untitled ENGLISH NOBILITY T - Z

v4.7 Updated 27 April 2024

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

TAILLEBOIS. 2

TOTNES. 7

TRACY. 9

TRESGOZ. 21

TRUSSEBUT. 29

VALOIGNES. 32

VAUTORT. 56

VAUX. 79

VERNON. 91

VESPONT/VIPONT. 97

WELLES. 100

WELLETON. 101

WINDSOR. 102

OTHER UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY. 108

 

 

 

TAILLEBOIS

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Cristot in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Tilly-sur-Seulles[1]The Taillebois family was studied by Ragg in the late 1920s[2].  He reproduces charters from the mid-13th century but provides no source citations for the earlier period.  Until more information comes to light, his work appears to be of limited value. 

 

 

[Three possible brothers:]

1.         IVO Taillebois [I] (-[1094/95], bur Spalding).  Ragg lists property in Lancashire and Westmorland which Ivo [I] donated to York St. Mary but does not cite his sources[3]"…Ivo Taillebois, Robert de Oilli" witnessed the spurious charter, purportedly dated 25 Dec [1071/75], under which William I King of England donated Chelsea to the monks of Westminster[4].  "…Ivonem Taillebois…" witnessed the charter under which William I King of England confirmed the rights of Ely abbey[5].  “Ivo Taleboys” donated Spalding Monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas Anjou, for “conjugis suæ Luciæ et antecessorum Toraldi…uxoris eius” by undated charter[6].  “Ivo Talliebois” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Luciæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois…[7].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Claxtuna et ecclesiam de Kirkby-Stephen…” by “Ivo Taillebois[8].  Domesday Book records “Ivo Taillebois” holding numerous properties in Lincolnshire[9].  “…Ivonis de Taliber…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[10].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the death of "Ivo Taillebois who had always been a most bitter enemy to Croyland" and his burial by "his wife the lady Lucia" in the priory of Spalding[11]m as her first husband, LUCY, daughter of --- (-1138, bur Spalding).  The Chronicon Angliæ Petriburgense records "Luciæ comitissæ…filiæ Algari comitis Leicestriæ" as husband of "Ivo Tailbois comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldingiæ et totius Hollandiæ" and "Toraldus avunculus eiusdem Luciæ"[12].  No other source has been yet been identified which names one of the parents of Lucy.  If the source is accurate (and it is a later source), it is not known whether the relationship with Thorold was through Lucy’s father or mother, although if "avunculus" is used in its strict sense (which is not beyond doubt) Thorold was her maternal uncle.  A manuscript recording the foundation of Spalding monastery records that “Yvo Talboys” married "Thoroldo…hærede Lucia" who, after the death of Ivo, married (in turn) "Rogerum filium Geroldi" and "comitem Cestriæ Ranulphum"[13].  “Ivo Taleboys” donated Spalding Monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas Anjou, for “conjugis suæ Luciæ et antecessorum Toraldi…uxoris eius” by undated charter[14].  She married secondly (after 1094) Roger FitzGerold.  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "his wife the lady Lucia" married "Roger de Romar the son of Gerald de Romar" when "hardly had one month elapsed after the death" of her first husband "Ivo Taillebois"[15].  She married thirdly (1098) Ranulf "Meschin" Vicomte du Bessin.  Ivo [I]  & [his wife] had [two] children: 

a)         [[BEATRIX] .  Assuming that “genero” in the following document was used in its strict sense of son-in-law, Ribald’s wife was Ivo’s daughter: Ivo Talliebois” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Luciæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois…[16].  The difficulty is that “gener” was sometimes used in medieval documents to indicate brother-in-law.  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that the "only daughter" of "Ivo Taillebois…[and] his wife the lady Lucia" married "a husband of noble rank" but "died before her father"[17].  It is possible that this passage refers to the wife of Ribald.  Assuming that this was the same wife of Ribald, her name is confirmed by the following document: “Ribaldus frater comitis” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “Alani comitis et Beatricis uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[18].  As Ingulph says that Ivo’s daughter predeceased her father, it is possible that Beatrix was a later wife of Ribald and not Ivo’s daughter.  m RIBALD, illegitimate son of EUDES de Bretagne Comte de Penthièvre & his mistress ---.] 

b)         [daughter Domesday Descendants suggests that Ingulph (quoted above) was incorrect and that Ivo Taillebois [I] left a second daughter who was the wife of Eldred, noting that the couple’s grandson William de Lancaster held the barony of Kendal which Ivo had previously held[19].  This is contradicted by an undated manuscript relating to Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire which names “Elthredum” as son of ”Ivo Tailbot[20], although this statement is improbable as no other primary sources indicate that Ivo had sons.  m ELDRED, son of ---.] 

2.         [RALPH Taillebois (-after 1085).  “Ivo Talliebois” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Luciæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois…[21].  The precise relationship between Ivo Taillebois and Ralph Taillebois is not known, but the positioning of their names in this charter directly after Ivo’s son-in-law suggests that it was close.  Maybe they were brothers.  Domesday Book records that “Peter de Valognes and Ralph Taillebois” took Welbury in Hertfordshire from "Ilbert [who] put it in his manor of Lilley while he was sheriff"[22].  This joint action suggests a family relationship between Ralph and Peter de Valoignes.]  m AZELINA, daughter of ---.  Domesday Book records “Azelina wife of Ralph Taillebois” holding half a hide of land in Soulbury in Cottesloe Hundred from the king in Buckinghamshire; several properties in Bedfordshire[23].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         daughter (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records that “the daughter of Ralph Taillebois holds in Hunsdon 4 hides of the fief of Hugh de Beauchamp…Ralph Taillebois took it from Stanstead Abbots and attached it to this manor” in Braughing Hundred in Hertfordshire[24]

3.         [WILLIAM Taillebois (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “William Taillebois” holding West Ashby and Alford in Lincolnshire[25].] 

 

 

The family relationships, if any, between the following individuals and the earlier Taillebois family has not been established.  It should be noted that a mid-15th century source records that three of the sons of Ribald, whose wife may have been the daughter of Ivo Taillebois as shown above, were named “Taillebois”[26].  The accuracy of such a late source to record events which occurred more than 300 years earlier is uncertain, but the document does demonstrate the possibility that the name “Taillebois” was transmitted outside Ivo’s direct family. 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         GUILLAUME Taillebois .  "Guillaume Taillebois" donated land "à Secqueville" to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, for his soul and that of "son frère Robert", by undated charter[27]

2.         ROBERT Taillebois .  "Guillaume Taillebois" donated land "à Secqueville" to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, for his soul and that of "son frère Robert", by undated charter[28]

 

 

1.         AIMERY Taillebois (-after 1204).  Ragg names “Americ Taillebois, also called Thebert...Archdeacon of Carlisle from 1196 with a short interval till at least after 1204[29]

 

2.         IVO Taillebois [II] (-[1212/14]).  A book of fees records that “Ivo de Tailbois” held “baroniam de Hephall cum uxore sua…filia [error for uxor, see other sources quoted below] Will de Bardulf”, previously granted to [a different, from the context] “Will Bardolf” by William I King of England[30].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Durham, dated to [1208/10]: "Ivo Talleboys" held "in capite de domino rege Theynagium quod fuit Willelmi filii Willelmi per Elyzabet uxorem suam…"[31].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Yvo Taylebois" holding "baroniam de Ephal[ton] cum uxore W[illelmi] Badulfi" with one knight’s fee from King John in Northumberland in [1210/12][32].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Yvo Tailleboys" holding "baroniam de Hephale cum uxore qui fuit Willelmi Bardolf quam habet de dono domini Regis Johannis" in Northumberland[33].  His date of death is estimated from the 1214 reference quoted below under his wife.  m ([1206/10]) as her [second/third] husband, ELIZABETH, widow of WILLIAM Bardulf, daughter of [WILLIAM FitzWilliam & his wife ---] (-before 6 Jul 1255).  There is some doubt about Elizabeth’s parentage.  On the one hand, Ragg records the sheriff accounting for receipts from “William son of William” in the Pipe Roll for Northumberland from 1177, ending before 1198 when “William Bardolf” rendered accounts for “taking to wife her who was the wife of William son of William, and for being allowed to place out in marriage three daughters of her and of William son of William[34].  The text of the 1198 Pipe Roll entry has not been checked.  On the other hand, King John confirmed land "in Hepedale et in Kokedale", which "Will fil Will patre predicte Elysabeth tenuit", to "Willelmo Bardulf et Elysabeth uxori sue" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[35].  Until more information comes to light, judging which version is correct would be speculative.  "Elizabeth q fuit uxor Willi Bard" paid a fine to marry where she will, in Northumberland, dated 1206[36].  A book of fees records that “Ivo de Tailbois” held “baroniam de Hephall cum uxore sua…filia [error for uxor, see other sources quoted below] Will de Bardulf”, previously granted to [a different, from the context] “Will Bardolf” by William I King of England[37].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Yvo Taylebois" holding "baroniam de Ephal[ton] cum uxore W[illelmi] Badulfi" with one knight’s fee from King John in Northumberland in [1210/12][38].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Yvo Tailleboys" holding "baroniam de Hephale cum uxore qui fuit Willelmi Bardolf quam habet de dono domini Regis Johannis" in Northumberland[39].  Ragg states that “Elizabeth who was the wife of Ivo Tailbois” paid for the king’s writ in 1214[40]The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "uxor Ivonis Talleboys" holding land in Northumberland[41].  An inquisition following a writ dated 6 Jul "40 Hen III", after the death of "Elizabeth Taylebois alias Taylboes", names "Robert Taylboes her son aged 40 at least is her heir" and lists one unspecified knight’s fee in Northumberland[42].  Ivo [II] & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         ROBERT Taillebois [I] (before 1215-before 18 Oct 1256).  Ragg states that Robert was the son of Elizabeth, wife of Ivo [II], although he does not say that Ivo was his father[43].  His parentage appears confirmed by his mother’s inquisition (see above).  “Robertus Taylebois” confirmed “terram meam de Banton et Ascumbe” to “Roberto le Franceis filio Hugonis le Franceis de Westmerland et Elychabet uxori sue” by charter dated to [1235][44]An inquisition following a writ dated 18 Oct "41 Hen III", after the death of "Robert Tayleboys alias Taleboys", names "Robert his son is his heir and of full age" and “Margery late his wife is dowered by the command of the queen”, listing one unspecified knight’s fee in Northumberland[45]m MARGERY, daughter of --- (-after 1259).  An inquisition following a writ dated 18 Oct "41 Hen III", after the death of "Robert Tayleboys alias Taleboys", names “Margery late his wife is dowered by the command of the queen[46]Ragg says that Robert’s widow (whom he does not name) claimed land “in Clifburne” from “Robert le Franceys” in 1259[47].  Robert [I] & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Taillebois [II] (-before 18 Oct 1281).  An inquisition following a writ dated 18 Oct "41 Hen III", after the death of "Robert Tayleboys alias Taleboys", names "Robert his son is his heir and of full age"[48].  An inquisition following a writ dated 7 Jun "9 Edw I", after the death of "Robert Taylleboys alias Taillebois", names “Luke his son aged 23 is his next heir” and a moiety of the manor of “Hephale...and of the town of Tossan” as one knight’s fee in Northumberland[49]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert [II] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       LUKE Taillebois ([1257/58]-).  An inquisition following a writ dated 7 Jun "9 Edw I", after the death of "Robert Taylleboys alias Taillebois", names “Luke his son aged 23 is his next heir[50]

b)         [ELIZABETHRobertus Taylebois” confirmed “terram meam de Banton et Ascumbe” to “Roberto le Franceis filio Hugonis le Franceis de Westmerland et Elychabet uxori sue” by charter dated to [1235][51].  The inclusion in this document of the grantee’s wife suggests that she may have been related to the grantor.  Could she have been Robert Taillebois’s sister?  m ROBERT le Franceys, son of HUGH le Franceys & his wife ---.] 

 

3.         IVO de Taillebois [III] .  "Yvonem de Taillebois" donated "ecclesie et juris patronatus de Cristot" to Vendôme La-Trinité, undated[52].  The identity of the donor, whether he was the same person as Ivo Taillebois [II], or even whether he was a member of the English Taillebois family at all, has not been ascertained. 

 

 

 

TOTNES

 

 

1.         ALUREDm ---.  The name of Alured’s wife is not known.  Alured & his wife had one child: 

a)         JUHEL de Totnes (-[1099/1129]).  [“…Whali [Rahel?] filii Aluredi…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[53].  It appears likely that "Whali" is a transcription error for "Juheli".]  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Joelis filii Aluredi” founded Barnstaple Priory[54].  His name suggests Breton origin.  Domesday Book records “Iudichael of Totnes” holding numerous properties in Devonshire, and Froxton in Cornwall[55].  “Juhellus filius Aluredi” founded Totness Priory by undated charter, dated to the reign of William II King of England[56].  An undated charter records that King William II expelled “Juhello de Totenesio" from "hæreditatem eius" and granted it to "Rogerio de Novant” founded Totness Priory by undated charter, dated to the reign of William II King of England[57]m --- de Picquigny, daughter of ---.  A "sœur de Guermond de Picquigny, mariée en Angleterre avec un riche seigneur nommé Joelle de Totenes" is referred to in the De Miraculis sanctæ Mariæ Laudunensis[58].  Juhel & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          ALURED (-after 1136).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alur fil Johel" accounting for "terre patris sui" in Devonshire[59].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Aluredo filio Joelis" held out against the king, after helping his friend Baldwin de Reviers at the siege of Exeter, following the surrender of most of his followers, dated to [1136][60]

ii)         ELEANOR .  "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[61].  Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Barnstaple Priory by "Johelis avi sui" by undated charter[62]m PHILIP [I] de Briouse, son of GUILLAUME [I] de Briouse & his wife --- ([1060/70]-[1131/39]). 

iii)        [daughter .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   It is probably speculative, designed to explain how the Tracy family held part of the honour of Barnstaple (the other part of which was in the hands of the Briouse family, inherited through Juhel de Totnes’s recorded daughter Eleanor): the 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Oliverus de Traci…pro parte sua de honore de Berdestapl" in Devonshire[63]Domesday Descendants comments that the honour of Barnstaple "probably came to [Henry de Tracy] by grant of King Stephen, against whom Alfred [fitz Juhel] had fought in the previous year, though the possibility that his wife was a sister of Alfred cannot be excluded"[64].  Stapleton is more specific, stating that Oliver de Tracy held "a moiety of the Honour of Barnstaple…through the grant of King Stephen to his father Henry de Tracy, but which grant had been made to the prejudice of the heir of the former possessor Joel son of Alured, who was the grandfather of William de Briouze"[65]m --- de Tracy, son of ---.] 

 

 

 

TRACY

 

 

Loyd says that “the actual place from which the family took its name is a difficult question.  At first sight there is much to be said for Tracy-sur-Mer (Calvados, arrondissement Bayeux, canton Ryes)...[but] it is shown by the Bayeux Inquest of 1133 that [the place] was then held by William Picot, [therefore] such a theory becomes untenable.  Two other places of the name remain – Tracy-Bocage (Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Villers-Bocage) and Tracy a fief in Neuville (Calvados, arrondissement and canton Vire).  As regards the first it lies wide of any of the ascertained lands of the family...[the second] is somewhat more hopeful...whatever the origin of the name...the Tracies were under-tenants in the département of La Manche of the comté of Mortain.  In view of this it is not without significance that Stephen was count of Mortain and that Henry de Tracy of Barnstaple was the king’s most prominent and persistent adherent in Devon”[66]

 

The Tracy family provides yet another example of bogus descents which were fabricated in later centuries, presumably to provide more illustrious ancestors for contemporary family members.  The result for the present-day is considerable confusion and inaccurate information in many published secondary sources.  The following is an attempt at finding a way through the puzzle, but it does not claim to provide the definitive answer to all the difficulties. 

 

 

A.      TRACY of BARNSTAPLE, DEVONSHIRE

 

 

Two siblings, parents not identified. 

1.         WILLIAM de Tracy (-after 1110).  “William de Tracy" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel on becoming a monk there by charter dated 1110, signed by "…Guillelmi de Traceio, Rohes[ie] uxoris sue, Turgisi filii sui, Henrici filii sui, Gieve sororis sue[67].  William presumably died soon afterwards.  m ROHESE, daughter of --- (-after 1110).  “William de Tracy" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel on becoming a monk there by charter dated 1110, signed by "…Guillelmi de Traceio, Rohes[ie] uxoris sue, Turgisi filii sui, Henrici filii sui, Gieve sororis sue[68].  William & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         TURGISE [I] de Tracy (-after 1110).  “William de Tracy" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel on becoming a monk there by charter dated 1110, signed by "…Guillelmi de Traceio, Rohes[ie] uxoris sue, Turgisi filii sui, Henrici filii sui, Gieve sororis sue[69].  

b)         HENRY de Tracy ).  “William de Tracy" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel on becoming a monk there by charter dated 1110, signed by "…Guillelmi de Traceio, Rohes[ie] uxoris sue, Turgisi filii sui, Henrici filii sui, Gieve sororis sue[70].  same person as...?  HENRY de Tracy of Barnstaple (-[1164/65]).  “Henricus de Traci…cum filio meo Olivero” donated property to Barnstaple Priory by charter dated 1146[71].  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Oliverus de Traci" owing ".D. m p parte sua de Honore de Barnestapl" in Devonshire, maybe indicating the recent death of his father[72].  m [firstly] (after [1130/35]) as her second husband, CECILY de Rumilly, widow of WILLIAM FitzRanulf, daughter and heiress of ROBERT de Rumilly [Romilly] of Skipton & his wife ---.  Domesday Descendants notes that Cecily de Rumilly married as her second husband "Henry de Tracy of Barnstaple", without citing the corresponding primary source, but adds that "there is no evidence to suggest that she was the mother of Henry de Tracy’s heir Oliver"[73].  No source has been found which indicates her date of death.  m [secondly] HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is indicated by an undated charter which confirms that her grandson "domini Henrici de Tracy" requested a daily mass at Pilton St James, for the souls of "Henrici de Traci avi sui et Oliveri patris sui et Hawysiæ avæ suæ"[74].  Assuming that this is the only mention of Hawise, it is presumably possible that she was either Henry’s paternal or maternal grandmother, although her being named with his father and paternal grandfather (and without his maternal grandfather) suggests the likelihood that she was his paternal grandmother.  If that is correct, no indication has been found to suggest the order of Henry’s marriages, although the date of death of Hawise’s son Oliver suggests the unlikelihood that he was born before [1130/35] and therefore that Hawise was her husband’s first wife.  This suggestion may be subject to change if a source emerges which confirms that Cecily de Rumilly survived after [1140].  Henry & his [second] wife had one child:

i)          OLIVER de Tracy ([1140?]-[1208/11]).  “Henricus de Traci…cum filio meo Olivero” donated property to Barnstaple Priory by charter dated 1146[75]

-        see below

c)         [WILLIAM de Tracy (-after [1135/49]).  “...Jordanus, Robertus et Henricus de Barnevilla, Guillelmus de Tracei...” witnessed the charter dated to [1135/49] under which “Philippus de Carteret” donated “decimam Sancti Audoeni in Gersoi” to Mont-Saint-Michel[76].  William’s parentage is not known, but the chronology suggests that he may have been another son of William.] 

2.         GEVA (-after 1110).  “William de Tracy" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel on becoming a monk there by charter dated 1110, signed by "…Guillelmi de Traceio, Rohes[ie] uxoris sue, Turgisi filii sui, Henrici filii sui, Gieve sororis sue[77]

 

 

OLIVER de Tracy, son of HENRY de Tracy & his [second] wife Hawise --- ([1140?]-[1209/10]).  “Henricus de Traci…cum filio meo Olivero” donated property to Barnstaple Priory by charter dated 1146[78].  His birth date is estimated very approximately on the assumption that Oliver was a young child in 1146, that his mother was Henry’s second wife as discussed above, and bearing in mind his date of death.  His parentage is indicated by the 28 Jan 1196 document cited below, which confirms that all the sources cited in this paragraph relate to the same Oliver, son of Henry.  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Oliverus de Traci" owing ".D. m p parte sua de Honore de Barnestapl" in Devonshire, maybe indicating the recent death of his father[79]The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Oliver de Tracy xvii l x s" in Devonshire in [1167/68][80].  The same source records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Oliverus de Tracieio" with one knight "de vicecomitatu de Cerenciis" and four knights in his own service[81].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Oliverus de Traci…pro parte sua de honore de Berdestapl" in Devonshire[82].  The 1184/85 Pipe Roll records the sheriff of Devon’s payment “de firma de Boui terra Oliveri de Traci postquam captus fuit[83].  No details regarding Oliver’s capture have been found, but presumably he was not detained for long as the 1185/86 Pipe Roll records “terre Oliveri de Traci in Deuenescira” unqualified by any capture[84].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Olyver de Tracy" among those granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Devonshire[85].  The Feet of Fines records an agreement 28 Jan 1196 settling a claim by "Will de Breosa" against "Oliver de Traci" for "medietate honoris de Bordestapl", tracing the alienations made by "predicto Olivero vel Henrico patre suo"[86].  Some details from Reichel’s translation of this document: “...if the said Oliver should have an heir by his espoused wife...born after the term of this concord”, “the wife of the said Oliver should outlive Oliver [she] shall have her dower...the manor of Boui [Bovey Tracy]”, and “...feofments made before the term of this concord...by the aforesaid Oliver or by Henry his father shall be firm & valid [specifying several enfeoffments made both by Henry and by Oliver]...donations made before the end of this concord by the said Oliver or by Henry his father...[87].  "…Will de Traceio [see below], Oliv de Traceio" both paid rent on land in Normandy, dated 1198[88].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records payments in Devon dated 1199/1200 including "Henricus de Tracy [see below] lm et dimidiam" and “...Oliver[us] de Tracy...” under “Quieti per brevia[89].  "Oliver de Traci" paid a fine for "heritanda baroñ Willi de Traci" [see below] in Devonshire, dated [1199/1200][90].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Oliverus de Traci" owing in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][91].  "Lucia de Moon […terre de Moon]…Will de Traceio…versus Oliv de Traceio" all paid rent in "Ballia Constancien" in Normandy, dated 1203[92].  A document dated 20 Jun 1205 records a hearing between “Oliver de Trasci plaintiff” and “William de Champeaus defendant” relating to the latter’s service of “7 knights which Oliver demands from William for the tenement which he holds of Oliver in...[93].  His death date is indicated by the 1210/11 Pipe Roll entry cited under his widow, Papin noting that “le délai de viduité après le décès du mari imposait à la veuve...de [se] retirer du marché matrimonial...l’Eglise définit...le droit des veuves à se remarier dans l’année suivant le décès de l’époux”, which suggests that Oliver died [1209/10][94]

[m firstly ---.  No primary source has been identified which confirms this supposed first marriage.  However, considering the [1196/97] estimated birth date of Oliver’s son Henry (see below), as well as Oliver’s own suggested birth date, it is likely that he had an earlier wife before he married Henry’s mother.  As the 28 Jan 1196 document cited above indicates that Oliver was childless at that time, any children born of this supposed earlier marriage presumably died young.] 

m [secondly] (before 28 Jan 1196) as her first husband, EVA, daughter of --- (before [1180/82?]-[Godstow?] after [1242/43]).  The 28 Jan 1196 document cited above indicates that Oliver was married at the time, without children, so may have married recently.  This [second] wife was the mother of Oliver’s son Henry (born [1196/97], see below), while the 1210/11 Pipe Roll cited below confirms that Oliver’s [second] wife was Eva.  Her suggested birth “before [1180/82?]” would be consistent with her sister being the mother of King John’s illegitimate son Oliver (follow Eva’s hyperlink for details).  Stapleton records that “Oliver, son of Henry de Tracy...survived till 12 Joh. 1211 [=1210/11], when Eva, his relict, wife first of Thomas de Londres, made proffer of 120 marks for assignation of dower and license of marrying at will” (no source citation)[95], confirming that Eva was Oliver’s widow when he died.  Eva married secondly ([1210/11?]) Thomas [II] de London.  As noted above, Stapleton names Eva as “wife first of Thomas de Londres”.  This phrase does not appear in the original source: the 1210/11 Pipe Roll records that “Eva que fuit uxor Oliveri de Traci” made a fine “pro habenda dota sua...de tenemento quod fuit Oliveri viri sui, et pro habendo maritagio suo”, and in a later entry that “Eva que fuit uxor Oliveri de Traci” owed a debt “pro habenda custodia filii sui heredis Oliveri de Traci cum tota terra quam habuit die qua obiit...[96].  Thomas was therefore Eva’s second husband and Stapleton incorrect. 

King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to leave in peace (“in pace esse permittat”) “manerium de Hamedon ita qd Eva de Tracy et Hawis mater Oliveri fratris dni Reg...” (“...habebant inde ronable estuveriu suu sn wasto usq”?), in accordance with a council decision in London 29 Sep, dated 2 Oct 1217[97].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to grant “plenam seisinam de terra de Hanedon...q habuit de baillio Com W. Mar rectoris nostri...cui Wills de London eam invadiavit p sexaginta marc”, noting that “terram illam habebat done Eva de Trasey q clamat terram illam e.e dotem suam”, to [Hawise’s son] “Olivero fratri meo” who ”de predictis sexaginta marc satisfecit”, dated 14 Mar 1218[98].  The Testa de Nevill lists landholdings, dated 1219, which include "Eva de Trascey est de donatione domini regis et non est maritata, et valet terra eius in Esgarestona quam tenet de domino rege" in Berkshire "Rotulus eschætarum... in hundredo de Launburn", and in Devonshire "terra sua de Bovy"[99].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Berkshire “qd statim visis literis cap in manu dni R totam terram Fulconis fil Warini et Eve de Trascy et sororis sue in bailla sua” for (“pp”) “fil et hede Thom London que dno R detinent qui ee debet in custodia dni R”, dated 10 Jan 1219[100] (mistranslated by the Fine Rolls Project: "take into the king’s hands" the lands of "Fulk fitz Warin and Eva de Tracy and her sister on account of the son [error for daughter] and heir of Thomas de London, who they detain from the king")[101].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Devon that, “[si] fil et heres Thom de Lond inventa fuerit in bailla sua” (unless in the custody of the king) or “si abducta fuerit a bailla sua”, he should take “in manu dni R...totam terram Eve de Trascy matris sue in bailla sua”, dated 26 Jan 1219[102].  "Eva de Tracy" paid a fine for "having a weekly market…at her manor of Bovey", dated 23 Oct 1219[103].  An undated document [between documents dated 26 Dec 1219 and 30 Dec 1219] records that “Willus Crassus primogenitus” made a fine to King Henry for “habiendo in uxorem filiam et heredem Thome de Lond”, payment guaranteed by ten named subscribers[104].  King Henry III notified the sheriff of Dorset and Somerset that “Willelmus Crassus” had made a fine for “habienda custodia terre q fuit Thome de London cum maritagio Hawisie filie et heredis ipsius Thome” and ordered him to transfer “eidem Willelmo omnibus terris...q fuerunt ipsius Thome in bailla tua plenariam saisinam”, dated 21 Jul 1220[105].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to disseise “Eva de Trasey de terra sua q tenuit in dote in Baillia tua”, when he granted “saisina...Willo Crasso seniori de terris q fuerunt Thome de Lond in Bailla tua”, dated 7 Aug 1220[106].  “Reso Crek” was ordered to return “terras...q fuerunt Thome de London” to “Willo Crasso”, to whom the king granted ”custodiam terre q fuit ipsius Thome cum maritagio Hawisie filie et heredis ipsius Thome”, dated 26 May 1221[107].  King Henry III notified the sheriff of Wiltshire that “Eva de Trascy” had made a fine for “transgressione quam fecit erga nos eo qd maritavit Hawisiam filiam suam...sine licencia nostra”, dated 23 Jun 1222[108].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Eva de Tracy...quia maritavit Hawisam filiam suam sine licencia R. que fuit de donatione sue” owing in “Nova Oblata” in Devon[109].  “Eva de Tracy” is named in a document dated [1231/32][110].  The Testa de Nevill lists "Feuda Fulconis Filii Warini" in Wiltshire which include "Eva de Bassingeburn [see below] tenet in Westbur dimidium feudum i militis de Eva de Tracy, et ipsa de dicto Fulcone, et Fulco de rege in capite", dated to [1242/43][111].  An undated document records the request for “nobili matrona, domina Eva de Tracy” to stay at Godstow nunnery[112].  Some background to Eva’s earlier life is provided by inquisitions dated 5 Jan 1253 which record that “the manor of Bovy never paid sheriff’s aid in the time of Oliver de Tracy, father of the said Henry...[who] fell into the custody of King John and Eva his mother had her dower of the said money, and she dwelling in distant parts allowed her bailiffs to pay sometimes more, sometimes less...[113]

Oliver & his second wife had [two] children: 

1.         HENRY de Tracy ([1196/97]-before 21 Aug 1274).  The 28 Jan 1196 document, cited above under his father, indicates that Oliver and his wife had no children at that time.  As Henry was presumably considered adult at the time of the Jun 1213 order cited below, he was probably born soon afterwards, say [1196/97].  His parentage is confirmed by the 5 Jan 1253 inquisitions cited below.  King John notified the sheriff of Devon that he had returned “Barnestapel et Tavistok et totum honorem de Barnestapel...parte illam qm Wills de Braos tenuit qm alia qm Oliver de Trascy tenuit” to “Henry de Trascy”, dated Jun 1213[114].  An undated charter confirms that "domini Henrici de Tracy" requested a daily mass at Pilton St James, for the souls of "Henrici de Traci avi sui et Oliveri patris sui et Hawysiæ avæ suæ"[115].  "Henr de Trascy" is named among the guarantors for a pledge of "Roberti de Ferariis" for a fine for "hnda fil Willelmi de Boclaund cum hereditate sua", dated [Oct] 1216[116].  A document dated 12 Mar 1219 records a hearing between “Cecily, daughter of Arthur de Winton, plaintiff” and “Henry de Tracy, opponent” relating to rent held from the latter “in which they were accustomed to render that rent to Oliver de Tracy, father of the said Henry...[117].  An order dated 2 Apr 1219 records "Henry de Tracy" repaying part of a debt[118].  The Pipe Roll 1223 includes land of “Henricus de Tracy...de dimidio feodo quod est in manu R. de feodis Oliveri de Tracy” in Devon[119].  A document dated 30 Jun 1228 records a hearing between “Philip Le Bealde, claimant” and “Henry de Tracy & Matilda his wife, opponents” relating to land in “Fislega[120].  Inquisitions dated 5 Jan 1253 record that “the manor of Bovy never paid sheriff’s aid in the time of Oliver de Tracy, father of the said Henry...[who] fell into the custody of King John and Eva his mother had her dower of the said money, and she dwelling in distant parts allowed her bailiffs to pay sometimes more, sometimes less...[121].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 21 Aug "2 Edw I" following the death of "Henry de Tracy" name “Maud daughter of his daughter whom Geoffrey de Caunville lately took to wife aged 31 at Christmas in the said year is his next heir”, adding that “he had a daughter Eva married to Guy de Bryane from whom was born Maud whom Geoffrey de Caunvile lately married”, and list the deceased’s properties in Barnstaple and numerous other places in Devonshire[122]m (before 30 Jun 1228) MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A document dated 30 Jun 1228 records a hearing between “Philip Le Bealde, claimant” and “Henry de Tracy & Matilda his wife, opponents” relating to land in “Fislega[123].  Drake, in a short Braose pedigree, records that “Loretta countess of Leicester” [daughter of William [III] de Briouse] granted “the manor and advowson of Tawstock, co. Devon” to “her niece Matilda and the heirs of her body”, citing a writ dated 1391 and adding that the same document confirms that William [IV] de Briouse was the grantor’s brother[124].  Drake also states that Matilda, the grantee, married “Henry de Tracy Lord of Barnstaple, ob. 2 Edw I (1273-4)”, but does not cite the primary source which confirms that her parentage is correct.  However, he does record that the manor of Tawstock (presumably Tavistock) was later held by the second husband of Matilda, daughter of Eva de Tracy and heir of Henry de Tracy according to the inquisitions quoted above.  From a chronological point of view, Drake’s indication appears possible.  If it is correct, Henry’s wife was MATILDA [de Briouse], daughter of WILLIAM [IV] de Briouse & his wife Matilda ---.  Henry & his wife had two children: 

a)         EVA de Tracy (-before 21 Aug 1274).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 21 Aug "2 Edw I" following the death of "Henry de Tracy" name “Maud daughter of his daughter whom Geoffrey de Caunville lately took to wife aged 31 at Christmas in the said year is his next heir”, adding that “he had a daughter Eva married to Guy de Bryane from whom was born Maud whom Geoffrey de Caunvile lately married[125]m GUY de Brian of Laugharne, co. Carmarthen, son of --- (-1307). 

b)         HENRY de Tracy ([May] [1237/38]-before 1274).  A writ dated 10 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of "Gunnora de la Mare" names "Henry, son of Henry Tracy her uncle, aged 13 at Whitsunday, 35 Hen III, and a son of Henry de la Mare, whose name is unknown, aged 15, are variously stated to be her heir" and "Elveiscot alias Elfeiscot, Alfiscot [Oxford]…Winterburne [Wiltshire]"[126]

2.         [EVA [de Tracy] (-after [1242/43]).  Papin records her parentage (no source cited)[127].  The Testa de Nevill lists "Feuda Fulconis Filii Warini" in Wiltshire which includes "Eva de Bassingeburn tenet in Westbur dimidium feudum i militis de Eva de Tracy, et ipsa de dicto Fulcone, et Fulco de rege in capite", dated to [1242/43][128].  The primary source which confirms her parentage more precisely has not been identified, although her family origin and marriage are indicated by the folloing document:  “Paganus de Cadurcis filius et hæres dominæ Hawisiæ de Londonia” donated land to Whiteland, Carmarthenshire, for the souls of “dominorum Thomæ de Londonia, Patricii de Cadurcis, Will. et Mauricii de Londonia, Warini de Bassingburne [presumably Eva’s husband], dominæ Evæ de Tracy, Aleys et Gundre defunctorum”, by charter dated May 1270[129].  The primary sources which confirm Warin’s parentage, the date of his marriage, and his date of death have not been identified.  m WARIN de Bassingbourn, son of ---.] 

 

 

1.         FARAMUS de Tracy (-after 4 Jan 1219).  "Farramus de Tracy" paid a fine "for having a pone" in a claim against "Ralph de Satchville" relating to land "in Broad Clyst" in Devonshire, dated 4 Jan 1219[130]

 

 

[Three] siblings, parents not identified.  The chronology suggests that they could have been children of Turgise [I] de Tracy.  Alternatively, William shown below could have been the same person as William de Tracy, shown above as the possible son of William de Tracy and his wife Rohese. 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Tracy (-[1172/1200]).  Lord of the barony of Bradnich, Devon[131]Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Martin de Troarn, including donations by "…Willelmi de Traceio…" of "molendinum de Trebuchet et decimum molendinorum suorum de Sancto Vigore", by charter dated to [1155/57][132]A charter dated to [1154/87] records that “W[illiam] de Traceio" built a house for lepers "at Coismas” but assigned its revenues to "Alan the clerk brother to the said W[illiam]"[133].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus de Tracy" held one knight’s fee from the bishop of Exeter in Devon[134].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Tracy xvii l x s" in Devonshire in [1167/68][135].  "…Willelmo de Traci…Ricardo Britone" subscribed the charter dated 1168 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property "in manerio de Hinton" of "Roberto de Basoges" granted to him by "comes Conanus"[136].  He was one of the murderers of Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury.  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus de Traci, Reginaldus filius Ursi, Hugo de Morevilla, Ricardus Brito” murdered the archbishop at Canterbury in 1171 and relate the subsequent events in detail[137]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "militum…Richardus Brito, Hugo de Morevilla, Renaldus Ursus et Guillelmus de Traci" as the murderers of Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury[138].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus de Traceio" with one knight "de baillia de Basseis" and five knights in his own service[139].  "Hugo de Corterua" confirmed the donation made by "dominus Willermus de Traci avunculus meus", before the murder of the archbishop of Canterbury, to "Alano de Traci clerico" by charter dated to [1180], witnessed by "Olivero de Traci…"[140].  "Willelmus de Pyreu" paid a fine for the lands of "terra Willelmi de Tracy sic id Will eam habuit die que obiit", at "Constanc’ et Vire", dated 1200[141].  Stapleton records that "a copy of the Roll of Infeudations subsequent to the separation of Normandy" confirms that the land in question was the same as that held by Turgise de Tracy, specifying that after "Turgisus de Traceyo…Guillelmus de Pirou habet"[142].  "Oliver de Traci" paid a fine for "heritanda baroñ Willi de Traci" in Devonshire, dated [1199/1200][143].  A writ dated 10 Nov "3 Edw I" into the manor of Morton records that "William de Tracy, who held the barony of Braneys and Morton of the king in chief, took part in the martyrdom of St Thomas of Canterbury, for which deed he went into exile and the barony became escheat of King Henry [II]"[144]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         [TURGISE [II] de Tracy (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Turgillus de Traceio ii milites et ad servitium suum viii milites" in the fief of Mortain[145].] 

b)         HENRY de Tracy (-[20 Jun/4 Nov 1200?]).  "Joselinus de Pomerei" donated property to Ford abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of "…domini fratris mei Hen de Pomerei", by undated charter (maybe dated to after 1200, when William father of Henry de Tracy died) witnessed by "…Willielmo de Tracy fratre Hugonis de Courtenay, Henrico filio Willielmi de Tracy"[146].  A writ dated 10 Nov "3 Edw I" into the manor of Morton [Devon] records that "William de Tracy, who held the barony of Braneys and Morton of the king in chief, took part in the martyrdom of St Thomas of Canterbury, for which deed he went into exile and the barony became escheat of King Henry [II]" and adds that "the same William had a son Henry de Tracy the hunchback (le Bozu) born in Normandy, who long after came to Geoffrey son of Peter, chief justice of England…[to recover] his inheritance, and for so doing he gave him the said manor of Morton"[147].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records payments in Devon dated 1199/1200 including "Henricus de Tracy lm et dimidiam" and “...Oliver[us] de Tracy..[see above].” under “Quieti per brevia[148].  King John confirmed the donation of "manerio de Morton" by "Henri fil Will de Tracy" to "G. fil Pet com Essex" by charter dated 20 Jun 1200[149].  A similar donation was made 4 Nov 1200 by "Hug de Curtenay"[150].  The suggestion that Henry died before this last date appears supported by "Oliver de Traci", as noted above, paying a fine for "heritanda baroñ Willi de Traci" in Devonshire, dated [1199/1200][151]

2.         ALAN de Tracy (-after [1180]).  A charter dated to [1154/87] records that “W[illiam] de Traceio" built a house for lepers "at Coismas” but assigned its revenues to "Alan the clerk brother to the said W[illiam]"[152].  "Hugo de Corterua" confirmed the donation made by "dominus Willermus de Traci avunculus meus" before the murder of the archbishop of Canterbury to "Alano de Traci clerico" by charter dated to [1180], witnessed by "Olivero de Traci…"[153]

3.         [--- de Tracy .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the charter dated to [1180] under which her son "Hugo de Corterua" confirmed the donation made by "dominus Willermus de Traci avunculus meus", before the murder of the archbishop of Canterbury, to "Alano de Traci clerico"[154].]  m GERVAIS de Couterne, son of ---.  Nicholas Vincent suggests that "Courtenay" represents a misreading for "Couterne" in the various sources quoted in this section[155]Gervais & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH de Couterne (-after May 1201).  "Hugo de Corterua" confirmed the donation made by "dominus Willermus de Traci avunculus meus", before the murder of the archbishop of Canterbury, to "Alano de Traci clerico" by charter dated to [1180], witnessed by "Olivero de Traci…"[156]"Hugo de Curterne" owed a fee "de scutagio Willelmi de Traci" in Devonshire in 1194[157]King John confirmed the donation of "manerio de Morton" by "Henri fil Will de Tracy" to "G. fil Pet com Essex" by charter dated 20 Jun 1200[158].  A similar donation was made 4 Nov 1200 by "Hug de Curtenay"[159].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Hug de Curtene" owing in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][160]

b)         WILLIAM de Tracy (-after 1203).  Stapleton records that "William de Traci, son of Gervasia de Courtenai" donated "land in North Chillingford which he held of Dru de Montgirum…also a feudatory in the Passeis where in 1172 Odo de Montegerol had a knights’ fee" to the canons of Torre, Devonshire[161].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Tracy" paying "xxv l x s, per Hugonem de Cort[enai]" in Devonshire[162].  "Will de Traceio…Lucia de Moon" both paid rent on part of "terre de Moon", dated 1198[163].  "…Will de Traceio, Oliv de Traceio" both paid rent on land in Normandy, dated 1198[164]"Joselinus de Pomerei" donated property to Ford abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of "…domini fratris mei Hen de Pomerei", by undated charter (maybe dated to after 1200, when William father of Henry de Tracy died) witnessed by "…Willielmo de Tracy fratre Hugonis de Courtenay, Henrico filio Willielmi de Tracy"[165].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Willelmus de Traci" owing in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][166].  "Lucia de Moon […terre de Moon]…Will de Traceio…versus Oliv de Traceio" all paid rent in "Ballia Constancien" in Normandy, dated 1203[167]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRY de Tracy .  Stapleton records that "Henry de Traci, son of William de Traci" donated "land of Cnutesbury…Leoford…and all the right in the land of Cliftwich which had been the marriage portion of his mother" to the church of St Mary of Ford, undated[168]

 

 

B.      TRACY of TODDINGTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE

 

 

WILLIAM de Tracy of Toddington, Gloucestershire, son of JOHN de Sudeley Lord of Sudely Castle & his wife Grace de Tracy (-after [1192]).  "Willelmus de Traceio" confirmed the donation of "Thanewordam villam meam" {Yaneworthe} to Gloucester St Peter made by "Radulfus de Suthleia frater meus", and with the consent of "Radulfo fratre meo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Henricus de Traceio…"[169]Frank Barlow comments that "William [de Tracy], the second son of John de Sudeley", whom he identifies as one of the murderers of Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury, "chose to take his name from the family of his mother, Grace daughter and heir of William (I) de Tracy, lord of Bradninch in Devon and illegitimate son of King Henry I"[170].  Professor Nicholas Vincent argues convincingly that William de Tracy of Toddington could not have been the same person as the murderer William de Tracy (shown in Part A of the present chapter), highlighting that the former is named in sources after the banishment of the latter[171].  "William de Tracy of Toddington…with his son Henry" witnessed a charter, dated to [1171/75], which records a donation to Winchcombe abbey[172]Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Saint-Lo, Coutances, including “the gift of William de Tracy the tithe of his mills of Humeel", by charter dated to [1184/87][173]"William de Tracy of Toddington" witnessed a charter of "Otuel de Sudeley" dated to [1192/98][174]

m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known. 

William & his wife had one child: 

1.         HENRY de Tracy"William de Tracy of Toddington…with his son Henry" witnessed a charter, dated to [1171/75], which records a donation to Winchcombe abbey[175]"Willelmus de Traceio" confirmed the donation of "Thanewordam villam meam" {Yaneworthe} to Gloucester St Peter made by "Radulfus de Suthleia frater meus", and with the consent of "Radulfo fratre meo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Henricus de Traceio…"[176]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Tracy, of Toddington (-before 1226).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRY Tracy, of Toddington .  "Henrico de Traci…" witnessed the charter dated to [1213/28] under which "Willelmus de Diglesdune" donated "terre in Quentone" to Eynsham abbey[177].  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by the king against "abbatem de Forda" for "ecclesiam de Lintona…advocacionem" which notes the death of "Willelmus de Tracy" and the inheritance by "Henricus de Tracy filius suus"[178]m ---.  He was ancestor of Henry Tracy 8th Viscount Tracy who died in 1797[179]

 

 

 

TRESGOZ

 

 

Loyd suggests that the name Tresgoz comes from Troisgots, located in the canton of Tessy-sur-Vire, arrondissement Saint-Lô, in the present-day French département of Manche[180]

 

 

A.      TRESGOZ of ESSEX

 

 

1.         WILLIAM [I] de Tresgoz (-[1150]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Tresgoz" in Essex and Norfolk[181].  “…Willielmus Tresgat…” witnessed the undated charter, dated to the reign of King Henry I, under which "Radulfus filius Briani et Emma uxor suus" founded Bresethe Priory in Suffolk[182]

 

2.         GEOFFREY de Tresgoz .  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Gaufridus Tresgoz…"[183]

 

 

Brother and sister: 

1.         GEOFFREY de Tresgoz (-before 1185).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfridi de Tresgoz i militem" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1171/72][184]m firstly AGNES de Valoignes, daughter of WALTER de Valoignes of Berneye & his wife ---.  m secondly AMABILIS de Gresley, son of ROBERT de Gresley & his wife --- (-before 1185).  Her family origin is indicated by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records [her son] “Simon Tresgoz filius Gaufridi de Tresgoz…nepos Roberti de Gresley” under the guardianship of "Roberti de Luci"[185].  Geoffrey & his first wife had two children: 

a)         AGNES de Tresgoz (-after 1197).  "Geoffrey de Nerford and Agnes Tregoz" claimed against "Ralph Travers and Petronilla de Tregoz his wife" relating to land "Lawingeham…Bernei…in Norfolk and…Frienton…in Essex…", the land ordered to be divided "between the two sisters", dated [1197/98][186]m GEOFFREY de Nerford, son of ---. 

b)         PETRONILLA de Tresgoz (-after 1197).  "Geoffrey de Nerford and Agnes Tregoz" claimed against "Ralph Travers and Petronilla de Tregoz his wife" relating to land "Lawingeham…Bernei…in Norfolk and…Frienton…in Essex…", the land ordered to be divided "between the two sisters", dated [1197/98][187]m RALPH Travers, son of ---. 

Geoffrey & his second wife had two children: 

c)         WILLIAM [III] de Tresgoz ([1167/68]-after [1210/12]).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus filius Galfridi de Tresgoz”, 17 years old, under the guardianship of "Roberti de Luci" whose daughter he had married, with land "de honore Peverelli…terra…de Toleshunt"[188].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Tresgoz" paying "xv s, i militem et dimidium" in Norfolk, Suffolk[189].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Tresgoz…pro fine terre patris sui" in Essex & Hertfordshire[190].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Tregoz" holding two knights’ fees, one half and eight parts, "de honore Peverelli de Londonia" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][191]m (1185 or before) --- de Lucy, daughter of ROBERT de Lucy & his wife ---.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus filius Galfridi de Tresgoz”, 17 years old, under the guardianship of "Roberti de Luci" whose daughter he had married, with land "de honore Peverelli…terra…de Toleshunt"[192].  William [III] & his wife had one child: 

i)          GEOFFREY de Tresgoz (-after 1226).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Gaufridus filius Willelmi Tregoz debet esse in custodia domini regis et Stephanus Haring habet illum...de honore Peverelli"[193].  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Gaufridus de Tresgoz" against "Johannem de Bretona" for land "in Legha", the defendant claiming that "Gaufridi avi predicti Gaufridi" donated "villam de Legha" to "Alano filio Henrici", while the plaintiff claimed that "Willelmus Tregoz pater suus" died seised of the land which was held by "Stephanus Harengod custos eiusdem Gaufridi dum fuit infra etatem"[194]

d)         SIMON de Tresgoz .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Simon Tresgoz filius Gaufridi de Tresgoz…nepos Roberti de Gresley” under the guardianship of "Roberti de Luci"[195]

2.         ALBREDA de Tresgoz (-after 1155).  Bigelow summarises a lawsuit brought by "Ricardus de Aneste" relating to the inheritance of "Willielmi [de Sackville] avunculi mei", recording that the latter had been betrothed to "Gaufridum de Tresgos…Albredam sororem eius", that he married "Adeliza daughter of vicecomes Aufred", that the Pope declared that second marriage void because the earlier betrothal agreement with Albreda had constituted a marriage, and that William had returned to live with his first wife until he died[196]m firstly (repudiated) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Sackville, son of ---.  m secondly (before 1155) ROBERT de Beseville, son of ---. 

 

 

3.         WILLIAM [II] de Tresgoz (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus de Tresgoz" with one knight and one half "in baillia Galfridi de Bleville, de Caleto"[197]

 

 

B.      TRESGOZ of HEREFORDSHIRE

 

 

1.         ROBERT [I] de Tresgoz (-[1213/14]).  "…Roberto de Tresgoz" subscribed the charter dated to [1181/89] under which Henry II King of England granted land to "Waltero ostiario de Camera"[198].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "feoda Huberti de Rya" paying "xvii l x s, per Robertum de Tresgoz, xxxv milites" in Norfolk, Suffolk[199].  This suggests a close family relationship between the two individuals, although this has not yet been traced.  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Roberto de Tresgoz c s in Martinesgraua de dimidio anno" in honour of Arundel[200].  "Nigell Pincebec et Alic uxor eius" paid a fine for "custodia terre et heredis Walt Biset vs Rob de Tresgoz et Sibill ux eius", in Herefordshire, dated 1204[201].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Tresgoz" holding "Alingetone" in Wiltshire, and 19 in Hereford, in [1210/12][202].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Tresgoz" held "feodum ii militum in Septon de honore de Ewias" in Hampshire[203].  m as her first husband, SIBYLLA de Ewias, daughter of ROBERT de Ewias & his wife Petronilla --- (-before 1 Jul 1236).  She married secondly (after [1213/14]) Roger [I] Clifford of Tenbury.  “Rogerus de Clifford” requested burial at Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Sibillæ uxoris meæ", next to "filium suum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Ricardo de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewyas seniore, Willielmo de Ewyas juniore, filio Sibillæ"[204].  "Domina Sibilla de Ewyas filia Roberti de Ewyas" donated her mill at Ethon to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire by undated charter, witnessed by “domino Waltero de Lacy, domino Rogero de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewias…Roberto Tregoz et fratribus suis"[205].  Robert [I] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT [II] de Tresgoz (-before 24 Sep 1268).  The Fine Rolls record the homage of “Robti Tresgoz fil et hered Sybil de Ewyas” 1 Jul 1236[206].  “Robert Tregoz the younger” donated “the whole fosse which is between the land which belonged to Walter de Welynton and the water which is called Duneleis” to Ewias Priory by charter dated to [1235/65] witnessed by “William my brother...[207]m (before 1 Aug 1245) JULIANE de Cauntelo, daughter of WILLIAM de Cauntelo & his wife Melisende de Gournay (-after 1282).  “Richard de Ewias son of John de Ewias” granted certain rents in Foy to “Juliana de Tregoz widow of Robert de Tregoz” by charter dated to [1265/85][208].  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" wrote to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" and names her son "John Tresgoos" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng", whose daughter "Milsent nostre mere" married "a Count de Euoyse en Normandy" by whom she had one son and one daughter, before marrying "Will de Cantelow nostre pere"[209].  Robert [II] & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN de Tresgoz (-before 6 Sep 1300).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" wrote to "son frère St Thomas de Cantlow, Euesque…de Hereford" and names her son "John Tresgoos" married "la reyne Blanch" [widow of Louis VIII King of France, such a second marriage being impossible chronologically] and had "un fils…Hugh…nostre ayle", who married "la soer le count Renaud de Boloyng", whose daughter "Milsent nostre mere" married "a Count de Euoyse en Normandy" by whom she had one son and one daughter, before marrying "Will de Cantelow nostre pere"[210].  He was summoned to parliament in 1297 whereby he is held to have become Lord Tresgoz.  A writ dated 6 Sep "28 Edw I", after the death of "John Tregoz alias de Tregoz", names "John la Warre his grandson (nepos) […aged 24, son of Clarice la Warre his eldest daughter who is dead…married to Roger la War] and Sibyl the wife of William de Grauntcoun (alias de Grandissono) his […younger] daughter […aged 30 and more] both aged 21 and more are his next heirs"[211]m firstly as her second husband, MABEL, widow of WILLIAM de Crèvecœur, daughter of FULK [IV] FitzWarin & his [first/second] wife [--- de Clifford/Constance de Tosny] (-before 24 May 1297).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" records that her son "John Tresgoos" married "Mabill file a noble…chevalier Foulk Fitz-Warren qui avoit a feme le soer Sr Rog de Clifford"[212].  It is suggested that the last reference to Mabel’s mother as a member of the Clifford family represents an error.  If it is correct, John de Tresgoz and his wife would have been very closely related, presumably first cousins, as Roger [II] de Clifford and John de Tresgoz’s father were uterine brothers.  From a chronological point of view, it is likely that Mabel was the daughter of Fulk FitzWarin [IV], whose recorded wife was Constance de Tosny, although it is possible that she was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage to a member of the Clifford family.  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body", names as heirs of "[the said Maud] Juliana daughter of John son of Agnes one of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 23 and more, John de Lenham son of Iseut the second of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 60 and more"[213]m secondly as her first husband, JOAN de Cokefield, daughter of ADAM de Cokefield of Feltwell, Norfolk and Moulton, Suffolk & his wife Joan --- (-before 7 Apr 1354).  She married secondly (before 28 Feb 1301) Laurence de Hameldene, and thirdly ([1313/14] or before) William de Beauchamp.  John & his first wife had two children: 

(a)       CLARISSA de Tresgoz (-[Apr 1289/6 Sep 1300]).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" names "Clarissa" as the elder daughter of "John Tresgoos" and his wife, adding that she married "Sr Roger la Ware"[214].  A writ dated 6 Sep "28 Edw I", after the death of "John Tregoz alias de Tregoz", names "John la Warre his grandson (nepos) […aged 24, son of Clarice la Warre his eldest daughter who is dead…married to Roger la War] and Sibyl the wife of William de Grauntcoun (alias de Grandissono) his […younger] daughter […aged 30 and more] both aged 21 and more are his next heirs"[215]m (Sep 1276 or before) ROGER la Warre, son of JOHN la Warre & his wife Olimpia de Fokington (-20 Jun 1320).  He was summoned to parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord La Warre. 

(b)       SIBYLLA de Tresgoz ([before 1270]-21 Oct 1334, bur Dore Abbey)"Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" names "Sibill" as the second daughter of "John Tresgoos" and his wife, adding that she married "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon"[216].  A writ dated 6 Sep "28 Edw I", after the death of "John Tregoz alias de Tregoz", names "John la Warre his grandson (nepos) […aged 24, son of Clarice la Warre his eldest daughter who is dead…married to Roger la War] and Sibyl the wife of William de Grauntcoun (alias de Grandissono) his […younger] daughter […aged 30 and more] both aged 21 and more are his next heirs"[217]m ([1285]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME de Grandson, son of PIERRE Seigneur de Grandson & his wife Agnes de Neuchâtel (-27 Jun 1335).  He was summoned to the English parliament from 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Grandson [Grandison][218]

ii)         --- de Tresgoz .  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1265/1300] under which [his son] “John Tregoz” donated “a certain road leading from my garden, which I had from John Tregoz my uncle, to the Street which is called Vriogis-strete” to Ewias Priory[219]m ---.  One child: 

(a)       JOHN Tregoz .  “John Tregoz” donated “a certain road leading from my garden, which I had from John Tregoz my uncle, to the Street which is called Vriogis-strete” to Ewias Priory by charter dated to [1265/1300][220]

b)         JOHN de Tresgoz (-before 1235).  Bannister names John as second son of Robert [I] de Tresgoz, adding that he died before 1235, but does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[221]

c)         WILLIAM de Tresgoz .  “Rogerus de Clifford” requested burial at Dore abbey, Herefordshire, with the consent of "Sibillæ uxoris meæ", next to "filium suum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Ricardo de Clifford, Willielmo de Ewyas seniore, Willielmo de Ewyas juniore, filio Sibillæ"[222].  “Robert Tregoz the younger” donated “the whole fosse which is between the land which belonged to Walter de Welynton and the water which is called Duneleis” to Ewias Priory by charter dated to [1235/65] witnessed by “William my brother...[223].  Bannister states that William became rector of Kentchurch, but does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[224]

 

 

C.      TRESGOZ of GORING, SUSSEX

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Tresgoz (-after [1135/38]).  “...Roberto Tresgod...” witnessed the undated charter (presumably dated to before the donor’s second marriage) under which “Aelidis filia Godefridi ducis Lotharingie qui fui uxor...regis Anglie Henrici” donated land “apud Hansberge...Stantonam manerium” to Oseney St. Mary, recorded by inspeximus dated 28 Feb 1320[225]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         JOHN de Tresgoz (-[1194]).  “…Johannes Treisgoz, Philippus Treisgoz…" witnessed the charter dated 2 Feb 1158 under which "William earl of Arundel” donated "the church of St Lo of Ansleville" to Montebourg abbey[226].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Johannes de Tresgoz et Philippus iii m et dimidiam" in Sussex in [1167/68][227].  A charter dated 8 Apr 1195 records agreements between Fécamp and “John de Tresgoz" made in 1164, relating to woods at Dureshurst, Perregate and Brunnesburi, and the settlement of further disputes which arose after his death between "his son John” with the agreement of "his brothers Henry and Thomas", with "Philip his uncle" as guarantor, witnessed "ex parte Johannis: Henricus et Thomas fratres sui, Philippus de Tresgoz…Walterus de Tresgoz…"[228]m (after 1166) as her second husband, AMICE, widow of PHILIP de Leyburn, daughter of ROBERT FitzGerold & his wife Alice ---.  Dugdale summarises donations to Southwark priory, including the confirmation of the donation of “lands of Waleton” made by "Amicia de Tregoz, daughter of Robert Fitzgerald and Alice his wife, sister of Alexander, and wife first of Philip de Leyburn and then of John de Tregoz" and confirmed by "Robert de Leyborn [her son]"[229].  John & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN de Tresgoz (-[1197]).  A charter dated 8 Apr 1195 records agreements between Fécamp and “John de Tresgoz" made in 1164, relating to woods at Dureshurst, Perregate and Brunnesburi, and the settlement of further disputes which arose after his death between "his son John” with the agreement of "his brothers Henry and Thomas", with "Philip his uncle" as guarantor, witnessed "ex parte Johannis: Henricus et Thomas fratres sui, Philippus de Tresgoz…Walterus de Tresgoz…"[230]

b)         HENRY de Tresgoz .  A charter dated 8 Apr 1195 records agreements between Fécamp and “John de Tresgoz" made in 1164, relating to woods at Dureshurst, Perregate and Brunnesburi, and the settlement of further disputes which arose after his death between "his son John” with the agreement of "his brothers Henry and Thomas", with "Philip his uncle" as guarantor, witnessed "ex parte Johannis: Henricus et Thomas fratres sui, Philippus de Tresgoz…Walterus de Tresgoz…"[231]

c)         THOMAS de Tresgoz .  A charter dated 8 Apr 1195 records agreements between Fécamp and “John de Tresgoz" made in 1164, relating to woods at Dureshurst, Perregate and Brunnesburi, and the settlement of further disputes which arose after his death between "his son John” with the agreement of "his brothers Henry and Thomas", with "Philip his uncle" as guarantor, witnessed "ex parte Johannis: Henricus et Thomas fratres sui, Philippus de Tresgoz…Walterus de Tresgoz…"[232]

2.         PHILIP de Tresgoz (-after 8 Apr 1195).  “…Johannes Treisgoz, Philippus Treisgoz…" witnessed the charter dated 2 Feb 1158 under which "William earl of Arundel” donated "the church of St Lo of Ansleville" to Montebourg abbey[233].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Johannes de Tresgoz et Philippus iii m et dimidiam" in Sussex in [1167/68][234].  A charter dated 8 Apr 1195 records agreements between Fécamp and “John de Tresgoz" made in 1164, relating to woods at Dureshurst, Perregate and Brunnesburi, and the settlement of further disputes which arose after his death between "his son John” with the agreement of "his brothers Henry and Thomas", with "Philip his uncle" as guarantor, witnessed "ex parte Johannis: Henricus et Thomas fratres sui, Philippus de Tresgoz…Walterus de Tresgoz…"[235].  “Philippo de Tresgoz et Willielmo filio eius...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Robertus de Sancto Johanne” donated land “in Walborgetune” to Boxgrove priory[236].  “Philippo de Tresgoz, Richardo filio suo...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Sancto Johanne filius et heres Adæ de Port” confirmed donations to Boxgrove priory made by tenants “in honore Hannaci[237]m EMMA, daughter of ---.  A charter of Philip de Tresgoz names “his wife Emma and William his son and heir[238].  Philip & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Tresgoz .  “Philippo de Tresgoz et Willielmo filio eius...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Robertus de Sancto Johanne” donated land “in Walborgetune” to Boxgrove priory[239].  A charter of Philip de Tresgoz names “his wife Emma and William his son and heir[240]

b)         RICHARD de Tresgoz .  “Philippo de Tresgoz, Richardo filio suo...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Sancto Johanne filius et heres Adæ de Port” confirmed donations to Boxgrove priory made by tenants “in honore Hannaci[241]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Tresgoz (-after 8 Apr 1195).  A charter dated 8 Apr 1195 records agreements between Fécamp and “John de Tresgoz" made in 1164, relating to woods at Dureshurst, Perregate and Brunnesburi, and the settlement of further disputes which arose after his death between "his son John” with the agreement of "his brothers Henry and Thomas", with "Philip his uncle" as guarantor, witnessed "ex parte Johannis: Henricus et Thomas fratres sui, Philippus de Tresgoz…Walterus de Tresgoz…"[242]

 

 

 

TRUSSEBUT

 

 

1.         WILLIAM [I] Trussebutm ---.  William [I] & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] Trussebut (-[1175/76])m ALBREDA de Harcourt, daughter of [IVO] de Harcourt & his wife Rohese Peverel ([1134/35]-before 25 May 1205).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[243].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Roysia" as second of the three sisters of "Willelmi Peuerel" who inherited the share of their oldest sister Matilda, adding that "de illa processit Albreda de Harecurt" who was mother of "Galfridus Trussebut, Rogerus, Robertus, Willelmus et Ricardus Trussebut", all of whom died "sine herede", and three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha"[244].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Alberia de Harwecurt…L annorum…iv filios” and her land “in Branteston…maritagium suum[245].  "Hillaria Trussebut" paid a fine for "terra de Branteston q fuit Albréé de Harecurt matris sue" in Northamptonshire, dated 1205[246].  Her date of death is indicated by the following document.  King John confirmed “parte suam q eu contingit de terra de Branteston q fuit Albréé de Harecurt avie sue” to [her grandson] “Rob de Ros”, dated 25 May 1205[247].  William [II] & his wife had children: 

i)          GEOFFREY Trussebut (-before 1190).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[248].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of "Galfridus Trussebut, Rogerus, Robertus, Willelmus et Ricardus Trussebut", all of whom died "sine herede"[249]

ii)         ROHESE Trussebut ([1153/58]-[1194/29 Sep 1196]).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[250].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha", adding that Rohese was mother of "Robertus de Ros senior"[251]A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that “Everardum de Roos” married “Rosam”, by whom he was father of “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan[252].  As the birth of Rohese’s son Robert de Ros is estimated to [1172/73], and her own mother’s birth to [1134/35], it is suggested that Rohese must have been one of her parents’ oldest children.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Everardi de Ros que fuit filia Willelmi Trussebut…xxxv” and her land “in Strowestone”, adding that she had "ii filios, primogenitus est xiii annorum et terra eius est in custodia Ranulfi de Glanville"[253]m EVERARD de Ros, son of ROBERT de Ros & his [first wife ---] ([before 1141/44]-1183). 

iii)        ROGER Trussebut .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of "Galfridus Trussebut, Rogerus, Robertus, Willelmus et Ricardus Trussebut", all of whom died "sine herede"[254]

iv)        ROBERT Trussebut (-1193).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of "Galfridus Trussebut, Rogerus, Robertus, Willelmus et Ricardus Trussebut", all of whom died "sine herede"[255]

v)         WILLIAM Trussebut .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of "Galfridus Trussebut, Rogerus, Robertus, Willelmus et Ricardus Trussebut", all of whom died "sine herede"[256]

vi)        RICHARD Trussebut .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of "Galfridus Trussebut, Rogerus, Robertus, Willelmus et Ricardus Trussebut", all of whom died "sine herede"[257]

vii)      HILARIA Trussebut (-12 Apr 1241).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[258].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha"[259].  "Hillaria Trussebut" paid a fine for "terra de Branteston q fuit Albréé de Harecurt matris sue" in Northamptonshire, dated 1205[260].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Hiraria Trussebut est de donacione domini regis; terra sua apud Neuton valet xx.l"[261]m ROBERT de Boulers Lord of Montgomery, son of STEPHEN de Boulers Lord of Montgomery & his wife --- (-1203). 

viii)     AGATHA Trussebut (-1247).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[262].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha"[263].  "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis"[264]m firstly HAIMO de Wolverton, son of --- (-[1196/98]).  m secondly as his second wife, WILLIAM [III] de Albini Brito, son of WILLIAM [II] de Albini Brito & his wife Matilda de Senlis (-1236). 

 

 

 

VALOIGNES

 

 

[Two] siblings: 

1.         PIERRE de Valoignes (-[1121/29]).  Domesday Book records “Peter de Valognes” with numerous land-holdings in Hertfordshire; several properties in Essex; numerous properties in Norfolk[265].  Domesday Book records that “Peter de Valognes and Ralph Taillebois” took Welbury in Hertfordshire from "Ilbert [who] put it in his manor of Lilley while he was sheriff"[266].  This joint action suggests a family relationship between Pierre de Valoignes and Ralph Taillebois.  "…Petrum de Valloniis…" witnessed the charter under which William I King of England confirmed the rights of Ely abbey[267]"…Petri de Valoniis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1093/97] under which William II King of England founded Bermondsey abbey[268].  “Petrus de Valoniis et Albreda uxor mea” founded Binham in Norfolk, with the consent of “filiis meis Willielmo et Rogerio…nepotis mei Walteri”, for the salvation of “Henrici regis domini mei et Matildis reginæ uxoris suæ..Albreda uxore mea et Eudone fratre suo et Rohaysia uxore…”, by charter dated to [1102/18][269].  An undated charter records an agreement in 1108 between “Herebertum episcopum” and “Petrum de Valoniis" relating to Binham which was witnessed by "…Walt. de Valoniis…"[270].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Binham priory by "Petrus de Valoniis…et Rogerius filius eius et…Robertus" by charter dated to [1121/29][271]m ALBREDA, daughter of ---.  “Petrus de Valoniis et Albreda uxor mea” founded Binham in Norfolk, with the consent of “filiis meis Willielmo et Rogerio…nepotis mei Walteri”, for the salvation of “Henrici regis domini mei et Matildis reginæ uxoris suæ..Albreda uxore mea et Eudone fratre suo et Rohaysia uxore…”, by charter dated to [1102/18][272].  Pierre & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Valoignes .  “Petrus de Valoniis et Albreda uxor mea” founded Binham in Norfolk, with the consent of “filiis meis Willielmo et Rogerio…nepotis mei Walteri”, by charter dated to [1102/18][273].  Presumably William predeceased his father and died before the date of the charter of King Henry I which confirmed the donation, dated to [1121/29] (see above). 

b)         ROGER de Valoignes (-[1141/42]).  “Petrus de Valoniis et Albreda uxor mea” founded Binham in Norfolk, with the consent of “filiis meis Willielmo et Rogerio…nepotis mei Walteri”, by charter dated to [1102/18][274]

-        see below

c)         MURIEL de Valoignes .  Muriel wife of Hubert de Munchensy donated land at Rushworth to Thetford abbey on making her son Hugh a monk there, confirmed by her sons "William de Bachetone and Roger de Munchensy, her brother Roger de Valoignes and his son Piers", by undated charter[275]m firstly --- de Backton, son of ---.  m secondly as his second wife, HUBERT de Munchensy, son of --- (-before 1120).  Muriel & her first husband had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM de Backton .  The bishop of Norwich confirmed an agreement between "Willliam of Bacton and his uncle Roger de Valonges" concerning land at Bacton and a fee held from the church of Norwich by charter dated to [1121/35][276].  Muriel wife of Hubert de Munchensy donated land at Rushworth to Thetford abbey on making her son Hugh a monk there, confirmed by her sons "William de Bachetone and Roger de Munchensy, her brother Roger de Valoignes and his son Piers", by undated charter[277]

d)         daughter .  m ALURED, son of ---.  Two children: 

i)          ADAM .  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis, Ricardus de Chalua, Robertus dapifer, Adam filius Aluredi, Fulqui de Munpinchun...[278].  “Adam filius Alueredi” donated land “in villa de Ingaldesthorp” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee” and for the souls of “Petri de Valoniis avi mei et Rogeri de Valoniis filii eius avunculi mei et Petri junioris cognati mei”, in the presence of “domina Beccha uxore mea et Rogero fratre meo”, by undated charter[279]m BECCHA, daughter of ---.  “Adam filius Alueredi” donated land “in villa de Ingaldesthorp” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee” and for the souls of “Petri de Valoniis avi mei et Rogeri de Valoniis filii eius avunculi mei et Petri junioris cognati mei”, in the presence of “domina Beccha uxore mea et Rogero fratre meo”, by undated charter[280]

ii)         ROGER .  “Adam filius Alueredi” donated land “in villa de Ingaldesthorp” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee” and for the souls of “Petri de Valoniis avi mei et Rogeri de Valoniis filii eius avunculi mei et Petri junioris cognati mei”, in the presence of “domina Beccha uxore mea et Rogero fratre meo”, by undated charter[281]

2.         [--- .  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         WALTER .  “Petrus de Valoniis et Albreda uxor mea” founded Binham in Norfolk, with the consent of “filiis meis Willielmo et Rogerio…nepotis mei Walteri”, by charter dated to [1102/18][282]same person as…?  WALTER de Valoignes (-after [1121/29]).  An undated charter records an agreement in 1108 between “Herebertum episcopum” and “Petrum de Valoniis" relating to Binham which was witnessed by "…Walt. de Valoniis…"[283]Walterus de Valoniis” donated land “in Londoniis Siredes...et duas domos juxta Tamisiam...et...terram vultra le Fliete...quam Hugo filius Ulgeri tenebat de me et de Eudone filio meo” to Binham priory, with the consent of “Rahesie conjugis mee et Agnetis filie mee heredis mee”, for the soul of “Petri de Valoniis” and for the salvation of “Rogeri de Valoniis et Agnetis uxoris sue et filiorum eorum et pro me ipso et uxore mea et filiabus meis”, by undated charter[284].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis...[285].  King Stephen confirmed the donation of land at Barney, Norfolk to Binham Priory by "Walt[erus] de Valoniis…concessu Rogeri de Valon[iis]" by charter dated to [1145/50][286].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the donation of “Berneyam cum terra de Thursford” made to Binham priory by “Walterum de Valoniis cognatum meum antequam monachus fieret”, in the presence of “Rohaisie uxoris sue...Agnetem filiam suam...heres”, by undated charter[287]m ROHESE, daughter of ---.  “Walterus de Valoniis” donated land “in Londoniis Siredes...et duas domos juxta Tamisiam...et...terram vultra le Fliete...quam Hugo filius Ulgeri tenebat de me et de Eudone filio meo” to Binham priory, with the consent of “Rahesie conjugis mee et Agnetis filie mee heredis mee”, for the soul of “Petri de Valoniis” and for the salvation of “Rogeri de Valoniis et Agnetis uxoris sue et filiorum eorum et pro me ipso et uxore mea et filiabus meis”, by undated charter[288].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the donation of “Berneyam cum terra de Thursford” made to Binham priory by “Walterum de Valoniis cognatum meum antequam monachus fieret”, in the presence of “Rohaisie uxoris sue...Agnetem filiam suam...heres”, by undated charter[289].  Walter & his wife had [three or more] children: 

i)          EUDES de Valoignes .  “Walterus de Valoniis” donated land “in Londoniis Siredes...et duas domos juxta Tamisiam...et...terram vultra le Fliete...quam Hugo filius Ulgeri tenebat de me et de Eudone filio meo” to Binham priory, with the consent of “Rahesie conjugis mee et Agnetis filie mee heredis mee”, for the soul of “Petri de Valoniis” and for the salvation of “Rogeri de Valoniis et Agnetis uxoris sue et filiorum eorum et pro me ipso et uxore mea et filiabus meis”, by undated charter[290].  It is uncertain from this document whether Eudes de Valoignes was deceased at the time.  Walter’s daughter Agnes is specified as his heir, but Eudes is not included among those for whose souls/salvation the donation was made.  It is possible that Eudes had been disinherited by his father but was still alive. 

ii)         AGNES de Valoignes .  “Walterus de Valoniis” donated land “in Londoniis Siredes...et duas domos juxta Tamisiam...et...terram vultra le Fliete...quam Hugo filius Ulgeri tenebat de me et de Eudone filio meo” to Binham priory, with the consent of “Rahesie conjugis mee et Agnetis filie mee heredis mee”, for the soul of “Petri de Valoniis” and for the salvation of “Rogeri de Valoniis et Agnetis uxoris sue et filiorum eorum et pro me ipso et uxore mea et filiabus meis”, by undated charter[291].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the donation of “Berneyam cum terra de Thursford” made to Binham priory by “Walterum de Valoniis cognatum meum antequam monachus fieret”, in the presence of “Rohaisie uxoris sue...Agnetem filiam suam...heres”, by undated charter[292]m as his first wife, GEOFFREY de Tresgoz, son of --- (-before 1185). 

iii)        daughter(s) .  “Walterus de Valoniis” donated land “in Londoniis Siredes...et duas domos juxta Tamisiam...et...terram vultra le Fliete...quam Hugo filius Ulgeri tenebat de me et de Eudone filio meo” to Binham priory, with the consent of “Rahesie conjugis mee et Agnetis filie mee heredis mee”, for the soul of “Petri de Valoniis” and for the salvation of “Rogeri de Valoniis et Agnetis uxoris sue et filiorum eorum et pro me ipso et uxore mea et filiabus meis”, by undated charter[293]

 

 

1.         THEOBALD de Valoignesm ---.  The name of Theobald’s wife is not known.  Theobald & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         BERTHA de Valoignes .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Rannulfus de Glanuile et uxor eius Berta, Matillis, Amabilis, Helewisa, Mabilia, filiæ eorum…"[294].  An undated manuscript records that “Ranulphus de Glanville quondam justiciarius Angliæ et fundator domus de Buttele” was born “in villa de Stratford” and married “Bertam filiam domini Theobaldi de Valoniis senioris domini de Perham”, who granted “terram de Brochous...in libero maritagio[295]Ranulphus de Glanvilla” donated property to Butley priory, Suffolk, in the presence of “uxore mea”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Osberto de Glanvil...Gerardo de Glanvile...Herveo de Glanvile, Savari de Valeines[296]Herveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo de Albervilla, Willielmo de Valoniis, Roberto de Valoniis...Willelmo de Glanvilla clerico et filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[297]m RANULF de Glanville, son of HERVE [I] de Glanville & his wife --- (-1190). 

b)         [MATILDA .  No primary source has been identified which confirms that Matilda was the daughter of Theobald de Valoignes.  However, the following charter indicates close connections between the Walter, Valoignes and Glanville families which appear best explained if Matilda was the sister of Bertha, wife of Ranulf de Glanville.  “Herveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo de Albervilla, Willielmo de Valoniis, Roberto de Valoniis...Willelmo de Glanvilla clerico et filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[298].]  m HERVE Walter, son of ---.  Hervé & his wife had five children: 

i)          THEOBALD Walter (-[4 Aug 1205/14 Feb 1206]).  The Complete Peerage records Theobald Walter as “s. and h. of Hervey Walter of West Dereham, Norfolk...by Maud da. and coh. of Theobald de Valoignes” but does not cite the primary source on which this statement is based[299]Ranulfus de Glamvilla” founded Leiston abbey, Suffolk by undated charter, witnessed by “...Willielmo de Valeines, Radulfo Murdac...Teobaldo Walteri...Rogero Walteri...[300]

-        EARLS of ORMOND (WALTER/BUTLER)

ii)         HUBERT Walter (-13 Jul 1205).  Herveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[301].  Archbishop of Canterbury 1193.  Chancellor 1199. 

iii)        WALTER WalterHerveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[302]

iv)        ROGER WalterHerveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[303]Ranulfus de Glamvilla” founded Leiston abbey, Suffolk by undated charter, witnessed by “...Willielmo de Valeines, Radulfo Murdac...Teobaldo Walteri...Rogero Walteri...[304]

v)         HAMON WalterHerveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[305]

 

 

Assuming that the hypothesis is correct, as explained above, that Matilda wife of Hervé Walter was the daughter of Theobald de Valoignes, William and Robert de Valoignes who are shown below must have been closely connected with the same family given that they are named together in the same documents.  It is possible that they were the same persons as other individuals of the same names who are shown elsewhere in the present chapter. 

 

1.         WILLIAM de ValoignesHerveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo de Albervilla, Willielmo de Valoniis, Roberto de Valoniis...Willelmo de Glanvilla clerico et filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[306]Ranulfus de Glamvilla” founded Leiston abbey, Suffolk by undated charter, witnessed by “...Willielmo de Valeines, Radulfo Murdac...[307]

 

2.         ROBERT de Valoignes"Rodbto de Valein, Hervico de Glavil, Randulfo de Glavil filio ei, Rogero de Glav, Rodbto filii ei, Will de Glav…Hosbto de Glavil, Reginaldo de Glav…" witnessed the charter dated to [1150] under which "Bartoloms de Glavilla" confirmed the grants to Bactun/Bromholme monastery, Norfolk by "patris meis Willm de Glavill"[308].  “Herveus Walterus” donated “feodum meum in Wyngefeild...in Sikebroc...in Istede...” to Butley priory, Suffolk, for the souls of “meæ et Matildis sponsæ meæ et filiorum nostrorum...Ranulfi de Glanvil et Bertæ sponsæ et filiorum suorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo de Albervilla, Willielmo de Valoniis, Roberto de Valoniis...Willelmo de Glanvilla clerico et filiis meis Huberto, Waltero et Rogero et Hamone[309].  It is not known whether these two documents both refer to the same Robert de Valoignes. 

 

 

1.         RUALLON [Roland] de Valoignes (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Rualo de Valoines, iii milites et dimidium cum Godseldo" among those providing military service for William Earl of Gloucester in Kent[310]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Valoignesm ALICE de Cokefield, daughter of --- de Cokefield & his wife ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Willelmus Talesmasche et Alicia uxor eius" against "Widonem de Verdun et Aliciam uxorem eius" for a fee "in Hecham", the defendants claiming that "Robertus de Cokefeldia frater…Sabina […antecessor Willelmi et Alicia]" had granted the land "in maritagium Willelmo de Valeines cum Alicia sorore sua", that it passed to "Ade […filium Roberti filii Umfridi] filii predicte Sabine" who owed allegiance to them[311]

 

 

ROGER de Valoignes, son of PIERRE de Valoignes & his wife Alberade --- (-[1141/42]).  “Petrus de Valoniis et Albreda uxor mea” founded Binham in Norfolk, with the consent of “filiis meis Willielmo et Rogerio…nepotis mei Walteri”, by charter dated to [1102/18][312].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Binham priory by "Petrus de Valoniis…et Rogerius filius eius et…Robertus" by charter dated to [1121/29][313].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of land "in Walsingham" to Binham Priory by "Rogerius de Valoines" by charter dated to [1108/29][314].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rogo de Valon" in Hertfordshire[315].  Empress Matilda granted property to "Rogero de Valoniis" by undated charter[316].  The bishop of Norwich confirmed an agreement between "Willliam of Bacton and his uncle Roger de Valonges" concerning land at Bacton and a fee held from the church of Norwich by charter dated to [1121/35][317].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[318].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis, Ricardus de Chalua, Robertus dapifer, Adam filius Aluredi, Fulqui de Munpinchun...[319]

m AGNES, daughter of JOHN & his wife --- ([1125]-after 1185).  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[320].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[321].  “Agnes de Valoniis” notified “filio suo Petro...ceterisque filiis suis” of her donation of “terre mee de Westleye” made to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei R. et...mea et...fratris mei Pagani...filiorum filiarumque...meorum” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Rogerus de Valoniis et Johannes frater eius, Fulquius de Munpincun et Radulfus filius eius...[322].  “Robertus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus de Valoniis avus meus et Rogerus pater meus et Petrus de Valoniis frater meus et domina Agnes mater mea”, with the advice of "dominæ Agnetis matris meæ et Hadæwisæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[323].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Hortfurdburia et Hochwelle” held by “Agnes de Valeines…l annorum”, property “Hecham et Leic” held by “Agnes de Valuines…plusquam lx annorum”, and “Redefelde” held by “Agnes de Valuines…soror Pagani filii Johannis” adding that her heir is “filia eius et heres data est Durando de Ostili[324].  The Complete Peerage says that her age suggests that she may have been the daughter of a second marriage[325]

Roger & his wife had [eight or more] children:   

1.         PETER de Valoignes (-1158).  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis...[326].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[327].  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] naming "…Petrus de Valon`" among her supporters[328].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[329].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Peter married "Gundredam de Waranna" but died without heirs[330]m as her first husband, GUNDRED de Warenne, daughter of RAINALD de Warenne & his wife Alice de Wormgay (-before 6 Nov 1224).  “Gundreda de Warrenna” donated “juris...in ecclesia de Dersingham” to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei Petri de Valoniis...”, by undated charter[331].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gundrea quæ fuit uxor Petri de Valoniis" held one knight’s fee from "Roberti de Valoine" in Essex[332].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Peter married "Gundredam de Waranna" but died without heirs[333].  She married secondly William de Courcy, and thirdly Geoffroy Hose.  An order dated 6 Dec 1224 required the confiscation of "the vill of Newnham that Gundrea de Warenne held in dower, which is an inheritance partible between Joan wife of Hugh de Neville, and Margaret wife of Falkes de Bréauté", with savings for "the executors of the testament of the same Gundrea"[334]

2.         ROBERT de Valoignes (-1184).  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis...[335].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[336].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[337].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Roberti de Valoine" in Essex[338].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfridus de Valoniis ii m, Robertus de Valoniis xx l iv s v d" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1167/68][339].  “Robertus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus de Valoniis avus meus et Rogerus pater meus et Petrus de Valoniis frater meus et domina Agnes mater mea”, with the advice of "dominæ Agnetis matris meæ et Hadæwisæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[340].  “Robertus de Valoniis” donated “jus advocacionis ecclesie de Westeleya” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et Athenize uxoris mee et Gunore filie mee”, by undated charter[341].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Robert was father of "Gunora mater predicte Cristiane"[342]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  “Robertus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus de Valoniis avus meus et Rogerus pater meus et Petrus de Valoniis frater meus et domina Agnes mater mea”, with the advice of "dominæ Agnetis matris meæ et Hadæwisæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[343].  “Robertus de Valoniis” donated “jus advocacionis ecclesie de Westeleya” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et Athenize uxoris mee et Gunore filie mee”, by undated charter[344].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUNNOR de Valoignes (-after 1208).  “Robertus de Valoniis” donated “jus advocacionis ecclesie de Westeleya” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et Athenize uxoris mee et Gunore filie mee”, by undated charter[345].  “Durandus de Steill camerarius domini regis et Gunnora de Valoniis uxor eius” confirmed donations made to Binham priory by “Rogerus de Valoniis” by undated charter[346].  Her first marriage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records property “Hortfurdburia et Hochwelle” held by her paternal grandmother “Agnes de Valeines…l annorum”, property “Hecham et Leic” held by “Agnes de Valuines…plusquam lx annorum”, and “Redefelde” held by “Agnes de Valuines…soror Pagani filii Johannis” adding that her heir is “filia eius et heres data est Durando de Ostili[347].  Round suggests that "filia eius" in this passage is an error for "neptis eius", as Gunnor was the senior heiress of her grandmother as only daughter of the latter’s second surviving son, and pointing out that "Durandus de Osteilli" paid scutage in Essex/Hertfordshire of £15/3/4 in the Pipe Roll 1190, equivalent to the 30 and one third knights’ fees on which the barony of Valoignes paid had paid in 1166, and on which "Gunnore de Valoniis" paid in 1194[348].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "Gunnore de Valoniis" paid "xx s, i militem" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and also paid in Essex, Hertfordshire[349].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Gunnore de Valoniis" paying "xxx l, xxx milites" in Essex, Hertfordshire[350].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Robert was father of "Gunora mater predicte Cristiane"[351].  "Rob fil Walteri et Gunnor ux eius" paid a fine for the inheritance of "Gaufri de Valon avunculi ipsius Gunnor", dated 1208[352]m firstly (before 1185) DURAND de Ostill, son of --- (-[1191/94]).  m secondly (after 1194) as his first wife, ROBERT FitzWalter of Woodham Walter, Essex, son of WALTER FitzRobert & his first wife Matilda de Lucy (-9 Dec 1235, Dunmow Priory). 

3.         GEOFFROY de Valoignes (-before 1208).  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis...[353].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[354].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[355].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record knights’ fees held from "Galfridus de Valoniis" in Essex[356].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfridus de Valoniis ii m, Robertus de Valoniis xx l iv s v d" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1167/68][357].  "Rob fil Walteri et Gunnor ux eius" paid a fine for the inheritance of "Gaufri de Valonavunculi ipsius Gunnor", dated 1208[358].  "Philipp de Valon" paid a fine for "saisina de terra de Burton et aliis terris e fuerunt Gaufr de Valon fratris sui", excepting what was owed to "Emma quondam ux eiusdem Gaufr…in dote", dated 1208[359]m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1208).  "Philipp de Valon" paid a fine for "saisina de terra de Burton et aliis terris e fuerunt Gaufr de Valon fratris sui", excepting what was owed to "Emma quondam ux eiusdem Gaufr…in dote", dated 1208[360]

4.         JOHN de Valoignes .  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis...[361].  “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[362].  “Agnes de Valoniis” notified “filio suo Petro...ceterisque filiis suis” of her donation of “terre mee de Westleye” made to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei R. et...mea et...fratris mei Pagani...filiorum filiarumque...meorum” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Rogerus de Valoniis et Johannes frater eius, Fulquius de Munpincun et Radulfus filius eius...[363].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[364]

5.         ROGER de Valoignes .  “Rogerus de Valoniis” donated “ecclesiam de Dersingham...et medietatem ecclesie Sancti Petri de Magna Walsingham” to Binham priory, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Agnetis”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes et Rogerus filii mei et Robertus de Chalua, Walterus de Valoniis...[365].  King Stephen confirmed the donation of land at Barney, Norfolk to Binham Priory by "Walt[erus] de Valoniis…concessu Rogeri de Valon[iis]" by charter dated to [1145/50][366].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[367].  “Agnes de Valoniis” notified “filio suo Petro...ceterisque filiis suis” of her donation of “terre mee de Westleye” made to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei R. et...mea et...fratris mei Pagani...filiorum filiarumque...meorum” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Rogerus de Valoniis et Johannes frater eius, Fulquius de Munpincun et Radulfus filius eius...[368].  "…Philippo de Valoniis, Rogero de Valoniis…" witnessed the undated charter under which William King of Scotland confirmed the freedoms of the priory of the Isle of May[369]

6.         PHILIP de Valoignes (-5 Nov 1215, bur Melrose Abbey).  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Philip went to Scotland and was there father of "Willelmum de Valoynes qui fuit heres suus et de quo exierunt uxores predictorum Henrici et aliorum"[370].  “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[371].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Philippus de Valoniis" paying "xx s, ii milites" in Essex, Hertfordshire[372].  "…Philippo de Valoniis, Rogero de Valoniis…" witnessed the undated charter under which William King of Scotland confirmed the freedoms of the priory of the Isle of May[373].  Chamberlain of Scotland[374].  "…Philippo de Valuniis…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey[375].  "…Philippo de Valoniis camerario…" subscribed the charter dated 1 Jul (no year) under which William King of Scotland donated "totam terram de Strathylaf" to Kinloss[376].  "…David Olifard, Philippo de Valoniis camerario, Ricardo Cumyn" witnessed the undated charter under which William King of Scotland granted "unum plenarium tofftum" to Scone Abbey over its territories[377].  "Philipp de Valon" paid a fine for "saisina de terra de Burton et aliis terris e fuerunt Gaufr de Valon fratris sui", excepting what was owed to "Emma quondam ux eiusdem Gaufr…in dote", dated 1208[378]m [firstly] ---.  The name of Philip’s first wife is not known.  [m secondly ---.  This second marriage is indicated by the chronology of the life of his daughter Sibylla, which suggests that she was much younger than her brother William.  One possibility is that this second wife was --- de Quincy, daughter of Saher de Quincy Earl of Winchester & his wife Margaret of Leicester.  This is suggested by the order dated 3 Feb 1223 under which King Henry III delivered "to Roger de Quency...the ward of the land of Sibilla de Valeines in Torpenno...the custody of which pertains to Roger by reason of Eustace de Stuteville, son and heir of said Sibilla, being in ward of Roger[379].  Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester was the brother of the wife of William de Valoignes, older brother of Sibylla.  However, that relationship would not have justified his wardship of Sibylla’s minor son after she died.  Many examples have been noted of a father marrying, as his second wife, the sister of the wife of his son and this may be another such case.]  Philip & his [first] wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Valoignes of Panmure, co. Forfar (-Kelso 1219, before 21 Jun, bur Melrose Abbey).  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Philip went to Scotland and was there father of "Willelmum de Valoynes qui fuit heres suus et de quo exierunt uxores predictorum Henrici et aliorum"[380].  "…Roll constabul, Philipp de Mubray, Willmo de Valloñ, Henr Biset, Thomas de Colville, Adam fil Herb, Ferg fratre Roll, Alexander de Finton" witnessed the charter dated 22 Sep (no year, but dated to after 1196) under which William King of Scotland confirmed the donation of "in territorio de Cliftun" to Melrose abbey made by "Walterus Corbet filius Walteri"[381].  Chamberlain of Scotland.  John of Fordun’s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death in 1219 of "Willelmus de Valoniis" and his burial "apud Melros in capitulo"[382]m LORETA de Quincy, daughter of SAHER de Quincy Earl of Winchester & his wife Margaret of Leicester.  The Complete Peerage names “Lorette m William de Valoynes of Panmure, co. Forfar, chamberlain of Scotland” as sister of Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester but does not cite the corresponding source[383].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   William & his wife had four children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Valoignes .  "Ysabella de Valloñ dña de Killebrid" donated "terre de Dalkarn" to the church of Glasgow, for the souls of "dñi DD Comyn mariti mei iam defuncti", by undated charter witnessed by "dño W. de Valloniis fratre meo, W. de Mortuo Mari decano…"[384]

ii)         LORETA de Valoignes (-after 25 May 1233).  "Henry de Balliol and Lora his wife, David Cumin and Isabel his wife, and Piers de Maudue and Christine his wife, had livery of the lands which Christine, late the wife of W. Earl of Maundeville had held from the king in chief" dated 25 May 1233[385]m (before 1233) HENRY de Balliol, son of [INGELRAN de Balliol & his wife ---] (-after 12 Feb 1246). 

iii)        ISABEL de Valoignes  (-before 17 Apr 1253).  "Henry de Balliol and Lora his wife, David Cumin and Isabel his wife, and Piers de Maudue and Christine his wife, had livery of the lands which Christine, late the wife of W. Earl of Maundeville had held from the king in chief" dated 25 May 1233[386].  "Ysabella de Valloñ dña de Killebrid" donated "terre de Dalkarn" to the church of Glasgow, for the souls of "dñi DD Comyn mariti mei iam defuncti", by undated charter witnessed by "dño W. de Valloniis fratre meo, W. de Mortuo Mari decano…"[387].  A writ dated 17 Apr "37 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel de Valoynes alias de Valoiniis" names "William Comin alias de Valoynes her son age variously stated as 16 and 17 is her heir"[388]m DAVID Comyn, son of WILLIAM Comyn Earl of Buchan & his first wife Sarah FitzHugh (-[1244/7 Aug 1247]). 

iv)        CHRISTINE de Valoignes (-after 1254).  "Henry de Balliol and Lora his wife, David Cumin and Isabel his wife, and Piers de Maudue and Christine his wife, had livery of the lands which Christine, late the wife of W. Earl of Maundeville had held from the king in chief" dated 25 May 1233[389].  “Alex. de Baliolo filius Henri de Balliol” confirmed the donation made by “domine Cristiane de Maunlea amite mee” of land “in villa de Dersingham in comitatu Northf[olcie]”, which he had inherited “post mortem domine Lore matris mee et Gydonis fratris mei”, to Binham Priory by charter dated 6 Apr 1272, witnessed by “...dno Henrico de Balliol...[390]m PETER de Maule, son of [RICHARD de Maule & his wife ---] (-after 1254). 

Philip & his [second] wife had [three] children: 

b)         SIBYLLA de Valoignes (-[22 Jun 1213/2 Feb 1223])Philippus de Valoniis” granted “villam de Torpenhon in maritagium” to “Roberto de Stutevill et Sibille filie mee” by undated charter[391].  "Sibilla de Valoinn" claimed from “Nicolas de Stuteville” her “terce of the honour of Lidel in Cumberland and of the whole honour of Russedale [and other named properties]...as the dower wherein her late husband Robert endowed her by grant and will of the said Nicholas his father”, dated 22 Jun 1213[392].  Her date of death is indicated by an order dated 3 Feb 1223 under which King Henry III delivered "to Roger de Quency...the ward of the land of Sibilla de Valeines in Torpenno...the custody of which pertains to Roger by reason of Eustace de Stuteville, son and heir of said Sibilla, being in ward of Roger[393]m ROBERT de Stuteville, son of NICHOLAS [I] de Stuteville & his [first] wife Ida --- ([1168/72?]-[1212/22 Jun 1213], bur Meaux). 

c)         [--- .  m ---.]  [One child]: 

i)          [ROBERT de Valoignes (-before 1280).  A charter dated  to [20 Jan/Feb] in 1280 records King Edward I’s permission for "Christiana de Maune and Alexander de Balliol, the heirs of Robert de Valoignes" to pay a debt at a reduced amount[394].  The parentage of Robert de Valoignes has not yet been identified.  As his two heirs were the son of Henry de Balliol, husband of the daughter of William de Valoignes, and (probably) the daughter of Henry’s sister-in-law Christine (see above), it is likely that Robert was closely related, maybe their first cousin.] 

d)         [--- .  This possible son of Philip de Valoignes may have been the same person as his unnamed son by his second wife who is shown above.  m ---.  [One child]: 

i)          [JOHN de Valoignes (-after 16 Feb 1246).  "Henr de Balliol cam, Johe de Vall, Nichol de Sulis" witnessed the charter dated 16 Feb 1246 under which Alexander II King of Scotland recorded a dispute regarding "terram de Dunroden quam tenet in Galuuath de dono Fergi" and Holyrood abbey[395].  His precise parentage has not yet been ascertained.   The involvement of Henry de Balliol suggests that John de Valoignes was closely related to William de Valoignes, Henry’s father-in-law (see above).] 

7.         daughters .  “Agnes de Valoniis” notified “filio suo Petro...ceterisque filiis suis” of her donation of “terre mee de Westleye” made to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei R. et...mea et...fratris mei Pagani...filiorum filiarumque...meorum” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Rogerus de Valoniis et Johannes frater eius, Fulquius de Munpincun et Radulfus filius eius...[396]

 

 

1.         SAVARY de Valoignes .  “Ranulphus de Glanvilla” donated property to Butley priory, Suffolk, in the presence of “uxore mea”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Osberto de Glanvil...Gerardo de Glanvile...Herveo de Glanvile, Savari de Valeines[397]

 

2.         PETER de Valoignes (-after [1172]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Petrus de Valoines" with one knight "in baillia Osberti de Hosa"[398]

 

3.         AILWIN de Valoignes .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ailwinus de Valoignis" in Devonshire[399]

 

4.         ALAN de Valoignes (-after 1190).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "honor Piperelli de Londonia" paying "li milites et vi pars…in diversis comitatibus", of which "in perdonis…Alano de Valoniis, xx s", in Essex, Hertfordshire[400]m as her first husband, HELEN, daughter of --- (-after 14 Jul 1204).  She married secondly (1194) Hugh de Hastings.  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Hugo de Hastinges" owing in Yorkshire "pro habenda uxore que fuit Alani de Valeines"[401].  "Willelmus de Cantilupo" paid a fine for "pro Rogero de Cantilupo fratre nostro pro ux q fuit Hug de Hasting" and custody of her "iv filios et I filia…primogenit x ann", dated 1202[402].  King John granted "custodia…terre et heredum Hugonis de Hasting…et maritagium Helene que fuit uxor ipsius Hugonis" to "Johannis Norwic episcopo" by charter dated 14 Jul 1204[403].  Alan & his wife had [one or more children]:

a)         child[ren] .  "Willelmus de Cantilupo" paid a fine for "pro Rogero de Cantilupo fratre nostro pro ux q fuit Hug de Hasting" and custody of her "iv filios et I filia…primogenit x ann", dated 1202[404].  The date of this document, and the date of their mother’s second marriage to Hugh de Hastings in 1194, shows that one or more of these children must have been born from their mother’s first marriage. 

 

5.         HENRY de Valoignes (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Henricus de Valoniis" paying "xl s, ii milites" in Essex, Herefordshire[405].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Henricus de Valoniis" paying "lx s, iii milites" in Essex, Hertfordshire[406]

 

6.         WILLIAM de Valoignes .  “Willielmus de Valeines” donated “ecclesiam de Culfou” to Leiston by undated charter[407]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children:

a)         MATILDA de Valoines .  The Complete Peerage states that "William de Verdon and his wife Maud, sister of Isabel, wife of Osbert de Wachesham" are named in a lawsuit concerning land at Cransford, Suffolk, dated 1205/06, but does not cite the primary source[408].  “Willielmus de Verdune” confirmed the donation of “ecclesiæ S. Botulfi de Culfo” to Leiston, on the request of “Matildis uxoris meæ”, as donated by “Willielmus de Valeines pater predictæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, sealed by “sigillo Wydonis patris mei[409]m WILLIAM de Verdun, son of GUY de Verdun & his wife Alice --- (-after 1210). 

b)         ISABEL de Valoignes .  The Complete Peerage states that "William de Verdon and his wife Maud, sister of Isabel, wife of Osbert de Wachesham" are named in a lawsuit concerning land at Cransford, Suffolk, dated 1205/06, but does not cite the primary source[410]m OSBERT de Wachesham, son of ---. 

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         ALAN de Valoignes (-before 29 Sep 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alanus de Valeines" holding "ii milites" in the honor of Wallingford in [1201/02][411].  The Pipe Roll 1210 records that "Robertus de Valeines" paid in respect of land "que fuit Alani fratris sui in Sobindon cuius heres ipse erat" before Michaelmas 1210[412].  

2.         ROBERT de Valoignes (-after [1210/12]).  The Pipe Roll 1210 records that "Robertus de Valeines" paid in respect of land "que fuit Alani fratris sui in Sobindon [Shabbington, Buckinghamshire] cuius heres ipse erat" before Michaelmas 1210[413].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Valeines, Walterus de Valeines…Johannes de Valeines" holding one knight’s fee "in Ewerlande", one quarter "in Sturremue", and one "in Swertlinges", respectively, in Kent in [1210/12], and "Robertus de Valeines" holding one half "in Bonchesham"[414]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [THOMAS de Valoignes .  The Testa de Nevill records "Thoma de Valoines" holding "ii.m de duobus feodis in Sobinton" in 1235/36][415].  The reference to Shabbington, Buckinghamshire suggests that Thomas was the heir of Robert de Valoignes, maybe his son.]  m ---.  The name of Thomas’s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOAN de Valoignes (-before 6 Sep 1312).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Sep "6 Edw II", after the death of "Joan de Grey ", name “the heir of John de Grey of Retherfeld who is under age...Robert de Grey sometime her husband” and “John, son of John de Grey aged 11 and in the king’s wardship is next heir of Robert and Joan”, and records “Schobyngton [Buckinghamshire] [which] descended to the said Joan after the death of Thomas de Valoignes her father[416]m (before 1273) ROBERT de Grey of Rotherfield, son of WALTER de Grey of Rotherfield & his wife Isabel de Duston (-before 27 May 1295). 

 

 

1.         WALTER de Valoignes (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Valeines, Walterus de Valeines…Johannes de Valeines" holding one knight’s fee "in Ewerlande", one quarter "in Sturremue", and one "in Swertlinges", respectively, in Kent in [1210/12][417]

 

2.         JOHN de Valoignes (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Valeines, Walterus de Valeines…Johannes de Valeines" holding one knight’s fee "in Ewerlande", one quarter "in Sturremue", and one "in Swertlinges", respectively, in Kent in [1210/12][418]

 

3.         PHILIP de Valoignes .  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Stutevill" held "villam de Thorpennoi de domino rege" in Cumberland which was "de baronia Alicie de Rumill" and that "Reginaldus de Lucy" had held the land "cum sorore predicte Alicie" and refused homage to "Philippi de Valoines, antecessoris predicti Roberti et uxoris sue"[419].  same person as…?  P--- de Valoignes (-after 1222)m (1222, Papal dispensation) as her second husband, ---, widow of WALTER de Lindsay, daughter of ---.  The Chronicle of Melrose records that in 1222 "P. de Valoniis, with the consent of…the king" married "the widow of Walter de Lindsay, but against her own will, because they were connected in the third or fourth degree of relationship or affinity" after which "P" obtained a dispensation from the Pope in Rome[420]

 

 

Three siblings: 

1.         THEOBALD de Valoignes (-after 28 Jan 1205).  King John confirmed that “Theobaldus de Valeines” founded Hickling priory, Norfolk as well as the donation of "terra sua de Ernestund" made by "Will. de Muntchanesy" by charter dated 26 Jan 1204[421].  King John confirmed the donation of "terra sua de Campesse" made by "Teobaud de Valeines [et] Johanne et Agnetis sororibus suis" to found a monastery there by charter dated 28 Jan 1205[422].  “Theobaldus de Valoines et Avicia uxor eius” donated "ecclesiam...de Dittona" to Hickling by undated charter[423]m AVICE, daughter of ---.  “Theobaldus de Valoines et Avicia uxor eius” donated "ecclesiam...de Dittona" to Hickling by undated charter[424].  Theobald & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS de Valoignes (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas filius Theobaldi de Waleines" holding seven knights’ fees "de honore Britanniæ" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][425].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Valoniis" holding "iii milites in Wodintone" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][426]

2.         JOAN de Valoignes (-after 28 Jan 1205).  King John confirmed the donation of "terra sua de Campesse" made by "Teobaud de Valeines [et] Johanne et Agnetis sororibus suis" to found a monastery there by charter dated 28 Jan 1205[427]

3.         AGNES de Valoignes (-after 28 Jan 1205).  King John confirmed the donation of "terra sua de Campesse" made by "Teobaud de Valeines [et] Johanne et Agnetis sororibus suis" to found a monastery there by charter dated 28 Jan 1205[428]

 

 

1.         AMICE de Valoignes (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hunfridus de Barenton" holding two knights’ fees "in Seringes cum Amicia uxore sua, de honore de Valoniis" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][429]m HUMPHREY de Barenton, son of --- (-after 1210). 

 

 

1.         SIBYLLA de Valoignes (-after 1212, bur Nun Appleton Priory)Her first and second marriages are confirmed by the 1165/66 Pipe Roll which records "Wills de Pci" accounting for ".cccc. m. p uxore Robti de Ross hnda" in Yorkshire[430]Evidently William de Percy failed to pay the full amount at the time, as the 1169/70 Pipe Roll records "Wills de Pci" paying "L. m. p uxore Robti de Ross habenda" in Yorkshire[431].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated Topcliffe church to York Cathedral, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Sybillæ…filiorum quoque et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Sybilla de Valloniis…[432].  It is assumed that the first witness was the donor’s wife but this is not specified in the document.  Her third marriage is confirmed by the 1181/82 Pipe Roll which records "Radulfus de Alben" accounting for ".cc. m pro ducenda matre Ebrardi de Ros" in Yorkshire[433].  A charter dated 4 Feb 1196 records a claim by “Sibillam de Vall et Agnetem de Percy” against the church of Beverley relating to “advocacione ecclesie de Lekenfeld[434]m firstly [as his second wife,] ROBERT de Ros, son of PIERS de Ros & his wife Adeline Espec of Helmsley, Northumberland (-[1162/63]).  m secondly ([1165/66]) as his second wife, WILLIAM de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire, son of ALAN de Percy & his wife Emma de Gant (-[1174/75]).  m thirdly ([1181/82]) RALPH de Albini Brito, son of WILLIAM de Albini Brito & his wife Cecily Bigod (-Acre 1191). 

 

2.         ALICE de Valoignes .  "Cristina filia Walteri Corbet" donated a serf to St Andrew’s priory, with the consent of "Willi filii comitis Patricii mariti mei et Aliiz de Valoniis matris mee", to St Andrew’s priory, for the souls of "Walteri Corbet patris mei et Aliz de Valoniis matris mee et W. filii comitis Patricii mariti mei", by undated charter[435]m WALTER Corbet, son of WALTER Corbet & his wife Asa de Umfraville. 

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         HAMON de Valoignes (-after 1194).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "de firma de Walton Hamonis de Valoignis de dimidio anno" in Gloucestershire[436].  Empress Matilda granted property to "Rogero de Valoniis" by undated charter[437]m firstly ---.  m secondly (divorced) AGNES de Somery, daughter of ROGER [III] de Somery & his wife ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Hamoni de Valoniis" against "Jeruasius de Aldermannebiria", the latter stating that "Rogerus de Sumery" gave "terram de Cristehale…in maritagium Hamoni patri istius Hamonis cum Agnete filia sua", that the couple were later divorced and the maritagium returned, while the claimant replied that Agnes lived for thirty years after her divorce and requested nothing from his father or from "Thoma fratre suo qui per v annos fuit in seisina tocius hereditatis patris sui"[438].  Hamon & his first wife had two children: 

a)         THOMAS de Valoignes .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Hamoni de Valoniis" against "Jeruasius de Aldermannebiria athachiatus", the latter stating that "Rogerus de Sumery" gave "terram de Cristehale…in maritagium Hamoni patri istius Hamonis cum Agnete filia sua", that the couple were later divorced and the maritagium returned, while the claimant replied that Agnes lived for thirty years after her divorce and requested nothing from his father or from "Thoma fratre suo qui per v annos fuit in seisina tocius hereditatis patris sui"[439]

b)         HAMON de Valoignes (-before 17 Dec 1243).  "Hamo fil Hamonis de Valon" made a fine for "terris que fuerunt ipsius Hamonis patris suis in Hibernia cum castro de Hinckesty", dated 5 Jul [1215][440].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Petrus Hamo f Hamonis de Valeines” owing in Kent[441].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Hamoni de Valoniis" against "Jeruasius de Aldermannebiria athachiatus", the latter stating that "Rogerus de Sumery" gave "terram de Cristehale…in maritagium Hamoni patri istius Hamonis cum Agnete filia sua", that the couple were later divorced and the maritagium returned, while the claimant replied that Agnes lived for thirty years after her divorce and requested nothing from his father or from "Thoma fratre suo qui per v annos fuit in seisina tocius hereditatis patris sui"[442].  A charter dated 17 Dec 1243 mandated to "W[illiam] de Cantilupe seisin of all the lands which belonged to Hamo de Valoignes in Ireland…with the marriage of Hamo’s heirs"[443]m --- de Burgh, daughter of RICHARD de Burgh Lord of Connaught & his wife Egidia de Lacy.  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by a charter dated 20 Sep 1242 which records that "Richard de Burgh has intimated to the king that John de Marisco, who married Mabel Richard’s granddaughter, having been taken prisoner and disseised of his land by the king’s order"[444].  Hamo & his wife had [two or more] children: 

i)          MABEL de Valoignes (-after 20 Sep 1242).  A charter dated 20 Sep 1242 records that "Richard de Burgh has intimated to the king that John de Marisco, who married Mabel Richard’s granddaughter, having been taken prisoner and disseised of his land by the king’s order", and that "Mabel was likewise disseised of the vill of Brunry her marriage portion and betook herself with her children to a house belonging to Richard and is living at his expense"[445]m JOHN du Marais [Marsh], son of ---. 

2.         --- de Valoignesm ---.  Two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Valoignes .  "Willelmus et Roylant de Valon" paid a fine for "heritenda medietate de Litlington quem Ham de Valon avunculus eorum eis dedit" in Canterbury, dated 1202[446]

b)         ROLAND de Valoignes .  "Willelmus et Roylant de Valon" paid a fine for "heritenda medietate de Litlington quem Ham de Valon avunculus eorum eis dedit" in Canterbury, dated 1202[447]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Valoignes .  "William Juvenal" paid a fine for a record of "a plea that was between him and Walter de Valoignes and Mary, his wife, concerning land in Churchford" in Suffolk, dated [Nov] 1223[448]m MARY, daughter of ---.  "William Juvenal" paid a fine for a record of "a plea that was between him and Walter de Valoignes and Mary, his wife, concerning land in Churchford" in Suffolk, dated [Nov] 1223[449]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Valoignesm MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after 1284).  "Willelmus de Valoniis filius et heres dñi Willmi de Valoniis" donated "ecclesie Sciandr…de Markinch" to St Andrew’s priory, for the soul of "dñi Malcolmi comitie quondam de Fyfe", by charter dated 1284, witnessed by "Margareta matre mea, Maria sorore mea…"[450].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Valoignes (-after 1284).  "Willelmus de Valoniis filius et heres dñi Willmi de Valoniis" donated "ecclesie Sciandr…de Markinch" to St Andrew’s priory, for the soul of "dñi Malcolmi comitie quondam de Fyfe", by charter dated 1284, witnessed by "Margareta matre mea, Maria sorore mea…"[451]

b)         MARY de Valoignes (-after 1284).  "Willelmus de Valoniis filius et heres dñi Willmi de Valoniis" donated "ecclesie Sciandr…de Markinch" to St Andrew’s priory, for the soul of "dñi Malcolmi comitie quondam de Fyfe", by charter dated 1284, witnessed by "Margareta matre mea, Maria sorore mea…"[452]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Valoignes (-after 6 Aug 1282).  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Valoignes (-before 6 Aug 1282).  A writ dated 6 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert son of Robert de Valoignes alias de Waleyns, de Valonyes, de Waloynis, de Waloniis, de Valoynes", named "his daughters Roysea aged 2 at the feast of All Saints 10 Edw I and Cecily aged 1 about the same feast are his next heirs” and specifies the dower of “Eva late his wife...the king’s cousin[453]m EVA, daughter of ---.  A writ dated 6 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert son of Robert de Valoignes alias de Waleyns, de Valonyes, de Waloynis, de Waloniis, de Valoynes", named "his daughters Roysea aged 2 at the feast of All Saints 10 Edw I and Cecily aged 1 about the same feast are his next heirs” and specifies the dower of “Eva late his wife...the king’s cousin[454].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROHESE de Valoignes ([1279/80]-).  A writ dated 6 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert son of Robert de Valoignes alias de Waleyns, de Valonyes, de Waloynis, de Waloniis, de Valoynes", named "his daughters Roysea aged 2 at the feast of All Saints 10 Edw I and Cecily aged 1 about the same feast are his next heirs” and specifies the dower of “Eva late his wife...the king’s cousin[455]

ii)         CECILY de Valoignes ([1280/81]-16 Jul 1325).  A writ dated 6 Aug "10 Edw I", after the death of "Robert son of Robert de Valoignes alias de Waleyns, de Valonyes, de Waloynis, de Waloniis, de Valoynes", named "his daughters Roysea aged 2 at the feast of All Saints 10 Edw I and Cecily aged 1 about the same feast are his next heirs” and specifies the dower of “Eva late his wife...the king’s cousin[456]m (before 1298) ROBERT de Ufford, son of ROBERT de Ufford & his first wife Mary --- (11 Jun 1279-9 Sep 1316 or before).  He was summoned to Parliament 4 Mar 1309, whereby he is held to have become Lord Ufford. 

 

 

 

VAUTORT

 

 

The family connections between the earliest generations of the Vautort family have not been ascertained.  Reginald [I] may have been the first ancestor in England, while it is a fair assumption that Reginald [II] and Roger [I] were father and son, or maybe brothers. 

 

1.         REGINALD [I] de Vautort (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records that “Reginald” held “Modbury” from Robert Comte de Mortain, along with numerous other holdings in Devonshire[457].  Oliver records that this person was “Reginald de Valletort[458], although his family name is not shown in the Domesday Book translation which has been consulted. 

 

2.         REGINALD [II] de Vautort (-after [15 Apr 1123]).  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “in Kinge Henry I tyme, Reginald de Valletort” held Hurberton, “whom successively followed, Roger, anno 8 of Kinge Henry I…” (no sources cited)[459].  "…Renaud de Valletorta…" witnessed the charter dated to [1103/04] under which King Henry I confirmed the donation of Winghall Priory to Marmoutier[460].  "…Goislinus de Pomereda, Rainald de Valle Torta…" witnessed the charter dated to [1123, Apr 15?] under which King Henry I confirmed the restoration of various churches to Exeter Cathedral[461].  A much later charter records the foundation of Plympton Priory, quoting the undated charter of King Henry I witnessed by "…Goselinus de Pomereda…Raynaldus de Valletorta…"[462]

 

3.         ROGER [I] de Vautort (-after [1129/30]).  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “in Kinge Henry I tyme, Reginald de Valletort” held Hurberton, “whom successively followed, Roger, anno 8 of Kinge Henry I…” (no sources cited)[463].  “Roger de Valletort” donated a tithe “and his demesnes in the counties of Devon and Cornwall” to the monks at Modbury, by undated charter (“Fragment of seal (early 12th century) bearing a griffin”)[464].  The 1129/30 Pipe Roll records "Nova placita et Nove Conventiones…in Perdonis per breve Regis. Rogero de Valletorta. xl. s…" in Cornwall[465], which suggests that he had recently succeeded to the family properties (”Nova placita…”). 

 

 

Two brothers, parents not identified, although the chronology suggests that they could have been the sons of Roger [I] who is shown above: 

1.         REGINALD [III] de Vautort (-after [1160/61]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1160/61, records "Reginaldus de Valle Torta, iim – j militem" in Devonshire[466].  The undated donation of his son Roger [II], cited below, confirms that Reginald had earlier made donations to Modbury.  m ---.  The name of Reginald’s wife is not known.  Reginald [III] & his wife had one child:

a)         ROGER [II] de Vautort (-after [1160/62]).  The 1160/61 Pipe Roll records “Nova Placita et Nove Convent…Roge de Valtort…de ..II. m…” in Devonshire[467].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records inqusitions, dated to 1160/62, in Devon which name “Rogerus de Valle Torta, ijm.  In viij, jm[468].  “Roger de Valletort” donated “the church of St. Stephen of Chircheton, near his castle of Trematon” to the monks at Modbury and “the Abbey of St. Mary at St. Pierre sur Dive”, for the souls of “his father Reginald, and of his own soul and that of his wife Emma”, and also confirming the “grants made to them by his paternal uncle Ralph, and his father Reginald”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Humphrey de Sacville (Unfredo de SiccaVilla), Robert, Dean of St. Just (de Jozte), Hugh, Dean of Maker (de Maceriis), and seven others named”; confirmed by charter dated to [1185/90] by John Bishop of Exeter, which records the donation made by “Roger de Valletort and Ralph his son…by consent of Roger son of the said Ralph”, witnessed by “Robert, Abbot of Ford, and six others named[469]

-        see below

2.         RALPH [I] de Vautort .  He is named as paternal uncle of Roger de Vautort in the latter’s undated donation to Modbury cited above, which also confirms that Ralph had earlier made donations to Modbury. 

 

 

ROGER [II] de Vautort, son of REGINALD [III] de Vautort & his wife --- (-after [1160/62]).  The 1160/61 Pipe Roll records “Nova Placita et Nove Convent…Roge de Valtort…de ..II. m…” in Devonshire[470].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records inqusitions, dated to 1160/62, in Devon which name “Rogerus de Valle Torta, ijm.  In viij, jm[471].  “Roger de Valletort” donated “the church of St. Stephen of Chircheton, near his castle of Trematon” to the monks at Modbury and “the Abbey of St. Mary at St. Pierre sur Dive [in Normandy]”, for the souls of “his father Reginald, and of his own soul and that of his wife Emma”, and also confirming the “grants made to them by his paternal uncle Ralph, and his father Reginald”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Humphrey de Sacville (Unfredo de SiccaVilla), Robert, Dean of St. Just (de Jozte), Hugh, Dean of Maker (de Maceriis), and seven others named”; confirmed by charter dated to [1185/90] by John Bishop of Exeter, which records the donation made by “Roger de Valletort and Ralph his son…by consent of Roger son of the said Ralph”, witnessed by “Robert, Abbot of Ford, and six others named[472]

m EMMA, daughter of ---.  She is named in her husband’s donation to Modbury cited above. 

Roger [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         RALPH [II] de Vautort ([1130/35?]-[1171]).  His birth date is estimated from the estimated birth dates of his sons shown below.  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records “Nova Placita et Nove Convent…Rad de Waltorp [corrected to Valtort in footnote]…de ..I. m…” in Devonshire[473], which suggests that he had recently succeeded to the family properties (”Nova placita…”).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Carta Radulfi de Valtort…quod tenet de Rege in capite…feodum j militis" in Devonshire, and in Cornwall “Carta Comitis Reginaldi…Radulfus de Vaultort tenet feodum de lix militibus tam in Devonia quam in Cornubia[474].  The 1167/68 Pipe Roll records “De Auxil’ Matild’ filie R…Rad de Valtort…de ..I. m. de eod auxil…” in Devonshire[475].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1167/8, records "Radulfus de Valle Torta, j m" in Devonshire, and in 1171/72 “Radulfus de Valle Torta, xxs”[476]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “Raph de Valletort, 14 of Kinge Henry 2” married “Jone, daughter of Reginald Erle of Cornwall” (no sources cited)[477].  This indication has not been verified and no other reference has been found to Earl Reginald having a daughter named Joanna.  Ralph [II] & his wife had [two or more] children: 

a)         RALPH [III] de Vautort ([1155/59?]-[before [1186/87?]).  The 1171/72 to 1173/74 Pipe Roll entries cited below indicate that Ralph [II] was a minor when his father died, under the guardianship of his paternal uncle Joel [I].  The 1171/72 Pipe Roll records “Nova Plac’ et Nove Conuent…Rad de Valtort…de Scut…Iohel de Waltort…p Custod Nepot suos c terra Rad de Waltort” in Devonshire[478].  The 1172/73 Pipe Roll records “De Scutag’ Milit q nec abier’t in Hyb…Iohel de Valtort…de .x. m. p custod Nepotum suo[rum] c terra Rad de Valtort” in Devonshire (similar entry in the 1173/74 Pipe Roll)[479].  The following entry suggests that Ralph [II] reached the age of majority at that time: the 1176/77 Pipe Roll records “Nova placita et nove conventiones per justicias ad Scaccarium…Et de dimidia marca de misericordia Reginaldi de Valtort” in Devonshire[480].  The 1186/87 Pipe Roll records “Nova Plac’ et nove conuentiones. De oblatis Curie…Idem vicecomes [=vicecomes de Cornualia, unnamed]…de firma de Clist que fuit Reginaldi de Valtort de dimisio anno…” in Devonshire (similar entry in 1189/90 Pipe Roll)[481].  The absence of Ralph [II]’s name in these last entries suggests that he may have been deceased at the time.  This suggestion appears corroborated by Roger [III] being named in the same Pipe Roll (see below). 

b)         [one or more] other son(s) .  His/their existence is confirmed by the 1172/73 Pipe Roll entry cited below under Joel [I] de Vautort (“…Nepotum suo[rum]…”). 

c)         ROGER [III] de Vautort ([1165/68?]-[1211/12]).  The chronology suggests that Roger [III] was one of the unnamed other sons referred to in the 1172/73 Pipe Roll entry cited above.  If that is correct, he was then under the guardianship of his paternal uncle Joel [I] de Vautort.  William Pole (early 1600s?) names “Roger & Joell, of Tawton” as the sons of “Raph de Valletort, 14 of King Henry 2…” (no sources cited)[482].  The following entry suggests that he reached the age of majority at that time: the 1186/87 Pipe Roll records “Nova Placita et nove conuentiones. De oblatis Curie…Rogerus de Valtort…de .c. m. de fine pro honore de Trementon…” in Cornwall[483]

-        see below

2.         JOEL [I] de Vautort ([1135/40?]-after [1194/95]).  William Pole (early 1600s?) names “Roger & Joell, of Tawton” as the sons of “Raph de Valletort, 14 of King Henry 2…” (no sources cited)[484], which in the case of Joel is proved incorrect by the 1171/72 Pipe Roll entry cited below.  Joel [I]’s birth date is estimated on the assumption that he was a few years younger than his brother Ralph [I], but [1135/40?] is only a guess.  The 1171/72 Pipe Roll records “Nova Plac’ et Nove Conuent…Rad de Valtort…de Scut…Iohel de Waltort…p Custod Nepot suos c terra Rad de Waltort” in Devonshire[485].  The 1172/73 Pipe Roll records “De Scutag’ Milit q nec abier’t in Hyb…Iohel de Valtort…de .x. m. p custod Nepotum suo[rum] c terra Rad de Valtort” in Devonshire (similar entry in the 1173/74 Pipe Roll)[486].  The 1186/87 Pipe Roll records “Nova Plac’ et nove conuentiones. De oblatis Curie…Ricardus Boschet…pro recto de .vii. m versus Juhel de Valletorta…” in Devonshire[487].  The 1189/90 Pipe Roll records “De Oblatis Curie…Robertus Foliot…de quarta parte feod .I. mil in But’lea et in Wasford. et in Dunsidioch et in Cadebia versus Johel de Valletorta…” in Devonshire (similar entry in 1194/95 Pipe Roll)[488]m ---.  The name of Joel’s wife is not known.  Joel [I] & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [REGINALD [IV] de Vautort ([1160?]-[1201/02?]).  The 1195/96 [8 Ric I] Pipe Roll records “De Snc’do Scut’…Rog’s de Valtort…de ij m de scut’…Nova Oblata…Regin’ de Valtort de xxm” in Devon[489].  The 1201/02 [4 John] Pipe Roll records “Nova Oblata…Regin’ de Valtort deb’ xxm” in Devon[490].  These entries follow the last entry for Joel [I], suggesting that Reginald [III] was his successor and maybe his son.  They do not mention his being a minor, which suggests his birth “before 1173?”, maybe several years earlier.]  m ---.  The name of Reginald’s wife is not known.  Reginald [IV] & his wife had [one possible son]: 

i)          [JOEL [II] de Vautort ([1182/89?]-after 1231).  The 1202/03 Pipe Roll entry cited below indicates that Joel was then a minor, presumably under the guardianship of the sheriff of Devon.  The date suggests that he was the successor of Reginald [III], and was maybe his son (also suggested by his name).  From a chronological point of view, it seems unlikely that Reginald [IV] and Joel [II] were brothers.  As his minority is not mentioned in the 1212 document cited below, his birth is estimated to “[1182/89?]”.  The 1202/03 [5 John] Pipe Roll records “De Oblatis…Et iiij li xii s x d p’ man’ eid’ Vic [the Sheriff] pro Joel’ de Valtort…De Amm’ciam’tis…Vic’ redd’ comp’…de i m’ de Joel’ de Valtort…” in Devon[491].] 

-        see below

 

 

ROGER [III] de Vautort, son of RALPH [II] de Vautort & his wife --- (-[1211/12]).  The chronology suggests that Roger [III] was one of the unnamed other sons of Ralph [I] referred to in the 1172/73 Pipe Roll entry cited above.  If that is correct, he was then under the guardianship of his paternal uncle Joel [I] de Vautort.  The following entry suggests that he had reached the age of majority at the time: the 1186/87 Pipe Roll records “Nova Placita et nove conuentiones. De oblatis Curie…Rogerus de Valtort…de .c. m. de fine pro honore de Trementon…” in Cornwall[492].  The 1189/90 Pipe Roll records “De oblatis Curie…Rogerus de Valtort…de fine de honore de Tremton…” in Cornwall[493].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1194/95, records Scutage “Anno VI Regis Ricardi”, in Devonshire "Isti habuerunt quietantiam per brevia – Olyver de Tracy, Johannes de Torintone, Henricus de Novant, Willelmus filius Martini, Rogerus de Valle Torta" (similar entry in the 1194/95 Pipe Roll in Devonshire[494]), and in Cornwall “In perdonis per breve Regis Reginaldo [mistake for Rogero? see the 1194/95 Pipe Roll entry below] de Valle torta…de lix militibus [ad feoda Moretoniæ[495].  The following document confrirms that Roger [III] was overseas with the king’s army: the 1194/95 Pipe Roll records “De placitis curie…Rogero de Valtort de (fine) honore de Trem’ton…” and “De scutagio Cornubie ad redemptionem domini Regis…Et in perdonis per breve R. Rogero de Valtort…de scutagio lix militum predicti feodi quia fuit cum R. in exercitu Norm’…”, both in Cornwall[496].  The 1195/96 [8 Ric I] Pipe Roll records “De Snc’do Scut’…Rog’s de Valtort…de ij m de scut’…Nova Oblata…Regin’ de Valtort de xxm” in Devon[497].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1196/97, records “Honor Comitis Reginaldi in Cornubia et Devonia…ad feodum Moretoniæ…et Rogero de Valle Torta, lix milites de prædictis feodis…[498].  The 1200/01 [3 John] Pipe Roll records “De Finibus & Scut’ Milit’…Rog’s de Valtort ij m de scut’…” in Devon (similar entries 1201/02 [4 John])[499].  An undated manuscript in the Red Book of the Exchequer records in Cornwall “R[egis] J[ohannis];…Rogero de Valtor[t], xiiij l in Calmitone, ut ibidem [”ut xiij R. J.” = 12 May 1211/2 May 1212]”[500].  Roger died before the 1212 record cited below which records “custodiam…herede Rogeri de Valle Torta”. 

m ([1190/94?]) ALICE, daughter of --- (-after [1213/14]).  Alice’s family origin is not known.  Her marriage date is suggested based on the likely birth date of her daughter Joanna shown below.  The 1208/09 [11 John] Pipe Roll records “…Alesia de valle Torta deb’ ccc m. pro Henr’ de la Pom’aie sic’ supa cotineta” in Devon[501], the payment being part of the fine made by “Henr de La Pomay [Henry [IV] de la Pomerai]…p habenda terras q fuit Henr patris sui, cujus heres ipse” in 1207[502]Powley comments that the payment made by Alice was “clearly a consideration in a marriage settlement” [see below for Alice’s daughter Joanna marrying Henry [IV] de la Pomerai][503]The 1213/14 [18 John] Pipe Roll records “Nova Oblata. Alesia de Valletorta deb’. i m. pro iniusta detenco’e…” in Devon[504].  The circumstances of the “unjust detention” have not been elucidated, but the date suggests that Alice was the widow of Roger [III] who died a couple of years earlier.  Maybe the delay before the 1213/14 entry was due to a dispute about her dower. 

Roger [III] & his wife had [six] children: 

1.         JOANNA de Vautort ([1193/95 or before?]-).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by an agreement dated 29 Sep 1268 under which “Henry de la Pomeray [Henry [VI] de la Pomerai, Joanna’s grandson] son of Henry de la Pomeray and Margery de Vernun” confirmed privileges to “the burgesses of Brigg…according to the tenor of the charter of my father, the son of Joan de Valletorta[505]The date of her marriage is suggested by the [1208/09] payment made by her mother towards the fine made by Henry [IV] de la Pomerai for custody of his father’s lands (see above), which in turn suggests Joanna’s birth not later than [1193/95].  That date suggests that Joanna was her parents’ oldest surviving child.  Her parentage and marriage are also indicated by inquisitions after a writ dated 24 Oct 1299 [“27 Edw I”] following the death of "Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valle Torta [Reginald [V] de Vautort, see below]" which name “Peter Corbet aged 30 and more, and Henry de la Pomerey [Henry [VII] de Pomerai, great-grandson of Joanna] aged 32, are next heirs of the inheritance of the said Reginald[506].  No other document has been found which names Joanna or indicates her date of death.  m ([1208/09]) HENRY [IV] de la Pomerai, son of HENRY [III] de la Pomerai & his wife Alice de Vernon (-[Apr/3 Nov] 1221). 

2.         REGINALD [V] de Vautort ([1198/1200?]-[early Jan 1246]).  His birth date is estimated on the assumption that he reached the age of majority shortly before the 3 Nov 1221 charter cited below.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records inqusitions, dated to 1210/12, in Cornwall which name “Reginaldus de Valletorta, lix milites de honore de Tremtone[507].  The bishop of Winchester was his guardian during his minority: the 1212/13 [15 John] Pipe Roll records “Nova Oblata…P. Winton’ Eps’ custos Regin’ de Valtort r’ comp’ de xxxvii li iiij s vi d p’ br’ R. de p’v’o sigill’…” in Devon[508].  Inquisitions in Devon dated to 1212 record that the bishop of Winchester "habet in custodiam manerium de Hurbertun’…cum herede Rogeri de Valle Torta per dominum regem", noting that "Rex Henricus primus” gave the manor to “Rogerio de Nunhant seniori", and in a later passage that the bishop also had “in custodiam per dominum regem cum heredibus Rogeri de Valle Torta S[utton] et Tamerton et Markerton per servicium j militis” which King Henry II gave to “antecessoribus Rogeri de Valletorta qui inde habuit servicium predictum, scilicet de Rogeri de --- Torta qui tenent duas predictarum terrarum et Johelus de Valle Torta et Radulfus filius Ricardi tenent terciam illarum terrarum per predictum servicium[509].  [The same inquisitions in Devon record that "manerium de Cliston" [Clyst Gerard? see below] is in the king’s hands because of the debts of "Henrici de Nunant” who owed “Judeis", noting that “quod manerium Robertus de Ver tenet de dote cum Isabella uxore sua que fuit uxor predicti Henrici” and Henry I had granted the manor to “Rogero de Nunant antecessori suo[510].]  The 1213/14 [18 John] Pipe Roll records “Isti habent Quiet p’ brevia [Rog’s cancelled] Regin’ de Valtort…de med’ honoris de Toteneis…” in Devon[511].  An order dated 21 Nov 1215 granted custody of “castrum de Toton [Totnes]” to “Reginaldo de Vall Torta[512].  A document dated 3 Nov 1221 records an agreement between “Reginald de Valle Torta” and the bishop of Salisbury concerning “the advowson of Herbertone[513].  Reginald was recorded as Sheriff of Cornwall between “5 Hen III” (28 Oct 1220/27 Oct 1221) and “9 Hen III” (28 Oct 1224/27 Oct 1225), with “Walterus de Truwerden pro eo” (presumably acting as his local deputy)[514].  An order dated 3 Nov 1221 granted “custodiam terre et heredis [Henry [V] de la Pomerai, son of Reginald de Vautort’s sister Joanna, see above] Henr de la Pomaye” to “Rado de Trublevill”, while an order dated 26 Apr 1222 instructed “Reginaldo de Valle torta” to release “filium et heredem Henr de la Pomeraie” to “Rad de Trublevill cui dns Rex custodiam terre et heredis ipsius Henri concessit[515].  An order dated 30 Jan 1227 [11 Hen III] records “Regin’ de Valle Torta” making a fine, as “Rogerus de Valle Torta pater suus” had done, for land granted by “Henr de Novant”, under an agreement between him and “Willm de Braos”, to “predicto Rogero[516].  The Testa de Nevill records, dated to [1228/29], that in Cornwall "Reginaldus de Valle Torta" held "in Tremeton’…lix feoda…"[517].  A document dated 18 Apr 1233 records the settlement of a dispute between “Walter de Dunstanvill, plaintiff” and “Reginald de Valle torta & Joan his wife, by Henry de Valle torta in Joan’s place, Richard Suward & Philippa his wife, by Henry de Blerec in their places, John Biset & Alice his wife […whom Gilbert Basset…Thomas de Mascey vouched to warranty], tenans, by Geoffrey de Dullingham in Alice’s place” concerning “2 ploughlands in Culinton[518].  The Testa de Nevill records, dated to [1235/36], payments "de xxviii feodis Reginaldi de Valle Torta de baronia sua…", as well as other payments which he made, and a sum owing “de j. feodo Joh’ Biset et Reginaldi de Valle Tort[519].  An undated charter records the donations made by “Rogerus de Valle Torta filius domini Rogeri de Valle Torta, et frater dominorum Reginaldi et Radulfi de Valle Torta” to the church of Gargaul in Cornwall, witnessed by “…Alexandro de Okeston…[520].  An order dated 30 Apr 1245 [29 Hen III] records “Regiñ de Valle Torta” making a fine for “maneriis de Cliftoñ Clautoñ et Brikesham [Brixham, Devon]” which “Isabella de Bolebek quondam comitissa Oxon tenuit in dote de dono Henri de Nuvaunt quondam viri sui[521].  Inquisitions after a writ to the sheriff of Devon dated 19 Jan 1246 ["30 Hen III"], following the death of "Reginald de Valle Torta", name “Ralph de Valle Torta, his brother, is his heir” and record “Hurberton, Holne, Clauton, Brixham and Brideford manors, held of the honour of Totnes…Silfreton manor…” in Devon[522]m ([19 May 1220/1223]) as her first husband, JOANNA Basset, daughter of THOMAS Basset [II] of Headington, Oxfordshire & his wife Philippa --- (-after 13 Jun 1249).  "Henry earl of Warwick…and Philippa his wife, and Reginald de Vautorte…and Joan his wife, and Alice sister of Philippa and Joan" performed homage for the lands formerly of "Thomas Basset, whose heirs are Philippa, Joan and Alice", dated 19 May 1220[523].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1223, by "Walterus de Dunstanvilla" against "Johannem Byset et Aliciam Malet uxorem eius" concerning "terre…in Culintona", the defendants claiming that "ipse Alicia" held the land "in proparte sororum unde Johanna uxor Reginaldi de Vautort et Philippa uxor Henrici comitis Warrewici"[524]Bracton records a claim in Devon, dated Hilary 1223, by "Engelardus de Pratellis et Sibilla uxor" against "Reginaldum de Vautort et Johannam uxorem eius" for "terciam partem unius caruc. terre in Culintona ut dotem eiusdem Sibille", inherited by "Ricardo ut filio suo primogenito et heredi" (referring back to the previous claim by "Walterus de Dunstanville")[525].  “Joh’a que fuit uxor Reg’ de Valle Torta” made a fine [14//20] Oct 1247 [31 Hen III] for licence to marry whom she will (“maritate cui voluit”)[526]Joanna married secondly ([Oct 1247/5 Jun 1249]) William de Courtenay: Powley indicates this second marriage in a genealogical table (no sources cited)[527]This indication is presumably based on William Pole (early 1600s?) who records that “Joane, first married unto Reginald de Valletort, & 2, unto Sr William de Courtenay, Kt, brother of John Lo. Courtenay”, noting that she gave her part of “Coliton” (inherited from the Basset family) to “Willm Courtenay her husband, & died without issue, for as that moyetye descended in the family of ye Courtenays, Erles of Devon” (no sources cited)[528]Her second marriage is also indicated by a document dated 5 Jun 1249 which records the settlement of a dispute between “Thomas Corbeth, claimant” and “Ralph de Valle Torta, deforciant” concerning “the manor of Syluerton, which manor William de Curtenay & Joan his wife held as the dower of Joan [suggesting that Joan was a widow when she married William, her first husband’s brother being responsible for settling her dower after he died] of the inheritance of the aforesaid Ralph on the day this agreement was made”, with the manor “[which] after Joan’s death ought to revert to Ralph & his heirs for ever, shall then remain to Thomas & his heirs quit of Ralph & his heirs for ever[529].  A document dated 13 Jun 1249 records the settlement of a dispute between “Walter de Bathonia, claimant” and “Ralph de Valletorta, deforciant” concerning “ploughland…in Clauton, which…Joan de Valletorta, wife of William de Curtenay, aforetime held in dower of the inheritance of the said Ralph [which] she let the same to Walter during the term of her life before the said William de Curtenay took her to wife…”, “being present the said William & Joan & consenting thereto[530]

3.         [HENRY de Vautort (-after 18 Apr 1233).  A document dated 18 Apr 1233 records the settlement of a dispute between “Walter de Dunstanvill, plaintiff” and “Reginald de Valle torta & Joan his wife, by Henry de Valle torta in Joan’s place…[531], see above for full details.  His inclusion in this document suggests that he may have been the brother of Reginald [IV], maybe his next oldest brother.  Powley names “Henry of Holne (-before Roger)” as youngest son of Roger [III], and shows “(illegitimate daughter)” (no explanation given), in a genealogical table (no sources cited)[532].  No other reference to Henry has been found, suggesting that he died soon after 1233.] 

4.         ISABEL de Vautort (-after 1 Jul 1241)Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated 26 Jan 1277 ["4 Edw I"] relating to "the barony of Valletorta…", recording in Devon “…Cherleton…land…which Reginald de Valletorta gave to Thomas Corbet and Isabel his sister in free marriage…[533]Her family origin and second marriage are also indicated by inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated 26 Jan 1277 ["4 Edw I"] relating to "the barony of Valletorta, whereof Peter Corbet [Isabel’s son] and Henry de la Pomeroy [descended from Isabel’s sister Joanna, see above] are heirs…of the said barony, and of full age" which record disputed holdings in Devon[534], and by inquisitions after a writ dated 24 Oct 1299 [“27 Edw I”] following the death of "Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valle Torta" which name “Peter Corbet [Isabel’s grandson] aged 30 and more, and Henry de la Pomerey aged 32, are next heirs of the inheritance of the said Reginald[535]Her first marriage is indicated by a charter dated 28 Apr 1241 which records a final settlement between "Willelmum de Englefeld querentem" [grandson of her first husband’s sister Emma] and "Alanum Basset impedientem" [son of his sister Cecily], under which the latter granted half a knight’s fee in Shiplake (Oxfordshire) to the former, in return for land in Tehidy (Cornwall) and other land in Cornwall "de hereditate que fuit Galfridi de Dunstanvill consanguiney predicti Willelmi" and land “que Isabella que fuit uxor Alani de Dunstanvill tenuit in eodem comitatu in dotem de dono predicti Alani” which should revert to William when Isabella died but would now instead pass to Alan[536]A charter dated 1 Jul 1241 records a final settlement between "Gilbertum de Basevil querentem" and "Alanum Bassat deforciantem" [both nephews of her first husband] relating to land in Bepton, Sussex and land in Cornwall "quam Isabella que fuit uxor predicti Alani de Dunstanvill tenet in dotem" which was inherited by Gilbert from "Alani de Dunstanvill avunculi predictorum Gilberti et Alani"[537]No record has been found which indicates when Isabel died.  m firstly ALAN [IV] de Dunstanville, son of ALAN [III] de Dunstanville & his [second] wife Muriel --- (-before [1225/28]).  m secondly ([1225/28]) THOMAS [I] Corbet, son of ROBERT [III] Corbet & his wife --- (-before 2 Nov 1274). 

5.         RALPH [IV] de Vautort ([1202/05?]-[28 Oct 1258/27 Oct 1259]).  Inquisitions after a writ to the sheriff of Devon dated 19 Jan 1246 ["30 Hen III"], following the death of "Reginald de Valle Torta", name “Ralph de Valle Torta, his brother, is his heir[538].  A document dated 5 Jun 1249 records the settlement of a dispute between “Thomas Corbeth, claimant” and “Ralph de Valle Torta, deforciant” concerning “the manor of Syluerton, which manor William de Curtenay & Joan his wife held as the dower of Joan of the inheritance of the aforesaid Ralph on the day this agreement was made”, with the manor “[which] after Joan’s death ought to revert to Ralph & his heirs for ever, shall then remain to Thomas & his heirs quit of Ralph & his heirs for ever[539].  A document dated 13 Jun 1249 records the settlement of a dispute between “Walter de Bathonia, claimant” and “Ralph de Valletorta, deforciant” concerning “ploughland…in Clauton, which…Joan de Valletorta, wife of William de Curtenay, aforetime held in dower of the inheritance of the said Ralph [which] she let the same to Walter during the term of her life before the said William de Curtenay took her to wife…”, “being present the said William & Joan & consenting thereto[540].  Dugdale records that Ralph [II] contributed to “the Aid for making the King’s eldest son Knight” for “28 Knight’s Fees and an half, sixth and twentieth part, being the moity of the Fees belonging to the Honour of Totneis, dated to “38 Hen 3” [28 Oct 1254/27 Oct 1255] (no source citation)[541].  A document dated 2 Dec 1256 records the settlement of a dispute between “Hamelin de Boley, claimant” and “Walter de Fraunkeyne & Avice his wife, Ralph de Valletorta & Emma his wife, William Cusseing & Lucy his wife, deforciant” concerning “his free tenement which he holds of Walter & Avice, Ralph & Emma, & William & Lucy in Gatepathe (Gappah in Kingsteignton)…1 knight’s fee…[542].  Dugdale records that Ralph [IV] died “43 Hen 3” [28 Oct 1258/27 Oct 1259] (no source cited)[543]m firstly (before 1253) EMMA, daughter of --- (-[2 Dec 1256/1257]).  “Rad’s de Valle Torta et Emma uxor ejus, Walterus de Franchenn’ et Avic uxor ejus et pticipes sui” made a fine “p uno bri ad tmin”, as notified to the Sheriff of Devon, dated [5/9] Jul 1253 [37 Hen III][544].  Her family origin is suggested by the following document dated 2 Dec 1256 which records the settlement of a dispute between “Hamelin de Boley, claimant” and “Walter de Fraunkeyne & Avice his wife, Ralph de Valletorta & Emma his wife, William Cusseing & Lucy his wife, deforciant” [three sisters and their husbands?] concerning “his free tenement which he holds of Walter & Avice, Ralph & Emma, & William & Lucy in Gatepathe (Gappah in Kingsteignton)…1 knight’s fee…[545]m secondly ([1257/58]) as her first husband, JOANNA, daughter of --- ([1240/42?]-after 24 Oct 1299).  Her birth date is suggested from the date of her first marriage.  She married secondly (-after 1259) as his second wife, Alexander de Okeston [or Oxton].  An undated charter records the donations made by “Rogerus de Valle Torta filius domini Rogeri de Valle Torta, et frater dominorum Reginaldi et Radulfi de Valle Torta” to the church of Gargaul in Cornwall, witnessed by “…Alexandro de Okeston…[546].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 16 Jan 1270 ["54 Hen III"], following the death of [her son, Reginald [VI], see below] "Reginald de Vautort alias de Valetort", record in Devon “Brikesham manor…whereof Lady Joan de Vautort, mother of the said Reginald, is dowered of a third part…Brideford manor…whereof…the said Lady Joan is dowered of a third part…Hurbertun manor…whereof the said Lady Joan is dowered of a third part[547].  An agreement between “William de Corcy, Prior of Modbury” and “Alexander de Okeston, lord of Modbury, and Joan his wife” is undated[548].  Her second husband died before inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated 26 Jan 1276 ["4 Edw I"], relating to "the barony of Valletorta, whereof Peter Corbet and Henry de la Pomeroy are heirs…of the said barony, and of full age", record in Devon “Hurberton…of which Alexander de Okeston and Joan his wife were jointly enfeoffed by Roger de Valletorta; and 16s land held by Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valletorta the younger in dower…Brixham.  A third part of the manor, of which the said Alexander and Joan were jointly enfeoffed by the said Roger…Brideford…similarly held jointly…Hurberton...rent of assize…held by the said Roger, which the king now has through his death.  33 ½ knights fees pertain to the said barony of which the king now has seisin through the death of the said Roger and Alexander; whereof the aforesaid Joan was dowered of 11 fees through the death of Ralph de Valletorta her former husband and the aforesaid Hawis of 6 ½ fees through the death of the aforesaid Reginald…Cherleton…land…which Reginald de Valletorta gave to Thomas Corbet and Isabel his sister in free marriage…Brideford…held by the aforesaid Hawis in dower…Fernhull…held…of Joan late the wife of Ralph de Valletorta…[549].  Inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated 4 Mar 1276 ["4 Edw I"] on the complaint of "Joan late the wife of the said Alexander…", record “Modbyri manor, Brideford manor, a third part of Brixham manor, and…lands…in Hurberton” in Devon “[which] were held jointly by the said Alexander de Okeston and Joan…enfeoffed to them and their heirs for ever by Roger de Valletorta …[550].  [The following passage from Collections towards a description of the county of Devon, written by Sir William Pole (an early 17th century antiquary) indicates (“(as it is probable)”, he says) that Joanna was the mistress of Richard Earl of Cornwall (presumably between the death of her first husband and her second marriage, if the indication is correct): Pole records that “Sr Roger de Valletort [Roger [IV] de Vautort, see below]” conveyed “Modbiry […Ermington Hundred]” to “Sr Alexander de Okeston, which had married Jone, the widowe of Raph de Valletort, which woman (as it is probable) was the concubine of Richard Erle of Cornwall”, adding that “they [=Joanna and Alexander] had issue Sr. James de Okeston, which died without issue; with commandement of King Ed. 2, [hee, i.e. James] conveyed Modbiry, & all other lands formerly granted unto his father by Roger de Valletort unto Sr Richard Chambernon, which was sonne of Richard Champernon, & Jone, daughter of Jone before mentioned, whom Edmond Erle of Cornwall [Edmund, son of Richard Earl of Cornwall] calleth by the name of his sister, in a grant made by hym unto the said Richard & Jone…dated anno 12 of Kinge Edw I [20 Nov 1283/19 Nov 1284]” (no source citations)[551].  If Pole’s report is factually correct, the simplest explanation for Earl Edmund calling the younger Joanna “his sister” is that her mother, the older Joanna, had been his father’s mistress.  However, no earlier source has been identified which confirms the information: in particular, the supposed 1283/84 grant has not been found (if it ever existed).  Until more information comes to light, Pole’s report should be treated with some caution.]  By order dated 28 Nov 1286, “James de Oxton, son and heir of Joan, late the wife of Alexander de Oxton” had seisin of the lands that “Joan held of the barony of Herberton, which is in the king’s hands by reason of the death of Roger de Vautort, tenant in chief[552].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 24 Oct 1299 [“27 Edw I”] following the death of [her daughter-in-law, see below] record that "Ralph de Valle Torta…sometime held the manors of Hurberton and Brixham…died seised thereof leaving Reginald his son and heir under age; but Joan his wife, who still survives, is dowered of a third part of the manor of Brixham"[553].  An agreement between “James de Oxton, lord of Modbury” and “Robert Truwerd, Prior of that place” is dated “30 Edw I” [20 Nov 1300/19 Nov 1301][554].  Powley indicates in a genealogical table that Joanna married thirdly “? Andrew de Trelluk”, noting that this was “Malet’s conjecture” (citing, footnote 2, “Data privately supplied in MS. by Major G. E. Malet”)[555].  The Champernon/Chambernon family were the main subject of a lengthy thread of postings to the “Soc.gen.medieval” group in Oct 2018[556].  Ralph [IV] & his second wife had one child: 

a)         REGINALD [VI] de Vautort ([1258/59]-[early Jan 1270]).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 16 Jan 1270 ["54 Hen III"], following the death of "Reginald de Vautort alias de Valetort", name “Roger de Vautort, his uncle, is his heir and of full age” and record in Devon “Brikesham manor…held of the king in chief by barony; whereof Lady Joan de Vautort, mother of the said Reginald, is dowered of a third part…Clautune manor…Brideford manor…whereof Sir Alexander de Okestune holds 5 marks rent for life of the gift of Sir Ralph de Vautort, and the said Lady Joan is dowered of a third part…Hurbertun manor…whereof the said Lady Joan is dowered of a third part, and Eustace de Burlestone jolds 16s rent for life of the gift of Sir Ralph de Vautort[557]m HAWISE, daughter of --- (-before 24 Oct 1299).  Inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated 26 Jan 1276 ["4 Edw I"] relating to "the barony of Valletorta…", record in Devon “Hurberton…16s land held by Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valletorta the younger in dower…33 ½ knights fees pertain to the said barony…whereof…the aforesaid Hawis of 6 ½ fees through the death of the aforesaid Reginald…Brideford…held by the aforesaid Hawis in dower…[558].  Powley indicates in a genealogical table (no sources cited) that Hawise married secondly “Luke de Poynings[559]: he is not named in the inquisitions after a writ dated 24 Oct 1299 [“27 Edw I”] following the death of "Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valle Torta" which name “Peter Corbet aged 30 and more, and Henry de la Pomerey aged 32, are next heirs of the inheritance of the said Reginald”, noting that Hawise and Reginald had married “with the king’s assent” while Reginald was still a minor “in the king’s wardship[560]

6.         ROGER [IV] de Vautort ([1204/11?]-before 26 Jan 1277).  William Pole records that “Sr Roger de Valletort” granted “Bridforde […Woonford Hundred]” to “Sr Alexander de Okeston & Jone his wief, which was the widowe of Raph de Valletort his elder brother…” and, in another passage, that he conveyed “Modbiry […Ermington Hundred]” to the same couple (no source citations)[561].  “Rogerus de Valle Torta, filius Domini Rogeri de Valle Torta, et frater Dominorum Reginaldi et Radulfi de Valle Torta” donated “Manerio de Gargaule cum Advocacionibus ecclesiarum Sancte Niwyline et Sancti Aluni” to the church of Bodmin by charter dated 29 Dec 1269[562].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 16 Jan 1270 ["54 Hen III"], following the death of "Reginald de Vautort alias de Valetort", name “Roger de Vautort, his uncle, is his heir and of full age[563].  Hargrave records that “Rogerus de Valle-torta” granted “castrum de Trematon et 59 feoda militum in Cornwall et Devon” to Richard Earl of Cornwall [ex-King of Germany], undated but dated to [16 Jan 1270/2 Apr 1272][564]: this grant is confirmed by inquisitions following the 1300 death of Edmund Earl of Cornwall (Richard’s son) which record in Cornwall "Callistoke…all held as of fee tail; for one Roger de Valle Torta, sometime lord of the said castle…gave the same to Richard sometime king of Almain…"[565].  Roger [IV] is named as deceased in the inquisitions after the 26 Jan 1277 writ of certiorari cited above in full under Joan, second wife of his brother Ralph [IV] de Vautort.  

 

 

The family connection, if any, between the following family group and the Vautort family shown above has not been ascertained. 

 

1.         RICHARD [I] de Vautort .  He is named as grandfather of Simon de Vautort in the [1199/1200] inquisition cited below.  m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH de Vautort .  He is named as father of Simon de Vautort in the [1199/1200] inquisition cited below.  [same person as…?  HUGH de Vautort (-after [1171/72]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records “Carta Roberti de Bello Campo” confirming to the king that “de feodo quod de vobis teneo in capite tenet de me Hugo de Valle Torto feoda vii militum” in Somerset[566].  The 1169/70, 1170/71, 1171/72 Pipe Rolls record “De Plac’ Regin’ de Warenn’ et Iohis Cumin In Sumerseta…Hug de Valletorta…de .II. m…” owing in Somerset, and (1170/71 only) “De Plac’ Regin’ de Warenn’ et Ioh’s Cumin et Geru’ de Cornhell…Hug de Valtort” as well as “Ric fil Willi” by agreement about Wasfeld with Hugh de Vautort (“de .x. m. p Concord de terra de Wasfeld . uxus Hug de Valtord”) in Devonshire[567].]  m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

i)          SIMON de Vautort (-before [1199/1200]).  "Simon de Valtort…with his brother Nicholas" donated land "in Babbekari" to Montacute priory, for the welfare of "his wife and of his lord Robert de Bello Campo", by undated charter[568]Domesday Descendants records that the daughter and heiress of Robert de Beauchamp of Hatch married "Simon de Vautort (d. 1199)" and that "her son assumed her name and succeeded as Robert [IV] de Beauchamp (d. 1251)" (no corresponding primary source cited)[569].  The information is confirmed by Bracton’s record of the 1230 claim brought by Simon’s cousin John de Vautort, cited below.  His date of death is indicated by the inquisition held [1199/1200] to determine “jus heredes Sim de Vautort…in Septon…quam Joh de Vautort tenet”, finding that “Ric de Vautort qui terram illam tenuit habuit ii. fil. s. Hug et Johm. et Hug fuit primogenitus.  Ille Hug habuit quidam filium Sim cuius filii debent esse heredes de terra de Septon[570]

-        BEAUCHAMP of HATCH BEAUCHAMP, SOMERSET

ii)         NICHOLAS de Vautort"Simon de Valtort…with his brother Nicholas" donated land "in Babbekari" to Montacute priory, for the welfare of "his wife and of his lord Robert de Bello Campo", by undated charter[571]

b)         JOHN de Vautort (-after [1199/1200]).  He is named in the [1199/1200] order cited above as the current holder of Shepperton, Middlesex.  He is named in the 1230 source cited under his son, which confirms that King John had granted him Shepperton (apparently ignoring the [1199/1200] inquisition).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had two children: 

i)          RICHARD [III] de Vautort .  He is named in the 1230 source cited below under his brother John, which confirms that Richard survived their father but died childless.  No source has been found which names Richard in his own right. 

ii)         JOHN de Vautort (-after 1230).  Bracton records a claim in Middlesex, dated 1230, by "Johannes de Valle Torta" against "Robertum de Bello Campo [son of John’s first cousin Simon, see above]" concerning "terre…in Shepertona…unde Johannes de Walletorta pater suus fuit seisitus…tempore J. Regis", inherited by "Ricardo ut filio suo primogenito et heredi" who died "sine herede de corpore suo" and passed to “huic Johanni ut fratri et heredi suo[572]

 

 

His name suggests that Richard [II] de Vautort was closely related to the preceding family.  Maybe he was another son of Richard [I]. 

1.         RICHARD [II] de Vautort (-after [1184/85]).  The 1184/85 Pipe Roll records “De placitis eorundem [=Rannulfi de Glauill et Rogeri filii Reinfridi et Willelmi Basset] in villa de Norhanton’…Ricardus de Valletorta…” in Northamptonshire[573]

 

 

1.         OSMUND de Vautort (-after 15 Mar 1203).  An order dated 15 Mar 1203 [4 John] confirmed that “Osmundus de Valletorta” had sworn homage to the king[574]

 

 

JOEL [II] de Vautort, son of [REGINALD [IV] de Vautort & his wife ---] ([1182/89?]-after 1231).  The 1202/03 Pipe Roll entry cited below indicates that Joel was then a minor, presumably under the guardianship of the sheriff of Devon.  The date suggests that he was the successor of Reginald [III], and was maybe his son (also suggested by his name).  From a chronological point of view, it seems unlikely that Reginald [IV] and Joel [II] were brothers.  As his minority is not mentioned in the 1212 document cited below, his birth is estimated to “[1182/89?]”.  The 1202/03 [5 John] Pipe Roll records “De Oblatis…Et iiij li xii s x d p’ man’ eid’ Vic [the Sheriff] pro Joel’ de Valtort…De Amm’ciam’tis…Vic’ redd’ comp’…de i m’ de Joel’ de Valtort…” in Devon[575].  Inquisitions in Devon dated to 1212 record that the bishop of Winchester had “in custodiam per dominum regem cum heredibus Rogeri de Valle Torta S[utton] et Tamerton et Markerton per servicium j militis” which King Henry II had given to “antecessoribus Rogeri de Valletorta qui inde habuit servicium predictum, scilicet de Rogeri de --- Torta qui tenent duas predictarum terrarum et Johelus de Valle Torta et Radulfus filius Ricardi tenent terciam illarum terrarum per predictum servicium[576].  The 1213/14 [18 John] Pipe Roll records “Nova Oblata…Vic’ dist’ingat Joelem de Valletorta & Hug’ de Hambire & p’tes alios qa continenta in bri…” in Devon[577].  A document dated 14 Jul 1226 records the settlement of a dispute between “Edmund de Thudeham plaintiff” and “Joel de Valle Torta, deforciant” concerning “the manor of Staunton (Churchstaunton)[578].  A document dated 21 Jun 1228 records the settlement of a dispute between “Joel de Valle Torta, plaintiff” and “Richard de Hidone, tenant” concerning “ploughland in Hemihoc[579].  A document dated 30 May 1244 records the settlement of a dispute between “Joel de Valle Torta, plaintiff” and “Robert Foliot, whom Warin son of Joel vouched to warranty” concerning “the manor of Dunsidiok[580].  Bracton records a claim in Middlesex, dated Easter 1231, by "Robertus Foliot et Ricardus de Hiduna" against "Johelum de Valle Torta et Galfridum de Barringtona…[and later] Eadmundum de Tudenham" concerning "terre de Stauntona", with another hearing dated Trinity 1231[581]

m [EMMA de Botreaux, daughter of [WILLIAM [II] de Botreaux & his [first/second/third wife Isabel de Say/---/Albreda Waleran] ([1175/80] or [1200/07?]-).  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “Joell de Valletort, younger sonne of Roger, & brother of Reginald de Valletort, held North Tawton, & had issue by Emma, daughter of Sr William Botreaux…[582].  The reference to Joel’s father suggests that Pole was referring to Joel [I], which from a chronological point of view appears impossible.  Assuming that there is some truth in Pole’s report (its accuracy has not been confirmed by information from another source), it is likely that Emma was the wife of Joel [II] de Vautort, and therefore the daughter of William [II] de Botreaux.] 

Joel [II] & his wife had one child (the information on Joel’s descendants is based mainly on William Pole’s narrative, which has not been verified unless otherwise shown below): 

1.         PHILIP de Vautort (-after 1253).  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “Joell de Valletort…had issue by Emma, daughter of Sr William Botreaux, Sr. Philip, 1253” who “had issue Sr John, which had issue Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue Egelina, wief of Oliver Champernon, Lucia, wief of Geffrey Lyff, Katerine, wief, 1, of William Lucy, &, 2, of Sr Henry, Frances, Beatrix, wief of Simon Bradeney, Elisabeth, wief of Sr Richard Champernon, of Modbiry, & Jone.  Only Egelina, Lucia, & Elisabeth, had issue…” (naming their descendants) (no sources cited)[583]m ---.  The name of Philip’s wife is not known.  Philip & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Sr. Philip, 1253had issue Sr John…” (naming their descendants) (no sources cited)[584]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  [same person as…?  JOHN de Vautort of Tawton (-after [1284/86]).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 13 Jan 1263 ["47 Hen III"], following the death of "Baldwin de Insula, Earl of Devon", record in Devon “Plimpton castle…with the following knights’ fees held of the lord of the castle…Tauton, 1 fee held by John de Valle Torta…[585].  “Joh’ de Valle Torta et Avic uxor ejus” made a fine “p una as. cap cor Henri de Bratton” in Devon by order dated [6/13] Jul 1266 [50 Hen III][586].  A document dated 16 Feb 1270 records the settlement of a dispute between “John Cumyn, claimant” and “John de Valle Torta & Avice his wife, opponents” concerning “land in Codeclive”, which the latter acknowledged to be the right of the former “To have & to hold…of John de Valle Torta & Avice & the heirs of Avice for ever…[587].  The last provision suggests that John and Avice were childless and that the property in question was Avice’s by her own right: maybe she was John’s second wife.  A document dated to [1284-86] records in “Hundredum de Hemyoc” Devon “Johannes de Todeham tenet Stanton pro di. f. m. de Johanne de Valle Torta de Tauton, et idem Johannes de comitissa Albemarlie, et eadem comitissa de rege i. c.[588]m AVICE, daughter of --- (-after 16 Feb 1270).  She is named as John’s wife in the two documents cited above.]  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          HUGH de Vautort (-[10 Feb 1310/early 1311]).  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Sr. Philip, 1253had issue Sr John, which had issue Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue Egelina, wief of Oliver Champernon, Lucia, wief of Geffrey Lyff, Katerine, wief, 1, of William Lucy, &, 2, of Sr Henry, Frances, Beatrix, wief of Simon Bradeney, Elisabeth, wief of Sr Richard Champernon, of Modbiry, & Jone.  Only Egelina, Lucia, & Elisabeth, had issue…” (naming their descendants) (no sources cited)[589].  A document dated 1303 records in “[Hundredum de] Braunton” Devon “Hugo de Valletorta tenet in Bocland Dyneham quartam parterm j. f.[590].  A document dated 1303 records in “[Hundredum de] Northtauton” Devon “Hugo de Vautort tenet Tauton cum membris j. f.[591].  “Hugh de Valla Torta” acknowledged a debt to “John de Pederton”, dated 10 Feb 1310[592].  He is named as deceased in the Easter 1311 document cited below under his wife.  m LUCY le Bret, daughter of ADAM le Bret & his wife --- (-after [Apr] 1311).  William Pole records her parentage and marriage, as cited above under her husband.  A hearing at Easter 1311 [4 Edw II] relates to the dispute between “Lucy, who had been the wife of Hugh de Valle Tortas, querent” and “Adam le Bret, deforciant” for “the manor of Curypol and the advowson of the church of Cherdelinche”, resulting in the grant to Lucy for life and after her death to “John son of Hugh de Valle Torta…”, with successive substitutes “Beatrice his [John’s] sister…Juliana her sister[593].  Hugh & his wife had eight children: 

(1)       JOHN de Vautort .  A hearing at Easter 1311 [4 Edw II] relates to the dispute between “Lucy, who had been the wife of Hugh de Valle Tortas, querent” and “Adam le Bret, deforciant” for “the manor of Curypol and the advowson of the church of Cherdelinche”, resulting in the grant to Lucy for life and after her death to “John son of Hugh de Valle Torta…”, with successive substitutes “Beatrice his [John’s] sister…Juliana her sister[594]

(2)       EGELINE de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue Egelina, wief of Oliver Champernon…  Only Egelina, Lucia, & Elisabeth, had issue…” (naming their descendants) (no sources cited)[595]m OLIVER Champernon, son of ---. 

(3)       LUCY de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue…Lucia, wief of Geffrey Lyff…Only Egelina, Lucia, & Elisabeth, had issue…” (naming their descendants) (no sources cited)[596]m GEOFFREY Lyfe, son of ---. 

(4)       KATHERINE de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue…Katerine, wief, 1, of William Lucy, &, 2, of Sr Henry…” (no sources cited)[597]m firstly WILLIAM Lucy, son of ---.  m secondly HENRY ---. 

(5)       FRANCES de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue……Frances…” (no sources cited)[598]

(6)       BEATRIX de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue…Beatrix, wief of Simon Bradeney…” (no sources cited)[599].  A hearing at Easter 1311 [4 Edw II] relates to the dispute between “Lucy, who had been the wife of Hugh de Valle Tortas, querent” and “Adam le Bret, deforciant” for “the manor of Curypol and the advowson of the church of Cherdelinche”, resulting in the grant to Lucy for life and after her death to “John son of Hugh de Valle Torta…”, with successive substitutes “Beatrice his [John’s] sister…Juliana her sister[600]m SIMON Bradeney, son of ---. 

(7)       ELIZABETH de Vautort ).  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue…Elisabeth, wief of Sr Richard Champernon, of Modbiry…Only Egelina, Lucia, & Elisabeth, had issue…” (naming their descendants) (no sources cited)[601]m RICHARD [III] Champernon of Modbury, son of RICHARD [II] Champernon & his wife ---. 

(8)       JULIANA [Joan?] de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “…Hugh de Valletort, by Lucia, daughter of Adam le Bret, had issue……& Jone…” (no sources cited)[602].  A hearing at Easter 1311 [4 Edw II] relates to the dispute between “Lucy, who had been the wife of Hugh de Valle Tortas, querent” and “Adam le Bret, deforciant” for “the manor of Curypol and the advowson of the church of Cherdelinche”, resulting in the grant to Lucy for life and after her death to “John son of Hugh de Valle Torta…”, with successive substitutes “Beatrice his [John’s] sister…Juliana her sister[603]

 

 

The connections between the earlier Vautort line shown above and the following members of the Vautort family (who are recorded in Devon from the mid-13th century) have not been established.  Only limited research has been carried out on these later members of the family, who fall outside the scope of the Medieval Lands project.  The information is shown below to provide a starting point for other researchers. 

 

1.         ANDREW de Vautort .  An order dated [26/28] Jul 1260 [44 Hen III] records the homage of “Andree de Valle Torta” who married “Margar’ primogenita fil et unam heredum Jacobi de Estwode” for “sexta parti feodi uni militis…quod idem Jacobus de Rege tenuit in Esrwude…die quo obiit[604]m (before [26/28] Jul 1260) MARGARET de Estwood, daughter of JAMES de Estwood & his wife ---.  She is named in the document cited above, which suggests that the couple married shortly before the date in question.  Inquisitions after a writ dated 20 Apr 1311 [“4 Edw II”] following the death of "Margaret late the wife of Andrew de Valle Torta alias de Vautort" name “John her son, aged 40, is her next heir”, and record in Essex “Estwode…held of the king in chief, as of the barony of Reygley, by service of 1/6 knight’s fee[605].  Andrew & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Vautort ([1270?]-after 20 Apr 1311).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 20 Apr 1311 [“4 Edw II”] following the death of "Margaret late the wife of Andrew de Valle Torta alias de Vautort" name “John her son, aged 40, is her next heir[606]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Vautortm MARGARET, daughter of --- (-before 8 Aug 1311).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 8 Aug 1311 [“4 Edw II”] following the death of "Margaret late the wife of Robert de Vautort" name “Thomas her son, aged 24 and more, is her next heir”, and record in Hertford “Sabrichesworth…[607].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS de Vautort ([1286/87?]-after 1311).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 8 Aug 1311 [“4 Edw II”] following the death of "Margaret late the wife of Robert de Vautort" name “Thomas her son, aged 24 and more, is her next heir[608]

 

 

Members of the Vautort family held Clyst Gerard (now Clyst Gerred) and Clyst St, Lawrence until the reign of King Henry VIII.  An outline descent is set out by William Pole (early 1600s?) who records that “In Kinge Henry 2 tyme Robert de Valletorta had his dwelling” in Clist St Lawrence “whom successively have followed Raph, Raph, John, Raph, Sr John de Valletort, Kt; in Kinge Edw. I tyme Raph his sonne; and after, six of the name John…” (no sources cited)[609].  Although none of this information has been verified, the earliest supposed generations are shown below in case other information emerges which corroborates Pole’s narrative. 

 

1.         [ROBERT de Vautort of Clyst St. Lawrence .  As noted above, Pole records that “In Kinge Henry 2 tyme Robert de Valletorta had his dwelling” in Clist St Lawrence.  No other reference has been found to this supposed Robert de Vautort, neither has any indication been found of his descent from the main Vautort family.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child:] 

a)         [RALPH [I] de Vautortm ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph [I] & his wife had one child:] 

i)          [RALPH [II] de Vautortm ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph [I] & his wife had one child:] 

(1)       [JOHN [I] de Vautort .  If John’s great-grandfather lived during the reign of Henry II, John probably lived in the mid- to late-13th century, in which case he may be the same person as John [II] de Vautort who is shown below.] 

 

 

Some late-13th/early 14th century primary sources record the Clyst Gerard/Clyst St Lawrence family, from which the following tentative reconstruction has been made. 

 

Two possible brothers:

1.         JOHN [II] de Vautort of Clyst Gerard (-before [1284/86?]).  He is named as father of John [II] in the [1284-86] document cited below.  m [EMMA, daughter of ---.  A document dated to [1284-86] records in “Hundredum de Clyston” Devon “Henricus de Frauncheine, Emma de Valle Torta, Johannes filius Johannis de Valle Torta de Clist [et] Johannes filius Ranulphi de Valle Torta” holding “Clist Giraud pro un. f. m. de Simone de Monte Acuto…[610].  Emma’s prominent position in the list suggests that she was senior in age: maybe she was the widow of the deceased older John holding part of the manor as dower.  The relationship between the Vautort family and “Henricus de Frauncheine…” has not been ascertained.]  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN [III] de Vautort .  A document dated to [1284-86] records in “Hundredum de Clyston” Devon “Henricus de Frauncheine, Emma de Valle Torta, Johannes filius Johannis de Valle Torta de Clist [et] Johannes filius Ranulphi de Valle Torta” holding “Clist Giraud pro un. f. m. de Simone de Monte Acuto…[611]

2.         [RALPH [III] de Vautort (-before [1284/86?]).  He is named as father of John [III] in the [1284-86] document cited below.  Maybe he was the brother of John [II].  m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN [IV] de Vautort of Clyst Gerard .  A document dated to [1284-86] records in “Hundredum de Clyston” Devon “Henricus de Frauncheine, Emma de Valle Torta, Johannes filius Johannis de Valle Torta de Clist [et] Johannes filius Ranulphi de Valle Torta” holding “Clist Giraud pro un. f. m. de Simone de Monte Acuto…[612]

 

 

Further progress on the reconstruction is hampered because, based on the limited sources so far found, it is impossible to determine whether John [V], shown below, was the same person as John [III] or John [IV] who are shown above. 

 

1.         JOHN [V] de Vautort of Clyst Gerard (-after [1315]).  A document dated 1303 records in “[Hundredum de] Clyston” Devon “Johannes de Valletorta tenet in Clyst Sancti Laurencii quartam partem f. Et per rotulos de scaccario j. f. Johannes de Valletorta et Margeria de Poltimor tenent in Clystgirard quartam partem f.  Alicia de Froncheynny et Johannes de Vautort, junior, tenent in Boterlegh quartam partem f.[613].  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “anno 8 of Kinge Edw. 2, John Vautort, of Clist Girard, Margery Poltimore, Claricia de Francheyney, Jone Filmere, & John Vawtort”, and “in the 19 of Kinge Edw. 3. John Vawtort, Marg’et Chiselden, Simon Francheyney, & John Vautort” (no sources cited)[614]m MARGERY de Poltimor, daughter of --- (-after 1303).  She is named as John’s wife in the 1303 document cited above. 

 

 

The problems are further compounded by the division of fiefs between junior members of the family, who are identified in primary sources as holding Botterly, Clyst St. Lawrence, and Sutton. 

 

1.         JOHN [VI] de Vautort “junior” of Botterly .  A document dated 1303 records in “[Hundredum de] Clyston” Devon “Johannes de Valletorta tenet in Clyst Sancti Laurencii quartam partem f. Et per rotulos de scaccario j. f. Johannes de Valletorta et Margeria de Poltimor tenent in Clystgirard quartam partem f.  Alicia de Froncheynny et Johannes de Vautort, junior, tenent in Boterlegh quartam partem f.[615]

 

 

1.         JOHN [VII] de Vautort of Clyst St. Lawrence (-before 3 Aug 1318).  A document dated 1303 records in “[Hundredum de] Clyston” Devon “Johannes de Valletorta tenet in Clyst Sancti Laurencii quartam partem f. Et per rotulos de scaccario j. f. Johannes de Valletorta et Margeria de Poltimor tenent in Clystgirard quartam partem f.  Alicia de Froncheynny et Johannes de Vautort, junior, tenent in Boterlegh quartam partem f.[616].  A document dated 1316 records in “Hundredum de Clyston” Devon “Villa de Clyst Sancti Laurencii, Clyst Gerard et Aysshclyst, que sunt membra ad eandem, et est dominus ejusdem Johannes Vautort[617].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 3 Aug 1318 [“12 Edw II”] following the death of "John de Valle Torta of Clist Lauraunz" name “Randolph his son, aged 40, is his next heir”, and record in Devon “Macre by Sutton…held of the king in chief as of the honour of Tremeton…Clist Lauraunz…[618]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John [VII] & his wife had one child: 

a)         RALPH [IV] de Vautort ([1277/78?]-).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 3 Aug 1318 [“12 Edw II”] following the death of "John de Valle Torta of Clist Lauraunz" name “Randolph his son, aged 40, is his next heir[619]

 

 

1.         JOHN [VIII] de Vautort of Sutton (-after 1318).  Inquisitions following the 1300 death of Edmund Earl of Cornwall (Richard’s son) record in Cornwall and Devon "59 fees pertaining to the castle of Trematon…Makere, Sutton [and King’s Tamerton]. 1 fee held by John de Vautort of Sutton…"[620].  A document dated 1303 records in “Hundredum de Rogheberg” Devon “Johannes de Valletorta tenet in Sutton, Matre et Kyngystamerton j. f. de Mortonia[621].  A document dated 1316 records in “Hundredum de Rouburgh” Devon “Villa de Sutton Rauf. Dominus ejusdem Johannes de Valletorta[622]

 

 

1.         JOHN [IX] de Vautort of Clyst St. Lawrence .  Knight.  m AMY de Clifford, daughter of REGINALD de Clifford & his wife ---.  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “Reginald de Clifford, Kt” gave “Evelegh (aunciently Yevelegh) […Cliston Hundred]…in mariage with Amy to his daughter unto Sr John de Valletort, of Clist St Lawrenc” who “with ye consent of the sayd Amy, granted unto William le Speke, sonne of Sr William le Speke…in frank mariage with Gilian his daughter” (no sources cited)[623].  The chronology of this report has not been checked.  The identitication of Amy’s husband is therefore uncertain.  John [IX] & his wife had one child: 

a)         JULIANA de Vautort .  William Pole (early 1600s?) records that “Branford Speake […Woonford Hundred]” was held by “Sr William le Espek, Kt, which maried Alice, da. & heire of Sr Walter Gervais, of Exon, & had issue William” who married “Julian, daughter of Sr John de Valletort, of Clist St Lawrence, Kt.” (and records that couple’s descendants) (no sources cited)[624]m WILLIAM Speake, son of Sir WILLIAM Speak & his wife Alice Gervais. 

 

 

William Pole traces the last generations of this family as follows: he records that “…The last John Vawtort died anno 26 of Kinge Henry 8, & left his heire Elisabeth, wief of Sr Hugh Pollard, Kt, the daughter of John Vawtorte, which died in his father’s lief tyme” (and records that couple’s descendants) (no sources cited)[625].  He records the Pollard ancestry in another passage (no sources cited)[626], and relates further information concerning the last male descendants of the family in yet another passage where he notes that “William de Grilleston held in King John’s tyme [Grilleston] […Hundred of Witheridge]”, that “Simon de Grilleston, 27 of Kinge Henry 3; William, 24 of King Ed. I, 8 of Kinge Edw. 2, & 19 of Kinge Edw. 3; John de Grilleston, 44 of Kinge Edw. 3; William, 13 of King Rich. 2; & Robert de Grilleston, whose daughter Elisab. was maried unto John Vautort, of Clist St Lawrence, which had issue John, whose sonne John died before his father, & left issue Elisabeth, wief of Sr Hugh Pollard…” (naming their descendant) (no sources cited)[627].  No attempt has been made to verify this information. 

 

 

 

VAUX

 

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Vaux (-after 1086).  An undated manuscript records that Robertus de Vallibus”, who arrived in England “cum Willielmo duce Normannorum”, founded Pentney, Norfolk[628].  “Rob. de Vauz” founded Pentney, Norfolk, for the souls of “meæ et Agnetis uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[629].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Vals” donated “de duabus partibus decimæ de Berneriis medietatem” to Ouche and that after he died “Rogerius...filius eius” confirmed and augmented the donation[630].  Domesday Book records “Robert de Vaux” holding Shimpling from Roger Bigod in Norfolk and properties from Roger Bigod in Suffolk[631]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  “Rob. de Vauz” founded Pentney, Norfolk, for the souls of “meæ et Agnetis uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[632].  Robert & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROGER de VauxOrderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Vals” donated “de duabus partibus decimæ de Berneriis medietatem” to Ouche and that after he died “Rogerius...filius eius” confirmed and augmented the donation[633]

b)         WILLIAM de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum, Oliverum et Henricum” as the three sons of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk[634].  “Willielmus de Vaus, filius Roberti de Vaus” confirmed the foundation of Pentney, Norfolk by “Robertus de Vaus pater meus” by undated charter[635]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT de Vaux (-after 1130)An undated manuscript names “Robertum, Adam et Willielmum” as the three sons of William, son of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk[636].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Vallibus…de terra de Hoctone de hereditate uxoris sue" in Norfolk[637]

-        see below

ii)         ADAM de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Robertum, Adam et Willielmum” as the three sons of William, son of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk[638]

iii)        WILLIAM de Vaux (-after 1165).  An undated manuscript names “Robertum, Adam et Willielmum” as the three sons of William, son of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk, adding that the third son William was prior of Pentney[639].  Prior of Pentney.  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Huberti de Vallibus” founded Lanercost priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “patris mei Huberti et matris meæ Greciæ”, by undated charter dated to 1165, witnessed by “…Roberto de Vallibus juniore…Rogero de Vallibus…Willielmo de Vallibus filio de Roberti de Vallibus…[640]

c)         OLIVER de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum, Oliverum et Henricum” as the three sons of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk[641]

d)         HENRY de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum, Oliverum et Henricum” as the three sons of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk[642]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Vaux (-after 1121).  "…Hugone de Valle…" witnessed the charter dated 1121 under which Henry I King of England granted "terram de Chelca" to "Rogero nepoti Huberti"[643]

 

 

ROBERT de Vaux, son of WILLIAM de Vaux & his wife --- (-after 1130)An undated manuscript names “Robertum, Adam et Willielmum” as the three sons of William, son of Robertus de Vallibus” who founded Pentney, Norfolk[644].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Vallibus…de terra de Hoctone de hereditate uxoris sue" in Norfolk[645]

m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known. 

Robert & his wife had seven children: 

1.         ROBERT de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux, adding that Robert was succeeded by “Robertus filius dicti Roberti” who died childless and was succeeded by “Oliverus filius dicti Roberti[646]

2.         OLIVER de Vaux (-[1238/41])An undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux, adding that Robert was succeeded by “Robertus filius dicti Roberti” who died childless and was succeeded by “Oliverus filius dicti Roberti[647].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Oliverus de Vall[ibus]" holding one quarter of one knight’s fee in "Scrahinge" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][648].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated 1219, which includes "Oliverus de Vallibus habet Petronillam que fuit filia Widonis de Croum de donacione domini Regis Johannis et terra eius [Schireb] valet annum l.l"[649]m ([1211/12]) as her third husband, PETRONILLA de Craon, widow firstly of WILLIAM de Longchamp and secondly of HENRY de la Mare, daughter of GUY [Wythe] de Craon & his wife Isabel ---.  A genealogy of the founders of Freston Priory names "dame Petronil de Croune" as the daughter of "monsieur Wythe de Croune" and his wife "Clarice", adding that she married firstly "baron monsieur William Longechaumpe" (by whom she had "monsieur Henre de Longechaumpe") and secondly "baron monsieur Oliver Vaux"[650].  "Henr de la Mare" made a fine for "terra Petronille de Croun ux sue et terris suis in Angliam et Willelmus de La Mara frater suus…", dated 1205[651].  Her third marriage is confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Oliverus de Vallibus" held "Vargeburn in barunia cum uxore que fuit Henrici de la Mare" in Hampshire[652].  Oliver & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROBERT de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Robertum, Will. et Ioh. et Oliverum” as the sons of Oliver de Vaux, adding that Oliver was succeeded by “Robertus filius dicti Oliveri[653]

b)         WILLIAM de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Robertum, Will. et Ioh. et Oliverum” as the sons of Oliver de Vaux, adding that Robert was succeeded by “Willielmus frater dicti Roberti[654]

c)         JOHN de Vaux (-before Nov 1287).  An undated manuscript names “Robertum, Will. et Ioh. et Oliverum” as the sons of Oliver de Vaux, adding that “Willielmus frater dicti Roberti” was succeeded by “frater eius dominus Iohannes de Vallibus[655].  A genealogy of the founders of Freston Priory names "John de Vaux" as the son of "baron monsieur Oliver Vaux" and his wife "dame Petronil de Croune", adding that he was granted "le manoir de Freston en taile"[656].  “Johannes de Vallibus filius domini Oliveri de Vallibus” donated land "de Botendone…de dono domini Rogeri de Clifford et Matildis uxoris suæ" to Basselech Priory, Monmouth by undated charter[657].  Inquisitions following a writ dated "15 Edw I" after the death of "John de Vallibus...on Thursday before the Exaltation of the Holy Cross 15 Edw I” name “Petronilla [...aged 28...[who married] William de Nerford] and Maud [...aged 26...[who] married William de Ros] his daughters are his next heirs and of full age[658]m as her second husband, JOAN, widow of ROGER de Gyney, daughter of ---.  The Complete Peerage names “Joan...widow of Roger de Gyney” as the wife of John de Vaux but implies that she may not have been his only wife when it questions whether she was the mother of his daughter Petronilla[659].  John & his wife had two children: 

i)          PETRONILLA de Vaux ([1258/59]-[1 May/20 Aug] 1326).  An undated manuscript names “Petronilla et Matilda” as the two daughters of John de Vaux, adding that Petronilla married “Willielmo de Nairford et genuit Johannem primogenitum suum” and naming their descendants[660].  Inquisitions following a writ dated "15 Edw I" after the death of "John de Vallibus...on Thursday before the Exaltation of the Holy Cross 15 Edw I” name “Petronilla [...aged 28...[who married] William de Nerford] and Maud [...aged 26...[who] married William de Ros] his daughters are his next heirs and of full age[661]m (4 Feb [1287/88]) WILLIAM de Nerford, son of PIERS de Nerford & his wife [Agatha ---] (-[12 Jun/9 Jul] 1302). 

ii)         MATILDA de Vaux ([1260/61]- [before 1316], bur Pentney Priory, Norfolk)An undated manuscript names “Petronilla et Matilda” as the two daughters of John de Vaux, adding that Matilda married “domino Willielmo de Ros et genuit Willelmum primogenitum suum...[662]A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that "Willielmum de Ros" married "Matildam de Vaus hæredem medietatis terrarium Johannis de Vaux"[663]Inquisitions following a writ dated "15 Edw I" after the death of "John de Vallibus...on Thursday before the Exaltation of the Holy Cross 15 Edw I” name “Petronilla [...aged 28...[who married] William de Nerford] and Maud [...aged 26...[who] married William de Ros] his daughters are his next heirs and of full age[664]m (before 1287) WILLIAM de Ros, son of ROBERT de Ros & his wife Isabel de Albini (-[12 May/16 Aug] 1316, bur Kirkham). 

d)         OLIVER de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Robertum, Will. et Ioh. et Oliverum” as the sons of Oliver de Vaux[665]

3.         JOHN de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux[666]

4.         PHILIP de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux[667]

5.         ROGER de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux[668]same person as...?  ROGER de Vaux (-after 1165).  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Huberti de Vallibus” founded Lanercost priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “patris mei Huberti et matris meæ Greciæ”, by undated charter dated to 1165, witnessed by “…Roberto de Vallibus juniore…Rogero de Vallibus…Willielmo de Vallibus filio de Roberti de Vallibus…[669]

6.         HUGH de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux[670]

7.         WILLIAM de VauxAn undated manuscript names “Willielmum [error for Robertum, see below], Oliverum, Johannem, Philippum, Rogerum et Hugonem, et quendam Willielmum” as the sons of Robert, son of William de Vaux[671]

 

 

1.         RALPH de Vaux (-killed 1186).  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1186 that “Radulfus de Vallibus” was killed by “Henrico de Ver[672]

 

 

1.         HUBERT de Vaux of Irthington, Cumberland (-after 1167).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Huberti de Vaus" held one knight’s fee from "honoris de Wartre" in Yorkshire[673].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Herbertus de Vallibus i m de feodo de Wartre" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][674].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Robertus de Vallibus" holding "Coupland" in Cumberland, adding that King Henry II had first granted it to "Huberto de Vallibus antecessori suo"[675]m GRACE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated to 1165 under which her son Robertus de Vallibus filius Huberti de Vallibus” founded Lanercost priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “patris mei Huberti et matris meæ Greciæ[676]Hubert & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT de Vaux (-1194).  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Huberti de Vallibus” founded Lanercost priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “patris mei Huberti et matris meæ Greciæ”, by undated charter dated to 1165, witnessed by “…Roberto de Vallibus juniore…Rogero de Vallibus…Willielmo de Vallibus filio de Roberti de Vallibus…[677].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Vaux" held five knights’ fees from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[678].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Vallibus xl s" in Northumberland in [1171/72][679]"Robertus de Wall" donated land "in Goseford" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Hugone de Morevill…Ricardo de Beauchamp…"[680]Robertus de Wallibus” donated land "in villa mea de Crogelyn" to Wetherhal priory, Cumberland by undated charter[681].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Rannulfus de Vallibus" owing "c m de debito fratris sui Roberti" in Norfolk & Suffolk[682]m as her second husband, ADA Engaine, widow of SIMON de Morville, daughter of WILLIAM Engaine & his wife Eustachie ---.  Her parentage and two marriages are shown in The Complete Peerage[683].  Robert & his wife had [one possible child]: 

i)          [ROBERT .  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Huberti de Vallibus” founded Lanercost priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “patris mei Huberti et matris meæ Greciæ”, by undated charter dated to 1165, witnessed by “…Roberto de Vallibus juniore…Rogero de Vallibus…Willielmo de Vallibus filio de Roberti de Vallibus…[684].  No other explanation has yet been found for "Roberto de Vallibus juniore" other than that he was the son of the founder.  If this parentage is correct, Robert must have predeceased his father whose heir is recorded as his brother Ranulf (see below).] 

b)         RANULF de Vaux (-[1210/12]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Ranulfus de Vallibus" paying "xl s, ii milites" in Cumberland[685].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Rannulfus de Vallibus" owing "c m de debito fratris sui Roberti" in Norfolk & Suffolk[686].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Ranulfus de Vallibus" holding one knight`s fee in Yorkshire in [1210/12][687]m ALICE, daughter of --- (-after 19 Dec 1212).  An order dated 15 Oct 1212 confirmed that "domina Alic de Vallibus…ex parte Roberti de Vallibus filii sui" gave to the king as a hostage "Robertum filium Willielmi de Vallibus de Ellebotle"[688].  King John ordered the liberation of "Alicia de Vallibus matrem sua et Greciam sororem suam et Hubertum filium ipsius Roberti et Rolandum fratrem eius bastardum et Thomam Walense filium filii Amite predicte Alic" now that "Robertus de Vallibus" was held in captivity, by order dated 19 Dec 1212[689].  An order dated 24 Apr 1229 following inquisition found that "Eustachius de Durevill" had, three years before being hanged for felony, sold "redditum de Cumpton" to “Alicie de Vallibus” who had granted it to “Willelmo de Wydiworth in maritagium cum Gretia filia sua”, that it had been confiscated by the king at the time of the hanging, but that the sheriff of Somerset should now return it[690].  Ranulf & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de Vaux (-after 19 Dec 1212).  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Ranulphi” confirmed donations to Wetherhal priory, Cumberland by undated charter, witnessed by "…Huberto de Vallibus…"[691].  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Ranulphi de Vallibus” confirmed donations to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Huberto de Vallibus, Rollando de Vallibus…"[692].  "Robert de Vallibus" donated land in Seavington, Somerset to Bruton, at the request of "Alice his mother", by undated charter[693].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Vallibus" holding two knights’ fees in Cumberland in [1210/12][694].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Robertus de Vallibus" holding "Coupland" in Cumberland, adding that King Henry II had first granted it to "Huberto de Vallibus antecessori suo"[695].  King John ordered the liberation of "Alicia de Vallibus matrem sua et Greciam sororem suam et Hubertum filium ipsius Roberti et Rolandum fratrem eius bastardum et Thomam Walense filium filii Amite predicte Alic" now that "Robertus de Vallibus" was held in captivity, by order dated 19 Dec 1212[696].  "Robert de Vallibus" donated land in Seavington, Somerset to Bruton, at the request of "Alice his mother", by undated charter[697]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       HUBERT de Vaux .  A manuscript recording “baronum et dominorum…baronia Gilleslandiæ” names “Hubertus de Vallibus filius Roberti [filius Ranulphi][698].  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Ranulphi” confirmed donations to Wetherhal priory, Cumberland by undated charter, witnessed by "…Huberto de Vallibus…"[699].  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Ranulphi de Vallibus” confirmed donations to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Huberto de Vallibus, Rollando de Vallibus…"[700].  King John ordered the liberation of "Alicia de Vallibus matrem sua et Greciam sororem suam et Hubertum filium ipsius Roberti et Rolandum fratrem eius bastardum et Thomam Walense filium filii Amite predicte Alic" now that "Robertus de Vallibus" was held in captivity, by order dated 19 Dec 1212[701]m ---.  The name of Hubert’s wife is not known.  Hubert & his wife had one child: 

(1)       MATILDA de Vaux (-19 May 1293).  A manuscript recording “baronum et dominorum…baronia Gilleslandiæ” names “Matildis de Vallibus filia Huberti de Vallibus Ob. 23 Edw I” as wife of “Thomas de Multon…Ob. 25 Hen III[702].  “Matildis de Vallibus Domina de Gillesland” donated property to Wetherhal priory, for the soul of "Domini mei Thomæ de Multon", by charter dtaed 29 Jun 1270, witnessed by "…Ranulpho de Vallibus…"[703].  The Chronicle of Lanercost records the death "die sancti Dunstani" (dated to 1294 or 1295 from the context) of "domina Matildis de Multona domina de Gilleslande, mater predictæ Thomæ" (whose death is recorded just before this entry)[704].  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[705]m THOMAS de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his second wife Ada de Morville (-1271). 

ii)         GRACE de Vaux (-after 24 Apr 1229).  King John ordered the liberation of "Alicia de Vallibus matrem sua et Greciam sororem suam et Hubertum filium ipsius Roberti et Rolandum fratrem eius bastardum et Thomam Walense filium filii Amite predicte Alic" now that "Robertus de Vallibus" was held in captivity, by order dated 19 Dec 1212[706].  King John ordered the release of "Alicie de Vallibus Greciam filiam suam" by order dated 9 Oct 1213[707].  An order dated 24 Apr 1229 following inquisition found that "Eustachius de Durevill" had, three years before being hanged for felony, sold "redditum de Cumpton" to “Alicie de Vallibus” who had granted it to “Willelmo de Wydiworth in maritagium cum Gretia filia sua”, that it had been confiscated by the king at the time of the hanging, but that the sheriff of Somerset should now return it[708]m WILLIAM de Widiworth, son of --- (-after 24 Apr 1229). 

Ranulf had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

iii)         ROLAND .  “Robertus de Vallibus filius Ranulphi de Vallibus” confirmed donations to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Huberto de Vallibus, Rollando de Vallibus…"[709].  King John ordered the liberation of "Alicia de Vallibus matrem sua et Greciam sororem suam et Hubertum filium ipsius Roberti et Rolandum fratrem eius bastardum et Thomam Walense filium filii Amite predicte Alic" now that "Robertus de Vallibus" was held in captivity, by order dated 19 Dec 1212[710]

c)         [WILLIAM de Vaux (-[1166]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus de Wall[ibus]" held thirty knights’ fees from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[711].]  same person as…?  WILLIAM de Vaux of Ellebottle .  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Vaux (-after 15 Oct 1212).  An order dated 15 Oct 1212 confirmed that "domina Alic de Vallibus…ex parte Roberti de Vallibus filii sui" gave to the king as a hostage "Robertum filium Willielmi de Vallibus de Ellebotle"[712]

 

 

1.         PETER de Vaux (-after [1158/59]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "xxiii m de militibus Petri de Vallibus" in Norfolk and Suffolk in [1158/59][713]

 

2.         ALEXANDER de Vaux (-after 30 Jan 1196).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alexander de Vallibus" held one half of one knight’s fee from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[714].  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 30 Jan or 6 Feb 1196 in a claim by "Willelmus filius Radulfi" against "Alex de Vallibus" concerning land "in Barsham et in Rigefeld" in Suffolk[715]

 

3.         HUGH de Vaux (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Vallibus" holding one half of one knight’s fee "in Wicheham" in Kent in [1210/12][716]

 

4.         PETER de Vaux (-after 1219)m (1208 or after) as her second husband, EMMA de Umfraville, widow of WALTER FitzGilbert, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  "Petrus de Vallibus" paid a fine to marry "Emma de Umfravill q fuit ux Walteri fil Gillbert si ipsa voluit", in Northumberland, dated 1208[717].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Emma que fuit uxor Walteri filii Giliberti…maritata Petro de Vallibus" holding land in Northumberland[718].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Northumberland, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Emma de Aydene est de donacione domini regis et maritata est Petro de Vallibus per Johannem Regem...Alina et Aleysia filie predicte Emme maritate sunt Jacobo de Kauz et Johanni de Kauz per Johannem Regem..."[719]

 

5.         WILLIAM de Vauxm ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ALEXANDER de Vaux (-after 1227).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Richerus de Strattona et Beatricia uxor eius" against "Alexandrum de Vallibus" for "terre…in Clypespy…dotem suam unde Henricus de Asegareby quondam vir suus eam dotavit", the plaintiffs claiming that "Willelmus de Vallibus pater Alexandri" disseised Henry from the land while the defendant claimed that the land was "maritagio matris sue"[720].

 

6.         WILLIAM de Vaux .  "Willelmus de Vallibus" donated "ecclesie de Golyn" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "domini mei Willelmi regis Scottorum", by undated charter[721]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOHN de Vaux .  "Johannes de Vallibus" confirmed the donation of "ecclesie de Golyn" made by "pater meus" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "domini mei Alexandri regis Scottorum…salva possessione Willelmi de Vallibus fratris mei in vita sua", by undated charter[722].  "Johannes de Wallibus" donated "unum croftum…in Golyn" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "Ade de Wallibus quondam uxoris mee", by undated charter[723]m ADA, daughter of ---.  "Johannes de Wallibus" donated "unum croftum…in Golyn" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "Ade de Wallibus quondam uxoris mee", by undated charter[724]

b)         WILLIAM de Vaux .  "Johannes de Vallibus" confirmed the donation of "ecclesie de Golyn" made by "pater meus" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "domini mei Alexandri regis Scottorum…salva possessione Willelmi de Vallibus fratris mei in vita sua", by undated charter[725].  "Willelmus de Vallibus" donated "ecclesie de Golyn" to Dryburgh monastery by undated charter[726]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Vaux of Tharston and Wisset (-before 9 May 1251)The executors of the will of "William de Vallibus formerly husband of Alienor de Ferrers, one of the heirs of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke" requested restoration of his part of the inheritance by charter dated 9 May 1251[727]m (before 5 Dec 1252) as her first husband, ELEANOR Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshal of Pembroke (-before 20 Oct 1274, bur Leeds Priory).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that "Alianora sexta filia" was "comitissa de Wintonia" and died childless[728].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[729].  She married secondly (before 5 Dec 1252) as his third wife, Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the Annals of Ireland which record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “quinta, Elianora de Varis, quæ fuit uxor comitis Wintonie…[730].  Matthew Paris records her husband's remarriage soon after the death of his second wife, but does not name his third wife[731].  "Rogerus de Quincy" donated "boscum nostrum de Gleddiswod" to Dryburgh monastery, for the souls of "nostre et Alyenore sponse mee et…Alani de Galwythya et Helene filie sue quondam sponse nostro", by undated charter[732].  She married thirdly (1267) as his second wife, Roger de Leyburn.  King Edward I ordered the the escheator of Ireland to take all the lands of the deceased "Alianora widow of Roger de Quency earl of Winchester" into the hands of the king by charter dated 25 Oct 1274[733]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Vaux"Robertus de Wallibus" donated land "Stanyacre in territorio de Elbotyll" to Dryburgh monastery, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee et prioris uxoris mee", by undated charter[734]m firstly ---.  m secondly ---.  Robert & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Vaux .  "Johannes de Wallibus filius Roberti de Wallibus" confirmed the donation "Stanyacre in territorio de Elbotyll" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "mee et uxoris mee", by undated charter[735].

 

 

1.         JOHN de Vaux .  "Alexander de Balliolo dominus de Caveris" donated "medietatem bosci de Gladiswod que quondam fuit domini Johannis de Wallibus et domine Deruorgille sponse sue" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "domini Gwido fratris mei", by undated charter, dated to before 1265[736]m DEVORGUILLA, daughter of ---.  "Alexander de Balliolo dominus de Caveris" donated "medietatem bosci de Gladiswod que quondam fuit domini Johannis de Wallibus et domine Deruorgille sponse sue" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "domini Gwido fratris mei", by undated charter[737]

 

2.         RANULF de Vaux (-after 29 Jun 1270).  “Matildis de Vallibus Domina de Gillesland” donated property to Wetherhal priory, for the soul of "Domini mei Thomæ de Multon", by charter dtaed 29 Jun 1270, witnessed by "…Ranulpho de Vallibus…"[738]

 

 

1.         JOHN de Vauxm ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         ALEXANDER de Vaux .  "Alex de Vallibus miles" confirmed the donation made by "bone memorie dñs Johannes de Vallibus pater noster" to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[739].  "Alexander de Wallibus dominus de Dyrlton" donated "jus patronatum ecclesie de Golyn" to Dryburgh monasteryby undated charter[740]

 

 

 

VERNON

 

 

RICHARD de Reviers, son of GUILLAUME de Vernon & his wife Emma --- (-8 Sep 1107, bur Abbey de Montebourg[741]).  His parentage is surmised by the references to his supposed brother Hugues and the latter's parents.  Seigneur de Reviers, de Vernon et de Néhou in Normandy.  Domesday Book records “Richard de Vernon” holding Ashton, Picton, Leftwich, Wharton, Davenham, Poulton and other properties in Cheshire[742].  "…Ricardus de Rederis…" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[743].  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem comitem et Ricardum de Radveriis...Rodbertum de Molbraio” as the main supporters of “Henricus clito” who governed “Abrincas et Cæsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray], dated to [1090][744].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that Henry I King of England granted the honors of ”primo Tiverton, ac postea…Plimton…in comitemque Devon…[et] insulam Vectæ” to “Ricardo de Redveriis[745].  Lord of Tiverton and Plimton in Devonshire, and Lord of the Isle of Wight.  An undated charter of Richard’s grandson "Ricardus de Redveriis filius Baldewini comitis Exonie" donated property to the abbey of Loders, Dorset founded by "Ricardus de Redveris avus meus"[746]The necrology of Montebourg records the death "8 Sep" of "Ricardus de Reveriis"[747]

m ADELISE Peverel, daughter of WILLIAM Peverel of Nottingham & his wife Adeline --- ([1075/80]-after 27 May 1156).  “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[748].  Her husband’s name is confirmed by another charter under which “Adeliz de Reviers” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the soul of “domini mei Ricardi de Reviers”, also undated[749].  The chronology of her descendants suggests that she must have been born not later than [1075/80].  "Adeliz de Redveris" donated property to the abbey of Loders, Dorset, for the souls of "patris mei…Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham…et matris mee Adeline", with the consent of "filiorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de ---…et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Reveris, Henrici atque Willelmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Stephanus de Magnevilla…Willelmus Avenel…"[750].  "Adeliza de Reviers" wrote to Goscelin Bishop of Salisbury, by charter dated to [1142/55], notifying him of her donation to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg of property which "her father William Peverel of Nottingham" gave with her to "Richard de Reviers"[751].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Ricardi de Reviers…Adelicie uxoris…concessu filiorum suorum comitis Balduini et Roberti de Sancte Marie Ecclesia…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182][752]

Richard & his wife had five children: 

1.         BALDWIN de Reviers ([1090/1100]-1155).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names ”Baldwinum” as first son of “Ricardo de Redveriis[753].  “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[754].  "Baldwin earl of Exeter" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg by "his father Richard de Reveriis" by charter dated to [1142/55][755].  Earl of Devon 1141. 

-        EARLS of DEVON

2.         WILLIAM de Vernon (-after Mar 1175).  “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[756].  Seigneur de Vernon.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Vernun" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[757].  "Baldwin earl of Exeter" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg with the consent of "his sons Richard, Henry and his brothers William de Vernone and Robert de Sancte Marie Ecclesia" by charter dated to [1142/55][758].  "…Willelmus de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated to [1147] under which "Henricus ducis Normannorum et comitis Andegavorum filius" confirmed the rights of the abbey of Saint-Ouen[759].  "…Willelmus de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[760].  "…Willelmo de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Fontenay at the request of "Jordani Taxonis"[761].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[762].  A charter dated to [1160] records (I) “Willelmus de Vernone” donating “capellam Sancti Maglorii in Serco” to Montebourg; (II) “Robertus de Barnevilla” donating “viginti solidos de centum solidos quos habeo a domino Willelmo de Vernone in Serc insula in feodum et unam salinam in Bevelanda” to Montebourg, for the soul of “Henrici filii mei”, witnessed by “Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus filius eius...”: and (III) “Ricardus de Vernon” donating “viginti solidos in insula de Serc quos Robertus de Barnevilla dedit...cum aliis viginti solidos quos Henricus de Barnevilla...dedit” to Montebourg, at the request and with the consent of “Oliverii de Barnevilla[763].  "William de Vernon" notified his donation of "the chapel of St Maglorius in Serk" to Montebourg by charter dated to [1174][764].  King Henry II confirmed the donation of "the chapel of St Maglorius in the island of Serck" to Montebourg made by "William de Vernon" by charter dated Mar 1175, witnessed by “Ricardo de Vernone...Willelmo de Vernone juniore[765]m LUCY de Tancarville, daughter of GUILLAUME de Tancarville & his wife Mathilde d'Arques.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   William & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         RICHARD de Vernon (-[3 Jul] after 1196).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[766].  “Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus filius eius...” witnessed the donation (II) recorded in the [1160] charter cited above under his father, and he was presumably “Ricardus de Vernon” recorded in (III) in the same document.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Richardus de Vernone" with 10 knights "de honore de Nehashou" and 30 knights "in Constentino" in his own service[767].  "…Ricardo Vernone…" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the freedoms of the city of Rouen[768].  “Ricardus de Vernone” confirmed privileges granted to Jumièges by “Hugonis de Vernone patrui mei”, with the consent of “Willelmi de Vernone patris mei...fratris sui”, by charter dated [24 Mar 1174/12 Apr 1175], witnessed by “...Hugone de Vernone fratre meo...[769].  King Henry II confirmed the donation of "the chapel of St Maglorius in the island of Serck" to Montebourg made by "William de Vernon" by charter dated Mar 1175, witnessed by “Ricardo de Vernone...Willelmo de Vernone juniore[770].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Willelmi de Vernone et Ricardi filii eius…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182], signed by "…Ricardo de Vernone…"[771].  "Ricardo de Vernone…Willelmo de Vernone juniore" subscribed the charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182] under which Henry II King of England granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Montebourg[772].  “Ricardus de Vernone pater et Ricardus filius meus" denied their oath to Richard I King of England and recognised the suzerainty ot Philippe II King of France over "Vernonem cum castellania" by charter dated Jan 1195 (maybe O.S.)[773].  "Richard de Vernon" confirmed the donation of "the chapel of St Maglorius in Serk" to Montebourg made by "his father William de Vernon" by charter dated 1196[774].  [The necrology of Montebourg records the death "3 Jul" of "Ricardus de Vernone"[775], although it is unclear to which Richard de Vernon this entry refers.]  m LUCY, daughter of --- (-26 Jul ----).  The necrology of Montebourg records the death "26 Jul" of "Lucia uxor Ricardi de Vernone"[776]Richard & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          [WILLIAM de Vernon “junior” (-after [Mar 1175/1182]).  William’s parentage has not been confirmed, but the following documents suggest that he may have been an older son of Richard who, if that is correct, predeceased his father.  Another possibility is that William “junior” was the same person as William de Vernon, later Earl of Devon, a younger son of Baldwin de Reviers Earl of Devon, older brother of William de Vernon “senior” (see above).  King Henry II confirmed the donation of "the chapel of St Maglorius in the island of Serck" to Montebourg made by "William de Vernon" by charter dated Mar 1175, witnessed by “Ricardo de Vernone...Willelmo de Vernone juniore[777].  "Ricardo de Vernone…Willelmo de Vernone juniore" subscribed the charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182] under which Henry II King of England granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Montebourg[778]same person as...? GUILLAUME de Reviers (-17 Sep ----).  The necrology of Montebourg records the death "17 Sep" of "Guillelmus de Reveriis secundus"[779]m ALICE, daughter of --- (-30 Sep ----).  The necrology of Montebourg records the death "30 Sep" of "Alicia uxor Guillelmi de Reveriis secundi"[780].

ii)         RICHARD de Vernon (-after 1219).  “Ricardus de Vernone pater et Ricardus filius meus" denied their oath to Richard I King of England and recognised the suzerainty ot Philippe II King of France over "Vernonem cum castellania" by charter dated Jan 1195 (maybe O.S.)[781]

-        VERNON (NORMANDY)

b)         HUGH .  “Ricardus de Vernone” confirmed privileges granted to Jumièges by “Hugonis de Vernone patrui mei”, with the consent of “Willelmi de Vernone patris mei...fratris sui”, by charter dated [24 Mar 1174/12 Apr 1175], witnessed by “...Hugone de Vernone fratre meo...[782]

c)         JULIANA (-[21 May ----]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  [The necrology of Montebourg records the death "21 May" of "Juliana de Vernone"[783].]  m WILLIAM de Venoix, son of ---. 

d)         [MATILDA .  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[784].  This charter does not specify that Richard’s wife was the daughter of Guillaume de Vernon but this appears to be a likely possibility.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardus de Haia et Matildis uxor sua", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][785]m RICHARD de la Haye, son of ROBERT de la Haye & his wife Muriel --- (-1169, bur Blanchelande abbey).] 

3.         ROBERT .  “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[786].  "Baldwin earl of Exeter" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg with the consent of "his sons Richard, Henry and his brothers William de Vernone and Robert de Sancte Marie Ecclesia" by charter dated to [1142/55][787].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Ricardi de Reviers…Adelicie uxoris…concessu filiorum suorum comitis Balduini et Roberti de Sancte Marie Ecclesia…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182][788]

4.         HUGH .  “Ricardus de Vernone” confirmed privileges granted to Jumièges by “Hugonis de Vernone patrui mei”, with the consent of “Willelmi de Vernone patris mei...fratris sui”, by charter dated [24 Mar 1174/12 Apr 1175], witnessed by “...Hugone de Vernone fratre meo...[789]

5.         HAWISE .  A manuscript detailing the descendants of the founders of Twinham Priory names “Hadwysam de Rumara comitissam Lincolniæ” as daughter of “Ricardus de Radvers comes Devoniæ…ex Adeliza comitissa uxore sua[790], although other sources do not show that her father bore the comital title.  “Willielmus de Romara comes de Lincolnia et Willielmus filius eius et Hawdewissa comitissa uxor eius” founded Revesby abbey by undated charter[791]m WILLIAM de Roumare, son of ROGER FitzGerold de Roumare & his wife Lucy --- ([1096]-before 1161).  He was created Earl of Lincoln 1141 by King Stephen. 

 

 

1.         MARGARET de Vernon (-after 1205).  "Margar de V’noñ" paid a fine for "hereditate sua…Freskewater in insula de Wicht q fuit saisita in manu dni R occoe mortis Johis Arsic viri sui", dated 1205[792].  "Thom de Stoke" made a fine in part payment of money owed by "Petr de Stoke…de fine que Margar de Vern ux sua…" in Hampshire, dated 1205[793]m firstly JOHN Arsic, son of --- (-before 1205).  m secondly (1205) PETER de Stokes, son of ---. 

 

2.         JULIANA de Vernon ).  Maxwell-Lyte records that William married "Juliana de Vernon"[794].  Maxwell-Lyte says that "Roger de Tony granted to William de Mohun, in frank marriage with Juliana his ‘kinswoman’, presumably his granddaughter [incorrect?], an annuity…out of the manor of South Tawton in Devonshire" (no source citation)[795].  Juliana’s parentage in the Vernon family has not been ascertained nor her precise family relationship with “Roger de Tony” (identified as Roger [V] de Tosny or Roger son of Baldwin de Tosny? – see the document ENGLISH LORDS T-Z.).  m WILLIAM de Mohun, son of REYNOLD [I] de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his wife Alice Briwere ([1203/10?]-Norton, Cornwall, 1265, bur Newenham). 

 

 

 

VESPONT/VIPONT

 

 

The precise relationship, if any, between this Vespont/Vipont family and the Vieuxpont family (Seigneurs de Courville, see the document CENTRAL FRANCE-CHARTRES, CHÂTEAUDUN) has not been ascertained.  Nicolson & Burn record say that Robert [I] de Vipont was descended from a family in Normandy “(de Veteri Ponte) lords of Curvaville” (presumably the same) but provide no details of the descent (no sources cited)[796].  Dugdale records several unlinked members of this family between 1073 and the late 12th century[797].  The primary sources which confirm their existence have not been identified. 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Vipont .  A later inspeximus records William and his wife “Mahald” donating land “at Meburn” to York St Peter (later St Leonard), undated[798]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A later inspeximus records William and his wife “Mahald” donating land “at Meburn” to York St Peter (later St Leonard), undated[799].  Nicolson & Burn record that she was the daughter of Simon de Morville and brought “Mauld’s Meburn” to her husband (no sources cited)[800].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT [I] de Vipont (-[1227/1 Feb 1228], bur Middle Temple, London).  Prescott records that King John granted “the barony of Westmoreland, with the Sheriffwick” to Robert de Vipont  in Mar 1202, noting also that Robert was “justice itinerant” in 1206, 1218 and 1226[801].  King John confirmed “Appilby et Burgh...dum balliva et redditu comitatus Westmorelandiæ” to “R. de Veteri Ponte” by charter dated 28 Oct 1203[802].  Robert de Vipont paid a fine in 1209 for the custody of the land and heirs of “William son of Ranulf” and for the marriage of Helwise de Stuteville his widow[803].  “Robertus de Veteriponte” donated "locum...vallis Magdalenæ in territorio villæ de Hepp...et...villam de Renegill...sicut etiam carta Matildis matris meæ et confirmatio Yvonis fratris mei...” to Shapp by charter dated 24 Apr 1214[804].  He died before the 1 Feb 1228 order cited under his son John.  Nicolson & Burn record his place of burial (no sources cited)[805]m IDONEA de Builly, daughter & heiress of JOHN de Builly Lord of Great Tickhill, Yorkshire & his wife --- (-1242, bur “Rupe or Roch abbey”, Yorkshire).  King John notified “Henr de Braybroc” that he had granted “saisina de tota terra q fuit Johis de Builly i Ballis tuis...q Ydonea uxore sua filiam ipi Johis heditarie contingit” to “Robto de Veti Ponte”, dated 22 Jun 1213, and (same date) also wrote to “Constabul Tikehull et vic Eborac” and [addressee unclear] “Custodi terre q fuit Robti de Turneha[806].  Prescott records her parentage, marriage and date of death[807].  Nicolson & Burn note that her father was “son and heir of Jordan de Builly, son and heir of Arnold, uncle and heir of Roger, son of Roger”, the last named being lord of Tickhill, Yorkshire during the reign of King Henry I (no sources cited) and records that Robert and his wife claimed Tickhill from “Alice countess of Ewe in the 4 Hen. 3 which ended in a compromise and partition” (no sources cited)[808].  Nicolson & Burn record her place of burial (no sources cited)[809].  Robert & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Vipont (-1241).  An order dated 1 Feb 1228 required the constables of Appleby, Malverstang and other castles to deliver them to Hubert de Burgh who had “the ward of...John till the heir’s najority[810].  “Johannes de Veteri-ponte” donated wood “in bosco meo de Winfel in Westmerlandia” to Wetherhal, for the souls of “meæ et Sibillæ uxoris meæ necnon...Roberti de Veteri-ponte patris mei”, by undated charter [dated to 1230/41][811].  His death is recorded in 1241[812]m SIBYL Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Agnes of Chester.  Prescott records her parentage and marriage (no source cited)[813].  “Johannes de Veteri-ponte” donated wood “in bosco meo de Winfel in Westmerlandia” to Wetherhal, for the souls of “meæ et Sibillæ uxoris meæ necnon...Roberti de Veteri-ponte patris mei”, by undated charter [dated to 1230/41][814]

(a)       ROBERT [II] de Vipont (-1264).  Lord of Westmoreland.  Nicolson & Burn record that Robert died from wounds received either at the battle of Lewes or Evesham (no sources cited)[815]m ISABEL, daughter of JOHN FitzGeoffrey & his wife Isabel ---.  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that the fourth (unnamed) daughter of "Johanni Fitz-Geffrey" and his wife "Isabella Bygod…" married "domino --- de Westmoreland", adding that they had two daughters "Idonia et Isabella, de quibus una" married "Rogero de Clifford" by whom she had "Robertus de Clifford"[816].  Robert & his wife had children: 

(1)       ISABEL de Vipont (-before 14 May 1292).  A writ dated 28 Apr "58 Hen III", records the proof of age of "Isabel, wife of Roger son and heir of Roger de Clifford, and eldest daughter and one of the heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte", a witness judging her “of full age[817].  "Johannis de Vallibus, Rogerus Clifford junior et Isabella uxor eius et Rogerus de Leyburn et Idonia uxor eius" confirmed the donation to St Bees made by "Roberti de Veteri Ponti antecessoris ipsarum Isabelle et Idonie et cujusdam Idonie uxoris predicte Roberti" by undated charter[818].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Dec "11 Edw I" following the death of "Roger de Clyfford the younger” record that “he had a son of Isabel his wife [...[property] divided between her and Idonea the wife of Roger de Leyburne, the heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte]...Robert aged 8...[7] is his next heir[819].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 14 May "20 Edw I" following the death of "Isabel de Clyfford one of the daughters and heirs of Robert de Veteri Ponte” name “Robert de Clyfford her son aged 18 at Easter last is her next heir[820].  An order dated 21 Jun 1292 granted “respite” for fees to the executors of the will of “Isabel de Clifford until her heir come of age[821]m (before 28 Apr 1271) ROGER [III] de Clifford, son of ROGER [II] de Clifford & his first wife --- (-[Menai Straits] 6 Nov 1282). 

(2)       IDONIA de Vipont (-after 26 Sep 1297).  "Johannis de Vallibus, Rogerus Clifford junior et Isabella uxor eius et Rogerus de Leyburn et Idonia uxor eius" confirmed the donation to St Bees made by "Roberti de Veteri Ponti antecessoris ipsarum Isabelle et Idonie et cujusdam Idonie uxoris predicte Roberti" by undated charter[822].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 26 Sep "25 Edw I" following the death of "Richard son of John” name as his heirs “...Robert de Clifford son of Isabel de Clifford daughter of Isabel de Veteri Ponte and Idonea daughter of the same Isabel de Veteri Ponte the second sister...[823]m ROGER de Leyburn, son of ---. 

ii)         CHRISTIANA de Vipont ).  The Testa de Nevill records that “Robert de Veteri Ponte has Thomas son of William son of Randolf and his land in ward” and that “to the same Thomas he married his daughter[824].  Farrer dates this holding to 1219[825].  Her family origin and marriage are indicated by inquisitions following a writ dated 28 Apr "17 Edw I", after the death of [her son] "William son of Thomas de Creystock...", which list Dufton in Westmoreland “held of his own inheritance of Lady Idonea de Leyburn, daughter and heir of Robert de Veteri Ponte[826]m (before 1219) THOMAS FitzWilliam [de Greystoke], son of WILLIAM FitzRalph & his wife Helwise de Stuteville ([1203?]-1247). 

b)         IVO de Vipont (-after 24 Apr 1214).  “Robertus de Veteriponte” donated "locum...vallis Magdalenæ in territorio villæ de Hepp...et...villam de Renegill...sicut etiam carta Matildis matris meæ et confirmatio Yvonis fratris mei...” to Shapp by charter dated 24 Apr 1214[827]

 

 

 

WELLES

 

 

1.         WALTER FitzRademerm ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Welle of Wells and Claxby, Norfolk (-before 1198)m MATILDA de Gand, daughter of WALTER de Gand & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre.  Her parentage and marriage are noted in Domesday Descendants[828].  William & his wife had children: 

i)          ISABEL ([1134/35]-after 1212).  "Roberto filio Hugonis et Rogero fratre eius, Isabella uxore Roberti filii Hugonis, Philippo et Roberto et Rogero filiis eius, Waltero filio Walteri filio Hugonis, Gaufrido capellano" witnessed the undated charter under which "Willielmus de Dentuna" donated property at "Langhage" to Kirkstead abbey[829].  "Robertus filius Hugonis" confirmed the donation of "bosco…Langhage" by "Willielmus de Dentuna frater meus" to Kirkstead abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero filio Hugonis, Isabella uxore mea…"[830].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that "uxor Roberti filii Hugonis…filia Willelmi filii Walteri de Welle" was 50 years old and had "x pueros", and in a later passage names her “Elisabeth que fuit uxor Roberti filii Hugonis” and her property "in Meltesbi…de maritagio suo, de feodo Willelmi filii Walteri" whose daughter he had married, with land "de honore Peverelli…terra…de Toleshunt"[831].  The Testa de Nevill records that in 1212 "Robertus de Tateshala" held land "in capite de domino rege in Candluobi" in Lincolnshire which "Elysabet mater predicti Roberti…tenet in dote"[832].  m ROBERT de Tattershall, son of HUGH Brito [de Tattershall] & his wife --- (-after 1185). 

 

 

 

WELLETON

 

 

1.         ALANm ---.  The name of Alan’s wife is not known.  Alan & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         BRIEN FitzAlan de Welleton (-[1171]).  "…Briennio filio Alani…" witnessed the charter dated to [1154] under which Conan IV Duke of Brittany confirmed the privileges of the men of his Soke of Gayton, Lincolnshire[833].  "…Brieno filio Alano…" witnessed the charter dated to [1164] which records an agreement between Kirkstead abbey and "Alberedam uxorem Radulfi filii Haconis et Simonem filium eius" concerning pasture in the fields of Gayton le Wold and Grimblethorpe[834]"Briennus filius Alani de [Welletun]" donated property in Gayton le Wold to Kirkstead abbey, with the consent of "Ediue uxoris mee", by charter dated to late in the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio --- fratre meo…"[835]m EDITH, daughter of ---.  "Briennus filius Alani de [Welletun]" donated property in Gayton le Wold to Kirkstead abbey, with the consent of "Ediue uxoris mee", by charter dated to late in the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio --- fratre meo…"[836].  "…Editha uxore Brienni de Welletun…" witnessed the charter, dated to late in the reign of King Henry II, under which "Beatrix olim uxor Joslani de Engelbi" gave quitclaim to the monks of Kirkstead abbey relating to land in Thorpe in the Fallows donated by her husband[837].  Brien & his wife had three children: 

i)          ALAN

ii)         RALPH .  "Giekellus de Jerdeburc filius Alani et Radulphus filius Brienni nepos eius" gave quitclaim to "Helie Moysant" relating to land at Grainthorpe by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Thoma filio Alani…"[838].  "Radulfus filius Brienni de Welletuna" donated a quarter of land at "Germundtorp…de conquisto patris mei" to "Roberto fratri meo" by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Giekello filio Alani…"[839]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

(a)       [ROBERT .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus filius Radulfi" holding seven knights’ fees from "Roberti de Staffordia" in Staffordshire in 1166[840].] 

iii)        ROBERT .  "Radulfus filius Brienni de Welletuna" donated a quarter of land at "Germundtorp…de conquisto patris mei" to "Roberto fratri meo" by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Giekello filio Alani…"[841]

b)         [WILLIAM] .  "Briennus filius Alani de [Welletun]" donated property in Gayton le Wold to Kirkstead abbey, with the consent of "Ediue uxoris mee", by charter dated to late in the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio --- fratre meo…"[842].  Because of the blank space in this charter, it is unclear whether William was the name of the donor’s brother or whether the space was large enough for more than one name to have been omitted.] 

c)         GIKELL de Jedburgh .  "Giekellus de Jerdeburc filius Alani et Radulphus filius Brienni nepos eius" gave quitclaim to "Helie Moysant" relating to land at Grainthorpe by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Thoma filio Alani…"[843].  "Radulfus filius Brienni de Welletuna" donated a quarter of land at "Germundtorp…de conquisto patris mei" to "Roberto fratri meo" by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Giekello filio Alani…"[844]

d)         [THOMAS FitzAlan .  "Giekellus de Jerdeburc filius Alani et Radulphus filius Brienni nepos eius" gave quitclaim to "Helie Moysant" relating to land at Grainthorpe by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "…Thoma filio Alani…"[845].] 

 

 

 

WINDSOR

 

 

WALTER FitzOther of Windsor, son of --- (-after 1100).  Domesday Book records land held by “Walter fitzOther” in Will Hall, Neatham Hundred and Malshanger, Chuteley Hundred in Hampshire, in Berkshire including in Ripplesmere Hundred and Nakedthorn Hundred, Stanwell in Middlesex/Surrey[846].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep[847]

m BEATRICE, daughter of --- (-after 1100).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep[848]

Walter & his wife had four children: 

1.         WILLIAM [I] FitzWalter (-[1154/60]).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep[849].  He succeeded his father in [1100/16] as forester of Windsor and lord of Eton[850].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that Henry I King of England notified "Willelmo filio Walteri et Croco venatori et Ricardo servienti et omnibus ministris de foresta Windesores" that he had granted tithes of all venison to Abingdon abbey, witnessed by "…Eudone dapifero" (which dates the notification to [1116/20][851].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Walti" at "Forest de Windesor" in Berkshire[852].  Empress Matilda confirmed that "Willelmus filius Walteri" should be "custodiam castelli de Windesh", and the lands which "ipse Willelmus et antecessores sui" had from Henry I King of England, by charter dated to [1141/42][853]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] de Windsor (-[1175/76]).  Henry II King of England confirmed to "Willelmo de Windesoriis" the land of "Willelmi filii Walteri patris sui et Walteri filii Otheri avi sui", dated to [1154/60][854]

-        see below

b)         WALTER de Windsor (-before 1184).  Dugdale records that “Walter de Windlesores and Christiana his wife” donated "Wormingford…church" to Wix priory, Essex by undated charter[855].  “Walterus de Windlesores” donated "elemosinam ecclesiam de Suinelande" to Wix priory, Essex by undated charter[856].  "...Walter de Windlesoure..." witnessed the charter dated to [1166] under which William King of Scotland confirmed the grant of property to “Robert de Brus[857]m [CHRISTIANA de Wiham, daughter of ---.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Cristina de Wiham i militem" in the fief of "Willelmi de Montefichet" in Essex in 1166[858].]  Dugdale records that “Walter de Windlesores and Christiana his wife” donated "Wormingford…church" to Wix priory, Essex by undated charter[859].  Walter & his wife had three children: 

i)          WALTER de Windsor (-1203).  The 1197/98 Feet of Fines records a settlement dated 18 Apr 1198 between "Waltm de Winlesore" and "Willm de Windesor" relating to the barony of "Willi de Windesor avi eorum", with land at "Burneham…Bekenefeld…Etona…Orton…Horslea…Stanewell et Lesmores…Horton…"[860]

ii)         CHRISTIANA de Windsor (-[1206/07]).  "Dunecani de Lasceles" donated land "in territorio de Seggin" to St Andrew’s priory, for the souls of "mme et C. uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Herneyo de Lasceles, Ricardo filio eius…"[861].  "Duncan de Lasceles and Christiana his wife account for 10 l for having her land of Boultona which is her heritage, since she cannot have a reasonable part of her heritage in Scotland", dated [1200/01][862].  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the 1206/07 Pipe Roll which records that "Ralf de Hosdeng and Duncan de Lasceles and Christiana his wife account for 240 marks for having the whole land which Walter de Windlesores held of the K. [John] in capite the day he died"[863]m as his first wife, DUNCAN de Lascelles, son of --- (-after 1 Dec 1208). 

iii)        GUNNOR de Windsor (-[1205/06]).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the 1206/07 Pipe Roll which records that "Ralf de Hosdeng and Duncan de Lasceles and Christiana his wife account for 240 marks for having the whole land which Walter de Windlesores held of the K. [John] in capite the day he died"[864]m HUGH de Hosdenc, son of ---. 

2.         GERALD FitzWalter (-before 1136).  He was granted Moulsford, Berkshire and held land in Pembrokeshire[865].  The Annales Cambriæ record that "Geraldus præfectus de Penbroc" laid waste to "Meneviæ fines" in 1097[866]m (1100) NESTA of Wales, daughter of RHYS ap Tudor Mawr King of Deheubarth [South Wales] & his wife Gwladus ---.  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales names, in 1106, "Nest daughter of Rhys son of Tewdwr and wife of Gerald the steward" and "Gwladus daughter of Rhiwallon, the mother of Nest", when recording that "Owain [son of Cadwgan son of Bleddyn]…accompanied by a small retinue [visited] her as his kinswoman" in the castle in which his father organised a feast and later reentered the castle and abducted her "with her two sons and daughter and also another son that he [=her husband] had by a concubine"[867].  She became mistress firstly of Henry I King of England, and secondly of Stephen Constable of Cardigan, as shown by the Expugnatio Hibernica which records that "Robertus filius Stephani" was freed from prison in Wales, naming "matre…Nesta, Resi magni filia"[868].  Gerald & his wife had three children: 

a)         MAURICE FitzGerald (-Wexford 1 Sep 1176).  The Expugnatio Hibernica names "David Menevensi episcopo et Mauricio Giraldi filio" as brothers of "Robertus filius Stephani"[869]

-        IRELAND – EARLS of DESMOND, EARLS of KILDARE

b)         DAVID (-1177, bur St David's Cathedral).  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales names "David Bishop of Menevia and William the Bastard…sons to Gerald the steward" as the brothers of "Robert son of Stephen by Nest daughter of Rhys son of Tewdwr"[870].  The Annales Cambriæ record the succession in 1150 of "David filius Giraldi" as "episcopus Meneviæ" after the death of Bishop Bernard[871].  Bishop of St David's.  The Expugnatio Hibernica names "David Menevensi episcopo et Mauricio Giraldi filio" as brothers of "Robertus filius Stephani"[872].  The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1177 of "David episcopus Menevensis" and his burial "in ecclesia Menevensi"[873].  Bishop David had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

i)          MILES .  The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Milo Menevensis, tam Stephanidæ quam Mauricii nepos…Henrici filius Robertus, Meilerii frater"[874].  Feudal Baron of Iverk, co. Kilkenny.  Ancestor of the family of Barron of Brownsford, co. Kilkenny[875]

c)         ANGHARAD .  She and her husband were parents of the historian "Giraldus Cambrensis".  m WILLIAM de Barry of Manorbier, son of ---.  The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Roberto Barrensi" and "Meilerius" as "Stephanidæque alter ex fratre, alter ex sorore nepotes"[876]

Gerald had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

d)         WILLIAM FitzGerald of Carew Castle, Pembrokeshire (-1173).  The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales names "David Bishop of Menevia and William the Bastard…sons to Gerald the steward" as the brothers of "Robert son of Stephen by Nest daughter of Rhys son of Tewdwr"[877].  The Annales Cambriæ name "Willielmus filius Geraldi" among those who destroyed "castellum Wix" in 1148[878]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had four children: 

i)          RAYMOND "le Gros"

ii)          GRIFFITH .  The Expugnatio Hibernica names "nepos…Mauricii Stephanidæque, Griffinus"[879]

iii)         ODO .  Ancestor of the Baronets CAREW[880]

iv)        daughter .  m ---.  One child: 

(a)        DAVID "the Welshman" . 

3.         MAURICE de Windsor (-after 1130).  Round suggests that Maurice was another son of Walter FitzOther[881]His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1155] under which Henry II King of England confirmed to "Ralph de Hastynges dapifero of the queen" the lands formerly belonging to Ralph steward of St Edmund’s and to "Maurice de Windsor maternal uncle of the said Ralph de Hastings" by charter dated to [1155][882]The abbot of Bury St Edmunds granted stewardship of the abbey to "Mauricius de Windleshore" by charter dated to [1115/19], witnessed by "Robertus de Wyndelshore, Reinaldus de Wyndeleshore"[883].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Mauric de Windesor" in Dorsetshire[884]same person as…?  MAURICE de Windsor (-after 25 May 1130).  "Maurice de Windsor and Edgidia his wife" donated the church of St Edmund at Hoxne to Norwich Cathedral priory by charter dated 25 May 1130[885]m EGIDIA, daughter of --- (-after 25 May 1130).  "Maurice de Windsor and Edgidia his wife" donated the church of St Edmund at Hoxne to Norwich Cathedral priory by charter dated 25 May 1130[886]Andrew Lancaster discusses sources which indicate that Maurice’s wife may have been Edith, daughter of Walter “the deacon” and his [second] wife ---[887]

4.         daughter Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1155] under which Henry II King of England confirmed to "Ralph de Hastynges dapifero of the queen" the lands formerly belonging to Ralph steward of St Edmund’s and to "Maurice de Windsor maternal uncle of the said Ralph de Hastings" by charter dated to [1155][888]m WILLIAM [I] de Hastings, son of ---. 

 

 

WILLIAM [II] de Windsor, son of WILLIAM [I] FitzWalter & his wife --- (-[1175/76]).  Henry II King of England confirmed to "Willelmo de Windesoriis" the land of "Willelmi filii Walteri patris sui et Walteri filii Otheri avi sui", dated to [1154/60][889].  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Windr" making payment in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire and "in perdona per breve Regis Hawise de Windr uxori eius"[890]

m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Windr" making payment in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire and "in perdona per breve Regis Hawise de Windr uxori eius"[891].  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Hawisa de Windr" accounting for "Berchhamsteda" in Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire[892].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Hawisia de Windesore” having “vii filias, quarum ii sunt in transmarinis partibus, ii sunt moniales, iii sunt in donatione Domini Regis", in another passage recording "Hawisia de Windesore" with "i filium…xviii annorum et vi filias" and "terra sua in Stanwelle"[893]

William [II] & his wife had [eight] children: 

1.         WILLIAM [III] de Windsor ([1162/64]-[1215]).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus de Windesore, filius Willelmi de Windesore senioris…de xviii annorum”, adding that he was “in custodia Hawisie de Windesore matris sue per ix annos cum terra sua…Hortone et Etone"[894].  The 1197/98 Feet of Fines records a settlement dated 18 Apr 1198 between "Waltm de Winlesore" and "Willm de Windesor" relating to the barony of "Willi de Windesor avi eorum", with land at "Burneham…Bekenefeld…Etona…Orton…Horslea…Stanewell et Lesmores…Horton…"[895]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [IV] de Windsor (-1248).  He was ancestor of LORDS WINDSOR of Stanwell[896]

2.         [six or seven] daughters .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Hawisia de Windesore” having “vii filias, quarum ii sunt in transmarinis partibus, ii sunt moniales, iii sunt in donatione Domini Regis", in another passage recording "Hawisia de Windesore" with "i filium…xviii annorum et vi filias" and "terra sua in Stanwelle"[897]

 

 

 

OTHER UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY

 

 

1.         HILBERTm ---.  The name of Hilbert’s wife is not known.  Hilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ENGUERRAND FitzHilbert (-after 24 Apr 1089).  "…Ingelrannus filius Ilberti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[898].  "…Ingilranni filii Hilberti…" witnessed a charter dated to [1077] under which William I King of England granted property to the abbey of Saint-Etienne de Caen[899].  "Ingelrannus, Hilberti filius" donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domini mei Willelmi Anglorum regis et Mathildis reginæ coniugis eius, filiorumque eorum Rotberti atque Willelmi", by charter dated 1080[900].  "…Eudo de Ria fitz Hubert…Engelramn fitz Hubert…" witnessed the charter dated 14 Jul 1080 under which William I King of England confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Lessay[901].  "…Engelrannus filius Ilberti…" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[902].  "…Engelranus filius Ilberti…" witnessed the charter dated 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy confirmed the restoration of the monastery of Saint-Vigor near Bayeux[903]

 

 

1.         GILBERTm ---.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         BALDRIC (-after 1130).  "Willelmo de Albin Britone et Ricardo Basset et Bald filio Gisleberti" witnessed the charter dated 1130 under which Henry I King of England confirmed protection over St Mary’s, Thorney[904]

 

2.         BALDRICm ---.  Baldric & his wife had one child: 

a)         RALPH (-after 1133).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation "in Stottona" to St Mary’s, Huntingdon by "Radulfus filius Baldr" by charter dated to [before 1133][905]

 

3.         BALDRICm ---.  Baldric & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH FitzBaldric .  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Hotona…in Normanby…et in Kyrkeby-Misperton” by “Hugo Baldrici filius[906].  The Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey lists "Hugo fil[ius] Baldri, Fulco f[rate]r Alein, Roger f[rate]r eius, Ricard avuncl ei[us]"[907]m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

i)          RICHARD .  The Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey lists "Hugo fil[ius] Baldri, Fulco f[rate]r Alein, Roger f[rate]r eius, Ricard avuncl ei[us]"[908]

ii)         ISABELLE .  The Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey lists "Aleinus de Crehun, Wido pat[er] eius, Isenbele, Wido, Morize, Gefridus, Meæriel de Belca[mp], Mabiliæ, Isenbele"[909]m GUY de Craon, son of --- (-after 1085). 

 

 

1.         ULF Fornesson .  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Skertenbek” by “Ulfe Formesson[910]

 

 

1.         PICARD (-after [1123]).  "…Picard…Roger fil Pic…" subscribed the charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[911]m ---.  The name of Picard’s wife is not known.  Picard & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER FitzPicard (-after [1123]).  "…Picard…Roger fil Pic…" subscribed the charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[912]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Turbeville (-after [1123]).  "…Hugo de Turbuilla…" subscribed the charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[913]

 

 

1.         HILDEBRAND .  His name suggests Italian or Germanic origin.  As his son was a supporter of Empress Matilda during the civil war with King Stephen, it is possible that Hildebrand came to England from the imperial court, after the death of Emperor Heinrich V, with the emperor’s widow.  m ---.  The name of Hildebrand’s wife is not known.  Hildebrand & his wife two children: 

a)         ROBERT FitzHildebrand (-[1142]).  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] witnessed by "…Rob fil Heldebrand…"[914].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Robertum filium Hildebrandi" fell in love with "Willelmus de Ponte Arcarum…uxorem", imprisoned her husband, but died from a painful illness, dated from the context to [1142][915]

b)         RICHARD FitzHildebrand (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardus filius Hildebrant" held half of one knight’s fee in Dorset from the abbot of Sherborne and five knights’ fees from the bishop of Salisbury in Wiltshire[916]

 

 

1.         SERLONm ---.  The name of Serlon’s wife is not known.  Serlon & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Serlon" in Oxfordshire in respect of "Liemer"[917]

b)         RICHARD FitzSerlon (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardus filius Serlonis" held one knight’s fee from "Ricardi dil Estre" in Somerset[918]

 

 

1.         BERTRAM de Bulmer (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Bertrann de Bulemer" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[919]

 

 

1.         PAYNm ---.  The name of Payn’s wife is not known.  Payn & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT FitzPayn (-after 1130).  Henry I King of England granted land "quæ fuit Ebrardi avunculi sui in Chillun" [Kilham, Yorkshire] to "Roberto filio Pagani" by charter dated to [1126] witnessed by "Henrico de Pomer, Eustacio filio Johannis, Roberto de Bruis, Waltero Espec"[920].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt fil Pag…terra Ebrardi avunculi sui" in Yorkshire[921]

 

2.         PAYNm ---.  The name of Payn’s wife is not known.  Payn & his wife had one child: 

a)         GEOFFREY FitzPayn (-1136).  "…Gaufr fil Pag…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[922].  "…Gaufrido filio Pagani" witnessed the charter dated 1127 under which Henry I King of England granted "custodiam et constabulariam castelli Roffi" to the archbishop of Canterbury[923].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gaufr fil Pag" in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire[924]

 

3.         GEOFFROY (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gaufr fil Cancell" in Dorsetshire[925]

 

4.         TURBOT (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Turbot fil Chembel" in Wiltshire[926]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Turville (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Turbtiuilla" in Dorsetshire[927]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Sackville (-before 1161).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         MABILE .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the letter of Pope Alexander III dated 8 Apr 1161, addressed to the bishop of Chichester, relating to the dispute concerning the inheritance of "Willielmi de Saccavilla" between "filia…Mabilla de Franceville" and "ex sorore nepos…Ricardum de Anesten", the latter claiming that the former was "de illicito matrimonio…genitam"[928]m --- de Franceville, son of ---.  

2.         sister .  m --- de Anestia, son of ---. 

a)         RICHARD de Anestia [Anesten] .  His parentage are confirmed by the letter of Pope Alexander III dated 8 Apr 1161, addressed to the bishop of Chichester, relating to the dispute concerning the inheritance of "Willielmi de Saccavilla" between "filia…Mabilla de Franceville" and "ex sorore nepos…Ricardum de Anesten"[929]

 

 

1.         PETER .  Camerarius.  m ---.  Peter & his wife had one child: 

a)         GEOFFREY (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Petrus camerarius" used to hold three knights` fees in Hampshire now held by "Galfridus filius eius"[930]

 

 

1.         ALDELINm ---.  Aldelin & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         WILLIAM FitzAldelin (-after 1166).  Marshall.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the names of tenants who held knights` fees from land granted by the king to "Willelmo filio Aldelin marscallo suo cum Juliana filia Roberti Dorsnelli"[931]m JULIANA, daughter of ROBERT Dorsnell & his wife --- (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the names of tenants who held knights` fees from land granted by the king to "Willelmo filio Aldelin marscallo suo cum Juliana filia Roberti Dorsnelli"[932]

 

 

1.         ALARD FitzWilliamm ---.  Alard & his wife had two children: 

a)         daughter .  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Alardus filius Willelmi" held "feudum unius militis de hereditate uxoris sue in Gathamthune", which King John granted to "Walterus Pipard…in maritagio cum uxore sua, filia predicti Alardi"[933].  m ([1199/1212]) WALTER Pipard, son of ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Walterus Pipardus vi milites" among the tenants of the honour of Wallingford[934].  

b)         daughter .  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Baldewinus de Kantilup" held "Powrd" in Oxfordshire "de dono Regis Johannes cum filia Alardi filii Willelmi"[935].  m (before 1210) BALDWIN de Cauntelo, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Calveley (-before 1200).  m ALICE, daughter of ---.  "Gilb fil Gilb de Calweleya et Alic mater eius" paid a fine for "terra que fuit G. patris sui die que obiit" in Northumberland and to marry "per voluntate sua et consilio matris sue", dated 1201[936]Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         GILBERT de Calveley (-after 1212).  "Gilb fil Gilb de Calweleya et Alic mater eius" paid a fine for "terra que fuit G. patris sui die que obiit" in Northumberland and to marry "per voluntate sua et consilio matris sue", dated 1201[937].  "Gilbertus de Calweleg" paid a fine for "heritanda Jattlincton" in Northumberland, dated 1199[938].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Gillebertus de Calveleya" holding "in capite de domino rege ii villas" in Northumberland which had been held by "omnes…antecessores sui…post tempus Regis Willelmi Bastardi"[939].  

 

 



[1] Loyd (1951), p. 100. 

[2] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), Series 2, Vol. 28,. 

[3] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 179. 

[4] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. I, 89, p. 23. 

[5] Liber Eliensis, Vol. I, II, 117, p. 252. 

[6] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Monastery, Lincolnshire, V, p. 216. 

[7] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, p. 553.   

[8] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[9] Domesday Translation, Lincolnshire, XIIII, pp. 909-14. 

[10] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, Lincoln Cathedral, IV, p. 1271.   

[11] Ingulph's Chronicle, pp. 258-9. 

[12] Chronicon Petroburgense, 1074, p. 58. 

[13] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Monastery, Lincolnshire, I, p. 215.   

[14] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Monastery, Lincolnshire, V, p. 216.   

[15] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 259. 

[16] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, p. 553.   

[17] Ingulph's Chronicle, p. 259. 

[18] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XI, p. 551.   

[19] Domesday Descendants, p. 539. 

[20] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire VI, p. 909.   

[21] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, p. 553.   

[22] Domesday Translation, Hertfordshire, I, p. 370. 

[23] Domesday Translation, Buckinghamshire, LIIII, p. 420, Bedfordshire, LV, p. 586. 

[24] Domesday Translation, Hertfordshire, XLIII, p. 393. 

[25] Domesday Translation, Lincolnshire, LXVI, pp. 955-6. 

[26] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 31. 

[27] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 52, p. 7. 

[28] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 52, p. 7. 

[29] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 180 [no source citation]. 

[30] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, Ex Libro Feod. milit. pence Remem. Regis in Scncc., p. 553.   

[31] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 26. 

[32] Red Book of the Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 563. 

[33] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 203. 

[34] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 180, citing Pipe Rolls 23 Hen II and 10 Richard I. 

[35] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 51. 

[36] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 364. 

[37] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary Abbey, XX, Ex Libro Feod. milit. pence Remem. Regis in Scncc., p. 553.   

[38] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 563. 

[39] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 203. 

[40] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 181, citing “16 John” (no precise citation reference). 

[41] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 250. 

[42] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 347, p. 94. 

[43] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 181 (no sources cited). 

[44] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 181 (no sources cited). 

[45] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 375, p. 102. 

[46] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 375, p. 102. 

[47] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), Appendix, I, p. 231. 

[48] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 375, p. 102. 

[49] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 406, p. 234. 

[50] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 406, p. 234. 

[51] Ragg ‘Cliburn Tailbois’ (1928), p. 181 (no sources cited). 

[52] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome III, DCLIX, p. 42, footnote 1. 

[53] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Covenham Priory, Lincolnshire, I, p. 993.   

[54] Dugdale Monasticon V, Barnstaple Priory, Devonshire, I, p. 197. 

[55] Domesday Translation, Devonshire, XVII, pp. 306-12, Cornwall, VI, p. 357. 

[56] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Totness Priory, Devonshire, I, p. 630. 

[57] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Totness Priory, Devonshire, II, p. 630. 

[58] Darsy (1860), p. 26, citing Hermannus monachus De miraculis sanctæ Mariæ laudunensis, lib. II, cap. XVII, p. 540 (available in Patrologia Latina, Vol. 156, not yet consulted). 

[59] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 153. 

[60] Gesta Stephani Regis, I, p. 24. 

[61] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 20, p. 688. 

[62] Dugdale Monasticon V, Barnstaple Priory, Devonshire, V, p. 198. 

[63] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), Devonshire, p. 2. 

[64] Domesday Descendants, p. 743. 

[65] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxl. 

[66] Loyd (1951), p. 105. 

[67] Round (1899), 719, p. 258. 

[68] Round (1899), 719, p. 258. 

[69] Round (1899), 719, p. 258. 

[70] Round (1899), 719, p. 258. 

[71] Dugdale Monasticon V, Barnstaple Priory, Devonshire, IV, p. 198. 

[72] Pipe Roll 11 Hen II (1164/65), p. 81. 

[73] Domesday Descendants, p. 675. 

[74] Malmesbury, Vol. II, CLXXVI, p. 34. 

[75] Dugdale Monasticon V, Barnstaple Priory, Devonshire, IV, p. 198. 

[76] Acte 3012, dans SCRIPTA. Base des actes normands médiévaux, dir. Pierre Bauduin, Caen, CRAHAM-MRSH, 2010-2019, at <https://pdnprod.unicaen.fr/scripta/ead.html?id=scripta&c=scripta_sc_3012> (20 Nov 2022). 

[77] Round (1899), 719, p. 258. 

[78] Dugdale Monasticon V, Barnstaple Priory, Devonshire, IV, p. 198. 

[79] Pipe Roll 11 Hen II (1164/65), p. 81. 

[80] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42. 

[81] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 635. 

[82] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), Devonshire, p. 2. 

[83] Pipe Roll 31 Hen II (1184/85), p. 164. 

[84] Pipe Roll 32 Hen II (1185/86), p. 157. 

[85] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 88. 

[86] Feet of Fines 1182-1196, 100, p. 83. 

[87] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (1.), pp. 1-4. 

[88] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 298. 

[89] Red Book Exchequer, p. 121. 

[90] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 16. 

[91] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 19. 

[92] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 515. 

[93] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (58.), p. 36. 

[94] Papin (2016), pp. 112-13, citing Santinelli, E. (2003) Des femmes éplorées? Les veuves dans la société aristocratique du haut Moyen Âge (Villeneuve-d’Ascq), p. 114 [not consulted]. 

[95] Stapleton (1844) Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxli. 

[96] Papin (2016), p. 112, footnote 513 quoting Pipe Roll 12 John, pp. 59, 169. 

[97] Rotuli Litteratum Clausarum, Vol. I (1833), p. 326. 

[98] Rotuli Litteratum Clausarum, Vol. I (1833), p. 355. 

[99] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 254 and 264. 

[100] Excerpta e rotulis finium, Vol. I, p. 24. 

[101] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 89a. 

[102] Excerpta e rotulis finium, Vol. I, p. 26. 

[103] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 430. 

[104] Excerpta e rotulis finium, Vol. I, p. 40. 

[105] Excerpta e rotulis finium, Vol. I, p. 50. 

[106] Rotuli Litteratum Clausarum, Vol. I (1833), p. 425. 

[107] Rotuli Litteratum Clausarum, Vol. I (1833), p. 459. 

[108] Excerpta e rotulis finium, Vol. I, p. 88. 

[109] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 24. 

[110] Memoranda Rolls: 16-17 Henry III (London, 1991), 1416, p. 108 [Google Books Snippet view]. 

[111] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 729. 

[112] Brewer, J. S. (ed.) (1858) Monumenta Franciscana (London), III Registrum fratrum minorem Londoniæ, XV, p. 98. 

[113] Inquisitions Miscellaneous (Chancery) (1916), Vol. I, 178, p. 59. 

[114] Rotuli Litteratum Clausarum, Vol. I (1833), p. 137. 

[115] Malmesbury, Vol. II, CLXXVI, p. 34. 

[116] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 18 John, p. 604. 

[117] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (125.), p. 66. 

[118] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 217. 

[119] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 21. 

[120] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (199.), p. 98. 

[121] Inquisitions Miscellaneous (Chancery) (1916), Vol. I, 178, p. 59. 

[122] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 76, p. 56. 

[123] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (199.), p. 98. 

[124] Drake ‘De Braose, Martyn, Audley and FitzWaryn’ (1882), p. 16, citing “King’s Writ to Sheriff of Devon (16 Rich II) 1391”. 

[125] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 76, p. 56. 

[126] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 144, p. 35. 

[127] Papin (2016), p. 113. 

[128] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 729. 

[129] Dugdale Monasticon V, Whiteland Abbey, Carmarthenshire, II, p. 591. 

[130] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 83. 

[131] Domesday Descendants, p. 743. 

[132] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXVIII, p. 123. 

[133] Round (1899), 558, p. 195. 

[134] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 248. 

[135] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42. 

[136] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCLXXII, p. 418. 

[137] Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 555. 

[138] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1171, MGH SS XXIII, p. 854. 

[139] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 639. 

[140] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLVII, p. 137. 

[141] Rotuli Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. 38. 

[142] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxviii. 

[143] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 16. 

[144] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, p. 96. 

[145] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 628. 

[146] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire, II, p. 382.   

[147] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, p. 96. 

[148] Red Book Exchequer, p. 121. 

[149] Rotuli Chartarum, 2 John, p. 79. 

[150] Rotuli Chartarum, 2 John, p. 79. 

[151] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 16. 

[152] Round (1899), 558, p. 195. 

[153] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLVII, p. 137. 

[154] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLVII, p. 137. 

[155] Vincent ‘Murderers of Thomas Becket’ (2003), p. 238 footnote 119. 

[156] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLVII, p. 137. 

[157] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I, p. 171. 

[158] Rotuli Chartarum, 2 John, p. 79. 

[159] Rotuli Chartarum, 2 John, p. 79. 

[160] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 15. 

[161] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxl, footnote x continuation from previous page. 

[162] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 88. 

[163] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 296. 

[164] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 298. 

[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire, II, p. 382.   

[166] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 21. 

[167] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. 515. 

[168] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxl, footnote x continuation from previous page. 

[169] Gloucester St Peter, Vol. II, DCCXXVII, p. 180. 

[170] Barlow (1990), p. 235. 

[171] Vincent ‘Murderers of Thomas Becket’ (2003), p. 232. 

[172] Vincent ‘Murderers of Thomas Becket’ (2003), p. 233, citing Royce, D. (ed.) (1892) Landboc sive registrum monasterii beatæ Mariæ virginis et sancti Cenhelmi de Winchelcumba (Exeter), Vol. I, pp. 191-3 (not yet consulted). 

[173] Round (1899), 912, p. 324. 

[174] Vincent ‘Murderers of Thomas Becket’, p. 233, citing BL Sloane Charter XXXIII.3 (not yet consulted). 

[175] Vincent ‘Murderers of Thomas Becket’, p. 233, citing Royce, D. (ed.) (1892) Landboc sive registrum monasterii beatæ Mariæ virginis et sancti Cenhelmi de Winchelcumba (Exeter), Vol. I, pp. 191-3 (not yet consulted). 

[176] Gloucester St Peter, Vol. II, DCCXXVII, p. 180. 

[177] Eynsham, Vol. I, 187, p. 138. 

[178] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1732, p. 568. 

[179] CP XI Appendix D, p. 110, footnote l continued from previous page. 

[180] Loyd (1951), p. 106. 

[181] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Essex, p. 56, Norfolk, p. 95. 

[182] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bresethe Priory, Suffolk, I, p. 174.   

[183] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Snape Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 558. 

[184] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 51. 

[185] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli IV, Norfolk, Hundredum de Hapinges, p. 30. 

[186] Kirk (1899), Vol. I, 9 Ric I, 58, p. 18. 

[187] Feet of Fines for Essex, Vol. I, 9 Ric I, 58, p. 18. 

[188] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli IV, Essex, Hundredum de Turst, p. 41. 

[189] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 77. 

[190] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Essex & Hertfordshire, p. 31. 

[191] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 479. 

[192] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli IV, Essex, Hundredum de Turst, p. 41. 

[193] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 275. 

[194] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1738, p. 574. 

[195] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli IV, Norfolk, Hundredum de Hapinges, p. 30. 

[196] Bigelow (1881), Appendix, F, p. 311

[197] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 633. 

[198] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXXXIX, p. 370. 

[199] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 76. 

[200] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Honor de Arundel, p. 9. 

[201] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 219. 

[202] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 484 and 496. 

[203] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 74. 

[204] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, IX, p. 555.   

[205] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Acornbury Priory, Herefordshire, VII, p. 491.   

[206] Excerpta e Rotulis Finium in Turri Londinensi asservatis (1835), Vol. I, p. 307. 

[207] Bannister (1902), 20, p. 50. 

[208] Bannister (1902), XIII, p. 61. 

[209] Gurney (1845) Part I, The Gournays in Normandy, p. 149, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum. 

[210] Gurney (1845), p. 149, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum. 

[211] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 603, p. 453. 

[212] Gurney (1845), p. 149, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum. 

[213] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 412, p. 274. 

[214] Gurney (1845), p. 149, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum. 

[215] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 603, p. 453. 

[216] Gurney (1845), p. 149, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum. 

[217] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 603, p. 453. 

[218] CP VI 60. 

[219] Bannister (1902), 26, p. 51. 

[220] Bannister (1902), 26, p. 51. 

[221] Bannister (1902), p. 25. 

[222] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, IX, p. 555.   

[223] Bannister (1902), 20, p. 50. 

[224] Bannister (1902), p. 25. 

[225] Calendar of Charter Rolls, Vol. III, p. 420. 

[226] Round (1899), 883, p. 315. 

[227] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 47. 

[228] Round (1899), 142, p. 47. 

[229] Dugdale Monasticon V, Southwark Priory, p. 169. 

[230] Round (1899), 142, p. 47. 

[231] Round (1899), 142, p. 47. 

[232] Round (1899), 142, p. 47. 

[233] Round (1899), 883, p. 315. 

[234] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 47. 

[235] Round (1899), 142, p. 47. 

[236] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Boxgrove Priory, Sussex, VIII, p. 647. 

[237] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Boxgrove Priory, Sussex, IX, p. 647. 

[238] Farrer (1925), Vol. III, p. 31, citing Cott. MS. Claud. A. vi, f. 65. 

[239] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Boxgrove Priory, Sussex, VIII, p. 647. 

[240] Farrer (1925), Vol. III, p. 31, citing Cott. MS. Claud. A. vi, f. 65. 

[241] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Boxgrove Priory, Sussex, IX, p. 647. 

[242] Round (1899), 142, p. 47. 

[243] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[244] Clark (1907), I, 22, p. 47. 

[245] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli III, Norhamtonsire, p. 14. 

[246] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 288. 

[247] Rotuli Litteratum Clausarum, Vol. I (1833), p. 34. 

[248] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[249] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[250] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[251] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[252] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievall Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[253] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, p. 1. 

[254] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[255] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[256] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[257] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[258] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[259] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[260] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 288. 

[261] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 361. 

[262] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[263] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[264] Dugdale Monasticon II, Belvoir Monastery, Lincolnshire, XI, p. 290.   

[265] Domesday Translation, Hertfordshire, XXXVI, pp. 389-90, Essex, XXXVI, pp. 1029-30, Norfolk, pp. 1165-7. 

[266] Domesday Translation, Hertfordshire, I, p. 370. 

[267] Liber Eliensis, Vol. I, II, 117, p. 252. 

[268] Dugdale Monasticon V, Bermondsey Abbey, Surrey, II, p. 100.   

[269] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, I, p. 345.   

[270] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, VI, p. 348.   

[271] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXXII, p. 355. 

[272] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, I, p. 345.   

[273] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, I, p. 345.   

[274] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, I, p. 345.   

[275] CP IX 412, footnote c, citing Cartulary of Thetford Abbey, Cott. MS., Vitell., F iv, fo. 161, Historical Manuscripts Commission, Var. Coll., Vol. II, p. 227. 

[276] Norwich Cathedral, I, 121, p. 68 [extract only, in translation]. 

[277] CP IX 412, footnote c, citing Cartulary of Thetford Abbey, Cott. MS., Vitell., F iv, fo. 161, Historical Manuscripts Commission, Var. Coll., Vol. II, p. 227. 

[278] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[279] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 114. 

[280] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 114. 

[281] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 114. 

[282] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, I, p. 345.   

[283] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, VI, p. 348.   

[284] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 98. 

[285] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[286] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 106, p. 39. 

[287] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 102. 

[288] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 98. 

[289] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 102. 

[290] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 98. 

[291] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 98. 

[292] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 102. 

[293] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 98. 

[294] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, fol. 22b, p. 17. 

[295] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, IV, p. 380. 

[296] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, I, p. 380. 

[297] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[298] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[299] CP II 447. 

[300] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Leystone Abbey, Suffolk, IV, p. 879. 

[301] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[302] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[303] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[304] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Leystone Abbey, Suffolk, IV, p. 879. 

[305] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[306] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[307] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Leystone Abbey, Suffolk, IV, p. 879. 

[308] Early Charters (Crawford), XVI, p. 32. 

[309] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, II, p. 380. 

[310] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 190. 

[311] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1100, p. 116. 

[312] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, I, p. 345.   

[313] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXXII, p. 355. 

[314] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CLXV, p. 349. 

[315] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Hertfordshire, p. 62. 

[316] Round (1892), p. 286. 

[317] Norwich Cathedral, I, 121, p. 68 [extract only, in translation]. 

[318] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, II, p. 346.   

[319] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[320] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, II, p. 346.   

[321] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[322] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 107. 

[323] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, IV, p. 347.   

[324] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotulus VII, Hertefordesire, Hundredum de Herdforde, p. 36, Verumdictum de Clavering, p. 41, and Rotulus X, Cantebrigesire, Alid Hundredum, p. 46. 

[325] CP XII/2 footnote d. 

[326] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[327] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, II, p. 346.   

[328] Round (1892), p. 172. 

[329] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[330] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1128, p. 147. 

[331] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 114. 

[332] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 362. 

[333] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1128, p. 147. 

[334] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/22, 9 Hen III, 27. 

[335] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[336] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, II, p. 346.   

[337] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[338] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 360. 

[339] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 38. 

[340] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, IV, p. 347.   

[341] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 106. 

[342] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1128, p. 147. 

[343] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, IV, p. 347.   

[344] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 106. 

[345] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 106. 

[346] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 113. 

[347] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotulus VII, Hertefordesire, Hundredum de Herdforde, p. 36, Verumdictum de Clavering, p. 41, and Rotulus X, Cantebrigesire, Alid Hundredum, p. 46. 

[348] Round ‘Comyn and Valoignes’ (Oct 1904), p. 132, quoting Red Book of the Exchequer, Vol. I, pp. 78, 94 and 361.  . 

[349] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 81 and 94. 

[350] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 97. 

[351] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1128, p. 147. 

[352] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 424. 

[353] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[354] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, II, p. 346.   

[355] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[356] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 349. 

[357] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 38. 

[358] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 424. 

[359] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 428. 

[360] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 428. 

[361] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[362] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, II, p. 346.   

[363] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 107. 

[364] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[365] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 110. 

[366] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. III, 106, p. 39. 

[367] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[368] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 107. 

[369] Isle of May, 16, p. 11. 

[370] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1128, p. 147. 

[371] Dugdale Monasticon III, Binham Monastery, Norfolk, III, p. 346.   

[372] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 78. 

[373] Isle of May, 16, p. 11. 

[374] Domesday Descendants, p. 759. 

[375] Lindores, II, p. 2. 

[376] Kinloss, p. 109. 

[377] Scone, 19, p. 17. 

[378] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 428. 

[379] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 848, p. 150. 

[380] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1128, p. 147. 

[381] Melrose Liber, Tome I, 115, p. 107. 

[382] Joannis de Fordun (Goodall), Vol. II, Lib. IX, Cap. XXXIV, p. 43. 

[383] CP XII/2 751 footnote e. 

[384] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 199, p. 159. 

[385] CP V 133 footnote f, citing Fine Roll, 17 Hen. III, m. 5. 

[386] CP V 133 footnote f, citing Fine Roll, 17 Hen. III, m. 5. 

[387] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 199, p. 159. 

[388] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 280, p. 72. 

[389] CP V 133 footnote f, citing Fine Roll, 17 Hen. III, m. 5. 

[390] Vincent ‘Sir Alexander Balliol of Cavers’ (1882), p. 4, quoting cartulary of Binham Priory, Norfolk, Cotton MSS, Claudius D xiii, f. 151 b. 

[391] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 124. 

[392] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 575, p. 101. 

[393] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 848, p. 150. 

[394] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 170, p. 56. 

[395] Holyrood, 74, p. 62. 

[396] Panmure, Vol. II, p. 107. 

[397] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Butley Priory, Suffolk, I, p. 380. 

[398] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 634. 

[399] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), Devonshire, p. 6. 

[400] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 78. 

[401] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Yorkshire, p. 161. 

[402] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 3 John, p. 195. 

[403] Rotuli Chartarum, 5 John, p. 114. 

[404] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 3 John, p. 195. 

[405] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 94. 

[406] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 97. 

[407] Hugo (1736), Tome II, Probationes, col. xxix. 

[408] CP XII/2 242. 

[409] Hugo (1736), Tome II, Probationes, col. xxix. 

[410] CP XII/2 242. 

[411] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 145. 

[412] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 17 footnote 1, quoting Pipe Roll, 12 John, Buckingham and Bedford. 

[413] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 17 footnote 1, quoting Pipe Roll, 12 John, Buckingham and Bedford. 

[414] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 469-70, and 472. 

[415] Testa de Nevill, Part IB, p. 462. 

[416] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 398, p. 220. 

[417] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 469-70. 

[418] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 469-70. 

[419] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 198. 

[420] Chronicle of Melrose, 1222, p. 58. 

[421] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Hickling Priory, Norfolk, I, p. 476.   

[422] Rotuli Chartarum, 5 John, p. 116. 

[423] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Hickling Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 476.   

[424] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Hickling Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 476.   

[425] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 480. 

[426] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 532. 

[427] Rotuli Chartarum, 5 John, p. 116. 

[428] Rotuli Chartarum, 5 John, p. 116. 

[429] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 503. 

[430] Pipe Roll 12 Hen II (1165/66), p. 41. 

[431] Pipe Roll 16 Hen II (1169/70), Lincolnshire, p. 37. 

[432] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, St Peter’s Cathedral, York, Yorkshire LXXVIII, p. 1190.   

[433] Pipe Roll 28 Hen II (1181/82), p. 46. 

[434] Percy Chartulary, V, p. 5. 

[435] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 262. 

[436] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Gloucestershire, p. 3. 

[437] Round (1892), p. 286. 

[438] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 550, p. 425. 

[439] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 550, p. 425. 

[440] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 556. 

[441] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 97. 

[442] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 550, p. 425. 

[443] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2647, p. 394. 

[444] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2584, p. 385. 

[445] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 2584, p. 385. 

[446] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 189. 

[447] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 189. 

[448] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/21, 8 Hen III, 25. 

[449] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/21, 8 Hen III, 25. 

[450] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 420. 

[451] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 420. 

[452] St Andrew’s Priory, p. 420. 

[453] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 432, p. 247. 

[454] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 432, p. 247. 

[455] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 432, p. 247. 

[456] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 432, p. 247. 

[457] Domesday Translation, Devonshire, XV, p. 296. 

[458] Oliver (1846) Monasticon Exoniensis , p. 297, citing “Exch. Domesd. fol. 105b; Exon. ditto. fol. 197; 2 Ellis’s Introduction to Domeday, p. 373”. 

[459] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 293. 

[460] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, 680, p. 39. 

[461] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, 1391, p. 185. 

[462] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Priory of Plympton, Devonshire, I, p. 52.   

[463] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 293. 

[464] Ninth Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part I. Report and Appendix (London, 1883), Manuscripts of Eton College, p. 351. 

[465] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Cornwall, p. 160. 

[466] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 25. 

[468] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, p. 698. 

[469] Ninth Report of the Royal Commission, Part I. Report and Appendix (1883), Manuscripts of Eton College, p. 351. 

[470] Pipe Roll 7 Hen II (1160/61), p. 28. 

[471] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, p. 698. 

[472] Ninth Report of the Royal Commission, Part I. Report and Appendix (1883), Manuscripts of Eton College, p. 351. 

[473] Pipe Roll 11 Hen II (1164/65), p. 81. 

[474] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 259, 261. 

[475] Pipe Roll 14 Hen II (1167/68), p. 129. 

[476] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, pp. 43, 56. 

[477] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 293. 

[478] Pipe Roll 18 Hen II (1171/72), p. 102. 

[479] Pipe Roll 19 Hen II (1172/73), p. 148, Pipe Roll 20 Hen II (1173/74), p. 93. 

[480] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), p. 7. 

[481] Pipe Roll 33 Hen II (1186/87), p. 146, Pipe Roll 1 Ric (1189/90), p. 136

[482] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 293. 

[483] Pipe Roll 33 Hen II (1186/87), p. 155. 

[484] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 293. 

[485] Pipe Roll 18 Hen II (1171/72), p. 102. 

[486] Pipe Roll 19 Hen II (1172/73), p. 148, Pipe Roll 20 Hen II (1173/74), p. 93. 

[487] Pipe Roll 33 Hen II (1186/87), p. 145. 

[488] Pipe Roll 1 Ric (1189/90), p. 134, Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), p. 168. 

[489] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 417. 

[490] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 419. 

[491] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 419. 

[492] Pipe Roll 33 Hen II (1186/87), p. 155. 

[493] Pipe Roll 1 Ric (1189/90), p. 112. 

[494] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), p. 171. 

[495] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, pp. 88, 89. 

[496] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), pp. 172, 174. 

[497] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 417. 

[498] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 112. 

[499] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 419. 

[500] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Appendix, p. 792. 

[501] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 421. 

[502] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus (1835), p. 407. 

[503] Powley (1944), p. 29. 

[504] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 422. 

[505] Somerset Manuscripts (1898), pp. 134-5. 

[506] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 523, p. 398. 

[507] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, p. 539. 

[508] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 422. 

[509] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 98-9. 

[510] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 98. 

[511] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 422. 

[512] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium (1835), Vol. I, Pars 1, p. 159. 

[513] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (134), 65, p. 70.

[514] Reports from Commissioners, Public Records, Vol. XXVIII (London, 1870), 31st Report, Appendix No. 4. List of Sheriffs of English Counties, p. 273. 

[515] Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum (1833), Vol. I, pp. 477, 494. 

[516] Excerpta e rotulis finium (1835), Vol. I, p. 154. 

[517] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 393. 

[518] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (259), 191, p. 127.

[519] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 431-5. 

[520] Oliver (1846) Monasticon Dioecesis Exoniensis, Bodmin, II, p. 18. 

[521] Excerpta e rotulis finium (1835), Vol. I, p. 435. 

[522] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 63, p. 15. 

[523] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/12, 4 Hen III, 152. 

[524] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1584, p. 461. 

[525] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1601, p. 471. 

[526] Excerpta e rotulis finium (1835), Vol. II, p. 20.

[527] Powley (1944), p. 36. 

[528] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 86. 

[529] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (456), 398, p. 235.

[530] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (477), 409, p. 242.

[531] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (259), 191, p. 127.

[532] Powley (1944), p. 37. 

[533] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 165, p. 105. 

[534] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 165, p. 105. 

[535] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 523, p. 398. 

[536] Basset Charters, 154, p. 94. 

[537] Basset Charters, 155, p. 95. 

[538] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 63, p. 15. 

[539] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (456), 398, p. 235.

[540] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (477), 409, p. 242.

[541] Dugdale Baronage, Valletort, consulted at <https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A36794.0001.001/1:6.173?rgn=div2;view=fulltext> (19 Apr 2024). 

[542] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (568), 500, p. 290.

[543] Dugdale Baronage, Valletort. 

[544] Excerpta e rotulis finium (1835), Vol. II, p. 167.

[545] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (568), 500, p. 290.

[546] Oliver (1846) Monasticon Dioecesis Exoniensis, Bodmin, II, p. 18. 

[547] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 728, p. 231. 

[548] Ninth Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part I. Report and Appendix (London, 1883), Manuscripts of Eton College, p. 351. 

[549] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 165, p. 105. 

[550] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 201, p. 124. 

[551] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 309. 

[552] Close Rolls Edward I 1279-1288, p. 440. 

[553] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 523, p. 398. 

[554] Ninth Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part I. Report and Appendix (London, 1883), Manuscripts of Eton College, p. 351. 

[555] Powley (1944), p. 36. 

[556] <https://groups.google.com/g/soc.genealogy.medieval/c/KsAIdPiLjio/m/ulfBCus7CAAJ> (24 Apr 2024). 

[557] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 728, p. 231. 

[558] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 165, p. 105. 

[559] Powley (1944), p. 36. 

[560] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 523, p. 398. 

[561] Pole ([1604?] 1791), pp. 248, 309. 

[562] Hingeston-Randolph, F. C. (1889) The Registers of Walter Bronescombe and Peter Quivil Bishops of Exeter (London), p. 43. 

[563] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 728, p. 231. 

[564] Hargrave, F. (1787) A Collection of Tracts relative to the Law of England, Vol. I (London), p. 55, citing “the charters of the duchy of Cornwall, the transcripts whereof remain in the receipt of the exchequer” (no precise citation reference).  . 

[565] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 604, pp. 456, 457. 

[566] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 233. 

[567] Pipe Roll 16 Hen II (1169/70), p. 117, Pipe Roll 17 Hen II (1170/71), p. 15, Pipe Roll 18 Hen II (1171/72), p. 74. 

[568] Montacute, 91, p. 149. 

[569] Domesday Descendants, p. 312. 

[570] Rotuli Curiæ Regis (1835), Vol. II, p. 189. 

[571] Montacute, 91, p. 149. 

[572] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 400, p. 328. 

[573] Pipe Roll 31 Hen II (1184/85), p. 50. 

[574] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium (1835), Vol. I, Pars 1, p. 26. 

[575] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 419. 

[576] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 99. 

[577] Lega-Weekes ‘Neigbours of North Wyke…Pipe Rolls’ (1904), p. 422. 

[578] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (141), 72, p. 73.

[579] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (225), 157, p. 110.

[580] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (372), 304, p. 185.

[581] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 521, 603, pp. 408, 464. 

[582] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[583] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[584] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[585] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 564, pp. 173, 176. 

[586] Excerpta e rotulis finium (1835), Vol. II, p. 440. 

[587] Feet of Fines (Devon) (1912), Vol. I, (686), 618, p. 354.

[588] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 338. 

[589] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[590] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 360. 

[591] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 370. 

[592] Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313, p. 214. 

[593] Somerset Fines 1307-1346 (1898), 4 Edward II, 70, p. 21. 

[594] Somerset Fines 1307-1346 (1898), 4 Edward II, 70, p. 21. 

[595] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[596] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[597] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[598] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[599] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[600] Somerset Fines 1307-1346 (1898), 4 Edward II, 70, p. 21. 

[601] Pole ([1604?] 1791), pp. 309, 426. 

[602] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 426. 

[603] Somerset Fines 1307-1346 (1898), 4 Edward II, 70, p. 21. 

[604] Excerpta e rotulis finium (1835), Vol. II, p. 332.

[605] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 247, p. 134. 

[606] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 247, p. 134. 

[607] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 248, p. 134. 

[608] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 248, p. 134. 

[609] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 177. 

[610] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 333. 

[611] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 333. 

[612] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 333. 

[613] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 367. 

[614] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 175. 

[615] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 367. 

[616] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 367. 

[617] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 382. 

[618] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. VI, Edward II, 157, p. 92. 

[619] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. VI, Edward II, 157, p. 92. 

[620] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 604, pp. 456, 476. 

[621] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 354. 

[622] Feudal Aids (1899), Vol. I, p. 380. 

[623] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 174. 

[624] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 236. 

[625] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 177. 

[626] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 435. 

[627] Pole ([1604?] 1791), p. 436. 

[628] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[629] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, I, p. 69. 

[630] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIII, p. 403. 

[631] Domesday Translation, Norfolk, p. 1100, Suffolk, p. 1223. 

[632] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, I, p. 69. 

[633] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIII, p. 403. 

[634] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[635] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, II, p. 70. 

[636] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[637] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), p. 92. 

[638] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[639] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[640] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, I, p. 236.   

[641] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[642] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[643] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CXXXII, p. 340. 

[644] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[645] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), p. 92. 

[646] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[647] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[648] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 520. 

[649] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 285. 

[650] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Freston Priory, Lincolnshire, III, p. 126. 

[651] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 7 John, p. 315. 

[652] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 74. 

[653] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[654] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[655] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[656] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Freston Priory, Lincolnshire, III, p. 126. 

[657] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Catesby Nunnery, Northamptonshire, II, p. 637. 

[658] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 653, p. 402. 

[659] CP IX 469, footnote i, citing Assize Roll 560, m 9. 

[660] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[661] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 653, p. 402. 

[662] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[663] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievall Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[664] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 653, p. 402. 

[665] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[666] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[667] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[668] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[669] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, I, p. 236.   

[670] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[671] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[672] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 518. 

[673] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 436. 

[674] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 40. 

[675] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 197. 

[676] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, I, p. 236.   

[677] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, I, p. 236.   

[678] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 395. 

[679] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 54. 

[680] St Bees, 309, p. 318. 

[681] Wetherhal, 191, p. 301.   

[682] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Norfolk & Suffolk, p. 63. 

[683] CP IX, table following p. 398, citing Lanercost Chartulary "penes the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle", pp. 12, 26, and 30 [not yet consulted]. 

[684] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, I, p. 236.   

[685] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 85. 

[686] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Norfolk & Suffolk, p. 63. 

[687] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 492. 

[688] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 95. 

[689] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 96. 

[690] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 169. 

[691] Wetherhal, 192, p. 302. 

[692] Wetherhal, 193, p. 305.   

[693] Bruton, 162, p. 37. 

[694] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 493. 

[695] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 197. 

[696] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 96. 

[697] Bruton, 162, p. 37. 

[698] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 238.   

[699] Wetherhal, 192, p. 302.   

[700] Wetherhal, 193, p. 305.   

[701] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 96. 

[702] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Lanercost Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 238. 

[703] Wetherhal, 194, p. 306. 

[704] Lanercost Chronicle, 1294, p. 159. 

[705] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 94, p. 64. 

[706] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 96. 

[707] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 15 John, p. 105. 

[708] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 169. 

[709] Wetherhal, 193, p. 305.   

[710] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 96. 

[711] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 395. 

[712] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 14 John, p. 95. 

[713] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 17. 

[714] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 397. 

[715] Feet of Fines 1182-1196, 104, p. 90. 

[716] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 473. 

[717] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 9 John, p. 441. 

[718] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 250. 

[719] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 371. 

[720] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1843, p. 641. 

[721] Dryburgh, 23, p. 15. 

[722] Dryburgh, 25, p. 16. 

[723] Dryburgh, 33, p. 22. 

[724] Dryburgh, 33, p. 22. 

[725] Dryburgh, 25, p. 16. 

[726] Dryburgh, 29, p. 19. 

[727] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3132, p. 466. 

[728] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire V, In Chronicis Abbatiæ Tynterne in Wallia, p. 271.   

[729] Calendar of Documents Ireland, Vol. I, 3080, p. 459. 

[730] Annals of Ireland, Vol. II, p. 314. 

[731] Matthew Paris, Vol. V, 1252, p. 341. 

[732] Dryburgh, 138, p. 99. 

[733] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 32, p. 8. 

[734] Dryburgh, 106, p. 76. 

[735] Dryburgh, 107, p. 77. 

[736] Dryburgh, 135, p. 97. 

[737] Dryburgh, 135, p. 97. 

[738] Wetherhal, 194, p. 306. 

[739] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 219, p. 180. 

[740] Dryburgh, 285, p. 233. 

[741] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 147. 

[742] Domesday Translation, Cheshire, pp. 723-4. 

[743] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 44, p. 49. 

[744] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XV, p. 350. 

[745] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 381. 

[746] Loders (Dorset), III, p. 16. 

[747] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario monasterii Montisburgensis, p. 555. 

[748] CP I Appendix I, p. 768, quoting Cartulary of Loders

[749] CP I Appendix I, p. 768, quoting Cartulary of Montebourg

[750] Loders (Dorset) V, p. 18. 

[751] Round (1899) 878, p. 314. 

[752] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXX, p. 149. 

[753] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 381. 

[754] CP I Appendix I, p. 768, quoting Cartulary of Loders

[755] Round (1899) 879, p. 314. 

[756] CP I Appendix I, p. 768, quoting Cartulary of Loders

[757] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Dorsetshire, Wiltshire, p. 13. 

[758] Round (1899) 879, p. 314. 

[759] Actes Henri II, Tome I, V, p. 10. 

[760] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XIV, p. 18. 

[761] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XLII, p. 47. 

[762] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 135. 

[763] Acte 3130, dans SCRIPTA. Base des actes normands médiévaux, dir. Pierre Bauduin, Caen, CRAHAM-MRSH, 2010-2019, at <https://pdnprod.unicaen.fr/scripta/ead.html?id=scripta&c=scripta_sc_3130> (20 Nov 2022). 

[764] Round (1899) 889, p. 317. 

[765] Round (1899) 891, p. 318. 

[766] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 135. 

[767] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 630. 

[768] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXXVI, p. 89. 

[769] Jumièges, Tome II, CXIV, p. 34. 

[770] Round (1899) 891, p. 318. 

[771] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXX, p. 149. 

[772] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXXIII, p. 167. 

[773] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 441, p. 186. 

[774] Round (1899) 890, p. 317. 

[775] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario monasterii Montisburgensis, p. 555. 

[776] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario monasterii Montisburgensis, p. 555. 

[777] Round (1899) 891, p. 318. 

[778] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLXXXIII, p. 167. 

[779] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario monasterii Montisburgensis, p. 555. 

[780] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario monasterii Montisburgensis, p. 555. 

[781] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 441, p. 186. 

[782] Jumièges, Tome II, CXIV, p. 34. 

[783] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario monasterii Montisburgensis, p. 554. 

[784] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XXXIV, p. 135. 

[785] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298.