ENGLISH LORDS L - O

v4.2 Updated 25 March 2020

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

LISLE. 2

A.         ORIGINS.. 2

B.         LORDS LISLE.. 3

LUCY. 3

A.         ORIGINS.. 4

B.         LORDS LUCY.. 12

LORDS MARMION. 13

LORDS MOHAUT. 24

MOHUN. 30

A.         ORIGINS.. 30

B.         LORDS MOHUN.. 40

MONTAGU. 42

A.         ORIGINS.. 42

B.         LORDS MONTAGU.. 47

MOUNTFORT (MONTFORT) 51

A.         MONTFORT. 51

B.         LORDS MOUNTFORT. 58

MOWBRAY. 58

LORDS MULTON. 67

NEVILLE. 70

A.         ORIGINS.. 71

B.         NEVILLE (DUNBAR/FITZMALDRED) 79

C.        LORDS NEVILLE (of Raby) 82

 

 

 

 

LISLE

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Lisle (-after 1129).  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Scamston” by “Robertus de Insula et uxor eius Albreda[1].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Insula" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[2]m ALBREDA, daughter of ---.  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Scamston” by “Robertus de Insula et uxor eius Albreda[3]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Lislem ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Red Book of the Exchequer which records three knights’ fees escheated from "Thomas Dispensator cum filia et hærede Hugonis de Insula" in "[Ly]bernby in Norhamtesira…in Lubestorp in Leyecestresira…in Torp in Notinghamsira…[de honore] Piperelli de Notingham" in [1211/12][4]m THOMAS Le Despencer, son of THOMAS Le Despencer & his wife --- (-before 1218). 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS LISLE

 

 

1.         JOHN de LisleLord Lislem PERNEL, daughter of ---.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         BARTHOLOMEW de Lisle ([1307/08]-15 Aug 1345).  He succeeded his father in 1331 as Lord Lisle.  m (1329 or before) ELIZABETH de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay [later Earl of Devon] & his wife Agnes de St John (-after Apr 1364).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names (in order) “Elianoram…et Elizabetham” as the two daughters of ”dominus Hugo secundus” & his wife, adding that Elizabeth married “domini Bartholomei de Lydell[5]

 

 

 

LUCY

 

 

The Complete Peerage says that “this family appears to have taken its name from Lucé, a commune in the département of Orne, about six kilometres south-east of Domfront, and in the bailiwick of Passeis”, commenting that “Lucé lies geographically in Maine, and its real connection with Normandy dates from the occupation in 1092 of Domfront, the castle of Robert Bellême, by Henry Beauclerc, then Count of the Cotentin”[6].  The Red Book of the Exchequer lists fees "De Baillia de Basseis/Passeis" in Normandy in 1172, including "Ricardus de Lusceio i militem, et sibi xvii milites"[7]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         --- de Lucym AVELINE, daughter of ---.  A charter of King Henry IV records donations by “Ricardi de Lucy…Avelinam matrem præfati Ricardi de Lucy” of their property “Newenthon…Rypen et in insula de Scapeye et in insula de Gryen[8].  Children: 

a)         RICHARD de Lucy (-[1179/80]).  A charter of King Henry IV records donations by “Ricardi de Lucy…Avelinam matrem præfati Ricardi de Lucy” of their property “Newenthon…Rypen et in insula de Scapeye et in insula de Gryen[9].  "Ricardo de Lucy et Gaufrido Martel et Osberto Martel" witnessed the charter dated to [1149/54] under which King Stephen confirmed liberties of Abbotsbury abbey[10].  Justiciar of England.  The 1155 Pipe Roll record "Ric de Luci" in London, Norfolk, Suffolk and many other places[11]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had five children: 

i)          GEOFFREY de Lucy (-before [1179/80]).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[12].  The 1155 Pipe Roll record "Gaufr de Luceio" in Essex[13].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Lucy" holding "i militis" in Devonshire[14]m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had six children: 

(a)       MATILDA de Lucy (-after 1230).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised, noting that "predicta Roeisie de Douera filia…Galfridi de Lucy" had "tres sorores…Matillidem…primogenita et maritata Willelmo de Bello Campo…aliam Mabiliam…que obiit sine herede et Auelinam…maritata…Radulfo Patric"[15].  Her parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[16]m WILLIAM de Beauchamp, son of ---. 

(b)       ROHESE de Lucy (-after 1194).  Her parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[17].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Rohesia de Doure" in Kent "pro habenda medietate terrarum que fuerunt Ricardi de Luci avi sui et quas postea Ricardus frater ipsius Rohesie habuit tam in Anglia quam in Normannia" and "pro licenctia maritandi se ubi voluerit"[18].  "Willelmus Briwer" paid a fine for "custodia terre et heredum Fobti de Dovr…et…custodia dotis Roes de Dovr", dated 1204[19].  "Nicol fil Alan et Roes de Dovr ux eius" paid a fine for "dote ipsius Roes" in Essex and Kent, dated 1205[20].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1223, into "terre…Newetona" disputed between "Henricum de Cobbeham" and "Wilhelmus Briwere", which found that "Roheysia de Douere filia Gaufridi de Lucy primogeniti filii Ricardi de Lucy" held the land which, after confiscation, was restored to "predicta Roeysia" who with "Nicholas vir suus" gave it to "Willelmo Briwere"[21]m firstly JOHN de Dover, son of WILLIAM de Dover & his wife --- (-1194).  m secondly (1205) NICHOLAS FitzAlan, son of ALAN & his wife ---. 

(c)       MABILIA de Lucy .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised, noting that "predicta Roeisie de Douera filia…Galfridi de Lucy" had "tres sorores…Matillidem…primogenita et maritata Willelmo de Bello Campo…aliam Mabiliam…que obiit sine herede et Auelinam…maritata…Radulfo Patric"[22]

(d)       AVELINE de Lucy .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised, noting that "predicta Roeisie de Douera filia…Galfridi de Lucy" had "tres sorores…Matillidem…primogenita et maritata Willelmo de Bello Campo…aliam Mabiliam…que obiit sine herede et Auelinam…maritata…Radulfo Patric"[23]m RALPH Patrick, son of ---. 

(e)       RICHARD de Lucy (-[1183]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", reciting that "Ricardo de Lucy…Gaufrido filio suo" had "duos filios Ricardum et Herbertum et unam filiam Roesiam predictam aviam suam", both sons dying without direct heirs[24]

(f)        HERBERT de Lucy ([1170/71]-1190).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “Herbertus de Luci…xiv annorum” was in the custody of “Godefridi de Luci”, referring to land “quod comes Glovecestrie dedit Ricardo de Lucy[25].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", reciting that "Ricardo de Lucy…Gaufrido filio suo" had "duos filios Ricardum et Herbertum et unam filiam Roesiam predictam aviam suam", both sons dying without direct heirs[26].  His parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isi Royse…filie et heredi suo"[27]

ii)         GODFREY de Lucy .  Bishop of Winchester.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “Herbertus de Luci…xiv annorum” was in the custody of “Godefridi de Luci”, referring to land “quod comes Glovecestrie dedit Ricardo de Lucy[28]

iii)        MATILDA de Lucy .  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardo de Luce" granted "Disce" in Norfolk to "Waltero filio Roberti…in maritagio cum filia sua", adding that it was currently held by "Robertus filius Walteri"[29].  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated property to Daventre Priory, for the souls of “…uxoris meæ Matildis de Lucy et filiorum et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter[30].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[31]m as his first wife, WALTER FitzRobert of Dunmow, son of ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare & his wife Maud de Senlis (-1198, bur Dunmow Priory). 

iv)       ALICE de Lucy .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[32]m ODINEL [II] de Umfraville, son of --- (-1182). 

v)        AVELINE de Lucy .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[33].  A charter of King Henry III, dated 16 Aug 1257, records donations to Ankerwyke Nunnery, including the donations of "partum…Wymede" by "Gilberti de Munfichet et Avelinæ uxoris eius"[34]m GILBERT de Montfichet, son of WILLIAM de Montfichet & his wife Margaret de Clare (-[1186/87]).  

b)         WALTER de Lucy .  Abbot of Battle. 

c)         ROBERT de Lucy (-before 1205).  m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  "Marger de Lucy" paid a fine for "dote sua…de terra q fuit Rob de Lucy quondam viri sui" in Dorset, dated 1205[35].  "Margareta de Lucy" paid a fine for "hereditate sua de Kerchel et de Hammes q Rob de Lucy quondam vir eius" pawned to the Jews during his lifetime, in Dorset, dated 1208[36].  Robert & his wife one child: 

i)          --- de Lucy .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus filius Galfridi de Tresgoz”, 17 years old, under the guardianship of "Roberti de Luci" whose daughter he had married, with land "de honore Peverelli…terra…de Toleshunt"[37]m (1185 or before) WILLIAM [III] de Tresgoz, son of GEOFFREY de Tresgoz & his wife --- de Gresley ([1167/68]-after [1210/12]). 

 

 

1.         MARGARET de Lucy It has not yet proved possible to identify the parentage of Margaret de Lucy.  William de Chesney recorded that he obtained Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire from "domino et fratre meo Roberto de Caisneto Lincolniensi episcopo" by two undated charters, one issued at Lincoln witnessed by “Ralf de Chesney and William his brother my nephews, Alexander de Chesney and Ralf his brother my cognati”, the other at Verneuil witnessed by “Marg de Luci uxore mea, Rad. de Caisneto et Willelmo fratre suo nepotibus meis, Milone de Langetot et Milone filio suo...[38]m WILLIAM de Chesney, son of ROGER de Chesney & his wife Alice de Langetot (-[1164/70]). 

 

 

1.         REYNOLD de Lucy (-[Jan 1199/1200]).  The chronology suggests that Reynold was another brother of Richard de Lucy, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not been identified.  Keeper of Nottingham castle when it was burnt by Earl Ferrers in the rebellion of 1174[39]m (before 1162) AMABEL, daughter of WILLIAM FitzDuncan [of Scotland] & his second wife Alice Le Meschin (-before 1201).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “prima…Cecilia…secunda Amabilla…tertia Alicia” as the three daughters of “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, and his wife Alice, adding that Amabel received the honor of Egremont and married “Reginaldo de Lucy”, by whom he fathered “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon”, the latter being succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[40].  Co-heiress of her brother.  Lady of Egremont and Copeland.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Stutevill" held "villam de Thorpennoi de domino rege" in Cumberland which was "de baronia Alicie de Rumill" and that "Reginaldus de Lucy" had held the land "cum sorore predicte Alicie" and refused homage to "Philippi de Valoines, antecessoris predicti Roberti et uxoris sue"[41].  Reynold & his wife had three children: 

a)         RICHARD de Lucy (-early 1213, bur St Bees priory).  "Ric de Luci fil Reginaldi de Luci" paid a fine for "terra sua de Copland et in Cautebige" relating to a claim against "B. com Albemarl et uxore sua et versus Rob de Curtenay et Alic uxorem suam", dated 1200[42].  "Ricardus de Lucy" donated land "in villa de Louswater", and confirmed the donation of "prato et capellam eiusdem ville" donated by "Rann[ulfi] de Lyndesey et Hetrede sponse sue", to St Bees, for the salvation of "Ade uxoris mee", by undated charter[43].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Ricardus de Lucy" holding "Coupland" in Cumberland, adding that King Henry I had first granted it to "Willelmo Messchin antecessori predicti Ricardi"[44].  m (before [1205/06]) as her first husband, ADA de Morville, daughter of HUGH de Morville & his wife Helwise de Stuteville (-after 20 Feb 1227).  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Luci accounts for 900 marks and five palfreys for having Alda his wife’s reasonable share...of Hugh de Moreville her father’s land"[45].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[46].  "Ada q fuit uxor Ricardi de Lucy de Egremunt" paid a fine for "hereditate sua [et] dote sua…q fuerunt predicti Ricardi quondam viri sui" in Cumberland, dated 1213[47].  She married secondly (before 13 Aug 1218) as his second wife, Thomas de Multon of Multon, near Spalding, Lincolnshire.  Henry III King of England noted that "Thomas de Muleton" married "Adam de Morevill, que fuit uxor Ricardi de Luci" without royal licence, and ordered the seizure of "omnibus terris ipsius Ade in Cumberlande et Westmerilande et de omnibus terris ipsius Thome in Coplande, cum castro suo de Egremunde", dated 13 Aug 1218[48].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Thomas de Muleton” owing “de pluribis debitis Ricardi de Lucy...et...pro Alda que fuit uxor eiusdem Ricardi” in Essex[49].  A royal licence granted the right to construct fisheries to "Thomas de Muleton and Ada his wife" dated 20 Feb 1227[50].  Richard & his wife had two children: 

i)          AMABEL de Lucy .  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[51].  "Lambertus de Moleton" donated rights in land "in Couplandia" to St Bees, for the soul of "Amabilie uxoris mee", by undated charter[52]m LAMBERT de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his first wife --- (-1246). 

ii)         ALICE de Lucy (-before 24 Mar 1288)The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[53]m (1219 or before) ALAN de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his first wife --- (-after 1250).  Their children adopted the name Lucy.  "Thomam de Lucy filium quondam Alani de Multon" and St Bees settled their dispute over "Lowswater" dated 10 May 1286[54]

b)         --- de Lucy .  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Richard de Lucy" gave "Wolenested…medietatem…hundredum de Tenhrigg" in Surrey to "Odoni de Dammartin cum sorore sua in maritagium"[55]m as his first wife, EUDES [IV] de Dammartin, son of WILLIAM de Dammartin & his wife --- (-after 1212). 

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY de Lucym (1204) as her second husband, ---, widow of SIMON de Tilleul, daughter of ---.  "Gaufr de Lucy" paid a fine for "maritage uxoris q fuit Sim de Tilloll" in Cumberland, dated 1204[56]

 

2.         PHILIP de Lucy (-after 1205).  "Philippus de Lucy" paid a fine for "custodia Ric de Warewic cum terram suam" in Yorkshire, dated 1205[57]

 

3.         ROGER de Lucy (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Rogerus de Lucy" holding "xv l in Iclinton"[58].  

 

4.         REYNOLD de Lucy (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Reginaldus de Lucy" holding "Wolcnestede…Langeho"[59].  

 

5.         LETITIA (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Leticia de Lucy, Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neovill, Ema de Marcy" holding "iv milites…in Heaumedon, Dubenhog, La Lee, Crawell"[60].  

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Lucym ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had four children: 

a)         EMMA de Lucy (-before [Feb] 1222).  "Henry de Pinkeni and Leticia his wife" and "Serlo de Marci and Emma his wife" granted land "in Cristehale" to "William Barun", dated [1198/99][61].  "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne", dated [Feb] 1222[62]m SERLO de Marcy, son of ---. 

b)         BEATRICE de Lucy (-after 29 Sep 1223).  "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne", dated [Feb] 1222[63].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni Milo de Sumeri et Beatricia de Lucy” owing in Essex[64]

c)         LETITIA de Lucy (-[1210/22])Domesday Descendants names "Letitia daughter and co-heir of Robert de Lucy, possibly the nephew of Richard de Lucy the justiciar" as the wife of Henry de Pinkeney, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[65].  "Henry de Pinkeni and Leticia his wife" and "Serlo de Marci and Emma his wife" granted land "in Cristehale" to "William Barun", dated [1198/99][66].  If this is correct, the precise family relationship has not yet been traced.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neville, Letitia de Pinkeyni, Serlo de Marcy" holding one knight’s fee each "in Elmedene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][67].  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by an order dated [Feb] 1222 under which "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[68]m HENRY de Pinkeney, son of GILBERT de Pinkeney & his first wife Eustachia --- (-1209). 

d)         --- de Lucy (-before 1222).  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by an order dated [Feb] 1222 under which "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[69]m --- de Somery, son of ---. 

 

 

ALAN de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his first wife Sarah de Flete (-after 1250).  Their children adopted the name Lucy.  "Thomam de Lucy filium quondam Alani de Multon" and St Bees settled their dispute over "Lowswater" dated 10 May 1286[70]

m ALICE de Lucy, son of RICHARD de Lucy & his wife Ada de Moreville (-before 24 Mar 1288).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[71]

Alan & his wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Lucy (-before 9 Apr 1305).  m ISABEL de Bolteby, daughter of ADAM de Bolteby & his wife Philippa de Tyndal.  Thomas & his wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS de Lucy ([1280/81]-before 24 Aug 1308).  m CHRISTIAN, daughter of --- (-after 1319). 

b)         ANTHONY de Lucy ([1282/83]-before 10 Jun 1343).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1321 whereby he is held to have become Lord Lucy

-        see below

 

 

 

B.      LORDS LUCY

 

 

ANTHONY de Lucy, son of THOMAS de Lucy & his wife Isabel de Bolteby ([1282/83]-before 10 Jun 1343).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1321 whereby he is held to have become Lord Lucy

m ELIZABETH, daughter of ---. 

Anthony & his wife had children:

1.         THOMAS de Lucy (-London 5 Dec 1365)Lord Lucym firstly ([Nov 1329]) MARGARET de Multon, daughter of THOMAS de Multon of Egremont & his wife --- ([1309/10]-after Sep 1341).  m secondly ([Jul 1343) AGNES de Beaumont, daughter of HENRY Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Alice Ctss of Buchan (-after 1359).  Thomas & his first wife had children: 

a)         ANTHONY de Lucy ([1340/41]-19 Aug or 16 Sep 1368)Lord Lucym (pardon for marrying without royal licence 29 Apr 1366) as her second husband, JOAN, widow of WILLIAM de Greystoke Lord Greystoke, daughter of HENRY FitzHenry of Ravensworth & his wife Joan de Fourneux (-Clerkenwell 1 Sep 1403, bur Clerkenwell).  She married thirdly (before 6 May 1378) Sir Matthew Redman.  Anthony & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOAN de Lucy (1366- 30 Sep 1369). 

b)         REGINALD de Lucy (-[1362/65])m (early 1347) as her first husband, EUPHEMIA Neville, widow of ROBERT Clifford Lord Clifford, daughter of RALPH Neville Lord Neville of Raby & his wife Alice de Audley (-[Oct/Nov] 1393).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[72].  She married thirdly Sir Walter de Heslarton

c)         MATILDA de Lucy (-18 Dec 1398).  Baroness Lucy.  m firstly as his second wife, GILBERT de Umfraville Earl of Angus, son of ROBERT de Umfraville Earl of Angus & his wife Lucy de Kyme ([1310]-6 Jan 1381).  m secondly (15 Dec 1381 or before) as her second husband, HENRY de Percy Earl of Northumberland, son of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his first wife Mary of Lancaster (10 Nov 1341-killed in battle Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster 19 Feb 1408, bur York Minster). 

2.         JOAN de Lucym WILLIAM de Melton, son of ---. 

3.         LUCY de Lucy (-bur Neasham Priory)m as his first wife, WILLIAM de Greystoke Lord Greystoke, son of RALPH de Greystoke Lord Greystoke & his wife Alice de Audley (Grimthorpe 6 Jan 1321-Brancepeth 10 Jul 1359). 

 

 

 

LORDS MARMION

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Fontenay-le-Marmion in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Bourguébus[73].  Vautier suggests that the Marmion family held the seigneurie de Fontenay "dès le principe, elle fut probablement créée pour eux", but adds that part of the seigneurie was transferred to the FitzErneis family with the marriage of Gersende Marmion, daughter of Robert Marmion [I], to Robert [II] FitzErneis[74]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME Marmion (-after 29 Aug 1060).  "…Willelmo Marmio…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[75]

 

2.         ROGER Marmion (-after 1066).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Rogier Marmion" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[76].  The accuracy of this statement is unknown. 

 

3.         ROBERT Marmion [I] (-after 1086, maybe after 1113).  Vaultier states that Robert Marmion was granted Tamworth for his part in the conquest of England and the lordship of "Scrivelsbye" in Lincolnshire[77].  [The Chronicle of Bermondsey records that in 1113 “Robertus Marmyon” donated “hidam de Wideflet...” to Bermondsey abbey[78].  It is not known to which Robert Marmion this relates.]  m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after [presumably misdated][79].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Haudvise uxoris Roberti Marmion" of land "in Sancto Georgio et in Jurkis et molendinum de la Boista et le Parket", by charter dated to [1180/82][80].  Robert [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROGER Marmion (-after [1115/18], maybe [1129]).  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after [presumably misdated][81].  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Roger Marmiun" with "ii milites" held from "abbatia de Burch" [in Hampshire][82].  The Lindsey Survey, dated to [1115/18], records "Roger Marmion" holding land in Fulstow [held at Domesday by Robert Marmion], Tatwell, Scrivelsby and other places [all held at Domesday by Robert Despencer][83].  The 1130 Pipe Roll entry of his son Robert Marmion [III] suggests that Roger may have died shortly before that date.  m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Marmion [III] of Tamworth, Staffordshire (-killed in battle [1143/44]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1144] under which King Stephen granted the land of "Rogeri avi sui et Roberti Marmium patris sui" to [his grandson] "Roberto Marmium"[84]

-         see below

b)         HELTON Marmion .  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after [presumably misdated][85]

c)         MANASSES Marmion .  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after [presumably misdated][86]

d)         GERSENDE Marmion .  She is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the donation by "Robertus…et Gersendis uxor mea filia Roberti Marmionis"[87].  Vaultier dates this donation quoted in the charter to after 1087[88]m ([before 1087]) ROBERT [II] FitzErneis, son of ROBERT [I] FitzErneis & his wife ---. 

 

4.         ROBERT Marmion [II] (-after 1091).  "…Rotberti Marmion…" consented to the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[89].  "…Robert Marmion…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[90].  From a chronological point of view, it is possible that Robert Marmion [II] was the same person as Robert [I]. 

 

5.         WALTER Marmion .  “Baderon de Monemue” donated property in Monmouth to Monmouth Priory, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Gileberti et Jacobi”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Waltero Marmiun…"[91]

 

6.         GEOFFREY Marmion (-after 1158).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfrido Marmion" in Warwick in [1158/59][92]

 

 

ROBERT Marmion [III] of Tamworth, Staffordshire, son of ROGER Marmion & his wife --- (-killed in battle [1143/44]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1144] under which King Stephen granted the land of "Rogeri avi sui et Roberti Marmium patris sui" to [his grandson] "Roberto Marmium"[93].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt Marmion" owing in Lincolnshire for “terre patris sui[94].  William of Newburgh records that “Robertus...Marmiun...homo bellicosus, ferocia, astutia, audacia, feri nulli suo tempore impar”, who had expelled the monks from Coventry church, was killed by a soldier in the Earl of Chester’s army, maybe dated to [1143/44][95].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barberie, including donations by "Roberti Marmium, concessione Roberti filii sui et uxoris sue et filiarum suarum", by charter dated to [1182/89][96].  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[97]

m as her first husband, MELISENDE de Rethel, daughter of GERVAIS de Rethel & his wife Elisabeth de Namur ([1121/23]-after 1154).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that [her stepfather] "Clarenbaldus de Roseto" alienated the lands of “filiastram suam Gervasii filiam” and married her to "cuidam nobili Roberto Marmioni de Normannia", without giving her name[98].  The Complete Peerage names her “Elizabeth” and identifies her husband as Robert Marmion [IV] without citing any primary source on which it bases this statement[99].  From a chronological point of view, it is more likely that the husband of Gervais de Rethel’s daughter was Robert Marmion [III], considering especially that Robert [III]’s wife had three known children by her second husband whom she married after Robert died in [1143/44].  If that is correct, other sources quoted below confirm that Robert [III]’s wife was named Mélisende, not Elisabeth, presumably after her paternal grandmother.  She married secondly (after [1143/44]) as his second wife, Richard [I] de Camville.  A charter dated to [1200], recounting the history of a donation of land to Eynsham abbey, records that King [Henry I] granted “Stantonam [cum] quadam femina” to “Roberto Marmiun”, and that “post Robertum Marmiun” the king granted “predictam Milisent” to “Ricardo de Kamuilla[100].  Domesday Descendants refers to the second marriage of Mélisende, whom it calls “a kinswoman of Queen Adelicia[101].  The primary source which confirms Mélisende’s family connection with the second wife of Henry I King of England has not been identified.  The Victoria County History of Oxfordshire states that the queen “before 1141...gave to her kinswoman Millicent, wife of Robert Marmion, land in Stanton Harcourt and South Leigh...”, without citing the corresponding primary source[102].  In light of the previous information, her second marriage is indicated by the charter dated 1154 under which Henry Duke of Normandy [the future King Henry II] confirmed Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire to "Milicenti uxori Ricardi de Camvilla in feodo et hereditate sibi…sicut regina Adelisia…in maritagium dedit" by charter dated 1154[103].  “Ricardus de Camvilla” donated “terciam partem decimarum...apud Hottoth” to Jumièges, for the souls of “uxoris mee Adelicie et sequentis uxoris mee Milesente...Rogeri fratris mei”, by charter dated [5 Apr 1170/27 Mar 1171], subscribed by “Ricardi filii mei...[104].  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney made by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[105]

Robert [III] & his wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT Marmion [IV] (-before Oct 1181).  King Stephen granted the land of "Rogeri avi sui et Roberti Marmium patris sui" to "Roberto Marmium" by charter dated to [1144][106].  "[Rodbertus] Marmiun" donated land in Roughton to Kirkstead abbey by charter dated 1163[107].  [The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Rob fil Milesent" accounting for land in Yorkshire[108].  It is not certain that this entry relates to Robert Marmion [IV], but this looks probable because Melisende was not a common name in England at that time.]  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus Marmion vii l xii s viii d, de novo lxx s" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1167/68][109].  "…Simon de Tornebu, Robertus Marmion et Willelmus de Glanvilla" reported the results of an enquiry into rights to the church of Surrain by charter dated Jan 1176[110].  "…Roberto Marmion…" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the freedoms of the town of Rouen[111].  Robert [IV] died before Oct 1181, the date of his son’s confirmation to Barberie abbey (see below).  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barberie, including donations made by "Roberti Marmium, concessione Roberti filii sui et uxoris sue et filiarum suarum", by charter dated to [1182/89][112]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife has not been found.  The Complete Peerage names “Elizabeth, daughter of Gervase, son of Hugh Count of Rethel” as the wife of Robert Marmion [IV] without citing any primary source on which it bases this statement[113].  As noted above, it is more likely that the daughter of Gervais de Rethel was the wife of Robert Marmion [III].  Robert [IV] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT Marmion [V] (-before [1217]).  "Robert Marmion, fils de Robert" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Barberie made by his father by charter dated Oct 1181[114]

-        see below

2.         daughters .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barberie, including donations by "Roberti Marmium, concessione Roberti filii sui et uxoris sue et filiarum suarum", by charter dated to [1182/89][115].  The number of daughters is not known. 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage of the following family members have not been identified. 

 

1.         GEOFFREY Marmion (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Galfridus Marmiun" held one knight’s fee from "Roberti Marmiun" in Warwickshire[116]

 

2.         ALBREDA Marmion (-after 1220).  King John confirmed "castellum et villam de Landesteph" to "G. de Camvill fil Will de Kamvill", naming "Albred Marmion matre ipsius Gaufridi", by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[117].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Albreda Marmiun" against "Henricum de Aldithelega" for "ecclesiam de Cliftona", adding that she had custody of "terram…Gaufrido de Camuilla filio suo"[118]m WILLIAM de Camville, son of --- (-before 25 Apr 1200). 

 

 

ROBERT Marmion [V], son of ROBERT Marmion [IV] & his wife --- (-before [1217]).  "Robert Marmion, fils de Robert" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Barberie made by his father by charter dated Oct 1181[119].  "Raoul Taisson, fils de Jourdain Taisson" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and confirmed the donations by "Robert Marmion" by undated charter[120].  Henry II King of England confirmed the franchise of pleas for the land of "Roberti Marmium" by charter dated to [1172/89][121].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Marmion" paying "cxiv s vi d" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire[122].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Robertus Marmiun" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire[123].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus Marmion" paying "x s, dimidium militem" in Northamptonshire[124].  The date of his death is difficult to assess, the question being complicated by his having two sons named Robert by his two marriages, the younger of whom was named “junior” in contemporary documents, being junior to his older brother not to his father. 

m firstly MATILDA de Beauchamp, daughter of WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley & his wife [Emmeline] de Abitot.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Robert Marmion, neveu de Guillaume de Beauchamp" made a declaration concerning a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and the charter dated 1224 under which "Robert Marmion le jeune, fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp" donated property to the same abbey[125]

m secondly PHILIPPA, daughter of --- (-after 1223).  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to a claim by "Philippa Marmiun" against "Robertum Marmiun seniorem filium et heredum Roberti Marmiun" relating to "tenemento in Tamewurth et in Middeltun…dotis [sue]" dated 6 Jan 1221, received by "Roberto Marmiun juniori…et ipsam matrem suam secum"[126].  No indication of her parentage has been found. 

Robert [V] & his first wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT Marmion [VI] (-1241).  "Robert Marmion, neveu de Guillaume de Beauchamp" made a declaration concerning a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by undated charter[127].  [The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Marmyun" holding one knight’s fee in "Scrivelby" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][128].  It is uncertain whether this entry refers to Robert Marmion [VI] or to Robert [V].]  Robert [VI] was disinherited during the early part of the reign of King Henry III, as shown by the fine paid by "Robert Marmion juniorfor having custody of Tamworth castle and of the lands formerly of Robert his father…", subject to "his brother Robert senior [coming] to the king’s peace", dated to [1217/18][129].  Henry III King of England ordered that the lands of "Roberti Marmiun" be granted to "Robertum Marmiun filium suum primogenitum", except for agreements with "Robertum Marmiun juniorem fratrem suum", dated 25 Nov 1220[130].  "Robert Marmion le jeune, fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1224[131].  "Robertus Marmion, filius Matillis de Bello Campo" granted property to "Radulfo Porto Aloe de Roquancourt" for his loyal service by charter dated 1233[132].  Matthew Paris names "…Robertus Marmiun…" among those who died in 1241[133]m JULIANA, daughter of PHILIP de Vassy & his wife ---.  "Philippus Marmion" names "Roberti Marmiun patris mei, et Willelmi Marmiun patrui mei…Juliane de Vauceio matris mee" in a charter dated 22 Oct 1246 which records the sale of Fontenay le Marmion[134].  Robert [VI] & his wife had one child: 

a)         PHILIP Marmion (-[20 Apr 1290/5 Dec 1291]).  "Philip son of Robert Marmiun" was granted lands by his father dated 10 Dec 1239[135].  "Philippus Marmion" sold Fontenay le Marmion, previously held by "Roberti Marmion patris mei, et Willelmi Marmion patrui mei" to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated 2 Nov 1245[136].  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[137]m firstly (1247 or before) JOAN, daughter of HUGH de Kilpeck & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "dicunt quod Hugo de Kilpe[k] tenuit manerium de Parva Teynton...habuit duas filias...heredes, quarum Philippus Marmiun desponsavit unam et Willelmus de Cantilupo habet custodiam alterius..."[138]. m secondly MARY, daughter of --- (-before 26 Sep 1313).  Philip & his first wife had three children: 

i)          JOAN (-before 13 Aug 1295).  m WILLIAM de Morteyn, son of ---. 

ii)         MAZERA (-before 1291).  m RALPH de Cromwell, son of ---. 

iii)        MATILDAm RALPH le Butler, son of ---. 

Philip & his second wife had one child: 

iv)       JOANm firstly THOMAS de Ludlow, son of ---.  m secondly HENRY Hillary, son of ---. 

Philip had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

v)         ROBERTm ISABEL, daughter of GILES FitzRalph & his wife ---. 

2.         MABEL .  The primary sources which confirm her parentage and two marriages have not been identified.  m firstly HUGH de Say [II], son of HUGH de Say [I] & his wife Lucy Clifford ([1165/70]-killed in battle ([1196]).  m secondly (before Mar 1200) REGINALD, son of ---. 

Robert [V] & his second wife had two children: 

3.         ROBERT Marmion [VII] (-before 23 Oct 1242).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Robertus Marmiun junior" dated 1216[139].  Henry III King of England granted "castri de Tamewurth et terrarum que fuerunt Robert patris sui" to "Robertus Marmium junior" dated 16 May 1218[140].  "Robert Marmion junior" paid a fine for "having custody of Tamworth castle and of the lands formerly of Robert his father…", default to "William brother of Robert junior", subject to "his brother Robert senior [coming] to the king’s peace", dated to [1217/18][141].  Henry III King of England ordered that the lands of "Roberti Marmiun" be granted to "Robertum Marmiun filium suum primogenitum", except for agreements with "Robertum Marmiun juniorem fratrem suum", dated 25 Nov 1220[142].  “Radulfus Basset” confirmed donations to Canwell priory by “Geua Ridel et pater meus Radulfus Basset”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Roberto Marmion, Willielmo Marmion filio suo…"[143]m AVICE, daughter of GERNEGAN de Tanfield & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are discussed in the Complete Peerage which cites the corresponding primary sources[144].   Robert [VII] & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Marmion (-27 Jul 1275).  “Radulfus Basset” confirmed donations to Canwell priory by “Geua Ridel et pater meus Radulfus Basset”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Roberto Marmion, Willielmo Marmion filio suo…"[145].  "Guillaume Marmion, clerc, fils de Robert Marmion, fils du fondateur de Barberie" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie, for the soul of "son jeune frère Robert", by charter dated 1238, confirmed by "Robert Marmion fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp"[146].  He supported the Barons against King Henry III, was summoned to Parliament by Simon de Montfort, and pardoned by the king 1 Jul 1267[147]m (1248) LORETTE, daughter of [RICHARD FitzJohn [FitzRoy] & his wife Rohese de Dover] (-after 1248).  In the Complete Peerage, she is described as the daughter of "Royce, daughter and heiress of Robert of Dover" who granted the manor of Luddington in 1248 to her daughter and son-in-law[148].  An assize of last presentation brought by the king in 1261 against "William Marmion and Lauretta" shows that "Lauretta was the daughter of Richard FitzRoy"[149]. 

-        LORDS MARMION[150]

b)         ROBERT Marmion .  "Guillaume Marmion, clerc, fils de Robert Marmion, fils du fondateur de Barberie" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie, for the soul of "son jeune frère Robert", by charter dated 1238[151]

4.         WILLIAM Marmion (-after Oct 1257).  "Robert Marmion junior" paid a fine for "having custody of Tamworth castle and of the lands formerly of Robert his father…", default to "William brother of Robert junior", subject to "his brother Robert senior [coming] to the king’s peace", dated to [1217/18][152].  "Philippus Marmion" sold Fontenay le Marmion, previously held by "Roberti Marmion patris mei, et Willelmi Marmion patrui mei" to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated 2 Nov 1245[153].  "Willelmus Marmion" sold property to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated Oct 1257[154]

 

 

The identity of the following person has not been ascertained.  It has not been possible to deduce precise chronological information from the only source so far identified, quoted below, in which he and his wife are named.  The impression is that Dugdale’s transcriptions followed a roughly chronological order, and other extracts on the same folio can be dated to the 13th century.  If that dating is correct, the donation would have been too late for Christiana to have been the widow of Robert Marmion [IV] who, as shown above, is the only head of the family for whom no wife has yet been identified.  There is of course no guarantee that any of the other later individuals named Robert Marmion did not have second wives whose marriages were otherwise unrecorded in primary sources.  Robert could also have been a younger son (for example no information has been found relating to Robert, younger son of Robert Marmion [VII], apart from the 1238 charter which is quoted above) or a member of one of the unconnected Marmion families who are shown below.  No other references to the name Christiana have been found in the Marmion family, which suggests that Christiana de Monte was not an ancestor in the direct line. 

 

1.         ROBERT Marmionm CHRISTIANA de Monte, daughter of RANDOLPH de Monte & his wife ---.  Dugdale summarises the following donation.  The original charter has not been located.  “Christiana filia Rondolfi de Monte que fui uxor Robti Marmiun” donated all rights in a salt deposit (“totum ius in salina”, location unspecified) which “Ricardus clericus de Monte” had held “de domo de Bordesleg” to Bordesley St Mary, Worcestershire, witnessed by “Gregorio de Crom-[155].  Christiana’s family has not been identified, although the manor of Hillend in Worcestershire probably originated in land at Castlemorton held by “Odo de Monte or Hill” in the late 1230s[156]

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the precise relationships, if any, between the following individuals and the main Marmion family have not been identified. 

 

1.         MAURICE Marmion .  "Mauricius Marmion miles" sold property to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated Apr 1245[157]

 

2.         THOMAS Marmionm ---.  The name of Thomas’s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Marmion .  "Guillaume Marmion, fils de Thomas Marmion, chevalier" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1248[158]

 

3.         ROBERT Marmionm ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER Marmion .  "Roger Marmion chevalier, fils de Robert Marmion" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1258[159]

 

 

1.         GEOFFROY Marmion .  "Geoffroy Marmion" confirmed a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by undated charter[160]

 

2.         GUILLAUME Marmion d’Urvillem ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER .  "Roger fils de Guillaume Marmion d’Urville" confirmed a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by undated charter[161].  "Roger Marmion chevalier, fils de Guillaume Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Fontenay by charter dated 1225[162]

 

3.         --- Marmionm JEANNE, daughter of --- & his wife Marguerite de May.  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1237 under which her son "Roger Marmion fils de Jeanne Marmion, fille de Marguerite de May" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie[163].  One child: 

a)         ROGER Marmion .  "Roger Marmion fils de Jeanne Marmion, fille de Marguerite de May" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1237[164]

 

4.         JEAN Marmion (-before 15 Dec 1282).  m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean Marmion & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEAN Marmion .  "Johannes Marmion armiger, filius quondam Johannis Marmion militis defuncti" donated property "in feodo Nicolai Marmion, in feodo Guillelmi Marmion, in feodo Laurencie Marmion, in feodo Roberti de Urvilla, in feodo Roberti de Touschet, armigeri defuncti" by charter dated 15 Dec 1282[165]

 

 

 

LORDS MOHAUT

 

 

1.         NORMANm ---.  The name of Norman’s wife is not known.  Norman & his wife had three children: 

a)         HUGH (-before 1130).  “Comes Ricardus” confirmed donations to Chester St. Werburgh, including the donation of “Gosetre [Goostrey] et Lautonam [Lawton]” made by “Hugo filius Normanni”, witnessed by “Hugone de Lasci et Radulfo et Rogero filiis Normanni”, by charter dated 1119[166]m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Hug fil Normani" owing in Suffolk for “terra patris sui q Rad dapif com Hug tenet” and for “p recto de hereditate matris sue[167]

b)         RALPH de Mohaut (-before 1130).  “Comes Ricardus” confirmed donations to Chester St. Werburgh, including the donation of “Gosetre [Goostrey] et Lautonam [Lawton]” made by “Hugo filius Normanni”, witnessed by “Hugone de Lasci et Radulfo et Rogero filiis Normanni”, by charter dated 1119[168].  “...Radulfus dapifer...” witnessed the charter dated to [1121/25] under which “Ranulfus comes de Cestria” donated “ecclesiam sancti Martialis de Crusillis” to Saint-Evroul[169].  “...Radulfo dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1121/29] under which “Ranulfus comes Cestrie” confirmed the donation of a fair and its revenues to Chester St. Werburgh made by his father[170].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo[171]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Mohaut (-before [1177/82]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo[172]

-         see below

c)         ROGER .  “Comes Ricardus” confirmed donations to Chester St. Werburgh, including the donation of “Gosetre [Goostrey] et Lautonam [Lawton]” made by “Hugo filius Normanni”, witnessed by “Hugone de Lasci et Radulfo et Rogero filiis Normanni”, by charter dated 1119[173]

 

 

ROBERT de Mohaut, son of RALPH [I] de Mohaut & his wife --- (-[1166/73]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo[174].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt fil Rad fil Norm" in Lincolnshire under the agreement between him and “Willm gocnatu suu[175].  The Annales Cestrienses record that “Robertus dapifer” killed “multa millia [Welshmen]...apud Wichum [Nantwich] III Non Sep” in 1146[176].  “Roberto dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1141/50] under which “Ranulphus comes Cestrie” donated rents from Chester to St. Werburgh[177].  “...Roberto dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1150] under which “Ranulfus comes Cestrie” granted Drayton Basset to Geoffrey Ridel and Ralph Basset[178].  “...Roberto dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1154/57] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed donations made by his father to Minting priory[179].  “Robertus de Monte Alto...” witnessed the charter dated to [1162/66] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” granted rights in the river Dee to Trentham priory[180].  “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed the donation of “dimidiam partem de Pultona” to found an abbey made by “Robertus pincerna” by charter dated to [1162/70], witnessed by “Roberto dapifero...[181].  “Roberto dapifero de Monte Alto...” witnessed the charter dated to [1166] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” donated “stagnum meum de Dunintona” to Bullington priory[182]

m LEUCA, daughter of --- (-after 1177/82]).  “Radulfus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, for the souls of “Roberti patris mei et Leuche matris mei”, with the consent and advice of “Leuche matris mee in cuius dote ipsa ecclesia...et W[illelmi] de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1177/82][183]

Robert & his wife had four children: 

1.         RALPH de Mohaut (-[1191/1194]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo”, from him to “Radulfo filio suo”, and from him to “eidem Rogero...filio et heredi suo[184].  “Radulfo dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1164/73] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” notified that William Venables had made a fine to hold [serfs] Dilred Hog and Artusius of the earl[185].  “Radulfus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, for the souls of “Roberti patris mei et Leuche matris mei”, with the consent and advice of “Leuche matris mee in cuius dote ipsa ecclesia...et W[illelmi] de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1177/82][186].  “...Radulfo seneschallo de Monte Alto...” witnessed the charter dated to [3 Feb 1188/15 Nov 1189] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie comes Cestrie et Richmondie” confirmed his predecessors’ donations to Bordesley abbey[187].  “...Radulfo de Monte Alto senescallo Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated to [1191/94] under which “Rannulfus comes Cestrie” confirmed the donation of half a salt-house to St. Werburgh[188]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Farrer states that Matilda was Ralph’s wife[189].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         [--- .  His parentage is indicated by a plea dated 13 Jun 1227 which records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord”, while the plaintiff claimed that “Ralph his ancestor had made the last presentation[190].  As Ralph is described in this plea as “ancestor” of Roger, not his father, it is likely that there was an intervening generation between the two, although the chronology would be tight.  It should be noted that this generation is not included in Bracton’s record of the claim dated 1222 which is summarised below.  One possibility is that this son predeceased his father, leaving an infant son who was still too young to succeed as “dapifer” on the death of Ralph, the office passing to Ralph’s brother Robert, and that Bracton ignored this step in the descent.  m ---.  One child:] 

i)          ROGER de Mohaut (-1232).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo”, from him to “Radulfo filio suo”, and from him to “eidem Rogero...filio et heredi suo[191].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Rogerus senescallus de Monte Alto" held "feodum jus militis in Calswah [Calceworth] de comite Cestrie"[192].  “Rogero de Monte Alto dapifero meo...” witnessed the charter dated to [1210/15] under which “Ranulphus comes Cestrie” confirmed “villam de Wynlatona” to “Henrico dispensario militi meo[193].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis"[194].  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord”, while the plaintiff claimed that “Ralph his ancestor had made the last presentation[195].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1232 of “Roger de Monte Alto senescallus de Hawerthin[196]m NICOLA, daughter of ---.  Farrer states that “Nicolaa” was Roger’s wife[197].  Roger & his wife had two children:

(a)       ROGER de Mohaut (-Castle Rising 28 Jun 1260).  Steward of Chester. 

-         see below

(b)       --- de Mohaut m Sir HUGH Ferrers of Bugbrooke, son of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Agnes of Chester (-[1257]). 

2.         WILLIAM de Mohaut .  “Radulfus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, for the souls of “Roberti patris mei et Leuche matris mei”, with the consent and advice of “Leuche matris mee in cuius dote ipsa ecclesia...et W[illelmi] de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1177/82][198]

3.         ROBERT de Mohaut (-[1208/12]).  “...Roberto senescallo de Moalto...” witnessed the charter dated to [1190/94] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie et comes Cestrie et Richemondie” confirmed donations to the Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem[199].  “Robertus dominus Moaldie et senescaldus comitis Cestrie” donated “villam de Gorestre” to Chester St. Werburgh by charter dated to [1192/1208], witnessed by “Radulfo de Menilw[arin]...Roberto de Menilwarin, Brito Pantun...[200].  “Robertus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” confirmed the donation of “patronatus ecclesie de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, as recorded by the charter of “Radulphi de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1208/11], witnessed by “...Rannulfo de Montealto...[201]

4.         ROGER de Mohaut (-after 1203).  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord”, while the plaintiff claimed that “Ralph his ancestor had made the last presentation[202].  “Rogerus de Mohaut” was represented at an assize at Lichfield in 1203[203]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         LEUCA de Mohaut (-before 13 Jun 1227).  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord[204].  Leuca’s husband has not yet been identified.  m ---.  One child: 

i)          AGNES --- ([after 1212]-).  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord[205]

 

 

ROGER de Mohaut, son of ROGER de Mohaut & his wife --- (-Castle Rising 28 Jun 1260).  A charter dated to [1258] records that “dominus Rogerus de Montealto cuius predecessores ius patronatus in ipsa ecclesia olim optinebant” forcibly entered “ecclesiam de Nestona” after the death of “Ricardi clerici” and presented “Radulphum de Montealto clericum” to the diocesis for institution in the church[206].  The episode is recorded in the Annales Cestrienses in 1258, adding that Roger died “infra eundem annum miserabiliter[207].  A charter dated to [1258] records the settlement of the dispute, under which “dominus Rogerus de Montealto” donated “terre in Nestona...[et] in advocacione ecclesie de Nestona” to Chester St. Werburgh, in return for “manerium de Brocton” and revenue for “Radulpho de Montealto[208].  He inherited the manor of Kenninghall, Castle of Rising, Norfolk, on the death of his brother-in-law.   The Annales Cestrienses record the death “circa nativitatem beate Johannis” 1260 of “Roger de Monte Alto apud Rysinges[209]

m CECILY de Albini, daughter of WILLIAM de Albini Earl of Arundel & his wife Mabel of Chester.  The Annales Londonienses name "Mabiliam, Nicholaam, Ceciliam et Isabellam" as the four daughters of "secunda…Mabillia…uxor comitis de Arundelle", specifying that "Cecilia" married "Rogero de Monte Alto"[210]

Roger & his wife had children: 

1.         ROBERT de Mohaut (-before 16 Sep 1275).  The Annales Cestrienses record that “Robertus de Monte Alto” was delivered from captivity after an agreement between King Henry III and “Lewelinum principem Wallie” in 1267[211]m ([1261]) JOAN Mowbray, daughter of ROGER de Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Matilda de Beauchamp.  Robert & his wife had children: 

a)         ROGER de Mohaut [1261/62]-2 Dec 1296).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohautm JULIANE de Clifford, daughter of ROGER de Clifford & his wife ---. 

b)         ROBERT de Mohaut of Mold (25 Mar 1274-26 Dec 1329).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohautm (royal licence 25 Jan 1301) as her second husband, EMMA, widow of RICHARD FitzJohn of Shere, daughter of --- (-26 Jan 1332, bur Stradsett, Norfolk). 

2.         [RALPH de Mohaut .  A charter dated to [1258] records that “dominus Rogerus de Montealto cuius predecessores ius patronatus in ipsa ecclesia olim optinebant” forcibly entered “ecclesiam de Nestona” after the death of “Ricardi clerici” and presented “Radulphum de Montealto clericum” to the diocesis for institution in the church[212].  The parentage of “Radulphum de Montealto clericum” is not specified in the document, but it is reasonable to suppose that he was closely related to Roger, maybe his son.  A charter dated to [1258] records the settlement of the dispute, under which “dominus Rogerus de Montealto” donated “terre in Nestona...[et] in advocacione ecclesie de Nestona” to Chester St. Werburgh, in return for “manerium de Brocton” and revenue for “Radulpho de Montealto[213].] 

 

 

1.         JOHN de Mohaut (-after Oct 1265)m (before Nov 1254) as her first husband, MILLICENT de Cauntelo, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] de Cauntelo of Calne, Wiltshire & his wife Eva de Briouse (-before 7 Jan 1299).  She married secondly (before 13 Dec 1273) Eon la Zouche. The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch" as the children of "Willielmo de Cantilupo" and his wife[214].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Nov "1 Edw I" after the death of "George de Cantilupo" name “Milisanda the wife of Eudo la Zuche of full age and John son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges who is under age an in the king’s wardship are his next heirs...the said Milisanda and Joan being sisters of the said George[215].   

 

 

 

MOHUN

 

 

According to Maxwell-Lyte, this family took its name from "Moyon near St Lo in Normandy"[216].  Richard III Duke of Normandy granted property including "…curtem…Moion…" to his wife Adela as her future dower by charter dated Jan 1027[217]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known. 

1.         WILLIAM de Mohun (-after 1090).  Leland quotes "Un Role de ceux queux veignont in Angleterre ovesque roy Wm le Conquereur" (without indicating its date) which names "monseir Willim de Moion"[218].  Domesday Book records “William de Moyon” holding Sutton Veny in Wiltshire, Todber, Spetisbury and Winterborne Houghton in Dorset, numerous holdings in Somerset[219].  He built the castle of Dunster.  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[220]m ADELISE, daughter of --- (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[221].  William & his wife had four children: 

a)         GEOFFREY de Mohun (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[222]

b)         ROBERT de Mohun (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[223]

c)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-1155 or before).  A charter of King Henry I confirmed the foundation and possessions of Bridlington priory, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Wicheforda" made by "Willielmus de Moion et uxor eius Agnes"[224].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Moiont" in Warwickshire[225].  Henry of Huntingdon names "William de Mohun" among the "traitors" who supported Empress Matilda in 1138, adding that he held "the castle at Dunster" against the king[226].  The Gesta Stephani Regis names "Willelmus de Mohun quem comitem ibi statuit Dorsetiæ" among the supporters of Empress Matilda in the English civil war[227].  He was created Earl [of Somerset/Dorset] by Empress Matilda in [Apr/Jun] 1141: "…com W[illelmo] de Moion…" subscribed the charter dated to midsummer 1141 under which Empress Matilda granted property to Geoffrey de Mandeville[228].  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[229]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[230].  "Willelmus de Mohun" confirmed a grant to "Willelmo filio Durandi" by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "Eudone fratre meo…"[231]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  A charter of King Henry I confirmed the foundation and possessions of Bridlington priory, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Wicheforda" made by "Willielmus de Moion et uxor eius Agnes"[232].  The parentage of Agnes is not known.  Maxwell-Lyte suggests "with some confidence" that she was Agnes de Gand, daughter of Walter de Gant & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre[233].  He bases this on the possession by Gilbert de Gand of Whichford, Warwickshire (then in Northamptonshire) in 1086, Gilbert’s son Walter’s foundation of the priory at Bridlington, and the donation by William de Mohun and Agnes his wife of the church of Whichford to Bridlington.  William & his wife had six children: 

i)          RALPH de Mohun (-before [1142]).  William de Mohun donated land at Avelham to the church of Dunster, for the benefit of the soul of Ralph his son, by undated charter[234].  He was not mentioned in his father’s foundation charter for Bruton, and so presumably died before 1142 if the document is correctly dated to that year. 

ii)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-1176).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[235]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[236]

-         see below

iii)        HENRY de Mohun (-after 1166).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[237]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[238].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Henricus de Moiun i m" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][239].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Mohun" held one knight’s fee from "Gervasii Paganelli" in Staffordshire[240]

iv)       IWAN de Mohun .  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[241]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[242].  "William de Moyun juvenis" confirmed his father’s donations to Bruton, for the souls of "William his father, Agnes his mother", by  undated charter, witnessed by "…Juvano filio comitis"[243]

v)        PETER de Mohun .  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[244]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[245]

vi)       RICHARD de Mohun (-after 1176).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[246]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[247].  “William de Moyon” confirmed the donation of the church of Lyon to Troarn abbey by "William de Moyon his father" by undated charter, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Moyon…"[248].  A charter dated to [1170] records that “Richard de Moyon” had resigned property of the church of Lyon to the bishop of Bayeux[249].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[250]

d)         EUDES de Mohun (-after [1150]).  "Willelmus de Mohun" confirmed a grant to "Willelmo filio Durandi" by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "Eudone fratre meo…"[251]

2.         WILMUND (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[252]

 

 

WILLIAM de Mohun, son of WILLIAM de Mohun & his wife Agnes de Gand (-1176).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[253]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[254].  "William de Moyun juvenis" confirmed his father’s donations to Bruton, for the souls of "William his father, Agnes his mother", by  undated charter, witnessed by "…Juvano filio comitis"[255].  “William de Moyon” donated tithes to Troarn abbey by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "God[eholda] uxore mea et Willelmo filio meo…"[256].  “William de Moyon” confirmed the donation of the church of Lyon to Troarn abbey by "William de Moyon his father" by undated charter, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Moyon…"[257].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Willelmi de Moiun" in Somerset[258].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Moyn xli m, de nov ii m" in Dorset, Somerset in [1167/68][259].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus de Moiun" with 5 knights and eleven knights in his own service[260]

m GODEHOLDE, daughter of --- (-before 1186).  “William de Moyon” donated tithes to Troarn abbey by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "God[eholda] uxore mea et Willelmo filio meo…"[261].  "William de Moion" granted tithes of his mills of Moion, Tesseium and Belcodreium to the Holy Trinity of Luzerne, for the soul of "his mother Godeheut", by charter dated 1186, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Sancto Johanne, Gaufrido et Johanne et Roberto de Moion…"[262]

William & his wife had seven children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Mohun (-Oct 1193).  “William de Moyon” donated tithes to Troarn abbey by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "God[eholda] uxore mea et Willelmo filio meo…"[263].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton made by "his grandfather Earl William, his father William" by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea…"[264].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[265].  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[266].  “William de Moyon” donated the churches of Moyon and Taissy to the canons of Briweton to hold "after the decease of his brother Thomas" by charter dated to [1177/94][267].  "William de Moion" granted tithes of his mills of Moion, Tesseium and Belcodreium to the Holy Trinity of Luzerne, for the soul of "his mother Godeheut", by charter dated 1186, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Sancto Johanne, Gaufrido et Johanne et Roberto de Moion…"[268]m LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 1203).  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton made by "his grandfather Earl William, his father William" by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea…"[269].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[270].  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[271].  "Reginald de Moyun" donated the church of Liun in Normandy and land at Bruwham to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia matre mea…"[272].  "Will de Traceio…Lucia de Moon" both paid rent on part of "terre de Moon", dated 1198[273].  "Lucea de Moyun" paid a fine for "feud vii mil" in Cambridgeshire, dated 1201[274].  "Lucia de Moon […terre de Moon]…Will de Traceio…versus Oliv de Traceio" all paid rent in "Ballia Constancien" in Normandy, dated 1203[275].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-[before 1193]).  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[276].  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[277]

b)         REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset (-1213).  "Reginald de Moyun" donated the church of Liun in Normandy and land at Bruwham to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia matre mea…"[278].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Reginaldus de Moun" holding one knight’s fee in Warwickshire in [1210/12][279].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Reginaldus de Moiun" held "Dunestorre…in capite domino rege per servicium xl militum et dimidii de conquestu Anglie…in hundredo de Karenton" in Somerset[280].  m as her first husband, ALICE Briwere, daughter of WILLIAM Briwere & his wife Beatrice --- (-after 24 Jul 1236).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[281].  She married secondly William Paynell of Bampton, Devon.  Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of her son "William Paynel alias Painel" which names the manor of "…Huffeculm…with 10 l land which Fulk Painel gave to William Briwer the elder…but afterwards William Brewer the younger…bestowed the said land upon William Painel, father of this one, in free marriage with Alice his sister" in Devon[282].  "William Paynel" assigned "Alice de Mohun his wife and Hugh de Samford" to make part payments of debts "in each of the three years after starting out on his pilgrimage to the Holy Land" with the manor of Bampton as security, dated 27 Sep, although listed in the roll among other fines dated [Feb/Mar] 1228[283].  Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Devon to release "dotem suam...Willelmum filium et heredi predicti Willelmi" to "Alicia de Moyun que fuit uxor Willelmi Paynel", and confirmed the custody granted to “Hereberto filio Mathei”, dated 1228[284].  The king granted custody of "the land and heir of William Paynel to Herbert son of Matthew", saving to "Alice who was William’s wife…her…dower", dated 18 Nov 1228[285].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Alicie de Moyun"[286].  King Henry III commanded "Alicia de Moyun” not to dispose of “the ward of the land which William Cumin held of her as the heritage of Margery his wife” because of the disputed succession, dated 24 Jul 1236[287].  King Henry III, seeing that "Alicia de Moyun has deceived him by the suggestion that there was another lawful heir to the manor of Sturton than Margery daughter of William Cumin”, ordered the sheriff of Warwick “to give Alicia seizin as custodian to cause John de Cantilupe and the said Margery his wife to have such seizin”, dated 24 Jul 1236[288].  Reynold & his wife had three children: 

i)          REYNOLD de Mohun (-Tor Mohun, Devon 20 Jan 1258, bur Newenham).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified. 

-         see below

ii)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-Norton, Cornwall, 1265, bur Newenham).  “Reginaldus de Mohun” donated “terra de Stortmanforde” to Clive abbey, for the soul of “piæ memoriæ Havisiæ de Mohun”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Mohun fratris mei”, by undated charter[289].  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[290].  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator” and in 1265 of “Willelmus de Moun fundator huius monasterii et frater germanus supradicti Reginaldi, qui apud Nortun in Cornubia in manerio huius domus moriebatur[291].  A manuscript records the burial at Newenham of “Willielmus de Moun, frater Reginaldi et alter fundator dictæ abbathiæ[292]

iii)        ALICE de Mohun m ROBERT de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, son of SIMON de Vautort & his wife --- de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (-1251). 

2.         GEOFFREY de Mohun .  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[293]

3.         JOHN de Mohun .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

4.         THOMAS de Mohun .  “William de Moyon” donated the churches of Moyon and Taissy to the canons of Briweton to hold "after the decease of his brother Thomas" by charter dated to [1177/94][294].  

5.         ROBERT de Mohun .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

6.         AGNES de Mohun .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m WILLIAM de Windsor, son of ---. 

7.         YOLANDE de Mohun .  Maxwell-Lyte notes that "Yolenta daughter of William de Mohun the Third" married "Ralph son of William son of Durand de Mohun, who may have been a distant cousin", who was the principal military tenant of the honour of Dunster and gave his name to Brompton Ralph[295].  "Ralph son of William de Bruneton" donated land in "Sudhei in his manor of Brunne" to Bruton, with the consent of "Yolenta his wife", by undated charter[296]m RALPH, son of WILLIAM de Bruneton & his wife ---. 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Mohun (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Willelmus de Moyun" paying "xli l…xli milites" in Dorset, Somerset[297].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Moyun" holding three knights’ fees from "honor d’Eu" in Sussex in [1210/12][298]

 

 

REYNOLD de Mohun, son of REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his wife Alice Briwere (-Tor Mohun, Devon 20 Jan 1258, bur Newenham).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  “Reginaldus de Mohun” donated “terra de Stortmanforde” to Clive abbey, for the soul of “piæ memoriæ Havisiæ de Mohun”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Mohun fratris mei”, by undated charter[299].  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[300].  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator[301].  A manuscript records the burial at Newenham of “Reginaldus de Moun principalis fundator[302]

m firstly HAWISE [de Mohun], daughter of ---.  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[303].  “Reginaldus de Mohun” donated “terra de Stortmanforde” to Clive abbey, for the soul of “piæ memoriæ Havisiæ de Mohun”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Mohun fratris mei”, by undated charter[304]

m secondly (1243 or before) as her second husband, ISABEL de Ferrers, widow of GILBERT Basset [II] of Wycombe, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshall of the Earls of Pembroke (-before 26 Nov 1260).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that Isabel married "Reginaldo de Monteminori", by whom she was mother of "Willihelmus de Monte" who died childless, "filiam…Alianore" who married "Johanni filio Nicholai de Carrew", "Margareta soror eius" who died childless, and "Maria soror eius" who married "Johanni Meriot" but died childless[305].  The Annals of Ireland record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “secunda, Isabella Basset…[306].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[307].  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[308].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[309].  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator” and in 1260 of “Isabella Basset uxor Reginaldi prædicti[310].  A writ dated 26 Nov "45 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel Basset" names "William son of Reginald de Moun and the said Isabel, age variously stated as 6 and 7, is her heir"[311]

Reynold & his first wife had children:

1.         JOHN de Mohun of Dunster (-Gascony [29 Jul 1253/1254])m as her first husband, JOAN de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshall of the Earls of Pembroke (-[Oct 1267]).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that "Johanna quinta filia" married "Johanni de Mohun", by whom she was mother of "Johannes de Mohun, de quo Johannes, de eo Johannes"[312].  The Annals of Ireland record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “tertia, Johanna Mohun, uxor domini Johannis de Mohun, filii domini Reginaldi…[313].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[314].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[315].  She married secondly (Aug 1256 or before) as his first wife, Sir Robert Aguillon of Watton and Perching.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN de Mohun (-11 Jun 1279)m as her first husband, ELEANOR, daughter of Sir REYNOLD FitzPiers & his first wife Alice --- (-after Jan 1283).  She married secondly William Martin Lord Martin.  John & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Mohun (-25 Aug 1330, bur Dunster Priory).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohun

-         see below

b)         [WILLIAM de Mohun (-before 20 Aug 1282).  A writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "William de Mohun alias de Moun, de Mohon, do Mowon, de Mouhun", names "Reginald his son aged 5 at Christmas next is his next heir...aged 6...aged 7 and more” and records that “Beatrice late the wife of the said William” held Stoke Fleming, Devonshire “in tenancy by the king’s writ until her dower be assigned[316]m BEATRICE, daughter of ---.  A writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "William de Mohun alias de Moun, de Mohon, do Mowon, de Mouhun", records that “Beatrice late the wife of the said William” held Stoke Fleming, Devonshire “in tenancy by the king’s writ until her dower be assigned[317].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          REYNOLD de Mohun ([1274/77]-).  A writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "William de Mohun alias de Moun, de Mohon, do Mowon, de Mouhun", names "Reginald his son aged 5 at Christmas next is his next heir...aged 6...aged 7 and more[318]

Reynold & his second wife had children: 

2.         ISABEL de Mohun m EDMUND Deincourt, son of JOHN [II] Deincourt of Blankney, Lincolnshire & his second wife Agnes de Neville (-6 Jan 1327).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Deincourt. 

3.         LUCY de Mohun m JOHN Grey, son of RICHARD de Grey of Codnor & his wife Lucy de Humez. 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS MOHUN

 

 

JOHN de Mohun, son of JOHN de Mohun & his wife Eleanor (-25 Aug 1330, bur Dunster Priory).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohun

m firstly (1299 or before) ADA, daughter of --- (-1324 or before). 

m secondly ([1325]) as her second husband, SIBYL, widow of HENRY de Lorty, daughter of --- (-Nov 1337). 

John & his first wife had children: 

1.         JOHN de Mohun (-before 1330)m (contract May 1305) CHRISTIAN de Segrave, daughter of Sir JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Christian du Plessis.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN Mohun ([1319/20]-15 Sep 1375)Lord Mohunm (before Sep 1342) JOAN Burghersh, daughter of Sir BARTHOLOMEW Burghersh Lord Burghersh & his wife Elizabeth de Verdun (-4 Oct 1404, bur Canterbury Cathedral).  John & his wife had three children: 

i)          ELIZABETH Mohun (1343-[14/16] Jan 1415).  The will of "William Montacute Earl of Sarum, Lord of Man and of the Isle of Wight", dated 20 Apr 1397, bequeathed property to “Elizabeth my wife[319].  The will of "Elizabeth Montacute Countess of Salisbury", dated 24 Nov 1414, chose burial “in the conventual church of Bustleham Montacute[320]m as his second wife, WILLIAM de Montagu Earl of Salisbury, son of WILLIAM de Montagu Lord Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katharine de Grandson (Donyatt, Somerset 20 Jun 1328-3 Jun 1397, bur Bisham). 

ii)         PHILIPPA de Mohun (-Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight 17 Jul 1431, bur Westminster Abbey).  The will of "John Golafre Knight", dated 19 Jan 1393, chose burial “in the chancel of the church of the Friars Minors of Exeter”, bequeathed property to “...Philippa my wife...Dame Elizabeth Golafre...Dame Alice Golafre my sister...William and John Golafre my cousins...[321].  The will of "Edward Duke of York", dated 22 Aug 1415, proved 30 Nov 1415, bequeathed property to “my...wife Philippa[322].  The will of "Philippa Duchess of York and Lady of the Isle of Wight", dated 1430, proved 13 Nov 1431, chose burial “in the conventual church of Westminster”, bequeathed property to “my son Walter Lord Fitz-Walter...[323]m firstly WALTER FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter, son of JOHN FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter & his wife Eleanor de Percy (Henham 31 May 1345-Galicia 26 Sep 1386).  m secondly (before 13 Nov 1389) Sir JOHN Golafre of Langley, Oxfordshire, son of --- (-Wallingford Castle 18 Nov 1396, bur Westminster Abbey).  m thirdly ([27 Feb 1397/7 Oct 1398]) EDWARD of Cambridge Earl of Rutland, Earl of Cork, son of EDMUND of Langley Earl of Cambridge [later Duke of York] & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Castilla ([Norwich] 1373-25 Oct 1415, bur Fotheringhay).  He succeeded his father in 1402 as Duke of York, Earl of Cambridge. 

iii)        MAUD de Mohun (-1401)m JOHN le Strange Lord Strange (of Knokin), son of ROGER le Strange Lord Strange (of Knokin) & his wife Aline FitzAlan of the Earls of Arundel ([1351/52]-28 Jul 1397). 

 

 

 

MONTAGU

 

 

It is not known whether this family took its name from Montacute in Bishopstone or brought it with them from Normandy[324].  The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         DREUX de Montagu, son of --- .  He held Knowle, in Shipton Montagu, in 1086[325]

 

2.         DREUX [Drogo] de Montagum ---.  The name of Dreux’s wife is not known.  Dreux & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD de Montagu .  "Richard de Monteacuto" donated land at Shepton to Bruton, by undated charter witnessed by "…Hugo de Monteacuto…"[326].  [m firstly ---.]  m [secondly] as her first husband, ALICE, daughter of --- .  She married secondly Alexander de Piro.  "Alice de Piro, formerly the wife of Richard de Monteacuto" informed the abbots of Evesham and Messenden that "her sons, the heirs of the said Richard…William and Richard" donated the church of Shepton to Bruton, by undated charter[327].  "Alexander de Pirou" donated property to Athelney for the soul of "my lord Richard de Montacute" and for "mine own soul and that of the lord William my son" by charter dated to [1174/91][328].  Richard & his [first] wife had one child: 

i)          DREUX de Montagu (-early 1167).  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide", Richard said that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater predicti Hugonis [error for Drogonis]" never held the property after the death of "Willelmi patris sui", that "tempore Ricardi Regis…Willelmus filius Roberti de Monte Acuto" granted "terram de Thorn" to "predicto Willelmo filio Ricardi de Monte Acuto" and that the latter granted "terram de Suttona" to "Willelmo filio Roberti", after whose death "Willelmus pater Drogonis" took the land[329].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Drogonis juvenis de Monte Acuto" from "comitis Meretoniæ" in Somerset[330]

Richard & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

ii)         ISABEL de Montagu .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1223, noted by Bracton, by "Willelmus filius Drogonis de Monte Acuto…infra etatem" against "Matheum de Cliuedona" for "ecclesiam de Suttona…advocacionem", the defendant claiming that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto avus predicti Willelmi" gave the advocacy to "Gilberto de Say in…maritagium cum Matillide nepte sua filia eiusdem Mathei"[331].  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide", Matilda calling "Willelmum de Monte Acuto filium et heredum Drogonis" as witness who said that "Willelmi de Monte Acuto patris ipsius Drogonis" gave "terras suas de Suttona eidem Matheo in maritagium cum Isobella [filia] sua"[332]m MATTHEW de Clivedon, son of --- (-after 1223).  One child: 

(a)       MATILDA de Clivedon (-after 1223).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1223, noted by Bracton, by "Willelmus filius Drogonis de Monte Acuto…infra etatem" against "Matheum de Cliuedona" for "ecclesiam de Suttona…advocacionem", the defendant claiming that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto avus predicti Willelmi" gave the advocacy to "Gilberto de Say in…maritagium cum Matillide nepte sua filia eiusdem Mathei"[333]m GILBERT de Say, son of HUGH de Say & his wife Lucy Clifford (-after 1210). 

Richard & his second wife had two children: 

iii)        WILLIAM de Montagu .  "Alice de Piro, formerly the wife of Richard de Monteacuto" informed the abbots of Evesham and Messenden that "her sons, the heirs of the said Richard…William and Richard" donated the church of Shepton to Bruton, by undated charter[334].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto" held one knight’s fee from "Drogonis juvenis de Monte Acuto" in Somerset[335]m ISABEL, daughter of --- (-after [Jun 1217]).  A charter dated 1217 records that "Alanum Basset" granted the manor of Yarlington, Somerset to "Isobel quondam uxorem Willelmi de Monte Acuto" [as her dower] by charter dated 1217, witnessed by "Gilberto Basset, Warino Basset…"[336].  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       DREUX de Montagu (-before 1216).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim dated 1223, noted by Bracton, by "Willelmus filius Drogonis de Monte Acuto…infra etatem" against "Matheum de Cliuedona" for "ecclesiam de Suttona…advocacionem", the defendant claiming that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto avus predicti Willelmi" gave the advocacy to "Gilberto de Say in…maritagium cum Matillide nepte sua filia eiusdem Mathei"[337]m as her first husband, ALINE Basset, daughter of ALAN Basset of Wycombe & his second wife Aline de Gai.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Aluina que fuit uxor Drogonis de Monte Acuto est de donatione domini regis", adding that "est in custodia Alani Basset per Regem Johannem et est maritanda et terra sua in Pideltun valet xx.l"[338].  She married secondly ([1219/24]) Richard [V] Talbot.  "Alan Basset" made a fine "by Richard Talbot" for marrying "Aline who was the wife of Drogo de Montagu…without the king’s licence", dated [Oct] 1224[339].  Dreux & his wife had one child: 

(1)       WILLIAM de Montagu ([1213]-23 Sep 1270).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset, dated 1219, which includes "Willelmus filius Drogonis filii Willelmi de Monte Acuto est in custodia Alani Basset et terra sua de Turelberiz valet vi.l"[340].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Willelmus filius Drogonis de Monte Acuto…infra etatem" against "Matheum de Cliuedona" for "ecclesiam de Suttona…advocacionem", the defendant claiming that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto avus predicti Willelmi" gave the advocacy to "Gilberto de Say in…maritagium cum Matillide nepte sua filia eiusdem Mathei"[341].  "William de Monteacuto the younger" confirmed the donation of Shepton church to Bruton made by "William de Monteacuto his grandfather" by undated charter witnessed by "Domino Reginaldo de Moyun, Domino Roberto de Bellocampo…"[342]m BERTHE, daughter of ---.  William & his wife had one child: 

a.         SIMON de Montagu (after 1250-26 Sep 1316, bur Bruton Priory).  Confirmation of charters in favour of the canons of Christchurch Twynham, dated 27 Nov 1313, includes a charter under which "Simon de Monte Acuto, son and heir of William de Monte Acuto" confirmed a conveyance made by "William de Monte Acuto" of the town of Pideleton, for the souls of "William his father, and Hawise wife of the said Simon" dated May 1287[343]

-         see below

iv)       RICHARD de Montagu (-before [Jun 1217]).  "Alice de Piro, formerly the wife of Richard de Monteacuto" informed the abbots of Evesham and Messenden that "her sons, the heirs of the said Richard…William and Richard" donated the church of Shepton to Bruton, by undated charter[344].  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide"[345]

 

 

3.         ROBERT de Montagu .  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide", Richard said that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater predicti Hugonis [error for Drogonis]" never held the property after the death of "Willelmi patris sui", that "tempore Ricardi Regis…Willelmus filius Roberti de Monte Acuto" granted "terram de Thorn" to "predicto Willelmo filio Ricardi de Monte Acuto" and that the latter granted "terram de Suttona" to "Willelmo filio Roberti", after whose death "Willelmus pater Drogonis" took the land[346]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Montagu .  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide", Richard said that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater predicti Hugonis [error for Drogonis]" never held the property after the death of "Willelmi patris sui", that "tempore Ricardi Regis…Willelmus filius Roberti de Monte Acuto" granted "terram de Thorn" to "predicto Willelmo filio Ricardi de Monte Acuto" and that the latter granted "terram de Suttona" to "Willelmo filio Roberti", after whose death "Willelmus pater Drogonis" took the land[347]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Montagu .  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide", Matthew said that "Willelmus primogenitus frater ipsius Ricardi" as the heir of "Willelmi patris sui" and granted it to "Willelmo de Monte Acuto patri predicti Drogonis" took the land[348]

ii)         RICHARD de Montagu .  Bracton notes an inquiry, dated 1226, whether "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater Ricardi de Monte Acuto" was seised with land "in Suttona" which "Gilibertus de Say…ad warantum Matillidem uxorem eius" claimed had been given by "Matheus de Cliuedona…in maritagium cum Matillide", Richard said that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto pater predicti Hugonis [error for Drogonis]" never held the property after the death of "Willelmi patris sui", that "tempore Ricardi Regis…Willelmus filius Roberti de Monte Acuto" granted "terram de Thorn" to "predicto Willelmo filio Ricardi de Monte Acuto" and that the latter granted "terram de Suttona" to "Willelmo filio Roberti", after whose death "Willelmus pater Drogonis" took the land[349]

 

4.         JOHN de Montagu (-after 1226).  "Johannes de Monte Acuto" paid a fine for "medietate honoris Walti Brit in Odecumb et Isle, Trente, Chedeslega, Bocland, Stooleg et Upecote…post mortem ipsi W. Brit acunculi sui" in Somerset and Sussex, dated [1199/1200][350].  "Joh de Monte Acuto" paid a fine for "saisina de terra que fuit patris sui" in Northamptonshire, dated 1201[351].  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmo de Monte Acuto fratri eiusdem Johannis" against "Johannes de Monte Acuto et Lucia uxor eius" claiming that "garciam Katerinam…filiam et heredem eorum" was not the daughter of John and his wife, while the bishop of Winchester stated that Lucy’s daughter was born "in vigilia S. Katerine, unde vocata fuit Katerina"[352]m LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 1226).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmo de Monte Acuto fratri eiusdem Johannis" against "Johannes de Monte Acuto et Lucia uxor eius" claiming that "garciam Katerinam…filiam et heredem eorum" was not the daughter of John and his wife, while the bishop of Winchester stated that Lucy’s daughter was born "in vigilia S. Katerine, unde vocata fuit Katerina"[353].  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         KATHARINE de Montagu (25 Nov ---- -after 6 Apr 1231).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmo de Monte Acuto fratri eiusdem Johannis" against "Johannes de Monte Acuto et Lucia uxor eius" claiming that "garciam Katerinam…filiam et heredem eorum" was not the daughter of John and his wife, while the bishop of Winchester stated that Lucy’s daughter was born "in vigilia S. Katerine, unde vocata fuit Katerina"[354].  Henry III King of England appointed judges in a claim by "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and "Mauricium de Borham tenentem de…terre…in Heles et…in Bradeford" dated 18 Apr 1229[355].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, by "Warinus Basset et Katerina uxor eius" against "abbatem de Gresten" concerning "terre…in Merse" of which "Johannes […de Monte Acuto] pater ipsius Katerine" was seised[356].  A charter dated 6 Apr 1231 records a final settlement between "Warinum Basset et Katerinam uxorem eius" and the dean of Exeter relating to the advowson of the church of Veryan which they had "ex dono Johannis de Monte Acuto patris predicte Katerine"[357]m WARIN Basset, son of ALAN Basset & his first wife Alice de Grey (-Cardiff Castle 1233). 

5.         WILLIAM de Montagu (-after 1226).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmo de Monte Acuto fratri eiusdem Johannis" against "Johannes de Monte Acuto et Lucia uxor eius" claiming that "garciam Katerinam…filiam et heredem eorum" was not the daughter of John and his wife, while the bishop of Winchester stated that Lucy’s daughter was born "in vigilia S. Katerine, unde vocata fuit Katerina"[358]

 

 

 

B.      LORDS MONTAGU

 

 

SIMON de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu & his wife Berthe --- (after 1250-26 Sep 1316, bur Bruton Priory).  Confirmation of charters in favour of the canons of Christchurch Twynham, dated 27 Nov 1313, includes a charter under which "Simon de Monte Acuto, son and heir of William de Monte Acuto" confirmed a conveyance made by "William de Monte Acuto" of the town of Pideleton, for the souls of "William his father, and Hawise wife of the said Simon" dated May 1287[359].  He was summoned to parliament 29 Dec 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Montagu

m firstly ([1270]) HAWISE de Saint-Amand, daughter of AMAURY [II] de Saint-Amand & his wife --- (-before May 1287).  Confirmation of charters in favour of the canons of Christchurch Twynham, dated 27 Nov 1313, includes a charter under which "Simon de Monte Acuto, son and heir of William de Monte Acuto" confirmed a conveyance made by "William de Monte Acuto" of the town of Pideleton, for the souls of "William his father, and Hawise wife of the said Simon" dated May 1287[360]

m secondly (1287 or before) ISABEL, daughter of --- (-after 1290). 

Simon & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM de Montagu (-Gascony 18 Oct 1319).  Camden’s Britannia (written in 1607) records that “William de Montacute his kinsman [of John Waldebeof], descended from the kings of Man, did by arms” conquer the Isle of Man but mortgaged the island to “Anthony Bec bishop of Durham and patriarch of Jerusalem[361].  Any relationship between the Montagu family and the kings of the Isle of Man has not been traced.  He succeeded his father in 1316 as Lord Montagum ([1292]) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Montfort, daughter of PIERS de Montfort of Beaudesert, Warwickshire & his wife Matilda de la Mare (-Aug 1354, bur Oxford, Priory of St Frideswide).  She married secondly (8 Jun 1322) Thomas de Furnivalle of Sheffield, Worksop.  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E, Iohannis Lincoln episcopi, Petri de Monte Forti patris, domine Matildis matris eiusdem domine, Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto, Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E., domini Thome de Furneuall secundi mariti dicte domine, Petri Lymyseye militis et consanguinei eiusdem domine, Simonis de Islep”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[362].  William & his wife had ten children: 

a)         JOHN de Montagu (-Aug 1317, bur Lincoln Cathedral).  The Complete Peerage suggests that John was his father’s younger son[363].  However, he is named first in the list of the couple’s children in the following source.  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto...liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[364]m (1317) as her first husband, JOAN de Verdun, daughter and heiress of THEOBALD [II] de Verdun Lord Verdun & his first wife Matilda de Mortimer (Wootton in Stanton Lacy, Shropshire 9 or 11 Aug 1303-Alton 2 Oct 1334, bur Croxden Abbey).  The Chronicle of Croxden records that “Johannam, enecyam [meaning unknown]”, daughter of Theobald [II], married firstly “filius domini Willielmi de Montague” and after his death “dominus Thomas de Furnivall die Sabati in festo sancti Mathei apostoli[365].  She married secondly (24 Feb 1318) Thomas de Furnivalle Lord Furnivalle

b)         WILLIAM de Montagu (Casington, Oxfordshire [1302/03]-30 Jan 1344, bur Bisham).  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto...liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[366].  He succeeded his father in 1319 as Lord Montagu and was summoned to parliament as such 18 Feb 1331.  He was created Earl of Salisbury 16 Mar 1337. 

-        EARLS of SALISBURY

c)         SIMON (-1345).  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto...liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[367].  King Edward II issued a charter dated 28 Nov 1318 in favour of “consanguineus noster Simon de Monte Acuto Oxoniæ Studio Litterarum insistens[368].  His family relationship with King Edward has not been traced.  Bishop of Ely. 

d)         EDWARD de Montagu (-14 Jul 1361).  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto...liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[369].  He was summoned to parliament 20 Nov 1348, whereby he is held to have become Lord Montagum firstly (before 29 Aug 1338) ALICE of Norfolk, daughter and co-heiress of THOMAS "of Brotherton" Earl of Norfolk and Earl Marshal & his first wife Alice Halys ([1324]-Bungay, Suffolk [14 Nov 1351/30 Jan 1352]).  m secondly JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 1379).  She died from wounds received in an assault by her husband[370].  Lord Edward & his first wife had --- children: 

i)          EDWARD de Montagu (-before Feb 1359). 

ii)         AUDREY de Montagu (-before Feb 1359). 

iii)        ELIZABETH de Montagu ([1344]-1361)m ([1351]) WALTER de Ufford, son of ROBERT de Ufford Earl of Suffolk & his wife Margaret de Norwich (-1360). 

iv)       MATILDA de Montagu [1346]-). 

v)        JOAN de Montagu (Bungay, Suffolk 2 Feb 1349-before 12 Jun 1376)m (before 3 Feb 1363) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Ufford, son of ROBERT de Ufford Earl of Suffolk & his wife Margaret de Norwich ([1339]-15 Feb 1382, bur Campsey Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1369 as Earl of Suffolk. 

Lord Edward & his second wife had two children: 

vi)       AUDREY de Montagu ([1359]-after Aug 1390).  m HUGH de Strelley, son of WILLIAM de Strelley of Hazelbadge, Derbyshire & his wife --- (-Aug 1390). 

vii)      EDWARD de Montagu ([May/Jun] 1361-4 Oct 1361). 

e)         ALICE (-before 1346).  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[371]m (1332) as his first wife, RALPH Daubeney, son of --- (1305-[after 1378]).   

f)          MARY .  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[372]m (before 1327) RICHARD de Cogan of Brampton, son of THOMAS de Cogan & his wife Pernell --- (9 Oct 1299-10 or 29 Apr 1368). 

g)         ELIZABETH .  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[373].  Prioress of Halliwell. 

h)         HAWISE .  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[374]m --- Bavent, son of ---. 

i)          MATILDA .  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[375].  Abbess of Barking. 

j)          ISABEL .  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E...Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E.”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[376].  Nun at Barking, later Abbess[377]

 

 

 

MOUNTFORT (MONTFORT)

 

 

The following family is recorded in Preston, Rutland and Beaudesert, Warwickshire.  Their names suggest a connection with the Seigneurs de Montfort-sur-Risle in Normandy, descendants of Thurstan de Bastembourg, in which the names Thurstan, Robert and Hugues were used repeatedly (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY-ARQUES, AUMÂLE, CAUX).  The Complete Peerage points out that Montfort-sur-Risle "is about 15 miles distant from Beaumont-le-Roger", the base of the Beaumont family who were Earls of Warwick in England and from whom the English Montfort family held Beaudesert[378].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Montfort”, who is identified as Hugues [II] Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle, holding numerous properties in Essex, in Norfolk and in Suffolk[379].  Hugues [II]’s son Robert [I] was banished from England in 1107 following accusations of treason.  Robert [I]'s younger brother Hugues [III] was recorded at Haughley, but Hugues [III]'s son Robert [II] was also banished in the early years of the reign of King Henry I.  Turning to the family which is shown below, from a chronological point of view it is possible that Thurstan [I] de Montfort was a younger brother of Hugues [II] Seigneur de Montfort-en-Risle who is unrecorded in the Norman sources.  It is also clear from the 1130 Pipe Roll, that the father of Robert [I] de Montfort of Preston, Rutland had held Preston before his son. 

 

 

A.      MONTFORT

 

 

1.         THURSTAN [I] de Montfort (-after [1087/1100]).  "…Turstini de Mundford…" is named as subscriber to a document, included in the Chronicle of Abingdon, which records Henry Earl of Warwick’s donation of "terrarum Turkilli de Ardene" (Chesterton and Hill) to the monastery of Abingdon during the reign of King William II and while Renaud was abbot[380]

 

 

Three brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT [I] de Montfort of Preston, co. Rutland (-before [1136/39]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Montef" accounting that his men “de Prestetona” in Rutland should pay him what they paid to “patr suo[381].  Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirmed donations to Thorney, including the donation of “medietatem villæ de Wenga cum medietate ecclesiæ eiusdem villæ et cum molendino” made by “Roberti de Muntfort et Turstini fratris sui”, by undated charter[382].  He presumably died before [1136/39], the estimated date of the charter under which King Stephen confirmed to his brother Thurstan the donation to Thorney made by Robert (see below). 

2.         THURSTAN [II] de Montfort of Beaudesert, Warwickshire (-1170 or after).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Turst de Montef" among “Nova Placita et Novæ Conventiones” in Berkshire[383].  Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirmed donations to Thorney, including the donation of “medietatem villæ de Wenga cum medietate ecclesiæ eiusdem villæ et cum molendino” made by “Roberti de Muntfort et Turstini fratris sui”, by undated charter[384].  King Stephen confirmed to “Thurstino de Montfort” the donation of land "de molendino de Wenga" made to Thorney abbey by "Robertus frater tuus" by charter dated to [1136/39][385].  “Thurstanus de Monteforti” confirmed the earlier donations to Thorney, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum et...fratris mei Roberti de Monteforti”, by undated charter witnessed by “Robertus filius meus...[386].  Empress Matilda granted "mercatum die dominica ad castellum suum de Bellodeser[to]" to "Turstino de Mont[eforti]" by charter dated 2/3 Mar 1141[387].  King Stephen confirmed to “Thurstino de Montfort” the donation of land made to Thorney abbey by "Robertus frater tuus" by charter dated to [1148/54][388].  “Turstinus de Mundeford” donated revenue from his mills at Ayton to Guisborough, for the soul of “fratris mei Henrici”, with the consent of “conjugis mee et heredis mei”, by charter dated to [1155/70] witnessed by “Roberto filio et herede ipsius Turstini...[389]m JULIANA Murdac, daughter of GEOFFREY Murdac & his wife ---.  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[390].  Thurstan [II] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT [II] de Montfort (-before 1185).  “Thurstanus de Monteforti” confirmed the earlier donations to Thorney, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum et...fratris mei Roberti de Monteforti”, by undated charter witnessed by “Robertus filius meus...[391].  Henri Duke of Normandy addressed “Arnulpho episcopo Lexoviensi et Roberto de Monteforti” ordering an inquest to decide which holdings of "Thomas de Ponte-Episcopi" belonged to the priory of Saint-Ymer by charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153][392].  “Turstinus de Mundeford” donated revenue from his mills at Ayton to Guisborough, for the soul of “fratris mei Henrici”, with the consent of “conjugis mee et heredis mei”, by charter dated to [1155/70] witnessed by “Roberto filio et herede ipsius Turstini...[393].  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[394]m ALICE de Harcourt, daughter of [IVO] de Harcourt & his wife [Rohese Peverel] (-after 1189).  The Complete Peerage records her marriage and family origin.  Her parentage has not been confirmed.  From a chronological point of view, she could have been either a daughter of Rohese Peverel who married one of the Harcourt brothers. 

b)         HENRY [II] de Montfort (-before Apr 1199).  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[395].  The estimated date of birth of his son suggests that Henry [II] may have been considerably younger than his brother Robert [II] or that the mother of Henry [II] was not her husband’s first wife.  "Henry de Monteforti" donated property to Castellion abbey, for the souls of "his father Turstin and his mother Juliana", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto de Offurd et Roberto filio eius...Henrico de Monteforte…"[396]m (before [1183/87]) --- (-after 1199).  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  The estimated date of birth of his son suggests that Henry [II] may have been considerably younger than his brother Robert [II] or that the mother of Henry [II] was not her husband’s first wife.  Henry [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          THURSTAN [III] de Montfort ([1183/87]-1216, before 21 Nov).  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[397]

-         see below

c)         HUGH de Montfort .  “Henr[icus] de Monte Forti” confirmed that he had granted “terras meas de Pychauilla et de Gouteuilla et de Cleuilla” to “Hugoni de Monte Forti fratri meo” by charter dated to [1178/99][398]

3.         HENRY [I] de Montfort .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robert de Widuilla et Henri de Montf" accounting for “terre Rogeri de Molbrai” in Pembroke[399].  “Turstinus de Mundeford” donated revenue from his mills at Ayton to Guisborough, for the soul of “fratris mei Henrici”, with the consent of “conjugis mee et heredis mei”, by charter dated to [1155/70] witnessed by “Roberto filio et herede ipsius Turstini...[400]

 

 

Two possible brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM de Montfort .  “Aytrop Hasteng, Willelmo et Waltero de Monte Forti...” witnessed the charter dated to [1178/99] under which “Henr[icus] de Monte Forti” confirmed that he had granted “terras meas de Pychauilla et de Gouteuilla et de Cleuilla” to “Hugoni de Monte Forti fratri meo[401]

2.         [WALTER de Montfort .  “Aytrop Hasteng, Willelmo et Waltero de Monte Forti...” witnessed the charter dated to [1178/99] under which “Henr[icus] de Monte Forti” confirmed that he had granted “terras meas de Pychauilla et de Gouteuilla et de Cleuilla” to “Hugoni de Monte Forti fratri meo[402].  The contiguity of the two names suggests that William and Walter may have been brothers.] 

 

 

It is not known whether the following persons, who were presumably all related to each other as they are named together in the same source, were members of the main Montfort family who is set out in the present chapter. 

 

1.         HUGH de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[403]

 

2.         RALPH de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[404]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[405]

 

4.         HENRY de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[406].  . 

 

 

Three brothers, parents not known.  It is not known whether they were related to the main Montfort family who is set out in the present chapter. 

1.         HENRY de Montfort .  “Ivor de Teveleford” granted land in Chatley to “Robert de Berkelai” by charter dated to the reign of King John, witnessed by “Dom. Roger de Berkele, Henry de Monteforti, Roger and Hubert his brothers...[407]

2.         ROGER de Montfort .  “Ivor de Teveleford” granted land in Chatley to “Robert de Berkelai” by charter dated to the reign of King John, witnessed by “Dom. Roger de Berkele, Henry de Monteforti, Roger and Hubert his brothers...[408]

3.         HUBERT de Montfort .  “Ivor de Teveleford” granted land in Chatley to “Robert de Berkelai” by charter dated to the reign of King John, witnessed by “Dom. Roger de Berkele, Henry de Monteforti, Roger and Hubert his brothers...[409]

 

 

The 1247 document quoted below indicates that the following small family group were members of a Norman family named Montfort.  The Montfort family shown in this section, in which Robert was a family name, appears to be the most likely possibility.  If that is correct, their precise relationship to this Montfort family has not been ascertained. 

 

1.         --- de Montfort m --- du Hommet Dame de Glos, daughter of [RICHARD du Hommet & his [first/second] wife [--- du Hommet/Agnes de Say]] (-after 14 Jul 1223).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the 1247 document quoted below, assuming that the term “avunculus” is interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncle, and assuming the avunculus in question can be identified as Guillaume [II] du Hommet.  One child: 

a)         ROBERT de Montfort .  A list of Querimoniæ Normannorum, dated 1247, includes a document recording that “Robertus de Montfort miles” won a lawsuit against “Willelmus de Humeto avunculus eius” [presumably Guillaume [II] du Hommet], during the reign of Philippe II King of France, relating to “terram quam possederat mater ipsius apud Gloz de matrimonio suo” which she had continued to hold after King Philippe died, but that “dominus rex qui nunc est” [King Louis IX] refused to return the land to Robert who claimed to be “heredum dicti Willelmi propinquorum”, noting that “dictus Willelmus” died “MCCXI tercio, circa Ascensionem Domini[410].  While the list in question is dated to 1247, it evidently includes documents which were produced earlier.  Without further documentation, it is not possible to provide any precise dating for Robert, although the document shows that he must have been adult during the middle part of the reign of Philippe II.  Considering the numerous descendants of Guillaume [II] du Hommet, it is difficult to see how Robert de Montfort could have successfully claimed to have been the heir of his “propinquorum”. 

 

 

THURSTAN [III] de Montfort, son of HENRY [II] de Montfort & his wife --- ([1183/87]-1216, before 21 Nov).  King John received the homage of "Tustan de Montiforti" and granted him his land on condition that he demised it for two years to "Willo de Cantilupo" by order dated 1205[411].  This confirmation, about six years after the death of his father, suggests that Thurstan [III] must have been a minor when his father died.  The demise to William de Cauntelo suggests that Thurstan [III] may have been declared of age before the usual time and that it was considered that he required help in managing his estates.  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[412]

m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known.  The reference in the source quoted above to the demise of Thurstan [III]’s land to William de Cauntelo (presumably identified as William [II] de Cauntelo) suggests a close relationship between the two.  Maybe William was Thurstan’s father-in-law or brother-in-law (the chronology of the Cauntelo family is insufficiently clear to decide between these two possibilities), in which case his wife may have been --- de Cauntelo, daughter of [Walter de Cauntelo/William [II] de Cauntelo] & his wife ---.  The fact that King John granted the marriage of Thurstan’s older son to William de Cauntelo, and that Thurstan [III] named his younger son William, are also suggestive of a connection between the two families. 

Thurstan [III] & his wife had two children: 

1.         PIERS [I] de Montfort of Preston, co. Rutland ([1205/07]-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265).  The Complete Peerage records that King John granted the wardship and marriage of Piers to William de Cauntelo in 1216[413].  “Petrus de Monteforti filius Turstini de Monteforti” confirmed the donation of land "in villa de Wenge cum advocatione ecclesiæ eiusdem villæ" to St Neot’s by charter dated 29 Aug 1245[414].  This confirmation presumably relates to the donation of the same place to Thorney priory which is quoted earlier in this chapter.  The Patent Rolls record that "Peter de Monte Forti" claimed rights to forests in Rutland of which he alleged "Thurstan de Monte Forti great grandfather of the said Peter was seised in his demesne", orders dated 14 Jul 1253, 11 Sep 1253 and 25 Feb 1255[415].  "P. de Monte Forti" wrote to Henry III King of England, dated to [Dec 1262], reporting that he "found the Welsh march in great confusion" and names "dominorum Humfridi de Boun, Reginaldi filii Petri…"[416]m (1228) ALICE de Audley, daughter of HENRY de Audley & his wife Bertred Mainwaring (after 1217-after 1265).  An order dated 1228 notified that the king had granted "scutagium feodroum i militis et dimidii", held by "Petrus de Monte Forti qui filiam suam duxit in uxorem", to “Henrico de Aldithel[417].  Piers & his wife had three children: 

a)         PIERS [II] de Montfort of Beaudesert, Warwickshire (-before 4 Mar 1287).  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Simon de Monteforti junior, Petrus de eodem” were in Northampton when it was captured by the king in 1264[418].  The Annals of Waverley name “dominus Gudo filius domini Symonnis de Monteforti…duo filii domini Petri de Monteforti…dominus Petrus et dominus Robertus de Munfort” were among those captured at the battle of Evesham in 1265[419]m ([1260]) MATILDA de la Mare, daughter of MATTHEW de la Mare & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are recorded in The Complete Peerage which does not cite a primary source[420].  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto...Petri de Monte Forti patris, domine Matildis matris eiusdem domine...”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[421].  Piers & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN de Montfort (-[24 Jun 1295/11 May 1296]).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Montfort. 

-         LORDS MOUNTFORT[422]

ii)         ELIZABETH de Montfort (-Aug 1354, bur Oxford, Priory of St Frideswide).  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E, Iohannis Lincoln episcopi, Petri de Monte Forti patris, domine Matildis matris eiusdem domine, Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto, Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E., domini Thome de Furneuall secundi mariti dicte domine, Petri Lymyseye militis et consanguinei eiusdem domine, Simonis de Islep”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[423]m firstly ([1292]) WILLIAM de Montagu, son of SIMON de Montagu Lord Montagu & his first wife Hawise de Saint-Amand (-Gascony 18 Oct 1319).  m secondly (8 Jun 1322) Sir THOMAS de Furnivalle of Sheffield, Worksop. 

b)         ROBERT de Montfort (-1274).  The Annals of Waverley name “dominus Gudo filius domini Symonnis de Monteforti…duo filii domini Petri de Monteforti…dominus Petrus et dominus Robertus de Munfort” were among those captured at the battle of Evesham in 1265[424]m (before 14 Jan 1270) as her first husband, PETRONILLA de Dunstanville, daughter of WALTER de Dunstanville & his first wife Dionisia --- (22 Feb 1248-[1284/92]).  A writ dated 28 Jan "53 Hen III", after the death of "Walter de Dunstanvil", names "Petronilla his daughter aged 22 on the day of St Peter in Cathedra next, whom Roberti de Monteforti married, is his heir"[425].  She married secondly ([1275/76]) as his first wife, John de la Mare.  Robert de Montfort & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Montfort (-[1309/Dec 1313]). 

ii)         ROBERT de Montfort

c)         WILLIAM de Montfort .  Pope Alexander IV issued an indult to “William clerk son of Peter de Montfort of the diocese of Worcester to hold benefices...”, dated 19 Dec 1258[426]

2.         WILLIAM de MontfortThe Complete Peerage records that Thurstan [III] de Montfort left a younger son William "who had from his brother a life interest in property at Ringwood"[427]

 

 

 

B.      LORDS MOUNTFORT

 

 

1.         PIERS [III] de MontfortLord Mountfortm [MARGARET de Furnivalle], daughter of ---.  Piers [III] & his wife had children: 

a)         GUY de Montfort (-before 1370)m (Papal dispensation Jul 1347) MARGARET de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer.  The will of "Katherine Countess of Warwick", dated 4 Aug 1369, bequeathed property to “the Earl my husband...Thomas my son...William my other son...Maud de Clifford my daughter...Philippa de Stafford my daughter...my daughter Alice...Margaret Montfort my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Elizabeth the daughter of my son Guy...[428].  Nun at Shouldham, Norfolk.  The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 6 Sep 1369, chose burial “in the quire of the Collegiate Church of our Lady at Warwick”, bequeathed property to “my two sons Thomas and William...Isabel my daughter...to her marriage...Margaret my daughter a nun at Shouldham...Katherine the daughter of my son Guy a nun at Shouldham...my daughter Alice...my daughter Clifford...Sir John Beauchamp...Sir Roger Beauchamp...Sir Guy de Brienne...[429]

 

 

The will of "Peter de Mountfort Lord of Beaudesert Knight", dated [12] Dec 1367, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Preachers of Warwick”, bequeathed property to “the nuns of Penley...the Lady Lora Astley a nun there...my cousin Sir Baldwin de Freville...my son Richard de Montfort[430]

 

 

 

MOWBRAY

 

 

ROGER de Mowbray, son of NELE d'Aubigny & his second wife Gundred de Gournay (-[late 1187/1188], bur Tyre).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[431].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Molbrai" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[432].  ”Gundreda, uxor Nigelli de Albini” donated property to the Hospital of St Leonard, York by undated charter which names “Rogero de Molbray filio suo[433].  “Rogerus de Moubray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “patris mei Nigelli et matris meæ Gundredæ…et uxoris meæ Adeliz”, by undated charter witnessed by “Samsone de Albineio[434].  “Rogerus de Molbrai” confirmed the donation of property to Pontefract Priory by “uxor mea…pro anima prioris domini sui Ilberti de Lasci”, by undated charter witnessed by “Willielmus Peverel…Turgis de Molbray…[435].  An undated charter notes the donation of ”Hospitale Sancti Michaelis Archangeli” to Whitby Monastery, at the request of “Dominam Gundredam uxorem Nigelli de Albini” for the soul of “Rogero de Moubray filio eorum[436].  “Rogerus de Molbray” confirmed the grant of property to the hospital of St Peter, York, with the consent of “Nigellus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1155/65][437].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Munbray lxxiii s iv d" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][438].  He left on crusade in [late 1185], was taken prisoner at the battle of Hittin 4 Jul 1187, ransomed by the Templars but died in Palestine or on his way back[439].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus de Molbray, qui fundavit abbatiam de Bellalanda” was captured “a Saracenis”, ransomed by the Templars, died “in terra sancta” and was buried “apud Sures[440]

m ([Feb 1141/20 Jun 1143]) as her second husband, ALICE de Gand, widow of ILBERT de Lacy, daughter of WALTER de Gand & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre.  “Aliz de Gant” donated property to Pontefract Priory, for the souls of “prioris domini mei Ilberti de Lascy” and with the consent of “Henricus de Lascy”, by undated charter[441].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Rogerus de Molbrai” confirmed the donation of property to Pontefract Priory by “uxor mea…pro anima prioris domini sui Ilberti de Lasci”, witnessed by “Willielmus Peverel…Turgis de Molbray…[442].  It is dated by an undated charter under which Roger de Mowbray and his wife Alice (Ilbert’s widow) donated property to the abbey of St. Mary, Hood, witnessed by William “decanus” who was consecrated bishop of Durham 20 Jun 1143, thus providing the latest date for the document[443].  “Rogerus de Moubray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “patris mei Nigelli et matris meæ Gundredæ…et uxoris meæ Adeliz”, by undated charter witnessed by “Samsone de Albineio[444].  “Alicia de Gaunt uxor Rogeri de Mubray” donated property to Fountains Abbey by charter dated 13 Apr 1176 which names “filiorum meorum Nigelli et Roberti[445]

Roger & his wife had three children: 

1.         NELE [Nigel] de Mowbray (-Acre 1191).  "Roger de Mobraio and Nigel his son" donated property to the abbey of Saint-André-en-Gouffern by charter dated [1160][446].  “Rogerus de Molbray” confirmed the grant of property to the hospital of St Peter, York, with the consent of “Nigellus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1155/65][447].  “Alicia de Gaunt uxor Rogeri de Mubray” donated property to Fountains Abbey by charter dated 13 Apr 1176 which names “filiorum meorum Nigelli et Roberti[448].  He accompanied his father on crusade in [late 1185][449].  “Rogerum de Molbrai et filios suos Nigellum et Robertum” donated property to Fountains Abbey by undated charter[450].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Nigellus de Munbray" paying "xliv l ii s vi d, iv xx viii [=88?] milites et quartam" in Yorkshire[451].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” took the cross and died “in mare Græco[452]m (before Nov 1170) MABEL, daughter of --- (-[1203]).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Mabiliam” as the wife of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray[453].  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” married “filiam Edmondi comitis de Clara…Mabillam[454], but her supposed father has not been identified from other sources.  “Mabilla uxor domini Nigelli de Moubray” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory, Southwark by undated charter[455].  "Mabill de Mumbrai" claimed "terra de Mauto [Leicestershire] …ex dono Nigill viri sui" from "Rob de Mubrai" in 1194/95[456].  Nele & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Mowbray (-Axholme before 25 Mar 1224, bur Neufbourg).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife, adding that William died “in insula de Haxeiholm” and was buried “apud Novum-Burgum[457]

-        see below

b)         PHILIP de Mowbray (-after 22 Sep 1196).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife[458].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[459].  "…Roll constabul, Philipp de Mubray, Willmo de Valloñ, Henr Biset, Thomas de Colville, Adam fil Herb, Ferg fratre Roll, Alexander de Finton" witnessed the charter dated 22 Sep (no year, but dated to after 1196) under which William King of Scotland confirmed the donation of "in territorio de Cliftun" to Melrose abbey made by "Walterus Corbet filius Walteri"[460]

c)         ROBERT de Mowbray (-after 1196).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife[461].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[462].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Munbray" paying "xx s, i militem" in Northamptonshire[463]

d)         ROGER de Mowbray (-after 1210).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife[464].  “Rogerus de Mowbray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, with the consent of “Sampsone de Albeneio” to whom “Nigellus pater meus” had granted the property in question, by undated charter[465].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Rogerus de Munbray" paying "l s, ii militem et dimidium" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[466].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Rogerus de Munbray" holding "x libratas in Fulburne et xvi libratas in Suaveshulle, de terries Britonum, de dono regis Johannis…de serjanteriis et terris sine servitio" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][467]

2.         ROBERT de Mowbray (-after 13 Apr 1176).  “Alicia de Gaunt uxor Rogeri de Mubray” donated property to Fountains Abbey by charter dated 13 Apr 1176 which names “filiorum meorum Nigelli et Roberti[468].  “Rogerum de Molbrai et filios suos Nigellum et Robertum” donated property to Fountains Abbey by undated charter[469].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[470]

3.         [471]daughter .  m WILLIAM de Daiville, son of ---. 

 

 

WILLIAM de Mowbray, son of NELE de Mowbray & his wife Mabel --- (-Axholme before 25 Mar 1224, bur Neufbourg).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife, adding that William died “in insula de Haxeiholm” and was buried “apud Novum-Burgum[472].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Munbray" paying "iv xx viii l [=88?] v s, iv xx viii [=88?] milites" in Yorkshire[473].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[474].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Munbray et Elyas filius Bernicii" holding one and one half knights’ fees in "Hiltone" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][475].  Any family relationship between the two individuals has not been traced. 

m AVICE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that the wife of “Willihelmus…primogenitus et hæres Nigelli de Molbray” married “[filiam] comitis de Arundel…Agnetem” who was mother of his two sons[476].  If this is correct, she would have been Agnes, daughter of William Earl of Arundel & his wife Matilda de Saint-Hilaire, but the identification of this person has not yet been corroborated from other sources. 

William & his wife had two children: 

1.         NELE [Nigel] de Mowbray (-Nantes 1230, bur Neufbourg).  "Nigel de Mowbray" made a fine for "having seisin of all lands…of which William de Mowbray his father, whose heir he is, was seised on the day he died", dated 25 Mar 1224[477].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Nigellum et Rogerum” as sons of “Willielmus de Molbray”, adding the Nele died “apud Nauntys” childless and was buried “apud Novum-Burgum[478].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Nigellus de Mubray” died in 1230[479]m as her first husband, MATILDA de Camville, daughter of ROGER de Camville & his wife --- (-before 6 Oct 1240).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Nigellum”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “filiam Rogeri de Canevilla[480].  She married secondly (before 2 Jan 1234) John de Courtenay.  A charter records an assize held a die Pasche” 1238 records a claim by “H. prior Meritone” against “Johannem de Curtenay et Matildem uxorem eius” relating to “ecclesiam de Reyers[481].  The primary source which confirms that Matilda, wife of John de Courtenay, was the same person as the wife of Nele de Mowbray has not yet been identified. 

2.         ROGER de Mowbray (-[Axholme] [Nov 1266], bur [Pontefract, Friars Church]).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Nigellum et Rogerum” as sons of “Willielmus de Molbray”, adding that Roger was buried “apud Pontemfractum[482].  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, died “in insula de Haxiholme” and was buried “apud Pomfret…in ecclesia prædictorum fratrum[483].  m as her first husband, MATILDA de Beauchamp, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford & his wife Ida de Longespee of the Earls of Salisbury (-before Apr 1273).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Matildam, filiam Willielmi de Bello-campo[484].  She married secondly Roger Le Strange.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   Roger & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROGER de Mowbray (-before 21 Nov 1297).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife had “filias tres et filium unum…Rogerum[485].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mowbray. 

-        see below

b)         JOAN Mowbray .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m ([1261]) ROBERT de Mohaut, son of ROGER de Mohaut & his wife Cecily de Albini of the Earls of Arundel (-before 16 Sep 1275). 

c)         two other daughters .  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife had “filias tres et filium unum…Rogerum[486]

 

 

ROGER de Mowbray, son of ROGER de Mowbray & his wife Matilda de Beauchamp (-[Gent] before 21 Nov 1297, bur Fountains Abbey).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife had “filias tres et filium unum…Rogerum[487].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mowbray.  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon…"[488].  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that “Rogerus”, son of “Rogerus”, died “in Gant ultra mare” and was buried “ad abbatiam de Fontibus…anno 1299[489]

m (1270) ROHESE de Clare, daughter of RICHARD de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford & his second wife Matilda de Lacy of Lincoln (1252-after 1316).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Isabella primogenita, Margareta et Roysea” as the three daughters of “Ricardus de Clare secundus filius et hæres…Gilberti et Isabellæ” and his wife “Matildem…filiam comitis Lincolniæ[490].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Roysam[491]

Roger & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         JOHN de Mowbray (4 Sep 1286-hanged York 23 Mar 1322).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Johannem” as the son of “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife[492].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth “II Non Sep” in 1286 of “Johannes filius Dñi Rogeri de Moubray[493].  He succeeded his father in 1297 as Lord Mowbray.  He fought for the Earl of Lancaster at the battle of Boroughbridge but was captured by Andrew de Harcia, hanged and his estates forfeited.  m (Swansea 1298) as her first husband, ALINE de Briouse, daughter of WILLIAM de Briouse Lord Brewes, Lord of Gower (-before 20 Jul 1331).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Roger]” married “Elianoram filiam domini Willielmi de Brewes in Wallia[494].  She married secondly Richard de Peshale.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   Lord John & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN Mowbray (Hovingham, Yorkshire 29 Nov 1310-4 Oct 1361, bur Bedford).  “Johannes filius et hæres Johannis de Moubray dominus insulæ de Haxiholme, et de honoribus de Gouher et de Brember” confirmed the donations to Byland Abbey by his ancestors by charter dated “in festo sanctæ Margaretæ virginis 1345[495].  He succeeded his father as Lord Mowbray de iure when the latter was hanged in 1322. 

-        see below

2.         [ROGER de Mowbray .  The parentage of Roger has not been confirmed.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been a younger son of Roger de Mowbray.  The absence of any reference to his parents in the source quoted below suggests that Roger had reached the age of majority at the time of his betrothal, even though his betrothed was probably still a child at the time.  If that assumption is correct, it is unlikely that Roger was the son of John de Mowbray who died in 1322.  Betrothed (Papal dispensation 17 Apr 1312) to MARGARET Abernethy, daughter of ALEXANDER Abernethy & his wife ---.  The Papal dispensation for the marriage between “dominum Rogerum de Moubray” and “Margaretam filiam...Alexandri de Abbernythy”, who were “in gradu consanguinitatis prohibito”, is dated 17 Apr 1312[496].] 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

JOHN Mowbray, son of JOHN de Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Aline de Briouse (Hovingham, Yorkshire 29 Nov 1310-4 Oct 1361, bur Bedford).  “Johannes filius et hæres Johannis de Moubray dominus insulæ de Haxiholme, et de honoribus de Gouher et de Brember” confirmed the donations to Byland Abbey by his ancestors by charter dated “in festo sanctæ Margaretæ virginis 1345[497].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth “V Kal Dec…apud Hovingham” in 1310 of “Johannes filius Dñi Johis de Moubray[498].  He succeeded his father as Lord Mowbray de iure when the latter was hanged in 1322.  However, his father's estates were confiscated for supporting the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster in his rebellion.  John de Mowbray was imprisoned in the Tower 26 Feb 1322.  His inheritance was restored on the accession of King Edward III.  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” was buried “apud Bedford[499].  

m firstly (after 28 Feb 1327) JOAN of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY Duke of Lancaster & his wife Matilda Chaworth ([1312]-7 Jul [1349], bur Byland Abbey, Yorkshire).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” married “Johannam sororem domini Henrici primi ducis Lancastriæ”, adding that she was buried “in Bellanda[500]

m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH de Vere, widow of HUGH de Courtenay, daughter of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Matilda Badlesmere (-[Aug/Sep] 1375).  She married thirdly (before 18 Jan 1369) William de Cosynton

Lord John & his first wife had three children:

1.         BLANCHE Mowbray (-1409)m firstly (1349) JOHN Segrave, son of JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Margaret Ctss of Norfolk (1340-before 1353).  m secondly ROBERT Bertram, son of ---.  m thirdly THOMAS Poynings, son of ---.  m fourthly JOHN Worth, son of ---.  m fifthly JOHN Wiltshire, son of ---. 

2.         ELEANOR Mowbray (-before 18 Jun 1387).  m firstly (1358) as his third wife, ROGER La Warre Lord La Warre, son of JOHN La Warre & his wife Margaret de Holand (1326-Gascony 27 Aug 1370).  m secondly (before 12 Feb 1373) LEWIS de Clifford, son of --- (-[17 Sep/5 Dec] 1404). 

3.         JOHN Mowbray (Epworth 25 Jun 1340-killed in battle [Palestine] 1368).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states names “Johannem” as son of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “Johannam sororem domini Henrici primi ducis Lancastriæ[501].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth in 1341 “in crastino Sci Johis Baptistæ” of “Johannes filius et hæres Dñi Johis de Moubray…[et] domina Johanna filia Dñi Henrici…Comitis Lancastriæ[502].  He succeeded his father as 4th Lord Mowbray.  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” left “ad Terram Sanctam” but was killed “a Turcis juxta Constantinopolim anno 1368[503]m ([1349]) ELIZABETH de Segrave, daughter of JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Margaret Ctss of Norfolk (Croxton Abbey 25 Oct 1338-before 1368).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” married “filiam et hæredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[504].  Lord John & his wife had three children: 

a)         ELEANOR Mowbray (1364-1417)m (1386) as his first wife, JOHN de Welles Lord Welles, son of JOHN de Welle Lord Welles & his wife Matilda [de Ros] (Conisholme, Lincolnshire 20 Apr 1352-26 Aug 1421). 

b)         JOHN Mowbray (Epworth 3 Aug 1365-London 1380, bur London Whitefriars Church).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family names “Johannem et Thomam” as the two sons of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “filiam et hæredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha”, adding that John was born “apud Epworth anno 1365”, was created Earl of Nottingham by King Richard II, and died childless “apud Londinum anno 1380” and was buried “apud Albos Fratres in Londino[505].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth 3 Aug 1365 “apud Eppeworth” of “Johannes filius et hæres Johis de Moubray [et] Elizabeth filia et hæres Dñi de Segrave[506].  He may have succeeded his mother [before 1368] as Lord Segrave.  He succeeded his father in 1368 as Lord Mowbray.  He was created Earl of Nottingham 16 Jul 1377. 

c)         THOMAS Mowbray (22 Mar 1366[507]-Venice 22 Sep 1399, bur Venice, abbey of St George).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family names “Johannem et Thomam” as the two sons of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “filiam et hæredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[508].  He was created Duke of Norfolk in 1397, and succeeded as Earl of Norfolk in 1399 on the death of his maternal grandmother.  Earl Marshal of England. 

-        EARLS of NORFOLK

 

 

 

LORDS MULTON

 

 

1.         THOMAS de Multon of Multon, near Spalding, Lincolnshire m firstly ([1190]) SARAH de Flete, daughter of RICHARD de Flete of Fleet, Lincolnshire & his wife Juliane ---.  m secondly (before 13 Aug 1218) as her second husband, ADA de Morville, widow of RICHARD de Lucy, daughter of HUGH de Morville & his wife Helwise de Stuteville (-after 20 Feb 1227).  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Luci accounts for 900 marks and five palfreys for having Alda his wife’s reasonable share...of Hugh de Moreville her father’s land"[509].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[510].  "Ada q fuit uxor Ricardi de Lucy de Egremunt" paid a fine for "hereditate sua [et] dote sua…q fuerunt predicti Ricardi quondam viri sui" in Cumberland, dated 1213[511].  Henry III King of England noted that "Thomas de Muleton" married "Adam de Morevill, que fuit uxor Ricardi de Luci" without royal licence, and ordered the seizure of "omnibus terris ipsius Ade in Cumberlande et Westmerilande et de omnibus terris ipsius Thome in Coplande, cum castro suo de Egremunde", dated 13 Aug 1218[512].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Thomas de Muleton” owing “de pluribis debitis Ricardi de Lucy...et...pro Alda que fuit uxor eiusdem Ricardi” in Essex[513].  A royal licence granted the right to construct fisheries to "Thomas de Muleton and Ada his wife" dated 20 Feb 1227[514].  Thomas & his first wife had two children:

a)         LAMBERT de Multon (-before 16 Nov 1246)

-        see below

b)         ALAN de Multon (-after 1250).  His children adopted the name Lucy. 

-        LUCY

Thomas & his second wife had one child: 

c)         THOMAS de Multon (-1271)m MATILDA de Vaux, daughter of HUBERT de Vaux & his wife --- (-19 May 1293).  A manuscript recording “baronum et dominorum…baronia Gilleslandiæ” names “Matildis de Vallibus filia Huberti de Vallibus Ob. 23 Edw I” as wife of “Thomas de Multon…Ob. 25 Hen III[515].  “Matildis de Vallibus Domina de Gillesland” donated property to Wetherhal priory, for the soul of "Domini mei Thomæ de Multon", by charter dtaed 29 Jun 1270, witnessed by "…Ranulpho de Vallibus…"[516].  The Chronicle of Lanercost records the death "die sancti Dunstani" (dated to 1294 or 1295 from the context) of "domina Matildis de Multona domina de Gilleslande, mater predictæ Thomæ" (whose death is recorded just before this entry)[517].  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[518].  Thomas & his wife had three children: 

i)          THOMAS de Multon ([1262/63]-).  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[519]

ii)         JAMES de Multon .  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[520]

iii)        HUBERT de Multon .  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[521]

 

 

LAMBERT de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon of Multon, Lincolnshire & his first wife Sarah de Flete (-before 16 Nov 1246)

m firstly AMABEL de Lucy, son of RICHARD de Lucy & his wife Ada de Moreville.  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[522].  "Lambertus de Moleton" donated rights in land "in Couplandia" to St Bees, for the soul of "Amabilie uxoris mee", by undated charter[523]

m secondly as her second husband, IDA, widow of GEOFFREY d’Oyly, daughter of ---.  She married thirdly Geoffrey de Millers

Lambert & his first wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Multon of Egremont (4 May 1225-before 29 Apr 1294).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[524]m firstly IDA, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH, widow of JOHN de Munemuth, daughter of --- ([1276/78]).  m thirdly (before 1288) MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after Dec 1313).  Thomas & his wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS de Multon (-24 Jul 1287).  A writ dated 22 Aug "15 Edw I", after the death of "Thomas de Multon the younger", records that he died “on the eve of St. James 15 Edw I”, names "Thomas his son aged 11 on Thursday in the first week of Lent in the same year is his next heir", and records that “Thomas Multon the elder” gave Hoylond, Lincolnshire to “Edmunda late the wife of the said Thomas the younger in dower when he married her, but she died before her husband[525]m EMOINE Le Botiller, daughter of JOHN Le Botiller of Ireland & his wife --- ([Sep 1284/Jul 1287]).  A writ dated 22 Aug "15 Edw I", after the death of "Thomas de Multon the younger", records that “Thomas Multon the elder” gave Hoylond, Lincolnshire to “Edmunda late the wife of the said Thomas the younger in dower when he married her, but she died before her husband[526].  Thomas & his wife had children:

i)          THOMAS de Multon (21 Feb 1276-[May 1321/8 Feb 1322]).  A writ dated 22 Aug "15 Edw I", after the death of "Thomas de Multon the younger", names "Thomas his son aged 11 on Thursday in the first week of Lent in the same year is his next heir"[527].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Multon of Egremont.  m (St Peter’s Priory, Ipswich 3 Jan 1297) ELEANOR de Burgh, daughter of RICHARD de Burgh Earl of Ulster & his wife Margaret de Burgh of Lanvalley.  Thomas & his wife had four children: 

(a)       JOAN Multon ([1303/04]-16 Jun 1363, bur Dunmore Priory)m ROBERT FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter, son of ROBERT FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter & his second wife Eleanor Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1300/01]-6 May 1328). 

(b)       ELIZABETH de Multon ([1305/06]-).  m firstly ROBERT de Harington, son of JOHN de Harington Lord Harington & his wife ---.  m secondly WALTER de Birmingham, son of ---. 

(c)       JOHN de Multon (Oct 1308-[19 Jul 1333/23 Nov 1334])Betrothed (25 May 1317) to JOAN de Gavaston, daughter of PIERS de Gavaston Earl of Cornwall & his wife Margaret de Clare ([1310]-Amesbury Priory 14 Jan 1325).  The marriage contract between “monsieur Thomas de Multon Seignur de Egremond...Johan einez filz et heir le dit monsieur Thomas” and “Johane la feile monsieur Piers de Gavaston jadys counte de Cornwall” is dated 25 May 1317 and provides for the marriage “si tost come les ditz enfauntz venuz a age convenable[528].  The Complete Peerage states that Joan died “aged 15 in Amesbury Priory14 Jan 1325[529]m as her first husband, ALICE, daughter of --- (-before 25 Oct 1339).  She married secondly (before Jul 1338) Edmund de Ufford

(d)       MARGARET de Multon ([1309/10]-after Sep 1341).  m ([Nov 1329]) as his first wife, THOMAS de Lucy, son of ANTHONY de Lucy Lord Lucy & his wife Elizabeth --- (-London 5 Dec 1365).  He succeeded as Lord Lucy

 

 

 

NEVILLE

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Neville (-after [1115/18]).  He held land at Walcot, Lincolnshire in 1086[530].  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Gislebertus de Nevila" holding land in Lincolnshire from "abbatia de Burch"[531]

 

2.         RALPH de Neville .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Radulfus de Nevila" holding land in Lincolnshire and Hampshire from "abbatia de Burch"[532]

 

3.         GEOFFREY de Neville of Walcot, Lincolnshire (-after [1145/46]). 

 

4.         GILBERT de Neville (-before 1169).  King Henry II gave him the barony of Ashby, Lincolnshire[533].  Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire by ”Gilberti de Nevill et Alani de Nevill fratris sui” by undated charter, which confirmed donations by “Galfredi de Nevill…Galfridi filii Alani de Nevill…Henrici de Nevill…Ernisii de Nevill…Hugonis de Nevill[534].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Gile de Neville v m" in Lincolnshire in [1161/62][535]m ---.  The name of Gilbert´s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had three children: 

a)         GEOFFROY de Neville (-before 1193).  Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire by ”Gilberti de Nevill et Alani de Nevill fratris sui” by undated charter, which confirmed donations by “…Galfridi filii Alani de Nevill…[536].  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[537]m ([1169/Nov 1176]) EMMA de Bulmer, daughter of BERTRAND de Bulmer & his wife [538]Emma Fossard of Mulgrave (-before 1208).  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Galfrido de Neuill qui habet filiam…Bertram [de Bulemer] cum hereditate" in Yorkshire[539].  Geoffrey & his wife had two children: 

i)          HENRY de Neville (-before 3 Mar 1227).  King John confirmed the grant of "in Askebi et in Thienthon" to "Henr de Nevill", as granted by King Henry II to "Gaufr de Nevill patri eiusdem Henrici", by charter dated 7 Aug 1199[540].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus de Neville" holding 3 knights´ fees "de Suttone" in Yorkshire in [1210/12][541]m ALICE, daughter of ---.  "Alice who was the wife of Henry de Neville" made a fine "for having licence to marry whom she wishes", dated to 3 Mar 1227[542]

ii)         ISABEL de Neville (-before May 1254).  "Robert fitz Maldred, who has to wife Isabella, sister and heiress of…Henry de Neville" paid homage to the king "for the lands formerly of Henry de Neville", dated to [Mar] 1227[543].  She was heiress of her brother Henry de Neville.  m firstly ROBERT FitzMaldred Lord of Raby and Brancepeth, co. Durham, son of MALDRED & his wife --- (-[25 Jun 1242/26 May 1248]).  m secondly (before 26 May 1248) GILBERT de Brakenberg, son of ---. 

b)         WILLIAM .  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[544]

c)         WALTER de Neville (-after 1194).  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[545]

-        see below

5.         ALAN de Neville of Ashby, Lincolnshire (-[1177/78]).  Henry II King of England confirmed the foundation of Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire by ”Gilberti de Nevill et Alani de Nevill fratris sui” by undated charter[546].  Judge of the Court of Exchequer[547].  Ancestor of the LORDS NEVILLE of Essex, created by writ 1311, extinct in the male line 1358[548]

 

 

1.         JOHN de Neville (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Johannes de Neville" held one knight fee "in Seorene" in Kent[549]

 

2.         ERNIS de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[550].  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Philippo Escrop…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla, Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[551]m ---.  The name of Ernis´s wife is not known.  Ernis & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[552].  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[553]

b)         WALTER de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[554].  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[555]

3.         ALAN de Neville .  "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel" by charter dated to the late 12th century[556]

4.         HUGH de Neville .  "Hernisius de Neuilla" donated land in Habrough to Newhouse abbey by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II witnessed by "Hugone de Neuilla fratre meo…Hugone de Neuilla filio meo, Waltero filio meo…"[557].  "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel" by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Ernisio de Neuilla, Willelmo de Amundeuilla, Willelmo filio Warin, Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Philippo Escrop…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla, Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…"[558]

 

5.         GILBERT de Neville .  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[559]

 

6.         RALPH de Neville of Museton .  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[560]

 

7.         GEOFFREY de Nevillem ---.  The name of Geoffrey´s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD de Neville .  "…Ernisio de Neuilla…Gileberto de Neuilla, Radulfo Neuilla de Museton…Hugone de Neuilla et Waltero fratre suo…Ricardi filio Galfridi de Neuilla…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[561]

 

8.         ROBERT de Nevillem ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         PETER de Neville .  "Petrus de Neuilla filius Roberti de Neuilla" donated land in Ulceby to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by charter dated to the late 12th century[562]

 

9.         HUGH de Neville (-before 1199).  m EMMA de Hommet, daughter of --- (-before 1208).  "Henr de Nevill" paid a fine for "saisina feod trium militum…in Raskel et in Sutton qui fuit Emme de Humez matris sue" in Yorkshire, dated 1208[563].  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRY Neville (-after 1210).  "Henr fil Hug de Novill" paid a fine for "saisina terre…patris suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1199[564].  King John confirmed "de soka de Thancastra…terre in Kermitton et in Croxton…", granted by King Henry II to "predicto Hugo", to "Henr de Nevill filio Hug de Nevill" by charter dated 13 Apr 1200[565].  "Henr de Nevill" paid a fine for "saisina feod trium militum…in Raskel et in Sutton qui fuit Emme de Humez matris sue" in Yorkshire, dated 1208[566].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus filius Hugonis de Neville" holding one knight´s fee in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][567]

 

10.      HUGH de Neville (-before [Mar] 1229).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "…Hugo de Neville…" was granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Kent and in Essex, Hertfordshire[568].  King John confirmed "unam feriam singulis annis apud Wakering" to "Hug de Nevill et Johe ux sue" by charter dated 30 Apr 1200[569].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Neville, Grassus" holding one knight´s fee "in Durintone" in Wiltshire, three "in Magna Totham de honore Gloucestriæ" in Essex, Hertfordshire, and "ii hidas et dimidiam in Wassingele per serjantariam eundi cum Rege in Walliam" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, in [1210/12][570]m JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 6 Dec 1224).  King John confirmed "unam feriam singulis annis apud Wakering" to "Hug de Nevill et Johe ux sue" by charter dated 30 Apr 1200[571].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Rogerus filius Renfrey et Walterus Avenel et uxor Hugonis de Nevill" holding parts of "Gamegeya"[572].  Her family origin is indicated by an order dated 6 Dec 1224 which required the confiscation of "the vill of Newnham that Gundrea de Warenne held in dower, which is an inheritance partible between Joan wife of Hugh de Neville, and Margaret wife of Falkes de Bréauté", with savings for "the executors of the testament of the same Gundrea"[573].  It is not clear from this source whether Joan was the daughter or the granddaughter of the deceased.  As the second heiress Margaret can be shown to be the granddaughter, it is possible that Joan was also a granddaughter, born from an older daughter.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         ERNIS Neville .  "Ernisius son of Hugh Neville Crassus" made a fine for "his relief of one knight´s fee that Hugh held of the king in chief in Durrington" Wiltshire, dated [Mar] 1229[574]

11.      [ALICE de Neville (-after 13 Apr 1216).  "Alic uxor Petri de Adelakeston, soror Hugonis de Nevill" paid a fine for "terris…ipsius Pet de Adhelakeston viri sui", with "Hug de Nevill" acting as guarantor, in Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire, dated 13 Apr 1216[575].  As more than one Hugh de Neville was recorded at the time, the identity of Alice´s brother is uncertain.  m PETER de Adelakestone, son of --- (-before Apr 1216).] 

 

12.      HUGH de Neville (-after 10 May 1229).  "Hugh de Neville" was pardoned by the king for payment "by which Hugh made fine with King John" because "he permitted Peter Bishop of Winchester to enclose the park of Taunton without warrant", dated 10 May 1229[576]

 

13.      JOEL de Neville (-[1196/1208]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Joelendus de Neville" held one knight fee "in Sorne" in Kent[577].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "…Jolland de Neville…" was granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Kent[578].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Jollandus de Neville" among those granted delay for payment "per brevia" in Kent[579].  King John confirmed "manerium de Sornes" to "Jolano de Neuvill" by charter dated 24 Aug 1199[580].  "Joelinus de Nouilla" donated land near Ailby to Greenfield priory, with the consent of "heredis mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, sealed by "Iollani de Nevile"[581]m ---.  The name of Joel´s wife is not known.  Joel & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Neville .  "Johannes de Nevill" paid a fine for "terris q fuerunt Jollan de Nevill patris sui", dated 1208[582]

 

14.      ROGER de Neville (-after 1217).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neville, Letitia de Pinkeyni, Serlo de Marcy" holding one knight´s fee each "in Elmedene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][583].  King John confirmed "totum essartum de Rokingeham qd Hug de Nevill essartavit dum castellum de Rokingeh fuit in custodia sua" to "Rogero de Nevill", as well as "partea communa in pastura eiusdem ville ad avia sua pascenda", by charter dated 25 Jun 1215[584].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Leticia de Lucy, Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neovill, Ema de Marcy" holding "iv milites…in Heaumedon, Dubenhog, La Lee, Crawell"[585].  

 

15.      THOMAS de Neville m --- de Hosdenc, daughter of RALPH de Hosdenc & his wife ---.  The Pipe Roll 1211 records that "Tomas de Nevill" held four and a half knights´ fees "cum herede Radulfi de Hosdeng" before Michaelmas 1211[586].  

 

16.      WILLIAM de Neville (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Rogerus de Monte Begonis, Simon filius Walteri, Alexander de Nevill" held land which was from "Willelmi de Nevill" in Cumberland, which King Henry I had granted to "Ade filio Swein, antecessori predictorum"[587].  m as her second husband, AMABEL, widow of ALEXANDER de Crèvecœur, daughter of ADAM FitzSwein & his wife ---. 

 

 

WALTER de Neville, son of GILBERT de Neville & his wife --- (-after 1194).  “Gaufridus de Nevilla” confirmed a donation to the monks of Byland by charter dated to [1169/93], witnessed by “…Willelmo de Nevill et Waltero fratre eius…[588].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Walterus de Neville" paying "xii l xii milites" in Lincolnshire[589].  "Walterus de Nevilla…et Ceciliam uxorem meam" donated a fishery in the river Ancolne to Bullington priory by charter dated to the late 12th century[590]

m CECILIA de Crèvecœur, daughter of [RENAUD de Crèvecœur & his wife ---] (-after 1204).  "Walterus de Nevilla…et Ceciliam uxorem meam" donated a fishery in the river Ancolne to Bullington priory by charter dated to the late 12th century, sealed by "Walteri de Nevila…Cecilie de Crevecwer"[591].  The document does not name Cecilia´s parents, but the chronology of the references to the Crèvecœur family in Lincolnshire suggests that Cecilia may have been the daughter of Alexander de Crèvecœur.  This would also explain the transmission of the name Alexander into the Neville family.  Her parentage is confirmed by the order dated 1204 which is quoted below.  "Alex de Crevequor" paid a fine relating to "xiv feod milit et dimid versus Cecil de Crevequor" in Lincolnshire, dated 1201[592].  "Cecil´ de Crevequor" paid a fine for "hereditate sua un dissaisita fuit p perceptu dñi Reg, et uñ Alex de Neovil fil suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[593].  "Cecilia de Crevequor" paid a fine for "terre…in Harpeswell et Herdewic qu´s Amabil q fuit uxor Alex de Crevequor tenuit in dote ex dono ipsius Alex et q ad ipsam Cecil q fuit fil eidsdem Alex et hs ipsa et jure hereditario deb revti", in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[594].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hugo filius Radulfi" held property "de baronia Cecillie de Crevequer, in Askebi, Sumerdebi et Enderbi et Teford et Hamringham et Willeton" in Lincolnshire[595].  

Walter & his wife had one child: 

1.         ALEXANDER de Neville (-[1212/27]).  "Cecil´ de Crevequor" paid a fine for "hereditate sua un dissaisita fuit p perceptu dñi Reg, et uñ Alex de Neovil fil suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[596].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Rogerus de Monte Begonis, Simon filius Walteri, Alexander de Nevill" held land which was from "Willelmi de Nevill" in Cumberland, which King Henry I had granted to "Ade filio Swein, antecessori predictorum"[597].  m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Margeria que fuit uxor Alexandri de Nevill est in custodia Ricardi de Alazun per regem pro terra de Redburn"[598].  "Margaret who was the wife of Alexander de Neville" paid a fine for "a pone against Thomas son of William concerning land in Mirfield" in Yorkshire, dated 26 Jan 1227[599].  Alexander & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN de Neville (-before [Oct] 1230).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Johannes filius Alexandri de Nevill in Redburn est in custodia Ricardi de Alazun per dominum regem..."[600].  A charter dated [Oct] 1230 records the death of "Johannes primogenitus filius Alexandri de Nevill" and grants custody of "Alexandri filii et heredis predicti Alexandri de Nevill" to "Ricardo de Alencun"[601]

b)         ALEXANDER de Neville (-before 12 Jul 1249).  A charter dated [Oct] 1230 records the death of "Johannes primogenitus filius Alexandri de Nevill" and grants custody of "Alexandri filii et heredis predicti Alexandri de Nevill" to "Ricardo de Alencun"[602].  A writ dated 12 Jul "33 Hen III", after the death of "Alexander de Nevill" names "Alexander his son, aged 12 and more, is his heir" and his manors "Nunington…Mirfeud town  [York]…Kirketon Soke [Lincoln"[603]m ---.  The name of Alexander´s wife is not known.  Alexander & his wife had one child: 

i)          ALEXANDER de Neville ([1235/36]-).  A writ dated 12 Jul "33 Hen III", after the death of "Alexander de Nevill" names "Alexander his son, aged 12 and more, is his heir"[604]

c)         CLEMENTIA de Neville .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1236, by "Alexander de Neouilla filius et heres Alexandri de Neouilla" which names "Clemencie filie predicti Alexandri" as wife of "Willelmus frater…Ricardi [de Alenzun"[605]m WILLIAM de Alenzun, son of ---. 

 

 

 

B.      NEVILLE (DUNBAR/FITZMALDRED)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

GEOFFREY FitzRobert, son of ROBERT FitzMaldred & his wife Isabel de Neville (-1242).  He assumed the name Neville, after his mother's family.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Neville" holding the hides of land "in Greftone" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][606]

m JOAN, daughter of --- (-after Nov 1247). 

Geoffrey & his wife had four children: 

1.         ROBERT de Neville (-before 20 Aug 1282).  A writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Nevil alias de Neuvile, de Neivile de Nevyle", names "Ranulph son of Robert de Nevill the younger aged 20 on the day of St. Luke 10 Edw I is his next heir” and land in Mitford and Felton, Northumberland “the dower of Lady Ida his wife, sometime the wife of Roger Bertram[607]m firstly ---.  m secondly (1273) as her second husband, IDA, widow of ROGER Bertram of Mitford, daughter of ---.  A writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Nevil alias de Neuvile, de Neivile de Nevyle", names land in Mitford and Felton, Northumberland “the dower of Lady Ida his wife, sometime the wife of Roger Bertram[608].  Robert & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT (-6 Aug 1271, bur Coverham).  His parentage is confirmed by a writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of [his father] "Robert de Nevil alias de Neuvile, de Neivile de Nevyle", names "Ranulph son of Robert de Nevill the younger aged 20 on the day of St. Luke 10 Edw I is his next heir[609]m ([1260]) MARY, daughter of RALPH FitzRandulf of Middleham & his wife Anastasia de Percy (-1320).  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire records that “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” married “Maria…domina de Midelham” who was eldest sister of “domina de Welle et de Snape…uxor Roberti de Tatershall”, daughters of “Radulfus filius Ranulfi[610].  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Mariam, Johannam" as the children of "Radulphum filium Ranulphi" and his wife "Anastasia filia Wilelmi domini de Percy", adding that Mary married "Roberti domini de Neuile et de Raby"[611].  Robert & his wife had eight children: 

i)          RANDOLPH ([1261/62]-18 Apr 1331, bur Coverham).  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire names “Ranulphum…de Nevile primogenitum” as the eldest of the three sons of “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” and his wife[612]Lord Neville of Raby 1305. 

-         see below

ii)         ROBERT .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[613]

iii)        RALPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[614]

iv)       MARGARET .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[615]m GILBERT de Wa---ton, son of ---. 

v)        JOAN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[616]

vi)       ANASTASIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[617]

vii)      HENRY .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[618]

viii)     RANDOLPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[619]

b)         JOHN

2.         AGNES (-[16 Jun 1285/20 Jul 1293]).  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[620]m firstly as his second wife, RICHARD de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire, son of JOSCELIN de Louvain & his wife Agnes de Percy (-1244).  m secondly (before 12 Nov 1251) as his second wife, JOHN [II] Deincourt, son of OLIVER [II] de Aincourt & his wife Nicole --- (-1257). 

3.         GEOFFREY (-before 1285).  m MARGARET, daughter of JOHN de Lungvillers & his wife --- (-1319).  Geoffrey & his wife had five children: 

a)         JOHN Neville of Hornby (1269-[1309]).  m PERNEL, daughter of --- (-[1346/49]). 

i)          JOHN (-1335). 

b)         GEOFFREY

c)         ROBERTm ---.  The name of Robert´s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT (before 1312-1342).  m firstly JOAN, daughter of HENRY de Atherton & his wife ---.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH de St Lawrence, widow of ROGER de Kirkby, daughter of THOMAS de St Lawrence & his wife ---.  Robert & his first wife had six children: 

(a)       ROBERT (-1413)m (1344) MARGARET de la Pole, daughter of WILLIAM de la Pole & his wife Catherine --- .  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(1)       THOMAS Neville of Hornby, Lincolnshire (-before 1387).  m ---.  The name of Thomas´s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a.         MARGARET Neville ([Jan 1377] or [1383]-[1413/26] probably before 9 Apr 1424, bur Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk).  Her place of burial is confirmed by the will of [her husband] "Thomas Duke of Exeter", dated 29 Dec 1426, which chose burial “with Margaret my wife in the chapel of the Blessed Virgin annexed to the church of St Edmund´s Bury in the diocese of Norwich[621].  The will of "Margaret Duchess of Exeter", proved 15 May 1458, chose burial “in the chapel of the college of St Katherine beside the Tower of London”, appointed “Thomas Tirrell Knt my executor and my nephew the Earl of Warwick supervisor[622]m (before 15 Feb 1404) THOMAS Beaufort, son of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his third wife Katharine Swynford née Roët (-East Greenwich Manor, Kent 31 Dec 1426, bur Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk).  Created Earl of Dorset 5 Jul 1412, and Duke of Exeter 18 Nov 1416. 

(b)       JOHN

(c)       GILES

(d)       THOMAS

(e)       WILLIAM

(f)        GILBERT .  

d)         EDMUND

e)         WILLIAM

4.         JOHN .  Clerk. 

 

 

 

C.      LORDS NEVILLE (of Raby)

 

 

RANDOLPH Neville, son of ROBERT Neville & his wife Mary FitzRandolph of Middleham (-18 Apr 1331, bur Coverham).  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire names “Ranulphum…de Nevile primogenitum” as the eldest of the three sons of “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” and his wife[623].  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Ranulfum, Robertum de Neuille, Radulfum clericum, Margaretam uxorem Gilberti Wa---ton, Johannam, Anastasiam, Henricum, Ranulfum" as the children of "Mariam uxorem Roberti domini de Neuille et de Raby"[624].  A writ dated 20 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Nevil alias de Neuvile, de Neivile de Nevyle", names "Ranulph son of Robert de Nevill the younger aged 20 on the day of St. Luke 10 Edw I is his next heir[625]Lord Neville of Raby 1305. 

m firstly EUPHEME, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoger Lord FitzRoger & his wife ---. 

m secondly MARGERY, daughter of JOHN de Thweng & his wife ---. 

Lord Randolph & his first wife had twelve children: 

1.         ROBERT (-1319).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[626].  "The peacock of the north".  m ELLEN, daughter of ---. 

2.         ANASTASIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[627]

3.         RALPH ([before 1291]-5 Aug 1368, bur Durham).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[628].  Lord Neville.  m (1327) as her second husband, ALICE de Audley, widow of RALPH de Greystoke Lord Greystoke, daughter of HUGH de Audley & his wife Isolt de Mortimer (-1374).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulfum de Neuille" married "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[629].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[630].  Lord Ralph & his wife had ten children: 

a)         MARGARET (-May 1372).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[631].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that “Willielmus”, son of “Willielmus de Roos”, married “Margaretam filiam domini Radulphi de Nevill”, and died childless “in terra sancta” where he was buried[632]m firstly (before 8 May 1341) WILLIAM de Ros, son of WILLIAM de Ros & his wife Margery de Badlesmere (Frieston, Lincolnshire 19 May 1329-before 3 Dec 1352).  m secondly (Brancepeth 12 Jul 1358) as his first wife, HENRY de Percy, son of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his first wife Mary of Lancaster (10 Nov 1341-killed in battle Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster 19 Feb 1408, bur York Minster).  He succeeded his father in 1368 as Lord Percy.  He was created Earl of Northumberland in 1377. 

b)         CATHERINE (-1361).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[633]m (before 1339) WILLIAM de Dacre, son of RANDOLF de Dacre Lord Dacre of Gilsland & his Margaret de Multon of Gilsland, Cumberland ([1319]-18 Jul 1361, bur Lanercost Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1339 as Lord Dacre. 

c)         EUPHEMIA (-[Oct/Nov] 1393).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[634]m firstly (1343) ROBERT Clifford Lord Clifford, son of ROBERT de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Isabel de Berkeley ([1327/28]-France 1345 before 7 Nov).  m secondly (early 1347) REGINALD de Lucy, son of THOMAS Lord Lucy & his wife Margaret de Multon (-[1362/65]).  m thirdly WALTER de Heslarton, son of ---. 

d)         JOHN (1341-1388).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[635].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[636].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Henricus Percy, Comes Northumbriæ Henricus, Thomas, Radulphus filii eius, Gilbertus Umfranville, Comes Dangus, Dñs Johannes Neuylle, Dñs Radulphus filius eius"[637]m firstly MATILDA Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his wife Idonia de Clifford (-before 18 Feb 1378).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of “Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[638].  Her marriage is indicated by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…Dame Margaret de Ferrers my sister…Maud Nevill my sister…" among his beneficiaries[639].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[640]m secondly ELIZABETH, daughter and heiress of WILLIAM Lord Latimer & his wife ---.  John & his first wife had six children:

i)          ALICE (-20 Jun 1433).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[641]m WILLIAM Deincourt Lord Deincourt, son of WILLIAM Deincourt & his wife Margaret de Welle of Well, Lincolnshire (26 Dec 1357-15/16 Oct 1381). 

ii)         MATILDA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[642]m WILLIAM Le Scrope, son of ---. 

iii)        RALPH (1364-1425).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Henricus Percy, Comes Northumbriæ Henricus, Thomas, Radulphus filii eius, Gilbertus Umfranville, Comes Dangus, Dñs Johannes Neuylle, Dñs Radulphus filius eius"[643].  He succeeded his father in 1388 as Lord Neville.  He was created Earl of Westmoreland 29 Sep 1397. 

-         EARLS of WESTMORELAND

iv)       IDONIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[644]

v)        ELEANOR (-after 1441).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[645]m RALPH de Lumley Lord Lumley, son of MARMADUKE de Lumley & his second wife Margaret de Holand (-executed Jan 1400). 

vi)       THOMAS (-14 Mar 1407, bur Worksop Priory).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[646]m firstly (before 1 Jul 1379) JOAN de Furnivalle, daughter of WILLIAM de Furnivalle Lord Furnivalle & his Thomasine de Dagworth of Dagworth, Suffolk née --- (1368-before 1401, bur Worksop Priory).  She succeeded as Baroness Furnivalle, suo iurism secondly ([8 Mar/4 Jul] 1401) as her second husband, ANKARET Lestrange Baroness Strange, widow of RICHARD Talbot Lord Talbot, daughter of JOHN Lestrange Lord Strange of Blackmere & his wife Mary FitzAlan of Arundel ([1361]-1 Jun 1413).  Thomas & his first wife had one child: 

(a)       MATILDA Neville ([1392]-[1423], bur Worksop Priory, Nottinghamshire).  She succeeded as Baroness Furnivalle, suo iurism (12 Mar 1407) as his first wife, JOHN Talbot, son of RICHARD Talbot Lord Talbot & his wife Ankaret Lestrange Baroness Strange (1384-killed in battle Castillon, Dordogne 17 Jul 1453, bur St Alkmund's, Whitchurch, Shropshire).  He succeeded his niece in 1421 as Lord Talbot, Lord Strange.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury 20 May 1442. 

John & his second wife had one child:

vii)      JOHN (-1430).  Lord Latimer. 

e)         ROBERT .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[647]

f)          ALEXANDER (-1352).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[648].  Archbishop of York. 

g)         THOMAS .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[649]

h)         WILLIAM .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[650]

i)          RALPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[651].  Ancestor of the NEVILLE family of Thornton Bridge. 

j)          ELEANOR .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[652]m GEOFFREY Le Scrope, son of HENRY Le Scrope Lord Scrope (of Masham) & his Joan [Agnes] --- [1342]-killed in battle siege of Piskre Castle, Lithuania 1362, bur Königsberg Cathedral). 

4.         MARY .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[653]

5.         ALEXANDRA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[654]

6.         JOHN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[655]

7.         JOAN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[656]

8.         MARGARET .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[657]

9.         ALICE .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[658]

10.      THOMAS .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[659]

11.      ANASTASIA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[660]

12.      WILLIAM .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum Neuille primogenitum sine prole obiit, Anastasiam, Radulfum, Mariam, Alexandram Neuille de Raskell, Johannem, Johannam, Margaretam, Alesiam, Thomam archidiaconum Dunelmie, Anastasiam secundam, Willelmum" as the children of "Ranulfum de Neville"[661]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[2] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, Northumberland, p. 25. 

[3] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[4] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones de honoribus exchætis…factæ anno XIII Regis Johannis, p. 584. 

[5] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 380. 

[6] CP VIII 257, footnote b. 

[7] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, p. 639. 

[8] Dugdale Monasticon II, Shepey Monastery, Kent, II, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 50.   

[9] Dugdale Monasticon II, Shepey Monastery, Kent, II, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 50.   

[10] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 1, p. 1. 

[11] Pipe Roll 2 Hen II (1155), pp. 5, 7 and 10. 

[12] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 476, p. 373. 

[13] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1158), p. 132. 

[14] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 256. 

[15] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1764, p. 591. 

[16] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 476, p. 373. 

[17] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 476, p. 373. 

[18] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Kent, p. 250. 

[19] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 229. 

[20] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 267. 

[21] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1593, p. 466. 

[22] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1764, p. 591. 

[23] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1764, p. 591. 

[24] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1044, p. 76. 

[25] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, de Hundredo de Angre, p. 40. 

[26] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1044, p. 76. 

[27] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 476, p. 373. 

[28] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, de Hundredo de Angre, p. 40. 

[29] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 131. 

[30] Dugdale Monasticon V, Davintre Priory, Northamptonshire, XIV, p. 181. 

[31] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1044, p. 76. 

[32] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1044, p. 76. 

[33] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1044, p. 76. 

[34] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Ankerwyke Nunnery, Buckinghamshire, II, p. 230.   

[35] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 242. 

[36] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 436. 

[37] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli IV, Essex, Hundredum de Turst, p. 41. 

[38] Eynsham, Appendix I, p. 417, citing Stow MS. 925, fol. 148. 

[39] CP VIII 247. 

[40] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[41] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 198. 

[42] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 45. 

[43] St Bees, 29, p. 57. 

[44] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 197. 

[45] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 352, p. 58. 

[46] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 198. 

[47] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 15 John, p. 474. 

[48] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 165. 

[49] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 48. 

[50] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 13. 

[51] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[52] St Bees, 50, p. 81. 

[53] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[54] St Bees, 106, p. 144. 

[55] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 69. 

[56] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 201. 

[57] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 255. 

[58] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 243. 

[59] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 243. 

[60] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 240. 

[61] Kirk (1899), Vol. I, 10 Ric I, 60, p. 15. 

[62] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/16, 6 Hen III, 95. 

[63] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/16, 6 Hen III, 95. 

[64] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 32. 

[65] Domesday Descendants, p. 636. 

[66] Kirk (1899), Vol. I, 10 Ric I, 60, p. 15. 

[67] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 500.  

[68] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/16, 6 Hen III, 95. 

[69] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/16, 6 Hen III, 95. 

[70] St Bees, 106, p. 144. 

[71] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[72] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[73] Loyd (1951), p. 60. 

[74] Vaultier ‘Vaucelles’ (1841), p. 4. 

[75] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, XXVII, p. 152. 

[76] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[77] Vaultier ‘L’ancien pays de Cinglais’ (1835), p. 96. 

[78] Dugdale Monasticon V, Bermondsey Abbey, I, Excerpta e Chronicis de Bermondsey, p. 96. 

[79] Vaultier ‘L’ancien pays de Cinglais’, p. 96, citing "De La Rue; Ess., etc, t. II, p. 13". 

[80] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCI, p. 199. 

[81] Vaultier ‘L’ancien pays de Cinglais’, p. 96, citing "De La Rue; Ess., etc, t. II, p. 13". 

[82] Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo, p. 174. 

[83] Waters (1882), pp. 27, 39. 

[84] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 577, p. 210. 

[85] Vaultier ‘L’ancien pays de Cinglais’, p. 96, citing "De La Rue; Ess., etc, t. II, p. 13". 

[86] Vaultier ‘L’ancien pays de Cinglais’, p. 96, citing "De La Rue; Ess., etc, t. II, p. 13". 

[87] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[88] Vaultier ‘L’ancien pays de Cinglais’, p. 97, citing Gallia Christiana, t. XI, instr. col. 96 and 333. 

[89] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, LXXXIII, p. 463. 

[90] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Saint-Etienne de Caen, 9, p. 271. 

[91] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Monmouth Priory, II, p. 596. 

[92] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 18. 

[93] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 577, p. 210. 

[94] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Lincolnshire, p. 111. 

[95] William of Newburgh, Vol. I, p. 47. 

[96] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCL, p. 392. 

[97] Dugdale Monasticon II, Bardney Monastery, Lincolnshire, XI, p. 633. 

[98] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1116, MGH SS XXIII, p. 822. 

[99] CP VIII 509. 

[100] Eynsham, Vol. I, 584, p. 399. 

[101] Domesday Descendants, p. 378. 

[102] Crossley & Elrington (1990), Vol. 12, p. 274.  

[103] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 140, p. 52. 

[104] Jumièges, Tome II, CI, p. 1. 

[105] Dugdale Monasticon II, Bardney Monastery, Lincolnshire, XI, p. 633. 

[106] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 577, p. 210. 

[107] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Kirkstead, 186, p. 126. 

[108] Pipe Roll 11 Hen II (1164/65), p. 48. 

[109] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 39. 

[110] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, XCV, p. 117. 

[111] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 135. 

[112] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCL, p. 392. 

[113] CP VIII 509. 

[114] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 1, p. 140. 

[115] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCL, p. 392. 

[116] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 327. 

[117] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 53. 

[118] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 94, p. 83. 

[119] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 1, p. 140. 

[120] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 3, p. 140. 

[121] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCI, p. 325. 

[122] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 74. 

[123] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 85. 

[124] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 105. 

[125] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 23 and 85, pp. 143 and 149. 

[126] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 307. 

[127] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 23, p. 143. 

[128] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 517. 

[129] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/9, 2 Hen III, 75. 

[130] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 273. 

[131] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 85, p. 149. 

[132] Fontenay le Marmion, XVIII, p. 15. 

[133] Matthew Paris, Vol. IV, 1241, p. 174. 

[134] Fontenay le Marmion, III, p. 3. 

[135] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 248. 

[136] Fontenay le Marmion, II, p. 2. 

[137] Dugdale Monasticon II, Bardney Monastery, Lincolnshire, XI, p. 633. 

[138] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1407. 

[139] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 7. 

[140] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 153. 

[141] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/9, 2 Hen III, 75. 

[142] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 273. 

[143] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, VI, p. 107.   

[144] CP VIII 516. 

[145] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Canwell Priory, Staffordshire, VI, p. 107.   

[146] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 163 and 164, p. 157. 

[147] CP VIII pp. 517-8. 

[148] CP VIII 518. 

[149] Turner ‘Richard Fitzroy’ (1906), p. 109, quoting Assize Rolls, no. 616, Roll 1 (not yet consulted). 

[150] CP VIII 518-22. 

[151] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 163, p. 157. 

[152] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/9, 2 Hen III, 75. 

[153] Fontenay le Marmion, II, p. 2. 

[154] Fontenay le Marmion, X, p. 9. 

[155] Bodleian Library, Oxford, Dugdale MS 15, p. 157.  Copy provided to the author by Dr. Nigel Tringham by email dated 27 Dec 2016. 

[156] Victoria County History Worcester, Vol. IV, p. 51. 

[157] Fontenay le Marmion, IX, p. 8. 

[158] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 216, p. 162. 

[159] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 285, p. 166. 

[160] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 14, p. 142. 

[161] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 15, p. 142. 

[162] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Fontenay-le-Pesnel, 48, p. 369. 

[163] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 157, p. 156. 

[164] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 157, p. 156. 

[165] Fontenay le Marmion, XXIV, p. 21. 

[166] Barraclough (1988), 8, p. 14. 

[167] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), p. 96. 

[168] Barraclough (1988), 8, p. 14. 

[169] Barraclough (1988), 10, p. 19. 

[170] Barraclough (1988), 12, p. 21. 

[171] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1558, p. 443. 

[172] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1558, p. 443. 

[173] Barraclough (1988), 8, p. 14. 

[174] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1558, p. 443. 

[175] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), p. 113. 

[176] Annales Cestrienses, p. 20. 

[177] Barraclough (1988), 26, p. 36. 

[178] Barraclough (1988), 40, p. 55. 

[179] Barraclough (1988), 125, p. 139. 

[180] Barraclough (1988), 151, p. 158. 

[181] Barraclough (1988), 157, p. 163. 

[182] Barraclough (1988), 182, p. 188. 

[183] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 527, p. 302. 

[184] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1558, p. 443. 

[185] Barraclough (1988), 162, p. 167. 

[186] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 527, p. 302. 

[187] Barraclough (1988), 206, p. 208. 

[188] Barraclough (1988), 228, p. 229. 

[189] Farrer (1925), Vol. II, p. 111, citing Calendar of Inquisitions Miscellaneous, Vol. I, p. 315 [not yet consulted]. 

[190] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1883, London), Plea Rolls of the Reign of Henry III, Roll. no. 27, p. 46. 

[191] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1558, p. 443. 

[192] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 160. 

[193] Barraclough (1988), 214, p. 215. 

[194] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1558, p. 443. 

[195] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1883), p. 46. 

[196] Annales Cestrienses, p. 58. 

[197] Farrer (1925), Vol. II, p. 111, citing Calendar of Inquisitions Miscellaneous, Vol. I, p. 315 [not yet consulted]. 

[198] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 527, p. 302. 

[199] Barraclough (1988), 242, p. 241. 

[200] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 540, p. 309. 

[201] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 528, p. 302. 

[202] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1883), p. 46. 

[203] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. III (1882, London), Curia Regis Rolls, Assize Roll 5 John, p. 89. 

[204] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1883), p. 46. 

[205] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1883), p. 46. 

[206] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 531, p. 304. 

[207] Annales Cestrienses, p. 76. 

[208] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 532, p. 305. 

[209] Annales Cestrienses, p. 58. 

[210] Annales Londonienses, pp. 126-7. 

[211] Annales Cestrienses, p. 98. 

[212] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 531, p. 304. 

[213] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 532, p. 305. 

[214] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 272.   

[215] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 17, p. 16. 

[216] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 1. 

[217] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. lxxxii, quoting Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 370. 

[218] Leland’s Collectanea, Vol. I, p. 202. 

[219] Domesday Translation, Wiltshire, XXXIV, p. 185, Dorset, XXXVI, pp. 217-8, Somerset, XXI, pp. 262-6. 

[220] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. II, p. 383, quoting in translation Two Chartularies of Bath (S. R. S.), C 34. 

[221] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. II, p. 383, quoting in translation Two Chartularies of Bath (S. R. S.), C 34. 

[222] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. II, p. 383, quoting in translation Two Chartularies of Bath (S. R. S.), C 34. 

[223] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. II, p. 383, quoting in translation Two Chartularies of Bath (S. R. S.), C 34. 

[224] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bridlington Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 286.   

[225] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), p. 108. 

[226] Henry of Huntingdon, IV, 7, p. 70. 

[227] Gesta Stephani Regis I, p. 81. 

[228] Round (1892), pp. 89, 93. 

[229] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[230] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[231] Maxwell-Lyte (1921), 2, p. 4. 

[232] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bridlington Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 286.   

[233] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[234] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 9, citing "D. C. M." [Muniments at Dunster Castle, see Preface, p. vi] XVI, 7. 

[235] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[236] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[237] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[238] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[239] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 30. 

[240] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 269. 

[241] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[242] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[243] Bruton, 4, p. 2. 

[244] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[245] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[246] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[247] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[248] Round (1899), 493, p. 175. 

[249] Round (1899), 497, p. 176. 

[250] Bruton, 6, p. 2. 

[251] Maxwell-Lyte (1921), 2, p. 4. 

[252] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. II, p. 383, quoting in translation Two Chartularies of Bath (S. R. S.), C 34. 

[253] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. I, p. 8. 

[254] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bruton Priory, Somerset, I, p. 335.   

[255] Bruton, 4, p. 2. 

[256] Round (1899), 487, p. 174. 

[257] Round (1899), 493, p. 175. 

[258] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 226. 

[259] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 44. 

[260] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 629. 

[261] Round (1899), 487, p. 174. 

[262] Round (1899), 780, p. 282. 

[263] Round (1899), 487, p. 174. 

[264] Bruton, 5, p. 2. 

[265] Bruton, 6, p. 2. 

[266] Bruton, 7, p. 2. 

[267] Round (1899), 504, p. 178. 

[268] Round (1899), 780, p. 282. 

[269] Bruton, 5, p. 2. 

[270] Bruton, 6, p. 2. 

[271] Bruton, 7, p. 2. 

[272] Bruton, 58, p. 12. 

[273] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 296. 

[274] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 135. 

[275] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 515. 

[276] Bruton, 6, p. 2. 

[277] Bruton, 7, p. 2. 

[278] Bruton, 58, p. 12. 

[279] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 550. 

[280] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 83.  

[281] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 796, p. 611. 

[282] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 139, p. 33. 

[283] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/27, 12 Hen III, 92. 

[284] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 24. 

[285] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 36. 

[286] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 401. 

[287] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 1283, p. 233. 

[288] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 1284, p. 234. 

[289] Dugdale Monasticon V, Clive Abbey, Somerset, VII, p. 733. 

[290] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, I, p. 691. 

[291] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, V, p. 693. 

[292] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, VI, p. 693. 

[293] Bruton, 7, p. 2. 

[294] Round (1899), 504, p. 178. 

[295] Maxwell-Lyte (1909), Vol. II, p. 557, citing Mohun Cartulary, Bruton Cartulary (S.R.S.) pp. 55, 60, BM Addl. Charter 11160, Pipe Roll no. 56, and Assize Roll, no. 1262, m 6d. 

[296] Bruton, 246, p. 60. 

[297] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 102. 

[298] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 554. 

[299] Dugdale Monasticon V, Clive Abbey, Somerset, VII, p. 733. 

[300] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, I, p. 691. 

[301] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, V, p. 693. 

[302] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, VI, p. 693. 

[303] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, I, p. 691. 

[304] Dugdale Monasticon V, Clive Abbey, Somerset, VII, p. 733. 

[305] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[306] Annals of Ireland, Chartulary of Dublin St Mary’s Vol. II, p. 314. 

[307] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2949, p. 439. 

[308] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, I, p. 691. 

[309] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[310] Dugdale Monasticon V, Newenham Abbey, Devonshire, V, p. 693. 

[311] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 500, p. 141. 

[312] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[313] Annals of Ireland, Chartulary of Dublin St Mary’s Vol. II, p. 314. 

[314] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2949, p. 439. 

[315] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[316] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 436, p. 249. 

[317] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 436, p. 249. 

[318] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 436, p. 249. 

[319] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 145. 

[320] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 183. 

[321] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 135. 

[322] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 186. 

[323] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 218. 

[324] CP IX 75 footnote b. 

[325] CP IX 75 footnote b. 

[326] Bruton, 102, p. 24. 

[327] Bruton, 105, p. 25. 

[328] Athelney, 33, p. 135. 

[329] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[330] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 228. 

[331] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1635, p. 496. 

[332] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[333] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1635, p. 496. 

[334] Bruton, 105, p. 25. 

[335] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 229. 

[336] Basset Charters, 212, p. 143. 

[337] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1635, p. 496. 

[338] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 261. 

[339] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/21, 8 Hen III, 421. 

[340] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 261. 

[341] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1635, p. 496. 

[342] Bruton, 112, p. 26. 

[343] Calendar of Charter Rolls, Vol. III, p. 228. 

[344] Bruton, 105, p. 25. 

[345] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[346] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[347] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[348] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[349] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1722, p. 561. 

[350] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 23.  

[351] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 171. 

[352] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1761, p. 590. 

[353] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1761, p. 590. 

[354] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1761, p. 590. 

[355] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 245. 

[356] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 354, p. 292. 

[357] Basset Charters, 135, p. 80. 

[358] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1761, p. 590. 

[359] Calendar of Charter Rolls, Vol. III, p. 228. 

[360] Calendar of Charter Rolls, Vol. III, p. 228. 

[361] Oliver (1860), Vol. I, Camden’s Britannia, p. 101. 

[362] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[363] CP IX 81 footnote I. 

[364] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[365] Dugdale Monasticon V, Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, I, Croxden Chronicle, p. 661. 

[366] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[367] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[368] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 164. 

[369] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[370] CP IX 85 footnote c. 

[371] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[372] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[373] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[374] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[375] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[376] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[377] CP IX 82-3 footnote f. 

[378] CP IX 120, footnote b. 

[379] Domesday Translation, Essex, XXVII, pp. 1008-10, Norfolk, pp. 1151-3, Suffolk, XXXI, pp. 1272-5. 

[380] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, p. 21. 

[381] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Rutland, p. 134. 

[382] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, XX, p. 602.   

[383] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Berkshire, p. 124. 

[384] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, XX, p. 602.   

[385] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 885, p. 323. 

[386] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, XXX, p. 604.   

[387] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 597, p. 220. 

[388] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 887, p. 324. 

[389] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, Addenda et corrigenda, p. lvii for p. 66, quoting Curia Regis Roll, John, no. 58, m 1d. 

[390] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1045, p. 358. 

[391] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, XXX, p. 604.   

[392] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 782, p. 287. 

[393] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, Addenda et corrigenda, p. lvii for p. 66, quoting Curia Regis Roll, John, no. 58, m 1d. 

[394] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1045, p. 358. 

[395] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1045, p. 358. 

[396] Round (1899), 415, p. 138. 

[397] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1045, p. 358. 

[398] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 35, p. 145. 

[399] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Pembroke, p. 137. 

[400] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, Addenda et corrigenda, p. lvii for p. 66, quoting Curia Regis Roll, John, no. 58, m 1d. 

[401] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 35, p. 145. 

[402] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 35, p. 145. 

[403] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[404] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[405] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[406] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[407] Jeayes (1892), 86, p. 35, no citation of the original. 

[408] Jeayes (1892), 86, p. 35, no citation of the original. 

[409] Jeayes (1892), 86, p. 35, no citation of the original. 

[410] RHGF, Tome XXIV, Querimoniæ Normannorum, 1, p. 2. 

[411] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 6 John, p. 55. 

[412] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1045, p. 358. 

[413] CP IX 123 footnote a, citing Harl. MS. 506, fo. 122 d. 

[414] Dugdale Monasticon III, St Neot’s, Huntingdonshire, XXX, p. 476. 

[415] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1908), pp. 235, 242, and 401. 

[416] Letters Henry III, Vol. II, DLXXXVIII, p. 230. 

[417] Close Rolls Henry III 1247-1258 (1902), p. 237. 

[418] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 229. 

[419] Annales de Waverleia, p. 365. 

[420] CP IX 127, citing Victoria County History, Surrey, Vol. III, p. 248 [not yet consulted]. 

[421] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[422] CP IX 128-30. 

[423] Oxford St Frideswide, Vol. II, 698, p. 15. 

[424] Annales de Waverleia, p. 365. 

[425] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 729, p. 232. 

[426] Bliss (1893), Vol. I, p. 361. 

[427] CP IX 123, citing Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum, (presumably Vol. I), pp. 293, 298 [not yet consulted]. 

[428] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 78. 

[429] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 79. 

[430] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 69. 

[431] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, VIII, p. 296. 

[432] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, Northumberland, p. 29. 

[433] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Hospital of St Leonard, York VII, p. 609.   

[434] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, V, p. 320. 

[435] Dugdale Monasticon V, Pontefract Priory, Yorkshire, XIII, p. 125. 

[436] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Monastery, Northumberland XL, p. 420.   

[437] Early Yorkshire Charters I, 331, p. 252. 

[438] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 30. 

[439] CP IX 371. 

[440] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[441] Dugdale Monasticon V, Pontefract Priory, Yorkshire, XII, p. 125. 

[442] Dugdale Monasticon V, Pontefract Priory, Yorkshire, XIII, p. 125. 

[443] Wightman (1966), p. 74, citing Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. IX, pp. 205-6 [not yet consulted]. 

[444] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, V, p. 320. 

[445] Dugdale Monasticon V, Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, LXXIII, p. 310. 

[446] Round (1899) 596, p. 208. 

[447] Early Yorkshire Charters I, 331, p. 252. 

[448] Dugdale Monasticon V, Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, LXXIII, p. 310. 

[449] CP IX 372. 

[450] Dugdale Monasticon V, Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, LIX, p. 307. 

[451] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 77. 

[452] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[453] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[454] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[455] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Southwark, St Mary Overey Priory, VII, p. 172. 

[456] Three Rolls King Richard I, p. 8.

[457] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[458] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[459] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, II, p. 318. 

[460] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 115, p. 107. 

[461] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[462] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, II, p. 318. 

[463] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 105. 

[464] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[465] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, III, p. 319. 

[466] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 83. 

[467] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 530. 

[468] Dugdale Monasticon V, Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, LXXIII, p. 310. 

[469] Dugdale Monasticon V, Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire, LIX, p. 307. 

[470] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, II, p. 318. 

[471] Domesday Descendants, p. 604. 

[472] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[473] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 87. 

[474] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, II, p. 318. 

[475] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 528. 

[476] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[477] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/21, 8 Hen III, 117. 

[478] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, pp. 346-7. 

[479] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 125. 

[480] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[481] Registrum Roffense, p. 596. 

[482] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, pp. 346-7. 

[483] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[484] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 346. 

[485] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 347. 

[486] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 347. 

[487] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 347. 

[488] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 290, p. 188. 

[489] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[490] Dugdale Monasticon II, Tewkesbury Monastery, Gloucestershire I, Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione Ecclesiæ Theokusburiæ, p. 61.   

[491] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 347. 

[492] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Quomodo mutatum fuit Cognomen de Albaneio in Cognomen de Mubrai, p. 347. 

[493] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. IV (1837), XXXVI.III, p. 262. 

[494] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[495] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, V, p. 347. 

[496] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 4. 

[497] Dugdale Monasticon V, Byland Abbey, Yorkshire, V, p. 347. 

[498] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. IV (1837), XXXVI.III, p. 262. 

[499] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 321. 

[500] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[501] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 320. 

[502] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. IV (1837), XXXVI.III, p. 262. 

[503] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 321. 

[504] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 321. 

[505] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 321. 

[506] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. IV (1837), XXXVI.III, p. 262. 

[507] CP IX 601, although it is more likely that the correct year was 1367 assuming his older brother's birth date is correct. 

[508] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 321. 

[509] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 352, p. 58. 

[510] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 198. 

[511] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 15 John, p. 474. 

[512] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 165. 

[513] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 48. 

[514] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 13. 

[515] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 238. 

[516] Wetherhal, 194, p. 306. 

[517] Lanercost Chronicle, 1294, p. 159. 

[518] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 94, p. 64. 

[519] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 94, p. 64. 

[520] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 94, p. 64. 

[521] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 94, p. 64. 

[522] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[523] St Bees, 50, p. 81.  

[524] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[525] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 634, p. 383. 

[526] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 634, p. 383. 

[527] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 634, p. 383. 

[528] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 127. 

[529] CP IX 404, footnote m, citing Cal. Chanc. Inq. Misc., Vol. II, no. 1329. 

[530] CP IX 491. 

[531] Chronicon Petroburgense, Appendix, Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo, p. 171. 

[532] Chronicon Petroburgense, Appendix, Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo, p. 175. 

[533] Domesday Descendants, pp. 610-1. 

[534] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire I, p. 870.   

[535] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 32. 

[536] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire I, p. 870.   

[537] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. II, 790, p. 132. 

[538] Domesday Descendants, p. 358.  According to CP IX 493, it is uncertain that Emma's mother was Emma Fossard. 

[539] Pipe Roll 22 Hen II (1175/76), Yorkshire, p. 100. 

[540] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 10. 

[541] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 491. 

[542] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 125. 

[543] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 146. 

[544] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  790, p. 132. 

[545] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  790, p. 132. 

[546] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Tupholm Abbey, Lincolnshire I, p. 870.   

[547] CP IX 478. 

[548] His descendants are set out in CP IX 478-86. 

[549] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 197. 

[550] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[551] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[552] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[553] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[554] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[555] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[556] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[557] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 275, p. 208. 

[558] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[559] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[560] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[561] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[562] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Newhouse, 314, p. 236. 

[563] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 423. 

[564] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 11. 

[565] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 45. 

[566] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 423. 

[567] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 517. 

[568] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 79 and 95. 

[569] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 54. 

[570] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 482, 503 and 531. 

[571] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 54. 

[572] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 243. 

[573] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/22, 9 Hen III, 27. 

[574] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 156. 

[575] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 592. 

[576] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 197. 

[577] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 197. 

[578] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 79. 

[579] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 97. 

[580] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 12. 

[581] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Greenfield, 137, p. 90. 

[582] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 428. 

[583] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 500. 

[584] Rotuli Chartarum, 17 John, p. 209. 

[585] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 240. 

[586] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 17 footnote 1, quoting Pipe Roll, 13 John, Buckingham and Bedford. 

[587] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 199. 

[588] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  790, p. 132. 

[589] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 84. 

[590] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 99, p. 65. 

[591] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 99, p. 65. 

[592] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 113. 

[593] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 199. 

[594] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 213. 

[595] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 167. 

[596] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 199. 

[597] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 199. 

[598] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 360. 

[599] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 83. 

[600] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 360. 

[601] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 405. 

[602] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 405. 

[603] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 154, p. 38. 

[604] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 154, p. 38. 

[605] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1187, p. 202. 

[606] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 484. 

[607] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 435, p. 249. 

[608] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 435, p. 249. 

[609] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 435, p. 249. 

[610] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 921.   

[611] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[612] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 921.   

[613] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[614] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[615] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[616] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[617] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[618] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[619] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[620] Percy Chartulary, III, p. 4. 

[621] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 207. 

[622] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 293. 

[623] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 921.   

[624] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 33. 

[625] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 435, p. 249. 

[626] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[627] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[628] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[629] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[630] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[631] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[632] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievall Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[633] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[634] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[635] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[636] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[637] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[638] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[639] Nicolas, N. H. (1826) Testamenta Vetusta Vol. I (London), p. 84. 

[640] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[641] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 108. 

[642] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 108. 

[643] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, folio 68b, p. 114. 

[644] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 108. 

[645] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 108. 

[646] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 108. 

[647] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[648] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[649] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[650] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[651] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[652] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[653] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[654] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[655] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[656] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[657] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[658] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[659] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[660] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34. 

[661] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 34.