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Foundations Volume 12

Online edition, published April 2020

HenryVIIdeathbed col

Deathbed of King Henry VII of England

 Heraldic drawing by Thomas Wriothesley (Garter King of Arms) of the deathbed of King Henry VII, 1509. Although not present, Wriothesley wrote his account, in which the drawing features, from discussions with attendees. The attendant at the bottom right corner is Sir John Sharpe, with his arms alongside. See the article in this journal on Sharpe of Essex.

© The British Library Board Add. MS 45131, f.54, reproduced by permission.

 

list of contents

 

by Graham S Holton [1]

Abstract

Genetic genealogy, combining the use of documentary evidence with DNA test results, holds the potential to reveal previously unknown medieval descents for those with little documentary evidence of their ancestry. The work undertaken as part of the Battle of Bannockburn and the Declaration of Arbroath Family History Projects has developed methodologies to advance studies of this nature which are described in this article. Covering various aspects of the process including ethical issues, the role of documentary evidence and appropriate types of DNA testing, the article includes several case studies. The article argues that genetic genealogy can provide a gateway to medieval genealogy for the masses.

Foundations (2020) 12: 2–15                                  © Copyright FMG and the author

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by James B Sutherland [1]

Abstract

This article is an attempt to examine the descent of medieval members of the De Moravia family and place them in relation to others as discussed in a previous article [Foundations 11 (2019): 49-62]. This has allowed construction of an updated genealogy based on relevant charters. that the author believes challenges other historians’ views,. The known facts are placed in a framework and timeline to provide a more positive statement of descent.

Foundations (2020) 12: 17–23                                © Copyright FMG and the author

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by David Williams [1]

Abstract

The parentage of Agnès de Grandson has frequently been the subject of unsubstantiated or dubious claims. Discussing some of these, the author shows that she was the daughter of Jacques I de Grandson, sire de Belmont, and that her mother was very probably the daughter and heiress of Richard de Grandson, sire de Belmont.

Foundations (2020) 12: 24–30                                © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Brad Kidd [1]

Abstract

In 1355 Sir John Bret alleged that his wife Joan had been abducted by Sir Thomas de Furnival of Sheffield. The evidence, including some impressive surviving representations of medieval heraldry, shows that the first husband of Joan de Mounteney, the second wife of Thomas V de Furnival, was John II Bret of Wiverton, Nottinghamshire. The backgrounds of the Furnival, Mounteney and Bret families are reviewed. It is established that the marriage of Thomas de Furnival and Joan de Mounteney followed an annulment of Joan’s previous marriage to John Bret. The probable identity of the biological father of Joan de Mounteney’s son John, born during Joan’s marriage to John Bret but delegitimised by the annulment and progenitor of the subsequent Mounteney family of Yorkshire, is examined.

Foundations (2020) 12: 31-54                                 © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Rosie Bevan[1]

Abstract

This article investigates the accuracy of the Sharpe pedigree from the Visitation of Essex 1558 against historical sources. As a result of the investigation the pedigree is deemed to be largely fabricated, but some surprising discoveries are made, including the true ancestry of Agnes, wife of Nicholas Sharpe, and her identity as mother of Robert Fabian, the notable chronicler of the fifteenth century.

Foundations (2020) 12: 55–88                                © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Andrew Lancaster [1]

Abstract

In his 1960 study of early Anglo-Norman feudal baronies I J Sanders had difficulties explaining the first post-1066 generations in what he referred to as the “Barony of Aveley”, and the “Barony of Crick” (as he spelled it). In recent decades, K S B Keats-Rohan singled them out as cases where new explanations had successfully superseded those of Sanders. However, it will be shown that the solutions proposed by Keats-Rohan are unlikely in several ways. The most likely scenarios are considered in this article. Aveley and Crich are dealt with together because there is a link between them which Keats-Rohan did not take account of: Graelan de Tani and Edward of Salisbury were brothers.

Foundations (2020) 12: 89–113                         © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Léa Chaillou [1]

Abstract

In this follow-up to the article published in Foundations 9 (2019), corrections and additions are presented which introduce new elements about the circumstances in which Constance’s son Arthur I was acknowledged duke of Brittany in his mother’s lifetime; also the parentage of William clericus and Margaret, viscountess of Rohan. The different possible identifications for Margaret, countess of Lara, are discussed. The corrections have been made to the online edition.

Foundations (2020) 12: 114–125                             © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Léa Chaillou[1]

Abstract

In this follow-up to the article published in Foundations 11 (2019), corrections and additions are presented which clarify the genealogy of the viscounts du Faou and the early members of the House of Léon. The corrections have been made to the online edition.

Foundations (2020) 12: 126–133                             © Copyright FMG and the author

 

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by David Williams [1]

Abstract

Ebal is the least known of the Grandson bishops, and what facts we have of him are derived entirely from two 13th-century charters from the Pays de Vaud (Switzerland). Combining information from these meagre sources and from papal registers of the period, the author sketches the background to the episcopate of this elusive prelate.

Foundations (2020) 12: 134–138                             © Copyright FMG and the author

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by Michael P Bodman[1]

Abstract

This article documents the ancestry of the Rt Revd Henry Cotton (c.1545–1615), bishop of Salisbury, 1598–1615, utilising information from contemporaneous wills and Chancery records. It includes lines of descent first from King John [“Lackland”] (1167–1216) via Elizabeth (Cherleton) Sutton née Berkeley (d.1478), daughter of Sir John Berkeley MP, of Beverston castle, co. Gloucester; and second from Sir Robert Onley (1435–1493), mayor of Coventry and MP, via Jane Cotton née Onley (d.1585), daughter of John Onley MP, of London and Catesby, co. Northampton. Sir Robert had entertained and lodged King Henry VII just two days after the battle of Bosworth in 1485, at his residence the Bull Inn in Coventry.

Foundations (2020) 12: 139–150                          © Copyright FMG and the author

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