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rouen ARCHBISHOPRIC

  v3.0 Updated 24 July 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                ARCHBISHOPS of ROUEN. 1

Chapter 2.                BISHOPS of AVRANCHES. 3

Chapter 3.                BISHOPS of BAYEUX. 3

Chapter 4.                BISHOPS of COUTANCES. 3

Chapter 5.                BISHOPS of EVREUX. 4

Chapter 6.                BISHOPS of LISIEUX. 4

Chapter 7.                BISHOPS of SEES. 4

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

This document sets out the families of the archbishops of Rouen and of the bishops of the six bishoprics which lay within the archiepiscopal diocese.  At present, the document is only partially completed.  It has been uploaded in Medieval Lands at this early stage in its development mainly to complete the hyperlinks to other documents. 

 

Chapter 1.    ARCHBISHOPS of ROUEN

 

 

 

1.         FRANCON (-[941/42]).  Archbishop of Rouen .  Guillaume de Jumièges records that “Karolus rex” sent "Franconem Rotomagensem archiepiscopum" to request a three months truce from “Rollonem[1].  Guillaume of Jumièges records the death of “Franco Rotomagensis archiepiscopus” and the succession of "Gunardus"[2], dated to [941/42] from the context. 

 

 

1.         HUGUES [de Tosny], son of HUGUES de Calvacamp & his wife --- (-10 Nov [989/90]).  Monk at Saint-Denis before 942.  Archbishop of Rouen 942.  The Acta Archiepiscorum Rothomagensium record that "Willelmus filius Rollonis dux Normannorum" appointed "Hugo…monachus apud sanctum Dyonisium" as archbishop of Rouen, adding that he was "prosapia clarus, sed ignobilis cunctis operibus", had "filios…quamplures", and granted "Todiniacum…in dominicatu archiepiscopi" to "fratri suo Radulfo…filio Hugonis de Calvacamp"[3].  The dates of his appointment and death are ascertained from Orderic Vitalis who records the death of his predecessor in 942, and that Hugues held the position for 47 years[4]Gallia Christiana records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Hugonis archiepiscopi"[5]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Normandie, son of RICHARD I "Sans-Peur" Comte [de Normandie] & his second wife Gunnora --- (-1037).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum...et Robertum atque Malgerium aliosque duos” as the sons of Richard and his wife “Gunnor ex nobilissima Danorum prosapia ortam[6].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Robertus archiepiscopus Rothomagensis" as brother of "dux Normannie Richardus II"[7].  He is named brother of Duke Richard II by Orderic Vitalis[8]Comte d'EvreuxArchbishop of Rouen 989, after his parents married to legitimise him in order to regularise his appointment[9].  An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Robertus archiepiscopus…ecclesie Rotomagensis et Vuillelmus et Malgerus fratres Richardi comitis…"[10].  He quarrelled with his nephew Robert II Duke of Normandy and took refuge in France.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1037 of "Robertus…archiepiscopus Rothomagensis"[11]

 

 

1.         MAUGER de Normandie, son of RICHARD II "le Bon/l'Irascible" Duke of Normandy & his third wife Papia [Poppa] [d'Envermeu] ([1020/26]-drowned Guernsey 1055).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard II married secondly after the death of his first wife “Papiam” by whom he had “Malgerium...archipræsulem et Willelmum Archacensem[12].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Malgerius Rothomagensis archiepiscopus" as son of "dux Normannie Richardus II"[13].  His parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis, who says he was "excessively addicted to the lusts of the flesh and distractions of the world"[14]Archbishop of Rouen 1037.  Robert of Torigny records that "Malgerius nepos eius" succeeded as archbishop of Rouen in 1037 on the death of his uncle Robert[15].  He governed the see for "18 years without receiving either apostolic blessing or the pallium", according to Orderic Vitalis who says that "Mauger too young received the seat of honour"[16].  "Malgerii arciepiscopi…" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[17].  "Guillelmus Archensis comes et frater meus Malgerius Archiepiscopus" donated the vill of Periers sur Andelle to the monastery of Saint-Ouen at Rouen, at the request of "matris mee Paveie" and the consent of "Guilielmo Normannorum comite", by charter dated to [1047/50][18].  According to William of Malmsbury, he was deprived of his archbishopric by his nephew Duke Guillaume as "he gave too much attention to hunting and hawking, and consumed the treasures of the church in a splendid mode of living" or alternatively that he wished to annul Duke Guillaume's marriage for consanguinity[19].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume banished “Malgerius archipræsul Rotomagensis” to “insula...Ghernervia” and appointed “Maurilio Fiscannensi monacho” in his place[20].  Orderic Vitalis says that he was deposed by Duke Guillaume for having aided the rebellion of his brother Guillaume[21]

 

 

1.         MAURILE (-9 Aug 1067).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Maurilius” was "genere Maguntinus" [from Mainz], and had been “in urbe Florentia monachali cœnobio abbatis” before being appoint archbishop of Rouen[22]Archbishop of Rouen .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume banished “Malgerius archipræsul Rotomagensis” to “insula...Ghernervia” and appointed “Maurilio Fiscannensi monacho” in his place[23].  Guillaume of Jumièges records the death “V Id Aug” 1067 of “Maurilius...archiepiscopus Rotomagensis” and the appointment of “Ioannes Abrincatinæ urbis præsul...comitis Rodulphi filius” as his successor[24].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “V Id Aug” of “Maurilius Rotomagensis archiepiscopus”, dated to 1067 from the context, and includes his epitaph written by “Ricardo Herluini filio[25]

 

 

1.         JEAN d'Ivry, son of [RAOUL d´Ivry Comte de Bayeux] & his [second] wife Eremburge [de Caville/Cacheville] (-1079).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[26].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore[27].  Considering the date of his death, Jean must have been considerably younger than his brother Hugues.  One possibility is that he was born from a second unrecorded marriage of his mother.  Bishop of Avranches 1061.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Lanfrancum Cadomensem abbatem” was appointed to succeed after the death of “Maurilius Rotomagensis archiepiscopus” but refused the task and pressed for the appointment of “Joannem Abrincatensium præsulem...filius Radulphi comitis Bajocensium...frater...uterinus Ricardi senioris ducis Normannorum” (who had held that post for seven years and three months, and was archbishop for ten years), even travelling to Rome to obtain Papal consent[28]Archbishop of Rouen 1069.  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records that "Joannes filius Rodulfi comitis fratris Ricardi" succeeded as Archbishop of Rouen in 1069, having been bishop of Avranches for seven years and three months[29].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “XVI Kal Aug” 1077 of "Hugo Lexoviensis episcopus", the subsequent dispute about his place of burial with “Johanni archiepiscopo” who refused to accept the king´s decision at Rouen and, while returning from there by mule, was struck down by a violent seizure, after which he survived for two years without being able to speak[30].  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records the death in 1079 of "Joannes Rothomag. Archiepiscopus"[31].  Orderic Vitalis records the death in 1079 of “Johannes archiepiscopus” after governing for eight years and his burial "in baptisterio basilicæ ad Aquilonem", and also records his epitaph[32]

 

 

[Two siblings:]

1.         RADBOD .  Bishop of Sées.  m ---.  Radbod [& his wife] had one child:

a)         GUILLAUME (-1110).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Willermus clericus cognomento Bona Anima, Radbodi Sagiensi episcopi filius”, who later governed the archbishopric of Rouen for nearly 36 years, accompanied Thierry Abbot of Ouche on pilgrimage, dated to [1057/58][33].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus Radbodi Sagiensis episcopi filius...consobrinus Guillelmi præsulis Ebroicensium, filii Girardi Fleitelli” succeeded Lanfranc “in Cadomensi ecclesia” when the latter was appointed archbishop of Canterbury, dated to 1070, adding that Gullaume was appointed archbishop of Rouen nine years later[34]Archbishop of Rouen 1079.  Orderic Vitalis records the death in 1079 of “Johannes archiepiscopus” and the election of "Guillelmus Cadomensis abbas", adding that he governed for 32 years[35]

2.         [sister The wife of Gérard Flaitel may have been the sister of Radbod Bishop of Sées: Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus Radbodi Sagiensis episcopi filius...consobrinus Guillelmi præsulis Ebroicensium, filii Girardi Fleitelli” succeeded Lanfranc “in Cadomensi ecclesia” when the latter was appointed archbishop of Canterbury, dated to 1070, adding that Gullaume was appointed archbishop of Rouen nine years later[36]m GERARD Flaitel, son of --- (-[1047]).] 

 

 

1.         HUGUES d´Amiens, son of ADAM Châtelain d´Amiens & his [first/second wife ---/Beatrix de Boves] (-1164)Archbishop of Rouen 1129. 

 

 

1.         GAUTHIER (-16 Nov 1207).  Archbishop of Rouen .  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death “XVI Kal Dec” in 1207 of “Walterus Rothomagensis archiepiscopus” and the succession of “magister Robertus cognomento Polein[37]

 

1.         ROBERT Polein (-1221, bur Mortemer).   Archbishop of Rouen 1207.  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death “XVI Kal Dec” in 1207 of “Walterus Rothomagensis archiepiscopus” and the succession of “magister Robertus cognomento Polein[38].  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death in 1221 of “Robertus Polanus Rothomagensis archiepiscopus” (and his burial “in choro nostro”) and the succession of “Theobaldus de Ambianis thesaurarius ecclesie Rothomagensis[39]

 

 

1.         --- .  m HUMBELINE, daughter of --- (-1203).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1203 of “domne Humeline Ambianensis” whose “filium...Theobaldum” was archbishop of Rouen[40].  One child: 

a)         THIBAUT (-25 Sep 1229).  Archbishop of Rouen 1221.  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death in 1221 of “Robertus Polanus Rothomagensis archiepiscopus” and the succession of “Theobaldus de Ambianis thesaurarius ecclesie Rothomagensis[41].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1221 that, after the death of “apud Rothomagum archiepiscopum magistrum Robertum Pulanum”, “Theobaldus thesaurarius filius domne Humeline Ambianensis” was made archbishop[42].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1229 of “archiepiscopus Rothomagensis Theobaldus” after holding office for eight years[43].  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death “VII Kal Oct” in 1229 of “Theobaldus de Ambianis archiepiscopus Rothomagensis” and the succession in 1231 of “Mauricius[44]

 

 

1.         MAURICE (-12 Jan 1234)Bishop of Le MansArchbishop of Rouen 1231.  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death “VII Kal Oct” in 1229 of “Theobaldus de Ambianis archiepiscopus Rothomagensis” and the succession in 1231 of “Mauricius[45].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records in 1231 that “episcopus Cenomannensis magister Mauritius” was made “archiepiscopus Rothomagensis” after the Pope rejected “magistro Thoma[46].  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica written in Mortemer records the death “pridie Id Jan...apud Salicosam” in 1234 of “Mauricius Rothomagensis archiepiscopus, de sede Cenomanensi...Rothomagensi ecclesie prerogatus[47]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    BISHOPS of AVRANCHES

 

 

 

1.         JEAN d'Ivry, son of [RAOUL d´Ivry Comte de Bayeux] & his [second] wife Eremburge [de Caville/Cacheville] (-1079).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[48].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore[49].  Considering the date of his death, Jean must have been considerably younger than his brother Hugues.  One possibility is that he was born from a second unrecorded marriage of his mother.  Bishop of Avranches 1061.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Lanfrancum Cadomensem abbatem” was appointed to succeed after the death of “Maurilius Rotomagensis archiepiscopus” but refused the task and pressed for the appointment of “Joannem Abrincatensium præsulem...filius Radulphi comitis Bajocensium...frater...uterinus Ricardi senioris ducis Normannorum” (who had held that post for seven years and three months, and was archbishop for ten years), even travelling to Rome to obtain Papal consent[50]Archbishop of Rouen 1069.  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records that "Joannes filius Rodulfi comitis fratris Ricardi" succeeded as Archbishop of Rouen in 1069, having been bishop of Avranches for seven years and three months[51].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “XVI Kal Aug” 1077 of "Hugo Lexoviensis episcopus", the subsequent dispute about his place of burial with “Johanni archiepiscopo” who refused to accept the king´s decision at Rouen and, while returning from there by mule, was struck down by a violent seizure, after which he survived for two years without being able to speak[52].  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records the death in 1079 of "Joannes Rothomag. Archiepiscopus"[53].  Orderic Vitalis records the death in 1079 of “Johannes archiepiscopus” after governing for eight years and his burial "in baptisterio basilicæ ad Aquilonem", and also records his epitaph[54]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    BISHOPS of BAYEUX

 

 

1.         HUGUES d'Ivry, son of RAOUL d´Ivry Comte [de Bayeux] & his wife Aubrée [de Caville/Cacheville] (-Oct 1049).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[55].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Hugo Rodulfi comitis filius, Baiocasinæ urbis præsul” secretly stocked “Ibrilicum castrum” and sought help from France to defend it, but was unable to re-enter the castle besieged by Robert II Duke of Normandy and left in exile[56].  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Bishop of Bayeux 1015.

 

 

1.         EUDES [Odo], son of HERLUIN Vicomte de Contéville & his first wife Herlève --- ([1036/38]-[Antioch/Palermo] [2/6] Jan 1097, bur Palermo Cathedral).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[57].  The birth date of Eudes is estimated on the assumption that Guillaume of Jumièges is correct (which is not beyond all doubt).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[58].  Florence of Worcester names Eudes as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[59]Bishop of Bayeux 1050 (when Eudes must have been an adolescent, assuming that his birth date is correctly estimated as shown above).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the death of “Hugo filius Rodulphi comitis Baiocensis episcopus”, Guillaume II Duke of Normandy appointed “Odoni fratri suo” to the bishopric of Bayeux, a position he held for nearly 50 years[60].  He is said to have taken an active part in the preparation of the Norman invasion of England and was present at the battle of Hastings 23 Oct 1066.  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Odone episcopo de Baiocis" contributed 120 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[61].  His half-brother William I King of England rewarded him with a grant of over 500 manors in England and created him Earl of Kent in 1067[62].  Florence of Worcester records that King William left "fratrumque suum Odonem Baiocensem episcopum et Willelmum filium Osberni quem in Herefordensi provincia comitum" when he went to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][63].  He was one of the leaders of the force which suppressed the rebellion of the earls of Norfolk and Hereford in 1075[64].  He began scheming to become Pope, sending great gifts to influential men in Rome, but was arrested by King William and sent to Normandy where he was a prisoner in Rouen between 1082 and 1087[65].  He was released by King William on his deathbed[66].  Although King William II restored Eudes to his earldom, he was one of the leaders of the rebellion in 1088 which sought to put Robert Duke of Normandy on the English throne[67].  He was banished from England and all his honours and possessions forfeited.  He became chief adviser to Duke Robert in Normandy[68].  Orderic Vitalis records that Bishop Eudes died “in urbem Panormitanam, quam vulgo Palernam vocant” and that “Gislebertus Ebroicensis episcopus” buried him “in metropolitana sanctæ Dei genetricis Mariæ basilica”, adding that he had been appointed “ab adolescentia sua” (which supports that the theory that he was born after the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy, as discussed above)[69].  William of Malmesbury records that he left on the First Crusade with Robert III Duke of Normandy and died “Antiochiæ, in obsidione Christianorum[70].  The necrology of Jumièges records the death 2 Jan of “Odo episcopus[71]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    BISHOPS of COUTANCES

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    BISHOPS of EVREUX

 

 

1.         GUNTBERTBishop of Evreux .  Flodoard´s Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ records the presence in 853 (“Hincmarus anno sui episcopatus VII”) at the synod at Soissons of “Wenilone Sennense archiepiscopo, Amalrico Turonense, Teoderico Cameracense episcopo, Rothado Suessonico, Lupo Cathalaunense, Immone Noviomagense, Erpuino Silvanectense, Erminfrido Belvacense, Pardulo Laudunense, Hilmerado Ambianense, Hucberto Meldense, Agio Aurelianense, Prudentio Trecasino, Hermanno Nivernense, Iona Augustudense, Godelsado Cavillonense, Dodone Andagavense, Guntberto Ebroicense, Hildebranno Sagense, Rigboldo Remorum corepiscopo[72]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME Flaitel, son of GERARD Flaitel & his wife --- (-1066).  Orderic Vitalis names "…Willermus episcopus Ebroicensis, filius Gerardi Fleitelli…" among the subscribers of a charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy dated to [1050][73]Bishop of Evreux 1046.  “Gerardus cognomento Pernotus videlicet Flagitellus”, gravely ill, donated “æcclesiarum Cambagi et Ulmiri et Avesnelle et Marculfiuille qui vulgo dicitur Boscgerard...et...in Longoilo villa” to Saint-Wandrille and became a monk there by charter dated to [1038/47], subscribed by “Willelmus episcopus, W. comitis de vicecomitis G., Anscherii, Rodberti filii G., H. filii Withsonis...[74].  "Willelmus…Ebrocassine civitatis episcopus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Wandrille, in memory of "patris mei Girardi" and for the souls of "fratrum meorum", by undated charter[75].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Guillelmo Ebroicensium episcopo”, “Balduinus ducis capellanus” was appointed and was bishop for seven years, dated to 1070, and was in turn succeeded by “Gislebertus Osberni filius canonicus et archidiaconus Lexoviensis” who was bishop for more than 30 years[76]

 

 

1.         GISELBERT, son of OSBERN & his wife --- (-1112).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of “Guillelmo Ebroicensium episcopo”, “Balduinus ducis capellanus” was appointed and was bishop for seven years, dated to 1070, and was in turn succeeded by “Gislebertus Osberni filius canonicus et archidiaconus Lexoviensis” who was bishop for more than 30 years[77]Bishop of Evreux [78]

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         ROTRODBishop of Evreux

2.         --- .  m ---.  One child: 

a)         ROBERT de Neuchâtel .  "Rotrodus...Ebroicensis ecclesie...minister" donated "ecclesias de Illeiis" to Chartres Notre-Dame by charter dated 1157 witnessed by “...Roberto de Novo-Burgo nepote nostro...[79]

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         HENRI (-22 Aug [1271]).  Bishop of Evreux .  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XI Kal Sep" of "Henrici quondam episcopi Hostiensis et Huldrici fratris dicti Henrici avunculorum bone memorie magistri Johannis de Secusa hujus ecclesie canonici[80]

2.         --- .  m ---.  One child:

a)         JEAN (-17 Aug ----).  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVI Kal Sep" of "Johannes de Secusa hujus ecclesie canonicus, nepos...Henrici quondam Ebredunensis archiepiscopi, a papa postea vocati in episcopum Hostiensem” and the donations made by “Huldrico fratre dicti Henrici episcopi, avunculo dicti Johannis[81]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    BISHOPS of LISIEUX

 

 

 

1.         HUGUES d'Eu, son of GUILLAUME Comte d'Hiémois et d'Eu [Normandy] & his wife Lesceline de Tourville (-17 Jul 1077).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Rodbertum...Willelmum Suessionensem comitem atque Hugonem Luxoviensem præsulem” as the three sons of “ducis uno ex patre fratrem progenitum...Willelmum” and his wife “Lezscelinam...filiam...Turchetilli[82].  An undated charter, dated to [1049], records that "Lezelina comitissa…cum filiis suis" was expelled "de castro Ou" and donated land on the banks of the Seine to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "filiis suis Hugone, Willelmo, Rotberto"[83].  He is named as brother of Robert Comte d'Eu by Orderic Vitalis[84]Bishop of Lisieux .  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Lecelina comitissa Aucensis relicta Willermi comitis" founded "mon. Sancti Petri super Divam virorum et mon. fem. ante urbem Lexoviensem" with "filiis suis Roberto comite Aucensi et Hugone episcopo Lexoviensi"[85].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “XVI Kal Aug” 1077 of "Hugo Lexoviensis episcopus" while he was being carried from Pont-l’Evêque to Lisieux, the dispute about his place of burial, and his eventual burial at Lisieux Sainte-Marie in the presence of “Roberto Aucensi comite...germanus eius[86]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 7.    BISHOPS of SEES

 

 

1.         HILDEBRANDBishop of Sées .  Flodoard´s Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ records the presence in 853 (“Hincmarus anno sui episcopatus VII”) at the synod at Soissons of “Wenilone Sennense archiepiscopo, Amalrico Turonense, Teoderico Cameracense episcopo, Rothado Suessonico, Lupo Cathalaunense, Immone Noviomagense, Erpuino Silvanectense, Erminfrido Belvacense, Pardulo Laudunense, Hilmerado Ambianense, Hucberto Meldense, Agio Aurelianense, Prudentio Trecasino, Hermanno Nivernense, Iona Augustudense, Godelsado Cavillonense, Dodone Andagavense, Guntberto Ebroicense, Hildebranno Sagense, Rigboldo Remorum corepiscopo[87]

 

 

1.         IVES de Bellême, son of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Sire d'Alençon & his wife Mathilde --- (-5 Apr 1070, bur Sées).  Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Ives évêque de Seès" was paternal uncle of Arnoul, after whose murder he took possession of the château de Bellême.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[88], he was the son of Guillaume de Bellême, son of "Guillaume de Belesme, fils d'Yves", the table specifying that he was "Sagiensis episcopus Wilhelmi scilicet domini de Bellismo filius" and "avunculus Rodberti filii Guillelmi".  From a chronological point of view, this appears unlikely to be correct.  Bishop of Sées 1035.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ivo...Sagiensis episcopus” besieged “Richardus atque Robertus et Avesgotus filii Willelmi cognomine Sorengi” in the church of Saint-Gervais, which they had occupied after they had devastated “omnem circa Sagium patriam”, and forced them to flight, the following chapter describing how each of the three brothers died[89]

 

 

 



[1] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber II, XIV, p. 229. 

[2] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber III, X, p. 237. 

[3] Veterum Analectorum, Tome II, Acta Archiepiscoporum Rothomagensium, p. 437. 

[4] Le Prévost, A. (1840) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. II, Liber V, IX, p. 362. 

[5] Gallia Christiana, XI, col. 26. 

[6] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247. 

[7] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1026, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783. 

[8] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 167. 

[9] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen) (“Robert de Torigny”), Book VIII c. 36. 

[10] Vernier, J. J. (ed.) (1916) Chartes de l'abbaye de Jumièges, Tome I c 825-1169 (Rouen, Paris) (“Jumièges”), 7, p. 16. 

[11] Robert de Torigny I, 1037, p. 40. 

[12] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, VII, p. 270. 

[13] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1026, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783. 

[14] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 87.  

[15] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1037, p. 40. 

[16] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 87. 

[17] Jumièges 20, p. 63. 

[18] Gurney, D. (1845) The record of the House of Gournay, Part I, The Gournays in Normandy, p. 43, quoting originals in the Archives de Rouen. 

[19] Sharpe, Rev. J. (trans.), revised Stephenson, Rev. J. (1854) William of Malmesbury, The Kings before the Norman Conquest (Seeleys, London, reprint Llanerch, 1989), 267, p. 251. 

[20] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXIV, p. 281. 

[21] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 85. 

[22] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, IX, p. 371. 

[23] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXIV, p. 281. 

[24] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[25] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, II, p. 168. 

[26] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[27] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 416. 

[28] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, II, p. 168. 

[29] Ex Chronico S. Stephani Cadom., RHGF XI, p. 379. 

[30] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, III, p. 309. 

[31] Ex Chronico S. Stephani Cadom., RHGF XI, p. 379. 

[32] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, IV, p. 312. 

[33] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, IV, p. 64. 

[34] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 213. 

[35] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, IV, p. 313. 

[36] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 213. 

[37] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1207, MGH SS VI, p. 466. 

[38] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1207, MGH SS VI, p. 466. 

[39] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1221, MGH SS VI, p. 468. 

[40] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1203, MGH SS XXIII, p. 881. 

[41] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1221, MGH SS VI, p. 468. 

[42] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1221, MGH SS XXIII, p. 912. 

[43] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1229, MGH SS XXIII, p. 926. 

[44] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1229, MGH SS VI, p. 468. 

[45] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1229, 1231, MGH SS VI, pp. 468-9. 

[46] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1231, MGH SS XXIII, p. 928. 

[47] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Mortui Maris 1234, MGH SS VI, p. 469. 

[48] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[49] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 416. 

[50] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, II, p. 168. 

[51] Ex Chronico S. Stephani Cadom., RHGF XI, p. 379. 

[52] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, III, p. 309. 

[53] Ex Chronico S. Stephani Cadom., RHGF XI, p. 379. 

[54] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, IV, p. 312. 

[55] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[56] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VI, V, p. 258. 

[57] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268. 

[58] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[59] Forester, T. (trans.) (1854) The Chronicles of Florence of Worcester with two continuations (London), 1088, p. 186. 

[60] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVI, p. 275. 

[61] Giles, I. A. (ed.) (1845) Scriptores rerum gestarum Willelmi Conquestoris (London) Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 22. 

[62] CP VII 126. 

[63] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 1. 

[64] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. II, p. 243, and Florence of Worcester, 1074, p. 178. 

[65] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, p. 189, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 43, and Garmonsway, G. N. (trans) (1972) The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (Dent), E, 1082 and 1086 [1087]. 

[66] Florence of Worcester, 1087, p. 185. 

[67] Florence of Worcester, 1088, p. 186. 

[68] CP VII 129. 

[69] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber X, IV, p. 17. 

[70] Willelmi Malmesbiriensis, Vol. II, Liber III, 277, p. 334. 

[71] Ex obituario Gemmeticensi, RHGF XXIII, p. 417. 

[72] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, Liber III, II, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 193.

[73] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, p. 39. 

[74] Lot. F. (1913) Etudes critiques sur l´abbaye de Saint-Wandrille, Bibliothèque de l´Ecole des Hautes Etudes, 204e fascicule (Paris), Appendice, (“Saint-Wandrille”), 22, p. 66. 

[75] Gurney (1845), p. 56, quoting Cartulaire de Saint-Wandrille, Rouen Archives. 

[76] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 214. 

[77] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VI, p. 214. 

[78] ES III 695. 

[79] Lépinois, E. de & Merlet, L. (eds.) (1865) Cartulaire de Notre-Dame de Chartres (Chartres) ("Chartres Notre-Dame") Tome I, LXV, p. 164. 

[80] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du XII siècle, p. 84.       

[81] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du XII siècle, p. 83.       

[82] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, III, p. 250. 

[83] Deville, A. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité du Mont de Rouen, Collection des cartularies de France Tome III (same volume as Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin) (Paris) ("Rouen Sainte-Trinité"), LXIX, p. 457. 

[84] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. II, Book III, p. 141. 

[85] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 200. 

[86] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, III, pp. 309-10. 

[87] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, Liber III, II, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 193.

[88] ES III 636. 

[89] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XII, XIII, pp. 273-4.