burgundy duchy

AUxerre

 

v4.6 Updated 29 January 2022

 

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RETURN TO BURGUNDY DUCHY INTRODUCTION

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                COMTES et VICOMTES d'AUXERRE. 2

A.         COMTES d'AUXERRE 859-921. 2

B.         COMTES d'AUXERRE 1016-1273. 5

C.        VICOMTES d'AUXERRE.. 9

D.        COMTES d'AUXERRE 1273-1440, SEIGNEURS de ROCHEFORT (BOURGOGNE-COMTE) 10

Chapter 2.                NOBILITY in AUXERRE. 22

A.         SEIGNEURS de BEAUVOIR [en Bourgogne], de BOURDEAU et de CHASTELLUS.. 22

B.         SEIGNEURS de CHARNY et de CHÂTEL-CENSOIR.. 26

C.        SEIGNEURS de MAILLY.. 29

D.        SEIGNEURS de SAINT-BRIS (MELLO) 31

E.         VICOMTES de SAINT-FLORENTIN.. 46

F.         SEIGNEURS de SEIGNELAY.. 46

G.        SEIGNEURS de TOUCY.. 75

H.        SEIGNEURS de VENISY.. 85

 

 

The county of Auxerre was located in the north-western part of the duchy of Burgundy, east of the Loire and straddling the river Yonne from north of the town of Auxerre to Coulanges in the south.  Its eastern and northern borders were marked by the river Serein, tributary to the Yonne[1].  Evolved from the pagus Autissiodorensis (Auxerrois), it was one of the earliest recorded Burgundian counties which the Carolingian monarchs granted to, and confiscated from, their supporters in reward for service to the crown.  The county passed to Richard, brother of Boson King [of Provence], in 886.  It remained part of the territory of the dukes of Burgundy until its capture by Landry Comte de Nevers in alliance with Robert II King of France.  The king granted the county to his daughter as dowry on her marriage with Landry’s son[2]

 

The county of Auxerre was ruled by the comtes de Nevers until the end of the 12th century.  The heiress of the three counties of Auxerre, Nevers and Tonnerre married (as his first wife) Pierre [II] Seigneur de Courtenay (who was later installed as Pierre I Latin Emperor of Constantinople).  Thereafter a succession of female heiresses resulted in the county passing through several different families.  Mathilde de Courtenay succeeded her mother as countess in 1192, although her father declared himself count in 1199.  Mathilde’s first husband, Hervé [IV] Seigneur de Donzy, succeeded as count in 1219 after his father-in-law died.  After Hervé died three years later, his widow resumed control of the county until her own death in 1257.  Auxerre (together with Nevers and Tonnerre) passed to her great-granddaughter Mathilde de Bourbon, heiress of her grandmother Agnes de Donzy (daughter of Hervé and Mathilde, and wife of Guy [I] de Châtillon-sur-Marne Comte de Saint-Pol) and of her mother Yolande de Châtillon (wife of Archambaud [IX] Seigneur de Bourbon) both of whom had predeceased their mother and grandmother.  Mathilde de Bourbon married Eudes de Bourgogne, son of Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy, bringing the three counties of Auxerre, Nevers and Tonnerre into the family of the Capet dukes of Burgundy.  Mathilde died in 1262, followed Eudes in 1266, and succession to the three counties was disputed by their daughters.  The dispute was eventually settled in 1273 by the parlement which allocated Auxerre to the third daughter Alix, wife of Jean [II] de Chalon Seigneur de Rochefort (of the family of the counts of Burgundy). 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    COMTES et VICOMTES d'AUXERRE

 

 

 

A.      COMTES d'AUXERRE 859-921

 

 

1.         ERMENOLDComte d'Auxerre.  Marin Bishop of Auxerre, contemporary of Charles I King of the West Franks (later Emperor Charlemagne), names "primus comes pagi Autissiodorensis Ermenoldus" in his acts and records his foundation of the monastery at Auxerre in honour of the Saviour[3]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         CONRAD, son of CONRAD [Welf] Comte de Paris & his wife --- (-876).  His parentage is deduced from Regino who names "Ruodolfus filius Chuonradi, nepos Huggonis abbatis"[4], the latter being recorded in the Miraculis Sancti Germani as "Hugo" one of the sons of "Chuonradus princeps", the patron of the church of Saint-Germain at Auxerre[5].  He helped save Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks after the invasion of Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks.  Comte d'Auxerre.  He fell into disgrace in 861, and passed into the service of the sons of Emperor Lothar.  He received Geneva, Lausanne and Sion from Louis II King of Italy.  Marquis of Transjurania in Dec 864. 

-        KINGS of BURGUNDY

2.         HUGUES "l'Abbé" (-Orléans 12 May 886, bur Saint-Germain d'Auxerre).  The Miraculis Sancti Germani names "Hugo" as one of the sons of "Chuonradus princeps" who continued to patronise the church of Saint-Germain at Auxerre after their father's death[6].  Abbot of Saint-Germain d'Auxerre 853.  Imperial missus in Auxerre 853.  Abbot of Saint-Riquier until 861.  Abbot of Saint-Bertin 859/62.  He was a supporter of King Lothaire 861/865.  Marquis de Neustrie, Comte de Tours et d'Angers 866:  the Annales Bertiniani record that "Hugoni clerico, avunculi sui [=Karoli regis] Chonradi filio" received the counties of Tours and Angers in 866[7]Comte d'Auxerre in [866], assuming that Hugues was appointed to succeed Robert "le Fort" in this as well as the latter's other counties, although the primary source which confirms this beyond doubt has not been identified.  Abbot of Saint-Martin de Tours 866.  Abbot of St Vaast, Arras [874].  Abbot of Saint-Aignan, Orléans before 876.  Abbot of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre 877.  Abbot of Sainte-Colombe de Sens.  Chaplain of the imperial chapel [880].  The necrology of the cathedral of Saint-Germain d'Auxerre records the death 12 May of "Hugo abbas"[8]

 

 

1.         ROBERT "le Fort" (-killed in battle Brissarthe 2 Jul 866).  The question of the origin of Robert "le Fort" is discussed in detail in FRANCE CAPETIAN KINGS.  A document issued by Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks dated Nov 853 names "Dodo episcopus, Hrotbertus et Osbertus" as missi in "Cinnomannio, Andegavensi, atque Turonico, Corboniso, et Sagiso"[9].  He rebelled against King Charles II in 858.  Robert submitted to the king's authority, when he was given command of the march of Neustria which had been confiscated from the Rorgonid family for supporting the revolt of Louis (later King Louis II) against his father[10]Regino records that Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks invested "Rodberto comiti" with "ducatum inter Ligerim et Sequanam adversum Brittones" in 861[11].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rodbertus" attacked "Salomone duce" [duke of Brittany] in 862[12].  The Annales record that King Charles’s son, the future King Louis II "le Bègue", rebelled against his father in 862 and, heading an army of Bretons, defeated "Rotbertum patris fidelem" in 862 and burned Angers yet again[13]Count in the march of Anjou [862/63]:  the creation of the "march" of Anjou is probably dated to the early 860s, as the Annales Bertiniani name "Rodberto, qui marchio in Andegavo fuerat" in 865[14].  However, this change of jurisdictional status must have been insufficient to control the Bretons and the Vikings as the mention of Robert in the Annales in 865 is in the context of King Charles imposing direct rule in the area by sending "Hludowicum filium suum" into "Neustriam" and granting him "comitatum Andegavensem et abbatiam Maioris-monasterii et quasdam villas illi", while Robert was compensated with "comitatum Autissiodorensem et comitatum Nivernensem".  Comte d'Auxerre and Comte de Nevers 865.  The Annales Bertiniani name "Rodbertus et Odo" as "præfecti" in the Seine valley area in 866 when recording that they repelled the Vikings who had sailed up river as far as "castrum Milidunum"[15].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rotbertum et Ramnulfum, Godtfridum quoque et Heriveum comites" were defeated by the Vikings at "Brieserta" in 866, where Robert was killed[16].  The Adonis Continuatio records that "Robertus quoque atque Ramnulfus…inter primos ipsi priores" were killed by the Vikings in 866[17]

 

 

1.         GIRBAUD (-after 902)Comte d'Auxerre.  The Chronicle of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire records Viking incursions as far as Orléans, soon after the death of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve" (dated elsewhere to 877), which were repelled by Hugues l'Abbé and "Girbold…comte d'Auxerre"[18].  Comte Girbaud's participation in the siege of Paris of 886 is recorded[19].  The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon records “...Girbaldus, Wido ac Radulfus comes, Madelgaudus Oscarensium vicecomes...” as present when “Richardus dux Burgundie” donated property “...in proximo pago Belnense, et in villa Givriaco” to Saint-Bénigne, dated to [893][20].  Chaume identifies these persons as Girbaud Comte d’Auxerre, Guy Comte “de Tonnerre ou d’Atuyer”, Raoul Comte “de Dijon”, and Maillaud Vicomte d’Oscheret[21].  Girbaud is named in his mother-in-law’s charter dated 902.  m REINTRUDIS, daughter of --- & his wife Adela --- (-after 902).  [Her mother] "Atila comitissa" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon "pro requie anime viri sui Milonis comitis" with the consent of "Girbaldus comes et Reintrudis uxor eius filia ipsius Atile" by charter dated 902[22]

 

 

1.         RICHARD, son of comte BUVINUS [Bouvin] & his wife --- d'Arles (-[31 Aug or 1 or 29 Sep] 921, bur Abbaye de Sainte-Colombe de Sens, Yonne).  The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[23].  Comte in 876, subsequently assuming the role of his brother Boson as missus in Italy in early 877, when the latter was recalled by Emperor Charles II.  Comte d’Autun.  He established himself in the future duchy of Burgundy, north of his brother's realm, with his capital at Autun.  He was invested as lay abbot of Saint-Symphorien by Carloman King of the East Franks in 880.  He succeeded his wife's uncle Hugues l'Abbé as Comte d'Auxerre in 886.  He led the Carolingian army which besieged his brother King Boso at Vienne in 882.  The counties in Burgundy, except Mâcon, submitted to him.  In 890 he was referred to as dux, marchio in 900, and dux Burgundionem in 918/921, later known as RICHARD "le Justicier" Duke of Burgundy

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d'AUXERRE 1016-1273

 

 

The Comtes d’Auxerre from the family of the comtes de Nevers are set out below in outline form only to show the succession to Auxerre.  For full details, see the document BURGUNDY NOBILITY - NEVERS. 

 

 

RENAUD [I] de Nevers, son of LANDRY Comte de Nevers & his wife Mathilde de Bourgogne-Comté (-killed in battle Seignelay 29 May 1040, bur Auxerre, Saint-Germain).  "Landricus…comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated to [1010] subscribed by "…Rainaldi eius filii…"[24]Comte d’Auxerre [1016], de iure uxoris.  "Landrici comitis, Rainaldi filii eius et uxoris eius, Widoni et uxoris eius Acherada…Rodberti filii Gibaldi" subscribed the charter dated Jun 1023 under which "Gibaldus" donated property to Cluny[25].  He succeeded his father in 1028 as Comte de Nevers

1.         GUILLAUME [I] de Nevers (-20 Jun 1098, bur Nevers, Saint-Etienne).  "Rainaldus comes Nivernensis" donated property "Belmontis" to Cluny, for the souls of "…uxoris mee Advise et filiorum meorum qui presentes sunt…" by charter dated to [1028/40], subscribed by "filii eorum Willelmi"[26].  He succeeded his father in 1040 as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'AuxerreComte de Tonnerre, de iure uxoris

a)         RENAUD [II] de Nevers (-killed 5 Aug 1089).  The Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum names "Guillelmum et Renaldum" as the two sons of "Guillelmus…I", stating that Renaud possessed "Malliacum et Huben, duo nobilia castra"[27]

i)          GUILLAUME [III] de Nevers (-20 Aug 1148).  The Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum names "Guillelmum" as the son of "Guillelmus…[filios]…Renaldum" and his second wife, commenting that he succeeded his grandfather[28].  He succeeded his grandfather in 1100 as Comte de Nevers, Comte d’Auxerre

-         see below.   

 

 

GUILLAUME [III] de Nevers, son of RENAUD [II] de Nevers & his second wife Agnes de Baugency (-20 Aug 1148).  The Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum names "Guillelmum" as the son of "Guillelmus…[filios]…Renaldum" and his second wife, commenting that he succeeded his grandfather[29].  He succeeded his grandfather in 1100 as Comte de Nevers, Comte d’Auxerre

1.         GUILLAUME [IV] de Nevers (-Auxerre 21 Nov 1161, bur Auxerre Saint-Germain).  The Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum names "Guillelmum et Renaldum" as the sons of "Guillelmum", son of "Guillelmus…[filius Renaldi]"[30].  He succeeded his father in 1148 as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre

a)         GUILLAUME [V] de Nevers ([1145]-Acre 24 Oct 1168, bur Bethlehem).  The Libro de Libertate Monasterii Vizeliacensis names "Nivernensis comes Guilelmus filius Gulielmi Cartusiensis…filius eius Gulielmus"[31].  He succeeded his father in 1161 as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre

b)         GUY [I] de Nevers ([1149]-Tonnerre, Yonne 19 Oct 1175).  "W Nivernensium comes" granted taxation rights to the church of Autun with the consent of "Ida cometissa et filius meus Guido…[et] Guillelmus filius meus" by charter dated 1158[32].  The Chronicon of Robert canon of St Maria, Auxerre names "Guillelmus Nivernensis comes…Guido frater eius" when recording that he succeeded his brother[33].  He left for Palestine with his brother, returning in [1170][34] when he succeeded as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre, Comte de Tonnerre

-        see below

 

 

GUY [I] de Nevers, son of GUILLAUME [IV] Comte de Nevers & his wife ([1149]-Tonnerre, Yonne 19 Oct 1175).  "W Nivernensium comes" granted taxation rights to the church of Autun with the consent of "Ida cometissa et filius meus Guido…[et] Guillelmus filius meus" by charter dated 1158[35].  The Chronicon of Robert canon of St Maria, Auxerre names "Guillelmus Nivernensis comes…Guido frater eius" when recording that he succeeded his brother[36].  He left for Palestine with his brother, returning in [1170][37] when he succeeded as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre, Comte de Tonnerre

1.         AGNES de Nevers ([1169/70]-[Mailly] 2 or 6 Feb 1193).  The Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorenses records that "Guido comes" left two children by his wife "Mathildis", stating that they became wards of the king after their father died[38].  She succeeded her brother in 1181 as Ctss de Nevers, Ctss d'Auxerre.  She succeeded as Ctss de Tonnerre when she and her husband bought Tonnerre from her mother in 1191[39]m (1184) as his first wife, PIERRE [II] Seigneur de Courtenay, son of PIERRE de France Seigneur de Courtenay & his wife Elisabeth de Courtenay Dame de Courtenay ([1155]-Epirus after Jun 1219).  He succeeded as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre in 1184, by right of his first wife.  After his defeat by Hervé de Donzy, following their dispute over the château de Gien, Pierre de Courtenay was confirmed as Comte d'Auxerre, Comte de Tonnerre for life in 1199 but was obliged to cede the county of Nevers, as well as his daughter's hand in marriage, to Hervé.  He was elected in 1216 to succeed his brother-in-law Henri de Flandres as PIERRE I Emperor of Constantinople

a)         MATHILDE de Courtenay ([1188]-29 Jul 1257, bur Abbaye de Réconfort, near Monceaux-le-Comte).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mathildem" as only daughter of "comitis Petris" & his first wife, specifying that she married firstly "Herveio Gaufridi filio de Giam et de Dunzeio" and secondly "comiti Gugoni Forensi"[40].  She succeeded her mother in 1193 as Ctss de Nevers, Ctss d'Auxerre, Ctss de Tonnerre, under the guardianship of her father.  m firstly (contract Paris Oct 1199, Papal dispensation 20 Dec 1213) HERVE [IV] Seigneur de Donzy, de Gien et de Saint-Aignan, son of HERVE [III] Seigneur de Donzy et de Gien & his first wife Mathilde Goët Dame de Montmirail (-Château de Saint-Aignan 22 Jul 1222, bur Abbaye de Pontigny near Auxerre).  The necrology of the Cathedral of Nevers records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Herveus comes Nivernensis"[41]m secondly (Jul 1226) as his third wife, GUY [IV] Comte de Forez, son of GUY [III] Comte de Lyon et de Forez [Albon] & his second wife Adalasia --- (-Castellaneta, Apulia 29 Oct 1241, bur Notre-Dame de Montbrison).  He succeeded as Comte de Nevers in 1226, by right of his wife.  He died while returning from Crusade with Thibaut King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne[42]

2.         GUILLAUME [VI] de Nevers ([1171/75]-17 Oct 1181, bur Abbaye de Saint-Michel).  The Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorenses records that "Guido comes" left two children by his wife "Mathildis", stating that they became wards of the king after their father died[43].  He succeeded his father in 1175 as Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre

 

 

HERVE [IV] Seigneur de Donzy, de Gien et de Saint-Aignan, son of HERVE [III] Seigneur de Donzy et de Gien & his first wife Mathilde Goët Dame de Montmirail (-Château de Saint-Aignan 22 Jul 1222, bur Abbaye de Pontigny near Auxerre).  He disputed possession of the château de Gien with Pierre de Courtenay, but defeated the latter and obliged him to agree to the hand of his daughter as well as the transfer of the county of Nevers.  The arrangement was confirmed by Philippe II King of France in Nov 1199.  His father-in-law invested him as Comte de Tonnerre before leaving France in early 1217 following his appointment as Emperor of Constantinople.  He succeeded his father-in-law in 1219 as Comte d'Auxerre[44]

m (contract Paris Oct 1199, Papal dispensation 20 Dec 1213) as her first husband, MATHILDE de Courtenay, daughter of PIERRE [II] Seigneur de Courtenay [later PIERRE I Emperor of Constantinople] & his first wife Agnes Ctss de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre ([1188]-29 Jul 1257, bur Abbaye de Réconfort, near Monceaux-le-Comte).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mathildem" as only daughter of "comitis Petris" & his first wife, specifying that she married "Herveio Gaufridi filio de Giam et de Dunzeio"[45].  She succeeded her mother in 1193 as Ctss de Nevers, Ctss d'Auxerre, Ctss de Tonnerre, under the guardianship of her father who declared himself Comte d'Auxerre, Comte de Tonnerre in 1199.  After her husband died in 1222, Mathilde resumed control of Auxerre until her own death in 1257.  She married secondly (Jul 1226) as his third wife, Guy [IV] Comte de Forez

1.         AGNES de Donzy (-1225).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comiti Herveo Nivernensi…filia" was betrothed to "Philippo primogenitor domni Ludovici", and that after he died she married "Guido primogenitus Galtheri de Sancti Paolo"[46].  Dame de Donzy.  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1222 the marriage of the daughter of "Henri comte de Nevers" and "Gui comte de Saint-Paul"[47].  Her daughter was heiress of the county of Nevers.  m (1221) GUY [I] Comte de Saint-Pol, son of GAUCHER [III] Seigneur de Châtillon-sur-Marne Comte de Saint-Pol & his wife Elisabeth Ctss de Saint-Pol (-killed in battle Aug 1226). 

a)         YOLANDE de Châtillon ([1221/22]-1254).  Heiress of the counties of Nevers and Tonnerre.  m ([30 May 1228]) ARCHAMBAUD de Bourbon, son of ARCHAMBAUD [VIII] "le Grand" Seigneur de Bourbon [Dampierre] & his first wife Guigone de Forez (-Cyprus 15 Jan 1249). 

i)          MATHILDE de Bourbon ([1234/35]-[Mar/Sep] 1262)She succeeded her father in 1249 as Dame de Bourbon.  She succeeded her great-grandmother Mathilde de Courtenay in 1257 as Ctss de Nevers, Ctss d'Auxerre, Ctss de Tonnerre.   m (contract Feb 1248) EUDES de Bourgogne, son of HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy & his first wife Yolande de Dreux Ctss d'Ossone (1230-Acre 4 Aug 1266, bur Acre, cemetery of St Nicolas).  Comte de Nevers, Comte d'Auxerre, Comte de Tonnerre 1257-1262, by right of his wife. 

(a)       ALIX de Bourgogne (1251-1279).  An arrêt of the Parliament dated 1 Nov 1273 addressed “dominus Ioannes de Cabilone miles...de parte Aalesin uxorem suam...Yolandim comitissam Niverrnensem [...Robertum de Flandria eius maritum] et Margaretam reginam Siciliæ sorores suas” in respect of the succession of “Mathildis quondam comitissæ Nivernensis matris suæ”, ordered the partition of “Nivernensi, Altissiodorensi et Tornodorensi comitatib.”, under which Nevers was granted to Yolande, Tonnerre to Marguerite, and Auxerre to Alix[48]Ctss d'Auxerre, Dame de Saint-Aignan et de Montjay.  m (église de Lantenay, Côte d'Or 1 Nov 1268) as his second wife, JEAN [II] de Chalon Seigneur de Rochefort, son of JEAN [I] "le Sage/l'Antique" Comte de Chalon [Bourgogne-Comté] & his second wife Isabelle de Courtenay (1243-before 10 Nov 1309).  Comte d'Auxerre, by right of his wife.

 

 

 

C.      VICOMTES d'AUXERRE

 

 

Only two references have been found to probable vicomtes d’Auxerre.  The periods during which they lived have not been ascertained. 

 

 

1.         LEOTERIC (-4 Apr ----).  Vicomte [d’Auxerre].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 4 Apr of "Leotericus vicecomes, huius ecclesiæ vexillarius"[49]

 

2.         GAUTHIER (-18 Aug ----).  Vicomte [d’Auxerre].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 18 Aug of "Walterius vicecomes"[50]

 

 

 

D.      COMTES d'AUXERRE 1273-1440, SEIGNEURS de ROCHEFORT (BOURGOGNE-COMTE)

 

 

JEAN de Salins, son of JEAN [I] "le Sage/l'Antique" Comte de Chalon, later Seigneur de Salins [Bourgogne-Comté] & his second wife Isabelle de Courtenay (1243-before 10 Nov 1309).  Seigneur de Rochefort: “Jehans cuens de Borguogne et sires de Salins” donated “Rochefort...Chevigny et...Bielne” to “Jehanz notre fil” in view of his marriage to “Ysabel srour Ferri duc de Lorrainne qui fut feme Guillaume cay en arriers conte de Vianne”, by charter dated Jun 1256[51]Jehans cuens de Boúrgoingne et sire de Salins” divided his territories between “nos autres enfants...Jehan notre aîné fils de la contesse Isabelle [le chastel de Bracon et le Bort]...Estevenet notre fils qui fut né après ledit Jehans de ladite Isabelle [le chastel de Rochefort...et le chastel de Montenot et la Tour de la Fontaine Benoite]...Perrin notre tier fils de ladite Ysabelle [Valampouliere...Chestelbelin...]...by charter dated 2 Jan 1260[52].  “Jehans cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” granted “Rochefort, Saint-Juliain, Orgelet et Valnantois” to “es enfanz que nous avons de…Ysabel…Johan, Estevenet et Perrenin…dame Blanche dame de Biaujuel”, by charter dated 25 Mar 1263[53].  “Jehans cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” confirmed a grant to “Jehan de Chalon signour de Rochefort nostre fil” by charter dated 15 Dec 1266 for the dowry of “Ysabeal sa fame, fille…Mayhu duc de Loherainne[54].  He succeeded in 1273 as Comte d'Auxerre, by right of his second wife.  Jehans de Chalons sires de Roichefort et cuens d’Auceure et...Aaliz de Nevers contesse d’Auceure fame audit Jehan” transferred “la grange des Jarries” to “madame Agnes la dame de Brageloigne” by charter dated Jul 1274[55]Père Anselme records that Marguerite, widow of Guy Seigneur de Montluel, exchanged property with Jean de Salins Comte d’Auxerre in 1304, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[56]

Betrothed (3 Jul 1255, terminated Jun 1256) to ADELHEID von Zollern, daughter of FRIEDRICH III Burggraf von Nürnberg & his first wife Elizabeth von Andechs-Merano (-30 May [1307]).  "Corraudus burgravii de Nuremberch et Fredericus filius eius" granted their rights "in comitatu Burgundie…et in regno Francie excepta advocatia Bisuntina", received from "Elisabeth uxore nostra sorore Ottonis quondam ducis Meranie", when agreeing the marriage of "Alis nata nostra burgravii iunioris" and "Johanne nato nobilis viri Johannis comitis Burgundie et domini Salinensis", by charter dated 3 Jul 1255[57].  The betrothal was terminated by charter dated Jun 1256[58].  "Ber[tholdus]…Babenbergensis Episcopus" appointed "consanguineus noster…Fridericus Burcravius de Nurenberc…filia sua Maria" as his heir in various properties, and if she died "aliam Adelheidam", in particular if "Cunradus frater dicti Burcravii" died childless, by charter dated 24 Apr 1262[59]

m firstly (1257) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Lorraine, widow of GUILLAUME de Vienne [titular] Comte de Vienne, daughter of MATHIEU II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Catherine de Limbourg ([1231/34]-May 1266).  “Jehans cuens de Borguogne et sires de Salins” donated “Rochefort...Chevigny et...Bielne” to “Jehanz notre fil” in view of his marriage to “Ysabel srour Ferri duc de Lorrainne qui fut feme Guillaume cay en arriers conte de Vianne”, by charter dated Jun 1256[60].  “Jehans cuens de Bourgoigne et sires de Salins” confirmed a grant to “Jehan de Chalon signour de Rochefort nostre fil” by charter dated 15 Dec 1266 for the dowry of “Ysabeal sa fame, fille…Mayhu duc de Loherainne[61]

m secondly (église de Lantenay, Côte d'Or 1 Nov 1268) ALIX de Bourgogne, daughter of EUDES de Bourgogne Comte de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre & his wife Mathilde de Bourbon [Dampierre] Dame de Bourbon, Ctss de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre (1251-1279).  An arrêt of the Parliament dated 1 Nov 1273 addressed “dominus Ioannes de Cabilone miles...de parte Aalesin uxorem suam...Yolandim comitissam Niverrnensem [...Robertum de Flandria eius maritum] et Margaretam reginam Siciliæ sorores suas” in respect of the succession of “Mathildis quondam comitissæ Nivernensis matris suæ”, ordered the partition of “Nivernensi, Altissiodorensi et Tornodorensi comitatib.”, under which Nevers was granted to Yolande, Tonnerre to Marguerite, and Auxerre to Alix[62]Ctss d'Auxerre, Dame de Saint-Aignan et de Montjay.  Jehans de Chalons sires de Roichefort et cuens d’Auceure et...Aaliz de Nevers contesse d’Auceure fame audit Jehan” transferred “la grange des Jarries” to “madame Agnes la dame de Brageloigne” by charter dated Jul 1274[63]

m thirdly ([29 Jan 1290]) MARGUERITE de Beaujeu Dame de Saint-Julien, daughter of LOUIS de Forez Seigneur de Beaujeu et de Dombes & his wife Eléonore de Savoie (-1338 or after).  "Jean de Châlon comte d’Auxerre" declared, at the time of his marriage to "Marguerite, fille de Louis sire de Beaujeu", that his father-in-law had agreed to make payment [of dowry] by charter dated 28 Jan 1290[64]"Margarita de Bello-joco, relicta Joannis de Cabilone Comitis Autissiodorensis et domini de Rupeforti" renounced rights after her husband's death, by charter dated 5 Nov 1309[65]

Jean & his second wife had one child:

1.         GUILLAUME d'Auxerre ([1270]-killed in battle Mons-en-Puelle 9 Aug 1304).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  He succeeded his mother in 1279 as Comte d'Auxerre, under the regency of his father until 1283.  His maternal aunt, Marguerite de Bourgogne Queen of Sicily, renounced the county of Tonnerre in his favour 2 Jan 1293, when he succeeded as Comte de Tonnerre, Seigneur de Monjay, Saint-Aignan, Selles and Valençay-en-Berry.  He was killed fighting for Philippe IV King of France against the count of Flanders.  m (Papal dispensation 4o 7 Jan 1291[66], 12 Jan 1292) as her first husband, ELEONORE de Savoie, daughter of AMEDEE V Comte de Savoie & his first wife Sibylle de Bâgé ([1279]-1324).  "Eleonora figlia del Conte Amedeo di Savoia e della Contessa Sibilla Moglie di Guglielmo di Chalon Conte d'Auxerre" renounced her rights of inheritance from her parents in favour of "suoi Padre e Madre, e di Oddoardo ed Aymone suoi fratelli" as part of the arrangements concerning her dowry, by charter dated "la festa di S. Vincenzo 1292"[67].  The marriage contract of "Domicellam Alienor filiam…domini Amedei comitis Sabaudiæ" and "Guillermus de Cabilone comes Altissiodorensis" is dated Jan 1292[68].  "Guglielmo di Chalon Conte d'Auxerres" donated property to "Eleonora figlia del Conte Amedeo di Savoia sua Moglie" in contemplation of marriage by charter dated 7 Jan 1292[69].  In the "Act of emancipation by her father" dated 25 Jan 1292, Eléonore is recorded as being 12 years old[70].  If this is correct, it is unlikely that her first child was born in 1292, as shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[71].  The testament of "Sibilla comitissa Sabaudiæ, dominaque Baugiaci, uxor…domini Amedei comitis Sabaudiæ" dated 1294 grants bequests to "…filiæ nostræ Elyonori, Guillermo comiti Altissiodorensi eius marito…filiæ nostræ Margaretæ…filiæ nostræ Agneti…filio nostro Aymoni…filium nostrum Eduardum…in pupillari ætate…illum quem gestamus in utero"[72].  She married secondly (1305) as his second wife, Dreux [IV] de Mello Seigneur de Sainte-Hermine.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Jun 1308 under which Philippe IV King of France requesting “Jean de Chalon-Auxerre”, guardian of “les enfants de feu Guillaume comte d’Auxerre”, to pay sums due “à la veuve de ce dernier, remariée à Dreux de Mello seigneur de Sainte-Hermine[73].  She married thirdly, as his second wife, Jean [I] Comte de Forez.  Guillaume & his wife had two children:

a)         JEAN [II] d'Auxerre ([1292]-1362).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified, but it is indicated by his marriage contract dated 1305.  He succeeded his father in 1304 as Comte d'Auxerre

-        see below

b)         JEANNE de Chalon (1300-26 Oct 1360, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  The treaty dated 1305 between Jean [II] Comte d’Auxerre and Renaud Comte de Montbéliard included the betrothal of Jean to “Marguerite fille de Renaud de Montbéliard” and between “Jeanne sœur de Jean de Chalon-Auxerre” and “Othenin de Montbéliard[74]Ctss de TonnerreBetrothed (1305) to OTHENIN de Bourgogne, son of RENAUD de Bourgogne [Comté] Comte de Montbéliard & his wife Guillemette de Neuchâtel Ctss de Montbéliard (-1338).  m (Chalon-sur-Saône 16 Jun 1321) ROBERT de Bourgogne, son of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France ([15 Aug 1304/3 Mar 1305]-Dijon 13 or 19 Oct 1334, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).  Comte de Tonnerre, the dowry of his wife. 

 

 

JEAN [II] d'Auxerre, son of GUILLAUME Comte d'Auxerre [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Eléonore de Savoie ([1292]-1362).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified, but it is indicated by his marriage contract dated 1305.  He succeeded his father in 1304 as Comte d'Auxerre.  The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[75].  He fought at the battle of Crecy in 1346 and at the battle of Poitiers in 1356.  He was imprisoned in London from 1357 to 1361.  He succeeded his sister in 1360 as Comte de Tonnerre

Betrothed (1305) to MARGUERITE de Bourgogne, daughter of RENAUD de Bourgogne [Comté] Comte de Montbéliard & his wife Guillemette de Neuchâtel Ctss de Montbéliard.  The treaty dated 1305 between Jean [II] Comte d’Auxerre and Renaud Comte de Montbéliard included the betrothal of Jean to “Marguerite fille de Renaud de Montbéliard” and between “Jeanne sœur de Jean de Chalon-Auxerre” and “Othenin de Montbéliard[76]

m (1317) ALIX de Bourgogne Dame de Montfleur, daughter of RENAUD de Bourgogne [Bourgogne-Comté] Comte de Montbéliard & his wife Guillemette de Neuchâtel Ctss de Montbéliard (-after 13 May 1362).  “Alix de Montbéliard comtesse d’Auxerre” donated revenue to “sa fille Marguerite de Chalon femme de Jean de Savoie” by charter dated 1334[77]

Mistress (1): ALIX de Thiellay, daughter of ---.  Clerc names “Alis de Châlais ou Thélais” as mother of Jean [II]’s illegitimate son “Jean bâtard de Châlons...seigneur d’Oliferne et capitaine d’Orgelet[78].  The primary source which confirms her relationship with Jean [III] has not been identified. 

Jean [II] & his wife had eleven children:

1.         JEAN [III] d'Auxerre "le Chevalier Blanc" ([1321/22]-1379)The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[79].  He succeeded his father in 1362 as Comte d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre. 

-        see below

2.         GUILLAUME de Chalon (-[before 1360]).  The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[80].  Seigneur de Chavannes.  Governor of Auxerre.  m as her second husband, JEANNE de Châteauvillain, widow of JEAN Seigneur de Thil et de Marigny, daughter of JEAN [III] Seigneur de Châteauvillain & his wife Marguerite de Noyers (-[1375/99]).  She married thirdly ([1360]) as his second wife, Hugues de Vienne Seigneur de Saint-Georges.  She married fourthly (contract 1362) Arnaud de Cervelles "l'Archiprêtre" (-1366 before Sep).  She married fifthly Enguerrand de Hesdin (-7 Mar 1391). 

3.         HUMBERT de Chalon (-after 1362).  The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[81].  Canon at Chartres before 1339.  Canon at Tournai 1339.  Seigneur de Montjay.  

4.         MARGUERITE de Chalon (-11 Oct 1378).  The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[82].  Two contracts of marriage between "Gio. di Savoia figlio di Lodovico di Savoia Signore di Vaud" and "Margarita di Chalon figlia di Gio. Signore di Chalon e d'Auxerre" are dated 14 Mar 1333 and 18 Dec 1337[83].  “Alix de Montbéliard comtesse d’Auxerre” donated revenue to “sa fille Marguerite de Chalon femme de Jean de Savoie” by charter dated 1334[84].  Dame de Courtenot.  A dispute between "Lodovico di Savoia di Vaud" and "Conte d'Auxeres suo Suocero" concerning the dowry of "Margarita di Savoia sua figlia" was settled by charter dated 8 May 1340[85].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not been identified.  m firstly (contracts 14 Mar 1333 and 18 Dec 1337[86], 14 Mar 1329) JEAN de Savoie Seigneur de Visieu, son of LOUIS [II] de Savoie Baron de Vaud & his wife Isabelle de Chalon [Bourgogne-Comté] (-killed in battle Laupen 21 Jun 1339).  m secondly HENRI de Vienne Seigneur d'Antigny, son of ---. 

5.         JEANNE de Chalon (-[1342])The marriage contract between “Thiébaud de Neuchâtel le Jeune” and “Jeanne de Chalon, fille di comte d’Auxerre” is dated 1336, specifies “le château de Nancuise” as her dowry, and confirms her emancipation[87].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by charters dated 1337 and 1339 which record that “son gendre Thiébaud de Neuchâtel” had given “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre” part of the dowry of “Jeanne de Chalon-Auxerre sa femme[88].  Her absence from her father’s testament dated 1334 has not been explained.  Dame de Nancuise.  m (contract 23 Jul 1336) as his first wife, THIBAUT [VI] Seigneur de Neuchâtel, son of THIBAUT [V] Seigneur de Neuchâtel [en Bourgogne] & his wife Agnes von Geroldseck (-1366, bur Lieucroissant). 

6.         BEATRIX de Chalon (-after 16 Dec 1369).  The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[89].  Her first betrothal is confirmed by a letter dated 1336 which terminated the contract by mutual consent[90].  "Johans de Chalon comtes d’Auxerre et sires de Rochefort" made a declaration dated 2 Jul 1342 following the marriage of "Beatrix nostre fille" and "le Seigneur de Villars"[91].  Dame de Mongefond.  Betrothed (before 1336, contract terminated 1336) BERAUD de Saint-Dizier Seigneur de Saint-Laurent-La-Roche, son of ETIENNE de Saint-Dizier Seigneur de Saint-Laurent-La Roche & his wife Huguette d’Antigny ([1320/25?]-1342).  m (Papal dispensation 10 Jul 1342) as his second wife, HUMBERT [V] Seigneur de Thoire-Villars, son of HUMBERT [IV] Seigneur de Thoire et de Villars & his wife Eléonore de Beaujeu [Forez] (-18 Aug 1372). 

7.         TRISTAN de Chalon (-murdered Château de Grimont [early May] 1369).  Presumably Tristan was born after 1334 (or was an infant at the time) as he is not named in his father’s testament of that date.  A charter dated 1365 records the partition of assets between Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre” and “Tristan de Chalon[92].  Seigneur de Rochefort: “Tristan de Chalon seigneur de Rochefort” granted revenue to “Renaud de Beuafort seigneur de Burmont” by charter dated 1362[93]Seigneur d’Orgelet: A charter dated 1368 records an agreement between “Tristan de Chalon seigneur d’Orgelet” and [his first wife’s sister] “Marguerite de Vienne dame d’Arguel et de Cuisaux, veuve de Louis de Chalon” concerning various fiefs which they held[94]Seigneur de Châtelbelin.  A charter dated 1368 records a debt contracted by Tristan de Chalon seigneur d’Orgelet et Châtelbelin” to “Marguerite de Virechatel et Etienne de la Palud son fils[95].  “Tristan de Chalon seigneur de Châtelbelin” mortgaged “tous ses biens” to “Pierre seigneur de Roset châtelain de Poligny” for a loan by charter dated 1369[96].  He was imprisoned at Grimont, near Poligny and killed in revenge for taking part in the siege of Rochefort: letters dated 12 May 1369 record that “Tristan de Chalons seigneur de Chatelbelin” was murdered “malvaisement et de nouvel en très grant esclandre[97]m firstly JEANNE de Vienne, daughter of PHILIPPE de Vienne Seigneur de Pymont & his wife Huguette d’Antigny Dame de Chay (after 1337-[1365]).  “Philippe de Vienne seigneur de Pymont” instructed “son neveu Henri de Longwy seigneur de Rahon” to swear homage to “Jeanne de Vienne dame de Rochefort sa fille” after his death by charter dated 1364[98].  “Philippe de Vienne seigneur de Pymont” granted “ses château et seigneurie de Beauregard” to “Jeanne de Vienne sa fille et à Tristan de Chalon son gendre” by charter dated 1365[99]m secondly ([1366]) as her second husband, BEATRIX de la Baume, widow of SIMON de Saint-Amour, daughter of GUILLAUME de la Baume Seigneur de l’Abergement & his first wife Clémence de la Palud (-1368).  Etienne de la Baume dit Galois (Galesius)...comme tuteur des enfants de feu Guillaume de la Baume chevalier son fils” sold “la terre et seigneurie de Coligny le Neuf” to “Jean de Saint Amour chevalier” to pay the dowries of “Béatrix femme de Simon de Saint Amour et d’Alix femme de Guy seigneur de Chautagne, toutes les deux filles dudit Guillaume de la Baume” as well as property “dans les châtellenies de Dramelay, Arinthod et Montfleur” bought from “Tristan de Chalon” by charter dated 12 Jul 1363[100]Tristan de Chalon seigneur d’Orgelet et de Châtelbelin et Béatrix de la Baume sa femme” waived rights against “la comtesse de Bourgogne” for “l’occupation du château de Chavannes par ses troupes et sur ses ordres” by charter dated 1368[101].  Tristan & his first wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN de Chalon ([1355/65]-killed in battle Nikopolis 11 Sep 1396).  “Hugues de Chalon-Arlay tuteur de Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” gave “les hommes et meix dépendant de la succession de Tristan de Chalon à By et à Combelle” to “Pierre seigneur de Roset”, as security for the loan (given under the charter dated 1369 cited above) by charter dated 1372[102].  Seigneur de Châtelbelin.  “Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” confirmed the dowry given to “sa sœur Alix de Chalon” for her marriage to “François de Sassenage” by charter dated 1388[103].  The testament of “Hugues de Vienne soignour de Salieres”, dated 25 Apr 1390, bequeathed property to “...nostre...cousin mes sire Johan de Chalon seignour de Chastelbelin...nostre...cousine sa suer femme au seignour de Chassenaige...” and bequeathed property after the death of “nostre...grand mere ma dame Marguerite de Montbeliart” to “noz...cousins...mes sire Johan de Chalon soignour de Chastelbelin...[104].  “Jean de Ghistelle et sa femme Jeanne de Châtillon” consented to the repurchase of “Havrincourt” by “Gaucher de Châtillon” from “Jean de Chalon” by charter dated 1395[105].  The primary source which confirms his place and date of death has not been identified.  After his death, Châtelbelin was disputed between his sister’s first husband François de Sassenage and Jean’s cousin Louis de Chalon Comte de Tonnerre (see below).  A monument at Nikopolis records the deaths there of ...Jean de Chalon Sire de Chatelbelin 1366-1396...[106]m firstly (contract 1388) JEANNE de Montfaucon, daughter of ETIENNE de Montfaucon Comte de Montbéliard & his wife Marguerite de Chalon (-[1388/89]).  The marriage contract between “Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” and “Jeanne de Montbéliard” was agreed by “Etienne de Montbéliard père de la fiancée et Jean de Chalon” by charter dated 1388[107].  “Etienne Comte de Montbéliard” received money from “Jean de Chalon seigneur de Châtelbelin” in repayment of the dowry of “feu sa fille Jeanne” by charters dated 1389 and 1391[108].  The testament of Jean de Chalon Seigneur de Châtelbelin, dated 3 May 1396, granted dower to his “compagne Jeanne de Guistelle”, granted “l’office de la châtellenie d’Orgelet” to “Jean bàtard de Châlons”, appointed as his heir “Louis de Châlons aîné, fils de son...frère Loys comte d’Auxerre et de Tonnerre”, bequeathed listed properties to “sa sœur Alis de Châlons dame de Sassenage...Louis de Châlons”, and appointed as executors “Amé de Châlons abbé de Baume, ses...frères Henri de Montbéliard seigneur d’Orbe, Henri de Châlons sire d’Arguel...Jehan bàtard de Châlons...[109]m secondy (contract 1393) as her first husband, JOHANNA van Gistel, daughter of JAN [VI] Heer van Gistel & his wife Jeanne de Châtillon (-[Feb 1423/1431]).  The marriage contract between “Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” and “Jeanne de Ghistelle” is dated 1393[110]Gaucher de Châtillon vicomte de Bligny” granted “la vicomté de Bligny et les terres d’Orcueil et Chaumesnil” to “Jeanne de Ghistelle sa nièce [=petite fille] fille de Jean de Ghistellle seigneur d’Esglemontier et de Jeanne de Châtillon fille du seigneur de Père, femme de Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” by charter dated 1393[111]A proxy was given 1394 to “Pierre de Merlie saige en droit” to take possession of “la terre d’Havrincourt et de la vicomté de Bligny”, given as dowry to “Jeanne de Ghistelle” by “Gaucher de Châtillon son aïeul et Jean de Ghistelle son père[112].  The testament of Jean de Chalon Seigneur de Châtelbelin, dated 3 May 1396, granted dower to his “compagne Jeanne de Guistelle[113].  She married secondly (Dec 1398) Jean de Neuchâtel Seigneur de Montagu.  Clerc records her second marriage in early Dec 1398[114]

b)         ALIX de Chalon (-after 1418).  The marriage contract of François de Sassenage and Alix de Chalon is dated Nov 1384 (vidimus dated 21 Mar 1441)[115].  “Hugues de Chalon-Arlay” acknowledged receiving “à la décharge de Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” of a sum for the marriage of “Alix de Chalon dame de Sassenage sa nièce” by charter dated 1385[116].  “Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin” confirmed the dowry given to “sa sœur Alix de Chalon” for her marriage to “François de Sassenage” by charter dated 1388[117].  The testament of “Hugues de Vienne seignour de Salieres”, dated 25 Apr 1390, bequeathed property to “...nostre...cousin mes sire Johan de Chalon seignour de Chastelbelin...nostre...cousine sa suer femme au seignour de Chassenaige...[118].  The testament of Jean de Chalon Seigneur de Châtelbelin, dated 3 May 1396, bequeathed listed properties to “sa sœur Alis de Châlons dame de Sassenage...Louis de Châlons[119].  “Philippe le Hardi” [Duke of Burgundy] decreed that “l’héritier de Jean de Chalon-Châtelbelin François de Sassenage seigneur de Vinay, mari d’Alix de Chalon” should have quiet enjoyment of his inheritance by charter dated 1397, a charter dated 1398 noting that “Louis de Chalon-Auxerre” had seized the inheritance in question[120].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not been identified.  A charter dated 1418 records an agreement between Henri de Sassenage and Alix de Chalon[121]m firstly (contract Nov 1384) as his second wife, FRANÇOIS Bérenger de Sassenage Seigneur de Sassenage et de Vinay, son of HENRI Bérenger Seigneur de Sassenage et de Pont-en-Royans & his wife Huguette de la Tour (-after 1397).  m secondly GUILLAUME de Saulieu, son of ---. 

8.         HENRIETTE de Chalon (after 1375).  Dame de Binant: “Hugues de Vienne seigneur de Pagny” took back “son château de Binan, dot de sa femme Henriette de Chalon” from “Tristan de Chalon” by charter dated 1362[122].  “Henriette de Chalon dame de Pagny veuve de Hugues de Vienne” acknowledged receipt of payments from “la comtesse de Bourgogne” by charter dated 1375[123]m (contract 24 May 1358) HUGUES de Vienne Seigneur de Pagny et de Croye, son of PHILIPPE de Vienne Seigneur de Pagny & his wife Jeanne de Chambly Dame de Neaufle-le-Château (-[1369/74]). 

9.         LOUISE de Chalon (-1394).  Abbess of Baume-les-Dames, resigned.  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. 

10.      ELEONORE de Chalon (-8 Aug 1374).  Abbess of Remiremont.  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. 

11.      ISABELLE de Chalon (-1385 or after).  Nun at Château-Chalon.  “Tristan de Chalon” granted revenue to “sa sœur Isabelle religieuse de Château-Chalon” by charter dated 1363[124]

Jean [II] had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):   

12.       JEAN (-after 3 May 1396).  Clerc names “Alis de Châlais ou Thélais” as mother of Jean [II]’s illegitimate son “Jean bâtard de Châlons...seigneur d’Oliferne et capitaine d’Orgelet”, adding the latter was living 1393-1400[125].  Seigneur d’Oliferne.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  The testament of Jean de Chalon Seigneur de Châtelbelin, dated 3 May 1396, granted “l’office de la châtellenie d’Orgelet” to “Jean bàtard de Châlons[126]

Jean [II] had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses:   

13.       JEAN bâtard de Chalon (-after 19 Feb 1400).  Seigneur de Montrichard.  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1398 quoted below.  Tristan de Chalon” gave revenue to “Jean bâtard de Chalon seigneur de Montrichard” by charter dated 1375 (misdated, assuming that Tristan’s death is correctly recorded as shown above?), confirmed by “Jean de Chalon-Châteaubelin” [Tristan’s son, see above] by charter dated 1386[127].  “Louis de Chalon-Châtelbelin” [Louis de Chalon Comte de Tonnerre, see below] gave revenue to “Henri et Jean bâtards de son aïeul Jean de Chalon” by charter dated 1398[128].  Jean de Chalon-Arlay prince d’Orange” confirmed a donation revenue made in 1392 by “son oncle Jean bâtard de Chalon seigneur de Montrichard et sa tante Jeanne femme du précédent” to “Jean de Fallerans leur écuyer” by charter dated 1399[129]The testament of “Jehan le bastard de Chalon chevalier seigneur de Montrichardt”, dated 19 Feb 1399 (O.S.) published late Nov 1400, chose burial “en l’esglise des religieuses dames Cordelieres de Megetes”, named “mes...enffans.  Jehanne de Montrichard dame de Tholongeon et Jehan sire de Costebrune filz de feu ma...fille Marguerite jaidicte dame de Costebrune[130].  m JEANNE de Salins, daughter of GUY de Salins & his wife Etiennette de Pasquier (-after 30 Aug 1416).  “Jean de Chalon-Arlay prince d’Orange” confirmed a donation revenue made in 1392 by “son oncle Jean bâtard de Chalon seigneur de Montrichard et sa tante Jeanne femme du précédent” to “Jean de Fallerans leur écuyer” by charter dated 1399[131].  The relationships “oncle...tante” in this extract are difficult to understand.  Jean de Chalon-Arlay Prince d’Orange, son of Louis de Chalon-Arlay (see the document BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY) was only remotely related to Jean bâtard de Chalon: Jean [II] de Chalon Comte d’Auxerre, father of the bastard, was the great-grandson of Jean [I] “l’Antique” Comte de Chalon Seigneur de Salins, while Louis was his great-great-grandson,.  If this was the family relationship described in the 1399 charter, it would represent an unusually extended use of “oncle...tante”.  No closer relationship has been found.  Jeanne’s parentage is confirmed by the following document: the testament of [her parents] “Guy de Chambier alias Chambier chevalier et Estienne de Paisquier sa femme”, dated 30 Aug 1416, ordered the payment to them of “ce que reste des mariaiges donnez a noz filles, femmes de...mes sire Jehan de Montruchart et de mes sire Jehan de Chissey chevaliers[132].  Jean & his wife had three children: 

a)         JEAN de Chalon (-after Jun 1393).  Accounts compiled by “Guyon de Montaigu receveur de la Saunerie pour M. de Châtelbelin” record that the latter gave money “après la St. Jehan 1393” to “Jehan fils de Jehan bâtard de Châlons sire de Montrichard...parce que led. fils vouloit aler outre mer[133]

b)         JEANNE de ChalonThe testament of “Jehan le bastard de Chalon chevalier seigneur de Montrichardt”, dated 19 Feb 1399 (O.S.) published late Nov 1400, chose burial “en l’esglise des religieuses dames Cordelieres de Megetes”, named “mes...enffans.  Jehanne de Montrichard dame de Tholongeon et Jehan sire de Costebrune filz de feu ma...fille Marguerite jaidicte dame de Costebrune[134].  Jean de Chalon sire d’Arlay et prince d’Orange” settled a dispute between “Jeanne de Montrichard dame de Toulongeon” and “Jean sire de Cottebrune” regarding the succession of “Jean bâtard de Chalon, leur père et aïeul”, by charter dated 1403[135]

c)          MARGUERITE de Chalon (-before 19 Feb 1400).  The testament of “Jehan le bastard de Chalon chevalier seigneur de Montrichardt”, dated 19 Feb 1399 (O.S.) published late Nov 1400, chose burial “en l’esglise des religieuses dames Cordelieres de Megetes”, named “mes...enffans.  Jehanne de Montrichard dame de Tholongeon et Jehan sire de Costebrune filz de feu ma...fille Marguerite jaidicte dame de Costebrune[136].  Jean de Chalon sire d’Arlay et prince d’Orange” settled a dispute between “Jeanne de Montrichard dame de Toulongeon” and  “Jean sire de Cottebrune” regarding the succession of “Jean bâtard de Chalon, leur père et aïeul”, by charter dated 1403[137].  m --- Seigneur de Cottebrune, son of ---. 

14.       HENRI bâtard de Chalon (-after 1398).  His parentage is confirmed by the following document: Louis de Chalon-Châtelbelin” gave revenue to “Henri et Jean bâtards de son aïeul Jean de Chalon” by charter dated 1398[138]

 

 

JEAN [III] d'Auxerre "le Chevalier Blanc", son of JEAN [II] Comte d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Alix de Bourgogne dame de Montfleur ([1321/22]-1379).  The testament of “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre”, dated 1334, divided his property between “ses trois fils Jean, Guillaume et Humbert et...ses filles Marguerite et Béatrix[139].  His date of birth is indicated by the charter dated 3 Sep 1336 under which [his father] “Jean de Chalon comte d’Auxerre et seigneur de Rochefort” emancipated “son fils Jean âgé de 14 ans au château d’Orgelet[140].  He succeeded his father in 1362 as Comte d'Auxerre et Comte de Tonnerre.  He died insane. 

m ([1336]) MARIE Crespin, daughter of GUILLAUME [VI] Crespin Seigneur d’Etrépagny et de Bec-Crespin, connétable de Normandie & his wife Mathilde de Bommiers (-after Nov 1350).  Dame du Bec-Crespin.  Her parentage, ancestry and marriage are recorded by Richemond[141].  “Jean de Chalon damoiseau emancipé” acknowledged a debt to his father relating to land brought to him as dowry of “Marie-Crépine fille de M. de Trépigny” by charter dated 1336[142].  A charter dated Nov 1350, in the presence of “dictorum comitisse et comitis de Roucyaco eius filii” and “dicte domine de Boutavant, suo et dicti mariti sui nomine”, confirms an earlier agreement between “madame Marguerite de Bomez contesse de Roucy et de Brayne [...monseigneur le conte de Roucy et monseigneur Symon de Roucy, ses enfants]” and “monseigneur Jehan de Meleun seigneur de Tancarville [...à cause de madame Jehanne Crespin sa fame...madame Marie Crespin dame de Boutavant] et monseigneur Jehan de Chalon seigneur de Boutevant, à cause de leurs fames, [filles de la feue] dame d’Estrepigny, suer de la dite contesse” concerning “Bomez, de Mirabel, de Blason et de Montfaucon[143]

Mistresses (1): - (4): ---. 

Mistress (5): PERRETTE Darnichot, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and relationship with Jean [III] has not been identified. 

Jean [III] & his wife had four children:

1.         JEAN de Chalon (-Poligny 1370).  He succeeded in 1363 as Seigneur de Rochefort: “Louis de Chalon dit le Chevalier Vert fils du comte de Tonnerre” approved the agreement between “Tristan de Chalon son oncle et Jean de Chalon son frère aîné” concerning the succession of “l’aïeul paternel de ce dernier”, under which “Jean de Chalon-Auxerre” was recognised as “propriétaire du château de Rochefort, des châteaux d’Arinthod, Boutavant et Dramelay”, by charter dated 1366[144]A charter dated 16 May 1368 records that Jean de Chalon-Rochefort, fils aîné du comte d’Auxerre” was imprisoned “pour avoir fait à la tête des compagnies pillies, roberies, occisions de personnes”, his imprisoned confirmed Jan 1369 after he failed to return to prison[145]

2.         LOUIS "le Chevalier Vert" (-1398).  “Louis de Chalon dit le Chevalier Vert fils du comte de Tonnerre” approved the agreement between “Tristan de Chalon son oncle et Jean de Chalon son frère aîné” concerning the succession of “l’aïeul paternel de ce dernier”, under which “Jean de Chalon-Auxerre” was recognised as “propriétaire du château de Rochefort, des châteaux d’Arinthod, Boutavant et Dramelay”, by charter dated 1366[146].  He succeeded his father in 1379 as Comte de Tonnerre

-        COMTES de TONNERRE

3.         MARGUERITE de Chalon .  1376.  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. 

4.         MATHILDE de Chalon .  1356.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m JEAN de Vienne Seigneur de Sainte-Croix, son of ---. 

Jean [III] had four illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) - (4) (the primary sources which confirm their parentage have not been identified):  

5.          HENRI (-1400).  Châtelain de Saint-Aubin.  

6.          JEAN (-1402, bur Baume-les-Moines).  Captain of Auxerre.  

7.          AIME (-1431, bur Baume-les-Moines).  His parentage is confirmed by the following document: le bailli d’Aval” remitted “des terres d’Orgelet et de Saint-Julien” to “Louis de Chalon comte de Tonnerre, représenté par Amé abbé de Baume son frère”, undated[147]Abbot of Baume-les-Moines. 

8.          HUGUES (-1399).  Prior of Jouhé. 

Jean [III] had two illegitimate daughters by Mistress (5) (the primary source which confirms their parentage has not been identified): 

9.          daughter . 

10.       daughter . 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    NOBILITY in AUXERRE

 

 

 

A.      SEIGNEURS de BEAUVOIR [en Bourgogne], de BOURDEAU et de CHASTELLUS

 

Beauvoir is located about 10 kilometres due west of Auxerre, in the present-day French département of Yonne, arrondissement Auxerre, canton Toucy.  Bourdeau, part of Saint-Symphorien-de-Marmagne on the north-eastern outskirts of Marmagne, lies about 10 kilometres due south of Autun, département Saône-et-Loire, arrondissement Autun.  Chastellus (the same as Chastellux?) has not been identified with certainty.  All these and other territories were held by Laure de Bourdeau, as shown below, and inherited by her relative (precise family relationship not ascertained) Guillaume de Beauvoir and his two sisters.  

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Bourdeaum SIMONE de Chastellux, daughter of ---.  Europäische Stammtafeln records her family origin and marriage[148]: the primary source which confirms the information has not been identified.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

a)         LAURE de Bourdeau (-1384, bur Quincy).  Auloy and Mouillebouche name her “Laure de Bourdeau”, identifying “La Tour Bourdeau, cne Saint-Symphorien-de-Marmagne, Saône-et-Loire[149]Europäische Stammtafeln records her precise parentage[150]: the primary source which confirms the information has not been identified.  Père Anselme records that “[Laure de Bordeaux] dame de Montperoux et de Chastellus” reached agreement with “Philippe sire de Tanlay et de Ravieres et Philiberte sa femme” for her dowry after the death of “monseigneur Robert de Tanlay son...mari” by charter dated 1344[151].  Père Anselme says that she married secondly “Guillaume de Montagu seigneur de Sombernon” and thirdly “Jean de Bourbon seigneur de Montperoux issu des anciens sire de Bourbon, dont elle fut la seconde femme[152].  “Jean de Bourbon chlr sgr de Montperroux, Châtellux, Marigny et Bazoiche” swore homage “tant en son nom qu’au nom de Laure de Bourdeaux dame desd. lieux pour les terres de Châtellux et de Bazoiches” in 1351[153].  “Laure de Bourdeaux dame de Châtellux, de Montperroux, de Marigny et de Bazoiche” swore homage for “Châtellux et Bazoiche” in 1356[154].  Père Anselme says that Laure “étant veuve pour la troisième fois en 1374” reached agreement with “Gerard de Bourbon fils de feu son mary” concerning her rights[155].  Laure “dame de Chastellus et de Basoche, femme de feu Robert de Tanlay seigneur de Tanlay” donated property to Quincy abbey by charter dated 1381[156].  Père Anselme records her testament dated 1383, a codicil dated 1384, her death “la même année” and burial “dans l’abbaye de Quincy”, her succession being shared by “Guillaume de Beauvoir son neveu et ses deux sœurs...en 1389[157].  In another passage, Père Anselme records that “Guillaume de Beauvoir [en Bourgogne]” became “seigneur de Bourdeaux, d’Aulcerre, de Chastelus, de Basoches, de Marigny, du Bouchet, de Bousson et autres terres qu’il eut de Laure de Bourdeaux sa proche parente [the precise family relationship not specified]” and that “Philippe de Jaucourt Seigneur de Ville-Arnoul”, second husband of his sister Isabelle, “donna quittance pour elle en 1388” to Guillaume regarding the succession of Laure de Bourdeau and that, after she was widowed, Guillaume granted “la terre de Villiers-Lienas” to Isabelle as part of the same succession[158]m firstly ROBERT [III] Seigneur de Tanlay, son of GUILLAUME [II] Seigneur de Tanlay [Courtenay] & his wife --- (-after 1341).  m secondly GUILLAUME de Montagu Seigneur de Sombernon [Bourgogne-Capet], .  m thirdly ([1351]) as his second wife, JEAN [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux, son of [HUGUES [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux & his [third] wife Jacquette de la Roche-en-Brenil]] ([1315/20?]-killed in battle Poitiers 19 Sep 1356, bur Poitiers Franciscans). 

 

 

The precise family relationship between Jean, shown below, and Laure de Bourdeau has not been ascertained. 

 

1.         JEAN (-1350 or before).  Seigneur de Bourdeau et d’Aulcerre.  Père Anselme records that in 1339 he shared his father-in-law’s territories with his brother-in-law Gérard and with “Alips femme d’Artaud de Beausemblant”, receiving Beauvoir en Bourgogne as his share[159].  Père Anselme records the charter dated mid-Jun 1340 under which Jean agreed to pay a debt of his father-in-law who had borrowed money from “Simon de Gayes, fils d’Odon de Gayes” to prevent the sale of Villiers-Lienas, and that he was “mort en 1350[160]m (before 1339) JACQUETTE d’Autun, daughter of GUY d’Autun Seigneur d’Arconçay, de Villiers-Lienas, et de Beauvoir & his wife ---.  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage[161].  Jean & his wife had four children: 

a)         PHILIBERT de Beauvoir (-after 1350).  Père Anselme records his parentage and notes that he and his siblings were under the tutelage of Jean [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux (husband of his relative Laure de Bourdeau, see above) in 1350[162]

b)         GUILLAUME de Beauvoir (-6 Jun 1408, bur Vezelay Cordeliers).  Père Anselme records his parentage and notes sources dated 1383, Apr 1396, 12 Oct 1405, 1406, 1407 in which he was named, and his date of death and place of burial[163]Seigneur de Bourdeau, de Chastellus, de Basoches et de Marigny.  His epitaph records the burial of “Guillaume de Beauvoir dit de Chastelus chevalier seigneur dudit Chastelus, vicomte d’Avalon, seigneur de Basoches, chambellan du roy[164]m firstly [ALIX] de Bourbon, daughter of [JEAN [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux & his first wife --- de Longwy/de Rahon] (-before 1394).  Père Anselme records Alix “fille de Jean de Bourbon seigneur de Montperoux et de Jeanne de Ternant” and her marriage, noting that she was childless and that her husband’s second marriage was dated “avant 1394[165].  This parentage is chronologically impossible assuming that her husband’s date of death is correctly recorded.  It seems more likely that Alix was another daughter of Jean [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux by his first wife.  If that is correct, her marriage was arranged by her stepmother Laure de Bourdeau who, as noted above, was “[une] proche parente” of Alix’s husband who (with his two sisters, one of whom was married to Alix’s supposed brother Gérard [I] according to Père Anselme, see above) shared Laure’s inheritance.  Her name is uncertain, considering the apparent existence of her sister apparently with the same name.  m secondly as her second husband, JEANNE de Saint-Verain, widow of GEOFFROY du Bouchet, daughter of --- (-[1420/21], bur Vezelay Cordeliers).  Père Anselme records her parentage and two marriages, the first “avant 1394”, her mention in 1420, her burial with her second husband, and Marguerite Dss of Burgundy dispensing Claude de Beauvoir seigneur de Chastelus in 1421 from homage due “à cause de Jeanne de S. Verain sa mère n’agueres decedée[166].  Guillaume & his second wife had children: 

i)          CLAUDE de Beauvoir (-12 Mar 1454, bur Auxerre Cathedral).  Père Anselme records his parentage, provides details of his career as Maréchal de France, records his testament dated 19 Jan 1453 (O.S.?), his death “12 mars suivant” and his place of burial[167]Seigneur de Chastelus, de Bourdeau, Vicomte d’Avalon.  Maréchal de France.  m firstly as her second husband, ALIX de Toucy, widow of OGIER Seigneur d’Anglure, daughter of LOUIS de Toucy Seigneur de Bazarnes et du Val d’Auligny & his wife Guye Dame de Mont-Saint-Jean.  Père Anselme records her parentage and two marriages[168]m secondly (contract 11 Aug 1427) JEANNE de Longwy, daughter of MATHIEU de Longwy Seigneur de Givry et de Rahon & his wife Bonne de la Trémoïlle (-after 15 Apr 1434, bur Mont-Saint-Jean).  Père Anselme records her parentage, marriage date, testament dated 15 Apr 1434, and place of burial[169]m thirdly MARIE de Savoisy, daughter of CHARLES de Savoisy Seigneur de Seignelay & his wife Yolande de Rodemack (-after 21 Nov 1486).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage, noting that she was living in 1469 and her testament dated 21 Nov 1486 which names her children[170]

-         SEIGNEURS de CHASTELLUS, COMTES de CHASTELLUS[171]

ii)         GEORGES de Beauvoir/de Chastelus (-after 1420).  Père Anselme records his parentage, and his appointment as Amirhal de France in 1420, but noting that “on n’a rien trouvé de lui[172]

iii)        LAURETTE de Beauvoir (-1432 or before).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage[173]m (contract end-Jun 1409) GUILLAUME de Grancey Seigneur de Larrey et de Praslin, son of GUILLAUME de Grancey & his wife Marguerite de Plancy. 

iv)       ALIX de Beauvoir .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage[174]m (16 Apr 1412) PIERRE Seigneur de Raigny, son of --- (-after 23 May 1414). 

c)         ISABELLE de Beauvoir (-after 1388).  Père Anselme records her parentage, her first marriage in 1360 to “Gerard de Bourbon seigneur de Montperoux” and her second marriage, noting that her second husband “donna quitance pour elle en 1388” to her brother regarding the succession of Laure de Bourdeau [see above] and that later (when she was widowed) her brother granted her “la terre de Villiers-Lienas” as part of the same succession[175].  Her second marriage is inconsistent with Gérard de Bourbon’s second marriage.  One possibility is that the “marriage” recorded by Père Anselme was only a betrothal which was terminated.  Another possibility is that Gérard’s supposed second marriage is incorrect.  [m firstly (1360) [as his first wife,] GERARD [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux, son of JEAN [I] de Bourbon Seigneur de Montperroux & his first wife --- [de Longwy/de Rahon] ([1342/48?]-before 24 Jul 1417).] m [secondly] PHILIPPE de Jaucourt Seigneur de Ville-Arnoul, son of --- (-after 1388). 

d)         MARIE de Beauvoir (-after 1397).  Père Anselme records her parentage, her marriage in 1360, her agreement in 1389 comcerning the succession of Laure de Bourdeau, and her husband’s agreement in her name with “Jacquette d’Arconçay dame de Beauvoir” relating to the partition of “la terre de Savoigny-le-Burvart” (citing “extrait du terrier de Beauvoir”)[176]Dame de Turcy-la-Guerre, de Sauvoigny-le-Burvart et de Chevannes.  m (1360) JEAN Broichard Seigneur de Veure et de Sainte-Reine, son of --- (-after 1397). 

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS de CHARNY et de CHÂTEL-CENSOIR

 

Charny, now known as Charny-Orée-de-Puisaye, is located about 25 kilometres north-west of Auxerre in the present-day French département of Yonne, arrondissement Auxerre, canton Charny.  Châtel-Censoir lies about the same distance south of Auxerre. also in Yonne, arrondissement Avallon, canton Vézelay.  

 

 

PONCE de Mont-Saint-Jean, son of HUGUES Seigneur de Mont-Saint-Jean & his wife Elisabeth de Vergy (-13 Feb 1230).  “Stephanus de Monte Sancti Iohannis” swore allegiance to “Odo Dux Burgundiæ dominus meus ligius”, in the war with “comite Cabilonensi et...Hugone de Vergeio, et dominus de Champlite”, adding that “Hugo de Vergeio dominus meus et consanguineus meus erat”, that they held “castello Vergeii” together, and that “alter dominorum de Champlite sororius meus erat”, and naming “...Willelmum dominum Anceii et Poncium fratres meos, Willelmum de Marrignei, Hugonem de Tricastello nepotes meos” among his guarantors, undated[177].  “Stephanus de Monte S. Iohannis” donated property “in territorio de Tarnant” to Vergy Saint-Denis, with the consent of “Hugo pater meus et Elizabeth mater mea et fratres mei Guillelmus et Pontius”, by charter dated 1196 witnessed by “...Helisabeth soror mea...[178].  “Poncius filius domini Hugonis de Monte-Sancti-Johannis” renounced rights over Diges in favour of Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the support of “dominus Willelmus frater meus...et uxor mea...Heluis, dominaque Bureta, uxor domini Willelmi fratris mei”, by charter dated 1201[179]Seigneur de Charny et de Châtel-Censoir.  Poncius de Monte S. Iohannis” donated what he unjustly claimed “in castellania Castricensorii...grangiam Lescherirarum” to Rigney abbey, with the support of “duæ filiæ meæ Agnes et Elizabeth et uxor mea Sibylla et filius meus Hugo”, by charter dated 1211[180].  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[181].  “Pontius de Monte Sancti Johannis dominus Charneii” donated property to the church of Combertant, with the support of “Sibille uxoris mee et Hugonis filii mei”, by charter dated Oct 1228[182].  "Willermus dominus Montis sancti Iohannis" noted that "Sybilla quondam uxor domini Pontii avunculi mei domini Charnei et Hugo filius eiusdem" executed her husband’s testament by charter dated 1229 (presumably O.S.)[183]

m firstly HELOISE, daughter of --- (-after 1201).  “Poncius filius domini Hugonis de Monte-Sancti-Johannis” renounced rights over Diges in favour of Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the support of “dominus Willelmus frater meus...et uxor mea...Heluis, dominaque Bureta, uxor domini Willelmi fratris mei”, by charter dated 1201[184]

m secondly SIBYLLE de Noyers, daughter of CLAREMBAUD Seigneur de Noyers & his wife Ada --- (-after 1230).  "…Filiarum mearum Adeline…et Sibylle" consented to the donation by "Clarenbaudus dominus de Noeriis" to the Priory of Jully-les-Nonnains by charter dated 1186[185].  “Poncius de Monte S. Iohannis” donated what he unjustly claimed “in castellania Castricensorii...grangiam Lescherirarum” to Rigney abbey, with the support of “duæ filiæ meæ Agnes et Elizabeth et uxor mea Sibylla et filius meus Hugo”, by charter dated 1211[186].  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1219 under which “Poncius de Monte Sancti Iohannis” swore allegiance to “dominæ meæ B. comitisse Campaniæ” in her war against “Herardum de Brena et Philippam uxorem eius et contra Aalidem Reginam Cypri”, except if she attacked “Milonem de Noeriis sororium meum in castello suo de Noeriis”, by charter dated 1219[187].  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[188].  “Pontius de Monte Sancti Johannis dominus Charneii” donated property to the church of Combertant, with the support of “Sibille uxoris mee et Hugonis filii mei”, by charter dated Oct 1228[189].  "Willermus dominus Montis sancti Iohannis" noted that "Sybilla quondam uxor domini Pontii avunculi mei domini Charnei et Hugo filius eiusdem" executed her husband’s testament by charter dated 1229 (presumably O.S.)[190]

Ponce & his second wife had five children: 

1.         HUGUES de Charny (-[1271]).  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[191].  “Pontius de Monte Sancti Johannis dominus Charneii” donated property to the church of Combertant, with the support of “Sibille uxoris mee et Hugonis filii mei”, by charter dated Oct 1228[192].  "Willermus dominus Montis sancti Iohannis" noted that "Sybilla quondam uxor domini Pontii avunculi mei domini Charnei et Hugo filius eiusdem" executed her husband’s testament by charter dated 1229 (presumably O.S.)[193]Seigneur de Charnym ---.  The primary source which confirms the identity of Hugues’s wife has not been identified.  Hugues & his wife had children: 

a)         DREUX de Charny (-after 1272)Seigneur de Charnym MARGUERITE de Joinville, daughter of JEAN Seigneur de Joinville, Sénéchal de Champagne & his [second wife Alix de Reynel] (-before 24 Dec 1306).  "Jean s. de Joinville" donated property to Saint-Laurent for the anniversary of “feu sa fille Marguerite dame de Charny” by charter dated 24 Dec 1306[194].  "Jean s. de Joinville" approved the donation to Joinville Saint-Laurent made by “André de Joinville s. de Bonney” for the souls of “sa mère Alix de Reynel, de son frère Gautier s. de Beaupré et de sa sœur Marguerite dame de Charny” by charter dated 7 May 1309[195].  This document, linked to Alix de Reynel, suggests that Marguerite was born from her father’s second marriage. 

-        SEIGNEURS de CHARNY[196]

2.         ELISABETH de Charny (-after Jun 1257).  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[197].  The testament of “Helisabeth domina Tilii relicta bone memorie Guillelmi quondam domini Tilii”, dated Jun 1257, made with the consent of “Sigero de Gandavo militis mariti mei”, refers to the rights of “heredes...Galcheri quondam domini Paceii...marito mee”, bequeathes property to “Agneti filie domine Adeline de Tylio...pro illa maritanda...”, and appoints “Hugonem dominum Charneii fratrem meum” among her executors[198]m firstly GUILLAUME Seigneur de Thil, son of GUY Seigneur de Thil & his wife Luce --- (-1247).  m secondly (after 1247) as his second wife, GAUCHER de Saint-Florentin Seigneur de Pacy, son of JEAN Vicomte de Saint-Florentin & his wife --- de Pleurs (-after Mar 1248).  m thirdly (before Jun 1257) SIGER van Gent, son of ---. 

3.         POLISSA de Charny .  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[199]

4.         AGNES de Charny (-after Nov 1238).  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[200].  “Pontius dominus Cuselli et Laurentia uxor mea” constituted proxies “super escheeta…avunculi nostri clare memorie quondam comitis Barri super Sequanam", relating to the marriage of "Hugone nato nostro" and "Pontium de Monte Sancti Johannis…Agnete nata ipsius", by charter dated [1223][201]Willelmus dominus de Albaspina” confirmed donations made to Miroir abbey by “Hugonem de Albaspina patrem suum”, and “Agnes domina Cuselli de consilio Amedei...domini Coloniaci” settled a claim by “Hugonis de Cusello nuper defuncti”, by charter dated Nov 1238[202]m (after [1223]) HUGUES [II] Seigneur de Cuiseaux, son of PONS [III] Seigneur de Cuiseaux & his wife Laure --- (-before Nov 1238). 

5.         ADELA de Charny .  “Ponce de Mont Saint-Jean seigneur de Charny” donated harvest to the abbey of la Bussière, where he and “sa femme Sibille” wished to be buried, with the consent of “Sibille et par leurs enfants Hugues, Elisabeth, Polissa, Agnès, Adèle”, by charter dated 28 Mar 1220[203]

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS de MAILLY

 

 

1.         HUMBERT Seigneur de Mailly.  "Humbertus de Mailleio et Anna uxor eius" property property to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon, for the soul of "filii sui Theodorici", by undated charter dated to the late 11th/early 12th century[204]m ANNE de Sombernon, daughter of GARNIER [I] Seigneur de Sombernon & his wife Istiburge [Engelburge] ---.  "Walo vocatus comes et fratre meus Walterius et Warnerius Sembernonis atque Humbertus advocatus seu frater eius Girardus" donated property to Saint-Bénigne de Dijon by charter dated 1020 signed by "Vuarnerii et uxoris eius Istiburgis et filiarum eius Anne et Addile"[205].  "Humbertus de Mailleio et Anna uxor eius" property property to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon, for the soul of "filii sui Theodorici", by undated charter dated to the late 11th/early 12th century[206].  A charter dated to [1155] records the life of "Garnerio…præposito" of Saint-Etienne de Dijon, and previous donations to the abbey including those by "dominus Humbertus de Malleio et…uxor eius Anna…secum suo consanguineo Guidone agnominato Divite, Divinionensi vicecomite" during the reign of Henri I King of France [incorrect if the earlier charter is correctly dated], by "Guido Dives miles de quo supra diximus", "mater…eius Anna"[207].  Humbert & his wife had [two or more] children: 

a)         THIERRY .  "Humbertus de Mailleio et Anna uxor eius" property property to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon, for the soul of "filii sui Theodorici", by undated charter dated to the late 11th/early 12th century[208]

b)         GARNIER (-before 1155).  A charter dated to [1155] records the life of "Garnerio…præposito" of Saint-Etienne de Dijon, and previous donations to the abbey including those by "dominus Humbertus de Malleio et…uxor eius Anna…secum suo consanguineo Guidone agnominato Divite, Divinionensi vicecomite" during the reign of Henri I King of France, by "Guido Dives miles de quo supra diximus", "mater…eius Anna"[209]

 

 

2.         FOULQUES de Mailly (-before 1163).  Seigneur de Maillym ERMENGARDE, daughter of ---.  “Martellus et Fulco frater meus” confirmed the donation made to Cîteaux by “matre nostra Ermengarde” when “patris nostri Fulconis dominis de Malliaco” (who had died excommunicated) was reburied at Bèze Saint-Pierre, by charter dated to 1163 or after[210].  Foulques & his wife had two children: 

a)         MARTEL (-after 1193).  Seigneur de Mailly.  “Martellus et Fulco frater meus” confirmed the donation made to Cîteaux by “matre nostra Ermengarde” when “patris nostri Fulconis dominis de Malliaco” (who had died excommunicated) was reburied at Bèze Saint-Pierre, by charter dated to 1163 or after[211].  "Martillus Maillei dominus" granted rights of pasturage to the hospital of Til-Châtel, with the consent of "uxor eius Cheureria et Huo et Gaufridus et Renaudus filii eius", by charter dated 1193[212]m CHEVREUSE, daughter of --- (-after 1193).  "Martillus Maillei dominus" granted rights of pasturage to the hospital of Til-Châtel, with the consent of "uxor eius Cheureria et Huo et Gaufridus et Renaudus filii eius", by charter dated 1193[213].  Martel & his wife had three children: 

i)          HUGUES .  "Martillus Maillei dominus" granted rights of pasturage to the hospital of Til-Châtel, with the consent of "uxor eius Cheureria et Huo et Gaufridus et Renaudus filii eius", by charter dated 1193[214]

ii)         GEOFFROY .  "Martillus Maillei dominus" granted rights of pasturage to the hospital of Til-Châtel, with the consent of "uxor eius Cheureria et Huo et Gaufridus et Renaudus filii eius", by charter dated 1193[215]

iii)        RENAUD .  "Martillus Maillei dominus" granted rights of pasturage to the hospital of Til-Châtel, with the consent of "uxor eius Cheureria et Huo et Gaufridus et Renaudus filii eius", by charter dated 1193[216]

b)         FOULQUES .  “Martellus et Fulco frater meus” confirmed the donation made to Cîteaux by “matre nostra Ermengarde” when “patris nostri Fulconis dominis de Malliaco” (who had died excommunicated) was reburied at Bèze Saint-Pierre, by charter dated to 1163 or after[217]

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-BRIS (MELLO)

 

 

The centre of activities of Dreux [I] de Mello and his family was located in the duchy of Burgundy.  He was presumably closely related to the seigneurs de Mello family who lived north of Paris, but the precise connection has not yet been established as discussed in more detail in PARIS REGION NOBILITY.  It is possible that Dreux [I] inherited property in the Auxerre/Tonnerre area from his mother, whose family background is unknown, and settled there.  A contrary indication is provided by the pair of charters dated 1177, quoted below, relating to Nitry (identified as located in Tonnerre), which specify that the land was the fief of Vuillermo de Merloto”.  If the latter can be identified as Guillaume Seigneur de Mello (PARIS REGION NOBILITY), this would suggest that the Burgundian properties were held by the Mello family before the marriage of Dreux [I]’s parents.  Saint-Bris has been identified as Saint-Bris-le-Vineux in the county of Auxerre.  The Burgundian Mello family was of some importance in the court of the comtes de Nevers, as shown by the prominent position in which they are named in the witness lists of charters quoted below and by the high-profile marriages of members of the family which were arranged in 13th and 14th centuries.  I am grateful to Jean-Claude Chuat for his help in identifying charters in which this family is named. 

 

 

DREUX [I] de Mello, son of --- de Mello & his wife Agnes --- ([1130/40]-3 Mar 1218, bur Saint-Bris).  His estimated birth date is suggested by his estimated marriage date.  Given that Dreux [I] was named in 1216, it is likely that he was born during the later part of the range.  "Robertus comes Mellenti" confirmed donations to Gournay Sainte-Marie made by "pater meus Galerannus comes et mater mea Agnes", in the presence of "Willelmus de Garlanda, Robertus Malusvicinus et Drogo de Mello fratres, Willelmus Malusvicinus, Manasses frater eius…", by undated charter dated to after 1166[218].  "Droco de Melloto..." witnessed the charter dated 1170 under which “Helizabet mater domini de Thocyaco” donated property to the monks of Vieupou[219].  "Drogo de Melloto et Ermengardis uxor mea" founded Vieupou priory, with the consent of “domini Guidonis de Dampetra et domini Milonis fratris sui et Guillelmi filii nostri”, by charter dated 1172[220].  “Drogo de Merloto” donated property from "Mintriaci" {Nitry, canton Noyers, arr. Tonnerre, Yonne} to La Charité-sur-Loire, for the souls of “fratris mei Roberti et Vuillelmi ibidem sepultorum”, with the consent of "domino Vuillelmo de Merloto…et uxore mea Ermengardi", by charter dated 1177[221].  Louis VII King of France confirmed the donations to La Charité-sur-Loire made by "Vuillermum de Garlanda", for the soul of “fratris sui Roberti ibidem sepulti”, and by "Drogonem de Merloto predicti Roberti fratrem pro eodem Roberto", by charter dated 1177, which records the consent of “Vuillermo de Merloto, de cujus feodo redditus iste movebat[222].  "...Narjodus de Tociaco, Drogo de Merlo, Guido de Guarlanda..." witnessed the charter dated 1184 under which Pierre Comte de Nevers donated property to Pontigny[223].  "Narjotus de Tuciaco, Drogo de Mello..." witnessed the charter dated 1186 under which Pierre Comte de Nevers donated property to Crisenon[224].  "Droco de Merlo" donated vines “apud Irenci” to Pontigny, with the consent of “uxoris mee Ermenjardis...et filii mei Guillelmi”, by charter dated [Jul] 1190[225].  Connétable de France 1191.  Pierre Comte de Nevers granted privileges to the inhabitants of Auxerre by charter dated 1194 which records the presence of "barones mei, Philippus dominus Giemi, Drogo de Merloto, Gaufridus senescallus meus, Iterius de Tociaco Autisiodorensis vicecomes..."[226].  "Droco de Melloto" exchanged property with the abbey of Saint-Jean de Sens by charter dated 1196[227].  “Dreux de Mello connétable de France” confirmed an agreement between Villeloin abbey and “Jehanne femme de feu Maurice Rimbaut” concerning a donation she had made, by undated charter1[228].  "Drogo de Merlot" reached agreement with Raoul abbé de Saint-Germain about “nemore Magne Bruerie...et...Montbolum” by charter dated 1203[229].  “Drocho de Merloto miles et...Willelmus filius eius” attested a donation to Saint-Germain made by “D. uxor Hugonis militis de Chevannis” by charter dated Apr 1208[230].  “Droco de Merloto senior”, on the point of leaving for Jerusalem “apud domum suam de Belca” {Beauche} in the presence of “filiis suis Willelmo et Drocone juniore”, recorded that the men of Saint-Maurice did not have the right to use the wood of Saint-Aubin-Château-Neuf by charter dated 1216[231].  Père Anselme records that his death 3 Mar 1218 is recorded on his tomb in the church of Saint-Bris[232]

m firstly (1161 or before) --- de Moncy, daughter of DREUX [II] de Moncy & his wife Basilie --- (-before 1172).  The History of Louis VII King of France records that "Nivilo de Petrafonte et Drogo de Merloto" had married "duas filias Drogonis de Monceio"[233].  The chronology suggests that this was not the same person as Dreux’s wife Ermengarde. 

m secondly ([1172]) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE, separated wife/widow of GUILLAUME [I] Seigneur de Dampierre, daughter of --- (-after Jul 1190).  Her first marriage is indicated by the charter dated Feb 1211 (O.S.) under which “Gui de Dampierre frère dudit Dreu” guaranteed the loyalty of “Dreu de Mello le jeune[234].  It is also suggested by the charter dated 1172 under which "Drogo de Melloto et Ermengardis uxor mea" founded Vieupou priory, with the consent of “domini Guidonis de Dampetra et domini Milonis fratris sui et Guillelmi filii nostri[235].  Another indication is the charter dated Dec 1223 under which “Willelmus dominus de Dampetra” swore allegiance to Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne, naming “...dominum Willelmum, dominum Droconem de Merloto avunculos meos...[236].  That charter also indicates that both Guillaume [I] de Mello and Dreux de Mello were sons of Ermengarde.  If the charters quoted here and under her supposed first husband are correctly dated, Ermengarde must have separated from her first husband.  “Drogo de Merloto” donated property from "Mintriaci" {Nitry, canton Noyers, arr. Tonnerre, Yonne} to La Charité-sur-Loire, for the soul of “fratris mei Roberti et Vuillelmi ibidem sepultorum”, with the consent of "domino Vuillelmo de Merloto…et uxore mea Ermengardi", by charter dated 1177[237].  "Droco de Merlo" donated vines “apud Irenci” to Pontigny, with the consent of “uxoris mee Ermenjardis...et filii mei Guillelmi”, by charter dated [Jul] 1190[238]

Dreux [I] & his second wife had [four] children: 

1.         GUILLAUME [I] de Mello ([1172]-after Jan 1243).  "Drogo de Melloto et Ermengardis uxor mea" founded Vieupou priory, with the consent of “domini Guidonis de Dampetra et domini Milonis fratris sui et Guillelmi filii nostri”, by charter dated 1172[239]

-        see below.  

2.         DREUX de Mello (after 1172-Cyprus 8 Jan 1249).  Seigneur de Loches.  Dreux de Mello seigneur de Loches” donated his rights “apud Rupes sur la terre d’un nommé Chalon” to the monks of the Chartreuse du Liget, with the consent of “Dreux son père”, by undated charter[240].  “G. de Trainel” guaranteed the loyalty of “Dreu de Mello le jeune son frère” by charter dated Feb 1211 (O.S.), which refers to the marriage of Dreux and “la fille de Sulpice d’Amboise[241].  “Droco de Merloto senior”, on the point of leaving for Jerusalem “apud domum suam de Belca” {Beauche} in the presence of “filiis suis Willelmo et Drocone juniore”, recorded that the men of Saint-Maurice did not have the right to use the wood of Saint-Aubin-Château-Neuf by charter dated 1216[242].  “Droco de Melloto” acknowledged that he had instituted a market at Saint-Maurice-Thizouaille without consent and that “dominus meus rex” cancelled it, by charter dated 1218[243].  A charter dated 1219 records that “Droconi de Melloto” had wrongly erected “fulcas” on the land of the chapter of Auxerre at Saint-Maurice-Thizouaille by charter dated 1219[244].  A charter dated 1223 records judgment in a dispute between the abbey of Sens-Saint-Rémy and Droconem de Melloto dominum Lochiarum” concerning certain serfs, with “Willelmo de Melloto fratre suoacting as guarantor[245].  “Willelmus dominus de Dampetra” swore allegiance to Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne, naming “...dominum Willelmum, dominum Droconem de Merloto avunculos meos...”, by charter dated Dec 1223[246].  That charter also indicates that both Guillaume [I] de Mello and Dreux de Mello were sons of Ermengarde.  “Droco de Melloto, Locharum dominus” confirmed a sale of property to the monks of Vieupou made by “Petronilla la Berondée et Meinfroninus filius eiusdem” by charter dated Mar 1235[247].  "Droco de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduane...Helisabeth uxor predicti Droconis" donated revenue "in polanis de Sancto Prisco" by charter dated Jul 1239[248].  “Dreux de Mello seigneur de Loches” acted as guarantor if “Archambaud de Bourbon son neveu” failed to observe the marriage convention between “Jean comte de Dreux et Marie sœur d’Archambaud” under a charter dated Nov 1242[249].  "Drocho de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduanæ et Ysabellis uxor eius hæres et domina Meduanæ" donated property to the abbey of Fontaine-Daniel by charter dated Jun 1243[250].  Guy Bishop of Auxerre confirmed that "Droco de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduane in testamento suo...avunculi nostri" bequeathed revenue from "polanos Sancti Prisci" to Pontigny by charter dated Jul 1248[251].  A second charter deals with the same subject-matter in more detail, Guy Bishop of Auxerre confirming that "avunculus noster Droco de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduane", on leaving on crusade, in his testament bequeathed revenue from "polanos Sancti Prisci" to Pontigny and renewed the donation “coram nobis” by charter dated 17 Jul 1248[252]m (before 1218) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Mayenne, daughter of JUHAEL [II] Seigneur de Mayenne & his wife Gervaise de Vitré Dame de Dinan (-11 Nov 1257).  "Droco de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduane...Helisabeth uxor predicti Droconis" donated revenue "in polanis de Sancto Prisco" by charter dated Jul 1239[253].  "Isabella uxor Droconis de Melloto, militis, domini de Meduana" ratified a donation to the abbey of Mont by charter dated 1237[254].  "Drocho de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduanæ et Ysabellis uxor eius hæres et domina Meduanæ" donated property to the abbey of Fontaine-Daniel by charter dated Jun 1243[255].  She married secondly (before 1251) as his second wife, Louis [I] Comte de Sancerre.  Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 1267 which records the settlement of a dispute between Robertus de Sancerro miles” and “Joanne comite de Sancerro fratre suo”, after arbitration by “Guillelmum de Calviniaco dominum Castri-Radulphi et Joannem de Claviniaco dominum de Leproso milites”, the document also naming “Ludovicum comitem Sacri-Cesaris defunctum patrem eorum fratrum et Isabellam dominam Meduanæ defunctam quondam uxorem dicti Ludovici[256]

3.         AGNES de Mello (-after 1215).  “G. de Trainel” guaranteed the loyalty of “Dreu de Mello le jeune son frère” by charter dated Feb 1211 (O.S.), which refers to the marriage of Dreux and “la fille de Sulpice d’Amboise[257].  "Droco de Melloto" noted a donation to Paraclet made by "Agnes filia mea uxor nobilis Garneri de Triangulo", with the consent of "eiusdem Garneri mariti sui", by charter dated 1215[258]m GARNIER [III] Seigneur de Traînel, son of GARNIER [II] Seigneur de Traînel & his wife --- (-after 17 Oct 1217). 

4.         [--- de Mello Her parentage and marriage are suggested by the charter dated Nov 1242 under which [her supposed brother] “Dreux de Mello seigneur de Loches” acted as guarantor if “Archambaud de Bourbon son neveu” failed to observe the marriage convention between “Jean comte de Dreux et Marie sœur d’Archambaud[259].  This hypothesis assumes that “neveu” (presumably “nepos”) in this charter can be interpreted as “great-nephew”, bearing in mind that “nephew” is extremely unlikely given the identification of the mother of Archambaud de Bourbon and his sister Marie as Beatrix, daughter of Archambaud de Montluçon, and also that a more remote cousin relationship would render it unlikely that Dreux de Mello would have acted as guarantor.  The hypothesis also appears to work from a chronological point of view, in light of the 1202 betrothal of the couple’s daughter to Guillaume [X] d’Auvergne.  m [ARCHAMBAUD Seigneur de Montluçon, son of ---.]  

 

 

GUILLAUME [I] de Mello, son of DREUX [I] de Mello & his second wife Ermengarde --- ([1172]-after Jan 1243).  "Drogo de Melloto et Ermengardis uxor mea" founded Vieupou priory, with the consent of “domini Guidonis de Dampetra et domini Milonis fratris sui et Guillelmi filii nostri”, by charter dated 1172[260].  "Droco de Merlo" donated vines “apud Irenci” to Pontigny, with the consent of “uxoris mee Ermenjardis...et filii mei Guillelmi”, by charter dated [Jul] 1190[261].  “Drocho de Merloto miles et...Willelmus filius eius” attested a donation to Saint-Germain made by “D. uxor Hugonis militis de Chevannis” by charter dated Apr 1208[262].  “Droco de Merloto senior”, on the point of leaving for Jerusalem “apud domum suam de Belca” {Beauche} in the presence of “filiis suis Willelmo et Drocone juniore”, recorded that the men of Saint-Maurice did not have the right to use the wood of Saint-Aubin-Château-Neuf by charter dated 1216[263]Seigneur de Saint-Bris.  “Guillaume de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris” granted vine cultivation rights to the monks of Reigny, with the consent of “Elisabeth sa femme”, by charter dated 1216[264].  A charter dated 1223 records judgment in a dispute between the abbey of Sens-Saint-Rémy and Droconem de Melloto dominum Lochiarum” concerning certain serfs, with “Willelmo de Melloto fratre suoacting as guarantor[265].  “Willelmus dominus de Dampetra” swore allegiance to Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne, naming “...dominum Willelmum, dominum Droconem de Merloto avunculos meos...”, by charter dated Dec 1223[266].  That charter also indicates that both Guillaume [I] de Mello and Dreux de Mello were sons of Ermengarde.  Guillelmus dominus de Merloto, Milo dominus Noeriorum, et Droco dominus de Espoisse et Chatel-Chinun” certified that “Gaucherium de S.-Florentino armigerum...concedente Eustagia uxore sua” had renounced rights in favour of Pontigny by charter dated May 1240[267].  “Guillaume de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris” acted as guarantor if “Archambaud de Bourbon son neveu” failed to observe the marriage convention between “Jean comte de Dreux et Marie sœur d’Archambaud” under a charter dated Nov 1242[268]Guillaumes de Mellot sires de Saint-Briz” swore hommage to Thibaut King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne for revenue from “la foire de Bar-seur-Aubeby charter dated Jan 1242 (O.S.)[269].  [“Guillelmus de Melloto dominus S. Prisci” swore homage to Guy bishop of Auxerre for “domum meam de Belcha” (“sa maison-forte de Beaulche”) by charter dated Jul 1248[270].  It is unclear whether this charter refers to Guillaume [I] or to his son Guillaume [II].  Guillaume [I] would have been extremely old in 1248, and also the swearing of hommage suggests a recent succession to the property in question.  On the other hand, Guillaume [II] is referred to as “de Meloto militis” in the marriage contract of his daughter Isabelle, suggesting that he may never have succeeded to the seigneurie de Saint-Bris, which would have been the case if he had predeceased his father.] 

m ELISABETH, daughter of --- (-after 1216).  “Guillaume de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris” granted vine cultivation rights to the monks of Reigny, with the consent of “Elisabeth sa femme”, by charter dated 1216[271].  The Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium (Continuatio) records the succession of “Guido de Melloto” as bishop of Auxerre, naming his parents “pater...Guillelmus de Melloto miles dominus castri Sancti Prisci...mater eius de prosapia dominorum Montis Sancti Iohannis[272].  Her precise relationship with the family of the seigneurs de Mont-Saint-Jean (see below) has not been established.  The chronology of the marriages of her grandchildren suggests that her children must have been born well into the 13th century, in turn suggesting that Elisabeth was considerably younger than her husband.  If that is correct, she may have been his second wife. 

Guillaume & his wife had six children: 

1.         GUILLAUME [II] de Mello (-after 1248).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  However, the marriage date of his daughter indicates that he could not have been the same person as Guillaume de Mello who is named in 1216.  [Seigneur de Saint-Bris.  “Guillelmus de Melloto dominus S. Prisci” swore homage to Guy bishop of Auxerre for “domum meam de Belcha” (“sa maison-forte de Beaulche”) by charter dated Jul 1248[273].  It is unclear whether this charter refers to Guillaume [II] or to his father Guillaume [I].  Guillaume [I] would have been extremely old in 1248, and also the swearing of hommage suggests a recent succession to the property in question.  On the other hand, Guillaume [II] is referred to as “de Meloto militis” in the marriage contract of his daughter Isabelle, suggesting that he may never have succeeded to the seigneurie de Saint-Bris, which would have been the case if he had predeceased his father.]  m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

a)         ISABELLE de Mello (-1301 or after).  The marriage contract between Guillaume comes Jovigniaci” and “Isabellim, quondam filiam Guillelmi de Meloto militis” is dated 8 Nov 1257, names “Guidoni Altissiod. episcopo patruo eiusdem Isabellis et tutor ipsius legitimo” in favour of whom Comte Guillaume renounced rights of succession “quando tres filie ipsius comitis...Isabellis, Joanna et Agnes...ex...Agnete quondam uxore ipsius comitiswhen they reached 12 years of age and of “patris ipsarum, vel Joannis filii ipsius comitis, fratris earundam[274].  Dame de Saint-Maurice-Thizouaille.  Jehan cuens de Jougny et...Marie comtesse de Jougny femme de ce dit Jehan” confirmed the disenfranchisement of the inhabitants of Coulanges-les-Vineuses et la Baroche by charter dated 1279, which names “Humbert de Biaujey connestable de France, sieur de Montpencier et de Sainct-Morise et...Isabeau connestablesse de France jadis contesse de Jougny, et...Berault de Marcuil père de ladite Marie contesse de Jougny nostre femme...et...monseignour de Chasteau-Villain nostre oncle[275]m firstly (8 Nov 1257) as his second wife, GUILLAUME [III] Comte de Joigny, son of GUILLAUME [II] Comte de Joigny & his wife Isabelle de Noyers (-1261 or after).  m secondly HUMBERT [II] Seigneur de Montpensier, son of GUICHARD de Beaujeu Seigneur de Montpensier & his wife Catherine Dauphine de Clermont (-before 14 Nov 1285). 

2.         DREUX [II] de Mello (-[1252]).  His parentage is confirmed by interpreting the charter dated Mar 1261 under which [his brother] “G...episcopus Autissiod.”, as executor of the testament of “genitoris nostri domini Guillelmi de Melloto quondam domini S. Prisci militis”, donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “nepotis nostri Drogonis de Melloto domini S. Prisci”, to found anniversaries for “predicti genitoris nostri...matris nostre quondam uxoris eiusdem...patrui nostri domini Drogonis de Melloto quondam domini Lochiarum[276].  “Dreux de Mello le Jeune seigneur d’Epoisses” reached agreement with Jully-les-Nonnains concerning a donation made by “soceri mei Andree quondam domini Espissie” by charter dated May 1239[277].  “Dreux de Mello le jeune seigneur d’Epoisses et sa femme Elvis” notified an agreement with the bishopric of Langres concerning a vine at Beaune held by “Bernard jadis seigneur d’Epoisses” which had been donated by “André seigneur d’Epoisses, Jean seigneur de Chevigny et Bernard seigneur de Vic” by charter dated Apr 1243[278].  "Droco de Melloto junior et Eluxdis uxor eiusdem D.", leaving for the Holy Land, donated revenue from "sitas in terra nostra de Expissia" by charter dated Jul 1248[279]m HELOISE d’Epoisses, daughter of ANDRE Seigneur d’Epoisses & his wife Huguette ---.  “Dreux de Mello le Jeune seigneur d’Epoisses” reached agreement with Jully-les-Nonnains concerning a donation made by “soceri mei Andree quondam domini Espissie” by charter dated May 1239[280].  “Dreux de Mello le jeune seigneur d’Epoisses et sa femme Elvis” notified an agreement with the bishopric of Langres concerning a vine at Beaune held by “Bernard jadis seigneur d’Epoisses” which had been donated by “André seigneur d’Epoisses, Jean seigneur de Chevigny et Bernard seigneur de Vic” by charter dated Apr 1243[281].  "Droco de Melloto junior et Eluxdis uxor eiusdem D.", leaving for the Holy Land, donated revenue from "sitas in terra nostra de Expissia" by charter dated Jul 1248[282].  The primary source which confirms her parentage more clearly has not yet been confirmed.  Dreux [II] & his wife had three children: 

a)         DREUX [III] de Mello (-1310).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Saint-Bris.  “Dreux de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris et de Château-Chinon” swore homage to the bishop of Auxerre for “sa maison de Beaulche” and for land granted to him by “son oncle l’évêque Gui”, dated 1269[283]

-        see below

b)         GUILLAUME de Mello (-after 1284).  Seigneur d’Espoisses.  m as her first husband, AGNES de Saint-Verain Dame de Vezinnes, daughter of HUGUES [I] de Saint-Verain & his wife Heloise ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriages has not been identified.  She married secondly Jean Seigneur de Frolois [Grancey] et de Marigny.  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

i)          JEANNE de Mello .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m ([18 Jan 1299]) AUBERT de Thourotte, son of GAUCHER de Thourotte Châtelain de Noyon et de Thourotte & his [first wife Beatrix de Honnecourt/Marie de Coucy] (-after 1314). 

ii)         GUILLAUME [II] de Mello (-1326).  Seigneur d’Espoisses.  m (before 1311) MARIE de Châteauvillain, daughter of GUY de Châteauvillain Seigneur de Luzy & his second wife Isabelle de Jaligny.  A charter dated 1301 records an agreement between "Robertus comes Claromontensis et Dalphinus Alverniæ miles pater…Roberti, Hugonis, Isabellis et Beatricis liberorum suorum procreatorum…ex…domina Ysabelle quondam domina de Jaliniaco uxoreque quondam eiusdem comitis" and "domicellus Johannes de Castrovillani dominus de Luziaco filius quondam domini Guidonis de Castrovillani quondam militis et dictæ dominæ Ysabellis…et pro Guillermo fratre suo et Maria sorore sua…ac…Aelidis et Johannæ sororum suarum" concerning the inheritance of "terra et castellania de Dompnapetra super Bebram et domus de Chazeles…et terra de Mercuilhs Æduensis diocesis…"[284].  Guillaume & his wife had children: 

(a)       GUILLAUME [III] de Mello (-after 1344).  Seigneur d’Espoisses. 

(b)       GUIBAUD de Mello (-after 1388).  Seigneur d’Espoisses.  m firstly MARIE de Pacy, widow of ERARD Seigneur de Lezinnes, daughter of GAUCHER de Pacy-sur-Armençon & his wife Jeanne de Marmeaux (-before 25 Jan 1362).  Petit notes a register of the parlement dated 25 Jan 1361 (O.S.) which records an agreement between [her second husband] “Giboud de Mello seigneur d’Epoisses” and “Jean Trouillard frère du défunt” and the parentage of Erard’s wife[285]m secondly (after 1361) as her second husband, ISABELLE de la Tour, widow of AMEDEE de Clermont Seigneur de Rochefort, daughter of BERTRAND [VI] Seigneur de la Tour & his wife Isabelle de Lévis (-after 1388).  The marriage contract between "Bertrandus dominus de Turre miles et Guido de Turre domicellus eius filius…domicellam Ysabellam de Turre filiam…eiusdem domini de Turre" and "dominus Amedeus Delphini miles dominus de Rupeforti" is dated 14 Nov 1354[286].   

(c)       JEAN de Mello (-1375).  Bishop of Chalon 1353.  Bishop of Clermont 1357. 

(d)       GUY de Mello (-before Jan 1376).  m AGNES de Clérey, daughter of GEOFFROY Seigneur de Clérey & his wife --- (-after 1379).  She donated property “à Cresney en Champagne”, for the souls of “son mari et de Geoffroy seigneur de Clery son père”, by charter dated Jan 1376[287].  Guy & his wife had children: 

(1)       GUILLAUME [IV] de Mello (-Hungary 1396)Seigneur d’Espoisses.  m (1374) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Bourbon Dame de la Ferté-Chauderon, widow of BERNARD Aycelin dit Griffon Seigneur de Montaigut, daughter of GERARD de Bourbon Seigneur de Clessy & his first wife Jeannette de Châtillon-en-Bazois Dame de la Roche-Milay et de la Montagne (1/2) (-after 1409).  Europäische Stammtafeln records her parentage and two marriages[288].  The primary sources which confirm the information have not been identified.  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

a.         JEANNE de Mello (-after 1432).  Dame de la Ferté-Chauderon.  m firstly EUDES de Thil, son of ---.  m secondly ([1403/21 Jan 1405]) JEAN de Montagu Seigneur de Couches, son of PHILIBERT de Montagu Seigneur de Couches & his wife Jeanne de Vienne (-9 May ----, after Feb 1439, bur Maisières). 

b.         GUILLAUME [V] de Mello (-after 1419).  Seigneur d’Espoisses. 

(2)       JEANNE de Mello (-3 Aug 1408, bur Bessons-en-Vexin).  Dame de Cléry.  m PIERRE dit Hutin d’Aumont, son of --- (-13 Mar 1413, bur Bessons). 

(3)       MARIE de Mello .  Dame de Bourbon-Lancy et d’Huchon.  m GUILLAUME de la Trémoille Seigneur d’Antigny, son of GUY [V] de la Trémoille & his wife Radégonde Guenant (-18 Feb 1397). 

(e)       [HELOISE de Mello (-before 1339)The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  After her death, her husband was authorised to found a chapel in 1339 using part of the inheritance under her testament which was proved in 1342[289]m as his first wife, GUILLAUME [I] Flotte Seigneur de Revel, Chancelier de France, son of PIERRE Flotte Seigneur de Revel, Chancelier de France & his wife --- (-after 1352).] 

c)         YOLANDE de Mello (-after 1278)Her family origin and marriage are indicated by the charter dated [2/7] Nov 1272 under which Yolande de Merlo dame de Bomiers, veuve de Robert seigneur dudit lieu”, in her name and that of her children, agreed to a division of “les dîmes de la paroisse de Bomiers” between  “le curé de Bomiers et l’abbé de Déols[290].  “Yolande dame de Mirebeau et de Blazon” issued a charter dated 1278 for “un chanoine de St.-Hilaire de Poitiers” who had acquired property from “Hugues Juze de la Chaise[291]m as his second wife, ROBERT [IV] Seigneur de Bommiers, son of ROBERT [III] Seigneur de Bommiers & his wife --- de Blazon (-[May 1270/Oct 1272])

d)         ISABELLE de Mello (-after Jun 1285)The primary source which confirms her parentage and first marriage has not been identified.  Père Anselme records her parentage and [first] marriage but provides no source citation[292].  "Johannes...Bituricensis archiepiscopus, Aquitanie primus" attested that “consanguinea nostra Isabellis de Melloto” had given a sum of money to “domino Droconi de Melloto fratri suo” which “G...Autissiod. episcopus patruus suus” held in deposit, by charter dated 30 Nov 1269[293].  The precise relationship between Jean de Sully and the Mello family has not been ascertained, but it could have been through Jean’s mother whose parentage is not known.  “Isabelle de Mello dame de Boosny” [error for Rosny?] instructed the people of Saint-Cire to recognise “pour leur seigneur messire Drève de Mello seigneur de Saint-Brys son frère” by charter dated before 11 Jun 1285[294].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage more precisely has not been identified.  m firstly RICHARD d’Harcourt, son of JEAN [I] Seigneur d’Harcourt & his wife Alix de Beaumont (-1269).  m secondly (after 30 Nov 1269) GUY [VII] de Mauvoisin Seigneur de Rosny, son of GUY [VI] de Mauvoisin Seigneur de Rosny & his wife --- (after [1242]-Mantes 1311). 

3.         GUY de Mello (-1270)Bishop of Verdun [1246].  The Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium (Continuatio) records the succession of “Guido de Melloto” as bishop of Verdun, naming his parents “pater...Guillelmus de Melloto miles dominus castri Sancti Prisci...mater eius de prosapia dominorum Montis Sancti Iohannis[295].  The Annales Sancti Vitoni Virdunensis record the death in 1245 of “Radulfus Virdunensis episcopus”, the succession of “Guido de Triagnel” who died in the same year, and the succession of “Guido de Melloto” who was transferred to the bishopric of Auxerre in the same year[296]Bishop of Auxerre 1247.  Guy Bishop of Auxerre confirmed that "Droco de Melloto dominus Locharum et Meduane in testamento suo...avunculi nostri" bequeathed revenue from "polanos Sancti Prisci" to Pontigny by charter dated Jul 1248[297].  “G...episcopus Autissiod.”, as executor of the testament of “genitoris nostri domini Guillelmi de Melloto quondam domini S. Prisci militis”, donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “nepotis nostri Drogonis de Melloto domini S. Prisci”, to found anniversaries for “predicti genitoris nostri...matris nostre quondam uxoris eiusdem...patrui nostri domini Drogonis de Melloto quondam domini Lochiarum” by charter dated Mar 1261[298].  A charter dated 1270 records the testament of "bone memorie G. de Melloto quondam Autissiod. episcopi" dated Oct 1265 and the codicil dated 1270[299]

4.         ISABELLE de Mello "Hugues de Châtillon sire de Jaligny" sold revenue promised by "Archambaud sire de Bourbon" on his marriage to "Isabelle fille de Guillaume de Mello", in exchange granting his wife "sa maison et terre de Billizois", by charter dated Feb 1234 (O.S.)[300]m (before Feb 1235) HUGUES Seigneur de Châtillon-en-Bazois, son of EUDES [I] Seigneur de Châtillon-en-Bazois & his first wife Alix de Chaumont Dame de Jaligny (-after 1257). 

5.         [--- .  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         daughter .  Her family origin and marriage are indicated by a document of the Paris parliament dated 1255 which records the excessive behaviour “du sire de Montréal” against priests and other ecclesiastical office-holders, including having one priest eaten by flies (“quemdam presbiterum muscis comedi fecerat”), that King Louis IX intended to implement swift retribution (“apporter un prompt remède”) but that “l’évêque d’Auxerre et le châtelain de Troyon, dont le sire de Montréal avait épousé la nièce” [the bishop of Auxerre in 1255 was Guy de Mello] requested delay to enable them to make representations fearing that “leurs neveux ne fussent déshérités pour le fait de leur père[301].  Her precise parentage has not been established.  m (before 1255) ANSERIC [V] Seigneur de Montréal, son of ANSERIC [IV] Seigneur de Montréal & his wife Marie de Garlande (-[1269]). 

6.         MARGUERITE de Mello (-21 Feb 1254, bur Larivour)An epitaph at Larivour records the death “1253 IX Kal Mar” [presumably O.S.] of “Marguareta de Mello mareschalissa Campanie[302]m firstly GUILLAUME de Villehardouin Seigneur de Lézinnes et de Villy Maréchal de Champagne, son of ERARD [I] Seigneur de Villehardouin & his first wife Mabile de Chappes (-8 Jun 1246, bur Larivour).  m secondly ([Jun 1246/30 Aug 1248]) as his second wife, ANSEAU [V] de Traînel Seigneur de Voisines, son of GARNIER [III] de Traînel Seigneur de Marigny & his wife Agnes de Mello (-after 1263). 

 

 

DREUX [III] de Mello, son of DREUX [II] de Mello & his wife Heloise d’Epoisses (-1310).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Saint-Bris.  “Dreux de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris et de Château-Chinon” swore homage to the bishop of Auxerre for “sa maison de Beaulche” and for land granted to him by “son oncle l’évêque Gui”, dated 1269[303].  "Johannes...Bituricensis archiepiscopus, Aquitanie primus" attested that “consanguinea nostra Isabellis de Melloto” had given a sum of money to “domino Droconi de Melloto fratri suo” which “G...Autissiod. episcopus patruus suus” held in deposit, by charter dated 30 Nov 1269[304].  A charter dated Dec 1283 records an agreement between “Drève de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris et dame Jeanne de Trye sa femme” and “Regnaut de Trye chevalier fils de Philippe de Trye et de dame Alyps dame de Monolio sa femme et iceluy de Trye frère de ladite Jeanne de Trye” regarding their future inheritances[305]

m firstly (Papal dispensation 1245) ADELAIDE de Montréal, daughter of ANSERIC [IV] Seigneur de Montréal & his wife Marie de Garlande.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified. 

m secondly (before 1257) EUSTACHIE de Lusignan, daughter of GEOFFROY de Lusignan Seigneur de Jarnac & his first wife Adalmode --- (-Carthage [1270/71]).  Dame de Sainte-Hermine, de Brulain, de Prahec, de Cherveux, de Sanxay et de la Mothe-Saint-Héray.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  An epitaph at Fontenay records the death “apud Chartaginem...---CCLXX---” of “Eustasia uxor quondam domini Droconis de Merloto Edoardi...regis Anglorum consanguinea[306]

m thirdly JEANNE de Trie, daughter of PHILIPPE de Trie & his wife Alix de Nanteuil.  A charter dated Dec 1283 records an agreement between “Drève de Mello seigneur de Saint-Bris et dame Jeanne de Trye sa femme” and “Regnaut de Trye chevalier fils de Philippe de Trye et de dame Alyps dame de Monolio sa femme et iceluy de Trye frère de ladite Jeanne de Trye” regarding their future inheritances[307]

Dreux [III] & his [second] wife had one child: 

1.         DREUX [IV] de Mello (-[1317]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  m firstly ([1297]) JEANNE de Toucy, daughter of OTHON de Toucy & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m secondly (1305) as her second wife, ELEONORE de Savoie, widow of GUILLAUME Comte d'Auxerre, daughter of AMEDEE V Comte de Savoie & his first wife Sibylle de Bâgé ([1279]-1324).  Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Jun 1308 under which Philippe IV King of France requesting “Jean de Chalon-Auxerre”, guardian of “les enfants de feu Guillaume comte d’Auxerre”, to pay sums due “à la veuve de ce dernier, remariée à Dreux de Mello seigneur de Sainte-Hermine[308].  She married thirdly (after [1317]), as his second wife, Jean [I] Comte de Forez.  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not been identified.  Dreux [IV] & his first wife had two children: 

a)         JEANNE de Mello (-1351)The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, records that "Raoul" married "à madame de Mello...Jehanne"[309]Her parentage is confirmed by a register of parliament dated 1319 which records a claim by “comes Augi et uxor sua filia primogenita deffuncti Droconis de Melloto militis” against “Ioannem dominum de Haricuria militem et hæredem vicecomitissæ Castriairaudi matris suæ[310].  A parliamentary register dated 1347 records a dispute between “Ioannam de Meloto comitissam Augi, Droconem et Guillelmum de Melloto milites fratres“ and “Vicecomitem Thoarcii et eius uxorem Comitissam Drocensem“ regarding the inheritance of “quondam Ioannæ filiæ defuncti Petri nuper comitis Drocensis[311]A charter dated 1351 records that “domina Augi, Guichardus de Comborino dominus de Piseia et Droco de Melloto milites“ claimed to be (“se dicentes heredis“) to property in Auvergne of “defunctæ Ioannæ comitissæ Drocensis filiæ Petri comitis Drocensis[312]m RAOUL [I] de Brienne Comte d’Eu, son of JEAN [III] de Brienne Comte d’Eu & his wife Beatrix de Châtillon (-Paris 19 Jan 1344, bur Foucarmont).  

Dreux [IV] & his second wife had one child: 

b)         MARGUERITE de Mello (-1360).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by letters dated 30 Jul 1329 rectifying in favour of "Raoul conte d’Eu et Jehanne sa femme" the division of the succession of “Dreuc sire de Mello chevalier jadis père des dites Jehanne [...ainsnée] et Marguerite” agreed with “Morice de Craon et Marguerite sa femme[313].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated Dec 1335 under which Philippe VI King of France ratified the agreement between "Guillaume de Craon viconte de Chastiaudun" and “chevalier Olivier seigneur de Clisson, tuteur de Amauri seigneur de Craon filz jadis de Morise de Craon seigneur de Sainte-Maure, meneur d’aage” and “Jehan Hoquet procureur de...Jean de Châlon chevalier seigneur d’Arlay et Marguerite sa femme, mère du dit menour[314]m firstly (before 8 Jan 1324) MAURICE [VII] de Craon Seigneur de Sainte-Maure et de Marcillac, son of AMAURY [III] Seigneur de Craon & his first wife Isabelle de Sainte-Maure ([1304]-8 Aug 1330, bur Angers Cordeliers).  m secondly (before 1332) as his first wife, JEAN de Chalon Seigneur d’Arlay, son of HUGUES [I] Seigneur d'Arlay et de Vitteaux [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Beatrix de la Tour du Pin (-25/26 Feb 1362, bur Mont-Sainte-Marie). 

Dreux [III] & his third wife had children:

2.         MAHYS de Mello (-[1328/29]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Saint-Bris.  m (before 1313) as her first husband, MARGUERITE d’Arcis-sur-Aube Dame de Pacy-sur-Armançon et de Chacenay, daughter of ERARD d’Arcis Seigneur de Chacenay & his [first wife Marguerite de Montagu [Bourgogne-Capet]] (-after 1359).  The primary source which confirms her precise parentage has not been identified.  Her inheritance of Chacenay suggests that she was the daughter of Erard, the inheritance of Pacy-sur-Armançon by her daughter Isabelle indicating that her mother was his first wife.  "Marguerite d’Arcies dame de Saint Briz et de Chacenay et Dreues de Mello chevaliers ses…filz seigneur de Saint Briz" relinquished rights in favour of the inhabitants of Chitry by charter dated 15 Jun 1348[315].  Mahys & his wife had children: 

a)         DREUX [V] de Mello (-1374).  A parliamentary register dated 1347 records a dispute between “Ioannam de Meloto comitissam Augi, Droconem et Guillelmum de Melloto milites fratres“ and “Vicecomitem Thoarcii et eius uxorem Comitissam Drocensem“ regarding the inheritance of “quondam Ioannæ filiæ defuncti Petri nuper comitis Drocensis[316]Seigneur de Saint-Bris, de Chitry, de Bligny, de Briare et de Jussy.  "Marguerite d’Arcies dame de Saint Briz et de Chacenay et Dreues de Mello chevaliers ses…filz seigneur de Saint Briz" relinquished rights in favour of the inhabitants of Chitry by charter dated 15 Jun 1348[317].  A charter dated 1353 records the dispute between “defunctum Guillelmum de Melloto militem quondam [now represented by “episcopum Cabilonensem Ioannem de Melloto fratrem et heredem dicti defuncti Guillelmi“] Droconemque de Melloto dominus S. Bricii” and “comitem Drocensem et eius uxorem[318]m MARGUERITE de Saint-Verain Dame de Jussy, daughter of --- (-[1381/84]).  Dreux [V] & his wife had children: 

i)          DREUX [VI] de Mello (-[1414/17]).  Seigneur de Saint-Bris et de Bligny.  m ISABELLE de Joigny Dame de Vendeuvre, daughter of JEAN de Joigny [Noyers] Seigneur de Rimaucourt et de Vandeuvre & his wife Jeanne de La Fauche (-after 1446).  Dreux [VI] & his wife had children: 

(a)       CHARLES de Mello (-Tilchâtel 10 Mar 1486).  Seigneur de Saint-Bris.  m firstly (1423) ISABELLE Aycelin Dame de Listenois, widow of JEAN de Vienne Seigneur de Roulans, daughter of LOUIS Aycelin Seigneur de Montaigut & his wife --- (-after 9 Mar 1439).  m secondly as her first husband, CATHERINE de Rougemont Dame de Rougemont et de Tilchâtel [part], daughter of THIBAUT [VI] Seigneur de Rougemont, de Tilchâtel, de Ruffey-sur-l’Ognon et d’Augy & his wife --- (-after 22 Sep 1494, bur Rougemont).  She married secondly (before 1488) Jean de Cicon, and thirdly (before Mar 1493) Jean [III] de Neufchâtel Seigneur de Saint-Aubin et de Reynel. 

(b)       GUILLAUME de Mello (-after 1486).  Seigneur de Bligny.  m JACQUELINE de Vendôme, daughter of JEAN de Vendôme Vidame de Chartres & his wife Catherine de Thouars Dame de Pouzauges, de Chabanais et de Conflant. 

(c)       MARGUERITE de Mellom ([1436]) ERARD [V] Trouillard de Lézinnes Seigneur de Lézinnes, son of --- (-before 1438). 

(d)       CLAUDE de Mello (-after 1457).  m (before 1431) GERARD de Cusance, son of --- (-after 1458). 

ii)         GUILLAUME de Mello (-[1351/53]).  A parliamentary register dated 1347 records a dispute between “Ioannam de Meloto comitissam Augi, Droconem et Guillelmum de Melloto milites fratres“ and “Vicecomitem Thoarcii et eius uxorem Comitissam Drocensem“ regarding the inheritance of “quondam Ioannæ filiæ defuncti Petri nuper comitis Drocensis[319]A charter dated 1353 records the dispute between “defunctum Guillelmum de Melloto militem quondam [now represented by “episcopum Cabilonensem Ioannem de Melloto fratrem et heredem dicti defuncti Guillelmi“] Droconemque de Melloto dominus S. Bricii” and “comitem Drocensem et eius uxorem[320]

iii)        JEAN de Mello .  Bishop of Chalon.  A charter dated 1353 records the dispute between “defunctum Guillelmum de Melloto militem quondam [now represented by “episcopum Cabilonensem Ioannem de Melloto fratrem et heredem dicti defuncti Guillelmi“] Droconemque de Melloto dominus S. Bricii” and “comitem Drocensem et eius uxorem[321]

b)         RENAUD de Mello (-1391).  Seigneur de Sainte-Parise et de Chacenay. 

-        SEIGNEURS de SAINTE-PARISE[322]

c)         THIBAUT de Mello .  Petit records the marriage contract end-Jan 1362 (O.S.?) between Milon [XII] and “Dreux et Thibaud de Mello...Isabelle leur sœur dame de Pacy, veuve de Louis de Sancerre[323]

d)         ISABELLE de Mello (-after 1396).  Dame de Pacy-sur-Armançon.  Petit records the marriage contract end-Jan 1362 (O.S.?) between Milon [XII] and “Dreux et Thibaud de Mello...Isabelle leur sœur dame de Pacy, veuve de Louis de Sancerre[324].  Père Anselme notes that Milon [XII] Seigneur de Noyers claimed his wife’s dower from the heirs of her first husband in 1367 and 1368[325]m firstly LOUIS de Sancerre Seigneur de Menetou-Salon, son of ---.  m secondly (contract end-Jan 1363) MILON [XII] Seigneur de Noyers, son of MILON [XI] Seigneur de Noyers & his wife Marguerite de Thianges (-12 Jan 1370, bur Noyers Saint-Nicolas).  m thirdly (3 Jun 1371) JEAN de Saint-Verain Seigneur de La Celle-sur-Loire, son of --- (-after 1417). 

 

 

 

E.      VICOMTES de SAINT-FLORENTIN

 

 

Saint-Florentin is located about 20 kilometres north-east of Auxerre, in the present-day French département of Yonne, arrondissement Auxerre, canton Saint-Florentin.  Much of the information included by Hermelin, in his early 20th century history of Saint-Florentin[326], has been supplemented by other sources which are cited below.  Maybe the noble family recorded at Saint-Florentin in 1035 were ancestors of the later vicecomital family, although the absence of the names Boson and Waldric in the latter suggest that they may not have been closely related.  Reference to the vicecomital title (vicomtes under the comtes d’Auxerre?) emerges from the sources in the 1140s: it is not known when the title was instituted.  The family’s origin is unknown.  Duchesne states that “il est certain” that they descended from the seigneurs de Châtillon-sur-Marne, whose arms they bore “chargées d’une estoille de sable sur le canton dextre du chef pour briseure”.  While acknowledging that he did not know the precise descent, he suggests that “Miles de Chastillon fils de Guermond de Chastillon II Seigneur de Savigny” was their ancestor and that he married “la fille ou seur de Rahier Vicomte de S. Florentin” who was recorded in a charter of Molesme dated 1159[327].  Duchesne’s suggestion is unlikely to be correct as Vicomte Rahier was succeeded by his son, as noted below, although the family’s arms do suggest an earlier connection.  In the mid-12th century, Saint-Florentin was among the fiefs held in the duchy of Burgundy by Thibaut Comte de Blois: “comes Theobaldus Blesensium” swore allegiance to Eudes Duke of Burgundy for “...Chelulciæ...et Merlennum castrum [Maligny]...et Arvicum castrum [Ervy]...et castrum Sancti-Florentini...et comitatus Trecarum totus...et Rutiscum castrum” by charter dated 1143[328].  Further work on the later generations of the vicomtes de Saint-Florentin, which remain sketchy as will be seen below, depends on the emergence of additional primary source material. 

 

 

1.         BOSON .  He is named as father of Waldric in the 1035 charter cited below.  m ---.  The name of Boson’s wife is not known.  The 1035 charter cited below suggests that she may have been the sister of “Manasse avunculi ejusdem Waldrici”, assuming that “avunculus” was used in its strict sense of maternal uncle.  The document also refers to an earlier agreement between the “avus” of Waldric and the abbey: it is not known whether this refers to his paternal or maternal grandfather, but the presence of his “maternal” uncle suggests that the relationship with Auxerre Saint-Germain originatated with Waldric’s mother’s family.  If that is correct, maybe she was the heiress of Saint-Florentin.  Boson & his wife had one child: 

a)         WALDRIC de Saint-Florentin (-after 1035).  A charter dated 1035 records the settlement of a dispute “apud castrum Sancti-Florentini” between “donnum Odonem” abbot of Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Waldricum prædicti castri Bosonis filium”, relating to “potestatis Willaris-Vinosi”, recording the agreement made by “avus eius” with “predecessore suo, abbate...Heldrico”, subscribed by “Saxwalonis; Manasse avunculi ejusdem Waldrici, Waldrici ejusdem...[329]

 

 

The family relationship, if any, between the following family and Waldric de Saint-Florentin has not been traced.  The common references to Villiers-Vineux suggest a continuity of property holdings, but the absence of the names Boson and Waldric among the known descendants of Eudes suggests that the two families may not have been closely related. 

 

1.         EUDES (-[1140/18 Aug 1147]).  Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145], witnessed by “...laïcali: comes Pertici Guillelmus Goetus...[330].  The witness was presumably Guillaume [IV] Goët Seigneur de Montmirail, Baron du Perche-Goët (see the document CENTRAL FRANCE-CHARTRES, CHÂTEAUDUN).  His connection with Saint-Florentin has not been ascertained, although his presence as first lay witness suggests a feudal relationship which could be consistent with the Comte de Blois later being feudal lord of Saint-Florentin as noted in the introduction above.  Eudes presumably died before 18 Aug 1147, the date of the charter in which his son Rahier is named as vicomte.  m AGNES, daughter of --- (-after [1140]).  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][331].  Eudes & his wife had children: 

a)         RAHIER de Saint-Florentin (-[1180/84]).  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][332]Vicomte de Saint-Florentin

-        see below

b)         HUGUES de Saint-Florentin .  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][333]

c)         EUDES de Saint-Florentin .  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][334]

 

 

RAHIER de Saint-Florentin, son of EUDES Vicomte de Saint-Florentin & his wife Agnès --- (-[1180/84]).  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][335]Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  Thibaut Comte de Blois settled disputes between Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Raherius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” by charter dated 18 Aug 1147[336].  “Raherius vicecomes Sancto-Florentino...Seguinus Furans-canem...” witnessed a charter of Thibaut Comte de Blois dated 1149[337].  A charter dated to [1150] records an agreement to split revenue from an oven “apud Villare-Vinosum” between Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini”, with the support of “Ada vicecomitissa et Willelmus filius amborum[338].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Raherius vicecomes de Sancto-Florentino”, with the consent of “filio suo Hugone, et uxore Ada”, the donations to Pontigny made by “patris eius Odonis”, by charter dated 29 May 1153, witnessed by “Sevinus de Sancto-Florentino, Henricus de Sancto-Florentino...[339].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens declared “locum...Frigidus-Mantellus”, donated by Molesme at the request of “domine Petronille Barrensis comitisse”, exempt from all lay jursidiction, noting that the nuns were permitted to receive donations including from “Raherius vicecomes de Sancto-Florentino”, by charter dated 6 Jul 1159[340].  “Sancti-Florentini...dominus Raherius, vicecomes ejusdem villæ” consented to Henri Comte de Troyes granting the right to hold an annual market at Saint-Florentin to the church by charter dated 1159[341].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated a chapel at Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, at the request of “Adæ conjugis nostræ” and with the consent of “filii nostri Willelmi et uxoris suæ Agnetis”, by charter dated 1175[342].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated “censuales...in curia monachi Sancti-Germani de Villers” to Saint-Germain, for the soul of “pie recordationis Ada conjuge mea”, with the consent of “Willelmi filii mei et uxoris sue Agnetis”, by charter dated to [1148] (corrected to [1180/84] by Hermelin[343])[344]

m firstly HODIERNE, daughter of ---.  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][345]

m secondly ADA, daughter of --- (-[1175/1184]).  A charter dated to [1150] records an agreement to split revenue from an oven “apud Villare-Vinosum” between Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini”, with the support of “Ada vicecomitissa et Willelmus filius amborum[346].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Raherius vicecomes de Sancto-Florentino”, with the consent of “filio suo Hugone, et uxore Ada”, the donations to Pontigny made by “patris eius Odonis”, by charter dated 29 May 1153[347].  The Feoda Campanie dated [1172] includes “...Milo de Noiers. Vicecomitissa sancti Florentini tenet tertiam partem, Milo de Pogiaco tertiam, Guido de Montmor tertiam…” in De Trecis et de Insulis[348].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated a chapel at Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, at the request of “Adæ conjugis nostræ” and with the consent of “filii nostri Willelmi et uxoris suæ Agnetis”, by charter dated 1175[349].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated “censuales...in curia monachi Sancti-Germani de Villers” to Saint-Germain, for the soul of “pie recordationis Ada conjuge mea”, with the consent of “Willelmi filii mei et uxoris sue Agnetis”, by charter dated to [1148] (corrected to [1180/84] by Hermelin[350])[351]

Rahier & his first wife had two children:

1.         EUDES de Saint-Florentin (-[1140/50]).  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][352].  The absence of Eudes from the [1150] and 29 May 1153 charters cited below suggests that he was deceased at the time. 

2.         HUGUES de Saint-Florentin (-after 29 May 1153).  “Odo vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated his rights in the church of Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, with the consent of “Agnete uxore mea...liberis meis Raherio, Hugone et Odone, et Hodierna uxore Raherii cum liberis suis...Odone, Hugone”, by charter dated to [1140] or [1145][353].  The absence of Hugues from the [1150] charter which names his half-brother Guillaume suggests that he was absent from Saint-Florentin at the time.  One possibility is that he had joined the Third Crusade with Louis VII King of France.  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Raherius vicecomes de Sancto-Florentino”, with the consent of “filio suo Hugone, et uxore Ada”, the donations to Pontigny made by “patris eius Odonis”, by charter dated 29 May 1153, witnessed by “Sevinus de Sancto-Florentino, Henricus de Sancto-Florentino...[354].  His absence from any later charters suggests his death soon after 1153. 

Rahier & his second wife had one child: 

3.         GUILLAUME de Saint-Florentin (-[1189/1201]).  A charter dated to [1150] records an agreement to split revenue from an oven “apud Villare-Vinosum” between Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini”, with the support of “Ada vicecomitissa et Willelmus filius amborum[355].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated a chapel at Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, at the request of “Adæ conjugis nostræ” and with the consent of “filii nostri Willelmi et uxoris suæ Agnetis”, by charter dated 1175[356].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated “censuales...in curia monachi Sancti-Germani de Villers” to Saint-Germain, for the soul of “pie recordationis Ada conjuge mea”, with the consent of “Willelmi filii mei et uxoris sue Agnetis”, by charter dated to [1148] (corrected to [1180/84] by Hermelin[357])[358]Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  “Guillelmus vicecomes S. Florentini” donated revenue from “census...in Spineto [Espinoy]” to Dilo, with the consent of “Agnes uxor mea et duo filii mei Guido et Johannes”, by charter dated 1184[359].  “Guillelmus vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated revenue and harvest “apud Villare-Vinosum” to Auxerre Saint-Germain, for the love of “filii mei Guidonis, qui in eodem monasterio habitum religionis assumpsit”, with the consent of “uxore mea Agnete et Johanne, filio meo”, by charter dated 1189[360].  Guillaume died before [1201], the date of the source cited below which records his wife’s dower.  m AGNES de Noyers, daughter of MILON [IV] Seigneur de Noyers & his wife Adeline de Chappes (-after [1201]).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the 1206 charter cited below.  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated a chapel at Saint-Florentin to Auxerre Saint-Germain, at the request of “Adæ conjugis nostræ” and with the consent of “filii nostri Willelmi et uxoris suæ Agnetis”, by charter dated 1175[361].  “Raerius vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated “censuales...in curia monachi Sancti-Germani de Villers” to Saint-Germain, for the soul of “pie recordationis Ada conjuge mea”, with the consent of “Willelmi filii mei et uxoris sue Agnetis”, by charter dated to [1148] (corrected to [1180/84] by Hermelin[362])[363].  “Guillelmus vicecomes S. Florentini” donated revenue from “census...in Spineto [Espinoy]” to Dilo, with the consent of “Agnes uxor mea et duo filii mei Guido et Johannes”, by charter dated 1184[364].  “Guillelmus vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated revenue and harvest “apud Villare-Vinosum” to Auxerre Saint-Germain, for the love of “filii mei Guidonis, qui in eodem monasterio habitum religionis assumpsit”, with the consent of “uxore mea Agnete et Johanne, filio meo”, by charter dated 1189[365].  The Feoda Campanie dated [1201] includes “…vicecomitissa Sancti Florentini ligia de suo dotario et…apud Jassiam, et castellum eius est jurabile...” in De Trecis et Insulis[366].  Agnes “vicomtesse de Saint-Florentin” confirmed the donation of rights “dans la forêt de Lagesse” made to the leprosery of Troyes by her parents Milon [IV] Seigneur de Noyers and Adeline by charter dated 1206, which also names her sister Oda as a widow[367].  Dame de Lagesse.  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUY de Saint-Florentin (-[1184/89]).  “Guillelmus vicecomes S. Florentini” donated revenue from “census...in Spineto [Espinoy]” to Dilo, with the consent of “Agnes uxor mea et duo filii mei Guido et Johannes”, by charter dated 1184[368].  His absence from the 1189 charter which names his brother suggests that he was deceased at the time. 

b)         JEAN de Saint-Florentin (-before Jul 1228).  “Guillelmus vicecomes S. Florentini” donated revenue from “census...in Spineto [Espinoy]” to Dilo, with the consent of “Agnes uxor mea et duo filii mei Guido et Johannes”, by charter dated 1184[369].  “Guillelmus vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated revenue and harvest “apud Villare-Vinosum” to Auxerre Saint-Germain, for the love of “filii mei Guidonis, qui in eodem monasterio habitum religionis assumpsit”, with the consent of “uxore mea Agnete et Johanne, filio meo”, by charter dated 1189[370]Vicomte de Saint-Florentin

-        see below

4.         [JEAN de Saint-Florentin (-after [1168/76]).  Guillaume Archbishop of Sens notified that he had granted “ecclesiam Sancti-Michaelis de Arceia” to “Johanni, clerico, de Sancto-Florentino”, at the request of “Odonis abbatis Sancti-Petri-Vivi”, by charter dated to [1168/76][371].  The date of this document suggests that Jean was another son of Rahier by his second marriage.]  

 

 

The relationships, if any, between the following persons and the main Saint-Florentin family have not been ascertained.  They could presumably be knights living at the castle whose name they adopted. 

 

1.         HENRI de Saint-Florentin (-after 29 May 1153).  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre confirmed that “Herbertus Crassus de Meriaco...” had donated to Pontigny whatever “Henricus de Sancto-Florentino et Beatrix uxor sua” had “in bosco de Contest et in territorio Sanctæ-Porcariæ...” by charter dated 1143[372].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Raherius vicecomes de Sancto-Florentino”, with the consent of “filio suo Hugone, et uxore Ada”, the donations to Pontigny made by “patris eius Odonis”, by charter dated 29 May 1153, witnessed by “Sevinus de Sancto-Florentino, Henricus de Sancto-Florentino...[373]

 

 

1.         --- .  He presumably died before the 1143 charter which names his wife and sons.  m ALPACIA, daughter of --- (-after 1143).  Hugues Archbishop of Sens confirmed that “Seguinus de Sancto-Florentino, cognomento Furans-Canem” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “mater sua Alpacia, et frater suus Guarmundus...Regina uxor ipsius Seguini”, by charter dated 1143[374]

a)         SEGUIN de Saint-Florentin “Furans-Canem” (-after 1168).  Hugues Archbishop of Sens confirmed that “Seguinus de Sancto-Florentino, cognomento Furans-Canem” had donated to Pontigny “totam terram quæ in territorio Challiaci [Chailley] jure hæreditario se contingebat et...de silva...Ota [Othe]...casamentum quoque Bosonio apud Sanctam-Porcianam et quod ipse Seguinus apud Campum-Inventum habebat...”, with the consent of “mater sua Alpacia, et frater suus Guarmundus...Regina uxor ipsius Seguini”, by charter dated 1143[375].  “Raherius vicecomes Sancto-Florentino...Seguinus Furans-canem...” witnessed a charter of Thibaut Comte de Blois dated 1149[376].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Sevvinus de Sancto-Florentino” donated “terram...inter ipsum et Isnardum vicecomitem [vicomte de Joigny]” to Pontigny, in return for “in loco...Boisarlabart”, with the support of “Regina uxor ejusdem et Garnerius filius ejus, et Alpacia et Alzurresa filiæ ejusdem Sevvini”, by charter dated 1150[377].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Raherius vicecomes de Sancto-Florentino”, with the consent of “filio suo Hugone, et uxore Ada”, the donations to Pontigny made by “patris eius Odonis”, by charter dated 29 May 1153, witnessed by “Sevinus de Sancto-Florentino, Henricus de Sancto-Florentino...[378].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Isnardus vicecomes Joviniaci, et Bovo et Gilduinus, clericus, fratres ejus” donated “pratum...inter Crientum et Ermenzun sitam, contiguam terre Seguini de Sancto-Florentino” to Pontigny by charter dated 1157[379].  Hugues Comte de Troyes confirmed the agreement between Pontigny and “Sevinus de Sancto Florentino” concerning “nemus...Sancti-Petri...de Venesiaco” by charter dated 1160[380].  A charter dated 1168 confirmed rights of Pontigny, including payments to “dominus de Chanloth” if he occupied “feodum quod tenet Sewinus de S. Florentino[381]m REGINE, daughter of --- (-after 1150).  Hugues Archbishop of Sens confirmed that “Seguinus de Sancto-Florentino, cognomento Furans-Canem” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “mater sua Alpacia, et frater suus Guarmundus...Regina uxor ipsius Seguini”, by charter dated 1143[382].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Sevvinus de Sancto-Florentino” donated “terram...inter ipsum et Isnardum vicecomitem [vicomte de Joigny]” to Pontigny, in return for “in loco...Boisarlabart”, with the support of “Regina uxor ejusdem et Garnerius filius ejus, et Alpacia et Alzurresa filiæ ejusdem Sevvini”, by charter dated 1150[383].  Seguin & his wife had three children: 

i)          GARNIER .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Sevvinus de Sancto-Florentino” donated “terram...inter ipsum et Isnardum vicecomitem [vicomte de Joigny]” to Pontigny, in return for “in loco...Boisarlabart”, with the support of “Regina uxor ejusdem et Garnerius filius ejus, et Alpacia et Alzurresa filiæ ejusdem Sevvini”, by charter dated 1150[384]

ii)         ALPACIA .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Sevvinus de Sancto-Florentino” donated “terram...inter ipsum et Isnardum vicecomitem [vicomte de Joigny]” to Pontigny, in return for “in loco...Boisarlabart”, with the support of “Regina uxor ejusdem et Garnerius filius ejus, et Alpacia et Alzurresa filiæ ejusdem Sevvini”, by charter dated 1150[385]

iii)        ALZURRESA .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Sevvinus de Sancto-Florentino” donated “terram...inter ipsum et Isnardum vicecomitem [vicomte de Joigny]” to Pontigny, in return for “in loco...Boisarlabart”, with the support of “Regina uxor ejusdem et Garnerius filius ejus, et Alpacia et Alzurresa filiæ ejusdem Sevvini”, by charter dated 1150[386]

b)         GUARMOND de Saint-Florentin .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens confirmed that “Seguinus de Sancto-Florentino, cognomento Furans-Canem” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “mater sua Alpacia, et frater suus Guarmundus...Regina uxor ipsius Seguini”, by charter dated 1143[387]

 

 

The references to Villiers-Vineux presumably indicate that the following persons belonged to a younger branch of the vicecomital family of Saint-Florentin, but the precise descent has not been ascertained. 

 

1.         MILON de Saint-Florentin (-after Apr 1244).  Seigneur de Villiers-Vineux.  “Milo de Sancto-Florentino dominus Villaris-Vinosi” and Auxerre Saint-Germain agreed their respective rights in Villiers-Vineux by charter dated Apr 1244[388]

 

2.         JEAN de Saint-Florentin (-[1284/13 Jun 1296]).  Seigneur de Villiers-Vineux.  “Jean de Saint-Florentin damoiseau seigneur de Villiers-Vineux” and “Robert de Joceval moine de Saint-Germain, préposé du monastère” agreed the rights of the monks in the woods of “Mabny, des Varvarins et de La Broce” by charter dated 1284[389].  He is named as deceased in his son’s 13 Jun 1296 charter.  m ---.  Jean & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEAN de Saint-Florentin .  Seigneur de Villiers-Vineux.  “Jean de Villiers-Vineux, fils de feu Jean de Saint-Florentin” exchanged revenue with “[les] frères de la Maladrerie de Saint-Florentin”, in particular “ès fiefs de Jehan fils de Monseigneur Gaucher de Saint-Florentin, chevalier” by charter dated 13 Jun 1296[390]same person as...?  JEAN de Saint-Florentin (-after 1 Jun 1317).  Seigneur de “Veure”.  Duchesne records that “Jean de Saint Florentin Sire de Veure et Jean de Saint Florentin Sire de Janguier” threatened to withdraw from the service of Louis de Flandre Comte de Nevers if he continued to rebel against the king, the bishop of Nevers and “Gerart de Chastillon” by charter dated 1 Jun 1317[391]

 

 

JEAN de Saint-Florentin, son of GUILLAUME Vicomte de Saint-Florentin & his wife Agnès --- (-before Jul 1228).  “Guillelmus vicecomes S. Florentini” donated revenue from “census...in Spineto [Espinoy]” to Dilo, with the consent of “Agnes uxor mea et duo filii mei Guido et Johannes”, by charter dated 1184[392].  “Guillelmus vicecomes Sancti-Florentini” donated revenue and harvest “apud Villare-Vinosum” to Auxerre Saint-Germain, for the love of “filii mei Guidonis, qui in eodem monasterio habitum religionis assumpsit”, with the consent of “uxore mea Agnete et Johanne, filio meo”, by charter dated 1189[393]Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  A charter dated to [1185/1218] names “W. de Melloto; Dominus de Sellenaio; Vicecomes Sancti-Florentini; Gudo de Meleigni...” among “milites ferentes banerias comitis Petri Altissiodorensis[394].  “...Barons...le vicomte de Saint-Florentin...” is named among the nobles in Champagne who confirmed the decision by Blanche Ctss de Champagne to allow succession of fiefs in the female line by charter dated 1212[395].  Jean presumably died before Jul 1228 when his son Gaucher is named as vicomte. 

m --- de Pleurs, daughter of --- (-after 1229).  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  The Feoda Campanie dated 1229 includes “...Galcherus de Sancto Florentino…apud Plaiostrum et in castellaria Plaiotri ex parte matris sue…” in Milites de Dotalitio[396]

Jean & his wife had children: 

1.         GAUCHER de Saint-Florentin (-after Mar 1248)Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  “Philippus dominus Planceii” declared that “Galcherus vicecomes Sancti-Florentini gener meus” acknowledging holding “in feodum...aput Jauges...apud Chau” from Thibaut Comte de Champagne by charter dated Jul 1228[397].  The Feoda Campanie dated 1229 includes “...Galcherus vicecomes Sancti Florentini…apud Jauges…” in Milites de Dotalitio[398], and “...Galcherus de Sancto Florentino…apud Plaiostrum et in castellaria Plaiotri ex parte matris sue…” in Milites de Dotalitio[399].  Seigneur de Pacy [sur-Armançon]: Thibaut King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne confirmed that “Gaucherus dominus Paciaci, filius Johannis quondam vicecomitis de sancto Florentino” had donated his rights “in decima de Jauges” to Pontigny by charter dated 1235[400].  Robert Bishop of Langres noted that "Gaucher de Saint-Florentin écuyer...avec Marguerite sa femme" granted rights in “ses bois de du finage de Laignes sauf le Corroi” to Molesme by charter dated [4 Apr 1238/27 Mar 1239][401]"Gaucher de Saint-Florentin sire de Pacy[-sur-Armançon] et Marguerite sa femme" granted rights to the church of Molesme at Laignes by charter dated Sep 1239[402].  “Iterus de Racines” swore homage for “feodum apud Boeloi”, except for “ligietate Galcheri de Sancto-Florentino”, swearing that when he had two sons one would owe allegiance to the king, the other to Gaucher, by charter dated to [1240][403].  “Guillelmus dominus de Merloto, Milo dominus Noeriorum, et Droco dominus de Espoisse et Chatel-Chinun” acknowledged that “Gaucherum de S-Florentino armigerum...Margarita...uxor dicti Gaucheri” renounced rights over certain harvest, donated by “bone memorie...Guillelmus de Brena...concedente Eustagia uxore sua”, in favour of Pontigny by charter dated May 1240[404].  “Galcherus de S. Florentino dominus de Paci” donated his rights “in decimam...apud Jauges [...medietatem] et apud Bondu [...quartam partem]” to Pontigny, with the consent of “Margareta uxor mea et Johannes vicecomes de S. Florentino frater meus”, by charter dated 1241[405].  "Gaucher de Saint-Florentin chevalier sire de Pacy[-sur-Armançon] et de Laignes" retook property “à Marcenay” as a fief from Molesme by charter dated Mar 1248[406]"Galcherus de Sancto Florentino miles Paciaciet Laignie dominus" agreed to share property “apud Marcenaium et...apud Laigniam” with Molesme by charter dated Apr [1247/48][407]m firstly (before 1228) MARGUERITE de Plancy, daughter of PHILIPPE Seigneur de Plancy & his wife Agnes de Brienne (-[1241/47]).  "Philippe sire de Plancy...avec Agnès sa femme, Jacques, Thibaut, Hugues et Marguerite ses enfants" reached agreement with Molesme concerning property “à Arthonnay” by charter dated [29 Mar 1220/11 Apr 1221][408].  Duchesne records that “Gaucher Vicomte de S. Florentin” married “Marguerite de Plancy fille de Philippes Seigneur de Plancy chevalier[409].  “Philippus dominus Planceii” declared that “Galcherus vicecomes Sancti-Florentini gener meus” acknowledging holding “in feodum...aput Jauges...apud Chau” from Thibaut Comte de Champagne by charter dated Jul 1228[410].  Robert Bishop of Langres noted that "Gaucher de Saint-Florentin écuyer...avec Marguerite sa femme" granted rights in “ses bois de du finage de Laignes sauf le Corroi” to Molesme by charter dated [4 Apr 1238/27 Mar 1239][411]"Gaucher de Saint-Florentin sire de Pacy[-sur-Armançon] et Marguerite sa femme" granted rights to the church of Molesme at Laignes by charter dated Sep 1239[412].  “Guillelmus dominus de Merloto, Milo dominus Noeriorum, et Droco dominus de Espoisse et Chatel-Chinun” acknowledged that “Gaucherum de S-Florentino armigerum...Margarita...uxor dicti Gaucheri” renounced rights over certain harvest, donated by “bone memorie...Guillelmus de Brena...concedente Eustagia uxore sua”, in favour of Pontigny by charter dated May 1240[413].  “Galcherus de S. Florentino dominus de Paci” donated his rights “in decimam...apud Jauges [...medietatem] et apud Bondu [...quartam partem]” to Pontigny, with the consent of “Margareta uxor mea et Johannes vicecomes de S. Florentino frater meus”, by charter dated 1241[414]m secondly (after 1247) as her second husband, ELISABETH de Charny, widow of GUILLAUME Seigneur de Thil, daughter of PONCE de Mont-Saint-Jean Seigneur de Charny et de Châtel-Censoir & his second wife Sibylle de Noyers (-after Jun 1257).  She married thirdly (before Jun 1257) Siger van Gent.  The testament of “Helisabeth domina Tilii relicta bone memorie Guillelmi quondam domini Tilii”, dated Jun 1257, made with the consent of “Sigero de Gandavo militis mariti mei”, refers to the rights of “heredes...Galcheri quondam domini Paceii...marito mee”, bequeathes property to “Agneti filie domine Adeline de Tylio...pro illa maritanda...”, and appoints “Hugonem dominum Charneii fratrem meum” among her executors[415]

2.         JEAN de Saint-Florentin (-after Dec 1261).  Vicomte de Saint-Florentin.  “Galcherus de S. Florentino dominus de Paci” donated his rights “in decimam...apud Jauges [...medietatem] et apud Bondu [...quartam partem]” to Pontigny, with the consent of “Margareta uxor mea et Johannes vicecomes de S. Florentino frater meus”, by charter dated 1241[416].  The wording of the extract of the Dec 1261 charter cited below under his sons suggests that their father was living at the time.  m .  Jean & his wife had three children: 

a)         GEOFFROY [Godefroi?] de Saint-Florentin (-after 1300).  “Ses fils [=Jean vicomte de Saint-Florentin?] Godefroy, Giles et Gaucher” acknowledged having ceded “leurs bois de Jaulges, contigus à ceux de leur père” to “Etienne, prêtre de la maison des Lépreux”, with the consent of “Maud femme de Godefroy”, by charter dated Dec 1261[417].  Seigneur de Jaulges.  “Geoffroi de Saint-Florentin seigneur de Jaulges” freed two serfs by charter dated Mar 1294 (O.S.)[418].  Duchesne records that “Geofroy de Saint Florentin...avec Maistre Robert Foison” held an enquiry in 1300 between “Edmond d’Angleterre Comte usufruitier de Champagne, et Jean de Montfort, Girard Chabot, et Guillaume d’Yury chevaliers[419].  m (before Dec 1261) MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  “Ses fils [=Jean vicomte de Saint-Florentin?] Godefroy, Giles et Gaucher” acknowledged having ceded “leurs bois de Jaulges, contigus à ceux de leur père” to “Etienne, prêtre de la maison des Lépreux”, with the consent of “Maud femme de Godefroy”, by charter dated Dec 1261[420]

b)         GILLES de Saint-Florentin (-after Dec 1261).  “Ses fils [=Jean vicomte de Saint-Florentin?] Godefroy, Giles et Gaucher” acknowledged having ceded “leurs bois de Jaulges, contigus à ceux de leur père” to “Etienne, prêtre de la maison des Lépreux”, with the consent of “Maud femme de Godefroy”, by charter dated Dec 1261[421]

c)         GAUCHER de Saint-Florentin (-after 29 Oct 1298).  “Ses fils [=Jean vicomte de Saint-Florentin?] Godefroy, Giles et Gaucher” acknowledged having ceded “leurs bois de Jaulges, contigus à ceux de leur père” to “Etienne, prêtre de la maison des Lépreux”, with the consent of “Maud femme de Godefroy”, by charter dated Dec 1261[422].  Duchesne records that “Gaucher de S. Florentin” sold his rights “au chastel et chastellenie d’Eruy...nommément sa part de dix fiefs tenus par Guillaume de Chambellain et Robert d’Acy chevaliers” to Henri Comte de Champagne King of Navarre in 1273[423].  Hermelin says that “Gaucher, troisième fils de Jean...vicomte de Saint-Florentin” sold “ses droits sur le village, le château, la châtellenie d’Ervy...” to Henri Comte de Champagne in 1273[424].  “Gaucher de Saint-Florentin chevalier” sold his rights “sur le village, le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur les prés du Breuil, de Monthiérault et de Chessy, sur divers fiefs à Chamblain et à la Vacherie” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Sep 1273[425].  These reports presumably all relate to the following document: “Gaucher de Saint-Florentin chevalier” sold his rights in “le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur les prés du Breuil, de Monthiérault et de Chessy, sur divers fiefs à Chamblain et à La Vacherie” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Sep 1273[426].  Gaucher confirmed possessions “ès chasteleries de Saint-Florentin et de Leigni-le-Chastel” donated “aux frères de la Maladrerie de Saint-Florentin”, with the consent of “sa femme Luque” by charter dated Jul 1291, and donated further property by charter dated 29 Oct 1298[427]m LUQUE, daughter of --- (-after Jul 1291).  Gaucher confirmed possessions “ès chasteleries de Saint-Florentin et de Leigni-le-Chastel” donated “aux frères de la Maladrerie de Saint-Florentin”, with the consent of “sa femme Luque” by charter dated Jul 1291[428]Europäische Stammtafeln names her “Lucquette”, daughter of “Jean [de Montréal] sn d’Athie et de Pont d’Aisy”[429], see the document BURGUNDY DUCHY-AUXOIS, DUESMOIS, AVALOIS.  The primary source which confirms this parentage has not been identified.  Gaucher & his wife had one child: 

i)          JEAN de Saint-Florentin (-killed La Réole 1324).  “Jean de Villiers-Vineux, fils de feu Jean de Saint-Florentin” exchanged revenue with “[les] frères de la Maladrerie de Saint-Florentin”, in particular “ès fiefs de Jehan fils de Monseigneur Gaucher de Saint-Florentin, chevalier” by charter dated 13 Jun 1296[430].  [Seigneur de “Janguier”: Duchesne records that “Jean de Saint Florentin Sire de Veure et Jean de Saint Florentin Sire de Janguier” threatened to withdraw from the service of Louis de Flandre Comte de Nevers if he continued to rebel against the king, the bishop of Nevers and “Gerart de Chastillon” by charter dated 1 Jun 1317[431].]  The Chronique de Saint-Denis records in 1324 that “le Seigneur de Saint Florentin Cheuëtaine des François”, under Charles Comte de Valois, besieged the brother of the king of England at La Réole and was killed in the ensuing battle[432]m ---.  Jean & his wife had one child: 

(1)       MARGUERITE de Saint-Florentin (-after 1343).  Hermelin records her parentage (no source cited), incorrectly identifying her husband as “Etienne III baron de Seignelay[433].  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” also records the supposed marriage of “Etienne III” with “Marguerite vicomtesse de Saint-Florentin”, noting that “estant veufve et sans enfans de lui” Marguerite  married secondly “Jean de Soigne ou de Saint-Seine...à cause d’elle baron et seigneur en partie de Seign-Let, 1337, mourut 1343[434].  If the “Carte des Barons” is correct, Marguerite married secondly Jean de Soigne [de Saint-Seine], but no other document has yet been found which confirms his existence.  Her [first] husband is correctly identified by Duchesne who records “Marguerite de Sainct Florentin veuve de Jean Seigneur de Saillenay” selling “la vicomté de Sainct Florentin” to King Philippe VI by letters dated 1343 which name “Gaucher sire de Saillenay escuyer fils de feu Jean de Saillenay[435].  The document in question is reproduced by Hermelin: “Marguerite de Sainct-Florantin dame de Saillenay, femme jadix de...feu Monseigneur Jehan jadix seigneur de Saillenay” sold “la viconté de Sainct-Florantin” to Philippe VI King of France and his wife Jeanne de Bourgogne, with the consent of “Gauchiers sires de Saillenay escuiers, filz de la dicte dame et doudit feu...Jehan de Saillenay chevalier jadix son mary”, by charter dated mid-Nov 1343[436].  A 1356 charter of the hospital of Saint-Florentin records “la royne Jeanne de Bourgoingne...au temps qu’elle tenait la chastellenie de Saint-Florentin en sa maison de Saillenay, jadis vicomtesse de la ville de Saint-Florentin[437]: Henry comments that “le manque de documents nous a empêché d’éclaircir ce fait important de notre histoire”, but the involvement of Jeanne de Bourgogne [Queen of France, who died 12 Dec 1349] is explained by the mid-Nov 1343 charter cited above.  m [firstly] ([before 1320?]) JEAN [III] Seigneur de Seignelay, son of --- ([1295?]-before 1343).  [m secondly JEAN de Soigne [Saint-Seine], son of ---.] 

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Saint-Florentin (-after Apr 1273).  “Guillaume de Saint-Florentin écuyer et Aliénor sa femme” sold their rights “sur le village, le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur la Vacherie sous Ervy, sur le Breuil près Monthiérault, sur le Breuil de Chessy, sur des fiefs...à Chamblain, à Davrey” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Apr 1273[438]m ELEONORE, daughter of ---.  “Guillaume de Saint-Florentin écuyer et Aliénor sa femme” sold their rights “sur le village, le château et la châtellenie d’Ervy, sur la Vacherie sous Ervy, sur le Breuil près Monthiérault, sur le Breuil de Chessy, sur des fiefs...à Chamblain, à Davrey” to Henri III Comte de Champagne by charter dated Apr 1273[439]

 

 

1.         --- de Saint-Florentinm MARGUERITE du Mex, daughter of GUY du Mex & his wife --- (-after Feb 1301).  The testament of “Margerite dite de S. Florentin, fille jadis deu Guy dou Mex, gisanz au lit deshaitiée”, dated Feb 1300 (O.S.?), made religious bequests, in the presence of “sire Pierre dou Meix baillif de Tourneurre...[440]

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de SEIGNELAY

 

 

Seignelay is located about 10 kilometres north of Auxerre, in the present-day French département of Yonne, arrondissement Auxerre, canton Seignelay.  The family of the seigneurs de Seignelay, until the early 13th century, was studied in 1979 and 1987 by Constance Bouchard[441].  The following reconstruction differs in some detail from Bouchard, as highlighted below.  The families of the seigneurs de Seignelay, from the 11th to 18th centuries, were also studied in 1833 and 1853 by Vaast-Barthélemi Henry[442].  Bouchard is dismissive of Henry, noting that his “reconstruction of the 12th century family is at odds with the primary documents and is filled out with conjecture[443].  On the other hand, he reproduces numerous primary sources in his second volume, particularly relating to the later period, details from which have been included below.  He cites other documentation which appears important, but unfortunately uses cryptic citation references which are too imprecise to enable them to be checked.  Henry also reproduces in full a manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (undated but the last entry is dated 18 Jun 1761) which traces the Seignelay descents from Bavon (see below) until the mid-18th century[444].  This manuscript must have used earlier primary source material as many details are corroborated by other documents which are cited below.  However, as highlighted by Bouchard, the 11th/12th century part of the document supposedly shows a series of intermediate generations between Bavon and Avalon [II] which remain unconfirmed and have not been included below.  A note on the name “Avalon”: Bouchard uses “Aswalo” throughout, while other secondary sources use other variations.  The names in Latin are inconsistent as will be seen below.  “Avalon” has been chosen for the present reconstruction as more similar to a present-day French name, but the choice is arbitrary and should not been seen as significant. 

 

 

1.         BAVON de Seignelay (-after [1000]).  Rodulphus Glaber records the religious persecutions of “Bavonis...et filii eius Alwalonis...Silliniaci...castri”, dated to [1000][445]m ---.  The name of Bavon’s wife is not known.  Bavon & his wife had one child: 

a)         AVALON [I] [Aswalo] de Seignelay .  Rodulphus Glaber names “Bavonis...et filii eius Alwalonis...Silliniaci...castri”, dated to [1000][446]same person as...?  [SASWALO] (-after 1035).  A charter dated 1035 records the settlement of a dispute “apud castrum Sancti-Florentini” between “donnum Odonem” abbot of Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Waldricum prædicti castri Bosonis filium”, relating to “potestatis Willaris-Vinosi”, recording the agreement made by “avus eius” with “predecessore suo, abbate...Heldrico”, subscribed by “Saxwalonis; Manasse avunculi ejusdem Waldrici, Waldrici ejusdem...[447].  The name of the first subscriber bears a striking resemblance to “Aswalo”, a variant of Avalon.  His position as first subscriber suggests an interest in the property in question: maybe he was Waldric’s feudal lord.  If that is correct, the proximity of Seignelay to Saint-Florentin suggests the possibility that he was the same person as Avalon [I] or was the latter’s son. 

 

 

The relationship between Avalon [II] and Avalon [I] has not been confirmed, but the unusual name suggests that the former was descended from the latter.  As noted in the introduction above, the manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” purports to show two intervening generations[448].  However, as the manuscript’s detail is imprecise and the chronology implausible (not enough generations), the information has not been reproduced below. 

 

1.         AVALON [II] de Seignelay ([1080/95?]-[23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140]/[25 Mar 1143/24 Mar 1144])Seigneur de Seignelay.  A judgment of Guillaume Comte de Nevers dated 1106 settled a dispute between Auxerre Saint-Germain and “Awalonem [dominum Seleniaci]”, noting that Avalon held rights of justice in “Alta-Ripa [Haute-Rive], de Monte [du Mont], de Olmeto [d’Ormoy], de Gurgiaco [de Gurgy]”, witnessed by “...Jolduinus vicecomes frater suus...” [Vicomte de Sens? see the document CHAMPAGNE NOBILITY-SENS & JOIGNY][449].  Bouchard highlights the difficulty of deciding whether “suus” in relation to the witness refers to “Awalonem [dominum Seleniaci]” or another of the witnesses, but notes the use of the name Daimbert in the family of the vicomtes de Sens which could suggest a Seignelay family connection (see Avalon [II]’s son Daimbert, below)[450].  “Aswalo de Sellenniaco” donated land to Auxerre Saint-Marien, with the support of “uxor mea et Daimbertus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1125/40][451].  “Awalo de Silliniaco dominus meus...” witnessed the 31 Aug 1126 charter under which “Bertrannus de Silliniaco” donated “censum...apud Sanctam Porcariam” to Pontigny[452].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], supported by “...donnus Avalo et Agnes uxor eius[453]m firstly ---.  This supposed first marriage is indicated by the [1110/15?] estimated birth date of Avalon [II]’s son Daimbert [I], which means that he was not the son of Avalon [II]’s known wife Agnes (assuming that her earlier Noyers marriage is correct, and considering the probable birth of her son Milon [IV] by her first husband in [1120/25?]).  Bouchard does not raise the possibility of this earlier marriage, but she does not discuss the potential chronological problem raised by the birth of Avalon’s son Daimbert[454].  The unusual name Daimbert suggests a connection with Daimbert who was Archbishop of Sens from 1097 to 1112 (see the document SENS ARCHBISHOPRIC).  It is possible therefore that Daimbert’s mother was related to the archbishop of the same name.  [“Aswalo de Sellenniaco” donated land to Auxerre Saint-Marien, with the support of “uxor mea et Daimbertus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1125/40][455].  The estimated date of this document is not precise enough to decide whether it refers to Avalon’s first or second wife.]  m secondly ([1127/31?]) as her second husband, AGNES ---, widow of MILON [III] Seigneur de Noyers, daughter of --- (-after [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140]).  Petit names Agnes as the wife of Milon [III] (no sources cited), noting incorrectly that she was “veuve du seigneur de Pierre-Perthuis” (drawing an incorrect conclusion from the sources quoted below which confirm that Etienne Seigneur de Pierre-Perthuis was the son of Avalon [II] Seigneur de Seignelay), and also noting her later Seignelay marriage[456].  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) says that Avalo [II] married “la veufue de Miles de Noyers, nommée Agnès, qui lui procréa trois [probably incorrect number, see below] garçons[457].  The approximate date of her Seignelay marriage is based on Europäische Stammtafeln recording that her first husband died “(1131)”[458], but the primary source which confirms this date has not been identified suggesting that his death a few years earlier cannot be excluded.  An earlier primary source which confirms her Noyer and Seignelay marriages has not been identified.  However, these two marriages would provide a good explanation for the family relationship between her first husband’s grandson Clarembaud Seigneur de Noyers and her second husband’s grandson Etienne de Pierre-Pertuis [son of his son Etienne, born from Avalon’s first marriage and probably adopting his new family name Pierre-Pertuis after his marriage, see below] which is indicated in the following document:  “Stephanus filius Stephani de Petra pertusa” confirmed his donation to Pontigny made in 1189 on leaving for Jerusalem for the soul of “patris mei” and donated “coustumas meas de Basso”, dated “in feriis Pentecosten, cum conscientia domini Clarembaudi, cognati mei” [no year][459].  The two marriages could also help explain why the life of Hugues de Noyers Bishop of Auxerre [her first husband’s grandson] names “Senonensis archiepiscopus Guido [her son by her second husband], avunculus episcopi”[460].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre (from 1136/1151, see the document SENS ARCHBISHOPRIC) notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], supported by “...donnus Avalo et Agnes uxor eius[461].  Avalon [II] & his first wife had [two] sons: 

a)         [AVALON de Seignelay .  Bouchard says that “the boy Aswalo, oldest son of Lord Aswalo I...appeared as puer in a [Molesme] charter of his father from the first years of the century”, noting that “since he is not seen again, one must assume he died young[462].  The charter in question has not been found in the second volume of Molesme charters reproduced by the “Projet CBMA” (although there is some suspicion that this copy does not reproduce the whole book)[463].  An alternative possibility is that the boy Avalon was in fact the same person as Avalon [II], father of Daimbert [I], and that Avalon the father named in the early 1100s was Avalon [II]’s father.]  

b)         DAIMBERT [I] de Seignelay ([1110/15?]-after 1155).  His birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date of his son Avalon [III], see below.  “Aswalo de Sellenniaco” donated land to Auxerre Saint-Marien, with the support of “uxor mea et Daimbertus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1125/40][464].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny, including land donated by “Gauterii filii Bertranni”, in the presence of “...Daimberto Silliniacensi...”, by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], witnessed by “Daimbertus, Bochardus, Stephanus...[465]Seigneur de Seignelay.  “Salo de Boolli” [Bouilly] confirmed the exchange made with Pontigny before he left for Jerusalem, of his rights “in territorio toto Creciaci et Dochei...” with Pontigny in return for the monastery’s property in “Silliniaco et Ruvreio”, with the support of “...Daimbertus de Silliniaco, de cujus casamento tenui ista que monachis commuto” and of “fratres Daimberti, Burchardus et Stephanus”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1143/24 Mar 1144][466].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Milo Collum gelatum” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “Daimbertus de Selliniaco et Alpazia uxor eius et Salo et Amelina uxor eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1147/24 Mar 1148][467].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Daimbertus de Silliniaco et uxor eius Alpacia”, with the support of “Bochardo et Stephano fratribus ejusdem Daimberti”, had donated property “in territorio de Creciaci et quicquid Milo Collum gelatum tenebat in territorio Creciaci” to Pontigny by charter dated to [14 Jun 1147/10 Apr 1148][468].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” and Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Gaubertus de Sellenniaco et Johannes frater eius, et Milo, filius Jheremiæ de Joviniaco” donated “territorium de Beischia”, held from “Burchardo filio Auvalonis” and with his consent and that of “Aanordis uxor eius”, to Dilo by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by “Dambertus de Sellenniaco...[469].  “Daimbertus...dominus Selleniaci...de cujus feodo erant molendina...Alpazide uxore illius, ac Auvalone, filio eius, et Burchardo, fratre suo...” (witnessed by “Burchardus de Sellenniaco...”), by charter dated 1151[470].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Galterus Jeremias” donated land “in territorio Villepei...” to Dilo, recording certain payments to him and “Guiardo, fratri ejus”, by charter dated 1155, witnessed by “...Daimbertus de Sellenniaco, Bulchardus frater ejus...[471]m (before [1140/45?]) ALPAZIA, daughter of --- (-after 1151).  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Milo Collum gelatum” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “Daimbertus de Selliniaco et Alpazia uxor eius et Salo et Amelina uxor eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1147/24 Mar 1148][472].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Daimbertus de Silliniaco et uxor eius Alpacia” had donated property “in territorio de Creciaci et quicquid Milo Collum gelatum tenebat in territorio Creciaci” to Pontigny by charter dated to [14 Jun 1147/10 Apr 1148][473].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” and “Daimbertus...dominus Selleniaci...de cujus feodo erant molendina...Alpazide uxore illius, ac Auvalone, filio eius, et Burchardo, fratre suo...” (witnessed by “Burchardus de Sellenniaco...”), by charter dated 1151[474].  Daimbert [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          AVALON [III] de Seignelay ([1140/45?]-[1190/99]).  His birth date is estimated based on the likely birth date of his wife.  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” and “Daimbertus...dominus Selleniaci...de cujus feodo erant molendina...Alpazide uxore illius, ac Auvalone, filio eius, et Burchardo, fratre suo...” (witnessed by “Burchardus de Sellenniaco...”), by charter dated 1151[475]Seigneur de Seignelay

-         see below

ii)         AGNES de Seignelay (-after 1189).  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Augalo de Silliniaco” confirmed all the possessions of Pontigny, with the consent of “Eludia uxor eius et Agnes soror eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1167/24 Mar 1168][476].  “Gaufridus dominus Sancti-Verani” donated harvest “de Basernia” to Crisenon, with the support of “uxor mea Agnes de Siliniaco et Hugo frater meus”, by charter dated 1189[477]m GEOFFROY Seigneur de Saint-Verain, son of GIBAUD [II] Seigneur de Saint-Verain & his wife Sara de Toucy[478] (-after 1189). 

Avalon [II] & his [first] wife had two further sons (The suggestion that their mother was Avalon’s first wife appears supported by the younger child Etienne naming one of his sons Daimbert, and also by both children being named with Daimbert [I] in the [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140] charter cited below, when they would have been young if born from their father’s second marriage dated to [1128/31] (although this date is not definite as explained above).  The question is potentially complicated by the [1189] charter in which Avalon’s grandson Etienne (“Stephanus filius Stephani de Petra pertusa”, son of the younger of these two further children, Etienne, who adopted the name Pierre-Perthuis as explained below) named “domini Clarembaudi, cognati mei[479], referring to Clarembaud Seigneur de Noyers who was the grandson of Avalon’s second wife by her first husband, although the term “cognatus” could presumably include a family connection who was not a blood relative): 

c)         BOUCHARD de Seignelay (-after 1175).  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny, including land donated by “Gauterii filii Bertranni”, in the presence of “...Daimberto Silliniacensi...”, by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], witnessed by “Daimbertus, Bochardus, Stephanus...[480].  “Salo de Boolli” [Bouilly] confirmed the exchange made with Pontigny before he left for Jerusalem, of his rights “in territorio toto Creciaci et Dochei...” with Pontigny in return for the monastery’s property in “Silliniaco et Ruvreio”, with the support of “...Daimbertus de Silliniaco, de cujus casamento tenui ista que monachis commuto” and of “fratres Daimberti, Burchardus et Stephanus”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1143/24 Mar 1144][481].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Daimbertus de Silliniaco et uxor eius Alpacia”, with the support of “Bochardo et Stephano fratribus ejusdem Daimberti”, had donated property “in territorio de Creciaci et quicquid Milo Collum gelatum tenebat in territorio Creciaci” to Pontigny by charter dated to [14 Jun 1147/10 Apr 1148][482].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Gaubertus de Sellenniaco et Johannes frater eius, et Milo, filius Jheremiæ de Joviniaco” donated “territorium de Beischia”, held from “Burchardo filio Auvalonis” and with his consent and that of “Aanordis uxor eius”, to Dilo by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by “Dambertus de Sellenniaco...[483].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” and “Daimbertus...dominus Selleniaci...de cujus feodo erant molendina...Alpazide uxore illius, ac Auvalone, filio eius, et Burchardo, fratre suo...” (witnessed by “Burchardus de Sellenniaco...”), by charter dated 1151[484].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Galterus Jeremias” donated land “in territorio Villepei...” to Dilo, recording certain payments to him and “Guiardo, fratri ejus”, by charter dated 1155, witnessed by “...Daimbertus de Sellenniaco, Bulchardus frater ejus...[485].  “...Bochardus de Selloeniaco, frater abbatisse, Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa, frater eius...” witnessed the 1161 charter which records the settlement of disputes between Auxerre Saint-Julien and “comes Joviniacensis, Rainardus[486].  A charter dated 1175 records the settlement of disputes between “dominum Bocardum de Seliniaco” and Auxerre Saint-Germain concerning “justicia...de terra Gurgiaci[487]m firstly (before [1150]) AENOR, daughter of ---.  Hugues Archbishop of Sens attested that “Gaubertus de Sellenniaco et Johannes frater eius, et Milo, filius Jheremiæ de Joviniaco” donated “territorium de Beischia”, held from “Burchardo filio Auvalonis” and with his consent and that of “Aanordis uxor eius”, to Dilo by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by “Dambertus de Sellenniaco...[488].  The estimated date of this charter is inconsistent with the chronology of the family of Bouchard’s known wife Aénor de Montbard.  If that is correct, “Aanordis” must have been an earlier wife.  Bouchard does not raise the possibility of this earlier marriage, but she does not discuss the potential chronological problem raised by the chronology of the Montbard family[489]m secondly AENOR de Montbard, daughter of ANDRE [I] Seigneur de Montbard & his wife Helvide de Montréal.  The life of [her son] Guillaume Bishop of Auxerre records “Guillermus de territorio Autissiodorensi, castro Silligniaco, patre Buchardo fratre Deimberti, domino ejusdem castri...matre Aanor, filia...Andree, domini de Monte-Barri...de genere...sanctissimi Bernardi, Clarevallensis abbatis[490].  Bouchard & his second wife had [five or more] children: 

i)          MANASSES de Seignelay (-28 Sep 1221, bur Orléans Sainte-Croix).  The life of Guillaume Bishop of Auxerre 1207/1220 records “frater unicus de multis in primevo etatis sue flore defunctis, Manasse...archidiaconus Senonensis et Autissiodorensis, postmodum in episcopum Aurelianensem assumptus...natu major erat”, noting that “uno ventre prodierant[491].  Archdeacon of Sens and Auxerre.  Bishop of Orléans: Gallia Christiana records his appointment 1207[492].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1210 that “Aurelianensis Manasses et Autissiodorensis Guilelmus frater eius” refused to support Philippe II King of France in his mission to recapture “munitionem Warplic” from the English for “Iudellus de Maduana”, and that the king confiscated their property (the Pope refusing to intervene on their behalf in “consuetudines regni”) which was returned to them two years later[493]Gallia Christiana records his death in 1221, recorded 28 Sep in the necrology of Orléans, and his burial in Orléans Sainte-Croix[494]

ii)         GUILLAUME de Seignelay (-23 Nov 1223).  The life of Guillaume Bishop of Auxerre 1207/1220 records “Guillermus de territorio Autissiodorensi, castro Silligniaco, patre Buchardo fratre Deimberti, domino ejusdem castri...matre Aanor, filia...Andree, domini de Monte-Barri...de genere...sanctissimi Bernardi, Clarevallensis abbatis” and his appointments as “in ecclesia cathedrali Senonensi thesaurarium et archidiaconatum Pruviniensem, in Autissiodorensi...decanatum[495]Bishop of Auxerre: Gallia Christiana records his appointment “V Id Feb” 1207[496].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1210 that “Aurelianensis Manasses et Autissiodorensis Guilelmus frater eius” refused to support Philippe II King of France in his mission to recapture “munitionem Warplic” from the English for “Iudellus de Maduana”, and that the king confiscated their property (the Pope refusing to intervene on their behalf in “consuetudines regni”) which was returned to them two years later[497]Bishop of Paris: Gallia Christiana records his appointment “IV Kal Mar” 1219 (O.S.)[498].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the appointment in 1220 “Guillelmus episcopus Autisiodorensis frater episcopi Manasse Aurelianensis...de licentia et concessione domni pape” as bishop of Paris[499].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1223 that, after the death of “episcopo Guilelmo”, “Bartholomeus Carnotensis decanus” was made bishop of Paris[500].  The necrology of Sens Cathedral records the death “IX Kal Dec” of “Guillelmus, Autissiodorensis episcopus et postea Parisiensis [1223][501].  [A necrology of Auxerre Cathedral records the death 12 Aug of “Andreas, archidiaconus Autissiodorensis, Guillelmi de Seligniaco, episcopi, consanguineus, juvenis bonæ memoriæ et bonæ indolis puer [1226][502].  The precise family relationship between Guillaume and Archdeacon André has not been ascertained.  Bouchard suggests that he could have been the son of Guillaume’s sister Agnès[503].] 

iii)        [two or more] sons (-young).  Their existence is confirmed by the life of their brother Guillaume Bishop of Auxerre, which names “frater unicus de multis in primevo etatis sue flore defunctis, Manasse...[504]

iv)       AGNES de Seignelay (-1202 or before).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the following documents: “Hugo dominus de Crus” ratified the donation made by “Agnes mea...mater, moriens” to Auxerre Saint-Marien by charter dated 1202, while Manassès archdeacon of Sens confirmed that “sa sœur Agnès, dame de Crux” bequeathed the same property, also in 1202[505]m --- Seigneur de Crux, son of --- (-before 1202). 

d)         ETIENNE de Seignelay (-[1185/89]).  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny, including land donated by “Gauterii filii Bertranni”, in the presence of “...Daimberto Silliniacensi...”, by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], witnessed by “Daimbertus, Bochardus, Stephanus...[506].  “Salo de Boolli” [Bouilly] confirmed the exchange made with Pontigny before he left for Jerusalem, of his rights “in territorio toto Creciaci et Dochei...” with Pontigny in return for the monastery’s property in “Silliniaco et Ruvreio”, with the support of “...Daimbertus de Silliniaco, de cujus casamento tenui ista que monachis commuto” and of “fratres Daimberti, Burchardus et Stephanus”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1143/24 Mar 1144][507].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Daimbertus de Silliniaco et uxor eius Alpacia”, with the support of “Bochardo et Stephano fratribus ejusdem Daimberti”, had donated property “in territorio de Creciaci et quicquid Milo Collum gelatum tenebat in territorio Creciaci” to Pontigny by charter dated to [14 Jun 1147/10 Apr 1148][508].  “Ex parte comitis Garnerius de Triagnello senescallus, Stphs de Petra pertussio...” witnessed the charter dated to [1160] under which Guillaume Comte de Nevers donated vines to Nevers Saint-Cyr[509].  “...Bochardus de Selloeniaco, frater abbatisse, Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa, frater eius...” witnessed the 1161 charter which records the settlement of disputes between Auxerre Saint-Julien and “comes Joviniacensis, Rainardus[510].  “Ex parte comitis Narjodus de Tociaco, Stephanus de Petrapertusa...” witnessed the 1173 charter under which Guy Comte de Nevers the bishop of Nevers to fortify Prémery[511].  “Stephano de Perrepertuis...” witnessed the charter dated [8 Apr 1173/23 Mar 1174] under which Henri Comte de Troyes notified the donation made to Pontigny by “Milo de Erviaco...[512].  Guillaume Archbishop of Sens attested that Guy Comte de Nevers had donated property to Pontigny by charter dated [25 Mar 1175/24 Mar 1176], in the presence of “...Stephano de Petra pertusa...[513].  Guy Archbishop of Sens notified that “dominus Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa” had donated annual revenue “in paagio de Basso” to Auxerre Saint-Marien, for the anniversaries of himself and “filii sui Guidonis”, and donated “prata...supra pontem Bellimontis”, with the support of “filii eius Daimbertus archidiaconus Autissiodorensis; Stephanus miles” and “cum uxore sua predictus Agalo, de cujus ista sunt casamento”, by charter dated 1185[514]m (before [1160]) --- [de Pierre-Pertuis], daughter of ---.  Her husband is named “seigneur de Pierre-Pertuis” from [1160] (see above).  Bouchard assumes that he married the heiress of Pierre-Pertuis[515], which seems a reasonable assumption.  If she is correct, Etienne’s wife was probably related to “dni [=domini] Hervei de Petra Pertusa miles” who approved a donation to the Templars dated Jun 1262[516].  The primary source which confirms her family origin has not been identified.  Etienne & his wife had three children:  . 

i)          ETIENNE de Pierre-Pertuis [de Brive] (-after 1190).  Guy Archbishop of Sens notified that “dominus Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa” had donated annual revenue “in paagio de Basso” to Auxerre Saint-Marien, for the anniversaries of himself and “filii sui Guidonis”, and donated “prata...supra pontem Bellimontis”, with the support of “filii eius Daimbertus archidiaconus Autissiodorensis; Stephanus miles”, by charter dated 1185[517].  “Stephanus filius Stephani de Petra pertusa” confirmed his donation to Pontigny made in 1189 on leaving for Jerusalem for the soul of “patris mei” and donated “coustumas meas de Basso”, dated “in feriis Pentecosten, cum conscientia domini Clarembaudi, cognati mei” [no year][518].  “Awalo de Sellenniaco”, with the support of “Adelina uxor mea...liberique mei Daimbertus et Ferricus”, confirmed that “Stephanus de Briva, cognatus meus, Jherusalem profecturus” donated “molendinum...apud Basso...” to Saint-Marien by charter dated 1190[519]

ii)         GUY de Pierre-Pertuis (-[before 1185]).  Guy Archbishop of Sens notified that “dominus Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa” had donated annual revenue “in paagio de Basso” to Saint-Marien abbey, for the anniversaries of himself and “filii sui Guidonis”, and donated “prata...supra pontem Bellimontis”, with the support of “filii eius Daimbertus archidiaconus Autissiodorensis; Stephanus miles”, by charter dated 1185[520].  The wording of this donation suggests that Guy was deceased at the time. 

iii)        DAIMBERT de Pierre-Pertuis (-18 May, after 1185).  Treasurer and archdeacon of Auxerre: Guy Archbishop of Sens notified that “dominus Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa” had donated annual revenue “in paagio de Basso” to Auxerre Saint-Marien, for the anniversaries of himself and “filii sui Guidonis”, and donated “prata...supra pontem Bellimontis”, with the support of “filii eius Daimbertus archidiaconus Autissiodorensis; Stephanus miles”, by charter dated 1185[521].  A necrology of Auxerre Cathedral records the death 18 May of “Daimbertus sacrista Nivernensis et archidiaconus Autissiodorensis”, for whom “Hugonis de Nuceriis, Autissiodorensis episcopi, cognatus” donated[522]

Avalon [II] & his [first/second] wife had one daughter (no indication has been found to suggest whether she was born from her father’s first or second marriage):

e)         AGNES de Seignelay .  Abbess of Auxerre Saint-Julien.  “...Bochardus de Selloeniaco, frater abbatisse, Stephanus de Petra-Pertusa, frater eius...” witnessed the 1161 charter which records the settlement of disputes between Auxerre Saint-Julien and “comes Joviniacensis, Rainardus[523].  The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified. 

Avalon [II] & his second wife had one son.  The identification of both Archbishop Guy’s father and mother has been controversial.  Bouchard assumes, correctly it seems, that Guy was the son of Avalon [II] de Seignelay[524].  The 1144, [31 Mar 1146/24 Mar 1147], and [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165] charters cited below, dated before his archiepiscopal appointment, identify Guy as a Seignelay.  Nevertheless, numerous secondary sources have for centuries shown him as a member of the Noyers family.  For example, Duchesne records “Guy de Noyers premierement archidiacre en l’église de Sens, et prevost en celle d’Auxerre, puis esleu archevesque de Sens 1177” as third son of Milon [IX] Seigneur de Noyers (died 1291) and his wife Marie de Châtillon-sur-Marne[525], which is clearly anachronistic.  Petit, supposedly correcting this chronological anomaly, names Guy as the son of Milon [III] Seigneur de Noyers[526].  Guy’s supposed connection with the Noyers family can probably be traced to the life of Hugues de Noyers Bishop of Auxerre which, as noted below, names “Senonensis archiepiscopus Guido, avunculus episcopi”, the term “avunculus” (strictly maternal uncle) being later confused with “patruus” (paternal uncle) (see his necrology entry below) and being misinterpreted as indicating that he was a Noyers.  The identity of Guy’s mother is confirmed by his being named “avunculus” of Hugues de Noyers Bishop of Auxerre as noted above: if Guy had been born from his father’s first marriage, he would not have been the bishop’s “avunculus” unless the term was used in an extended sense to include non-blood relatives (which would be unusual):

f)          GUY de Seignelay ([1128/32?]-22 Dec 1193, bur Sens Cathedral).  Archbishop Guy has been studied most recently by Jenni Chandler to whom I am grateful for sharing the results of her research[527].  The life of Guillaume [de Seignelay] Bishop of Auxerre [see above] records “Guillermus de territorio Autissiodorensi, castro Silligniaco, patre Buchardo fratre Deimberti, domino ejusdem castri...” and “pater...frater eius Guido, archiepiscopus Senonensis” and “avunculus [an example of the term being used in the sense of “patruus”] ejus archiepiscopus[528].  If his mother has been correctly identified, Guy’s birth would be estimated to [1128/32] (if his father’s second marriage is correctly dated as shown above), in which case he would have been only 12/15 years old when (as a Seignelay) he was first named as a monk at Pontigny: “...Guido de Siliniaco...monachi Pontiniacenses...” witnessed the 1144 charter under which Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notifies the confirmation of donations to Pontigny[529].  “Galterius Calvus, Guido de Siliniaco, Galterius Buxsacré, monachi Pontiniacenses...” witnessed the charter dated [31 Mar 1146/24 Mar 1147] under which “Holdigerius de Autisiodoro…” donated property to Pontigny[530].  Archdeacon of Sens: “...Guido de Saliniaco archidiaconus Senonensis...” witnessed the charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165] under which Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged[531]Archbishop of Sens: Gallia Christiana records his appointment in 1177[532].  “Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” [son of Daimbert [I], see above] had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][533].  The life of Hugues de Noyers Bishop of Auxerre records that “Senonensis archiepiscopus Guido, avunculus [meaning father’s uterine half-brother] episcopi” commuted a punishment inflicted on peasants by Bishop Hugues[534]Gallia Christiana records his death “XII Kal Jan” 1193 and his burial “in majori ecclesia[535].  Canon Potel’s necrology of Auxerre Cathedral, compiled in 1761 but based on earlier documents[536], records the death 22 Dec of “Guillelmus (vel Guido] de Nuceriis, ultimus Autissiodorensis ecclesiæ præpositus, deinde Senonensis archiepiscopus [1194], Hugonis, Autissiodorensis episcopi, patruus...[537], the term “patruus” (strictly paternal uncle) further confusing the question of Archbishop Guy’s connection with the Noyers family. 

 

 

The connection between the following four family groups and the main Seignelay family, if any, has not been confirmed.  It is possible either that they were unrelated or descended from junior branches of the family. 

 

1.         BERTRAND de Seignelay (-[31 Aug 1126/1139]).  “Bertrannus de Silliniaco” donated “censum...apud Sanctam Porcariam” to Pontigny, with the support of “uxor mea Ilduisis cognomento Damaruns, et filius meus Gauterius et filia mea Ilduisis cognomento Lorria”, by charter dated 31 Aug 1126, witnessed by “Awalo de Silliniaco dominus meus, Gauterius nepos meus...[538]m ILDUISE dite Damaruns, daughter of ---.  “Bertrannus de Silliniaco” donated “censum...apud Sanctam Porcariam” to Pontigny, with the support of “uxor mea Ilduisis cognomento Damaruns, et filius meus Gauterius et filia mea Ilduisis cognomento Lorria”, by charter dated 31 Aug 1126[539].  Bertrand & his wife had children: 

a)         GAUTHIER .  “Bertrannus de Silliniaco” donated “censum...apud Sanctam Porcariam” to Pontigny, with the support of “uxor mea Ilduisis cognomento Damaruns, et filius meus Gauterius et filia mea Ilduisis cognomento Lorria”, by charter dated 31 Aug 1126[540].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny, including land donated by “Gauterii filii Bertranni”, by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140][541]

b)         ILDUISE dite Lorria .  “Bertrannus de Silliniaco” donated “censum...apud Sanctam Porcariam” to Pontigny, with the support of “uxor mea Ilduisis cognomento Damaruns, et filius meus Gauterius et filia mea Ilduisis cognomento Lorria”, by charter dated 31 Aug 1126[542]

 

 

1.         GARMOND de Bouilly .  He is named as father of Salon in the [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140] charter cited below, the wording of which suggests that he may have been living at the time or recently deceased.  m ---.  The name of Garmond’s wife is not known.  Garmond & his wife had one child: 

a)         SALON de Seignelay [de Bouilly] (-after [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165]).  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], supported by “Salo...et Amelina uxor mea...[543].  “Salo de Boolli” [Bouilly] confirmed the exchange made with Pontigny before he left for Jerusalem, of his rights “in territorio toto Creciaci et Dochei...” in return for the monastery’s property in “Silliniaco et Ruvreio”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1143/24 Mar 1144][544].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Milo Collum gelatum” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “Daimbertus de Selliniaco et Alpazia uxor eius et Salo et Amelina uxor eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1147/24 Mar 1148][545].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” and “Daimbertus...dominus Selleniaci...de cujus feodo erant molendina...Alpazide uxore illius, ac Auvalone, filio eius, et Burchardo, fratre suo...” (witnessed by “Burchardus de Sellenniaco...”), by charter dated 1151[546]. Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165], witnessed by “...Guido de Saliniaco archidiaconus Senonensis...[547]m AMELINE, daughter of --- (-after [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165]).  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre notified an exchange between “Salo [...de Silliniaco] filius Garmundi de Bodoliaco” and Pontigny by charter dated to [23 Apr 1139/6 Apr 1140], supported by “Salo...et Amelina uxor mea...[548].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Milo Collum gelatum” had donated property to Pontigny, with the consent of “...Salo et Amelina uxor eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1147/24 Mar 1148][549].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” by charter dated 1151[550]. Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165][551].  Salon & his wife had five children: 

i)          MILON .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165][552]

ii)         GUILLAUME .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165][553]

iii)        GILDUIN .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165][554]

iv)       ERMENGARDE .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165][555]

v)        ALPAZIA .  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Salo de Boliaco et uxor eius Aimelina et filii eius Milo et Guillelmus et Gilduinus et Ermengardis et Alpazia filiæ eius” confirmed rights of Pontigny in property exchanged [see earlier charters] by charter dated to [25 Mar 1164/24 Mar 1165][556]

 

 

1.         GUIRY (-before [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167]?).  He is named as father of Seguin in the [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167] charter cited below, the wording of which suggests that he was recently deceased.  m LUCA, daughter of ---.  Alain Bishop of Auxerre notified that “Seguinus de Sellemniaco, filius Guirrici, et Salo, frater eius, Luca, mater eius, Sibillla, soror eius” had donated their property “in territorio et finagio de Sancta Porcaria...de tenemento patris eorum” to Pontigny by charter dated to [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167][557].  Guiry & his wife had three children: 

a)         SEGUIN de Seignelay (-after [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167]).  Alain Bishop of Auxerre notified that “Seguinus de Sellemniaco, filius Guirrici, et Salo, frater eius, Luca, mater eius, Sibillla, soror eius” had donated their property “in territorio et finagio de Sancta Porcaria...de tenemento patris eorum” to Pontigny by charter dated to [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167], witnessed by “Augalo dominus de Sellemniaco...[558]

b)         SALON .  Alain Bishop of Auxerre notified that “Seguinus de Sellemniaco, filius Guirrici, et Salo, frater eius, Luca, mater eius, Sibillla, soror eius” had donated their property “in territorio et finagio de Sancta Porcaria...de tenemento patris eorum” to Pontigny by charter dated to [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167][559]

c)         SIBYLLE .  Alain Bishop of Auxerre notified that “Seguinus de Sellemniaco, filius Guirrici, et Salo, frater eius, Luca, mater eius, Sibillla, soror eius” had donated their property “in territorio et finagio de Sancta Porcaria...de tenemento patris eorum” to Pontigny by charter dated to [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167][560]

 

 

1.         SIMON de Seignelay (-after 1168).  “...Symon de Siliniaco...” witnessed the charter dated 1167 (O.S.) under which Guillaume Comte de Nevers exchanged property with Pontigny[561]

 

 

AVALON [III] de Seignelay, son of DAIMBERT [I] Seigneur de Seignelay & his wife Alpazia --- ([1140/45?]-[1190/99]).  His birth date is estimated based on the likely birth date of his wife.  Hugues Archbishop of Sens records that “Salo de Boolliaco” agreed to change arrangements relating to his earlier donation of rights “in molendino et in piscatione de Fricambaut” to Dilo Notre-Dame, with the support of “Emmelina uxore Salonis” and “Daimbertus...dominus Selleniaci...de cujus feodo erant molendina...Alpazide uxore illius, ac Auvalone, filio eius, et Burchardo, fratre suo...” (witnessed by “Burchardus de Sellenniaco...”), by charter dated 1151[562].  The following document suggests that Avalo [III] was of age at the time, so therefore could have been born [1140/45].  Seigneur de Seignelay.  “Augalo dominus de Sellemniaco...” witnessed the charter dated to [24 Apr 1166/8 Apr 1167] under which Alain Bishop of Auxerre notified that “Seguinus de Sellemniaco, filius Guirrici, et Salo, frater eius, Luca, mater eius, Sibillla, soror eius” had donated their property “in territorio et finagio de Sancta Porcaria...de tenemento patris eorum” to Pontigny[563].  Hugues Archbishop of Sens notified that “Augalo de Silliniaco” confirmed all the possessions of Pontigny, with the consent of “Eludia uxor eius et Agnes soror eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1167/24 Mar 1168][564].  “Augalo dominus de Sellegniaco” swore homage to the abbot of Sens Saint-Remy, and agreed to certain obligations before 1185 “ad Caniacum” [Cheny], by undated charter[565].  “Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][566].  “Agalo dominus Siliniaci”, with the consent of “uxor mea Adelina et filii mei Daimbertus et Fredericus”, consented to the donation made to Pontigny by “Daimbertus de Briennone...uxor...eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190][567].  “Awalo de Sellenniaco”, with the support of “Adelina uxor mea...liberique mei Daimbertus et Ferricus”, confirmed that “Stephanus de Briva, cognatus meus, Jherusalem profecturus” donated “molendinum...apud Basso...” to Saint-Marien by charter dated 1190[568].  Avalon presumably died before 1199, the date of the charter cited below in which his son Daimbert [II] is named as seigneur de Seignelay. 

m ADELINE de Courtenay, daughter of RENAUD Seigneur de Courtenay & his first wife Helvis de Donjon ([1142/48?]-after 1190).  The Continuator of Aimon of Fleury names “Willermum, Ioscelinum et Rainaldum” as the children of “Milonem de Cortinaco” and his wife “sorore comitis Nivernensis”, adding that “Rainaudus” was father of “uxorem Petri fratris domini regis et uxorem Avalonis de Seleniaco[569].  “Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][570].  “Agalo dominus Siliniaci”, with the consent of “uxor mea Adelina et filii mei Daimbertus et Fredericus”, consented to the donation made to Pontigny by “Daimbertus de Briennone...uxor...eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190][571].  “Awalo de Sellenniaco”, with the support of “Adelina uxor mea...liberique mei Daimbertus et Ferricus”, confirmed that “Stephanus de Briva, cognatus meus, Jherusalem profecturus” donated “molendinum...apud Basso...” to Saint-Marien by charter dated 1190[572]

Avalon [III] & his wife had four children: 

1.         DAIMBERT [II] de Seignelay (-after 1202).  “Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][573].  “Agalo dominus Siliniaci”, with the consent of “uxor mea Adelina et filii mei Daimbertus et Fredericus”, consented to the donation made to Pontigny by “Daimbertus de Briennone...uxor...eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190][574].  “Awalo de Sellenniaco”, with the support of “Adelina uxor mea...liberique mei Daimbertus et Ferricus”, confirmed that “Stephanus de Briva, cognatus meus, Jherusalem profecturus” donated “molendinum...apud Basso...” to Saint-Marien by charter dated 1190[575]Seigneur de Seignelay.  “Daimbertus dominus Siligniaci” confirmed that “Iterius miles de Siligniaco” sold “illi de aqua Sanain” to Pontigny by charter dated 1199[576].  “Daimbertus dominus Silliniaci...et uxori meæ Margaretæ” donated “clausum vineæ meæ de Monte-Sancti-Sulpicii” to Pontigny, with the support of “Stephano filio meo”, by charter dated 1202[577]m MARGUERITE, daughter of --- (-before [25 Mar 1224/24 Mar 1225]).  “Daimbertus dominus Silliniaci...et uxori meæ Margaretæ” donated “clausum vineæ meæ de Monte-Sancti-Sulpicii” to Pontigny, with the support of “Stephano filio meo”, by charter dated 1202[578].  “Margareta domina Sailliniaci et Stephanus filius eius” donated harvest “in molendinis de Bellomonte...” to the chaplain of the castle of Seignelay by charter dated to [1220][579].  She is named in her son’s [25 Mar 1224/24 Mar 1225] charter cited below, the wording of which suggests that she was deceased at the time.  [Faget de Casteljau says that she was Marguerite de Mont-Saint-Jean who married secondly “Daimbert de Seignelay” but he cites no source which confirms that this is correct[580].  If he is correct, she was Marguerite de Mont-Saint-Jean, widow of Guy [III] Seigneur de Tilchâtel, daughter of Hugues Seigneur de Mont-Saint-Jean & his wife Elisabeth de Vergy (-after 1224).]  Daimbert [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         ETIENNE [I] de Seignelay (-[Mar 1246/Apr 1248]).  Daimbertus dominus Silliniaci...et uxori meæ Margaretæ” donated “clausum vineæ meæ de Monte-Sancti-Sulpicii” to Pontigny, with the support of “Stephano filio meo”, by charter dated 1202[581]Seigneur de Seignelay.  “Margareta domina Sailliniaci et Stephanus filius eius” donated harvest “in molendinis de Bellomonte...” to the chaplain of the castle of Seignelay by charter dated to [1220][582].  “Stephanus dominus de Selleigniaco” confirmed the donation bequeathed to Pontigny by “mater mea Margareta”, with the consent of “Johannes frater meus et Agnes uxor mea”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1224/24 Mar 1225][583].  “Etienne seigneur de Seignelay” settled a dispute between “Jean mon frère” and Auxerre Saint-Germain “Stephano filio meo”, by charter dated 1228[584].  “Stephanus dominus Sellenniaci et...Agnes uxor eius” sold harvest “in grangia...ecclesiæ de Heriaco” to Auxerre Saint-Germain by charter dated Jul 1238[585].  Etienne was presumably alive in Mar 1246, when his son was “dominus Mellegniaci”, but died before Apr 1248 when his son was seigneur de Seignelay.  m AGNES, daughter of --- (-after Jul 1238).  “Stephanus dominus de Selleigniaco” confirmed the donation bequeathed to Pontigny by “mater mea Margareta”, with the consent of “Johannes frater meus et Agnes uxor mea”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1224/24 Mar 1225][586].  “Stephanus dominus Sellenniaci et...Agnes uxor eius” sold harvest “in grangia...ecclesiæ de Heriaco” to Auxerre Saint-Germain by charter dated Jul 1238[587].  Etienne [I] & his wife had one child: 

i)          JEAN [I] de Seignelay (-[Jul 1285/Sep 1294], bur Monastère des Isles).  Seigneur de Maligny, de iure uxoris.  “Johannes de Sellegniaco dominus Mellegniaci et Margarita uxor eius” donated annual revenue to Pontigny, for so long as “dicta Marguarita vixerit” and “Guidonem et Mariam liberos dicte Margarite in advoeriam suam tenuerit”, for the anniversary of “defuncti Galcheri de Mellegniaco quondam viri dicte Margarite”, by charter dated Mar 1246[588]Seigneur de Seignelay

-         see below

b)         JEAN de Seignelay (-after 1228).  “Stephanus dominus de Selleigniaco” confirmed the donation bequeathed to Pontigny by “mater mea Margareta”, with the consent of “Johannes frater meus et Agnes uxor mea”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1224/24 Mar 1225][589].  “Etienne seigneur de Seignelay” settled a dispute between “Jean mon frère” and Auxerre Saint-Germain “Stephano filio meo”, by charter dated 1228[590]

2.         RAINARD de Seignelay (-[17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189]/[25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190]).  Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][591]

3.         FERRY de Seignelay (-[after 25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190]).  Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][592].  “Agalo dominus Siliniaci”, with the consent of “uxor mea Adelina et filii mei Daimbertus et Fredericus”, consented to the donation made to Pontigny by “Daimbertus de Briennone...uxor...eius”, by charter dated to [25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190][593].  “Awalo de Sellenniaco”, with the support of “Adelina uxor mea...liberique mei Daimbertus et Ferricus”, confirmed that “Stephanus de Briva, cognatus meus, Jherusalem profecturus” donated “molendinum...apud Basso...” to Saint-Marien by charter dated 1190[594]

4.         PIERRE de Seignelay (-[17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189]/[25 Mar 1189/24 Mar 1190]).  Guido...Senonensis archiepiscopus” notified that “filius et nepos noster Augalo dominus de Siliniaco” had donated “aquam suam de fluvio Hermançon [Armançon]...a ponte de Neiseles [Natiaux] usque ad aquam nostram” to Pontigny with the consent of “Ha--- uxor ipsius Augalonis et eorum filii Daimbertus, Rainaudus, Ferricus et Petrus”, by charter dated to [17 Apr 1188/24 Mar 1189][595]

 

 

The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) says that Avalo [II] married “la veufue de Miles de Noyers, nommée Agnès, qui lui procréa trois garçons[596]

 

 

JEAN [I] de Seignelay, son of ETIENNE [I] Seigneur de Seignelay & his wife Agnès --- (-[Jul 1285/Sep 1294], bur Monastère des Isles).  Seigneur de Maligny, de iure uxoris.  “Johannes de Sellegniaco dominus Mellegniaci et Margarita uxor eius” donated annual revenue to Pontigny, for so long as “dicta Marguarita vixerit” and “Guidonem et Mariam liberos dicte Margarite in advoeriam suam tenuerit”, for the anniversary of “defuncti Galcheri de Mellegniaco quondam viri dicte Margarite”, by charter dated Mar 1246[597]Seigneur de Seignelay.  “Jean seigneur de Seignelay et Marguerite son épouse” settled a dispute with Auxerre Saint-Germain by charter dated Apr 1248[598].  “Johannes dominus Selliniaci” settled a dispute between Pontigny and “nobiles de Boolliaco...dominum Milonem, dominum Iterium milites, dominum Guidonem presbyterum, fratres, Isabellam relictam Tierrici dicti Chandoiseau militis, et ejus liberos, dominam Margaritam relicti Iterii dicti Bavard militis et eius filiam” by charter dated 1258[599].  “Johannes dominus Sellegniaci...et Margaretam uxorem meam [...domina Melligniaci] et heredes meos” exchanged revenues with Pontigny, including revenue bequeathed by “Daimbertus avus meus quondam dominus Sellegniaci” in Feb 1207 (O.S.), and donated by “defunctus Stephanus pater meus quondam dominus Seilligniaci” in 1233, by charter dated Aug 1261[600].  “Jehanz chevaliers sires de Seleguay” confirmed that “Guillemins de Marcenay escuiers” had donated harvest to Pontigny by charter dated Aug 1275[601].  “Jehanz sires de Seillenay chevaliers” donated revenue “sus le four de Seillenay...de lor rentes de Melleigny” to Pontigny by charter dated 1276[602].  “Jehanz de Sellegnay” confirmed that “madame Gile fame monsegnor Milon de Booli et...Pierre son fil” sold land to Pontigny by charter dated 11 Jun 1278[603].  “Erarz de Brene chevaliers sires de Venisy et ma dame Mahaud sa fame” granted “le fyé...à Montigny, près de Pontigny et de Venousse” to “Jehanz de Seillenay chevaliers et sires de Seillenay” by charter dated Jun 1278[604].  “Jehanz sires de Seillegnay chevaliers et Marguerite dame de Seillenay sa fame” approved a sale of property to Pontigny by “Guiz de Merligny chevaliers...et Agnes sa fame” by charter dated [23/29] Jul 1285[605].  He died before Sep 1294, the date of the charter cited below in which his son is named seigneur de Seignelay.  His place of burial is confirmed by the 1375 vidimus cited below under his sons. 

m (after 1241) as her second husband, MARGUERITE, widow of GAUCHER Seigneur de Maligny, daughter of ---.  The testament of “Galcherus dominus de Merliniaco” is dated 1241[606].  “Jean seigneur de Seignelay et Marguerite son épouse” settled a dispute with Auxerre Saint-Germain by charter dated Apr 1248[607].  Hermelin records “Etienne III baron de Seignelay” as great-grandson of “une autre Marguerite de Saint-Florentin...veuve vers 1241 de Jobert de Maligny dit Gaucher” who married “Jean I de Sign-let” (no source cited)[608].  Henry records her two marriages but not her family origin, while the manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” records neither her family origin nor first marriage[609]

Jean [I] & his wife had six children: 

1.         ETIENNE [II] de Seignelay ([1242/45?]-[Jun 1307/9 Sep 1308]).  Henry records that “L’abbé de Paquy, dans son relevé des titres de la maladrerie de Saint-Florentin” (no citation reference) names “Etienne, Guy et Jean, chevaliers, Geoffroy, qui fut chanoine de Langres, d’Auxerre et d’Orléans, et deux filles, l’une dame de La Broce, et l’autre de Pacy” as the six children of Jean [I][610]His birth date is estimated from the likely marriage date of his parents.  Seigneur de Seignelay.  A vidimus of Philippe de Savoisy Seigneur de Seignelay, dated 1375, records “Etienne, Jean et Geoffroy de Seignelay”, by virtue of the testament of “leur père Jean” who had chosen burial in the monastère des Isles, acknowledged the monastery’s right to revenue from “leurs moulins d’Hauterive[611].  “Jeuffroiz de Seillenay chenoines d’Auceurre” confirmed revenue “sus la chariere de Basso” to Pontigny by charter dated Sep 1294, sealed by “mon frère monseigneur Estienne seigneur de Seillenay[612].  “Bernarz dou Mes” [arbitrator] notified that “Estienne seigneur de Saillenay et de Reborseau...” had agreed rights “ou bois de Contest” with Pontigny by charter dated [12/18] Jun 1307[613].  He died before [9/15] Sep 1308, the date of the charter cited below in which his son was named seigneur de Seignelay.  m ---.  The primary source which confirms the name of Etienne’s wife has not been found.  Etienne [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEAN [II] de Seignelay ([1265/70?]-[1317/23]).  His birth date is estimated from the likely birth date of his father, bearing in mind the likely birth date of Gaucher Seigneur de Seignelay who is named below (one of the possibilities being that Gaucher was the grandson of Jean [II], as discussed below).  Seigneur de Seignelay.  “Jehans sires de Saillenay et de Reborseau chevaliers” approved the agreement between “mon...père monseigneur Estienne homme de bonne mémoire, jadis seigneur de Saillenay et de Reborseau chevalier” and Pontigny relating “ou bois de Contest” by charter dated [9/15] Sep 1308[614].  “Jehans sires de Sellegney chevaliers” and “Prins de Saint-Franchi escuyer” settled their dispute about “la justice de la Cummoigne” by charter dated 31 Mar 1317 (O.S.?)[615].  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) records that Jean [II] died ”entre l’an 1317 et 1323” (no sources cited)[616]m ---.  The primary source which confirms the name of Jean’s wife has not been found. 

i)          [ETIENNE [III] de Seignelay (-before 1337).  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) records “Etienne III passe adveu à Jean de Challon, comte d’Auxerre, 1323” as the successor of Jean [II] but does not record the family relationship between them[617].  As no other document has been found in which he is named, his existence is uncertain.  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” records Etienne’s supposed marriage with “Marguerite vicomtesse de Saint-Florentin”, noting that “estant veufve et sans enfans de lui” she married secondly “Jean de Soigne ou de Saint-Seine...à cause d’elle baron et seigneur en partie de Seign-Let, 1337, mourut 1343”.  However, Marguerite’s mid-Nov 1343 charter quoted below names Jean Seigneur de Seignelay as her husband and Gaucher as their son.]

2.         GUY de Seignelay .  Henry records that “L’abbé de Paquy, dans son relevé des titres de la maladrerie de Saint-Florentin” (no citation reference) names “Etienne, Guy et Jean, chevaliers, Geoffroy, qui fut chanoine de Langres, d’Auxerre et d’Orléans, et deux filles, l’une dame de La Broce, et l’autre de Pacy” as the six children of Jean [I][618]

3.         JEAN de Seignelay .  Henry records that “L’abbé de Paquy, dans son relevé des titres de la maladrerie de Saint-Florentin” (no citation reference) names “Etienne, Guy et Jean, chevaliers, Geoffroy, qui fut chanoine de Langres, d’Auxerre et d’Orléans, et deux filles, l’une dame de La Broce, et l’autre de Pacy” as the six children of Jean [I][619].  A vidimus of Philippe de Savoisy Seigneur de Seignelay, dated 1375, records “Etienne, Jean et Geoffroy de Seignelay”, by virtue of the testament of “leur père Jean” who had chosen burial in the monastère des Isles, acknowledged the monastery’s right to revenue from “leurs moulins d’Hauterive[620]

4.         GEOFFROY de Seignelay (-after Sep 1294).  Canon at Langres.  Henry records that “L’abbé de Paquy, dans son relevé des titres de la maladrerie de Saint-Florentin” (no citation reference) names “Etienne, Guy et Jean, chevaliers, Geoffroy, qui fut chanoine de Langres, d’Auxerre et d’Orléans, et deux filles, l’une dame de La Broce, et l’autre de Pacy” as the six children of Jean [I][621].  A vidimus of Philippe de Savoisy Seigneur de Seignelay, dated 1375, records “Etienne, Jean et Geoffroy de Seignelay”, by virtue of the testament of “leur père Jean” who had chosen burial in the monastère des Isles, acknowledged the monastery’s right to revenue from “leurs moulins d’Hauterive[622].  Canon at Auxerre.  “Jeuffroiz de Seillenay chenoines d’Auceurre” confirmed revenue “sus la chariere de Basso” to Pontigny by charter dated Sep 1294, sealed by “mon frère monseigneur Estienne seigneur de Seillenay[623]

5.         --- de Seignelay .  Henry records that “L’abbé de Paquy, dans son relevé des titres de la maladrerie de Saint-Florentin” (no citation reference) names “Etienne, Guy et Jean, chevaliers, Geoffroy, qui fut chanoine de Langres, d’Auxerre et d’Orléans, et deux filles, l’une dame de La Broce, et l’autre de Pacy” as the six children of Jean [I][624]m --- Seigneur de la Broce, son of ---. 

6.         --- de Seignelay .  Henry records that “L’abbé de Paquy, dans son relevé des titres de la maladrerie de Saint-Florentin” (no citation reference) names “Etienne, Guy et Jean, chevaliers, Geoffroy, qui fut chanoine de Langres, d’Auxerre et d’Orléans, et deux filles, l’une dame de La Broce, et l’autre de Pacy” as the six children of Jean [I][625]m --- de Pacy, son of ---. 

 

 

Two possible siblings.  The primary source which confirms the parentage of Jean [III], who presumably succeeded Jean [II] as seigneur de Seignelay, has not been traced.  The most likely possibilities are that he was the son of Jean [II] (the same person as the, maybe misnamed, shadowy “Etienne [III]”?) or was the grandson of one of Etienne [II]’s brothers.  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” names Gaucher, son of Jean [III], as ”cousin d’Etienne III” (no sources cited)[626], although no corroboration of this statement has been found.  The “Carte des Barons”, referring to Gaucher, notes that “en lui fut éteinte l’ancienne race des barons du nom et des armes de Sign-Let”. 

 

1.         JEAN [III] de Seignelay ([1295?]-before 1343)Seigneur de Seignelay:  he is named as such in the mid-Nov 1343 charter of his widow, cited below.  No document has been found which names Jean [III] in his own capacity.  m ([before 1320?]) [as her first husband,] MARGUERITE de Saint-Florentin, daughter of JEAN Vicomte de Saint-Florentin & his wife --- (-after 1343).  Hermelin records her parentage (no source cited), incorrectly identifying her husband as “Etienne III baron de Seignelay” as noted above[627].  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” also records the supposed marriage of “Etienne III” with “Marguerite vicomtesse de Saint-Florentin”, noting that “estant veufve et sans enfans de lui” Marguerite  married secondly “Jean de Soigne ou de Saint-Seine...à cause d’elle baron et seigneur en partie de Seign-Let, 1337, mourut 1343[628].  If the “Carte des Barons” is correct, Marguerite married secondly Jean de Soigne [de Saint-Seine], but no other document has yet been found which confirms his existence.  Her husband is correctly identified by Duchesne who records “Marguerite de Sainct Florentin veuve de Jean Seigneur de Saillenay” selling “la vicomté de Sainct Florentin” to King Philippe VI by letters dated 1343 which name “Gaucher sire de Saillenay escuyer fils de feu Jean de Saillenay[629].  The document in question is reproduced by Hermelin: “Marguerite de Sainct-Florantin dame de Saillenay, femme jadix de...feu Monseigneur Jehan jadix seigneur de Saillenay” sold “la viconté de Sainct-Florantin” to Philippe VI King of France and his wife Jeanne de Bourgogne, with the consent of “Gauchiers sires de Saillenay escuiers, filz de la dicte dame et doudit feu...Jehan de Saillenay chevalier jadix son mary”, by charter dated mid-Nov 1343[630].  A 1356 charter of the hospital of Saint-Florentin records “la royne Jeanne de Bourgoingne...au temps qu’elle tenait la chastellenie de Saint-Florentin en sa maison de Saillenay, jadis vicomtesse de la ville de Saint-Florentin[631]: Henry comments that “le manque de documents nous a empêché d’éclaircir ce fait important de notre histoire”, but the involvement of Jeanne de Bourgogne [Queen of France, who died 12 Dec 1349] is explained by the mid-Nov 1343 charter cited above.  Jean & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         GAUCHER de Seignelay ([1320?]-[1360]).  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) names Gaucher ”cousin d’Etienne III” (no sources cited)[632].  His correct parentage is confirmed by his mother’s mid-Nov 1343 charter quoted below.  His birth date is estimated from the date of his first marriage, bearing in mind his father’s likely birth date, and on the assumption that he was of age in Nov 1343.  Seigneur de Seignelay.  [His mother] “Marguerite de Sainct-Florantin dame de Saillenay, femme jadix de...feu Monseigneur Jehan jadix seigneur de Saillenay” sold “la viconté de Sainct-Florantin” to Philippe VI King of France and his wife Jeanne de Bourgogne, with the consent of “Gauchiers sires de Saillenay escuiers, filz de la dicte dame et doudit feu...Jehan de Saillenay chevalier jadix son mary”, by charter dated mid-Nov 1343[633].  Jean II King of France, at the request “ex parte Gaucherii domini de Sellegniaco militis, et ejus uxoris...”, granted remission for illegal actions during the English invasion of the Auxerrois by charter dated May 1361[634].  The reference to his wife suggests that Gaucher was deceased at the time.  m firstly (before 6 Feb 1348) ISABELLE de Joinville, daughter of ERARD de Joinville Seigneur de Doulevant & his wife ---.  “Gaucher sire de Seignelay et de Rebourseau” confirmed that “son père Erard de Joinville sire de Doulevant” granted harvest rights “sur le territoire d’Arnoncourt” to the Templars, donated since her marriage “par ledit Erard à sa fille Isabelle de Joinville”, by charter dated 6 Feb 1347 (O.S.?)[635]m secondly MARIE de Lézinnes, daughter of JEAN “Trouillard” Seigneur de Lezinnes & his wife Jeanne de Bourlémont (-1386).  Petit records her parentage, her marriage to “Gaucher de Seignelay, alors veuf d’Isabeau de Joinville, et dernier descendant mâle de cette famille de Seignely, mort en 1360 pendant l’invasion anglaise”, adding that she sued her brother in Mar 1375 (O.S.), settled a dispute with Molesme concerning Lezinnes, left a testament, and died in 1386 “sans laisser de postérité” having survived her husband for 26 years[636].  Marie retained an interest in the seigneurie of Seignelay after her husband died, as shown by Petit’s statement that she sued “Philippe de Savoisy chambellan du roi” between 1377 and 1380 (see below) concerning repairs to Seignelay castle “qu’ils possédaient en commun[637].  How Philippe de Savoisy acquired an interest in Seignelay is discussed below.  “Marie de Lesine dame de Saillenay et du dit Lesignes en partie” donated money, which reverted to her after the death of “Marguerite-la-Prévoste femme feu Jehan Vandraces du dit Lesignes, nostre femme mainmortable”, to Pontigny by charter dated [19/26] Oct 1383[638]

b)         [MARGUERITE de Seignelay ([1320/30?]-before 1373).  Forestier indicated that the inheritance of Seignelay was divided following the death “avant 1373” of “Marguerite jadiz dame de Saillegnay, femme de monseigneur Philibert de Montagu, sire de Saint Pereuse” and shared between her Villebéon cousins who are named below[639].  He cites no sources but, assuming that he is correct, the logical explanation is that Marguerite was the sister of Gaucher Seigneur de Seignelay.  An alternative possibility is that Marguerite was Gaucher’s first cousin.  The chronology of the Seignelay family suggests that Marguerite must have been the second wife of Philibert [I] de Montagu Seigneur de Couches not the first wife of Philibert [II].  If that is correct, her husband was not “sire de Saint Pereuse” as indicated by Forestier, as Sainte-Pérouse entered the Montagu/Couches family on the marriage of Hugues, son of Philibert [I].  m ([1335/45?]) as his second wife, PHILIBERT [I] de Montagu Seigneur de Couches, son of ETIENNE de Montagu Seigneur de Sombernon et de Malain & his wife Marie de Bauffremont Dame de Couches ([1300?]-4 May ----)]. 

2.         [--- de Seignelay .  If Forestier correctly names [her son] Jean de Villebéon as “cousin germain” of Marguerite de Seignelay, his mother was the sister of Jean [III] Seigneur de Seignelay.  The primary source which confirms that this family relationship is correct has not been identified.]  m --- de Villebéon, son of ---.  Three children: 

a)         JEAN de Villebéon (-after 28 Aug 1373). Forestier records, after the death of Marguerite de Seignelay (wife of Philibert de Montagu, see above), three parts of the seigneurie de Seignelay being held by (1) “Jehan de Villebeon, chevalier, cousin germain de la défunte”, who sold his rights in Seignelay [to Philippe de Savoisy] for “3000 livres tournois...”, ratified by “sa femme, madame Guie de Flavigny” by charter dated 28 Aug 1373 [no citation reference]; (2) “Marguerite, sœur de Jehan”, who later died and was succeeded in her share by “son frère [Jean]”; and (3) “Isabeau, sœur du même, épouse de Jehan de Hautefeuille”, who exchanged their rights in Seignelay [with Philippe de Savoisy] “contre cession de la terre d’Ormeau et de Rigny” (no sources cited)[640]m (before 28 Aug 1373) GUYE de Flavigny, daughter of ---.  Forestier records one part of the seigneurie de Seignelay being held by (1) “Jehan de Villebeon, chevalier, cousin germain de la défunte”, who sold his rights in Seignelay [to Philippe de Savoisy] for “3000 livres tournois...”, ratified by “sa femme, madame Guie de Flavigny” by charter dated 28 Aug 1373 ... (no sources cited)[641]

b)         MARGUERITE de Villebéon .  Forestier records, after the death of Marguerite de Seignelay (wife of Philibert de Montagu, see above), three parts of the seigneurie de Seignelay being held by ... (2) “Marguerite, sœur de Jehan”, who later died and was succeeded in her share by “son frère [Jean]” ... (no sources cited)[642]

c)         ISABELLE de Villebéon .  Forestier records, after the death of Marguerite de Seignelay (wife of Philibert de Montagu, see above), three parts of the seigneurie de Seignelay being held by ... (3) “Isabeau, sœur du même, épouse de Jehan de Hautefeuille”, who exchanged their rights in Seignelay [with Philippe de Savoisy] “contre cession de la terre d’Ormeau et de Rigny” (no sources cited)[643]m JEAN de Hautefeuille, son of ---. 

 

 

The primary source which confirms the parentage of the following person has not been traced.

 

1.         JEAN de Seignelay .  Seigneur de Sainte-Péreuse.  m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEANNE [Isabelle] de Seignelay .  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage, noting the marriage “avant 1353” (no sources cited)[644].  The chronology of the Montagu family suggests that she married several years earlier.  Dame de Sainte-Péreuse.  The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) records [her son] ”Philibert de Montagu, chevalier, baron de Sign-Let, par acquisition ou par alliance; avait contestation avec Miles seigneur de Noyers, pour le titre de Bassou, 1369” (no sources cited), Henry noting that “Isabelle [error for Jeanne?] de Saillenay” married “Hugues de Montagu seigneur de Couches[645].  Forestier records that “Isabelle de Seignelay” [referring to “Jeanne”] married “Hugues de Montaigu seigneur de Couches” by whom she had “un fils Alexandre, abbé de Flavigny en 1361”, and that Hugues was deceased in 1375 when a charter was approved by “sa fille et héritière, Philiberte, dame de Cheny et de Beaumont” (no citation reference)[646]m HUGUES de Montagu Seigneur de Couches, son of PHILIBERT de Montagu Seigneur de Couches & his wife --- ([1315/20?]-[before 1375 or after 1381]).  Seigneur de Sainte-Péreuse, de iure uxoris

 

 

The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) does not explain how the Savoisy family acquired the seigneurie de Seignelay[647].  Henri Forestier, in his 1926 thesis, indicated that “Philippe de Savoisy seigneur de Courdaoul” bought the castle and seigneurie de Seignelay 9 Mar 1373 (O.S.?) (no citation reference), at which time it was held by the king who had acquired the county of Auxerre in 1371.  Forestier noted that, even before the sale, “un quart de Seignelay et dépendances” already belonged to Philippe and his wife “à certainne cause” but that the 1373 sale contract (l’acte de vente) provides no further information on this holding[648].  It is not clear to which this “quart” relates, as Forestier also indicates that Philippe de Savoisy had already bought a part interest in Seignelay from Jean de Villebéon (see above) for “3000 livres tournois...” and had acquired the interest held by Jean’s sister Isabelle de Villebón “contre cession de la terre d’Ormeau et de Rigny (no sources cited)[649].  As noted above, Marie de Lézinnes, widow of Gaucher Seigneur de Seignelay held another part interest in Seignelay after her husband died, which at some point she may also have sold to Philippe de Savoisy as she had no direct heirs.  In this way, Philippe de Savoisy may have collected different part interests in Seignelay by stages, eventually owning the totality.  This suggestion does not exclude the possibility that Philippe or his wife was related in some way to the Seignelay seigneurial family and therefore had a personal interest in acquiring the seigneurie.  Forestier noted that, in 1373, the seigneurie de Seignelay comprised “Seignelay, château, ville et châtellenie relevant du roi à cause du comté d’Auxerre, Bassou relevant de Seignelay, Rebourceaux relevant du roi et de Ligny le Châtel à cause du comté de Tonnerre” and other listed properties[650]

 

The following reconstruction of the seigneurs de Seignelay from the Savoisy family is based largely on Père Anselme, whose accuracy is inconsistent and cannot be guaranteed.  Primary sources which confirm the information have not been identified unless otherwise stated below. 

 

PHILIPPE de Savoisy, son of HEMONIN Seigneur de Savoisy & his wife Conegan --- (-25 Jul 1398).  Père Anselme records that he and his brother divided their Burgundian territories 27 Nov 1357, Philippe taking “la Forte-Maison du Fossé, les terres d’Eschevannes et d’Is, avec quelques héritiers à Marcilly[651]Seigneur de Seignelay.  Chambellan du Roi 1380.  Philippe de Savoisy chevalier seigneur de Saillenay” swore allegiance to Auxerre Saint-Germain for the fiefs of Montaigu, Mallevalle and others by charter dated 16 Aug 1397, in the presence of “Pierre de Savoisy évêque de Beauvais, fils du dit seigneur de Saillenay...Jean de Savoisy escuyer fils de messire Eudes de Savoisy chevalier...[652].  “Philippe de Savoisy chevalier seigneur de Saillenay conseiller et chambellan du roi” donated “le paage...de Venousse” to Pontigny by charter dated 28 May 1398[653]

m MARIE de Duisy, daughter of PHILIPPE de Duisy [Maître-d’hôtel du dauphin Duc de Normandie] & his wife ---. 

Philippe & his wife had children: 

1.         CHARLES de Savoisy (-before 2 Dec 1372)m (contract 30 Jan 1370 (O.S.?), ratified 28 Dec 1371) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Châtillon, daughter of JEAN [I] de Châtillon Comte de Porcien & his second wife Jacqueline de Dammartin Dame de Beaumont-le-Bois (-after 15 Jul 1389).  Père Anselme records her parentage and her marriage to Charles de Savoisy, noting the dates of their marriage contract and ratification[654], which must have been her first marriage.  She married secondly Guillaume de Fayel Vicomte de Breteuil.  Letters dated 15 Jul 1389 record a claim by "Guillelmo de Fayello dicto le Besgué milite vicecomite de Bretolio ac cambellano nostro et…Margareta de Castellione domina de Porciano eius uxore” against “Ioanne de Castellione milite fratre dicta Margareta liberis comitis de Porciano…et defuncta Iaqueline de Dompnomartino eisudem comitis uxoris” regarding their father’s succession[655]

2.         PIERRE de Savoisy .  Bishop of Le Mans 1385.  Bishop of Beauvais 1397.  Philippe de Savoisy chevalier seigneur de Saillenay” swore allegiance to Auxerre Saint-Germain for the fiefs of Montaigu, Mallevalle and others by charter dated 16 Aug 1397, in the presence of “Pierre de Savoisy évêque de Beauvais, fils du dit seigneur de Saillenay...Jean de Savoisy escuyer fils de messire Eudes de Savoisy chevalier...[656]

3.         ISABELLE de Savoisy m (contract 21 Jan 1387) JEAN de Melun “le Brun” Seigneur de la Borde, son of ---. 

4.         CHARLES de Savoisy (-[1418/3 Aug 1420])Seigneur de SeignelayGrand Echanson de France 1407.  m (contract 2 Jul 1410) YOLANDE von Rodemachern, daughter of JOHANN Herr von Rodemachern & his wife Mathilde de Grancey (-after 3 Aug 1420).  Charles & his wife had children: 

a)         MARIE de Savoisy m (before 19 Jan 1435 (O.S.?)) CLAUDE de Beauvoir Vicomte d’Avalon, Seigneur de Chastelus et de Mont-Saint-Jean, son of ---. 

b)         PHILIPPE de Savoisy (-before 12 Jan 1488)Seigneur de SeignelayPhilippe de Savoisy Seigneur de Seignelay and Auxerre Saint-Germain settled disputes by charter dated 26 Jun 1458[657]m (24 Mar 1455) MARGUERITE de Lugny, daughter of JACQUES Seigneur de Lugny & his wife Catherine de Dyo (-after 1489).  Philippe & his wife had children: 

i)          CLAUDE de Savoisy (-[10 Jun/31 Dec] 1517).  Seigneur de Seignelaym (Château de Marigny, near Semur 2 Oct 1472) LOUISE de la Baume-Montrevel, daughter of ---. 

ii)         PERRETTE de Savoisy m (contract 3 Mar 1482 (O.S.)) THIBAUT de Cusance Seigneur de Cusance, son of FERRY de Cusance Seigneur de Beauvoir & his wife Louise de la Baume.  

iii)        LOUISE de Savoisy (-after 1517).  She inherited one-third of Seignelay on the death of her brother[658]m JACQUES Malain Baron de Lux, son of --- (-1536). 

iv)       MADELEINE de Savoisy (-after 6 Jun 1553).  She inherited two-thirds of Seignelay, Cheny, Beaumont and Bassou on the death of her brother[659]m (contract 11 Apr 1499) FRANÇOIS de la Rivière Seigneur de Champlemy, son of --- (-1536). 

c)         ISABELLE de Savoisy (-before 1463)m (before 19 Jan 1435 (O.S.?)) BLANCHES d’Estouteville Seigneur de Villebon et de Montdoucet, son of --- (-after 1463). 

 

 

The manuscript “Carte des Barons de Sign-Let” (see the introduction above) traces the succession of Seignelay, after the death of Claude de Savoisy (see above), through his sister Madeleine successively to the Rivière, Buz, Malain and Boucher families, and the sale of Seignelay by Marie de Boucher (with the consent of her husband Pierre de Choulard) to Jean-Baptiste Colbert (minister of King Louis XIV) whose great-granddaughter married Charles François de Montmorency-Luxembourg[660]

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de TOUCY

 

 

The town of Toucy is located west of the county of Auxerre.  Primary sources which identify the suzerain of the Seigneurs de Toucy have not been identified.  Some later documents which name members of the Toucy family also refer to the comtes de Nevers, but they do not specify that there was any vassal relationship between the two. 

 

 

1.         ITIER [I] de Narbonne, son of ---.  Seigneur de Toucy.  1060.  m ---.  The name of Itier [I]'s wife is not known.  Itier [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         ITIER [II] de Toucy, son of --- (-[Jerusalem] [1100]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Toucy.  He and his brother Hugues are named in a 1086 charter[661].  "Hugo de Toceio et Norgaudus frater eius" are named in a charter dated 31 May [before 1100] relating to a donation to the abbey of Molesme which also names "uxore sua [Norgaudi] Ermengaudi et filia Beatrice cum ceteris infantibus suis" and is subscribed by "Iterius frater eius"[662].  A charter dated to [1100] records a donation to Molesme by “miles…Marcus”, with the consent of “domno Iterio de Toceio”, records that Itier constituted “domnus Hugo frater eius” as his heir before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, and a subsequent confirmation by “domnus Hugo frater eius” with the consent of “Norgaudus frater eius” before they both travelled to Jerusalem, and a last donation by Hugues after his return[663]

b)         HUGUES (-after [1100]).  Seigneur de Toucy.  He and his brother Itier are named in a 1086 charter[664].  A charter dated to [1100] records a donation to Molesme by “miles…Marcus”, with the consent of “domno Iterio de Toceio”, records that Itier constituted “domnus Hugo frater eius” as his heir before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, and a subsequent confirmation by “domnus Hugo frater eius” with the consent of “Norgaudus frater eius” before they both travelled to Jerusalem, and a last donation by Hugues after his return[665].  "Hugo de Toceio et Norgaudus frater eius" are named in a charter dated 31 May [before 1100] relating to a donation to the abbey of Molesme which also names "uxore sua [Norgaudi] Ermengaudi et filia Beatrice cum ceteris infantibus suis" and is subscribed by "Iterius frater eius"[666]

c)         [HUMBALD .  As "Humbald enfans" he is named in a 1086 charter with Itier and Hugues de Toucy[667].] 

d)         NARJOT [I] de Toucy (-[Jerusalem] before 1110).  A charter dated to [1100] records a donation to Molesme by “miles…Marcus”, with the consent of “domno Iterio de Toceio”, records that Itier constituted “domnus Hugo frater eius” as his heir before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, and a subsequent confirmation by “domnus Hugo frater eius” with the consent of “Norgaudus frater eius” before they both travelled to Jerusalem, and a last donation by Hugues after his return[668].  He succeeded his brothers in [1100] as Seigneur de Toucy

-        see below

2.         AGANON de Narbonne .  The primary source which confirms his origin has not been identified.  1060. 

 

 

NARJOT [I] de Toucy, son of ITIER [I] Seigneur de Toucy & his wife --- (-[Jerusalem] before 1110).  A charter dated to [1100] records a donation to Molesme by “miles…Marcus”, with the consent of “domno Iterio de Toceio”, records that Itier constituted “domnus Hugo frater eius” as his heir before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, and a subsequent confirmation by “domnus Hugo frater eius” with the consent of “Norgaudus frater eius” before they both travelled to Jerusalem, and a last donation by Hugues after  his return[669].  He succeeded his brothers in [1100] as Seigneur de Toucy.  "Norgaudus de Toceiaco" reached agreement with the abbey of Molesme in memory of "fratris sui Hugonis…fratris sui Iterii" by charter dated to [1101/09], subscribed by "Ermengardis uxoris eius, Iterii filii sui, Adeliæ filie eius, ceterorum infantum eius"[670].  A charter dated 1110 records that "dominus Tocciensis castri…Nariotus" renounced rights in favour of the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, requesting "uxor ipsius Narioti quam Hugo gener eius" to perform his wishes, in the presence of "Nivernensium comite Guillelmo"[671]

m ERMENGARDE, daughter of --- (-after 1134).  "Hugo de Toceio et Norgaudus frater eius" are named in a charter dated 31 May [before 1100] relating to a donation to the abbey of Molesme which also names "uxore sua [Norgaudi] Ermengaudi et filia Beatrice cum ceteris infantibus suis" and is subscribed by "Iterius frater eius"[672].  A charter dated 1110 records that "Dominus Tocciensis castri…Nariotus" renounced rights in favour of the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, requesting "uxor ipsius Narioti quam Hugo gener eius" to perform his wishes[673].  Itier de Toucy, Ermengarde his mother, Etienne his brother and Hugues de Til confirmed the previous donations by their ancestors to the priory of Jully-les-Nonnains by charter dated 1134[674].  "Willelmus Nivernensis comes" confirmed the property of the abbey of Crisenon, including property donated by "Iterius…de Tociaco" with the consent of "matre Ermengarde et Stephano fratre eius", by charter dated 1134[675]

Narjot [I] & his wife had [eight] children: 

1.         BEATRIX de Toucy .  "Hugo de Toceio et Norgaudus frater eius" are named in a charter dated 31 May [before 1100] relating to a donation to the abbey of Molesme which also names "uxore sua [Norgaudi] Ermengaudi et filia Beatrice cum ceteris infantibus suis" and is subscribed by "Iterius frater eius"[676].  It is assumed from this charter that Beatrix was her parents' oldest child, presumably the only one to have been considered old enough to be named in the document.  m (before 1110) HUGUES Manceau de Cosne.  He acted as Seigneur de Toucy during his father-in-law's absence in Jerusalem[677].  A charter dated 1110 records that "dominus Tocciensis castri…Nariotus" renounced rights in favour of the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire before leaving for Jerusalem where he died, requesting "uxor ipsius Narioti quam Hugo gener eius" to perform his wishes[678]

2.         ITIER [III] de Toucy (-1147).  "Norgaudus de Toceiaco" reached agreement with the abbey of Molesme in memory of "fratris sui Hugonis…fratris sui Iterii" by charter dated to [1101/09], subscribed by "Ermengardis uxoris eius, Iterii filii sui, Adeliæ filie eius, ceterorum infantum eius"[679].  Itier de Toucy, Ermengarde his mother, Etienne his brother and Hugues de Til confirmed the previous donations by their ancestors to the priory of Jully-les-Nonnains by charter dated 1134[680].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Toucy.  Seigneur de Puisaye et de Saint-Fargeau.  "Willelmus Nivernensis comes" confirmed the property of the abbey of Crisenon, including property donated by "Iterius…de Tociaco" with the consent of "matre Ermengarde et Stephano fratre eius, et Hugo de Tilio", by charter dated 1134[681].  A charter dated to [1147] records a donation to the abbey of Crisenon by "domnum Iterium de Tociaco"[682].  "Iterius Tociacensis Dominus" donated property to "ecclesiæ beatæ Mariæ de Rupibus…Gaufrido meo nepote eiusdem loci…abbate", with the consent of "Elisabeta uxore mea", by charter dated 1147[683].  “Iterius de Tociaco laudante Helisabeth uxore eius” donated free passage through his woods to Pontigny by charter dated [end May/early Jun] 1147, witnessed by “Gofridus abbas de Rupibus...[684].  The History of Louis VII King of France names "…Iterius de Toceio…"  among those who accompanied King Louis VII on crusade in 1147[685].  He died on Crusade.  m ELISABETH, daughter of ---.  "Iterius Tociacensis Dominus" donated property to "ecclesiæ beatæ Mariæ de Rupibus…Gaufrido meo nepote eiusdem loci…abbate", with the consent of "Elisabeta uxore mea", by charter dated 1147[686].  “Iterius de Tociaco laudante Helisabeth uxore eius” donated free passage through his woods to Pontigny by charter dated [end May/early Jun] 1147[687].  "Helizabet mater domini de Thocyaco" donated property to the priory of Vieupou by charter dated 1170, with the support of "Narjotus de Thociaco et Regnauldus de Pogiaco"[688].  Itier [III] & his wife had six children: 

a)         NARJOT [II] de Toucy (-1192).  His parentage is deduced from the charter dated 1170 under which "Helizabet mater domini de Thocyaco" donated property to the priory of Vieupou, with the support of "Narjotus de Thociaco et Regnauldus de Pogiaco"[689].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Toucy

-        see below

b)         GUY de Toucy .  "Nariotus…dominus Tusciaci" renounced rights in favour of the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire with the consent of "Vuido frater meus" by charter dated to [1160/67][690]

c)         SARA de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  1167.  m GUIBAUD Seigneur de Saint-Vérain, son of --- (-before 1167). 

d)         daughter .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m RENAUD Seigneur de Pougy, son of ---. 

e)         ITIER de Toucy (-before 1178).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Bazarne.  1151. 

f)          JEAN de Toucy (-before 1189).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  1180. 

3.         ADELINA de Toucy .  "Norgaudus de Toceiaco" reached agreement with the abbey of Molesme in memory of "fratris sui Hugonis…fratris sui Iterii" by charter dated to [1101/09], subscribed by "Ermengardis uxoris eius, Iterii filii sui, Adeliæ filie eius, ceterorum infantum eius"[691]

4.         ETIENNE de Toucy (-1162).  "Willelmus Nivernensis comes" confirmed the property of the abbey of Crisenon, including property donated by "Iterius…de Tociaco" with the consent of "matre Ermengarde et Stephano fratre eius, et Hugo de Tilio", by charter dated 1134[692].  Itier de Toucy, Ermengarde his mother, Etienne his brother and Hugues de Til confirmed the previous donations by their ancestors to the priory of Jully-les-Nonnains by charter dated 1134[693].  First abbot of Reigny. 

5.         HERVE de Toucy .  "Guillelmus comes Nivernensis, qui fuit natus de filia Lancelini de Baugenciaco" renounced practices which prejudiced the abbey of Saint-Michel by charter dated 1134, witnessed by “…Hervaudus de Tociaco, Odo frater eius…[694].  Monk at Pontigny 1120/1151, later Carthusian. 

6.         EUDES de Toucy (-after 1134).  "Guillelmus comes Nivernensis, qui fuit natus de filia Lancelini de Baugenciaco" renounced practices which prejudiced the abbey of Saint-Michel by charter dated 1134, witnessed by “…Hervaudus de Tociaco, Odo frater eius…[695]

7.         GARNA de Toucy (-before 1178).  Guillaume [de Toucy] Bishop of Auxerre approved spending commitments of the nuns of Crisenon, in memory of "nobilis matrone, Garne…sororis defuncti Ytherii de Tuciaco", by charter dated 1178[696].  Her marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[697].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not been identified.  Gervais abbé de Saint-Germain d'Auxerre and "Gaufredum Donziacum" reached agreements relating to Diges, with the consent of "B…uxor Gaufredi et duo filii eius, Herveus…et Gaufredus", by charter dated 1151[698], which likely refers to Geoffroy’s second wife as the document is dated only six years before the recorded date of his death.  m as his second wife, GEOFFROY [III] Seigneur de Donzy, son of HERVE [II] Seigneur de Donzy & his wife --- de la Ferté (-1157). 

8.         [---.  m ---.]  Two children: 

a)         GEOFFROY .  Abbot of Les Roches.  "Iterius Tociacensis Dominus" donated property to "ecclesiæ beatæ Mariæ de Rupibus…Gaufrido meo nepote eiusdem loci…abbate", with the consent of "Elisabeta uxore mea", by charter dated 1147[699].  “Iterius de Tociaco laudante Helisabeth uxore eius” donated free passage through his woods to Pontigny by charter dated [end May/early Jun] 1147, witnessed by “Gofridus abbas de Rupibus...[700]Ansericus de Monte regio senescalchus Burgundie” donated land “in petraria super Valeisturneis” to Pontigny “mecum...uxor mea Ada et liberi mei et pater meus...et anima Milonis fratris mei”, with the consent of “uxor mea...Sibilla, infantes mei Ansericus et Johannes”, by charter dated [25 Mar 1180/24 Mar 1181][701]

b)         JEAN .  Brother of Geoffroy abbot of Les Roches, monk at Cluny[702]

 

 

NARJOT [II] de Toucy, son of ITIER [III] Seigneur de Toucy & his wife Elisabeth --- (-1192).  His parentage is deduced from the charter dated 1170 under which "Helizabet mater domini de Thocyaco" donated property to the priory of Vieupou, with the support of "Narjotus de Thociaco et Regnauldus de Pogiaco"[703].  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Toucy.  Seigneur de Bazarne, de Saint-Fargeau et de Puisaye.  "Nariotus…dominus Tusciaci" renounced rights in favour of the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire with the consent of "Vuido frater meus" by charter dated to [1160/67][704].  He died on crusade. 

m AGNES de Dampierre, daughter of GUY [I] de Dampierre-sur-l'Aube Vicomte de Troyes & his wife Helvide de Baudémont (-after 1192).  She is named as wife of Narjot [II] in the late 13th century cartulary of Crisenon[705]

Narjot [II] & his wife had five children: 

1.         ITIER [IV] de Toucy (-Damietta 1218)Seigneur de Toucy.  Seigneur de Bazarne.  “Yterius dominus de Tociaco et Baiserna” confirmed a donation to Rigny abbey made by “Raynaldus cognomento Caprarius”, with the support of “fratres mei Ansericus et Narjotus”, by charter dated 1201[706].  The Feoda Campanie dated [1204/10] includes “…Yterus de Tociaco…” in De Magnis Feodis[707].  "Dominus Iterus de Toce et uxor sua domina Montis Acuti" ratified a donation by charter dated Dec 1210[708].  "Iterius de Tociaco" founded the priory of Boutissant, in memory of "dominus Narjotus pater meus" and with the consent of "uxoris me Berte", by charter dated 1218[709].  "Yterus de Thusciaco" donated a fishery at Auxerre to Pontigny, with the consent of “Ansericus frater meus”, by charter dated Jul 1218[710].  He died on crusade.  The Historia Damiatina by Oliverus Scholasticus records the deaths in 1218 at Damieta of "comes de Marcha et comes de Bar et filius eius, frater Guillelmus de Carnoto magister militiæ templi, Herveus de Virsione, Iterius de Tacci, Oliverus filius regis Anglie"[711]m ([1206]) as her second husband, BEATRIX de Rion Dame de Gergy, widow of ALEXANDRE de Montagu, daughter of ---.  "B. domina Montis Acuti" donated property to Maizières by charter dated 1206, the dating clause of which refers to "post obitum mariti mei domini Alexandri, antequam nuxissem domino Itero de Toceio"[712].  "Dominus Iterus de Toce et uxor sua domina Montis Acuti" ratified a donation by charter dated Dec 1210[713].  "Beatrix domina Gergeaci" notified an agreement between the abbeys of la Ferté and Sasonay relating to land at Gergy by charter dated 1217[714].  "Iterius de Tociaco" founded the priory of Boutissant, in memory of "dominus Narjotus pater meus" and with the consent of "uxoris me Berte", by charter dated 1218[715].  The necrology of Maizières records the death "Id Jan" of "domine Beatrice matre domini Montis Acuti"[716].  Itier [IV] & his wife had three children: 

a)         JEAN de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Toucy, de Saint-Fargeau et de Puisaye.  He died on Crusade.  m (1231) as her third husband, EMMA de Laval, widow firstly of ROBERT [III] Comte d'Alençon and secondly of MATHIEU [II] "le Grand" Seigneur de Montmorency, daughter of GUY [V] Seigneur de Laval & his wife Avise de Craon ([1197/98]-27 Apr 1264, bur Clermont).  "Guido dominus sextus de Lavalle" donated property to Olivet priory, for the soul of "Ozannæ filiæ meæ", by charter dated to [1205], witnessed by "Haoys uxore mea, Guido filius meus, Emma filia mea"[717].  A manuscript genealogy of the Lords of Beaumont record the marriage of “Robertum comitem Alencheii” and “Emmam filiam Guidonis domini de La Val” after the death of his wife “Joanna…filia domini Josberti de Guirchia[718].  "Robertus comes d’Alencon et dominus Lavallis et Emma uxor eius filia Guidonis de Lavalle et hæres Lavallis" exchanged property with "Yvoni Franco et dominæ Haoys uxori suæ" by charter dated Feb 1216[719].  "Matheus de Montemorenciaco, conestabularius Franciæ et Emma, eius uxor, comitissa de Alanconio et domina Lavallensis" ratified a donation by "dominus Ivo Francus et uxor eius Advisia de Lavalle" to Bellebranche, for the salvation of "domini Guydonis de Lavalle" and for "Hugonis filii sui", by charter dated 1218[720].  "Ama comitissa de Alenceon" donated property to Notre-Dame, Paris for the soul of "domini Mathei de Monte Morenciaco mariti mei defuncti" by charter dated 1230[721].  "Joannes dominus de Toceio miles" confirmed commitments made for his marriage to "Emmam comitissam de Alenchon et dominam de Lavalle" by charter dated 1231[722].  The necrology of Joyenval records the death “27 Apr...circa 1280“ of "dominæ Emmæ comitissæ Alençonio, dominæ de Valle Guyonis, domini Guillelmi de Bellomonte [error] uxoris” and that “domini Guidonis de Laval filii eorum primogeniti” confirmed their donations[723].  Jean & his wife had one child: 

i)          JEANNE de Toucy ([1232/40]-[Feb/7 Jul] 1317).  Given that her mother gave birth to a child by her first marriage in 1217, it is unlikely that Jeanne was born much after her parents’ marriage.  No primary source has been found which indicates the date of her marriage.  Considering the extended chronology of her numerous children, it is likely that she married several years after the death of her husband’s first wife.  Dame de Toucy, de Saint-Fargeau et de Puisaye.  Thiebauz cuens de Bar sires de Thoci et...Johanne sa fame” confirmed the sale of property to the chapter of Auxerre by “Pierre de Vaus escuiers” by charter dated Sep 1282[724].  The testament of Thiebaut cuens de Bar”, dated 1282, appoints as executors “Jehenne contesse de Bar ma femme, mon signor Guy de Toucy signor de Baserne, mon signor Thieri d’Amele le chastelains de Bar qui or est...” and names “Henry aineis fils le comte de Bar[725]"Iehanne de Thoci comtesse de Bar et dame de Pusoye" confirmed the peace agreement between Philippe IV King of France and "nostre...fil Henry cuens de Bar" by charter dated 1301 “le Vendredy apres Pentecoste[726]m as his second wife, THIBAUT II Comte de Bar, son of HENRI II Comte de Bar & his wife Philippa de Dreux [Capet] dame de Torcy-en-Brie ([1221]-Oct 1291). 

b)         MATHILDE de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Abbess of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre. 

c)         OTHON de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  1228.  m ---.  The name of Othon's wife is not known.  Othon & his wife had one child: 

i)          OTHON de Toucy (-1297).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Admiral of France.  m ---.  The name of Othon's wife is not known.  Othon & his wife had two children:

(a)       JEANNE de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  m ([1297]) as his first wife, DREUX [IV] de Mello Seigneur de Lormat, de Château-Chinon et de Sainte-Hermine, son of DREUX [III] de Mello Seigneur de Saint-Bris & his [second wife Eustachie de Lusignan] (-[1317]). 

(b)       PHILIPPE de Toucy (-before 1301).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  1290/1298. 

2.         JEAN de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  1180/1212. 

3.         ANSERIC de Toucy (-1242).  "Yterus de Thusciaco" donated a fishery at Auxerre to Pontigny, with the consent of “Ansericus frater meus”, by charter dated Jul 1218[727].  "Guido comes Nivernensis et Forensis, et Mathildis uxor mea comitissa Nivernensis" wrote concerning the viscounty of Auxerre held by "dominus Ansericus de Tociaco…domino Narioto fratre suo" by charter dated 1226[728].  Seigneur de Bazarne.  Seigneur de Huban, by right of his first wife.  Seigneur de Pierre-Perthuis, by right of his second wife.  Vicomte d'Auxerre 1201.  m firstly --- de Huban, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her origin and marriage has not been identified.  m secondly ([1220]) GUILLEMETTE de Pierre-Perthuis, daughter and heiress of GUY Seigneur de Pierre-Perthuis & his wife Agnes --- (-after 1264).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriages has not been identified.  She married secondly (1248) Thibaut de Plancy Seigneur de Saint-Vinnemer (-1250).  Theobaldus de Planceyo miles dominus Sancti Winimerii” donated rights over Pimelles to the abbey Saint-Michel, with the consent of “Guillerma domina Bacerne uxor eius”, by charter dated Jul 1248[729]

-        SEIGNEURS de BAZARNE[730]

4.         NARJOT [III] de Toucy (-1241).  “Yterius dominus de Tociaco et Baiserna” confirmed a donation to Rigny abbey made by “Raynaldus cognomento Caprarius”, with the support of “fratres mei Ansericus et Narjotus”, by charter dated 1201[731].  Seigneur de Bazarnes.  Regent of the Latin Empire of Constantinople 1228/31 and 1238/39. 

-        see below

5.         MATHILDE de Toucy .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  Abbess of Saint-Julien d'Auxerre. 

 

 

NARJOT [III] de Toucy, son of NARJOT [II] Seigneur de Toucy & his wife Agnes de Dampierre (-1241).  “Yterius dominus de Tociaco et Baiserna” confirmed a donation to Rigny abbey made by “Raynaldus cognomento Caprarius”, with the support of “fratres mei Ansericus et Narjotus”, by charter dated 1201[732].  Seigneur de Bazarnes.  Regent of the Latin Empire of Constantinople 1228/31 and 1238/39. 

m firstly --- Branaina, daughter of THEODOROS Branas & his wife Agnes de France (-before 1239).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "sororem regis Francorum imperatricem" marrying "Nargaldo de Toceio, Guidonis de Dampetro consobrinus", in a later passage recording that she was "filia Livernes et sororis regis Francie"[733]

m secondly ([1239/40]) --- of the Kumans, daughter of JONAS of the Kumans (-Constantinople after 1241).  The primary source which confirms her origin and marriage has not been identified.  She became a nun after her husband died. 

Narjot [III] & his first wife had four children: 

1.         PHILIPPE de Toucy (-12 Jan 1277).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Regent of the Latin Empire of Constantinople 1245/47.  Admiral of the Kingdom of Sicily 1271.  m PORTIA de Roye, daughter of OTHON de Roye & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  Philippe & his wife had two children: 

a)         NARJOT [IV] de Toucy (-[8 Aug/16 Sep] 1293).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Signor di Terza.  Captain-General of Durazzo.  Admiral of the kingdom of Sicily 1277.  Captain-General of Morea 1282.  In early 1288, when Lucia and her husband arrived at Acre to take up her inheritance, the Commune of Tripoli refused to accept her.  It finally recognised her as Ctss of Tripoli after suspecting that the Genoese, led by Bartolomeo Embriaco, wished to seize control of the town[734].  Sultan Qalawun, taking advantage of the general confusion over the succession, besieged Tripoli in Feb 1289 and captured the city 26 Apr 1289, whereupon Ctss Lucia escaped to Cyprus.  m ([1278]) LUCIE of Antioch, daughter of BOHEMOND VI Prince of Antioch & his wife Sibylle of Armenia (-before 29 Jun 1299).  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "principe Beimonte…haveva una sorella" who was married in Apulia to "messer Hugo de Theusi, amira de Puglia"[735].  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Beymont, Ysabeau, Marie et Lucie" as the four children of "Beymont" & his wife, stating that Lucie married "Nerjo de Toussi" and died without heirs[736].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "una sorella Luciana…moglie del signor Nargo…almiraglio del re Carlo in Puglia" was heiress of "Beimonte principe de Antiochia et conte de Tripoli"[737].  She succeeded her brother in 1287 as Ctss of Tripoli, while living in Apulia.  The Istoria of Marino Sanudo Torsello names "miser Narzi di Torzi armiraglio del Rè Carlo" and "la principessa d’Antiochia sua moglie"[738]Narjot [IV] & his wife had one child: 

i)          PHILIPPE de Toucy (-after 1300).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  He succeeded his father in 1293 as Signor di Terza.  He succeeded his mother as titular Prince of Antioch.  m (1299, dissolved by Papal bull 17 Jan 1300 because of the minority of the parties) as her first husband, ELEONORE of Sicily, daughter of CHARLES II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary (1289-Monastery of San Nicolo di Arena 9 Aug 1341, bur Catania, Franciscan monastery).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriages has not been identified.  She married secondly (Messina May 1303) Federigo I King of Sicily [Trinacria], son of PEDRO III King of Aragon. 

b)         OTHON [Oddone] de Toucy (-after 1300).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Seigneur de Roye.  Heir of the family properties in the kingdom of Sicily.  Judge in Sicily. 

2.         ANSELIN de Toucy (-Jan 1273).  The Livre de la Conqueste de la Morée records that “messire Ancelin de Tucy, le frere de messire Philippe de Ticu qui baux estoit de Constantinople” fought against the Turks, in a passage dated to [1265], adding that “il fus nés et Norris en Romanie et savoit la langue et les manieres des Turs” and therefore acted as go-between with the Turkish leader[739].  Signor di Mottola, Ceglie del Gualdo Servano 1269.  m (after 1261) as her second husband, ---, widow of OTHON de Tournay Baron of Kalavryta, daughter of ---.  The Livre de la Conqueste de la Morée records that “messire A de Toucy, freré de monseignor Philippe” married “la mere de messire Goffroy de Tornay[740]

3.         [AGNES] de Toucy .  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage of "Guielmus" and "filiam Nargaldi natam de filia Livernes et sororis regis Francie" but does not name his wife[741].  1239/1252.  m (1239) as his first wife, GUILLAUME de Villehardouin, son of GEOFFROY I Prince of Achaia & his wife Elisabeth [de Chappes] (Kalamata Castle after [1208][742]-Kalamata Castle[743] 1 May 1278, bur Andravida, church of St James).  He succeeded his brother in 1246 as GUILLAUME II "le grand Dent" Prince of Achaia

4.         MARGUERITE de Toucy (-[1279]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.  Nun at Morea until 1252.  m LEONARDO di Veruli, son of --- (-1281).  Chancellor of the Principality of Achaia. 

 

 

 

H.      SEIGNEURS de VENISY

 

 

Venisy is located north-east of Auxerre in the present-day département of Yonne, in the canton of Brienon-sur-Armançon.  The Venisy family rose to retrospective fame in the early 13th century dispute between Pope Innocent II and Erard de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt concerning the validity of his marriage to Philippa of Jerusalem [Champagne], their consanguinity being traced to a common descent from Philippe I King of France, in the case of Erard through Adelais de Venisy.  The family of earlier seigneurs de Venisy in the mid-12th century is reconstructed mainly from charters in the collection of the cartulary of Yonne. 

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         ARNAUD [de Venisy] .  A charter dated 20 May 1145 records the donation to the abbey of Dilo of “censum suum…apud Naalli” by “Joffridus de Montchardun”, which the monks had repurchased from "Arnaudo avunculo Garini de Venesi"[744].  It is possible that Arnaud was deceased at the date of the charter, his interest in the property in question having been inherited by Garnier.  It is not known whether Arnaud was the maternal or paternal uncle of Garnier.  The term "avunculus" would indicate his maternal uncle if used in its strict sense, but the word was often used more loosely in contemporary documentation. 

2.         [brother/sister] --- .  As noted above, it is not known which parent of the brothers Garnier and Anseau was the sibling of Arnaud.  m ---.  Two children: 

a)         GARNIER [Warin] de Venisy (-after 1151).  A charter dated 20 May 1145 records the donation to the abbey of Dilo of “censum suum…apud Naalli” by “Joffridus de Montchardun”, which the monks had repurchased from "Arnaudo avunculo Garini de Venesi", with the consent of "hoc Garino de Venesi et uxore eius de cujus feodo census est et filio ipsorum Anselmo", witnessed by "Garinus de Venesi, Anselmus filius eius…"[745]

-        see below

b)         ANSEAU de Venisy .  “Garinus de Venisiaco et uxor mea Petronilla cum filio Ansello” confirmed a donation of land at Chailly to Pontigny, reciting a division of the land in the presence of “Ansello fratre meo”, by charter dated 9 Aug 1141, with the consent of "…filius noster Fregericus" and witnessed by "…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…"[746].  It is unclear from the wording of the document whether Anseau, brother of Garnier, was deceased at the time, the division of land having taken place at some time before the confirmation. 

 

 

It is not known how the following family group was related to the main Venisy family, if at all. 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Venisy .  He is named as father of Thibaut in the 1143 charter witnessed by his son (see below).  m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

a)         THIBAUT de Venisy (-after 1143).  “…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…” witnessed the charter dated 1138 under which recited the history of a donation to Pontigny[747].  “Garinus de Venisiaco et uxor mea Petronilla cum filio Ansello” confirmed a donation of land at Chailly to Pontigny, reciting a division of the land in the presence of “Ansello fratre meo”, by charter dated 9 Aug 1141, with the consent of "…filius noster Fregericus" and witnessed by "…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…"[748].  “…Theobaldus filius Guillelmi de Venisiaco…” witnessed the charter dated 1143 under which the archbishop of Sens confirmed a donation to Pontigny[749]

 

 

GARNIER [Warin] de Venisy, son of --- (-after 1151).  A charter dated 1139 records donations to the abbey of Dilo, including the donation of “feodum de Thori” by “Symon Pichered” which was confirmed by "Garnerus de Venisy…a quo feodum istud tenebat"[750].  “Garinus de Venisiaco et uxor mea Petronilla cum filio Ansello” confirmed a donation of land at Chailly to Pontigny, reciting a division of the land in the presence of “Ansello fratre meo”, by charter dated 9 Aug 1141, with the consent of "…filius noster Fregericus" and witnessed by "…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…"[751].  A charter dated 20 May 1145 records the donation to the abbey of Dilo of “censum suum…apud Naalli” by “Joffridus de Montchardun”, which the monks had repurchased from "Arnaudo avunculo Garini de Venesi", with the consent of "hoc Garino de Venesi et uxore eius de cujus feodo census est et filio ipsorum Anselmo", witnessed by "Garinus de Venesi, Anselmus filius eius…"[752].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre noted that “Garinus de Venesiaco et uxor sua Petronilla et filii sui Ansellus et Ferricus” had relinquished claims “in territorio de Burs” in favour of Pontigny by charter dated 1146[753].  A charter dated to after 1151 recites the donation of “feodum de Thori” by “Symon Pichered” to Dilo abbey, confirmed by "Garnerus…de Venisiaco a quo feodum illud Symon tenebat et uxor Garini Petronilla sed et filius eius Ansellus", and a later donation confirmed by "Ansellus…de Venisiaco…et frater Anselli, Freherus, sed et uxor sua Elisabeth", as well as other donations by Anseau, Isabelle and Ferry[754]

m PETRONILLE, [sister of Hélisende, wife of Anseau [I] Seigneur de Traînel,] daughter of --- (-after 1146).  “Garinus de Venisiaco et uxor mea Petronilla cum filio Ansello” confirmed a donation of land at Chailly to Pontigny, reciting a division of the land in the presence of “Ansello fratre meo”, by charter dated 9 Aug 1141, with the consent of "…filius noster Fregericus" and witnessed by "…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…"[755].  The origin of Pétronille is not known.  A possible clue is provided by the charter dated [25 Mar 1184/24 Mar 1185] under which "Garnerius de Triagnello" confirmed that "domna A[aliz] consanguinea mea" [Petronille’s granddaughter, wife of André de Brienne Seigneur de Ramérupt] had renounced rights over the wood of Saint-Etienne in favour of Pontigny[756].  The precise relationship between the two has not been traced.  It is possible that rights to Saint-Etienne entered the Vénisy family through the wife of Garnier [Warin] and that Garnier [II] de Traînel retained some residual rights through a family relationship with her.  The family origin of Garnier de Traînel’s mother is not known (see CHAMPAGNE NOBILITY) but she was also involved in a donation relating to the wood of Saint-Etienne and it would be chronologically possible for her to have been a sister of Pétronille.  A charter dated 20 May 1145 records the donation to the abbey of Dilo of “censum suum…apud Naalli” by “Joffridus de Montchardun”, which the monks had repurchased from "Arnaudo avunculo Garini de Venesi", with the consent of "hoc Garino de Venesi et uxore eius de cujus feodo census est et filio ipsorum Anselmo", witnessed by "Garinus de Venesi, Anselmus filius eius…"[757].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre noted that “Garinus de Venesiaco et uxor sua Petronilla et filii sui Ansellus et Ferricus” had relinquished claims “in territorio de Burs” in favour of Pontigny by charter dated 1146[758]

Garnier & his wife had two children: 

1.         ANSEAU de Venisy (-after 1151).  “Garinus de Venisiaco et uxor mea Petronilla cum filio Ansello” confirmed a donation of land at Chailly to Pontigny, reciting a division of the land in the presence of “Ansello fratre meo”, by charter dated 9 Aug 1141, with the consent of "…filius noster Fregericus" and witnessed by "…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…"[759].  A charter dated 20 May 1145 records the donation to the abbey of Dilo of “censum suum…apud Naalli” by “Joffridus de Montchardun”, which the monks had repurchased from "Arnaudo avunculo Garini de Venesi", with the consent of "hoc Garino de Venesi et uxore eius de cujus feodo census est et filio ipsorum Anselmo", witnessed by "Garinus de Venesi, Anselmus filius eius…"[760].  Hugues Bishop of Auxerre noted that “Garinus de Venesiaco et uxor sua Petronilla et filii sui Ansellus et Ferricus” had relinquished claims “in territorio de Burs” in favour of Pontigny by charter dated 1146[761].  “…Alelmus de Veniseio…” witnessed the charter dated to before 1150 under which "Hugo Pauper, filius Galteri Rufi" donated property to Vauluisant[762].  A charter dated to after 1151 recites the donation of “feodum de Thori” by “Symon Pichered” to Dilo abbey, confirmed by "Garnerus…de Venisiaco a quo feodum illud Symon tenebat et uxor Garini Petronilla sed et filius eius Ansellus", and a later donation confirmed by "Ansellus…de Venisiaco…et frater Anselli, Freherus, sed et uxor sua Elisabeth", as well as other donations by Anseau, Isabelle and Ferry[763].  "Ansellus de Venesiaco et Freerius" donated rights in the wood of Rajeuse to Pontigny, with the consent of "Isabel uxor Anselli", by charter dated [25 Mar 1152/24 Mar 1153], witnessed by “Guillelmus archidiaconus, Herveus prepositus frater eius...[764]m ([1136]) [as her first husband,] ISABELLE de Nangis Dame de Nangis, daughter of FLEURI de France Seigneur de Nangis & his wife [--- de Nangis] ([1118]-[after 1166/67]).  Documents dated Jul 1213 and Aug 1213, relating to the consanguinity between Erard de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt and his wife Philippa of Jerusalem, record "rex Franciæ…Grossus rex fratrem…Florium…filia Isabellis de Nangies…domina de Venisiaco", adding that her daughter was "domina de Venisiaco, mater…[Erardum de Rameruco] [Erardum de Brena]", another document in the series clarifying that Isabelle was the mother of "Aalaidis dominæ Venisiaci…mater…Erardi"[765].  "Ansellus de Venesiaco et Freerius" donated rights in the wood of Rajeuse to Pontigny, with the consent of "Isabel uxor Anselli", by charter dated [25 Mar 1152/24 Mar 1153], witnessed by “Guillelmus archidiaconus, Herveus prepositus frater eius...[766].  Dame de Nangis.  A charter dated to after 1151 recites the donation of “feodum de Thori” by “Symon Pichered” to Dilo abbey, confirmed by "Garnerus…de Venisiaco a quo feodum illud Symon tenebat et uxor Garini Petronilla sed et filius eius Ansellus", and a later donation confirmed by "Ansellus…de Venisiaco…et frater Anselli, Freherus, sed et uxor sua Elisabeth", as well as other donations by Anseau, Isabelle and Ferry[767].  She is named in the cartulary of Preuilly[768].  [She married secondly Guy [de Marolles].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Isabelle married firstly "Guy de Marolles", adding that he joined the crusade in 1141 and died in Palestine[769].  The primary source on which this is based is not known.  However, under a charter dated to [1166/67], Louis VII King of France confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Barbeau, including the donation of "apud capellam de Sarnai" made by "Guidonis de Nangiis…cum assensu uxoris sue Helisabeth" and with the consent of "Milo de Corteriaco…uxore et filiis"[770].  It is possible that "Guidonis de Nangiis" is the same person as Guy de Marolles, and that his wife "Helisabeth" was Isabelle de Nangis.  If this is correct, Guy would have been Isabelle’s second husband not her first, assuming that the charter relates to then current donations.  This would also be consistent with her supposed daughter by this marriage having given birth to children from her second marriage (to Adam de Melun) in the 1180s.  Anseau & his wife had one child: 

a)         ADELAIS de Venisy (-[20 Mar 1221/Nov 1222])"Andreas de Venesiaco" ratified an agreement with Pontigny regarding the wood of Saint-Etienne, with the consent of "uxor mea Aaliz et filius meus Gauterius", by charter dated [25 Mar 1184/24 Mar 1185][771].  "Gaucherus de Joviniaco et dominus de Rameruco" confirmed the donation to Montiéramy made by “Andreas dominus de Rameruco cujus uxorem post eius obitum desponsavi” by charter dated 1195[772].  Documents dated Jul 1213 and Aug 1213, relating to the consanguinity between Erard de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt and his wife Philippa of Jerusalem, record "rex Franciæ…Grossus rex fratrem…Florium…filia Isabellis de Nangies…domina de Venisiaco", adding that her daughter was "domina de Venisiaco, mater…[Erardum de Rameruco] [Erardum de Brena]", another document in the series clarifying that Isabelle was the mother of "Aalaidis dominæ Venisiaci…mater…Erardi"[773].  Dame de Venisy.  “Dominus Gaucherus de Jovigniaco et domina Aelicia de Venesiaco uxor eius et dominus Erardus de Brena ipsius Aelicie filius” confirmed the donation made by “Milo de Pogiaco et Helisabeth uxor sua” to Sens Maison-Dieu by charter dated Aug 1207[774].  “Gaucherus de Joviniaco dominus Venisiaci...et uxor mea A. et filius eius E. de Brena” relinquished rights in the forest of Saint-Etienne in favour of Pontigny abbey by charter dated 1211[775]m firstly (before 1167) ANDRE de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt, son of GAUTHIER [II] Comte de Brienne & his [first/second] wife Humbeline de Baudément (-killed in battle Acre Oct 1189).  m secondly (before 1295) as his first wife, GAUCHER de Joigny Seigneur de Châteaurenard, seneschal de Nevers, son of RENARD [IV] Comte de Joigny & his wife Adelaide de Nevers (-before Nov 1237). 

2.         FERRY de Venisy (-after 1151).  “Garinus de Venisiaco et uxor mea Petronilla cum filio Ansello” confirmed a donation of land at Chailly to Pontigny, reciting a division of the land in the presence of “Ansello fratre meo”, by charter dated 9 Aug 1141, with the consent of "…filius noster Fregericus" and witnessed by "…Theobaldus de Venisiaco…"[776].  "Ansellus de Venesiaco et Freerius" donated rights in the wood of Rajeuse to Pontigny, with the consent of "Isabel uxor Anselli", by charter dated [25 Mar 1152/24 Mar 1153], witnessed by “Guillelmus archidiaconus, Herveus prepositus frater eius...[777].  A charter dated to after 1151 recites the donation of “feodum de Thori” by “Symon Pichered” to Dilo abbey, confirmed by "Garnerus…de Venisiaco a quo feodum illud Symon tenebat et uxor Garini Petronilla sed et filius eius Ansellus", and a later donation confirmed by "Ansellus…de Venisiaco…et frater Anselli, Freherus, sed et uxor sua Elisabeth", as well as other donations by Anseau, Isabelle and Ferry[778]

 

 

 

 

 



[1] See the map at Challe (1878), between pp. 112 and 113.

[2] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58. 

[3] Histoire d’Auxerre (1850), Tome III, p. 24. 

[4] Reginonis Chronicon 888, MGH SS I, p. 598. 

[5] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 5, MGH SS XIII, p. 402. 

[6] Ex Heirici Miraculis S. Germani 5, MGH SS XIII, p. 402. 

[7] Annales Bertiniani III 866. 

[8] Histoire d’Auxerre (1850), Tome III, p. 41. 

[9] Karoli II Conventus Silvacensis, Missi…et pagi… 8, MGH LL 1, p. 426. 

[10] McKitterick (1983), p. 266. 

[11] Reginonis Chronicon 861, MGH SS I, p. 571. 

[12] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 456.  

[13] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 457. 

[14] Annales Bertiniani 865, MGH SS I, p. 470. 

[15] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 471. 

[16] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 473. 

[17] Adonis Continuatio Prima, Auctore Anonymo 866, MGH SS II, p. 324. 

[18] Histoire d’Auxerre (1850), Tome III, p. 39. 

[19] Histoire d’Auxerre (1850), Tome III, p. 39. 

[20] Chronique de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon (1875), p. 113. 

[21] Chaume (1925), Vol. 1, p. 369. 

[22] Dijon Saint-Bénigne I, 154, p. 172. 

[23] Annales Bertiniani III 882. 

[24] Cluny, Tome III, 2678, p. 707.   

[25] Cluny, Tome III, 2781, p. 805. 

[26] Cluny, Tome IV, 2811, p. 13. 

[27] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 316. 

[28] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 316. 

[29] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 316. 

[30] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 316. 

[31] Hugonis Pictavini Libro de Libertate Monasterii Vizeliacensis, MGH SS XXVI, p. 140. 

[32] Autun (Charmasse), Vol. II, 11, p. 96. 

[33] Roberti Canonici S Mariani Autissiodorensis Chronicon 1168, MGH SS XXVI, p. 239. 

[34] Bouchard (1987), p. 348. 

[35] Autun (Charmasse), Vol. II, 11, p. 96. 

[36] Roberti Canonici S Mariani Autissiodorensis Chronicon 1168, MGH SS XXVI, p. 239. 

[37] Bouchard (1987), p. 348. 

[38] Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorensis, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 249. 

[39] Bouchard (1987), p. 349. 

[40] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1217, MGH SS XXIII, p. 906. 

[41] Nécrologe de la Cathédrale de Nevers, Never Saint-Cyr, p. 214. 

[42] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 458. 

[43] Chronologia Roberti Altissiodorensis, RHGF, Tome XVIII, p. 249. 

[44] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 457-8. 

[45] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1217, MGH SS XXIII, p. 906. 

[46] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 902. 

[47] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 130. 

[48] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 88. 

[49] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 12. 

[50] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 17. 

[51] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 160.  

[52] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 179. 

[53] Hugues de Chalon, 530, p. 386. 

[54] Hugues de Chalon, 489, p. 349. 

[55] Yonne (suite), 682, p. 344. 

[56] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 147. 

[57] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), XLI, p. 62. 

[58] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), L, p. 78. 

[59] Monumenta Zollerana (1843), LXVII, p. 101. 

[60] Guillaume (1757), Tome I, Preuves, p. 160. 

[61] Hugues de Chalon 489, p. 349. 

[62] Duchesne (Bourgogne), Preuves, p. 88. 

[63] Yonne (suite), 682, p. 344. 

[64] Huillard-Bréholles (1867), Tome I, 816, p. 146. 

[65] Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 700. 

[66] State Archives, volume 102, page 18.2, fascicule 1. 

[67] State Archives, volume 102, page 17.2, fascicule 3. 

[68] Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 154. 

[69] State Archives, volume 102, page 17, fascicule 1. 

[70] State Archives, volume 109, page 17, fascicule 2. 

[71] ES III 121. 

[72] State Archives, volume 104, pages 34 and 37, fascicules 21.1, 21.2 and 21.3, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 150. 

[73] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 35, p. 19.  

[74] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 22, p. 16. 

[75] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[76] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 22, p. 16. 

[77] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 214, p. 91.  

[78] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 218, footnote (1).  

[79] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[80] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[81] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[82] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[83] State Archives, volume 102, page 49, fascicule 1, and page 49.2 fascicule 4. 

[84] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 214, p. 91. 

[85] State Archives, volume 102, page 49.2 fascicule 5. 

[86] State Archives, volume 102, pages 49.1 and 49.2, fascicule 4, respectively. 

[87] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 475, p. 201.  

[88] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 25, p. 17. 

[89] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[90] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 65, footnote (1) citing “MSS. Chiflet, Miscellanea”.  

[91] Guichenon (Bresse/Bugey), IV Partie, Preuves, col. 252. 

[92] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 36, p. 21.  

[93] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 214, p. 91.  

[94] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 400, p. 168.  

[95] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 36, p. 21.  

[96] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 427, p. 180.  

[97] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 165, footnote (1) quoting “Lettres datées de Salins du 12 Mai 1369”.  

[98] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 52, p. 30.  

[99] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 421, p. 177.  

[100] Héraldique et Généalogie, no. 181 (2006), Montluel, p, 324, citing Arch. Nales. P 13893, cote 351. 

[101] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 531, p. 227.  

[102] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 427, p. 180.  

[103] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 27, p. 18. 

[104] Robert (1901), Tome 1, 116, p. 511. 

[105] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 28, p. 18. 

[106] Pelot (2012), p. 464. 

[107] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 27, p. 18. 

[108] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 27, B. 28, p. 18. 

[109] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 254, no citation reference.  

[110] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 28, p. 18. 

[111] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 533, p. 227.  

[112] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 28, p. 18. 

[113] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 254, no citation reference.  

[114] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 264, footnote (2), no citation reference.  

[115] Soulingeas (2001), Tome II, Sassenage, p. 30. 

[116] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 27, p. 18. 

[117] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 27, p. 18. 

[118] Robert (1901), Tome 1, 116, p. 511. 

[119] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 254, no citation reference.  

[120] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 337, p. 140.  

[121] Soulingeas (2001), Tome II, Sassenage, p. 30. 

[122] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 423, p. 179.  

[123] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 263, p. 109.  

[124] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 214, p. 91.  

[125] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 218, footnote (1).  

[126] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 254, no citation reference.  

[127] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 215, p. 91.  

[128] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 216, p. 92.  

[129] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 216, p. 92.  

[130] Robert (1901), Tome 1, 131, p. 538. 

[131] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 216, p. 92.  

[132] Robert (1907), Tome II, 146, p. 31. 

[133] Clerc (1846), Tome II, p. 245, no citation reference.  

[134] Robert (1901), Tome 1, 131, p. 538. 

[135] Inventaire Sommaire - Côte-d’Or série B (1878), Tome 5, B. 11699, p. 153.  

[136] Robert (1901), Tome 1, 131, p. 538. 

[137] Inventaire Sommaire - Côte-d’Or série B (1878), Tome 5, B. 11699, p. 153.  

[138] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 216, p. 92.  

[139] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 30, p. 19.  

[140] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 35, p. 21.  

[141] Richemond (1908), Vol. II, table following p. 98. 

[142] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 35, p. 21.  

[143] Actes royaux du Poitou, Tome 3, CCCLVIII, p. 33 

[144] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 397, p. 167.  

[145] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 36, p. 21.  

[146] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 397, p. 167.  

[147] Inventaire sommaire -Côte-d’Or série B (1878), Tome 5, B. 11699, p. 153.   

[148] ES XIV 58. 

[149] Auloy & Mouillebouche, p. 32. 

[150] ES XIV 58. 

[151] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 524 (no primary source citation reference). 

[152] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 558. 

[153] Marolles (1873), col. 172. 

[154] Marolles (1873), col. 172. 

[155] Père Anselme, Tome I, pp. 558-9. 

[156] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 524 (no primary source citation reference). 

[157] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 558. 

[158] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[159] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[160] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[161] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[162] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[163] Père Anselme, Tome VII, pp. 3-4. 

[164] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 4. 

[165] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 4. 

[166] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 4. 

[167] Père Anselme, Tome VII, pp. 1-2, 4. 

[168] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 4. 

[169] Père Anselme, Tome II, p. 224, and Tome VII, p. 4. 

[170] Père Anselme, Tome VII, pp. 4-5. 

[171] Père Anselme, Tome VII, pp. 4-10. 

[172] Père Anselme, Tome VII, pp. 4, 834. 

[173] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 4. 

[174] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 4. 

[175] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[176] Père Anselme, Tome VII, p. 3. 

[177] Duchesne (1625) Vergy, Preuves, p. 165. 

[178] Duchesne (1625) Vergy, Preuves, p. 168. 

[179] Yonne (suite), 8, p. 4. 

[180] Duchesne (1625) Vergy, Preuves, p. 172. 

[181] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[182] Petit, Vol. IV, 1912, p. 238. 

[183] Autun (Charmasse), Vol. I, LXII, p. 142. 

[184] Yonne (suite), 8, p. 4. 

[185] Jully-les-Nonnains, p. 26. 

[186] Duchesne (1625) Vergy, Preuves, p. 172. 

[187] Duchesne (1625) Vergy, Preuves, p. 173. 

[188] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[189] Petit, Vol. IV, 1912, p. 238. 

[190] Autun (Charmasse), Vol. I, LXII, p. 142. 

[191] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[192] Petit, Vol. IV, 1912, p. 238. 

[193] Autun (Charmasse), Vol. I, LXII, p. 142. 

[194] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 708, p. 403. 

[195] Delaborde, Seigneurs de Joinville, Actes, 717, p. 405. 

[196] ES XV 125, extinct in the male line in 1418. 

[197] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[198] Petit, Vol. IV, 2901, p. 439. 

[199] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[200] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[201] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes V, 279, p. 91. 

[202] Du Boucher (1662), p. 60. 

[203] Petit, Vol. IV, 1608, p. 182. 

[204] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome II], 20, p. 23. 

[205] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 272, p. 63. 

[206] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome II], 20, p. 23. 

[207] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 1, p. 1. 

[208] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome II], 20, p. 23. 

[209] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 1, p. 1. 

[210] Cîteaux, 164, p. 130. 

[211] Cîteaux, 164, p. 130. 

[212] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 105, p. 117. 

[213] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 105, p. 117. 

[214] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 105, p. 117. 

[215] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 105, p. 117. 

[216] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome IV], 105, p. 117. 

[217] Cîteaux, 164, p. 130. 

[218] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Fascicule 3, Appendix, p. 259, quoting A. N. LL 1397 fol. 22. 

[219] Yonne, Tome  II, CCXII, p. 229. 

[220] Yonne, Tome II, CCXXVI, p. 242. 

[221] La Charité-sur-Loire, LXXIII, p. 167. 

[222] La Charité-sur-Loire, LXXIV, p. 168. 

[223] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXXXVIII, p. 352. 

[224] Yonne, Tome II, CCCLVI, p. 367. 

[225] Poligny, 342, p. 344. 

[226] Yonne, Tome II, CDL, p. 459. 

[227] Yonne, Tome II, CDLXVI, p. 475. 

[228] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2157, p. 232. 

[229] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, 97, p. 65. 

[230] Yonne (suite), 71, p. 33. 

[231] Yonne (suite), 177, p. 80. 

[232] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 58. 

[233] Molinier (1887) De Glorioso Rege Ludovico, Ludovici filio, XIX, p. 167. 

[234] Delisle (1856), 1330-1334, p. 305. 

[235] Yonne, Tome II, CCXXVI, p. 242. 

[236] Chantereau le Febvre (1662), Autres preuves par les Actes, p. 150. 

[237] La Charité-sur-Loire, LXXIII, p. 167. 

[238] Pontigny, 342, p. 344. 

[239] Yonne, Tome II, CCXXVI, p. 242. 

[240] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2142, p. 230, citing ‘Cartul. du Liget’. 

[241] Delisle (1856), 1329, p. 304. 

[242] Yonne (suite), 177, p. 80. 

[243] Yonne (suite), 198, p. 89. 

[244] Yonne (suite), 216, p. 96. 

[245] Yonne (suite), 285, p. 124. 

[246] Chantereau le Febvre (1662), Autres preuves par les Actes, p. 150. 

[247] Yonne (suite), 420, p. 190. 

[248] Pontigny, 194, p. 240. 

[249] Yonne (suite), 878, p. 407. 

[250] Guyard de la Fosse (1850), Preuves, XXX.  

[251] Pontigny, 250, p. 282. 

[252] Pontigny, 251, p. 283. 

[253] Pontigny, 194, p. 240. 

[254] Abbayette Saint-Michel, 33, p. 43. 

[255] Guyard de la Fosse (1850), Preuves, XXX.  

[256] La Thaumassière (1679), p. 728. 

[257] Delisle (1856), 1329, p. 304. 

[258] Paraclet, 155, p. 157. 

[259] Yonne (suite), 878, p. 407. 

[260] Yonne, Tome II, CCXXVI, p. 242. 

[261] Pontigny, 342, p. 344. 

[262] Yonne (suite), 71, p. 33. 

[263] Yonne (suite), 177, p. 80. 

[264] Yonne (suite), 176, p. 80. 

[265] Yonne (suite), 285, p. 124. 

[266] Chantereau le Febvre (1662), Autres preuves par les Actes, p. 150. 

[267] Yonne (suite), 467, p. 211. 

[268] Yonne (suite), 879, p. 407. 

[269] Yonne (suite), 482, p. 224. 

[270] Gallia Christiana, Tome XII, Instrumenta Ecclesiæ Autissiodorensis, col. 163, and Yonne (suite), 763, p. 393. 

[271] Yonne (suite), 176, p. 80. 

[272] Laurentii Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium Continuatio, 9, MGH SS VIII, p. 521. 

[273] Gallia Christiana, Tome XII, Instrumenta Ecclesiæ Autissiodorensis, col. 163, and Yonne (suite), 763, p. 393. 

[274] Yonne (suite), 578, p. 278. 

[275] Yonne (suite), 701, p. 356. 

[276] Yonne (suite), 599, p. 292. 

[277] Petit, Vol. IV, 3002, p. 473. 

[278] Petit, Vol. IV, 2460, p. 336. 

[279] Pontigny, 193, p. 240. 

[280] Petit, Vol. IV, 3002, p. 473. 

[281] Petit, Vol. IV, 2460, p. 336. 

[282] Pontigny, 193, p. 240. 

[283] Yonne (suite), 771, p. 394. 

[284] Baluze (1708) Auvergne, Tome II, p. 298. 

[285] Petit ‘Villehardouin’ (1912), pp. 50-1. 

[286] Baluze (1708) Auvergne, Tome II, p. 318. 

[287] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 65 (no citation reference). 

[288] ES XIV 58. 

[289] Père Anselme, Tome VI, pp. 64, 276. 

[290] Maussabré (1860), p. 17, citing Invent. des tit. du duché de Châteauroux, t. IV, p. 497. 

[291] Maussabré (1860), p. 18, citing Tit. du chap. de St-Hilaire; Rec. de dom Fontenau, t. II, p. 431. 

[292] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 128. 

[293] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, 212, p. 122. 

[294] Yonne (suite), 1137, p. 431. 

[295] Laurentii Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium Continuatio, 9, MGH SS VIII, p. 521. 

[296] Annales Sancti Vitoni Virdunensis, MGH SS VIII, p. 528. 

[297] Pontigny, 250, p. 282. 

[298] Yonne (suite), 599, p. 292. 

[299] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, 213, p. 123. 

[300] Huillard-Bréholles (1867), Tome I, 176, p. 37. 

[301] Yonne (suite), 899, p. 410. 

[302] Petit, Vol. V, p. 437. 

[303] Yonne (suite), 771, p. 394. 

[304] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, 212, p. 122. 

[305] Yonne (suite), 1138, p. 431. 

[306] Petit, Vol. V, p. 442. 

[307] Yonne (suite), 1138, p. 431. 

[308] Inventaire sommaire - Doubs série B (1883), B. 35, p. 19.  

[309] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Chronique des comtes d’Eu, p. 447. 

[310] La Roque (1662), Tome III, p. 238. 

[311] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 299. 

[312] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 300. 

[313] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 486, pp. 292, 335. 

[314] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 501, p. 359.  

[315] Lalore (1885), 223, p. 115, quoting Archives de l’Yonne, E. 548. 

[316] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 299. 

[317] Lalore (1885), 223, p. 115, quoting Archives de l’Yonne, E. 548. 

[318] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 300. 

[319] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 299. 

[320] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 300. 

[321] Duchesne (1631) Dreux, Dreux, Preuves, p. 300. 

[322] ES III 652. 

[323] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), p. 249, citing Archives de Dijon, Recueil de Peincedé

[324] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), p. 249, citing Archives de Dijon, Recueil de Peincedé

[325] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 652 (no citation reference). 

[326] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912. 

[327] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 674. 

[328] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXVI, p. 369. 

[329] Yonne, Tome I, XXCIX, p. 169. 

[330] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[331] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[332] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[333] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[334] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[335] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[336] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXXI, p. 433. 

[337] Yonne, Tome I, CCXCII, p. 447. 

[338] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXVII, p. 467. 

[339] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLIII, p. 511. 

[340] Yonne, Tome II, XCII, p. 99. 

[341] Yonne, Tome II, XCIII, p. 101. 

[342] Yonne, Tome II, CCXLIII, p. 262. 

[343] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 29/305, footnote (5). 

[344] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXXV, p. 438. 

[345] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[346] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXVII, p. 467. 

[347] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLIII, p. 511. 

[348] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 1ère Partie, p. 72. 

[349] Yonne, Tome II, CCXLIII, p. 262. 

[350] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 29/305, footnote (5). 

[351] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXXV, p. 438. 

[352] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[353] Yonne, Tome I, CCX, p. 349. 

[354] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLIII, p. 511. 

[355] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXVII, p. 467. 

[356] Yonne, Tome II, CCXLIII, p. 262. 

[357] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 29/305, footnote (5). 

[358] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXXV, p. 438. 

[359] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXXXIII, p. 349. 

[360] Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXVIII, p. 395. 

[361] Yonne, Tome II, CCXLIII, p. 262. 

[362] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 29/305, footnote (5). 

[363] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXXV, p. 438. 

[364] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXXXIII, p. 349. 

[365] Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXVIII, p. 395. 

[366] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 3ème Partie, p. 95. 

[367] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), p. 113. 

[368] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXXXIII, p. 349. 

[369] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXXXIII, p. 349. 

[370] Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXVIII, p. 395. 

[371] Yonne, Tome II, CLXXXVII, p. 204. 

[372] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXIII, p. 366. 

[373] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLIII, p. 511. 

[374] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXIV, p. 367. 

[375] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXIV, p. 367. 

[376] Yonne, Tome I, CCXCII, p. 447. 

[377] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXIII, p. 474.  

[378] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLIII, p. 511. 

[379] Yonne, Tome II, LXXIX, p. 84. 

[380] Yonne, Tome II, CIX, p. 117. 

[381] Yonne, Tome II, CLXXXIV, p. 201. 

[382] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXIV, p. 367. 

[383] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXIII, p. 474. 

[384] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXIII, p. 474. 

[385] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXIII, p. 474. 

[386] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXIII, p. 474. 

[387] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXIV, p. 367. 

[388] Yonne (suite), 498, p. 229. 

[389] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 30/306, footnote (3). 

[390] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 46/322, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 62”. 

[391] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 675. 

[392] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXXXIII, p. 349. 

[393] Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXVIII, p. 395. 

[394] Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXVIII, p. 377. 

[395] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome V, 815, p. 72, full list of signatories at Tome IV, Part II, p. 558, footnote (b). 

[396] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 6ème Partie, p. 156. 

[397] Yonne (suite), 360, p. 161. 

[398] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 6ème Partie, p. 152. 

[399] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 6ème Partie, p. 156. 

[400] Henry (1839) Pontigny, Pièces justificatives, p. 378. 

[401] Molesme, Tome II, 92, p. 292. 

[402] Molesme, Tome II, 93, p. 292. 

[403] Yonne (suite), 465, p. 211. 

[404] Yonne (suite), 467, p. 211. 

[405] Henry (1839) Pontigny, Pièces justificatives, p. 380. 

[406] Molesme, Tome II, 95, p. 293. 

[407] Molesme, Tome II, 96, p. 293. 

[408] Molesme, Tome II, 134, p. 309. 

[409] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 675. 

[410] Yonne (suite), 360, p. 161. 

[411] Molesme, Tome II, 92, p. 292. 

[412] Molesme, Tome II, 93, p. 292. 

[413] Yonne (suite), 467, p. 211. 

[414] Henry (1839) Pontigny, Pièces justificatives, p. 380. 

[415] Petit, Vol. IV, 2901, p. 439. 

[416] Henry (1839) Pontigny, Pièces justificatives, p. 380. 

[417] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 45/321, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 15”. 

[418] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 46/322, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 52”. 

[419] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 675. 

[420] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 45/321, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 15”. 

[421] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 45/321, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 15”. 

[422] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 45/321, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 15”. 

[423] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 675. 

[424] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 45/321, no citation reference. 

[425] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome VI, 3782, p. 89. 

[426] Yonne (suite), 896, p. 409. 

[427] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 46/322, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, pp. 36, 76”. 

[428] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 46/322, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, pp. 36, 76”. 

[429] ES XIII 63. 

[430] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 46/322, citing “Cartul. de l’Hôtel-Dieu de Saint-Florentin, Tome I, p. 62”. 

[431] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 675. 

[432] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 675. 

[433] Hermelin ‘Histoire de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 47/323. 

[434] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227. 

[435] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 676. 

[436] Hermelin ‘Histoire de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, Pièces justificatives, III, p. 349/625. 

[437] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 228, footnote (1). 

[438] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome VI, 3752, p. 83. 

[439] Arbois de Jubainville, Tome VI, 3752, p. 83. 

[440] Henry (1839) Pontigny, Pièces justificatives, p. 387. 

[441] Bouchard ‘Seignelay’ (1979), pp. 39-56, and Bouchard (1987), Appendix A, pp. 354-7. 

[442] Henry (1833, 1853) Seignelay, Tomes 1, 2. 

[443] Bouchard ‘Seignelay’ (1979), p. 40, footnote 6. 

[444] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, pp. 225-32. 

[445] Glabri Rodulphi Historiarum, RHGF, Tome X, Liber V, Cap. I, p. 57. 

[446] Glabri Rodulphi Historiarum, RHGF, Tome X, Liber V, Cap. I, p. 57. 

[447] Yonne, Tome I, XXCIX, p. 169. 

[448] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 226. 

[449] Quantin, M. ‘Une sentence de Guillaume Ier Comte de Nevers de l’an 1106’, Bulletin de la Société des Sciences historiques et naturelles de l’Yonne, Année 1886, Vol. 40 (Auxerre, Paris 1886), pp. 231-4. 

[450] Bouchard (1987), p. 355. 

[451] Yonne, Tome I, CXL, p. 258. 

[452] Pontigny, 110, p. 178. 

[453] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[454] Bouchard (1987), p. 355. 

[455] Yonne, Tome I, CXL, p. 258. 

[456] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), pp. 98-9. 

[457] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 226. 

[458] ES XV 126. 

[459] Pontigny, 217, p. 256. 

[460] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, p. 447. 

[461] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[462] Bouchard ‘Seignelay’ (1979), p. 47, footnote 29, citing “Cart. de Molesme 2 (Paris 1911) 153, no. 1.160”. 

[463] Projet CBMA - Chartæ Burgundiæ Medii Aevi, “Molesme”, Tome 2 “TXT2” and “DOC2” <http://www.cbma-project.eu/21-accueil/71-cartulaire-de-l%E2%80%99abbaye-de-molesme.html> (consulted 9 Jul 2021). 

[464] Yonne, Tome I, CXL, p. 258. 

[465] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[466] Pontigny, 138, p. 197, and Yonne, Tome I, CCXXVIII, p. 372. 

[467] Pontigny, 140, p. 199. 

[468] Pontigny, 145, p. 204, and Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXI, p. 422. 

[469] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXX, p. 470. 

[470] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[471] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLXVIII, p. 527. 

[472] Pontigny, 140, p. 199. 

[473] Pontigny, 145, p. 204. 

[474] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[475] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[476] Pontigny, 129, p. 190. 

[477] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXC, p. 397. 

[478] ES XIII 149. 

[479] Pontigny, 217, p. 256. 

[480] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[481] Pontigny, 138, p. 197, and Yonne, Tome I, CCXXVIII, p. 372. 

[482] Pontigny, 145, p. 204, and Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXI, p. 422. 

[483] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXX, p. 470. 

[484] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[485] Yonne, Tome I, CCCLXVIII, p. 527. 

[486] Yonne, Tome II, CXXI, p. 130. 

[487] Yonne, Tome II, CCL, p. 268. 

[488] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXX, p. 470. 

[489] Bouchard (1987), p. 356. 

[490] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, pp. 451, 454. 

[491] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, p. 457. 

[492] Gallia Christiana, Tome VIII, col. 1459. 

[493] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1210, MGH SS XXIII, p. 891. 

[494] Gallia Christiana, Tome VIII, col. 1462. 

[495] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, pp. 451, 454. 

[496] Gallia Christiana, Tome XII, col. 300. 

[497] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1210, MGH SS XXIII, p. 891. 

[498] Gallia Christiana, Tome VII, col. 91. 

[499] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1220, MGH SS XXIII, p. 910. 

[500] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1223, MGH SS XXIII, p. 913. 

[501] Obituaires de Sens, Tome I, Sens Cathedral, p. 13. 

[502] Obituaires de Sens, Tome III, Auxerre Cathedral, p. 261. 

[503] Bouchard ‘Seignelay’ (1979), p. 53. 

[504] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, p. 457. 

[505] Yonne (suite), 10, p. 5. 

[506] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[507] Pontigny, 138, p. 197, and Yonne, Tome I, CCXXVIII, p. 372.  

[508] Pontigny, 145, p. 204, and Yonne, Tome I, CCLXXI, p. 422. 

[509] Nevers Saint-Cyr, 101, p. 168. 

[510] Yonne, Tome II, CXXI, p. 130. 

[511] Nevers Saint-Cyr, 111, p. 187. 

[512] Pontigny, 134, p. 194. 

[513] Pontigny, 8, p. 89. 

[514] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXLV, p. 358. 

[515] Bouchard ‘Seignelay’ (1979), p. 50. 

[516] Douët d’Arcq, Sceaux, Tome II, 3216, p. 27. 

[517] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXLV, p. 358. 

[518] Pontigny, 217, p. 256. 

[519] Yonne, Tome II, CDX, p. 415. 

[520] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXLV, p. 358. 

[521] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXLV, p. 358. 

[522] Obituaires de Sens, Tome III, Auxerre Cathedral, p. 256. 

[523] Yonne, Tome II, CXXI, p. 130. 

[524] Bouchard ‘Seignelay’ (1979), p. 50. 

[525] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 326. 

[526] Petit ‘Sires de Noyers’ (1874), p. 98. 

[527] Jenni Chandler, by emails dated Jun/Jul 2021.  

[528] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, pp. 451, 453. 

[529] Yonne, Tome I, CCXLI, p. 385. 

[530] Pontigny, 106, p. 176. 

[531] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[532] Gallia Christiana, Tome XII, col. 53. 

[533] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[534] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, Tome I, p. 447. 

[535] Gallia Christiana, Tome XII, col. 55. 

[536] Obituaires de Sens, Tome III, Auxerre Cathedral, p. 224. 

[537] Obituaires de Sens, Tome III, Auxerre Cathedral, “Nécrologe du chanoine Potel”, p. 269. 

[538] Pontigny, 110, p. 178, and Yonne, Tome I, CXLI, p. 259. 

[539] Pontigny, 110, p. 178, and Yonne, Tome I, CXLI, p. 259. 

[540] Pontigny, 110, p. 178, and Yonne, Tome I, CXLI, p. 259. 

[541] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[542] Pontigny, 110, p. 178, and Yonne, Tome I, CXLI, p. 259. 

[543] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[544] Pontigny, 138, p. 197, and Yonne, Tome I, CCXXVIII, p. 372. 

[545] Pontigny, 140, p. 199. 

[546] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[547] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[548] Pontigny, 130, p. 191. 

[549] Pontigny, 140, p. 199. 

[550] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[551] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[552] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[553] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[554] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[555] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[556] Pontigny, 139, p. 198. 

[557] Pontigny, 113, p. 180. 

[558] Pontigny, 113, p. 180. 

[559] Pontigny, 113, p. 180. 

[560] Pontigny, 113, p. 180. 

[561] Pontigny, 117, p. 183. 

[562] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXXXIV, p. 487. 

[563] Pontigny, 113, p. 180. 

[564] Pontigny, 129, p. 190. 

[565] Yonne, Tome II, CCCXLIV, p. 357. 

[566] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[567] Pontigny, 149, p. 206. 

[568] Yonne, Tome II, CDX, p. 415. 

[569] Ex Continuatore Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, Cap. XLVII, Bouchet (1661), Preuves, p. 4. 

[570] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[571] Pontigny, 149, p. 206. 

[572] Yonne, Tome II, CDX, p. 415. 

[573] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[574] Pontigny, 149, p. 206. 

[575] Yonne, Tome II, CDX, p. 415. 

[576] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 11, p. 239. 

[577] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 13, p. 240. 

[578] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 13, p. 240. 

[579] Yonne (suite), 260, p. 113. 

[580] Faget de Casteljau ‘Choiseul’ (1972), p. 158. 

[581] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 13, p. 240. 

[582] Yonne (suite), 260, p. 113. 

[583] Pontigny, 232, p. 266. 

[584] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 19, p. 244. 

[585] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 20, p. 249. 

[586] Pontigny, 232, p. 266. 

[587] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 20, p. 249. 

[588] Pontigny, 176, p. 228. 

[589] Pontigny, 232, p. 266. 

[590] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 19, p. 244. 

[591] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[592] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[593] Pontigny, 149, p. 206. 

[594] Yonne, Tome II, CDX, p. 415. 

[595] Pontigny, 153, p. 209, and Yonne, Tome II, CCCLXXXIV, p. 392. 

[596] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 226. 

[597] Pontigny, 176, p. 228. 

[598] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 25, p. 254. 

[599] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 27, p. 255. 

[600] Pontigny, 198, p. 243. 

[601] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 29, p. 257. 

[602] Henry (1839) Pontigny, Pièces justificatives, p. 383. 

[603] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 30, p. 258. 

[604] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 258. 

[605] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 32, p. 259. 

[606] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 24, p. 252. 

[607] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 25, p. 254. 

[608] Hermelin ‘Histoire de la ville de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 47/323, footnote (4). 

[609] Henry (1833, 1853) Seignelay, Tome 1, p. 189, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227. 

[610] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227, footnote (2). 

[611] Inventaire Sommaire - Yonne série H (1888), Tome III, IIe partie, p. 526. 

[612] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 34, p. 261. 

[613] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 35, p. 261. 

[614] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 36, p. 265. 

[615] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 37, p. 266. 

[616] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227. 

[617] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227. 

[618] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227, footnote (2). 

[619] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227, footnote (2). 

[620] Inventaire Sommaire - Yonne série H (1888), Tome III, IIe partie, p. 526. 

[621] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227, footnote (2). 

[622] Inventaire Sommaire - Yonne série H (1888), Tome III, IIe partie, p. 526. 

[623] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 34, p. 261. 

[624] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227, footnote (2). 

[625] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227, footnote (2). 

[626] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, pp. 227-8. 

[627] Hermelin ‘Histoire de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, p. 47/323. 

[628] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 227. 

[629] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, p. 676. 

[630] Hermelin ‘Histoire de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, Pièces justificatives, III, p. 349/625. 

[631] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 228, footnote (1). 

[632] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, pp. 227-8. 

[633] Hermelin ‘Histoire de Saint-Florentin’ 1911/1912, Pièces justificatives, III, p. 349/625. 

[634] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, 297, p. 182. 

[635] Petit, Tome VIII (1903), 8454, p. 465. 

[636] Petit ‘Villehardouin’ (1912), p. 59. 

[637] Petit ‘Villehardouin’ (1912), p. 59. 

[638] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 39, p. 268. 

[639] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier, H. (26 Jan 1926) Deux Bourguignons au service du roi de France 1355-1420, La Châtellenie de Seignelay sous Philippe et Charles de Savoisy [listed at Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, Vol. 87 (Paris, 1926), p. 222, descriptive notice at Les Archives Départementales de l’Yonne <https://archivesenligne.yonne.fr/ark:/56431/vta1cb7be094c0bd87a> (16 Jul 2021)], consulted at <https://seignelay.blog4ever.com/philippe-et-charles-de-savoisy-la-chatellenie-de-seignelay-seignelayles-usages-bassou-hauterive-beine-poinchy-cheny-ormoy-bouilly-poilly-sur-serein> (15 Jul 2021), link sent by Jenni Chandler,

[640] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[641] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[642] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[643] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[644] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 560. 

[645] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 228. 

[646] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[647] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 229. 

[648] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[649] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[650] “Seignelay, son histoire” (1 Oct 2011), extract from Forestier (26 Jan 1926),

[651] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 549. 

[652] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 41, p. 270. 

[653] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 40, p. 269. 

[654] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 551. 

[655] Duchesne (1621) Châtillon, Preuves, p. 222. 

[656] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 41, p. 270. 

[657] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 43, p. 279. 

[658] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 552. 

[659] Père Anselme, Tome VIII, p. 552. 

[660] Henry (1853) Seignelay, Tome 2, Pièces justificatives, 1, pp. 231-. 

[661] Bouchard (1987), p. 374. 

[662] Molesme II, 53, p. 63. 

[663] Yonne, Tome I, CIII, p. 199. 

[664] Bouchard (1987), p. 374. 

[665] Yonne, Tome I, CIII, p. 199. 

[666] Molesme II, 53, p. 63. 

[667] Bouchard (1987), p. 374. 

[668] Yonne, Tome I, CIII, p. 199. 

[669] Yonne, Tome I, CIII, p. 199. 

[670] Molesme II, 54, p. 64. 

[671] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire CVII, p. 267, and Yonne, Tome I, CXVII, p. 220. 

[672] Molesme II, 53, p. 63. 

[673] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire CVII, p. 267, and Yonne, Tome I, CXVII, p. 220. 

[674] Jully-les-Nonnains 1134, p. 12. 

[675] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 35. 

[676] Molesme II, 53, p. 63. 

[677] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire 107, 164 (I:267-9, 351-6), cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 374. 

[678] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire CVII, p. 267, and Yonne, Tome I, CXVII, p. 220. 

[679] Molesme II, 54, p. 64. 

[680] Jully-les-Nonnains 1134, p. 12. 

[681] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 35. 

[682] Yonne, Tome I, 267, p. 418. 

[683] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 38. 

[684] Pontigny, 69, p. 140. 

[685] Molinier (1887) De Glorioso Rege Ludovico, Ludovici filio, X, p. 158. 

[686] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 38. 

[687] Pontigny, 69, p. 140. 

[688] Yonne, Tome II, 212, p. 229. 

[689] Yonne, Tome II, 212, p. 229. 

[690] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire CLXXIII, p. 399. 

[691] Molesme II, 54, p. 64. 

[692] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 35. 

[693] Jully-les-Nonnains 1134, p. 12. 

[694] Yonne, Tome I, CLXXIV, p. 296. 

[695] Yonne, Tome I, CLXXIV, p. 296. 

[696] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 53, and Yonne, Tome II, 279, p. 298. 

[697] ES III 435. 

[698] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 41. 

[699] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 38. 

[700] Pontigny, 69, p. 140. 

[701] Pontigny, 48, p. 121. 

[702] Bouchard (1987), p. 374. 

[703] Yonne, Tome II, 212, p. 229. 

[704] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire CLXXIII, p. 399. 

[705] Bouchard (1987), p. 375. 

[706] Yonne (suite), 5, p. 3. 

[707] Longnon (1901), Tome I, Les Fiefs, 4ème Partie, p. 111. 

[708] Petit (1887), Vol. III, 1468, p. 484. 

[709] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 81. 

[710] Pontigny, 320, p. 330. 

[711] Toulgoët-Treanna (1884), p. 114 footnote 4, quoting the extract in full, without citation reference, incorrectly attributed to Jacobus de Vitriaco Historia Orientalis

[712] Petit, Vol. III, 1126, p. 405. 

[713] Petit, Vol. III, 1468, p. 484. 

[714] Petit, Vol. III, 1395, p. 467. 

[715] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 81. 

[716] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye de Maizières, p. 624.       

[717] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 288, p. 171. 

[718] Dugdale Monasticon III, Shrewsbury Abbey, XI, Genealogia Dominorum Bellismontium, p. 522.   

[719] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 333, p. 206. 

[720] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 340, p. 208. 

[721] Paris Notre-Dame Tome II, IV, XVII, p. 160. 

[722] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 381, p. 222. 

[723] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Joyenval, p. 292.       

[724] Yonne (suite), 711, p. 364. 

[725] Calmet (1728), Tome II, Preuves, col. dxviii. 

[726] Duchesne (1631), Bar, Preuves, p. 38. 

[727] Pontigny, 320, p. 330. 

[728] Histoire d’Auxerre (1855), Tome IV, p. 92. 

[729] Yonne (suite), 517, p. 243. 

[730] See ES III 114. 

[731] Yonne (suite), 5, p. 3. 

[732] Yonne (suite), 5, p. 3. 

[733] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1205 and 1235, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 885 and 939. 

[734] Runciman (1952, 1978), Vol. 3, pp. 404-5. 

[735] Amadi, p. 213. 

[736] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 95. 

[737] Amadi, p. 218. 

[738] Hopf (1873), Marino Sanudo Torsello Historia del Regno di Romania, I, p. 113. 

[739] Livre de la conqueste de la princée de la Morée, p. 177. 

[740] Livre de la conqueste de la princée de la Morée, Prologue, p. 29. 

[741] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1235, MGH SS XXIII, p. 939. 

[742] Miller (1908), p. 98.  Rodd (1907) 1 131 footnote 2, points out that Sanudo calls him "native of Champagne like his brother". 

[743] Miller (1908), p. 145. 

[744] Yonne, Tome I, CCL, p. 400. 

[745] Yonne, Tome I, CCL, p. 400. 

[746] Yonne, Tome I, CCXIII, p. 353. 

[747] Yonne, Tome I, CXCV, p. 333. 

[748] Yonne, Tome I, CCXIII, p. 353. 

[749] Yonne, Tome I, CCXXIV, p. 367. 

[750] Yonne, Tome I, CCI, p. 339. 

[751] Yonne, Tome I, CCXIII, p. 353. 

[752] Yonne, Tome I, CCL, p. 400. 

[753] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXII, p. 414. 

[754] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXL, p. 494. 

[755] Yonne, Tome I, CCXIII, p. 353. 

[756] Pontigny, 83, p. 152. 

[757] Yonne, Tome I, CCL, p. 400. 

[758] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXII, p. 414. 

[759] Yonne, Tome I, CCXIII, p. 353. 

[760] Yonne, Tome I, CCL, p. 400. 

[761] Yonne, Tome I, CCLXII, p. 414. 

[762] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXIII, p. 465. 

[763] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXL, p. 494. 

[764] Pontigny, 74, p. 144. 

[765] Patrologia Latina, Vol. CCXVI, Innocentii III PP Regestorum Lib. XVI, IX, X and XII, cols. 979 and 982. 

[766] Pontigny, 74, p. 144. 

[767] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXL, p. 494. 

[768] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 78 footnote 63, citing Catel, A. and Lecomte, M. (eds.) (1927) Chartes et documents de l'abbaye cisterciennes de Preuilly (Paris), 183 (not yet consulted). 

[769] ES XIV 146. 

[770] Leroy ‘Diplôme inédit du roi Louis VII...Barbeau’ (1909), pp. 127-31. 

[771] Pontigny, 82, p. 151. 

[772] Montiéramey, 109, p. 139. 

[773] Patrologia Latina, Vol. CCXVI, Innocentii III PP Regestorum Lib. XVI, IX, X and XII, cols. 979 and 982. 

[774] Yonne (suite), 63, p. 28. 

[775] Yonne (suite), 103, p. 46. 

[776] Yonne, Tome I, CCXIII, p. 353. 

[777] Pontigny, 74, p. 144. 

[778] Yonne, Tome I, CCCXL, p. 494.