untitled ENGLISH NOBILITY P - S

v4.7 Updated 06 June 2024

 

RETURN TO INDEX

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

PANTULF. 2

PAYNELL. 10

PEVEREL. 26

PICOT. 40

PINKENEY. 45

PIPARD. 53

POMERAI 54

PONT-de-l’ARCHE. 58

RAMES. 62

RIDEL. 75

RIE. 79

ROLLOS. 88

ROS (of Kent) 89

RUMILLY. 93

SAINT-CLAIR. 94

SAINT-HILAIRE. 100

SAINT-MARTIN. 104

SAINT-MEDARD. 105

STUTEVILLE (ESTOUTEVILLE) 107

 

 

 

PANTULF

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Noron in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Falaise, canton Falaise[1].  This is demonstrated by Orderic Vitalis recording that "Guillelmus miles cognomento Pantol" donated "ecclesias de Norun" to "S. Ebrulfo", with the consent of "Rogerio comite domino suo", in 1073[2]

 

 

[PANTULF] .  The name of William Pantulf’s father is not known.  However, in light of other examples of Norman families (including Corbet, Picot), it is possible that he was named Pantulf, which was then adopted as a family name by his descendants. 

m BEATRIX, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Guillelmus miles cognomento Pantol" donated "terram quam Beatrix mater eius in dominio habebat apud Fossas" to "S. Petro"[3]

[Pantulf] & his wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM [I] Pantulf (-16 Apr, after 1112, bur Noron Saint-Pierre).  Orderic Vitalis records "Guillelmum cognomento Pantulfum et Picodum atque Corbatum, filiosque eius Rogerium et Rodbertum" as vassals of Roger de Montgommery in Shropshire, dated to [1071] from the context[4].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillelmus miles cognomento Pantol" donated "ecclesias de Norun" to "S. Ebrulfo", with the consent of "Rogerio comite domino suo", in 1073, and donated "terram quam Beatrix mater eius in dominio habebat apud Fossas" to "S. Petro"[5].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmum Pantol et Rodbertum de Cordaio nepotem suum" accompanied "Rodbertus…abbas, frater Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio" to Apulia in 1077[6].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmo Pantol", after his return from Apulia, was accused of involvement in the murder of "Mabilia comitissa" [wife of Roger de Montgommery] by "militis Hugonis de Jalgeio" and had his lands confiscated by Roger de Montgommery[7].  Domesday Book records “William Pantulf” holding Wolverley, Great Wytheford, Horton, Wem and many other places in Shropshire[8].  Orderic Vitalis records a second journey to Apulia made by "Willelmus" after the death of William I King of England, after which he donated "unum manerium in Anglia…Traditona" [Trotton, Sussex] to "ecclesia B. Petri"[9].  Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112, shortly before he died[10].  Orderic Vitalis records a second journey to Apulia made by "Willelmus" after the death of William I King of England, after which he donated "unum manerium in Anglia…Traditona" [Trotton, Sussex] to "ecclesia B. Petri"[11].  Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112[12].  Orderic Vitalis records the death "XVI Kal Mai" of "Guillelmo Pantulfo"[13]m LESCELINE, daughter of --- (-21 Sep, after 1112, bur Noron Saint-Pierre).  Her marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records the donations made by "Guillelmus miles cognomento Pantol" and later refers to "Willelmus et Leelina uxor eius"[14].  Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112[15].  Orderic Vitalis records the death "XI Kal Oct" of "Guillelmo Pantulfo…Leelina uxor eius"[16].  William [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         PHILIP Pantulf .  Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112, commenting that Philip inherited his father’s patrimony "in Normannia"[17].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Philippus et Robertus ac Ivo et Arnulfus, filii eorum" had not increased the donations of their parents since they died[18]

b)         ROBERT Pantulf (-after 1130).  Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112, commenting that "filii eius…Rodbertus" inherited his father’s property "in Anglia"[19].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Philippus et Robertus ac Ivo et Arnulfus, filii eorum" had not increased the donations of their parents since they died[20].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Hugo Malbaeng" accounting "pro placito Duelli inter eum et Robertum Pantulf"[21]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          [IVO Pantulf (-after [1175/76]).  Eyton records that Robert had a son named Ivo, ancestor of the later Pantulf family, but he does not cite the primary source on which the information is based[22].  Ivo’s date of death indicates that he was not the same person as Ivo, son of William Pantulf.] 

-        see below

ii)         [ALEXANDER Pantulf (-after [1175/76]).  "Ivo Pantul" donated "terram…Hida…ad manerium Hales" to Haughmond abbey, with the consent of "Willielmi filii Alani", by undated charter (dated to [1175/76]) witnessed by "Ivone capellano, Alexandro fratre meo, Waltero Meverello, Radulpho Diablo"[23].] 

c)         IVO Pantulf Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112[24].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Philippus et Robertus ac Ivo et Arnulfus, filii eorum" had not increased the donations of their parents since they died[25]

d)         ARNULF Pantulf .  Orderic Vitalis records that "idem Guillelmus" made another donation to "ecclesia B. Petri", with the consent of "Leelina uxore sua…tres filii eorum Philippus et Ivo et Arnulfus", in 1112[26].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Philippus et Robertus ac Ivo et Arnulfus, filii eorum" had not increased the donations of their parents since they died[27]

2.         HELVISE .  Her parentage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records the donations made by "Guillelmus miles cognomento Pantol" and also that "Helvis soror eiusdem Guillelmi" donated "totum mariagium suum de Alberi-Vico" to "S. Petro"[28]same person as…?  daughter .  Assuming that "nepotem" in the passage from Orderic Vitalis, quoted below, indicates nephew, it is likely that Robert de Cordai was the son of a sister of William Pantulf.  If that is correct, it is also possible that he was the son of William’s sister Helvise, who is the only sibling mentioned in the same source.  m --- de Cordai, son of ---.  One child: 

a)         ROBERT de Cordaie (-after 1077).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Willelmum Pantol et Rodbertum de Cordaio nepotem suum" accompanied "Rodbertus…abbas, frater Hugonis de Grentemaisnilio" to Apulia in 1077[29]

 

 

IVO Pantulf, son of [ROBERT Pantulf & his wife ---] (-after [1175/76]).  Eyton records that Robert had a son named Ivo, ancestor of the later Pantulf family, but he does not cite the primary source on which the information is based[30].  Ivo’s date of death indicates that he was not the same person as Ivo, son of William Pantulf.  "…Ivo Pantulf…" witnessed the charter dated to [1130] under which "Nicolaus filius Roberti de Stafford et Robertus primogenitus et heres meus" donated "ecclesiam Sancti Wlfadi de Stanis" to Kenilworth priory[31]A charter of King Henry III dated 4 Apr 1266 records donations to Cumbermere, including the donation of “Clivam” made by “Yvonis Pantulph et Bricii filii sui[32].  "Ivo Pantul" donated "terram…Hida…ad manerium Hales" to Haughmond abbey, with the consent of "Willielmi filii Alani", by undated charter (dated to [1175/76]) witnessed by "Ivone capellano, Alexandro fratre meo, Waltero Meverello, Radulpho Diablo"[33]The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus Purcel et Gaudefridus de Codewalton homines Yvonis Pantolf" accounting in Staffordshire[34]

[m firstly ---.  No direct confirmation has been found of this supposed first marriage.  However, the charter quoted below which names Ivo’s wife Alice names her two sons, which suggests that Ivo’s oldest son and heir was not her son.]  

m [secondly] ALICE de Verdun, daughter of [NORMAN de Verdun & his wife Lesceline de Clinton].  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Normannus Panton" confirmed to "Ranulpho de Tetesworth" the rights granted by "Alicia de Verdon mater mea, consensu Willi Panton fratis mei" in "villa de Rudierd"[35].  Her precise parentage is not known, but both the chronology and the name of her son suggest that Alice was probably the daughter of Norman de Verdun. 

Ivo & his [first] wife had three children: 

1.         HUGH Pantulf (-before 28 Dec 1224)Eyton records that Hugh Pantulf confirmed his father’s donation to Shrewsbury abbey, with his wife Christiana, by charter dated to the early 13th century, witnessed by "Robert Corbet and his son Robert, Ivo Pantulf…"[36].  Sheriff of Shropshire 1179-1189.  A charter, dated to the end of King Henry II’s reign, records the sale of "terram…de Wogheresforlong et de Dorfaut" (presumably dated to [1176/79]), in the presence of "Hugone Pantun, Hamelino fratre eius, Bricio fratre eius", its later donation to Haughmond abbey and a subsequent dispute, witnessed by "…Hugone Panton tunc vicecomitis…"[37]"Herveius Bagot" reached agreement with "Thomam de Erdinton", including releasing the latter from marrying "filiæ primogenitæ nostræ Hawisiæ, vel alterius filiæ nostræ, vel tertiæ", with the consent of "dominæ Milisandæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1197], witnessed by "Willelmo filio Alani, Hugone Pantolfe, Roberto Corbet, Johanne Extraneo, Radulfo Basset…William Bagot…"[38]m (before [3 Mar/24 Jun] 1170) CHRISTIANA, daughter of WILLIAM FitzAlan & his [first/second] wife [Christiana ---/Isabel de Say].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by reading several documents together: firstly, under a charter dated [3 Mar/24 Jun] 1170, Henry II King of England authorised deduction from the FitzAlan estates of revenue from the manor of Badminton "which the king had assigned as the marriage portion of William fitz Alan’s daughter"; secondly, Hugh Pantulf donated his rights in the church of Badminton to Lilleshall abbey by charter dated to [1215/18]; thirdly, Hugh Pantulf names his wife "Christiana" in a donation to Shrewsbury abbey[39].  It is assumed that Christiana was William’s daughter by his first marriage because of her name, but this is not beyond all doubt.  Hugh & his wife had five children: 

a)         WILLIAM [V] Pantulf of Wem (-[1232/4 Feb 1233]).  "…William, Alan and Hugh, sons of Hugh Pantulf…" witnessed an undated charter under which Robert Corbet donated tithes to Shrewsbury abbey[40]m (before Jan 1226) HAWISE, daughter of FULK FitzWarin [III] & his first wife Matilda le Vavasour.  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Hauwyse, qe pus fust dame de Wemme" as the first daughter of "Fouke" and his wife "dame Mahaud de Caus"[41].  William [V] & his wife had two children: 

i)          MATILDA Pantulf (-[1286/92]).  m firstly (before 1243) RALPH Le Botiler, son of --- (-3 Jul 1281).  m secondly as his --- wife, WALTER de Hopton, son of --- (-1305). 

ii)         ELIZABETH Pantulf

b)         IVO Pantulf .  Eyton records that Hugh Pantulf confirmed his father’s donation to Shrewsbury abbey, with his wife Christiana, by charter dated to the early 13th century, witnessed by "Robert Corbet and his son Robert, Ivo Pantulf…"[42]

c)         ALAN Pantulf .  "…William, Alan and Hugh, sons of Hugh Pantulf…" witnessed an undated charter under which Robert Corbet donated tithes to Shrewsbury abbey[43]

d)         HUGH Pantulf .  "…William, Alan and Hugh, sons of Hugh Pantulf…" witnessed an undated charter under which Robert Corbet donated tithes to Shrewsbury abbey[44]

e)         R--- Pantulf (-before 1 Nov 1203).  An order dated 1 Nov 1203 records that King John appointed a new chaplain for "capella nostra de Bruges" previously held by "Ulger et deinde R. fil Hug Pantolf"[45]

2.         HAMELIN Pantulf (-after [1176/79]).  A charter, dated to the end of King Henry II’s reign, records the sale of "terram…de Wogheresforlong et de Dorfaut" (presumably dated to [1176/79]), in the presence of "Hugone Pantun, Hamelino fratre eius, Bricio fratre eius", its later donation to Haughmond abbey and a subsequent dispute, witnessed by "…Hugone Panton tunc vicecomitis…"[46]

3.         BRICE Pantulf (-after [1208/11]).  A charter, dated to the end of King Henry II’s reign, records the sale of "terram…de Wogheresforlong et de Dorfaut" (presumably dated to [1176/79]), in the presence of "Hugone Pantun, Hamelino fratre eius, Bricio fratre eius", its later donation to Haughmond abbey and a subsequent dispute, witnessed by "…Hugone Panton tunc vicecomitis…"[47].  “Robertus dominus Moaldie et senescaldus comitis Cestrie” donated “villam de Gorestre” to Chester St. Werburgh by charter dated to [1192/1208], witnessed by “Radulfo de Menilw[arin]...Roberto de Menilwarin, Brito Pantun...[48].  “...Brito Pantul...” witnessed the charter dated to [1208/11] under which “Robertus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” confirmed the donation of “patronatus ecclesie de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh made by “Radulphi de Montealto fratris mei[49].  A charter of King Henry III dated 4 Apr 1266 records donations to Cumbermere, including the donation of “Clivam” made by “Yvonis Pantulph et Bricii filii sui[50]

Ivo & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

4.         WILLIAM [II] Pantulf of Cublesdon and Hales (-after 1166).  "Normannus Panton" confirmed to "Ranulpho de Tetesworth" the rights granted by "Alicia de Verdon mater mea, consensu Willi Panton fratis mei" in "villa de Rudierd" by undated charter[51]

-        see below

5.         NORMAN Pantulf .  "Normannus Panton" confirmed to "Ranulpho de Tetesworth" the rights granted by "Alicia de Verdon mater mea, consensu Willi Panton fratis mei" in "villa de Rudierd" by undated charter[52]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM [III] Pantulf (-after 1183)Domesday Descendants records the marriage of William Pantulf and "Eleanor eldest daughter of Joscelin de Louvain before 1174", and his acquiring Hambledon, Hampshire on the marriage, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[53].  His parentage has not been identified.  “Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit” and for the salvation of “mea et Roehais uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Roberto de Verdun, Waltero de Canvile, Ada de Aldithelee...Willielmo Pantouf, Radulpho de Biseche, Rogero Bagot, Philippo de Draicote, Milone de Verdun[54]m (before 1174) ELEANOR de Percy, daughter of JOSCELIN de Louvain & his wife Agnes de Percy.  Domesday Descendants records the marriage of William Pantulf and "Eleanor eldest daughter of Joscelin de Louvain before 1174", and his acquiring Hambledon, Hampshire on the marriage, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[55].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

WILLIAM [II] Pantulf, son of [IVO Pantulf & his [second] wife Alice de Verdun] (-after 1166).  "Normannus Panton" confirmed to "Ranulpho de Tetesworth" the rights granted by "Alicia de Verdon mater mea, consensu Willi Panton fratis mei" in "villa de Rudierd" by undated charter[56]Domesday Descendants states that William, son of Ivo, was the same person as William who is named in the other sources below, but does not cite the primary source which confirms this affiliation[57].  Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury confirmed donations to Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire made by “Willielmus Pantulf…de Bredun”, and including other donations made by “…Burgæ quondam uxoris Willielmi Pantulf de Bredun”, by undated charter[58].  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[59]

m BURGA [de Stuteville], daughter of [ROBERT [II] d’Estouteville & his second wife Erneburga ---] (-after 1166).  Domesday Descendants names "Burga de Stuteville" as the wife of William Pantulf, but does not cite the primary source which confirms her family origin[60].  Clay records her marriage, saying that she was “probably” a daughter of Robert [II][61].  If this affiliation is correct, the chronology suggests that Burga was the daughter of Robert [II] d’Estouteville and his second wife, named after her mother.  Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury confirmed donations to Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire made by “Willielmus Pantulf…de Bredun”, and including other donations made by “…Burgæ quondam uxoris Willielmi Pantulf de Bredun”, by undated charter[62].  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[63]

William [II] & his wife had three children: 

1.         WILLIAM [IV] Pantulf of Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire (before [1160]-).  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[64]m JOAN de Goldington, daughter of PETER de Goldington & his wife [Eva ---].  Domesday Descendants names "Joan de Goldington", daughter of Peter de Goldington, as the wife of William Pantulf[65].  William [IV] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ISOLDA Pantulf (-after 1267).  "Isolda q fuit ux Walteri de Baskvill" paid a fine for "dote sua" in Leicestershire, dated 1213[66].  “Isolda Pantulf…in viduitate constitutam” confirmed donations to Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire made by “Willielmi Pantulf avi mei…Burgæ aviæ meæ” by charter dated "die Jovis prox. ante festum sanctæ Margaretæ post mortem Walteri de Baskervile domini mei, anno quo Ricardus de Marisco consecratus fuit in episcopum"[67].  "Isolda Biset" paid a fine for "villa de Magorham…Henr Biset quondam vir suus…habuit" in Wiltshire, dated 9 Dec 1213[68].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[69].  The Complete Peerage states that her son and heir Robert de Tattershall undertook payment of her debts and orders were made in 1223 and 1228 which would normally connote her death, but that in 1267 she was still prosecuting her rights of dower against her grandson Robert de Tattershall[70]m firstly HUGH de Montpinçon, son of ---.  m secondly WALTER de Tattershall, son of ROBERT [de Tattershall] & his wife Isabel --- (-[1199/1200]).  m thirdly WALTER de Baskerville, son of --- (-before Oct 1213).  m fourthly (1213) HENRY Bisset, son of MANASSER Bisset & his wife Alice --- (-1213).  m fifthly AMAURY [I] de Saint-Amand, son of --- (-[Apr/Sep] 1241).

2.         ROGER Pantulf .  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[71]

3.         PHILIP Pantulf .  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[72]

William had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

4.         WILLIAM (-after 1166).  "William Pantulf of Samella, his wife Burga and his three sons William, Roger and Philip" donated "the land of Samella" to Saint-André de Gouffern by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "Willelmus Bastardus filius meus…"[73]. 

 

 

 

PAYNELL

 

 

The early generations of this family have been reconstructed from secondary sources, which appear reliable but do not cite the corresponding primary sources.  The individuals are shown below in square brackets.  The result appears convincing, but should not be taken as the final answer. 

 

 

A.      PAYNELL FAMILIES of MOÙTIERS-HUBERT (NORMANDY), DRAX and HOOTON (YORKSHIRE)

 

 

[Two] brothers: 

1.         [WILLIAM Paynell (-[1087]).  Ellis says that "it is all but certain that [Ralph Paynel] was a younger son of the seigneur of Moûtiers-Hubert near Lisieux, and had been with his elder brother William at the battle of Hastings", adding that "William returned to Normandy"[74].  He appears to base this on the Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, which names "Paomiel [which Ellis transcribes as "Painals"] de Moustier-Hubert" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[75], but he cites no source which names William.  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Guillelmus Paganellus”, dated to 1087 from the context[76].]    m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         [WILLIAM Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert (-after [1145]).  Ellis names "William Paynel of Moûtiers-Hubert and Fulk Paynel of Dudley" as the sons of William Paynell Seigneur de Moûtiers-Hubert, without citing the primary sources on which he bases his supposition[77].  On the other hand, Domesday Descendants amalgamates this William Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert with William Paynell of Drax (see below), stating that the daughter of William FitzWimund was his first wife, while Avice de Rumilly was his second wife[78].  More work is needed on the precise pattern of inheritance of the different properties held by the Paynell family before it can be assessed which version may be correct.  "Villelmus Paganellus" founded the abbey of Hambie, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Hugonis et Fulconis, et Thomæ et Ioannis", by undated charter, dated to [1145][79].]  m [--- d’Avranches, daughter of WILLIAM FitzWimund d’Avranches & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are shown in the Complete Peerage, presumably because her supposed brother Robert d’Avranches is described as avunculus of her son Fulk Paynell[80], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.]  William & his wife had four children:   

i)          HUGH Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert (-1180 or before).  "Villelmus Paganellus" founded the abbey of Hambie, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Hugonis et Fulconis, et Thomæ et Ioannis", by undated charter, dated to [1145][81].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo Paganellus" with five knights and six knights in his own service[82]m NICOLE, daughter of ---.  She is named in the Complete Peerage, but the primary source on which the information is based has not yet been identified[83].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

(a)       PIERRE Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert and West Rasen, Lincolnshire (-1184).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Peter...Paynel...joined with his parents and brother William in a gift of land to the abbey of St Stephen at Caen" when his father became a monk there, undated, but he does not cite the source reference[84].  He and three generations of his descendants are shown in the Complete Peerage[85]m ---.  The name of Pierre’s wife is not known.  Pierre & his wife had one child: 

(1)       HUGH Paynell (-1244).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo Paynel" holding 3 knights’ fees "de Draxe" in Yorkshire and 5 in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][86]

(b)       GUILLAUME Paynell .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Peter...Paynel...joined with his parents and brother William in a gift of land to the abbey of St Stephen at Caen" when his father became a monk there, undated, but he does not cite the source reference[87]

ii)         FULK [I] Paynell of Hambye and Bréhal, Normandy and Drax, Yorkshire (-1182).  "Villelmus Paganellus" founded the abbey of Hambie, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Hugonis et Fulconis, et Thomæ et Ioannis", by undated charter, dated to [1145][88].  "…Folqueio Painel…" confirmed the charter dated to [1180/82] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation to the abbey of Hambie by "Philippus de Columbariis"[89]

-        PAYNELL of HAMBYE

iii)        THOMAS Paynell .  "Villelmus Paganellus" founded the abbey of Hambie, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Hugonis et Fulconis, et Thomæ et Ioannis", by undated charter, dated to [1145][90]

iv)        JEAN Paynell .  "Villelmus Paganellus" founded the abbey of Hambie, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Hugonis et Fulconis, et Thomæ et Ioannis", by undated charter, dated to [1145][91]

b)         [FULK Paynell (-after 1129).  Ellis names "William Paynel of Moûtiers-Hubert and Fulk Paynel of Dudley" as the sons of William Paynell Seigneur de Moûtiers-Hubert, without citing the primary sources on which he bases his supposition[92]Domesday Descendants does not specify Fulk’s parentage[93].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Fulco Paenell" in Staffordshire[94].] 

-        PAYNELL of DUDLEY, WORCESTERSHIRE

2.         RALPH Paynell (-after 1088).  Ellis says that "it is all but certain that [Ralph Paynel] was a younger son of the seigneur of Moûtiers-Hubert near Lisieux, and had been with his elder brother William at the battle of Hastings"[95].  He appears to base this on the Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, which names "Paomiel [which Ellis transcribes as "Painals"] de Moustier-Hubert" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[96].  Domesday Book records “Ralph Paynel” holding Stockland, East Quantoxhead, Beggearn Huish, West Bagborough and Newhall in Somerset; Drax and other properties in Yorkshire[97].  He held Irnham, Lincolnshire in Domesday book[98].  Sheriff of Yorkshire 1088[99].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Millingtona et in Hugeth…et…in Howald” by “Radulphus Painel[100]"Hugh de Beauchamp, Ralph Paganel" witnessed the charter dated to [1094/1100] under which William II King of England granted a market to St Mary of Thorney[101].  [m firstly ---.  This supposed earlier marriage is suggested by the Complete Peerage which states that land held by Ralph Paynell as a Domesday tenant-in-chief, including Drax in Yorkshire, Irnham in Lincolnshire, and manors in Somerset and Devon, passed "to his son William, presumably by an earlier marriage"[102].]  m [secondly] MAUD, daughter of [RICHARD de Surdeval & his wife ---].  The Complete Peerage states that land in Yorkshire, including the manor of Hooton (Paynell), were acquired by Ralph Paynell "through his marriage to Maud, presumed to be daughter of Richard de Surdeval"[103].  Ralph & his [first] wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Paynell of Drax (-[1147]).  He inherited Drax, Yorkshire and Irnham, Lincolnshire from his father[104].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills Paenell" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[105]Willielmus Paganellus” founded Drax priory, Yorkshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo Paganello...[106]"…Willelmo Paganello…" witnessed the charter dated to [1142/46] under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina et Henricus filius comitis Andegavie" confirmed the rights of "Unfrido de Buhun" in the lands he held on the death of her father[107]m as her second husband, AVICE de Rumilly, widow of WILLIAM de Courcy, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf du Bessin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-[1179][108]).  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam[109].  “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…[110].  She married thirdly (before 1153) Walter de Percy.  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[111].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          ALICE Paynell .  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Aviciam de Romely…unicam filiam Aliciam” married ”Roberto de Ganth[112].  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.   “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…[113].  “R de Gaunt” donated property to Bridlington convent, for the souls of “comitis Gilberti…et…Adeliz uxoris mee et Aviz filie mee” by charter dated to [1156/75][114].  “Robertus de Gaunt et Aeliz Paganella uxor sua et Avicia filia eorum” donated property to the hospital of St John of Jerusalem by charter dated to [1166/77], witnessed by “…Henrico de Gaunt…[115]Robertus de Gant” confirmed that “Willielmus Paganellus” had donated “ecclesiam de Swynamestede...antequam terram possedi cum filia Willielmi Paganelli” to Drax priory by undated charter[116]A charter of King Richard I dated 7 Sep 1189 confirmed donations to Vaudey abbey among which by “Robertus de Gant et Alizia Painell uxor eius[117]m firstly RICHARD de Courcy, son of ROBERT de Courcy & his wife ---.  m secondly as his first wife, ROBERT de Gand, son of WALTER de Gand & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre (-[1191/92], bur Vaudey Abbey). 

Ralph & his [second] wife had two children: 

b)         JORDAN Paynell of Hooton (-[1147]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Jordan Paenell" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[118].  He inherited the manor of Hooton (Paynell) in Yorkshire from his mother but died childless[119].  Stephen King of England confirmed the possessions of Bridlington priory, including donations made by "Jordanus Paganel…pro anima Geretrudis uxoris sue" and by "Stephani de Meinill privigni sui", by charter dated to [1135/39][120]m (before [1135/39]) as her second husband, GERTRUDE Fossard, widow of ROBERT de Meinil, daughter of NIGEL Fossard & his wife ---.  Domesday Descendants names "Gertrude Fossard, widow of Robert de Meinil" as the wife of Jordan Paynell, but does not cite the primary source which confirms her marriages and family origin[121].  Stephen King of England confirmed the possessions of Bridlington priory, including donations made by "Jordanus Paganel…pro anima Geretrudis uxoris sue" and by "Stephani de Meinill privigni sui", by charter dated to [1135/39][122]

c)         ALEXANDER Paynell of Hooton (-before [1147/53]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Eustachius de Greinuilla" against "Priorem S. Trinitatis Ebor" for "ecclesiam de Bertona…aduocacionem", reciting that the land was held by "Willelmi Paynel…Radulfus Paynel qui fundavit ecclesiam…Alexandri Painel filii et heredis ipsius Radulfi…Willelmi filii Alexandri Paynel…Frechesante filie ipsius Willelmi"[123].  He inherited the manor of Hooton (Paynell) in Yorkshire from his brother Jordan[124]m AGNES Fossard, daughter of ROBERT FitzNigel Fossard & his wife Ascelina --- (-after [1147/53]).  “Agnes Fossard, filia Roberti Fossard” donated property to the canons of Nostell, with the consent of “Willelmi Fossardi fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1147/53][125].  Alexander & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Paynell (-1202).  “Agnes Fossard” donated property to the canons of Nostell by charter dated to [1147/53] which names “Willelmo Painel filio suo[126].  “Willelmus Painel” donated property to the canons of Nostell by charter dated to [1154/81][127].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus Paganellus vii l" in Yorkshire in [1161/62][128].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus Paganell xv l, de novo xx s" in Yorkshire in [1171/72][129].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus Paganellus" paying "vii l x s, xv milites" in Yorkshire[130].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus Paganellus" paying "xv l, xv milites" in Yorkshire[131].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Eustachius de Greinuilla" against "Priorem S. Trinitatis Ebor" for "ecclesiam de Bertona…aduocacionem", reciting that the land was held by "Willelmi Paynel…Radulfus Paynel qui fundavit ecclesiam…Alexandri Painel filii et heredis ipsius Radulfi…Willelmi filii Alexandri Paynel…Frechesante filie ipsius Willelmi"[132]m FRETHESANT, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants names "Frethesant" as the wife of William Paynell, but does not cite the primary source which confirms her marriage[133].  William & his wife had three children: 

(a)       ALEXANDER Paynell (-before his father).  Domesday Descendants records that William Paynell and his wife had a son "Alexander who died in his lifetime", but does not cite the primary source which confirms her marriage[134]

(b)       FRETHESANT (-after 1220).  "Henry de Neufmarché" paid a fine for "having as his wife Frethesenta who was the wife of Geoffrey Luttrell, if she wishes", dated to [1217/18][135].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Frethesanth que fuit uxor [...Galfridi Luterel, filia] Willelmi Paynel", adding that "Henricus de Novo Mercato eam habet", holding land in "Rydal" as well as "filia Isabelle sororis Frethesanth predicte…Eustachius de Greinvill eam habet"[136].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Frethesaunte Paynel uxoris Henrici de Nov Mercato" holding land at Stratford[137].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Eustachius de Greinuilla" against "Priorem S. Trinitatis Ebor" for "ecclesiam de Bertona…aduocacionem", reciting that the land was held by "Willelmi Paynel…Radulfus Paynel qui fundavit ecclesiam…Alexandri Painel filii et heredis ipsius Radulfi…Willelmi filii Alexandri Paynel…Frechesante filie ipsius Willelmi"[138]m (before 26 Feb 1204) GEOFFREY Luttrell of Gamston and Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire (-[1216/17]).  m secondly ([Oct 1217/Oct 1218]) HENRY de Neufmarché, son of HENRY de Neufmarché & his wife Denise de Tilly (-1239 or before). 

(c)       ISABEL (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Frethesanth que fuit uxor [...Galfridi Luterel, filia] Willelmi Paynel", adding that "Henricus de Novo Mercato eam habet", holding land in "Rydal" as well as "filia Isabelle sororis Frethesanth predicte…Eustachius de Greinvill eam habet"[139].  m EUSTACE de Grenville, son of ---. 

 

 

Three siblings, parents not identified: 

1.         WILLIAM Paynell (-after 1205).  "Willelmus Painnell" paid a fine for "saisina de tercia parte ville de Westrasen quem Petrus Painnell frater eius ei dedit" in Lincolnshire, pledging guarantors in Yorkshire, dated 1205[140]

2.         PETER Paynell (-before 1205).  "Willelmus Painnell" paid a fine for "saisina de tercia parte ville de Westrasen quem Petrus Painnell frater eius ei dedit" in Lincolnshire, pledging guarantors in Yorkshire, dated 1205[141]

3.         daughter .  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Robertus de Busci" owing in Yorkshire "pro habenda…maritagio uxoris sue sororis Willelmi Painelli"[142]m ROBERT de Buscy, son of ---. 

 

 

B.      PAYNELL FAMILIES of HAMBYE

 

See the document NORMANDY NOBILITY-AVRANCHES, BAYEUX, COTENTIN. 

 

 

C.      PAYNELL FAMILIES of DUDLEY (WORCESTERSHIRE)

 

 

FULK Paynell, son of [WILLIAM Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert & his wife ---] (-after 1129).  Ellis names "William Paynel of Moûtiers-Hubert and Fulk Paynel of Dudley" as the sons of William Paynell Seigneur de Moûtiers-Hubert, without citing the primary sources on which he bases his supposition[143]Domesday Descendants does not specify his parentage[144].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Fulcoius Paenell" paying half a fine relating to his suit against "Rogerum Parlarium" in Staffordshire[145].  “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Isabellæ comitissæ de Norhamton”, by charter dated 1187 which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus[146]

m [BEATRIX, daughter of WILLIAM FitzAnsculf of Dudley & his wife ---].  Domesday Descendants states that Fulk Paynell "acquired the fief of William fitz Ansculf de Picquigny lord of Dudley, Worcestershire, probably by marriage to William’s heiress (?daughter)"[147].  Ellis is more definite, naming "Beatrix, d. and heiress of Will. fitz Ansculph, of Dudley" as the wife of Fulk Paynell, without citing the primary sources on which he bases his supposition[148].  Grazebrook comments that "it has…been suggested, and I think with great probability" that Fulk Paynell acquired the lordship of Dudley "by marriage with Fitz Ansculph’s heiress"[149].  This last quote indicates that the connection is speculative and is not based on any primary source.  Until more information comes to light, this supposed wife of Fulk is shown in square brackets. 

Fulk & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         RALPH Paynell (-before [1160]).  ["…Rad Paganell…" witnessed the charter dated [Jul 1141/Dec 1142] under which Empress Matilda permitted "Milon com Heref" to hold the castle and honour of Abergavenny, from "Bri fil com et Matild de Walengeford uxor sue"[150].  "…Radulfo Paganello…" witnessed the charter dated to [1142/46] under which "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina et Henricus filius comitis Andegavie" confirmed the rights of "Unfrido de Buhun" in the lands he held on the death of her father[151].  It is not known whether these charters refer to Ralph son of Fulk Paynell.]  “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Isabellæ comitissæ de Norhamton”, by charter dated 1187 which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus[152]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         GERVASE Paynell (-before Sep 1194).  “G. Painel”, considering the proposal of “Radulfi Painel patris mei”, founded Dudley priory, for the salvation of “Isabellæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated by Dugdale to "before 1161"), witnessed by "…Radulpho de Sumeri…"[153].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights fees held from "Gervasius Paganellus" in Staffordshire[154].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Gervasius Paganellus i m" in Staffordshire in [1167/68][155].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Gervasius Paganellus" with one knight "de baillia de Basseis" and four knights in his own service[156].  “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Isabellæ comitissæ de Norhamton”, by charter dated 1187 which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus”, witnessed by “Simone comite Northamptoniæ, Isabella comitissa matre eius…Fulcone Paganello, Wilielmo fratre eius…Wilielmo Paganello et Bernardo filio eius…[157].   Baron of Dudley, Worcestershire.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Gervasius Paganellus" paying "lxxix s ii d" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire and "xxv l, i milites" in Staffordshire[158].  “Fulcodius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “Gervasius Paganellus et uxor eius comitissa Isabella et Robertus Paganellus eorum filius, et Willielmus Paganellus prædicti Fulcodii frater…[159].   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "de his qui non habent capitales honores…Gervasii Paganelli" paying "xx s" in Oxfordshire and in Buckinghamshire, Bedforshire[160]m (after 1153) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Beaumont, widow of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester & his wife Amicie de Gaël .  Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Symone comite Huntedoniæ" as "filia Roberti comitis Legecestriæ" but does not name her[161].  Her second marriage is confirmed by charter dated 1187 under which “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Isabellæ comitissæ de Norhamton”, which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus”, witnessed by “Simone comite Northamptoniæ, Isabella comitissa matre eius[162].  “G. Painel”, considering the proposal of “Radulfi Painel patris mei”, founded Dudley priory, for the salvation of “Isabellæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated by Dugdale to "before 1161")[163].  “Fulcodius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “Gervasius Paganellus et uxor eius comitissa Isabella et Robertus Paganellus eorum filius, et Willielmus Paganellus prædicti Fulcodii frater…[164].   Gervase & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Paynell (-before 1194).  “G. Painel”, considering the proposal of “Radulfi Painel patris mei”, founded Dudley priory, for the salvation of “Isabellæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated by Dugdale to "before 1161")[165].  “Fulcodius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “Gervasius Paganellus et uxor eius comitissa Isabella et Robertus Paganellus eorum filius, et Willielmus Paganellus prædicti Fulcodii frater…[166]

b)         HAWISE Paynell (-after 1210).  “Hawys Paganella” confirmed donations to Tykford Priory by "Johannes de Sumeri vir meus" by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Sumeri filio meo[167].   Smyth records that Roger paid a fine to marry "Hawisia mother of Raph de Somery" in [1196/97][168]Hawis Paynel” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “domini mei Rogeri de Berkele”, for the soul of “Gervasii Paynel fratris mei”, by undated charter[169].   Hawise must have survived her son Ralph [II] de Somery, as shown by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240 which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", and passed from her to her grandsons: "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[170]m firstly JOHN de Somery, son of --- (-[1191/92]).  m secondly ([1196/97]) ROGER de Berkeley, son of NICHOLAS de Berkeley & his wife Alice [de Teckenham] (-1230). 

2.         [AGNES Paynell (-18 Nov ----).  The manuscript history of the Bruce family of Carleton records that “primus Brus de Carleton…Robertus de Brus” married “Agnetam filiam Fulconis Paynell” and received “manerium de Carleton” from his father-in-law[171].  The primary source which confirms that Agnes’s father was Fulk Paynell of Staffordshire has not yet been identified.  “Robertus de Brus…Agnes uxor mea, filiusque noster Adam de Brus” donated property to Middlesburgh priory by undated charter[172].  “Robertus de Brus…et Agnes uxor mea et Adam filius noster” founded Gisburne Priory, Yorkshire by undated charter[173].  The 1155 Pipe Roll records "Agnes de Bruis…p filio suo"[174].  A charter of King Henry II, dated to [1176/86], confirmed donations to the canons of Gisburne, among which a donation by “Agnetis uxoris Roberti de Brus[175].  The obituary of Gisburne priory records the death “XIV Kal Dec” of "Agnetis Brus uxoris fundatoris nostri"[176]m ROBERT [I] de Brus, son of --- (-11 May 1141, bur Gisburne Priory).] 

 

 

D.      PAYNELL FAMILIES of BAMPTON (DEVONSHIRE)

 

It is probable that William Paynell who married the heiress of Bampton was another son of Fulk Paynell of Dudley, shown above, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified. 

 

1.         WILLIAM Paynell (-before 1166).  m as her first husband, JULIANA de Bampton, daughter of ROBERT de Bampton & his wife Emma ---.  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Willielmi Paganelli et matris meæ Julianæ de Bahantune…”, by undated charter[177]Domesday Descendants records that Juliana married secondly (before 1166) Warin de Aula[178].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         FULK Paynell of Bampton, Devonshire (-1208).  "Fulco Painel" paid a fine for "honore de Banton" in Devonshire, dated 1199[179]

-        see below

b)         WILLIAM Paynell .  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory by undated charter subscribed by “Willielmo Paganello fratre meo…[180].  “Fulcodius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “Gervasius Paganellus et uxor eius comitissa Isabella et Robertus Paganellus eorum filius, et Willielmus Paganellus prædicti Fulcodii frater…[181].  

 

 

FULK Paynell of Bampton, Devonshire, son of WILLIAM Paynell & his wife Juliana de Bampton (-1208).  "Fulco Painel" paid a fine for "honore de Banton" in Devonshire, dated 1199[182].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Folqueius Painel…honoris de Banton" owing in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][183].  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Willielmi Paganelli et matris meæ Julianæ de Bahantune et Aldæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willielmi et Fulcodii, filiarumque mearum Julianæ et Christianeæ”, by undated charter subscribed by “Willielmo Paganello fratre meo, Stephano de Bahamtune, Alberto de Bahamtune[184].  “Fulcodius Paganellus” donated property “ecclesiam Hunespill in Brentemares” to Tykford Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “Gervasius Paganellus et uxor eius comitissa Isabella et Robertus Paganellus eorum filius, et Willielmus Paganellus prædicti Fulcodii frater…[185].  

m AUDE, daughter of ---.  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “…Aldæ uxoris meæ…”, by undated charter[186]

Fulk & his wife had four children: 

1.         WILLIAM Paynell (-before 4 Feb 1228).  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “…Aldæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willielmi et Fulcodii, filiarumque mearum Julianæ et Christianeæ”, by undated charter subscribed[187].  “Willielmus Paynel, filius Fulconis Paynell de Bamtone”, with the consent of “Willielmo Briwere et hæredibus suis”,  confirmed the donation of property “totum manerium de Burgh Walteri” to Tykford Priory by “Fulco Paynel pater meus”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Reginaldo de Mohun, Ricardo Briwere[188]m (after 1213) as her second husband, ALICE Briwere, widow of REYNOLD [I] de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset, daughter of WILLIAM Briwere & his wife Beatrice --- (-after 1234).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[189].  Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of her son "William Paynel alias Painel" which names the manor of "…Huffeculm…with 10 l land which Fulk Painel gave to William Briwer the elder…but afterwards William Brewer the younger…bestowed the said land upon William Painel, father of this one, in free marriage with Alice his sister" in Devon[190].  "William Paynel" assigned "Alice de Mohun his wife and Hugh de Samford" to make part payments of debts "in each of the three years after starting out on his pilgrimage to the Holy Land" with the manor of Bampton as security, dated 27 Sep, although listed in the roll among other fines dated [Feb/Mar] 1228[191].  Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Devon to release "dotem suam...Willelmum filium et heredi predicti Willelmi" to "Alicia de Moyun que fuit uxor Willelmi Paynel", and confirmed the custody granted to “Hereberto filio Mathei”, dated 1228[192].  The king granted custody of "the land and heir of William Paynel to Herbert son of Matthew", saving to "Alice who was William’s wife…her…dower", dated 18 Nov 1228[193].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Alicie de Moyun"[194].  William & his wife had three children: 

a)         AUDE ([1209/10]-1261).  A writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Paynel alias Painel" names "Lady Auda wife of John de Balun, age variously stated as 30 and more and 40, is his heir"[195].  The document does not specify the relationship between the deceased and his heir, but it appears that she was too old to have been his daughter so was probably his sister.  Aude’s age in this document is inconsistent with the marriage date of her supposed parents as shown above, but may have been exaggerated.  m JOHN de Ballon, son of JOHN de Ballon & his first wife --- (-1275). 

b)         MILICENT Paynell (-before 1249)The Complete Peerage states that Herbert FitzMatthew married “Milicent da. and coh. of William Paynel of Bampton, Devon” but does not cite the corresponding primary source[196].  An indication of the connection between the two families is provided by the order dated 4 Feb 1228 under which Henry III King of England granted "custodiam terre et heredis Willelmi Paynel" to "Hereberto filio Mathey" and ordered the sheriff of Devon to release them to him[197].  She must have died childless before 1249 when an inquisitions after her brother’s death name his sister Aude as his heir. m HERBERT FitzMatthew, son of MATTHEW FitzHerbert & his wife Joan Patric (-3 or 5 Feb 1245). 

c)         WILLIAM Paynell (-before 2 Jan 1249).  Henry III King of England granted "custodiam terre et heredis Willelmi Paynel" to "Hereberto filio Mathey" and ordered the sheriff of Devon to release them to him, 4 Feb 1228[198].  Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Devon to release "dotem suam...Willelmum filium et heredi predicti Willelmi" to "Alicia de Moyun que fuit uxor Willelmi Paynel", and confirmed the custody granted to “Hereberto filio Mathei”, dated 1228[199].  The king granted custody of "the land and heir of William Paynel to Herbert son of Matthew", saving to "Alice who was William’s wife…her…dower", dated 18 Nov 1228[200].  A writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Paynel alias Painel" names "Lady Auda wife of John de Balun, age variously stated as 30 and more and 40, is his heir" and the manors of "Baunton which he gave to John de Hockeford 15 days before he died, Huffeculm…with 10 l land which Fulk Painel gave to William Briwer the elder…but afterwards William Brewer the younger…bestowed the said land upon William Painel, father of this one, in free marriage with Alice his sister" in Devon[201]

2.         FULK Paynell .  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “…Aldæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willielmi et Fulcodii, filiarumque mearum Julianæ et Christianeæ”, by undated charter subscribed[202]

3.         JULIANA Paynell .  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “…Aldæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willielmi et Fulcodii, filiarumque mearum Julianæ et Christianeæ”, by undated charter subscribed[203]

4.         CHRISTIANA Paynell .  “Fulcodius Paganellus de Bahantune” donated property to Tykford Priory, for the souls of “…Aldæ uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willielmi et Fulcodii, filiarumque mearum Julianæ et Christianeæ”, by undated charter subscribed[204]

 

 

E.      OTHER PAYNELL FAMILIES

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Paynell .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Longues, including the donation of "medietatem ecclesie de Ria" made by "Willelmi Paienelli et Alienoris uxoris sue", by charter dated to [1185/89][205]m ELEANOR, daughter of ---.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Longues, including the donation of "medietatem ecclesie de Ria" made by "Willelmi Paienelli et Alienoris uxoris sue", by charter dated to [1185/89][206].  This donation suggests that Eleanor was a member of the Rie family. 

 

2.         WILLIAM Paynell, son of --- .  This William Paynell has not yet been identified.  m --- de Munchensy, daughter of WARIN de Munchensy & his wife Agnes ---.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[207]

 

 

Two brothers and [one sister], parents not known: 

1.         JORDAN Paynell .  "Walter de Gaunt" founded Bridlington priory, with the assent of Henry I King of England, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Jordan Paganel…"[208].  "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[209].  "Jordan Paynel" notified the donation by "Jertrudis my wife" to Bridlington priory of land in Bridlington "of her dower which Robert de Masinlio her former husband had given her", with the permission of "Stephen her son and heir", by undated charter[210].  The following charter in the compilation records the donation of "Stephen de Menyl", presumably Jordan’s stepson named in the earlier document, dated 1267, which suggests that the former charter should be dated to [1240/60].  However, this dating is incorrect, as shown by the charter of Henry I King of England under which he confirmed donations to Bridlington priory, including by “Jordan Paganl” for the soul of “Geretrud his wife” and the grant of "Stephen de Maynil his stepson"[211]m as her second husband, GERTRUDE, widow of ROBERT de Meynill, daughter of ---.  "Jordan Paynel" notified the donation by "Jertrudis my wife" to Bridlington priory of land in Bridlington "of her dower which Robert de Masinlio her former husband had given her", with the permission of "Stephen her son and heir", by undated charter[212].  Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Bridlington priory, including by “Jordan Paganl” for the soul of “Geretrud his wife” and the grant of "Stephen de Maynil his stepson", by undated charter[213]

2.         HUGH Paynell .  "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[214]

3.         [BEATRIX Paynell (-11 Nov ----).  Her parentage and marriage are assumed from the undated charter under which "W. de Gaunt" donated land at Besingby to Bridlington priory, witnessed by "…Jordan Painel, Hugh his brother, W. de Mundevill his nepote…"[215].  “Walterus de Amundevill…et mater mea Beatrix” founded Ellesham Prioryby charter dated to before 1166 witnessed by “Willielmo, Elia, Radulfo, Adam de Amundevilla fratribus meis…Willielmo de Amundevilla…[216].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “III Id Nov” of “Beatrix uxor Goslani dapiferi[217].  This is the only source so far identified which indicates the name of Beatrix’s husband.  m JOSCELIN de Amundeville, son of --- (-5 Apr ----).] 

 

 

1.         ADAM Paynell (-after [Mar] 1216).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Adam Paganellus" paying "xx s, i militem" in Lincolnshire[218].  "Adam Paynel" paid a fine for the liberation of "Adam nepotem suum" as hostage, dated [Mar] 1216[219]m ---.  The name of Adam’s wife is not known.  Adam & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- Paynellm ---.  One child: 

i)          ADAM (-after [Mar] 1216).  "Adam Paynel" paid a fine for the liberation of "Adam nepotem suum" as hostage, dated [Mar] 1216[220]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Paynell (-after 25 Aug 1227).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Willelmus Pahienel pro hereditate que fuit uxoris sue iv milites" among the tenants of the honour of Wallingford[221].  "William Paynel and Sara his wife" donated property "in Watlinton" to Oseney abbey dated 25 Aug 1227[222]m SARAH, daughter of --- (-after 25 Aug 1227).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Willelmus Pahienel pro hereditate que fuit uxoris sue iv milites" among the tenants of the honour of Wallingford[223].  "William Paynel and Sara his wife" donated property "in Watlinton" to Oseney abbey dated 25 Aug 1227[224].  

 

2.         --- Paynell (-before 1 Jul 1225)m --- Bardolf, daughter of HUGH [I] Bardolf & his [first] wife Isabel --- (-before 1 Jul 1225).  If the term “avunculus” was used in her son’s 1 Jul 1225 charter to indicate maternal uncle, Ralph Paynell’s mother was the sister of Robert Bardolf.  Her husband has not otherwise been identified in the Paynell family.  One child: 

a)         RALPH Paynell .  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[225]

 

 

 

PEVEREL

 

 

A.      PEVEREL FAMILIES of HATFIELD, ESSEX and NOTTINGHAM

 

 

1.         RANULF Peverel of Hatfield, Essex (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Ranulph Peverel” holding Ewelme in Oxfordshire; numerous properties in Essex[226]m [INGELRICA, daughter of INGELRIC & his wife ---] (-[1100]).  Dugdale records that Ingelrica, wife of Ranulf Peverell "who had been mistress to King William the Conqueroris stated to have founded…in the time of King William Rufus a college of secular canons dedicated to St Mary Magdalen" at Hatfield Peverell which she entered and stayed until her death "about the year 1100"[227].  He does not reproduce the primary source which provides the basis for this information.  Eyton says that, according to Dugdale, her relationship with William (then Duke of Normandy) predated her marriage and that Duke William was the father of her son William Peverel[228].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Ranulf & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         WILLIAM Peverel (-28 Jan 1114).  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England constructed “Snotingeham castrum” [Nottingham] and entrusted it to “Guillelmo Peverello”, dated to 1068[229].  Domesday Book records “William Peverel” holding properties in Buckinghamshire; numerous properties in Northamptonshire; several properties in Derbyshire; numerous properties in Nottinghamshire[230].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Rudstan” by “Willielmus de Peverel[231].  “…Willelmo Peverello…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[232].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of the church of Lenton to Cluny, by charter dated to [1103/14], which records “Willelmo Peverello cum uxore sua Adaleida et filio suo Willelmo” as founders of the church and is subscribed by “Mathildis regine, Willelmi Pevrelli de Notingaham, Adeline sue uxoris, Willelmi Pevrelli filii illorum, Ro[berti] comitis Mellentis, Gisleberti de Aquila…Roberti fratris Willelmi Pevrelli, Simonis comitis, Stephani comitis de Alber[233].  “Robertus de Laceio” founded Pontefract Priory, for the soul of “Hylberti patris mei et Hawisiæ matris meæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “W. Peverel…[234].  The Cartulary of the Priory of St James, Northampton records the death “V Kal Feb” of “Willi Peverell fundatoris[235]m ADELINE, daughter of ---.  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of the church of Lenton to Cluny, by charter dated to [1103/14], which records “Willelmo Peverello cum uxore sua Adaleida et filio suo Willelmo” as founders of the church and is subscribed by “… Willelmi Pevrelli de Notingaham, Adeline sue uxoris, Willelmi Pevrelli filii illorum…[236].  “Willelmus Peverellus” donated land “juxta Picheseie” to Colchester St. John, with the advice of “matris mee A.”, by undated charter[237].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Adeline mat[ri Will Peur] de Noting" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[238].  The Cartulary of the Priory of St James, Northampton records the death “XIV Kal Feb” of “Adelyne uxis ei” (immediately after that of “Willi Peverell fundatoris”)[239].  William & his wife had four children: 

i)          ADELISE ([1075/80]-after 27 May 1156).  "Adeliz de Redveris" donated property to the abbey of Loders, Dorset, for the souls of "patris mei…Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham…et matris mee Adeline", with the consent of "filiorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de ---…et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Reveris, Henrici atque Willelmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Stephanus de Magnevilla…Willelmus Avenel…"[240].  Her husband’s name is confirmed by another charter under which “Adeliz de Reviers” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the soul of “domini mei Ricardi de Reviers”, also undated[241].  The chronology of her descendants suggests that she must have been born not later than [1075/80].  "Adeliza de Reviers" wrote to Goscelin Bishop of Salisbury, by charter dated to [1142/55], notifying him of her donation to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg of property which "her father William Peverel of Nottingham" gave with her to "Richard de Reviers"[242]m RICHARD de Reviers, son of GUILLAUME de Vernon & his wife Emma [de Crépon] (-8 Sep 1107, bur Abbey de Montebourg). 

ii)         WILLIAM Peverel (-1100).  The Cartulary of the Priory of St James, Northampton records the death “XVI Kal Mai 1111” of “Willi filii dci dni Willi Peverell”, another manuscript recording the year as 1100[243].  Assuming that the death date of his father and the estimated birth date range of his sister Adelise are both correct, it is unlikely that 1111 could have been the correct year of William’s death, considering that his parents had another son named William who was presumably born after the older William died. 

iii)        MATILDA Peverel (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Mathildi sorori Willi Peur de Noting" in Northamptonshire[244]

iv)        WILLIAM Peverel ([1100/05]-after 1155).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of the church of Lenton to Cluny, by charter dated to [1103/14], which records “Willelmo Peverello cum uxore sua Adaleida et filio suo Willelmo” as founders of the church and is subscribed by “… Willelmi Pevrelli de Notingaham, Adeline sue uxoris, Willelmi Pevrelli filii illorum…[245].  Considering the likely estimated birth date of William’s sister Adelise, it is unlikely that William could have been born much later than the earliest years in the 12th century.  This therefore suggests that “Willelmi Pevrelli filii illorum” in the charter dated to [1103/14] could not refer to the older brother of this William Peverel junior, whose death is recorded elsewhere (see above).  “Willelmus Peverellus” donated land “juxta Picheseie” to Colchester St. John, with the advice of “matris mee A.”, by undated charter[246].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills Peur de Noting" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire in respect of "Forest"[247].  King Stephen named “Willielmo Peverello juniori cum uxore sua Oddona et filio suo Henrico” in his charter relating to Lenton Priory[248].  Ralph de Diceto records that "Willelmus Peverel de Notingeham" was disinherited in 1155 for poisoning "Ranulfo comiti Cestriæ"[249].  The 1156 Pipe Roll records "Willi Peurelli de Notingen" in Nottinghamshire, with a revenue of ₤175, and the 1157 Pipe Roll "Willi Peurelli" in Nottinghamshire[250].  In 1155, Henry II King of England confiscated the properties of William Peverel, who retired to a monastery[251]m firstly ODDONA, daughter of ---.  King Stephen named “Willielmo Peverello juniori cum uxore sua Oddona et filio suo Henrico” in his charter relating to Lenton Priory[252]m secondly ([1140/45]) [as her first husband,] HAWISE de Lancaster, daughter of --- (-after [1188/89]).  “Avisia de Lancastria, uxor Willielmi Peverel” donated property to Derley Priory by undated charter[253].  The Complete Peerage which speculates that the wife of William Peverel was Hawise, daughter of Roger de Montgommery Lord of Lancaster & his wife Almodis Ctss de la Marche[254].  This is not an ideal fit.  Her supposed father Roger was banished from England in 1102 and retired to La Marche, so it is unclear why Hawise would have been described as “de Lancastria” in a charter which must have been dated about 40 years later.  In any case, the chronology is also unfavourable.  It is unlikely that the wife of Roger de Montgommery, Almodis de la Marche, was born much later than 1070, given the known chronology of her family, which means that her children would have been born before 1110 at the latest.  On the other hand, it is likely that William Peverel’s second marriage should be dated to the early 1140s at the earliest, as his first wife is named in one of the charters of Stephen King of England (who succeeded in 1135).  Such a marriage date is late if his second wife was born in the early 1100s, and impossible assuming that his widow was the same person who married Richard de Morville and had children by him in the late 1150s.  According to Domesday Descendants, she married secondly Richard de Morville (no corresponding primary source cited)[255].  The primary source which confirms that the widow of William Peverel was the same person who remarried Richard de Morville has not yet been identified.  Domesday Descendants states that the wife of Richard de Morville was Hawise de Lancaster, daughter of William de Lancaster (no corresponding primary source cited)[256].  As can be seen from the chronology of William de Lancaster’s known wife Gundred de Warenne, this affiliation would only be possible if Hawise had been born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage.  On the other hand, the onomastics are favourable, as each succeeding generation of this "de Lancaster" family included a Hawise de Lancaster.  "Avicia de Lonc spouse of Richard de Morevilla, with the consent of William her heir and her other heirs" confirmed a donation to Furness St. Mary by charter dated to [1188/89][257].  William & his first wife had [two] children: 

(a)       HENRY Peverel .  King Stephen named “Willielmo Peverello juniori cum uxore sua Oddona et filio suo Henrico” in his charter relating to Lenton Priory[258]

(b)       [MARGARET ([1123/26]-).  “Robertus comes de Ferrariis” granted property “in Stebbingis…per Margaretam comitissam uxorem meam” to Morice FitzGeoffrey by charter dated “VI Kal Oct IV anno imperii Regis Stephani” (1139)[259].  Her parentage is suggested by the charter of John King of England which names “Willelmo de Ferrariis comiti” as heir to territories of “Willelmi Peverell[260].  If this parentage is correct, Margaret is unlikely to have been born outside the narrow date range shown above, which would also indicate that her marriage took place only shortly before the date of this charter.  m (before 1139) ROBERT Ferrers Earl [of Derby], son of ROBERT de Ferrers Earl [of Derby] & his wife Hawise --- (-before 1160, bur Merevale Abbey).] 

b)         ROBERT Peverel (-after 1103).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of the church of Lenton to Cluny, by charter dated to [1103/14], which records “Willelmo Peverello cum uxore sua Adaleida et filio suo Willelmo” as founders of the church and is subscribed by “…Roberti fratris Willelmi Pevrelli…[261]

c)         [RANULF Peverel (-after 27 Jan 1091).  "…Ranulfus Peverellis…" witnessed the charter dated 27 Jan 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the status of Bath abbey[262].  Assuming that the dates attributed to William, son of Ranulf Peverel, are correct as shown above, it is unlikely that Ranulf who witnessed this charter was William’s father.  It is assumed therefore that he was another younger brother of William who is unrecorded elsewhere.] 

 

 

1.         HENRY Peverel of Lund .  m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH Peverel of Lund .  “Hugh Peuerel son of Henry Peuerel of Lund” donated land “in the field of Lund and of Edenham, lying upon Foxeberche” to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[263].  “Hugh Peuerel of Lund” donated revenue from Lund, to be received from “Agnes Peuerel the grantor’s sister”, to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[264]

b)         AGNES Peverel .  “Hugh Peuerel of Lund” donated revenue from Lund, to be received from “Agnes Peuerel the grantor’s sister”, to Bridlington Priory by undated charter[265]

 

 

B.      PEVEREL FAMILIES of DOVER and BOURN, CAMBRIDGESHIRE

 

The connection between the following family sub-group and the Peverel family of Nottingham has not yet been ascertained.  The precise reconstruction of the following family as shown below is approximate and depends on the co-identity of William Peverel of Bourne (named in the Thorney charter) with William Peverel of Dover (named in the Shrewsbury charters). 

 

Four siblings, parent not identified: 

1.         HAMO Peverel of Dover (-1138 or before).  "…Willelmo Peurell Doure et Haimone Peurello et Ricardo Peurello…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[266].  "Stephanus comes Moritoni" confirmed the donation to Bec Sainte-Marie by "Willelmus Pevrellus de Dovra" with the consent of "fratrum suorum Hamonis et Pagani", by charter dated 1127[267].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Hamoni Peur" exempted in Staffordshire[268].  “Willielmus Peverellus de Douria” donated property “Wlurunton, Einardeseiam, Crugelton” granted to him by “Hamo Peverell patruus meus” to Shrewsbury abbey by undated charter[269].  "Hamo Paperellus" granted property "in Waletonia" to "Seburgæ filiæ meæ", dated to [1137/41][270].  “Willielmus Peverel de Brunne” donated property “in Wildene villa mea…Oddewic” to Thorney Monastery, for the souls of “avunculi mei Willielmi Peverel de Doure…patris mei Rodberti Peverel fratris sui, et Hamonis Peverel avunculi mei et…matris meæ Adeliciæ, et…Henrici Regis Angliæ” by undated charter[271]m SIBYL, daughter of GERARD de Tornay & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are recorded by Eyton[272].  Hamo had one [illegitimate] child by [an unknown mistress]: 

a)         SEBURGA .  "Hamo Paperellus" granted property "in Waletonia" to "Seburgæ filiæ meæ", dated to [1137/41][273].  Eyton concludes that Seburga must have been illegitimate as she and her descendants held property as tenants of her father’s collateral heirs[274].  William FitzAlan confirms the foundation of Wombourne abbey by "Willielmi et uxoris eius Saburgæ de Hedlega et Alani eorum filii" by undated charter, dated to [1130/35][275]m WILLIAM de Hadley, son of --- (-[1135/36]). 

2.         ROBERT [Payn] Peverel (-after 1127, bur Barnwell).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus Peverel de Brunne” donated property “in Wildene villa mea…Oddewic” to Thorney Monastery, for the souls of “avunculi mei Willielmi Peverel de Doure…patris mei Rodberti Peverel fratris sui, et Hamonis Peverel avunculi mei et…matris meæ Adeliciæ, et…Henrici Regis Angliæ[276].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that Henry I King of England granted the barony of "Roberto filio Pycoti" in Cambridgeshire to "suo familiari…Pagano Peuerel"[277].  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory names “Pagano Peverelle…militi”, in the time of Henry I King of England, as a donor to the priory in 1112[278].  The other references in the same source, quoted below, suggest that Payn must have been an alias of Robert Peverel.  "Stephanus comes Moritoni" confirmed the donation to Bec Sainte-Marie by "Willelmus Pevrellus de Dovra" with the consent of "fratrum suorum Hamonis et Pagani", by charter dated 1127[279].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Pagani Peuerel" died just before ten years after the move of canons to Barnwell priory and was buried at Barnwell[280]m ADELISA, daughter of ---.  “Willielmus Peverel de Brunne” donated property “in Wildene villa mea…Oddewic” to Thorney Monastery, for the souls of “avunculi mei Willielmi Peverel de Doure…patris mei Rodberti Peverel fratris sui, et Hamonis Peverel avunculi mei et…matris meæ Adeliciæ, et…Henrici Regis Angliæ” by undated charter[281].  Robert & his wife had five children: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] Peverel of Bourne, later of Dover (-Palestine [1147/48]).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Willelmus filius eius" succeeded on the death of "Pagano Peuerel" and confirmed his father’s donations to Barnwell priory and also donated "terre in Brunna"[282].  “Willielmus Peverel de Brunne” donated property “in Wildene villa mea…Oddewic” to Thorney Monastery, for the souls of “avunculi mei Willielmi Peverel de Doure…patris mei Rodberti Peverel fratris sui, et Hamonis Peverel avunculi mei et…matris meæ Adeliciæ, et…Henrici Regis Angliæ” by undated charter[283].  “Willielmus Peverellus de Douria” donated property “Wlurunton, Einardeseiam, Crugelton” granted to him by “Hamo Peverell patruus meus” to Shrewsbury abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walchelinus Maminot…"[284].  "…Willelmus Pevrel de Dovra…" subscribed a charter dated 8 Aug 1111 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the episcopate of Somerset at Bath[285].  "…Willelmo Peurell Doure et Haimone Peurello et Ricardo Peurello…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[286].  "Walkelinus Maminot" donated Bradford mill to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1141/48], witnessed by "Rogerio filio Warini et Fulcone fratre suo, Stephano de Haia et Michaele fratre suo", and "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera" also donated Bradford mill, donated by "dominus Walchelinus Maminot" for the soul of "Rogeri de Haia", witnessed by "…Matilla mea conjuge, Matilla de Dovera mea sorore, Acelina mea sorore…"[287].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Willelmus…de Dovre" opposed King Stephen during the civil war and joined the crusade during which her was killed, dated from the context to [1147][288].  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory records that “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani” confirmed his father’s donations but died childless in Jerusalem[289].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Willelmus [Peuerel]" died in Jerusalem leaving as his heirs "quatuor sorores…Pagani filias"[290]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera" donated Bradford mill, donated by "dominus Walchelinus Maminot" for the soul of "Rogeri de Haia", to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1141/48], witnessed by "…Matilla mea conjuge, Matilla de Dovera mea sorore, Acelina mea sorore…"[291]

b)         MATILDA (-before 1185).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Matilda died childless[292].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Matildis de Doure" as oldest of the four sisters of "Willelmi Peuerel" adding that she died "sine herede" and that her share in her brother’s inheritance was divided between her three sisters[293].  "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera" donated Bradford mill, donated by "dominus Walchelinus Maminot" for the soul of "Rogeri de Haia", to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1141/48], witnessed by "…Matilla mea conjuge, Matilla de Dovera mea sorore, Acelina mea sorore…"[294].  "…Mathilde uxore mea…" signed the charter dated to [1151/53] under which "Hugo de Chileham filius Fulberti de Dofora" donated the church of Chilham to the abbey of Saint-Bertin, for the souls of "patris mei Fulberti et matris mee Adelit…et Matildis uxoris mee"[295].  "William Fitz Warin of Burwasley" witnessed the charter dated to [1161/72] under which "Hugh de Dover and Matilda his wife" restored property to Shrewsbury abbey[296]m HUGH de Dover of Chilham, Kent, son of FULBERT de Dover & his wife Adelaide --- (-[1167/72]). 

c)         ALICE (-after 1185).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Alice married “Hamonis Feche senioris” by whom she had “filii et filiæ, primogenitus…Gilbertus Pecche primus et secundus…Gaufridus Pecche” and lists their descendants[297].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Aelicia" as one of the three sisters of "Willelmi Peuerel" who inherited the share of their oldest sister Matilda, the text indicating that she was the oldest of the surviving sisters, adding that she married "Hamonis Peche senioris" by whom she had "filii et filie"[298].  Her parentage and marriage are further confirmed by Hamon, her husband, recording in 1166 that William Peverel “gave him two knights’ fees in frank marriage with his sister[299], and by the undated charter under which "Gilbertus Peccatum" confirmed donations of land "in Harcalua" held by "Matildis de Dovre amita mea"[300]m HAMO Pecche, son of WILLIAM Pecche & his second wife Isilia --- (-[1168/85]). 

d)         ROHESE .  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[301].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Roysia" as second of the three sisters of "Willelmi Peuerel" who inherited the share of their oldest sister Matilda, adding that "de illa processit Albreda de Harecurt"[302]m IVO d’Harcourt, son of ROBERT d’Harcourt & his wife Agnes --- (-after 1166). 

e)         ASCELINE (-before 1190).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina de Waterville” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Asceline was mother of “duæ filiæ…Ascelina de Waterville et Matildis de Diva[303].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Ascelina de Wateruile" as third of the three sisters of "Willelmi Peuerel" who inherited the share of their oldest sister Matilda, adding that she was mother of "due filie Ascelina de Wateruille et Matildis de Diva", the former being the mother of "Rogerus de Torpel" and the latter of "Hugo de Diva"[304].  "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera" donated Bradford mill, donated by "dominus Walchelinus Maminot" for the soul of "Rogeri de Haia", to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1141/48], witnessed by "…Matilla mea conjuge, Matilla de Dovera mea sorore, Acelina mea sorore…"[305].  "G. de Waltervilla" granted his part of "Herchalun…et…meam partem de feudo Hugonis de Laci" to "Willielmo de Hetlehe", with the consent of "Acelinæ uxoris meæ et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1155/62], which names "Hamo Piperellus avunculus uxoris meæ"[306].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   m firstly GEOFFREY de Walterville [Waterville], son of ASCELIN de Walterville & his wife --- (-[1160/62]).  m secondly (1163) SAHER [II] de Quincy, son of SAHER [I] de Quincy & his wife Matilda de Senlis ([1138]-[1190/92]). 

3.         WILLIAM [I] Peverel (-1133 or after).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Willielmus Peverel de Brunne” donated property “in Wildene villa mea…Oddewic” to Thorney Monastery, for the souls of “avunculi mei Willielmi Peverel de Doure…patris mei Rodberti Peverel fratris sui, et Hamonis Peverel avunculi mei et…matris meæ Adeliciæ, et…Henrici Regis Angliæ[307].  "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera, Hamundo P. fratri suo et Willilemo P. nepoti suo" enfeoffed "Thurstano dapifero meo" with "Geddingam et Laiwellam" by charter dated to [1121/22][308].  "Stephanus comes Moritoni" confirmed the donation to Bec Sainte-Marie by "Willelmus Pevrellus de Dovra" with the consent of "fratrum suorum Hamonis et Pagani", by charter dated 1127[309].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo Peur de Doura" in Huntingdonshire[310]

4.         [EMMA] .  Eyton calls "Emma Peverel supposed wife of Hugh Maminot" parents of Walkelin Maminot but does not cite the primary source which confirms their names[311].  Her relationship to William Peverel is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Walchelinus Maminot" restored “terram de Lega” (near Ellesmere), unjustly taken by “avunculus meus Willielmus Peverel”, to Shrewsbury abbey[312]m [HUGH] Maminot, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         RICHARD Peverel (-after 1114).  "…Willelmo Peurell Doure et Haimone Peurello et Ricardo Peurello…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[313]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Peverel (-after 1155).  The 1155 Pipe Roll refers to "in dñio Will. Peurell" in Lincolnshire[314]

 

2.         WILLIAM Peverel .  “Willielmus Peverellus” donated “terram meam de Cortinestoca”, held by “Robertus et Godwinus et Hamo”, to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire), with the consent of “Willielmi filii mei et heredis mei”, by undated charter (maybe dated to the mid-12th century from the context of other charters)[315].  This William Peverel was presumbly the same person as one of the other William Peverels named in this section.  However, no other source has been identified which names William as father of another William Peverel.  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Peverel .  “Willielmus Peverellus” donated “terram meam de Cortinestoca” to Garendon abbey (Leicestershire), with the consent of “Willielmi filii mei et heredis mei”, by undated charter (maybe dated to the mid-12th century from the context of other charters)[316]

 

3.         WILLIAM Peverel (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Peverel" used to hold one knight’s fee in Hampshire now held by "Robertus del Broc"[317]

 

4.         THOMAS Peverel .  "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel" by charter dated to the late 12th century[318]

 

5.         ROBERT Peverel (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Normannus de Normanville et Robertus Peverel ii m i militem" in Sussex in [1160/61][319].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Peverel et Normannus de Normanville" held one knight’s fee in Sussex from the king[320]

 

6.         ROBERT Peverel (-after 1190).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus Peverellus" in Sussex[321]

 

7.         MATTHEW Peverelm ---.  Matthew & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Peverel (-on Crusade before 7 Apr 1202).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus Peverellus filius Mathæi c s" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1186/87][322].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus Peverel" paying "xxx s, iii milites" in Norfolk, Suffolk[323].  An order of King John dated 7 Apr 1202 granted "custodia terre et heredis Willielmi Peverelli, qui in partibus Jerusalem obiit" to "T’rico Theuton"[324]

 

 

C.      PEVEREL FAMILIES of DORSET and SOMERSET

 

 

Two brothers, parents not identified: 

1.         THOMAS Peverelm AGNES, daughter of --- (-after 1249).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Thome Peuerel…infra etatem" against "Robertus Peuerel" for withholding land "in Ardientona" of which "Thomas Peuerel pater predicti Thome…sui fratris" was seised, noting that Thomas was born posthumously from "Agnes mater et custos predicti Thome"[325].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "Andreas Peverel...terre in bergthon...Agnes Peverel et Annora neptis eius...in Manebrig et Berton"[326].  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS Peverel (-[before 1249]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Thome Peuerel…infra etatem" against "Robertus Peuerel" for withholding land "in Ardientona" of which "Thomas Peuerel pater predicti Thome…sui fratris" was seised, noting that Thomas was born posthumously from "Agnes mater et custos predicti Thome"[327]m ---.  The name of Thomas’s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [ANORA .  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "Andreas Peverel...terre in bergthon...Agnes Peverel et Annora neptis eius...in Manebrig et Berton"[328].  It is assumed that this entry refers to a granddaughter of Agnes which, if correct, suggests that she may have been the daughter of Agnes’s son, presumably deceased.  This hypothesis has not been confirmed.] 

2.         ROBERT Peverel (-before Sep 1227).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Peverel" holding nine knights’ fees "de feodo eiusdem" in Cornwall in [1210/12][329].  "Eiusdem" in the text refers to the previous line which records "Robertus filius Walteri" holding eleven knights’ fees "de feodo Ricardi de Lusci avunculi sui".  It is not specified whether was Richard de Lucy was also uncle to Robert Peverel, but the large number of knights’ fees suggest that they may have been acquired due to a family relationship.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Peverel" holding "Bradeforde…de honore Bononiæ" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][330].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset and Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Robertus de Peverel" holding "Bradeford"[331].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Thome Peuerel…infra etatem" against "Robertus Peuerel" for withholding land "in Ardientona" of which "Thomas Peuerel pater predicti Thome…sui fratris" was seised, noting that Thomas was born posthumously from "Agnes mater et custos predicti Thome"[332]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ANDREW Peverel (-before 20 Mar 1274).  "Andrew Peverel" made a fine "for his relief of all the lands which Robert Peverel, his father, held of the king in chief in Burtin and Blatchington", dated 28 Sep 1227[333].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 20 Mar "2 Edw I" following the death of "Andrew Peverel" name “Thomas his son aged 30 and more is his next heir” and deals with the manors of “Blachinton alias Blechinton...[334].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "Andreas Peverel...terre in bergthon...Agnes Peverel et Annora neptis eius...in Manebrig et Berton"[335]m ---.  The name of Andrew’s wife is not known.  Andrew & his wife had one child: 

i)          THOMAS Peverel .  Inquisitions after a writ dated 20 Mar "2 Edw I" following the death of "Andrew Peverel" name “Thomas his son aged 30 and more is his next heir” and deals with the manors of “Blachinton alias Blechinton...[336]

 

 

D.      PEVEREL FAMILIES of SANFORD, DEVONSHIRE

 

 

1.         MATILDA Peverel .  Henry I King of England confirmed the donations of land "in corpore manerii de Plimtona" by "Bald de Ridveriis et Wido de Nunant et Robertus filius Martini et Matilda Peverel uxor sua" to Plympton priory, Devonshire by charter dated to [1121/35][337].  By undated charter, King Henry II reconfirmed donations to Plympton priory, earlier confirmed by “regis H. avi mei”, including donations made by “comes Baldewinus de Radveriis, et Wido de Nuvant, et Robertus filius Martini, et Matillis Peurella uxor sua…in corpore manerii de Plimtona  de dominio comitis Baldewini”, and …terræ in Bureton...Robertus fil. Martini, et Matillis Peurell...[338]By the same charter, King Henry II confirmed new donations to Plympton, including “…Et in Ermintona terram Wulwardi nigri; et terram filii sui, et terram cujusdam viduæ, quas Matillis Peurell eis dedit in excambio terræ de Killebiria…...[339]: this confirmation appears to confirm that Matilda survived her husband, although her connections, if any, with the other persons named are unclearAccording to Domesday Descendants, Matilda was the daughter of Ranulf Peverel of Essex[340], but this appears unlikely to be correct if her husband’s date of death is accurate as shown here.  Her connection with the Peverel family of Sanford is indicated by the undated charter under which "H. Peverel lord of Samford" donated "land of Buelle which the lady Matilda Peverel had before given", for the welfare of "himself and Cicely his wife"[341]m as his first wife, ROBERT FitzMartin, son of MARTIN & his wife Geva de Burcy (-before 1159). 

 

 

Two brothers, parents not identified: 

1.         HUGH Peverel (-[4 Jun 1228/23 Feb 1229]).  "Hug Peverell de Sanford" paid a fine for "terre sue" in Devonshire, dated 1200[342].  "Hug Peverel" paid a fine to enquire "si Ric Peverel frater ipsius Hug deponsavit Johannam fil Margar de Renby" in Devonshire, dated 1201[343].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Hug Peverel" owing in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][344].  "H. Peverel lord of Samford" donated "land of Buelle which the lady Matilda Peverel had before given", for the welfare of "himself and Cicely his wife", by undated charter[345].  An order of King John dated 21 May 1203 relates to a debt to the Jews at Oxford of "Walteri de Bolebec" to be paid by "Hel de Bello Campo et Constanc uxore sua"[346].  Henry III King of England ordered the release from prison at Winchester of "Hugonem Peverel de Samford" dated 4 Jun 1228[347]m CECILIA, daughter of ---.  "H. Peverel lord of Samford" donated "land of Buelle which the lady Matilda Peverel had before given", for the welfare of "himself and Cicely his wife", by undated charter[348].  An order dated 23 Feb 1229 ordered the sheriff of Somerset to transfer "manerio de Taleton quod fuit Hugonis Peverel de Samford" to "Cecilie que fuit uxor ipsius Hugonis" and “filius et heres ipsius Hugonis” assigned dower to “prefate matri sue[349].  "Cecilia who was the wife of Hugh Peverel of Sampford" made a fine "for marrying herself to whom she will wish except the king’s enemies", dated [Apr] 1230[350].  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Peverel .  "William, son and heir of Hugh Peverel of Sampford" paid homage for "all the lands that Hugh held of the king in chief" in Devonshire, dated [Mar] 1229[351].  "William Peverelle of Sanforde, son of Hugh Peverelle of Sanford" donated revenue "from Behulle", for the souls of "Christina my wife, Hugh Peverelle my father, and Cicely my mother", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Randulph Peverelle, Thomas Peverelle…"[352]m CHRISTINA, daughter of ---.  "William Peverelle of Sanforde, son of Hugh Peverelle of Sanford" donated revenue "from Behulle", for the souls of "Christina my wife, Hugh Peverelle my father, and Cicely my mother", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Randulph Peverelle, Thomas Peverelle…"[353]

2.         RICHARD Peverel (-after 1194).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Ricardus Peverel" paying "xv s" in Devonshire[354].  "Hug Peverel" paid a fine to enquire "si Ric Peverel frater ipsius Hug deponsavit Johannam fil Margar de Renby" in Devonshire, dated 1201[355].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Hugo Peverell de Sanford" making a fine "si Ric Peverell frater ipsius Hugonis disponsavit Johannam filiam Margarete de Reigin", in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][356].  [m JOANNA, daughter of --- & his wife Margaret ---].  "Hug Peverel" paid a fine to enquire "si Ric Peverel frater ipsius Hug deponsavit Johannam fil Margar de Renby" in Devonshire, dated 1201[357].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Hugo Peverell de Sanford" making a fine "si Ric Peverell frater ipsius Hugonis disponsavit Johannam filiam Margarete de Reigin", in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][358]

 

 

 

PICOT

 

 

The list of fees held from the church of Bayeux in 1133 includes “feodum Guillelmi Picoth, feodum trium militum in Culeyo, in Traceyo et Leon et Franca Villula supra Rothomagum et Montberton[359]

 

 

1.         PICOT (-after [1071]).  Orderic Vitalis records "Guillelmum cognomento Pantulfum et Picodum atque Corbatum, filiosque eius Rogerium et Rodbertum" as vassals of Roger de Montgommery in Shropshire, dated to [1071] from the context[360]

 

2.         ROGER Picot (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger Picot" in Cambridgeshire[361]

 

3.         WILLIAM Picot (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Picot" held one knight’s fee from "Galfridi de Ver" in Shropshire[362]

 

4.         RALPH Picot (-1166).  An undated charter records that “in tempore Henrici regis primiElyas de Crevequer” donated “ecclesie de Serres...advocacionem” to the canons of Leeds priory who donated it to “clericum suum Radulfum Pykot” who resigned his position and became a knight, that “Emma filie et heredes dicti Elye” later confirmed her father’s donation, and that later still “Hamo...dominus medietatis manerii de Serres” further confirmed the donation[363].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus Picot" held parts of knights’ fees from "Simonis de Bello Campo" in Bedfordshire[364]The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records "Rad Picot" accounting for land in Kent, but adding "sed mortuus est"[365]m ---.  Ralph & his wife had three children: 

a)         ADELISA Picot (-after 1194).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Adelizia primogenita filia Radulfi Pikot" in Kent "pro habenda…parte hereditatis sue de Tanga et Kingesdon que eam contingit versus Eugeniam sororem suam"[366]same person as...? ALICE Picot m GILBERT Malet, son of WILLIAM Malet & his first wife --- (-1194).  Salzman records her parentage and marriage[367].  

b)         EUGENIA ([1154/55]-after 1194).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Ewgenia Picot…filia Radulfi Picot de Kancia et uxor Thome filii Bernardi…xxx annorum”, her property “in hundredo de Redefeld…de feodo Gileberti Malet" given to her by "Willelmus Malet…in dotem”, adding that she had three sons, aged 10, 8 and 3, and one daughter, given by "Dominus Rex, filio Johannis de Bidun", by her second husband[368].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Eugenia Picot x s" in Kent in [1186/87][369].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Eugenia Pikot…pro custodia Johannis f sue et terre sue" in Kent[370].  “Eugenia Picot” donated capelle de Kingesdune” to Rochester by undated charter[371].  A charter dated “in octabis sancti Michaeli” 1218 records an agreement concerning “advocatione ecclesie de Kingesdune” followinig a claim by Radulfum filium Bernardi” and “Willelmum priorem de Rosa[372]m firstly (1165 or before) as his second wife, WILLIAM Malet, son of --- (-1169).  m secondly THOMAS FitzBernard, son of BERNARD & his wife --- (-before 1185). 

c)         AGNES Picot m TRIAN de Bidun, son of HALENALD de Bidun & his [first/second wife Sara ---/Anneta ---] (-after 1176). 

 

5.         EUSTACE Picot (-after 1166).  "Eustachius Picot" held one knight’s fee from "Hugonis de Dovra" in Cambridgeshire in 1166[373]m ---.  The name of Eustace`s wife is not known.  Eustace & his wife had one child: 

a)         LORETA Picot ([1144/45]-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Lauretta Picot que fuit uxor Hugonis de Burdeleis et filia Eustachii Picot…xl annorum”, adding that she has “vi filios et ii filias et Willelmus filius eius et heres est xxvi annorum[374]m HUGH de Bordelais, son of --- (-before 1185). 

 

 

1.         HENRY Picot .  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that Henry I King of England granted one knight’s fee in Cambridgeshire "Henricus pater meus", held in 1166 by his son "Albricus Picot"[375]m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had one child: 

a)         AUBRY Picot (-after 1171).  "Albricus Picot" held one knight’s fee in Cambridgeshire in 1166, stating that Henry I King of England had granted it to "Henricus pater meus"[376].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Albricus Picot i m" in Cambridgeshire in [1167/68][377].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Albricus Picot xx s" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1171/72][378]m MABILIA, daughter of ---.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Mabilia…neptis Rannulfi de Glanville…uxor Albrici Picot”, her property “in Bukeswurthe…in feodo Gileberti de Muntfichet", and her "ii filios et iii filias, et primogenitus est miles[379].  Aubry & his wife had five children: 

i)          ROBERT Picot (-after 1210).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “filius Albrici Picot”, his property “in Beche", and "in custodia Rannulfi de Glanville”, and in a later passage "terra Roberti Picot in Cneya…in custodia Rannulfi de Glanville et…habet etatem et est miles"[380].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus Picot" paying "x s, i militem" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire[381].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Robertus Picot" paying "xx s, i militem" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire[382].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Picot" holding one knight’s fee "in Cueye" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][383]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       PETER Picot (-after 1217).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Petrus filius Roberti Pikot" holding "medietatem de Heydene…ad coronationem Regis" from the Serjeantie in Essex and Herefordshire[384]

ii)         --- Picot .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Mabilia…neptis Rannulfi de Glanville…uxor Albrici Picot”, her property “in Bukeswurthe…in feodo Gileberti de Muntfichet", and her "ii filios et iii filias, et primogenitus est miles[385]

iii)        three daughters .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Mabilia…neptis Rannulfi de Glanville…uxor Albrici Picot”, her property “in Bukeswurthe…in feodo Gileberti de Muntfichet", and her "ii filios et iii filias, et primogenitus est miles[386]

 

 

1.         ROBERT Picot (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Picot" held one knight’s fee from "comitis Hugonis" in Norfolk[387]

 

2.         RALPH Picot (-after 1210).  Henry II King of England confirmed property at Dieppe donated to the abbey of Foucarmont by "Radulfus Picot et Amfria uxor eius" which had been confirmed by "Willermus frater meus" by charter dated to [1177/82][388].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus Picot" holding "i carucatam in Erdele et i…in Salinges per serjanteriam" in Essex in [1210/12][389]m AMFRIA, daughter of ---.  Henry II King of England confirmed property at Dieppe donated to the abbey of Foucarmont by "Radulfus Picot et Amfria uxor eius" which had been confirmed by "Willermus frater meus" by charter dated to [1177/82][390]

 

 

1.         PETER Picotm ---.  The name of Peter’s wife is not known.  Peter & his wife had one child: 

a)         PETER Picot (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Petrus filius Petri Picot" holding "dimidiam Heydene per serjanteriam serviendi cum i toaloa ad coronationem Regis" in Essex in [1210/12][391].

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Picot (-after 28 Feb 1216).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus Picot…et Willelmus filius Willelmi de Cliftone" holding parts of knights’ fees in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][392].  "Willelmus Picot" made a fine for returning to the king’s support naming "Alex filius suus" as hostage who was given, dated 28 Feb 1216[393]m as her second husband, JULIANA, widow of HENRY de Gand, daughter of ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Willelmus Picot et Juliana uxor eius" against "Matillidem filiam Gaufridi" for "terciam parte…terre in Birstaudeby dotem ipsius Juliane unde Henricus de Gaunt quondam vir suus" of which "Thomas Peuerel pater predicti Thome…sui fratris" was seised, noting that Thomas was born posthumously from "Agnes mater et custos predicti Thome"[394].  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ALEXANDER Picot (-after 28 Feb 1216).  "Willelmus Picot" made a fine for returning to the king’s support naming "Alex filius suus" as hostage who was given, dated 28 Feb 1216[395]

 

 

 

PINKENEY

 

 

1.         GILO de Pinkeney .  The Complete Peerage records that Gilo de Pinkeney founded the priory of Weedon Pinkeny, Northamptonshire as a cell of Beauvais Saint-Lucien, undated, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[396]m ---.  The name of Gilo’s wife is not known.  Gilo & his wife had two chlidren: 

a)         RALPH de Pinkeney (-before 29 Sep 1158).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter in which his son "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire[397].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad de Pincheneio" in Northamptonshire and to marry "uxore Sym Chaisnedoit"[398]m ([1129/30]) as her second husband, ---, widow of SIMON de Chesneduit, daughter of ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad de Pincheneio" in Northamptonshire and to marry "uxore Sym Chaisnedoit"[399].  Ralph & his wife had three children: 

i)          GILBERT de Pinkeney (-1178).  "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis…meis…Henrico primogenito meo et cæteris", by undated charter witnessed by "Hugonis de Pinchenni, Radulphi fratris iam dicit Gilberti…Ancheri de Pincheni…"[400].  "Gilebertus Pinconiensis" confirmed donations by “avus meus Gilo Pinconiensis…pater meus Radulfus” of donations to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis Henrico et Gilberto cum cæteris", by undated charter[401].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Gilbertus de Pinkeni" in Buckinghamshire[402].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Gilbertus de Pinkeygni xv s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire in [1171/72][403]m firstly EUSTACHIA, daughter of ---.  "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis…meis…Henrico primogenito meo et cæteris", by undated charter[404]m secondly (after [1162]) as her second husband, HELWISE de Guerres, widow of WILLIAM de Hastings, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  Her family origin and three marriages are stated in Domesday Descendants, which does not cite the corresponding primary source[405].  She married thirdly William FitzRobert.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Suffolk “Hundredum de Cosford”, dated 1219, which names "Domina Helewisa de Gwerres bis dotata...primo Willelmo de Pynkiny, secundo Willelmo filio Roberti et domina Matillis de Flamvilla" [Helwise’s daughter-in-law] holding "manerium de Bildeston...de baronia Godefridi de Luvein per hereditatem uxoris sue"[406].  Gilbert & his first wife had [four or more] children: 

(a)       HENRY de Pinkeney (-1209).  "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis…meis…Henrico primogenito meo et cæteris", by undated charter[407]

-        see below

(b)       GILBERT de Pinkeney (-after 1166).  "Gilebertus Pinconiensis" confirmed donations by “avus meus Gilo Pinconiensis…pater meus Radulfus” of donations to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis Henrico et Gilberto cum cæteris", by undated charter[408].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gilberto filio meo" held one half a knight’s fee from "Gilbertus de Pinkeni" in Buckinghamshire[409]

(c)       two or more other children .  "Gilebertus Pinconiensis" confirmed donations by “avus meus Gilo Pinconiensis…pater meus Radulfus” of donations to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis Henrico et Gilberto cum cæteris", by undated charter[410]

ii)         HUGH de Pinkeney .  "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire by undated charter witnessed by "Hugonis de Pinchenni, Radulphi fratris iam dicit Gilberti…Ancheri de Pincheni…"[411]

iii)        RALPH de Pinkeney .  "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire by undated charter witnessed by "Hugonis de Pinchenni, Radulphi fratris iam dicit Gilberti…Ancheri de Pincheni…"[412]

b)         ROBERT de Pinkeney of Moreton Pinkeney (-before [1160]).  The Complete Peerage records that Gilo de Pinkeney gave land in Sulgrave, Northamptonshire and Maidenhead, Berkshire to his younger son Robert[413]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          HENRY de Pinkeney (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Gilbertus de Pinkeni" in Buckinghamshire, including "Henricus filius Roberti de Pinkeney v milites et dimidium, Gilo de Pinkeny i militem et dimidium"[414]

ii)         ROBERT de PinkeneyDomesday Descendants names Robert as a younger son of Robert de Pinkeney and records that he and his wife Agnes donated property to Northampton St Andrew[415]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants names Robert as a younger son of Robert de Pinkeney and records that he and his wife Agnes donated property to Northampton St Andrew[416]

 

 

1.         AGNES de Pinkeney .  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Bernardus Bail senior, Bernardus junior filius eius, Ingelram le b filius eius, Wid et Eustacius filii eius, Matilda mater et Hawisia et altera Hawis, et domina Agnes de Pinchensi uxor junioris Bernardi, Rogerus filius Hugonis nepos eius et Johannes frater Rogerii"[417]m BERNARD Balliol, son of BERNARD Balliol & his wife Matilda --- (-after 1174). 

 

2.         WILLIAM de Pinkeney (-after 1167).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus de Pinkeini" held one knight’s fee from "Margaretæ de Boun" in Gloucestershire[418].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Pinkeingni ix l, sed amodo in Norhamtesira" in Buckinghamshire in [1167/68][419]

 

3.         GILO de Pinkeney (-after 4 Apr 1196).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Gilbertus de Pinkeni" in Buckinghamshire, including "Henricus filius Roberti de Pinkeney v milites et dimidium, Gilo de Pinkeny i militem et dimidium"[420].  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 4 Apr 1196 in a claim by "Egid de Pinkeni et Matill ux sua" against "Will de Englefield fil eiusdem Matill"[421]m as her second husband, MATILDA, widow of --- de Englefield, daughter of --- (-after 4 Apr 1196).  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 4 Apr 1196 in a claim by "Egid de Pinkeni et Matill ux sua" against "Will de Englefield fil eiusdem Matill"[422]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Pinkeney (-after [1189]).  “Helewis filia Willelmi de Lancastr” confirmed to “Gileberto fratri meo...terras quas pater meus” had given him “Slegil...et Sockebroc et Tyrerhge...et totam terram de Paterickedale” by charter dated to [1189], witnessed by “......Roberto de Pinkenei...Gervas de Aencurt...[423]

 

 

HENRY de Pinkeney, son of GILBERT de Pinkeney & his first wife Eustachia --- (-1209).  "Gilebertus de Pinchenni" confirmed donations by “Gilo avus meus et Radulfus pater meus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the priory of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis…meis…Henrico primogenito meo et cæteris", by undated charter[424].  "Gilebertus Pinconiensis" confirmed donations by “avus meus Gilo Pinconiensis…pater meus Radulfus” of donations to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, supported by "uxore mea Eustachia et liberis Henrico et Gilberto cum cæteris", by undated charter[425].  "Henricus Pinconiensis" confirmed donations by “proavus meus Gilo et avus meus Radulfus et pater meus Gilebertus” of land “de suo dominio de Wedonia” to found the prior of Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire by undated charter[426].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gilbertus de Pinkeni" granted one knight’s fee "postea" to "Henrico filio meo" in Buckinghamshire[427].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Pinkenei" held one and one half knights’ fees from "Roberti de Chokes" in Northamptonshire[428].  "Robertus de Pinconio filius Henrici" donated property to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, with the consent of "Henrici filii mei et hæredis", for the souls of "Eglina uxore mea et Henrico filio meo…et…Philippæ filiæ meæ defunctæ", by undated charter[429].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Henricus de Pingkeygni" paying "vi l xvi s, xiii milites et dimidium" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[430].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Henricus de Pinkeingny" paying "xiii l x s, xiii milites et dimidium" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, and being granted delay to pay in Berkshire[431].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Henricus de Pinkeyni" paying "xiv l x s, xiii milites" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[432].  “Henricus de Pynkeny” donated "ecclesiam de Haudeneby" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s by undated charter witnessed by "…Rogero de Pinkeni, Ansculfo de Pykeny, Roberto de Pinkeni"[433].  "Henry de Pinkeni and Leticia his wife" and "Serlo de Marci and Emma his wife" granted land "in Cristehale" to "William Barun", dated [1198/99][434]

m LETITIA de Lucy, daughter of ROBERT de Lucy & his wife ---.  Domesday Descendants names "Letitia daughter and co-heir of Robert de Lucy, possibly the nephew of Richard de Lucy the justiciar" as the wife of Henry de Pinkeney, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[435].  "Henry de Pinkeni and Leticia his wife" and "Serlo de Marci and Emma his wife" granted land "in Cristehale" to "William Barun", dated [1198/99][436].  It is likely that the wives of Henry de Pinkeney and Serlo de Marcy were related, maybe holding a joint interest in the land in question.  If this is correct, the precise family relationship has not yet been traced.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neville, Letitia de Pinkeyni, Serlo de Marcy" holding one knight’s fee each "in Elmedene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][437].  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by an order dated [Feb] 1222 under which "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[438]

Henry & his wife had three children: 

1.         ROBERT de Pinkeney (-[29 Sep/12 Dec] 1232).  "Robertus de Pinconio filius Henrici" donated property to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, with the consent of "Henrici filii mei et hæredis", for the souls of "Eglina uxore mea et Henrico filio meo…et…Philippæ filiæ meæ defunctæ", by undated charter[439].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Pingkeigni" paying "xv s, i militem et dimidium" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[440].  The Pipe Roll 1209 records that "Robertus de Pinkenni" paid fine on succession to "Henrici patris sui"[441].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Robertus de Pinchingny" held "xv milites de feodo de Windlesor"[442].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Pinkeny" holding "xv milites" in Northamptonshire in [1210/12][443].  Under an order dated [Feb] 1222 "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[444].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni Milo de Sumeri et Beatricia de Lucy” owing in Essex[445].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni” owing “pro Henrico fratre suo et Henrico f suo” in Northamptonshire[446].  An order dated 1231 records the return of "Robertus de Pinkeny...Henricus de Pinkeny frater suus" from service with the army in Wales[447].  Bracton lists a claim by "Robertus de Pinkingny" against "Galfrido de Cruce" relating to "Andree filii et heredis Johannis de Windesores", dated Michaelmas 1232, recording that "Reginaldus de Pinkingny ante gwerram" had enfeoffed "Petrum patrem predicti Johannis et auum ipsius Andree in suburbio Windesores in com. Berck"[448]m AIGELINE, daughter of ---.  "Robertus de Pinconio filius Henrici" donated property to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, with the consent of "Henrici filii mei et hæredis", for the souls of "Eglina uxore mea et Henrico filio meo…et…Philippæ filiæ meæ defunctæ", by undated charter[449].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRY de Pinkeney (-before 16 May 1254).  "Robertus de Pinconio filius Henrici" donated property to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, with the consent of "Henrici filii mei et hæredis", for the souls of "Eglina uxore mea et Henrico filio meo…et…Philippæ filiæ meæ defunctæ", by undated charter[450]

-        see below

b)         PHILIPPA de Pinkeney (-before 1232).  "Robertus de Pinconio filius Henrici" donated property to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, with the consent of "Henrici filii mei et hæredis", for the souls of "Eglina uxore mea et Henrico filio meo…et…Philippæ filiæ meæ defunctæ", by undated charter[451]

2.         --- de Pinkeney .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus…filius Willelmi de Nokes filii Hugonis…xviii annorum” in the custody of “Henrici de Pinkeni cuius filiam desponsavit…elapsis iam iv annis" and his land "in Messedina[452]Betrothed ([1181]) to WILLIAM de Nokes, son of WILLIAM FitzHugh de Nokes & his wife --- ([1167/68]-). 

3.         HENRY de Pinkeney (-after 1231).  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni” owing “pro Henrico fratre suo et Henrico f suo” in Northamptonshire[453].  An order dated 1231 records the return of "Robertus de Pinkeny...Henricus de Pinkeny frater suus" from service with the army in Wales[454]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Pinkeney (-after 1241)m ([Apr/13 May] 1241) as her second husband, CHRISTIANA de Limesey, widow of DAVID de Lindsay, daughter of --- (-after [25 Jun] 1241).  Her family origin and marriage are indicated by a document dated to [1225/26] which records that "the heirs of Amabilis de Limesi owe...of her fine not to be compelled to marry”, that “Hugh de Oddingseles and Basilia his wife” owe a debt, and that “David son and heir of David de Lindesi, who has one of Amabilis’s sisters” owes part[455].  A document dated to [15 Apr] 1241 records that "Christiana widow of David de Lindesye, who had a writ for her dower versus Gerard de Doddingeseles in Bradefelde...is not present[456].  Her second marriage is indicated by the following document, assuming that “Bradewelle” is the same as “Bradefelde” which is named in the document dated [15 Apr] 1241.  "Robert de Pinkeny and Cristiana his wife” sued several individuals concerning rights of land, including “Simon the clerk of Bradewelle” relating to land “in Bradewelle in Oxfordshire which...they claim as Cristiana’s dower”, dated 13 May 1241[457].  The marriage is also indicated by a document dated 16 May 1241 which records a claim by "Robert de Pinkeny and Cristiana his wife” against “Gerard de Oddingeseles[458], who is also named in the [15 Apr] 1241 document.  "Robert de Pinkeny and Cristiana his wife” sued “Henry de Pinkeny” relating to land “in Whichinton which...they claim as Cristiana’s dower”, dated [25 Jun] 1241[459]

 

 

HENRY de Pinkeney Lord of Wedon-Pinkeney, son of ROBERT de Pinkeney & his wife Aiglene --- (-before 16 May 1254)The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni” owing “pro Henrico fratre suo et Henrico f suo” in Northamptonshire[460].  "Robertus de Pinconio filius Henrici" donated property to Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, with the consent of "Henrici filii mei et hæredis", for the souls of "Eglina uxore mea et Henrico filio meo…et…Philippæ filiæ meæ defunctæ", by undated charter[461].  A writ after the death of "Henry de Pinkeny alias de Pynkeny", dated "2 Jul 38 Hen III", and later inquisitions, record that "Henry his son aged 26 and more is his heir" and refer to "Barton, 10 marks land held of Sir Henry de Hastinges in free marriage, which the deceased gave to Alice his daughter"[462]

m ALICE de Lindsay, daughter of DAVID de Lindsay & his wife Marjory [of Scotland] (-[1252/54]).  "Henry de Pinkeny, who had married Alicia sister and heir of Gerard de Lyndesi in the moiety of the barony of Lymesy” swore homage to King Henry III, dated 10 Apr 1249[463].  The proofs relating to the claim to the Scottish throne in 1291 made by "domini Roberti de Pinkeny" name "Alicia" as daughter of "Margareta", daughter of "Henri patre Regis Willi"[464]

Henry & his wife had two children: 

1.         HENRY de Pinkeney (before 1228-before 25 Aug 1275)A writ after the death of "Henry de Pinkeny alias de Pynkeny", dated "2 Jul 38 Hen III", and later inquisitions, record that "Henry his son aged 26 and more is his heir" and refer to "Barton, 10 marks land held of Sir Henry de Hastinges in free marriage, which the deceased gave to Alice his daughter"[465].  The proofs relating to the claim to the Scottish throne in 1291 made by "domini Roberti de Pinkeny" name "Henricus de Pinkeny" as the son of "Alicia"[466].  By a writ of certiorari undated "4 Edw I", following the death of "Henry de Pynkeny" an order was requested relating to "the dower of Christiana who was the wife of Robert de Pynkeney in Stanes[467]m MARY, daughter of --- (-after her husband).  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Henry & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT de Pinkeney (-shortly before 2 Sep 1296).  King Edward I granted seisin of his father’s lands to "Robert de Pinkeny son and heir of Henry de Pinkeny deceased" by charter dated 4 Feb 1277[468].  The proofs relating to the claim to the Scottish throne in 1291 made by "domini Roberti de Pinkeny" name him as son of "Henricus de Pinkeny"[469]Claimant to the throne of Scotland in 1291, 5th in order on the Great Roll of Scotland.  A writ dated 2 Sep "24 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Pynkeny alias de Pinkeney" names "Henry de Pynkeny knight his brother aged 40 at the feast of St John the Baptist last is his next heir"[470]

b)         HENRY de Pinkeney ([1255/56]-before 24 Apr 1315).  A writ dated 2 Sep "24 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Pynkeny alias de Pinkeney" names "Henry de Pynkeny knight his brother aged 40 at the feast of St John the Baptist last is his next heir"[471].  He was summoned to parliament in 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Pinkeny.  m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after 1315). 

2.         ALICE de Pinkeney A writ after the death of "Henry de Pinkeny alias de Pynkeny", dated "2 Jul 38 Hen III", and later inquisitions, record that "Henry his son aged 26 and more is his heir" and refer to "Barton, 10 marks land held of Sir Henry de Hastinges in free marriage, which the deceased gave to Alice his daughter"[472].  The identity of Alice’s husband has not been ascertained.  m ---. 

 

 

 

PIPARD

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Pipard (after [1175/76]).  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records "William Pipard" in Gloucestershire[473]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         GILBERT Pipard (-[Sep 1191/Sep 1192]).  Sheriff of Gloucester and Hereford.  m (before 8 Dec 1195) as her first husband, ALICE FitzDuncan Lady of Cockermouth and Allerdale, daughter of WILLIAM FitzDuncan [of Scotland] & his second wife Alice de Rumilly (before [1153/54][474]-[6 Mar or 18 Mar] [1212/1215], bur [Gisburne Priory])The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “prima…Cecilia…secunda Amabilla…tertia Alicia” as the three daughters of “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, and his wife Alice, adding that Alice received “Aspatrike, et baronia de Allerdale et libertate de Cokermouth” and married “Gilberto Pipard” and secondly “Roberto de Courtenay”, but died childless and was succeeded by “Thomas de Lucy, cui successit Thomas filius eius, cui successit Antonius frater eius[475].  She married secondly (before 8 Dec 1195) as his second wife, Robert de Courtenay Lord of Sutton, Berkshire, Sheriff of Cumberland.  The obituary of Gisburne priory records the death “II Non Mar” of "Aliciæ de Rumley"[476]

2.         ROBERT Pipard .  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1184 of “...Robertus de Aldeford” and that his land “cum filia supradicti Roberti relicta non dum bina” was given to “Roberto Pipardi fratri Gilthleberti Pipard” by King Henry II[477]m --- de Aldford, daughter of ROBERT de Aldford & his wife --- ([1180/81]-).  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1184 of “...Robertus de Aldeford” and that his land “cum filia supradicti Roberti relicta non dum bina” was given to “Roberto Pipardi fratri Gilthleberti Pipard” by King Henry II[478]

 

 

 

POMERAI

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in La Pommeraye in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Falaise, canton Thury-Harcourt[479]

 

 

RALPH de la Pomerai (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Ralph de la Pommeraye” holding Stowey and Oare in Somerset, and numerous properties in Devonshire[480].  Powley indicates that Ralph’s was the fifth largest baronial tenant in Devonshire, calculating the acreage of each of his fiefs[481]

 

 

Two brothers, Powley says that Ralph, see above, was their father, indicating their succession in his properties[482]

1.         WILLIAM de la Pomerai (-after 1102).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Willelmus de Pomeria" donated "in Deveneschire villam…Bery pro qua Goselinus frater eius dedit Seldene, pro qua habemus Hopemaleysel" in 1102, "rege Henrico seniore consentiente et confirmante, tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][483]

2.         JOSCELIN de la Pomerai (-[1125/29]).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Willelmus de Pomeria" donated "in Deveneschire villam…Bery pro qua Goselinus frater eius dedit Seldene, pro qua habemus Hopemaleysel" in 1102, "rege Henrico seniore consentiente et confirmante, tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][484].  King Henry I confirmed donations to Gloucester St Peter, including "Sheldon [Devon]" donated by “Jocelin de la Pommeraye” by charter dated [May] 1114[485].  "…Goislinus de Pomereda, Rainald de Valle Torta…" witnessed the charter dated to [1123, Apr 15?] under which King Henry I confirmed the restoration of various churches to Exeter Cathedral[486].  "Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[487].  A much later charter records the foundation of Plympton Priory, quoting the undated charter of King Henry I witnessed by "…Goselinus de Pomereda…Raynaldus de Valletorta…"[488].  He is not named in the 1129 Pipe Roll in which his son is named so presumably had died before that date.  m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1125).  "Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[489]Joscelin & his wife had five children: 

a)         HENRY [I] de la Pomerai (-[1157/64])"Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[490]Lord of Berry Pomeroy, Devon, he had supported King Henry I during the rebellion of 1123, commanding the royal army at Pont-Athou.  Deputy Constable in the Royal household of King Henry I[491].  "Henrico de Pomer…" witnessed the charter dated to [1126] under which Henry I King of England granted property to Robert FitzPayn[492].  The 1129/30 Pipe Roll records "Henr de Pomer" in Dorsetshire[493].  "…Henrico de Pomeria…" subscribed the charter dated 1157 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Jean de Falaise[494].  Henry [I] presumably died before the 1164/65 Pipe Roll which records “Nova Placita et Nove Convent…Henr de Pomia]…de ..I. m…” in Devonshire[495], which presumably relates to Henry [II] (“Nova Placita…”).  m ROHESE, daughter of --- & his [mistress/wife] Sibyl Corbet (-1176).  The identity of the father of Rohese is uncertain.  Renaud Earl of Cornwall granted Roseworthy manor in Cornwall to his sister "Rohesia de Pomeria" in a charter[496].  The wife of Henry de la Pomerai was presumably therefore either Rohese, illegitimate daughter of Henry I King of England & his mistress Sibyl Corbet, or Rohese, daughter of Herbert FitzHerbert & his wife Sibyl Corbet.  Henry [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          HENRY [II] de la Pomerai (-before 28 Apr 1194)Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Pomeria" held one knight’s fee from the bishop of Exeter in Cornwall and half a knight’s fee in Devon[497]

-        see below

ii)         JOSCELIN de la Pomerai (-after [1201?]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "filius Henrici de Pomeria" held one knight’s fee from "Willelmi comitis Gloucestriæ" in Gloucestershire[498]Benedict of Peterborough records that Henry II King of England granted the kingdom of Limerick to "Hereberti filio Hereberti, et Willelmo fratri comitis Reginaldi, et Joellano de la Pumerai nepoti eorum" at a council in Oxford in May 1177, but that "Herbertus et Willelmus, fratres Reginaldi comitis Cornubiæ, et Joellanus de Pumeria nepos eorum" declined it at a council at Marlborough 3 Jun 1177[499].  "Joselinus de Pomerei" donated property to Ford abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of "…domini fratris mei Hen de Pomerei", by undated charter (maybe dated to after 1200, when William father of Henry de Tracy died) witnessed by "…Willielmo de Tracy fratre Hugonis de Courtenay, Henrico filio Willielmi de Tracy"[500].  As “domini fratris mei Hen…” was deceased at the time of Joscelin’s donation (see below), Joscelin survived his brother.  The early Sep 1319 charter cited below under Henry [VIII] de la Pomerai records this earliest charter for Ford issued by “Joselini de Pomerai[501]: the absence of any reference to Henry [II] from that document also suggests that he predeceased Joscelin. 

b)         ROGER de la Pomerai (-after 1129).  "Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[502].  The 1129/30 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Pomer" in Cornwall[503]

c)         PHILIP de la Pomerai"Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[504]

d)         JOSCELIN de la Pomerai"Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[505]

e)         RAOUL de la Pomerai (-after Sep 1151).  "Goscelin de la Pommeraye" founded the abbey of Sainte-Marie-du-Val, with the consent of "sa femme Emma et de ses fils Henry, Roger, Philippe, Goscelin et Raoul", by charter dated 1125[506].  "…Radulpho de Pomeria" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] which "H. dux Normannorum" issued for the hôpital de Falaise[507].  "…Radulfo de Pomeria…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Fontenay at the request of "Jordani Taxonis"[508]

 

 

HENRY [II] de la Pomerai, son of HENRY [I] de la Pomerai & his wife Rohese --- (-before 28 Apr 1194).  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll which records “Nova Placita et Nove Convent…Henr de Pomia]…de ..I. m…” in Devonshire[509], which presumably relates to Henry [II] (“Nova Placita…”).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Pomeria" held one knight’s fee from the bishop of Exeter in Cornwall and half a knight’s fee in Devon[510].  Henri Bishop of Bayeux notified that “Henry de Pomeria the younger” confirmed donations to Sainte-Marie du Val made by “Goslin de Pomeria and Henry his son” by charter dated 1167[511].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Henricus de Pomeray xxxi l v s vi d" in Devonshire in [1167/68][512].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Henricus de Pomaria" with three parts of one knight "de feodo de Vado…de honore Mortonii in baillia Osberti de Hosa", adding that he held "castrum de Pomeria cum purprestura de Rege"[513].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Henricus de la Pomereio" in Devonshire[514].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Henricus de la Pomeraye xxxi l xviii s iv d" in Devonshire in [1186/87][515].  King Richard I confirmed transfers to Ford abbey by charter dated 16 Sep 1189, including the sale of “unam piscariam in Cornubia…Coresturnam” made by “Henrici de Pomeria” (presumably during the reign of King Henry II, suggesting that this refers to Henry [II] de la Pomerai)[516].   Roger of Hoveden records that “Henricus de la Pumerai” expelled the monks from St. Michael’s Mount (Cornwall), dated to Feb 1194, but hearing of the approach of the king, died of fright (“audito adventu regis, obiit timore perterritus”)[517]: Powley points out that King Richard had not then reached England, concluding that “Legend has provided an unacceptable story of the baron’s revolt and death[518].  Henry [II] died before 28 Apr 1194, the date of the king’s confirmation of lands to his son Henry [III], cited below. 

m firstly MATHILDE de Vitré, daughter of ---.  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 28 Mar 1200 under which King John confirmed lands to "Willelmo Briwere", including "manerium de Braworthi" donated by "qd Henri de la Pomeria fil Matildi de Vitri"[519].  Her precise parentage has not been ascertained. 

m secondly as her first husband, ROHESE Bardolf, daughter of THOMAS Bardolf & his wife Rohese Hanselyn (-after 1224).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", states that "a fourth sister Rohese" [referring to the three daughters of Thomas Bardolf] was "first the wife of Henry de la Pommeraie and secondly of John Russell" (no source cited)[520].  She married secondly ([1201]) John Russell.  Hutchins’s History of the County of Dorset records that, in the third year of King John, “John Russel” paid 50 marks to the king for marrying “the sister of Doun Bardulf[521].  Wiffen records an abstract of a suit, in the Plea Rolls for the second year of King John, between “John Russell and Rohesia his wife” and “Henry de Pomeroy” [presumably Henry [III] de Pomerai] relating to land in Devon and Cornwall[522]

Henry [II] & his first wife had one child: 

1.         HENRY [III] de la Pomerai (-1207).  King Richard I confirmed to “Henry de Pomeraio, son of Henry…all his lands in England and Normandy”, dated 28 Apr 1194 [“5 Rich I” = 3 Sep 1193/2 Sep 1194][523].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Henricus de la Pomeray" paying "xxi l xviii s iv d" in Devonshire[524].  The Rotulus Cancellarii records "Henricus de la Pomeraie" owing in Devonshire, dated [27 May 1201/26 May 1202][525].  “…Hnr de Pomer…” witnessed the 16 Jan 1204 charter under which King John confirmed a church and land to “Hnrco decano de Fordham[526].  “…Henr de Pomer…” witnessed the 12 May 1204 charter under which King John granted property “in Sutthon” to “Willo de Wrotham[527].  An order dated 3 Apr 1207 records that “Henr de la Pomay” recorded the privileges granted to “homies de Lideford” and those of Exeter[528].  Henry [III] died in 1207, the date of an order placing “omnes terras q fuerunt Henr de La Pomaya” in the hands of “Willo Briw [Briwere]”[529].  As discussed under his wife, it appears likely that “Henrici junioris”, in the early Sep 1319 charter cited below under Henry [VII], was Henry [III] de la Pomerai.  m ALICE de Vernon, daughter of ---.  The early Sep 1319 charter cited below under Henry [VIII] de la Pomerai records the latter’s confirmation of earlier confirmations to Ford abbey, including a charter issued by “Henrici de la Pomerai filii Henrici junioris et Aliciæ de Vernun[530].  It seems likely that “Henrici junioris” was Henry [III].  Her parentage has not been ascertained in the Vernon family.  Henry [III] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         HENRY [IV] de la Pomerai (-[Damietta?] [Apr/3 Nov] 1221).  “Henr de La Pomay” made a fine “p habenda terras q fuit Henr patris sui, cujus heres ipse”, dated 1207[531].  Part of this fine was paid by Alice de Vautort: the 1208/09 [11 John] Pipe Roll records “…Alesia de valle Torta deb’ ccc m. pro Henr’ de la Pom’aie sic’ supa cotineta” in Devon[532].  "Henr fil Henr de Pomeraya" paid a fine for "terris q fuerunt ipsius Henrici patris sui" in Cornwall and Devon, dated 1208[533].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus de Pomerai" holding one knight’s fee in Cornwall in [1210/12][534].  “Henry de Pomeray, son of Henry de Pomeray, and Alice de Ver” leased lands “de Brudon” to “Reginald Beaupell”, dated 29 Sep 1213 [“15 John” = 23 May 1213/7 May 1214], with sureties “The said Henry de Pomeray and Geoffrey his brother…”, witnessed by “…William de Pomeray[535].  King John addressed ”H. fil Com et Henr de la Pomeraye” in Cornwall and Devon, dated 10 Feb 1215[536].  By two orders dated 15 May 1215, King John granted ”[…castr Exon cum] comitatum nostrum Devon custodiendum [as sheriffs]” to “Hnr de La Pomaye et Johi de Erlegh[537].  King John granted “terram q fuit Rog de Raymes in Bailla sua quam dns Rex ei dedit” to “Henr de la Pomaye” by order dated 34 Dec 1215[538].  Henry [IV] rebelled against the king, as indicated by a document dated 10 Sep 1216 under which King John ordered the restoration of their lands to “Henr de Pomaye et Guido de Bretevill” who had made peace with the king (“veniant ad fide et pace dni Reg…”) and granted “terram q fuit Andr de Vytery” in Cornwall to “dicto Henr[539].  Powley provides detailed background to Henry’s dispute with King John, which also involved Alan de Dunstanville[540].  King John by undated charter (inspeximus in a charter dated 5 Feb 1313) confirmed donations to Ford Abbey, including the donation of “unum ferlingum terre…Tymbrichtenford in Exemora” made by “Henrici de Pomeria”, the sale of “unam piscariam in Cornubia…Coresturnam” by “Henrici de Pomeria”, the donation of “totam terrem de Talle” by “Gellani de Pomeria et Henrici nepotis  sui”, and “totam terram de Roscarwich” by “Henrici de Pomeria[541]: if these donations/sales are listed in chronological order, it is possible that the last-named was donated by Henry [IV].  An order of King Henry III dated 15 Feb 1218 restored land “in Upotery” to “Ric de Crues”, from which he had been disseised by “Henr de Pomer[542].  An order dated 2 Apr 1219 records that “Henr fil Com” summoned “Henr de la Pomeraie” (and others) for a sum owed[543].  “Sir Henry de la Pomeraie, knight” gave a bond to “brother Warren de Monte Acuto, master of…the Hospital of Jerusalem” for a sum “he received in parts of ‘Damascus (Daunathe) [corrected to ‘Damietta (Damiathe)’ in the Errata[544]]‘ with the army of the Cross”, undertaking to repay the sum “in England, at London, within 40 days”, dated Apr 1221, naming 12 sureties[545].  Henry [IV] died before 3 Nov 1221, as indicated by the order cited below which granted custody of his lands and heir to Ralph de Trubleville.  Neither Henry [IV] nor his wife are named in the early Sep 1318 charter cited below under Henry [VIII].  m ([1208/09]) JOANNA de Vautort, daughter of ROGER [III] de Vautort & his wife Alice --- ([1193/95 or before?]-).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by an agreement dated 29 Sep 1268 under which “Henry de la Pomeray son of Henry de la Pomeray and Margery de Vernun” confirmed privileges to “the burgesses of Brigg…according to the tenor of the charter of my father, the son of Joan de Valletorta[546].  The date of her marriage is suggested by the following document: the 1208/09 [11 John] Pipe Roll records “…Alesia de valle Torta [Joan’s mother] deb’ ccc m. pro Henr’ de la Pom’aie sic’ supa cotineta” in Devon[547], this payment being part of the fine made by Henry [IV] in 1207 for custody of his father’s lands (see above).  Powley comments that the payment made by Alice was “clearly a consideration in a marriage settlement[548].  Joanna’s parentage and marriage are also indicated by inquisitions after a writ dated 24 Oct 1299 [“27 Edw I”] following the death of "Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valle Torta [Reginald [V] de Vautort]" which name “Peter Corbet aged 30 and more, and Henry de la Pomerey [the great-grandson of Joanna, see below] aged 32, are next heirs of the inheritance of the said Reginald[549]No other document has been found which names Joanna, nor indicates her date of death.  Henry [IV] & his wife had one child: 

i)          HENRY [V] de la Pomerai ([1210/12?]-before 10 Apr 1237).  An order dated 3 Nov 1221 granted “custodiam terre et heredis Henr de la Pomaye” to “Rado de Trublevill”, while an order dated 26 Apr 1222 instructed “Reginaldo de Valle torta [Reginald de Vautort, Henry [V]’s maternal uncle]” to release “filium et heredem Henr de la Pomeraie” to “Rad de Trublevill cui dns Rex custodiam terre et heredis ipsius Henri concessit[550].  An order dated 26 Apr 1224 granted time to "Henry de la Pomeraie" for repayment of "the debt his father owed to the king"[551].  Henry [IV] was presumably “Henrici de la Pomerai filii Henrici junioris et Aliciæ de Vernun” in the early Sep 1319 charter cited below under Henry [VIII] de la Pomerai.  If that is correct, he was the father of Henry [VI] who is named in the same document (“…Henrici de la Pomerai de Byrye, filii Henrici et Margeriæ filiæ --- de Vernun…”)[552].  An order dated 10 Oct 1227 granted “Henr de La Pomaye qui est in custodia Radi de Trublevill” delay in paying “de debito Henr de La Pomaye patris predicti Henrici[553].  Powley cites other sources dated 1228/29, 1229/30, and 1231 which indicate that Henry [V] was still under age (all dates corroborated by primary source citations)[554], suggesting his birth [1210/12?].  He became of age before the following: “Henr de La Pomaye fil et heredis Henr de La Pomaye” swore allegiance “de terris quas idem Henr tenuit de R in capite”, dated 20 Jul 1232[555].  Henry [V] died before the 10 Apr 1237 order cited below under his wife.  m MARGERY de Vernon, daughter of --- (-after 1249).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by an agreement dated 29 Sep 1268 under which [her son] “Henry de la Pomeray son of Henry de la Pomeray and Margery de Vernun” confirmed privileges to “the burgesses of Brigg…[556].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Devon, dated 1249, including "Henricus de la Pomedray debet esse in custodia domini regis et Margeria mater eius habet custodiam ipsius per dominum regem..."[557].  Inquisitions following a writ de causa captionis dated 7 Jul "38 Hen III", after the death of "Henry de la Pomeraye" record that "Margaret late the wife of the said Henry had wardship of his land and heirs, with their marriage, by fine made with the king after his death"[558].  An order dated 10 Apr 1237 assigned dower from “terras…que fuerunt Henrici de la Pumeraye et sunt in custodia regis in ballia sua” to “Margarete que fuit uxor ipsius Henrici[559].  By order dated 1 Oct 1245, the king granted respite to “Marger’ que fuit ux Henr de La Pumay” in respect of certain payments[560].  The early Sep 1319 charter cited below under Henry [VIII] de la Pomerai records the latter’s confirmation of earlier confirmations, including those issued by “…Henrici de la Pomerai de Byrye, filii Henrici et Margeriæ filiæ --- de Vernun avi mei”, quoting the [undated] charter of “Henricus de la Pomeray de Byrye, filius Henrici de la Pomeray, et Margeriæ de Vernun who confirmed having inspected the [undated] charters of “Joselini de Pomerai” and “Henrici de la Pomerai filii Henrici junioris et Aliciæ de Vernun” in favour of Ford abbey, Devonshire, witnessed by "Johanne de Courtney, Olivero Dinam, Henrico de Champernoun…militibus"[561].  The primary source which confirms Margery’s parentage has not been identified.  Henry [V] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       HENRY [VI] de la Pomerai (-before 12 Jul 1281, bur Exeter Dominican church).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Devon, dated 1249, which include "Henricus de la Pomedray debet esse in custodia domini regis et Margeria mater eius habet custodiam ipsius per dominum regem..."[562].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Jul "9 Edw I" following the death of "Henry de la Pomereye" name “Henry de la Pomereye aged 16 at Whitsunday last is his next heir and was married before the death of his father[563]

-        see below

b)         GEOFFREY de la Pomerai (-1269 or after).  “Henry de Pomeray, son of Henry de Pomeray, and Alice de Ver” leased lands “de Brudon” to “Reginald Beaupell”, dated 29 Sep 1213 [“15 John” = 23 May 1213/7 May 1214], with sureties “The said Henry de Pomeray and Geoffrey his brother…”, witnessed by “…William de Pomeray[564].  Powley cites a charter dated May 1205 under which “Henry, ‘son of the earl’ [Reginald]” admitted the rights of “Henry de la Pomerai” [Henry [III]] to “Clistwick, Brendon and Ceriton (Cheriton)”, and sub-infeudated Clistwick to “Geoffrey, son of Henry de la Pomerai”, while “Henry de la Pomerasi kept the wardship of Geoffrey” [indicating that Geoffrey was still a minor at the time][565].  Based on Geoffrey being under age at that time, Powley concludes that Geoffrey was his parents’s third son (and William “second” son, see below)[566], although if that is correct it is unclear why William would not have acted as surety 29 Sep 1213 in place of Geoffrey.  It seems safer to assume that Geoffrey was second son unless other documents emerge proving otherwise.  Powley cites other sources dated 1223, 1229, 1234, 1235, 1244, 1247, and 1249 which name Geoffrey, as well as stating that “Geoffrey and wife were alive in 1269, a son Henry in 1257, a grandson Henry in 1270” (all dates corroborated by primary source citations)[567]

c)         [WILLIAM de la Pomerai (-1267).  Powley says that the witness “…William de Pomeray”, in the 29 Sep 1213 charter cited above, was “presumably second [third?] son of Henry de la Pomerai (III) and Alice de Vernon…no doubt”, and suggests his birth “by 1192?[568].  He cites other sources dated 1218, 1219, 1230, 1236, 1242/43, 1244, 1249, 1251/52, and 1253 which name William, and notes that “He was recently dead in 1267” (all dates corroborated by primary source citations)[569].] 

 

 

HENRY [VI] de la Pomerai, son of HENRY [V] de la Pomerai & his wife Margery de Vernon (-before 12 Jul 1281, bur Exeter Dominican church).  An order dated 6 May 1242 granted respite to “Willo Caperon” for payments “pro custodia heredum Henr de La Pomaye et p debitis ipsius Henr[570].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Devon, dated 1249, which include "Henricus de la Pomedray debet esse in custodia domini regis et Margeria mater eius habet custodiam ipsius per dominum regem..."[571].  Henry [VI] presumably came of age before the order dated 25 Jun 1257 which records a claim by “Henry de la Pomeray” against “Richard de Hanvill & Mabel his wife” relating to land “in Upotery[572].  Powley cites numerous other sources dated between 1259 and 1278 which name Henry [VI] (all corroborated by primary source citations)[573].  Henry [V] was presumably “…Henrici de la Pomerai de Byrye, filii Henrici et Margeriæ filiæ --- de Vernun avi mei”, named in the early Sep 1319 charter cited below under Henry [VIII] who was therefore his grandson (“…avi mei”).  If that is correct, the same document quotes the charter issued by “Henricus de la Pomeray de Byrye, filius Henrici de la Pomeray, et Margeriæ de Vernun which was witnessed by "Johanne de Courtney, Olivero Dinam, Henrico de Champernoun…militibus"[574].  If that is correct, the first witness was presumably John de Courtenay of Okehampton (died 3 May 1274, son of of Robert de Courtenay/Mary de Vernon, see Earlso f Devon in the document ENGLAND EARLS-created 1138-1143), while “Olivero Dinam” has not otherwise been identified in the Dinan family (see BRITTANY NOBILITY-CORNOUAÏLLE, PENTHIEVRE) and the family of “Henrico de Champernoun” not identified at all.  Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Jul "9 Edw I" following the death of "Henry de la Pomereye" name “Henry de la Pomereye aged 16 at Whitsunday last is his next heir and was married before the death of his father[575].  Powley records his place of burial[576]

m [as her first husband,] ISOLDA [Isabella] “de Bathonia” [Bath], daughter of --- (-before 1 Apr 1311).  An undated document (“[Edward I.?]”) records a grant by “Henry, son of Henry de Pomeray, and Isabella de Bathonia” of “land in Bery Pomereye…” to “Richard Gale[577].  The “Bathonia/Bath” family has not been studied for Medieval Lands: a list of sources relating to the family is available on the internet (but does not mention Isolda/Isabella or the Pomerai family)[578].  An order dated 1 Sep 1281 “cause[d] dower to be assigned to Isabella de la Pomer[eye], late the wife of Henry de la Pome[reye], tenant in chief…[579].  An order dated 13 Apr 1282 instructed the sheriff of Devon “to assign dower to Isolda, late the wife of Henry de la Pomereye, tenant in chief…[580].  No explanation has been found for the earlier order naming “Isabella”, and the later “Isolda”, presumably referring to the same person who was Henry [VI]’s widow.  “Iseult, late the wife of Henry de la Pomerey” was permitted to pay a fine “that she may marry whomsoever she will in the king’s fealty”, dated 15 Nov 1282[581].  Powley suggests that she married secondly in 1284 “William de Albamara?”[582].  Powley records inquisitions into the family’s properties dated Mar 1292 which record that “Iseult…held 1/3 of Beri in dower, part of Stoklegh, part of Tregony…” and drew various money payments[583].  An order dated 1 Apr 1311 instructed “the escheator beyond Trent” to “take into the king’s hand the lands late of Iseult late the wife of Henry de la Pomeray the elder, deceased, tenant-in-chief[584].  The wife of Henry [VI] is not named in the early Sep 1318 charter cited below under Henry [VIII]. 

Henry [VI] & his wife had one child: 

1.         HENRY [VII] de la Pomerai (Tregony May [1264/65]-before 4 Sep 1305, bur Berry-Pomeroy St Mary)Inquisitions after a writ dated 12 Jul "9 Edw I" following the death of "Henry de la Pomereye" name “Henry de la Pomereye aged 16 at Whitsunday last is his next heir and was married before the death of his father[585].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 11 May "15 Edw I" prove the age of "Henry son of Henry de la Pomeray born at Tregony...was 22 on Friday before Whitsunday in the year abovesaid"[586].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 24 Oct 1299 [“27 Edw I”] following the death of "Hawis late the wife of Reginald de Valle Torta" name “Peter Corbet aged 30 and more, and Henry de la Pomerey aged 32, are next heirs of the inheritance of the said Reginald[587].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Sep 1305 (“33 Edw I”), after the death of “Henry de la Pomeray”, record "Henry his son, aged 14, is his next heir" and list his properties in Cornwall and Devon[588].  His date of death is also indicated by the 1305 order cited below under his widow.  Henry [VI]’s place of burial is confirmed by the probate of his widow’s will cited below.  m (before 12 Jul 1281) as her first husband, AMICE de Camville, daughter of GEOFFREY de Camville [later Lord Camville] & his first wife --- ([1265?]-[5/16] Feb 1340, bur Berry-Pomeroy St Mary).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by her son’s early Sep 1319 charter cited below.  The marriage date is confirmed by the Inquisitions cited above under her husband.  She married secondly ([1305]), as his second wife, William Martin Lord Martin.  Her two marriages are confirmed by the probate of her will cited below.  King Edward I granted custody of the lands of the heirs of Henry de la Pomerai to William Lord Martin in 1305[589], suggesting his second marriage around the same time.  The will of “Amicia de la Pomeray”, dated 5 Feb 1339 (O.S.), requested burial “in Cancello Beate Marie de Bury [Berry-Pomeroy], juxta sepulcram Domini mei”, bequeathed property to “Isabelle, filie mee”, and appointed executor “Isabellam filiam meam…et Dominum Jacobum de Cokyngtone, Coexecutorem[590].  The will of “Nobilis Mulier, Domina Amicia de la Pomeray, relicta quondam Nobilis Viri, Domini Willelmi Martyn, Militis et Baronis” was proved 16 Feb and exhibited 25 Feb 1339 (O.S.)[591]Henry [VII] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRY [VIII] de la Pomerai ([1290/91]-23 Oct 1367).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 11 May "15 Edw I" prove the age of "Henry son of Henry de la Pomeray born at Tregony...was 22 on Friday before Whitsunday in the year abovesaid"[592].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Sep "33 Edw I" record "Henry his son, aged 14, is his next heir" and list his properties in Cornwall and Devon[593].  By charter dated early Sep “13 Edw. II” [1319], witnessed by “domino Hugone de Courtney, Nicholaio de Cheiney…militibus”, "Henricus de la Pomerei filius et hæres Henrici de la Pomerecy militis et Amiciæ filiæ Galfridi Camvill militis" confirmed the [undated] confirmations of “Joselini de la Pomeray, et Henrici de la Pomerai de Byrye, filii Henrici et Margeriæ filiæ --- de Vernun avi mei”, quoting the [undated] charter which reads “Henricus de la Pomeray de Byrye, filius Henrici de la Pomeray, et Margeriæ de Vernun” and confirmed having inspected the [undated] charters of “Joselini de Pomerai” and “Henrici de la Pomerai filii Henrici junioris et Aliciæ de Vernun” in favour of Ford abbey, Devonshire, relating to [unspecified] property “de feudo meo” in Devon and Cornwall witnessed by "Johanne de Courtney, Olivero Dinam, Henrico de Champernoun…militibus"[594].  It is recognised that this summary is difficult to follow as one piece of unbroken text.  Each section is analysed in more detail above, identifying the persons named among the ancestors of Henry [VII].  Inquisitions following a writ dated [1 Nov "41 Edw III"], after the death of “Henry de la Pomeray, the elder, knight”, record his death "on Friday before SS Simon and Jude, 41 Edward III", list his properties in Devon which he held “of the king in chief for the lives of himself and Joan his wife, deceased…with remainder in tale to Henry his son…”, and noting that “the aforesaid Henry son of Henry, knight, is his heir; but he will enjoy nothing by hereditary right, but by right of acquisition in form aforesaid[595]m firstly JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 4 Dec 1348).  Powley names her “Joan de Moles” in his genealogical table of the Pomerai family, does not discuss the marriage or her parentage in his text concerning Henry [VIII], but names her as mother of Henry [IX] in a later passage[596].  The primary sources which confirm her parentage and date of marriage have not been identified.  “Henry de la Pomeray, knight, and Joan his wife, of the dicoese of Exeter” petitioned Pope Clement VI dated 4 Dec 1348 (“2 Non Dec”)[597].  Joan is named as deceased in the Inquisitions quoted above after the death of her husband.  m secondly ([8 Jul 1350/8 Apr 1359]) as her second husband, ELIZABETH ---, widow of ROGER de Carminou, daughter of --- (-[before 1 Nov 1367]).  Her two marriages are confirmed by the following three entries in the registers of John de Grandson Bishop of Exeter.  A register of Bishop John, dated 1346 (O.S.), records “Whitstone [Cornwall-Wytestone and Whitstone, MS]…Thomas de Carmynou, clerk” installed “(at Chudleigh), 19 March; Patron Roger de Carmynou…’”, who was named as present, and another dated 1350, records “Whitstone [Whiston, in Cornubia, MS]…Richard Bovyle, clerk” installed “(at Chudleigh), 8 July; Patron, Dame Elizabeth de Carmynou’[598].  A register of Bishop John, dated 1359, records “Whitstone (Devon)…Sir Thomas Canynges, priest” installed “(at Chudleigh), 8 April: Patron, hac vice, Sir Henry de la Pomeray, senior, Knt., ‘racione juris Elizabet, uxoris sue’[599].  Elizabeth is not named in the inquisitions which followed her husband’s death, which suggests that she was deceased by then.  Henry [VIII] & his first wife had five children: 

i)          HENRY [IX] de la Pomerai (-[18/24] Dec 1373).  He is named as his father’s son and heir in the Inquisitions cited above (which do not record his age).  Powley records sources dated 1340 (when a knight),1346, 1350, 3 Dec 1367, 1369, 1371, and 1373 in which Henry [IX] was named (primary sources cited)[600].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Jan 1374 "47 Edw III", after the death of “Henry de la Pomeray knight”, record his death "on Wednesday before Christmas last", name “John de la Pomereye, knight, his son, aged 27 years and more […28 years and more], is his next heir”, and lists his properties in Cornwall and Devon[601]m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry [IX] & his wife had three children: 

(1)       JOHN de la Pomerai ([1346/47?]-19 Jun 1416).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Jan 1374 "47 Edw III", after the death of “Henry de la Pomeray knight”, name “John de la Pomereye, knight, his son, aged 27 years and more […28 years and more], is his next heir[602].  Powley records his mentions Feb 1374, 1375, 1377, 1378, 1379, 1380, Jun 1381, Dec 1381, 1382, 1385, May 1387 (with his wife), 1392, 30 Sep 1388, 1398, Apr 1404 (with his wife), 1410, 1412, 12 Sep 1414[603].  Powley records his date of death, and his will proved 1 Oct 1416[604]m as her second husband, JOAN Merton, widow of JOHN Bampfield of Poltemore, daughter of RICHARD Merton & his wife --- (-6 Jun 1420).  Powley records her parentage and two marriages, mention with her husband May 1387, and other mentions Mar 1404 (grant by Edward de la Pomerai, see below), 1410, 12 Sep 1414, “Ascenciontide” 1420, and her death “on Corpus Christi day” 1420[605]

(2)       JOANNA de la Pomerai .  Powley records her parentage, marriage, and her daughter Joanna (and her three marriages)[606]m Sir JAMES Chudleigh, son of ---. 

(3)       MARGARET de la Pomerai .  Powley records her parentage, marriage, and her son[607]m ADAM Cole, son of ---. 

ii)         WILLIAM de la Pomerai ([1309]-after 1378).  Powley records his parentage, his record as a “knight banneret” in 1330 (therefore suggesting his birth “[not] later than 1309”), and his mention in 1378[608]

iii)        NICHOLAS de la Pomerai (-after 1383).  Powley records his parentage and mentions in 1347 (?), 20 Mar 1357, 1353 (?), 1365 (?), 4 Oct 1375), 1377, and 1383 (?)[609]

iv)        JOHN de la Pomerai (-after 20 Mar 1357).  Powley records his parentage and mentions 10 Oct 1349, 1351 (“parson of Aveton Giffard”), and 20 Mar 1357 (with Nicholas de la Pomerai)[610]

v)         THOMAS de la Pomerai (-[1378?]).  Powley records his parentage and possible mentions 1365, 1366, 1371, 1374, 1377, and 1378[611]m ---.  The name of Thomas’s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

(1)       EDWARD de la Pomerai (-[1444/May 1446]).  Powley records his parentage and mentions Mar 1404, Jul 1404 (with his wife, in a grant to Joan, wife of his cousin John, see above), Mar 1418, Oct 1419, 1426, Nov 1431, 1432, Oct 1433, Nov 1434, 1435, Jun 1436, 1440. 1443, 1444, and that he was dead in May 1446[612]m MARGARET Beville, daughter of JOHN Beville & his wife ---.  Powley records her parentage stated in a fine levied Apr 1404, Mar 1418[613]

-        POMERAY FAMILY[614]

b)         ISABELLA de la Pomerai (-after 25 Feb 1340).  She is named as beneficiary in her mother’s will, in which she was named executor, cited above. 

 

 

 

PONT-de-l’ARCHE

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Pont de l’Arche (-after 1142)"…Willelmo de Ponte Arch" witnessed the charter dated to [1114] under which Henry I King of England granted privileges to Battle abbey[615].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills de Pontearc" in Oxfordshire, Dorsetshire (two entries),  Wiltshire (three entries), Hampshire (twice), and Surrey[616].  "…W. de Pont…" witnessed the charter dated 1133 under which Henry I King of England confirmed his father’s lands to "Willo fil Udardi de Baenb"[617]m CONSTANCE Mauduit, daughter of ROBERT [I] Mauduit & his wife --- (-after [1142]).  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Robertum filium Hildebrandi" fell in love with "Willelmus de Ponte Arcarum…uxorem", imprisoned her husband, but died from a painful illness, dated from the context to [1142][618].  Guillaume & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT de Pont de l’Arche (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Ponte Arche x m v militem" in Hampshire in [1160/61][619].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Mauduit" used to hold one knights fee in Hampshire now held by "Robertus de Ponte Arche"[620].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Ponte Arche i m" in Hampshire in [1167/68][621].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Ponte Arche xx s" in Hampshire in [1171/72][622].  By undated charter, King Henry II confirmed the donation of “terram de Neweton” made to Plimpton priory by “Robertus de Ponte Arche, assensu Matildis uxoris suæ, et hæredum suorum”, and noting that “Emma, soror ejusdem Roberti, sponsa R. de Rivertis comitis Devoniæ” also made a donation[623]The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Ponte Arche xx s" in Hampshire in [1186/87][624].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Ponte Arche" paying "x s, i militem" in Hampshire and "xii d" in Wiltshire[625].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Robertus de Ponte Arche" paying "xx s i militem" in Hampshire[626].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Ponte Arche" paying "xx s, i militem" in Hampshire[627]m ---.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "uxor Roberti de Archis" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Chauz" in Nottinghamshire[628]m MATILDA Marshal, daughter of JOHN Marshal & his second wife Sibyl of Salisbury.  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.   The Complete Peerage names her and records her marriage (no sources cited)[629]By undated charter, King Henry II confirmed the donation of “terram de Neweton” made to Plimpton priory by “Robertus de Ponte Arche, assensu Matildis uxoris suæ, et hæredum suorum[630]Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          JULIANE de Pont de l’Arche (-15 Nov 1217, bur Bristol St Augustine)Smyth records that "the first wife of Lord Robert was Julian de Ponte Arche daughter of William de Pontelargo o Pontearche and necce to…Willm Earl Marischall the elder Earle of Pembroke", records her death "15 Nov in the second year of Kinge Henry the third", and her burial at Bristol St Augustine, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[631]According to Dugdale, Robert de Berkeley married "Julian, daughter of William de Pontearch, niece to William Marshal Earl of Pembroke"[632]Robert de Berkelaia” donated land Kingswood Abbey, for his soul and that of “his wife Juliana”, by charter dated 11 Jun 1200[633].  “John de Wodeford” granted land in Nibley, Gloucestershire (“in Nubbeleia”), which he had recovered “contra Dom. Margaretam quondam uxorem Othonis fil. Willelmi”, to “Dom. Juliana de Ponte Arche wife of Robert de Berkeleia” by charter dated to [1200][634]m (before 11 Jun 1200) as his first wife, ROBERT de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley & his wife Alice de Berkeley ([1164/65]-13 May 1220, bur Bristol St Augustine). 

b)         EMMA de Pont de l’Arche (-young)Her betrothal is noted in Domesday Descendants[635].  By undated charter, King Henry II confirmed the donation of “terram de Neweton” made to Plimpton priory by “Robertus de Ponte Arche, assensu Matildis uxoris suæ, et hæredum suorum”, and noting that “Emma, soror ejusdem Roberti, sponsa R. de Rivertis comitis Devoniæ” also made a donation[636]Betrothed to RICHARD de Reviers, son of BALDWIN de Reviers Earl of Devon & his wife Adelise --- ([1115/30]-21 or 27 Apr 1162, bur Christ Church, Twynham).  He succeeded his father in 1155 as Earl of Devon, Lord of the Isle of Wight. 

2.         OSBERT de Pont de l’Arche (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Albico de Pontearc" in Surrey[637].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Osbto de Pontearch" in Hertfordshire[638]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Pont de l’Arche (-after [Apr] 1224).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Ponte Arche" holding ten parts of one knight’s fee "in Swindone" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][639].  "William de Pont de l’Arche" made a fine for "having seisin of his land in Swindon…taken into the king’s hand…because he was not in the army of Wales", dated [Apr] 1224[640]m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after [Mar] 1217).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Margareta uxor Willelmi de Ponte Archi" dated to [Mar] 1217[641]

 

2.         MATILDA [Eva] de Pont de l’Arche (-after 1 Sep 1227)"William baron of Naas and Eva his wife" paid a fine for "having dower in the manor of Grene, which pertains to Eva of the free tenement formerly of Phillip de Braose, her former husband, in Ireland", dated 12 Sep 1220[642].  A charter dated 1 Sep 1227 records that "Matilda who was the wife of the Baron of Nas represents that the justiciary…has disseised her of her dower out of…those of Philip de Breouse her first husband" and the king’s order to restore the property to her[643]m firstly PHILIP de Briouse, son of WILLIAM de Briouse & his wife Mathilde de Saint-Valéry.  m secondly WILLIAM FitzWilliam Baron of Naas, son of WILLIAM FitzMaurice Baron of Naas & his wife Aline de Clare (-before Aug 1227). 

 

 

Three brothers: 

1.         ROBERT de Pont de l’Arche (-before 22 Feb 1246).  A writ dated 22 Feb "30 Hen III", after the death of "Robert de Pont del Arche alias de Pont Arche" names "Ralph his brother is his next heir, after William de Pont Arche who was lately outlawed" and lists his manors in Gloucester "Wulvirchesthrop town…Waddon and Mortun towns…which Constance late the wife of the said Robert now holds by the king’s bail…Stanleg alias Stanleye town…Coccebiri alias Cokebiri"[644]m CONSTANCE, daughter of --- (-after 22 Feb 1246).  A writ dated 22 Feb "30 Hen III", after the death of "Robert de Pont del Arche alias de Pont Arche" lists his manors in Gloucester "…Waddon and Mortun towns…which Constance late the wife of the said Robert now holds by the king’s bail…"[645]

2.         WILLIAM de Pont de l’Arche .  A writ dated 22 Feb "30 Hen III", after the death of "Robert de Pont del Arche alias de Pont Arche" names "Ralph his brother is his next heir, after William de Pont Arche who was lately outlawed"[646]

3.         RALPH de Pont de l’Arche .  A writ dated 22 Feb "30 Hen III", after the death of "Robert de Pont del Arche alias de Pont Arche" names "Ralph his brother is his next heir, after William de Pont Arche who was lately outlawed"[647]

 

 

 

RAMES

 

 

Morandière says that “honor Ramarum” was located on the edge of Lillebonne (in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime)[648]Alwyn L. Raimes also suggested that “Roger de Rames”, recorded in Domesday, originated in “a hamlet in Normandy...near the forest of Lillebonne...Rames[649].  The place may have been located near “la Ferme des Râmes”, at Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Taille, a couple of kilometres west of Lillebonne[650].  The family’s English properties were mainly in Essex, Suffolk and Middlesex as will be seen below. 

 

Reconstructing the 12th century Rames family is challenging.  While the known descendants of William [I] de Rames are relatively straight-forward (although no primary source has been found which confirms that William was the son of Roger [I]), four other individuals, shown below after William’s direct family and presumably related in some way, present major difficulties.  Resolution of the problems awaits the emergence of more primary source material. 

 

 

1.         ROGER [I] de Rames (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records “Lands of Roger de Rames” in Essex (including Dedham, see below) and Suffolk[651], as well as numerous other properties in Middlesex, Norfolk.  A full list of his properties listed in Domesday is available at opendomesday.org[652]

 

 

Two brothers.  The name Roger given to William [I]’s son suggests a close relationship with Roger [I]: presumably the brothers were either his sons or nephews.  The common connection with Dedham, Essex also indicates that they were close relatives, but the primary source which confirms the relationship has not been identified. 

 

1.         WILLIAM [I] de Rames (-before [1129/30], bur Colchester St John).  ...Willelmus de Raines, Galfridus frater eius...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Osbertus filio Hugonis...” donated “decimas meas de Chaluedona” to Colchester St John[653].  “Willelmus de Ramis” donated “duas partes decime totius dominii mei...in Boituna” to Colchester St John, for the soul of “Eudonis dapiferi domini mei”, by undated charter [probably dated to soon after 1 Mar 1120 when Eudes de Rie died], witnessed by “Radulfo Martel, Roberto de Ramis, Rogero de Ramis, Adam Pincerna...[654]He is named as father of Roger and Robert in the 1129/30 Pipe Roll cited below, which indicates that he was deceased at the time, probably recently.  His place of burial is confirmed by the undated charter for Colchester St John cited below under his son Robert [I].  m ([before 1100?]) --- (-bur Colchester St John).  The primary source which confirms the name of William’s wife has not been identified.  Her likely marriage date is estimated from the suggested birth date of their son Roger [II].  The place of burial of the mother of Robert [I] de Rames is confirmed by the undated charter for Colchester St John cited below under Robert.  Robert [I] also confirmed an earlier donation to Colchester by his unnamed mother, as cited below.  William & his wife had two children (the order of their birth is uncertain: the 1129/30 Pipe Roll suggests that Roger was older, but the undated charter witnessed by both sons suggests that Robert was the older son): 

a)         ROGER [II] de Rames ([1100/05?]-[1129/30]).  His parentage is confirmed by the 1129/30 Pipe Roll cited below.  His birth date is estimated from his probably leaving four children as shown below.  Willelmus de Ramis” donated “duas partes decime totius dominii mei...in Boituna” to Colchester St John, for the soul of “Eudonis dapiferi domini mei”, by undated charter [probably dated to soon after 1 Mar 1120 when Eudes de Rie died], witnessed by “...Roberto de Ramis, Rogero de Ramis...[655][The Leicestershire Survey, dated to [Spring 1124/Autumn 1129], records “In Humberstay Roger de Ram[is] viii. car.” in Gosecote Wapentake, “H[undreda] de Essebia[656].  This entry presumably relates to Roger [II], although that is not beyond all doubt.  Nevertheless, the same source records Edward [II] de Salisbury, the probable father of Roger’s future son-in-law shown below, Salisbury/Rames contacts maybe explaining the future marriage.]  The 1129/30 Pipe Roll includes “Rogs et Rob filii Willi de Raimes” rendering for their father’s debts, “Rogerus de Raimes...Robertus de Raimes...p relevat terre patris sui”, and “Rogerus de Raimes” rendering for “forist- parci que fecit sine licentia Regis” for which he was pardoned because he was dead (“quia mortuus est”), all in Essex[657]The Liber Niger records in Essex "die qua Rex H. fuit vivus et mortuus, tenuit Willelmus filius Milonis, feod duorum militum de Rogero de Raines” and “Dedham feodum dimidii militis, quem Rex habet in manu sua...”, adding that “De novo sesamento Robertus de Reines tenet quartam partem militis"[658].  Dedham being in the king’s hands in 1135 appears to confirm the death of Roger [II] as recorded in the 1129/30 Pipe Roll cited above, as his heirs would have been infants at that time.  If that is correct, “Rogero de Raines”, from whom William FitzMiles held his two fiefs, presumably refers to the same deceased Roger [II].  It should be noted that Round interpreted this document differently, suggesting that the fief held "de Rogero de Raines” indicated that Roger [II] was living 1135, although he makes no mention of the Pipe Roll mention of his death[659]m ([1124?]) --- de Vere, daughter of AUBREY [II] de Vere & his wife Adelisa de Clare.  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the charter dated 1142 under which Empress Matilda confirmed grants to "Albericus de Veer" and the rights "de cremento Diham [Dedham, Essex, see above] que fuit Rogeri de Ramis rectum nepotum ipsius comitis Alberici…filiorum Rogeri de Ramis"[660].  Her suggested parentage assumes that “nepotum” in this charter should be interpreted as “nephews”.  Her marriage date is suggested from the couple probably having four children before her husband died, as shown below.  Roger & his wife had [four] children (an unknown number of sons is referred to in the 1142 charter cited above under their mother, presumably the same as the three sons named below): 

i)          ROBERT [II] de Rames (-[before 1158/59?]).  "Robertus de Ramis filius Rogeri de Ramis" wrote to "Robert [de Sigillo] Bishop of London" concerning the church of Ardleigh, undated[661].  King Henry II confirmed donations made to St. Bartholomew, including “ex dono Roberti de Ramis ecclesiam Sancti Bartholomei de Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Rogeri de Ram’ ecclesiam Sancti Laurentii de Stanmere [Stanmore]...et quicquid Willielmus de Ramis vel Adam Buchiente vel comes Patricus vel Ela comitissa...in villa de Eggeswere [Edgware] et apud Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Willelmi de Rames ecclesiam de Bradefeld [Bradfield]...”, by charter dated by Webb to [1176][662].  If that estimated date is correct, “Roberti de Ramis” in this document could be either Robert [I] or Robert [II], “Roger de Ram” Roger brother of Robert [II], and “Willemi de Rames” William [II].  The Liber Niger records in Essex "milites qui tenuerunt de feodo Roberti de Raimes die qua Rex Henricus vivus et mortuus...Willelmus filius Jocelini II milites...De Hiham [Higham]...X. militibus...” and “Robertus de Raimes feodium quartæ partis militis de meo Domino in Heham, Willelmus, filius Edmundi, feodum quartæ partis militis de meo Dominio, Hii duo R. et W. sunt noviter feodati de meo Dominio..."[663].  The document, divided into two parts, appears to refer firstly to the fiefs of Robert [I] (see below), held in 1135 or before, and secondly to two fourth parts of a knight’s fee held by “Robertus de Raimes” and “Willelmus, filius Edmundi”, both stated to be “noviter feodati de meo Dominio”.  The distinction between the two parts suggests that “Robertus de Raimes” in the second part was not Robert [I], but Robert [II].  The linking of “Robertus de Raines” with “Willelmus” suggests that the latter was also “de Raimes” (see below) and that the two had recently succeeded to equal shares of the same fief under King Henry II, presumably after the death of Robert [I] (without children?).  That suggestion appears corroborated by the Testa de Nevill recording that "Leonia de Stutevill [daughter of Robert [II]’s unnamed sister, see below] tenet feodum unius militis in Byh[a]m [=Dedham, according to Round] unde debet facere unam medietatem heredi Ricardi de Reymes [presumably the supposed brother of Robert [II], see below] et alteram medietatem heredi Willelmi de Reymes [presumably William [II], see below]", undated[664].  In this scenario, Robert [II] would have died before the 1158/59 Pipe Roll and was succeeded successively by his supposed brothers Roger [II] and  Richard who are named in that source as fiefholders in Essex, as shown below. 

ii)         [ROGER [III] de Rames (-[1159/60?]).  The primary source which confirms Roger’s parentage has not been identified, but it seems reasonable to suppose that he was a brother of Robert [II] as explained here.  The 1158/59 Pipe Roll records “Rogero de Ram [de XII. li...XIII. s...iiii. d”]...Ric de Ramis [de XII. li...XIII. s...iiii. d”]...Roberto de Ram [de .I. m]” in Essex[665].  Round, analysing the monetary amounts specified for “Rogero de Ram” and “Ric de Ramis”, indicates that they each represent “an assessment of nine and a half knights”, linking this to the ten knights’ fees specified in the Liber Niger cited above under Robert [II], minus the two quarters specified therein for Robert [II] and William [II][666].  In this scenario, as noted above, Robert [II] was presumably succeeded in these knights’ fees successively by Roger [III] and Richard, who would have been his brothers.  King Henry II confirmed donations made to St. Bartholomew, including “ex dono Roberti de Ramis ecclesiam Sancti Bartholomei de Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Rogeri de Ram’ ecclesiam Sancti Laurentii de Stanmere [Stanmore]...et quicquid Willielmus de Ramis vel Adam Buchiente vel comes Patricus vel Ela comitissa...in villa de Eggeswere [Edgware] et apud Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Willelmi de Rames ecclesiam de Bradefeld [Bradfield]...”, by charter dated by Webb to [1176][667].  If that estimated date is correct, “Roberti de Ramis” in this document could be either Robert [I] or Robert [II], “Roger de Ram” Roger brother of Robert [II], and “Willemi de Rames” William [II].  Roger [III] and Richard are not named in the 1159/60 and 1160/61 Pipe Rolls, although Richard is named in 1161/62 as noted below.  This suggests that Roger [III] may have died in [1159/60].] 

iii)        [RICHARD de Rames (-after 1194/95).  The 1158/59 Pipe Roll records “Rogero de Ram [de XII. li...XIII. s...iiii. d”]...Ric de Ramis [de XII. li...XIII. s...iiii. d”]...Roberto de Ram [de .I. m]” in Essex[668].  Round’s explanation that the monetary amounts stated represent a shared fief with Roger [III] is discussed above.  The 1161/62 Pipe Roll records “Id de Scutag Ric de Rainis. In th .II. m...dim” in Essex/Hertford[669].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1161/62, records "...Ricardus de Reimes, ii m et dimidiam..." in Essex/Hertford[670].  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records “Wills de Raines redd Comp de .X. m. In th .II. m.  Et deb .VIII. m, Ric de Raimes redd Comp de .VII. m. In th .V. m. Et deb .II. m” in Essex/Hertford[671].  The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records “Wills de Raim . deb .VIII. m. de Eod Excitu, Ric de Raim . deb .II. m de Eod Excitu” in Essex/Hertford[672], with similar entries in the 1166/67 Pipe Roll[673].  The 1167/68 Pipe Roll records “Wills de Raim . deb .VIII. m. de Eod Excitu, Ric de Raim . deb .II. m de Eod Excitu”, other entries for the same names including “...Ric de Reimis...et in Dnio R. de Dedha .I. m...sed calumpniat qd Picot de Tanie ht .II. Mil p Rege et Sim de Cantelu .II. et Com Albic . dim. et Phylippus Parage .dim” in Essex/Hertford[674].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1167/68, records "Wills de Raimis deb .viii m. de eod Exerc. Sed calumpniat qd Rex ipse et Com Hug et Com Albic et Sim de Cantelu tenent feod, Ric de Raimis deb .II. m. Sed Simon de Cantelu ht feod p Rege” “xxx, de veteri feffamento, et iiis and iiiide novo] sed calumniatur [quod Rex ipse et Comes Hugo et Comes Albericus et Simon de Cantelu tenet feoda] " in Essex/Hertford[675].  The Liber Niger records "Ricardus de Reimis [al Raimes]" rendering "compotum de x marcis pro x militibus...et in dominio Regis de Dedham 1 mar. Et debet...sed calumpniatur quod Picot de Tanie habet II milites per Regem..."[676].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1171/72, records "...Willelmus de Rames, viii l...Ricardus de Reymes x l; sed calumpniatur quod predicti tenent feoda viii militum" in Essex/Hertford[677].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1186/87, records "Ricardus de Rames, x l..." in Essex/Hertford[678].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Ricardus de Reymes" paying "c s", but "calumpniabatur quod Willelmus filius Roberti de Stuteville [his great-nephew, grandson of his sister shown below] habet in dominico dimidium militem in Dedham" [see above under his mother], in Essex, Hertfordshire[679].  Richard is named in Pipe Rolls for Essex between 1169/70 and 1194/95.  The primary source which confirms his date of death has not been identified.  Later holdings of Rames family property holdings by Leonie [d’Estouteville] (see below) suggest that Richard de Rames died without direct heirs.] 

iv)        --- de Rames ([1126/31]-).  Her descent from the Rames family is confirmed by the 1185 Rotuli de Dominabus in which her daughter Leonie was “uxor Roberti de Stuteville...de parentela Edwardi de Salisburia ex parte patris, et ex parte matris est de progenie Rogeri de Reimes”.  The distinction between the Rotuli’s “de parentela”, more normally indicating “kinship”, for her father, and “de progenie” for her mother could be interpreted as meaning that Leonie’s mother was the daughter of “Rogeri de Reimes”, who would therefore have been Roger [II] de Rames (the chronology would be impossible for Roger [I] de Rames to have been Leonie’s father).  Père Anselme reached the same conclusion, naming "Leonelle dame de Rames, sœur et héritière de Robert seigneur de Rames" [assumed to be Robert [II], see above] as the wife of Robert d’Estouteville (no source cited)[680].  On the other hand, Europäische Stammtafeln names “Leonia of Salisbury Dame de Rames, of Dedham, Essex and Bourne, Cambridgeshire” as daughter of “Edward & Andelize de Rames[681].  Morandière makes another suggestion, also inconsistent with the Rotuli, saying that Leonie was "fille d’Erard seigneur de Rames et de Marguerite de Lannery" [this couple has not otherwise been identified with certainty, although see the reference to “Edmund de Rames” below][682].  [Raimes names this daughter “Adeliza”, saying that she married secondly “Payn de Hocton (1129/30 Pipe Roll)”, by whom she had a daughter “Maud, who refers in an undated deed to her father Payn and her mother Adeliz de Raimes[683].  See below under “Adelisa de Rames” for discussion about this point.]  Round doubts that her daughter Leonie [d’Estouteville] and Alice de Tanay (see below) were the "true co-heirs of the fief of Raimes", stating that "they were merely under-tenants of that fief, Leonia holding one knight’s fee from the tenants of the whole fief..."[684].  However, Leonie was named “de Rennes/de Reynes” in charters for Welbeck abbey issued by her and by her son Henri d’Estouteville, which suggests that she acquired a greater part of the Rames fief than indicated by Round.  In addition, Morandière lists numerous properties in “honor Ramarum” in Normandy, donated by Robert d’Estouteville, husband of Leonie[685], which suggests that Leonie was the principal heiress of at least the French part of Rames (through her mother).  Follow her husband’s hyperlink for the explanation of the clumsy “[---/Edward [III]?]” used for his name.  m ([1140/45?]) [---/EDWARD [III]?] de Salisbury, son of [EDWARD [II] de Salisbury & his [first/second] wife ---] ([1118/20?]-[1145/48?]). 

b)         ROBERT [I] de Rames (-[1158/59?]).  “Willelmus de Ramis” donated “duas partes decime totius dominii mei...in Boituna” to Colchester St John, for the soul of “Eudonis dapiferi domini mei”, by undated charter [probably dated to soon after 1 Mar 1120 when Eudes de Rie died], witnessed by “...Roberto de Ramis, Rogero de Ramis...[686].  The 1129/30 Pipe Roll includes “Rogs et Rob filii Willi de Raimes” rendering for their father’s debts, “Rogerus de Raimes...Robertus de Raimes...p relevat terre patris sui” in Essex, and “[G?]aufridus filius Herlewini” owing to have his land “de Roberto de Raimes” in Nova Placita et Nove Conventiones in Suffolk[687].  “Robertus de Ramis” received the homage of “Waltero filio Willelmi filii Bernardi” for “terram Pod. et terram Algari. et terram Purcegari sicut eam tenuit Willelmus pater eius de me...”, undated, witnessed by “...Mauricius de Haia et Rannulfus filius eius de Haia...Robertus de Rames[688].  “Robertus de Ramis” donated revenue from “molendinum de Reines...”, and confirmed “septem acras quas mater Roberti olim dederat Segaro preposito”, to Colchester St John for the souls of “parentum suorum qui jacent ad illud monasterium”, by undated charter[689]"Robert son of William de Ramis" wrote to "Robert [de Sigillo] Bishop of London" concerning the church of Ardleigh, undated[690].  The Liber Niger records in Essex "milites qui tenuerunt de feodo Roberti de Raimes die qua Rex Henricus vivus et mortuus...Willelmus filius Jocelini II milites” and “Robertus de Raimes feodium quartæ partis militis de meo Dominio in Heham, Willelmus, filius Edmundi, feodum quartæ partis militis de meo Dominio, Hii duo R. et W. sunt noviter feodati de meo Dominio..."[691].  The 1158/59 Pipe Roll records “Rogero de Ram [de XII. li...XIII. s...iiii. d”]...Ric de Ramis [de XII. li...XIII. s...iiii. d”]...Roberto de Ram [de .I. m]” in Essex[692].  King Henry II confirmed donations made to St. Bartholomew, including “ex dono Roberti de Ramis ecclesiam Sancti Bartholomei de Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Rogeri de Ram’ ecclesiam Sancti Laurentii de Stanmere [Stanmore]...et quicquid Willielmus de Ramis vel Adam Buchiente vel comes Patricus vel Ela comitissa...in villa de Eggeswere [Edgware] et apud Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Willelmi de Rames ecclesiam de Bradefeld [Bradfield]...”, by charter dated by Webb to [1176][693].  If that estimated date is correct, “Roberti de Ramis” in this document could be either Robert [I] or Robert [II], “Roger de Ram” Roger brother of Robert [II], and “Willemi de Rames” William [II].  Robert [I]’s absence from later Pipe Roll entries suggests that he died soon after this date, presumably without direct heirs. 

2.         GEOFFREY .  “...Willelmus de Raines, Galfridus frater eius...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Osbertus filio Hugonis...” donated “decimas meas de Chaluedona” to Colchester St John[694]

 

 

The primary source which confirms the name of the person shown below as the second husband of Sibylle de Montgommery has not been identified.  Europäische Stammtafeln names him “Jean Sire de Raimes”[695]The reference is presumably based on Motey who records Sibylle’s second marriage with Jean de Raimes, mort en 1131”, by whom “elle laissa deux fils, Robert et Roger[696].  Motey is clearly referring to William de Rames who is shown above with his sons Roger [II] and Robert [I].  However, if William married Sibylle, the chronology indicates that she was not the mother of those sons, considering Roger [II]’s birth in [1100/05] and the death of Sibylle’s first husband in 1107.  One possibility is that Sibylle was William’s second wife, although no primary source has been found which corroborates that suggestion.  Although no other obvious candidate has been identified in the Rames family, it seems preferable to leave Sibylle’s second husband as unnamed until further information comes to light. 

 

1.         --- de Rames )m as her second husband, SIBYLLE de Montgommery, widow of ROBERT FitzHamon Lord of Glamorgan, daughter of ROGER de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois [later Earl of Shrewsbury] & his first wife Mabel d'Alençon (-[after 1141?]).  Follow her hyperlink for details concerning her first marriage.  The second marriage of Sibylle is confirmed by the Liber Johannis Stillingflete (dated 1434) which lists donations to the Knights Hospitallers in England, including ”Sibilla de Raynes, filia Rogeri comitis de Montegomerico” donating “præceptoriam de Shenegey [Shingay, Cambridgeshire]...AD MCXL[697], although the date seems late considering the family chronology which suggests that Sibylle must have been very old in 1141.  The same donation is recorded in the following document: King John confirmed donations to the Knights Hospitallers by charter dated 30 Aug 1199, including “ex dono Sibille de Rames et [her son-in-law, husband of her daughter by her first marriage] com Gloucestr Senegeiam...[698][Maybe Sibylle de Montgommery was the witness in the following document, considering that the Rames family made donations to Colchester St John, as shown above, and no other person named Sibyl/Sibylle has been found in the cartulary at that time: “...Sibilla domini filia” witnessed the undated charter under which “Gausfridus Talebotus et uxor eius Agnes” donated “de terra Fenge” to Colchester St John[699], dated to before [1129/30] when the Pipe Roll records Geoffrey [I] Talbot as deceased (see the document ENGLISH LORDS T-Z).  It is presumably possible that her father, Roger de Montgommery held a lordship in Essex and was therefore described as “domini”.] 

 

 

The chronology of the following person is difficult to determine, and therefore also the generation of the Rames family to which she belonged.  As noted below, she is named in the undated charter of her daughter Matilda.  Raimes suggested that she was the same person as the wife of [---/Edward [III]?] de Salisbury (shown above as the husband of Roger [II] de Rames’s unnamed daughter), and that she married Pain de Hocton as her second husband (although his narrative appears to confuse [---/Edward [III]?] with Edward [II] de Salisbury, see the document ENGLAND EARLS 1138-1143 where this problem is discussed)[700].  There appear to be three possibilities:

·       Adelisa was the unnamed wife of Pain de Hocton, widow of Edward [II] de Salisbury, whom he married [1130]: the 1129/30 Pipe Roll records “Willelmus de Hoctona” rendering for the debts of “terra Ric de Edintona” and for “uxore Eduardi Sar cum terra sua ad opus Pag fil sui”, followed by “Paganus de Hoctona” rendering [to marry] “uxore Eduardi Sar”, in Northamptonshire[701].  If Matilda de Hocton was Pain’s daughter by this marriage, the chronology suggests that her mother, as a member of the Rames family, could have been a daughter of William [I] but not the daughter of Roger [II].  Matilda names “Willelmi avi mei” in the charter cited below.  However, her paternal grandfather may also have been named William, if “Willelmus de Hoctona” in the 1129/30 Pipe Roll was Pain’s father (which has not been confirmed): Matilda’s charter does not clarify whether “Willelmi” was her paternal or maternal grandfather.  The other difficulty with this suggested parentage is that her supposed niece (daughter of Roger [II]) would have married the supposed son of Edward [II] de Salisbury, although it has not been confirmed that he was Edward’s son by the wife who was recorded as his widow in 1129/30. 

·       Pain’s wife, married in [1130], died, after which he married Matilda’s mother.  If his second wife was the widow of [---/Edward [III]?] de Salisbury, the marriage took place after [1145/48?] the suggested date of his death.  If Matilda’s husband died [1163?], as suggested below, this date seems impossibly late. 

·       Pain married Matilda’s mother before marrying Edward [II]’s widow, in which case Matilda could have been born [1125 or before].  In this case also, Adelisa could have been the daughter of William [I]. 

These three possibilities can only be tested further if more primary source material emerges providing better indications of the chronology of Pain, his wife/wives, and his daughter, although even on the basis of the limited information now available it appears unlikely that Adelisa was the daughter of Roger [II] as suggested by Raimes. 

 

1.         ADELISA de Rames .  She and her husband are named as parents of Matilda in the latter’s undated charter cited below.  m [as his first/second wife,] PAIN de Hocton, son of ---.  One child: 

a)         MATILDA de Hocton .  “Matildis de Hoctuna” donated “totum redditum salis mei de Hoilande...et unam virgatam terre in Hoctona” to Biddlesdon, for her soul and those of “Roberti Grimbald domini mei...Pagani patris mei...Adeliz de Raimes matris mee...Willelmi avi mei”, with the consent of “Simonis heredis mei”, by undated charter dated to the reign of Henry II[702]m ROBERT Grimbald, son of --- (-[1163?]).  “Robert Grimbald floruit 1130 x 1136 son of Grimbald, steward of Honour of Huntingdon, also sheriff of Huntingdon (before 1155) and sheriff of Northampton (1136x55)” is named in the “People of Medieval Scotland” website[703].  It has not been confirmed whether this was the same Robert Grimbald who married Matilda de Hocton, although it could be consistent with the following Pipe Roll entries for Rutland (adjacent to Northamptonshire).  The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records “Robertus fil Goedbaldi” returning “de firma de Rotel” in Rutland[704].  The 1158/59 Pipe Roll records “[R]ob fil Godeb” returning “de firma de Rotel” in Rutland[705].  He is named in the Pipe Rolls for 1161/62 (“Rob fil Gubolt”), 1162/63 (“Rob fil Goeb”), all in Rutland[706].  He was not found in the 1159/60 and 1160/61 Pipe Rolls, and those between 1163/64 and 1169/70, suggesting his death in [1163].

 

 

The 1185 Rotuli de Dominabus entries cited below indicate a connection between “Alizia/Alicia de Tany” and the Rames family.  There seem to be two possibilities:

·       The phrase “de progenie Rogeri de Reimes” in the 1185 entry applies only to Alice’s oldest son and not to Alice herself.  This was the interpretation adopted in 1892 by Round when comparing Alice’s 1185 entries with the entry for Leonie [de Stuteville] (“Leonia is...stated to be ‘de progenie Rogeri de Reimes’ and so is the heir of Alice (not, as alleged, Alice herself)”)[707].  This possibility would mean that the Rames connection was through Alice’s husband, whether Picot de Tany or an earlier husband.  If he was born in, say, [1130/40], his mother would have been born [1115/25].  In this scenario, identifying his maternal grandfather in the Rames family would be difficult, given the birth of William [I]’s known children in [1100/05], unless William was Sibylle de Montgommery’s second husband (one possibility suggested above) and she was his maternal grandmother.  If Alice’s husband’s mother was born towards the end of the [1115/25] range, she could have been the daughter of Roger [II] de Rames, but the timing suggests that she must in that case have been his oldest daughter which seems incompatible with the inheritance of Rames properties by Leonie [de Stuteville] (daughter of Roger’s unnamed daughter).  By 1913, Round had nuanced his view, maybe implicitly acknowledging these difficulties, as he then said that “[Alice] (or her son) is described...as ‘de progenie Rogeri de Reimes’[708]

·       Another possibility is that the phrase “de progenie Rogeri de Reimes” applies to Alice, and therefore also to her son, in which case Alice herself would be descended from the Rames family.  The 1185 entry records Alice’s oldest son as 20 years old, which if accurate would place his parents’ marriage before [1164] and his mother’s birth in the late 1140s.  If those dates are correct, the chronology suggests that Alice could have been a daughter of Roger [II].  In this scenario, she would have been either the widow of [---/Edward [III]?] de Salisbury or another, otherwise unrecorded, daughter.  As noted above, the suggested date of death of [---/Edward [III]?] is [1145/48?], so Alice’s birth to the second husband of his widow would fit chronologically.  If that is correct, Alice would have been the uterine half-sister of Leonie [de Stuteville].  Either way, this parentage could account for Alice sharing part of the Rames inheritance with Leonie. 

The second possibility, which appears more likely, is adopted for the following suggested reconstruction. 

 

1.         WILLIAM FitzJocelin .  The Liber Niger records in Essex "milites qui tenuerunt de feodo Roberti de Raimes die qua Rex Henricus vivus et mortuus...Willelmus filius Jocelini II milites[709]m [--- de Rames?], daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms the name of William’s wife has not been identified, although as discussed above the 1185 Rotuli Dominabus suggests that she was related to the Rames family.  William & his wife had one child:

a)         ALICE ([1146/48?])-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Alizia de Tany...de donatione Domini Regis” with her land “Hundredum de Tendringe”, Essex, adding "ipsa habet v filios et ii filias, et heres ejus est xx annorum, de progenie Rogeri de Reimes"[710].  The same source also records in a separate paragraph (which clearly relates to the same person) “Alicia, filia Willelmi filii Godcelini, quam [traditit] Dominus Rex Picoto de Tani, est in donatione Domini Regis” with her land Hundredum de Henigforde [Hinkford] “de feodo Ricardi de Ramis”, Essex, and "ipsa habet v filios et primogenitus est xx annorum et ii filias”, adding that “Picot de Tani habuit dictam terram v annis elapsis, cum autumpnus venerit "[711].  Neither entry records Alice’s age.  m ([before 1164?]) PICOT de Tany, son of ---.  The 1167/68 Pipe Roll records “...Ric de Reimis...et in Dnio R. de Dedha .I. m...sed calumpniat qd Picot de Tanie ht .II. Mil p Rege et Sim de Cantelu .II. et Com Albic . dim. et Phylippus Parage .dim” in Essex/Hertford[712].  Picot’s parentage has not been ascertained.  Presumably he was related to Hasculf de Tany who married, as her second husband, the unnamed widow of the father of Edward [II] de Salisbury (see ENGLAND EARLS 1138-1143)

 

 

The origin of William [II] de Rames also presents a problem.  The Liber Niger, cited below, names “Willelmus, filius Edmundi” in such a way to suggest that he was the same person as William [II].  The document, divided into two parts, appears to refer firstly to the fiefs of Robert [I] de Rames (see above), held in 1135, and secondly to two fourth parts of a knight’s fee held by “Robertus de Raimes” and “Willelmus, filius Edmundi”, both stated to be “noviter feodati de meo Dominio”.  The distinction between the two parts suggests that “Robertus de Raimes” in the second part was not Robert [I], but Robert [II].  The linking of the latter with “Willelmus” suggests that William was also “de Raimes”, that the two had recently succeeded to equal shares of the same fief under King Henry II (presumably after the death of Robert [I], maybe without children), and that “Willelmus” was William [II].  Edmund may then have been another brother of Robert [I].  This suggestion appears supported by the Testa de Nevill recording that "Leonia de Stutevill [daughter of the unnamed sister of Robert [II] and Richard, see above] tenet feodum unius militis in Byh[a]m [=Dedham, according to Round] unde debet facere unam medietatem heredi Ricardi de Reymes [presumably the supposed brother of Robert [II]] et alteram medietatem heredi Willelmi de Reymes [presumably William [II]]", undated[713].  In that scenario, William [II] would have died without direct heirs and his share of the fief passed to his first cousin’s daughter Leonie.  It should be noted that the summary of the undated charter cited below under William [II], relating to Edgware and Stanmore, names “Roger, William’s father[714].  It is assumed that that is an error as the chronology suggests that neither Roger [I] not Roger [II] de Rames could have been William [II]’s father. 

 

1.         EDMUND [de Rames?] (-[before 1164/65?]).  Although named as father of William in the source cited below, no primary source has been found which names Edmund in his own capacity or confirms his parentage.  Assuming that William was the same person as William [II] de Rames, as suggested below, Edmund presumably died before William [II]’s first mention in 1164/65.  m ---.  The primary source which confirms the name of Edmund’s wife has not been identified.  La Roque names “Guillaume Seigneur de la Tournelle Mareschal de France” who had “pour predecesseurs Guiot Seigneur de la Tournelle et Marguerite de Lanery sa femme mariée auparavant à Erard de Raimes escuyer[715].  “Erard de Raimes” has not been identified, but the similarity between “Erard” and “Edmund” suggests that he may have been the same person as the father of William [de Rames?], particularly as no “Erard de Rames” has otherwise been identified.  It should also be noted that Morandière incorrectly identifies Leonie [d’Estouteville] as "fille d’Erard seigneur de Rames et de Marguerite de Lannery"[716].  No other information about Marguerite de Lannery has been found.  Edmund & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [de Rames?] .  The Liber Niger records in Essex "milites qui tenuerunt de feodo Roberti de Raimes die qua Rex Henricus vivus et mortuus...Willelmus filius Jocelini II milites” and “Robertus de Raimes feodum quartæ partis militis de meo Domino in Heham, Willelmus, filius Edmundi, feodum quartæ partis militis de meo Dominio, Hii duo R. et W. sunt noviter feodati de meo Dominio..."[717]same person as...?  WILLIAM [II] de Rames (-[1185?]).  This possible co-identity is discussed above.  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records “Wills de Raines redd Comp de .X. m. In th .II. m.  Et deb .VIII. m, Ric de Raimes redd Comp de .VII. m. In th .V. m. Et deb .II. m” in Essex/Hertford[718].  The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records “Wills de Raim . deb .VIII. m. de Eod Excitu, Ric de Raim . deb .II. m de Eod Excitu” in Essex/Hertford[719], with similar entries in the 1166/67 Pipe Roll[720].  The 1167/68 Pipe Roll records “Wills de Raim . deb .VIII. m. de Eod Excitu, Ric de Raim . deb .II. m de Eod Excitu”, other entries for the same names including “...Ric de Reimis...et in Dnio R. de Dedha .I. m...sed calumpniat qd Picot de Tanie ht .II. Mil p Rege et Sim de Cantelu .II. et Com Albic . dim. et Phylippus Parage .dim” in Essex/Hertford[721].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1167/68, records "...Ricardus de Reimes, x m: sed in dominico Regis de Dunham i m...Willelmus de Reimes [debet viii m. xxx, de veteri feffamento, et iiis and iiiide novo] sed calumniatur [quod Rex ipse et Comes Hugo et Comes Albericus et Simon de Cantelu tenet feoda] " in Essex/Hertford[722].  The 1170/71 Pipe Roll records “Hunfr Bucuinte” returning “ut placitet contra Willm de Reimes in civit Lund de terra de Eggeswera[723].  Lysons records that in 1171 “Henry Boccinte” paid 1 mark “that he might implead William de Reymes” for the manor of Edgware[724], citing Madox’s History of the Exchequer whose entry names “Hunfridus Bucuinte” paying to plead “contra Willelmum de Reimes in civitate Lundonia, de terra de Eggeswera” undated[725].  Lysons says that “it appears by some ancient lists of knights’ fees at the Exchequer [no source citation] that Henry Boccointe held an estate in Little-Stanmore, or Whitchurch, under the barony of William de Reymes[726].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1171/72, records "...Willelmus de Rames, viii l...Ricardus de Reymes x l; sed calumpniatur quod predicti tenent feoda viii militum" in Essex/Hertford[727].  King Henry II confirmed donations made to St. Bartholomew, including “ex dono Roberti de Ramis ecclesiam Sancti Bartholomei de Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Rogeri de Ram’ ecclesiam Sancti Laurentii de Stanmere [Stanmore]...et quicquid Willielmus de Ramis vel Adam Buchiente vel comes Patricus vel Ela comitissa...in villa de Eggeswere [Edgware] et apud Tidulfuestre [Elstree]...Ex dono Willelmi de Rames ecclesiam de Bradefeld [Bradfield]...”, by charter dated by Webb to [1176][728].  If that estimated date is correct, “Roberti de Ramis” in this document could be either Robert [I] or Robert [II], “Roger de Ram” Roger brother of Robert [II], and “Willemi de Rames” William [II].  “William de Ram” granted “half his land in Egeswhere [Edgware] and [Sta]nmere [Stanmore], which Ranulph, Adam’s father, held of Roger, William’s father...and the church...by the service of half a knight’s fee...” to “Adam son of Ranulph son of Adam”, for which grant “Adam has given him six mares, and to Sara his wife 5s”, undated, witnessed by “Roger, prior of St. Bartholomew’s, Richard de Ram’, Geoffrey Bucuint, William le Engleis...[729].  William is named in Pipe Rolls for Essex between 1169/70 and 1184/85, but not in the Pipe Roll for 1185/86, suggesting that he died in [1185], maybe without direct heirs.  m SARAH, daughter of ---.  She is named in the summary of the undated charter for Edgware and Stanmore which is cited above under her husband. 

 

 

The relationships between the following persons and the main Rames family have not been ascertained.  Maybe they were members of junior branches of the family, descended from collaterals of Roger [I] de Rames. 

 

1.         ROBERT [III] de Rames (-after [1168/69]).  The 1167/68 Pipe Roll records “Rob de Raimes deb .I. m. p defectu” in Cambridgeshire[730], with a similar entry in the 1168/69 Pipe Roll[731].  No other entry has been found which could refer to Robert [III], who may have died soon after 1168/69.  The date indicates that he was a different person from Robert [I] and Robert [II] who are named above. 

 

2.         HERVE de Rames (-after [1194/95]).  A document dated 11 Dec 1194 records “Herevicus de Raimes” claiming “i milit in Raimes sic jus et hereditate sua q ei descendit ex parte Auchi fratris Osberti avi sui...” from “Rob de Welles”, in Essex[732].  “Auchi fratris Osberti” has not been traced.  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records “Herueus de Reimes” owing “pro habendo recto de feodo i militis in Reimes[733]

 

3.         WILLIAM [III] de Rames (-after 20 Jun 1199).  He was not the same person as William [II], assuming that the latter’s death is correctly dated to [1185?] as shown above.  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records “Willelmus de Reimes” rendering “de viii li de scutagio suo. In thes. xx s. Et debet vii li[734].  A document dated 21 Oct 1198 records “Wills de Reimes de ma. ve.” claiming against “Johannem filium Walrami” for “homag p Rob filiu Doresert et Joh Oisu pl ess Will Gunt . ap Lamehic”, in Essex[735].  A document dated 9 May 1199 records “Will de Chesnei” claiming against “Will de Raimes”, in Norfolk[736].  A document dated 28 May 1199 records “Will de Raimes” claiming against “Andr Bludu”, relating to a debt involving “Gilb -- Will fil Rob...et Andr q Lucia ux eius posuerat...”, in Middlesex[737].  A document dated 20 Jun 1199 records “Rog de Reimes” [presumably Roger [IV], see below] claiming against “Will de Reimes” for “pl svic p Ric de Hecham ñ hms . bre”, in Suffolk[738]

 

4.         ROGER [IV] de Rames (-after [1214/15]).  A document dated 2 May 1199 records “Rog de Reimes” claiming against “Gaufr de Barinto et Ric d Hidan et Thom Foliot”, in Devon[739].  A document dated 20 Jun 1199 records “Rog de Reimes” claiming against “Will de Reimes” [presumably William [III], see above] for “pl svic p Ric de Hecham ñ hms . bre”, in Suffolk[740]The later history of the Rames/Reymes family in Suffolk was discussed in his 1955 article by A. L. Raimes, who indicated that Roger [IV] was named in 1214/15 and that he was the possible ancestor of the later family members[741]

 

 

 

RIDEL

 

 

A.      RIDEL

 

Betham’s Baronetage indicates that the Ridel family in England was descended from Geoffroy Rudel d’Angoulême Seigneur de Blaye, younger son of Geoffroy Comte d’Angoulême & his wife Pétronille d’Archiac [see the document ANGOULÊME/LA MARCHE/PERIGORD][742].  He seems to base his position only on “Rudel” being the same name as “Ridel”.  His assumption is unlikely to be correct as the name “Rudel” was used in the Angoulême area as a secondary first name (similar to “Talairand”) in the Périgord/Angoulême, Bergerac, and Pons families well into the 14th century, without any indication that it was co-identified with “Ridel”.  Betham presumably based his assertion on Hutchinson (the two texts are virtually the same, including the same source citations), who recorded this alleged Ridel descent a few years earlier[743].  This supposed Angoulême origin was repeated by Ridlon in his 1884 study of the Ridel/Ryedale family (no sources cited)[744].  On the other hand, Cadwalader J. Bates refers to “that monstrous fabrication, the genealogy of the Riddells of Ardnamurchan, given in Hutchinson’s Durham, App. III., vii[745].  Many of the details in the early generations of Hutchinson’s reconstruction are inaccurate, and in particular his sources cited do not appear to corroborate the alleged Rudel/Ridel connection.  Until more information comes to light, it is recommended that the accounts written by Hutchinson and Betham be treated with caution. 

 

Any connection between this family and the Ridel family in southern Italy between 1068 and 1091 (see the document SOUTHERN ITALY (1), Dukes of Gaeta) has not been established.  From a chronological point of view Geoffrey Ridel (died 1120) who is named below could have been the son of Geoffrey Ridel Duke of Gaeta (died 1086).  This suggestion is also consistent with Domesday Book recording that the former arrived in England “from Apulia” (see below), but no primary has yet been found which confirms that it is correct.  . 

 

 

[Three] siblings, parents not identified: 

1.         GEOFFREY Ridel (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Domesday Book records that the king gave land in Horsey, Norfolk to “Roger Bigod...when his brother William came from Apulia with Geoffrey Ridel[746].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "Joffrid Ridel and Geva his wife and his sister the lady Hawise" visited Croyland (dated to 1114)[747].  Dapifer.  Royal justiciar.  He was granted Drayton Basset in Staffordshire.  Orderic Vitalis names "Goisfredus Ridel" among those who drowned in the White Ship in 1120[748]m GEVA, illegitimate daughter of HUGUES d’Avranches Earl of Chester & his mistress --- (-after 1145).  Geva, filia Hugonis comitis Cestriæ, uxor Galfridi Ridelli” founded Canwell priory, with the consent of “Ranulfi comitis Cestriæ cognate mei…hæredum meorum…Gaufridi Ridelli et Radulfi Basset”, by undated charter[749].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "Joffrid Ridel and Geva his wife and his sister the lady Hawise" visited Croyland (dated to 1114)[750]"Radulphus comes Cestriæ, Willelmo Constabulario et Roberto dapifero" confirmed the grant of "Draitune…in libero conjugio" to "Gevæ Ridel, filiæ comitis Hughes" by charter dated to [1120][751]Geoffrey & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT Ridel ([after 1100/05]-after 1120).  Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere", by charter dated to [1120/23][752].  Robert presumably died soon afterwards as no further record of him has been found and his father’s lands passed to the husband of his sister Matilda. 

b)         MATILDA Henry I King of England confirmed that he had granted "filiam Galfridi Ridel in uxorem" to "Ricardo Basset", together with the wardship of "terre predicti G. Ridel" until "Robertus Ridel" became a knight and married "neptem Radulfi Basset, scilicet filiam cuiusdam filie sue de muliere", by charter dated to [1120/23][753]Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter under which Empress Matilda granted property held by "pater eius Ricardus Basset…[et] Galfridi Ridel avi sui" to "Galfrido Ridel filio Ricardi Basset", dated to [1144/46][754]m ([1120/23]) RICHARD Basset, son of RALPH Basset [I] & his wife A--- (-1144 or before). 

c)         MABEL (-after 1130).  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo", adding that Richard married "Mabilla Ridel" by whom he had "Galfridum de Sancto Medardo et Hugonem Ridel"[755].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills Flandr" accounting for "Mabilia uxore Ric de sco Medardo cu dote sua" in Northamptonshire[756]m RICHARD de Saint-Médard, son of ANSKETIL de Saint-Médard & his wife --- (-before 1130). 

2.         HAWISE (-after 1114).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "Joffrid Ridel and Geva his wife and his sister the lady Hawise" visited Croyland (dated to 1114)[757]

3.         [MATHIEU (-[1107?]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Mathias de Monte Sancti Michaelis" succeeded “Turold” as abbot of Peterborough, dated to [1071] from the context[758].  Prévost specifies in a footnote that Mathieu was “frère de Geoffroi Ridel, justicier du roi” but does not cite the source on which this statement is based.  The Chronicon Angliæ Petriburgense records the death of Abbot Turold in 1098, the succession of “Godricum” (specifying that he was deposed by Archbishop Anselm, leaving a five year vacancy), the appointment of “Matthias...post Godericum” in 1104, and the appointment of “Arnulfus prior Cantuariæ” in 1107 (without specifying that this followed the death of Mathieu)[759].] 

 

In addition to the above, Hutchinson names other supposed siblings of Geoffrey Ridel who died in 1120, but their family connections have not been verified.  In particular, Hutchinson records Hugh as Geoffrey’s brother, noting that he “obtained for his patrimony the lands at Farringdon, etc. in Northamptonshire; besides which he held the barony of Rilly, in Touraine, in France, and the manor of Cranston in Scotland”, adding that he was “father of Reginald, and grandfather of Hugh II Ridel, who, having no male issue, his granddaughter, Margaret, by Peter de St. Medard, lord of the manor of Witering, became heir to his own estate, and to that of Witering”.  Hutchinson cites several sources, but it is unclear whether any of them confirm that Hugh and Geoffrey were brothers[760].  It seems more likely that the Hugh in question was the same person as Hugh Ridel, son of Richard de Saint-Médard and his wife Mabel Ridel (Geoffrey’s daughter shown above), who was also recorded with a son named Reginald and the manor of Wittering.  Follow the hyperlink of Mabel’s husband above for more details. 

 

 

B.      RIDEL (BASSET)

 

 

GEOFFREY Ridel, son of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel (-1180).  Empress Matilda granted property held by "pater eius Ricardus Basset…[et] Galfridi Ridel avi sui" to "Galfrido Ridel filio Ricardi Basset" by charter dated to [1144/46], witnessed by "…Walchelino Maminot [et] Rogero filio"[761]"Galfridus Ridel" granted Colston "de feodo meo quæ fuit Gevæ Ridel avæ nostræ…Draituna", which "Radulfus Basset avus meus et Ricardus Basset pater noster" had granted, to "Radulfo Basset fratri meo", as well as other grants naming "Matildis Ridel matris meæ", by charter dated to [1150][762]Gaufridus Ridel” confirmed to “Johanni de Stutuilla” all the tenements which he held in fief, by charter dated to [1160] “feci predicto Johanni die qua ipse Johannes humagium et ligentiam apud Northantona mihi fecit”, witnessed by “…Radulfus Basset, W. Basset, R. filius Hugonis, Ricardus Engaine…Hugo Ridel…R. filius Nicolai de Stutauilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla…[763]"Robertus de Stafford" confirmed "terram de Madeleya" to "Galfrido Ridel", with the consent of "domine Amicie uxori sue", by undated charter[764]"Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…"[765].  "Gaufridus Ridel" granted various properties in the counties of Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to "Johanni fratri meo" by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…Radulfus Basset, Richardus Basset, W. Basset…Hugo Ridel…"[766].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfridus Ridel iv l iv s vii d" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][767].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Galfridus Ridel" held one knight’s fee from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire, and records the knights’ fees held from "Galfridus Ridel" in Northamptonshire, previously held by "Ricardus Basset pater suus" during the reign of King Henry I[768]

m firstly AMICE, daughter of ---.  "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed "terram de Madeleya" to "Galfrido Ridel", with the consent of "domine Amicie uxori sue", by undated charter[769] 

m secondly SIBYLLA Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM [II] Mauduit & his wife Matilda de Hanslope (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[770].  Another passage in the same source records property “in Frixtone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Gaufridi Ridel et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that “Gaufridus Basset ei dedit in dotem” and that “Ricardus Basset” is heir[771]

Geoffrey & his first wife had one child: 

1.         RICHARD Basset (-1217).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[772]  

-        BASSET of WELDON, NORTHAMatthew ParisTONSHIRE

Geoffrey & his second wife had three children: 

2.         [son] Ridel (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[773].  [same person as...?  GEOFFREY Ridel (-before 11 Aug 1203).  An order of King John dated 11 Aug 1203 grants "terre et heredis Gaufridi Ridell fratris sui qui mortuus est" to "S. Ridell"[774].  It is not known whether these brothers were the sons of Geoffrey Ridel by his first or second wife: Hutchinson says that Geoffrey was the older brother of Richard Basset, born from Geoffrey’s first marriage, and died childless[775].]  [same person as...?  HUGH Ridel .  Hutchinson records Hugh as older son of Geoffrey by his second wife, noting that he was “direct of ancestor of this family[776].  Hutchinson says that Hugh married “Margaret, daughter and heir of Peter de Sancto Medardo or Semerc” and “in her right he acquired the lordship of Witering, in Northamptonshire; and also the manor of Cranston, in Scotland, the barony of Rilly, in Touraine, in France, and considerable property in England[777]: none of this information has been verified against primary sources.  Hutchinson records Hugh’s supposed descendants[778], information not verified either.] 

3.         [son] Ridel (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[779].  [same person as...?  S--- Ridel (-after 11 Aug 1203).  An order of King John dated 11 Aug 1203 grants "terre et heredis Gaufridi Ridell fratris sui qui mortuus est" to "S. Ridell"[780].  It is not known whether these brothers were the sons of Geoffrey Ridel by his first or second wife.]  [same person as...?  WILLIAM Ridel (-1214).  Hutchinson records William as second son of Geoffrey by his second wife, noting that he was “lord of the manor of Risby, in the county of Lincoln, and of Primside and Glengarnoch in Scotland; of which kingdom he was High Chancellor, under William the Lion”, died in 1214 “leaving…a son Ralph, his heir”, and names somes of his supposed descendants[781]: none of this information has been verified against primary sources.]    

4.         [daughter] Ridel .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[782].  [same person as...?  MATILDA Ridel .  Hutchinson records Sibylla as the daughter of Geoffrey by his second wife, who married “Sewal, the direct ancestor of the noble family of Shirley, Earls Ferrars, from whom also the present Earl of Leicester, Baron de Ferrars, is sprung”, and names somes of his supposed descendants[783].]

 

 

 

RIE

 

 

This family presumably originated in Ryes, which lies south of Arromanches-les-Bains on the Normandy coast and about 5 kilometres north-east of Bayeux, in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Bayeux, canton Ryes.  In England, the family’s main holdings were located in Norfolk: Blomefield says that Hingham “was always reputed the head of the barony of Rye ever since it was first granted to Henry de Rye (see below)”[784].  The reconstruction of the early generations is based mainly on the history of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester, the reliability of which was discussed by Round[785], supplemented by various charter information quoted below. 

 

 

1.         HUBERT [I] de RieHe is named as the father of the children shown below in the History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester, quoted below.  The reliability of this narrative was discussed by Round[786].  No source has yet been identified which names Hubert in his own capacity, except for his supposed participation in the conquest of England described in Wace’s romanticised chronicle[787]m ---.  The name of Hubert’s wife is not known.  Hubert [I] & his wife had six children: 

a)         EUDES de Rie (-1 Mar 1120, bur Colchester)His parentage is confirmed by the History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester which names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, “pater…eius…Hubertus de Ria, qui internuntius et sequester inter ducem Normanniæ et regem Angliæ…”, his three brothers “Radulfus...custodia castelli et comitatus Notingehamiæ, Hubertus…turris Norwici…Adam…in Cantia”, and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater[788].  "…Eudo dapifer" witnessed the charter dated to [1072] under which William I King of England summoned knights to attend Easter at Clarendon[789].  "…Eudo de Ria fitz Hubert…Engelramn fitz Hubert [=Hilbert]…" witnessed the charter dated 14 Jul 1080 under which William I King of England confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Lessay[790].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Eudo…dapifer Regis…sororis suæ Muriellæ" dated to [1080], witnessed by "…Radulfo fratre Ilgeri, Rogero vicecomite et Osberno sororio Eudonis et Walgero filio eius…"[791].  "…Eudo, Adam brother of Eudo…Richard de Meri, Geoffrey de Sai, Robert de Oilli" witnessed the charter dated 1084 under which William I King of England confirmed a donation by Roger de Albini to Lessay Holy Trinity[792].  Domesday Book records “Eudo fitzHubert” holding Ashe in Overton Hundred in Hampshire; St Leonards in Ripplesmere Hundred in Berkshire; "Eudo the Steward" holding numerous properties in Essex, in Norfolk and in Suffolk[793]"…Eudo dapifer, Ivo dapifer, Hanno dapifer…" witnessed the charter dated 27 Jan 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the status of Bath abbey[794].  King William II’s grant of "manerio Deremanni quod Lefstanus frater eius habebat" to “Eudonem dapiferum meum” in an undated charter[795], dated by the Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum to [1093/97][796].  "Eudo dapifer" donated "the whole tithe of the forest of Tison...[and rights] in all his honour of Préaux [Pratellis]" to Saint-Amand by undated charter[797].  “Eudo dapifer domini regis” founded Colchester St John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda “...uxore mea Roaysia”, by undated charter[798].  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester records the death “pridie Kal Mar 1120” of “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, and that “Waltherius eius nepos” brought his body for burial[799]m ROHESE, daughter of RICHARD FitzGilbert de Brionne & his wife Rohese Giffard (-7 Jan 1121, bur Le Bec, Normandy[800]).  “Eudo dapifer domini regis” founded Colchester St John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda “...uxore mea Roaysia”, by undated charter[801].  Her parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Rohais uxor Eudonis dapiferi” donated “manerium de Halingberi sicut dominus meus Eudo die qua vivus et mortuus fuit illud habebat” and land which “Gelebertus frater meus” gave her, for the souls of “Eudonis dapiferi mariti mei et Gilberti fratris mei[802], which is corroborated by the undated charter under which  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated “terram de teia” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti filii Ricardi et matris mee Matildis et...Rohaise amite mee que ecclesiam Sancti Johannis fundavit et fratrum suorum”, to Colchester St. John[803].  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester also names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ” and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater[804].  Other sources suggest a different parentage for Rohese.  According to Guillaume de Jumièges and the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, she was Rohese, widow of Richard FitzGilbert de Brionne, daughter of Gauthier Giffard & his wife Ermengarde (-after 1113, bur [Colchester]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Galterium Giffardum primum” as father of “secundum Galterium Giffardum et filias plures” of whom “una...Rohais” married “Richardo filio comitis Gisleberti[805].  According to the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, ”Rohesia” married secondly “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normanniæ” after the death of “Ricardo filio comitis Gisleberti” and that they were both buried “tempore Henrici primi” in “castrum Clecestriæ…cœnobio in honore sancti Johannis” which Eudo constructed[806].  The Complete Peerage says that this parentage is “probably erroneous[807].  From a chronological point of view, the connection would be tight, assuming that the death date of Richard FitzGilbert is correctly estimated to [1090] and the birth of Rohese’s granddaughter by her alleged second marriage, Beatrix, is correctly assessed at [1105].  This supposed different parentage is disproved by the three sources quoted above.  Eudes & his wife had [one possible child]: 

i)          MARGUERITE ([1080/90]-).  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names “Margareta” as daughter of “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normanniæ” and “Rohesia”, adding that she married “Willielmo de Mandavill” by whom she was mother of “Gaufridi filii comitis Essexiæ et iure matris Normanniæ dapifer[808].  According to the Complete Peerage, this genealogy is “probably erroneous” but it does not explain the basis for the doubts[809].  Marguerite’s second marriage is suggested by the charter dated [1141/42] under which Empress Matilda made various grants of property including a grant to "Willelmo filio Otuel fratri…Comitis Gaufredi"[810].  The only Ottiwell has been identified was the illegitimate son of Hugh Earl of Chester.  m firstly ([1100/05]) WILLIAM de Mandeville, son of GEOFFREY de Mandeville & his first wife Adelisia --- (-[1116]).  m secondly ([1116/19]) OTTIWELL, [maybe OTTIWELL FitzHugh, illegitimate son of HUGH Earl of Chester & his mistress ---] (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120)

b)         RAOUL .  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, “pater…eius…Hubertus de Ria, qui internuntius et sequester inter ducem Normanniæ et regem Angliæ…”, his three brothers “Radulfus...custodia castelli et comitatus Notingehamiæ, Hubertus…turris Norwici…Adam…in Cantia”, and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater[811].  Constable of Nottingham. 

c)         HUBERT [II] (-before 1127).  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, “pater…eius…Hubertus de Ria, qui internuntius et sequester inter ducem Normanniæ et regem Angliæ…”, his three brothers “Radulfus...custodia castelli et comitatus Notingehamiæ, Hubertus…turris Norwici…Adam…in Cantia”, and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater[812]

-        see below

d)         ADAM (-after 1 Mar 1120).  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, “pater…eius…Hubertus de Ria, qui internuntius et sequester inter ducem Normanniæ et regem Angliæ…”, his three brothers “Radulfus...custodia castelli et comitatus Notingehamiæ, Hubertus…turris Norwici…Adam…in Cantia”, and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater[813].  Custodian of Kent castle.  "…Eudo, Adam brother of Eudo…Richard de Meri, Geoffrey de Sai, Robert de Oilli" witnessed the charter dated 1084 under which William I King of England confirmed a donation by Roger de Albini to Lessay Holy Trinity[814]Willelmus de Ramis” donated “duas partes decime totius dominii mei...in Boituna” to Colchester St John, for the soul of “Eudonis dapiferi domini mei”, by undated charter [probably dated to soon after 1 Mar 1120 when Eudes de Rie died, see above], witnessed by “Radulfo Martel, Roberto de Ramis, Rogero de Ramis, Adam Pincerna...[815]

e)         ROBERT (-1082).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Ivone...Sagiensium præsule”, “Rodbertus Huberti de Ria filius” was appointed and was bishop for twelve years, dated to 1070[816].  Bishop of Sées. 

f)          [MATILDA .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Sumeri" in Kent for holdings "tra Matis uxoris sue"[817].  Her parentage is indicated by Domesday Descendants saying that the land in question was held by Adam FitzHubert, brother of Eudes dapifer, in Domesday Book[818].  Her family origin appears corroborated by her daughter naming her son Adam, presumably after his maternal great-uncle.  No indication has been found of the name of Matilda’s husband.]  m ---.  One child: 

i)          CHRISTIANA (-after 1139).  Domesday Descendants cites a charter under which Roger de Somery donated property to Rochester St Andrew, naming his wife Christiana, undated[819].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Sumeri" in Kent for holdings "tra Matis uxoris sue"[820].  King Stephen confirmed a donation to Stratford-at-Bow priory of land at Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire by "Cristiana de Sumeri et filii sui" by charter dated to [1139/54][821]m ROGER [I] de Somery, son of --- (-after 1129). 

g)         MURIEL .  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Eudo…dapifer Regis…sororis suæ Muriellæ" dated to [1080], witnessed by "…Radulfo fratre Ilgeri, Rogero vicecomite et Osberno sororio Eudonis et Walgero filio eius…"[822].  The charter does not specify that the witness Osbern was the husband of Muriel, as well as brother-in-law of Eudes, but this appears probable.  [m OSBERN, son of ---.  Osbern & his wife had one child]: 

i)          [WALGER .  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Eudo…dapifer Regis…sororis suæ Muriellæ" dated to [1080], witnessed by "…Radulfo fratre Ilgeri, Rogero vicecomite et Osberno sororio Eudonis et Walgero filio eius…"[823].] 

2.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         ROGER"…Rogerius nepos Huberti de Ria…" witnessed a charter dated to [1070/80] which records that "Hubertus Ribola et Garsendis uxore eius" wrongly made claims to "ecclesia Sancte Marie de Curte Dominica"[824]

 

 

1.         --- de Rie m BEATRIX de Grantmesnil, daughter of --- de Grantmesnil & his wife Emma ---.  "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey, in return for a horse for "son fils Guillaume de Rye", by undated charter witnessed by "Guillaume de Creully, Henri de Pont-Audemer, Michel Belet et Julien de Rye"[825].  One child: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Rie .  "Beatrix de Rye" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, for the health of "Emma sa mère et de Guillaume de Grentesmesnil son frère" and confirmed their donations to the abbey, in return for a horse for "son fils Guillaume de Rye", by undated charter witnessed by "Guillaume de Creully, Henri de Pont-Audemer, Michel Belet et Julien de Rye"[826]

 

 

HUBERT [II] de Rie, son of HUBERT [I] de Rie & his wife --- (-before 1127).  The History of the foundation of St John’s abbey, Colchester names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, “pater…eius…Hubertus de Ria, qui internuntius et sequester inter ducem Normanniæ et regem Angliæ…”, his three brothers “Radulfus...custodia castelli et comitatus Notingehamiæ, Hubertus…turris Norwici…Adam…in Cantia”, and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater[827].  Custodian of Norwich castle.  "…Hubert de Rye…" witnessed the charter dated 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the possessions of the church of Salisbury[828].  “…Hubert de Ria…” witnessed the charter dated [May 1092] under which William II King of England confirmed previous grants to Lincoln cathedral[829].  “…Huberti de Ria…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[830].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of "decimas de Hokeringhe, de Swanetuna, de Depham, de Bukestuna, de Mercheshale" by "Hubertus de Ria…Agnes de Belfo uxor eius…cum Ricardo filio suo" to Holy Trinity, Norwich, at the request of "Henrici filii et heredis ipsorum", by charter dated to [1127][831]

m as her second husband, AGNES de Tosny, widow of RALPH de Belfou, daughter of ROBERT de Tosny of Belvoir & his wife --- (-[after 1129?]).  “Agnetis de Toteneia (filiæ Roberti de Totenei I et uxoris Huberti de Ria” donated “una boveta terræ in Aselakebi…” to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, by undated charter[832].  “Agnes de Toteneio” confirmed the donation to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by "pater meus Robertus de Toteneio et mater mea Adelais", by undated charter[833].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of "decimas de Hokeringhe, de Swanetuna, de Depham, de Bukestuna, de Mercheshale" by "Hubertus de Ria…Agnes de Belfo uxor eius…cum Ricardo [de Belfou] filio suo" to Holy Trinity, Norwich, at the request of "Henrici filii et heredis ipsorum", by charter dated to [1127][834].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Henricus de Rya” confirmed the donations to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by "Roberti avi mei et Agnetis matris meæ"[835].  [The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Agnes de Belfago" rendering account because “filius suus perrexit ad Comitem Flandr”, in Norfolk[836].  Walter Rye links this entry to the widow of Hubert [II][837].  If that is correct, her son mentioned would have been born from her first marriage.  It is uncertain whether the following document refers to Agnes and a daughter by her first marriage: William d’Aubigny confirmed “Hapisburgh” to Windham priory, Borfolk, on the burial of his wife Maud Bigot, in the presence of “Alice Bigot, mother of the deceased, Agnes de Beaufoe, and Almund her daughter[838].  Walter Rye suggests that “Almund” was the same person who is named in the following document: Henry de Rie [Agnes’s son by her second marriage] donated the mill of Worthing and other property to Castle Acre by undated charters, one of which was witnessed by "Almeda his sister"[839].] 

Hubert [II] & his wife had [three or more] children: 

1.         HENRY [I] de Rie (-[1158/59]).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation of "decimas de Hokeringhe, de Swanetuna, de Depham, de Bukestuna, de Mercheshale" by "Hubertus de Ria…Agnes de Belfo uxor eius…cum Ricardo filio suo" to Holy Trinity, Norwich, at the request of "Henrici filii et heredis ipsorum", by charter dated to [1127][840].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Henric de Ria" in Norfolk[841].  “Henricus de Rya” confirmed the donations to Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire by "Roberti avi mei et Agnetis matris meæ", by undated charter[842].  King Stephen confirmed the exchange of land between the see of Canterbury and "Henricus de Ria" (confirming the exchange made by "Hubertus de Ria pater Henrici eis in morte sua") by charter dated to after 19 Aug 1146[843].  Blomefield records that King Stephen granted Hingham, Norfolk to “Henry de Rye, son of Hubert de Rye, castellan of Norwich”, after it was renounced by “William de Caineio or Cheney”, undated (no source cited)[844].  A charter extract records that “Ricardus filius Rabodi” gave “ad maritandam filiam suam j marcam argenti, per breve Regis de ultra mare" and "xs. ad defendendam marchiam Waliæ” to “Henrico de Ria”, undated but presumably dated to before the death of Henry [I][845].  Henry presumably died before the [1158/59] Pipe Roll in which his wife and his presumed son are named in “Nova Placita”, cited below.  m AVELINE, daughter of --- (-[1178/79]).  The [1158/59] Pipe Roll records “Auelina de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk under “Nova Placita[846].  The [1159/60] Pipe Roll records “Auel de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk[847].  The [1167/68] Pipe Roll records “Auelina de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk for causing her son to be knighted while in the king’s custody (“fil suu Mil q erat i custodia Regis”)[848].  A charter extract, under “Baronia Henrici de Ria”, undated, records that “homines de Aldebi” [Aldeby, Norfolk] gave "Avelinæ uxori Henrico de Ria, ad exercitum Waliæ, xxxs", “ad faciendum Hubertum de Ria militem, ii marcas”, and "ad sororem suam maritandam, xls", and that they gave “j marcam” after "dominus Reginaldus de Warenna suscepit terram Huberti"[849].  Another charter extract, under “Baronia Henrici de Ria”, also undated, records that “Domina Avelina, uxor Henrici de Ria” collected "de Newtonia, postquam Rex transfretavit, xxxviii marcas, bono animo", and that, after "dominus Reginaldus de Warenna suscepit terram Huberti de Ria in custodia", he received “de eadem villa, ad filiam Henrici de Ria maritandam, v marcas…[850].  A third charter extract, under “Baronia Henrici de Ria”, also undated, records payments “de terra Willelmi de Caisneto, de Wrokesham, jm. ad faciendum Hubertum de Ria militem” and "iim. ad filiam Henrici maritandam, per præceptum Regis", and "iim. ad exercitum Waliæ[851].  A fourth charter extract, under “Baronia Henrici de Ria”, also undated, records payments “de terra Willelmi filii Baldrici de Tunestale, ad maritandam filiam Henrici de Ria, xxviid. et ob.", and "duobus exercitibus de Wales iiiis. et viid.[852].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Auelina de Ria…pro filio suo quem fecit militem dum esset in custodia regis" in Norfolk/Suffolk[853].  The [1178/79] Pipe Roll records “Auelinus de Ria Hubertus filius ejus” returning in Norfolk/Suffolk “de misericordia matris sue” and still owing more[854].  Henry [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [HENRY [II] de Rie (-[1166/67]).  The [1158/59] Pipe Rolls records “Henr de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk under “Nova Placita[855].  The inclusion of this entry under “Nova Placita” indicates that Henry recently inherited the obligation, presumably after his father’s death (see above), and that the entry did not refer to Henry [I] who is named above.  The [1160/61] Pipe Rolls records “Henr de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk[856].  The [1164/65] Pipe Roll records “Henr de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk[857].  Henry presumably died before the [1166/67] Pipe Roll which records [his presumed brother] Hubert (see below).  The death of an older brother Henry could also account for their mother needing to knight [her younger son] Hubert early, for which she was fined heavily (see above).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Ria" held three knights’ fees from the bishop of Ely in Cambridgeshire[858].] 

b)         HUBERT [IV] de Rie (-[1188/89]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to “Hubertus de Rya, xxl” in Norfolk/Suffolk in [1161/62][859].  The [1161/62] Pipe Roll records “Hub de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk[860].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Hubert de Rie xxxv l per Rogerum de Warenne" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1171/72][861].  The [1166/67] Pipe Roll records “Hubt de Ria” owing “de v. Militib . sed Rex ht ext eis .iii. Mil de feodo Henr de Essex…” in Norfolk/Suffolk[862].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records “Hubertus de Rya, xxxvm” in Norfolk/Suffolk in [1167/68][863].  The [1167/68] Pipe Roll records “Hubt de Ria” owing in Norfolk/Suffolk “p Mil suis[864].  The [1178/79] Pipe Roll records “Auelinus de Ria Hubertus filius ejus” returning in Norfolk/Suffolk “de misericordia matris sue” and still owing more[865].  Walter Rye records that the 1188/89 Pipe Roll states that “[Hubert] is dead, and that his lands are in the king’s custody[866]

c)         daughter .  A charter extract records that “Ricardus filius Rabodi” gave “ad maritandam filiam suam j marcam argenti, per breve Regis de ultra mare" and "xs. ad defendendam marchiam Waliæ” to “Henrico de Ria”, undated but presumably dated to before the death of Henry [I] (before [1158/59])[867].  Although this document dates the marriage, it does not indicate whom she married.  Her husband’s identity is suggested by another charter extract, which records “homines de Aldebi” [Aldeby, Norfolk] giving "Avelinæ uxori Henrico de Ria, ad exercitum Waliæ, xxxs", “ad faciendum Hubertum de Ria militem, ii marcas”, and "ad sororem suam maritandam, xls", and adding that they gave “j marcam” after "dominus Reginaldus de Warenna suscepit terram Huberti"[868].  Presumably the last transaction occurred after the death of Hubert [IV] in [1188/89] and indicated that Rainald de Warenne succeeded to his properties, presumably because he was the husband of Hubert’s sister.  A charter extract records, “de feodo Henrici de Ria, quod est in custodia Reginaldi de Warenna, de socha Hokeringhes”, “Reginaldus de Warenna" making payments "ad solvendum debitum Huberti de Ria…”, undated but presumably dated to after [1188/89] when Hubert [IV] died[869].  [m ([1158/59?]) RAINALD de Warenne, son of [RAINALD de Warenne & his wife Alice de Wormgay] (-after [1188/89]).] 

2.         [two or more] sons .  Henry de Rie’s brothers are referred to, but not named, in his undated charter in which he donated the mill of Worthing to Castle Acre[870]

3.         HUBERT [III] de Rie ).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter for Southwark issued by his son Hubert, cited below.  m ALICE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter for Southwark issued by her son Hubert, cited below.  Hubert & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         HUBERT [V] de Rie (-[1196/1207])).  Walter Rye amalgamates Hubert [V] and Humbert [IV] de Rye[871], which must be incorrect as shown by the various charter extracts cited above which show that “Avelina” was the wife of Henry [I] de Rie and was not the same person as “Alice” who married Hubert [III].  [Walter Rye records that Hubert de Rye donated “his lands in Kinesthorp” to John Bishop of Norwich by undated charter, dated by Rye to [1175/80], witnessed by “William de Rye, whom I presume to have been his brother[872]: this document could presumably refer to either Hubert [IV] or Hubert [V].]  Hubert [V] de Rie donated “the church of Hokering and the chapel of Berch” to Southwark priory, for the souls of “his father Hubert, his mother Alice, his uncle (great-uncle) Eudo dapifer, and his grandfather Hubert”, by undated charter, later confirmed by John Bishop of Norwich [either John of Oxford, bishop 1175-1200, or John de Gray, 1200-1214] (no source citation for the confirmation)[873].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "feoda Huberti de Rya" paying "xvii l x s, per Robertum de Tresgoz, xxxv milites" in Norfolk/Suffolk[874].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Hubertus de Rya" paying "xxxv l" in Norfolk/Suffolk[875].  Hubert [V] succeeded to the family properties after the death without heirs of the last descendant of his paternal uncle Henry [I] de Rie.  m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  She is named in the undated charter of her son-in-law John Marshall cited below.  Hubert [V] & his wife had two children: 

i)          AVELINE [Aline] de Rie (-[1266/67]).  An order dated 1207 records "Avelina et Isabel filiæ et heredes Hub de Rye", in Norfolk[876].  Her marriage is suggested by the Red Book of the Exchequer which records "Johannes Marscallus et Rogerus de Cressi" [the latter married to Aveline’s younger sister] holding 18 knights’ fees "de baronia Huberti de Ria" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][877]John Marshal gave land in Foulsham, Norfolk to Walsingham priory for the souls of "himself and his wife Aline, for John and Alice, his father and mother, for William Marshal the Earl and Isabel his wife, and for Hubert and Margaret de Rye"[878]Walter Rye cites sources dated 22 Hen III, 24 Hen III, 34 Hen III, and 35 Hen III which name her[879]She was named heir of her sister Isabel in the inquisitions which followed the latter’s death, cited below.  Inquisitions following an undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Aelina Marescall alias la Marischal", name "John son of Sir William le Mareschal […her son], aged 12, is her heir"[880]Her grandson and his descendants therefore inherited the barony of Rie[881]m ([1200]) JOHN Marshall, illegitimate son of JOHN the Marshal & his mistress Alice --- (-1235).  Marshal of Ireland. 

ii)         ISABEL de Rie (-28 Oct 1263).  "Rob fil Rog" paid a fine for "juniori filia Hubti de Ria ut ipsa maritanda cuidam nepoti suo" in Norfolk & Suffolk, dated 1199[882]An order dated 1207 records "Avelina et Isabel filiæ et heredes Hub de Rye", in Norfolk[883].  "Rog de Cressy" paid a fine for "heritanda I ux Ysabell q fuit uxor Gaufridi de Cestr", dated 1207[884].  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “tres filias...Margaretam, Clementiam et Saram” as the children of “Willielmum de Caineto”, son of “domino Roberto filio Walteri fundatori domus sanctæ Fidis de Horsham”, adding that “Margareta” married firstly “cuidam Normanno Hugoni de Crescy”, by whom she had “filium...Rogerum” who married “Isabellam de Ry” and had “quatuor filios...Hugonem, Rogerum, Johannem et Stephanum” all of whom died childless, and secondly “Roberto filio Rogeri[885].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Johannes Marscallus et Rogerus de Cressi" holding 18 knights’ fees "de baronia Huberti de Ria" in Norfolk/Suffolk in [1210/12][886].  Walter Rye cites sources dated 30 Hen III, 34 Hen III, 35 Hen III, and 46 Hen III which name her, and records her death “on St. Simon and St Jude’s day 48 Hen III[887].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 13 Nov "48 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel de Cressy alias de Cressi", record her date of death, and name "Aline la Marscale alias la Mareschal, her sister, age variously stated as 60 and more, and 90 and more, is her heir"[888]m firstly ([1199]) GEOFFREY de Chester, [nephew of ROBERT FitzRoger], son of --- (-before 1207).  m secondly (1207 or before) ROGER de Cressy, son of HUGH de Cressy & his wife Margaret de Cainy (-1246). 

b)         [WILLIAM de Rie (-after [1175/80]).  Walter Rye records that Hubert [IV] de Rye donated “his lands in Kinesthorp” to John Bishop of Norwich by undated charter, dated by Rye to [1175/80[889]], witnessed by “William de Rye, whom I presume to have been his brother[890]: this document could presumably refer to either Hubert [IV] or Hubert [V].] 

 

Walter Rye says that the following persons “[were] certainly of the Hingham family” but does not suggest how they may have been connected to the earlier Rye family in Norfolk: Henry de Rye, named 1250, his son William de Rye named 1255, 1268, and 1275, another William de Rye “probably son of the last-named William” named 1309, Henry de Rye “whom I take to have been his brother” named in 1296-8, and Joanna de Rye named 1327[891].  The repetition of the name William in this group suggests a connection with William de Rie, shown above as the possible brother of Hubert [V]. 

 

 

1.         RALPH de Rie (-after [1178/79]).  The [1178/79] Pipe Roll records “Radulfus de Ria” owing in Kent[892]

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         TOUSTAIN de Riem AGNES de Raveston, daughter of --- (-after 1215).  "Agnes de Raveston, femme de Toustain de Rye chevalier" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, with the consent of "son fils Robert de Rye", by charter dated 1215[893].  Toustain & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Rie (-after 1215).  "Agnes de Raveston, femme de Toustain de Rye chevalier" donated property to Saint-Jean-de-Falaise, with the consent of "son fils Robert de Rye", by charter dated 1215[894]

2.         ROBERT de Rie .  "Robert de Rye" confirmed the donation to the abbey of Saint-André-en-Gouffern by "son frère Toustain chevalier", by undated charter[895]

 

 

 

ROLLOS

 

 

Two brothers, parents not yet identified: 

1.         WILLIAM de Rollos (-before 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Baldwinus filius Gisleb" for "terra Willi de Rullos cum filia Ric fratris sui" in Lincolnshire[896]

2.         RICHARD de Rollos (-[after 1130]).  "Ricardus de Roll[os]" is named holding land "in Thorp et in Twyford" in Lodinton Hundred, Gosecote Wapentake in the Leicestershire survey, dated to [1124/29][897].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Baldwinus filius Gisleb" for "terra Willi de Rullos cum filia Ric fratris sui" in Lincolnshire[898].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "---ic de Rullos" in Westmoreland[899].  “Richard de Rollos" donated the church of St Martin of Rollos to the priory of Saint-Etienne, Plessis-Grimould, with the consent of "his sons Richard and Robert”, by charter dated to [1130][900]m EMMA, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants cites a charter which names Richard de Rollo’s wife as Emma and suggests that she was one of the daughters of "the Breton Enison Musard" who held a fief in the honour of Richmond, later recorded as held by Richard[901].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "Richard de Rulos" married "the daughter and heiress of Hugh de Evermue, lord of Brunne and Depyng"[902].  If this is correct, she was [Emma] de Evermou, daughter of Hugh de Evermou & his wife --- de Bourne.  Round dismisses this alleged parentage and marriage as chronologically impossible, although his explanation of the chronological difficulties does not appear to be correct[903].  Nevertheless, Ingulph’s Chronicle is, in any case, of dubious authority.  Richard & his wife had four children: 

a)         RICHARD de Rollos (-after [1141/63]).  “Richard de Rollos" donated the church of St Martin of Rollos to the priory of Saint-Etienne, Plessis-Grimould, with the consent of "his sons Richard and Robert”, by charter dated to [1130][904].  “Richard the second de Rollos" donated the churches of Burcy and Saint-Martin de Trottemer to the priory of Saint-Etienne, Plessis-Grimould, for his soul and that of "his wife”, by charter dated to [1141/63][905]m ---. 

b)         ROBERT de Rollos .  “Richard de Rollos" donated the church of St Martin of Rollos to the priory of Saint-Etienne, Plessis-Grimould, with the consent of "his sons Richard and Robert”, by charter dated to [1130][906]

c)         WILLIAM de Rollos .  He is named in Domesday Descendants, without citing the corresponding primary source[907]

d)         ADELINA de Rollos (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Baldwinus filius Gisleb" for "terra Willi de Rullos cum filia Ric fratris sui" in Lincolnshire[908].  A charter of King Edward III confirmed donations to Bourn Priory, among which donations by “Baldevinus filius Gisleberti” with the consent of “filio meo Rogero et uxore mea Adhelina[909]m (before 1130) BALDWIN FitzGilbert de Clare, son of GILBERT FitzRichard de Clare & his wife Adelisa de Clermont (-[1154]).  Lord of Bourne.  Domesday Descendants suggests that Baldwin did not inherit Bourne from his wife, who had older brothers living after their marriage, but that the lordship was regranted by King Henry I after the death of her paternal uncle William de Rollos[910]

 

 

 

ROS (of Kent)

 

 

1.         ANSCHETIL de Ros .  An undated charter of King Richard I confirmed possessions of Colchester St John, including the donation of “decimam de Ho et dimidiam decimam de Plumstede” made by “Asketillus de Ros[911]

 

 

1.         GEOFFROY de Ros (-after 1166).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gaufr de Ros" in Kent for holdings "patris sui"[912]m SIBYL de Bidun, daughter of HALENALD de Bidun & his [first/second] wife [Sara ---/Anneta ---].  Her parentage is confirmed by an undated charter which records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[913].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Sibilla de Ros" held fees in Oxfordshire during the reign of King Henry I and now held fees from "Manasser Arsic"[914].  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM [I] de Ros (-before 1185).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name those providing knights for military service with "Willelmi de Ros" in Kent[915].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Ros iv l i m" in Kent in [1167/68][916].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "William de Ros vii l" in Kent in [1171/72][917]m MATILDA de Camville, daughter of RICHARD [I] de Camville & his [second wife Melisende ---] (-after 1185).  “Matildis de Ros, filia Ricardi de Canvilla…cum Beatrice filia mea” donated revenue from "molendino de Hildrikesham de maritagio meo" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the souls of "Willielmi de Ros viri mei et Willielmi filii mei", by undated charter[918].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matildis de Ros que fuit filia Ricardi de Kaunville et soror Gerardi de Kaunville” and her land “in Heldrinham…de feodo Gerardi de Kaunville”, adding that she had "de Willelmo de Ros iii filios et iv filias, primogenitus est xx annorum"[919].  William [I] & his wife had seven children: 

i)          WILLIAM [II] de Ros ([1164/65]-before 30 Sep 1194).  “Matildis de Ros, filia Ricardi de Canvilla…cum Beatrice filia mea” donated revenue from "molendino de Hildrikesham de maritagio meo" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the souls of "Willielmi de Ros viri mei et Willielmi filii mei", by undated charter[920].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matildis de Ros que fuit filia Ricardi de Kaunville et soror Gerardi de Kaunville” and her land “in Heldrinham…de feodo Gerardi de Kaunville”, adding that she had "de Willelmo de Ros iii filios et iv filias, primogenitus est xx annorum"[921].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Ros vii l" in Kent in [1186/87][922].  An undated charter records an agreement between “Radulphum de Bidun” and “Willelmum de Ros filium Sibille de Ros amite sue et heredum suum” relates to land of “Triani patris mei et Radulfus Picot avi mei”, by undated charter[923].  The date of his death is estimated from the 1194 Pipe Roll which records "heredes Willelmi de Ros" owing in Kent[924]

ii)         son .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matildis de Ros que fuit filia Ricardi de Kaunville et soror Gerardi de Kaunville” and her land “in Heldrinham…de feodo Gerardi de Kaunville”, adding that she had "de Willelmo de Ros iii filios et iv filias, primogenitus est xx annorum"[925]same person as...?  JAMES de Ros .  The 1194 Pipe Roll records "Jammes de Ros" owing in Kent for “terre in Wuda[926]

iii)        son .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matildis de Ros que fuit filia Ricardi de Kaunville et soror Gerardi de Kaunville” and her land “in Heldrinham…de feodo Gerardi de Kaunville”, adding that she had "de Willelmo de Ros iii filios et iv filias, primogenitus est xx annorum"[927]

iv)        BEATRICE de Ros .  “Matildis de Ros, filia Ricardi de Canvilla…cum Beatrice filia mea” donated revenue from "molendino de Hildrikesham de maritagio meo" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the souls of "Willielmi de Ros viri mei et Willielmi filii mei", by undated charter[928]

v)         three daughters .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matildis de Ros que fuit filia Ricardi de Kaunville et soror Gerardi de Kaunville” and her land “in Heldrinham…de feodo Gerardi de Kaunville”, adding that she had "de Willelmo de Ros iii filios et iv filias, primogenitus est xx annorum"[929]

 

 

1.         WILLIAM [III] de Ros (-before 1227).  William [III] de Ros was probably the son of William [II] de Ros, see above, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not been identified.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Willelmus de Ros" paying "vii l, per Alexandrem Arsic, custodem heredis" in Kent[930].  An order of King John dated 26 Dec 1202 granted "Pet de Stoke...totam terram que fuit Willi de Ros, q Alex Arsic qui mortuus est habuit in custodiam cum heredem predicti Willi"[931].  The Rotulus de Prestito names “Will de Ros de Cancia" among the knights serving in Dublin in 1210[932]m ALICE, daughter of ---.  Farrer states that “Alice de Ros” held ¾ fee in Farningham “in the name of the dower of Richard de Ros, who held of the heirs of Robert Arsik[933].  It is assumed that Alice was Richard’s mother.  William [II] & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM [IV] de Ros (-before 1243).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1227, by "Rogerus de Gloucestria pater Johannis" against "Willelmum filium Willelmi de Ros qui infra etatem est" concerning "terre...in Toppefeld", which records what happened to the land when “Willelmi de Ros patris qui similiter fuit infra etatem et in custodia Petri de Stokes[934].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1230 in Kent, which records that "Willelmus de S. Johanne" had bought "maritagium heredis Willelmi de Ros" from "Willelmum de Eynefordia"[935]m [firstly] ([1230/Jan 1234]) GOLDEHOLDE de St John, daughter of WILLIAM de St. John & his wife Godeholde Paynell.  An order dated 24 Jan 1234 pardoned debts of “Willelmo de Sancto Johanne” and “Willelmo de Ros, qui filiam predicti Willelmi duxit in uxorem” for not having served in Wales[936].  She married secondly Hugh de Wyndleshores.  “Geoffrey de Percy, Matilda his wife, and Lore widow sister of the said Matilda” granted the manor of Northcraye to “Hugh de Wyndlesores and Godeholda his wife...late the wife of William de Ros (brother of the said Matilda and Lora)”, undated[937].] 

b)         RICHARD de Ros (-[1243/46]).  Farrer records that “the heir of William de Ros” held 1 fee in Lullingstone of “Margaret de Rivers” in 1242/43[938].  Farrer states that “Alice de Ros” held ¾ fee in Farningham “in the name of the dower of Richard de Ros, who held of the heirs of Robert Arsik[939]

c)         MATILDA de Ros .  A notification dated 26 Jan 1246 states that the king “has made the marriage between the sister of Richard de Ros deceased and Geoffrey de Percy, king’s yeoman[940].  “Geoffrey de Percy, Matilda his wife, and Lore widow sister of the said Matilda” granted the manor of Northcraye to “Hugh de Wyndlesores and Godeholda his wife...late the wife of William de Ros (brother of the said Matilda and Lora)”, undated[941]m ([Jan] 1246) GEOFFREY de Percy, son of ---. 

d)         LORA de Ros (-after 1293).  Farrer says that Lora married firstly “Gilbert de Kirkebi”, and secondly “presumably...Peter de Otham” but does not cite the primary source which confirms this statement[942].  “Geoffrey de Percy, Matilda his wife, and Lore widow sister of the said Matilda” granted the manor of Northcraye to “Hugh de Wyndlesores and Godeholda his wife...late the wife of William de Ros (brother of the said Matilda and Lora)”, undated[943]m firstly (1246) GILBERT de Kirkby, son of ---.  m secondly PETER de Otham, son of ---. 

 

 

 

RUMILLY

 

 

Two siblings:

1.         ROBERT de Rumilly [Romilly] of Skipton, son of [RAINFRED & his wife ---].  [A charter dated to [1069] records the property of Troarn abbey including donations of land at “Tallivalla" by "Turstin de Croilleio, William de Columberiis, Roscelin son of Herald, Robert son of Rainfred, Richard vicomte of Avranches[944].  The estimated date of this document seems early for “Robert son of Rainfred” to be the same person as Robert de Rumilly, although it is possible that the estimate was incorrect.]  m CECILY, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         CECILY de Rumilly .  “Willielmus de Meschines et Cecilia uxor mea” founded Bolton Priory by undated charter[945].  “Cecilia de Romeli” donated property to Bolton Priory by undated charter which names “gener meus Willielmus nepos regis Scotiæ Duncani[946].  “Willielmus de Meschines et Cecilia uxor mea” founded Bolton Priory by undated charter[947].  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[948].  Her children by her first marriage used the name Rumilly.  Domesday Descendants notes that Cecily de Rumilly married as her second husband "Henry de Tracy of Barnstaple", without citing the corresponding primary source, but adds that "there is no evidence to suggest that she was the mother of Henry de Tracy’s heir Oliver"[949].  No source has been found which indicates her date of death.  m firstly WILLIAM FitzRanulf, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Mathilde] d'Avranches (-[1130/35]).  m secondly (after [1130/35]) as his [first] wife, HENRY de Tracy of Barnstaple, son of [WILLIAM de Tracy & his wife Rohese ---] (-[1164/65]). 

b)         [LUCY (-after 15 Jul 1131)Domesday Descendants says that Robert de Rumilly was "doubtless father also of Lucy wife of Jordan de Sai", but does not explain the reasoning[950].  According to Gallia Christiana, the abbey of Aunay was founded 15 Jul 1131 by Jordan “de Saio prope Argentomum” and Lucy his wife[951].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Jordani de Saio et Lucie uxoris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][952]m JORDAN de Say, son of --- (-after 15 Jul 1131).] 

2.         ADELISIA .  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Saint-Martin de Troarn, including donations by "…Adelicie sororis Roberti de Rumilleio…" of property "in Anaeriis et…inter Taillevillam et Sanctum Albinum…", by charter dated to [1155/57][953]

 

 

 

SAINT-CLAIR

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Saint-Clair-sur-Elle in the present-day French département of Manche, arrondissement Saint-Lô, canton Saint-Clair[954]

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Saint-Clair (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Richard de Saint-Clair” holding Wortham from Ralph de Beaufour in Suffolk[955]

 

2.         RALPH de Saint-Clair .  “Hamo de Sancto Claro et Hubertus filius eius” donated “Eadgareslauue” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “Gunnoris sue conjugis et Eudoni dapiferi et Rohaise et patris et matris sue et fratrum suorum et omnium fidelium defunctorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfus de Sancto Claro...[956]

 

 

[Four or more] brothers, parents not identified: 

1.         WILLIAM de Saint-Clair (-after 1161).  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “ecclesie Sancte Marie Walcre” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda, “Eudonis dapiferi et...mee et uxoris mee Gunnoris et anime Huberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated to before 1119), witnessed by “Willelmo de Sancto Claro, Huberto de Sancto Claro...[957].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de sco Claro" in Dorsetshire and Huntingdonshire[958].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Savigny abbey, including donation by "Guillelmi de Sancto Claro et Haimonis fratris eius" of "sextam partem de Taon", by charter dated to [1156/58][959].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "in perdonis Willelmo de Sancto Claro, xxl" in Somerset in [1158/59][960].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Sancto Claro iv l xi s viii d" in Somerset in [1161/62][961].  “Willelmus de Sancto Claro suo fratri Hamoni de Sancto Claro et Huberto filio eius” donated “totam tenuram meam de Grenesteda” to Colchester St. John and reached agreement on the donation by undated charter[962].  An undated charter of King Richard I confirmed possessions of Colchester St John, including the donation of “Algareslawe in Berleya” made by “Hamo de Sancto Claro” and “Grenestede juxta Colecestriam” by “Willelmus de Sancto Claro[963]

2.         HAMON de Saint-Clair (-after 1139, bur Colchester St. John).  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “ecclesie Sancte Marie Walcre” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda, “Eudonis dapiferi et...mee et uxoris mee Gunnoris et anime Huberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated to before 1119), witnessed by “Willelmo de Sancto Claro, Huberto de Sancto Claro...[964].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro et Hubertus filius eius” donated “Eadgareslauue” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “Gunnoris sue conjugis et Eudoni dapiferi et Rohaise et patris et matris sue et fratrum suorum et omnium fidelium defunctorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfus de Sancto Claro...[965].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “omnes decimas de manerio meo de Adgareslawe” to Colchester St. John by charter dated 1123[966].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Savigny abbey, including the donation by "Guillelmi de Sancto Claro et Haimonis fratris eius" of "sextam partem de Taon", by charter dated to [1156/58][967].  “Willelmus de Sancto Claro suo fratri Hamoni de Sancto Claro et Huberto filio eius” donated “totam tenuram meam de Grenesteda” to Colchester St. John and reached agreement on the donation by undated charter[968].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” confirmed the donation of “totam Grenestedam” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “...fratrum meorum qui jacent ad illud monasterium”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hubertus de Sancto Claro...[969].  An undated charter of King Richard I confirmed possessions of Colchester St John, including the donation of “Algareslawe in Berleya” made by “Hamo de Sancto Claro” and “Grenestede juxta Colecestriam” by “Willelmus de Sancto Claro[970].  “Hubertus de Sancto Claro” donated “cum corpore patris mei Hamonis de Sancto Claro...molendinum de Lexendene...sicut...fuit...in manu Willelmi de Sancto Claro patrui mei” to Colchester St. John, by undated charter[971]m firstly as her second husband, GUNNOR, widow of ROBERT FitzSwein Lord of Rayleigh, Essex, daughter of ROGER Bigod of Earsham, Suffolk & his [second] wife Adelise de Tosny (-before [1137]).  A charter of Hugh Bigod for Norwich Priory refers to property given by “his sister Gunnor”[972].  “Robert de Essex and Gunnora his wife, daughter of Roger Bigod” donated Fremingham church to Thetford priory, Norfolk for the souls of their ancestors and of "their son Henry on his birth-day"[973].  It is not clear from this extract whether Gunnor’s father was named in the original document.  Her first marriage is indicated by the charter of King Henry II which confirmed donations to Thetford Priory, including the donation by “Gunnoræ matris Henrici de Exessa[974].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “ecclesie Sancte Marie Walcre” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda, “Eudonis dapiferi et...mee et uxoris mee Gunnoris et anime Huberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated to before 1119), witnessed by “Willelmo de Sancto Claro, Huberto de Sancto Claro...[975].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro et Hubertus filius eius” donated “Eadgareslauue” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “Gunnoris sue conjugis et Eudoni dapiferi et Rohaise et patris et matris sue et fratrum suorum et omnium fidelium defunctorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfus de Sancto Claro...[976].  Her second husband confirmed grants of her marriage portion in Brome for her soul[977]m secondly MARGARET, daughter of ROBERT FitzWalter de Caen & his first wife Aveline --- (-bur Colchester St. John).  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “manerium de Stoches” to Colchester St. John, at the request of “Margarete uxoris mee cujus maritagium illud manerium erat”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Symon frater Margarete...[978].  “Margareta uxor Hamonis de Sancto Claro” donated “Stoches...manerium meum cum suis appendiciis de Sudfolchia et Norfolc...sicut...michi pater meus concessit” to Colchester St. John for her burial there, and for the souls of “patris mei Roberti et Aueline matris mee et Johannis fratris mei” and for the salvation of “viri mei Hamonis” and with his consent, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hubertus de Sancto Claro, Symon frater meus...[979].  Hamon & his first wife had [two] children: 

a)         HUBERT de Saint-Clair ([before 1110]-before 1185).  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “ecclesie Sancte Marie Walcre” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda, “Eudonis dapiferi et...mee et uxoris mee Gunnoris et anime Huberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated to before 1119), witnessed by “Willelmo de Sancto Claro, Huberto de Sancto Claro...[980].  Hubert’s date of birth is estimated on the assumption that he was still a child at the date of this charter, but old enough to have signed as a witness.  “Willelmus de Sancto Claro suo fratri Hamoni de Sancto Claro et Huberto filio eius” donated “totam tenuram meam de Grenesteda” to Colchester St. John and reached agreement on the donation by undated charter[981].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” confirmed the donation of “totam Grenestedam” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “...fratrum meorum qui jacent ad illud monasterium”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hubertus de Sancto Claro...[982].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro et Hubertus filius eius” donated “Eadgareslauue” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “Gunnoris sue conjugis et Eudoni dapiferi et Rohaise et patris et matris sue et fratrum suorum et omnium fidelium defunctorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfus de Sancto Claro...[983].  “Margareta uxor Hamonis de Sancto Claro” donated “Stoches...manerium meum cum suis appendiciis de Sudfolchia et Norfolc...sicut...michi pater meus concessit” to Colchester St. John for her burial there, and for the souls of “patris mei Roberti et Aueline matris mee et Johannis fratris mei” and for the salvation of “viri mei Hamonis” and with his consent, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hubertus de Sancto Claro, Symon frater meus...[984].  “Hubertus de Sancto Claro” donated “cum corpore patris mei Hamonis de Sancto Claro...molendinum de Lexendene...sicut...fuit...in manu Willelmi de Sancto Claro patrui mei” to Colchester St. John, by undated charter[985].  “Hubertus de Sancto Claro” donated “totam tenuram de Grenesteda...sicut pater meus Hamo et Willelmus patruus meus...habuerunt” to Colchester St. John by undated charter[986]m CLEMENTIA, daughter of --- ([1124/25]-after 1185).  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[987].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Clementia qui fuit uxor Huberti de Sancto Claro”, aged 60, her land "in Westone" in Hertfordshire, and in another passage that she held "Haiam de Willelmo de Lanvalei" in Huntingdonshire[988].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei miles” donated “terram...ad Galweidone in Lexedene...pro dimidia virgata terre quam Clementia avia mea...pro anima matris mee Gunnore de maritagio suo in Westone donaverat” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[989].  Hubert & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUNNOR de Saint-Clair ([1140/50]-before 1185)Domesday Descendants names "Gunnora daughter and heiress of Hubert de St Clair" as the wife of William de Lanvalay, but does not cite a specific source reference for this information[990].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that the age of her mother is accurately stated in the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185.  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[991]m WILLIAM [I] de Lanvallay, son of --- (-before 1185). 

b)         [MATILDA (-after 1147).  “Albricus de Domno Martino et Matilda uxor eius” donated “ecclesiam de Hamertune” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Hubertus de Sancto Claro...[992].  The witness also donated the same church to Colchester St. John, which suggests a joint interest with the donors.  Maybe Matilda was the sister of Hubert de Saint-Clair.  Evans dates this document to [1147/67][993]m [as his second wife,] AUBREY [I] de Dammartin, son of EUDES [I] de Dammartin & his wife Basilia --- (-after [1171/72]).] 

3.         two or more brothers (-bur Colchester St. John).  “Hamo de Sancto Claro et Hubertus filius eius” donated “Eadgareslauue” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “Gunnoris sue conjugis et Eudoni dapiferi et Rohaise et patris et matris sue et fratrum suorum et omnium fidelium defunctorum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfus de Sancto Claro...[994].  It is unclear in this document whether “defunctorum” applies to “omnium fidelium” or also to “fratrum suorum”.  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” confirmed the donation of “totam Grenestedam” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “...fratrum meorum qui jacent ad illud monasterium”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hubertus de Sancto Claro...[995]

 

 

Three brothers, parents not yet identified: 

1.         ROBERT de Saint-Clair (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Robertus de Sancto Claro, ii milites, Johannes de Sancto Claro, ii milites" among those providing knights for military service with "Walteri de Meduana" in Kent[996]

2.         JOHN de Saint-Clair (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Robertus de Sancto Claro, ii milites, Johannes de Sancto Claro, ii milites" among those providing knights for military service with "Walteri de Meduana" in Kent[997]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH de Saint-Clair (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hugo de Sancto Claro" holding one quarter of one knight’s fee "in Hesslingeham" in Kent in [1210/12][998]m CHRISTIANA, daughter of ---.  Bracton lists a claim by "Cristina de Sancto Claro…neptem Roberti Bataill" against "Gilebertum de Sancto Claro", dated 1218, for "terciam partem…terre…in Stanes…dotem suam…quod fuit Hugonis de Sancto Claro viri sui", defended on the basis of an agreement between "Simonem patrem ipsius Gilberti et Johannem patrem ipsius Hugonis"[999]

3.         SIMON de Saint-Clairm ---.  The name of Simon’s wife is not known.  Simon & his wife had one child: 

a)         GILBERT de Saint-Clair (-after 1218).  Bracton lists a claim by "Cristina de Sancto Claro…neptem Roberti Bataill" against "Gilebertum de Sancto Claro", dated 1218, for "terciam partem…terre…in Stanes…dotem suam…quod fuit Hugonis de Sancto Claro viri sui", defended on the basis of an agreement between "Simonem patrem ipsius Gilberti et Johannem patrem ipsius Hugonis"[1000]

 

 

1.         GILBERT de Saint-Clair (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gilbertus de Sancto Claro" held two parts of one knight’s fee "de honore Sancti Edmundi" in Norfolk[1001]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Saint-Clair (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmo de Sancto Claro" paying for "i militem et dimidium" in Essex, Herefordshire[1002].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Willelmus de Sancto Claro" paying "xxx s, i militem et dimidium" in Essex, Hertfordshire[1003]

 

3.         JAMES de Saint-Clair (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Jacobus de Sancto Claro" holding "quartam pro i carucata…in Summenystre" in London, Middlesex in [1210/12][1004]

 

4.         GEOFFREY de Saint-Clair (-[1219/22]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Gaufridus de Sancto Claro" holding "Stepeltone" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12], adding "debet tenere die Paschæ coram domina Regina unum manutergium"[1005].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset and Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Galfridus de Sancto Claro" holding land "in Stapeltun" in Somerset[1006].  m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Saint-Clair .  "Robert [de St Claro]" had "full seisin…of the land formerly of Geoffrey de St Claro in Standen which is of the fee of the daughter and heiress of the earl of the Isle [of Wight]" in Hampshire, dated [Jan 1223][1007].  "Robert de St Claro" did homage to the king for "the land of Stapleton…and…in Somerton" in Somerset, dated 8 Jan 1223[1008]

 

 

 

SAINT-HILAIRE

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët in the present-day French département of Manche, arrondissement Mortain, canton Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët[1009]

 

 

[Two] brothers, parents not yet identified: 

1.         ASCULF de Saint-Hilaire (-1121 or after).  ["Apud oppidum Santi Hilarii, Harchodio vicecomite, Petro fratre eius" witnessed the undated charter under which "Radulfus Filogerensis et uxor eius Avicia" donated revenue to Sainte-Trinité de Fougères[1010].  It appears likely that "Harchodio vicecomite" was the same person as Asculf de Saint-Hilaire but this is not beyond doubt.]  "…Hasculfo de Sancto Jacobo…" witnessed the charter dated to [1100/01] under which Henry I King of England confirmed donations by "Hugo de Grentemesnil" to Saint-Evroul[1011].  “…Hasculfo de Sancto Hylario…" witnessed the charter dated to [1100/04] under which Guillaume Comte de Mortain confirmed donations to Saint-Martin de Marmoutier[1012]m MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   Asculf & his wife had four children: 

a)         EUDES de Saint-Hilaire .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

b)         PHILIPPE de Saint-Hilaire .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

c)         JAMES de Saint-Hilaire (-after 1138).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   “Jacobi de Sancto Hylario" donated land at Dallenges to Savigny, with the consent of "Aveline uxoris sue, Petri fratris eius", by charter dated 1138, witnessed by "…Georgius nepos Jacobi, et Oliverus, et Ricardus filius Adeline[1013]m as her second husband, AVELINE, widow of ---, daughter of --- (-after 1138).  “Jacobi de Sancto Hylario" donated land at Dallenges to Savigny, with the consent of "Aveline uxoris sue, Petri fratris eius", by charter dated 1138, witnessed by "…Georgius nepos Jacobi, et Oliverus, et Ricardus filius Adeline[1014].  James & his wife had one child: 

i)          MATILDA de Saint-Hilaire Robert of Torigny records that "Willermus de Albineio…comitem d'Arundel…[filium] Guillermum de Albineio primogenito" and "relictam Rogerii comitis de Clara filiam Jacobi de Sancto Hilario"[1015].  Her name is confirmed by the undated charter which records that Wilielmus comes Sussexiæ” confirmed donations to Boxgrove Priory by his predecessors “Rogerus de Albineio, et Willelmus Pincerna…et Willielmi patris mei filii reginæ Aeliz, et Matildis matris meæ[1016]m firstly ROGER de Clare Earl of Hertford, son of RICHARD FitzGilbert de Clare Lord of Clare & his wife Agnes [Alicia] of Chester (-1173).  m secondly WILLIAM de Albini, son of WILLIAM Earl of Arundel & his wife Adelisa de Louvain (-24 Dec 1193, bur Wymondham Priory).  He was restored as Earl of Arundel in 1190. 

d)         PETER de Saint-Hilaire (-after [1157]).  “Jacobi de Sancto Hylario" donated land at Dallenges to Savigny, with the consent of "Aveline uxoris sue, Petri fratris eius", by charter dated 1138, witnessed by "…Georgius nepos Jacobi, et Oliverus, et Ricardus filius Adeline[1017].  “…Petro de Sancto Hylario…" witnessed the charter dated Nov 1151 under which Henri Duke of Normandy confirmed protection over Savigny abbey[1018].  “…Petro de Sancto Hylario…Carpentario de Sancto Hylario" witnessed the charter dated to [1157] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the rights of Savigny abbey over land at Damfront[1019]

e)         --- .  m ---.  One child: 

i)          GEORGE .  “Jacobi de Sancto Hylario" donated land at Dallenges to Savigny, with the consent of "Aveline uxoris sue, Petri fratris eius", by charter dated 1138, witnessed by "…Georgius nepos Jacobi, et Oliverus, et Ricardus filius Adeline[1020]

2.         [PIERRE de Saint-Hilaire .  "Apud oppidum Santi Hilarii, Harchodio vicecomite, Petro fratre eius" witnessed the undated charter under which "Radulfus Filogerensis et uxor eius Avicia" donated revenue to Sainte-Trinité de Fougères[1021].  It appears likely that "Harchodio vicecomite" was the same person as Asculf de Saint-Hilaire but this is not beyond doubt.] 

 

 

1.         HERBERT de Saint-Hilaire .  “…Herberto de Sancto Hylario…" witnessed the charter dated to [1141/63] under which William de Briouse confirmed rights of the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur[1022]

 

 

Three siblings, parents not identified: 

1.         RALPH de Saint-Hilaire .  Robert Earl of Leicester donated land at Medmontous, held by gift of his father and of “Ralf de Sancto Hylario and William his brother and Thomas their nepos”, to the abbey of Saint-André-en-Gouffern by charter dated to [1198/1204][1023].  Philippe II King of France confirmed the charter under which Robert fils du comte de Leicester” had donated the possessions of “Raoul de Saint-Hilaire, Guillaume son frère et Thomas leur neveu...apud Mesmouton” to Saint-André de Goufer by charter dated [1 Nov 1215/9 Apr 1216][1024]

2.         WILLIAM de Saint-Hilaire .  Robert Earl of Leicester donated land at Medmontous, held by gift of his father and of “Ralf de Sancto Hylario and William his brother and Thomas their nepos”, to the abbey of Saint-André-en-Gouffern by charter dated to [1198/1204][1025].  Philippe II King of France confirmed the charter under which Robert fils du comte de Leicester” had donated the possessions of “Raoul de Saint-Hilaire, Guillaume son frère et Thomas leur neveu...apud Mesmouton” to Saint-André de Goufer by charter dated [1 Nov 1215/9 Apr 1216][1026]

3.         --- de Saint-Hilairem ---.  One child: 

a)         THOMAS de Saint-Hilaire .  Robert Earl of Leicester donated land at Medmontous, held by gift of his father and of “Ralf de Sancto Hylario and William his brother and Thomas their nepos”, to the abbey of Saint-André-en-Gouffern by charter dated to [1198/1204][1027].  Philippe II King of France confirmed the charter under which Robert fils du comte de Leicester” had donated the possessions of “Raoul de Saint-Hilaire, Guillaume son frère et Thomas leur neveu...apud Mesmouton” to Saint-André de Goufer by charter dated [1 Nov 1215/9 Apr 1216][1028]

 

 

1.         EMMA de Saint-Hilaire .  "Willelmus de Veteri Ponte filius et heres Willelmi de Veteri Ponte et Emme de Sancto Hylario" donated "ecclesiam de Boeltun" to Holyrood abbey, with the consent of "domini mei Regis Scott Willelmi et Dni mei Alexandri filii eius", for the souls of "sponse mee et filii et heredis mei Willi…patris mei et matris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "…Willelmo Medio et Willelmo Juniore fratribus meis…"[1029].  "W. de Veteri Ponte primogenitum filium domine Emme de Sancte Hylario" donated "decimam de carbonario meo de Kareddin" to Holyrood abbey by undated charter witnessed by "…Willelmo Medio et W. Juniore fratribus meis…"[1030]m WILLIAM de Vieuxpont, son of ---. 

 

2.         PETER de Saint-Hilaire (-[29 Sep 1223/1229]).  "Peter de St Hillary and Gunnora his wife" paid a fine for "having their land of Corton Denham", dated [Aug] 1220[1031].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Petrus de Sancto Hillario et Gunnora uxor eius” owing “pro habenda terra de Corston” in Somerset[1032]m GUNNORA, daughter of --- (-after 1229).  "Peter de St Hillary and Gunnora his wife" paid a fine for "having their land of Corton Denham", dated [Aug] 1220[1033].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Petrus de Sancto Hillario et Gunnora uxor eius” owing “pro habenda terra de Corston” in Somerset[1034].  An order dated 1229 records that "Gunnora de Sancto Elario" relinquished "terra...in Corfton de Galfrido de Dynant" in favour of “Henrici de Sancto Elario filii sui postgeniti” when the latter paid homage to the king[1035].  Peter & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRY de Saint-Hilaire .  An order dated 1229 records that "Gunnora de Sancto Elario" relinquished "terra...in Corfton de Galfrido de Dynant" in favour of “Henrici de Sancto Elario filii sui postgeniti” when the latter paid homage to the king[1036]

 

 

 

SAINT-MARTIN

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Saint-Martin-le-Gaillard in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Dieppe, canton Eu[1037]

 

 

1.         JOHN de Saint-Martin .  "Willemus Maled camerarius regis" notified "hominibus Sancti Martini" that he had restored to "Johanni nepoti meo" land which "Johannes avus suus et Huonus pater suus et Willelmo de Sancto Martino patruus suus" had held "in Sancto Martino" by charter dated 29 Sep [1131/57][1038]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH de Saint-Martin .  "Willemus Maled camerarius regis" notified "hominibus Sancti Martini" that he had restored to "Johanni nepoti meo" land which "Johannes avus suus et Huonus pater suus et Willelmo de Sancto Martino patruus suus" had held "in Sancto Martino" by charter dated 29 Sep [1131/57][1039]m --- Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM [I] Mauduit & his wife Hawise ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Sep [1131/57] under which [her brother] "Willemus Maled camerarius regis" notified "hominibus Sancti Martini" that he had restored to "Johanni nepoti meo" land which "Johannes avus suus et Huonus pater suus et Willelmo de Sancto Martino patruus suus" had held "in Sancto Martino"[1040].  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Saint-Martin (-after [1140]).  "Willemus Maled camerarius regis" notified "hominibus Sancti Martini" that he had restored to "Johanni nepoti meo" land which "Johannes avus suus et Huonus pater suus et Willelmo de Sancto Martino patruus suus" had held "in Sancto Martino" by charter dated 29 Sep [1131/57][1041]

b)         WILLIAM de Saint-Martin .  "Willemus Maled camerarius regis" notified "hominibus Sancti Martini" that he had restored to "Johanni nepoti meo" land which "Johannes avus suus et Huonus pater suus et Willelmo de Sancto Martino patruus suus" had held "in Sancto Martino" by charter dated 29 Sep [1131/57][1042]

 

 

1.         ALURED de Saint-Martin (-after 20 Nov 1189[1043]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alvredus de Sancto Martino" held one knights fee in Sussex under the Earl of Arundel[1044]A charter of King Edward III dated 5 Nov 1337, which confirms various donations to Robert’s Bridge Abbey in Sussex, quotes a charter of King Richard I which records that Aluredus de Sancto Martino fundator ejusdem abbaciæ” held “de Galfrido de Sancto Martino et hæredibus suis in rapo de Hastyng[1045]m firstly ---.  m secondly (after 1170) as her second husband, ALICE de Albini, widow of JEAN [I] Comte d'Eu Lord of Hastings, daughter of WILLIAM de Albini Earl of Arundel & his wife Adelisa de Louvain (-11 Sep [1188], bur Fécamp)).  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  It is suggested by a charter of King Edward III dated 5 Nov 1337 which confirms various donations to Robert’s Bridge Abbey in Sussex founded by Aluredus de Sancto Martino”, including “terram de Swergate et pasturam infra Wallam et extra” donated by “Aliciæ comitissæ de Augo et Henrici filii eius comitis Augi[1046].  “Alizia comitissa Augi” donated "terram meam de Snergate, infra wallam et extra" to Robert’s Bridge Abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Arundeliæ patris mei et Aliziæ reginæ matris meæ et…domini mei J. comitis Augi et Godefridi fratris mei et Matildis et Margaretæ filiarum mearum”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Henrico comite Augi, Roberto fratre eius, Aluredo de Sancto Martino…[1047]

 

 

 

SAINT-MEDARD

 

 

1.         ANSKETIL de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records that "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo" held land from "abbatia de Burch, in Hamtonascira" and in Lincolnshire[1048]m ---.  The name of Ansketil’s wife is not known.  Ansketil & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD de Saint-Médard (-before 1130).  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo"[1049]m MABEL Ridel, daughter of GEOFFREY Ridel & his wife Geva [d’Avranches] (-after 1130).  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo", adding that Richard married "Mabilla Ridel" by whom he had "Galfridum de Sancto Medardo et Hugonem Ridel"[1050].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills Flandr" accounting for "Mabilia uxore Ric de sco Medardo cu dote sua" in Northamptonshire[1051].  Richard & his wife had two children: 

i)          GEOFFREY de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo", adding that Richard married "Mabilla Ridel" by whom he had "Galfridum de Sancto Medardo et Hugonem Ridel"[1052]m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

(a)       PETER de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Petrum" as the son "Galfridum de Sancto Medardo"[1053]m ---.  The name of Peter’s wife is not known.  Peter & his wife had one child: 

(1)       GEOFFREY de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Galfridum…[qui] fuit in custodia abbatis Benedicti, qui postea fuit leprosus" as the son "Petrum"[1054]m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had one child: 

a.         PETER de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Petrum qui fuit in custodia abbatis Acharii" as son of "Galfridum…[qui] fuit in custodia abbatis Benedicti, qui postea fuit leprosus"[1055]m ---.  The name of Peter’s wife is not known.  Peter & his wife had one child: 

(i)         GEOFFREY de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Galfridum qui fuit in custodia abbatis Martini" as son of "Petrum qui fuit in custodia abbatis Acharii"[1056]

ii)         HUGH Ridel [of Oxendon] (-after 1166).  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo", adding that Richard married "Mabilla Ridel" by whom he had "Galfridum de Sancto Medardo et Hugonem Ridel"[1057]Gaufridus Ridel” confirmed to “Johanni de Stutuilla” all the tenements which he held in fief, by charter dated to [1160] “feci predicto Johanni die qua ipse Johannes humagium et ligentiam apud Northantona mihi fecit”, witnessed by “…Radulfus Basset, W. Basset, R. filius Hugonis, Ricardus Engaine…Hugo Ridel…R. filius Nicolai de Stutauilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla…[1058].  “Gaufridus Ridel” granted various lands in Leicester, Rutland and Northampton to “Johanni fratri meo” to hold “in pace…sicut Radulfus frater meus [tenet]” by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by “…Radulfus Basset, Ricardus Basset, W. Basset, R. filius Hugonis, Ricardus Engaine…Hugo Ridel…R. de Stuteuilla, Thomas frater suus…”, and noting that “propter hanc donationem Johannes” donated property to “Gaufrido Ridel…die qua ipse Johannes filius Johannis fecit humagium domino Gaufrido…apud Landam[1059]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hugo Ridel" held "ix carucatas et i virgatam pro servitio i militis in Welesham et in Suttone et in Dingele" from "Galfridi Ridel" in Northamptonshire[1060]m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

(a)       RAINALD Ridel .  Domesday Descendants records that Hugh was named in “Pipewell charters as brother of Hugh de Senlis, uncle of Henry fitz Richard of Oxendon, and father of a son Rainald[1061].  Domesday Descendants records that Hugh abbot of Bury St Edmund’s confirmed to Rainald “his father’s lands in East Farndon, Northamptonshire[1062]

b)         GERARD de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo"[1063]m ---.  The name of Gerard’s wife is not known.  Gerard & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo", adding that "Girardus genuit Robertum" and "Robertus genuit Margaretam"[1064]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       MARGARET de Saint-Médard .  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo (later addition dated to the reign of King Henry III) names "Ricardum et Girardum" as the children of "Asketillus de Sancto Medardo", adding that "Girardus genuit Robertum" and "Robertus genuit Margaretam" who held land "in Sibbertona et Ettona"[1065]

 

 

 

STUTEVILLE (ESTOUTEVILLE)

 

 

According to Le Prévost, this family originated in "Etouteville-sur-Mer, canton d’Yerville"[1066], situated in the Pays de Caux about 30 kilometers north-west of Rouen.  The family was studied in the early 20th century by Gabriel de la Morandière[1067].  He appears to clarify adequately the relationship between the Estouteville family in Normandy and the Stuteville family in England.  However, his account of the descent of the various branches of the English Stuteville family is confused and contradictory.  In particular, he allocates to the English branch several of the members of the French branch, who also held property in England.  The family was also studied more recently by Clay[1068], parts of whose work have been consulted. 

 

 

ROBERT [III] de Stuteville, son of ROBERT [II] d’Estouteville & his [second] wife Erneburg --- ([1110?]-1183).  Clay says that it is “probable that his birth can be placed as c. 1110[1069], which appears to be a reasonable estimate bearing in mind the later Stuteville family chronology.  Besides the charters cited below, Clay records numerous documents dated between 1138 and [1178] in which he was named[1070].  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", for the souls of "Roberti de Stutevilla avi mei et Roberti patris mei et Erneburgæ matris meæ et Helewisæ uxoris meæ", with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1071].  A manuscript recording the foundation of Byland Abbey, Yorkshire records “dominus Robertus de Stutevilla et Willelmus frater eius” settling their dispute with Byland concerning land “in territorio de Cokewald” [Coxwold] donated by “dominus R. de Molbray[1072], dated to 1147 by Clay[1073].  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire, records that "Robertus…de Stutevylla, quondam dominus de Cotyngham" donated a mill "super ripam de Hullo, in territorio de Cotyngham" to the abbey[1074].  “...Roberto de Stutevilla, Rogero fratre suo...” witnessed the charter dated 1163 under which King Henry II granted freedoms to the weavers of York[1075].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Stoteville" held eight knights’ fees from "Rogeri de Munbray" in Yorkshire[1076].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Osmundus de Stuteville" held two parts of one knight’s fee from "Robertus de Stuteville" in Yorkshire[1077].  "Roberto de Stutevilla, Willelmo de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated 1168 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property "in manerio de Hinton" of "Roberto de Basoges" granted to him by "comes Conanus"[1078].  “Roberto de Stutevilla vicecomite et Nicholao et Eustachio filiis eius...” witnessed a charter dated to [1170/76] under which “Gaufridus de Laceles” confirmed a donation to Rievaulx[1079].  One manuscript of Benedict of Peterborough names “...Robertus de Stutevil et filii et fratres eius...” among those who supported King Henry II against his son Henry in 1173[1080].  The 1173/74 Pipe Roll records "Robert de Stutevill" in Yorkshire[1081].  A charter of King John dated 3 Feb 1200 confirmed donations to Keldholm Priory, Yorkshire, including those made by “Roberti de Stutevill, et concessione Willielmi de Stutevill hæredis sui[1082].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Stoteville cviii s iv d" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][1083].  "Roberto de Stutevilla, Willelmo de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated 1168 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property "in manerio de Hinton" of "Roberto de Basoges" granted to him by "comes Conanus"[1084].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Stoteville viii l, de novo ii s vi d" in Yorkshire in [1171/72][1085].  "…Roberto de Stut[evilla]…" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England granted concessions to the lepers at Mont-aux-Malades[1086].  A charter dated 1176 records “...Roberto de Stut’...Willelmo de Stut...at aliis baronibus domini regis...[1087].  King Henry II confirmed “manerium de Leestune...et Uptonam...et [revenue from] terra de Selfleta” to “Ranulfo de Glamvilla” by undated charter, witnessed by “Ricardo de Luci, Hugone de Cressi, Roberto de Stutevill, Rogero de Stutevill, Willielmo de Stutevill[1088].  Clay, noting the Rotuli Dominabus recording “filie Mathei de Neville...in custodia Hugonis de Creissi elapso i anno a Nativitate Domini [1184]” and “prius his viii annis...in custodia Roberti de Stuteville[1089], concludes that “the deduction can be made that Robert died in 1183[1090]

[m [firstly] ---.  The age difference between Robert [III]’s son William and his daughter Helwise suggests the possibility that he married twice.] 

m [secondly] HELWISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", for the souls of "Roberti de Stutevilla avi mei et Roberti patris mei et Erneburgæ matris meæ et Helewisæ uxoris meæ"[1091].  “Philip de Valognes...domina Helewis uxor Roberti de Stutevilla” with Osmund “filius eius” witnessed a charter of William de Vescy for the monks on Farne Island [dated by Clay to “not later than Mich 1183, when William de Vescy was dead”][1092].  If the suggestion of Robert’s two marriages is correct, her name suggests that Helwise was his second wife after whom his younger daughter Helwise was named. 

Robert [III] & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Stuteville ([1140/43?]-1202).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Willielmum, Nicholaum, Eustachium et Robertum" as the sons of "Robertus…de Stutevylla, quondam dominus de Cotyngham", adding that all except Nicholas died childless[1093].  Clay says that his birth date was “probably c. 1140[1094], although his first mention in 1168 suggests that he may have been born a little later.  "Roberto de Stutevilla, Willelmo de Stutevilla" subscribed the charter dated 1168 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property "in manerio de Hinton" of "Roberto de Basoges" granted to him by "comes Conanus"[1095].  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona", with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et aliorum filiorum meorum", by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1096].  A charter dated 1176 records “...Roberto de Stut’...Willelmo de Stut...at aliis baronibus domini regis...[1097].  Roger of Hoveden records in 1177 that King Henry II granted custody of “castellum de Rokesburc” to “Willelmo de Stutevile[1098].  “Willelmus de Stuttevilla” granted “Bluberhousem...” to “Roberto forestario” by charter dated to [1173/85], witnessed by “Roberto de Stuttevill...[1099].  The 1190/91 Pipe Roll records "William de Stuteville (Reginald de Basset for him) renders his account; in lands granted to the K. of Scotland 100s for half a year"[1100].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Stoteville" paying "iv l pro se, et c s pro militibus Nigelli de Munbray quos habet in custodia" in Yorkshire[1101].  The same source, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Estuteville" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire and in Yorkshire[1102].  A charter of King John dated 3 Feb 1200 confirmed donations to Keldholm Priory, Yorkshire, including those made by “Roberti de Stutevill, et concessione Willielmi de Stutevill hæredis sui[1103].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1202 of "vir nobilis Willelmus de Stutevilla"[1104].  "Nichol de Stutevill" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt Willi de Stutevill fratris sui…exceptis castello de Knareburg et Ponte Burgi q in manu dñi R" in Yorkshire, dated 5 Aug 1205[1105]m firstly ---.  This first marriage is suggested because William’s son was a minor when he died (when he was probably in his 60s).  m secondly ---.  No indication has been found of the name of William’s second wife.  William & his second wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Stuteville (-[9 Jul 1204/5 Aug 1205]).  King John confirmed "Rob de Stutevill filio et heredi Willi de Stutevill" in all assets held by "pater suus…die que obiit" by charter dated 9 Jul 1204[1106].  King John granted "custodia Rob filii et heredis Willi de Stutevill" to "H. Cant archiepiscopo" by charter dated 9 Jul 1204[1107], showing that Robert was still a minor when his father died.  Robert presumably died before 5 Aug 1205, when his paternal uncle Nicholas made a fine for the property of Robert’s father William (see above). 

2.         NICHOLAS [I] de Stuteville ([1142/45?]-1216).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Willielmum, Nicholaum, Eustachium et Robertum" as the sons of "Robertus…de Stutevylla, quondam dominus de Cotyngham", adding that all except Nicholas died childless[1108]

-        see below

Robert [III] & his [second] wife had [six] children: 

3.         BURGA de Stuteville (-after 1185, bur Alnwick Abbey).  A manuscript concerning the founders of Watton priory names “Burga sorore Willielmi de Stotevill” as wife of “Willielmum”, son of “Eustachius filius Johannis”, adding that her dowry was “villam de Langetone[1109].  The date of her marriage suggests that Burga would have been one of the older children of her father’s second wife (assuming that he married twice as suggested above).  “Burge uxor domini Willielmi de Vesci” donated property “ecclesiam de Langatune…de maritagio meo” to Malton priory, for the souls of “domini mei Willielmi de Vesci et Eustachii filii nostri”, by undated charter[1110].  A charter of King John dated 3 Feb 1200 confirmed donations to Keldholm Priory, Yorkshire, including those made by “Willielmi de Vesci, concessu Burgiæ uxoris suæ[1111]m (before [1169/71]) WILLIAM de Vescy, son of EUSTACE FitzJohn & his first wife Beatrice de Vescy (-before Nov 1183, bur Alnwick Abbey). 

4.         OSMUND de Stuteville (-Jaffa [1192]).  Domesday Descendants names Osmund as son of Robert [III] de Stuteville[1112].  His mother’s name is confirmed by the Vescy charter cited below.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Osmundus de Stuteville" held two parts of one knight’s fee from "Robertus de Stuteville" in Yorkshire[1113].  “Philip de Valognes...domina Helewis uxor Roberti de Stutevilla” with Osmund “filius eius” witnessed a charter of William de Vescy for the monks on Farne Island [dated by Clay to “not later than Mich 1183, when William de Vescy was dead”][1114].  “Osmundus de Stutevile…homines mei de honore de Gressinghale” confirmed donations to the church of “sanctæ Mariæ de Acra”, with the consent of “Ysabel uxoris meæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Rogero fratre dominæ…[1115].  The primary source which confirms his place and date of death has not been identified.  m as her second husband, ISABEL, widow of BERENGER de Creissi, daughter of ROGER FitzWilliam of Gressinghall, Norfolk & his wife Aline ---.  “Osmundus de Stutevile…homines mei de honore de Gressinghale” confirmed donations to the church of “sanctæ Mariæ de Acra”, with the consent of “Ysabel uxoris meæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Rogero fratre dominæ…[1116].  Domesday Descendants records her parentage and three marriages[1117].  She married secondly ([1192/94]) William FitzRoger of Huntingfield.  “Ysabella de Gressingehale” donated property to the church of “sanctæ Mariæ de Acra”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Hunteinfeld domini mei”, by undated charter[1118].  Osmund & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Stuteville .  Domesday Descendants records his parentage[1119].  "Willelmus de Estutevilla" donated "ecclesiam de Atuna in Clifland" to Whitby by undated charter, dated to [1180/96][1120]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          [WILLIAM de Stuteville of Gressenhall, Elsing, East Lexham, Weasenham and Cowesby, Norfolk (-before 20 May 1259).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, William was the same person as William who is shown above[1121], but the chronology seems too stretched for this to be correct.  "William de Stuteville" paid a fine to marry "Margaret who was the wife of Robert de Mortimer", dated to [Nov] 1219[1122].  Inquisitions dated 20 May 1259 record that "William de Scoteville" held the manors of Wychbold and Cotheridge in Worcestershire from "Margery his wife" and name "Sir Hugh de Mortuo Mari son of the said Margery" as her next heir and of full age[1123].]  m (Royal licence 23 Nov 1219) as her third husband, MARGERY de Say, widow firstly of HUGH de Ferrers of Lechlade and secondly of ROBERT de Mortimer, daughter of HUGH [II] de Say of Richard's Castle & his wife Mabel --- ([1190/96]-1230).  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166 (but added later), record that "Robertus de Mortuo mari" held 23 knights’ fees "in honore Castelli Ricardi" with "filia Hugonis de Say hærede Osberti filii Hugonis" in Herefordshire[1124].  Henry III King of England consented to the marriage of "Margaretam que fuit uxor Roberti de Mortuo Mari" and "Willelmus de Stutevill" dated 23 Nov 1219[1125].  "William de Stuteville" paid a fine to marry "Margaret who was the wife of Robert de Mortimer", dated to [Nov] 1219[1126].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1230 of “Margerie de Say[1127].  Inquisitions dated 20 May 1259 record that "William de Scoteville" held the manors of Wychbold and Cotheridge in Worcestershire from "Margery his wife" and name "Sir Hugh de Mortuo Mari son of the said Margery" as her next heir and of full age[1128].  William & his wife had two children: 

(a)       ROBERT de Stuteville (-before 1275).  “Robertus filius Willielmi de Stutevill, de Cressenhall” donated property to Wendling, for the souls of “meæ et Joannæ uxoris meæ, patris mei, matris meæ”, by charter dated “VI Id Jul” 1273[1129].  By writ of certiorari dated 20 Aug "3 Edw I", following the death of "Robert de Stutevill", "Jordan Folyot" complained that the escheator had ejected him from the lands of “the said Robert his uncle deceased whose heir he is[1130]m JOAN, daughter of ---.  “Robertus filius Willielmi de Stutevill, de Cressenhall” donated property to Wendling, for the souls of “meæ et Joannæ uxoris meæ, patris mei, matris meæ”, by charter dated “VI Id Jul” 1273[1131]

(b)       MARGERY de Stuteville .  Her parentage and marriage are shown in the Complete Peerage[1132]m RICHARD [V] Foliot of Norton, Fenton, Grimston and Wello, Nottinghamshire, son of JORDAN [III] Foliot & his wife --- (-Mar 1299). 

5.         EUSTACE de Stuteville (-after 1201, maybe after 1208, maybe after 1213).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Willielmum, Nicholaum, Eustachium et Robertum" as the sons of "Robertus…de Stutevylla, quondam dominus de Cotyngham", adding that all except Nicholas died childless[1133].  “Roberto de Stutevilla vicecomite et Nicholao et Eustachio filiis eius...” witnessed a charter dated to [1170/76] under which “Gaufridus de Laceles” confirmed a donation to Rievaulx[1134].  "Eustachio de Stuteville, Willelmo de Stuteville, Ansel de Stuteville…" subscribed the charter dated to [1177/89] under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Lillebonne to the abbey of Valmont, for the soul of "Roberti de Stuteville"[1135].  Clay says that this Eustace was “probably the Eustace who with Robert his brother witnessed a charter of William de Stuteville to Keldholme priory, 1190-1201[1136].  Clay indicates that Eustace “held the manor of Brinklow, co. Warwick [after 1201]” and that “it is likely that he was the Eustace against whom Thurstan de Montfort brought a claim in 1208 (see Appendix A), and who is mentioned in a record of 1213 relating to his tenure among other knights holding of the honour of Leicester in Warwickshire[1137]m ---.  The name of Eustace’s wife is not known.  Eustace & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [ROBERT de Stuteville (-after 1233).  Clay names Eustace’s son “Robert, born and brought up overseas, to whom Nicholas de Stuteville II was ordered to restore land, apparently in Yorkshire, in 1233[1138].] 

6.         [ANSELM de Stuteville (-after 1177).  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Roberti de Stuteville…Leonie uxoris predicti Roberti…Willelmi de Stuteville…Nicolai de Stuteville…Ricardi de Stuteville", by charter dated to [1177/89], signed by "…Willelmo de Stutevilla…Anselmo de Stutevilla"[1139].  "Eustachio de Stuteville, Willelmo de Stuteville, Ansel de Stuteville…" subscribed the charter dated to [1177/89] under which Henry II King of England donated the forest of Lillebonne to the abbey of Valmont, for the soul of "Roberti de Stuteville"[1140].  Neither document specifies Anselm’s parentage, although his name is linked in both subscription lists to sons of Robert [III] who could therefore also have been his father.] 

7.         ROBERT [IV] de Stuteville .  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Willielmum, Nicholaum, Eustachium et Robertum" as the sons of "Robertus…de Stutevylla, quondam dominus de Cotyngham", adding that all except Nicholas died childless[1141].  Clay links Robert to “the Stutevilles of Great Ayton and Hemlington[1142]

8.         HELWISE de Stuteville ([after 1170?]-after [1226/28]).  Domesday Descendants names Helwise as the younger daughter of Robert [III] de Stuteville[1143].  Her birth date is estimated from her having had children by all three husbands, bearing in mind her third marriage after 1201.  If the estimate is correct, Helwise was presumably born from her father’s supposed second marriage.  The primary source which confirms her parentage precisely has not yet been identified.  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” married ”Helewisiam[1144].  A charter of King Henry II records that “Willielmum secundum” married “Helewisam de Stuteville” by whom he was father of “Helewisam” who married “Gilberto filio Rogeri filii Reynfredi[1145].  "Hug de Morevill et Helew uxor eius" paid a fine relating to "dote ipsi Helewis" in Westmoreland, dated 1200[1146].  The co-identity of the widow of William [II] de Lancaster with the wife of Hugh de Morville is confirmed by the following charter: Hugo de Morwile”, with the consent of “sponsæ meæ Helewisæ”, confirmed “totam Fortonam” [referring to the same land granted by the first charter], to [his son] “Henrico de Lancastre” which “pater eius Warinus” had received from “Willelmi de Lancastre awnculi sui”, by undated charter[1147]"William Briewere and Helewisa de Stuteville, defendant" reached agreement "regarding the admeasurements of her dower from Hugh de Moreville her late husband" relating to “the manor of Chircoswarde and the manor of Lesingebi...the manor of Hisale”, dated to [1204][1148].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Helewisa de Stutevill" holding land[1149].  Her third marriage is confirmed by Robert de Vipont paying a fine in 1209 for the custody of the land and heirs of “William son of Ranulf” and for the marriage of Helwise de Stuteville his widow[1150].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Helewisa de Stutevill" holding land[1151].  “Elewysa de Estuteuilla” set the boundaries of her land “in Herletona” [Ellerton, south of the Cottingwiths[1152]] with York St Mary, with the consent of “Thome filii Willelmi”, undated[1153].  Clay records documents dated 1219 and [1226/28] in which she was named[1154]m firstly WILLIAM [II] de Lancaster, son of WILLIAM [I] de Lancaster & his [second] wife Gundred de Warenne ([1154/56]-1184, bur Furness Abbey).  m secondly (after 1184) HUGH de Morville, son of SIMON de Morville & his wife Ada Engaine (-1201).  m thirdly (after 1201) WILLIAM FitzRalph, son of RALPH FitzWalter & his wife Amabel ---  (-[1207/09]). 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the relationships between the following persons and the main Stuteville family have not been identified.    

 

1.         BARTHOLOMEW de Stuteville (-after 1200).  "Robertus de Stutevilla" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of "terram de Houetona" by undated charter witnessed by "…Johanne de Stutevilla, Nicholao de Stutevilla, Rogero de Stutevilla, Bartholomæo de Stutevilla…"[1155]"Nicholaus de Stutevilla" donated land "in Dregg" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Bartholomeo de Stutevilla…"[1156]"Barth de Stutevill" paid a fine to summon "Amabl fil Willi Medici" for land "in Creshopp" in Cumberland, dated 1200[1157]

 

2.         GEOFFREY de Stuteville .  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land in “insulam de Wreth” by “Gosfridus de Stutavilla[1158]

 

3.         RALPH de Stuteville (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus de Stutaville" held half of one knight’s fee from "Willelmi de Traci" in Devon[1159]

 

 

NICHOLAS [I] de Stuteville, son of ROBERT [III] de Stuteville & his [first/second] wife [---/Helwise ---] ([1142/45?]-1216).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Willielmum, Nicholaum, Eustachium et Robertum" as the sons of "Robertus…de Stutevylla, quondam dominus de Cotyngham", adding that all except Nicholas died childless[1160].  [The chronology suggests that the last-named witness in the following document was not Nicholas [I]: "Gaufridus Ridel" confirmed a grant of property to "Johanni de Stutuilla" in his fee by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "…R. filius Nicolai de Stutavilla, Thomas frater suus…R. de Stutuilla, Nicolaus de Stutuilla"[1161].]  “Roberto de Stutevilla vicecomite et Nicholao et Eustachio filiis eius...” witnessed a charter dated to [1170/76] under which “Gaufridus de Laceles” confirmed a donation to Rievaulx[1162].  Benedict of Peterborough records “castellum de Lidel quod fuit Nicolai de Stuteville” among the castles captured by William “the Lion” King of Scotland in 1176[1163].  [The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Nicholao de Stutevill…in hundredo de Norton" in Dorset and Somerset[1164].  It is not known whether this was a different Nicholas.]  “Nicholaus de Stutevilla” donated property to Keldholm priory, Yorkshire by undated charter[1165].  "Nichol de Stutevill" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt Willi de Stutevill fratris sui…exceptis castello de Knareburg et Ponte Burgi q in manu dñi R" in Yorkshire, dated 1205[1166].  In an assize of mort d’ancestor dated 1 Dec 1208, “William son of Lambert recognised that 2 carucates in Arthuret were the right of Nicholas de Stuteville, on whose behalf Robert de Stuteville [Clay says “his son”, see below] acted” and on the same day Nicholas de Stuteville received “a quitclaim of half a carucate in Fademor [=Fademoor in Kirkby Moorside], which he then gave to Nicholas his son[1167].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Nicholaus de Stuteville" holding six knights’ fees "de Cotingham" in Yorkshire, and property in Cumberland, in [1210/12][1168].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Nicholaus de Stutevill" held land in Cumberland which "comes Ranulfus Cestrie" had granted to "Turgisio Brundos, antecessori predicti Nicholai"[1169].  "Sibilla de Valoinn" claimed from “Nicolas de Stuteville” her “terce of the honour of Lidel in Cumberland and of the whole honour of Russedale [and other named properties]...as the dower wherein her late husband Robert endowed her by grant and will of the said Nicholas his father”, dated 22 Jun 1213[1170].  In addition to the above, Clay cites documents dated 1200, 1201, 1205, 1206, and 25 Mar 1216 which name “Nicholas de Stuteville” whom he identifies as Nicholas [I][1171].  Roger of Wendover records “...Nicolaus de Stutevilla...” among the barons who rebelled against King John in 1215 and “...Nicolaum de Stutevilla” among those excommunicated in 1216[1172].  An order dated 25 May 1224 records that “Nichs de Stuteville captus apud Lincoln a Com W. Marescallo qui mortuus est in guerra mota inter dnm J. Rege patrem nostrum et Barones...[1173]: Nicholas [II] therefore presumably died in 1216, between the date of his excommunication and the death of King John.  His death is confirmed by King Henry III granting “totam terram que fuit Nichol de Stutevill et Galf de Say” to “Philipp de Alban”, dated 29 Jun 1217[1174].  His capture is confirmed by an order dated to [121718] confirming that "Nicholas de Stuteville" made a fine for his ransom, while "Robert de Stuteville and Walter of Sowerby have mainpermed for this fine"[1175].  An undated charter of King Henry III confirmed donations to Rosedale Nunnery, Yorkshire made by “Nicholaus de Stutevill…Roberti de Stutevill filii ipsius Nicholai[1176]

m [firstly] IDA, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by a claim dated 1219, recorded by Bracton, made by "Nicholaus de Stuteuilla" [Nicholas [II], see below] against "abbatem de Walemund" concerning "ecclesiam de Kyneburle" donated by "Nicholai de Stiteuilla patris ipsius Nicholai et Eidm uxoris eius"[1177].  No other mention has been found of Ida.  An indication of her possible family connection is suggested by the Close Rolls dated [1209] which name [her son] "Nicholao de Stuteville" as "nepoti Hug de Gurnai" [presumably Hugues [V] de Gournay, see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY-ARQUES, AUMÂLE, CAUX, ROUEN, EU] and name "Nicholaus pater eius"[1178]

[m secondly (after [1191/92]) as her second husband, GUNNORA de Albini Brito, widow of ROBERT de Gand, daughter of RALPH de Albini Brito & his wife Sibylla de Valoignes ([1177?]-).  Domesday Descendants names Gunnora, wife firstly of Robert de Gand and secondly of Nicholas de Stuteville, as the youngest of the three daughters of Ralph de Albini Brito and his wife[1179].  From a chronological point of view, this appears tight, but is consistent with other information concerning the Albini Brito family.  The Gand/Stuteville connection is confirmed by the following document: "Gillebertus de Gant" [Gunnora’s son by her first marriage] confirmed the donation of land at Barton on Humber to Rufford monastery, Nottinghamshire, for the souls of "patris mei Roberti de Gant et matris mee Gunwar de Gant", by charter dated to the late 12th century [early 13th?], witnessed by "Nicolao de Stuteville…"[1180], the witness presumably being Gunnora’s second husband.  Clay identifies Gunnora’s second husband as Nicholas [I], naming her “Gunnora sister [incorrect, should be daughter] and co-heir of Ralph d’Aubigny, and widow of Robert de Gant[1181].  Another possibility is that her husband was Nicholas [II] (as his first wife).  No source has been found which indicates when Gunnora died, which could help identify her husband conclusively.] 

Nicholas [I] & his [first] wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT de Stuteville ([1168/72?]-[1212/22 Jun 1213], bur Meaux).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Robertum…et Nicholaum" as the two sons of "Nicholaus", adding that Robert was buried "apud nos"[1182].  In an assize of mort d’ancestor dated 1 Dec 1208, “William son of Lambert recognised that 2 carucates in Arthuret were the right of Nicholas de Stuteville, on whose behalf Robert de Stuteville [Clay says “his son”] acted” and on the same day Nicholas de Stuteville received “a quitclaim of half a carucate in Fademor [=Fademoor in Kirkby Moorside], which he then gave to Nicholas his son[1183].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus filius Nicholai de Suteville" holding one knight’s fee "de Mideltone" in Yorkshire, and "Robertus de Stuteville" holding property in Cumberland, in [1210/12][1184].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Stutevill" held "villam de Thorpennoi de domino rege" in Cumberland which was "de baronia Alicie de Rumill" and that "Reginaldus de Lucy" had held the land "cum sorore predicte Alicie" and refused homage to "Philippi de Valoines, antecessoris predicti Roberti et uxoris sue"[1185].  A charter of King Henry III confirmed donations to Rosedale Nunnery, Yorkshire by “Nicholaus de Stutevill…Roberti de Stutevill filii ipsius Nicholai[1186].  He is named deceased in the 22 Jun 1213 document cited under his wife.  m SIBYLLA de Valoignes, daughter of PHILIP de Valoignes & his [second wife ---] (-[22 Jun 1213/2 Feb 1223]).  “Philippus de Valoniis” granted “villam de Torpenhon in maritagium” to “Roberto de Stutevill et Sibille filie mee” by undated charter[1187].  "Sibilla de Valoinn" claimed from “Nicolas de Stuteville” her “terce of the honour of Lidel in Cumberland and of the whole honour of Russedale [and other named properties]...as the dower wherein her late husband Robert endowed her by grant and will of the said Nicholas his father”, dated 22 Jun 1213[1188].  Her date of death is indicated by an order dated 3 Feb 1223 under which King Henry III delivered "to Roger de Quency...the ward of the land of Sibilla de Valeines in Torpenno...the custody of which pertains to Roger by reason of Eustace de Stuteville, son and heir of said Sibilla, being in ward of Roger[1189].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         EUSTACE de Stuteville (-1241).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Eustachius" as the son of "Robertus", adding that he donated "unum clausum apud Hilbank" and died childless[1190].  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to property of "S. comitem Wintonie…Rogerum de Quenci filium et heredem ipsius comitis" at "Lidel", which "Nicholaus de Stutevill" had assigned to "Eustachio filio Roberti de Stutevill fratris sui" and which after his death would be given to "predicto S. comiti Wintonie", dated [Jul] 1220[1191].  A charter of King Henry III confirmed donations to Rosedale Nunnery, Yorkshire by “Eustachius de Stutevilla filius Roberti de Stutavilla[1192].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, by "Eustachius de Estutevilla", claiming that "Nicholaus de Estutevilla avunculus suus" relinquished "manerio de Cotingeham", while "Hugo Wack et Willelmus de Mastak" claimed seisin of the manor through "uxorum suarum filiarum heredum predicti Nicholai"[1193].  Matthew Paris names "…Eustachius de Stutewilla, cui successit in hæreditatem uxor Hugonis Wac…" among those who died in 1241[1194]

2.         NICHOLAS [II] de Stuteville ([1170/75?]-Priory of St Andrew [8 Sep/18 Oct] 1233).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire names "Robertum…et Nicholaum" as the two sons of "Nicholaus"[1195].  In an assize of mort d’ancestor dated 1 Dec 1208, “William son of Lambert recognised that 2 carucates in Arthuret were the right of Nicholas de Stuteville, on whose behalf Robert de Stuteville acted” and on the same day Nicholas de Stuteville received “a quitclaim of half a carucate in Fademor [=Fademoor in Kirkby Moorside], which he then gave to Nicholas his son[1196].  The Close Rolls dated [1209] name "Nicholao de Stuteville" as "nepoti Hug de Gurnai" and name "Nicholaus pater eius"[1197].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1219, by "Nicholaus de Stuteuilla" against "abbatem de Walemund" concerning "ecclesiam de Kyneburle" donated by "Nicholai de Stiteuilla patris ipsius Nicholai et Eidm uxoris eius"[1198].  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to property of "S. comitem Wintonie…Rogerum de Quenci filium et heredem ipsius comitis" at "Lidel", which "Nicholaus de Stutevill" had assigned to "Eustachio filio Roberti de Stutevill fratris sui" and which after his death would be given to "predicto S. comiti Wintonie", dated [Jul] 1220[1199].  Clay cites a document dated 8 Sep 1233 in which Nicholas was named and says that “his date of death was apparently before 19 Oct[1200].  He was named as deceased in the 20 Nov 1233 document cited below under his wife.  m DEVORGUILLA of Galloway, daughter of ROLAND Lord of Galloway & his wife Helen de Morville (-after 1241).  King Henry III commanded "B. de Insula...to receive from Devorguil widow of Nicholas de Stuteville, Margaret his younger daughter, and deliver her to William de Mastac to whom the K. has given her marriage”, dated 20 Nov 1233[1201].  Nicholas [IV] & his wife had two children: 

a)         JOAN de Stuteville (-before 6 Apr 1276).  King Henry III pardoned "Hugoni Wac" for marrying "filiam Nicholai de Stutevill" without royal licence, dated 1229[1202].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, by "Eustachius de Estutevilla", claiming that "Nicholaus de Estutevilla avunculus suus" relinquished "manerio de Cotingeham", while "Hugo Wack et Willelmus de Mastak" claimed seisin of the manor through "uxorum suarum filiarum heredum predicti Nicholai"[1203].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Leicester, dated 1247, which include "De terris Normannorum, dicunt quod Hugo le Bigod tenet Wyrithele nomine Johanne uxoris sue que fuit uxor Hugonis Wake..."[1204].  The Chronicle of Lanercost records in 1255 a dispute involving "Hugonem de Bigod, fratrem Rogeri comitis Marescalli, pro uxore sua filia et herede dominorum  de Stuteville"[1205].  In an assize of darrein presentment to Arthuret church brought by “Joan de Stuteville” against Jeburgh abbey in 1266, it was stated that “Robert her ancestor [antecessor?] presented Robert his clerk in king John’s time, who was duly instituted and died last as rector”, that “from Robert the right of presentation came to Eustace his son and heir” who “died without an heir of his body [when] it reverted to Nicholas brother of Robert as his uncle and heir” and that “it [then] passed from Nicholas to Joan the claimant, as his daughter and heir[1206].  A writ dated 6 Apr "4 Edw I", after the death of "Joan de Stutevill" names "Sir Baldwin de Wake her son is her next heir and of full age", and also refers to events "after the death of Hugh le Bigot sometime her husband"[1207]m firstly (before 29 May 1229) HUGH Wake, son of BALDWIN Wake & his wife Isabel Briwere (-on crusade before 18 Dec 1241).  m secondly HUGH Bigod Chief Justiciar of England, son of HUGH Bigod Earl of Norfolk & his wife Matilda Marshal of Pembroke (-before 7 May 1266). 

b)         MARGARET de Stuteville (-before 13 Nov 1235).  King Henry III commanded "B. de Insula...to receive from Devorguil widow of Nicholas de Stuteville, Margaret his younger daughter, and deliver her to William de Mastac to whom the K. has given her marriage”, dated 20 Nov 1233[1208].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, by "Eustachius de Estutevilla", claiming that "Nicholaus de Estutevilla avunculus suus" relinquished "manerio de Cotingeham", while "Hugo Wack et Willelmus de Mastak" claimed seisin of the manor through "uxorum suarum filiarum heredum predicti Nicholai"[1209]m WILLIAM de Mastac, son of ---. 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the relationships between the following persons and the main Stuteville family have not been identified. 

 

1.         ALICE (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Alicia de Stuteville" holding land in Northumberland[1210].  

 

2.         ROBERT de Stuteville (-after [1217/18]).  "Nicholas de Stuteville" paid a fine for his ransom, "Robert de Stuteville and Walter of Sowerby have mainpermed for this fine", dated to [1217/18][1211]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Stuteville (-1245).  Matthew of Paris names "Willelmi de Stuteville, Nicholai de Stuteville, Eustachii de Stuteville" among those who died in 1245[1212]

 

4.         NICHOLAS de Stuteville (-1245).  Matthew of Paris names "Willelmi de Stuteville, Nicholai de Stuteville, Eustachii de Stuteville" among those who died in 1245[1213]

 

5.         EUSTACE de Stuteville (-1245).  Matthew of Paris names "Willelmi de Stuteville, Nicholai de Stuteville, Eustachii de Stuteville" among those who died in 1245[1214]

 

 

 



[1] Loyd (1951), p. 76. 

[2] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, pp. 427-8. 

[3] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 428. 

[4] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, p. 220. 

[5] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, pp. 427-8. 

[6] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 431. 

[7] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 432. 

[8] Domesday Translation, Shropshire, III, pp. 703-5. 

[9] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 433. 

[10] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[11] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 433. 

[12] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[13] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XIII, p. 221. 

[14] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 429. 

[15] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[16] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XIII, p. 221. 

[17] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[18] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XIII, p. 221. 

[19] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[20] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XIII, p. 221. 

[21] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Bedfordshire, p. 104. 

[22] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 161. 

[23] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 163, quoting Haughmond Chartulary, Tit. Cutteston juxta Hales. 

[24] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[25] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XIII, p. 221. 

[26] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 434. 

[27] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XIII, p. 221. 

[28] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 429. 

[29] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XVI, p. 431. 

[30] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 161. 

[31] Eyton ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Series II, no. IV, p. 204. 

[32] Dugdale Monasticon V, Combermere Abbey, Cheshire, III, p. 324. 

[33] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 163, quoting Haughmond Chartulary, Tit. Cutteston juxta Hales. 

[34] Pipe Roll 22 Hen II (1175/76), p. 112. 

[35] Erdeswick, p. 493 footnote b. 

[36] Eyton (1858), Vol. VI, p. 364, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 297. 

[37] Owen & Blakeway (1825) Vol. II, p. 418. 

[38] Eyton ‘The Staffordshire Chartulary` (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIX, p. 270. 

[39] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, pp. 164-6. 

[40] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 18, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 291. 

[41] Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin, p. 362. 

[42] Eyton (1858), Vol. VI, p. 364, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 297. 

[43] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 18, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 291. 

[44] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 18, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 291. 

[45] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 5 John, p. 35. 

[46] Owen & Blakeway (1825), Vol. II, p. 418. 

[47] Owen & Blakeway (1825), Vol. II, p. 418. 

[48] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 540, p. 309. 

[49] Chester St. Werburgh, Part II, 528, p. 302. 

[50] Dugdale Monasticon V, Combermere Abbey, Cheshire, III, p. 324. 

[51] Erdeswick, p. 493 footnote b. 

[52] Erdeswick, p. 493 footnote b. 

[53] Domesday Descendants, p. 1059. 

[54] Dugdale Monasticon V, Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, II, p. 662. 

[55] Domesday Descendants, p. 1059. 

[56] Erdeswick, p. 493 footnote b. 

[57] Domesday Descendants, p. 1059. 

[58] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire, III, p. 222. 

[59] Round (1899) 597, p. 209. 

[60] Domesday Descendants, p. 1059. 

[61] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. IX, The Stuteville Fee, pp. 5, and charter no. 17. 

[62] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire, III, p. 222. 

[63] Round (1899) 597, p. 209. 

[64] Round (1899) 597, p. 209. 

[65] Domesday Descendants, p. 482, citing Curia Regis Rolls, Vol. II, p. 347. 

[66] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 15 John, p. 500. 

[67] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Langley Nunnery, Leicestershire, IV, p. 222. 

[68] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 15 John, p. 511. 

[69] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1580, p. 458. 

[70] CP XI 296 footnote b. 

[71] Round (1899) 597, p. 209. 

[72] Round (1899) 597, p. 209. 

[73] Round (1899) 597, p. 209. 

[74] Ellis ‘Landholders of Gloucestershire’ (1879-80), Vol. IV, p. 148. 

[75] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[76] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, I, p. 259. 

[77] Ellis ‘Landholders of Gloucestershire’, p. 150. 

[78] Domesday Descendants, p. 1057. 

[79] Neustria Pia, p. 821. 

[80] CP IV 317, table "The Heirs of Richard fitz Baldwin". 

[81] Neustria Pia, p. 821. 

[82] Red Book of the Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 627. 

[83] CP IV 317, table "The Heirs of Richard fitz Baldwin". 

[84] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. cxxi. 

[85] CP IV 317, table "The Heirs of Richard fitz Baldwin". 

[86] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 491 and 517. 

[87] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. cxxi. 

[88] Neustria Pia, p. 821. 

[89] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCII, p. 204. 

[90] Neustria Pia, p. 821. 

[91] Neustria Pia, p. 821. 

[92] Ellis ‘Landholders of Gloucestershire’, p. 150. 

[93] Domesday Descendants, p. 1055. 

[94] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Staffordshire, p. 73. 

[95] Ellis ‘Landholders of Gloucestershire’, p. 148. 

[96] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[97] Domesday Translation, Somerset, XXVII, p. 267, Yorkshire, XVII, pp. 840-1. 

[98] CP VIII 284. 

[99] CP X 319. 

[100] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[101] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1913), Vol. I, 477, p. 115. 

[102] CP VIII 284, footnote d. 

[103] CP VIII 284, footnote d. 

[104] CP VIII 284, footnote d. 

[105] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, Northumberland, p. 29. 

[106] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Drax Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 195. 

[107] Actes Henri II, Tome I, III, p. 7. 

[108] Domesday Descendants, p. 674. 

[109] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.   

[110] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1864, p. 473. 

[111] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433. 

[112] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.   

[113] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. III,  1864, p. 473. 

[114] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1214, p. 488. 

[115] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. III,  1768, p. 391. 

[116] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Drax Priory, Yorkshire, V, p. 196. 

[117] Dugdale Monasticon V, Vaudey Abbey, Lincolnshire III, p. 490.   

[118] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, Northumberland, p. 29. 

[119] CP VIII 284. 

[120] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 119, p. 44. 

[121] Domesday Descendants, pp. 985 and 1057. 

[122] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 119, p. 44. 

[123] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 97, p. 86. 

[124] CP VIII 284. 

[125] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. II, 1018, p. 341. 

[126] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. II, 1019, p. 342. 

[127] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. II, 1022, p. 344. 

[128] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 29. 

[129] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 53. 

[130] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 77. 

[131] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 87. 

[132] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 97, p. 86. 

[133] Domesday Descendants, p. 1058. 

[134] Domesday Descendants, p. 1058. 

[135] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/9, 2 Hen III, 72, translation available at Henry III Fine Rolls Project

[136] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 248. 

[137] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 249. 

[138] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 97, p. 86. 

[139] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 248. 

[140] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 247. 

[141] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 247. 

[142] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Yorkshire, p. 150. 

[143] Ellis ‘Landholders of Gloucestershire’, p. 150. 

[144] Domesday Descendants, p. 1055. 

[145] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Staffordshire, p. 73. 

[146] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, II, p. 203. 

[147] Domesday Descendants, p. 1055, citing Sanders, I. J. (1960) English Baronies: A Study of their Origins and Descent 1086-1327 (Oxford), p. 113 (not yet consulted). 

[148] Ellis ‘Landholders of Gloucestershire’, p. 150. 

[149] Grazebrook ‘The Barons of Dudley` (1888), p. 8. 

[150] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 26, p. 43. 

[151] Actes Henri II, Tome I, III, p. 7. 

[152] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, II, p. 203. 

[153] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dudley Priory, II, p. 83. 

[154] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 269. 

[155] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42. 

[156] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 639. 

[157] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, II, p. 203. 

[158] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 71. 

[159] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, IV, p. 204. 

[160] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 84 and 90. 

[161] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1153, p. 274. 

[162] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, II, p. 203. 

[163] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dudley Priory, II, p. 83. 

[164] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, IV, p. 204. 

[165] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dudley Priory, II, p. 83. 

[166] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, IV, p. 204. 

[167] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, VI, p. 204. 

[168] Berkeleys Lives, Vol. I, p. 46. 

[169] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, V, p. 204. 

[170] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608, P.R.O. Assize Roll 1174. 

[171] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Gysburn Priory, Yorkshire, IV, Nomina Antecessorum de Carleton de Familia de Brus, p. 268. 

[172] Dugdale Monasticon III, Middlesburgh Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 632.   

[173] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Gysburn Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 267. 

[174] Pipe Roll 2 Hen II (1155), "Everwichscira", p. 27. 

[175] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. II, 673, p. 30. 

[176] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. IV (1837), Ex Calendario…Prioratui de Gisburna, p. 262. 

[177] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[178] Domesday Descendants, p. 1058. 

[179] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 4. 

[180] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[181] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, IV, p. 204. 

[182] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 4. 

[183] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 17. 

[184] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[185] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, IV, p. 204. 

[186] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[187] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[188] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, VII, p. 204. 

[189] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 796, p. 611. 

[190] Inquisitions post mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 139, p. 33. 

[191] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/27, 12 Hen III, 92. 

[192] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 24. 

[193] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 36. 

[194] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 401. 

[195] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 139, p. 33. 

[196] CP V 442 footnote c. 

[197] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 17. 

[198] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 17. 

[199] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 24. 

[200] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 36. 

[201] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 139, p. 33. 

[202] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[203] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[204] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, III, p. 204. 

[205] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCLVII, p. 408. 

[206] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCLVII, p. 408. 

[207] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotulus V, Norffolk, p. 26, Verumdictum de Clavering, p. 41, and Rotulus X, Cantebrigesire, Alid Hundredum, p. 46. 

[208] Bridlington Priory, p. 12. 

[209] Bridlington Priory, p. 25. 

[210] Bridlington Priory, p. 12. 

[211] Bridlington Priory, p. 213. 

[212] Bridlington Priory, p. 12. 

[213] Bridlington Priory, p. 213. 

[214] Bridlington Priory, p. 25. 

[215] Bridlington Priory, p. 25. 

[216] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Ellesham Priory, Lincolnshire, II, p. 559. 

[217] Giraldi Cambrensis Opera, Vol. VII, Appendix B, Lincoln Cathedral Obituary, p. 162. 

[218] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 84. 

[219] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 580. 

[220] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 580. 

[221] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 118. 

[222] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 57. 

[223] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 118. 

[224] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 57. 

[225] Fine Rolls, 9 Hen III, p. 129. 

[226] Domesday Translation, Oxfordshire, XXXI, p. 436, Essex, XXXIIII, pp. 1023-7. 

[227] Dugdale Monasticon III, Hatfield Peverell Priory, p. 294.   

[228] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 104. 

[229] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, IV, p. 184. 

[230] Domesday Translation, Buckinghamshire, XVI, p. 407, Northamptonshire, XXX, pp. 610-2, Derbyshire, VII, pp. 749-50, Nottinghamshire, IX, pp. 770-73. 

[231] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[232] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, Lincoln Cathedral, IV, p. 1271.   

[233] Cluny, Tome V, 3813, p. 162. 

[234] Dugdale Monasticon V, Pontefract Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 120. 

[235] CP I Appendix I, p. 761 footnote c, quoting Cartulary of the Priory of St James at Northampton, Cotton MSS, Tiber. E f. 1 v. 

[236] Cluny Tome V, 3813, p. 162. 

[237] Colchester St John, Vol. I, p. 142. 

[238] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, p. 12. 

[239] CP I Appendix I, p. 761 footnote c, quoting Cartulary of the Priory of St James at Northampton, Cotton MSS, Tiber. E f. 1 v. 

[240] Loders (Dorset), V, p. 18. 

[241] CP I Appendix I, p. 768, quoting Cartulary of Montebourg

[242] Round (1899) 878, p. 314. 

[243] CP I Appendix I, p. 761 footnote c, quoting Cartulary of the Priory of St James at Northampton, Cotton MSS, Tiber. E f. 1 v. 

[244] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Northamptonshire, p. 86. 

[245] Cluny, Tome V, 3813, p. 162. 

[246] Colchester St John, Vol. I, p. 142. 

[247] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, pp. 7-9. 

[248] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. V, Lenton Priory, III, p. 113. 

[249] Ex Radulfi de Diceto imaginibus historiarum, RHGF XIII, p. 185. 

[250] Pipe Roll, 3 Hen II (1156), Nottinghamshire, p. 91, and 4 Hen II (1157), Nottinghamshire, p. 153. 

[251] CP I Appendix I, p. 765. 

[252] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. V, Lenton Priory, III, p. 113. 

[253] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Derley Priory, Derbyshire, XIX, p. 361. 

[254] CP I Appendix I, p. 762. 

[255] Domesday Descendants, p. 603. 

[256] Domesday Descendants, p. 603. 

[257] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. I, 195, p. 28. 

[258] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. V, Lenton Priory, III, p. 113. 

[259] CP I Appendix I, p. 767, quoting MSS of the Earl of Essex, Hist. MSS Comm., Varous collections, vol. VII, p. 310. 

[260] CP I Appendix I, p. 765, quoting Duchy of Lancaster, Royal Charters, no. 49. 

[261] Cluny, Tome V, 3813, p. 162. 

[262] Dugdale Monasticon II, Bath Cathedral, IX, p. 266.   

[263] Bridlington Priory, p. 365. 

[264] Bridlington Priory, p. 365. 

[265] Bridlington Priory, p. 365. 

[266] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, LXXXIX, p. 331. 

[267] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CCV, p. 360. 

[268] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Staffordshire, p. 76. 

[269] Dugdale Monasticon III, Shrewsbury Abbey, XIII, p. 522. 

[270] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 353, quoting Wombridge Chartulary, Tit. Wellinton, no.V. 

[271] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, VIII, p. 601. 

[272] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 104. 

[273] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 353, quoting Wombridge Chartulary, Tit. Wellinton, no.V. 

[274] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 107, footnote 8 continued from p. 106. 

[275] Eyton (1858), Vol. VII, p. 363. 

[276] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, VIII, p. 601.  

[277] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 8, p. 41. 

[278] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, I, Historia Fundationis et Fundatorum eiusdem Cœnobii, p. 86. 

[279] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CCV, p. 360. 

[280] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 20, p. 47. 

[281] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, VIII, p. 601.  

[282] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 21, p. 47. 

[283] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, VIII, p. 601. 

[284] Dugdale Monasticon III, Shrewsbury Abbey, XIII, p. 522. 

[285] Bath St Peter, 43, p. 46. 

[286] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, LXXXIX, p. 331. 

[287] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 65, quoting "original deed, late in possession of Mr. George Morris of Shrewsbury". 

[288] Gesta Stephani Regis, II, p. 111. 

[289] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, p. 86. 

[290] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 21, p. 47. 

[291] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 65, quoting "original deed, late in possession of Mr. George Morris of Shrewsbury". 

[292] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, p. 86. 

[293] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[294] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 65, quoting "original deed, late in possession of Mr. George Morris of Shrewsbury". 

[295] Saint-Bertin (Grand Cartulaire), Tome I, 215, p. 95. 

[296] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 5, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 30. 

[297] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[298] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[299] Red Book of the Exchequer, p. 367, cited in CP X 332, footnote e. 

[300] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 72, quoting Newport Evidences

[301] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[302] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[303] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[304] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 48. 

[305] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 65, quoting "original deed, late in possession of Mr. George Morris of Shrewsbury". 

[306] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 75, quoting "the late Mr. George Morris’s deeds". 

[307] Dugdale Monasticon II, Thorney Monastery, Cambridgeshire, VIII, p. 601.  

[308] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 35, quoting Chartæ Antiquæ, p. 36, and p. 36 discussing Thurstan’s Engain descendants. 

[309] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CCV, p. 360. 

[310] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Huntingdonshire, p. 49. 

[311] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 68. 

[312] Dugdale Monasticon III, Shrewsbury Abbey, XII, p. 522. 

[313] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, LXXXIX, p. 331. 

[314] Pipe Roll 2 Hen II (1155), Lincolnshire, pp. 45-6. 

[315] Nichols, J. (1804) The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester (London), Vol. III, Part II, Garendon Chartulary, p. 806. 

[316] Nichols (1804), Vol. III, Part II, Garendon Chartulary, p. 806. 

[317] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 206. 

[318] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[319] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 23. 

[320] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 203. 

[321] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 72. 

[322] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 59. 

[323] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 76. 

[324] Rotuli de Liberate, 3 John, p. 30. 

[325] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1013, p. 53. 

[326] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1419. 

[327] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1013, p. 53. 

[328] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1419. 

[329] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 539. 

[330] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 546. 

[331] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 261. 

[332] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1013, p. 53. 

[333] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/25, 11 Hen III, 380. 

[334] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 51, p. 38. 

[335] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1419. 

[336] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 51, p. 38. 

[337] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CCCXIV, p. 387. 

[338] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Plympton Priory, Devonshire, III, p. 53. 

[339] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Plympton Priory, Devonshire, III, p. 53. 

[340] Domesday Descendants, p. 925. 

[341] Somerset Record Society (1894) Two Cartularies of the Augustinian Priory of Bruton and the Cluniac Priory of Montacute in the county of Somerset (London) ("Montacute"), 144, p. 173. 

[342] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 50. 

[343] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 133. 

[344] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 22. 

[345] Montacute, 144, p. 173. 

[346] Rotuli de Liberate, 4 John, p. 38. 

[347] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 54. 

[348] Montacute, 144, p. 173. 

[349] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 155. 

[350] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/29, 14 Hen III, 258. 

[351] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 170. 

[352] Montacute, 145, p. 173. 

[353] Montacute, 145, p. 173. 

[354] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 88. 

[355] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 133. 

[356] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 25. 

[357] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 133. 

[358] Rotulus Cancellarii, 3 John, p. 25. 

[359] RHGF, Tome XXIII, Scripta de Feodis ad Regem Spectantibus, Appendix I ad Caput XXIV, 442, p. 700. 

[360] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, p. 220. 

[361] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Cambridgeshire, p. 45. 

[362] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 274. 

[363] Registrum Roffense, p. 598. 

[364] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 319. 

[365] Pipe Roll Society, Vol. IX (1888) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 12th year of King Henry II (London) ("Pipe Roll 12 Hen II (1165/66)"), p. 112. 

[366] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Kent, p. 246. 

[367] Victoria County History Cambridge, Vol. 6, p. 159. 

[368] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, p. 46. 

[369] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 58. 

[370] Pipe Roll 6 Ric I (1194/95), Kent, p. 249. 

[371] Registrum Roffense, p. 653. 

[372] Registrum Roffense, p. 599. 

[373] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 368. 

[374] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norfolk, p. 29. 

[375] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 370. 

[376] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 370. 

[377] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 48. 

[378] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 57. 

[379] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, p. 44. 

[380] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, pp. 44 and 45-6. 

[381] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 74. 

[382] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 82. 

[383] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 525. 

[384] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, De serjantiis in diversis comitatibus Angliæ, p. 457. 

[385] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, p. 44. 

[386] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, p. 44. 

[387] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 397. 

[388] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXCIII, p. 187. 

[389] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 506. 

[390] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXCIII, p. 187. 

[391] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 506. 

[392] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 517. 

[393] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 578. 

[394] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1026, p. 62. 

[395] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 578. 

[396] CP X 521. 

[397] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[398] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Northamptonshire, p. 81. 

[399] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Northamptonshire, p. 81. 

[400] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[401] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, III, p. 1019. 

[402] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 317. 

[403] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 51. 

[404] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[405] Domesday Descendants, p. 506. 

[406] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 282. 

[407] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[408] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, III, p. 1019. 

[409] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 318. 

[410] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, III, p. 1019. 

[411] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[412] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[413] CP X 521, footnote f, citing B. M. Add. Chr. 22011. 

[414] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 317. 

[415] Domesday Descendants, p. 637. 

[416] Domesday Descendants, p. 637. 

[417] Liber Vitæ Dunelmensis, p. 103. 

[418] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 294. 

[419] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 37. 

[420] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 317. 

[421] Feet of Fines 1182-1196, 122, p. 108. 

[422] Feet of Fines 1182-1196, 122, p. 108. 

[423] Ragg ‘De Lancaster’ (1910), Art. XXI, Charter III, p. 431. 

[424] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, I, p. 1018. 

[425] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, III, p. 1019. 

[426] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, II, p. 1018. 

[427] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 317. 

[428] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 334. 

[429] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wedon Pinkney Priory, Northamptonshire, IV, p. 1019. 

[430] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 71. 

[431] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 90 and 94. 

[432] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 109. 

[433] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Clerkenwell Priory, XXV, p. 85. 

[434] Kirk (1899), Vol. I, 10 Ric I, 60, p. 15. 

[435] Domesday Descendants, p. 636.