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AVRANCHES, BAYEUX, COTENTIN

 

  v4.0 Updated 19 April 2017

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                AVRANCHES, MORTAIN. 2

A.         COMTES d’AVRANCHES.. 2

B.         COMTES de MORTAIN, VICOMTES de CONTEVILLE.. 4

C.        VICOMTES d'AVRANCHES.. 13

D.        SEIGNEURS de GRANVILLE.. 19

E.         SEIGNEURS d’ORVAL. 20

F.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-JEAN.. 21

Chapter 2.                BAYEUX. 25

A.         COMTES de BAYEUX.. 25

B.         VICOMTES du BESSIN (BAYEUX) 32

C.        SEIGNEURS d’AUNAY-sur-ODON (SAY) 38

D.        SEIGNEURS de CREULLY.. 40

E.         SEIGNEURS de CREVECŒUR.. 43

F.         SEIGNEURS du HOMMET. 61

G.        SEIGNEURS d’IVRY (GOËL) 71

Chapter 3.                COTENTIN. 77

A.         VICOMTES de COTENTIN, SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAUVEUR.. 77

B.         SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAUVEUR (TAISSON) 84

C.        SEIGNEURS de BARNEVILLE.. 89

D.        SEIGNEURS de BRICQUEBEC (BERTRAN) 90

E.         FAMILY of THURSTAN HALDUP.. 96

F.         SEIGNEURS de LA HAYE.. 98

G.        SEIGNEURS de PREAUX.. 99

 

 

 

This document groups the nobility in the western part of the duchy of Normandy, located in the present-day départements of Manche and Calvados. 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    AVRANCHES, MORTAIN

 

 

 

A.      COMTES d’AVRANCHES

 

 

South of the Cotentin in the south-west corner of the duchy of Normandy, lay the diocese of Avranches, which included the pagus Abricantinus (Avranchin) next to the duchy of Brittany[1].  The first count, Robert, was an illegitimate son of Richard I Comte de Normandie.  In the mid-11th century, the county (then referred to as Mortain) was recorded in the hands of Guillaume Comte de Corbeil, son of Mauger, a younger son of Duke Richard I.  Guillaume was banished in 1063 by Duke Guillaume II who appointed his uterine half-brother Robert to the county.  Henry I King of England deprived Guillaume, son of Robert Comte de Mortain, of the county after the battle of Tinchebrai in [1106].  Thereafter the territory remained under the direct control of the kings of England until Normandy was captured by the Capetian kings of France in the early 13th century.  The early counts of Avranches/Mortain were studied by Potts[2]

 

 

 

ROBERT, illegitimate son of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his mistress --- (-after [1015])Comte d’Avranches.  His parentage is established by André de Fleury’s Vita Gauzlini which records that “Rotbertus Abricatinensium comes” held “de sui jure patrimonii ecclesiam sancti Hylarii”, that after his death it was held by “eius filius Richardus” who was banished “a proprio avunculo Richardo” [Richard II Duke of Normandy][3].  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][4]

m firstly BILELDIS, daughter of --- (-before [1015]).  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][5]

m secondly ASCELINE, daughter of --- (-after [1015]).  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][6]

Robert & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

1.         GUILLAUME .  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][7]

2.         ROBERT .  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][8]

3.         RICHARD .  "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi" by charter dated to [1015][9]Comte d’AvranchesAndré de Fleury’s Vita Gauzlini records that “Rotbertus Abricatinensium comes” held “de sui jure patrimonii ecclesiam sancti Hylarii”, that after his death it was held by “eius filius Richardus” who was banished “a proprio avunculo Richardo” [Richard II Duke of Normandy][10]. 

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME "Guerlenc" de Corbeil, son of MAUGER de Normandie Comte de Corbeil & his wife Germaine de Corbeil (-1067).  His parentage is established by Orderic Vitalis who calls him "son of Count Mauger" when recording his banishment[11]Comte de CorbeilGuillelmus comes Corboilensis” donated the church of Corbeil Saint-Jean-Baptiste to Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, in the presence of “Nanterus Corboilensis vicecomes”, by charter dated 26 May 1043[12].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Werlencus de stirpe Richardi magni comes...Moritolii” plotted rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, as reported to the duke by “tyro de familia sua...Robertus Bigot”, and that the duke expelled him to Apulia and granted his county to “Robertum fratrem suum[13].  Orderic Vitalis calls him "son of Count Mauger" and says he was Comte de Mortain, banished by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "on some trivial pretexts"[14] in 1063.  “…Walterius comes Pontisariensis, Willelmus comes Corboilensis, Ivo comes Bellomontensis, Walerannus comes Melledensis” are named among those present at the opening of the reliquary of Saint-Denis, dated 9 Jun 1053[15]m ---.  The name of Guillaume's wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had three children:

 

 

 

B.      COMTES de MORTAIN, VICOMTES de CONTEVILLE

 

 

Le Prévost states that Conteville was “Conteville-sur-mer, près l’embouchure de la Risle [Eure]” and that the properties of Herluin de Conteville in the area were later referred to as “l’honneur de Saint-Mère-Eglise” and, after being united with Saint-Pierre-du-Châtel, “Notre-Dame-du-Châtel[16]

 

 

HERLUIN, son of --- (-[1066], bur Grestain).  [Vicomte] de Conteville.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Herluinus...de Contavilla” married “Herlevam Rodberti ducis concubinam[17].  He founded the abbey of Grestain after 1050[18].  It is possible that either Herluin or his wife were related to an ancestor of Robert of Rhuddlan (see above): Orderic Vitalis names “Roberto de Rodelento nepos eius” among the followers of “Odo...palatinus Cantiæ consul[19].  The relationship between the two families has not been traced. 

m firstly ([after 1035]) HERLEVE, mistress of ROBERT II Duke of Normandy, daughter of FULBERT & his wife [Doda/Duwa] --- (-[1050]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[20].  The dating of her marriage is in doubt: William of Malmesbury records that it took place “ante patris [referring to Robert II Duke of Normandy] obitum[21].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Herluinus...de Contavilla” married “Herlevam Rodberti ducis concubinam[22]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of Duke Guillaume as "filia…Herbertus pelliparius et uxor eius Doda sive Duwa", specifying that the family was from Chaumont in the diocese of Liège but moved to Falaise although others said that they were from Huy, and specifies her marriage to "Herlewino de Vado comitis"[23].  Orderic Vitalis calls her "Duke Robert's concubine", and specifies her marriage, referring to her husband as stepfather to Duke Guillaume[24].  She presumably died before her husband founded the abbey of Grestain as she is not referred to in the abbey's confirmation charter dated 14 Nov 1189[25]Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Herluinus de Contevilla…et Herleve uxor eius" were buried in "mon. Sanctæ Mariæ Gresteni"[26]

m secondly FREDESENDIS, daughter of ---.  She is named as the wife of Herluin in the confirmation charter of the abbey of Grestain, dated 14 Nov 1189[27]

Vicomte Herluin & his first wife had three children:

1.         ROBERT de Mortain ([1036/38]-8 Dec after [1087/91], bur abbaye de Grestain).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[28].  Florence of Worcester names Robert as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[29].  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[30].  [Vicomte.  Geoffrey Richard Driscoll Tobin has suggested that the third and fourth witnesses in the following charter were Robert and Eudes, sons of Vicomte Herluin[31]: "Comes Eudo et nepos eius Gaufridus, Robertus vicecomes et frater eius Eudo…Guichomarus filius Alani vicecomitis…" witnessed a charter dated to 1050 relating to the abbey of Saint-Georges de Rennes[32].  No brothers named Vicomte Robert and Eudes have been identified among the Breton nobility at the time, and the suggestion is plausible.  If correct, it has several implications.  Firstly, the order of their names indicates that Robert was older than his brother Eudes.  Secondly, this would be the only primary source which indicates that Robert bore the vicecomital title (before the death of his father).  Thirdly, the dating of the charter is probably correct considering the suggested date of Eudes’s appointment as bishop.]  Orderic Vitalis records that he was installed as Comte de Mortain in 1063 by his half-brother Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, after he dispossessed Guillaume Werlenc[33].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Werlencus de stirpe Richardi magni comes...Moritolii” plotted rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, as reported to the duke by “tyro de familia sua...Robertus Bigot”, and that the duke expelled him to Apulia and granted his county to “Robertum fratrem suum[34].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Rodbertus comes Moritoliensis, Willermi ducis uterinus frater...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[35].  King William I granted him nearly all the land of Cornwall as a reward for his participation at the battle of Hastings in 1066, but he does not seem to have been created Earl of Cornwall, continuing to be referred to as "comes Moritoniensis"[36].  "Robertus Moretonii comes frater Villelmi Anglorum regis et Normannorum principis" granted property to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire by charter dated 9 Jan 1083[37]He joined his brother Eudes in the 1088 rebellion against King William II but was pardoned[38]The necrology of the church of Mortain records the death "8 Dec" of "Robertus comes Moretonii fundator istius ecclesie"[39]m firstly (before 1066) MATHILDE de Montgommery, daughter of ROGER Seigneur de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois [later Earl of Shrewsbury] & his first wife Mabel d'Alençon (-[1085], bur abbaye de Grestain).  Orderic Vitalis names “Emma sanctimonialis et Almaniscarum abbatissa, Mathildis comitissa uxor...Rodberti Moritoliensium comitis, Mabilia conjux Hugonis de Novo-Castello et Sibylia uxor Rodberti filii Haimonis” as the four daughters of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[40].  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" by charter dated to [1087/91][41].  “Willielmus comes Moritonii” founded Montacute Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti comitis et matris meæ Mathillidis comitissæ”, by undated charter[42]m secondly ALMODIS, daughter of ---.  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son" by charter dated to [1087/91], which specifies that "William his other son has promised to grant it if Almodis should leave no heir"[43].  Earl Robert & his first wife had [seven] children:

a)         ROBERT .  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son" by charter dated to [1087/91], which specifies that "William his other son has promised to grant it if Almodis should leave no heir"[44]

b)         GUILLAUME de Mortain (-Bermondsey after 1140).  Orderic Vitalis refers to him as nepos of Robert III Duke of Normandy[45]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Guilelmi" as son of "Robertum comitem Moretonii"[46].  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis"[47].  "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son…and William his other son" by charter dated to [1087/91][48].  He succeeded his father as Comte de Mortain, and in the latter's lands in Cornwall.  He unsuccessfully claimed the earldom of Kent on the death of his uncle Eudes[49].  “Willielmus comes Moritonii” founded Montacute Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti comitis et matris meæ Mathillidis comitissæ”, by undated charter[50].  "…Willelmi comitis de Moritun…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[51].  Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmus comes de Moreteon" rebelled against Henry I King of England, who confiscated all his English lands in [1104][52].  Florence of Worcester also records that "comes Willelmus de Moretonio" fought with Robert Duke of Normandy against King Henry I at Tinchebrai in [1106], was captured, but later escaped and fled[53].  Orderic Vitalis records that he was imprisoned for many years and all his honours forfeited[54].  He became a Cluniac monk at Bermondsey in 1140.  m ADELISA, daughter of --- (-after [1100/06]).  William count of Mortain confirmed a donation to Marmoutier Saint-Martin by charter dated to [1100/06], signed by "…Guillelmi comitis Moritolii, Adilidis comitisse de M[oritolio]"[55].  [daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I offered “neptem suam Rodberti...Moritolii comitis filiam” in marriage to Guillaume de Grantmesnil, who refused and left for Apulia[56].  It is probable that this daughter was the same person as one of the other daughters of Robert who are named below.] 

c)         DENISE de Mortain ([1065/70]-1090).  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned second) married "Guido de Laval"[57].  A charter dated to [1085] records that "Guy II fils de Hamon" withdrew claims against Ronceray relating to property donated by his father by charter dated to [1085] which names "Denise son épouse" and is witnessed by "Hugues, frère de Guy II"[58].  A charter dated to [1080/90] records that "Guidone de Valle" sold "boscum…Monduluet" to "domnus Rivallonus monachus" at Marmoutier, with the consent of "Hugo frater eius…et Dionisia uxor eius"[59].  "Guido de Lavalle" donated the priory of Parné to the church of Saint-Nicholas d'Angers "pro salute sua et uxoris sue Dionisie" by charter dated [1080/90][60].  A charter dated 1090 records that "Guido junior" succeeded "in paternum…honorem" on the death of "Haimonis senioris de Valle Guidonis" and that when, after some time, "supradicti domni Guidonis conjugem" died, he granted further rights to Marmoutier when she was buried "juxta patrem suum Haimonem"[61]m [as his second wife,] GUY [II] Seigneur de Laval, son of HAMON Seigneur de Laval & his wife Hersende --- (before [1037/38]-after 1105, bur Marmoutier). 

d)         EMMA de Mortain (-after [1126/27]).  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned third) married "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii"[62].  Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1114 under which her daughter “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis[63].  “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea...Petro episcopo...[64].  This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[65]m (before 1080) as his second wife, GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse, son of PONS Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Almodis de la Marche (-killed in battle Huesca 1094). 

e)         [SIBYLLE (-after 1134).  An undated charter records the return of property to Notre-Dame de Saintes by "Willelmus comes Pictavensis", stating that on the same day "abbatissa Florentia” accepted “Sibillam materteram comitisse...factam post abbatissam” into her monastery[66].  This charter is dated to [1100/07] in the compilation, but the document in the form in which it has survived must be a later production given the reference to the subsequent appointment of Sibylle as abbess.  There appears to be no way of dating the original return of the property in question.  In the charter, “comitisse” would have been Philippa de Toulouse, wife of Guillaume IX Duke of Aquitaine, and so her “matertera” would have been the sister of Emma de Mortain, wife of Guillaume IV Comte de Toulouse.  Abbess of Notre-Dame de Saintes, she is named in charters dated 1122, 1130, 1131 and 1134[67].  “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea, et Arembergi de Volvent monacha...Petro episcopo...[68].  This charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine (identified as the donor) succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”: it is likely that the bishop of Saintes would have been involved in transactions relating to Notre-Dame de Saintes) is named in a document dated 1127[69].  Although the term “amita” would normally indicate paternal aunt, it is assumed that in this case it was used in the broader sense of maternal great-aunt which is consistent with the relationship posited from the earlier charter dated to [1100/07] which is quoted above.  If Sibylle’s family is correctly identified, she was probably younger than her supposed sister Emma as it would be normal for the daughter of a noble family to enter religion at a young age if she was destined for an ecclesiastical career.] 

f)          AGNES de Mortain (-[maybe after 1126/27]).  Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned first) married "Andreas de Vitreio"[70].  A charter dated to [1110] records that "Andreas dominus Vitriaci castri et frater eius Philippus et uxor ipsius Andreæ…Agnes, cum filiis suis Roberto, Gervasio et Elia" confirmed the foundation of Sainte-Croix de Vitré[71].  [It is possible that Agnes de Mortain was “Agnete amita mea” in the following charter: “Willelmus...dux Aquitanorum” donated “ecclesiam S. Juliani de Stapio...ecclesiam S. Mariæ de Clida” to Notre-Dame de Saintes “et abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” by charter dated “XII Kal Sep”, signed by “eadem abbatissa Sibillla, et comitissa Tholosæ avia mea, et Agnete amita mea, et Arembergi de Volvent monacha...Petro episcopo...[72].  The charter does not specify the year but can be dated to [1126/27], given that Duke Guillaume X succeeded his father in 1126 and that the successor of Pierre Bishop of Saintes (assuming that he can be identified as the subscriber “Petro episcopo”) is named in a document dated 1127[73].  The donor in the document is identified as Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine.  As discussed in more detail above, there are good arguments for identifying “abbatissæ Sibillæ amitæ meæ” as his great-aunt, sister of his grandmother Emma de Mortain.  The key to identifying the subscribers to the document appears to be the presence of the donor’s maternal grandmother who would, it seems, not normally be involved in a donation by the duke of Aquitaine unless she had some interest in the property donated.  If that is correct, “Agnete amita mea” would, logically, have subscribed only if she also had an interest in the same property.  The best explanation is that the three subscribers were sisters who were the only surviving representatives of the Mortain family and joint holders of an interest in the properties donated.  The main difficulty with this hypothesis is that Agnes’s husband was still alive at the time: it is therefore unclear why he would not have subscribed the document in place of his wife.  The churches in question have not been identified.  It should be pointed out that it is not obvious how the Mortain or Montgommery families, based in Normandy, would have held interests in churches which were presumably located in the Saintonge area of the duchy of Aquitaine.  Another possibility is that the subscriber of the [1126/27] charter was Agnes, [probably illegitimate] daughter of Guillaume VIII Duke of Aquitaine, who succeeded Sibylle as abbess of Notre-Dame de Saintes in [1134/37] (see the document AQUITAINE DUKES).  However, in that case the potential common interest in the donated properties would not apply and it is then difficult to understand the reason for Agnes subscribing the document.]  m ANDRE [I] Seigneur de Vitré, son of ROBERT [I] Seigneur de Vitré & his wife Berthe de Craon (-after 1139). 

Earl Robert & his second wife had one child:

g)         ROBERT de Mortain .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

2.         EUDES [Odo] ([1036/38]-[Antioch/Palermo] [2/6] Jan 1097, bur Palermo Cathedral)Guillaume of Jumièges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[74].  The birth date of Eudes is estimated on the assumption that Guillaume of Jumièges is correct (which is not beyond doubt, as noted above).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[75].  Florence of Worcester names Eudes as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[76].  [Geoffrey Richard Driscoll Tobin has suggested that the third and fourth witnesses in the following charter were Robert and Eudes, sons of Vicomte Herluin[77]: "Comes Eudo et nepos eius Gaufridus, Robertus vicecomes et frater eius Eudo…Guichomarus filius Alani vicecomitis…" witnessed a charter dated to 1050 relating to the abbey of Saint-Georges de Rennes[78].  No brothers named Vicomte Robert and Eudes have been identified among the Breton nobility at the time, and the suggestion is plausible.  If correct, it has several implications.  Firstly, the order of their names indicates that Robert was older than his brother Eudes.  Secondly, this would be the only primary source which indicates that Robert bore the vicecomital title (before the death of his father).  Thirdly, the dating of the charter is probably correct considering the suggested date of Eudes’s appointment as bishop.]  Bishop of Bayeux [1050] (when Eudes must have been an adolescent, assuming that his birth date is correctly estimated as shown above).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that, after the death of “Hugo filius Rodulphi comitis Baiocensis episcopus”, Guillaume II Duke of Normandy appointed “Odoni fratri suo” to the bishopric of Bayeux, a position he held for nearly 50 years[79].  He is said to have taken an active part in the preparation of the Norman invasion of England and was present at the battle of Hastings 23 Oct 1066.  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Odone episcopo de Baiocis" contributed 120 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[80].  His half-brother William I King of England rewarded him with a grant of over 500 manors in England and created him Earl of Kent in 1067[81].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mœnia Guentæ”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus præfecturam Angliæ”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[82]Florence of Worcester records that King William left "fratrumque suum Odonem Baiocensem episcopum et Willelmum filium Osberni quem in Herefordensi provincia comitum" when he went to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][83]He was one of the leaders of the force which suppressed the rebellion of the earls of Norfolk and Hereford in 1075[84].  He began scheming to become Pope, sending great gifts to influential men in Rome, but was arrested by King William and sent to Normandy where he was a prisoner in Rouen between 1082 and 1087[85].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William captured “Odoni fratri suo...in insula Vecta” and held him in prison for four years “pro nimietate sua[86].  He was released by King William on his deathbed[87].  Although King William II restored Eudes to his earldom, he was one of the leaders of the rebellion in 1088 which sought to put Robert Duke of Normandy on the English throne[88].  He was banished from England and all his honours and possessions forfeited.  He became chief adviser to Duke Robert in Normandy[89].  Orderic Vitalis records that Bishop Eudes died “in urbem Panormitanam, quam vulgo Palernam vocant” and that “Gislebertus Ebroicensis episcopus” buried him “in metropolitana sanctæ Dei genetricis Mariæ basilica”, adding that he had been appointed “ab adolescentia sua” (which supports that the theory that he was born after the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy, as discussed above)[90].  William of Malmesbury records that he left on the First Crusade with Robert III Duke of Normandy and died “Antiochiæ, in obsidione Christianorum[91].  The necrology of Jumièges records the death 2 Jan of “Odo episcopus[92].  Bishop Eudes had one illegitimate son:

a)         JEAN de Bayeux (-1131).  Son of Eudes bishop of Bayeux according to Orderic Vitalis, who records that Jean gave King Henry news of the death of his nephew Guillaume "Clito" Count of Flanders in 1128[93].  Orderic Vitalis records that he lived at the court of Henry I King of England where he was held in esteem for his eloquence and probity[94]

Vicomte Herluin & his [first/second] wife had [one child]:

3.         [daughter .  The precise identity of the mother of Guillaume [III] de la Ferté-Macé has not been ascertained, but the following source indicates that she was related to the Conteville family.  Planché refers to a charter which names “William [of Ferté Macé]” (presumably indicating Guillaume [III] de la Ferté-Macé) as “nephew of Bishop Odo” (no precise citation reference, but a later passage describes the document as “the charter of an archbishop of Tours, temp. St Louis”)[95].  The reference to this charter has not been found, but “nephew” presumably indicates “nepos”, which if used in its strict sense would indicate that Guillaume [II]’s wife was the daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, given the notoriously imprecise nature of the term, the precise relationship could be more remote.  m [GUILLAUME [II] de la Ferté-Macé, son of GUILLAUME [I] de la Ferté-Macé & his wife --- (-before 1083)].] 

Vicomte Herluin & his second wife had [three] children: 

4.         RAOUL de Conteville (-after 1089).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[96].  "…Rodulfus filius Herluini…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[97].  He is referred to as the son of Herluin in the charter of confirmation of the abbey of Grestain, dated 14 Nov 1089, the implication of the text being that he was the son of Hilduin's wife Fredesendis[98].  Domesday Book records “Ralph fitzHerluin” holding Shimpling from Roger Bigod in Norfolk[99]m ---.  The name of Raoul's wife is not known.  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)         BERNARD FitzRaoul .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1092/93. 

5.         JEAN de Conteville .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1089. 

6.         [RICHARD FitzHerluin (-after 1082).  "…Richard fitz Herluin…" witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England donated property to the abbey of la Trinité de Caen[100].] 

 

 

 

C.      VICOMTES d'AVRANCHES

 

 

ANSFRID, son of --- .  His name and that of his son suggest that this family was of Viking origin, which is confirmed by Guillaume of Jumièges who names [his son] “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis[101]

m ---.  The name of Ansfrid's wife is not known. 

Ansfrid & his wife had one child: 

1.         THURSTAN "le Goz" (-[1045/55]).  Vicomte.  "Ricardi filii Gulberti, Nigelli vicecomitis…Storstingi vicecomitis" signed the charter dated 1027 (redated to [1017]) in which "secundus nominis mei Normannorum dux Ricardus" confirmed donations to Fécamp abbey[102].  "…Torstingus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[103].  "…Turstingi vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[104].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[105].  "Turstin vicecomes" witness the donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen of "Gozelinus vicecomes" dated [1038/50][106].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis, Godefredi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[107].  "…Turstinci vicecomitis…Turstinci Gazel…Richardi filii Turstinci, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[108].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis” rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy at “Falesiæ castellum”, which was attacked by the duke’s forces led by “Rodulfus Waceiensis magister militum”, and was forced to flee into exile, dated to early during the reign of Duke Guillaume II from the context[109]m ---.  The name of Thurstan's wife is not known.  Thurstan & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD "le Goz" (-after 1082).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Ricardus Turstini filius” served Duke Guillaume II loyally after his father “Turstenus cognomento Guz, Ausfridi Dani filius...præses Oximensis” rebelled and was forced to flee into exile[110].  "…Turstinci vicecomitis…Turstinci Gazel…Richardi filii Turstinci, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[111]Vicomte d'Avranches.  "…Richardi filii Torestini…" witnessed the charter dated to [1055] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[112].  "…Willelmi filii Osberti, Rotgerii de Monte Golmerii, Richardis vicecomitis Abrinchensis…" witnessed the charter dated [1055/56] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "in pago…Constantino, villam…Flotomannum" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[113].  "…Ricardus vicecomes Abrincatinus…" witnessed the charter dated 1064 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy settled a claim in favour of the monks of Marmoutier relating to property donated by "Guido de Valle"[114].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Richart d’Avrenchin" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[115].  "Richardi filii Torsteingoiz" witnessed a charter of William I King of England dated 1069[116].  "Ricardo filio Turstini Guz et Guillelmo Caritate, Fulkoque filio Gerardi Budel atque Radulfo de Ollei" are named as present in the charter dated 30 Nov 1074 under which Odo Bishop of Bayeux bought "la terre de Chernet" from "Herberto de Agnellis", with the consent of "suo domino Radulfo de Conchis"[117]m (before [1047]) ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  She is called “Emma” in the Complete Peerage[118], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  A manuscript relating to St Werburgh’s Chester records that “Hugo Lupus filius ducis Britanniæ et nepos Gulielmi magni ex sorore” transformed the foundation into a monastery[119].  This suggests that Hugues’s mother may have been a uterine sister of King William, and therefore daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, no indication has been in other primary sources which supports the contention that Hugues was the son of a duke of Brittany.  It is assumed therefore that both lines of his parentage have been romanticised in this document to improve his status and reputation.  Another possibility is that she was related to the Grantmesnil family: Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus, Unfridi filius” [Robert of Rhuddlan, son of Onfroi de Tilleul and his wife Adelise de Grantmesnil] went “cum Hugone consobrino suo, Richardi de Abrincis cognomento Goz filio” to England[120]If the relationship is as indicated by Orderic, from a chronological point of view Richard’s wife could have been --- de Grantmesnil,  daughter of Robert de Grantmesnil & his wife Hawise ---.  Richard & his wife had four children: 

i)          HUGUES d'Avranches "Lupus"[121] ([1047]-St Werburg's Abbey, Chester 27 Jul 1101).  Orderic Vitalis records that King William granted “Cestrensem consulatum” to “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” after Gerbod returned to Flanders, dated to 1071[122], whereby he is held to have become Earl of Chester. 

-         EARLS of CHESTER

ii)         MARGUERITE [Mathilde] d'Avranches (-after [1098]).  She is named "Mathilda soror Hugonis comitis" by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her son[123].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[124]m RANULF Vicomte du Bessin, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin & his wife Alix de Normandie (-after [1098]). 

iii)        HELISENDE d'Avranches .  Her marriage is referred to by Orderic Vitalis, who says that she was the sister of Hugh Earl of Chester but does not give her name[125].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] Comte d'Eu, son of ROBERT Comte d'Eu & his first wife Beatrix --- (-2 Jan after 1096). 

iv)       JUDITH d'Avranches .  Orderic Vitalis records that “Richerium de Aquila Engenulfi filium” married “Judith filiam Ricardi Abrincatensis cognomento Goz, sororem...Hugonis Cestrensium comitis[126].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[127].  "Richer de Aquila son of Ingenulf de Aquila" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Evroul by charter dated to [1099] (although this date is incorrect if the date of his death is as shown above), witnessed by "…Judiht uxore mea, filia Richardi de Abrincis et sorore Hugonis comitis Cestrensis"[128].  "Robertus…" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1101/17], confirmed by "Gisleberti…de Aquila" and witnessed by "Gisleberti de Aquila, Julite eiusdem matris et Juliane uxoris ipsius"[129]m RICHER de Laigle, son of ENGENULF & his wife Richereda --- (-killed in battle Sainte-Suzanne 18 Nov 1085, bur Monastery of St Sulpice-sur-Risle).        

b)         ROBERT .  "…Turstinci vicecomitis…Turstinci Gazel…Richardi filii Turstinci, Roberti fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[130]

 

 

1.         GUITMUND [Wimund] .  Vicomte"…Vuitmundus vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[131].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[132]m ---.  The name of Wimund’s wife is not known.  Wimund & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM FitzWimund d'Avranches (-[1087]).  Orderic Vitalis records the death of “Guillelmus de Abrincis filius Witmundi”, dated to 1087 from the context[133]m ---.  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT d'Avranches (-before 1142).    He is shown as son of William FitzWimund in the Complete Peerage, and as avunculus of Fulk Paynell[134], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Abrinc" in Devonshire accounting to the king for his malevolence for his marriage to "filia Geldewini de Dol"[135]m firstly HAWISE de Dol, daughter of GELDUIN de Dol & his wife Noga de Tinteniac.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Abrinc" in Devonshire accounting to the king for his malevolence for his marriage to "filia Geldewini de Dol"[136]Domesday Descendants mentions that she is named Hawise in one of the charters of her husband "for the Mont"[137]m secondly (after 1130) MATILDA Avenell, daughter of RANDULF Avenell & his wife Alice --- (-21 Sep 1173).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” had “unicam filiam…Matildam” who died[138].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges”, and died “IX Kal Oct 1173[139].  As noted below, charter evidence indicates that the wife of Robert FitzEdith was Mathilde d’Avranches, daughter of Matilda Avenell, not Matilda Avenell herself.  Matilda’s supposed second marriage, as reported in the Ford Abbey document, is therefore assumed to be incorrect.  Robert & his second wife had four children: 

(a)       HAWISE d’Avranches ([after 1132]-1 Aug 1209).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis” and that she married “Reginaldo de Courtenay” as “uxor eius secunda[140].  Hawise must have been born after 1132 at the earliest as her father is recorded in [1129/30] with his first wife.  The suggested date of her marriage is based on the approximate marriage date of her son Robert in [1174/75].  m ([1150/55]) as his second wife, RENAUD Seigneur de Courtenay, son of MILON Seigneur de Courtenay & his second wife Ermengarde de Nevers ([1105/20]-27 Sep 1194). 

(b)       MATHILDE d’Avranches )"Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[141].  The heirship of Mathilde to “Ricardi filii Baldewini” (who was a member of a younger branch of the Brionne/Eu family, see above) was through her maternal grandmother, who is recorded as a sister of the brothers Robert and Richard.  "Robertus filius Regis Henrici" donated "duos ferlingos in manerio meo Calvalegiæ juxta Cobbalegiam" to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis de Abrinco uxoris meæ", by charter dated 1162[142].  The parentage of the wife of Robert FitzEdith is confirmed by a claim, dated 1222, which is recorded by Bracton: "Matillis de Curteney" sued "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Ocumptona", "Robertus" claiming that the land was "hereditas Matillidis de Aueregnes" who had "duas filias…Hawisiam matrem suam primogenitam […filia Gaufridi de Crimes primi viri Matillidis de Auerenches] et…Matillidem", while the claimant Matilda asserted that she had the land in question "ex dono Roberti filii Regis patris eiusdem Matillidis et secundi viri predicte Matillidis de Auerenches"[143].  A different parentage is indicated by the Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey which records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges[144].  Matilda, daughter of Ranulf Avenell, was the mother of Mathilde d’Avranches.  The two charters quoted above indicate that this supposed second marriage of Matilda is not correct.  The identity of Mathilde’s first husband is uncertain.  Bracton’s report of the 1222 lawsuit which is quoted above identifies him as "Gaufridi de Crimes primi viri Matillidis de Auerenches".  However, another claim recorded by Bracton, also dated 1222, identifies him differently: "Matillis de Curtenay" claimed against "Robertum de Curtenay" concerning "manerium de Chamelegha", the defendant stating that "Robertus filius Regis…Matillidem de Auerenches uxorem suam" held the land which was inherited by "Hawisie filie sui matri eiusdem Roberti de Curtenay que fuit filia Willelmi de Curcy viri eiusdem Matillidis"[145].  No other information has yet been found which would resolve this inconsistency.  Another outstanding point concerns the date of death of Matilda Avenell, as wife of Robert FitzEdith, as reported in the Ford Abbey document.  It is assumed that the date does in fact refer to Matilda Avenell and not to Mathilde d’Avranches, although the point is not beyond all doubt.  If that is correct, no indication has been found of the date of death of Mathilde d’Avranches.  m firstly [GEOFFROY de Crimes/GUILLAUME de Curcy], son of ---.  m secondly (before 1162) [as his second wife,] ROBERT FitzRoy, illegitimate son of HENRY I King of England & his mistress Edith --- (-31 May [1172]). 

(c)       daughter .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis[146]

(d)       daughter .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” had “filiam unam…Hawisiam, necnon duas alias, postea factas moniales” by her husband “Roberto de Abrincis[147]

ii)         [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are shown in the Complete Peerage, presumably because her supposed brother Robert d’Avranches is described as avunculus of her son Fulk Paynell[148], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  m WILLIAM Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert, son of [WILLIAM Paynell of Moûtiers-Hubert and Hambye & his wife ---] (-after [1145]).] 

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de GRANVILLE

 

 

This was Granville in the Cotentin, Normandy {arr. Avranches, Manche} which was a fief of the abbey of Saint-Michel. 

 

 

1.         RENAUD de Granville (-after [1054]).  Seigneur de Granville"Hilger de Ardevone, Thescelin his brother, Reginald de Grandivalle and Ralf de Sancto-Johanne" are named as "St. Michael’s men" present in the charter dated to [1054] under which "William Pichenoht" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel, witnessed by "…Ricardi vicecomitis, Hilgerii de Ardevone, Thescelini fratris eius, Raginaldi de Grandivilla, Radulfi de Sancto Johanne"[149]A charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, confirmed in a charter of King William I dated 1080, confirmed the foundation of Caen Sainte-Trinité and its possessions, including the donation of “quam habebat in Grainvilla, pro filia sua ibi facta monacha” made by “Rogerius de Molbray” witnessed by “Drogo de Sancto Vigore et Rainaldus de Glanvilla[150]

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS d’ORVAL

 

 

1.         RENAUD [I] d’Orval (-after 1126).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Rainaldus de Aureavalle" by charter dated 1126, witnessed by "Roberto de Haia, Rogero de Sancto Johanne, Hugone de Aureavalle…"[151]

 

2.         HUGUES d’Orval (-after 1126).  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Holy Trinity, Lessay by "Rainaldus de Aureavalle" by charter dated 1126, witnessed by "Roberto de Haia, Rogero de Sancto Johanne, Hugone de Aureavalle…"[152]

 

3.         RENAUD [II] d’Orval m MURIEL de Saint-Jean, daughter of ROGER de Saint-Jean & his wife Cecilia de La Haye.  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex records that Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” married “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle” by whom she had "filiam…Mabiliam" who married "Adæ de Port"[153].  Renaud & his wife had one child: 

a)         MABILE d’Orval )A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Mabiliam" as the daughter of “Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” and her husband “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle”, adding that she married "Adæ de Port"[154]m as his first wife, ADAM de Port, son of JOHN de Port & his wife Maud --- ([1150/55]-[25 Jun/28 Jul] 1213). 

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-JEAN

 

 

According to The Complete Peerage, this was Saint-Jean-le-Thomas in the Cotentin, Normandy {arr. Avranches, Manche} which was a fief of the abbey of Saint-Michel[155]

 

 

1.         RAOUL de Saint-Jean (-after Oct 1066).  Seigneur de Saint-Jean.  "Hilger de Ardevone, Thescelin his brother, Reginald de Grandivalle and Ralf de Sancto-Johanne" are named as "St. Michael’s men" present in the charter dated to [1053] under which "William Pichenoht" donated property to Mont Saint-Michel, witnessed by "…Ricardi vicecomitis, Hilgerii de Ardevone, Thescelini fratris eius, Raginaldi de Grandivilla, Radulfi de Sancto Johanne"[156].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de S. Jehan" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[157]

 

2.         OLIVIER de Saint-Jean (-after 1093).  The Gwentian Chronicle records that "Oliver St John" was granted "the lordship of Aberbernant" by Robert FitzHamon after the defeat of Rhys ap Tewdwr in Wales in 1093[158]

 

 

[Five] siblings, parents not known.  The chronology may be too extended for them to have been the sons of Raoul de Saint-Jean who is shown above: 

1.         THOMAS de Saint-Jean (-[1123/30]).  Seigneur de Saint-Jean.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Thomam de Sancto Johanne" ineffectively blockaded Tinchebrai on behalf of Henry I King of England in 1106[159].  He and his family were studied by Gerville[160].  "…Th. de Sancto Johanne…" witnessed the charter dated 1108 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Holy Trinity, London[161].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that King Henry I appointed "Thoma de Sancto Johanne ac Ricardo de Monte" as "Oxenefordscire vicecomitibus" at Oxford in 1111[162].  Matthew of Paris quotes a charter dated 1116 of King Henry I which records his grant of Biscot, Bedfordshire to the abbey of St Albans, witnessed by "…Adam de Port, Thomas de Sancto Johanne, Willelmus frater eius, Hugo de Gornaio"[163].  A charter dated to [1121] records that "Thomas de Sancto Johanne" had constructed his castle at Saint-Jean with wood taken from land of the abbey of Saint-Michel and records his donation in settlement of their claim, signed by "Thoma, Johanne fratre eius et Rogerio…"[164].  A charter dated to [1123/29] records a donation by King Henry I to Mont-Saint-Michel, witnessed by "…Thoma de Sancto Johanne"[165]

2.         GUILLAUME de Saint-Jean .  Matthew of Paris quotes a charter dated 1116 of King Henry I which records his grant of Biscot, Bedfordshire to the abbey of St Albans, witnessed by "…Adam de Port, Thomas de Sancto Johanne, Willelmus frater eius, Hugo de Gornaio"[166]

3.         JEAN de Saint-Jean (-[1149/53]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rogerius de Sancto Johanne et Johannes frater eius" defended the castle of La Motte-Gautier against Foulques V Comte d’Anjou for Henry I King of England in 1118[167].  A charter dated to [1121] records that "Thomas de Sancto Johanne" had constructed his castle at Saint-Jean with wood taken from land of the abbey of Saint-Michel and records his donation in settlement of their claim, signed by "Thoma, Johanne fratre eius et Rogerio…"[168]The Historia Fundationis of Kingswood priory in Wiltshire records that King Stephen granted illi de Kingswode Haseldene…terras Reginaldo de sancto Walerico” to "Johanne de sancto Johanne", in the early years of his reign[169]m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean & his wife had three children: 

a)         THOMAS de St John (-after 1166).  Domesday Descendants states that Thomas, Roger and William were the sons of Jean de Saint-Jean, adding that William was rector of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[170]

b)         ROGER de St JohnDomesday Descendants states that Thomas, Roger and William were the sons of Jean de Saint-Jean, adding that William was rector of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[171]

c)         WILLIAM de St JohnDomesday Descendants states that Thomas, Roger and William were the sons of Jean de Saint-Jean, adding that William was rector of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[172]

4.         ROGER de Saint-Jean (-1130 or before).  A charter dated to [1121] records that "Thomas de Sancto Johanne" had constructed his castle at Saint-Jean with wood taken from land of the abbey of Saint-Michel and records his donation in settlement of their claim, signed by "Thoma, Johanne fratre eius et Rogerio…"[173].  A charter dated 1121 confirmed the possessions of Lewes Priory including the donation of "…ecclesiam de Cunctona…" by "Rogeri de Sco Johe"[174].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rogerius de Sancto Johanne et Johannes frater eius" defended the castle of La Motte-Gautier against Foulques V Comte d’Anjou for Henry I King of England in 1118[175].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "filii Rogi de sco Johe…relevat tre patis sui" in Hampshire[176]m CECILIA de la Haye, daughter of ROBERT de la Haye & his wife Muriel --- (-[1162/77]).  Her parentage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1111 under which her maternal grandfather “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery[177]A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex states that Roberti di Haya…Ceciliam filiam suam” married “Rogero de sancto Johanne[178].  Roger & his wife had three children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Saint-Jean (-[Sep 1201/Sep 1202])A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names Willielmum et Robertum de sancto Johanne” as the sons of “Rogero de sancto Johanne” and his wife[179].  Henry II King of England confirmed the donation of revenue from "manerio de Contona" [Compton] to Fontevraud by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater suus" by charter dated to [1169][180].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater eius et Oliva uxor Willelmi", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][181].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne" in Sussex[182]m firstly ([1154/62]) as her second husband, OLIVE de Penthièvre, widow of HENRI Seigneur de Fougères, daughter of ETIENNE de Bretagne Comte de Penthièvre, Lord of Richmond & his wife Havise de Guingamp.  Her two marriages are confirmed by the charter dated 1174 under which "Olive daughter of Count Stephen" donated the church of Bennington to the abbey of Sauvigny, with the consent of "Guillelmus de Sancto Johanne maritus meus and Ralf de Filgeriis and her other sons"[183].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater eius et Oliva uxor Willelmi", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][184]m secondly (before 1187) GODEHEUT, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1187 under which "William de Sancto Johanne and Robert his brother and Godeheldis wife of William" confirmed the donations to Boxgrave priory by "his grandfather Robert de Haia and his father Robert de Sancto Johanne"[185]

b)         ROBERT de Saint-Jean (-after [1169]).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names Willielmum et Robertum de sancto Johanne” as the sons of “Rogero de sancto Johanne” and his wife[186].  “Robertus de sancto Johanne” donated land “in Walborgetune" to Boxgrove priory, with the consent of "domini Willielmi fratris mei”, for the soul of "…uxoris meæ…", by undated charter[187].  Henry II King of England confirmed the donation of revenue from "manerio de Contona" [Compton] to Fontevraud by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater suus" by charter dated to [1169][188].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Willelmus de Sancto Johanne et Robertus frater eius et Oliva uxor Willelmi", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][189]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  She is referred to in the charter quoted above. 

c)         MURIEL de Saint-Jean A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex records that Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” married “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle” by whom she had "filiam…Mabiliam" who married "Adæ de Port"[190]m RENAUD d’Orval, son of ---. 

5.         [ALIX de Saint-JeanDomesday Descendants names "Richard de Monte (Mont-Saint-Michel) and Alice, sister of John of St John" as the parents of Gilbert de Monte[191].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “heres Gilberti de Monte…xv annorum” was "nepos Thome de Sancto Johanne et Johannis de Sancto Johanne et Hugonis de Plugenet et Willelmi Fossard"[192].  The information is not precise enough to ascertain the precise relationship, but presumably a sister of John and Thomas de Saint-Clair married one parent or one grandparent of Gilbert de Mont.  m RICHARD de Mont, son of ---.] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    BAYEUX

 

 

 

A.      COMTES de BAYEUX

 

 

The diocese of Bayeux comprised only the pagus Bajocassinus (le Bessin), in which the county of Bayeux later developed[193].  Raoul d’Ivry, uterine half-brother of Richard I Duke of Normandy, seems to have been recognised with the title count by his half-brother, which is generally applied to the castle of Bayeux which he constructed.  The title, however, did not survive his death and no further counts of Bayeux are recorded. 

 

 

1.         ESPERLENG de Pîtres, son of --- m SPROTA, daughter of --- .  From Brittany.  Sprota was previously the concubine or wife of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” and that they had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures[194].  Esperling & his wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         RAOUL d'Ivry ([942/50]-after 1011).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus dux primus” consulted “Rodulfo comite suo equidem uterino fratre” about his succession before he died[195].  It is assumed that he was born after the death of Comte Guillaume I, but it is unlikely that he was born much later than 945 if it is correct that the birth of his older half-brother Richard can be dated to [1032] (see the document NORMANDY DUKES).  Comte [de Bayeux].  [m firstly ALBREDA, daughter of --- (-murdered ----).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore”, adding that it was reported that “præfata matrona” beheaded “Lanfredum architectum” after the castle was finished so that he could not build a similar structure for anyone else, and tried to expel her husband who killed her[196].  It is not certain that “Albereda” in Orderic’s passage was the same person as “Eremburgam” in Guillaume de Jumièges.  It is curious that Orderic does not state in his text that Hugues Bishop of Bayeux and Jean Archbishop of Rouen were the children of “Albereda”: the omission would best be explained if they were born from another marriage of Raoul and “Eremburgam” their mother was a different person from “Albereda”.  If this speculation is correct, the chronology of the children of Raoul suggests that they were born later in his life, presumably from a second marriage if he did marry twice, in which case Albreda would have been his first wife.]  m [secondly] [as her first husband,] EREMBURGE [de Caville/Cacheville], daughter of ---.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[197].  Comte Raoul & his [second] wife had four children: 

i)          HUGUES d'Ivry (-Oct 1049).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[198].  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Bishop of Bayeux 1015.  Hugues had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses: 

-         see below

ii)         EMMA d'Ivry .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that one of the daughters of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Osberno de Crepon de qua natus est Willelmus filius Osberni[199].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60], signed by "…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…"[200].  "Osberni frater eius [Willelmi]" witnessed a charter dated 1038 or after[201].  After her husband died, she became abbess of St Amand at Rouen[202]m OSBERN de Crepon, son of HERFAST & his wife --- (-murdered [1038/42]). 

iii)        daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[203]m RICHARD de Beaufour, son of ---.  Richard & his wife had [four or more] children: 

(a)       ROBERT de Beaufour .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[204].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus...de Bellofago” towards the end of his life became a monk at Bec, where “filii eius Richardus et Willelmus” also entered religion[205]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

(1)       RICHARD de Beaufour .  “Robertus...de Bellofago” towards the end of his life became a monk at Bec, where “filii eius Richardus et Willelmus” also entered religion[206]

(2)       GUILLAUME de Beaufour .  “Robertus...de Bellofago” towards the end of his life became a monk at Bec, where “filii eius Richardus et Willelmus” also entered religion[207]

(b)       daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[208]m as his first wife, HUGUES [II] de Montfort, son of HUGUES [I] de Montfort-sur-Risle & his wife --- (-1088 or after). 

(c)       daughters .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that another daughter of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Richardus de Bello-fago” by whom she had “Robertum qui ei successit et filias plures, quarum una iuncta est Hugoni de Monte-forti matrimonio[209]

iv)       JEAN d'Ivry (-1079).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[210].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore[211].  Considering the date of his death, Jean must have been considerably younger than his brother Hugues.  One possibility is that he was born from a second unrecorded marriage of his mother.  Bishop of Avranches 1061.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Lanfrancum Cadomensem abbatem” was appointed to succeed after the death of “Maurilius Rotomagensis archiepiscopus” but refused the task and pressed for the appointment of “Joannem Abrincatensium præsulem...filius Radulphi comitis Bajocensium...frater...uterinus Ricardi senioris ducis Normannorum” (who had held that post for seven years and three months, and was archbishop for ten years), even travelling to Rome to obtain Papal consent[212]Archbishop of Rouen 1069.  Guillaume of Jumièges records the death “V Id Aug” 1067 of “Maurilius...archiepiscopus Rotomagensis” and the appointment of “Ioannes Abrincatinæ urbis præsul...comitis Rodulphi filius” as his successor[213].  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records that "Joannes filius Rodulfi comitis fratris Ricardi" succeeded as Archbishop of Rouen in 1069, having been bishop of Avranches for seven years and three months[214].  Orderic Vitalis records the death “XVI Kal Aug” 1077 of "Hugo Lexoviensis episcopus", the subsequent dispute about his place of burial with “Johanni archiepiscopo” who refused to accept the king’s decision at Rouen and, while returning from there by mule, was struck down by a violent seizure, after which he survived for two years without being able to speak[215].  The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records the death in 1079 of "Joannes Rothomag. Archiepiscopus"[216].  Orderic Vitalis records the death in 1079 of “Johannes archiepiscopus” after governing for eight years and his burial "in baptisterio basilicæ ad Aquilonem", and also records his epitaph[217]

b)         daughters .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus I filius Willelmi Longæspatæ...mater eius Sprota” and “Asperlengi” and that they had “filium Rodulphum...et filias plures” who were later married in Normandy with noblemen[218]

 

 

HUGUES d'Ivry, son of RAOUL d’Ivry Comte [de Bayeux] & his wife Aubrée [de Caville/Cacheville] (-Oct 1049).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulphum” married “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” and that they had “duos filios Hugonem postea episcopum Baiocensem et Ioannem Abricatensem...[219].  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Bishop of Bayeux 1015.  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Hugo Rodulfi comitis filius, Baiocasinæ urbis præsul” secretly stocked “Ibrilicum castrum” and sought help from France to defend it, but was unable to re-enter the castle besieged by Robert II Duke of Normandy and left in exile[220].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albereda uxor Radulfi Bajocensis comitis” built “arcem de Ibreio” [Ivry] which “Hugo Bajocensis episcopus frater Johannis Rotomagensis archiepiscopi” defended “contra duces Normannorum multo tempore[221]

[m ---.  The name of Hugues’s possible wife or mistress is not known.]   

Hugues & his [wife/mistress] had [two] [illegitimate] children.  No direct proof has been found that Hugues Bishop of Bayeux was the father of Roger (Orderic Vitalis confirms that he was the father of Albreda, see below).  The other candidate is Hugues Bishop of Lisieux, son of Guillaume de Normandie Comte d’Eu and his wife Lesceline.  However, the chronology of the two families suggests that Hugues Bishop of Lisieux must have been born in [1010/20], while the birth of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux must be placed much earlier considering that his father’s birth can probably be estimated to [942/50] (see above).  The charter of Saint-Trinité de Rouen dated 1074 shows that the bishop’s grandson was old enough to have sold property before 1074, which could place his birth in [1040/50].  This birth date range is more consistent with the older of the two bishops being his grandfather, although it would not exclude descent from Hugues Bishop of Lisieux.  In addition, the family of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux has more connections with the pays de Caux, the location of all the properties referred to in the three charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in which the bishop’s son is named.  The bishop of Bayeux’s mother is recorded as having constructed the castle of Iv ry, and his sister Emma, wife of Osbern de Crepon dapifer, is named in several charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in connection with property in the pays de Caux

1.         [ROGER (-after [1037/55]).  An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[222].  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[223].]  m ODA, daughter of ---.  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[224].  [same person as…?  ROGER [I] de Mortemer (-[1078/86])Stapleton proposed in 1846 that Roger [I] de Mortemer was the same person as Roger, son of "Bishop Hugues"[225].  The Complete Peerage dismisses Stapleton’s hypothesis[226].  It argues firstly that the wife of Roger [I] de Mortemer is named Hawise in primary sources, compared with Oda as the wife of the bishop’s son, and also that the bishop’s son is recorded with children named Guillaume and Hugues, whereas Roger [I]’s heir was named Ralph, although it would not be beyond the stretch of imagination to combine the two families, with Roger having married twice.  The third difficulty proposed by the Complete Peerage is harder to dismiss.  This is that the 1074 charter of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen which is quoted below implies that Roger, father of Guillaume, was already deceased at the time of the sale of their property to Raoul de Warenne, whereas sources demonstrate that Roger [I] de Mortemer was still alive in 1078.  A further difficulty with Stapleton’s hypothesis is that, if it was correct, the same person would have been referred to in the sources sometimes as "filius episcopi" and sometimes as "de Mortuomari".  Such dual appellations are unusual.  Different primary sources at the time usually refer to the same individual by the same name and epithet, presumably reflecting the style by which he was normally known among his contemporaries.  If a person was known by two names, the style "X qui et Y" was usually adopted in the sources.  One possible explanation for this apparent exception to normal practice is that, after the confiscation of his castle, "Rogerius de Mortuomari" became known as "Rogerius filius episcopi", although this does not appear consistent with the survival of the name Mortimer among Roger’s descendants long after the castle was lost.]  Roger & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUILLAUME (-[after 1074]).  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[227].  "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[228]

b)         HUGUES .  "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[229]same person as…?  HUGH de Mortemer (-after 1066).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "Hue de Mortemer…son parent par son pere" his "Connestable d’Angleterre" after the conquest of England[230].  This co-identity would be the consequence if Roger, son of Bishop Hugues, was the same person as Roger [I] de Mortemer, the possibility of which is discussed above.  If it was correct, the reference to "son parent par son père" would be explained because both King William and Hugh de Mortemer would have descended from Sprota, who was firstly mistress of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie] (ancestor of King William) and, after his death, married Esperling de Pitres who was the paternal grandfather of Hugues d’Ivry Bishop of Evreux. 

2.         ALBREDA .  Chibnall speculates that the grandmother of Ascelin Goël may have been the daughter of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux, which could have provided her grandson with a claim to Ivry by inheritance[231], assuming that her supposed illegitimacy presented no obstacle.  This parentage and first marriage are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[232] but it is not known whether based on a specific primary source or on Chibnall’s speculation.   Her parentage and [second] marriage are confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Radulfus tiro filius Alberti de Crevento” attacked “Guitmundum monachum...Manlia venientem in valle Guidonis” who returned on foot to Pacy and begged “Albertum” to protect him from “filium sibi”, on which “Alberada uxor eius” burst into tears, adding in a later passage that she was “Hugonis Bajocensis episcopi filia[233].  The date of her [second] marriage is estimated because her son died in [1070] when he was a young adult, assuming that the report of his activities by Orderic Vitalis is factually correct.  [m firstly ROBERT d'Ivry, son of --- (-[before 1050 or 1060]).]  m [secondly] ([1050] or [1060]) ALBERT de Cravent, son of --- (-[after 1070 or after 1080], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Albertus” donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul (in 1070, see below for a discussion about why this date may be incorrect) but that soon afterwards Albert died and was buried at Ouche, whereupon “heredes...Guido...gener eius, Ebrardi de Rui filius, et Radulfus de Cunella [whose family relationship with the deceased had not been traced], aliique” confirmed this donation[234]Albreda & her [second] husband had two children: 

a)         RAOUL de Cravent (-[before 1070 or 1080]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Radulfus tiro filius Alberti de Crevento” attacked “Guitmundum monachum...Manlia venientem in valle Guidonis”, who returned on foot to Pacy and begged “Albertum” to protect him from “filium sibi”, on which “Alberada uxor eius” burst into tears, adding in a later passage that Raoul repented before he died, after which Albert in 1070 donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul[235].  There must be some doubt about the date of this event because Orderic Vitalis records Geoffroy Bishop of Chartres in the dating clause, although in another passage he records the appointment of Bishop Geoffroy in 1077[236].  Le Prévost suggests that the donation should be redated to 1080[237]

b)         daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Albertus” donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul (in 1070, see below for a discussion about why this date may be incorrect) but that soon afterwards Albert died and was buried at Ouche, whereupon “heredes...Guido...gener eius, Ebrardi de Rui filius, et Radulfus de Cunella [whose family relationship with the deceased had not been traced], aliique” confirmed this donation[238]m GUY de Rui, son of EVRARD de Rui & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

B.      VICOMTES du BESSIN (BAYEUX)

 

 

ANSCHITIL, son of ---.  Vicomte.  His name suggests a Viking origin.  "…Anschitillus Baiocacensis vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[239]

m ---.  The name of Anschitil's wife is not known. 

Anschitil & his wife had [three] children: 

1.         RANULF (-killed in battle Val-es-Dunes 1047).  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli", by charter dated to [1042][240]Vicomte du Bessin (Bayeux).  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Randulfum Baiocensium vicecomitem" supported "Guido filius Burgundionum comitis" in his rebellion, dated to [1047][241].  "…Rannulfi filii Ascelini" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[242].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ranulfum Bajocensem ac Haymonem Dentatum et Nigellum de Constantino" rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy at the battle "apud Vallesdunas"[243]m ALIX de Normandie, illegitimate daughter of RICHARD III Duke of Normandy & his mistress ---.  Robert of Torigny names "Nicolaum…duas filias Papiam…uxorem Walterii de Sancto Walerico et Aeliz uxorem Ranulfi vicecomitis de Baiocis" as the children of "Ricardo secundo duce Normannum filio primi Ricardi"[244]Vicomte Ranulf & his wife had one child: 

a)         RANULF [Ralph] (-after [1098])Vicomte du Bessin (Bayeux).  "…Ranulfus vicecomes Baiocensis…" witnessed the charter dated 1064 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy settled a claim in favour of the monks of Marmoutier relating to property donated by "Guido de Valle"[245].  "…Rannulfus filius Rannulfi vicecomitis…Rannulfus vicecomes" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[246].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[247]m MARGUERITE [Mathilde] d'Avranches, daughter of RICHARD Vicomte d'Avranches & his wife --- (-after [1098]).  She is named "Mathilda soror Hugonis comitis" by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her son[248].  Her husband is named in another passage, as father of his son Guillaume[249].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[250].  Vicomte Ranulf & his wife had four children: 

i)          RICHARD (after [1098]).  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[251].  As Richard is named in this source together with his brother’s wife, his date of death is estimated based on his brother’s estimated marriage date.  “R de Meschin, Richerio vicecomiti Karleoli” donated property to Wetherall priory, Cumberland, for the soul of “…Richard fratris mei…et uxoris meæ Luciæ…”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Osberto vicecomite, Walteof filio Cospatricii comitis, Forno Sigulfi filio, Chetello Ectredi filio…[252]

ii)         RANULF du Bessin "le Meschin" (-17 or 27 Jan 1129, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  Orderic Vitalis names him and his mother[253].  "…Rannulfus filius Rannulfi vicecomitis…Rannulfus vicecomes" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[254].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[255].  He succeeded his father as Vicomte du Bessin (Bayeux).  He was appointed Vicomte d'Avranches in 1120 after the death of his first cousin Richard d'Avranches, and also obtained the grant of the county palatine of Chester thereby becoming Earl of Chester (upon which he surrendered the lordship of Carlisle). 

-         EARLS of CHESTER

iii)        WILLIAM FitzRanulf (-[1130/35]).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that William I King of England granted “totam terram de comitatu Cumbriæ” to “Ranulpho de Meschines, et Galfrido fratri eiusdem…et Willielmo fratri eorundem terram de Copland[256]

-         see below

iv)       GEOFFROY of Gillesland .  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that William I King of England granted “totam terram de comitatu Cumbriæ” to “Ranulpho de Meschines, et Galfrido fratri eiusdem Ranulphi totum comitatum Cestriæ, et Willielmo fratri eorundem terram de Copland”, adding that Geoffroy died without heirs and was succeeded by his brother Ranulf[257].  

2.         [HONFROI (-after [1060]).  "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[258].  It is not certain that Honfroi was the brother of Ranulf son of Anschitil, but no other person with the latter name has yet been identified.] 

3.         [FREDESENDE .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Fredesend amite Ran[nulfi] vicecomitis" of "Osbertivillam", by charter dated to [1180/82][259].  If "amita" is interpreted strictly in this document, Frédésende would have been Ranulf’s paternal aunt, but this is not beyond doubt.] 

 

 

WILLIAM FitzRanulf, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Mathilde] d'Avranches (-[1130/35][260]).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that William I King of England granted “totam terram de comitatu Cumbriæ” to “Ranulpho de Meschines, et Galfrido fratri eiusdem…et Willielmo fratri eorundem terram de Copland[261].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Guillaume son of Ralph the vicomte" was present at the capture of Nikaia in 1097[262].  “Ranulfus Meschinus” donated property to Wetherhal priory, Cumberland by undated charter, witnessed by “uxore mea Lucia et Willelmo fratre meo…[263].  “Ranulphus comes Cestriæ” records donations to Chester St Werburgh in an undated charter which names “Hugonis comitis avunculi mei”, including a donation by “Willielmus Meschin frater meus” with the consent of “Ranulphi comitis et Ranulphi filii sui[264].  It is suggested that the mention of “Hugonis comitis avunculi mei” means that this document relates to the brother of Ranulf who was invested as Earl of Chester in 1120.  “Willielmus filius Randulfi” donated property to the priory of St Bee, Cumberland by undated charter[265].  He was given the barony of Egremont, Cumberland by King Henry I[266].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Chirkbibeceoch…et ecclesiam S. Begæ” by “Willielmus Meschin” and "villam de Ananderdale et…terræ in Egermond" by "Radulphus filius eius"[267].  Lord of Skipton-in-Craven, de iure uxoris.  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[268].  “Willielmus de Meschines et Cecilia uxor mea” founded Bolton Priory by undated charter[269].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Ricardus de Lucy" holding "Coupland" in Cumberland, adding that King Henry I had first granted it to "Willelmo Messchin antecessori predicti Ricardi"[270].  

m as her first husband, CECILY de Rumilly, daughter and heiress of ROBERT de Rumilly [Romilly] of Skipton & his wife ---.  “Willielmus de Meschines et Cecilia uxor mea” founded Bolton Priory by undated charter[271].  “Cecilia de Romeli” donated property to Bolton Priory by undated charter which names “gener meus Willielmus nepos regis Scotiæ Duncani[272].  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[273].  She married secondly[274], as his second wife, Henry de Tracy of Barnstaple. 

William & his wife had five children: 

1.         RANULF de Rumilly (-[1135/40]).  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by himself and “uxoris meæ Ceciliæ…concessione Ranulphi filii mei[275].  "Ranulfus Meschinus filius Willelmi Meschin" confirmed the donation of land "in Wirchintuna" donated by "Chetellus filius Heltredi" to St Bees by undated charter[276].  “Ranulphus Meschinus, filius Willielmi, filii Ranulphi” confirmed donations of property to the priory of St Bee, Cumberland, on the advice of “Fulconis avunculi mei…”, by undated charter[277].  He succeeded his father, but on his death soon after was succeeded by his sisters as co-heiresses[278].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Chirkbibeceoch…et ecclesiam S. Begæ” by “Willielmus Meschin” and "villam de Ananderdale et…terræ in Egermond" by "Radulphus filius eius"[279]

2.         MATTHEW de Rumilly (-[after 1141/42]).  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] including a grant to "Matheus de Rumilli" of "terram patris sui quam Gaufridus de Turevill tenet"[280].  The primary source which confirms his parentage more precisely has not yet been identified. 

3.         ALICE de Rumilly .  A manuscript genealogy of William de Forz Comte d’Aumâle names “Aliciam de Rumeleya” as daughter of “Willielmus de Mechines primus hæres de Sciptun in Craven”, adding that she married “Willielmo filio Duncan” and was buried “apud Fontes[281].  A different version of her parentage is provided by the Cronicon Cumbriæ which records that “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, married “Aliciam filiam Roberti de Romeney, domini de Skipton in Craven” and his wife “filiam Willielmi de Meschinis domini de Coupland[282].  Lady of Skipton.  “Willielmus filius Dunecani nepos regis Scotiæ…et Aeliz de Rumeili uxor mea” confirmed donations of property to Bolton Priory by undated charter[283].  "Aelicia de Rumelli…in libera potestate viduitatis mee" confirmed the donations to St Bees made by "pater meus Willelmus Meschinus et frater meus Ranulfus" by undated charter[284].  "Aelicia de Rumelli" confirmed the donations to St Bees made by "dominus meus Willelmus nepos regis Scocie" by undated charter[285].  “Aaliz de Rumelli” donated property to Pontefract Priory, with the consent of “Willielmi filii mei”, for the soul of “domini mei Willielmi filii Dunecani”, by undated charter[286].  Dugdale summarises donations to Southwark priory, including the donation of “cheese at Badleking in the manor of Kingston Lisle in Berkshire” made by "Alexander Fitzgerald" and confirmed by "Alice de Rumeley, wife of Alexander"[287]m firstly (1138) [as his second wife,] WILLIAM FitzDuncan, son of DUNCAN II King of Scotland & his wife Ethelreda of Northumberland ([1091/94]-[1153/54]).  m secondly ALEXANDER FitzGerold, son of ROBERT FitzGerold & Alice his wife --- (-1178). 

4.         MATILDA de Rumilly (-after 1189[288]).  “Philippus de Belmeis” founded Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…[289]The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[290]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[291]; (2) Roger Mortimer’s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[292]; (3) the charter of Philip de Belmeis, her first husband, quoted abovem firstly PHILIP de Belmeis of Tong, Shropshire, son of [293]WALTER de Belmeis & his wife --- (-after May 1145).  m secondly ([1150]) HUGH [II] de Mortimer, son of RALPH [I] de Mortimer & his [second/third wife Mabel ---/---] (-Cleobury [26 Feb] [1180/81], bur Wigmore). 

5.         AVICE de Rumilly (-[1179][294]).  “Amicia filia Cecilie de Rumilli” confirmed donations to the canons of St Mary, for the soul of “Willelmi de Curci filii mei”, by charter dated to [1138/50], witnessed by “Willelmo de Curci filio meo…[295].  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam[296].  “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…[297].  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[298]m firstly ([1125]) WILLIAM de Courcy, son of WILLIAM de Courcy [Curcy] & his wife Emma de Falaise (-before 1130).  m secondly WILLIAM Paynell of Drax, son of RALPH Paynell & his [first wife ---] (-[1147]).  [299]m thirdly (before 1153) WALTER de Percy, son of ALAN de Percy & his wife Emma de Gand . 

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS d’AUNAY-sur-ODON (SAY)

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME de Say The Complete Peerage refers to this Guillaume de Say but does not establish his relationship with the later Say family (Barony created by writ in 1313, see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY)[300].  Such a connection is likely given the unique name (according to The Complete Peerage, there is only one place of this name in Normandy about 2 miles south-east of Argentan[301]).  m AGNES de Grantmesnil, daughter of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife --- (-14 Sep ----).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Agnes married “Guillelmo de Saia[302]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "14 Sep" of "Agnes filia Hugonis de Grentesmesnil"[303]

 

2.         JORDAN de Say (-after 15 Jul 1131)Domesday Descendants suggests that he was the son of Guillaume de Say[304], see above.  Seigneur d’Aunay-sur-Odon {Calvados}.  "…Jordano de Say…" witnessed the charter dated 1108 under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Holy Trinity, London[305].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Jordano de Sai" in Oxfordshire[306].  According to Gallia Christiana, the abbey of Aunay was founded 15 Jul 1131 by Jordan “de Saio prope Argentomum” and Lucy his wife[307].  "Iordanus de Sai" donated "ecclesiam de Sulethorn" to Eynsham abbey, for the soul of "filii Willelmi" on his burial at the monastery, by charter dated to [before 1161][308].  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius regis Angliæ” confirmed the foundation of Aulnay, including donations made by “Jordani de Saio et Luciæ uxoris eius” and by himself and “Agnetis uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willelmi, Enguerrani et Jordani”, by undated charter[309].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Jordani de Saio et Lucie uxoris sue" confirmed by "Richardi de Humetis constabularii et Agnetis uxoris eius", by charter dated to [1181/89][310]m LUCY [de Rumilly], daughter of [ROBERT de Rumilly of Skipton] & his wife [Cecilia ---].  According to Gallia Christiana, the abbey of Aunay was founded 15 Jul 1131 by Jordan “de Saio prope Argentomum” and Lucy his wife[311]Domesday Descendants says that Robert de Rumilly was "doubtless father also of Lucy wife of Jordan de Sai", but does not explain the reasoning[312].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Jordani de Saio et Lucie uxoris sue", by charter dated to [1181/89][313].  Jordan & his wife had five children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Say (-bur Eynsham).  "Iordanus de Sai" donated "ecclesiam de Sulethorn" to Eynsham abbey, for the soul of "filii Willelmi" on his burial at the monastery, by charter dated to [before 1161][314]

b)         ENGUERRAND de Say .  "Willelmus de Albiniaco" donated “ecclesias de villa...Ham” to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1132/51], witnessed by “...Olivarius frater Willelmi de Albiniaco et Radulfus de Haia et Engerannus de Sai...[315].  "…Engueranno de Sayo…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[316]

c)         GILBERT de SayDomesday Descendants names "Gilbert and Peter" as sons of Jordan de Say without citing the corresponding primary source[317]

d)         PIERRE de SayDomesday Descendants names "Gilbert and Peter" as sons of Jordan de Say without citing the corresponding primary source[318]

e)         AGNES de Say Her parentage and marriage are referred to in Domesday Descendants[319]Richard du Hommet donated property to Aunay with the consent of "uxore mea Agnete et filiis meis Willelmo, Engerranno et Jordano" by undated charter[320].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][321]m [as his second wife,] RICHARD [du Hommet], son of ROBERT & his wife --- (-[1180/81]). 

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de CREULLY

 

 

RICHARD FitzRobert, son of ROBERT Fitzroy Earl of Gloucester & his wife Mabel [Maud or Sibylle] FitzRobert ([1120/35]-1175).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which his son "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados[322].  He succeeded his mother as Seigneur de CreullyRobert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[323]

m --- de Montfort, daughter of HUGUES van Gent Seigneur de Montfort-en-Risle & his wife Adeline de Beaumont ([1125/40]-).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[324]

Richard & his wife had eight children: 

1.         PHILIPPE de Creully (-[before May 1219]).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Richardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ" and the succession of "Philippus filius eius natus ex sorore Roberti de Monte Forti"[325]Seigneur de Creully.  "Philippe de Creully, fils de Richard, fils du comte de Creully" confirmed donations to the priory of Sainte-Barbe by "Roger Malfilastre, Thomas Malfilastre son frère, et le fils dudit Thomas…", by undated charter[326].  "Philippus de Croileio miles…dicti Ricardi hæres" confirmed the donations of the mills at Mesnilbuye to the church of Bayeux made by "Ricardus filius comitis Gloecestriæ pater meus" by charter dated to [1184/1218][327].  "Ricardus de Croilleio" confirmed the donations of the mills at Mesnilbuye to the church of Bayeux made by "Ricardus filius comitis pater meus…Philippus de Croilleio frater meus primogenitus" by charter dated to [1184/1218][328]m ---.  The name of Philippe’s wife is not known.  Philippe & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are suggested by a charter dated May 1219 under which "Gillebertus de Tilleriis dominus de Croleio" granted land "in parochia de Maton" to "Petro de Telleio"[329], confirmed by "Ricardus de Croleio miles" by charter dated Sep 1220[330]m GILBERT de Tillières, son of GILBERT Crispin Seigneur de Tillières & his wife Eléonore de Vitré (-after Sep 1220).  Seigneur de Creully, de iure uxoris.] 

2.         RICHARD de Creully (-after 1234).  "Ricardus de Croilleio" confirmed the donations of the mills at Mesnilbuye to the church of Bayeux made by "Ricardus filius comitis pater meus…Philippus de Croilleio frater meus primogenitus" by charter dated to [1184/1218][331].  "Ricardus de Croleio miles" confirmed the grant of land "in parochia de Maton" to "Petro de Telleio" made by "Gilleberti de Theleriis" by charter dated Sep 1220[332].  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter[333].  "Guillaume Acaria…assisté de Richard et Raoul de Creully frères" confirmed the donation to the Maison-Dieu de Lisieux made by "Hugues et Guillaume La Prevost…" by charter dated Apr 1232[334].  "Richard de Creully" confirmed a donation to the abbey of Aunay made by "Tustin de Lanteuil" by charter dated 1234[335].  The possible descendants of Richard de Creully have been studied by Thierry Le Hête[336]

3.         ROGER de Creully (-before 1248).  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Nicolas de Creully, Godefroi de Creully…"[337].  "Roger de Creully fils du comte de Glocestre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues, for the health of "son frère Philippe", by undated charter, witnessed by "ses frères Robert et Henri de Creully…Réginald fils de la comtesse"[338].  “Rogerus filius Ricardi de Croileio” donated rights “in decima de Manereio” to Jumièges by charter dated to [1198/1213][339]m as her second husband, LUCIE de Reviers, widow of ENGUERRAND de Camprond, daughter of --- (-after 1248).  "Lucie de Reviers, veuve du seigneur Roger de Creully chevalier" donated produce from her mill La Fosse to Sainte-Marie de Longues, with the consent of "son fils Guillaume", by charter dated 1248[340].  Her first marriage is confirmed by an undated charter under which "Guillaume de Montfort" granted produce from his mill at La Fosse to "Enguérand de Campo-Rotondo et à Lucie sa femme"[341], confirmed by the charter dated 1248 under which "Guillaume de Campo Rotundo chevalier seigneur de Jore" confirmed the previous donation by "sa mère Lucie de Reviers"[342]

4.         ROBERT de Creully"Roger de Creully fils du comte de Glocestre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues, for the health of "son frère Philippe", by undated charter, witnessed by "ses frères Robert et Henri de Creully…Réginald fils de la comtesse"[343].  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter[344]

5.         GUILLAUME de Creully .  "Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter[345]

6.         HENRI de Creully .  "Roger de Creully fils du comte de Glocestre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues, for the health of "son frère Philippe", by undated charter, witnessed by "ses frères Robert et Henri de Creully…Réginald fils de la comtesse"[346]

7.         RAOUL de Creully (-after Apr 1232).  Joan Queen of Sicily bequeathed 30 marcs to "Ralf de Crolly" under her testament dated 1199[347].  "Guillaume Acaria…assisté de Richard et Raoul de Creully frères" confirmed the donation to the Maison-Dieu de Lisieux made by "Hugues et Guillaume La Prevost…" by charter dated Apr 1232[348]

8.         daughter .  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Ingerannus Patric filius eius [Guillermi Patric]" and "filiam Richardi filii comitis"[349]m ENGUERRAND Patric, son of GUILLAUME Patric & his wife ---. 

 

 

1.         NICOLAS de Creully"Roger de Croylet, fils de Richard fils du comte de Gloucester" donated property to the abbey of Ardennes, Calvados, with the consent of "ses quatre frères Richard, Robert, Guillaume et Henry", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Nicolas de Creully, Godefroi de Creully…"[350].  The fact that Nicolas witnessed, but did not consent to this donation, suggests that he was not the full brother of the named four brothers.  The names of his sons suggest a close family connection with Richard FitzRobert, but maybe Nicolas was Richard’s illegitimate son.  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[351]m ---.  The name of Nicolas’s wife is not known.  Nicolas & his wife had three children: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Creully .  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[352].  "Guillaume fils aîné de Nicolas de Creully" donated land at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter[353]

b)         PHILIPPE de Creully .  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[354]

c)         NICOLAS de Creully .  "Nicolas de Creully chevalier" donated property at Lauteuil to the abbey of Aunay by undated charter, confirmed by another charter by "Guillaume, Philippe et Nicolas de Creully, tous trois enfans dudit Nicolas de Creully"[355]

 

 

 

E.      SEIGNEURS de CREVECŒUR

 

 

Crèvecœur is a canton in the present-day French département of Oise.  It was located on the borders with the duchy of Normandy and, as can be seen below, many members of the Crèvecœur families were closely associated with Normandy and were granted land in England in the 12th century by the English kings.  There appear to have been several different families who adopted the name Crèvecœur, and between whom no family connection has yet been established.  In addition, Seigneurs de Crèvecœur are recorded from the mid-12th century, descended from the family of the seigneurs de Breteuil (see the document PARIS REGION NOBILILTY).  Hugues de Breteuil, brother of Valéran [III] Seigneur de Breteuil, is recorded as seigneur de Crèvecœur from about the 1150s.  No indication has been found about how Hugues acquired the seigneurie.  In particular, no relationship has yet been traced with any of the earlier Crèvecœur families.  One possibility is that Hugues was born from his father’s second wife Ivette, whose family origin is not known but who may have had some connection with Crèvecœur.  The seigneurs de Crèvecœur are shown at the end of the present section after the other Crèvecœur families.  The seigneurie was held by members of the same family until the marriage in the early 16th century of Louise de Crèvecœur, heiress of François de Crèvecœur, to Guillaume Gouffier de Bonnivet. 

 

 

1.         HAMON de Crèvecœur (-1119 or before).  Domesday Descendants names "Haimo de Crèvecœur, Calvados, arr. Lisieux, cant. Mézidon, whom he succeeded by 1119" as the father of Robert de Crèvecœur but does not cite the primary source which confirms this information[356]m ---.  The name of Hamon’s wife is not known.  She was presumably the sister of Hamon dapifer, assuming that “avunculi mei” in the following document is correctly translated as maternal uncle:  Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde...” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter[357]Hamon & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT de Crèvecœur (-[1154/56]).  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo"[358].  "…Roberto de Crevecor…" witnessed the charter dated 1121 under which Henry I King of England granted "totam dotem matris sue…terram de Sceldedena et de Herleia et dominicum managium suum de Wintonia extra portam civitatis" to "Willelmo Maledocto"[359].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robto de Crepacor" in Kent[360]Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde, ecclesia de Chettham...de Renham...de Gutherste...de Lamberherste...de Farlege...de Terstane” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter witnessed by “Roysa uxore mea, Elya fratre meo, Hamone filio Vitalis...[361]m ROHESE, daughter of ---.  Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde, ecclesia de Chettham...de Renham...de Gutherste...de Lamberherste...de Farlege...de Terstane” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter witnessed by “Roysa uxore mea, Elya fratre meo, Hamone filio Vitalis...[362].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo"[363].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          HELIE de Crèvecœur .  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo"[364]

ii)         DANIEL de Crèvecœur (-1177).  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes other charters which record that "Robertus de Crepito-corde" founded Leeds priory in Kent witnessed by "Roysa uxore meo, Elia filio meo, Daniele filio meo" and that "Daniel de Crevequer" confirmed the donations made by "pater meus Robertus"[365].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Daniel de Crevequor viii l" in Kent in [1161/62] and "xi l i m" in [1167/68][366].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the names of those providing knights for military service with "Danielis de Crevequer" in Kent[367].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Daniel de Crevequer" held [one] knights fee in Sussex under the Earl of Arundel[368].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Daniel de Creuecuer" in Kent[369]m ISABEL, daughter of ---.  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Daniel de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent for the soul of "sororis meæ Gunnoræ, quas tenuit uxor Wyse, et Edstanus" and made another donation for the soul of "Isabellæ uxoris meæ"[370].  Daniel & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ROBERT de Crèvecœur (-after [1210/12])Rodbertus de Crevequer” confirmed the donation of “duas terras...Techesto Rochester, made by “Helyas filius Hamonis” with the consent of “patris mei Danielis de Crevequer et mater eius Roeis”, by undated charter[371]

-         see below.   

iii)        GUNNOR de Crèvecœur .  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Daniel de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent for the soul of "sororis meæ Gunnoræ, quas tenuit uxor Wyse, et Edstanus" and made another donation for the soul of "Isabellæ uxoris meæ"[372]m --- Wyse, son of ---. 

b)         HELIE de Crèvecœur Robertus de Crepito Corde” donated “ecclesiam...de Ledes cum capella de Bromfelde, ecclesia de Chettham...de Renham...de Gutherste...de Lamberherste...de Farlege...de Terstane” to the canons of Leeds priory, for the soul of “avunculi mei Hamonis dapiferi”, by undated charter witnessed by “Roysa uxore mea, Elya fratre meo, Hamone filio Vitalis...[373].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Helias de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent[374].  It is not known whether this last document refers to the brother of Robert de Crèvecœur.  same person as...?  HELIE de Crèvecœur .  The chronology suggests that Hélie de Crèvecœur who is named in the following document was the same person as the brother of Robert de Crèvecœur, but this has not been confirmed beyond doubt.  An undated charter records that “in tempore Henrici regis primiElyas de Crevequer” donated “ecclesie de Serres...advocacionem” to the canons of Leeds priory who donated it to “clericum suum Radulfum Pykot” who resigned his position and became a knight, that “Emma filie et heredes dicti Elye” later confirmed her father’s donation, and that later still “Hamo...dominus medietatis manerii de Serres” further confirmed the donation[375]m ---.  The name of Hélie’s wife is not known.  Hélie & his wife had one child: 

i)          EMMA de Crèvecœur .  An undated charter records that “in tempore Henrici regis primiElyas de Crevequer” donated “ecclesie de Serres...advocacionem” to the canons of Leeds priory who donated it to “clericum suum Radulfum Pykot” who resigned his position and became a knight, that “Emma filie et heredes dicti Elye” later confirmed her father’s donation, and that later still “Hamo...dominus medietatis manerii de Serres” further confirmed the donation[376]

 

 

1.         AVICE de Crèvecœur ([1114/15]-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Avicia de Crievequor…lxx annorum”, her fee "i militis…de feodo comitis Legrecestrie…in Croxton", and names “Robertus de Bouesbez filius filii sui…heres eius…xxii annorum” and records that she also had three daughters "quas Dominus Rex maritavit"[377]m --- de Bousbes, son of ---. 

 

2.         HUGUES de Crèvecœur (-after [1133]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records knights of the church of Bayeux in [1133], "Hugo de Crevequer" with five knights[378]m ---.  The name of Hugues’s wife is not known.  Hugues & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME de Crèvecœur (-after Jan 1153).  "…Willielmo de Crivecuer…" witnessed the charter dated [Jan/Aug] 1153 under which Henry Duke of Normandy donated property to Flexley abbey[379].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Barbe-en-Auge, including donations by "Willelmi de Crievecuer", by charter dated to [1185/89][380]

 

 

ROBERT de Crèvecœur, son of DANIEL de Crèvecœur & his wife Isabel (-after [1210/12])Rodbertus de Crevequer” confirmed the donation of “duas terras...Techesto Rochester, made by “Helyas filius Hamonis” with the consent of “patris mei Danielis de Crevequer et mater eius Roeis”, by undated charter[381].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus filius Danielis de Crevequer" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent[382].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Crevequer" paying "vii l, xiv milites" in Kent[383].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "…Robertus de Crevequor…" was granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Kent[384].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Crevequor" paying "xiv l…xiv milites" in Kent[385].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Crevequor" holding one and three quarters knights’ fees (location unspecified), one quarter "in Dene", one "in Cheveninges", one "in Fotescraye", as well as twelve other unspecified knights’ fees, in Kent in [1210/12][386]

m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known. 

Robert & his wife had one child: 

1.         HAMON de Crèvecœur (-before 6 Apr 1263).  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Hamo de Crevequer" confirmed the donations to Leeds priory in Kent made by "Roberti de Crevequer atavi mei, vel Danielis avi mei vel Roberti patris mei", witnessed by "…domino Roberto de Crevequer filio meo…"[387].  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Hamo de Crevequoer" dated 11 Jun 1217[388].  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Robert de Creuker, son of Hamo de Creweker the younger, and nepos of the said Hamo deceased aged 24 and more is his heir…[to] Bokingefaud manor [Kent]", and "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[389]m firstly ---.  The name of Hamon’s first wife is not known.  This first marriage is indicated by the documents quoted below.  m secondly MATILDA d’Avranches, daughter of WILLIAM d’Avranches & his wife Matilda de Bocland (-before 6 Apr 1263).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches"[390].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her…" and names her heirs as noted below[391].  Hamon & his first wife had three children: 

a)         HAMON de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[392]m ---.  The name of Hamon’s wife is not known.  The charters quoted below under her son Robert suggest that she may have been heiress of the Cressy family.  Hamon & his wife had children: 

i)          ROBERT de Crèvecœur ([1238/39]-after 5 Jun 1293).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Robert de Creuker, son of Hamo de Creweker the younger, and nepos of the said Hamo deceased aged 24 and more is his heir…[to] Bokingefaud manor [Kent]"[393].  A charter of Edward III King of England quotes another charter which records that "Robertus filius Hammonis de Crevequer junioris" donated property to Leeds priory in Kent 3 Dec 1272[394].  “Robertus de Creuequer, dominus manerii quod fuit Hugonis de Cressy in villa de Trottesclyve” confirmed land “in Parva Wrotham” to Willelmo le Ken servienti meo” by charter dated [1272/73][395].  “Robertus de Creuquer filius Hamonis de Creuquer junioris” donated his rights “in manerio de Trottesclyve”, which had belonged to Stephani de Cressy”, to Rochester by charter dated 2 Jun 1278[396].  “Robertus de Creuquer...et Iseude uxori mee” settled a dispute with “dominum Rogerium Leyburne” relating to maneria sua de Trottesclyve et de Flete”, from the reversion of the dowry of “Ermentruda que fuit uxor Stephani de Cressy...per manum domini Willelmi de Stoteville tunc mariti sui”, by charter dated 5 Jun 1293[397]m ISOLDA, daughter of --- (-after 5 Jun 1293).  “Robertus de Creuquer...et Iseude uxori mee” settled a dispute with “dominum Rogerium Leyburne” relating to maneria sua de Trottesclyve et de Flete”, from the reversion of the dowry of “Ermentruda que fuit uxor Stephani de Cressy...per manum domini Willelmi de Stoteville tunc mariti sui”, by charter dated 5 Jun 1293[398]

ii)         JOHN de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[399]

iii)        THOMAS de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[400]

b)         MATTHEW de Crèvecœur ([1222/23]-after 1263).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[401]

c)         ROBERT de Crèvecœur ([1232/33]-).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names "Matthew de Creuequer aged 40 and more, Robert de Creuequer aged 30, Hamo de Creuequer son of the said Hamo, and Robert de Creuequer, John de Creuequer and Thomas de Creuequer, sons of Hamo the younger, are heirs of Hamo de Creuquer last deceased" as heirs in the residue of his tenements[402]

Hamon & his second wife had five children:

d)         WILLIAM de Crèvecœur (-before 6 Apr 1263)A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body"[403]m as her first husband, MABEL, daughter of FULK [IV] FitzWarin & his [first/second] wife [--- de Clifford/Constance de Tosny] (-before 24 May 1297).  She married secondly as his first wife, John de Tregoz, later Lord Tresgoz.  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body"[404]

e)         AGNES de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[405].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body", names as heirs of "[the said Maud] Juliana daughter of John son of Agnes one of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 23 and more, John de Lenham son of Iseut the second of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 60 and more"[406]m JOHN de Sandwich, son of ---. 

f)          ISOLDA de Crèvecœur (-before 1263).  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[407].  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body", names as heirs of "[the said Maud] Juliana daughter of John son of Agnes one of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 23 and more, John de Lenham son of Iseut the second of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 60 and more"[408]m NICHOLAS de Lenham, son of ---. 

g)         ELEANOR de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[409]m BERTRAM de Criel, son of ---. 

h)         ISABEL de Crèvecœur .  A writ dated 6 Apr "47 Hen III", after the death of "Hamo de Creuequer…and Maud de Avereng…sometime his wife", names their heirs and records that Hamon married "Maud sister and heiress of William de Averenches" by whom he had four daughters "Agnes married to John de Sandwyco, Isolda who was married to Nicholas de Lenham and had one son name John now aged 12, Ellen alias Eleanor married to Bartholomew de Kyrieul alias Bertram de Criel, and Isabel married to Henry de Gaunt", adding that "the said Agnes, John, Ellen and Isabel are heirs of the said Maud"[410]m HENRY de Gaunt, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         PIERRE de Crèvecœur (-before 1175).  “Willelmus [...cum uxore mea et liberis cum fratribus...meis] et Petrus [...cum Girardo et ceteris fratribus...meis] vicedomini Gerboreti” confirmed the donation of “terram suam de Ursimonte” made to Lannoy abbey by “...Petrus de Crevecor cum uxore sua Emelina et filio suo Waltero...” by charter dated 1160[411]m EMMELINE, daughter of --- (-after 1175).  “Willelmus [...cum uxore mea et liberis cum fratribus...meis] et Petrus [...cum Girardo et ceteris fratribus...meis] vicedomini Gerboreti” confirmed the donation of “terram suam de Ursimonte” made to Lannoy abbey by “...Petrus de Crevecor cum uxore sua Emelina et filio suo Waltero...” by charter dated 1160[412].  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[413].  Pierre & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         GAUTHIER (-after 1211).  “Willelmus [...cum uxore mea et liberis cum fratribus...meis] et Petrus [...cum Girardo et ceteris fratribus...meis] vicedomini Gerboreti” confirmed the donation of “terram suam de Ursimonte” made to Lannoy abbey by “...Petrus de Crevecor cum uxore sua Emelina et filio suo Waltero...” by charter dated 1160[414].  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[415].  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][416].  “Galterus de Crepicordio” donated property “in territorio de Copemont” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Petri filii sui”, by charter dated 1211[417].  m MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][418].  Gauthier & his wife had six children: 

i)          PIERRE .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][419].  “Galterus de Crepicordio” donated property “in territorio de Copemont” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Petri filii sui”, by charter dated 1211[420].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[421]m ALINE, daughter of ---.  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[422]

ii)         GUY .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][423].  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[424].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[425]m MARGUERITE, daughter of ---.  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina” by charter dated 1221[426]

iii)        CLEMENCE .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][427].  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[428].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[429]m ADAM de Bovereches, son of ---. 

iv)       ERMENGARDE .  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][430].  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[431]m GARIN, son of ---. 

v)        AUBREYE .  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina”, with the consent of “dominus Garinus miles, Willermus Patin, Adam de Bovereches et uxores eorumdem Ermengardis...Albereda et Clementia”, by charter dated 1221[432]m GUILLAUME Patin, son of ---. 

vi)       GERARD .  “Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina” by charter dated 1221[433].  “Petrus de Crepicordio” donated harvest “in granchia de Malpertuis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Aeline uxoris sue et fratres eiusdem Petri...Guido et Gerardus et Clementia soor eorumdem”, by charter dated 1231[434]m ALINE, daughter of ---.  Balduinus de Reyo miles” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Guido et Girardus fratres Petri de Crievecuer...et uxores eorumdem Margareta et Aelina” by charter dated 1221[435]

b)         PHILIPPE .  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[436].  “Galterus de Crevecuer” harvest “in territorio de Ursimontis” to Lannoy, with the consent of “Philippi fratris sui et Matildis uxoris sue et filiorum suorum ac filiarum Petri...Guidonis, Clementiæ et Hermengardis...Emeline de Reio et filiorum suorum Balduini et Gervasii et filie sue Milesendis”, by charter dated to [1194/1200][437]

c)         [--- .  m ---.]  Two children: 

i)          GERVAISPhilippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[438]

ii)         ROGER .  Philippe Bishop of Beauvais confirmed the donation of “quartam partem terre...Fomucum” to Lannoy made by “Emelina uxor Petri de Crevecor” with the consent of “filiis suis Galtero et Philipo et nepotibus suis Gervasio, Rogero” by charter dated 1175[439].

 

 

1.         HUGUES de Crèvecœur (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, name "Hugo de Crevequer, i militem" among those providing military service for William Earl of Gloucester in Kent[440]Hugo de Crevecuer” donated “terre...de feodo de Crevecuer apud Riencort” inherited from “Ascelino de Bules et...uxore eius Freessent” to Saint-Just-en-Chaussée by undated charter (12th century)[441]

 

 

1.         RENAUD de Crèvecœur (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Reginaldus de Crevequer viii m et dimidiam" in Lincolnshire in [1161/62][442].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Reginaldus Crevequer" held one half of one knight’s fee from "comitis Simonis" in Lincolnshire[443]m MATILDA, daughter of --- ([1124/25]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis que fuit uxor Reginaldi de Crievequeor…lx annorum et amplius” and her land "de Redburne"[444].  Renaud & his wife had four children: 

a)         SIMON de Crèvecœur (-before 1185).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Simon de Crevequer xiii l x s" in Lincolnshire in [1171/72][445].  “Alexander de Creuequer” donated land "in Culgait" to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Symone de Creuequer…"[446]m --- de Goxhill, daughter of ROBERT FitzErneis de Goxhill & his wife Adeline Ingram (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, her land "in Huddintune…de feodo Walteri de Neville", adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage naming her mother "filie Johannis Ingelram" and specifying that her younger son was 4 years old, and that "post mortem Simonis de Crievequor terra de Hakenton fuit in manu Domini Regis"[447].  Simon & his wife had four children: 

i)          son ([1179/80]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage specifying that her younger son was 4 years old[448]

ii)         son ([1180/81]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage specifying that her younger son was 4 years old[449]

iii)        two daughters .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Simonis de Crievequeor…filia Roberti filii Ernisii de Gousele”, adding that she was 24 years old and had two sons “primogenitus…v annorum…in custodia matris per Dominum Regem” and two daughters, in a later passage specifying that her younger son was 4 years old[450]

b)         ALEXANDER de Crèvecœur (-before 1204).  “Alexander de Creuequer” donated land "in Culgait" to Wetherhal priory by undated charter, witnessed by "Adam de Mortegeg, Warino, Symone de Creuequer…"[451].  "Alex de Crevequor" paid a fine relating to "xiv feod milit et dimid versus Cecil de Crevequor" in Lincolnshire, dated 1201[452].  "Alexander de Creuequer" donated land in Hackthorn and Redbourne "in feudo Symonis filii Willlemi" to Bullington Priory, in exchange for land donated by "pater meus Reginaldus", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II[453].  [The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alexander de Crevequer" holding three and one half knights’ fees in "honor de Crevequer" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][454].]  m firstly ---.  The name of Alexander’s first wife is not known.  This first marriage is suggested by the order dated 1204, quoted below, which appears to indicate that the mother of Alexander’s daughter Cecilia was not Amabel.  m secondly as her first husband, AMABEL, daughter of ADAM FitzSwein & his wife ---.  Her parentage is indicated by the undated charter under which [her husband] “Alexander de Creuequer” donated "molendinum meum de Culgait" to Wetherhal priory[455] and another undated charter [her supposed father] “Adam filius Suani” also donated "molendinum meum de Culgait" to Wetherhal[456].  "Cecilia de Crevequor" paid a fine for "terre…in Harpeswell et Herdewic qu’s Amabil q fuit uxor Alex de Crevequor tenuit in dote ex dono ipsius Alex et q ad ipsam Cecil q fuit fil eidsdem Alex et hs ipsa et jure hereditario deb revti", in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[457].  She married secondly William de Neville.  Alexander & his first wife had one child: 

i)          CECILIA de Crèvecœur (-after 1212).  "Walterus de Nevilla…et Ceciliam uxorem meam" donated a fishery in the river Ancolne to Bullington priory by charter dated to the late 12th century, sealed by "Walteri de Nevila…Cecilie de Crevecwer"[458].  The document does not name Cecilia’s parents, but the chronology of the references to the Crèvecœur family in Lincolnshire suggests that Cecilia may have been the daughter of Alexander de Crèvecœur.  This would also explain the transmission of the name Alexander into the Neville family.  Her parentage is confirmed by the order dated 1204 which is quoted below.  "Alex de Crevequor" paid a fine relating to "xiv feod milit et dimid versus Cecil de Crevequor" in Lincolnshire, dated 1201[459].  "Cecil’ de Crevequor" paid a fine for "hereditate sua un dissaisita fuit p perceptu dñi Reg, et uñ Alex de Neovil fil suus" in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[460].  "Cecilia de Crevequor" paid a fine for "terre…in Harpeswell et Herdewic qu’s Amabil q fuit uxor Alex de Crevequor tenuit in dote ex dono ipsius Alex et q ad ipsam Cecil q fuit fil eidsdem Alex et hs ipsa et jure hereditario deb revti", in Lincolnshire, dated 1204[461].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hugo filius Radulfi" held property "de baronia Cecillie de Crevequer, in Askebi, Sumerdebi et Enderbi et Teford et Hamringham et Willeton" in Lincolnshire[462].  m WALTER de Neville, son of GILBERT de Neville & his wife --- (-after 1194). 

c)         AMABLE de Crèvecœur .  "Amable de Creuequer" donated land "de Hactorn…iuxta Alexandrum de Creuequer in parte", of Bullington priory, for the souls of "patrum et matrum nostrorum…viri mei Hugonis de Chene", by charter dated to late in the reign of King Henry II[463]m HUGH de Chesney, son of ---. 

d)         GILBERT de Crèvecœur .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

1.         RENAUD de Crèvecœur (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Reginaldus de Crevequer" held property "in Blesebi in Houtton…in Snelleslund et Suntorp et Reresbi" in Lincolnshire[464].  

 

2.         ISABELLE de Crèvecœur (-after Apr 1217).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Isabella de Crevequer…cum Reginaldo de Cornhill viro suo" dated 12 Apr 1217[465]m REGINALD de Cornhill, son of --- (-after Apr 1217). 

 

 

HUGUES de Breteuil, son of ERARD [III] Seigneur de Breteuil & his [first/second] wife [Beatrix de Coucy/Ivette ---] (-[28] Mar 1184, bur Abbaye de Breteuil)Odon Bishop of Beauvais confirmed donations to Lannoy, including the donation of property “in villa et in terra Teoleti” made by “Everardus Britolii dominus et filii eius Walerannus, Everardus et Hugo”, by charter dated 1140[466]Seigneur de Crèvecœur.  As noted in the introduction to the present section, no indication has yet been found about how Hugues acquired the seigneurie de Crèvecœur.  One possibility is that he was the son of his father’s second wife, whose family origin is unknown but who may have been related to the earlier Crèvecœur families who are shown above.  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[467]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179, witnessed by "Manasserus de Britolio…"[468]"Aelidis comitissa Claromontis et domina Britulli" confirmed the donation to the church of Breteuil by "Hugo de Crepicordio frater patris mei Galeranni" for the soul of "Petronille filie sue" and confirmed after his death by "Heverardus eius filius successor et heres" by charter dated 1194[469]

m (before 1157) ADA de Gerberoy, daughter of HELIE [II] Vidame de Gerberoy & his wife Martine ---.  Hugo de Britolio, Galeranus frater eius, Ada uxor Hugonis” subscribed a charter dated 1157 which records a donation to Beaupré[470]Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1160, which records a donation to Beaupré made by Gérard de Caigny”, subscribed by “Hugo de Britulio, gener ipsius Helye vicedomini Gerboredensis[471]Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[472]

Hugues & his wife had five children: 

1.         ERARD de Crèvecœur (-[1183/90]).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[473]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179[474]Seigneur de Crèvecœur.  "Aelidis comitissa Claromontis et domina Britulli" confirmed the donation to the church of Breteuil by "Hugo de Crepicordio frater patris mei Galeranni" for the soul of "Petronille filie sue" and confirmed after his death by "Heverardus eius filius successor et heres" by charter dated 1194[475]

2.         ENGUERRAND de Crèvecœur (-[1204/05]).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[476]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179[477]Seigneur de Crèvecœur.  “Ingelramus de Crevecuer” donated property to Beauvais Saint-Lucien, with the consent of “uxoris Clementiæ”, by charter dated 1190[478]m as her first husband, CLEMENCE de Gerberoy, daughter of PIERRE [III] de Gerberoy & his wife Juliana de Gerberoy.  “Ingelramus de Crevecuer” donated property to Beauvais Saint-Lucien, with the consent of “uxoris Clementiæ”, by charter dated 1190[479].  Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated 1240 under which [her son] “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais[480].  She married secondly Eudes de Ronquerolles.  “Clementia de Crevecuer”, in the absence of “domino Odone milite ad præsens marito meo” on pilgrimage to the Holy Land, confirmed a donation by “Giroldus de Crevecuer” of property held from “Ingelrani quondam mariti mei”, by charter dated Jul 1220[481].  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

a)         JEAN de Crèvecœur (-1240).  Seigneur de CrèvecœurJoannes de Crevecor” confirmed the donation to Lannoy made by “Ingerranus de Crevecor pater meus...et domina Clementia mater mea” by charter dated 1219[482].  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[483]Guillelmus de Bello saltu miles dominus Brithulii” [presumably acting in his capacity as head of the Breteuil family] confirmed the donation of “medietatem terre in terra Alodiorum” made to Beaupré by “bone memorie Ingeranno de Crepicordio milite et domina Clementia quondam eius uxore” and by “dominus Johannes de Crepicordio miles eorum filius heres terre...et Aelis uxor dicti Johannis” by charter dated 1231[484]Joannes de Crepicordio et dominus” confirmed the donation to Beauvais Saint-Lucien made by “Vuilelmus, Petrus, Ricardus et Petronilla soror eorumdem de Tilloel...” by charter dated 1239[485].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[486]m ALIX, daughter of ---(-1279).  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[487].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[488].  Jean & his wife had three children: 

i)          RENAUD de Crèvecœur (-1282).  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[489].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[490]

-         SEIGNEURS de CREVECŒUR

ii)         EUDES de Crèvecœur (-after 1240).  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[491].  “Joannes de Crepicordio miles...et filii mei...Reginaldus et Odardus et domina Alidis uxor” renounced claims to land of “Vuilelmi de Gerboredo...tanquam hœredem proximiorem” in favour of the bishop of Beauvais by charter dated 1240[492]

iii)        ISABELLE de Crèvecœur .  “Joannes de Crepicordio armiger” confirmed a donation to Beaupré made by “bonæ memoriæ Ingerranus pater meus et domina Clementia mater mea”, with the consent of “Alix uxor mea, liberi nostri Rainaldus, Odo, Isabellis”, by charter dated 1231[493]

b)         GUY (-after Oct 1250).  “Guido de Crepicordio miles filius dominæ Clementiæ de Crepicordio” donated property to Beauvais Hôtel-Dieu by charter dated Oct 1250[494]

3.         MATHILDE de Crèvecœur (-after 1179).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[495]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179[496]

4.         SARA de CrèvecœurHugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[497]Hugo de Britolio” donated “decimam meam de Hulseia” to Variville on the entry of "filia mea Sara" as a nun, with the consent of "filii mei Ebrardus et Engerramus et filia mea Mathildis", by charter dated 1179, witnessed by "Manasserus de Britolio…"[498]Nun at Variville 1179. 

5.         PETRONILLE de Crèvecœur (-before 1194).  “Hugo de Crevecuer...et uxor mea Ada et filii mei et filiæ meæ omnes...Ebrardus, Ingelranus, Matilda, Sara et Petronilla” donated “terra de Mormaisons” to Beauvais Saint-Lucien by undated charter[499].  "Aelidis comitissa Claromontis et domina Britulli" confirmed the donation to the church of Breteuil by "Hugo de Crepicordio frater patris mei Galeranni" for the soul of "Petronille filie sue" and confirmed after his death by "Heverardus eius filius successor et heres" by charter dated 1194[500]

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS du HOMMET

 

 

The following four generation reconstruction of the earliest supposed members of the Hommet family is based only on early 13th century charters as quoted by Stapleton[501].  The chronology appears stretched.  In particular, the 1239 charter quoted below indicates that the great-granddaughter of the first Robert du Hommet (supposedly adult before 1026) married a person who died in 1181.  In addition, there is some mutual contradiction between the documents cited by Stapleton, as highlighted below under the supposed great-granddaughter of the first Robert du Hommet.  The reconstruction is shown in square brackets to indicate uncertainty, considering that the accuracy of the documents cited by Stapleton (dated up to two centuries after the events which they purport to record) is unknown. 

 

1.         [ROBERT du HommetStapleton records a charter dated 1239 under which “William du Hommet, Constable of Normandy filius Ricardi de Humeto junioris” confirmed privileges of the priory of Saint-Fromond stating that it was founded during the time of Richard II Duke of Normandy (so before 1026) by “Robertus de Humeto” who was succeeded by his grandson and heir “William du Hommet[502]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is  not known.  Robert & his wife had one child]: 

a)         [--- du Hommet .  His/her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1239 cited below.  m ---.  Name not known.]  [One child]: 

i)          [GUILLAUME [I] du Hommet .  Stapleton records a charter dated 1239 under which “William du Hommet, Constable of Normandy filius Ricardi de Humeto junioris” confirmed privileges of the priory of Saint-Fromond stating that it was founded during the time of Richard II Duke of Normandy (so before 1026) by “Robertus de Humeto” who was succeeded by his grandson and heir “William du Hommet[503].  He is named Connétable de Normandie in the 1213 charter cited under his daughter below.  m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is  not known.]  Guillaume [I] & his wife had [one child]:

(a)       [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1213 under which Guillaume du Hommet granted to Roger de Saint-Lo “the chapel of Sainte Catherine, in the parish of Le Desert” including rent which “Guillelmus de Humeto constabularius avus meus” had donated before he married his daughter to “Ricardo” (“antequam filiam suam maritasset Ricardo”)[504].  Assuming that the information recorded in this charter is factually correct (about which there must be some doubt as pointed out above), this person must have been Richard’s first wife as she would have been the mother of his oldest son.  Another document confuses the issue: by undated charter “Richard du Hommet, Constable of King Henry [Henry II], grandson of William du Hommet abovenamed” donated tithes from mills to Saint-Fromond by undated charter[505].  Richard would have been the son-in-law not grandson of Guillaume [I] du Hommet assuming that the information included in the 1213 document is correct, although “grandson” in Stapleton’s translated summary of the undated charter presumably represents his translation (maybe incorrect?) of the Latin term.  m as his first wife, RICHARD [du Hommet], son of ROBERT & his wife --- (-[1180/81]).] 

 

 

1.         SIMON du Hommet (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Sym de Humez" in Essex[506]

 

2.         ROBERT (-after 1130).  Domesday Descendants says that he is recorded as "nepos episcopi" and is said to have been the grandson of Odo Bishop of Bayeux but comments that "the evidence is slight and ambiguous"[507].  Of course “nepos” could be interpreted both as grandson and as nephew.  The basis of the argument that the “episcopus” in question should be identified as Bishop Odo is not known.  Presumably another bishop could have been Robert’s grandfather/uncle.  Stapleton records an undated charter under which “Robert grandson of Bishop Odo” donated tithes to Saint-Fromond[508].  He does not specify whether the document in question specifically names Bishop Odo or whether this name represents his own speculation about the bishop’s identity.  Stapleton also records the “Roll of the Exchequer 31 Hen. I. 1130” which states that “Robertus nepos Episcopi” was “an accomptant pro placito bisse in Norhamtescira[509].  Robert’s identity as grandfather of Guillaume [II] du Hommet is confirmed by the following document: the Fine Roll “6 Joh. 1204” records a request for an inquisition made by “Simon de Eston” to ascertain whether “Simon de Eston, grandfather of him the said Simon” had mortgaged property to “Robert grandson [presumably nepos in the original, so ambiguous] of the Bishop, grandfather of William du Hommet the Constable[510]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  It is suggested that she was related to the Verdun family as shown by the following charter which records that Bertram de Verdun was brought up by [her son] Richard du Hommet: Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit”, by undated charter[511]Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD [du Hommet] (-[1180/81]).  Assuming that his first marriage is correctly shown below, Richard adopted the name “du Hommet” after inheriting properties (including the right to the office Connétable de Normandie) from his first wife.  Connétable de Normandie: "Ricardo de Humez constabulario…Roberto de Dunstanvilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [1152/54] under which Henri Duke of Normandy ceded the former house of "Conani thesaurarii" to Bayeux until his heirs paid a debt[512].  "Ricardus de Humez constabularius, Richardus de Haia…Robertus de Dunstanvilla…" witnessed the charter dated under which Henri Duke of Normandy notified a judgment relating to the house of the late "Conani thesaurarii" by charter dated to [1152/54][513].  Richard de Bohon Bishop of Coutances notified "…Ricardo de Hometo constabulo regis…" that he had placed a priest of the church of Thaon by charter dated to [1164][514].  "Guillelmus de Humeto" [identified as his son Guillaume [II] du Hommet?] confirmed the donation to Bayeux of the church of Hérils made by "Roberti de Novo Burgo" by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Humeto…"[515].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardi de Humez" held two knights fees in Sussex under the Earl of Arundel[516].  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius Henrici regis Angliæ” donated the church of St. Andrew, Stanford to Stanford Nunnery by charter dated 3 Feb 1170[517].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Ricardus de Humeto" with 3 and a half knights "de honore de Hummeto" and 18 knights in his own service[518].  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius regis Angliæ” confirmed the foundation of Aulnay, including donations made by “Jordani de Saio et Luciæ uxoris eius” and by himself and “Agnetis uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willelmi, Enguerrani et Jordani”, by undated charter[519].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aulnay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][520].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1181 of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis", adding that he had lived one and a half years as a monk "in abbatia de Alneto" [Aulnay] which he had built and that he left "filios suos heredes suæ terræ…Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum"[521].  There must be some doubt about this year of death in light of the charter dated 1180 under which Henry II King of England confirmed "Willelmo de Humetis constabulariam meam" in his office previously held by "Ricardus de Humetis pater suus"[522].  [m [firstly] --- du Hommet, daughter of GUILLAUME du Hommet [Connétable de Normandie] & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1213 under which Guillaume du Hommet granted to Roger de Saint-Lo “the chapel of Sainte Catherine, in the parish of Le Desert” including rent which “Guillelmus de Humeto constabularius avus meus” had donated before he married his daughter to “Ricardo” (“antequam filiam suam maritasset Ricardo”)[523].  Assuming that the information recorded in this charter is factually correct (about which there must be some doubt as pointed out above), this person must have been Richard’s first wife as she would have been the mother of his oldest son.  Another document confuses the issue: by undated charter “Richard du Hommet, Constable of King Henry [Henry II], grandson of William du Hommet abovenamed” donated tithes from mills to Saint-Fromond by undated charter[524].  Richard would have been the son-in-law not grandson of Guillaume [I] du Hommet assuming that the information included in the 1213 document is correct, although “grandson” in Stapleton’s translated summary of the undated charter presumably represents his translation (maybe incorrect?) of the Latin term.]  m [secondly] AGNES de Say, daughter of JORDAN de Say & his wife Lucy ---.  Her parentage and marriage are referred to in Domesday Descendants[525]Richard du Hommet donated property to Aunay with the consent of "uxore mea Agnete et filiis meis Willelmo, Engerranno et Jordano" by undated charter[526].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][527].  Richard & his [first] wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME [II] du Hommet (-after 1213).  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius regis Angliæ” confirmed the foundation of Aulnay, including donations made by “Jordani de Saio et Luciæ uxoris eius” and by himself and “Agnetis uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willelmi, Enguerrani et Jordani”, by undated charter[528]

-         see below

Richard & his [first/second] wife had [three] children: 

ii)         ENGUERRAND du Hommet .  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius regis Angliæ” confirmed the foundation of Aulnay, including donations made by “Jordani de Saio et Luciæ uxoris eius” and by himself and “Agnetis uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willelmi, Enguerrani et Jordani”, by undated charter[529].  Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum" as the sons and heirs of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis" when recording his death[530].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum" and of "Engueranni de Humetis…concessu Cecilie uxoris sue et Henrici filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/89][531]m CECILE de Semilly, daughter of GUILLAUME de Semilly & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1181/98] under which her son "Willelmus de Similleio, filius Enguerrandi de Humeto" confirmed the donation of the church of Pert to Bayeux by "Willelmus de Similleio avus noster" with the consent of "Ceciliæ filiæ et hæredis suæ et matris nostræ"[532].  "Cæcilia filia Willelmi de Similleio" confirmed the donation of the church of Pert to Bayeux by "Willelmus de Similleio pater meus" by charter dated to [1181/98][533].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Engueranni de Humetis…concessu Cecilie uxoris sue et Henrici filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/89][534].  Enguerrand & his wife had two children: 

(a)       GUILLAUME de Semilly [de Say] .  "Willelmus de Similleio, filius Enguerrandi de Humeto" confirmed the donation of the church of Pert to Bayeux by "Willelmus de Similleio avus noster" with the consent of "Ceciliæ filiæ et hæredis suæ et matris nostræ", by charter dated to [1181/98], later confirmed by Henri Bishop of Bayeux[535].  "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire[536]

(b)       HENRI du Hommet .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Engueranni de Humetis…concessu Cecilie uxoris sue et Henrici filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/89][537].  "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire[538]

iii)        JORDAN du Hommet .  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius regis Angliæ” confirmed the foundation of Aulnay, including donations made by “Jordani de Saio et Luciæ uxoris eius” and by himself and “Agnetis uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willelmi, Enguerrani et Jordani”, by undated charter[539].  Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum" as the sons and heirs of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis" when recording his death[540].  [The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Jordanus de Humeto" with 3 knights "de feodo de Cliville" and 13 knights in his own service[541].  The chronology of the family suggests the possibility that this Jordan du Hommet was the same person as the son of Richard du Hommet.]  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][542].  "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire[543]

iv)       [AGATHA du Hommet Her first marriage and parentage are confirmed by the Chronicon Savigniacensis Monasterii which records the death "XVIII Kal Jul" in 1212 of "Gaufridus dominus Filgeriarum, filius Willelmi et Agathæ, filiæ Willelmi de Humeto"[544]The primary source which confirms that Richard was her father has not yet been identified, but from a chronological point of view this appears likely to be correct.  Her second marriage is indicated by the charter dated Mar [1230/31] under which Fulco Paganelli” gave security to Louis IX King of France on behalf of “Radulpho de Filgeriis nepoti meo” relating to “terram suam in Normannia[545]m firstly GUILLAUME de Fougères, son of RAOUL [II] Seigneur de Fougères & his wife Mathilde --- (-7 Jun 1187).  m secondly FULK [II] Paynel[546], son of FULK [I] Paynell of Hambye & his wife Lesceline de Subligny (-after 25 Jun 1215).] 

 

 

GUILLAUME [II] du Hommet, son of RICHARD [du Hommet] Connétable de Normandie & his [first wife --- du Hommet] (-after 1213).  “Ricardus de Humet constabularius regis Angliæ” confirmed the foundation of Aulnay, including donations made by “Jordani de Saio et Luciæ uxoris eius” and by himself and “Agnetis uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum Willelmi, Enguerrani et Jordani”, by undated charter[547].  Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum, Enjorannum, Jordanum" as the sons and heirs of "Richardus de Humet constabularius regis" when recording his death[548].  ["Guillelmus de Humeto" [identified as Guillaume [II] du Hommet?] confirmed the donation to Bayeux of the church of Hérils made by "Roberti de Novo Burgo" by charter dated 1166, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Humeto…" [his father?][549].]  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Aunay, including donations by "Richardi de Humetis et Agnetis uxoris sue, filie et heredis predicti Jordani" with the agreement of "Guillelmi de Humetis et Engerranni et Jordani filiorum suorum", by charter dated to [1181/89][550].  Connétable de Normandie.  Henry II King of England confirmed "Willelmo de Humetis constabulariam meam" in his office previously held by "Ricardus de Humetis pater suus" by charter dated 1180[551].  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia”, except land held from him by “Gervasia de Saeio sicut de primogenito et...Jordanus de Maisnillo et...Willelmus Cotele”, to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[552].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Willelmus de Homez" paying "xx s, i militem" in Hampshire[553].  "Willelmus de Humeto constabularius Normanniæ" donated half the church of Louvières to Bayeux, in the presence of "Jordano filio meo episcopo Lexoviensi", by charter dated to [1202/05], which names "Ricardi patris mei"[554].  “Willielmus de Humeth” donated property to Stanford Nunnery, confirmed by King John by charter dated 22 Nov [1199/1205][555].  Guillaume du Hommet donated property to the priory of Sainte-Marguerite de Vignats, in the presence of “Thomas du Hommet his son and of William du Hommet his grandson”, by charter dated to 1204 or before[556].  Guillaume du Hommet granted to Roger de Saint-Lo “the chapel of Sainte Catherine, in the parish of Le Desert” including rent which “Guillelmus de Humeto constabularius avus meus” had donated before he married his daughter to “Ricardo” (“antequam filiam suam maritasset Ricardo”), by charter dated 1213[557]

m LUCY, daughter of ---.  "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "domini mei Willelmi de Humetis et Ricardi filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…"[558].  Her family origin is indicated by the following document: a charter dated 1232, recording donations to the monks of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte residing at the priory of la Luthumière, states that “Guillaume du Hommet concessionnaire de la Luthumière” had married “Luce, héritière des biens d’Adam de Bruys, son aïeul[559].  “Lucia uxor domini Willielmi de Humet constabularii domini regis” donated "terra mea de Bradecrofd" to Stanford Nunnery, with the consent of "domini mei Willielmi et Ricardi filii mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Jordano de Humet, Ricardo de Humet, Willielmo de Sae, Henrico fratre suo…"[560].  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[561].  It is unclear from the wording of this document whether Lucy was alive or deceased at the time. 

Guillaume [II] & his wife had six children: 

1.         RICHARD du Hommet (-before 1204).  "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "domini mei Willelmi de Humetis et Ricardi filii mei", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…"[562].  “Lucia uxor domini Willielmi de Humet constabularii domini regis” donated "terra mea de Bradecrofd" to Stanford Nunnery, with the consent of "domini mei Willielmi et Ricardi filii mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Jordano de Humet, Ricardo de Humet, Willielmo de Sae, Henrico fratre suo…"[563].  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[564].  He predeceased his father as shown by his father’s charter dated to 1204 or before (see below) which names Richard’s son Guillaume.  m GILLE de la Haye, daughter of RICHARD de la Haye & his wife Mathilde [de Vernon].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[565].  Richard & his wife had one child: 

a)         GUILLAUME du Hommet (-23 Aug ----).  Guillaume du Hommet donated property to the priory of Sainte-Marguerite de Vignats, in the presence of “Thomas du Hommet his son and of William du Hommet his grandson”, by charter dated to 1204 or before[566].  Connétable de Normandie.  Guillaume du Hommet donated the chapel of Sainte-Catherine in the parish of Le Desert to “the brethren of the Holy Trinity”, in whose favour “his wife Eustachia had there founded a priory”, by charter dated 1238[567].  His parentage is confirmed by the following document.  “William du Hommet, Constable of Normandy filius Ricardi de Humeto junioris” confirmed privileges of the priory of Saint-Fromond stating that it was founded during the time of Richard II Duke of Normandy (so before 1026) by “Robertus de Humeto” who was succeeded by his grandson and heir “William du Hommet” by charter dated 1239[568]The necrology of Péronne records the death "23 Aug" of "domini Willelmi de Humeto, connestabularii Normanniæ, cujus uxor domum istam fundavit"[569]m EUSTACHIE, daughter of --- (-4 May 1254).  Guillaume du Hommet donated the chapel of Sainte-Catherine in the parish of Le Desert to “the brethren of the Holy Trinity”, in whose favour “his wife Eustachia had there founded a priory”, by charter dated 1238[570]The necrology of Péronne records the death "4 May 1254" of "domina Eustachia, fundatrix istius domus"[571]

2.         GUILLAUME du Hommet .  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[572]HENRI du Hommet .  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[573]

3.         JORDAN du Hommet .  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[574].  "Willelmus de Humeto constabularius Normanniæ" donated half the church of Louvières to Bayeux, in the presence of "Jordano filio meo episcopo Lexoviensi", by charter dated to [1202/05], which names "Ricardi patris mei"[575]

4.         THOMAS du Hommet .  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[576].  Guillaume du Hommet donated property to the priory of Sainte-Marguerite de Vignats, in the presence of “Thomas du Hommet his son and of William du Hommet his grandson”, by charter dated to 1204 or before[577]

5.         ENGUERRAND du Hommet .  “Willelmus de Humeto domini regis constabularius” donated “totam terram meam in Lengronia” to Aulnay Sainte-Marie, with the consent of “filiorum meorum...Richardi de Humeto et Willelmi et Henrici et Jordani et Thomæ et Enguerranni”, for the souls of “meæ, patris et matris meæ et Luciæ uxoris meæ”, by charter dated 1190[578]

6.         AGNES du Hommet (-before 12 Nov 1223).  King John confirmed "terra de Wichenson [Winchendon, Buckinghamshire] q Willelmus de Humet pater suus dedit ei in maritagium per manu H. Reg patris nostri" to "Agneti Wak" by order dated 23 Mar 1207[579].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Agnes Wake" holding "medietatem de Winchende" in Buckinghamshire in [1210/12][580].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1221, by "abbas de Nutelegha" against "Agnetem Wace" for "medietatem manerii de Winchendona" which she said "Willelmus de Humet pater suis dedit ei in maritagium"[581].  An order dated 12 Nov 1223 relates to payment of the fine made by "Ranulf de Vernay", while Agnes was still alive, for marrying "Agnes Wake…without the licence…of the king"[582]m firstly (before 1189) BALDWIN Wake, son of HUGH Wake & his wife Emma de Clare (-before Nov 1198).  m secondly RANULPH de Vernay, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         --- du Hommetm JEANNE de Coulonges, daughter of --- (-3 Oct 1299).  The necrology of Péronne records the death "3 Oct 1299" of "domina Johanna de Colonciis condam domina de Humeto" and her donation[583]

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS d’IVRY (GOËL)

 

 

1.         ROBERT d'Ivry, son of --- (-[before 1050]).  If the speculation about the parentage of his wife is correct as discussed below, Robert must have died before [1050/1060] (the precise date depends on the dating of a donation to Ouche made by Albreda’s supposed second husband, about which there is some doubt, see below) as his wife’s son by her supposed second marriage died in [1070 or 1080] when he was a young adult.  m as her first husband, ALBREDA, daughter of ---.  Chibnall speculates that she may have been Albreda, [illegitimate] daughter of Hugues d'Ivry Bishop of Bayeux & his [wife/mistress ---], which may have provided her grandson with a claim to Ivry by inheritance[584], assuming that her supposed illegitimacy presented no obstacle.  This parentage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[585] but it is not known whether this is based on a specific primary source or on Chibnall’s speculation.   She married [secondly] ([1050] or [1060]) Albert de Cravent: Orderic Vitalis who records that “Radulfus tiro filius Alberti de Crevento” attacked “Guitmundum monachum...Manlia venientem in valle Guidonis” who returned on foot to Pacy and begged “Albertum” to protect him from “filium sibi”, on which “Alberada uxor eius” burst into tears, adding in a later passage that Raoul repented before he died, after which Albert in 1070 donated “medietatem decimæ de Ulmeio” to Ouche Saint-Evroul[586].  There must be some doubt about the date of this event because Orderic Vitalis records Geoffroy Bishop of Chartres in the dating clause, although in another passage he records the appointment of Bishop Geoffroy in 1077[587].  Le Prévost suggests that the donation should be redated to 1080[588].  Robert & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         ROBERT d'Ivry .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  m HILDEBURGE de Gallardon, daughter of HERVE Seigneur de Gallardon & his wife Beatrix --- (-3 Jun [1116 or after], bur Pontoise Saint-Martin).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Hildiburgis…de nobili prosapia in pago Carnotensi Castro Galardone exorta”, her parents “pater…Herveus Castri Galardonis dominus…genetrix…Beatrix”, and her husband “Roberto Ibriensi”, adding that she refused to remarry after her husband died[589].  "Femina Hildeburgis de nobili prosapia in pago Carnotensi castro Galardone exorta" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise by charter dated during the reign of Philippe I King of France which names "pater…Hervæus Castri Galardonis…dominus…genitrix…Beatrix" and specifies that she married "Roberto Ibriensi" by whom she had three sons "primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelmus…milites…tertius Robertus clericus"[590]"Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][591].  The former document records the death of "Hildeburgis sanctimonialis…III Non Iun" and her burial "in ecclesia S Martini Pontisariensis".  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis records the death “III Non Iun” of “Hildiburgis Sanctimonialis” and her burial “in ecclesia beati Martini Pontisariensis[592]Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          ASCELIN Goël (-after [1116]).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis[593]"Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[594]Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Goellus de Breherii-valle" seized the castle of Ivry-la-Bataille (Eure) from Guillaume de Breteuil and surrendered it to Robert [III] Duke of Normandy[595]Orderic Vitalis records that, two years after the death of King William I [1089], “Ascelinus cognomento Goellus” captured “arcem Ibreii” from “Guillelmo Bretoliensi domino suo” and surrendered it to Duke Robert who resold it to Guillaume de Breteuil for “MD libras”, triggering a lengthy war[596]The same source records that, during the course of the war, “Guillelmum Bretoliensem” was captured and imprisoned, after which he agreed to the marriage of “Isabel filiam suam” to “Goello” as part of the peace agreement, dated to [1092][597]The resulting war with Guillaume ended with the latter's capture and agreement to Ascelin's marriage to his daughter[598].  Another untraced family connection of Ascelin is indicated by a charter dated 1066 under which "Richardus Herluini filius, comitis Galerani Mellenti nepos" [vicomte de Meulan] donated property to Coulombs[599], and a note in the cartulary of Coulombs, following this charter, which records that "Richardus" became a monk "cum filiis [Jordanum et Robertum]" at Coulombs where "habuerunt quemdam cognatum Ascelinum cognomento Goellum", and a second note that "Ascelinus Goellus" was the heir after the death of Richard’s sons Jourdain and Robert[600]"Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][601]m ([1092]) ISABEL de Breteuil, [illegitimate] daughter of GUILLAUME de Breteuil & [his mistress ---] (-after [1116]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmum Bretoliensem” agreed to the marriage of “Isabel filiam suam” to “Goello” as part of the peace agreement between them, dated to [1092][602]The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Elisabeth” as wife of “Goellus[603]She must have been illegitimate as the chronicler says in another passage that her father's marriage was childless[604], unless she was born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage of her father.  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[605]"Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][606].  Ascelin & his wife had [five or more] children: 

(a)       ROBERT d'Ivry (-after 1118).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Robertus et Wiltinus” as sons of “Goellus” and his wife “Elisabeth[607].  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[608]"Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][609]"Robert son of Ascelin Goël" joined the rebellion against Henry I King of England in 1118, but rejoined the king who committed the castle of Ivry to him to guarantee his loyalty[610]m ---, daughter of ---.  Raoul "le Rouge" de Pont-Echanfray was brother-in-law of Robert Goël, according to Orderic Vitalis[611]

(b)       GUILLAUME "Lovel" d'Ivry (-after 1153).  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Robertus et Wiltinus” as sons of “Goellus” and his wife “Elisabeth[612].  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[613]"Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116][614]Son of Ascelin according to Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he inherited the castle of Ivry after the death of his brother Robert and records his marriage[615].  He rebelled against Henry I King of England in Sep 1123, with his brothers-in-law Waléran de Meulan, Hugues de Montfort and Hugues de Châteauneuf[616].  Robert of Torigny records "discordia inter Symonem comitem Ebroicensem" and "filios Ascelini Goelli, scilicet et Willermum Lupellum et Rogerium Balbosum" in 1153[617]m ([1120]) MATHILDE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet].  Orderic Vitalis records Waleran Comte de Meulan having three sisters (whom he does not name), one of whom he married to "Guillaume Lovel son of Ascelin"[618].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. 

(c)       brothers .  Orderic Vitalis records that they were given as hostages to Henry I King of England to guarantee the good conduct of their brother Robert[619]

(d)       ROGER "Balbosus" (-after 1153).  Robert of Torigny records "discordia inter Symonem comitem Ebroicensem" and "filios Ascelini Goelli, scilicet et Willermum Lupellum et Rogerium Balbosum" in 1153[620]

Ascelin had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

(e)        ROBERT (-after [1116]).  "Roberti Bastardi Rufi filii eiusdem Goelli, Gauterii de Sparnone fratris eiusdem Roberti" subscribed the charter dated [1116] under which "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[621]

(f)         [GAUTHIER (-after [1116]).  "Roberti Bastardi Rufi filii eiusdem Goelli, Gauterii de Sparnone fratris eiusdem Roberti" subscribed the charter dated [1116] under which "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[622].  It is assumed that Gauthier was also the son of Ascelin Goël, although the wording of this charter does not exclude the possibility that he was the uterine brother of Robert.] 

ii)         GUILLAUME Goël .  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis[623]"Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[624]He was tried by Guillaume de Breteuil for having "done an injury to a certain woman at Pacy", providing the pretext for his brother's attack on Ivry[625]

iii)        ROBERT .  The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis[626]"Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise[627]

b)         [ROGER d'Ivry (-after 24 Apr 1089).  No information has so far been found on the parentage of Roger, but presumably he was closely connected to Robert d'Ivry, husband of Aubrée.  Seigneur d'Ivry.  Pincerna of William I King of England.  He founded the abbey of Ivry-la-Balluis[628].  An undated manuscript records that “Robertus de Oili” built "castellum Oxonii” in 1072 and that "Robertus de Oili et Rogerus de Iveri" built the church of St George in Oxford castle in 1074[629].  Domesday Book records land held by “Roger d’Ivry” in Bucklebury, Eagle, Blewbury and Gainfield Hundreds in Berkshire, land in Ixhill, Mursley and Rowley Hundreds in Buckinghamshire, and "Robert d’Oilly and Roger d’Ivry" holding Stowe in Buckinghamshire from the bishop of Bayeux in Buckinghamshire and Arncott from the abbot of Abingdon St Mary in Oxfordshire, "Roger d’Ivry" other properties in Oxfordshire[630].  His parentage has not yet been ascertained, but from a chronological point of view he could have been the son of Guillaume d’Ivry.  The joint activities with Robert de Oilly suggest a family relationship.  He held Cottisford from his father-in-law in 1086 in Domesday Book[631].]  m ADELINE de Grantmesnil, daughter of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelisa [Aelis] de Beaumont-sur-Oise (-[1110/11]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Adelinam et Hadvisam, Rochesiam et Mathildem et Agnetem” as the daughters of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife “Adelidem filiam Ivonis comitis de Bellomonte”, adding that Adeline married “Rogerio de Ibreio[632].  Domesday Book records “the wife of Roger d’Ivry” holding land in Islip, Kiddington and Oddington in Oxfordshire[633].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "nobilis...matrona Athelina de Hiuerio" donated land "apud...Faineote" to Abingdon in [1110/11] and that “filia eiusdem Adeliz” later confirmed the donation[634].  She died soon after making grants to Abingdon Abbey in [1110/11][635].  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          ADELISE d'Ivry (-after [Jun] 1133).  Daughter and heiress of Roger d'Ivry and Adelina de Grantmesnil, she is named in her mother's grants to Abingdon Abbey in [1110/11].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "nobilis...matrona Athelina de Hiuerio" donated land "apud...Faineote" to Abingdon in [1110/11] and that “filia eiusdem Adeliz” later confirmed the donation[636]King Henry I confirmed the donation of "the manor of Rowington in Warwickshire" to Reading St Mary made by “Adelicia de Evereio”, by charter dated [Jun] 1133[637]Domesday Descendants says that this is the last recorded reference to her[638]

c)         [HUGUES d’Ivry (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Hugh d’Ivry” holding Ambrosden from the king in Oxfordshire[639].  No information has so far been found on the parentage of Hugues, but presumably he was closely connected to Robert d'Ivry, husband of Aubrée.] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    COTENTIN

 

 

The diocese of Coutances occupied the Cherbourg peninsula and comprised the pagus Constantinus (Cotentin), bound on the north and west by the sea and on the east by the river Vire, and the pagus Coriovallensis which existed briefly in the north around the town of Cherbourg[640].  The Cotentin area did not correspond with any of the known medieval counties within the duchy of Normandy.  It is assumed that all the nobles who are shown below were direct vassals of the dukes of Normandy. The history of these families was studied in the mid-19th century by Léopold Delisle[641]

 

 

A.      VICOMTES de COTENTIN, SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAUVEUR

 

 

1.         ROGER [I] (-after [990/1000]).  A charter dated to [1136] records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, which it states was first constructed "tempore vetuli Ricardi comitis" (Richard II Duke of Normandy) "et Rogeri vicecomitis"[642]

 

2.         NEEL [I] (-[1040/42]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Edelredus rex Anglorum” sent an army to invade Normandy which was defeated by “Nigellus...[cum] milites Constanienses[643].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which he had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois[644].  "…Niellus…" witnessed the charter dated to [1015] under which "Rotbertus comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel for the souls of "uxoris meæ Bileeldis defunctæ et…vivente Ascelinæ, filiorumque meorum Vilelmi et Rotberti atque Ricardi"[645]Vicomte [de Cotentin].  "…Nielli vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1020] under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property "in pago Constantino, villam…Hetredvilla" to the abbey of Marmoutier[646].  "Ricardi filii Gulberti, Nigelli vicecomitis…Storstingi vicecomitis" signed the charter dated 1027 (redated to [1017]) in which "secundus nominis mei Normannorum dux Ricardus" confirmed donations to Fécamp abbey[647].  "…Negel vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated Aug 1027 under which Richard II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Bernay[648].  "…Nigelii vicecomes…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[649].  "…Nielli vicecomitis, Nielli filii eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[650].  "…vetulus Nigellus, Turaldus…Radulfus camberarius filius Geraldi, Gotscellinus Rufus de Formovilla, Humfridus constructor eiusdem loci cum filiis suis Rogerio, Roberto, Willelmo…Ricardus de Lillabona…Hugo filius Waleranni comitis…" are named as present in the charter dated 1035 under which "Willelmus adhuc puerulus…Roberti comitis filius" donated "Turstini villa" to the abbey of Préaux[651].  The Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie records that, after the death of Canute King of England, "le Conte Neel de Coustantin…le sire de Guerarville, le sire de Gournay" sailed from Harfleur to England with Edward Prince of England to claim the English throne[652].  "Robertus archiepiscopus, Odo comes et Niellus vicecomes" are named as present in the charter dated to [1035/37] under which Hugues Bishop of Bayeux made a census of the properties of the church[653].  "Nigelli vicecomitis, Goisfridi vicecomitis, Rodulfi Taisson" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Mauger Archbishop of Rouen confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sigy[654].  "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[655]m ---.  The name of Néel’s wife is not known.  Néel & his wife had one child: 

a)         NEEL [II] (-1 Aug, before [1073] or 1092).  "…Nielli vicecomitis, Nielli filii eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[656].  "…Nielli vicecomitis, Nielli filii eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[657]

-        see below

b)         EUDES (-after 1104).  Vicomte de Contentin["…Eudo vicecomes Constantini…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[658].  Delisle suggests that Eudes was the son of Thurstan Haldup.  However, it appears more likely that he was the younger brother of Vicomte Néel [II].]  "Eudo vicecomes pagi Constantini" donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier by charter dated 1081[659].  "…Eudone Luxoviensi…" was named as a judge at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[660].  A charter dated to [1090] records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur by "Nigellus vicecomes" and "…Eudo vicecomes, concessu Henrici comitis…Eudo vicecomes Sancto Salvatori…Eudo vicecomes…"[661].  A charter dated 1104 records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur by "Nigellus presbyter de Geroville et Rogerus frater eius et Briennius filius ipsius", witnessed by and with the consent of "Eudone vicecomite…", and by "Eudo vicecomes" confirmed earlier donations by "Nigellus frater eius"[662].  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Nigello vicecomite, Eudone vicecomite" among the deceased at "sancti Salvatoris de Constantino"[663]m ROHAISE, daughter of --- (-after 1104).  A charter dated 1104 records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur by "Eudo vicecomes…et Rohais vicecomitissa", with the consent of "Nigellus presbyter de Geroville [et Rogerus frater eius] et Briennius filius ipsius"[664]

 

 

NEEL [II], son of NEEL [I] Vicomte [de Cotentin] & his wife --- (-1 Aug, before [1073] or 1092).  "…Nielli vicecomitis, Nielli filii eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[665].  "…Willelmus filius Guillelmi, Niellis juvenis, Hatuardus Rex, Hunfredus Namo, Guillelmus filius Ranoldi, Rogerius filius Hunfredi, Joffredus vicecomes, Hugo filius Huberti, Hunfredus Parvus" witnessed the charter dated to [1042] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "nostras insulas Serc et Aurrene, propter medietatem Grenere" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, supported by "Rannulfo filio Anschitilli"[666].  Guillaume de Poitou records that "Nigellum præsidem Constantini pagi" supported "Guido filius Burgundionum comitis" in his rebellion, dated to [1047][667].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted “castrum Brioci” to “Widonem...filium Rainaldi Burgundionem comitis” who rebelled against the duke with “Nigellum Constantiniensem præsidem” but was defeated at “Valedunas” in 1047[668].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Ranulfum Bajocensem ac Haymonem Dentatum et Nigellum de Constantino" rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy at the battle "apud Vallesdunas"[669].  A charter dated 1075 records that "comitissa Adeliz, Ricardi comitis filia, Roberti comitis soror" held "castrum…Hulme in Constantino" and that "Guido filius suus" (Guy Comte Palatin de Bourgogne) later granted it to "Nigello vicecomiti"[670].  "…Nielli vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1047 or before] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation by "Adelelmi…Beatricis uxor eius…Rotberti filius eius" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[671].  Delisle suggests that Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confiscated his assets after the battle of Val des Dunes[672].  However, the subsequent references in primary sources to Vicomte Néel suggest that this confiscation, if it took place, must have been reversed.  "…Nielli vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated 1054 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of "terram…Sancta Columba…dedit Niellus clericus" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[673].  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060], witnessed by "…Ingulfus dapifer, Rogerius filius Toraldi, Unfredus filius Ansquitilli, Rainaldus Foliot, Ricardus de Sturavilla, Gosfridus filius Rotberti Venatoris, Nigellus de Glanvilla, Rodulfus camerarius…Serlus filius Alveredi, Ricardus Britesonis filius"[674].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Noel de S. Sauveur le Viconte" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[675].  "Nigellus vicecomes" founded the abbey of Saint-Sauveur by undated charter, dated to [1080] in the compilation[676].  The charter of his brother Eudes (see above) clarifies that Néel [II] was the founder of Saint-Sauveur.  However, the charter dated to [1073], under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli", previously made by "suus pater", of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[677] suggests that Néel [II] had died before this date.  If this is correct, the foundation charter of Saint-Sauveur must be dated to before [1073].  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Nigello vicecomite, Eudone vicecomite" among the deceased at "sancti Salvatoris de Constantino"[678].  The necrology of Saint-Sauveur records the death "pridie Id Aug" of "Nigellus vicecomes qui monachos hic constituit"[679]

m ADELA de Brionne, daughter of GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" Comte d'Eu & his wife ---.  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][680].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[681]

Néel & his wife had eight children: 

1.         NEEL [III] (-[before 1092]).  William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli", previously made by "suus pater", of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier by charter dated to [1073][682].  A charter dated to [1076] records a judgment passed by "Rannulfus vicecomes, Niellus filius Nielli, Rotbertus de Vezpunt", in a court of William I King of England, relating to the monastery of Mont-Saint-Michel[683].  "…Nigelli de Constantino…" witnessed a charter dated to [1077] under which William I King of England granted property to the abbey of Saint-Etienne de Caen[684].  "…Nigellus de Constantino" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[685].  A charter dated to [1090] records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur by "Nigellus vicecomes" and others[686]same person as…?  --- .  A charter dated to [1136] records the foundation of the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, first constructed "tempore vetuli Ricardi comitis" (Richard II Duke of Normandy) "et Rogeri vicecomitis", the placing of monks by "Nigellus vicecomes", and the donations by "nepotes autem eius Nigellus…et Rogerius"[687].  The supposed brothers Néel [IV] and Roger [II] were therefore grandsons of Néel [II].  Their father must have been one of the sons of Néel [II].  Although he is not identified, it is reasonable to suppose that he was Néel [III].  m ---.  Three children: 

a)         NEEL [IV] .  A charter dated to [1136] records the foundation of the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, first constructed "tempore vetuli Ricardi comitis" (Richard II Duke of Normandy) "et Rogeri vicecomitis", the placing of monks by "Nigellus vicecomes", and the donations by "nepotes autem eius Nigellus…et Rogerius", a later passage clarifying that they were "Nigellus vicecomes…fratre suo Rogero"[688]

b)         ROGER [II] (-murdered [1137/38]).  A charter dated to [1136] records the foundation of the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, first constructed "tempore vetuli Ricardi comitis" (Richard II Duke of Normandy) "et Rogeri vicecomitis", the placing of monks by "Nigellus vicecomes", and the donations by "nepotes autem eius Nigellus…et Rogerius", a later passage clarifying that they were "Nigellus vicecomes…fratre suo Rogero"[689].  Orderic Vitalis records that Stephen King of England appointed "Guillelmum de Rolmara et Rogerium vicecomitem" in Normandy[690].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Rogerius vicecomes" was murdered in an ambush, dated to [1137/38][691]m CECILE, daughter of [ENGUERRAND de Port & his wife ---].  A charter dated to [1136] records donations to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur, including that of "Rogerus vicecomes, frater Nigelli, et Cecilia uxor eius"[692].  Delisle suggests her possible parentage based on a charter dated 1202[693]

c)         --- .  m ---.  Two children: 

i)          LETICIE (-after 1178).  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1180] which records donations to Saint-Sauveur by "Leticia, neptis Rogerii vicecomitis et uxor Jordani Thessonis, jam defuncti"[694].  "Jordanus Taison et Leticia sponsa mea" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by charter dated 1145, witnessed by "…Roberto de Perceio…Roberto de Vuas, Nicholao fratres illius Roberti"[695].  "Iordanus Taisson et Lætitia uxor mea cum filiis nostris Radulfo, Rogerio et Iordano" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by undated charter[696].  "Letitia de Sancto Salvatore, qui fui uxor Jordani Tesson" donated property to the abbey of Hambie, witnessed by "Jordano Tesson filio meo, Roberto de Monte acuto milite, Letitia filia mea uxore Fulconis Paganelli"[697]m (before 1145) JOURDAIN Taisson, son of RAOUL & his wife Adelise --- (-1178). 

ii)         daughter .  m ---.  One child: 

(a)       FOULQUES des Prés

2.         ROGER .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][698]

3.         GUILLAUME .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][699]

4.         GUILLAUME .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][700]

5.         GERARD .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][701]

6.         EMMA .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][702]

7.         BILELDIS .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][703]

8.         MATHILDE .  "Niellus vicecomes" donated six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier, for the souls of and with the consent of "uxore mea Adila…filiis nostris Rotgerio…et Willelmo, alteroque Willelmo et Girardo…cum sororibus eorum Emma, Bilelde atque Mahelde", by charter dated to [1060][704]

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS de SAINT-SAUVEUR (TAISSON)

 

 

1.         RAOUL "d’Anjou" .  He is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the original donation by "Robertus filius Erneisi, filii Radulphi Andegavensis et Alpaidis…"[705]m ALPAIDIS, daughter of ---.  She is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the original donation by "Robertus filius Erneisi, filii Radulphi Andegavensis et Alpaidis…"[706].  Raoul & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL Taisson (-[Oct 1066/1070], bur [Saint-Etienne de Fontaines]).  He is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the original donation by "Robertus filius Erneisi, filii Radulphi Andegavensis et Alpaidis…et nepos Radulphi Taxonis qui fuit frater patris mei Erneisi et filius Radulphi Andegavensis et Alpaidis"[707].  "…Rodulf et fr. eius Ernis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[708].  "Nigelli vicecomitis, Goisfridi vicecomitis, Rodulfi Taisson" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Mauger Archbishop of Rouen confirmed the foundation of the priory of Sigy[709].  "…Rodulfi Taxonis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[710].  Orderic Vitalis names "…Rodulfus Taison…" among the subscribers of a charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy dated to [1050][711].  "…Radulfi Toxonis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1055] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated property to the abbey of Marmoutier[712].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulfus Taisson et Erneisus frater eius” founded “ecclesiam sancti Stephani Fontaneti[713].  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Radulfus Taxo, Albereda eius uxor" among the deceased at "sancti Stephani Fontanensis", presumably indicating that they were buried there[714]m ALBEREDA, daughter of --- (-bur [Saint-Etienne de Fontaines]).  A manuscript at Caen, which commemorates the death of Abbess Mathilde, daughter of William I King of England, names "Radulfus Taxo, Albereda eius uxor" among the deceased at "sancti Stephani Fontanensis", presumably indicating that they were buried there[715].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Alberede uxoris Radulfi Tesson" of "servicium terre quam Fulcherius Malherbe de ipsa tenebat in Blevilla", by charter dated to [1180/82][716]

b)         ERNEIS .  He is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the original donation by "Robertus filius Erneisi, filii Radulphi Andegavensis et Alpaidis…"[717].  "…Rodulf et fr. eius Ernis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[718].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodulfus Taisson et Erneisus frater eius” founded “ecclesiam sancti Stephani Fontaneti[719]m [HACINTA, daughter of ---.  She is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the original donation by "Robertus filius Erneisi, filii Radulphi Andegavensis et Alpaidis…et filius Hacintæ sororis antiqui Fulconis de Alnon"[720].  However, the apparent clarity of this statement is confused by a later passage which records the donation by "Robertus pater meus" for the soul of "uxoris suæ Hacintæ", commenting that "patre meo in Anglia occiso".  The latter text refers to Robert [I] FitzErneis.  The strict conclusion from the two passages is that both Erneis and his son Robert [I] FitzErneis were married to persons named Hacinta.  However, this appears to be a strange coincidence.  It is possible that there is some confusion in the wording of the charter and that only either Erneis or Robert [I] was married to Hacinta.]  Erneiz & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT [I] FitzErneis (-killed in battle Hastings 17 Oct 1066).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that King Harold II was killed at Hastings by "un chevalier…Robert fils Herveis"[721]

-         FITZERNEIS

ii)         RAOUL FitzErneis (-after 1066).  He is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the donation by "Robertus pater meus" for the soul of "uxoris suæ Hacintæ" commenting that "patre meo in Anglia occiso" and that he was buried by "Radulphi filii Erneisi"[722]

 

 

2.         RAOUL Taisson (-after 1091).  "…Raoul Taisson…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[723].  "…Rotberti de Belmont, Rodulfi de Bec, Willelmi filii Girardi, Rogerii fratris Rodulfi, Gisleberti Crispini, Rotberti filii Alvuardi, Rotberti Marmion, Rodulfi Taisson, Rotberti Herneis, Ricardi de Baiocas…" witnessed the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[724]

 

3.         RAOUL Taisson .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad Taissoni" in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire and in Yorkshire/Northumberland (twice)[725]m ADELISE, daughter of ---.  Jourdain Taisson confirmed the grants of "Raoul son père et Adelize sa mère" to Savigny by undated charter[726].  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOURDAIN Taisson (-1178).  Jourdain Taisson confirmed the grants of "Raoul son père et Adelize sa mère" to Savigny by undated charter[727].  "Jordanus Taison et Leticia sponsa mea" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by charter dated 1145, witnessed by "…Roberto de Perceio…Roberto de Vuas, Nicholao fratres illius Roberti"[728].  "…Jordano Tesson…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] which "H. dux Normannorum" issued for the hôpital de Falaise[729].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Jordanus Taisson" with 10 knights "de Treverio" and 30 knights in his own service[730].  "Iordanus Taisson et Lætitia uxor mea cum filiis nostris Radulfo, Rogerio et Iordano" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by undated charter[731].  Benedict of Peterborough names "Jordanus Tessun" among those who led the army of Henry II King of England against Louis VII King of France who had besieged Verneuil in 1173[732]m LETICIE, daughter of --- (-after 1178).  "Jordanus Taison et Leticia sponsa mea" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by charter dated 1145, witnessed by "…Roberto de Perceio…Roberto de Vuas, Nicholao fratres illius Roberti"[733].  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1180] which records donations to Saint-Sauveur by "Leticia, neptis Rogerii vicecomitis et uxor Jordani Thessonis, jam defuncti"[734].  "Iordanus Taisson et Lætitia uxor mea cum filiis nostris Radulfo, Rogerio et Iordano" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by undated charter[735].  "Letitia de Sancto Salvatore, qui fui uxor Jordani Tesson" donated property to the abbey of Hambie, witnessed by "Jordano Tesson filio meo, Roberto de Monte acuto milite, Letitia filia mea uxore Fulconis Paganelli"[736].  Jourdain & his wife had [six] children: 

i)          RAOUL Taisson (-[1213/14]).  "Iordanus Taisson et Lætitia uxor mea cum filiis nostris Radulfo, Rogerio et Iordano" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by undated charter[737].  A charter dated to [1165] records donations to Saint-Sauveur by "Jordanus Taison et Leticia uxor eius…et filii eorum Radulfus et Rogerus"[738].  "Raoul Taisson, fils de Jourdain Taisson" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and confirmed the donations by "Robert Marmion" by undated charter[739].  "Radulfus Taisson" confirmed his parents’ donations to the abbey of Hambie by undated charter[740].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Radulfus Tesson" among those granted delay for payment "per brevia" in Kent[741].  Seneschal of the duchy of Normandy 1201[742]m as her first husband, MATHILDE de la Lande-Patri, daughter of ENGUERRAND Patri & his wife ---.  She married secondly Guillaume de Milly.  "Matillis domina de Landa Patrie…in mea viduitate" granted property to "Ricardo Ravengier, de Mesnillo Patrie" for his loyal service by charter dated 1239[743].  Raoul & his wife had three children: 

(a)       PERNELLE Taisson .  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records that the oldest of the three daughters of "Raoul Tesson sire de la Roche Tesson, de Tuit, Tury, Fontenay le Marmion" was married "au sire de Hambye"[744].  King John pardoned "Fulcon Painell" and agreed the marriage between "filium eius Willelmum" and "filia Radi Teysum primogenitam" by charter dated 25 Jun 1215[745].  She obtained the fiefs of Percy and Haineville under the inheritance of her father[746]m (after 25 Jun 1215) WILLIAM Paynell, son of FULK Paynell & his wife Agatha du Hommet (-after 1233). 

(b)       JEANNE Taisson (-1262 or after).  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records that the second of the three daughters of "Raoul Tesson sire de la Roche Tesson, de Tuit, Tury, Fontenay le Marmion" was married "a messire Robert Bertran" to whom she brought "les terres de Tuit, Tury et Fontenay le Marmion"[747].  She obtained the fief of Thury under the inheritance of her father[748]m ROBERT [IV] Bertran Seigneur de Bricquebec, son of ROBERT [III] Bertran Seigneur de Bricquebec & his wife ---. 

(c)       MATHILDE Taisson (-after 28 Apr 1242).  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records that the third of the three daughters of "Raoul Tesson sire de la Roche Tesson, de Tuit, Tury, Fontenay le Marmion" was married "à J. d’Harcourt"[749].  She obtained the barony of Saint-Sauveur under the inheritance of her father[750].  Her descendants, in the male line until 1356, are discussed by Delisle[751]m RICHARD d’Harcourt, son of ROBERT [II] "le Vaillant" Seigneur d’Harcourt & his [second] wife Eva Crispin (-[8 Jun 1236/1239]).   

ii)         ROGER Taisson (-1231 or before).  "Iordanus Taisson et Lætitia uxor mea cum filiis nostris Radulfo, Rogerio et Iordano" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by undated charter[752].  A charter dated to [1165] records donations to Saint-Sauveur by "Jordanus Taison et Leticia uxor eius…et filii eorum Radulfus et Rogerus"[753]

iii)        JOURDAIN Taisson (-after 1188).  "Iordanus Taisson et Lætitia uxor mea cum filiis nostris Radulfo, Rogerio et Iordano" donated property to Saint-Sauveur by undated charter[754].  "Letitia de Sancto Salvatore, qui fui uxor Jordani Tesson" donated property to the abbey of Hambie, witnessed by "Jordano Tesson filio meo, Roberto de Monte acuto milite, Letitia filia mea uxore Fulconis Paganelli"[755]

iv)       MATHILDE Taisson (-after 1217).  m ([1198]) GUILLAUME de Soliers, son of ---. 

v)        CECILE Taisson .  "Letitia de Sancto Salvatore, qui fui uxor Jordani Tesson" donated property to the abbey of Hambie, witnessed by "Jordano Tesson filio meo, Roberto de Monte acuto milite, Letitia filia mea uxore Fulconis Paganelli"[756]m as his first wife, FULK [II] Paynell, son of FULK [I] Paynell de Hambye & his wife Lesceline de Subligny (-after 25 Jun 1215). 

vi)       [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

(a)       ROBERT FitzErneis .  "Robert Fitz-Erneiz, neveu de Raoul Tesson" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1219[757]

 

 

 

C.      SEIGNEURS de BARNEVILLE

 

 

1.         ROGER [I] de Barneville (-killed Antioch [Jan/Jun] 1098).  Albert of Aix records the brave participation of "…Rutgerus de Barnavilla…" in the siege of Nikaia, dated to mid-1097 from the context[758].  Albert of Aix records that "Rotgerus de Barnevilla, Everhardus de Poisat militibus" accompanied Robert Duke of Normandy to the river Farfar, dated to late 1098 from the context[759].  Albert of Aix records that "Rotgerus de Barnevilla" was killed by the Turks when returning after a raiding expedition during the siege of the city, dated to early-1098 from the context[760]

 

2.         ROGER [II] de Barneville (-after Jul 1102).  "Rocca filia Drogoni comitis" donated property to Monte Cassino, with the consent of "Roggerii comitis…et…Roggerii de Bernabilla gener meus", by charter dated Jul 1102[761]m ---, daughter of UBERTO & his wife Rocca [di Apulia]. 

 

 

 

D.      SEIGNEURS de BRICQUEBEC (BERTRAN)

 

 

GUILLAUME Bertran, son of THURSTAN de Bastembourg & his wife --- .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Turstinus...de Bastenburc” had “duos filios Willelmum Bertrannum et Hugonem cum barba de Monteforti[762].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was ancestor of the family Bertrand de Bricquebec but no further details are given[763].  Domesday Book records land held by “William Bertram” in Polhampton in Overton Hundred in Hampshire[764].  "…Willelmus Bertrannus" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[765]

m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known. 

Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

1.         ROBERT [I] Bertran "le Tors" (-after 1082).  "…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam"[766].  Vicomte de Cotentin.  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Robert Bertran le Tort" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[767].  "…Robert Bertrann…" witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England donated property to the abbey of la Trinité de Caen[768].  "Robertus Bertran" confirmed the donations to the priory of Notre-Dame de Beaumont-en-Auge by "predecessorum meorum…Robertus Tortus et eius uxor Susanna" by charter dated 1221[769]m SUZANNE, daughter of ---.  "Robertus Bertran" confirmed the donations to the priory of Notre-Dame de Beaumont-en-Auge by "predecessorum meorum…Robertus Tortus et eius uxor Susanna" by charter dated 1221[770].  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT [II] Bertran (-after 1100).  "Robertus Bertrannus" granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Montivilliers by charter dated 1100[771]m as her first husband, ADELISE d’Aumâle, daughter of ETIENNE Comte d’Aumâle & his wife Hawise de Mortemer (-before [1168]).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmus” had “sorores quatuor, filias Stephani” who married “una…vicedomino de Pynkeney, altera…vicedomino de Verberay, tertia…Bertanno de Brikebet, quarta Willielmo de Romare et postea Petro de Brus[772].  She married secondly as his second wife, Ingelger de Bohun.  "Adeliza daughter of [Stephen] count Albemaris" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Engelger her husband and Robert Bertrand her son" by charter dated to [1151/77][773].  Robert [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT [III] Bertran (-after 1147).  "Adeliza daughter of [Stephen] count Albemaris" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Engelger her husband and Robert Bertrand her son" by charter dated to [1151/77][774]

-         see below

 

 

ROBERT [III] Bertran, son of ROBERT [II] Bertran Seigneur de Bricquebec & his wife Adelise d’Aumâle (-after 1147).  "Adeliza daughter of [Stephen] count Albemaris" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Engelger her husband and Robert Bertrand her son" by charter dated to [1151/77][775]

m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known. 

Robert [III] & his wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT [IV] Bertran (-[22 Jul 1228/Sep 1240]).  "Robertus Bertran" granted property to "Herberti de Barnevilla, servienti meo" by charter dated 1195[776].  "Robertus Bertran" granted property to "Roberto Brienchon" by charter dated to before 1204, witnessed by "Willelmo Bertran, Roberto Bertran juniore filiis meis"[777].  "Robertus Bertran" confirmed the donations to the priory of Notre-Dame de Beaumont-en-Auge by "predecessorum meorum…Robertus Tortus et eius uxor Susanna" by charter dated 1221[778].  "Robertus Bertran miles" donated revenue to Bricquebec priory for the soul of "Ysabelis sororis mee, condam domine de Rocha" by charter dated 22 Jul 1228[779]m JEANNE Taisson, daughter of RAOUL Taisson & his wife Mathilde de La Lande-Patri (-1262 or after).  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records that the second of the three daughters of "Raoul Tesson sire de la Roche Tesson, de Tuit, Tury, Fontenay le Marmion" was married "a messire Robert Bertran" to whom she brought "les terres de Tuit, Tury et Fontenay le Marmion"[780].  She obtained the fief of Thury under the inheritance of her father[781].  "Philippus Marmion" sold Fontenay le Marmion, previously held by "Roberti Marmion patris mei, et Willelmi Marmion patrui mei" to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated 2 Nov 1245[782].  Robert [IV] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT [V] Bertran (-before 1267).  "Robertus Bertran" granted property to "Roberto Brienchon" by charter dated to before 1204, witnessed by "Willelmo Bertran, Roberto Bertran juniore filiis meis"[783].  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament names "messire Robert et messire Guillaume Bertran, chevaliers" as the children of "messire Robert Bertran" and his wife[784]Seigneur de Bricquebec, de Roncheville, de Faugernon et de Fontenay le Marmion.  "Robertus Bertran miles, filius Roberti Bertranni militis et Johanne domine de Tureio" granted rights to the monks of Saint-Michel in the forest of Bricquebec priory by charter dated Sep 1240[785].  The latest date of his death is indicated by the decision of the Paris parliament dated 1267, extrected below.  m (contract 1245) ALIX de Tancarville, daughter of --- de Tancarville & his wife Helisende de Meulan (-before 1267).  A charter dated 1245 records the marriage contract of "Guillelmus camerarius de Tanquarvilla miles…Aelicia sorore mea" and "domino Roberto Bertran militi", and refers to property given to "Helysendi matri mee a domino Ammarico de Mellent avunculo meo"[786].  The latest date of her death is indicated by the decision of the Paris parliament dated 1267, extrected below.  Robert [V] & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT [VI] Bertran (-before 10 May 1308)Seigneur de Briquebec.  A decision of the Paris parliament dated 1267 instructed “Robert Bertrand” to share the succesion of their father and mother with “Guillaume Bertrand chevalier son frère puîné[787]

-         see below

ii)         GUILLAUME Bertran .  A decision of the Paris parliament dated 1267 instructed “Robert Bertrand” to share the succesion of their father and mother with “Guillaume Bertrand chevalier son frère puîné[788]Philippe III King of France confirmed the grant of la baronnie de Faugernon by "Roberti Bertrandi militis domini de Roncheville et de Briquebec" to "Guillaume Bertran mon frere" by charter dated Mar 1274[789].  A charter dated Mar 1275 records the agreement between "Guillaume Bertran écuyer avec son frère aîné Robert Bertran chevalier" to divide the inheritance from their parents[790].  "Robertus Bertran miles" confirmed donations to the abbey of Corneville, for the souls of "Roberti patris sue et Alicie matris sue" and for "Philippe uxoris sue et…Guillermi fratris sui" by charter dated 22 Sep 1295[791]

b)         GUILLAUME Bertran (-after 1288).  "Robertus Bertran" granted property to "Roberto Brienchon" by charter dated to before 1204, witnessed by "Willelmo Bertran, Roberto Bertran juniore filiis meis"[792].  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament names "messire Robert et messire Guillaume Bertran, chevaliers" as the children of "messire Robert Bertran" and his wife[793].  Seigneur de Thury et de Tuit.  Philippe III King of France confirmed the grant of la baronnie de Faugernon by "Roberti Bertrandi militis domini de Roncheville et de Briquebec" to "Guillaume Bertran mon frere" by charter dated Mar 1274[794]m JEANNE, daughter of --- (-after 10 Mar 1312).  "Guillaume Bertran chevalier, seignour de Fauzgernon" granted "le fieu de la visconté de Fontenay le Marmion" to "Robert Bertran escuier son frere" by charter dated 3 Jan 1309, which names "madame Jehane, jadis fame [de] monsieur Guillaume lour pere, mere des diz monsieurs Guillaume et Robert"[795].  "Robert Bertran escuier…madame Jehane sa mere" issued a charter dated 10 Mar 1312 relating to her property[796].  Guillaume & his wife had six children: 

i)          GUILLAUME Bertran .  Seigneur de Fauguernon et de Fontenay le Marmion.  "Guillaume Bertran chevalier, seignour de Fauzgernon" granted "le fieu de la visconté de Fontenay le Marmion" to "Robert Bertran escuier son frere" by charter dated 3 Jan 1309, which names "madame Jehane, jadis fame [de] monsieur Guillaume lour pere, mere des diz monsieurs Guillaume et Robert"[797]m ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

(a)       AGNES Bertran .  The marriage contract of "Guillaume Bertran seignour de Fuasgernon…Agnes ma fille" and "Guilaume de Brucourt" is dated 4 Jul 1300[798]m (contract 4 Jul 1300) GUILLAUME de Brucourt, son of ---. 

ii)         ROBERT Bertran .  Seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion 1309: "Guillaume Bertran chevalier, seignour de Fauzgernon" granted "le fieu de la visconté de Fontenay le Marmion" to "Robert Bertran escuier son frere" by charter dated 3 Jan 1309, which names "madame Jehane, jadis fame [de] monsieur Guillaume lour pere, mere des diz monsieurs Guillaume et Robert"[799]m (contracts 25 Sep 1316 and 14 Jun 1318) JEANNE de Tilly, daughter of JEAN Seigneur de Tilly & his wife Jeanne de Beaufou.  The marriage contracts of "monsieur Robert Bertran chevalier, seignour de Fontenay le Marmion" and "monsieur Jehan de Tilly chevalier signour de Tyllie et noble dame madame Jehanne de Beau Fou…damoisele Jehane leur fille" are dated 25 Sep 1316 and 14 Jun 1318[800].  Heiress of Moyaux, Hiéville, Boissey and Duval. 

iii)        GUIFFREY Bertran .  Seigneur de Bourgthéroude et de Rougemonstiers.  

iv)       daughter .  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records that the eldest of the three daughters of "messire Guillaume Bertran" was married "a messire Guillaume sire de Clisson" to whom she brought "la terre de Tuit", and names their son "Guillaume sire de Clisson et de Tuit", his son "messire Olivier de Clisson", and the latter’s son "messire Olivier de Clisson, qui a present vit"[801]m GUILLAUME de Clisson, son of ---. 

v)        daughter . 

vi)       daughter . 

c)         JEANNE Bertran .  An undated charter records the agreement between "Robert Malet chevalier, seignour de Planes" and "Robert Bertran chevalier seignour de Briquebec et monseignour Guillaume Bertran chevalier son frère" concerning the dowry of "Johenne lour seur, ma fame"[802]m ROBERT Malet, son of ---. 

2.         [GUILLAUME Bertran (-before 1189)m (1179) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Fougères, daughter of RAOUL Seigneur de Fougères & his wife Mathilde ---.  The marriage contract between “Galeranum filium Roberti comitis Mellenti” and “Margaritam filiam Radulfi de Feugeriis” is dated 1189, and names her first husband “Willelmo Bertranno[803].  She married secondly (contract 1189) Waléran [V] de Meulan.] 

3.         ISABELLE Bertran (-before 22 Jul 1228).  "Robertus Bertran miles" donated revenue to Bricquebec priory for the soul of "Ysabelis sororis mee, condam domine de Rocha" by charter dated 22 Jul 1228[804]m --- Seigneur de Roche, son of ---. 

 

 

ROBERT [VI] Bertran, son of ROBERT [V] Bertran Seigneur de Bricquebec & his wife Alix de Tancarville (-before 10 May 1308).  A decision of the Paris parliament dated 1267 instructed “Robert Bertrand” to share the succesion of their father and mother with “Guillaume Bertrand chevalier son frère puîné[805]"Robertus Bertran, armiger, dominus de Briquebec" confirmed the possessions of Bricquebec priory by charter dated Feb 1271[806].  Philippe III King of France confirmed the grant of la baronnie de Faugernon by "Roberti Bertrandi militis domini de Roncheville et de Briquebec" to "Guillaume Bertran mon frere" by charter dated Mar 1274[807].  A charter dated Mar 1275 records the agreement between "Guillaume Bertran écuyer avec son frère aîné Robert Bertran chevalier" to divide the inheritance from their parents[808].  "Robert Bertran chevalier seignour de Roncheville et ma dame Philippe sa fame" set the rent of land for the inhabitants of the parish of Notre-Dame de la Remuée by charter dated 20 Jan 1288[809].  "Robertus Bertran miles" confirmed donations to the abbey of Corneville, for the souls of "Roberti patris sue et Alicie matris sue" and for "Philippe uxoris sue et…Guillermi fratris sui" by charter dated 22 Sep 1295[810]

m (contract Feb 1270) PHILIPPA de Clermont, daughter of SIMON [II] de Clermont Seigneur de Nesles & his wife Adela de Montfort (-[20 Jan 1288/22 Sep 1295]).  The marriage contract of "Simons de Cleirmont sire de Neele chevaliers…Philippe ma fille" and "Robert Bertrans" is dated Feb 1270[811].  "Robert Bertran chevalier seignour de Roncheville et ma dame Philippe sa fame" set the rent of land for the inhabitants of the parish of Notre-Dame de la Remuée by charter dated 20 Jan 1288[812].  "Robertus Bertran miles" confirmed donations to the abbey of Corneville, for the souls of "Roberti patris sue et Alicie matris sue" and for "Philippe uxoris sue et…Guillermi fratris sui" by charter dated 22 Sep 1295[813]

Robert [VI] & his wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT [VII] Bertran (-1348).  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament records names "messire Robert Bertran, mareschal de France" as the child of "messire Robert...Bertran", son of "messire Robert Bertran" and his wife, but this narrative omits a generation[814].  "Robert Hairon et Nicole sa femme" rented property to "Robert Bertran escuier seigneur de Briquebec" by charter dated 10 May 1308[815].  Maréchal de France.  Vicomte de Roncheville.  m (3 May 1318) MARIE de Sully, daughter of HENRI [IV] Seigneur de Sully & his wife Jeanne de Vendôme.  The marriage contract of "Henrys sires de Seuly bouteiller de France…damoisele Marie fille" and "Robert Bertran" is dated May 1318, and names "Guillaume Bertran chanoines de Beauvais frère dudit Robert Bertran"[816].  Robert [VII] & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROBERT Bertran (-killed in battle Crécy 1346). 

b)         GUILLAUME Bertran (-killed  in battle Mauron 14 Aug 1352).  The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that “le sire de Briquebec” was killed in battle “en Bretaigne” 14 Aug 1352[817]

c)         PHILIPPA Bertran (-after 3 Feb 1392).  A document dated 27 Jul 1381 in litigation in the Paris parliament names "madame Philippe" as the daughter and heiress of "messire Robert Bertran, mareschal de France"[818].  Heiress of the vicomté de Roncheville.  m GERARD [V] Chabot Baron de Rays, Seigneur de la Mothe-Achard, son of GERARD [IV] Chabot Baron de Rays, Seigneur de la Mothe-Achard & his wife Catherine de Laval (-before 1399). 

d)         JEANNE Bertran .  The marriage contract of "Robert Bertran chevalier, sire de Briquebec, mareschal de France…demoiselle Jehenne Bertan fille" and "Fouquie Painnel chevalier, seigneur de Hambuye…Guillaume Painel escueir fils ainsné" is dated 2 Jun 1338[819].  Dame de Bricquebec.  m (contract 2 Jun 1338) GUILLAUME Paynel, son of FOULQUES Paynel Seigneur de Hambye & his wife ---.  

2.         GUILLAUME Bertran (-after May 1318).  "Hebert de Moustiers" granted "ma maire de Glatigny" to "Guillaume Bertran escuier, fiuz de…Robert Bertran seignour de Briquebec…mon filoel" by charter dated 28 Jun 1299[820].  The marriage contract of "Henrys sires de Seuly bouteiller de France…damoisele Marie fille" and "Robert Bertran" is dated May 1318, and names "Guillaume Bertran chanoines de Beauvais frère dudit Robert Bertran"[821]

 

 

 

E.      FAMILY of THURSTAN HALDUP

 

 

1.         THURSTAN [Richard] Haldup (-after 1079).  "Richardus qui vocatur Turstinus Haralduc cum Emma uxore sua, Eudoque filius eorum" founded the abbey of Lessay by undated charter, dated to [1079/87][822].  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Ricardus qui vocatus est Turstinus Haldup et Eudo filius eius", by charter dated 1126[823].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessay, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][824]m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1079).  "Richardus qui vocatur Turstinus Haralduc cum Emma uxore sua, Eudoque filius eorum" founded the abbey of Essay by undated charter, dated to [1079/87][825].  Thurstan & his wife had four children: 

a)         EUDES (-after [1081]).  "Richardus qui vocatur Turstinus Haralduc cum Emma uxore sua, Eudoque filius eorum" founded the abbey of Essay by undated charter, dated to [1079/87][826].  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Ricardus qui vocatus est Turstinus Haldup et Eudo filius eius", by charter dated 1126[827].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessay, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][828].  [Vicomte de Contentin.  "…Eudo vicecomes Constantini…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[829].  Delisle suggests that Eudes was the son of Thurstan Haldup.  However, it appears more likely that he was the younger brother of Vicomte Néel [II].]  "Eudo filius Turstini" donated his part of "villa…Helville" to the abbey of Marmoutier by charter dated to [1081][830]

b)         EMMA (-[1095]).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Ernaldus de Escalfoio Willermi Geroiani filius” married “Emmam, Turstini cognomento Haldue filiam”, by whom he had “Willermum et Rainaldum ac Petronillam atque Gevam, aliosque filios et filias”, who after her husband died retired “ad Eudonem fratrem suum Normannici ducis dapiferum” (who was a lord “in pago Constantino”) and lived “pene xxx annis” in her widowhood[831]m ARNAUD d'Echaufour, son of GUILLAUME & his first wife Hiltrude --- (-I Jan [1065]). 

c)         daughter Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the foundation charter of the priory in which her son Robert de La Haye names himself "son of Ranulf the seneschal of Robert de Mortain" and "nephew of Eudo dapifer" [son of Thurstan Haldup][832]m RANULF, son of ---.  Seneschal of Robert de Mortain. 

d)         ADELAIDE .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Adelaidis filie Tustini Haldup" of "alteram medietatem ville de Carpiquet", by charter dated to [1180/82][833]

 

 

 

 

F.      SEIGNEURS de LA HAYE

 

 

According to Domesday Descendants, this family originated in La Haye-du-Puits in the Cotentin, Normandy {Manche}[834].  The founding charter of Boxgrove Priory in Sussex states that the founder, Robert de La Haye, was "consanguineo" of Henry I King of England.  The precise relationship has not yet been traced. 

 

 

1.         --- (-after Oct 1066).  Seigneur de La Haye.  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de la Haye" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[835]m ---.  One child: 

a)         RANULF .  Seneschal of Robert de Mortain.  m ---, daughter of THURSTAN Haldup & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the foundation charter of the priory in which her son Robert de La Haye names himself "son of Ranulf the seneschal of Robert de Mortain" and "nephew of Eudo dapifer" [son of Thurstan Haldup][836].  Ranulf & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de La Haye ([1075/80]-[1150])A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex states that it was founded by Roberti di Haya…consanguineo eius” [referring to King Henry], to whom Henry I King of England had granted “honorem Halnaci” [Halmaker] in Sussex, and given to the abbey of Essay in Normandy[837]According to Domesday Descendants, this was land which had been forfeited by William de Ansleville[838].  In the foundation charter of the priory he names himself "son of Ranulf the seneschal of Robert de Mortain" and "nephew of Eudo dapifer" [son of Thurstan Haldup][839]Domesday Descendants dates the foundation to "before 1105"[840], which would place Robert’s birth in [1075/80], bearing in mind his date of death.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][841]

-         UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY - LA HAYE

 

 

 

G.      SEIGNEURS de PREAUX

 

 

1.         OSBERT de Préaux (-before 1172).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that "Osbert de Préaux" donated tithes from harvest in the parish of Bois l’Evêque to the monks of Holy Trinity of Mont-de-Rouen, for his own soul “those of his parents and of the parents of his wife Matildis”, undated, and that his wife and “their sons Simon and John” granted the tythe to the monks in perpetuity, but he does not cite the source reference[842].  The date of his death is uncertain.  Osbert certainly died before Henry “the Young King”, son of King Henry II, who died in 1183 as his son Pierre recorded that Henry had been his “lord” in his charter dated to [Jun 1200] which is quoted below.  m ([1163/67]) as her first husband, MATHILDE, daughter of [HAMELIN d'Anjou Earl of Surrey & his first wife ---] (-before 13 Dec 1228).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that "Osbert de Préaux" donated tithes from harvest in the parish of Bois l’Evêque to the monks of Holy Trinity of Mont-de-Rouen, for his own soul “those of his parents and of the parents of his wife Matildis”, undated, and that his wife and “their sons Simon and John” granted the tythe to the monks in perpetuity, but he does not cite the source reference[843].  Her first and second marriages are indicated by the charter dated Mar 1233 under which [her daughter by her second marriage] "Ælicia comitissa Augi in viduitate" granted revenue from "molendino de Duno" to “in matrimonium Ælidæ filiæ Petri de Pratellis fratris mei[844].  Her connection with the Warenne family is indicated by the undated charter under which her daughter “Haelisia comitissa Augy quondam uxor Radulfi de Ysondun comitis Augy” donated property to Roche Abbey, witnessed by “domino Willielmo comite Warennæ avunculo meo…[845].  Because Mathilde had three children by her first husband who died in [1172], she could not have been the daughter of Hamelin by his wife Isabelle de Warenne.  There are therefore two possibilities: either she was Hamelin’s daughter by an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage or she was the daughter of Isabelle de Warenne by her first marriage.  The latter possibility is unlikely as any daughter of Guillaume de Blois Comte de Boulogne would have been Ctss de Boulogne instead of Guillaume’s sister.  In any case, the chronology would be tight for Mathilde to have been Isabelle’s daughter.  Until more information comes to light, it is supposed that Mathilde was the daughter of Hamelin by an earlier marriage.  She married secondly Henri [II] Comte d'Eu Lord of Hastings.  She married thirdly Henry de Stuteville Lord of Eckington co Derby, Seigneur de Valmont et de RamesThe primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.  The wording of the charter of her son Pierre, dated to [Jun 1200], suggests that his mother might have died before that date: “Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni[846].  If this charter is correctly dated, at least two of the donor’s brothers were alive at that time, while his father was certainly deceased.  The question then is determining the significance, if any, between his parents not being named in the document while his brothers are named.  One possibility is that the unnamed individuals (and therefore including the donor’s mother) were deceased, but the named brothers were living.  It should be emphasised that this observation is speculative.  Osbert & his wife had five children: 

a)         SIMON de Préaux .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that "Osbert de Préaux" donated tithes from harvest in the parish of Bois l’Evêque to the monks of Holy Trinity of Mont-de-Rouen, for his own soul “those of his parents and of the parents of his wife Matildis”, undated, and that his wife and “their sons Simon and John” granted the tythe to the monks in perpetuity, but he does not cite the source reference[847]Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni” by charter dated to [Jun 1200][848]

b)         ROGER de PréauxPetrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni” by charter dated to [Jun 1200][849].  Roger is singled out in the document for a candle to be burned in his memory during masses after the death of the donor, which suggests that he may have been the donor’s favourite brother. 

c)         JEAN de Préaux (-after 4 Apr 1206).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that "Osbert de Préaux" donated tithes from harvest in the parish of Bois l’Evêque to the monks of Holy Trinity of Mont-de-Rouen, for his own soul “those of his parents and of the parents of his wife Matildis”, undated, and that his wife and “their sons Simon and John” granted the tythe to the monks in perpetuity, but he does not cite the source reference[850].  "Johs de Patell et Petrus et Engelm de Patell" were granted property of “Gundolum de Bretemar”, dated Sep 1199[851].  "...Johe et Pet de Pratell...Engeram de Pratell..." witnessed an order dated 31 Jan 1200[852]Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni” by charter dated to [Jun 1200][853]King John granted custody of "heredem Dun Bard" to “Waltero de Sancto Joh militi...et...J. de Patell” dated 29 Jul 1203[854].  John King of England confirmed the grant of land “in Tywa” made to "Johi de Patell" by “Rann com Cestr” dated 4 Apr 1206[855]m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean & his wife had one child: 

i)          GUILLAUME de Préaux (-1223).  “Petrus de Pratellis et alii milites...apud Rotomagum” confirmed the terms of peace at Rouen and gave “Guillelmum nepotem meum filium Joannis de Pratellis” as hostage, dated 1 Jun 1204[856].  John King of England granted "terram que fuit Willi de Lanvalay...Rad de Rouecestr...insulas de Geresye" to “Willo de Pratellis”, dated 19 Mar 1216[857].  King John granted "manerio de Awelton" to “Willo de Patell” dated 9 Apr 1216[858]m firstly (before Oct 1215) as her third husband, PHILIPPA d'Alençon, widow firstly of WILLIAM de Roumare Earl of Lincoln and secondly of GUILLAUME [III] Malet de Graville, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte d'Alençon & his wife Beatrix de Maine [Anjou] (-before [1220]).  m secondly MARIE, daughter of --- (-after 1223).  The Complete Peerage notes that Guillaume left "left a widow Mary when he died"[859]

d)         PIERRE de Préaux ([1170/72]-after 31 Jan 1207)His parentage is indicated by the charter dated Mar 1233 under which "Ælicia comitissa Augi in viduitate" granted revenue from "molendino de Duno" to “in matrimonium Ælidæ filiæ Petri de Pratellis fratris mei”, with the consent of “Radulphi filii mei[860].  It is assumed that Pierre and Enguerrand were born shortly before their father died as they are not named with their mother in the undated charter, cited above, which names her sons Simon and Jean.  "Johs de Patell et Petrus et Engelm de Patell" were granted property of “Gundolum de Bretemar”, dated Sep 1199[861].  John King of England granted "insulas de Gerse et de Gernere et de Aurene...cum filia et hede Willi com de Insula" to “Petro de Pratell”, dated 14 Jan 1200[862].  "...Johe et Pet de Pratell...Engeram de Pratell..." witnessed an order dated 31 Jan 1200[863]Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni” by charter dated to [Jun 1200][864]"Peter de Préaux" donated "the island of Escrehou" to the church of Sainte-Marie de Valricher, for the soul of “John...King of England who had given him the islands in the English channel”, by charter dated 1203 witnessed by “Engelram de Préaux his brother...[865].  “Petrus de Pratellis et alii milites...apud Rotomagum” confirmed the terms of peace at Rouen and gave “Guillelmum nepotem meum filium Joannis de Pratellis” as hostage, dated 1 Jun 1204[866].  "...Pet de Pratell..." witnessed an order dated 31 Jan 1207[867]m ([Jan 1200]) as her first husband, MARY de Vernon, daughter of WILLIAM de Reviers Earl of Devon & his wife Mabile de Meulan (-after 1244).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Johannam…Willielmi Brewer et Mariam Roberti de Courtney…uxores” as the two daughters of ”Willielmum de Vernona” & his wife, an earlier passage in the same source adding that “domina Maria, juniore filia domini Willielmi de Redveriis comitis Devoniæ” was the wife of “Robertus de Courtenay[868].  John King of England granted "insulas de Gerse et de Gernere et de Aurene...cum filia et hede Willi com de Insula" to “Petro de Pratell”, dated 14 Jan 1200[869].  Her first marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1201 under which “Robertus Comes Melleti” granted property to “Petro de Patett et Marie filie Willi Comitis de Insula filie Mabirie filie mee” on their marriage[870].  She married secondly Robert de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon.  Henry III King of England granted "in manerio de Aulton" to "Marie uxori Roberti de Curtenay" dated [Oct] 1226[871].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Devon, dated 1244, which include "de dominabus, dicunt quod Maria que fuit uxor Roberti de Curtenay est de donacione domini regis et terra eius de Wymple valet x.l"[872].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 11 May "2 Edw I" following the death of [her son] "John de Corteney alias de Curtenay" record that “William de Vernoun earl of the Isle gave the manor [of Cruk] to Robert de Curtenay father of the said John in free marriage with Mary his daughter[873].  Pierre & his wife had one child: 

i)          ALIX .  "Ælicia comitissa Augi in viduitate" granted revenue from "molendino de Duno" to “in matrimonium Ælidæ filiæ Petri de Pratellis fratris mei”, with the consent of “Radulphi filii mei”, by charter dated Mar 1233[874]m ([Mar 1233]) ---. 

e)         ENGUERRAND de Préaux ([1170/72]-before 1228)It is assumed that Pierre and Enguerrand were born shortly before their father died as they are not named with their mother in the undated charter, cited above, which names her sons Simon and Jean.  "Johs de Patell et Petrus et Engelm de Patell" were granted property of “Gundolum de Bretemar”, dated Sep 1199[875].  "...Johe et Pet de Pratell...Engeram de Pratell..." witnessed an order dated 31 Jan 1200[876]Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni” by charter dated to [Jun 1200][877]An order of King John dated 11 May 1201 granted permission to go abroad to "fideli militi nostro Engelram de Patell"[878].  "Peter de Préaux" donated "the island of Escrehou" to the church of Sainte-Marie de Valricher, for the soul of “John...King of England who had given him the islands in the English channel”, by charter dated 1203 witnessed by “Engelram de Préaux his brother...[879].  King John ordered the sheriff of Oxfordshire to grant land "i Blokesham" to “Ingeram de Patell” in exchange for “manerio de Moredon q dedit Willo de Cav” dated 1204[880]m (after [1195]) as her second husband, SIBYLLA, widow of WALTER de Dunstanville, daughter of --- (-after 1230).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Engelramus de Pratellis…et Sibilla uxor eius" against "Thomam Basset" for "terciam partem de Colintona…dotem ipsius Sibille et Walterus de Dunstanuilla quondam vir suus"[881]Enguerrand & his wife had one child: 

i)          ENGUERRAND de PréauxHenry III King of England granted "terris quas predictus Engeramus pater suus tenuit" to "Engeramo filio Engerami de Pratellis" dated 1228[882]

 

 

[Two] brothers: 

1.         GUILLAUME de Préaux .  “…Willelmo et Engerranno de Pratell fratribus…” subscribed the charter dated to [Jun 1200] under which Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni[883]King John granted "terram cum Sapio cum ptin suis et honorem de Okementon" to “Willo de Patell” dated 27 Nov 1203[884].  Two orders of King John dated 31 Jan 1204 released "Willo de Patell" from obligations and confirmed “posuit i wanasta [warnesta] castelli de Valle Rod [Vallerod][885]

2.         [ENGUERRAND de Préaux (-after [Jun 1200]).  …Willelmo et Engerranno de Pratell fratribus…” subscribed the charter dated to [Jun 1200] under which Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni[886].  The absence of Guillaume from the list of the donor’s brothers in the body of the charter suggests that he was not Pierre’s brother, and therefore that Guillaume’s brother Enguerrand was a different person from Pierre’s brother of the same name.] 

 

 

1.         JEAN de Préaux .  The Fine Rolls record the king waiving debts of “Johe de Patell avunculo suo” if "Johs de Patell" provided security, dated 21 Mar 1233[887]

 

2.         PIERRE de Préaux (-before 1242)m (before 1216) ISABELLE d’Estouteville, daughter of HENRI Seigneur d’Estouteville & his wife Mathilde d’Eu (-after 1242).  Morandière cites a charter dated 1216 under which "Ysabel", daughter of Henri d’Estouteville, "avec son mari Pierre de Préaux" donated rights over "les moulins de Bec-de-Mortagne" to Beaulieu abbey, confirmed by her as a widow in 1242[888]

 

 

1.         --- de Préaux (-before 1219)m as her first husband, GODDE, daughter of --- (-after Mar 1234).  She married secondly (before 1219) as his second wife, Robert de Coucy Seigneur de Pinon.  "Godde dame de Raineval femme de Robert de Coucy seigneur de Pinon" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Jean, Florent, Willaume, Raoul et Simon ses enfants", by charter dated 1219[889].  "Ioannis de Pratellis militis domini de Reneval" donated property to Amiens cathedral, with the consent of "nobilis dominæ Godæ matris suæ", by charter dated Mar 1234[890].  The Lignages de Coucy (written in 1303) record that "Robers...de Pignon" married “madame Godde de --- si ot de luy un fils...Iehan qui fut sires de Pignon apres son pere” and married “Marguerite seur monsieur Nicole de Morlaines” and had “un fils et plusieurs filles”, that “le fils...Robers” married “l’hoir de Perreumont” and had “plusieurs enfans”, that “l’une des filles...Jehan sieur de Pignon” married “au sieur de Bailleux qui en ot un fils...Jehan...[qui] mourut sans hoirs de son corps...et une fille que le sire d’Argilliers ot à femme” and that “la seconde fille...Jehan sieur de Pignon” married “au sieur de Ballaimmont en Henault[891].  It is possible that the son of Godde who is named in this passage refers to her son by her first marriage.  Five children: 

a)         JEAN de Préaux (-after Mar 1234).  "Godde dame de Raineval femme de Robert de Coucy seigneur de Pinon" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Jean, Florent, Willaume, Raoul et Simon ses enfants", by charter dated 1219[892].  Seigneur de Raineval.  "Ioannis de Pratellis militis domini de Reneval" donated property to Amiens cathedral, with the consent of "nobilis dominæ Godæ matris suæ", by charter dated Mar 1234[893]

b)         FLORENT de Préaux .  "Godde dame de Raineval femme de Robert de Coucy seigneur de Pinon" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Jean, Florent, Willaume, Raoul et Simon ses enfants", by charter dated 1219[894]

c)         GUILLAUME de Préaux .  "Godde dame de Raineval femme de Robert de Coucy seigneur de Pinon" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Jean, Florent, Willaume, Raoul et Simon ses enfants", by charter dated 1219[895]

d)         RAOUL de Préaux .  "Godde dame de Raineval femme de Robert de Coucy seigneur de Pinon" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Jean, Florent, Willaume, Raoul et Simon ses enfants", by charter dated 1219[896]

e)         SIMON de Préaux .  "Godde dame de Raineval femme de Robert de Coucy seigneur de Pinon" donated property to Saint-Fuscian lés Amiens, with the consent of "Jean, Florent, Willaume, Raoul et Simon ses enfants", by charter dated 1219[897]

 

 

 



[1] Le Prévost ‘Anciennes divisions territoriales de la Normandie’ (1837-39), p. 1. 

[2] Houts (2000), p. 91 footnote 59, quoting Potts (1992) 'The earliest Norman counts revisited: the lords of Mortain', The Haskins Society Journal, 4 (1992) pp. 23-37 [not yet consulted]. 

[3] Vita Gauzlini, Liber I, X (1853), pp. 282-3. 

[4] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 1. 

[5] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 1. 

[6] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 1. 

[7] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 1. 

[8] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 1. 

[9] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, I, p. 1. 

[10] Vita Gauzlini, Liber I, X (1853), pp. 282-3. 

[11] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 99. 

[12] Depoin ‘Les vicomtes de Corbeil’ (1899), Pièces justificatives, II, p. 42. 

[13] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVI, p. 275. 

[14] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 99. 

[15] Douet-D’Arcq (1855), p. lxv, quoting Félibien Histoire de l’abbaye de Saint-Denis pr. ii partie, p. clxix. 

[16] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, p. 246, footnote (1). 

[17] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[18] ES III 694B. 

[19] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, II, p. 270. 

[20] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268. 

[21] Willelmi Malmesbiriensis, Liber III, 277, p. 333. 

[22] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[23] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1032, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 784-5. 

[24] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 99. 

[25] Quoted in CP VII 125 footnote g (from previous page). 

[26] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 201. 

[27] Quoted in CP VII 125 footnote g (from previous page). 

[28] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268. 

[29] Florence of Worcester, 1088, p. 186. 

[30] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[31] Geoffrey Richard Driscoll Tobin in a private email to the author dated 21 Aug 2015. 

[32] Rennes Saint-Georges, XIII, p. 238. 

[33] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 99. 

[34] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVI, p. 275. 

[35] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, XI, p. 121. 

[36] CP III 428. 

[37] Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire XCII, p. 241. 

[38] Florence of Worcester, 1088, p. 186, and CP III 428. 

[39] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario ecclesiæ Moretoniensis, p. 583. 

[40] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIII, p. 412. 

[41] Round (1899) 716, p. 256. 

[42] Dugdale Monasticon V, Montacute Priory, Somerset, II, p. 165. 

[43] Round (1899) 716, p. 256. 

[44] Round (1899) 716, p. 256. 

[45] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 85. 

[46] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1032, MGH SS XXIII, p. 785. 

[47] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1159, p. 319. 

[48] Round (1899) 716, p. 256. 

[49] William of Malmesbury, II, p. 473, cited in CP VII 129 footnote d. 

[50] Dugdale Monasticon V, Montacute Priory, Somerset, II, p. 165. 

[51] Bath St Peter 42, p. 46. 

[52] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 53. 

[53] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 55. 

[54] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 95. 

[55] Round (1899), 1209, p. 436. 

[56] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXVIII, p. 455. 

[57] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1159, p. 319. 

[58] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 63, p. 63, extract only, citing Cartulaire du Ronceray CCCLXIII. 

[59] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 64, p. 63. 

[60] Château-du-Loir 51, p. 27. 

[61] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 67, p. 65. 

[62] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1159, p. 319. 

[63] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome IV, Preuves, XXVII, p. 362. 

[64] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484. 

[65] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068. 

[66] Saintes Notre-Dame, LXXVI, p. 69.

[67] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1128. 

[68] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484. 

[69] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068. 

[70] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1159, p. 319. 

[71] ‘Les paroisses de Vitré, leurs origins et leur organisation ancienne’, Bulletin de l’Association bretonne (1876) Tome XIX, Pièces justificatives II, p. 134. 

[72] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, Instrumenta, col. 484. 

[73] Gallia Christiana, Tome II, col. 1068. 

[74] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268. 

[75] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[76] Florence of Worcester, 1088, p. 186. 

[77] Geoffrey Richard Driscoll Tobin in a private email to the author dated 21 Aug 2015. 

[78] Rennes Saint-Georges, XIII, p. 238. 

[79] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVI, p. 275. 

[80] Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris, p. 22. 

[81] CP VII 126. 

[82] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, I, p. 167. 

[83] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, p. 1. 

[84] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, p. 243, and Florence of Worcester, 1074, p. 178. 

[85] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, p. 189, Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 43, and Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, E, 1082 and 1086 [1087]. 

[86] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[87] Florence of Worcester, 1087, p. 185. 

[88] Florence of Worcester, 1088, p. 186. 

[89] CP VII 129. 

[90] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber X, IV, p. 17. 

[91] Willelmi Malmesbiriensis, Vol. II, Liber III, 277, p. 334. 

[92] Ex obituario Gemmeticensi, RHGF XXIII, p. 417. 

[93] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 379. 

[94] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, p. 264. 

[95] Planché (1874), Vol. I, p. 88, and Vol. II, p. 286.  

[96] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, p. 246. 

[97] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 33, p. 36. 

[98] Quoted in CP VII 125 footnote g (from previous page). 

[99] Domesday Translation, Norfolk, p. 1102. 

[100] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1913), Vol. I, 150, p. 41. 

[101] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, VI, p. 270. 

[102] Louviers, Tome I, II, p. 3. 

[103] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 7, p. 8, citing Neustria pia, p. 398. 

[104] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 9, p. 10. 

[105] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 16, p. 17. 

[106] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, 2, p. 423. 

[107] Jumièges, Tome I, 20, p. 63. 

[108] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 22, p. 26. 

[109] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, VI, p. 270. 

[110] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, VI, p. 270. 

[111] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 22, p. 26. 

[112] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 25, p. 28. 

[113] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 6, p. 670. 

[114] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 28, p. 39. 

[115] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[116] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, 67, p. 455. 

[117] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, II, p. 3. 

[118] CP III 164. 

[119] Dugdale Monasticon II, Chester St Werburgh, I, p. 384.    

[120] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, III, p. 283. 

[121] A nickname attributed to him later because of his rapacity: CP III 164. 

[122] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, VII, p. 219. 

[123] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309. 

[124] Durham Liber Vitæ, folio 52, p. 78. 

[125] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 285. 

[126] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, X, p. 197. 

[127] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome II, Liber Quartus, 27, p. 534. 

[128] Round (1899), 622, p. 218. 

[129] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome II, Liber Quartus, 27, p. 534. 

[130] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 22, p. 26. 

[131] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 7, p. 8, citing Neustria pia, p. 398. 

[132] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 16, p. 17. 

[133] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, I, p. 261. 

[134] CP IV 317, table "The Heirs of Richard fitz Baldwin". 

[135] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155. 

[136] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Devonshire, p. 155. 

[137] Domesday Descendants, p. 263, citing Barraclough Charters of the Anglo-Norman Earls of Chester, no. 10. 

[138] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[139] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[140] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[141] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XLVI, List of charters in the cartulary of St Nicholas Priory, at Exeter, 151, p. 188. 

[142] Collectanea Topographica Genealogica, Vol. I, XLVI, List of charters in the cartulary of St Nicholas Priory, at Exeter, 341, p. 382. 

[143] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 170, p. 137. 

[144] Dugdale Monasticon V, Ford Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[145] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1569, p. 450. 

[146] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[147] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, p. 378. 

[148] CP IV 317, table "The Heirs of Richard fitz Baldwin". 

[149] Round (1899), 710, p. 252. 

[150] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta, col. 60. 

[151] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXVIII, p. 354. 

[152] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXVIII, p. 354. 

[153] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[154] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[155] CP XI 340. 

[156] Round (1899), 724, p. 259. 

[157] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[158] Gwentian Chronicle, p. 75. 

[159] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber XI, XX, p. 224. 

[160] Gerville, C. (1825) Recherches sur les anciens châteaux de la Manche, pp. 38-47, not yet consulted. [Listed in Google Book, no preview]. 

[161] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, LXI, p. 322. 

[162] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 119. 

[163] Matthew Paris, Vol. VI, 22, p. 36. 

[164] Round (1899), 710, p. 252. 

[165] Round (1899), 723, p. 259. 

[166] MP Vol. VI, 22, p. 36. 

[167] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber XII, IV, p. 323. 

[168] Round (1899), 710, p. 252. 

[169] Dugdale Monasticon V, Kingswood Priory, Wiltshire I, p. 425.   

[170] Domesday Descendants, p. 690. 

[171] Domesday Descendants, p. 690. 

[172] Domesday Descendants, p. 690. 

[173] Round (1899), 711, p. 252. 

[174] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 8, p. 11. 

[175] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. IV, Liber XII, IV, p. 323. 

[176] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Hampshire, p. 43. 

[177] Dugdale Monasticon III, Spalding Monastery, Lincolnshire, XII, p. 218.   

[178] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[179] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[180] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCLXXXII, p. 430. 

[181] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298. 

[182] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 72. 

[183] Round (1899), 848, p. 305. 

[184] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298. 

[185] Round (1899), 928, p. 331. 

[186] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[187] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VIII, p. 647. 

[188] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCLXXXII, p. 430. 

[189] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298. 

[190] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[191] Domesday Descendants, p. 594, citing Cartulary of Evesham, p. 174. 

[192] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli III, Norhamtonsire, Hundredo de Suttone, p. 15. 

[193] Le Prévost ‘Anciennes divisions territoriales de la Normandie’ (1837-39), p. 1. 

[194] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[195] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber IV, XX, p. 248. 

[196] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 416. 

[197] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[198] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[199] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[200] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, IV, p. 424. 

[201] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, 4, p. 424. 

[202] ES III 694A. 

[203] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[204] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[205] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 289. 

[206] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 289. 

[207] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 289. 

[208] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[209] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[210] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[211] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 416. 

[212] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, II, p. 168. 

[213] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[214] Ex Chronico S. Stephani Cadom., RHGF XI, p. 379. 

[215] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, III, p. 309. 

[216] Ex Chronico S. Stephani Cadom., RHGF XI, p. 379.  

[217] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, IV, p. 312. 

[218] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[219] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 288. 

[220] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VI, V, p. 258. 

[221] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XXIV, p. 416. 

[222] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXVII, p. 435. 

[223] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442. 

[224] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442. 

[225] Stapleton, Archæological Journal, Vol. III (1846), pp. 1-26, cited in CP IX Appendix A, p. 6 footnote e. 

[226] CP IX Appendix A, p. 7. 

[227] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442. 

[228] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXXV, p. 440. 

[229] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442. 

[230] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 240. 

[231] Chibnall, Vol. IV, p. 199 footnote 4. 

[232] ES III 694A. 

[233] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber III, VI, pp. 32 and 34. 

[234] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber III, VI, pp. 34-5. 

[235] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber III, VI, pp. 32 and 34. 

[236] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber II, XVI, p. 431. 

[237] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, p. 34 footnote (4). 

[238] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber III, VI, pp. 34-5. 

[239] Lambert, M. ‘Les anciens vicomtes de Bayeux’, Mémoires de la société d’agriculture, sciences, arts et belles-lettres de Bayeux, Tome VIII (Bayeux, 1879), p. 252. 

[240] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 17, p. 19. 

[241] Gesta Willelmi ducis Normannorum et regis Anglorum a Willelmo Pictaviensi…archidiacono, p. 80. 

[242] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 22, p. 26. 

[243] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, p. 231. 

[244] Robert of Torigny, Tome I, 1026, p. 33. 

[245] Broussillon (1895), Tome I, 28, p. 39. 

[246] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 44, p. 49. 

[247] Durham Liber Vitæ, folio 52, p. 78. 

[248] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309. 

[249] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book IX, p. 59, the editor in footnote 2 stating, incorrectly it would seem, that he was the great nephew rather than nephew of Hugh Earl of Chester. 

[250] Durham Liber Vitæ, folio 52, p. 78. 

[251] Durham Liber Vitæ, folio 52, p. 78. 

[252] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 583.   

[253] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 309. 

[254] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 44, p. 49. 

[255] Durham Liber Vitæ, folio 52, p. 78. 

[256] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 584.   

[257] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 584.   

[258] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[259] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCI, p. 199. 

[260] Domesday Descendants, p. 675. 

[261] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 584.   

[262] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book IX, p. 59, the editor in footnote 2 stating, incorrectly it would seem, that he was the great nephew rather than nephew of Hugh Earl of Chester. 

[263] Wetherhal, 3, p. 10.   

[264] Dugdale Monasticon II, Chester St Werburgh, VI, p. 387.   

[265] Dugdale Monasticon III, St Bee’s Priory, Cumberland, II, p. 576.   

[266] Domesday Descendants, p. 1039. 

[267] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[268] Dugdale Monasticon III, St. Bee’s Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 577. 

[269] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bolton Priory, Yorkshire, II, p. 203. 

[270] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 197. 

[271] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bolton Priory, Yorkshire, II, p. 203. 

[272] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bolton Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 203. 

[273] Dugdale Monasticon III, St. Bee’s Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 577. 

[274] Domesday Descendants, p. 675. 

[275] Dugdale Monasticon III, St. Bee’s Priory, Cumberland, III, p. 577. 

[276] St Bees, 4, p. 32. 

[277] Dugdale Monasticon III, St Bee’s Priory, Cumberland, V, p. 577.   

[278] Domesday Descendants, pp. 675 and 1039. 

[279] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[280] Round (1892), p. 170. 

[281] Dugdale Monasticon V, Melsa Abbey, Yorkshire, VII, Genealogia Fundatoris, p. 394. 

[282] Dugdale Monasticon III, Wetherall Priory, Cumberland, XVI, Cronicon Cumbriæ, p. 585.   

[283] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Bolton Priory, Yorkshire, IV, p. 203. 

[284] St Bees, 12, p. 40. 

[285] St Bees, 15, p. 43. 

[286] Dugdale Monasticon V, Pontefract Priory, Yorkshire, XIV, p. 125. 

[287] Dugdale Monasticon V, Southwark Priory, p. 169. 

[288] CP IX 272 states that she was alive during the reign of King Richard I. 

[289] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire, III, p. 262. 

[290] CP IX 271, footnote e. 

[291] Journal of British Archæological Association, Vol. XXIV, p. 29, from a plea roll of Easter 28 Hen III, and Chetham Society, Vol. LXXXIV N. S. (1915), p. 41 (neither yet consulted). 

[292] Farrer, Honors and Knights Fees, Vol. II, p. 51 (not yet consulted). 

[293] Eyton (1855), Vol. II, p. 208. 

[294] Domesday Descendants, p. 674. 

[295] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1862, p. 467. 

[296] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.   

[297] Early Yorkshire Charters III, 1864, p. 473. 

[298] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433. 

[299] Domesday Descendants, p. 631. 

[300] CP XI 464, footnote b. 

[301] CP XI 464, footnote a. 

[302] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XVI, pp. 359 and 361. 

[303] RHGF XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 489. 

[304] Domesday Descendants, p. 680. 

[305] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, LXI, p. 322. 

[306] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Oxfordshire, p. 5. 

[307] CP XI 464, citing Gallia Christiana Vol. XI, col. 443. 

[308] Eynsham, Vol. I, 152, p. 118. 

[309] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXIV, col. 88. 

[310] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[311] CP XI 464, citing Gallia Christiana Vol. XI, col. 443. 

[312] Domesday Descendants, p. 675. 

[313] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[314] Eynsham, Vol. I, 152, p. 118. 

[315] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome II, Liber Quartus, CXXII, p. 611. 

[316] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XIV, p. 18. 

[317] Domesday Descendants, p. 680. 

[318] Domesday Descendants, p. 680. 

[319] Domesday Descendants, p. 680, citing Arch. dept. du Calvados H660, Histoire de l’abbaye d’Aunay

[320] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 93 footnote 5, quoting Archives de Calvados, fonds d’Aunay, no. 25. 

[321] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[322] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 15, p. 3. 

[323] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 58. 

[324] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 58. 

[325] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 58. 

[326] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Sainte-Barbe (en Auge), 75, p. 103. 

[327] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CCLXXIV, p. 322. 

[328] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CCLXXIII, p. 321. 

[329] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CCXVII, p. 264. 

[330] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CCXVIII, p. 266. 

[331] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CCLXXIII, p. 321. 

[332] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CCXVIII, p. 266. 

[333] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 15, p. 3. 

[334] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Lisieux, 139, p. 32. 

[335] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Aunay, 111, p. 58. 

[336] Le Hête ‘An Unstudied Descent from Robert de Caen, Earl of Gloucester’ (Jul 2009), pp. 119-25. 

[337] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 15, p. 3. 

[338] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Longues, 8, p. 41. 

[339] Jumièges, Tome II, CLXXVI, p. 132. 

[340] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Longues, 43, p. 45. 

[341] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Longues, 10, p. 41. 

[342] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Longues, 44, p. 46. 

[343] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Longues, 8, p. 41. 

[344] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 15, p. 3. 

[345] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 15, p. 3. 

[346] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Longues, 8, p. 41. 

[347] Round (1899), 1105, p. 392. 

[348] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. II, Lisieux, 139, p. 32. 

[349] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 48. 

[350] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Ardennes, 15, p. 3. 

[351] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Aunay, 346, 347, p. 80. 

[352] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Aunay, 346, 347, p. 80. 

[353] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Aunay, 349, p. 80. 

[354] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Aunay, 346, 347, p. 80. 

[355] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Aunay, 346, 347, p. 80. 

[356] Domesday Descendants, p. 419. 

[357] Registrum Roffense, p. 209. 

[358] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[359] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CXXXI, p. 340. 

[360] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Kent, p. 63. 

[361] Registrum Roffense, p. 209. 

[362] Registrum Roffense, p. 209. 

[363] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[364] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[365] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[366] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, pp. 28 and 36. 

[367] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 190. 

[368] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 203. 

[369] Pipe Roll 23 Hen II (1176/77), Kent, p. 204. 

[370] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[371] Registrum Roffense, p. 540. 

[372] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[373] Registrum Roffense, p. 209. 

[374] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[375] Registrum Roffense, p. 598. 

[376] Registrum Roffense, p. 598. 

[377] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, p. 8. 

[378] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Nomina militum tenentium de ecclesia Baiocensi, p. 645. 

[379] Actes Henri II, Tome I, LI, p. 57. 

[380] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCLVI, p. 402. 

[381] Registrum Roffense, p. 540. 

[382] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[383] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 70. 

[384] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 79. 

[385] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 96. 

[386] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 469, 471-2 and 474. 

[387] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 216.   

[388] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 68. 

[389] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III (London), 563, p. 171. 

[390] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[391] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 412, p. 274. 

[392] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[393] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[394] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Leeds Priory, Kent, II, p. 217.   

[395] Registrum Roffense, p. 696. 

[396] Registrum Roffense, p. 661. 

[397] Registrum Roffense, p. 660. 

[398] Registrum Roffense, p. 660. 

[399] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[400] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[401] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[402] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[403] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 412, p. 274. 

[404] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 412, p. 274. 

[405] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[406] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 412, p. 274. 

[407] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[408] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. III, Edward I, 412, p. 274. 

[409] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[410] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 563, p. 171. 

[411] Lannoy, Tome X, XXIV, p. 653. 

[412] Lannoy, Tome X, XXIV, p. 653. 

[413] Lannoy, Tome X, LXVIII, p. 685. 

[414] Lannoy, Tome X, XXIV, p. 653. 

[415] Lannoy, Tome X, LXVIII, p. 685. 

[416] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[417] Lannoy, Tome XI, CLXXIII, p. 210. 

[418] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[419] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[420] Lannoy, Tome XI, CLXXIII, p. 210. 

[421] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXCVIII, p. 339. 

[422] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXCVIII, p. 339. 

[423] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[424] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[425] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXCVIII, p. 339. 

[426] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[427] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[428] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[429] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXCVIII, p. 339. 

[430] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[431] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[432] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[433] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[434] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXCVIII, p. 339. 

[435] Lannoy, Tome XI, CCXLIV, p. 305. 

[436] Lannoy, Tome X, LXVIII, p. 685. 

[437] Lannoy, Tome XI, CXVIII, p. 175. 

[438] Lannoy, Tome X, LXVIII, p. 685. 

[439] Lannoy, Tome X, LXVIII, p. 685. 

[440] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 190. 

[441] Saint-Just-en-Chaussée, XV, p. 414. 

[442] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 32. 

[443] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 383.  

[444] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli II, Lincolnscir, p. 11. 

[445] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 56. 

[446] Wetherhal, 195, p. 308. 

[447] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, pp. 3 and 9. 

[448] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, pp. 3 and 9. 

[449] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, pp. 3 and 9. 

[450] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, pp. 3 and 9. 

[451] Wetherhal, 195, p. 308. 

[452] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 113. 

[453] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 96, p. 62. 

[454] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 521. 

[455] Wetherhal, 195, p. 308. 

[456] Wetherhal, 196, p. 311. 

[457] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 213. 

[458] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 99, p. 65. 

[459] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 2 John, p. 113. 

[460] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 199. 

[461] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 213. 

[462] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 167. 

[463] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Bullington, 40, p. 27. 

[464] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 171-2. 

[465] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 56. 

[466] Lannoy, Tome X, VII, p. 633. 

[467] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference].  . 

[468] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 121, citing Archives de l’Oise, fonds Variville.  

[469] Lépinois (1877), Pièces justificatives, XLV, p. 455. 

[470] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 120, citing Titres de Beaupré (no precise citation reference).  

[471] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 121, citing Bornet Beaupré, p. 86.  

[472] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[473] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[474] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 121, citing Archives de l’Oise, fonds Variville.  

[475] Lépinois (1877), Pièces justificatives, XLV, p. 455. 

[476] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[477] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 121, citing Archives de l’Oise, fonds Variville.  

[478] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 40, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[479] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 40, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[480] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[481] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 51, quoting Pillet Histoire de Gerberoy [no page reference]. 

[482] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 48, quoting Abbé Deladreue Histoire de l’abbaye de Lannoy, Archives de l’Oise, fonds de Lannoy. 

[483] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[484] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 64, citing Titres de Beaupré (no precise citation reference).  

[485] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 47, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[486] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[487] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[488] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[489] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[490] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[491] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[492] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[493] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 49, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy, Titres de Beaupré [no precise citation reference]. 

[494] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 46, quoting Manuscrits de du Caurroy [no precise citation reference]. 

[495] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[496] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 121, citing Archives de l’Oise, fonds Variville.  

[497] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[498] Leblond (1910), 1, p. 121, citing Archives de l’Oise, fonds Variville.  

[499] Seillier ‘Maison de Crèvecœur’ (1892), p. 33, quoting Louvet Anciennes Remarques sur la Noblesse Beauvaisienne [no page reference]. 

[500] Lépinois (1877), Pièces justificatives, XLV, p. 455. 

[501] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation references).  [I am grateful to Kim Derrick for drawing my attention to this text in a private email dated 18 Oct 2016.]

[502] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[503] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[504] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[505] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii (no citation reference). 

[506] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Essex, p. 56. 

[507] Domesday Descendants, p. 522, citing Foster, C. W. and Major, K. The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln, Vol. VI, pp. 181-6. 

[508] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii (no citation reference). 

[509] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii (no citation reference). 

[510] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii (no citation reference). 

[511] Dugdale Monasticon V, Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, II, p. 662. 

[512] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, XIII, p. 19. 

[513] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CXXXVIII, p. 166. 

[514] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CXXXIV, p. 161. 

[515] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CV, p. 128. 

[516] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 202. 

[517] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Stanford Nunnery, Lincolnshire, V, p. 261.   

[518] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 630. 

[519] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXIV, col. 88. 

[520] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[521] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, 1181, p. 93. 

[522] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXLIX, p. 126. 

[523] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[524] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii (no citation reference). 

[525] Domesday Descendants, p. 680, citing Arch. dept. du Calvados H660, Histoire de l’abbaye d’Aunay

[526] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 93 footnote 5, quoting Archives de Calvados, fonds d’Aunay, no. 25. 

[527] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[528] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXIV, col. 88. 

[529] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXIV, col. 88. 

[530] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, II, 1181, p. 93. 

[531] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[532] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, LXXXVII, p. 110. 

[533] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, LXXXVIII, p. 112. 

[534] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[535] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, LXXXVII, p. 110, and CXL, p. 170. 

[536] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Southwick, 441, p. 325. 

[537] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[538] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Southwick, 441, p. 325. 

[539] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXIV, col. 88. 

[540] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, 1181, p. 93. 

[541] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 630. 

[542] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[543] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Southwick, 441, p. 325. 

[544] Ex Chronico Savigniacensis Monasterii, RHGF XVIII, p. 351. 

[545] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes, Tome II, 2129, p. 202. 

[546] Domesday Descendants (2002), p. 522. 

[547] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXIV, col. 88. 

[548] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, 1181, p. 93. 

[549] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CV, p. 128. 

[550] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCCXLV, p. 379. 

[551] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXLIX, p. 126. 

[552] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[553] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 91. 

[554] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CXXI, p. 147. 

[555] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Stanford Nunnery, Lincolnshire, VIII, p. 261.   

[556] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[557] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[558] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Southwick, 441, p. 325. 

[559] Gerville ‘Anciens châteaux de l’arrondissement de Valognes’ (1825), p. 242, citing “V. mon répertoire in-fol., p. 172”.  [information provided by Kim Derrick in a private email dated 18 Oct 2016]

[560] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Stanford Nunnery, Lincolnshire, XV, p. 262.   

[561] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[562] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), Southwick, 441, p. 325. 

[563] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Stanford Nunnery, Lincolnshire, XV, p. 262.   

[564] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[565] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 503, p. 391. 

[566] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[567] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxi, (no citation reference). 

[568] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. clxxxi-clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[569] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Perrinensi, p. 551. 

[570] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxi, (no citation reference). 

[571] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Perrinensi, p. 550. 

[572] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[573] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[574] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[575] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, CXXI, p. 147. 

[576] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[577] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. clxxxii, (no citation reference). 

[578] Gallia Christiana, Tome XI, Instrumenta, XXVI, col. 90. 

[579] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 8 John, p. 70. 

[580] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 538. 

[581] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1500, p. 416. 

[582] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/21, 8 Hen III, 27. 

[583] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Perrinensi, p. 552. 

[584] Chibnall, Vol. IV, p. 199 footnote 4. 

[585] ES III 694A. 

[586] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber III, VI, pp. 32 and 34. 

[587] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber II, XVI, p. 431. 

[588] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, p. 34 footnote (4). 

[589] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 153. 

[590] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[591] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[592] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 154. 

[593] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 153. 

[594] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[595] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XVI, p. 300. 

[596] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XII, p. 332. 

[597] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XII, pp. 335-6. 

[598] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, pp. 199-201 and 287-9.   

[599] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Appendice, p. 343, Pièces justificatives, III. 

[600] Pontoise Saint-Martin, Appendice, p. 344, Pièces justificatives, III and IIIb. 

[601] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[602] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XII, pp. 335-6. 

[603] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 154. 

[604] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 41. 

[605] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[606] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[607] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 154. 

[608] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[609] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[610] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, pp. 219 and 229. 

[611] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 231. 

[612] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 154. 

[613] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[614] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[615] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 333. 

[616] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 333.   

[617] Robert de Torigny, Vol. I, 1153, p. 278. 

[618] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 333. 

[619] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, pp. 219 and 229. 

[620] Robert de Torigny, Vol. I, 1153, p. 278. 

[621] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[622] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVII, p. 54. 

[623] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 153. 

[624] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[625] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 287. 

[626] Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis, Spicilegium II, p. 153. 

[627] Pontoise Saint-Martin LVI, p. 50. 

[628] ES III 697. 

[629] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, II, p. 251. 

[630] Domesday Translation, Berkshire, XLIIII, p. 155, Buckinghamshire, IV, XLI, pp. 398, 417, Oxfordshire, IX, XXIX, pp. 430, 435-6. 

[631] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, p. 237 footnote 11. 

[632] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XVI, pp. 359 and 361. 

[633] Domesday Translation, Oxfordshire, LV, p. 441. 

[634] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 72. 

[635] Domesday Descendants, p. 528. 

[636] Abingdon Chronicle, Vol. II, p. 72. 

[637] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, 1757, p. 261. 

[638] Domesday Descendants, p. 528. 

[639] Domesday Translation, Oxfordshire, XXVI, p. 435. 

[640] Le Prévost ‘Anciennes divisions territoriales de la Normandie’ (1837-39), p. 1. 

[641] Delisle (1867). 

[642] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 48, p. 59. 

[643] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, IV, p. 250. 

[644] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, X, p. 253. 

[645] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 1, p. 1. 

[646] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 3, p. 4. 

[647] Louviers, Tome I, II, p. 3. 

[648] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 7, p. 8, citing Neustria pia, p. 398. 

[649] Lambert ‘Les anciens vicomtes de Bayeux’, p. 252. 

[650] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 9, p. 10. 

[651] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 12, p. 12, citing Gallia Christiana XI, instr. col. 200. 

[652] Chronique Manuscrite de Normandie, RHGF XI, p. 339. 

[653] Bayeux (Livre noir), Tome I, XXI, p. 27. 

[654] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 15, p. 18, citing Gallia Christiana XI, instr. 12. 

[655] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 16, p. 17. 

[656] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 9, p. 10. 

[657] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 17, p. 19. 

[658] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 30, p. 33. 

[659] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 40, p. 44. 

[660] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 42, p. 46. 

[661] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 45, p. 50. 

[662] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 46, p. 55. 

[663] Delisle (1866), p. 204. 

[664] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 46, p. 55. 

[665] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 9, p. 10. 

[666] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 17, p. 19. 

[667] Gesta Willelmi ducis Normannorum et regis Anglorum a Willelmo Pictaviensi…archidiacono, p. 80. 

[668] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XVI, p. 275. 

[669] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, p. 231. 

[670] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 34, p. 37. 

[671] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 22, p. 26. 

[672] Delisle (1867), p. 19. 

[673] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 24, p. 27. 

[674] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[675] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 236. 

[676] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 38, p. 42. 

[677] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 33, p. 36. 

[678] Delisle (1866), p. 204. 

[679] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[680] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[681] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, XXVII, p. 152. 

[682] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 33, p. 36. 

[683] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 36, p. 40. 

[684] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 37, p. 41. 

[685] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 44, p. 49. 

[686] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 45, p. 50. 

[687] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 48, p. 59. 

[688] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 48, p. 59. 

[689] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 48, p. 59. 

[690] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. V, Liber XIII, XXXIII, p. 91. 

[691] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. V, Liber XIII, XXXIII, p. 105. 

[692] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 48, p. 62. 

[693] Delisle (1867), p. 29, citing Rot. Norm., p. 16. 

[694] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 54, p. 78. 

[695] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 49, p. 65. 

[696] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[697] Delisle (1867), p. 35, citing Cartulaire de Hambie, n. 170. 

[698] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[699] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[700] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[701] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[702] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[703] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[704] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 31, p. 34. 

[705] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[706] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[707] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[708] Lambert ‘Les anciens vicomtes de Bayeux’, p. 252. 

[709] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 15, p. 18, citing Gallia Christiana XI, instr. 12. 

[710] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 16, p. 17. 

[711] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, p. 40. 

[712] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 25, p. 28. 

[713] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXII, p. 278. 

[714] Delisle (1866), p. 186. 

[715] Delisle (1866), p. 186. 

[716] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCI, p. 199. 

[717] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[718] Lambert ‘Les anciens vicomtes de Bayeux’, p. 252. 

[719] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXII, p. 278. 

[720] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[721] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 236. 

[722] Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, Instrumenta ecclesiæ Bayocensis, XXXIX, col. 96. 

[723] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Saint-Etienne de Caen, 9, p. 271. 

[724] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, LXXXIII, p. 463. 

[725] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, p. 11, and Yorkshire, Northumberland, pp. 30 and 34. 

[726] Delisle (1867), p. 33, citing Cartulaire de Savigny, f. 52, n. 206. 

[727] Delisle (1867), p. 33, citing Cartulaire de Savigny, f. 52, n. 206. 

[728] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 49, p. 65. 

[729] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XIII, p. 17. 

[730] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 628. 

[731] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[732] Benedict of Peterborough, Vol. 1, 1173, p. 52.   

[733] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 49, p. 65. 

[734] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 54, p. 78. 

[735] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[736] Delisle (1867), p. 35, citing Cartulaire de Hambie, n. 170. 

[737] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[738] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 52, p. 70. 

[739] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 3, p. 140. 

[740] Delisle (1867), p. 33 footnote 6. 

[741] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 97. 

[742] Delisle (1867), p. 37, citing Rot. litt. pat., pp. 3 and 24. 

[743] Fontenay le Marmion, XIX, p. 16. 

[744] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[745] Rotuli Chartarum, 16 John, p. 207. 

[746] Delisle (1867), p. 39, citing Delisle, L. (1864) Recueil des jugements de l’échiquier de Normandie, p. 35, n. 137. 

[747] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[748] Delisle (1867), p. 39, citing Delisle, L. (1864) Recueil des jugements de l’échiquier de Normandie, p. 35, n. 137. 

[749] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[750] Delisle (1867), p. 39, citing Delisle, L. (1864) Recueil des jugements de l’échiquier de Normandie, p. 35, n. 137. 

[751] Delisle (1867), pp. 44-94. 

[752] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[753] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 52, p. 70. 

[754] Neustria Pia, p. 540. 

[755] Delisle (1867), p. 35, citing Cartulaire de Hambie, n. 170. 

[756] Delisle (1867), p. 35, citing Cartulaire de Hambie, n. 170. 

[757] Calvados (Anisy), Vol. I, Barberie, 70, p. 148. 

[758] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber II, Cap. XXVII, p. 320. 

[759] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber III, Cap. XXXIII, p. 362. 

[760] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber IV, Cap. XXVII, p. 407. 

[761] Guerrieri (1899), Diplomi e documenti, XVII, p. 83. 

[762] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXXVIII, p. 289. 

[763] ES III 698. 

[764] Domesday Translation, Hampshire, XXXI, p. 113. 

[765] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 44, p. 49. 

[766] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, XXVII, p. 152. 

[767] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[768] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1913), Vol. I, 150, p. 41. 

[769] Bricquebec, 19, p. 205. 

[770] Bricquebec, 19, p. 205. 

[771] Bricquebec, I, p. 189. 

[772] Dugdale Monasticon V, Melsa Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 394. 

[773] Round (1899) 971, p. 346. 

[774] Round (1899) 971, p. 346. 

[775] Round (1899) 971, p. 346. 

[776] Bricquebec, 3, p. 191. 

[777] Bricquebec, 6, p. 194. 

[778] Bricquebec, 19, p. 205. 

[779] Bricquebec, 20, p. 208. 

[780] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[781] Delisle (1867), p. 39, citing Delisle, L. (1864) Recueil des jugements de l’échiquier de Normandie, p. 35, n. 137. 

[782] Fontenay le Marmion, II, p. 2. 

[783] Bricquebec, 6, p. 194. 

[784] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[785] Bricquebec, 22, p. 210. 

[786] Fontenay le Marmion, Appendice, 1, p. 173. 

[787] Boutaric (1863), Tome I, Tome I, 1147, p. 105. 

[788] Boutaric (1863), Tome I, 1147, p. 105. 

[789] Fontenay le Marmion, Appendice, 2, p. 176. 

[790] Bricquebec, 40, p. 230. 

[791] Bricquebec, 68, p. 254. 

[792] Bricquebec, 6, p. 194. 

[793] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[794] Fontenay le Marmion, Appendice, 2, p. 176. 

[795] Fontenay le Marmion, LVI, p. 75. 

[796] Fontenay le Marmion, LIX, p. 82. 

[797] Fontenay le Marmion, LVI, p. 75. 

[798] Fontenay le Marmion, CXXVI, p. 170. 

[799] Fontenay le Marmion, LVI, p. 75. 

[800] Fontenay le Marmion, XXXII and XXXIII, pp. 30 and 32. 

[801] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[802] Bricquebec, 17, p. 203. 

[803] Veterum Scriptorum I, col. 986. 

[804] Bricquebec, 20, p. 208. 

[805] Boutaric (1863), Tome I, 1147, p. 105. 

[806] Bricquebec, 38, p. 228. 

[807] Fontenay le Marmion, Appendice, 2, p. 176. 

[808] Bricquebec, 40, p. 230. 

[809] Bricquebec, 61, p. 247. 

[810] Bricquebec, 68, p. 254. 

[811] Bricquebec, 36, p. 226. 

[812] Bricquebec, 61, p. 247. 

[813] Bricquebec, 68, p. 254. 

[814] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[815] Bricquebec, 83, p. 266. 

[816] Bricquebec, 100, p. 278. 

[817] Delachenal (1910), Tome I, p. 33. 

[818] Fontenay le Marmion, Introduction, p. xxx footnote 3, quoting Archives nationales, X ic 43.  

[819] Bricquebec, 117, p. 302. 

[820] Bricquebec, 74, p. 262. 

[821] Bricquebec, 100, p. 278. 

[822] Neustria Pia, p. 617. 

[823] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXVII, p. 353. 

[824] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298. 

[825] Neustria Pia, p. 617. 

[826] Neustria Pia, p. 617. 

[827] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (1956), Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXVII, p. 353. 

[828] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298. 

[829] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 30, p. 33. 

[830] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 41, p. 45. 

[831] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, IX, p. 108. 

[832] Domesday Descendants, p. 496, citing Cart. Boxgrove, no. 4, Gallia Christiana, XI, Inst. 224ff. 

[833] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCI, p. 199. 

[834] Domesday Descendants, p. 496. 

[835] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 238. 

[836] Domesday Descendants, p. 496, citing Cart. Boxgrove, no. 4, Gallia Christiana, XI, Inst. 224ff. 

[837] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, VI, p. 646. 

[838] Domesday Descendants, p. 496. 

[839] Domesday Descendants, p. 496, citing Cart. Boxgrove, no. 4, Gallia Christiana, XI, Inst. 224ff. 

[840] Domesday Descendants, p. 497. 

[841] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DCLXXIX, p. 298. 

[842] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi. 

[843] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi. 

[844] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi, charter quoted but no source reference. 

[845] Dugdale Monasticon V, Roche Abbey, Yorkshire XII, p. 505. 

[846] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[847] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi. 

[848] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[849] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[850] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi. 

[851] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 30. 

[852] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[853] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[854] Rotuli de Liberate, 5 John, p. 55. 

[855] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 163. 

[856] RHGF, Tome XVII, p. 57. 

[857] Rotuli Chartarum, 17 John, p. 220. 

[858] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 17 John, p. 175. 

[859] CP VII 672 footnote a, citing Rot. Lit. Claus. Vol. I, p. 597 [not yet consulted]. 

[860] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, pp. ccxxx-i, no source reference. 

[861] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 30. 

[862] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 33. 

[863] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[864] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[865] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi, charter quoted but no source reference. 

[866] RHGF, Tome XVII, p. 57. 

[867] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 173. 

[868] Dugdale Monasticon V, Forde Abbey, Devonshire I, pp. 379 and 381. 

[869] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 33. 

[870] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. II (1835), XLIII, p. 390. 

[871] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 67. 

[872] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1385. 

[873] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 71, p. 50. 

[874] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi, charter quoted but no source reference. 

[875] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 30. 

[876] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 59. 

[877] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[878] Rotuli de Liberate, 3 John, p. 13. 

[879] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. ccxxxi, charter quoted but no source reference. 

[880] Rotuli de Liberate, 5 John, p. 91. 

[881] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 101, p. 89. 

[882] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 76. 

[883] Vincent (2013), Appendix of Charters, 7, p. 115. 

[884] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 5 John, p. 36. 

[885] Rotuli de Liberate, 5 John, pp. 78 and 82.