england, earls created 1067-1122

  v3.0 Updated 27 May 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 3

Chapter 1.                CHESTER. 5

A.         EARL of CHESTER 1070-1071. 5

B.         EARLS of CHESTER 1071-1120 (AVRANCHES) 7

C.        EARLS of CHESTER 1120-1232 (family of RANULF "le Meschin") 11

Chapter 2.                HEREFORD. 22

A.         EARL OF HEREFORD (MANTES) 22

B.         EARLS of HEREFORD [1067]-1075 (family of WILLIAM FitzOsbern) 24

C.        EARLS of HEREFORD 1141-1155 (family of MILES of GLOUCESTER) 35

D.        EARLS of HEREFORD 1200-1373 (BOHUN) 45

Chapter 3.                HUNTINGDON. 73

A.         EARLS of HUNTINGDON 1070-1075 (family of WALTHEOF of NORTHUMBRIA) 74

B.         EARLS of HUNTINGDON (family of SIMON de SENLIS) 77

Chapter 4.                KENT. 81

A.         EARL of KENT 1067-1088 (family of HERLUIN de CONTEVILLE) 82

B.         EARL of KENT 1227-1243 (HUBERT de Burgh) 83

C.        EARLS of KENT 1321-1352 (PLANTAGENET) 89

D.        EARLS of KENT [1352]-1408 (HOLAND) 91

Chapter 5.                NORFOLK. 102

A.         EARLS of NORFOLK 1067-1075 (BARONS de GAËL) 102

B.         EARLS of NORFOLK 1142-1306 (BIGOD) 105

C.        EARLS of NORFOLK 1312-1397 (PLANTAGENET) 119

D.        EARLS of NORFOLK (SEGRAVE) 121

E.         DUKES of NORFOLK 1397-1476 (MOWBRAY) 125

F.         DUKES of NORFOLK 1483-1572 (HOWARD) 136

Chapter 6.                SHREWSBURY. 142

A.         EARLS of SHREWSBURY 1074-1102 (MONTGOMMERY) 142

B.         EARLS of SHREWSBURY 1442-1538 (TALBOT) 144

Chapter 7.                SURREY. 160

A.         EARLS of SURREY 1088-1164 (WARENNE) 160

B.         EARLS of SURREY 1164-1347 (WARENNE - ANJOU) 172

Chapter 8.                WARWICK. 181

A.         EARLS of WARWICK 1088-1263 (BEAUMONT) 181

B.         EARLS of WARWICK 1263-1449 (BEAUCHAMP) 194

Chapter 9.                BUCKINGHAM.. 207

A.         EARLS of BUCKINGHAM [1097]-1164 (GIFFARD) 207

B.         DUKES of BUCKINGHAM 1444-1164 (STAFFORD) 209

Chapter 10.              LEICESTER. 215

A.         EARLS of LEICESTER [1107]-1204 (BEAUMONT-le-ROGER) 215

B.         EARL of LEICESTER 1239-1265 (MONTFORT) 222

Chapter 11.              GLOUCESTER. 226

A.         LORDS of GLOUCESTER.. 227

B.         EARLS of GLOUCESTER 1122-1225. 229

C.        EARLS of GLOUCESTER 1217-1314 (CLARE) 236

D.        EARL of GLOUCESTER 1297-1307 (MONTHERMER) 251

E.         EARLS of GLOUCESTER 1337-1347 (AUDLEY) 253

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

This document sets out the families of the English earldoms which were created during the period between the Norman conquest and 1122, in approximate chronological order of their first creation.  Two companion documents show the families of earls whose earldoms were created between 1138 and 1143, and between 1207 and 1466. 

 

William I King of England granted extensive estates to Norman barons as a reward for their part in the conquest of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom.  The complexity of this task implies the rapid implementation of a sophisticated bureaucracy.  The resulting network of local feudal lordships not only enabled the king to assert rapid control over every part of the country but also created a network of local power bases for these influential immigrants.  The grants were personal from the king and were therefore also revocable at the king's will.  There are numerous examples of changes in local control which followed forfeiture imposed as punishment for various transgressions. 

 

In many cases, the same individual lord was granted numerous different lordships.  An extreme example is provided by King William's grants of more than 500 different manors to his half-brother Odo Bishop of Bayeux.  The process therefore also enabled the grantees to reward their own retainers with sub-grants of land, which led to a second wave of Norman immigrants who had not taken part in the conquest but who were subsequently rewarded for their loyalty during the absence of their masters at war in England. 

 

The grants to the same individual frequently included property in many different parts of the country.  There were exceptional cases: for example, most of the grants to Bishop Odo were in Kent.  Over time, the territorial allocation became ever more disjointed as holdings were transferred between families either by sale, inheritance or marriage portion.  It is not known whether the piecemeal attribution of land was a conscious policy on the part of the monarch to reduce the risk of local power-bases emerging which could challenge his central royal authority.  Whether or not the intention, it was certainly the result as the English earls were never able to concentrate their power in centralised counties in the same way as, for example, their French or German counterparts. 

 

Another result of the decentralised nature of land grants was the slow emergence of territorial epithets attached to titles.  The more powerful grantees of land held the title earl [comes].  No documents have survived which indicate that the title was attributed by specific royal grant.  Although they acquired considerable power in the counties in which their main estates lay, during the immediate post-conquest period contemporary records rarely show titles such as "Earl of [county]", the territorial qualification being gradually applied over time.  As late as 1161, Hawise, widow of William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, described herself as "Hadewysia comitissa de Rumara"[1], and her son William Earl of Lincoln styled himself "Earl William de Romara" during the reign of Richard I[2].  One contrasting example of an early territorial epithet is provided by Roger de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury who, as "Rogerus comes Salosberiensis", witnessed a charter of King William I granting the barony of Plessis to the church of Bayeux dated 24 Dec 1074[3], although it is possible that the earldom of Shrewsbury was a special case because of the particular need for territorial control to protect against raids from the neighbouring Welsh.  The earldom of Lincoln even provides an example of a double creation, as King Stephen created William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln in [1141], but also created Gilbert de Gand Earl of Lincoln in [1147/48].  The inevitable conclusion is that the territorial epithet was not considered exclusive at the time.  Reference to these early earls as "Earl in [county]" rather than "Earl of [county]" may therefore more accurately reflect contemporary reality.  This is not unlike the situation in Germany, where titles were rarely linked to a particular territory before the early 12th century. 

 

By the 1140s there are signs that titles were becoming more closely linked to the counties.  Under a charter dated [1142], Empress Matilda conceded that Aubrey de Vere should be "Earl of Cambridgeshire…unless that county were held by the King of the Scots, [or in the latter case] one of Earl of Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire or Dorsetshire"[4].  This example also demonstrates that availability played a large part in the attribution of a county to a new title.  Aubrey de Vere held land in Essex (where 14 estates had been granted to his grandfather by King William I[5]),  Suffolk (9 estates) and Cambridgeshire (7 estates), but only the last named county was available for an earldom in the early 1140s.  King Stephen had already granted the earldom of Essex to Geoffrey de Mandeville by charter at Westminster in [Jun/Dec] 1140, confirmed by another grant by Empress Matilda in [Jun] 1141 after Geoffroy abandoned the king following the battle of Lincoln in Feb 1141[6].  Suffolk may also have been unavailable as it was already closely associated with the earldom of Norfolk, conceded by King Stephen to Hugh Bigod in [Dec 1140/Jan 1141].  As it turned out, Aubrey became Earl of Oxford, not one of the counties where he held significant amounts of land. 

 

Few earldoms were created during the post-conquest period.  However, the earls represented only a small proportion of the English nobility.  The vast majority of English nobles were the numerous local feudal lords who held no formal title but whose nobility was not in doubt.  This had two results.  Firstly, it meant that the pool of noble marriage partners available for the earls and their immediate families was considerably extended outside their own limited family groups.  The resulting exogamous pattern of marriages was reflected in the marriage policies of the English royal family which, in addition to European dynastic marriages, did not hesitate to marry into English families of the lesser nobility.  Secondly, it provided opportunity for advancement to many other families besides those of the principle earls.  Even if they never made the transition to earldom, many such families enjoyed great influence, as shown by frequent marriages with the first-tier nobility.  A notable example is provided by the Tosny family (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY). 

 

The first post-conquest earldoms were Chester, Hereford, Huntingdon (with Northampton), Kent, Norfolk and Shrewsbury (Shropshire).  King William II created the earldoms of Surrey and Warwick, and maybe Buckingham, although the supposed titleholder of the last named is more frequently described in contemporary sources as "Walterus comes .. cognomina Giffardus"[7].  King Henry I created the earldoms of Leicester and Gloucester, the latter for his illegitimate son Robert. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    CHESTER

 

 

William I King of England granted the city of Chester and large areas surrounding it to Gerbod, dated to before 1071.  After Gerbod returned to Flanders, the king must have considered this grant forfeited or otherwise ineffective, as he granted the city and county of Chester to Hugues d'Avranches in 1071.  Cheshire is described as a "County Palatine" but it is unclear what practical difference this made to its constitution or administration.  On the death of Ranulf "de Blundeville" Earl of Chester in 1232, King Henry III appointed John "le Scot", son of David of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon, as Earl of Chester.  After his death in 1237, the earldom remained vacant until King Henry created his son Edward (later King Edward I) Earl of Chester in 1254.  The earldom was held briefly by Simon de Montfort Earl of Leicester in 1265, but after his death at the battle of Evesham 4 Aug 1265 King Henry III annexed the earldom of Chester to the crown.  Since then, the title Earl of Chester has been one of the titles granted to the eldest son of the monarch until the present time. 

 

 

 

A.      EARL of CHESTER 1070-1071

 

 

Three siblings, parents not known.  As noted below, one charter suggests that Gundred’s mother was Mathilde de Flandre, wife of William I King of England, by an earlier husband who is not otherwise recorded, but this information is dubious as discussed further below.  Their possible family connection to the Avoués de Saint-Bertin is also discussed below: 

1.         GERBOD (-after 22 Feb 1071)Earl of Chester: Orderic Vitalis records that King William had “iamdudum” granted “Cestram et comitatum eius” to “Gherbodo Flandrensi”, who was harried ceaselessly “ab Anglis quam a Guallis”, who was granted permission by the king to return to Flanders but was captured and imprisoned, dated to 1071[8].  The Complete Peerage states that he returned to Flanders where he fought and was captured at the battle of Cassel 22 Feb 1071 “and kept captive for a long period, never coming back to England” (no primary source cited)[9]same person as...?  GERBOD [II] (-[after 6 Jan 1056]).  Avoué de Saint-Bertin.  The Complete Peerage says that Gerbod Earl of Chester was “avoué of the abbey of St Bertin” without stating the primary source on which this information is based[10].  If correct, the chronology suggests that he was Gerbod [II].  However, this co-identity is not ideal considering that Gundred, sister of Gerbod Earl of Chester, married in 1070, which suggests that her brother was a relatively young man when appointed earl by the English king.  Another possibility is that the sources, quoted below, in which Gerbod [II] is named in fact refer to two different avoués named Gerbod, and that the earl of Chester was the same person who was named only in 1056.  "…Gerbodonis advocati, Ernulfi advocati…" signed the charter dated 1026 under which "Balduinus Taruannensis ecclesia episcopus" exchanged property with the abbot of Saint-Bertin[11].  ["…Gerbodonis advocati" signed the charter dated 6 Jan 1042 under which Baudouin V Count of Flanders settled the entitlements of the avoués of Saint-Bertin in the seigneurie of Arques[12].  "Dominum Bovonem abbatem et advocatem huius loci Gerbodonem" settled a dispute relating to "villa sancti Bertini Arkas" by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1056[13].  Baudouin V Count of Flanders confirmed privileges relating to "villa sanct Bertini Arkas", settling a dispute between "abbatis Bovonis et Gerbodonis advocati", by charter dated 6 Jan 1056[14].] 

2.         GUNDRED (-Castle Acre, Norfolk 27 May 1085, bur Lewes Priory).  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "Sutregiam" to "Guillelmo de Guarenna" who had married "Gundredam sororem Gherbodi"[15].  "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes [et] Gundrada uxor mea" founded Lewes Priory as a cell of Cluny by charter dated 1080[16].  This charter also names "domine mee Matildis regine, matris uxoris mee", specifying that the Queen gave "mansionem quoque Carlentonam nomine" to Gundred.  It is presumably on this basis that some secondary works claim, it appears incorrectly, that Gundred was the daughter of William I King of England.  Weir asserts that the charter in question "has been proved spurious"[17], although it is not certain what other elements in the text indicate that this is likely to be the case.  Assuming the charter is genuine, it is presumably possible that "matris" was intended in the context to indicate a quasi-maternal relationship, such as foster-mother or godmother.  The same relationship is referred to in the charter dated to [1080/86] under which William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suć Gundfredć filić meć[18].  Gundred died in childbirth.  The necrology of Longpont records the death “VII Kal Jun” of “Gondreda comitissa[19]m (1070) as his first wife, WILLIAM [I] de Warenne, son of RAOUL de Warenne & his [first wife Beatrix ---] (-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory).  He was created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088. 

3.         FREDERIC (-[after 1086]).  Domesday Book records that “William” held land in Trumpington village, Cambridgeshire, in the land of “William de Warenne”, adding that “Toki” held it from the bishop of Ely in the time of King Edward and that “afterwards Frederick William’s brother had this land[20].  The implication of the passage is that “William” was “William de Warenne”, and that “Frederick” was therefore his brother.  It is assumed that “brother” was used in a broad sense and that Frederic was William’s brother-in-law.  Domesday Book records the lands of William de Warenne in Norfolk, including in Greenhoe Hundred “Acre...this is of the fief of Frederick[21]

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of CHESTER 1071-1120 (AVRANCHES)

 

 

HUGUES d'Avranches "Lupus", son of RICHARD "le Goz" Vicomte d'Avranches & his wife --- ([1047]-St Werburg's Abbey, Chester 27 Jul 1101[22]).  A manuscript relating to St Werburgh’s Chester records that “Hugo Lupus filius ducis Britannić et nepos Gulielmi magni ex sorore” transformed the foundation into a monastery[23].  This suggests that the mother of Hugues may have been a uterine sister of King William, and therefore daughter of Herluin de Conteville.  However, no indication has been in other primary sources which supports the contention that Hugues was the son of a duke of Brittany.  It is assumed therefore that both lines of his parentage have been romanticised in this document to improve his status and reputation.  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Hugo vicecomitis Abrincatensis postea…comes Cestrensis" founded "abbatiam Sancti Severi in Constantinensi episcopatu"[24].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Hugone postea comite de Cestria" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[25].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William granted “Cestrensem consulatum” to “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” after Gerbod returned to Flanders, dated to 1071[26], whereby he is considered to have become Earl [of Chester].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz...cum Rodberto de Rodelento et Rodberto de Malopassu” [Robert de Rhuddlan and Robert de Malpas] shed “multum Guallorum sanguinem[27].  He succeeded his father in [1082] as Vicomte d'Avranches.  An undated charter records the grant of pasturage rights "ad castrum Claromontis, Credulii, Gornaci, Lusarchiarum" to Saint-Leu d’Esserant by "Hugo comes Cestrensis" and "Hugo Claromontensis et Margarita uxor eius", later confirmed by "Rainaldus comes" with the consent of "uxore eius Clementia et filiis eius Guidone et Rainaldo"[28].  Domesday Book records that “Earl Hugh” held Bickton in Fordinbridge Hundred in Hampshire; Drayton in Sutton Hundred and Buscot in Wyfold hundred in Berkshire; his land-holdings in Dorset; and in numerous other counties[29].  Orderic Vitalis names “Hugonem comitem et Ricardum de Radveriis...Rodbertum de Molbraio” as the main supporters of “Henricus clito” who governed “Abrincas et Cćsarisburgum et Constantiam atque Guabreium” [Avranches, Cherbourg, Coutances, Gavray], dated to [1090][30].  Florence of Worcester records that, in 1098, he and Hugh de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury led troops into Anglesey where they mutilated or massacred many of the inhabitants of the island[31].  "…Hugonis comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[32].  He founded the abbeys of Saint-Sever in Normandy and St Werburg in Chester, becoming a monk at the latter four days before he died[33].  Orderic Vitalis states that Hugues was "a slave to gluttony, he staggered under a mountain of fat" and was "given over to carnal lusts and had a numerous progeny of sons and daughters by his concubines"[34].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1101 of “Hugone comite Cestrensi[35].  The Annales Cambrić record the death in 1101 of "Hugo comes Crassus urbis Legionum"[36].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “VI Kal Aug” of “Hugo primus comes Cestrić[37]

[m firstly ---.  No direct evidence has been found about this supposed first marriage.  However, assuming that the birth date of Hugh is correctly estimated to [1047] as shown above, it would be surprising if his marriage to Ermentrude de Clermont (before 1093) was his first.] 

m [secondly] ([before 1093]) ERMENTRUDE de Clermont, daughter of HUGUES de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis] & his wife Marguerite de Roucy [Montdidier] (-after 13 May 1106).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” married “Ermentrudem filiam Hugonis de Claromonte Belvacensi[38].  The Genealogić Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to a sister of "comes Rainaldus" as husband of "comiti Hugoni de Cestre"[39].  “Ricardus Cestrensis comes et Ermentrudis comitissa mater eius” confirmed donations to Abingdon by charter dated 13 May 1106[40]

Earl Hugh & his [second] wife had one child:

1.         RICHARD d'Avranches ([1093]-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names “Ricardum Cestrensis comitatum hćredum” as the child of “Hugonis de Abrincis filio Ricardi cognomento Goz” and his wife “Ermentrudem filiam Hugonis de Claromonte Belvacensi”, adding that he died “juvenis” and childless “VII Kal Dec” in the shipwreck “cum Guillelmo Adelino Henrici regis Anglorum filio[41].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records that “Richardus filius eius” was “puer septem annorum” when he succeeded “Hugo primus comes Cestrić[42].  His date of birth is estimated from the Annales Cestrienses which record the death in 1101 of “Hugone comite Cestrensi” and the succession of “Ricardus puer vii annorum[43].  He succeeded his father in 1101 as Earl of Chester and Vicomte d'Avranches.  William of Malmesbury records that Richard drowned with his wife following the sinking of the “Blanche Nef [White Ship]”[44].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "…Ricardus comes Cestrensis, Otthuel frater eius…" among those drowned in the sinking of the White Ship[45].  The Annales Cestrienses record that “in die S. Katerine” 1120 “filius regis et Ricardus comes Cestrie cum uxore sua” were sunk “apud Barbelfleo[46]m (1115) MATHILDE de Blois, daughter of ETIENNE Comte de Blois & his wife Adela de Normandie (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Her parentage and marriage are recorded by Orderic Vitalis[47].  The Annales Cestrienses record the marriage in 1115 of “Ricardus comes Cestrić” and “Mathildam neptem Henrici regis filiam Stephanis comitis[48].  William of Malmesbury records that she drowned with her husband following the sinking of the “Blanche Nef [White Ship]”[49].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "…neptis regis Comitissa de Cestria" among those drowned in the sinking of the White Ship[50].  The Annales Cestrienses record that “in die S. Katerine” 1120 “filius regis et Ricardus comes Cestrie cum uxore sua” were sunk “apud Barbelfleo[51]

Earl Hugh had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:

2.          OTTIWELL [Otuel] (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  He was tutor to the children of Henry I King of England.  "…Otuero filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[52].  His parentage is confirmed more precisely by the Continuator of Florence of Worcester who names "…Ricardus comes Cestrensis, Otthuel frater eius…" among those drowned in the sinking of the White Ship[53].  [m ([1116/19], as her second husband, MARGUERITE, widow of WILLIAM de Mandeville, daughter and heiress of EUDO de Rie, dapifer, of Colchester, Essex & his wife Rohese ---.  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names “Margareta” as daughter of “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normannić”, adding that she married “Willielmo de Mandavill” by whom she was mother of “Gaufridi filii comitis Essexić et iure matris Normannić dapifer[54].  According to the Complete Peerage, this genealogy is “probably erroneous” but it does not explain the basis for the doubts[55].  Her second marriage is suggested by a charter dated [1141/42], under which Empress Matilda made various grants of property including a grant to "Willelmo filio Otuel fratri…Comitis Gaufredi" (identified as Geoffrey de Mandeville Earl of Essex)[56].  The only contemporary "Otuel" so far identified is the illegitimate son of Hugh Earl of Chester.]  Otuel & his wife had [one] child: 

a)         [WILLIAM FitzOtuel ([1120]-after [1166/75]).  Empress Matilda made various grants of property including a grant to "Willelmo filio Otuel fratri…Comitis Gaufredi" (identified as Geoffrey de Mandeville Earl of Essex)[57].  It is not certain that "Otuel" was the same person as the illegitimate son of Earl Hugh, although as noted above no other person of this name has yet been identified.  The co-identification appears confirmed by the following two charters.  "Hugo comes Cestrie" confirmed a donation of land in Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Othuer" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "patris mei Randulfi", by charter dated to [1155] witnessed by "Matilla matre sua…"[58].  "Willelmus comes de Essex" confirmed a donation of land in Aby and South Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Otueli avunculus meus" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1166/75] witnessed by "Simone de Bello Campo…"[59].  "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…" witnessed the charter dated to the reign of King Henry II under which "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei"[60].] 

3.          ROBERT (-after 1102).  He was recorded as the son of Hugh Earl of Chester by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was a monk at the abbey of Saint-Evroul , Normandy[61].  He was appointed Abbot of Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk in 1100 by Henry I King of England, but deposed in 1102 by Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury at the Council of London[62]

4.          GEVA (-after 1145)Geva, filia Hugonis comitis Cestrić, uxor Galfridi Ridelli” founded Canwell priory, with the consent of “Ranulfi comitis Cestrić cognate mei…hćredum meorum…Gaufridi Ridelli et Radulfi Basset”, by undated charter[63].  "Radulphus comes Cestrić, Willelmo Constabulario et Roberto dapifero" confirmed the grant of "Draitune…in libero conjugio" to "Gevć Ridel, filić comitis Hughes" by charter dated to [1120][64].  m GEOFFREY Ridel, son of --- (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  He was granted Drayton Basset in Staffordshire. 

 

 

 

C.      EARLS of CHESTER 1120-1232 (family of RANULF "le Meschin")

 

 

RANULF du Bessin "le Meschin", son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Matilda] d'Avranches (-17 or 27 Jan 1129, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  Orderic Vitalis names him and his mother[65].  "…Rannulfus filius Rannulfi vicecomitis…Rannulfus vicecomes" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[66].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of “ecclesias de Apelby…sancti Michaelis et sancti Laurentii” by “Radulfus Meschin[67].  The Liber Vitć of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[68].  He succeeded his father as Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux].  “Ranulfus Meschinus Richerio Vicecomiti Karlioli” donated property for the foundation of Wetherhal priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “Domini mei Regis Willelmi…et Richard fratris mei…mea et uxoris meć Lucić…”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Osberto vicecomite, Waldievo filio Gospatricii comitis, et Forna Sigulfi filio et Ketello Eldredi filio et Herveio Morini filio et Eliphe de Penrith[69].  “Ranulfus Meschines” donated property to Wetherall priory, Cumberland, by undated charter, witnessed by “uxore mea Lucia, Willielmo fratre meo…[70].  He was appointed Vicomte d'Avranches in 1120 after the death of his first cousin Richard d'Avranches, and also obtained the grant of the county palatine of Chester thereby becoming Earl of Chester (upon which he surrendered the lordship of Carlisle).  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1121 that “Ranulphus Miscinus” was made “comes[71].  He was commander of the royal forces in Normandy in 1124[72].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1128 the death of “Ranulphus Miscinus comes Cestrie” and the succession of “Rannulphus comes filius eius[73].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “VI Kal Feb” of “Ranulfus de Meschines” and his burial at St Werburgh’s, Chester[74]

m ([1098]) as her third husband, LUCY, widow firstly of IVO Taillebois Lord of Kendal and secondly of ROGER FitzGerold, daughter of --- & his wife [--- Malet] (-1138[75]).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that William I King of England arranged the marriage of "Ivo Taillebois" and "Lucia sister of Edwin and Morcar", her dowry consisting of their land at Hoyland[76], but this parentage appears impossible from a chronological point of view.  Peter of Blois's Continuation of the Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the death of Ivo and his burial at the priory of Spalding, and the remarriage of his widow "hardly had one month elapsed after his death" with "Roger de Romar the son Gerald de Romar"[77].  A manuscript recording the foundation of Spalding monastery records that “Yvo Talboys” married "Thoroldo…hćrede Lucia" who, after the death of Ivo, married (in turn) "Rogerum filium Geroldi" and "comitem Cestrić Ranulphum"[78].  She is named as wife of Ranulf by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her first husband, but does not state her origin[79].  The Liber Vitć of Durham names "Rannulfus Mahald uxor eius Ricardus Rannulfus de Mesc filii eorum Lucia uxor Rann"[80].  “Ranulfus Meschinus Richerio Vicecomiti Karlioli” donated property for the foundation of Wetherhal priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “…mea et uxoris meć Lucić…”, by undated charter[81].  “Ranulfus Meschinus” donated property to Wetherhal priory, Cumberland by undated charter, witnessed by “uxore mea Lucia et Willelmo fratre meo…[82].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Lucia comitissa Cestr…tra patis sui" in Lincolnshire[83].  According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln, as well as kinswoman of Thorold "the Sheriff"[84].  “Lucia cometissa” donated “manerium de Spallingis...cum quibus melius tenui et liberalius tempore Ivonis de Thallebos et Rogeri filii Geroldi et cometis Rannulfi” by charter dated to [1135][85]

Earl Ranulf & his wife had three children:

1.         RANULF "de Gernon" (Château de Gernon, Normandy before 1100-[murdered] 16 Dec 1153, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[86].  He succeeded his father in [1129] as Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches. 

-        see below

2.         AGNES ([1098/1105]-bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married firstly “Agnetem Ranulfi Bajocensis filiam[87].  Her birth date range is estimated from the likely marriage date of her parents.  If that range is correct, it is more likely that Agnes was Robert’s third wife than his first.  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil died “Kal Jun” 38 years after his father and was buried at Ouche “cum duabus uxoribus suis: Agnete et Emma[88]m as his [third] wife, ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelisa [Aelis] de Beaumont-sur-Oise (-1 Jun [1136], bur Ouche Saint-Evroul).  

3.         ALICE (-after 1139).  Guillaume de Jumičges records that "Richardum”, son of “Gislebertus ex filia comitis de Claromonte”, married “sororem comitis Rannulfi junioris comitis Cestrić” by whom he had “tres filios Gislebertum qui ei successit et fratres eius[89].  The History of Gloucester St Peter records the confirmation by "Ranulphus comes Cestrić" of the donation of "molendinum de Taddewelle" by "Alicia soror eius" for the soul of "Ricardi filii Gilberti viri sui" (undated)[90].  “Rics filius Gilebi” donated lands in Hawkedon, Suffolk to the abbey of St Edmunds, with the consent of “Rogs…filius me…et coiux mea Xpiana”, by undated charter[91].  This charter is attributed to Richard FitzGilbert in Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica and dated to 1154, which must be incorrect in view of Richard’s recorded death in 1136.  The reference to his wife’s name as Christiana cannot be explained.  It does not appear that Richard married twice, assuming that the sources quoted here are accurate.  The extract from the History of Gloucester St Peter suggests that his wife “Alice of Chester” survived her husband, while the St Edmunds charter shows that “Christiana” was alive after Richard’s son Roger was old enough to consent to the donation.  She was rescued from the Welsh by Miles of Gloucester[92].  A charter of Henry Duke of Normandy dated [1153/early Apr 1154] relates to donations to Gloucester by "Ranulphi comitis Cestrie…[et] Alis sororis eiusdem comitis" for the soul of "Ricardi filii Gilberti viri sui""[93].  It is not clear from the document how long before the date of the charter these donations were made.  m [firstly] RICHARD FitzGilbert de Clare, son of GILBERT FitzRichard Lord of Clare & his [first/second] wife [---/Adelisa de Clermont] (-killed in battle near Abergavenny 15 Apr 1136, bur Gloucester).  [[94]Maybe m secondly ROGER de Condé [Cundet], son of --- (-10 Oct [1139/45]).] 

Earl Ranulf had [one possibly illegitimate daughter] by an unknown mistress: 

4.          [daughter .  The source quoted below suggests that the mother of Richard Bacon was the sister of Ranulf Earl of Chester, presumably illegitimate.]  m --- Bacon du Molay, son of ---.  One child: 

a)         RICHARD Bacon (-[after 1142/43]).  Ric. Bacun” founded Rocester Priory, for the soul of “Ranulphi comitis Cestrić avunculi mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “Hugone [W]ac…[95]

Earl Ranulf had one [probably] illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

5.          BENEDICT (-after [1162/65]).  “...Benedicto fratre comitis...” witnessed the charter dated to [1162/65] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed his father’s donation of land “in Midelwicho” by his father[96].  It is likely that Benedict was illegitimate. 

 

 

RANULF "de Gernon", son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin "le Meschin" & his wife Lucy --- (Château de Gernon, Normandy before 1100-[murdered] 16 Dec 1153, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[97].  He succeeded his father in [1129] as Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches.  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1128 the death of “Ranulphus Miscinus comes Cestrie” and the succession of “Rannulphus comes filius eius[98].  Stephen King of England appointed him Constable of Lincoln.  Earl Ranulf fought against King Stephen at Lincoln in 1141 and was seized by the king at court in Northampton 29 Aug 1146.  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1141 “III Non Feb” that King Stephen was captured “a duobus comittibus...Ranulpho comite Cestrić et a Roberto comite Gloucestrie...in bello apud Lincolniam” and in 1146 that “Ranulphus comes de Cestrie” was captured by King Stephen “apud Northamantiam IV Kal Sep[99].  King Stephen nevertheless granted him the castle and city of Lincoln, probably after 1151.  Robert of Torigny records the death  in 1153 of "Ranulfus comes Cestrić"[100].  The Annales Cambrić record the death in 1154 of "Radulphus comes Urbis Legionum"[101].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1153 of “Ranulphus II comes Cestrie[102].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “XVI Kal Jan” of “Ranulfus de Gernons” and his burial at St Werburgh’s, Chester[103].  It was alleged that he was poisoned by his wife and by William Peverell of Nottingham[104].  Ralph de Diceto records that "Willelmus Peverel de Notingeham" was disinherited in 1155 for poisoning "Ranulfo comiti Cestrić"[105]

m ([1141]) MATILDA of Gloucester, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoy Earl of Gloucester & his wife Mabel [Matilda or Sibylle] FitzRobert (-29 Jul 1190).  Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Ranulfus comes Cestrić" as "filia Roberti comitis Gloecestrić"[106].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Wadinton de feodo comitis Cestrie” held by “Matillis comitissa Cestrie…filia Roberti comitis Gloecestrie, filii regis Henrici primi[107].  It was alleged that she and William Peverell of Nottingham poisoned her husband[108].  "Hugo comes Cestrie" confirmed a donation of land in Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Othuer" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "patris mei Randulfi", by charter dated to [1155] witnessed by "Matilla matre sua…"[109].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “IV Kal Aug” in 1190 of “Matildis comitissa Cestria[110]

Earl Ranulf & his wife had two children: 

1.         HUGH "of Kevelioc" (Kevelioc, co. Monmouth 1147-Leek, Staffordshire 30 Jun 1181, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  The Annales Cestrienses record the birth in 1147 of “comes Hugo II[111].  Robert of Torigny names "Hugonem filium suum" as successor of "Ranulfus comes Cestrić"[112].  He succeeded his father in 1153 as Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches.  "Hugo comes Cestrie" confirmed a donation of land in Thoresby donated by "Willelmus filius Othuer" to Greenfield priory, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "patris mei Randulfi", by charter dated to [1155] witnessed by "Matilla matre sua…"[113].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1169 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” was made a knight[114].  He joined the rebellion of Henry "the Young King" against Henry II King of England and was taken prisoner at Alnwick 13 Jul 1174: the Annales Cestrienses record in 1173 that “Henricus tertius Rex Anglie filius Henrici Regis Anglie” captured “patrem suum” with the help of “duobus comitibus Anglie...Hugone comite Cestrensi et Roberto comite Leicestrie”, adding that “Hugo comes Cestrie” was captured “apud Dol in Britanniam...cum Radulpho de Feugis[115].  He was deprived of the earldom but restored in Jan 1177[116].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1177 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” captured “totam Bromfeld in Id Jun” with “David filio Owino[117].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “II Kal Jul” of “Hugo”, son of “Ranulfus de Gernons”, and his burial at St Werburgh’s, Chester[118].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death “II Kal Jul...apud Lech” 1181 of “Hugo II...comes Cestrie[119]m ([1169/70]) BERTRADE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON de Montfort Comte d'Evreux & his wife Mathilde --- ([1155]-1227).  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1169 that “Hugo comes Cestrie” married “filiam Simonis comitis Ebroensis...Bertrad” arranged by King Henry II and that she was “ipsius cognata[120].  Robert of Torigny records the marriage arranged by Henry II King of England in 1170 of "Hugoni comiti Cestrić cognate suo" and "filiam comitis Ebroicensis cognatam suam ex parte patris sui"[121].  “Bertreia comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated to [1169/73] under which Hugh Earl of Chester granted land at Coventry to Godfrey his homager[122].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Beltesford et Hemmingebi et Dunintone” held by “Bertia comitissa, filia comitis de Evereros, uxor Hugonis comitis Cestrie[123].  “Bertrada comitissa Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated [3 Feb 1188/15 Nov 1189] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie comes Cestrie et Richmondie” confirmed a donation to Bordesley abbey[124].  The Annals of Burton record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestrić[125].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1227 of “Bertrudis comitissa Cestrie[126].  Earl Hugh & his wife had six children: 

a)         RANULF "de Blundeville"[127] (Oswestry, Powys [1170]-Wallingford 28 Oct 1232, bur 3 Nov 1232 Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1170 the birth of “Ranulphus III filius Hugonis comes Cestrie[128].  The accuracy of this date depends on the accuracy of the dating of his parents’ marriage which, as noted above, is reported in 1169 or 1170 in different sources.  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records that “Ranulfus filius eius” succeeded on the death of “Hugo”, son of “Ranulfus de Gernons[129].  He succeeded his father in 1181 as Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches.  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1188 that “Rannulphus comes Cestrie” was knighted by King Henry II “in die circumcisionis domini apud [Cadomum][130].  Earl of Richmond, Duke of Brittany from 1189, de iure uxoris, until his divorce in 1199.  He supported John King of England against the rebellious barons in 1215.  He was created Earl of Lincoln 23 May 1217-1231.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names “...comes Renoldus de Cestra cum Savarico de Malleone” among those who set out on crusade in 1219 and fought “ante Damietam[131].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1220 that “dominus Rannulphus comes Cestrie” returned “de Damata” and arrived “Cestriam in crastino Assumpcionis[132].  He resigned the earldom of Lincoln [Apr 1231/1232] in favour of his sister Hawise[133].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln records the death “VII Kal Nov” of “Ranulfus” and his burial at St Werburgh’s, Chester[134].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Ranulfus comes Cestrić” died in 1232[135].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “VII Kal Nov apud Walingeford” in 1232 of “Randulfus comes Cestrić” and his burial “apud Cestriam[136].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death “VII Kal Nov apud Walingford” of “Rannulphus comes Cestrie et Lincoln” and his burial “III Non eiusdem apud Cestrie[137]m firstly (3 Feb 1188, divorced 1199) as her second husband, CONSTANCE Dss of Brittany, widow of GEOFFREY of England Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond, daughter of CONAN IV Duke of Brittany & his wife Margaret of Scotland ([1161]-[Nantes] 3/4 Sep 1201, bur Villeneuve-les-Nantes, Abbaye de Notre-Dame).  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1188 that “Rannulphus comes Cestrie” was knighted “in die circumcisionis domini apud [Cadomum]” by King Henry II who also granted him “relictam [Galfridi filii sui]...comitissam Britannie filia Alani comitis Britannie...Constancia et toto comittatu de Richemund” whom he married “in die Sancte Werburge...III Non Feb apud ---[138].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Constantiam comitis Conani filia" as wife of "Gaufridus dux Britannie comes Richemontis filius Henrici regis Anglie natu tertius", specifying that she married [thirdly] "Guido frater vicecomitem de Tuart"[139].  She is named by Matthew Paris, who also gives her parentage, when he records her betrothal[140].  The Genealogia Comitum Richemundić records that "Constantia filia Conani" married secondly "Ranulphus Comes Cestrić", stating that he divorced her because of her adultery and that the marriage was childless[141].  Living apart from her second husband, he captured her at Pontorson in 1196 and imprisoned her at his castle at Beuvron.  She was liberated in Summer 1198, and repudiated her marriage.  She married thirdly (Oct 1199) as his first wife, Guy de Thouars.  The Genealogia Comitum Richemundić records that "Constantia filia Conani" married thirdly "Guidoni de Thoarcio"[142].  The Annals of Burton record the death in 1201 of “Constantia mater Arthuri comitis Britannić[143]m secondly (before 7 Oct 1200) as her second husband, CLEMENCE de Fougčres, widow of ALAIN de Vitré Seigneur de Dinan, daughter of GUILLAUME de Fougčres & his wife Agatha du Hommet (-1252 after 25 Dec).  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.   The Annales Cestrienses record in 1200 that “Rannulphus comes Cestrie”, having left “comitssa Britannie...Constancia”, married “filiam Radulphi de Feugis[144].  King John confirmed "manerio de Belinton" made by "Gaufr de Fulgeriis" to "R. com Cestr…in maritagio cum Clementia sorore sua" by charter dated 29 May 1204[145].  The Annals of Burton record the death “post Natale Domini” in 1252 of “Clementia comitissa de Rependun relicta…Ranulfi quondam comitis Cestrić[146].  A writ of certiorari dated 26 Jan "55 Hen III", was issued by "Ralph de Krumbewell and Margaret his wife, John le Straunge and Joan his wife, Walter de Suly and Mabel his wife, and Henry de Erdington and Maud his wife" concerning lands of "Clemence sometime countess of Chester…taken into the king’s hands upon her death by reason of the minority of the said Ralph her heir, lately deceased, of whom the said Margaret, Joan, Mabel and Maud claim to be heirs"[147].  Earl Ranulf & his [second] wife had one child: 

i)          [MARGUERITE (-[1220] or before).  "Gaufredus vicecomes de Rohan" confirmed donations to Bonrepos abbey made by “avus meus Alanus vicecomes de Rohan et pater meus”, for the salvation of “Margaritć uxoris meć”, with the consent of "fratribus meis Oliverio et Alano", by charter dated 1216[148].  Marguerite is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[149] as the daughter of Ranulf Earl of Chester and his first wife Constance Dss of Brittany, although the primary source on which this parentage is based has not yet been identified.  Assuming that Marguerite was the daughter of Earl Ranulf, it is more probable that she was his daughter by his second wife as no record has been found of her claiming the succession to Brittany, despite what would have been her superior claim to her younger half-sister Alix.  On the other hand, the Genealogia Comitum Richemundić records that the second marriage of "Constantia filia Conani" and "Ranulphus Comes Cestrić" was childless[150].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   m as his first wife, GEOFFROY [I] Vicomte de Rohan, son of ALAIN [IV] Vicomte de Rohan & his wife Mabile de Fougčres (-15 Sep 1221).] 

b)         MATILDA ([1171]-[6] Jan 1233).  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1171 the birth of “Matildis filia Hugonis comitis Cestrie[151].  The accuracy of this date depends on the accuracy of the date of birth of her brother Ranulf, as discussed above.  The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestrić" had four sisters, of whom "primogenita…Matilda" married "comiti David"[152].  Benedict of Peterborough records the marriage in 1190 of "David frater Willelmi regis Scotić" and "sororem Ranulfi comitem Cestrić"[153].  "Comes David frater regis Scottorum" founded Lindores Abbey, for the souls of "…Matilde comitisse sponse mee et…David filii mei", by undated charter (dated to before 1203 from the names of the subscribers)[154].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes Cestrie" gave land "in Forthington et in Ulesbi" in Lincolnshire to "comiti Davidi in maritagium cum sorore ipsius comitis"[155].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death “circa Epiphaniam Domini” 1233 of “Matildis mater comitis Johannis[156]m (26 Aug 1190[157]) [as his second wife,] DAVID of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon, son of HENRY of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Ada de Warenne ([1144]-Yardley, Northants 17 Jun 1219, bur Sawtrey Abbey, Hunts). 

c)         son ([1173]-after [1171/73]).  Earl Hugh had more than one son as shown by the charter dated to [1171/73] under which “H. comes Cestrie” confirmed land to the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem for the souls of “puerorum meorum[158]same person as...?  [RICHARD (-after [1177/81]).  “Ricardo filius comitis...” witnessed the charter dated to [1177/1181] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed his father’s donation to Grimsby abbey[159]Domesday Descendants suggests that Richard was the son of Earl Hugh[160].  This suggestion is open to question.  If it is correct that the birth of Earl Hugh’s son Ranulf is dated to 1170, soon after his father’s marriage, Richard would have been the earl’s younger son.  If that is correct, it is far from obvious why a second son would witness this charter and not the donor’s older son.  It is more likely that the witness was the brother of Earl Hugh, who is referred to as “filius comitis” in another of his brother’s charters (see below).  Barraclough’s dating of this charter to [1177/81] appears to depend solely on the assumption that the witness was the donor’s son.  There appears to be no indication in the text of the document to prevent it being dated much earlier.] 

d)         MABEL (-after 1232).  The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestrić" had four sisters, of whom "secunda…Mabillia" married "comiti Arundelle"[161].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes Cestrie" gave land "in Calswah" in Lincolnshire to "comiti de Arundell in maritagium cum sorore sua"[162].  m WILLIAM d'Aubigny Earl of Sussex and Arundel, son of WILLIAM d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel and Sussex & his wife Matilda de Saint-Hilaire (-Cainell, near Rome before 30 Mar 1221, bur Wymondham Priory). 

e)         AGNES [Alice] (-2 Nov 1247).  The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestrić" had four sisters, of whom "tertia…Agnes" married "comiti de Ferrariis, id est Derby, Willelmo seniori"[163].  Lady of Chartley, Staffordshire, and Bugbrooke, Northamptonshire, following her brother's death in 1232[164].  The Annals of Burton record the death “X Kal Oct” in 1247 of “Willelmus de Ferrariis…comes Derbeić” and “IV Non Nov” of “Agnes comitissa uxor eius[165]m (1192) WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby, son of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Sibyl de Briouse (-22 Sep 1247). 

f)          HAWISE ([1175/81][166]-[6 Jun 1241/3 Mar 1243]).  The Annales Londonienses record that "Ranulphus comes Cestrić" had four sisters, of whom "quarta…Hawisia" married "Roberto de Quenci"[167].  Ctss of Lincoln [Apr 1231/1232] on the resignation of her brother of this Earldom in her favour[168]m (before 1208) ROBERT de Quincy, son of SAHER de Quincy [later Earl of Winchester] & his wife Margaret of Leicester ([1187/90]-London 1217). 

Earl Hugh had one [illegitimate] child by [an unknown mistress]:

g)         AMICIA .  Her alleged legitimacy, the subject of a bitter dispute in the late 17th century, was championed by one of her supposed descendants Thomas Mainwaring of Baddeley, Cheshire[169].  It is difficult at this distance in time to judge the merits of the arguments, although it is interesting to note that her daughter was named Bertrade, the name of Earl Hugh’s wife who herself witnessed the charter which recorded Amicia’s marriage contract (see below), which may suggest that Bertrade de Montfort was her mother.  On the other hand, Amicia is not named among the earl’s legitimate daughters who are referred to in several contemporary primary sources, as quoted above.  H. comes Cestrie” granted “servicium Giliberti filii Rogeri, scilicet servicium trium militum” to “Radulfo de Meinilwarin cum Amicia filia mea in libero maritagio” by charter dated to [1178/80], witnessed by “Bertraya comitisse Cestrie...Willelmo de Meinilwarin...Roberto de Meinilwarin...[170].  m RALPH de Mesnilwarin [Mainwaring], Justice of Chester, son of ---.  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROGER Mainwaring .  “Rogerus de Menilwarin” donated “grangie de Biveleg” to Deulacresse, for the soul of “domini Ranulphi quondam comitis Cestrić et Lincolnić avunculi mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo de Menilwarin...[171]

ii)         BERTRADE Mainwaring (-after 1249).  “Radulfus de Meidnilwar” granted “Smelewde...et Snellest...et dimid Pichemere...” to “Henrico de Alditelegh in liberum maritagium cum Bertrea filia mea” by undated charter, witnessed by “Ran com Cestr, Hug com Ultonić...[172]Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by inquisitions after a writ dated 22 Apr "4 Edw I", following the death of [her grandson] "Henry de Audidelegh..." which record the manor of “Smalewode...given to Henry de Audithele grandfather of the said Henry” by “Thomas [error for Ralph?] de Meynwaryn as free marriage[173].  m HENRY de Audley, son of ADAM de Audley & his wife Emma --- ([1175]-1246 before Nov)

2.         RICHARD (-[1170/75], bur Coventry).  “Ricardo fratre comitis...” witnessed the charter dated to [1162/66] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” granted land to “Rodberto filio Hugonis accipitrum[174].  “Ricardo filio comitis...” witnessed the charter dated to [1165/70] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam Bettesfordic” to Trentham priory[175].  “Ricardo filius comitis...” witnessed the charter dated to [1177/1181] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed his father’s donation to Grimsby abbey[176].  As discussed above (under the possible son of Earl Hugh named Richard), the dating of this charter is uncertain.  It is likely that the witness was the donor’s brother.  A charter dated to [1165/70] records that Richard was buried in the abbey church of Coventry[177]

Earl Ranulf had one possible illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

3.          [ROBERT FitzCount (-before 1166).  The Complete Peerage states that Robert FitzCount who “became Constable of Chester jure uxoris and d. in or before 1166” was “apparently an illeg. s. of an Earl of Chester[178].  If that is correct, the dating of his marriage suggests his birth in the range [1115/35], suggesting in turn that he was the son of Ranulf Earl of Chester who died in 1153, born illegitimate long before Earl Ranulf’s marriage.   m (after 1157) as her second husband, AGNES, widow of EUSTACE FitzJohn, daughter of WILLIAM FitzNeel Constable of Chester, Baron of Halton & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.] 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    HEREFORD

 

 

The earldom of Hereford appears to have been first created by Edward "the Confessor" King of England in favour of his nephew Raoul de Mantes.  With the Norman conquest, the title was effectively revoked and the earldom was awarded to William FitzOsbern by William I King of England as a reward for his part in the conquest of England.  After the rebellion in 1075 of Earl William’s son, the family forfeited the title and estates which presumably remained in the hands of the crown.  King Stephen granted the town and county of Hereford to Robert de Beaumont Earl of Leicester in [1139/40] but the latter does not appear in documents as Earl of Hereford[179].  Empress Matilda granted the earldom to Miles of Gloucester in 1141.  It was re-granted by Henry II King of England to Miles's son Roger in 1154, but on the latter's death in [1155] the earldom became extinct.  It was granted again in 1200 by King John to Humphrey de Bohun, who was the grand-nephew and principle heir of Earl Roger Fitz-Miles. 

 

 

 

A.      EARL OF HEREFORD (MANTES)

 

 

RAOUL de Mantes, son of DREUX Comte de Mantes & his wife Godgifu [Goda] of England ([1025/30]-21 Dec 1057, bur Peterborough[180]).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[181].  Florence of Worcester calls Raoul the "son of King Edward's sister"[182].  "Droco comes Ambianensium" donated property to "Sancti Petri Gismoensis" by undated charter, signed by "Droconis comitis, Eotde comitissć, Falconis fratris comitis, Rodulfi filiii comitis, Gualterii alterius filii…"[183].  Simeon of Durham names "earl Rodulph the son of king Eadward's sister Goda" in 1051[184].  He was created Earl of Hereford.  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that “earl Ralph” rallied to the support of Edward "the Confessor" King of England “throughout his earldom” in Sep 1051 when Godwin Earl of Wessex and his sons were threatening force against the king, and “came to Gloucestershire to the king’s assistance...willing to attack Godwine’s levies if the king had wished it[185].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records in 1052 that “the king and his council decided that ships should be sent out to Sandwich [as defence against the return of Earl Godwin], and earl Ralph and earl Odda were put in command[186].  Florence of Worcester records that he assembled an army to defend Hereford against Earl Ćlfgar and Gruffydd Prince of South Wales but fled 24 Oct 1055, describing Ralph as “cowardly[187].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records in 1055 that “earl Ćlfgar son of earl Leofric...went to Ireland and to Wales and raised there a great force and marched on Hereford; but earl Ralph came against him with a great host, and after a brief encounter they were put to flight and many were slain in that rout”, manuscript C clarifying that “earl Ralph gathered great levies to oppose them at Hereford, and they came together there: but before a spear was thrown, the English fled, because they had been made to fight on horseback”, adding that “earl Harold had an earthwork built around the town [of Hereford][188].  This last comment suggests that Earl Ralph was removed from the government of Hereford, although the later entry which records his death still accords him the comital title.  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records in 1057 that “on 21 December earl Ralph passed away and was buried at Peterborough[189]

m GYTHA, daughter of --- (-after 1066).  Domesday Book records, in relation to land in Waddesdon Hundred, Buckinghamshire which "Ambrose holds of William Adstock", that “this manor Gytha wife of Earl Ralph held and could sell”, and “William himself holds Haversham...this manor Countess Gytha held”, as well as “Drogo holds of William Stoke Goldington...this manor Countess Gytha held[190].  Bannister comments that “Earl Ralph...had married an English woman, probably of Godwin’s house or kin” (without citing any primary source which indicates that the statement might be correct)[191].  Her name suggests English (or at least Danish) origin.  It is of course the name of the widow of Earl Godwin, but as the birth of Godwin’s first child is dated to [1020/22] his widow would have been in her late 40s when her husband died so unlikely to have married Earl Ralph as her second husband and given birth to a child by him.  Earl Ralph’s wife could have been an otherwise unrecorded daughter of Earl Godwin and his wife Gytha, named after her mother, although on the basis of the limited information available in the document ANGLO-SAXON NOBILITY it was unusual for the child of an Anglo-Saxon noble family to be named after a parent.  A connection with Godwin’s family would explain the introduction of the name Harold into the Ewias family. 

Raoul & his wife had one child: 

1.         HAROLD de Ewias of Ewias Harold, Herefordshire (-after 1120).  Bannister suggests that Harold “could only have been a boy in January 1066”, adding that “he was then a minor in the wardship of Queen Edith, widow of the Confessor and daughter of Earl Godwin” (without citing the corresponding primary source)[192].  Freeman states that "Harold the son of Ralph" is named in Domesday in Gloucestershire, Worcester, Warwickshire and Middlesex[193].   Domesday Book records that "Harold son of Earl Ralph holds Sudeley of the king. Ralph his father held it...[and] Toddington" in Gloucestershire[194].  Lord of Ewias, Herefordshire after 1086: Bannister comments that “exactly how or when Harold became possessed of this Ewias land it is not possible to explain[195].  A manuscript which lists donations to Gloucester St Peter includes a record of the donation in 1100 by “Haraldus dominus de Ewyas” and the later confirmation by “Robertus” of "donum Haraldi patris sui"[196]

-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY - EWIAS

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of HEREFORD [1067]-1075 (family of WILLIAM FitzOsbern)

 

 

GUILLAUME FitzOsbern, son of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d'Ivry (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Cormeilles).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that one of the daughters of “Rodulphum” and his wife “Erembergam...natam in quadam villa Calcini territorii...Cavilla” married “Osberno de Crepon de qua natus est Willelmus filius Osberni[197].  Orderic Vitalis calls Guillaume nepos of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux[198].  "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissć Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60], signed by "…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…"[199].  "Willelmo filio Osberni et…Ćlicia eius uxore filia Rogeri de Thoneio" founded the abbey of Lyre by charter dated 1046[200].  "…Guillelmi filii Osberni…" witnessed the charter dated 1054 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of "terram…Sancta Columba…dedit Niellus clericus" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[201].  "…Willelmi filii Osberti, Rotgerii de Monte Golmerii, Richardis vicecomitis Abrinchensis…" witnessed the charter dated [1055/56] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "in pago…Constantino, villam…Flotomannum" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[202].  He founded the monastery of Corneilles in [1060] "on his own estates"[203].  "…Guillelmi filii Osberni…" witnessed the charter dated 1054 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of "terram…Sancta Columba…dedit Niellus clericus" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[204].  "…Guillelmus filius Osberti…Guillelmus filius Guillelmi filiii Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[205].  "Ansfredus, Osberni de Ou vicecomitis, postea…Hierosolimitani monachi, filius…cum conjuge mea Emma" offered "unicum filium meum…Goiffredum" as a monk at Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis meis Emma, Osberni dapiferi uxore et filiis eius Willelmo et Osberno…Willelmo…principe Normannorum", by undated charter[206].  "Willelmus filius Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Pčre[207].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus Osberni filius, ducis cognatus et dapifer...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[208].  The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Willelmo dapifero filio Osberni" contributed 60 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[209].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Guillermus Osberni filius...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[210].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "le Conte Rogier de Montgomery et Guillaume le filz Osber" his two "Marechaulx d’Engleterre" after the conquest of England[211].  "Erchenbaldo filio Erchenbaldi vicecomitis", on the point of leaving "ultra mare", donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "rege Anglorum et duce Normannorum Guillelmo", by undated charter, signed by "…Willelmi filii Osberni, Emmć matris eius, Ansfredi filii Athlć…"[212].  He fought at the battle of Hastings.  Earl of Hereford: Florence of Worcester records that King William left "fratrumque suum Odonem Baiocensem episcopum et Willelmum filium Osberni quem in Herefordensi provincia comitum" when he went to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][213].  "Willelmus comes filius Osberni dapiferi" donated rights in "totius silvć Longum Bothel" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by charter dated 1068, which states that later "Willelmus…filius eius" confirmed the donation[214].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Ricardi filius Eboracensis prćsidii custos” was killed, that “Marius Suenus, Gaius Patricius, Edgarus Adelinus, Archillus et quatuor filii Karoli” attacked “munitionem regis in Eboraco”, that “Willelmus cognomento Maletus, prćses castrensis regi” announced to the king that he would be forced to withdraw unless reinforcements were sent, and that the king constructed a second castle in York which entrusted to “Guillelmum comitem Osberni filium”, dated to 1069[215].  Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmi Herefordensis comitis" seized treasure from monasteries in England 17 Feb [1070][216].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William granted “insulam Vectam et comitatum Herfordensem” to “Willelmo dapifero Normannić Osberni filio”, and sent him “cum Gualterio de Laceio” to fight “contra Britones” [Welsh], during which they first invaded “Brachaniaunos” and defeated “Guallorum reges Risen et Caducan ac Mariadoth”, dated to 1071[217].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William sent "Guillelmum Osberni filium" to Normandy to govern "cum Mathilde regina...provinciam" in “anno quinto regni sui” [1070/71] and that he was sent by Philippe I King of France to help Arnoul Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert “le Frison” but was killed in battle “X Kal Mar”, his body being returned to Normandy for burial “in cśnobio Cormeliensi[218].  The Chronicon Lyrensi records that "Willelmus filius Osberni" was killed by "Roberto Frison die Dominica Septuagesimć" in 1072 and buried "Apud Cormelias"[219].  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normannić dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis" was buried "apud Cormelias"[220]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "20 Feb" of "Willelmus Britolii comes"[221].  The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "20 Feb" of "Guillelmus comes institutor hujus loci"[222]Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Willelmus...filius Osberni, propinquus ducis Willelmi” founded “duo monasteriain honorem...Marić unum apud Liram...alterum apud Cormelias”, adding that he was buried at Cormeilles[223]

m firstly (before 1046) ADELISE de Tosny, daughter of ROGER de Tosny & his wife Godechildis --- (-6 Oct ----, bur Abbaye de Lire).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Willelmus...filius Osberni, propinquus ducis Willelmi” founded “duo monasteriain honorem...Marić unum apud Liram...alterum apud Cormelias”, adding that he buried “Adelinam filiam Rogerii de Toenio uxorem suam” at Lyre[224].  "Willelmo filio Osberni et…Ćlicia eius uxore filia Rogeri de Thoneio" founded the abbey of Lyre by charter dated 1046[225].  Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normannić dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis…Aelizam uxorem suam filiam Rogeri de Toeneio" was buried in the monastery of Lire[226]The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "6 Oct" of "Adeliz uxor Willelmi hujus loci fundatoris"[227].  The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "6 Oct" of "mater Willelmi Britolii Adeliza"[228]

m secondly (after Jul 1070) as her third husband, RICHILDE, widow firstly of HERMAN Comte de Hainaut and secondly of BAUDOUIN VI Count of Flanders, daughter of --- (-Messines 15 Mar 1087, bur Hanson Abbey).  The question of the possible parentage of Richilde is discussed fully in the document HAINAUT, dealing with her first husband's family.  The Annals of Winchester record the marriage in 1070 of “comitissam Flandrić” and “rex…nepoti suo Willelmo filio Osberni[229].  William of Malmesbury records that Baudouin I comte de Hainaut entrusted the guardianship of his two sons to "Philip king of France…and to William Fitz-Osberne", adding that the latter "readily undertook the office that he might increase his dignity by a union with Richilda"[230].  The Complete Peerage, citing "Annales Flandrić", states that Richilde was taken in battle where her new husband FitzOsbern was killed[231], but the precise reference has not yet been found to this primary source.  The necrology of Ličge Saint-Lambert records the death "XVII Kal Apr" of "Richildis comitisse"[232]

Earl Guillaume & his first wife had four children: 

1.         GUILLAUME de Breteuil (-Bec 12 Jan [1103], bur Monastery of Lire[233]).  Guillaume of Jumičges names “Willelmum et Rogerium Contumacem” as the two sons of “Willelmo Osberni filio” and his wife “Adelizam Rogerii Toenitć filiam[234].  "…Guillelmus filius Osberti…Guillelmus filius Guillelmi filiii Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[235].  "Willelmus comes filius Osberni dapiferi" donated rights in "totius silvć Longum Bothel" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by charter dated 1068, which states that later "Willelmus…filius eius" confirmed the donation[236].  Son of Guillaume Earl of Hereford according to Orderic Vitalis[237], who also refers to him as nepos of Guillaume Comte d'Evreux[238].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father "Guillelmum Osberni filium", "[filius] eius...Willelmus major natu" inherited “Britolium et Paceium” [Breteuil and Pacy] and the remainder of his father’s property in Normandy, which he held for the approximately 30 years of his life[239].  Orderic Vitalis records the rebellion of Robert, son of King William I, and his departure from Normandy accompanied by “Rodbertus de Bellismo et Guillelmus de Britolio, Rogerius Ricardi de Benefacta filius, Rodbertus de Molbraio et Guillelmus de Molinis, Guillelmus de Ruperia”, dated to [1077/78], and their journeys during five years of exile[240].  He was captured in an attack on Conques, during the war between Raoul de Tosny and Guillaume Comte d'Evreux triggered by the enmity between their wives, and ransomed for 3,000 livres and the promise to make his cousin Roger de Tosny his heir[241].  "Guillelmus de Bretolio filius Guillelmi comitis" donated revenue to the monks of Saint-Evroult by charter dated to [1080][242].  "…Willelmus de Bretoil…" witnessed the charter dated 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy confirmed the restoration of the monastery of Saint-Vigor near Bayeux[243]Orderic Vitalis records that “comes Ebroicensis” requested Robert [III] Duke of Normandy to return “Bathventum et Nogionem, Vaceium et Craventionem, Scoceium [Bavent, near Troarn, Noyon-sur-Andelle, Gacé, Gravençon, Ecouché], aliosque fundos Radulfi patrui mei...Caput Asini” to him and grant “Pontem Sancti Petri” [Pont Saint-Pierre] to “nepoti...meo Guillelmo Bretoliensi”, which the duke agreed to, except “Scoceium” which was held by “Girardus de Gornaco...qui de eadem parentela prodierat, filius...Basilić Girardi Fleitelli filić”, dated to [1089][244]The same source records that, during the course of the war, “Guillelmum Bretoliensem” was captured and imprisoned, after which he agreed to the marriage of “Isabel filiam suam” to “Goello” as part of the peace agreement, dated to [1092][245]Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmus” [Guillaume de Breteuil] gave “tria millia librarum” to “avunculo suo Radulpho” [Raoul [III] de Tosny] for his ransom as part of the peace settlement of the Evreux/Tosny war and appointed “Rogerium consobrinum suum Radulfi filium” [Roger [II] de Tosny] as his heir and that Guillaume Comte d’Evreux also named Roger as his heir[246]There is some confusion of the date of Guillaume’s death.  An addition to the chronicle of Robert of Torigny records the death "apud Beccum V Id Jan" in 1183 of "Willermo filio Osberni comite Herefordić…filiis ipsius…Willemus maior natu" and his burial "in claustro Lirensis cenobii"[247].  The Chronicon Lyrensi records the death "apud Beccum V Id Jan" in 1098 of "Willelmus filius Willelmi filii Osberni" and his burial "in claustro Lirensis Cśnobii" which had been built by his father[248]The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "12 Jan" of "Willelmus Britolii"[249]m ADELINE de Montfort-sur-Risle, daughter of HUGUES [II] de Montfort-sur-Risle & his second wife ---.  She is named as wife of Guillaume by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and specifies that the couple were childless[250].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Roberti de Monte Forti…Adeline sororis ipsius Roberti", by charter dated to [1181/89][251].  Guillaume had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses:

a)         EUSTACHE de Pacy (-Pacy [Feb] 1136[252])Orderic Vitalis records that he was the son of Guillaume "by a concubine", that he challenged the claims of William de Gaël and Renaud de Grancey to his father's estates and established himself as Seigneur de Breteuil et de Pacy, which was recognised by Henry I King of England who gave him his daughter's hand in marriage[253].  He rebelled against Henry I King of England, his father-in-law, in 1119, forfeited Breteuil but was allowed to retain Pacy[254]The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Eustach de Britolio" in Wiltshire[255].  m (1103) JULIANE, illegitimate daughter of HENRY I King of England & his mistress [Ansfride] .  She is named as the daughter of King Henry I by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that the king arranged her marriage[256].  According to the Complete Peerage[257], it is "not unlikely that she was the daughter of Ansfride" as her presumed full brother Richard interceded with King Henry on her behalf in 1119[258].  After her husband's rebellion in 1119, the king (her father) besieged her in Breteuil castle, from where she "was forced to leap down from the walls…and fell shamefully with bare buttocks into the depths of the moat", and fled to her husband at Pacy[259].  She and her husband were later pardoned.  She became a nun at Fontevraud Abbey[260].   Eustache & his wife had three children: 

i)          GUILLAUME (-1153).  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Pacy.  Orderic Vitalis records that he attacked Breteuil[261], which had been given to Raoul de Gaël.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 "sine liberis" of "Willermo de Paccio" and states that the castle of Pacy passed to "Roberto filio Roberti comitis Legecestrić"[262]. 

ii)         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that she and her sister were given as hostages by their father in exchange for the son of Ralph Harenc.  After Eustache blinded the boy, King Henry allowed Ralph to blind the two girls and cut off the tips of their noses[263]

iii)        daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that she suffered the same fate as her sister[264]

b)         ISABEL (-after [1116])Orderic Vitalis records that “Guillelmum Bretoliensem” agreed to the marriage of “Isabel filiam suam” to “Goello” as part of the peace agreement between them, dated to [1092][265].  She must have been illegitimate as the same chronicler states in a later passage that her father's marriage was childless[266], unless she was born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage of her father.  The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[267].  m ([1092]) ASCELIN Goel, son of ROBERT d'Ivry & his wife Hildeburge de Gallardon (-after [1116]). 

2.         ROGER de Breteuil (-after 1087).  Guillaume of Jumičges names “Willelmum et Rogerium Contumacem” as the two sons of “Willelmo Osberni filio” and his wife “Adelizam Rogerii Toenitć filiam[268]Earl of Hereford: Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father "Guillelmum Osberni filium", "[filius] eius...Rogerius...junior frater" inherited “comitatum Herfordensem” and all his father’s property in England[269].  He conspired with his brother-in-law Raoul de Gaël Earl of Norfolk at Exning, Cambridgeshire in 1075, at the marriage of his sister, and rebelled against King William I during the latter's absence in Normandy.  They raised an army but were prevented from crossing the River Severn by the Bishop of Worcester and the Abbot of Evesham.  On the king's return to England, Earl Roger was imprisoned and his estates forfeited.  Orderic Vitalis records that he remained captive for the rest of his life[270].  Florence of Worcester records that "Herefordensis comes Rogerus filius Willelmi…East-Anglorum comiti Radulfo" conspired against King William in [1074][271].  Florence of Worcester records that "comites Morkarum et Rogerum, Siwardum cognomento Barn, et Wlnothum regis Haroldi germanum" were released by King William on his deathbed in 1087[272]m ---.  The name of Roger's wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had two children: 

a)         RENAUD (-after [1130])He is named as the son of Roger by Orderic Vitalis, who says that he and his brother became "some of the best soldiers in the service of King Henry I and are still awaiting his pardon"[273].  Nephew of Guillaume de Breteuil, on whose death he claimed Breteuil[274].  He held the Ballon fief in Wiltshire by [1130] de iure uxoris[275].  A charter of Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire including the donation by “Reginaldi filii comitis et Emelinć uxoris eius…hćredum suorum Eatonam”, by undated charter[276].  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[277]m EMMELINE, daughter of HAMELIN de Ballon Lord of Abergavenny & his wife Agnes --- .  A charter of Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire including the donation by “Reginaldi filii comitis et Emelinć uxoris eius…hćredum suorum Eatonam”, by undated charter[278].  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[279].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, which record the knights’ fees held from "Willelmus filius Reginaldi" in Herefordshire and name "Hamelinus de Balun avus suus"[280].  Renaud & his wife had [six] children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Ballon (-[1168/75]).  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[281].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Willelmus filius Reginaldi" in Herefordshire and name "Hamelinus de Balun avus suus"[282].  He claimed the Lordship of Abergavenny in 1166, in right of his mother. 

ii)         RAINALD de Ballon (-1203).  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[283].  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldum de Baelun Reginaldi filii comitis filium, et Emelinć de Baelun” confirmed his father’s donation of property “Eatonam” to Godstow, naming “Hamelinus de Baelun avus meus”, subscribed by “Hamelino de Baelun[284].  He succeeded his brother in [1168/75][285].  "Reginald de Baelun son of Reginald, son of the earl, and Emeline de Baelun" confirmed the donation of the manor of Eaton to Godstow abbey, made by "their father and mother", by charter dated to [1170/80][286].  It is supposed that "their" is a mistake for "his", and that "Emeline" was the mother of Rainald de Ballon not his otherwise unrecorded sister of this name, although this is not beyond all doubt.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Reginaldus de Baalon" paying "xx s" in Hereford[287]m ---.  The name of Rainald’s wife is not known.  Rainald & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOHN de Ballon (-1235).  The Fine Roll of 1207 records “John de Balun” settling a dispute between “Reginaldum de Balun patrem ipsius Johannis” and “Gaufridum filium Ace et Agnetem uxorem suam” relating to "terra que fuit Hamelini de Balun" in Wiltshire[288].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Nicholaus de Limesia et Margeria uxore sua et…sororibus uxoris sue" against "Johannem de Balun" who failed to appear[289]m firstly ---.  The name of John’s first wife is not known.  Rosie Bevan suggests that she was "Lady Maud de Balun", for whom the Hundred Rolls of 1276 record that the prior of Canonsleigh had received rent for her soul for the previous fifty years[290]m MARGERY, daughter of ---.  The Testa de Nevill records "Margeria de Balun" holding dower in Eastington, Gloucestershire in 1235/36[291].  The Testa de Nevill records "Margeria de Balun et Willelmus filius Gilleberti" holding two thirds of a knight’s fee in Swallowcliffe, Wiltshire in 1242/43[292].  John & his first wife had three children: 

(1)       JOHN de Ballon (-1275).  The Testa de Nevill records "feuda Johannis de Balon" in "Magna Sutton…Magna Chiverel…de rege de honore de Mortelay" in Wiltshire in 1242/43[293].  m firstly AUDE Paynell, daughter of WILLIAM Paynell & his wife Alice Briwere ([1209/10]-1261).  A writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of "William Paynel alias Painel" names "Lady Auda wife of John de Balun, age variously stated as 30 and more and 40, is his heir"[294].  The document does not specify the relationship between the deceased and his heir, but it appears that she was too old to have been his daughter so was probably his sister.  Aude’s age in this document is inconsistent with the marriage date of her supposed parents, but may have been exaggerated.  m secondly MARGARET, daughter of ---. 

(2)       WALTER de Ballon (-[1287/88])m ([1282/87]) as her first husband, ISOLDA de Mortimer, [illegitimate daughter of EDMUND [I] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer & his mistress ---] (before 1273[295]-after 1336).  According to the Complete Peerage[296], Isolda was the daughter of Edmund de Mortimer and his wife Margaret de Fiennes.  However, this is chronologically impossible if Isolda gave birth to her son Hugh Audley in [1289][297].  It is therefore assumed that Isolda was Edmund de Mortimer's illegitimate daughter, although no proof has been found that this is correct.  Another possibility is that she was Edmund's sister[298].  Her name suggests a Welsh origin.  Edmund de Mortimer gave her and her first husband the manor of Arley, Staffordshire[299].  She married secondly ([1288/89]) Hugh de Audley

(3)       REGINALD de Ballon (-after 1294). 

iii)        HAMELIN de Ballon (-after 1166).  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[300].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Hamelin de Baalun" holding half a knight’s fee, and "Mathćus de Baaluum" holding one knight’s fee, from "Henrici de Novo Mercato" in Gloucestershire[301]

iv)       [MATTHEW de Ballon (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Hamelin de Baalun" holding half a knight’s fee, and "Mathćus de Baaluum" holding one knight’s fee, from "Henrici de Novo Mercato" in Gloucestershire[302].  It is not known with certainty whether these two feeholders were brothers, but this seems possible.] 

v)        AGNES .  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[303]

vi)       JULIANA .  The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordić et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[304]

b)         ROGER (-after [1125/26][305]).  He is named as the son of Roger by Orderic Vitalis, who says that he and his brother became "some of the best soldiers in the service of King Henry I and are still awaiting his pardon"[306]

3.         EMMA .  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Willelmo Osberni filio” and his wife “Adelizam Rogerii Toenitć filiam” had “unam filiam” who married “Rodulfo comite genere Britoni” with whom she went to Jerusalem on pilgrimage “in diebus Urbani Papć[307].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northwici" to "Radulfo de Guader genero Guillelmi filii Osberni"[308].  Florence of Worcester records that her brother "Herefordensis comes Rogerus filius Willelmi" arranged her marriage to "East-Anglorum comiti Radulfo" against the wishes of King William in [1074][309].  The Annals of Winchester record the marriage in 1075 of “Radulfo Wadele comiti” and “comitis Willelmi Osberni filii filiam[310]m (Exning, Cambridgeshire 1075[311]) RALPH de Gaël Earl of Norfolk, son of RALPH "the Staller" Seigneur de Gaël & his wife --- (before 1040-on crusade after 1096). 

4.         daughter .  Guillaume de Jumičges records that Guillaume FitzOsbern had two daughters[312].  

Guillaume had one [Illegitimate] child [by an unknown mistress]: 

5.          RAOUL .  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Willelmus...filius Osberni, propinquus ducis Willelmi” founded “duo monasteriain honorem...Marić unum apud Liram...alterum apud Cormelias”, adding that “Rodulfus filius eius” became a monk at Cormeilles “a pueritia[313].  From the context of the passage, it would appear that Adelisa, wife of Guillaume FitzOsbern, was not the mother of Raoul as he is not included in the list of the couple's children in an earlier sentence in the same passage. 

 

 

 

C.      EARLS of HEREFORD 1141-1155 (family of MILES of GLOUCESTER)

 

 

Ellis suggests that this family "must have come from that now rural village of Pitres…on the banks of the Seine, some miles above Rouen, at the foot of the Coté des Deux Amants"[314]

 

 

1.         ROGER [de Pîtres] (-before 1086).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records a precept addressed by William I King of England to "Lanfranco archiepiscopo, Roberto de Oilleio et Rogero de Pistri" in favour of the monastery of Abingdon[315].  A charter dated to [1164/74] records that the burial at Lanthony of "domini Milonis comitis Herefordić" and records that "Rogerum de Pistres" was granted "custodi castri Gloucestrić" after the conquest and that his family succeeded him "Durandum de Pistres fratrem eius" and "filium…Walteri de Gloucestria"[316].  Sheriff of Gloucester.  He probably died shortly before 1086: his son is recorded with his father’s name holding property in Domesday Book, and his son made donations for his father’s soul by charter dated that year (see below).  m ADELISE, daughter of --- (-after 1125).  The Chronicle of Gloucester St Peter records that "Adeliza vicecomitissa mater Walteri de Gloucestria" donated "domos, redditus omnes…in Gloucestria" to the monastery dated 1125[317].  "Adeliz vicecomitissa" donated "quicquid burgagii…in Gloucestria" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "Walterius constabularius filius suus", by undated charter[318].  A charter of King Henry II confirms donations to Gloucester St Peter including the donation of "burgagium…in Gloucestria" donated by "Athelays vicecomitissa…concessu Walteri filii eius"[319].  Roger & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         WALTER of Gloucester (-1129 or after[320]).  Domesday Book records land held by “Walter fitsRoger de Pitres” in Barton Stacey in Barton Hundred and East Dean in Broughton Hundred in Hampshire; "Walter FitzRoger" holding Great Barrington and South cerney in Gloucestershire[321].  A charter of King William I dated 1086 confirmed various donations to Gloucester St Peter, including the donation of "in Erchenefelde unam terram Westwode" for the soul of "patris sui"[322].  Sheriff of Gloucester.  Constable [of Gloucester Castle][323].  The Chronicle of Gloucester St Peter records that "Rogerus [presumably an error for Walterus] de Gloucestria" donated "Westwode in Jerchenfeld…" to the monastery for the soul of "Herberti fratris sui" dated 1101[324].  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny records that “Brientio filio comitis de Insula, nepoti suo de sorore sua…Lucia” granted the lordship of Abergavenny to “Waltero constabulatio totius Anglić, consanguineo suo[325].  The precise relationship between Walter and his predecessor has not yet been established.  Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of "heredibus suis Herefordiam [parvam et] Ullingeswicam" to "Waltero de Gloec" by the bishop of Hereford by charter dated 1121, witnessed by "…Ricardo filio Poncii…"[326].  The Chronicle of Gloucester St Peter records that "Walterus de Gloucestria" donated "terram de Westwode in Jerchenffeld in Lawaran"[327].  "Walterus de Gloucestria, assensu Milonis filii mei et Berthć uxoris meć" donated "ecclesiam de Cernay…ecclesiam… Sanctć Helenć de Halgestane…terram…de Westwode in Herchenefelde" to Gloucester St Peter by undated charter[328].  Henry I King of England granted the lands of "Edrici fil Chetelli" to "Walto de Gloec" by charter date [3/10] Jun 1123[329].  A charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[330].  "Walter de Gloecestria, Milo fili ei…Willelm de Mara" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[331]m BERTHE, daughter of ---.  "Walterus de Gloucestria, assensu Milonis filii mei et Berthć uxoris meć" donated "ecclesiam de Cernay…ecclesiam… Sanctć Helenć de Halgestane…terram…de Westwode in Herchenefelde" to Gloucester St Peter by undated charter[332].  The Complete Peerage suggests that Berthe was a relative of Hamelin de Ballon Lord of Abergavenny, citing the passage from the Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny quoted above[333].  However, there are two difficulties with this hypothesis.  Firstly, it is Walter, not his son, who is described as “consanguineo” of Brien FitzCount, suggesting that the relationship must have been through Walter’s parents not his wife.  Secondly, doubt exists about the relationship between Brien FitzCount (generally identified as the illegitimate son of Alain IV Duke of Brittany, although the primary source which confirms that this affiliation is correct has not yet been traced) and Hamelin de Ballon, as discussed more fully in the document WALES (Lords of Abergavenny).  The Complete Peerage also cites[334] the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Abergavenny Priory by “Hamelinus de Balon et Brientius comitis filius et Walterus de Herefort et Henricus de Herefort[335].  This document does suggest a close relationship between the two families.  However, a family connection through the mother of Miles of Gloucester is not the only possibility.  Walter & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          MILES of Gloucester (-24 Dec 1143, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Milonem” as son of “Waltero constabulatio totius Anglić[336].  Henry I King of England appointed him Constable of England[337].  He was created Earl of Hereford in 1141.  

-         see below

ii)         [MATILDA (-after [1127]).  A charter dated to [1127] records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[338].  Round indicates that this charter means that Matilda must have been the daughter of Walter of Gloucester, noting that Ullingswick was recorded in Domesday Book as belonging to the church of Hereford, and also that King Henry I confirmed its grant and that of Little Hereford by the bishop of Hereford to Walter of Gloucester by another charter (see above)[339].  The fact that Matilda named two of her children after her supposed parents also indicates that this parentage is probably correct (although the name Walter was already used in the FitzPons family before Richard’s marriage).  "Ricardus filius Puncii" donated “ecclesiam de Lecha" to Great Malvern monastery, Worcestershire, for the soul of "uxoris meć Mathildis et liberorum meorum…", by undated charter, witnessed by "Simon et Osbernus fratres mei…"[340]m RICHARD FitzPons, son of PONS & his wife --- (-[1127/29]).] 

iii)        [--- .]  m ---.  One child: 

(a)       RENAUD (-25 Aug 1149).  A manuscript listing abbots of Evesham records that ”Reginaldus, monachus Gloucestrić, nepos comitis Milonis Herefordić” was appointed abbot in 1122 and died “VIII Kal Sep 1149[341], although another manuscript records his death “VIII Kal Sep 1136[342]

b)         HERBERT (-[before 1101]).  The Chronicle of Gloucester St Peter records that "Rogerus [presumably an error for Walterus] de Gloucestria" donated "Westwode in Jerchenfeld…" to the monastery for the souls of "patris sui et matris et pro anima Herberti fratris sui" dated 1101[343].  The wording suggests that Herbert was deceased at the time of the donation. 

c)         [--- .  Her parentage and marriage are established by the charter dated to [1123] which records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[344], although it is always possible that "nepos" should be interpreted in this document as indicating a more remote relationship than nephew of Walter of Gloucester.  m --- de la Mare, son of ---.] 

2.         DURAND [de Gloucester] (-[1101], bur Gloucester).  A charter dated to [1164/74] records that the burial at Lanthony of "domini Milonis comitis Herefordić" and records that "Rogerum de Pistres" was granted "custodi castri Gloucestrić" after the conquest and that his family succeeded him "Durandum de Pistres fratrem eius" and "filium…Walteri de Gloucestria"[345].  Sheriff of Gloucestershire.  Domesday Book records “Durand of Gloucester” holding Cliddesden in Basingstoke Hundred and Weston in Hoddington Hundred in Hampshire; several landholdings in Wiltshire; land in Westbury, Ashbrook, Duntisbourne, Culkerton, Didmarton, Whaddon, Sezincote, Icomb Proper, Shipton Solers, Haresfield Court, Moreton Valence, Littleton and Condicote in Gloucestershire; properties in Herefordshire[346]m ---.  The name of Durand’s wife is not known.  Durand & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [EUDO (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records “Durand” holding of the bishop of Worcester land in Barnsley and "Eudo" holding land in the same place[347].  There is no indication of any relationship between Durand and Eudo but their holding property jointly suggests that they may have been related.  It seems unlikely that land would be held jointly by brothers, it is more likely that the two were father and son or uncle and nephew.  If Eudo was Durand’s son, it is unlikely that he survived his father as Durand’s nephew Walter is recorded as Sheriff of Gloucester after Durand.] 

 

 

MILES of Gloucester, son of WALTER of Gloucester & his wife Berthe --- (-24 Dec 1143, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Milonem” as son of “Waltero constabulatio totius Anglić[348].  "Walterus de Gloucestria, assensu Milonis filii mei et Berthć uxoris meć" donated "ecclesiam de Cernay…ecclesiam… Sanctć Helenć de Halgestane…terram…de Westwode in Herchenefelde" to Gloucester St Peter by undated charter[349].  "Walter de Gloecestria, Milo fili ei…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[350].  Henry I King of England appointed him Constable of England in succession to his father[351].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Miloni Gloec" in Wiltshire (two entries)[352].  Stephen King of England granted him the honour of Gloucester and Brecknock in [1136] and appointed him Constable of Gloucester Castle.  “Mylo constabularius de Gloucestria” donated property to Lanthony abbey, naming “antecessores mei Rogerus de Gloecestria et Walterus constabularius”, by charter dated 1137, supplemented by another later donation (undated) jointly with "uxor mea Sibilla et filii mei Rogerus et Walterus atque Henricus" in the presence of "…Roberto Corbet…"[353].  He joined Empress Matilda on her arrival in England in 1139, acting as her Constable.  She created him Earl of Hereford at Oxford 25 Jul 1141, and granted him the castle of Abergavenny[354].  Brien FitzCount, illegitimate son of Alain IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany, and his wife transferred the honour of Abergavenny to Earl Miles in [1141/42][355].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Paganus filius Joannis…et Milo" of Gloucester were killed, dated to [1137/40][356].  It is unclear why the two deaths are reported at the same time as a later passage in the Gesta records that "comes…Herefordić, Milo" was killed by arrow, and in a third passage that he was killed while hunting, dated from the context to [1142/43][357].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[358]

m ([Apr/May] 1121) SIBYLLE de Neufmarché, daughter and heiress of BERNARD de Neufmarché Lord of Brecknock & his wife Nesta [Agnes] --- (-bur Lanthony Prior, Gloucester).  A manuscript narrating the history of Brecknock priory records that the founder “Bernard de Nefmarche, Norman” married “Neste qe fut apele Agnes, la file Griffin le fiz Lewelin…cruel tyrant de Gales” by whom he fathered “Mael…noble chevalier” whom it was claimed was not his son and who was deprived of Brecknock in favour of “la file [de] Neste, Sibile” wife of “Miles…fiz Watir le conestable de Gloucestre e de Hereford[359].  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Sibillam, legitimam hćredem totius terrć Breconić…Bernardi et Agnetis de Novo-Mercato” as wife of “Milonem”, son of “Waltero constabulatio totius Anglić[360].  A charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato", the dowry being all the possessions of her father and of her mother[361].  “Mylo constabularius de Gloucestria” donated property to Lanthony abbey, naming “antecessores mei Rogerus de Gloecestria et Walterus constabularius”, by charter dated 1137, supplemented by another later donation (undated) jointly with "uxor mea Sibilla et filii mei Rogerus et Walterus atque Henricus"[362].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Sibbill wiff of the seid Milo…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[363]

Earl Miles & his wife had seven children:

1.         MARGARET ([1121/23]-6 Apr 1187, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Margaret married “Humphredo de Boun” and inherited “comitatu Herefordić[364].  Her birth date range is estimated from the date of her parents' marriage and the likely birth date of her daughter Matilda.  "…Margarita filia ipsi Mil…" subscribed the charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[365].  This document suggests that Margaret must have been her parents’s oldest child.  “Humfridus de Bohun regis dapifer et Marger. uxor mea” founded Farleigh Priory by undated charter[366].  She certified the knights' fees made in the fee of her father during the time of King Henry I[367], which may imply that her husband had died by then.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Margareta de Bohun xvii m" in Gloucestershire in [1167/68][368].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the death 6 Apr 1187 of “Margeriam”, wife of “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun tertium” and her burial “in capitulo Lanthonić, juxta Gloucestriam[369].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Sibbill wiff of the seid Milo…Ladi Margaret the furst begotton daughter of the said Milo…married to Humfre of Bohun the third…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[370].  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "duas partes de Onedesleye" made by "Margar de Bohun", in accordance with the division made "inter ipsam et Luciam sororem suam"[371]m HUMPHREY [III] de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [II] de Bohun & his wife Matilda of Salisbury ([1100/10]-[1164/65]). 

2.         ROGER FitzMiles (-1155, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Rogerum comitem, Henricum, Walterum, Maiel et Wilielmum” as the five sons of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Roger died childless[372].  “Mylo constabularius de Gloucestria” donated property to Lanthony abbey, naming “antecessores mei Rogerus de Gloecestria et Walterus constabularius”, by charter dated 1137, supplemented by another later donation (undated) jointly with "uxor mea Sibilla et filii mei Rogerus et Walterus atque Henricus"[373].  He succeeded his father in 1143 as Earl of Hereford.  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Rogerius, Milonis filius, juvenis…ćtate" succeeded "in comitatum Herefordić" after his father was killed[374].  Constable of England.  Lord of Abergavenny.  Earl Roger founded the Cistercian Abbey of Flaxley in Gloucestershire [1148/54], maybe in memory of his father[375].  He was in dispute with Henry II King of England in [1154], probably about the castle of Gloucester, and surrendered the castle and his earldom, although the king made a re-grant of the latter to Roger[376].  The Chronicle of Gervase names "comes Herefordensis Rogerius…magni Milonis filius" when recording his dispute with King Henry II in 1155[377].  The History of Gloucester St Peter records the donation by "Rogeri comes Herfordić" on becoming a monk at the monastery, and the donation of "Walterus constabularius Herefordić frater eius" (both undated)[378].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “Rogerus comes Herefordić” died in 1155[379].  On his death the earldom granted by King Henry II became extinct.  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Roger…his first begotten sonne…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[380]m (before [Dec 1137/May 1138]) as her first husband, CECILY, daughter of PAYN FitzJohn of Ewyas, co. Hereford, Sheriff of Hereford and Shropshire & his wife Sibyl de Lacy (-1207).  She is referred to as the wife of Roger in King Stephen's charter dated [Dec 1137/May 1138][381].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire records that “Rogerus comes Hereford” married “vicecomes Paganus…filiam[382].  King Stephen confirmed to "Rogo filio Milonis Gloec et Cecilie uxori sue filie Pag fil Johis" the lands of her father by charter dated to [Dec 1137/May 1138][383].  She married secondly Guillaume de Poitou. Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[384].  She married thirdly (before 1166) Gauthier de Mayenne.  "Walter de Maine" confirmed the donation of land in Perriton to Bruton by undated charter witnessed by "Cecilia comitissa uxore mea…"[385].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "comitissa Hereford quć fuit uxor Walteri de Meduana" paying "xiv l x s de scutagio militum de veteri feffamento xxix milites" in Kent[386].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "honor Walteri de Meduana" paying "xxix l, per Ciciliam comitissam Herfordić et Willelmum de Monte Kanisio, xxix milites" in Kent[387]

3.         WALTER FitzMiles (-1159 or after).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Rogerum comitem, Henricum, Walterum, Maiel et Wilielmum” as the five sons of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Walter died childless[388].  “Mylo constabularius de Gloucestria” donated property to Lanthony abbey, naming “antecessores mei Rogerus de Gloecestria et Walterus constabularius”, by charter dated 1137, supplemented by another later donation (undated) jointly with "uxor mea Sibilla et filii mei Rogerus et Walterus atque Henricus"[389].  “Waltero fratre meo” witnessed the undated charter under which “Rogerus comes Herefordić” donated property to Brecknock priory[390].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Walterius…frater comitis Herefordić" captured "Rogerium de Berchelai" and tortured him, dated from the context to [1147][391].  He was Constable of Henry II King of England in 1154[392].  Sheriff of Gloucester 1155-1157, and of Hereford 1155-1159[393].  The History of Gloucester St Peter records the donation by "Rogeri comes Herfordić" on becoming a monk at the monastery, and the donation of "Walterus constabularius Herefordić frater eius" (both undated)[394].  He succeeded his brother in 1155 as Lord of Abergavenny and Brecknock.  He left for Palestine [Michaelmas] 1159, dying soon after[395]

4.         HENRY FitzMiles (-murdered Castle Arnold, near Abergavenny Easter [1159/63], bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Rogerum comitem, Henricum, Walterum, Maiel et Wilielmum” as the five sons of “Milonem” & his wife[396].  “Mylo constabularius de Gloucestria” donated property to Lanthony abbey, naming “antecessores mei Rogerus de Gloecestria et Walterus constabularius”, by charter dated 1137, supplemented by another later donation (undated) jointly with "uxor mea Sibilla et filii mei Rogerus et Walterus atque Henricus"[397].  He succeeded his brother Walter as Lord of Abergavenny and Brecknock.  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny records that “Waltero constabulatio totius Anglić” granted “castrum de Abergavenny cum tota terra superioris Wencić” to “Henrico…filio Milonis” during the lifetime of his father, and that Henry succeeded on the death of his brother Roger, was killed by “quodam satellite…Senell, filio Donwaldi, iuxta castrum Arnaldi in superiore Wencia”, and was buried “apud Lanthoniam primam[398].  He was murdered by Seisyll ap Dyvnwal[399].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Roger…his first begotten sonne…Henri his brother Lord of Bricone…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[400]m ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-after 1166).  "Ysabele uxor Henrici de Herford" held "v milites in dotem" from "Margareta de Boun" in Gloucestershire in 1166[401]

5.         MAHEL FitzMiles (-after [Jan 1162/64], bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Rogerum comitem, Henricum, Walterum, Maiel et Wilielmum” as the five sons of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Mahel died childless[402].  He succeeded his brother Henry as Lord of Abergavenny and Brecknock.  “Maihelus de Hereford” donated property to Brecknock priory by undated charter which names “Bernardus de Novo-mercato avus meus…Milo pater meus…fratres mei Rogerus comes, et Walterius constabularius et Henricus”, witnessed by “…Humfridus de Buhun nepos meus…[403].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Roger…his first begotten sonne…Henri his brother Lord of Bricone…Michel Lord of Bricone…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[404]

6.         WILLIAM FitzMiles (-Bronllys Tower, co. Brecon [1164/66]).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Rogerum comitem, Henricum, Walterum, Maiel et Wilielmum” as the five sons of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that William died childless[405].  He succeeded his brother Mahel as Lord of Abergavenny and Brecknock.  He was mortally wounded by a stone dropped from Bronllys Tower, co. Brecon[406]

7.         BERTHA .  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Berthe married “Philippo de Brusa domino de Duelth“ (naming their descendants) and inherited “tota terra Breconić, Wencić superioris et Gower[407].  A manuscript narrating the history of Brecknock priory records that “Berte” married “Willame de Brewes”, and also lists her descendants[408].  "Willielmus de Braiosa" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze by "Philippus de Braiosa pater eiusdem Willielmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum"[409]m (before [1140]) WILLIAM [II] de Briouse, son of PHILIPPE de Briouse & his wife Eleanor of Barnstaple (-[1175]).  He was Lord of Abergavenny and Brecon from [1173] by grant of his brother-in-law Mahel FitzMiles[410]

8.         LUCY (before 1143-[1219/20] or after, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Lucy married “Herberto filio Hereberti” and inherited “foresta de Dene et aliis terries in Anglia[411].  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "duas partes de Onedesleye" made by "Margar de Bohun", in accordance with the division made "inter ipsam et Luciam sororem suam"[412].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from bishop of Worcester, whose assets had been confiscated by King John, dated to [1208/13]: "Henricus de Boun comes Herefordie et domina Lucia que fuit uxor Herberti filii Herberti" held "manerio in Suham et Brokhamt ii milites…in comitatu Glouc"[413].  A feodary of the bishop of Worcester’s estates drawn up in [1219/20] records that "Dame Lucia, widow of Herbert fitz Herbert" held shares in two Gloucestershire manors[414].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Sibbill wiff of the seid Milo…Luce the third daughter of the seid Milo Erle…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[415]m HERBERT FitzHerbert [II], son of HERBERT FitzHerbert [I] & his wife Sibyl Corbet (-before 18 Jul 1204). 

 

 

 

D.      EARLS of HEREFORD 1200-1373 (BOHUN)

 

 

Planché records that the Bohun family derived its name from Bohon in the arrondissment of Saint-Lo in the Cotentin in Normandy, where “the communes of St. André and St. George de Bohon” are still found[416].  No trace of the Bohun family has been in sources in Normandy, before or after the Norman conquest of England, except for the donation by Humphrey [I] de Bohun to Rouen Saint-Amand, the charter being subscribed by Duke Guillaume (see below).  Their infrequent appearance in the surviving records suggests that the family was of lesser nobility and enjoyed little political influence in the duchy.  However, a much later manuscript, which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey, records that “dominus Hunfredus de Bohun, cum barba”, who accompanied William “the Conqueror” to England, was “cognatus” of the king[417].  It is not known whether this document exaggerated connections with the ducal family in order to boost the prestige of the founders of the abbey, but in any case “cognatus” could include relationships which were remote, either by birth or marriage.  Whatever the truth of their position in Normandy, the fortunes of the Bohun family started in England in a small way, as Humphrey [I] de Bohun is recorded in Domesday Book only as holding Tatterford in Norfolk, which suggests that any family relationship with the king was not close enough to be acknowledged by the monarch.  The fortunes of the family took a turn for the better when Humphrey [II] de Bohun married Matilda de Salisbury, who brought large estates in Wiltshire to her husband.  Humphrey [III] de Bohun increased the family fortunes further by marrying the eldest daughter of Miles Earl of Hereford who, after the death of her brother without issue, was his principle heir and transmitted the hereditary office of Constable of England to her son.  The earldom of Hereford was revived in 1200 in favour of her grandson Henry de Bohun. 

 

 

HUMPHREY [I] de Bohun [Bohon, in Normandy], son of --- (-after 1092).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “dominus Hunfredus de Bohun, cum barba” accompanied William “the Conqueror” to England, adding that he was “cognatus” of William[418].  "…Unfredi de Bohun et Richardi filii eius necnon Ingulfi eiusdem loci canonici…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[419].  Domesday Book records "Humphrey de Bohun" holding Tatterford in Norfolk[420].  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[421].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Humphrey de Bohon" donated part of the fief of Puchay to the monastery of Saint-Leger at Préaux, with the consent of "his sons Robert and Richard", undated, but he does not cite the source reference[422]

m firstly ---.  "Humfrey de Buhun" donated tithes to Rouen Saint-Amand "for himself and iii uxoribus suis" by charter dated to before 1066, signed by "Willelmi comitis et Normannorum ducis"[423]

m secondly ---.  "Humfrey de Buhun" donated tithes to Rouen Saint-Amand "for himself and iii uxoribus suis" by charter dated to before 1066, signed by "Willelmi comitis et Normannorum ducis"[424]

m thirdly (before 1066) ---.  "Humfrey de Buhun" donated tithes to Rouen Saint-Amand "for himself and iii uxoribus suis" by charter dated to before 1066, signed by "Willelmi comitis et Normannorum ducis"[425]

Humphrey [I] & his [first/second/third] wife had six children: 

1.         ROBERT .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Humphrey de Bohon" donated part of the fief of Puchay to the monastery of Saint-Leger at Préaux, with the consent of "his sons Robert and Richard", undated, but he does not cite the source reference[426]

2.         RICHARD de Méry (-before 1131).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Humphrey de Bohon" donated part of the fief of Puchay to the monastery of Saint-Leger at Préaux, with the consent of "his sons Robert and Richard", undated, but he does not cite the source reference[427].  His epithet "de Méry" suggests that this was territory inherited from his mother.  Thomas Stapleton identifies Méry as "Mareium…the marshy territory along the banks of the river L’Ouve in the vicinity of le Homme, otherwise L’Isle-Marie, adjacent to the communes of Liésville on one side and of Picauville on the other" and lists various donations by individuals named "de Mareio"[428].  The dates of the documents in which Richard is named suggest that he may have been one of his father’s oldest children.  "…Unfredi de Bohun et Richardi filii eius necnon Ingulfi eiusdem loci canonici…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[429].  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[430].  A charter dated 1093 records that "Richard de Mereio" confirmed the donation to the monks of St Martin made by "his father Humfrey" for "quendam monachum eiusdem loci fratrem suum…Ingelrannum who urged it on him and for love of a little boy of his whom he had given them to bring up and teach"[431].  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, says that "in 1131 a proffer of sixty marks of silver would be owing from [Humphrey de Bohon the King’s steward] to the crown si poterit dirrationare terram de Meri", citing the 1129/30 Pipe Roll, which suggests that Richard de Méry had died before that date[432]m (before 1092) LUCIE, daughter of ---.  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[433].  Domesday Descendants records that the mother of Ingelger [I] de Bohun was "Lucy brother of Alexander"[434].   Richard & his wife had seven children: 

a)         ROBERT .  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[435]

b)         HENRY .  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[436]

c)         HUMPHREY .  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[437]

d)         HAVIDE .  A charter dated 1092 records the claim by "Richard de Mereio son of Humfrey de Bohonio" for a field near the monastery of Bohun from the monks of Marmoutier, a settlement being confirmed by the monks receiving "one of his little sons (parvulis) Humfrey…[to] teach him until he reached the age at which he could be a monk if he wished", with the consent of "uxor eius domina Luc[i]a et filii eius Rotbertus, Hainricus, Hunfridus, Havidis filia eorum" and witnessed by "Hunfrido patre eorum, Ricardo filio suo"[438]

e)         INGELGER [I] de Bohun (-[1172]).  "…Engelgerius de Bohun, Alexander de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[439].  His grant to the priory of Saint-Georges de Bohon names his deceased first wife and his second wife[440].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "Engelgerius de Bohon…Ricardus Avenel…Doon Bardouf et Thomas frater eius…", by charter dated 1157[441].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Engelgero de Buhun" at "Blochesha", yielding ₤20, in Oxfordshire[442].  "Engelger de Bohon" donated property to St Georges de Bohun "desiring for the weal of his wife Adelisa and his father Richard de Meri" by charter dated to [1155/65][443].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Engelger de Boun" with two knights and seven knights "in Costentino" in his own service[444]m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants records that Ingelger donated property to the priory of Saint-Georges de Bohon naming "a deceased wife Mathilde and…his present wife Adelise"[445].   m secondly as her second husband, ADELISE d'Aumâle, widow of ROBERT [II] Bertran Seigneur de Briquebec, daughter of ETIENNE Comte d'Aumâle & his wife Hawise de Mortemer (-before [1168]).  Domesday Descendants records that Ingelger donated property to the priory of Saint-Georges de Bohon naming "a deceased wife Mathilde and…his present wife Adelise"[446].   "Adeliza daughter of [Stephen] count Albemaris" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte for the souls of "Engelger her husband and Robert Bertrand her son" by charter dated to [1151/77][447].  [The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records "Aliz de Bohun" accounting for "Aldewurda" in Berkshire[448].  The identity of "Aliz de Bohun" is uncertain, although the second wife of Ingelger [I] de Bohun is the only person with a similar name who has so far been identified around that time period.  The previous year’s Pipe Roll includes no Bohun entries for Berkshire.] 

f)          ALEXANDER de Bohun (-[1153]).  Steward of Henri Comte d'Anjou and Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) at Falaise, Argentan and Domfront[449].  "…Alexandro de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated to [1146/50] under which "G. dux Norm et comes And…" confirmed the rights of the abbey of Saint-Wandrille[450].  "…Engelgerius de Bohun, Alexander de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[451]

g)         MURIEL de Bohun .  Domesday Descendants states that Savari de Beaumont married "Muriel daughter of Richard de Meri, the Norman heir of Humphrey de Bohun" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[452].  Her family origin is indicated by a charter of King Richard I dated 31 Mar 1190 confirming "Ford, Climpling, Rustinton, Presteton and Lovinto…in the county of Sussex" to "Francus de Bohun", to hold in the same way as "Savaric son of Savaric, heir of Enjulger de Bohon" had held[453].  "Savaric son of Cana and Muriel his wife" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees by charter dated to [1105], witnessed by "…Radulfus et Savarico filii ipsius Savarici"[454]m SAVARY de Beaumont, son of RAOUL [V] Vicomte de Beaumont-sur-Sarthe, Vicomte du Maine & his second wife Cana --- . 

h)         [daughter .  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, says that "a daughter of Richard de Meri was apparently the wife of one Engelger, a Norman of the Cotentin, who in 1130 was instrumental in making peace between Henry I and his favourite Geoffrey de Clinton", referring as "proof of this conjecture" to "a recital as to tenure of certain land in Oxfordshire, which dates from the time of King John, that Hugh de Plaiz held seven hides in Bereford (Little Barford) which had been given to Richard de Meri…[who] had given them to Enjugier de Bohun in frank-marriage and…the said Enjugier gave them to the ancestor of Hugh de Plaiz", but he does not cite the source reference[455]m ENGELGER, son of --- (-after 1130).] 

3.         INGELRAM [Ingulf] (-after 1093).  Monk at Marmoutier.  "…Unfredi de Bohun et Richardi filii eius necnon Ingulfi eiusdem loci canonici…" are named as witnesses at the court of William I King of England in the charter dated to [1081] which records an agreement between the monks of Marmoutier and "Gaufridus Nervei filius"[456].  A charter dated 1093 records that "Richard de Mereio" confirmed the donation to the monks of St Martin made by "his father Humfrey" for "quendam monachum eiusdem loci fratrem suum…Ingelrannum who urged it on him and for love of a little boy of his whom he had given them to bring up and teach"[457]

4.         daughter .  Nun at Saint-Leger, Préaux.  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Humphrey de Bohon" confirmed his donation of the tithe of "Barbivilla and the church of Notre-Dame de Brevans" to the monastery of Saint-Leger at Préaux for "a second daughter of his admitted into the monastery", with the consent of his sons "Richard and Humphrey and Ralph du Cotentin their cousin", undated, but he does not cite the source reference[458]

5.         daughter .  Nun at Saint-Leger, Préaux.  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "Humphrey de Bohon" confirmed his donation of the tithe of "Barbivilla and the church of Notre-Dame de Brevans" to the monastery of Saint-Leger at Préaux for "a second daughter of his admitted into the monastery", with the consent of his sons "Richard and Humphrey and Ralph du Cotentin their cousin", undated, but he does not cite the source reference[459]

6.         ADELA de Bohun (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Adele amite Unf de Buhun" in Wiltshire[460]same person as…?  ADELISA [de Bohun] .  "Main pater Willelmi de Albinico, Adelisa, Hunfredus de Buun avunculus eius…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc…" are listed in the Liber Vitć of Thorney abbey[461].  The chronology of the Albini Brito family (descended from Adelisa and her husband) is difficult to determine precisely, but it appears possible that "Hunfredus de Buun", who is named in the Thorney list as "avunculus" of William [I] de Albini Brito, was Humphrey [II] de Bohun, in which case William’s mother may have been Humphrey’s sister who is named Adela in the 1130 Pipe Roll.  m MAIN, son of ---. 

Humphrey & his [third] wife had one child: 

7.         HUMPHREY [II] de Bohun (-[1128/29]).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun secundum” as son of “dominus Hunfredus de Bohun, cum barba[462].  The estimated date of Humphrey’s marriage suggests that he was born from his father’s third marriage, or even from a later marriage contracted after the conquest of England.  "…Humphrey de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated 13 Jan 1103 under which Henry I King of England confirmed an agreement between the abbot of Fécamp and Philip de Braose[463].  "…Humphrey de Bohun…" (signing first among the noblemen whose names followed the earls in the list) witnessed the charter dated [1 Aug] 1107 under which Henry I King of England confirmed a donation made by Richard de Reviers to Montebourg abbey[464].  "…Humphrey de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated 2 Mar [1113] under which King Henry I confirmed a grant made by Raoul de Fougčres relating to the forest of Savigny[465].  "…Humphrey de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated [Jun 1119] under which King Henry I confirmed a fair at Nostell to the canons of St Oswald[466].  "…Humphrey de Bohun…" witnessed the charter dated to [1124-29] under which King Henry I confirmed a donation by William Paynel to Caen Saint-Etienne[467].  He died before the 1129/30 Pipe Roll in which his son is recorded as paying relief on his father’s land.  m ([1089/99]) MATILDA de Salisbury, daughter of EDWARD de Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire & his wife --- (-bur Lanthony Priory).  The Book of Lacock names “Matildam” as daughter of “Edwardum…vicecomitem Wiltes”, adding that she married “Humphridus de Bohun[468].  The Complete Peerage states that the marriage was arranged "at the instance (it is said)" of King William II, citing Dugdale[469].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun secundum” married “Matildem filiam Edwardi de Salesbury”, adding that she brought “Weston juxta Salesbury, et Walton, Newenton, Piryton, Staunton, Trobrege…” to her husband[470].  Humphrey [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUMPHREY [III] de Bohun ([1100/10][471]-[1164/65]).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus tertius de Bohun et Matildis” as the children of “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun secundum” and his wife “Matildem filiam Edwardi de Salesbury[472]

-        see below

b)         MATILDA de Bohun .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus tertius de Bohun et Matildis” as the children of “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun secundum” and his wife “Matildem filiam Edwardi de Salesbury[473].  Thomas Stapleton names her "Mabilia" but he does not cite the primary source on which he bases this information[474]

 

 

1.         INGELGER [II] de Bohun (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Emugerus de Bohun" paying "lx s" in Sussex[475].  Ingelger [II] de Bohun was presumably related to Ingelger [I] (see above), but the precise relationship has not yet been traced. 

 

 

HUMPHREY [III] de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [II] de Bohun & his wife Matilda de Salisbury ([1100/10]-[1164/65]).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus tertius de Bohun et Matildis” as the children of “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun secundum” and his wife “Matildem filiam Edwardi de Salesbury[476].  His birth date is estimated from his holding the position dapifer from 1131.  He succeeded his father, recorded in the 1129/30 Pipe Roll as paying relief on his land[477].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Vnfr de Bohun" in Dorsetshire and Wiltshire[478].  "…Humphrey de Bohun dapifer…" witnessed the charter dated [Aug] 1131 under which King Henry I confirmed donations to Bec abbey[479].  As steward [dapifer], he witnessed King Stephen's 1136 Charter of Liberties[480].  He was steward of King Stephen from 1136 to 1139[481], but later supported Empress Matilda as shown by the following charter.  "M. imperatrix, Henrici regis filia et Anglorum domina et Henricus filius comitis Andegavie" confirmed the rights of "Unfrido de Buhun" in the lands he held on the death of her father "et dapiferatum suum in Anglia et Normannia" by charter dated to [1142/46][482].  The 1155 Pipe Roll records "Hunfr. de Buhu" in Wiltshire[483].  The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Hunfr de Buhun" in Wiltshire, "in Melchesha" yielding ₤48, in "Bradeford" ₤40[484].  “Humfridus de Bohun regis dapifer et Marger. uxor mea” founded Farleigh Priory by undated charter[485].  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Hunfr de Bohu" owing ".ccc. m p Releuio terre patris sui" in Wiltshire, which implies that Humphrey senior had recently died[486]

m MARGARET of Hereford, daughter of MILES of Gloucester Earl of Hereford & his wife Sibylle de Neufmarché ([1121/25]-6 Apr 1187, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Margaret married “Humphredo de Boun” and inherited “comitatu Herefordić[487].  Her birth date range is estimated from the date of her parents' marriage and the likely birth date of her daughter Matilda.  “Humfridus de Bohun regis dapifer et Marger. uxor mea” founded Farleigh Priory by undated charter[488].  She certified the knights' fees made in the fee of her father during the time of King Henry I[489], which may imply that her husband had died by then.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Margareta de Bohun xvii m" in Gloucestershire in [1167/68][490].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the death 6 Apr 1187 of “Margeriam”, wife of “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun tertium” and her burial “in capitulo Lanthonić, juxta Gloucestriam[491].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Sibbill wiff of the seid Milo…Ladi Margaret the furst begotton daughter of the said Milo…married to Humfre of Bohun the third…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[492].  King John confirmed the possessions of Lanthony abbey by charter dated 30 Jul 1199, including the donation of "duas partes de Onedesleye" made by "Margar de Bohun", in accordance with the division made "inter ipsam et Luciam sororem suam"[493]

Humphrey [III] de Bohun & his wife had [five] children:

1.         HUMPHREY [IV] de Bohun (-[1180], bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “dominus Humfridus quartus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et constabularius Anglić” as son of “dominum Hunfredum de Bohun tertium” and his wife “Margeriam[494].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Trowbridge, Wiltshire.  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Hunfr de Bohu" owing ".ccc. m p Releuio terre patris sui" in Wiltshire, which implies that Humphrey senior had recently died[495].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Humfridus de Boun" with two knights and two knights "in Costentino" in his own service[496].  He was appointed Constable of England by [1172][497], presumably inheriting the position from his mother's family.  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Hunfredus de Bohun"[498].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “dominus Humfridus quartus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et constabularius Anglić” was buried at Lanthony[499].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Ladi Margaret the furst begotton daughter of the said Milo…married to Humfre of Bohun the third…Humfre of Bohum the iiiith sonne and heire of the foresaid Margaret…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[500]m (1171 before Easter) as her second husband, MARGARET of Huntingdon, widow of CONAN IV "le Petit" Duke of Brittany, daughter of HENRY of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Ada de Warenne of Surrey ([1143/44]-1201, bur Sawtrey Abbey, Herts).  Her origin and first marriage are deduced from Benedict of Peterborough recording that "filia sororis regis Scotić Willelmi comitissa Brittanić" gave birth in 1186 to "filium…Arturum"[501].  Her birth date is estimated from the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records property “villam de Wissinton” held by “Margareta comitissa…xl annorum”, adding that “comes Britannie habet filiam suam” and that she has “i filium de Humfrido de Buun qui est infra etatem[502].  The Genealogia Comitum Richemundić records that "Conanus filius Alani" married "Margaretam sororem Willielmi Regis Scotie"[503].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “dominus Humfridus quartus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et constabularius Anglić” married “Margaretam comitissam Britannić[504].  The Annals of Burton record the death in 1201 of “Margareta mater…Constantić, soror Willelmi regis Scotić, mater Henrici de Boum comitis Herefordić[505].  Humphrey [IV] de Bohun & his wife had [two] children:

a)         HENRY de Bohun (-1 Jun 1220, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Henricus de Bohun comes Hereford et constabularius Anglić” as son of “dominus Humfridus quartus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et constabularius Anglić” and his wife “Margaretam comitissam Britannić[506].  He succeeded his father as hereditary Constable of England.  He was created Earl of Hereford in 1200. 

-        see below

b)         [MARGARET (-[17 Nov 1189/1195]).  Her suggested parentage and marriage is justified as follows.  A charter dated "X Kal Feb 1221" (Spanish Era = A. D. 23 Jan 1183) at Anjou records a donation by "P…comes de Lara…comitisse Marger’ uxori mee consanguinee H...angl’ regis" of "Molmera et Handaluz et Agusinu et Eles et Pulucranke…in Hyspania" to Llanthony abbey witnessed by "comes Gaufredus Britannie, J. sine terra, J. comes J, Mauricius de Creon senescallus Andeg, J. Didaci comitis"[507].  Evans suggests that she was Margaret of Scotland, widow firstly of Conan IV "le Petit" Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond, and secondly of Humphrey de Bohun, daughter of Henry of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Ada de Warenne of Surrey ([1143/44]-1201, bur Sawtrey Abbey, Herts).  He points out that Llanthony had been founded in 1136 by Miles of Gloucester, whose eldest daughter married Humphrey de Bohun, who was the father of Margaret’s second husband[508].  If this origin is correct, Pedro’s marriage to Margaret was presumably terminated before her death, given his third marriage.  The difficulty with Evans’s proposal is the obvious age difference between Pedro de Lara and Margaret of Scotland.  Another possibility, which also justifies the connection with Llanthony through the Bohun family and is more satisfactory from a chronological point of view, is that Pedro’s second wife was an otherwise unrecorded daughter of Margaret by her second husband Humphrey de Bohun.  "P…comes…cum uxore mea Marg. cometissa" donated their property "in Asbaladejo et in Cannet et in termino Conchć" to the Order of Calatrava by charter dated 30 Dec 1187[509].  "Comes Petrus…cum uxore mea Margarita" donated "hćreditatem de Grudis" to found a monastery, confirmed by "sororum Marić et…Santia Marric", by charter dated 11 Mar 1187[510].  "Petrus…comes…cum uxore mea comitissa domna Margerina" donated vines at Madrid to the Order of Calatrava by charter dated 17 Nov 1189[511]m as his second wife, conde don PEDRO Manrique de Lara Vicomte de Narbonne, son of conde don MANRIQUE Pérez de Lara & his wife Ermesinde Ctss de Narbonne (-Jan 1202, bur Santa María de Huerta).]

2.         MILO (-young).  Domesday Descendants records that he is named as son of Humphrey in a charter[512]

3.         RICHARD (-young).  Domesday Descendants records that he is named as son of Humphrey in a charter[513]

4.         MATILDA de Bohun ([1140/43][514]-after 1194, or after 1199).  Her parentage is established by a 1263 inquisition which confirms that Humphrey de Bohun, grandfather of Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford at that time, gave Bradenham to his sister Matilda[515].  Her first and [third] marriages are confirmed by a lawsuit recorded in 1194 in which "Matill uxor Walteri fil Robti" sued "Cecilia uxore Rad fil Wigain" over Swereford manor, Oxfordshire, given to her by "Henri de Oilli vir eius…in dote"[516].  A writ dated 7 Mar "47 Hen III", after the death of "John de Plessetis alias de Plascetis earl of Warwick", notes that "Humphrey de Bohun gave the manor [of Bradenham, Buckinghamshire] in free marriage to Henry de Oylly with Maud his sister"[517].  The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "uxor Henri de Oilli" accounting for land in Oxfordshire, presumably indicating that her husband had recently died[518].  Her possible second marriage is confirmed by the Feet of Fines which records the judgment dated 9 Feb 1196 in a claim by "Henricus de Bohon…pro Adam de Greiuill" against "Matill de Bohon" concerning land "villa de Waleton…villam de Blakemer" and "in villa de Niweton" given to Matilda "in maritagium quondam Iuhellus de Mee---e"[519].  It is supposed that Matilda was the plaintiff’s aunt, although this is not specifically stated in the document.  No other Matilda de Bohun has been identified, and the 1194 document demonstrates that Henry’s aunt was litigious.  It is supposed that the name "de Mee---e" indicates Mayenne, but this is not beyond all doubt.  ["Matill de Buun" paid a fine for "saisina de matris sue die qua obiit…de terra de Liscaret et de Kareswell" in Devonshire and Cornwall, dated 1199[520].  It is unsure whether this entry relates to Matilda, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Margaret of Hereford.]  m firstly HENRY de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, son of ROBERT d'Oilly & his wife Edith Forne (-1163).  [m secondly (after 1163) JUHEL de Mayenne, son of JUHEL Seigneur de Mayenne & his wife Clémence de Ponthieu (-after 1172).]  [521]m [thirdly] as his second wife, WALTER FitzRobert of Little Dunmow, Essex, son of ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare & his wife Matilda de Senlis (-1198, bur Dunmow Priory). 

5.         [MARGARET de Bohun (-before 1196).  According to the Complete Peerage[522], the first wife of Waleran de Beaumont Earl of Warwick was Margaret de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun & his wife Margaret of Hereford.  This appears chronologically improbable in light of the likely birth dates of Humphrey and Margaret's children in the 1140s and the estimated birth date of Waleran and Margaret's son in [1190].]

 

 

HENRY de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [IV] de Bohun, hereditary Constable of England & his wife Margaret of Huntingdon (-1 Jun 1220, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Henricus de Bohun comes Hereford et constabularius Anglić” as son of “dominus Humfridus quartus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et constabularius Anglić” and his wife “Margaretam comitissam Britannić[523].  He succeeded his father as hereditary Constable of England.  He inherited the principal estates of the former Earls of Hereford, through his paternal grandmother.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Henricus de Bohun" paying "x s, dimidium militem" in Berkshire[524].  He was created Earl of Hereford at Porchester 28 Apr 1200.  He was one of the 25 barons appointed to secure the observance of Magna Carta in 1215, and after the death of King John supported Louis de France when he invaded England.  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Lincoln 20 May 1217[525].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1220 of “Henricus de Boun comes Hertfordić[526].  The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the death in 1220 of "Henricus de Boum comes Herefordensis"[527].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus de Bohun” died 1 Jun 1220 and was buried at Lanthony[528].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “Milo…Erle of Herforde, Lord of Bricone and of all the Forest of Done, and also Constable of England…Ladi Margaret the furst begotton daughter of the said Milo…married to Humfre of Bohun the third…Humfre of Bohum the iiiith sonne and heire of the foresaid Margaret…Henri of Bohum sonne and heire of the foreseid Margaret…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[529]

m as her first husband, MATILDA de Mandeville, daughter of GEOFFREY FitzPiers Earl of Essex & his first wife Beatrice de Say (-27 Aug 1236, bur Lanthony Priory).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Galfridus…Willielmus cognomina Mandavilla…et Matildis, Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordić maritata” as children of “domino Galfrido filio Petri” & his wife[530].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus de Bohun” married “Matildem filiam et hćredem domini Galfridi filii Petri comitis Essexić[531].  Henry III King of England ordered custody of "tocius terre que fuit H. comitis Herefordie", except the property of "Matildi comitisse Herefordie…manerio de Wokesie…dotem suam…[et] maritagio suo in manerio de Witehurst" given by "G. filius Petri pater ipsius comitisse…H. comiti Herefordie", dated 26 Jul 1220[532].  She married secondly (before 22 Feb 1228, divorced before 24 Apr 1233, divorce revoked before Jul 1236[533]) Roger de Daunteseye of Dauntsey, Wiltshire.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Gloucestershire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Comitissa Herford est maritata Rogero de Antesye, nescitur pre quem. Terra eius valet xv.l"[534].  An order dated 22 Feb 1228 records a fine paid by "Rogerus de Antese et Matildis comitissa Herefordie uxor eius" in respect of a debt of "W. comes Essexie frater ipsius comitisse"[535].  She succeeded her brother, William de Mandeville Earl of Essex, in 1227 as Ctss of Essex, suo iure.  The Annals of Dunstable record that “comitissa Herfordić” died in 1236[536]

Earl Henry & his wife had three children:

1.         HUMPHREY [V] de Bohun (-24 Sep 1275, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordić” and his wife “Matildi[537].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” as sons of “Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam et hćredem domini Galfridi filii Petri comitis Essexić[538].  He succeeded his father in 1220 as Earl of Hereford, hereditary Constable of England.  He had livery of his mother's lands 9 Sep 1236, thereby succeeding as Earl of Essex.  He supported Henry III King of England against the barons in 1263/64[539]m firstly MATHILDE de Lusignan, daughter of RAOUL de Lusignan Comte d'Eu & his wife Alice d'Eu (-14 Aug 1241, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić” married firstly “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that she died “in vigilia assumptionis beatć Marić” and was buried in Lanthony[540].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “circa Assumptionem beatć Marić” in 1241 of “comitissa Herefordić” and her burial “apud Lentoniam juxta Gloucestriam[541].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “…Matildae daughter of the Erle of Ewes in Normanni, first wiff of…Humfre de Bohum the vth…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[542]The necrology of Ulterioris Portus monastery records the death "14 Aug" of "Mathildis comitissa de Herefort, filia...Aelidis comitissć Augi"[543]m secondly MATILDA de Avenbury, daughter of --- (-Sorges, Gascony 8 Oct 1273, bur Sorges, transferred 1290 to Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus quintus de Bohun” married secondly “Matildem de Avenbury”, adding that she died 8 Oct 1273 “apud Sorgee in Gasconia” where she was buried, her son transferring her body to Lanthony 17 years after her death[544].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “…Matildae of Avenburi Countes, wiff of the seid Humfre the second…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[545].  Earl Humphrey [V] & his first wife had five children:

a)         HUMPHREY [VI] de Bohun (-Beeston Castle, Cheshire 27 Oct 1265, bur Combermere Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “dominus Humfredus sextus de Bohun, dominus de Brekenok” as the son of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia[546]

-        see below

b)         MATILDA de Bohun (-Groby, Lincolnshire 20 Oct 1252, bur Brackley).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordić” and his wife “Matildi[547].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Matildis..Alicia” as the first two of the four daughters of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that Matilda married “Ancelmo filio et hćredi Willielmi le Mareschall[548].  A charter dated 19 Jan 1246 mandates the grant to "Matilda who was the wife of Anselm Marshall…[of] 60 librates of land in Ireland, for her maintenance until the king shall cause her dower to be assigned to her out of Anselm’s lands"[549]m firstly ANSELM Marshal, son of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare Ctss of Pembroke (-Chepstow [22/24] Dec 1245, bur Tintern Abbey).  He succeeded his brother in 1245 as Earl of Pembroke.  m secondly (before 5 Jun 1250) as his second wife, ROGER de Quincy Earl of Winchester, son of SAHER de Quincy Earl of Winchester & his wife Margaret of Leicester (-25 Apr 1264, bur [Brackley]). 

c)         ALICE (-bur Lanthony Priory).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Matildis..Alicia” as the first two of the four daughters of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that Alice married “domino de Thonye” and was buried at Lanthony[550].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “…the Ladi Alice of Tonny daughter of Humfre of Bohum the vth…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[551]m as his first wife, ROGER [V] de Tosny, son of RAOUL [VI] de Tosny & his wife Pernel de Lacy (29 Sep 1235-[10 Jun 1263/14 May 1264]). 

d)         [daughter .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that the third of the four daughters of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia” married “domino de Quincy[552].  This may represent confusion with the second marriage of this supposed daughter’s sister Matilda to Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester (see above).] 

e)         [daughter .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia” had four daughters[553].] 

Earl Humphrey & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

f)          RALPH de Bohun (-after 2 Nov 1256).  Pope Alexander IV issued an indult to “Ralph de Bohun clerk son of the earl of Hereford and Essex constable of England to hold one benefice...in addition to those which he has”, dated 2 Nov 1256[554]

Earl Humphrey [V] & his second wife had one child:

g)         JOHN de Bohun of Haresfield .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannem de Bohun, dominum de Haresfeld, patrem domini Edmundi de Bohun” as the son of “Humfredus quintus de Bohun” and his second wife “Matildem de Avenbury[555].  He performed the office of Constable of England in 1282 when his nephew Humphrey was confined to Brecknock[556]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          EDMUND de Bohun .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannem de Bohun, dominum de Haresfeld, patrem domini Edmundi de Bohun[557]m MATILDA de Segrave, daughter of NICHOLAS de Segrave Baron of Stowe, Staffordshire & his wife ---. 

2.         HENRY de Bohun .  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordić” and his wife “Matildi[558].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” as sons of “Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam et hćredem domini Galfridi filii Petri comitis Essexić”, adding that Henry died young[559]

3.         RALPH de Bohun .  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordić” and his wife “Matildi[560]

 

 

HUMPHREY [VI] de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [V] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his first wife Matilda de Lusignan (-Beeston Castle, Cheshire 27 Oct 1265, bur Combermere Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “dominus Humfredus sextus de Bohun, dominus de Brekenok” as the son of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Anglić et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia[561].  He supported the barons against Henry III King of England in 1263/64 and was taken prisoner at the battle of Evesham 4 Aug 1265[562].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “dominus Humfredus sextus de Bohun, dominus de Brekenok” was captured at the battle of Evesham and taking to “castellum de Bystone juxta Cestriam” where he died “in vigilia sanctorum Simonis et Judć”, adding that he was buried “in abbathia de Cumbremere[563].  A writ dated 21 Feb "51 Hen III", after the death of "Humphrey de Boun", names "Humphrey son of the said Humphrey and Eleanor his wife, aged 18 1/2 , is heir"[564]

m firstly (after Aug 1241) ELEANOR de Briouse, daughter and co-heiress of WILLIAM de Briouse Lord of Abergavenny & his wife Eve Marshal of the Earls of Pembroke (-bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Isabella, Matildis, Eva et Alianora” as the four daughters of “Willielmus de Brews quartus” and his wife “Evam filiam domini Willielmi Mareschalli”, adding that Eleanor married “Hunfredo de Bohun quinto cum dominio de Brekenok”, corrected to “Humfredus sextus” in a later passage which also adds that the marriage took place after the death of Humphrey’s mother[565].  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Matilda, Alianora et Eva" as the three daughters of "Willielmo de Brewes" and his wife "quinta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Eva", adding that Eleanor married "Humfrido de Bohun vi"[566].  A manuscript in Aske’s collections names “…Elionor of Brewis, Ladi and heire of the land of Bricon…” among those buried at Lanthony Priory[567]

m secondly JOAN de Quincy, daughter and co-heiress of ROBERT de Quincy & his wife Helen of Wales (-25 Nov 1284).  An undated writ "48 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Quency earl of Winchester", records that "Joan, wife of Humphrey de Boum the younger of full age, and Hawis, within age, daughters of the late Robert de Quency" were his heirs in the manor of "Styventon alias Steventon [Bedford]"[568].   A writ dated 15 Dec "12 Edw I", after the death of "Joan late the wife of Humphrey de Boun alias de Bohun", records that she died "on Thursday the feast of St Katherine 12 Edw I" and that "Hawis her sister, late the wife of Baldwin Wake, is her next heir and of full age"[569]

Humphrey [VI] de Bohun & his first wife had four children: 

1.         HUMPHREY [VII] de Bohun ([1249]-1298).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus septimus de Bohun” as son of “dominus Humfredus sextus de Bohun, dominus de Brekenok” and his wife “Alianoram de Brewes[570].  He succeeded his grandfather in 1275 as Earl of Hereford and Essex. 

-        see below

2.         GILBERT de Bohun .  His brother granted him all the lands in Ireland belonging to their mother[571]

3.         --- de Bohunm ---.  One child: 

a)         OLIVER de Bohun .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus sextus de Bohun” as “avus domini Oliveri de Bohun” but does not name Oliver’s parents[572]

4.         ELEANOR de Bohun (-20 Feb 1314, bur Walden Abbey).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1313 X Kal Mar” of “Elianora comitissa Derbi” and her burial at Walden[573]m (26 Jun 1269) as his second wife, ROBERT de Ferrers Earl of Derby, son of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his second wife Margaret de Quincy of Winchester ([1239]-1279, bur [Stafford, Priory of St Thomas]). 

 

 

HUMPHREY [VII] de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [VI] de Bohun & his first wife Eleanor de Briouse of Abergavenny ([1249]-Pleshey 31 Dec 1298, bur Walden, Essex).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus septimus de Bohun” as son of “dominus Humfredus sextus de Bohun, dominus de Brekenok” and his wife “Alianoram de Brewes[574].  A writ dated 21 Feb "51 Hen III", after the death of "Humphrey de Boun", names "Humphrey son of the said Humphrey and Eleanor his wife, aged 18 1/2 , is heir"[575].  He succeeded his grandfather in 1275 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England.  He was confined to Brecknock in 1282 and the office of Constable performed by his uncle John de Bohun[576].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1298 II Kal Jan” of “Humfridus de Boun comes Herefordić et Essexić[577].  The Annals of Worcester record the death “II Kal Jan” in 1298 of “Umfredus comes Herefordić” and his burial “in monasterio de Waledene[578]

m (1275) MATHILDE de Fiennes, daughter of ENGUERRAND Seigneur de Fiennes & his wife Isabelle de Condé (-6 Nov before 1298, bur Walden, Essex).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilda de Fenis” as wife of “Humfridus de Boun comes Herefordić et Essexić[579].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus septimus de Bohun” married “Matildem de Fenes”, adding that she died “in festo S. Leonardi” and was buried “apud Waldene[580].  An inspeximus dated 15 Jun 1275 records the dower promised by “William de Fenles lord of Fenles” to “Humphrey de Boun” with “his sister Maud de Fenles in marriage[581].  

Earl Humphrey [VII] & his wife had one child:

1.         HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun ([1276]-killed in battle Boroughbridge 16 Mar 1322, bur York, Church of the Friars Preachers).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” as son of “Humfredus septimus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem de Fenes[582].  He succeeded his father in 1298 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England.  He was deprived of his office of Constable in 1302, but was restored as such 28 Aug 1311.  He was among the Barons who forced King Edward II to agree to the appointment of the Ordainers, of whom he became one himself.  He opposed the Despensers, joined the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster, and was killed while trying to force the bridge at Boroughbridge.  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Humfridus de Bohun” was killed “ad pontem de Burrowbrigge” and was buried at York[583].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus” died 16 Mar 1321 and was buried “apud Ebor, inter Fratres Prćdicatores[584]m (Papal dispensation 12 Aug 1302, Westminster 14 Nov 1302) as her second husband, ELIZABETH of England, widow of JAN I Count of Holland and Zeeland, daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta dońa Leonor de Castilla (Rhuddlan Castle, Flintshire Aug 1282-Quendon, Essex [5] May 1316, bur Walden Abbey, Essex).  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Rothelan" in 1282 of "filiam…Elizabetham" to "Alienora regina Anglić"[585].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[586].  The dispensation for the marriage of “Humfrido comiti Herefordensi” and “Elizabetć natć...Edvardi regis Anglić...relictć quondam Johannis comitis Hollandić” is dated 10 Aug 1302[587].  The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "in festo Sanctć Katerinć…apud Caversham juxta Redyng" in 1302 of "Margareta filia regis Anglić, comitissa Hoylandić et Salondić" and "domino Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordić"[588].  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jan and "Elizabeth…Eduardi regis filia", recording in a later passage that she returned to England after her husband died and married (secondly) "comes Erffordie"[589].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” married “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that she was buried “apud Waldene[590].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “qućdam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage her burial at Waldon[591].  Humphrey [VIII] & his wife had ten children:

a)         MARGARET de Bohun ([Tinehmue] 1303-).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Tinehmue” of “Margareta primogenita” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[592].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that the first Margaret died young[593]

b)         HUMPHREY de Bohun (Knaresborough [1304]-10 Sep 1304).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Knaresburgh” of “Humfridus filius suus primogenitus” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[594].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that the first Humphrey died 10 Sep 1304[595]

c)         JOHN de Bohun (St Clements 23 Nov 1306-Kirkby Thore, co. Westmoreland 20 Jan 1336, bur Stratford Abbey near London).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that John was “comes Hereford et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić[596].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Plesset” of “Johannes” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[597].  He succeeded his father as Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England but this office was removed from him 26 Oct 1330 in favour of his brother "on account of his infirmity"[598].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death in 1335 of “Johannes sine hćrede” and his burial “abbatiam de Stratford[599].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the death of “comes Johannes”, after the death of his brother Edward, “apud Kirkeby Thore sine hćrede in festo sanctorum Fabiani et Sebastiani” in 1335 and his burial “in abbathia de Stratford iuxta London[600]m firstly (Papal dispensation Feb 1325) ALICE FitzAlan, daughter of EDMUND FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alice de Warenne of Surrey (-bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the marriage of “Johannes de Bohun comes”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Aliciam filiam domini Edmundi comitis Arundelić” after the death of his father, and her burial at Walden[601].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Alicia Arundell” as the wife of “Johannes de Boon, comes Herefordić et Essexić” and records that she was buried at Walden[602]m secondly MARGARET Basset, daughter of RALPH Basset Lord Basset of Drayton & his wife Joan de Grey of Wilton (-after 1 Dec 1347).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the second marriage of “Johannes de Bohun comes”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Margaretam filiam domini Radulphi Basset” after the death of his first wife[603]

d)         HUMPHREY [IX] de Bohun (Longmaban, Scotland [1309]-Pleshey 15 Oct 1361, bur London, Church of the Friars Augustine).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that the second Humphrey was “comes Hereford et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and was unmarried[604].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Longmaban in Scotia” of “Humfridus” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[605].  He succeeded his brother in 1336 as Earl of Hereford and Essex.  He granted the office of Constable of England to his brother William for life 12 Jun 1338[606], but it presumably reverted to Earl Humphrey when his brother died in 1360.  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1361 XVIII Kal Nov” of “Humfridus” at London and his burial “in ecclesia fratrum sancti Augustini[607].  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Lord of Brecknock", dated 10 Oct 1361 and proved 20 Oct 1361, chose burial “among the poor brothers, Augustine Friars, in the choir of their church in London”, bequeathed property to “our...nephew Humphrey de Bohun...Elizabeth our niece of Northampton...our niece Dame Catherine d’Engayne...our sister Countess of Ormond, our brother Mons. Hugh de Courtenay Earl of Devonshire...our sister Countess of Devonshire...[608].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the death of “Humfredus decimus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essexić, ac dominus Breconić” in 1361 “apud Pleysis sine hćrede” and his burial “Londini apud Fratres Augustinos[609]

e)         EDWARD de Bohun (Caldecot [1312]-Low Malden castle, Scotland [10] Nov 1334, bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that Edward and William were “nati ad unum tempus” and that Edward died “in Scotia” and was buried “apud Waldene[610].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Caldecot” of “duo gemelli…Edwardus et Willielmus” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[611].  Twin with his brother William.  He replaced his brother as Constable of England 26 Oct 1330 on account of his brother's infirmity[612].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death in 1333 “ad castrum de Low-Malden” of “Edwardus de Boun miles”, drowned, and his burial “apud Walton[613].  He was drowned in Scotland when trying to rescue one of his followers[614]m MARGARET de Ros, daughter of WILLIAM de Ros & his wife Matilda de Vaux (-bur Walden Abbey).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Margareta le Roos” as the wife of “Edwardus de Boon” and records that she was buried at Walden with her husband[615]

f)          WILLIAM de Bohun (Caldecot [1312]-16 Sep 1360, bur Walden Abbey, Essex).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that Edward and William were “nati ad unum tempus” and that King Edward III invested William as Earl of Northampton after the death of his brother John[616].  Earl of Northampton. 

-        see below

g)         ELEANOR de Bohun (-7 Oct 1363).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that Eleanor married firstly (after the death of her father) “domino Jacobo le Botyler Hibernić”, who was created “comitem de Urmond” by King Edward III[617].  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Lord of Brecknock", dated 10 Oct 1361 and proved 20 Oct 1361, bequeathed property to “our...nephew Humphrey de Bohun...Elizabeth our niece of Northampton...our niece Dame Catherine d’Engayne...our sister Countess of Ormond, our brother Mons. Hugh de Courtenay Earl of Devonshire...our sister Countess of Devonshire...[618]m firstly (1327) JAMES Butler, son of EDMUND Butler [Le Botiller] & his wife Joan FitzGerald of Kildare ([1305]-[Jan/Feb] 1338, bur Gowran, co. Kilkenny).  He was created Earl of Ormond Oct 1328.  m secondly (licence 24 Jan 1344, before 20 Apr 1344) THOMAS de Dagworth, son of JOHN de Dagworth of Dagworth, Suffolk & his wife Alice FitzWarin (after 1292-killed in battle Aurai, Brittany [Jul/Aug] 1350).  He was created Lord Dagworth 13 Nov 1347. 

h)         MARGARET de Bohun (-16 Dec 1391, bur Exeter Cathedral).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that the second Margaret married (after the death of her father) “domino Hugoni de Cortney…comitem de Devonschire[619].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records the marriage ”1325 III Id Aug” of “Hugonem tertium” and “dominć Margaretć filić comitis Herefordić domini Humphredi de Bohun”, adding that her mother was “dominam Elizabetham…regis…Edwardi…primi filiam[620].  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Lord of Brecknock", dated 10 Oct 1361 and proved 20 Oct 1361, bequeathed property to “our...nephew Humphrey de Bohun...Elizabeth our niece of Northampton...our niece Dame Catherine d’Engayne...our sister Countess of Ormond, our brother Mons. Hugh de Courtenay Earl of Devonshire...our sister Countess of Devonshire...[621]m (contract [1314/15], 11 Aug 1325) HUGH de Courtenay, son of HUGH de Courtenay Lord Courtenay [later Earl of Devon] & his wife Agnes de St John (12 Jul 1303-2 May 1377, bur Exeter Cathedral).  He was summoned to parliament 23 Apr 1337, whereby he is held to have become Lord Courtenay.  He succeeded his father in 1340 as Earl of Devon. 

i)          ENEAS de Bohun ([1313/15]-Kimbolton [29 Sep] 1331, bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that Eneas died after his father and was buried “apud Waldene[622].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud ---” of “Eneas” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[623].  He is mentioned in his father's will, but deceased in the 19 Jan 1344 ordination of the chantry of his brother William[624].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1331 circa festum sancti Michaelis…apud Kymbolton” of “Ćneas de Bohun” and his burial at Walden[625]

j)          ISABEL de Bohun (Quendon [5] May 1316-young, bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that Isabel died young[626].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Quenden” of “qućdam filia” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić” during whose birth her mother died, and in a later passage the burial of mother and child at Walden[627]

 

 

WILLIAM de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY [VIII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Elizabeth of England (Caldecot [1312]-16 Sep 1360, bur Walden Abbey, Essex).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Margareta…Humfredus…Johannes…Humfredus decimus…Edwardus et Willielmus…Alianora, Margareta secunda, Eneas, Isabella” as the six sons and four daughters of “Humfredus octavus de Bohun, comes Herefordić et Essex, constabularius Anglić et dominus Breconić” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici tertii”, adding that Edward and William were “nati ad unum tempus” and that King Edward III invested William as Earl of Northampton after the death of his brother John[628].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the birth “apud Caldecot” of “duo gemelli…Edwardus et Willielmus” to “Humfridus de Bohun” and his wife “Elizabethć…regis Anglić Edwardi…filić[629].  Twin with his brother Edward.  He was created Earl of Northampton 16 Mar 1337.  His brother Humphrey granted him the office of Constable of England for life 12 Jun 1338[630].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the death of “Willielmus de Bohun…comes Northamtonić et constabularius Anglić” 16 Sep 1350 (an error in the document, corrected when the text records the death of William’s brother Humphrey in 1361 “unum annum, unum mensem et quinque dies” after his brother died) and his burial “apud Waldene[631]

m (licence 1335) as her second husband, ELIZABETH de Badlesmere, widow of EDMUND [II] Mortimer Lord Mortimer, daughter of BARTHOLOMEW de Badlesmere Lord Badlesmere & his wife Margaret de Clare ([1313]-after 31 May 1356, bur London Dominican Church).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the marriage of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere”, previously married to “domino Edmundo de Mortuomari[632].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356 and made “with the leave of my husband”, chose burial “in the quire of the church of the Friars Preachers, London”, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[633]

Earl William & his wife had two children:

1.         HUMPHREY [X] de Bohun (25 Mar 1342-16 Jan 1373, bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus undecimus et una filia…Elizabetha” as the children of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and his wife “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere[634].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Humfredus filius domini Willielmi de Bohun, comitis de Northampton” succeeded his uncle[635].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[636].  He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of Northampton.  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Lord of Brecknock", dated 10 Oct 1361 and proved 20 Oct 1361, bequeathed property to “our...nephew Humphrey de Bohun...Elizabeth our niece of Northampton...our niece Dame Catherine d’Engayne...our sister Countess of Ormond, our brother Mons. Hugh de Courtenay Earl of Devonshire...our sister Countess of Devonshire...[637].  He succeeded his uncle in 1361 as Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England.  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford, of Essex and of Northampton and Constable of England", dated 12 Dec 1372, proved 15 May 1373, chose burial “in the church of the abbey of Walden”, appointed among his executors “...Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Johanna my...wife...[638].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1372 VII die Jan” of “Humfredus de Bohun” and his burial at Walden[639]m (after 9 Sep 1359) JOAN FitzAlan, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster ([1347]-7 Apr 1419, bur Walden Abbey).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the marriage of “Humfredus filius domini Willielmi de Bohun, comitis de Northampton” and “dominam Joannam filiam comitis Arundellć[640].  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus undecimus” married “Johannam filiam Richardi comitis Arundelić et de Surreia[641].  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford, of Essex and of Northampton and Constable of England", dated 12 Dec 1372, proved 15 May 1373, chose burial “in the church of the abbey of Walden”, appointed among his executors “...Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Johanna my...wife...[642].  The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 5 Dec 1375, bequeathed property to “Richard my son...my son Thomas Bishop of Ely...John my son...Joane my daughter [...Countess of Hereford]...Alice my daughter...the eldest daughter of my said son John...Henry and Edward the younger sons of my said son John...William another son of my said son John...my nephews and nieces sons and daughters of Roger le Strange and to my sister Dame Alaine le Strange wife to the said Roger...my...uncle John Arundell[643].  The will of "John de Arundel Knt", dated 26 Nov 1379, bequeathed property to “Eleanor my wife...Joane my daughter...each of my sons and daughters...my brother the Earl of Arundel...the Countess of Hereford my sister[644].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “VII Id Apr 1419” of “Johanna filia comitis Arundel” and her burial with her husband at Walden[645].  Humphrey [X] & his wife had two children:

a)         ELEANOR de Bohun ([1366]-Minoresses’ Convent, Aldgate, London 3 Oct 1399, bur Westminster Abbey).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Alianoram…et Mariam” as the two daughters of “Humfredus filius domini Willielmi de Bohun, comitis de Northampton” and his wife “dominam Joannam filiam comitis Arundellć”, adding that Eleanor was wife of “domino Thomć de Woodstock…regis Anglić Edwardi tertii filio, duci Gloucestrić et comiti Buckinghamić[646].  The will of "Eleanor Duchess of Gloucester, Countess of Essex", dated 9 Aug 1399, chose burial “in the church of the abbey of Westminster...near the body of my...husband Thomas Duke of Gloucester and seventh son of King Edward the Third”, bequeathed property to “my...mother the Countess of Hereford...my son Humphrey...my daughter Anne...my daughter Johanne...my daughter Isabel sister to the...Minoresses[647].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death “1399 V Non Oct” of “Elianora ducissa Gloucestrić” and her burial at Westminster[648]m (before 8 Feb 1376) THOMAS of Woodstock, son of EDWARD III King of England & his wife Philippa de Hainaut (Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire 7 Jan 1356-murdered Prince’s Inn, Calais 8/9 Sep 1397, bur Pleshy, Essex, Collegiate Church of the Holy Trinity).  He was recognised as Constable of England, de iure uxoris.  He was created Earl of Buckingham 16 Jul 1377.  He succeeded as Earl of Essex 22 Jun 1380, in right of his wife after she came of age.  He was created Duke of Gloucester 6 Aug 1385. 

b)         MARY de Bohun ([1369/70]-Peterborough Castle 4 Jun 1394, bur Leicester, St Mary’s Church, later removed to Trinity Hospital Leicester).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Alianoram…et Mariam” as the two daughters of “Humfredus filius domini Willielmi de Bohun, comitis de Northampton” and his wife “dominam Joannam filiam comitis Arundellć”, adding that Mary was wife of “Henrici comiti de Derbi, domini Johannes de Gant ducis Lancastrić filio[649].  She died in childbirth.  m (Rochford, Essex or Arundel Castle, Sussex [20 Jul 1380/10 Feb 1381]) as his first wife, HENRY "of Bolingbroke" Earl of Derby, son of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his first wife Blanche of Lancaster (Bolingbroke Castle, Lincolnshire [3] Apr 1367-Jerusalem Chamber, Westminster Abbey 20 Mar 1413, bur Canterbury Cathedral).  He was created Earl of Northampton and Earl of Hereford in right of his wife 22 Dec 1384.  He succeeded in 1399 as HENRY IV King of England

2.         ELIZABETH de Bohun (-3 Apr 1385, bur Lewes).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus undecimus et una filia…Elizabetha” as the children of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and his wife “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere”, adding that Elizabeth married “Richardo filio et hćrede [Richardi] comitis Arundelić[650].  The will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[651].  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Lord of Brecknock", dated 10 Oct 1361 and proved 20 Oct 1361, bequeathed property to “our...nephew Humphrey de Bohun...Elizabeth our niece of Northampton...our niece Dame Catherine d’Engayne...our sister Countess of Ormond, our brother Mons. Hugh de Courtenay Earl of Devonshire...our sister Countess of Devonshire...[652]m (contract 28 Sep 1359, Papal dispensation Sep 1359) as his first wife, RICHARD FitzAlan, son of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster (1346-beheaded Cheapside 21 Sep 1397, bur Church of the Augustine Friars, Bread Street, London).  He succeeded his father in 1376 as Earl of Arundel. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    HUNTINGDON

 

 

The earldom of Huntingdon was linked to Northampton from the 11th century and both enjoyed a special connection with Northumberland.  Huntingdon appears to have been part of the domains held by Harold Godwinson (later Harold II King of England) in 1051 but was granted soon afterwards to Siward Earl of Northumbria (see ANGLO-SAXON NOBILITY).  When Earl Siward died in 1055, the earldom of Northampton was granted, with Northumbria, to Tostig Godwinson.  Waltheof, son of Earl Siward, became Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton in succession to Earl Tostig after the latter was banished in Oct 1065.  While no evidence has been found which confirms that Waltheof opposed the Norman conquest, he was taken to Normandy in 1067 when his earldom was presumably forfeited.  He submitted to William I King of England in Jan 1070 and his earldom returned, this being the only example of a pre-conquest earldom being restored to the non-Norman pre-conquest holder of the title.   The earldom was presumably forfeited again after Earl Waltheof's rebellion in 1075, but was restored in favour of his son-in-law Simon de Senlis in [1087/90], although the Complete Peerage cites no evidence for the grant[653].  The earldom passed to David I King of Scotland when he married Earl Simon's widow in 1113, passing over the legitimate heir who was Earl Simon's infant son, and to King David's son Henry in 1136.  The Northumberland connection was reinforced when King Stephen alienated Huntingdon to David I King of Scotland as part of the peace treaty between the two countries in 1139 which followed the battle of the Standard.  Empress Matilda's [1142] charter to Aubrey de Vere, concerning his own elevation to the peerage, suggests that Cambridgeshire was also considered within the same sphere of influence as Huntingdon, as she accorded the earldom of Cambridgeshire to Aubrey "unless that county were held by the King of the Scots"[654].  In addition, David of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon was recognised as Earl of Cambridge by receiving the third penny of the county on 23 May 1205[655].  During the English civil war between King Stephen and Empress Matilda, the king of Scotland supported the latter and it appears that the earldom was forfeited yet again.  In [1140/41], Simon de Senlis, son of the earlier Earl Simon, was created Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton by King Stephen, regularising the succession to the earldom.  The rightful heir was by-passed a second time in 1157 when Henry II King of England granted the earldom to Malcolm IV King of Scotland.  Simon de Senlis was recognised as earl in 1174, but after his death in 1185 the earldom passed once more to the Scottish royal family. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of HUNTINGDON 1070-1075 (family of WALTHEOF of NORTHUMBRIA)

 

 

WALTHEOF, son of SIWARD Earl of Northumbria & his wife Ćlfled of Northumbria (-executed St Giles's Hill, Winchester 31 May 1076, bur Crowland Abbey[656]).  His parentage is recorded by Roger of Hoveden[657].  Matthew Paris specifies that he was the son of Siward, of Danish origin[658].  Snorre names “Earl Valthiof”, although stating that he was the son of “Earl Gudin Ulfnadson” and “Earl Ulf’s sister Gyda[659].  He was installed as Earl of Huntingdon and Northamptonshire after Tostig Godwinson was banished in Oct 1065.  Snorre recounts that “Earl Morukare and…Earl Valthiof” failed to prevent Harald III King of Norway after landing on the river Humber in 1066 in a battle “upon the Wednesday next Mathias’ day”, adding that “Earl Valthiof…fled up to the castle of York[660].  Snorre also recounts that “Earl Valthiof” took part in the battle of Hastings and “escaped by flight”, seriously condensing his account of Waltheof’s subsequent career when he adds that King William “sent a message to Earl Valthiof that they should be reconciled” but that he was captured “at a heath north of Kastala-bryggia…put…in fetters and afterwards he was beheaded[661].  Snorre’s narrative includes two fragments of a poem in praise of Waltheof, presumably written contemporarily with Waltheof’s life.  Jonathan Allen suggests that Waltheof himself may have patronised an Icelandic skald (court poet) whose work was eventually passed through to Snorre, providing interesting evidence of the persistence of Scandinavian culture in England in the second half of the 11th century[662].  Florence of Worcester records that "Waltheofum Siwardi ducis filius" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][663].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Stigandum archiprćsulem, Edgarum Adelinum Eduardi regis consobrinum et tres...comites: Eduinum, Morcarum et Guallevum, Egelnodum quoque Cantuariensem satrapam” accompanied King William to Normandy, dated to 1067 from the context[664].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Suenus rex Danorum” sent a fleet led by “duos...filios suos et Osbernum fratrem suum” to attack England, that they were repulsed at Dover, Sandwich and Ipswich, and at Norwich by “Radulfus de Guader”, that they were joined by “Adelinus, Guallevus, Siguardus” but defeated on the Humber, entered York headed by “Guallevus...Gaius Patricius, Marius Suenus, Elnocinus, Archillus et quatuor filii Karoli” but were eventually expelled, dated to 1069, a later passage adding that “Guallevus prćsens et Gaius Patricius absens” made peace with King William at the river Tees[665]Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northamtonić" to "Guallevo comiti filio Sivardi" and "Judith neptem suam" in marriage[666].  Simeon of Durham records that "Waltheu the son of earl Siward…by Elfleda daughter of Earl Aldred" was installed as Earl of Northumberland after the earldom was confiscated from Gospatrick [in 1072][667].  Earl Waltheof joined the conspiracy of the Earls of Norfolk and Hereford against King William in 1075, repented and asked for the king's pardon, but was tried at Westminster at Christmas 1075, imprisoned at Winchester and, after the trial resumed there, beheaded[668].  Florence of Worcester records that "comitumque Waltheofum" joined the conspiracy of William Earl of Hereford and Ralph Earl of Norfolk in [1074] but was tried and beheaded at Winchester the following year[669]

m (1070) JUDITH de Lens, daughter of LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens & his wife Adelais de Normandie (1054-after 1086).  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northamtonić" to "Guallevo comiti filio Sivardi" and "Judith neptem suam" in marriage[670].  A manuscript records that “Juditha comitissa…uxor Waldevi comitis Huntingdon, et neptis Gulielmi Conquestoris” founded Elstow priory[671].  Her parentage is further clarified by the foundation charter of Saint-Martin d’Auchy narrates the church’s foundation by “Guerinfrido qui condidit castellum…Albamarla” and names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum” and “Addelidis comitissa supradicti Engueranni et supradicte Adelidis filia…Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia[672].  The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis records that “Waldevus” married “rex Willelmus…neptem suam Juettam filiam comitis Lamberti de Lens, sororem…Stephani comitis de Albemarlia[673].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Judith uxoris suć" betrayed “Guallevus comes” to the king in relation to the conspiracy with the earls of Hereford and Norfolk of which he was accused[674]

Earl Waltheof & his wife had two children:

1.         MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon ([1071/74]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[675].  Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinć regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonć et Huntendonć” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[676].  Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotić] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[677].  "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[678].  "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[679]m firstly ([1090]) SIMON de Senlis [Saint Lis], son of RANOUL "le Riche" & his wife --- (-Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire [1111], bur Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire).  Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton de iure uxorism secondly (1113) DAVID of Scotland Prince of Cumbria, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife).  Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon de iure uxoris.  He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland

2.         ADELISA of Huntingdon ([1073/76]-after [1126]).  Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage and names her two sons and indicates she had "several daughters" without naming them[680].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Alice younger daughter of Judith and "Rodolph de Tournay", her dowry being "the lordship of Wilchamstowe"[681].  She inherited Walthamstow, Essex[682].  “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesić S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “Hugonis de Toeni filii mei qui ibidem jacet sepultus…Radulphi de Toeni mariti mei…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filić meć Isabellć", by undated charter[683]m (1103) RAOUL de Tosny Seigneur de Tosny et de Conques, son of RAOUL [II] de Tosny & his wife Isabelle de Montfort (-[1126], bur Conques Saint-Pierre). 

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of HUNTINGDON (family of SIMON de SENLIS)

 

 

SIMON de Senlis [Saint Lis], son of RANOUL "le Riche" & his wife --- (-Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire [1111], bur Priory of La Charité-sur-Loire).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that “duo fratres…Garnerius dictus le Ryche et Simon de Seynlyz filii Raundoel le Ryche” accompanied William “the Conqueror” to England[684].  He was created Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton in [1087/90] after his marriage, presumably de iure uxoris, although his late father-in-law's earldom must have been forfeited in [1075] implying that a new grant would have been necessary.  He witnessed a charter to Bath Abbey as "Earl Simon" in 1090[685].  He built the castle of Northampton.  “Symon et uxor mea Matildis” founded the St Andrew’s, Northampton by undated charter, subscribed by “…Johannis nepotis comitis…Symonis nepotis comitis, Warneri nepotis comitis…Petri nepotis comitis…[686].  "…Symonis comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[687].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that Simon died “apud Caritatem” while returning from a journey to “terram sanctam” and was buried there[688]

m ([1087/90]) as her first husband, MATILDA [Matilda] of Huntingdon, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1071/76]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon[689].  She married secondly (1113) David of Scotland Prince of Cumbria, who succeeded in 1124 as David I King of Scotland.  Orderic Vitalis records that David King of Scotland married “filiam...Guallevi comitis et Judith consobrinć regis” who brought him “binosque comitatus Northamtonć et Huntendonć” which “Simon Silvanectensis comes” had possessed with her[690].  Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotić] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband[691].  "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[692].  "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[693]

Earl Simon & his wife had four children:

1.         SIMON de Senlis (-Aug 1153, bur St Andrew's Priory).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[694].  He was restored as Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton [before 1141]. 

-        see below

2.         WALTHEOF de Senlis (-3 Aug 1159[695]).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[696].  "…Waldef filio Reginć…" witnessed a charter dated to [1128] by which "David…Rex Scottorum" made grants to the church of St John in the castle of Roxburgh[697].  Prior of Kirkham.  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Thornton Abbey records that it was founded in 1139 by “Willielmus Grose comes Albermarlić”, and that “cognati sui Wallevi, prioris de Kyrkham…fratris Simonis comitis Northamtonić” arranged the arrival of the first monks[698].  The relationship between the two was through Judith de Lens, maternal grandmother of Waltheof, who was uterine sister of Guillaume’s father.  The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis names “Simonem, Waldevum et Matildam” as the children of “comes…Simon…ex Mathilda comitissa”, adding that Waltheof was "postea…abbas de Malros"[699].  The Chronicle of Melrose records that he was installed as second abbot of Melrose in 1148[700]

3.         MATILDA de Senlis (-[1157/63]).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[701].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi[702].  A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1112 of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and “Matildam de Sancto Lisio”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[703].  The Complete Peerage records her second marriage, citing Hatton’s Book of Seals for “proof of this marriage”, and in a later passage that “her charter of dower lands in Essex and London, bearing her seal, is witnessed by her sons Walter FitzRobert and Saher[704].  The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records "Matildi de Seinliz" in Essex and Hertfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", suggesting that this related to her dower land soon after the death of her husband[705].  A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1140 of “Matildis de Sancto Licio uxor Roberti filii Ricardi”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[706]m firstly ([1112]) ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare Lord of Dunmow, son of RICHARD Lord of Clare and Tonbridge & his wife Rohese Giffard (-[1134], bur Priory of St Neot).  m secondly (1136) SAHER [I] de Quincy, son of --- (-[1156/58]). 

4.         daughter .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi”, but does not name the second sister[707]

 

 

SIMON de Senlis, son of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon & his wife Matilda of Huntingdon (-Aug 1153, bur St Andrew's Priory).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[708].  After his father died, he was passed over as earl in favour of his stepfather.  However, he was restored as Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton [before 1141] by Stephen King of England for whom he fought at Lincoln in Feb 1141[709].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of St Andrew’s Priory, Northampton records that “Simon de Seynlyz junior” founded “abbatiam beatć Marić de Pratis juxta Northampton[710].  A charter of King Edward III confirmed the donations to the Abbey of De la Pre, founded by “Simon comes de Norhamtona”, for the soul of “Gervasii Paynel fratris mei”, by undated charter[711].   Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 of "Symone comite Huntedonić"[712].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “comes de Norhamptone” died in 1153[713]

m as her first husband, ISABELLE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester & his wife Amicie de Gaël .  Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Symone comite Huntedonić" as "filia Roberti comitis Legecestrić" but does not name her[714].  "R. comes Legrecestrie" granted tithes to "Isabele comitisse de Norhamtone sororis mee" by charter dated to the middle of the reign of King Henry II[715].  "I. comitissa Northamptonie" donated land at Groby to Nuneaton priory, for the souls of "patris mei et fratris mei R. comitis Legrecestrie" by charter dated to the middle of the reign of King Henry II[716].  She married secondly Gervase Paynell Baron of Dudley.  Her second marriage is confirmed by charter dated 1187 under which “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meć Isabellć comitissć de Norhamton”, which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus”, witnessed by “Simone comite Northamptonić, Isabella comitissa matre eius[717]

Earl Simon & his wife had four children:

1.         SIMON de Senlis ([1138]-Jun 1184, bur St Andrew's Priory).  The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis names “Simonem de Senliz tercium et duas filias…Amicia et Hawisia” as the children of “comes…Simon…[et] Ysabellam comitissam, filiam Roberti comitis Leicestrie[718].  Robert of Torigny records that "Symon filius eius" succeeded on the death in 1153 of "Symone comite Huntedonić"[719].  He was recognised as Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton in 1174.  “Simon comes de Norhamtonia” donated property to Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire by charter dated 28 Mar 1175, witnessed by “Simon fratre comitis…[720]m ALICE de Gand, daughter of GILBERT de Gand Earl of Lincoln & his wife Rohese de Clare (-1238, bur Bridlington).  Robert of Torigny records that "filiam eius unicam [Gisleberti de Gant]" married "Symon iuvenis filius comitis Symonis"[721].  The Stemma fundatoris of Bardney Abbey names “Aliciam” as the daughter of ”Gilbertus”, adding that she married “Simon de Monteforti comes Noramtonić[722].  A manuscript genealogy of the Gant family names “Aliciam” as the daughter of “Gilbertus”, adding that she married “Simoni de sancto Licio, comiti Huntingtonić et Northamptonić”, died childless, and was buried “apud Bredlinton[723].  "A. comitissa Norhamtunie filia Gilleberti comes Lincolnie" confirmed the donation of land in Scampton to Kirkstead abbey by "Radulfus filius Gilleberti", for the health of "sponsi mei Simonis comitis", by charter dated to early in the reign of King Henry II[724].  Simon & his wife had two children: 

a)         GUNNOR .  The Stemma fundatoris of Bardney Abbey names “Gonorram” as the daughter of “Simon de Monteforti comes Noramtonić” and his wife Alice, adding that she died without heirs[725]

b)         SIMON de Senlis (-young).  “Simon de sancto Licio frater comitis Symonis” donated property to the Abbey of De la Pre, Northamptonshire, for the soul of “Symonis nepotis mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “comitissa Adelyz de Gaund…[726]

2.         AMICE de Senlis .  The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis names “Simonem de Senliz tercium et duas filias…Amicia et Hawisia” as the children of “comes…Simon…[et] Ysabellam comitissam, filiam Roberti comitis Leicestrie[727]

3.         HAWISE de Senlis .  The Vita et Passio Waldevi Comitis names “Simonem de Senliz tercium et duas filias…Amicia et Hawisia” as the children of “comes…Simon…[et] Ysabellam comitissam, filiam Roberti comitis Leicestrie[728]

4.         ISABELLE de Senlis .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1158/74] under which [her brother] "Comes Simon" confirmed to "Willelmo Malduit camerario domini regis et Isabelle uxori sue" the land "in Grendon…" which "comes Simon pater meus dedit Willelmo Malduit et Isabelle uxori sue in libero maritagio"[729].   m WILLIAM [III] Mauduit of Hanslope, son of WILLIAM [II] Mauduit & his wife Matilda of Hanslope (-2 Oct 1194, bur Waverley Abbey). 

Earl Simon had one [probably illegitimate] son [by an unknown mistress]: 

5.          SIMON de Senlis (-after 28 Mar 1175).  Simon comes de Norhamtonia” donated property to Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire by charter dated 28 Mar 1175, witnessed by “Simon fratre comitis…[730].  Simon de sancto Licio frater comitis Symonis” donated property to the Abbey of De la Pre, Northamptonshire, for the soul of “Symonis nepotis mei”, by undated charter witnessed by “comitissa Adelyz de Gaund…[731].  It is assumed that Simon was illegitimate, which appears to be the most likely explanation for his having the same name as his brother the Earl of Huntingdon. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    KENT

 

 

William I King of England rewarded his half-brother Eudes for his help in preparing the Norman invasion of England by granting him extensive lands and creating him Earl of Kent in 1067.  His earldom was forfeited twice, in 1082 and 1088, following his rebellions.  The earldom of Kent was not granted again until 1227 when Hubert de Burgh was created earl by King Henry III.  After the death of Earl Hubert in 1243 the earldom remained vacant for another 80 years before it was granted by King Edward II to his half-brother Edmund of Woodstock. 

 

 

 

A.      EARL of KENT 1067-1088 (family of HERLUIN de CONTEVILLE)

 

 

1.         EUDES [Odo], son of HERLUIN Vicomte de Conteville & his first wife Herleve --- ([1036/38]-[Antioch/Palermo] [2/6] Jan 1097, bur Palermo Cathedral).  Guillaume of Jumičges names “Herleva Fulberti cubicularii ducis filia” as the mother of “Willelmus...ex concubina Roberti ducis...natus“, and that after Duke Robert died “Herluinus...miles” married her by whom he had “duos filios Odonem et Robertum[732].  The birth date of Eudes is estimated on the assumption that Guillaume of Jumičges is correct (which is not beyond all doubt).  Orderic Vitalis records that Guillaume Duke of Normandy granted “multis honoribus in Normannia et Anglia” to “Herluinus...de Contavilla...filios eius: Radulfus, quem de alia conjuge procreaverat, fratresque suos uterinos: Odonis et Rodbertum[733].  Florence of Worcester names Eudes as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[734]Bishop of Bayeux 1050 (when Eudes must have been an adolescent, assuming that his birth date is correctly estimated as shown above).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that, after the death of “Hugo filius Rodulphi comitis Baiocensis episcopus”, Guillaume II Duke of Normandy appointed “Odoni fratri suo” to the bishopric of Bayeux, a position he held for nearly 50 years[735].  Orderic Vitalis records that his half-brother invested him as Bishop of Bayeux on the death of Bishop Hugues, son of Raoul d'Ivry Comte de Bayeux, dated to 1050[736].  He is said to have taken an active part in the preparation of the Norman invasion of England and was present at the battle of Hastings 23 Oct 1066.  His half-brother William I King of England rewarded him with a grant of over 500 manors in England and created him Earl of Kent in 1067[737].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mśnia Guentć”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus prćfecturam Anglić”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[738].  He was one of the leaders of the force which suppressed the rebellion of the earls of Norfolk and Hereford in 1075[739].  He began scheming to become Pope, sending great gifts to influential men in Rome, but was arrested by King William and sent to Normandy where he was a prisoner in Rouen between 1082 and 1087[740].  He was released by King William on his deathbed[741].  Although King William II restored Eudes to his earldom, he was one of the leaders of the rebellion in 1088 which sought to put Robert Duke of Normandy on the English throne[742].  He was banished from England and all his honors and possessions were forfeited.  He became chief adviser to Duke Robert in Normandy[743].  Orderic Vitalis records that Bishop Eudes died “in urbem Panormitanam, quam vulgo Palernam vocant” and that “Gislebertus Ebroicensis episcopus” buried him “in metropolitana sanctć Dei genetricis Marić basilica”, adding that he had been appointed “ab adolescentia sua” (which supports that the theory that he was born after the death of Robert II Duke of Normandy, as discussed above)[744].  William of Malmesbury records that he left on the First Crusade with Robert III Duke of Normandy and died “Antiochić, in obsidione Christianorum[745].  The necrology of Jumičges records the death 2 Jan of “Odo episcopus[746]

 

 

 

B.      EARL of KENT 1227-1243 (HUBERT de Burgh)

 

 

---.  Ellis suggests that the father of Hubert de Burgh was Walter de Burgh, of Burgh-next-Aylsham, Norfolk[747]

m ALICE, daughter of --- (-bur Walsingham).  The Complete Peerage quotes a charter, dated to [1230], under which her son Hubert de Burgh donated the advowson of Oulton church, Norfolk to Walsingham for the soul of "Alice my mother who rests in the church of Walsingham"[748].  

--- de Burgh & his wife had six children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Burgh (-[1205/06]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 7 Oct 1234 which records payment of a fine by his son "Richard de Burgh" for return of land in Connaught which had been confiscated from him "the strife with Hubert de Burgh Earl of Kent his uncle"[749].  Lord of Connaught. 

-        LORDS of CONNAUGHT

2.         HUBERT de Burgh (-Banstead, Surrey 12 May 1243, bur London, Church of the Black Friars[750]).  He was appointed Chamberlain to John Comte de Mortain (the future John King of England) in or before 1198, holding the office until 1205 except for a brief interlude after the return of King Richard I and before the latter's death.  He was seriously wounded at the siege of castle of Chinon in Normandy in 1205, which may account for the loss of his public offices and his temporary disappearance from the records.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hubertus de Burgo" holding 15 knights’ fees in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][751].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Hubertus de Burgo" holding 17 knights’ fees "cum hćrede R. de Bello Campo" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][752].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Hubertus de Burgo" held "Stok de domino rege cum herede Roberti de Bello Campo per servicium ii militum de feodo Moretonie…hundredum de Tinterell" in Somerset[753].  As Hubert at that date still appears to have been married to Beatrice de Warenne, it is assumed that he was holding these knights’ fees by virtue of the right to arrange the marriage of the heiress, not that he was married to her himself.  He remained a powerful supporter of King John, siding with the king against the barons at the signing of Magna Carta in 1215.  He successfully defended Dover Castle against Louis de France who had invaded England in 1216, and was a party to the treaty of peace made with Louis 11 Sep 1217 before he left England.  Hubert became the most powerful official in England during the minority of King Henry III and was created Earl of Kent 19 Feb 1227 immediately after the king came of age.  His downfall came in 1232, when he was deprived of his earldom and imprisoned in the Tower.  He was pardoned and restored in 1234, but thereafter took little part in public life[754].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "III Id Mai" of "Hubertus de Burgo comes Cantić"[755].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in 1243 of “Hubertus de Burgo apud Banstude, comes de Kent[756]Betrothed (agreement confirmed 28 Apr 1200) to JOAN de Vernon, daughter of WILLIAM de Vernon [Reviers] Earl of Devon & his wife Mabile de Meulan (-after 1233).  "Hubertus Camarerius" paid a fine for his agreement with "com Devon de maritanda sui Joha fil ipsius comitis", dated 1200[757].  A charter dated 28 Apr 1200 confirmed the marriage contract between "Willm de Vernon comes Devon…Johe filie ipsius comitis junioris" and "Hub de Burgo dni Regis camerarium", confirming that "honoris sui in Devon cum castello de Plinton" had been allocated to "filie sue priori natu" while "insula de Wicth et Cristeschirche" were assigned to the younger daughter[758]m firstly (after 1205) as her third husband, BEATRICE de Warenne, widow firstly of RALPH, and secondly of DOON Bardolf Lord of Shelford, daughter of WILLIAM de Warenne of Wormegay, Norfolk & his first wife Beatrix de Pierrepont (-before 12 Dec 1214).  Her second and third marriages are confirmed by a receipt dated 22 Jul 1227  for payment of a fine by Hubert de Burgh for "Beatrice de Warenna late his wife, by whom he had children" to have the lands of "William de Warenna her father and…her dower of the lands of Dodo Bardolf, formerly her husband"[759].  Her third marriage is suggested by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Gaufridus de Merlai" held "quoddam feodum in Illington" in Norfolk "de Huberto de Burgo per heredum Willelmi de Warenne uxorem suam", adding that Henry II King of England had granted the property to "Reginaldo de Warrenn"[760].  m secondly ([Sep] 1217) as her third husband, ISABEL [Avise] Countess of Gloucester, divorced wife (firstly) of JOHN King of England and widow (secondly) of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRobert Earl of Gloucester & his wife Avise de Beaumont ([before 1176]-14 Oct or [18 Nov] 1217, bur Canterbury Cathedral Church).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the second marriage of “Isabellam” and “Galfrido de Mandevile comiti Essexić”, and her third marriage to “Huberto de Burgo justiciario Anglić[761].  Her lands and title were confiscated on the death of her second husband, who died a rebel.  The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1217 of “Isabel comitissa Gloucestrić[762].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Johannam comitissam Gloucestrić” died “paucos dies” after her marriage to “Hubertus de Burgo justiciarius Anglić” and was buried “apud Cantuarium[763]m thirdly (Berwick 1 Aug or York Jun 1221, divorced 1232) MARGARET of Scotland, daughter of WILLIAM "the Lion" King of Scotland & his wife Ermengarde de Beaumont (1193-1259, bur London, Church of the Black Friars).  The Annales Londonienses record the marriage in 1221 of "Hubertus de Burgo, justiciarius Anglić" and "sororem regis Scotić apud Sanctum Trinitatum Londoniis"[764].  The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records the marriage "in die Sancti Petri ad vincula apud Bereuicum" of "Marioriam sororem suam Alexander rex" and "comiti de Pendburghe, marescallo Anglie"[765].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hubertus de Burgo justiciarius domini regis” married “filiam regis [Scotić]” in 1222[766].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hubertus de Burgo justiciarius Anglić” divorced his third wife in 1232, because she was “consanguinea” of his second wife “comitissć Glovernić”, in a prolonged and difficult lawsuit[767].  A writ dated 25 Nov "44 Hen III", after the death of "Margaret countess of Kent" names "John de Burgo alias de Burk of full age is her heir"[768].  An undated writ, after the death of "Margaret countess of Kent", clarifies that "she died without heir of her body and…manors ought to revert to John de Burgo aged 40 and more, son and heir of Hubert de Burgo sometime her husband…"[769].  Earl Hubert & his first wife had one child:

a)         JOHN de Burgh (-before 1 Dec 1274).  He was excluded from succeeding his father as Earl of Kent by the terms of the creation of the earldom, succession to which was limited to the issue of his father's third marriage[770].  A writ dated 25 Nov "44 Hen III", after the death of "Margaret countess of Kent" names "John de Burgo alias de Burk of full age is her heir"[771].  An undated writ, after the death of "Margaret countess of Kent", clarifies that "she died without heir of her body and…manors ought to revert to John de Burgo aged 40 and more, son and heir of Hubert de Burgo sometime her husband…"[772].  “Johannes de Burgo” confirmed a donation to Colchester St. John made by “Hawisa de Lamualei filia Hugonis de Boclonde” by undated charter[773].  “Johannes de Burgo et Hawise uxoris mee” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanusely mater Hawise uxoris mee” by undated charter[774].  A charter dated 1235 records a dispute a claim “Johannem de Burgo et Hawisiam uxorem eius” against the abbot of Colchester relating to revenue from “molendino de Nordmilne” and the agreed settlement which refers to “Johannes et Hauuisia et heredes ipsius Hauuisie”, the latter being unnamed[775].  “Johannes de Burgo filius Huberti de Burgo” donated property “juxta Grebbe in villa de Staneweye...” to Colchester St John by undated charter[776].  The Annals of Bermondsey record that King Henry III confirmed the donation by “Johannis filii Huberti de Burgo” of “manerio de Chalk” to the abbey in 1271[777].  A writ dated 1 Dec “3 Edw I”, after the death of "John de Burgo the elder", names "John de Burgo the younger...aged 40 and more is his next heir", records "Hallingebyri...manor...held of the king in chief of tyhe barony of Launvaly...of the inheritance of Hawis his wife", and names “Hubert de Burgo father of John de Burgo the elder[778]m HAWISE de Lanvalay, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] de Lanvalay & his wife Matilda Pecche ([1213/16]-after 1235).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[779].  “Johannes de Burgo et Hawise uxoris mee” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanusely mater Hawise uxoris mee” by undated charter[780].  A charter dated 1235 records a dispute a claim “Johannem de Burgo et Hawisiam uxorem eius” against the abbot of Colchester relating to revenue from “molendino de Nordmilne” and the agreed settlement which refers to “Johannes et Hauuisia et heredes ipsius Hauuisie”, the latter being unnamed[781].  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Burgh ([before 1234]-after 1 Dec 1274).  A writ dated 1 Dec “3 Edw I”, after the death of "John de Burgo the elder", names "John de Burgo the younger...aged 40 and more is his next heir"[782]

Earl Hubert & his third wife had one child: 

b)         MARGARET de Burgh (1223-Nov 1237).  She is named as daughter of Hubert de Burgh by Matthew Paris, who records the anger of King Henry III at her marriage with "Ricardus comes Glovernić" while she was in the king's custody[783].  The Annales Londonienses record the marriage in 1237 of "Ricardus heres comitatus Glovernić" and "Margaretam filiam Huberti de Burgo comitis Cantić" and their divorce immediately afterwards as the marriage had been arranged without the approval of the king[784].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in Nov 1237 of “Margareta filia Huberti de Burgo[785]m (secretly 1237, divorced 1237) as his first wife, RICHARD de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, son of GILBERT de Clare Earl of Hereford, Earl of Gloucester & his wife Isabel Marshal of Pembroke (4 Aug 1222-Ashenfield in Waltham, near Canterbury 15 Jul 1262, bur Tonbridge, transferred 28 Jul 1262 to Tewkesbury). 

3.         THOMAS de Burgh (-after 1216).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Burgo" holding two knights’ fees in "Burcg et Swafham…de honore Britannić" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][786].  Matthew Paris records that “Thomam de Burgo fratrem...Huberti” had been captured by Louis de France “in castro Norwici” and, together with “comes Saresberiensis W[illelmus]”, urged his brother’s surrender to Louis at Dover[787]m ---.  The name of Thomas's wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         THOMAS de Burgh (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de Burgo filius Thomć de Burgo" holding one half of one knight’s fee "de honore Britannić" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][788]

4.         [son .  The precise parentage of Raymond is not known.  It is possible that his father was the same person as Thomas de Burgh (see above).]  m ---.  One child: 

a)         RAYMOND de Burgh of Dartford, Kent (-drowned 1230, bur Dover).  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hubertus de Burgo…Remundus nepos eius” married “comitissam Essexić” in 1227[789].  “Reimundus de Burgo” confirmed the donation of property made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawise uxoris eiusdem”, confirming the confirmation made by “Cristina de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe sponsa mea in...viduitate sua", by undated charter[790].  Matthew Paris records the death in 1230 of "Reimundus de Burgos nepos Huberti" while riding “super ripam Ligeris” when his horse slipped into the water[791].  The Annales Londonienses record the death in 1230 "submersus…in flumine Ligeri" of "Reymundus de Burgo"[792].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Remundus de Burgo” died in 1230[793].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “ultra mare mersus” of “Reimundus de Burgo” and his burial “apud Dovere[794]m ([9 Jan/15 May] 1227) as her second husband, CHRISTINE, widow of WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of ROBERT FitzWalter of Woodham Walter Essex & his first wife Gunnor de Valoignes (-before 17 Jun 1232, bur Shouldham Priory).  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hubertus de Burgo…Remundus nepos eius” married “comitissam Essexić” in 1227[795].  "Roger of Dauntsey and Matilda countess of Hereford, sister and heiress of William de Mandeville formerly earl of Essex" made a fine "for Matilda’s relief and for having seisin of the lands formerly of the same W. earl of Essex", saving "to Reymund de Burgh and Christiana his wife, the dower of Christiana…from the lands formerly of William earl of Essex", dated 29 Oct 1227[796].  An order dated [Nov] 1227 refers to "Reymundus de Burgo…et Christiana uxore eius"[797].  King Henry III granted "duos damos in foresta de Wauberg" to "Christiane uxori Remundi de Burgo”, dated 1229[798].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Cristiana uxore sua, comitissa Essexić” was buried with her (first) husband “apud Soldham[799]

5.         GEOFFROY de Burgh (-1228).  Bishop of Ely.  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records that "Galfridus frater Huberti de Burgo iustitiarius" was elected Bishop of Ely[800].  The Annales Londonienses record the death in 1228 of "Galfridus de Burgo episcopus Eliensis"[801]

6.         [daughter .  Assuming that “nepos” in the source quoted below can be interpreted as “nephew”, the mother of Thomas de Blundeville was the sister of Hubert de Burgh Earl of Kent.]  m --- de Blundeville, son of ---.  [Two] children: 

a)         THOMAS de Blundeville (-16 Aug 1236).  Blomefield states that “Thomas de Blumville, Blundeville or Blunnel” appears to have been “by his arms...of the same family with the Blundeviles of Newton Flotman in Norfolk” but does not name his father and cites no primary source on which this speculation is based[802].  Bishop of Norwich 1226.  The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1226 of “Pandulphus episcopus Norwicensis” and the succession as bishop of “Thomas de Blumwilla clericus curialis[803].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “J. [error for T] nepos Huberti de Burgo” was consecrated as Bishop of Norwich in 1226[804].  Matthew Paris records the death "XVII Kal Sep" of “Thomas de Blundvilla episcopus Norwicensis[805]

b)         [WILLIAM de Blundeville (-before 1226).  Blomefield states that “Will de Blundeville” bequeathed “Blomevyle’s manor in Depham [Norfolk]” to “Richard his son who was lord in 1226 being nephew to Tho. de Blumville Bishop of Norwich”, and gives some details of their descendants, but cites no primary source on which this information is based[806].  If the relationship between William’s son and Bishop Thomas is correctly described, William was the bishop’s brother.  However, “nephew” presumably represents a translation of “nepos” from the original (uncited) source, the imprecision of which as a term describing family relationships is well-known.] 

 

 

 

C.      EARLS of KENT 1321-1352 (PLANTAGENET)

 

 

EDMUND "of Woodstock", son of EDWARD I King of England & his second wife Marguerite de France (Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire 5 Aug 1301-executed outside Winchester Castle 19 Mar 1330, bur Winchester, Church of the Friars Minor, later transferred to Westminster Abbey).  The Annals of Worcester record the birth “Non Aug…apud Wodestok” in 1301 of “regina [filium]…Edmundum[807].  King Edward II issued a charter dated 18 Apr 1318 to “Thomć comiti Norffolcić et marescallo Anglić et Edmundo de Wodestok fratribus nostris...executoribus testamenti bonć memorić Margaretć nuper reginć Anglić matris nostrć[808].  Summoned to Parliament 1320 as Lord Woodstock.  Appointed Keeper of Kent, Dover Castle and the Cinque Ports 16 Jun 1321.  Created Earl of Kent 28 Jul 1321.  He supported King Edward II, with his brother Thomas, in his campaign against the enemies of the Despenser family in Autumn 1321.  He presided at the trial of Thomas Earl of Lancaster at Pontefract Castle 1321.  He accompanied Queen Isabelle on her flight to France, and returned with her to England in 1326 to overthrow King Edward II.  Created Earl of Arundel 26 Feb 1327, the King also granted him all the forfeited lands of Hugh Despenser in Leicestershire (except the manor of Loughborough).  Having received reports that his half-brother Edward II was still alive, he plotted to have him restored to the throne, and was condemned to death for treason.  He supported his deposed half-brother King Edward II, and was executed on the orders of Queen Isabella and Mortimer.  The Annals of Bermondsey record the beheading 10 Dec 1328 “apud Wyntoniam” of “Edmundus Wodestok comes Kantić, avunculus Edwardi regis tertii” betrayed by “Isabellć reginć et Rogeri Mortymer comitis Marchić[809].  His earldom was forfeited.

m (Papal dispensation 6 Oct 1325, Dec 1325) as her second husband, MARGARET Wake, widow of JOHN Comyn of Badenoch, daughter of JOHN Wake of Liddel, Cumberland, Lord Wake & his wife Joan --- ([1299/1300]-from the Black death 29 Sep 1349).  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire, names "Thomam, Johannem et Margaretam" as the children of "Johannem", son of "Baldewinum de Wake", adding that Margaret married "Edmundus comes Cantić, filius regis Edwardi primi"[810].  She succeeded her brother in 1349 as Baroness Wake. 

Edmund Earl of Kent & his wife had four children:

1.         EDMUND ([1326]-before 5 Oct 1331).  He was restored as Earl of Kent, Lord Woodstock 7 Dec 1330.

2.         MARGARET ([1327]-[before 1 May 1351]).  King Edward III appointed representatives to negotiate the marriage between “Bernardetto domino de la Breto...Amaneum primogenitum dicti Bernardetti” and “Margaretam filiam clarć memorić Edmundi comitis Kantić avunculi nostri” by charter dated 4 Apr 1340[811].  No document has been located which indicates that these negotiations culminated in a betrothal.  Margaret presumably died before Arnaud Amanieu was betrothed to Isabella, daughter of Edward III King of England.  [Betrothed ([1340]) to ARNAUD AMANIEU [VIII] d'Albret, son of BERNARD AIZ [V] Sire d'Albret & his second wife Mathe d'Armagnac (-1401).] 

3.         JOAN (29 Sep 1328-Wallingford Castle, Berkshire 8 Aug 1385, bur 29 Jan 1386 Greyfriars Church, Stamford, Lincolnshire, probably later transferred to London).  She was known as the Fair Maid of Kent.  She separated from her first husband shortly after their marriage, returning to him in [1349] after her second marriage was annulled.  She succeeded her brother in 1352 as Countess of Kent, Baroness Woodstock and Baroness Wake, suo iure.  The papal dispensation for the marriage between “Edwardi regis Anglić...filii...Edwardi de Wodestok principis Wallić dicti regis primogeniti” and “Johannć comitissć Cantić” is dated 10 Sep 1361[812].  A charter dated 10 Oct 1361 records the marriage between “domini Edwardi principis Wallić...Edwardi regis Anglić primogeniti” and “Johannć comitissć Cantić” is dated 10 Sep 1361[813].  The Chronicon Anglić records the marriage of “Edwardus princeps Wallić” and “Johannam comitissam Cancić relictam domini Thomć de Holand”, adding that she had been separated “olim...a comite Sarisburić”, dated to 1361 from the context[814]m firstly (Spring 1340) THOMAS de Holand of Broughton, Buckinghamshire, son of ROBERT de Holand of Upholland, Lancashire & his wife Matilda La Zouche (-in Normandy 26 or 28 Dec 1360, bur Stamford, Church of the Grey Friars).  He was summoned to a Council 1353/4 as Lord Holand.  He succeeded as Earl of Kent, de iure uxorism secondly (bigamously, before 10 Feb 1341, annulled by Papal Bull 17 Nov 1349) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu Lord Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katharine de Grandson (Donyatt, Somerset 20 Jun 1328-3 Jun 1397, bur Bisham).  He succeeded his father in 1344 as Earl of Salisbury.  m thirdly (Papal dispensation 10 Sep 1361, St Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster or Canterbury Cathedral or Windsor Castle 10 Oct 1361) EDWARD "of Woodstock" Prince of Wales, son of EDWARD III King of England & his wife Philippa de Hainaut (Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire 15 Jun 1330-Palace of Westminster 8 Jun 1376, bur Canterbury Cathedral, Kent). 

4.         JOHN (posthumously Arundel Castle, Sussex 7 Apr 1330-26/27 Dec 1352, bur Church of the Grey Friars, Winchester, Hampshire).  He succeeded his brother in [1331] as Earl of Kent, Lord Woodstock, receiving livery of all his lands 10 Apr 1351 on coming of age.  He succeeded his mother in 1349 as Lord Wake.  m (Papal dispensation 3 Apr 1348) as her first husband, ELISABETH von Jülich, daughter of WILHELM V Markgraf von Jülich & his wife Jeanne de Hainaut (-6 Jun 1411, bur Church of the Grey Friars, Winchester, Hampshire).  She took a vow of chastity at Waverley Abbey after the death of her first husband, but broke it to marry secondly (Wingham, Kent 29 Sep 1360) Eustace d’Aubréchicourt (-Evreux soon after 1 Dec 1372).  The will of "Elizabeth Juliers Countess of Kent", dated 20 Apr 1411, proved 29 Jun 1411, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors in the city of Winchester in the tomb of John late Earl of Kent late my husband”, bequeathed property to “my...sister Alice Countess of Kent...Joan Countess of Kent[815]

 

 

 

D.      EARLS of KENT [1352]-1408 (HOLAND)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

 

1.         HENRY de Holland (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Henricus de Holand" holding land in Lancashire[816].  

 

 

ROBERT de Holand, son of --- (-1230). 

m CICELY Columbers, daughter of ---. 

Robert & his wife had one child: 

1.         THURSTAN de Holand (-1275).  m --- Kellet, daughter of ---.  Thurstan & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Holand (-after 1302).  A claim by “Rogerum de Hegham” against “Robertum de Holaund...Ricardum de Holaund...” and many other named parties, relating to land in Hale, Lancashire, records that property was granted to “Thurstano de Holaund pater ipsius Roberti cujus heres ipse est”, undated[817].  The document does not explain the relationship with Richard de Holand.  m ELIZABETH de Samlesbury, daughter of WILLIAM de Samlesbury [Blackburn, Lancashire] & his wife Avina --- (-after 5 Mar 1311).  The Complete Peerage names “Elizabeth da. and coh. of William de Samlesbury” as wife of Robert de Holand but does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[818].  A document dated 3 Nov 1257 records the settlement of a claim by “Avina de Samelesbyri” against “Robert de Hampton and Margery his wife” relating to “a mill and...land...in Brihtmede”, under which Avina received the mill for life, reverting to “Robert and Margery, Cecilia and Elyzabeth younger sisters of Margery as heirs of the said Avina[819].  records that Breightmet in 1302 was held by “Robert de Holland and John Deuias, the respective husbands of Elizabeth and Cecily[820].  Inquisitions held 5 Mar "4 Edw II", after the death of "Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln", record in Lancashire "Samlesbery...land held by Lady Cicely de Euyas and Lady Elizabeth de Holand"[821].  Robert & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          ROBERT de Holand of Upholland, Lancashire ([1270]-7 Oct 1328, bur [Preston, Lancs, Grey Friars Church]).  He was created Lord Holland 29 Jul 1314. 

-         see below

ii)         [JANE de Holandm firstly EDMUND Talbot of Bashall, son of ---.  m secondly HUGH Dutton of Dutton, Cheshire, son of ---.] 

 

 

ROBERT de Holand of Upholland, Lancashire, son of ROBERT de Holand & his wife Elizabeth de Samlesbury ([1270]-7 Oct 1328, bur [Preston, Lancs, Grey Friars Church]).  He was created Lord Holand 29 Jul 1314.   

m ([1311]) MATILDA la Zouche, daughter and co-heiress of ALAN la Zouche of Ashby, Leicestershire, Lord Zouche & his wife Eleanor de Segrave ([1289/90]-31 May 1349, bur Brackley).  The Book of Lacock names “Elam, Matildam, Elizabetham, Rogerum de la Souche” as children of “Alanus de la Souch” and his wife[822].  An inquisition held 24 Apr "7 Edw II", after the death of "Alan la Zousche alias la Zuche, la Souche", names "Ellen […the wife of Nicholas de Sancto Mauro] and Maud […the wife of Robert de Holand] his daughters are his next heirs and Maud the younger is aged 24…both aged 26 and more…and a younger daughter Elizabeth aged 20 who has taken the garb of the nuns at Brewode"[823].  A writ dated 23 May "5 Edw III", following the death of "Emelina Longespe or de Lungespe", names "Robert de Holond and Maud his wife” and “the said Maud aged 40 years is her next heir”, while a second writ dated 3 Jan “6 Edw III” and inquisitions dated 9 Mar “7 Edw III” state that Emmeline died “on Whitsunday 5 Edward III” and that “Maud sometime the wife of Robert de Houlond...and Helen her sister both aged 40 years and more are next heirs of the said Emelina[824]

Robert & his wife had six children:

1.         ROBERT de Holand (1312-Hawes, Brackley 16 Mar 1373, bur Brackley, St James's Chapel).  He succeeded his father in 1328 as Lord Holand.  m ELIZABETH, daughter of ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Holand (-Mar 1373 or before).  m ([1355]) JOAN [Alice], daughter of ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          MATILDA de Holand (1356-7 May 1423).  She succeeded her grandfather in 1373 as Baroness Holand, suo iurem ([1372]) JOHN Lord Lovel, son of JOHN Lovel, Lord Lovel & his wife Isabel la Zouche of Haringworth ([1354]-Wardour 10 Sep 1408, bur [Brackley, Northants, Church of St John's Hospital). 

2.         THOMAS de Holand of Broughton, Buckinghamshire (1314-in Normandy 26 or 28 Dec 1360, bur Stamford, Church of the Grey Friars).  He was summoned to a Council 1354 as Lord Holand.  He succeeded as Earl of Kent, de iure uxoris.   

-        see below

3.         MARGARET de Holand (-20/22 Aug 1349).  m (before 1326) JOHN La Warre, son of JOHN La Warre Lord La Warre & his wife Joan de Grelley (-before 24 Jun 1331). 

4.         ALAN de Holand .  He owned the manors of Dalbury and Wecksworth, Derbyshire. 

5.         OTHO de Holand (-[1360/61]). 

6.         MARY de Holandm JOHN Tempest of Bracewell, Yorkshire, son of ---. 

 

 

THOMAS de Holand of Broughton, Buckinghamshire, son of ROBERT de Holand of Upholland, Lancashire & his wife Matilda La Zouche (1314-in Normandy 26 or 28 Dec 1360, bur Stamford, Church of the Grey Friars).  He served the king in various military expeditions in Flanders, Bayonne, and Brittany, and fought at the battle of Crécy 26 Aug 1346.  During his absence in Prussia, his wife went through a form of marriage with William Montagu Earl of Salisbury.  In May 1347, he petitioned Pope Clement VI who ordered Joan to return to Thomas 17 Nov 1349.  Appointed Joint Lieutenant and Captain of Normandy 28 Oct 1359, jointly with Philippe de Navarre Comte de Longueville.  Summoned to a Council 1353/4 as Lord Holand.  He was one of the founder Knights of the Order of the Garter.  He succeeded as Earl of Kent, de iure uxoris

m (1339 or before) as her first husband, JOAN of Kent, daughter of EDMUND Earl of Kent & his wife Margaret Baroness Wake (29 Sep 1328-Wallingford Castle, Berkshire 7, 8 or 21 Aug 1385, bur 29 Jan 1386 Greyfriars Church, Stamford, Lincolnshire, probably later transferred to London).  She separated from her first husband shortly after their marriage.  She married secondly (bigamously, before 10 Feb 1341, annulled by Papal Bull 17 Nov 1349) as his first wife, William de Montagu.  She returned to her first husband in [1349] after her second marriage was annulled.  She succeeded her brother in 1352 as Countess of Kent, Baroness Woodstock and Baroness Wake, suo iure.  She was known as the Fair Maid of Kent.  She married thirdly (Papal dispensation 10 Sep 1361, St Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster or Canterbury Cathedral or Windsor Castle 10 Oct 1361) Edward "of Woodstock" Prince of Wales.  The Chronicon Anglić records the marriage of “Edwardus princeps Wallić” and “Johannam comitissam Cancić relictam domini Thomć de Holand”, adding that she had been separated “olim...a comite Sarisburić”, dated to 1361 from the context[825]

Earl Thomas & his wife had five children:

1.         THOMAS de Holand ([1350]-25 Apr 1397, bur Bourne Abbey, Lincolnshire).  He succeeded his father as Earl of Kent.   

-        see below

2.         EDMUND de Holand ([1351/52]-young). 

3.         JOAN de Holand (1350-Nantes Nov 1384, bur Nantes, Abbaye de Notre dame de Pričres)The Chronicon Britannicum records that “Johannes dux Britannić comes Montisfortis et Richemundić” married secondly “Johannam filiam principisse Gallić et Aquitanić[826].  The testament of “Jehanne Duchesse de Bretagne Comtesse de Montfort et de Richemont”, dated 25 Sep 1384, chooses burial “ou moustier de Nostre-Dame de Prieres en l’Evesché de Vannes et de l’ordre de Citeaux”, appoints “le Comte de Kent nostre frere” as her heir to all property in England, requests that “mon...Seigneur le Duc de Bretagne” continues to enjoy the “Comté de Richemont[827]m (London May 1366) as his second wife, JEAN V "le Vaillant" Duke of Brittany, son of JEAN IV Duke of Brittany & his wife Jeanne de Flandre ([Nov/Dec] 1339 or [30 Sep/8 Dec] 1340-Nantes 1/2 Nov 1399, bur Nantes Cathedral).

4.         JOHN de Holand (after 1358-executed 9/10 Jan 1400, bur Pleshy, Collegiate Church).  Appointed Lieutenant of Ireland in Aug 1382.  In [May] 1384, he murdered a Carmelite friar who had charged John of Gaunt with high treason.  In Jul 1385, he killed the Earl of Stafford's eldest son, in revenge for the death of his squire who had been killed in a quarrel by one of the Earl of Stafford's archers, but he was pardoned 2 Feb 1386.  Appointed Constable of the army which John of Gaunt took to Spain to enforce his claim to the throne of Castile, it was on John de Holand's advice that John abandoned this unsuccessful enterprise.  He was created Earl of Huntingdon 2 Jun 1388, and Duke of Exeter 29 Sep 1397.  He was accused of complicity in the murder of Thomas Duke of Gloucester 29 Oct 1399.  He joined in the plot to seize King Henry IV, but was captured at Prittlewell, Essex and taken to Pleshy Castle where he was executed.  He was declared a traitor by Parliament in Jan 1401, and his possessions confiscated and titles forfeited[828]m (Plymouth 24 Jun 1386) as her second husband, ELIZABETH of Lancaster, divorced wife of JOHN Hastings Earl of Pembroke, daughter of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his first wife Blanche of Lancaster (Burford, Shropshire before 21 Feb 1363-24 Nov 1425, bur Burford Church, Shropshire).  She deserted her first husband, was seduced by her second husband, whom she hurriedly married as she was pregnant.  A late 15th century/early 16th century manuscript names “Henricum regum IIII, Elezabetham comitissam Huntyndonie, Phelippam reginam Portingalie, Edwardum et Johannem qui moriuntur” as the children of “Johannes Gaunt Dux Lancastrie et quartus filius Edward III” and his first wife “Blanchiam filiam Henrici ducis Lancastrie[829].  A late 15th century/early 16th century manuscript names “Henricum regum IIII, Elezabetham comitissam Huntyndonie, Phelippam reginam Portingalie, Edwardum et Johannem qui moriuntur” as the children of “Johannes Gaunt Dux Lancastrie et quartus filius Edward III” and his first wife “Blanchiam filiam Henrici ducis Lancastrie[830].  The will of "John son of the King of England, Duke of Lancaster", dated 3 Feb 1397, chose burial “in the cathedral church of St Paul, of London...beside my...late wife Blanch”, bequeathed property to “Dame Katherine del Staple...my...wife Katherine...my...brother the Duke of York...my...son Henry Duke of Hereford, Earl of Derby...my...daughter Philippa Queen of Portugal...my...daughter Katherine Queen of Castile and Leon...my...daughter Elizabeth Duchess of Exeter...my...son John Beaufort Marquis of Dorset...my...son the Bishop of Lincoln...my...son Thomas Beaufort...my...daughter their sister Countess of Westmoreland and Lady of Nevil...my...son John brother to...Henry...Mons. Thomas Swyneford...Mons Walter Blount...[831].  She married thirdly (before 12 Dec 1400) as his second wife, John Cornwall.  Duke John & his wife had [five] children:

a)         CONSTANCE de Holand (1387-12 or 14 Nov 1437, bur London, St Katherine’s by the Tower).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living[832]m firstly (1404) THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, son of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (1385-executed 1405).  m secondly (before 24 Feb 1413) JOHN Grey of Ruthin, son of REYNOLD Grey Lord Grey of Ruthin & his first wife Margaret de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (-27 Aug 1439). 

b)         RICHARD de Holand (-3 Sep 1400). 

c)         EDWARD de Holand (-young). 

d)         [ALICE (-before 1406).  The Commons petitioned King Henry IV, dated 1400, to restore to the office of Chamberlain of England Richard de Vere Earl of Oxford "q’ ad espose la file de v’re soere n’re tres redoute Seign’r", Nicolas stating that “it is most likely that she was the daughter of Elizabeth Plantagenet, sister of Henry IV, by her first husband John Duke of Exeter[833]m (before 1400) as his first wife, RICHARD de Vere, son of AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Alice FitzWalter ([1385]-15 Feb 1417, bur Earl's Colne).  He succeeded his father in 1400 as Earl of Oxford.] 

e)         JOHN de Holand (Dartington, Devon 29 Mar 1395-5 Aug 1447 bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower).  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Baugé 22 Mar 1421 and remained in captivity for five years[834].  He was created Duke of Exeter 6 Jan 1444.  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living”, bequeathed property to “Anne my daughter...my son Henry[835]m firstly (before 15 Jul 1427) as her second husband, ANNE Stafford, widow of EDMUND [IV] Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster, daughter of EDMUND Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Anne Ctss of Buckingham (-20 or 24 Sep 1432, bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living[836]m secondly (licence 20 Jan 1433) as her second husband, dona BRITES de Portugal, widow of THOMAS Earl of Arundel and Surrey, illegitimate daughter of JOĂO I King of Portugal & his mistress dona Ines Peres Esteves ([1386]-Bordeaux 23 Oct 1439, bur Arundel).  m thirdly as her third husband, ANNE Montagu, widow firstly of RICHARD Hankeford and secondly of LEWIS Johan, daughter of JOHN Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Matilda Fraunceys (-28 Nov 1457 bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living[837].  The will of "Ann Holland Dutchess of Exeter", dated 20 Apr 1457, proved 15 May 1458, chose burial “in...the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London where the corpse of my...husband is buried[838].  Duke John & his first wife had two children: 

i)          HENRY de Holand (Tower of London 27 Jun 1430-drowned Sep 1475).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, bequeathed property to “Anne my daughter...my son Henry[839].  He succeeded his father in 1447 as Duke of Exeter.  He took part in Lord Egremont's rebellion in the north May 1454, was captured and sent to Pontefract Castle, and from there to Wallingford Castle.  A Lancastrian supporter, he fled to Scotland after the defeat at Towton and was attainted by Parliament 4 Nov 1461 and all his honours forfeited.  He escaped to Flanders, where he seems to have been reduced to extreme poverty[840].  He returned to England during the brief restoration of King Henry VI in 1471, but was severely wounded at the battle of Barnet 14 Apr 1471 and captured.  He was released 20 May 1475 and joined the king's expedition to France, but was drowned on the return journey between Calais and Dover[841]m (before 30 Jul 1447, divorced 12 Nov 1472) as her first husband, ANNE of York, daughter of RICHARD Duke of York & his wife Cicely de Neville (Fotheringay Castle 10 Aug 1439-12 or 14 Jan 1476, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Cecily Duchess of York" as mother of "Anne Duchess of Exeter, also wedded to Thomas Saint Leger", and her children "Anthony Saint Leger, Anne"[842].  Duke Henry & his wife had one child:

(a)       ANNE de Holand (-[26 Aug 1467/6 Jun 1474]).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Cecily Duchess of York" as mother of "Anne Duchess of Exeter, also wedded to Thomas Saint Leger", and her children "Anthony Saint Leger, Anne"[843].  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage in Oct 1466 “apud Grenewiche” of “Thomam Gray militem filium reginć” and “dominam hćredem ducis Exonić neptem regis” to the great secret displeasure of “comitis Warrwici” who had previously arranged the marriage of “dictam dominam Annam” to “filium comitis Northumbrić fratris dicti comitis Warrwici[844]m (Greenwich Oct 1466) as his first wife, THOMAS Grey Lord Ferrers, son of JOHN Grey Lord Ferrers (of Groby) & his wife Elizabeth Wydeville (-20 Sep 1501, bur Astley, Warwickshire).  He was created Earl of Huntingdon in 1471, and Marquess of Dorset in 1475. 

Duke Henry had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

(b)        ROBERT de Holandm MARGARET, daughter of ---.  Robert & his wife had two children: 

(1)        JOAN de Holandm firstly JOHN Kendall, son of ---.  m secondly JOHN Trelawny, son of ---. 

(2)        ELIZABETH de Holandm as his second wife, JOHN Reskimir, son of ---.  No children. 

ii)         ANNE de Holand (-26 Dec 1486).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, bequeathed property to “Anne my daughter...my son Henry[845].  The will of "John Neville Knight sonne and heire to Rauf Erle of Westmerland", dated 1 Dec 1449, proved 30 Mar 1451, chose burial “in the church of Hautenprice”, bequeathed property to “my wife Ann[846]m firstly (1441) JOHN Neville, son of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his first wife Elizabeth Percy (-7 Mar 1450).  Lord Neville.  m secondly (1452) her first husband's uncle, JOHN Neville Lord Neville, son of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his wife Elizabeth de Holand (-killed in battle Towton 1461).  m thirdly as his second wife, JAMES Douglas Earl of Douglas, son of JAMES Douglas Earl of Douglas & his second wife Beatrice Sinclair (1425-Lindores Abbey [after 22 May] 1491, bur Lindores Abbey). 

Duke John had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress:

iii)        WILLIAM de Holand

iv)        THOMAS de Holand

5.         MATILDA de Holand ([1359]-before 13 Apr 1392).  A charter dated 18 Jul 1379 records the release from captivity of “Walrand de Lussenbourgh comte de Seint Poul prisoner de nostre...Roy” and the agreement for his marriage to “[la] dame de Courtenay[847]m firstly (Papal dispensation 5 Sep 1363) as his second wife, HUGH de Courtenay, son of HUGH de Courtenay & his wife Elizabeth --- (-20 Feb 1374).  He was summoned to parliament 8 Jan 1371, whereby he is held to have become Lord Courtenay.  m secondly (contract 18 Jul 1379, 1380) as his first wife, VALERAN de Luxembourg Comte de Ligny et de Saint-Pol, son of GUY Comte de Ligny [Luxembourg] & his wife Mathilde de Châtillon Ctss de Saint-Pol (1355-château d'Yvoy 22 Apr 1415, bur Yvoy). 

 

 

THOMAS de Holand, son of THOMAS de Holand of Broughton, Buckinghamshire & his wife Joan Ctss of Kent ([1350]-25 Apr 1397, bur Bourne Abbey, Lincolnshire).  He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of Kent, Lord Woodstock, Holand and Wake.  He was appointed Marshal of England 13 Mar 1380, until 30 Jun 1385.  The will of "Thomas of Holand Earl of Kent and Lord Wake", proved 10 May 1397, chose burial “in the abbey of Brune”, bequeathed property to “Alice my wife...Thomas my son[848]

m (after 10 Apr 1364) ALICE FitzAlan, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Eleanor of Lancaster ([1350]-17 Mar 1416).  The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 5 Dec 1375, bequeathed property to “Richard my son...my son Thomas Bishop of Ely...John my son...Joane my daughter [...Countess of Hereford]...Alice my daughter...the eldest daughter of my said son John...Henry and Edward the younger sons of my said son John...William another son of my said son John...my nephews and nieces sons and daughters of Roger le Strange and to my sister Dame Alaine le Strange wife to the said Roger...my...uncle John Arundell[849].  The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 4 Mar 1392, bequeathed property to “my...wife Philippa...hangings of the hall...with the arms of my sons the Earl Marshal, Lord Charlton and Monsr William Beauchamp...my sons Richard and Thomas...my daughter Charlton...my daughter Elizabeth...my daughter Mareschal...my daughter Margaret...my brother the Archbishop of York...my...sister of Hereford...my...sister of Kent...my mother of Norfolk...my...niece of Gloucester[850].  The will of "Thomas of Holand Earl of Kent and Lord Wake", proved 10 May 1397, bequeathed property to “Alice my wife...Thomas my son[851].  The will of "Elizabeth Juliers Countess of Kent", dated 20 Apr 1411, proved 29 Jun 1411, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors in the city of Winchester in the tomb of John late Earl of Kent late my husband”, bequeathed property to “my...sister Alice Countess of Kent...Joan Countess of Kent[852]

Earl Thomas & his wife had ten children:

1.         THOMAS de Holand ([1371]-beheaded 7/8 Jan 1400, bur Cirencester Abbey).  The will of "Thomas of Holand Earl of Kent and Lord Wake", proved 10 May 1397, bequeathed property to “Alice my wife...Thomas my son[853].  He succeeded his father in 1397 as Earl of Kent, Lord Woodstock, Holand and Wake.  He was created Duke of Surrey 29 Sep 1397, and granted the office of Marshal of England 30 Jan 1398[854].  He was accused by King Henry IV of complicity in the murder of Thomas Duke of Gloucester.  He joined in the plot to seize King Henry IV, but was captured at Cirencester by a mob which beheaded him[855]m (after 20 Oct 1392) JOAN de Stafford, daughter of HUGH Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Philippa de Beauchamp of Warwick (1371-[30 Sep/1 Oct] 1442).  The will of "Elizabeth Juliers Countess of Kent", dated 20 Apr 1411, proved 29 Jun 1411, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors in the city of Winchester in the tomb of John late Earl of Kent late my husband”, bequeathed property to “my...sister Alice Countess of Kent...Joan Countess of Kent[856]

2.         ELEANOR de Holand ([1373]-6 or 18 Oct 1405).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchić comes” married “dominć Elianorć filić domini Thomć Holland comitis Kancić[857].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Eleanor Countess of the March, after wed to the Lord Powis [of] Charlton" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent" and mother of "Anne Countess of Cambridge" and of "Jocosa Lady Tiptoft, married John, Lord Tiptoft"[858].  She died in childbirth.  m firstly ([7 Oct 1388]) ROGER [VII] Mortimer Earl of March, son of EDMUND [III] Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Philippa of Clarence (Usk, Monmouthshire 11 Apr 1374-killed in battle against the Irish Kenlis 20 Jul 1398, bur Wigmore, Herefordshire).  m secondly (after [19/30] Jun 1399) as his first wife, EDWARD Cherleton, son of JOHN Cherleton Lord Cherleton & his wife Joan de Stafford of the Earls of Stafford ([1371]-14 Mar 1421).  He succeeded his brother in 1401 as Lord Cherleton. 

3.         JOHN de Holand (-young). 

4.         RICHARD de Holand (-young). 

5.         JOAN de Holand ([1380]-12 Apr 1434)m firstly (1393) as his second wife, EDMUND "of Langley" Duke of York, son of EDWARD III King of England & his wife Philippa de Hainaut (Abbot’s Langley, Hertfordshire 5 Jun 1341-King’s Langley, Hertfordshire 1 Aug 1402, bur King’s Langley, Church of the Dominican Friars).  m secondly ([1 Aug 1402/9 Aug 1404]) as  his second wife WILLIAM de Willoughby Lord Willoughby de Eresby, son of ROBERT de Willoughby Lord Willoughby de Eresby & his first wife Alice --- ([1370]-Edgefield 4 Dec 1409, bur Spilsby).  m thirdly (licence 6 Sep 1410, [Faxflete Chapel, Yorkshire]) as his second wife, HENRY Le Scrope Lord Scrope (of Masham), son of STEPHEN Le Scrope Lord Scrope (of Masham) & his wife Margery de Huntingfield née [de Welles] ([1373]-beheaded Southampton 5 Aug 1415).  m fourthly ([Nov 1415/27 Apr 1416]) as his first wife, HENRY Bromflete of Londesborough, Yorkshire, son of THOMAS Bromflete & his wife Margaret St John (-16 Jan 1469, bur London, Whitefriars).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1449 whereby he is held to have become Lord Vessy. 

6.         EDMUND de Holand (6 Jan 1383-killed in battle Ile de Bréhat, Brittany 15 Sep 1408, bur Bourne Abbey, Lincolnshire).  He succeeded his brother in 1400 as Earl of Kent, Lord Woodstock, Holand and Wake.  m (Southwark, St Mary Ottery 24 Jan 1407) LUCIA Visconti, daughter of BERNABŇ Visconti Lord of Milan & his wife Beatrice [Regina] della Scala (1372-14 Apr 1424, bur Austin Friars, London).  The will of "Lucy Countess of Kent", dated 1423, bequeathed property “to the abbey of Brunne where my...husband is buried”, made donations for the soul of “Edmund late Earl of Kent my husband[859]Mistress (1): ([1405]) CONSTANCE of York, widow of THOMAS le Despenser Lord Despenser, daughter of EDMUND "of Langley" Duke of York & his first wife Infanta dońa Isabel de Castilla ([1374]-28 Nov 1416, bur Reading Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “Thomam le Despencer et comitem Gloucestrić”, last child of “Edwardus…secundus, filius…Edwardi” and his wife, married “dominam Constantiam filiam domini Edmundi de Langley, filii regis Edwardi tertii et ducis Eboracensis”, adding in a later passage that Constance married secondly “domino Thomć comiti de Arundell” by whom she was mother of “filiam…Elianoram” who married “Hugoni domino de Audley” and had “filium…Jacobum[860].  This last passage is inconsistent with other sources regarding the paternity of Constance’s daughter Eleanor and the identity of Eleanor’s husband.  It is not known whether it constituted a conscious effort to cover the tracks regarding her true parentage.  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death in 1417 of “domina Constancia, mater…dominć Isabellć” and her burial “apud monasterium de Reding 1420[861].  Earl Edmund had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1): 

a)         ELEANOR de Holand ([1406]-)The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “dominam Constantiam filiam domini Edmundi de Langley, filii regis Edwardi tertii et ducis Eboracensis” married secondly “domino Thomć comiti de Arundell” by whom she was mother of “filiam…Elianoram” who married “Hugoni domino de Audley” and had “filium…Jacobum[862].  This passage is inconsistent with other sources regarding the paternity of Constance’s daughter Eleanor and the identity of Eleanor’s husband.  m (Papal dispensation 14 Feb 1430) as his second wife, JAMES Touchet Lord Audley , son of JOHN Tuchet Lord Audley & his wife Isabel --- ([1398]-23 Sep 1459). 

7.         MARGARET de Holand ([1381/85]-St Saviour’s Abbey, Bermondsey 30 Dec 1439, bur Augustine Monastery of St Saviour, London).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Margaret Countess of Somerset" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent"[863].  The will of "John Beaufort late Earl of Somerset, Chamberlain of England and Captain of Calais", dated 16 Mar 1409, proved 5 Apr 1410, bequeathed property to “Henry his brother...Bishop of Winchester” and appointed him and “Margaret his wife” as his executors[864].  The will of "Thomas son of the King Duke of Clarence, Earl of Albemarle and Steward of England", dated 10 Jul 1417, proved 23 Nov 1423, chose burial “in Christ Church Canterbury at the feet of my...father”, bequeathed property to “Margaret my...consort...my...son Henry Earl of Somerset[865].  This document also confirms Margaret’s parentage as “my...son Henry Earl of Somerset” was the testator’s stepson, his wife’s son by her first marriage.  m firstly (before 28 Sep 1397) JOHN Beaufort Earl of Somerset, son of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his third wife Katharine Swynford née Roët ([1372/75]-Hospital of St Katherine by the Tower, London 16 Mar 1410, bur Canterbury Cathedral).  m secondly (Papal dispensation 10 Nov 1411) THOMAS Duke of Clarence, son of HENRY IV King of England & his first wife Mary de Bohun (Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire or London 29 Sep 1388-killed in battle Baugé 22 Mar 1421, bur Canterbury Cathedral). 

8.         ELEANOR de Holand ([1386]-after 1413, bur Bisham).  The will of "Thomas Montacute Earl of Salisbury, Perch, and Lord Monthermer", undated, chose burial “at Bustleham”, and in a codicil required “the body of the Lady Alianore sometime my wife...with the body of the Lady Alice my present wife now living” to be buried with him[866]m (23 May 1399 or before) as his first wife, THOMAS Montagu, son of JOHN de Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Matilda Francis (-Meung-sur-Loire 3 Nov 1428, bur Bisham).  He was restored as Earl of Salisbury 14 Jun 1409. 

9.         ELIZABETH de Holand (-1423)m (1394) JOHN Neville Lord Neville, son of RALPH Neville Lord Neville [later Earl of Westmoreland] & his first wife Margaret Stafford ([1387]-1420). 

10.      BRIDGET de Holand (-before 1416).  Nun at Barking.  She presumably predeceased her mother as she was not mentioned in her inquisitions post mortem[867]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    NORFOLK

 

 

William I King of England created Ralph [de Gaël] "the Staller" as Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1067.  His son followed him as earl but his titles and estates were forfeited after his rebellion against the king in 1075.  The earldom remained un-granted until [1140/41] when King Stephen created Hugh Bigod Earl of Norfolk.  After the death in 1306 of Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk, to whom the earldom had been regranted only for his life, the title reverted to the crown.  Thomas “of Brotherton”, younger son of Edward I King of England, was created Earl of Norfolk in 1312.  He was succeeded by his daughter Margaret, who was created Duchess of Norfolk for life in 1397 and from whom the earldom to her grandson Thomas Mowbray.  The dukedom of Norfolk was restored in favour of his son John Mowbray in 1425, and in 1483 was inherited by John Howard who was descended from the last Mowbray duke’s paternal aunt. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of NORFOLK 1067-1075 (BARONS de GAËL)

 

 

Two siblings: 

1.         RALPH "the Staller" ([before 1011]-1069).  He may have been "Radulphus Anglicus" who witnessed charters of Alain Duke of Brittany in [1031/32].  As "dapifer", he witnessed a charter of King Edward "the Confessor" in 1060.  He was one of the Royal "Stallers".  The Chronicon Centulense records that "un noble, breton d’origine…Raoul, qui jouissait d’un grand crédit et de grands honneurs auprčs de" Edward the Confessor donated revenue to Saint-Riquier[868].  He held extensive estates in Norfolk and Suffolk, although it is uncertain whether this was by royal grant or by inheritance from his wife's family.  Seigneur de Gaël, in Brittany.  William I King of England created him Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1067[869].  The Chronicon Centulense records a charter under which King William I confirmed donations to Saint-Riquier made by "le comte Raoul et Raoul son fils"[870]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  The Complete Peerage suggests that she was the sister of Godwin, a landowner in Norfolk[871].  Earl Ralph & his wife had two children:

a)         RALPH (before 1040-on crusade after 1096).  The Chronicon Centulense records a charter under which King William I confirmed donations to Saint-Riquier made by "le comte Raoul et Raoul son fils"[872]Earl of Norfolk: Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northwici" to "Radulfo de Guader genero Guillelmi filii Osberni"[873].  Florence of Worcester records that "Herefordensis comes Rogerus filius Willelmi…East-Anglorum comiti Radulfo" conspired against King William in [1074][874].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that he escaped to Denmark in search of help, returning with 200 ships under Knud, son of King Svend, and Jarl Hakon but that they left for Flanders before joining battle[875].  Orderic Vitalis records that he was deprived of all his lands and his earldom in England and eventually retired to Brittany, where he was Seigneur de Gaël[876].  Florence of Worcester records that he and his wife accompanied Robert Duke of Normandy on the First Crusade, in the course of which they both died[877]m (Exning, Cambridgeshire 1075[878]) EMMA of Hereford, daughter of WILLIAM FitzOsbern Earl of Hereford & his first wife Adelise de Tosny (-after 1096).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Willelmo Osberni filio” and his wife “Adelizam Rogerii Toenitć filiam” had “unam filiam” who married “Rodulfo comite genere Britoni” with whom she went to Jerusalem on pilgrimage “in diebus Urbani Papć[879].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "comitatum Northwici" to "Radulfo de Guader genero Guillelmi filii Osberni"[880].  Florence of Worcester records that her brother "Herefordensis comes Rogerus filius Willelmi" arranged her marriage to "East-Anglorum comiti Radulfo" against the wishes of King William in [1074][881].  She held her husband's castle during his rebellion in 1075, but was given safe conduct to leave England[882].  Florence of Worcester records that Ralph and his wife accompanied Robert Duke of Normandy on the First Crusade, in the course of which they both died[883].  Earl Ralph & his wife had three children:

i)          GUILLAUME de Gaël .  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Gaël.  Orderic Vitalis names him as nephew of Guillaume de Breteuil, on whose death he unsuccessfully claimed Breteuil but died soon after[884]

ii)         RAOUL de Gaël .  He succeeded his brother as Seigneur de Gaël et de Montfort, in Brittany.  He received Breteuil in 1119.  According to the Complete Peerage, his descendants in the male line continued to hold his estates in Brittany, acquiring Laval and Vitré in the 15th century with the marriage of the heiress of Montmorency-Laval[885].  This descent has not been traced.  m ---.  The name of Raoul's wife is not known.  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

(a)       AMICE de Gaël (-31 Aug [1168 or after]).  She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and specifies that her marriage was arranged by Henry I King of England after she had been betrothed to his deceased son Richard[886].  Heiress of Breteuil.  She is said to have become a nun at Nuneaton after her husband's death[887].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Kal Sep" of "Amicia comitissa Leecestre"[888]The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "31 Aug" of "Robertus comes Leicestrić, Amicia comitissa"[889]Betrothed to RICHARD, illegitimate son of HENRY I King of England & his mistress Ansfride --- (before 1101-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  m (after 25 Nov 1120) ROBERT de Beaumont Earl of Leicester "le Bossu", son of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] (1104-5 Apr 1168, bur [Sainte-Marie de Pré]). 

iii)        ALAIN de Gaël .  Orderic Vitalis records that he went with his father on the First Crusade[890]

b)         HARDOUIN (-after 1066).  Domesday Book records “Hardwin the brother of Earl Ralph” taking away land in Coddenham Suffolk in the time of King William[891]

2.         [daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed if “nephew” is correctly translated n the source quoted below (presumably a translation of “nepos”).  The chronology suggests that it is unlikely that Alsige could have been Earl Ralph’s grandson.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         ALSIGE .  Domesday Book records “Ćlfgeat a free man commended to Alsige nephew of Earl Ralph” holding land in Gislingham, Suffolk in the time of King Edward[892]

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of NORFOLK 1142-1306 (BIGOD)

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         GAUTHIER Bigod (-[1070/78] or after).  An undated charter, which records that Geoffroy "Martel" Comte d’Anjou restored property to the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme after he acquired the county of Vendôme, states that after his death [dated to 1060/67] "Gualterius Bigotus et frater eius Hugo" seized "terram de Pinis"[893].  "…Wauterii Bigoti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040/65] under which "Avesgaudus, Sancti Vincentii abbas" confirmed a donation to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans[894].  "Wauterius Bigotus et Alexandra uxor sua" sold revenue from "terre…Liragundam" to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [1070/78][895]m ALEXANDRA, daughter of ---.  "Wauterius Bigotus et Alexandra uxor sua" sold revenue from "terre…Liragundam" to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [1070/78][896].  Gauthier & [his wife] had one child: 

a)         GUY Bigod .  "Wido, filius Wauterii Bigoti, monachus" is named as one of the judges in a charter dated to [1080/1100] which records a dispute between Saint-Vincent du Mans and "Raherio…de Sarciaco"[897]

2.         HUGUES Bigod .  An undated charter, which records that Geoffroy "Martel" Comte d’Anjou restored property to the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme after he acquired the county of Vendôme, states that after his death [dated to 1060/67] "Gualterius Bigotus et frater eius Hugo" seized "terram de Pinis"[898].  The cartulary of Saint-Vincent du Mans includes a census taken "ad festum sancti Johannis Baptiste", dated to end-11th/early 12th century, which names "…Ricardus Bigot iv d…Hugo Bigot iii s…"[899]

 

 

1.         ROBERT Bigod (-after 1063).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Willelmus cognomento Werlencus de stirpe Richardi magni comes...Moritolii” plotted rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, as reported to the duke by “tyro de familia sua...Robertus Bigot”, and that the duke expelled him to Apulia and granted his county to “Robertum fratrem suum[900]

 

2.         RICHARD Bigod .  The cartulary of Saint-Vincent du Mans includes a census taken "ad festum sancti Johannis Baptiste", dated to end-11th/early 12th century, which names "…Ricardus Bigot iv d…Hugo Bigot iii s…"[901]

 

3.         HAMELIN Bigod .  The cartulary of Saint-Vincent du Mans includes a census taken "hortorum super sartam reddendo ad festum Symonis et Jude", dated to end-11th 12th century, which names "…Hamelinus Bigot xv d…Guarinus Bigotus xv d…"[902]

 

4.         WARIN Bigod .  The cartulary of Saint-Vincent du Mans includes a census taken "hortorum super sartam reddendo ad festum Symonis et Jude", dated to end-11th 12th century, which names "…Hamelinus Bigot xv d…Guarinus Bigotus xv d…"[903]

 

5.         JEAN Bigod .  "…Johannes Bigotus…" witnessed the undated charter, dated to late 11th century, under which "Herbertus [Desreatus]…et Willelmus frater eius…et omnes infantes Herberti" donated property to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans[904]

 

 

Two brothers, one sister, parents not known: 

1.         ROGER Bigod (-1107, bur Thetford[905]).  Domesday Book records “Roger Bigod” holding numerous properties in Norfolk and Suffolk[906].  "…Rogerus Bigotus…" subscribed a charter dated Sep 1101 under which Bishop Herbert donated property to Norwich priory[907].  "…Rogeri de Bigot…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[908].  “Rogerus Bygot” founded Thetford Priory, with the advice of “…uxoris meć Adelicić”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[909].  The Annals of Bermondsey which record the death in 1107 of “Rogerus Bigod, principalis fundator monasterii Beatć Marić Thetfordić[910].  [m firstly ADELAIS, daughter of ---.  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Rodgerus Bigodus, Atheles uxor eius, Willelmus filius eorum"[911].  “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” donated property to Thetford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Rogerii Bigoti et matris meć Adelidis” and for the salvation of “fratris mei Hugonis et sororum mearum”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[912].  The Complete Peerage[913] states that the wording of this charter shows that Adelais, mother of William, was deceased at the time, and must therefore have been a different person from Adelise de Tosny, Roger Bigod's [second] wife, who was recorded as alive in 1136.  However, the question is open to debate as “pro anima” clauses are often difficult to interpret accurately.]  m [secondly] (before [1100]) ADELISE de Tosny, daughter of ROBERT de Tosny Lord of Belvoir & his wife Adelais --- (-after 1136[914]).   Her parentage is indicated by the 1130 Pipe Roll which records "Adeliz uxor Rogi Big…tra patris sui de Belueder" in Lincolnshire[915], which also indicates that Adelise succeeded her sister Albreda in the Belvoir estates of their father.  It is also indicated by the charter dated 23 Apr [1430] under which her descendant “Thomas dominus de Ros, de Hamelake, de Trussebout et de Beavoir” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire made by "antecessores nostros…Robertum de Toteneio, Willielmum de Toteneyo filium suum, Agnetem de Toteneio filiam dicti Roberti de Toteneyo, Henricum de Rya filium Huberto de Rya, Agnetem de Toteneyo, Willielmum de Albeneio primum, Willielmum de Albeneio secundum, Willielmum de Albeneio tertium, Willielmum de Albeneio quartum, Ywynum de Albeneyo, Heliam de Albeneyo et uxores eorundem, Isabellam filiam domini Willielmi de Albeneio quć fuit uxor domini de Ros, domini de Beauvoire et de Hamelake"[916], the connection between Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir, father of Alice, being established through the marriage of her daughter Cecilia to William de Albini Brito.  "Rogerius Bigot…et uxoris mee Adalicie" donated the church of Thetford to Cluny dated [1100][917].  “Rogerus Bygot” founded Thetford Priory, with the advice of “…uxoris meć Adelicić”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[918].  Roger & his [first] wife had one child:

a)         WILLIAM Bigod (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Rodgerus Bigodus, Atheles uxor eius, Willelmus filius eorum"[919].  He succeeded his father in 1107 as Lord of Framlingham, Suffolk.  “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” donated property to Thetford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Rogerii Bigoti et matris meć Adelidis” and for the salvation of “fratris mei Hugonis et sororum mearum”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[920].  Sheriff of Suffolk 1116.  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "…Willelmus Bigod…" among those drowned in the sinking of the White Ship[921]

Roger & his [second] wife had five children: 

b)         HUGH Bigod ([1095]-1177 before 9 Mar).  “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” donated property to Thetford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Rogerii Bigoti et matris meć Adelidis” and for the salvation of “fratris mei Hugonis et sororum mearum”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[922].  The Complete Peerage states that he was William’s brother “presumably of the half-blood”, the basis for the statement being explained on the previous page[923].  He succeeded his [half-]brother as Lord of Framlingham.  King Stephen created him Earl of Norfolk in [Dec 1140/Jan 1141]. 

-        see below

c)         HUMPHREY Bigod (-after [1112/13]).  Royal chaplain of King Henry I and prebendary of Totenhall 1101 to [1112/13][924]

d)         GUNNOR Bigod (-before [1137]).  A charter of Hugh Bigod for Norwich Priory refers to property given by “his sister Gunnor”[925].  “Robert de Essex and Gunnora his wife, daughter of Roger Bigod” donated Fremingham church to Thetford priory, Norfolk for the souls of their ancestors and of "their son Henry on his birth-day"[926].  It is not clear from this extract whether Gunnor’s father was named in the original document.  Her first marriage is indicated by the charter of King Henry II which confirmed donations to Thetford Priory, including the donation by “Gunnorć matris Henrici de Exessa[927].  “Rob Waster” donated "duos partes totius decimć meć de Wereslai" to St Neot’s, Huntingdonshire, for the soul of “Soeni de Essessa” and for the health of "domini mei Roberti filii prćdicti Soeni…Gunnor uxoris suć…uxoris meć et Willielmi filii Gerei patris sui", by undated charter[928].  “Hamo de Sancto Claro” donated “ecclesie Sancte Marie Walcre” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of King Henry I, Queen Matilda, “Eudonis dapiferi et...mee et uxoris mee Gunnoris et anime Huberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated to before 1119), witnessed by “Willelmo de Sancto Claro, Huberto de Sancto Claro...[929].  Her second husband confirmed grants of her marriage portion in Brome for her soul[930]m firstly ROBERT FitzSwein Lord of Rayleigh, Essex son of SWEIN FitzRobert & his wife --- (-[1132/40][931]).  [932]m secondly as his first wife, HAMON de Saint-Clair, son of --- (-after 1139). 

e)         MATILDA Bigod (-[1121/33][933]).  “Willielmus de Albeneyo, pincerna Henrici regis Anglorum” donated property to Wymondham priory, assisted by “uxoris suć Matilidis filić…Rogeri Bigot” by undated charter, witnessed by “filii…eiusdem Willielmi, Nigellus et Oliverus[934]m GUILLAUME d'Aubigny "Pincerna", son of ROGER d'Aubigny & his wife Amice --- (-1139). 

f)          CECILY Bigod (-after 1136).  Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated 23 Apr [1430] under which her descendant “Thomas dominus de Ros, de Hamelake, de Trussebout et de Beavoir” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire made by "antecessores nostros…Robertum de Toteneio, Willielmum de Toteneyo filium suum, Agnetem de Toteneio filiam dicti Roberti de Toteneyo, Henricum de Rya filium Huberto de Rya, Agnetem de Toteneyo, Willielmum de Albeneio primum, Willielmum de Albeneio secundum, Willielmum de Albeneio tertium, Willielmum de Albeneio quartum, Ywynum de Albeneyo, Heliam de Albeneyo et uxores eorundem, Isabellam filiam domini Willielmi de Albeneio quć fuit uxor domini de Ros, domini de Beauvoire et de Hamelake"[935], the connection with Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir, her maternal grandfather, being established through her marriage.  She inherited Belvoir from her mother.  "…Willelmu[us] de Albinioc, Cecilia uxor eius, filii eius Willelmus, Rogerius, Matildis filia eius" are listed in the Liber Vitć of Thorney abbey[936].  "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…[937].  "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Cecilić uxoris meć et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…[938].  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hćredis mei et Matildis uxoris meć et Cecilić matris meć, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[939].  “Willielmus de Albineio” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hćredis mei et Matildis uxoris meć et Cecilić matris meć, necnon de Radulphi de Albineio fratris mei", by undated charter[940]m WILLIAM de Albini Brito, son of MAIN & his wife Adelisa [de Bohun] (-after 1148).  He owned part of the fee of Belvoir before Cecily's mother held it, the Complete Peerage concluding therefore that the marriage may have been arranged to settle rival claims[941]

2.         WILLIAM Bigod (-after [1091]).  Domesday Book records that the king gave land in Horsey, Norfolk to “Roger Bigod...when his brother William came from Apulia with Geoffrey Ridel[942].  “Willelmus Bigut...” witnessed a charter dated to [1091] records the settlement of a challenge by "Ricardi fratris Widonis de Rupe", represented by "miles…nepos Gisleberti de Marlo…Compains", to the donation by "Hugo comes de Domno Martino" of "feodum…Vuidonis de Rupe" to the priory of Saint-Leu d’Esserent[943].  “Willelmi Bigot” donated “medietate terre de Fraituilla” to Saint-Wandrille, with the consent of “Guidone de Roca et filio eius Widone”, by charter dated to [1091/1120], witnessed by “Hugone sororio suo de Hosdenc et Ricardo Oliuier...[944]

3.         MATILDA (-after [1107]).  “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” confirmed donations to Thetford Priory, including the donations of “terrć in Daneseia, de maritagio prćdictć Matildis” made by “Hugo de Hosdene et uxor eius Matildis”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[945].  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1091/1120] which records the donation made to Saint-Wandrille by “Willelmi Bigot”, witnessed by “Hugone sororio suo de Hosdenc...[946]The Complete Peerage dates this charter to [1107][947]m HUGUES de Hosdenc, son of --- (-after [1107]). 

 

 

HUGH Bigod, son of ROGER Bigod of Earsham, Suffolk & his [second] wife Adelise de Tosny ([1095]-1177 before 9 Mar).  “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” donated property to Thetford Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Rogerii Bigoti et matris meć Adelidis” and for the salvation of “fratris mei Hugonis et sororum mearum”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[948].  The Complete Peerage states that he was William’s brother “presumably of the half-blood”, the basis for the statement being explained on the previous page[949].  He succeeded his [half-]brother in 1120 as Lord of Framlingham, Suffolk.  "…Hug Bigoto…" subscribed the charter date [3/10] Jun 1123 under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of "Edrici fil Chetelli" to "Walto de Gloec"[950].  King Stephen created him Earl of Norfolk in [Dec 1140/Jan 1141].  The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the death in 1177 of "comes Hugo Bigod, vir magnificus"[951].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1177 of "Hugo Bigot comes" and that he was succeeded by "Rogerius filius eius"[952]

m firstly (annulled) as her first husband, JULIANE de Vere, daughter of AUBREY de Vere Lord of Hedingham & his wife Adelisa de Clare (-after 1185).  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissć Julianć matris meć et Idć uxoris meć”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[953].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Duvercurt” held by “comitissa Juliana…soror comitis Albrici[954].  She married secondly Walkelin Maminot.  The Complete Peerage says that “for the souls of her father and mother and of her husbands Hugh Bigoth and Walkelin Maminot she granted Begham Abbey land in Brockley” but does not quote the original[955].  According to the Complete Peerage, she was still living in 1185, citing a grant by “Juliana comitissa” at Dovercourt to Colne Priory, witnessed by “Alberico comite et Alberico filius eius”, adding “which being notified to Gilbert Bishop of London was not later than 1189[956]

m secondly as her first husband, GUNDRED, daughter of --- (-[1200/08]).  Documents show that “Gundred, widow of Hugh Earl of Norfolk”, disputed her husband’s inheritance after his death in favour of her son Hugh[957].  She married secondly, as his second wife, Roger de Glanville.  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Bungay Nunnery by “Rogeri de Glanvill et Gundredć comitissć uxoris meć” of property at Bungay[958].  It is probably a safe conclusion that Roger de Glanville’s “countess Gundred” was the widow of the earl of Norfolk as no other countess of this name has been identified at that time in England.  According to The Complete Peerage[959], she was “apparently” Gundred of Warwick, daughter of Roger Earl of Warwick & his wife Gundred de Warenne of Surrey.  This parentage is deduced from a charter under which "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[960].  The Complete Peerage makes the assumption that “Gundrede uxoris mee” and “Comitisse” in this document refer to the same person[961].  A charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic[962], certainly suggests that this assumption is probably correct, but the question is not entirely without doubt.  However, greater problems arise when attempting to link the supposed daughter of Roger Earl of Warwick with these two marriages.  The Complete Peerage cites a series of documents based on which, it suggests, the link is a reasonable assumption[963].  However, on closer examination, the only one of these documents which provides any indication of a connection is the Red Book of the Exchequer, in which the 1166 return of William Earl of Warwick (Gundred’s supposed brother) shows that he had received Bungay (subject of the donation in the charter quoted above) in exchange from the Earl of Leicester[964].  However, this provides only circumstancial evidence regarding the link and, if this is the only indication available, it cannot safely be concluded that the link is proved beyond all doubt.  The safest position is therefore to show Gundred’s parentage as unproven. 

Earl Hugh & his first wife had one child: 

1.         ROGER Bigod (-1221 before 2 Aug).  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1177 of "Hugo Bigot comes" and that he was succeeded by "Rogerius filius eius"[965].  He was recognised as Earl of Norfolk 25 Nov 1189.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Rogerus Bigod" paying "lxii l xii s vi d" in Norfolk, Suffolk[966].  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissć Julianć matris meć et Idć uxoris meć”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[967].  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[968]m IDA, daughter of ---.  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[969].  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissć Julianć matris meć et Idć uxoris meć”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[970].  She was mistress ([1175/76] of Henry II King of England, and mother of William Longespee Earl of Salisbury.  The relationship is confirmed by two documents.  Firstly, William Longespee refers to his mother as "comitissa Ida, mater mea" and "Ida comitissa, mater mea" in two charters[971].  Secondly, a list of hostages captured at the battle of Bouvines in 1214 includes "Rad[ulfus] Bigot frater comitis Salesbir[iensis]"[972].  Roger & his wife had [seven] children: 

a)         HUGH Bigod (-[11/18] Feb 1225).  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[973].  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissć Julianć matris meć et Idć uxoris meć”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[974].  He succeeded his father in 1221 as Earl of Norfolk

-        see below

b)         WILLIAM Bigod .  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[975]

c)         JOHN Bigod .  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[976]

d)         RALPH Bigod (-after 1214).  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[977].  A list of hostages captured at the battle of Bouvines in 1214 includes "Rad[ulfus] Bigot frater comitis Salesbir[iensis]"[978]

e)         ROGER Bigod (-1230).  “Rogerus Bigot, filius comitis Rogeri Bigot” granted property to “Willelmo Russell filio Waldras” by charter dated to [1190/1220][979]

f)          BASILIA .  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[980]

g)         MARY Bigod .  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[981].  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Ranulphum filium Roberti" married "Maria filia Rogeri Bigod comitis Norfolk"[982]m RANDULF FitzRobert Lord of Middleham, son of ROBERT FitzRalph & his wife Heloise de Glanville. 

h)         MARGERY Bigod .  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[983].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Margeria de Hastinges" holding one knight’s fee "in Torp" in Lancashire in [1210/12][984]m WILLIAM de Hastings, son of WILLIAM de Hastings & his first wife Matilda Banaster . 

i)          IDA .  The Liber Vitć of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[985]

j)          [ALICE Bigod (-after 1214).  According to the Complete Peerage, the second wife of Aubrey was “apparently” the daughter of Roger, but it cites no primary source on which this is based, suggesting that “it may be derived from the Book of Colne Priory” without further explanation[986]m (after 1207) as his second wife, AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford & his third wife Agnes de Essex ([1163 or later]-1214 before Oct, bur Colne Priory).]  

Earl Hugh & his second wife had two children: 

2.         HUGH Bigod .  Documents show that “Gundred, widow of Hugh Earl of Norfolk”, disputed her husband’s inheritance after his death in favour of her son Hugh[987].  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissć Julianć matris meć et Idć uxoris meć”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[988]

3.         WILLIAM Bigod .  The Complete Peerage names “Hugh and William” as the two sons of Earl Hugh by his second marriage, citing the 1190/91 Pipe Roll[989][990]m MARGARET, daughter and heiress of ROBERT de Sutton, of Bures, Essex & his wife ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Walterus de Verdun" against "abbatem de Meaudona" for "aduocacionem ecclesie de Langedona" granted by "Robertus de Sutton" to "Willelmo de Bigod in maritagium cum filia sua"[991]

 

 

1.         HENRY Bigod (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus Bigod" holding "dimidiam hidam per serjanteriam" in Hereford in [1210/12][992]

 

 

HUGH Bigod, son of ROGER Bigod Earl of Norfolk & his wife Ida --- (-[11/18] Feb 1225).  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissć Julianć matris meć et Idć uxoris meć”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[993].  He succeeded his father in 1221 as Earl of Norfolk.  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hugo Bigot comes” died in 1225[994].  The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1225 of “Hugo Bigot comes Norfolchić[995]

m ([before Lent] 1207) as her first husband, MATILDA Marshal of Pembroke, daughter of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel Ctss of Pembroke ([before 1195]-1/7 Apr 1248).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Matilda…Johanna…Isabella” as the daughters of “Willielmi Marescalli comitis Penbrochić”, adding that Matilda married “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and secondly “Johanni de Garrene comiti de Surrey[996].  Her birth date is estimated from the birth of her first child in [1212/13].  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Matildis uxor Hugonis Bygod" dated 7 Sep 1217[997].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hugo Bigot comes…uxor” married “comiti Warennić[998].  She married secondly as his second wife, William [IV] de Warenne Earl of Surrey.  

Earl Hugh & his wife had [four] children:

1.         [ISABEL .  The sources which report the parentage of the wife of Gilbert de Lacy are conflicting.  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Gilbertus de Lacy” married “Isabellć Mareschal[999], presumably confusing her with Isabel daughter of William Marshal Earl of Pembroke who married firstly Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hereford and secondly Richard Earl of Cornwall.  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Isabella soror Johannis" as daughter of ”Rogerus sive Radulphus Bigod, secundus filius Hugonis le Bigod com. Norfolke et Suffolke…” and his wife “Bertam de Fornivale”, adding that she married firstly "Gilberto de Lacy" and secondly "Johanni Fitz-Geffrey"[1000].  This must also be incorrect, as any children of Ralph Bigod could not have been born before the late 1220s at the earliest, which is inconsistent with the timing of Isabel’s first marriage.  If Isabel was a member of the Bigod family, she must have been the daughter of Hugh and Matilda Marshal of Pembroke.  This is the solution adopted by the Complete Peerage[1001], although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  m firstly GILBERT de Lacy, of Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire, son of WALTER de Lacy Lord of Meath & his wife --- (-[12 Aug/25 Dec] 1230, bur Lanton, Wales).  m secondly JOHN FitzGeoffrey, son of GEOFFREY FitzPiers Earl of Essex & his second wife Aveline de Clare (-1258).  Justiciar of Ireland.] 

2.         ROGER Bigod ([1212/13]-4 Jul 1270, bur Thetford 10 Jul 1270).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Hugo Bigod primus filius, comes Norfolke et Suffolke, et Rogerus sive Radulfus secundus filius” as the children of “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and his wife[1002], although this reverses the order of birth of the two sons.  He succeeded his father in 1225 as Earl of Norfolk.  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "die Translationis Sancti Martini" [4 Jul] of "Rogerus Bigod comes Norfol. et Suff. marescallus Anglić, Cuhabe" and his burial "apud Thetford monachorum"[1003].  The Annals of Osney record the death “V Non Jul” in 1270 of “Rogerus Bigod marescallus Anglić[1004].  A writ dated 6 Jul "54 Hen III", after the death of "Roger le Bygod earl of Norfolk", names "Roger Bigot, son of the late Hugh le Bigot brother of the said earl, age variously stated as 24 and more, 25 and more and 26 and more, is his heir"[1005]m (Alnwick May 1225, repudiated 1245 on grounds of consanguinity, compelled to cohabit again by ecclesiastical sentence 1253) ISABEL of Scotland, daughter of WILLIAM "the Lion" King of Scotland & his wife Ermengarde de Beaumont (-after 1253, bur Church of the Black Friars, London).  Henry III King of England granted property to "Isabelle soori A. regis Scottorum" on her marriage to "Rogero filio et heredi H. le Bigod comitis Norfolkie" dated 11 May 1225[1006].  An order dated 20 May 1225 refers to the marriage of "Rogerum fil et heredem H. com le Bigod" and "Isab sorore reg Scot"[1007].  She is called "filiam regis Scotić" (but not named) by Matthew Paris when he records her husband's resumption of their marriage[1008].  She appears to have been living in Gloucestershire in Oct 1263. 

3.         HUGH Bigod (-before 7 May 1266).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Hugo Bigod primus filius, comes Norfolke et Suffolke, et Rogerus sive Radulfus secundus filius” as the children of “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and his wife[1009], although this reverses the order of birth of the two sons.  Chief Justiciar of England 1257.  m (after 1241) as her second husband, JOAN de Stuteville, widow of HUGH Wake, daughter of NICHOLAS [IV] de Stuteville & his wife Devorguilla of Galloway (-before 6 Apr 1276).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Leicester, dated 1247, which include "De terris Normannorum, dicunt quod Hugo le Bigod tenet Wyrithele nomine Johanne uxoris sue que fuit uxor Hugonis Wake..."[1010].  The Chronicle of Lanercost records in 1255 a dispute involving "Hugonem de Bigod, fratrem Rogeri comitis Marescalli, pro uxore sua filia et herede dominorum  de Stuteville"[1011].  A writ dated 6 Apr "4 Edw I", after the death of "Joan de Stutevill" names "Baldwin de Wake her son is her next heir and of full age", and also refers to events "after the death of Hugh le Bigot sometime her husband"[1012].  Hugh & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROGER Bigod ([1243/46]-6 Dec 1306).  A writ dated 6 Jul "54 Hen III", after the death of "Roger le Bygod earl of Norfolk", names "Roger Bigot, son of the late Hugh le Bigot brother of the said earl, age variously stated as 24 and more, 25 and more and 26 and more, is his heir"[1013].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "Rogerum filium Hugonis Bigod fratris eiusdem defuncti" when recording that he succeeded his paternal uncle as Earl of Norfolk[1014].  He succeeded his uncle in 1270 as Earl of Norfolk.  “Rogerus le Bigod comes Norfolcić” donated property to Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire by charter dated 4 Aug 1301, witnessed by ”domino Johanne le Bygod fratre meo, domino Johanne de Bygod de Stocton…[1015].  The earldom reverted to the crown on his death, under the terms of a re-grant for life agreed 12 Apr 1302[1016]m firstly (before 29 Oct 1271) as her second husband, ALINE Basset, widow of HUGH Le Despencer, daughter and heiress of PHILIP Basset of Wycombe, Berkshire & his first wife Hawise de Lovaine ([1242/50]-before 11 Apr 1281).  A writ dated 6 Nov "55 Hen III", after the death of "Philip Basset", names "Aline his daughter, wife of Roger Bygod earl of Norfolk, marshal of England, late the wife of Hugh le Despensir, age variously stated as 22 and more, 24 and more, 26 and 30 and more, is the heir"[1017].  Inquisitions after a writ "9 Edw I" following the death of "Aline la Despensere daughter and heir of Philip Basset, alias Aveline countess of Norfolk alias Aline countess Marescall" name “Hugh son of Hugh le Despencer age [...20 in the first week of March last] is next heir[1018]m secondly (1290) ALIX de Hainaut, daughter of JEAN II Comte de Hainaut [later JAN II Count of Holland] & his wife Philippine de Luxembourg (-26 Oct 1317).  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage of "Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchić et marescallus Anglić" and "Aliciam filiam Johannis de Areynes comitis Agennogić"[1019]

b)         JOHN Bigod .  “Rogerus le Bigod comes Norfolcić” donated property to Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire by charter dated 4 Aug 1301, witnessed by ”domino Johanne le Bygod fratre meo, domino Johanne de Bygod de Stocton…[1020].  His brother settled on him, his wife and two sons, the manor of Settrington, Yorkshire 25 Apr 1302[1021].  An inspeximus dated 4 Mar 1303 records that “Roger le Bygod earl of Norfolk and marshal of England” gave “the manor of Seterington, co. York” to “John le Bygod of Stokton knight and Isabel his wife...remainder to John son of the said John and Isabel...remainder to Roger son of the said John and Isabel[1022].  He was unable to succeed to the Earldom of Norfolk which had been re-granted to his brother Roger in 1302 only for the latter's life.  m ISABEL, daughter of --- (-after 25 Apr 1302).  An inspeximus dated 4 Mar 1303 records that “Roger le Bygod earl of Norfolk and marshal of England” gave “the manor of Seterington, co. York” to “John le Bygod of Stokton knight and Isabel his wife...remainder to John son of the said John and Isabel...remainder to Roger son of the said John and Isabel[1023].  John & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN Bigod of Settrington, Yorkshire .  An inspeximus dated 4 Mar 1303 records that “Roger le Bygod earl of Norfolk and marshal of England” gave “the manor of Seterington, co. York” to “John le Bygod of Stokton knight and Isabel his wife...remainder to John son of the said John and Isabel...remainder to Roger son of the said John and Isabel[1024].   

ii)         ROGER Bigod .  An inspeximus dated 4 Mar 1303 records that “Roger le Bygod earl of Norfolk and marshal of England” gave “the manor of Seterington, co. York” to “John le Bygod of Stokton knight and Isabel his wife...remainder to John son of the said John and Isabel...remainder to Roger son of the said John and Isabel[1025]

c)         JOAN Bigod .  A manuscript genealogy of the Gant family records that “Philippus de Kyme” married “Hugoni Bigot…filiam suam[1026].  Her name is confirmed by a charter dated to the reign of King Edward II under which “Philip de Kyme, son and heir of William de Kyme” confirmed property to Bullington priory, for his soul and that of “Joan his wife[1027].   m PHILIP de Kyme Lord Kyme, son of WILLIAM de Kyme & his wife Lucy de Ros (-1323 before 2 Apr). 

4.         RALPH Bigod .  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names ”Rogerus sive Radulphus Bigod, secundus filius Hugonis le Bigod com. Norfolke et Suffolke et Matildć primć filić Willihelmi Marescalli, et frater Hugonis Bygod com. Norfolke et Suffolke[1028]m BERTHA de Furnival, daughter of ---.  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that ”Rogerus sive Radulphus Bigod, secundus filius Hugonis le Bigod com. Norfolke et Suffolke…” married “Bertam de Fornivale[1029].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN Bigod .  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Johannes Bigod" as son of ”Rogerus sive Radulphus Bigod, secundus filius Hugonis le Bigod com. Norfolke et Suffolke…” and his wife “Bertam de Fornivale[1030]

 

 

 

C.      EARLS of NORFOLK 1312-1397 (PLANTAGENET)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

THOMAS "of Brotherton", son of EDWARD I King of England & his second wife Marguerite de France (Brotherton, Yorkshire 1 Jun 1300-[4 Aug/20 Sep] 1338, bur Abbey of Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk).  The Annals of Worcester record the birth “IV Non Jun…in manerio de Brothertone” in 1300 of “Margareta regina…filium…Thomas[1031].  He was created Earl of Norfolk 16 Dec 1312, and Marshal of England 10 Feb 1316.  King Edward II issued a charter dated 18 Apr 1318 to “Thomć comiti Norffolcić et marescallo Anglić et Edmundo de Wodestok fratribus nostris...executoribus testamenti bonć memorić Margaretć nuper reginć Anglić matris nostrć[1032].  Keeper of England during the king's absence in Scotland in Spring 1319.  He supported King Edward II, with his brother Edmund, in his campaign against the enemies of the Despenser family in Autumn 1321.  By 1326 he joined the queen and her lover Roger Mortimer in their plot to overthrow the king, but in 1330 helped his nephew Edward III to overthrow their joint regency.  Charges of oppression were brought against Thomas, and King Edward III retook the Marshalsy of England from him in Mar 1337.

m firstly ([1316/20]) ALICE Halys, daughter of ROGER Halys [Hales] of Harwich, Essex [coroner of Norfolk] & his wife --- (-[8 May 1326/1330]). 

m secondly ([1328]) as her second husband, MARY de Brewes, widow of RALPH de Cobham Lord Cobham of Norfolk, daughter of PIERS de Brewes [Briouse] of Tetbury, Gloucestershire & his wife Agnes --- (-[17 Apr 1361/15 Jun 1362]). 

Thomas Earl of Norfolk & his first wife had three children:

1.         EDWARD ([1320]-before Aug 1334[1033])m (Hereford [May/Jun] 1328) as her first husband, BEATRICE Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer [later Earl of March] & his wife Joan de Geneville [Joinville] (-16 Oct 1383).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam… Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam… Matildam… Blanchiam…et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Beatrice married “Edwardo filio et hćredi domini Thomć Brotherton comitis marescalli” and after the death of her first husband “domino Thomć de Breusa[1034].  She married secondly ([1334]/before 13 Sep 1337) Thomas de Brewes, who became Lord Brewes in 1348.  

2.         MARGARET ([1320/22]-24 Mar 1399, bur Charterhouse, Smithfield, London or Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London).  She succeeded her father in 1338[1035] as Countess of Norfolk, suo iure.  The will of "Walter Lord of Manney Knight", dated 30 Nov 1371, chose burial “in...the quire of the Carthusians called Our Lady near West Smithfield”, bequeathed property to “Mary my sister a nun...my two bastard daughters nuns...Mailosel and Malplesant...Cishbert my cousin...Margaret Mareschall my...wife...my daughter of Pembroke...[1036].  She was created Duchess of Norfolk for life 29 Sep 1397.  m firstly (after 3 Mar 1327, probably [1337/38]) JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave, son of STEPHEN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Alice FitzAlan of Arundel ([1315]-1 Apr 1353).  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Lord Segrave.  m secondly (shortly before 30 May 1354) WALTER de Mauny, son of JEAN "le Borgne" de Mauny [Magny] Seigneur de Magny[-en-Hainaut] & his wife Jeanne de Jenlain ([1310]-London 8 or 15 Jan 1372, bur Charterhouse, Smithfield, London).  He came to England as a page of Philippa de Hainaut, on her marriage to King Edward III.  He served the King in campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Gascony, and at the capture of Calais in Aug 1347.  Summoned to Parliament from 1347 as Lord Mauny.  Appointed Admiral of the Fleet from the Thames to Berwick Mar 1348.  He was one of the guarantors of the Treaty of Brétigny 8 May 1360, and an arbitrator on the claims to the duchy of Brittany.  The will of "Walter Lord of Manney Knight", dated 30 Nov 1371, chose burial “in...the quire of the Carthusians called Our Lady near West Smithfield”, bequeathed property to “Mary my sister a nun...my two bastard daughters nuns...Mailosel and Malplesant...Cishbert my cousin...Margaret Mareschall my...wife...my daughter of Pembroke...[1037].  Ctss Margaret & her first husband had three children:

-        see Part D, below

Ctss Margaret & her second husband had two children:

a)         ANNE de Mauny (24 Jul 1355-3 Apr 1384).  The will of "Walter Lord of Manney Knight", dated 30 Nov 1371, chose burial “in...the quire of the Carthusians called Our Lady near West Smithfield”, bequeathed property to “Mary my sister a nun...my two bastard daughters nuns...Mailosel and Malplesant...Cishbert my cousin...Margaret Mareschall my...wife...my daughter of Pembroke...[1038].  She succeeded her father in 1372 as Baroness Mauny.  The will of "John de Hastings Earl of Pembroke", dated 5 May 1372, proved 17 Jul 1376, chose burial “in the church of St Paul’s London”, bequeathed property to “Ann my...wife...[1039]m ([Jul or after] 1368) as his second wife, JOHN Hastings Earl of Pembroke, son of LAURENCE de Hastings Earl of Pembroke & his wife Anne de Mortimer (Sutton Valence 29 Aug 1347-Picardy 1375, bur Hereford Church of the Friars Preachers). 

b)         THOMAS de Mauny (-died aged 5). 

3.         ALICE ([1324]-Bungay, Suffolk [14 Nov 1351/30 Jan 1352]).  She died from wounds received in an assault by her husband[1040]Betrothed (1333) to WILLIAM de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu Lord Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katharine de Grandson (Donyatt, Somerset 20 Jun 1328-3 Jun 1397, bur Bisham), who succeeded his father in 1344 as Earl of Salisbury and later contracted a bigamous marriage with her first cousin Joan of Kent.  m (before 29 Aug 1338) as his first wife, EDWARD de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu Lord Montagu & his wife Elisabeth de Montfort ([1304]-14 Jul 1361).  He was summoned to parliament 20 Nov 1348, whereby he is held to have become Lord Montagu. 

Thomas Earl of Norfolk & his second wife had one child:

4.         JOHN .  Monk at Ely Abbey, Cambridgeshire. 

 

 

 

D.      EARLS of NORFOLK (SEGRAVE)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

HEREWARD of Segrave, Leicestershire. 

m ---.  The name of Hereward's wife is not known. 

Hereward & his wife had one child: 

1.         GILBERT de Segrave (-[before Nov 1201]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gilbertus de Segrave" held four parts of one knight’s fee from "Willelmi comitis de Warwico" in Warwickshire[1041].  "…Gileberto de Satgraue…" witnessed the charter dated to the reign of King Henry II under which "Bertram de Verdum" granted land at Long Whatton, Leicestershire to "Wauchelino filio Baldewini et Aeliz uxori sue", which was held by "mater uxoris predicti Walchelini" during the reign of King Henry I[1042]m ---.  The name of Gilbert's wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         STEPHEN de Segrave (-Leicester Abbey 1241).  Henry III King of England ordered "Stephano de Sedgrave" to surrender the manors of "Meleburne, Kirketone, Stauntone, Tingdene, Leland", as well as "Novum Castrum super Linam quod G. filius vester tenet", by letter dated 14 Jun 1234[1043].  Matthew Paris names "…Stephanus de Segrave, specialis regis consiliarius et quasi Anglić justitiarius…" among those who died in 1241[1044].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1241 of “Stephanus de Sagreve[1045]m firstly ROHESE le Despencer, daughter of THOMAS le Despencer & his wife ---.  The Complete Peerage records her parentage and marriage[1046]m secondly as her first husband, IDA Hastings, daughter of WILLIAM de Hastings & his first wife Margery Bigod of Norfolk (-before 2 Mar 1289, bur London, Church of the Grey Friars).  She married secondly Hugh Pecche.  Stephen & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

i)          JOHN de Segrave (-before Nov 1230).  King Henry III granted "maritagium Emme de Cauz que fuit uxor Johannis de Sedgrave, filii ipsius Stephani" to "Stephano de Sedgrave" dated 2 Nov 1230[1047]m as her first husband, EMMA de Cauz, daughter of ROGER de Cauz & his wife --- (-after 2 Nov 1230).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, which involved "Johannem de Segraue et Emmam uxorem eius filiam et heredem…Rogeri de Cauz"[1048].  King Henry III granted "maritagium Emme de Cauz que fuit uxor Johannis de Sedgrave, filii ipsius Stephani" to "Stephano de Sedgrave" dated 2 Nov 1230[1049].  She married secondly (after 2 Nov 1230) as his second wife, John de Grey of Shirland, Derbyshire. 

ii)         STEPHEN de Segrave (-before 1241).  Henry III King of England issued letters of presentation of "ecclesie de Burneham" to "Stephanus filius Stephani de Segrave" dated 26 Dec 1222[1050]

iii)        GILBERT de Segrave (-Pons, Poitou before 8 Oct 1254).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, relating to "manerium de Burtona" granted to "Gilbertus de Segraue…per consilium Stephani de Segraue patris sui"[1051].  Henry III King of England ordered "Stephano de Sedgrave" to surrender "Novum Castrum super Linam quod G. filius vester tenet" by letter dated 14 Jun 1234[1052].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Gilbertus de Segrave” died in 1254 in the prison of “Reginaldi de Puns in partibus transmarinis[1053].  An undated writ after the death of "Gilbert de Segrave" names "Nicholas his son, age variously stated as 16 and 17 as his heir"[1054]m (before 30 Sep 1231) as her first husband, AMABIL, daughter of ROBERT de Chaucombe & his wife --- (-after 26 Aug 1273, bur Chaucombe Priory).  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[1055].  She married secondly as his second wife, Roger [IV] de Somery.  Gilbert & his wife had two children: 

(a)       ALICE (-after 8 Jan 1268)m WILLIAM [V] Mauduit, son of WILLIAM [IV] Mauduit of Hanslope, Berkshire & his wife Alice of Warwick ([1220/21]-8 Jan 1267, bur Westminster Abbey).  He succeeded in 1263 as Earl of Warwick. 

(b)       NICHOLAS de Segrave ([1238]-before 12 Nov 1295, bur Chaucombe Priory).  An undated writ after the death of "Gilbert de Segrave" names "Nicholas his son, age variously stated as 16 and 17 as his heir"[1056].  He was summoned to Parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Segrave. 

-         see below

 

 

NICHOLAS de Segrave, son of GILBERT de Segrave & his wife Amabil de Chaucombe ([1238]-before 12 Nov 1295, bur Chaucombe Priory).  An undated writ after the death of "Gilbert de Segrave" names "Nicholas his son, age variously stated as 16 and 17 as his heir"[1057].  He was summoned to Parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Segrave. 

m MATILDA, daughter of ---. 

Lord Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

1.         JOHN de Segrave ([1256]-before 4 Oct 1325, bur Chaucombe Priory).  He succeeded his father as Lord Segrave.  m CHRISTIAN du Plessis, daughter of HUGH du Plessis Lord Plessis & his wife --- (-after 8 May 1331).  Lord John & his wife had two children: 

a)         STEPHEN de Segrave (-before 12 Dec 1325, bur Chaucombe Priory).  He succeeded his father in [1325] as Lord Segrave.  m ALICE FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alasia di Saluzzo (-7 Feb 1340).  Lord Stephen & his wife had one child:

i)          JOHN de Segrave ([1315]-1 Apr 1353).  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Lord Segrave.  m (after 3 Mar 1327, probably [1337/38]) as her first husband, MARGARET of Norfolk, daughter of THOMAS "of Brotherton" Earl of Norfolk & his first wife Alice Halys ([1320/22]-24 Mar 1399, bur Charterhouse, Smithfield, London or Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London).  She succeeded her father in 1338 as Ctss of Norfolk, suo iure.  She was created Duchess of Norfolk for life 29 Sep 1397.  Lord John & his wife had three children:

(a)       ELIZABETH de Segrave (Croxton Abbey 25 Oct 1338-before 1368).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” married “filiam et hćredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[1058]m (1349) JOHN Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Joan of Lancaster (Epworth 25 Jun 1340-killed in battle [Palestine] 1368).  He succeeded his father as Lord Mowbray. 

(b)       JOHN de Segrave (1340-before 1353)m (1349) as her first husband, BLANCHE Mowbray, daughter of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Joan of Lancaster (-1409). 

(c)       ANNE de Segrave (-[1377]).  Abbess of Barking. 

b)         CHRISTIAN de Segrave m (contract May 1305) JOHN de Mohun, son of JOHN de Mohun Lord Mohun & his first wife Ada --- (-before 1330). 

2.         ELEANOR de Segrave .  The Book of Lacock records that “Alanus de la Souch” married “Alianoram filiam Nicholai de Segrave” by whom he had “Elam, Matildam, Elizabetham, Rogerum de la Souche[1059]m ALAN la Zouche, son of ROGER de la Zouche & his wife Ela de Longespee (9 Oct 1266-[1313/14]).  

 

 

1.         NICHOLAS de Segrave .  Baron of Stowe, Staffordshire.  m ---.  The name of Nicholas's wife is not known.  Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATILDA de Segrave m EDMUND de Bohun, son of JOHN de Bohun of Haresfield & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

E.      DUKES of NORFOLK 1397-1476 (MOWBRAY)

 

 

ROGER de Mowbray, son of NELE d'Aubigny & his second wife Gundred de Gournay (-[late 1187/1188], bur Tyre).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Nigello de Albinneio” married “Gundredam filiam Giraldi de Gornaco” by whom he had “filium...Rogerium de Moubraio[1060].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Molbrai" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[1061].  ”Gundreda, uxor Nigelli de Albini” donated property to the Hospital of St Leonard, York by undated charter which names “Rogero de Molbray filio suo[1062].  “Rogerus de Moubray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “patris mei Nigelli et matris meć Gundredć…et uxoris meć Adeliz”, by undated charter witnessed by “Samsone de Albineio[1063].  “Rogerus de Molbrai” confirmed the donation of property to Pontefract Priory by “uxor mea…pro anima prioris domini sui Ilberti de Lasci”, by undated charter witnessed by “Willielmus Peverel…Turgis de Molbray…[1064].  An undated charter notes the donation of ”Hospitale Sancti Michaelis Archangeli” to Whitby Monastery, at the request of “Dominam Gundredam uxorem Nigelli de Albini” for the soul of “Rogero de Moubray filio eorum[1065].  “Rogerus de Molbray” confirmed the grant of property to the hospital of St Peter, York, with the consent of “Nigellus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1155/65][1066].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Munbray lxxiii s iv d" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][1067].  He left on crusade in [late 1185], was taken prisoner at the battle of Hittin 4 Jul 1187, ransomed by the Templars but died in Palestine or on his way back[1068].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus de Molbray, qui fundavit abbatiam de Bellalanda” was captured “a Saracenis”, ransomed by the Templars, died “in terra sancta” and was buried “apud Sures[1069]

m as her second husband, ALICE de Gand, widow of ILBERT de Lacy, daughter of WALTER de Gand & his wife Mathilde de Penthičvre.  “Aliz de Gant” donated property to Pontefract Priory, for the souls of “prioris domini mei Ilberti de Lascy” and with the consent of “Henricus de Lascy”, by undated charter[1070].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Rogerus de Molbrai” confirmed the donation of property to Pontefract Priory by “uxor mea…pro anima prioris domini sui Ilberti de Lasci”, witnessed by “Willielmus Peverel…Turgis de Molbray…[1071].  “Rogerus de Moubray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, for the soul of “patris mei Nigelli et matris meć Gundredć…et uxoris meć Adeliz”, by undated charter witnessed by “Samsone de Albineio[1072].  “Alicia de Gaunt uxor Rogeri de Mubray” donated property to Fountains Abbey by charter dated 13 Apr 1176 which names “filiorum meorum Nigelli et Roberti[1073]

Roger & his wife had three children:  

1.         NELE [Nigel] de Mowbray (-Acre 1191).  "Roger de Mobraio and Nigel his son" donated property to the abbey of Saint-André-en-Gouffern by charter dated [1160][1074].  “Rogerus de Molbray” confirmed the grant of property to the hospital of St Peter, York, with the consent of “Nigellus filius meus”, by charter dated to [1155/65][1075].  “Alicia de Gaunt uxor Rogeri de Mubray” donated property to Fountains Abbey by charter dated 13 Apr 1176 which names “filiorum meorum Nigelli et Roberti[1076].  He accompanied his father on crusade in [late 1185][1077].  “Rogerum de Molbrai et filios suos Nigellum et Robertum” donated property to Fountains Abbey by undated charter[1078].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Nigellus de Munbray" paying "xliv l ii s vi d, iv xx viii [=88?] milites et quartam" in Yorkshire[1079].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” took the cross and died “in mare Grćco[1080]m (before Nov 1170) MABEL, daughter of --- (-[1203]).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Mabiliam” as the wife of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray[1081].  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” married “filiam Edmondi comitis de Clara…Mabillam[1082], but her supposed father has not been identified from other sources.  “Mabilla uxor domini Nigelli de Moubray” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory, Southwark by undated charter[1083].  "Mabill de Mumbrai" claimed "terra de Mauto [Leicestershire] …ex dono Nigill viri sui" from "Rob de Mubrai" in 1194/95[1084].  Nele & his wife had four children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Mowbray (-Axholme before 25 Mar 1224, bur Neufbourg).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife, adding that William died “in insula de Haxeiholm” and was buried “apud Novum-Burgum[1085]

-        see below

b)         PHILIP de Mowbray (-after 22 Sep 1196).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife[1086].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[1087].  "…Roll constabul, Philipp de Mubray, Willmo de Valloń, Henr Biset, Thomas de Colville, Adam fil Herb, Ferg fratre Roll, Alexander de Finton" witnessed the charter dated 22 Sep (no year, but dated to after 1196) under which William King of Scotland confirmed the donation of "in territorio de Cliftun" to Melrose abbey made by "Walterus Corbet filius Walteri"[1088]

c)         ROBERT de Mowbray (-after 1196).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife[1089].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[1090].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Munbray" paying "xx s, i militem" in Northamptonshire[1091]

d)         ROGER de Mowbray (-after 1210).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife[1092].  “Rogerus de Mowbray” donated property to Newburgh Abbey, with the consent of “Sampsone de Albeneio” to whom “Nigellus pater meus” had granted the property in question, by undated charter[1093].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Rogerus de Munbray" paying "l s, ii militem et dimidium" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire[1094].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Rogerus de Munbray" holding "x libratas in Fulburne et xvi libratas in Suaveshulle, de terries Britonum, de dono regis Johannis…de serjanteriis et terris sine servitio" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][1095]

2.         ROBERT de Mowbray (-after 13 Apr 1176).  “Alicia de Gaunt uxor Rogeri de Mubray” donated property to Fountains Abbey by charter dated 13 Apr 1176 which names “filiorum meorum Nigelli et Roberti[1096].  “Rogerum de Molbrai et filios suos Nigellum et Robertum” donated property to Fountains Abbey by undated charter[1097].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[1098]

3.         [1099]daughter .  m WILLIAM de Daiville, son of ---. 

 

 

WILLIAM de Mowbray, son of NELE de Mowbray & his wife Mabel --- (-Axholme before 25 Mar 1224, bur Neufbourg).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Willielmum, Robertum, Philippum et Rogerum” as the four sons of “filius Rogeri de Molbray primogenitus…Nigellus de Molbray” & his wife, adding that William died “in insula de Haxeiholm” and was buried “apud Novum-Burgum[1100].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus de Munbray" paying "iv xx viii l [=88?] v s, iv xx viii [=88?] milites" in Yorkshire[1101].  “Willielmus de Molbrai” confirmed donations to Newburgh Abbey by “Rogeri de Molbray avi mei et Nigelli de Molbray patris mei” by undated charter, witnessed by “Roberto de Mubray patruo meo, Philippo de Mubray fratre meo, Roberto de Mubray fratre meo…[1102].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Munbray et Elyas filius Bernicii" holding one and one half knights’ fees in "Hiltone" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][1103].  Any family relationship between the two individuals has not been traced. 

m AVICE, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that the wife of “Willihelmus…primogenitus et hćres Nigelli de Molbray” married “[filiam] comitis de Arundel…Agnetem” who was mother of his two sons[1104].  If this is correct, she would have been Agnes, daughter of William Earl of Arundel & his wife Matilda de Saint-Hilaire, but the identification of this person has not yet been corroborated from other sources. 

William & his wife had two children: 

1.         NELE [Nigel] de Mowbray (-Nantes 1230, bur Neufbourg).  "Nigel de Mowbray" made a fine for "having seisin of all lands…of which William de Mowbray his father, whose heir he is, was seised on the day he died", dated 25 Mar 1224[1105].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Nigellum et Rogerum” as sons of “Willielmus de Molbray”, adding the Nele died “apud Nauntys” childless and was buried “apud Novum-Burgum[1106].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Nigellus de Mubray” died in 1230[1107]m as her first husband, MATILDA de Camville, daughter of ROGER de Camville & his wife --- (-before 6 Oct 1240).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Nigellum”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “filiam Rogeri de Canevilla[1108].  She married secondly (before 2 Jan 1234) John de Courtenay.  A charter records an assize held a die Pasche” 1238 records a claim by “H. prior Meritone” against “Johannem de Curtenay et Matildem uxorem eius” relating to “ecclesiam de Reyers[1109].  The primary source which confirms that Matilda, wife of John de Courtenay, was the same person as the wife of Nele de Mowbray has not yet been identified. 

2.         ROGER de Mowbray (-[Axholme] [Nov 1266], bur [Pontefract, Friars Church]).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Nigellum et Rogerum” as sons of “Willielmus de Molbray”, adding that Roger was buried “apud Pontemfractum[1110].  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, died “in insula de Haxiholme” and was buried “apud Pomfret…in ecclesia prćdictorum fratrum[1111]m as her first husband, MATILDA de Beauchamp, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford & his wife Ida de Longespee of the Earls of Salisbury (-before Apr 1273).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Matildam, filiam Willielmi de Bello-campo[1112].  She married secondly Roger Le Strange.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   Roger & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROGER de Mowbray (-before 21 Nov 1297).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife had “filias tres et filium unum…Rogerum[1113].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mowbray. 

-        see below

b)         JOAN Mowbray .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m ([1261]) ROBERT de Mohaut, son of ROGER de Mohaut & his wife Cecily de Albini of the Earls of Arundel (-before 16 Sep 1275). 

c)         two other daughters .  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife had “filias tres et filium unum…Rogerum[1114]

 

 

ROGER de Mowbray, son of ROGER de Mowbray & his wife Matilda de Beauchamp (-[Gent] before 21 Nov 1297, bur Fountains Abbey).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife had “filias tres et filium unum…Rogerum[1115].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mowbray.  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon…"[1116].  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family (many of the details in which relating to the early generations of the family are inconsistent with other sources) states that “Rogerus”, son of “Rogerus”, died “in Gant ultra mare” and was buried “ad abbatiam de Fontibus…anno 1299[1117]

m (1270) ROHESE de Clare, daughter of RICHARD de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford & his second wife Matilda de Lacy of Lincoln (1252-after 1316).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Isabella primogenita, Margareta et Roysea” as the three daughters of “Ricardus de Clare secundus filius et hćres…Gilberti et Isabellć” and his wife “Matildem…filiam comitis Lincolnić[1118].  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Roysam[1119]

Roger & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         JOHN de Mowbray (4 Sep 1286-hanged York 23 Mar 1322).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry names “Johannem” as the son of “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, and his wife[1120].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth “II Non Sep” in 1286 of “Johannes filius Dńi Rogeri de Moubray[1121].  He succeeded his father in 1297 as Lord Mowbray.  He fought for the Earl of Lancaster at the battle of Boroughbridge but was captured by Andrew de Harcia, hanged and his estates forfeited.  m (Swansea 1298) as her first husband, ALINE de Briouse, daughter of WILLIAM de Briouse Lord Brewes, Lord of Gower (-before 20 Jul 1331).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Roger]” married “Elianoram filiam domini Willielmi de Brewes in Wallia[1122].  She married secondly Richard de Peshale.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   Lord John & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN Mowbray (Hovingham, Yorkshire 29 Nov 1310-4 Oct 1361, bur Bedford).  “Johannes filius et hćres Johannis de Moubray dominus insulć de Haxiholme, et de honoribus de Gouher et de Brember” confirmed the donations to Byland Abbey by his ancestors by charter dated “in festo sanctć Margaretć virginis 1345[1123].  He succeeded his father as Lord Mowbray de iure when the latter was hanged in 1322. 

-        see below

2.         [ROGER de Mowbray .  The parentage of Roger has not been confirmed.  From a chronological point of view, he could have been a younger son of Roger de Mowbray.  The absence of any reference to his parents in the source quoted below suggests that Roger had reached the age of majority at the time of his betrothal, even though his betrothed was probably still a child at the time.  If that assumption is correct, it is unlikely that Roger was the son of John de Mowbray who died in 1322.  Betrothed (Papal dispensation 17 Apr 1312) to MARGARET Abernethy, daughter of ALEXANDER Abernethy & his wife ---.  The Papal dispensation for the marriage between “dominum Rogerum de Moubray” and “Margaretam filiam...Alexandri de Abbernythy”, who were “in gradu consanguinitatis prohibito”, is dated 17 Apr 1312[1124].] 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

JOHN Mowbray, son of JOHN de Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Aline de Briouse (Hovingham, Yorkshire 29 Nov 1310-4 Oct 1361, bur Bedford).  “Johannes filius et hćres Johannis de Moubray dominus insulć de Haxiholme, et de honoribus de Gouher et de Brember” confirmed the donations to Byland Abbey by his ancestors by charter dated “in festo sanctć Margaretć virginis 1345[1125].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth “V Kal Dec…apud Hovingham” in 1310 of “Johannes filius Dńi Johis de Moubray[1126].  He succeeded his father as Lord Mowbray de iure when the latter was hanged in 1322.  However, his father's estates were confiscated for supporting the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster in his rebellion.  John de Mowbray was imprisoned in the Tower 26 Feb 1322.  His inheritance was restored on the accession of King Edward III.  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” was buried “apud Bedford[1127]

m firstly (after 28 Feb 1327) JOAN of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY Duke of Lancaster & his wife Matilda Chaworth ([1312]-7 Jul [1349], bur Byland Abbey, Yorkshire).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” married “Johannam sororem domini Henrici primi ducis Lancastrić”, adding that she was buried “in Bellanda[1128]

m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH de Vere, widow of HUGH de Courtenay, daughter of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Matilda Badlesmere (-[Aug/Sep] 1375).  She married thirdly (before 18 Jan 1369) William de Cosynton

Lord John & his first wife had three children:

1.         BLANCHE Mowbray (-1409)m firstly (1349) JOHN Segrave, son of JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Margaret Ctss of Norfolk (1340-before 1353).  m secondly ROBERT Bertram, son of ---.  m thirdly THOMAS Poynings, son of ---.  m fourthly JOHN Worth, son of ---.  m fifthly JOHN Wiltshire, son of ---. 

2.         ELEANOR Mowbray (-before 18 Jun 1387).  m firstly (1358) as his third wife, ROGER La Warre Lord La Warre, son of JOHN La Warre & his wife Margaret de Holand (1326-Gascony 27 Aug 1370).  m secondly (before 12 Feb 1373) LEWIS de Clifford, son of --- (-[17 Sep/5 Dec] 1404). 

3.         JOHN Mowbray (Epworth 25 Jun 1340-killed in battle [Palestine] 1368).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states names “Johannem” as son of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “Johannam sororem domini Henrici primi ducis Lancastrić[1129].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth in 1341 “in crastino Sci Johis Baptistć” of “Johannes filius et hćres Dńi Johis de Moubray…[et] domina Johanna filia Dńi Henrici…Comitis Lancastrić[1130].  He succeeded his father as 4th Lord Mowbray.  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” left “ad Terram Sanctam” but was killed “a Turcis juxta Constantinopolim anno 1368[1131]m ([1349]) ELIZABETH de Segrave, daughter of JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Margaret Ctss of Norfolk (Croxton Abbey 25 Oct 1338-before 1368).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” married “filiam et hćredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[1132].  Lord John & his wife had three children: 

a)         ELEANOR Mowbray (1364-1417)m (1386) as his first wife, JOHN de Welles Lord Welles, son of JOHN de Welle Lord Welles & his wife Matilda [de Ros] (Conisholme, Lincolnshire 20 Apr 1352-26 Aug 1421). 

b)         JOHN Mowbray (Epworth 3 Aug 1365-London 1380, bur London Whitefriars Church).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family names “Johannem et Thomam” as the two sons of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “filiam et hćredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha”, adding that John was born “apud Epworth anno 1365”, was created Earl of Nottingham by King Richard II, and died childless “apud Londinum anno 1380” and was buried “apud Albos Fratres in Londino[1133].  A manuscript relating to the Mowbray family records the birth 3 Aug 1365 “apud Eppeworth” of “Johannes filius et hćres Johis de Moubray [et] Elizabeth filia et hćres Dńi de Segrave[1134].  He may have succeeded his mother [before 1368] as Lord Segrave.  He succeeded his father in 1368 as Lord Mowbray.  He was created Earl of Nottingham 16 Jul 1377. 

c)         THOMAS Mowbray (22 Mar 1366[1135]-Venice 22 Sep 1399, bur Venice, abbey of St George).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family names “Johannem et Thomam” as the two sons of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “filiam et hćredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[1136].  He was created Duke of Norfolk in 1397.  Earl Marshal of England. 

-        see below

 

 

THOMAS Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Elizabeth de Segrave (22 Mar 1366-Venice 22 Sep 1399, bur Venice, abbey of St George).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family names “Johannem et Thomam” as the two sons of “Johannes filius [Johannis]” and his wife “filiam et hćredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[1137].  He succeeded his brother in 1383 as Lord Mowbray, Lord Segrave.  He was created Earl of Nottingham 10 Feb 1383.  He received the office of Earl Marshal of England 12 Jan 1386.  He was created Duke of Norfolk 29 Sep 1397, and succeeded as Earl of Norfolk in 1399 on the death of his maternal grandmother.  He died of plague at Venice on his return from Palestine[1138]

m firstly ELIZABETH Le Strange Baroness Strange, daughter of JOHN Le Strange Lord Strange & his wife Isabel --- ([1374]-23 Aug 1383)

m secondly (Jul 1384) as her second husband, ELIZABETH FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Elizabeth Bohun of Northampton (before 1375-8 Jul 1425).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Thomas Mowbray…ducem de Norfolk” married “filiam comitis de Arundell…Elizabetham[1139].  She married thirdly (before 10 Aug 1401) Robert Goushill of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, and fourthly (before 18 Apr 1411[1140]) Gerard Usflete

Duke Thomas & his second wife had five children: 

1.         THOMAS Mowbray (17 Sep 1385-executed 8 Jun 1405, bur York, Grey Friars).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family names “Thomam” as son of “Thomas Mowbray…ducem de Norfolk” and his wife “filiam comitis de Arundell…Elizabetham”, adding that he was born in 1386[1141].  He succeeded his father in 1399 as Earl of Norfolk.  He was involved in the Scrope conspiracy, captured in the priory of Monks Kirby, Warwickshire, and executed without trial[1142]m (1404) as her first husband, CONSTANCE de Holand, daughter of JOHN de Holand Duke of Exeter & his wife Elizabeth of Lancaster (1387-12 or 14 Nov 1437, bur London, St Katherine by the Tower).  She married secondly (before 24 Feb 1413) John Grey of Ruthin.  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living[1143]

2.         MARGARET Mowbray ([1388]-after 1437).  The will of "Alice Howard wife of John Howard Knight", dated 13 Oct 1426, proved 20 Oct 1426, bequeathed property to “my son Henry...John Howard my husband...Robert Howard my son...Lady Margaret wife of the said Robert[1144]m (1417) ROBERT Howard, son of JOHN Howard of Stoke Neyland & his second wife Alice Tendring ([1384/85]-1436). 

3.         JOHN Mowbray (1392-Epworth [19 Oct] 1432, bur Epworth Priory).  He succeeded his brother in 1405 as Earl of Norfolk, Earl of Nottingham, Earl Marshal.  He was restored as Duke of Norfolk 30 Apr 1425.  The will of "John Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal and of Nottingham, Marshal of England", dated 19 Oct 1432, proved 14 Feb 1433, chose burial “in the Carthusian Church in the Island of Axholme”, bequeathed property to “Katherine wife...[1145]m (licence Raby 12 Jan 1412) as her first husband, KATHERINE Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his second wife Joan Beaufort ([1402/03]-after 1483).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Johannam minorissam, Ricardum, Katherinam ducissam Norfolchie, Henricum mortuum, Thomam dominum de Seymour, Cuthbertum mortuum, Alienoram uxorem comitis Northumbrie, Robertum episcopum Dunelmie, Willelmum dominum de Fauconberge, Annam comitssam Staffordie, Johannem mortuum, Georgium dominum de Latymer, Ceciliam ducissam Eboraci, Edwardum dominum de Bergeny" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and his wife "Johanna filia Johannis ducis Lancastrie uxor secunda"[1146].  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Katherine Duchess of Norfolk, m John Duke of Norfolk, m Thomas Strangeways" as sister of "Richard Earl of Salisbury" and mother (by her first husband) of "John Duke of Norfolk, father of John Duke of Norfolk" and (by her second husband) of "Jane first wedded to William Willoughby, after to the Marquess of Berkeley" (also listing two children of the last named by her first husband)[1147].  The will of "John Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal and of Nottingham, Marshal of England", dated 19 Oct 1432, proved 14 Feb 1433, bequeathed property to “Katherine wife...[1148].  She married secondly Thomas Strangeways, thirdly John Beaumont Viscount Beaumont, and fourthly John Wydeville.  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage Jan 1464 (O.S.) “maritagium diabolicum” of “Katerina ducissa Norffolchić juvencula ćtatis fere iiixx annorum” and “Johannis Widevile fratri reginć ćtatis xx annorum[1149].  Duke John & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN Mowbray (12 Sep 1415-6 Nov 1461, bur Thetford).  He succeeded his father in 1432 as Duke of Norfolkm (1424) ELEANOR Bourchier, daughter of WILLIAM Bourchier Comte d'Eu & his wife Anne of Gloucester ([1417]-Nov 1474, bur Thetford).  Duke John & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Mowbray (18 Oct 1444-Framlingham Castle, Suffolk 16/17 Jan 1476, bur Thetford).  He was created Earl of Surrey and Warenne 24 Mar 1451.  He succeeded his father in 1461 as Duke of Norfolk.  On his death, the Dukedom of Norfolk, and Earldoms of Nottingham, Marshall, and Surrey and Warenne became extinct[1150]m (before 27 Nov 1448) ELIZABETH Talbot, daughter of JOHN Talbot Earl of Shrewsbury & his second wife Margaret Beauchamp of Warwick (-[6 Nov 1506/10 May 1507]).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter of "John duke of Norfolk", dated 30 Jun "29 Hen VI", under which he granted the manor of Weston near Baldok, Hertfordshire, formerly belonging to "Elizabeth his grandmother", to "John Mowbray earl Warren and Surrey and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John earl of Shrewsbury"[1151].  Duke John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ANNE Mowbray (Framlingham Castle, Suffolk 10 Dec 1472-Greenwich Palace shortly before 26 Nov 1481, bur Westminster Abbey).  She succeeded her father as Ctss of Norfolk, Baroness Mowbray and Segrave, suo iurem (St Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster 15 Jan 1478) RICHARD "of Shrewsbury" Duke of York, son of EDWARD IV King of England & his wife Lady Katherine Wydeville (Dominican Friary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire 17 Aug 1473-[murdered] [Sep] 1483, bur [Westminster Abbey]).  He was created Earl of Nottingham 12 Jun 1476, and Earl Warenne and Duke of Norfolk 7 Feb 1477, in contemplation of his marriage. 

4.         ISABEL Mowbray (-27 Sep 1452, bur Gloucester Grey Friars)m firstly (before 13 Jul 1416) HENRY Ferrers, son of WILLIAM Lord Ferrers (of Groby) & his first wife Philippa de Clifford (-before 1423).  m secondly ([1423/24]) as his third wife, JAMES de Berkeley Lord Berkeley, son of JAMES de Berkeley & his wife Elizabeth Bluet of Raglan, Monmouthshire (Raglan [1394]-Berkeley Castle Nov 1463, bur Berkeley). 

5.         ELIZABETH Mowbray (-after 1 Dec 1423).  She became a nun at Bruisyard, Suffolk before 17 Jan 1420.  m (before 24 Nov 1403) MICHAEL de la Pole, son of MICHAEL Earl of Stafford & his wife Catherine de Stafford ([1394/95]-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur [Ewelme, Oxfordshire]).  He succeeded his father in 1415 as Earl of Suffolk

 

 

 

F.      DUKES of NORFOLK 1483-1572 (HOWARD)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

1.         JOHN Howard of Stoke Neyland (-after 13 Oct 1426).  m firstly MARGARET de Scales, daughter of ---.  m secondly ALICE Tendring, daughter of WILLIAM Tendring of Tendring near Stoke Neyland & his wife --- (-[13/20] Oct 1426).  The will of "Alice Howard wife of John Howard Knight", dated 13 Oct 1426, proved 20 Oct 1426, chose burial “in...Stoke Neyland Church near my father”, bequeathed property to “my son Henry...John Howard my husband...Robert Howard my son...Lady Margaret wife of the said Robert[1152].  John & his first wife had one child:

a)         JOHN Howard of Wiggenhall, Norfolk (-24 Apr 1438).  m firstly ([1380]) MARGARET de Plaiz, daughter of JOHN de Plaiz Lord Plaiz & his second wife Joan de Stapleton of Bedale, Yorkshire and Ingham, Norfolk (-[10/14] Aug 1391, bur Weeting).  She succeeded her father in 1389 as Baroness Plaiz, suo iurem secondly ---.  The name of John’s second wife is not known.  John & his first wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Howard ([1374]-after 4 Sep 1409).  He succeeded his mother in 1391 as Lord Plaiz.  The will of "John Howard son of John Howard Knight", dated 4 Sep 1409, proved 26 Oct 1410, chose burial “in Holy Sepulture” and appointed “the Countess of Hertford and John Howard Knight my father” as executors[1153]m (before May 1406) as her first husband, JOAN Walton, daughter of JOHN Walton of Wyvenhoe, Essex & his wife --- (-1424).  She married secondly Thomas Erpingham.  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ELIZABETH Howard ([1409/10]-[Stratford Nunnery] after 25 Dec 1475, bur London, Church of the Austin Friars).  She was forced to surrender her property to Richard Duke of Gloucester in 1475[1154]m ([22 May/31 Aug] 1425) JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of RICHARD de Vere Earl of Oxford & his second wife Anne Sergeaux (Hedingham Castle 23 Apr 1408-executed Tower Hill 26 Feb 1462, bur London, Church of the Austin Friars). 

John & his second wife had two children:

b)         HENRY Howard (-after 13 Oct 1426).  The will of "Alice Howard wife of John Howard Knight", dated 13 Oct 1426, proved 20 Oct 1426, bequeathed property to “my son Henry...John Howard my husband...Robert Howard my son...Lady Margaret wife of the said Robert[1155]

c)         ROBERT Howard of Stoke Neyland, Suffolk ([1384/85]-1436).  The will of "Alice Howard wife of John Howard Knight", dated 13 Oct 1426, proved 20 Oct 1426, bequeathed property to “my son Henry...John Howard my husband...Robert Howard my son...Lady Margaret wife of the said Robert[1156]m (1417) MARGARET Mowbray, daughter of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel ([1388]-after 1437).  The will of "Alice Howard wife of John Howard Knight", dated 13 Oct 1426, proved 20 Oct 1426, bequeathed property to “my son Henry...John Howard my husband...Robert Howard my son...Lady Margaret wife of the said Robert[1157].  Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          JOHN Howard (1428-killed in battle Bosworth 22 Aug 1485, bur Leicester, transferred to Thetford).  He was summoned to parliament 15 Oct 1470, whereby he is held to have become Lord Howard.  He was created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England 28 Jun 1483.   

-         see below

ii)         MARGARET Howardm THOMAS Daniel Baron de Rathwier (-1452). 

iii)        CATHERINE Howard (-1478)m (1448) as his second wife, EDWARD Neville Lord Abergavenny, son of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his second wife Joan Beaufort (-18 Oct 1476). 

 

 

JOHN Howard, son of ROBERT Howard & his wife Lady Margaret Mowbray of Norfolk (1428-killed in battle Bosworth 22 Aug 1485, bur Leicester, transferred to Thetford).  He was summoned to parliament 15 Oct 1470, whereby he is held to have become Lord Howard.  He was created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England 28 Jun 1483.  He was attainted 7 Nov 1485 after his death and all his honours forfeited, although the attainder was later reversed[1158]

m firstly ([1442/43]) CATHERINE de Moleyns, daughter of WILLIAM de Moleyns & his second wife Anne Whalesborough of Cornwall (1429-Stoke Neyland 3 Nov 1465). 

m secondly (before 22 Jan 1467) as her third husband, MARGARET Chedworth, widow firstly of NICOLAS Wyfold and secondly of JOHN Norreys of Bray, daughter of JOHN Chedworth & his wife --- (-1494, bur Stoke Neyland). 

Duke John & his first wife had six children:

1.         THOMAS Howard (Stoke Neyland 1443-Framlingham Castle 21 May 1524, bur 26 Jun 1524 Thetford Abbey).  He was created Earl of Surrey in 1483.  He was created Earl Marshal for life 10 Jul 1510, and Duke of Norfolk 1 Feb 1514 (when he resigned the earldom of Surrey in favour of his eldest son). 

-        see below.   

2.         ANNE Howardm as his first wife, EDMUND Gorges of Wraxall (1454-1511). 

3.         ISABEL Howard m ROBERT Mortimer, son of ---. 

4.         JOAN Howard (-1508).  m (1481) JOHN Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, son of --- ([1446/51]-1510). 

5.         MARGARET Howardm as his first wife, JOHN Wyndham of Crownthorpe, son of --- (-executed 1503). 

6.         NICOLAS Howard

Duke John & his second wife had one child:

7.         CATHERINE Howard (-12 Mar 1536)m JOHN Bourchier Lord Berners, son of HUMPHREY Berners & his wife Elizabeth Tylney of Boston, Lincolnshire ([1466/67]-Calais 19 Mar 1533, bur Calais). 

 

 

THOMAS Howard, son of JOHN Howard Duke of Norfolk & his first wife Catherine Moleyns (Stoke Neyland 1443-Framlingham Castle 21 May 1524, bur 26 Jun 1524 Thetford Abbey).  He was created Earl of Surrey 28 Jun 1483.  He was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Bosworth 22 Aug 1485, but found favour with King Henry VII whom he served for many years[1159].  He was created Earl Marshal for life 10 Jul 1510, and Duke of Norfolk 1 Feb 1514 (when he resigned the Earldom of Surrey in favour of his eldest son). 

m firstly (30 Apr 1472) as her second husband, ELIZABETH Tylney, widow of HUMPHREY Bourchier, daughter of FREDERICK Tylney of Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk & his wife Elizabeth Cheney of Ditton, Cambridgeshire (-4 Apr 1497). 

m secondly (Papal dispensation 17 Aug 1497, licence 8 Nov 1497) AGNES Tylney, daughter of HUGH Tylney of Boston, Lincoln & his wife --- Tailboys (-bur 31 May 1545 Framlingham Abbey). 

Duke Thomas & his first wife had ten children: 

1.         THOMAS Howard (1473-Kenninghall, Norfolk 25 Aug 1554, bur 2 Oct 1554 Framlingham Abbey).  He was styled Lord Howard from 1483-1514.  He was created Earl of Surrey for life 1 Feb 1514.  He succeeded his father in 1524 as Duke of Norfolk.  He was created Earl Marshal for life 28 May 1533. 

-        see below.   

2.         EDWARD Howard (1477-killed in battle off Brest 25 Apr 1513)m firstly as her third husband, ELIZABETH Stapleton, widow firstly of WILLIAM Calthorpe and secondly of JOHN Fortescue, daughter of MILES Stapleton & his wife --- (-1505).  m secondly (before Jan 1506) as her second husband, ALICE Lovel Baroness Morley, widow of WILLIAM Parker, daughter of WILLIAM Lovel [Lord Morely] & his wife Eleanor Morley Baroness Morley and Baroness Marshal ([1465/67]-Hallinbury Morley, Essex 23 Dec 1518). 

3.         EDMUND Howard ([1478/80]-1539)m firstly as her second husband, JOYCE Culpepper, widow of RALPH Leigh, daughter of RICHARD Culpepper & his wife ---.  m secondly DOROTHY Troyes, daughter of THOMAS Troyes & his wife --- (-1530).  m thirdly as her second husband, MARGARET Mundy, widow of WILLIAM Uvedale, daughter of JOHN Mundy & his wife ---.  Lord Edmund & his first wife had one child:

a)         KATHERINE Howard (Lambeth, London or Horsham, Sussex [1525]-executed Tower of London 13 Feb 1542, bur Royal Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London).  She was attainted for high treason.  m (Oatlands Palace, Surrey 28 Jul 1540) as his fifth wife, HENRY VIII King of England, son of HENRY VII King of England & his wife Elizabeth of York (Greenwich Palace, Kent 28 Jun 1491-Whitehall Palace, London 28 Jan 1547, bur St George's Chapel, Windsor). 

4.         RICHARD Howard (-young). 

5.         HENRY Howard (-young). 

6.         CHARLES Howard (-young). 

7.         JOHN Howard (-young). 

8.         HENRY Howard (-young). 

9.         MURIEL Howard (-Lambeth 14 Dec 1512, bur Lambeth)m firstly JOHN Grey Viscount Lisle, son of EDWARD Grey (of Groby) Viscount Lisle & his first wife Elizabeth Talbot Baroness Lisle of Kingston Lisle (Apr 1480-9 Sep 1504, bur Abingdon Monastery).  m secondly (before 9 Jul 1506) THOMAS Knyvet of Buckenham, Norfolk (-killed in battle Brest Aug 1512). 

10.      ELIZABETH Howard (-Baynard’s Castle 3 Apr 1538, bur Lambeth)m ([1500]) THOMAS Boleyn of Hever, Kent, son of WILLIAM Boleyn of Blickling, Norfolk & his wife Margaret Butler of the Earls of Ormond ([1477]-Hever, Kent 12 Mar 1539, bur Hever).  He was created Viscount Rochford in 1525, Earl of Wiltshire and Earl of Ormond in 1529. 

Duke Thomas & his second wife had seven children: 

11.      THOMAS Howard (-1537)Betrothed to MARGARET Douglas, daughter of ARCHIBALD Douglas Earl of Angus & his wife Margaret Tudor Queen Regent of Scotland (Harbottle 18 Oct 1515-Hackney 9 Mar 1578, bur 3 Apr 1578 Westminster Abbey). 

12.      RICHARD Howard (-1517). 

13.      WILLIAM Howard ([1509/10]-[Hampton Court or Reigate] 11/12 Jan 1573, bur Reigate, Surrey).  He was created Baron Howard of Effingham 9 Oct 1554.  m firstly (before 18 Jun 1531) CATHERINE Broughton, daughter of JOHN Broughton of Toddington, Bedfordshire & his wife Anne Sapcote (-23 Apr 1535, bur Lambeth).  m secondly (before 1536) MARGARET Gamage, daughter of THOMAS Gamage of Coity, Glamorganshire & his wife Margaret St John of Bletsoe, Bedfordshire (-18 May 1581, bur Reigate, Surrey).  He and his second wife were ancestors of the BARONS HOWARD of EFFINGHAM, later EARLS of EFFINGHAM. 

14.      ANNE Howard (-before 22 Feb 1559, bur Lambeth)m (settlement 16 Nov 1511) JOHN de Vere, son of GEORGE de Vere & his wife Margaret Stafford (14 Aug 1499-14 Jul 1526, bur Colne Priory).  He succeeded his uncle in 1513 as Earl of Oxford. 

15.      DOROTHY Howard m (before 21 Feb 1530) as his first wife, EDWARD Stanley Earl of Derby, son of THOMAS Earl of Derby & his wife Anne Hastings (10 May 1509-Lathom House 24 Oct 1572, bur Ormskirk). 

16.      ELIZABETH Howard (-18 Sep 1534, bur Lambeth, transferred to Boreham)m (before 21 May 1524) HENRY Radcliffe, son of ROBERT Radcliffe Lord Fitzwalter (later Viscount Fitzwalter, and Earl of Sussex) & his first wife Elizabeth Stafford of the Dukes of Buckingham ([1507]-Canon Row, Westminster 17 Feb 1557, bur London St Lawrence Pountney, transferred to Borham).  He succeeded his father in 1542 as Earl of Sussex, Viscount Fitzwalter. 

17.      CATHERINE Howard

 

 

THOMAS Howard, son of THOMAS Howard Duke of Norfolk & his first wife Elizabeth Tilney (1473-Kenninghall, Norfolk 25 Aug 1554, bur 2 Oct 1554 Framlingham Abbey).  He was styled Lord Howard from 1483-1514.  Lord High Admiral 4 May 1513-Jul 1525.  Created Earl of Surrey for life 1 Feb 1514, when his father was created Duke of Norfolk.  Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1520-1522.  Lord High Treasurer 4 Dec 1522-Feb 1547.  He succeeded his father 1524 as Duke of Norfolk.  He signed the letter to the Pope concerning King Henry VIII's divorce in 1529, and took an active part in the overthrow of Cardinal Wolsey.  He was created Earl Marshal for life 28 May 1533.  He was found guilty of high treason, was attainted 27 Jan 1547, and only avoided the death sentence because of the death of King Henry VIII the following day.  He remained in prison during the reign of King Edward VI but was released by Queen Mary I who restored him 3 Aug 1553 to his honours[1160]

m firstly (Greenwich 4 Feb 1495) ANNE of York, daughter of EDWARD IV King of England & his wife Elizabeth Wydeville (Palace of Westminster 2 Nov 1475-22 Nov [1511/12], bur Thetford Priory, Norfolk, later removed to Framlingham Church, Suffolk). 

m secondly (8 Jan 1513, separated Easter 1533) Lady ELIZABETH Stafford, daughter of EDWARD Stafford Duke of Buckingham & his wife Lady Eleanor Percy ([1497]-Lambeth 30 Nov 1558, bur 7 Dec 1558 Lambeth). 

Duke Thomas & his first wife had four children: 

1.         THOMAS Howard (-young). 

2.         HENRY Howard (-young). 

3.         WILLIAM Howard (-young). 

4.         son (-young). 

Duke Thomas & his second wife had three children:

5.         MARY Howard (-9 Dec 1557).  Lady-in-waiting to Queen Anne of Cleves in 1540.  m (dispensation 28 Nov 1533, not consummated) HENRY FitzRoy Duke of Richmond, illegitimate son of HENRY VIII King of England & his mistress Elizabeth Blount (Blackmore, Essex 1519-Thetford 22 Jul 1536). 

6.         HENRY Howard (1517-executed Tower Hill 19 Jan 1547, bur Allhallows, Barking, later transferred to Framlingham).  Earl of Surrey.  He was found guilty of high treason at Guildhall 13 Jan 1547 and executed.  m (contract 13 Feb 1532, before Apr 1532) as her first husband, FRANCES Vere, daughter of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Elizabeth Trussell ([1516/17]-Earl Soham, Suffolk 30 Jun 1577, bur Framlingham).  She married secondly (before 1553) Thomas Steynings of Earl Soham, Suffolk.  Earl Henry & his wife had two children: 

a)         THOMAS Howard (10 Mar 1538-executed Tower Hill 2 Jun 1572, bur The Tower chapel).  Earl of Surrey.  He succeeded his paternal grandfather in 1554 as Duke of Norfolk.  He was found guilty of high treason 16 Jan 1572 and attainted when all his honours were forfeited.  m firstly (30 Mar 1555 or before) MARY FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of HENRY FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Lady Catherine Grey (1540-Arundel House, Strand, London 25 Aug 1557, bur London, St Clement Danes).  She died in childbirth.  m secondly ([10 Dec 1558/2 Mar 1559]) MARGARET Audley, widow of Lord HENRY Dudley, daughter of THOMAS Audley Baron Audley of Walden & his second wife Lady Elizabeth Grey (1540-Norwich 10 Jan 1564, bur 17 Jan 1564 Norwich, St John the Baptist, later transferred to Framlingham).  m thirdly (29 Jan 1567) as her second husband, ELIZABETH Lelburne, widow of THOMAS Lord Dacre of Gilsland, daughter of JAMES Leyburne of Cunswick, Westmoreland & his second wife Helen Preston of Levens (-Kenninghall 4 Sep 1567, bur 18 Sep 1567 Kenninghall).  She died in childbirth.  Duke Thomas & his first wife had one child:

i)          PHILIP Howard (1557-1595).  Earl of Arundel and Surrey.  m ANNE Dacre, daughter of THOMAS Lord Dacre of Gilsland & his first wife Elizabeth Neville of the Earls of Westmoreland.  Ancestors of the DUKES of NORFOLK and EARLS of STAFFORD (ext 1762). 

Duke Thomas & his second wife had two children:

ii)         THOMAS Howard (1561-1626)m firstly MARY Dacre, daughter of THOMAS Lord Dacre of Gilsland & his first wife Elizabeth Neville of the Earls of Westmoreland.  m secondly as her second husband, CATHERINE Knevet .  Ancestors of the EARLS of SUFFOLK and LORDS HOWARD of French (ext. 1715). 

iii)        WILLIAM Howard (1563-1640)m (1577) ELIZABETH Dacre, daughter of THOMAS Lord Dacre of Gilsland & his first wife Elizabeth Neville of the Earls of Westmoreland.  Ancestors of the EARLS of CARLISLE. 

b)         HENRY Howard (-1614).  Earl of Northampton. 

7.         THOMAS Howard .  Viscount Howard. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 6.    SHREWSBURY

 

 

William I King of England granted the earldom of Shrewsbury (or Shropshire) to Roger [II] de Montgommery in 1074.  The earldom's territory was critical in defending the kingdom from raids from neighbouring Wales.  The Montgommery earls were, however, rebellious and gained a reputation for treachery.  The earldom was finally forfeited in 1102.  The earldom of Shrewsbury was not granted again until 1442 when John Talbot, Lord Talbot, was created Earl of Shrewsbury for his services to Henry VI King of England. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of SHREWSBURY 1074-1102 (MONTGOMMERY)

 

 

ROGER [II] de Montgommery, son of ROGER [I] de Montgommery Seigneur de Montgommery and Vicomte de l'Hiémois & his wife Josceline --- (-Shrewsbury 27 Jul 1094, bur Shrewsbury Abbey[1161]).  He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois.  He remained in Normandy at the time of the Norman invasion of England in 1066 to assist Duchess Mathilde to govern the duchy[1162], but accompanied King William I to England in Dec 1067.  Orderic Vitalis records that King William gave him "first of all Arundel castle and the town of Chichester"[1163], afterwards creating him Earl of Shrewsbury [1/4] Dec 1074, presumably with the intention of strengthening the defence of the western part of the country against Welsh incursions.  As "Rogerus comes Salosberiensis" he witnessed a charter of King William I giving the barony of Plessis to the church of Bayeux dated 24 Dec 1074[1164].  Sire d'Alençon.  Domesday Book records the land of “Earl Roger” in Wotton Hundred and Godalming Hundred in Surrey, his land in Hampshire including in Portsdown and Chalton Hundreds[1165].  He allied himself with Robert Duke of Normandy at the time of the latter's rebellion against King William II in 1089[1166]

1.         ROBERT de Montgommery "de Bellęme" ([1052/56]-[Wareham Castle] 1 or 8 May 1118 or [after 1129], bur [Wareham Castle]).  He is referred to as his mother's "first-born son" by Orderic Vitalis, who says that his "name is now a byword for his cruelty to the wretched peasantry"[1167].  He witnessed a charter for Saint Martin de Sées with his brother Roger, and a charter for Saint Aubin of Angers in [1060/62] without Roger[1168], suggesting that the latter had died by then.  He succeeded his mother in 1079 as Sire de Bellęme et d'Alençon.  He rebelled against William II King of England in 1088, crossed to England but was besieged at Rochester Castle and in Jun 1088 forced to surrender[1169].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Rodbertus...filius eius” obtained “totum feudum eius in Normannia”, adding that he was “crudelis et superbus” and committed “innumeras iniquitates[1170].  He succeeded his younger brother in 1098 as Earl of Shrewsbury after a payment of Ł3000[1171].  He succeeded his father-in-law in Oct 1100 as Comte de Ponthieu.  Florence of Worcester records that "Scrobbesbyriensis comes Rotbertus de Beleasmo" rebelled against Henry I King of England in [1101], was deprived of all his honours and estates in England, and retired to Normandy[1172].  The Annals of Margan record that “Robertus comes de Belesmo” was expelled from England in 1102 “cum fratre suo Arnulfo[1173].  Florence of Worcester records that "Rotbertus de Beleasm" fought with Robert Duke of Normandy against King Henry I at Tinchebrai in [1106], was captured, but later escaped and fled[1174].  He helped Helias de Saint-Saens protect Guillaume, son of Robert "Curthose" ex-Duke of Normandy, after Henry I King of England ordered the arrest of the boy[1175].  He was arrested in 1112, imprisoned at Cherbourg and all his lands and honours forfeited.  He was imprisoned at Wareham Castle, Dorset from Jul 1113[1176].  The Annals of Margan record the death “Kal Mai” in 1118 of “Robertus comes de Belesme[1177].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records payments made "in libatione Robti de Belismo" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[1178].  This suggests a pension or maintenance in some form, although it is not certain that it relates to Robert de Montgommery Earl of Shrewsbury. 

2.         HUGUES de Montgommery ([1053/59]-Anglesey 31 Jul 1098, bur [17 Aug 1098] Shrewsbury Abbey[1179]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertus de Bellismo, Hugo de Monte-Gomerici, Rogerius Pictavinus, Philippus atque Arnulfus” as the five sons of “Rogerius [de Monte-Gomerici]” and his first wife[1180].  He succeeded his father in 1094 as Earl of Shrewsbury and to all his lands in England and Wales[1181].  Florence of Worcester records that "comites Hugo de Legecastra et Hugo de Scrobbesbyria" invaded Anglesey in [1098], mutilating or massacring many of the inhabitants of the island, and that "comes Hugo de Scrobbesbyrie" was killed by an arrow discharged by Magnus King of Norway during a raid on the Welsh coast[1182].  The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Hugh was killed in Anglesey "by pirates from oversea"[1183].  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of his father in 1094, “Hugo...de Monte-Gomerici [filius eius]” obtained “comitatum Scrobesburić”, but that after a few years he was killed by “Magno fratre regis Northwigenarum” and buried “Scrobesburiensis conventus[1184].  "Arnulf son of earl Roger" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees for the souls of "his father Roger and his brother Hugh who was slain that year" by charter dated 27 Aug 1098[1185]

3.         other children: see NORMANDY NOBILITY

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of SHREWSBURY 1442-1538 (TALBOT)

 

 

The earliest references to individuals with the name “Talbot” have been found in cartularies which include donations of property located within the county of Eu.  Presumably Guillaume Talbot enjoyed a position of some prominence at the court of Robert Comte d’Eu, who is recorded as having consented to Guillaume’s donation to the abbey of Tréport Saint-Michel.  Le Maho specifies that the original patrimony of the family was at Sainte-Croix-sur-Buchy but was fixed at Cleuville, Seine-Maritime in [1071], a branch of the family holding property there under the Giffards[1186].  As can be seen below, it appears that there were two branches of the Talbot family in England in the 12th century, descended from two possible brothers referred to in this document as Geoffrey [I] and Richard [II], but the information in the primary sources which have so far been consulted are insufficient to reconstruct the early generations of the family with any confidence. 

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME Talbot (-after 1036).  "Robertus comes Augensis…uxore Beatrice et filiis meis Radulfo, Willermo atque Roberto" made donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport, and confirmed donations, including the donation of “servitium terre Sansogolonis in Gillemercourt” made by “Willermi Talebot”, by charter dated 1036[1187].  "Robertus comes Augensis…" confirmed donations to the abbey of St Michel, Tréport, including the donation of “servitium terre Sansgolonis quam habebat in Gilermercourt” to “ecclesie Sancti Michaelis de Ulterisportu” made by “Willelmus Talebot” with the consent of “comitis Roberti et comitisse Beatricis ac filiorum eorundem Willelmi...”, by charter dated 1059[1188].  This document includes no indication whether Guillaume Talbot was still allive or not at the date of the confirmation.  The same donation was later confirmed by Hugues Archbishop of Rouen by charter dated 1145[1189], and by Pope Lucius III by charter dated 19 Jun 1185[1190]

 

2.         HUGUES [I] Talbot .  No indication has been found of the family relationship between Guillaume Talbot (see above) and Hugues Talbot.  The chronology of Hugues’s life cannot be ascertained.  There are no indications to date the document which records his donation, although presumably it can be dated to the mid-11th century.  If that is correct, Hugues could have been Guillaume’s son or his brother.  "Hugo cognomento Taleboth" donated "decimam de Sanreith" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "dominis Walo de la Roca, ad quem prćdictć terrć possessio devenit postea", and later confirmed by “successor illorum Osbernus de Ansevilla”, by undated charter, signed by “Hugonis Talebot, Walonis de Roca, Osberni de Ansevilla”, witnessed by “Gulbertus de Ou, Osbernus de Alberti Villa...Osbernus filius Goiffredi de Ou...[1191].  Hugues Archbishop of Rouen confirmed past donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux, including property "apud Wanevillam" in "feudo Hugonis Talebot", by charter dated 1137[1192]

 

 

1.         RICHARD [I] Talbot (-after 1086).  Morandičre states refers to "Richard Talebot…compagnon de son voisin Grondebśuf ŕ Hastings" when recording the marriage of his granddaughter[1193].  Domesday Book records “Richard Talbot” holding land in Battlesden, Bedfordshire from "Walter Giffard"[1194]m ---.  Richard [I] & his wife had [two children]: 

a)         [--- Talbot .  Baron de Cleuville.  m ---.  One child:] 

i)          [JEANNE Talbot .  Morandičre states that "Robert II le jeune d’Estouteville" married "avant le désastre de Tinchebray…Jehanne Talebot heritičre de l’aisné des surnommés Talebot, barons de Cleuville", naming her grandfather "Richard Talebot…compagnon de son voisin Grondebśuf ŕ Hastings" but not her father, adding that she died early leaving a son[1195]m (before 1106) as his first wife, ROBERT [II] d’Estouteville, son of ROBERT [I] d’Estouteville & his wife Béatrice --- (-[before 1138]).] 

b)         [--- Talbot .  The reference to “l’aisné des surnommés de Talebot” suggests that there was also a “puisné”.  If that is correct, this could have been the same person as Gilbert Talbot or Geoffrey [I] Talbot, both named below.] 

 

2.         [GILBERT Talbot (-after [1101]).  Morandičre states that "Maude d’Estouteville, femme de Gilbert Talebot" was granted the fief of Shrewsbury confiscated from Robert de Montgommery (dated to [1101]), adding that she was the sister of Robert [I] d’Estouteville[1196].  The reference to the transfer of the Montgommery fief of Shrewsbury to the Talbot family is evidently anachronistic.  No other reference has been found to Mathilde and her supposed husband.  Until further corroboration comes to light, it is suggested that this information should be treated with caution.  m MATHILDE d’Estouteville, daughter of --- (-after [1101]).] 

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY [I] Talbot ([1050/65]-before 1130).  Domesday Book records “Geoffrey Talbot” holding Liston in Essex from "Hugh de Gournai"[1197].  “Gausfridus Talebotus et uxor eius Agnes” donated part “de terra Fenge” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Sibilla domini filia” [who has not yet been identified][1198].  An undated charter records an agreement between the abbot of Colchester St John and “Gaufridum Talebot et uxorem eius Agnetem et filium eorundem Gaufridum Talebot”, with the consent of “Ricardo Lundoniensi episcopo” [therefore dated to before 1127], relating to “ecclesia de Turrituna[1199].  He presumably died shortly before the 1129 Pipe Roll in which his son is recorded as making a fine for “terra patris sui” (see below).  m AGNES [de Lacy, daughter of WALTER de Lacy & his wife Emmeline ---] (-after 1129).  “Gausfridus Talebotus et uxor eius Agnes” donated part “de terra Fenge” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Sibilla domini filia” [who has not yet been identified][1200].  Her possible parentage is indicated by the charter dated to [1130/39] under which [her presumed daughter] “Sibilla de Lacy” notified her bailiffs and foresters that she had donated “land of Leghe near the church of St Michael” to “my uncle Walter abbot of Gloucester”, for the souls of “myself and my husband Payne Fitz-john”, by charter dated to [1130/39][1201], on the assumption that “uncle” can be interpreted in the document in its strict sense which would mean that Walter de Lacy Abbot of Gloucester was the brother of Agnes.  Keats-Rohan says that Agnes “used erroneously to be identified as a de Lacy” and that she was “possibly a daughter of Helto” (dapifer, recorded in Domesday Book as holding Swanscombe, Kent from Odo Bishop of Bayeux) but does not explain the reasoning, although in a later sentence she suggests that the connection between the Talbot and Lucy families would be explained if “Adeline or Adelisa, wife of Hugh de Lacy (d.a.1115), was the daughter of Geoffrey and Agnes[1202].  An undated charter records an agreement between the abbot of Colchester St John and “Gaufridum Talebot et uxorem eius Agnetem et filium eorundem Gaufridum Talebot”, with the consent of “Ricardo Lundoniensi episcopo” [therefore dated to before 1127], relating to “ecclesia de Turrituna[1203].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Agnes uxor Gaufr Talebot" in Kent in respect of "dote et maritag suo"[1204].  Geoffrey [I] & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         GEOFFREY [II] Talbot (-Hereford 22 Aug 1140, bur Gloucester).  An undated charter records an agreement between the abbot of Colchester St John and “Gaufridum Talebot et uxorem eius Agnetem et filium eorundem Gaufridum Talebot”, with the consent of “Ricardo Lundoniensi episcopo” [therefore dated to before 1127], relating to “ecclesia de Turrituna[1205].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Gaufr Talebot" paying a fine in Kent for "terra patris sui"[1206].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records the capture of "Galfridus…Taleboth, cognatusque illius Gislebertus de Laceio"[1207].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XI Kal Sep", dated to 1140, of "Galefridus Talebotus miles" and his burial "Glaornć"[1208].  "Walterus de Meduana" [who was married to Geoffrey’s presumed niece Cecily, daughter of his presumed sister Sibylla de Lacy] confirmed to King Henry II that he held "in capite...xx milites" in Kent which “Galfridus Tallebot” had held on the death of King Henry I, dated 1166[1209]

b)         [SIBYLLA de Lacy (after 1138).  “Sibilla de Lacy” notified her bailiffs and foresters that she had donated “land of Leghe near the church of St Michael” to “my uncle Walter abbot of Gloucester”, for the souls of “myself and my husband Payne Fitz-john”, by charter dated to [1130/39][1210].  "Rogo filio Milonis Gloec et Cecilie uxori sue filie Pag fil Johis" the lands of her father, including land which "Pag dedit Sibille uxoris sue in dote", by charter dated to [Dec 1137/May 1138][1211].  Roger Bishop of Salisbury instructed "Sibille q fuit uxor Pag fil Johis" to restore property which her husband had granted to "Rogo fil Milon Gloec cum Cecilia filia tua p-mogenita" by charter dated 1138[1212]m PAYN FitzJohn of Ewyas, Herefordshire, son of JOHN & his wife --- (before 1100-killed 10 Jul 1137, bur Gloucester Abbey).]

 

 

1.         RICHARD [II] Talbot ([1065/1075]-[after 1100]).  His birth date is estimated bearing in mind the estimated birth date of his son Hugues [III] and on the assumption that he was somewhat older than his wife, which would have been normal at the time.  If that estimate is correct, Richard [II] Talbot is unlikely to have been the same person as Richard [I] who is shown above.  The chronology indicates that Richard [II] Talbot could not have been the same person as Richard [III] who is shown below.  If all that is correct, Richard [II] Talbot could have been a younger brother of Geoffrey [I] who is shown above.  No reference has been found to Richard [II] acting in his own capacity apart from the confirmations of his donations by King Henry II.  If his birth date is correctly estimated as shown above, those confirmations must have been made some time after Richard [II] died.  m AMICIE de Gournay, daughter of [HUGUES [III] de Gournay & his wife Basilie Flaitel] or [GERARD de Gournay & his [first] wife ---] or [GERARD de Gournay & his [second] wife Edive [Edith] de Warenne] or [---] (before [1085]-).  Her marriage and family connection are indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" rebelled against King Henry I after the marriage of his sister Gundred in Jun [1118], and captured “municipium...Plessicii” which he granted to "nepoti eius Hugoni Talabot"[1213].  The passage indicates that Hugh Talbot was at least a young adult at the time, so not born later than [1100], which would place his mother’s birth no later than [1085].  There are therefore at least three possibilities for her parentage.  Firstly, if she was the child of Gérard de Gournay by his known wife Edive de Warenne, Edive would have been born in the early part of her estimated birth date range shown above and Amicie born soon after the marriage.  Secondly, given that that chronology is tight, Amicie could have been the daughter of Gérard by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage.  Thirdly, the word “nepos” in Orderic could indicate a more distant family relationship than nephew, maybe first cousin, in which case Amicie could have been the daughter of Hugues [III] de Gournay, although the more remote the relationship the less likely the appointment of Richard Talbot as custodian of the castle by Hugues [IV] de Gournay.  On balance, the most likely case appears to be the second.  Her name is indicated by two charters of King Henry II: Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "…Richardi Tallebot et Amicie uxoris eius et Hugonis et Willelmi filiorum suorum…", by charter dated to [1181/83][1214].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Foi de Longueville, including donations by "Ricardi Thalebot et Avitie uxoris sue et Hugonis filii sui", by charter dated to [Mar/Jun] 1189[1215].  Richard [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH [II] Talbot (before [1100]-).  His parentage is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who records that "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" rebelled against King Henry I after the marriage of his sister Gundred in Jun [1118], and captured “municipium...Plessicii” which he granted to "nepoti eius Hugoni Talabot"[1216].  His birth date is estimated is estimated assuming that he was a young adult at the time.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations made by "…Richardi Tallebot et Amicie uxoris eius et Hugonis et Willelmi filiorum suorum…", by charter dated to [1181/83][1217].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations made by "Hugonis Talebot…eiusdem Hugonis et Willelmi fratris sui", by charter dated to [1177/89][1218].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the priory of Sainte-Foi de Longueville, including donations made by "Ricardi Thalebot et Avitie uxoris sue et Hugonis filii sui" and by "Hugonis Talebot senis…Hugonis Talebot junioris", by charter dated to [Mar/Jun] 1189[1219]

b)         WILLIAM Talbot .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "…Richardi Tallebot et Amicie uxoris eius et Hugonis et Willelmi filiorum suorum…", by charter dated to [1181/83][1220].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Valmont, including donations by "Hugonis Talebot…eiusdem Hugonis et Willelmi fratris sui", by charter dated to [1177/89][1221]same person as...?  WILLIAM Talbot (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Tallebot" held one knight’s fee from "Roberti filii Regis" in Devon[1222].

 

 

1.         HUGH [III] Talbot (before 1105-).  His birth date is estimated on the assumption that he was older than his wife.  If that is correct, he could have been the same person as Hugh [II] Talbot who is shown above.  In addition, as noted below, Hugh [III] Talbot may have been the same person as Hugh [IV] who is shown below.  m (divorced) as her first husband, BEATRIX de Mandeville, daughter of WILLIAM de Mandeville & his wife Marguerite de Rie ([1105]-[Rickling, Essex] 19 Apr [1197 or before], bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript listing property of Walden abbey states, quoting a charter of Stephen King of England dated 1147, that “sororem suam…Beatricem” (referring to "Galfridus Essexić comes") married "Hugoni Talebot" from whom she was divorced and secondly "Willielmo de Saye"[1223].  She married secondly William de Say.  She became the heiress of her nephew William de Mandeville Earl of Essex, her son by her second husband, Geoffrey, being allowed to occupy her place in view of her age[1224].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Beatrix de Mandavilla domina de Say, soror Galfridi primi, fundatoris, et amita Willielmi” succeeded her nephew[1225].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death in 1200 of “Beatrix de Say, soror fundatoris nostri et uxor Willielmi de Say” and her burial in the abbey[1226]

 

 

1.         HUGH [IV] Talbot (-after 1162).  From a chronological point of view, Hugh [IV] Talbot may have been the same person as Hugh [III], on the assumption that Hugh [IV]’s four sons were adult when named in 1162.  “...Hugone Talbot...” witnessed the charter dated to [1140/44] under which “Robertus de Ver constabularius regis Anglić et Adeluda filia Hugonis de Monteforte uxor mea” donated property to Monks Horton[1227].  Hugh Talbot granted a rent in Feltwell to Beaubec abbey, with the consent of his wife Ermentrude and sons Gerard, Geoffrey, Hugh and Richard, by charter dated 1162[1228].  [The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo Talebot" with one knight "in baillia Galfridi de Bleville, de Caleto"[1229].  "…Hugone Talebot…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[1230].  It is not certain to which Hugh Talbot these two entries refer.]  m ERMENTRUDE, daughter of --- (-after 1162).  Hugh Talbot granted a rent in Feltwell to Beaubec abbey, with the consent of his wife Ermentrude and sons Gerard, Geoffrey, Hugh and Richard, by charter dated 1162[1231].  Hugh [IV] & his wife had four children: 

a)         GERARD Talbot (-after [1181/89]).  Hugh Talbot granted a rent in Feltwell to Beaubec abbey, with the consent of his wife Ermentrude and sons Gerard, Geoffrey, Hugh and Richard, by charter dated 1162[1232].  "…Ger[ardo] Talebot…" subscribed the charter dated to [1181/89] under which Henry II King of England granted land to "Waltero ostiario de Camera"[1233].  

b)         GEOFFREY Talbot .  Hugh Talbot granted a rent in Feltwell to Beaubec abbey, with the consent of his wife Ermentrude and sons Gerard, Geoffrey, Hugh and Richard, by charter dated 1162[1234]

c)         HUGH [V] Talbot .  Hugh Talbot granted a rent in Feltwell to Beaubec abbey, with the consent of his wife Ermentrude and sons Gerard, Geoffrey, Hugh and Richard, by charter dated 1162[1235]

d)         RICHARD [IV] Talbot .  Hugh Talbot granted a rent in Feltwell to Beaubec abbey, with the consent of his wife Ermentrude and sons Gerard, Geoffrey, Hugh and Richard, by charter dated 1162[1236]

 

 

No indication has been found about how the following three individuals may have been related to the other branches of the Talbot family which are shown above: 

 

1.         ALURED Talbot (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alvredus Taleboth" holding one knight’s fee under Alured de Lincoln in Dorset in 1166[1237]

 

2.         ROGER Talbot (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Rogero Tallebot" paying for "ii milites et dimidium" in Essex, Herefordshire[1238].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Rogerus Tallebot" paying "l s, ii milites et dimidium" in Essex, Hertfordshire[1239]

 

3.         WILLIAM Talbot (-after 17 Mar 1226).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus Talebot" holding "quintam pro i carucata in Hessyldeham" in London, Middlesex in [1210/12][1240].  Henry III King of England conscripted "…Willelmus Talebot…" for service "in Wasconiam" dated 17 Mar 1225[1241]

 

 

His possible link with the Lacy family, noted below, suggests that Richard [III] Talbot may have been a descendant of Geoffrey [I] Talbot (see above), whose probable connections with Lacy are discussed above. 

 

1.         RICHARD [III] Talbot (-after [1174]).  Henry II King of England granted "manerium de Lintona…terram de Cottona" to "Ricardo Talebot" by charter dated to [1156/58][1242].  The 1155 Pipe Roll records "Hugo de Longo campo et Ric Talebot in Lintun et Wintun" in Herefordshire[1243].  Richard’s family connection with Hugh de Longchamp, suggested by this entry, has not been ascertained.  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy" on the roll dated 1198, states that "the families of Longchamp and Lacy had, it seems, intermarried"[1244].  If that is correct, it is likely that Richard [III] Talbot was closely related to Geoffrey [II] Talbot, whose mother may have been Agnes [de Lacy] (see above), maybe his son.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Ricardo Talebot iv m" in Hereford in [1158/59][1245].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardi de Candos" granted one half of one knight’s fee to "Ricardo Tallebaut" in Herefordshire[1246].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Ricardus Talebot" with one knight "in baillia Galfridi de Bleville, de Caleto"[1247].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus Talebot" previously held "feudum i militis apud Linton" in Herefordshire, granted by King Henry II, which was now held by "Gilbertus filius eius"[1248].  Michael Tutty records that Richard Talbot went to Ireland as part of the first Anglo-Norman invasion and “was granted the lordship of Malahide by Henry II King of England about 1174”, but does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[1249]m ---.  The name of Richard Talbot's wife is not known.  Richard [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         GILBERT Talbot of Linton (-before 13 Feb 1231).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Gilbertus Tallebot" holding one knight’s fee in Hereford in [1210/12][1250].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus Talebot" previously held "feudum i militis apud Linton" in Herefordshire, granted by King Henry II, which was now held by "Gilbertus filius eius"[1251].  Henry III King of England ordered "…Gillebertus Talebot…" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Herefordie" dated [Jul] 1219[1252]m ---.  The name of Gilbert Talbot's wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

i)          RICHARD [V] Talbot of Linton (-before 13 Apr 1234)m ([1219/24]) as her second husband, ALINE Basset, widow of DREUX de Montagu, daughter of ALAN Basset of Wycombe, Buckinghamshire & his second wife Aline de Gai.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Aluina que fuit uxor Drogonis de Monte Acuto est de donatione domini regis", adding that "est in custodia Alani Basset per Regem Johannem et est maritanda et terra sua in Pideltun valet xx.l"[1253].  "Alan Basset" made a fine "by Richard Talbot" for marrying "Aline who was the wife of Drogo de Montagu…without the king’s licence", dated [Oct] 1224[1254].  Richard [V] & his wife had [one possible child]: 

(1)       [GILBERT Talbot (-before 8 Sep 1274, bur Wormesley Priory, Herefordshire).  The Complete Peerage states that there is no evidence that Gilbert was Richard Talbot's son but that this parentage is suggested by the succession of first names in the line of descent[1255].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 8 Sep "2 Edw I" following the death of "Gilbert Talebot" name “Richard his son aged 24 and more is his next heir[1256].]  m GWENLLIAN, daughter of RHYS Mechyll Lord of Dynevor & his wife Matilda de Briouse.  Wrottesley shows "Rees, Wenchiliana, Margaret, Dughrica" as the children of "Lewellyn ap Rees" in relation to a claim by "Gilbert Talbot chivaler, Res ap Howel ap Willym and Walter ap Jevan ab Lewellyn" against Henry Earl of Lancaster and Blanche his wife for "the castle and commote of Tokennyn", adding that Gwenllian was mother of Richard Talbot, grandmother of Gilbert, great-grandmother of Richard, and great-great-grandmother of "Gilbert the plaintiff"[1257].  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       RICHARD [VI] Talbot ([1249/50]-1306).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 8 Sep "2 Edw I" following the death of "Gilbert Talebot" name “Richard his son aged 24 and more is his next heir[1258]

-         see below.

 

 

RICHARD [VI] Talbot, son of GILBERT Talbot & his wife Gwenthlian of Dynevor ([1249/50]-before 3 Sep 1306).  Inquisitions after a writ dated 8 Sep "2 Edw I" following the death of "Gilbert Talebot" name “Richard his son aged 24 and more is his next heir[1259].  Wrottesley shows "Rees, Wenchiliana, Margaret, Dughrica" as the children of "Lewellyn ap Rees" in relation to a claim by "Gilbert Talbot chivaler, Res ap Howel ap Willym and Walter ap Jevan ab Lewellyn" against Henry Earl of Lancaster and Blanche his wife for "the castle and commote of Tokennyn", adding that Gwenllian was mother of Richard Talbot, grandmother of Gilbert, great-grandmother of Richard, and great-great-grandmother of "Gilbert the plaintiff"[1260]

m (after 7 Jan 1269) SARAH de Beauchamp, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire & his wife Isabel Mauduit of Warwick (-after Jul 1317). 

Richard [VI] Talbot & his wife had three children: 

1.         GILBERT Talbot (18 Oct 1276-Eccleswall 24 Feb 1346).  Wrottesley shows "Rees, Wenchiliana, Margaret, Dughrica" as the children of "Lewellyn ap Rees" in relation to a claim by "Gilbert Talbot chivaler, Res ap Howel ap Willym and Walter ap Jevan ab Lewellyn" against Henry Earl of Lancaster and Blanche his wife for "the castle and commote of Tokennyn", adding that Gwenllian was mother of Richard Talbot, grandmother of Gilbert, great-grandmother of Richard, and great-great-grandmother of "Gilbert the plaintiff"[1261].  He was one of those responsible for the death of Piers Gaveston, but was pardoned in 1313[1262].  He was summoned to parliament 27 Jan 1332, whereby he is held to have become Lord Talbot.  m ANNE le Botiler, daughter of WILLIAM le Botiler of Wem, Shropshire & his wife ---.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD Talbot ([1305]-1356).  Wrottesley shows "Rees, Wenchiliana, Margaret, Dughrica" as the children of "Lewellyn ap Rees" in relation to a claim by "Gilbert Talbot chivaler, Res ap Howel ap Willym and Walter ap Jevan ab Lewellyn" against Henry Earl of Lancaster and Blanche his wife for "the castle and commote of Tokennyn", adding that Gwenllian was mother of Richard Talbot, grandmother of Gilbert, great-grandmother of Richard, and great-great-grandmother of "Gilbert the plaintiff"[1263].  Lord Talbot.   

-        see below

2.         RICHARD Talbot (-1328).  He succeeded to Richard's Castle, de iure uxorism (1317) as her second husband, JOAN de Mortimer, widow of THOMAS de Bykenore, daughter and co-heiress of HUGH de Mortimer Lord Mortimer of Richard's Castle & his wife Maud --- (Caerphilly Castle 24 Nov 1291-before 12 Jan 1241).  Richard & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD Talbot .  He was passed over. 

b)         JOHN Talbot ([1319]-1355)m (1330) JULIANA de Grey, daughter of ROGER de Grey Lord Grey of Ruthin & his wife Elizabeth de Hastings (-1361).  John Talbot & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN Talbot (1337-1375).  m as her first husband, KATHERINE, daughter of --- (-1381).  She married secondly John Seintclere.  John Talbot & his wife had five children: 

(a)       ELIZABETH Talbot (1364-1407).  m WARIN d'Arcedekne Lord Arcedekne, son of --- (-1400). 

(b)       PHILIPPA Talbot (1367-2/3 May 1417).  m firstly ROBERT de Asheton Constable of Dover Castle (-9 Jan 1384).  m secondly MATTHEW de Gournay, son of --- ([1310]-26 Sep 1406).  m thirdly (before 24 Feb 1408) as his first wife, JOHN Tiptoft of Tiptoft, son of PAYN Tiptoft [Tybetot] & his wife Agnes Wroth of Enfield, Middlesex (-27 Jan 1443).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1426 whereby he is held to have become Lord Tiptoft. 

(c)       RICHARD Talbot (1370-1382). 

(d)       ELEANOR Talbot (1372-1390).  A nun. 

(e)       JOHN Talbot (1374-1383). 

3.         THOMAS Talbot ([1287]-).  A priest. 

 

 

RICHARD Talbot, son of GILBERT Lord Talbot & his wife Anne le Botiler ([1305]-23 Oct 1356).  Wrottesley shows "Rees, Wenchiliana, Margaret, Dughrica" as the children of "Lewellyn ap Rees" in relation to a claim by "Gilbert Talbot chivaler, Res ap Howel ap Willym and Walter ap Jevan ab Lewellyn" against Henry Earl of Lancaster and Blanche his wife for "the castle and commote of Tokennyn", adding that Gwenllian was mother of Richard Talbot, grandmother of Gilbert, great-grandmother of Richard, and great-great-grandmother of "Gilbert the plaintiff"[1264].  He was summoned to parliament 27 Jan 1332, whereby he is held to have become Lord Talbot.   

m ([24 Jul 1326/23 Mar 1327]) as her first husband, ELIZABETH Comyn, daughter of JOHN COMYN Lord of Badenoch & his wife Joan de Valence (1 Nov 1299-20 Nov 1372).  She married secondly ([21 Feb 1358/16 Feb 1361]) John Bromwych

Lord Richard & his wife had one child: 

1.         GILBERT Talbot ([1332]-Roales, Spain 24 Apr 1387).  Wrottesley shows "Rees, Wenchiliana, Margaret, Dughrica" as the children of "Lewellyn ap Rees" in relation to a claim by "Gilbert Talbot chivaler, Res ap Howel ap Willym and Walter ap Jevan ab Lewellyn" against Henry Earl of Lancaster and Blanche his wife for "the castle and commote of Tokennyn", adding that Gwenllian was mother of Richard Talbot, grandmother of Gilbert, great-grandmother of Richard, and great-great-grandmother of "Gilbert the plaintiff"[1265].  He succeeded his father in 1356 as Lord Talbot.  He died of plague[1266]m firstly (before 8 Sep 1352) PERNEL Butler, daughter of JAMES Butler Earl of Ormond & his wife Eleanor de Bohun (-1368).  m secondly (before 16 Nov 1379) as her second husband, JOAN de Stafford, widow of JOHN Cherleton Lord Cherleton, daughter of RALPH de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his second wife Margaret de Audley (-before 1397).  Lord Gilbert & his first wife had one child: 

a)         RICHARD Talbot ([1361]-London 8/9 Sep 1395).  He was summoned to Parliament 3 Mar 1384, in consequence of his marriage to the heiress of Strange, whereby he is held to have become Lord Talbot[1267]m (before 23 Aug 1383) as her first husband, ANKARET Le Strange, daughter of JOHN Le Strange Lord Strange of Blackmere & his wife Mary FitzAlan of Arundel ([1361]-1 Jun 1413).  She succeeded her father 23 Aug 1383 as Baroness Strange, suo iure.  She married secondly ([8 Mar/4 Jul] 1401) as his second wife, Thomas Neville Lord Furnivalle.  Lord Richard & his wife had four children:    

i)          GILBERT Talbot (1383-Rouen 19 Oct 1418).  He succeeded his father in 1396 as Lord Talbot.  He succeeded his mother in 1413 as Lord Strange [of Blackmere].  He died at the siege of Rouen.  Betrothed ([20 May 1392]) to JOAN of England, daughter of THOMAS "of Woodstock" Duke of Gloucester & his wife Eleanor de Bohun (1384-16 Aug 1400, bur Walden Abbey, Essex).  m ([1415]) as her first husband, BRITES de [1268][Sousa, daughter of LOPES Diaz de Sousa & his wife ---] (-25 Dec 1447, bur East Shefford, Berkshire).  She married secondly (before 1423) Thomas Pettiplace of East Shefford, Berkshire.  Lord Gilbert & his wife had one child:

(a)       ANKARET Talbot (1416-13 Dec 1421).  She succeeded her father as Baroness Strange, Baroness Talbot, suo iure

ii)         JOHN Talbot (1384-killed in battle Castillon, Dordogne 17 Jul 1453, bur St Alkmund's, Whitchurch, Shropshire).  He succeeded his niece in 1421 as Lord Talbot, Lord Strange.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury 20 May 1442.    

-         see below

iii)        ANNE Talbot (-16 Jan 1441)m HUGH de Courtenay, son of EDWARD de Courtenay Earl of Devon & his wife Matilda [Camoys] (1389-16 Jun 1422).  He succeeded his father in 1419 as Earl of Devon. 

iv)       ALICE Talbot .  The tomb at Ashby St Ledgers, Northamptonshire of "Willielmus Catesbie quondam unus trenchiatorum regis Henrici sexti", died 1452, records "Philippa uxor prima Willielmi Catesbie militis…" and "Domina Johanna uxor secuna Willielmi Catesbie militis antea uxor Renardi de la Bere et filia Thome Barre militis et Alicie uxoris eius sororis Johannis Dni Talbot creati com Salop…" as well as the couple’s children[1269]m THOMAS Barre, son of ---. 

 

 

JOHN Talbot, son of RICHARD Talbot Lord Talbot & his wife Ankaret Lestrange Baroness Strange (1384-killed in battle Castillon, Dordogne 17 Jul 1453, bur St Alkmund's, Whitchurch, Shropshire).  He succeeded his niece in 1421 as Lord Talbot, Lord Strange.  King Henry VI created him Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis in 1434.  He was created Earl of Shrewsbury 20 May 1442, and Earl of Waterford in Ireland 17 Jul 1446. 

m firstly (12 Mar 1407) MATILDA Neville Baroness Furnivalle, daughter of THOMAS Neville Lord Furnivalle & his first wife Joan de Furnivalle Baroness Furnivalle ([1392]-[1423], bur Worksop Priory, Nottinghamshire). 

m secondly (Warwick Castle 6 Sep 1425) MARGARET Beauchamp, daughter of RICHARD Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his first wife Elizabeth Berkeley Baroness Berkeley (1404-14 Jun 1467, bur London, St Paul's). 

John & his first wife had three children:

1.         JOHN Talbot ([1413]-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460, bur Worksop Priory).  "John Talbot kt, lord of Furnyvale, son and heir apparent of John earl of Shrewsbury" quit-claimed his possession of the manor of Munden Furnyvale and the priory of Rownehay, Hertfordshire by charter dated 14 Nov "26 Hen VI"[1270].  He succeeded his father in 1453 as Earl of Shrewsbury

-        see below

2.         THOMAS Talbot (Finglas, near Dublin 19 Jun 1416-10 Aug 1416, bur London, Church of the Black Friars). 

3.         JOAN Talbot m firstly (settlement 25 Jul 1457) as his fourth wife, JAMES de Berkeley Lord Berkeley, son of JAMES Berkeley & his wife Elizabeth Bluet of Raglan, Monmouthshire (Raglan [1394]-Berkeley Castle Nov 1463, bur Berkeley).  m secondly (before 26 May 1474) EDMUND Hungerfold, son of ---. 

4.         ELIZABETH Talbot (-[6 Nov 1506/10 May 1507]).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter of "John duke of Norfolk", dated 30 Jun "29 Hen VI", under which he granted the manor of Weston near Baldok, Hertfordshire, formerly belonging to "Elizabeth his grandmother", to "John Mowbray earl Warren and Surrey and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John earl of Shrewsbury"[1271]m (before 27 Nov 1448) JOHN Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his wife Eleanor Bourchier d'Eu (18 Oct 1444-Framlingham Castle, Suffolk 16/17 Jan 1476, bur Thetford).  He was created Earl of Surrey and Warenne 24 Mar 1451.  He succeeded his father in 1461 as Duke of Norfolk. 

5.         HUMPHREY Talbot . 

6.         LOUIS Talbot . 

7.         JOHN Talbot (-17 Jul 1453).  He was created Lord and Baorn of Lisle in 1445, and Viscount Lisle in 1451.  m as her second husband, JOAN Chedder, widow of RICHARD Stafford, daughter of THOMAS Chedder & his wife Isabel Scobhull ([1425]-15 Jul 1464).  John Talbot & his wife had three children: 

a)         THOMAS Talbot (-20 Mar 1470).  Viscount de Lisle.  m (Sep 1466) MARGARET Herbert, daughter of WILLIAM Herbert Lord Herbert (later Earl of Pembroke) & his wife Anne Devereux (-before 1503).  She married secondly Henry Bodrugan of Cornwall. 

b)         ELIZABETH Talbot (1451-8 Sep 1487, bur Astley, Warwickshire).  Baroness Lisle of Kingston Lisle, suo iurem as his first wife, EDWARD Grey of Groby, son of EDWARD Grey Lord Ferrers (of Groby) & his wife Elizabeth Baroness Ferrers (of Groby) (-17 Jul 1492, bur Astley, Warwickshire).  He was created Lord and Baron of Lisle in 1475, and Viscount Lisle in 1483. 

c)         MARGARET Talbot (-before 13 Mar 1475) .  m GEORGE Vere, son of ---. 

8.         ELEANOR Talbot (-30 Jun 1468).  The Memoirs of Philip de Comines record that the bishop of Bath “discovered to the duke of Gloucester that his brother king Edward” had married (before he married the queen), the bishop performing the ceremony “nobody was present but they two and himself[1272].  The declaration of nullity of the marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Wydeville (25 Jun 1483 by the Act of Parliament “Titulus Regius”) was based on his alleged pre-contract of marriage with Eleanor Butler.  The Titulus Regius 23 Jan 1483 (O.S.) records that “King Edward was...maryed...to...Dame Elianor Butteler doughter of the old Earl of Shrewesbury, with whom the same King Edward had made a precontracte of matrimonie...bifore he made the...pretensed mariage with...Elizabeth Grey[1273]m THOMAS Butler, son of RALPH Boteler Lord Sudeley & his first wife Elizabeth Hende née --- (-[1450/68]).  Mistress: of EDWARD Duke of York, son of RICHARD Duke of York & his wife Cecily Neville (Rouen 28 Apr 1442-Palace of Westminster 9 Apr 1483, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor).  He succeeded in 1461 as EDWARD IV King of England.  The declaration of nullity of the marriage of King Edward IV and Elizabeth Wydeville (25 Jun 1483 by the Act of Parliament “Titulus Regius”) was based on his alleged pre-contract of marriage with Eleanor Butler. 

9.         CHRISTOPHER Talbot (-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460[1274]). 

 

 

JOHN Talbot, son of JOHN Talbot Earl of Shrewsbury & his first wife Matilda Neville Baroness Furnivalle ([1413]-killed in battle Northampton 10 Jul 1460, bur Worksop Priory).  "John Talbot kt, lord of Furnyvale, son and heir apparent of John earl of Shrewsbury" quit-claimed his possession of the manor of Munden Furnyvale and the priory of Rownehay, Hertfordshire by charter dated 14 Nov "26 Hen VI"[1275].  He succeeded his father in 1453 as Earl of Shrewsbury

[1276]Betrothed CATHERINE Burnel, widow of JOHN Ratcliffe, daughter of HUGH Lord Burrell & his wife --- (-13 Oct 1452). 

m (before Mar 1445) ELIZABETH Butler, daughter of JAMES Butler Earl of Ormond & his first wife Joan Beauchamp of Abergavenny (-8 Sep 1473, bur 11 Sep 1473 Shrewsbury Abbey). 

Earl John & his wife had six children:

1.         JOHN Talbot (12 Dec 1448-Coventry 28 Jun 1473, bur Worksop Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1460 as Earl of Shrewsburym ([1467]) CATHERINE Stafford, daughter of HUMPHREY Stafford Duke of Buckingham & his wife Anne Neville of Westmoreland (-26 Dec 1476).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Katharine Countess of Shrewsbury…" as daughter of "…Anne Duchess of Buckingham…", and mother of "George Earl of Shrewsbury that now is, Thomas Talbot"[1277].  The will of "Ann Vere widow", dated 12 Apr 1472, proved 2 May 1472, bequeathed property to “my brother Wiltshire...my sister Shrewsbury...my daughter Anne[1278].  Earl John & his wife had two children: 

a)         GEORGE Talbot (Shifnal, Shropshire 1468-Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire 26 Jul 1538, bur 27 Mar 1539 Sheffield, St Peter's).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Katharine Countess of Shrewsbury…" as daughter of "…Anne Duchess of Buckingham…", and mother of "George Earl of Shrewsbury that now is, Thomas Talbot"[1279]Earl of Shrewsbury.  He and his first wife were ancestors of the later Earls of Shrewsbury (extinct in 1618).  m firstly (before 27 Jun 1481) ANNE Hastings, daughter of WILLIAM Hastings Lord Hastings & his wife Katherine Neville of Salisbury (-after 4 Jan 1507, bur Sheffield, St Peter's).  m secondly ([1512]) ELIZABETH Walden, daughter of RICHARD Walden of Erith, Kent & his wife Margery Prendergast of Pembroke (-Jul 1567, bur Erith). 

b)         THOMAS Talbot .  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Katharine Countess of Shrewsbury…" as daughter of "…Anne Duchess of Buckingham…", and mother of "George Earl of Shrewsbury that now is, Thomas Talbot"[1280]

2.         JAMES Talbot (-1471). 

3.         CHRISTOPHER Talbot (-after 1474).  Rector of Christ Church, Shropshire. 

4.         GILBERT Talbot (-15 Aug 1517).  Lord of Grafton, Worcestershire.  m firstly ELIZABETH Greystock, daughter of RALPH Greystoke Lord Greystoke & his [first/second] wife ---.  m secondly as her third husband, AUDREY Cotton, widow firstly of THOMAS Barton and secondly of RICHARD Gardiner, daughter of WILLIAM Cotton & his wife ---.  Gilbert & his first wife had two children: 

a)         GILBERT Talbot (-1542).  Lord of Grafton.  m firstly ANNE Paston, daughter of WILLIAM Paston & his wife Anne Beaufort.  m secondly ELIZABETH Wynter, daughter of ---.  Gilbert & his first wife had three children:

i)          MARGARET Talbotm ROBERT Newport

ii)         ELIZABETH Talbot m JOHN Littleton, son of WILLIAM Littleton of Frankley & his first wife Ellen Walsh of Wanlip, Leicestershire (-17 May 1532).  They were ancestors of the Viscounts Cobham, created 1718. 

iii)        MARY Talbotm THOMAS Astley of Patshull. 

Gilbert had four illegitimate children by unknown mistresses: 

iv)        HUMPHREY Talbot

v)         GEOFFREY Talbot

vi)        WALTER Talbot

vii)       ELEANOR Talbotm GEOFFROY Sutton [Dudley]. 

b)         HUMPHREY Talbot

Gilbert & his second wife had one child: 

c)         JOHN Talbot of Albrighton, Shropshire (-10 Sep 1549).  He was ancestor of the Earls of Shrewsbury from 1618 to 1856. 

5.         GEORGE Talbot

6.         ANNE Talbot

 

 

 

 

Chapter 7.    SURREY

 

 

The earldom of Surrey was granted by King William II to William de Warenne in 1088, as a reward for his support in crushing a rebellion.  The daughter and heiress of his grandson, William [III] de Warenne, married as her second husband Hamelin d’Anjou, illegitimate brother of King Henry II, who became Earl of Surrey by right of his wife and adopted the Warenne name.  After the death in 1347 without legitimate heirs of John de Warenne Earl of Surrey, the earldom was inherited by his nephew Richard FitzAlan Earl of Arundel, who was the son of the deceased earl’s only sister and whose family is shown under the Earls of Arundel. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of SURREY 1088-1164 (WARENNE)

 

 

WILLIAM [I] de Warenne, son of RAOUL de Warenne & his [first wife Beatrice ---] ([1035/40]-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory).  There is some doubt about the identity of the mother of William de Warenne.  Guillaume of Jumičges names “Willelmus postea comes Surreić...” as Raoul’s son by his wife Beatrice[1281].  However, an undated charter, quoted more fully below, names them "Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus"[1282].  As documents date Raoul’s marriage to Emma in [1053/59], the birth of their children of Raoul’s second marriage would be dated to [1055/65].  However, reports quoted below indicate that Guillaume de Warenne was active as an adult in Normandy before the English invasion in 1066, which would place his birth to [1035/40].  This all suggests that Guillaume of Jumičges is correct and that the children were born from their father’s first marriage.  Orderic Vitalis records, in recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, that "castrum…Mortui Mari" was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius" after it was confiscated from "Rogerium de Mortuomari" who had helped the escape of a French prisoner after defeating troops of Henri King of France in 1054 "apud Mortuum-Mare"[1283].  According to the Complete Peerage, in [1054], he acquired land at Bellencombre, whose castle became the headquarters of the Warenne family in Normandy, and in 1066 took part in the invasion of England in 1066 and was rewarded with land in 13 counties[1284].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Willermus de Warenna et Hugo Pincerna...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[1285].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Hugo de Grentemaisnilio et Guillermus de Garenna...” among those who took part in the battle of Hastings[1286].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William installed “Guillermum Osberni filium” at his new fortress at Winchester (“intra mśnia Guentć”) and appointed him “vice sua toti regno versus Aquilonem”, while he granted “Doveram...totamque Cantiam” to “Odoni fratri suo”, and thus he entrusted “his duobus prćfecturam Anglić”, seconded by “Hugonem de Grentemaisnilio et Hugonem de Monteforti, Guillelmumque de Garenna”, dated to 1067[1287].  Orderic Vitalis says the king "gave Surrey" to William de Warenne in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[1288].  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "Sutregiam" to "Guillelmo de Guarenna" who had married "Gundredam sororem Gherbodi"[1289].  "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villć…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[1290].  A charter dated 1074 records that "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillć…Flamenvillć, Amundi Villć et Anglicevillć" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villć eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi"[1291].  Orderic Vitalis records, in recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, that "castrum…Mortui Mari" was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius" after it was confiscated from "Rogerium de Mortuomari" who had helped the escape of a French prisoner after defeating troops of Henri King of France in 1054 "apud Mortuum-Mare"[1292].  The chronology of the family shows that the grant to William de Warenne must have occurred several years after the confiscation from Roger de Mortimer.  “…Willielmi de Guarenna…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[1293].  Domesday Book records land held by “William de Warenne” in Fratton in Portsdown Hundred in Hampshire; numerous holdings in Norfolk[1294].  Orderic Vitalis says the king "gave Surrey" to William de Warenne in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[1295].  Orderic Vitalis records that in Jan 1086 “Guillelmus de Warenna et Baldricus de Chitreio Nicolai filius, atque Gislebertus de Aquila”, wanting to avenge the death of “Richerii fratris sui” [Richer de Laigle], unsuccessfully attacked the besiegers of the castle of Sainte-Suzanne[1296].  He supported King William II against the rebels led by Eudes Bishop of Bayeux and Robert Comte de Mortain in early 1088 and was rewarded by being created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088: Orderic Vitalis records that King William II appointed “Guilelmum de Guarenna” as “comitem Suthregić”, and adds that he was later buried at Lewes, dated to [1088/89][1297]He and his immediate successors usually styled themselves "Earl de Warenne".  He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey[1298].  William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suć Gundfredć filić meć” by charter dated to [1080/86], witnessed by "…Michael de Tona…Milonis Crispini…"[1299]

m firstly (1070) GUNDRED, sister of GERBOD "the Fleming" Earl of Chester, daughter of --- (-Castle Acre, Norfolk 27 May 1085, bur Lewes Priory).  Orderic Vitalis records that King William I granted "Sutregiam" to "Guillelmo de Guarenna" who had married "Gundredam sororem Gherbodi"[1300].  "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes [et] Gundrada uxor mea" founded Lewes Priory as a cell of Cluny by charter dated 1080[1301].  This charter also names "domine mee Matildis regine, matris uxoris mee", specifying that the queen gave "mansionem quoque Carlentonam nomine" to Gundred.  It is presumably on this basis that some secondary works claim, it appears incorrectly, that Gundred was the daughter of William I King of England.  Weir asserts that the charter in question "has been proved spurious"[1302], although it is not certain what other elements in the text indicate that this is likely to be the case.  Assuming the charter is genuine, it is presumably possible that "matris" was intended in the context to indicate a quasi-maternal relationship, such as foster-mother or godmother.  The same relationship is referred to in the charter dated to [1080/86] under which William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suć Gundfredć filić meć[1303].  Gundred died in childbirth.  The necrology of Longpont records the death “VII Kal Jun” of “Gondreda comitissa[1304]

m secondly ([1085/88]) [MARIE], sister of RICHARD Guet, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the Annals of Bermondsey which record the donation in 1098 by “Ricardus Guet frater comitissć Warennć” of “manerium de Cowyk” to the monastery[1305].  As William de Warenne’s son must have been below marriageable age before his father died, this reference can only apply to a second wife of William de Warenne senior.  [The necrology of Longpont records the death “XIV Kal Oct” of “Marie comitisse de ---ranna[1306].  It is not certain that the incomplete place name indicates “Warenna”.  However, two other references to the Warenne family are included in the same necrology.  If this hypothesis is correct, the second wife of Earl William is the only countess whose name is not otherwise recorded so the entry could relate to her.] 

William [I] & his first wife had three children: 

1.         WILLIAM [II] de Warenne (-[11 May] 1138, bur Lewes Priory)Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of Williame de Warenne Earl of Surrey, “prćfati consulis filii Guillelmus et Rainaldus” succeeded “cum Gundreda matre sua” [incorrect, as their mother was already deceased], dated to 1089[1307]"Willelmo et Reynaldo filiis et heredibus meis" are named in the charter of "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes" dated 1080[1308].  He succeeded his father in 1088 as Earl of Surrey, though usually styled Earl de Warenne. 

-        see below.  

2.         EDIVE [Edith] ([1072/80]-after 1155).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”Giraldus” left for Jerusalem “cum uxore sua Edithua sorore Willelmi comitis de Warenna”, who married secondly “Drogoni de Monceio”, by whom she had “unum filium...Drogonem[1309].  Her second marriage is confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who names "Hugo filius Girardi de Gornaco" and "Drogo, vitricus eius"[1310].  Her birth date is indicated bearing in mind that she had children by both her marriages.  The date of her first marriage is estimated assuming that she was about 12 years old at the time.  m firstly ([1084/92]) [as his second wife,] GERARD de Gournay Seigneur de Gournay-en-Bray, son of HUGUES [III] Seigneur de Gournay & his wife Basilia Fleitel (-Palestine after 1104).  He and his wife participated in the First Crusade but he died before the capture of Jerusalem[1311]m secondly DREUX [I] Seigneur de Moncy, son of ---. 

3.         RAINALD (before 1080-before 1118).  Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of Williame de Warenne Earl of Surrey, “prćfati consulis filii Guillelmus et Rainaldus” succeeded “cum Gundreda matre sua” [incorrect, as their mother was already deceased], dated to 1089[1312]"Willelmo et Reynaldo filiis et heredibus meis" are named in the charter of "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes" dated 1080[1313].  He inherited his mother's possessions in Flanders.  He supported Robert "Courthose" against his brother Henry I King of England, was captured in 1106 but released before the battle of Tinchebrai[1314]

 

 

The precise relationship between the following family, noted in the source quoted below as “de progenie comitis Warennie ex parte patris”, and the main Warenne family has not yet been ascertained. 

1.         MEINFELINm ---.  The name of Meinfelin’s wife is not known.  Meinfelin & his wife had one child: 

a)         HAMON (-May 1184).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Wulrintone” held by “Hamo filius Hamonis filii Meinfelin…xx annorum”, adding that his father died “die Veneris ante Ascensionem”, that he is “de progenie comitis Warennie ex parte patris[1315]m MATILDA Mauduit, daughter of WILLIAM Mauduit & his wife Matilda de Hanslope (-after 1184).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Wulrintone” held by “Hamo filius Hamonis filii Meinfelin…xx annorum”, adding that his father died “die Veneris ante Ascensionem”, that he is “nepos Willelmi Mauduit ex parte matris[1316].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Stokes” held by “Matilda que fuit uxor Hamonis Meinfelini[1317].  Hamon & his wife had five children: 

i)          four daughters, married in 1184.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Wulrintone” held by “Hamo filius Hamonis filii Meinfelin…xx annorum”, adding that he has “tres sorores datas, et i monialem[1318]

ii)         HAMON ([1164/65]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Wulrintone” held by “Hamo filius Hamonis filii Meinfelin…xx annorum”, adding that his father died “die Veneris ante Ascensionem”, that he has “tres sorores datas, et i monialem”, that he is “de progenie comitis Warennie ex parte patris” and “nepos Willelmi Mauduit ex parte matris[1319]

iii)        daughter .  Nun.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Wulrintone” held by “Hamo filius Hamonis filii Meinfelin…xx annorum”, adding that he has “tres sorores datas, et i monialem[1320]

 

 

WILLIAM [II] de Warenne, son of WILLIAM [I] de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his first wife Gundred --- (-[11 May] 1138, bur Lewes Priory)Orderic Vitalis records that, after the death of Williame de Warenne Earl of Surrey, “prćfati consulis filii Guillelmus et Rainaldus” succeeded “cum Gundreda matre sua” [incorrect, as their mother was already deceased], dated to 1089[1321]"Willelmo et Reynaldo filiis et heredibus meis" are named in the charter of "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes" dated 1080[1322].  He succeeded his father in 1088 as Earl of Surrey, though usually styled Earl de Warenne.  He supported Robert Duke of Normandy in 1101 against his brother Henry I King of England, who confiscated his lands in England in consequence although they were restored in 1103[1323].  "…Guillaume comte de Varennes…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[1324].  "Guillelmus filius Guillelmi de Vuarenna" confirmed donations of property to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery), witnessed by "Gislebertus de Grenosavilla, Ysabel comitissa, Radulfus filius comitis…"[1325].  “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostri Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[1326].  The necrology of Longpont records the death “V Id Mai” of “Guillermus comes de Garenna[1327]

m (1118) as her second husband, ISABELLE [Elisabeth] de Vermandois, widow of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester, daughter of HUGUES de France Comte de Vermandois et de Valois [Capet] & his wife Adelais Ctss de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([before 1088][1328]-17 Feb 1131, bur Lewes Priory).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”secundus Willelmus de Warenna comes Surreić...tertius Willelmus filius eius” was born to “Elizabeth filia Hugonis Magni comitis Viromandorum”, who had first married “Roberto comiti Mellenti” by whom she had “tres filios et totidem filias[1329].  William de Warenne donated property to St Faith, Longueville by charter dated to [1130], witnessed by "Ysabel comitissa uxor comitis et Willelmo et Radulfo filii eorum"[1330].  “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostri Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[1331]

William [II] & his wife had five children: 

1.         WILLIAM [III] de Warenne ([1119]-killed in battle Laodicea 19 Jan 1147).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”secundus Willelmus de Warenna comes Surreić...tertius Willelmus filius eius” was born to “Elizabeth filia Hugonis Magni comitis Viromandorum”, who had first married “Roberto comiti Mellenti” by whom she had “tres filios et totidem filias[1332].  William de Garenne donated property to St Faith, Longueville by charter dated to [1130], witnessed by "Ysabel comitissa uxor comitis et Willelmo et Radulfo filii eorum"[1333].  “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostri Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[1334].  He succeeded his father in 1138 as Earl of Surrey.  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Willielmus comes Warennić” for the souls of “Willielmi comitis patris mei…matris meć Isabellć et fratrum meorum Radulphi Warennić et Reginaldi Warennić[1335].  Robert of Torigny records that "tercii Willermi comitis de Guarenna" accompanied Louis VII King of France to Jerusalem and died there[1336].  William of Tyre records "comes Guarenna...Galcherius de Montiay, Evrardus de Bretol, Berus de Magnac…" among those killed in battle at Laodicea, in early 1148 (N.S.)[1337]m as her first husband, ELA de Ponthieu, daughter of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte d'Alençon & his wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] (-10 Dec 1174).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”Willelmum Talavatium” married “Ala...quć fuerat antea uxor ducis Burgundić” [incorrect], and had “duos filios et totidem filias” of whom “altera” married “tertio Willelmi de Warenna comiti...Surreić[1338].  She married secondly (1152 or before) as his second wife, Patrick Earl of Salisbury.  Her second marriage is confirmed by Robert of Torigny who refers to the wife of "comes Patricius" as "filia Guillermi comitis Pontivi, matre comitisse de Warenna"[1339].  Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury wrote to “Alć comitissć Warennć” concerning the retention from the monks of Lewes of tithes from her dower lands, dated to [1162/74][1340]The register of Lewes priory records the death “IV Id Dec” in 1174 of “domina Ala comitissa Surregić filia comitis de Belesme et uxor Willielmi tertii...anno xxvi post virum suum” and states that it is not known where she was buried (“ubi sepulta est nescitur”)[1341]William [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ISABELLE de Warenne (-[12 Jul 1203], bur Chapter House, Lewes).  She succeeded her father in 1148 as Ctss of Surrey, suo iure.  Robert of Torigny records that "filiam tercii Guillermi de Warenna" married "Guillermus filius Stephani regis"[1342].  Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1164 of "Hamelinus naturalis frater regis Henrici" and "comitissam de Guarenna, relictam Willelmi comitis Moritoni filii Stephani regis, …filia tercii Willermi comitis de Guarenna"[1343].  "Hamelinus comes Guarennie" confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux made by "Guillelmus de Guarenna et comes Guillelmus filius eius", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter, witnessed by "Guillelmum de Guarenna filium meum…"[1344]m firstly (before 6 Nov 1153, maybe before [1148/49]) WILLIAM de Blois, son of STEPHEN King of England & his wife Mathilde Ctss de Boulogne ([1132/37]-11 Oct 1159, bur hospital of Montmorillon, Poitou).  Earl of Warenne and Surrey, Lord of Pevensey and Norwich [1148/49], by right of his wife[1345].  He succeeded his brother in 1153 as Comte de Boulogne.  He was disinherited from the throne of England by his father in Nov 1153.  He succeeded his father in 1154 as Comte de Mortain.  m secondly ([Apr] 1164) [as his second wife,] HAMELIN d’Anjou, illegitimate son of GEOFFROY V "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d’Anjou & his mistress --- (1130-7 May 1202, bur Chapter House, Lewes).

2.         GUNDRED ([1120 or after]-after 1166).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”Walerannus et Robertus...mater eorum” married secondly after the death of her first husband “secundo Willelmo de Warenna comiti Surreić” by whom she had “Willelmum tertium et duas filias” of whom “filiarum...primogenitam” married “comes Rogerus de Warwic[1346].  Robert of Torigny names "Gondrada sorore uterine Galeranni comitis Mellenti" as wife of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[1347].  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmum de Lancaster” married ”Gundredam prius comitissam de Warwyke[1348].  Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic” and that she was the mother of his son William[1349].  Her second marriage date is dictated by the death of her first husband, recorded in Jun 1153.  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated property to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et hćredis et Gundredć uxoris meć", by charter dated to [1153/56][1350].  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[1351].  Farrer has suggested that the wording of this last document indicates that the wife of William de Lancaster was the daughter of Countess Gundred rather than the countess herself, suggesting that the latter must have been "well advanced in years" at the time of the marriage and implying that she would therefore have been past child-bearing age[1352].  It is correct that the wording of the document is curious as it appears inconsistent with both possibilities: if Gundred was "Comitisse", one would expect the first part of the document to read "Gundree Comitisse uxoris mee"; on the other hand, if she was Gundred the daughter, one would expect the subscription to read "Gundr fil Comitisse ux mee".  The two names which are quoted above in the subscription list of the document dated to [1156/60] precede the subscribers who held religious positions.  It would therefore be normal for them to be the same persons who are named in the body of the document, in the same order, giving their consent to the transaction.  However, it is difficult to adopt an interpretation which contradicts the three different sources quoted above (Robert de Torigny, the undated manuscript, and the charter of King Henry II) which identify the countess as William’s wife.  m firstly ROGER de Beaumont Earl of Warwick, son of HENRY de Beaumont Earl of Warwick & his wife Marguerite du Perche ([1101/02]-12 Jun 1153).  m secondly ([Jun 1153/1156]) [as his second wife,] WILLIAM [I] de Lancaster "Taillebois", son of GILBERT & his wife Goditha ---.  Lord of Kendale and Lonsdale in Westmoreland in 1166[1353]

3.         RALPH (-after [1130]).  William de Garenne donated property to St Faith, Longueville by charter dated to [1130], witnessed by "Ysabel comitissa uxor comitis et Willelmo et Radulfo filii eorum"[1354], which suggests that Ralph must have been his parents' second son.  “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostri Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[1355].  "Guillelmus filius Guillelmi de Vuarenna" confirmed donations of property to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery), witnessed by "Gislebertus de Grenosavilla, Ysabel comitissa, Radulfus filius comitis…"[1356].  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Willielmus comes Warennić” for the souls of “Willielmi comitis patris mei…matris meć Isabellć et fratrum meorum Radulphi Warennić et Reginaldi Warennić[1357]

4.         ADA de Warenne (-1178).  Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Henricus filius eius [David rex Scotić]" as "filia Willermi comitis de Warenna, sorore uterine Gualeranni comitis Mellenti"[1358].  She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father[1359]m (1139) HENRY of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon, son of DAVID I King of Scotland & his wife Matilda de St Lis of Huntingdon ([1115]-12 Jun 1152, bur Kelso Abbey, Roxburghshire). 

5.         RAINALD de Warenne (-1179).  “Reginaldus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, with the consent of “Alicić uxoris meć et Willielmi filii mei”, for the souls of “…Isabellć comitissć dominć meć…Willielmi comitis Warennć fratris mei…Willielmi de Wormengay patris Alicić uxoris meć”, by undated charter[1360].  Lord of Wormegay, Norfolk.  The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records "Reg de Warenna" owing a fine for "terre Willi de Wermegai" in Norfolk/Suffolk, indicating the recent death of his father-in-law[1361].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Reginaldus de Warenn…pro fine terre Willelmi de Wermegai" in Norfolk and Suffolk[1362].  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Willielmus comes Warennić” for the souls of “Willielmi comitis patris mei…matris meć Isabellć et fratrum meorum Radulphi Warennić et Reginaldi Warennić[1363]m ALICE de Wormegay, daughter and heiress of WILLIAM de Wormegay, Norfolk & his wife --- (-after 1179).  “Reginaldus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, with the consent of “Alicić uxoris meć et Willielmi filii mei”, for the souls of “…Isabellć comitissć dominć meć…Willielmi comitis Warennć fratris mei…Willielmi de Wormengay patris Alicić uxoris meć”, by undated charter[1364].  Rainald & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         WILLIAM (-after 24 Jan 1191).  “Reginaldus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, with the consent of “Alicić uxoris meć et Willielmi filii mei”, by undated charter[1365].  “Willielmus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, for the souls of “patris mei Reginaldi et matris meć Alicić et Beatricis uxoris meć et Reginaldi filii nostri et Beatricis et Isabellć filiarum nostrarum”, by undated charter[1366].  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Hamelinus comes Warennić”, witnessed by “Willilemus de Warennia filius Reginaldi de Warennia…[1367].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Warenne" paying "vii l ii s vi d de honore de Wermengy" in Norfolk, Suffolk[1368].  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 24 Jan 1191 in a claim involving "Willm de Warenn fil Regin de Warenne" concering "advocatione ecclesie de Herthille"[1369]m firstly BEATRIX de Pierrepont, daughter of HUGUES de Pierrepont & his wife Clémence de Rethel.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   “Willielmus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, for the souls of “patris mei Reginaldi et matris meć Alicić et Beatricis uxoris meć et Reginaldi filii nostri et Beatricis et Isabellć filiarum nostrarum”, by undated charter[1370]m secondly MILLICENT de Montfichet, daughter of RICHARD de Montfichet & his wife Millicent --- (-[before 1210]).  King Henry III commanded the Sheriff of Norfolk to inquire "what knights’ fees were assigned to Milesent de Muntfichet, widow of William de Warenne in dower...as H. de Burgo who married the daughter and heir of the said William has placed himself coram Rege in said inquiry”, dated 18 Mar 1235[1371].  The chronology suggests that Millicent must have been one of her parents’ older children.  She probably died childless soon after her husband, maybe before her father, as she is not named in the documents relating to her father’s heirs.  William & his first wife had three children: 

i)          RAINALD (-before 1205, bur Southwark St Mary Overey).  “Willielmus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, for the souls of “patris mei Reginaldi et matris meć Alicić et Beatricis uxoris meć et Reginaldi filii nostri et Beatricis et Isabellć filiarum nostrarum”, by undated charter[1372].  “Beatrix filia Willielmi de Warenna” confirmed her father’s donation of property to St Mary Overey Priory, for the souls of “…fratris mei Reginaldi cuius corpus ibi requiescit”, by undated charter[1373]

ii)         BEATRICE de Warenne (-before 12 Dec 1214).  “Willielmus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, for the souls of “patris mei Reginaldi et matris meć Alicić et Beatricis uxoris meć et Reginaldi filii nostri et Beatricis et Isabellć filiarum nostrarum”, by undated charter[1374].  “Beatrix filia Willielmi de Warenna” confirmed her father’s donation of property to St Mary Overey Priory, Southwark after the death of “domini mei Radulphi”, for the souls of “avi mei Reginaldi de Warenna et Alicić avić meć et patris mei Willielmi et matris meć Beatricis et fratris mei Reginaldi cuius corpus ibi requiescit”, by undated charter[1375].  Her second and third marriages are confirmed by a receipt dated 22 Jul 1227  for payment of a fine by Hubert de Burgh for "Beatrice de Warenna late his wife, by whom he had children" to have the lands of "William de Warenna her father and…her dower of the lands of Dodo Bardolf, formerly her husband"[1376].  Her third marriage is suggested by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Gaufridus de Merlai" held "quoddam feodum in Illington" in Norfolk "de Huberto de Burgo per heredum Willelmi de Warenne uxorem suam", adding that Henry II King of England had granted the property to "Reginaldo de Warrenn"[1377].  m firstly RALPH, son of ---.  m secondly DOON Bardolf Lord of Shelford, son of THOMAS Bardolf & his wife Rohese --- (-1205).  m thirdly as his first wife, HUBERT de Burgh, son of --- & his wife Alice --- (-Banstead, Surrey 12 May 1243, bur Church of the Black Friars, Holborn).  He was created Earl of Kent in 1227. 

iii)        ISABEL .  “Willielmus de Warenna” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory; Southwark, for the souls of “patris mei Reginaldi et matris meć Alicić et Beatricis uxoris meć et Reginaldi filii nostri et Beatricis et Isabellć filiarum nostrarum”, by undated charter[1378]m GEOFFREY de Merlay, son of ---. 

b)         [ROGER de Warenne (-after 1171).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Rogerus de Warenne, xiv l v s, de novo v s de honore de Wrmegai" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1171/72][1379].  This is the only reference so far found to "Roger" de Warenne of Wormgay, Norfolk.  It is possible that the entry is a mistranscription or error for Rainald de Warenne (see above).  If the document accurately records his name, Roger could have been another son of Rainald de Warenne and his wife Alice de Wormgay.] 

c)         [RAINALD de Warenne .  The parentage of Rainald is not known.  However, if the estimated date of his marriage is correct, it is possible that he was another son of Rainald de Warenne and his wife Alice de Wormgay.  A charter extract, undated, records "de feodo Henrici de Ria…in custodia Reginaldi de Warenne, de socha Hokeringhes…[et] ad sororem Huberti maritandam"[1380]m ([1160/70]) --- de Rie, daughter of HENRY de Rie & his wife Aveline ---.  A charter extract, undated, records a grant to "Avelinć uxori Henrico de Ria", another "ad faciendum Hubertum de Ria militem", a third "ad sororem suam maritandam", and a last "dominus Reginaldus de Warenna suscepit terram Huberti"[1381].  This extract is clarified, concerning the last point, by another charter extract, also undated, which records that "dominus Reginaldus de Warenna suscepit terram Huberti de Ria…ad filiam Henrici de Ria maritandam"[1382].  The chronology of the Rie family suggests that this marriage took place in [1160/70].] 

d)         ALICE .  According to Domesday Descendants, Alice de Warenne was the wife of Peter the Constable of Mealton[1383]m PETER, son of ---. 

e)         [1384]GUNDRED (-before 6 Dec 1224).  “Gundreda de Warrenna” donated “juris...in ecclesia de Dersingham” to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei Petri de Valoniis...”, by undated charter[1385].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gundrea quć fuit uxor Petri de Valoniis" held one knight’s fee from "Roberti de Valoine" in Essex[1386].  “Gundreda de Waren” claimed “ecclesiam de Newinham...advocationem” from the abbot of Abindon in 1194 through “in loco suo Gilone Hose”, while “Henr de Godham senescallus Warin fil Gerald” also claimed it as “hereditas uxoris domini sui[1387].  "Gundreda que fuit uxor Gaufr Huse" paid a fine for "custodia Gaufr filii et heredis sui cum tota terra sua" in Wiltshire, dated 1199[1388].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Gundreda de Waren" holding land "in Niweham…in hundredo de Bulenden et de Soteleu" in Oxfordshire[1389].  “Christiana de Maundeville...in mea...viduitate”, as successor of “Roberti de Valoniis avi mei et Roberti filii Walteri patris mei, Gunnore uxoris sue matris mee”, confirmed the donation of revenue from “ecclesia de Baketona in Suffolchia” to Binham priory made by “Robertus filius Walteri pater meus et Gunnora mater mea”, for the souls of “Willelmi de Maundeville comitis Essexie quondam mariti mei...Roberti filii Walteri patris mei et Gunnore uxoris sue matris mee”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Gondreda de Warenne soror mea[1390].  An order dated 6 Dec 1224 required the confiscation of "the vill of Newnham that Gundrea de Warenne held in dower, which is an inheritance partible between Joan wife of Hugh de Neville, and Margaret wife of Falkes de Bréauté", with savings for "the executors of the testament of the same Gundrea"[1391].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Peter married "Gundredam de Waranna" but died without heirs[1392]m firstly PETER de Valognes, son of ROGER de Valognes & his wife --- (-1158).  m secondly WILLIAM de Courcy, son of WILLIAM de Courcy [Curcy] & his wife Alice de Rumilly [Chester] (-1171).  [1393]m thirdly GEOFFROY Hose, son of --- (-1199 or before). 

f)          [1394][MURIEL .  Nun at Carrow.] 

 

 

 

B.      EARLS of SURREY 1164-1347 (WARENNE - ANJOU)

 

 

HAMELIN d'Anjou, illegitimate son of GEOFFROI V “le Bel/Plantagenet” Comte d’Anjou & his mistress --- (1130-7 May 1202, bur Chapter House, Lewes).  Benedict of Peterborough names "Hamelinus frater regis Henrici comes Warennć" among those present at the coronation of King Richard I in 1189[1395].  Maybe Vicomte de Touraine.  Earl of Surrey 1164 by right of his wife.  "Hamelinus comes Guarennie" confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux made by "Guillelmus de Guarenna et comes Guillelmus filius eius", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter, witnessed by "Guillelmum de Guarenna filium meum…"[1396].  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Hamelinus comes Warennić” with the consent of “Isabellć comitissć Warennić uxoris meć et Willielmi de Warennia filii et hćredis mei”, for the souls of “Henrici regis fratris mei et Gaufridi comitis Andegavić patris mei”, witnessed by “Willilemus de Warennia filius Reginaldi de Warennia…[1397].  “Hamelinus comes de Warenna” donated property to Slevesholm Priory, with the consent of “Ysabellć comitissć uxoris meć et Willielmi filii nostri”, by undated charter[1398].  “Hamelinus comes de Warenna et Hysabella comitissa mea” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory, Southwark, for the souls of “Willielmi primi, secundi et tertii, et…Gundredć comitissć et Hisabellć comitissć”, by undated charter[1399].  Advocate of the abbey of Saint-Bertin: "Hamelin…comes de Waringe et ecclesie beati Bertini advocatus" donated land "in parochia de Rokesthorn" to Saint-Bertin, for "uxoris mee filiique mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1182][1400]

[m firstly ---.  This first marriage is indicated by the chronology of Hamelin’s supposed daughter Mathilde, who had three children by her first husband who died in [1172] and so could not have been Hamelin’s daughter by his wife Isabelle de Warenne.] 

m [secondly] ([Apr] 1164) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Warenne, widow of GUILLAUME de Blois Comte de Boulogne, daughter & heiress of WILLIAM [III] de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Ela de Ponthieu (-[12 Jul 1203], bur Chapter House, Lewes).  Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1164 of "Hamelinus naturalis frater regis Henrici" and "comitissam de Guarenna, relictam Willelmi comitis Moritoni filii Stephani regis, …filia tercii Willermi comitis de Guarenna"[1401].  "Hamelinus comes Guarennie" confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux made by "Guillelmus de Guarenna et comes Guillelmus filius eius", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter, witnessed by "Guillelmum de Guarenna filium meum…"[1402].  “Hamelinus comes de Warenna” donated property to Slevesholm Priory, with the consent of “Ysabellć comitissć uxoris meć et Willielmi filii nostri”, by undated charter[1403].  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Hamelinus comes Warennić” with the consent of “Isabellć comitissć Warennić uxoris meć et Willielmi de Warennia filii et hćredis mei[1404]

Hamelin & his [first wife] had [one child]:

1.         [MATHILDE (-before 13 Dec 1228).  Her first and second marriages are indicated by the charter dated Mar 1233 under which [her daughter by her second marriage] "Ćlicia comitissa Augi in viduitate" granted revenue from "molendino de Duno" to “in matrimonium Ćlidć filić Petri de Pratellis fratris mei[1405].  Her connection with the Warenne family is indicated by the undated charter under which her daughter “Haelisia comitissa Augy quondam uxor Radulfi de Ysondun comitis Augy” donated property to Roche Abbey, witnessed by “domino Willielmo comite Warennć avunculo meo…[1406].  Because Mathilde had three children by her first husband who died in [1172], she could not have been the daughter of Hamelin by his wife Isabelle de Warenne.  There are therefore two possibilities: either she was Hamelin’s daughter by an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage or she was the daughter of Isabelle de Warenne by her first marriage.  The latter possibility is unlikely as any daughter of Guillaume de Blois Comte de Boulogne would have been Ctss de Boulogne instead of Guillaume’s sister.  In any case, the chronology would be tight for Mathilde to have been Isabelle’s daughter.  Until more information comes to light, it is supposed that Mathilde was the daughter of Hamelin by an earlier marriage.  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that "Osbert de Préaux" donated tithes from harvest in the parish of Bois l’Evęque to the monks of Holy Trinity of Mont-de-Rouen, for his own soul “those of his parents and of the parents of his wife Matildis”, undated, and that his wife and “their sons Simon and John” granted the tythe to the monks in perpetuity, but he does not cite the source reference[1407].  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.  The wording of the charter of her son Pierre, dated to [Jun 1200], suggests that his mother might have died before that date: “Petrus de Pratell” donated annual revenue to Notre-Dame de Beaulieu, for the salvation of “mee et patris mei et matris mee et fratrum meorum...Simonis et Rogeri, Iohannis et Engerranni[1408].  If this charter is correctly dated, at least two of the donor’s brothers were alive at that time, while his father was certainly deceased.  The question then is determining the significance, if any, between his parents not being named in the document while his brothers are named.  One possibility is that the unnamed individuals (and therefore including the donor’s mother) were deceased, but the named brothers were living.  It should be emphasised that this observation is speculative.  m firstly ([1163/67]) OSBERT de Préaux, son of --- (-before 1172).  m secondly HENRI [II] Comte d'Eu Lord of Hastings, son of JEAN [I] Comte d'Eu & his wife Alice d'Aubigny of Arundel (-16/17 Jul [1190/91]).  m thirdly HENRY de Stuteville Lord of Eckington co Derby, Seigneur de Valmont et de Rames (-before 1236).] 

Hamelin & his [second] wife had [four] children:

2.         WILLIAM [IV] de Warenne (1166-London 27 May 1240, bur Lewes Priory).  "Hamelinus comes Guarennie" confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux made by "Guillelmus de Guarenna et comes Guillelmus filius eius", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter, witnessed by "Guillelmum de Guarenna filium meum…"[1409].  He succeeded his father in 1202 as Earl of Surrey

-        see below

3.         ELA de Warenne ).  The Complete Peerage names “Ela” as daughter of Earl William and her husbands firstly “Robert de Newburn of whom nothing is known” and secondly “William FitzWilliam of Sprotborough”, but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[1410].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.   m firstly ROBERT de Newburn, son of ---.  m secondly as his [second] wife, WILLIAM FitzWilliam of Sprotbrough, Yorkshire, son of WILLIAM FitzWilliam & his wife Avice de Tanai (-[9 Feb 1219/1224]).  

4.         ISABEL de Warenne (-before 30 Nov 1234).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Isabella” as wife of “Robertus Lacy”, adding that they were childless[1411].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Ysabel que fuit uxor Roberti de Laci" owing in Yorkshire "pro habenda dota sua de terra eiusdem Roberti"[1412].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Gileberti de Aquila" married "comes Warennie…sorore sua" whose dowry was "villa de Westcot…hundredum de Wudetun" in Surrey[1413].  m firstly ROBERT de Lacy, son of HENRY de Lacy & his wife Aubreye de Vesci (-21 Aug 1193, bur Kirkstall Abbey).  m secondly ([1196]) GILBERT de Laigle Lord of Pevensey, son of RICHER de Laigle & his wife Edelina --- (-1231)

5.         [daughter (-[killed 1200]).  According to Given-Wilson & Curteis[1414], one of the mistresses of King John was the "sister of William de Warenne" but the authors do not specify which sister she was.  The Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester names "Richard fiz le rei…Ion" and  "the erles daughter of Wareine" his mother[1415].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1200 that “W. de Waren meunch fil Regis” was killed[1416].  Christie suggests that one possibility is that “meunch” in this source may represent a contraction of “mater Richardi”, another possibility being that it represents “avunculus” and that the entry refers to the death of William de Warenne (although if that is correct, the date makes little sense)[1417]Mistress of JOHN of England, son of HENRY II King of England & Eléonore Dss d'Aquitaine (Beaumont Palace, Oxford 24 Dec 1167-Newark Castle, Lincolnshire 18/19 Oct 1216, bur Worcester Cathedral).  He succeeded in 1199 as JOHN King of England.] 

 

 

WILLIAM [IV] de Warenne, son of HAMELIN d'Anjou Earl of Surrey & his [second] wife Isabelle de Warenne (1166-London 27 May 1240[1418], bur Lewes Priory).  "Hamelinus comes Guarennie" confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux made by "Guillelmus de Guarenna et comes Guillelmus filius eius", for the soul of "uxoris mee Ysabel", by undated charter, witnessed by "Guillelmum de Guarenna filium meum…"[1419].  "Hamelin…comes de Waringe et ecclesie beati Bertini advocatus" donated land "in parochia de Rokesthorn" to Saint-Bertin, for "uxoris mee filiique mei Willelmi", by charter dated to [1182][1420].  “Hamelinus comes de Warenna” donated property to Slevesholm Priory, with the consent of “Ysabellć comitissć uxoris meć et Willielmi filii nostri”, by undated charter[1421].  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Hamelinus comes Warennić” with the consent of “Isabellć comitissć Warennić uxoris meć et Willielmi de Warennia filii et hćredis mei[1422].  He succeeded his father in 1202 as Earl of Surrey.  He received Grantham and Stamford, co Lincoln, 19 Apr 1205 as compensation for the loss of his lands in Normandy[1423].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in May 1240 of “Willelmus comes Warennić[1424]

m firstly MATHILDE, daughter of --- (-6 Feb [1216]).  An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennć” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Willielmus comes de Warennia” for the soul of “Matildis comitissć uxoris meć[1425].  According to the Complete Peerage, “she is alleged to have been daughter of an Earl of Arundel and to have died 6 Feb 1216[1426]

m secondly (before 13 Oct 1225) as her second husband, MATILDA Marshal of Pembroke, widow of HUGH Bigod Earl of Norfolk, daughter & co-heiress of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel Ctss of Pembroke (-1/7 Apr 1248).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Matilda…Johanna…Isabella” as the daughters of “Willielmi Marescalli comitis Penbrochić”, adding that Matilda married “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and secondly “Johanni de Garrene comiti de Surrey[1427].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hugo Bigot comes…uxor” married “comiti Warennić[1428].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in 1250 of “Johanna comitissa de Warenne[1429].  Although both the name and the date are not corroborated in other sources, it is likely that this entry refers to the widow of William Earl of Surrey. 

William [IV] & his second wife had two children:

1.         ISABEL de Warenne (-before 23 Nov 1282, bur Marham, Norfolk).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Johannes de Garren comes de Garren et Isabella de Aubeni soror eius et comitissa de Arundel” as the children of “Johanni de Garrene comiti de Surrey” and his wife Matilda Marshal of the Earls of Pembroke[1430].  She is named "Ysabella comitissa Harundollić quondam Hugonis comitis Harundellić uxor" when Matthew Paris records her foundation of the nunnery of Marham near Lymm[1431]m (1234) HUGH de Albini Earl of Arundel, son of WILLIAM d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel & his wife Mabel of Chester ([1213/15]-7 May 1243, bur Wymondham Priory). 

2.         JOHN de Warenne (1231 or after-Kennington [Nov] 1304, bur Lewes Priory).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Johannes de Garren comes de Garren et Isabella de Aubeni soror eius et comitissa de Arundel” as the children of “Johanni de Garrene comiti de Surrey” and his wife Matilda Marshal of the Earls of Pembroke[1432].  He succeeded his father in 1240 as Earl of Surrey.  Henry III King of England agreed that “unam filiarum filić...comitis [Sabaudić]” would marry “vel Johanni de Warenna qui si vixerit comes erit Warennć, vel Edmundo de Lacy qui si vixerit comes erit Lincolnić” by charter dated 1246[1433].  He was one of the guardians of the realm on the death of King Henry III, until the return of Edward I from crusade.  He was appointed keeper of the realm of Scotland 3 Sep 1296, but never assumed the post as he was defeated by the Scots at the battle of Stirling[1434].  The Annales Londonienses record the death "circiter festum Exaltationis Sanctć Crucis…apud Newentone" in 1304 of "comes Warennić" and his burial "in ecclesia Sancti Pancratii Lewensi"[1435]m [firstly] (Aug 1247) ALIX de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES [XI] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche & his wife Isabelle Ctss d’Angoulęme ([1224]-1256, after 9 Feb).  She is named "Aelesia" by Matthew Paris when he records her visit to England in 1247 with her brothers to her uterine half-brother King Henry III and her subsequent marriage with "Johanni comiti Warennić adolescenti"[1436].  Matthew Paris records her death in early 1256[1437].  [m secondly ---.  No direct evidence has been found of this second marriage.  However, the Chronicle of Thomas Wykes describes John de Warenne’s daughter Isabel as “adolescentulam” at the time of her marriage in 1279.  If that is correct, it appears improbable that Isabel was born from John’s known wife Alix de Lusignan who died in 1256.  In that case, she would have been born from an otherwise unrecorded second marriage of her father.  A second marriage also appears probable as John survived his known wife by nearly fifty years.]  John Earl of Surrey & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Warenne (1256-murdered Croydon 15 Dec 1286).  He was ambushed and slain after attending a tournament at Croydon[1438].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 15 Dec "15 Edw I" following the death of "William de Warenna...he died on Sunday before St Lucy in the said year...Sunday after St Lucy” name “Joan his wife...Robert de Veer earl of Oxford father of the said joan...John his son born at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist 14 Edw I is his next heir...aged 38 weeks on Tuesday before St Gregory in the said year[1439]m ([Jun 1285]) JOAN de Vere, daughter of ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Alice de Sanford (-23 Nov 1293 or before, bur Lewes Priory).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 15 Dec "15 Edw I" following the death of "William de Warenna...he died on Sunday before St Lucy in the said year...Sunday after St Lucy” name “Joan his wife...Robert de Veer earl of Oxford father of the said joan...John his son born at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist 14 Edw I is his next heir...aged 38 weeks on Tuesday before St Gregory in the said year[1440].  William de Warenne & his wife had two children:

i)          JOHN de Warenne (30 Jun 1286-29 Jun 1347, bur Lewes St Pancras).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 15 Dec "15 Edw I" following the death of "William de Warenna...he died on Sunday before St Lucy in the said year...Sunday after St Lucy” name “Joan his wife...Robert de Veer earl of Oxford father of the said joan...John his son born at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist 14 Edw I is his next heir...aged 38 weeks on Tuesday before St Gregory in the said year[1441].  Her succeeded his grandfather in 1304 as Earl of Surrey.  He unsuccessfully attempted to divorce his wife to marry his mistress Matilda de Nerford[1442].  The testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347, requests burial "en l’esgise Saint Pancratz de Lewes", makes bequests to "…Monsieur William de Warenne mon filz…ma fille sa compaigne…Edward de Warenne mon filz…Johanne de Basyngg ma fille…Katerine ma fille…Isabell ma fille Noneyn de Sempyngham…William de Warenne mon fil…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1443]m (25 May 1306) JEANNE de Bar, daughter of HENRI III Comte de Bar & his wife Eleanor of England (-31 Aug 1361).  The Chronicle of Lanercost names "filium…Edwardum et filiam quam Johannes de Warenna comes duxit in uxorem" as the children of "Alianora filia regis" and "Henrico comiti Barienti"[1444].  The Annales Londonienses record the marriage "VIII Kal Jun" in 1306 of "dominus Johannes de Warenne" and "filiam comitis de Bar et Elianorć filić…regis Edwardi"[1445].  Froissart records that "la contesse de Garanes…estoit suer au conte de Bar"[1446].  "Dame Iehanne de Bar comtesse de Garennes" bought property at "Gibecourt, Raupont et Gernencourt" from “l’abbé...de l’Isle en Barrois”, in the presence of “son...frere...Edouard comte de Bar”, by charter dated Nov 1333[1447].  "Consanguinea nostra Yolandis de Flandria comitissa de Barro et domina de Cassello relicta defuncti Henrici quondam comitis de Barro" confirmed that she was the mother of "Roberti filii sui nunc comitis de Barro...nunc unici filii sui", and records “Edvardi primogeniti...tunc viventis”, by charter dated 5 Jun 1353 which also records that “Ioanna de Barro comitissa de Barro” affirmed that “defunctus Henricus quondam comes de Barro, proavusque dicti Roberti comitis” was father of “comitem Edvardum et ipsam comitissam de Garennis”, that “quidem comes Edvardus” was father of “Henricum comitem Barrensem maritum dictć comitissć Barrensis”, who was father of “prćfati Edvardus comes ultimo defunctus et Robertus comes modernus[1448]Mistress (1): MATILDA de Nerford, wife of S. de Diriba, daughter of ---.  Mistress (2): ISABEL de Holand, daughter of ---.  The testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347 and makes bequests to "…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1449].  Earl John had six illegitimate children by Mistress (1): 

(a)        JOHN Warenne (-after Jun 1347).  The testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347 and makes bequests to "…Monsieur William de Warenne mon filz…ma fille sa compaigne…Edward de Warenne mon filz…Johanne de Basyngg ma fille…Katerine ma fille…Isabell ma fille Noneyn de Sempyngham…William de Warenne mon fil…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1450]

(b)        THOMAS Warenne (-before 24 Jun 1347).  It is assumed that Thomas predeceased his father in whose testament he is not named. 

(c)        EDWARD Warenne (-after Jun 1347).  The testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347 and makes bequests to "…Monsieur William de Warenne mon filz…ma fille sa compaigne…Edward de Warenne mon filz…Johanne de Basyngg ma fille…Katerine ma fille…Isabell ma fille Noneyn de Sempyngham…William de Warenne mon fil…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1451]Founder of the WARENN family of Poynton. 

(d)        JOAN Warenne (-after Jun 1347).  The testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347 and makes bequests to "…Monsieur William de Warenne mon filz…ma fille sa compaigne…Edward de Warenne mon filz…Johanne de Basyngg ma fille…Katerine ma fille…Isabell ma fille Noneyn de Sempyngham…William de Warenne mon fil…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1452]m (before 24 Jun 1347) --- de Basing, son of ---. 

(e)        CATHERINE WarenneThe testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347 and makes bequests to "…Monsieur William de Warenne mon filz…ma fille sa compaigne…Edward de Warenne mon filz…Johanne de Basyngg ma fille…Katerine ma fille…Isabell ma fille Noneyn de Sempyngham…William de Warenne mon fil…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1453]m (after 24 Jun 1347) ROBERT Heveningham, son of ---. 

(f)         ISABEL WarenneThe testament of "Johan Counte de Warenne de Surrey et de Strathorne Seigneur de Bromfeld et de Yal" is dated 24 Jun 1347 and makes bequests to "…Monsieur William de Warenne mon filz…ma fille sa compaigne…Edward de Warenne mon filz…Johanne de Basyngg ma fille…Katerine ma fille…Isabell ma fille Noneyn de Sempyngham…William de Warenne mon fil…Isabelle de Holand ma compaigne"[1454].  Nun at Sempingham. 

ii)         ALICE de Warenne ([May/Jul 1287]-before 23 May 1338).  It is assumed that she was born posthumously as there was insufficient time for her birth between her parents' marriage and the birth of her brother, but no proof has been found that this is correct.  m (1305) EDMUND Fitzalan Earl of Arundel, son of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alasia di Saluzzo (1 May 1285-executed Hereford 17 Nov 1326). 

b)         ELEANOR de Warenne (1251-after 1282, bur Sallay)m (York 8 Sep 1268) HENRY de Percy, son of WILLIAM de Percy & his second wife Ellen de Balliol ([1235]-29 Aug 1272, bur Sallay). 

John Earl of Surrey & his [second] wife had one child:

c)         ISABEL de Warenne ([1265/69]-).  The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes records the marriage “infra octavus Purificationis” in 1279 of “Johannes de Balhol” and “adolescentulam Isabellam filiam comitis Warennć[1455].  The word “adolescentulam” suggests her birth in [1265/69].  If that is correct, it appears that Isabel must have been born from an otherwise unrecorded second marriage of her father.  This would also be more consistent with the date of death of her son Edward, who would have been extremely old if born soon after his parents’ marriage.  A charter dated 27 Mar 1281 records a grant of property by "Dervergulla de Balliol" to "her son John de Balliol and the king’s cousin Isabella daughter of Earl Warrenne his wife"[1456]m (before 7 Feb 1279) JOHN Balliol, son of JOHN de Balliol of Barnard Castle, co Durham & his wife Devorguilla of Galloway ([1250]-in France [either Château Gaillard, Normandy or Bailleut-en-Gouffern, Normandy] [4 Mar 1314/4 Jan 1315], bur [Church of St Waast, Normandy]).  He succeeded in 1292 as JOHN King of Scotland

 

 

 

 

Chapter 8.    WARWICK

 

 

King William II created Henry de Beaumont, from the family of the comtes de Meulan in Normandy, as Earl of Warwick in 1088 as a reward for support in crushing a rebellion.  The earldom was inherited by Henry’s descendants until the death in 1242 of Thomas Earl of Warwick who was succeeded by his sister Margaret, whose second husband John du Plessis used the title in her right.  When John died in 1263 without direct heirs by his wife Margaret, the earldom passed to Margaret’s first cousin William Mauduit, son of her paternal aunt Alice.  In 1267, the earldom passed to William’s nephew William de Beauchamp, whose descendants retained the earldom until 1449. 

 

 

 

A.      EARLS of WARWICK 1088-1263 (BEAUMONT)

 

 

HENRY de Beaumont, son of ROGER Seigneur de Beaumont-le-Roger & his wife Adeline de Meulan ([1048]-[20 Jun] 1119, bur Préaux).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that “Rogerius de Bellomonte” married “Adelinam, Waleranni comitis Mellenti filiam“, by whom he had “duos filios Robertum et Henricum...postea comites” and that Henry received “comitatum Warwik” from “Willelmi regis in Anglia[1457].  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England constructed “castrum apud Guarevicum” [Warwick] and entrusted it to “Henrico Rogerii de Bellomonte filio”, dated to 1068[1458].  "…Rotgerius de Bello monte, Hainricus filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1073] under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by "Nielli filii alterius Nielli" made by "suus pater" of six churches on Guernsey to the abbey of Marmoutier[1459].  “Rogerius et filii mei Robertus et Henricus” donated “decimam tocius Brotonie” to Saint-Wandrille by charter dated 13 Jan 1086[1460].  After supporting William II King of England against the rebellion of 1088, the king created him Earl of Warwick in [Jul/Dec] 1088.  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Henricum” as the heirs of “Rogerius...de Bellomonte”, adding that Henry was granted “comitatum de Guarewico[1461].  "Rogerus de Bellomonte" founded la Sainte-Trinité de Beaumont-le-Roger, with the consent of "liberis meis Roberto comite Mellentensi et Henrico comite de Warwic", by charter dated [1088/89][1462].  He opposed the invasion of England by Robert Duke of Normandy in Jun 1101, and remained loyal to Henry I King of England throughout his life[1463].  "…Henrici comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[1464].  “Henricus…Warwicense consul et Margareta uxor mea et Rogerus noster filius” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter[1465].  The Annals of Margan record the death in 1119 of “comes Henricus de Warewic[1466]

m MARGUERITE de Perche, daughter of GEOFFROY Comte de Mortagne et de Perche & his wife Beatrix de Ramerupt [Roucy] (-27 Aug after 1156).  Orderic Vitalis names “Margaritam...Julianam” as the daughters of “Goisfredus Rotronis Mauritanić comitis filius” and his wife “Beatricis”, adding that Marguerite married “Henrico comiti de Covarevico[1467]The Genealogić Scriptoris Fusniacensis names " Rotaldum eiusdem loci comitem et Iulainam de Aquila matrem regine Navarrensis, et Margaretam uxorem Gisleberti de Novo-burgo" as children, incorrectly, of "Rotaldo comiti de Pertica" & his wife Beatrix de Roucy, specifying that Marguerite had children "Rotaldum Ebrodiensem episcopum cum aliis liberis utriusque sexus"[1468].  “Henricus…Warwicense consul et Margareta uxor mea et Rogerus noster filius” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter[1469].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "comitisse de Warwic" in Wiltshire[1470]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "27 Aug" of "Margarita mater Rotrodi episcopi"[1471]

Earl Henry & his wife had five children:

1.         ROGER de Beaumont ([1101/02]-12 Jun 1153).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rogerium et Rodbertum de Novoburgo” as the children of Henry and his wife[1472].  He was installed as Earl of Warwick in 1123. 

-        see below

2.         ROBERT de Neufbourg [Novoburgo] (-30 Aug [or 12 Sep] 1159).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rogerium et Rodbertum de Novoburgo” as the children of Henry and his wife[1473].  He succeeded to his father's lands in Normandy and held Neubourg from the Comte de Meulan.  A charter dated to [1144] records the agreement relating to "la banlieue de Cambremer" made by "Robertus de Curceio et Robertus de Novo Burgo" in favour of the church of Bayeux[1474].  “R. comes de Warwick” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter witnessed by “Roberto de Novoburgo, G. fratre eius, Gundreda comitissa, Turstino de Montfort…[1475].  The marriage settlement of "Rogerus comes Warr…Agnetem filiam meam" and "Gaufrido camerario" is undated, witnessed by "…Roberto fratre meo et Gaufrido et Henrico…Willelmus de Glint[ona]…Hug[one] de Glint[ona] et Maur[icio] fratre eius…"[1476].  He was chief steward and governor of Normandy 1154 to 1159[1477].  The Chronicon Beccensis Abbatić records that "Kal Aug" 1159 “Robertus de Novoburgo vice-dominus totius Normannić” became a monk at Bec and died “III Kal Sep[1478]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "30 Aug" of "Robertus de Novo Burgo frater Rotrodi episcopi qui dedit quandam masuram apud Sanctum Gaudum"[1479].  [The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "12 Sep" of "Robertus de Novo Burgo"[1480].]  m GODECHILDE de Tosny, daughter of RALPH de Tosny & his wife Adelisa of Huntingdon (-17 Oct after 1143).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”Rogerus [comes] Warwic...fratrum suorum natus post ipsum...Robertus de Novoburgo” married “sororem Rogerii de Toenio filiam secundi Rodulfi Godechildem” by whom he had “plures filios...Henricum et fratres eius[1481].  According to Robert of Torigny[1482], this was the same Godechilde who married Baudouin de Boulogne King of Jerusalem, but he is clearly confusing her with her aunt of the same name who allegedly married Robert de Beaumont Comte de Meulan as her first husband[1483].  "Robert de Novoburgo" donated property to the abbey of Bec-Hellouin with the consent of his mother countess Margaret, his wife Godeheld and his sons Henry and Ralf, by charter dated 1143[1484]The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "17 Oct" of "Godeheut uxor domini Roberti de Novo Burgo"[1485]Robert & his wife had three children: 

a)         HENRY de Neufbourg (-[1165/66]).  Guillaume of Jumičges records that ”Rogerus [comes] Warwic...fratrum suorum natus post ipsum...Robertus de Novoburgo” married “sororem Rogerii de Toenio filiam secundi Rodulfi Godechildem” by whom he had “plures filios...Henricum et fratres eius[1486].  "Robert de Novoburgo" donated property to the abbey of Bec-Hellouin with the consent of his mother countess Margaret, his wife Godeheld and his sons Henry and Ralph, by charter dated 1143[1487].  He confirmed his father's grant to Beaulieu Abbey, Chartres in [1160][1488].  [The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Henricus de Novo Burgo" with 10 knights "de honore de Hummeto" and 6 knights and three parts in his own service[1489].] 

b)         RALPH (-after 1143).  "Robert de Novoburgo" donated property to the abbey of Bec-Hellouin with the consent of his mother countess Margaret, his wife Godeheld and his sons Henry and Ralf, by charter dated 1143[1490].  Sire de Livarot. 

c)         RICHARD .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Baron d'Asnebec. 

3.         ROTROU (-25 Nov 1183).  His parentage is confirmed by the necrology of the church of Evreux which records the death "27 Aug" of his mother "Margarita mater Rotrodi episcopi"[1491]Bishop of Evreux.  Archbishop of Rouen.  Chief Justiciar and Steward of Normandy[1492]

4.         GEOFFROY .  The marriage settlement of "Rogerus comes Warr…Agnetem filiam meam" and "Gaufrido camerario" is undated, witnessed by "…Roberto fratre meo et Gaufrido et Henrico…Willelmus de Gli