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Foundations Volume 8

Dugdale

 

 

 

 

William Dugdale, the 17th-century English antiquary and herald compiled a number of works of continuing value for the medieval genealogist, including Monasticon Anglicanum, Antiquities of Warwickshire, Baronage of England, and various Herald’s Visitations

 

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by M L Bierbrier[1]

Foundations (2016) 8: 2                                         © Copyright FMG and the author

 

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Proper genealogy requires documentation. Oral genealogy is limited, very often wrong, and subject to invention. In England the increase in documentation from the 16th century onwards, notably the introduction of parish registers, allows more scope for detailed genealogical research. Documentation did, of course, exist in the medieval period, but it was more limited in its coverage and survives to a lesser extent. One positive aspect of the paucity of material makes it possible to compose databases of all surviving names and families in the Anglo-Saxon period, available on the internet in PASE, and the early Norman period, available in books published by Dr Keats-Rohan. There is perhaps more scope for other databases. Because of language and writing difficulties, the documentation that survives has not been fully examined or published. Much pertains to the ruling elite and concerns property and rights of inheritance but that is not the full extent of it, by any means.

It is not correct, as is usually assumed, that all surviving medieval documentation has already been reviewed by the previous generations of historians and genealogists. There is still plenty of new material to find and some of the old material needs to be revised. Information is available not only for the elite property owners but also for more ordinary folk. Articles in this journal have used surviving tax returns on aliens and in this issue manorial documents to illustrate the names and genealogies of some families. Manorial documents have been rather overlooked in the past. Where they survive, they can yield a wealth of information. Other important documents are found in the livery companies’ archives. Recent research has enabled the maiden name of Alice Perrers, mistress of Edward III, to be determined (it is Salisbury) and a putative family tree developed along with more details on her first husband Janekyn Perrers. The material is out there in record offices and family archives, and who knows what discoveries await.


[1]     Dr Bierbrier was a founder member of the FMG and has recently joined the Executive Committee.

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by Vanessa King[1]

Abstract

The survival of 255 manorial rolls for the manors of Walsham and High Hall, present day Walsham le Willows, spanning the years 1303 to 1399, have long been recognised as a valuable source for the study of the peasantry in fourteenth century Suffolk. This article, which is based on the author’s talk at the 2015 AGM of the FMG, draws on the evidence of the rolls to illuminate the lives of two villein families: the Hawys and the Lenes.

Foundations (2016) 8: 3-14                                    © Copyright FMG and the author

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by John M. Watson[1]

Abstract

The parish of Badsworth is situated about 6 miles south of Pontefract in the modern metropolitan county of West Yorkshire. In the medieval period there were two manors in the parish; Badsworth and Rogerthorpe. The descent of the manor of Badsworth is obscured by the fact that at the end of twelfth century it was split into two moieties, each of which is referred to in contemporary documents as “the manor of Badsworth”. The two parts of the manor were not reunited under one owner until 1529 when they were held by Sir Peter Vavasour of Spaldington. An attempt has been made to trace the descent of these two moieties of the manor through the various families that held them between the eleventh and sixteenth centuries.

Foundations (2016) 8: 15-32                                   © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Andrew B W MacEwen[1], John P Ravilious[2] and Rosie Bevan[3]

Abstract

The odd results of a scribal error in a 1293 court case are explored and the wife of Hugh III de Morwick is established. Additions and corrections to the Randolph pedigree are also presented to show the putative relationship of the Randolphs to the Greystoke family, as well as the conflation of Sir Thomas Randolph with his hitherto unidentified son.

Foundations (2016) 8: 33-51                                   © Copyright FMG and the author

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by the late Andrew B W MacEwen

Introduction

FMG News no.12, sent to members electronically in June 2015, invited readers to submit solutions to a puzzle posed by Andrew B W MacEwen concerning the date of a bipartite agreement between the burgesses of Irvine and Brice of Eglinton, supposedly sealed in 1205. We received no responses, so here we summarise Mr MacEwen’s conclusions, which he sent to us before his death in 2015.

Foundations (2016) 8: 52                                       © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Rosie Bevan and Peter G M Dale[1]

Abstract

In the authors’ previous article on Richard de Lucy, chief Justiciar of Henry II, and his newly discovered daughter, Rose, it was stated that we were left with the implication that there may be other unrecognised children - in particular, Reginald de Lucy, who seemed to be clearly related to Richard. A recent find from manuscripts in the British Library has indeed confirmed Reginald as brother of Geoffrey de Lucy and thus son of Richard de Lucy. This article examines the evidence and discusses the implications for the wider family network, including that of Reginald’s little known daughter, Cecily, who the authors suggest was wife of Walter de Cherlecote, (progenitor of the Lucys of Charlecote), Roger de St John and Richard Mallore.

Foundations (2016) 8: 53-72                                  © Copyright FMG and the authors

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Transcribed[1] and translated by Jessica Lutkin and Jonathan Mackman

Introduction

The original of this will may be located in Exchequer: Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer: Memoranda Roll, Trinity Term, 41 Edward III, Recorda, m.15; TNA Reference E 368/139. Images of the membrane are on the AALT site: http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT5/E3/E368no139/aE368no139fronts/IMG_0288.htm
and */IMG_0289.htm

Foundations (2016) 8: 73-74                      © Copyright the transcribers and FMG

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by Brad Verity[1]

Abstract

This genealogical account uses, whenever possible, primary sources such as inquisitions post mortem, Chancery Roll entries, and contemporary chronicle accounts, to compile the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Eleanor (de Bohun), countess of Ormond, granddaughter of Edward I of England.

A supplementary illustrated account (in this online edition only) tells how Kilpeck Castle, Herefordshire, came into the possession of Eleanor de Bohun as well as the role the castle played in the marriage of her elder daughter, Lady Petronilla Butler, to Gilbert, Lord Talbot.

Foundations (2016) 8: 75-89                                   © Copyright FMG and the author

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Transcribed[1] and translated by Jessica Lutkin and Jonathan Mackman

Introduction

The original will is in the bishop’s register at Lichfield Record Office (ref. B/A/1/6). We are grateful to the archivist, Staffordshire and Stoke on Trent Archive Service, for supplying an image of the document, with permission to publish.

Foundations (2016) 8: 90                                © Copyright FMG and the transcribers

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by the late Andrew B W MacEwen [1]

Abstract

Using material long available, the author fixes the year of the martyrdom of Earl Magnus, by two different methods, as 1118. He points out that Gregor Lamb had independently reached the same conclusion in 2004.

Foundations (2016) 8: 91-95                                   © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Keith Moore[1]

Foundations (2016) 8: 96-97                                   © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Nathan W Murphy, Douglas Richardson and Matthew Tompkins[1]

Abstract

This article confirms an old genealogical conclusion using new documents. Complete Peerage doubted the conclusion that Margaret Grey married two earls of Wiltshire. Recently published apostolic penitentiary records include a 1501 marriage dispensation issued to Henry Stafordi to marry the widow Margareta Staffordi alias W[i]ltshire alias de Lisle. The marriage is confirmed in a recently-indexed common pleas case.

Foundations (2016) 8: 98-100                                © Copyright FMG and the authors

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Les titres et résumés en français

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