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normandy

arques, aumâle, caux, rouen, eu

 

  v4.1 Updated 06 August 2017

 

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RETURN TO NORMANDY INTRODUCTION

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                ARQUES. 3

A.         COMTE de TALOU, COMTE d’ARQUES.. 3

B.         VICOMTES d’ARQUES, SEIGNEURS de LONGUEVILLE (GIFFARD) 4

C.        FLAITEL. 11

Chapter 2.                AUMÂLE. 14

A.         SEIGNEURS d'AUMÂLE.. 15

B.         COMTES d'AUMÂLE (BLOIS-CHAMPAGNE) 15

C.        COMTES d'AUMÂLE (FORZ) 22

D.        COMTE d'AUMÂLE (BETHUNE) 25

E.         VICOMTES d'AUMÂLE.. 27

Chapter 3.                CAUX. 28

A.         SEIGNEURS d’AUFFAY.. 29

B.         SEIGNEURS d’ESTOUTEVILLE.. 32

C.        FAMILY of GUNNORA, mistress of RICHARD I Comte de NORMANDIE.. 45

D.        SEIGNEURS de GOURNAY.. 52

E.         SEIGNEURS de MARIGNY.. 62

F.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAËNS.. 71

G.        SEIGNEURS de SAINT-VALERY.. 73

H.        SEIGNEURS de TANCARVILLE.. 86

I.      WARENNE.. 92

Chapter 4.                EU. 100

A.         COMTES d'EU 996-1040, descendants of GEOFFROY de Brionne. 100

B.         COMTES d'EU, descendants of GUILLAUME d'HIEMOIS.. 105

C.        COMTES d'EU (LUSIGNAN) 118

D.        COMTES d'EU (BRIENNE) 122

E.         COMTES d'EU (CAPET) 128

F.         VICOMTES d'EU.. 131

Chapter 5.                ROUEN. 132

A.         VICOMTES de ROUEN.. 133

B.         SEIGNEURS de BEC-CRESPIN.. 135

C.        SEIGNEURS de GUITRY.. 137

C.        SEIGNEURS de MONTFORT-sur-RISLE (BASTEMBOURG) 138

D.        SEIGNEURS de MONTFORT-sur-RISLE (GAND) 142

E.         SEIGNEURS de NEUFMARCHE.. 144

F.         SEIGNEURS de PONT-AUDEMER, SEIGNEUR de VIEILLES.. 146

G.        SEIGNEURS de TOURVILLE.. 148

H.        OTHER NOBILITY in NORMANDY.. 150

 

 

 

 

This document groups the nobility in the north-eastern part of the duchy of Normandy, located in the present-day département of Seine-Maritime. 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    ARQUES

 

 

The pagus Tellau (Talou), within the episcopal diocese of Rouen, was located north-east of Rouen and was bordered by the pagus Vimnau (Vimeu) to the north-east, the sea to the north-west, the pagus Caletensis (Caux) to the west, and the pagus Rotomagensis to the south-east[1].  The county of Talou was granted in the mid-11th century by Duke Guillaume II to his uncle Guillaume, who transformed the territory into the county of Arques after constructing the castle of that name on his land, although no further counts are recorded as he presumably died childless.  It is assumed that after that time the nobility in the territory of the former county were direct vassals of the dukes of Normandy. 

 

 

 

A.      COMTE de TALOU, COMTE d’ARQUES

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Normandie, son of RICHARD II "le Bon/l'Irascible" Duke of Normandy & his second wife Papia [Poppa] --- ([1020/26]-[Boulogne] after [1054]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard II married secondly, after the death of his first wife, “Papiam” by whom he had “Malgerium...archipræsulem et Willelmum Archacensem”, adding that the latter was granted “comitatum Talogi” by Duke Guillaume II who was “iam in adolescentia” and built “castrum Archarum in cacumine ipsius montis[2].  Orderic Vitalis calls him brother of Mauger, and specifies that Duke Guillaume II invested him as Comte de Talou[3].  “Willelmus...comes filius...Ricardi Normannorum quondam ducis” restored “insulam in fluvio magno Secane...Belcinaca...ecclesias eciam Vatheuille et Brotonii” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1032/47], subscribed by “Godofredi vicecomitis, comitis, Walterus filius, Lambertus, Willelmus, Osbernus[4].  "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges by charter dated to [1040][5]Comte d’Arques: "Guillelmus Archensis comes et frater meus Malgerius Archiepiscopus" donated the vill of Periers sur Andelle to the monastery of Saint-Ouen at Rouen, at the request of "matris mee Paveie" and the consent of "Guilielmo Normannorum comite", by charter dated to [1047/50][6].  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of “ecclesias...in maris Constantini pagi...” made by “Roberto...Hunfredi...filio” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1035/53], subscribed by “Roberti filii Hunfredi, Rogeri fratris eius, Anscetilli, Willelmi filii Ricardi secundi Normannorum ducis, Rogerii filii Radulfi de Warethna, Rogerii filii Ragnulfi, Gilleberti Crispin, Willelmi Guiet[7].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmum Archacensem” rebelled against Duke Guillaume, helped by Henri I King of France, that “Ingelrannus Abbatisvillæ comes...ac Hugo cognomento Bardulfus” were killed by the duke´s forces, and that Guillaume left “cum uxore sua sorore...Widonis comitis Pontivi” and was welcomed by “Eustachium Boloniæ comitem” with whom he remained in exile until he died[8].  William of Malmesbury records that Guillaume II captured the fortress of Arques, and Guillaume went into exile in [1054][9].  No record has been found of his having left descendants.  m --- de Ponthieu, daughter of HUGUES [II] Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Berthe d'Aumâle.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmum Archacensem” went into exile “cum uxore sua sorore...Widonis comitis Pontivi” after his rebellion was crushed by Duke Guillaume II and found refuge with “Eustachium Boloniæ comitem” with whom he remained in exile until he died[10]

 

 

 

B.      VICOMTES d’ARQUES, SEIGNEURS de LONGUEVILLE (GIFFARD)

 

 

 [Three] brothers, parents unknown, but their names suggest a Viking origin: 

1.         OSBERN de Bolbec, son of --- (-bur [Saint-Etienne de Fontaines]).  ["Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1026], subscribed by "…Osbernus frater comitisse, Hunfredus frater eius…"[11].  There are two possibilities for identifiying "comitisse": (1) she could have been the donor’s second wife Papia, who is named in two documents with a brother named Osbern (see NORMANDY DUKES), or (2) she could have been Gunnor, wife of Richard [I] Duke of Normandy and mother of the donor, although in that case "frater" should be interpreted as "brother-in-law" in light of the source quoted below which names Osbern’s wife as Gunnor’s sister.]  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Osbernus Giffardus, Haduisa eius conjunx" among the deceased at "sancti Stephani Fontanensis", presumably indicating that they were buried there[12].  It is assumed that "Osbernus Giffardus" refers to Osbern de Bolbec given that his son used the name Giffard.  “...Osbernus avunculus comitis, Walterius fr. eius...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][13]m [firstly] [AVELINE], sister of GUNNORA [mistress of Richard I Duke of Normandy], daughter of ---.  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[14].  She and her three sisters, as well as their husbands, are named by Robert de Torigny[15].  On the other hand, the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Turketillus…frater…Turulphi, cuius filius Hasculfus d’Harcourt” married “aliam sororem…comitissæ Gunnoræ” by whom he was father of “duos…filios…Walterum de Giffard primogenitum…[16].  As noted below, another primary source indicates that the wife of "Osbernus Giffardus" (assumed to refer to Osbern de Bolbec given that his son used the name Giffard) was named Hawise[17].  It is not known whether Osbern was married twice or whether all the sources cited refer to the same person, one or other mistaking the name.  [m secondly HAWISE, daughter of --- (-bur [Saint-Etienne de Fontaines]).  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Osbernus Giffardus, Haduisa eius conjunx" among the deceased at "sancti Stephani Fontanensis", presumably indicating that they were buried there[18].  It is supposed that "Osbernus Giffardus" refers to Osbern de Bolbec, given that his son used the name Giffard.  If this is correct, Hawise was presumably his second wife, unless "Aveline" is an error for "Hawise" in Guillaume de Jumièges and Robert de Torigny which names Osbern’s supposed first wife.]  Osbern & his [first/second] wife had four children: 

a)         GAUTHIER Giffard (-before 1085).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[19].  “...Walterius Gyfardus...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][20].  Seigneur de Longueville, Normandy.  "…Walterius Giffardus…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[21].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Waltero Giffardo" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[22].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Galterius Giphardus et Radulphus Toenites...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[23].  He received grants of 107 lordships (48 in Buckinghamshire) as his reward[24].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[25].  Orderic Vitalis states that the king "gave [Walter Giffard] the county of Buckinghamshire", in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[26]m ERMENGARDE, daughter of GERARD Flaitel & his wife ---.  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli[27].  [The necrology of Longueville records the death 13 May of “domina Hermengauda comitissa condam hujus loci” and her confirmation of the donation made by “illos de Saukervilla” of “molendino de Longa Villa[28].  It is not certain whether this entry refers to the wife of Gauthier Giffard or to the wife of his grandson Walter Giffard.]  Gauthier & his wife had [five or more] children: 

i)          WALTER Giffard (-in England 15 Jul 1102, bur Longueville, Normandy[29]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum...[30].  He succeeded his father in his lands.  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Buchingeham" to "Gualterio...cognomento Gifardo"[31].  Domesday Book records land held by “Walter Giffard” in West Hanney in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire[32]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Aucensium comes et Gauterius Gifardus et Radulfus de Mortuomari” and nearly all the seigneurs who lived “trans Sequanam usque ad mare” joined King William II against his brother Robert Duke of Normandy and received considerable sums to fortify their castles, dated to [1089/90][33]He was created Earl of Buckingham [after 1093] by King William II, although known contemporarily as Earl Giffard[34]

-         EARLS of BUCKINGHAM

ii)         WILLIAM Giffard .  Bishop of Winchester.  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester names “Rohaisam…soror Willielmi Giffardi episcopi Wintoniæ” as wife of “Ricardi…filius Gilberti comitis[35].  "…Willelmi Giffardi episcopi…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[36]

iii)        ROHESE Giffard (-after 1113, bur [Colchester]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum et filias plures” of whom “una...Rohais” married “Richardo filio comitis Gisleberti[37].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gisleberti comitis [filium] Ricardum” married “Roaldem Gualterii Gifardi filiam[38].  Domesday Book records “Rohais wife of Richard son of Gilbert” holding Standon in Braughing Hundred in Hertfordshire[39].  According to the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, ”Rohesia” married secondly “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normanniæ” after the death of “Ricardo filio comitis Gisleberti” and that they were both buried “tempore Henrici primi” in “castrum Clecestriæ…cœnobio in honore sancti Johannis” which Eudo constructed[40].  According to the Complete Peerage, this genealogy is “probably erroneous” but it does not explain the basis for the doubts[41].  From a chronological point of view, the connection would be tight, assuming that the death date of Richard FitzGilbert is correctly estimated to [1090] and the birth of Rohese’s granddaughter by her alleged second marriage, Beatrix, is correctly assessed at [1105].  This supposed second parentage is disproved by sources quoted in the section dealing with Eudes de Rie.  m [firstly] RICHARD FitzGilbert de Brionne, son of GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" Comte d'Eu & his wife --- (before 1035-[1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire).  [Incorrect supposed second marriage: m secondly EUDES de Rie dapifer, son of HUBERT [I] de Rie & his wife ---(-1 Mar 1120, bur Colchester).] 

iv)       daughters .  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum et filias plures” of whom “una...Rohais” married “Richardo filio comitis Gisleberti[42]

v)        [AMFRIDA (-2 Jan [1099/1100]).  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "tempore S. Anselmi abbatis Becci tres matronæ nobiles…Basilia uxor Hugonis de Gornaco, et Amfrida neptis ipsius Basiliæ, et Eva uxor Guillelmi Crispini" entered Bec and lived at the abbey, adding that they died on three consecutive Sundays "Amfrida Basiliæ neptis...minor...ætate, virgo…IV Non Jan, qua sepulta…Basilia domina eius…XVII Kal Feb…tertia Eva…X Kal Feb...post mortem...viri sui Guillermi Crispini...Beccique usque ad finem vitæ...perseuerauit"[43].  Gurney dates the passage to [1099/1100][44].  The parentage of Amfrida is uncertain.  However, Ermengarde is the only sibling of Basilie Flaitel who is known to have had children, so it is possible that she was the daughter of Gauthier Giffard.] 

b)         GODEFROI Giffard .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[45]Vicomte d'Arques, which he presumably inherited from his father-in-law  “Willelmus...comes filius...Ricardi Normannorum quondam ducis” restored “insulam in fluvio magno Secane...Belcinaca...ecclesias eciam Vatheuille et Brotonii” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1032/47], subscribed by “Godofredi vicecomitis, comitis, Walterus filius, Lambertus, Willelmus, Osbernus[46]m --- de Rouen, daughter of GOZELIN Vicomte de Rouen et d’Arques & his wife Emmeline ---.  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1080 which relates that "Gozelinus vicecomes de Archis…cum coniuge sua et filiis" founded Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and donated property, and that "Willelmus de Archis heres defuncti…avi sui Gozelini" confirmed the donation[47].  "Grandfather" must be "maternal grandfather" as the paternal ancestors of Guillaume d'Arques are confirmed by Guillaume de Jumièges (see above and below).  Godefroi & his wife had [three] children:  

i)          GUILLAUME d'Arques (-[1090]).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[48].  "Guillelmus et Gislebertus filii Godefredi Archarum vicecomitis" donated land in Montvilla to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1059[49]Vicomte d'Arques.  Lord of Folkestone[50].  A charter dated 1080 relates that "Gozelinus vicecomes de Archis…cum coniuge sua et filiis" founded Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and donated property, and that "Willelmus de Archis heres defuncti…avi sui Gozelini" confirmed the donation[51].  [Orderic Vitalis records “Edgarus Adelinus et Robertus Belesmensis atque Guillelmus de Archis monachus Molismensis” as the advisers of Robert [III] Duke of Normandy, dated to [1089][52].  It is possible that the third named person was Guillaume Vicomte d’Arques but no other record has been found that he became a monk at Molesme in Burgundy before he died.]  m BEATRIX Malet, daughter of GUILLAUME [I] Malet & his wife Esilia [Crespin].  “Beatrix soror Roberti Malet” donated property to Eye priory, for the souls of “fratrum meorum Roberti Maleth et Gilberti Malet”, by undated charter[53].  Brown indicates that Beatrix donated Redlingfield to Eye by undated charter which confirms her as husband of "William vicomte of Arques"[54].  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "Beatrix post mortem domini sui Willielmi de Archis" of "terram dotis suæ de Newenton" by undated charter[55].  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

(a)       MATHILDE d'Arques .  Guillaume de Jumièges records "Mathildis" as the daughter of “Willelmi de Archis”, adding that she married “Willelmus camerarius de Tancarvilla” by whom she had “filium Rabellum qui ei successit[56]m GUILLAUME [I] de Tancarville, son of RAOUL [I] de Tancarville & his wife Avicia --- (-1129). 

(b)       EMMA d'Arques (-after 1140).  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[57].  “Manasses Gisnensis comes et Emma uxor eius…filia Willielmi de Arras” founded Redlingfield priory by charter dated 1120, witnessed by “Widonis fratris mei, Rosæ filiæ meæ[58].  The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium names "Emmam filiam Roberti camerarii de Tancarvilla in Normannia, viduam Odonis de Folkestane in Anglia" as wife of "Manasses"[59], which appears to be incorrect.  "Manasses Gisnensium comes et Emma comitissa" granted the administration of the church of Saint-Léonard to Saint-Bertin by charter dated 1129[60].  According to Domesday Descendants she became a nun at Saint-Leonard de Guines after the death of her second husband[61]m firstly NELE de Muneville, son of --- (-1103).  Lord of Folkestone.  m secondly (before 1106) MANASSES Comte de Guines, son of BAUDOUIN Comte de Guines & his wife Adela [Christina] [of Holland] (-Ardres 1137).  Emma & her first husband had one child: 

(1)       MATHILDE de Muneville .  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "domini Nigelli de Munevilla quondam domini de Folkestan antecessoris mei…cum uxore sua Emma" for the souls of "antecessorum suorum…Willielmi de Archis et Beatricis uxoris illius" by undated charter, which also records that Nele died without male heirs and that Henry I King of England married "filiam eius…Matildam" to "Rualoni de Abrincis"[62]m RUALON d’Avranches, son of --- (-[1130/34]). 

ii)         GISELBERT d'Arques (-after 1059).  "Guillelmus et Gislebertus filii Godefredi Archarum vicecomitis" donated land in Montvilla to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1059[63]

iii)        [OSBERN d'Arques .  He is named in Europäische Stammtafeln[64] as possible son of Godefroi Giffard but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  Domesday Book records “Osbern d’Arques” holding numerous properties in Yorkshire[65].]  m ---.  The name of Osbern's wife is not known.  Osbern & his wife had [two] children: 

(a)       GUILLAUME .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

(b)       GISELBERT (-1112).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Guillelmo Ebroicensium episcopo”, “Balduinus ducis capellanus” was appointed and was bishop for seven years, dated to 1070, and was in turn succeeded by “Gislebertus Osberni filius canonicus et archidiaconus Lexoviensis” who was bishop for more than 30 years[66]Bishop of Evreux [67]

c)         [JOSCELINE de Bolbec .  Josceline and her marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[68].  This is presumably based on Robert de Torigny, continuation of William of Jumièges[69], the unreliability of this part of whose chronicle is discussed in the Complete Peerage[70].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quintam” married “Hugo de Monte-gummerici” by whom she had “Rogerius pater Roberti de Bellismo[71].  There must be considerable doubt about whether this can be correct as Osbern de Bolbec’s wife and Hugues de Montgommery’s mother would have been first cousins.]  m HUGUES de Montgommery Vicomte d'Hiémois, son of ROGER I Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-killed in battle 7 Feb [1035/before 1048], bur Troarn). 

2.         [HUNFRED .  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1026], subscribed by "…Osbernus frater comitisse, Hunfredus frater eius…"[72].  The brother of Osbern de Bolbec, assuming that “comitisse” in this document was Gunnor, the donor’s mother, as discussed above.] 

3.         GAUTHIER .  “...Osbernus avunculus comitis, Walterius fr. eius...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][73]

 

 

 

C.      FLAITEL

 

 

1.         GERARD Flaitel (-[1047]).  “Ricardus princeps et dux Normannorum, filius Ricardi seniroris” donated “villam...Fontes in Braio...Brendelcurt cum ecclesia...æcclesiam de Nouobosco, æcclesiam de Bosmesnil...” to Saint-Wandrille, at the request of “Yvonis...militis”, by charter dated to [1024], subscribed by “Riccardi principis Normannorum, Papie comitisse, Roberti archipresulis fratris eiusdem principis, Yvonis militis...Hugonis Baiocensis episcopi, Girardi Flagitelli...[74].  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[75]m ---, daughter of ---.  The name of Gérard’s wife is not known.  The wife of Gérard Flaitel may have been the sister of Radbod Bishop of Sées: Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus Radbodi Sagiensis episcopi filius...consobrinus Guillelmi præsulis Ebroicensium, filii Girardi Fleitelli” succeeded Lanfranc “in Cadomensi ecclesia” when the latter was appointed archbishop of Canterbury, dated to 1070, adding that Gullaume was appointed archbishop of Rouen nine years later[76].  Gérard & his wife had [seven] children: 

a)         GUILLAUME Flaitel (-1066).  Orderic Vitalis names "…Willermus episcopus Ebroicensis, filius Gerardi Fleitelli…" among the subscribers of a charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy dated to [1050][77]Bishop of Evreux 1046.  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[78].  "Willelmus…Ebrocassine civitatis episcopus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Wandrille, in memory of "patris mei Girardi" and for the souls of "fratrum meorum", by undated charter[79].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Guillelmo Ebroicensium episcopo”, “Balduinus ducis capellanus” was appointed and was bishop for seven years, dated to 1070, and was in turn succeeded by “Gislebertus Osberni filius canonicus et archidiaconus Lexoviensis” who was bishop for more than 30 years[80]

b)         ANSCHER Flaitel (-after [1047]).  “...Anscherius filius Gerardi Flagitel...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][81].  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[82]

c)         ROBERT Flaitel (-after [1047]).  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[83]

d)         [son[s]  (-[after 1047]).  "Willelmus…Ebrocassine civitatis episcopus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Wandrille, in memory of "patris mei Girardi" and for the souls of "fratrum meorum", by undated charter[84].] 

e)         [ALBERT .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Avesgotus” invaded “Cambeiam super Albertum Girardi Fleitelli filium”, after Ives Bishop of Seés had expelled Avesgod and his brothers from the church of Saint-Gervais, and was killed[85].  It is not known whether “Albertum” in this passage represents an error for one of the other sons of Gérard Flaitel who are named above.  No other reference to Albert has been found.] 

f)          ERMENGARDE .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli[86].  [The necrology of Longueville records the death 13 May of “domina Hermengauda comitissa condam hujus loci” and her confirmation of the donation made by “illos de Saukervilla” of “molendino de Longa Villa[87].  It is not certain whether this entry refers to the wife of Gauthier Giffard or to the wife of his son Walter Giffard.]  m GAUTHIER Giffard, son of OSBERN de Bolbec & his [first/second wife [Aveline] ---/Hawise ---] (-before 1085). 

g)         BASILIE (-16 Jan [1099/1100]).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli” and that “alteram...Basiliam relictam Rodulphi de Waceio” married [secondly] “Hugo de Gornaco[88].  "Domino meo Hugone Gurnacensi et filio eius Girardo et uxore eius Basilia" consented to the donation by "Radulfus cognomine Havoth" to Jumièges by charter dated to [1040][89], although presumably the document is misdated.  Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury wrote to "Basiliæ amicæ Filiæ in Domino", dated to after 1093[90].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "tempore S. Anselmi abbatis Becci tres matronæ nobiles…Basilia uxor Hugonis de Gornaco, et Amfrida neptis ipsius Basiliæ, et Eva uxor Guillelmi Crispini" entered Bec and lived at the abbey, adding that they died on three consecutive Sundays "Amfrida Basiliæ neptis...minor...ætate, virgo…IV Non Jan, qua sepulta…Basilia domina eius…XVII Kal Feb…tertia Eva…X Kal Feb...post mortem...viri sui Guillermi Crispini...Beccique usque ad finem vitæ...perseuerauit"[91].  Gurney dates the passage to [1099/1100][92].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Hugonis de Gornaco et Girardi filii…Girardi de Gornaio et Basilie matris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][93]m firstly RAOUL de Gacé, son of ROBERT Comte d'Evreux Archbishop of Rouen [Normandy] & his mistress Herleva --- (-1051).  m secondly HUGUES [III] Seigneur de Gournay, son of --- (- [1093]). 

 

 

1.         ROBERT Flaitel .  His precise relationship with “domnus Stephanus de Haimonis Villa avunculus eius”, whose donation to Chartres Saint-Père was confirmed by [his son] "Philippus filius Roberti Flagelli nepos domni Nivelonis" by charter dated to [1101/29][94], has not yet been ascertained.  "...Robertus Flagellum..." witnessed the undated charter, placed in the cartulary among charters dated to the early 12th century, under which “Hugo filius Balduini” settled a dispute with Saint-Père de Chartres[95]m --- de Fréteval, daughter of [FOUCHER Seigneur de Fréteval & his wife Hildeburge Goët].  Her parentage is indicated and her marriage confirmed by the charter dated to [1101/29] under which [her son] "Philippus filius Roberti Flagelli nepos domni Nivelonis" settled a dispute with Saint-Père de Chartres concerning “decime Haimonis Ville” and confirmed a donation of land made by “domnus Stephanus de Haimonis Villa avunculus eius[96].  It is not known whether this person was the same as one of the named daughters of Foucher de Fréteval who are shown in CENTRAL FRANCE.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         PHILIPPE (-after 1119).  "Philippus filius Roberti Flagelli nepos domni Nivelonis" settled a dispute with Saint-Père de Chartres concerning “decime Haimonis Ville” and confirmed a donation of land made by “domnus Stephanus de Haimonis Villa avunculus eius” by charter dated to [1101/29][97].  "Roscelinus nepos Nivelonis, Fulcherius frater Roscelini, Philippus nepos Nivelonis" witnessed the charter dated 1119 recording an agreement between the monks of "Majoris Monasterii" and "Nivelonem de Fracte Valle"[98]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    AUMÂLE

 

 

The lordship of Aumâle was located in the north-east of the duchy of Normandy, south of the county of Eu, centred on the town of Aumâle on the river Bresle.  It passed to the family of the Comtes de Ponthieu following the marriage of Berthe, heiress of Aumâle, to Hugues de Ponthieu.  Their son Enguerrand was Seigneur d'Aumâle as well as Comte de Montreuil.  On his death in 1053, his widow Adelais, illegitimate daughter of Robert II Duke of Normandy, styled herself as countess, but applied the title to the territory of Aumâle rather than Montreuil, apparently without any formal regrant.  Adelais brought the new “county” to her third husband Eudes Comte de Troyes, who was disinherited of his paternal inheritance and sought refuge in Normandy where he and his descendants were accepted as counts of Aumâle as vassals of the dukes.  The king of France captured the castle of Aumâle in 1196, and awarded the title to Renaud de Dammartin Comte de Boulogne in Dec 1204. 

 

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS d'AUMÂLE

 

 

1.         GUERINFRID, son of ---.  Seigneur d'Aumâle.  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum” and “Addelidis comitissa supradicti Engueranni et supradicte Adelidis filia…Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[99]m ---.  The name of Guerinfrid's wife is not known.  Guerinfrid & his wife had one child: 

a)         BERTHE d'Aumâle .  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[100]m HUGUES [de Ponthieu], son of ENGUERRAND Comte [de Ponthieu] & his first wife --- (-killed 20 Nov 1052, bur Saint-Riquier).  Comte de Montreuil.  Their children inherited Aumâle. 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d'AUMÂLE (BLOIS-CHAMPAGNE)

 

 

EUDES de Troyes, son of ETIENNE I Comte de Troyes [Blois] & his wife Adela --- (-after [1115/18]).  "Odo puer nepos comiti Tethberti" witnessed a charter dated to [6 Dec 1047/31 Aug 1055] under which the canons of St Maurice d'Angers temporarily relinquished certain rights in the church of Joué[101].  He succeeded his father in [1048] as Comte de Troyes.  He succeeded as Comte d’Aumâle, de iure uxoris.  He was disinherited before 1071 and sought refuge in Normandy.  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[102].  He was granted the lordship of Holderness in [1087] by William I King of England, following the forfeiture of Drogo de La Beuvrière[103]A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “manerium Horneshay et ecclesiam…et Marram eius piscaturam et Thorp ibi juxta” by “Odo comes et Stephanus filius eius[104]Orderic Vitalis records that “primus Normannorum Stephanus de Albamarla filius Odonis Campaniæ comitis” fortified “castellum suum super Aucium flumen” at the expense of William II King of England and placed there a garrison against “ducem” [Robert III Duke of Normandy], dated to [1089/90][105]Florence of Worcester records that "comitem Odonem de Campania…Stephani patrem" was imprisoned in [1096] for his part in the conspiracy which planned to place his son on the English throne[106].  He lost the lordship of Holderness.  Albert of Aix names "…Stephanus de Albemarla filius Udonis comitis de Campania…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[107].  "…Stephanus de Albamarla…" subscribed a charter dated 8 Aug 1111 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the episcopate of Somerset at Bath[108].  He is referred to as “comes Odo” in the Lindsey survey 1115/18. 

m ([1060]) as her third husband, ADELAIS de Normandie, widow firstly of ENGUERRAND [II] Comte de Montreuil Seigneur d’Aumâle and secondly of LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens, illegitimate daughter of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- (-[1082/84]).  Robert de Torigny names "Aeliz" as the daughter of Duke Robert II "de alia concubina" from Herleve[109].  The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum[110].  She retained the title Comtesse d'Aumâle after her first marriage.  Her second marriage is deduced from the same charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy which also names “Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[111].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Hildernessæ" to "Odoni...Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi comitis" who had married "sororem...regis filiam...Rodberti ducis"[112].  William I King of England donated various properties to the abbey of La Trinité de Caen, including "burgum de Hulmo" with the consent of "Adelisa amita mea…cujus hereditas erat sed et comitissa A. de Albamarla…in vita sua", by charter dated 1082[113]

Eudes & his wife had one child:

1.         ETIENNE de Troyes (before 1070-before 1130, maybe [1127]).  Albert of Aix names "Stephanus de Albemarla filius Udonis comitis de Campania" among those present with Adhémar Bishop of Le Puy on the First Crusade[114].  He succeeded his mother in [1082/84] as Comte d’AumâleFlorence of Worcester records that "Northymbrensis comes Rotbertus de Mulbrei et Willelmus de Owe" conspired against William II King of England in [1095], planning to place "filium amitæ illius Stephanus de Albamarno" on the English throne[115]"Stephanus comes de Alba marla" donated "ecclesiam S. Martini de Alciaco" to the monks of Beauvais Saint Lucien, naming "mater mea Adelidis comitissa", by charter dated 14 Jul 1096[116]William of Tyre names Etienne Comte d'Albemarle among those who left on the First Crusade in 1096 with Robert Count of Flanders[117]He was granted the lordship of Holderness in 1102.  Orderic Vitalis reports that he supported Baudouin VII Count of Flanders and Guillaume "Clito" de Normandie against Henry I King of England in 1118[118].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “manerium Horneshay et ecclesiam…et Marram eius piscaturam et Thorp ibi juxta” by “Odo comes et Stephanus filius eius” and of “Fulfordam…” by “Stephanus (de Albemarla)[119].  “Stephanus, Albermarlensis comes” founded Saint-Martin, Aumâle by undated charter which names “mater mea Adeliza…Willielmi regis Angliæ avunculi mei[120]m (before [1100]) HAWISE de Mortimer, daughter of RALPH [I] de Mortimer of Wigmore, Herefordshire & his first wife Mélisende --- (before 1088[121]-).  "Stephen count of Aumâle" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin-des-Champs, Paris with the consent of "Hauisa his wife and her father Ralf de Mortuomari" for the souls of "…Milesenda his wife deceased" by charter dated to [1100][122].  Comte Etienne & his wife had [seven] children:

a)         GUILLAUME "le Gros" d'Aumâle (-20 Aug 1179, Abbey of Thornton, co Lincoln).  A manuscript genealogy of the Comtes d’Aumâle names “Willielmus le Groos” as son of “Stephani filii Odonis[123].  He succeeded his father as Comte d’Aumâle, Lord of Holderness.  "…Waleranni comitis de Mellent, Willielmi de Albemara, Simonis de Silvanecta…" witnessed the charter dated Easter 1136 under which Stephen King of England granted the manor of Bishop’s Sutton, Hampshire to Winchester cathedral[124]Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” founded Melsa Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hingeram”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hingeram fratre comitis[125].  Richard Prior of Hexham’s De Gestis Regis Stephani et de Bello Standardii records that King Stephen created "Willelmum de Albamarla" as "in Eboracensi…[comes]" after the battle of the Standard in Aug 1138[126].  The continuator of Simeon of Durham names "Willemus de Albamarla comes…" as the leaders of the English contingent at the battle of the Standard[127]"Willelmo comite Ebor[aci]…" witnessed the charter dated to [1138/43] under which Stephen King of England granted Furness Abbey, Lancashire to Savigny abbey[128]A manuscript narrating the foundation of Thornton Abbey records that it was founded in 1139 by “Willielmus Grose comes Albermarliæ”, and that “cognati sui Wallevi, prioris de Kyrkham…fratris Simonis comitis Northamtoniæ” arranged the arrival of the first monks[129].  The relationship between the two was through Judith de Lens, maternal grandmother of Waltheof, who was uterine sister of Guillaume’s father.  "…W[illelmo] com[ite] de Albarm[arla]…" witnessed the charter dated Christmas 1141 under which Stephen King of England granted property to "Gauf[edo] comiti de Essexa"[130]The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire, records that the abbey was founded by "Willielmus le Gros…comes Albemarliæ et dominus de Holdernesse" adding that he was "quasi dominus totius provinciæ Eboracensis"[131].  "Willelmus comes Albemarlie" confirmed donations to St Bees, for the souls of "…antecessorum uxoris mee Cecilie", by undated charter[132].  Benedict of Peterborough records the death in 1179 of "Willelmus comes Albemarliæ" and his burial "in abbatia sua de Tornetuna"[133].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Thornton Abbey records the death “XIII Kal Sep” in 1180 of “comes et…monasteriorum fundator Willielmus Grose[134]m CICELY Lady of Skipton, daughter of WILLIAM FitzDuncan of Scotland & his second wife Alice Lady of Skipton (-before 1190).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “prima…Cecilia…secunda Amabilla…tertia Alicia” as the three daughters of “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, and his wife Alice, adding that Cicely received the honor of Skipton and married “Willielmo le Grossus comiti Albemarliæ[135].  "Willelmus comes Albemarlie" confirmed donations to St Bees, for the souls of "…antecessorum uxoris mee Cecilie", by undated charter[136].  "Cecilia comitissa Albamarlie" donated land "inter Esc et Duden…Kirkesantan et Haverigg…et Thueites" to St Bees, and confirmed the donation of "ecclesia de Gosford" made by "W[illelmi] fratris mei", by undated charter[137].  Comte Guillaume & his wife had [two] children:

i)          HAWISE d'Aumâle (-11 Mar 1214)The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[138].  The Chronicle of Meaux names "Hawisiam" as the only daughter of "Willielmus le Groos" and his wife "Ceciliam…filiam Willielmi filii Dunnekan", adding that she married firstly "Willielmo de Mandavilla", secondly "Baldewino de Betoyn comiti Insulæ", and thirdly "Willielmum de Fortibus primum"[139]She succeeded her father in 1179 as Ctss d’Aumâle and Lady of Holderness.  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus comes de Magnavilla" and "filia Willermi comitis Albæ Marlæ" together with the county of Aumâle in 1179[140]Ralph de Diceto records that "Willelmus de Magna-villa comes Essexiæ" married "Hadewisam comtis Albimarlæ primogenitam…apud Pleizet in Essexia XIX Kal Feb" in 1180 and was granted his father-in-law’s county[141].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[142].  "Ric de Luci fil Reginaldi de Luci" paid a fine for "terra sua de Copland et in Cautebige" relating to a claim against "B. com Albemarl et uxore sua et versus Rob de Curtenay et Alic uxorem suam", dated 1200[143].  “Hawisia comitissa Albemarlæ” donated property to Garendon Abbey, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi de Mandevill comitis Essex”, by undated charter which refers to “post mortem domini mei Baldewini de Betunia…Willielmi comitis Albemarle patris mei[144].  The necrology of Choques records the death V Id Mar” of “Hadwidis comitissa Albæmarlæ[145]m firstly (Pleshy, Essex 14 Jan 1180) WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex, son of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex & his wife Rohese de Vere (-[Rouen/Gisors/Le Vaudreuil] Normandy 14 Nov 1189, bur Abbey of Mortemer).  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in 1180, de iure uxorism secondly (after 3 Jul 1190) GUILLAUME de Forz, son of --- (-1195).  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle, de iure uxorism thirdly (before Jul 1196) BAUDOUIN de Béthune Seigneur de Choques [en-Artois], son of ROBERT [V] “le Roux” Seigneur de Béthune & his wife Adelaide --- (-Burstwick, Holderness 13 or 14 Oct 1212, bur Abbey of Meaux[146]).  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in [1195/96], de iure uxoris

ii)         [AMICE .  By order dated 4 Nov 1278, "John de Aston" relinquished his claim, in return for four knights’ fees, to "his right in the earldom of Albemarle and in all the lands in England that at any time belonged to Alina de Fortibus, John de Fortibus, Thomas de Fortibus, William de Fortibus, and William le Gros sometime earl of Albemarle and to Hawisia his daughter" and "with all the right of Amice, Constance and Ranulph, John’s ancestors, and of others his and their ancestors, both in England and in Normandy"[147].  The Complete Peerage states that "John d’Eston [Eshton, Yorkshire]" claimed descent from "Avice, daughter as he averred" of Guillaume "le Gros" Comte d’Aumâle[148].  The order dated 4 Nov 1278 indicates his descent, presumably through Constance, supposed daughter of Amice, and Ranulph, supposed son of Constance (although these relationships are not specified in the order).  No indication has been found of the identity of the supposed husbands of Amice or of her supposed daughter Constance.  Sir C. G. Young suggested that the whole claim by John de Ashton was a fiction to give the king "a colourable pretence for retaining the honour in his own hands, as by admitting the fictitious claim, and then purchasing it from him, he shut out the real claim that might have been justly made by Wivelby (see below)"[149].  Young also points out that, if the claim had been valid, John de Ashton would have been the heir to all the honour of Albemarle and all the lands in Craven which were inherited from Amice’s supposed mother, and that it seems incredible that he would have relinquished such wealth for compensation which was valued at only one hundred pounds annually.] 

Comte Guillaume had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

iii)        GEOFFROY .  "Cecilia comitissa Albamarlie" donated land "inter Esc et Duden…Kirkesantan et Haverigg…et Thueites" to St Bees, and confirmed the donation of "ecclesia de Gosford" made by "W[illelmi] fratris mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "Galfrido filio comitis…"[150].  Geoffroy must have been illegitimate as there is no record of his having inherited the county of Aumâle from his father. 

b)         ENGUERRAND d’Aumâle (-after 1150).  Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” founded Melsa Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hingeram”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hingeram fratre comitis[151].  The chronology, as well as the names of the individuals concerned, suggests that Enguerrand may have been the same person as Enguerrand Vicomte d’Aumâle who, with his son Etienne, is named in a charter of Lannoy abbey dated 1155 (see Part E below). 

c)         [--- .  m ---.  One possible child:] 

i)          [EUPHEMIE Her origin is indicated by the charter dated to [1150/60] under which “W. comes Albemarle” granted property to “Eufemie nepti mee uxori Roberti de Brus[152]Domesday Descendants speculates that she was the daughter of Guillaume’s brother Enguerrand[153], although there seems no reason to choose one of his brothers over any of the others.  Another possibility is that she was the daughter of Guillaume’s sister Mathilde, whose husband Guermond de Picquigny is recorded with a sister named Euphemie.  Robertus de Brus” notified his donation to the hospital of St Peter, York by charter dated to [1150/70], witnessed by “domina Eufemia…[154]m ROBERT de Brus Lord of Annandale, son of ROBERT de Brus Lord of Skelton and Annandale & his first wife Agnes de Payanell (-after [1170/90]).] 

d)         ETIENNE d’Aumâle (-after 1150).  Gulielmus comes Albemarliæ” donated property to Melsa Abbey, for the souls of “Hingeram fratris mei et Stephani[155].  This document does not state that Etienne was another brother of Guillaume but this is implied from the text.  Sir C. G. Young recorded that "Wivelby" (referring to Philip de Wyvelesby[156]) proved his descent from Etienne (incorrectly called "Simon" in the Complete Peerage[157]), brother of Guillaume "le Gros" Comte d’Aumâle[158]

e)         daughter A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[159]m RICHARD de Gerberoy, son of ---. 

f)          ADELISE d'Aumâle (-before [1168][160]).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[161].  "Adeliza daughter of [Stephen] count Albemaris" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Engelger her husband and Robert Bertrand her son" by charter dated to [1151/77][162]m firstly ROBERT [II] Bertran Seigneur de Briquebec, son of ROBERT [I] Bertran "le Tors" & his wife Suzanne ---.  m secondly as his second wife, INGELGER de Bohun, son of RICHARD de Meri & his wife Lucie --- (-[1172]). 

g)         [MATHILDE/BEATRIX] d'Aumâle A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[163].  The chronology suggests that the husband of the sister who married “vicedomino de Pynkeney” was Gérard de Picquigny, but it is not known whether it was his first or second wife.  The date of her parents’ marriage (“before [1100”) suggests that she may have been his first wife, whose name was Mathilde: Gérard de Picquigny granted tithes of salt at “Wimering” to Southwick priory, for the souls of his parents and his wife Matilda, and for the salvation of himself and his heirs, by charter dated [1160/65][164].  The distinction between the two groups of beneficiaries suggests that Mathilde was deceased at the time of the donation.  On the other hand the marriage date of her sister Agnes (“after 1143”) suggests that her identity as Gérard’s second wife cannot be excluded.  The name of Gérard’s second wife was Beatrix: Daire indicates that Beatrix wife of Gérard de Picquigny “paroît dans les Chartes en 1154” but provides no primary source citation[165]m [as his first/second wife,] GERARD de Picquigny Vidame d'Amiens, son of GUERMOND [II] de Picquigny Vidame d'Amiens & his wife Beatrix --- (-1178, bur Abbaye du Gard).  

h)         AGNES d’AumâleA manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[166].  Secondary sources often indicate that Agnes’s husband was in fact Adam [I] de Brus.  This conclusion is based not only on the assumption that the manuscript history mistook "Petro" for "Adam", but also that it reversed the order of Agnes’s marriages: the birth date of Isabel, daughter of Adam [II] de Brus (son of Adam [I]), estimated to [1168/70] on the basis of her first marriage in [1180], suggests the likelihood that Adam [II] was born before 1143 (approximate date of Agnes’s marriage to William de Roumare) rather than after 1151 (date of death of William de Roumare).  As a general principle, it appears preferable to find ways of confirming that a primary source is factually correct rather than justifying why it is in error.  No other primary source has yet been identified which names Agnes as the wife of Adam, or as the mother of his children.  In addition, as noted in  SCOTLAND KINGS, Peter [I] de Brus was named in a charter dated to [1155/65].  It is therefore possible that the manuscript history is factually correct and that Agnes d’Aumâle married Peter as her second husband, presumably as his second wife considering his likely age by that time.  While waiting for other primary source information to emerge, this appears to be a safer interim conclusion compared with assuming that the manuscript history made two factual errors, relating to the name of Agnes’s Brus husband and to the order of her marriages.  m firstly (after 1143) WILLIAM de Roumare, son of WILLIAM Seigneur de Roumare & his wife Hawise de Reviers (-1151).  m secondly (after 1151) [as his second wife,] PETER [I] de Brus, son of --- (-after [1155/65]). 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES d'AUMÂLE (FORZ)

 

 

Stapleton states that "the surname de Fortibus" was derived from "Fors, a commune in the canton of Prahecq, arrondissement of Niort, departement of Deux Sèvres, in Poitou"[167].  Unfortunately, he purports to justify this statement by quoting the charter dated Feb 1233 (O.S.) under which “A[lix] comitissa Augi” confirmed that she relinquished "terram de Forzex eschæta Guillelmi quondam domini de Forz et comitis Aubemarle" to Louis IX King of France[168], which makes no mention of the location of "terram de Forz".  No indication has yet been found of any connection between Guillaume de Forz and the village of Fors, which lies due south of Niort in the département of Deux-Sèvres, although the Feb 1233 charter does suggest a geographical connection with a place named Forz/Fors.  The editor of the published edition of the Layette du Trésor des Chartes, in which the charter is reproduced, assumes that what he terms "la terre des Forts" was in Normandy.  This would explain how Alix Ctss d’Eu obtained an interest in the property, the county of Eu being adjacent to the county of Aumâle in north-east Normandy.  In addition, his marriage to the heiress of the county of Aumâle could best be explained if Guillaume de Forz was a powerful local nobleman.  On the other hand, an origin in Poitou is suggested by Roger of Hoveden who names "Willelmum de Forz de Ulerum"[169], presumably indicating the island of Oléron, due west of Rochefort in the present-day French département of Charente-Maritime.  The origin of the family of Guillaume [II] [de Forz], who is shown below, in Oléron appears confirmed by a charter dated 4 May 1150 under which Bernard Bishop of Saintes settled a dispute between Notre-Dame de Saintes and "Willelmum Aimerici quendam baronem de Holerone" concerning "decime...terre...de Bonamia", which the bishop found that “Gauterius de Forz avus eius” had donated when “Aiteldem filiam suam” had entered the monastery as a nun[170].  It is assumed that Guillaume [II] was descended from the same “Forz” family who were barons of Oléron (see POITOU, BARONS d’OLERON), although his precise descent has not been confirmed.  Other primary sources refer to Guillaume and his family as "de Fortibus", rather than "de Forz".  This recalls Guillaume de Vivonne "de Fortibus", son of Hugues de Vivonne seneschal of Gascony (see POITOU, SEIGNEURS de VIVONNE).  In the case of Guillaume de Vivonne, there is no indication that "de Fortibus" was used in any other way than as a personal nickname which was not transmitted to his descendants.  In his case, it is likely that the name was presumably the ablative plural of the Latin adjective fors/fortis, used in a nominal sense to indicate that the person in question was "among the strongest".  No family relationship has been traced between the Vivonne and Forz families. 

 

 

GUILLAUME [II] [de Forz] [Fortibus] (-1195)Roger of Hoveden records that Richard I King of England appointed "Girardum Auxiensem archiepiscopum, et Bernardum episcopum de Baonia, et Robertum de Sablun, et Ricardum de Camvilla, et Willelmum de Forz de Ulerum" as "ductores et constabularios totius navigii sui" at Chinon, dated to Jun 1190[171].  He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle, de iure uxoris.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus des Forz" paying "vi l de honore de Sciptone, xii milites…[et] x l de feodo Albæ Marlæ" in Yorkshire[172].  “Willielmus de Forz comes Albemarliæ” confirmed the donations to Pontefract Priory made by “domina Aaliz de Rumelli” by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo Britone tunc dapifero, Willielmo Painel…[173].  He accompanied Richard I King of England on crusade[174].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Fortibus" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire[175].  Roger of Hoveden records the death in 1195 of "Willelmus de Forz comes Albemarliæ"[176].  “A[lix] comitissa Augi” confirmed that she relinquished "terram de Forzex eschæta Guillelmi quondam domini de Forz et comitis Aubemarle" to Louis IX King of France by charter dated Feb 1233 (O.S.)[177]m (after 3 Jul 1190) as her second husband, HAWISE Ctss d'Aumâle, widow of WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of GUILLAUME "le Gros" Comte d'Aumâle, Lord of Holderness & his wife Cicely Lady of Skipton [Scotland] (-11 Mar 1214).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[178].  The Chronicle of Meaux names "Hawisiam" as the only daughter of "Willielmus le Groos" and his wife "Ceciliam…filiam Willielmi filii Dunnekan", adding that she married firstly "Willielmo de Mandavilla", secondly "Baldewino de Betoyn comiti Insulæ", and thirdly "Willielmum de Fortibus primum"[179]Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus comes de Magnavilla" and "filia Willermi comitis Albæ Marlæ" together with the county of Aumâle in 1179[180]The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[181].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[182]She married thirdly (before Jul 1196) Baudouin de Bethune Seigneur de Choques [en-Artois], who succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle [1195/96], de iure uxoris.  “Hawisia comitissa Albemarlæ” donated property to Garendon Abbey, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi de Mandevill comitis Essex”, by undated charter which refers to “post mortem domini mei Baldewini de Betunia…Willielmi comitis Albemarle patris mei[183]The king of France captured the castle of Aumâle in 1196, and gave the title to Renaud de Dammartin Comte de Boulogne in Dec 1204.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Forz (-29 Mar 1241).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[184]

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY - FORZ

 

 

 

D.      COMTE d'AUMÂLE (BETHUNE)

 

 

BAUDOUIN de Béthune, son of ROBERT [V] "le Roux" Seigneur de Béthune & his wife Adelaide --- (-Burstwick, Holderness 13 or 14 Oct 1212, bur Abbey of Meaux[185]).  "Robertus de Betunia, Atrebatensis advocatus…advocatus de Warneston et Adhelis uxor mea et filii mei Robertus, Willelmus, Balduinus" confirmed the possessions of Warneton abbey by charter dated 1177[186].  “Robertus de Betuna advocatus Atrebati” donated “terram meam de Messewalla”, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Roberti, Willielmi, Balduini, Johannis, Cononi", to Faversham Abbey, Kent by undated charter, dated to the reign of Henry II King of England[187]Seigneur de Choques [en-Artois].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Baldewinus de Betun" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[188]He succeeded as Comte d'Aumâle in [1195/96], de iure uxorisThe king of France captured the castle of Aumâle in 1196, and gave the title to Renaud de Dammartin Comte de Boulogne in Dec 1204.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes Baldwi de Betun" held land "in Timelb et in Langetun et in Cuningesb" in Lincolnshire[189].  The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1213 of “Baldwinus comes de Aubemare[190].  The necrology of Béthune Saint-Barthélemy records the death III Id Oct” of “Baldevinus comes Albamalliæ filius Roberti Rufi advocati[191]The necrology of Choques records the death Prid Id Oct” of “Balduinus de Bethunia comes Albamarlæ[192]

m (before Jul 1196) as her third husband, HAWISE Ctss d'Aumâle, widow firstly of WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex and secondly of GUILLAUME de Forz Comte d’Aumâle, daughter of GUILLAUME "le Gros" Comte d'Aumâle, Lord of Holderness & his wife Cicely Lady of Skipton [Scotland] (-11 Mar 1214).  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus comes de Magnavilla" and "filia Willermi comitis Albæ Marlæ" together with the county of Aumâle in 1179[193]The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Hawysiam” as the child of “Willielmus Grossus comes Albemarliæ” and his wife, adding that he was succeeded by “Willielmus de Fortibus comes Albemarliæ”, in turn succeeded by “alter Willielmus de Fortibus”, and the latter by “Avelina” who married “Edmondo fratri domini Regis E” and died childless[194].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Aubemalle…Havi le contesse" married successively "le conte de Mandeville…Guillaumes" by whom she was childless, "Guillaume de Fors" by whom she had "i fills…Guillaumes", and thirdly "Bauduin de Biethune"[195].  “Hawisia comitissa Albemarlæ” donated property to Garendon Abbey, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi de Mandevill comitis Essex”, by undated charter which refers to “post mortem domini mei Baldewini de Betunia…Willielmi comitis Albemarle patris mei[196].  The necrology of Choques records the death V Id Mar” of “Hadwidis comitissa Albæmarlæ[197]

Baudouin & his wife had two children: 

1.         ALIX de Béthune (-[1216], bur London, St Paul's Cathedral).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Bauduins li cuens d’Aubemalle…[et] Havy la contesse sa feme" had "une fille…Aalis" who married "Guillemin le frère Guillaume le mareschal le conte de Pembroc"[198].  King John confirmed "maritagium de Willelmo filio Willelmi Marescall com de Pembroke" and "Alicia filia B. de Bettun comitis de Albamar", providing that William should marry "alteram filiam predicti comitis" if Alix died, and that Alix should marry "Ric junior filius suus" should William die, by charter dated 9 Jul 1204[199].  Dame de Choques.  m (contract 9 Jul 1214) as his first wife, WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke, son of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare Ctss of Pembroke (Normandy [1190]-6 Apr 1231, bur 15 Apr 1231 Temple Church, London). 

2.         daughter (-after 9 Jul 1204).  Her existence is confirmed by the charter dated 9 Jul 1204 under which King John confirmed "maritagium de Willelmo filio Willelmi Marescall com de Pembroke" and "Alicia filia B. de Bettun comitis de Albamar", providing that William should marry "alteram filiam predicti comitis" if Alix died, and that Alix should marry "Ric junior filius suus" should William die[200]

Baudouin had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

3.          --- de Béthune (-after 1216).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre names "un chevalier qui fu fils le conte d’Aubemalle, le boin chevalier" at the siege of Farnham in 1216[201]

 

 

 

E.      VICOMTES d'AUMÂLE

 

 

The chronology, as well as his own name and that of his son, suggests that Enguerrand Vicomte d’Aumâle who is shown below may have been the same person as Enguerrand, second son of Etienne de Troyes Comte d’Aumâle (see Part B above). 

 

 

1.         ENGUERRAND (-after 1155).  Vicomte d’AumâleIngelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[202]m ---.  The name of Enguerrand’s wife is not known.  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

a)         FRANCO (-after 1155).  Ingelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[203]Stephanus filius Engelrami vicecomitis de Albamarla” donated property “in terra de Moncellis...[et] in territorio Maisniliorum et Vaccariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Ansoldus Bisete [...domini sui], similiter et Franco frater Stephani”, by charter dated 1155[204]m ---.  The name of Franco’s wife is not known.  Franco & his wife had two children: 

i)          MATHIEU (-after 1150).  Ingelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[205]

ii)         ENGUERRAND d’Aumâle (-after 1224).  “Ingerranus de Albemarle” confirmed donations “in territorio de Moncellis” to Lannoy, including by “Franconis patris mei et Stephani patrui mei”, with the consent of “Aeliz uxoris mei et Ingelranni filii mei”, by charter dated 1211[206]m ALIX, daughter of --- (-after [1210]).  “Ingerranus de Albemarle” confirmed donations “in territorio de Moncellis” to Lannoy, including by “Franconis patris mei et Stephani patrui mei”, with the consent of “Aeliz uxoris mei et Ingelranni filii mei”, by charter dated 1211[207].  “Eremburgis filia domini Ingerranni vicecomitis Albemalle” donated revenue “apud Blangiel” to Lannoy, with the consent of “domini Ingerranni patris mei et Ingerranni filii mei primogeniti”, by charter dated 1224[208].  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

(1)       ENGUERRAND .  “Ingerranus de Albemarle” confirmed donations “in territorio de Moncellis” to Lannoy, including by “Franconis patris mei et Stephani patrui mei”, with the consent of “Aeliz uxoris mei et Ingelranni filii mei”, by charter dated 1211[209]

(2)       EREMBURGE (-after 1224).  “Eremburgis filia domini Ingerranni vicecomitis Albemalle” donated revenue “apud Blangiel” to Lannoy, with the consent of “domini Ingerranni patris mei et Ingerranni filii mei primogeniti”, by charter dated 1224[210]m ---. 

b)         ETIENNE (-after 1155).  Ingelrannus comes Albe Marle” donated property to Beaupré, with the consent of “Francone et Stephano filiis meis, Matheo nepote meo filio Franconis” and in the presence of “domini Ingelrani de Alba Marla”, by charter dated 1150[211]Stephanus filius Engelrami vicecomitis de Albamarla” donated property “in terra de Moncellis...[et] in territorio Maisniliorum et Vaccariarum” to Lannoy abbey, with the consent of “Ansoldus Bisete [...domini sui], similiter et Franco frater Stephani”, by charter dated 1155[212]

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    CAUX

 

 

The pagus Caletensis (pays de Caux), in the episcopal diocese of Rouen, lay west of the pagus Tellau (Talou, later the county of Arques)[213].  It did not correspond with any of the known medieval counties which developed later in the duchy of Normandy.  It is assumed that all the nobles based in this area who are shown below were direct vassals of the dukes of Normandy. 

 

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS d’AUFFAY

 

 

GILBERT d'Auffay, son of RICHARD de Heugleville & his wife Ada --- (-15 Aug 1087, bur Sainte-Marie d’Ouche).  He helped his "consanguineus" William I King of England pacify the country after the 1066 invasion, but refused offers of estates in England and returned to Normandy[214].  Orderic Vitalis records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “Beatricis conjugis suæ”, dated 1079, witnessed by “Bernardus de Novo-Mercato...Rodbertus de Huglevilla...[215].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gulberto” died “XVIII Kal Sep” [year not specified, but from the context soon after the donation to Ouche Saint-Evroul which he made (see above)] and was buried at Ouche[216].  In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records the death “XIX Kal Sep” of “cognatus eiusdem [referring to William I King of England] Guilbertus Alfagiensis filius Ricardi de Huglevilla”, during the time when King William was unwell, and his burial “in ecclesia Sanctæ Mariæ ubi sex monachos ex Uticensi cœnobio constituerat[217]

m BEATRIX de Valenciennes, daughter of CHRISTIAN de Valenciennes & his wife --- (-4 Jan [1091], bur Sainte-Marie d’Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” married “Beatricem filiam Christiani de Valencenis...Mathildis reginæ consobrina[218].  Beatrix’s father has not otherwise been identified and the relationship between Beatrix and Queen Mathilde has not been traced.  Orderic Vitalis records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “Beatricis conjugis suæ”, dated 1079, witnessed by “Bernardus de Novo-Mercato...Rodbertus de Huglevilla...[219].  Orderic Vitalis records that Beatrix died “II Non Jan” three years after her husband[220].  In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records the burial “II Non Jan” of “Beatrix uxor eius [referring to Guilbertus Alfagiensis filius Ricardi de Huglevilla]”, four years later during which she was a nun “in ecclesia Sanctæ Mariæ ubi sex monachos ex Uticensi cœnobio constituerat” and her burial there[221]

Gilbert & his wife had three children: 

1.         GAUTHIER d'Auffay (-27 May ----[3 years after his wife]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Gualterium et Hugonem atque Beatricem” as the children of “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” and his wife[222].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Gulberto”, “Gualterius filius eius” confirmed his father’s donation to Ouche Saint-Evroul[223].  Orderic Vitalis in a later passage says that he was "handsome but lacking in wisdom…easily dominated by Godmund and other false teachers…[and] dissipated his inheritance"[224].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “VI Kal Jun” of “Gualterius” nearly three years after his wife died[225]m AVISE, daughter of HERBRAND de Sauqueville & his wife --- (-22 Feb ----).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after he married “Aviciam Herbranni de Salchevilla filiam”, “Gualterius” further confirmed his father’s donation to Ouche Saint-Evroul and added “decimam...teleonei de Alfagio[226].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Aviciam, Herbranni filiam” had “tres fratres...milites: Jordanum et Guillelmum atque Rodbertum” who helped her husband maintain his property, that she and her husband had “filios et filias numero xii...quorum majorem partem immatura mors in infantia”, and that she died “VIII Kal Feb” after 15 years of marriage[227].  Gauthier & his wife had twelve children: 

a)         RICHARD d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years, adding that Richard died aged 12 and was succeeded by “Jordanus...frater eius[228]

b)         JORDAN d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years, adding that Richard died aged 12 and was succeeded by “Jordanus...frater eius[229].  King Henry I gave him Norton Ferris in Kilmington, Somerset on his marriage[230]m (after 1121) JULIANA, daughter of GODESCHALK & his wife ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I arranged the marriage of “Jordanus” and “Julianam Godeschalchi filiam” who had come “cum Adelide regina de Lovennensi regione in Angliam[231].  “Godeschalk” has not been identified in the nobility in Brabant/Louvain at the time.  Jordan & his wife had one child: 

i)          RICHARD d'Auffay .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  "…Ricardum de Altifago…Renaldum de Vassumvilla…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[232]m ---.  The name of Richard's wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JEAN d'Auffay .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

c)         GAUTHIER d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years[233].  He is called consanguineus of Roger son of Richard [de Clare] by Orderic Vitalis[234], but this relationship has not been traced. 

d)         ELIAS d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis records that on his death “Gaulterio” left “quatuor pupilli...Ricardus et Jordanus, Gualterius et Helias”, whom Henry I King of England took “in sua tutela” while entrusting “Alfagiense jus” to “Rodberto vicecomiti” for two years before “Jordanus de Salcavilla” took “ipsosque nepotes suos” for a further four years[235]

e)         eight other children .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Aviciam, Herbranni filiam” and her husband had “filios et filias numero xii...quorum majorem partem immatura mors in infantia[236]

2.         HUGUES d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis names “Gualterium et Hugonem atque Beatricem” as the children of “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” and his wife[237].  Monk at Saint-Evroul. 

3.         BEATRIX d'Auffay .  Orderic Vitalis names “Gualterium et Hugonem atque Beatricem” as the children of “Gulbertus...Ricardi filius” and his wife[238]

 

 

1.         RICHARD d’Auffay .  "…Richardo de Aufay…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[239]

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS d’ESTOUTEVILLE

 

 

According to Le Prévost, this family originated in "Etouteville-sur-Mer, canton d’Yerville"[240], situated in the Pays de Caux about 30 kilometers north-west of Rouen.  This family has been studied by Gabriel de la Morandière[241].  He appears to clarify adequately the relationship between the Estouteville family in Normandy and the Stuteville family in England.  However, his account of the descent of the various branches of the English Stuteville family is confused and contradictory (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY P-S). 

 

 

[Three] siblings, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT [I] d’Estouteville (-after 1106).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[242].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] d’Estouteville and his family[243].  Orderic Vitalis quotes a charter, dated to [1066/89], witnessed by "…Rodbertus de Stotavilla…"[244].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land in “Edelyngthorp…Harton…et decimas de dominio suo de Cukewald et Honingham, Kirkeby, Buttercram et Strayngham et Langtuna et…in Cucewald” by “Robertus de Stutavilla”, as well as land "in Mitona" by "Robertus de Maisnil et Robertus de Stutaville"[245].   Orderic Vitalis names "…Rodbertum de Stotavilla…" among the supporters of Robert III Duke of Normandy in 1105, among those who were captured at the battle of Tinchebrai in 1106, and who were condemned to life imprisonment[246]m BEATRICE, daughter of ---.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…"[247].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[248].  Morandière states that "Robert I le vieux d’Estouteville et son autre sœur Amaurie ont épousé Blanche et Alain, enfants de Guéthénoc Sire de Rieux" (who he says was descended from a younger son of Alain I Duke of Brittany, who died in 907) but cites no primary source on which the information is based[249].  It is not impossible that "Blanche" was an error for "Beatrice", but no other corroboration has yet been found for her alleged parentage.  Morandière’s work does not appear convincing in relation to the early generations of the Estouteville family and it is suggested that the information should be treated with caution.  Robert [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         EMMA d’Estouteville (-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum, Emma Robertus…" and in a later passage the same names with the last two replaced by "Emme uxor Rodberti, Rodbertus filius eius…"[250].  The chronology of her marriages suggests that she must have been considerably older than her brother Robert, maybe born from an earlier marriage of their father.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married secondly “Emmam Rodberti de Stotevilla filiam[251].  The chronology of these families suggests that Emma must have been Robert’s first wife not his second.  La Roque states that “une généalogie de la maison d’Estouteville” names Errand’s wife as “Emme et la comprend entre ceux du sang...[de] Robert d’Estouteville”, suggesting that she was the same person who later married “Hugues de Grentesmesnil[252].  The passage is somewhat garbled and in any case La Roque does not provide a citation reference to the source in question or quote it in his “Preuves”.  It is suggested that, until further documentation comes to light, this supposed marriage of Errand should be treated with caution.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[253][m firstly ERRAND Seigneur d'Harcourt, son of ANSCHETIL d’Harcourt & his wife --- (-after 1078).]  m [secondly] as his [first] wife, ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelise de Beaumont-sur-Oise ([before 1060]-1 Jun [1136], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul). 

b)         ROBERT [II] d’Estouteville (-after Aug 1138).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[254].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[255]

-        see below

c)         RALPH d’Estouteville .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[256].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[257]

d)         WILLIAM d’Estouteville .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[258].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[259]

2.         [MATHILDE d’Estouteville (-after [1101]).  Morandière states that "Maude d’Estouteville, femme de Gilbert Talebot" was granted the fief of Shrewsbury confiscated from Robert de Montgommery (dated to [1101]), adding that she was the sister of Robert [I] d’Estouteville[260].  The reference to the transfer of the Montgommery fief of Shrewsbury to the Talbot family is evidently anachronistic.  No other reference has been found to Mathilde and her supposed husband.  Until further corroboration comes to light, it is suggested that this information should be treated with caution.  m GILBERT Talbot, son of --- (-after [1101]).] 

3.         [AMAURIE d’Estouteville .  Morandière states that "Robert I le vieux d’Estouteville et son autre sœur Amaurie ont épousé Blanche et Alain, enfants de Guéthénoc Sire de Rieux" (who he says was descended from a younger son of Alain I Duke of Brittany, who died in 907) but cites no primary source on which the information is based[261]m ALAIN Seigneur de Rieux, son of GUETHENOC Seigneur de Rieux & his wife ---.] 

 

 

ROBERT [II] d’Estouteville, son of ROBERT [I] d’Estouteville & his wife Béatrice --- (-after Aug 1138).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Robertus de Stuteville, Beatrix uxor eius, Robertus, Graulfus, Willelmus filii eorum…"[262].  Domesday Descendants suggests that these entries refer to Robert [I] de Stuteville and his family[263].  Orderic Vitalis names "…Rodbertus juvenis de Stotevilla…" among those who defended the castle of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dive and were captured, dated to [1106][264].  Simeon of Durham names "…Robertus de Stuthavilla…" among the leaders of the English contingent at the battle of the Standard (dated to Aug 1138)[265]

[m firstly (before 1106) JEANNE Talbot, daughter of --- Talbot Baron de Cleuville & his wife ---.  Morandière states that "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" married "avant le désastre de Tinchebray…Jehanne Talebot heritière de l’aisné des surnommés Talebot, barons de Cleuville", naming her grandfather "Richard Talebot…compagnon de son voisin Grondebœuf à Hastings" but not her father, adding that she died early leaving a son "Nicholas d’Estouteville"[266].] 

m [secondly] ERNEBURG, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", for the souls of "Roberti de Stutevilla avi mei et Roberti patris mei et Erneburgæ matris meæ et Helewisæ uxoris meæ"[267]

Robert [II] & his [first wife] had [one child]: 

1.         [NICOLAS [I] d’Estouteville (-22 Apr 1177).  Morandière names "Nicholas d’Estouteville" as the son of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his first wife "Jehanne Talebot" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[268].  Père Anselme names "Nicolas I sire d’Estouteville et de Vallemont, baron de Cleuville" as the oldest son of Robert [II] d’Estouteville without naming his mother, and without citing a primary source[269].] 

-        see below

Robert [II] & his [second] wife had [nine] children: 

2.         ROBERT [III] d’Estouteville (-1183).  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", for the souls of "Roberti de Stutevilla avi mei et Roberti patris mei et Erneburgæ matris meæ et Helewisæ uxoris meæ", with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[270].  King Henry II confirmed “manerium de Leestune...et Uptonam...et [revenue from] terra de Selfleta” to “Ranulfo de Glamvilla” by undated charter, witnessed by “Ricardo de Luci, Hugone de Cressi, Roberto de Stutevill, Rogero de Stutevill, Willielmo de Stutevill[271]

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY, STUTEVILLE

3.         [RICHARD d’Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[272].  Père Anselme records that "Eustache et Richard d’Etouteville, s’établirent en Angleterre" and that they were the two younger sons of Robert [II] d’Estouteville without naming their mother, and without citing a primary source[273].] 

4.         [ROGER d’Estouteville .  King Henry II confirmed “manerium de Leestune...et Uptonam...et [revenue from] terra de Selfleta” to “Ranulfo de Glamvilla” by undated charter, witnessed by “Ricardo de Luci, Hugone de Cressi, Roberto de Stutevill, Rogero de Stutevill, Willielmo de Stutevill[274].  No indication has been found of the identity of Roger d’Estouteville.  Until more primary source material emerges, he is shown he as a possible brother of Robert [III].  If, in line with one possibility which is indicated below, the witness William de Stuteville was the son of Robert [III], Roger could have been an otherwise unrecorded older son.] 

5.         [WILLIAM d’Estouteville (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willemus de Stuteville" with one knight "de feodo de Dodeavulle…in baillia Willelmi de Malepalet"[275].  [King Henry II confirmed “manerium de Leestune...et Uptonam...et [revenue from] terra de Selfleta” to “Ranulfo de Glamvilla” by undated charter, witnessed by “Ricardo de Luci, Hugone de Cressi, Roberto de Stutevill, Rogero de Stutevill, Willielmo de Stutevill[276].  The witness William de Stuteville could have been the same William who is named in [1172].  Alternatively, he could have been Robert [III] de Stuteville’s son.]  m EMMA, daughter of ---.] 

6.         [OSMOND d’Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[277].] 

7.         [PATRICK d’Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[278].] 

8.         JOHN d’Estouteville (-after 1166).  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[279].  The Thorney Liber Vitæ records John as son of Robert [II] d’Estouteville and his wife Eremburg, and his wife Agnes[280].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Johannes de Stuteville" held "ix carucatas terræ in Cheteleby et in Hollewelle et in Herdeby et in Hevintone" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[281]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  The Thorney Liber Vitæ records John as son of Robert [II] d’Estouteville and his wife Eremburg, and his wife Agnes[282].  Domesday Descendants suggests that she was "probably daughter of Waleran, son of Hugh and Matilda"[283].  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN de Stuteville (-after [1160]).  "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo" by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Richardus Basset, W. Basset…Hugo Ridel…" and which notes that "ipse Johannes filius Johannis" swore homage to the grantor and gave him a gold ring[284].  William Reedy assumes that "Johanni fratri meo" was the grantor’s brother-in-law John de Stuteville[285].  This appears to be confimed as correct by the undated charter under which "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed that "Johanni de Stutevilla" did homage to him by on the same day, witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset, W. Basset…R. de Stutevill, Nicolaus de Stutevill…"[286]"Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[287]m MATILDA Basset, daughter of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel.  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the charter date to [1160] under which [her brother] "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo", which notes that "ipse Johannes filius Johannis" swore homage to the grantor and gave him a gold ring[288]

b)         ROGER de Stuteville (-after [1183/84]).  Domesday Descendants names "John and Roger" as the sons of John d’Estouteville[289].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Stoteville xxxvii s vi d de militibus quos habet de feodo Adæ de Brus" in Yorkshire in [1171/72][290].  The 1169/70 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stutevill" in Northumberland[291].  The 1173/74 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stutevill" in Northumberland[292].  The 1174/75 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stutteville" in Northumberland and “rebuilding the mill burned at Colebrige by the Scots war[293].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stuteville" in Northumberland[294].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Rogerus de Stutewille et uxor eius, Anselmus filius eius"[295].  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[296].  The 1183/84 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Stuteville" rendering his account in Northumberland “in lands granted to the K. of Scotland, 10 l in Tindale[297]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          ANSELM de Stuteville .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Rogerus de Stutewille et uxor eius, Anselmus filius eius"[298]

9.         [EUSTACHE d’Estouteville .  Morandière names "Robert, Richard, Osmond, Patrick, Jean et Eustache" as the sons of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his [second] wife Erneburg, adding that "ils nous sont donnés par les généalogies anglaises" but without citing the corresponding primary sources[299].  Père Anselme records that "Eustache et Richard d’Etouteville, s’établirent en Angleterre" and that they were the two younger sons of Robert [II] d’Estouteville without naming their mother, and without citing a primary source[300].] 

10.      --- d’Estouteville .  Domesday Descendants records that "Robert de Daville" married a daughter of Robert [II] d’Estouteville as his first wife (marrying secondly Juliana de Montfort)[301]m as his first wife, ROBERT de Daville, son of ---. 

11.      [BURGA [de Stuteville] (-after 1166)Domesday Descendants names "Burga de Stuteville" as the wife of William Pantulf, but does not cite the primary source which confirms her family origin[302].  If this affiliation is correct, the chronology suggests that Burga was the daughter of Robert [II] d’Estouteville and his second wife, named after her mother.  Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury confirmed donations to Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire made by “Willielmus Pantulf…de Bredun”, and including other donations made by “…Burgæ quondam uxoris Willielmi Pantulf de Bredun”, by undated charter[303].  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[304]m WILLIAM [II] Pantulf, son of [IVO Pantulf & his [second] wife Alice de Verdun] (-after 1166).] 

 

 

NICOLAS [I] d’Estouteville, son of ROBERT [II] d’Estouteville & his [first wife Jeanne Talbot] (-22 Apr 1177).  Morandière names "Nicholas d’Estouteville" as the son of "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" and his first wife "Jehanne Talebot" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[305].  Père Anselme names "Nicolas I sire d’Estouteville et de Vallemont, baron de Cleuville" as the oldest son of Robert [II] d’Estouteville without naming his mother, and without citing a primary source[306].  "…Nicholao de Stotavilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" donated property to the abbey of Mortemer[307].  "Nicolaus de Stotevilla" founded the abbey of Valmont, with the consent of "Roberti filii mei", for the souls of "…Iulianæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter[308], the foundation dated to 1169 in Gallia Christiana[309].  “Nicholao de Stotevilla…Roberto de Stotevill” witnessed the undated charter under which Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Le Valasse[310].  Round dates this document to [1166/67][311].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Nicholaus de Stuteville" with one knight "de feodo de logis et prato…in baillia Willelmi de Malepalet" and "vii hospitibus quos habet apud Fiscanum"[312].  "…Nicolao de Stutevilla…Roberto de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Valasse[313].  The necrology of Valmont records the death 22 Apr of "Nicholai primi fundatoris"[314]Domesday Descendants records that Nicholas died in 1177 but does not cite the corresponding primary source[315].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…", by charter dated to [1181/83][316]

m JULIANE, daughter of --- (-5 Nov ----).  "Nicolaus de Stotevilla" founded the abbey of Valmont, with the consent of "Roberti filii mei", for the souls of "…Iulianæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter[317], the foundation dated to 1169 in Gallia Christiana[318].  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[319].  Père Anselme names "Julienne, que l’on dit fille de Gaucher de Thorotte" as the wife of Nicholas d’Estouteville, without citing a primary source[320].  The necrology of Valmont records the death 5 Nov of "Julianæ primæ fundatricis"[321]

Nicolas [I] & his wife had five children: 

1.         ROBERT d’Estouteville (-[1185]).  "Nicolaus de Stotevilla" founded the abbey of Valmont, with the consent of "Roberti filii mei", for the souls of "…Iulianæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter[322], the foundation dated to 1169 in Gallia Christiana[323].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[324].  "…Nicolao de Stutevilla…Roberto de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Valasse[325].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][326].  "Eustachio de Stuteville, Willelmo de Stuteville, Ansel de Stuteville…" subscribed the charter dated to [1177/89] under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Lillebonne to the abbey of Valmont, for the soul of "Roberti de Stuteville"[327]m LEONIE, daughter of --- (-after 1210).  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][328].  Père Anselme names "Leonelle dame de Rames, sœur et héritière de Robert seigneur de Rames" as the wife of Robert d’Estouteville, without citing a primary source[329].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Leonia de Stuteville" paying "ii m et dimidiam de parte sua de honore de Brunne" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire[330].  The same record lists "Gilbertus Peche" as paying "dimidiam de honore de Brunne", which suggests a family relationship between the two which has not yet been traced.  "Leonia que fuit uxor Rob de Stutevill" paid a fine for "seisina tota terra sua…disseisita pro perceptu dñi Reg occoe filii eiusd Leon q est in Norm…et pro…manerio de Barton", in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, dated 1204[331].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Leonia de Stuteville" holding half of one knight’s fee "in Biham…honor de Reimes" in Essex, Hertfordshire, and 15 in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, in [1210/12][332].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Leoyna de Stuteville et Illaria Trussebute et Gulbertus Peche" holding land in "honor Peverelli de Dovere" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][333].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

a)         HENRI d’Estouteville (-1231).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

-        see below

b)         EUSTACHE d’Estouteville .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

c)         SAMSON d’Estouteville (-after 1216).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

2.         NICOLAS [II] d’Estouteville (-after [1187/88]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[334].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][335].  Morandière quotes (in translation) an undated charter under which "Nicholas [d’Estouteville]" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "mon épouse Hodierne…mon frère Robert", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[336]"Nicholaus de Stutevilla" donated land "in Dregg" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Bartholomeo de Stutevilla…"[337]"Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[338].  The 1187/88 Pipe Roll records "William de Lindeseia owes 40 marks for having the right in the K’s court against Henry the clerk of Appelby, the Countess of Albemarle, and Nicholas de Stuteville in Uckemanebi and Blendherseta, and Wuering, and Leventona, and Laweswater, and Bekyrmet and Stapelthein" in Cumberland[339]m HODIERNE, daughter of ---.  Morandière quotes (in translation) an undated charter under which "Nicholas [d’Estouteville]" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "mon épouse Hodierne…mon frère Robert", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[340].  Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

a)         R[OBERT] de Stuteville .  "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla"[341]

b)         THOMAS de Stuteville .  "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla"[342]

3.         GUILLAUME d’Estouteville (-before 1210).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[343].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89], signed by "…Willelmo de Stutevilla…Anselmo de Stutevilla"[344].  "Eustachio de Stuteville, Willelmo de Stuteville, Ansel de Stuteville…" subscribed the charter dated to [1177/89] under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Lillebonne to the abbey of Valmont, for the soul of "Roberti de Stuteville"[345].  Morandière quotes (in translation) an undated charter under which "Guillaume [d’Estouteville]" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "…mon frère Richard", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[346].  [m HELENE de Ponthieu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Beatrix de Saint-Pol.  Père Anselme records "Guillaume d’Estouteville", son of Nicolas [I] d’Estouteville, adding "à qui l’on donne femme, mais sans preuve, Helene de Ponthieu, on la dit fille de Jean I comte de Ponthieu et de Beatrix de S. Paul sa troisième femme"[347].] 

4.         RICHARD d’Estouteville .  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/83] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "[Nicolai] de Stotevilla…Juliane uxoris predicti Nicolai…Roberti de Stotavilla filii eiusdem Nicolai…et…Nicolai de Stotevilla filii predicti Nicolai…Willelmi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…Richardi de Stotavilla filii predicti Nicolai senioris…"[348].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89][349]

5.         EUSTACHE d’Estouteville .  Père Anselme names "Eustache" as the youngest son of Nicholas d’Estouteville, without citing a primary source[350]

 

 

HENRI d’Estouteville, son of ROBERT d’Estouteville & his wife Léonie --- (-1231).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   "Leonia que fuit uxor Rob de Stutevill" paid a fine for "seisina tota terra sua…disseisita pro perceptu dñi Reg occoe filii eiusd Leon q est in Norm…et pro…manerio de Barton", in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, dated 1204[351]

m MATHILDE d’Eu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte d'Eu & his wife Alice d'Aubigny of Arundel.  “Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[352]The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that the older of the two daughters of "Jehan...[et]...Aaliz" married "l’aisné d’Estouteville qui estoient trois frères, qui vinrent d’Angleterre eulx marier en Caux"[353]

Henri & his wife had three children: 

1.         JEAN d’Estouteville (-after 1262)Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated 1231 under which "Jehan d’Estouteville" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "Henri mon père et de Mathilde ma mère…et de Agnès mon épouse et de Robert mon frère", witnessed by "Raoul d’Estouteville miles…", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[354]Johannes de Estotevilla miles dominus de Boscheto et Agnes uxor mea” renounced rights over the priory of Lancé in favour of Marmoutier, with the consent of “Robertus primogenitus noster, Radulphus et Astulphus filii mei”, by charter dated 1249[355]m AGNES de Châteaudun, daughter of GEOFFROY [V] Vicomte de Châteaudun & his first wife Adela de Nevers (-19 Jul after 1271).  Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated 1231 under which "Jehan d’Estouteville" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "Henri mon père et de Mathilde ma mère…et de Agnès mon épouse et de Robert mon frère", witnessed by "Raoul d’Estouteville miles…", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[356]Johannes de Estotevilla miles dominus de Boscheto et Agnes uxor mea” renounced rights over the priory of Lancé in favour of Marmoutier, with the consent of “Robertus primogenitus noster, Radulphus et Astulphus filii mei”, by charter dated 1249[357]Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated Jun 1272 under which "Agnes [d’Estouteville] au temps de mon veuvage" donated property to Valmont, with the consent of "domini Roberti, domini Willelmi, et domini Estoldi, et Magistri Johannis de Estoutevilla canonici Rothomagensis, filiorum meorum", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[358].  Jean & his wife had five children: 

a)         ROBERT d’Estouteville (-after 1282).  Johannes de Estotevilla miles dominus de Boscheto et Agnes uxor mea” renounced rights over the priory of Lancé in favour of Marmoutier, with the consent of “Robertus primogenitus noster, Radulphus et Astulphus filii mei”, by charter dated 1249[359]Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated Jun 1272 under which "Agnes [d’Estouteville] au temps de mon veuvage" donated property to Valmont, with the consent of "domini Roberti, domini Willelmi, et domini Estoldi, et Magistri Johannis de Estoutevilla canonici Rothomagensis, filiorum meorum", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[360]

-        SEIGNEURS d’ESTOUTEVILLE[361].  The Chronique Artésienne records “mesires d’Estoutevile” among those killed at the battle of Courtrai 11 Jul 1302[362]

b)         RAOUL d’Estouteville (-after 1249).  Johannes de Estotevilla miles dominus de Boscheto et Agnes uxor mea” renounced rights over the priory of Lancé in favour of Marmoutier, with the consent of “Robertus primogenitus noster, Radulphus et Astulphus filii mei”, by charter dated 1249[363]

c)         ESTOUT d’EstoutevilleJohannes de Estotevilla miles dominus de Boscheto et Agnes uxor mea” renounced rights over the priory of Lancé in favour of Marmoutier, with the consent of “Robertus primogenitus noster, Radulphus et Astulphus filii mei”, by charter dated 1249[364]Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated Jun 1272 under which "Agnes [d’Estouteville] au temps de mon veuvage" donated property to Valmont, with the consent of "domini Roberti, domini Willelmi, et domini Estoldi, et Magistri Johannis de Estoutevilla canonici Rothomagensis, filiorum meorum", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[365]

d)         GUILLAUME d’Estouteville .  Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated Jun 1272 under which "Agnes [d’Estouteville] au temps de mon veuvage" donated property to Valmont, with the consent of "domini Roberti, domini Willelmi, et domini Estoldi, et Magistri Johannis de Estoutevilla canonici Rothomagensis, filiorum meorum", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[366]

e)         JEAN d’Estouteville .  Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated Jun 1272 under which "Agnes [d’Estouteville] au temps de mon veuvage" donated property to Valmont, with the consent of "domini Roberti, domini Willelmi, et domini Estoldi, et Magistri Johannis de Estoutevilla canonici Rothomagensis, filiorum meorum", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[367]

2.         ROBERT d’Estouteville .  Morandière quotes (in translation) a charter dated 1231 under which "Jehan d’Estouteville" donated property to Valmont, for the souls of "Henri mon père et de Mathilde ma mère…et de Agnès mon épouse et de Robert mon frère", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[368]

3.         ISABELLE d’Estouteville (-after 1242).  Morandière cites a charter dated 1216 under which "Ysabel", daughter of Henri d’Estouteville, "avec son mari Pierre de Préaux" donated rights over "les moulins de Bec-de-Mortagne" to Beaulieu abbey, confirmed by her as a widow in 1242[369]m (before 1216) PIERRE de Préaux, son of --- (-before 1242). 

 

 

 

C.      FAMILY of GUNNORA, mistress of RICHARD I Comte de NORMANDIE

 

 

Four sisters and one brother, presumably of Viking origin.  Their parents are not known, and there is no guarantee that they all shared the same father and mother: 

1.         SAINSFRIDA [Senfrie] .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "in domo forestarii...hospiti suo...uxorem suam Sainfriam" rejected the advances of Richard I Comte [de Normandie] and sent “Gunnorem sororem suam” to his bed in her place[370].  She and her three sisters, as well as their husbands, are named by Robert de Torigny[371]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Seufriam" as sister of "Gunnor uxor…Richardi Normannis ducem"[372]m ---.  The name of Sainsfrida's husband is not known.  Sainsfrida and her husband had one child: 

a)         JOSCELINE The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Iosceline" as daughter of "Seufriam"[373].  Josceline, her husband and her mother are named in a letter of Ives Bishop of Chartres to Henry I King of England dated 1114 which explains the consanguinity between the king and Hugues de Châteauneuf, who wanted to marry one of the king's illegitimate daughters[374]m ROGER [I] Seigneur de Montgommery, son of --- (-before [1048]). 

2.         GUNNORA ([950]-5 Jan 1031).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "in domo forestarii...hospiti suo...uxorem suam Sainfriam" rejected the advances of Richard I Comte [de Normandie] and sent “Gunnorem sororem suam” to his bed in her place[375].  She and her three sisters, as well as their husbands, are named by Robert de Torigny[376].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Richard married “Gunnor ex nobilissima Danorum prosapia ortam”, in the sentence which follows the record of the death of Richard’s first wife[377].  According to Robert de Torigny, the marriage took place to legitimise Richard and Gunnora's son Robert to permit his appointment as Archbishop of Rouen[378].  The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "Non Jan" of "Gonnoridis…comitissa Normannie"[379]m ([before 989]) as his second wife, RICHARD I “Sans Peur" Comte [de Normandie], son of GUILLAUME Comte [de Normandie] & his first wife Sprota --- (Fécamp [932]-Fécamp 20 Nov 996, bur Fécamp). 

3.         HERFAST .  His parentage is confirmed by Guillaume of Jumièges who records the murder of [his son] “Osbernus...procurator principalis domus, Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius[380].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Osbernus Herfasti filius” was “de pago Calcegio oriundus”, although in the context of a passage which is anachronistic[381]m ---.  The name of Herfast's wife is not known.  Herfast & his wife had two children: 

a)         OSBERN de Crépon (-murdered Vandreuil [1038/42]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Osbernus Herfasti filius” was “de pago Calcegio oriundus”, although in the context of a passage which is anachronistic[382].  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1026], subscribed by "…Osbernus filius Arfast, Ranulfus frater eius"[383].  "…Osbe filius Herfasti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[384].  Steward (dapifer) of Robert II and Guillaume II Dukes of Normandy.  "Rotberti comitis, Osberni dapiferi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030/35] under which "Erchembaldus vicecomes" donated "prata de Salhus et…in Sarlosvilla jure hereditario" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen[385].  An undated charter, recording a donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, records that "Osbernus dapifer" was killed "a suis hostibus"[386].  He is named "Osberni cognomento Pacifici" in the charter dated to [1035/60] which records the donation by his widow and two sons to Rouen Sainte-Trinité for his soul[387].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Osbernus...procurator principalis domus, Herfasti Gunnoris comitissæ fratris filius“ was killed while sleeping “in cubiculo ducis cum ipso in valle Rodoili” by “Willelmo Rogerii de Montegumeri filio”, dated to early in the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context[388]m EMMA d'Ivry, daughter of RAOUL d'Ivry Comte de Bayeux & his wife Aubrée [Eremburge] --- (-after [1067]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that one of the daughters of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Osberno de Crepon de qua natus est Willelmus filius Osberni[389].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60][390].  "Emma Osberni dapiferi uxore" is named as "dominis mei" with her two sons in the undated charter of Ansfredus[391].  "Erchenbaldo filio Erchenbaldi vicecomitis", on the point of leaving "ultra mare", donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "rege Anglorum et duce Normannorum Guillelmo", by undated charter, signed by "…Willelmi filii Osberni, Emmæ matris eius, Ansfredi filii Athlæ…"[392].  "Ansfredus, Osberni de Ou vicecomitis, postea…Hierosolimitani monachi, filius…cum conjuge mea Emma" offered "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" as a monk at Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis meis Emma, Osberni dapiferi uxore et filiis eius Willelmo et Osberno…Willelmo…principe Normannorum", by undated charter[393].  Osbern & his wife had three children: 

i)          GUILLAUME FitzOsbern (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Cormeilles).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that one of the daughters of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Osberno de Crepon de qua natus est Willelmus filius Osberni[394].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60], signed by "…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…"[395].  "Willelmo filio Osberni et…Ælicia eius uxore filia Rogeri de Thoneio" founded the abbey of Lyre by charter dated 1046[396].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus Osberni filius, ducis cognatus et dapifer...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[397].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Willelmo dapifero filio Osberni" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[398].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Guillermus Osberni filius...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[399].  He was rewarded for his part in the conquest of England with estates in the Isle of Wight and county of Hereford, thereby becoming Earl of Hereford

-         EARLS of HEREFORD

ii)         OSBERN (-1101).  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60][400].  "Osberni frater eius [Willelmi]" witnessed a charter dated 1038 or after[401].  "Ansfredus, Osberni de Ou vicecomitis, postea…Hierosolimitani monachi, filius…cum conjuge mea Emma" offered "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" as a monk at Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis meis Emma, Osberni dapiferi uxore et filiis eius Willelmo et Osberno…Willelmo…principe Normannorum", by undated charter[402].  Chancellor of England.  Bishop of Exeter 1072[403]

iii)        EMMA .  "Willelmus Vernonensis filius Hugonis eiusque conjux Emma" donated property at "castrum Vernonense" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo rege Anglorum et duce Normannorum", by undated charter[404].  Guillaume de Vernon, his son Hugues and his wife Emma donated property to Rouen Holy Trinity, confirmed in the charter dated to [1067][405].  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter of Carisbrooke Priory, Isle of Wight which names “Johannem et Ricardum” as the two sons of “Willielmum filium Osberni marescallum…comitem Herefordiæ” who predeceased their father, and records that their inheritance went to “Ricardo de Rivers, nepoti prædicti Willielmi filii Osberni, tunc comiti Exoniæ[406]m GUILLAUME de Vernon, son of HUGUES de Vernon & his wife --- (-[4 Jun ----]). 

b)         RAINULF .  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1026], subscribed by "…Osbernus filius Arfast, Ranulfus frater eius"[407]

4.         WEWA .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that Wewa married “Turulfo de Ponte-Audomari...filius...Torf” by whom she had “Humfridum de Vetulis patrem Rogerii de Bellomonte[408].  She and her three sisters, as well as their husbands, are named by Robert de Torigny[409].  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that the (unnamed) sister of ”Gunnora comitissa Normanniæ” married “Turulpho de Ponte-Adomaro[410]m THOROLD de Pont-Audemer, son of TORF & his wife --- (-after 1040). 

5.         [AVELINE] .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[411].  She and her three sisters, as well as their husbands, are named by Robert de Torigny[412].  On the other hand, the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Turketillus…frater…Turulphi, cuius filius Hasculfus d’Harcourt” married “aliam sororem…comitissæ Gunnoræ” by whom he was father of “duos…filios…Walterum de Giffard primogenitum…[413].  As noted under Giffard, another primary source indicates that the wife of "Osbernus Giffardus" (assumed to refer to Osbern de Bolbec given that his son used the name Giffard) was named Hawise[414].  It is not known whether Osbern was married twice or whether all the sources cited refer to the same person, one or other mistaking the name.  m [as his first wife,] OSBERN de Bolbec, son of ---. 

6.         [--- .  It is not known which brother or sister of Gunnora was the parent of Beatrix.] 

a)         BEATRIX .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius[415].  An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[416]m as his first wife, RAOUL de Warenne, son of --- . 

7.         [--- .  It is not known which brother or sister of Gunnora was the parent of the following daughter.] 

a)         daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...altera” married “Nicolao de Bascheritivilla” among whose descendants were “Willelmus Martellus et Walterus de Sancto Martino[417]m ROGER de Baqueville, son of ---. 

8.         [--- .  It is not known which brother or sister of Gunnora was the parent of the following daughter.] 

a)         daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...tertia” married “Richardo vicecomiti Rothomagensi, patri...Lamberti de Sancto Sidonio[418]m RICHARD Vicomte de Rouen, son of ---. 

9.         [--- .  It is not known which brother or sister of Gunnora was the parent of the following daughter.] 

a)         daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...quarta” married “Osmundo de Centum-villis vicecomiti Vernonii” by whom she had “primus Fulco de Aneio, plures filiæ, quarum una mater fuit primi Balduini de Reuers” [although the latter part at least of this passage is contradicted by other primary sources][419]m OSMOND de Centville Vicomte de Vernon, son of ---. 

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known.  This family was closely related to the family of Gunnora, as is seen from the common references in the charters quoted below. 

1.         ARCHAMBAUD [Erchembaldus] .  "Erchembaldus vicecomes" donated "prata de Salhus et…in Sarlosvilla jure hereditario" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, by charter dated to [1030/35], signed by "Rotberti comitis, Osberni dapiferi, eiusdem Erchembaldi, Franconis fratris eius, Gisleberti senescalli, Normanni de Herolcurt…"[420].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60], signed by "…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…"[421]m ---.  The name of Archambaud's wife is not known.  Archambaud & his wife had three children: 

a)         GILBERT (-1038 [or after]).  An undated charter records that "Osbernus dapifer" was killed "a suis hostibus" (dated to 1038) and "Gulbertus filius Erchembaldi vicecomitis fidelis eius" seriously wounded and donated "prata de Reduil" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen for his recovery, with the consent of "fratribus eius Crocone et Erchembaldo" and confirmed by "Willelmus comes Normannorum"[422]

b)         CROCO .  An undated charter records that "Osbernus dapifer" was killed "a suis hostibus" (dated to 1038) and "Gulbertus filius Erchembaldi vicecomitis fidelis eius" seriously wounded and donated "prata de Reduil" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen for his recovery, with the consent of "fratribus eius Crocone et Erchembaldo" and confirmed by "Willelmus comes Normannorum"[423].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60][424].  "…Croci, Erchembaldi…" witnessed a charter of "Ricardus vir potens de Bernay" dated 1047, together with "Emmæ ipsius dominæ" and her two sons Guillaume and Osbern[425], although the relationship between the two is not specified.  "Croco" witnessed a charter of "Huelino fratre Osmundi de Franca Villa" dated 1058[426]

c)         ARCHAMBAUD (-after 1067).  An undated charter records that "Osbernus dapifer" was killed "a suis hostibus" (dated to 1038) and "Gulbertus filius Erchembaldi vicecomitis fidelis eius" seriously wounded and donated "prata de Reduil" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen for his recovery, with the consent of "fratribus eius Crocone et Erchembaldo" and confirmed by "Willelmus comes Normannorum"[427].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60][428].  "Erchenbaldo filio Erchenbaldi vicecomitis", on the point of leaving "ultra mare", donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "rege Anglorum et duce Normannorum Guillelmo", by undated charter, signed by "…Willelmi filii Osberni, Emmæ matris eius, Ansfredi filii Athlæ…"[429]

2.         FRANCO (-after [1030/35]).  "Erchembaldus vicecomes" donated "prata de Salhus et…in Sarlosvilla jure hereditario" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, by charter dated to [1030/35], signed by "Rotberti comitis, Osberni dapiferi, eiusdem Erchembaldi, Franconis fratris eius, Gisleberti senescalli, Normanni de Herolcurt…"[430]

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de GOURNAY

 

 

The town of Gournay was located in the eastern part of the duchy of Normandy, in the area known as "le pays de Bray", separated from the domaine royale by the river Epte.  Gurney records that "the local tradition states that" the town and adjacent territory was assigned by the Norman leader Rollo to one of his followers named Eudes but he does not cite a corresponding primary source[431].  His descendants remained as direct vassals of the dukes of Normandy and erected fortifications at Gournay itself, La Ferté, Gaillefontaine and Argueil.  In [1078], Hugues de Gournay conquered twenty-four parishes on the left bank of the Epte in the Beauvaisis, in respect of which he was the vassal of the king of France[432]

 

 

1.         [EUDES .  According to Gurney, the town of Gournay and adjacent land were granted by Rollo to Eudes, in 912, but he adds in a later passage that the existence of Eudes and his supposed son Hugues "is a matter of tradition" and that there is no surviving contemporary document in which they are named[433]m ---.  The name of Eudes’s wife is not known.  Eudes & his wife had one child:] 

a)         [HUGUES de Gournay .  According to Gurney, the existence of Eudes and his supposed son Hugues "is a matter of tradition" and no contemporary document survives in which they are named[434].] 

 

2.         RENAUDSeigneur de Gournaym ALBERADE, daughter of ---.  Gauthier de la Ferté founded the priory of La Ferté en Brai, at the command of "fratre Hugone", by charter dated to [989/96], which names his father Renaud and his mother Alberade[435].  Renaud & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGUES [I] de Gournay (-after 989).  Gauthier de la Ferté founded the priory of La Ferté en Brai, at the command of "fratre Hugone", by charter dated to [989/96], which names his father Renaud and his mother Alberade[436].  The "command" of his brother suggests that Hugues was the older son, and presumably also Seigneur de Gournay

b)         GAUTHIER de la Ferté (-after 989).  Gauthier de la Ferté founded the priory of La Ferté en Brai, at the command of "fratre Hugone", by charter dated to [989/96], which names his father Renaud and his mother Alberade[437]

 

3.         HUGUES [I] de la Ferté (-before 1047).  He may have been the son of Gauthier de la Ferté, named above, but no document survives which confirms that this is the correct.  "Hugo" founded the priory of Sigy by charter dated to [1030/35][438]m ---.  The name of Hugues’s wife is not known.  Hugues & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGUES [II] de la Ferté .  "Hugo Hugonis Firmentis filius" confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sigy by charter dated to before 6 Mar 1047[439].  Monk at St Ouen, Rouen.  

 

4.         HUGUES [II] de Gournay (-[killed in battle Cardiff 1074]).  The Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie records that, after the death of Canute King of England in 1035, "le Conte Neel de Coustantin…le sire de Guerarville, le sire de Gournay" sailed from Harfleur to England with Edward Prince of England to claim the English throne[440].  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Hugonis Gornacensis" joined forces with "Roberti Aucensis comitis", dated to after 1053[441].  "…Hugo de Gornai…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[442].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Hue de Gournay sire de Bray" and "le Conte Hue de Gournay" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066, the two similar names suggesting that they were father and son[443].  [The Histoire et Chronique de Normandie, printed in 1610 at Rouen, records that "Hue de Gournay et le comte d’Evreux" died in Normandy from wounds received in battle at Cardiff in 1074, fighting an invasion led by "Canut [roi] de Norvège"[444].  The account must be garbled as there was no king named Canute in either Norway or Denmark at the time, nor has any record been found of a comte d’Evreux dying around that period.  The historical basis of the account is uncertain.] 

 

 

1.         HUGUES [III] de Gournay (-[1093]).  "Domino meo Hugone Gurnacensi et filio eius Girardo et uxore eius Basilia" consented to the donation by "Radulfus cognomine Havoth" to Jumièges by charter dated to [1040][445], although presumably the document is misdated.  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Hue de Gournay sire de Bray" and "le Conte Hue de Gournay" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066, the two similar names suggesting that they were father and son[446].  "…Hugonis de Gornaio…" subscribed the charter dated Apr 1067 under which "Willelmus…dux Normannorum…Anglorum rex" confirmed rights to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire[447]"…Hugo de Gurniaco, Ricardus de Curci, Rodulfus filius Herluini, Willelmus filius Hastenchi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" to the abbey of Marmoutier[448].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Gournai” holding Liston, Ardleigh and Fordham in Essex[449].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Hugonis de Gornaco et Girardi filii", by charter dated to [1181/89][450]m (after 1051) as her second husband, BASILIE, widow of RAOUL de Gacé, daughter of GERARD Flaitel & his wife --- (-16 Jan [1099/1100]).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Galterium Giffardum primum” married “unam filiarum Girardi Flatelli” and that “alteram...Basiliam relictam Rodulphi de Waceio” married [secondly] “Hugo de Gornaco[451].  "Domino meo Hugone Gurnacensi et filio eius Girardo et uxore eius Basilia" consented to the donation by "Radulfus cognomine Havoth" to Jumièges by charter dated to [1040][452], although presumably the document is misdated.  Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury wrote to "Basiliæ amicæ Filiæ in Domino", dated to after 1093[453].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "tempore S. Anselmi abbatis Becci tres matronæ nobiles…Basilia uxor Hugonis de Gornaco, et Amfrida neptis ipsius Basiliæ, et Eva uxor Guillelmi Crispini" entered Bec and lived at the abbey, adding that they died on three consecutive Sundays "Amfrida Basiliæ neptis...minor...ætate, virgo…IV Non Jan, qua sepulta…Basilia domina eius…XVII Kal Feb…tertia Eva…X Kal Feb...post mortem...viri sui Guillermi Crispini...Beccique usque ad finem vitæ...perseuerauit"[454].  Gurney dates the passage to [1099/1100][455].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Hugonis de Gornaco et Girardi filii…Girardi de Gornaio et Basilie matris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][456].  Hugues [III] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [GUILLAUME de Gournay (-after 1082).  "…William de Gornai…Girard de Gornai…" witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England donated property to the abbey of la Trinité de Caen[457].] 

b)         GERARD de Gournay (-Palestine after 1104).  "Domino meo Hugone Gurnacensi et filio eius Girardo et uxore eius Basilia" consented to the donation by "Radulfus cognomine Havoth" to Jumièges by charter dated to [1040][458], although presumably the document is misdated.  "Domino meo Hugone Gurnaiensi et filio eius Girardo et uxore eius Basilia" consented to a donation to Jumièges abbey by "Radulphus cognomina Havoth cum uxore mea" on his entering the abbey as a monk, by undated charter[459].  "…William de Gornai…Girard de Gornai…" witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England donated property to the abbey of la Trinité de Caen[460].  “Odo comes et Stephanus filius eius[461]Orderic Vitalis records that “primus Normannorum Stephanus de Albamarla filius Odonis Campaniæ comitis” fortified “castellum suum super Aucium flumen” at the expense of William II King of England and placed there a garrison against “ducem” [Robert III Duke of Normandy] and that “Gornacensis Girardus” followed his example and delivered “Gornacum et Firmitatem et Goisleni Fontem” [Gournay, La Ferté-en-Brai, Gaillefontaine] to the king, dated to [1089/90][462].  Orderic Vitalis records that “comes Ebroicensis” requested Robert [III] Duke of Normandy to return “Bathventum et Nogionem, Vaceium et Craventionem, Scoceium [Bavent, near Troarn, Noyon-sur-Andelle, Gacé, Gravençon, Ecouché], aliosque fundos Radulfi patrui mei...Caput Asini” to him and grant “Pontem Sancti Petri” [Pont Saint-Pierre] to “nepoti...meo Guillelmo Bretoliensi”, which the duke agreed to, except “Scoceium” which was held by “Girardus de Gornaco...qui de eadem parentela prodierat, filius...Basiliæ Girardi Fleitelli filiæ”, dated to [1089][463]He and his wife participated in the First Crusade but he died before the capture of Jerusalem[464].  Albert of Aix names "…Gerardus de Gorna…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[465].  Baudry names "Girardus de Gornaio" among those on the First Crusade in 1097[466].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Giraldus” left for Jerusalem  but died while away[467].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Hugonis de Gornaco et Girardi filii…Girardi de Gornaio et Basilie matris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][468].  [m firstly ---.  As discussed below, one possibility for the parentage of Amicie, wife of Richard Talbot, is that she was the daughter of Gérard de Gournay by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage.]  m [secondly] ([1084/92]) as her first husband, EDIVE [Edith] de Warenne, daughter of WILLIAM [I] de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his first wife Gundred --- ([1072/80]-after 1155).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Giraldus” left for Jerusalem “cum uxore sua Edithua sorore Willelmi comitis de Warenna”, who married secondly “Drogoni de Monceio”, by whom she had “unum filium...Drogonem[469].  Her birth date is indicated bearing in mind that she had children by both her marriages.  The date of her first marriage is estimated assuming that she was about 12 years old at the time.  She married secondly Dreux [I] Seigneur de Moncy.  Her second marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who names "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" and "Drogo, vitricus eius"[470].  Gérard & his [first/second] wife had [one child]: 

i)          [AMICIE de Gournay (before [1085]-[after 1100]).  Her marriage and family connection are indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" rebelled against King Henry I after the marriage of his sister Gundred in Jun [1118], and captured “municipium...Plessicii” which he granted to "nepoti eius Hugoni Talabot"[471].  The passage indicates that Hugh Talbot was at least a young adult at the time, so not born later than [1100], which would place his mother’s birth no later than [1085].  There are therefore at least three possibilities for her parentage.  Firstly, if she was the child of Gérard de Gournay by his known wife Edive de Warenne, Edive would have been born in the early part of her estimated birth date range shown above and Amicie born soon after the marriage.  Secondly, given that that chronology is tight, Amicie could have been the daughter of Gérard by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage.  Thirdly, the word “nepos” in Orderic could indicate a more distant family relationship than nephew, maybe first cousin, in which case Amicie could have been the daughter of Hugues [III] de Gournay, although the more remote the relationship the less likely the appointment of Richard Talbot as custodian of the castle by Hugues [IV] de Gournay.  On balance, the most likely case appears to be the second.  Her name is indicated by two charters of King Henry II: Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "…Richardi Tallebot et Amicie uxoris eius et Hugonis et Willelmi filiorum suorum…", by charter dated to [1181/83][472].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Foi de Longueville, including donations by "Ricardi Thalebot et Avitie uxoris sue et Hugonis filii sui", by charter dated to [Mar/Jun] 1189[473]m RICHARD Talbot, son of ---.] 

Gérard & his [second] wife had two children: 

ii)         HUGUES [IV] de Gournay ([1098/1100]-1180).  Orderic Vitalis names "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" and "Drogo vitricus eius"[474]

-         see below

iii)        GUNDRED de Gournay ([1100/1105]-after 1155).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[475].  Orderic Vitalis records the marriage in Jun [1118] of "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco...sorore sua...Gundrea...consilio regis" to “Nigello de Albinneio[476].  In another passage she is named as second wife of Nigel d'Aubigny[477].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gunderede uxori Nig de Albin" in Leicestershire[478].  ”Gundreda, uxor Nigelli de Albini” donated property to the Hospital of St Leonard, York by undated charter which names “Rogero de Molbray filio suo[479].  An undated charter notes the donation of ”Hospitale Sancti Michaelis Archangeli” to Whitby Monastery, at the request of “Dominam Gundredam uxorem Nigelli de Albini” for the soul of “Rogero de Moubray filio eorum[480]m (Jun [1118]) as his second wife, NELE de Albini, son of ROGER de Albini & his wife Amice --- (-21 or 26 Nov 1129). 

b)         [HAWISE de Gournay (-after 1112).  The Annals of Bermondsey record the donation made by “Hawisia de Gurnay” of “ecclesiam de Inglescombe in comitatu Somerset” to the abbey in 1112[481].  No indication has been found about the parentage of Hawise.  If she was a member of the main Gournay family, the chronology suggests that she was more likely the daughter of Hugues [IV] de Gournay than of his son Gerard de Gournay.] 

 

 

HUGUES [IV] de Gournay, son of GERARD de Gournay & his wife Edith de Warenne ([1098/1100]-1180).  Orderic Vitalis names "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" and "Drogo vitricus eius"[482].  Considering his death in 1180, it is unlikely that he was born much earlier than [1098/1100].  Matthew of Paris quotes a charter dated 1116 of King Henry I which records his grant of Biscot, Bedfordshire to the abbey of St Albans, witnessed by "…Adam de Port, Thomas de Sancto Johanne, Willelmus frater eius, Hugo de Gornaio"[483].  "Hugo de Gornaco" confirmed a donation by "Girardus pater meus" to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, for the souls of "Beatricis…uxoris mee et Hugonis filii mei", by undated charter[484].  "Gornacensis dominus et…Hugo filius meus" donated property to Saint-Leu d’Esserent, for the soul of "Beatricis…uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1144][485].  “Helias et Petrus vicedomini Gerbosreti, Hugo de Gornaco...” subscribed the charter dated 1149 under which Henri Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “territorii veteris Briostel” to Lannoy made by “Drogo filius Roeri et mater eius Isabelt[486].  An undated charter of Henry II King of England refers to the transfer of the priory of Sigy to a new site by "Hugo de Gornaio"[487].  "Dominus Hugo de Gournaio et Milesend uxor illius" founded Clairruissel priory, with the consent of "filiorum nostrorum Girardi et Hugonis", by undated charter[488].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo de Gurnaio" with 12 knights[489].  "Hugo de Gurnaio filius Geraldi de Gurnaio" confirmed an agreement between "Henricum abbatem et conventum Pratellensem" and “Rogerium abbatem et conventum Sancti Salvatoris” by charter dated 1172[490].  Ralph de Diceto records that "Hugo de Gornai, tam pater quam filius" were captured in 1173 "a Rege filio" during the rebellion of Henry the Young King against his father Henry II King of England[491].  "…Hugone de Gournayo…" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the monks of Bec established at the church of Pré at Rouen which had been made by a charter of King Henry I dated 1122[492]

m firstly BEATRIX de Vermandois, daughter of HUGUES [I] de France Comte de Vermandois [Capet] & his wife Adelais Ctss de VermandoisThe De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses refers to (but does not name) the fourth daughter of "comite Hugone et Adela uxore" being the wife of "comes Garentie"[493], although it is possible that this refers to "William de Warenne", second husband of the couple's daughter Elisabeth.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Giraldo...filius eius Hugo” married “sorore Rodulfi de Parrona comitis Viromandorum”, by whom he had “unum filium...Hugonem[494].  "Hugo de Gornaco" confirmed a donation by "Girardus pater meus" to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, for the souls of "Beatricis…uxoris mee et Hugonis filii mei", by undated charter[495].  "Gornacensis dominus et…Hugo filius meus" donated property to Saint-Leu d’Esserent, for the soul of "Beatricis…uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1144][496]

m secondly (after [1151]) as her second husband, MELISENDE de Coucy, widow of ADELEME Châtelain d’Amiens, daughter of THOMAS de Marle Comte d’Amiens, Seigneur de Coucy, de Marle et de Boves & his third wife Mélisende de Crécy-sur-Serre.  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Ingelrannum de Marla et Robertum Bovensem et filiam nomine matris" as children of "Thomam de Marla" by his wife Mélisende, specifying that their daughter married "Hugonem de Gornai dominum eiusdem loci"[497]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Thomas de Coci" & his "secundo uxor domna de Bovis" as "illam que data est Hugoni de Gornaio" but does not name her[498].  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  "Dominus Hugo de Gournaio et Milesend uxor illius" founded Clairruissel priory, with the consent of "filiorum nostrorum Girardi et Hugonis", by undated charter[499]

Hugues [IV] & his first wife had one child: 

1.         HUGUES de Gournay (-young).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Giraldo...filius eius Hugo” married “sorore Rodulfi de Parrona comitis Viromandorum”, by whom he had “unum filium...Hugonem[500].  "Hugo de Gornaco" confirmed a donation by "Girardus pater meus" to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, for the souls of "Beatricis…uxoris mee et Hugonis filii mei", by undated charter[501]

Hugues [IV] & his second wife had two children: 

2.         GERARD de Gournay (-young).  "Dominus Hugo de Gournaio et Milesend uxor illius" founded Clairruissel priory, with the consent of "filiorum nostrorum Girardi et Hugonis", by undated charter[502]

3.         HUGUES [V] de Gournay (-25 Oct [1214])"Dominus Hugo de Gournaio et Milesend uxor illius" founded Clairruissel priory, with the consent of "filiorum nostrorum Girardi et Hugonis", by undated charter[503].  Ralph de Diceto records that "Hugo de Gornai, tam pater quam filius" were captured in 1173 "a Rege filio" during the rebellion of Henry the Young King against his father Henry II King of England[504].  "…Hugone de Gurnai…" subscribed the charter dated to [1182/89] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barbery[505].  "Hugo de Gornaco" founded Bellosanne Abbey by charter dated 1198[506].  "Hugo de Gornaco" donated property to Fécamp, for the souls of "Juliane uxoris mee et puerorum meorum", by charter dated 1202[507].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Hugo de Gurnay" held "Wendoun de dominico domini regis"[508].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Gurnay" holding three knights’ fees in Norfolk in [1210/12][509].  The Close Rolls dated 9 Sep [1214] record the illness of "Hugonis de Gornaco" and name "Gerardi filii primogeniti et heredis sui"[510].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hugo de Gurnaco” became a Templar "in Pictavia" and died in 1213[511].  The obituary of Belosanne Abbey records the death 25 Oct of Hugues de Gournay[512]m JULIANE, daughter of --- (-after 1202).  "Hugo de Gornaco" donated property to Fécamp, for the souls of "Juliane uxoris mee et puerorum meorum", by charter dated 1202[513].  A letter which purports to be from her granddaughter "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" gives a confused version of the family’s lineage: "Sr Hugh de Gornaye" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng"[514].  Genealogical details in other parts of the letter can be corroborated against other sources.  It is therefore difficult to decide whether the entry relating to the wife of Hugues [V] should be dismissed in the same way as the supposed marriage of his father to the widow of King Louis VIII or whether it is factually correct.  If the document is correct, Hugues [V]’s wife was Juliane de Dammartin, daughter of Aubry [II] Comte de Dammartin & his wife Mathilde de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis.  The absence of Juliane’s descendants from the enquiry in 1267, which adjudged property of “Philippus olim comes Bolonie et...Matildis” to “Matheus comes Domni-Martini, domini Guillelmus de Fienes, Baldoinus de Fienes, Michael de Fienes, Ingerannus de Pinquegniaco et Renaudus de Pinquegniaco, heredes comitisse Matildis Bolonie[515], suggests that this alleged parentage is incorrect.  Hugues [V] & his wife had three children: 

a)         GERARD de Gournay (-[9 Sep 1214/22 Apr 1216]).  The Close Rolls dated 9 Sep [1214] record the illness of "Hugonis de Gornaco" and name "Gerardi filii primogeniti et heredis sui"[516]

b)         MELISENDE de Gournay (-after 14 Mar 1217)Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a letter which purports to be from her daughter "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" which gives a confused version of the family’s lineage: "Sr Hugh de Gornaye" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng", whose daughter "Milsent nostre mere" married "a Count de Euoyse en Normandy" by whom she had one son and one daughter, before marrying "Will de Cantelow nostre pere"[517].  Henry III King of England granted "maneriis de Mapeldureham et Petrefeld" to "Rogero la Szuche", as granted by King John except for the dower of "Milesentie que fuit uxor comitis Ebroici", dated 14 Mar 1217[518]m firstly (before 1203) as his second wife, AMAURY [VI] de Montfort Comte d’Evreux, son of AMAURY [V] de Montfort Comte d'Evreux & his wife Mabel of Gloucester (-[1213])m secondly (1219) WILLIAM [III] de Cauntelo, son of WILLIAM [II] de Cauntelo & his wife --- (-1251). 

c)         HUGUES [VI] de Gournay of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire (-1239, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  "Hug de Gurnay fil Hug de Gurnay" paid a fine for "feodis suis q sunt in manu dñi Reg", in Norfolk and Suffolk, dated 22 Apr 1216[519]m firstly (after May 1220) as her second husband, LUCY, widow of ROBERT de Berkeley, daughter of --- (-18 Jan 1234, bur Bristol St Augustine).  Smyth records that "the second wife [of Lord Robert] was Lucy whom hee maryed not above two yeares before his death", that she married secondly "Hugh de Gurney sonne of Hugh", died 18 Jan 1234 and was buried at Bristol St Augustine, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[520]The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Gloucestershire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Lucia que fuit uxor Roberti de Berkelay est maritata Hugoni de Gurney. Terra eius valet c.l"[521]m secondly as her first husband, MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  She married secondly Roger de Clifford of Bridge Sollers, Herefordshire.  Hugues [VI] & his second wife had one child: 

i)          JULIANE ([1235/39]-1295).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 23 Dec "18 Edw I" after the death of "William Bardolf...died on Thursday after St Andrew in the said year” name “Hugh Bardolf aged 30 is his next heir...the inheritance of Juliana de Gurnay his wife[522]m WILLIAM Bardolf, son of WILLIAM Bardolf of Wormegay, Norfolk & his wife --- (-1 Dec 1289). 

 

 

1.         --- de Gournay (-before 1200).  m AVELINE de Noerey, daughter of --- (-after 1200).  "Robertus comes Drocensis" confirmed the sale of "apud Vitriacum" to Notre-Dame de Paris made by “nobilis mulier Avelina de Noereio et Guillelmus de Gornaio filius eius, consentiente...Helisent senescalla uxore eiusdem et fratribus eius” by charter dated 1200[523].  Three or more children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Gournay"Robertus comes Drocensis" confirmed the sale of "apud Vitriacum" to Notre-Dame de Paris made by “nobilis mulier Avelina de Noereio et Guillelmus de Gornaio filius eius, consentiente...Helisent senescalla uxore eiusdem et fratribus eius” by charter dated 1200[524]m HELISENDE, daughter of ---.  "Robertus comes Drocensis" confirmed the sale of "apud Vitriacum" to Notre-Dame de Paris made by “nobilis mulier Avelina de Noereio et Guillelmus de Gornaio filius eius, consentiente...Helisent senescalla uxore eiusdem et fratribus eius” by charter dated 1200[525]

b)         sons .  "Robertus comes Drocensis" confirmed the sale of "apud Vitriacum" to Notre-Dame de Paris made by “nobilis mulier Avelina de Noereio et Guillelmus de Gornaio filius eius, consentiente...Helisent senescalla uxore eiusdem et fratribus eius” by charter dated 1200[526]

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS de MARIGNY

 

 

The Marigny family’s lands were located in the pays de Bray near the forest of Lyons[527], near the town of Lyons-la-Forêt in the present-day département of Eure, arrondissement Les Andelys.  The family rose to prominence with the success achieved by Enguerrand de Marigny at the court of Philippe IV King of France, where he became chambellan in the early 14th century.  Enguerrand made enemies and in 1315, falling victim to their machinations, was tried for corruption and witchcraft, and hanged.  Two of his brothers filled important ecclesiastical positions and members of Enguerrand’s family married into the lesser ranks of nobility in northern France as will be seen below.  Père Anselme’s reconstruction of the family includes individuals whose names have not been copied into the following section as the corresponding primary sources which confirm their family relationships have not been identified[528]

 

 

1.         MATHILDE [de Marigny], daughter of --- (-after 1209).  Heiress of Marigny.  “Richardus de Maregny et Matildis uxor mea et Petronilla filia mea” donated revenue from “terra...de Marregny et Dampnopetro” to the church of Saint-Hildebert de Gournay-en-Bray by undated charter[529].  “Hugo Portarius” confirmed the donation of revenue from “terra...de Marregny et Dampnopetro” to the church of Saint-Hildebert de Gournay en Bray made by “Ricardus de Sancto Leodegario et Matildis uxor mea” by undated charter[530].  “Hugo Portarius” exchanged property with the church of Lyons Saint-Laurent, with the consent of “Matildis uxoris mea et Ingerrani filii mei”, by charter dated 1209[531]m firstly RICHARD de Saint-Léger, son of ---.  Richardus de Maregny et Matildis uxor mea et Petronilla filia mea” donated revenue from “terra...de Marregny et Dampnopetro” to the church of Saint-Hildebert de Gournay en Bray by undated charter[532]m secondly HUGUES [le] Portier, son of ENGUERRAND [le] Portier & his wife --- (-after 1209).  Père Anselme names “Hugues le Portier chevalier” as son of “Enguran le Portier chevalier seigneur de Rosey et de Lyons en partie“ named in 1150 and 1180[533].  The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified.  It is possible that Anselme exaggerated Hugues’s social status, with the term “chevalier”, as he is called “mercatus” in the May 1246 charter of his grandson quoted below.  “Hugo Portarius” exchanged property with the church of Lyons Saint-Laurent, with the consent of “Matildis uxoris mea et Ingerrani filii mei”, by charter dated 1209[534].  Mathilde & her first husband had one child: 

a)         PETRONILLE de Saint-Léger .  “Richardus de Maregny et Matildis uxor mea et Petronilla filia mea” donated revenue from “terra...de Marregny et Dampnopetro” to the church of Saint-Hildebert de Gournay-en-Bray by undated charter[535]

Mathilde & her second husband had one child: 

b)         ENGUERRAND [I] [le] Portier [de Marigny] (-[Apr 1240/May 1246]).  Hugo Portarius” exchanged property with the church of Lyons Saint-Laurent, with the consent of “Matildis uxoris mea et Ingerrani filii mei”, by charter dated 1209[536].  “Ingeranus de Marreigny” confirmed donations to Saint-Hildebert de Gournay-en-Bray by charter dated Apr 1240[537]m ---.  The name of Enguerrand’s wife is not known.  Enguerrand [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          JEAN de Marigny (-after Jan 1272).  “Ioannes de Marigny” donated property to Lyons Saint-Laurent and confirmed donations made by “Hugo Portuarius avus meus mercatus...Ingerranus pater meus” by charter dated May 1246[538].  The testament of “Ioannes de Marregny miles” is dated Jan 1271 (O.S.?)[539]

ii)         PHILIPPE de Marigny (-after Sep 1268)Philippus de Marregny armiger filius Ingeranni Portarii militis et hæres eiusdem de feodo de Escoyes” donated property to Mortemer abbey by charter dated Sep 1268[540]

-         see below

 

 

PHILIPPE de Marigny, son of ENGUERRAND [I] [le] Portier [de Marigny] & his wife --- (-before 23 Mar 1306)Philippus de Marregny armiger filius Ingeranni Portarii militis et hæres eiusdem de feodo de Escoyes” donated property to Mortemer abbey by charter dated Sep 1268[541].  A charter dated 23 Mar 1306 records the settlement of his succession between “domina Petronilla de Bosco Galteri relicta...Philippi de Marrigniaco militis domini d’Escoyes defuncti et Petrus Oyseleti predicte relicte primogenitus ex predicti defuncti...procreatus pro aliis liberis minoribus ex ipsis similiter procreatis” and “Ingerrannus de Marreigniaco miles dominus de Media Villa predicti defuncti primogenitus pro se, fratre sororbusque suis germanis[542]

m firstly ---.  The name of Philippe’s first wife is not known.  The age range of Philippe’s earlier children, shown below as born to his first marriage, suggest that they may have been born from more than one wife. 

m secondly PETRONILLE de Bois-Gauthier, daughter of --- (-after 23 Mar 1306).  A charter dated 23 Mar 1306 records the settlement of his succession between “domina Petronilla de Bosco Galteri relicta...Philippi de Marrigniaco militis domini d’Escoyes defuncti et Petrus Oyseleti predicte relicte primogenitus ex predicti defuncti...procreatus pro aliis liberis minoribus ex ipsis similiter procreatis” and “Ingerrannus de Marreigniaco miles dominus de Media Villa predicti defuncti primogenitus pro se, fratre sororbusque suis germanis[543]

Philippe & his first wife had [six or more] children: 

1.         ENGUERRAND [II] de Marigny ([1265/75]-30 Apr 1315, bur [1317] église des chartreux de Vauvert-lès-Paris, transferred [1325/26] to Notre-Dame d’Ecouis).  His estimated birth date reflects the estimated birth date of his oldest son Louis, although judging from the indications of Louis’s youth at the time of his 1309 marriage it is likely that Enguerrand was born in the later part of this range.  Pannetier of Jeanne Queen of France: Enjorrant de Marigni escuier panetier madame la reine de France” acknowledged receiving money from the royal treasury “ou non de monseigneur l’arcevesque de Roan et pour lui” by charter dated 27 May 1299[544].  Père Anselme says that Enguerrand was “dès l’année 1298...que Pannetier de la Reine[545].  The birth date of his son Louis suggests that Enguerrand started his career in the household of the queen (who arranged his first marriage, see below) a few years earlier but no document has been identified which throws light on the position he may have held at the time.  Seigneur de Marigny.  Chambellan de France.  Père Anselme states that Enguerrand was created comte de Longueville in May 1301 or May 1305[546].  This statement is presumably based on the following document, although it makes no mention of any comital title: Philippe IV King of France granted property “in villis de Longavilla et de Longolio, ballivie Calentensis” to “Ingerrannus de Marrigniaco miles et cambellanus noster...suisque heredibus ab eodem et Hauvidi nunc uxorea sua procreatis et procreandis” by charter dated May 1305[547].  A document dated Jun 1305 granted Enguerrand judicial rights [in] “vicecomitatus que in dicta villa de Longavilla...antiquitus apud Arches[548].  Enguerrand’s epitaph in Notre-Dame d’Ecouis named him “conte de Longueville[549], but no indication has been found in any document consulted that he bore this title during his lifetime.  A charter dated 23 Mar 1306 records the settlement of his father’s succession between “domina Petronilla de Bosco Galteri relicta...Philippi de Marrigniaco militis domini d’Escoyes defuncti et Petrus Oyseleti predicte relicte primogenitus ex predicti defuncti...procreatus pro aliis liberis minoribus ex ipsis similiter procreatis” and “Ingerrannus de Marreigniaco miles dominus de Media Villa predicti defuncti primogenitus pro se, fratre sororbusque suis germanis[550].  “Ingerranus dominus de Marregniaco miles et Cambellanus...Philippi...Regis Francorum” founded Ecouis church, with the consent of “consortis meæ Ælipidis”, for the souls of “...Ioannæ prioris coniugis meæ”, by charter dated Jan 1310[551].  Charles Comte de Valois and his wife exchanged property with “Engerran de Marreigni chevalier et chambellene du roy de France...et a madame Havys sa femme” by charter dated 22 Jun 1310[552].  “Ingerrannus dominus de Marrigniaco miles et cambellanus...” founded Notre-Dame d’Ecouis, with the consent of “consortis mee Aelipdis” and in memory of “regine Johanne...ac Johanne prioris consortis mee defuncte”, by charter dated Jan 1311[553].  Baron de Marigny: Philippe IV King of France united certain properties for “nostre...chevalier et chambellene Engerrans sires de Marreigni” to create “la baronnie de Marreigni” by charter dated Dec 1313[554].  A continuator of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the trial in 1315 of “Enguerannus de Marigniaco miles” on charges of corruption and witchcraft and his subsequent hanging[555].  The same source records in 1317 that “circa idem tempus” the king permitted the burial of “Engueranni suspensi” at “fratrum Carthusiensium juxta Parisius” where “frater eius Philippus Senonensis archiepiscopus” was already buried[556].  His body was exhumed and transferred to Notre-Dame d’Ecouis, maybe dated to [1325/26], where his monument was destroyed during the French revolution[557].  Combault Auteuil notes that “André du Chesne...dans un mémoire MS où il parle d’Enguerran” stated that “depuis sa mort il y eut declaration pour son innocence[558]m firstly ([1289/95]) JEANNE, daughter of --- (-before 1305).  “Ingerrannus dominus de Marrigniaco miles et cambellanus...” founded Notre-Dame d’Ecouis, with the consent of “consortis mee Aelipdis” and in memory of “regine Johanne...ac Johanne prioris consortis mee defuncte”, by charter dated Jan 1311[559].  Père Anselme calls her “Jeanne de S. Martin” adding that she was “filleule de la reine Jeanne de Bourgogne [disproved by the Jun 1316 testament quoted below], auprès de laquelle elle avoit été élevée[560].  The primary source which confirms her family origin has not been identified, although it may be indicated by the following document assuming that Pierre’s relationship with Enguerrand de Marigny was by marriage: Pope Clement V granted dispensation to “Petro de Sancto Martino canonico ecclesie sancti Amati Duacensis, Attrebatensis dyocesis” for three years’ study while continuing to hold his ecclesiastical posts, at the request of “Ingerranni domini de Marrigniaco pro te nepote suo”, by charter dated 24 Aug 1313[561].  Louis X King of France, in his testament dated Jun 1316, bequeathed property to “Loys de Marreigni nostre filleul” in view of service provided to his mother by “Jeanne mere de Loys de Marreigni”, whose marriage to “Enguerran de Marreigni” the king’s mother had arranged, and considering “la grant infortune qui est avenue audit Loys et aux autres enfans[562]m secondly (before May 1305) HAWISE [Alix] de Mons[-sur-Seine], daughter of --- (-after 1348).  Philippe IV King of France granted property “in villis de Longavilla et de Longolio, ballivie Calentensis” to “Ingerrannus de Marrigniaco miles et cambellanus noster...suisque heredibus ab eodem et Hauvidi nunc uxorea sua procreatis et procreandis” by charter dated May 1305[563].  Her family origin is indicated by the 3 Jul 1310 charter quoted below.  Régnier suggests that “Mons” was “la seigneurie de Mons-sur-Seine[564].  “Ingerranus dominus de Marregniaco miles et Cambellanus...Philippi...Regis Francorum” founded Ecouis church, with the consent of “consortis meæ Ælipidis”, for the souls of “...Ioannæ prioris coniugis meæ”, by charter dated Jan 1310[565].  Charles Comte de Valois and his wife exchanged property with “Engerran de Marreigni chevalier et chambellene du roy de France...et a madame Havys sa femme” by charter dated 22 Jun 1310[566].  Philippe IV King of France confirmed that “Engerran de Marreigni nostre...chevalier et chambellene et Hays de Mons sa fame” had granted “la chastellenie de Guellefontaines...” to “Loys son ainzné fils né du mariage de lui et de Jehane jadis sa fame” by charter dated 3 Jul 1310[567].  “Ingerrannus dominus de Marrigniaco miles et cambellanus...” founded Notre-Dame d’Ecouis, with the consent of “consortis mee Aelipdis” and in memory of “regine Johanne...ac Johanne prioris consortis mee defuncte”, by charter dated Jan 1311[568].  She was named in the 1348 document cited below under her son Raoul.  Enguerrrand [II] & his first wife had [three or more] children: 

a)         LOUIS de Marigny ([1289/95]-1328).  His parentage is confirmed in his marriage contract dated 14 Dec 1309 quoted below, when Louis was still a minor.  Some indication of his age is provided by the following document: Philippe IV King of France notified the emancipation by “Ingerrannnus de Marreignyaco...cambellanus noster” of “Ludovicum primogenitum filium suum, uxoratum, majorem quatuordecim annis, minorem tamen vigintiuno” by charter dated 3 Jul 1310[569].  The wording of this document suggests the likelihood that Louis was born in the later part of the date range indicated above.  Philippe IV King of France confirmed that “Engerran de Marreigni nostre...chevalier et chambellene et Hays de Mons sa fame” had granted “la chastellenie de Guellefontaines...” to “Loys son ainzné fils né du mariage de lui et de Jehane jadis sa fame” by charter dated 3 Jul 1310[570].  “Yde dame de Croisilles, Loys de Marreigny et Roberte sa fame fille de ladite dame” appointed “monseigneur Guy d’Eskaencourt frere a moi dessus dite Ydain, monseigneur Gile de Clari, monseigneur Guillaume de Villers chevaliers et madame Jehanne fame dudit monseigneur Gile, sereur a moy devant dite Ydain” as proxies to request royal approval of a loan to Enguerrand de Marigny by charter dated 11 Nov 1311[571].  Louis X King of France, in his testament dated Jun 1316, bequeathed property to “Loys de Marreigni nostre filleul” in view of service provided to his mother by “Jeanne mere de Loys de Marreigni”, whose marriage to “Enguerran de Marreigni” the king’s mother had arranged, and considering “la grant infortune qui est avenue audit Loys et aux autres enfans[572]m (contract 14 Dec 1309) as her first husband, ROBERTE de Beaumetz, daughter of GILLES [IV] de Beaumetz & his wife Ida de Croisilles (-1352).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the following document: “Mahault comtesse d’Artois et de Bourgoigne...” attested the marriage contract between “Enguerran sire de Marigny et chambellan Monsieur le Roy de France...Louys ainsné filz dudict Monsieur Enguerran” and “Noble Dame Yde de Croisilles...Damoiselle Roberte fille jadis à Monsieur Gilles de Beaumez et de ladicte Madame Yde”, with the consent of “Noble Homme Robert chastelain de Bapaumes et Seigneur de Beaumez et de Madame Ysabel sa femme ayeul et ayeule de ladicte Damoiselle Roberte”, by charter dated 14 Dec 1309[573].  She married secondly ([1328]) as his second wife, Guy [IX] Mauvoisin Seigneur de RosnyThis second marriage is confirmed by a document of the Parlement de Paris dated 23 Nov 1336 which maintained security against “Louis de Marigny chevalier premier mari de la femme du sire de Rosny[574]Louis & his wife had [two children]: 

i)          IDE de Marigny (-Sep 1391, bur [Ecouis Notre-Dame]).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage, says that she was “fille unique” and “élevée auprês de la reine de Navarre”, adds that her uncles arranged her marriage in 1348, and that she died childless in Sep 1391[575].  Regnier indicates that the couple’s marriage contract was dated 19 Oct 1348[576].  If the marriage of her parents-in-law is correctly dated to [1334] (as suggested by Père Anselme), Ide must have been several years older than her husband.  Regnier quotes an 18th century genealogical note which indicates that Ide was buried at Notre-Dame d’Ecouis near [her great-uncle] Jean de Marigny Archbishop of Rouen[577].  He also cites a reference to her testament dated 25 May 1391, the text of which has apparently been lost[578].  Regnier cites an “arrêt du Parlement” dated 23 Dec 1394 concerning the succession of “Ide de Marigny” but provides no details[579]m (contract 19 Oct 1348) JEAN [III] de Melun, son of JEAN [II] de Melun Vicomte de Melun, Comte de Tancarville & his wife Jeanne Crespin (-13 Mar 1381).  He succeeded his father as Vicomte de Melun, Comte de Tancarville. 

ii)         [MARGUERITE de Marigny .  Père Anselme records her parentage (citing “A. du Chesne”, without any precise citation reference) and states that she married, as his first wife, Robert [IV] d’Harcourt Seigneur de Beaumesnil, son of Robert [III] d’Harcourt Seigneur de Beaumesnil & his wife Jeanne de Prunelay dame de Bullon[580].  However, Anselme records “Marguerite Mauvoisin...fille de Guy Mauvoisin seigneur de Rosny...et de Roberte de Baumés chastelaine de Bapaume” as Robert’s second wife which, if he was correct about the first marriage, would mean that she was his deceased first wife’s half-sister.  A Papal dispensation for such a second marriage would presumably have been difficult to obtain.  In addition, no indication has been found of the descendants of Robert [IV]’s first wife inheriting part of the Beaumetz properties from Roberte de Beaumetz, wife of Louis de Marigny.  Until a primary source comes to light, it is suggested that Marguerite’s supposed parentage and marriage should be treated with caution and the identity of the first wife of Robert [IV] d’Harcourt considered as unknown.] 

b)         [two or more] children (-after Jun 1316).  The other children of Enguerrand de Marigny are referred to in the testament of Louis X King of France quoted above and participated in the bequest to their brother Louis.  Their participation in this bequest, made in consideration of the service provided by Louis’s mother to the king’s mother, suggests that they too must have been born from Enguerrand’s first marriage.  The primary source which confirms the number of these children has not been identified. 

Enguerrand [II] & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

c)         ISABELLE de Marigny (before 1302-).  Philippe IV King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “Johanna domina de Tanquarvilla mater Guillelmi de Tanquarvilla filii quondam Roberti cambellani domini de Tanquarvilla...dicti Guillelmi” and “Ysabellem filiam...Ingerranni domini de Marrignyaco militis et cambellani nostri...qui ont ja passé sept ans”, naming “...monseigneur Drieu de Mellou pour lui et pour son pere, monseigneur Regnaut vidame d’Amiens, monseigneur Girart et Ferris ses freres, monseigneur Jehan Malet seigneur de Guerarville, Jehan et Guillaume ses fieus, Robert Bertran, monseigneur Guillaume Bertran...” as present for the marriage contract 23 Oct 1309, by charter dated 18 Nov 1309[581].  Her age indicated in this contract suggests that Isabelle could have been from either her father’s first or second marriage.  Philippe IV King of France confirmed the marriage in another charter dated Feb 1310[582].  Her second marriage is recorded by Père Anselme[583].  The primary source on which this information is based has not been identified.  m firstly (contract 23 Oct 1309, before Feb 1310) GUILLAUME de Tancarville, son of ROBERT de Tancarville & his wife Jeanne de Rosny.  m secondly HUGUES d’Auxy Seigneur de Dompierre, son of JEAN Seigneur d’Auxy & his wife Isabelle de Craon (-after 1337). 

Enguerrand [II] & his second wife had [two or more] children: 

d)         [two or more] children .  The existence of at least two children born to Enguerrand’s second marriage is confirmed by the following document:  Pope Clement V granted indulgence to “Ingerranno domino de Marrignyaco” to enable “uxori tue ac tuis et eius filiis ex te et ipsa natis...necnon illi quem ex quondam Johanna priore uxore tua” to be buried eventually at Notre-Dame d’Ecouis by charter dated 29 Dec 1312[584]

e)         RAOUL de Marigny (-after 1348).  Seigneur de Mons.  L’abbé Lebeuf (in 1739/43?) recorded that “Jacques de Pacy [qui] avoit un château à Ablon” settled a dispute with “Alix femme d’Enguerrand de Marigny et Raoul son fils, Seigneur de Mons” by charter dated 1348[585]

2.         PHILIPPE de Marigny (-1316, bur Carthusian church near Paris)Bishop of Cambrai 1306.  Archbishop of Sens 1309.  A continuator of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the dedication of the church of Ecouis by the Papal legate in 1313 in the presence of “deux freres d’Enguerran de Marigny, Philippes archevesque de Sens et Jean evesque de Beauvais[586].  A continuator of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1316 of “Philippo de Marigniaco fratre Engueranni...archiepiscopo Senonensis” and the succession of “Guillermus vicecomitis Melduni filius[587].  His place of burial is confirmed by the continuator of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis who records in 1317 that “circa idem tempus” the king permitted the burial of [his brother] “Engueranni suspensi” at “fratrum Carthusiensium juxta Parisius” where “frater eius Philippus Senonensis archiepiscopus” was already buried[588]

3.         JEAN de Marigny (-1351, bur Ecouis Notre-Dame)Bishop of Beauvais 1312.  A continuator of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1312 of “Simon prius Noviomensis sed nunc Belvacensis episcopus” and the succession of “Johannes de Marigniaco frater Engueranni cantor Parisiensis ecclesiæ[589].  A continuator of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the dedication of the church of Ecouis by the Papal legate in 1313 in the presence of “deux freres d’Enguerran de Marigny, Philippes archevesque de Sens et Jean evesque de Beauvais[590].  Philippe VI King of France noted that “Jean de Marregny evesque de Beauvez et Robert son frere” had bought property from “nostre...cousin le Dauphin de Vienne” and confirmed their purchase “pour considération des bons...services que nostre dit conseiller et Robert nous ont faits en nos guerres de Gascogne en la compagnie de nostre...fils” by charter dated 2 Mar 1340[591]Archbishop of Rouen [1346/47].  His ecclesiastical appointments are listed in his epitaph at Notre-Dame d’Ecouis[592]

4.         [two or more] daughters .  A charter dated 23 Mar 1306 records the settlement of his succession between “domina Petronilla de Bosco Galteri relicta...Philippi de Marrigniaco militis domini d’Escoyes defuncti et Petrus Oyseleti predicte relicte primogenitus ex predicti defuncti...procreatus pro aliis liberis minoribus ex ipsis similiter procreatis” and “Ingerrannus de Marreigniaco miles dominus de Media Villa predicti defuncti primogenitus pro se, fratre sororbusque suis germanis[593]

5.         ROBERT de Marigny .  Pope Clement V granted dispensation to “Roberti de Marrignyaco scolastici ecclesie Aurelianensis” for three [extended to seven by another similar document] years’ study while continuing to hold his ecclesiastical posts, at the request of “Ingerranni domini de Marrignyaco militis fratris sui, cambellani...regis...”, by charter dated 21 Apr 1312[594].  The reference to study suggests that Robert was still a youth at the time, so may have been his father’s youngest child by his first wife.  Philippe VI King of France noted that “Jean de Marregny evesque de Beauvez et Robert son frere” had bought property from “nostre...cousin le Dauphin de Vienne” and confirmed their purchase “pour considération des bons...services que nostre dit conseiller et Robert nous ont faits en nos guerres de Gascogne en la compagnie de nostre...fils” by charter dated 2 Mar 1340[595]

Philippe & his second wife had children: 

6.         PIERRE de Marigny Oyselet” .  A charter dated 23 Mar 1306 records the settlement of his succession between “domina Petronilla de Bosco Galteri relicta...Philippi de Marrigniaco militis domini d’Escoyes defuncti et Petrus Oyseleti predicte relicte primogenitus ex predicti defuncti...procreatus pro aliis liberis minoribus ex ipsis similiter procreatis” and “Ingerrannus de Marreigniaco miles dominus de Media Villa predicti defuncti primogenitus pro se, fratre sororbusque suis germanis[596]

7.         [two or more] children ([after 1290]-).  The existence of two or more other children born to Philippe’s second wife is confirmed by the document, all minors at the time: a charter dated 23 Mar 1306 records the settlement of his succession between “domina Petronilla de Bosco Galteri relicta...Philippi de Marrigniaco militis domini d’Escoyes defuncti et Petrus Oyseleti predicte relicte primogenitus ex predicti defuncti...procreatus pro aliis liberis minoribus ex ipsis similiter procreatis” and “Ingerrannus de Marreigniaco miles dominus de Media Villa predicti defuncti primogenitus pro se, fratre sororbusque suis germanis[597]

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAËNS

 

 

LAMBERT de Saint-Saëns, son of RICHARD Vicomte de Rouen & his wife --- .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...tertia” married “Richardo vicecomiti Rothomagensi, patri...Lamberti de Sancto Sidonio[598]

m ---.  The name of Lambert’s wife is not known. 

Lambert & his wife had one child: 

1.         HELIE de Saint-Saëns (-after 1128).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus dux" married "filiam suam…de pellice" to "Heliæ filio Lamberti de Sancto Sidonio", and granted him "Archas cum Buris et adjacente provincia" and apponted him to defend "Calegiique [error for Talegii?] comitatum", adding that he always remained loyal to Duke Robert under Kings William II and Henry I, braving persecution and disinheritance[599].  Henry I King of England entrusted him with the upbringing of his wife's half-brother Guillaume after his father was captured in 1106[600].   King Henry confiscated his castle and gave it to William de Warenne after Hélie fled with his ward whose arrest had been ordered by the king[601].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume granted him Montreuil-sur-Mer after his installation as Count of Flanders in Mar 1128[602]m [firstly] ([1087/90]) --- de Normandie, illegitimate daughter of ROBERT III Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- ([1072/78]-).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rodbertus dux" married "filiam suam…de pellice" to "Heliæ filio Lamberti de Sancto Sidonio", and granted him "Archas cum Buris et adjacente provincia"[603].  Her birth date range is estimated on the assumption that she was in her early teenage years when she married.  [m secondly ([1106]) --- of England, illegitimate daughter of HENRY I King of England & his mistress ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that King Henry I married "Heliæ Sancto Sidonio" to "filiam de pellice sibi natam" and granted him "Arcacensem comitatum"[604].  This passage echoes the earlier reference in the same source to the marriage of Hélie de Saint-Saëns to the illegitimate daughter of Robert III Duke of Normandy, brother of King Henry, and the grant to him of Arques[605].  It is possible that Orderic has been confused about this supposed second marriage, especially as in the former passage he emphasises that Hélie was always loyal to Duke Robert, and that the second passage does not refer to a second marriage.] 

 

 

2.         MATHILDE de Saint-Saëns (-after 1143).  King Stephen notified the right of "Mathild[is] de Sancto Sidonio cognate mea" to hold the manor of Stisted, Essex from the see of Canterbury by charter dated to [1143/52][606]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known.  They are not referred to as “de Saint-Saëns” in the charter which is quoted below.  However, Saint-Saëns is the object of the document and the name Hélie links with Hélie de Saint-Saëns who is named above. 

 

1.         MATHIEU [de Saint-Saëns] (-after 1150).  “Matheus” renounced claims “in ecclesia sancti Sydonii” in favour of Saint-Wandrille, and donated “decimam omnem furnorem istius ville et Osmundiuille”, by charter dated 1150, witnessed by “militum: Roberti, Radulphi, Nicolay, Helie quoque fratris Mathei...[607]

2.         HELIE (-after 1150).  “Matheus” renounced claims “in ecclesia sancti Sydonii” in favour of Saint-Wandrille, and donated “decimam omnem furnorem istius ville et Osmundiuille”, by charter dated 1150, witnessed by “militum: Roberti, Radulphi, Nicolay, Helie quoque fratris Mathei...[608]

 

 

1.         FELICIA de Saint-Saëns A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Hugonem”, son of Hugh, married “dominam Feliciam de sancto Sydonio[609]m HUGH [III] de Mortimer, son of HUGH [II] de Mortimer & his wife Matilda de Rumilly (-killed Warwick [1180]). 

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-VALERY

 

 

Le Prévost identifies Saint-Valéry as “Saint-Valéri-sur-Somme, dont les seigneurs n’étaient que les avoués de l’abbaye fondée par Clotaire en 613, et à laquelle la suzerainté du lieu appartenait”, adding that it was from this port that the fleet left to conquer England[610]

 

 

GILBERT, son of --- .  Avocat de Saint-Valéry.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gulbertus cognomento advocatus de Sancto Gualerico” married “filiam Ricardi ducis[611]

m PAPIA, illegitimate daughter of RICHARD I Comte [de Normandie] & his mistress ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Richard had two daughters “ex concubinis”, but does not name them[612].  It is not certain that Papia, wife of Gilbert de Saint-Valéry, was the daughter of Richard I.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Gulbertus cognomento advocatus de Sancto Gualerico” married “filiam Ricardi ducis[613]It is not clear from this text to which duke Richard he refers, but in a later passage the same source confirms her name Papia daughter of "Ricardi iunioris ducis Normannorum" (which does suggest that he too is referring to Duke Richard III)[614].  Some authors have taken this to refer to Duke Richard III, presumably inspired by Robert de Torigny who names "Papiam uxorem Walteri de Sanct Walerico et Aeliz uxorem Ranulfi vicecomitis de Baioeis" as the two daughters of Duke Richard III[615].  This is, however, chronologically impossible assuming that it is correct, as asserted by Orderic Vitalis[616], that Papia's grandson, Richard de Heugleville, helped Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in the 1054 rebellion when he was already old enough for Geoffroy de Neufmarché to be his son-in-law.  Neither of the passages in Orderic Vitalis names Papia's mother.  It is tempting to imagine that she was Duke Richard II's second wife of the same name.  However, it is also chronologically inconsistent with the 1054 references to Papia's grandson for Papia to have been the daughter of duke Richard II  Assuming that all this speculation is correct, Papia must have been born in the early years of the 11th century and therefore she must have been the daughter of Richard I. 

Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

1.         BERNARD [I] de Saint-Valéry .  Orderic Vitalis names “Bernardum patrem Gualterii de Sancto-Gualerico et Ricardum de Huglevilla” as the son of “Gulbertus cognomento advocatus de Sancto Gualerico” and his wife “filiam Ricardi ducis[617].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de S. Wallery" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[618]m ---.  The name of Bernard's wife is not known.  Bernard & his wife had two children: 

a)         GAUTHIER de Saint-Valéry (-after [1098]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Bernardum patrem Gualterii de Sancto-Gualerico et Ricardum de Huglevilla” as the son of “Gulbertus cognomento advocatus de Sancto Gualerico” and his wife “filiam Ricardi ducis[619].  Domesday Book records that “Walter de Saint-Valery” held Isleworth and Hampton in Middlesex; Creeting in Suffolk[620].  William of Tyre names "Walterius de Sancto Valerius Bernardusque filius eius" among those present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[621].  Murray suggests that Gauthier de Saint-Valéry and his son Bernard were the same persons who are named by Albert of Aix as "…Walterus de Domedart et eius filius Bernardus…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia[622], suggesting that "Domedart" indicates a toponym derived from the saint’s name "domnus Medardus" and that it could indicate Domart-en-Ponthieu[623].  Albert of Aix records "…Reinardus de Hamersbach, Walterus de Domedart" as those who guarded Adhémar Bishop of Le Puy into the mountains towards the port of Simeon after finding the holy lance, dated to mid-1098 from the context[624]m [HODIERNE [Ermesende] de Montlhéry, daughter of GUY "le Grand" Seigneur de Montlhéry & his wife Hodierne de Gometz-la-Ferté (-[25 Mar] ----).  The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Brayo et Guidonem Rubeum, Comitissam quoque Reiteste, et Bonam-vecinam de Pontibus, Elizabeth etiam uxorem Joscelini de Corteciniaco, insuper dominam de Puisat, et dominam de S. Galerico" as the children of "Guidonem" and his wife[625].  The identity of Hodierne’s husband is uncertain, but from a chronological point of view he could have been Gauthier.  The necrology of Longpont records the death "IX Kal Aug" of "Guido institutor hujus loci. Guido vicecomes; Adalaidis comitissa, uxor; Wido filius eius", a supplementary section adding a further reference to the anniversary of “donni Guidonis senioris hujus loci institutoris et Guidonis comitis filii eius...IX Kal Aug” as well as the anniversary of “donne Hodierne uxoris ipsius Guidonis senioris et Ermensendis de Sancto Galarico filie amborum...VII Kal Apr” with a reference to her visit to Cluny where “beato Hugoni abbati” gave her “calicem...aureum[626].  In another passage, the necrology of Longpont records the death "VIII Kal Apr" of "domine Hodierne de Sancto Galarico"[627].]  Gauthier & his wife had one child: 

i)          BERNARD [II] de Saint-Valéry .  William of Tyre names "Walterius de Sancto Valerius Bernardusque filius eius" among those present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[628].  Orderic Vitalis also names him as son of Gauthier, with whom he was present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[629]

-         see below

b)         RICHARD de Saint-Valéry .  Orderic Vitalis names “Bernardum patrem Gualterii de Sancto-Gualerico et Ricardum de Huglevilla”, adding that “Ricardus” fought for “duci Normanniæ avunculo...suo” who arranged his marriage to “nobilem Adam, Herluini senis de Huglevilla relictam, cum toto patrimonio eius[630].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardum de Huglevilla” built “super Sedam in vico qui olim Isnellivilla...burgum...Alfagium” [Auffay] and that “tempore Guillelmi juvenis, filii Rodberti ducis” Richard held out against “Guillelmus de Archis” and his rebels “in castello suo secus ecclesiam Sancti-Albini”, dated to [1054][631]m as her second husband, ADA, widow of HERLUIN de Heugleville, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis names “Bernardum patrem Gualterii de Sancto-Gualerico et Ricardum de Huglevilla”, adding that “Ricardus” fought for “duci Normanniæ avunculo...suo” who arranged his marriage to “nobilem Adam, Herluini senis de Huglevilla relictam, cum toto patrimonio eius[632].  Richard & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          GILBERT d'Auffay (-15 Aug 1087, bur Sainte-Marie d’Ouche).  Orderic Vitalis records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “Beatricis conjugis suæ”, dated 1079, witnessed by “Bernardus de Novo-Mercato...Rodbertus de Huglevilla...[633]

-         SEIGNEURS d’AUFFAY

ii)         ADA de Heugleville .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, soon after “Drogo nepos suus” [identified as Dreux de Neufmarché, her son] left military life and became a monk at Ouche[634].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardum de Huglevilla” held out against “Guillelmus de Archis” and his rebels “in castello suo secus ecclesiam Sancti-Albini” with the help of “Goisfredus gener eius et Hugo de Morio-Monte, Turchetilli de Novo-Mercato filii”, dated to [1054][635].  She is named as daughter of Richard by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her husband who helped his father-in-law during the rebellion of Guillaume d'Arques[636]m (before 1054) GEOFFROY de Neufmarché, son of TURCHETIL de Neufmarché & his wife ---. 

iii)        [ROBERT de Heugleville (-after 1079).  Orderic Vitalis records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, with the consent of “Beatricis conjugis suæ”, dated 1079, witnessed by “Bernardus de Novo-Mercato...Rodbertus de Huglevilla...[637].  “Rodbertus de Huglevilla” has not been identified.  Two possibilities: either he was the donor’s uterine brother by his mother’s first marriage or he was the donor’s full brother.] 

 

 

1.         RANULF de Saint-Valéry (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Ranulph de Saint-Valéry” holding Ranby, Great Sturton, Market Stainton, Burreth in Tupholme, Reepham and Scothern in Lincolnshire[638]

 

2.         HERBERT de Saint-Valéry (-[before 1130]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willelm filius Herberti de Sancto Walerico" and "Will fil Herb" in Wiltshire[639]m ---.  The name of Herbert’s wife is not known.  Herbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Saint-Valéry (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willelm filius Herberti de Sancto Walerico" and "Will fil Herb" in Wiltshire[640]

 

3.         [ROBERT de Saint-Valéry (-after 1144).  "Robertus de Sancto Walerico" recognised the rights of the bishops of Bayeux and Lisieux in land at Cheffreville by charter dated to [1144/52][641].  This is the only reference so far found for Robert de Saint-Valéry.  It is possible that "Robertus" in this document was an error for "Rainaldus".] 

 

 

BERNARD [II] de Saint-Valéry, son of GAUTHIER de Saint-Valéry & his wife --- .  William of Tyre names "Walterius de Sancto Valerius Bernardusque filius eius" among those present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[642].  Orderic Vitalis also names him as son of Gauthier, with whom he was present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[643].  Murray suggests that Gauthier de Saint-Valéry and his son Bernard were the same persons who are named by Albert of Aix as "…Walterus de Domedart et eius filius Bernardus…" among those who took part in the siege of Nikaia[644], suggesting that "Domedart" indicates a toponym derived from the saint’s name "domnus Medardus" and that it could indicate Domart-en-Ponthieu[645]Domesday Descendants records that "Bernard de Saint-Valéry and Dommard and Matilda comitissa" donated property to Berteaucourt[646].  The primary source which confirms that he was the same person as the Bernard de Saint-Valéry named by William of Tyre and Orderic Vitalis has not yet been identified. 

m [as her second husband,] MATHILDE, [widow of --- Comte,] daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants records that "Bernard de Saint-Valéry and Dommard and Matilda comitissa" donated property to Berteaucourt[647].  It is likely that Mathilde retained her title "comitissa" after the death of a first husband who was comte, although the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified. 

Bernard [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         RENAUD [I] de Saint-Valéry (-5 Aug [after 1163]).  According to Domesday Descendants, Renaud de Saint-Valéry was the son of "Bernard de Saint-Valéry and grandson of Domesday’s Walter de Saint-Valéry" but no corresponding primary source is cited[648].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire records that King Stephen granted illi de Kingswode Haseldene…terras Reginaldo de sancto Walerico” to "Johanne de sancto Johanne", in the early years of his reign[649].  Steward [Dapifer] of Normandy from [1146] to [1153].  "…Raginaldo de Sancto Walerico dapiffero…" witnessed the charter dated to [1146/50] under which "G. dux Norm et comes And et H. filius eius" confirmed the rights of the abbey of Fécamp[650].  "…Raginaldo de Sancto Walerico…" witnessed the charter dated to [1151/52] under which Henri Duke of Normandy ordered an enquiry about "la banlieue de Cambremer" with a view to its use being transferred to Bayeux abbey as it had been in the time of "Ricardus filius Sansonis" [Richard de Douvres] during the reign of King Henry I[651].  "…Rainaldo de Sancto Walerico dapifero meo…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" donated property to the abbey of Mortemer[652].  Henry Duke of Normandy confirmed a donation to Fontevraud abbey by "Raginaldus de Santo Walerico…sive filius eius Bernardus" to Fontevraud abbey, in the presence of "patris mei et mea fratrisque mei Willelmi" and with the consent of "Bernardus eius filius", by charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] witnessed by "…Mathilde amita mea Fontis Ebraudi abbatissa"[653].  The cartulary of Cercamp includes a charter of Bernard de Saint-Valéry which recalls the pilgrimage of "pater meus" (Renaud [I] de Saint-Valéry) to Jerusalem"[654].  Renaud [I] de Saint-Valéry is recorded in one source as Lord of Harenc, but it is not at all clear that this can be correct.  The precise date of Renaud’s arrival in Palestine is not known.  "…Rainaudus de S. Valerio…" witnessed the charter dated 1159 under which Mélisende Queen of Jerusalem donated property to the leprosarium of St Lazarus[655].  "…Rainaldus de S. Gallerico…" witnessed the charter dated 1160 under which "Hugo de Ybelino dominus Ramathensis" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem[656].  Other sources name Renaud [I] de Saint-Valéry in England and France between [1160/61] and 1163, suggesting that he left Palestine soon after witnessing the charter dated 1160.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Reginaldus de Sancto Valerico c m - l milites" in Oxfordshire in [1160/61][657], and "Reginaldo de Sancto Valerico i m" in Berkshire in [1161/62][658] (although these entries do not prove that he was present in England at the time).  "…Raginaldo de Sancto Walerico…" witnessed a charter dated 1162 under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Hogues to Fécamp abbey[659].  Robert de Torigny records that "Rotrocus episcopus Ebroicensis et Rainaldus de Sancto Walerio" recognised the rights of Henry II King of England in Normandy in 1163[660].  Henry II King of England addressed a writ to "R[otrou] bishop of Evreux and R[eginald] de Sancto Walerico" confirming the possession of the church of Lion by the canons of Briweton[661].  In contrast to this, we have a single primary source which indicates that Renaud de Saint-Valéry was Lord of Harenc in 1158:  Robert de Torigny records that "Balduinus rex Jerosolimitanus" captured "Cæsaream magnam Palestinæ" near Antioch, and also "castrum Harenc", adding that he granted the latter to "Rainaldo de Sancto Valerico", dated to 1158 from the context[662].  This source contradicts the Chronicle of Patriarch Michel le Grand which records that "Hérim" was captured by "le roi de Jérusalem" who gave it "au fils de Djoslin qui portait le même nom que son père et qui était héritier de Romgla" [referring to Joscelin [III] de Courtenay, son of Joscelin [II] Count of Edessa], adding that the latter ravaged Aleppo in revenge for the death of his father but after two years was captured and died in chains (although the sources quoted in  EDESSA indicate that Joscelin [III] did not die at the time)[663].  William of Tyre does not help much in resolving the conflict between the two texts as he records that Baudouin King of Jerusalem besieged and recaptured "castrum urbi Antiochiæ vicinum" (which is not named in the text, but named "castrum Harenc" in the heading of the relevant chapter) and records that the king restored it to "domino principi, cuius jurisdictionis fuerat", the old French text specifying that "li rois bailla le chastel au conte Renaut, por ce qu’il devoit estre de sa princée" (presumably indicating Renaud de Châtillon Prince of Antioch, as the suzerain of the area), dated to 1157 from the context[664].  However, the History of Kamel-Altevarykh dates the capture of Joscelin [III] de Courtenay to 1164 when it records that "au mois de ramadhan Nour-eddin Mahmoud" conquered "le château de Harem" from the Franks and that "le prince Boémond souverain d’Antioche, le comte, maître de Tripoli…le fils de Josselin…et le duc" were captured[665].  If this date is correct, Joscelin probably held Harenc until its capture by Nur ed-Din, which leaves no room at all for Renaud de Saint-Valéry to have been lord of Harenc.  There appears no way of reconciling these texts other than by suggesting that Robert de Torigny was in error and that he had meant to indicate Renaud de Châtillon Prince of Antioch when he named Renaud de Saint-Valéry.  This would be surprising, as otherwise Robert de Torigny appears to be an accurate and reliable source, although it would provide the link to William of Tyre who, as noted above, indicates that the castle was returned to Renaud de Châtillon.  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "5 Aug" of "Reginaldus de Sancto Walarico et eius uxor"[666]m [firstly] ---.  The name of Renaud’s [first] wife is not not known.  A possible origin is suggested by the charter dated to [1191/1205] under which her grandson "Thomas de Sancto Walerico" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Tettebyr" to Eynsham abbey made by "R. de Sancto Walerico avi mei", and of "terram de Fines-stokes…ex dono Radulfi Basset et ex concessione R. avi mei"[667].  This document suggests a relationship with Ralph Basset (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY).  It appears unlikely that the mother of Renaud [I] de Saint-Valéry, titled "comitissa", would have been the daughter of such an obscure noble.  The other possibility is that Renaud [I] confirmed the donation to Eynsham in the name of his wife.  m [secondly] ---.  The name of Renaud’s [second] wife is not not known.  The chronology of Renaud’s known children suggests that he married twice: his daughter [Beatrix] died before 1144, whereas his daughter Laure was not married until after 1162.  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "5 Aug" of "Reginaldus de Sancto Walarico et eius uxor"[668]Renaud [I] & his [first] wife had four children: 

a)         BERNARD [III] de Saint-Valéry (-[17 Sep] 1191).  Henry Duke of Normandy confirmed a donation to Fontevraud abbey by "Raginaldus de Santo Walerico…sive filius eius Bernardus" to Fontevraud abbey, in the presence of "patris mei et mea fratrisque mei Willelmi" and with the consent of "Bernardus eius filius", by charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] witnessed by "…Mathilde amita mea Fontis Ebraudi abbatissa"[669].   

-        see below

b)         GAUTHIER de Saint-Valéry (-1171).  Domesday Descendants names "Bernard, Walter later archdeacon of Rouen (d. 1171) and Guy" as the three sons of Renaud de Saint-Valéry, citing the cartulary of Oseney abbey for Gauthier[670].  Archdeacon of Rouen. 

c)         GUY de Saint-Valéry (-after [1183]).  Domesday Descendants names "Bernard, Walter later archdeacon of Rouen (d. 1171) and Guy" as the three sons of Renaud de Saint-Valéry but does not cite the corresponding primary sources on which this information is based[671].  "…Widone de Sancto Walerico…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[672].  "…Widone de Sancto Walerico" subscribed the charter dated to [1183/89] under which Henry II King of England confirmed income from the prévôté de Valognes and the forest of Brix for the hospital de la Madeleine[673]

d)         [BEATRIX] de Saint-Valéry (-before 13 Feb 1144, bur Abbaye de Saint-Jean)Domesday Descendants records that the daughter of Renaud de Saint-Valéry was the mother of "Gerard II de Picquigny vidame d’Amiens", presumably indicating Gérard [II], and cites the cartulary of Oseney[674].  The chronology for this connection does not appear ideal, assuming that the dates of the members of the Picquigny family are accurately recorded in the present document.  However, a connection (maybe a family relationship) between the Saint-Valéry and Picquigny families is shown by the letter written by Pope Alexander III to Henri Archbishop of Reims, dated 29 Mar 1154, to enforce reparations from "vicedominus Pinciniaco, Bern. de S. Walerico et Gualterius Tyrellus" for the damage which they had caused to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Selincourt[675]The wife of Guermond [I] is called Beatrix in secondary sources but the primary source on which this is based, as well as the source which records her date of death and place of burial which are shown above, has not yet been identified.  m GUERMOND [I] de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens, son of --- (-after 1131).]  

Renaud [I] & his [second] wife had one child: 

e)         LAURE de Saint-Valéry Domesday Descendants records that Renaud de Saint-Valéry was the father of "Laura wife first of John count of Ponthieu, by whom she was repudiated, and secondly of Alleaume de Fontaines", but does not cite the corresponding primary sources[676]m [firstly] (after 1162, [repudiated before 1170]) as his second wife, JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu, son of GUY [II] Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Ida --- (-Acre 30 Jun 1191).  [m secondly ALLEAUME de Fontaines, son of ---.] 

 

 

BERNARD [III] de Saint-Valéry, son of RENAUD [I] de Saint-Valéry & his wife --- (-[17 Sep] 1191).  Henry Duke of Normandy confirmed a donation to Fontevraud abbey by "Raginaldus de Santo Walerico…sive filius eius Bernardus" to Fontevraud abbey, in the presence of "patris mei et mea fratrisque mei Willelmi" and with the consent of "Bernardus eius filius", by charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] witnessed by "…Mathilde amita mea Fontis Ebraudi abbatissa"[677]Pope Alexander III wrote to Henri Archbishop of Reims 29 Mar 1154 to enforce reparations from "vicedominus Pinciniaco, Bern. de S. Walerico et Gualterius Tyrellus" for the damage which they had caused to the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Selincourt[678]"…Bernardo de Sancto Walerico…" subscribed the charter dated to [1155/58] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of the monastery of Westwood, belonging to Fontevraud, by "Osbertus filius Hugonis et Eustachia de Say mater sua"[679].  The date of this charter coincides with the journey to Jerusalem of Bernard’s father, and suggests that the latter had delegated control over his lands to his son during his absence.  The cartulary of Cercamp includes a charter of Bernard de Saint-Valéry which recalls the pilgrimage of "pater meus" to Jerusalem"[680].  Henry II King of England confirmed the donations of "molendina de Hortona et de Suttona et…de Chentona…Toicheham" to Berteaucourt abbey by "Bernardus de Sancto Valarico…et…Raginaldus filius ipsius" by charter dated [1156 or 1172/73], witnessed by "Bernardo de Sancto Valarico…"[681].  “Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated the manor of "Wulgariscote" to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Avoridis et filiorum meorum Reginaldi, Bernardi et Thomæ", confirmed by Henry II King of England, by undated charter[682].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Bernardus de Sancto Valerico 1 l per Hugonem de Sancto Germano" in Oxfordshire in [1171/72][683].  "Bern de Sancto Walerico" subscribed the charter dated to [May 1175/Mar 1182] under which Henry II King of England confirmed possessions of the abbey of Saint-Valéry[684].  "…Bernardo de Sancto Walerico…" subscribed the charter dated Feb 1187 under which Henry II King of England granted duty exemptions to the Cistercians of Dunes[685].  "…Bernardo de Sancto Walerico…" subscribed the charter dated 11 Mar 1186 under which "M…regina Angl, soror Philippi regis Franc" renounced her rights over Gisors[686].  [The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "17 Sep" of "Bernardus de Sancto Walerico" and his donation of "x marchas argenti" to the church[687].  It is not known to which Bernard this entry refers.] 

m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-[1151]).  Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated property to Stodely Nunnery, Oxfordshire, for the souls of “Matildis uxoris meæ…et pro meipso et uxore mea Alanora et pro liberis meis” by undated charter[688]Domesday Descendants states that she "died around 1151" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[689]

m secondly ANORA [Avoris], daughter of --- (-after 1194).  “Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated the manor of "Wulgariscote" to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Avoridis et filiorum meorum Reginaldi, Bernardi et Thomæ", confirmed by Henry II King of England, by undated charter[690].  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Thomas de sancto Walerico” confirmed the donation by "Bernardus bonæ memoriæ pater meus" made to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire with the consent of Henry II King of England, for the souls of “Edelæ uxoris meæ et Bernardi patris meæ et Anoræ matris meæ[691].  “Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated property to Stodely Nunnery, Oxfordshire, for the souls of “Matildis uxoris meæ…et pro meipso et uxore mea Alanora et pro liberis meis” by undated charter[692].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Anora de Sancto Walerico…pro habenda rationabili dote sua de terra que fuit Bernardo de Sancto Walerico viri sui in Anglia et Norm" in London & Middlesex[693]

Bernard [III] & his [second] wife had [six] children: 

1.         RENAUD de Saint-Valéry (-[1189/91]).  “Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated the manor of "Wulgariscote" to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Avoridis et filiorum meorum Reginaldi, Bernardi et Thomæ", confirmed by Henry II King of England, by undated charter[694].  Henry II King of England confirmed the donations of "molendina de Hortona et de Suttona et…de Chentona…Toicheham" to Berteaucourt abbey by "Bernardus de Sancto Valarico…et…Raginaldus filius ipsius" by charter dated [1156  or 1172/73], witnessed by "Bernardo de Sancto Valarico…"[695].  A charter of Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire including the donation by “Reginaldi de sancto Walerico” of the mill at "Wolgaricote", by undated charter[696]Betrothed (before 1178) to ADELA de Ponthieu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Beatrix de Saint-Pol (-after 18 Oct 1241).  Letters dated 1178 confirm the marriage of "comes Pontivi filiam suam Edelam" and "Renaldo filio Bernardi de Sancto Walerico", with the right of substitution in case either party died before the marriage[697].  The death of Renaud before the marriage took place is indicated by the charter dated 1205 under which "Thomas de Sancto Walarico" promised service to "fratrem meum et dominum Willelmum comitem Pontivi"[698]

2.         BERNARD de Saint-Valéry (-before 21 Oct 1190).  “Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated the manor of "Wulgariscote" to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Avoridis et filiorum meorum Reginaldi, Bernardi et Thomæ", confirmed by Henry II King of England, by undated charter[699].  A letter dated 21 Oct 1190, recording the arrival of the archbishop of Canterbury at Tyre, names “...Bernardus junior de Sanwaleri...” among those who had died [in Palestine][700]

3.         THOMAS de Saint-Valéry (-before 1220).  “Bernardus de sancto Walerico” donated the manor of "Wulgariscote" to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "uxoris meæ Avoridis et filiorum meorum Reginaldi, Bernardi et Thomæ", confirmed by Henry II King of England, by undated charter[701].  “Thomas de sancto Walerico” confirmed the donation by "Bernardus bonæ memoriæ pater meus" made to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire with the consent of Henry II King of England, for the souls of “Edelæ uxoris meæ et Bernardi patris meæ et Anoræ matris meæ”, by undated charter[702].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Thomas de Sancto Valerico" paying "xx s, i militem" in Hampshire[703].  "Thomas de Sancto Walerico" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Tettebyr" to Eynsham abbey made by "R. de Sancto Walerico avi mei", and of "terram de Fines-stokes…ex dono Radulfi Basset et ex concessione R. avi mei", by charter dated to [1191/1205][704].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Thomas de Sancto Walerico" held "Thornton, sed caput est alibi"[705].  The agreement between "dominum comitem Pontivi et Monstreoli" and "dominum Thomam de Sancto Waleriaco" is confirmed by charter dated Sep 1209[706].  An agreement dated 1209 between "dominum comitem" and "dominum Thomam de Sancto Walerico" refers to the marriage of the latter to "domine Edle sororis sue" and also names "Bernardus pater suus"[707].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Sancto Walerico" holding one half of one knight’s fee "in Cretinge, quam Walterus de Bulonia tenet de eo" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][708]m ([1191/92]) ADELA de Ponthieu, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Beatrix de Saint-Pol (-after 18 Oct 1241).  Letters dated 1178 confirm the marriage of "comes Pontivi filiam suam Edelam" and "Renaldo filio Bernardi de Sancto Walerico", with the right of substitution in case either party died before the marriage[709].  The death of Renaud before the marriage took place is indicated by the charter dated 1205 under which "Thomas de Sancto Walarico" promised service to "fratrem meum et dominum Willelmum comitem Pontivi"[710].  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her husband “Thomas de sancto Walerico” confirmed the donation by "Bernardus bonæ memoriæ pater meus" made to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire with the consent of Henry II King of England, for the souls of “Edelæ uxoris meæ et Bernardi patris meæ et Anoræ matris meæ[711].  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         ELEONORE de Saint-Valéry (1192-15 Nov 1250).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter of Stodely Nunnery, Oxfordshire which records donations by Robertus comes Drocarum et dominus de sancto Walerico et Alanora uxor eiusdem comitis filia et hæres Thomæ de sancto Walerico” Dec 1226, and after her husband’s death by “Alanora comitissa Drocarum et domina de sancto Walerico” in Aug 1234[712]Dame de Saint-Valéry.  A charter dated Dec 1220 issued by "Robertus comes Drucocensis, dominus Sancti Walerici et…Aaenors uxor eiusdem" relates to rights of navigation[713].  “Henricus dominus Soyliaci” acknowledged owing “quatuor millia librarum Parisiensium” to Louis IX King of France for the repurchase of “comitatus Drocensis et terre…uxoris mee comitisse Drocensis” by charter dated Jan [1238/39][714].  “Henricus de Soliaco dominus et Aanor comitissa Drocarum et domina Sancti-Walerici uxor mea” recorded their agreement with “Johannem filium Roberti condam comitis Drocarum”, including “super ballio duorum fratrum suorum iuniorem...Roberti et Petri” and “hereditate...in possessione...Robertus pater suus”, by charter dated 27 Apr 1240[715].  The necrology of the Frères Prêcheurs de Chartres records the death "15 Nov" of "Aanor comitissa Drocarum et domina Sancti Valerici"[716]m firstly (1210) ROBERT [III] "Gasteblé" Comte de Dreux et de Braine, son of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux & his second wife Yolande de Coucy (1185-Braine 3 Mar 1234, bur Braine).  m secondly (1237) as his second wife, HENRI [I] Seigneur de Sully, son of ARCHAMBAUD [IV] Seigneur de Sully & his [first/second/third] wife --- (-after 1248). 

4.         HENRI de Saint-Valéry (-after 1223).  Domesday Descendants names "Henry" as a younger son of Bernard [III] de Saint-Valéry, citing a charter dated 1191[717].  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Henricus de Sancto Walerico" dated [May] 1217[718].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Henricus de S. Walerico" against "Stephanum de Wlurichestona" concerning "terre…in Hectona"[719]

5.         MATHILDE de Saint-Valéry (-Corfe Castle 1210).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre names "fille fu Bernart de Saint-Waleri…Mehaus" as the wife of "Guillaumes de Brayouse", commenting that she once boasted about her cows to "Bauduin le conte d’Aubemalle son neveu"[720].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Matildis de S. Walerico, quondam uxoris Willielmi de Brewes” when recording the marriage of her daughter[721].  "Willelmus de Braosa dominus de Brechen" donated property to Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Matildis de Sancto Walerico et puerorum nostrorum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Willelmo et Philippo filiis meis"[722].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Matildis matrona nobilis cognomento de la Haie, uxor Willelmi de Braose” was captured with “Willelmo filio suo milite…in Galwaitha” in 1210 and starved to death “apud Windeshores[723].  Matthew Paris records that "uxorem Willelmi de Brause et Willelmum filium eius cum uxore sua" were captured in 1210 at the siege of Meath, but escaped, were captured again “in insula de May”, and imprisoned at Windsor, in a later passage recording that all four died “apud Windleshores[724].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that Mathildis uxor eius et Willielmus filius eorum” (referring to William, son of Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”) were imprisoned by King John and died in prison[725].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmum de Brause juniorem et sororem eius et Matildam matrem eius” were captured in Ireland in 1210 by King John, adding that they later died in prison[726].  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Mehaus sa feme [Guillaumes de Braiouse] et Guillaumes ses fils" fled from King John to Ireland where they were captured at "le castiel de Cracfergu", taken to England, and imprisoned at "el castiel del Corf" where they were starved to death[727].  The question whether "Mathilde de Saint-Valéry" and "Mathilde de la Haie" refer to the same person appears to be resolved by the 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre which records her parentage and the circumstances of her death in the same lengthy passage.  m ([1170/75]) WILLIAM [III] de Briouse, son of WILLIAM [II] de Briouse Lord of Abergavenny, Briouse, Bramber, Brecon and Over-Gwent & his wife Bertha of Hereford (-Corbeil 9 Apr 1211, bur Paris, Saint-Victor). 

6.         [PHILIPPA (-after 1181).  “Bernard de Sancto Walerico” donated property to “the lady Philippa nun of Fontevrault”, with the consent of "his sons Renald and Bernard and his other boys", for the souls of "…Aanoris his wife", by charter dated 1181[728]Domesday Descendants suggests that Bernard [III de Saint-Valéry was "possibly father or brother of Philippa"[729].] 

 

 

 

H.      SEIGNEURS de TANCARVILLE

 

 

1.         RAOUL [I] de Tancarville .  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Tancarville" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[730]m AVICE, daughter of ---.  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[731].  It is possible that she was the sister of Eudes Stigand, as shown by the charter of Henry I King of England, dated 1129, which confirmed an earlier donation to the abbey of Sainte-Barbe by "Odo Stigandus", at the request of "Guillelmi camerarii de Tancarvilla […nepos supradicti Odonis Stigandi] et Rabelli filii sui"[732].  Raoul [I] & his wife had three children: 

a)         RAOUL de Tancarville .  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[733]

b)         NEEL de Tancarville .  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[734]

c)         GUILLAUME [I] de Tancarville (-1129).  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[735].  "…Willo de Tancvilla…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[736].  Henry I King of England confirmed an earlier donation to the abbey of Sainte-Barbe by "Odo Stigandus", at the request of "Guillelmi camerarii de Tancarvilla […nepos supradicti Odonis Stigandi] et Rabelli filii sui", by charter dated 1129[737].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Savigny abbey, including the donation by "Guillelmi camerarii de Tancharvilla" of "landam de Tor", by charter dated to [1156/58][738].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Barbe-en-Auge, including donations by "Rabelli Camerarii…Willelmus camerarius pater eius…Willelmi Camerarii filii Rabelli", by charter dated to [1185/89][739]m MATHILDE d’Arques, daughter of GUILLAUME d’Arques & his wife Beatrix Malet.  Guillaume de Jumièges records "Mathildis" as the daughter of “Willelmi de Archis”, adding that she married “Willelmus camerarius de Tancarvilla” by whom she had “filium Rabellum qui ei successit[740].  Guillaume [I] & his wife had three children: 

i)          RABEL de Tancarville (-1140).  Guillaume de Jumièges records "Mathildis" as the daughter of “Willelmi de Archis”, adding that she married “Willelmus camerarius de Tancarvilla” by whom she had “filium Rabellum qui ei successit[741]

-         see below

ii)         ROBERT de Tancarville .  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[742]

iii)        LUCY de Tancarville ).  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[743].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   m WILLIAM de Vernon, son of RICHARD Seigneur de Reviers & his wife Adelise Peverel (-[16 Jun] after [1147]). 

 

 

RABEL de Tancarville, son of GUILLAUME [I] de Tancarville & his wife Mathilde d’Arques (-1140).  Guillaume de Jumièges records "Mathildis" as the daughter of “Willelmi de Archis”, adding that she married “Willelmus camerarius de Tancarvilla” by whom she had “filium Rabellum qui ei successit[744].  Guillaume chamberlain confirmed the donation to the abbey of St Georges de Bocherville by Raoul, chief chamberlain of William I King of England, and his sons Raoul, Nigel and Guillaume, and their mother Avicia, with the consent of his sons Rabel and Robert and Lucy, recorded in a charter of Henry I King of England dated 1114[745].  "Rabel fils de Guillaume, chambellan de Tancarville, qui avait épousé Agnès, héritière des biens du fondateur de ce prieuré" confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sainte-Barbe and its possession of all its lands "de la Dive", by charter dated 1128[746].  Henry I King of England confirmed an earlier donation to the abbey of Sainte-Barbe by "Odo Stigandus", at the request of "Guillelmi camerarii de Tancarvilla […nepos supradicti Odonis Stigandi] et Rabelli filii sui", by charter dated 1129[747].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rabeli de Tancvilla" in Wiltshire[748].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Barbe-en-Auge, including donations by "Rabelli Camerarii…Willelmus camerarius pater eius…Willelmi Camerarii filii Rabelli", by charter dated to [1185/89][749]

m firstly TIPHAINE de Penthièvre, daughter of ETIENNE de Bretagne Comte de Penthièvre & his wife Havise de Guingamp.  The Testa de Nevill records that "Coleby" in Lincolnshire previously belonged "de honore Britannie" and was granted "in maritagio cum Thephania filia comitis Stephani" and later "in maritagio cum Oliva sorore Willelmi camerarii de Tancarville"[750].    

m secondly ---.  The name of Rabel’s second wife is not known. 

Rabel & his first wife had one child: 

1.         OLIVE de Tancarville .  The Testa de Nevill records that "Coleby" in Lincolnshire previously belonged "de honore Britannie" and was granted "in maritagio cum Thephania filia comitis Stephani" and later "in maritagio cum Oliva sorore Willelmi camerarii de Tancarville"[751].  The name of Olive’s husband is not specified.  Domesday Descendants names "Oliva de Tancarville, daughter of Rabel and Theophania de Richmond" as the wife of William [II] Malet[752].  However, the chronology for this marriage is not ideal.  The birth of Olive’s maternal grandfather is estimated to [1058/62].  His daughter was therefore probably born in [1080/1100], and Olive in [1095/1115].  On the other hand, William [II] Malet is first named in a charter dated Sep 1101 when he was presumably already adult, and no mention of him has been found after [1117/21].  Stapleton suggests that Olive may have been the mother of Guillaume Malet de Graville (see below) which appears to provide a better chronological fit[753].  [m WILLIAM [II] Malet, son of [ROBERT [I] Mallet & his wife Matilda ---] (-after [1117/21]) or m MATTHEW de Graville, son of --- (-after 1172).] 

Rabel & his second wife had one child:  

2.         GUILLAUME [II] de Tancarville (-[Nov 1190/1191]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "camerarius de Tanquarville" with 10 knights and 18 knights in his own service[754].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Barbe-en-Auge, including donations by "Rabelli Camerarii…Willelmus camerarius pater eius…Willelmi Camerarii filii Rabelli", by charter dated to [1185/89][755].  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his son "Raoul, Chamberlain de Tancarville, fils de Guillaume, Chamberlain" confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sainte-Barbe by "Rabel le Chambellan son aïeul"[756]m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL [II] de Tancarville (-before 1204).  "Raoul, Chamberlain de Tancarville, fils de Guillaume, Chamberlain" confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sainte-Barbe by "Rabel le Chambellan son aïeul" by undated charter[757]m ---.  The name of Raoul’s wife is not known.  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

b)         GUILLAUME [III] de Tancarville (-after 1214)"Willelmus camerarius de Tancharvilla, filius Rabelli" confirmed the purchase of land at Bretteville from the church of Bayeux, with the consent of "Willelmum filium meum", by charter dated to [1182/1205][758]

-        see below

c)         MARSILIE de Tancarville (-after 1205).  Philippe II King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “Guillelmus cambellanus de Tancarvilla...Isabella filia sua” and “Adæ filio...Galterii junioris camerarii nostri” by charter dated 1205, which provided for an increase in the dowry if Guillaume de Tancarville had no male heir “ex Alliz uxore sua” and if “Marsilia sororia ipsius” died[759]

 

 

GUILLAUME [III] de Tancarville, son of GUILLAUME [II] de Tancarville & his wife Alix de Séran (-after 1214).  "Willelmus camerarius de Tancharvilla, filius Rabelli" confirmed the purchase of land at Bretteville from the church of Bayeux, with the consent of "Willelmum filium meum", by charter dated to [1182/1205][760].  "Guillaume Chambellan de Tancarville" donated land "à Iz" to the priory of Sainte-Barbe, at the request of "Alix sa femme", by undated charter witnessed by "Guillaume de Séran, frère de la dite Alix"[761]

m ALIX de Serans, daughter of ---.  "Guillaume Chambellan de Tancarville" donated land "à Iz" to the priory of Sainte-Barbe, at the request of "Alix sa femme", by undated charter witnessed by "Guillaume de Séran, frère de la dite Alix"[762].  Philippe II King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “Guillelmus cambellanus de Tancarvilla...Isabella filia sua” and “Adæ filio...Galterii junioris camerarii nostri” by charter dated 1205, which provided for an increase in the dowry if Guillaume de Tancarville had no male heir “ex Alliz uxore sua” and if “Marsilia sororia ipsius” died[763]

Guillaume [III] & his wife had two children: 

1.         ISABELLE de Tancarville (-[1214]).  Philippe II King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “Guillelmus cambellanus de Tancarvilla...Isabella filia sua” and “Adæ filio...Galterii junioris camerarii nostri” by charter dated 1205, which provided for an increase in the dowry if Guillaume de Tancarville had no male heir “ex Alliz uxore sua” and if “Marsilia sororia ipsius” died[764]m (1205) as his first wife, ADAM [I] de Villebéon, son of GAUTHIER [II] Seigneur de Villebéon & his wife Elisabeth --- ([1183/85]-28 Jan 1235, bur Jard). 

2.         RAOUL [III] de Tancarville (after 1205-).  m ---.  The name of Raoul’s wife is not known.  Raoul [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME [IV] de Tancarville (-after 1268).  m AUDE, daughter of ---.  Guillaume [IV] & his wife had three children: 

i)          RAOUL [IV] de Tancarville (-[21 Sep 1275/1283]). 

ii)         GUILLAUME [V] de Tancarville (-after 1285). 

iii)        ROBERT de Tancarville (-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302).  The Chronique Artésienne records “li camberlens de Tancarvile” among those killed at the battle of Courtrai 11 Jul 1302[765]m JEANNE Mauvoisin, daughter of GUY [VII] Mauvoisin Seigneur de Mello & his wife Isabelle de Mello (-after Feb 1310).  She is named in the marriage contract of her son:  Philippe IV King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “Johanna domina de Tanquarvilla mater Guillelmi de Tanquarvilla filii quondam Roberti cambellani domini de Tanquarvilla...dicti Guillelmi” and “Ysabellem filiam...Ingerranni domini de Marrignyaco militis et cambellani nostri...qui ont ja passé sept ans” by charter dated 18 Nov 1309[766]Her family origin is indicated in the following document:  Philippe IV King of Francer granted “le bailh et toute la garde des enfans de Robert jadis chambellane de Tanquarville chevalier”, noting specifically “[le] mariage de Guillaume ainzné fieus dudit Robert”, to “Engerran de Marreigni nostre...chevalier et chambellene”, reserving the assets of “Jehanne de Roony, femme jadis dudit Robert”, by charter dated Feb 1310[767]Thomas indicates her precise parentage, adding that she was her father’s oldest daughter[768].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

(a)       JEANNE de Tancarville (-before 1327)m ([1316]) as his first wife, JEAN [I] Vicomte de Melun, son of ADAM de Melun Seigneur de Montreuil-Belloy & his wife Jeanne de Sully (-11 Mar 1359).  Comte de Tancarville. 

(b)       GUILLAUME [VI] de Tancarville (before 1302-)Philippe IV King of Francer granted “le bailh et toute la garde des enfans de Robert jadis chambellane de Tanquarville chevalier”, noting specifically “[le] mariage de Guillaume ainzné fieus dudit Robert”, to “Engerran de Marreigni nostre...chevalier et chambellene”, reserving the assets of “Jehanne de Roony, femme jadis dudit Robert”, by charter dated Feb 1310[769]m (contract 23 Oct 1309, before Feb 1310) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Marigny, daughter of ENGUERRAND [II] Seigneur de Marigny, Chambellan de France & his [first wife Jeanne ---/second wife Hawise [Alix] de Mons[-sur-Seine]] (before 1302-).  Philippe IV King of France confirmed the marriage contract between “Johanna domina de Tanquarvilla mater Guillelmi de Tanquarvilla filii quondam Roberti cambellani domini de Tanquarvilla...dicti Guillelmi” and “Ysabellem filiam...Ingerranni domini de Marrignyaco militis et cambellani nostri...qui ont ja passé sept ans”, naming “...monseigneur Drieu de Mellou pour lui et pour son pere, monseigneur Regnaut vidame d’Amiens, monseigneur Girart et Ferris ses freres, monseigneur Jehan Malet seigneur de Guerarville, Jehan et Guillaume ses fieus, Robert Bertran, monseigneur Guillaume Bertran...” as present for the marriage contract 23 Oct 1309, by charter dated 18 Nov 1309[770].  Philippe IV King of France confirmed the marriage in another charter dated Feb 1310[771].  She married secondly Hugues d’Auxy Seigneur de Dompierre.  Her second marriage is recorded by Père Anselme[772].  The primary source on which this information is based has not been identified. 

 

 

 

I.        WARENNE

 

 

According to the Complete Peerage, the name "de Warenne" comes from the hamlet of Varenne {Seine-Inférieure}, Normandy[773]

 

 

1.         RAOUL de Warennem ---.  The name of Raoul’s wife is not known.  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER .  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of “ecclesias...in maris Constantini pagi...” made by “Roberto...Hunfredi...filio” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1035/53], subscribed by “Roberti filii Hunfredi, Rogeri fratris eius, Anscetilli, Willelmi filii Ricardi secundi Normannorum ducis, Rogerii filii Radulfi de Warethna, Rogerii filii Ragnulfi, Gilleberti Crispin, Willelmi Guiet[774]

 

 

2.         HUGUES .  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Warenna et Hugo Pincerna...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[775]

 

 

RAOUL de Warenne, son of --- (-1074 or after).  An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[776].  "Rodulfus de Warenna" sold "totam portionem suam silvæ montium Blovillæ et Scurræ", with the consent of "uxoris suæ…Emmæ", by undated charter (dated to [1059]), signed by "Willelmi comitis, ipsius Rodulfi, Emmæ uxoris eius, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Leudonis…"[777].  "Rodulfus de Warenna cum conjuge sua…Emma" sold "Amundi Villæ, Anglicevillæ, Flamenvillæ, Maltevillæ", with the consent of "Willelmi consulis Normanniæ", by undated charter[778].  "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[779].  "Quidam miles de la Bruere…Alveredus, annuente Adheliza uxore sua" sold "decimas…in Maltevilla et Amunde Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Wido comes et Rodulfus de Warethna cum uxore sua…Emma", by undated charter, signed by "…Goiffredi fratris Alveredi, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Roberti filii eius…"[780].  "Quidam miles…Willelmus filius Ansgeri de Salceid" sold land "in Amundi Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domino eius Rodulfo…de Warenna…et uxor eius…Emma", by undated charter[781].  "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[782].  He sold land at Matevilla, Flamenvilla, Amundi Villa and Anglicevilla, all in pagi Calentensis, to Sainte-Trinité jointly with his wife and two sons, dated 1074[783]

m firstly BEATRICE, [niece of GUNNORA, mistress of Richard I Duke of Normandy,] daughter of --- (-after 1053).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius” [although the undated charter quoted below which records a sale of property by “Hugo de Flamenvilla” indicates that Raoul’s second wife was the mother of his son Guillaume][784].  An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[785]

m secondly (1059 or before) EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1074).  "Rodulfus de Warenna" sold "totam portionem suam silvæ montium Blovillæ et Scurræ", with the consent of "uxoris suæ…Emmæ", by undated charter (dated to [1059]), signed by "Willelmi comitis, ipsius Rodulfi, Emmæ uxoris eius, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Leudonis…"[786].  "Rodulfus de Warenna cum conjuge sua…Emma" sold "Amundi Villæ, Anglicevillæ, Flamenvillæ, Maltevillæ", with the consent of "Willelmi consulis Normanniæ", by undated charter[787].  "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[788].  "Quidam miles de la Bruere…Alveredus, annuente Adheliza uxore sua" sold "decimas…in Maltevilla et Amunde Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Wido comes et Rodulfus de Warethna cum uxore sua…Emma", by undated charter, signed by "…Goiffredi fratris Alveredi, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Roberti filii eius…"[789].  "Quidam miles…Willelmus filius Ansgeri de Salceid" sold land "in Amundi Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domino eius Rodulfo…de Warenna…et uxor eius…Emma", by undated charter[790].  "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[791]

Raoul & his [first] wife had [four] children.  There is some doubt about the identity of the mother of these children.  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ...” as Raoul’s son by his wife Beatrice[792].  However, an undated charter, quoted more fully below, names them "Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus"[793].  As the documents quoted above date Raoul’s marriage to Emma in [1053/59], the birth of the children of Raoul’s second marriage would be dated to [1055/65].  However, reports quoted below indicate that Guillaume de Warenne was active as an adult in Normandy before the English invasion in 1066, which would place his birth to [1035/40].  This all suggests that Guillaume of Jumièges is correct and that the children were born from their father’s first marriage. 

1.         RODULF (-after 1074).  "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[794].  "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[795]The Complete Peerage speculates that he may have succeeded his father, married and left issue[796]

2.         GUILLAUME (-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory)Orderic Vitalis records, in recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, that "castrum…Mortui Mari" was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius" after it was confiscated from "Rogerium de Mortuomari" who had helped the escape of a French prisoner after defeating troops of Henri King of France in 1054 "apud Mortuum-Mare"[797]According to the Complete Peerage, in [1054], he acquired land at Bellencombre, whose castle became the headquarters of the Warenne family in Normandy, and in 1066 took part in the invasion of England in 1066 and was rewarded with land in 13 counties[798]Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Warenna et Hugo Pincerna...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[799].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Hugo de Grentemaisnilio et Guillermus de Garenna...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[800].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[801].  Orderic Vitalis says the king "gave Surrey" to William de Warenne in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[802].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "Sutregiam" to "Guillelmo de Guarenna" who had married "Gundredam sororem Gherbodi"[803].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius” [although the undated charter quoted below which records a sale of property by “Hugo de Flamenvilla” indicates that Raoul’s second wife was the mother of his son Guillaume][804].  "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[805].  "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[806].  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jan 1086 “Guillelmus de Warenna et Baldricus de Chitreio Nicolai filius, atque Gislebertus de Aquila”, wanting to avenge the death of “Richerii fratris sui” [Richer de Laigle], unsuccessfully attacked the besiegers of the castle of Sainte-Suzanne[807]He supported King William II against the rebels led by Eudes Bishop of Bayeux and Robert Comte de Mortain in early 1088 and was rewarded by being created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088: Orderic Vitalis records that King William II appointed “Guilelmum de Guarenna” as “comitem Suthregiæ”, and adds that he was later buried at Lewes, dated to [1088/89][808]He and his immediate successors usually styled themselves "Earl de Warenne".  He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey[809]

-        EARLS of SURREY

3.         [ERNEIS de Coulonces .  The source quoted below names [his son] “Rogerius Erneisi de Coluncis filius” as “nepos Guillelmi de Guarenna”.  It is not known whether this passage means that Roger was the son of the sister or of the brother of Guillaume de Warenne.  The different names Coulonces/Warenne suggest that Guillaume and Erneis may not have been brothers, although it is possible that two brothers were called by different geographical epithets if they held different seigneuries.  Another difficulty is that the same text refers to another person “Ernaldus Unfridi de Telliolo filius” as “nepos ex sorore” of Hugues de Grantmesnil.  If the passage was constructed logically, this would imply that the Coulonces/Warenne relationship was different and therefore that Guillaume de Warenne and Erneis de Coulonces were brothers.  However, it cannot be assumed that strict logic applied in the composition of the source.  Another passage in the same source records that “Rogerius...de Guarenna” became a  monk at Ouche (see below).  It is assumed that this refers to the same person, son of Erneis: yet another passage, also quoted below, calls his brother “Ricardus...de Coluncis”, which suggests that this assumption is correct.  If correct, the addition of the name “de Guarenna” suggests that Warenne was his paternal family.  On balance, it appears more likely that it was Roger’s father who was the brother of Guillaume de Warenne, but this conclusion is not beyond all doubt.  Another possibility is that “nepos” in this case indicates a more remote family relationship, either cousinship or a relationship by marriage.  m ---.  The name of Erneis’s wife is not known.]  Erneis & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER [de Warenne] (-after 1081).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Drogo filius Goisfredi de Novo-Mercato et Rogerius Erneisi de Coluncis filius nepos Guillelmi de Guarenna et Ernaldus Unfridi de Telliolo filius, nepos ex sorore Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio" donated revenue[810].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius...de Guarenna” became a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul where he lived for about 46 years[811].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Mainerius abbas” (abbot of Ouche Saint-Evroul) went to England in the 14th year of his abbacy [1081] with “Rogerium de Guarenna, Drogonem...de Novo-Mercato” when William I King of England confirmed the possessions of Ouche by charter (which he quotes in full)[812]

b)         RICHARD de Coulonces (-15 Sep 1125).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” (referring to “Rogerius...de Guarenna” who is named on the previous page) donated “ecclesiam de Estolveio” [Etouvy], which he had bought from “Erneiso quodam homine suo”, to Ouche Saint-Evroul “cum Adelaisa conjuge sua et præfato Erneiso[813].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” lived prosperously to an old age (“usque ad senectutem prospere vixit”) and died “XVII Kal Oct” 1125[814]m ADELAIS, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” (referring to “Rogerius...de Guarenna” who is named on the previous page) donated “ecclesiam de Estolveio” [Etouvi], which he had bought from “Erneiso quodam homine suo”, to Ouche Saint-Evroul “cum Adelaisa conjuge sua et præfato Erneiso[815]Richard & his wife had fifteen children: 

i)          HUGUES (-after 1125).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia”, adding that Hugues donated a silver bowl to Ouche after his father died[816]

ii)         GEOFFROYOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[817]

iii)        RICHARDOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[818]

iv)       JEANOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia”, adding that “Johannes” was a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul[819]

v)        ROBERTOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[820]

vi)       EUDESOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[821]

vii)      HENRIOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[822]

viii)     IVESOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[823]

ix)       RAOULOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[824]

x)        GUILLAUMEOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[825]  

xi)       HENRIOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[826]

xii)      ROHAISOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[827]

xiii)     ADELISEOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia”, adding that “Adelidis” was a nun at Caen Holy Trinity[828]

xiv)     MATHILDEOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[829]

xv)      AVICEOrderic Vitalis records that “Ricardus...de Coluncis, præfati Rogerii frater” had by his wife “xi filios et iv filias...Hugo, Goisfredus et Ricardus, Johannes et Rodbertus, Odo et Henricus, Ivo et Rodulfus, Guillelmus et Henricus; Rohes ac Adeliza, Mathildis et Avicia[830]

4.         [GAUTHIER de Saint-MartinGuillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius” [although the undated charter quoted below which records a sale of property by “Hugo de Flamenvilla” indicates that Raoul’s second wife was the mother of his son Guillaume][831]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Rogerius de Mortuo Mari filius Walterii de Sancto Martini frater…primi Willermi de Warenna" founded "mon. Sancti Victoris In proprio solo"[832].  The difficulty of ascertaining the correct ancestry of Roger de Mortimer is discussed fully in  ENGLAND EARLS, created 1207-1466.  It does not appear that the ancestry suggested in the two sources quoted above can be correct.  m ---.  The name of Gauthier's wife is not known.  Gauthier & his wife had one child:] 

a)         [ROGERGuillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius de Mortuo-mari filius Walteri de sancto Martino frater primi Willelmi de Warenna” founded “monasterium sancti Victoris in proprio solo[833]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Rogerius de Mortuo Mari filius Walterii de Sancto Martini frater…primi Willermi de Warenna" founded "mon. Sancti Victoris In proprio solo"[834].  It does not appear that this affiliation can be correct, although other sources do indicate a family relationship between William de Warenne and Roger de Mortimer (see ENGLAND EARLS,  MARCH (MORTIMER).] 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    EU

 

 

A.      COMTES d'EU 996-1040, descendants of GEOFFROY de Brionne

 

 

The counties of Eu and Hiémois were granted to two illegitimate sons of Richard I Duke of Normandy, Geoffroy and Guillaume, by their half-brother Duke Richard II. 

 

 

GEOFFROY de Brionne, illegitimate son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- ([953]-[1015]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis”, adding that Geoffroy was “comes...Aucensis[835].  Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[836].  He is named as son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[837]Comte d'Eu after 996. 

m ---.  The name of Geoffroy's wife is not known. 

Geoffroy & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" ([979/1000]-murdered [Mar] [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis” inherited his father’s county before he was killed[838].  Named as son of "Godfrey" by Orderic Vitalis[839]Comte d'Eu.  "Gislebertus filius Godefridi comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[840].  Orderic Vitalis records that “tempore Rodberti ducis Gislebertus comes Brionniæ” invaded “in pagum Vimmacensem” [Vimeu] but was repulsed by “Ingelrannus Pontivi comes”, adding that “miles...Herluinus” fled the battle and afterwards founded “in patrimonio suo in loco...Beccus...cœnobium sanctæ Dei genitricis Mariæ[841].  Le Prévost dates this event to “antérieure à 1034, époque présumée de la fondation du Bec[842].  He was appointed guardian of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after the death in 1040 of Alain III Duke of Brittany[843].  He was murdered by his cousin Raoul de Waco, after which Brionne was kept by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[844].  On the other hand, another passage in Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Witot” had been exiled “propter occisionem Gisleberti comitis[845].  Robert of Torigny names "Radulfo de Waceio filio Roberti archiepiscopi Rothomagensis" as murderer of "Gislebertus filius…Godefridi"[846].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi[847].  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Gislebertus comes Briognensis", undated but listed among other deaths recorded in Mar[848]m ---.  The name of Gilbert's wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had four children: 

a)         RICHARD de Brionne (before 1035-[Apr] [1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus[849].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[850].  He and his brother are named sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[851].  Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[852].  Lord of Clare and Tonbridge.  Regent of England 1075.   

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY

b)         GUILLAUME de Brionne (-after 29 Aug 1060).  "Milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 29 Aug 1060, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[853]

c)         BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richardum et Balduinum” as the two sons of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[854].  He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[855].  Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[856].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[857].  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England built a castle within the walls of Exeter, after he suppressed the town’s rebellion, and appointed “Balduinum de Molis filium Gisleberti comitis” as custodian, dated to early 1067[858].  After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon.  “…Halduini [Balduini?] filii comitis Gilberti…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[859].  Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086.  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb[860]m ALBERADE, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England[861].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ[862].  Her precise parentage has not yet been ascertained.  Baudouin & his wife had six children: 

i)          ROBERT (-after Dec 1101).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[863].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus[864].  Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who describes him as castellan of Brionne when he defended his right to the castle in [1090/94] after Robert de Beaumont claimed it from Robert III Duke of Normandy.  The castle was subsequently stormed by Duke Robert's troops and returned to Robert de Beaumont[865].  He inherited his brother's English honours in 1096.  "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[866]. 

ii)         WILLIAM (-1096).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[867].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus[868].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devon.

iii)        RICHARD (-[Jun] 1137, bur 25 Jun 1137 Brightley Abbey, Devon, transferred to Forde Abbey).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[869].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus[870].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ[871].  He succeeded his brother as Lord of Okehampton.  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records the burial “VI Kal Jul 1137” of “domino Ricardo” and the subsequent transfer of his body “de Brightley apud Fordam”, adding that he died childless[872]"Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[873]. 

iv)       ADELA (-24 Aug 1142, bur Forde Abbey, Devon).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[874].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ[875].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “Adeliciæ…sorori suæ” inherited the lands of “vicecomes Ricardus”, was thereafter called “vicecomitissa” and died “1142 IX Kal Sep” and was buried “apud novum monasterium de Ford[876]m ---.  One child: 

(a)       ALICE .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ[877]m RANDULF Avenell, son of ---. 

v)        EMMA .  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[878]The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m HUGH de Waft, son of ---. 

vi)       daughter .  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis[879]

Baudouin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

vii)       WIGER (-[1133]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”, adding that Wiger became a monk at Bec where he lived for about 40 years under abbots Guillaume and Boson[880]

d)         ADELA ).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[881]m NEEL Vicomte [de Cotentin], son of NEEL [I] Vicomte [de Cotentin] & his wife --- (-Aug 1092). 

2.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Gislebertus comes Brionnæ nepos Ricardi ducis Normannorum" married "neptem suam" to “Baldrico Teutonico”, who had come “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II][882].  Her exact parentage is not known.  m BALDRIC, son of --- (-before 1053). 

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d'EU, descendants of GUILLAUME d'HIEMOIS

 

 

GUILLAUME de Normandie, illegitimate son of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his mistress --- (978-1057).  According to Dudo of Saint-Quentin[883], he was an illegitimate son of Richard I by a mistress other than Gunnora.  Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis[884].  Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines, recording that Guillaume was first "comes…Aucensis" and after the death of his brother became "comes Brionnensis"[885].  An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Robertus archiepiscopus…ecclesie Rotomagensis et Vuillelmus et Malgerus fratres Richardi comitis…"[886].  Comte d'Hiémois et Comte d'Eu.  Guillaume of Jumièges records the rebellion of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum”, who had received “Oximensem” from his brother, his capture and imprisonment “in Rothomagensis urbis turre”, before his escape five years later and subsequent reconciliation with his brother who granted him “Ocensem comitatum” and his marriage to “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli[887].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus Aucensis comes instinctu religionæ conjugis suæ Lezscelinæ” founded “abbatiam sanctæ Mariæ super rivulum Divæ[888]

m LESCELINE, daughter of TURCHETIL Seigneur de Tourville & his wife --- (-26 Jan [1057/58]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records the rebellion of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum”, who had received “Oximensem” from his brother, his capture and imprisonment “in Rothomagensis urbis turre”, before his escape five years later and subsequent reconciliation with his brother who granted him “Ocensem comitatum” and his marriage to “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli[889].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus Aucensis comes instinctu religionæ conjugis suæ Lezscelinæ” founded “abbatiam sanctæ Mariæ super rivulum Divæ[890].  An undated charter, dated to [1049], records that "Lezelina comitissa…cum filiis suis" was expelled "de castro Ou" and donated land on the banks of the Seine to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis Hugone, Willelmo, Rotberto"[891]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Lecelina comitissa Aucensis relicta Willermi comitis" founded "mon. Sancti Petri super Divam virorum et mon. fem. ante urbem Lexoviensem" with "filiis suis Roberto comite Aucensi et Hugone episcopo Lexoviensi"[892]

Comte Guillaume & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         ROBERT d'Eu ([1005/10]-8 Sep [1089/93], bur Le Tréport).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Rodbertum...Willelmum Suessionensem comitem atque Hugonem Luxoviensem præsulem” as the three sons of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum” and his wife “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli”, adding that Robert succeeded to his father’s county[893].  He succeeded his father as Comte d'Eu

-        see below

2.         GUILLAUME "Busac" d'Eu (-[1076]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Rodbertum...Willelmum Suessionensem comitem atque Hugonem Luxoviensem præsulem” as the three sons of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum” and his wife “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli[894].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Busacius” plotted rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, who besieged “castrum Oucis” and forced Guillaume into exile with Henri I King of France, who granted him “comitatum Suessionis...cum quadam nobili coniuge[895].  An undated charter, dated to [1049], records that "Lezelina comitissa…cum filiis suis" was expelled "de castro Ou" and donated land on the banks of the Seine to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis Hugone, Willelmo, Rotberto"[896]Comte de Soissons, by right of his wife. 

-        COMTES de SOISSONS

3.         HUGUES d'Eu (-17 Jul 1077, bur Lisieux Sainte-Marie).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Rodbertum...Willelmum Suessionensem comitem atque Hugonem Luxoviensem præsulem” as the three sons of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum” and his wife “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli[897].  An undated charter, dated to [1049], records that "Lezelina comitissa…cum filiis suis" was expelled "de castro Ou" and donated land on the banks of the Seine to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis Hugone, Willelmo, Rotberto"[898].  He is named as brother of Robert Comte d'Eu by Orderic Vitalis[899]Bishop of Lisieux .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo Willermi Aucensis comitis filius” was bishop of Lisieux[900]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Lecelina comitissa Aucensis relicta Willermi comitis" founded "mon. Sancti Petri super Divam virorum et mon. fem. ante urbem Lexoviensem" with "filiis suis Roberto comite Aucensi et Hugone episcopo Lexoviensi"[901]Orderic Vitalis records the death “XVI Kal Aug” 1077 of "Hugo Lexoviensis episcopus" while he was being carried from Pont-l’Evêque to Lisieux, the dispute about his place of burial, and his eventual burial at Lisieux Sainte-Marie in the presence of “Roberto Aucensi comite...germanus eius[902]

4.         [daughter .  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         GUILLAUME "de Alderi" (-hanged 1096).  Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmi de Owe…dapiferum illius Willelmum de Alderi filium amitæ illius" was hanged in [1096] for his part in the conspiracy against William II King of England[903].  "Willelmum de Alderi" has not yet been identified but, if "amita" is translated in its strict sense of paternal aunt, he was presumably the son of a daughter of Guillaume de Normandie Comte d'Eu. 

 

 

ROBERT d'Eu, son of GUILLAUME Comte d'Hiémois et d'Eu & his wife Lesceline de Tourville ([1005/10]-8 Sep [1089/93], bur Le Tréport).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Rodbertum...Willelmum Suessionensem comitem atque Hugonem Luxoviensem præsulem” as the three sons of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum” and his wife “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli”, adding that Robert succeeded to his father’s county[904].  He is named as the son of Guillaume Comte d'Eu by Orderic Vitalis[905]Robert’s date of birth is estimated from his having three sons who are named in a charter dated 1036.  The date is consistent with his father’s estimated birth date, although it means that he must have been extremely old when he died.  "Robertus comes Augensis…uxore Beatrice et filiis meis Radulfo, Willermo atque Roberto" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated 1036, witnessed by "Hugo vicecomes"[906]An undated charter, dated to the [1035/50], records the donation of "predium Heltonis quod possedit Gozelinus vicecomes" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the support of "Willelmus comes Normanniæ, et Willelmus, filius Willelmi comitis, qui et hæres Heltonis, et Robertus comes frater eius…Niellus…et Turstinus vicecomites", subscribed by "…filii Turchitilli Hugo et Goffridus necnon Walerannus comes", signed by "Gozelini vicecomitis, Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Waleranni comitis, Alberici comitis, Heltæ filii Heltonis…"[907].  An undated charter, dated to [1049], records that "Lezelina comitissa…cum filiis suis" was expelled "de castro Ou" and donated land on the banks of the Seine to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis Hugone, Willelmo, Rotberto"[908].  He succeeded his father as Comte d'Eu, indicating presumably that he was the eldest son.  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rodbertus comes, Willermi Aucensis Satrapæ filius...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[909].  "Rotbertus comes de Ou et Beatrix conjux eius" donated "jure hereditario silvam de Spinei" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis", by undated charter dated to "tempore que discordia cepit inter [Willelmus comes Normanniæ] et Henricum regem Francorum", witnessed by "…Willelmi filii Osberni, Rodulfi camerarii…Goisfredi filii Osberni de Ou, Ansfredi fratris eius, Widonis filii Amalrici, Rainaldi de Sancto Martino, Osberti de Albert Villa…"[910].  "Rotberti comitis de Auco" witnessed a charter of "Rogerius de Buslei" dated 1053[911]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Lecelina comitissa Aucensis relicta Willermi comitis" founded "mon. Sancti Petri super Divam virorum et mon. fem. ante urbem Lexoviensem" with "filiis suis Roberto comite Aucensi et Hugone episcopo Lexoviensi"[912]The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Roberto comite Augiensi" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[913]Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Aucensium comes et Gauterius Gifardus et Radulfus de Mortuomari” and nearly all the seigneurs who lived “trans Sequanam usque ad mare” joined King William II against his brother Robert Duke of Normandy and received considerable sums to fortify their castles, dated to [1089/90][914]The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Robertus comes Aucensis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in early September[915]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "8 Sep" of "Robertus comes Augensis hujus ecclesiæ fundator"[916]

m firstly BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-10 Apr ----).  "Robertus comes Augensis…uxore Beatrice et filiis meis Radulfo, Willermo atque Roberto" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated 1036, witnessed by "Hugo vicecomes"[917]"Rotbertus comes de Ou et Beatrix conjux eius" donated "jure hereditario silvam de Spinei" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis", by undated charter dated to "tempore que discordia cepit inter [Willelmus comes Normanniæ] et Henricum regem Francorum"[918]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "10 Apr" of "comitissa Beatrix, loci hujus...fundatrix"[919].  This entry must be linked to the wife of Comte Robert as the latter is described as "nostri monasterii fundatoris" in the entry which relates to their son Guillaume (see below) and also in his own entry in the same necrology. 

m secondly (repudiated before [1080][920]) as her first husband, MATHILDE of Sicily, daughter of ROGER I Count of Sicily & his first wife Judith d'Evreux (1062-before 1094).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and first marriage has not yet been identified.  According to Houben[921], Mathilde who married Robert Comte d'Eu was the daughter of Roger I Count of Sicily by his second wife, and a different person from Mathilde his daughter by his first wife who married Raymond Comte de Saint-Gilles.  No source is quoted, but this seems unlikely from a chronological point of view as Roger's second marriage took place in [1077], and Robert Comte d'Eu died in [1089/93].  In addition, it seems unlikely that Roger, at the height of his power as Count of Sicily in the late 1080s, would have agreed to his daughter's marriage to an obscure count in northern France at the same time as arranging royal marriages for his other daughters.  She married secondly ([1080], divorced [1088]) as his second wife, Raymond de Toulouse, who later succeeded as Raymond IV Comte de Toulouse.  Malaterra records the marriage of "Raimundus comes Provinciarum" and "Matildem filiam suam [Rogerii Siculorum comitis]…de prima uxore" which he dates to 1080[922]

Comte Robert & his first wife had six children:

1.         RAOUL d'Eu"Robertus comes Augensis…uxore Beatrice et filiis meis Radulfo, Willermo atque Roberto" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated 1036, witnessed by "Hugo vicecomes"[923]

2.         GUILLAUME d'Eu (-2 Jan after 1096)"Robertus comes Augensis…uxore Beatrice et filiis meis Radulfo, Willermo atque Roberto" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated 1036, witnessed by "Hugo vicecomes"[924]Domesday Book records land held by “William de Eu” in King’s Somborne in Somborne Hundred, Deane in Chuteley Hundred, and Silchester in Holdshott Hundred in Hampshire, in Reading, Kintbury and Wantage Hundreds in Berkshire, numerous land-holdings in Wiltshire, land in Hertfordshire[925].  He ravaged Gloucestershire in 1089 after plundering Berkeley castle[926].  He succeeded in [1093] as Comte d'Eu, Lord of Hastings.  Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmi comes de Owe"  deserted Robert Duke of Normandy in [1093/94] "won over by his greediness of lucre and attracted by the promise of vast domains" by William II King of England[927].  Florence of Worcester records that "Northymbrensis comes Rotbertus de Mulbrei et Willelmus de Owe" conspired against William II King of England in [1095], planning to place "filium amitæ illius Stephanus de Albamarno" on the English throne[928]The same source records that Guillaume was captured after being vanquished in a duel, and condemned at Salisbury 13 Jan 1096 to be blinded and castrated[929]The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "2 Jan" of "Guillelmus primus comes Augi, fundator hujus ecclesiæ"[930].  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "2 Jan" of "Augensis comes Guillermus...Roberti, nostri monasterii fundatoris, filii"[931]m firstly BEATRICE, sister of ROGER de Builly Lord of Tickhill, daughter of --- & his wife --- (-2 Sep ----).  She is named as the first wife of Comte Guillaume in the Complete Peerage, which does not cite the primary source on which the information is based[932]The primary source which confirms her origin has not yet been identified.  The necrology of Longpont records the death “IV Non Sep” of “Beatrix comitissa[933]m secondly HELISENDE d'Avranches, daughter of RICHARD Vicomte d'Avranches & his wife ---.  Her marriage is referred to by Orderic Vitalis, who says that she was the sister of Hugh Earl of Chester but does not give her name[934].  Comte Guillaume & his [first/second] wife had [five] children: 

a)         HENRI d'Eu (-Fécamp 12 Jul 1140)"Henricus comes Augensis filius comitis Willermi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport with the consent of "Margarita comitissa et fratres supradicti comitis Robertus, Willelmus major, Willelmus minor" by a charter dated 1101[935]He succeeded his father in 1096 as Comte d'Eu

-        see below

b)         ROBERT d'Eu (-1149 or after).  "Henricus comes Augensis filius comitis Willermi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport with the consent of "Margarita comitissa et fratres supradicti comitis Robertus, Willelmus major, Willelmus minor" by a charter dated 1101[936]1101/1109.  "Johannes Augensium comes" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport referring to "antecessores mei comes Robertus et Guillermus filius eius et Henricus pater meus" by a charter dated 1149, witnessed by "Robertus de Augo"[937]m ---.  The name of Robert's wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          THOMAS de Bréançon .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

c)         GUILLAUME d'Eu "major" (-[24 Mar ----]).  "Henricus comes Augensis filius comitis Willermi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport with the consent of "Margarita comitissa et fratres supradicti comitis Robertus, Willelmus major, Willelmus minor" by a charter dated 1101[938]1101/1109.  "Guillaume de Grandcourt son of Guillaume Comte d'Eu" captured Amaury de Montfort Comte d'Evreux at the battle of Bourg-théroulde (Rougemontier) in 1124, but chose to go into exile with him[939].  [The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "24 Mar" of "Guillermus de Augo, frater Henrici comitis"[940].  It is not known to which Guillaume this entry refers.] 

d)         GUILLAUME d'Eu "minor" .  "Henricus comes Augensis filius comitis Willermi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport with the consent of "Margarita comitissa et fratres supradicti comitis Robertus, Willelmus major, Willelmus minor" by a charter dated 1101[941]1101/1109. 

e)         [ALBREDA (-19 Jun ----).  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "19 Jun" of "Albreda, Willelmi comitis filia"[942].  It is assumed that this entry refers to an otherwise unrecorded daughter of Guillaume Comte d’Eu, but this is not beyond all doubt.] 

Comte Guillaume had three illegitimate children by an unknown mistress:

f)          three children .  Orderic Vitalis records that Comte Guillaume "had three children by a concubine" ignoring his second wife[943]

3.         ROBERT d'Eu"Robertus comes Augensis…uxore Beatrice et filiis meis Radulfo, Willermo atque Roberto" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated 1036, witnessed by "Hugo vicecomes"[944]

4.         ARMAND de Mortain .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

-        CONTI di MONTESCAGLIOSO

5.         EREMBURGE de Mortain (-[1087]).  Malaterra records the death of "Eremburga filia Gulielmi comitis Mortonensis" wife of "comes Rogerius", dating the event to 1089[945]m ([1077]) as his second wife, ROGER I Count of Sicily, son of TANCRED de Hauteville & his [second wife] [Fressenda] ([1031]-Mileto 22 Jun 1101, bur Mileto, Abbey of the Holy Trinity).  .

6.         [CONDOHA (-after 1087).  The Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensis names "filia de --- Ounormani Vagena, quæ vocabatur Condo" as wife of "Fulconi…Engolismensi Comiti" and mother of Comte Guillaume [V][946]"Ounormani" is interpreted as meaning "Eu des Normands".  Assuming that this is correct, it appears chronologically consistent for Condoha's father to be identified as Robert Comte d'Eu, but this is not beyond doubt.  The interpretation of "Vagena" as applied to Condoha's father has not yet been found.  "Fulco Engolismensium comes" donated property to Saint-Amant-de-Boixe with the consent of "Condoha comitissa uxore mea, filiisque meis Guillelmo…ac Gaufrido atque Fulcone" by charter dated to [1076/87][947]m FOULQUES Comte d'Angoulême, son of GEOFFROY Comte d'Angoulême & his first wife Pétronille d'Archiac (-[after 1089]).]

 

 

HENRI d'Eu, son of GUILLAUME I Comte d'Eu & his [first/second] wife --- (-Fécamp 12 Jul 1140)"Henricus comes Augensis filius comitis Willermi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport with the consent of "Margarita comitissa et fratres supradicti comitis Robertus, Willelmus major, Willelmus minor" by a charter dated 1101[948]He succeeded his father in 1096 as Comte d'Eu.  In 1118, he supported a rebellion against Henry I King of England in favour of Guillaume "Clito" de Normandie, but was arrested at Rouen with Hugues de Gournay, "thrown into fetters and forced to surrender his castles"[949].  He founded Saint-Martin-du-Bosc in [1107] and the abbey of Fécamp in 1129/30[950].  He became a monk at the abbey of Fécamp.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1140 of "Henricus comes de Ou"[951]The necrology of the church of Eu records the anniversary "12 Jul" of "Henrici comitis Augi" who introduced "canonicos regulares" to the church[952]

m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-30 Mar [1107 or before]).  "Henricus comes Augensis" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport "pro salute anime Matildis uxoris mee" with the consent of "frater meus Robertus" by a charter dated 1107[953]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "30 Mar" of "Maltildis Augensis comitissa, Henrici comitis...sponsa"[954]

m secondly ERMENTRUDE, daughter of --- (-17 or 24 Apr ----).  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "17 Apr" of "Hermentrudis Augi comitissa"[955]The necrology of Longpont records the death “VIII Kal Mai” of “Hermetrudis comitissa Augi[956].  The necrology of Longpont contains numerous references to the Montlhéry family, Comtes de Rochefort (see  PARIS REGION).  The inclusion of Ermentrude suggests that she may be related to that family. 

m thirdly MARGUERITE de Sully, daughter of GUILLAUME de Blois Seigneur de Sully & his wife Agnes de Sully (-15 Dec [1145], bur Fécamp).  "Henricus comes Augensis filius comitis Willermi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport with the consent of "Margarita comitissa et fratres supradicti comitis Robertus, Willelmus major, Willelmus minor" by a charter dated 1101[957]The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "15 Dec" of "Margareta Augensis comitissa, mater Johannis comitis"[958]

Comte Henri & his third wife had three children: 

1.         JEAN [I] d'Eu (-Fécamp 26 Jun 1170, bur Fécamp).  Robert of Torigny records that "Johannes filius eius" succeeded on the death in 1140 of "Henricus comes de Ou"[959].  He succeeded his father in 1140 as Comte d'Eu"Johannes Augensium comes" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport referring to "antecessores mei comes Robertus et Guillermus filius eius et Henricus pater meus" by a charter dated 1149, witnessed by "Robertus de Augo"[960]He became a monk at the abbey of Fécamp.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1170 of "Johannes comes Aucensis"[961]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "26 Jun" of "Johannes comes Augi"[962]m as her first husband, ALICE de Albini, daughter of WILLIAM de Albini Earl of Arundel & his wife Adelisa de Louvain (-11 Sep [1188], bur Fécamp).  "Johannes comes Augi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated [1169/70], witnessed by "Henricus et Robertus filii comitis et A[elicia] comitissa Augi"[963]Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum primogenitum suum et Godefridum et…comitissam uxorem Johannis comitis Aucensis" as children of "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" & his wife[964].  "Alizia comitissa Augi" donated property to the abbey of Robert's Bridge for the soul of "Willielmi comitis Arundelie patris mei et Alizie regine matris mee et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margarete filiarum mearum" by undated charter witnessed by "Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratris eius"[965]She married secondly Alured de Saint-MartinThe primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  It is suggested by a charter of King Edward III dated 5 Nov 1337 which confirms various donations to Robert’s Bridge Abbey in Sussex founded by Aluredus de Sancto Martino”, including “terram de Swergate et pasturam infra wallam” donated by “Aliciæ comitissæ de Augo et Henrici filii eius comitis Augi[966].  “Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[967]The necrology of the church of Eu records the anniversary "15 May" of "Aelidis comitissæ Augi" who donated "capellam Sancti Thomæ martyris juxta Criolium"[968]Comte Jean & his wife had five children: 

a)         HENRI d'Eu (-12 or 16/17 Jul [1190/91], bur Fécamp)"Johannes comes Augi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated [1169/70], witnessed by "Henricus et Robertus filii comitis et A[elicia] comitissa Augi"[969]He succeeded his father as Comte d'Eu, Lord of Hastings.  “Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[970].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Henricus de Augo" paying "xxxiii l vi s viii d" in Sussex[971]m ([after 1172]) as her second husband, MATHILDE, widow of OSBERT de Préaux, daughter of [HAMELIN d'Anjou Earl of Surrey & his first wife ---] (-before 13 Dec 1228).  Her first and second marriages are indicated by the charter dated Mar 1233 under which [her daughter by her second marriage] "Ælicia comitissa Augi in viduitate" granted revenue from "molendino de Duno" to “in matrimonium Ælidæ filiæ Petri de Pratellis fratris mei[972].  Her connection with the Warenne family is indicated by the undated charter under which her daughter “Haelisia comitissa Augy quondam uxor Radulfi de Ysondun comitis Augy” donated property to Roche Abbey, witnessed by “domino Willielmo comite Warennæ avunculo meo…[973].  Because Mathilde had three children by her first husband who died in [1172], she could not have been the daughter of Hamelin by his wife Isabelle de Warenne.  There are therefore two possibilities: either she was Hamelin’s daughter by an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage or she was the daughter of Isabelle de Warenne by her first marriage.  The The latter possibility is unlikely as any daughter of Guillaume de Blois Comte de Boulogne would have been Ctss de Boulogne instead of Guillaume’s sister.  In any case, the chronology would be tight for Mathilde to have been Isabelle’s daughter.  Until more information comes to light, it is supposed that Mathilde was the daughter of Hamelin by an earlier marriage.  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that "Osbert de Préaux" donated tithes from harvest in the parish of Bois l’Evêque to the monks of Holy Trinity of Mont-de-Rouen, for his own soul “those of his parents and of the parents of his wife Matildis”, undated, and that his wife and “their sons Simon and John” granted the tythe to the monks in perpetuity, but he does not cite the source reference[974].  She married thirdly Henry de Stuteville Lord of Eckington, Derbyshire.  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.  The wording of the charter of her son Pierre, dated to [Jun 1200], suggests that his mother might have died before that date: “Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni[975].  If this charter is correctly dated, at least two of the donor’s brothers were alive at that time, while his father was certainly deceased.  The question then is determining the significance, if any, between his parents not being named in the document while his brothers are named.  One possibility is that the unnamed individuals (and therefore including the donor’s mother) were deceased, but the named brothers were living.  It should be emphasised that this observation is speculative.  Comte Henri & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          RAOUL d'Eu (-1 May 1186, bur Fécamp).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Raoul et Guy" as the two sons of "Henry et Mahault", adding that Raoul was buried "en la dite eglise de Foucarmont...assez près de ses oncles", and in a later passage that he died in 1186[976].  Considering the chronology of their mother’s family, it is likely that Raoul and Guy were still children when they died.  "Radulfus Augensium comes" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated 1191, naming "antecessores mei comes Robertus et Guillermus filius eius et Henricus avus Henrici iunioris et Johannes pater eiusdem Henrici et idem H[enricus]"[977]The necrology of the church of Eu records the anniversary "1 May" of "Radulfi comitis Augi qui dedit nobis xv libras annui redditus ad luminaria ecclesiæ"[978]

ii)         GUY d'Eu (-1185, bur Fécamp).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Raoul et Guy" as the two sons of "Henry et Mahault", adding that Guy was buried "à senestre costé du cueur de l’abbaye de Eu" and in a later passage that he died in 1185[979].  Considering the chronology of their mother’s family, it is likely that Raoul and Guy were still children when they died. 

iii)        ALIX d'Eu (-La Mothe Saint Héray [13/15] May 1246).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Aalis et Jehanne" as the two daughters of "Henry et Mahault", adding in a later passage that Alix married "Radulphus de Yssouduno...filz du conte de la Marche mainsné" in 1200, and died in 1245 "à Villeneuve en Poitou en un sien lieu appelé la Mote"[980]She succeeded her father as Ctss d'Eu, Lady of Hastings.  “Haelisia comitissa Augy quondam uxor Radulfi de Ysondun comitis Augy” donated property to Roche Abbey, for the souls of “…Radulfi filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “domino Willielmo comite Warennæ avunculo meo…[981].  An order of King John dated 1 Apr 1202 relates intelligence that "filia Com. Aug…uxor Rad de Exoldun mortua est"[982].  Presumably the report of her death was incorrect, assuming that Alix’s death in correctly recorded in the Chronique des comtes d’Eu.  A letter from "W. comes Warrenæ" to "Huberto de Burgo justiciario Angliæ" dated Aug 1219 announces the arrival in England of "dominæ comitissæ Augi neptis vestræ, cognatæ nostræ"[983].  The relationship between Hubert de Burgh and Alix d’Eu Ctss d’Eu has not yet been traced.  “A[lix] comitissa Augi” confirmed that she relinquished "terram de Forzex eschæta Guillelmi quondam domini de Forz et comitis Aubemarle" to Louis IX King of France by charter dated Feb 1233 (O.S.)[984]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "14 May" of "Aelis...comitissa Augi"[985]m (1191 or before) RAOUL de Lusignan, son of HUGUES [IX] de Lusignan & his wife [Orengarde ---] (-Melle 1 May 1219, bur Exoudun).  He succeeded in 1194 as Comte d'Eu, by right of his wife. 

iv)       [JEANNE d’Eu (-1252, bur Foucarmont).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Aalis et Jehanne" as the two daughters of "Henry et Mahault", adding that Jeanne married "au conte Pierre Malclerc de Bretaigne" [which is inconsistent with other primary sources], inherited "la viconté de Crieul", and died childless in 1252 "en la conté Witoniensis en l’hospital Bratell" and was buried "à Foucarmont"[986].] 

b)         ROBERT d'Eu (-Acre ----, bur Jerusalem).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Henry, Robert et Jehan" as the three sons of "Jehan...[et]...Aaliz", adding that Robert was buried in Jerusalem[987]"Johannes comes Augi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport by a charter dated [1169/70], witnessed by "Henricus et Robertus filii comitis et A[elicia] comitissa Augi"[988]Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[989]

c)         JEAN [II] d'Eu (-4 Aug after 1207, bur Fécamp).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Henry, Robert et Jehan" as the three sons of "Jehan...[et]...Aaliz"[990]Comte d'Eu 1202.  “Johannes de Augo filius Johannis comitis de Augo” confirmed the donation of "mariscum de Snergate, qui pertinet ad feudum meum de Bilsintone…" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey made by “Aliciæ comitissæ de Augo matris meæ et Henrici comitis de Augo fratris mei”, for the souls of “…Henricis comitis de Augo fratris mei”, by undated charter[991].  Lord of Billington.  He became a monk at Fécamp abbey.  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "4 Aug" of "Johannes filius Johannis comitis"[992]

d)         MATHILDE d'Eu .  “Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[993]The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that the older of the two daughters of "Jehan...[et]...Aaliz" married "l’aisné d’Estouteville qui estoient trois frères, qui vinrent d’Angleterre eulx marier en Caux"[994]m HENRI d’Estouteville, son of ROBERT d’Estouteville & his wife Léonie --- (-1231). 

e)         MARGUERITE d'Eu"Johannes comes Augi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport "pro anima Matildis sororis mee", buried "III Kal Aug", by a charter dated 1153, on the intercession of "pia mea Margarita"[995]Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallum et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[996]The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that the younger of the two daughters of "Jehan...[et]...Aaliz" married "au seigneur de Saint Remy en la Rivière" adding that "le seigneur de Saint Remy son filz...Ive" donated property to "l’eglise de Foucarmont" and "ung sien filz...Simon de Saint Remy" founded "leur manoir de Coquereaulmont"[997]m --- Seigneur de Saint-Rémy-en-Rivière, son of ---. 

Jean had two children, either by his wife or illegitimate: 

f)          HENRI d'Eu (-after 1196, bur Fécamp).  Two charters dated 1195 record the presence of "Henry de Ow, dean of St Mary’s Hastings"[998].  Dean at St Mary's, Hastings.  The Pipe Roll records "Henricus filius comitis de Auco…per plegium Ade fratris sui" in 1196[999].  The latter source does not name the father of the two brothers but, from a chronological point of view, Jean Comte d’Eu appears to be the only possibility.  The fact that the oldest son of Comte Jean is also recorded with the name Henri suggests that this second Henri may not have been born from the same mother.  As Jean’s wife outlived him, in that case the two brothers Henri and Adam would have been illegitimate. 

g)         ADAM d'Eu (-before 18 Feb 1228).  The Pipe Roll records "Henricus filius comitis de Auco…per plegium Ade fratris sui" in 1196[1000]

2.         ETIENNE d'Eu (-after [1140]).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehan et Estienne" as the two sons of "Henry et Marguerite"[1001]

3.         MATHILDE d'Eu (-bur 30 Jul 1153).  "Johannes comes Augi" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport "pro anima Matildis sororis mee", buried "III Kal Aug", by a charter dated 1153, on the intercession of "pia mea Margarita"[1002]

Comte Henri had [two possible children, probably illegitimate]: 

4.          [GUILLAUME d'Eu (-1150 or after).  Domesday Descendants names "Willelm de Auco" as archdeacon of Cornwall, in the diocesis of Exeter, from [1128] to 1150[1003].  There is no indication of his parentage, and no certainty that he was a member of the comital family of Eu.  If Guillaume and Hugues were the sons of Henri Comte d’Eu, it is likely that they were illegitimate: the father of Henri’s third wife, by whom he had all his known legitimate children, was born in [1090/93], in which case it is unlikely that his daughter could have given birth to a younger son who was archdeacon from [1128].] 

5.          [HUGUES d'Eu (-after May 1162).  Domesday Descendants names "Hugo de Auco" as archdeacon of Totnes, in the diocesis of Exeter, from 1137 to May 1162[1004].  There is no indication of his parentage, and no certainty that he was a member of the comital family of Eu.  If Guillaume and Hugues were the sons of Henri Comte d’Eu, it is likely that they were illegitimate: the father of Henri’s third wife, by whom he had all his known legitimate children, was born in [1090/93], in which case it is unlikely that his daughter could have given birth to a younger son who was archdeacon from [1128].] 

 

 

 

C.      COMTES d'EU (LUSIGNAN)

 

 

RAOUL de Lusignan "d'Exoudun", son of HUGUES [IX] de Lusignan & his wife [Orengarde ---] (-Melle 1 May 1219, bur Issoudun).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Radulfum de Esselduno qui fuit comes Augi" as "Hugo Brunus fratrem natu maiorem" (presumably an error for "minorem"), adding that "horum pater Hugo de Lisegnen" had "fratres…Gaufridum, Henricum regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum"[1005].  "Maiorem" is presumably an error in this source for "minorem", or represents a transcription error: no scenario has been identified in which Raoul being the older brother is compatible with the other information relating to the Lusignan family.  According to the Complete Peerage, "Esselduno" was "Exoudun, Deux-Sèvres, arrondissement Melle, canton La Mothe-Saint-Héray" not "Issoudun, Indre"[1006], although the editor of the Monumenta Germanica series states that the place was "Issoudun, départ. Indre"[1007]Comte d'Eu, Seigneur d'Exoudun, de Melle, et de la Mothe-Saint-Héray.  The date of the marriage and Raoul’s succession as count is uncertain.  It must have taken place before 1194 when "comes de Auco" paid scutage on land in Sussex[1008].  "Radulfus Augensium comes" confirmed donations to Tréport, made by "antecessores mei comes…Robertus et Guillelmus filius eius et Henricus avus Henrici junioris et Johannes pater eiusdem Henrici et idem H.", by charter dated 1191[1009], indicating that the marriage took place some years earlier assuming that this document is correctly dated.  The Annals of Burton record that “Warinus de Clapiun senescallus Normanniæ” besieged “castellum de Denecurt”, on the orders of John King of England, adding that King Richard had given the castle to “Radulpho de Ysoudun comiti de Aueo, fratri Hugonis le Brun”, but that the siege was lifted by Philippe King of France before the arrival of King John[1010].  The same passage is given by Roger of Hoveden[1011].  "Hugo Brunus comes Marchie", on leaving for Jerusalem, recommended "R. comiti Augi et Hugoni filio meo" to take the abbey of Châtelliers under their protection by charter dated to [1200][1012].  "Hugo Brun com March et Rad com Augi" swore homage to John King of England, dated 28 Jan 1200[1013].  Ralph of Coggeshall records that in 1202 John King of England made war against "comitem de Marchis…Hugonem cognomento Brun et fratrem eius comitem de Eu" who had rebelled against him "pro filia comitis Engolismi, quam Hugo prædictus prius affidaverat"[1014].  Seigneur de Civray et de Chizé: an order of King John dated 2 Nov 1202 refers to "gentes Com Augi de Siveray et de Chisie"[1015].  An order of King John dated 7 Nov 1202 granted safe passage for a visit to "R. com Augi"[1016].  "Comes Augi" pledged his lands for his homage to Philippe II King of France, and that of "fratres sui comes Marchie et vicecomes Castri Eraudi" dated (by Delisle) to [1209][1017]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "1 May" of "Radulphus comes Augi"[1018]

m (1194) ALIX Ctss d'Eu, Lady of Hastings, daughter of HENRI II Comte d'Eu [Normandie] & his wife Mathilde de Warenne (-[13/15] May 1246).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Aalis et Jehanne" as the two daughters of "Henry et Mahault", adding in a later passage that Alix married "Radulphus de Yssouduno...filz du conte de la Marche mainsné" in 1200, and died in 1245 "à Villeneuve en Poitou en un sien lieu appelé la Mote"[1019]Haelisia comitissa Augy quondam uxor Radulfi de Ysondun comitis Augy” donated property to Roche Abbey, for the souls of “…Radulfi filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “domino Willielmo comite Warennæ avunculo meo…[1020].  An order of King John dated 1 Apr 1202 relates intelligence that "filia Com. Aug…uxor Rad de Exoldun mortua est"[1021].  “A[lix] comitissa Augi” confirmed that she relinquished "terram de Forzex eschæta Guillelmi quondam domini de Forz et comitis Aubemarle" to Louis IX King of France by charter dated Feb 1233 (O.S.)[1022]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "14 May" of "Aelis...comitissa Augi"[1023]

Comte Raoul & his wife had four children:

1.         RAOUL de Lusignan (-[1/2] Sep 1246).  “Haelisia comitissa Augy quondam uxor Radulfi de Ysondun comitis Augy” donated property to Roche Abbey, for the souls of “…Radulfi filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “domino Willielmo comite Warennæ avunculo meo…[1024].  He succeeded his father in 1219 as Seigneur d’Exoudun, de Melle, de Civray, de Chizé et de la Mothe-Saint-Héray.  "Rad. de Issoudunio comitis Augi filius" confirmed donations to the abbey of Châtelliers made by "antecessores mei" by charter dated Jul 1234[1025].  "Radulphus de Exolduno comitis Augi filius" donated property to la Chatille by charter dated 1237[1026].  He presumably only succeeded his mother in 1246 as Comte d’EuThe necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "2 Sep" of "Radulfus comes Augi filius Aelis comitissæ"[1027]m firstly (1222) JEANNE de Bourgogne, daughter of EUDES III Duke of Burgundy [Capet] & his second wife Alix dame de Vergy ([1200/10]-shortly after 1222, bur Abbaye de Foucarmont).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that Alix Ctss d’Eu married "son filz [Raoul de Yssouldun] à la fille du duc de Bourgongne" in 1222, but that she died soon afterwards[1028]m secondly YOLANDE de Dreux, daughter of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux et de Braine [Capet] & his second wife Yolande de Coucy (1196-1 Feb 1239).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to one of the seven daughters (mentioned sixth in the list) of "comiti de Brana Roberto" and his wife Yolande as the wife of "Radulfus de Augo"[1029]The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Raoul de Yssouldun" married secondly "la fille au duc de Bretaigne...Aleonor"[1030].  The necrology of Fontevraud records the death of "Yolendis comitissa Augi, soror dominæ Johannæ de Brana"[1031]m thirdly ([1239/40]) as her first husband, PHILIPPA de Dammartin, daughter of SIMON de Dammartin Comte d'Aumâle & his wife Marie Ctss de Ponthieu (-[14 Apr 1278/1281]).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, the four daughters of "comes de Pontivo Symon" (in order) as the wives of "rex Castelle de Hispanie Fernandus…maiorem filius vicecomitis de Castro Araudi…filius comitis de Augo…comes de Roceio"[1032].  She married secondly (after Nov 1246) Raoul Seigneur de Coucy.  "Philippa quondam comitissa Augi et domina Couciaci" granted a fief by charter dated Jul 1251[1033].  She married thirdly (1253) as his second wife, Otto [II] Graaf van Gelre.  The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Otto…grave van Gelre" married secondly "Philippa, de grave van Syntpols dochter"[1034]Comte Raoul & his second wife had one child: 

a)         MARIE de Lusignan (-Melle, Poitou 1 Oct 1260, bur Abbaye de Foucarmont)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Marie" as the daughter of "Raoul de Yssouldun" and his second wife "la fille au duc de Bretaigne...Aleonor", adding that she married "messire Alphons...filz au roy Jehan de Hierusalem"[1035]She succeeded her father in 1246 as Ctss d'Eu, dame de Civray, de Chizé et de Bénais.  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "1 Oct" of "Maria comitissa Augi"[1036]m  (before 1250) ALPHONSE de Brienne dit d'Acre, son of JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem Emperor of Constantinople & his third wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla (-Tunis 25 Aug 1270, bur Saint-Denis).  He succeeded as Comte d'Eu, de iure uxoris

2.         GUERIN de Lusignan (-after 29 Sep 1217).  Henry III King of England ordered that "castrum suum de Tykehull" be granted to "Warino, filio…R. comitis Augy" dated 29 Sep 1217[1037]

3.         MATHILDE de Lusignan (-14 Aug 1241, bur Llanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” married firstly “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that she died “in vigilia assumptionis beatæ Mariæ” and was buried in Lanthony[1038].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “circa Assumptionem beatæ Mariæ” in 1241 of “comitissa Herefordiæ” and her burial “apud Lentoniam juxta Gloucestriam[1039].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “…Maude daughter of the Erle of Ewes in Normanni, first wiff of…Humfre de Bohum the vth…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[1040]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "14 Aug" of "Mathildis comitissa de Herefort, filia...Aelidis comitissæ Augi"[1041]m as his first wife, HUMPHREY [V] de Bohun Earl of Hereford, son of HENRY de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Matilda de Mandeville (-24 Sep 1275, bur Llanthony Priory, Gloucester). 

4.         JEANNE de Lusignan (-3 Oct ----).  The necrology of the church of Eu records the anniversary "3 Oct" of "dominæ Johannæ filiæ Radulfi d’Insoudun senioris comitis Augi" who donated "xx libras et unam capellaniam" to the church[1042]

 

 

 

D.      COMTES d'EU (BRIENNE)

 

 

ALPHONSE de Brienne dit d'Acre, son of JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem & his third wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla y León (-Tunis 25 Aug 1270, bur Saint-Denis)The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1244 that Jean Emperor of Constantinople sent "ses trios fils, Alphonse, Jean et Louis, encore enfants" to Louis IX King of France[1043]He succeeded as Comte d'Eu, de iure uxoris.  Chambrier of France.  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "messire Alphons...filz au roy Jehan de Hierusalem" died in 1270[1044].  The necrology of the church of Eu records the anniversary "14 Sep" of "Alfonsi filii Johannis regis Hierusalem"[1045]He died of plague while on crusade. 

m (before 1250) MARIE de Lusignan Ctss d'Eu, daughter of RAOUL de Lusignan Comte d'Eu et de Guines & his second wife Yolande de Dreux (-Melle, Poitou 1 Oct 1260, bur Abbaye de Foucarmont).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Marie" as the daughter of "Raoul de Yssouldun" and his second wife "la fille au duc de Bretaigne...Aleonor", adding that she married "messire Alphons...filz au roy Jehan de Hierusalem"[1046].  The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "1 Oct" of "Maria comitissa Augi"[1047]

Comte Alphonse & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         JEAN [II] de Brienne (-Clermont-en-Beauvaisis 12 Jun 1294, bur Foucarmont)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehan" as son of "messire Alphons...filz au roy Jehan de Hierusalem" and his wife[1048]He succeeded his father as Comte d'EuThe Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Jehan fils du dit Alphons" died "à Clairmont en Beauvoisin" in 1294 and was buried next to his mother[1049]m BEATRIX de Châtillon, daughter of GUY [II] de Châtillon-sur-Marne Comte de Saint-Pol & his wife Mathilde de Brabant ([after 1254]-Saint-Pol 1304, bur Abbaye de Cercamp).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Jehan fils du dit Alphons" married "Bietrix de Saint Pol, fille au conte de Saint Pol", adding that she was reputed "la plus belle qui fust en France" and that it was rumoured that she was "femme au roy Philippes le Biax"[1050]Comte Jean & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         JEAN [III] (-killed in battle Courtrai 11 Jul 1302, bur Foucarmont)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehan" as the son of "Jehan fils du dit Alphons" and his wife "Bietrix de Saint Pol, fille au conte de Saint Pol"[1051]He succeeded his father as Comte d'Eu.  Comte de Guines, by right of his wife.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "comes Augi" was killed "apud Corteriacum"[1052].  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Jehan filz [de Jehan fils du dit Alphons]" died "à Courtray" in 1302 and was buried with his father[1053].  The Chronique Artésienne records “li quens d’Eu” among those killed at the battle of Courtrai[1054]m JEANNE Ctss de Guines, daughter of BAUDOUIN de Guines Châtelain de Bourbourg Seigneur d'Ardres & his wife Jeanne de Montmorency (-Guerville [Sep 1331/19 Apr 1342], bur Foucarmont).  The Lignages de Coucy (written in 1303) names "l’aisnée…Jeanne…contesse de Guignes apres son pere…l’autre…Blanche" as the daughters of "Baudouyn…cues de Guines" and his wife "la sœur du sieur de Montmorency", adding that Jeanne married "au conte d’Eu qui mourut en la bataille de Courtray" and left two children[1055]The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Jehan filz [de Jehan fils du dit Alphons]" married "madame Jehanne de Coussy contesse de Guynes à cause de sa mère, fille de Guines et femme monsieur de Coussy", adding in a later passage that she died "en Guerreville" in 1331[1056] Comte Jean & his wife had two children: 

i)          RAOUL [I] de Brienne (-Paris 19 Jan 1344, bur Foucarmont)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Raoul" as the son of "Jehan filz [de Jehan fils du dit Alphons]" and his wife, adding that he was "bien jeune enfant" when his father died[1057]He succeeded his father as Comte d'Eu et de Guines.  Constable of France 1327.  Governor of Languedoc.  He was killed in a tournament[1058]m JEANNE de Mello Dame de Lormes et de Château-Chinon, daughter of DREUX [IV] de Mello Seigneur de Château-Chinon, de Jarnac et de Sainte-Hermine & his first wife Jeanne de Toucy (-1351).  A parliamentary register dated 1347 records a dispute between “Ioannam de Meloto comitissam Augi, Droconem et Guillelmum de Melloto milites fratres“ and “Vicecomitem Thoarcii et eius uxorem Comitissam Drocensem“ regarding the inheritance of “quondam Ioannæ filiæ defuncti Petri nuper comitis Drocensis[1059].  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Raoul" married "à madame de Mello...Jehanne"[1060]Her parentage is confirmed by a register of parliament dated 1319 which records a claim by “comes Augi et uxor sua filia primogenita deffuncti Droconis de Melloto militis” against “Ioannem dominum de Haricuria militem et hæredem vicecomitissæ Castriairaudi matris suæ[1061].  Comte Raoul & his wife had three children: 

(a)       RAOUL [II] de Brienne (-beheaded Paris 19 Nov 1350, bur Paris Saint-Augustin)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Raoul" as the son of "Raoul" and his wife "madame de Mello", adding in a later passage that he was "connestable de France ainsi comme son père l’avoit esté", that he was captured at Caen, held prisoner for three years in England, but was ransomed and returned to Paris in 1350[1062]He succeeded his father as Comte d'Eu et de Guines.  Constable of France 1344.  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that Jean II King of France granted the county of Eu to "messire Jehan d’Artois...fliz de messire Robert d’Artois" after the death of Raoul[1063]m (contract Dec 1340[1064], before 19 Dec 1340[1065]) as her second husband, CATHERINE de Savoie, widow of AZZONE Visconti Lord of Milan, daughter of LOUIS [II] de Savoie Baron de Vaud & his wife Isabelle de Chalon [Bourgogne-Comté] (-18 Jun 1388, bur Namur Franciscan Monastery).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Raoul", son of "Raoul", married "madame Catherine de Savoye"[1066]The contract of marriage between "Rodolfo d'Eu Conte di Guines" and "Cattarina figlia di Lodovico di Savoia Signore di Vaud" is dated Dec 1340[1067]The testament of "Cattarina di Savoia Contessa di Guines" dated 6 May 1343 appoints as her heirs, if she has no children, "Isabella di Challon sua Madre e premorando questa, Ludovico di Savoia Signore di Vaud suo Padre", chooses her burial "nel Convento de' P. P. Minori di Mion, ove resta sepolto Gio. di Savoia suo fratello", and names "Conte Rodolfo suo marito"[1068].  A testamentary codicil of "Lodovico di Savoia Signore di Vaud" dated 18 Jan 1349 confirms bequests made to "Isabella di Challon sua Consorte" and refers to the dowry of "Cattarina sua figlia, Moglie del Principe Rodolfo Conte d'Eu e di Guines"[1069]She married thirdly (Mar 1352) Guillaume I "le Riche" Comte de Namur

(b)       JEANNE de Brienne (-Sens 6 Jul 1389, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehanne...et Marie" as the two daughters of "Raoul" and his wife "madame de Mello", adding that Jeanne married "au duc d’Athènes et depuis au conte d’Estampes"[1070]Dame de Château-Chinon et de Darcy.  The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records the marriage 16 Jan 1358 of “monseigneur Loys conte d’Estampes” and “madame Jehanne de Eu, fille jadis de Raoul conte de Eu et de Guynes et connestable de France”, widow of “monseigneur Gautier duc d’Athennes et conte de Brenne en Champaigne et connestable de France” who had been killed at Poitiers[1071].  The Chronique de Saint-Denis records the death 13 Jul 1389 of “madame Jeanne duchesse d’Athènes, femme de messire Louis comte d’Etampes” and her burial in “l’église de Saint-Denis l’Aréopagite” to which she had bequeathed “les trois riches vêtements dont elle avait été parée le jour de son premier mariage[1072]m firstly ([18 Jun 1342/10 Mar 1343]) as his second wife, GAUTHIER [VI] de Brienne Conte di Lecce e Conversano titular Duke of Athens, son of GAUTHIER [V] de Brienne Duke of Athens Conte di Lecce & his wife Jeanne de Châtillon-Porcéan (Lecce 1302-killed in battle Poitiers 19 Sep 1356, bur Abbaye de Beaulieu).  m secondly (contract 16 Jan 1358) LOUIS d'Evreux Comte d'Etampes, son of CHARLES d'Evreux Comte d'Etampes [Capet] & his wife doña María de la Cerda dame de Lunel (1336-Paris Hôtel de Nesle 6 May 1400, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). 

(c)       MARIE (-young).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehanne...et Marie" as the two daughters of "Raoul" and his wife "madame de Mello", adding that Marie died young[1073]

ii)         MARIE (-young, bur Abbaye de Longvilliers).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Marie" as the daughter of "Jehan filz [de Jehan fils du dit Alphons]" and his wife, adding that she "mourut jeune enfant" and was buried "en une abbaye de l’ordre de Cistealx...Lonviller, assez près de Guines et de Boulongne"[1074]

b)         JEANNE (-after 12 Mar 1325)Charles de France Comte de Valois confirmed the agreement between “dame Iehanne de Eu nostre cousine femme iadis Remon vicomte de Turene chevalier” and “Bernard de Cominge et Marguerite sa femme hoir de la vicomté de Turaine” regarding the dower of the former, by charter dated 1306[1075].  “Domina Matha de Insula comitissa Convenarum, vicecomitisa Turenæ gubernatrix et administratrix eiusdem vicecomitatus Turenæ”, on behalf of “domina Cecilia filia sua...Urgelli et Convenarum comitissa, vicecomitissaque Turenæ”, under the powers granted under the testament of “bonæ memoriæ viri domini Bernardi quondam comitis Convenarum, vicecomitisque Turenæ”, executed obligations including towards “dominæ Ioanne de Eugo dominæ de Piquiniaco olim vicecomitissæ Turenæ”, by charter dated 5 Sep 1345[1076]m firstly ([1299/1303]) as his third wife, RAYMOND [VII] Vicomte de Turenne, son of RAYMOND [VI] Vicomte de Turenne & his first wife Agassie de Pons ([28 Aug/Sep] 1276-Flanders 1304).  m secondly (before 4 Aug 1314) RENAUD Seigneur de Piquigny Vidame d'Amiens, son of JEAN Seigneur de Picquigny Vidame d’Amiens & his wife Marguerite de Beaumetz (-1315). 

c)         [MATHILDE ([1272/74]-[1348/53])The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos records that "D. Alonso Guedella" married "D. Mafalda"[1077]Salazar y Castro asserts that she was "Mathilde de Narbonne señora de Lunel, daughter of Aimeric [VI] Vicomte de Narbonne and his wife Sibylle de Foix[1078]This is presumably based on Zurita’s Anales de la Corona de Aragón, written [1562/80], which record that "don Alonso hijo del Infante don Fernando" married "en Francia…Mofalda…quanto yo congeturo fue de la casa de los Vizcondes de Narbona, y con ella huvo el señorio de Lunel"[1079].  Masnata relates that the seigneurie de Lunel passed to the French crown on the death in 1295 of Rousselin last seigneur de Lunel, concluding therefore that Alfonso de la Cerda could not have inherited the seigneurie through his wife (it was granted by Charles IV King of France to Alfonso’s son, Alfonso, see below)[1080].  Masnata found no basis for the supposed origin of Mathilde in Narbonne, and suggests that the wife of Alfonso de la Cerda was Mathilde, daughter of Jean de Brienne Comte d'Eu.  He reaches this conclusion by process of elimination of other possible candidates connected with the French royal family, and after remarking that Jean de Brienne is reported, in early secondary sources, to have had a daughter named Mathilde whose marriage is not otherwise recorded[1081].  Masnata comments that the chronology is correct and the onomastics favourable, as the name Juan passed into the Cerda family after this marriage[1082].  He also quotes the Continuator of the Chronique de Jean de Saint-Victor which names "filz au roy d’Espagne et…une dame de Normandie" as the parents of "monseigneur Aufour" (which refers to Alphonse de la Cerda, son of Alfonso and his wife Mathilde)[1083].  It should nevertheless be emphasised that Masnata has not identified a primary source which confirms that his hypothesis is correct.  She was Alfonso's mistress from [1288/89].  m (1290) don ALFONSO de la Cerda de Castilla, son of Infante don FERNANDO "él de la Cerda" de Castilla y León & his wife Blanche de France (Valladolid 1270-Piedrahita shortly after 23 Dec 1324).] 

2.         [ISABELLE (-[Dec 1302/11 Nov 1307])The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Ysabeau de Dompierre...Marguerite de Touars" as the two daughters of "Jehan fils du dit Alphons" and his wife "Bietrix de Saint Pol, fille au conte de Saint Pol", adding that Yolande married "au seigneur de Puiligny et seigneur de Dompierre en la rivière de Somme assez près d’Abbeville en Pontieu"[1084].  There are considerable chronological difficulties if Isabelle and Marguerite were daughters of Jean [II] Comte d’Eu.  In the case of Marguerite, she is recorded as the wife of Vicomte Guy [II] in a charter dated 25 Jul 1278 (see below), while the birth of the wife of Comte Jean [II] is estimated to [1254][1085].  Not enough is known about the chronology of Isabelle to be certain that the same problem exists, but it is likely that she was born not more than ten years or so later than her husband.  It appears more likely that the two were daughters of Jean’s father Alphonse.  m JEAN [II] de Dampierre Seigneur de Dampierre Vicomte de Troyes, son of JEAN [I] Seigneur de Dampierre & his wife Laure de Lorraine ([1251/53]-before 11 Nov 1307).] 

3.         [MARGUERITE (-20 May 1310)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Ysabeau de Dompierre...Marguerite de Touars" as the two daughters of "Jehan fils du dit Alphons" and his wife "Bietrix de Saint Pol, fille au conte de Saint Pol", adding that Marguerite married "au viconte de Toars"[1086]"Gui vicomte de Toarz chevalier…" provided for the inheritance of his cousin, with the consent of "madame Marguerite d’Eu nostre fame", by charter dated 25 Jul 1278[1087]There are considerable chronological difficulties if Isabelle and Marguerite were daughters of Jean [II] Comte d’Eu, given this charter dated 25 Jul 1278 and given the birth of the wife of Comte Jean [II] in [1254][1088].  It appears more likely that the two were daughters of Jean’s father Alphonse.  Marguerite died 28 May 1310[1089]m (before 1274) GUY [II] Vicomte de Thouars Seigneur de Talmond, son of AIMERY [IX] Vicomte de Thouars & his wife Marguerite de Lusignan (-21 Sep 1308).] 

4.         BLANCHE (-before 1338).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Blanche" as daughter of "messire Alphons...filz au roy Jehan de Hierusalem" and his wife, adding that she was a nun at Maubuisson and later abbess[1090]Abbess of Maubuisson 1309.  The necrology of Maubuisson records the donation "XVIII Kal Oct" of "Alphonsus comes Augi Francie camerarius…filie sue Blanche"[1091]

 

 

 

E.      COMTES d'EU (CAPET)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been confirmed, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

 

JEAN d'Artois "Sans-Terre", son of ROBERT [III] d'Artois Seigneur de Conches & his wife Jeanne de Valois (29 Aug 1321-6 Apr 1387, bur Eu, église abbatiale de Notre-Dame).  Imprisoned at Château-Gaillard after the trial of his father, he was released on the accession in 1350 of Jean II "le Bon" King of France who created him Comte d'Eu in Feb 1351.  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that Jean II King of France granted the county of Eu to "messire Jehan d’Artois...fliz de messire Robert d’Artois" after the death of Raoul[1092]Member of the Royal Council, Lieutenant of the King in Normandy in 1351.  Captured at Poitiers 1356, he was taken to London but released soon after.  He continued to serve the French king faithfully for the rest of his life.  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records the death "le jour du vendredy aouré...à Eu" in 1386 of "Jehan" and his burial "à Eu"[1093]

m (contract Château d'Eu 11 Jul 1352) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Melun Dame de Houdain, widow of PIERRE Comte de Dreux [Capet], daughter of JEAN [I] Vicomte de Melun Comte de Tancarville [Chamberlain of France] & his second wife Isabelle Dame d'Antoing, Epinoy, Zotteghem et Houdain, Bgfn van Gent (1328-Château de Monceaux, Eu 20 Dec 1389, bur Eu, église abbatiale de Notre-Dame).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "messire Jehan d’Artois" married "madame Ysabel de Melun, sœur au conte Tancarville, de messire Charles d’Espagne connestable et de l’archevesque de Sens, non pas tous d’un père", adding that she had previously married "au conte de Dreux"[1094].  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records the death "en la conté de Eu à Mouchiax" in 1389 of "Ysabel" and her burial "à Eu"[1095].  The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "20 Dec" of "Ysabelis de Meleun comitissæ Augi uxoris domini Johannis de Artezio"[1096]

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of Comte Jean's mistress is not known. 

Comte Jean & his wife had six children:

1.         JEANNE d'Artois ([1353]-22 May 1420, bur Abbaye d'Eu, Chapelle de la Trinité)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "mademoiselle de Dreux" as sister of "monsieur Philippes d’Artois conte de Eu", adding that she married "au viconte de Touars et conte de Dreux" who died "jeune enfant"[1097]After her husband died, she was called Mademoiselle de Dreux, Dame de Saint-Valéry.  The necrology of Eu abbey records the anniversary XI Kal Jun“ of “dominæ Ioannæ d’Artois comitissæ de Dreux” and her donation[1098].  m (contract Compiègne, Oise 1 Jul 1362, Château d'Eu 12 Jul 1365) SIMON de Thouars Comte de Dreux, son of LOUIS Vicomte de Thouars Seigneur de Talmont & his wife Jeanne Ctss de Dreux Dame de Saint-Valéry (-Château d'Eu 12 Jul 1365, bur Abbaye d'Eu, Chapelle de la Trinité).  He was killed in a tournament on the day of his marriage. 

2.         JEAN d'Artois ([1355]-Péronne, Somme 14 Feb 1363, bur Péronne, église collégiale Saint-Foucy).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehan d’Artois, aisné" as oldest son of "messire Jehan d’Artois" and his wife "madame Ysabel de Melun", adding that he was buried "à Peronne"[1099]Seigneur de Péronne. 

3.         ROBERT d'Artois (1356-poisoned Château d'Œuf, Naples 20 Jul 1387, bur Naples, church of San Lorenzo)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Robert d’Artois" as second son of "messire Jehan d’Artois" and his wife "madame Ysabel de Melun", adding that he died "ou pais de Gennes sans hoirs"[1100]Although he died after his father, he probably did not know of the death of the latter so did not claim to have succeeded as Comte d'Eu.  He and his wife were poisoned by orders of his brother-in-law Charles III King of Sicily.  m ([1376]) as her second husband, JEANNE of Sicily, widow of Infante don LUIS de Navarra Comte de Beaumont-le-Roger, daughter of CHARLES of Sicily Duke of Durazzo [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Marie of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (1344-poisoned château d'Œuf, Naples 20 Jul 1387, bur Naples, church of San Lorenzo).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Robert d’Artois", second son of "messire Jehan d’Artois" and his wife "madame Ysabel de Melun", married "la duchesse de Duras"[1101]

4.         PHILIPPE d'Artois (1358-Mihaliççik, Anatolia 16 Jun 1397, bur Eu, Abbaye de Saint-Laurent, or bur Constantinople, Convent of Saint-François de Galata)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "monsieur Philippes d’Artois conte de Eu" as son of "messire Jehan d’Artois" and his wife "madame Ysabel de Melun", adding that he was still living[1102]He succeeded his father in 1387 as Comte d'Eu.  He was appointed Connétable de France 31 Dec 1392 by Charles VI King of France.  He fought in Palestine, was captured by the Turks but was freed by Maréchal Boucicaut.  He was captured again at the siege of Nicopolis.  He was captured by the Turks after the failed siege of Nicopolis in Sep 1396, and died soon after.  The necrology of the church of Eu records the anniversary "17 Jun" of "domini Philippi comitis de Augo conestablularii Franciæ" who died "inter Sarracenos"[1103]m (contract Paris 27 Jan 1393) as her second husband, MARIE de Berry, widow of LOUIS [II] de Châtillon Comte de Dunois, daughter of JEAN de France Duc de Berry & his first wife Jeanne d'Armagnac (-Lyon Jun 1434, bur Abbaye de Souvigny-en-Bourbonnais, Allier).  The necrology of the church of Eu records that "Maria de Berry uxor sua" donated "centum libras annui redditus" for masses for "domini Philippi comitis de Augo conestablularii Franciæ" who died "inter Sarracenos"[1104]She married thirdly (contract Paris 27 May 1400, in person Paris, Palais du Roi 21 Jun 1401) Jean I Duc de Bourbon et d'Auvergne.  Comte Philippe & his wife had four children:

a)         PHILIPPE d'Artois (-Eu 23 Dec 1397, bur église abbatiale d'Eu). 

b)         CHARLES d'Artois ([1394]-25 Jul 1471, bur église abbatiale d'Eu).  He succeeded his father in 1397 as Comte d'Eu.  Captured by the English at Azincourt 1415, imprisoned in England until 1438 when he was exchanged for the Earl of Somerset.  Lieutenant Général du Roi in Normandy.  Governor of Paris 1465.  The Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI records the death Jul 1471 of “monseigneur le Conte d’Eu” after which his county “fut mise...en la main du Roy” to the disgust of “monseigneur le Conte de Neuers frere [error for neveu] de mondit seigneur d’Eu” who claimed to succeed “comme son vray heritier[1105]The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "25 Jul" of "Karolus d’Artois comes Augi"[1106]After his death, his nephew Jean de Bourgogne Comte de Nevers became Comte d'Eu.  m firstly (église de Saint-Martin aux Jumeaux, Picardie 21 Jul 1448) JEANNE de Saveuse, daughter and heiress of PHILIPPE Seigneur de Saveuse & his wife Marie d'Ailly (-Château de Sancerre 2 Jan 1449, bur église abbatiale d'Eu).  m secondly (Antoing near Tournai, Hainaut 23 Sep 1454) HELENE de Melun, daughter of JEAN [I] de Melun Burggraaf van Gent, Seigneur d'Antoing [Constable of Flanders, Governor of Douai] & his wife Jeanne d'Abbeville Dame de Boubers[-en-Ponthieu] (-Rouen 25 Jul 1472, bur Abbaye d'Eu, Chapelle Saint-Antoine).  Mistress (1): LOUISE de Hénin-Liétard, daughter of ---.  Comte Charles had one possible illegitimate son by Mistress (1):   

i)          [CHARLES d'Artois ([1470]-).  Kerrebrouck[1107] refers to the claim by the family d'Artois of Artois (extinct in the male line in 1885) to descend from this possible illegitimate son of Charles d'Artois Comte d'Eu.  m AGNES de Namur, daughter of ---.]

c)         BONNE d'Artois ([1395]-in childbirth Dijon 17 Sep 1425, bur Dijon, église des Chartreux)Père Anselme records her parentage, first marriage, the dates and places of her second marriage and death, and the place of her burial, without citing the corresponding primary sources[1108]Regent of Nevers after her first husband's death, until her second marriage.  She succeeded her aunt Jeanne d'Artois Mademoiselle de Dreux as Dame de Houdain.  m firstly (contract Paris 12 Mar 1413, Château de Beaumont-en-Argonne, Ardennes 20 Jun 1413) as his second wife, PHILIPPE de Bourgogne Comte de Nevers et de Rethel, son of PHILIPPE II "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders (Villaines-en-Duesmois Oct 1389-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Estelan near Rethel).  m secondly (Moulins-lès-Engelbert 1424) as his second wife, PHILIPPE III "le Bon" Duke of Burgundy, son of JEAN "Sans-Peur" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite de Hainaut (Dijon 31 Jul 1396-Bruges 15 Jun 1467, bur Dijon église des Chartreux).  

d)         CATHERINE d'Artois (-before 3 Sep 1420)m as his first wife, JEAN de Bourbon Seigneur de Carency, son of JEAN I de Bourbon Comte de Vendôme et de la Marche & his wife Catherine Ctss de Vendôme (-29 Apr 1458).

5.         CHARLES d'Artois (1359-15 Apr 1368, bur Eu, église abbatiale de Notre-Dame).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Charles d’Artois qui morut jeune enfant" as third son of "messire Jehan d’Artois" and his wife "madame Ysabel de Melun", adding that he was buried "à Eu"[1109]

6.         ISABELLE d’Artois (1361-26 Jun 1379, bur Eu, église abbatiale de Notre-Dame, Chapelle Saint-Jean).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Ysabeau d’Artois" as one of the two daughters of "messire Jehan d’Artois" and his wife "madame Ysabel de Melun", adding that she died aged 18 and was buried "à Eu"[1110]

Comte Jean had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):  

7.          GUILLAUME bâtard d'Eu .  He pleaded at the parlement of Paris in 1414 with his half-sister Jeanne d'Artois Mademoiselle de Dreux. 

 

 

 

F.      VICOMTES d'EU

 

 

1.         OSBERN d'EuVicomtem ---.  The name of Osbern's wife is not known.  Osbern & his wife had one child: 

a)         ANSFRED"…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…" signed that charter dated to [1035/60] under which "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen[1111].  "Ansfredus, Osberni de Ou vicecomitis, postea…Hierosolimitani monachi, filius…cum conjuge mea Emma" offered "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" as a monk at Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis meis Emma, Osberni dapiferi uxore et filiis eius Willelmo et Osberno…Willelmo…principe Normannorum", by undated charter[1112]m EMMA, daughter of ---.  "Ansfredus, Osberni de Ou vicecomitis, postea…Hierosolimitani monachi, filius…cum conjuge mea Emma" offered "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" as a monk at Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis meis Emma, Osberni dapiferi uxore et filiis eius Willelmo et Osberno…Willelmo…principe Normannorum", by undated charter[1113].  Ansfred & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          GEOFFROY .  Monk at Holy Trinity, Rouen.  "Ansfredus, Osberni de Ou vicecomitis, postea…Hierosolimitani monachi, filius…cum conjuge mea Emma" offered "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" as a monk at Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis meis Emma, Osberni dapiferi uxore et filiis eius Willelmo et Osberno…Willelmo…principe Normannorum", by undated charter[1114]

ii)         [OSBERN (-after 7 May 1092).  "…Osberto nepote Osberti vicecomitis…" is named among the ecclesiastical witnesses of the charter dated 7 May 1092 under which Odo Bishop of Bayeux made donations to the church[1115].  If he was the son of Ansfred, he must have been born after the charter under which Ansfred gave "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen (see above).] 

 

2.         --- .  Vicomte d’Eum JEANNE, daughter of --- (-16 Jan ----).  The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "16 Jan" of "Johanna vicecomitissa Augi"[1116].  [Two children]: 

a)         [ROBERT (-1 Mar ----).  The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "1 Mar" of "Robertus vicecomitis et Heliardis uxor eius"[1117]m HELIARDIS, daughter of ---.  The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "1 Mar" of "Robertus vicecomitis et Heliardis uxor eius"[1118].] 

b)         [JEANNE (-9 Mar ----).  The necrology of the church of Eu records the death "9 Mar" of "Johanna filia vicecomitis Augi"[1119].] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    ROUEN

 

 

A.      VICOMTES de ROUEN

 

 

The pagus Rotomagensis (Roumois), centred on the city of Rouen, was located south of the pagi Tellau [Talou, later the county of Arques] and Caletensis [pays de Caux], north of the diocese of Evreux, and extended to the west as far as the river Risle[1120].  No evidence has been found that Rouen later existed as a separate county in the duchy of Normandy.  The town was the main base of the dukes, and the nobles who are listed below were presumably their direct vassals. 

 

 

1.         GOZELIN Vicomte de Rouen, Vicomte d'Arques.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Goscelinus de Archis” founded “extra muros Rotomagi in monte sanctæ Trinitatis cœnobium, quod vulgo sanctæ Catharinæ dicitur[1121].  "…Gozelinus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1122].  "Gozelini…vicecomitis et Emmelinæ uxoris eius" confirmed the foundation in 1030 by Robert II Duke of Normandy of the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen[1123]An undated charter, dated to [1030/35], records a donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "vicecomes Rotomagi Gozelinus…fundator" and "Heltone, generosi Gulberti filio", witnessed by "Rotberti comitis, Rotberti archiepiscopi, Gozelini vicecomitis, Emmelinæ uxoris eius, Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis"[1124].  "Gozelinus…vicecomes" donated "ecclesiam Montvillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domino meo comite…Rotberto", by undated charter (dated to [1030/35]), signed by "Rotberti comitis, Gozelini vicecomitis, Emmelinæ vicecomitissæ…Hertoldi de Limeisi…"[1125].  "…Gotscellinus Rufus de Formovilla…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1126]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Goscelinus vicecomes Arcacensis, patruus Godefridi patris Mathildis uxoris Willelmi camerarii" founded "monasterium Sanctæ Trinitatis in monte Rothomagi"[1127], although the detailed family relationships are inconsistent with those confirmed by other sources.  m EMMELINE, daughter of ---.  "Gozelini…vicecomitis et Emmelinæ uxoris eius" confirmed the foundation in 1030 by Robert II Duke of Normandy of the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen[1128]An undated charter, dated to [1030/35], records a donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "vicecomes Rotomagi Gozelinus…fundator" and "Heltone, generosi Gulberti filio", witnessed by "Rotberti comitis, Rotberti archiepiscopi, Gozelini vicecomitis, Emmelinæ uxoris eius, Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis"[1129].  "Gozelinus…vicecomes" donated "ecclesiam Montvillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domino meo comite…Rotberto", by undated charter (dated to [1030/35]), signed by "Rotberti comitis, Gozelini vicecomitis, Emmelinæ vicecomitissæ…Hertoldi de Limeisi…"[1130].  A charter of Henry V King of England records donations to Saint-Amand de Rouen including the donations by “Goscelini…vicecomitis et Emmelinæ uxoris eius”, confirmed by Robert Duke of Normandy[1131].  Gozelin & his wife had one child: 

a)         daughter .  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1080 which relates that "Gozelinus vicecomes de Archis…cum coniuge sua et filiis" founded Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and donated property, and that "Willelmus de Archis heres defuncti…avi sui Gozelini" confirmed the donation[1132].  "Grandfather" must be "maternal grandfather" as the paternal ancestors of Guillaume d'Arques are confirmed by Guillaume de Jumièges (see above and below).  m GODEFROI, son of OSBERN de Bolbec & his [first/second wife Aveline ---/Hawise ---].  Vicomte d'Arques, presumably de iure uxoris

 

2.         RICHARD Vicomte de Rouenm ---, niece of Gunnora mistress of Richard I Comte [de Normandie], daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...tertia” married “Richardo vicecomiti Rothomagensi, patri...Lamberti de Sancto Sidonio[1133].  Richard & his wife had one child: 

a)         LAMBERT de Saint-Saëns .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...earum...tertia” married “Richardo vicecomiti Rothomagensi, patri...Lamberti de Sancto Sidonio[1134]

-        SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAËNS

 

3.         GUILLAUME Trentegeruns (-after 1150).  Vicomte de Rouen"…Hugone de Douvra, Willelmo Trentegeruns tunc temporis vicecomite de Rothomago…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" donated property to Notre-Dame-du-Pré at Rouen[1135]

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS de BEC-CRESPIN

 

 

The primary source which confirms the descent of this family from the Crispin family in England (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C) has not been identified. 

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME [III] CrespinSeigneur de Bec-Crespinm EVE d’Harcourt Dame de Lisors, daughter of ---.  Guillaume [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME [IV] Crespin (-[28 Jul] 1251)Seigneur de Bec-Crespin.  Seigneur de Dangut.  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “28 Jul“ of "domini Crispini domini [de] Dangut...et Amiciæ uxoris eius filiæ domini fundatoris” and their donation of revenue “apud Montemealvum et jus patronatus de Herbetot[1136]m firstly AMICIE de Roye, daughter of BARTHELEMY de Roye & his wife Petronille de Montfort (-[28 Jul] ----).  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “28 Jul“ of "domini Crispini domini [de] Dangut...et Amiciæ uxoris eius filiæ domini fundatoris” and their donation of revenue “apud Montemealvum et jus patronatus de Herbetot[1137]m secondly ALIX de Sancerre, daughter of ETIENNE [II] de Sancerre Seigneur de Saint-Brisson et de Châtillon-sur-Loing & his first wife Eléonore de Soissons (-after 1263).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the decision of the Paris parliament dated 1263 granting a share in their paternal inheritance “de Lopa et de Marcheisvillam”, which they claimed from “leur frère le comte de Sancerre”, to la dame de Dangu et à la vicomtesse de Melun[1138]Guillaume [IV] & his first wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME [V] Crespin ([19 Jun] 1283).  Seigneur de Bec-Crespin.  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “19 Jun“ 1266 of "domini Guillelmi Crispini junioris militis filii dominæ Amiciæ de Roya[1139]m JEANNE de Mortemer Dame de Varanguebec, daughter of GUILLAUME de Varanguebec & his wife --- (-before 1271).  Heiress of the connétablie de Normandie.  Guillaume [V] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       GUILLAUME [VI] Crespin (-before 1330)Richemond names “Guillaume VI de Bec-Crespin sire d’Etrépagny et connétable héréditaire de Normandie, fils du maréchal Guillaume V Crespin et de Jeanne de Mortemer dame de Varanguebec” as the husband of Mathilde de Bommiers[1140]Seigneur de Bec-Crespin.  Seigneur d’Etrépagny.  [m firstly --- de Calletot, daughter of ROBERT de Calletot Seigneur de Berneval-en-Caux & his wife --- de HoudencA manuscript genealogy records "N--- de Houdent femme de Guillaume Calletot (al. Robert) seigneur de Berneual et des trois villes S. Denys" as mother of “N--- Calletot femme du Baron de Montmorency” and of “N--- Calletot femme du Baron du Bec Crespin[1141].]  m [secondly] MATHILDE de Bommiers, daughter of THIBAUT Seigneur de Bommiers et de Blazon & his [second] wife [Jeanne de Vendôme] (-after 1330).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by an order of the Parlement de Paris dated 20 Mar 1323 relating to a dispute between “comitem Rouciacy” and “Guillelmum Crispini militem dominum d’Estrepigny” concerning the inheritance of “defuncti Theobaldi de Bomes militis, quondam patris dictarum uxorum[1142].  Guillaume [VI] & his [second] wife had two children: 

(1)       JEANNE Crespin (-1374).  Dame d’Etrépagny, de Varanguebec et de Neauphle.  Her parentage, ancestry and marriage are recorded by Richemond[1143]Père Anselme dates her marriage to “vers l’an 1334[1144], but the source on which this speculation is based has not been identified.  A charter dated Nov 1350, in the presence of “dictorum comitisse et comitis de Roucyaco eius filii” and “dicte domine de Boutavant, suo et dicti mariti sui nomine”, confirms an earlier agreement between “madame Marguerite de Bomez contesse de Roucy et de Brayne [...monseigneur le conte de Roucy et monseigneur Symon de Roucy, ses enfants]” and “monseigneur Jehan de Meleun seigneur de Tancarville [...à cause de madame Jehanne Crespin sa fame...madame Marie Crespin dame de Boutavant] et monseigneur Jehan de Chalon seigneur de Boutevant, à cause de leurs fames, [filles de la feue] dame d’Estrepigny, suer de la dite contesse” concerning “Bomez, de Mirabel, de Blason et de Montfaucon[1145]m ([1334]) JEAN [II] de Melun Vicomte de Melun Comte de Tancarville, son of JEAN [I] de Melun Vicomte de Melun Comte de Tancarville & Jeanne [Alix] Dame de Tancarville (-after 1351). 

(2)       MARIE Crespin (-after Nov 1350).  Dame de Bec-Crespin, de Boutavant et de Louves.  A charter dated Nov 1350, in the presence of “dictorum comitisse et comitis de Roucyaco eius filii” and “dicte domine de Boutavant, suo et dicti mariti sui nomine”, confirms an earlier agreement between “madame Marguerite de Bomez contesse de Roucy et de Brayne [...monseigneur le conte de Roucy et monseigneur Symon de Roucy, ses enfants]” and “monseigneur Jehan de Meleun seigneur de Tancarville [...à cause de madame Jehanne Crespin sa fame...madame Marie Crespin dame de Boutavant] et monseigneur Jehan de Chalon seigneur de Boutevant, à cause de leurs fames, [filles de la feue] dame d’Estrepigny, suer de la dite contesse” concerning “Bomez, de Mirabel, de Blason et de Montfaucon[1146]m JEAN [III] de Chalon Comte d’Auxerre et de Tonnerre, son of JEAN [II] Comte d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Alix de Bourgogne dame de Montfleur ([1321/22]-1379). 

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS de GUITRY

 

 

Guitry is located in the canton of Ecouis, south-east of Rouen.  The seigneurie of Guitry was inherited by the Chaumont family, through the marriage of Robert “Eloquens” de Chaumont and the daughter of Nicolas de Guitry. 

 

 

1.         BAUDRY [I] de Guitrym ---.  The name of Baudry’s wife is not known.  Baudry [I] & his wife had one child: 

a)         NICOLAS de Guitry"Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...filius meus Rogerus" donated "ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei" to found the priory of Saint-Wandrille[1147]m ---.  The name of Nicolas’s wife is not known.  Nicolas & his wife had three children: 

i)          BAUDRY [II] de Guitry (-after Jan 1086).  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jan 1086 “Guillelmus de Warenna et Baldricus de Chitreio Nicolai filius, atque Gislebertus de Aquila”, wanting to avenge the death of “Richerii fratris sui” [Richer de Laigle], unsuccessfully attacked the besiegers of the castle of Sainte-Suzanne[1148]

ii)         ROGER de Guitry"Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...filius meus Rogerus" donated "ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei" to found the priory of Saint-Wandrille[1149]

iii)        daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter under which [her father] "Nicholaus filius...Baldrici...filius meus Rogerus" donated "ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei" to found the priory of Saint-Wandrille[1150], read together with the undated charter under which [her son]  "Otmundus et utrique filii eius Willelmus et Otmundus" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam...in villa...Chitrei" to found the priory of Saint-Wandrille made by “avus eorum Nicholaus[1151]m ROBERT "Eloquens" de Chaumont, son of --- (-bur Aillerie, near Chaumont). 

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS de MONTFORT-sur-RISLE (BASTEMBOURG)

 

 

THURSTAN de Bastembourg, son of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstinus...de Bastenburc” had “duos filios Willelmum Bertrannum et Hugonem cum barba de Monteforti[1152].  No other reference to Thurstan has been found. 

m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known. 

Thurstan & his wife had three children: 

1.         GUILLAUME Bertran .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstinus...de Bastenburc” had “duos filios Willelmum Bertrannum et Hugonem cum barba de Monteforti[1153].  "…Willelmus Bertrannus" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[1154]

-        SEIGNEURS de BRICQUEBEC.   

2.         HUGUES [I] "cum barba" de Montfort-sur-Risle (-killed in battle [1035/45]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstinus...de Bastenburc” had “duos filios Willelmum Bertrannum et Hugonem cum barba de Monteforti[1155].  "…Hugo vicecomes filius Turstingi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[1156]Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Hugo de Monteforti filius Tustini” and “Walchelino de Ferrariis” [a later passage names him “Henricus de Ferrariis”] fought and killed each other, dated to the early part of the reign of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy from the context of the passage[1157]m ---.  The name of Hugues's wife is not known.  Hugues [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         HUGUES [II] de Montfort-sur-Risle (-1088 or after).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “secundus Hugo” as the son of “Turstinus...de Bastenburc...[filium] Hugonem cum barba de Monteforti[1158]Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle.  He fought in the battle of Mortmaer in 1054.  "…Hugo de Monte Forti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[1159].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Hugone de Mumfordia" contributed 50 ships and 60 knights towards the invasion of England in 1066[1160].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Montfort sur Rille" and "Hue sire de Montfort", presumably referring to the same person, as two of those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[1161].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[1162].  Warden of Dover Castle, Constable of England 1067.  "Hugo de Monteforti" founded Saint-Ymer-en-Auge for the souls of "patris mei Hugonis et matris meæ et uxoris mea et…fratrum meorum Radulphi ac Roberti atque filiorum" by charter dated to [1066/67][1163].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Montfort” holding numerous properties in Essex, in Norfolk and in Suffolk[1164].  He became a monk in 1088[1165]m firstly --- de Beaufour, daughter of RICHARD de Beaufour & his wife ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[1166]m secondly ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “secundus Hugo” married “aliam” after the death of his first wife by whom he had “Hugonem tertium et Robertum fratrem eius[1167].  The name of Hugues's second wife is not known.  Hugues [II] & his first wife had one child: 

i)          ALICE de Montfort-sur-Risle .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “secundus Hugo”, son of “Turstinus...de Bastenburc...[filium] Hugonem cum barba de Monteforti”, had “de filia Richardi de Bellofago...unam filiam” who married “Giselbertus de Ganz[1168].  The Stemma fundatoris of Bardney Abbey names “Alicia de Monteforti” as wife of ”Gislebrictus de Gaunt[1169]Dame de Montfort-sur-Risle.  Montfort-sur-Risle was inherited by her children.  m GILBERT van Gent, son of --- (-[1095]).  Lord of Folkingham. 

Hugues [II] & his second wife had three children: 

ii)         ROBERT [I] de Montfort-sur-Risle (-before 1111).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “secundus Hugo” married “aliam” after the death of his first wife by whom he had “Hugonem tertium et Robertum fratrem eius”, specifying that both sons died childless on pilgrimage[1170].  "…Robert de Montfort…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[1171].  His properties were confiscated after he was accused of treason in 1107.  He was in Durazzo in 1108[1172].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Roberti de Monte Forti…Adeline sororis ipsius Roberti", by charter dated to [1181/89][1173]

iii)        HUGUES [III] de Montfort-sur-Risle (-before 1100).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “secundus Hugo” married “aliam” after the death of his first wife by whom he had “Hugonem tertium et Robertum fratrem eius”, specifying that both sons died childless on pilgrimage [incorrect in the case of Hugues [III], assuming that the two children shown below are correctly assigned to him][1174].  Lord of Haughley.  m ---.  The name of Hugues's wife is not known.  Hugues [III] & his wife had two children: 

(a)       ROBERT [II] de Montfort-sur-Risle .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Lord of Haughley.  He was banished before 1107. 

(b)       ADELISE de Montfort-sur-Risle (-after 1142).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after succeeding his brother, Simon confirmed his predecessors’ donations to saint-Evroul, with the consent of "Adelina conjuge sua"[1175].  “Robertus de Ver constabularius regis Angliæ et Adeluda filia Hugonis de Monteforte uxor mea” donated property to Monks Horton by charter dated to [1140/44] witnessed by “Gaufrido de Ver et Roberto fratre suo...[1176]m firstly SIMON Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche, son of GUILLAUME Seigneur de Moulins-la-Marche & his second wife Doda de Meulan (-[1119/29]).  m secondly (before 1130) ROBERT de Vere, son of BERNARD de Vere & his wife --- (-after 1142).  Constable of England 1142. 

iv)       ADELINE de Montfort-sur-Risle .  She is named as wife of Guillaume by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and specifies that the couple were childless[1177].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Roberti de Monte Forti…Adeline sororis ipsius Roberti", by charter dated to [1181/89][1178]m GUILLAUME de Breteuil Seigneur d'Ivry, son of WILLIAM FitzOsbern Earl of Hereford & his first wife Adelise de Tosny (-Bec 12 Jan [1103], bur Monastery of Lyre). 

b)         RAOUL .  "Hugo de Monteforti" founded Saint-Ymer-en-Auge for the souls of "patris mei Hugonis et matris meæ et uxoris mea et…fratrum meorum Radulphi ac Roberti atque filiorum" by charter dated to [1066/67][1179]

c)         ROBERT (-after 1089).  "Hugo de Monteforti" founded Saint-Ymer-en-Auge for the souls of "patris mei Hugonis et matris meæ et uxoris mea et…fratrum meorum Radulphi ac Roberti atque filiorum" by charter dated to [1066/67][1180].  "…Robertus de Montfort…" witnessed the charter dated 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy confirmed the restoration of the monastery of Saint-Vigor near Bayeux[1181]

d)         [THURSTAN de Montfort-sur-Risle .  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that [his son] "Willermus, nobili Normannorum prosapia originem...in...castro super Rislam...Monsfortis...pater eius Turstinus, mater...Albereda" succeeded as third abbot of Bec[1182].  The parentage of Thurstan is not known.  From a chronological point of view, it appears more likely that he was the son of Hugues [I] Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle than his brother, but this is not beyond all doubt.]  m ALBREDA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ which records that "Willermus, nobili Normannorum prosapia originem...in...castro super Rislam...Monsfortis...pater eius Turstinus, mater...Albereda...Rogerii de Bello Monte patris Roberti comitis Mellenti ex uxore neptis" succeeded as third abbot of Bec[1183].  Thurstan & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME (-Sep 1124, bur Bec).  Abbot of Bec 1093.  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Willermus, nobili Normannorum prosapia originem...in...castro super Rislam...Monsfortis...pater eius Turstinus, mater...Albereda" succeeded as third abbot of Bec[1184].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records the death in 1124 of "dominus Willermus tertius abbas Beccensis ecclesiæ" and his burial in the abbey[1185].  The Vita Beccensium abbatum Guillelmi records the death "anno...vicesimo nono abbatiæ mense Septembris" of Guillaume[1186]

3.         GISLA de Montfort-sur-Risle Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Geroius” married “Turstini de Monteforti...filiam...Gislam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus et Fulcoius...Willelmus et Rodulfus Mala-Corona, Robertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis et Emma, Adelais et Hadvisa”, adding that “ex his filiorum et nepotum militaris turma propagata est, quæ Barbaris in Anglia vel Apulia seu Trachia vel Syria nimio terrori visa est” [“from these children and grandchildren sprang a race of knights who became the terror of the barbarians in England, Apulia, Thrace and Syria”][1187].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Geroius" married “Gislam Turstini de Basteburgo filiam” by whom he had “septem filios et quatuor filias...Ernaldus, Willermus, Fulcoius, Radulfus Mala-corona, Rodbertus, Hugo et Geroius, Heremburgis, Hadvisa, Emma, Adelais[1188].  Her marriage can probably be dated to [1005/10]: Orderic Vitalis records that Giroie died only “Ernaldus et Willermus” were knights, in another passage making it clear that he died before the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy (who died in 1035)[1189]m ([1005/10]) GIROIE [Geroius] Seigneur d'Echauffour et de Montreuil, son of ARNAUD & his wife --- (-before 1035). 

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de MONTFORT-sur-RISLE (GAND)

 

 

HUGUES van Gent, son of GILBERT van Gent & his wife Alix de Montfort-sur-Risle (-after [1147]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “quartum Hugonem” as the son of “Giselbertus de Ganz” by his wife “secundum Hugonem...filiam[1190].  He adopted his mother's name and succeeded her as Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle.  He rebelled against Henry I King of England in Sep 1123, with his brothers-in-law Waléran de Meulan, Hugues de Châteauneuf and Guillaume Louvel.  He rejected peace terms proposed by the king, was disinherited and imprisoned in England[1191].  "Hugo de Monteforti filius Gisleberti de Gant" donated property with the consent of "Gaufridi Normannorum ducis et filii eius Henrici…Haelina uxore mea et filiis meis Roberto et Valeranno" to Saint-Ymer-en-Auge by charter dated to [1145 or 1147], which also refers to donations by "Hugonis avi mei"[1192]

m ([1120]) ADELINE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “quartum Hugonem” married “Adelinam filiam Roberti comitis Mellenti” by whom he had “filium suum primogenitum Robertum et alios[1193].  Orderic Vitalis names her as one of the three sisters of Waleran Comte de Meulan, whom he married to Hugues de Montfort[1194].  "Hugo de Monteforti filius Gisleberti de Gant" donated property with the consent of "…Haelina uxore mea et filiis meis Roberto et Valeranno" to Saint-Ymer-en-Auge by charter dated to [1145 or 1147], which also refers to donations by "Hugonis avi mei"[1195].  Arnoul Bishop of Lisieux declared the donation of the church of Saint-Ymer to the abbey of Bec by undated charter which names "Hugo de Monteforti et Robertus filius eius et Adelina uxor eius"[1196]

Hugues [IV] & his wife had three children: 

1.         ROBERT de Montfort (-1178).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “quartum Hugonem” married “Adelinam filiam Roberti comitis Mellenti” by whom he had “filium suum primogenitum Robertum et alios[1197].  "Hugo de Monteforti filius Gisleberti de Gant" donated property with the consent of "…Haelina uxore mea et filiis meis Roberto et Valeranno" to Saint-Ymer-en-Auge by charter dated to [1145 or 1147][1198].  Arnoul Bishop of Lisieux declared the donation of the church of Saint-Ymer to the abbey of Bec by undated charter which names "Hugo de Monteforti et Robertus filius eius et Adelina uxor eius"[1199].  "Robertus de Monteforti" confirmed the donations of his predecessors to Saint-Ymer-en-Auge on leaving for Jerusalem, by undated charter[1200].  "Robertus de Monteforti" confirmed donations of "Hugo pater meus" to Saint-Ymer-en-Auge by charter dated 1160[1201].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Robertus de Monteforti" with five knights "de honore de Caucainville" and 33 knights in his own service[1202]Robert of Torigny records the death in 1178 of "Robertus de Monte Forti" and the succession of "Hugo filius eius natu de sorore Radulfi de Fulgeriis"[1203]m CLEMENCE de Fougères, daughter of HENRI Seigneur de Fougères & his wife Olive de Penthièvre (-1194 or after).  Robert of Torigny records that "Robertus de Monte Forti" married "sorore Radulfi de Fulgeriis"[1204]A charter dated 1189 records the right of the abbey of Bec-Hellouin to choose the priest for the church of Saint-Ymer "in die…sepulture Roberti iuvenis de Monteforti fratris Hugonis de Monteforti" at the request of "matris sue Clementie", naming "Robertus pater suus"[1205].  "Clemens de Monteforti" donated property to Saint-Ymer by charter dated 1194[1206].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGUES de Montfort (-after 1189).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1178 of "Robertus de Monte Forti" and the succession of "Hugo filius eius natu de sorore Radulfi de Fulgeriis"[1207]A charter dated 1189 records the right of the abbey of Bec-Hellouin to choose the priest for the church of Saint-Ymer "in die…sepulture Roberti iuvenis de Monteforti fratris Hugonis de Monteforti" at the request of "matris sue Clementie", naming "Robertus pater suus"[1208]

b)         ROBERT de Montfort (-before 1189).  A charter dated 1189 records the right of the abbey of Bec-Hellouin to choose the priest for the church of Saint-Ymer "in die…sepulture Roberti iuvenis de Monteforti fratris Hugonis de Monteforti" at the request of "matris sue Clementie", naming "Robertus pater suus"[1209]

2.         WALERAN de Montfort (-after [1147]).  "Hugo de Monteforti filius Gisleberti de Gant" donated property with the consent of "…Haelina uxore mea et filiis meis Roberto et Valeranno" to Saint-Ymer-en-Auge by charter dated to [1145 or 1147][1210]

3.         --- de Montfort ([1125/40]-)Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[1211]m RICHARD of Gloucester, son of ROBERT Fitzroy Earl of Gloucester & his wife Mabel [Sibylle] FitzRobert ([1120/25]-1175).  He succeeded his mother as Seigneur de Creully. 

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS de NEUFMARCHE

 

 

1.         TURCHETIL de Neufmarché .  Orderic Vitalis names his sons “Goisfredus gener eius et Hugo de Morio-Monte, Turchetilli de Novo-Mercato filii[1212].  No source has yet been identified in which Thurkill is named in his own capacity.  m ---.  The name of Thurkill's wife is not known.  Turchetil & his wife had two children: 

a)         GEOFFROY de Neufmarché Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardum de Huglevilla” held out against “Guillelmus de Archis” and his rebels “in castello suo secus ecclesiam Sancti-Albini” with the help of “Goisfredus gener eius et Hugo de Morio-Monte, Turchetilli de Novo-Mercato filii”, dated to [1054][1213].  "…Giraldi di Novomercato" subscribed the charter dated Apr 1067 under which "Willelmus…dux Normannorum…Anglorum rex" confirmed rights to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire[1214]m (before 1054) ADA de Heugleville, daughter of RICHARD de Saint-Valéry Seigneur de Heugleville & his wife Ada [de Heugleville].  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that “generosus in Normannia miles...Gulbertus Ricardi de Huglevilla filius” donated “ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Alfagio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul, soon after “Drogo nepos suus” [identified as Dreux de Neufmarché, her son] left military life and became a monk at Ouche[1215].  She is named as daughter of Richard by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her husband who helped his father-in-law during the rebellion of Guillaume d'Arques[1216].  Geoffroy & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          BERNARD de Neufmarché (after 1054-1125).  Orderic Vitalis names “Bernardum et Drogonem” as the children of “Goisfredus ex Adda Ricardi filia”, adding that Bernard bore arms “usque ad senium” and fought under three English kings, in particular “tempore Guillelmi Rufi” against “Resen Guallorum regem”, after whose death he built “Brachaniaucum castellum” and possessed “regnum...Britonum, cujus caput Talgard[1217].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Bernardus Goisfredi de Novo-Mercato filius” donated “ecclesiam de Speinis” [Speen, Kentbury-Eagle, near Newbury, Berkshire] to Ouche Saint-Evroul[1218].  Lord of Brecknock. 

-         WALES – LORDS of BRECKNOCK

ii)         DREUX de Neufmarché (after 1054-).  Orderic Vitalis names “Bernardum et Drogonem” as the children of “Goisfredus ex Adda Ricardi filia”, adding that Dreux abandoned a military career and became a monk at Ouche Saint-Evroul[1219].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Drogo filius Goisfredi de Novo-Mercato et Rogerius Erneisi de Coluncis filius nepos Guillelmi de Guarenna et Ernaldus Unfridi de Telliolo filius, nepos ex sorore Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio" donated revenue to the church[1220].  Monk at Saint-Evroul.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Mainerius abbas” (abbot of Ouche Saint-Evroul) went to England in the 14th year of his abbacy [1081] with “Rogerium de Guarenna, Drogonem...de Novo-Mercato” when William I King of England confirmed the possessions of Ouche by charter (which he quotes in full)[1221]

iii)        [OSBERN de Neufmarché .  A charter of Henry V King of England records donations to Saint-Amand de Rouen including the donations by "Giroldus" of "ecclesiam de Rolmare", with the consent of William I King of England, witnessed by "Osbernus de Novoforo"[1222].  It is not certain that Osbern was related to the main Neufmarché family.] 

b)         HUGUES de Morimont (-killed in battle Morimont [1054]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ricardum de Huglevilla” held out against “Guillelmus de Archis” and his rebels “in castello suo secus ecclesiam Sancti-Albini” with the help of “Goisfredus gener eius et Hugo de Morio-Monte, Turchetilli de Novo-Mercato filii”, dated to [1054], adding that Hugues was killed in the combat “apud Morium-Montem[1223]

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de PONT-AUDEMER, SEIGNEUR de VIEILLES

 

 

TORF, son of ---. 

m ---.  The name of Torf's wife is not known. 

Torf & his wife had one child:

1.         THOROLD [Turold] de Pont-Audemer (-murdered after 1040).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that Wewa married “Turulfo de Ponte-Audomari...filius...Torf” by whom she had “Humfridum de Vetulis patrem Rogerii de Bellomonte[1224].  "…Turaldus…" is named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1225].  He was strangled[1226].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turoldus teneri ducis pædagogus“ was killed, dated to early in the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context[1227]m WEWA, sister of GUNNORA [mistress of Richard I Duke of Normandy].  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that Wewa married “Turulfo de Ponte-Audomari...filius...Torf” by whom she had “Humfridum de Vetulis patrem Rogerii de Bellomonte[1228].  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that the (unnamed) sister of ”Gunnora comitissa Normanniæ” married “Turulpho de Ponte-Adomaro[1229].  Thorold & his wife had [two] children:

a)         HONFROI de Vieilles (-after 1053, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that Wewa married “Turulfo de Ponte-Audomari...filius...Torf” by whom she had “Humfridum de Vetulis patrem Rogerii de Bellomonte[1230].  He is named as son of Thorold by Orderic Vitalis[1231].  Seigneur de Vieilles et de Pont-Audemer, in Normandy.  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Humfridum de Vetulis” as son of “Turulpho de Ponte-Adomaro” & his wife[1232].  He witnessed charters under Robert I Duke of Normandy.  He founded the monasteries of Saint-Pierre before 1035 and Saint-Leger in [1040], both at Préaux, near Pont-Audemer: Orderic Vitalis records that “Unfredus de Vetulis” founded Préaux[1233].  "…Humfridus constructor eiusdem loci cum filiis suis Rogerio, Roberto, Willelmo…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1234].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” was “totius Normanniæ signifer“ rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” who sent “Rogerium de Bellomonti filium suum” against Roger and killed him[1235].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Hunfredus de Vitullis pater Rogerii de Bellomonte et Albereda uxor eius" founded two monasteries "in fundo Pratelli” in 1053[1236].  He became a monk at the former before he died[1237]m ALBREDA, daughter of --- (-after 1053).  Robert of Torigny records that "Hunfridus de Vetulis, pater Rogerii de Bello Monte, et Albereda uxor eius" founded two monasteries, one for men the other for women, in "fundo Pratelli"[1238].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ records that "Hunfredus de Vitullis pater Rogerii de Bellomonte et Albereda uxor eius" founded two monasteries "in fundo Pratelli” in 1053[1239].  Honfroi & his wife had four children: 

i)          ROGER de Vieilles (-29 Nov 1094, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).  "…Humfridus constructor eiusdem loci cum filiis suis Rogerio, Roberto, Willelmo…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1240]

-         COMTES de MEULAN

ii)         ROBERT de Vieilles (-after 1066, bur Préaux, monastery of Saint-Pierre).  "…Humfridus constructor eiusdem loci cum filiis suis Rogerio, Roberto, Willelmo…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1241]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the proposed marriage of "Robertus comes Mellentinus" and the daughter of "Hugonis Crispeiensis comes" which was prohibited by "Yvo [episcopus]" on grounds of consanguinity, the mutual descent of the two parties from "Gauterus Albus de Albamarla" being set out in the chronicle[1242].  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of “ecclesias...in maris Constantini pagi...” made by “Roberto...Hunfredi...filio” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1035/53], subscribed by “Roberti filii Hunfredi, Rogeri fratris eius, Anscetilli, Willelmi filii Ricardi secundi Normannorum ducis, Rogerii filii Radulfi de Warethna, Rogerii filii Ragnulfi, Gilleberti Crispin, Willelmi Guiet[1243].  “Robertus filius Humfredi” donated “Foucaruillam et ecclesiam” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated to [1038/53], subscribed by “Roberti filii Hunfredi, Rogeri fratris eius...[1244].  William I King of England gave him land in the Cotentin[1245].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Bellomonte, filius Unfredi”, whom “Rogerius de Clara” had killed, was buried at Préaux[1246]

iii)        GUILLAUME de Vieilles .  "…Humfridus constructor eiusdem loci cum filiis suis Rogerio, Roberto, Willelmo…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1247]

iv)       DUNELME de VieillesThe primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Her daughter became a nun at Saint-Leger de Préaux[1248]m ---. 

b)         [ROGER (-after [1060]).  "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1249].  It is not certain that Roger was the brother of Honfroi de Vieilles.  However, no other person named Thorold has yet been identified in the primary sources so far consulted.] 

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de TOURVILLE

 

 

1.         TURCHETIL Seigneur de Tourville.  Guillaume de Jumièges records that “Turulfo de Ponte-Audomari...filius...Torf” was the brother of “Turchetillus pater Anschetilli de Harecurt[1250].  According to Robert de Torigny[1251], he was the brother of Thorold and father of Ansketil d’Harcourt.  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Turketillus…frater…Turulphi, cuius filius Hasculfus d’Harcourt” married “aliam sororem…comitissæ Gunnoræ” by whom he was father of “duos…filios…Walterum de Giffard primogenitum…[1252]m ---.  The primary source which confirms the identity of Turchetil’s wife has not been identified.  Turchetil & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         [HASCULF d’Harcourt .  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Turketillus…frater…Turulphi, cuius filius Hasculfus d’Harcourt” married “aliam sororem…comitissæ Gunnoræ” by whom he was father of “duos…filios…Walterum de Giffard primogenitum…[1253].  This is contradicted by Guillaume of Jumièges who Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gunnor" had “excepta Sainfria...duas sorores Wewam et Avelinam”, adding that “tertia...sororum Gunnoris comitissæ” [Aveline, from the context] married “Osberno de Bolebec”, by whom she had “Galterium Giffardum primum et Godefridum patrem Willelmi de Archis[1254].]   

b)         HUGUES .  An undated charter, dated to the [1035/50], records the donation of "predium Heltonis quod possedit Gozelinus vicecomes" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the support of "Willelmus comes Normanniæ, et Willelmus, filius Willelmi comitis, qui et hæres Heltonis, et Robertus comes frater eius…Niellus…et Turstinus vicecomites", subscribed by "…filii Turchitilli Hugo et Goffridus necnon Walerannus comes", signed by "Gozelini vicecomitis, Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Waleranni comitis, Alberici comitis, Heltæ filii Heltonis…"[1255]

c)         GEOFFROY .  An undated charter, dated to the [1035/50], records the donation of "predium Heltonis quod possedit Gozelinus vicecomes" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the support of "Willelmus comes Normanniæ, et Willelmus, filius Willelmi comitis, qui et hæres Heltonis, et Robertus comes frater eius…Niellus…et Turstinus vicecomites", subscribed by "…filii Turchitilli Hugo et Goffridus necnon Walerannus comes", signed by "Gozelini vicecomitis, Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Waleranni comitis, Alberici comitis, Heltæ filii Heltonis…"[1256]

d)         LESCELINE (-26 Jan [1057/58]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records the rebellion of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum”, who had received “Oximensem” from his brother, his capture and imprisonment “in Rothomagensis urbis turre”, before his escape five years later and subsequent reconciliation with his brother who granted him “Ocensem comitatum” and his marriage to “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli[1257].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus Aucensis comes instinctu religionæ conjugis suæ Lezscelinæ” founded “abbatiam sanctæ Mariæ super rivulum Divæ[1258].  "Lezelina comitissa" donated land bordering the Seine to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated [1049], which also names her three sons (in order) Hugues, Guillaume and Robert[1259]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Lecelina comitissa Aucensis relicta Willermi comitis" founded "mon. Sancti Petri super Divam virorum et mon. fem. ante urbem Lexoviensem" with "filiis suis Roberto comite Aucensi et Hugone episcopo Lexoviensi"[1260]m GUILLAUME Comte d'Eu, illegitimate son of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his mistress --- (978-1057). 

 

 

 

H.      OTHER NOBILITY in NORMANDY

 

 

 

1.         RICHARDVicomte"…Richardus vicecomes, Negel vicecomes, Alvredus vicecomes, Torstingus vicecomes, Vualterius vicecomes, Odo vicecomes, Seiricus vicecomes, Vuitmundus vicecomes, Gosfredus vicecomes, Gozelinus vicecomes, Gislebertus, Richardus frater eius" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1261]

 

2.         ALURED [Alfred] .  Vicomte"…Alvredus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1262]m ---.  The name of Alured’s wife is not known.  Alured & his wife had [one] child: 

a)         [SERLO (-after [1060]).  "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1263]

 

3.         GAUTHIERVicomte"…Vualterius vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1264]

 

4.         EUDESVicomte"…Odo vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1265]

 

5.         SEIRICVicomte"…Seiricus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1266]

 

6.         GAUSFRED [Geoffroy] .  Vicomte"…Gosfredus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1267].  "…Goisfredi Farsels vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1268].  "Nigelli vicecomitis, Goisfridi vicecomitis, Rodulfi Taisson" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Mauger Archbishop of Rouen confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sigy[1269].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[1270].  "…Joffredus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated to [1042] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli"[1271].  "…Gaufredi vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1272]

 

7.         HAMON "Dentatus" .  Vicomte.  "…Aymonis vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1273].  "…Haimonis vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1274].  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Haimonem agnomine Dentatum" supported "Guido filius Burgundionum comitis" in his rebellion, dated to [1047][1275]

 

8.         GOSCELIN .  Vicomte.  “...Goscelini vicecomitis...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][1276]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         HUBERT (-after [1063]).  Vicomte

2.         GEOFFROY Mancel (-after [1063]).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted the property of "Rodberti de Witot" to "Goisfredo Mancello fratri vicecomitis Huberti", dated to [1063][1277]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         GILBERT (-after Aug 1027).  "…Gislebertus, Richardus frater eius" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1278]

2.         RICHARD (-after Aug 1027).  "…Gislebertus, Richardus frater eius" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[1279]

 

 

1.         GERAUDm ---.  The name of Géraud’s wife is not known.  Géraud & his wife had one child: 

a)         RAOUL .  "…Radulfus camberarius filius Geraldi…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1280]

 

 

1.         WALERAN .  An undated charter, dated to the [1035/50], records the donation of "predium Heltonis quod possedit Gozelinus vicecomes" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the support of "Willelmus comes Normanniæ, et Willelmus, filius Willelmi comitis, qui et hæres Heltonis, et Robertus comes frater eius…Niellus…et Turstinus vicecomites", subscribed by "…filii Turchitilli Hugo et Goffridus necnon Walerannus comes", signed by "Gozelini vicecomitis, Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Waleranni comitis, Alberici comitis, Heltæ filii Heltonis…"[1281]

 

2.         AUBRY [Alberic] .  An undated charter, dated to the [1035/50], records the donation of "predium Heltonis quod possedit Gozelinus vicecomes" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the support of "Willelmus comes Normanniæ, et Willelmus, filius Willelmi comitis, qui et hæres Heltonis, et Robertus comes frater eius…Niellus…et Turstinus vicecomites", subscribed by "…filii Turchitilli Hugo et Goffridus necnon Walerannus comes", signed by "Gozelini vicecomitis, Heltonis, Willelmi heredis Heltonis, Walberti fratris Heltonis, Waleranni comitis, Alberici comitis, Heltæ filii Heltonis…"[1282]

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Lillebonne .  "…Ricardus de Lillabona…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[1283]

 

2.         RENAUDm ---.  The name of Renaud’s wife is not known.  Renaud & his wife had two children: 

a)         THURSTAN .  "…Turstinci filii Rainaldi, Guillelmi fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1284]

b)         GUILLAUME .  "…Willelmus filius Guillelmi, Niellis juvenis, Hatuardus Rex, Hunfredus Namo, Guillelmus filius Ranoldi, Rogerius filius Hunfredi, Joffredus vicecomes, Hugo filius Huberti, Hunfredus Parvus" witnessed the charter dated to [1042] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli"[1285].  "…Turstinci filii Rainaldi, Guillelmi fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1286]

 

 

1.         ROBERT Crassusm ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRI...Henricus filius Roberti Crassi...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][1287]

 

2.         CORBUSm ---.  The name of Corbus’s wife is not known.  Corbus & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME .  "…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[1288]

 

3.         NEEL de Glanville (-after [1060]).  "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1289]

 

4.         BRITOm ---.  The name of Brito’s wife is not known.  Brito & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD (-after [1060]).  "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1290]

 

5.         GERAUD (-after 1066).  Dapifer.  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Geraldo dapifero" contributed 40 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[1291]

 

6.         HASTENGm ---.  The name of Hasteng’s wife is not known.  Hasteng & his wife had one child:

a)         GUILLAUME (-after [1090]).  "…Willelmus filius Hastenchi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1292].  A charter dated to [1090] records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur by "Nigellus vicecomes" and "…Willelmus filius Hastench…concedente Nigello vicecomite…"[1293]

 

7.         HERLUIN .  Seneschal.  m ADA, daughter of ---.  "Duo…milites Ricardus et Rogerius, filii Herluini senescalli et Ada mater eorum" donated "ecclesiam in Alta Vesna" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo comite Normannorum", by undated charter, signed by "…Avitiæ uxoris Ricardi…Droconis filii Goiffredi de Novo Mercato…"[1294].  Herluin & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD .  "Duo…milites Ricardus et Rogerius, filii Herluini senescalli et Ada mater eorum" donated "ecclesiam in Alta Vesna" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo comite Normannorum", by undated charter, signed by "…Avitiæ uxoris Ricardi…Droconis filii Goiffredi de Novo Mercato…"[1295]m AVICE, daughter of ---.  "Duo…milites Ricardus et Rogerius, filii Herluini senescalli et Ada mater eorum" donated "ecclesiam in Alta Vesna" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo comite Normannorum", by undated charter, signed by "…Avitiæ uxoris Ricardi…Droconis filii Goiffredi de Novo Mercato…"[1296]

b)         ROGER .  "Duo…milites Ricardus et Rogerius, filii Herluini senescalli et Ada mater eorum" donated "ecclesiam in Alta Vesna" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Willelmo comite Normannorum", by undated charter, signed by "…Avitiæ uxoris Ricardi…Droconis filii Goiffredi de Novo Mercato…"[1297]

 

8.         INGULFm ---.  The name of Ingulf’s wife is not known.  Ingulf & his wife had one child:

a)         GUILLAUME (-after 1081).  "…Willelmo filio Ingulfi…" witnessed the charter dated 1081 under which "Eudo vicecomes pagi Constantini" donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[1298]

 

9.         ANSFRID (-after 1081).  Vicomte.  "…Ansfrido vicecomite…" witnessed the charter dated 1081 under which "Eudo vicecomes pagi Constantini" donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[1299]

 

10.      ROBERT de Vieux-Pont (-killed siege of Sainte-Suzanne [1081]).  "Rodbertus de Vetero-Ponte…" subscribed the charter dated to [1074] which recorded the foundation of the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême by "domnus Rotgerius de Montgommerici"[1300]

 

11.      OSBERN d’Arches .  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Populton…in Hesteieia…et in Eboraco” by “Osbernus de Arches[1301]

 

12.      CLAREMBAUDm ---.  The name of Clarembaud’s wife is not known.  Clarembaud & his wife had one child:

a)         RAOUL (-after 1081).  "…Rodulfo filio Clarenbaldi…" witnessed the charter dated 1081 under which "Eudo vicecomes pagi Constantini" donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[1302]

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Le Prévost ‘Anciennes divisions territoriales de la Normandie’ (1837-39), p. 1. 

[2] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, VII, p. 270. 

[3] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 85. 

[4] Saint-Wandrille, 15, p. 56. 

[5] Jumièges, Vol. I, 20, p. 63. 

[6] Gurney (1845), p. 43, quoting originals in the Archives de Rouen. 

[7] Saint-Wandrille, 19, p. 62. 

[8] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, VII, p. 270. 

[9] Malmesbury, 232, pp. 221-2. 

[10] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, VII, p. 270. 

[11] Round (1899) 702, p. 249. 

[12] Delisle (1866), p. 186. 

[13] Saint-Wandrille, Appendice, 17, p. 59. 

[14] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[15] Robert de Torigny, Book VIII, c. 37. 

[16] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire III, p. 269. 

[17] Delisle (1866), p. 186. 

[18] Delisle (1866), p. 186. 

[19] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[20] Saint-Wandrille, Appendice, 17, p. 59. 

[21] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, XXVII, p. 152. 

[22] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 22. 

[23] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, XIV, p. 148. 

[24] CP II 387. 

[25] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, I, p. 167. 

[26] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 265. 

[27] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[28] RHGF, Tome XXIII, p. 434. 

[29] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 37. 

[30] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[31] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 221. 

[32] Domesday Translation, Berkshire, XXXIX, p. 154. 

[33] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IX, p. 319. 

[34] CP II 387. 

[35] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Colchester St John Abbey, Essex, I, Historia Fundationis, pp. 607 and 608.   

[36] Bath St Peter, 42, p. 46. 

[37] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[38] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XIII, p. 344. 

[39] Domesday Translation, Hertfordshire, XLII, p. 393. 

[40] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire III, p. 269. 

[41] CP V 113-4. 

[42] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[43] Chronicon Beccensis Abbatiæ (1648), p. 5. 

[44] Gurney (1845), p. 52. 

[45] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[46] Saint-Wandrille, Appendice, 15, p. 56. 

[47] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, LXXXII, p. 462. 

[48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[49] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXV, p. 433. 

[50] ES III 695. 

[51] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, LXXXII, p. 462. 

[52] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, X, p. 322. 

[53] Dugdale Monasticon III, Eye Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 405.   

[54] Eye (1994), Part 2, Introduction, p. 6, DB 320a. 

[55] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Folkestone Priory, Kent, II, p. 673.   

[56] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312. 

[57] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Folkestone Priory, Kent, II, p. 673.   

[58] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Redlingfield Priory, Suffolk, I, p. 26.   

[59] Historia Comitum Ghisnensium 33, MGH SS XXIV, p. 578, undated but "c 1100" has been added in the margin by the editor. 

[60] Saint-Bertin (Grand Cartulaire), Tome I, 164, p. 65. 

[61] Domesday Descendants, p. 287. 

[62] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Folkestone Priory, Kent, II, p. 673.   

[63] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXV, p. 433. 

[64] ES III 695. 

[65] Domesday Translation, Yorkshire, XXXVI, pp. 847-8. 

[66] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 214. 

[67] ES III 695. 

[68] ES III 695. 

[69] Robert de Torigny, Vol. VIII, c. 35, cited in CP XI 683 footnote d. 

[70] CP XI 683. 

[71] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.