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Foundations Volume 10

 

Durham castle and cathedral

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Durham Castle and Cathedral from the north-west

Source: Wikipedia                     Photo by Steve F E Cameron    

The magnificent cathedral at Durham dating from the 12th century (with many later additions) is a fine example of the Romanesque style. As the centrepiece of the World Heritage Site it formed the backdrop to the 2017 FMG Conference and AGM which was held in the adjacent university.

List of contents

 by Paul Dryburgh [1]

Abstract

There are relatively few collections which provide evidence of familial links deep into the medieval past. Alongside wills and inquisitions post mortem one of the best sources is the vast collection of deeds documenting transfers of land and property and thereby often the descent of land between generations. This is particularly true for the collection of deeds and evidences in the Court of Wards and Liveries, the principal early modern institution by which the crown oversaw the transfer of property and protected the interests of minors, which now survives as the TNA series WARD 2. The aim of this paper is to provide an introduction to the riches of that collection and to the work we have been doing at TNA to make it more accessible.

Paper presented at the FMG Conference, University of Durham, 1st September 2017.

Foundations (2018) 10: 2-18                              © UK Crown Copyright reserved

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by Michael Stansfield [1]

Abstract

The medieval archive of Durham Cathedral Priory is one of the most extensive and comprehensive in the British Isles. It provides a wide-ranging and rich resource for the study of genealogy and indeed all aspects of medieval life in the north-east of England in particular, but also for the whole country, and much of Scotland as well. The article outlines how the different types of materials in the archive can be applied to genealogical studies.

Paper presented at the FMG Conference, University of Durham, 31st August 2017.

Foundations (2018) 10: 19-24                                 © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Rosie Bevan [1]

Abstract

This article is an attempt to examine contemporary sources to construct a genealogy of the Quarles family during the medieval period, as well as explore its economic activity throughout this time. As merchants, the Quarles family took advantage of the burgeoning wool and fishing industries, continental trade agreements, and the development of ports on the north Norfolk coast, which led to the rise in trade and shipping during the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries. The family’s intermarriages with minor gentry, meant it kept a foothold in landed interests, while mercantile activity contributed to its increasing social and geographical mobility to spread within Norfolk, and to London and Northamptonshire by the mid-sixteenth century.

Foundations (2018) 10: 25-61                           © Copyright FMG and the author

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 by Bruce McAndrew[1]

Abstract

Most 16th century Scottish armorials include a short section containing the arms of 'the lord of X of auld' claiming to give the arms borne by territorial lords at the dawn of heraldry. They can therefore be considered to represent the collective heraldic memory of the period. Some can be shown to be incorrect. Consequently a wider heraldic examination has been made of the originally Anglo-Norman families in this category utilising data from French, English and Scottish sources. In the majority of cases there exists a close relationship between the arms borne by a name in Normandy and the arms borne by their kindred name in England and Scotland as exemplified by such families as de la Haye/Hay, Vieuxpont/Vipont, and Bailleul/Balliol. The few exceptions such as Bruce and Stewart have been analysed and rationalised.

These cross-Channel similarities allow the reconsideration of the arms of the Morville lords of Lauderdale as defined in the collective memory and make predictions with respect to its accuracy.  While it is also possible to make an educated guess as to the arms borne by the Avenel lords of Eskdale, the coat-of-arms originally borne by the Valognes lords of Panmure has defeated this approach.

Foundations (2018) 10: 62-88                              © Copyright FMG and the author

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by David Williams [1]

Abstract

An entry in the papal Regesta reveals that William de Grandison married twice, and fathered sons by his first marriage. Hitherto, the name of his first wife, and the number and names of their children have been unknown. Bringing strands of additional evidence together, the author proposes that William was very likely first married to Jeanne, daughter of Pierre II, count of Gruyère; and that she was probably the mother of those sons, and of at least one daughter, Agnes, wife of Thomas Bardolf, 2nd Lord Bardolf.

Foundations (2018) 10: 89-97                                © Copyright FMG and the author

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 by Kim Anderson & Richard Joscelyne [1]

Abstract

Our purpose is to examine the arguments surrounding the parentage of Geoffrey, son of Count Eustace ll of Boulogne, and to look at evidence which may identify him both as the son of Eustace and Godgifu and as Eustace’s ‘nepos’ captured at Dover in 1067.

Foundations (2018) 10: 98-102                              © Copyright FMG and the author

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 by Timothy Gordon Barclay [1]

Abstract

Numerous authors have explored the identities of individuals and families using the toponymic ‘de London’ in the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. In particular, the explorations of the apparently related de London families of south-west England, Wales and Scotland, have produced largely reliable accounts, but, as each has concentrated on a single family at a time, the connections between them have remained elusive. A new study of wider scope exposes these ties and proposes a solution to the shared heritage of these de London families.

Foundations (2018) 10: 103-127                             © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Michael P Bodman[1]

Abstract

Nathaniel Littleton (1605-1654), immigrant to the Eastern Shore of Virginia, c.1635, has long been the subject of American genealogical interest but the origin and ancestry of his mother, Dame Mary Littleton, née Walter (1567-1633), had not been documented. This article reports research on her origin and ancestry, carried out in 2007 at TNA and in the official registers at the College of Arms, London. One of the findings is Dame Mary’s medieval royal ancestry through her thrice-married grandmother, Katherine (Hackluit) (Foxe) (Depden) (d. after 28 April 1582), daughter of Thomas Trentham, junior, Esq, (d.1519) of Shrewsbury, Shropshire, MP, by his wife Elizabeth Corbet. This article presents the ancestry of Dame Mary (Walter) Littleton, including the 15th- and 16th-century generations from which she derives her medieval royal descent from Edward I of England.

 Foundations (2018) 10: 128-150                             © Copyright FMG and the author

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