CROATIA

  v3.0 Updated 29 May 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                LEADERS of DALMATIAN CROATIA, DUKES of CROATIA 845-910 (TRPIMIROVIĆ) 4

Chapter 2.                KINGS of CROATIA [925]-1096. 8

Chapter 3.                BANS of CROATIA. 18

A.         BANS of CROATIA, late 13th CENTURY.. 19

B.         BANS of CROATIA (GARAY) 20

C.        BANS of CROATIA (TALOVAĆ) 22

Chapter 4.                CROATIAN & DALMATIAN COUNTS. 23

A.         COUNTS of ABSAR.. 23

B.         COUNTS of BRIBIR and SPLIT (ŠUBIĆ) 23

C.        COUNTS of CILLI [CELJE] 24

D.        COUNTS of VEGLIA [KRK] (FRANGEPANI or FRANKEPAN) 29

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

According to the Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split, the Croats were originally called "Curetes vel Coribantes" because they were "running about" ("currentes") and unsettled[1].  The area now known as Croatia was under the control of the Avars until some time during the seventh century, although even after that time the Croatians to the north in Pannonian Croatia remained part of the Avar khaganate, centred on the Tisza River.  The De Administrando Imperio of Konstantinos Porphyrogenetos records that "Chrobati" took refuge with Emperor Heraclius when "Abares" expelled "Romanos" but that with Roman help they managed to expel the Avars from their lands under "Chrobatorum princeps…Porga"[2].  Charles I King of the Franks (later Emperor Charlemagne) launched his first campaign against the Avars in 791, followed by a second campaign in 795-96.  He eliminated the independent Avar state, although a small khaganate continued to exist until at least 822 as a vassal of the Franks.  The Franks were overlords as far east as the Tisza River, including over the two separate Croatian principalities in Pannonia and Dalmatia[3].  Within the territory of Dalmatian Croatia, some non-contiguous walled coastal towns (including Dubrovnik, Split, Trogir and Zadar) and offshore islands (including Krk and Rab) recognised Byzantine suzerainty.  They were consolidated into the Byzantine theme of Dalmatia in the 870s, although they remained largely autonomous from direct Byzantine control[4].  Under the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, by which the territory of the empire was divided between the three sons of Emperor Louis I, Pannonian Croatia fell to the kingdom of the East Franks ruled by Louis II King of the East Franks, while Dalmatian Croatia became part of Lotharingia ruled by Emperor Lothaire.  Dalmatian Croatia was reassigned to Germanic jurisdiction in 875 but succeeded in asserting its independence the following year[5].  Small administrative units "županije" were formed, usually covering one karst valley, under "župani" who ruled from fortified castles[6]

 

The Historia Salonitanorum describes the boundaries of the kingdom of Croatia: to the east "Delmina, ubi fuit civitas Delmis", to the west Carinthia up to the town of "Stridonis quod nunc est confinium Dalmatie et Ystrie", to the north "a ripa Danubii usque ad mare Dalmaticum cum tota Maronia et Chulmie ducatu"[7].  A 12th century manuscript records that the Croatian monarchs were elected, in particular that if the king of Croatia died childless, his successor was elected by the seven "bani…banus Croacie, banus Bosnoniensis, banus Sclavonie, banus Posige, banus Podrame, banus Albanie, banus Sremi" who belonged to the families of "comites in comitatibus Croacie: Kacigi, Cucari, Suacigi, Cudomirigi, Mogorouigi, Subigi"[8].  The same source names "Stephanus Cucar, Saruba Cudomirigi, Ourica…Mogorouig…Cacig…Caran …Can…Slauaz…Cucar…Petrus Suacig" as the bans of Croatia between the reigns of "regis Suetopelegi" (who has not yet otherwise been identified in Croatia) and "Suinimiri regis Croatorum". 

 

The Historia Salonitanorum records that "rex Suinimirus" died without leaving an heir from his posterity, and that "quidam ex magnatibus Sclavonie" went "in Hungariam…ad regem Vladisclavum" requesting him to intervene in Croatia to put an end to the chaos which followed the king's death[9].  Around the same time the Venetians took control of part of the kingdom, as shown by the charter dated 1097 which names "domino nostro Vitali Michaeli…duci Venetie atque Dalmatie sive Chroatie et imperiali prothoseuastori"[10].  The precedence attributed to "Dalmatie" in this document shows that the Venetian power-base was centred on the southern part of the Croatian kingdom.  The Historia Salonitanorum records that Kálmán King of Hungary annexed the remaining parts of Croatia in 1102/03[11], ending Croatia's almost three hundred years of existence as an independent state.  By 1107, he had also taken control of all the Byzantine towns in Dalmatia.  He was elected king of Croatia and Dalmatia, which remained a jurisdictionally separate kingdom from Hungary, in return for guaranteeing the local authority of the Croatian nobility.  Each successive Hungarian king was separately crowned king of Croatia until the accession of Béla V in 1235[12].  Hungary lost control of its parts of Dalmatia to Venice in 1116.  Despite attempts to recapture it in 1117 and 1124, the occupation lasted until 1181 when the territories were recovered by King Béla III with Byzantine support[13].  In 1222, the rebellion of the Croatian lower nobility forced András II King of Hungary to issue the Golden Bull which limited royal authority[14].  Fine and Macartney highlight that this was a wider Hungarian issue not limited to Croatia[15]

 

The city commune of Dubrovnik developed into an independent republic by the mid-14th century and extended its jurisdiction along an extensive coastal belt.  It competed with Venice commercially[16].  In 1408, Ladislas King of Naples, claimant to the throne of Hungary, sold all his rights in Dalmatia to Venice which by 1420 governed Istria as well as various cities and islands between the Kvarner gulf in the north-west and the Dubrovnik republic in the south[17].  Croatia fell to the Ottoman Turks after the battle of the Krbava Valley in Lika in 1493, in which Derenčin Ban of Croatia was killed[18].  By the 1520s, the old nucleus of the Croatian state had been converted into Ottoman sanjaks[19]

 

The first Croatian hagiographies and chronicles were written in the 12th century, including the Historia Salonitanorum atque Spalatinorum pontificum by Archdeacon Thomas of Split.  The relationships between the 9th to 11th century dukes and kings of Croatia are therefore particularly suspect, unless the information is corroborated in non-Croatian sources.  In addition, the problem of the authenticity of the source known as the Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja, which appears to be a 17th century falsification, is discussed in the Introduction to the document MONTENEGRO.  The parentage and marriages of the members of the families set out in this document have not yet been confirmed in primary sources, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    LEADERS of DALMATIAN CROATIA, DUKES of CROATIA 845-910 (TRPIMIROVIĆ) 

 

 

 

1.         VIŠESLAV (-[810]).  Leader of the Croatians of Dalmatia, based at Nin, near Zadar.  It appears that the Frankish campaigns helped unite Croatian Dalmatia under this single prince, who also accepted Frankish overlordship.  The Franks placed the Croatians under the Marchese of Friulia[20]

 

 

Two siblings, parents not known: 

1.         BORNA (-821[21]).  He succeeded as Prince of Dalmatian Croatia in [810], with his main residence at Nin.  Einhard's Annales record that in 819 "Borna…dux Dalmatiĉ" fought "Liudewito" at "Colapium fluvium", that "Draganosus socer Liudewiti" was killed in the battle and that Borna married his widow[22].  Einhard's Annales record a meeting at Aachen in 820 in which the rebellion of "Liudewiti" was discussed, "Borna" being the leader of the legates[23].  The Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that "Liudovitus" defeated "Bornĉ…Dalmatiĉ ducis" [in 819][24].  Einhard's Annales record a meeting at Aachen in 820 at which "Bera comes Barcinonĉ" was defeated in horseback combat by those who had accused him of "fraudis et infidelitatis"[25].  Einhard's Annales record the death in 821 of "Borna dux Dalmatiĉ atque Liburniĉ" and that "nepos illius…Ladasclavus" was chosen by the people as his successor, with the consent of the emperor[26]m (819) as her second husband ---, widow of DRAGANOSUS, daughter of ---.  Einhard's Annales record that in 819 "Borna…dux Dalmatiĉ" fought "Liudewito" at "Colapium fluvium", that "Draganosus socer Liudewiti" was killed in the battle and that Borna married his widow[27]

2.         ---.  m ---.  One child: 

a)         LADISLAS .  The Royal Frankish Annals record him as nephew of Borna and his succession in 821 as Prince of Dalmatian Croatia[28].  The Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that the emperor installed "neptem suum…Ladasclao" after the death of "Borna"[29].  Einhard's Annales record the death in 821 of "Borna dux Dalmatiĉ atque Liburniĉ" and that "nepos illius…Ladasclavus" was chosen by the people as his successor, with the consent of the emperor[30].  Einhard's Annales name "Adalungus abbas monasterii sancti Vedasti et Hunfridus comes Curiensis" as missi to "Liudemuhslum avunculum Bornĉ ducis"[31].  It is possible that this last reference is intended to refer to Ladislas. 

 

 

1.         MISLAV (-after 839).  Duke of Croatia.  "Mislav Chroatorum dux" donated property "in Lasani et Tugari…[et] curte sua Clusan" to "ecclesiĉ beati Georgii in Putalo" by charter dated 839[32].  This appears to be the only reference to Mislav.  There is no way of determining how long he held power in Croatia. 

 

1.         [--- .  Duke of Croatiam ---.]  One child:  

a)         IVAN (-before 894).  A 17th century Russian source records that "Joanne filio regis Chroatorum" lived for 42 years as a hermit in Bohemia until he was discovered by "Borivoj, Moraviĉ dux", dated to [873/94][33].  The identity of his father is not known. 

 

 

1.         TRPIMIR (-[864]).  Duke of Croatia. "Tirpimirus dux Croatorum" donated property "in Lasani et Tugari…Putalio" to the church of Split by charter dated 4 Mar [852][34].  The dating clause of this charter refers to "regnante in Italia…Lothario Francorum rege", which demonstrates that Croatia was at that time under Lotharingian suzerainty.  Trpimir transferred his main residence from Nin to Klis.  A charter dated to [850/96] lists pilgrims from "Slavicĉ nationis" to monasteries in Italy and includes "Domno Tripimiro…Petrus filius domno Tripimero…"[35]m ---.  The name of Trpimir's wife is not known.  Trpimir & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         PETAR (-[879]).  A charter dated to [850/96] lists pilgrims from "Slavicĉ nationis" to monasteries in Italy and includes "Domno Tripimiro…Petrus filius domno Tripimero…"[36]

b)         [ZDESLAV (-879, before Jun).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   He succeeded his father in [864] as Duke of Croatia, but in the same year was overthrown by Domagoj, a Knin nobleman, and fled to Constantinople[37].  He was restored as Duke of Croatia in [878], in succession to Duke Demagoj's son, Duke Iljiko.  Pope John VIII asked "Sedescaluo…comiti Sclavorum" to take care of his legate sent to "Uulgarorum…Michaelem…regem" [Boris Khan of the Bulgars, who was baptised with the name Mikhael] by letter dated 879[38].  The Chronicon Venetum records that "Sclavus nomine Brenamir" usurped "ducatum" after killing "Sedescavo" in 879[39].  The date of Zdeslav´s fall from power is set more precisely by another letter from Pope John VIII to "Branimir" dated 7 Jun 879 (see below).]  m ---.  The name of Zdeslav's wife is not known.  Zdeslav & his wife had one child:

i)          MUTIMIR (-after 892).  He succeeded as Duke of Croatia.  "Muncimir…Croatorum dux" confirmed the privileges of the church of Split granted by "Tirpimiro…duce" and donations by "patre meo" by charter dated 28 Sep 892[40].  No evidence has been found that Mutimir continued to rule until the accession of Tomislav (see Chapter 2) as duke of Croatia. 

 

 

1.         DOMAGOJ (-[876]).  He deposed Duke Zdeslav, and succeeded in [864] as Duke of Croatia.  The Chronicon Venetum records a peace agreement between "Ursus dux" and "Dommagoum, Sclavorum principem" in [864][41].  Pope John VIII wrote to "Domagoi duci" dated 873[42].  After the Frankish suzerainty was transferred from the Lotharingian to the Germanic part of the empire in 875, the Franks reasserted their authority in Dalmatian Croatia triggering a successful revolt in 876.  Domagoj also tried to liberate Istria but was driven out by Venetian troops[43].  The Chronicon Venetum records that, after the death of "Domogoi, Sclavorum pessimo duce", peace was agreed between "domnus Ursus dux et Johannes suus filius" and "Sclavis", dated to 876[44]m ---.  The name of Domagoj's wife is not known.  Domagoj & his wife had one child: 

a)         ILJIKO (-after 878).  He succeeded his father in [876] as Duke of Croatia, but was overthrown by Duke Zdeslav in [878].  He ended Frankish suzerainty over Croatia[45]

 

 

1.         BRANIMIR (-[888/92]).  Duke of Croatia.  The Chronicon Venetum records that "Sclavus nomine Brenamir" usurped "ducatum" after killing "Sedescavo" in 879[46].  Pope John VIII wrote to "Branimir" dated 7 Jun 879[47].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Branimiri ducis Slavonia", when Marinus was archbishop of Split[48].  "Branimir dux Chroatorum" donated property to "ecclesiĉ sancti Domnii" by charter dated to [879/88][49].  His name "Branimir Duke of the Croats" appears on four stone inscriptions, one mentioning 888[50].  A memorial records "Branimiri" in 888[51]

 

 

2.         BRAZLOWO (-after [896]).  The Annales Fuldenses name "Brazlowoni duce" who ruled "inter Dravum et Savum flumine", that King Arnulf met him at "Hengistfeldon" in 892 and that in 896 Emperor Arnulf appointed "Brazlowoni, duci suo" to guard "urbe Paludarum"[52]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    KINGS of CROATIA [925]-1096

 

 

1.         TOMISLAV (-[925/30]).  No indication has been found whether Tomislav was related to the previous dukes of Croatia who are set out in Chapter 1.  He succeeded in [905/10] as TOMISLAV Duke of Croatia.  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Tamislavi ducis" in 914, when Iohannes was archbishop of Split[53].  Pannonian Croatia requested help from Tomislav Duke of Dalmatian Croatia against the Hungarians whom he defeated, established a lasting border along the Drava River in the early 900s, and annexed what remained of Pannonian Croatia[54].  In 923, Byzantium negotiated an alliance with Tomislav against Bulgaria, and awarded him the honorary title of proconsul.  This provoked Symeon I Tsar of Bulgaria into attacking Croatia, but Tomislav defeated him in [926][55].  Pope John X wrote to "Tamislao Croatorum et Michaeli…duci Chulmorum nec non…Joanni…Salonitanĉ ecclesiĉ archiepiscopo" dated to [925][56].  Pope John X wrote to "Tamislaum regem Croatorum, Michaelem ducem Chulmorum, Joannem et eius suffrageneos", undated but dated to [914/28][57].  This document has been taken to indicate that Tomislav was at some time crowned King of Croatia, presumably with a Papal crown.  However, Fine points out that the document´s authenticity cannot be guaranteed as it survives only in copies made in the 16th century and later[58].  In addition, another similar document quoted above omits the title "regem".  Church synods held in Split in 925 prohibited the Slav language in liturgy and the Glagolithic script in favour of Latin[59]

 

 

2.         TRPIMIR (-[935]).  Trpimir was the possible son of Duke Mutimir (see Chapter 1) according to Europäische Stammtafeln[60].  His name certainly suggests a family relationship with the earlier Croatian dukes.  Fine highlights the confusion about the kings of Croatia between the death of Tomislav in [928] and the succession of Krešimir II in [949][61].  He succeeded in [928] as TRPIMIR II [King] of Croatia

 

 

3.         KREŠIMIR (-[940/45]).  Krešimir was the son of Trpimir according to Europäische Stammtafeln[62].  He succeeded in [935] as KREŠIMIR I [King] of Croatia.  The De Administrando Imperio of Konstantinos Porphyrogenetos names "Crasemere" as leader of "Chrobatiĉ" when recording that he was succeeded by "Mirosthlabus filius"[63].  This appears to be the only reference in primary sources to the existence of Krešimir I.  The date of Krešimir´s death is calculated from the same source, probably written in the late 940s, recording that his son ruled for four years.  m ---.  The name of Krešimir´s wife is not known.  Krešimir & his wife had one child: 

a)         MIROSLAV (-[945/49]).  The De Administrando Imperio of Konstantinos Porphyrogenetos records that "Crasemere…Mirosthlabus filius" succeeded his father as leader of "Chrobatiĉ", adding that he was killed by "Pribunia bano" after reigning for four years[64].  According to Fine, Pribina was ban of Lika, Krbava and Gacka, in 949[65].  He succeeded his father as MIROSLAV [King] of Croatia

 

 

1.         MIHAIL KREŠIMIR (-[965/70], bur Solin St Stephen).  Mihail Krešimir was the son of Miroslav according to Europäische Stammtafeln[66].  The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified, although his name does suggest a family relationship with Krešimir I.  He succeeded as KREŠIMIR II [King] of Croatia.  It is assumed that Croatia was divided by rival factions after the murder of Miroslav and that Krešimir II did not succeed immediately.  Časlav Knez of Serbia conquered much of Bosnia from Croatia, although Krešimir II regained western Bosnia after the death of Časlav in [960][67].  A charter dated 1062 records that "Cresimir…Petrus Chroatorum rex Dalmationorumque" confirmed donations to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" founded by "proavi nostri Cresimiris maioris"[68].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "magnificus vir Cresimirus rex" was buried in the basilica of St Stephen in Salona [Solin] "cum pluribus aliis regibus et reginis"[69]m JELENA, daughter of --- (-8 Oct 975, bur Solin).  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "Helena regina" founded the churches of St Stephen and St Mary in Salona [Solin][70].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[71], Jelena was from the family of the "Zadser Primorengeschlechtes der Madier".  Krešimir II & his wife had one child: 

a)         STJEPAN DRŽISLAV (-[995/1000]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1062 under which "Cresimir…Petrus Chroatorum rex Dalmationorumque" confirmed donations to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" founded by "proavi nostri Cresimiris maioris" and recorded donations during the time of "filii eius Dirzislai et eorum…banis Pribyne et Godemiro, et…Suataslao et fratrum eius Cresimir et Goyslao et filii eius Stephani patris mei"[72].  He succeeded as STJEPAN DRŽISLAV [King] of Croatia.  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Dirscisclavi regis" in 970, when Martin was archbishop of Split[73].  A charter dated 9 Feb 994, which records a donation by "Pincius…consanguinei Stephani imperatoris…" to the church of St Michael at Split, records that he and "fratres ac propinquos suos" were expelled from "terra…Bulgarorum ex urbe Tarnoua" by "patrem suum [=Stephani imperatoris], patruum…nostrum…Sismanum imperatorem" and were received in Croatia by "regem Dirzislaum" who established them "in suburbia Clysii"[74].  He was crowned as King of Croatia in [988].  He became the ally of Emperor Basileios II, who granted him the administration of the Byzantine held towns in Dalmatia, naming him eparchos and patrikios, in return for support against the Bulgarian empire of Samuil Kometopoulos[75].  The dating clause of a charter dated 1 Aug 1000 refers to "regnantibus dominis nostris Basilio et Constantino magnis imperatoribus, in regno Chroacie gubernante…Dirzislauo…rege"[76].  He left Croatia to be divided between his three sons after his death[77]m ---.  The name of Stjepan Držislav's wife is not known.  King Stjepan Držislav & his wife had three children: 

i)          SVETOSLAV (-after 1000).  He succeeded his father as SVETOSLAV King of Croatia, jointly with but with primacy over his two brothers.  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that all the successors of "Dirscisclavi regis" were called kings of Dalmatia and Croatia, received the insignia of kingship from the emperors in Constantinople and were styled "eparchi sive patricii"[78].  Faced with threats to Byzantium's outpost towns in Dalmatia, both from pirate raids and from Samuil Tsar of Bulgaria, who by 997 had conquered Durazzo and much of Duklja and Serbia, Emperor Basileios II requested Venetian help to defend its interests and in 998 recognised the Doge of Venice as official imperial representative in Dalmatia, according him the title dux of Dalmatia and the honorary position of proconsul[79].  After Svetoslav attempted to exercise sole authority over his brothers, they rebelled and plunged Croatia into civil war.  In 1000, they finally ousted Svetoslav, who turned to Venice for support and recognised Venetian overlordship over Dalmatia[80]m ---.  The name of Svetoslav's wife is not known.  King Svetoslav & his wife had one child: 

(a)       STJEPAN (-after 1024).  After his father recognised Venetian overlordship over Dalmatia in [1000], he was sent as a hostage to Venice, where he married the Doge's daughter[81].  After the fall from power of the Orseolo family in 1024, Stjepan left Venice to find refuge in Hungary which granted him Slavonia as an appanage[82]m (after [1000]) HICELA Orseolo, daughter of PIETRO Orseolo (II) Doge of Venice & his wife Maria ---.  The Chronicon Venetum names "Hicelam" as eldest of the four daughters of "Petrus dux", naming her husband "Stefano Sclavorum regis filio"[83]

ii)         KREŠIMIR (-[1029/30]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1062 under which "Cresimir…Petrus Chroatorum rex Dalmationorumque" confirmed donations to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" founded by "proavi nostri Cresimiris maioris" and recorded donations during the time of "filii eius Dirzislai et eorum…banis Pribyne et Godemiro, et…Suataslao et fratrum eius Cresimir et Goyslao et filii eius Stephani patris mei"[84].  He succeeded in [1000] as KREŠIMIR III King of Croatia

-         see below

iii)        GOJISLAV .  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1062 under which "Cresimir…Petrus Chroatorum rex Dalmationorumque" confirmed donations to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" founded by "proavi nostri Cresimiris maioris" and recorded donations during the time of "filii eius Dirzislai et eorum…banis Pribyne et Godemiro, et…Suataslao et fratrum eius Cresimir et Goyslao et filii eius Stephani patris mei"[85]

 

 

1.         TRPIMIR (-after [990]).  He succeeded in 986 as TRPIMIR III King of Croatia, until 995.  His name suggests a family relationship with the early dukes of Croatia who are set out in Chapter 1.  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Tripimiri et Mucimiri, filii eius, regum" in 990, when Peter was archbishop of Split[86]m ---.  The name of Trpimir's wife is not known.  King Trpimir III & his wife had two children:

a)         MUCIMIR (-after [1000]).  The Chronicle of Andrea Dandolo records that after the death of "Tyrpimiro rege" there was a dispute between "filios Mucimirum et Surignam" over the succession, Mucimir prevailing[87].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Tripimiri et Mucimiri, filii eius, regum" in 990, when Peter was archbishop of Split[88].  Co-regent of Croatia before 990-995.  He succeeded in 995 as MUCIMIR King of Croatia, until 1000.

b)         SURONJA (-after [990]).  The Chronicle of Andrea Dandolo records that after the death of "Tyrpimiro rege" there was a dispute between "filios Mucimirum et Surignam" over the succession, Mucimir prevailing[89].  He was banished to Venetian Trogia by his brother[90]

 

 

KREŠIMIR, son of STJEPAN DRŽISLAV King of Croatia & his wife --- (-[1029/30]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1062 under which "Cresimir…Petrus Chroatorum rex Dalmationorumque" confirmed donations to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" founded by "proavi nostri Cresimiris maioris" and recorded donations during the time of "filii eius Dirzislai et eorum…banis Pribyne et Godemiro, et…Suataslao et fratrum eius Cresimir et Goyslao et filii eius Stephani patris mei"[91].  He succeeded in [1000] as KREŠIMIR III King of Croatia.  Following Byzantium's 998 grant to Venice of increased authority over its Dalmatian outpost towns, Venice increased its involvement in the area to turn this theoretical right into real control.  It extracted oaths of loyalty from several of the Byzantine-controlled towns, then turned its attention to the Croatian-controlled ports, imposing itself as overlord in Biograd.  A major Venetian offensive took place in 1018, and Krešimir turned to Byzantium for support.  He accepted Byzantine overlordship and was granted the title patrikios[92].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Cresimiri eorum patricii et regis Chroatorum" in 1015, "in the time of the emperors Basil and Constantine" and when Paul was archbishop of Split[93].  The Venetian civil war of 1024 enabled Krešimir to regain control over the Croatian towns in Dalmatia, as well as Byzantium to reassert its authority over its own Dalmatian towns[94].  After the death of Emperor Basileios II in 1025, Krešimir III ceased to pay homage to Byzantium, reasserting the independence of Croatia[95]

m ---.  The name of King Krešimir's wife is not known.  She was in a Byzantine jail in 1024[96]

King Krešimir III & his wife had two children: 

1.         STJEPAN (-1058).  He was in a Byzantine jail in 1024[97].  He succeeded his father in 1030 as STJEPAN I King of Croatia.  "Stephanus banus, imperialis protospatharius…cum coniuge mea Maria" donated property to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" by charter dated Apr 1042[98].  He increased the size of the Croatian navy and succeeded in maintaining control over the Croatian ports in Dalmatia.  He annexed Carinthia[99]m MARIA, daughter of ---.  "Stephanus banus, imperialis protospatharius…cum coniuge mea Maria" donated property to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" by charter dated Apr 1042[100].  According to Fine, the wife of King Stjepan was from Venice[101].  King Stjepan I & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         PETAR KREŠIMIR (-after Nov 1075).  He was brought up in Venice[102].  He succeeded his father in 1058 as KREŠIMIR IV King of Croatia.  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Stephani, Cresimiri et Suinimiri" as kings while Lawrence was archbishop of Salona (his installation is dated to 1060) and "temporibus Michaelis imperatoris"[103].  "Cresimir rex" confirmed the privileges of "in civitate Belgrado…monasterio sancti Johannis evangeliste" by charter dated Feb 1059, the interpolated version of which names him "Cresimir Stephani regis filius"[104].  "Cresimir…Petrus Chroatorum rex Dalmationorumque" confirmed donations to "monasterio Chrysogoni Jaderĉ" founded by "proavi nostri Cresimiris maioris" and recorded donations during the time of "filii eius Dirzislai et eorum…banis Pribyne et Godemiro, et…Suataslao et fratrum eius Cresimir et Goyslao et filii eius Stephani patris mei" by charter dated 1062[105].  "Cresimir rex Chroatie et Dalmatie, filius Stephani regis" confirmed the privileges of "monasterio sancte Marie Iadrensis" founded by "soror mea Cicca", with the consent of "nostri ducis Stephani", by charter dated 1066[106].  Byzantium appointed Krešimir IV as imperial representative in Dalmatia in 1069[107].  He founded a Benedictine monastery at Biograd[108]: "rex Chresimir" founded "monasterium…sancti Thome situm in civitate Belgrado" by charter dated to [1069][109].  The Normans attacked northern Dalmatia in 1074, establishing themselves as overlords in Split, Trogir, Biograd and Zadar, but were expelled by the Venetians over the following three years[110].  The dating clause of a charter dated Nov 1075 refers to "ea tempestate, qua comes Amicus regem Croatie cepit" [Count Amico Giovinazzo][111].  This document suggests that King Krešimir IV was deposed.  m ---.  The name of King Krešimir's wife is not known.  King Krešimir IV & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [STJEPAN (-before 1069).  "Cresimir rex Chroatie et Dalmatie, filius Stephani regis" confirmed the privileges of "monasterio sancte Marie Iadrensis" founded by "soror mea Cicca", with the consent of "nostri ducis Stephani", by charter dated 1066[112].  It is possible that "ducis Stephani" was the same person as the future King Stjepan II (see below).  It is also possible that he was the donor´s son, although if that was the case it is surprising that the document does not specify "filii mei".  If King Krešimir did have a son named Stjepan, he must have died before 1069, the date of a charter in which King Krešimir IV is named as "patruus" of his heir Stjepan.] 

b)         CICCA (-after 1087).  "Cresimir rex Chroatie et Dalmatie, filius Stephani regis" confirmed the privileges of "monasterio sancte Marie Iadrensis" founded by "soror mea Cicca", with the consent of "nostri ducis Stephani", by charter dated 1066[113].  Various ecclesiastical dignitaries confirmed the foundation of "Iaderensis ecclesie beate Marie", at the request of "abbatissa…Cicha, cum omnibus sororibus", by charter dated to [1072][114].  "Dragus…prior Jadere urbis" donated property to "domna Cicca abbatissa" by charter dated 1072[115].  "Suinimir…rex Chroatie Dalmatieque" confirmed royal protection for "abbatisse Ciche…tuoque monasterio sancte Marie" granted by "precessor meus Cresimir rex" by charter dated 1087 "in festivitate s. Dimitrii"[116]m --- (-before 1066).  The name of Cicca´s husband is not known, but presumably he predeceased her foundation of the monastery which is recorded above.  One child: 

i)          VEKA [Vekanega] (-after 1107).  A charter dated 1091 records "querimonia domne Veke filie Ciche" relating to the inheritance of "viri sui…Dobroslavi…Petrus socer suus filius domni Dabri" after whose death she became a nun[117].  "Vekenega abbatissa sancte Marie" bought property "in Brauzo" from "Zurona filiastro Mazogomile" by charter dated 1107[118]m DOBROSLAV, son of PETAR & his wife --- (-before 1091). 

c)         [--- .  Although the charter quoted below clarifies that King Krešimir IV was the uncle of Stjepan, it is not known with certainty whether the relationship was through the latter´s father or mother.  The charters uses the term "patruus" which, if translated literally would indicate that the relationship was paternal.  However, it is uncertain whether the terminology can be interpreted so strictly.  m ---.]  One child:

i)          STJEPAN (-[1090/91]).  ["Cresimir rex Chroatie et Dalmatie, filius Stephani regis" confirmed the privileges of "monasterio sancte Marie Iadrensis" founded by "soror mea Cicca", with the consent of "nostri ducis Stephani", by charter dated 1066[119].  It is not known whether "ducis Stephani" was the same person as the future King Stjepan II.  It is also possible that it was the donor´s son, although if that was the case it is surprising that the document does not specify "filii mei".]  "Cresimirus…rex Chrobatorum atque Dalmatorum" donated the church of St Stjepan near Split to the archbishop of Split, confirmed by "Stephanus…patrui mei heres…futurus in regno successor", by charter dated 1069[120].  He abdicated in 1075 and became a monk at St Stefan in Split[121].  "Stephanus olim…dux Chroatorum" donated property to "monasterium sancti Stephani", in the presence of "Suinimiri regis domini mei, Lepe regine, Radouani filii regis", by charter dated 1078[122].  He succeeded in [1087/88] as STJEPAN II King of Croatia and Dalmatia.  The dating is confirmed by a charter dated 1087 "in festivitate s. Dimitrii" under which "Suinimir…rex Chroatie Dalmatieque" confirmed royal protection for "abbatisse Ciche…tuoque monasterio sancte Marie" granted by "precessor meus Cresimir rex"[123], and a charter dated 1088 which records "coram Stephano rege Chroatie"[124].  His co-identity with Stjepan, nepos of King Krešimir IV is confirmed by the charter dated 1089 under which "Stephanus…Chroatorum et Dalmatinorum rex" referred to "p, auum, proauumque solio [in] regio"[125].  He ruled jointly with Slavić from [1089/90] until [1090/91].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Stephani, Cresimiri et Suinimiri" as kings while Lawrence was archbishop of Salona (he was installed in 1060) and "temporibus Michaelis imperatoris"[126].  "Stephanus…Chroat" confirmed the donation of property to the church of St Benedict at Split by "nuper rege defuncto Suinimiro" by charter dated [1088/89][127].  "Stephanus…rex Chroatorum et Dalmatinorum" donated property to the church of St Stjepan at Split by charter dated 1089[128].   

2.         daughter .  The Chronicle of Joannes Archidiaconus Goricensis records that "sancto Stephano" betrothed "Emerici ducis Sclavoniĉ" to "filia Cresimiri" but that the future bridegroom died the following year[129]Betrothed ([1030]) to IMRE of Hungary, son of ISTVÁN I King of Hungary & his wife Gisela of Bavaria ([1007]-killed Bihar 2 Nov 1031). 

 

 

1.         ZVONIMIR DMITRIJE (-[1089]).  Zvonimir was the possible descendant of Iljiko Duke of Croatia (see Chapter 1) according to Europäische Stammtafeln[130].  Ban of Slavonia (between the Sava and Drava rivers), as an appanage of the kingdom of Croatia, after 1060.  His territory was joined to Croatia, although he continued to enjoy local independence, in return for his being named heir to King Krešimir IV.  According to Fine, from this time Croatian charters were issued in the joint names of King Krešimir and Ban Zvonimir[131], but the documents compiled in the Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ do not confirm that this statement is correct.  He was crowned in [late 1075/early 1076] as ZVONIMIR DMITRIJE King of Croatia by a Papal legate at Split: a charter dated Oct 1076 records that "Demetrius qui et Suinimir nuncupor…Croatie, Dalmatieque" was installed by "domino Gebizo, ex apostolice sedis legatione"[132].  Presumably his succession was engineered by Count Amico who seized control of Croatia in 1075: the dating clause of a charter dated Nov 1075 refers to "ea tempestate, qua comes Amicus regem Croatie cepit" [Count Amico Giovinazzo][133].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split names "Stephani, Cresimiri et Suinimiri" as kings while Lawrence was archbishop of Salona (he was installed in 1060) and "temporibus Michaelis imperatoris", commenting that Zvonimir was "ultimus rex Chroatorum"[134].  The Normans attacked northern Dalmatia in 1074, making themselves overlords in Split, Trogir, Biograd and Zadar, but were expelled by the Venetians over the following three years[135].  "Zuoinimir seu Demetrius…rex Chrobatorum et Dalmatinorum" recorded the homage of "insule Bracie…nobilibus" by charter dated 1077, witnessed by "Dragote Bani, Slavogosti Jupani, Berislavi comitis…"[136].  The Annales Carinthiĉ record that "Zolemyri Dalmatiĉ regis" invaded Carinthia "cum Hungarorum auxilio" in [1079/83][137].  "Suinimirus…rex Chroatorum atque Dalmatarum" donated property "in…loco…Radunam" to the church of St Stjepan at Split by charter dated 1083 witnessed by "regina Lepa et Radouanus filius regis"[138].  "Suinimir…rex Chroatie Dalmatieque" confirmed royal protection for "abbatisse Ciche…tuoque monasterio sancte Marie" granted by "precessor meus Cresimir rex" by charter dated 1087 "in festivitate s. Dimitrii"[139].  King Zvonimir had ceased to ruled by 1088 when a charter records "coram Stephano rege Chroatie"[140].  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "rex Suinimirus" died without leaving an heir from his posterity, and that "quidam ex magnatibus Sclavonie" went "in Hungariam…ad regem Vladisclavum" requesting him to intervene in Croatia to put an end to the chaos which followed the king's death[141].  According to legend he was killed in a brawl during a council meeting[142]m ([1064]) ILONA [Lepa] of Hungary, daughter of BÉLA I King of Hungary & his wife [Ryksa] of Poland (-before 1095).  "Stephanus olim…dux Chroatorum" donated property to "monasterium sancti Stephani", in the presence of "Suinimiri regis domini mei, Lepe regine, Radouani filii regis", by charter dated 1078[143].  Her parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Joannes Archidiaconus Goricensis which records that "bano Svinimir" married "Belĉ, Geysa et Ladislaus…ducum sororem" in 1064[144].  The Chronica Hungarorum states that "rex Zolomerus Dalmatiĉ" was "sororius Geysĉ" when recording the help he gave in the Hungarian war against Carinthia[145].  "Suinimirus…rex Chroatorum atque Dalmatarum" donated property "in…loco…Radunam" to the church of St Stjepan at Split by charter dated 1083 witnessed by "regina Lepa et Radouanus filius regis"[146].  In [1090], she assumed power as ILONA Queen of Croatia.  Faced with considerable opposition from the Croatian nobility, her brother László I King of Hungary intervened to protect her interests and occuped much of Croatia and part of Dalmatia.  He was obliged to withdraw from Dalmatia to defend Hungary against an attack by Cumans, but retained Pannonian Croatia.  In 1091, King László created a Croatian banovina between the Drava River and Gvozd Mountains, ruled by his nephew Almos, but this was recaptured by Petar King of Croatia in 1095[147].  The dating clause of a charter dated 1091 refers to "tempore quo Uladislaus Pannoniorum rex, Chroatie inuadens regnum, dominum Almum suum nepotem in illo statuit regem"[148].  King Zvonimir Dmitrije & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [CLAUDA .  "Suinimirus rex" donated property to "cuidam nobili de genere Lapaç, Vonyça" with "quadam filia sua Clauda" by charter dated to [1076/87], classified as spurious in the compilation consulted[149]m ([1076/87]) VONICK, of the family Lapčani.] 

b)         [VINICA .  "Suinimirus rex" donated "terram Carini" to "Michaeli Nelipçio ab Oršić et eiusdem coniuge filiĉ…suĉ Winicĉ" by letters of Stefan Tvrtko dated 1390, classified as spurious in the compilation consulted[150]m MIKHAEL Nelipči, son of ---.] 

c)         RADOVAN (-after 1083).  "Stephanus olim…dux Chroatorum" donated property to "monasterium sancti Stephani", in the presence of "Suinimiri regis domini mei, Lepe regine, Radouani filii regis", by charter dated 1078[151].  "Suinimirus…rex Chroatorum atque Dalmatarum" donated property "in…loco…Radunam" to the church of St Stjepan at Split by charter dated 1083 witnessed by "regina Lepa et Radouanus filius regis"[152]

 

 

1.         PETAR (-killed in battle 1096).  Unrelated to the previous dynasties, he succeeded in 1091 as PETAR King of Croatia, although by then Hungary had assumed control of most of the country.  He succeeded in recapturing most of Croatia in 1095, but Pannonian Croatia fell once more in 1096 to Kalman King of Hungary who killed King Péter on the Gvozd mountain (renamed Petrova Gora in his honour), and occupied Biograd in 1097[153]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    BANS of CROATIA

 

 

The Bans of Croatia were appointed by the kings of Hungary, but other than being a military leader the appointee interfered little in local affairs.  During the late fourteenth/early fifteenth centuries, these bans were Croatian noblemen[154]

 

 

 

A.      BANS of CROATIA, late 13th CENTURY

 

 

Three brothers: 

1.         PÁL (-after 5 Aug 1308).  Ban of Croatia.  "Paulus banus Croatie, Dalmatie et dominus Bosne…cum consorte sua Ursa" founded "s. Joannis B. ecclesiam penes monasterium s. Elisabeth ex adverso civitatis Scardonĉ" by charter dated 7 Apr 1299[155].  "Paulus banus Crovatorum et dominus Bosne" confirmed that "civitati Arbensi" owned "castri Jablanaz" by charter dated 4 Jan 1307[156].  "Paulus banus Croatorum et dominus Bosne" condoned the excesses and offences of "civibus Tragurii" by charter dated 5 Aug 1308[157]m URSA, daughter of --- (-after 7 Apr 1299).  "Paulus banus Croatie, Dalmatie et dominus Bosne…cum consorte sua Ursa" founded "s. Joannis B. ecclesiam penes monasterium s. Elisabeth ex adverso civitatis Scardonĉ" by charter dated 7 Apr 1299[158]

2.         DJURADJ .  Charles II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] confirmed the possessions in "partes inferiors terrĉ Bozninensis" of "Hrivatino filiis et fratribus eius…consanguinei et cognati…Pauli bani Croatorum nec non Georgii et Mladini fratrum, comitum civitatum Dalmatiĉ" by charter dated 14 Jun 1299[159]

3.         MLADIN .  Charles II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] confirmed the possessions in "partes inferiors terrĉ Bozninensis" [Dolni Kraji (Lower Bosnia)] of "Hrivatino filiis et fratribus eius…consanguinei et cognati…Pauli bani Croatorum nec non Georgii et Maldini fratrum, comitum civitatum Dalmatiĉ" by charter dated 14 Jun 1299[160].  "Maladinus secundus Croatorum et tocius Bosne banus" appointed "Saracenum filium Eliĉ de Sibenico" as proxy to Venice by charter dated 24 Feb 1314[161].  "Mladinus Croatorum et Bosine banus" recommended "magistro Gulielmo de Vergnana, medico fideli suo" to the Venetian senate by charter dated 7 Jan 1320[162]

 

 

 

B.      BANS of CROATIA (GARAY)

 

 

1.         ANDRÁS Garay[163], son of ISTVÁN & his wife --- (-before 10 May 1340).  m ---, daughter of LÁSZLÓ de Nevnai & his wife Jolantha Kórogy.  András & his wife had two children:

a)         MIKLÓS [I] Garay (-beheaded near Gara Sep 1386).  Obergespan of Baranya 1355.  Ban of Macsó 1359/1375.  Palatine 1375/1386.  Obergespan of Pressburg 1376/1377.  Leading adviser of Erszebet Queen of Hungary, and her daughter Maria, in 1381.  He was beheaded after the battle near Gara[164]m ---.  The name of Miklós's wife is not known.  1401.  Miklós [I] & his wife had one child:

i)          JÁNOS Garay (-before 9 Apr 1428).  Obergespan of Temes 1402/1417.  Ban of Uzora and Obergespan of Pozsega 1411/1417.  m (after 3 Jan 1410) JADWIGA of Plock, daughter of SIEMOWIT IV Prince of Plock and Kujavia [Piast] & his wife Alexandra of Lithuania (shortly before 16 Nov 1393-after 19 Feb 1439).  János & his wife had four children: 

(a)       HEDWIG Garay .  1430.  m PÉTER von Thallócz.  1437/1448. 

(b)       KATALIN GarayBetrothed to MIKLÓS Bebek de Pelsöcz. 

(c)       ISTVÁN Garay (-before 1430). 

(d)       DOROTTYA Garay .  Her betrothal was arranged to confirm her future husband's alliance with Hungary[165]Betrothed (9 Apr 1428) to STJEPAN TVRTKO II King of Bosnia, son of STJEPAN TVRTKO I King [Kralj] of Bosnia & his wife Doroteja of Bulgaria (before 1382-Nov 1443). 

ii)         MIKLÓS [II] Garay ([1366]-before 17 Jan 1434).  Ban of Macsó 1386/1390.  Ban of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia 1394/1402.  Palatine 1402/1433. 

-         see below

iii)        ILONA Garaym (before 1398) MIKLÓS Széchy de Felsölendva, Obergespan of Zala, Vas and Seprom (-before 2 Dec 1432).  Treasury minister of Hungary 1409.  . 

iv)       DOROTTYA Garay m MIKLÓS [Frankepán] Ban of Croatia and Dalmatia, son of HANS Frankepan Count of Veglia, Ban of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia (-26 Jun 1432). 

b)         PAL Garay .  1340/1356.  m ---.  The name of Pal's wife is not known.  Pal & his wife had one child:

i)          ISTVÁN Garay .  1402. 

 

 

MIKLÓS [II] Garay, son of MIKLÓS [I] Garay & his wife --- ([1366]-before 17 Jan 1434).  Ban of Macsó 1386/1390.  Ban of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia 1394/1402.  Palatine 1402/1433. 

m firstly ([1387/88]) TODORA Lazarevic, daughter of LAZAR Hrebljanović Knez of Serbia & his wife Milica --- (-before 1405).  This marriage was arranged to seal the peace between her father, who had initially supported the rebellion of Jan Horvat Ban of Mačva, and Sigismund King of Hungary[166]

m secondly (Aug 1405) ANNA of Celje [Cilly], daughter of HERMAN [II] Count of Cilli [Celje], Ban of Slavonia, Croatia and Dalmatia & his wife Anna von Schaunberg (-after 23 Jun 1438). 

Miklós [II] & his first wife had two children: 

1.         MIKLÓS [III] Garay (-1435 or after).  at Nikcse, Köszeg, Somlyö and Vichodol 1432.  Joint Lord of Boró.  m (24 Apr 1431 or later) as her first husband, MARGIT Cseh de Léva, daughter of PÉTER Cseh de Léva Ban of Macsó.  She married secondly (before 23 Oct 1439) Matko Ban of Thallócz.  Miklós [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         KATALIN Garay .  1440/1491. 

2.         KATALIN Garay (-[1471/83])m ([1430]) as his second wife, HEINRICH V Graf von Görz und Kirchberg, son of MEINHARD VI Graf von Görz & his second wife Utelhild von Mätsch ([8 Apr/22 Jun] 1376-[18 Mar] 1454). 

Miklós [II] & his second wife had five children: 

3.         LÁSZLÓ [II] Garay (-before 19 Apr 1459).  Ban of Macsó 1432/40 and 1445/67.  Palatine 1447/58.  m ALEXANDRA von Teschen, daughter of BOLKO Duke of Teschen and Auschwitz [Piast] & his second wife Euphemia of Mazovia [Piast] (-after 6 Oct 1463).  László [II] & his wife had four children: 

a)         JOB Garay (-1481).  m FRUSZINA, daughter of ---.  at Nekcse 1489/1491. 

b)         ANNA Garay (-after 1460)Betrothed (17 Jan 1458) to MÁTYÁS Hunyadi "Corvinus" King of Hungary, son of JÁNOS Hunyadi & his wife Erszebet Szilágyi de Horogszeg (Kolozsvár 1440-Klausenburg, Vienna 6 May 1490, bur Székesfehérvár Cathedral).  m firstly IMRE de Hederváry Ban of Macsó.  1442/1445.  m secondly (after 6 Oct 1460) MIKLÓS de Ujlak Voivode of Transylvania Ban of Macsó

c)         JÁNOS [VIII] Garay .  1449. 

d)         MIKLÓS Garaym MARGIT, daughter of ---.  Miklós & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOZSEF Garay

ii)         ILONA Garay

4.         JÁNOS Garay (-young). 

5.         PÉTER Garaym ---.  The name of Péter's wife is not known.  Péter & his wife had one child:

a)         MIHALY Garay (-1480). 

6.         DOROTTYA Garaym firstly ISTVÁN de Kanizsaym secondly RAYNALD de Rozgony

7.         ERZSEBET Garaym JÁNOS Korogyi

 

 

 

C.      BANS of CROATIA (TALOVAĆ)

 

 

Four brothers: 

1.         MATKO Talovać (-1444).  Appointed Ban of Slavonia 1435 by Sigismund King of Hungary.  Also appointed Ban of Croatia 1435 to replace the rebel John Frankapan, whose inheritance in the south of Croatia he was granted by the King after the latter's defeat.  He was replaced as Ban of Croatia by his brother Péter in 1438[167]

2.         PÉTER Talovać (-1453).  Appointed Ban of Croatia by Sigismund King of Hungary in 1438. 

3.         JAN Talovać (-killed in battle 1445).  Prior of Varna.  He was killed when Frederic Count of Cilli seized a large part of his deceased brother's lands and claimed the Banship of Slavonia[168]

4.         son. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    CROATIAN & DALMATIAN COUNTS

 

 

 

A.      COUNTS of ABSAR 

 

 

1.         ROGER [Rugjer] (-before Mar 1208).  Count of Absarm ---.  The name of Roger´s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROBERT .  A charter dated Mar 1208 records the privileges granted by Venice to "Roberti et Petri, sive Joannis atque Andree filiorum quondam comitis Rugerii Mauroceno…bone memorie comitis Absarensis" in "comitatu Absari cum insula Leporaria et Auriola ac Seracana" in return for their allegiance[169]

b)         PETER .  A charter dated Mar 1208 records the privileges granted by Venice to "Roberti et Petri, sive Joannis atque Andree filiorum quondam comitis Rugerii Mauroceno…bone memorie comitis Absarensis" in "comitatu Absari cum insula Leporaria et Auriola ac Seracana" in return for their allegiance[170]

c)         IOANNES .  A charter dated Mar 1208 records the privileges granted by Venice to "Roberti et Petri, sive Joannis atque Andree filiorum quondam comitis Rugerii Mauroceno…bone memorie comitis Absarensis" in "comitatu Absari cum insula Leporaria et Auriola ac Seracana" in return for their allegiance[171]

d)         ANDREA .  A charter dated Mar 1208 records the privileges granted by Venice to "Roberti et Petri, sive Joannis atque Andree filiorum quondam comitis Rugerii Mauroceno…bone memorie comitis Absarensis" in "comitatu Absari cum insula Leporaria et Auriola ac Seracana" in return for their allegiance[172]

 

 

 

B.      COUNTS of BRIBIR and SPLIT (ŠUBIĆ)

 

1.         GREGORY Šubić .  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "Gregorium Berberensium" was appointed as Count of Split after the death of "comite Petro", dated to [1225/30] from the context, but that he was expelled soon after by "Domaldum"[173]m ---.  The name of Gregory's wife is not known.  Gregory & his wife had one child: 

a)         MARC Šubić .  The Historia Salonitanorum of Thomas Archdeacon of Split records that "Marcum filium Gregorii" was appointed as Count of Split after the expulsion of "Domaldum", dated to [1235] from the context[174]

 

2.         PAVAO Šubić .  Count of Bribir.  He supported the Angevin candidate for the Hungarian thrown after the extinction of the Arpad dynasty in 1301.  He ruled the coastal cities of Split, Trogir and Šibenil, and the interior in Bosnia.  He was appointed hereditary Ban of Croatia.  He minted his own coins, conferred charters on cities and levied annual taxes[175].  He and his son were removed from power after a rebellion of Croatia nobility[176]m ---.  The name of Pavao's wife is not known.  Pavao & his wife had one child: 

a)         MLADIN .  "Mladinus banus Boznensis" granted commercial privileges to the merchants of Split by charter dated 4 Jun 1302[177].  He and his son were removed from power after a rebellion of Croatia nobility[178]

 

 

 

C.      COUNTS of CILLI [CELJE]

 

 

Cilli (Celje) lay south of Maribor on the River Savinja, in present day Slovenia. 

 

 

1.         ULRICH von Sanegg, son of ULRICH Herr von Sanegg[179] & his wife Anna von Sternberg (-1308 or after)m ([1287/21 Aug 1302]) KATHARINA von Heunberg, daughter and heiress of ULRICH [III] Graf von Heunburg & his wife Agnes von Baden [Zähringen] (-[1316]).  Ulrich & his wife had two children: 

a)         FREDERIC [I] of Celje (-[9 Aug 1359/15 Mar 1360).  He was the principle heir of the Grafen von Heunburg, through his mother.  He was created Count of Celje by Imperial order 16 Apr 1341.  m (before 29 Dec 1330) as her second husband, DIEMUT von Wallsee, widow of ANDREAS von Güssing Obergespan von Zala, daughter of ULRICH von Wallsee & his wife Diemut von Rohrau (Liechtenstein-Nikolsburg] (-[14 May 1353/30 Nov 1357]).  Frederic [II] & his wife had four children: 

i)          ULRIC [I] of Celje ([1331]-26 Jul 1368)Count of Celje.  His title was recognised in Austria by order 12 Nov 1362.  m ([1360/61]) as her second husband, ADELHEID von Ortenburg, widow of ALBRECHT Graf von Oettingen, daughter of [HERMANN Graf von Ortenburg [in Carinthia] & his wife Adelheid von Schaunberg] (-[17 Aug 1331]).  Ulric [I] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       WILHELM of Celje ([1361/62]-19 Sep 1392).  Count of Celje, his title was confirmed by Imperial order 30 Sep 1372.  m (27 Mar or 6 Apr 1380) as her first husband, ANNA of Poland, legitimated daughter of KAZIMIERZ III "Wielki/the Great" King of Poland [Piast] & his fourth wife Hedwig von Glogau [Piast] (1366-9 Jun 1422, bur Mindelheim St Stefan).  She married secondly (before 16 Sep 1394) as his first wife, Ulrich II Herzog von Teck.  Wilhelm & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ANNA of Celje ([1380/81]-20/21 Mar 1416)m (Krakow 29 Jan 1402) as his first wife, WŁADYSŁAW II King of Poland, son of ALGIRDAS [Olgierd] Grand Duke of Lithuania & his second wife Iuliana Aleksandrovna of Tver [Rurikid] ([1351]-Grodek 31 May 1434, bur Krakow Cathedral ([1351]-Grodek 31 May 1434, bur Krakow Cathedral). 

ii)         HERMAN [I] of Celje (-21 Mar 1385)Count of Celje, his title was confirmed by Imperial order 30 Sep 1372.  m (1362) KATERINA of Bosnia, daughter of VLADISLAV Kotromanić Regent of Bosnia & his wife Jelena Subić of Bribir.  1377, 1396.  Herman [I] & his wife had two children: 

(a)       HANUS of Celje ([1363]-29 Apr 1372). 

(b)       HERMAN [II] of Celje ([1365]-Pressburg [Bratislava] 13 Oct 1435, bur Kartause Plettriach).  Ban of Slovenia, Croatia and Dalmatia 1406/1408.  Count of Celje 1423/1431.  He was created Reichsfürst by Imperial order at Pressburg [Bratislava] 27 Sep 1435. 

-         see below

iii)        KATHARINA of Celje (-17 Jul 1389, bur Bad Waldsee)m firstly ([1353]) as his second wife, ALBRECHT III Graf von Görz, son of ALBRECHT von Görz & his wife Elisabeth von Hessen (-[1365]).  m secondly (before 22 Jul 1367) JOHANN Truchsess von Waldsee (-[22/31] Mar 1424). 

iv)       ANNA of Celje m (before 12 Jul 1354) OTTO Graf von Ortenburg [in Carinthia] (-before 1376). 

b)         ANNA of Celje m (contract 25 Jan 1318) RUDOLF OTTO von Liechtenstein zu Murau.  1318/1378.  

 

 

HERMAN [II] of Celje, son of HERMAN [I] Count of Celje & his wife Katerina [Kotromanić] of Bosnia ([1365]-Pressburg [Bratislava] 13 Oct 1435, bur Kartause Plettriach).  An active supporter of Zsigmond King of Hungary, both at the battle of Nikopolis in 1396 and in the civil war against Ladislas King of Sicily, he was rewarded with the district of Varaždin and other land in Zagorje.  Count in Zagorien 1399.  He was appointed Ban of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia in 1406, with the right to mint money, exact tolls and receive mining revenue[180].  He held much of Slovenia and Zagorje, as well as large tracts of land in Slavonia[181].  Ban of Slavonia  1423/1435.  He inherited the Kingdom of Bosnia by treaty 2 Sep 1427[182].  Graf von Ortenburg und Sternberg, by Imperial order at Breslau 29 Feb 1420.  Count of Celje 1423/1431.  He was created Reichsfürst by Imperial order at Pressburg [Bratislava] 27 Sep 1435. 

m ([1377]) ANNA von Schaunberg, daughter of [HEINRICH Graf von Schaunberg & his wife Ursula von Görz] (-before 1396). 

Herman [II] & his wife had six children: 

1.         FREDERIC [II] of Celje ([1379]-9 Jun or 13 Jul 1454).  He succeeded as "gefürsteter Graf" von Cilli und Ortenburg-Sternberg in 1435.  He was promised on his marriage a huge cash dowry, secured by half the island of Krk and three fortresses in Vinodol.  His father granted him Kranj and several castles in Slavonia.  After his wife's murder, he fled to the Hungarian court.  Following pressure from the Frankapan family, King Zsigmond sentenced him to death in absentia, but his father imprisoned him until 1429.  Following the death of Matko Talovac Ban of Slavonia in 1444, he and his son seized a large part of the former's lands, took over the whole district of Zagreb and claimed the Banship of Slavonia.  Jan Hunyadi, Regent of Hungary, forced the Counts of Cilli to relinquish the territory but agreed to appoint Frederic as Ban of Slavonia, while at the same time appointing Jan Szekely as Vice-Ban in Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia[183].  He also claimed the Banship of Croatia in 1453 after the death of Ban Péter Talovac, and succeeded in conquering part of the deceased Ban's former lands.  To protect himself from further retaliation from Jan Hunyadi, he formed an alliance with Stefan Vukčić Kosača[184].  He founded Kloster Enzersdorf in Lower Austria[185]m firstly ([1405]) ELIZAVETA Frankepan, daughter of STJEPAN Frankepan[186] & his wife Caterina Carrara of Padua (-murdered 1422).  Her husband left her for Veronica.  Forced to return to his wife by his father, she was found murdered in her bed the next morning.  m secondly (in secret 1422) VERONICA von Dešnić, daughter of --- (-murdered Osterwitz 1425).  She was brought to trial as a witch by her father-in-law, found guilty and drowned in a fishing pond under the castle of Celje.  Frederic [II] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ULRIC [II] of Celje (1406-murdered Beograd 9 Nov 1456, bur Celje).  His status of Fürst was confirmed by Imperial orders 30 Nov 1436 and 16/17 Aug 1443.  Governor of Bohemia 1438/1439.  Regent of Görz 1443.  He was appointed Ban of Slavonia in 1454 following the death of his father.  He was killed by László Hunyadi's men[187].  The necrology of Wilhering records the death "III Id Nov 1456" of "Ulricus com de Cilia"[188]m (20 Apr 1434) CANTAKUZINA, daughter of DJURADJ Branković Despot of Serbia & his wife Eirene Kantakouzene (-Ježovo [1490/92].  The Masarelli Vatican manuscript names (in order) Gregory, Stephen, Lazar, Maria, and Cantacuzina as the children of George of Serbia & his wife, stating that Cantacuzina married Ulrich count of Cilly[189].  The manuscript Vaticanus latinus 4789 records that the sister of “le seigneur Georges Cantacuzène...la première...Irène” married “[le] despote de Serbie” had two daughters, of whom “l´autre [=la deuxième]” married “[le] seigneur Ulrich”[190]Theodoros Spandounes records that "el Dispoto Jurgo di Servia…figliola…Catherina" married "uno fratello dello imperador Federico di casa d´Austria, conte de Cil"[191]She succeeded to his properties on the death of her husband but was obliged to conclude a treaty 15 Dec 1457 with Friedrich III Duke of Austria under which the latter received all the Cilli castles in Carinthia, Styria and Carniola while Katarina retained the family castles in Hungary and Croatia.  However, in 1460 she was obliged to sell her remaining properties to Vitovec Ban of Slavonia, and retired to Dubrovnik[192].  "Catherina comitissa Cillii" donated "castrum Bellogradi" to "Mathaeo Spandonino equiti et comiti palatino" for the love of "nepotis sue, uxoris dicti Mathaei" by document dated 9 Dec 1488 at Constantinople[193].  Ulric [II] & his wife had three children: 

i)          HERMAN of Celje (-1452).  The Masarelli Vatican manuscript records that Ulrich count of Cilly & his wife had a son who died aged 16[194]

ii)         GEORG of Celje (-1445). 

iii)        ELISABETH [Gelsa] of Celje (1441-[6 Nov] 1455).  The Masarelli Vatican manuscript names Gelsa as the daughter of Ulrich count of Cilly & his wife, stating that she married Matthias King of Hungary[195].  Theodoros Spandounes records that the daughter of "il conte de Cil" and his wife married "Mathias rè di Ungheria"[196].  She and her husband are named in the Masarelli Vatican manuscript[197]m (1455) as his first wife, MÁTYÁS Hunyadi "Corvinus" King of Hungary, son of JÁNOS Hunyadi & his wife Erszebet Szilágyi de Horogszeg (Kolozsvár 1440-Klausenburg, Vienna 6 May 1490, bur Székesfehérvár Cathedral). 

Frederic [II] & his second wife had one child: 

b)         FREDERIC of Celje .  Carthusian monk at Seitz. 

Frederic [II] had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses: 

c)          HANS (-after Jan 1462).  Legitimated 15 Nov 1447 by the Pope. 

d)         daughter (-before 1474)m (1455 before 22 Mar, repudiated 1463) as his first wife, VLATKO Herzegović, son of STEFAN Vukčić Kosaca, Herceg of Saint Sava, [Vojvoda of Bosnia], & his first wife Jelena Balša of Zeta ([1426]-Island of Rab before Mar 1489).  He succeeded his father in 1466 as Herceg of Saint Sava. 

2.         ELISABETH of Celje (-[1424/26])m (contract 31 Jan 1400, before 1407) as his first wife, HEINRICH V Graf von Görz, son of MEINHARD VI Graf von Görz & his second wife Utelhild von Mätsch ([8 Apr/22 Jun] 1376-[18 Mar] 1454).  Graf von Kirchberg 1415. 

3.         ANNA of Celje (-after 23 Jun 1438)m (Aug 1405) as his second wife, MIKLÓS [II] Garay, son of MIKLÓS [I] Garay & his wife --- ([1366]-before 17 Jan 1434).  Ban of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia. 

4.         HERMAN [III] of Celje ([1380]-Stain bei Radmannsdor 30 Jul 1426, bur Neustift).  He died after falling from his horse[198]m firstly ([1403]) as her second husband, ELISABETH von Abensberg, widow of ULRICH Graf von Schaunberg, daughter of JOHANN Herr von Abensberg ([1377]-before 1423).  m secondly (Ortenburg 31 May 1424) as her first husband, BEATRIX of Bavaria, daughter of ERNST Duke of Bavaria in Munich & his wife Elisabetta Visconti of Milan ([1403]-Neumarkt 12 Mar 1447, bur Gnadenberg).  She married secondly (Riedenburg 7 Sep 1428) as his second wife, Johann Pfalzgraf in Neunburg vorm Wald und in Neumarkt.  Herman [III] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         MARGARETA of Celje (-22 Jul 1480)m firstly HERMANN [I] Graf von Montfort und Pfannberg in Bregenz (-[22 Jan 1434/24 Jul 1435]).  m secondly (1444) WLADISLAW Duke of Teschen and Glogau, son of BOLKO I Duke of Auschwitz und Teschen [Piast] & his second wife Euphemia of Mazovia [Piast] (-[14 Feb 1460]). 

5.         LUDWIG of Celje (-[1417]). 

6.         BARBARA of Celje ([1392]-Melnik 11 Jul 1451, bur Prague).  She was Regent of Hungary 1412-1414 and 1416-1418.  She died of plague.  m (contract 6 Dec 1405, 1408) as his second wife, ZSIGMOND King of Hungary, son of Emperor KARL IV King of Germany, King of Bohemia & his fourth wife Elisabeth von Pommern (Prague 28 Jun 1368-Znaim/Znojmo 9 Dec 1437, bur Cathedral of Grosswardein/Szarvas, Hungary).  Elected SIGMUND King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 14 Sep 1410, confirmed 21 Jul 1411, crowned at Aachen 8 Nov 1414.  Elected ZIKMUND King of Bohemia at Hradschin 28 Jul 1410, crowned at Prague 27 Jul 1420 after the death of his older half-brother King Wenzel IV, when he also succeeded as Duc de Luxembourg.  Crowned King of Italy at Milan 25 Nov 1431.  Crowned Emperor SIGMUND at Rome 31 May 1433. 

Herman [II] had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

7.          HERMANN (-Cilli 13 Dec 1421).  Bishop of Freising 1412.  Elected Bishop of Trieste 1420.  The Gesta Episcoporum Frisingensium record the death in 1421 "habens rupturam intestinorum" of "vir iuvenis Hermanno filio comitis Cilie illegitime tamen nato" who was Bishop of Freising[199]

 

 

 

D.      COUNTS of VEGLIA [KRK] (FRANGEPANI or FRANKEPAN) 

 

 

Originally, a princely family from the island of Krk in Dalmatia.  Bartol and Vid, not receiving a share of Krk, went to the mainland and entered the service of the king of Hungary.  One of Vid's sons was named podesta of Split in the 1250s, while a second became podesta of Senj.  Frederick became Count of Modruš and Vinodol [1257], presumably granted the counties by Bela IV King of Hungary[200]

 

 

1.         DOIMO [Duym] (-before 3 Aug 1163).  Count of Veglia [Krk].  m ---.  The name of Doimo´s wife is not known.  Doimo & his wife had two children: 

a)         BARTOLOMEO [Bartol] (-[9 Jun 1194/5 May 1198]).  "Vitalis Michael…Venetiarum, Dalmatie atque Croatie dux", after the death of "comitis Doimi", confirmed "Bartholomeum atque Guidonem fratrem tuum, filium predicti comitis Doimi", in possession of "comitatum Veglensem" by charter dated 3 Aug 1163[201]Count of Veglia [Krk].  Béla III King of Hungary granted "totam terram pertinentem ad comitatum Modrus" to "comitis Bartholomĉi de Veglia" by charter dated 1193, witnessed by "Dominico curiali comite et eodem de Budrugensi, Andres comite de Suprum, Both comite de Bohar, Egidio comite de Sala, Fulcone comite de Vosvar, --- comite Sanegg [Macario comite de Zaunuch]"[202].  The archbishop of Spalato with "Damiano Iadertino comite et Grubessa Spalatino comite" defined the boundaries between the lands of the Knights Templars and the church of St Cosmas and St Damian to "comitis Bartholomĉi de Veglia" by charter dated 9 Jun 1194[203].  A charter dated 5 May 1198 refers to the recently deceased "Bartolomeus Veglensis comes"[204]

b)         GUIDO [Vid] .  "Vitalis Michael…Venetiarum, Dalmatie atque Croatie dux", after the death of "comitis Doimi", confirmed "Bartholomeum atque Guidonem fratrem tuum, filium predicti comitis Doimi", in possession of "comitatum Veglensem" by charter dated 3 Aug 1163[205]Count of Veglia [Krk]. 

 

2.         HANSZCount of Veglia [Krk].  "Johanni Veglensi comiti" swore allegiance to "Petrus Ziani…Venetiarum, Dalmatie atque Croatie dux" for "comitatu Vegle…et insula de Perviki" by charter dated May 1213[206]

 

3.         FRIGYES of Krk, son of DUYM Count of Krk [Veglia][207] & his wife Ursa [de Vodiča] (-before 16 Oct 1343).  Count of Krk [Veglia], Vindol, Modruš and Gačka.  m (before 1313) ELISABET, daughter of --- .  2 Nov 1315.  Frigyes & his wife had two children: 

a)         DUYM (-31 Mar 1348 or later).  Count of Krk [Veglia] and Modruš.  m ELIZABET de Bribir, daughter of MLADEN [II] de Bribir Ban of Bosnia and Croatia (-after 23 Feb 1356). 

b)         BARTOL [Bertalan] Frankepan (-[8 May 1361/23 Dec 1363]).  Count of Krk [Veglia] and Modruš.  m ---, sister of ULRIC, daughter of ---.  Bartol & his wife had four children: 

i)          STJEPAN (-[30 Sep 1388/Apr 1390]).  Count of Krk [Veglia] and Modruš.  m (1372) CATERINA Carrara, daughter of FRANCESCO Duke of Padua (-after 5 Oct 1405).  Stjepan & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ELIZABETA (-murdered 1422).  Her husband left her for Veronica.  Forced to return to his wife by his father, Elizabeta was found murdered in her bed the next morning.  m ([1405]) as his first wife, FREDERIC [II] Count of Cilli, son of HERMAN [II] Count of Cilli [Celje] & his wife --- (-1454). 

ii)         HANSZ (-29 Nov 1393).  Count of Veglia [Krk] and Modruš.  Ban of Croatia and Dalmatia 1385/1386.  Ban of Dalmatia, Croatia and Slavonia 1392/1395. 

-         see below

iii)        daughter .  m (23 May 1361) UGO di Duino .  1386/1390. 

iv)       MARGARETA (-before 1390).  m (before 11 Aug 1353) OTTO von Stubenberg (-10 Mar 1402). 

 

 

HANSZ of Krk, son of BARTOL [Bertalan] Count of Krk [Veglia] and Modruš & his wife --- (-29 Nov 1393).  Count of Veglia [Krk] and Modruš.  Ban of Croatia and Dalmatia 1385/1386.  Ban of Dalmatia, Croatia and Slavonia 1392/1395. 

m (23 May 1361) ANNA von Görz, daughter of MEINHARD VI Graf von Görz & his first wife Katharina von Pfannberg (-5 Sep 1402). 

Hansz & his wife had two children: 

1.         MIKLÓS (-26 Jun 1432).  Count of Veglia.  His lands included Krk (the family seat), Senj, and the counties of Vinodol, Modruš, Gacka (in Dalmatia), Lika (in Croatia), and Cetin, Slunj and Ozalj (in Slavonia).  He was appointed Ban of Croatia in 1426 by Sigismund King of Hungary, to whom he made a huge loan on his appointment, receiving as security major parts of Croatia.  He was the first of his family to adopt the name "Frangipani/Frangipán/Frankapan", which was recognised by the Pope in 1430[208]m DOROTTYA Garay, daughter of MIKLÓS Garay, Palatine & his wife ---.  Miklós & his wife had eleven children: 

a)         HANSZ Frangepán (-[19 Dec 1436/29 Jan 1437]).  Count of Veglia.  He was appointed Ban of Croatia after his father's death in 1432.  After his father-in-law's death in 1434, he inherited the latter's Croatian lands between Velebit and the Cetina River.  However, King Sigismund forfeited the inheritance, declaring Hansz a rebel.  After his death, Hansz's widow surrendered her inheritance to the king and retired to the Frankapán castle of Rmanj on the Una[209]m (betrothed 20 Nov 1411, 1416) KATARINA Nelipić, daughter and heiress of IVANIŠ Ivanović Count Nelipčić.  This marriage was agreed to confirm the alliance between the parties' respective parents, two of the strongest Croatian nobles in the Dalmatian region[210].  

-        DESCENDANTS[211]

b)         MIKLÓS Frangepán (-[5 Mar 1456/2 Sep 1458]).  Count of Veglia.  Joint Ban of Croatia and Dalmatia.  m (contract 15 Aug 1428) BARBARA von Walsee, daughter of REINPRECHT von Walsee & his wife Katharina of Duino.  Miklós & his wife had three children: 

i)          BERTALAN Frangepán (-22 Feb 1474, bur Teracz Franciscan Monastery).  m as her second husband, DÓRÁ Tóth de Szomszédvár, widow of JÁNOS Hening-Czernin de Szomszédvár, daughter of JÁNOS Tóth de Szomszédvár (1420-1489). 

ii)         MARGIT Frangepán .  Nun at St Demetrius, Zara. 

iii)        BORBÁLA [Barbara] Frangepán (-before 6 Jan 1490)m WILHELM von Liechtenstein zu Nikolsburg (-[murdered] Jul 1459). 

c)         ISTVÁN Frangepán (-1481).  Count of Veglia.  Ban of Croatia and Dalmatia.  After the loss of much of the family's lands following the death of his brother Martin and the expulsion from Krk of his brother Hans, Matyas Corvinus King of Hungary restored a portion of these lands to ISTVÁN, considered the brother who had been most loyal to the Hungarian crown[212]m (1446) ISOTTA d'Este, daughter of --- (1425-1456).  István & his wife had one child: 

i)          BERNAT Frangepán (-3 Nov 1527 or after).  Count Frangepán at Modruš.  He inherited his father's holdings in 1481.  m (before 16 Sep 1476) donna LUISA Marzano d'Aragona, daughter of MARINAO Marzano Principe di Rossano, Duca di Sessa e Squilacce & his wife Leonor de Aragón.  Bernat & his wife had [eight] children: 

(a)       KRISTÓF Frangepán (-Martinać 22 Sep 1527, bur Modruš).  Count Frangepán of Veglia, Zengg and Modruš.  m firstly ANNA Drágffy de Béltek, daughter of --- (-after 13 May 1507).  m secondly ([1513]) as her second husband, APPOLONIA Lang von Wellenburg, widow of JULIAN Graf von Lodron, daughter of HANS Lang von Wellenburg of Augsburg & his wife Margareta Sulzer ([1475/76]-Milan 4 Feb 1520, bur Capo d'Istria). 

(b)       MÁTYÁS Frangepánm as her second husband, ZSÓFIA Thuz de Lak, widow of ANDRÁS Hening de Szomszédvár, daughter of JÁNOS Thuz de Lak Ban of Croatia. 

(c)       JÁNOS FERENC Frangepán (-Pressburg 1543).  Archbishop of Kalocsa 1530.  Bishop of Eger 1537. 

(d)       ISOTTA Frangepán (-13 Sep 1545).  m firstly (contract 22 Jan 1492) LÁSZLÓ Egerváry de Egervár et Velike (-before 1496).  m secondly (contract 5 Sep 1515) ISTVÁN Perényi de Nagyida (-before 30 Jul 1525).  m thirdly ([1525/27]) GÁSPÁR Serédy de Seréd Tokay et Talyon (-1 Mar 1550). 

(e)       BEATRICE Frangepán ([1480]-1510 before 27 Mar)m firstly (Bihac 1496 before 7 Apr) JÁNOS Corvin Hunyadi Duke of Slavonia, Croatia and Dalmatia, Prince of Hungary, illegitimate son of MÁTYÁS "Corvinus" King of Hungary & his mistress Barbara Edelpöck (1473-12 Oct 1504).  m secondly (Gyula 21 Jan 1509) GEORG Markgraf von Brandenburg (-1543). 

(f)        MARIA MAGDALENE Frangepán .  1489. 

(g)       FERDINAND Frangepán (-[1527]).  He was elected Bishop of Modruš, resigned.  m (before 1509) MARIJA Brankovic, daughter of JOVAN Stefanović [Serbia] & his wife Jelena Jakšić (-1540). 

-         DESCENDANTS[213]

(h)       [KATALIN (-1536 or after).  m (after 1502) ADAM Svetoković (-Vienna 19 Nov 1422).] 

d)         GYÖRGY Frangepán (-before [22 Sep 1434]). 

e)         BARTLME Frangepán (-before 2 Sep 1458).  Count of Veglia [Krk].  m ELSPETH [Jelša], daughter of ---. 

-        DESCENDANTS[214]

f)          DUYM Frangepán (-after 14 Sep 1487).  Count of Veglia.  m (before 24 Jun 1457) BARBARA von Schaunberg, daughter of JOHANN Graf von Schaunberg zu Achan und Eferding & his wife Anna von Pettau (-after 1492). 

-        DESCENDANTS[215]

g)         MARTON [Martin] Frangepán (-4 Oct 1479, bur Teracz Franciscan Monastery).  Count of Veglia.  On the death of his father-in-law in 1442, he inherited the town of Jastrebarsko and two fortresses in the county of Dubica[216].  While he was dying, his territories were occupied by his brother Hans, but the latter was expelled by Blaž the Magyar who was appointed Ban of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia by Matyas Corvinus King of Hungary in early 1470[217]m firstly (before 7 Apr 1431) URSULA, daughter of ---.  She was joint founder of the Franciscan monastery at Teracz.  m secondly (before 24 Aug 1442) JELENA of Lipovać, daughter of --- (-before 20 May 1449).  m secondly ([1446/48]) as her second husband, DOROTEJA Hrvatinić, widow of IVANIŠ Count de Blagay, daughter of BALŠA Hercegović & his wife ---.  Heiress of Verbaz and Kozar in Bosnia. 

h)         KATALIN Frangepán .  1416.  m (21 Jan 1428) FRIEDRICH von Pettau, Hauptmann of Styria (-6 Jan 1438). 

i)          ANDRÁS Frangepán .  1434/1439. 

j)          ZSIGMOND Frangepán (-before 1466).  Count of Veglia [Krk].  m ELENA, daughter of --- (-[10 Nov 1489/4 Jun 1493]). 

k)         ANŽ [Hans] Frangepán (-after 1488).  Count of Veglia [Krk], under Hungarian suzerainty.  While his brother Martin was dying in 1479, Hans seized his lands but was expelled by Blaž the Magyar who besieged Hans at Krk.  Hans surrendered the island to Venice in Feb 1480 to safeguard his position, but after Blaž withdrew Hans was not permitted to remain as Governor and was sent to Venice.  m ELIZABETTA Morosini, daughter of PAOLO Morosini & his wife ---.  Anž & his wife had five children: 

i)          BORBALA [Varvara] Frangepán (-[1506])m firstly VUK Grgurević, illegitimate son of GRGUR Branković & his mistress --- ([1438]-16 Apr 1485).  Titular despot of Raitzen.  m secondly FRANJA Berislavić de Graborja Ban of Jajce.  1470/1517. 

ii)         DÓRÁ Frangepánm ISTVÁN Count de Blaga (-[1489/1504]). 

iii)        ANŽ [Hans] Frangepán (-1465). 

iv)       MIKLÓS Frangepán (-before 1480). 

v)        KATALIN Frangepánm firstly --- Dandolo, son of ANTONIO Dandolo.  m secondly Ser ANDREA Foscolo

2.         daughter .  m ---, a Pole. 

 

 



[1] Karbić, D., Matijević Sokol, M. and Sweeney, J. R. (eds. trans.) (2006) Thomĉ archidiaconi Spalatensis, Historia Salonitanorum atque Spalatinorum pontificum (CEP) ("Thomas Archdeacon of Split") 7, p. 37. 

[2] Bekker, I. (ed.) (1840) Constantini Porphyrogeniti De Thematibus et De Administrando Imperio, Corpus Scriptorum Historiĉ Byzantinĉ (Bonn), 31, p. 148. 

[3] Fine, J. V. A. (1991) The Early Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 252. 

[4] Fine (1991), pp. 252, 258 and 276. 

[5] Fine (1991), pp. 256 and 261. 

[6] Goldstein, I., trans. Jovanović, N. (1999) Croatia: A History (Hurst & Company, London), p. 17. 

[7] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 13, p. 61. 

[8] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1878) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb) ("Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium"), Vol. VII, 230, p. 473, quoting Registrum membran. uti videtur sĉculi XII, olim monasterii S. Petri in Selo, in archive capituli spalatensis. 

[9] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 17, p. 93. 

[10] Sakcinski, I. K. (ed.) (1874) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiĉ, Dalamatiĉ et Slavoniĉ, Diplomatički Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije I Slavonije (Zagreb) ("Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ"), Vol. I, CCXXVIII, p. 187. 

[11] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 17, pp. 95 and 97. 

[12] Fine (1991), pp. 285-86. 

[13] Fine (1991), p. 289. 

[14] Goldstein (1999), p. 22. 

[15] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 149, and Macartney, C. A. (1962) Hungary: A Short History (Edinburgh University Press), Chapter 2 (consulted at Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, <http://www.hungary.com/corvinus/lib/> (20 Jul 2003). 

[16] Goldstein (1999), p. 28. 

[17] Goldstein (1999), pp. 29-30. 

[18] Goldstein (1999), p. 31. 

[19] Goldstein (1999), p. 31. 

[20] Fine (1991), p. 252. 

[21] Scholz, B. W. with Rogers, B. (2000) Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories (University of Michigan Press) (“RFA”), 821, p. 109. 

[22] Einhardi Annales 819, MGH SS I, p. 207. 

[23] Einhardi Annales 820, MGH SS I, p. 207. 

[24] Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 32, MGH SS II, p. 625. 

[25] Einhardi Annales 821, MGH SS I, p. 208. 

[26] Einhardi Annales 819, MGH SS I, p. 207. 

[27] Einhardi Annales 819, MGH SS I, p. 207. 

[28] RFA 821, p. 109. 

[29] Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 32, MGH SS II, p. 625. 

[30] Einhardi Annales 819, MGH SS I, p. 207. 

[31] Einhardi Annales 823, MGH SS I, p. 210. 

[32] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 1, p. 3. 

[33] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 192, p. 377, quoting Vita in chronographico russico, n. 459, ch. 475. 

[34] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, LIX, p. 45, and Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 2, p. 3. 

[35] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 194, p. 382. 

[36] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 194, p. 382. 

[37] Fine (1991), p. 257. 

[38] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 4, p. 7. 

[39] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 21. 

[40] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, LXXXVII, p. 72, and Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 12, p. 14. 

[41] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 18. 

[42] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 3, p. 6. 

[43] Fine (1991), p. 261. 

[44] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 20. 

[45] ES II 157. 

[46] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 21. 

[47] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 5, p. 8. 

[48] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 13, p. 59. 

[49] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 11, p. 14. 

[50] Goldstein (1999), p. 17. 

[51] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 189, p. 375. 

[52] Annales Fuldenses Pars V, 884, 892 and 896, MGH SS I, pp. 401, 408 and 413. 

[53] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 13, p. 61. 

[54] Fine (1991), p. 262. 

[55] Fine (1991), pp. 157 and 262. 

[56] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, XC, p. 77. 

[57] Patrologia Latina, Vol. 132, col. 809A. 

[58] Fine (1991), p. 267. 

[59] Goldstein (1999), p. 18. 

[60] ES II 157. 

[61] Fine (1991), p. 265. 

[62] ES II 157. 

[63] De Administrando Imperio, 31, p. 151. 

[64] De Administrando Imperio, 31, p. 151. 

[65] Fine (1991), p. 265. 

[66] ES II 157. 

[67] Fine (1991), p. 265. 

[68] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 45, p. 62. 

[69] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 16, p. 90. 

[70] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 16, p. 90. 

[71] ES II 157. 

[72] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 45, p. 62. 

[73] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 13, p. 61. 

[74] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 16 and 19, pp. 20 and 23. 

[75] Fine (1991), p. 274, points out that the evidence to support this appointment is sparse and that the titles given may have been purely honorific. 

[76] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 22, p. 28. 

[77] Fine (1991), p. 274. 

[78] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 13, p. 61. 

[79] Fine (1991), p. 275. 

[80] Fine (1991), pp. 274-76. 

[81] Fine (1991), pp. 274-76. 

[82] Fine (1991), p. 278. 

[83] Iohannis Diaconi, Chronicon Venetum MGH SS VII, p. 37. 

[84] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 45, p. 62. 

[85] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 45, p. 62. 

[86] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 14, p. 63. 

[87] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, p. 428. 

[88] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 14, p. 63. 

[89] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, p. 428. 

[90] ES II 157. 

[91] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 45, p. 62. 

[92] Fine (1991), p. 276. 

[93] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 14, p. 63. 

[94] Fine (1991), pp. 277-78. 

[95] Fine (1991), p. 278. 

[96] ES II 157. 

[97] ES II 157. 

[98] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 37, p. 46. 

[99] Fine (1991), p. 278. 

[100] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 37, p. 46. 

[101] Fine (1991), p. 280. 

[102] Fine (1991), p. 280. 

[103] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 16, p. 89. 

[104] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 40, p. 51. 

[105] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 45, p. 62. 

[106] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CXLVI, p. 126. 

[107] Fine (1991), p. 279. 

[108] Fine (1991), p. 280. 

[109] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLVII, p. 135. 

[110] Fine (1991), p. 281. 

[111] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLXXXIV, p. 150. 

[112] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CXLVI, p. 126. 

[113] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CXLVI, p. 126. 

[114] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLXIX, p. 143. 

[115] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLXXIII, p. 145. 

[116] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXVII, p. 180.  

[117] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXXIII, p. 184. 

[118] Sakcinski, I. K. (ed.) (1875) Codex Diplomaticus Regni Croatiĉ, Dalamatiĉ et Slavoniĉ, Diplomatički Zbornik kraljevine Hrvatske, Dalmacije i Slavonije (Zagreb) ("Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ"), Vol. II, XV, p. 13. 

[119] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CXLVI, p. 126. 

[120] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLIV, p. 134. 

[121] ES II 157. 

[122] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 51, p. 66. 

[123] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXVII, p. 180. 

[124] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXIX, p. 181. 

[125] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXX, p. 181. 

[126] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 16, p. 89. 

[127] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 124, p. 148. 

[128] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 125, p. 149. 

[129] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 230, p. 472, quoting Joannes archidiaconus goricensis, scriptor aĉculi XIV, Krčelić, B. De regnis Dalmatiĉ, Croatiĉ et Sclavoniĉ notitiĉ prĉlimiares, pp. 101-2. 

[130] ES II 157. 

[131] Fine (1991), p. 279. 

[132] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLXXXVI, p. 152. 

[133] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CLXXXIV, p. 150. 

[134] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 16, p. 89. 

[135] Fine (1991), p. 281. 

[136] Gusztáv, W. (ed.) (1860) Codex Diplomaticus Arpadianus Continuatus, Monumenta Hungariĉ Historia, Diplomataria, VI, 1001-1235 (Pest) ("Monumenta Hungariĉ Historia, Diplomataria VI"), 7, p. 30.  

[137] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 230, p. 473, quoting Megiser (1616) Annales Carinthiĉ, lib. VII, c. 32, pp. 742-5. 

[138] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXI, p. 177. 

[139] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXVII, p. 180. 

[140] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXIX, p. 181. 

[141] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 17, p. 93. 

[142] Fine (1991), p. 283. 

[143] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 51, p. 66. 

[144] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 230, p. 474, quoting Joannes archidiaconus goricensis, scriptor aĉculi XIV, Krčelić, B. De regnis Dalmatiĉ, Croatiĉ et Sclavoniĉ notitiĉ prĉlimiares, pp. 101-2. 

[145] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, 230, p. 473, quoting Schwandtner, J.G. (ed.) (1765) M. Joan. de Thurocz chronica Hungarorum, c. XLVII and LVI, pp. 184 and 211. 

[146] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXI, p. 177. 

[147] Fine (1991), p. 284. 

[148] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXXIII, p. 184. 

[149] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 121, p. 146. 

[150] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 121, p. 146. 

[151] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. VII, Acta, 51, p. 66. 

[152] Codex Diplomaticus Croatiĉ, Vol. I, CCXI, p. 177. 

[153] Fine (1991), p. 284.  According to Goldstein, the battle in which King Petar was killed took place in 1097. 

[154] Fine (1991), p. 286. 

[155] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1892) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb) ("Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium"), Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, XCIX, p. 18. 

[156] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, CV, p. 19. 

[157] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, CVIII, p. 19. 

[158] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, XCIX, p. 18. 

[159] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, C, p. 18. 

[160] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, C, p. 18. 

[161] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, CX, p. 20. 

[162] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, CX, p. 20. 

[163] Two generations of his ancestors, and the descendants of his two brothers, are shown in ES III 174. 

[164] ES III 175. 

[165] Fine (1994), p. 473. 

[166] Fine (1994), p. 398. 

[167] Fine (1994), p. 496-7. 

[168] Fine (1994), p. 551. 

[169] Academia scientiarum et artum Slavorum meridionalium (1868) Monumenta spectantia historiam Slavorum meridionalium (Zagreb) ("Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium"), Vol. I, XXXIII, p. 24. 

[170] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XXXIII, p. 24. 

[171] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XXXIII, p. 24. 

[172] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XXXIII, p. 24. 

[173] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 32, pp. 211 and 213. 

[174] Thomas Archdeacon of Split 32, p. 213. 

[175] Goldstein (1999), p. 27. 

[176] Goldstein (1999), p. 27. 

[177] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. XXIII, Actĉ Bosnĉ, CI, p. 18. 

[178] Goldstein (1999), p. 27. 

[179] His ancestors are shown in ES III 45. 

[180] Fine (1994), pp. 464-5. 

[181] Fine (1994), p. 495. 

[182] ES II 158. 

[183] Fine (1994), p. 551. 

[184] Fine (1994), p. 552. 

[185] ES III 45. 

[186] Fine (1994), p. 495. 

[187] Fine (1994), p. 552. 

[188] Necrologia Wilheringensia, Passau Necrologies I, p. 444. 

[189] Massarelli, A. Dell'Imperadori Constantinopolitani Vat. Lat. 12127 f. 349v-353.  [MB]

[190] Brayer, E., Lemerle, P., Laurent, V. ‘Le Vaticanus latinus 4789: histoire et alliances des Cantacuzènes aux XIV-XV siécle’, Revue des études byzantines, Tome 9 (1951) (“Laurent ‘Vaticanus latinus 4789’ (1951)”), p. 75, available at <http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/rebyz_0766-5598_1951_num_9_1_1037> (21 Dec 2012).   

[191] Theodore Spandounes (Spandugnino), De la origine deli Imperatori Ottomani, Sathas, C. N. (ed.) (1890) Documents inédits relatifs à l'histoire de la Grèce au moyen âge, IX (Paris), p. 152. 

[192] Fine (1994), pp. 553-4. 

[193] Sathas Tome IX (1890), p. xiv, quoting Valentinelli, J. (1864) Regesta documentorum Germaniĉ historiam illustrantium (Munich), p. 238. 

[194] Massarelli, A. Dell'Imperadori Constantinopolitani Vat. Lat. 12127 f. 349v-353.  [MB]

[195] Massarelli, A. Dell'Imperadori Constantinopolitani Vat. Lat. 12127 f. 349v-353.  [MB]

[196] Spandounes, p. 152. 

[197] Massarelli, A. Dell'Imperadori Constantinopolitani Vat. Lat. 12127 f. 349v-353.  [MB]

[198] ES III 45. 

[199] Gesta Episcoporum Frisingensium Continuationes XIV et XV, MGH SS XXIV, p. 326. 

[200] Fine (1994), pp. 206-7. 

[201] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XII, p. 6. 

[202] Fejér, G. (ed.) (1829) Codex Diplomaticus Hungariĉ (Buda), Tome II, p. 292. 

[203] Codex Diplomaticus Hungariĉ, Tome II, p. 296. 

[204] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XXV, p. 16. 

[205] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XII, p. 6. 

[206] Monumenta Historiam Slavorum Meridionalium, Vol. I, XXXVII, p. 28. 

[207] His ancestors and collaterals are shown in ES III 587. 

[208] Fine (1994), p. 495. 

[209] Fine (1994), pp. 496-7. 

[210] Fine (1994), pp. 489-90. 

[211] His descendants, extinct in the male line [after 1520], are set out in ES III 588. 

[212] Fine (1994), p. 592. 

[213] His descendants, extinct in the male line in 1577, are set out in ES III 589. 

[214] His descendants, extinct in the male line in 1661, are set out in ES III 589. 

[215] His descendants, extinct in the male line in 1572, are set out in ES III 588. 

[216] Fine (1994), p. 497. 

[217] Fine (1994), p. 590.