FRANCE, CAPETian kings

  v3.0 Updated 30 May 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                KINGS OF FRANCE (CAPET) 3

A.         KINGS OF FRANCE 888-898 and 922-936. 3

B.         DUCS des FRANCS 936-987. 13

C.        KINGS OF FRANCE 987-1328. 18

Chapter 2.                KINGS OF FRANCE (VALOIS) 89

A.         COMTES de VALOIS, KINGS of FRANCE 1328-1498. 89

B.         DUCS d'ORLEANS, KINGS of FRANCE 1515-1589. 113

C.        COMTES et DUCS d'ALENÇON.. 125

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The Capetian kings first ruled France from 888 to 898 and from 922 to 923.  The dynasty established itself more permanently in 987, when Hugues "Capet" was elected king in succession to the last king of the Carolingian dynasty, Louis V.  According to Pinoteau, the name "Capet" was first attributed to the dynasty by Ralph de Diceto writing in London in [1200], maybe because of the position of the early kings as lay abbots of St Martin of Tours, where part of the "cappa" of the saint was allegedly conserved[1].  The name appears never to have been applied officially to the family of the French kings, which was referred to in primary sources as "la maison de France" from the end of the 13th century, representing chronological continuity from the earlier Merovingian and Carolingian dynasties[2].  Nevertheless, the name "Capet" provides a convenient epithet for modern historians to describe the dynasty. 

 

The Capetian dynasty has been studied widely and needs little introduction.  However, one of the intriguing puzzles remains its origin, discussed below under Robert "le Fort".  Doubt also remains about the origins of the wives of four heads of the family in the 9th and 10th centuries, including three Capetian kings: the wives of Robert "le Fort" (died 866), King Eudes (died 898), King Robert I (died 923), and King Hugues "Capet" (died 996). 

 

The younger branches of the dynasty quickly expanded and their political influence extended across Europe.  The brothers of Hugues "Capet" King of France were installed as dukes of Burgundy from 956 to 1002, and Robert younger son of Robert II King of France established the main line of dukes which ruled Burgundy from 1032 until 1361 (see the document BURGUNDY DUCHY, DUKES), as well as the kings of Portugal from [1095] until the revolution in 1910 (see PORTUGAL KINGS).  Hugues, younger son of Henri I King of France, married the heiress of the counties of Vermandois, Valois and Crépy, which his descendants continued to rule until 1213 when they reverted to the French crown (see NORTHERN FRANCE NOBILITY).  Robert, son of Louis VI King of France, was installed as Seigneur de Dreux in 1152 and his descendants in the male line ruled as Comtes de Dreux et de Braine from 1184 until [1355], the two counties being sold to the French crown in 1377 (see PARIS REGION NOBILITY).  The line of Dreux also provided dukes of Brittany from 1213 until 1514, when the duchy fell to the French crown (see BRITTANY).  Robert's brother Pierre married the heiress of the seigneurie de Courtenay (see PARIS REGION NOBILITY), although his most prominent descendants were Latin emperors of Constantinople from 1216 until 1261 (see CONSTANTINOPLE LATIN EMPIRE).  Robert, younger son of Louis VIII King of France, was installed as comte d'Artois in 1237, his descendants ruling the county until 1329 (see NORTHERN FRANCE NOBILITY), as well as the county of Eu from 1351 to 1472 (see NORMANDY NOBILITY).  Robert's younger brother Charles was invested as king of Sicily by Pope Clement IV in 1265, his descendants continuing to rule in southern Italy until 1435 (see SICILY KINGS) and in Hungary from 1301 to 1387 (see HUNGARY KINGS).  Robert, son of Louis IX King of France, was created Comte de Clermont in 1269, and inherited the seigneurie de Bourbon, by right of his wife, in 1287 (see PARIS REGION NOBILITY).  His descendants were created dukes of Bourbon in 1327 (see BOURBON), and provided the kings of France from 1589 (their descendants fall outside the chronological scope of Medieval Lands).  The Valois dynasty of French kings, sub-dynasty of the Capet dynasty, descended from Charles Comte de Valois, younger son of Philippe III King of France (see Chapter 2), younger branches of which provided later dukes of Burgundy (see BURGUNDY DUCHY, DUKES), kings of Navarre (see NAVARRE KINGS), Dukes of Anjou (and titular kings of Sicily) (see ANJOU), and Comtes and Dukes of Alençon (see Chapter 2.C). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    KINGS OF FRANCE (CAPET)

 

 

 

A.      KINGS OF FRANCE 888-898 and 922-936

 

 

ROBERT "le Fort", son of --- ([815/30]-killed in battle Brissarthe 2 Jul 866).  Robert’s birth date range is estimated assuming that his known sons were born in [850/60] as shown below.  The parentage of Robert "le Fort" is obscure.  Some general indications of his origin are found in near contemporary sources, but these are contradictory.  An unspecific Franconian origin is favoured by the Annales Xantenses which name him “Ruodbertus…ortus de Francia, dux Karoli” when recording his death[3], and by Widukind who refers to his son King Eudes as “ex orientalibus Francia[4].  A Saxon origin is suggested by two sources: firstly, Richer names “ex equestre ordine Rotbertum” as father of King Eudes and his “avum…paternum Witichinum advenam Germanum[5]; secondly, the Miracula Sancti Benedicti names “Robertus, Andagavensis comes, Saxonici generis vir[6].  Abbon refers to his son Eudes King of France as "Neustrien…fils de la Neustrie"[7].  Other early sources specifically state that nothing is known of the origins of Robert, for example Rodulphus Glaber ("cuius genus…oscurum")[8].  The possible identity of Robert’s mother is suggested by the charter dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege" under which "Robertus…beati Martini abbas…et comes" confirmed donations to Tour Saint-Martin made "olim…ab Odone quondam comite Aurelianensi avunculo nostro et Willelmo eius filio"[9].  However, there are two possible interpretations of the dating clause of this document.  If it refers to Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, whose reign is normally dated from the death of his father in Jun 840, the year would be [867] the year after Robert "le Fort" died.  Another possibility is that the clause refers to Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, in which case the year would be 920, indicating that the donor was the future Robert I King of France, rather than Robert "le Fort", although this would not change the significance of the relationship described ("avunculus" could also have been used in the document in the sense of "great-uncle").  As discussed further below, Anatole de Barthélemy uses this document as part of his argument for identifying Guillaume Comte de Blois as the father of Robert "le Fort".  However, "avunculus" in its strict sense indicates "maternal uncle" and, while the terms "patruus" (paternal uncle) and "avunculus" (maternal uncle) are frequently used interchangeably in contemporary primary source documentation, it is possible that the relationship was through a sister of the two brothers Eudes Comte d’Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois, who could have been the mother of Robert "le Fort".  If this is correct, he would have been Robert "le Fort", son of --- & his wife ---.  It should be emphasised that this hypothesis is speculative.  Another possibility is that, assuming that the donor was the future Robert I King of France as suggested, the relationship could have been through his mother, the wife of Robert "le Fort", who could have been the niece of the brothers Eudes Comte d’Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois. 

Four more specific suggestions about Robert’s paternal ancestry have been made: 

Firstly, many modern secondary sources identify him as Robert [Rodbert], son of Rodbert Graf im Wormsgau & his wife Wiltrud ---, who was first named in Germany in 836 as "son of the late Rodbert Graf von Wormsgau", in a donation to Mettenheim[10].  No primary source has yet been found which points specifically towards this suggested co-identity, although it is consistent with the Franconian origin referred to by the Annales Xantenses and by Widukind, as noted above.  It is assumed that the suggestion is based primarily on onomastics, although the first secondary source which proposed the connection has not yet been identified and therefore has not been checked.  The author in question may have assumed that Robert was a unique name among noblemen in France in the first half of the 9th century, although this ignores Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry, who was the possible brother of the wife of Pepin I King of Aquitaine (see the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY).  The timing of the supposed arrival of Robert from Franconia, assuming that the co-identity is correct, is not ideal either.  Robert would presumably have fled Germany after opting to support Charles II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks in the latter’s fight against his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche” King of the East Franks.  This dispute is dated to 858/59: King Ludwig invaded in Aug 858, when King Charles was faced with widespread rebellion, and was defeated in Jan 859.  However, Robert "le Fort" is already named as missus in Maine, Anjou and Touraine in Nov 853, in a document issued by King Charles II (see below), unless of course this document refers to Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau, which is not impossible. 

Secondly, there is a possible connection between Robert "le Fort" and the family of Aledramn [I] Comte de Troyes, who died in [852] (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY).  Such indications are provided by Regino who names "Waltgerius comes, nepos Odonis regis, filius scilicet avunculi eius Adalhelmi in Aquitanien" when recording his battle against "Ramnulfum et fratrem eius Gozbertum et Ebulonem abbatum de sancto Dionysio " in Jul 892, and names "Megingaudus comes, nepos supradicti Odonis regis [son of Robert "le Fort"]" when recording his death, also in 892[11].  A further indication is found in the charter dated 14 Sep 937, under which Robert "le Fort"‘s grandson "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux" to Tours Saint-Martin, specifying that he had inherited the property from "comte Aledramnus" who had been granted it by Charlemagne[12].  It should be noted, however, that all these sources would be consistent with the family connection between Robert "le Fort" and Adalhelm being through the female line, or even through Robert’s wife. 

Thirdly, an interesting possibility is indicated by Europäische Stammtafeln which names the first wife of Comte Robert as "[Agane]"[13].  It cites no corresponding primary source, but presumably the suggestion is based on the Miraculis Sancti Genulfi which names "Agana filia…Byturicensium comes…Wifredus [et]…Oda coniux" as wife of "Roberto viro primoque palatii Pipini regis"[14].  This "Roberto" can probably be identified as Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry, the supposed brother of the wife of Pepin I King of Aquitaine (this relationship is referred to by Settipani, but he neither quotes nor cites the corresponding source[15]).  Could it be possible therefore that he was the same person as Robert "le Fort"?  If this was the case, it would be consistent with the Saxon origin which is suggested by Richer and by the Miracula Sancti Benedicti (see above).  The supposed father of Robert de Sesseau was Theodebert Comte de Madrie who, it is suspected, was related to the family of Nibelung and Childebrand (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY).  The Saxon connection of the latter family is suggested by the name Theoderic (nine different individuals named Theoderic have been identified in the family), which was first recorded in Saxony in the family of Widukind by Einhard in 782 (see the document SAXONY). 

Fourthly, Anatole de Barthélemy suggests that Robert was the son of Guillaume Comte de Blois, who was killed in battle in Jun 834 (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY)[16].  This suggestion was accepted by René Merlet[17].  Barthélemy bases his theory on the exchange of property in the county of Blois made by Comte Robert dated 865 (see below), concluding that Robert "avait son principal établissement à Blois…en pleine Neustrie, ce qui confirme singulièrement l’allégation d’Abbon" (who refers to Robert’s Neustrian origin, see above)[18].  Barthélemy also quotes a charter under which "Robertus…beati Martini abbas…et comes" confirmed donations to Tour Saint-Martin made "olim…ab Odone quondam comite Aurelianensi avunculo nostro et Willelmo eius filio", dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege"[19].  As noted above, the dating clause of this document may either refer to King Charles II "le Chauve" or to Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, in the latter case the donor being the future Robert I King of France not Robert "le Fort", although this would not change the significance of the relationship described ("avunculus" could also have been used in the document in the sense of "great-uncle").  As discussed further above, the term "avunculus" reminds us that the relationship, as described in this charter, could also have been through a sister of the two brothers Eudes Comte d’Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.  

Whatever the truth about Robert’s parentage, his career in France is recorded with certainty from 853, although Merlet suggests that he was named in a charter dated I Oct 845[20]:  Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks restored property to Hincmar Archbishop of Reims which he had previously granted to his supporters, including property granted to "…Rotbertus…", by charter dated 1 Oct 845[21].  This co-identity is not beyond doubt.  A document issued by King Charles II "le Chauve" dated Nov 853 names "Dodo episcopus, Hrotbertus et Osbertus" as missi in "Cinnomannio, Andegavensi, atque Turonico, Corboniso, et Sagiso"[22].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Pippinus" joined with "Rotberto comiti et Britonibus" in 859[23], which suggests that Robert had earlier rebelled against King Charles II in Brittany.  Robert submitted to the king's authority, when he was given command of the march of Neustria, which had been confiscated from the Rorgonid family for supporting the revolt of Louis (later King Louis II) against his father[24]Regino records that King Charles II "le Chauve" invested "Rodberto comiti" with "ducatum inter Ligerim et Sequanam adversum Brittones" in 861[25].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rodbertus" attacked "Salomone duce" [duke of Brittany] in 862[26].  The Annales record that King Charles’s son, the future King Louis II "le Bègue", rebelled against his father in 862 and, heading an army of Bretons, defeated "Rotbertum patris fidelem" in 862, after which he burned Angers yet again[27]Count in the march of Anjou [862/63]:  the creation of the "march" of Anjou is probably dated to the early 860s, as the Annales Bertiniani name "Rodberto, qui marchio in Andegavo fuerat" in 865[28].  This change of jurisdictional status must have been insufficient to control the Bretons and the Vikings because Robert is named in the Annales Bertiniani in 865 in the context of King Charles imposing direct rule in the area by sending "Hludowicum filium suum" into "Neustriam" and granting him "comitatum Andegavensem et abbatiam Maioris-monasterii et quasdam villas illi", while recording that Robert was compensated with "comitatum Autissiodorensem et comitatum Nivernensem".  "Le comte Robert" donated "certains biens…situés dans le comté de Blois, dans la viguerie d’Averdon au village dit Gabrium et faisant partie du domaine de Saint-Lubin" to Actard Bishop of Nantes in exchange for other property "situés au même lieu et dépendant aussi du domaine de Saint-Lubin" by charter dated May 865[29].  Merlet suggests that this charter indicates that Robert "le Fort" was Comte de Blois at the time[30].  However, another possibility is that the county indicated was the "march of Anjou" to which Robert had been appointed count some years before (see above).  Comte d'Auxerre and Comte de Nevers 865.  The Annales Bertiniani name "Rodbertus et Odo" as "præfecti" in the Seine valley area in 866 when recording that they repelled the Vikings who had sailed up river as far as "castrum Milidunum"[31].  "Odo" is presumably identified as Eudes Comte de Troyes, who died 1 Aug 871 (see CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY) and who, according to René Merlet, may have been the brother of Robert "le Fort"[32].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rotbertum et Ramnulfum, Godtfridum quoque et Heriveum comites" were defeated by the Vikings at "Brieserta" in 866, where Robert was killed[33].  The Adonis Continuatio records that "Robertus quoque atque Ramnulfus…inter primos ipsi priores" were killed by the Vikings in 866[34]

The name of Comte Robert's wife or wives is not known, but there are indications that he married more than once, maybe three times.  One possibility can be dismissed immediately: one passage in the Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Regine, que cum esset iuvencula fuit concubina Karoli Magni iam senioris" as wife of "Roberti Fortis marchionis"[35].  This is chronologically impossible as Regina must have been born in [785] at the latest (the birth of her older son is recorded in 801), and therefore was far too old to have been Robert’s wife.  Three possibilities remain: 

[m [firstly] ---.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[36], the first wife of Comte Robert was "[Agane]".  The primary source on which this is based is not noted, but as stated above, it is probably the Miraculis Sancti Genulfi which names "Agana filia…Byturicensium comes…Wifredus [et]…Oda coniux" as wife of "Roberto viro primoque palatii Pipini regis"[37].  As discussed above, this would mean that Robert "le Fort" was the same person as Robert Seigneur [comte] à Sesseau en Berry.  If this co-identity is correct, Agane would have been too old to have been the mother of the recorded children of Robert "le Fort".  It would therefore be consistent for her to have been Robert’s first wife.] 

[m [secondly] ---.  If the theories relating to Robert’s possible first and third marriages are correct as set out in the present document, the chronology dictates that the wife who was the mother of his children, born in [850/60], must have been a different person.  There is no indication who she might have been, apart from the charter dated 20 Feb "anno XXVII regnante domino Carolo…rege" which is discussed above.  If, in accordance with one of the possibilities suggested above, the dating clause in this document refers to the reign of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, the donor must have been the future Robert I King of France.  In this case, the relationship "avunculus" described in the document could have been through the donor’s mother, the wife of Robert "le Fort" which, if correct, would mean that Robert’s second wife could have been the niece of the brothers Eudes Comte d’Orléans and Guillaume Comte de Blois.] 

[m [thirdly] ---.  Some secondary works[38] assert that the wife of Robert was Adelais [de Tours], widow of Conrad Comte de Paris et d'Auxerre [Welf], daughter of Hugues Comte de Tours & his wife Ava ---.  If this is correct, Adelais must have been Comte Robert's second or third wife as Conrad died after 862, by which date Robert's known children were already born.  The assertion appears to be based on the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon which names "duo filii Rotberti Andegavorum comitis, frs Hugonis abbatis, senior Odo…Robertus alter"[39], "Hugonis abbatis" being the son of Conrad Comte de Paris and assuming that "frs" is an abbreviation for "fratres".  Settipani states that the passage is a 12th century interpolation and has little historical value, although he does suggest that it is likely that the wife of Comte Robert was a close relation of Adelais (without providing the reasoning for his statement)[40].  A family connection between Comte Robert and Conrad Comte de Paris is also suggested by the former being invested with the county of Auxerre in 865, after this county was confiscated from the latter (as recorded by Hincmar[41]), on the assumption that there was some basis of heredity behind the transmission of counties in France at that time (which is probable, but remains unproven). 

Comte Robert & his [second] wife had three children:

1.         EUDES [Odo] (in Neustria [after 852][42]-La Fère-sur-Oise 3 Jan 898)Herimannus names "Odo filius Roudperti" when recording his assuming power in "Gallia usque ad Ligerim et in Aquitania" after the death of Emperor Karl III[43].  The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Odonem ducem Aquitanio" succeeded as king of France, stating that he was "filius Raimundi comitis Lemovicensis"[44], although it is not known on what information this may be based.  He succeeded his father in 866 as Marquis en Neustrie, but was dispossessed in 868 by Charles II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks in favour of Hugues l’Abbé.  He was created Comte de Paris 882-83, after unsuccessfully challenging Hugues l’Abbé for his inheritance.  Abbot of Saint-Martin de Tours:  “Odo...comes et...abbas...Sancti Martini” returned property in Italy “Solarium...et Vallem Caumoniam” to the abbey by charter dated Apr 886, subscribed by “Ademari comitis, Attonis vicecomitis...[45].  "Eudes…comme abbé de Saint-Martin" exchanged "la villa de Marsat en Auvergne et la villa…Dronius" for "les villæ…Balneacum et Vineas situées en Berri dans le vicaria Corboninse" with Frothaire Archbishop of Bourges by charter dated May 886[46].  He was finally invested as Marquis de Neustrie in Sep 886, following the death during the siege of Paris of Duke Heinrich (who was ancestor of the "alte" Babenberg family, see the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY) to whom Emperor Charles II had granted the territories of Robert “le Fort” on the death of Hugues l’Abbé earlier in the same year[47].  "Odo Parisiorum pagi…comes" donated land at Fontenay, Charenton to Notre-Dame by charter dated to before 888, subscribed by "Roberti comitis, Altmari comitis"[48].  He was acclaimed as EUDES King of France 29 Feb 888.  He was consecrated king at Compiègne by the Archbishop of Sens.  King Eudes defeated the Normans at Montfaucon-en-Argonne 24 Jun 888, after which he was recognised as king by Arnulf King of the East Franks who sent royal insignia for a second consecration at Reims 13 Nov 888[49].  He was succeeded by the Carolingian Charles III "le Simple", who had been consecrated as anti-king at Reims 28 Jan 893, as recorded in the agreement reached in 897 between the two adversaries after Eudes defeated Charles[50].  The Annales Prumienses record the death "898 III Non Ian" of "Odo rex"[51].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Jan" of "Odo rex"[52]m as her first husband, THEODERADA, daughter of --- (-18 Oct [after 900]).  "Odo…rex" confirmed the possessions of "monasterio Vedastino" by charter dated 21 May [891/92] which names "coniux nostra Theoderada"[53].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[54], she was Theoderada, [daughter of Adelramn [II]].  The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  Settipani says that it has no historical basis[55].  Nevertheless, Theoderic, supposed son of Adelramn [II], was a strong supporter of King Eudes, as recorded in the Annales Vedastini[56], which is best explained by a family connection: if the relationship is correct, he would have been Theoderada’s brother.  She married secondly Otto.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the Kalendarium Sanctæ Mariæ Virdunensis, which records the death "XIV Kal Jul" of "Otto comes venerabilis qui dedit fratribus Haraudi montem, Bresadi villam, Samepodium"[57], read together with the necrology of Verdun Cathedral which records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Theudrada regina et postea sancti monialis qui cum viro suo Hattone dedit fratribus Haraldi montem"[58].  These two sources make it clear that "viro suo Hattone" named in the second cannot refer to Eudes King of France, who would not have been called "Otto comes" in the first.  King Eudes & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         children .  King Eudes refers to his unnamed children in 889 according to Settipani, who does not cite the primary source on which this is based[59]

b)         [RAOUL ([882]-after 898).  He is named as son of King Eudes in Europäische Stammtafeln[60] but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  King of Aquitaine.] 

c)         [ARNOUL ([885]-898).  The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "filius eius Arnulfus" succeeded on the death of his father "Francorum…rege Odone" but lived only a short time[61].  This is the only source so far identified which mentions Arnoul.] 

d)         [GUY [Wido] .  "Alanus" [Duke of Brittany] signed a charter dated 28 Aug 903 witnessed by "…Guido filius Ottonis regis Franciæ qui tunc erat cum Alano"[62].  According to Settipani, the charter is a forgery[63].] 

2.         ROBERT ([860]-killed in battle near Soissons 15 Jun 923).  "Rodbertum fratrem Odonis regis" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[64].  He was elected ROBERT I King of France in 922.   

-        see below

 

 

ROBERT, son of ROBERT "le Fort" Comte [de Tours], Marquis en Neustrie & his [second] wife --- ([860]-killed in battle near Soissons 15 Jun 923).  "Rodbertum fratrem Odonis regis" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[65].  He was installed as lay abbot of Marmoutier on the death of Hugues l’Abbé in 886[66].  He succeeded his brother in 888 as Marquis en Neustrie, and probably also as Comte de Paris, d'Orléans et de Tours.  After his brother King Eudes captured Poitou in 893, he installed Robert as Comte de Poitou but the latter was expelled by Adémar, son of Comte Emenon[67].  Abbot of Saint-Martin de Tours:  "Robert abbé de Saint-Martin" confirmed possessions of Saint-Martin de Tours by charter dated 30 Aug 894[68].  Eudes King of France granted the abbey of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers to the bishop of Poitiers, at the request of "marchiones…Hrobertus…atque Ademarus", by charter dated to [894][69].  After the death of his brother in 898, Robert supported Charles III King of France who seems to have confirmed Robert's position in Neustrie.  “Rotbertus...beati Martini abba...et comes” restored “cellulæ...Sancti Clementis”, previously donated by “predecessor noster domnus Odo germanus noster...tunc abbas deinde Francorum rex”, to Saint-Martin by charter dated 13 Sep 900, subscribed by “...Attonis vicecomitis, Guarnegaudi vicecomitis, Fulconis vicecomitis, Rainaldi vicecomitis...[70].  He rebelled against the king in 922, triggered by the confiscation of the monastery of Chelles by King Charles from Rothilde (who was the mother-in-law of Robert's son Hugues) in favour of his favourite Haganon.  He was elected ROBERT I King of France 22 Jun 922, consecrated at Reims by Gauthier Archbishop of Sens.  Flodoard records in 922 that "Franci" elected “Rotbertum seniorem” who was invested “Remis apud Sanctum Remigium ab episcopis et primatibus regni[71].  King Robert was killed fighting ex-King Charles, although his forces won the battle: Flodoard records in 923 that "Karolus cum suis Lothariensibus" crossed “Mosam...ad Atiniacum...et...super Axonam” where he lost the battle near Soissons in which “Rotbertus...rex” was killed[72].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Rotbertus rex"[73].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Magloire records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Robertus rex"[74].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records that "Rotbertus rex" was killed in battle 15 Jun[75]

m firstly ---.  The name of Robert's first wife is not known.  However, as King Robert's known wife Béatrix de Vermandois could not have been the mother of his daughter Adela (married to the brother of Béatrix) it is assumed that this earlier marriage is correct.   According to Europäische Stammtafeln[76], Robert's first wife was named AELIS.  This may be based on the 21 May 907 donation of Rebais abbey to the church of Paris which refers to "comitis Rotberti et Adele comitisse"[77].  However, as shown below, this is more likely to refer to Robert and his daughter than to his wife. 

m secondly ([897]) BEATRIX de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [I] Comte de Vermandois & his wife --- ([880/83]-after 26 Mar 931).  The Historia Francorum Senonensis records that "sororem Herberti" was the wife of "Robertus princeps" who rebelled against Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks[78].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodbertus dux” married “sororem Herberti” by whom he had “Hugonem Magnum[79].  "Hugo rector Abbatiæ sancti Martini" names "genitoris nostri Rotberti quondam regis ac genitricis nostræ domnæ Beatricis" in his charter dated 26 Mar 931[80].  The marriage date is estimated by Werner on the assumption that the marriage accompanied the political reconciliation between Beatrix's father and Robert's uncle[81].  If the 907 donation mentioned above in fact refers to Robert's first wife, his marriage to Beatrix would of course have taken place after that date. 

King Robert I & his first wife had one child:

1.         [ADELA] (before 898-).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to "comitis Heriberti gener…Roberti" and in a later passage to the sister of "dux Hugo Cappatus" as the wife of "comitis Heriberti de Peroni, Campanie et Veromandie" but does not name her[82].  Her origin is confirmed by Flodoard naming "Hugo dux cum nepotibus suis, Heriberti filiis" in 943[83].  Her birth date is estimated from the birth of her first child in [915].  Her name is deduced as follows.  The 21 May 907 donation of Rebais abbey to the church of Paris refers to "comitis Rotberti et Adele comitisse"[84].  Although this phrasing usually indicates husband and wife, Settipani suggests that the chronology of the life of King Robert's son Hugues (attested as Robert's son by his second wife Beatrix) favours his birth, and therefore his father's second marriage, well before 907, which would mean "Adele" could not have been Robert's wife.  This reasoning appears based firstly on Hugues already being married in [914], and secondly on the probability of his having reached the age of majority when he was recognised as duke in 922.  The 907 document is therefore explained as referring to Robert and his elder daughter.  The issue, however, is not beyond doubt, especially if the document in question was misdated.  m (before 21 May 907) HERIBERT II Comte de Vermandois, son of HERIBERT I Comte de Vermandois[-Carolingian] & his wife [Liedgardis] --- ([880]-23 Feb 943, bur Saint Quentin). 

King Robert I & his [first/second] wife had one child:

2.         EMMA (-2 Nov 934).  Flodoard names "Emma regis Rotberti filia" when recording that she obliged Seulf Archbishop of Reims to consecrate her as queen at Reims in 923 in the absence of her husband fighting[85].  Rodulfus Glaber names "Emmam…sororem…magni Hugonis" as wife of "Rodulfus, Richardi ducis Burgundiæ filius", suggesting that she was instrumental in persuading her brother to support her husband's accession as king[86].  "Emme nostri imperii consortis" and "Emma coniux mea" is named in the charters of "Rodolfus Francorum rex" dated 21 Jun 931 and 1 Jul 931[87].  There is no indication whether Emma was born from her father's first or second marriage.  From a chronological point of view, it appears that both cases are possible.  Flodoard records the death of "Emma regina" at the end of his passage dated 934[88].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "IV Non Nov" of "domna Emma regina"[89]m ([911/19]) RODOLPHE [Raoul] Comte de Bourgogne, son of RICHARD “le Justicier” Duke of Burgundy & his wife Adélais d’Auxerre [Welf] (-Auxerre, Yonne 15/16 Jan 936, bur Abbaye de Sainte-Colombe de Sens).  Flodoard names "Rodulfo filio Richardi"[90].  He is named "Rodulfo rex filio meo" in the grant of "Adeleydis comitissa soror Rodulfi" to Cluny dated 14 Jun 929[91].  Rodulfus Glaber names "Rodulfus, Richardi ducis Burgundiæ filius"[92].  He succeeded his father in 921 as Duke of Burgundy.  He was elected as RAOUL King of France in 13 Jul 923 at Soissons to succeed his father-in-law, consecrated by Gauthier Archbishop of Sens at the abbey of Saint-Médard de Soissons.  Flodoard records in 923 that, after King Charles III had retreated "trans Mosam", “Rodulfum...regem...[filius Richardi]” was elected and consecrated “apud urbem Suessonicam[93].  Flodoard records in 936 (as the second report in that year) the death of “rex Rodulfus” and his burial “Senonis apud sanctam Columbam[94].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Rodulfo rege", specifying his burial "in basilica aanctæ Columbæ"[95].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 14 Jan of "Rodulphus rex"[96]

King Robert I & his second wife had one child: 

3.         HUGUES ([898]-Dourdan, Essonne 16 Jun 956, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Historia Francorum Senonensis names "Hugo Magnus" as son of "Robertus princeps [et] sororem Herberti"[97].  He was installed as HUGUES "le Grand" Duc des Francs in 936. 

-        see below, Part B

 

 

 

B.      DUCS des FRANCS 936-987

 

 

HUGUES “le Grand”, son of ROBERT I King of France & his second wife Beatrix de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([898]-Dourdan, Essonne 16 Jun 956, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rodbertus dux” married “sororem Herberti” by whom he had “Hugonem Magnum[98].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis names "Hugo Magnus" as son of "Robertus princeps [et] sororem Herberti"[99].  "Rodbertum fratrem Odonis regis, qui erat pater Hugonis postea Francorum ducus" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[100].  Rodulfus Glaber names "Hugo filius Rotberti, Parisiorum comitis", commenting on the obscurity of his ancestry[101].  He was recognised by the king as heir to his father’s lands in 914.  Flodoard records in 922 that, after King Charles III had returned [from “Lotharingia”] to Laon, "Hugo filius Rotberti" arrived “post pascha super Vidulam...ubi apud villam Finimas[102].  Flodoard records in 922 that "Rotbertus" sent “filium suum Hugonem” with an army of Franks “in regnum Lotharii...propter Capraemontum Gislberti castrum” where he relieved the siege led by King Charles and returned after accepting hostages “a quibusdam Lothariensibus[103].  He declined the succession to the throne of France on the death of his father in 923, when his brother-in-law Raoul Duke of Burgundy was elected king.  Abbot of Saint-Martin de Tours: "l’abbé Hugues" granted "la ville de Mons…dans le pays de Melun" to "la reine Emma sa sœur, fille du roi Robert" by charter dated 926[104].  On the death of King Raoul, Hugues once more declined the succession, instead negotiating the return from England of the Carolingian Prince Louis, son of King Charles III “le Simple”, who was his wife's nephew and whom he installed as King Louis IV.  Hugo rector Abbatiæ sancti Martini" names "genitoris nostri Rotberti quondam regis ac genitricis nostræ domnæ Beatricis" in a charter dated 26 Mar 931[105].  "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux", inherited from "comte Aledramnus", to Tours Saint-Martin by charter dated 14 Sep 937 which names "sa femme Havis"[106].  The position of power acquired by Hugues is confirmed by the title dux francorum/Duc des Francs used in charters dated 25 Jul 936 and 25 Dec 936[107], and the king's references to him as “notre second dans tous nos royaumes”.  Disputes between Hugues and the king quickly followed.  On the death of King Louis IV in 954, Hugues was confirmed as Duc des Francs.  He was granted lordship over Burgundy and Aquitaine[108].  He only succeeded in subjugating the former, succeeding Duke Giselbert as Duke of Burgundy in Apr 956.  The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death "XVI Kal Iul apud Drodingam villam" of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum" and his burial "in basilica beati Dyonisii martiris Parisius"[109].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVI Kal Jul" of "Hugo dux Francorum"[110].  The Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris records the death "XV Kal Jul" of "Hugo dux Francorum"[111].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 16 Jun of "Hugo comes"[112]

m firstly ([914]) [JUDITH] du Maine, daughter of ROGER Comte du Maine & his wife Rothilde [Carolingian] (before 900-925).  The marriage of Hugues Comte de Paris with the daughter of Roger Comte du Maine is deduced from Flodoard naming "Rothildis, amitæ suæ [regis Karoli], socrus autem Hugonis" when recording that the king deprived her of "abbatiam…Golam" [Chelles] in favour of his favourite Hagano, the context dictating that "Hugonis" was "Hugo filius Rotberti"[113].   The source which names her father has not yet been identified, but it appears reasonably certain from the sources quoted in the document MAINE that Rothilde's husband was Roger.  She is named Judith in Europäische Stammtafeln[114] but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.  According to Settipani her name is not known[115]

m secondly ([926]) EADHILD, daughter of EDWARD I "the Elder" King of Wessex & his second wife Ælfleda (-937).  Flodoard mentions, but does not name, "filiam Eadwardi regis Anglorum, sororem coniugis Karoli" when recording her marriage to "Hugo filius Rotberti" in 926[116].  William of Malmesbury names (in order) "Edfleda, Edgiva, Ethelhilda, Ethilda, Edgitha, Elfgiva" as the six daughters of King Eadweard and his wife "Elfleda", specifying that Ethilda married "Hugh".  The Book of Hyde names "Ethyldam" as fourth of the six daughters of King Edward by his first wife "Elfelmi comitis filia Elfleda", specifying that she married "pater Hugonis Capet"[117].  At the time of the couple's betrothal, her future husband sent sumptuous gifts to King Æthelstan, including spices, jewels, richly caparisoned horses, three holy relics and a gold crown[118]

m thirdly ([9 May/14 Sep] 937) HEDWIG of Germany, daughter of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde [Immedinger] ([922]-9 Jan [958 or after 965]).  "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux", inherited from "comte Aledramnus", to Tours Saint-Martin by charter dated 14 Sep 937 which names "sa femme Havis"[119].  Rodulfus Glauber names "sororem [=Otto] Haduidem" as wife of "Hugo dux Francorum cognomento Magnus"[120].  Flodoard refers to "sororem Othonis regis Transfhenensis, filiam Heinrici" as the wife of "Hugo princeps, filius Roberti", without naming her, recording their marriage in 938[121].  Flodoard also refers to "relicta Hugonis" as "amita Lotharius rex"[122].  The Annales Nivernenses record in 958 that "rex et mater sua et Ugo filius Ugonis et mater sua" attended a hearing "apud Marziacum vicum iuxta Nevernis…contra Guillelmum comitem Aquitaniæ post missa sancti Martini"[123].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Id Jan" of "Hadhuidis comitissa"[124]

Mistress (1): RAINGARDE [Ringare], daughter of ---.  The Historia Episcoporum Autissiodorensium names "Heribertus Francigena filius Hugonis Ducis cognomento Magni ex concubina Raingarda" as bishop of Auxerre from 971 to 995[125]

Duke Hugues & his [second/third] wife had one child:

1.         BEATRIX (-23 Sep 1003).  Flodoard refers to "Hugonis principis filiam" marrying "Fredericus, frater Adalberonis episcopi" in 954[126].  The Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium names "Beatricis, Hugonis Capitonis Francorum regis sororis" as wife of "ducis Frederici"[127].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "sororem [Otto filius Hugo rex…dux Burgundie]…Beatricem" as wife of "Fridericus dux Mosellanorum"[128].  There is no proof of the identity of the mother of Beatrix, although it is unlikely that she was the daughter of her father's first wife given the date of her marriage.  She acted as regent of Upper Lotharingia for her son Duke Thierry I from 978 to 987, taking an active part in the government of the duchy.  She intervened with her brother Hugues Capet over the capture of her son by French troops during the siege of Verdun in 985, and actively attempted to resolve the Franco/German conflict over Lotharingia by diplomatic means.  She was imprisoned in an abbey by her son, impatient to assume personal rule, but the Pope obliged him to release her.  She visited the monastery of Saint-Dié in 1003 with her family[129]m (Betrothed 951, [10 Sep/12 Nov] 954) FREDERIC Comte, son of WIGERICH [III] Graf im Bidgau, Pfalzgraf & his wife Cunegondis --- ([910/15]-[Jun/Jul] 978).  He was installed in 959 as FREDERIC I Duke of Upper Lotharingia.

Duke Hugues & his third wife had four children:

2.         HUGUES ([940]-villa "Les Juifs", near Prasville, Eure-et-Loire 24 Oct 996, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Rodulfus Glauber names "Hugoni, Parisiensis ducis filio…illius Magni Hugonis", specifying that his mother was "Ottone…sorore"[130].  He was elected HUGUES "Capet" King of France by an assembly of nobles at Senlis 29 May 987. 

-        see below

3.         EMMA ([943]-after 18 Mar 968).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage in 956 of "Richardus filius Guillelmi principis Normannorum" with "filiam Hugonis ducis", although she is not named[131].  Guillaume of Jumièges records the betrothal of “Hugo dux...filiam suam...Emmam” and “puerum Richardum”, with the consent of “Bernardi Silvanectensis”, and in a later passage their marriage[132].  No direct proof has yet been found that Emma was the daughter of her father's third marriage.  However, this is likely given that betrothals at the time normally took place when the female partner was still a child or in early adolescence.  Guillaume of Jumièges records the death without children of “Emma uxor eius filia Hugonis Magni[133]m (Betrothed 956, Rouen 960) as his first wife, RICHARD I “Sans Peur" Comte [de Normandie], GUILLAUME "Longuespée" Comte [de Normandie] & his first wife Sprota --- (Fécamp [932]-Fécamp 20 Nov 996, bur Fécamp).  Regent of France 956-960. 

4.         OTTON [Eudes] ([945]-23 Feb 965, bur Saint-Germain d’Auxerre).  The Historia Francorum Senonensis names (in order) "Hugo, Otto et Heinricus" as the three sons of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum…ex filia Odonis regis"[134].  Comte d’Auxerre.  On the death of his father-in-law in 956, Lothaire King of France installed Eudes as Duke of Burgundy at Beaune. 

-        DUKES of BURGUNDY.   

5.         EUDES [Odo] ([948]-Château de Pouilly-sur-Saône 15 Oct 1002, bur Auxerre).  The Historia Francorum Senonensis names (in order) "Hugo, Otto et Heinricus" as the three sons of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum…ex filia Odonis regis"[135].  Flodoard names "Hugonem et Oddonem clericum" as brothers of "Otto filius Hugonis", when he records that the rectores of Burgundy named them as his successors[136].  He adopted the name HENRI, and the title Duke of Burgundy

-        DUKES of BURGUNDY

Duc Hugues "le Grand" had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

6.          HERIBERT (-Château de Toucy 23 Aug[137] 996 or after, bur Church of Notre-Dame d'Auxerre)The Historia Episcoporum Autissiodorensium names "Heribertus Francigena filius Hugonis Ducis cognomento Magni ex concubina Raingarda", specifying that he died "apud castrum Tociacum"[138]Bishop of Auxerre 8 Jan 971, until 996 when he was replaced by "Joannes natione Autissiodorensis patre Ansaldo matre Raingarda"[139].  Bouchard speculates that Héribert's successor may therefore have been his uterine half-brother[140]

 

 

 

C.      KINGS OF FRANCE 987-1328

 

 

HUGUES, son of HUGUES “le Grand” Duc des Francs & his third wife Hedwig of Germany ([940]-villa "Les Juifs", near Prasville, Eure-et-Loire 24 Oct 996, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Historia Francorum Senonensis names (in order) "Hugo, Otto et Heinricus" as the three sons of "Hugo Magnus dux Francorum…ex filia Odonis regis"[141].  Flodoard names "Hugonem et Oddonem clericum" as brothers of "Otto filius Hugonis", when he records that the rectores of Burgundy named them as his successors[142].  Rodulfus Glauber names "Hugoni, Parisiensis ducis filio…illius Magni Hugonis", specifying that his mother was "Ottone…sorore"[143].  His father named Richard Comte [de Normandie] as Hugues's guardian in 956, the arrangement being confirmed by Richard's betrothal to the sister of Hugues.  The Annales Nivernenses record in 958 that "rex et mater sua et Ugo filius Ugonis et mater sua" attended a hearing "apud Marziacum vicum iuxta Nevernis…contra Guillelmum comitem Aquitaniæ post missa sancti Martini"[144].  He was installed as Duc des Francs/dux Francorum by Lothaire King of the West Franks in 960.  By 974, Hugues had become effective leader of France under King Lothaire, and headed the army which retook the kingdom of Lotharingia from Otto II King of Germany in 978[145].  He was elected HUGUES "Capet" King of France by an assembly of nobles at Senlis 29 May 987, after the death of Louis V King of France.  He was consecrated at Noyon 1 Jun 987.  Charles Duke of Lotharingia, the late king's uncle, opposed the accession of King Hugues.  He captured Laon in [May] 988, and Reims in [Aug/Sep] 989, with the help of his nephew Arnoul Archbishop of Reims, but was finally captured at Laon in 991[146].  The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the death in 998 of "Hugo rex" and his burial "in basilica beati Dyonisii martiris Parisius"[147].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IX Kal Nov" of "Hugo rex"[148]

m ([968]) ADELAIS [de Poitou, daughter of GUILLAUME III “Tête d'Etoupes” Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME I Comte de Poitou] & his wife Adela [Gerloc] de Normandie] ([950/55]-15 Jun [1004]).  There is some doubt about Adelais’s ancestry.  The 11th century Translatio S. Maglorii et aliorum names "Adelaide…filia Pictavorum comitis, de progenie Caroli Magni" as the wife of "Hugone, Francorum duce", clarifying that the latter refers to Hugues "Capet" King of France when it names "Roberto…rege, memorati ducis filio"[149].  This Poitevin origin is also suggested by Richer when he records that King Robert "ob nepotem suum Wilelmum" besieged "in Aquitania…Hildebertum"[150].  It is assumed that such a relationship between King Robert and Duke Guillaume would be through the king's mother as no family connection through his father has been established.  Some doubt about this supposed Poitevin ancestry is introduced by the Chronicle of Ademar de Chabannes which, on the other hand, recounts the dispute between "Dux Aquitanorum Willelmus" and King Hugues, as well as the subsequent peace agreed between the parties in 990, without mentioning that the duke was the king's brother-in-law[151], all the more surprising if the Poitevin origin is correct as Ademar concentrates on Poitevin affairs and also includes genealogical details in his narrative.  Another possible ancestry is suggested by Helgaud's Vita Roberti Regis which names "Rex Francorum Rotbertus…patre Hugone, matre Adhelaide", specifying that "ab Ausonis partibus descenderat"[152].  Settipani equates "Ausonia" with Rome or Italy[153], although no other reference to an Italian origin for Adelais has yet been identified.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "rex Francorum Robertus" as "superiorem regum Anglie soror"[154] but it is difficult to see to whom this could refer or how it could be correct.  The paucity of references in contemporary sources to the wife of Hugues Capet and her origin contrasts sharply with the frequent references to his mother and to the wives of his son King Robert II.  This suggests that the background of Queen Adelais may have been obscure and that her family had little political influence at the time, although this would be surprising as her husband was already enjoying a position of some power at the Carolingian court at the time of his marriage.  Maybe her family was prominent when the couple married but suffered a subsequent decline by the time her husband was elected king.  Nevertheless, an Aquitainian marriage would have fitted the political circumstances of the time.  After several decades of dispute between the Capet and Poitou families, a permanent peace appears to have been established from about the time the marriage took place[155].   The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Adelaidis regina"[156]

[Mistress (1): ---.  The name of King Hugues's possible mistress is not known.] 

King Hugues & his wife had three children:

1.         GISELA de France ([970][157]-).  The Chronique de Saint Riquier records that Hugues "Capet" King of France granted the château d'Abbeville "à un chevalier nommé Hugues" who had married the king's daughter "Gisèle"[158]m (before 987) HUGUES ---, son of --- (-4 Jul [1000]).  Hugues Capet King of France separated Abbeville, Ancre and Domart from the Abbaye de Saint-Riquier and gave them to Hugues, who was known as the avoué de Saint-Riquier[159].  These territories became the foundation of the county of Ponthieu. 

2.         HEDWIGE [Avoie] de France ([969][160]-after 1013).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Robertum regem et filiam Hadevidem…comitissam Hainonensium" as the children of King Hugues[161].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also names "soror regis Roberti Hadwidis" as wife of "Rainero comiti de Hainaco, fratri Lamberti comitis de Lovanio"[162].  Sigebert's Chronica records in 977 that "Raginerus" married "Hathuidem filiam Hugonis postea regis"[163].  "Comes Raginerus et Hathuidis coniux" are named in the Gesta of Gembloux Abbey[164].  Her brother gave her the towns of Couvin, Fraisne, Nîme, Eve and Bens [all now in Belgium] as her dowry on her marriage.  "Raginero comite…et Hathuidis coniunx eius" donated property at Gion to Gembloux by charter dated to [1013][165].  "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" took into his protection the abbey of Florennes founded by "Gerardus…in primis meus capellanus postea…Cameracensis episcopus effectus et fratres sui Godefridus et Arnulphus" by charter dated 1018, which refers to earlier donations of property by "comitissa Hawidis, annuentibus filiis suis comite Raginero et Lamberto"[166].  "Chuonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the foundation of Florennes abbey by charter dated 1033, which records among others the donation of "comitissa Hadegundis, annuentibus comite Raginero et Lamberto filiis suis…in Prona sita in pago Haynomensi"[167].  The identity of "comitissa Hawidis/Hadegundis", and therefore the existence of Lambert, supposed brother of Reginar [V] Comte de Hainaut, is not certain.  Hedwige, wife of Reginar [IV] Comte de Hainaut, is the most obvious candidate.  If this is correct, the donation must have been made after her husband's death in 1013 as he is not named in the document.  The other possibility is that the donor was the mother of Reginar [IV] Comte de Hainaut and his brother Lambert [I] Comte de Louvain.  However, the name of the wife of their father, Reginar [III] Graf im Maasgau, is recorded elsewhere as Adela (see BRABANT).  m ([996]) REGINAR IV Comte de Hainaut, son of REGINAR [III] Graf im Maasgau & his wife Adela [von Dachsburg] (after 947-1013). 

3.         ROBERT de France (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Robertum regem et filiam Hadevidem…comitissam Hainonensium" as the children of King Hugues[168].  He was consecrated Associate-King 25 Dec 987, Cathedral of Sainte-Croix d’Orléans.  He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France.   

-        see below

King Hugues had one possible illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

4.          [GAUCELIN (-Châtillon Priory 1030, bur Fleury).  Ademar refers to "abbatem Gauzlenum" being ordained at "sancti Benedicti" by "Rex Rotbertus".  The text continues by explaining that he was "nobilissimi Francorum principis filius manzer, a puero in monasterio sancti Benedicti nutritus", specifying that "rex supra scriptus [=Rotbertus]" later installed him as "archiepiscopum Bituricensibus" after the death of Archbishop Dagbert[169].  André de Fleury’s Vita Gauzlini records that “Gauzlinus” was “ex liberiori totius Galliæ stirpe fertur ingenuam genituram excepisse[170].  These oblique references have been interpreted as meaning that the father of Gauzlin was King Hugues "Capet"[171], although this is not beyond doubt.  Kerrebrouck also casts doubt on this assumed paternity of Gauzlin[172].  Abbot of Fleury [1005].  Archbishop of Bourges 1013.  André de Fleury’s Vita Gauzlini records the death of Gaucelin “Castellionis” and in a later passage his burial “Floriacum[173].] 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the family of the Capetian kings has not been established.  It is possible that he was related through the wife of King Hugues Capet. 

1.         INGO (-29 Jan 1026).  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records that “Ingo Abbas sancti Martini –aciacensis et sancti Germani Parisiensis, consanguineus…Regis” succeeded as abbot of “sancti Petri Vivi” in 1015[174].  The Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis records the death “1026 IV Kal Feb” of “Ingo Abbas[175]

 

 

ROBERT de France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais [de Poitou] (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Robertum regem et filiam Hadevidem…comitissam Hainonensium" as the children of King Hugues[176].  He was invested as associate-king with his father 25 Dec 987, consecrated 1 Apr 988 at the cathedral of Sainte-Croix in Orléans[177].  He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux"[178] King of France.  He claimed the duchy of Burgundy on the death of his paternal uncle Duke Henri in 1002, but took 12 years to complete its conquest in the face of opposition from Otto-Guillaume Comte de Mâcon[179].  After the death of Emperor Heinrich II in 1024, King Robert supported the rebels (led by Frédéric II Duke of Upper Lotharingia) opposed to King Konrad II but he refused the crown of Italy which they offered it to him.  Robert nevertheless sent troops to attack Metz, but was repulsed[180].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1031 of "rex Francorum Robertus"[181].  Rodolfus Glaber records the death of King Robert at Melun in July and his place of burial[182].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XII Kal Aug" of "Rotbertus rex"[183].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Aug" of "Rotbertus…Francorum rex"[184]

m firstly (988, before 1 Apr, repudiated [991/92]) as her second husband, ROZALA [Suzanne] di Ivrea, widow of ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, daughter of BERENGARIO II ex-King of Italy [Ivrea] & his wife Willa of Tuscany-Arles ([950/960]-13 Dec 1003 or 7 Feb 1004, bur Gent, church of the Abbey de Saint-Pierre du Mont-Blandin).  Regino records that two of the daughters (unnamed) of ex-King Berengario were brought up in the imperial palace by the empress after being brought to Germany[185].  One of these two daughters was presumably Rozala, bearing in mind that the emperor arranged her marriage.  The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Berengeri regis Langobardorum, Ruzelam quæ et Susanna" as wife of Comte Arnoul[186].  The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 950 and 968] of "Arnulfus iunior" and "filiam Beregeri regis Susannam"[187].  Her marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Otto to increase his influence in Flanders at a time when Lothaire IV King of the West Franks was asserting his own control over the county.  According to Nicholas, Count Arnoul II married Rozala di Ivrea when he reached the age of majority in 976[188], but the source on which this is based has not been located.  "Baldwinus marchysus cum matre sua Susanna" donated "villam Aflingehem…jacentem in pago Tornacinse" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, after the death of "Arnulfi marchysi", by charter dated 1 Apr 988, signed by "…Waldberto advocato, Theoderico comite, Arnulfo comite, Artoldo comite, Baldwino comite, item Arnulfo comite…"[189].  The Vita Sancti Bertulfi names "Rozala filia…Berengarii Regis Italiæ", specifying that "post mortem Arnulfi [Balduini filius] principis, Roberto Regi Francorum nupsit et Susanna dicta"[190].  Kerrebrouck, presumably basing his supposition on this passage from the Vita Sancti Bertulfi, says that she adopted the name Suzanne on her second marriage[191], but the sources quoted above show that she was referred to by this name earlier.  Hugues "Capet" King of France arranged her second marriage to his son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987[192].  She was given Montreuil-sur-Mer by the county of Flanders as her dowry on her second marriage.  Richer records that King Robert repudiated his wife "Susannam…genere Italicam eo quod anus esset" but refused to allow her to retake her castle at Montreuil, whereupon she constructed another nearby[193].  She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baldwin IV.  France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer.  "Susanna regina cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…Atingehem…et in Testereph" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "filie sue Mathildis", by charter dated 26 Jun 995[194].  "Susanna regina…cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…in pago Flandrensi…in Holtawa…in Fresnere…in Clemeskirca…in Jatbeka…in Sclefteta…" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jun 1003[195].  The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the death in 1003 of "Susanna regina"[196].  The Memorial of "regina Susanna" records her death "VII Feb"[197]

m secondly ([late 996/early 997], divorced Sep 1001) BERTHE of Burgundy, widow of EUDES I Comte de Blois et de Chartres, daughter of CONRAD I “le Pacifique” King of Burgundy [Welf] & his wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian] ([964/965]-16 Jan after 1010).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names "Berta filia Conradi regis Burgundiæ" as wife of "Odone comite Carnotensium"[198].  This origin is corroborated by Rodulfus Glauber who names "Odo natus ex filia Chuonradi regis Austrasiorum, Berta nomine"[199].  “Odo comes” restored “villam...Culturas” to Marmoutier, for the souls of “...domini Hugonis archiepiscopi, cujus ibi corpus...jacet”, by charter dated to [986], subscribed by “Berte comitissæ uxoris eius, majoris filii eius Teutboldi, filii eius Odonis adhuc in cunabulo[200].  Richer records that King Robert married "Berta Odonis uxor"[201].  “Berta...regina cum filiis meis Tetbaldo...episcopo nec non Odoni comitis” donated tonlieu over boats at Blois to Marmoutier by undated charter[202].  Pope Gregory V called on King Robert to repudiate his wife in 998 on grounds of consanguinity.  The request was repeated in 1001 by the court of Rome.  Robert at first refused and the kingdom of France was excommunicated[203].  "Bertæ reginæ, Odonis comitis filii eius…" subscribed the charter dated 1004 under which "Gislebertus prepositus" recorded a donation[204].  The king, in reaction to the 1108 assassination of his favourite Hugues de Beauvais who had served Queen Berthe, visited Rome in 1008 in an unsuccessful attempt to divorce his third wife in order to take back Berthe[205].  "Odonis comitis, Ermengardis uxoris eius, Bertæ reginæ…" subscribed the charter dated after 1005 under which "comitem Odonem" donated property "in comitatu Dunensi…Boscus Medius" to "Sancti Petri"[206].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVII Kal Feb" of "Berta mater Odonis comitis"[207]

m thirdly (after Sep 1001 before 25 Aug 1003) CONSTANCE d'Arles, daughter of GUILLAUME II “le Libérateur” Comte d’Arles [Provence] et Marquis & his second wife Adelais [Blanche] d’Anjou ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Historia Francorum names "Constantiam, filiam Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis, natam de Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of King Robert[208].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also names "Constantia filia fuit Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as wife of "Robertus rex"[209].  The Chronicon Hugonis names "Constantiam" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "cognatam Hugonis Autisiodorensis episcopi comitis Cabilonensis"[210].  This is presumably based on Rodulfus Glaber who states incorrectly that "Constantiam…filiam…prioris Willemi Aquitanie ducis" was wife of King Robert II, specifying that she was "cognatam" of Hugues Comte de Chalon Bishop of Auxerre[211].  The only relationship so far identified between the two is that Constance's maternal uncle, Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, was the second husband of the mother of Comte Hugues.  Rodulfus Glauber dates her marriage to "about the year 1000"[212].  The king attempted to separate from Constance in 1008 in order to take back his second wife, according to Rodulfus Glaber through the influence of "Hugo dictus Beluacensis"[213], but he restored Constance's royal prerogatives end-1009[214].  She opposed her husband's proposal to crown their second son Henri as associate king in 1026, supporting the candidature of her third son Robert[215].  She organised two revolts against King Robert, and another against her son King Henri I after his accession in 1031[216].  Rodolfus Glaber records the death of Queen Constance in the same city as her husband [Melun] and in the same month [July] in the following year, as well as her place of burial[217].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XI Kal Aug" of "regina Constancia"[218].  The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "VIII Kal Aug" of "Constancia regina"[219]

King Robert & his third wife had [seven] children:

1.         [CONSTANCE de France.  There is no proof that Constance, wife of Manassès de Dammartin, was the daughter of King Robert II, the affiliation being proposed for onomastic reasons only[220]. It is, however, suggested by the presence of the king and queen at a donation by "Manasses comes" dated 4 Feb 1031[221].  Rodolfus Glaber records that King Robert had two daughters by his wife Constance[222], presumably referring to Hedwige and Adela.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[223], the wife of Manassès was "Constance [de Dammartin]", presumably on the theory that she brought her husband the county of Dammartin.  m ([1023 or before]) MANASSES Comte de Dammartin-en-Goële, son of [HILDUIN [I] de Montdidier Seigneur de Ramérupt & his wife ---] (-killed in battle Ornel, near Etain, Bar-le-Duc 15 Nov or 15 Dec 1037).]

2.         HEDWIGE [Avoie] de France ([1003]-5 Jun after 1063).  Rodolfus Glaber records that "Rainaldus…Landrici comitis filius" married a daughter of King Robert[224].  The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis names "Adelaidem…Rainaldi comitis Nivernensis uxorem" as the daughter of King Robert and his wife Constance[225].  The Historia Nivernensium Comitum records that the wife of "Renaldum" was "sorori Regis Roberti, filii Hugonis Capitonis"[226].  The Annales Vizeliacenses also specifies that Renaud's wife was the sister not daughter of King Robert II[227].  However, this is chronologically unlikely given that King Robert and his known sisters were born in the 970s, more than twenty years before the earliest possible date of birth of Comte Renaud.  Her marriage was agreed by her father as part of his alliance with Landry Comte de Nevers after capturing Auxerre, which the king gave to his daughter as dowry[228].  "Rainaldus comes Nivernensis" donated property "Belmontis" to Cluny, for the souls of "…uxoris mee Advise…" by charter dated to [1028/40][229].  She founded the abbeys of Crisenon and Issenon.  m (1006, soon after 25 Jan 1016) RENAUD de Nevers, son of LANDRY Comte de Nevers & his wife Mathilde de Bourgogne-Comté (-killed in battle Sainte-Vertu, Yonne 29 May 1040, bur Auxerre, Saint-Germain).  He succeeded his father in 1028 as RENAUD I Comte de Nevers.  He was killed in battle against Robert I Duke of Burgundy, his brother-in-law. 

3.         HUGUES de France (1007-28 Aug 1025, bur Compiègne, church of the Abbaye de Saint-Corneille).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[230].  He was consecrated associate-king 9 Jun 1017, at Compiègne, church of the Abbaye de Saint-Corneille, when he was "barely ten years old" according to Rodolfus Glaber[231].  He rebelled against his father claiming the full authority of his position as associate-king, but later submitted[232].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "V Kal Sep" of "Hugo iuvenis rex Francorum"[233].  The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "V Kal Sep" of "Hugo iuvenis rex"[234].  Rodolfus Glaber records his place of burial[235]

4.         HENRI de France ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[236].  He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France.   

-        see below

5.         ROBERT de France ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Côte d’Or).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[237].  Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[238].  His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father.  His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030.  He was installed as ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I.   

-        DUKES of BURGUNDY

6.         EUDES de France ([1013]-Germigny-des-Prés, near Sully, Loiret 15 May [1057/59]).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[239].  He allied himself with Eudes II Comte de Blois in the war against his brother Henri I King of France 1034-1041.  He was defeated and imprisoned at Orléans.  After his release, he fought for the king in Normandy, but was defeated in 1054 at Mortemer.  Orderic Vitalis records the war between the Normans and "Henricum regem" in 1054 when "Odonem fratrem suum" was defeated by "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" who led the Norman forces "apud Mortuum-mare"[240].  He owned land near Bellême[241].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Mai" of "Odo Roberti regis filius"[242]

7.         ADELA de France (-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "soror…regis Henrici Adela" as wife of "Balduino Insulano"[243].  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" as the daughter of King Robert[244].  She is named as daughter of King Robert in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also refers to her marriage[245].  Kerrebrouck mentions her betrothal to Duke Richard "très jeune" but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[246].  "Richardus Nortmannorum dux" agreed grants of property to "Adela" on the occasion of their marriage by charter dated Jan 1026, which does not specify her parentage[247].  Her father gave her the seigneurie of Corbie as her dowry.  Ctss de Contenance.  She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres.  Philippe I King of France donated “villam in pago Parisiacensi sitam...Curtesiolum” to Saint-Denis, at the request of “amita mea soror...patris mei H...Adela”, by charter dated 1060, after 4 Aug[248]The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[249]Betrothed (Jan 1027) to RICHARD III Duke of Normandy, son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Bretagne ([1001]-6 Aug 1027).  m (Amiens 1028) BAUDOUIN de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille, Saint-Pierre).  He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V “le Pieux/Insulanus” Count of Flanders.  He was regent of France for his nephew Philippe I King of France 1060-1066/67. 

 

 

HENRI de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles [Provence] ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[250].  His father installed him as Duke of Burgundy 25 Jan 1016 after completing his conquest of the duchy[251].  He was consecrated associate-king 14 May 1027, at Notre-Dame, Reims, despite the opposition of his mother.  He rebelled against his father, together with his brother Robert, 1029-1031, and captured Dreux, Beaune and Avallon[252].  He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France, at which time the duchy of Burgundy was given to his younger brother Robert.  In light of his mother’s continuing opposition to his succession, he was obliged to take refuge briefly in Normandy in 1033.  He regained control with the help of Robert II Duke of Normandy.  A fragmentary chronicle records the death “Vitriaci” in 1059 of “Ainricus[253].  The Chronicle of Saint-Pierre de Sens records the death in 1060 “apud Vitriacum castrum in Brieria” of “Rex Hainricus” and his burial “in Basilica S. Dionysii[254].  Merlet reviews all these sources but, based on other documentation, concludes that the king must have died at Dreux[255].  He refers to the charter of King Henri dated 1060 at Dreux (“Drocis castro”), under which the king confirmed the foundation of the priory of Saint-Germain de Brezolles, which records the presence of Agobert Bishop of Chartres and various other members of the chapter of Chartres[256].  Merlet refers to Orderic Vitalis who states that at the end of his life the king was treated by a doctor, also from Chartres “Joanne...Surdus cognominabatur”, but died suddenly from the effects of drinking water against the medical advice[257].  He then highlights the supplementary addition at the end of the charter in question which states that “post mortem patris, Philippus rex cum matre regina” signed the document “Drocis castro in sua aula[258].  This addition is dated “anno secundo sui regni”, but Merlet attributes the delay to the frequent lapse of time which in medieval times occurred between the action, and finalising the corresponding documentation, a phenomenon which is discussed in detail by Giry[259].  The monastery of Saint-Denis’s Historia Regum Francorum records that King Henri died “civitate Senonis[260].  The Annales Nivernenses record the death "1060 II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex, Rotberti regis filius"[261].  The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "IV Non Aug" of "Henrici regis Francorum"[262].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex"[263].  The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 4 Aug of "Henricus rex Franciæ"[264]

Betrothed (May 1033) to MATHILDE of Germany, daughter of Emperor KONRAD II King of Germany & his wife Gisela of Swabia ([Oosterbecke] 1027[265]-Worms 1034, bur Worms Cathedral).  Wipo names "filia imperatoris Chuonradi et Giselæ, Mahthilda" when recording her death and burial at Worms in 1034, specifying that she was betrothed to "Heinrico regi Francorum"[266].  Her marriage was arranged to confirm a peace compact agreed between King Henri and Emperor Konrad at Deville in May 1033[267].  Her absence from the list of deceased relatives in the donation of "Chuonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" to the church of Worms by charter dated 30 Jan 1034 suggests that Mathilde died after that date, while her absence from the list of the children of Emperor Konrad named in the same charter is explicable on the basis of her youth[268]

m firstly (1034) MATHILDE, daughter of --- ([1025/26]-Paris 1044, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Rodolfus Glaber records that King Henri married "Mathildem…de regno eius ex Germanie nobilioribus"[269].  Her precise origin is not known.  A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young and that King Henri's wife died soon after[270].  The Historia of Monk Aimon records that King Henri married "neptem Henrici Alamaniæ Imperatoris" in 1034[271].  Szabolcs de Vajay[272] suggests that she was Mathilde, daughter of Liudolf Markgraf von Friesland [Braunschweig] & his wife Gertrud von Egisheim, her supposed father being the uterine half-brother of Emperor Heinrich III.  The Historia Francica records the death in 1044 of "Mahildis Regina"[273].  The Miracula Sancti Bernardi records the death in Paris in 1044 of "Mahildis regina…ex Cæsarum progenie", and her burial "monasterio Sancti Dionysii"[274]

m secondly (Reims 19 May 1051) as her first husband, ANNA Iaroslavna, daughter of IAROSLAV I Vladimirovich "Mudriy/the Wise" Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Ingigerd Olafsdottir of Sweden (1036-5 Sep ([1075/78], bur Abbaye Villiers near La-Ferté-Alais).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam regis Russorum Annam" with King Henri[275].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Henricus…Francorum rex" married "Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam"[276].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum" as wife of King Henri[277].  She was consecrated Queen Consort at Reims on her wedding day.  She caused a scandal by marrying secondly ([1061]) as his third wife, Raoul III “le Grand” Comte de Valois, and was forced to leave the court, although she returned after his death in 1074[278].  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "Anna, Henrici relicta" and "Rodulfo comitis"[279]

King Henri I & his first wife had one child:

1.         daughter ([1040]-1044 or before).  A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young[280].  She died before her mother, under 5 years old[281]

King Henri I & his second wife had four children:

2.         PHILIPPE de France (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[282].  He was consecrated Associate-King 23 May 1059, Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims.  He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France

-        see below

3.         EMMA de France (1054-).  The Historia Francorum names "Emmamque filiam" in addition to the three sons of King Henri and Anna[283]

4.         ROBERT de France (before Jun 1054-[1063]).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri & Anna, specifying that "Rotbertus inmatura morte decessit"[284].  This is confirmed by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which names (in order) "Philippum, Robertum et Hugonam" as the three sons of King Henri, specifying that "Robertus iuvenis mortuus est"[285]

5.         HUGUES de France (1057-Tarsus 18 Oct 1102, bur Tarsus, church of St Paul).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[286].  William of Tyre records "dominus Hugo Magnus" as brother of Philippe I King of France[287].  Orderic Vitalis names "Philippum et Hugonem Magnum Crispeii comitem" as the children of "Henricus…Francorum rex" and his wife "Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam"[288].  Comte de Vermandois et de Valois by right of his wife.  Leader of the French contingent in the First Crusade Aug 1096.  Albert of Aix records that "Hugonem Magnum fratrem regis Franciæ, Drogonem et Clareboldum" were held in chains in prison by the emperor at Constantinople but were released after the intervention of "Baldewinus Hainaucorum comes et Heinricus de Ascha" who were sent as envoys by Godefroi de Bouillon[289].  He returned to France after the victory of Antioch 1098 to raise another army.  The Alexeiad names "a certain Hugh, brother of the king of France" when recording that he "sent an absurd message to the emperor proposing that he should be given a magnificent reception" after arriving in Constantinople[290].  He set out again Mar 1101, but died from wounds received fighting the Greeks at Tarsus in Cilicia.  m (after 1067) as her first husband, ADELAIS Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy, daughter and heiress of HERIBERT IV Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Alix Ctss de Crépy ([1062]-28 Sep [1120/24]).  The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Odonem et Adelam sororem" as the two children of "comes Herbertus", specifying that the husband of Adela was "Hugoni le Magne", referring to her second husband "comes de Claromonte" and specifying that her daughter by the latter married Charles Count of Flanders[291].  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Adelidem comitissam Viromandensium, defuncto priore viro, scilicet Hugone Magno" as wife of "comes Rainaldus [de Claromonte]"[292].  She succeeded her father in [1080] as Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy.  She married secondly (1103) as his first wife, Renaud de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis]. 

-        COMTES de VERMANDOIS

 

 

PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye de Saint Benoît-sur-Loire[293]).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[294].  Orderic Vitalis names "Philippum et Hugonem Magnum Crispeii comitem" as the children of "Henricus…Francorum rex" and his wife "Bertradam, Julii Claudii regis Russiæ filiam"[295].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth in 1052 of "rex futurus regis Francorum Henrici filius ex Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum"[296].  He was consecrated associate-king 23 May 1059, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims: the Hugonis Floriacensis Actum records the consecration in 1058 of “rex...Henricus...Philippum filium suum duodennum” at “Remis a Gervasio archiepiscopo”, in the presence of “duo Nicholai papæ legati, Hugo...Bisunciensis archiepiscopus et Hermenfredus Sedunensis episcopus[297].  His father entrusted his education to his uncle Baldwin V Count of Flanders, who later became regent until 1066/67.  He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.  The Bertholdi Annales record in 1060 the death of “Heinricus Galliarum rex” and the succession of “filius eius Philippus adhuc puer regnum cum matre gubernandum suscepit[298].  Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims.  Foulques IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to him in 1069, in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[299].  King Philippe pursued this policy of expanding his territories, adding Corbie in 1074, acquiring part of Vermandois on the death of Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1074, invading Vexin in 1077, and taking possession of Bourges in 1100[300].  In 1071, after ineffectively helping Arnoul III Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert, the latter made peace with King Philippe and arranged the king's marriage to his stepdaughter.  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii records the death "apud Milidunum IV Kal Aug" of King Philippe and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Benedicti super Ligerim in pago Aurelianensi"[301].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex Francorum"[302].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex"[303]

Betrothed ([1055/59]) to JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey).  The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[304].  This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother.  This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted. 

m firstly (1072, repudiated 1092) BERTHA of Holland, daughter of FLORIS I Count of Holland & his wife Gertrud of Saxony[-Billung] ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 30 Jul 1093).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[305].  The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[306].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[307].  Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[308].  She was repudiated after King Philippe abducted Bertrade de Montfort from her husband, and was sent to Montreuil[309]

m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) as her second husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, fifth wife of FOULQUES IV “le Réchin” Comte d’Anjou, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d’Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Rémy-l’Honoré, Yvelines).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Bertrada...Andegavorum comitissa”, fearing that her husband was about to treat her like his previous two wives, sought protection from “Philippo regi Francorum” who repudiated his own wife and married her, the ceremony being conducted by “Odo Bajocensis episcopus[310].  The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe, specifying that the king abducted her from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[311].  William of Tyre records this marriage[312].  Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[313].  The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[314].  Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[315].  "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][316]

King Philippe I & his first wife had four children:

1.         CONSTANCE de France ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[317]).  Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[318].  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis", specifying that Constance married firstly "Hugoni Trecharum comiti", from whom she was separated for consanguinity, and secondly "Boamundo apud Carnotho"[319].  Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe married “Constantiam...filiam suam” firstly to “Hugonis Trecassino comiti” and secondly to “duci Antiochiæ Buamundo apud Carnotum[320].  An early sign of possible difficulties in Constance's first marriage is shown by the charter dated 1102 under which "Constantia, Philippi regis Francorum filia…Hugonis comitis Trecensium coniux legitima" donated property to the abbey of Molesme[321], the suggestion being that the reference to "coniux legitima" indicates that her husband may have had another "unofficial" relationship at this time.  "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated 2 Apr 1104, which names "frater meus Odo comes, Constantiam regis Francorum filiam necnon et comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[322].  William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her (second) marriage[323].  Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[324].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[325].  Her second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium.  After her second marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[326].  She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her second husband[327].  She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France.  The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[328].  The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[329]m firstly ([1093/95], annulled Soissons 25 Dec 1104 on grounds of consanguinity[330]) as his first wife, HUGUES I de Blois Comte de Troyes, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his third wife Alix de Crépy-Valois (-Palestine 14 Jun 1126).  m secondly (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch, son of ROBERT “Guiscard” Duke of Apulia and Calabria [Sicily] & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia).

2.         LOUIS THIBAUT de France (Paris end 1081-Château Bethizy near Paris 1 Aug 1137, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis"[331].  He succeeded his father in 1108 as LOUIS VI "le Gros" King of France.   

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3.         HENRI de France (1083-young).  The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Ludowicum et filiam Constantiam [atque Henricum]" as the children of King Philippe and "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam"[332]

King Philippe I & his second wife had [four] children:

4.         PHILIPPE de France ([1093]-[2 Sep] after 1133).  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem"[333].  Orderic Vitalis names “Philippum et Florum” as the children of King Philippe by his second marriage[334].  He succeeded as Seigneur de Montlhéry in 1104 by right of his wife.  His half-brother installed him as Comte de Mantes and Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yèvre in [1104].  Suger's Vita Ludovici records the rebellion of "regis Ludovici Philippus frater" against his brother, supported by "Amalricus de Monte Forti…avunculus eius" and "Fulco comes Andegavensis postea rex Hierosolymitanus frater eius", and the confiscation of his castles of Montlhéry and Mantes[335].  "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][336].  The necrology of Saint-Germain L'Auxerrois records the death "IV Non Sep" of "Philippus frater Ludovici regis"[337], which may refer to Philippe Comte de Mantes.  m (1104) ELISABETH de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry, daughter and heiress of GUY [III] “Troussel” Seigneur de Montlhéry et de Chevreuse & his [first/second wife Adelaide ---/Mabile ---] (-after 3 Mar 1141).  The Chronica Regum Francorum records the betrothal of "unus illorum Regis illegitimus ex comitissa Andegavensi" and "filiam…Milonis de Montlehery"[338].  The dating clause of a charter dated to [1106/07] refers to the first year in which "Philippus filius Philippi regis Francorum" married "Helizabeth filiam Guidonis Trosselli"[339]

5.         FLEURI [Florus] de France ([1095]-after 1119).  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem"[340].  Orderic Vitalis names “Philippum et Florum” as the children of King Philippe by his second marriage[341].  A document dated Jul 1213 records that "rex Franciæ…Grossus rex fratrem…Florium…filia Isabellis de Nangies…domina de Venisiaco"[342].  He was living in Anjou with his mother in 1117.  Seigneur de Nangis, by right of his wife.  m [--- de Nangis, daughter & heiress of --- de Nangis & his wife ---].  Her parentage and marriage are assumed because her daughter is called "Isabellis de Nangies" in the source quoted below.   Fleuri & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         ISABELLE de Nangis ([1118]-[after 1166/67]).  Documents dated Jul 1213 and Aug 1213, relating to the consanguinity between Erard de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt and his wife Philippa of Jerusalem, record "rex Franciæ…Grossus rex fratrem…Florium…filia Isabellis de Nangies…domina de Venisiaco", adding that her daughter was "domina de Venisiaco, mater…[Erardum de Rameruco] [Erardum de Brena]", another document in the series clarifying that Isabelle was the mother of "Aalaidis dominæ Venisiaci…mater…Erardi"[343]Dame de Nangis.  A charter dated to after 1151 recites the donation of “feodum de Thori” by “Symon Pichered” to Dilo abbey, confirmed by "Garnerus…de Venisiaco a quo feodum illud Symon tenebat et uxor Garini Petronilla sed et filius eius Ansellus", and a later donation confirmed by "Ansellus…de Venisiaco…et frater Anselli, Freherus, sed et uxor sua Elisabeth", as well as other donations by Anseau, Isabelle and Ferry[344].  She is named in the cartulary of Preuilly[345].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Isabelle married firstly "Guy de Marolles", adding that he joined the crusade in 1141 and died in Palestine[346].  The primary source on which this is based is not known.  However, under a charter dated to [1166/67], Louis VII King of France confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Barbeau, including the donation of "apud capellam de Sarnai" made by "Guidonis de Nangiis…cum assensu uxoris sue Helisabeth" and with the consent of "Milo de Corteriaco…uxore et filiis"[347].  It is possible that "Guidonis de Nangiis" is the same person as Guy de Marolles, and that his wife "Helisabeth" was Isabelle de Nangis.  If this is correct, Guy would have been Isabelle’s second husband not her first, assuming that the charter relates to then current donations.  This would also be consistent with her supposed daughter by this marriage having given birth to children from her second marriage (to Adam de Melun) in the 1180s.  Her descendants by this supposed second marriage were studied by Maurice Lecomte[348]m [firstly] ([1136]) ANSEAU de Venizy, son of GARNIER de Venizy & his wife Pétronille ---.  [m secondly GUY [de Marolles], son of --- (-after [1166/67]).  Seigneur de Nangis, de iure uxoris.] 

b)         [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are recorded in Europäische Stammtafeln which also states that she was "Dame de Châtel-les-Nangis"[349].  The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  However, as noted above under her supposed sister Isabelle, under a charter dated to [1166/67] Louis VII King of France confirmed donations of property to the abbey of Barbeau, including the donation of "apud capellam de Sarnai" made by "Guidonis de Nangiis…cum assensu uxoris sue Helisabeth" and with the consent of "Milo de Corteriaco…uxore et filiis"[350].  The consent given by "Milo de Corteriaco" and his wife and children would be consistent with he and his wife also having an interest in the property donated, which would be the case if his wife was the sister of Isabelle de Nangis.  Her husband’s connection with the Melun family has not been confirmed.  m MILON [de Melun] Seigneur de Courtry, son of ---.] 

6.         CECILE de France ([1097]-after 1145).  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem", specifying that the (unnamed) daughter married "Tanchredus Anthiochenus"[351].  Her parentage is recorded by William of Tyre, who also records her two marriages[352].  Her first marriage was arranged while Bohémond I Prince of Antioch was visiting the French court seeking support against Alexios I Emperor of Byzantium.  She sailed for Antioch end 1106[353].  While dying, Prince Tancred made Pons de Toulouse promise to marry his wife[354].  Albert of Aix records the marriage at Tripoli of "Punctus filius Bertrannus de Tripla" and "uxorem Tancredi, quæ filia erat regis Franciæ", dated to [1115] from the context[355].  William of Tyre refers to the wife of the count of Tripoli as uterine sister of Foulques King of Jerusalem and names her[356].  She claimed Jebail as her dower, but was eventually satisfied with Chastel Rouge and Arzghan[357].  She became Lady of Tarsus and Mamistra, in Cilician Armenia, in 1126[358].  "Cecilia comitissa" donated property for the souls of "domini mei Poncii comitis…et filii mei Raimundi comitis" to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 1139[359]m firstly (late 1106) TANCRED Prince of Tiberias, Regent of Antioch, son of ODO [Guillaume] “le Bon” Marquis & his wife Emma de Hauteville (-12 Dec 1112).  He succeeded in 1111 as Prince of Antiochm secondly (Tripoli 1112) PONS Count of Tripoli, son of BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse and Tripoli & his second wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] ([1096]-executed near Mont Pèlerin, near Tripoli Mar 1137). 

7.         [EUSTACHIE de France (-1143).  She and her husband are named by Kerrebrouck who cites no primary source on which this is based[360].  She founded the Abbaye de Yerres[361]m JEAN Seigneur d'Etampes et de Corbeil, son of HUGUES de Breteuil Seigneur du Puiset et d’Etampes & his wife ---.]

King Philippe had one [probably illegitimate] child [by an unknown mistress]: 

8.          EUDES de France (-1096).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1096 of "Odo frater Ludovici Grossi de alia matre"[362].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[363], Eudes was the son of King Philippe & his first wife but this appears to be contradicted by Alberic.  According to Kerrebrouck[364], Eudes was the son of King Philippe's second marriage but there seems little time for a third child to have been born to Bertrade de Montfort during the first three years of her marriage.  It is more likely that Eudes was an illegitimate son of King Philippe. 

 

 

LOUIS THIBAUT de France, son of PHILIPPE I King of France & his first wife Bertha of Holland (Paris end 1081-Château Bethizy, near Paris 1 Aug 1137, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[365].  The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis"[366].  The difficulty of dating Louis’s birth is discussed fully by Luchaire, who opts for end 1081 as the most likely possibility[367].  Louis’s birth would be dated to [1077/78] if Suger is correct in recording that he was about sixty years old when he died[368].  The early 12th century Vita Sancti Arnulfi Bishop of Soissons by Hariulf records Louis’s birth in 1081[369].  This date is corroborated by the Chronicon S. Petri Catalaunensis which records that Louis was 26 years old when his father died in 1108[370].  His father installed him as Comte du Vexin, de Mantes et de Pontoise in 1092.  He lived away from court after the repudiation of his mother.  Associate-king 1098/1100, elected rex designatus by an assembly of nobles and bishops but not crowned[371].  His father transferred effective governing power to him in 1101, investing him as Comte de Vermandois between 1101 and 1105.  He succeeded his father in 1108 as LOUIS VI "le Gros" King of France.  According to Luchaire, the nickname "le Gros", while not contemporary, was first applied to him as early as the 12th century, including in a fragmentary manuscript which records that "Rex Francorum Ludovicus Grossus" built several churches in 1112[372].  He was consecrated 3 Aug 1108, at the Cathedral of Sainte-Croix, Orléans.  Suger's Vita Ludovici records his coronation at Orléans by "Senonensis archiepiscopus Daimbertus"[373].  In 1119, Louis VI took Cluny and all its dependent priories under his protection, acquiring in return the right to build castles on their lands with the permission of the abbot of Cluny[374].  He transferred effective power to his son at Châteauneuf-sur-Loire 28 Oct 1135, due to ill health.  Suger's Vita Ludovici records the death of King Louis VI "Kal Aug" aged about sixty years old and his burial "ad ecclesiam sanctorum Martyrum"[375].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "Kal Aug" of "Ludovicus rex Francorum"[376].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Aug" of "Ludovicus…Francorum rex"[377]

Betrothed (1104, annulled Council of Troyes 23 May 1107 on grounds of consanguinity) to LUCIENNE de Rochefort, daughter of GUY [II] "le Rouge" de Rochefort Sire de Rochefort-en-Yvelines & his second wife Adelais de Crécy dame de Gournay-sur-Marne ([1090/95]-6 May, 1138 or after).   This betrothal is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who calls her "Luciana", names her father and specifies that she later married "Guiscardo de Bello Loco"[378].  Suger's Vita Ludovici records the betrothal of "filius dominus Ludovicus" and "filiam Guidonis [comitis de Rupe Forti]" and their separation on grounds of consanguinity[379].  She married (after 23 May 1107) Guichard [IV] Seigneur de Beaujeu.  "Luciana soror Hugonis de Creciaco" donated "terrae sue…apud Agglias et Buxiacum" to Notre-Dame de Longpont, with the consent of Louis VII King of France, by charter dated to [1140], signed by "Hugone de Creciaco…Radulfo comite, Manasse de Turnomio…et Beatrix uxor eius"[380]

m (Paris [25/30] Mar 1115) as her first husband, ADELAIDE de Maurienne, daughter of HUMBERT III "le Renforcé" Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie & his wife Gisèle de Bourgogne [Comté] ([1092]-Montmartre 18 Nov 1154, bur Montmartre, église abbatiale de Saint-Pierre).  Her marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and her four oldest sons[381]. The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses records "filiam Humberti comitis Morienne" as wife of "Ludovicum regem Grossum"[382].   The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "regina Alaydis…soror Amadei comitis Sabaudie" as wife of "Ludovici Grossi"[383].  She exercised considerable influence over her husband, playing an active part in the downfall of Etienne de Garlande, Chancellier de France.  After her son Louis succeeded in 1137, she conspired against Suger, Abbé de Saint-Denis, triggering a quarrel with her son.  She married secondly ([1138]) as his second wife, Mathieu Sire de Montmorency, Connétable of France under King Louis VII, and retired to her lands at Compiègne.  Her second marriage is confirmed by an undated charter which records a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicolas d’Acy, near Senlis made in the presence of "dominæ Adelæ reginæ et domini Mathei mariti eius"[384].  She retired to the church of the Abbaye de Saint-Pierre at Montmartre, which she had founded, in 1153[385].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIV Kal Dec" of "Adelaidis regina"[386]

Mistress (1): MARIE de Breuillet, daughter of [RENAUD de Breuillet & his wife ---].  Kerrebrouck names Marie de Breuillet as the mother of King Louis’s daughter Isabelle, citing an article by Dufour and adding that according to Depoin "Renaud de Breuillet pourrait bien être le grand-père maternel d’Isabelle"[387].  A charter dated to [1115/1118] records a donation of land "apud Soliniacum" made to Longpont Notre-Dame made by "Bernardus de Cabrosa", with the consent of "Ivisia uxore sua, Bernardo amborum filio, Helizabeth et Cecilia filiabus", and the later confirmation by "Maria…Reinaldi de Braiolo filia" in the presence of "Florentia uxore Rainaldi, Godefrido de Braiolo…"[388].  "Maria filia Rainaldi de Brayolo" confirmed the donation of "medietatem terre de Soliniaco" made by "Bernardus de Cabrosia", adding that "pater…eius" donated property with the consent of "eadem Maria…cum filiis suis Aymone et Nanterio", by undated charter, in the presence of "Florencia uxore Rainaldi, Maria filia eius, et filiis eius Aymone et Nanterio, Godefrido de Braiolo…", the document also recording the subsequent confirmation by "Rainaldus filius eiusdem Rainaldi"[389]

King Louis VI & his wife had nine children:

1.         PHILIPPE de France (29 Aug 1116-Paris 13 Oct 1131, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis[390]).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[391].  He was recognised as his father's successor at Senlis 19 Apr 1120, and thereafter named rex designatus.  He was consecrated associate-king 14 Apr 1129, at Reims.  Orderic Vitalis records that he died "after falling from his horse and being terribly battered"[392].  Suger's Vita Ludovici records the death of "regis Ludovici filius, floridus et amœnus puer, Philippus" while riding in the outskirts of Paris and his burial at Saint-Denis[393].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "II Id Oct" of "Philipus rex puer"[394].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Id Oct" of "Philippus puer Francorum rex"[395]

2.         LOUIS de France (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau, transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[396].  He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother in 1131, was consecrated associate-king 25 Oct 1131, and succeeded his father in 1137 as LOUIS VII "le Jeune/le Pieux" King of France

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3.         HENRI de France ([1121/23]-13 Nov 1175, bur Reims)His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[397].  He was tonsured in 1134.  Archdeacon of Orléans 1142.  He resigned from all his ecclesiastical posts 1146-47 to become a Cistercian monk at Clairvaux[398].  Elected Bishop of Beauvais 1148/49, consecrated 1150.  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica from Anchin records the death in 1161 of "Samson Remorum archiepiscopus”, the succession of “Henricus Belvacensis episcopus frater Ludowici regis Francorum”, and the succession as bishop of Beauvais of “Bartholomeus Remensis æcclesie archidiaconus[399].    Archbishop of Reims 1162.  The Continuatio of Sigebert's Chronica from Anchin records the death in 1161 of "Samson Remorum archiepiscopus”, the succession of “Henricus Belvacensis episcopus frater Ludowici regis Francorum”, and the succession as bishop of Beauvais of “Bartholomeus Remensis æcclesie archidiaconus[400].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1175 of "Henricus frater Lodovici regis Francorum archiepiscopus Remensis"[401].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Nov" of "Henricus archiepiscopus Remorum frater regis Francorum"[402]

4.         HUGUES de France ([1122]-young, maybe bur Paris, Saint-Victor).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[403]

5.         ROBERT de France ([1124/26]-Braine [10/12] Oct 1188, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived).  William of Tyre names him as brother of Louis VII King of France[404].  He was installed as ROBERT I "le Grand" Seigneur de Dreux in 1152. 

-        COMTES de DREUX

6.         PIERRE de France ([1126]-Palestine 10 Mar [1180/10 Apr 1183])William of Tyre names him as brother of Louis VII King of France, when recording his arrival in Palestine in 1179[405].  He succeeded as Seigneur de Courtenay, by right of his wife.  "Petrus regis frater et Curtiniacensis dominus" donated property to the abbey of Fontaine-Jean by charter dated 1170, with the support of "uxor mea Isabel et primogenitus meus Petrus"[406].  The necrology of La Cour-Dieu records the death “VI Id Mar” of “Petrus de Curtiniaco[407]

-        SEIGNEURS de COURTENAY.  

7.         CONSTANCE de France ([1128]-Reims 16 Aug after 1177).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to the sister of King Louis as wife firstly of "Eustachieus comes Bolonie" and secondly of "comiti de Sancto Egidio", specifying that she had children by the latter, but does not name her[408].  The De Genere Comitum F landrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "filiam unam [Ludovicum regem Grossum] nomine Constantiam"[409].   Her brother Louis VII arranged her first marriage to symbolise his support for Stephen King of England against his cousin Empress Matilda and her husband Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou.  William of Newburgh records the betrothal of Eustache, son of King Stephen, and "regi Francorum…sororem eius Constantiam"[410].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage in Feb [1140] of "regis Anglie Stephani…filius" and "Francorum regis sororem"[411].  The Chronicle of Gervase records the marriage "mense Februario 1140" of "Eustachius filius regis Stephani" and "sororem regis Francia Lodovici Constantiam"[412].  Her marriage is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who specifies that she was sister of Louis VII King of France[413].  Her brother arranged her second marriage to cement his alliance with Toulouse against Henri d'Anjou Duke of Normandy [later Henry II King of England] who had just allied himself with Aragon.  Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem confirmed a sale of property, with the consent of "…Constantiæ sorori regis Franciæ et S. Egidii comitissæ", by charter dated [Sep/Dec] 1177[414].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XVII Kal Sep" of "Constantia filia Ludovici regis"[415]m firstly (1140) EUSTACHE de Blois, son of STEPHEN King of England & his wife Mathilde Ctss de Boulogne ([1127-31]-Bury St Edmund’s 10 or 16 Aug 1153, bur Faversham Abbey, Kent).  He succeeded his mother in 1151 as EUSTACHE IV Comte de Boulognem secondly (10 Aug 1154, separated 1166) RAYMOND V Comte de Toulouse, son of ALPHONSE I Jourdain Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, Marquis de Provence & his wife Faydide d’Uzès (1134-Nimes Dec 1194, bur Notre Dame de Nîmes).

8.         PHILIPPE de France ([1132/33]-5 Sep 1161, bur Notre-Dame-de-Paris).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "domnus Henricus Remensis archiepiscopus et Robertus comes de Barro et Petrus et Philippus clericus" as the brothers of King Louis[416].  He succeeded to the ecclesiastical positions resigned by his brother Henri 1146-47.  Elected Bishop of Paris in [1159], but he refused the nomination.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Philippus frater Ludovici regis Francorum, decanus Sancti Martini Turonensis"[417].  The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records the death “Non Sep” of “Philippus frater Regis Francie[418], which, by process of elimination of the other brothers named Philippe of French kings, appears to refer to the brother of King Louis VII. 

9.         child (-young, bur Paris, Saint Victor).  Kerrebrouck records this child and his burial, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[419]

King Louis VI had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1): 

10.       ISABELLE (after [1101/04] before 1108-5 Aug, after 13 Apr 1175).  Louis VI King of France donated property to Chartres Saint-Père when "filiam meam" married “Willelmo, Othmundi filio”, and now confirmed the donation, by charter dated 6 Jan 1118[420].  "Isabel de Calvo Monte" donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 1175 for the soul of "patris mei Lugdovici…regis Francorum…et…Willelmi filii Osmondi et Rainaldi de Braileic", with the consent of “filiorum meorum”, subscribed by "Lugdovici filii eius, Philippi clerici, Gasthonis militis, Baudrici militis, Hugonis militis, Osmundi militis"[421].  m ([1114/17]) GUILLAUME Seigneur de Chaumont, son of OSMOND Seigneur de Chaumont[-Guitry] & his wife --- ([-before 13 Apr 1175]).  "Guillelmus de Caluimonte" was son-in-law of Louis VI King of France according to Orderic Vitalis, who says that he was captured while trying to take the castle of Tillières in 1119 and ransomed for 200 marks of silver[422]"Guillelmus filius Osmundi de Calvo Monte", who had married “filiam Ludovici regis”, donated property to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 9 Apr 1119, which records "…Gaulterius de Monte Falconis, Haimo filius eius" as present[423].  The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "Non Aug" of "Isabella nobilis matrona de Calvomonte"[424]

 

 

LOUIS de France, son of LOUIS VI King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoie] (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau[425], transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[426].  He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother in 1131.  Consecrated associate-king 25 Oct 1131, Notre-Dame de Reims, he received effective power from his father 28 Oct 1135, due to the latter's ill health.  He succeeded his father in 1137 as LOUIS VII "le Jeune/le Pieux" King of France.  Duke of Aquitaine, by right of his first wife, 8 Aug 1137 at Bordeaux.  He declared war against Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne, who was fighting Raoul Comte de Vermandois, laid siege to and captured Vitry, but signed a peace treaty there in 1143.  After the fall of Edessa in 1146, Pope Eugenius III addressed a bull to Louis VII 1 Dec 1145 urging a new crusade[427].  He assembled his army at Metz 15 Jun 1147, and arrived in Constantinople 4 Oct 1147.  He left the government in the hands of Suger Abbé de Saint-Denis, his brother Henri Archbishop of Reims and his cousin Raoul Comte de Vermandois.  Although the crusade failed in its aim to capture Damascus end-Jul 1148, Louis VII gained much prestige as the first western king to lead a crusading army.  After leaving Palestine in Summer 1149, he landed in Calabria where he discussed launching a new crusade aimed at taking vengeance on Byzantium with Roger II King of Sicily and Pope Eugenius III, but the scheme was later dropped for lack of support from Konrad III King of Germany who had entered an alliance with Emperor Manuel I[428].  He arrived back in Paris end-1149.  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1180 that “Ludovicus rex Francorum” was buried “aput abbatiam Barbel quam ædificavit[429].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "XV Kal Oct" of "rex Ludovicus pius" and his burial "abbatiam Cisterciensis ordinis de Sancto Portu…Barbel"[430].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Oct" of "Ludovicus rex"[431]

m firstly (Bordeaux, Cathedral of Saint-André  22 Jul 1137, annulled for reasons of consanguinity Château de Beaugency 21 Mar 1152) as her first husband, ELEONORE Dss of Aquitaine, daughter of GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou & his first wife Eléonore de Châtellerault (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[432].  She succeeded her father 9 Apr 1137 as Dss of Aquitaine Ctss de Saintonge, Angoûmois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux & Agen.  She left France with her husband in Jun 1147 on the Second Crusade[433].  She married secondly (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) Henri Comte d'Anjou et du Maine Duke of Normandy, who succeeded in 1153 as Henry II King of England.  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[434]

m secondly (Cathedral of Sainte Croix, Orléans ([Jan/Jul] 1154) Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Castilla, daughter of don ALFONSO VII King of Castile and León & his first wife Berenguela de Barcelona ([1138]-6 Oct 1160, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  This second marriage of King Louis is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who calls her father "Aldefonsi regis Hispaniæ cuius regni caput civitas est Tholetum"[435].  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Sancium et Fernandum, Elisabeth et Beatiam" as the children of "Aldefonsi Hispaniarum Regis" and his wife "Berengariam", specifying that "Elisabeth" (error for Constantia) married "Ludovico Regi Francorum"[436].  She was consecrated Queen Consort in 1154 at Orléans, église Sainte-Croix.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Constantia regina Franciæ" while giving birth to a daughter[437].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1160 the death of “regina Francorum” in childbirth[438].  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “regina Francorum filia Athelfunsi imperatoris Hispaniarum” died while giving birth to a daughter who survived (“incolumi filia”)[439].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Oct" of "Constantia regina filia regis Hispanie"[440]

m thirdly (Paris, Cathedral of Notre-Dame 13 Nov 1160) ALIX de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT IV “le Grand” Comte de Blois, Comte de Troyes/Champagne & his wife Mathilde von Sponheim [Carinthia] ([1140]-Paris 4 or 13 Jun 1206, bur Pontigny, Yonne, église de l'Abbaye cistercienne).  William of Tyre names her as "Ala filia Theobaldi senioris" when recording her marriage[441].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Alam sororem…Henrici comitis Campanensis" as the wife of "Ludovicus rex"[442].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Adela Francorum regina" as the youngest of the six daughters of "comes Campanie Theobaldus", and in a later passage names "filia comitis Theobaldi…Adala" as mother of the wife of Alexios Komnenos[443].  She was anointed queen after her marriage in Notre-Dame de Paris.  Regent of France for her son King Philippe II Jun-Dec 1191, during his absence abroad.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "1206…Non Iun" of "Adela regina Francorum mater regis Philippi"[444].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Jun" of "Ala Francorum regina, mater Philippi regis"[445].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1206 of "la reine Adèle, mère de Philippe roi de France" at Paris and her burial "en Bourgogne, à Pontion"[446]

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of the mistress of King Louis VII is not known. 

King Louis VII & his first wife had two children:

1.         MARIE de France (1145-11 Mar 1198, bur Cathedral of Meaux, Seine-et-Marne).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mariam comitissam Trecensum et Aelidem comitissam Blesensem" as the two daughters of "regi Francie Ludovico" and his wife "Alienor Guilielmi filia comitis Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis"[447].  Her parentage is confirmed by Matthew of Paris, who specifies that she was the older sister and married the older brother "Henricus filius magni comitis Theodbaldi Flandrensis", although he does not give her name[448].  Regent of Champagne during the absence of her husband on Crusade 1179-1181, during the minority of her son Henri II 1181-1187, during the latter's absence on Crusade 1190-1197, and during the minority of her grandson Thibaut III 1197-1198.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1198 of "comitissa Maria Campaniensis"[449]m (1164) HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne, son of THIBAUT IV “le Grand” Comte de Blois & his wife Mathilde of Carinthia [Sponheim] (1126-Troyes 17 Mar 1181, bur Troyes, Saint-Etienne).

2.         ALIX de France (1150-11 Sep after 1195).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mariam comitissam Trecensum et Aelidem comitissam Blesensem" as the two daughters of "regi Francie Ludovico" and his wife "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis"[450].  Her parentage is confirmed by Matthew of Paris, who specifies that she was the younger sister and married the younger brother "Theodbaldus filius magni comitis Theodbaldi Flandrensis", although he does not give her name[451].  "Adelicia uxore mea…" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus comes Blesensis, Francie senesscalus" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteaudun by charter dated 1190[452].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "III Id Sep" of "Adelicia…Blesensium comitissa", stating that "cuius filius…comes Blesensis Ludovicus" donated property for her soul[453]m (1164) as his second wife, THIBAUT V "le Bon" Comte de Blois et de Chartres, son of THIBAUT IV “le Grand” Comte de Blois, Comte de Troyes/Champagne & his wife Mathilde of Carinthia ([1130]-siege of Acre 1191, bur Abbaye de Pontigny).  Seneschal of France 1154-1191. 

King Louis VII & his second wife had two children:

3.         MARGUERITE de France ([1157]-Acre shortly after 10 Sep 1197).  Robert of Torigny records arrangements for the betrothal in 1158 of "filium suum [Henrici regis] Henricum" and "filiam regis Francorum Margaritam"[454].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1158 that “...archdiaconus Cantuarensis...Thomas regis Cancellarius” arranged the betrothal of “Henricus primogenitus regis Anglorum” and “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum”, in a later passage recording the marriage of “filium regis Anglorum septennum” and “filiam regis Francorum triennem[455].  Robert of Torigny records the betrothal "apud Novum Burgum" in 1160 of "Henrico filio Henrici regis Anglorum" and "Margarita filia Ludovici regis Francorum"[456].  Ctss de Vexin, with the Château de Gisors, as her dowry.  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “Henricus rex Angliæ” arranged the betrothal of “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum”, who was living in his household, to “Henrico filio suo” with “castellum de Gisors” as dowry, it being agreed that she would be cared for by the Knights Templar until the marriage took place[457].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "reginam Margaretam Anglie et comitissam Aaliz" as childen of King Louis VII & his second wife[458].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1172 that “Rotro Rothomagensis archiepiscopus” consecrated “Margaritam filiam regis Francorum” as “reginam Angliæ[459].  Matthew Paris records her coronation as queen 27 Aug 1172 at Winchester Abbey[460].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1186 that “Margarita soror regis Francorum” married “Bela regi Hungariæ[461].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Margareta soror regis Philippi" as widow of "iunior Henricus rex Anglorum" and records her second marriage to "Hungarorum regi Bela"[462].  Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a charter dated 1194/95, reciting the consanguinity between Philippe II King of France and his second wife Ingebjörg of Denmark on which their divorce was based, which records that “Belæ Regis Hungariæ” married “sororem Philippi Regis Francorum[463].  Her father-in-law arranged her second marriage so he could retain her dowry.  She left for Palestine after being widowed for the second time.  The Chronicle of Ernoul records the arrival of "une reine en Hongrie…veve sans hoir" at Tyre [in 1197] and her death eight days later, specifying that she was the sister of the mother of Henri Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem and had been "feme…le jouene roi d'Englietere…et suer…le roi Phelippe de France"[464]m firstly (contract Neubourg, Eure 1160, 21 Aug or 2 Nov 1172) HENRY of England, son of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore d’Aquitaine (Bermondsey Palace 28 Feb 1155-Château de Martel, Turenne 11 Jun 1183, bur Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou, later transferred to Rouen Cathedral).  He was crowned King of England in his father’s lifetime 14 Jun 1170 at Westminster Abbey, being styled Duke of Normandy, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine.  After this he was known as “the Young King”.  He was crowned again 27 Aug 1172 at Winchester Cathedral.  m secondly ([1185/86]) as his second wife, BÉLA III King of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1149-23 Apr 1196, bur Székesfehervar, transferred to Coronation Church Budapest). 

4.         ALIX [Adelaide] de France ([4 Oct] 1160-after Jan 1213).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Constantia regina Franciæ" while giving birth to a daughter[465].  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1160 that “regina Francorum filia Athelfunsi imperatoris Hispaniarum” died while giving birth to a daughter who survived (“incolumi filia”)[466].  The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records that King Louis VII had "aliam filiam de Constantia…Adelaidis", her mother dying while giving birth to her[467].  The Historia Gloriosi Regis Ludovici VII records that the king had "unam filiam de Constantia regina…Adelaidis", stating that her mother died in giving birth[468].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "reginam Margaretam Anglie et comitissam Aaliz" as childen of King Louis VII & his second wife, specifying that Alix married "Guilelmus comes de Pontivo"[469].  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Adelodis" as the daughter of "Ludovico Regi Francorum" and his wife "Elisabeth" (error for Constantia), specifying that she married "Comitis de Pontivo"[470].  There is some confusion between this daughter and King Louis VII's supposed daughter Alix by his third wife (see below).  Roger of Hoveden records that the betrothal of King Louis's daughter to Richard of England was first proposed in 1161, when Richard's older brother Henry was betrothed to her sister Marguerite[471].  Chronologically, this can only refer to the king's daughter by his second marriage.  This appears to be confirmed by the Chronicle of Gervase which records the betrothal in 1169 of "Ricardus…filius regis Anglæ" and "filiam regis Franciæ quam habuit de filia regis Hispanorum"[472].  Ctss de Bourges 1174, as her dowry.  Benedict of Peterborough records the betrothal "XI Kal Oct 1177" of "rex Anglie…Ricardus comes Pictaviæ filius eius" and "regi Franciæ…filiam" as part of the peace agreement between the two kings[473].  It is assumed that this refers to the same daughter, although the primary source which confirms this beyond doubt has not yet been identified.  If this is correct, she was presumably the same daughter who later married the Comte de Ponthieu.  Until further information comes to light, it is assumed that Alix/Adelaide who was betrothed to Richard, and who later married the Comte de Ponthieu, was the daughter who was born in 1160, and that King Louis had no daughter of this name by his third marriage.  Alix was brought up in England after her betrothal.  Benedict of Peterborough records that the betrothal of "Alesia soror eius [Philippi regis Franciæ]" and Richard was renewed in 1189, commenting that the king of England "in custodia habet"[474].  Richard refused the marriage after his accession to the throne.  Kerrebrouck states that King Richard arranged her betrothal to his younger brother John in early 1193[475], but the primary source which confirms this information has not been identified.  She returned to France in Aug 1195.  Ctss d'Eu, Dame d’Arques in 1195, as her dowry for her marriage.  "Willelmus comes Pontivi" granted rights to the commune of Marquienneterre, with the consent of "uxoris mee Aalidis filie Ludovici regis Francie", by charter dated 1199[476].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" donated property to the church of Saint Giosse, with the consent of "Marie filie mee et Aelis uxoris mee", by charter dated 1205[477].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli…et Aalais uxor mea comitissa Pontivi et Maria filia mea" granted concessions by charter dated 1207[478].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee Ludovici regis filie et Marie filie mee", by charter dated Aug 1208[479].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to the commune of Maioc, with the consent of "Aalis, uxoris mee et Symonis de Bolonia, generis mei, et Marie filie mee, uxoris eius", by charter dated 1209[480].  "Willelmus comes Pontivi et Monstreoli" granted rights to the nuns of Moreaucourt, for his soul and that of "Aelidis, uxoris mee, filie Ludovici regis Francie", by charter dated Dec 1209[481].  "Willaume comte de Pontieu et de Montreuil" agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille" by charter dated Nov 1211[482].  A charter dated Jan 1213 (New Style) confirms a grant of rights to the church of Sainte-Marie at Clairvaux by "Willelmus…Pontivi et Monstreoli comes et Aalis, uxor eius, filia pii regis Ludovici" agreed a concession made by one of his vassals, with the consent of "Aalis sa femme et de Marie leur fille"[483]Betrothed (by peace treaty 30 Sep 1174, betrothed 21 Sep 1177) to RICHARD of England, son of HENRY II King of England & Eléonore Dss d'Aquitaine (Beaumont Palace, Oxford 8 Sep 1157-Chalus 6 Apr 1199, bur Fontevrault Abbey).  He succeeded his father in 1189 as RICHARD I " Cœur-de-lion " King of EnglandBetrothed (early 1193) to JOHN of England, son of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore Dss d'Aquitaine (Beaumont Palace, Oxford 24 Dec 1166 or 1167-Newark Castle, Lincolnshire 18/19 Oct 1216, bur Worcester Cathedral).  This betrothal appears to have taken place despite the fact that John was already married to his first wife at the time.  He succeeded his brother in 1199 as JOHN King of Englandm (contract Mantes, Yvelines 20 Aug 1195) GUILLAUME II “Talvas” Comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil, son of JEAN I Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Béatrice de Saint-Pol (after 1178-6 Oct 1221, bur Abbaye de Valloires, Somme). 

King Louis VII & his third wife had three children:

5.         PHILIPPE de France (Château de Gonesse, Val d’Oise 21 Aug 1165-Mantes, Yvelines 14 Jul 1223, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  William of Tyre names him and records his parentage, specifying that he was his father's only son[484].  He was consecrated associate-king 1 Nov 1179, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims.  He succeeded his father in 1180 as PHILIPPE II “Auguste” King of France

-        see below

6.         [ALIX de France ([1168/70]-).  According to Kerrebrouck[485], the daughter of King Louis VII who was betrothed to Richard of England and later married to Guillaume Comte de Ponthieu was the king's daughter by his third marriage born "vers 1170".  As demonstrated above, from a chronological point of view the daughter whose betrothal to Richard was first discussed in 1161 could only have been the younger daughter of the king's second marriage.  The sources cited above appear to indicate that this is the same daughter whose betrothal was later confirmed, and who later married the Comte de Ponthieu.  No primary source has so far been identified which confirms that she was the king's daughter by his third marriage.  Until further information comes to light, it is assumed that Alix/Adelaide was the daughter who was born in 1160, and that King Louis had no daughter of this name by his third marriage.  Since writing this paragraph, a book by Sommerard has been consulted which refers to the birth of the king’s daughter Alix, born to his third wife in 1168, whom he identifies as the betrothed of Richard of England, but he cites no corresponding primary source[486].] 

7.         AGNES de France ([1171/72]-[1220 or after 1240]).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of King Louis VII & his third wife as "imperatricem Grecorum quam duxit Alexius filius Manuelis"[487].  Her birth is dated to 1171 by Sommerard, but he cites no corresponding primary source[488].  According to Niketas Choniates, she was 11 years old at the time of her second marriage (see below), which would place her birth in [1172].  William of Tyre records the marriage "in palatio domini Constantini senioris…Trullus" of "Manuele Constantinopoleos imperatore…filio…impuberi vix annorum tredecim Alexio" and "Francorum regis domini Ludovici filiam vix annorum octo Agnetem", dated to 1180 from the context[489].  Pope Alexander III wrote to Henri de France Archbishop of Reims, dated "XI Kal Mar" in 1171 or 1172, suggesting that "Ludovicus…Francorum Rex" betrothe "suam…filiam" to "filio Imperatoris Constantinopolitani" instead of what the Pope had heard was the proposal for a marriage to "filio persecutoris ecclesiæ" (assumed to be a reference to Emperor Friedrich I)[490].  Bearing in mind that Agnes had only recently been born, Sommerard suggests that the document (which does not name the daughter in question) may have related either to "Alix, qui avait trois ans" or not to any specific daughter[491].  The idea of the Byzantine marriage prospered as the Chronicle of Ernoul records that "l’emperérour Manuel" asked Philippe Count of Flanders, who had stopped in Constantinople on his return journey to Flanders, whether "li rois Loeis de France avoit nulle fille à marier" and proposed her betrothal "petite…et jouene" to "son fil…jouenes enfes", requesting the count to take the proposal to the French king[492].  Benedict of Peterborough records that "Lodovicus rex Francorum Agnetem filiam suam quam Ala regina Francorum…peperat" was sent to Constantinople in 1179 to marry "Alexio filio Manuelis imperatoris Constantinopolis"[493].  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1179 that “Agnes filia Ludovici regis Francorum” married “Alexio Manuelis imperatoris filio[494].  Benedict of Peterborough records the death of her first husband and her second marriage to his successor[495].  She adopted the name ANNA on her first marriage.  Niketas Choniates records that Andronikos married "Annam imperatoris Alexii sponsam, regis Francorum filiam", stating that she was only eleven years old[496].  Her third marriage is deduced from Villehardouin naming "Theodore Branas, a Greek who was married to the king of France's sister" when recording that Apros was restored to him in 1205[497].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that in 1193 "Livernas…prenominatus" lived with "sororem regis Francorum, imperatricem illam, quam habere debuit Alexius Manuelis filius" without marrying her, and in a later passage in 1205 that "Livernas", who had lived with "sororem regis Francorum, imperatricem…absque legalibus nuptiis", married her and married their daughter to "Nargaldo de Torceio, Guidonis de Dampetra consobrino"[498].  Robert de Clari records in Sep 1203 that "le sereur le roi de Franche" was alive and married to "li Vernas"[499].  The text also provides a clue to Alberic’s reference to "Livernas", indicating that it was the old French definite article combined with a corruption of the name "Branas".  No primary source has yet been identified which records when Agnes died.  According to Sommerard, she died in 1220, after the marriage of her daughter[500].  Kerrebrouck states that she died in 1240[501].  Neither of these authors cites the primary sources on which they base their statements.  m firstly (Constantinople [2 Mar] 1180) ALEXIOS Komnenos, son of Emperor MANUEL I & his second wife Marie of Antioch (Constantinople 10 Sep 1169-murdered 24 Sep 1183).  He succeeded his father 24 Sep 1180 as Emperor ALEXIOS IIm secondly (1184) as his second wife, Emperor ANDRONIKOS I, son of ISAAKIOS Komnenos sébastokrator & his wife Eirene --- ([1123/24]-murdered Constantinople 12 Sep 1185).  m thirdly (1204) THEODOROS Branas Duke of Adrianople, son of ALEXIOS Branas Komnenos pansébastos & his wife Anna Komnena Vatatzina.

King Louis VII had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

8.          PHILIPPE de France (-1161).  Kerrebrouck names him as illegitimate son of King Louis but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[502].  Doyen of Saint-Martin at Tours.

 

 

PHILIPPE de France, son of LOUIS VII King of France & his third wife Alix de Champagne (Château de Gonesse, Val d’Oise 21 Aug 1165-Mantes, Yvelines 14 Jul 1223, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis[503]).  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1165 that “regina Francorum” gave birth to “filium...Philippum[504].  William of Tyre names him and records his parentage, specifying that he was his father's only son[505].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1165 the birth "un des jours d'août, jour de dimanche, dans l'octave de l'Assomption de sainte Marie" of "un fils…Philippe" to King Louis[506].  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Philippum" as the son of "Ludovicus rex" and his wife Alix de Champagne[507].  He was consecrated associate-king 1 Nov 1179, Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims.  He succeeded his father in 1180 as PHILIPPE II “Auguste” King of France.  In 1183, following the death without a direct heir of Elisabeth de Vermandois (first wife of Philippe Count of Flanders), Philippe claimed her inheritance.  He conquered Chauny and Saint-Quentin in 1182, and under the Treaty of Boves in Jul 1185 took parts of Valois and Amiénois.  He took Tournai from Flanders in 1187.  He left on the Third Crusade from Vézelay with Richard I King of England 4 Jul 1190, landing at Acre 20 Apr 1191.  He returned to France in early Aug 1191 soon after the final capitulation of Acre 12 Jul 1191[508].  After the death of Philippe Count of Flanders in 1191, Philippe took control of Artois and parts of Vermandois.  He was a candidate for the imperial throne in 1197, following the death of Emperor Heinrich IV.  He recaptured Normandy from John King of England in 1204.  He defeated the English/German/Flemish coalition at Bouvines 27 Jul 1214.  He took possession of Alençon in Jan 1221, Clermont-en-Beauvaisis in 1218, Beaumont-sur-Oise in Apr 1223.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "II Id Jul" of "domini Philippi regis Francie"[509].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1223 "à Mantes, la veille des ides de juillet" of King Philippe and his burial "dans le monastère de Saint-Denis en France"[510]

m firstly (Abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité, Bapaume, Pas-de-Calais 28 Apr 1180) ISABELLE de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut [BAUDOUIN VIII “le Courageux” Count of Flanders] & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders (23 Apr 1170-Paris 14/15 Mar 1190, bur Paris, Cathedral of Notre-Dame).  The Chronicon Hanoniense records the birth "mense Aprili 1170" of "filiam Elizabeth" to "Balduinus [et] Margharetam…Mathie comitis Boloniensis sororem"[511].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1191 names "Elizabeth Francie reginam…Hyolenz uxorem Petri Autisiodorensis et Sibiliam domnam Bellioci uxorem Wichardi" as the three daughters of "Balduinus [Haynaco]"[512].  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis names the wife of Philippe II King of France as "Elisabeth regina que fuit soror Balduini comitis Flandrie", when recording the birth of their son Louis in 1187[513].  Her marriage is recorded by Matthew of Paris, who also names her parents, although he incorrectly calls her "Margareta"[514].  This marriage was arranged by her maternal uncle Philippe Count of Flanders while he was adviser to Philippe II King of France in 1180 after the latter's accession, with Artois as her dowry[515].  Consecrated Queen of France 29 May 1180, Abbaye de Saint-Denis.  King Philippe planned to repudiate her in 1186, for lack of a male heir.  The Flandria Generosa records the death in 1189 of "Elisabeth Francorum regina" after giving birth to twins, specifying her burial "in eccleisa beatæ Mariæ Parisius"[516].  The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the death "1189 Id Mar" of "Elysabeth regina uxor Philippi Francorum regis" and her burial "in ecclesiam beatissime virginis Marie Parisius"[517].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Id Mar" of "Isabel regina Francorum"[518]

m secondly (Notre-Dame d’Amiens, Somme 14 Aug 1193, repudiated later that year, annulled Compiègne 5 Nov 1193, annulment declared illegal 13 Mar 1195, remarried 1200) INGEBJÖRG of Denmark, daughter of VALDEMAR I King of Denmark & his wife Sofia Vladimirovna of Novgorod (1174-Priory of Saint-Jean-en-l’Ile, near Corbeil, Essonne 29 Jul 1236, bur Saint Jean-en-l'Ile).  The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the marriage of King Philippe in 1193 and "sororem regis Daciæ…Ingelburgh" and his repudiation of her after the wedding[519].  The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam…regis Dano", recording that he repudiated her after 8 days and imprisoned her[520].  She was known as ISAMBOUR in France.  She was consecrated Queen of France 15 Aug 1193, but during the ceremony King Philippe "by the devil's suggestion, began to be horrified, to tremble and turn pale at the sight of her"[521].  The chronicler William of Newburgh reported that the king's aversion to Isambour was reported to be due to the fetid smell of her breath or to some hidden deformity[522].  King Philippe disavowed her, imprisoned her at Cysoing and procured an annulment from prelates at the synod of Compiègne, although this was not recognised by the Pope[523].  A charter dated 1193 records that Etienne Bishop of Tournai requested Guillaume Archbishop of Reims to protect "Reginam" who had sought protection in Cysoing abbey[524].  Protracted correspondence with successive Popes ensued, the dispute being complicated by the king's bigamous third marriage.  King Philippe's refusal to restore Isambour eventually resulted in Pope Innocent III's interdict on France 13 Jan 1200.  The king restored Isambour as queen from Apr 1213, although it is likely that the couple did not live together, Isambour living on her dower lands near Orléans[525].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1237 of "senior regina Francie…Guineburgis sive Indeburgis de Dacia" specifying that she was "domna Aurelianensis"[526].  The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "IV Kal Aug" of "regina Ysenburgis…uxor regis Francorum Philippi"[527]

m thirdly (bigamously 1 Jun 1196, repudiated 1200) AGNES von Andechs-Merano, daughter of BERTHOLD III Duke of Merano, Marchese of Istria, Graf von Andechs & his wife Agnes von Wettin ([1180]-Château de Poissy, Yvelines 18/19 Jul 1201, bur église abbatiale de Saint-Corentin, Rosay, near Mantes, Yvelines).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage in 1196 of "Philippus [rex]" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et marchionis Histrie"[528].  The Gestis Philippi II Augusti records the marriage in Jun 1196 of "Philippus rex" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et Boemie marchionisque Hystrie"[529].  The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Agnes regina Francie…filia Pertoldi quondam ducis Meranie" when recording her death, in 1250 which is incorrect[530].  The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the third marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam Bertoldi ducis de Durenbon", recording that she died giving birth to her third child[531].  Her children were recognised as legitimate by Pope Innocent III 2 Nov 1201.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1201 of "mater…Philippus puer et Maria soror eius" and her burial "iuxta Melentam in ecclesie beati Corentini"[532].  The necrology of Diessen records the death "Kal Aug XIII" of "Chuniza Agnes regina Francie filia ducis Meranie Berhtoldi"[533].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIV Kal Aug" of "Agnes regina Francie"[534]

Mistress (1): ---, a lady from Arras.  Kerrebrouck records that the mother of Pierre, son of King Philippe II, was "une dame d’Arras", citing the Chronique rimée of Philippe Mouskes[535]

King Philippe II & his first wife had three children:

1.         LOUIS de France (Paris, Palais Royal 3 Sep 1187-Château de Montpensier-en-Auvergne 8 Nov 1226, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1187 that “Margarita regina Francorum” gave birth to “filium...Ludovicum[536].  He succeeded his father in 1223 as LOUIS VIII "le Lion" King of France

-        see below

2.         twin son (Paris 15 Mar 1190-Paris 18 Mar 1190, bur Notre-Dame de Paris).  The Flandria Generosa records the death in 1189 of "Elisabeth Francorum regina" after giving birth to twins[537]

3.         twin son (Paris 15 Mar 1190-Paris 18 Mar 1190, bur Notre-Dame de Paris).  The Flandria Generosa records the death in 1189 of "Elisabeth Francorum regina" after giving birth to twins[538]

King Philippe II & his third wife had two children:

4.         MARIE de France (after 1197-15 Aug 1238, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "filium unum Philippum…et filiam unam Mariam" as children of "Philippus [rex]" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et marchionis Histrie", and in a later passage records their legitimation[539].  The primary sources which confirm her two betrothals have not yet been identified.  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1212 of "Philippe roi de France…Marie sa fille, veuve de Philippe comte de Namur" and "le duc de Brabant"[540].  The Annales Parchenses record the marriage in 1204 of "Heinricus dux Lotharingie" and "filiam regis Francie", naming her "Maria uxor Henrici ducis" in a later passage[541], although the date is incorrect.  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that Marie was buried "Affligenii"[542]Betrothed (1200) to ALEXANDER Prince of Scotland, son of WILLIAM I "the Lion" King of Scotland & his wife Ermengarde de Beaumont (Haddington, East Lothian 24 Aug 1198-Isle of Kerrara, Bay of Ohan 8 Jul 1249, bur Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire).  He succeeded in 1214 as ALEXANDER II King of ScotlandBetrothed (Apr 1202) to ARTHUR I Duke of Brittany, son of GEOFFREY of England Duke of Brittany & his wife Constance Dss of Brittany (posthumously Nantes 29 Mar 1187-murdered Rouen or Cherbourg 3 Apr 1203, bur Notre Dame des Prés, Rouen or Abbaye de Bec, Normandy).  m firstly (contract Aug 1206) PHILIPPE I “le Noble” Marquis de Namur, son of BAUDOUIN V Comte de Hainaut [BAUDOUIN VIII Count of Flanders] & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders (Valenciennes Mar 1174-15 Oct 1212, bur Namur, Cathedral Saint-Aubin).  m secondly (Soissons, Aisne 22 Apr 1213) as his second wife, HENRI I "le Guerroyeur" Duke of Brabant, son of GODEFROI VII Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Duc de Louvain, Comte de Brabant & his first wife Margareta van Limburg (1165-Köln 5 Sep 1235, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre) (-5 Oct 1235). 

5.         PHILIPPE "Hurepel" de France (Jul 1200-killed in a tournament Corbie, Somme 14 or 18 Jan 1234, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "filium unum Philippum…et filiam unam Mariam" as children of "Philippus [rex]" and "Mariam filiam ducis Meranie et marchionis Histrie", and in a later passage records their legitimation[543].  Comte de Boulogne et de Dammartin (by right of his wife) May 1210.  He was invested as Comte de Mortain et d’Aumâle in Feb 1223 by his father.  He was confirmed as Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, de Mortain, et d'Aumâle in Feb 1224 by his brother King Louis VIII.  The Chronica Andrensis records the death in 1233 of "comes Boloniensis Philippus…regis Philippi filius" and his burial "apud Sanctum Dyonysium iuxta fratrem et patrem suum"[544].  The necrology of the abbey of Vauduisant records the death "XIV Kal Feb" of "Philippi comitis Bolonie"[545].  The necrology of La Cour-Dieu records the death “XV Kal Feb” of “Philippi comitis Bononiæ[546]m (contract Compiègne, Oise Aug 1201, contract Saint-Germain-en-Laye May 1210, 1216) as her first husband, MATHILDE de Dammartin, daughter and heiress of RENAUD Comte de Dammartin [en-Goële], de Mortain, de Varenne et d’Aumâle & his second wife Ide de Flandre Ctss de Boulogne (-[9 Oct 1261/8 Feb 1263]).  The Chronica Andrensis names "Mathilde…filia…Reinaldi quondam comitis Bolonie" as the wife of "Philippus frater Ludovici regis Gallie"[547].  She succeeded in 1223 as Ctss de Dammartin and in 1227 as Ctss de Boulogne.  She married secondly (1235, divorced 1253) as his first wife, Infante dom Afonso de Portugal, who later succeeded as Afonso III King of Portugal.  "Mahaud comitissa Bolonie et Clarimontis…et Johanne filie nostre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde, for the souls of "bone memorie Philippi condam comitis Bolonie et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated Apr 1239[548].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated Jun 1240 under which "Aufonsus filius regis Portigalis comes Bolonie et Matildis uxor sua comitissa Bolonie" confirmed a donation by "Johanni de Bello Monte domini regis cambellano et Ysabelli Buticularie uxori sue"[549].  A charter dated Nov 1242 records a declaration by "Mathildis comtissa Bolonie…cum…marito nostro Alfonso filio…regis Portugalie comiti Bolonie" relating to her testament and names "Gaucherus de Castellione et Johanna filia nostra uxor eiusdem, heredes nostri"[550].  The Chronicon Savigniacense records the death in 1258 (presumably O. S.) of "Matildis Comitissa Boloniæ" and the reversion of her county to the king[551].  The Breve Chronicon Alcobacense records that "comitissa Bolonie" was still alive when "rex Dionisius" was born (9 Oct 1261, see below), but had died before the birth of his brother Afonso (8 Feb 1263, see below), and it was therefore claimed that Diniz was illegitimate but Afonso legitimate[552].  Philippe "Hurepel" & his wife had two children:

a)         AUBRY de Dammartin (1222-after 1284).  Kerrebrouck records his parentage and adds that he settled in England, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[553].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Comte de Dammartin, de Clermont et d'Aumâle.  He gave up his estates and titles in favour of his sister, and settled in England. 

b)         JEANNE de Dammartin (1219-14 Jan 1252).  The Chronica Andrensis records that "comes Boloniensis Philippus" left "unicam filiam" when he died but does not name her[554].  The marriage contract between “Hues de Chastelon, cuens de Saint Pol et de Blois…Gauchier son neveu” and “madame la contesse de Bouloingne Mahaut…sa fylle Jehanne” is dated Dec 1236[555].  "Mahaud comitissa Bolonie et Clarimontis…et Johanne filie nostre" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Hoïlde, for the souls of "bone memorie Philippi condam comitis Bolonie et liberorum nostrorum", by charter dated Apr 1239[556].  A charter dated Nov 1242 records a declaration by "Mathildis comtissa Bolonie…cum…marito nostro Alfonso filio…regis Portugalie comiti Bolonie" relating to her testament and names "Gaucherus de Castellione et Johanna filia nostra uxor eiusdem, heredes nostri"[557].  Ctss de Clermont et d'Aumâle, Dame de Mortain et de Domfront.  m (contract Dec 1236, before 1241) GAUCHER de Châtillon Seigneur de Montjay, son of GUY [III] de Châtillon Comte de Saint-Pol & his wife Agnès Dame de Donzy (-Munyat Abu Abdallah, Egypt 6 Apr 1251). 

6.         child (b and d Jul 1201).  The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the third marriage of "Philippus [rex]" and "filiam Bertoldi ducis de Durenbon", recording that his wife died giving birth to her third child[558]

King Philippe II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

7.          PIERRE [Charles] ([1205/09]-in a shipwreck off Damietta, Egypt 9 Oct 1249, bur Noyon Cathedral).  His parentage is confirmed by a letter of Pope Gregory IX dated 5 Jul 1240 in which he complained to the archbishop of Reims about the election of “P[etrum Carlotum], natum clare memorie -- regis Francie, subdiaconum nostrum” as bishop of Noyon[559].  Elected Bishop of Noyon 1240, Comte de Noyon.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1240 of “episcopus Noviomensis Nicholaus” and the election of “domnus Karolus regis patruus...Petrus” as his successor[560].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that the Pope suspended and later deposed “episcopus Noviomensis domnus Karolus” in 1241[561].  Chancellor of Charles d’Anjou King of Sicily.  Matthew of Paris records the death in 1249 in a ship bound for Cyprus of "vir præclarus episcopus Noviomensis, comes Palatinus"[562]

 

 

LOUIS de France, son of PHILIPPE II "Auguste" King of France & his first wife Isabelle de Hainaut Ctss d'Artois (Paris, Palais Royal 3 Sep 1187-Château de Montpensier-en-Auvergne 8 Nov 1226, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Ralph de Diceto’s Abbreviationes Chronicorum record in 1187 that “Margarita regina Francorum” gave birth to “filium...Ludovicum[563].  He received Artois, the inheritance of his mother, 1209 but never bore the title Comte d'Artois.  He was offered the throne of England in Autumn 1215 by the English barons who deposed King John.  He boarded ship for England 21 May 1216, arriving in London 2 Jun 1216.  He soon controlled south-east England, but when King John died 19 Oct 1216 the barons recognised the latter’s son Henry III as rightful king of England.  Louis continued the war, but his army was defeated at Lincoln 20 May 1217, his fleet in Aug 1217.  He negotiated a settlement with the English regents, and returned to France.  He succeeded his father in 1223 as LOUIS VIII "le Lion" King of France.  He was consecrated 6 Aug 1223, at Notre-Dame de Reims.  Amaury de Montfort ceded to Louis the rights to the county of Toulouse and the duchy of Narbonne in Feb 1224.  The testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 bequeathes “terram Attrebatesii…quam ex parte matris nostre Elysabet possidemus” to “filius noster secundus”, “comitatum Andegavie et Cenomannie” to “tercius filius noster”, “comitatum Pictavie et totam Alverniam” to “quartus filius noster”, and requests that “quintus filius noster…et omnes alii qui post eum nascentur” become “clericus[564].  The Annales Sancti Nicasii Remenses record the death in 1226 of "rex Lugdovicus" while returning from Avignon which he had captured and whose walls and fortifications he had destroyed[565].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1226 "à Montpensier en Auvergne…à l'octave de la Toussaint" of King Louis, returning from his campaign against the Albigeois, and his burial at "Saint-Denis en France"[566].  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "VI Id Nov" of "domini regis Ludovici defuncti in Montepanceto"[567].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Nov" of "Ludovicus rex Francorum, filius Philippi regis"[568].  The Annales Londonienses record the death "in Auvernia VI Id Nov" in 1226 of "Lodowicus rex Franciæ"[569].  He died from dysentery. 

m (Church of Port-Mort, Eure, near Pont-Audemer, Normandy 23 May 1200) Infanta doña BLANCA de Castilla, daughter of don ALFONSO VIII “el Noble/él de las Navas” King of Castile & his wife Eleanor of England (Palencia [1188/89]-Paris 26/27 Nov 1252, bur Notre-Dame de Maubuisson).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche Francie regina" as daughter of "filio…Sanctii rege", in a later passage recording the marriage in 1200 of "Ludovicus filius regis Francie" and "Blancham filiam Alphonsi regis Castelle neptem ex sorore regum Anglie Richardi et Iohannis"[570].  The dating clause of a charter dated 4 Mar 1190 (“era MCCXXVIII”), which records a donation to Arlanza, states “anno quo nata est Palentie infantissa Blanca de regina Alienor[571].  Blanca’s birth in 1190 appears inconsistent with the birth of her brother Fernando 29 Nov 1189.  Fernando’s birth makes 1189 improbable as well, unless Blanca was born very early in the year.  “[1188/89]” seems the best estimation, which is consistent with her having reached the age of 12 on her marriage.  As part of continuing Anglo/French peace negotiations, John King of England gave Infanta Blanca (who was his niece) Issoudun and Graçay en Berry, le Vexin, Evreux and 20,000 marcs of silver as her dowry.  She was consecrated Queen with her husband 6 Aug 1223.  Regent of France during the minority of her son King Louis IX 1226-1234, and also during his absence on crusade 1248 until her death.  An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records the death in 1252 of "Blanche...reine de France" and her burial "à l’abeïe de Maubuisson"[572]Her death is recorded by Matthew of Paris[573].  The necrology of Hôtel-Dieu at Provins records the death "IV Kal Dec" of "Blancha Francorum regina"[574].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Kal Dec" of "Blanche regina"[575]

King Louis VIII & his wife had twelve children:

1.         daughter (1205-died soon after).  Kerrebrouck records the birth of this daughter, and her death soon after her birth, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[576]

2.         PHILIPPE de France (7 Sep 1209-1218, before Jul, bur Notre-Dame de Paris).  “Herveus comes Nivernensis” confirmed the franchises granted by “Ludovicus...regis Franciæ primogenitus” in “terra...Montismirabilis, Aloye, Bracote, Autoin, Basochie et Froseii”, granted as dower to “filie nostre Agneti cum primogenito dicti Ludovici Philippo in maritagium”, by charter dated Jul 1218[577]Betrothed (contract Melun Jul 1215) to AGNES de Nevers, daughter and heiress of HERVE [IV] Comte de Nevers Seigneur de Donzy & his wife Mathilde de Courtenay Ctss de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre (-1225).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "comiti Herveo Nivernensi…filia" was betrothed to "Philippo primogenitor domni Ludovici", and that after he died she married "Guido primogenitus Galtheri de Sancti Paolo"[578].  “Herveus comes Nivernensis” confirmed the franchises granted by “Ludovicus...regis Franciæ primogenitus” in “terra...Montismirabilis, Aloye, Bracote, Autoin, Basochie et Froseii”, granted as dower to “filie nostre Agneti cum primogenito dicti Ludovici Philippo in maritagium”, by charter dated Jul 1218[579]

3.         ALPHONSE de France (Lorrez-le-Bocage en Gâtinais, Seine-et-Marne 26 Jan 1213-died young, bur Notre-Dame de Poissy).  Twin with his brother Jean.  The Chronicon Bernardi Iterii records the birth of two twins "in festo sancti Policarpi à Lorre" in 1212 to "uxor Ludovici regis junioris"[580].  The primary source which confirms his name has not yet been identified. 

4.         JEAN de France (Lorrez-le-Bocage en Gâtinais, Seine-et-Marne 26 Jan 1213-died young, bur Notre-Dame de Poissy).  Twin with his brother Alphonse.  The Chronicon Bernardi Iterii records the birth of two twins "in festo sancti Policarpi à Lorre" in 1212 to "uxor Ludovici regis junioris"[581].  The primary source which confirms his name has not yet been identified. 

5.         LOUIS de France (Château de Poissy, Yvelines 25 Apr 1214-Tunis 25 Aug 1270, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[582].  He succeeded his father in 1226 as LOUIS IX King of France

-        see below

6.         ROBERT de France (Sep 1216-killed in battle Mansurah, Egypt 9 Feb 1250).  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[583].  Matthew of Paris names him "Robertus comes Atrabatensis regis frater" when he records his death[584].  The testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 bequeathes “terram Attrebatesii…quam ex parte matris nostre Elysabet possidemus” to “filius noster secundus[585].  He was installed as Comte d'Artois 7 Jun 1237. 

-        COMTES d’ARTOIS.  

7.         ALPHONSE de France (11 Nov 1220-Castle of Corneto, near Siena 21 Aug 1271, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[586].  The testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 bequeathes “comitatum Andegavie et Cenomannie” to “tercius filius noster” and “comitatum Pictavie et totam Alverniam” to “quartus filius noster[587].  Assuming that the order of birth of Alphonse and Jean is correctly recorded in the Chronicon Turonense, this testament indicates that Anjou and Maine were originally destined for Alphonse not Jean.  He is recorded as brother of Louis IX King of France by Matthew of Paris, who states that the king sent him home with his brother Charles after the battle of Mansurah in 1250[588].  He was invested as Comte de Poitiers et d’Auvergne by his brother King Louis 24 Jun 1241.  During King Louis IX’s absence on crusade, Alphonse at first remained in France to assist their mother the regent.  He left on crusade with his wife from Aigues-Mortes 26 Aug 1249.  He was captured with the King 5 Apr 1250 at Mansurah.  He succeeded as Comte de Toulouse by right of his wife in 1249 during his absence abroad.  He took possession of Toulouse in Oct 1250, making his official entry 23 May 1251.  Following the death of his mother in 1252, he took an active part in governing France (with his brother Charles Comte d’Anjou), taking charge in particular of foreign affairs and military operations.  Matthew of Paris records in 1252 that he suffered from an incurable disease[589].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XIII Kal Sep" of "Alfonsus quondam Pictavie et Tholose comes frater quondam regum…Ludovici…et Karoli regis Cicilie"[590]A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death in 1271 of "Alfonsus comes Tholosanus filius regis Francie" at "Savonam feria VI"[591]Betrothed (by treaty Vendôme Mar 1227) to ISABELLE de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES [XI] “le Brun” Comte de la Marche & his wife Isabelle Ctss d'Angoulême (-14 Jan 1300).  The primary source which confirms her betrothal has not yet been identified.  m (by treaty 1229, 13 Mar 1234 or 1241) JEANNE de Toulouse, daughter and heiress of RAIMOND VII Comte de Toulouse & his first wife Infanta doña Sancha de Aragón (1220-Castle of Corneto, near Siena 25 Aug 1271, bur Notre-Dame de Gercy, Brie).  The papal dispensation for the marriage of "L. regem Francorum...A. frater." and "R. filium quondam comitis Tolosani...filia" despite their 4o consanguinity is dated 26 Jun 1229[592]The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that "la fille du comte…Jeanne" was 9 years old in 1229[593].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage of "alter regis frater Alphonsus" and "filia Raymundi comitis Tolosani", but does not name her[594].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1241 the marriage of "Saint Louis roi de France…Alphonse son frère" and "Jeanne fille du comte de Toulouse", together with "la terre d'Auvergne, du Poitou, et les terres des Albigeois"[595].  She succeeded her father 27 Sep 1249 as Ctss de ToulouseA "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death in 1271 of "domina Johanna comitissa Tholose, uxor supradicti comitis" (immediately following the record of the death of her husband) at "Savonam...feria 2"[596]The testament of Jeanne Ctss de Toulouse dated 22 Jun 1270 provided bequests to "dominæ Mariæ consanguinæ nostræ", widow of "domini Othonis quondam vicecomitis Leomaniæ" and now "uxoris domini Archambaudi comitis Petragoricensis", to two of Marie's brothers Guillaume and Bernard, and to Gaillarde de Toulouse, daughter of her first cousin Bertrand de Toulouse Vicomte de Bruniquel[597]

8.         JEAN de France (-1232, bur Notre-Dame de Poissy)The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[598].  The testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 bequeathes “comitatum Andegavie et Cenomannie” to “tercius filius noster” and “comitatum Pictavie et totam Alverniam” to “quartus filius noster[599].  Assuming that the order of birth of Alphonse and Jean is correctly recorded in the Chronicon Turonense, this testament indicates that Anjou and Maine were originally destined for Alphonse not Jean.  Comte d'Anjou et du Maine.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1232 of "duo de fratribus regie Francie, Iohannes et Dagobertus"[600]Betrothed (Mar 1227) to YOLANDE de Bretagne, daughter of PIERRE Duke of Brittany & his first wife Alix de Thouars (in Brittany end 1218-château de Bouteville 10 Oct 1272, bur Villeneuve-les-Nantes, église abbatiale de Notre Dame).  The Chronicon Turonense records the betrothal of "Rex Franciæ Joannem fratrem suum, puerum octennem" and "filiæ Petri Comitis Britanniæ", and the grant of the county of Anjou to him[601].  The marriage contract between “P. dux Britannie, comes Richemondie…Yolendi filie mee” and “Ludovicus, rex Francorum…Johannem fratrem suum” is dated 27 Mar [1226/27][602].  The Annals of Dunstable record the betrothal of “filiam comitis Britanniæ” and “rex Franciæ…fratri suo minori”, who received the county of Anjou, in 1227[603]

9.         PHILIPPE de France dit DAGOBERT (20 Feb 1222-1234, bur Abbaye de Royaumont, Asnières-sur-Oise, transferred to Saint-Denis 1817).  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[604].  The testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 requests that “quintus filius noster…et omnes alii qui post eum nascentur” become “clericus[605].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1232 of "duo de fratribus regie Francie, Iohannes et Dagobertus"[606]

10.      ISABELLE de France (Mar 1224-Clarrisian Abbey at Longchamps 23 Feb 1270, bur Convent de l’Humilité Notre-Dame).  The Chronicon Turonense records the birth in 1224 "mense martio" of "Isabellis, filia Ludovici Regis Franciæ"[607].  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[608].  The contract of marriage between “I…regina Anglie et comitissa Marchie et Engolismi…Hugone filio nostro primogenito” and “Ludovicem…regem Francie…Elysabet sorore domini regis” is dated Jun 1230[609].  After refusing the hand of Konrad, son of Emperor Friedrich II, she took a vow of chastity, although she never became a nun.  She founded the Clarrisian Abbey at Longchamps 1255.  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "domina Ysabelli...sorore sancti regis Franciæ Ludovici" founded "cœnobium sororum Minorum juxta sanctum Clodoaldum supra Secanam" in 1259[610]Pope Leon X beatified her 1521.  Betrothed (by treaty of Vendôme Mar 1227, contract Jun 1230) to HUGUES [XII] de la Marche, son of HUGUES [XI] "le Brun" de Lusignan Sire de Lusignan, Comte de La Marche et d'Angoulême & his wife Isabelle Ctss d’Angoulême ([1221]-Damietta Apr 1250, bur Abbaye de la Couronne, Charente).  He succeeded his father in 1248 as Sire de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême

11.      ETIENNE de France ([Paris] end 1225-early 1227, bur Abbaye de Royaumont, Asnières-sur-Oise).  The Chronicon Turonense records the birth in 1225 (at the end of the text dealing with events in that year) of "Stephanus, Ludovici Regis Francorum filius" and his baptism in Paris[611].  He must have been born after the testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 which only names five (surviving) sons[612].  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[613]

12.      CHARLES de France (posthumously [21] Mar 1227-Foggia 7 Jan 1285, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).  He is recorded as brother of Louis IX King of France by Matthew of Paris, who states that the king sent him home with his brother Alphonse after the battle of Mansurah in 1250[614].  Marquis de Provence and Comte de Forcalquier 1246, in right of his wife.  Created Comte d'Anjou et du Maine Aug 1246.  He was invested as CHARLES I King of Sicily in 1265.   

-        KINGS of SICILY

 

 

LOUIS de France, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla (Château de Poissy, Yvelines 25 Apr 1214- Tunis 25 Aug 1270, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[615].  He succeeded his father in 1226 as LOUIS IX King of France.  Consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 29 Nov 1226.  He left on crusade from Aigues-Mortes 25 Aug 1248, landing first at Limassol, Cyprus, then in Egypt in May 1249[616].  His forces captured Damietta in Jun 1249, but King Louis was captured at Fariskur 6 Apr 1250, freed 6 May against the cession of Damietta[617], after which he sailed for Acre and was accepted as de facto ruler of the kingdom of Jerusalem[618].  He set sail from Acre 24 Apr 1254, arriving in France 10 Jul 1254[619].  He died from dysentery after capturing Tunis, at the start of another crusade.  He was canonised by Pope Boniface VIII 11 Aug 1297, feast day 25 Aug. 

m (Cathedral of St Etienne, Sens, Yonne 27 May 1234) MARGUERITE de Provence, daughter of RAIMOND BERENGER V Comte de Provence & his wife Béatrice de Savoie (St Maime near Forcalquier Spring 1221-Paris, Abbaye de St Marcel 21 Dec 1295, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Vincentii Bellovacensis Memoriale Omnium Temporum records the marriage in 1233 of King Louis IX and "comitis Provincie filiam…Margaretam"[620].  "R Berengarii…comes et marchio Provincie et comes Folcalquerii" made arrangements for the dowry of "filie nostre Margarite" by charter dated 17 May 1234[621].  Consecrated Queen 28 May 1234, Cathedral of St Etienne, Sens.  The testament of "Beatricis relictæ Raimundi Berengarii comitis Provinciæ", dated 14 Jan 1264, confirms her previous testaments appointing "Reginarum filiarum suarum Margarethæ Franciæ et Alienoræ Angliæ…" as her heirs[622].  After disputing the succession of her youngest sister Béatrice to the county of Provence, she renounced her rights in 1287 and received Beaufort and Baugé.  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Paris in 1295 of "regina Franciæ Margareta" and her burial "in ecclesia sancti Dionysii in Francia juxta regem sanctissimum Ludovicum conjugem suum", adding that she had retired to "Parisius apud sanctum Marcellum cœnobium sororum minorum"[623]

King Louis IX & his wife had eleven children:

1.         BLANCHE de France (12 Jul or 4 Dec 1240-29 Apr 1243, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Royaumont, transferred 1820 to Saint-Denis).  The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth "in Translatione sancti Benedicti" in 1240 of "Blanca primogenita Ludovici regis"[624]Her birth is recorded in 1240 by Matthew of Paris, although he does not name her or give her precise date of birth[625]

2.         ISABELLE de France (2 or 18 Mar 1242-Hyères near Marseille 27 Apr 1271, bur Provins, église des Cordeliers)The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth "die Martis" in 1241 (O.S.) of "Ysabella filia Ludovici regis"[626].  An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the first child of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" was a daughter who married "au roi de Navarre", and in a later passage records her marriage in 1255[627]She died on returning from the crusade in Tunis.  The "Corónicas" Navarras record the death "XV Kal Mai…apud Yeras" in 1271 of "Helisabet…regina Navarre et comitissa Campanie atque Brie" and her burial "in monasterio…Barra"[628].  The necrology of Saint-Etienne, Troyes records the death "22 Apr" of "Ysabellis quondam regine Navarre…regis Francorum filia"[629]m (Melun, Seine-et-Marne 6 Apr 1258) TEOBALDO II King of Navarre [THIBAUT V Comte de Champagne], son of TEOBALDO I King of Navarre [THIBAUT IV Comte de Champagne] & his third wife Marguerite de Bourbon (1239-Trapani, Sicily 4 Dec 1270, bur Provins, église des Cordeliers). 

3.         LOUIS de France (21 Sep 1243 or 24 Feb 1244-Paris 11 Jan or [2 Feb] 1260, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Royaumont, transferred to Saint-Denis 1817)The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth "in festo sancti Matthæi Apostoli" in 1243 of "Ludovicus primogenitus Ludovici regis"[630].  An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the second child of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" was "un fuiz...Looys", adding that he died and was buried "à Roiaumont"[631].  The Speculum historiali of Vincent de Beauvais records the birth in 1243 of "Ludovicus filiorum...Ludovici regis Franciæ primogenitus"[632]He exercised power nominally during his father’s absence, from his grandmother’s death until Jul 1254.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "III Id Jan" of "Ludovici primogeniti beati Ludovici regis"[633].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1259 of "Louis fils ainé de saint Louis roi de France" and his burial "dans le monastère de Montréal, couvent de l'ordre de Cîteaux"[634]The Flores historiarum of Adam of Clermont records the death "circa Purificationis Beatæ Virginis" in 1259 [presumably O.S.] of "Ludovicus primogenitus"[635]Betrothed (Paris 20 Aug 1255) to Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO X "el Sabio" King of Castile and León & his wife Infante doña Violante de Aragón (Seville [10 Oct/25 Nov] 1253-Guadalajara, convent of Santa Clara de Toro 1300, bur Santo Domingo el Real de Madrid)This betrothal is recorded by Matthew of Paris, although he does not give her name[636].  She was recognised as her father’s successor 5 May 1255, in default of male heirs, until the birth of her brother 23 Oct 1255.  Installed as Señora de Guadalajara by her father.  She founded the convent of Santa Clara de Toro at Guadalajara.  A nun at Las Huelgas. 

4.         PHILIPPE de France (Poissy, Yvelines 1 May 1245-Perpignan 5 Oct 1285, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the birth in 1245 "le premier mai, à la fête des apôtres Jacques et Philippe" of Philippe, son of Louis IX King of France[637].  Heir to the throne in 1260 on the death of his older brother.  He succeeded his father in 1270 as PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France

-        see below.

5.         JEAN de France ([1246/47]-10 Mar 1248, bur Abbaye de Royaumont, transferred 1820 to Saint-Denis).  Kerrebrouck quotes the monumental inscription which records the burial of "Johannes…Lud[ovici regis Francorum filius]" who died "VI Id Mar" 1247 (O.S.)[638]

6.         JEAN “Tristan” de France (Damietta, Egypt 8 Apr 1250-Tunis [2/3] Aug 1270, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the fourth child of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" was "Jehan qui fu nommez Tritrem et fu quens de Nevers"[639]The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the birth in 1250 at Damietta of Jean, whom his mother Marguerite "fit surnommer Tristan, à cause de la tristesse qu'elle ressentit de la captivité de son mari et de ses frères, et des malheurs du people chrétien"[640].  Comte de Nevers 1265 by right of his wife.  He claimed to inherit the counties of Auxerre and Tonnerre on the death of his father-in-law.  Comte de Valois et de Crépy in Mar 1268.  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Aug 1270 "apud Carthaginem" of "regis Franciæ filium Johannem comitem Nivernensium"[641]He died of dysentery on crusade in Tunis.  The necrology of Port-Royal records the death "IV Non Aug" of "Jehan jadis comte de Nevers"[642].  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "III Non Aug" of "Johannes comes Nivernensis"[643]m (contract Vincennes 8 Jun 1258, Jun 1265) as her first husband, YOLANDE de Bourgogne Ctss de Nevers, daughter & heiress of EUDES de Bourgogne [Capet] Comte de Nevers, d’Auxerre et de Tonnerre & his wife Mathilde de Bourbon Dame de Bourbon Ctss de Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre ([1248/49]-2 Jun 1280, bur Nevers, église Saint-François).  The marriage contract between “Oedes fiuz le Duc de Bourgongne, cuens de Nevers et sires de Bourbon...Yolent nostre ainznée fille” and “Loys...roi de France...monseigneur Iehan son fil” is dated 8 Jun 1258[644].  Hugues IV Duke of Burgundy, in light of dispute between “Ioannem filium...Ludovici Franc. regis et...neptem nostram Yolendim eius uxorem, filiam primogeniti filii nostri Odonis”, and himself, ordered that Yolande be returned to her father until her husband was 21 years old by charter dated May 1266[645].  The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Yolendem filiam Odonis comitis Nivernensis et viduam Iohannis filii Ludovici regis Francie" as second wife of "Robertus primogenitus Guidonis", specifying that he obtained the county of Nevers by this marriage[646].  The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon names "Yolandem filiam Odonis comites Nivernensis et viduam Iohannis filii Ludovici…regis Francie" as [second] wife of "Robertus primogenitus Guidonis et Mathilde"[647].  She married secondly (contract Auxerre Mar 1272) as his second wife, Robert III Comte de Flandres.

7.         PIERRE de France ([1251]-Salerno 6 or 7 Apr 1284, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers)An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the fifth child of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" was "Pierre...quens d’Alençon" who married "la fille le conte de Blois"[648].  His parentage is confirmed by the Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis which records the marriage in 1272 of "comes Alensonis Petrus frater Philippi regis Franciæ" and "Johannam filiam Johannis comitis Blesensis"[649]He was invested by his father in Mar 1269 as Comte d'Alençon et du Perche, Seigneur de Mortagne et de Bellême.  He entered into possession of his lands on return from crusade in Dec 1271.  Comte de Blois et de Chartres, by right of his wife.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "VII Id Apr" of "domini Petri quondam comitis Alençonii filii quondam regis Francie"[650].  An anonymous Chronicon of Saint-Marcial records the death in Apulia of "comes de Lanso…nepos domini Karoli" in 1284[651]The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1284 "in Apuliam" of "comes Alansonis Petrus Philippi regis Franciæ frater", the burial of his flesh and intestines "in abbatia Regalis montis Apuliæ Cisterciensis ordinis" and the burial of his bones and heart "Parisius...apud fratres Prædicatores...apud Minores"[652]m (by treaty Paris Feb 1263, 1272) JEANNE de Châtillon Ctss de Blois, de Chartres et de Dunois, daughter of JEAN [I] de Châtillon Comte de Blois & his wife Alix de Bretagne ([1253]-19 or 29 Jan 1291, bur Abbaye de Laguiche, near Blois).  The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1272 of "comes Alensonis Petrus frater Philippi regis Franciæ" and "Johannam filiam Johannis comitis Blesensis"[653].  The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records that "uxor...eius Johanna Blesis comitissa" was childless after the death of "comes Alansonis Petrus Philippi regis Franciæ frater" and that she lived "in sancta viduitate"[654]She sold the county of Chartres to the crown 1286.  The necrology of Chartres records the death "IV Kal Feb" of "Joanna de Castellione comitissa Carnotensis vidua Petri de Francia comitis de Alençonio filii Ludovici regis"[655].  A charter dated Jan 1295 records that “Johannis comitis Britannie” and “Hugonis de Castellione comitis Blesen.” agreed a division of territories following the deaths of “la contesse Jehane de Blois...sans hoir [...et du conte Pierre d’Alençon son mary]...du conte Jehan de Bloys et de la contesse Aaliz notre seur sa femme[656].  Comte Philippe & his wife had two children:

a)         LOUIS d’Alençon ([1272]-1272, bur Abbaye de Royaumont, transferred 1791 to Saint-Denis).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Kerrebrouck records that the tomb of Louis and Philippe is preserved "au musée de Cluny à Paris"[657]

b)         PHILIPPE d’Alençon ([1274]-1275, bur Abbaye de Royaumont, transferred 1791 to Saint-Denis).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Kerrebrouck records that the tomb of Louis and Philippe is preserved "au musée de Cluny à Paris"[658]

8.         BLANCHE de France ([Jaffa early 1253]-Paris, Monastère des Clarisses de l’Ave Maria, Faubourg Saint-Marcel 17 Jun 1320, bur Paris, Monastère des Clarisses de l’Ave Maria, Faubourg Saint-Marcel)An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records the birth of "Blanche" second daughter of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence", after the birth of "Robert...quens de Clermont em Biauvoisin" [which is inconsistent with other sources], adding that she married "le roy d’Espaigne"[659]Matthew of Paris records the birth of King Louis's daughter in Palestine but does not name her[660].  The chronology of the family suggests that this daughter must have been Blanche, but this is not beyond all doubt.  The marriage contract between "Donum Fernandum primogenitum Domini…Alfonsi…Electi in Regem Romanorum necnon et Castellæ, Toleti, Legionis, Galeciæ, Sibil. Cordub. Murc. Giem. et Alguarb. Regis" and "Dominum Ludovicum …Regem Franciæ…dominam Blancham filiam suam" is dated 28 Sep 1266[661].  The Chronicon de Cardeña records the marriage “dia de Sant Andres” in 1269 of “Infant D. Ferrando con Doña Blanca fija del Rey de Francia[662].  She was imprisoned in Castile on the death of her husband, but returned to France in 1277 from where she attempted to have the rights of her son to the throne of Castile recognised.  The testament of "Philippes…Roy de France" is dated Dec 1285 and makes a bequest to "Blanche nostre suer", and also names "la Reine Isabelle jadis nostre demme"[663]m (contract Saint-Germain-en-Laye 28 Sep 1266, Burgos 30 Nov 1268) Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla “él de la Cerda”, son of ALFONSO X “el Sabio” King of Castile & his wife Infanta doña Violanta de Aragón (Valladolid 23 Oct 1255-Ciudad Real 25 Jul 1275, bur Las Huelgas de Burgos).

9.         MARGUERITE de France ([early 1255]-Jul 1271, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the third daughter of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" married "au duc de Braibant" but did not live long[664].  Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that she was born after Blanche, but before her brother Robert.  The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Ampliata names "Margaretam filiam sancti Ludovici Regis Francie" as the first wife of "Iohannes dux Lothoringie et Brabantie" specifying that she had one son[665].  The primary source which confirms her first betrothal has not yet been identified.  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that "Johannes primus…in ducatu Lotharingie et Brabancie" married "Margaretam, filiam Philippi regis Francorum", adding that she died in childbirth with her child[666]Betrothed (1257) to HENRI de Brabant, son of HENRI III "le Pacifique/le Débonnaire" Duke of Brabant & his wife Alix de Bourgogne [Capet] (Louvain [1251/52]-after 29 Apr 1272).  This betrothal was terminated because of the imbecility of the fiancé.  He succeeded his father in 1261 as HENRI IV Duke of Brabant, but abdicated in 1267 in favour of his younger brother whom Marguerite later married.  m ([1270]) as his first wife, JEAN I “the Victorious” Duke of Brabant, son of HENRI III "le Pacifique/le Débonnaire" Duke of Brabant & his wife Alix de Bourgogne [Capet] (Brussels 1253-Antwerp 3 May 1294, bur Brussels Franciscan Church).

10.      ROBERT de France (1256-7 Feb 1317, bur Paris, église des Jacobins)An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the sixth child of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" was "Robert...quens de Clermont em Biauvoisin" who married "la fille au seigneur de Bourbon"[667].  His parentage is confirmed by the Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis which names "rex Franciæ fratrem suum Robertum comitem Clarimontis"[668].  The Majus Chronicon Lemovicense records the birth in 1256 of "Robertus filius Ludovici...regis" and his betrothal to "filia vicecomitis Lemovicensis"[669]He was created Comte de Clermont, Seigneur de Creil-sur-Oise et de Sassy-le-Grand in Mar 1269.  He received severe head injuries, which affected his reason for the rest of his life, during a tournament in Paris in 1279 in celebration of the arrival of Charles d'Anjou Prince of Salerno [later Charles II King of Sicily][670].  Sire de Bourbon 1287, by right of his wife. 

-        COMTES de CLERMONT

11.      AGNES de France ([1260]-Château de Lantenay, Côte d’Or 19 or 20 Dec 1325, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux)An anonymous chronicle of the kings of France, written [1286/1314], records that the fourth daughter of "li rois Loois...[et] Marguerite la fille au conte de Provence" married "au duc de Bourgoigne"[671]She was regent of Burgundy during the minority of her son Duke Hugues from 1306 until 9 Nov 1311.  The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "XIII Kal Jan" of "Agnes ducissa Burgundiæ filia Ludovici regis Francorum"[672]m (contract 20 Oct 1272, 1273) ROBERT II “Sans Terre” Duke of Burgundy, son of HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy & his first wife Yolande de Dreux ([1245/50]-Vernon, Eure 21 Mar 1306, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).

 

 

PHILIPPE de France, son of LOUIS IX King of France & his wife Marguerite de Provence (Poissy, Yvelines 1 May 1245-Perpignan 5 Oct 1285, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth "in festo apostolorum Philippi et Jacobi" in 1245 of "Philippus filius Ludovici regis"[673]The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the birth in 1245 "le premier mai, à la fête des apôtres Jacques et Philippe" of Philippe, son of Louis IX King of France[674]The Speculum historiali of Vincent de Beauvais records the birth in 1243 of "Ludovicus filiorum...Ludovici regis Franciæ primogenitus" and the birth "anno sequenti" of "ei secundus filius...Philippus"[675]Heir to the throne 1260 on the death of his older brother.  He succeeded his father in 1270 as PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France.  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 15 Aug 1271.  He succeeded his uncle in Toulouse 1271.  He was a candidate for the imperial throne in 1273.  King Philippe III invaded Aragon in early 1285 and briefly captured Girona 7 Sep 1285.  The testament of "Philippes…Roy de France" is dated Dec 1285 and makes a bequest to "Blanche nostre suer", and also names "la Reine Isabelle jadis nostre demme"[676]The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1285 "apud Perpeigniacum" of "Philippus...rex Franciæ", the burial of his flesh and intestines "apud Narbonam in majori ecclesia" and the burial of his heart "fratres Prædicatores Parisius...in sua...ecclesia"[677]The necrology of the Leprosery at Sens records the death "VI Non Oct" of "Phylippus filius Ludovicus regi Francorum" at the castle of "Paripagniaus"[678]

m firstly (by contract Corbès near Montpellier 11 May 1258, Clermont-en-Auvergne 6 Jul 1262) Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón, daughter of don JAIME I "el Conquistador" King of Aragon & his second wife Iolanda of Hungary (1243-Cosenza, Calabria 28 Jan 1271, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Violant…la otra Costancia…et Isabel…la quarta…Maria" as the four daughters of King Jaime and his second wife, stating that Isabel married "Phelip filio primogenito del Rey de Francia"[679].  The marriage contract between "Ludovicus…Francorum Rex…filium nostrum Philippum" and "Isabellam filiam…Jacobi…Regis Aragonum, Maioricarum et Valentiæ, comitem Barchinonensem et Urgelli et dominum Montispessulani" is dated 11 May 1258[680].   The Flores historiarum of Adam of Clermont records the marriage "in civitate Claromontensi" in 1262 of "Philippus regis Franciæ filius" and "filiam regis Aragonum...Ysabellam neptem beatæ Helizabeth Teutonicæ", adding that his father-in-law granted Philippe his property "in civitate Bituricensi, Carcassona et in diœcesi Mimatensi" in exchange for property "in comitatibus de Besaudu et Rossilionis et Cataloniæ"[681]The “Visitation” of Rigaud Archbishop of Rouen records “II Non Jul” 1262 that he conducted the marriage (“desponsavimus”) “in majori ecclesia dicti loci” (suggested in the edition consulted to be “Clari Montis”) of “dominum Philippum primogenitum domini regis Francorum” and “domicella Ysabelli filia...regis Aragonum[682].  The Gesta Sancti Ludovici records “circa Pentecosten” 1262 the marriage “apud Claromontem in Avernia” of “Ludovicus rex Franciæ...Philippo filio suo primogenito” and “Ysabellam filiam regis Aragoniæ[683].  She died, 6 months pregnant, after a fall from a horse on returning from the crusade in Tunis.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "V Kal Feb" of "dominis Ysabellis de Aragonis quondam Francie regine"[684]

m secondly (contract Vincennes 21 Aug 1274) MARIE de Brabant, daughter of HENRI III Duke of Brabant & his wife Alix de Bourgogne [Capet] (Louvain ([1260]-Murel near Meulan 12 Jan 1322, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Henricum…Iohannem…Godefridum…et Mariam" as the children of "Henricus…tertius dux" & his wife, specifying that Marie was later "regina Francie"[685]The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1274 "die Martis infra octavas Assumptionis beatæ Mariæ...apud Vincenas" of "Philippus rex Franciæ" and "Mariam...filiam Henrici quondam ducis Brabantiæ ex filia ducis Hugonis Burgundiæ et sororem Joannis tunc Brabantiæ ducis"[686]She was consecrated Queen of France at Paris, Sainte Chapelle 24 Jun 1275.  The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the consecration in 1275 "apud Parisius...in festo sancti Joannis Baptistæ" of "Maria regina Franciæ"[687].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1321 (O.S.) of "Maria quondam regina Franciæ, orta de Brabanto et quondam ducis filia, uxor Philippi regis Franciæ filii sancti Ludovici" and her burial "apud fratres Minores Parisius"[688]The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "IV Id Jan" of "domina Maria de Brebencia quondam regina Francie uxor quondam Philippi regi Francie dicti le Hardi"[689]

King Philippe III & his first wife had five children:

1.         LOUIS de France (1263-of poisoning Château du Bois de Vincennes 1276 before May, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1276 of "Ludovicus primogenitus filius regis Franciæ Philippi", allegedly poisoned, adding that it was rumoured that "regina Maria uxor regis" was responsible[690].  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1276 of "Ludovicus primogenitus regis Franciæ Philippi" and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Dionysii in Francia"[691]

2.         PHILIPPE de France (Fontainebleau [8 Apr/Jun] 1268-Fontainebleau 29 Nov 1314, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis, his heart bur Priory of Poissy)The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the birth in 1268 of "Philippus filius Philippi primogeniti sancti regis Franciæ Ludovici"[692]He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother.  He succeeded 1284 by right of his wife as FELIPE I King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne.  He succeeded his father in 1285 as PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France.   

-        see below

3.         ROBERT de France (1269-1276, before May, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Kerrebrouck states that Robert was born in 1269[693].  Accounts for "le terme de l’Ascension 1276" records payment made to "Maria, nutrix deffuncti Roberti filii regis"[694]

4.         CHARLES de France (Vincennes 12 Mar 1270-Le Perray, Yvelines 16 Dec 1325, bur Paris, église des Jacobins)The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth "in Quadragesima" in 1270 of "Carolus filius Philippi regis de prima uxore"[695]Comte de Valois et d'Alençon 1285.   

-        see below, Chapter 2.  KINGS of FRANCE, HOUSE of VALOIS

5.         son stillborn (28 Jan 1271).  Kerrebrouck records this stillbirth but does not cite the corresponding primary source[696].   

King Philippe III & his second wife had three children:

6.         LOUIS de France (May 1276-Hôtel d’Evreux, Paris 19 May 1319, bur Paris, église des Jacobins)The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth in May 1276 of "Ludovicus filius Philippi regis de uxore secunda"[697].  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife[698]"Philippus…Francorum Rex" granted annual revenue to "fratri nostro Ludovico", by charter dated Apr 1307[699].  Comte de Beaumont-le-Roger (Beaumont-sur-Oise) 1284-1298.  Comte d’Evreux, de Meulan, de Gien et de Longueville 6 Oct 1298, confirmed Apr 1308.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death "sabbato post Ascensionem Domini" in 1319 of "dominus Ludovicus comes Ebroicensis" and his burial "juxta uxorem suam in ecclesia fratrum Prædictorum Parisius"[700]The Chronique Parisienne records the death in 1319 “le jour d’un vendredi aprez l’Ascencion Nostre Seigneur...à Longpont” of “Louys de France conte de la cité d’Evreux, frere de Philippe le Beaux jadiz roy de France” and his burial “le mardy ensuivant...à Paris en l’eglise des Jacobins[701]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "20 May" of "Ludovici comitis Ebroicensis"[702]m (1301) MARGUERITE d’Artois dame de Brie-Comte-Robert, daughter of PHILIPPE d'Artois Seigneur de Conches & his wife Blanche de Bretagne (1285-23/24 Apr or 26 Oct 1311, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that one of the daughters of "Philippus filius Roberti comitis Attrebatensis" married "Ludovicus regis Franciæ frater, comes Ebroicarum"[703].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1301 of "Ludovicus comes Ebroicensis frater regis Franciæ" and "Margaretam filiam Philippi Roberti comitis Attrebatensis filii"[704]Philippe IV King of France granted revenue to "consanguinea nostra Blancha...J. ducis Britannie filia" for “Margarete filie sue...Ludovici comitis Ebroicensis germani nostri...uxori...maritagii” by charter dated Jul 1303[705].  Dame de Brie-Comte-Robert.  The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "26 Oct" of "Margarethæ quondam comitissæ Ebroicensis"[706]Louis Comte d'Evreux & his wife had five children: 

a)         MARIE d’Evreux (1303-31 Oct 1335, bur Brussels, Franciscan Church).  The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Ampliata names "Mariam filiam domini Ludovici fratris Regis Francie" as the wife of "Iohannem ducem…tercium"[707].  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that "Johannes tertius" married "Mariam filiam Ludowici comitis Eboracensis"[708]m (1314) JEAN III “le Triomphant” Duke of Brabant, son of JEAN II Duke of Brabant & his wife Margaret of England (1300-Brussels 5 Dec 1355, bur Villers-la-Ville, Brabant).  

b)         PHILIPPE d’Evreux (27 Mar 1306-Jerez de la Frontera 23 or 26 Sep 1343, bur Pamplona, Cathedral Santa María el Real)Comte d’Angoulême et de Mortain 27 Mar 1318, confirmed by the Treaty of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon 14 Mar 1336.  He succeeded his father in 1319 as Comte d’Evreux.  He was proclaimed FELIPE III “le Bon/le Sage” King of Navarre by an Assembly in 1328, shortly after the succession of Philippe VI King of France.  Crowned King of Navarre 5 Mar 1329, Pamplona, Cathedral of Santa María el Real.  He died after being injured in the neck by an arrow at the siege of Algeciras.  The necrology of Vauvert records the death "VI Kal Oct" of "Philippus rex Navarre"[709]m (contract Paris 27 Mar 1318, 18 Jun 1318, Château de Conflans 1329) JEANNE de France, daughter of LOUIS X “le Hutin” King of France & his first wife Marguerite de Bourgogne [Capet] (Conflans Sainte Honorine 28 Jan 1312-died of the plague Château de Conflans 6 Oct 1349, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  On the death of her father, she was excluded from the succession to the French crown, her birth being suspicious because of the reputation of her mother.  Following her maternal grandmother’s protests, her uncle King Philippe V confirmed her future rights to the counties of Champagne and Brie 27 Mar 1318.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1318 of "regis Ludovici nuper defuncti...filia" and "comitis Ebroicensis Ludovico [filio Philippo]"[710]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage “le jour de la feste de la Trinité Nostre Seigneur à Paris au palaiz royal” of “Philippe filz de mons. Louys [conte de la conté d’Evreux” and “Marie l’aisnée fille de Louys jadiz roy de France et de Navarre”, dated to 1318 from the context[711]She was proclaimed JUANA II Queen of Navarre by an Assembly 1328 shortly after the succession of Philippe VI as King of France.  Crowned Queen of Navarre 5 Mar 1329, Pamplona, Cathedral of Santa María el Real.  She renounced her rights to the county of Champagne 1335.   

-        KINGS of NAVARRE

c)         CHARLES d’Evreux (-5 Sep 1336, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  Baron d’Etampes 1319.  Comte d'Etampes Sep 1327.  m (by treaty Poissy, Yvelines Apr 1335) as her first husband, doña MARÍA de la Cerda dame de Lunel, daughter of don FERNANDO de la Cerda de Castilla & his wife doña Juana Nuñez Señora de Lara ([1319]-Paris 13 Mar 1375, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  Ayala’s Crónica de Enrique II records in 1373 that “Doña Maria de Lara fija de Don Ferrando de la Cerda e de Doña Juana de Lara, hermana de Don Juan Nuñez de Lara Señor de Vizcaya, Condesa de Alanzon...primero casada en Francia con el Conde de Estampas...y despues...con el Conde de Alanzon, hermano del Rey Don Phelipe de Francia” claimed “las tierras de Lara é de Vizcaya” from Enrique II King of Castile[712]She married secondly Charles II Comte d’Alençon.  The necrology of the Celestins de Paris commemorates "domine Marie de Hyspania comitisse de Alençonio" mother of "dominorum Ludovici comitis de Stampis ac Johannis fratris sui" on "XVIII Kal Jul"[713].  Charles Comte d'Etampes & his wife had two children:

i)          LOUIS d’Evreux [d'Etampes] (1336-Paris Hôtel de Nesle 6 May 1400, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The necrology of the Celestins de Paris commemorates "dominorum Ludovici comitis de Stampis ac Johannis fratris sui" on "XVIII Kal Jul"[714]Comte d’Etampes et de Gien 1336.  Seigneur de Beaufort et de Soleines en Champagne Feb 1357.  Seigneur de Lunel 20 Apr 1364.  m (contract 16 Jan 1358) as her second husband, JEANNE de Brienne, widow of GAUTHIER VI de Brienne Conte de Lecce e Conversano titular Duke of Athens, daughter of RAOUL I de Brienne Comte d’Eu et de Guines & his wife Jeanne de Mello Dame de Lormes (-Sens 6 Jul 1389, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronique des comtes d’Eu, written in 1390, names "Jehanne...et Marie" as the two daughters of "Raoul" and his wife "madame de Mello", adding that Jeanne married "au duc d’Athènes et depuis au conte d’Estampes"[715]Dame de Château-Chinon. 

ii)         JEAN d’Etampes (-Rome after 1373).  The necrology of the Celestins de Paris commemorates "dominorum Ludovici comitis de Stampis ac Johannis fratris sui" on "XVIII Kal Jul"[716].  He was held hostage by the English in 1360 for the release of Jean II “le Bon” King of France. 

d)         MARGUERITE d’Evreux (1307-1350, bur Notre-Dame de Boulogne-sur-Mer)A charter dated 25 Jul 1331 is addressed to "Margaritæ comitissæ Boloniæ natæ quondam Ludovici de Francia comitis Ebroicensis"[717].  "Domina Marguerita Ebroicensi Arverniæ et Boloniæ comitissa tutrice...Johannæ filiæ suæ et quondam...Guillelmi...comitis" is named in a charter dated 1334[718]m (1325) GUILLAUME [XI] Comte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne, son of ROBERT VII “le Grand” Comte d’Auvergne et de Boulogne & his wife Blanche de Clermont (-Château de Vic-le-Comte, Puy-de-Dôme 6 Aug 1332). 

e)         JEANNE d’Evreux (1310-Brie-Comte-Robert 14 Mar 1371, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "rex" married "Johannam quondam filiam comitis Ebroicensis, cognatam suam germanam...avunculi sui filiam" after the death of his second wife[719].  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the marriage "III Non Jul" in 1324 of King Charles and "filiam quondam domini Ludovici patruelis sui, comitis Ebroycensis" after dispensation for 2o consanguinity[720]The necrology of Vauvert records the death "IV Non Mar" of "domine Joanna de Ebroicis regina Francie et Navarre"[721].  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "IV Non Mar" of "domine Johanne de Ebroys Francie et Navarre regine uxoris Karoli quarti…filii…Philippi Pulcri Francie regis"[722]m (Paris 1325) as his third wife, CHARLES IV King of France, son of PHILIPPE IV King of France & his wife Juana I Queen of Navarre (Creil, Oise 18 Jun 1294-Château du Bois de Vincennes 1 Feb 1328, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). 

7.         MARGUERITE de France (1275-Marlborough Castle, Wiltshire 14 Feb 1318, bur Grey Friars, London)The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife, recording in a later passage the marriage of Marguerite "apud Cantuariam" in 1299[723]Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[724].  The Annals of Worcester record the marriage “Sep…IV Id…in ecclesia Cantuarensi” in 1299 of “Edwardus rex” and “Margareta soror Philippi Regis Franciæ[725].  A charter dated 27 Sep 1299 lists the dower assigned by King Edward to “Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ[726].  King Edward II issued a charter dated 18 Apr 1318 to “Thomæ comiti Norffolciæ et marescallo Angliæ et Edmundo de Wodestok fratribus nostris...executoribus testamenti bonæ memoriæ Margaretæ nuper reginæ Angliæ matris nostræ[727]m ([Betrothed 12 May 1299] treaty Montreuil 19 Jun 1299, Canterbury Cathedral 8 Sep 1299) as his second wife, EDWARD I King of England, son of HENRY III King of England & his wife Eléonore de Provence (Palace of Westminster 17/18 Jun 1239-Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland 8 Jul 1307, bur Westminster Abbey).

8.         BLANCHE de France Ctss d'Alsace (1278-Vienna 19 Mar 1306, bur Vienna, Minoritenkirche)The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife, recording in a later passage the marriage of Blanche and "regis Romanorum Alberti filius Radulfus dux Austriæ" in 1299 "apud Parisius"[728]The Annals of Worcester record that Edward I King of England was absorbed by “immoderatus amor” for “mulieris Gallicæ et neptis propriæ” in 1294[729].  Her Austrian marriage was arranged to confirm King Albrecht's new alliance with France[730]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Mar 1306 of "ducissa Austriæ Blancha, regis Franciæ soror ex patre...cum filio suo unico", poisoned[731]The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "domina Blanka" without giving further details to identify her[732].  The necrology of Feldbach records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "Blanka relicta Ruodolfi quondam regis Boemie"[733], although this implies, wrongly it appears, that her husband predeceased her.  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIV Kal Apr 1305" of "Blanka filia regis Francie, ducissa Austrie et Styrie"[734].  The necrology of Minoritenkirche, Vienna records the death "XIV Kal 1305" of "Blanka ducissa Austrie filia Philippi regis Francie consors Rudolfi ducis Austrie hic sepulta"[735].  The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Non Mar" of "Planca ducissa Austrie et Stirie"[736], although this date is inconsistent with other sources.  Betrothed (Sep 1290) to JEAN de Flandre, son of GUY Count of Flanders & his second wife Isabelle de Luxembourg Ctss de Namur (1267-[28 Oct 1329/31 Jan 1330], Bruges, église des Cordeliers).  He succeeded in 1298 as JEAN I Comte de NamurBetrothed (31 Jul 1291) to EDWARD Prince of Wales, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral).  He succeeded his father in 1307 as EDWARD II King of EnglandBetrothed (1296) JEAN de Hainaut Graaf van Oostrevant, son of JEAN II Comte de Hainaut & his wife Philippine de Luxembourg (-killed in battle near Courtrai 11 Jul 1302).  m (by treaty Aug 1299, Paris 29 May 1300) as his first wife, RUDOLF III Duke of Austria, son of ALBRECHT I King of Germany & his wife Elisabeth Queen of Hungary and Bohemia ([1282]-Heerlager [Horazdiowitz/Horaždovice] an der Otava/Mottawa 4 Jul 1307, bur Prague, St Veit’s Cathedral).  He succeeded in 1306 as RUDOLF King of Bohemia

 

 

PHILIPPE de France, son of PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Aragón (Fontainebleau 8 Apr/Jun 1268-Fontainebleau 29 Nov 1314, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis, his heart bur Priory of Poissy)The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the birth in 1268 of "Philippus filius Philippi primogeniti sancti regis Franciæ Ludovici"[737].  He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother.  He succeeded in 1284 by right of his wife as FELIPE I King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne.  He succeeded his father in 1285 as PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France.  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 6 Jan 1286.  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Philippus...cum uxore" were crowned in 1285 (O.S.) "Remis...die festo Epiphanie"[738]He refused the offer of Pope Nicholas IV 1290 to become guardian of the Holy Land.  He conquered Bordeaux and Guyenne from King Edward I of England 1294, although these territories were returned to England under the terms of the peace treaty of Paris 20 May 1303.  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death "in eodem quo natus loco...in castro de Fonte Bliaudi...III Kal Dec" in 1314 of "Philippus rex Franciæ" and his burial "in apud Sanctum Dionysium", his heart being buried "apud Pyssiacum" in the monastery which he founded[739]The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "III Kal Dec" of "domini Philippi nepotism beati Ludovici quondam regis Francie et Navarre"[740]

m (contract May 1275, Paris, Notre Dame 16 Aug 1284) JUANA I Queen of Navarre Ctss de Champagne, daughter of ENRIQUE I King of Navarre, HENRI III Comte de Champagne & his wife Blanche d’Artois (Bar-sur-Seine 14 Jan 1273-Château de Vincennes 31 Mar or 2 Apr 1305, bur Paris église des Cordeliers).  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1284 "festo Assumptionis beatæ virginis matris Domini...crastino...apud Parisius" of "Philippus regis Franciæ Philippi filius major natu" and "Johannam filiam defuncti regis Navarræ comitisque Campaniæ Henrici"[741]The contract between "Philippus…Francorum Rex" and "Blancham Reginam Navarræ, Campaniæ, Briæque Comitissam Palatinam", dated May 1275, provides for the marriage between "filiam suam Joannam heredem unicam" and "unum ex duobus primogenitis nostris"[742].  After her marriage, she continued to govern Champagne personally, her husband governing Navarre.  A charter dated 1297 records the appointment of arbitrators in the dispute between "Mathildis de Courtenaio comitissa Theati uxor…domini Philippi de Flandria, filii…comitis Flandrensis" and "Lora vicecomitissa Turenne domina de Cabanesio soror dicte domine Mathildis" concerning the county of Bigorre, which they had sold to "domina Johanna regina Francie et Navarre"[743].  A charter dated 1302 records that Philippe IV King of France summoned "comitem Fuxi, Margaritam comitissam Fuxo eius matrem, comitissam Armaignensem relictam domini Geraldi de Armaniaco, Constanciam vicecomitissam de Marciano, et Guillermam de Bearno dominam de Moncada" as proxy for "consortis nostre regine, Guillelmo Tesson militi et Lore vicecomitisse Turenne" for a hearing relating to the county of Bigorre[744]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Apr 1305 "apud nemus Vincennarum" of "Johanna regina Franciæ et Navarræ, Britanniæ et Campaniæ comitissa" and her burial "in ecclesia fratrum Minorum"[745]The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "II Kal Apr" of "domine Johanne quondam regine Francie et Navarre"[746]

King Philippe IV & his wife had seven children:

1.         LOUIS de France (Paris 4 Oct 1289-Château du Bois de Vincennes 5 Jun 1316, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his mother in 1305 as LUIS I King of Navarre, Comte de Champagne.  Crowned King of Navarre at Pamplona, Cathedral of Santa María el Real, 1 Oct 1307.  He succeeded his father in 1314 as LOUIS X "le Hutin" King of France.  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 24 Aug 1315.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death "in domo regali nemoris Vicenarum" 5 Jul 1316 of "Ludovicus rex Franciæ et Navarræ" and his burial "primo Parisius in ecclesia beatæ Virginis...sequenti ad ecclesiam beati Dionysii"[747]The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "VIII Id Jun" of "Ludovici quondam Francie et Navarre Regis"[748].  His date of death is confirmed as 5 Jun by a manuscript account of 1316 which records that he died “V de junii anno predicto” and was buried “VII diem junii CCC XVI[749]m firstly (contract Abbaye de Longchamp 28 Feb 1299/1300, contract Vincennes 28 Mar 1301, Corbeil, Essonne 23 Sep 1305) MARGUERITE de Bourgogne, daughter of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France (1290-Château-Gaillard from tuberculosis 30 Apr 1315, bur Vernon, église des Cordeliers).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage "die Jovis post festum sancti Matthæi apostoli" in 1305 of "Ludovicus primogenitus regis Francorum" and "Margaretam primogenitam ducis Burgundie"[750]Hugues dux de Bourgoigne” promised to pay “quatre mile livres de tornois fors” to “nostre…uncle mons. Jehan de Chalon signour d’Allay” less the sum owed to “adit roy mon signour dou marriage de madame la reyne de Navarre nostre…suer[751].  Accused of adultery in 1314, she was imprisoned at Château-Gaillard where she died soon after.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Margareta Navarræ regina juvencula et Blancha regis Navarræ Karoli fratris junioris uxor" were accused of adultery respectively with "Philippo et Galtero de Alneto fratribus militibus" in 1314[752]The allegations against her, and her sisters-in-law, were the subject of la Ballade des dames du temps jadis by François Villon[753]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1315 of "Margareta quondam Navarræ regina" and her burial "Vernone in ecclesia fratrum Minorem"[754].  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death in Apr 1315 of "uxor prima Ludovici regis Franciæ, filia ducis Burgundiæ" held "in privata custodia"[755]m secondly (Paris 31 Jul 1315) CLEMENCE of Hungary, daughter of CHARLES MARTEL of Sicily, Principe di Salerno, KÁROLY I titular King of Hungary [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Klementia von Habsburg (Feb 1293-Paris 12 Oct 1328, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "circa Natale Domini" in 1314 "cambellanum et secretarium suum Hugonem de Bovilla" was sent "ad partes Siciliæ" to bring back "Clementiam regis Hungariæ filiam" to marry "Ludovicus rex Franciæ et Navarræ", and in a later passage records their marriage "julio mense in festo beatæ Christinæ...apud sanctum Dionysium" in 1315[756].  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the marriage 31 Jul 1315 of "Ludovicus rex" and "Clementiam filiam quondam Karoli Martelli, qui fuit filius primogenitus Karoli secundi regis Siciliæ"[757]She was consecrated Queen with her husband, Notre-Dame de Reims 24 Aug 1315.  The Chronique Parisienne records the death “le jeudi“ 13 Oct 1328 of “Climence la roynne de France et de Navarre...fame jadiz de Louys roy de France et de Navarre” and her burial “le lundi ensuivant en l’eglise des Freres Prescheurs Jacobins[758]Mistress (1): EUDELINE, daughter of ---.  King Louis X & his first wife had one child:

a)         JEANNE de France (Conflans Sainte Honorine 28 Jan 1312-Château de Conflans 6 Oct 1349, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the birth "V Kal Feb" in 1311 (O.S.) of "Ludovicus rex...filiam Johannam"[759].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Ludovicus rex Franciæ et Navarræ" left "filiam unicam...Johannam" by his first wife[760]On the death of her father, she was excluded from the succession to the French crown, her birth being suspicious because of the reputation of her mother.  Following her maternal grandmother’s protests, her uncle King Philippe V confirmed her future rights to the counties of Champagne and Brie 27 Mar 1318.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1318 of "regis Ludovici nuper defuncti...filia" and "comitis Ebroicensis Ludovico [filio Philippo]"[761]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage “le jour de la feste de la Trinité Nostre Seigneur à Paris au palaiz royal” of “Philippe filz de mons. Louys [conte de la conté d’Evreux” and “Marie l’aisnée fille de Louys jadiz roy de France et de Navarre”, dated to 1318 from the context[762]She was proclaimed JUANA II Queen of Navarre by an assembly in 1328 shortly after the accession of Philippe VI as King of France, when he renounced his rights to the crown of Navarre.  She renounced her rights to the county of Champagne in 1335.  She died of the plague.  m (contract Paris 27 Mar 1318, 18 Jun 1318, Château de Conflans 1329) PHILIPPE d’Evreux, son of LOUIS de France Comte d’Evreux & his wife Marguerite d’Artois (27 Mar 1306-Jerez de la Frontera 23 Sep 1343, bur Pamplona, Cathedral Santa María el Real).  Comte d’Angoulême et de Mortain 27 Mar 1318, confirmed by the Treaty of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon 14 Mar 1336.  He succeeded his father in 1319 as Comte d’Evreux.  He was proclaimed FELIPE III “le Bon/le Sage” King of Navarre by an Assembly 1328, shortly after the succession of Philippe VI King of France.  Crowned King of Navarre 5 Mar 1329, Pamplona, Cathedral of Santa María el Real. 

King Louis X & his second wife had one child:

b)         JEAN de France (posthumously Paris 14 Nov 1316-Louvre 19 Nov 1316, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the birth "Parisius apud Luparam XXVII Kal Dec ex regina Clementia" of "puer masculus regis Ludovici...Johannes", his death "XIII Kal mensis predicti ibidem", and his burial "in ecclesia beati Dionysii"[763]He succeeded at birth as JEAN I “le Posthume” King of France, JUAN I King of Navarre.  

King Louis X had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1):  

c)          EUDELINE (1305-after 1330).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   Nun, later abbess at the Cordeline Convent, Faubourg Saint Marcel, Paris.

2.         MARGUERITE de France (-1294).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   Betrothed (Nov 1294) to Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla, son of don SANCHO IV "el Bravo" King of Castile and León & his wife doña María Alfonso de Molina “la Grande” (Seville 6 Dec 1285-Jaen 7 Sep 1312).  He succeeded in 1295 as FERNANDO IV "el Ajurno" King of Castile and León. 

3.         ISABELLE de France (Paris 1292-Castle Rising, Norfolk or Hertford Castle 21 Nov 1358, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London).  Edward I King of England appointed “Amadeum comitem Sabaudiæ consanguineum nostrum” as proxy for the marriages between “nos et Margaretam sororem...regis Franciæ...ac inter Edwardum filium nostrum et Isabellam...regis Franciæ filiam” by charter dated 12 May 1299[764].  The betrothal contract between “Ed. filz du roi d’Angleterre” and “Isabel fille du roi de France” is dated 20 May 1303[765].  The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "apud Boloniam…in festo Conversionis Sancti Pauli" in 1308 of "rex Edwardus" and "Isabellam filiam regis Franciæ Philippi"[766]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in Jan 1308 "apud Boloniam supra mare" of "Eduardus Angliæ rex" and "filiam unicam regis Franciæ Philippi...Isabellam"[767]The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the marriage “apud Boloniam...V Kal Feb” of “rex Edwardus” and “Isabellam filiam...regis Francie[768].  She was crowned Queen of England with her husband [23/25] Feb 1308.  The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the return of the couple to England 5 Feb and their coronation “VII Kal Mar...apud Westmonasterium[769].  Her relationship with her husband steadily deteriorated over the years, culminating in her flight to France to seek the protection of her brother Philippe V King of France.  In 1324, she started a love affair with Roger Mortimer, and together they plotted her husband's overthrow.  She was declared head of the Council of Regency by Parliament on the deposition of her husband.  However, her rule was unpopular.  She signed an unfavourable treaty with France and recognised Robert Bruce as king of Scotland for the first time.  In addition, Mortimer alienated the barons with his territorial ambitions.  Her son seized power, had Mortimer arrested after a Great Council meeting at Nottingham 19 Oct 1330 and condemned him to death.  Isabelle thereafter lived in retirement.  Froissart records that Isabelle went to "Ostrevant en Haynau en un chastel…Buignicourt dont messires Nicoles d’Aubrecicourt estoit sires"[770].  The Chronicon Angliæ records the death “die Sancti Rufi martyris” of “domina mater regis Edwardi domina Ysabella” and her burial “in ecclesia Fratrum Minorum Londoniis”, dated to 1357 from the context[771]m (contract 12 May 1299, betrothed 20 May 1303, Boulogne-sur-Mer 22 Jan 1308) EDWARD II King of England, son of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Caernarvon Castle 25 Apr 1284-murdered Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire 21 Sep 1327, bur Gloucester Cathedral).  Mistress ([1324/30]) of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer, son of EDMUND [I] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer & his wife Margaret de Fiennes (25 Apr or 3 May 1287-executed Tyburn, London 29 Nov 1330, bur Shrewsbury, Church of the Grey Friars).  He was created Earl of March in 1328. 

4.         BLANCHE de France (-shortly after 1294, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   Betrothed (1294) to Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla, son of don SANCHO IV "el Bravo" King of Castile and León & his wife doña María Alfonso de Molina “la Grande” (Seville 6 Dec 1285-Jaen 7 Sep 1312).  He succeeded in 1295 as FERNANDO IV "el Ajurno" King of Castile and León.    

5.         PHILIPPE de France ([1292/93]-Longchamp, near Paris 3 Jan 1322, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He was recognised Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Sire de Salins, by right of his wife, 26 Jun 1310.  Comte de Poitiers Dec 1311.  He was appointed regent on the death of his brother in 1316, awaiting the birth of his nephew.  He succeeded his nephew in 1316 as PHILIPPE V "le Long" King of France, FELIPE II King of Navarre.  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 6 Jan 1317.  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death 3 Jan 1321 (O.S.) of "Philippus rex"[772]The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "III Non Jan" of "Philippus regis Magni"[773]m (contract Vincennes 2 Mar 1295, Corbeil, Marne Jan 1307) JEANNE I Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne, Ctss d'Artois, daughter of OTHON V Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Mahaut Ctss d’Artois (before 2 Mar 1291-Roye, Somme 21 Jan 1330, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in Jan 1307 "apud Corbolium" of "Philippus regis Franciæ Philippi filius secundus genitus" and "Johannam primogenitam Odonis quondam Burgundiæ comitis ex filia Roberti Attrebati comitis"[774]She was accused of adultery in Spring 1314 and imprisoned in the Château de Dourdan.  She was declared innocent and taken back by her husband.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Johanna...sponsa Philippi comitis Pictavensis" was accused of adultery at the same time as her sister and sister-in-law in 1314, imprisoned "apud Durdactum castrum", but found not guilty and was reconciled with her husband[775]King Philippe V & his wife had five children:

a)         JEANNE de France (1 or 2 May 1308-10 or 15 Aug 1347, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Fontenay)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "rex Franciæ...filias...quarum majorem natu" married "duci Burgundiæ", in a later passage recording the marriage "in festo Trinitatis"[776]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage “le jour de la feste de la Trinité Nostre Seigneur à Paris au palaiz royal” of “le duc de Bourgongne” and “Jehanne l’ainsnée fille du roy de France et de Navarre”, dated to 1318 from the context[777]The testament of "Mathildis comitssa Attrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatina ac domina Salinensis", dated 24 Mar 1328, chooses burial "in ecclesia B. Mariæ Regalis prope Pontifaram" at the foot of "genitoris mei Roberti quondam comitis Atrebatensis" or "in ecclesia Fratrum Minorem apud Parisius" next to "Roberti…filii mei", appoints as her heir in Artois "Johannam…filiam meam…Reginam Francie et Navarræ" and in default "filiam meam Johannam ducissam Burgundiæ eiusdem Reginæ primogenitam", donated property for the soul of "domini et mariti mei Othonis quondam comitis Atrebatensis et Burgundiæ Palatini ac domini Salinensis", and makes other bequests[778].  She succeeded her mother in 1330 as Ctss Palatine de Bourgogne Ctss d’Artois.  Betrothed (contract Paris 6 Apr 1313) to HUGUES V Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France (1294-château d'Argilly, Côte d'Or early May 1315, bur 12 May Abbaye de Cîteaux).  m (contract Nogent-sur-Seine, Aube 29 Sep 1316, Paris 18 Jun 1318) EUDES IV Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France (1295-Sens, Yonne 3 Apr 1349, bur Abbaye de Cîteaux).

b)         MARGUERITE de France (1309-Paris 9 May 1382, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage "in die Magdalenæ" in 1320 of "comes Flandrie...filium" and "unam de filiabus regis"[779]Her marriage was arranged under the Treaty of Paris 5 May 1320, which reaffirmed the loyalty of her future husband's grandfather to the French crown[780].  Ctss d'Artois 1361.  m (contract 21 Jun 1320, 22 Jul 1320) LOUIS de Flandre, son of LOUIS de Flandre Comte de Nevers et de Rethel & his wife Jeanne Ctss de Rethel ([1304]-killed in battle Crécy 25 Aug 1346, bur Bruges, St Donat).  He succeeded his grandfather in 1322 as LOUIS I Count of Flanders

c)         ISABELLE de France (1310-1348)The Chronicle attributed to Jean Desnouelles records that one of the daughters of King Philippe V married "au doffin de Viane"[781]The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records the marriage of "Guigo" and "Isabellam Philippi Longi Francorum regis et Joannæ Burgundæ filiam"[782].  Letters dated [May] 1322 confirmed the marriage between "Guigonem Dalphinum Vienn." and "domicellam Isabellam…Philippi quondam Regis Franciæ…filiam"[783].  A charter dated May 1323 confirms the dowry for the marriage of "Guigone Dalphino Vienn. Albonisque comite" and "D. Isabella filia…Philippi quondam Francorum…Regis et D. Johannæ…Reginæ comitissæque Burgundiæ Palatinæ ac Dominæ Salinarum"[784]m firstly (contract Lyon 18 Jun 1316, contract Dole, Jura 17 May 1323, Fond-de-Dole 17 May 1323) GUIGUES VIII Dauphin de Viennois Comte d'Albon et de Grenoble, son of JEAN [II] de la Tour Comte d’Albon Dauphin de Viennois & his wife Béatrice of Hungary ([1309]-siege of la Perrière 28 Jul 1333, bur Grenoble, Saint-André).  m secondly ([1339]) JEAN [III] Seigneur de Faucogney, son of JEAN [II] Seigneur de Faucogney & his wife Catherine de Neufchâtel ([1310]-17 Jun/13 Dec 1345). 

d)         BLANCHE de France ([1311/12]-Longchamps 26 Apr 1358, bur Longchamps).  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records that "quarta...filia" of Philippe V King of France became a nun with "sororum Minorisarum Parisius" in 1317[785]The necrology of Longchamp provides on 2 Jan for a mass for "Phelippe roy de France et de Navarre et la reyne Jehanne de Bourgoingne pere et mere de la dame, seur Blanche, laquelle fut religieuse en ceste eglise"[786].  Clarice nun at Longchamps 1319. 

e)         PHILIPPE [Louis] de France (24 Jun 1316-Paris 24 Feb 1317, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the birth "circa festum sancti Johannis Baptistæ" in 1316 of "Philippo filius...Philippus" adding that he died "infra annum"[787]The Chronique Parisienne records the death 24 Feb “en l’ostel du palaiz de Paris” of “Louys filz Philippe le roy de France et de Navarre” and his burial “à Paris en l’eglise des Freres Mineurs[788]

6.         CHARLES de France (Creil, Oise 18 Jun 1294-Château du Bois de Vincennes 1 Feb 1328, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Comte de La Marche 1314.  He succeeded his brother in 1322 as CHARLES IV "le Bel" King of France, CARLOS I King of Navarre.  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 21 Feb 1322.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death "in vigilia Purificationis beatæ Mariæ apud nemus Vicenarum prope Parisius" in 1328 of "regem Franciæ Karolum" and his burial "apud sanctum Dionysium"[789]The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "Kal Feb" of "Karoli Francie et Navarre regis"[790]m firstly (before Apr 1308, annulled 19 May 1322) BLANCHE de Bourgogne, daughter of OTTO de Chalon Comte de Bourgogne & his wife Mathilde Ctss d’Artois (1296-Abbaye de Maubuisson Apr 1326).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1308 of "Karolus regis Franciæ tertius filius" and "Blancham filiam secundam quondam ducis Burgundiæ Othelini"[791]She was accused and convicted of adultery.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Margareta Navarræ regina juvencula et Blancha regis Navarræ Karoli fratris junioris uxor" were accused of adultery respectively with "Philippo et Galtero de Alneto fratribus militibus" in 1314, and in a later passage under 1315 that "Blancha", while in prison, became pregnant by her jailer or according to others by her own husband ("a serviente quodam eius custodiæ deputato dicebatur...a proprio [comite] diceretur")[792]She was imprisoned at Château-Gaillard.  Boudet quotes correspondence between various members of the French royal family and Pope John XXII, dated May to Aug 1318, requesting an urgent annulment of the marriage, and insinuating (although not expressly stating) that the pregnancy was the real reason for the urgency[793]An annulment was finally granted in May 1322 on the grounds of consanguinity.  The Chronique Parisienne records the annulment of the marriage of “Blanche d’Artoiz la premiere fame Charlez le roy de France et de Navarre...enclose au Chasteau de Gaillart en Normandie”, both because of “l’esmouvement de la fornicacion et avoutrie contre elle approuvé de son amy et mal veullant Gaultier d’Annoy chevalier, frere de Philippe d’Annoy, qui pour ce furent escorchez tous vifs” and because of the consanguinity between the couple[794]The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the annulment "XIV Kal Jun" in 1322 by Pope John XXII of the marriage between "Karolus...filius quondam tertiogenitus Philippi regis" and "Blancham comitis Burgundiæ filiam"[795]She became a nun at the Abbaye de Maubuisson after her repudiation.  m secondly (Provins, Seine-et-Marne 21 Sep 1322) MARIE de Luxembourg, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH VII Comte de Luxembourg & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (1305-Issoudun, Indre Mar 1324, bur Montargis, Loiret, église des religieuses de Saint-Dominique).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Maria" as older sister of "Regem Boemiæ"[796]The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the marriage "circa festum sancti Mathæi apostoli" in Sep 1322 of "Karolus...filius quondam tertiogenitus Philippi regis" and "Mariam filiam quondam Henrici de Lucemborc imperatoris Romanorum, germanamque regis Boemiæ"[797].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage "in festo beati Matthæi apostoli in primo castro regie" in 1322 of "rex" and "Mariam filiam Henrici quondam imperatoris et quondam comitis de Lucemburg"[798]The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage "IV Id Apr" in 1322 of "Maria…Boemiæ Regis germana" and "Karulo Regi Franciæ"[799].  She was consecrated Queen at Paris Sainte-Chapelle 15 May 1323.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death in 1324 of "Maria Regina Franciæ" in childbirth and her burial "ad sanctum Dionisium"[800]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in 1324 of "uxore regis Franciæ sorore regis Boemiæ"[801]She died in childbirth after falling out of the bottom of the coach which was driving her and her husband to a meeting with the Pope in Avignon[802]The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death "apud Exaudunum castrum" of "[reginam] Mariam" and her burial "in monasterium sororum de Monte Argivo" in Mar 1323 (O.S.)[803]m thirdly (5 Jul 1325) JEANNE d'Evreux, daughter of LOUIS de France Comte d’Evreux & his wife Marguerite d’Artois (1310-Brie-Comte-Robert 14 Mar 1371, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "rex" married "Johannam quondam filiam comitis Ebroicensis, cognatam suam germanam...avunculi sui filiam" after the death of his second wife[804].  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the marriage "III Non Jul" in 1324 of King Charles and "filiam quondam domini Ludovici patruelis sui, comitis Ebroycensis" after dispensation for 2o consanguinity[805]The necrology of Vauvert records the death "IV Non Mar" of "domine Joanna de Ebroicis regina Francie et Navarre"[806].  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "IV Non Mar" of "domine Johanne de Ebroys Francie et Navarre regine uxoris Karoli quarti…filii…Philippi Pulcri Francie regis"[807].  King Charles IV & his first wife had two children:

a)         PHILIPPE de la Marche (shortly before 5 Jan 1314-before 24 Mar 1322, bur Abbaye du Pont-aux-Dames, Crécy-la-Chapelle, Seine-et-Marne).  Kerrebrouck records his birth and burial, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[808].    

b)         JEANNE de la Marche (1315-17 May 1321, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson).  Kerrebrouck records her birth and burial, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[809].    

King Charles IV & his second wife had one child:

c)         LOUIS de France (Issoudun, Indre Mar 1324-[Mar] 1324, bur Montargis).  The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the birth of "unicum filium" to "Karolus...filius quondam tertiogenitus Philippi regis" and his wife "Mariam filiam quondam Henrici de Lucemborc imperatoris Romanorum, germanamque regis Boemiæ", adding that he died "post modicum" after being christened[810]

King Charles IV & his third wife had three children:

d)         JEANNE [Isabelle] de France ([1325]-end 1326).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "altera eius primogenita filia" died around the time the queen gave birth to another daughter in 1327[811].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Girard de Fracheto records that "Johanna regina Franciæ" gave birth "apud Castrum Novum super Ligerim" to "secundam filiam...Mariam", dated to late 1326 (O.S.?), after which "filia primogenita" died[812]The Chronique Parisienne records the birth “en la feste de Toussains à Chasteau-Thierry“ 1326 of “la segonde fille du roy”, and the death of “Ysabel sa premiere fille aprez ung an qu’elle avoit esté née, à Chasteau-Neuf-sur-Laire[813]

e)         MARIE de France ([1 Nov] 1326-6 Oct 1341, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "regina" gave birth to "filiam" in late 1326 (O.S.?)[814].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Girard de Fracheto records that "Johanna regina Franciæ" gave birth "apud Castrum Novum super Ligerim" to "secundam filiam...Mariam", dated to late 1326 (O.S.?), after which "filia primogenita" died[815]The Chronique Parisienne records the birth “en la feste de Toussains à Chasteau-Thierry“ 1326 of “la segonde fille du roy”, and the death of “Ysabel sa premiere fille aprez ung an qu’elle avoit esté née, à Chasteau-Neuf-sur-Laire[816]

f)          BLANCHE de France (posthumously [Vincennes or Châteauneuf near Orléans] 1 Apr 1328-[Vincennes] 8 Feb 1393, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "regina Johanna uxor nuper Karoli regis" gave birth to a daughter 1 Apr 1328 "apud nemus Vicenarum"[817].  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Girard de Fracheto records that "regina Johanna Ebroicensis" gave birth 1 Apr 1328 "apud nemus Vicenarum" to "feminam...Blancham"[818]The Chronique Parisienne records that “la vigille de Pasquez, Jehanne d’Evreux roynne de France fame Charlez roy de France et de Navarre...eust une fille qui au Boiz-de-Vincennes mourust [error]“ 1328[819]The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records that “domina Blancha, Regis Francie et Navarre et filia, ducissa Aurelianensis, Valesie et Bellimontis comitissa…dicti domini quondam sponsa” made donations on the death of “Philippus, Regis Francie filius, dux Aurelianensis, Valesie et Bellimontis comes[820].  Ctss de Beaumont-le-Roger.  m (contract 8 Jan 1345) PHILIPPE de France Comte de Valois, son of PHILIPPE VI King of France & his first wife Jeanne "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne (Château du Bois-de-Vincennes 1 Jul 1336-Orléans 1 Sep 1375, bur Orléans, église Sainte-Croix).  He was created Duc d'Orléans, Comte de Beaumont-le-Roger, Vicomte de Breteuil by his father 16 Apr 1344. 

7.         ROBERT de France (1297-Saint-Germain-en-Laye Aug 1307, bur Priory of Poissy, église de Saint Louis)The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis names "Robertum" as youngest of the four sons of Philippe IV King of France, adding that he died "in flore adolescentiæ suæ" and was buried "in monasterio sororem de Pyssiaco" in Aug 1308[821]Betrothed (Oct 1306) to CONSTANZA of Sicily, daughter of FEDERIGO I King of Sicily [Aragon] & his wife Eléonore of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] ([1306]-after 19 Jun 1344). 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    KINGS OF FRANCE (VALOIS)

 

 

A.      COMTES de VALOIS, KINGS of FRANCE 1328-1498

 

 

CHARLES de France, son of PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Aragón (Vincennes 12 Mar 1270-Le Perray, Yvelines 16 Dec 1325, bur Paris, église des Jacobins)The Brevis Chronicon of Saint-Denis records the birth "in Quadragesima" in 1270 of "Carolus filius Philippi regis de prima uxore"[822].  The Gesta Philippi Tertia Francorum Regis of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Philippus rex Franciæ" claimed "regnum Aragoniæ" for "filio suo Karolo" in 1284[823]He was appointed anti-king of Aragon and Valencia Feb/Mar 1284 by Pope Martin IV, crowned 11 Jun 1284 at Castillo de Lers, Catalonia, and attempted to conquer the kingdom from Pedro III but made peace in Jun 1295.  Comte de Valois et d'Alençon 1285.  Comte de Chartres, du Perche 1290.  His father-in-law ceded him the counties of Anjou and Maine 18 Aug 1290, in return for his renouncing his right to the kingdoms of Aragon and Valencia, the king of Sicily hoping thereby to obtain the release of his three sons still held hostage by Alfonso III King of Aragon[824].  He fought against the English in Guyenne in 1295, and against Guy Count of Flanders whom he captured in 1299.  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Karolus comes Valesii" captured "Guido comes Flandrensium...cum duobus filiis Roberto et Guillermo" in 1299[825]Pope Boniface VIII appointed him captain-general of the Romagna and the march of Ancona at Agnani 3 Sep 1301.  Allied with Charles II King of Sicily, he campaigned in Sicily to expel Federigo de Aragón in 1302.  Titular Emperor of Constantinople 1301, by right of his second wife, he obtained Venice's support for an invasion of Byzantium in 1306 and was joined by the Catalan company in 1308 when he landed in western Greece, but by 1310 his threat evaporated for lack of active support[826].  The Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris records the death "XVII Kal Jan 1325" of "Carolus comes Valesii"[827]A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the death 16 Dec 1325 of "dominus Karolus comes Valesii pater regis Philippi de Valesio"[828]The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records the death of “Karolus de Valesio patruus regis Francie Karoli” after conspiring against the French king, stating that he was not “hanged or beheaded out of respect for this royal blood” (“propter reverenciam sanguinis regalis non fuit suspensus nec decapitatus”) but “was placed naked in cold water” (“sine femoralibus nudo marmori aquis frigidis resperso insedit”) and died from the effects of the cold[829]

m firstly (contract 28 Dec 1289, Corbeil, Essonne 16 Aug 1290) MARGUERITE of Sicily, daughter of CHARLES II “le Boiteux” King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary ([1273]-31 Dec 1299, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1290 "in crastino Assumptionis beatæ Virginis Dei genitricis Mariæ apud castrum Corbolii" of "Karolus comes Valesii frater regis Franciæ Philippi" and "Karoli regis Siciliæ...unam de filiabus", adding that his father-in-law gave him "Andegaviæ et Cenomaniæ comitatus"[830].  A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the death "in festo S. Silvestri" of "domina Margarita comitissa Valesii mater regis Philippi de Valesio"[831]

m secondly (Priory of Saint-Cloud, near Paris 28 Feb 1301) CATHERINE I titular Empress of Constantinople, Marquise de Namur, Dame de Courtenay, daughter of PHILIPPE de Courtenay titular Emperor of Constantinople, King of Thessaly & his wife Béatrice of Sicily (1274-Paris 11 Oct 1307 or 2 Jan 1308, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Catherina" as only daughter of "Balduino imperatore...Philippus eiusdem filius" and his wife "filiam Karoli regis Siciliæ"[832]Catharina...Imperatrix Constantinopolitana” transferred “terram nostram de Cortenayo, de Blacon, de Hellebek et de Breviller” to “domini nostri Caroli germani...Philippi...Francorum regis“, stated in the document to be before their marriage, by charter dated [end Jan] 1300 (O.S.?)[833]The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the second marriage in 1300 of "Karolus comes Valesii" and "Catharinam...Philippi filii Balduini imperatoris Græciæ quondam expulsi filiam", adding that she brought with her "jus imperii"[834]She transferred her rights to Courtenay, Namur and the empire of Constantinople to her husband 23 Apr 1301[835]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death "præcedenti die lunæ...in villa sancti Audoeni, apud Prædicatores parisienses" in 1307 of "Catherina heres Constantinopolitani imperii, Karoli fratris regis uxor secunda" and her burial "die Jovis post festum beati Dionysii martyris"[836]The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "V Id Oct" of "Catharina imperatrix Constantinopolitana"[837]A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the death "Martis post S. Silvestrum" of "domina Catharina comitissa Valesii imperatrix Constantinopolitana"[838]

m thirdly (Poitiers Jul 1308) MATHILDE de Châtillon, daughter of GUY [III] de Châtillon Comte de St Pol & his wife Marie de Bretagne (1293-3 Oct 1358, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the third marriage in 1308 of "comes Valesii Karolus" and "filiam Guidonis comitis sancti Pauli"[839]

Charles Comte de Valois & his first wife had six children:

1.         ISABELLE de Valois (1292-1309).  The Liber Pluscardensis records that "Edwardo de Balliolo…regis Scociæ filio" was betrothed to "nepte…regis Franciæ", further identified in a later passage as "Karoli de Valoiz et Andegavensis comitis…filiam germani [sui]", dated to [1295] from the context[840].  The marriage contract between “Philippo...regi Francorum...nepte vestra seu consanguinei” and “Johannes...Scotiæ rex...Edvardo filio nostro primogenito et hærede” is dated 5 Jul 1295[841].  A second marriage contract between “Charles fiuz au roi de France, conte de Valeys, d’Alencon, de Chartres et de Aungeo...nostre esnee fille, niece...le roi de France” and “Johan...roi d’Ecosse...l’esne fiuz” is dated 23 Oct 1295[842].  The marriage contract between “Charles filz de Roy de France comte de Valois, d’Alençon, de Chartres et d’Anjou et Marguerite sa femme comtesse...Isabeau nostre premiere et ainsnée fille” and “Jehan Duc de Bretaigne comte de Richemont...filz ainsné Artur de Bretaigne ainsné filz de nous dit Duc” dated 18 Feb 1297 (O.S.)[843].  The marriage contract between “Charles filz de Roy de France comte de Valois, d’Alençon, de Chartres et d’Anjou et Marguerite sa femme comtesse...Isabeau nostre premiere et ainsnée fille” and “Jehan Duc de Bretaigne comte de Richemont...filz ainsné Artur de Bretaigne ainsné filz de nous dit Duc” dated 18 Feb 1297 (O.S.)[844]Betrothed (contracts 5 Jul and 23 Oct 1295) to EDWARD Balliol, son of JOHN Balliol King of Scotland & his wife Isabel de Warenne (-[May 1363/Sep 1365]).  m (18 Feb 1298) as his first wife, JEAN de Bretagne, son of ARTHUR de Bretagne [later ARTHUR II Duke of Brittany] & his first wife Marie de Limoges (Châteauroux, Indre 8 Mar 1286-Caen, Calvados 30 Apr 1341, bur Ploërmel, Morbihan, Chapelle des Carmes).  Vicomte de Limoges 1301.  He succeeded his father in 1312 as JEAN III "le Bon" Duke of Brittany

2.         PHILIPPE de Valois (1293-Abbaye de Coulombs, near Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir 22 Aug 1350, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the birth in 1293 of "Rex Philippus de Valesio"[845]Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 20 May 1314.  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Comte de Valois.  He succeeded in 1328 as PHILIPPE VI "le Fortuné" King of FranceThe Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Philippus...filius Karoli comitis Valesii" became king after "regina Johanna uxor nuper Karoli regis" gave birth to a daughter 1 Apr 1328[846]

-        see below

3.         JEANNE de Valois ([1294]-Abbaye de Fontenelles, Hainaut 7 Mar 1352, bur Abbaye de Fontenelles)She became a Franciscan nun at the Abbaye de Fontenelles 2 Nov 1337.  m (Chauny, Aisne 19 May 1305) GUILLAUME III “le Bon” Comte de Hainaut WILLEM III Count of Holland, son of JEAN II Comte de Hainaut, JAN II Count of Holland & his wife Philippa de Luxembourg ([1280]-7 Jun 1337, bur Valenciennes, église des Franciscains)

4.         MARGUERITE de Valois ([1295]-Jul 1342)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis which records the betrothal in 1308 of "Guido quondam comitis Blesensis primogenitus" and "filia Karolii Valesii ex conjuge Catherina adhuc teneræ ætatis"[847].  This source apparently incorrectly identifies the bride’s mother.  m (Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines Oct 1298, in person after 6 Oct 1310) GUY [I] de Châtillon Comte de Blois, son of HUGUES de Châtillon Comte de Blois & Beatrix de Flandre (-after 12 Aug 1342, bur Abbaye de Laguiche, Coulanges, Loir-et-Cher). 

5.         CHARLES de Valois (1297-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 20 Jan 1334 under which "Charles de Valois, frère du roi de France, conte d’Alençon et du Perche" granted le droit de colombier to the prior of Saint-Martin de Bellême[848].  Comte de Chartres 1314.  He succeeded in Apr 1326 as Comte d'Alençon et de Perche. 

-        see below, Part C.  COMTES et DUCS d'ALENÇON

6.         CATHERINE de Valois (1299-young, bur Abbaye du Val-de-Sery, Picardie).  

Charles Comte de Valois & his second wife had four children:

7.         JEAN de Valois (-died young).  Comte de Chartres.

8.         CATHERINE de Valois (1303-Naples Oct 1346).  She succeeded her mother in 1308 as titular Empress of Constantinople.  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage "circa festum Magdalenes" in 1313 of "princeps Tarantinus" and "filiam comitis Valesii ex conjuge Catherina heredem Constantinopolitani imperii"[849]She sold Courtenay in 1313 to Jeanne "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne, wife of her half-brother Philippe de Valois (the future Philippe VI King of France).  On the death of her husband in 1332, she acted as regent for her son Robert.  After the 1332 exchange of territories between her son and her brother-in-law Jean Conte di Gravina, Catherine assumed the government of the principality of Achaia in her son's name[850].  She and her sons installed themselves at Patras in Morea from 1338 to 1341 and, with the help of her adviser Niccolò Acciaiuoli whom she named bailli of Achaia, Kefalonia and Lepanto, established their authority over the principality of Achaia[851]Betrothed (contract Sens 15 Apr 1303, Papal dispensation 3 Jun 1307, renounced due to ill-health, confirmed 6 Apr 1312) to HUGUES de Bourgogne, son of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France (1294-château d'Argilly, Côte d'Or early May 1315, bur 12 May Abbaye de Cîteaux).  He succeeded his father in 1306 as HUGUES V Duke of Burgundym (Fontainebleau end Jul 1313) as his second wife, PHILIPPE of Sicily Principe di Tarento, son of CHARLES II “le Boiteux” King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary (-Naples 26 Dec 1332, bur Naples, San Dominico).  Prince of Achaia and Morea 1307-1313.  Despot of Romania 1294-1315. 

9.         JEANNE de Valois (1304-Château-Gaillard 9 Jul 1363, bur Paris, église des Augustins)The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the marriage in 1316 of "Robertus Attrebatensis comitissæ nepos ex fratre" and "filiam comitis Valesii"[852]She was called Madame d'Artois.  She encouraged her husband to revolt, the king her brother arrested her in 1334.  She was imprisoned at Château-Gaillard, where she died many years later.  [Betrothed (1308) to GUY Comte de Blois, son of HUGUES [II] de Châtillon Comte de Blois & his wife Beatrix de Flandre.]  Betrothed (1313) to CHARLES di Tarento Despot of Epirus, son of PHILIPPE of Sicily Principe di Tarento [Anjou-Capet] & his first wife Thamar Angelina Komnene Dukaina of Epirus ([1296]-killed in battle Montecatini, between Pistoia and Lucca 29 Aug 1315).  m (1318) ROBERT III d'Artois Comte de Beaumont-le-Roger, son of PHILIPPE d’Artois Seigneur de Conches & his wife Blanche de Bretagne (1287-[Brest], Brittany end-Oct 1342, bur London, St Paul's).  He was banished from France and his assets confiscated 19 Mar 1332. 

10.      ISABELLE de Valois (1306-Abbaye de Fontevrault 11 Nov 1349, bur Fontevrault).  Nun at Poissy.  Abbess of Fontevrault 1342, before 30 Jul. 

Charles Comte de Valois & his third wife had four children:

11.      LOUIS de Valois (1309-2 Nov 1328, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  Comte d'Alençon et de Chartres, Seigneur de Châteauneuf-en-Thymerais.  A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the death 2 Nov 1328 of "Ludovicus de Valesio filius dicti comitis [dominus Karolus comes Valesii] et frater regis"[853]

12.      MARIE de Valois (-28 Oct 1331, bur Naples, Santa Chiara)The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death "in San Nicola di Bari" in 1331 of "la duchessa di Calabria suore del Re di Francia" and her burial 21 Aug in "Santa Chiara di Napoli"[854]m (Paris 4 Oct 1323, in person May 1324) as his second wife, CHARLES of Sicily, son of ROBERT King of Sicily and Jerusalem [Anjou-Capet] & his first Infanta doña Violanta de Aragón ([28 May] 1298-Naples 10 Nov 1328, bur Naples, Santa Chiara).  He was installed as Duca di Calabria in 1325, Viceroy of Sicily.   

13.      ISABELLE de Valois (1313-Paris 26 Jul 1383, bur Paris, église des Frères mineurs)The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage “le mardi devant la feste saint Denys, v jours au moys d’Octobre au Boys de Vinciennes“ 1322 of “le filz à Louys conte de Clermont” and “la fille Charlez le conte de Valoiz[855]She became a nun at the convent des Cordeliers du Faubourg Saint-Marceau, Paris.  m (Vincennes 5 Oct 1322) PIERRE de Bourbon, son of LOUIS I "le Boiteux" Duc de Bourbon & his wife Marie de Hainaut [Avesnes] ([1311]-killed in battle Poitiers 19 Sep 1356, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  He succeeded his father in 1342 as Duc de Bourbon

14.      BLANCHE [Marguerite] de Valois (1317-Prague 1 Aug 1348, bur Prague St Veit).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1323 of "Wencezslaus Regis primogenitus" and "Blancza, soror fratris Philippi Regis de stirpe regia"[856].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the coronation in 1347 of Karl and "sua coniunx, Domina Blanca"[857].  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death of "Blanche de Valois femme de l'aisné fils du roy de Boheme marquise de Moravie" on "VIII Kal Oct"[858].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death "in die ad vincula sancti Petri" in 1348 of "Regina Blancza, coniunx Domini Karoli" and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi"[859]m (Prague May 1329) as his first wife, WENZEL KARL of Bohemia, son of JAN I King of Bohemia and Poland [JEAN I Comte de Luxembourg] & his wife Eliska [Elisabeth] of Bohemia [Přemyslid] (Prague 14 May 1316-Prague 29 Nov 1378, bur Prague, Cathedral of St Guy).  Mgf of Moravia 1334.  Elected KARL IV King of Germany at Rhena 11 Jul 1346, crowned at Bonn 26 Nov 1346.  He succeeded his father in 1346 as KARL King of Bohemia, crowned 2 Nov 1347.  Crowned as Emperor KARL IV at Rome 5 Apr 1355.    

 

 

PHILIPPE de Valois, son of CHARLES de France Comte de Valois & his first wife Marguerite of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (1293-Abbaye de Coulombs, near Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir 22 Aug 1350, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the birth in 1293 of "Rex Philippus de Valesio"[860]Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 20 May 1314.  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Comte de Valois.  Named regent of the kingdom in 1328 on the death of his cousin King Charles IV, pending the birth of the queen’s child.  When she gave birth to a daughter 1 Apr 1328, he succeeded as PHILIPPE VI "le Fortuné" King of FranceThe Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Philippus...filius Karoli comitis Valesii" became king after "regina Johanna uxor nuper Karoli regis" gave birth to a daughter 1 Apr 1328[861].  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims, 29 May 1328.  A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the coronation "die S. Trinitatis" in 1328 of "Rex Philippus de Valesio"[862]He renounced the crown of Navarre at Saint-Germain-en-Laye Apr 1328 in favour of Jeanne de France, daughter of Louis X King of France, and her husband Philippe Comte d'Evreux.  He confiscated Guyenne and other English possessions in France 24 May 1337, declaring war on England in 1338 in reaction for the English king's claim to the French throne at Westminster 7 Oct 1337.  The necrology of Vauvert records the death "X Kal Sep" of "princeps dominus Philippus rex Francie"[863]

m firstly (contract Sens, Yonne 24 Mar 1303, Fontainebleau end Jul 1313) JEANNE "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne, daughter of ROBERT II Duke of Burgundy & his wife Agnès de France ([1293/94]-Hôtel de Nesle, Paris 12 Dec 1349, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She was invested with Courtenay at Fontainebleau in July 1313.  She was consecrated queen with her husband at Notre Dame de Reims 29 May 1328.  A forceful person, she exercised great influence over her husband, who named her regent during his absence in August 1338.  Henri IV Comte de Bar appointed her regent of the county of Bar under his will 30 Nov 1344, during the minority of his son.  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Dec" of "domina Johanna quondam regina Francie mater…domini Johannis regis Francie"[864].  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "II Id Dec" of "domine Johanne filia ducis Burgundie quondam regine Francie"[865]

m secondly (Brie-Comte-Robert, Seine-et-Marne 11 Jan 1350) Infanta doña BLANCA de Navarra, daughter of don FELIPE III “el Bueno” [d’Evreux] King of Navarre & his wife doña Juana II [de France] Queen of Navarre (1330-Château de Neaufles-Saint-Martin, Eure 5 Oct 1398, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She was never consecrated Queen of France.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "III Non Oct" of "Blanche Francie regina regis Philippi de Valesio quondam consortis"[866]

Mistress (1): ---, from Armagnac. 

Mistress (2): BEATRICE de la Berruère, daughter of --- (1294-1348).  The primary source which names Philippe’s mistress has not yet been identified.  Marcellin Boudet suggests that the mother of King Philippe’s illegitimate son Thomas de la Marche was Blanche de Bourgogne [Comté], first wife of Charles Comte de la Marche (the future Charles IV King of France), particularly in order to explain why Thomas was named "de la Marche"[867]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records that "Margareta Navarræ regina juvencula et Blancha regis Navarræ Karoli fratris junioris uxor" were accused of adultery respectively with "Philippo et Galtero de Alneto fratribus militibus" in 1314, and in a later passage under 1315 that "Blancha", while in prison, became pregnant by her jailer or according to others by her own husband ("a serviente quodam eius custodiæ deputato dicebatur...a proprio [comite] diceretur")[868]Boudet quotes correspondence between various members of the French royal family and Pope John XXII, dated May to Aug 1318, requesting an urgent annulment of the marriage, and insinuating (although not expressly stating) that the pregnancy was the real reason for the urgency[869].  However, the annulment was not then granted (it was finally issued in May 1322 on grounds of consanguinity), which suggests that the urgency no longer applied, either because the pregnancy ended or the child was stillborn. 

King Philippe VI & his first wife had nine children:

1.         JEAN de Valois (Château de Gué-de-Mauny, Le Mans, Sarthe 26 Apr 1319-Savoy Hotel, London 8 Apr 1364, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1350 as JEAN II "le Bon" King of France

-        see below

2.         MARIE de Valois (1326-Paris 22 Sep 1333, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  Froissart records that Philippe VI King of France betrothed "sa fille" to "l’ainnet fil le ducq de Braibant" after breaking her betrothal to the daughter of the comte de Hainaut[870]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage in 1332 ofle filz ainsné du duc de Breban de l’aage de ix ans ou environ“ and “ma dame Marie fille du roy de France Philippe de Valoiz[871].  The Chronique Parisienne records the deathle merquedi aprez la feste saint Mathieu appostre et euvangeliste au moys de septembre“ of “ma dame Marie duchesse de Lanbour fille du roy Philippe de France, qui avoit esté mariée en l’an precedent au duc de Lanbourc filz au duc de Breban” and her burial “à Paris en l’eglise des Freres Mineurs Cordeliers[872]m (contract Crèvecœur-en-Brie, Seine-et-Marne 8 Jul 1332) JEAN de Brabant, son of JEAN III Duke of Brabant & his wife Marie d'Evreux [Capet] (24 Nov 1327-1335/6, bur Tervueren).  

3.         LOUIS de France (born and died Château du Bois de Vincennes 17 Jan 1329, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  A Fragmentum historicum from the Codex Pater records the birth and death 17 Jan 1328 of "Ludovicus filius...regis Philippi de Valesio"[873]

4.         LOUIS de France (8 Jun 1330-23 Jun 1330, bur Paris, église des Cordeliers).  The Chronique Parisienne records the birth “le vendredi“ 8 Jun 1330 of “Louys le tiers filz du roy de France Philippe de Valoiz[874].  The Chronique Parisienne records the death “le vendredi jour de feste saint Pierre et saint Pol...en Saint-Germain-en-laye“ Jun 1330 of “Louys l’enffant de France nouvellement nez[875]

5.         JEAN de France (b and d 2 Oct 1333, bur Priory of Poissy, Yvelines).  The Chronique Parisienne records the birth 2 Oct 1333 toJehanne la roynne de France“ of “ung filz qui tantost mourut et sans baptesme si comme l’en dist[876]

6.         son (Maubuisson, Saint Ouen l'Aumône, Val-d'Oise stillborn 28 May 1335).  The Chronique Parisienne records the birth 28 May 1335en l’abbaie royale de Nostre-Dame-de-Maubuisson delez Ponthoise“ of “ung filz mort-né” to “la Roynne Jehanne fame du roy[877]

7.         PHILIPPE de France (Château du Bois de Vincennes 1 Jul 1336-Orléans 1 Sep 1375, bur Orléans, église Sainte-Croix)The Chronique Parisienne records the birth 1 Jul 1336au Bois-de-Vincennes“ of “ung filz...Philippe” to “Jehanne la roynne de France[878]Comte de Valois [1336].  Humbert II Dauphin de Viennois named him heir to the Dauphiné 23 Feb 1343, but his brother Jean persuaded the Dauphin to substitute him as heir 7 Jun 1344.  Duc d'Orléans, Comte de Beaumont-le-Roger, Vicomte de Breteuil by his father 16 Apr 1344.  Jeanne de Savoie, widow of Jean III Duke of Brittany and daughter of Edouard Comte de Savoie, bequeathed her titular rights to the county of Savoie to Philippe by testament before her death in Jun 1344, but his father abandoned in his name all rights to Savoy in favour of Comte Amédée VI at Chambéry 25 Feb 1347 in return for the castles of Milly and Bicêtre.  He lost Beaumont-le-Roger and Breteuil to his brother King Jean II 5 Mar 1353.  He was captured at the battle of Poitiers 1356, and held hostage until 1360.  The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records the death “Kal Sep” of “Philippus, Regis Francie filius, dux Aurelianensis, Valesie et Bellimontis comes”, adding that he was buried in the cathedral[879]m (contract 8 Jan 1344) BLANCHE de France Ctss de Beaumont-le-Roger, posthumous daughter of CHARLES IV King of France & his third wife Jeanne d'Evreux (posthumously Châteauneuf near Orléans 1 Apr 1328-Vincennes 8 Feb 1393, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The necrology of Orléans Cathedral records that “domina Blancha, Regis Francie et Navarre et filia, ducissa Aurelianensis, Valesie et Bellimontis comitissa…dicti domini quondam sponsa” made donations on the death of “Philippus, Regis Francie filius, dux Aurelianensis, Valesie et Bellimontis comes[880].  Philippe had two illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:    

a)         son "le bâtard d'Orléans" (-Château-Thierry, Aisne [1380]).  He was brought up at Bourges with Jean de France Duc de Berry.    

b)         LOUIS bâtard d'Orléans (-Jerusalem 27 Mar 1395, bur Paris Notre-Dame).  Monk at the Abbaye de Saint-Lucien at Beauvais.  Counsellor at the Parliament of Paris.  Elected Bishop of Poitiers Mar 1391.  Legitimated 22 Nov 1392.  Elected Bishop of Beauvais, Comte et pair de France 1394. 

8.         JEANNE de France (b and d Vincennes Nov 1337).  The Chronique Parisienne records the birth le mercredi devant la saint Climent au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ of “une fille...Jehanne” to “Jehanne la roynne de France“, adding that she died “l’endemain ensuivant[881]

9.         son (Château du Bois de Vincennes summer 1343). 

King Philippe VI & his second wife had one child:

10.      JEANNE de France (posthumously May 1351-Béziers 16 Sep 1371, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She died on the way to meet her future husband.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle commemorates "Philippi regis de Valesio et Johanne Francie eius filie" on "XI Kal Sep", also naming "Blancha regina quondam dicti Philippi uxor et mater dicte Johanne"[882]Betrothed (contract 16 Jul 1370) to Infante don JUAN de Aragón Duque de Gerona, son of don PEDRO IV "el Ceremonioso" King of Aragon & his third wife Eleonora of Sicily [Aragon] (Perpignan 27 Dec 1350-Foixa 19 May 1396).  He succeeded his father in 1387 as don JUAN I "el Cazador" King of Aragon

King Philippe VI had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

11.       JEAN d'Armagnac (-after 1350).  

King Philippe VI had one illegitimate son by Mistress (2):  

12.       THOMAS de la Marche "Albus" (1318-[Sep] 1361).  His life has been studied by Marcellin Boudet[883].  The Chronicle of Geoffrey Le Baker de Swynebroke, written in 1356, names "Thomas de la Marche, français de nation et fils du roi Philippe"[884].  Thomas de Walsingham’s Chronicle, written in [1388], names "Dominum Johannem bastard filium Philippi regis Francorum" iin 1350[885].  He fought with Hugues IV King of Cyprus in 1343, then with Leo IV King of Armenia.  He entered the service of Jeanne I Queen of Naples in 1346, and took part in the siege of Catania in 1348[886]Edward III King of England granted supplies and protection to “Thomas le Bastard de Francia miles” to come to England for a duel with “Johannem Viscontes militem” by charter dated 24 Jun 1350[887].  Edward III King of England records the duel between “Thomas de la Marche Bastardo Franciæ nuncupato” and “Johanne Viscount miles”, in which the latter was defeated, by charter dated 12 Oct 1350 which also relates the background to the duel in some detail[888].  The Chronicle of Geoffrey le Baker of Swinbrook records that “duo milites stipendiarii domini regis Armenie...alter...Iohannes de Viscomite nacione Ciprius alterum...Thomam de la Marche nacione Gallicum et filium Philippi nuper regis Francie set illegitimum” came to England to fight a duel in the presence of the English king[889].  He was granted the arms of la Marche in Nov 1350.  Legitimated in Mar 1353. 

 

 

JEAN de Valois, son of PHILIPPE de Valois [later PHILIPPE VI King of France] & his first wife Jeanne "la Boiteuse" de Bourgogne [Capet] (Château de Gué-de-Mauny, Le Mans, Sarthe 26 Apr 1319-Savoy Hotel, London 8 Apr 1364, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Called "Jean de France" from the accession of his father 1328.  Duc de Normandie, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 17 Feb 1332.  He persuaded Humbert II Dauphin de Viennois to name him as heir to the Dauphiné 7 Jun 1344, in place of his younger brother Philippe who had been named heir 23 Feb 1343.  Installed as Comte de Poitou [Jan/26 May] 1344.  Duc de Guyenne 11 Sep 1345.  He succeeded his father in 1350 as JEAN II "le Bon" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 26 Sep 1350.  He succeeded in recapturing Normandy from the English in 1355.  He was captured at the battle of Poitiers 19 Sep 1356 and taken to London as a prisoner, liberated by the Treaty of Brétigny 8 May 1360, returning to Paris 13 Dec 1360.  He inherited the duchy of Burgundy, as the nearest male heir, on the death of Philippe I "de Rouvres" Duke of Burgundy and declared it reunited to the crown by charter at Paris in Nov 1361.  He was in London to negotiate the release of his son Jean Duc de Berry when he died.  The necrology of Vauvert records the death "VI Id Apr" of "dominus Joannes Francorum rex"[890]

m firstly (Notre-Dame de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 28 Jul 1332) GUTA of Bohemia, daughter of JAN I King of Bohemia [JEAN I Comte de Luxembourg] & his first wife Eliska [Elisabeth] of Bohemia [Přemyslid] (Prague 20 May 1315-Abbaye de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône, Val-d'Oise 3 or 11 Sep 1349, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) names "Guta" as second daughter of "Regina"[891].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1322 of "Iohannes Rex…Gutam…filiam…minorem" and "Friderico Marchioni Misnensi"[892]The Chronique Parisienne records the marriage 28 Jul 1332 “à Melun-sur-Sainne“ of “Jehan dit de France de l’aage de xv ans ou environ filz de Philippe le roy de France” and “ma dame Bonne fille Jehan le roy de Behangne[893]She was  known as BONNE in France, Dss de Normandie.  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "III Non Sep" of "domina Bona filia regis Bohemie quondam ducissa Normannie"[894]

m secondly (Sainte-Gemme, Feucherolles, Yvelines 9 Feb 1350) as her second husband, JEANNE Ctss d'Auvergne et de Boulogne, widow of PHILIPPE de Bourgogne "Monsieur" Comte d'Artois [Capet], daughter of GUILLAUME [XI] Comte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne & his wife Marguerite d'Evreux (8 May 1326-Vadans, Haute-Saône 29 Sep 1360, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The marriage contract between "Jean aisne fils du roy de France" and "Jeanne de Bouloigne comtesse de Bouloigne et d’Auvergne" is dated 13 Dec 1352[895]She was consecrated Queen of France at Notre-Dame de Reims 26 Sep 1350 with her husband. 

King Jean II & his first wife had eleven children: 

1.         BLANCHE de France (1336-young).  

2.         CHARLES de France (Château du Bois de Vincennes 21 Jan 1338-Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne 16 Sep 1380, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Chronique Parisienne records the birth vigille de feste saint Vincent...au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1338 of “Charles filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normandie et de ma dame Bonne sa fame fille le conte de Lucembourc[896]He succeeded his father in 1364 as CHARLES V "le Sage" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 19 May 1364.   

-        see below.

3.         CATHERINE de France (1338-young). 

4.         LOUIS de France (Château du Bois de Vincennes 23 Jul 1339-Biseglia Castle near Bari 20 Sep 1384, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice)The Chronique Parisienne records the birth le mardi aprez la feste saint-Jasques et saint Cristofle au moys de juillet au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1339 of “Loys le segond filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normendie[897]Comte de Poitiers.  Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 1351.  Duc d'Anjou at Calais Oct 1360. 

-        DUCS d'ANJOU

5.         JEAN de France (Château du Bois de Vincennes 30 Nov 1340-Paris, Hôtel de Nesle 15 Jun 1416, bur Bourges Sainte-Chapelle).  Comte de Poitou.  Duc de Berry et d'Auvergne at Boulogne-sur-Mer Oct 1360, confirmed at Paris 3 Mar 1375, and at Vincennes Dec 1380.  He was sent to England as a hostage under the Treaty of Brétigny 1360, remaining there for nine years.  With his three brothers, he was regent during the minority of his nephew King Charles VI.  Governor of Languedoc 19 Nov 1380.  Principe di Tarento, by donation of his brother Louis Duc d'Anjou at Avignon 30 May 1380.  He exchanged Tarento at Cavaillon 11 Sep 1385 for the counties of Etampes and Gion with his sister-in-law Marie Dss d'Anjou.  Appointed Governor of Paris 21 Aug 1405.  He was head of the Armagnac party, constituted after his alliance at Gien 18 Apr 1410 with the dukes of Brittany and Orléans, and the counts of Alençon, Clermont and Armagnac, aimed at releasing and restoring King Charles VI to power.  A compulsive collector of art, he lived a life of style and luxury in his palaces at Bourges, Poitiers, Bicêtre and Paris (Hôtel de Nesle).  His collection of illuminated manuscripts survives.  m firstly (contract Carcassonne, Aude 24 Jun 1360, Rodez, Aveyron 17 Oct 1360) JEANNE d'Armagnac, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte d'Armagnac & his wife Béatrice de Clermont ([1346]-Mar 1387).  The testament of "domini Johannis comitis Armaniaci", dated 18 Feb 1347, names as his heirs, in turn, "filii nostri Johannis primogeniti…Bernardum filium nostrum secundo genitum…Johannam filiam nostrum…"[898].  The testament of "domina Beatrix de Clermont, comitissa Armaniaci, dominaque Charrolesio, uxor…domini Johannes comitis Armaniaci", dated 20 Aug 1361, appoints "filiam nostrum Johannam, Bituriæ et Alverniæ ducessam ac…dominos Johannem de Francia, Bituriæ et Alverniæ necnon et Burgendie et Borboni duces, et comitem Pardiaci…"[899].  A second testament of "Johannes…comes Armaignaci, Fesensiaci et Ruthene, vicecomesque Leomaniæ et Altivillaris ac dominus terre Ripparie", dated 5 Apr 1373, names "…Johanne…filie nostre…uxorique domini ducis de Beriui et Alvernie…"[900]m secondly (contract 9 Mar 1389, Riom, Puy-de-Dôme 5 Jun 1390) as her first husband, JEANNE d'Auvergne, daughter of JEAN II Comte d'Auvergne et de Boulogne & his wife Eléonore Ctss de Comminges (1378-shortly before 6 Feb 1423, bur Bourges Sainte-Chapelle).  She succeeded her father in 1394 as JEANNE II Ctss d'Auvergne et de Boulogne.  She married secondly (Aigueperse-en-Auvergne, Puy-de-Dôme 16 Nov 1416) as his first wife, Georges Sire de La Trémoïlle [Grand Chamberlain of France] ([1385]-6 May 1446, bur Château de Sully).  Duke Jean & his first wife had five children:

a)         CHARLES de Berry (1362-1382[901]).  Comte de Montpensier.  m ([1381][902]) as her first husband, MARIE de Sully, daughter and heiress of LOUIS Sire de Sully & his wife Isabeau Dame de Craon.  She married secondly (1382) Guy [V] Sire de La Trémoïlle, and thirdly (27 Jan 1400) Charles [I] Sire d'Albret Comte de Dreux

b)         LOUIS de Berry (1364-after Jul 1383). 

c)         BONNE de Berry (1362 or 1365-Carlat, Cantal 30 Dec 1435, bur Rodez église des Cordeliers).  The contract of marriage between "Amey Comte de Savoie…Amey fils dudit Monsieur le Comte" and "Monsieur Jean fils Roy de France, Duc de Berry et d’Auvergne, Comte de Mascon…Madame Bonne fille dudit Monsieur le Duc" is dated 7 May 1372[903].  She arrived in Savoie in 1381.  The testament of "Dominus Amedeus comes Sabaudiæ" dated 1 Oct 1391 made bequests to "…Domina Bona de Biturio eius consorte"[904].  Passed over by her husband as regent for their son in favour of her mother-in-law, the ensuing dispute was settled by agreement 8 May 1393.  Dame de Faucigny, by cession of her mother-in-law at Chambéry 4 May 1393.  Dame de Carlat, by cession of her father at Bourges Nov 1410.  She renounced Faucigny in 1427 in favour of her son Amédée VIII Duke of Savoy.  m firstly (contract Valence, Drôme 7 May 1372, Paris Hôtel Saint-Pol 18 Jan 1377) AMEDEE de Savoie Comte de Bresse, son of AMEDEE VI Comte de Savoie & his wife Bonne de Bourbon (Château de Chambéry 24 Feb 1360-Château de Ripaille, Thonon 1 Nov 1391, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe, Saint-Pierre-de-Curtille, Savoie).  He succeeded his father 1383 as AMEDEE VII "le Comte Roux" Comte de Savoiem secondly (contract Château de Mehun-sur-Yèvre, Cher 2 Dec 1393) BERNARD [VII] Comte d'Armagnac, son of JEAN [II] Comte d'Armagnac & his wife Jeanne de Périgord (1364-murdered Paris 12 Jun 1418).  Encouraged by his father-in-law, he became a leading adversary of the Burgundian party.  Appointed Connétable de France 30 Dec 1415.  He was killed by the Burgundians.   

d)         MARIE de Berry (1370-Lyon Jun 1434, bur Priory of Souvigny)The necrology of the church of Eu records that "Maria de Berry uxor sua" donated "centum libras annui redditus" for masses for "domini Philippi comitis de Augo conestablularii Franciæ" who died "inter Sarracenos"[905]She was appointed Dss d'Auvergne, Ctss de Montpensier 26 Apr 1418, confirmed 1425.  Her third husband appointed her administrator of all his estates 17 Jan 1421 during his imprisonment.  m firstly (contract Bourges, Cher 29 Mar 1386, Bourges Saint-Etienne 1386) LOUIS [II] de Châtillon Comte de Dunois, son of GUY [II] de Châtillon Comte de Soissons, de Blois et de Dunois & his wife Marie de Namur (-Beaumont en Hainaut 15 Jul 1391).  m secondly (contract Paris 27 Jan 1393) PHILIPPE d'Artois Comte d'Eu, son of JEAN d'Artois Comte d'Eu & his wife Marie de Namur (1358-Mihaliççik, Anatolia 16 Jun 1397, bur Eu, Abbaye de Saint-Laurent, or bur Constantinople, Convent of Saint-François de Galata).  Appointed Connétable de France 31 Dec 1392 by Charles VI King of France.  He fought in Palestine, was captured by the Turks but was freed by Maréchal Boucicaut.  He was captured again at the siege of Nicopolis.  He was captured by the Turks after the failed siege of Nicopolis in Sep 1396, and died soon after.  m thirdly (contract Paris 27 May 1400, in person Paris, Palais du Roi 21 Jun 1401) JEAN de Bourbon Comte de Clermont, son of LOUIS II "le Bon" Duc de Bourbon & Anne Dauphine d'Auvergne Ctss de Forez (Mar 1381-in prison London 5 Jan 1434, bur Priory of Souvigny).  Chamberlain of France 18 Mar 1408.  He succeeded his father 1410 as Duc de Bourbon.  He was captured by the English at the battle of Agincourt 1415, and remained a prisoner for the rest of his life. 

e)         JEAN de Berry (4 Feb 1377-1397[906]).  Comte de Montpensier.  According to Kerrebrouck, Jean died after his father, although he cites no source in support[907].  Such a late date of death is inconsistent with his wife's remarriage in 1402, unless she was divorced from her first husband although no mention of any such divorce has been found.  m firstly (la Noble-Maison de Saint Ouen near Paris 5 Aug 1386) CATHERINE de France, daughter of CHARLES V King of France & his wife Jeanne de Bourbon (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 4 Feb 1378-Oct 1388, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône, Val d'Oise).  m secondly (1390) as her first husband, ANNE de Bourbon, daughter of JEAN I de Bourbon Comte de la Marche et de Vendôme & his wife Catherine Ctss de Vendôme (-Paris Sep 1408, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  She married secondly (Paris 1 Oct 1402) as his first wife, Ludwig von Bayern-Ingolstadt, who succeeded in 1413 as Ludwig VII Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt

6.         PHILIPPE de France (Pontoise 15 Jan 1342-Hall, 27 Apr 1404, bur Dijon).  Duc de Touraine 1360-1364.  He was installed as PHILIPPE II "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy at Germiny-sur-Marne 6 Sep 1363, 1st pair de France.  With his three brothers, he was Regent during the minority of his nephew Charles VI King of France.  Comte de Mortagne 1380-1385.  Count of Flanders and Artois, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne, Comte de Nevers, de Rethel, d'Etampes et de Gien 1383.  Comte de Charolais 1390.  Regent of Brittany 1399-1404, during the minority of Jean VI Duke of Brittany.  m (by proxy 12 Apr 1369, in person Ghent 19 Jun 1369) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Flandre, daughter of LOUIS III "de Mâle" Count of Flanders & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Mâle, near Bruges 1350, chr 13 Apr 1350-Arras 16 or 20 Mar 1405, bur Lille, église Saint-Pierre).  She succeeded her father in 1383 as MARGUERITE III Ctss of Flanders, Artois, Nevers and Rethel, Ctss Palatine of Burgundy.  Dss of Brabant and Limburg, Markgravine of Antwerp, Dame de Malines 1404. 

-        DUKES of BURGUNDY

7.         JEANNE de France (Châteauneuf-sur-Loire, Loiret 24 Jun 1343-Evreux 1373, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)Betrothed (Palais du Louvre 21 Jun 1347) to HENRI de Brabant, son of JEAN III Duke of Brabant & his wife Marie d'Evreux (-29 Nov 1349, bur Terveuren).  m (Château de Vivier-en-Brie, Coutevroult 12 Feb 1352) don CARLOS II "el Malo" King of Navarre, son of FELIPE III King of Navarre [Evreux-Capet] & his wife doña Juana II Queen of Navarre [Capet] (Château d'Evreux, Eure 17 May 1332-Pamplona 1 Jan 1387, bur Pamplona, Cathedral of Santa María la Real).  

8.         MARIE de France (Saint Germain-en-Laye 18 Sep 1344-15 Oct 1404, bur Bar-le-Duc, église de Saint-Mesme)m (contract Bar-le-Duc 4 Jun 1364, 1 Dec 1364) ROBERT I Duke of Bar, son of HENRI IV Comte de Bar & his wife Yolande de Flandre Dame de Cassel (8 Sep 1344-2 Apr 1411, bur Bar-le-Duc, église collégiale Saint-Maxe).

9.         AGNES de France (Saint-Germain-en-Laye 9 Dec 1345-Hôtel de Nesle, Paris Apr 1350, bur Paris église des Jacobins).  

10.      MARGUERITE de France (Palais du Louvre 20 Sep 1347-Poissy 25 Apr 1352).  

11.      ISABELLE de France (Château de Bois-de-Vincennes 1 Oct 1348-Pavia 11 Sep 1373, bur Pavia San Francesco)The Chronicon of Pietro Azario records the marriage of "Dominum Johannem Galeazium", son of "Domino Galeazio" and his wife, and "Dominam Elisabetam filiam…Regis Francorum"[908].  Her marriage was arranged by her maternal uncle Amédée VI Comte de Savoie[909].  Her dowry was the county of Sommières, exchanged for the county of Vertus.  Declared Ctss de Vertus in Apr 1361.  Giovanni di Musso’s Chronicon Placentinum records the death "in civitate Papiæ" of "Domina Isabellis consors Domini Galeaz Vicecomitis, comitis Virtutum, filii Domini Galeaz Vicecomitis Domini Mediolani…quondam filia…Domini Johannis Regis Francorum et sorore…Domini Caroli Regis Bohemiæ" giving birth to "filium masculum…Dominum Carolum"[910]m (Milan Oct 1360) GIAN GALEAZZO Visconti, son of GALEAZZO II Visconti Lord of Milan & his wife Blanche Marie de Savoie (Melegnano [Marignan] 15 Oct or Nov 1351-Pavia 3 Sep 1402).  Comte de Vertus, in right of his wife Apr 1361.  Conte di Asti 27 Mar 1379.  He deposed his uncle 6 May 1385, succeeding as Lord of Milan.  He was created GIAN GALEAZZO Duke of Milan 11 May 1395. 

King Jean II & his second wife had three children:   

12.      BLANCHE de France (Châteauneuf-sur-Loire Nov 1350-young).  

13.      CATHERINE de France (early 1352-young). 

14.      son de France (Le Moncel lès Pont-Sainte-Maxence, Oise early 1353-young).  

 

 

CHARLES de France, son of JEAN de France Duc de Guyenne [later JEAN II "le Bon" King of France] & his first wife Jutta [Bonne] of Bohemia [Luxembourg] (Château du Bois de Vincennes 21 Jan 1338-Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, Nogent-sur-Marne 16 Sep 1380, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Chronique Parisienne records the birth vigille de feste saint Vincent...au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1338 of “Charles filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normandie et de ma dame Bonne sa fame fille le conte de Lucembourc[911]He was invested as Dauphin de Viennois 16 Jul 1349, after Humbert II Dauphin de Viennois ceded his territories 30 Mar 1349, called thereafter "Monsieur le Dauphin".  Comte de Poitiers 1354.  Duc de Normandie 7 Dec 1355, installed at Notre-Dame de Rouen 10 Jan 1356.  He took the title "Lieutenant du Roi" during the imprisonment of his father after the battle of Poitiers 1356, and that of regent 14 Mar 1358 until his father's release in 1360.  Duc de Touraine, from his brother Philippe's nomination as Duke of Burgundy 1363.  He succeeded his father in 1364 as CHARLES V "le Sage" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 19 May 1364.  He confiscated the duchy of Guyenne from the king of England 30 Nov 1369, war with England having broken out once more. 

m (contract Lyon Jul 1349, Tain-en-Viennois, Drôme 8 Apr 1350) JEANNE de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Isabelle de Valois (Château du Bois de Vincennes 3 Feb 1339-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The marriage contract of "Jehan ainsnez fils du Roy de France, Duc de Normandie et de Guyenne…Charles de France nostre ainsnez fils" and "Pierre Duc de Bourbonnois conte de Clermont et de la Marche…Jehanne de Bourbon nostre ainsnée fille" is dated Jul 1349[912]Ayala’s Crónica de Pedro I records that another daughter “del...Duque de Borbon” married “el Rey de Francia Don Carlos” when recording the negotiations for the marriage of her sister Blanche in 1351[913]She was consecrated Queen of France with her husband 19 May 1364.  She died from a fever following childbirth. 

Possible Mistress (1): BIETTE de Cassinel, daughter of --- .  Kerrebrouck[914] dismisses this as unlikely given that her son was born when his supposed father would only have been 13 years old. 

Mistress (2): ---. 

King Charles V & his wife had nine children:

1.         JEANNE de France (Abbaye de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône, Val d'Oise end Sep 1357-Abbaye de Saint Antoine-des-Champs, Paris 21 Oct 1360, bur Abbaye de Saint Antoine-des-Champs).  

2.         BONNE de France (-Palais Royal, Paris 7 Nov 1360, bur 12 Nov Abbaye de Saint Antoine-des-Champs, Paris).  

3.         JEAN de France (1359-after 1364).  

4.         JEANNE de France (Château du Bois de Vincennes 6 Jun 1366-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 21 Dec 1366, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  

5.         CHARLES de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 3 Dec 1368-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 21 Oct 1422, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1380 as CHARLES VI "le Bien-Aimé" King of France

-        see below

6.         MARIE de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 27 Feb 1370-Paris Jun 1377)Betrothed (1373) to GUILLAUME de Hainaut, WILHELM von Bayern-Straubing, son of ALBRECHT Duke of Bavaria-Straubing [later ALBERT Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland] & his first wife Margareta von Brieg [Piast] (5 Apr 1365-château de Bouchain 30 May 1417, bur Valenciennes).  He succeeded his father in 1404 as GUILLAUME VI Comte de Hainaut, WILLEM V Count of Holland, WILHELM II Graf von Straubing. 

7.         LOUIS de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 13 Mar 1372-murdered Paris 23 Nov 1407, bur Paris, église des Célestins).  Comte de Valois after the death of Philippe Duc d'Orléans 1 Sep 1375, first named as such 4 Jan 1376.  Duc de Touraine Nov 1386 at Lille.  He joined the Royal Council 16 Feb 1389.  He entered Lombardy Feb 1391, taking Pavia Mar 1391.  Duc d'Orléans at Paris 4 Jun 1392, in exchange for the Duchy of Touraine.    

-        see below, Part B.

8.         ISABELLE de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 24 Jul 1373-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 23 Feb 1378, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).   

9.         CATHERINE de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 4 Feb 1378-Oct 1388, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône, Val d'Oise)m (la Noble-Maison de Saint Ouen near Paris 5 Aug 1386) as his first wife, JEAN de Berry Comte de Montpensier, son of JEAN de France Duc de Berry & his first wife Jeanne d'Armagnac (4 Feb 1377-1397).  

King Charles V had one possible illegitimate son by his possible Mistress (1):  

10.       [JEAN de Montaigu ([Paris 1350]-beheaded Paris 1409, bur Marcoussis).  Grand maître de l'hôtel of Charles VI King of France.]  m JACQUELINE de La Grange, daughter of ETIENNE de La Grange & his wife ---.  Jean de Montaigu & his wife had four children:

a)         CHARLES de Montaigu (1396-killed in battle Agincourt 1415).  Vidame de Laon.  m (1409) CATHERINE d'Albret, daughter of CHARLES d'Albret Comte de Dreux & his wife Marie de Sully.

b)         ISABELLE de Montaigu (-Lyon Oct 1429, bur Marcoussis, monastère des Célestins)m firstly ([1413]) JEAN [VI] Comte de Roucy et de Braine, son of HUGUES [II] Comte de Braine et de Roucy & his wife Blanche de Coucy Dame de Montmirail (-killed in battle Azincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Braine Sainte-Ived).  m secondly ([1416]) PIERRE de Bourbon Seigneur de Préaux, son of JACQUES de Bourbon Seigneur de Dargies, de Préaux, de Dangu et de Thury & his wife Marguerite de Préaux, dame de Préaux, Dangu et Thery (-murdered La Rochelle 11 Oct 1422).  

c)          JACQUELINE de Montaigu (-Moncontour 1436).  Dame de Marcoussis.  m firstly JEAN de Craon Vicomte de Châteaudun (-killed in battle 1415).  m secondly JEAN Malet Seigneur de Graville.  

d)         JEANNE de Montaigu ([1396/97]-Valère-en-Touraine Sep 1420, bur Marcoussis, monastère des Célestins)m (1417) JACQUES de Bourbon Seigneur d'Argies, son of JACQUES de Bourbon Seigneur de Dargies, de Préaux, de Dangu et de Thury & his wife Marguerite de Préaux, dame de Préaux, Dangu et Thery (-murdered returning from Rome 1429).  After his wife's death, he became a monk at the Celestin monastery at Ambert. 

King Charles V had one possible illegitimate son by Mistress (2):  

11.       [OUDARD d'Attainville ([Paris 1360]-after 1415).  He is cited in the Chronique Normande de Pierre Cochon[915].  Bailli de Rouen.] 

 

 

CHARLES de France, son of CHARLES V "le Sage" King of France & his wife Jeanne de Bourbon (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 3 Dec 1368-Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 21 Oct 1422, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  His father gave him the title Dauphin de Viennois soon after his birth, thereafter known as "Monseigneur le Dauphin".  He was appointed Lieutenant-General and Imperial Vicar for the kingdom of Arles, the Dauphiné de Viennois and Piémont at Paris 9 Jan 1378.  He succeeded his father in 1380 as CHARLES VI "le Bien-Aimé" King of France, under the regency of his four uncles during his minority until 3 Nov 1385.  He was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 4 Nov 1380.  In Jan 1393, he appointed his brother Louis Duc d'Orléans as regent to act during his periods of insanity.  He concluded a four year peace with England in 1395, sealed by the marriage of his daughter Isabelle to King Richard II.  During one of his periods of madness he was persuaded to sign the Treaty of Troyes 21 May 1420, under which he named Henry V King of England as regent and his heir.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "XII Kal Nov" of "Karoli sexti quondam regis Francie"[916]

m (Cathedral of Amiens 17 Jul 1385) ELISABETH von Bayern-Ingolstadt, daughter of STEFAN II Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt & his first wife Taddea Visconti ([1369/70]-Paris 24 or 30 Sep 1435, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Consecrated at Sainte-Chapelle, Paris 23 Aug 1389.  She was known as ISABEAU de Bavière in France.  Appointed President of the Council of Regency 26 Apr 1403 during the periods of insanity of her husband.  She proclaimed herself regent in 1408.  She was sent to Blois, and later Tours, by her husband and delivered by Jean “sans Peur” Duke of Burgundy 2 Nov 1417.  The necrology of Vauvert records the death "Kal Oct" of "domina Ysabella de Bavaria regina Francie"[917]

Mistress (1): ODINETTE [Oudine] de Champdivers, daughter of ODIN de Champdivers [master of the stables at court] & his wife --- (1389-1424).  Originating in Burgundy, she was brought to the court of Charles VI King of France by Jean "Sans Peur" Duke of Burgundy.  She took care of the King and became his mistress, with the consent of Queen Isabelle.  She left court after the King's death, seeking refuge at Saint-Jean de Losne in 1423. 

King Charles VI & his wife had twelve children:

1.         CHARLES de France Dauphin de Viennois (Maison royale de Beauté, Bois de Vincennes 25 Sep 1386-Château du Bois de Vincennes 28 Dec 1386, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  

2.         JEANNE de France (Maison royale de Saint-Ouen, near Saint-Denis 14 Jun 1388-1390, bur Abbaye royale de Maubuisson, Saint-Ouen l'Aumône).  

3.         ISABELLE de France (Palais du Louvre 9 Nov 1389-Blois before 9 Sep 1409, bur Chapelle de Notre-Dame des Bonnes-Nouvelles, Abbaye de Saint-Laumer, Blois, transferred 1624 to l'église des Célestins, Paris).  Her first marriage sealed the four-year peace with England concluded by her father in 1395.  The marriage contract between “[le] Roy d’Angleterre” and “[le roy de France] nostre...niece” is dated 9 Mar 1396[918].  The Annals of Bermondsey record the marriage “1396…circa festum Omnium Sanctorum apud Caleys” of “Isabella regina regi Ricardo” and her coronation “8 Jan…apud Westmonasterium[919].  Imprisoned after the deposition of her first husband, she returned to France Aug 1401.  She died from the after effects of childbirth.  m firstly (contract Paris 9 Mar 1396, by proxy Sainte-Chapelle, Palais Royal, Paris 12 Mar 1396, Calais Saint-Nicolas 1 Nov 1396, not consummated) as his second wife, RICHARD II King of England, son of EDWARD Prince of Wales "the Black Prince" & Joan Ctss of Kent (Bordeaux [6] Jan 1367-Pontefract Castle, Yorkshire, probably murdered 6 Jan or 14 Feb 1400, bur King’s Langley Church, Hertfordshire, transferred 1413 to Westminster Abbey).  m secondly (contract 5 Jun 1406, Compiègne, Oise 6 Jun 1407) as his first wife, CHARLES d'Orléans Comte d'Angoulême, son of LOUIS de France Duc d'Orléans & his second wife Valentina Visconti of Milan (Hôtel royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 24 Nov 1394-Château d'Amboise 4 Jan 1465, bur Chapelle d'Orléans, église des Célestins, Paris).  He succeeded his father in 1407 as Duc d'Orléans. 

4.         JEANNE de France (Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 24 Jan 1391-Vannes, Morbihan 27 Sep 1433, bur Vannes, Cathédrale de Saint-Pierre).  The marriage contract between “Jehan Duc de Bretagne Comte de Richemont...nostre...filz Jehan Comte de Montfort” and “Monsieur le Roy...Madame Jehanne de France [sa] fille”, on the understanding that he would succeed “à nostre...compagne la Duchesse mere de nostredit filz...come son filz aisné”, is dated 26 Jan 1391 (presumably O.S.)[920].  Her marriage was celebrated twice, due to an "irregularity" in the first ceremony[921].  The Chronicon Britannicum records the death 20 Sep 1433 of “Johanna senior filia regis Franciæ ducissa Britanniæ” and her burial “in ecclesia cathedrali S. Petri Venetensis[922]m (contract Tours 26 Jan 1392, Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 19 Sep 1396, Palais du Louvre 30 Jul 1397) JEAN de Bretagne Earl of Richmond, son of JEAN V Duke of Brittany & his third wife Infanta doña Juana de Navarra (Château de l'Hermine, near Vannes, Morbihan 24 Dec 1389-manoir de La Touche, near Nantes 29 Aug 1442, bur Tréguier, Cathédrale Saint-Tugdual).  He succeeded his father in 1399 as JEAN VI Duke of Brittany

5.         CHARLES de France Dauphin de Viennois (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 6 Feb 1392-Paris 13 Jan 1401, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc de Guyenne.  Betrothed to MARGUERITE de Bourgogne, widow of LOUIS de France Dauphin de Viennois, daughter of JEAN de Bourgogne [later JEAN "Sans-Peur" Duke of Burgundy] & his wife Margareta of Holland (1390-Paris 2 Feb 1441, bur Paris église des Carmélites).  

6.         MARIE de France (Bois de Vincennes [Jul/Aug] 1393-Palais Royal, Paris 19 Aug 1438, bur church of the convent at Poissy).  Her mother destined her for the church, possibly because she saw her husband's madness as a punishment from God[923].  She entered the convent of Poissy 8 Sep 1397, taking her vows as a nun 26 May 1408.   She died of the plague[924]

7.         MICHELLE de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 11 Feb 1395-Gent 8 Jul 1422, bur Gent, St Bavo)m (contract Paris 5 May 1403 and 14 Feb 1405, Paris Jun 1409) as his first wife, PHILIPPE de Bourgogne, son of JEAN "Sans-Peur" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite de Hainaut (Dijon 31 Jul 1396-Bruges 15 Jun 1467, bur Dijon église des Chartreux).  He succeeded his father in 1419 as PHILIPPE III "le Bon" Duke of Burgundy.  

8.         LOUIS de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 22 Jan 1397-Hôtel de Bourbon, Paris 18 Dec 1415, bur Notre-Dame de Paris, transferred to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded on the death of his older brother Charles 13 Jan 1401 as Dauphin de Viennois.  Duc de Guyenne 14 Jan 1401.  Leader of the Council of the King 31 Dec 1409.  Comte de Mortain Mar 1412.  m (contract Paris 5 May 1403, Notre-Dame de Paris 30 Aug 1404, consummated Jun 1409) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Bourgogne, widow of LOUIS de France Dauphin de Viennois, daughter of JEAN de Bourgogne [later JEAN "Sans-Peur" Duke of Burgundy] & his wife Margareta of Holland (1390-Paris 2 Feb 1441, bur Paris église des Carmélites).  She married secondly Arthur de Bretagne, Earl of Richmond, Comte de Dreux, who succeeded in 1457 as Arthur III Duke of Brittany.  . 

9.         JEAN de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 31 Aug 1398-Compiègne 4/5 Apr 1417, bur Compiègne, Abbaye royale de Saint-Corneille).  Duc de Touraine 12 Jul 1401, confirmed 24 May 1414.  Baron de Mortagne 1403.  He succeeded on the death of his older brother Louis 18 Dec 1415 as Dauphin de Viennois, renouncing the Duchy of Touraine in favour of his younger brother Charles.  Duc de Berry, Comte de Poitou 17 May 1416, following the death of his great-uncle Jean de France Duc de Berry.  He lived with his father-in-law, returning to France Jan 1417.  He was poisoned.  m (contract Paris 5 May 1403, Compiègne 29 Jun 1406, dispensation 22 Apr 1411, contract The Hague 6 Aug 1415) as her first husband, JACQUELINE de Hainaut, daughter of GUILLAUME VI Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland and Seeland (Le Quesnoy 16 Jul 1401-murdered at Schloss Teilingen 8 Oct 1436, bur The Hague).  She succeeded her father in 1417 as JACQUELINE Ctss de Hainaut, Ctss of Holland and Seeland. 

10.      CATHERINE de France (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 27 Oct 1401-Bermondsey, Abbey of St Saviour 3 Jan 1438, bur Westminster Abbey).  The Chronicle of Adam de Usk records that “dominus rex” requested “in Franciam...regem eciam et reginam ac eorum filiam Katerinam” as his wife and “regnum” after her father’s death[925].  Crowned Queen of England 24 Feb 1421 at Westminster Abbey.  The Historie of England by Polydore Vergil records that King Henry V’s widow married, after he died, “Owen Tyder a gentleman of Wales...who derived his pedigree from Cadwallider the last king of Brittons[926].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the will of [her son] "Jasper Duke of Bedford and Earl of Pembroke", dated 15 Dec 1495, proved 2 Jul 1496, which ordered masses for the souls of “Katherine sometime Queen of England my mother, Edmund late Earl of Richmond my brother[927].  She died in childbirth.  A manuscript calendar records the death “III Non Jan” of “queene Katerine[928].  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the death 3 Feb 1437 “aìd Barmondsey” of “regina Katerina[929].  She died in childbirth.  m firstly (contract Troyes 21 May 1420, Troyes Cathedral 2 Jun 1420) HENRY V King of England, son of HENRY IV King of England & his first wife Mary de Bohun (Monmouth Castle 9 Aug 1387-Château du Bois de Vincennes 31 Aug 1422, bur Westminster Abbey).  m secondly (secretly [1425/28]) OWEN Tudor, son of MAREDUDD [Meredith] ap Tewdwr & his wife Margred [Margaret] Fychan (Plas Penmynydd, Wales [1400]-executed Hereford 2 Feb 1461, bur Hereford, Church of the Grey Friars).  

11.      CHARLES de France (Hôtel Royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 22 Feb 1403-Château de Mehun-sur-Yèvre, Cher 22 Jul 1461, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1422 as CHARLES VII "le Victorieux" King of France

-        see below

12.      PHILIPPE de France (Hôtel Barbette, Marais, Paris 10 Nov 1407-Nov 1407, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  

King Charles VI had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1):   

13.       MARGUERITE de Valois (1407-after 1448).  Legitimated Jan 1428.  Called "Mademoiselle de Belleville".  m (contract 3 May 1428) as his first wife, JEAN [III] de Harpedanne Seigneur de Belleville, son of JEAN [II] de Harpedanne Seigneur de Belleville & his wife Jeanne de Mussidan. 

 

 

CHARLES de France, son of CHARLES VI "le Bien-Aimé" King of France & his wife Elisabeth von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Hôtel Royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 22 Feb 1403-Château de Mehun-sur-Yèvre, Cher 22 Jul 1461, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Comte de Ponthieu.  Duc de Touraine 4/5 Apr 1417.  Member of the Royal Council from 3 Sep 1416.  Dauphin de Viennois 13 Apr 1417, following the death of his older brother Jean.  Duc de Berry, Comte de Poitou 17 May 1417.  He was named President of the Royal Council 14 Jun 1417 during the periods of insanity of his father.  Invested as Lieutenant General of the King in the whole kingdom 6 Nov 1417.  He escaped from Paris 29 May 1418 after it was invaded by the Burgundians, and established his parliament at Poitou 21 Sep 1418.  Regent of France 26 Dec 1418.  After the Treaty of Troyes 21 May 1420, naming Henry V King of England as regent and heir to the throne of France, Charles withdrew to Anjou, Poitou and Berry.  Deprived of the regency 3 Jan 1421.  He succeeded his father in 1422 as CHARLES VII "le Victorieux" King of France, establishing his residence at Bourges abandoned by most of France.  With the help of Jeanne d'Arc, he re-established himself and was consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 17 Jul 1429.  He entered Paris 12 Nov 1437. 

m (contract Palais du Louvre 18 Dec 1413, Tours 2 Jun 1422) MARIE d'Anjou, daughter of LOUIS II Duc d'Anjou Titular King of Naples, Sicily and Jerusalem & Violanta Infanta de Aragón (Angers 14 Oct 1404-Abbaye de Chateliers-en-Poitou, near Saint-Maxent, Deux-Sèvres 29 Nov 1463, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Her mother transferred her rights to the crown of Aragon to her at Saumur 16 Feb 1440.  She claimed her rights to Aragon 1446. 

Mistress (1): AGNES Sorel, daughter of JEAN Soreau Seigneur de Saint-Gérand & his wife Catherine de Maignelas chatelaine de Verneuil ([Froidmantel, Péronne, Somme[930]] [1422]-Château d'Anneville, Normandie 9 Feb 1450, bur Loches, église collégiale Saint-Ours).  She came to the French court in 1444, when King Charles VII gave her the Château de Beauté-sur-Marne, near the bois de Vincennes, hence her nickname "Mademoiselle de Beauté".  She died from the after-effects of childbirth. 

King Charles VII & his wife had fourteen children:

1.         LOUIS de France (Bourges, Bishop's palace 3 Jul 1423-Château de Plessis-les-Tours, La Riche, Indre-et-Loire 30 Aug 1483, bur Notre-Dame de Cléry, Loiret).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth.  He succeeded in 1461 as LOUIS XI King of France.   

-        see below

2.         JEAN de France (b and d Poitiers 19 Sep 1426).  

3.         RADEGONDE de France (Chinon, Indre-et-Loire 1425 before 29 Aug-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 19 Mar 1444, bur Tours, Cathédrale Saint-Gatien)Betrothed (contract Innsbruck 22 Jul 1430) to SIGISMUND of Austria, son of FRIEDRICH IV "mit den leeren Tasche" Graf von Tirol & his second wife Anna von Braunschweig-Lüneburg (Innsbruck 26 Oct 1427-Innsbruck 4 Mar 1496, bur Stams).  He succeeded his father in 1439 as SIGISMUND "der Münzreiche" Graf von Tirol

4.         CATHERINE de France (-Brussels 13 Sep 1446, bur Brussels, Cathédrale Saint-Michel).  She left the French court in May 1438 to live with the Duke of Burgundy at Saint-Omer.  m (Betrothed 1438, St Omer 19 May 1440) CHARLES de Bourgogne Comte de Charolais, son of PHILIPPE III "le Bon" Duke of Burgundy & his third wife Infanta doña Isabel de Portugal (Dijon 11 Nov 1433-killed in battle Nancy 5 Jan 1477, bur 1512 Bruges église de Notre-Dame).  He succeeded his father in 1467 as CHARLES "le Hardi/le Téméraire" Duke of Burgundy

5.         JACQUES de France (1432-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 2 Mar 1437, bur Tours, Cathédrale Saint-Gatien).  

6.         YOLANDE de France (Tours, Indre-et-Loire 23 Sep 1434-Chambéry 29 Aug 1478, bur Vercelli, San Eusebio).  The marriage contract between "Amedeo di Savoia figlio del Duca Lodovico" and "Yolant di Francia figlia di Carlo VII Re di Francia" is dated 16 Aug 1436[931].  After her betrothal, she was sent to Thonon to be brought up by her future mother-in-law.  Regent of Savoy 1472-1478 during the minority of her son Philibert.  m (contract Tours 16 Aug 1436, Feurs en Forez, Loire 1452) AMEDEE de Savoie, son of LOUIS Duc de Savoie & his wife Anne Pss of Cyprus (Château de Thonon, Haute-Savoie 1 Feb 1435-Vercelli 30 Mar 1472, bur Vercelli, San Eusebio).  He succeeded his father in 1465 as AMEDEE IX Duke of Savoy

7.         JEANNE de France (1435-Château de Moulins, Allier 4 May 1482, bur Moulins, église de Notre-Dame)m (contracts Château de Montils-lès-Tours 23 Dec 1446 and Tours 26 Dec 1446, dispensation 3 Nov 1452, in person end 1452) as his first wife, JEAN de Bourbon Comte de Clermont, son of CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon et d'Auvergne & his wife Agnès de Bourgogne [Valois] (Château de Moulins, Allier 30 Aug 1426[932]-Château de Moulins 1 Apr 1488, bur Priory of Souvigny).  He succeeded his father in 1456 as JEAN II Duc de Bourbon et d'Auvergne.  

8.         PHILIPPE de France (Château de Chinon, Indre-et-Loire 4 Feb 1436-11 Jun 1436).  

9.         MARGUERITE de France (May 1437-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 24 Jul 1438).  

10.      JEANNE de France (Amboise 7 Sep 1438-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 26 Dec 1446).  Twin with Marie. 

11.      MARIE de France ( Amboise 7 Sep 1438- Tours, Indre-et-Loire 14 Feb 1439).  

12.      MARIE de France (1441-young).  

13.      MADELEINE de France (Tours, Indre-et-Loire 1 Dec 1443-Pamplona 24 Jan 1495, bur Pamplona Cathedral)Betrothed (Sep 1457) to LADISLAUS Duke of Austria, King of Bohemia, ULÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary, son of ALBRECHT V Duke of Austria, King of Bohemia and Hungary & his wife Elisabeth Pss of Bohemia & Hungary [Luxembourg] (posthumously Komarón, Hungary 22 Feb 1440-Prague 23 Nov 1457, bur Prague St Veit).  m (contract Tours 1458, Saint-Jean-d'Angély, Charente-Maritime 11 Feb 1462, Saint-Macaire, Gironde 7 Mar 1462) GASTON de Foix Principe de Viana, son of GASTON IV de Grailly Comte de Foix et de Bigorre & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Aragón y Navarra [later Leonor I Queen of Navarre] (1444-Libourne, Gironde 23 Nov 1470, bur Bordeaux, Cathédrale Saint-André).  He died from injuries received during a tournament.  

14.      CHARLES de France (Château de Montils-lès-Tours 12 Dec 1446-Bordeaux 24 May 1472, bur Bordeaux, Cathédrale Saint-André).  He bore the title Duc de Berry from birth, confirmed Nov 1461.  His father Charles VII unsuccessfully proposed Charles to succeed Ladislaus of Austria as King of Bohemia and Hungary, sending an ambassador to Prague Feb 1458.  Duc de Normandie, Comte de Mortain Oct 1465, enthroned as Duke at Notre-Dame de Rouen 1 Dec 1465, dispossessed by the King his brother Nov 1469.  Duc de Guyenne Apr 1469.  Mistress (1): COLETTE de Chambes, wife of LOUIS Sire d'Amboise Vicomte de Thouars Prince de Talmont, daughter of JEAN de Chambes Seigneur de Montsoreau [counsellor and first maître d'hôtel of the King, captain and governor of La Rochelle] & his wife Jeanne Chabot (-Saint-Sever 14 Dec 1471, bur Saint-Sever).  She left her husband mid-1469 to live with Charles Duc de Guyenne.  Duke Charles had two illegitimate daughters by Mistress (1):

a)         JEANNE bâtarde de Guyenne (-after 1533).  Dominican nun.  Under-prioress at the convent of Saint-Pardoux la Rivière, Périgord. 

b)         ANNE bâtarde de Guyenne (-before 14 Nov 1491)m (contract 5 Oct 1470) as his first wife, FRANÇOIS de Volvire Seigneur de Ruffec en Angoûmois, son of JEAN de Volvire [counsellor and chamberlain of Charles Duc de Guyenne] & his wife Catherine de Comborn (-1541).  Seigneur de Montcucq en Quercy 1471.  Counsellor and Chamberlain of the King. 

King Charles VII had four illegitimate children by Mistress (1):   

15.       MARIE ([Dec 1443/Oct 1444]-before 1473).  Recognised by her father King Charles VII with the name "de Valois" Oct 1458, created Dame de Royan et de Mornac en Saintonge.  m (contract Vendôme 28 Oct 1458, 25 Nov 1458) OLIVIER de Coëtivy Seigneur de Taillebourg, son of ALAIN [III] de Coëtivy Seigneur de Coëtivy et de Taillebourg & his wife Catherine de Chastel (-before 1480).  Lieutenant in the navy of his brother Admiral Prégent de Coëtivy, in the war against the English.  Governor of Dieppe 1433.  Seneschal of Guyenne, he was captured when Bordeaux revolted in 1452 and taken to England a prisoner until 1457[933]

16.       CHARLOTTE bâtarde de France ([Sep 1446]-murdered Château de Rouvres, near Anet, Eure-et-Loire 31 May/1 Jun 1477, bur Abbaye de Coulombs, near Nogent-le-Roi).  She was stabbed by her husband who discovered her in flagrante delictom (1 Mar 1462) JACQUES de Brezé, son of PIERRE [II] de Brezé Comte de Maulévrier [counsellor and chamberlain of the King] & his wife Jeanne Crespin (-Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loire 14 Aug 1494, bur Abbaye de Coulombs).  He succeeded his father 16 Jul 1465 as Comte de Maulévrier.  He was tried for the murder of his wife, condemned to pay 100,000 écus as payment for which he ceded all his possessions to the King by contract at Tours 6 Oct 1481, but in 1484 appealed to the Parliament which found in his favour[934].  He was pardoned by Charles VIII King of France Aug 1486. 

17.       JEANNE bâtarde de France ([Feb] 1448-after 1467)m (contract Tours 23 Dec 1461) ANTOINE Sire de Bueil Comte de Sancerre, son of JEAN [V] Sire de Bueil Comte de Sancerre & his wife Jeanne de Montejean (-after 1506).  Amiral de France. 

18.       daughter (Manoir de Mesnil, near l'Abbaye de Jumièges, Normandie 3 Feb 1450-[Aug] 1450). 

 

 

LOUIS de France, son of CHARLES VII King of France & his wife Marie d'Anjou (Bourges, Bishop's palace 3 Jul 1423-Château de Plessis-les-Tours, La Riche, Indre-et-Loire 30 Aug 1483, bur Notre-Dame de Cléry, Loiret).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth.  He moved to Viennois in Jan 1447, governing the territory himself until Aug 1456.  He founded the University of Valence in 1454, and annexed Orange.  He was in open revolt against his father in 1456, and was forced to seek refuge in Brabant at the Château de Genappe.  He returned to France on the death of his father in 1461, succeeding as LOUIS XI King of France, consecrated 15 Aug 1461 at Notre-Dame de Reims.  On the death of Charles Duke of Burgundy in 1477, he united the duchy of Burgundy and the counties of Artois and Boulogne with the crown.  He inherited the possessions of René Duc d'Anjou, and his nephew Charles Comte du Maine. 

m firstly (contract Perth, Scotland 19 Jul 1428, contract Chinon, Indre-et-Loire 30 Oct 1428, Cathédrale de Tours 24 Jun 1436) MARGARET of Scotland, daughter of JAMES I King of Scotland & his wife Joan Beaufort (1424-Châlons-sur-Marne, Cathédrale Saint-Etienne 16 Aug 1445, bur Abbaye de Saint-Laon, Vienne). 

m secondly (contract Genève, couvent des Cordeliers, Château de Chambéry 9 Mar 1451) CHARLOTTE de Savoie, daughter of LOUIS I Duke of Savoy & his wife Anne Pss of Cyprus (11 Nov 1441-Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 1 Dec 1483, bur Cléry, église de Notre-Dame).  The marriage contract between "Lodovico figlio primogenitor del Re di Francia Delfino" and "Carlotta figlia del Duca Lodovico di Savoia" is dated 14 Feb 1451[935].  This second marriage took place without the consent of Louis's father. 

Mistress (1): PHELISE Regnard or Raynard, daughter of --- [notary at Grenoble].  m firstly CHARLES de Seillons, son of ---.  Secretary of King Louis XI.  m secondly GRÂCE d'Archelles, son of ---. 

Mistress (2): MARGUERITE de Sassenage, daughter of HENRI Seigneur de Sassenage & his wife Antoinette de Saluces.  m AMBLARD de Beaumont Seigneur de Montfort, son of ---.

King Louis XI & his second wife had eight children:

1.         LOUIS de France (Château de Genappe 18 Oct 1458-1460). 

2.         JOACHIM de France (Château de Genappe 15 Jul 1459-Namur 29 Nov 1459, bur Amboise, église des Cordeliers).  

3.         LOUISE de France (Château de Genappe Jul 1460-1460).  

4.         ANNE de France (Château de Genappe Apr 1461-Château de Chantelle en Bourbonnais, Allier 14 Nov 1522, bur Priory of Souvigny).  Created Vicomtesse de Thouars, Ctss de Gien at Amboise May 1470.  She governed France during the minority of her brother 1483-1488.  She acquired the vicomté de Châtellerault and the seigneurie de Gironde 13 Mar 1505 from the Duc de Nemours.  m (contract Jargeau, near Orléans 3 Nov 1473, Tours 1474) PIERRE de Bourbon Sire de Beaujeu, son of CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Agnès de Bourgogne [Valois] (1 Dec 1438-Château de Moulins 10 Oct 1503, bur Priory of Souvigny) Created Comte de Clermont 3 Apr 1476.  He governed jointly with his wife, during the minority of his brother-in-law Charles VIII King of France.  He succeeded his brother in 1488 as PIERRE II Duc de Bourbon

5.         JEANNE de France (Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir 23 Apr 1464-Bourges, Bishop's palace 4 Feb 1505, bur Bourges, Monastère de l'Annonciade).  Created Dss de Berry 26 Dec 1498.  In 1501 she founded the Monastère de l'Annonciade in Bourges, where she became a nun Pentecost 1504 as Sœur Jehanne-Marienne.  Beatified 18 Jun 1742 by Pope Benedict XIV, canonised 28 May 1950 by Pope Pius XII as Sainte-Jeanne de France.  m (contract Jargeau, Loiret 28 Oct 1473, and 28 Aug 1476, Château de Montrichard 8 Sep 1476, annulled Amboise 17 Dec 1498) as his first wife, LOUIS Duc d'Orléans, son of CHARLES Duc d'Orléans & his third wife Maria von Kleve (Château de Blois 27 Jun 1462-Hôtel royal des Tournelles, Paris 1 Jan 1515, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded in 1498 as LOUIS XII King of France

6.         FRANÇOIS de France (b and d 4 Dec 1466). 

7.         CHARLES de France (Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 30 Jun 1470-Château d'Amboise 7 Apr 1498, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth.  He succeeded his father in 1483 as CHARLES VIII "l'Affable" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 30 May 1484.  His sister Anne de Bourbon, and her husband Pierre de Bourbon Sire de Beaujeu, governed France until 1488.  The incorporation of the counties of Provence and Forcalquier into the royal domains was pronounced at Compiègne 7 Oct 1486, following the bequest to his father by René Duc d'Anjou of all his lands.  He incorporated Brittany into the royal domains, entering Nantes 4 Apr 1491.  He transferred the counties of Roussillon and Cerdagne to Fernando King of Aragon under the Treaty of Barcelona 19 Jan 1493.  He took the titles King of Jerusalem and Sicily at Lyon 13 Mar 1494[936], as a prelude to his conquest of the Kingdom of Sicily.  He entered Naples 12 May 1495, but lost the kingdom Feb 1496.  Betrothed (Amboise 22 Jun 1483) to MARGARETA von Habsburg, daughter of MAXIMILIAN von Habsburg [later MAXIMILIAN I King of the Romans, Archduke of Austria, Emperor] & his first wife Marie Dss of Burgundy [Valois] (Brussels 10 Jan 1480-Mechelen 1 Dec 1530, bur Brou near Bourg-en-Bresse).  This betrothal was arranged as part of King Louis XI's plan for the dismemberment of the territories of the Dukes of Burgundy, agreed under the Treaty of Arras signed 23 Dec 1482 with the Flemish.  m (Château de Langeais, Indre-et-Loire 6 Dec 1491, contract Langeais 13 Dec 1491) as her first husband, ANNE Dss of Brittany, daughter of FRANÇOIS II Duke of Brittany & his second wife Marguerite de Foix (Château de Nantes 25 Jan 1477-Château de Blois 9 Jan 1514, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She was consecrated Queen of France at Saint-Denis 8 Feb 1492.  King Charles VIII & his wife had six children:

a)         CHARLES ORLAND de France (Château du Plessis-lès-Tours, La Riche, Indre-et-Loire 10 Oct 1492-Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 16 Dec 1495, bur Tours, église cathédrale Saint-Martin).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth. 

b)         son (b and d Courcelles, Loiret Aug 1493, bur Notre-Dame de Cléry). 

c)         daughter (b and d Mar 1495). 

d)         CHARLES de France (Château du Plessis-lès-Tours, La Riche, Indre-et-Loire 8 Sep 1496- Château du Plessis-lès-Tours 2 Oct 1496, bur Tours, église cathédrale Saint-Martin).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth.  

e)         FRANÇOIS de France (1497-Montils-lès-Tours 1498, bur Tours, église cathédrale Saint-Martin).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth.  

f)          ANNE de France (b and d 20 Mar 1498, bur Tours, bur Tours, église cathédrale Saint-Martin). 

8.         FRANÇOIS de France (Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 3 Sep 1472-Amboise Jul 1473, bur Amboise, église des Cordeliers).  Duc de Berry. 

King Louis XI had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1):   

9.          GUYETTE bâtarde de France (-after 11 Mar 1502).  Legitimated.   

King Louis XI had three illegitimate children by Mistress (2): 

10.       JEANNE de Valois ([1447/56]-1519, bur Mirabeau, Vienne, église des Cordeliers).  Legitimated 25 Feb 1466.  Dame de Mirabeau et d'Usson en Auvergne.  m (Paris end Feb 1466) LOUIS bâtard de Bourbon Comte de Roussillon et de Ligny, illegitimate son of CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon & his mistress Jeanne de Bournan (-Valognes, Manche Jan 1487, bur église Saint-François).  Amiral de France 1466. 

11.       MARIE ([1449/51]-[1470]).  Legitimated 11 Jul 1467.  She died in childbirth.  m (contract Chartres Jun 1467) as his first wife, AYMAR de Poitiers Seigneur de Saint-Vallier, son of CHARLES II de Poitiers Seigneur de Saint-Vallier & his wife Anne de Montlaur (-after 9 Sep 1510).  Counsellor and chamberlain of King Louis XI.  Grand seneschal of Provence 1484-1494.  He was a member of the Council of Regency on the death of Louis XI. 

12.       ISABEAUm LOUIS de Saint-Priest

 

 

 

B.      DUCS d'ORLEANS, KINGS of FRANCE 1515-1589

 

 

LOUIS de France, son of CHARLES V "le Sage" King of France & his wife Jeanne de Bourbon (Hôtel de Saint-Pol, Paris 13 Mar 1372-murdered Paris 23 Nov 1407, bur Paris, église des Célestins).  Comte de Valois after the death of Philippe Duc d'Orléans 1 Sep 1375, first named as such 4 Jan 1376.  Duc de Touraine Nov 1386 at Lille.  He joined the Royal Council 16 Feb 1389.  He entered Lombardy in Feb 1391, taking Pavia in Mar 1391.  Duc d'Orléans at Paris 4 Jun 1392, in exchange for the duchy of Touraine.  His brother named him regent in Jan 1393 to act during the former's periods of insanity.  He acquired the duchy of Luxembourg and county of Chiny 18 Aug 1402.  He was murdered near la Porte Barbette on the orders of Jean "Sans Peur" Duke of Burgundy. 

Betrothed (1374) to KATALIN of Hungary, daughter of LAJOS I King of Hungary & his second wife Jelisaveta Kotromanić of Bosnia (1370-1377). 

m firstly (by proxy Apr 1385, contract abandoned) as her first husband, MÁRIA King of Hungary, daughter of LAJOS I King of Hungary & his second wife Jelisaveta Kotromanić of Bosnia (1371-Ofen 1395, bur Warasdin). 

m secondly (contract Paris 27 Jan 1387, by proxy Pavia 8 Apr 1387, in person Melun 17 Aug 1389) VALENTINA Visconti, daughter of GIAN GALEAZZO Visconti Lord of Milan & his first wife Isabelle de France (1366-Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher 14 Dec 1408, bur Paris, église des Célestins).  Giovanni di Musso’s Chronicon Placentinum records the betrothal in 1387 of "Dominus comes Virtutum…unicam filiam suam Dominam Valentinam" and "Duci Turoniæ comiti Valexii, fratris…Regis Francorum"[937].  She was given the counties of Vertus and Asti as her dowry.  She left the French court Apr 1396, living thereafter at Asnières, Château-Thierry, Villers-Cotterêts and Blois. 

Mistress (1): YOLANDE [Mariette] d'Enghien, daughter of JACQUES d'Enghien & his wife ---.

Duke Louis & his second wife had eight children:

1.         son (Paris 25 Mar 1390-young, bur Paris église Saint-Paul). 

2.         LOUIS d'Orléans (Paris Hôtel de Saint-Pol 26 May 1391-Sep 1395, bur Paris église des Célestins). 

3.         JEAN d'Orléans (Sep 1393-Château de Vincennes before 31 Oct 1393, bur Paris église des Célestins). 

4.         CHARLES d'Orléans (Hôtel royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 24 Nov 1394-Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 4 Jan 1465, bur Paris église des Célestins).  Comte d'Angoulême.  Duc de Valois.  He succeeded his father in 1407 as Duc d'Orléans. 

-        see below

5.         PHILIPPE d'Orléans (Asnières-sur-Oise, Val d'Oise [21/24] Jul 1396-Beaugency, Loiret 1 Sep 1420, bur Paris église des Célestins).  Comte de Vertus et de Porcien, after his father's death under the latter's will.  Vertus was withdrawn, but restored to him 27 Aug 1412, registered 29 Aug 1412.  He was a faithful supporter of the Dauphin, later King Charles VII.  Betrothed (1408, contract repudiated [1410]) to CATHERINE de Bourgogne, demoiselle de Guise, daughter of JEAN "Sans Peur" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite de Hainaut (1391-Ghent 1414).  Philippe had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:  

a)         PHILIPPE bâtard de Vertus (-executed before 18 Jul 1445).  Governor of Blois.

6.         MARIE d'Orléans (Château de Coucy, Aisne Apr 1401-young).  

7.         JEAN d'Orléans ([May] 1400-Château de Cognac, Charente 30 Apr 1467, bur Angoulême Cathédrale Saint-Pierre).  Comte d'Angoulême et de Périgord, after his father's death under the latter's will.   

-        see below

8.         MARGUERITE d'Orléans (1406-Abbaye de Laguiche, near Blois 24 Apr 1466, bur Abbaye de Laguiche).  She was given the county of Vertus as her dowry.  After her husband died, she retired to the Abbaye de Laguiche.  m (Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher 29 Aug 1423) RICHARD de Bretagne Comte d'Etampes, son of JEAN V Duke of Brittany & Infanta doña Juana de Navarra (end 1395-Château de Clisson, Loire-Atlantique 2 Jun 1438, bur Nantes Cathedral Saint-Pierre).  

Duke Louis had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

9.          JEAN d'Orléans (Paris 23 Nov 1402-L'Haye 24 Nov 1468, bur Notre Dame de Cléry)Seigneur de Valbonais 1421.  Comte de Dunois 1439.  Comte de Longueville 1443.   m (16 Nov 1439) MARIE d’Harcourt, daughter of JACQUES [II] d’Harcourt Baron de Montgommery & his second wife Marguerite de Melun Ctss de Tancarville (-1 Sep 1464). 

-        COMTES de LONGUEVILLE

 

 

CHARLES d'Orléans, son of LOUIS de France Duc d'Orléans & his second wife Valentina Visconti of Milan (Hôtel royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 24 Nov 1394-Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 4 Jan 1465, bur Paris église des Célestins).  Comte d'Angoulême.  Duc de Valois.  He succeeded his father 1407 as Duc d'Orléans.  He was invested as Conte di Asti by Emperor Sigismund 12 Sep 1413.  Captured at the battle of Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, he was taken to England where he remained a prisoner until 1440.  He claimed the duchy of Milan in 1447 on the death of Filippo Maria Visconti, and entered the city 22 Oct 1447. 

m firstly (contract 5 Jun 1406, Compiègne, Oise 6 Jun 1407) as her second husband, ISABELLE de France, widow of RICHARD II King of England, daughter of CHARLES VI King of France & his wife Elisabeth [Isabelle] von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Palais du Louvre 9 Nov 1389-Blois before 9 Sep 1409, bur Chapelle de Notre-Dame des Bonnes-Nouvelles, Abbaye de Saint-Laumer, Blois, transferred 1624 to l'église des Célestins, Paris).  She died from the after-effects of childbirth. 

m secondly (contract Gien, Loiret 18 Apr 1410, Riom, Puy-de-Dôme 15 Aug 1410) BONNE d'Armagnac, daughter of BERNARD [VII] Comte d'Armagnac & his wife Bonne de Berry (Lavardens, Gers 19 Feb [1395]-Castelnau-de-Montmiral, Tarn [1430[938]/16 Nov 1435]). 

m thirdly (contract Montreuil 16 Nov 1440, Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, Abbaye de Saint-Bertin 26 Nov 1440) as her first husband, MARIA von Kleve, daughter of ADOLF II Duke of Kleve & his second wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] (19 Sep 1426-Chauny-en-Picardie, Aisne Jul 1486, bur Paris église des Célestins).  She was brought up at the court of her uncle Duke of Burgundy.  Dame de Chaumont-sur-Loire, de La Borde et des Rochettes May 1466.  She married secondly (secretly [1473/75]) Claude de Rabodanges Seigneur de Thun ([1441/42]-), who had arrived in Blois [1468] and became her maître d'hôtel. 

Duke Charles & his first wife had one child:

1.         JEANNE d'Orléans (Blois Aug 1409-Angers, Abbaye de Saint-Aubin, Maine-et-Loire 19 May 1432, bur Abbaye de Saint-Aubin)m (contract Blois 14 May 1410, Blois 1424) as his first wife, JEAN II "le Bon" Duc d'Alençon, son of JEAN I "le Sage" Duc d'Alençon & his wife Marie de Bretagne dame de La Guerche (Château d’Argentan 1409- Paris 1476, bur Paris, église des Jacobins). 

Duke Charles & his third wife had three children:

2.         MARIE d'Orléans (Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher 19 Dec 1457-Mazères, Ariège 1493, bur Mazères)m (1476) JEAN de Foix Infante de Navarra Vicomte de Narbonne Comte d'Etampes, son of GASTON IV Comte de Foix et de Bigorre & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Navarra (after 1450-5 Nov 1500, bur Etampes, Notre-Dame, Essonne).  He claimed the throne of Navarre 1483-1497. 

3.         LOUIS d'Orléans (Château de Blois 27 Jun 1462-Hôtel royal des Tournelles, Paris 1 Jan 1515, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1465 as Duc d'Orléans.  He succeeded in 1498 as LOUIS XII King of France

-        see below

4.         ANNE d'Orléans (1464-Poitiers, Abbaye de Sainte-Croix 9 Sep 1491, bur Poitiers, Abbaye de Sainte-Croix).  Abbess of Fontevrault 1478.  Abbess of Sainte-Croix, Poitiers. 

 

 

LOUIS d'Orléans, son of CHARLES Duc d'Orléans & his third wife Maria von Kleve (Château de Blois 27 Jun 1462-Hôtel royal des Tournelles, Paris 1 Jan 1515, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1465 as Duc d'Orléans.  President of the Royal Council 4 Nov 1483.  He rebelled against the government of Pierre de Bourbon Sire de Beaujeu, defeated at Saint-Aubin du Cormier 1488, his assets were confiscated 24 Apr 1488.  He was imprisoned, first in the Château de Lusignan, later in the tour de Bourges.  Pardoned by King Charles VIII at Montils-lès-Tours 28 Jun 1491, his assets were restored to him.  On the death of King Charles VIII, he was proclaimed LOUIS XII King of France, Dauphin de Viennois 9 Apr 1498, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 27 May 1498.  He conquered Milan 6 Oct 1499, losing it shortly after, but reconquering it in spring 1501.  He was invested as duke of Milan by the emperor 7 Apr 1505 confirmed at Trento 14 Jun 1509.  Allying himself with Fernando King of Aragon in 1501, they expelled Federigo King of Sicily and divided his territories between them.  He entered Naples in Aug 1501, but he was defeated by the Spanish and lost the kingdom under the Peace of Lyon 31 Mar 1504. 

m firstly (contract Jargeau, Loiret 28 Oct 1473, and 28 Aug 1476, Château de Montrichard 8 Sep 1476, annulled Amboise 17 Dec 1498) JEANNE de France, daughter of LOUIS XI King of France & his second wife Charlotte de Savoie (Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir 23 Apr 1464-Bourges, Bishop's palace 4 Feb 1505, bur Bourges, Monastère de l'Annonciade).  Created Dss de Berry 26 Dec 1498.  In 1501, she founded the Monastère de l'Annonciade in Bourges, where she became a nun Pentecost in 1504 as Sœur Jehanne-Marienne.  Beatified 18 Jun 1742 by Pope Benedict XIV, canonised 28 May 1950 by Pope Pius XII as Sainte-Jeanne de France. 

m secondly (contract Etampes 18 Aug 1498[939], Papal dispensation 13 Sep 1498, Château de Nantes 7 Jan 1499) as her third husband, ANNE Dss of Brittany, widow of CHARLES VIII King of France, daughter of FRANÇOIS II Duke of Brittany & his second wife Marguerite de Foix (Château de Nantes 25 Jan 1477-Château de Blois 9 Jan 1514, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She was consecrated Queen of France, for the second time, 18 Nov 1504 at l'Abbaye de Saint-Denis.  It was a condition of the contract for her second marriage that, should her husband die without heirs, she could only marry the heir to the French throne. 

m thirdly (contract London 7 Aug 1514, by proxy Greyfriars Church, Greenwich Palace 13 Aug 1514, by proxy église des Célestins Paris 2 Sep 1514, contract 14 Sep 1514, in person Abbeville Cathedral, Somme 9 Oct 1514) as her first husband, MARY Pss of England, daughter of HENRY VII King of England & his wife Elizabeth of York (Richmond Palace, Surrey or Palace of Westminster 18 Mar 1496-Westhorpe Hall, Suffolk [24/26] Jun 1533, bur 22 Jul Abbey Church, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, transferred to St Mary’s Church, Bury St Edmunds).  Consecrated Queen of France 5 Nov 1514 at l'Abbaye de Saint-Denis.  She married secondly (secretly Chapel in the Palais de Cluny, Paris [4/20] Feb 1515 and 31 Mar 1515, publicly Greyfriars Church, Greenwich Palace 13 May 1515) as his third wife, Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, son of Sir William Brandon & his wife Elizabeth Bruyn ([1484]-The Palace, Guildford, Surrey 22 Aug 1545, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor), who was English ambassador to the King of France Oct 1514-May 1515.  She returned to England Apr 1515. 

[Mistress (1): ---.  The name of King Louis's possible mistress is not known.] 

King Louis XII & his second wife had four children:

1.         CLAUDE de France (Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher or Romorantin 13 Oct 1499-Château de Blois 20 Jul 1524, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Ctss de Blois.  Her father installed her as Dss de Bretagne at Beauvais 27 Oct 1514, in succession to her mother.  Consecrated Queen of France 10 May 1517 at Saint-Denis.  Betrothed (Lyon 12 Aug 1501, contract terminated at Tours 1506) to KARL Archduke of Austria, son of PHILIPP Archduke of Austria [FELIPE I King of Spain] & his wife doña Juana Queen of Spain (Gent 24 Feb 1500-San Jeronimo de Yuste near Toledo 21 Sep 1558, bur San Jeronimo de Yuste, transferred 1574 to Escorial).  He succeeded his maternal grandfather in 1516 as CARLOS I King of Aragon and Castile.  He succeeded his paternal grandfather in 1519 as Archduke of Austria, abdicated 1521.  Elected Emperor KARL V and King of the Romans in 1519.  m (contract Château de Montils-lès-Tours 22 May 1506, Château de Saint Germain-en-Laye 18 May 1514) FRANÇOIS d'Orléans Duc de Valois "Monseigneur", Comte d'Angoulême, son of CHARLES d'Orléans Comte d'Angoulême et de Périgord & his wife Louise de Savoie (Château de Cognac 12 Sep 1494-Château de Rambouillet 31 Mar 1547, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded in 1515 as FRANÇOIS I King of France.  

2.         son (stillborn Château de Blois 21 Jan 1503). 

3.         RENEE de France (Château de Blois 25 Oct 1510-Château de Montargis, Loiret 12 Jun 1575, bur Château de Montargis).  Invested as Dss de Chartres, Ctss de Gisors, Dame de Montargis, Jul 1528 as part of her dowry.  She returned to France after her husband died, to live at Montargis.  She converted to Calvinism.  m (contract 30 Jul 1527, contract 10 Feb 1528, Paris, Chapelle Saint-Louis du Palais de la Cité 28 Jun 1528) ERCOLE d'Este, son of ALFONSO I d'Este Duke of Ferrara, Modena and Reggio & his second wife Lucrezia Borgia (4 May 1508-Ferrara 3 Oct 1559, bur Ferrara Corpus Domini).  He succeeded his father in 1534 as ERCOLE II Duke of Ferrara, Modena and Reggio. 

4.         son (stillborn Château de Blois Jan 1512).  

King Louis XII had one possible illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

5.          [MICHEL de Bucy ([1484/85]-8 Feb 1511, bur Bourges Cathedral).  Protonotary apostolic and doyen of Saint-Aignan at Orléans.  Proposed as Archbishop of Bourges 25 Sep 1505, his appointment was confirmed by Pope Julius II 21 Nov 1505 as far as the temporal administration was concerned, with a deputy for the spiritual until he attained the age of 27.] 

 

 

JEAN d'Orléans, son of LOUIS de France Duc d'Orléans & his second wife Valentina Visconti of Milan ([May] 1400-Château de Cognac, Charente 30 Apr 1467, bur Angoulême Cathédrale Saint-Pierre).  Comte d'Angoulême et de Périgord, after his father's death under the latter's will.  Sent to England as a hostage by his brother Charles Duc d'Orléans under the Treaty of Buzançais 14 Nov 1412, he remained a prisoner in England until Apr 1445.  Known as "le Bon", in 1515 Rome started the necessary enquiries preliminary to canonisation, but this did not proceed. 

m (contract 31 Aug 1449) MARGUERITE de Rohan, daughter of ALAIN IX Vicomte de Rohan Comte de Porhoët & his wife Marguerite de Bretagne (-Château de Cognac 1496, bur Angoulême). 

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of Jean's mistress is not known. 

Comte Jean & his wife had three children:

1.         LOUIS d'Orléans ([1450]-Château de Bouteville-en-Angoûmois 1453).  

2.         CHARLES d'Orléans (1459-Châteauneuf-en-Angoûmois, Charente 1 Jan 1496, bur Angoulême Cathédrale Saint-Pierre).  Comte d'Angoulême et de Périgord.  m (contract Paris 16 Feb 1488) LOUISE de Savoie, daughter of PHILIPPE de Savoie Comte de Baugé [later PHILIPPE I Duke of Savoy] & his first wife Marguerite de Bourbon (Château de Pont d'Ain, Ain 11 Sep 1476-manoir de Grez-sur-Loing, Gâtinais, Seine-et-Marne 22 Sep 1531, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  After the accession of her son, she used the title "Madame".  She was created Dss de Bourbon for life by her son 30 Jun 1528 (registered 11 Aug), after the death of Charles III Duc de Bourbon in 1527.  After her death, the King declared her assets united with the crown Jan 1532, representing the final stage in the disputed inheritance of the duchy of Bourbon which had lasted for nearly 50 years.  Mistress (1): ANTOINETTE de Polignac Dame de Combronde.  Lady of Honour of Louise de Savoie Dss d'Angoulême.  m JEAN de Polignac, son of ---.  Mistress (2): JEANNE Le Conte, daughter of ---.  Comte Charles & his wife had two children:

a)         MARGUERITE d'Orléans (Château d'Angoulême, Charente 11 Apr 1492-Château d'Odos en Bigorre, near Tarbes 21 Dec 1549, bur Lescar).  Dss de Berry 11 Oct 1517, registered 4 Feb 1518.  She was the author of several surviving literary works.  m firstly (contract Blois, Loir-et-Cher 9 Oct 1509, Château de Blois 2 Dec 1509) CHARLES IV Duc d'Alençon, son of RENE Duc d'Alençon & his [second] wife Marguerite de Lorraine (Alençon 2 Sep 1489-Lyon 11 Apr 1525, Notre-Dame, Alençon).  m secondly (contract 3 Jan 1527, Saint-Germain-en-Laye 24 Jan 1527) don ENRIQUE II titular King of Navarre, son of JEAN d'Albret King of Navarre & his wife doña Catalina Queen of Navarre [Foix] (Sangüesa, Navarre 18 Apr 1503-Hagetmau en Béarn, Landes 29 May 1555, bur Lescar Cathedral). 

b)         FRANÇOIS d'Orléans (Château de Cognac 12 Sep 1494-Château de Rambouillet 31 Mar 1547, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1496 as Comte d'Angoulême.  Installed as Duc de Valois Feb 1498.  Heir presumptive at court from 1501, called "Monseigneur".  He succeeded in 1515 as FRANÇOIS I King of France

-        see below.

Comte Charles had two illegitimate daughters by Mistress (1): 

c)          JEANNE bâtarde d'Angoulême (-after 1531/1538).  Legitimated at Lyon Aug 1501.  Ctss de Bar-sur-Seine 24 Mar 1522, registered 2 May 1522.  m firstly (Aug 1501) JEAN Aubin Seigneur de Malicorne, son of JEAN Aubin Seigneur de Malicorne & his wife Louise de Clermont.  m secondly JEAN [IV] de Longwy Seigneur de Givry et de Fontaine-Française Baron de Pagny et de Mirebeau en Bourgogne, son of PHILIPPE de Longwy Seigneur de Pagny, de Givry et de Longepierre & his wife Jeanne de Bauffremont Dame de Mirebeau (-[1520/21]).   

d)         MADELEINE bâtarde d'Angoulême ([1575/76]-Abbaye de Fontevrault, Maine-et-Loire 26 Oct 1543, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault).  She became a nun at the Abbaye de Notre-Dame de Saintes.  Prioress of Pont-l'Abbé en Saintonge 1495.  Abbess of Hautes-Bruyères, Chartres.  Abbess of Saint-Eusony, Angoulême 1496.  Abbess of Faremoutiers 1511.  Abbess of Jouarre 1515.  Abbess of Fontevrault 1517.  

Comte Charles had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (2):

e)         SOUVERAINE bâtarde d'Angoulême (-23 Feb 1551, bur Chilly-Mazarin, Saint-Etienne, Essonne).  Legitimated at Dijon May 1521.  m (contract Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 10 Feb 1512) MICHEL [III] de Gaillard Seigneur de Chilly, de Longjumeau et du Fayet, son of MICHEL [II] de Gaillard Seigneur de Chilly, de Longjumeau et du Fayet & his wife Marguerite Bourdin (-4 Jul 1535, bur Chilly-Mazarin, Saint-Etienne, Essonne). 

3.         JEANNE d'Orléans (1462-1520).  Created Dss de Valois at Blois 28 Dec 1516, registered 9 Feb 1516.  m (before 1511) CHARLES FRANÇOIS de Coëtivy Sire de Taillebourg, son of OLIVIER de Coëtivy Sire de Taillebourg & his wife Marie bâtarde de France.  Created Comte de Taillebourg. 

Comte Jean had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

4.          JEAN bâtard d'Angoulême .  Legitimated at Beaugency Jun 1458. 

 

 

FRANÇOIS d'Orléans, son of CHARLES d'Orléans Comte d'Angoulême et de Périgord & his wife Louise de Savoie (Château de Cognac 12 Sep 1494-Château de Rambouillet 31 Mar 1547, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1496 as Comte d'Angoulême.  Installed as Duc de Valois Feb 1498.  Heir presumptive at court from 1501, called "Monseigneur".  King Louis XII declared him Duc de Bretagne 18 Nov 1514.  He succeeded in 1515 as FRANÇOIS I King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 25 Jan 1515.  Claiming the Duchy of Milan through his great grandmother Valentina Visconti, he headed a large army to enforce his claim, defeated the Swiss at Marignano 13 Sep 1515 after which Lombardy submitted to him.  Under the Treaty of Viterbo 13 Oct 1515, Pope Leo X ceded Parma and Piacenza to him.  He concluded the concordat of Bologna with the Pope 18 Aug 1516.  He entered Rennes formally 9 Oct 1518 as sovereign of Brittany.  He conquered Navarre 1521, but lost it soon thereafter.  He lost Milan 17 Nov 1521, but retook it 20 Oct 1524, laid siege to Pavia but was captured 24 Feb 1525 and taken to Spain.  While in prison in Madrid, he purported to abdicate in favour of his son François Dauphin de Viennois Nov 1525, aiming to reduce the bargaining power of his captor Emperor Karl V, but this was not acted upon in France.  He was freed 13 Mar 1526, under the terms of the Treaty of Madrid 14 Jan 1526.  He signed the Peace of Cambrai 3 Aug 1528.  The treaty of union between Brittany and France was signed at Plessis-Macé 3 Sep 1532.  In 1536, he conquered the territory of the Duke of Savoy, who had refused him passage to Italy. 

m firstly (contract Château de Montils-lès-Tours 22 May 1506, Château de Saint Germain-en-Laye 18 May 1514) CLAUDE de France, daughter of LOUIS XII King of France & his second wife Anne Dss de Bretagne (Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher or Romorantin 13 Oct 1499-Château de Blois 20 Jul 1524, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Her father installed her as Dss de Bretagne at Beauvais 27 Oct 1514, in succession to her mother.  Consecrated Queen of France 10 May 1517 at Saint-Denis. 

m secondly (by proxy Torrelaguna, Castile 20 Mar 1530, in person Abbaye de Saint-Laurent de Beyries, near Villeneuve-de-Marsan, Landes 7 Aug 1530) as her second husband, Infanta doña LEONOR of Spain, widow of MANOEL I King of Portugal, daughter of PHILIPP Archduke of Austria [FELIPE I King of Spain] & his wife doña Juana "la Loca" Queen of Castile (Brussels, Palais de Coudenberg 14 Nov 1498-Talavera de la Reina, near Badajoz 17 Feb 1558, bur Lérida, transferred 1573 to Escorial).  Consecrated Queen of France 5 Mar 1531 at Saint-Denis.  Her stepson Henri II King of France created her Dss de Touraine, Ctss de Poitou et de Civray, Dame de Quercy, Agenais, Villefranche and Rouergue at Saint-Germain-en-Laye 8 Jul 1547.  She retired to Flanders to the court of her brother Emperor Karl V in 1548, and went with him to Spain in 1555. 

Mistress (1): ---. 

Mistress (2): JACQUETTE de Lanssac, daughter of ---.  m firstly ALEXANDRE de Saint-Gelais Seigneur de Cornefou, Romefort et Breuil-sur-Loup (-Bourg near Bordeaux 20 Jun 1522).  m secondly as his second wife, JACQUES de Pons Baron de Mirambeau. 

King François I & his first wife had seven children:

1.         LOUISE de France (Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 19 Aug 1515-Château d'Amboise 21 Sep 1518, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). 

2.         CHARLOTTE de France (Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 23 Oct 1516-Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher 8 Sep 1524, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  

3.         FRANÇOIS de France (Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 28 Feb 1518-Château de Tournon, Ardèche 10 Aug 1536, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Dauphin de Viennois from birth.  His father purported to abdicate in his favour Nov 1525 while in prison in Madrid, but this was not acted upon in France.  To procure his father's release from prison in Madrid, he was exchanged for his father, together with his younger brother Henri, arriving in Spain 17 Mar 1526 and remaining until 1 Jul 1530.  He succeeded his mother 1524 as François III[940] Duke of Brittany, his entry at Rennes was delayed until 13 Aug 1532 because of his imprisonment in Spain.  He was consecrated the next day in the Cathédrale Saint-Pierre.  Betrothed (contract 2 and 4 Oct 1518, marriage by proxy Greenwich 5 Oct 1518) to MARY Pss of England, daughter of HENRY VIII King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Catalina de Aragón (Greenwich Palace 18 Feb 1516-St James’s Palace, London 17 Nov 1558, bur Westminster Abbey).  She succeeded in 1553 as MARY I Queen of England

4.         HENRI de France (Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye 31 Mar 1519-Hôtel des Tournelles, Paris 10 Jul 1559, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc d'Orléans from birth.  He succeeded his father in 1547 as HENRI II King of France.    

-        see below

5.         MADELEINE de France (Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye 10 Aug 1520-Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh 2 Jul 1537, bur Edinburgh, Holyrood Abbey)m (contract Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher 26 Nov 1536, Notre-Dame de Paris 1 Jan 1537) as his first wife, JAMES V King of Scotland, son of JAMES IV King of Scotland & his wife Margaret Tudor (Linlithgow Palace, Fife 15 Apr 1512-Falkland Castle 14 Dec 1542).

6.         CHARLES de France (Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye 22 Jan 1522-Abbaye de Forest-Montiers near Abbeville, Somme 9 Sep 1545, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc d'Angoulême.  Created Duc de Châtellerault at Château de La Fère sur Oise 27 Aug 1527, confirmed at Fontainebleau 12 Jun 1540.  Chambrier de France 26 Sep 1537.  Duc d'Orléans at Fontainebleau 12 Jun 1540.  Created Duc de Bourbon at Fontainebleau 5 Feb 1543.  The King his father gave him the command of the army for the successful campaign to capture Luxembourg from Emperor Karl V in 1542.  Betrothed (Peace Treaty of Crépy en Laonnais 18 Sep 1544) to Infanta doña MARÍA of Spain Adss of Austria, daughter of Emperor KARL V [CARLOS I King of Spain], Archduke of Austria & his wife Infanta dona Isabel de Portugal (Madrid, Royal Alcazar 21 Jun 1528-Madrid 26 Feb 1603, bur Madrid, Nuestra Señora de la Consolación). 

7.         MARGUERITE de France (Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye 5 Jun 1523-Turin 14 Sep 1574, bur Turin, Cathedral San Giovanni).  Created Dss de Berry 29 Apr 1550.  m (contract Hôtel de Tournelles, Paris 27 Jun 1559, Paris, église Saint-Paul 9 Jul 1559) EMMANUEL PHILIBERT Duke of Savoy, son of CHARLES III Duke of Savoy & his wife Infanta dona Maria Brites de Portugal (Chambéry 8 Jul 1528-Turin 30 Aug 1580).  

King François I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):   

8.          NICOLAS d'Estouteville (-Constantinople 1567).  Seigneur de Villecouvin. 

King François I had one possible illegitimate son by Mistress (2):   

9.          LOUIS de Saint-Gelais (Cornefou, near Cognac 1513-Château de Précy-sur-Oise Oct 1589, bur Château de Précy-sur-Oise).  Captain of the town and castle of Bourg.  Counsellor in the Private Council of François II King of France 16 Jul 1559.  Baron de La Mothe-Saint-Héray 25 Feb 1576.  m firstly (before 1541) JEANNE de la Roche-Landry, daughter of PHILIPPE Baron de la Roche-Landry & his wife Jeanne de Beaumont (-1563).  m secondly (8 Oct 1565) as her third husband, GABRIELLE de Rochechouart, widow firstly of FRANÇOIS de Goulaines Seigneur de Martigné-Briand, and secondly of FRANÇOIS de Volvire Baron de Ruffec [Governor of Angoûmois], daughter of FRANÇOIS de Rochechouart Baron de Mortemart & his wife ---. 

a)         …extinct in the third generation 1636[941]

 

 

HENRI de France, son of FRANÇOIS I King of France & his first wife Claude de France (Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye 31 Mar 1519-Hôtel des Tournelles, Paris 10 Jul 1559, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc d'Orléans from birth.  To procure his father's release from imprisonment in Madrid, he was exchanged for his father, together with his older brother François, arriving in Spain 17 Mar 1526 and remaining until 1 Jul 1530.  Chambrier de France (during his absence in prison in Spain) at Compiègne 26 Sep 1527.  He succeeded his brother François 1536 as Dauphin de Viennois.  Duc de Bretagne 9 Feb 1539 and 18 Apr 1540, never crowned, he was the last effective Duke of Brittany.  He succeeded his father in 1547 as HENRI II King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 26 Jul 1547.  He died from injuries received during a tournament. 

m (contract Château d'Anet, Eure-et-Loir 24 Apr 1531, contract Marseille 27 Oct 1533, Marseille Cathedral 28 Oct 1533) CATARINA de' Medici, daughter of LORENZO [II] de' Medici Duca di Urbino & his wife Madeleine de La Tour d'Auvergne (Florence, Palazzo Medici 13 Apr 1519-Château de Blois, Loir-et-Cher 5 Jan 1589, bur Blois, église Saint-Sauveur, transferred 1610 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She was naturalised as French in May 1519 at Saint-Germain-en-Laye.  She succeeded her father in 1519 as Duchess of Urbino.  Her marriage was arranged to bolster French power in Italy and to block Emperor Karl V's ambitions in the area.  To this end, Pope Clement VII transferred to her at the time of her marriage the cities of Pisa, Livorno, Reggio, Modena, Rubiera, Parma and Piacenza, as well as promising support for the reconquest of Milan by France and the recovery of Urbino.  She was consecrated Queen of France 10 Jun 1549 at Saint-Denis.  She was named regent of France during her husband's absences abroad in 1552, 1553 and 1554.  She was named "Gouvernante de France" 21 Dec 1560 during the minority of her son King Charles IX.  She was de facto ruler of France from 1559 to 1589.  Her son King Charles IX granted her the usufruit of the duchy of Bourbon at Paris 14 May 1562 (registered 23 Dec).  She built the Palais des Tuileries at Paris, and the Châteaux de Saint-Maur des Fossés, Montceaux en Brie and Chenonceau en Touraine. 

Mistress (1): [942]FILIPPA Duco, sister of GIAN ANTONIO Duco, from Moncalieri in Piemonte, daughter of --- (Moncalieri, Piemonte). 

Mistress (2): DIANE de Poitiers, widow of LOUIS de Brezé Comte de Maulévrier, daughter of JEAN de Poitiers Seigneur de Saint-Vallier & his first wife Jeanne de Batarnay de Bouchage. 

Mistress (3): JEAN Stewart, widow of MALCOLM Lord Fleming of Leviston, illegitimate daughter of JAMES IV King of Scotland & his mistress Agnes Stewart (1510-1552).  Governess of Mary Queen of Scots.  She was known in France as  "Mademoiselle Flamine de Leviston". 

Mistress (4): NICOLE de Savigny Baronne de Fontette, daughter of --- (1535-1590).

King Henri II & his wife had ten children:

1.         FRANÇOIS de France (Château de Fontainebleau 19 Jan 1544-Orléans 5 Dec 1560, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Called "Monseigneur le Duc de Bretagne".  On the succession of his father in 1547 he became Dauphin de Viennois, known as "Monseigneur le Dauphin".  He was recognised as King of Scotland, by right of his wife, on his marriage.  He succeeded his father in 1559 as FRANÇOIS II King of France, consecrated 18 Sep 1559 at Notre-Dame de Reims.  m (contract Châtillon 27 Jan 1548, contract Palais du Louvre 19 Apr 1558, Notre-Dame de Paris 24 Apr 1558) as her first husband, MARY I Queen of Scots, daughter of JAMES V King of Scotland & his second wife Marie de Lorraine (Linlithgow Palace 7/8 Dec 1542-executed Fotheringay Castle, Northamptonshire 8 Feb 1587, bur Peterborough Cathedral, transferred 1612 to Westminster Abbey).  She left the French court Mar 1561, receiving the Duchy of Touraine and the County of Poitou, retired to Reims and then back to Scotland, arriving at Holyrood Palace 19 Aug 1561. 

2.         ELISABETH de France (Château de Fontainebleau 2 Apr 1546-Madrid 3 Oct 1568, bur Escorial).  She died in childbirth.  Betrothed (contract Angers 19 Jul 1551) to EDWARD VI King of England, son of HENRY VIII King of England & his third wife Jane Seymour (Hampton Court Palace 12 Oct 1537-Greenwich Palace 6 Jul 1553, bur Westminster Abbey).  m (contract Palais du Louvre 20 Jun 1559, by proxy Notre-Dame de Paris 22 Jun 1559, in person Guadalajara 2 Feb 1560) as his third wife, don FELIPE II King of Spain, son of Emperor KARL V [CARLOS I King of Spain], Archduke of Austria & his wife Infanta dona Isabel de Portugal (Valladolid 21 May 1527-Escorial 13 Sep 1598, bur Escorial).  

3.         CLAUDE de France (Château de Fontainebleau 12 Nov 1547-Nancy 21 Feb 1575, bur Nancy, église des Cordeliers)m (contract Palais du Louvre 19 Jan 1559, Notre-Dame de Paris 22 Jan 1559) CHARLES III Duc de Lorraine et de Bar, son of FRANÇOIS I Duc de Lorraine et de Bar & his wife Christina of Denmark (Nancy 18 Feb 1543-Nancy 14 May 1608, bur Nancy église des Cordeliers).  

4.         LOUIS de France (Saint-Germain-en-Laye 3 Feb 1549-Mantes 24 Oct 1550, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc d'Orléans. 

5.         CHARLES MAXIMILIEN de France (Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye 27 Jun 1550-Château du Bois de Vincennes 30 May 1574, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc d'Angoulême.  Duc d'Orléans, after the death of his older brother Louis.  He succeeded his brother in 1560 as CHARLES IX King of France, under the Regency of his mother until 17 Aug 1563.  Consecrated 15 May 1561 at Notre-Dame de Reims.  He was recognised as Protector of Holland by Willem I Prince of Orange May 1572.  m (contract Madrid 14 Jan 1570, by proxy Speyer 22 Oct 1570, in person Notre-Dame de l'Espérance, Mézières-en-Champagne 26 Nov 1570) ELISABETH Adss of Austria, daughter of Emperor MAXIMILIAN II & his wife Maria Infanta of Spain Adss of Austria (Vienna 5 Jul 1554-Vienna 22 Jan 1592, bur Vienna Clarissan Convent, transferred 1782 to Vienna St Stefan).  Consecrated Queen of France at l'Abbaye de Saint-Denis 25 Mar 1571.  After her husband died, she received the Duchy of Berry at Avignon 25 Nov 1574 (registered 15 Dec).  She received the Duchies of Bourbon and Auvergne, in exchange for Berry, at Blois 20 Jan 1577 (registered 9 May).  She left the French court 5 Dec 1575.  After the death of her daughter, she returned to Vienna where she founded the Clarissan Convent.  Mistress (1): MARIE Touchet, daughter of JEAN Touchet Seigneur de Beauvais et de Quillart & his wife Marie Mathy (Orléans [1553]-Paris, Hôtel d'Angoulême 28 Mar 1638, bur Paris, église des Minimes, Place Royale).  Dame de Belleville et de Langeais.  m (20 Oct 1578) FRANÇOIS de Balzac Seigneur d'Entragues et de Marcoussis.  Governor of Orléans.  King Charles IX & his wife had one child:

a)         MARIE-ELISABETH de France (Palais du Louvre, Paris 27 Oct 1572-Paris, Hôtel d'Anjou 2 Apr 1578, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

King Charles IX had two illegitimate children by Mistress (1):   

b)         son (1572-young).  

c)          CHARLES bâtard de Valois (Château du Fayet, near Montmélian en Dauphiné 28 Apr 1573-Paris 24 Sep 1650, bur Paris Place Royale église des Minimes).  Known as "Charles, Monsieur".  Abbé de la Chaise-Dieu 1586.  Duc d'Angoulême, Comte de Ponthieu 1619, called "Monsieur d'Angoulême". 

-        VALOIS - DUCS d'ANGOULÊME

6.         EDOUARD ALEXANDRE de France (Château de Fontainebleau 19 Sep 1551-murdered Saint-Cloud 2 Aug 1589, bur Compiègne, transferred 23 Jun 1610 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  At first called "Monsieur, Monseigneur le Duc d'Angoulême".  He took the title Duc d'Orléans 8 Dec 1560.  He adopted the first name HENRI, after his late father, at his confirmation 18 Mar 1566 at Toulouse Cathédrale Saint-Etienne.  Entering the Royal Council at Moulins Feb 1567, he was created Duc d'Anjou et de Bourbon[943].  He adopted the title Duc d'Anjou but was referred to as "Monseigneur" or "Monseigneur frère du roi".  Appointed Lieutenant General of the army 12 Nov 1567.  Named Supreme General in the war against the Huguenots 4 Oct 1568, he won the battles of Jarnac and Moncontour in 1569.  Duc d'Auvergne at Amboise 17 Aug 1569, registered 24 Nov 1569.  He was elected HENRYK King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania by the Diet of Warsaw 11 May 1573, crowned at Krakow St Wenceslas Cathedral 21 Feb 1574.  Having reserved his rights to succeed in France 22 Aug 1573 before he left for Poland, he succeeded his brother in 1574 as HENRI III King of France.  Although he left Poland for France immediately, he did not formally abdicate as King of Poland but continued to refer to himself as King of Poland, even after the election of Stefan Bathori as King in his place.  Consecrated 13 Feb 1575 at Notre-Dame de Reims.  m (contract Reims 14 Feb 1575, Reims Cathedral 15 Feb 1575) LOUISE de Lorraine Mademoiselle de Vaudémont, daughter of NICOLAS de Lorraine Duc de Mercœur & his first wife Margareta van Egmond (Château de Nomény, Meurthe-et-Moselle 30 Apr 1553-Château de Moulins, Allier 29 Jan 1601, bur église des Capucins, transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Although she was present at her husband's coronation, two days before their marriage, she was never consecrated Queen of France herself.  After her husband died, she lived first at Chenonceau, later at Moulins.  She was created Dss de Bourbon et d'Auvergne 20 May 1592. 

7.         MARGUERITE de France (Saint-Germain-en-Laye 14 May 1553-Paris, Faubourg Saint-Germain 27 Mar 1615, bur 21 Jul 1616 église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Created Ctss d'Agenais, de Rouergue et de Quercy 18 Mar 1578.  Created Dss de Valois et d'Etampes, Ctss de Senlis et de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis 8 Jul 1582, confirmed by her ex-husband 29 Dec 1599[944] and by King Louis XIII May 1610.  She transferred the Duchy of Etampes to her husband's mistress, Gabrielle d'Estrées Dss de Beaufort, 11 Nov 1598.  After the annulment of her marriage, she was called “la Reine Marguerite duchesse de Valois”.  m (contract Palais du Louvre 17 Aug 1572, Notre-Dame de Paris 18 Aug 1572, separated 1578, divorced 17 Dec 1599) as his first wife, HENRI de Bourbon Duc de Bourbon King of Navarre, son of ANTOINE de Bourbon Duc de Vendôme, King of Navarre & his wife Jeanne d’Albret Queen of Navarre (Château de Pau, Béarn 13 Dec 1553-assassinated Paris 14 May 1610, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  On the death of his father, he became premier prince de sang de France.  He succeeded 2 Aug 1589 as HENRI IV King of France

8.         FRANÇOIS de France (Château de Fontainebleau 18 Mar 1555-Château-Thierry, Aisne 10 Jun 1584, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Duc d'Alençon at Moulins 8 Feb 1566.  Named Head of the Council, Commander-in-Chief of the army 5 Aug 1573.  He left court in Sep 1575 because he was refused the position of Lieutenant General of the kingdom, becoming the head of the reîtres.  To settle the dispute, he was created Duc d'Anjou, de Touraine et de Berry under the peace of Etigny 6 May 1576.  Named Lieutenant General of the army in 1576, and Lieutenant General of the kingdom 4 May 1580.  He was offered sovereignty of the United Provinces of the Netherlands in Sep 1580, crowned Duke of Brabant at Antwerp 19 Feb 1582, and recognised as Count of Flanders at Bruges 15 Jul 1582.     

9.         VICTOIRE de France (Château de Fontainebleau 24 Jun 1556-Château d'Amboise, Indre-et-Loire 17 Aug 1556, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Twin with Jeanne. 

10.      JEANNE de France (b and d Château de Fontainebleau 24 Jun 1556, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Twin with Victoire. 

King Henri II had two illegitimate daughters by Mistress (1):   

11.       DIANE (Piemonte 1538-Paris 11 Jan 1619, bur Paris, église des Minimes, Place Royale).  Kerrebrouck[945] corrects the error that Diane was the daughter of Diane de Poitiers.  Legitimated 1548.  Dss de Châtellerault at Vincennes 22 Jun 1563, registered 5 Oct 1563.  Dss d'Etampes at Paris Feb 1576, registered 17 Mar 1576.  Dss d'Angoulême, Ctss de Ponthieu at Fontainebleau Aug 1582, registered 13 Aug 1582, in exchange for the Duchy of Châtellerault.  m firstly (betrothed Tours 6 May 1551, contract 13 Feb 1553, 14 Feb 1553) ORAZIO Farnese Duca di Castro, son of PIETRO LUIGI Farnese Duke of Parma and Piacenza & his wife Girolama Orsini ([1528/29]-killed in battle siege of Hesdin, Pas-de-Calais 18 Jul 1553, bur Abbeville, Somme, église des Minimes).  m secondly (Villers-Cotterêts, Aisne 3 May 1557) as his second wife, FRANÇOIS de Montmorency, son of ANNE Duc de Montmorency [Connétable de France] & his wife Madeleine de Savoie (17 Jul 1530-Château d'Ecouen, Val d'Oise 6 May 1578, bur Montmorency église Saint-Martin).  Governor of Paris and l'Ile de France 1556.  Created Maréchal de France 1559.  He was the leader of the political faction opposed to the Guise family.  He succeeded his father as Duc de Montmorency. 

12.       daughter. 

King Henri II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (3):   

13.       HENRI bâtard d'Angoulême (Spring 1551-Aix-en-Provence 2 Jun 1586, bur Aix-en-Provence, église des Carmes).  Known as "le Chevalier d'Angoulême".  Grand Prior in France of the Order of St John of Jerusalem 1563.  Abbé de la Chaise-Dieu, Clermont 1562.  Abbé de Saint-Pierre d'Agen 1568.  Appointed Governor of Provence 1579.  He was killed in a duel with Philippe Altoviti Baron de Castellane. 

King Henri II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (4): 

14.       HENRI de Saint-Rémy (Paris 1557-Paris 1621, bur Paris).  Baron de Fontette. 

-        VALOIS-SAINT-REMY.

 

 

 

C.      COMTES et DUCS d'ALENÇON

 

 

CHARLES de Valois, son of CHARLES de France Comte de Valois & his first wife Marguerite of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (1297-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  Comte de Chartres 1314.  He succeeded in Apr 1326 as CHARLES II “le Magnanime” Comte d'Alençon et de Perche.  "Charles de Valois, frère du roi de France, conte d’Alençon et du Perche" granted le droit de colombier to the prior of Saint-Martin de Bellême by charter dated 20 Jan 1334[946]

Betrothed (1308) to NEDA of Serbia, daughter of STEFAN UROŠ II MILUTIN King of Serbia & his third wife Erszebet of Hungary ([1295/98]-after 1346).  This betrothal was part of the treaty agreed between the fathers of the two parties aimed at ensuring the support of the Comte de Valois in King Milutin's war with his brother Dragutin[947]

m firstly (contract Apr 1314) JEANNE Ctss de Joigny Dame de Mercœur, daughter of JEAN [II] “Blondel” Comte de Joigny Seigneur de Mercœur & his wife Agnès de Brienne (-24 Sep 1336).  The Istoria of Marino Sanudo Torsello records that the wife of "miser Carlo figlio de miser Carlo de Vallois consobrino del Rè di Francia" was "[la] figliola…[del] conite Altino da Campagna" and his wife "la figliola…[del] conte di Brenna"[948].  The necrology of the Hôpital de Joigny records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "domine Johanne quondam comitisse Alençonii et Joigniaci et fundatricis istius hospitalis"[949]

m secondly (contract Dec 1336) as her second husband, doña MARÍA de La Cerda dame de Lunel, widow of CHARLES d’Evreux Comte d’Etampes, daughter of don FERNANDO de la Cerda de Castilla & his wife doña Juana Nuñez Señora de Lara ([1319]-Paris 13 Mar 1375, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  Ayala’s Crónica de Enrique II records in 1373 that “Doña Maria de Lara fija de Don Ferrando de la Cerda e de Doña Juana de Lara, hermana de Don Juan Nuñez de Lara Señor de Vizcaya, Condesa de Alanzon...primero casada en Francia con el Conde de Estampas...y despues...con el Conde de Alanzon, hermano del Rey Don Phelipe de Francia” claimed “las tierras de Lara é de Vizcaya” from Enrique II King of Castile[950]The necrology of the Celestins de Paris commemorates "domine Marie de Hyspania comitisse de Alençonio" mother of "dominorum Ludovici comitis de Stampis ac Johannis fratris sui" on "XVIII Kal Jul"[951]

Comte Charles II & his second wife had six children:

1.         CHARLES d'Alençon (Feb 1337-Château de Pierre-Encize, Lyon 5 Jul 1375, bur Lyon).  He succeeded his father in 1346 as CHARLES III Comte d'Alençon.  He resigned his county in 1361 to become a Dominican monk at the convent of Saint-Jacques, Paris.  Archbishop of Lyon 13 Jul 1365. 

2.         PHILIPPE d'Alençon (Paris 1339-Rome 15 Aug 1397, bur Rome, Santa Maria beyond the Tiber).  He succeeded 1361 as PHILIPPE Comte d'Alençon et du Perche, when his older brother became a Dominican monk.  He divided these territories 20 Jan 1367 between his two younger brothers.  “Le cardinal d’Alençon”.  Bishop of Beauvais 24 Mar 1356, but not consecrated.  Archbishop of Rouen 13 May 1362.  Named Patriarch of Jerusalem by the Pope.  Cardinal 18 Sep 1378. 

3.         ISABELLE d'Alençon (-Poissy 3 Sep 1379, bur Poissy, Priory of Saint-Louis).  Nun at the Priory of Saint-Louis at Poissy.

4.         PIERRE d'Alençon (-Argentan, Orne 20 Sep 1404, bur Perche. église des Chartreux du Val-Dieu).  He was given as a hostage to the English to replace King John II, he remained imprisoned until the death of King John in 1363.  He succeeded in 1367 as PIERRE II “le Bon/le Noble” Comte d’Alençonm (20 Oct 1371) MARIE Chamaillart Vicomtesse de Beaumont-au-Maine, daughter and heiress of GUILLAUME Chamaillart Seigneur d’Anthenaise & his wife Marie de Beaumont[-en-Brienne] (-Château d’Argentan 18 Nov 1425, bur Argentan, Saint-Thomas).  Mistress (1): JEANNE de Maugastel Dame de Blandé.  She married Pierre Cointerel, who was created Vicomte de Perche by Pierre II Comte d’Alençon.  Comte Pierre II & his wife had eight children:

a)         PIERRE d’Alençon (-1375, bur Perche, Abbaye de Perseigne).  

b)         JEAN d’Alençon (-1376, bur Perche, Abbaye de Perseigne).

c)         MARIE d’Alençon (-1377, bur Perche, Abbaye de Perseigne).  

d)         JEANNE d’Alençon (-Château d’Argentan 6 Aug 1403, bur Perche, église des Chartreux du Val-Dieu).

e)         MARIE d’Alençon (Château d’Essay, Orne 21 Mar 1373-before 1418)m (contract Paris 17 Mar 1390) JEAN [VII] Comte d’Harcourt et d'Aumâle, son of JEAN [VI] Comte d’Harcourt et d'Aumâle & his wife Catherine de Bourbon ([1369]-18 Dec 1452).  

f)          CATHERINE d’Alençon (Verneuil-sur-Avre, Eure [1380]-Paris, Hôtel d’Auxerre 25 Jun 1425, bur Paris, Abbaye Sainte-Geneviève).  The necrology of Vauvert records the death "VII Kal Jul" of "domine Katherina de Alençonio ducissa in Bavaria filia ducis Alençonii quondam uxor…principis domini Petri de Navarra"[952]m firstly (contract 21 Apr 1411, Château d’Alençon Aug 1411) PIERRE d'Evreux Infante de Navarra Comte de Mortain, son of don CARLOS II King of Navarre & his wife Jeanne de France (Evreux 1366-Sancerre 29 Jul 1412, bur Paris, église des Chartreux).  m secondly (Paris, Hôtel Saint-Pol 1 Oct 1413) as his second wife, LUDWIG VII "der Bärtige" Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt, son of STEFAN III Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt & his wife Taddea Visconti of Milan ([20 Dec 1365/1369]-in prison Burghausen 1/2 May 1447, bur Raitenhaslach).  

g)         MARGUERITE d’Alençon (-after 1400, bur Hôtel-Dieu d’Argentan).  Nun at Argentan. 

h)         JEAN d’Alençon (Château d'Essay 1385-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Sées, Abbaye de Saint-Martin).  Comte du Perche.  He succeeded his father in 1404 as JEAN I "le Sage" Comte d'Alençon.  Created Duc d’Alençon 1 Jan 1415.   

-        see below

Comte Pierre II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):   

i)           PIERRE bâtard d'Alençon (-after I.1422).  Seigneur d'Aunou-le-Faucon et de Goulet Jan 1422. 

5.         ROBERT d’Alençon (-1377, bur Sées, église abbatiale de Saint-Martin).  Comte du Perche.  "Robert d’Alençon comte du Perche" confirmed the rights to revenue of the church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême by charter dated 11 Jun 1362[953]m (contract 25 Apr 1374) as her first husband, JEANNE de Rohan, daughter of JEAN Vicomte de Rohan & his first wife Jeanne Dame de Léon (-after 20 Jan 1407).  The marriage contract between “Robert d’Alençon Conte du Perche Seigneur d’Iexmois et de Caniel” and “Jehan Viconte de Rohan...Demoiselle Jehanne de Rohan fille de nous dit Viconte”, with the consent of “Allain notre fils aisné”, is dated 25 Apr 1374[954].  She married secondly Pierre Sire d’Amboise Vicomte de Thouars.  Comte Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         CHARLES (-young, before his father). 

6.         ISABELLE d’Alençon (posthumously 1346-). 

 

 

JEAN d’Alençon, son of PIERRE II “le Bon/le Noble” Comte d’Alençon & his wife Marie Chamaillart, Vicomtesse de Beaumont-au-Maine (Château d'Essay 3 May 1385-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Sées, Abbaye de Saint-Martin).  Comte du Perche.  He succeeded his father in 1404 as JEAN I "le Sage" Comte d'Alençon.  Created Duc d’Alençon 1 Jan 1415. 

m (contract Château de l’Hermine, Vannes 26 Jun 1396) MARIE de Bretagne dame de La Guerche, daughter of JEAN V Duke of Brittany & his third wife Infanta doña Juana de Navarra ([Nantes] 18 Feb 1391-18 Dec 1446).  “Pierres Conte d’Alençon Seigneur de Fougieres et Viconte de Beaumont ayant la garde...de nostre...fils Jehan Conte de Perche” issued proxy for his marriage to “le Duc de Bretaigne...la fille” by charter dated 3 Apr 1396[955].  The marriage contract between “Pierres Comte d’Alançon Seigneur de Foulgeres et Vicomte de Beaumont et...Marie Comtesse Dame et Vicomtesse desdits lieux...nostre...fils Jehan Comte du Perche” and “Marie fille de...nos...cousin et cousin les Duc et Duchesse de Bretagne” is dated 26 Jun 1396[956]

Mistress (1): ---. 

Duke Jean I & his wife had five children:

1.         PIERRE d’Alençon (Château d’Argentan, Orne 4 Oct 1407-16 Mar 1408, bur Abbaye de Notre-Dame-de-Silly, near Argentan).  Comte du Perche. 

2.         JEAN d'Alençon (Château d’Argentan 1409- Paris 1476, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  Comte du Perche.  He succeeded his father in 1415 as JEAN II “le Bon” Duc d’Alençon

-        see below

3.         JEANNE d'Alençon (Château d’Argentan 17 Sep 1412-17 Oct 1420, bur Abbaye de Bourgueil-en-Anjou, Indre-et-Loire).  

4.         MARIE d'Alençon (Château d’Argentan---- aged 2, bur Notre-Dame de Silly, near Argentan).  

5.         CHARLOTTE d'Alençon (Château d’Argentan 15 Dec 1413-Lamballe en Bretagne, Côtes d’Armor 24 Mar 1435, bur Lamballe, église de Notre-Dame). 

Duke Jean I had two illegitimate children by Mistress (1):    

6.          PIERRE bâtard d'Alençon (-after 31 Dec 1428).  Seigneur de Gallandon.

7.          MARGUERITE bâtarde d'Alençonm JEAN de Saint-Aubin Seigneur de Preaux.  Counsellor and Chamberlain of the King. 

 

 

JEAN d'Alençon, son of JEAN I "le Sage" Duc d'Alençon & his wife Marie de Bretagne dame de La Guerche (Château d’Argentan 1409- Paris 1476, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).  Comte du Perche.  He succeeded his father in 1415 as JEAN II “le Bon” Duc d’Alençon, but his duchy was occupied by the English.  He was captured by the English at the battle of Verneuil 17 Aug 1424, and imprisoned until at the Château de Crotoy until 30 Oct 1427.  He was sentenced to death for treason 10 Oct 1458, and deprived of his honours.  His sentence was commuted to life imprisonment at Loches, but he was released and re-established by Louis XI 11 Oct 1461.  After a second rebellion 1472, he was sentenced to death again 18 Jul 1474, but imprisoned for life in Palais du Louvre. 

m firstly (contract Blois 14 May 1410, Blois 1424) JEANNE d’Orléans, daughter of CHARLES Duc d'Orléans & his first wife Isabelle de France (Blois Aug 1409-Angers, Abbaye de Saint-Aubin, Maine-et-Loire 19 May 1432, bur Abbaye de Saint-Aubin). 

m secondly (contract Chateau de l’Isle-Jourdain, Gers 30 Apr 1437) MARIE d’Armagnac, daughter of JEAN [IV] Comte d'Armagnac & his wife Infanta doña Isabel de Navarra ([1420/25]-monastère des Hospitalières, Mortagne-au-Perche 25 Jul 1473, bur église collégiale de Toussaint). 

Mistresses (1) - (x): ---. 

Duke Jean II & his second wife had two children:

1.         CATHERINE d'Alençon (-17 Jul 1505).  A nun at Alençon after she was widowed.  m (contract Tours 8 Jan 1461) FRANÇOIS de Laval, son of GUY XIII Sire ([Comte] de Laval & his wife Isabelle de Bretagne (19 Nov 1435-15 Mar 1500).  He succeeded his father in 1486 as GUY XIV Comte de Laval.

2.         RENE d'Alençon ([1454]-Château d’Alençon 1 Nov 1492, bur Alençon, église de Notre-Dame).  Comte du Perche.  He was arrested and imprisoned in the Château de Chinon 1481, but released by King Charles VIII.  RENE Duc d’Alençonm firstly MARGUERITE d’Harcourt, daughter of GUILLAUME d’Harcourt Comte de Tancarville & his second wife Yolande de Laval (-before May 1488).  m secondly (contract Toul 14 May 1488) MARGUERITE de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY II de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont & his wife Yolande d’Anjou (1463-Argentan [1/2] Nov 1521, bur Alençon, église de Notre-Dame).  Nun, later Abbess, at the convent of Sainte-Claire, Argentan (which she founded in [1500]) 11 Aug 1520.  Beatified 15 Mar 1921.  Mistresses (1) - (x): ---.  Duke René & his second wife had three children:

a)         CHARLES d'Alençon (Alençon 2 Sep 1489-Lyon 11 Apr 1524, bur Alençon, église de Notre-Dame).  He succeeded as CHARLES IV Duc d'Alençon et de Berry.  He succeeded in 1497 as Comte d’Armagnac, by inheritance through his paternal grandmother.  Recognized in 1515 as First Prince of the Blood.  Betrothed (21 Mar 1501, papal dispensation 29 Dec 1501) to SUZANNE de Bourbon, daughter of PIERRE II Duc de Bourbon et d'Auvergne & his wife Anne de France (10 May 1491-Château de Châtellerault 28 Apr 1521, bur Priory of Souvigny).  m (contract 9 Oct 1509, 2 Dec 1509) as her first husband, MARGUERITE d’Angoulême, daughter of CHARLES Comte d'Angoulême & his wife Louise de Savoie (Château d'Angoulême, Charente 11 Apr 1492-Château d'Odos en Bigorre, near Tarbes 21 Dec 1549, bur Lescar).  She married secondly (contract 3 Jan 1527, Saint-Germain-en-Laye 24 Jan 1527) don Enrique II titular King of Navarre.  Duchess of Alençon and Comtesse du Perche for life 1 May 1525.  On her death, the duchy was reunited with the crown by letters given at Fontainebleau Jan 1549. 

b)         FRANÇOISE d'Alençon ([1490]-Château de La Flèche en Anjou 14 Sep 1550, bur Vendôme, église Saint-Georges).  Created Dss de Beaumont en Maine Sep 1543 (registered 16 Sep).  Betrothed to LOUIS d’Armagnac Duc de Nemours, son of JACQUES d’Armagnac Duc de Nemours & his wife Louise d’Anjou.  m firstly (contract Blois 6 Apr 1505) FRANÇOIS II d’Orléans Duc de Longueville, son of --- (-1512).  m secondly (contract Châteaudun, Eure-et-Loir 18 May 1513) CHARLES de Bourbon Comte de Vendôme, son of FRANÇOIS de Bourbon Comte de Vendôme & his wife Marie de Luxembourg (Vendôme 2 Jun 1489-Amiens 25 Mar 1537, bur Vendôme, église Saint-Georges).  Created Duc de Vendôme Feb 1514 (registered 6 Mar).  On the death of his distant cousin (and brother-in-law) Charles IV Duc d'Alençon in 1525 he became "premier prince du sang de France". 

c)         ANNE d'Alençon (30 Oct 1492-Casale Monferrato, Alessandria, Italy 12 Oct 1562).  The Masarelli Vatican manuscript records that Guglielmo married Anna daughter of the duke of Alençon, cousin of the king of France[957].  Dame de la Guerche.  Regent of Monferrato 1518-1530.  m (Blois, église Saint-Sauveur 31 Aug 1508) GUGLIELMO XI GIOVANNI Marchese di Monferrato, son of BONIFACIO III Marchese di Monferrato & his third wife Maria Branković of Serbia (Pontestura 10 Aug 1486-Casale Monferrato 4 Oct 1518).

Duke René had four illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) - (x):

d)         CHARLES bâtard d'Alençon (-1545).  Seigneur de Cany et de Caniel 1523.  m as her first husband, GERMAINE Balue, daughter of NICOLAS Balue Seigneur de Villepreux & his wife Philippa Bureau.  She married secondly Claude Brinon Seigneur du Plessis-aux-Tournelles.  Charles & his wife had two children: 

i)          MARGUERITE (-in childbirth 25 Sep 1551).  Dame de Cany et de Caniel.  m (13 Dec 1550) LANCELOT du Monceau Seigneur de Thignonville en Beauce.  Premier maître d’hôtel de la Reine de Navarre. 

ii)         ANNE .  Mademoiselle de Saint-Paul.  Demoiselle de Marguerite d’Orléans Duchesse d’Alençon.  m (1540) NICOLAS de Bernay Seigneur de Bernay.  Ecuyer trenchant de Madame la Dauphine. 

e)         CHARLES bâtard d'Alençon (-1524).  Baron de Cany.  m (1505) RENEE de Beauvoisin, daughter of ---.  

f)          MARGUERITE bâtarde d'Alençonm firstly (contract 15 Jul 1485) JACQUES de Boisguyon Seigneur de la Ronssaye, son of PHILIPPE de Boisguyon & his wife Marie de Lagogne Dame de Montdoucet.  m secondly HENRI de Bournel, son of ---.

g)         JACQUELINE bâtarde d'Alençon (bur Saint-Germain-le-Desire, near Etampes).  m GILLES des Ormes Seigneur de Saint-Germain et de Jodainville (-1506).  Conseiller et premier maître d’hôtel du Roi Louis XII. 

Duke Jean II had five illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) - (x):   

3.          JEAN bâtard d'Alençon (-after 1483). 

4.          ROBERT bâtard d'Alençon (-after 1489).  Elected Abbé de Saint-Martin de Sées 1486.

5.          JEANNE bâtarde d'Alençon (-after 4 Dec 1481).  Dame de Beaumont-le-Roger 17 Nov 1470.  m (contract 14 Nov 1470) GUY de Maumont Seigneur de Saint-Quentin en La Marche, son of NICOLAS Seigneur de Maumont & his wife Catherine d’Aubusson (-siege of Dôle, Jura).

6.          MADELEINE bâtarde d'Alençon (-after 16 Jan 1487).  m HENRI de Breuil, son of ---.

7.          MARIE bâtarde d’Alençon ([1452/53]-1501).  Abbess of the Benedictine monastery of Almenêches, Orne 1472. 

 



[1] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1876) Ymagines Historiarum: The Historical Works of Master Ralph de Diceto (London), Vol. I, pp. 290, 291 and 440, cited in Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), pp. 21 and 26, Preface by Hervé Baron Pinoteau. 

[2] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 21 and 26, Preface by Hervé Baron Pinoteau, citing various primary sources. 

[3] Annales Xantenses 867, MGH SS II, p. 232. 

[4] Widukind I, 29, MGH SS III, p. 430. 

[5] Richeri Historia I, 5, MGH SS III, p. 570. 

[6] Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) Miracula Sancti Benedicti (Paris) II, p. 93. 

[7] Guizot, M. (1824) Collection des mémoires relatifs à l’histoire de France (Paris), Siège de Paris par les Normands, poème d’Abbon, Livre II, p. 58. 

[8] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.2, MGH SS VII, p. 53. 

[9] Barthélemy, A. de ‘Origines de la maison de France’, Revue des questions historiques, Tome XIII, 1 (1873), p. 121, quoting Lecointe, C. (1673) Annales ecclesiastici francorum, Vol. VIII, p. 101 (not yet consulted). 

[10] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 399, which does not cite the source reference. 

[11] Reginonis Chronicon 892, MGH SS I, pp. 604 and 605. 

[12] Mabille, E. (ed.) (1866) La pancarte notre de Saint-Martin de Tours brulée en 1793 (Paris, Tours) ("Tours Saint-Martin") LVIII, p. 95. 

[13] ES II 10. 

[14] Miraculis Sancti Genulfi 6, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1206. 

[15] Settipani (1993), p. 354 footnote 1111. 

[16] Barthélemy ‘Origines de la maison de France’, p. 120-22. 

[17] Merlet, R. ‘Origine de Robert le Fort’, Mélanges Julien Havet (Paris, 1895), p. 108. 

[18] Barthélemy ‘Origines de la maison de France’, p. 120. 

[19] Barthélemy ‘Origines de la maison de France’, p. 121, quoting Lecointe, C. (1673) Annales ecclesiastici francorum, Vol. VIII, p. 101 (not yet consulted). 

[20] Merlet, R. ‘Les comtes de Chartres, de Châteaudun et de Blois aux IX et X siècles’, Mémoires de la Société archéologique d’Eure-et-Loir, Tome XII, 1895-1900 (Chartres, 1901), p. 28. 

[21] RHGF VIII, Diplomata, LV, p. 478. 

[22] Karoli II Conventus Silvacensis, Missi…et pagi… 8, MGH LL 1, p. 426. 

[23] Annales Bertiniani 859, MGH SS I, p. 453. 

[24] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 266. 

[25] Reginonis Chronicon 861, MGH SS I, p. 571. 

[26] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 456. 

[27] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 457. 

[28] Annales Bertiniani 865, MGH SS I, p. 470. 

[29] Tours Saint-Martin LX, p. 96. 

[30] Merlet ‘Les comtes de Chartres’, p. 27. 

[31] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 471. 

[32] Merlet, R. ‘Origine de Robert le Fort’, Mélanges Julien Havet (Paris, 1895), pp. 106-7. 

[33] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 473. 

[34] Adonis Continuatio Prima, Auctore Anonymo 866, MGH SS II, p. 324. 

[35] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 988, MGH SS XXIII, p. 774. 

[36] ES II 10. 

[37] Miraculis Sancti Genulfi 6, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1206. 

[38] Including ES II 10. 

[39] Abbé E. Bougaud (ed.) (1875) Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon ( Dijon) ("Chronicle St-Bénigne de Dijon"), p. 109. 

[40] Settipani (1993), p. 400. 

[41] Hincmari Remensis Annales 865, MGH SS I, p. 470. 

[42] When his father is first cited in Neustria, Settipani (1993), p. 402. 

[43] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 888, MHG SS V, p. 109. 

[44] Chavanon, J. (ed.) (1897) Adémar de Chabannes, Chronique (Paris), III, 20, p. 139. 

[45] Mabille, E. ‘Les invasions normandes dans la Loire et les pérégrinations du corps de saint Martin’, Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, Tome XXX (1869), Pièces Justificatives, V, p. 431. 

[46] Tours Saint-Martin LXXVII, p. 106. 

[47] Settipani (1993), p. 403. 

[48] Lasteyrie, R. D. (ed.) (1887) Cartulaire général de Paris Tome I 528-1180, Histoire général de Paris (Paris) ("Cartulaire Général de Paris") 52, p. 70. 

[49] Settipani (1993), p. 404. 

[50] Settipani (1993), p. 404. 

[51] Annales Prumienses 898, MGH SS XV.2, p. 1292. 

[52] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 306.       

[53] Diplomata Odonis Regis XIV, RHGF IX, p. 452. 

[54] ES II 10. 

[55] Settipani (1993), p. 405, cites Kalckstein, C. von (1871) Robert der Tapfere, Markgraf von Anjou, der Stammvater des Kapetingischen Hauses (Berlin), as the originator of the theory. 

[56] Annales Vedastini 888, MGH SS II, p. 203. 

[57] Aimond, C. 'Le nécrologe de la cathédrale de Verdun', Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für lothringische Geschichte und Altertumskunde Year 21 (second part) (1910), Appendice Kalendarium S. Mariæ Virdunensis, p. 312. 

[58] Nécrologe de la cathédrale de Verdun' (second part) (1910), p. 285. 

[59] Settipani (1993), p. 405. 

[60] ES II 10, he is not mentioned in Settipani (1993), p. 405. 

[61] Adémar de Chabannes III, 22, p. 141. 

[62] Aurélien de Courson, M. (ed.) (1863) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Redon en Bretagne (Paris), LIV, p. 376. 

[63] Settipani (1993), p. 405. 

[64] Saint-Bertin 2.69, 893, p. 136. 

[65] Saint-Bertin 2.69, 893, p. 136. 

[66] Settipani (1993), p. 405. 

[67] Richard, A. (1903) Histoire des Comtes de Poitou (republished Princi Negue, 2003) Tome I 72. 

[68] Tours Saint-Martin XCVIII, p. 117. 

[69] ‘Documents pour l’histoire de l’église de Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers’, Mémoires de la société des antiquaires de l’ouest, année 1847 (Poitiers, 1848) ("Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers"), XII, p. 16. 

[70] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes...’, Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, Tome XXX (1869), Pièces Justificatives, IX, p. 442. 

[71] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[72] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 371. 

[73] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 14.       

[74] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Magloire, p. 390.       

[75] L'abbé Lebeuf (1855) Mémoires concernant l'histoire civile et ecclésiastique d'Auxerre et de son ancient diocese (Auxerre) (“Histoire d’Auxerre”), Tome IV, p. 15. 

[76] ES II 10. 

[77] Diplôme de Charles III, no 57, Lauer, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 407. 

[78] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[79] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber II, XXI, p. 233. 

[80] RHGF IX, p. 719. 

[81] Werner, K. F. (1967) 'Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen bis um Jahr 1000 (1.-8. Generation)', Karl der Große, IV, p. 458, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 407. 

[82] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 920 and 988, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 756 and 774. 

[83] Flodoard 944, MGH SS III, p. 390. 

[84] Diplôme de Charles III, no 57, Lauer, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 407. 

[85] Flodoard, 923, MGH SS III, p. 372. 

[86] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) I.6, p. 15. 

[87] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny (Paris), Tome I, 396, p. 379, and 397, p. 381. 

[88] Flodoard, 935, MGH SS III, p. 382. 

[89] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 277.       

[90] Flodoard, 922, MGH SS III, p. 369. 

[91] Cluny, Tome I, 379, p. 358. 

[92] Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum I.6, p. 15. 

[93] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 372. 

[94] Flodoard 936, MGH SS III, p. 383. 

[95] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[96] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 9. 

[97] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[98] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber II, XXI, p. 233. 

[99] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[100] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Bertin (Paris), 2.69, 893, p. 136. 

[101] Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum I.6, p. 15. 

[102] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[103] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 371. 

[104] Tours Saint-Martin CIII, p. 119. 

[105] RHGF IX, p. 719. 

[106] Tours Saint-Martin LVIII, p. 95. 

[107] McKitterick (1983), p. 315. 

[108] Settipani (1993), pp. 409-10. 

[109] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[110] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 14.       

[111] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris, p. 227.       

[112] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 15. 

[113] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[114] ES II 10. 

[115] Settipani (1993), p. 410. 

[116] Flodoard 926, MGH SS III, p. 377. 

[117] Rerum Britannicarum medii ævi scriptores (1866) Liber Monasterii de Hyda 455-1023 (London), XIV.4, p. 112. 

[118] McKitterick (1983), p. 314. 

[119] Tours Saint-Martin LVIII, p. 95. 

[120] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum I.4, MGH SS VII, p. 54. 

[121] Flodoard 938, MGH SS III, p. 385. 

[122] Flodoard 957, MGH SS III, p. 404. 

[123] Annales Nivernenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 89. 

[124] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.       

[125] Duru, L.-M. (ed.) (1850) Bibliothèque historique de l'Yonne, I, (Auxerre) Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, p. 382. 

[126] Flodoard 954, MGH SS III, p. 402. 

[127] Laurentii Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium 2, MGH SS X, p. 492. 

[128] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 958, MGH SS XXIII, p. 767. 

[129] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Nancy), pp. 14-15. 

[130] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum II.1, p. 51. 

[131] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 5, MGH SS IX, p. 383. 

[132] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, X, XII, pp. 243-4. 

[133] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber IV, XVIII, p. 247. 

[134] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[135] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[136] Flodoard 965, MGH SS III, p. 406. 

[137] Vidier, A. and Mirot, L. (eds.) (1909) Obituaries de la province de Sens, III, Diocèses d'Orléans, d'Auxerre et de Nevers (Paris), p. 240, cited in Bouchard, C. B. (1987) Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy 980-1198 (Cornell University Press), p. 388. 

[138] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, p. 382-3. 

[139] Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium, p. 384. 

[140] Bouchard (1987), p. 388. 

[141] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 366. 

[142] Flodoard 965, MGH SS III, p. 406. 

[143] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum II.1, p. 51. 

[144] Annales Nivernenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 89. 

[145] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 47. 

[146] Settipani (1993), pp. 336-7, and Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 48. 

[147] Hugonis Floriacensis, Historia Francorum Senonensis, MGH SS IX, p. 368. 

[148] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 329.       

[149] Acta Sanctorum, October, Tome X, Translatio S. Maglorii et aliorum, 4 and 5, p. 792, quoting Mabillon Annales Ordini Sancti Benedicti, Tome III, p. 666. 

[150] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1840) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) ("Richer") IV, supplementary notes following CVII, p. 308. 

[151] Chronico Ademari Cabanensis, RHGF X, p. 145. 

[152] Vita Roberti Regis, RHGF X, p. 99. 

[153] Settipani (1993), p. 417. 

[154] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1031, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783. 

[155] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 141. 

[156] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 319.       

[157] ES II 11.  Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 49, gives no date of birth. 

[158] Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier, IV.XII, p. 217. 

[159] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 49. 

[160] ES II 11.  Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 49, gives no date of birth. 

[161] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252. 

[162] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1031, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783. 

[163] Sigeberti Chronica 973, MGH SS VI, p. 352. 

[164] Gesta Abbatum Gemblacensium 43, MGH SS VIII, p. 541. 

[165] Roland, C. G. (ed.) (1921) Recueil des chartes de l’abbaye de Gembloux (Gembloux) ("Gembloux"), 15, p. 32. 

[166] D H II 387, p. 493. 

[167] D K II 202, p. 271. 

[168] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252. 

[169] Adémar de Chabannes III, 39, p. 161. 

[170] Vita Gauzlini, Liber I, I, Mémoires de la Société Archéologique de l’Orléanais, Tome II (Orléans, Paris, 1853), p. 276. 

[171] For example, Ademari Historiarum III.39, MGH SS IV, p. 133, footnote 13. 

[172] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55 footnote 59.

[173] Vita Gauzlini, Liber II, LXXI, LXXIV (1853), pp. 319-20. 

[174] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 474. 

[175] Chronicon Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensis, Spicilegium II, p. 475. 

[176] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252. 

[177] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55. 

[178] This nickname was applied to the king from the early years of his reign, see Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 59 footnote 2. 

[179] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55. 

[180] Poull (1994), pp. 21-2. 

[181] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1031, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783. 

[182] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159. 

[183] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 16.       

[184] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.       

[185] Reginonis Chronicon 965, MGH SS I, p. 627. 

[186] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306. 

[187] Annales Elnonenses Minores [950-968], MGH SS V, p. 19. 

[188] Nicholas, D. (1992) Medieval Flanders (Longman), p. 44. 

[189] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92. 

[190] Vita Sancti Bertulfi Abbatis Renticensis, RCGF 10, p. 365. 

[191] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 60 footnote 32. 

[192] Nicholas (1992), p. 45. 

[193] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) IV.LXXXVII, p. 270. 

[194] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 102, p. 96. 

[195] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 107, p. 101. 

[196] Annales Elnonenses Minores 1003, MGH SS V, p. 19. 

[197] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299. 

[198] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387. 

[199] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64. 

[200] Métais, C. (ed.) (1889/91) Marmoutier Cartulaire Blésois (Blois) (“Marmoutier (Blésois)”), I, IV, p. 8. 

[201] Richer IV, supplementary notes following CVII, p. 308. 

[202] Marmoutier (Blésois), I, V, p. 10. 

[203] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 62 footnote 42. 

[204] Lecesne, H. (ed.) (1874) Cartulaire de Marmoutier pour le Dunois III, p. 4. 

[205] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 242 footnote 8. 

[206] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres (Paris) ("Chartres Saint-Père"), I, Liber Quintus, Cap. V, p. 96.  

[207] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 5.       

[208] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[209] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780. 

[210] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 996, MGH SS VIII, p. 368. 

[211] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107. 

[212] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.40, p. 165. 

[213] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107. 

[214] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 57. 

[215] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.34, p. 157. 

[216] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 56 and 57. 

[217] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159. 

[218] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 267.       

[219] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348.       

[220] Depoin, J. (1912) Recueil des chartes et documents de Saint-Martin-des-Champs, monastère parisien, Vol. 1 (Paris), no. 6, pp. 15-16, expanded by Mathieu, J. N. (1996) 'Recherches sur les premiers Comtes de Dammartin', Mémoires publiés par la Fédération des sociétés historiques et archéologiques de Paris et de l'Ile-de-France, t. 47 (1996), pp. 7-60, 15-16, both cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 63. 

[221] Lépinois, E. de & Merlet L. (1862) Cartulaire de Notre-Dame de Chartres d'après les cartularies et les titres originaux (Chartres), Vol. I, XIII, p. 87, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 63 footnote 57. 

[222] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107. 

[223] ES III 676. 

[224] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.26, p. 213. 

[225] Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis, RHGF X, p. 222. 

[226] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF X, p. 258. 

[227] Bouchard (1987), pp. 343-4, the author highlighting the "unreliable genealogies" of Raoul Glaber and preferring the Annales Vizeliacenses as a reliable source. 

[228] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58. 

[229] Cluny Tome IV, 2811, p. 13. 

[230] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[231] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.32, p. 151. 

[232] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58. 

[233] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 270.       

[234] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348.       

[235] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.33, p. 157. 

[236] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[237] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[238] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64. 

[239] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[240] Le Prévost, A. (1840) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. I, Liber I, p. 184, and Vol. III, Liber VII, p. 160. 

[241] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58. 

[242] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 317.       

[243] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792. 

[244] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252. 

[245] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Vol. IV, Appendix I, p. 350. 

[246] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58. 

[247] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 390. 

[248] Prou, M. (ed.) (1908) Recueil des actes de Philippe I roi de France (Paris), IV, p. 13. 

[249] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.       

[250] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[251] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55. 

[252] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65. 

[253] RHGF XI, Ex Historiæ Francicæ Fragmento, p. 161. 

[254] RHGF XI, Ex Chronico S. Petri Vivi Senonensi auctore Clario monacho, p. 197. 

[255] Merlet, R. ‘Du lieu où mourut Henri I roi de France’, Le Moyen Âge (1903), pp. 203-9. 

[256] Merlet ‘Du lieu où mourut Henri I’, pp. 204-5, citing Archives d’Eure-et-Loir, H. 399. 

[257] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 79. 

[258] Merlet ‘Du lieu où mourut Henri I’, p. 206. 

[259] Giry, A. (1925) Manuel de Diplomatique, new edition (Paris), pp. 583-9. 

[260] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii, 32, MGH SS IX, p. 404. 

[261] Annales Nivernenses 1060, MGH SS XIII, p. 90. 

[262] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 163.       

[263] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 323.       

[264] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 16. 

[265] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 244 footnote 17. 

[266] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 32, MGH SS XI, p. 271. 

[267] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65. 

[268] D K II 204, p. 275. 

[269] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.23, p. 211. 

[270] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157. 

[271] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[272] Vajay 'Mathilde', pp. 248-54. 

[273] Ex Historiæ Francicæ Fragmento, RHGF XI, p. 161. 

[274] Miracula Sancti Benedicti, auctore Andreæ monachi Floriacensis quartus, Liber VII, III, p. 252. 

[275] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388. 

[276] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 158. 

[277] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789. 

[278] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 66. 

[279] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 389. 

[280] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157. 

[281] Bautier, R.-H. 'Anne de Kiev, reine de France, et la politique royale au XIe siècle. Etude critique de la documentation', Aspects des relations intellectuelles entre la France et la Russie, Revue des etudes slaves (Paris, 1985) t. 57, pp. 539-64, citing Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) André de Fleury Miracula sancti Benedicti, VII, ch III, p. 252, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70 footnote 46.  . 

[282] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389. 

[283] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[284] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389. 

[285] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792. 

[286] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389. 

[287] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), (“WT”) I. XVII, p. 45. 

[288] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159. 

[289] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber II, Cap. VII-VIII, pp. 304-5. 

[290] Sewter, E. R. A. (trans.) (1969) Anna Comnena The Alexiad (Penguin Books), Book 10, p. 313. 

[291] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257. 

[292] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255. 

[293] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[294] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389. 

[295] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159. 

[296] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789. 

[297] Hugonis Floriacensis Modernorum Regum Francorum Actus, MGH SS IX, p. 389. 

[298] Bertholdi Annales, 1060, MGH SS Tome V, p. 271. 

[299] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70. 

[300] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 70-1. 

[301] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[302] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.       

[303] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.       

[304] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127. 

[305] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390. 

[306] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *. 

[307] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006). 

[308] Nicholas (1992), p. 52. 

[309] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 71. 

[310] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 386. 

[311] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257. 

[312] WT XIV.I, p. 606. 

[313] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 107. 

[314] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72. 

[315] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5. 

[316] Bienvenue, J. M. (ed.) (2000) Grand Cartulaire de Fontevraud, Tome I (Poitiers) (“Fontevraud”) 156, p. 142. 

[317] Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ΣΥΝΔΕΣΜΟΣ Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16. 

[318] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159. 

[319] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[320] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 390. 

[321] Laurent, J. (ed.) (1911) Cartulaires de l'abbaye de Molesme, Tome II, 254, p. 237. 

[322] Molesme II, 19, p. 26. 

[323] WT XI.I, p. 450. 

[324] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30. 

[325] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93. 

[326] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.   

[327] Houben (2002), p. 31. 

[328] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417. 

[329] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282. 

[330] Ivo of Chartes, Epistolæ, in Migne, J. P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completes, serie Latina CLXII, pp. 163-4 ep. 158, cited in Chibnall, Vol. VI, p. 70 footnote 5. 

[331] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[332] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *. 

[333] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[334] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 389. 

[335] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XVII, pp. 66-7. 

[336] Fontevraud 156, p. 142. 

[337] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chapitre Saint-Germain L'Auxerrois, p. 799. 

[338] Ex Chronica Regum Francorum, RHGF XII, p. 208. 

[339] Le cartulaire du prieuré de Notre-Dame de Longpont de l’ordre de Cluny au diocèse de Paris (Lyon, 1870) ("Longpont Notre-Dame"), CXCVII, p. 181. 

[340] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[341] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 389. 

[342] Patrologia Latina, Vol. CCXVI, Innocentii III PP Regestorum Lib. XVI, IX, col. 979. 

[343] Patrologia Latina, Vol. CCXVI, Innocentii III PP Regestorum Lib. XVI, IX, X and XII, cols. 979 and 982. 

[344] Quantin, M. (ed.) (1860) Cartulaire general de l'Yonne (Auxerre) ("Yonne"), Tome I, CCCXL, p. 494. 

[345] Catel, A. and Lecomte, M. (eds.) (1927) Chartes et documents de l'abbaye cisterciennes de Preuilly (Paris), 183 (not yet consulted), cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 78 footnote 63. 

[346] ES XIV 146. 

[347] Leroy, G. ‘Diplôme inédit du roi Louis VII en faveur de l’abbaye de Barbeau’, Bulletin de la Société d’archéologie, sciences, lettres et arts du département de Seine-et-Marne, Vol. XII 1907-08 (Melun, 1909), pp. 127-31. 

[348] Lecomte, M. ‘Une famille de seigneurs briards aux XII et XIII siècles, les Britaud, seigneurs de Nangis-en-Brie’, Bulletin de la Société d’archéologie, sciences, lettres et arts du département de Seine-et-Marne, Vol. XII 1907-08 (Melun, 1909), pp. 133-228. 

[349] ES XIV 146. 

[350] Leroy ‘Diplôme inédit du roi Louis VII’, pp. 127-31. 

[351] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[352] WT XI.I, p. 450, and XIV.I, p. 606. 

[353] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 52.   

[354] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 125. 

[355] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XII, Cap. XIX, p. 701. 

[356] WT XIV.V, pp. 612 and XIV.VI, p. 614. 

[357] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 134 footnote 3. 

[358] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople (2e edition Paris), p. 631. 

[359] Rozière, E. de (ed.) (1849) Cartulaire de l'église de Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem (Paris) ("Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem"), 92, p. 183. 

[360] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74. 

[361] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74. 

[362] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1096, MGH SS XXIII, p. 805. 

[363] ES II 11.

[364] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74. 

[365] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159. 

[366] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405. 

[367] Luchaire, A. (1890) Louis VI le Gros, Annales de sa vie et de son règne (Paris), pp. 285-9. 

[368] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXXII, pp. 147-8.  

[369] Luchaire (1890), p. 285, citing Vita Sancti Arnulfi

[370] Ex Chronico S. Petri Catalaunensis 1108, RHGF XII, p. 276. 

[371] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 79. 

[372] Fragmentum ex Viteri membrana, RHGF XII, p. 63, cited and dated in Luchaire (1890), p. 284, which cites several other sources to justify the statement. 

[373] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XIII, p. 48. 

[374] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), p. 103. 

[375] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXXII, pp. 147-8. 

[376] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.       

[377] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.       

[378] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 157. 

[379] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis VIII, p. 26. 

[380] Longpont Notre-Dame, CCXCII, p. 235. 

[381] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[382] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 258. 

[383] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 846. 

[384] Duchesne, A. (1624) Histoire généalogique de la maison de Montmorency et de Laval (Paris), Preuves, p. 43. 

[385] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 81. 

[386] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 331.       

[387] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 83 and 91, footnote 91, citing Dufour, J. ‘Un faux de Louis VI relatif à Liancourt (Oise)’, Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, Tome 144 (1986), appendice, pp. 66-7, and Depoin, J. (1900) Bulletin historique et philologique du Comité des travaux historiques et scientifiques, p. 144 (not yet consulted). 

[388] Longpont Notre-Dame, CCLVI, p. 213. 

[389] Longpont Notre-Dame, CCLXXIV, p. 224. 

[390] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 423. 

[391] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[392] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 391. 

[393] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XXXI, p. 138. 

[394] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 277.       

[395] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 328.       

[396] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[397] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[398] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 81. 

[399] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Aquicinense 1161, MGH SS VI, p. 397. 

[400] Sigeberti Continuatio auctarium Aquicinense 1161, MGH SS VI, p. 397. 

[401] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Vol. II, p. 59. 

[402] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 331.       

[403] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[404] WT XXI.XXX, p. 1058. 

[405] WT XXI.XXX, p. 1058. 

[406] Quantin, M. (ed.) (1860) Cartulaire general de l'Yonne (Auxerre) ("Yonne") Tome II, 204, p. 222. 

[407] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Abbaye de la Cour-Dieu, Extraits des deux obituaires, p. 170. 

[408] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252. 

[409] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 258. 

[410] Howlett, R. (ed.) (1884) (London) Historia rerum Anglicarum of William of Newburgh (“William of Newburgh”) I.XI, p. 44. 

[411] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, Tome II, p. 125. 

[412] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1879) The Historical Works of Gervase of Canterbury, Vol. I (London) (“Gervase”), p. 112. 

[413] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (London) (“MP”), Vol. II, 1139, p. 170. 

[414] Röhricht, R. ed. (1893) Regesta Regni Hierosolymitani (Oeniponti), 545, p. 145. 

[415] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 323.       

[416] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252. 

[417] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 328. 

[418] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 96. 

[419] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 83. 

[420] Chartres Saint-Père, Codex Diplomaticus Pars Tertia ex Schedis D. Muley, XXIII, p. 638. 

[421] Chartres Saint-Père, Codex Diplomaticus Pars Tertia ex Schedis D. Muley, XLIV, p. 652. 

[422] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 249. 

[423] Chartres Saint-Père, Codex Diplomaticus Pars Tertia ex Schedis D. Muley, XXIV, p. 640. 

[424] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de Saint-Père-enVallée, p. 193. 

[425] MP, Vol. II, 1180, p. 315. 

[426] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155. 

[427] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 248. 

[428] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 286-7. 

[429] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 517. 

[430] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1181, MGH SS XXIII, p. 857. 

[431] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 326.       

[432] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841. 

[433] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 262. 

[434] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 166. 

[435] MP, Vol. II, 1155, p. 210. 

[436] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383. 

[437] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329. 

[438] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511. 

[439] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532. 

[440] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 328.       

[441] WT XXII.IV, p. 1068. 

[442] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 515. 

[443] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152 and 1164, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 841 and 848. 

[444] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1206, MGH SS XXIII, p. 886. 

[445] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 319.       

[446] Guizot, M. (ed.) (1825) Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis, Collection des Mémoires relatifs à l'histoire de France (Paris) (“Guillaume de Nangis”), p. 94. 

[447] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841. 

[448] MP, Vol. II, 1137, p. 166. 

[449] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876. 

[450] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841. 

[451] MP, Vol. II, 1137, p. 166. 

[452] Belfort, A. de (ed.) (1881) Archives de la Maison-Dieu de Châteaudun (Paris, Châteaudun) (“Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu”) XXXII, p. 24. 

[453] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 93.       

[454] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1158, p. 311. 

[455] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 511. 

[456] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329. 

[457] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532. 

[458] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1164, MGH SS XXIII, p. 848. 

[459] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 514. 

[460] MP, Vol. II, 1172, p. 286. 

[461] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 518. 

[462] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 858. 

[463] Liljegren, J. G. (ed.) (1829) Diplomatarium Suecanum, Svensk Diplomatarium, Tome I 817-1285 (Stockhom) ("Diplomatarium Suecanum") 101, p. 125. 

[464] Mas Latrie, M. L. (ed.) (1871) Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier (Paris) (“Ernoul”) 26, p. 302. 

[465] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1160, p. 329. 

[466] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Ymagines Historiarum, col. 532. 

[467] Stevenson, J. (ed.) (1875) Radulphi de Coggeshall Chronicon Anglicanum (London), p. 13. 

[468] Historia Gloriosi Regis Ludovici VII, RHGF, p. 128. 

[469] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1164, MGH SS XXIII, p. 848. 

[470] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 7, RHGF XII, p. 383. 

[471] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1868) Chronica, Magistri Rogeri de Houedene (London) (“Roger of Hoveden”), Vol. I, p. 218. 

[472] Gervase, p. 208. 

[473] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1847) Gesta Regis Henrici Secundi Benedicti Abbatis, The Chronicle of the reigns of Henry II and Richard I 1169-1192, known commonly under the name of Benedict of Peterborough (London) (“Benedict of Peterborough”) Vol. I 1177, p. 191.   

[474] Benedict of Peterborough Vol. 2 1189, p. 70.   

[475] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 97. 

[476] Prarond, E. (ed.) (1897) Le cartulaire du comté de Ponthieu, Mémoires de la société d'émulation d'Abbeville, Tome II (Abbeville) ("Ponthieu") XVII, p. 32. 

[477] Ponthieu XXIV, p. 43. 

[478] Ponthieu XXIX, p. 48. 

[479] Ponthieu XXXI, p. 50. 

[480] Ponthieu XXXII, p. 52. 

[481] Ponthieu XXXIV, p. 55. 

[482] Ponthieu XLVIII, p. 72. 

[483] Ponthieu LI, p. 74. 

[484] WT XXII.IV, p. 1068. 

[485] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 97. 

[486] Sommerard, L. du (1907) Deux princesses d’Orient au XII siècle, Anne Comnène, Agnès de France (Paris), pp. 205 and 210. 

[487] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1164, MGH SS XXIII, p. 848. 

[488] Sommerard (1907), p. 204. 

[489] WT XXII.IV, pp. 1066-7. 

[490] Sommerard (1907), p. 341 quotes the full text from RHGF XV. 

[491] Sommerard (1907), pp. 210-1. 

[492] Mas Latrie, M. L. (ed.) (1871) Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier (Paris) (“Ernoul”), p. 46. 

[493] Benedict of Peterborough I 1179, p. 230.   

[494] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 515. 

[495] Benedict of Peterborough I 1183, p. 234. 

[496] Meineke, A. (ed.) (1835) Nicetæ Choniatæ Historia, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn) ("Niketas Choniates"), Imperiii Andronici Comneni, Liber 1, 1, p. 357. 

[497] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), 18, p. 133. 

[498] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1193 and 1205, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 870 and 885. 

[499] Lauer, P. (ed.) (1924) Robert de Clari, La conquête de Constantinople (Paris), LIII, p. 54 (information provided by Andrew Dalby). 

[500] Sommerard (1907), p. 305. 

[501] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 97. 

[502] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 98. 

[503] MP, Vol. III, 1223, p. 82, "tertio autem idus Augusti mortuus est". 

[504] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 512. 

[505] WT XXII.IV, p. 1068. 

[506] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 44. 

[507] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 515. 

[508] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 52. 

[509] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 819. 

[510] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 131. 

[511] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 519. 

[512] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1191, MGH SS XXIII, p. 868. 

[513] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1187, MGH SS V, p. 46. 

[514] MP, Vol. II, 1180, p. 317. 

[515] Count Philippe was never appointed regent of France nor guardian of the young king, see Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 114, footnote 14. 

[516] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 7, MGH SS IX, p. 329. 

[517] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1189, MGH SS XXVI, p. 291. 

[518] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 312.       

[519] Radulphi de Coggeshall, Chronicon Anglicanum, p. 62. 

[520] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536. 

[521] Gesta Innocentii III, xlviii. 93-4, quoted in Conklin, George 'Ingeborg of Denmark, Queen of France, 1193-1223', in Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 40 footnote 4. 

[522] Howlett, R. (ed.) Chronicles of the Reigns of Stephen, Henry II and Richard I, 4 vols. RS 82 (London, 1884-89), I, 369, quoted in Conklin 'Ingeborg of Denmark', p. 40 footnote 5. 

[523] Baldwin, J. 'La vie sexuelle de Philippe Auguste' Mariage et sexualité ay Moyen âge. Accord ou crise? Colloque international de Conques, sous la direction de M. Rouche, pp. 217-229, and Bruguières, N. B. 'Le mariage de Philippe Auguste et Isambour de Danemark, Aspects canoniques et politiques', Melanges offerts à Jean Dauvilier (Toulouse, 1979), pp. 135-56. 

[524] Coussemaker, I. de (ed.) (1886) Cartulaire de l’abbaye de Cysoing et de ses dépendances (Lille) ("Cysoing"), LX, p. 74. 

[525] Conklin 'Ingeborg of Denmark', p. 51. 

[526] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1237, MGH SS XXIII, p. 942. 

[527] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 162.       

[528] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 872. 

[529] Rigordi Gestis Philippi II Augusti 1196, MGH SS XXVI, p. 293. 

[530] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 330. 

[531] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536. 

[532] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1201, MGH SS XXIII, p. 878. 

[533] Necrologium Diessense , Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7. 

[534] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 321.       

[535] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 112, citing Philippe Mouskès Chronique rimée, vers 20723. 

[536] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 519. 

[537] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 7, MGH SS IX, p. 329. 

[538] Flandria Generosa (Continuatio Claromariscensis) 7, MGH SS IX, p. 329. 

[539] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196 and 1201, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 872 and 878. 

[540] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 109. 

[541] Annales Parchenses 1214 and 1235, MGH SS XVI, p. 607. 

[542] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 64. 

[543] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196 and 1201, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 872 and 878. 

[544] Willelmi Chronica Andrensis 252, MGH SS XXIV, p. 772. 

[545] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Vauduisant, p. 53.       

[546] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Abbaye de la Cour-Dieu, Extraits des deux obituaires, p. 169. 

[547] Willelmi Chronica Andrensis 220, MGH SS XXIV, p. 763. 

[548] Jacob, A. (ed.) (1882) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Sainte-Hoïlde (Bar-le-Duc") ("Sainte-Hoïlde") XCVII, p. 79. 

[549] Delisle, L. ‘Recherches sur les comtes de Dammartin au XIII siècle’, Mémoires de la société impériale des antiquaires de France, 4th series, Tome I (1869, Paris), Appendice, VII, p. 247. 

[550] Delisle L. ‘Recherches sur les comtes de Dammartin au XIII siècle’, Appendice, VIII, p. 248. 

[551] Chronicon Savigniacense, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber II, Collectio Veterum, p. 321. 

[552] Breve Chronicon Alcobacense, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, p. 21. 

[553] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 112. 

[554] Willelmi Chronica Andrensis 252, MGH SS XXIV, p. 772. 

[555] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2473, p. 330. 

[556] Sainte-Hoïlde XCVII, p. 79. 

[557] Delisle L. ‘Recherches sur les comtes de Dammartin au XIII siècle’, Appendice, VIII, p. 248. 

[558] Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon 1182, MGH SS XXV, p. 536. 

[559] Auvray, L. (1908-1910) Les registres de Grégoire IX (Paris), Tome III, 5246, p. 281. 

[560] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1240, MGH SS XXIII, p. 948. 

[561] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1241, MGH SS XXIII, p. 949. 

[562] MP, Vol. V, 1249, p. 92. 

[563] Historiæ Anglicanæ Scriptores X (1652), Radulphus de Diceto, Abbreviationes Chronicorum, col. 519. 

[564] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. 

[565] Annales S. Nicasii Remenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 85. 

[566] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 136. 

[567] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 823. 

[568] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 330.       

[569] Annales Londonienses, p. 27. 

[570] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1143 and 1200, MGH SS XXIII, pp. 837 and 877. 

[571] Serrano, L. (ed.) (1925) Cartulario de San Pedro de Arlanza (Madrid) (“Arlanza”), CXXVI, p. 232.

[572] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 83. 

[573] MP, Vol. V, 1252, p. 354. 

[574] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Hôtel-Dieu de Provins, p. 964. 

[575] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 332.       

[576] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 124. 

[577] Quantin, M. (1873) Recueil de pièces pour faire suite au Cartulaire Général de l’Yonne, XIII siècle (Auxerre, Paris) (“Yonne (suite)”), 212, p. 94. 

[578] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 902. 

[579] Yonne (suite), 212, p. 94. 

[580] Duplès-Agier, H. (ed.) (1874) Chroniques de Saint-Martial de Limoges (Paris) Chronicon Bernardi Iterii, p. 86. 

[581] Chronicon Bernardi Iterii, p. 86. 

[582] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[583] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[584] MP, Vol. V, 1250, p. 158. 

[585] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. 

[586] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[587] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. 

[588] MP, Vol. V, 1250, p. 175. 

[589] MP, Vol. V, 1252, p. 354. 

[590] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 83.       

[591] Vic, Dom C. de and Dom Vaissete (1840) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. (Paris), Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 680. 

[592] Histoire Générale de Languedoc Tome V, Preuves, CLII, p. 658. 

[593] Lagarde, C. (trans.) (1864) Chronique de Maître Guillaume de Puylaurens sur la guerre des Albigeois (1202-1272) (Béziers), Chap. XL, p. 235. 

[594] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1237, MGH SS XXIII, p. 941. 

[595] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 150. 

[596] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn., Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 680. 

[597] Col. Périgord, Vol. 53, fol 322, citing Archives nat. de Fr., Trésor de Chartes, boîte cotée 'Testaments des rois, reines et grands seigneurs', 2e partie, Testament de Jeanne, fille de Raimond comte de Toulouse et de Poitiers, femme d'Alphonse de France comte de Poitiers[JCC] 

[598] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[599] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. 

[600] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1232, MGH SS XXIII, p. 930. 

[601] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 319. 

[602] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1922, p. 119. 

[603] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 103. 

[604] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[605] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. 

[606] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1232, MGH SS XXIII, p. 930. 

[607] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 305. 

[608] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[609] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 2065, p. 182. 

[610] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 557. 

[611] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 313. 

[612] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. 

[613] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[614] MP, Vol. V, 1250, p. 175. 

[615] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. 

[616] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 257-61. 

[617] MP, Vol. V, 1250 pp. 158 and 164. 

[618] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 275. 

[619] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 280. 

[620] Vincentii Bellovacensis Memoriale Omnium Temporum 1233, MGH SS XXIV, p. 161. 

[621] Gallia Christiana Novissima, I.1, Aix, Instrumenta, Col. 27-28, no. XXIII. 

[622] State Archives, consulted at <http://ww2.multix.it/asto/asp/inventari.asp> (14 Nov 2003), volume 104, page 11, fascicules 11.1, 2 and 3, and Wurstenberger, L. (1858) Peter der Zweite Graf von Savoyen, Markgraf in Italien, sein Haus und seine Lande (Bern, Zurich), Vol. IV, 636, p. 317. 

[623] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 577. 

[624] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 144. 

[625] MP, Vol. IV, 1240, p. 24. 

[626] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 144. 

[627] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, pp. 81 and 84. 

[628] Ubieto Arteta, A. (ed.) (1989)"Corónicas" Navarras (Zaragoza), 7.12, p. 75. 

[629] Troyes Necrologies, 2 Obituaire de Saint-Etienne, p. 219. 

[630] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 144. 

[631] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[632] RHGF XXI, E speculo historiali Vincentii Bellovacensis, Liber 30, CLII, p. 74. 

[633] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 815. 

[634] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 173. 

[635] RHGF XXI, E floribus historiarum auctore Adamo Claromontensi, p. 78. 

[636] MP, Vol. V, 1255, pp. 509-10. 

[637] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 153. 

[638] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 141, footnote 54, quoting Chancel-Bardelot, B. de ‘La sculpture métallique: tombeaux et statuaire (XIII-XIV siècles)’, L’Œuvre de Limoges. Emaux limousins du Moyen-Age, exposition à Paris au musée du Louvre, 23 Oct 1995-22 Jan 1996 (Paris, 1995), p. 403. 

[639] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[640] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 160. 

[641] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 564. 

[642] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Port-Royal, p. 642. 

[643] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 655. 

[644] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), Preuves, p. 84. 

[645] Du Chesne (1628), Preuves, p. 85. 

[646] Iohannis de Thielrode Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ MGH SS IX, p. 335. 

[647] Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon, MGH SS XXV, p. 575. 

[648] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[649] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 492. 

[650] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 817. 

[651] Chroniques de Saint-Martial de Limoges, Anonymum S Martialis Chronicon, p. 178. 

[652] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 524. 

[653] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 492. 

[654] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 524. 

[655] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire Patin, p. 163.       

[656] Morice, H. (1742) Mémoires pour servir de preuves à l’histoire ecclesiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome I (Paris), col. 1105. 

[657] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 142, footnote 72. 

[658] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 142, footnote 72. 

[659] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[660] MP, Vol. V, 1252, p. 311. 

[661] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 662. 

[662] Chronicon de Cardeña, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 374. 

[663] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 691. 

[664] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[665] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Ampliata 14, MGH SS XXV, p. 397. 

[666] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 68. 

[667] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[668] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 512. 

[669] RHGF XXI, Majus Chronicon Lemovicense, p. 769. 

[670] Louis Carolus-Barré 'Les grands tournois de Compiègne et de Senlis en l'honneur de Charles Prince de Salerne (mai 1279)', Bulletin de la Société nationale des antiquaries de France (Paris, 1978), pp. 87-100, cited in Kerrebrouck (1987), p. 51 footnote 6. 

[671] RHGF XXI, Chronique anonyme des rois de France, p. 81. 

[672] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.       

[673] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 144. 

[674] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 153. 

[675] RHGF XXI, E speculo historiali Vincentii Bellovacensis, Liber 30, CLII, p. 74. 

[676] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 691. 

[677] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 570. 

[678] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Léproserie du Popelin à Sens, p. 980. 

[679] Ximénez de Embún y Val, T. (ed.) (1876) Historia de la Corona de Aragón: Crónica de San Juan de la Peña: Part aragonesa, available at Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes <http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/FichaObra.html?Ref=12477> (3 Aug 2007), XXXV, p. 149. 

[680] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 634. 

[681] RHGF XXI, E floribus historiarum auctore Adamo Claromontensi, p. 79. 

[682] E visitationibus Odonis Rigaudi archiepiscopi Rothomagensis, RHGF XXI, p. 587. 

[683] Gesta Sancti Ludovici, RHGF XX, p. 414. 

[684] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 815. 

[685] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ 9, MGH SS XXV, p. 391. 

[686] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 494. 

[687] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 496. 

[688] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 650. 

[689] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 32.       

[690] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 502. 

[691] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 565. 

[692] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 561. 

[693] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 149, footnote 37, citing Brown, E. A. R. ‘The prince is father of the king: the character and childhood of Philip the Fair of France’, Medieval Studies, Vol. 49 (Toronto, 1987), p. 317. 

[694] RHGF XXII, Fragmenta Computorum, s. 37a, p. 754. 

[695] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 145. 

[696] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 145. 

[697] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 145. 

[698] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 571. 

[699] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 698. 

[700] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 625. 

[701] Hellot, A. (ed. (1884) Chronique Parisienne anonyme du XIV siècle (Nogent) (“Chronique Parisienne”), 30, p. 39. 

[702] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario ecclesiæ Ebroicensis, p. 462. 

[703] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 581. 

[704] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 584. 

[705] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1180. 

[706] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario ecclesiæ Ebroicensis, p. 463. 

[707] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Ampliata 14, MGH SS XXV, p. 397. 

[708] Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 72. 

[709] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chartreux de Vauvert, p. 703. 

[710] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 620. 

[711] Chronique Parisienne, 21, p. 33. 

[712] López de Ayala, P. (1780) Crónicas de los Reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Octavo, Cap. X, p. 49. 

[713] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Celestins de Paris, p. 709. 

[714] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Celestins de Paris, p. 709. 

[715] RHGF XXIII, Chronique des comtes d’Eu, p. 447. 

[716] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Celestins de Paris, p. 709. 

[717] Baluze, S. (1708) Histoire généalogique de la maison d’Auvergne (Paris) ("Baluze (1708) Auvergne"), Tome II, p. 187. 

[718] Baluze (1708) Auvergne, Tome II, p. 188. 

[719] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 656. 

[720] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 733. 

[721] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chartreux de Vauvert, p. 697. 

[722] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 816. 

[723] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 571 and 581. 

[724] Rymer, T. (1745) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literæ 3rd Edn (London), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206. 

[725] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1869) Annales Monastici Vol. IV, Annales de Oseneia, Chronicon Thomæ Wykes, Annales de Wigornia (London), p. 542. 

[726] Rymer (1740), Tome I, Pars III, p. 213. 

[727] Rymer (1745), Tome II, Pars I, p. 149. 

[728] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 571 and 582. 

[729] Annales de Wigornia, p. 515. 

[730] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), p. 100. 

[731] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 591. 

[732] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[733] Necrologium Feldbacense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 389. 

[734] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[735] Necrologium Patrum Minorum ad S Crucem Vindobonæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 166. 

[736] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[737] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 561. 

[738] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 571. 

[739] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 724. 

[740] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 823. 

[741] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 570. 

[742] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 682. 

[743] Merlet, L. ‘Procès pour la possession du comté de Bigorre (1254-1503)’, Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, Vol. 18, no. 1 (1857), Pièces Justificatives, XII, p. 321, quoting Cartulaire de Bigorre, ch. 34. 

[744] Merlet ‘Procès’, Pièces Justificatives, XIV, p. 322, quoting Cartulaire de Bigorre, ch. 36. 

[745] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 591. 

[746] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 817. 

[747] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 615.  

[748] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 818. 

[749] Viard, J. ‘Date de la mort de Louis X Hutin’, Bibliothèque de l’école des chartes, Tome 60 (1899), p. 115. 

[750] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 592. 

[751] Prost, B. and Bougenot, S. (eds.) (1904) Cartulaire de Hugues de Chalon (1220-1319) (Lon-le-Saunier) (“Hugues de Chalon”), 548, p. 415. 

[752] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 609. 

[753] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 589 footnote 36. 

[754] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 613. 

[755] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 724. 

[756] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 612 and 614. 

[757] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 724. 

[758] Chronique Parisienne, 184, p. 122. 

[759] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 724. 

[760] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 615. 

[761] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 620. 

[762] Chronique Parisienne, 21, p. 33. 

[763] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 616-7. 

[764] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 206. 

[765] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars IV, p. 26. 

[766] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1882) Annales Londonienses and Annales Paulini (London), Annales Londonienses, p. 152. 

[767] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597. 

[768] Thompson, E. M. (1889) Chronicon Galfridi le Baker de Swynebroke (Oxford) (“Chronicon Galfridi le Baker”), p. 3. 

[769] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 3. 

[770] Luce, S. (ed.) (1869) Chroniques de J. Froissart (Paris) ("Froissart"), Tome I, Livre 1, 8, pp. 20-1. 

[771] Thomson, E. M. (1874) Chronicon Angliæ 1328-1388 (London) (“Chronicon Angliæ 1328-1388 (1874)), p. 38. 

[772] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 732. 

[773] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 814. 

[774] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 594. 

[775] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 610. 

[776] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 618 and 620. 

[777] Chronique Parisienne, 21, p. 33. 

[778] Foppens, J. F. (1748) Diplomatum Belgicorum nova collectio, sive supplementum ad opera diplomatica Auberti Miræi (Brussels), Tome IV, Pars II, CXVIII, p. 267. 

[779] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 625. 

[780] Nicholas (1992), p. 197. 

[781] RHGF XXI, Extraits de la Chronique attribuée à Jean Desnouelles, p. 197. 

[782] Terrebasse, A. de (ed.) (1844) Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus (Vienne) ("De Allobrogibus") VIII, p. 458. 

[783] Valbonnais, Marquis de (1722) Histoire de Dauphiné (Geneva), Tome II, XIV, p. 193. 

[784] Valbonnais (1722), Tome II, XV, p. 195. 

[785] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 726. 

[786] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Celestins de Paris, p. 707. 

[787] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 726. 

[788] Chronique Parisienne, 6, p. 26. 

[789] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 644. 

[790] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 815. 

[791] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 597. 

[792] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 609 and 613. 

[793] Boudet, M. ‘Nouveaux documents sur Thomas de la Marche’, Le Moyen Âge (1903), pp. 284-94. 

[794] Chronique Parisienne, 88, p. 71. 

[795] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 732. 

[796] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 120. 

[797] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 732. 

[798] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 651. 

[799] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IX, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 130. 

[800] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput XI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 136. 

[801] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 656. 

[802] Gade, J. A. (1951) Luxemburg in the Middle Ages (Leiden), p. 140. 

[803] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 733. 

[804] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 656. 

[805] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 733. 

[806] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chartreux de Vauvert, p. 697. 

[807] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 816. 

[808] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 172. 

[809] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 172. 

[810] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 732. 

[811] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 644. 

[812] RHGF XXI, Continuatio Chronici Girardi de Fracheto, p. 69. 

[813] Chronique Parisienne, 154, p. 107. 

[814] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 644. 

[815] RHGF XXI, Continuatio Chronici Girardi de Fracheto, p. 69. 

[816] Chronique Parisienne, 154, p. 107. 

[817] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 646. 

[818] RHGF XXI, Continuatio Chronici Girardi de Fracheto, p. 70. 

[819] Chronique Parisienne, 173, p. 114. 

[820] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 95. 

[821] RHGF XXI, E floribus chronicorum auctore Bernardo Guidonis, p. 708. 

[822] RHGF XXIII, Ex brevi Chronico ecclesiæ S. Dionysii, p. 145. 

[823] RHGF XX, Gesta Philippi Tertii Francorum Regis, p. 524. 

[824] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 253. 

[825] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 582. 

[826] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 233. 

[827] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris, p. 232.       

[828] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 403. 

[829] Chronicon Galfridi le Baker, p. 36. 

[830] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 574. 

[831] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 403. 

[832] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 567. 

[833] Bouchet, J. du (1661) Histoire généalogique de la maison royale de Courtenay (Paris), Preuves, p. 22. 

[834] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 582. 

[835] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 464. 

[836] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 595. 

[837] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[838] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 403. 

[839] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 598. 

[840] Skene, F. J. H. (ed.) (1877) Liber Pluscardensis, Historians of Scotland Vol. VII (Edinburgh) Vol. I, Liber VIII, CXVIII and CXIX, pp. 143 and 144. 

[841] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 146. 

[842] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars III, p. 152. 

[843] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1123. 

[844] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1123. 

[845] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 404. 

[846] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 646. 

[847] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 598.  

[848] Barret (ed.) (1894) Cartulaire de Marmoutier pour la Perche (Mortagne) ("Marmoutier-Perche"), 54, p. 72. 

[849] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 607. 

[850] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 286. 

[851] Sturdza (1999), p. 500. 

[852] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 617. 

[853] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 403. 

[854] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 223. 

[855] Chronique Parisienne, 91, p. 72. 

[856] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput XI, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 134. 

[857] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 343. 

[858] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[859] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 347. 

[860] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 404. 

[861] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 646. 

[862] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 404. 

[863] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chartreux de Vauvert, p. 702. 

[864] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 656. 

[865] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 824. 

[866] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 822. 

[867] Boudet, M. (1900) Thomas de la Marche Bâtard de France et ses aventures (1318-1361) (Riom, reprint Genève, 1978), pp. 22-44. 

[868] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 609 and 613. 

[869] Boudet, M. ‘Nouveaux documents sur Thomas de la Marche’, Le Moyen Âge (1903), pp. 284-94. 

[870] Froissart, Tome I, Livre 1, 57, alternative text, p. 365. 

[871] Chronique Parisienne, 234, p. 150. 

[872] Chronique Parisienne, 247, p. 154. 

[873] RHGF XXI, Fragmentum historicum e codice dicto Pater excerptum, p. 404. 

[874] Chronique Parisienne, 204, p. 133. 

[875] Chronique Parisienne, 207, p. 134. 

[876] Chronique Parisienne, 249, p. 154. 

[877] Chronique Parisienne, 264, p. 163. 

[878] Chronique Parisienne, 274, p. 167. 

[879] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 95. 

[880] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Cathédrale d’Orléans, Livre de Distributions du XVI siècle, p. 95. 

[881] Chronique Parisienne, 292, p. 173. 

[882] Obituaires de Sens