "Enguerrand de Boves and his brother Robert" joined the Fourth Crusade[125].  The Scripta de Feodis of King Philippe II record “Johans sires de Neele” holding “Neele et les apartenances...” and name among his “home...missire Engerranz de Bove, missire Roberz sis frères...[126]A charter dated 14 Mar 1214 (O.S.) lists the knights from Vermandois who fought at Bouvines, including “...Hugues de Boves, Enguerrand de Boves, Robert de Boves...”[127]m firstly ELISABETH, daughter of --- (-after 1185).  A charter of Vauclair dated 1185 names "Ingelranni de Bova et Elizabeth uxoris eius neptis Rogeri Laudunensis episcopi"[128]m secondly ADA [de Nesle, daughter of JEAN [I] de Nesle Châtelain de Bruges & his wife Elisabeth van Peteghem] (-[Dec 1252/Dec 1254]).  "Ingelrannus dominus Bovæ" accepted the arbitrage of a dispute involving the priory of Saint-Leu d’Esserent concerning revenue from Ailly, with the consent of "uxor mea Ada et Robertus et Thomas et Hugo fratres mei", by charter dated May 1202[129].  The second wife of Enguerrand [II] Seigneur de Boves is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln as the daughter of Jean de Nesle Châtelain de Bruges[130].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Du Chesne provides no indication of her parentage[131].  Enguerrand [II] & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Boves (-[4 May] [1245/1249]).  Seigneur de Boves.  “Dominus Robertus de Bova” confirmed donations to the church of Amiens "in litteris Ingelranni patris sui...Roberti quondam domini de Bova avi sui" by charter dated Aug 1227[132].  "Robertus de Bova miles dominus de Fouencamp" donated revenue from “traversum suum de Folliaco” to Corbie, with the consent of “Roberti domini de Bova”, by charter dated 1237[133].  "Robert seigneur de Boves chevalier, Robert de Boves son vassal fils de Robert son oncle, seigneur de Fouencamp, Marie femme dudit Robert seigneur de Fouencamp" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1239[134].  "Robert de Boves" confirmed the sale of “la troisième partie de la disme de Cagny” to Saint-Acheul, with the consent of “sa femme”, by charter dated 1245[135].  [The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Non Mai" of "domini Roberti de Bova militis et Margaretæ eius uxoris"[136].  It is not certain which Robert Seigneur de Boves is indicated by this entry, although Robert son of Enguerrand [II] seems to be the only possibility.]  m --- (-after 1245).  "Robert de Boves" confirmed the sale of “la troisième partie de la disme de Cagny” to Saint-Acheul, with the consent of “sa femme”, by charter dated 1245[137].  Information appears contradictory regarding the identity of the wife of Robert Seigneur de Boves, which suggests that he may have married twice: [m MARGUERITE. daughter of ---.  The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Non Mai" of "domini Roberti de Bova militis et Margaretæ eius uxoris"[138].  As noted above, it is not certain which Robert Seigneur de Boves is indicated by this entry.] [m as her first husband, HELVIDE d'Autrèches, daughter of GUILLAUME de Nanteuil-la-Fosse Seigneur d'Autrèches [Châtillon] & his wife Beatrix d’Arcy (-after 1262).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, the wife of Robert Seigneur de Boves was Helvide, daughter of Guillaume de Nanteuil-la-Fosse seigneur d’Autrêches, noting the dates “1238/1262”[139].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not been identified.  Europäische Stammtafeln states that she married secondly Renaud de la Tournelle[140].] 

ii)         ISABELLE de Boves (-after Jul 1263).  No primary source has been found which confirms Isabelle’s parentage.  Her inheritance of the seigneurie de Boves indicates a close relationship with Robert Seigneur de Boves who died [1245/49].  The dating of Isabelle’s marriage suggests that it is more likely that she was Robert’s sister rather than his daughter.  Nicolaus dominus de Rumigniaco et de Florines” donated property to Bonnefontaine abbey, with the consent of “Elisabeth uxoris mee et liberorum meorum”, by charter dated May 1235[141].  Dame de Château-Porcien: Isabelle is named as Dame de Château-Porcien in the charter dated Jul 1259 quoted below.  It is unclear how she inherited this seigneurie.  Her husband Nicolas [V] Seigneur de Rumigny was already named as seigneur de Château-Porcien in 1239: “Nicolaus de Ruminiaco et de castro Portuensi dominus” donated fishing rights to Chaumont, with the consent of “Isabelle uxoris mee et liberorum meorum”, by charter dated May 1239[142].  Assuming that he inherited Château-Porcien from his wife, this charter suggests that it formed part of her dowry or at least was inherited by Isabelle before the death of her brother Robert Seigneur de Boves.  However, no earlier sources indicate that Château-Porcien was one of the fiefs of the Boves family.  A more likely explanation is that it was purchased by Nicolas de Rumigny from a third party.  Dame de Boves: “Yssabella domina de Bova et de Porciens” confirmed the concession made by “quondam...Nicholai domini de Rumigniaco quondam mariti mei” to Chaumont abbey by charter dated Jul 1259[143].  The seigneurie de Boves was inherited by her son Hugues [II] Seigneur de Rumigny et de Florennes.  m (before May 1214) NICOLAS [V] Seigneur de Rumigny, son of NICOLAS [IV] Seigneur de Rumigny & his [second] wife Mathilde d’Avesnes (-1257, after 21 Mar). 

b)         ROBERT de Boves (-[Apr 1226/Jul 1228]).  “Ingerranus de Bova” donated property from "Robertus pater meus hereditatem meam" to Amiens, with the consent of “Beatrice matre mea et Roberto fratre meo”, by charter dated 1192[144].  "Robertus iunior de Bova de assensu uxoris suæ" donated annual harvest to Corbie abbey, confirmed "anno sequenti Ingelrannus de Bova ipsius Roberti superioris frater", by charter dated 1200[145].  “Ingelrannus de Bova...Robertus frater meus” reached agreement with the church of Amiens, with the consent of "uxor eius Maria et heredes eiusdem Roberti", by charter dated 1201[146].  "Ingelrannus dominus Bovæ" accepted the arbitrage of a dispute involving the priory of Saint-Leu d’Esserent concerning revenue from Ailly, with the consent of "uxor mea Ada et Robertus et Thomas et Hugo fratres mei", by charter dated May 1202[147].  "Robert de Boves et Marie sa femme, Enguerran de Boves seigneur de Boves son frere, Robert, Hellins et Thomas ses enfants" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1202[148].  Villehardouin records that "Enguerrand de Boves and his brother Robert" joined the Fourth Crusade[149].  The Scripta de Feodis of King Philippe II record “Johans sires de Neele” holding “Neele et les apartenances...” and name among his “home...missire Engerranz de Bove, missire Roberz sis frères...[150].  Seigneur de Fouencamps.  The necrology of Amiens records the death (undated) of "Roberti de Bova frater Thomæ præpositi huius ecclesiæ"[151]m MARIE, daughter of --- (-after 1202).  “Ingelrannus de Bova...Robertus frater meus” reached agreement with the church of Amiens, with the consent of "uxor eius Maria et heredes eiusdem Roberti", by charter dated 1201[152].  "Robert de Boves et Marie sa femme, Enguerran de Boves seigneur de Boves son frere, Robert, Hellins et Thomas ses enfants" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1202[153]A charter dated 14 Mar 1214 (O.S.) lists the knights from Vermandois who fought at Bouvines, including “...Hugues de Boves, Enguerrand de Boves, Robert de Boves...”[154]Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT de Boves (-before Feb 1245).  “Ingelrannus de Bova...Robertus frater meus” reached agreement with the church of Amiens, with the consent of "uxor eius Maria et heredes eiusdem Roberti", by charter dated 1201[155].  "Robert de Boves et Marie sa femme, Enguerran de Boves seigneur de Boves son frere, Robert, Hellins et Thomas ses enfants" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1202[156]Robertus de Bova junior miles” confirmed the donation to the hospital at Boves made by “pater meus Robertus de Bova” by charter dated 24 Dec 1224[157]Seigneur de Fouencamp: Radulphus Robertus de Bova miles dominus de Foencans” sold property “in territorio de Sailliaco” to Boves hospital by charter dated Feb 1234 (O.S.?)[158]"Robertus de Bova miles dominus de Fouencamp" donated revenue from “traversum suum de Folliaco” to Corbie, with the consent of “Roberti domini de Bova”, by charter dated 1237[159].  "Robert seigneur de Boves chevalier, Robert de Boves son vassal fils de Robert son oncle, seigneur de Fouencamp, Marie femme dudit Robert seigneur de Fouencamp" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1239[160]m MARIE, daughter of --- (-after 1239).  "Robert seigneur de Boves chevalier, Robert de Boves son vassal fils de Robert son oncle, seigneur de Fouencamp, Marie femme dudit Robert seigneur de Fouencamp" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1239[161].  Robert & his wife had [one child]: 

(a)       [MABILE de Boves (-after 1292).  Dame de Fouencamp: Du Chesne, in a paragraph dealing with Robert de Boves Seigneur de Fouencamp, notes that "la lignée de celuy-ci finit en Mabile de Boves, qualifiée Damoiselle de Foencamp dans un acte de 1292", without providing any citation reference to the document[162].  If the date is correct, the chronology suggests that Mabile could have been the daughter of Robert.  However, from what Du Chesne says it does not appear that the document specifies the family relationship between the two.  Other relationships are possible: for instance Mabile could have been the widow of a male member of the family or a descendant of one of Robert’s brothers.] 

ii)         HELLIN de Boves (-after 1202).  "Robert de Boves et Marie sa femme, Enguerran de Boves seigneur de Boves son frere, Robert, Hellins et Thomas ses enfants" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1202[163]

iii)        THOMAS de Boves (-after 1202).  "Robert de Boves et Marie sa femme, Enguerran de Boves seigneur de Boves son frere, Robert, Hellins et Thomas ses enfants" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens by charter dated 1202[164].  The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Id Sep" of "Hugonis de Bova nobilis militis filii Roberti de Bova et frater Thomæ præpositi huius ecclesiæ et uxoris dicti Hugonis et Thomæ iuvenis nepotis dictorum Hugonis et Thomæ"[165]

c)         HUGUES de Boves (-after 14 Mar 1215).  "Ingelrannus dominus Bovæ" accepted the arbitrage of a dispute involving the priory of Saint-Leu d’Esserent concerning revenue from Ailly, with the consent of "uxor mea Ada et Robertus et Thomas et Hugo fratres mei", by charter dated May 1202[166].  The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Id Sep" of "Hugonis de Bova nobilis militis filii Roberti de Bova et frater Thomæ præpositi huius ecclesiæ et uxoris dicti Hugonis et Thomæ iuvenis nepotis dictorum Hugonis et Thomæ"[167]A charter dated 14 Mar 1214 (O.S.) lists the knights from Vermandois who fought at Bouvines, including “...Hugues de Boves, Enguerrand de Boves, Robert de Boves...”[168]m ---.  The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Id Sep" of "Hugonis de Bova nobilis militis filii Roberti de Bova et frater Thomæ præpositi huius ecclesiæ et uxoris dicti Hugonis et Thomæ iuvenis nepotis dictorum Hugonis et Thomæ"[169]

d)         THOMAS de Boves (-before 1244).  "Ingelrannus dominus Bovæ" accepted the arbitrage of a dispute involving the priory of Saint-Leu d’Esserent concerning revenue from Ailly, with the consent of "uxor mea Ada et Robertus et Thomas et Hugo fratres mei", by charter dated May 1202[170].  Canon at Amiens 1200.  Provost at Amiens Cathedral 1225.  The necrology of Amiens records the death "IV Non Mar" of "Beatricis sororis Hugonis comitis de Sancto Paulo et uxoris Roberti domini de Bova et matris Thomæ præpositi huius ecclesiæ"[171]

5.         MELISENDE de Coucy Guibert de Nogent records that "Thoma…filiam" married "filius Adæ…Adelelmus" but does not name her[172].  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Ingelrannum de Marla et Robertum Bovensem et filiam nomine matris" as children of "Thomam de Marla" by his wife Mélisende, specifying that their daughter married "Hugonem de Gornai dominum eiusdem loci"[173]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Thomas de Coci" & his "secundo uxor domna de Bovis" as "illam que data est Hugoni de Gornaio" but does not name her[174]m firstly ADELELME Châtelain d’Amiens, son of ADAM Châtelain d’Amiens & his first wife --- (-1151 or before).  m secondly as his second wife, HUGUES [IV] de Gournay, son of GERARD de Gournay & his wife Edith de Warenne (-1180)

6.         MATHILDE de Coucy (-after 1146)Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1151 under which her son "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean, subscribed by "…Robertus comes Ambianensis, avunculus meus"[175].  "Alelmus de Ambianis" granted fishing rights to the church of Amiens, with "parentes eius Guido et Mathildis" and with the consent of "Roberto comite Ambian", by charter dated 1146[176]m GUY Châtelain d’Amiens, son of ADAM Châtelain d’Amiens & his first wife --- (-[1146/47]). 

 

 

The following individual was presumably the same as one of the other family members who are named above but at present insufficient information is available to make the precise link. 

 

1.         ROBERT de Bovesm as her first husband, GERTRUDE, daughter of --- (-27 Feb ----).  She married secondly Hugues d’Aubigny Seigneur d’Orreville.  The necrology of Amiens records the death "III Kal Mar" of "Gertrudis uxoris Hugonis d’Aubegny dicti Tacon domini d’Orreville et demum uxoris Roberti de Bova"[177].  

 

 

 

C.      CHÂTELAINS d’AMIENS

 

 

1.         ADAM (-1125 or after)Châtelain d’Amiens.  The Vita Godefridis Bishop of Amiens names "Adamum [Ambianensi] civitatis principem" when recording disturbances in the town[178].  Guibert de Nogent records that "Adam…cui præerat ipse" helped "Ingelrannus urbis comes" quell a rebellion in Amiens[179]Suger's Vita Ludovici records that "Ambianensem…civitatis Adæ…tyranni" was dispossessed by Louis VI King of France[180].  [m firstly ---.  No direct reference to this supposed first marriage has been found.  However, assuming that Adam’s second marriage is correctly stated below, it is unlikely that his sons Adelelme and Guy were born to his second wife, who would have been the first cousins of their wives.]  m [secondly] BEATRIX de Boves, daughter of ENGUERRAND [I] Seigneur de Boves Comte d’Amiens & his wife Ada de Marle [Roucy] (-1144).  Malbrancq records her parentage and marriage[181], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  Adam & his [first] wife had two children: 

a)         ADELELME [I] (-1151 or before).  Guibert de Nogent names "filius Adæ…Adelelmus, puer" when recording his marriage[182]Châtelain d’Amiensm as her first husband, MELISENDE de Coucy, daughter of THOMAS de Marle Comte d’Amiens, Seigneur de Coucy, de Marle et de Boves & his third wife Mélisende de Crécy-sur-Serre.  Guibert de Nogent records that "Thoma…filiam" married "filius Adæ…Adelelmus" but does not name her[183].  She married secondly Hugues [IV] de Gournay.  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Ingelrannum de Marla et Robertum Bovensem et filiam nomine matris" as children of "Thomam de Marla" by his wife Mélisende, specifying that their daughter married "Hugonem de Gornai dominum eiusdem loci"[184]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Thomas de Coci" & his "secundo uxor domna de Bovis" as "illam que data est Hugoni de Gornaio" but does not name her[185]

b)         GUY (-[1146/47])Châtelain d’Amiens.  "Alelmus de Ambianis" granted fishing rights to the church of Amiens, with "parentes eius Guido et Mathildis" and with the consent of "Roberto comite Ambian", by charter dated 1146[186]m MATHILDE de Coucy, daughter of THOMAS de Marle Comte d’Amiens, Seigneur de Coucy, de Marle et de Boves & his third wife Mélisende de Crécy-sur-Serre (-after 1146).  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1151 under which her son "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean, subscribed by "…Robertus comes Ambianensis, avunculus meus"[187].  "Alelmus de Ambianis" granted fishing rights to the church of Amiens, with "parentes eius Guido et Mathildis" and with the consent of "Roberto comite Ambian", by charter dated 1146[188].  Guy & his wife had four children: 

i)          ADELELME [II] (-21 Nov 1176).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1146 under which "Alelmus de Ambianis" granted fishing rights to the church of Amiens, with "parentes eius Guido et Mathildis" and with the consent of "Roberto comite Ambian"[189]Châtelain d’Amiens

-         see below

ii)         FLANDRINE (-after 1175).  "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean on leaving on crusade, confirming donations by "Uvido pater meus et Mathildis mater mea", with the consent of "sorores meæ Flandria, Melissendis et Mathildis", by charter dated 1151[190].  The source which links Flandrine, daughter of Guy, to Flandrine, wife of Guermond [III], has not been identified, although the unusual name and the close geographic proximity of the two families suggest that this co-identity is likely.  Weremundus vicedomini Pinconii” donated property “in montana de feodo meo...territoria Moncellorum, Maisniliorum et Vacariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Flandrina uxor mea, Girardus filius meus, Petrus et Johannes fratres mei”, by charter dated 1179[191]m (1175) GUERMOND [III] de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens, son of GUERMOND [I] de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his first wife Mathilde --- (-after 1186, bur Abbaye du Gard). 

iii)        MELISENDE (-after 1151).  "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean on leaving on crusade, confirming donations by "Uvido pater meus et Mathildis mater mea", with the consent of "sorores meæ Flandria, Melissendis et Mathildis", by charter dated 1151[192]

iv)       MATHILDE (-after 1151).  "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean on leaving on crusade, confirming donations by "Uvido pater meus et Mathildis mater mea", with the consent of "sorores meæ Flandria, Melissendis et Mathildis", by charter dated 1151[193]

Adam & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

c)         HUGUES d’Amiens (-1164)Archbishop of Rouen 1129. 

d)         [THIERRY (-after 1151).  "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean on leaving on crusade, confirming donations by "Uvido pater meus et Mathildis mater mea", with the consent of "sorores meæ Flandria, Melissendis et Mathildis", for the soul of "Alermi avunculi mei", by charter dated 1151, subscribed by "Theodoricus Ambianensis, Robertus comes Ambianensis, avunculus meus"[194].  The transcription of this document consulted does not specify the relationship between the donor and "Theodoricus Ambianensis", but the latter has been assumed by secondary sources to be the donor’s uncle.] 

 

 

ADELELME [II] d’Amiens, son of GUY Châtelain d’Amiens & his wife Mathilde de Coucy (-21 Nov 1176)Châtelain d’Amiens.  "Alelmus de Ambianis" granted fishing rights to the church of Amiens, with "parentes eius Guido et Mathildis" and with the consent of "Roberto comite Ambian", by charter dated 1146[195].  "Aleaume d’Amiens sire de Flixecourt" confirmed agreement with the abbey of Saint-Lucien concerning donations by "Guy son père", with the consent of "Ade sa femme…", by charter dated 1150[196].  "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean on leaving on crusade, confirming donations by "Uvido pater meus et Mathildis mater mea", with the consent of "sorores meæ Flandria, Melissendis et Mathildis", for the soul of "Alermi avunculi mei", by charter dated 1151, subscribed by "Theodoricus Ambianensis, Robertus comes Ambianensis, avunculus meus"[197]

m ADA, daughter of ---.  "Aleaume d’Amiens sire de Flixecourt" confirmed agreement with the abbey of Saint-Lucien concerning donations by "Guy son père", with the consent of "Ade sa femme…", by charter dated 1150[198]

Adelelme [II] & his wife had two children: 

1.         DREUX (-[1194/95]).  "Dreux d’Amiens seigneur du château de Flexicourt" confirmed privileges of the priory of Flexicourt "depuis le vivant de Aleaume son père" by charter dated 1180[199]Seigneur de Flexicourt, de Vignacourt, de la Broye et de l’Etoile.  m MARGUERITE de Saint-Pol, daughter of ANSELME Comte de Saint-Pol & his [first wife ---] (-after 1219).  Her parentage is confirmed by Villehardouin who records that "Count Hugh of St Paul, Peter of Amiens his nephew…" formed the third division in the attack on Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204[200]Dreux & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         PIERRE (-Philippi, Macedonia 1204).  Seigneur de Vignacourt et de Flexicourt.  "Pierre d’Amiens" donated property to Moreaucourt, with the consent of "Thomas son frère", by charter dated May 1200[201].  "Reginaldus de Ambianis…son frère" assumed the succession of "Pierre fils aîné de Dreux comte d’Amiens et de Marguerite, étant mort en 1202 au voyage de Constantinople", with the consent of "Mathilde son épouse…ses filles Marguerite et Adéline, de ses frères Thibault, Aléaume et Bernard"[202]Villehardouin records that "Count Hugh of St Paul, Peter of Amiens his nephew…" formed the third division in the attack on Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204[203]

b)         RENAUD (-1227, bur Vignacourt).  Châtelain d’Amiens.  "Regilnadus de Ambianis…son frère" assumed the succession of "Pierre fils aîné de Dreux comte d’Amiens et de Marguerite, étant mort en 1202 au voyage de Constantinople", with the consent of "Mathilde son épouse…ses filles Marguerite et Adéline, de ses frères Thibault, Aléaume et Bernard"[204].  "Regnaud d’Amiens" donated property to Moreaucourt, with the consent of "Thomas, Aleaume et Bernard ses frères", by charter dated Jul 1210[205]m MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-[1224/27]).  "Regilnadus de Ambianis…son frère" assumed the succession of "Pierre fils aîné de Dreux comte d’Amiens et de Marguerite, étant mort en 1202 au voyage de Constantinople", with the consent of "Mathilde son épouse…ses filles Marguerite et Adéline, de ses frères Thibault, Aléaume et Bernard"[206]

-        SEIGNEURS de VIGNACOURT, de FLEXICOURT et de REGNAUVILLE[207]

c)         THIBAUT (-after 1252).  "Regilnadus de Ambianis…son frère" assumed the succession of "Pierre fils aîné de Dreux comte d’Amiens et de Marguerite, étant mort en 1202 au voyage de Constantinople", with the consent of "Mathilde son épouse…ses filles Marguerite et Adéline, de ses frères Thibault, Aléaume et Bernard"[208].  Seigneur de Canaples et d’Outrebois.  m ---.  The name of Thibaut’s wife is not known.  Thibaut & his wife had five children[209]

i)          [JEANNE (-after 1260)Père Anselme names "Jeanne d’Amiens, dame de Talmas, de l’Orsignol et de Buire-aux-Bis, fille de Thibaut d’Amiens, seigneur de Winacourt et de Canaples" as the wife of "Gilles II…seigneur de Mailly" but cites no corresponding primary source[210]m GILLES [II] Seigneur de Mailly, son of GILLES [I] Seigneur de Mailly & his wife Avicie de Heilly (-after 1270).]  

d)         [THOMAS (-after 1244).  "Pierre d’Amiens" donated property to Moreaucourt, with the consent of "Thomas son frère", by charter dated May 1200[211].  "Regnaud d’Amiens" donated property to Moreaucourt, with the consent of "Thomas, Aleaume et Bernard ses frères", by charter dated Jul 1210[212].  The order of the names in the last document suggests that "Thomas" may represent a mistranscription for "Thibaut" by Dom Villevieille.]  

e)         ADELELME (-before Aug 1248).  "Regilnadus de Ambianis…son frère" assumed the succession of "Pierre fils aîné de Dreux comte d’Amiens et de Marguerite, étant mort en 1202 au voyage de Constantinople", with the consent of "Mathilde son épouse…ses filles Marguerite et Adéline, de ses frères Thibault, Aléaume et Bernard"[213].  "Regnaud d’Amiens" donated property to Moreaucourt, with the consent of "Thomas, Aleaume et Bernard ses frères", by charter dated Jul 1210[214].  Seigneur de l’Etoile. 

f)          BERNARD (-Jul 1251).  "Regilnadus de Ambianis…son frère" assumed the succession of "Pierre fils aîné de Dreux comte d’Amiens et de Marguerite, étant mort en 1202 au voyage de Constantinople", with the consent of "Mathilde son épouse…ses filles Marguerite et Adéline, de ses frères Thibault, Aléaume et Bernard"[215].  "Regnaud d’Amiens" donated property to Moreaucourt, with the consent of "Thomas, Aleaume et Bernard ses frères", by charter dated Jul 1210[216]Seigneur de Regnauville 1226.  Seigneur d’Estrées 1251. 

2.         PIERRE (-after 1172). 

 

 

 

D.      VIDAMES d’AMIENS (PICQUIGNY)

 

 

Two brothers, parents not identified: 

1.         EUSTACHE (-after 1069).  Vidame d’Amiens.  "…Eustachius vicedominus, Guermundus frater eius…" subscribed the charter dated to [1069/74] relating to "vicecomitatu Costencii" for Sainte-Marie d'Amiens[217]

2.         GUERMOND [I] (-after 1069).  "…Guermundus frater vicedomini…" subscribed the charter dated 1069 under which "Rodulphus…Ambianensis comes" donated property to Sainte-Marie d'Amiens[218]

 

 

1.         ARNAUD de PicquignyVidame d’AmiensHe is named in the source quoted below which names his daughter.  No primary source has been found which names him in his own capacity.  m ---.  The name of Arnaud’s wife is not known.  Arnaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         MELISENDE de Picquigny .  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium names "de…regis Francorum Karoli Magni stirpe et familia progenitam, Ernulphi vicedomini de Pinkinio filiam…Milesendem" as wife of "Willelmus Andomarensis castellanus"[219].  Her alleged descent from Charlemagne has not been traced.  m GUILLAUME [II] Châtelain de Saint-Omer, son of [GUILLAUME [I] Châtelain de Saint-Omer] & his [first wife ---] (-1143 or after). 

 

 

1.         GUERMOND [II] de Picquigny (-after 1131).  No primary source has been found which indicates the parentage of Guermond [II], but his name indicates a family relationship with Guermond [I] who is named above.  Vidame d’Amiensm BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-13 Feb 1144, bur Abbaye de Saint-Jean).  The wife of Guermond [I] is called Beatrix in secondary sources but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  Darsy states that the wife of Guermond "Béatrix" was buried “XVI Kal Mar” 1144 at “l’église de Saint-Jean[220].  In a later passage, he notes a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial in the presence of her six children "avec les trois enfants de Gérard et Manassès de Bulles, frère de Renault"[221].  Domesday Descendants records that the --- de Saint-Valéry, daughter of Renaud de Saint-Valéry was the mother of "Gerard II de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens", presumably indicating Gérard [I], and cites the cartulary of Oseney[222].  The chronology for this connection does not appear ideal, assuming that the dates of the members of the Picquigny family are accurately recorded in the present document.  However, a connection (maybe a family relationship) between the Saint-Valéry and Picquigny families is shown by the letter written by Pope Alexander III to Henri Archbishop of Reims, dated 29 Mar 1154, to enforce reparations from "vicedominus Pinciniaco, Bern. de S. Walerico et Gualterius Tyrellus" for the damage which they had caused to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Selincourt[223].  Guermond [II] & his wife had six children: 

a)         GERARD [I] (-1178, bur Abbaye du Gard)...Gerardus et Enguerannus de Pincquinis fratres...” witnessed the charter dated Jul 1129 under which “Hugo castellanus de Cambrai et dom. de Oisy” donated property to Mont Saint-Eloi[224]Vidame d’Amiens.  "Girard vidame de Picquigny" donated property to "la maison de Gabarinville, lorsque dam Euphémie sa sœur s’y fit religieuse" by charter dated 1149[225].  He appears to have acquired land at Wymering, Hampshire in part through his marriage[226].  Pope Alexander III wrote to Henri Archbishop of Reims 29 Mar 1154 to enforce reparations from "vicedominus Pinciniaco, Bern. de S. Walerico et Gualterius Tyrellus" for the damage which they had caused to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Selincourt[227].  Pope Alexander III wrote to Henri Archbishop of Reims 23 May 1154 to enforce reparations from "vicedominus Pinginniacensis" for the damage which they had caused to the abbey of Cercamps[228]Gerardus vicedominus de Pinconio” settled disputes with Amiens cathedral, with the consent of “filiorum suorum Guermundi primogeniti sui et heredis et Petri”, by charter dated 1176[229].  The date of his death is indicated by a charter dated 1178 which records a donation made by Darsy cites a charter dated 1178 which records a donation made by Gérard in the presence of his three sons as well as a confirmation of the same donation by his son Guermond [III] in the presence of his two brothers[230].  m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-before 1154).  Gérard de Picquigny granted tithes of salt at “Wimering” to Southwick priory, for the souls of his parents and his wife Matilda, and for the salvation of himself and his heirs, by charter dated [1160/65][231].  The distinction between the two groups of beneficiaries suggests that Mathilde was deceased at the time of the donation.  m secondly (before 1154) BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-4 Feb ----).  Daire indicates that Beatrix wife of Gérard de Picquigny “paroît dans les Chartes en 1154” but provides no primary source citation[232].  Darsy states that the “Cartulaire” (presumably of Amiens) records the death “la veille des nones de février” of “Béatrix mère de Willaume” canon at Amiens[233].  One of Gérard’s wives was --- d’Aumâle, daughter of ETIENNE Comte d’Aumâle & his wife Hawise de Mortemer: a manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[234].  The date of her parents’ marriage (“before [1100”) suggests that she may have been his first wife, but the marriage date of her sister Agnes (“after 1143”) suggests that her identity as Gérard’s second wife cannot be excluded.  Gérard [I] & his first wife had three children: 

i)          GUERMOND [III] (-after 1186, bur Abbaye du Gard).  Darsy cites a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children "avec les trois enfants de Gérard..."[235].  Gerardus vicedominus de Pinconio” settled disputes with Amiens cathedral, with the consent of “filiorum suorum Guermundi primogeniti sui et heredis et Petri”, by charter dated 1176[236].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1190 under which his son "Girard vidame de Picquigny" confirmed the donation made by "Girard son ayeul, aux malades du val de Picquigny, laquelle Vermond son père a acquittée pendant toute sa vie"[237].  Vidame d’AmiensWeremundus vicedomini Pinconii” donated property “in montana de feodo meo...territoria Moncellorum, Maisniliorum et Vacariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Flandrina uxor mea, Girardus filius meus, Petrus et Johannes fratres mei”, by charter dated 1179[238]m (1175) FLANDRINE d’Amiens, daughter of GUY Châtelain d’Amiens & his wife Mathilde de Coucy.  "Alermus Fleciscortis et Ambianis civitatis princeps quartus" confirmed his donation to Amiens Saint-Jean on leaving on crusade, confirming donations by "Uvido pater meus et Mathildis mater mea", with the consent of "sorores meæ Flandria, Melissendis et Mathildis", by charter dated 1151[239].  The source which links Flandrine, daughter of Guy, to Flandrine, wife of Guermond [III], has not been identified, although the unusual name and the close geographic proximity of the two families suggest that this co-identity is likely.  Weremundus vicedomini Pinconii” donated property “in montana de feodo meo...territoria Moncellorum, Maisniliorum et Vacariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Flandrina uxor mea, Girardus filius meus, Petrus et Johannes fratres mei”, by charter dated 1179[240]Guermond [III] & his wife had five children: 

(a)       GERARD [II] (-[Acre] [1190/92]).  Weremundus vicedomini Pinconii” donated property “in montana de feodo meo...territoria Moncellorum, Maisniliorum et Vacariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Flandrina uxor mea, Girardus filius meus, Petrus et Johannes fratres mei”, by charter dated 1179[241]Vidame d’Amiens"Girard vidame de Picquigny" confirmed the donation made by "Girard son ayeul, aux malades du val de Picquigny, laquelle Vermond son père a acquittée pendant toute sa vie" by charter dated 1190[242]The Chronicon Hanoniense names "vice-dominus de Pinkinio" among those who died in Palestine in [1191], presumably at the siege of Acre[243]

(b)       ENGUERRAND (-[Jun/Nov] 1224)Vidame d’Amiens"Enguerrand de Picquigny, vidame d’Amiens" confirmed the donations made to the leprosery of Picquigny by "Gérard l’ancien vidame son ayeul, par Gérard son frère" and founded "une chapellenie à Tansol" for the soul of "Enguerrant de Lully son cousin", by charter dated 1205[244].  

-         see below

(c)       MARGUERITE .  Darsy cites a charter (no date cited) which names "Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the daughters of Guermond [III] de Picquigny[245].  

(d)       MATHILDE .  Darsy cites a charter (no date cited) which names "Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the daughters of Guermond [III] de Picquigny[246].  

(e)       BEATRIX .  Darsy cites a charter (no date cited) which names "Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the daughters of Guermond [III] de Picquigny[247].  

ii)         PIERRE (-after 1179).  Darsy cites a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children "avec les trois enfants de Gérard..."[248].  Gerardus vicedominus de Pinconio” settled disputes with Amiens cathedral, with the consent of “filiorum suorum Guermundi primogeniti sui et heredis et Petri”, by charter dated 1176[249].  Weremundus vicedomini Pinconii” donated property “in montana de feodo meo...territoria Moncellorum, Maisniliorum et Vacariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Flandrina uxor mea, Girardus filius meus, Petrus et Johannes fratres mei”, by charter dated 1179[250]

iii)        JEAN (-after 1179).  Darsy cites a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children "avec les trois enfants de Gérard..."[251].  Weremundus vicedomini Pinconii” donated property “in montana de feodo meo...territoria Moncellorum, Maisniliorum et Vacariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Flandrina uxor mea, Girardus filius meus, Petrus et Johannes fratres mei”, by charter dated 1179[252]

Gérard [I] & his second wife had eight children: 

iv)       GERARD de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[253].  Daire identifies Gérard as “Gérard de Pequigny Seigneur d’Ailly qui épousa Agnès”, and names their son “Jean Seigneur d’Ailly sur Somme” who married “Agnès Dame d’Ailly sur Somme” by whom he had “Enguerran, Thibaut, Guillaume, Robert marié à Ode selon le Nécrologe d’Amiens, Marguerite, Mathilde et Beatrix de Pequigny[254].  Daire cites no primary sources on which he bases this information, and it appears to duplicate the contradictory information provided by Darsy who, as shown below, names the seven last-named as younger siblings of Gérard. 

v)        ENGUERRAND de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[255].  

vi)       THIBAUT de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[256].  

vii)      GUILLAUME de Picquigny (-28 Mar ----).  Darsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage, adding that the “Cartulaire” (presumably of Amiens) records the death “V Kal Apr” of “Willaume” canon at Amiens[257].  

viii)     ROBERT de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[258].  

ix)       MARGUERITE de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[259].  

x)        MATHILDE de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[260].  

xi)       BEATRIX de PicquignyDarsy cites charters (he does not cite the dates) which name "Gérard, Enguerran, Thibault, Willaume, Robert, Marguerite, Mathilde et Béatrix" as the children of Gérard [I] de Picquigny by his second marriage[261].  

b)         ENGUERRAND (-after 1150).  ...Gerardus et Enguerannus de Pincquinis fratres...” witnessed the charter dated Jul 1129 under which “Hugo castellanus de Cambrai et dom. de Oisy” donated property to Mont Saint-Eloi[262]Enguerran brother of Gerard de Picquigny” witnessed the charter dated 1150 which records the reconciliation between “Alelmus” and Beauvais Saint-Lucien[263].  

c)         ADA "Drogo dominus Monciaci" released "Hauvi uxorem Gisleberti de Meirart", on the advice of "uxoris meæ Adæ", by charter dated 5 Feb "in eodem anno quo mortuus est Rainaldus de Merlodo"[264].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  It is indicated by Darsy who notes a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children (named with, in the case of the daughters, their husbands, he implies) "avec les trois enfants de Gérard et Manassès de Bulles, frère de Renault"[265].  m ([before 13 Feb 1144]) DREUX [III] de Moncy, son of DREUX [II] de Moncy & his wife Basilie --- (-after 1151). 

d)         BEATRIX (-after 1144).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  It is indicated by Darsy who notes a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children (named with, in the case of the daughters, their husbands, he implies) "avec les trois enfants de Gérard et Manassès de Bulles, frère de Renault"[266].  m ([before 13 Feb 1144]) GUERARD de Dours Seigneur de Dours, Vicomte et Vidame de Brebières, son of --- (-after 1148). 

e)         EUPHEMIE (-after 1149).  "Girard vidame de Picquigny" donated property to "la maison de Gabarinville, lorsque dam Euphémie sa sœur s’y fit religieuse" by charter dated 1149[267].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  It is indicated by Darsy who notes a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children (named with, in the case of the daughters, their husbands, he implies) "avec les trois enfants de Gérard et Manassès de Bulles, frère de Renault"[268].  m ([before 13 Feb 1144, separated before 1149]) RENAUD Seigneur de Bulles, son of LANCELIN [II] de Beauvais Seigneur de Bulles & his wife Adela de Dammartin (-after 1167). 

f)          GISELE (-after 1144).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  It is indicated by Darsy who notes a charter dated 13 Feb 1144 which records the burial of Beatrix, wife of Guermond [II] de Picquigny, in the presence of her six children (named with, in the case of the daughters, their husbands, he implies) "avec les trois enfants de Gérard et Manassès de Bulles, frère de Renault"[269].  

2.         daughter .  Darsy states that a "sœur de Guermond de Picquigny, mariée en Angleterre avec un riche seigneur nommé Joelle de Totenes" is referred to in the De Miraculis sanctæ Mariæ Laudunensis[270].  m JUHEL de Totnes, son of ALURED & his wife --- (-[after 1099]). 

 

 

ENGUERRAND de Picquigny, son of GUERMOND [III] de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Flandrine d’Amiens (-[Jun/Nov] 1224)Vidame d’AmiensIngelrannus de Pinconio vicedominus Ambianensis” confirmed a donation to Amiens made by "Fulcho dominus de Kyerru" by charter dated 6 Apr 1204[271]"Enguerrand de Picquigny, vidame d’Amiens" confirmed the donations made to the leprosery of Picquigny by "Gérard l’ancien vidame son ayeul, par Gérard son frère" and founded "une chapellenie à Tansol" for the soul of "Enguerrant de Lully son cousin", by charter dated 1205[272].  Ingelrannus de Pinchonio vicedominus Ambianensis” donated property to the church of Amiens for the anniversaries of "meo et...uxoris mee Margarete" by charter dated Apr 1209[273]"Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[274].  

m MARGUERITE de Ponthieu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Beatrix de Saint-Pol (-after Aug 1216).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Ingelrannus de Pinchonio vicedominus Ambianensis” donated property to the church of Amiens for the anniversaries of "meo et...uxoris mee Margarete" by charter dated Apr 1209[275]"Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[276].  

Enguerrand & his wife had [eleven] children: 

1.         GUERMOND (-after 1197).  “Guermond 1197” is named as oldest son of Enguerrand de Picquigny in Europäische Stammtafeln[277].  The primary source which confirms that this information is correct has not been identified. 

2.         MARIE (-after 1197).  “Marie 1197” is named as oldest daughter of Enguerrand de Picquigny, with her husband “Eustache d’Encre 1197”, in Europäische Stammtafeln[278].  The primary source which confirms that this information is correct has not been identified.  m EUSTACHE d’Encre, son of --- (-before 1197). 

3.         GERARD [III] (-[May 1248/Jun 1249]).  "Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[279].  Vidame d’Amiens"Girardus dominus Pincenii et vicedominus Ambianensis" confirmed the donation of salt to Paris Hôtel-Dieu made by "Ingerrandus quondam pater meus", with the consent of "Aaliddis uxoris mee", by charter dated Feb 1244[280]"Vicedominus de Pinquigniaco et Aaliz uxor prefati vicedomini et...Petrus de Villamarchaz miles dictus Cambellanus et Ysabel relicta defuncti Ade Cambellani de Villabeum" paid revenue to “prior de Tornanfuie" by charter dated Mar 1244[281]m firstly LAURE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON [V] Seigneur de Montfort & his wife Alix de Montmorency (-1227 or before).  Darsy names "Lore ou Laure de Montfort" as first wife of Gérard [III] de Picquigny, and refers to her testament under which she bequeathed property to Gard convent[282].  If her family origin is correctly stated, the chronology suggests that she was the daughter of Simon de Montfort and his wife Alix de Montmorency.  m secondly (before 1243) as her second husband, ALIX de Vierzon Dame de Tournenfuy, widow of GAUTHIER [III] de Villebéon "le Chambellan", daughter of HERVE [II] Seigneur de Vierzon & his second wife Marie de Dampierre (-3 Dec 1245).  "Girardus dominus Pincenii et vicedominus Ambianensis" confirmed the donation of salt to Paris Hôtel-Dieu made by "Ingerrandus quondam pater meus", with the consent of "Aaliddis uxoris mee", by charter dated Feb 1244[283]"Vicedominus de Pinquigniaco et Aaliz uxor prefati vicedomini et...Petrus de Villamarchaz miles dictus Cambellanus et Ysabel relicta defuncti Ade Cambellani de Villabeum" paid revenue to “prior de Tornanfuie" by charter dated Mar 1244[284]The necrology of the Abbaye du Jard records the death "III Non Dec" of "Aaliz quondam vicedomine de Pingquiniaco" and her donation of revenue “in decima de Villabeonis[285].  Darsy quotes a charter dated 1285 under which [her stepson] Jean de Picquigny names "Aalis de Tourne-en-Faies jadis feme monseigneur mon père"[286].  m thirdly (1246) as her first husband, MATHILDE de Crecques, daughter of ANSEAU [II] Seigneur de Crecques & his wife Beatrix de Guines (-after 1296).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that "Joannes", son of "domino Arnulpho de Audenarde", married secondly "sororem domini Roberti de Cresekes, relictam vicedomini de Pinkengni"[287]She married secondly (before Sep 1251) as his second wife, Jan Heer van OudenaardeJohannes de Audenarde miles et...Mathildis relicta...Gerardi quondam vicedomini Pinchonii uxor nostra” confirmed a donation to Amiens made by “Eustachius dictus Dyabolus” by charter dated Apr 1252[288].  "Jehans dis Sires d’Audenarde et Sires de Rosoit et Mehaus sa femme Vidamesse d’Amiens Dame de Piquigny" donated property to "le Maison des Vaus des Virgenes de Pamele" by charter dated Jan 1277[289]Gérard [III] & his first wife had two children: 

a)         MARGUERITE (-after 1257).  The Chronicle of Baudouin d’Avesnes records that "Thomas", son of "Thomas dominus de Veruin ex Mathilde primogenita filia comitis de Retest", married secondly "Margaretam vicedomini de Pinkengni filiam"[290].  The chronology indicates the likelihood that Marguerite was born from her father’s first marriage.  "Thomas de Cociaco junior miles et Margarita filia vice-domini de Piqueniaco uxor eius" granted privileges to Vaux de Cernay by charter dated Jun 1251[291]m firstly (Jul 1246) NICOLAS [VI] de Rumigny, son of NICOLAS [V] Seigneur de Rumigny et de Florennes & his wife Isabelle de Coucy (-killed in battle 1249).  m secondly (before Jun 1251) as his second wife, THOMAS de Coucy Seigneur de Vervins, son of THOMAS de Coucy Seigneur de Vervins & his wife Mathilde de Rethel (-before 1276). 

b)         JEANNE (-after 1246).  “Jeanne Dame de Heilly, 1234 min/1246” is shown as daughter of Gérard [III] de Picquigny by his first marriage, with her husband, in Europäische Stammtafeln[292].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m (before Feb 1246) GAUTHIER [IV] Seigneur de Heilly, son of --- (-after 1246). 

Gérard [III] & his second wife had one child: 

c)         ALIX .  “Alix” is named as daughter of Gérard [III] de Picquigny by his second marriage in Europäische Stammtafeln[293].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. 

Gérard [III] & his third wife had two children: 

d)         JEAN (-Perusa, Italy 29 Sep 1304).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1285 under which he names "Aalis de Tourne-en-Faies jadis feme monseigneur mon père"[294], read together with the other charters quoted above which name Gérard as the husband of Alix.  Vidame d’Amiens.  Seneschal of Gascony 1303. 

-        see below

e)         MATHIEU .  “Mathieu” is named as second son of Gérard [III] de Picquigny by his third marriage in Europäische Stammtafeln[295].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified. 

4.         RENAUD (-after Jan 1260).  "Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[296].  m as her second husband, BEATRIX de Guines, widow of ANSEAU [II] de Crecques, daughter of ARNOUL Comte de Guines & his wife Beatrix de Bourbourg (-after Jan 1260).  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium records the births of "Adelidem et secundam Beatricem" to “Broburgensis castellana et Ardensis domina...Beatrix[297].  "Baudewins cuens de Ghines et chastellains de Broubergh" donated property to "seur Beatris me…sereur et au couvent [de]…nostre Dame de Leisbistade" by charter dated May 1244[298]Béatrix femme de Renaud de Pinquigny veuve d’Anselme II de Crésecque” confirmed the donation of “la dîme de Louches” made to Notre-Dame de Licques by “Robert de Crésecque son fils” by charter dated Jan 1260[299]Renaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         daughter The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that “Michaël” son of "Hugo patri succedens in terra de Antoing et de Espinoit" and his wife married secondly “filiam domini Renaldi de Pinkengni[300]m as his second wife, MICHEL d’Antoing Seigneur de Harnes, son of HUGUES [II] Seigneur d’Antoing et d’Epinoy & his wife Ida de Douai (-1269 or before). 

5.         FLANDRINE (-after Aug 1216).  "Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[301].  

6.         IDA (-after Aug 1216).  "Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[302].  

7.         MARGUERITE (-after Aug 1216).  "Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[303].  

8.         MARIE (-after Aug 1216).  "Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[304].  

9.         [daughter The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "Margareta" as fifth daughter of "castellano Sancti-Audomari domino Wilelmo" and his wife, adding that she married "Balduino de Creki, filio domini Balduini ex uxore prima" and naming their children: “primogenitus...Philippus terram de Creki tenens post patrem”, who married “sorore Vicedomini de Penkengni Gerardi” by whom he had “liberos...filiarum...una...Margareta” who married firstly “primogenito domini de Gistele” and had “unum...filium, qui post mortem domini Walteri successit in terra de Furmeselles”, secondly “Jacobo de Archicourt...defuncto sine liberis”, thirdly “domino Walloni de Beure”, and fourthly “domino de Trasengnies[305].  This daughter was presumably one of the daughters who are named in the Aug 1216 charter, see above.  m PHILIPPE Seigneur de Créquy, son of BAUDOUIN [II] Seigneur de Créquy & his wife Marguerite de Saint-Omer.] 

10.      ENGUERRAND (-after 1241).  “Enguerrand 1241” is named as fourth son of Enguerrand de Picquigny in Europäische Stammtafeln[306].  The primary source which confirms that this information is correct has not been identified.  Assuming that this affiliation is correct, his absence from the charter dated Aug 1216, which names Enguerrand’s two other sons, suggests that Enguerrand was born after that date. 

11.      GUILLAUME (-after 1269).  “Guillaume 1248 im hl Land, 1259/68, 1269 sn de Mortagne” is named as fifth and youngest son of Enguerrand de Picquigny, with his son “André 1268”, in Europäische Stammtafeln[307].  The primary source which confirms that this information is correct has not been identified.  Assuming that this affiliation is correct, his absence from the charter dated Aug 1216, which names Enguerrand’s two other sons, suggests that Guillaume was born after that date. 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

JEAN de Picquigny, son of GERARD de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his third wife Mathilde de Crecques (-Perusa, Italy 29 Sep 1304).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1285 under which he names "Aalis de Tourne-en-Faies jadis feme monseigneur mon père"[308], read together with the other charters quoted above which name Gérard as the husband of Alix.  Vidame d’Amiens.  Seneschal of Gascony 1303. 

m (before 1278) MARGUERITE de Beaumetz, daughter of GILLES [III] de Beaumetz Châtelain de Bapaume & his wife Jeanne de Beauvoir (-before 1303).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. 

Jean & his wife had eleven children: 

1.         RENAUD (-1315)Vidame d’Amiens.  He is named as brother of Ferry de Picquigny in the 4 Jun 1310 charter quoted below.  m (before 4 Aug 1314) as her second husband, JEANNE d'Eu, widow of RAYMOND [VII] Vicomte de Turenne, daughter of JEAN [II] de Brienne Comte d'Eu & his wife Beatrix de Châtillon (-after 5 Sep 1345).  Charles de France Comte de Valois confirmed the agreement between “dame Iehanne de Eu nostre cousine femme iadis Remon vicomte de Turene chevalier” and “Bernard de Cominge et Marguerite sa femme hoir de la vicomté de Turaine” regarding the dower of the former, by charter dated 1306[309].  “Domina Matha de Insula comitissa Convenarum, vicecomitisa Turenæ gubernatrix et administratrix eiusdem vicecomitatus Turenæ”, on behalf of “domina Cecilia filia sua...Urgelli et Convenarum comitissa, vicecomitissaque Turenæ”, under the powers granted under the testament of “bonæ memoriæ viri domini Bernardi quondam comitis Convenarum, vicecomitisque Turenæ”, executed obligations including towards “dominæ Ioanne de Eugo dominæ de Piquiniaco olim vicecomitissæ Turenæ”, by charter dated 5 Sep 1345[310].  Renaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         MARGUERITE (-after 4 Mar 1377)Vidamesse d’Amiens, Dame de Picquigny.  Her parentage and first and second marriages are confirmed by the charter dated 27 Dec 1329 under which Gauthier de Noyers agreed her dower from her first husband with Robert Comte de Roucy[311]m firstly (Dec 1323) JEAN de Roucy Seigneur de Pierrepont, son of JEAN [V] Comte de Roucy et de Braine & his wife Marguerite de Bommiers (-[1326/28]).  m secondly (Jul 1328) GAUTHIER de Noyers Seigneur d’Eclaron, son of MILON [X] Seigneur de Noyers & his second wife Jeanne de Dampierre Dame de Moeslain (-killed in battle 1339).  m thirdly ([29 Jul 1357/14 Nov 1359]) as his second wife, RAOUL Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont, son of GUILLAUME Seigneur de Raineval & his wife Ada Dame de Fouilloy (-1393).  Grand Pannetier de France 1383. 

2.         GERARD .  He is named as brother of Ferry de Picquigny in the 4 Jun 1310 charter quoted below.  Seigneur de Bergicourt.  

3.         GUILLAUME (-before 28 Oct 1330).  He is named as brother of Ferry de Picquigny in the 4 Jun 1310 charter quoted below. 

4.         FERRY (-before 1344).  Seigneur d’Ailly-sur-Somme et de Hervey.  A charter dated 1341 records “Ferricus de Pinconio miles et consiliarius regis” acting “ratione uxoris...pro herede defuncti domini de Falviaco[312]m firstly JEANNE de Faillouël, daughter of GUY de Faillouël & his wife Gille --- (-after 4 Jun 1310).  This earlier marriage is confirmed by the following documents.  Enguerrand Seigneur de Marigny, Chambellain de France acquired property in Condran, de Feulhouel” in Vermandois from “monseigneur Ferri de Piquigny chevalier et madame Jehanne sa fame”, reserving rights to “madame Gile fame jadis monseigneur Guy de Feullouel chevalier et mere de ladite madame Jehane”, by charter dated 8 Mar 1310, which also names “Guillaume de Piqueigni” (without specifying any family relationship with the seller)[313]Another document dated 4 Jun 1310 relating to the same transaction names Ferris de Piqueigny chevalier sires de Kerlu...” and specifies the consent of “monseigneur Regnaut vidame d’Amiens, seigneur de Piqueigny no[stre]...frere et monseigneur Guerars de Piqueigni chevalier et Guillaume de Piqueigni nos freres[314]m secondly (before 29 Sep 1319) BEATRIX de Nesle Dame de Falvy et de la Hérelle, daughter of JEAN [III] de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy & his wife Jeanne de Vendeville (-after 1344).  A charter dated 1341 records “Ferricus de Pinconio miles et consiliarius regis” acting “ratione uxoris...pro herede defuncti domini de Falviaco[315].  “Beatrix Dame de Fallevy et d’Ailly sur Somme et Jehan de Pinkigny chevaliers Sires de ladite ville d’Ailly et de Hornoy en Vimeu” confirmed the foundation of a hospital “en la ville de Rivieres” by charter dated 7 Apr 1344[316].  Ferry & his second wife had three children: 

a)         JEAN (-[Jan 1346/Mar 1348]).  His daughter’s inheritance of Falvy shows that Jean was born from his father’s second marriage.  m as her first husband, CATHERINE de Châtillon, daughter of HUGUES de Châtillon Seigneur de Leuze & his wife Jeanne de Dargies (-after 1383).  Madame Ieanne de Dargies Comtesse de Soissons” exchanged property with “monsieur Iean de Nesle seigneur d’Offemont” by charter dated 1333, ratified by “Iean de Piqueny et Katherine de Leuse femme, fille de ladite comtesse de Soissons” by charter dated Jan 1343 (O.S.)[317]She married secondly ([1354]) Jean [II] Comte de GrandpréA parliamentary register dated 10 May 1354 records a claim by “Margareta de Pinconio domicella...ut habente ballum Marguaretæ et Ioannæ de Pinconio neptum suarum” against “comitem Grandisprati et Katherinam de Leuses eius uxorem et quondam defuncti Ioannis de Pinconio militis” regarding property of “defunctum Ferricum de Pinconio militem ipsius domicella et prædicti defuncti Ioannis patrem[318]Jean & his wife had two children: 

i)          MARGUERITE (-[19 Mar 1371/1376])A parliamentary register dated 10 May 1354 records a claim by “Margareta de Pinconio domicella...ut habente ballum Marguaretæ et Ioannæ de Pinconio neptum suarum” against “comitem Grandisprati et Katherinam de Leuses eius uxorem et quondam defuncti Ioannis de Pinconio militis” regarding property of “defunctum Ferricum de Pinconio militem ipsius domicella et prædicti defuncti Ioannis patrem[319].  “Hugues de Melun sire d’Antoing, d’Epinoy et châtelain de Gand et Marguerite de Picquegny son épouse” confirmed letters relating to a foundation in the church of Antoing by charter dated 10 Jul 1369[320]Dame de Falvy et de la Hérelle.  m as his first wife, HUGUES de Melun Burggraaf van Gent, son of JEAN [I] de Melun Vicomte de Melun, Comte de Tancarville & his second wife Isabelle d’Antoing (-1406). 

ii)         JEANNEA parliamentary register dated 10 May 1354 records a claim by “Margareta de Pinconio domicella...ut habente ballum Marguaretæ et Ioannæ de Pinconio neptum suarum” against “comitem Grandisprati et Katherinam de Leuses eius uxorem et quondam defuncti Ioannis de Pinconio militis” regarding property of “defunctum Ferricum de Pinconio militem ipsius domicella et prædicti defuncti Ioannis patrem[321]m GILLES de Soyecourt, son of ---. 

b)         MARGUERITE (-after 1378).  A parliamentary register dated 10 May 1354 records a claim by “Margareta de Pinconio domicella...ut habente ballum Marguaretæ et Ioannæ de Pinconio neptum suarum” against “comitem Grandisprati et Katherinam de Leuses eius uxorem et quondam defuncti Ioannis de Pinconio militis” regarding property of “defunctum Ferricum de Pinconio militem ipsius domicella et prædicti defuncti Ioannis patrem[322]

c)         MARIE (-1381)m JEAN [V] de Hangest, son of --- (-[4 Apr 1358/1363]). 

5.         JEAN (-killed in battle Hainaut 1340).  Seigneur de Saint-Ouen et d’Ailly.  m (after Jul 1302) as her second husband, MARTHA d’Amiens, widow of BAUDOUIN [III] Seigneur de Créquy et de Fressin, daughter of GILLES d’Amiens Seigneur de Canaples et d’Outrebois & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and tow marriages has not been identified.  Jean & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEANNE (-after 1373).  Dame de Canaples et d’Outrebois.  m firstly JEAN de Mailly Seigneur de Talmas et de Buyre-au-Bois, son of ---.  m secondly (1354) HENDRIK van Beveren Seigneur de Dixmude, son of --- (-after 27 Dec 1367). 

6.         ROBERT (-after 10 Feb 1358).  Seigneur de Maves et de Fossemanant.  Seigneur de Fluy, de iure uxorisRobert de Pecquigny chev. Sgr de Maves et de Fossemanant” granted “les chastel et terre du Quesnoy-les-Airaines“, inherited by “sa ditte fille” following the death of “feue la dame de Fluy sa femme, mère de la dite dame d’Ailly”, to “Robert d’Ailly son petit-fils et filleul, fils puisné de la dame d’Ailly sa fille” by charter dated 10 Feb 1358[323].  m --- de Fluy, daughter of GARIN Seigneur de Fluy & his wife --- (-before 10 Feb 1358).  Robert de Pecquigny chev. Sgr de Maves et de Fossemanant” granted “les chastel et terre du Quesnoy-les-Airaines“, inherited by “sa ditte fille” following the death of “feue la dame de Fluy sa femme, mère de la dite dame d’Ailly”, to “Robert d’Ailly son petit-fils et filleul, fils puisné de la dame d’Ailly sa fille” by charter dated 10 Feb 1358[324].  Robert & his wife had children: 

a)         JEAN (-before May 1359).  Seigneur de Fluy. 

-        SEIGNEURS de FLUY et d’ACHY[325]

b)         MARGUERITE (-[after 1398]).  The marriage contract between Robert d’Ailly chev. Sgr d’Ailly, de Boubers-sur-Canche et de Fontaines-sur-Somme” and “damoiselle Marguerite de Pecquigny fille de Mgr Robert de Pecquigny chev“ is dated 12 Nov 1342[326].  Robert de Pecquigny chev. Sgr de Maves et de Fossemanant” granted “les chastel et terre du Quesnoy-les-Airaines“, inherited by “sa ditte fille” following the death of “feue la dame de Fluy sa femme, mère de la dite dame d’Ailly”, to “Robert d’Ailly son petit-fils et filleul, fils puisné de la dame d’Ailly sa fille” by charter dated 10 Feb 1358[327].  Dame de Picquigny, Vidamesse d’Amiens.  The basis for the choice of Marguerite, in preference to others with a senior hereditary claim, to inherit these titles from her first cousin Marguerite de Picquigny has not been ascertained.  Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny” granted part of “la terre et Sgrie du Quesnoy-les-Airaines, tenue en fief de Pecquigny“, which had belonged to “feue dame de Pecquigny sa cousine et prédésseresse”, to “Beaugeois d’Ailly son fils”, with the consent of “Wautier d’Arly dit Tristant chev. son fils aîné et plus apparent héritier”, by charter dated 8 Sep 1382[328].  Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny et Baudoin d’Arly dit Baugois son fils sire et héritier de ladite vidamie et de Pecquigny” amortised a fief acquired by the abbey du Gard by charter dated 12 Jul 1385[329].  m (contract 12 Nov 1342) as his second wife, ROBERT Seigneur d’Ailly, son of --- (-before May 1363). 

7.         MATHILDE (-after 1338).  Dame de Gouy.  m ([1300]) as his second wife, HUGUES [IV] Seigneur d’Antoing et d’Epinoy, son of HUGUES [III] Seigneur d’Antoing et d’Epinoy & his first wife Sibylle de Wavrin (-[1310]). 

8.         MARGUERITE (-after 16 Nov 1343).  A document dated 1310 records a settlement between “domicellam Margaretam de Pinquigniaco” and “Ioannam de Vendolio relictam defuncti Mathei de Roya militis”, which names “defuncti Mathei de Roya iunioris filii procreati ex eis...domicellæ Mariæ filiæ dictæ Ioannæ et dicti defuncti Mathei quondam mariti eiusdem[330]A document of the Parlement de Paris dated 7 Jan 1329 records the rejection of the claim by “Jean de Chatillon chevalier et Aliénor sa femme, seigneurs de La Ferté en Ponthieu, d’Yaucourt et de Dury en Vermandois” for a fifth part of the dower of “Marguerite de Picquigny damoiselle de La Ferté, veuve de Mathieu de Roye et mère d’Aliénor[331]m (Apr 1291) MATHIEU de Roye Seigneur de la Ferté en Ponthieu, son of MATHIEU [I] de Roye Seigneur de la Ferté en Ponthieu & his wife Jeanne Dame de Vendeuil. 

9.         MARIEm JEAN Seigneur de Saint-Amand, son of ---. 

10.      CATHERINE (-after 13 Jan 1324).  m JEAN [I] Seigneur d’Auxy, son of --- (-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302). 

11.      JEANNEm (contract 1 Nov 1292) JEAN [II] Seigneur de Varennes, son of --- (-after Sep 1302). 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the Picquigny family has not been ascertained. 

 

1.         MARIE de Picquigny .  Père Anselme states that Marie was “fille de N. de Pecquigny vidame d’Amiens” and shows her marriage without citing any source which confirms the information[332].  Her precise parentage has not been ascertained, but from a chronological point of view she could have been the daughter of Jean de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens (although he is already recorded with a daughter named Marie, see above).  m JACQUES Seigneur de Croy, son of --- (-after 1313). 

 

 

 

E.      VIDAMES d’AMIENS, SEIGNEURS d’AILLY et de PICQUIGNY

 

 

1.         ROBERT d’Ailly (-before May 1363)Seigneur d’Ailly.  He was recorded as deceased in the accounts dated May 1363 in which his son Gauthier is named (see below).  m firstly ---.  Cassiaux states that a charter dated 13 Jun 1413 specifies that Marguerite de Picquigny was her husband’s second wife[333]m secondly (contract 12 Nov 1342) MARGUERITE de Picquigny, daughter of ROBERT de Picquigny Seigneur de Fluy & his wife --- de Fluy (-[after 1398]).  The marriage contract between Robert d’Ailly chev. Sgr d’Ailly, de Boubers-sur-Canche et de Fontaines-sur-Somme” and “damoiselle Marguerite de Pecquigny fille de Mgr Robert de Pecquigny chev“ is dated 12 Nov 1342[334].  Dame de Picquigny, Vidamesse d’AmiensThe basis for the choice of Marguerite, in preference to others with a senior hereditary claim, to inherit these titles from her first cousin Marguerite de Picquigny has not been ascertained.  Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny” granted part of “la terre et Sgrie du Quesnoy-les-Airaines, tenue en fief de Pecquigny“, which had belonged to “feue dame de Pecquigny sa cousine et prédésseresse”, to “Beaugeois d’Ailly son fils”, with the consent of “Wautier d’Arly dit Tristant chev. son fils aîné et plus apparent héritier”, by charter dated 8 Sep 1382[335].  “Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny et Baudoin d’Arly dit Baugois son fils sire et héritier de ladite vidamie et de Pecquigny” amortised a fief acquired by the abbey du Gard by charter dated 12 Jul 1385[336].  Robert & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT d’Ailly (-before 20 Jan 1379).  The succession of his daughter as Dame d’Ailly indicates that Robert was his father’s oldest son.  However, the charter dated 8 Sep 1382 of Marguerite de Picquigny indicates that Robert d’Ailly’s son Gauthier was her first son.  Logic dictates therefore that Robert was born from his father’s first marriage.  “Robert de Pecquigny chev. Sgr de Maves et de Fossemanant” granted “les chastel et terre du Quesnoy-les-Airaines“, inherited by “sa ditte fille” following the death of “feue la dame de Fluy sa femme, mère de la dite dame d’Ailly”, to “Robert d’Ailly son petit-fils et filleul, fils puisné de la dame d’Ailly sa fille” by charter dated 10 Feb 1358[337]m MARIE d’Auxy, daughter of --- (-after [1383]).  Accounting records dated [1383] record that “Wautier d’Ailly” held part of Ailly, belonging to “Marie d’Auxy veuve de Mr. Robert d’Ailly son frère comme tutrice de Catherine d’Ailly sa fille héritière d’Ailly[338].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          CATHERINE d’Ailly (-after 5 Dec 1401).  “Mre Wautier d’Ailly dit Tristan chev.” confirmed holding rights in “la terre de Fontaines-sur-Somme”, owned by “damoiselle Catherine d’Ally sa nièce femme d’Ogier d’Engline”, by charter dated 20 Jan 1379 (presumably O.S.)[339].  Accounting records dated [1383] record that “Wautier d’Ailly” held part of Ailly, belonging to “Marie d’Auxy veuve de Mr. Robert d’Ailly son frère comme tutrice de Catherine d’Ailly sa fille héritière d’Ailly[340]Dame d’Ailly.  The monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre granted powers to “Mgr Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin chev. Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine, de Haurenas et d’Aisseu, Jac d’Ally dit Hustin éc. et madame Catherine d’Ally Sgr et dame d’Ally” by charter dated 30 Nov 1400[341].  “Catherine Dame d’Ally et de Fontaines et Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine” acknowledged a debt to the monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre relating to a donation made by “feue leur...tante et sœur la dame d’Espaumesnil femme de leur...oncle et frère Hustin d’Ally actuellement deffunt” by charter dated 5 Dec 1401[342]m (before 20 Jan 1380) OGIER d’Engline, son of ---. 

Robert & his second wife had four children: 

b)         GAUTHIER dit Tristan d’Ailly (-before 24 Jun 1387).  Accounts dated May 1363 record that “Wautier d’Ailly fils de feu Mgr d’Ally” paid money due from “[le] château et la terre de Bouberch-sur-Canche”, bequeathed to him under the testament of his father[343].  “Mre Wautier d’Ailly dit Tristan chev.” confirmed holding rights in “la terre de Fontaines-sur-Somme”, owned by “damoiselle Catherine d’Ally sa nièce femme d’Ogier d’Engline”, by charter dated 20 Jan 1379 (presumably O.S.)[344].  “Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny” granted part of “la terre et Sgrie du Quesnoy-les-Airaines, tenue en fief de Pecquigny“, which had belonged to “feue dame de Pecquigny sa cousine et prédésseresse”, to “Beaugeois d’Ailly son fils”, with the consent of “Wautier d’Arly dit Tristant chev. son fils aîné et plus apparent héritier”, by charter dated 8 Sep 1382[345].  Accounting records dated [1383] record that “Wautier d’Ailly” held part of Ailly, belonging to “Marie d’Auxy veuve de Mr. Robert d’Ailly son frère comme tutrice de Catherine d’Ailly sa fille héritière d’Ailly[346].  Accounts for the period starting 24 Jun 1387 record that “Baudin d’Arly dit Baugeois Vidame d’Amiens chev. héritier de Pecquigny” inherited property “à Foreste” on the death of “feu Mre Tristan d’Arly son frère[347]

c)         BAUDOUIN dit Beaugeois d’Ailly (-[18 Apr/3 Dec] 1415).  “Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny” granted part of “la terre et Sgrie du Quesnoy-les-Airaines, tenue en fief de Pecquigny“, which had belonged to “feue dame de Pecquigny sa cousine et prédésseresse”, to “Beaugeois d’Ailly son fils”, with the consent of “Wautier d’Arly dit Tristant chev. son fils aîné et plus apparent héritier”, by charter dated 8 Sep 1382[348].  “Marguerite vidamesse d’Amiens, dame d’Arly et de Pecquigny et Baudoin d’Arly dit Baugois son fils sire et héritier de ladite vidamie et de Pecquigny” amortised a fief acquired by the abbey du Gard by charter dated 12 Jul 1385[349]Vidame d’Amiens.  Accounts for the period starting 24 Jun 1387 record that “Baudin d’Arly dit Baugeois Vidame d’Amiens chev. héritier de Pecquigny” inherited property “à Foreste” on the death of “feu Mre Tristan d’Arly son frère[350].  Seigneur de Picquigny.  Letters dated 17 Mar 1396 (presumably O.S.) record that “Baugois d’Ally Vidame d’Amiens et Sgr de Pecquigny chev.” was appointed “chambellan en son hôtel” by the duke of Burgundy[351].  Accounts dated 30 Dec 1408 record that “Baugoys d’Arly chev. Vidame d’Amiens conseiller chambellan du Duc de Bourgogne” received payment for a horse[352].  “Baugois d’Ally Vidame d’Amiens sire de Pequigny et Raoul d’Ally chev. sire de Raineval, de Varennes et de Vinacourt fils dudit Mgr le Vidame et don héritier apparent” consented to l’Hôtel-Dieu d’Amiens holding certain land by charter dated 4 Feb 1412 (presumably O.S.)[353].  A charter dated 18 Apr 1415 records that land “tenu en fief de Mgr Baugeois d’Arly chev. Vidame d’Amiens” was sold to Hôtel-Dieu d’Amiens[354].  He died before 3 Dec 1415 when his son is recorded as having succeeded to his land (see below).  m (1406) JEANNE de Raineval, daughter of VALERAN de Raineval Comte de Fauquemberghe, Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont & his wife Jeanne de Varennes (-before 28 Nov 1413).  A charter records that “Damoiselle Jne d’Arly damoiselle de Foulloy et de l‘Etoile” succeeded to property in the succession of “feue Madame Jne de Raineval sa mère, dame de Raineval et femme du Vidame d’Amiens“ on 4 Jan and 15 Feb 1412 (presumably O.S.) and that “Mgr Raoul d’Arly Sgr de Varennes et de Raineval“ succeeded to Varennes and the mairie of Forceville  “de la de Dame sa mère[355].  Baudouin & his wife had two children: 

i)          RAOUL d’Ailly (-1463).  “Baugois d’Ally Vidame d’Amiens sire de Pequigny et Raoul d’Ally chev. sire de Raineval, de Varennes et de Vinacourt fils dudit Mgr le Vidame et don héritier apparent” consented to l’Hôtel-Dieu d’Amiens holding certain land by charter dated 4 Feb 1412 (presumably O.S.)[356].  Seigneur de Raineval.  A charter records that “Damoiselle Jne d’Arly damoiselle de Foulloy et de l‘Etoile” succeeded to property in the succession of “feue Madame Jne de Raineval sa mère, dame de Raineval et femme du Vidame d’Amiens“ on 4 Jan and 15 Feb 1412 (presumably O.S.) and that “Mgr Raoul d’Arly Sgr de Varennes et de Raineval“ succeeded to Varennes and the mairie of Forceville  “de la de Dame sa mère[357]Vidame d’Amiens, Seigneur de Picquigny.  A charter dated 3 Dec 1415 records that “Mgr Raoul d’Arly Vidame d’Amiens Sgr de Pequigny” succeeded to land from “Mgr Baugeois d’Arly son père[358].  “Sgr Mgr Raoul d’Ailly vidame d’Amiens Sgr de Pequigny et de Raineval” donated property to Corbie by charter dated 25 Oct 1450[359]m (contract 13 Nov 1413) JACQUELINE de Béthune, daughter of ROBERT [VIII] de Béthune Vicomte de Meaux & his third wife Isabelle van Gistel.  Raoul & his wife had children: 

(a)       JEAN d’Ailly (-1492)Vidame d’Amiens, Seigneur de Picquigny.  m (The Hague 1 Jun 1456) YOLANDE bâtarde de Bourgogne, illegitimate daughter of PHILIPPE “le Bon” Duke of Burgundy & his mistress --- (-3 Nov 1470). 

-         VIDAMES d’AMIENS, SEIGNEURS de PICQUIGNY

(b)       ANTOINE d’Ailly (-16 Jul 1465).  Seigneur de Varennes.  m as her first husband, JEANNE bâtarde de Luxembourg, illegitimate daughter of LOUIS de Luxembourg Comte de Saint-Pol et de Brienne, Conte di Conversano & his mistress ---.  She married secondly Guillaume d’Hezé

(c)       JACQUELINE d’Ailly (-1470).  She is named in the marriage contract of her daughter Elisabeth dated 25 Mar 1455.  m as his first wife, JEAN de Nevers, son of PHILIPPE de Bourgogne Comte de Nevers et de Rethel [Bourgogne-Valois] & his second wife Bonne d’Artois (Clamecy 25 Oct 1415-Nevers 25 Sep 1491, bur Nevers).  He succeeded his brother in 1464 as Comte de Nevers, de Rethel et d'Etampes, Baron de Donzy et de Luzy, pair de France.  Comte d'Eu 1472.  Governor of Picardie. 

ii)         JEANNE d’Ailly .  A charter records that “Damoiselle Jne d’Arly damoiselle de Foulloy et de l‘Etoile” succeeded to property in the succession of “feue Madame Jne de Raineval sa mère, dame de Raineval et femme du Vidame d’Amiens“ on 4 Jan and 15 Feb 1412 (presumably O.S.) and that “Mgr Raoul d’Arly Sgr de Varennes et de Raineval“ succeeded to Varennes and the mairie of Forceville  “de la de Dame sa mère[360].  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no sources on which the information is based[361]m firstly PHILIPPE d’Harcourt Baron de Montgommery, son of JACQUES [I] d’Harcourt Baron de Montgommery et d’Havré & his wife Jeanne d’Enghien (-13 Oct 1414).  m secondly CORNELIUS de Gavre Seigneur de Lens, son of ---. 

d)         MATHIEU dit Sarrasin d’Ailly .  The monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre granted powers to “Mgr Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin chev. Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine, de Haurenas et d’Aisseu, Jac d’Ally dit Hustin éc. et madame Catherine d’Ally Sgr et dame d’Ally” by charter dated 30 Nov 1400[362].  “Catherine Dame d’Ally et de Fontaines et Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine” acknowledged a debt to the monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre relating to a donation made by “feue leur...tante et sœur la dame d’Espaumesnil femme de leur...oncle et frère Hustin d’Ally actuellement deffunt” by charter dated 5 Dec 1401[363]

e)         JACQUES dit Hustin d’Ailly (-[30 Nov 1400/5 Dec 1401]).  The monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre granted powers to “Mgr Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin chev. Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine, de Haurenas et d’Aisseu, Jac d’Ally dit Hustin éc. et madame Catherine d’Ally Sgr et dame d’Ally” by charter dated 30 Nov 1400[364].  “Catherine Dame d’Ally et de Fontaines et Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine” acknowledged a debt to the monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre relating to a donation made by “feue leur...tante et sœur la dame d’Espaumesnil femme de leur...oncle et frère Hustin d’Ally actuellement deffunt” by charter dated 5 Dec 1401[365]m --- Dame d’Espaumesnil, daughter of --- (-before 5 Dec 1401).  “Catherine Dame d’Ally et de Fontaines et Mahieu d’Ally dit Sarrasin Sgr du Quesnoy-sur-Araine” acknowledged a debt to the monks of Abbeville Saint-Pierre relating to a donation made by “feue leur...tante et sœur la dame d’Espaumesnil femme de leur...oncle et frère Hustin d’Ally actuellement deffunt” by charter dated 5 Dec 1401[366].  Jacques & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [--- dit Hustin d’Ailly .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  His nickname “Hustin” suggests that he may have been the son of Jacques dit Hustin d’Ailly.  Accounts dated from 24 Jun 1401 record that “Hustin d’Arly comme mary de madame Périne veuve de feu Mgr de Famechon” held land “Willeman et de Wamin...en un fief du château d’Hesdin[367].  Accounts starting 24 Jun 1409 record that “Hustin d’Arly” paid towards the marriage of “la fille ainée du Duc de Bourgogne avec le Dauphin de Viennois”, levied on “la terre de Willeman[368]m (before 24 Jun 1401) as her second husband, PERRINE de ---, widow of --- de Famechon, daughter of ---.  Accounts dated from 24 Jun 1401 record that “Hustin d’Arly comme mary de madame Périne veuve de feu Mgr de Famechon” held land “Willeman et de Wamin...en un fief du château d’Hesdin[369].] 

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de CROY

 

 

Croÿ, now Crouy-Saint-Pierre, is situated on the river Somme about five kilometres downstream of Picquigny, in the present-day French département of Somme, arrondissement Amiens, canton Picquigny.  The following reconstruction of this family is an outline which shows selected family members only, mainly for hyperlinking to other families studied in Medieval Lands.  The information has not been verified against primary source documentation, unless otherwise stated. 

 

 

1.         JACQUES de Croÿ (-after 1313)Seigneur de Croÿ et d’Araines.  m MARIE de Picquigny, daughter of --- de Picquigny [Vidame d’Amiens] & his wife ---.  Père Anselme states that Marie was “fille de N. de Pecquigny vidame d’Amiens” and shows her marriage without citing any source which confirms the information[370].  Her precise parentage has not been ascertained, but from a chronological point of view she could have been the daughter of Jean de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens (although he is already recorded with a daughter named Marie). 

 

2.         JEAN [I] de Croÿ (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Saint-Bertin)Seigneur de Croÿ, de Renty, de Seneghen et d’Araines.  Grand bouteiller de France.  m as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Craon Dame de Tour-sur-Marne, widow of BERNARD de Dormans Seigneur de Soupy, daughter of JEAN [I] de Craon Seigneur de Dommart, de Bernarville, de Clacy, de Montsoreau et de Nouâtre & his wife Marie de Châtillon Vidamesse de Laon.  Jean [I] & his wife had children:  

a)         ANTOINE [I] de Croÿ “le Grand” (-1475, bur château de Porcien)Seigneur de Croÿ, de Renty, de Beaurain, de Bar-sur-Aube.  Chambellan de Philippe “le Bon” Duke of Burgundy 1431.  Comte de Porcien 1438.  Seigneur de Beaumont [en Hainaut] 1453.  Grand Maître de France 1462. 

-        COMTES de PORCIEN

b)         JEAN de Croÿ (-Valenciennes 1472, bur Chimay).  Seigneur de Tour-sur-Marne.  He acquired Chimay from the seigneur de Moreuil and was installed as Comte de Chimay by Charles Duke of Burgundy. 

-        COMTES de CHIMAY

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS d’ENCRE

 

 

The medieval town of Encre is now called Albert, about 30 kilometres north-east of Amiens and about the same distance south-west of Bapaume, in the present-day French département of Somme.  The Continuatio Valcellensis of Sigebert's Chronica records in 1115 that “Balduinus comes Flandriæ” captured “castrum Encres” from “Hugone Camdavena”, who had usurped it, and granted it to “Karolo consobrino suo[371]

 

 

1.         HUGUES d’Encre (-1139)He is named in the source quoted below which records his marriage.  No primary source has yet been found which names him in his own capacity.  Burchgraeve van Gent, de iure uxorism (1139) as her first husband, ALIX van Gent, daughter of SIGER [I] Burchgraeve van Gent & his wife --- (-before 1154).  A charter dated 1139 records that "miles nobilis…Hugo de Inkers" married "filiam Sigeri castellani Gandensis…Aliciam" and donated property to Afflighem[372].  She married secondly (before 8 Aug 1145) Steppo van Viggezele.  A charter dated 1154 records that "dominus Steppo" married "uxorem eius…Aliciam" after the death of "Hugone de Inkers" and donated property to Afflighem[373].  

 

2.         BAUDOUIN d’Encre .  He is named in the source quoted below which records his marriage.  No primary source has yet been found which names him in his own capacity.  m (after 1145) as her third husband, MARGUERITE de Clermont, widow firstly of CHARLES Count of Flanders, and secondly of HUGUES [III] “Candavène” Comte de Saint-Pol, daughter of RENAUD [II] Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis & his first wife Adelais Ctss de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([1104/05]-after 1145).   The Vita Karoli Comitis Flandriæ names "nobilem puellam Margaretam, Reinaldi comitis Clarmontensis filiam" as wife of Count Charles, specifying that the marriage took place before his accession[374].  It is assumed that Marguerite was born soon after her parents' marriage as her mother was already nearly 40 years old at the time. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses refers to (but does not name) the daughter of "comes de Claromonte" and his wife Adela, specifying that she married firstly Charles Count of Flanders, secondly "Hugo Champdaveine…comes Sancti Pauli" by whom she had "Radulfus Champdaveine et Guod Champdaveine", and thirdly "dominus Balduinus de Encra" by whom she had "domini Galteri de Helli"[375]The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to, but does not name, the daughter of "comes Rainaldus [de Claromonte]" and his wife Adelaide as the wife of "comes Karolus Flandre"[376].  It is assumed that Marguerite was born soon after her parents' marriage as her mother was already nearly 40 years old at the time.  Baudouin & his wife had one child: 

a)         GAUTHIER de Heilly .  The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses refers to (but does not name) the daughter of "comes de Claromonte" and his wife Adela, specifying that she married thirdly "dominus Balduinus de Encra" by whom she had "domini Galteri de Helli"[377]

 

3.         EUSTACHE d’Encre (-before 1197)m MARIE d’Amiens, daughter of ENGUERRAND Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Marguerite de Ponthieu (-after 1197).  “Marie 1197” is named as oldest daughter of Enguerrand de Picquigny, with her husband “Eustache d’Encre 1197”, in Europäische Stammtafeln[378].  The primary source which confirms that this information is correct has not been identified. 

 

 

 

H.      SEIGNEURS de HANGEST

 

 

Hangest-en-Santerre is located in the canton of Moreuil, south-east of Amiens, in the present-day French département of Somme.  A junior branch of this family were seigneurs de Genlis, whose name was changed to Villequier-Aumont in the 18th century and which is located just north of Chauny and south-east of Ham, and was previously in the county of Vermandois[379]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         FLORENT [I] de Hangest (-Acre [1190/91]).  "...Florentius de Hangest et Albertus frater eius…" are named among the arbitrators in a charter dated 1190 which records the settlement of a dispute with Ourscamp concerning "molendini de Salice"[380]Roger of Hoveden names “...Florentius de Angest...” among those who died at the siege of Acre[381].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Florentius de Hangest" among those who died in Palestine in [1191], presumably at the siege of Acre[382]m ---.  The name of Florent’s wife is not known.  Florent & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         [JEAN [I] de Hangest (-[1190/1202]).  Père Anselme names "Jean seigneur de Hangest [...vivoit en 1190]...Aubert de Hangest" as the two sons of Florent [I] de Hangest but cites no primary source which confirms the statement[383].  He adds that Jean [I] founded “la chapelle de S. Martin de Hangest”.  Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.]  m HELISENDE, daughter of --- (-after 1202).  "Florentio Juveni de Hangest" donated land “in maresco inter novam calceiam ante Davenescurt...” to Compiègne Saint-Corneille, at the request of "matris sue Helessendis, Auberti militis de Hangest avunculi eiusdem Florentii", by charter dated 1202[384].  Père Anselme says that, in relation to Jean [I], "on lui donne pour femme Helisende, et selon d’Autres Gode des Preaux, dame d’Avesnecourt, fondatrice du prieuré d’Avesnecourt" but cites no primary source which confirms either statement[385].  Jean [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          FLORENT [II] de Hangest (-after May 1226).  Père Anselme names "Florent seigneur de Hangest II du nom...Jean d’Hangest seigneur d’Avesnecourt" as the two sons of Jean [I] de Hangest but cites no primary source which confirms the statement[386]Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  "Florentio Juveni de Hangest" donated land “in maresco inter novam calceiam ante Davenescurt...” to Compiègne Saint-Corneille, at the request of "matris sue Helessendis, Auberti militis de Hangest avunculi eiusdem Florentii", by charter dated 1202[387].  The Scripta de Feodis of King Philippe II record “Florencium de Hangest” among the fiefholders of “Odo de Han...de baronia de Ham[388]Florentius de Hangest” confirmed the sale made by “Joannes de Rosoy” by charter dated May 1226[389]m ---.  The name of Florent’s wife is not known.  Florent [II] & his wife had one child: 

(1)       [FLORENT [III] de Hangest (-before 1254).  Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  Père Anselme names "Florent seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt III du nom" as the son of Florent [II] de Hangest, adding that he made donations “à la maladerie d’Avesnecourt et mourut sans postérité avant 1254[390].] 

ii)         [JEAN [II] d’Hangest (-after 1264)Père Anselme names "Florent seigneur de Hangest II du nom...Jean d’Hangest seigneur d’Avesnecourt" as the two sons of Jean [I] de Hangest but cites no primary source which confirms the statement[391]Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  

-         see below

iii)        --- de Hangest The Chronicon Hanoniense of Baudouin d’Avesnes records that "conte Jehan de Soissons...monseigneur Raoul son frere" married firstly "la roine de Chyppre...ainsnee fille le roi Henri d’Acre" (garbled) and secondly “la fille monseignour Jehan de Hangest...[in one manuscript] qui fus peres monsigneur Aubert” by whom he had “une fille qui fut hoirs de sa terre[392]m RAOUL de Nesle, son of RAOUL de Nesle Comte de Soissons & his second wife Yolande --- (-after 1272).

b)         AUBERT [II] de Hangest (-after 1202)Père Anselme names "Jean seigneur de Hangest [...vivoit en 1190]...Aubert de Hangest" as the two sons of Florent [I] de Hangest, in a later passage “il est cru fils puiné de Florent seigneur de Hangest[393].  He cites no primary source which confirms his statement.  However, his parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1202 under which [his nephew] "Florentio Juveni de Hangest" donated land “in maresco inter novam calceiam ante Davenescurt...” to Compiègne Saint-Corneille, at the request of "matris sue Helessendis, Auberti militis de Hangest avunculi eiusdem Florentii"[394].  Seigneur de Genlis et de Neuville-le-roi. 

-        see below

2.         AUBERT [I] de Hangest (-after 1190).  "...Florentius de Hangest et Albertus frater eius…" are named among the arbitrators in a charter dated 1190 which records the settlement of a dispute with Ourscamp concerning "molendini de Salice"[395]

 

 

JEAN [II] d’Hangest, son of [JEAN [I] Seigneur de Hangest & his wife Hélisende ---] (-after 1264)Père Anselme names "Florent seigneur de Hangest II du nom...Jean d’Hangest seigneur d’Avesnecourt" as the two sons of Jean [I] de Hangest but cites no primary source which confirms the statement[396].  He adds that Jean [II] settled a dispute with the inhabitants of Avesnecourt concerning a donation made by Gode des Preaux, which was confirmed by Louis IX King of France in 1258, and confirmed the donations made by “son neveu Florent seigneur de Hangest...à la maladerie d’Avesnecourt” in 1264.  Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  

m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known. 

Jean [II] & his wife had [one child]: 

1.         [JEAN [III] de Hangest (-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302).  The Exercitus Fuxensis Index Primus, dated 1272, names “milites...Johannes [de] Hangesto” among “homines feodales...in ballia Viromandensi...Mons Desiderii[397]Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  "Jehans sire de Hangest" confirmed the donation of land "inter villam de Waescort...et villam de Greuni" made to Ourscamp by “Perron Wignon de Goiencourt escuier” by charter dated Jul 1287[398]Père Anselme states that Jean [III] confirmed an exchange of property with Compiègne Saint-Corneille by charter dated 1287[399].  The Chronique Artésienne records “mesires Jehans de Hangest” among those killed at the battle of Courtrai 11 Jul 1302[400].]  m JEANNE de la Tournelle, daughter of RAOUL Seigneur de la Tournelle & his wife Beatrix de Saint-Sauflieu.  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage[401].  Jean [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         RORICON de Hangest (-[1352])Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  A document of the Parlement de Paris dated 4 Jan 1337 records that “les héritiers et exécuteurs testamentaires de Dreu de Roye chevalier” were ordered to guarantee “Rogue sire de Hangest chevalier et Aubert son fils écuyer” relating to claims against “[les] fidéjusseurs d’Aubert de Narcy chevalier, mort avant d’avoir exécuté les engagements qu’il avait contractés conjointement avec son frère Pierre envers le roi de Bohème”, noting that “ces charges avaient été transmises par la veuve d’Aubert de Narcy à son second mari Dreu de Roye” after whose death she had married “en troisièmes noces Rogue de Hangest, tandis que sa fille de mariait avec Aubert fils de Rogue[402]Maréchal de France 1352.  m firstly ISABELLE de Montmorency, daughter of MATHIEU [IV] Seigneur de Montmorency & his second wife Jeanne de Levis (-bur Avesnecourt Notre-Dame).  m secondly as her third husband, ALIX de Garlande, widow firstly of AUBERT Seigneur de Narcy and secondly of DREUX de Roye Seigneur de Germigny, daughter of [JEAN de Garlande Seigneur de Possesse & his wife --- de Roucy] (-after 1335).  Her three marriages are confirmed by the document dated 4 Jan 1337 quoted above under her husband.  Père Anselme names her as daughter of Jean de Garlande Seigneur de Possesse[403].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Roricon & his first wife had two children: 

i)          JEAN [IV] de Hangest (-[4 Apr 1358/1363])Seigneur de Hangest et d’Avesnecourt.  m (1342) MARIE de Picquigny, daughter of FERRY de Picquigny Seigneur d’Ailly-sur-Somme et de Hervey & his second wife Beatrix de Nesle Dame de Falvy et de la Hérelle (-1381).   

-         SEIGNEURS de HANGEST

ii)         AUBERT de Hangest (-[1342/52]).  His parentage is confirmed by the document dated 4 Jan 1337 quoted above under his father.  m (before 4 Jan 1337) JEANNE de Narcy Dame de Narcy, daughter of AUBERT Seigneur de Narcy & his wife Alix de Garlande.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the document dated 4 Jan 1337 quoted above under her father-in-law.  

-         SEIGNEURS de BLAISE, de VAVINCOURT, et d’ARZILLIERS

 

 

AUBERT [II] de Hangest, son of FLORENT [I] de Hangest & his wife --- (-after 1202)Père Anselme names "Jean seigneur de Hangest [...vivoit en 1190]...Aubert de Hangest" as the two sons of Florent [I] de Hangest, in a later passage “il est cru fils puiné de Florent seigneur de Hangest[404].  He cites no primary source which confirms his statement.  However, his parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1202 under which [his nephew] "Florentio Juveni de Hangest" donated land “in maresco inter novam calceiam ante Davenescurt...” to Compiègne Saint-Corneille, at the request of "matris sue Helessendis, Auberti militis de Hangest avunculi eiusdem Florentii"[405].  Seigneur de Genlis et de Neuville-le-roi. 

m COMTESSE, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme names her as wife of Aubert [II], adding that she gave her consent to a donation to Beauvais Saint-Lucien made by her husband by charter dated 1188[406]

Aubert [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         AUBERT [III] de Hangest (-[after Mar 1231]).  Philippe II King of France granted “villam...Pons-sancti Petri” to “fideli nostro Alberto de Angesto et heredi suo masculo de uxore sua desponsata” by charter dated 1204[407]The Scripta de Feodis of King Philippe II record “dominus Aubertus d’Enges[t]” holding “medietatem Pontis Sancti Petri et de Romelliaco et de Pitres et de foresta de Longo Bouello de rege” in “feoda de ballivia Rothomagensi”, “Aubertus de Hangesto” holding “Genli...et Guivencort et...medietatem bosci Oignois[408]"Aubertus de Hangest et Ricardus Heldols milites" were named as arbitrators in a charter dated May 1215 which records a dispute between Compiègne Saint-Corneille and "Johannem de Cosduno militem et Hugonem filium eius" concerning “justicia ville de Mares[409]...Alberto de Hangest...” is named as present in a charter of “Johannes comes Bellimontis” dated 1222[410].  ["Aubertus de Hangest miles" confirmed the donation to Compiègne Saint-Corneille made by "Rainerius d’Estalons filius Alberici Croisset militis et Florencia uxor eius" by chartrer dated Mar 1231[411].  It is not certain whether this charter relates to Aubert [III] or his son Aubert [IV].]  m [BEATRIX de Châtillon, daughter of GAUCHER [III] Seigneur de Châtillon-sur-Marne Comte de Saint-Pol & his wife Elisabeth Ctss de Saint-Pol (-1233, bur Genlis Sainte-Elisabeth)Du Chesne records her marriage and states that she and her husband founded the abbey of Sainte Elisabeth de Genlis where she was buried, citing in his Preuves only a communication "par le sieur Hozier" stating that “Aubert de Hanest Seigneur de Genly fils puisné de Messire Florent Seigneur de Hangest et de Genly espousa Dame Beatrix de Chastillon seur d’Ysabeau femme de Messire Raoul de Coucy” and reporting their foundation and burial[412].  This statement is inaccurate concerning the wife of Raoul de Coucy.  It is not known whether it is accurate concerning Aubert de Hangest and his wife.  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage, but names her Elisabeth, also without citing any primary source[413].]  Aubert [III] & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [AUBERT [IV] de Hangest (-before 1259).  Père Anselme records Aubert [IV] as the son of Aubert [III] but without citing any primary source[414].  Seigneur de Genlis.  ["Aubertus de Hangest miles" confirmed the donation to Compiègne Saint-Corneille made by "Rainerius d’Estalons filius Alberici Croisset militis et Florencia uxor eius" by charter dated Mar 1231[415].  A list of knights participating in a tournament at Compiègne in Jun 1238 includes “...Ambiers de Hangest...[416].  It is not certain whether these documents relate to Aubert [III] or his son Aubert [IV].]  m as her first husband, MARIE de Roye, daughter of RAOUL de Roye Seigneur de la Ferté-en-Ponthieu & his wife Marie de Ville (-13 Mar ----).  She married secondly ([before 1259]) Bouchard [VIII] Comte de Vendôme.  The executors of “domini Auberti de Hangesto” claimed against “comitem Vindocinensem” for “dotalicio comitisse uxoris sue” dated 1260[417].  She married thirdly ([15 May/9 Dec] 1271) Jean de Vieuxpont Seigneur de Courville.  Her third marriage is confirmed by the necrology of Saint-Nicolas de Courville which records the death “V Non Mai“ of "dominus Johannes de Veteriponte miles junior” and his donation for the anniversaries of “patris et matris eiusdem necnon et domini Yvonis condam fratris sui” made “Curveville in castello...in presencia nobilis domine domine de Vindocino domine de Curvavilla uxoris eiusdem...anno LXXI die mercurii post Concepcionem beate Marie Virginis” [1270/71][418].  A charter dated 1272 records a judgment against “B. comitem Vindocinensem” and after his death dominam Mariam comitissam Vindocinensem, ratione liberorum suorum” relating to the capture of four men in the land of Sentier priory[419].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "V Non Mar" of "Maria comitissa"[420].  The necrology of Saint-Nicolas de Courville records the death “III Id Mar“ of "Marie domine de Curveville condam comitisse Vindocinensis et matris Yvonis domini Curveville militis” and the donation for whom of “annui redditus super preposituram Curveville, ad festum beati Remigii[421].  Aubert [IV] & his wife had three children: 

i)          --- de Hangest (-after 1273).  Richemond states that the older sister of Aubert [V] married Jean de Wallencourt, adding that both sisters disputed the inheritance of their father with their brother[422].  In 1273, “Johannes de Wallencuria et eius uxor” agreed that part of the succession of “defuncto domino Auberto de Hangesto patre ipsius domicelle”, as “filiabus suis legata”, should be paid to “Auberto de Hangesto fratri domicelle predicte[423]m (before 1273) JEAN de Wallencourt, son of ---. 

ii)         AUBERT [V] de Hangest (-after 1297).  Père Anselme records Aubert [V] as the son of Aubert [IV], adding that his stepfather won a lawsuit against him in 1281 regarding the execution of contracts agreed between them[424]. 

-         see below

iii)        LAURE de Hangest (-after 1280).  Richemond names Laure as younger sister of Aubert [V], adding that both sisters disputed the inheritance of their father with their brother[425]. “Domicelle Lore de Hangesto sororis sue” claimed against “Auberti de Hangesto militis” for “maritagio ipsius domicelle” in 1280[426]

 

 

AUBERT [V] de Hangest, son of AUBERT [IV] de Hangest Seigneur de Genlis & his wife Marie de Roye (-after 1297).  Père Anselme records Aubert [V] as the son of Aubert [IV], adding that his stepfather won a lawsuit against him in 1281 regarding the execution of contracts agreed between them[427].  The Exercitus Fuxensis Index Primus, dated 1272, names “armigeri..Aubertus de Hangesto” among “homines feodales...in ballia Viromandensi...Calriacum[428].  “Aubiers de Hangiest chevaliers sire de Genli” confirmed an exchange of property made by “Pieron de Saint-Aubin” by charter dated Mar 1284[429]Richemond records that Aubert resolved a dispute between Jean d’Avesnes and the citizens of Valenciennes in 1296, and in 1297 was sent by Philippe IV King of France with Jacques de Saint-Paul to negotiate an agreement with the citizens of Douai, commenting that Aubert’s son Aubert [VI] would have been too young at that time to have undertaken these missions[430]

m ([1275]) [ELEONORE] de Villebéon, daughter of GAUTHIER [IV] de Villebéon, Seigneur de Tournenfuye, de Heuqueville et de Fontaine-Guérart & his wife Eléonore de Melun.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the lawsuit dated 1281 concerning the marriage contract between “domini G. Cambellani militis...filiam” and “Aubertum de Hangesto militem[431].  Richemond highlights the absence of texts which confirm the name of this daughter, adding that “nous lui prêtons le prénom d’Eléonore parce que ce fut celui de sa mère et de sa fille[432]Père Anselme names “Isabelle de Tancarville dame de Fontaines, fille de Guillaume sire de Tancarville, chambellan de Normandie” as the wife of Aubert [V][433].  Richemond explains that this error presumably resulted from a misinterpretation of the documentation relating to the 1281 lawsuit, which names Aubert’s father-in-law “G. Cambellanus” which Anselme took to refer to the chamberlain of Normandy, especially as the dowry consisted of land inherited by his father-in-law’s paternal grandmother (Isabelle de Tancarville daughter of Guillaume de Tancarville and his wife Alix de Serans)[434]

Aubert [V] & his wife had one child: 

1.         AUBERT [VI] de Hangest (-[17 Aug 1328/1329], bur Genlis).  A charter dated Aug 1305 records a settlement between Ourscamp and "monseigneur Aubert de Hangest chevalier seigneur de Genli" concerning various properties[435]A list of convocations, dated 15 Jul 1317, names “Vermandois...à Montdidier: ...Aubert de Angest...[436].  A list of convocations, dated 5 Feb 1319 (N.S.), names “Vermandois: Monseigneur Aubert de Angest” and dated 25 Mar 1319 (N.S.) “...Monseigneur Aubert de Angest...[437]m firstly ---.  The name of Aubert’s first wife has not been identified.  The fact of this first marriage is confirmed by the chronology of Aubert’s oldest son Aubert (see below).  m secondly (Papal dispensation 10 Jun 1302) as her second husband, AGNES [de Bruyères], widow of RENAUD [II] Seigneur de Dargies, daughter of --- (-before 1329).  According to Père Anselme, she was “Agnes de Bruyères...sœur de Thomas seigneur de Bruyères” but he cites no primary source which confirms his statement[438].  It is presumably based on the charter dated Jul 1319, cited by Dom Villevieille, which records that [her daughter] “Jne d’Argiès, fille de Renaut d’Argiès, Ctsse de Soissons, veuve de Jn de Clermont chev.” sold “la terre de Puyvert“ to “Thomas de Bruyères son oncle et à Isabeau de Melun sa femme[439].  The Papal dispensation for the marriage of “nobili viro Auberto de Hangesto milite” and “nobli muliere Agnete domina de Dargies”, because “quondam Reginaldus de Dargies olim vir predicte Agnetis” was related by 4o affinity to “ipsi Auberto”, is dated 10 Jun 1302[440].  According to Père Anselme, she was “Agnes de Bruyères...sœur de Thomas seigneur de Bruyères” but he cites no primary source which confirms his statement[441].  Richemond says that she was “fille de Jean de Bruyères et d’Eustachie de Lévis ou de Lesves, et veuve de Robert d’Argies” but he cites no primary source[442]Aubert [VI] & his first wife had two children: 

a)         AUBERT [VII] de Hangest ([after 1295?]-29 Sep 1338, bur Genlis)His parentage and betrothal are confirmed by the report of the kidnapping of his first betrothed.  The date of his betrothal means that Aubert must have been born from a first marriage of his father, his marriage presumably being arranged by his stepmother who was the mother of Jeanne de Dargies.  Considering the estimated marriage date of his paternal grandfather, Aubert [VII] must have been younger than his proposed bride and was maybe still a child at the time of the betrothal.  Seigneur de Genlis.  Betrothed ([1304]) to JEANNE de Dargies, daughter of RENAUD [II] Seigneur de Dargies et de Catheux & his wife Agnes de Bruyères ([1290]-[Sep 1333/22 Feb 1337]).  Boutaric records that “le comte de Soissons avait enlevé et épousé la fille du sire de Dargies, fiancée à Aubert d’Hangest, fils d’un favori du roi” and that King Philippe IV requested Pope Clement V to confirm the marriage[443].  Given the Pope’s appointment 5 Jun 1305, the event must have taken place in early 1305.  [m firstly ---.  This possible first marriage is suggested considering Aubert [VII]’s likely date of birth, which would mean that his known marriage in 1335 would be late for a first marriage.]  m [secondly] (contract 20 Nov 1335) as her first husband, JEANNE de Joinville Dame de Rimaucourt, daughter of ANSEAU Seigneur de Joinville & his first wife Laura von Saarbrücken (-after 10 Jan 1345).  "Jean de Hangest chevalier frère et héritier d’Aubert de Hangest" sold property to Philippe VI King of France, saving revenue for "Jeanne de Joinville veuve d’Aubert", by charter dated Nov 1338[444].  "Le duc de Normandie fils du roi de France" granted compensation to "Anseau de Joinville" for “la garde du fils de feu Aubert de Hangest seigneur de Genlis son gendre” by charter dated 1338[445].  She married secondly (before 1344) Jean de Noyers Comte de Joigny.  The Parlement of Paris ordered "Henri de Joinville" to pay "à sa sœur Jeanne comtesse de Joigny veuve d’Aubert de Hangest" the sum due “au jour de la rédaction du contrat de mariage de Jeanne avec Aubert de Hangest seigneur de Genlis...daté du 20 novembre 1335” from the succession of “Anseau de Joinville” by charter dated 10 Jan 1344[446].  Aubert & his [second] wife had one child: 

i)          --- de Hangest ([1336/37]-[1338]).  "Le duc de Normandie fils du roi de France" granted compensation to "Anseau de Joinville" for “la garde du fils de feu Aubert de Hangest seigneur de Genlis son gendre” by charter dated 1338[447].  It is not clear from this extract whether Aubert’s son was deceased at the time, but presumably he must have died around [1338] as Aubert’s brother was named as Aubert [VII]’s heir. 

b)         JEAN de Hangest (-after 1340).  His absence from the 1329 lawsuit brought by his brother Mathieu and sister Eléonore suggests that Jean was born from his father’s first marriage.  "Jean de Hangest chevalier frère et héritier d’Aubert de Hangest" sold property to Philippe VI King of France, saving revenue for "Jeanne de Joinville veuve d’Aubert", by charter dated Nov 1338[448]m MARIE de Vignement, daughter of ---. 

-        SEIGNEURS de GENLIS

Aubert [VI] & his [first/second] wife had [one child]: 

c)         [JEANNE de Hangest .  Dame de Beaulieu.  Richemond shows her parentage in a genealogical table[449].  He does not cite the source on which he bases this information, but he has presumably copied Père Anselme who names “Jeanne de Hangest, dame de Beaulieu, dont l’alliance est ignorée” as daughter of Aubert [VI] (no source cited)[450].  Assuming that the information is correct, Jeanne’s absence from the 1329 lawsuit brought by her supposed brother Mathieu and sister Eléonore suggests that either she was born from her father’s first marriage or, if she was the daughter of his second wife, that she died before 1329 without direct heirs.] 

Aubert [VI] & his second wife had two children: 

d)         MATHIEU de Hangest (-before 1331).  Seigneur de la Taule.  Père Anselme records Mathieu’s participation in the 1329 lawsuit of his sister Eléonore[451].  m as her first husband, MARIE de la Bove, daughter of --- (-after 1347).  She married secondly ([1333]) Jean de Villesçavoir.  Père Anselme records that she “étoit remariée en 1333 à Jean de Villesçavoir” and that in 1347 “comme tutrice de ses enfans” [presumably by her first marriage] claimed against “les héritiers de la comtesse de Soissons” (no sources cited)[452].  This second lawsuit presumably arose out of the same family dispute which triggered the 1329 lawsuit in which her first husband was involved. 

-        SEIGNEURS de la TAULE

e)         ELEONORE de Hangest (-after 1336).  Père Anselme says that Eléonore was the daughter of Aubert [VI] and that she sued “la comtesse de Soissons et la dame de Barbançon” [daughters of Aubert [VI]’s second wife by her first marriage] in 1329 for the succession of “sa mère” and in 1336 the bishop of Noyon[453].  Margry provides more details, recording that “Eléonore de Hangest Genlis”, whom he calls widow of “Raoul le Flamenc VI seigneur de Canny” (clearly misidentified considering his death at Courtrai in 1302), “conjointement avec Mathieu de Hangest-Hugueville son frère” sued “la Comtesse de Soissons et la Dame de Barbanson” in 1329 relating to “la succession de Dame Agnès de Bruyères leur mère[454]Richemond says that Eléonore was the daughter of Aubert [V] and his wife [Eléonore] de Villebéon[455].  He cites no source to corroborate this information, which he bases on the chronological impossibility of the death in 1302 of the husband of a daughter of Aubert [VI].  He does not consider the more likely explanation that Eléonore’s husband was misidentified by Père Anselme.  No primary source has yet been identified which helps to identify Eléonore’s husband precisely.  The dates of Eléonore’s birth and marriage are estimated based on her parents’ marriage in Jun 1302.  Père Anselme, in one of his numerous references to the lawsuit involving Eléonore, notes that her brother Mathieu’s widow “comme tutrice de ses enfans” made a follow-up claim in 1347[456].  Anselme makes no mention either of Eléonore de Hangest, or of any of her children, participating in that 1347 claim.  If Mathieu’s widow acted alone at that time, it is probable that Eléonore predeceased her and had that she had died childless. m ([1315] or after) --- le Flamenc [Seigneur de Canny], son of --- (-before 1329, maybe before 1324).] 

 

 

 

I.        SEIGNEURS de RAINEVAL

 

 

Raineval, now known as Mailly-Raineval, is located about 15 kilometres south-east of Amiens in the present-day French département of Somme, arrondissement Montdidier, canton Ailly-sur-Noye.  The following reconstruction of this family is an outline which shows selected family members only, mainly for hyperlinking to other families studied in Medieval Lands.  The information has not been verified against primary source documentation, unless otherwise stated. 

 

 

1.         RAOUL de Raineval (-before 1300).  Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont.  m ---.  The primary source which confirms the identity of Raoul’s wife has not been identified.  Père Anselme names her “N--- de Nanteuil” without citing any source on which he bases this information[457].  Raoul & his wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN [I] de Raineval (-after 1325).  Père Anselme records his parentage without citing any source on which he bases this information[458]Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont.  m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean [I] & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          JEAN [II] de Raineval (-after 1329).  Père Anselme records his parentage without citing any source on which he bases this information[459]Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont.  m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean [I] & his wife had two children: 

(a)       GUILLAUME de Raineval (-after 1365)Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont. 

-         see below

(b)       PERRONNE de Raineval (-after 1367).  Père Anselme records her parentage and two marriages, citing sources dates Nov 1348, 1361, 1362, 1365 and 1367 in which she is named[460].  Dame du Mesnil 1361.  m firstly WAST Seigneur de Montigny, son of ---.  m secondly GILLES de Mailly dit Maillet, son of --- (-before 1361). 

ii)         [BEATRIX de Raineval (-after 1325).  Père Anselme says that “on croit” that Beatrix was the daughter of Jean [I] de Raineval, records her marriage, and notes that she was living in 1325, without citing the corresponding sources[461]m SAUCET de Bauçay, son of ---.]  

b)          [ISABELLE] de Raineval The genealogy of the Conflans family, written in [1350], records that “messires Eustasses”. oldest son of “Eustasses, fils du connestable” and his wife “la fille le comte de Soissons”, married firstly “[la] fille au seigneur de Rayneval” by whom he had “une fille qui mourut josne[462]Père Anselme names her “Isabeau de Raineval”, and dates their marriage to “1306”, without citing any source on which he bases this information[463].  The date is consistent with the estimate birth date of her husband.  m ([1306]) as his first wife, EUSTACHE [V] de Conflans Seigneur de Mareuil, son of EUSTACHE [IV] de Conflans Seigneur de Mareuil & his wife --- de Soissons ([1280/90]-[1335/43])

 

 

GUILLAUME de Raineval, son of JEAN [II] Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont & his wife --- (-after 1365)Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont. 

m ADA Dame de Fouilloy, daughter of ---.  Père Anselme names her without citing any source on which he bases this information[464]

Guillaume & his wife had [three or more] children: 

1.         RAOUL de Raineval (-1393)Seigneur de Raineval et de Pierrepont.  Grand pannetier de France 1383.  m firstly (contract 19 Nov 1350) PHILIPPA de Luxembourg, daughter of JEAN de Luxembourg Seigneur de Ligny & his first wife Alix de Flandre (-before 14 Oct 1359).  The marriage contract between "monsieur Raoul de Raineval fils de monsieur Guillaume seigneur de Raineval" and “madamoiselle Philippe fille de monsieur Iean de Lucembourg chastellain de Lille” is dated 19 Nov 1350 and provides land “en Touraine et sa seigneurie de Brueil” as dowry[465]m secondly ([29 Jul 1357/14 Nov 1359]) as her third husband, MARGUERITE de Picquigny Vidamesse d’Amiens, Dame de Picquigny, widow firstly of JEAN de Roucy Seigneur de Pierrepont and secondly of GAUTHIER de Noyers Seigneur d’Eclaron, daughter of RENAUD de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Jeanne d’Eu (-after 4 Mar 1377)Her parentage and first and second marriages are confirmed by the charter dated 27 Dec 1329 under which Gauthier de Noyers agreed her dower from her first husband with Robert Comte de Roucy[466]m thirdly (before 1387) ISABELLE de Coucy Dame de Dronay, daughter of AUBERT de Coucy Seigneur de Dronay & his wife Jeanne de Villesavoir (-1413).  Raoul & his first wife had five children: 

a)         VALERAN de Raineval (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415)Seigneur de Raineval, de Fouilloy et de Fluy.  Comte de Fauquemberghe 1392, after the death of his maternal aunt Jeanne de Luxembourg.  m JEANNE de Varennes, daughter of JEAN Seigneur de Varennes, de Vinacourt et de la Broye & his wife Isablle de Walincourt (-before 1415).  Valéran & his wife had two children: 

i)          RAOUL de Raineval (-before 1404)m JEANNE de Dondeauville, daughter of JEAN Seigneur de Dondeauville & his wife Jeanne de Créquy.  She married secondly Guillaume d’Estouteville Seigneur de Torcy et de Blainville. 

ii)         JEANNE de Raineval (-before 28 Nov 1413)A charter records that “Damoiselle Jne d’Arly damoiselle de Foulloy et de l‘Etoile” succeeded to property in the succession of “feue Madame Jne de Raineval sa mère, dame de Raineval et femme du Vidame d’Amiens“ on 4 Jan and 15 Feb 1412 (presumably O.S.) and that “Mgr Raoul d’Arly Sgr de Varennes et de Raineval“ succeeded to Varennes and the mairie of Forceville  “de la de Dame sa mère[467]m (1406) BAUDOUIN d’Ailly dit Beaugeois Vidame d’Amiens, son of ROBERT Seigneur d’Ailly & his second wife Marguerite de Picquigny (-[18 Apr/3 Dec] 1415)

b)         RAOULEQUIN de Raineval (-after 3 Aug 1379).  Seigneur de Cardonnay. 

c)         JEAN de Raineval (-after 1406).  Executor of the testament of “Jeanne de Varennes dame de Raineval”, named in 1406 in a legal dispute between “Guillaume d’Estouteville sire de Blainville” and “Baudouin d’Ailly dit Baugeois mari de Jeanne dame de Raineval[468]

d)         JEANNE de Raineval (-early Nov 1389, bur Beauvais église des Jacobins)m GUILLAUME Châtelain de Beauvais Seigneur de Saint-Denis-le-Thibous, son of --- (-1391, bur Beauvais église des Jacobins). 

e)         ADA de Raineval (-1392 or before)m (contract late-Jan 1365 (O.S.?)) JACQUES Seigneur d’Heilly et de Pas, son of ---. 

Raoul & his third wife had two children: 

f)          JEAN de Raineval (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415)Seigneur de Méraucourt, de Coudun et de Dronay.  m (13 Sep 1407) JEANNE de Montmorency, daughter of HUGUES de Montmorency Seigneur de Beausault & his wife Jeanne d’Harcourt (-after Aug 1416).  

g)         AUBERT de Raineval (-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415).  Seigneur de Bétencourt. 

2.         MARGUERITE de Raineval (-before 1373).  Père Anselme names “Marguerite de Raineval fille aînée de Guillaume sire de Raineval”, noting that the latter granted her “les terres de Lambersart, de la Motte et de Montraux en la châtellenie de Lille” on the marriage of his son and adding that she may have married “Robert seigneur de Freauville chevalier qui plaidoit comme son exécuteur testamentaire contre Raoul sire de Raineval en 1373[469]

3.         [daughter(s) .  Guillaume had other daughters if Père Anselme correctly identifies Marguerite as “[sa] fille aînée” (see above).] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    COMTES de MONTREUIL

 

 

 

1.         HELGAUD, son of --- (-[866]).  Abbé de Saint-Riquier.  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "le comte Helgaud" succeeded "Rodolphe…du sang imperial" as lay abbot of Saint-Riquier and that he was succeeded by "Guelfon…du sang royal"[470].  "Rodolphe" is identified with Rudolf Comte de Sens, brother of Empress Judith, who died in 866, and "Guelfon" as Rudolf's son.  This casts doubt on the chronology of this passage as, if the relationship between Rudolf and Welf is correctly identified, it is likely that the son succeeded the father as lay abbot as such a post was often hereditary.  same person as…?  HELGAUD (-after 879).  Flodoard records "terra filiorum Balduini, Rodulfi quoque de Gangeio atque Hilgaudi" in 925[471]Comte de Montreuil 877-879.  It is probable that Helgaud, abbé de Saint-Riquier, and his son Herluin are in fact the same people as Helgaud Comte de Montreuil 877-79 and his son Herluin who died in 945, and that the Chronique de Saint-Riquier is inaccurate in its chronology relating to the supposedly earlier father and son of these names.  m ---.  The name of Helgaud's wife is not known.  Helgaud & his wife had one child:

a)         HERLUIN (-killed in battle 13 Jul 945).  Flodoard names "Monasteriolum castellum Erluini filii Hilgaudi comitis" when recording that Montreuil was besieged by "Heribertus et Hugo"[472]The Chronique de Saint Riquier names "Herluin…comte" as son of "le comte Helgaud" lay abbot of Saint-Riquier[473].  As noted above, it is possible that Helgaud and his son Herluin are in fact the same people as Helgaud Comte de Montreuil 877-79 and his son Herluin who died in 945 (see below), and that the Chronique de Saint-Riquier is inaccurate in its chronology relating to the supposedly earlier father and son of these names.  Comte de Montreuil.  Arnoul Count of Flanders captured Montreuil in 939: Flodoard records in 939 that “comes Arnulfus” captured “castellum Erluini...Monasteriolum” and that he sent “uxorem ipsius Erluini...cum filiis” across the sea “ad Alstanum regem[474]Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Arnulfus Flandrensis comes” captured "castrum...Monasteriolum" from “comiti...Herluino”, who sought help from “Normanniæ dominum” who recaptured the castle for Herluin[475].  Comte d'Amiens 944/45.  He was killed fighting the Normans.  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the death of "Herluinus Monasterioli castro comes" fighting "Aygroldo regi Danorum"[476].  Guillaume de Jumièges records that “Herluini” was killed on the orders of “Haigroldo regi Danorum[477]m firstly (divorced before 927) ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  m secondly (before 927) --- (-after 939).  Flodoard records in 939 that “comes Arnulfus” captured “castellum Erluini...Monasteriolum” and that he sent “uxorem ipsius Erluini...cum filiis” across the sea “ad Alstanum regem[478]Comte Herluin & his second wife had [two or more] children:

i)          children (-after 939).  Flodoard records in 939 that “comes Arnulfus” captured “castellum Erluini...Monasteriolum” and that he sent “uxorem ipsius Erluini...cum filiis” across the sea “ad Alstanum regem[479].  There is no indication about the number of children nor whether Roger, named below, was one of them. 

ii)         ROGER .  Flodoard names "Rotgarii filii Erluini" when recording that Arnoul Count of Flanders besieged the castle of Montreuil in 943[480]Comte de Montreuil 948/57.  m ---.  The name of Roger's wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child:

(a)       HUGUES (-961, bur Saint-Rémy).  Flodoard names "Huggo filius Totgarii quondam comitis, adolescens" when recording his death in 961 and burial place[481]

b)         ERARD .  Flodoard names "Ebrardum fratrem Erluini" when recording that his castle of Ham was captured in 932 by "Heribertus comes"[482].  Seigneur du château de Ham (Picardie). 

c)         LAMBERT (-killed in battle after 945).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that “Lambertus frater eius” was killed trying to avenge the death of “Herluini[483]

 

 

1.         HUGUES, son of --- (-4 Jul [1000]).  Kerrebrouck[484] says there is no proof that Hugues was the son of Hilduin Comte de Montreuil (see above), and that he could have been a member of the family of Enguerrand, one of whom was abbé de Saint-Riquier at the beginning of the 11th century.  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that Hugues "Capet" King of France granted the château d'Abbeville "à un chevalier nommé Hugues" and also confiscated "Forest-Moutier" from the abbey of Saint-Riquier and granted it to him, recording in a later passage that Hugues bore the title "avoué" not comte[485]These territories became the foundation of the county of Ponthieu.  m (before 987) GISELE de France, daughter of HUGUES Duc des Francs [later HUGUES "Capet" King of France] & his wife Adelais [d'Aquitaine] ([[969][486]-).  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that Hugues "Capet" King of France granted the château d'Abbeville "à un chevalier nommé Hugues" who had married the king's daughter "Gisèle"[487].  Hugues & his wife had two children:

a)         ENGUERRAND (-1045, bur Saint-Riquier)The Chronique de Saint Riquier names "Angelran" as son of Hugues, commenting that he contented himself with the title avoué until his marriage when he adopted the title comte[488]Avoué de Saint-Riquier.  He defeated Gilbert Comte de Brionne who had invaded Le Vimeu[489]The Chronique de Saint Riquier records the death in 1045 of "seigneur Angelran" and his burial at Saint-Riquier[490].  [m firstly ---.  If the date attributed to Enguerrand's marriage to Aleida is correct as shown below, it is chronologically implausible for her to have been the mother of Enguerrand's sons.  This is because Enguerrand's grandson, Enguerrand, must have married in [1045/50] (see below).  This earlier marriage is therefore almost inevitably correct, although no direct reference which confirms this has yet been found in primary sources.]  m [secondly] ([after 1033]) as her second husband, ALEIDA, widow of BAUDOUIN Comte de Boulogne, daughter of [ARNULF Count of Holland & his wife Liutgard de Luxembourg].  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Angelran" killed "le comte de Boulogne" in battle and married his widow "Adelvie…qui était de l'origine la plus illustre", after which he adopted the title comte[491].  She is named as the possible daughter of Arnulf, and her two marriages shown, in Europäische Stammtafeln[492] but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  Enguerrand & his [first] wife had three children: 

i)          HUGUES (-killed 20 Nov 1052, bur Saint-Riquier)The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "son fils Hugues" succeeded after the death of "Angelran"[493]

-         see below

ii)         GUY (-1074).  The Chronicon Hariulfi records that “Guidonem...comitis germanum Hugonis, comitis Widonis patruum” succeeded “Fulconis” as bishop of Amiens[494].  Archdeacon of Notre-Dame.  Bishop of Amiens 1058.  He was the probable author of the poem Carmen, written in [1067], which commemorates the campaign of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy to conquer England[495]

iii)        FOULQUES (-after 1059).  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Foulques…fils d'Angelran" usurped the abbacy of Saint-Riquier[496]Abbé de Saint-Riquier 1042.  Abbé de Forestmoutier 1045. 

b)         GUYThe Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Gui…frère de Seigneur Angelran" was named abbé of Saint-Riquier[497]

 

 

HUGUES [de Ponthieu], son of ENGUERRAND Comte [de Ponthieu] & his first wife --- (-killed 20 Nov 1052, bur Saint-Riquier)The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "son fils Hugues" succeeded after the death of "Angelran"[498]He fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 according to the poem Carmen, attributed to his uncle Guy Bishop of Amiens, although the date is inconsistent with his date of death shown here.  Comte de Montreuil. 

m BERTHE d'Aumâle, daughter of GUERINFRID Seigneur d'Aumâle & his wife ---.  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[499]

Hugues & his wife had five children: 

1.         ENGUERRAND (-killed in battle Château d'Arques 25 Oct [1053])The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Hugues" had four sons of whom the eldest "Angelran" confirmed a donation of his father to Saint-Riquier on his deathbed by charter dated "XII Kal Dec"[500]The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[501]Comte de Montreuil.  Orderic Vitalis records that “tempore Rodberti ducis Gislebertus comes Brionniæ” invaded “in pagum Vimmacensem” [Vimeu] but was repulsed by “Ingelrannus Pontivi comes[502].  Le Prévost dates this event to “antérieure à 1034, époque présumée de la fondation du Bec[503].  Seigneur d'Aumâle.  Comte d’Abbeville: Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmum Archacensem” rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, helped by Henri I King of France, and that “Ingelrannus Abbatisvillæ comes...ac Hugo cognomento Bardulfus” were killed by the duke’s forces during the attack on his castle of Arques[504]m as her first husband, ADELAIS de Normandie, illegitimate daughter of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- (-[1081/86]).  Robert de Torigny names "Aeliz" as the daughter of Duke Robert II "de alia concubina" from Herleve[505]The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[506]She retained the title Comtesse d'Aumâle after her first marriage.  She married secondly ([1053/54]) Lambert de Boulogne Comte de Lens, and thirdly ([1060]) Eudes Comte de Troyes [Blois-Champagne], who succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in [1070].  Her second marriage is deduced from the same charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy which also names “Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[507]Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[508].  Enguerrand & his wife had three children: 

a)         GUY [I] de Montreuil (-13 Nov [1100], bur Abbéville, Saint-Pierre).  A charter dated 1100 included in the cartulary of Saint-Josse records a grant of fishing rights by "Guido comes Monsteroli et Pontivensium" which names "Hugo noster avus" and "patre meo Ingerrano"[509].  This is inconsistent with the Chronique de Saint Riquier which records that "comte Gui fils du comte Hugues" succeeded after "Angelran son frère" was killed by the Normans and possessed the county of Ponthieu and the avouerie of Saint-Riquier[510].  It is assumed that the charter provides the more reliable record of Guy's parentage.  Comte de MontreuilComte de Ponthieu

-        COMTES de PONTHIEU

b)         ADELAIDE de Montreuil .  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum” and “Addelidis comitissa supradicti Engueranni et supradicte Adelidis filia…Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[511].  1098. 

c)         HELISSENDE de Montreuil .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  1096.  "Comes Hugo de Sancto Paulo" donated property to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "uxoris sue Helisendis filiorumque suorum Ingelranni et Hugonis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1095[512]m (before 1091) HUGUES [II] Comte de Saint-Pol, son of --- (-before [1118/19]). 

2.         ROBERTThe Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Hugues" had four sons of whom the eldest was "Angelran" but does not name the three others[513]same person as…?  ROBERT d’Aumâle (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Robert d’Aumale” holding numerous properties in Devonshire[514]

3.         son .  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Hugues" had four sons of whom the eldest was "Angelran" but does not name the three others[515]

4.         son .  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that "Hugues" had four sons of whom the eldest was "Angelran" but does not name the three others[516]same person as…?  GALERAN (-killed in battle Mortemer 1054). 

5.         daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmum Archacensem” went into exile “cum uxore sua sorore...Widonis comitis Pontivi” after his rebellion was crushed by Duke Guillaume II and found refuge with “Eustachium Boloniæ comitem” with whom he remained in exile until he died[517]m GUILLAUME de Normandie Comte d'Arques, son of RICHARD II "le Bon/l'Irascible" Duke of Normandy & his second wife Papia [Poppa] --- (-1054). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    COMTES de PONTHIEU

 

 

 

A.      COMTES de PONTHIEU

 

 

The area around Ponthieu, which extended approximately from the river Canche in the north to the river Somme in the south, was conquered by Arnoul I Count of Flanders in [940].  It developed into a separate county in the early 11th century, based around territory which was granted by Hugues "Capet" King of France to Hugues, avocat de Saint-Riquier, who had married the king's daughter some time in the 980s.  The counts were vassals of the Capetian kings.  The county was inherited by the Norman family of Bellême/Montgommery in the late 11th century, and by the family of the counts of Dammartin in the early 1220s.  A disputed inheritance resulted in the county passing into English control in 1281. 

 

 

GUY de Montreuil, son of ENGUERRAND Comte de Montreuil & his wife Adelais de Normandie (-13 Nov [1100], bur Abbéville, Saint-Pierre).  A charter dated 1100 included in the cartulary of Saint-Josse records a grant of fishing rights by "Guido comes Monsteroli et Pontivensium" which names "Hugo noster avus" and "patre meo Ingerrano"[518].  This is inconsistent with the Chronique de Saint Riquier which records that "comte Gui fils du comte Hugues" succeeded after "Angelran son frère" was killed by the Normans and possessed the county of Ponthieu and the avouerie of Saint-Riquier[519].  It is assumed that the charter provides the more reliable record of Guy's parentage.  Comte de MontreuilComte de Ponthieu.  Orderic Vitalis records that Guy fought with "Ralph Comte de Montdidier", in support of Henri I King of France, in Feb 1054, was captured by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy and kept prisoner for 2 years until he paid homage to the duke[520].  "Pontivensium comes Wido" donated property to Compiègne Saint-Corneille, confirmed by "Anne comitisse nostre filie", by charter dated to [1067 or after][521].  A charter dated 1100 records the foundation of the priory of St-Pierre d’Abbeville by "Guy comte de Ponthieu et Adèle sa femme", sealed by "Guy comte, de Agnèz sa fille, de Mahaut sa fille…"[522].  "Wido…Pontivi regionis comes" issued a charter dated 1101 relating to the church of Montreuil witnessed by "Agnetis mee filie, Hugonis filii Ramelini cum Ade sue conjugis, Widonis filii Hermenfredi, Simonis Rogeronis filii, Godefridi vicecomitis…Wascelini tunc temporis vicecomitis Monsteroli et ville Rue…"[523]

m firstly ADA, daughter of --- (-5 Mar before 1066).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. 

m secondly ADILA [Ada], daughter of ---.  "Wido comes Pontivensis et uxor eius Adila comitissa" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin des Champs for the soul of "filii sui Ingelranni" by charter dated before 1090[524].  A charter dated 1100 records the foundation of the priory of St-Pierre d’Abbeville by "Guy comte de Ponthieu et Adèle sa femme", sealed by "Guy comte, de Agnèz sa fille, de Mahaut sa fille…"[525].  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "his predecessors…count Guy and Adda his wife…" by charter dated 1127[526]

Comte Guy & his [first] wife had one child: 

1.         ANNE de Ponthieu (-[after 1067]).  "Pontivensium comes Wido" donated property to Compiègne Saint-Corneille, confirmed by "Anne comitisse nostre filie", by charter dated to [1067 or after][527].  The title "comitisse" in this charter suggests that Anne must have been married to a count at that date.  [m ---.] 

Comte Guy & his [second] wife had four children: 

2.         ENGUERRAND de Ponthieu (-before [1079/80]).  "Wido comes Pontivensis et uxor eius Adila comitissa" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin des Champs for the soul of "filii sui Ingelranni" by charter dated before 1090[528]

3.         AGNES de Ponthieu (-after 6 Oct 1100)Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertum Belesmensem” married “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem[529]"Wido…Pontivi regionis comes" issued a charter dated 1101 relating to the church of Montreuil witnessed by "Agnetis mee filie…"[530].  This marriage was arranged by William II King of England, according to Orderic Vitalis, who also specifies her father's name[531].  A charter dated 1100 records the foundation of the priory of St-Pierre d’Abbeville by "Guy comte de Ponthieu et Adèle sa femme", sealed by "Guy comte, de Agnèz sa fille, de Mahaut sa fille…"[532].  Orderic Vitalis records that she was treated cruelly by her husband and imprisoned in the castle of Bellême, from where she escaped, took refuge with Adela Ctss de Blois, and retired to Ponthieu[533]m (before 9 Sep 1087) ROBERT de Montgommery, son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery Seigneur d'Alençon, Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury & his wife Mabile d'Alençon ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 8 May [1131 or later], bur [Wareham Castle]).  Comte de Bellême 1101.  Seigneur d'Alençon. 

-        see below, Part B.  COMTES de PONTHIEU (BELLEME)

4.         IDA de Ponthieu .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Abbess of Sainte-Austreberte at Montreuil. 

5.         MATHILDE de Ponthieu .  A charter dated 1100 records the foundation of the priory of St-Pierre d’Abbeville by "Guy comte de Ponthieu et Adèle sa femme", sealed by "Guy comte, de Agnèz sa fille, de Mahaut sa fille…"[534].   

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de PONTHIEU (BELLÊME-MONTGOMMERY)

 

 

ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême", son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury & his first wife Mabile d'Alençon ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 8 May [after 1129], bur [Wareham Castle]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quinque filios et quatuor filias...Robertus et Hugo, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus et Arnulfus, Emma, Mathildis, Mabilia et Sibylla” as the children of “Willelmus Talavatius...filiam suam...Mabiliam” and “Rogerium de Monte-Gummeri[535].  He witnessed a charter for Saint Martin de Sées with his brother Roger, and a charter for Saint Aubin of Angers in [1060/62] without Roger[536], suggesting that the latter had died by then.  He succeeded his mother in 1079 as Seigneur de Bellême et d'Alençon.  He rebelled against William II King of England in 1088, crossed to England but was besieged at Rochester Castle and in Jun 1088 forced to surrender[537].  "Rotbertus de Belismo filius Rotgerii comitis et Mabilie" donated the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built by "Willelmus attavus Rotberti", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "fratres ipsius Rotberti, Hugo, Rotgerius, Arnulfus", by charter dated 1092[538].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Rodbertus...filius eius” obtained “totum feudum eius in Normannia”, adding that he was “crudelis et superbus” and committed “innumeras iniquitates[539].  He succeeded his younger brother in 1098 as Earl of Shrewsbury after a payment of £3000[540].  He succeeded his father-in-law in Oct 1100 as Comte de Ponthieu.  He rebelled against Henry I King of England in 1102, was deprived of all his honours and estates in England, and retired to Normandy.  The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo[541].  He was arrested in 1112, imprisoned at Cherbourg and all his lands and honours were forfeited.  He was imprisoned at Wareham Castle, Dorset from Jul 1113[542].  The Annals of Margan record the death “Kal Mai” in 1118 of “Robertus comes de Belesme[543].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records payments made "in libatione Robti de Belismo" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[544].  This suggests a pension or maintenance in some form, although it is not certain that it relates to Robert de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury. 

m (before 9 Sep 1087) AGNES de Ponthieu, daughter of GUY [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Ada --- (-after 6 Oct 1100).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertum Belesmensem” married “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem[545]Orderic Vitalis records that she was treated cruelly by her husband and imprisoned in the castle of Bellême, from where she escaped, took refuge with Adela Ctss de Blois, and retired to Ponthieu[546].  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "… his father Robert de Belesmo and his mother Agnes…" by charter dated 1127[547]

Comte Robert & his wife had three children: 

1.         GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" (-30 Jun 1171)Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum” as the son of “Rodbertum Belesmensem” and his wife “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem[548]Comte de Ponthieu

-        see below.

2.         ANDRE .  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte by charter dated 1127, subscribed by "…Andrea fratre comitis"[549]

3.         MABILE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" de Ponthieu, son of ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellême" Seigneur d'Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu, Earl of Shrewsbury & his wife Agnès de Ponthieu (-30 Jun 1171)Orderic Vitalis names “Guillelmum” as the son of “Rodbertum Belesmensem” and his wife “filiam Guidonis Pontivi comitis Agnetem[550]He succeeded his father [4 Mar 1106/1110][551] as Comte de Ponthieu.  "Wilelmus comes Pontivi" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême to Marmoutier by charter dated to [1112/14][552].  Henry I King of England restored Comte Guillaume to his father's lands in Normandy in Jun 1119[553].  He resigned Ponthieu [before 1129] in favour of his son Guy: Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “filiorum primogenitus Wido” was made “patre vivente...comes Pontivi[554].  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "his predecessors earl Roger and Mabel his wife, count Guy and Adda his wife, his father Robert de Belesmo and his mother Agnes and…Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[555].  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[556]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes nepos suus…ex Guidone primogenito suo"[557].  The Obituaire of Saint-Martin de Séez records the death 30 Jun of "Guillelmus Pontivorum comes"[558]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "30 Jun" of "Willelmus comes Talevat"[559]

[m firstly ---.  The name of Guillaume’s supposed first wife is not known.  This first marriage is strongly suggested by the marriage date of Guillaume’s daughter Clémence.  She is named in Jul 1128 with her son "Gaufrido primogenito" (see below).  The addition of the word "primogenito" suggests that there was at least one other younger child at that date.  This would place her marriage in late 1125 at the very latest.  It is extremely unlikely, therefore, that she could have born from Guillaume’s marriage to Hélie de Bourgogne, the death of whose first husband is recorded in late Apr 1112.  The other indication is the unlikelihood that Hélie de Bourgogne could have had eleven children by her second husband, considering her own estimated birth date.] 

m [secondly] ([late 1112/1115]) as her second husband, HELIE de Bourgogne, widow of BERTRAND de Toulouse Count of Tripoli, daughter of EUDES I Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his wife Sibylle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1080/83]-28 Feb 1141).  She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her parentage, her two marriages and the names of her eldest sons by each marriage[560].  The contract of marriage between "Bertrandus Raimundi filius" and "Electæ" is dated Jun 1095[561].  If this document is correctly dated, it is unlikely that Hélie was born much later than [1080/83].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias[562].  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "…Ela his wife…" by charter dated 1127[563].  "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139[564].  "Wido comes Pontivii" confirmed freedoms over his lands, with the consent of "patris mei Willermi et domine Ele matris mee, fratris mei Johannis et uxoris mee Ide et filii mei Johannis" by undated charter[565]

Comte Guillaume [I] & his [first] wife had [three] children: 

1.         CLEMENCE de Ponthieu (-30 Nov before 1189).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “una” married “Iuhello filio Walterii de Meduana[566].  As noted above, the chronology suggests that Clémence was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of her father.  "Juhello principe Meduane et uxore eius Clementia et filio eorum Gaufrido primogenito" subscribed a charter dated 12 and 26 Jul 1128, under which property was restored to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[567]m (before [1126]) JUHEL Seigneur de Mayenne, son of GAUTHIER Seigneur de Mayenne & his wife Aline --- (-23 Dec 1161, bur Evroux).

2.         MABILE de Ponthieu .  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[568].  If this translation is accurate, the wording suggests that Mabile was not the daughter of Guillaume’s known wife Hélie. 

3.         PHILIPPA de Ponthieu (-before 1149, bur Abbaye de Saint-Martin de Sées).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  It is suggested that she may have been born from her father’s supposed first marriage only to reduce the number of children attributed to his wife Hélie, whose age suggests that she could not have been the mother of ten children. 

Comte Guillaume [I] & his [second] wife had nine children: 

4.         GUY [II] de Ponthieu (-Ephesus [25 Dec] 1147)His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[569].  He succeeded before 1129 as Comte de Ponthieu

-        see below

5.         GUILLAUME de Ponthieu (-after 1166).  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[570].  Comte d'Alençon 1166.

6.         ROBERT de Ponthieu .  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[571].  1127. 

7.         ROBERT de Garennes (-1171 or after).  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[572].  Monk before 1147. 

8.         GUILLAUME de Ponthieu .  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[573]

9.         ENGUERRAND de Ponthieu .  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[574]

10.      ENGUERRAND de Ponthieu .  "Gulielmus comes Pontivorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Ela his wife and of their sons two of them called Robert and two William and two Enguerrand and Mabel his daughter" by charter dated 1127[575]

11.      JEAN de Ponthieu (-24 Feb 1191).  "Wido comes Pontivii" confirmed freedoms over his lands, with the consent of "patris mei Willermi et domine Ele matris mee, fratris mei Johannis et uxoris mee Ide et filii mei Johannis" by undated charter[576].  He succeeded in 1141 as Comte d'Alençon.  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[577]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes comes filius eius" in the lands which he held from the English king "in Normannia et in Cenomannensi pago"[578]

-        COMTES d'ALENÇON

12.      ELA de Ponthieu (-10 Dec 1174).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “altera” married “tertio Willelmi de Warenna comiti...Surreiæ[579].  Her name suggests that she must have been born from Guillaume’s marriage to Hélie de Bourgogne.   Her second marriage is confirmed by Robert of Torigny who refers to the wife of "comes Patricius" as "filia Guillermi comitis Pontivi, matre comitisse de Warenna"[580].  Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury wrote to “Alæ comitissæ Warennæ” concerning the retention from the monks of Lewes of tithes from her dower lands, dated to [1162/74][581]The register of Lewes priory records the death “IV Id Dec” in 1174 of “domina Ala comitissa Surregiæ filia comitis de Belesme et uxor Willielmi tertii...anno xxvi post virum suum” and states that it is not known where she was buried (“ubi sepulta est nescitur”)[582]m firstly WILLIAM [III] de Warenne Earl of Surrey, son of WILLIAM [II] de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] ([1119]-killed in battle Laodicea 19 Jan 1148)m secondly (1152 or before) as his second wife, PATRICK Earl of Salisbury, son of WALTER FitzEdward de Salisbury & his wife Maud de Chaources [Chaworth] (-killed in battle Poitou [7 Apr] 1168, bur Poitiers, Abbaye de Saint-Hilaire).  

 

 

GUY [II] de Ponthieu, son of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] (-Ephesus [25 Dec] 1147).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[583].  He succeeded [before 1129] as Comte de Ponthieu.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quæ fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundiæ” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “filiorum primogenitus Wido” was made “patre vivente...comes Pontivi[584].  "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux with the consent of "pater eius Willelmus comes…et mater eius Hela" by charter dated 18 Dec 1139, signed by "Guido comes et uxor sua Ida"[585].  He left on crusade in 1146. 

m (before 18 Dec 1139) IDA, daughter of --- (-after 1177).  "Wido comes Pontivii" confirmed freedoms over his lands, with the consent of "patris mei Willermi et domine Ele matris mee, fratris mei Johannis et uxoris mee Ide et filii mei Johannis" by undated charter[586].  "Guido comes Pontivi" donated property to Cîteaux by charter dated 18 Dec 1139, signed by "Guido comes et uxor sua Ida"[587]"Jean comte de Ponthieu" founded l’Hôtel-Dieu d’Abbeville by charter dated 1158, witnessed by "Ide comtesse…"[588].  "Johannes comes Pontivi" confirmed rights of the monks of Val, with the consent of "Guidonis fratris mei et Beatricis comitisse uxoris mee", by charter dated 1177, which also names "mater mea Ida comitissa"[589]

Comte Guy [II] & his wife had three children: 

1.         JEAN [I] de Ponthieu (-Acre 30 Jun 1191).  "Wido comes Pontivii" confirmed freedoms over his lands, with the consent of "patris mei Willermi et domine Ele matris mee, fratris mei Johannis et uxoris mee Ide et filii mei Johannis" by undated charter[590].  He succeeded his father as Comte de Ponthieu"Jean comte de Ponthieu" founded l’Hôtel-Dieu d’Abbeville by charter dated 1158, witnessed by "Ide comtesse…"[591].  Robert of Torigny records that Henry II King of England granted "castrum Alenceium et Rocam Mabiriæ" to "Willermus Talavacius comes Sagiensis et filius eius Johannes et iterum Johannes nepos eius filius Guidonis primogeniti sui comitis Pontivi" in 1166[592]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1171 of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi" and the succession of "Johannes nepos suus…ex Guidone primogenitor suo"[593]"Jean comte de Ponthieu, Guillaume son fils, et Beatrix son épouse" granted revenues to "Baudin et Simon son frère…" by charter dated 1186[594].  m firstly (after 1158) MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  1162.  m secondly (after 1162 [repudiated, before 1170]) [as her first husband,] LAURE de Saint-Valéry, daughter of RENAUD de Saint-Valéry & his [second] wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  Domesday Descendants records that Renaud de Saint-Valéry was the father of "Laura wife first of John count of Ponthieu, by whom she was repudiated, and secondly of Alleaume de Fontaines", but does not cite the corresponding primary sources[595].  [She married secondly Alleaume de Fontaines.]  m thirdly (before 4 Dec 1170) BEATRIX de Saint-Pol, daughter of ANSELME "Candavène" Seigneur de Lucheux et de Tarentefirt [later Comte de Saint-Pol] & his first wife --- (-1202 or after).  "Johannes comes Pontivi" confirmed rights of the monks of Val, with the consent of "Guidonis fratris mei et Beatricis comitisse uxoris mee", by charter dated 1177, which also names "mater mea Ida comitissa"[596]The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  "Jean comte de Ponthieu, Guillaume son fils, et Beatrix son épouse" granted revenues to "Baudin et Simon son frère…" by charter dated 1186[597].  Comte Jean [I] & his third wife had [four] children: 

a)         ADELA de Ponthieu (-after 18 Oct 1241).  Letters dated 1178 confirm the marriage of "comes Pontivi filiam suam Edelam" and "Renaldo filio Bernardi de Sancto Walerico", with the right of substitution in case either party died before the marriage[598].  The death of Renaud before the marriage took place is indicated by the charter dated 1205 under which "Thomas de Sancto Walarico" promised service to "fratrem meum et dominum Willelmum comitem Pontivi"[599]Dame de Saint-AubinHer marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her husband “Thomas de sancto Walerico” confirmed the donation by "Bernardus bonæ memoriæ pater meus" made to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire with the consent of Henry II King of England, for the souls of “Edelæ uxoris meæ et Bernardi patris meæ et Anoræ matris meæ[600]Betrothed (contract 1178) to RENAUD de Saint-Valéry, son of BERNARD Seigneur de Saint-Valéry & his wife Anora ---  (-[1189/91]).  m ([1191/92]) THOMAS de Saint-Valéry, son of BERNARD Seigneur de Saint-Valéry & his wife Anora --- (-before 1220).  Seigneur de Saint-Valéry.  The agreement between "dominum comitem Pontivi et Monstreoli" and "dominum Thomam de Sancto Waleriaco" is confirmed by charter dated Sep 1209[601].  An agreement dated 1209 between "dominum comitem" and "dominum Thomam de Sancto Walerico" refers to the marriage of the latter to "domine Edle sororis sue" and also names "Bernardus pater suus"[602]

b)         GUILLAUME [II] "Talvas" de Ponthieu (after 1178-6 Oct 1221, bur Abbaye de Valloires, Somme)"Jean comte de Ponthieu, Guillaume son fils, et Beatrix son épouse" granted revenues to "Baudin et Simon son frère…" by charter dated 1186[603].  He succeeded his father in 1191 as Comte de Ponthieu

-        see below

c)         MARGUERITE de Ponthieu (-after Aug 1216)The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Ingelrannus de Pinchonio vicedominus Ambianensis” donated property to the church of Amiens for the anniversaries of "meo et...uxoris mee Margarete" by charter dated Apr 1209[604]"Enguerrand Sgr de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens" donated property to the abbey of Gard, with the consent of "Marguerite sa femme, de ses fils et filles Girard, Renaut, Flandrine, Ide, Marguerite et Marie", by charter dated Aug 1216[605].  m ENGUERRAND de Picquigny Vidame d'Amiens, son of GUERMOND [III] de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Flandrine d’Amiens (-[Jun/Nov] 1224).  

d)         [HELENE de Ponthieu .  Père Anselme records "Guillaume d’Estouteville", son of Nicolas [I] d’Estouteville, adding "à qui l’on donne femme, mais sans preuve, Helene de Ponthieu, on la dit fille de Jean I comte de Ponthieu et de Beatrix de S. Paul sa troisième femme"[606]m GUILLAUME d'Estouteville, son of NICOLAS [I] Seigneur d’Estouteville & his wife --- (-before 1210).] 

2.         GUY de Ponthieu (-[1205/Nov 1218]).  "Johannes comes Pontivi" confirmed rights of the monks of Val, with the consent of "Guidonis fratris mei et Beatricis comitisse uxoris mee", by charter dated 1177, which also names "mater mea Ida comitissa"[607].  Seigneur de Noyelles.  "Will Talevas cuens de Pontieu" granted rights to Crècy, with the consent of "Guyon mon oncle", by charter dated 1194[608].  Teutonic Knight 1205.  A charter dated Nov 1218 issued by "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" confirmed grants by "Johannes pater meus" to "Guidoni fratri suo", and names "Johanni filio et heredi dicti Guidonis avunculi mei" and "Willelmus de Maneriis frater minor dicti Johannis"[609]

-        SEIGNEURS de MAISNIERES, SEIGNEURS de MAINTENAY[610]

3.         AGNES de Ponthieu .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Abbess at Montreuil. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [II] "Talvas" de Ponthieu, son of JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife (after 1178-6 Oct 1221, bur Abbaye de Valloires, Somme)"Jean comte de Ponthieu, Guillaume son fils, et Beatrix son épouse" granted revenues to "Baudin et Simon son frère…" by charter dated 1186[611].  He succeeded his father in 1191 as Comte de Ponthieu.  "Will Talevas cuens de Pontieu" granted rights to Crècy, with the consent of "Guyon mon oncle", by charter dated 1194[612].  He played an important role in the war in Normandy, commanding troops at the battle of Bouvines 1204.  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of "Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee", by charter dated 1205[613]"Guilelmus comes Pontivi et Monstrolii" donated property to Saint-Maurice d’Agaune, for the souls of "Alaidis uxoris meæ et Mariæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated Mar 1210[614]He was part of the army brought together at Lyon in Apr 1215 to march against the Albigeois.  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monsteroli" confirmed rights granted to the abbey of Balances by "Johannes comes Pontivi pater meus" by charter dated 1214[615].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" confirmed property rights of the church of Saint-Valéry granted by "Johannis comitis Pontivi patris mei et Beatricis matris mee et mea" by charter dated Mar 1215[616]

m (contract Mantes, Yvelines 20 Aug 1195) ALIX de France, daughter of LOUIS VII King of France & his [second wife Infanta doña Constanza de Castilla] ([4 Oct] 1160-after Jan 1213).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Constantia regina Franciæ" while giving birth to a daughter[617].  She is named Adelaide by Kerrebrouck[618], but he cites no primary source on which this is based.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "reginam Margaretam Anglie et comitissam Aaliz" as children of King Louis VII & his second wife, specifying that Alix married "Guilelmus comes de Pontivo"[619].  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Adelodis" as the daughter of "Ludovico Regi Francorum" and his wife "Elisabeth" (error for Constantia), specifying that she married "Comitis de Pontivo"[620].  There is some confusion between this daughter and King Louis VII's supposed daughter Alix by his third wife.  Roger of Hoveden records that the betrothal of King Louis's daughter to Richard of England was first proposed in 1161, when Richard's older brother Henry was betrothed to her sister Marguerite[621].  Chronologically, this can only refer to the king's daughter by his second marriage.  This appears to be confirmed by the Chronicle of Gervase which records the betrothal in 1169 of "Ricardus…filius regis Anglæ" and "filiam regis Franciæ quam habuit de filia regis Hispanorum"[622]Ctss de Bourges 1174, as her dowry.  Benedict of Peterborough records the betrothal "XI Kal Oct 1177" of "rex Anglie…Ricardus comes Pictaviæ filius eius" and "regi Franciæ…filiam" as part of the peace agreement between the two kings[623].  It is assumed that this refers to the same daughter, although the primary source which confirms this beyond doubt has not been identified.  If this is correct, she was presumably the same daughter who later married the Comte de Ponthieu.  Until further information comes to light, it is assumed that Alix/Adelaide who was betrothed to Richard, and who later married the Comte de Ponthieu, was the daughter who was born in 1160, and that King Louis had no daughter of this name by his third marriage.  Alix was brought up in England after her betrothal.  Benedict of Peterborough records that the betrothal of "Alesia soror eius [Philippi regis Franciæ]" and Richard was renewed in 1189, commenting that the king of England "in custodia habet"[624]Richard refused the marriage after his accession to the throne.  Kerrebrouck states that King Richard arranged her betrothal to his younger brother John in early 1193[625], but the primary source which confirms this has not been identified.  She returned to France in Aug 1195.  Ctss d'Eu, Dame d’Arques in 1195, as her dowry for her marriage.  "Willelmus comes Pontivi" granted rights to the commune of Marquienneterre, with the consent of "uxoris mee Aalidis filie Ludovici regis Francie", by charter dated 1199[626].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of "Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee", by charter dated 1205[627].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…et Aalais uxor mea comitissa Pontivi et Maria filia mea" granted concessions by charter dated 1207[628].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee Ludovici regis filie et Marie filie mee", by charter dated Aug 1208[629].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to the commune of Maioc, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee et Symonis de Bolonia, generis mei, et Marie filie mee, uxoris eius", by charter dated 1209[630].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to the nuns of Moreaucourt, for his soul and that of "Aelidis, uxoris mee, filie Ludovici regis Francie", by charter dated Dec 1209[631]"Guilelmus comes Pontivi et Monstrolii" donated property to Saint-Maurice d’Agaune, for the souls of "Alaidis uxoris meæ et Mariæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated Mar 1210[632]"Willaume comte de Pontieu et de Montreuil" agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille" by charter dated Nov 1211[633].  A charter dated Jan 1213 (New Style) confirms a grant of rights to the church of Sainte-Marie at Clairvaux by "Willelmus…Pontivi et Monstreoli comes et Aalis, uxor eius, filia pii regis Ludovici" agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille"[634].  A charter dated Mar 1215 under which "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" confirmed property rights of the church of Saint-Valéry granted by "Johannis comitis Pontivi patris mei et Beatricis matris mee et mea"[635]

Comte Guillaume [II] & his wife had one child:   

1.         MARIE de Ponthieu (before 17 Apr 1199-Sep 1250).  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Mariam…mater Joannæ Reginæ Castellæ et Legionis" as the daughter of "Comitis de Pontivo" and his wife "Adelodis" daughter of "Ludovico Regi Francorum" (and his wife "Elisabeth", an error for Constanza)[636].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of "Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee", by charter dated 1205[637].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…et Aalais uxor mea comitissa Pontivi et Maria filia mea" granted concessions by charter dated 1207[638].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee Ludovici regis filie et Marie filie mee", by charter dated Aug 1208[639].  "Renaldus comes Bolonie" confirmed the marriage contract between "Guillelmum comitem Pontivi et Mariam eiusdem comitis filiam" and "Simonem fratrem meum" by charter dated Sep 1208[640].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to the commune of Maioc, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee et Symonis de Bolonia, generis mei, et Marie filie mee, uxoris eius", by charter dated 1209[641]"Guilelmus comes Pontivi et Monstrolii" donated property to Saint-Maurice d’Agaune, for the souls of "Alaidis uxoris meæ et Mariæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated Mar 1210[642]"Willaume comte de Pontieu et de Montreuil" agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille" by charter dated Nov 1211[643].  She succeeded her father in 1221 as Ctss de Ponthieu.  Louis VIII King of France confirms an agreement with "consanguinea nostra Maria comitissa Pontivi" related to rights of her "filios et filios quos susceperat a Simone fratre comitis Renaldi Bolonie" by charter dated 1225[644]"Symon comes Pontivi et Monsteroli et Maria uxor mea" confirmed a donation of property to the abbey of Notre-Dame d'Ourscamp by "Johannes comes Pontivi" by charter dated 2 Mar 1230[645]"Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Boulogne in memory of "Symon comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…maritus meus" by charter dated Oct 1239[646].  "Matheus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli et Maria uxor eius, comitissa" noted property sales by charter dated Sep 1242[647].  "Matheus de Montemorenc. comes Pontivi et Monsterolii dominus de Atechi" donated property, with the consent of "Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monsterolii uxor mea", by charter dated Feb 1246[648]m firstly (contract Sep 1208) SIMON de Dammartin Comte d'Aumâle, son of AUBRY [II] Comte de Dammartin & his wife Mathilde de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-21 Sep 1239).  m secondly ([Sep 1240/15 Dec 1241]) MATHIEU de Montmorency Seigneur d'Attichy, son of MATHIEU [II] Seigneur de Montmorency & his first wife Gertrude de Soissons (-killed in battle Mansurah 8 Feb 1250). 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES de PONTHIEU (DAMMARTIN)

 

 

SIMON de Dammartin, son of AUBRY [II] Comte de Dammartin & his wife Mathilde de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-21 Sep 1239).  “Reginaldus comes Bolonie” donated property to Jumièges, for the soul of “Alberici patris mei comitis Dampnimartini in eadem ecclesia sepulti”, with the consent of “Yde uxoris mee comitisse Bolonie, Radulfi et Simonis fratrum meorum et sororum mearum”, by charter dated [19 Sep/Dec] 1200[649].  The Chronicon Andrensis names "comes Bolonie Reinaldus et Simon frater eius", specifying that Simon married "filiam comitis Pontivi unicam"[650].  Comte d'Aumâle 1205/11.  "Renaldus comes Bolonie" confirmed the marriage contract between "Guillelmum comitem Pontivi et Mariam eiusdem comitis filiam" and "Simonem fratrem meum" by charter dated Sep 1208[651]Comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil.  “Symon comes Pontivi…Maria comitissa Pontivi” agreed with Louis IX King of France not to marry “de duabus filiabus nostris promogenitis” without consent of the king, dated Mar 1231[652].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1239 of "comes de Pontivo Symon"[653]

m (contract Sep 1208) as her first husband, MARIE de Ponthieu, daughter of GUILLAUME [II] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Alix de France (before 17 Apr 1199-Sep 1250).  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Mariam…mater Joannæ Reginæ Castellæ et Legionis" as the daughter of "Comitis de Pontivo" and his wife "Adelodis" daughter of "Ludovico Regi Francorum" (and his wife "Elisabeth", an error for Constanza [654].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of "Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee", by charter dated 1205[655].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…et Aalais uxor mea comitissa Pontivi et Maria filia mea" granted concessions by charter dated 1207[656].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee Ludovici regis filie et Marie filie mee", by charter dated Aug 1208[657].  "Renaldus comes Bolonie" confirmed the marriage contract between "Guillelmum comitem Pontivi et Mariam eiusdem comitis filiam" and "Simonem fratrem meum" by charter dated Sep 1208[658].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to the commune of Maioc, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee et Symonis de Bolonia, generis mei, et Marie filie mee, uxoris eius", by charter dated 1209[659]"Guilelmus comes Pontivi et Monstrolii" donated property to Saint-Maurice d’Agaune, for the souls of "Alaidis uxoris meæ et Mariæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated Mar 1210[660]"Willaume comte de Pontieu et de Montreuil" agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille" by charter dated Nov 1211[661].  She succeeded her father in 1221 as Ctss de Ponthieu.  “Maria comitissa Pontivi” wrote to Louis VIII King of France request consent for the future succession to Ponthieu by “filiorum et filiarum mearum” is dated Jul 1225[662].  Louis VIII King of France confirmed an agreement with "consanguinea nostra Maria comitissa Pontivi" related to the rights of succession of her "filios et filios quos susceperat a Simone fratre comitis Renaldi Bolonie" and that her husband would not inherit the county of Ponthieu, by charter dated 1225[663].  “Maria comitissa Pontivi” acknowledged receipt of “duo milia librarum” from King Louis VIII, dated Dec 1225[664]"Symon comes Pontivi et Monsteroli et Maria uxor mea" confirmed a donation of property to the abbey of Notre-Dame d'Ourscamp by "Johannes comes Pontivi" by charter dated 2 Mar 1230[665]"Maria comitissa Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Boulogne in memory of "Symon comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…maritus meus" by charter dated Oct 1239[666]The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not been identified, although it is suggested by the charter dated Sep 1242 under which "Matheus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli et Maria uxor eius, comitissa" noted property sales[667].  She married secondly ([Sep 1240/15 Dec 1241]) Mathieu de Montmorency Seigneur d'Attichy.  The barons of the Cinque Ports in England wrote to "domine Marie, de Pontivo et Monstreolo comitisse", dated Aug 1250, replying to her claims respecting commercial rights[668]

Comte Simon & his wife had four children: 

1.         JEANNE de Dammartin ([1220]-Abbeville 16 Mar 1279, bur monastery of Valoires).  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Mariam…mater Joannæ Reginæ Castellæ et Legionis" as the daughter of "Comitis de Pontivo" and his wife "Adelodis" daughter of "Ludovico Regi Francorum" (and his wife "Elisabeth", an error for Constanza)[669].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, the four daughters of "comes de Pontivo Symon" as the wives of "rex Castelle de Hispanie Fernandus…natu maiorem filius vicecomitis de Castro Araudi…filius comitis de Augo…comes de Roceio"[670].  "Symon comes Pontivi et Monstreoli et…Maria comitissa dicte terre" granted "quatuor millaria alectium…annuatim" [four thousand herrings a year] to the nuns of Espaigne, at the request of "primogenite nostre J. …regine Yspanie et Castelle", by charter dated Aug 1237[671].  It is  not known whether the document accords the queen’s title to Jeanne because she was already married or just betrothed at that date.  The contract of marriage between "Ferrandi…regis Castelle et Toleti, Legionis et Galicie" and "donna Johanna…socero nostro…comite Pontivi" is noted in a charter dated Jan 1238 (N. S.) issued by Louis IX King of France, which also refers to the king of Castile's letter dated 31 Oct 1237[672].  She succeeded her father as Ctss d‘Aumâle in 1239.  She succeeded her mother in 1250 as Ctss de Ponthieu.  She returned to France after her first husband died[673].  "Johanna…Castelle [regina]" confirmed a donation to Saint-Vulfran, for the souls of "…bone memorie…regis Castelle et Legionis quondam mariti nostri" and tor the salvation of "nostre et Fernandi…filii nostri primogeniti", by charter dated Aug 1255[674]"Jehans de Neele cuens de Pontieu de Monsteruel et d’Aubemarle" appointed "la noble dame Jehane…roine de Castele et de Lyon contesse de Pontieu nostre…fame" as his proxy to pursue a claim against the monks of Saint-Sauve by charter dated 17 Oct 1270[675]The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in 1279 of "regina Hispanie, domina Pontivi, mater Alienoræ reginæ Angliæ"[676]m firstly (Burgos 1237, [before Aug]) as his second wife, FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile, son of ALFONSO IX King of León & his second wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla (Monte de Valparaíso [30 Jul/5 Aug] 1201-Seville 30 May 1252, bur Seville, Cathedral Santa María).  m secondly ([May 1260/9 Feb 1261]) as his second wife, JEAN de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle, son of RAOUL de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy & his wife Alix de Roye (-2 Feb 1292). 

2.         MATHILDE de Dammartin (before [1220]-after Jan 1257).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, the four daughters of "comes de Pontivo Symon" (in order) as the wives of "rex Castelle de Hispanie Fernandus…filius vicecomitis de Castro Araudi…filius comitis de Augo…comes de Roceio"[677].  The wording of this passage means that the husband of this Dammartin daughter was not Aimery [II] Vicomte de Châtellerault, as shown in many secondary sources, which would in any case be chronologically impossible, but his son[678].  In addition, the full passage appears to indicate that the wife of "filius vicecomitis de Castro Airaudi" was the oldest of the four daughters as she is referred to "alteram natu maiorem", even though her husband is mentioned second in the list.  This would seem surprising considering that the county of Ponthieu was inherited by Jeanne, wife of Fernando III King of Castile.  The charter dated Aug 1237, quoted above, under which her parents name their daughter Jeanne "primogenite nostre J. …regine Yspanie et Castelle", confirms that Jeanne was indeed the oldest daughter[679].  Interestingly, Butkens states, in his commentary relating to the Dammartin-Ponthieu family, that (1) this daughter married "le fils du Vicomte de Chastellerault" and (2) that she was the oldest daughter[680], the latter statement presumably being based on a literal interpretation of the passage in Alberic which, as explained above, is contradicted by the charter dated Aug 1237.  Butkens, in the same passage, says that "le fils du Vicomte de Chastellerault…n’en eust pas de lignée" (from his wife, Simon’s daughter), although as shown in the document POITOU this statement is incorrect.  The wife of Vicomte Jean was named Mathilde, as shown by the charter dated Jan 1256 under which "Matildis nostra uxor" confirmed a donation to the abbey of Bécheron by "Johannes vicecomes Castri Ayraudi"[681].  Mathilde was presumably named after her paternal grandmother.  The charter dated 1291, under which "Jean de Harcourt chevalier et Jeanne vicomtesse de Châtellerault sa femme, fille de Jean vicomte de Châtellerault" confirmed all the donations to Saint-André-en-Gouffern made by their predecessors[682], indicates that Mathilde was the mother of Jean’s daughter Jeanne, as other donations to Saint-André-en-Gouffern which are recorded in the same source were made by the comtes de Ponthieu (ancestors of Mathilde), not by the vicomtes de Châtellerault.  If it is correct that Mathilde was the second daughter of Simon de Dammartin and his wife, it is likely that she was married after her sister Jeanne, whose marriage can be dated to before Aug 1237 as noted above.  m (after [Aug] 1237) JEAN de Châtellerault, son of AIMERY [II] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Agatha --- (-before 1290, bur Saint-André de Gouffern). 

3.         PHILIPPA de Dammartin (-[14 Apr 1278/1281]).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, the four daughters of "comes de Pontivo Symon" (in order) as the wives of "rex Castelle de Hispanie Fernandus…natu maiorem filius vicecomitis de Castro Araudi…filius comitis de Augo…comes de Roceio"[683].  This entry could not refer to Raoul, who had succeeded as comte d’Eu in 1219, but to his otherwise unrecorded son who must have predeceased his father.  "Philippa quondam comitissa Augi et domina Couciaci" granted a fief by charter dated Jul 1251[684].  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto…grave van Gelre" married secondly "Philippa, de grave van Syntpols dochter"[685]The Lignages de Coucy (written in 1303) records that the wife of "Raoul", oldest son of "Enguerran de Coucy", married secondly "le conte Otte de Guelles"[686].  "Phelippe contesse de Guelle" founded the chapel of Transleel, with the consent of "mon…seigneur Jehan de Neele conte de Pontieu et…ma…sereur…royne", by charter dated Aug 1277[687]m firstly ([1239/40]) as his third wife, RAOUL de Lusignan Comte d’Eu, son of RAOUL [I] de Lusignan Comte d’Eu & his wife Alix Ctss d’Eu (-[1/2] Sep 1246).  m secondly (after Nov 1246) RAOUL Seigneur de Coucy, son of ENGUERRAND [III] Seigneur de Coucy & third his wife Marie de Montmirail (-killed in battle Faraskur 6 Apr 1250).  m thirdly ([1252/54]) as his second wife, OTTO II Graaf van Gelre, son of GERHARD III Graaf van Gelre & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (-10 Jan 1271). 

4.         MARIE de Dammartin (-after 1279).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, the four daughters of "comes de Pontivo Symon" (in order) as the wives of "rex Castelle de Hispanie Fernandus…natu maiorem filius vicecomitis de Castro Araudi…comitis de Augo…comes de Roceio"[688].  Moret de la Fayole records that “Maria comitissa Rociaci et domina Petro-ponti tutrix...Joannis filii mei, quem suscepi ex marito meo quondam comite Rociaci” donated property to Cuissac by charter dated 1256[689]m (before 15 Dec 1241) as his second wife, JEAN [II] Comte de Roucy, son of ROBERT de Pierrepont Comte de Roucy & his wife Eustachie Ctss de Roucy (-killed in battle Flanders 1251).  

 

 

 

D.      COMTES de PONTHIEU (CASTILE)

 

 

Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla y León, son of FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile & his second wife Jeanne de Dammartin Ctss d'Aumâle et de Ponthieu (1238-in France before 1264)He was known as FERDINAND de Ponthieu.  Comte d’Aumâle, Baron de Montgomery et de Noyelles-sur-Mer.  "Johanna…Castelle [regina]" confirmed a donation to Saint-Vulfran, for the souls of "…bone memorie…regis Castelle et Legionis quondam mariti nostri" and tor the salvation of "nostre et Fernandi…filii nostri primogeniti", by charter dated Aug 1255[690].  "Ferrandus domicellus de Pontivo filius regis Hyspanie et Laura filia comitis Montisfortis uxor eiusdem Ferrandi" confirmed the donation made to Vaux de Cernay by “clare memorie Johannes quondam comes Montisfortis filius...Almarici Montisfortis quondam comitis...frater noster, de assensu...Johanne uxoris sue nunc defuncte” by charter dated Dec 1257[691].  "Ferrandus…regis Hyspanie filius, heres Pontivil et dominus Sparnonis ac miles et domina Laura de Monteforti eiusdem Sparnonis domina eius uxor" issued letters to the priory of Saint-Thomas d’Epernon by charter dated Feb 1261[692]

m (after 1256) as her first husband, LAURE de Montfort Dame d'Epernon, daughter of AMAURY [VII] de Montfort ex-Duc de Narbonne & his wife Beatrix de Viennois [Bourgogne-Capet] (-before Aug 1270, bur Abbaye Saint-Antoine-lès-Paris).  "Ferrandus domicellus de Pontivo filius regis Hyspanie et Laura filia comitis Montisfortis uxor eiusdem Ferrandi" confirmed the donation made to Vaux de Cernay by “clare memorie Johannes quondam comes Montisfortis filius...Almarici Montisfortis quondam comitis...frater noster, de assensu...Johanne uxoris sue nunc defuncte” by charter dated Dec 1257[693].  "Ferrandus…regis Hyspanie filius, heres Pontivil et dominus Sparnonis ac miles et domina Laura de Monteforti eiusdem Sparnonis domina eius uxor" issued letters to the priory of Saint-Thomas d’Epernon by charter dated Feb 1261[694].  She married secondly (before Dec 1267) Henri de Grandpré Seigneur de Livry. 

Ferdinand & his wife had one child: 

1.         JEAN de Ponthieu (-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302).  He succeeded his father as Comte d’Aumâle, Baron of Montgomery, Seigneur d’Epernon and Noyelles-sur-Mer.  However, on the death of his paternal grandmother in 1279, his aunt Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla Queen of England succeeded to Ponthieu in his place as the closer direct relation.  After an inconclusive hearing at Amiens 23 May 1281, Jean renounced Ponthieu in return for 14,000 livres compensation.  The Chronique Artésienne records “li quens d’Aubemarle” among those killed at the battle of Courtrai[695]m ([1289/93]) as her second husband, IDA de Meulan Dame de Fontaine-Guérard, widow of GOBERT Seigneur de Dargies, daughter of AMAURY [II] de Meulan Baron de la Queue-en-Brie et de Gournay-sur-Marne, Seigneur de Noyon-sur-Andelle, de La Croix-Saint-Leuffroy, de Fontaine-Guérard et de Roissy & [his wife Marguerite de Neufbourg] (-16 Jan 1324, bur Abbaye de Fontaine-Guérard).  Her first and second marriages are indicated by the testaments of Renaud Seigneur de Dargies [younger brother of Ida’s first husband], dated early 1294 and Aug 1295, which bequeathed dowry to his daughter Jeanne “...toute le terre de Clari qui me doit venir apres le dechest me dame le contesse d’Aubemalle[696], indicating that the property in question must have constituted Ida’s dower from her first marriage.  Ida’s parentage is indicated by the charter dated Apr 1274 under which "Almaricus de Meullento dominus de Cauda, Guillelmus de Essartis dominus de Ambleinvilla, Gobertus de Argus dominus de Guitebuef, Albertus de Longavalle dominus de Croissiaco milites, Ysabellis predicti Guillelmi, Yda dicti Goberti, et Anna dicti Alberti uxores" confirmed rights of pasture of the convent of Notre-Dame de Gournay[697].  The death of Gobert de Dargies is estimated to [1288/92][698], which indicates that his widow must have been older than her second husband at the time of their marriage.  It has previously been suggested that, because of this age difference, it is more likely that the wife of Jean de Ponthieu was Ida de Meulan, daughter of Amaury [III] de Meulan, and not Ida de Meulan, daughter of Amaury [II] de Meulan, who married Gobert de Dargies[699].  However, the testaments of Renaud de Dargies quoted above confirm that the same Ida de Meulan married the two individuals.  Jean & his wife had two children: 

a)         LAURE de Ponthieu (after 1290-after 1303)Duchesne states that Guy [VIII] Mauvoisin and his wife Laure de Ponthieu are named in a charter dated 1303 but provides no other details or citation reference[700].  m ([1303]) GUY [VIII] Mauvoisin Seigneur de Rosny, son of GUY [VII] Mauvoisin Seigneur de Rosny & his wife Isabelle de Mello (-after 31 Jan 1327). 

b)         JEAN de Ponthieu (-[16 Jan 1340 or 1342]).  He succeeded his father in 1302 as Comte d’Aumâle, Baron de Montgomery, Seigneur d’Epernon, de Noyelles-sur-Mer and de Fontaine-Guérard.  He took part in the siege of Cambrai, and the battle of Burronfosse 22 Jul 1337.  m (before 2 Sep 1319) CATHERINE d’Artois, daughter of PHILIPPE d'Artois Seigneur de Conches [Capet] & his wife Blanche de Bretagne ([1296]-Normandy Nov 1368).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by a charter dated 17 May 1343 which records an agreement between [her son-in-law] “Jean comte de Harcourt” and “Catherine d’Artois sa belle-mère” regarding her dower[701].  Comte Jean & his wife had two children: 

i)          BLANCHE de Ponthieu (-12 [Apr/May] 1387).  She succeeded her father in 1340 as Ctss d’Aumâle, Dame de Montgomery, de Mesles-sur-Sarthe, de Gouffer, de Vigues d'Aubigny, de Noyelles-sur-Mer, de Hiermont, de Noyellette et de Pontailler.  Her parentage is indicated by a charter dated 17 May 1343 which records an agreement between “Jean comte de Harcourt” and “Catherine d’Artois sa belle-mère” regarding her dower[702].  A document relating to a lawsuit in 1344 names “dominus comes de Haricuria et de Albamarla et domina Blancha de Ponthieu eius uxor[703].  An undated document records the efforts, after the death of her husband, of “Madame Blanche de Ponthieu” regarding “la fausse et inique condamnation [de] Jean...Comte de Ponthieu son mary et à ses enfants, le plus aagé desquels n’avoit que treize ans” to reverse the confiscation of his assets, noting that she later died 12 Mar [error?] 1387 and was buried at Notre-Dame du Parc[704]m ([1340/41]) JEAN [V] d'Harcourt Comte d'Harcourt, Vicomte de Châtellerault, Seigneur d'Elbœuf, son of JEAN [IV] d'Harcourt Comte d'Harcourt & his wife Isabeau de Parthenay (-beheaded Rouen 8 Jan 1355).

ii)         JEANNE de Ponthieu (-30 May 1376).  Dame d'Epernon.  m JEAN [VII] Comte de Vendôme, Seigneur de Castres, son of BOUCHARD [IX] Comte de Vendôme & his wife Alix de Bretagne (-Montpellier [1/22] Feb 1364, bur Castres). 

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS de CAYEUX

 

 

In the 12th and 13th centuries, the seigneurs de Cayeux were connected with the Vimeu, a geographical region which lies in western Picardie south of the river Somme and north of the river Bresle, and which was part of the county of Ponthieu.  The Cayeux family of Vimeu was studied in the 1930s by Jacques de Vismes[705].  More recently, the various Cayeux families of northern France have been analysed by Michel Champagne in the context of his study on the seigneurie de Longvilliers[706].  La Gorgue-Rosny states that the Cayeux family originated in the Vimeu[707].  The town of Cayeux-sur-Mer is situated on the Channel coast south of the Somme estuary and north of Le Tréport, in the Vimeu.  However, Champagne points out that the Historia Comitum Ghisnensium records that the "Odrenses" (people of Odre: la Tour d’Odre is located in the northern suburbs of the town of Boulogne) associated with "Caiosensibus" in order to hunt in the forest of Boulogne, which suggests that the two peoples were near neighbours[708].  He also highlights the 18th century Marquis des Cajeux, whose château was situated at Capécure, near Boulogne on the left bank of the river Liane, and suggests that the Cayeux family may have originated in the adjacent hamlet of Caïeu which no longer exists[709].  Whatever the precise point of origin of the family, one branch did settle in the Vimeu and presumably gave its name to Cayeux-sur-Mer.  An extensive, but inaccurate, genealogy of the Cayeux family is given in Belleval’s Nobiliaire de Ponthieu et de Vimeu[710].  The book refers to primary sources but gives no precise citation references. 

 

 

Three siblings, parents not known: 

1.         BAUDOUIN de Cayeux (-after 1107).  "Balduini de Caioht et Rogeri fratris sui, Ingelramni de Monasteriolo, Hugonis de Colesberge, Nenfedi dapiferi, Willelmi vicecomitis" suscribed the charter dated 1107 under which "Eustachius Bononensium comes…cum comitissa Maria" submitted the monastery of Samer to Cluny[711].  Renaud Archbishop of Reims confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Dommartin, including the donation of "decimas…et terram…in Boloniensi patria" made by "Balduinus de Caieo", by charter dated 1125[712].  It is not known whether these two charters refer to the same Baudouin de Cayeux. 

2.         ROGER de Cayeux (-after 1115).  "Balduini de Caioht et Rogeri fratris sui…" suscribed the charter dated 1107 under which "Eustachius Bononensium comes…cum comitissa Maria" submitted the monastery of Samer to Cluny[713].  "…Rogerius de Caiou…" subscribed the charter dated 16 Jul 1113 under which "Eustachius junior…Boloniensium comes" confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Samer[714].  "…Roger de Caïeu…" subscribed the charter dated 1115 under which Eustache III Comte de Boulogne confirmed the donation of Wissant to the abbey of Arras[715].  A bull of Pope Alexander III dated 1173 confirmed the possessions of Samer, including the donation of land "in Rustinghem" made by "Rogerii de Caieu et Gislæ sororis eius"[716]

3.         GISELE de Cayeux .  A bull of Pope Alexander III dated 1173 confirmed the possessions of Samer, including the donation of land "in Rustinghem" made by "Rogerii de Caieu et Gislæ sororis eius"[717]

 

 

1.         --- de Cayeux (-before 1153).  No indication has been found of the name of Heldefrida’s husband, but he was presumably one of the Cayeux family who is named in the present document.  m HELDEFRIDA, daughter of --- (-after 1153).  Thierry Bishop of Amiens confirmed the donation to Dommartin made by "Eustachius Collet et Agnes mater eius…" made by "Balduinus de Caieo", in the presence of "…Balduino de Caieo et Heldefrida matre eius et Helfrido frater eius…", by charter dated 1153[718].  Two children: 

a)         BAUDOUIN de Cayeux (-after 1153).  Thierry Bishop of Amiens confirmed the donation to Dommartin made by "Eustachius Collet et Agnes mater eius…" made by "Balduinus de Caieo", in the presence of "…Balduino de Caieo et Heldefrida matre eius et Helfrido frater eius…", by charter dated 1153[719]same person as…?  BAUDOUIN de Cayeux (-after 1172).  "Pharamo de Tingri, Balduino de Caio…" subscribed the charter dated 1172 under which Matthieu Comte de Boulogne granted revenue from fisheries to the monks of Saint-Josse-sur-mer[720]

b)         HELFRID de Cayeux (-after 1153).  Thierry Bishop of Amiens confirmed the donation to Dommartin made by "Eustachius Collet et Agnes mater eius…" made by "Balduinus de Caieo", in the presence of "…Balduino de Caieo et Heldefrida matre eius et Helfrido frater eius…", by charter dated 1153[721]

 

 

1.         ANSEAU [I] de Cayeux (-[1136]).  Seigneur de Cayeux.  Champagne states that Anseau [I] donated "la ferme de Rohastre avec permission de prendre du bois dans sa forêt de Séry" to the Knights Templars of Jerusalem by charter dated 1090[722].  He does not cite the corresponding primary source, but the date is dubious considering that the founding of the order of the Knights Templar is generally dated to [1119].  La Gorgue-Rosny states that "Ansel de Cayeux, seigneur dudit lieu, Bouillencourt-en-Séry, Fréville, Rambures" founded the abbey of Séry in 1127 but does not cite the corresponding primary source[723].  Belleval refers to a charter dated 1128 which names Anseau and his three sons who are named below but gives no indication of the precise source[724].  "Wido comes Pontivi" confirmed "mansionem apud Sanctum Quintinum…et terram de Friencort {Friacourt, canton d’Ault} que data est eius in elemosina de feodo Anslemi de Caioco" to the church of Eu, by charter dated to [1126/47][725].  Champagne states that Anseau [I] died "vers 1136" but does not provide the basis for his statement[726]m ---.  The name of Anseau’s wife is not known.  Anseau & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [I] de Cayeux (-after 1160).  Belleval names Guillaume (and his descendants), Etienne ("sans suite") and Arnould ("auteur de la branche des seigneurs de Longvillers") as the sons of Anseau [I] de Cayeux[727].  Seigneur de Cayeux, de Bouillancourt-en-Séry, de Sénarpont et de Bouttencourt[728]m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume [I] & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME [II] de Cayeux (-1223, bur Séry)"Willelmus de Cayaco filius alterius Willelmi" confirmed rights of the abbey of Séry granted by his father and grandfather, with the consent of "Isabelle sa femme", by charter dated 1185[729]Seigneur de Cayeux, de Bouillancourt-en-Séry, de Sénarpont et de Bouttencourt.  Seigneur de Broutelles 1178. 

-         see below

b)         ETIENNE de Cayeux .  Belleval names Guillaume (and his descendants), Etienne ("sans suite") and Arnould ("auteur de la branche des seigneurs de Longvillers") as the sons of Anseau [I] de Cayeux[730]same person as…?  ETIENNE de Cayeux (-after May 1161).  "…Stephanum de Kaieu" subscribed the charter dated May 1161 under which Mathieu Comte de Boulogne confirmed the possessions of Samer[731].  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium records that "episcopus Framericus" (bishop of Thérouanne) granted property "in terra Bolonensium", which "Stephanus et Anselmus de Chaiocho" held in fee from "Ardensi domino", to "Herredum" on his marriage to "neptem eius…Adele"[732].  Champagne points out the chronological anomaly in this passage, due to Frameric’s bishopric being recorded between 964 to 995[733].  It is assumed, therefore, that the mention of Etienne and Anseau de Cayeux was inserted as a reference for contemporary readers to enable the land in question to be better identified. 

c)         ARNOUL de Cayeux .  Belleval names Guillaume (and his descendants), Etienne ("sans suite") and Arnould ("auteur de la branche des seigneurs de Longvillers") as the sons of Anseau [I] de Cayeux[734].  Champagne says that no document exists to indicate that Arnoul, son of Anseau [I], was the same person as the ancestor of the later seigneur de Longvilliers (see below)[735].  From a chronological point of view, it appears unlikely to be correct, considering the death of Anseau [I] in [1135] and that Arnoul [I] de Cayeux seigneur de Longvilliers was named in a charter dated 1197. 

d)         [ANSEAU [II] de Cayeux .  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium records that "episcopus Framericus" (bishop of Thérouanne) granted property "in terra Bolonensium", which "Stephanus et Anselmus de Chaiocho" held in fee from "Ardensi domino", to "Herredum" on his marriage to "neptem eius…Adele"[736].  Champagne points out the chronological anomaly in this passage, due to Frameric’s bishopric being recorded between 964 to 995[737].  It is assumed, therefore, that the mention of Etienne and Anseau de Cayeux was inserted as a reference for contemporary readers to enable the land in question to be better identified.  The relationship between Etienne and Anseau is not mentioned, but it is assumed that they were brothers or father and son.] 

e)         MELISENDE de Cayeux (-after 1142).  "Milesende de Cayeu fille d’Ansel et épouse de Hugues Fretels de Vilers" is named in a charter dated 1142 which records the donation of property at Hestruval to the abbey of Saint-Josse-au-Bois[738]m (before 1142) HUGUES Fretel Seigneur de Vilers, son of --- (-after 1157). 

 

 

GUILLAUME [II] de Cayeux, son of GUILLAUME [I] Seigneur de Cayeux, de Bouillancourt & his wife --- (-1223, bur Séry).  "Willelmus de Cayaco filius alterius Willelmi" confirmed rights of the abbey of Séry granted by his father and grandfather, with the consent of "Isabelle sa femme", by charter dated 1185[739].  "…Willelmus de Kaeu…" is listed among those who swore to uphold a treaty between John King of England and the count of Flanders dated 18 Aug 1199[740].  “Thomas de Sancto Walerico" named "Willelmum de Kaioco et Eustachium filius eius" as guarantors under his agreement with "domino meo Willelmo comite Pontivi et Monsterolii" by charter dated Sep 1209[741].  “Willelmus de Kaieio" agreed to act as guarantor under an agreement between "dominum comitem Pontivi et Mosterolii" and "dominum Thomam de Sancto Walarico" by charter dated Sep 1209[742].  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", in memory of "son fils Eustache décédé au combat devant Toulouse", by charter dated Jul 1218[743].  "Willaume de Cayeu" donated property, which he had previously sold to the abbey "à l’occasion du mariage de son fils Eustache", to Séry, with the consent of "son épouse Elisabeth et de Willaume son fils aîné", by charter dated 1220[744]

m (before 1185) ELISABETH [Isabelle] de Carency, daughter of ELBERT [III] Seigneur de Carency & his wife Elisabeth --- (-1225, bur Séry).  Robertus Bituniensis castri dominus et Atrebaensis advocatus” confirmed the donation to Saint-Eloy which “Ilbertum de Carenci et filium eius Ilbertum” made with the consent of “filiabus suis Elizabeth et Maria necnon et fratribus Balduino et Guillelmo clericis, Gualone, Amulrico, Hugone militibus” by charter dated 1190[745]La Gorgue-Rosny states that "Guillaume sire de Cayeux, Bouillencourt, Sénarpont…" married "Elisabeth de Béthune dame de Carency" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[746].  Champagne says that the wife of Guillaume [II] was the daughter of Elbert [III] Seigneur de Carency[747].  He cites letters dated Nov 1210 which name "Willermo de Keu domino de Carency", adding that the name of Guillaume [II]’s son "Wibert" is also indicative as it resembles the name "Elbert"[748].  "Willelmus de Cayaco filius alterius Willelmi" confirmed rights of the abbey of Séry granted by his father and grandfather, with the consent of "Isabelle sa femme", by charter dated 1185[749].  "Willaume de Cayeu" donated property, which he had previously sold to the abbey "à l’occasion du mariage de son fils Eustache", to Séry, with the consent of "son épouse Elisabeth et de Willaume son fils aîné", by charter dated 1220[750]

Guillaume [II] & his wife had five children: 

1.         EUSTACHE de Cayeux (-killed in battle Toulouse before Jul 1218).  “Thomas de Sancto Walerico" named "Willelmum de Kaioco et Eustachium filius eius" as guarantors under his agreement with "domino meo Willelmo comite Pontivi et Monsterolii" by charter dated Sep 1209[751].  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", in memory of "son fils Eustache décédé au combat devant Toulouse", by charter dated Jul 1218[752].  "Willaume de Cayeu" donated property, which he had previously sold to the abbey "à l’occasion du mariage de son fils Eustache", to Séry, with the consent of "son épouse Elisabeth et de Willaume son fils aîné", by charter dated 1220[753]m ---.  The name of Eustache’s wife is not known, but his marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1220 which is quoted above. 

2.         GUILLAUME [III] de Cayeux (-after Nov 1246).  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", by charter dated Jul 1218[754].  "Willaume de Cayeu" donated property, which he had previously sold to the abbey "à l’occasion du mariage de son fils Eustache", to Séry, with the consent of "son épouse Elisabeth et de Willaume son fils aîné", by charter dated 1220[755].  Seigneur de Carency.  “Wirlelmus de Kaeu miles dominus de Boulaincourt” donated harvest “in grangia mea de Boulaincourt” to Mont Saint-Martin, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Margaritæ et filii et heredis mei Wirlelmi militis domini de Carenci”, by charter dated Jul 1239[756].  Guillaume de Cayeux founded a hospital in the forest of Sénarpont, with the consent of "sa fille Aelis", for the soul of "son fils Willaume", by charter dated 22 Dec 1243[757]Guillelmus de Caioto dominus de Bouillencurt, de Senerpont et de Carenche” donated property to Saint-Germer, for the souls of “bone memorie Guillelmi de C. patris mei et Isabellis matris mee et Willelmi filii mei”, by charter dated Nov 1246[758]m firstly (before Jul 1218) CATHERINE, daughter of --- (-before 1226).  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", by charter dated Jul 1218[759].  [m secondly MATHILDE de Poix Dame de Villers-Faucon, daughter of ---.  La Gorgue-Rosny states that "Guillaume sire de Cayeux, Bouillencourt, Sénarpont…" married "Mathilde de Poix dame de Villers-Faucon" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[760].  No primary source has yet been identified which confirms this marriage.  Because of the inherent inaccuracy of the old secondary sources which report the seigneurs de Cayeux, it is suggested that the marriage should be viewed with caution until a primary source emerges.]  m [secondly/thirdly] MARGUERITE, daughter of --- (-after Jul 1239).  “Wirlelmus de Kaeu miles dominus de Boulaincourt” donated harvest “in grangia mea de Boulaincourt” to Mont Saint-Martin, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Margaritæ et filii et heredis mei Wirlelmi militis domini de Carenci”, by charter dated Jul 1239[761].  Guillaume [III] & his first wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Cayeux ([Jul 1239/22 Dec 1243]).  Wirlelmus de Kaeu miles dominus de Boulaincourt” donated harvest “in grangia mea de Boulaincourt” to Mont Saint-Martin, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Margaritæ et filii et heredis mei Wirlelmi militis domini de Carenci”, by charter dated Jul 1239[762].  Guillaume de Cayeux founded a hospital in the forest of Sénarpont, with the consent of "sa fille Aelis", for the soul of "son fils Willaume", by charter dated 22 Dec 1243[763]Guillelmus de Caioto dominus de Bouillencurt, de Senerpont et de Carenche” donated property to Saint-Germer, for the souls of “bone memorie Guillelmi de C. patris mei et Isabellis matris mee et Willelmi filii mei”, by charter dated Nov 1246[764]

b)         ALIX de Cayeux .  Guillaume de Cayeux founded a hospital in the forest of Sénarpont, with the consent of "sa fille Aelis", for the soul of "son fils Willaume", by charter dated 22 Dec 1243[765]m GUILLAUME de Montigny, son of ---. 

Guillaume [II] & his [second] wife had one child: 

c)         CATHERINE de Cayeux (-after Apr 1285).  La Gorgue-Rosny records her parentage and marriage but does not cite the corresponding primary source[766].  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis records that “Nicolaus”, son of “soror...Eustachio de Rodio...quarti” and her husband “domino Jacobo de Bailleul”, married “filiam domini Guillelmi de Keu unicam, et ideo terram tenet de Karenci et de Vilers de Facon post mortem dicti Guilelmi de Keu[767].  Dame de Carency.  "Nicholaus de Condato dominus de Moriaumes miles et Katerina uxor eius domina de Karenci" notified sales of property to the church of Saint-Barthélemy de Béthune by charter dated 7 Apr 1245[768].  "Nicholes de Condet sire de Moriaumes et…Katherine sa feme dame de Karenchi" confirmed a donation of property "de Sains" made by "Simon de Villers chevalier jadis baillius d’Artois" by charter dated Oct 1281[769]Nicholas de Condet sires de Morialmes et...Katherine de Karenchi femme...Nicholon devant dit” donated “tiere...a Thumaides” to Cambron by charter dated Apr 1285[770]m (before 7 Apr 1245) NICOLAS [II] de Condé dit de Bailleul, Seigneur de Bailleul et de Morialmes, son of JACQUES de Condé Seigneur de Bailleul et de Morialmes & his wife Agnes de Rœulx (-23 Jun 1293). 

3.         JEAN de Cayeux (-[1226]).  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", by charter dated Jul 1218[771]

4.         WIBERT [I] de Cayeux (-after Oct 1250).  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", by charter dated Jul 1218[772]m EMMELINE, daughter of ---.  Wibert & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEAN de Cayeux (-after 1288).  Seigneur d’Ansenne.  m MARIE, daughter of ---.  Jean & his wife had one child: 

i)          WIBERT [II] de Cayeux (-before 1321). 

5.         BEATRIX de Cayeux (-after Jul 1218).  Guillaume de Cayeux donated annual revenue to Séry, with the consent of "sa femme Isabelle, de Willaume son fils, de Catherine femme de celui-ci, de Jean, de Wibert et Béatrix ses autres enfants", by charter dated Jul 1218[773]

 

 

[Three] brothers, parents not known, presumably descended from Anseau [I] de Cayeux: 

1.         ARNOUL [I] de Cayeux (-after Apr 1197).  Belleval names Guillaume (and his descendants), Etienne ("sans suite") and Arnould ("auteur de la branche des seigneurs de Longvillers") as the sons of Anseau [I] de Cayeux[774].  Champagne says that no document exists to indicate that Arnoul, son of Anseau [I], was the same person as the ancestor of the later seigneur de Longvilliers[775].  From a chronological point of view, it appears unlikely to be correct: Anseau [I] de Cayeux is recorded in 1090, whereas Arnoul [I] de Cayeux seigneur de Longvilliers is named in a charter dated 1197.  Seigneur de Longvilliers.  William of Andres records that "dominum Arnulphum de Kaeu et dominam Adelidem de Bavelinghem uxorem eius" donated property "apud Diependale" to the abbey of Andres, confirming the donation made by "dominum Hugonem patrem ipsius domine" before the marriage of "filiam suam", with the consent of "domini Balduini comitis Gisnensis", and retired to the abbey, dated to 1196[776].  "Dominum Arnulfus de Kaieu et dominam Adelidem de Bavelingem uxorem eius" donated property to the abbey of Andres, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Anselmi, Willelmi", by charter dated 1196[777]m as her first husband, ADELAIDE de Bavelinghem, daughter of HUGUES de Bavelinghem & his wife Mathilde [Matha] ---.  William of Andres records that "dominum Arnulphum de Kaeu et dominam Adelidem de Bavelinghem uxorem eius" donated property "apud Diependale" to the abbey of Andres, confirming the donation made by "dominum Hugonem patrem ipsius domine" before the marriage of "filiam suam", with the consent of "domini Balduini comitis Gisnensis", dated to 1196[778].  "Dominum Arnulfus de Kaieu et dominam Adelidem de Bavelingem uxorem eius" donated property to the abbey of Andres, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Anselmi, Willelmi", by charter dated 1196[779].  She married secondly Daniel de Gand.  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium names "Adelidem" as the only daughter of "Hugonem" (son of "Eustacio…de Balinghehen" and his wife Adelaide illegitimate daughter of Robert [Manassès] Comte de Guines) and his wife "Mathildem puerili nomine Matham…filiam Laurette de Hammis", adding that she married firstly "Ernulpho de Caiou" and secondly "Danieli fratri Sigeri castellani de Gandavo"[780].  Arnoul [I] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ANSEAU [IV] de Cayeux ([1165/80]-after Jun 1221).  Belleval names Arnoul and Anseau as sons of Arnoul de Cayeux and his wife but cites no primary source[781].  [Champagne states that "Anselme de Chaieu" witnessed a charter dated 5 Jun 1190 under which "Bauduin d’Hermelinghen" donated property to Beaulieu abbey[782].  He identifies this person as Anseau [IV], but from a chronological point of view it is also possible that he was Anseau [III].]  "Anselme de Cayeu ‘le jeune’ et Guillaume son frère" subscribed a charter 1195 under which "Bauduin d’Assonval" donated property to Clairmarais abbey[783].  "Dominum Arnulfus de Kaieu et dominam Adelidem de Bavelingem uxorem eius" donated property to the abbey of Andres, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Anselmi, Willelmi", by charter dated 1196[784].  Seigneur de Longvilliers.  "…Ansellus de Keu…" subscribed the charter dated Aug 1201 under which Renaud Comte de Boulogne agreed with Philippe II King of France the future betrothal of his daughter Mathilde to the king’s son Philippe[785].  "Anselmus de Kayeu dominus de Longovillari" confirmed a donation to the abbey of Clairmarais made by "Willelmus de More" by charter dated 1206[786].  Champagne states that "Ansiau de Caieu, pair du Boulonnais, vassal du comte Renaud" is one of the principle personnages in the "roman d’Eustache le Moine", celebrated pirate from Boulogne, which was written in [1225/30], in which he is reported as having accompanied Richard I King of England on crusade, served faithfully Renaud Comte de Dammartin, and fought at his side at the battle of Bouvines in Jul 1214[787].  La Gorgue-Rosny also states that "Anselme [de Cayeux]" was one of the knights "du comté de Boulogne" at the battle of Bouvines but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[788].  "Ansellus de Longvillari" witnessed the charter dated Jun 1221 under which Guillaume de Saint-Omer donated property to the abbey of Saint-André-au-Bois[789].  Adam Bishop of Morins confirmed the possessions of Notre-Dame de Licques, including the donation of “decimam in parrochia de Audrewic” made by “Manassetis et Arnulfi de Kaieu et uxoris eius Aelidis et filiorum eorum” with the consent of “eorumdem domino Arnulfo comite Gisnensi”, by charter dated Feb 1224[790]m ([1200]) as her second husband, ALAIS de Saint-Omer, widow of BAUDOUIN [I] de Créquy, daughter of GUILLAUME [IV] Châtelain de Saint-Omer, Seigneur de Fauquembergues & his wife Ida d'Avesnes (-after 1218).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "Alaydis" as fourth daughter of "castellano Sancti-Audomari domino Wilelmo" and his wife, adding that she married "Balduino de Creki" (as his second wife) and secondly "domino Anselmo de Lomviler domino de Kahen", naming her descendants by both marriages[791].  Adam Bishop of Morins confirmed the possessions of Notre-Dame de Licques, including the donation of “decimam in parrochia de Audrewic” made by “Manassetis et Arnulfi de Kaieu et uxoris eius Aelidis et filiorum eorum” with the consent of “eorumdem domino Arnulfo comite Gisnensi”, by charter dated Feb 1224[792]Anseau [IV] & his wife had three children: 

i)          ARNOUL [III] de Cayeux (-before Jul 1248).  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "filius…Arnulphus" as the son of "domino Anselmo de Lomviler domino de Kahen" and his wife, adding that he succeeded his father[793]m as her first husband, MELISENDE Kiéret [Quiéret], daughter of HUGUES [II] Kiéret Seigneur de Douriez & his wife Agnes d’Hermelinghen (-after [1257/58]).  She married secondly ([Jul 1248/Dec 1252]) Baudouin de Fiennes.  Arnoul [III] & his wife had three children: 

(a)       daughter .  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "filius…Arnulphus" as the son of "domino Anselmo de Lomviler domino de Kahen" and his wife, adding later in the same paragraph that "una filiarum domini Arnulphi de Lomviler primogenita" married "domino de Esquerdes" and had children[794]m --- Seigneur de Esquerdes, son of ---. 

(b)       daughter .  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "filius…Arnulphus" as the son of "domino Anselmo de Lomviler domino de Kahen" and his wife, adding later in the same paragraph that "secunda filia [domini Arnulphi de Lomviler]" married "filio domino Anselmi de Ordre"[795]m --- d’Ordre, son of ANSEAU Seigneur d’Ordre & his wife ---. 

(c)       GUILLAUME de Cayeux (-after Aug 1304).  Seigneur de Longvilliers.  m firstly AGNES de Fiennes, daughter of ---.  m secondly (1249) YPHAINE d’Airaines, daughter of HENRI [II] Seigneur d’Airaines & his wife --- (-after Jul 1304). 

-         SEIGNEURS de LONGVILLIERS[796]

ii)         IDA de Cayeux .  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "filiarum una…Yda" as one of the two daughters of "domino Anselmo de Lomviler domino de Kahen" and his wife, adding that Ida married "domino Engelramo de Liskes" by whom she had three sons and one daughter (who the source names)[797]m ENGUERRAND [II] Seigneur de Licques, son of EUSTACHE [III] Seigneur de Licques & his wife --- (-after 1276). 

iii)        daughter .  The late 13th century genealogy by Balduinus de Avennis names "filiarum una…Yda" as one of the two daughters of "domino Anselmo de Lomviler domino de Kahen" and his wife, the source not naming the second daughter[798]same person as…?  ALIX de Cayeux (-Paris 1249, bur Montmartre).  Père Anselme records that Roger de Bournonville married "Aleide de Longvilliers-Cayeux, mourut à Paris en 1249 et fut enterrée à Montmartre" by whom he was ancestor of the later Bournonville family, but he cites no primary source on which the information is based[799].  From a chronological point of view, assuming that the information is correct, Alix could have been the second daughter of Anseau [IV] de Cayeux.  m as his first wife, ROGER de Bournonville, son of ROBERT de Bournonville & his wife ---.  

b)         GUILLAUME de Cayeux (-after 1218).  "Dominum Arnulfus de Kaieu et dominam Adelidem de Bavelingem uxorem eius" donated property to the abbey of Andres, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Anselmi, Willelmi", by charter dated 1196[800].  "Anselme de Cayeu ‘le jeune’ et Guillaume son frère" subscribed a charter 1195 under which "Bauduin d’Assonval" donated property to Clairmarais abbey[801]

c)         ARNOUL [II] de Cayeux (-after 1227).  Belleval names Arnoul and Anseau as sons of Arnoul de Cayeux and his wife but cites no primary source[802]

2.         ETIENNE de Cayeux (-after [1188/90]).  Ida Ctss de Boulogne relinquished rights in favour of the town of Montreuil by undated charter, witnessed by "Ernulfi de Kaiolo, Stephani fratris sui…"[803]Champagne dates this document to [1188/90][804]

3.         [ANSEAU [III] de Cayeux .  Champagne refers in passing to Etienne, brother of Arnoul [I] de Cayeux Seigneur de Longvilliers, being recorded as having another brother "Anselme", but he does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[805].  Champagne states that "Anselme de Chaieu" witnessed a charter dated 5 Jun 1190 under which "Bauduin d’Hermelinghen" donated property to Beaulieu abbey[806].  He identifies this person as Anseau [IV] (see above), but from a chronological point of view it is also possible that he was Anseau [III].  As discussed further below, Anseau [III] appears to be the best candidate among the individuals named Anseau in the Cayeux family to be identified with Anseau whose activities in the campaigns of the Fourth Crusade are recorded by Villehardouin.] 

 

 

The most difficult problem associated with the Cayeux family is identifying precisely the persons named "Anseau de Cayeux" whose careers took them to the Latin empire of Constantinople and their relationship with the main branches of the Cayeux family in northern France.  The career of "Anseau de Cayeux" is recorded between 1204 and 1273, which suggests that there were at least two different individuals with that name.  Villehardouin records that "Count Hugh of St Paul, Peter of Amiens his nephew…Anseau of Cayeux" formed the third division in the attack on Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204, names "Anseau of Cayeux" among those who defeated Theodoros Laskaris later in the same year, and records that Henri de Flandre left "Anseau of Cayeux" in command of the city of Bizye[807].  The fact that Anseau was left in command of the city suggests that he was a mature individual, indicating that it is unlikely that he was born much later than [1180].  Champagne states that Anseau was seriously wounded in the neck by a lance during a battle against Theodoros Angelos Komnenos "Théodore d’Epire" (presumably identified as Theodoros Angelos Komnenos who installed himself as lord of Epirus in 1215 and as despot and autokrator in Thessaloniki in 1224, see the document THESSALONIKI), which therefore automatically dates the event to much later than the initial campaign of the Fourth Crusade[808].  Of the individuals named Anseau who are shown above in the present document, Anseau [I] of course belongs to a much earlier generation, and it is also likely that his probable son Anseau [II] would have been too old to be identified with Villehardouin’s Anseau.  The shadowy Anseau [III] would fit from a chronological point of view, and also Anseau [IV].  In the case of the latter, the documents quoted above show a continuous career in northern France between 1195 and 1221, but no record dated between Aug 1201 and 1206 during which period he could have joined the Fourth Crusade.  However, if the report of Anseau’s being wounded in battle against Theodoros of Epirus is correct, the Anseau in Constantinople could not have been Anseau [IV] who was recorded in the west between 1214 and 1221.  It is assumed therefore that Anseau [III] is the best candidate to be identified with Villehardouin’s Anseau.  The next chronological reference to Anseau is dated to 1237, and this has been assumed, in the present document, to refer to Anseau [V] who is shown below.  If this is correct, it is possible that Anseau [V] was the son of Anseau [III], maybe called to Constantinople during his father’s old age or after he had died. 

 

1.         ANSEAU [V] de Cayeux ([1195/1205]-[13 May 1273/Mar 1276])Regent of the Latin empire of Constantinople in 1237: the Continuator of William of Tyre records that, after the death in Mar 1237 of Emperor Jean de Brienne and the succession of "fiz moult juene…Baudoin", the barons appointed "baille et garde del empire et del enfant un vaillant home…Anseau" who "maintint bien la terre selonc le mauvais point en quoi ele estoit" and "por ce que il la peust meauz maintenir, fist il pais et aliance o les Comanz, et esposa la fille d’un Coman por meauz atraire les a soi"[809].  Emperor Baudouin was in the west seeking allies to defend Constantinople between 1236 and July 1239.  It is therefore probable that Anseau was appointed as regent only for the period of Baudouin’s absence, after the death of Emperor Jean.  The choice of Anseau suggests that he must already have held a position of importance in the imperial government and that therefore he was reasonably mature at the time, suggesting a birth date range of [1195/1205], but no source has yet been found which confirms that this speculation is correct.  Champagne says that, after the return to Constantinople of Emperor Baudouin, Anseau held "différents commandements sur terre et sur mer et se distingua contre les Bulgares, contre les Grecs, contre les Lombards"[810].  The primary sources which confirm that this statement is correct have not been identified.  Georgius Akropolites records that "Aseldecaë [Ασέλ Δεκαέ]" (="Ansel de Cayeu") led Latin imperial troops "apud Tzurulum" against Emperor Ioannes III Vatatzes, but fled to Constantinople leaving behind his wife "Eudocia soror uxoris imperatoris", who was later expelled and sent back to Constantinople as well, dated to [1247] from the context of the passage[811].  After [1247], it is difficult to be certain whether the references to Anseau de Cayeux are to the same person as Anseau [V], although the charter dated Jun 1277, under which his supposed widow "Marie de Kaieu jadis fame monseigneur Ansel de Kaieu, grant baron et camberlenc de l ‘empiere de Costantinoble, et Anseaus, leur fils" donated property to the monks of Dommartin[812], suggests that there was probably only one Anseau de Cayeux.  Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation for the marriage of "Anselmum de Keu ac Mariam natam Matildis dominæ de Posaga, natæ comitissæ Viennensis" dated 15 Aug 1253, and the marriage licence for "Maria, nate quondam Calojohanni" dated 13 Jan 1254, the documents naming "imperatore Constantinopolitano, eiusdem Matildis avunculo"[813].  Pope Alexander IV confirmed the marriage of "nobili viro Anselmo domino de Keu et Marie uxori eius" dated 15 Jan 1255[814].  McDaniel assumes that the bridegroom Anseau was "resident in or held lands around Keu", on the basis of the information contained in this marriage dispensation and licence[815].  He identifies "Keu" as "present-day Banostor" in Hungary.  However, it is more likely that "Keu" in these documents represents an imaginative rendering of "Cayeux", especially given the number of orthographic variations of the name which are found in contemporary primary sources.  Anseau was appointed Vicar-General of Albania in 1273 by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet]: "Anselmo de Caen" was named "Capitaneum et Vicarium generale in Regno Albanie" by charter dated 13 May 1273[816].  [m firstly ---.  No direct indication of this supposed first marriage has been found.  However, the date of Anseau’s marriage to the Kuman princess ([Mar 1237/1239]) would be late for a first marriage, assuming that his birth date is correctly estimated as shown above.  No details are known about Anseau’s career before 1237, but it is possible that he was called to Constantinople from France and, if this is correct, that his supposed first wife was French.  It is assumed that this first wife died without leaving surviving children.]  m [secondly] ([Mar 1237/1239]) ---, daughter of --- of the Kumans.  The Continuator of William of Tyre records that "…Anseau" married "la fille d’un Coman" as part of his alliance with the Kuman people[817]m [thirdly] ([1239/47]) EVDOKIA Laskarina, daughter of THEODOROS I Emperor in Nikaia and his first wife Anna Angelina ([1210/12]-[1247/53]).  Georgius Akropolites names "Irene, Maria et Eudocia" as the three daughters of "Theodorum Lascarim imperatorem…ex Anna uxore"[818].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that one of the daughters (mentioned fourth) of "Lascarum Grecum" married "Anselmus de Kiev, de Pontivo natus"[819].  Georgius Akropolites records that "Eudocia soror uxoris imperatoris" was the wife of "Aseldecaë [Ασέλ Δεκαέ]" (="Ansel de Cayeu") at "apud Tzurulum" which was besieged by Emperor Ioannes III Vatatzes, her husband fleeing, Evdokia later being sent to Constantinople, dated to [1247] from the context of the passage[820]Ephræmius records that "sororem reginæ…Eudociam" married "Aseldecao Italo dynastæ"[821].  The reference to "Italo" is presumably deduced from Anseau’s later appointment as Vicar-General by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (see above).  If it is correct, as shown below, that it was Anseau [V] who married Maria Angelina, and not a younger person also named Anseau de Cayeux, Evdokia must have died before 1253.  m [fourthly] (Papal dispensation 15 Aug 1253, licence 13 Jan 1254) MARIA Angelina, daughter of IOANNES "Kaloiannes" Angelos & his wife Mathilde von Vianden (-after 1285).  Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation for the marriage of "Anselmum de Keu ac Mariam natam Matildis dominæ de Posaga, natæ comitissæ Viennensis" dated 15 Aug 1253, and the marriage licence for "Maria, nate quondam Calojohanni" dated 13 Jan 1254, the documents naming "imperatore Constantinopolitano, eiusdem Matildis avunculo"[822].  Pope Alexander IV confirmed the marriage of "nobili viro Anselmo domino de Keu et Marie uxori eius" dated 15 Jan 1255[823].  "Marie de Kaieu jadis fame monseigneur Ansel de Kaieu, grant baron et camberlenc de l ‘empiere de Costantinoble, et Anseaus, leur fils" donated property to the monks of Dommartin by charter dated Jun 1277[824].  "Anslaus de Kayeu fieus et hoirs Ansiel de Kayeu chevalier jadis boutellier de Seles" confirmed possessions of the church of Dommartin, with the consent of "Marie me dame et me mère", by charter dated Mar 1276[825].  McDaniel dates her last documented appearance to 1285[826].  Anseau [V] & his [third] wife had one child: 

a)         EUDOXIA [Marie] de Cayeux (-before 1275)Her parentage and marriage are shown by Champagne in a genealogical table but he cites no corresponding primary source[827].  If her parentage is correctly identified, her name suggests that she must have been born from her father’s marriage to Evdokia Laskarina.  It has not yet proved possible to estimate her birth year with any confidence as no precise information has been found about the chronology of her children.  She is named Marie in various secondary sources on the internet, but the primary source basis for this statement has not been identified.  Dame de Sainte-Geneviève.  m as his first wife, DREUX de Beaumont, son of ADAM [II] Seigneur de Beaumont-en-Gâtinais & his wife --- (-[14 Nov 1276/30 Mar 1277]).  Marshal of Sicily. 

Anseau [V] & his [fourth] wife had two children: 

b)         ANSEAU [VI] de Cayeux (-after Nov 1288).  "Anslaus de Kayeu fieus et hoirs Ansiel de Kayeu chevalier jadis boutellier de Seles [presumably indicating the kingdom of Sicily]" confirmed possessions of the church of Dommartin, with the consent of "Marie me dame et me mère", by charter dated Mar 1276[828].  "Marie de Kaieu jadis fame monseigneur Ansel de Kaieu, grant baron et camberlenc de l ‘empiere de Costantinoble, et Anseaus, leur fils" donated property to the monks of Dommartin by charter dated Jun 1277[829].  "Anssiaus de Cayeu chevaliers sires de Dominois" donated property to the abbey of Valoires, with the consent of "me dame Maroie me femme", by charter dated Apr 1283[830].  "Messire Ansiaux de Caïeu" acknowledged that he had no rights over "le terrois de Houssoy" by charter dated Nov 1288[831]m ([Jun 1277/Apr 1283]) MARIE, daughter of --- (-after Apr 1283).  "Anssiaus de Cayeu chevaliers sires de Dominois" donated property to the abbey of Valoires, with the consent of "me dame Maroie me femme", by charter dated Apr 1283[832].  No indication has been found of the family origin of the wife of Anseau [VI]. 

c)         GUILLAUME de Cayeux (-1302).  "Guill de Cayeu sire de Boullaincourt en Seri…seigneur de Kaieu" confirmed a donation to Saint-Vulfran, in the presence of "mon seigneur Jehan de Pontieu conte de Aubemarle" acknowledged a fine for his actions against "Jehan de Monchiaus alores bailleus d’Abbeville", with "Guill de Cayeu sire de Senarpont…et…Ansel frère au dit seigneur de Cayeu" acting as sureties, by charter dated Dec 1205 (redated possibly to 1285)[833]Seigneur de Sénarpont et Dominois-en-Caïeu.  m MARGUERITE de Longueval, daughter of ---. 

-        SEIGNEURS de DOMINOIS[834]

 

 

Two brothers, maybe descended from Guillaume [III] de Cayeux through the female line: 

1.         GUILLAUME de Cayeux (-after 1293).  Seigneur de Boullaincourt-en-Séry.  "Guill de Cayeu sire de Boullaincourt en Seri…seigneur de Kaieu" confirmed a donation to Saint-Vulfran, in the presence of "mon seigneur Jehan de Pontieu conte de Aubemarle" acknowledged a fine for his actions against "Jehan de Monchiaus alores bailleus d’Abbeville", with "Guill de Cayeu sire de Senarpont…et…Ansel frère au dit seigneur de Cayeu" acting as sureties, by charter dated Dec 1205 (redated possibly to 1285)[835]m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

a)         BEATRIX de Cayeux (-after Apr 1326).  "Béatrice de Cayeux" donated "toute sa terre de Cayeux et de Bouillancourt-en-Séry…" to "sa sœur Jeanne" by charter dated 18 Jul 1321[836].  Charles IV King of France  confirmed a donation by "Béatrice de Cayeux, religieuse de l’abbaye royale à Poissy" to "son oncle Anseau de Cayeux chevalier seigneur de Bouttencourt et de Bus-en-Artois" charter dated Apr 1326[837].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  [m as his second wife, MAURICE [V] de Belleville Seigneur de Montaigu, son of MAURICE [IV] de Belleville Seigneur de Montaigu & his first wife Sibylle de Châteaubriand (-after 1320).] 

b)         JEANNE de Cayeux (-before 7 Jun 1343).  "Béatrice de Cayeux" donated "toute sa terre de Cayeux et de Bouillancourt-en-Séry…" to "sa sœur Jeanne" by charter dated 18 Jul 1321[838]Dame de Cayeux et de Bouillancourt-en-Séry.  m JEAN de Varennes Seigneur de Forceville, de Vinacourt et de l’Arbroye, son of JEAN de Varennes Seigneur de l’Arbroie & his wife Agnes d’Amiens. 

2.         ANSEAU [VII] de Cayeux (-after 1329).  "Guill de Cayeu sire de Boullaincourt en Seri…seigneur de Kaieu" confirmed a donation to Saint-Vulfran, in the presence of "mon seigneur Jehan de Pontieu conte de Aubemarle" acknowledged a fine for his actions against "Jehan de Monchiaus alores bailleus d’Abbeville", with "Guill de Cayeu sire de Senarpont…et…Ansel frère au dit seigneur de Cayeu" acting as sureties, by charter dated Dec 1205 (redated possibly to 1285)[839].  Seigneur de Boutaincourt.  Charles IV King of France  confirmed a donation by "Béatrice de Cayeux, religieuse de l’abbaye royale à Poissy" to "son oncle Anseau de Cayeux chevalier seigneur de Bouttencourt et de Bus-en-Artois" charter dated Apr 1326[840].  Champagne records that he was named in a document dated 1329[841]m CLEMENCE de Bouvaincourt, daughter of --- (-after 10 Jan 1310).  "Climenche de Bouvaincourt dame de Boutencourt et de Bus en Artoyx…et…Anssiaux de Caieu chevalier et sire des lieus dessus nommés" notified their homage for the castel de Bus by charter dated 10 Jan 1310[842]

-        SEIGNEURS de BUS-en-ARTOIS[843]

 

 

 

F.      VICOMTES de DOULLENS

 

 

1.         ROBERT (-after 1155).  Vicomte de Doullens.  Jean [I] Comte de Ponthieu confirmed the donation of property at “Domina Adhelidis de Perona filia Mathei qui Strabo dictus est, uxor...Symonis de Buisceavesnes” made by “Gerardus de Pinconio vicedominus et filii eius...Robertus vicecomes et filii eius...” to the abbey of Saint-Jean d’Amiens by charter dated 1155[844]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Amiens, 1, p. 1. 

[2] Amiens, Tome I, 1, p. 1. 

[3] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais aux X et XI siècles' (2000), p. 234. 

[4] ES III 657. 

[5] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, p. 56 footnote 1. 

[6] Seversmith (1939-58), Vol. 5, p. 2468 [information provided to the author by Janet Bjorndahl in a private email dated 25 Apr 2011]. 

[7] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Quartus, Cap. V, p. 87. 

[8] Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, LXIII, p. 123. 

[9] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552. 

[10] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 248. 

[11] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, XLVII, p. 76. 

[12] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Sainte-Colombe, p. 15.       

[13] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Eglise cathedrale de Paris, p. 1015. 

[14] ES III 657. 

[15] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552. 

[16] Sainte-Croix d'Orléans LXIII, p. 123. 

[17] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552. 

[18] Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Remensis, XIII, col. 17. 

[19] Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Ambianensis, III, col. 282. 

[20] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552. 

[21] Gallia Christiana, Tome X, col. 1162. 

[22] RHGF, Tome X, XIX, p. 591. 

[23] Sainte-Croix d'Orléans LXIII, p. 123. 

[24] RHGF, Tome X, IV, p. 552. 

[25] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170. 

[26] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170. 

[27] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170. 

[28] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLIII, p. 170. 

[29] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173. 

[30] Saint-Wandrille, 7, p. 37. 

[31] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LII, p. 82. 

[32] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book III, p. 117, and Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77. 

[33] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77. 

[34] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 274. 

[35] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book  VII, p. 77. 

[36] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book  VII, p. 77. 

[37] RHGF, Tome X, L, p. 622. 

[38] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173. 

[39] Florence of Worcester, 1051, p. 150. 

[40] Florence of Worcester, 1055, p. 157. 

[41] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173. 

[42] Simeon of Durham, p. 535. 

[43] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77. 

[44] Jumièges, Tome I, 14, p. 46. 

[45] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173. 

[46] Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Tome I, LII, p. 82. 

[47] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. XLVI, p. 173. 

[48] Gallia Christiana, Tome X, col. 1162. 

[49] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 77. 

[50] Amiens, Tome I, 3, p. 7. 

[51] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1062, MGH SS XXIII, p. 793. 

[52] Yves de Chartres, Epistola 45, Patrologia Latina, Tome 162, col. 57. 

[53] Amiens, Tome I, 9, p. 14.  

[54] Amiens, Tome I, 9, p. 14. 

[55] Ducange (1840), p. 243. 

[56] Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Appendix col. 423, and Ducange (1840), p. 241. 

[57] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 11, footnote 2, quoting Duchesne Histoire généalogique des maisons de Guines…et de Coucy, Preuves du Livre VI, pp. 315-6 [not yet consulted]. 

[58] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 11, footnote 2, quoting Duchesne Histoire généalogique des maisons de Guines…et de Coucy, Preuves du Livre VI, pp. 316-7 [not yet consulted]. 

[59] Ducange (1840), p. 239. 

[60] Ducange (1840), p. 239. 

[61] Ducange (1840), p. 239. 

[62] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 11, footnote 2, quoting Duchesne Histoire généalogique des maisons de Guines…et de Coucy, Preuves du Livre VI, pp. 316-7 [not yet consulted]. 

[63] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 27, footnote 1, quoting Cartulaire de Lihons-en-Santerre, Bibl. nat ms lat. 5460, fol. 7 et 8. 

[64] Ducange (1840), p. 239. 

[65] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 27, footnote 1, quoting Cartulaire de Lihons-en-Santerre, Bibl. nat ms lat. 5460, fol. 7 et 8. 

[66] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 27, footnote 1, quoting Cartulaire de Lihons-en-Santerre, Bibl. nat ms lat. 5460, fol. 7 et 8. 

[67] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 27, footnote 1, quoting Cartulaire de Lihons-en-Santerre, Bibl. nat ms lat. 5460, fol. 7 et 8. 

[68] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 11, footnote 2, quoting Duchesne Histoire généalogique des maisons de Guines…et de Coucy, Preuves du Livre VI, pp. 315-6 [not yet consulted]. 

[69] Ducange (1840), p. 239. 

[70] Ducange (1840), p. 238, stating that "l’original de cette charte est conservé aux archives départementales de la ville d’Amiens". 

[71] Toussaints du Plessis (1728), Pièces Justificatives, II, p. 128. 

[72] Vita Sancti Arnulfi Suessionensis Episcopi, Liber I, XXVI, col. 1397. 

[73] ES III 644. 

[74] Lecoy de la Marche (1867), Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis, III, p. 21. 

[75] Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Appendix col. 423, and Ducange (1840), p. 241. 

[76] Toussaints du Plessis (1728), Pièces Justificatives, IV, p. 130. 

[77] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[78] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[79] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 

[80] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 65 (77), MGH SS VIII, p. 601. 

[81] Guibert de Nogent, Liber III, III and X, pp. 135 and 181. 

[82] Annales Lobienses 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[83] Noulens (1888), p. 24, citing Malbrancq, J. (1654) De Morinis et morinorum rebus, Tome II, p. 489 [not yet consulted]. 

[84] Guibert de Nogent, Liber III, III and X, pp. 135 and 181. 

[85] Annales Lobienses 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[86] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[87] Guibert de Nogent, Liber III, VII, p. 160. 

[88] Toussaints du Plessis (1728), Pièces Justificatives, II, p. 128. 

[89] William of Tyre, I. XVII, p. 46. 

[90] Lecoy de la Marche (1867), Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis VII, p. 21. 

[91] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 538. 

[92] Lecoy de la Marche (1867), Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXX, p. 131. 

[93] Breve Chronicon Buciliensis, p. 9. 

[94] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 13. 

[95] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[96] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 506. 

[97] Annales Lobienses 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[98] Lecoy de la Marche (1867), Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis VII, p. 21. 

[99] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 13. 

[100] Annales Lobienses 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[101] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[102] Tardif ‘Enguerran de Coucy’ (1918), p. 14. 

[103] Saint-Vincent de Laon, XXII, p. 206. 

[104] Annales Lobienses 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[105] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 506. 

[106] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[107] Analectes pour servir à l´histoire ecclésiastique de la Belgique, Tome XVI (Louvain, 1879), Documents Waulsort, XIII, p. 23. 

[108] Duvivier (1865), CXXXII, p. 591. 

[109] Annales Lobienses 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[110] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[111] Dion (1884), p. 20, citing Moreau, t. LXII, fol. 22. 

[112] RHGF, Tome XV, VIII, p. 414. 

[113] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[114] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[115] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[116] Amiens, Tome I, 23, p. 31. 

[117] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. III, p. 89. 

[118] Amiens, I, 86, p. 115. 

[119] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[120] ES III 622. 

[121] Amiens, I, 86, p. 115. 

[122] Amiens, I, 105, p. 139. 

[123] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 343. 

[124] Esserent Saint-Leu, XCIV, p. 97. 

[125] Villehardouin (1963), 1, p. 30. 

[126] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Scripta de Feodem ad Regem spectantibus, 223, p. 656. 

[127] Beauvillé (1857), Vol. 1, p. 103, quoting “Cartulaire de Philippe Auguste, Bibl. nat. 172”. 

[128] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 343. 

[129] Esserent Saint-Leu, XCIV, p. 97. 

[130] ES VII 80. 

[131] Duchesne (1631), Guines, pp. 247-8. 

[132] Amiens, I, 191, p. 239. 

[133] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[134] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[135] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 346. 

[136] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[137] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 346. 

[138] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[139] ES VII 23 and 80. 

[140] ES VII 80. 

[141] Roland ‘Rumigny-Florennes’ (1891), Pièces justificatives, XV, p. 294. 

[142] Lelong (1783), 17, p. 605. 

[143] Roland ‘Rumigny-Florennes’ (1891), Pièces justificatives, XXIII, p. 301. 

[144] Amiens, I, 86, p. 115. 

[145] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 343. 

[146] Amiens, I, 105, p. 139. 

[147] Esserent Saint-Leu, XCIV, p. 97. 

[148] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[149] Villehardouin (1963), 1, p. 30. 

[150] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Scripta de Feodem ad Regem spectantibus, 223, p. 656. 

[151] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[152] Amiens, I, 105, p. 139. 

[153] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[154] Beauvillé (1857), Vol. 1, p. 103, quoting “Cartulaire de Philippe Auguste, Bibl. nat. 172”. 

[155] Amiens, I, 105, p. 139. 

[156] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[157] Beauvillé (1877), Part III, p. 2. 

[158] Beauvillé (1877), Part III, VIII, p. 5. 

[159] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[160] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[161] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[162] Duchesne (1631), Guines, p. 246. 

[163] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[164] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 345. 

[165] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[166] Esserent Saint-Leu, XCIV, p. 97. 

[167] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[168] Beauvillé (1857), Vol. 1, p. 103, quoting “Cartulaire de Philippe Auguste, Bibl. nat. 172”. 

[169] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[170] Esserent Saint-Leu, XCIV, p. 97. 

[171] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[172] Guibert de Nogent, Liber XIV, p. 201. 

[173] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[174] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[175] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[176] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 323. 

[177] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 342. 

[178] Ex Vita S. Godefridis Ambianensis Episcopi, RHGF, XIV, p. 178. 

[179] Guibert de Nogent, Liber XIV, p. 198. 

[180] Lecoy de la Marche (1867), Suger, Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXIII, p. 95. 

[181] Noulens (1888), p. 24, citing Malbrancq, J. (1654) De Morinis et morinorum rebus, Tome II, p. 489 [not yet consulted]. 

[182] Guibert de Nogent, Liber XIV, p. 201. 

[183] Guibert de Nogent, Liber XIV, p. 201. 

[184] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 8, MGH SS XIII, p. 253. 

[185] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1119, MGH SS XXIII, p. 824. 

[186] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 323. 

[187] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[188] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 323. 

[189] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 323. 

[190] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[191] Lannoy, LXXXII, p. 693. 

[192] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[193] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[194] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[195] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 323. 

[196] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 325, quoting (in translation) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Lucien de Beauvais, fol. 149. 

[197] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[198] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 325, quoting (in translation) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Lucien de Beauvais, fol. 149. 

[199] Noulens (1888), Preuves, VIII, p. 332, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 354. 

[200] Villehardouin (1963), 36. 

[201] Noulens (1888), Preuves, VIII, p. 348, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 356. 

[202] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IX, p. 337, quoting Roze, J. B. M. (1885) Nécrologe de l’Eglise d’Amiens, pp. 181-2. 

[203] Villehardouin (1963), 36. 

[204] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IX, p. 337, quoting Roze, J. B. M. (1885) Nécrologe de l’Eglise d’Amiens, pp. 181-2. 

[205] Noulens (1888), Preuves, XVI, p. 351, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 357. 

[206] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IX, p. 337, quoting Roze, J. B. M. (1885) Nécrologe de l’Eglise d’Amiens, pp. 181-2. 

[207] ES XIII 6-7. 

[208] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IX, p. 337, quoting Roze, J. B. M. (1885) Nécrologe de l’Eglise d’Amiens, pp. 181-2. 

[209] ES XIII 8, Seigneurs de Canaples, de Bachimont et du Plessis. 

[210] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 628. 

[211] Noulens (1888), Preuves, VIII, p. 348, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 356. 

[212] Noulens (1888), Preuves, XVI, p. 351, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 357. 

[213] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IX, p. 337, quoting Roze, J. B. M. (1885) Nécrologe de l’Eglise d’Amiens, pp. 181-2. 

[214] Noulens (1888), Preuves, XVI, p. 351, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 357. 

[215] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IX, p. 337, quoting Roze, J. B. M. (1885) Nécrologe de l’Eglise d’Amiens, pp. 181-2. 

[216] Noulens (1888), Preuves, XVI, p. 351, quoting Passier, H. and A. (1877) Trésor généalogique de Dom Villevieille, Tome I, p. 357. 

[217] Amiens, Tome I, 6, p. 10. 

[218] Amiens, Tome I, 5, p. 9. 

[219] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium 46, MGH SS XXIV, p. 584. 

[220] Darsy (1860), p. 26. 

[221] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not traced). 

[222] Domesday Descendants, p. 698, citing Salter, H. E. (ed.) (1929-36) The Oseney Cartulary (Oxford), Vol. V, p. 1037. 

[223] Veterum Scriptorum, Tome II, col. 826. 

[224] Le Carpentier (1664), Part IV, Preuves, p. 17. 

[225] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Extraits du Cartulaire de Picquigny, p. 30. 

[226] Domesday Descendants, p. 635, citing Victoria County History, Hampshire, Vol. III, p. 166. 

[227] Veterum Scriptorum, Tome II, col. 826. 

[228] Veterum Scriptorum, Tome II, col. 837. 

[229] Amiens, Tome I, 55, p. 75. 

[230] Darsy (1860), p. 29, citing “le cartulaire du Gard” (no citation reference). 

[231] Hanna (1988-89) I.118, p. 70 (snippet view in Google Books).  The summary provided by Domesday Descendants, p. 635, indicates that the donation was made also for the souls of Matilda’s parents.  This is not apparent from the snippet view in Google Books.  The full page of the original has not been consulted. 

[232] Daire (1757), Vol. I, p. 41. 

[233] Darsy (1860), p. 30, footnote (3) citing “Cartulaire [d’Amiens?], t. VI, p. 123” (not consulted). 

[234] Dugdale Monasticon V, Melsa Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 394. 

[235] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[236] Amiens, Tome I, 55, p. 75. 

[237] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Extraits du Cartulaire de Picquigny, p. 30. 

[238] Lannoy, Tome X, LXXXII, p. 693. 

[239] Noulens (1888), Preuves, IV, p. 326. 

[240] Lannoy, Tome X, LXXXII, p. 693. 

[241] Lannoy, Tome X, LXXXII, p. 693. 

[242] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Extraits du Cartulaire de Picquigny, p. 30. 

[243] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 579. 

[244] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Extraits du Cartulaire de Picquigny, p. 30. 

[245] Darsy (1860), p. 31, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 57 (not consulted). 

[246] Darsy (1860), p. 31, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 57 (not consulted). 

[247] Darsy (1860), p. 31, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 57 (not consulted). 

[248] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[249] Amiens, Tome I, 55, p. 75. 

[250] Lannoy, Tome X, LXXXII, p. 693. 

[251] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[252] Lannoy, Tome X, LXXXII, p. 693. 

[253] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[254] Daire (1757), Vol. I, p. 41. 

[255] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[256] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[257] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38, and “Cartulaire [d’Amiens?], t. VI, p. 127” (none consulted). 

[258] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[259] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[260] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[261] Darsy (1860), p. 30, citing Cartulaire du Gard, tome II, pp. 420, 456, Cartulaire de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (none consulted). 

[262] Le Carpentier (1664), Part IV, Preuves, p. 17. 

[263] Slack (2001), p. 39, citing BN, Collection de Picardie 257, 5-6 [available Snippet View in Google Book].  I am grateful to Douglas Richardson for drawing my attention to this source in a private email to the author dated 28 Apr 2012. 

[264] Esserent Saint-Leu, LXII, p. 63. 

[265] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[266] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[267] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Extraits du Cartulaire de Picquigny, p. 30. 

[268] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[269] Darsy (1860), p. 27, citing Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Saint-Jean, p. 38 (not consulted). 

[270] Darsy (1860), p. 26, citing Hermannus monachus De miraculis sanctæ Mariæ laudunensis, lib. II, cap. XVII, p. 540 (available in Patrologia Latina, Vol. 156, not yet consulted). 

[271] Amiens, I, 112, p. 149. 

[272] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Extraits du Cartulaire de Picquigny, p. 30. 

[273] Amiens, I, 123, p. 160. 

[274] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[275] Amiens, I, 123, p. 160. 

[276] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[277] ES XIII 143. 

[278] ES XIII 143. 

[279] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[280] Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 481, p. 234. 

[281] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, Pièces justificatives, XVIII, p. xxxvi. 

[282] Darsy (1860), p. 35, citing Cartulaire du Gard, t. I, p. 104 (not yet consulted). 

[283] Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 481, p. 234. 

[284] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, Pièces justificatives, XVIII, p. xxxvi. 

[285] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye du Jard, p. 52.       

[286] Darsy (1860), p. 35, footnote (6) (no citation reference). 

[287] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 561. 

[288] Amiens, I, 340, p. 395. 

[289] Foppens (1734), Tome III, Pars I, CLXI, p. 136. 

[290] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 383.  

[291] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, Part 2, DXX, p. 481. 

[292] ES XIII 144. 

[293] ES XIII 144. 

[294] Darsy (1860), p. 35, footnote (6) (no citation reference). 

[295] ES XIII 144. 

[296] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[297] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium 150, MGH SS XXIV, p. 639. 

[298] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 286. 

[299] Notre-Dame de Licques, LXXII, p. 111. 

[300] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 562. 

[301] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[302] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[303] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[304] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[305] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[306] ES XIII 143. 

[307] ES XIII 143. 

[308] Darsy (1860), p. 35, footnote (6) (no citation reference). 

[309] Justel (1645), Preuves, p. 73. 

[310] Justel (1645), Preuves, p. 73. 

[311] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 651 (no citation reference). 

[312] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 180. 

[313] Favier (1965), 84, p. 189. 

[314] Favier (1965), 88, p. 197. 

[315] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 180. 

[316] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 180. 

[317] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, Preuves, p. 186. 

[318] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, Preuves, p. 187. 

[319] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, Preuves, p. 187. 

[320] Devillers (1867), Tome V, XXI, p. 64. 

[321] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, Preuves, p. 187. 

[322] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, Preuves, p. 187. 

[323] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[324] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[325] ES XIII 144, extinct in the male line after 1510.  

[326] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[327] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[328] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[329] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[330] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 176. 

[331] Furgeot (1920), X/1a/6 49, p. 14.  

[332] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 636. 

[333] Cassiaux (1777), Tome I, p. 42. 

[334] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[335] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[336] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[337] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[338] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[339] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[340] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[341] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[342] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[343] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 115. 

[344] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[345] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[346] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[347] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[348] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[349] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 116. 

[350] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[351] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[352] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[353] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 120. 

[354] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 121. 

[355] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 120. 

[356] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 120. 

[357] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 120. 

[358] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 121. 

[359] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 124. 

[360] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 120. 

[361] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 136. 

[362] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[363] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[364] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[365] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[366] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[367] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[368] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 118. 

[369] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 117. 

[370] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 636. 

[371] Sigeberti Continuatio Valcellensis 1115, MGH SS VI, p. 459. 

[372] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 74. 

[373] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 76. 

[374] Vita Karoli Comitis Flandriæ 7, MGH SS XII, p. 542. 

[375] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257. 

[376] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255. 

[377] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257. 

[378] ES XIII 143. 

[379] Melleville (1857), Vol. II, p. 284. 

[380] Ourscamp Notre-Dame, CIII, p. 70. 

[381] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. III, p. 89. 

[382] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 579. 

[383] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[384] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, CCL, p. 367. 

[385] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[386] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[387] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, CCL, p. 367. 

[388] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Scripta de Feodem ad Regem spectantibus, 182, p. 647. 

[389] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 350, quoting Titres de Monchy l’abbaye (no precise citation reference). 

[390] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[391] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[392] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, MGH SS XXV, p. 437. 

[393] Père Anselme, Tome VI, pp. 738 and 743. 

[394] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, CCL, p. 367. 

[395] Ourscamp Notre-Dame CIII, p. 70. 

[396] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[397] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Exercitus Fuxensis Index Primus, 1, p. 739. 

[398] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCXLIII, p. 452. 

[399] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[400] Chronique Artésienne (1899), p. 50. 

[401] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 738. 

[402] Furgeot (1920), X/1a/7 1829, p. 326. 

[403] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 35. 

[404] Père Anselme, Tome VI, pp. 738 and 743. 

[405] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, CCL, p. 367. 

[406] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 743. 

[407] Veterum Scriptorum, I, col. 1049. 

[408] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Scripta de Feodem ad Regem spectantibus, 19, 203, pp. 612, 652. 

[409] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, CCCX, p. 437. 

[410] Veterum Scriptorum, I, col. 1164. 

[411] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCXLIV, p. 453. 

[412] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 69, and Preuves, p. 38. 

[413] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 743. 

[414] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 744. 

[415] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCXLIV, p. 453. 

[416] Barthélemy, E. de ‘Le Tournoi de Compiègne en 1238’, Le Vermandois (1873), p. 149. 

[417] Olim, Tome I, XIV, p. 472. 

[418] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Paroisse de Courville, p. 465.       

[419] Marmoutier (Blésois), Tome I, CCCXXVII, p. 308. 

[420] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 201.       

[421] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Paroisse de Courville, p. 464.       

[422] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 108. 

[423] Olim, Tome I, XIII, p. 927. 

[424] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 744. 

[425] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 108. 

[426] Olim, Tome II, XLIV, p. 170. 

[427] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 744. 

[428] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Exercitus Fuxensis Index Primus, 1, p. 739. 

[429] Saint-Amand, XCVI, p. 249. 

[430] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 109, citing Funck-Brentano Philippe le Bel en Flandre, pp. 157, 172, 227 [Not yet consulted]. 

[431] Olim, Tome II, XXV, p. 181. 

[432] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 107. 

[433] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 744. 

[434] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 109. 

[435] Ourscamp Notre-Dame DCCXLV, p. 453. 

[436] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Listes de Convocations, p. 807. 

[437] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Listes de Convocations, pp. 820-1. 

[438] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 744. 

[439] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome II, p. 164. 

[440] Carolus-Barré ‘Les deux testaments de Renaut seigneur de Dargies’ (1969), p. 705, footnote 5, quoting Digard, Faucon, Thomas (eds.) Registres de Boniface VIII, Tome III, no. 4696 [not yet consulted]. 

[441] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 744. 

[442] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 110. 

[443] Boutaric (1861), p. 48. 

[444] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 894, p. 445, citing Arch. nat. J 149 no. 68. 

[445] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 895, p. 446, citing Arch. nat. J 396 no. 20. 

[446] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 909, p. 449, citing Arch. nat. X i A 10, f 66 r. 

[447] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 895, p. 446, citing Arch. nat. J 396 no. 20. 

[448] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 894, p. 445, citing Arch. nat. J 149 no. 68. 

[449] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, p. 111. 

[450] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 745. 

[451] Père Anselme, Tome VI, pp. 745, 749. 

[452] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 749. 

[453] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 745. 

[454] Margry ‘Seigneurs de Canny et Varesnes (1888), p. 15, citing “P. Anselme; D. Labbé”.  Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 745 records the claim but does not mention Mathieu’s involvement, while on p. 638 he does not mention the claim at all

[455] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, pp. 110 and 112 footnote 2. 

[456] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 749. 

[457] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 614. 

[458] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 614. 

[459] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 615. 

[460] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 615. 

[461] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 615. 

[462] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, Appendice, 2, p. 463. 

[463] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 614. 

[464] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 615. 

[465] Duchesne (1631), Luxembourg, Preuves, p. 94. 

[466] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 651 (no citation reference). 

[467] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome I, p. 120. 

[468] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 616. 

[469] Pére Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 615. 

[470] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, III.X and XI, pp. 126 and 128. 

[471] Flodoard, 925, MGH SS III, p. 376. 

[472] Flodoard, 929, MGH SS III, p. 378. 

[473] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, III.X, p. 126. 

[474] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 385. 

[475] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237. 

[476] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 5, MGH SS IX, p. 383. 

[477] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber IV, VII, p. 242. 

[478] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 385. 

[479] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 385. 

[480] Flodoard, 943, MGH SS III, p. 389. 

[481] Flodoard, 961, MGH SS III, p. 405. 

[482] Flodoard, 932, MGH SS III, p. 380. 

[483] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber IV, VII, p. 242. 

[484] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 54 footnote 53. 

[485] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 217-8. 

[486] ES II 11.  Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 49, gives no date of birth. 

[487] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 217. 

[488] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 218. 

[489] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book III, p. 13. 

[490] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XVII, p. 228. 

[491] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 218. 

[492] ES II 2. 

[493] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXI, p. 242. 

[494] Chronicon Hariulfi monachis S. Richarii Centulensis, Lib. IV, Cap. XXXVI, Spicilegium, Tome IV, p. 615. 

[495] Barlow (1999). 

[496] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 216. 

[497] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 217. 

[498] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXI, p. 242. 

[499] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60. 

[500] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXI, p. 242. 

[501] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60. 

[502] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 13. 

[503] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, p. 13 footnote (2). 

[504] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, VII, p. 270. 

[505] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1026, p. 34. 

[506] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60. 

[507] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60. 

[508] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221. 

[509] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, "Remarques", p. lxvii, which does not cite the reference of the cartulary of Saint-Josse. 

[510] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXII, p. 250. 

[511] CP I 351 footnote d, quoting from Stapleton, T. Archaeologia XXVI, pp. 358-60. 

[512] Molesme, Tome II, 84, p. 89. 

[513] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXI, p. 242. 

[514] Domesday Translation, Devonshire, XXVIII, p. 322. 

[515] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXI, p. 242. 

[516] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXI, p. 242. 

[517] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, VII, p. 270. 

[518] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, "Remarques", p. lxvii, which does not cite the reference of the cartulary of Saint-Josse. 

[519] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XXII, p. 250. 

[520] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 89. 

[521] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, XVI, p. 40. 

[522] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 35. 

[523] Montreuil-sur-Mer (1907), III, p. 6. 

[524] Liber Testamentorum Sancti Martini de Campis, XXXV, p. 45. 

[525] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 35. 

[526] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[527] Compiègne Saint-Corneille, Tome I, XVI, p. 40. 

[528] Liber Testamentorum Sancti Martini de Campis XXXV, p. 45. 

[529] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300. 

[530] Montreuil-sur-Mer (1907), III, p. 6. 

[531] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV VIII, p. 159. 

[532] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 35. 

[533] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 424. 

[534] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 35. 

[535] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XIII, p. 274. 

[536] CP XI 690. 

[537] CP XI 690. 

[538] Marmoutier-Perche, 13, p. 23. 

[539] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIV, p. 422. 

[540] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, p. 32, cited in CP XI 692. 

[541] Annales de Margan, p. 7. 

[542] CP XI 693-4. 

[543] Annales de Margan, p. 10. 

[544] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Dorsetshire, Wiltshire, p. 12. 

[545] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300. 

[546] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 424. 

[547] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[548] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300. 

[549] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[550] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, V, p. 300. 

[551] CP XI 697. 

[552] Marmoutier-Perche, 20, p. 32. 

[553] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 225. 

[554] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311. 

[555] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[556] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1166, p. 360. 

[557] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28. 

[558] Obituaire de Saint-Martin de Séez, Bibl.Nat. Ms français 18953, p. 227, quoted in Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28 footnote 3. 

[559] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 487. 

[560] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI XIII, p. 431. 

[561] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 389, col. 738. 

[562] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311. 

[563] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[564] Cîteaux, 113, p. 104. 

[565] Ponthieu, I, p. 9. 

[566] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311. 

[567] Abbayette Saint-Michel 10, p. 21. 

[568] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[569] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI XIII, p. 431. 

[570] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[571] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[572] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[573] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[574] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[575] Round (1899) 970, p. 346. 

[576] Ponthieu I, p. 9. 

[577] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1166, p. 360. 

[578] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28. 

[579] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311. 

[580] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 5. 

[581] Ellis (1846), 3rd series, Vol. I, Letter XIII, p. 23. 

[582] Ellis (1846), 3rd series, Vol. I, p. 25 quoting “Reg. Priorat. Lewes fol. 107 b”. 

[583] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, XIII, p. 431. 

[584] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXV, p. 311. 

[585] Cîteaux 113, p. 104. 

[586] Ponthieu I, p. 9. 

[587] Cîteaux 113, p. 104. 

[588] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 37. 

[589] Ponthieu VII, p. 16. 

[590] Ponthieu I, p. 9. 

[591] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 37. 

[592] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1166, p. 360. 

[593] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 28. 

[594] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 37. 

[595] Domesday Descendants, p. 698, citing Salter, H. E. (ed.) (1929-36) The Oseney Cartulary (Oxford), Vol. V, p. 1037. 

[596] Ponthieu VII, p. 16. 

[597] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 37. 

[598] Ponthieu IX, p. 21. 

[599] Ponthieu XXII, p. 41. 

[600] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, III, p. 363.   

[601] Ponthieu XXXV, p. 56. 

[602] Ponthieu XXXVI, p. 57. 

[603] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 37. 

[604] Amiens, I, 123, p. 160. 

[605] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Abbaye du Gard extraits du cartulaire, p. 29. 

[606] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 88. 

[607] Ponthieu VII, p. 16. 

[608] Ponthieu XIV, p. 27. 

[609] Ponthieu LXX, p. 106. 

[610] See ES III 639. 

[611] La Gorgue-Rosny (1877), Documents inédits, Autres chartes de Ponthieu, p. 37. 

[612] Ponthieu XIV, p. 27. 

[613] Ponthieu XXIV, p. 43. 

[614] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria I, VI, p. 37. 

[615] Ponthieu LVI, p. 81. 

[616] Ponthieu LX, p. 86.  

[617] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329. 

[618] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 97. 

[619] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1164, MGH SS XXIII, p. 848. 

[620] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 383. 

[621] Roger of Hoveden, I, p. 218. 

[622] Gervase, p. 208. 

[623] Benedict of Peterborough, Vol. I 1177, p. 191. 

[624] Benedict of Peterborough, Vol. 2 1189, p. 70.   

[625] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 97. 

[626] Ponthieu XVII, p. 32. 

[627] Ponthieu XXIV, p. 43. 

[628] Ponthieu XXIX, p. 48. 

[629] Ponthieu XXXI, p. 50. 

[630] Ponthieu XXXII, p. 52. 

[631] Ponthieu XXXIV, p. 55. 

[632] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria I, VI, p. 37. 

[633] Ponthieu XLVIII, p. 72. 

[634] Ponthieu LI, p. 74. 

[635] Ponthieu LXIII, p. 90. 

[636] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 383. 

[637] Ponthieu XXIV, p. 43. 

[638] Ponthieu XXIX, p. 48. 

[639] Ponthieu XXXI, p. 50. 

[640] Montreuil-sur-Mer (1907), VI, p. 9. 

[641] Ponthieu XXXII, p. 52. 

[642] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria I, VI, p. 37. 

[643] Ponthieu XLVIII, p. 72. 

[644] Ponthieu LXXXVII, p. 131. 

[645] Ourscamp Notre-Dame CCLXVIII, p. 168. 

[646] Ponthieu CXXXIII, p. 182. 

[647] Ponthieu CXLIII, p. 192. 

[648] Duchesne (1624), Preuves, p. 104. 

[649] Jumièges, Tome II, CCXVII, p. 179. 

[650] Willelmi Chronica Andrensis 194, MGH SS XXIV, p. 755. 

[651] Montreuil-sur-Mer (1907), VI, p. 9. 

[652] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2121, p. 199. 

[653] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947. 

[654] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 383. 

[655] Ponthieu XXIV, p. 43. 

[656] Ponthieu XXIX, p. 48. 

[657] Ponthieu XXXI, p. 50. 

[658] Montreuil-sur-Mer (1907), VI, p. 9. 

[659] Ponthieu XXXII, p. 52. 

[660] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria I, VI, p. 37. 

[661] Ponthieu XLVIII, p. 72. 

[662] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1713, p. 56. 

[663] Ponthieu LXXXVII, p. 131. 

[664] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1733, p. 62. 

[665] Ourscamp Notre-Dame CCLXVIII, p. 168. 

[666] Ponthieu CXXXIII, p. 182. 

[667] Ponthieu CXLIII, p. 192. 

[668] Ponthieu CLVII, p. 213. 

[669] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 383. 

[670] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947. 

[671] Ponthieu CXXII, p. 169. 

[672] Ponthieu CXXV, p. 172. 

[673] Szabolcs de Vajay (1989), p. 381. 

[674] Ponthieu CLX, p. 217. 

[675] Montreuil-sur-Mer, IV, p. 4. 

[676] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 221. 

[677] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947. 

[678] Bert M. Kamp, in a private email to the author dated 13 Sep 2010.  

[679] Ponthieu CXXII, p. 169. 

[680] Butkens (1724), Vol. I, p. 254 (information highlighted by Bert M. Kamp in a private email to the author dated 21 Oct 2010). 

[681] Bécheron CXXV, p. 109. 

[682] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Saint-André en Gouffern, 1031, p. 471. 

[683] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947. 

[684] Ponthieu CLVIII, p. 215. 

[685] Kronijk van Arent toe Bocop, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1860), vijfde deel, p. 184. 

[686] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 373. 

[687] Ponthieu CCXV, p. 280. 

[688] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1239, MGH SS XXIII, p. 947. 

[689] Moret de la Fayole (1675), p. 50. 

[690] Ponthieu CLX, p. 217. 

[691] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, Part 2, DLXXVIII, p. 538. 

[692] Epernon Saint-Thomas, LVIII, p. 60. 

[693] Notre-Dame des Vaux de Cernay, Tome I, Part 2, DLXXVIII, p. 538. 

[694] Epernon Saint-Thomas, LVIII, p. 60. 

[695] Chronique Artésienne (1899), p. 49. 

[696] Carolus-Barré ‘Les deux testaments de Renaut seigneur de Dargies’ (1969), pp. 699-728, quoting Archives dép. Oise, H 4276 (fonds de l’abbaye cistercienne de Beaupré).  [Information provided by Bert M. Kamp to the author in a private email dated 31 Dec 2011]

[697] Paris Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Tome V, 1252, p. 101. 

[698] Newman (1971), table Dargies.  [Information provided by Bert M. Kamp to the author in a private email dated 19 Jul 2010] 

[699] Héraldique et Généalogie (1996), p. 368, and (2000), p. 94.  [Information provided by Bert M. Kamp in a private email to the author dated 19 Jul 2010].. 

[700] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, p. 116. 

[701] La Roque (1662), Tome III, p. 269. 

[702] La Roque (1662), Tome III, p. 269. 

[703] La Roque (1662), Tome III, p. 269. 

[704] La Roque (1662), Tome III, p. 283. 

[705] Vismes, J. de ‘Essai généalogique sur les premiers Sires de Cayeu’, Bulletin de la Société d’Emulation Historique et Littéraire d’Abbeville, Tome 15 (1932-34), pp. 393-442 [not yet consulted]. 

[706] Champagne (2007). 

[707] La Gorgue-Rosny (1874), Tome I, p. 368. 

[708] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium, 22, MGH SS XXIV, p. 573, discussed in Champagne (2007), p. 8. 

[709] Champagne (2007), p. 8. 

[710] Belleval (1864), Tome II, pp. 68-71. 

[711] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), I, p. 109. 

[712] Calonne (1875), p. 6, and Appendice, II, p. 277. 

[713] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), I, p. 109. 

[714] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), III, p. 115. 

[715] Champagne (2007), p. 8, citing Tock, B. M. (2000) Monumenta Arroasiensia (Brépols), no. 5 (not yet consulted). 

[716] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), VIII, p. 128. 

[717] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), VIII, p. 128. 

[718] Calonne (1875), p. 11, and Appendice, III, p. 279. 

[719] Calonne (1875), p. 11, and Appendice, III, p. 279. 

[720] Haigneré ‘Chartes inédites Boulonnais’(1882-86), VI, p. 421. 

[721] Calonne (1875), p. 11, and Appendice, III, p. 279. 

[722] Champagne (2007), p. 10. 

[723] La Gorgue-Rosny (1874), Tome I, p. 368. 

[724] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 68. 

[725] Ponthieu II, p. 10. 

[726] Champagne (2007), p. 10. 

[727] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 68. 

[728] Champagne (2007), p. 11. 

[729] Champagne (2007), 11, citing Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Instrumenta, col. 323 (not yet consulted). 

[730] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 68. 

[731] Haigneré ‘Samer’ (1880), VII, p. 126. 

[732] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium, 99, MGH SS XXIV, p. 609. 

[733] Champagne (2007), p. 8. 

[734] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 68.  

[735] Champagne (2007), p. 10. 

[736] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium, 99, MGH SS XXIV, p. 609. 

[737] Champagne (2007), p. 8. 

[738] Champagne (2007), p. 10, citing Copie du cartulaire de Dommartin de 1666 A.D. 62, 12J/MS77, copie Roger Rodière (not consulted). 

[739] Champagne (2007), 11, citing Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Instrumenta, col. 323 (not yet consulted). 

[740] Round (1899), 1363, p. 495. 

[741] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Tome I, 888, p. 335. 

[742] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Tome I, 889, p. 335. 

[743] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[744] Champagne (2007), p. 11, citing Darsy, F. I. (1861) Notice historique sur l’abbaye de Séry (Amiens), p. 50 (not yet consulted). 

[745] Duchesne (1639) Béthune, Preuves, p. 50. 

[746] La Gorgue-Rosny (1874), Tome I, p. 368. 

[747] Champagne (2007), p. 13. 

[748] Champagne (2007), p. 13, citing Duchesne, A. (1639) Histoire de la Maison de Béthune, preuves du Livre IX, pp. 372-3 (not yet consulted). 

[749] Champagne (2007), 11, citing Gallia Christiana, Tome X, Instrumenta, col. 323 (not yet consulted). 

[750] Champagne (2007), p. 11, citing Darsy, F. I. (1861) Notice historique sur l’abbaye de Séry (Amiens), p. 50 (not yet consulted). 

[751] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 888, p. 335. 

[752] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[753] Champagne (2007), p. 11, citing Darsy, F. I. (1861) Notice historique sur l’abbaye de Séry (Amiens), p. 50 (not yet consulted). 

[754] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[755] Champagne (2007), p. 11, citing Darsy, F. I. (1861) Notice historique sur l’abbaye de Séry (Amiens), p. 50 (not yet consulted). 

[756] Le Carpentier (1664), Part IV, Preuves, p. 28. 

[757] Champagne (2007), p. 12. 

[758] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 158, quoting Titres de l’abbaye de S. Germer (no precise citation reference). 

[759] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[760] La Gorgue-Rosny (1874), Tome I, p. 368. 

[761] Le Carpentier (1664), Part IV, Preuves, p. 28. 

[762] Le Carpentier (1664), Part IV, Preuves, p. 28. 

[763] Champagne (2007), p. 12. 

[764] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 158, quoting Titres de l’abbaye de S. Germer (no precise citation reference). 

[765] Champagne (2007), p. 12. 

[766] La Gorgue-Rosny (1874), Tome I, p. 368. 

[767] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 551. 

[768] Béthune Saint-Barthélemy, 78, p. 38. 

[769] Champagne (2007), p. 14. 

[770] Cambron, Cartarum de Roseria, XL, p. 393. 

[771] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[772] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[773] Champagne (2007), pp. 11-12, citing Vismes ‘Sires de Cayeu’, pp. 400-02 (not yet consulted). 

[774] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 68. 

[775] Champagne (2007), p. 10. 

[776] Willelmi Chronica Andrensis, 113, MGH SS XXIV, p. 724. 

[777] Duchesne (1631), Guines, Preuves, p. 129. 

[778] Willelmi Chronica Andrensis, 113, MGH SS XXIV, p. 724. 

[779] Champagne (2007), p. 22. 

[780] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium 34, MGH SS XXIV, p. 579. 

[781] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 70. 

[782] Champagne (2007), p. 28, citing Mémoires de la société académique de Boulogne-sur-Mer, Tome IX, (Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1879), p. 563 (not yet consulted, "snippet view" only on Google Book). 

[783] Champagne (2007), p. 28, citing Pas, J. de ‘Analyse d’une chronique du 18e sur l’abbaye de Clairmarais (recueil d’actes)’, Bulletin de la Société des Antiquaires de la Morinie, Tome X, p. 261 (not yet consulted). 

[784] Champagne (2007), p. 22. 

[785] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Tome I, 613, p. 226. 

[786] Champagne (2007), p. 29, quoting Pas, J. de ‘Analyse d’une chronique du 18e sur l’abbaye de Clairmarais (recueil d’actes)’, Bulletin de la Société des Antiquaires de la Morinie, Tome X, p. 266 (not yet consulted). 

[787] Champagne (2007), p. 28, citing Mousseigne, E. (1996) Eustache Le Moine, pirate boulonnais du XIIIe siècle (La Voix du Nord), pp. 112-13, 158, 178, 231 (not yet consulted). 

[788] La Gorgue-Rosny (1874), Tome I, p. 370, citing "La Rocque" (no precise citation reference). 

[789] Champagne (2007), p. 29, quoting "12J/MS400 Fiche 6782, fonds St André" (no location of the archive specified). 

[790] Notre-Dame de Licques, XXVIII, p. 74. 

[791] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[792] Notre-Dame de Licques, XXVIII, p. 74. 

[793] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[794] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[795] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[796] Champagne (2007), pp. 57-71. 

[797] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[798] Balduinus de Avennis Genealogia, RHGF, Tome XIII, p. 563. 

[799] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 826. 

[800] Champagne (2007), p. 22. 

[801] Champagne (2007), p. 28, citing Pas, J. de ‘Analyse d’une chronique du 18e sur l’abbaye de Clairmarais (recueil d’actes)’, Bulletin de la Société des Antiquaires de la Morinie, Tome X, p. 261 (not yet consulted). 

[802] Belleval (1864), Tome II, p. 70. 

[803] Montreuil-sur-Mer, p. 98. 

[804] Champagne (2007), p. 21. 

[805] Champagne (2007), p. 21. 

[806] Champagne (2007), p. 28, citing Mémoires de la société académique de Boulogne-sur-Mer, Tome IX, (Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1879), p. 563 (not yet consulted, "snippet view" only on Google Book). 

[807] Villehardouin, 36, 84, 111. 

[808] Champagne (2007), p. 16, citing Groué, L. (1992) Aux confins de la Picardie et de la Normandie (La Voix du Nord), p. 135 (not yet consulted). 

[809] William of Tyre Continuator, XXXIII, XIV, p. 381. 

[810] Champagne (2007), p. 16, citing Prarond, E. (1863) Saint-Valéry et les cantons voisins, Tome I, p. 344 (not yet consulted). 

[811] Georgius Akropolites 47, p. 92. 

[812] Ponthieu CCXII, p. 277. 

[813] McDaniel ‘John Angelos and Queen Jelena’, pp. 43-50, available at <http://www.feefhs.org/links/Serbia/jelena.html> (consulted 19 Jul 2010), quoting Berger, E. (ed.) (1897) Les Registres d’Innocent IV (Paris), Vol. 3, 6862, p. 289, and 7178, p. 351. 

[814] McDaniel ‘John Angelos and Queen Jelena’, quoting Bourel de la Roncierre, M. (ed.) (1895) Les Registres d’Alexandre IV (Paris), Vol. 1, 48, p. 13. 

[815] McDaniel ‘ John Angelos and Queen Jelena’. 

[816] Giudice ‘La famiglia di re Manfredi’ (1880), Documenti, XVI, p. 303,

[817] William of Tyre Continuator. XXXIII, XIV, p. 381. 

[818] Georgius Akropolites 15, p. 29. 

[819] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1221, MGH SS XXIII, p. 911. 

[820] Georgius Akropolites 47, p. 92. 

[821] Ephræmius 8615, p. 346. 

[822] McDaniel ‘John Angelos and Queen Jelena’, quoting Berger, E. (ed.) (1897) Les Registres d’Innocent IV (Paris), Vol. 3, 6862, p. 289, and 7178, p. 351. 

[823] McDaniel ‘John Angelos and Queen Jelena’, quoting Bourel de la Roncierre, M. (ed.) (1895) Les Registres d’Alexandre IV (Paris), Vol. 1, 48, p. 13.