untitled ENGLISH NOBILITY L - O

v3.0 Updated 28 May 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

LACY. 2

LA HAYE. 13

LA MARE. 19

LANCASTER. 23

LANGETOT. 39

LANVALAY. 42

LAVAL. 52

LESTRANGE. 55

LIMESEY. 66

LINCOLN. 73

LISLE. 79

LUCY. 80

MALET. 90

MAMINOT. 105

MARMION. 110

MARTEL. 118

MAUDUIT. 124

LORDS of MIDDLEHAM, YORKSHIRE. 133

MOHAUT. 136

MOHUN. 143

MONTFICHET. 154

MONTFORT. 160

MORVILLE. 168

MULTON. 177

MUNCHENSY. 180

MURDAC. 190

NEUFMARCHE. 193

NOEL. 199

OILLY. 202

 

 

 

 

LACY

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Lassy in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Vire, canton Condé-sur-Noireau[1]

 

 

1.         --- [de Lacy], son of --- (-before 1069).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Lacy" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[2].  Ellis suggests that the father of Walter de Lacy and Ilbert de Lacy was named Hugh "for each gave this name to a son"[3]m EMMA, daughter of ---.  "Emma mater Hilberti de Lacei" donated property "in monte…Mainart" to Saint-Amand on becoming a nun, by undated charter[4].  Ellis dates this charter to before 1069[5].  [Three] children: 

a)         [WALTER de Lacy (-27 Mar 1085).  Ellis suggests that Walter de Lacy was the brother of Ilbert de Lacy, highlighting that Walter held a "knight’s fee in Lassy and Campeaux" in Normandy from Odo Bishop of Bayeux and that "this fief was afterwards held in parage by the heirs of Walter and Ilbert".  He shows the supposed brothers in his genealogical table as born from different mothers[6].  Presumably he bases this on Emma naming only her son Ilbert in the charter which is quoted above.  However, there could be many explanations for the omission of Walter from the document and, assuming that the two were brothers, it seems probable that Emma was also the mother of Walter, who gave this name to his second daughter.  A manuscript which lists donations to Gloucester St Peter includes a record of the donation in 1080 by "Walterus de Lacy" of “terras de le Dene", confirmed by "rege Willielmo seniore", before "oblato Domino et sancto Petro, Waltero filio suo tunc parvulo"[7].] 

-        see below

b)         [HELWISE .  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Helewysa relicta Willelmi de Ebroys" donated "terram…Hyda, quam Walterus de Lacy dedit ei in matrimonium" with the consent of "rege Henrico seniore…tempore Willelmi abbatis" [abbot from 1113 to 1131][8].  It is possible that Helwise was the sister of Walter de Lacy.  A close relationship is indicated by his donation to her of property on her marriage.  It appears unlikely that Helwise was Walter’s daughter: firstly, it is likely that such a relationship would have been specified in the source, and secondly Walter’s children were young when he died so any of his daughters may not have been old enough for marriage at the time.  m (before 27 Mar 1085) WILLIAM de Ebroys, son of --- (-before 1131).] 

c)         ILBERT de Lacy (-[1093], bur [Pontefract Priory]).  "Emma mater Hilberti de Lacei" donated property "in monte…Mainart" to Saint-Amand on becoming a nun, by undated charter[9].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Lacy" (twice) among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[10].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that “Ilberto de Lacy” accompanied William “the Conqueror” to England and was awarded “dominio et honore de Pontefracto”, adding that he was buried “ad dextrum cornu altaris sancti Benedicti” (which appears from the context to refer to Pontefract Priory)[11].  Domesday Book records “Ilbert de Lacy” holding Tingewick in Rowley Hundred in Buckinghamshire; several properties in Nottinghamshire; numerous properties in Yorkshire; land in Dunholme, Scothern, Stow and Willingham by Stow in Lincolnshire[12].  “Hilbertus de Laceio…cum Hadrude uxore mea” donated property to the Holy Trinity of the Mount, Rouen, for the souls of “…filiique mei Hugonis” who is buried there, by charter dated to [1088/94][13].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Meretona et in Gerford” by “Ilbertus de Laci[14].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Ilbertus de Laceio, Hathewis sua uxor, Rodbertus et Hugo filii eorum"[15]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  “Robertus de Laceio” founded Pontefract Priory, for the soul of “Hylberti patris mei et Hawisiæ matris meæ”, by undated charter[16].  “Hilbertus de Laceio…cum Hadrude uxore mea” donated property to the Holy Trinity of the Mount, Rouen, for the souls of “…filiique mei Hugonis” who is buried there, by charter dated to [1088/94][17].  It is not known whether “Hadrude” was a mistranscription for Hawise, or whether Ilbert had two wives with these names.  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that “Ilberto de Lacy…uxor eius” was buried “ad sinistrum cornu altaris [sancti Benedicti]” (which appears from the context to refer to Pontefract Priory)[18].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Ilbertus de Laceio, Hathewis sua uxor, Rodbertus et Hugo filii eorum"[19].  Ilbert & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT de Lacy (-after 23 Nov 1102, bur Pontefract Priory).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Robertum Lacy” as son of “Ilberto de Lacy” and his wife “Hauisia”, adding that he founded “monasterium apud Pontefractum”, died during the reign of King William II, and was buried at Pontefract[20]

-         see below

ii)         HUGH (-bur Holy Trinity of the Mount, Rouen).  “Rodbertus de Laceio” confirmed the donation by “pater meus Hilbertus” to Selby Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hugonis”, by undated charter[21].  “Hilbertus de Laceio…cum Hadrude uxore mea” donated property to the Holy Trinity of the Mount, Rouen, for the souls of “…filiique mei Hugonis” who is buried there, by charter dated to [1088/94][22].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Ilbertus de Laceio, Hathewis sua uxor, Rodbertus et Hugo filii eorum"[23]

iii)        [MATILDA .  “Henricum de Laceio” founded Kirkstall Abbey, for the souls of “Ilberti avi mei et Hawis uxoris suæ…et Matildis amitæ”, by undated charter[24].] 

 

 

WALTER de Lacy, son of --- de Lacy & [his wife Emma ---] (-27 Mar 1085).  Ellis suggests that Walter de Lacy was the brother of Ilbert de Lacy, highlighting that Walter held a "knight’s fee in Lassy and Campeaux" in Normandy from Odo Bishop of Bayeux and that "this fief was afterwards held in parage by the heirs of Walter and Ilbert".  He shows the supposed brothers in his genealogical table as born from different mothers[25].  Presumably he bases this on Emma naming only her son Ilbert in the charter which is quoted above.  However, there could be many explanations for the omission of Walter from the document and, assuming that the two were brothers, it seems probable that Emma was also the mother of Walter, who gave this name to his second daughter.  Orderic Vitalis records that King William granted “insulam Vectam et comitatum Herfordensem” to “Willelmo dapifero Normanniæ Osberni filio”, and sent him “cum Gualterio de Laceio” to fight “contra Britones” [Welsh], during which they first invaded “Brachaniaunos” and defeated “Guallorum reges Risen et Caducan ac Mariadoth”, dated to 1071[26].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Walterus de Lacy" donated “terras de Ledene" in 1080, with the consent of "rege Willelmo seniore", when "Waltero filio suo tunc parvulo" entered the monastery, "tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][27].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the death "VI Kal Apr" 1085 of "Walterus fundator Sancti Petri Hereford", his burial "Gloucestriæ in capitulo", and the donation of "villam quinque hidarum Duntesborne tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104] made by "uxor eius Ermelina"[28]

m [as her first husband,] EMMELINE, daughter of --- (-after 27 Mar 1085).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the death "VI Kal Apr" 1085 of "Walterus fundator Sancti Petri Hereford", his burial "Gloucestriæ in capitulo", and the donation of "villam quinque hidarum Duntesborne tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104] made by "uxor eius Ermelina"[29].  Domesday Book records “Roger de Lacy” holding Siddington in Gloucestershire, adding that "his mother holds it as her dower land"[30].  A charter of Stephen King of England dated 1138 confirmed donations to Gloucester St Peter including the donation by "Emelinæ uxoris Walterii de Laceio" of “Duntesburna"[31].  [There are indications that Emmeline may have married secondly Arnoul de Hesdin.  Both families made numerous donations to Gloucester St Peter, although it has not yet proved possible to link any of the names of land donated to both families, but most significantly the Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ, in a list of holdings, records (in order) donations made by "Walterus de Lacy dedit Leden, Ernulfus de Hesding dedit Lyncoholt, Hermelina de Lacy dedit pro anima viri sui Duntesbourne…"[32].  The interposition of Arnoul’s name between Walter de Lacy and his wife Emmeline is best explained if he was Emmeline’s second husband.  From a chronological point of view, the two marriages would fit.  It should be emphasised that this suggestion is speculative.  If it is correct, she could have been Emmeline, daughter of [Dreux de Baladon & his wife ---].  The reasoning behind this speculative parentage is discussed in the document WALES.] 

Walter & his wife had [six] children: 

1.         ROGER de Lacy (-after [1107/22]).  Domesday Book records that “Roger de Lacy” held Enborne, Kintbury Hundred, and Childrey in Wantage Hundred, in Berkshire; land in Kiddington, Mongewell and Salford in Oxfordshire; several properties in Gloucestershire, numerous properties in Herefordshire; several properties in Shropshire[33].  Henry I King of England granted property of "Walterus de Lacy et Rogerus et Hugo filii eius" to St Guthlac’s, Hereford by charter dated to [1107/22][34].  Lord of the manor of Stanton Lacy, Shropshire. 

2.         WALTER de Lacy ([1072/73]-[8] Feb 1139).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Walterus de Lacy" donated “terras de Ledene" in 1080, with the consent of "rege Willelmo seniore", when "Waltero filio suo tunc parvulo" entered the monastery, "tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][35].  Abbot of Gloucester.  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the succession as abbot of Gloucester, after the death "III Id Jul" 1131, of "Walterus de Lacy capellanus" who his parents had consigned "circiter VII annos" to the monastic life at Gloucester which had been generously endowed "tam a patre quam a matre sua Emma"[36].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the the death of Abbot Walter after becoming blind and paralysed and his burial "VI Id Feb" 1139[37]

3.         HUGH de Lacy (-before 1121).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Hugo de Lacy" donated "ecclesiam Sancti Petri in Herford", built by "pater suus Walterus", in 1101[38].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Hugo de Lacy" donated "unum villanum et unam virgatam terræ in Moneswelle juxta Walyngeford", and in a later passage "ecclesiam de Quenyntone et ecclesiam de Wyke", both dated "tempore Serlonis abbatis" [abbot from 1072 to 1104][39].  Henry I King of England granted property of "Walterus de Lacy et Rogerus et Hugo filii eius" to St Guthlac’s, Hereford by charter dated to [1107/22][40].  A manuscript describing the descendants of the founders of Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire records that “Hugo de Lacy primus fundator prioratus Lanthoniæ” came “in Wallia” during the reign of King William I but that, dying childless, "duabus sororibus suis…Ermelinæ quæ obit sine hærede et Emmæ sorori suæ" inherited his property[41].  Eyton conjectures that Hugh de Lacy died between 1108 and 1121[42].  Keats-Rohan says that Agnes (wife of Geoffrey Talbot, see below) “used erroneously to be identified as a de Lacy” and that she was “possibly a daughter of Helto” (dapifer, recorded in Domesday Book as holding Swanscombe, Kent from Odo Bishop of Bayeux) but does not explain the reasoning, although in a later sentence she suggests that the connection between the Talbot and Lucy families would be explained if “Adeline or Adelisa, wife of Hugh de Lacy (d.a.1115), was the daughter of Geoffrey and Agnes[43].  Presumably the Hugh de Lacy in question (“d.a.1115”) was this supposed brother of Agnes’s, but the source which confirms his marriage has not yet been identified. 

4.         EMMELINE de Lacy .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Hugo de Lacy primus” had “duabus sororibus…Ermelinæ…et Emmæ” who were his heiresses, adding that Emmeline died childless[44]

5.         EMMA de Lacy .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Hugo de Lacy primus” had “duabus sororibus…Ermelinæ…et Emmæ” who were his heiresses, adding that Emma married “---[45]m ---.  The name of Emma’s husband is not known.  Emma & her husband had one child: 

a)         GILBERT de Lacy (-[1158/63]).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Gilbertus de Lacy” as son of Emma and her unnamed husband[46].  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Galfridus…Taleboth cognatus…Gislebertus de Laceio" was captured by King Stephen’s forces, dated to [1139/40][47].  "Gilbertus de Laci et Robertus filius eius" confirmed the donation of a tenement in Droitwich to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory by charter dated to [1150][48].  A manuscript which records the foundation of Lanthony Abbey refers to “Hugo de Laci…nepos” who, after many contests, worked for the Christian cause "sub habitu Templariorum"[49].  Although not named, the nepos in question was presumably Gilbert[50].  A listing of Templar properties dated 1185 includes land “apud Guttingres…Holeford” donated by "Gileberti de Laci"[51].  Eyton conjectures that Gilbert de Lacy died, or at least retired from the world, between 1158 and 1163[52]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROBERT de Lacy (-after [1150]).  "Gilbertus de Laci et Robertus filius eius" confirmed the donation of a tenement in Droitwich to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory by charter dated to [1150][53].  Robert must have predeceased his father, assuming that he was the oldest son. 

ii)         HUGH de Lacy (-killed 25 Jul 1185).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Hugo…et Walterus frater eius” as the sons of “Gilbertus de Lacy”, adding that Hugh died childless[54].  This is contradicted by the Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire which records that "Gilbertus de Lacy" had a son "Hugonem" who had "filium Walterum"[55].  "…Hugoni de Lacy…" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the freedoms of the city of Rouen[56]Lord of Meath in Ireland. 

-         LORDS of MEATH

iii)        [WALTER de Lacy .  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Hugo…et Walterus frater eius” as the sons of “Gilbertus de Lacy[57].  This document identifies Walter as the father of Gilbert de Lacy (see below) and therefore by implication as Lord of Meath.  However, this appears unlikely from a chronological point of view, and also ignores the existence of Hugh de Lacy Lord of Meath.  This supposed parentage is disproved by the undated charter under which “Walterus de Lacy filius Hugonis de Lacy” confirmed his father’s donation to Lanthony Abbey[58].] 

6.         [AGNES  (-after 1129).  “Gausfridus Talebotus et uxor eius Agnes” donated part “de terra Fenge” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Sibilla domini filia” [who has not yet been identified][59].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Agnes uxor Gaufr Talebot" in Kent in respect of "dote et maritag suo"[60].  Her possible parentage is indicated by the charter dated to [1130/39] under which [her presumed daughter] “Sibilla de Lacy” notified her bailiffs and foresters that she had donated “land of Leghe near the church of St Michael” to “my uncle Walter abbot of Gloucester”, for the souls of “myself and my husband Payne Fitz-john”, by charter dated to [1130/39][61], on the assumption that “uncle” can be interpreted in the document in its strict sense which would mean that Walter de Lacy Abbot of Gloucester was the brother of Agnes.  Keats-Rohan says that Agnes “used erroneously to be identified as a de Lacy” and that she was “possibly a daughter of Helto” (dapifer, recorded in Domesday Book as holding Swanscombe, Kent from Odo Bishop of Bayeux) but does not explain the reasoning, although in a later sentence she suggests that the connection between the Talbot and Lucy families would be explained if “Adeline or Adelisa, wife of Hugh de Lacy (d.a.1115), was the daughter of Geoffrey and Agnes[62].  Presumably the Hugh de Lacy in question (“d.a.1115”) was this Agnes’s supposed brother Hugh who is shown above, but the source which confirms his marriage has not yet been identified.  m GEOFFREY Talbot, son of --- (-before 1129).] 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the Lacy family has not been ascertained. 

1.         --- .  Niece of Hugh de Lacy Lord of Meath.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m MEILER FitzHenry, son of HENRY [illegitimate son of King Henry I] & his wife --- (-1220, bur Great Connall, co. Kildare). 

 

 

ROBERT de Lacy, son of ILBERT de Lacy & his wife Hawise --- (-after 23 Nov 1102, bur Pontefract Priory).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Robertum Lacy” as son of “Ilberto de Lacy” and his wife “Hauisia”, adding that he founded “monasterium apud Pontefractum”, died during the reign of King William II, and was buried at Pontefract[63].  The Liber Vitæ of Durham names "Ilbertus de Laceio, Hathewis sua uxor, Rodbertus et Hugo filii eorum"[64].  “Rodbertus de Laceio” confirmed the donation by “pater meus Hilbertus” to Selby Abbey, for the soul of “fratris mei Hugonis”, by undated charter[65].  “Robertus de Laceio” founded Pontefract Priory, for the soul of “Hylberti patris mei et Hawisiæ matris meæ”, by undated charter, dateable to the reign of King William II, witnessed by “W. Peverel…[66].  Florence of Worcester records that "Beornardus de Novo Mercatu, Rogerius de Laceio…Rawlfus de Mortuo Mari…cum hominibus comitis Rogeri de Scrobbesbyria" threatened Worcester with an army of Normans and Welsh, dated to [1088][67].  A writ addressed to Robert Bishop of Lincoln and Osbert Sheriff of Lincolnshire, dated to [1095/1100], sanctioned an exchange of lands between "Ur de Abet" and "Rotb de Laceio de Ingoluesmaera", witnessed by "R. fil Haim"[68].  "Robertus de Lacy" granted "Magnam Merlay…et Tuisleton…et…in Cliderhou" to "Radulpho le Rus" by charter dated 23 Nov 1102[69]

m MATILDA, daughter of --- (-bur [Pontefract Priory]).  “Henricus de Lasci” donated property to Pontefract Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti de Lasci et Matilildis matris meæ”, by undated charter[70].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that Ilbert de Lacy was buried “ad sinistrum cornu altaris sancti Benedicti” next to his mother[71]

Robert & his wife had four children: 

1.         ILBERT de Lacy (-1141, bur [Pontefract Priory]).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Hilbertum et Henricum” as the two sons of “Robertum Lacy” and his wife “Matilda”, adding that he died childless and was buried “ad sinistrum cornu altaris sancti Benedicti” next to his mother[72].  "Ilbertus de Lacy" confirmed the grant of "magna Merlay, Twisleton…et…in Poterton et…in Cliderh…" made by "pater meus" [see above for his father’s grant] to "Radulfo le Rus", with the consent and advice of "Roberti fratris mei", by charter dated to [1135/41][73].  "Ilbertus de Lacy" confirmed the grant of "magnam Mitton, Haghton, magnam Merlay, Twisleton…in Potreton et…in Cliderhou" to "Radulfo le Rouse" and granted further property to "eidem Radulfo fratri meo" by charter dated to [1135/41][74]m as her first husband, ALICE de Gand, daughter of WALTER de Gand & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre.  “Aliz de Gant” donated property to Pontefract Priory, for the souls of “prioris domini mei Ilberti de Lascy” and with the consent of “Henricus de Lascy”, by undated charter[75].  She married secondly Roger de Mowbray.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Rogerus de Molbrai” confirmed the donation of property to Pontefract Priory by “uxor mea…pro anima prioris domini sui Ilberti de Lasci”, witnessed by “Willielmus Peverel…Turgis de Molbray…[76]

2.         ROBERT de Lacy (-after [1135/41]).  "Ilbertus de Lacy" confirmed the grant of "magna Merlay, Twisleton…et…in Poterton et…in Cliderh…" made by "pater meus" [see above for his father’s grant] to "Radulfo le Rus", with the consent and advice of "Roberti fratris mei", by charter dated to [1135/41][77]

3.         HENRY de Lacy (-Holy Land 25 Sep 1177).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Hilbertum et Henricum” as the two sons of “Robertum Lacy” and his wife “Matilda[78].  “Henricus de Lasci” donated property to Pontefract Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti de Lasci et Matilildis matris meæ”, by undated charter[79].  “Henricum de Laceio” founded Kirkstall Abbey, for the souls of “Ilberti avi mei et Hawis uxoris suæ…et Matildis amitæ”, by undated charter[80].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Henricus de Lascy xliv l xv s, de novo xxxl xvi d" in Yorkshire in [1171/72][81].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that the death “in terra sancta VII Kal Oct” of Henry de Lacy, adding that his burial place is unknown[82]m [as her second husband,] AUBREYE, daughter of [EUSTACE] [de Vescy] & his wife ---.  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that “Henricus Lacy” married “sororem Willielmi Vesci rectoris de Berwic[83].  Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated to [1180/93] under which “Robertus de Lasci” (her son) granted property to “Willelmo filio Eustachii avunculo meo[84].  However, it is not impossible that Aubreye was the uterine sister of William FitzEustace and therefore did not share the same father.  The question of Aubreye’s possible earlier marriage is discussed below.  Henry & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Lacy (-21 Aug 1193, bur Kirkstall Abbey).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Lascy" paying "xxi l xvii s vi d" in Yorkshire[85].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Robertus” as the son of “Henricus Lacy” and his wife “sororem Willielmi Vesci rectoris de Berwic”, adding that he died “1193 XII Kal Sep” and was buried “apud Kirkstall[86]m as her first husband, ISABEL de Warenne, daughter of HAMELIN d’Anjou Earl of Surrey & his [second] wife Isabel de Warenne of Surrey (-before 30 Nov 1234).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Isabella” as wife of “Robertus Lacy”, adding that they were childless[87].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Ysabel que fuit uxor Roberti de Laci" owing in Yorkshire "pro habenda dota sua de terra eiusdem Roberti"[88].  She married secondly ([1196]) Gilbert de Laigle Lord of Pevensey.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Gileberti de Aquila" married "comes Warennie…sorore sua" whose dowry was "villa de Westcot…hundredum de Wudetun" in Surrey[89].  

4.         AUBREYE de Lacy .  According to The Complete Peerage, Aubreye de Lisours, successor of Robert de Lacy was his cousin[90], implying that her mother was Robert’s paternal aunt.  This appears to be confirmed by the 1130 Pipe Roll which records "Robt de Lusor" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and that he married "sorore Ilbti de Laci"[91].  An apparently different version of Aubreye’s parentage is provided by a manuscript history of the Lacy family which records that “Albreda vel Aubreia, filia Roberti Lisours, soror ex parte matris” succeeded on the death of “Robertus Lacy[92].  If this is correct, Aubreye’s father was the [first/second] husband of Robert de Lacy’s mother.  As the husband of Aubrey junior died in 1163, the chronology suggests that, if this version is correct, it is more probable that Aubreye was the daughter of her mother’s first marriage.  It appears from the 1130 Pipe Roll that the Complete Peerage version is to be preferred.  m ROBERT de Lisours, son of FULK de Lisours & his wife --- (-after 1167).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "F[ulconis] de Lisuris" in Northamptonshire, referring to land which "Ricardus Engaine avus meus" gave to "ultimæ uxori suæ in dotem, scilicet uxori Ricardi filii Ursi" and refers to land held by "duæ amitæ meæ"[93].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Lisures i m" in Huntingdonshire in [1167/68][94]

Robert had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

5.          RALPH le Roux (-after [1135/41]).  "Robertus de Lacy" granted "Magnam Merlay…et Tuisleton…et…in Cliderhou" to "Radulpho le Rus" by charter dated 23 Nov 1102[95].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1135/41] under which "Ilbertus de Lacy" confirmed the grant of "magnam Mitton, Haghton, magnam Merlay, Twisleton…in Potreton et…in Cliderhou" to "Radulfo le Rouse" and granted further property to "eidem Radulfo fratri meo"[96]

 

 

1.         HENRY de Lacy (-after 1194).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "de his qui non habent capitales honores…Henrico de Lascy" paying "xiii s" in Oxfordshire[97]

 

2.         ROGER de Lacy (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Rogerus de Laci" holding "feuda de v militum de feodo de Cliderhou" in Lancashire, adding that he granted land to "Roberto de Flainesburch in maritagio cum filia Roberti de Liverseg"[98].  

 

3.         GILBERT de Lacy (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Rogerus de Laci" gave land to "Gilberto de Laci" in Lancashire "cum Agneta filia Johannis de Himerum in maritagio"[99].  m (before 1212) AGNES, daughter of JOHN de Himerum & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Rogerus de Laci" gave land to "Gilberto de Laci" in Lancashire "cum Agneta filia Johannis de Himerum in maritagio"[100].  

 

 

 

 

LA HAYE

 

 

According to Domesday Descendants, this family originated from la Haye-du-Puits in the Cotentin, Normandy {Manche}[101].  The founding charter of Boxgrove Priory in Sussex states that the founder, Robert de La Haye, was "consanguineo" of Henry I King of England.  The precise relationship has not yet been traced. 

 

 

ROBERT de la Haye, son of RANULF & his wife --- ([1075/80]-[1150]).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex states that it was founded by “Roberti di Haya…consanguineo eius” [referring to King Henry], to whom Henry I King of England had granted “honorem Halnaci” [Halmaker] in Sussex, and given to the abbey of Essay in Normandy[102].  According to Domesday Descendants, this was land which had been forfeited by William de Ansleville[103].  In the foundation charter of the priory he names himself "son of Ranulf the seneschal of Robert de Mortain" and "nephew of Eudo dapifer" [son of Thurstan Haldup][104]Domesday Descendants dates the foundation to "before 1105"[105], which would place Robert’s birth in [1075/80], bearing in mind his date of death.  “Robertus de Haia et sponsa mea Gundrede” donated Basselech Priory, Monmouth to Glastonbury, with the consent of "domini mei Roberti filii Hamonis et sponsæ suæ Sibiliæ", by charter dated to [1101/20][106].  King Henry I, with "Johanni episcopo Luxoviensi, et comiti Gloecestriæ, et comiti Rannulfo Cestriæ, et Roberto de Haia", confirmed the privileges of the church of Bayeux by charter dated [1118/35][107].  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Robertus de Haia Ricardus et Eudonis nepos" [which appears to be garbled] with the advice of "Muriele uxoris sue et filiorum suorum Ricardi…Radulfi", by charter dated 1126[108].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral commemorates “IV Id Sep” (not their deaths, presumably referring to the date of a donation) “Robertus de Heia et Muriel uxor eius[109].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][110]

m [firstly] GUNDRED, daughter of ---.  “Robertus de Haia et sponsa mea Gundrede” donated Basselech Priory, Monmouth to Glastonbury, with the consent of "domini mei Roberti filii Hamonis et sponsæ suæ Sibiliæ", by charter dated to [1101/20][111].  It is assumed that Gundred was Robert’s first wife as his wife Muriel was named in a charter dated 1126 (see below). 

m [secondly] MURIEL, daughter of PICOT FitzColswein & his wife Beatrice ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1111 which records that “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery, in the presence of "ipso Pichoto uxore eius Beatrice…"[112].  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Robertus de Haia Ricardus et Eudonis nepos" [which appears to be garbled] with the advice of "Muriele uxoris sue et filiorum suorum Ricardi…Radulfi", by charter dated 1126[113].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral commemorates “IV Id Sep” (not their deaths, presumably referring to the date of a donation) “Robertus de Heia et Muriel uxor eius[114].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][115]

Robert & his [second] wife had four children: 

1.         RICHARD de la Haye (-[24 Apr], 1169 or after 1171, bur Blanchelande abbey).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated May 1111 under which his maternal grandfather “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery[116].  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Robertus de Haia Ricardus et Eudonis nepos" [which appears to be garbled] with the advice of "Muriele uxoris sue et filiorum suorum Ricardi…Radulfi", by charter dated 1126[117].  A charter dated to [1144] of Geoffroy Duke of Normandy, Comte d’Anjou, records the notification to the archbishop of Rouen of an enquiry into the possessions of Bayeux church, including a donation made "coram Ricardo de Haia et Roberto de Novo Burgo et Roberto de Curceio"[118].  "…Ricardus de Haya…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[119].  "Ricardus de Humez constabularius, Richardus de Haia…" witnessed the charter dated under which Henri Duke of Normandy notified a judgment relating to the house of the late "Conani thesaurarii" by charter dated to [1152/54][120].  Henry II King of England confirmed "Ric de Haia" in the possession of his father’s lands, including "constabularia sua de Lincolscii, custodia castelli mei Linc", by charter dated to [1155/58][121].  “Rich. de Haia et Mat. uxor eius” donated “villam Cambringeham” in England to Blanchelande abbey by undated charter[122].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[123].  “Ricardus de Haia” donated “molendino de Welletune” in England to Blanchelande abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "T. Ragin. de Maisnillo nepote meo…"[124].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Ricardus de Haya xvi m, de novo iv m" in Lincolnshire in [1167/68][125].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1169 of "Richardus de Haia", adding that he left "filias tres"[126].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Ricardus de Haya xx l" in Lincolnshire in [1171/72][127], which suggests that Richard’s date of death as reported by Robert of Torigny may be incorrect.  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “VIII Kal Apr” of “Ricardus de Heia[128].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][129]m MATHILDE, daughter of [GUILLAUME de Vernon & his wife Lucy de Tancarville] (-after 1157).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[130].  This charter does not specify that Richard’s wife was the daughter of Guillaume de Vernon but this appears to be a likely possibility.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardus de Haia et Matildis uxor sua", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][131].  Richard & his wife had three children: 

a)         NICOLE de la Haye (-Nov 1230)Nicholaa de Haya filia Ricardi de Haya” confirmed the donation of “villam de Kambringham” to Blanchelande abbey by "dictus Ricardus pater meus" by undated charter[132].  King Richard I confirmed the inheritance by "Gerardo de Canuilla et Nicolæ uxori sue" of all her inheritance in England and Normandy from "Rob de Haia et R[ic] de Haia", including "constabularia castelli Lincoln" and land at Poupeville and Varreville, by charter dated 1189[133].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Ricardi de Hai…predecessor domine Nicollæ uxoris Gerardi [de Camvill]" in relation to landholdings in Lincolnshire[134].  Henry III King of England took "dominam Nicholaam de Haya et Ricardum de Campvill filium suum" under protection dated 12 Feb 1217[135].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated 1219, which includes "Domina Nicholaa de Haya est de donacione domini regis et terra eius de Swaveton valet per annum xx.l"[136].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[137]m firstly WILLIAM FitzErneis, son of --- (-1178).  m secondly GERARD de Camville, son of RICHARD de Camville & his [second] wife [Melisende ---] (-1214). 

b)         GILLE de la Haye .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[138]m RICHARD du Hommet, son of GUILLAUME du Hommet & his wife Lucie ---. 

c)         ISABELLE de la Haye .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" against "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" concerning "manerium de Dudingtona", inherited from "Nicholaæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est" which names "Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius" as "filias et heredes Ricardi de Haya"[139]m WILLIAM de Rullos, son of ---. 

2.         CECILIA de la Haye (-[1162/77]).  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated May 1111 under which her maternal grandfather “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery[140].  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex states that “Roberti di Haya…Ceciliam filiam suam” married “Rogero de sancto Johanne[141]m ROGER de Saint John, son of --- (-1130 or after). 

3.         RALPH de la Haye .  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Robertus de Haia Ricardus et Eudonis nepos" [which appears to be garbled] with the advice of "Muriele uxoris sue et filiorum suorum Ricardi…Radulfi", by charter dated 1126[142].  "Willelmus de Albiniaco" donated “ecclesias de villa...Ham” to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated to [1132/51], witnessed by “...Olivarius frater Willelmi de Albiniaco et Radulfus de Haia et Engerannus de Sai...[143].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Radulfus de Haia" with two knights and one half "de honore de Plaiseisio", one knight "de honore Mortolii, de feodo de Crienciis" and six knights and one half "in Constantino" in his own service[144].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][145].  Of Halnaker, Sussex.  m OLIVE de Albini, daughter WILLIAM de Albini "Pincerna" & his wife Maud le Bigod (-bur Boxgrove Priory).  Wilielmus Cicestriæ comes” donated property “ecclesiæ de Bisintona quam Radulphus de Haia dedit ecclesiæ sanctæ Trinitatis” to Boxgrove Priory, dated the day “ipse Radulphus” was betrothed to “uxorem suam Olivam sororem…meam”, subscribed by “Radulfus filius Savari…[146].  “Wilielmus comes Arundelli” donated property “Bessesola..[et] Winkingas” to Boxgrove Priory, for the souls of “Adelizæ reginæ…Olivæ sororis meæ, et Olyvæ filiæ meæ, et Agathæ, quæ ibi iacent”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Godfridus filius comitis[147].  Her brother settled dower in Sussex on her[148]

4.         --- de la Hayem ---.  One child: 

a)         RALPH de la Haye (-after 1157).  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[149]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de la Haye .  "Robertus de Haia" confirmed the donation of land at Authorpe to the monks of la Sauve Majeure at Burwell, Lincolnshire by "R. avi mei et R. de Haia patris mei", by charter dated to the late reign of King Henry II[150]

 

2.         RICHARD de la Haye (-after 1190).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Ricardus de Haia" paying "viii l, xvi milites" in Lincolnshire[151]

 

3.         ROGER de la Haye (-after 1198).  The Testa de Nevill records that "Rogerus de Haia" held land "in Akes" in Yorkshire in 1198[152].  

 

4.         WILLIAM de la Haye (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de la Haie" holding one knight’s fee and one half "in Mersie et Leigre" in Essex, Hertfordshire, and one half "in Ratendone" in Essex in [1210/12][153]

 

5.         SARAH, daughter of --- (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Sarra de Haya" held "manerium de Mildetun" in Surrey[154].  

 

 

 

 

LA MARE

 

 

 

1.         --- de la Mare m [--- de Gloucester, daughter of ROGER de Pitres & his wife Adeline ---].  Her parentage and marriage are established by the charter dated to [1123] which records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[155], although it is always possible that "nepos" should be interpreted in this document as indicating a more remote relationship than nephew.  [Two] children: 

a)         WILLIAM de la Mare (-[1127/28]).  Domesday Book records “William de la Mare” holding land in Welwyn in Hertfordshire from Guillaume d’Eu[156].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Danby” by “Willielmus de la Mara[157].  A charter dated to [1123] records that "Walt de Gloec" gave Little Hereford in fee to "Willo de Mara nepoti suo"[158].  "Walter de Gloecestria, Milo fili ei…Willelm de Mara" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Puncii filii" granted Aston, Gloucestershire ("Hestoniam") to "Mathilli uxori mee"[159]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROBERT de la Mare (-[1129]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rob de Lamara…p ministio" in Wiltshire (twice), adding in one entry that "mortuus est" and that "fra suus" returned in Oxfordshire[160]

ii)         HENRY de la Mare .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Henr de Lamara" in Oxfordshire (three times) and in Gloucestershire[161]m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had [one child]: 

(a)       [WILLIAM de la Mare (-after [1171/83]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus de Mara" with half a knight "de honore de sanctæ Mariæ ecclesia"[162].  "Will de Lamara" donated land at Rendcombe, Gloucestershire to Bruerne abbey, Oxfordshire by charter dated to [1171/83][163].  William’s parentage has not been confirmed but his holding land in Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire suggests that it is likely that he was the son of Henry de Mare.] 

b)         [RALPH de la Mare (-after 1130).  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records that "Radulfus de la Mare" held land from "abbatia de Burch, in Hamtonascira" and in Lincolnshire[164].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad de Lamara" in Northamptonshire, adding a reference to "nepotes suos" (presumably referring to Robert and Henry who are also named in the 1130 Pipe Roll, indicating that Ralph was presumably the brother of William)[165].] 

 

 

1.         ALAN de la Mare (-before [1160]).  "Alanus de la Mara et sponsa eius Beatrix" donated land in Ruholm to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1150][166]m BEATRIX, daughter of --- (-after [1160]).  "Alanus de la Mara et sponsa eius Beatrix" donated land in Ruholm to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by charter dated to [1150][167].  "Willelmus de la Mare filius Alani de la Mare et Beatrix mater eius" confirmed a donation of land in Kirmington to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Adam de Chirningtun filium Heruei" by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "..:Wigan avunculo Alani de la Mara…"[168].  Alan & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de la Mare (-after [1160]).  "Willelmus de Lamarre filius Alani de Lamarre et Amabilis sponsa eius" confirmed the donation of Ruholm to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "Alani de Lamarre", by charter dated to [1157/63], witnessed by "..:Roberto filio Ernisii de Gousla…"[169].  "Willelmus de la Mare filius Alani de la Mare et Beatrix mater eius" confirmed a donation of land in Kirmington to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Adam de Chirningtun filium Heruei" by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "..:Wigan avunculo Alani de la Mara…"[170]m MABILE, daughter of ---.  "Willelmus de Lamarre filius Alani de Lamarre et Amabilis sponsa eius" confirmed the donation of Ruholm to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, for the soul of "Alani de Lamarre", by charter dated to [1157/63], witnessed by "..:Roberto filio Ernisii de Gousla…"[171]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de la Mare (-[1210/Jun 1212]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de la Mare" holding half of one knight’s fee "in Lavintone" in Wiltshire, and one "in Waldene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][172].  "Robertus de la Mare" donated land "in villa de Baldyndone" to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to before Jun 1212[173]m ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         PETER de la Mare (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Petrus filius Roberti de la Mare iii milites" among the tenants of the honour of Wallingford[174].  "Petrus de la Mare" confirmed the donation of land "in villa de Baldyndone" to Eynsham abbey made by "bone memorie Robertus de la Mare pater meus", for the soul of "uxoris mee et heredum meorum", by charter dated to [1212/28][175]m ---. 

 

 

Two brothers: 

1.         HENRY de la Mare (-[1210/12]).  The Testa de Nevill records that "Henricus de la Mare" held land "in Alveseicuth" in Oxfordshire, and land "in Winterburn" in Wiltshire, in 1198[176].  "Henr de la Mare" made a fine for "terra Petronille de Croun ux sue et terris suis in Angliam et Willelmus de La Mara frater suus…", dated 1205[177].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Henricus de la Mare" holding three hides "in Winterburne per serjantariam" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][178]m as her second husband, PETRONILLA de Craon, widow of WILLIAM de Longchamp, daughter of GUY [Wythe] de Craon & his wife Isabel ---.  A genealogy of the founders of Freston Priory names "dame Petronil de Croune" as the daughter of "monsieur Wythe de Croune" and his wife "Clarice", adding that she married firstly "baron monsieur William Longechaumpe" (by whom she had "monsieur Henre de Longechaumpe", and listing several generations of his descendants) and secondly "baron monsieur Oliver Vaux"[179].  "Henr de la Mare" made a fine for "terra Petronille de Croun ux sue et terris suis in Angliam et Willelmus de La Mara frater suus…", dated 1205[180].  "Henr de Mara et Petronill ux eius" claimed "dote…versus…Henr de Longo Campo" in Herefordshire, dated 1207[181].  She married thirdly ([1211/12]) Oliver des Vaux.  Her third marriage is confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Oliverus de Vallibus" held "Vargeburn in barunia cum uxore que fuit Henrici de la Mare" in Hampshire[182]

2.         WILLIAM de la Mare (-after 1210).  "Henr de la Mare" made a fine for "terra Petronille de Croun ux sue et terris suis in Angliam et Willelmus de La Mara frater suus…", dated 1205[183].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de la Mare" holding three knights’ fees in "Ditton…de honore Britanniæ" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][184]

 

 

1.         RALPH de la Mare (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de la Mare" holding three knights’ fees in "Cadeneye, Kaleseye, Sperlingtone, Kerlingtone" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][185]

 

2.         JAMES de la Mare (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Jacobus de la Mare" holding land from "honor Peverelli" in Leicestershire in [1210/12][186]

 

3.         THOMAS de la Mare (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas de la Mare" holding 2 knights’ fees "in Hanlega, Redmarlega, Alretone et Doddeham" in Worcestershire in [1210/12][187]

 

4.         HENRY de la Mare (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Henricus de la Mar" holding land "in Elwescot" in Bampton in Oxfordshire[188].  

 

5.         HENRY de la Marem ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- de la Mare ([1233/35]-).  A writ dated 10 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of "Gunnora de la Mare" names "Henry, son of Henry Tracy her uncle, aged 13 at Whitsunday, 35 Hen III, and a son of Henry de la Mare, whose name is unknown, aged 15, are variously stated to be her heir" and "Elveiscot alias Elfeiscot, Alfiscot [Oxford]…Winterburne [Wiltshire]"[189]

 

6.         GUNNORA de la Mare (-before 10 Jan 1249).  A writ dated 10 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of "Gunnora de la Mare" names "Henry, son of Henry Tracy her uncle, aged 13 at Whitsunday, 35 Hen III, and a son of Henry de la Mare, whose name is unknown, aged 15, are variously stated to be her heir" and "Elveiscot alias Elfeiscot, Alfiscot [Oxford]…Winterburne [Wiltshire]"[190]

 

 

 

 

LANCASTER

 

 

1.         ELDRED .  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Ivo Tailbot genuit Elthredum[191].  This statement is presumably incorrect as other sources indicate that Ivo Taillebois had no sons.  m [---, daughter of IVO Taillebois & his [second] wife ---].  Domesday Descendants suggests that the Cokersand Abbey manuscript is incorrect and that it was the wife of Eldred who was the daughter of Ivo Taillebois, adding that their grandson William de Lancaster held the barony of Kendal which was previously held by Ivo Taillebois[192].  Eldred & his wife had two children: 

a)         KETEL (-after 1120).  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Elthredus [genuit] Ketellum[193].  His parentage is confirmed by a charter of William of Lancaster to York St Leonard’s, confirming a donation by his "avunculus" Ketel fitz Eldred, from which it can be deduced that William’s mother was Ketel’s sister (assuming that avunculus is interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncle)[194].  "Chetellus filius Eldred" donated "ecclesiam de Morlund…et ecclesiam de Brounefeld…et ecclesiam de Wirkynton" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Christiane et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "Cristiana uxore mea , Willelmo filio meo, Archil senescaldo, Yvone filio Forni…"[195].  "Chetellus filius Eltred" donated "ecclesiam de Morlund…et ecclesiam de Wirchington" to York St Mary by undated charter, witnessed by "Christiana uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo, Archibaldo senescallo"[196].  "Ranulfus Meschinus filius Willelmi Meschin" confirmed the donation of land "in Wirchintuna" donated by "Chetellus filius Heltredi" to St Bees by undated charter[197]m CHRISTIANA, daughter of ---.  "Chetellus filius Eldred" donated "ecclesiam de Morlund…" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Christiane et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter[198].  "Chetellus filius Eltred" donated "ecclesiam de Morlund…et ecclesiam de Wirchington" to York St Mary by undated charter, witnessed by "Christiana uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo, Archibaldo senescallo"[199].  Ketel & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          WILLIAM .  "Chetellus filius Eldred" donated "ecclesiam de Morlund…" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Christiane et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter[200].  "Chetellus filius Eltred" donated "ecclesiam de Morlund…et ecclesiam de Wirchington" to York St Mary by undated charter, witnessed by "Christiana uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo, Archibaldo senescallo"[201]

ii)         [ORM (-after 1094).  "…Orm filius Ketell…" witnessed the charter dated 1094 under which "Rogerus comes Pictavencis" donated land "iuxta Lanecastrum…" to the church of St Martin (of the church of St Mary, Lancaster), for the souls of "Rogeri Scroberiæ patris sui, matrisque suæ Mabiliæ cometissæ"[202].]  same person as…?  ORM .  This co-identity is assumed by Farrer[203].  The connection with the church of Workington, held by Ketel supposed father of Orm and by Gospatrick his son, suggests that the hypothesis may be correct.  The chronology, however, is not ideal, given Orm’s mention in 1094 and his supposed son’s death after 1174.  m firstly GUNHILDA, daughter of GOSPATRICK Earl of Northumberland & his wife ---.  The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Waldevus filius comitis Cospatricii” enfeoffed “Ormo Ketelli” with property and “Gurwelda sorore sua[204]m secondly EBREA, daughter of ---.  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[205].  Orm & his second wife had four children: 

(a)       GOSPATRICK (-after 1174).  "Alanus filius Waldevi" confirmed the donation of "unam plenariam toftam apud Scadebuas" made to St Bees by "pater meus" by undated charter witnessed by "…Gospatricio filio Horm, Uctredo filio Uctredi, Ailwardi filio Dolf[ini], Gospatricio fratre suo…"[206].  "…Gospatricio filio Orm et Randulfo de Lindeseia…" witnessed the undated charter under which David King of Scotland confirmed the donation to St Bees made by "Matildis uxor Godardi"[207].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Gospat’z fil Ormi" in Carlisle[208].  "Gospatricius filius Ormi et Egelina uxor eius" donated land "juxta Flemingby" to Carlisle St Mary by undated charter, witnessed by "Michaele fratre Gospatricuum, Ormo filio Dolfini…"[209].  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge", and confirmed "ecclesiam de Wirchingetona" and "ecclesiam de Halfringtuna" which "Elemerus clericus, cognatus meus" held during his lifetime, to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "Alano filio Wallef, Willelmo Engaine, Gilberto fratre eius, Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[210].  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Saltergre", and confirmed "ecclesiam de Wirkynton" and "ecclesiam de Haverinton" which "Elemerus clericus, cognatus meus" held during his lifetime as well as "communi pastura de Arlokedene", to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "Alano filio Waltef, Willelmo Engaine, Gilberto fratre eius, Roberto filio Orm, Michaele fratre eius…Egeliva uxore mea, Ebrea matre mea…Rogero filio Orm"[211].  "Cecilia comitissa Albamarlie" donated land "inter Esc et Duden…Kirkesantan et Haverigg…et Thueites" to St Bees, and confirmed the donation of "villam de Salterge cum communi pastura de Arlokedene" made by "Cospatric filii Horm", by undated charter[212]m EGELINE [Elgiva], daughter of ---.  "Gospatricius filius Ormi et Egelina uxor eius" donated land "juxta Flemingby" to Carlisle St Mary by undated charter, witnessed by "Michaele fratre Gospatricuum, Ormo filio Dolfini…"[213].  Gospatrick & his wife had four children: 

(1)       THOMAS (-[13 Nov 1200/1201]).  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[214].  "Thomas filius Gospatricii de Wirkintona" donated "salmones in Wirkintona…" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Alano filio Gospatricii et Adam fratre eius, Thomas Engaina…"[215].  "Thomas filius Gospatrici" donated "salinam de Culwen" to St Bees, with the consent of "Patricii filii mei", by undated charter[216].  "Willelmus persona de Wirkinton filius Thome de Wirkinton" donated property to the church of Wirkinton by undated charter, witnessed by "Thoma filio Gospatricii, Thoma herede suo…"[217]m as her first husband, GRACE, daughter of ---.  She married secondly (1201) Roger de Beauchamp.  "Rog de Bello Campo et Grecia q fuit uxor Thom fil Gospatric" made a fine for "custodia terre et heredis Thom fil Gospatric et p maritaghndo ipsius heredis" in Westmoreland & Cumberland, dated 1201[218].  Thomas & his wife had three children: 

a.         THOMAS (-before 1201).  "Robertus abbas ecclesie beate Marie Eboraci" granted "ecclesiam nostram de Wirkinton" to "Willelmo clerico filio Thome de Wirkinton" by undated charter, witnessed by "Thoma filio Gospatrici, Thoma herede suo…"[219].  "Willelmus persona de Wirkinton filius Thome de Wirkinton" donated property to the church of Wirkinton by undated charter, witnessed by "Thoma filio Gospatricii, Thoma herede suo…"[220]

b.         PATRICK (-after 26 Nov 1250).  "Thomas filius Gospatrici" donated "salinam de Culwen" to St Bees, with the consent of "Patricii filii mei", by undated charter[221].  "Patricius filius Thome de Wirkintona" confirmed the donation of "salmones in Wirkintona…" to St Bees, for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee", by undated charter[222]

c.         WILLIAM (-after 1227).  "Robertus abbas ecclesie beate Marie Eboraci" granted "ecclesiam nostram de Wirkinton" to "Willelmo clerico filio Thome de Wirkinton" by undated charter, witnessed by "Thoma filio Gospatrici, Thoma herede suo…"[223].  "Willelmus persona de Wirkinton filius Thome de Wirkinton" donated property to the church of Wirkinton by undated charter, witnessed by "Thoma filio Gospatricii, Thoma herede suo…"[224]

(2)       ALAN .  "Thomas filius Gospatricii de Wirkintona" donated "salmones in Wirkintona…" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Alano filio Gospatricii et Adam fratre eius, Thomas Engaina…"[225]

(3)       ADAM .  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[226].  "Thomas filius Gospatricii de Wirkintona" donated "salmones in Wirkintona…" to St Bees by undated charter, witnessed by "Alano filio Gospatricii et Adam fratre eius, Thomas Engaina…"[227]

(4)       ROBERT .  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[228]

(b)       ROBERT .  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[229]

(c)       MICHAEL .  "Gospatricius filius Ormi et Egelina uxor eius" donated land "juxta Flemingby" to Carlisle St Mary by undated charter, witnessed by "Michaele fratre Gospatricuum, Ormo filio Dolfini…"[230].  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius"[231]

(d)       ROGER .  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Saltergre…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Roberto filio Orm, Michaele fratre eius…Rogero filio Orm"[232]

b)         GODITHA .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter of [her son] William of Lancaster to York St Leonard’s, confirming a donation by his "avunculus" Ketel fitz Eldred, from which it can be deduced that William’s mother was Ketel’s sister (assuming that avunculus is interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncle, which is not always the case)[233].  She is named in the charter dated to [1156/60] under which “Wills de Lancastre” donated pasture rights to the church of Leicester St. Mary du Pré, with the consent of “Willi fil mei et heredis et Gundree uxis mee”, for the souls of “Gilebti pris mei et Godithe matris mei et Jordani fil mei et Margarete fil Comitisse”, witnessed by “Willo fil meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse...[234]m GILBERT, son of ---.  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Ketellus [genuit] Gilbertum[235].  As noted above, this statement is contradicted by the charter cited above which describes Ketel as “avunculus” of Gilbert’s son William.  This suggests that the more likely family relationship is that Gilbert’s wife was the sister of Ketel.  This is possibly corroborated by Gilbert’s own Frankish-origin name (derived from Giselbert?) which, if he was the blood relation of Ketel, would represent the only non-Anglo-Saxon/Danish name in the family.  Gilbert & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          WILLIAM [I] "Taillebois" de Lancaster (-after 1166).  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Gilbertus [genuit] Will; qui quidem Willielmus fecit se vocari Willielmum de Lancaster...baronem de Kendale[236].  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by “Willielmus filius Gilberti de Lancastria[237]

-         see below

ii)         ROGER .  "Rogerus filius Gilberti" donated "villam de Helsingham" to St Bees, for the salvation of "Willelmi fratris mei et nepotis mei Willelmi", by undated charter[238].  "Rogerus filius Gilberti" donated "terram de Walton" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Sigeride", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto fratre meo…Roberto filio meo…"[239]m as her second husband, SIGRID, widow of WALTHEOF, daughter of ---.  "Rogerus filius Gilberti" donated "terram de Walton" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Sigeride", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto fratre meo…Roberto filio meo…"[240].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which [her son] "Alanus filius Walthef et Sigrid mater et Rogerus vir eius" donated land "in Aspatrick" to St Bees by undated charter[241].  Roger [& his wife] had one child: 

(a)       ROBERT .  "Rogerus filius Gilberti" donated "terram de Walton" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Sigeride", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto fratre meo…Roberto filio meo…"[242].  It is possible that Robert was his father’s son by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage. 

iii)        ROBERT .  "Rogerus filius Gilberti" donated "terram de Walton" to St Bees, with the consent of "uxoris mee Sigeride", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto fratre meo…Roberto filio meo…"[243]

iv)       [GILBERT de Lancaster .  "…Gillebto de Lancas--- Ricardo filio Gillebti" witnessed the undated charter under which "Ricardus de Moravilla constabularius regis Scotie et Willelmus filius eius et heres" donated property "in Witelei" to Melrose abbey[244].  It is possible that "Gillebto de Lancas" in this charter was related to Hawise de Lancaster, the wife of Richard de Morville, possibly her paternal uncle.  It is not known whether "Ricardo filio Gillebti" was the son of the same person, although this is suggested because the name follows Gilbert’s.  “Uchtredus filius Ketelli” confirmed to “Gileberto de Lancastro quartam partem tocius terre quam Willelmus de Loncastr” had given to “patri meo Ketello” in “Stirkeland” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Willo filio Ketelli, Roberto de Morvill...Bernardo filio Ketell[245].  It is not known whether this document relates to this Gilbert de Lancaster.] 

 

 

The parentage of Warin de Lancaster has not been traced, although from a chronological point of view it is possible that he was another son of Gilbert de Lancaster and his wife Goditha: 

1.         WARIN de Lancaster (-before [1190/94]).  "Johannes Comes Moreton" confirmed "terras…Ravenesmeles, Ainuluesdale, Vplitherland, Liuerpul, et Le Franceis", granted by "Rex Henricus pater meus" to "Warino patri suo", to "Henrico, filio Warini de Lancastre" by charter dated to [1190/94][246]m ---.  The name of Warin’s wife is not known.  Warin & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRY de Lancaster .  "Johannes Comes Moreton" confirmed "terras…Ravenesmeles, Ainuluesdale, Vplitherland, Liuerpul, et Le Franceis", granted by "Rex Henricus pater meus" to "Warino patri suo", to "Henrico, filio Warini de Lancastre" by charter dated to [1190/94][247]

 

 

WILLIAM [I] "Taillebois" de Lancaster, son of GILBERT & his wife Goditha --- (-after 1166).  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Gilbertus [genuit] Will; qui quidem Willielmus fecit se vocari Willielmum de Lancaster...baronem de Kendale[248].  “Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee’s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by “Willielmus filius Gilberti de Lancastria[249].  "Willelmus filius Ranulfi" confirmed the donation of land "de Swartahof" donated by "Willelmus filius Gilberti de Lancastre" to St Bees by undated charter[250].  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmum de Lancaster” as son of ”Gilbertus[251].  A charter of King Henry II confirmed the donation to Furness by “Willilemum filium Gilberti” also named “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys[252].  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated property to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et hæredis et Gundredæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1153/56][253].  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[254].  Lord of Kendale and Lonsdale in Westmoreland in 1166[255].  A charter of King Henry II records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic[256]

[m firstly ---.  No direct proof has been found of this supposed first marriage.  However, assuming that Hawise, wife of Richard de Moreville, was the daughter of William de Lancaster, she must have been born from an otherwise unrecorded first marriage, given the estimated birth date of William’s known wife Gundred de Warenne.] 

m [secondly] ([Jun 1153/1156]) as her second husband, GUNDRED de Warenne, widow of ROGER de Beaumont Earl of Warwick, daughter of WILLIAM [II] de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] ([1120 or after]-after 1166).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Walerannus et Robertus...mater eorum” married secondly after the death of her first husband “secundo Willelmo de Warenna comiti Surreiæ” by whom she had “Willelmum tertium et duas filias” of whom “filiarum...primogenitam” married “comes Rogerus de Warwic[257].  Robert of Torigny names "Gondrada sorore uterine Galeranni comitis Mellenti" as wife of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[258].  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmum de Lancaster” married ”Gundredam prius comitissam de Warwyke[259].  Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic” and that she was the mother of his son William[260].  Her marriage date is dictated by the death of her first husband, recorded in Jun 1153.  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated property to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et hæredis et Gundredæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1153/56][261].  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[262].  Farrer has suggested that the wording of this last document indicates that the wife of William de Lancaster was the daughter of Countess Gundred rather than the countess herself, suggesting that the latter must have been "well advanced in years" at the time of the marriage and implying that she would therefore have been past child-bearing age[263].  It is correct that the wording of the document is curious as it appears inconsistent with both possibilities: if Gundred was "Comitisse", one would expect the first part of the document to read "Gundree Comitisse uxoris mee"; on the other hand, if she was Gundred the daughter, one would expect the subscription to read "Gundr fil Comitisse ux mee".  The two names which are quoted above in the subscription list of the document dated to [1156/60] precede the subscribers who held religious positions.  It would therefore be normal for them to be the same persons who are named in the body of the document, in the same order, giving their consent to the transaction.  However, it is difficult to adopt an interpretation which contradicts the three different sources quoted above (Robert de Torigny, the undated manuscript, and the charter of King Henry II) which identify the countess as William’s wife. 

William [I] & his [first] wife had one child: 

1.         HAWISE de Lancaster (-after [1188/89]).  "Ricardus de Morevill constabularius regis Scottie" donated "totam terram de Blanesleye" to Melrose abbey, with the consent of "Willi de Morevill filii et heredis mei", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Auicie et Willi filii mei", by undated charter[264].  "Will de Morev" confirmed the donation of "totam terram de Bleyneslei" to Melrose abbey, made by "pater meus Ric de Moreuill", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Ric de Morv patre meo, Auice de Loncastre matre…"[265].  There is uncertainty surrounding this "Hawise de Lancaster".  Her marriage to William Peveril is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Avisia de Lancastria, uxor Willielmi Peverel” donated property to Derley Priory by undated charter[266].  Her marriage to Richard de Moreville is confirmed by the 1169/70 Pipe Roll which records "Ric de Moreuill" owing ".cc. m p recto hndo de tra q clamat c filia Willi de Lancastr" in Lancashire[267].  The primary source which confirms that the widow of William Peverel was the same person who remarried Richard de Morville has not yet been identified.  There is also a difficulty concerning Hawise’s parentage.  Domesday Descendants states that the wife of Richard de Morville was the daughter of William de Lancaster (no corresponding primary source cited)[268].  As can be seen from the chronology of William de Lancaster’s known wife Gundred de Warenne, this affiliation would only be possible if Hawise had been born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage.  On the other hand, the onomastics are favourable for this affiliation, as each succeeding generation of the "de Lancaster" family included a Hawise de Lancaster.  A different affiliation is suggested by the Complete Peerage which speculates that the wife of William Peverel was Hawise, daughter of Roger de Montgommery Lord of Lancaster & his wife Almodis Ctss de la Marche[269].  This is not an ideal fit.  Her supposed father Roger was banished from England in 1102 and retired to La Marche, so it is unclear why Hawise would have been described as “de Lancastria” in a charter which must have been dated about 40 years later.  In any case, the chronology is unfavourable.  It is unlikely that the wife of Roger de Montgommery, Almodis de la Marche, was born much later than 1070, given the known chronology of her family, which means that her children would have been born before 1110 at the latest.  On the other hand, it is likely that William Peverel’s second marriage should be dated to the early 1140s at the earliest, as his first wife is named in one of the charters of Stephen King of England (who succeeded in 1135).  Such a marriage date is late if his second wife was born in the early 1100s, and impossible assuming that his widow was the same person who married Richard de Morville and had children by him in the late 1150s.  “Helewis filia Willelmi de Lancastr” confirmed to “Gileberto fratri meo...terras quas pater meus” had given him “Slegil...et Sockebroc et Tyrerhge...et totam terram de Paterickedale” by charter dated to [1189], witnessed by “......Roberto de Pinkenei...Gervas de Aencurt...[270].  "Avicia de Lonc spouse of Richard de Morevilla, with the consent of William her heir and her other heirs" confirmed a donation to Furness St. Mary by charter dated to [1188/89][271]m firstly as his second wife, WILLIAM Peverel of Nottingham, son of WILLIAM Peverel & his wife Adeline ([1100/05]-after 1155).  m secondly RICHARD de Moreville, son of HUGH de Morville & his wife Beatrice de Beauchamp (-1189). 

William [I] & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

2.         JORDAN (-before [1156/60]).  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[272].  There is no indication of the age of Jordan when he died, so he could have been from either of William’s supposed marriages. 

William [I] & his [second] wife had two children: 

3.         WILLIAM [II] de Lancaster ([1154/56]-1184, bur Furness Abbey).  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” as son of ”Willielmum de Lancaster[273].  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated property to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et hæredis et Gundredæ uxoris meæ", by charter dated to [1153/56][274].  "Willelmus de Lancastre" donated pasture rights in "feodum meum in Lonisdale et in Aumundernesse" to Leicester, St Mary de Pré, with the consent of "Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundree uxoris mee", for the souls of "…Gilberti patris mei et Godithe matris mee et Jordani filii mei et Margarete filia Comitisse", by charter dated to [1156/60], witnessed by "Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundr fil Comitisse…"[275].  A charter of King Henry II confirmed the donation to Furness by “Willielmum filium Gilberti” and names “Willielmum secundum” as son of “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” and his wife “Gundredam comitissam Warwic[276].  If this charter is correct in identifying William’s mother, William must have been an infant when he "consented" to the donations of his father in the charters dated to [1153/56] and [1156/60] which are quoted above.  An alternative possibility is that the William who is named in the two charters was an older son, by his father’s presumed first marriage, who died soon afterwards and before the birth of a second son named William born to his father’s second wife.  It should be noted that the chronology of the family of William’s wife, Helwise de Stuteville, is consistent with her husband having been born in [1154/56].  "Willelmus filius Willelmi de Lancastre" confirmed the donations of "villam de Helsingham cum terra de Walton" to St Bees made by "Rogerus filius Gilberti" by undated charter[277].  “Willielmus de Lancastre” donated property to Furness Abbey, for the soul of “Agnetis sponsæ meæ” by charter dated 6 Nov 1240 which records that “avi mei…Willielmi de Lancastre” was buried in the abbey[278]m HELWISE de Stuteville, daughter of ROBERT de Stuteville & his wife Helwise ---.  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” married ”Helewisiam[279].  A charter of King Henry II records that “Willielmum secundum” married “Helewisam de Stuteville” by whom he was father of “Helewisam” who married “Gilberto filio Rogeri filii Reynfredi[280].  William [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         HAWISE de Lancaster .  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Helewisia” as daughter of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” and his wife, adding that she married ”Gilbert filium Raynfridi[281].  Henry II King of England granted "filiam Willelmi de Lancastre cum tota hæreditate sua" to "Gilleberto filio Rogeri filii Rainfridi, dapifero nostro" by charter dated to [1184/89][282].  A charter of King Henry II names “Helewisam” as daughter of “Willielmum secundum” and his wife “Helewisam de Stuteville”, adding that she married “Gilberto filio Rogeri filii Reynfredi[283].  “Gilbertus filius Reinfredi et Elewisa uxor eius” donated various churches to Wetherhal priory by undated charter[284]m ([1184/89]) GILBERT FitzRoger FitzReinfrid Lord of Kendal, son of ROGER FitzReinfrid & his wife --- (-[1216/20]). 

4.         GILBERT de Lancaster (-before 1220).  “Helewis filia Willelmi de Lancastr” confirmed to “Gileberto fratri meo...terras quas pater meus” had given him “Slegil...et Sockebroc et Tyrerhge...et totam terram de Paterickedale” by charter dated to [1189], witnessed by “......Roberto de Pinkenei...Gervas de Aencurt...[285].  “Gilbertus filius Rogeri filii Raifrai” confirmed “totam meam partem d’Aitlerdale et totam laudum d’Iaukesite” to “Gilberto de Lancastre” by charter dated to [1189/96], witnessed by “...Lamberto de Bussai...[286]m SAPIENCE, daughter of ---.  “Sapience condam uxor Gilberto de Loncastre” leased “tertio meo in Staynerhead” to “domino Gilberto de Loncastr” by charter dated to [before 1220][287]

 

 

1.         ROGER FitzReinfrid .  A charter of King Edward II confirmed donations to “ecclesiæ beati Thomæ martiris de Westwuda in Liesenes” including the donation of “ecclesiam de Ramesdena” made by “Rogeri filii Reinfrei[288]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         GILBERT FitzRoger FitzReinfrid (-[1216/20]).  Henry II King of England granted "filiam Willelmi de Lancastre cum tota hæreditate sua" to "Gilleberto filio Rogeri filii Rainfridi, dapifero nostro" by charter dated to [1184/89][289].  Lord of Kendal.  “Gilbertus filius Rogeri filii Raifrai” confirmed “totam meam partem d’Aitlerdale et totam laudum d’Iaukesite” to “Gilberto de Lancastre” by charter dated to [1189/96], witnessed by “...Lamberto de Bussai...[290].  Richard I King of England exempted "Gileberto filio Rogeri filii Reinfredi" from neatgeld or cornage in "totam terram suam de Westmeriland et de Kendale" by charter dated 15 Apr 1190[291].  King John confirmed "tota terra sua de Westmoriland et de Kendal" to "G. fil Rog filii Reinfr" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[292].  “Gilbertus filius Reinfredi et Elewisa uxor eius” donated various churches to Wetherhal priory by undated charter[293].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Gilbertus filius Reinfridi" holding "feudum unius militis" in Lancashire, adding that "Willelmus de Lanc" had granted "in maritagium v caricatas terre in duobus Eccliston et in Lairbrec"[294].  "Gilebertus fil Reinfr" made a fine for the release of "Willelmus de Lancastr filius suus et Rad de Aencurt et Lambertus de Busay milites sui…qui capti sunt in castro Roffens", naming "…filius primogenitus Rogeri de Kirkeby que habit de filia eiusdem Gilberti fil Reinfr, filium et heredum Willelmi de Windlesor que habit de nepte eiusdem Gilebert…" among the hostages which were given, dated 1216[295]m ([1184/89]) HAWISE de Lancaster, daughter of WILLIAM [II] de Lancaster & his wife Helwise de Stuteville.  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Helewisia” as daughter of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” and his wife, adding that she married ”Gilbert filium Raynfridi[296].  Henry II King of England granted "filiam Willelmi de Lancastre cum tota hæreditate sua" to "Gilleberto filio Rogeri filii Rainfridi, dapifero nostro" by charter dated to [1184/89][297].  A charter of King Henry II names “Helewisam” as daughter of “Willielmum secundum” and his wife “Helewisam de Stuteville”, adding that she married “Gilberto filio Rogeri filii Reynfredi[298].  “Gilbertus filius Reinfredi et Elewisa uxor eius” donated various churches to Wetherhal priory by undated charter[299].  Gilbert & his wife had six children: 

i)          WILLIAM [III] de Lancaster (-29 Nov 1247).  An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmus de Lancaster tertius” as son of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” and his wife, adding that he died childless[300].  "Gilebertus fil Reinfr" made a fine for the release of "Willelmus de Lancastr filius suus et Rad de Aencurt et Lambertus de Busay milites sui…qui capti sunt in castro Roffens", naming "…filius primogenitus Rogeri de Kirkeby que habit de filia eiusdem Gilberti fil Reinfr, filium et heredum Willelmi de Windlesor que habit de nepte eiusdem Gilebert…" among the hostages which were given, dated 1216[301].  Henry III King of England granted custody of "Thedbaldo filio Thedbaldi Walteri Matildem sororem ipsius…", previously granted by King John to "Gileberto filio Reinfridi patris tuo", to "Willelmo de Lancastria" dated [Jun] 1220[302].  "William of Lancaster" performed homage for "his relief for the lands…formerly of Gilbert son of Reinfrid his father", dated 16 Jun 1220[303].  “Willelmus de Loncastre” confirmed “terram...de Martyndale...” to “Rogero de Loncastre fratri meo” by charter dated to [1220/47], witnessed by “Agnete sponsa mea...[304].  “Willielmus de Lancastre” donated property to Furness Abbey, for the soul of “Agnetis sponsæ meæ” by charter dated 6 Nov 1240 which records that “avi mei…Willielmi de Lancastre” was buried in the abbey, witnessed by “…domino Rogero fratre meo…Gilberto de Lancastre constabulario de Kirkeby…[305].  A writ dated 25 Dec "31 Hen III", after the death of "William de Lancastr" names "Peter de Brus of full age and Walter son of William de Lyndeseys aged 16 are his heirs", adding that he died "on Wednesday the vigil of St Andrew"[306]m AGNES de Brus, daughter of ---.  A manuscript narrating the family of “Willielmi de Lancastra” records that “Willielmus de Lancastra tertius” married “Agnetem de Brus[307].  “Willelmus de Loncastre” confirmed “terram...de Martyndale...” to “Rogero de Loncastre fratri meo” by charter dated to [1220/47], witnessed by “Agnete sponsa mea...[308]

ii)         daughter .  "Gilebertus fil Reinfr" made a fine for the release of "Willelmus de Lancastr filius suus et Rad de Aencurt et Lambertus de Busay milites sui…qui capti sunt in castro Roffens", naming "…filius primogenitus Rogeri de Kirkeby que habuit de filia eiusdem Gilberti fil Reinfr, filium et heredum Willelmi de Windlesor que habuit de nepte eiusdem Gilebert…" among the hostages which were given, dated 1216[309]m ROGER de Kirkby, son of --- (-after 1216). 

iii)        HAWISE de Lancaster .  A manuscript describing the descendants of “Ivo Tayleboyse” names “Helewisiam primogenitam…maritata Petro de Brus seniori, Alicia…maritata Willo de Lindesay et Serotam…maritata Alano de Multono” as the three sisters of "Willielmum de Lancastre…tertius et ultimus"[310].  A manuscript narrating the family of “Willielmi de Lancastra” records that “Petrus le Brus senior” married “Helewisam” sister of “Willielmus de Lancastra tertius[311].  According to an undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire, the wife of “Petrum de Brus seniorem” was Hawise, daughter of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” as her second husband[312]m PETER [III] de Brus Lord of Skelton, son of PETER [II] de Brus Lord of Skelton & his wife Joan --- (-Marseille 13 Sep 1241, bur Gisburne Priory). 

iv)       ALICE de Lancaster (-before 1247).  A manuscript describing the descendants of “Ivo Tayleboyse” names “Helewisiam primogenitam…maritata Petro de Brus seniori, Alicia…maritata Willo de Lindesay et Serotam…maritata Alano de Multono” as the three sisters of "Willielmum de Lancastre…tertius et ultimus"[313].  However, her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a writ dated Thursday after Epiphany "56 Hen III", after the death of her son "Walter de Lyndesay", which records "a moiety of the lands which were of William de Lonecastre his uncle, one of whose heirs he was, excepting the dower of Agnes sometime the wife of the said William"[314]m ([1220]) WILLIAM de Lindsay, son of WALTER de Lindsay & his wife --- (-1247). 

v)        SEROTA de Lancaster .  A manuscript describing the descendants of “Ivo Tayleboyse” names “Helewisiam primogenitam…maritata Petro de Brus seniori, Alicia…maritata Willo de Lindesay et Serotam…maritata Alano de Multono” as the three sisters of "Willielmum de Lancastre…tertius et ultimus"[315]m ALAN de Multon, son of ---. 

vi)       ROGER de Lancaster (-after [1220/47]).  A charter dated to [1357] confirmed an agreement dated to [1225/26] between “dominum Willelmum de Lancastre” and “dominum Thomam filium Willelmi” [Greystoke] concerning fisheries “in essaveria de Ulleswatr”, and another agreement between “dominus Willus de Lancastre et Radulphus de Ayncurt et Rogerus de Lancastre et dominus Thomas filius Willelmi” concerning “stangno de Stayneton”, and also notes that “Ketell filius Aldred” donated “2 bovatas terre et molendinum de Barton” to the hospital of St. Nicholas and that “Wills filius Gilberti” confirmed the donation made by “predictus Ketel avunculus eius[316].  “Willelmus de Loncastre” confirmed “terram...de Martyndale...” to “Rogero de Loncastre fratri meo” by charter dated to [1220/47], witnessed by “Agnete sponsa mea...[317].  Assuming, as suggested below, that there were two persons named Roger de Lancaster, the earlier Roger who was the brother of William de Lancaster could have been their father’s legitimate son who, if that is correct, must have predeceased his brother. 

 

 

1.         ROGER de Lancaster (-[Jun/Aug] 1292).  It appears unlikely that this Roger de Lancaster was the same person as the son of Gilbert (named above) who would have been extremely old if he had died in 1292.  In addition, if there was only one Roger he would have been very much older than his wife Philippa.  If, as suggested above, Roger son of Gilbert was his father’s legitimate son who predeceased his brother William, the second Roger could not have been the son of the first as he was not the heir of William.  This second Roger must have enjoyed a position of some importance in light of his high profile marriage.  One possibility is that he was a descendant of Gilbert de Lancaster, son of William [II], and in that capacity the senior representative of the old Lancaster family.  An agreement dated 1256 settled a dispute between “Rogerum de Lancastre” and “Gilbertum de Lancastre” concerning “manerio de Herteshop[318].  A charter dated 1266 records the settlement of a dispute between “Rogerum de Lancastre” and “Henricum de Tyrwhr” concerning “boschis et pasturis in Baynwiodal[319].  Inquisitions dated [Aug] "19 Edw I", after the death of "Roger [de Lancaster]", names “Philippa his wife” and as heir "John de Lancaster his son aged 25"[320]m PHILIPPA de Bolebec, daughter of HUGH de Bolebec & his wife Tiphaine --- ([1238/39]-[1292/Aug 1293]]).  An undated charter relating to Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland records that Cecilia de Vescy married “Hugoni de Bolbek seniori, qui genuit Walterum de Bolbek, qui Hugonem juniorem, qui Feliciam matrem domini Johannis de Lancastria[321].  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters, Philippa aged 23 and more married to Roger de Launcastre…are his heirs"[322].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[323].  A writ dated 1 Sep "22 Edw I", after the death of "Philippa late the wife of Roger de Lancaster", names as heir "John de Lancaster her son aged 24 or more...30"[324].  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Lancaster ([1262/63]-1334).  Inquisitions dated [Aug] "19 Edw I", after the death of "Roger [de Lancaster]", names “Philippa his wife” and as heir "John de Lancaster his son aged 25"[325].  A writ dated 1 Sep "22 Edw I", after the death of "Philippa late the wife of Roger de Lancaster", names as heir "John de Lancaster her son aged 24 or more...30"[326].  Wrottesley shows John as son of Roger de Lancaster and his wife from a plea relating to the church of Barneton, Cambridgeshire[327]m ANNORA, daughter of --- (-1338).  Wrottesley shows Annora as the wife of John de Lancaster from a plea relating to the church of Barneton, Cambridgeshire[328]

 

2.         GILBERT de Lancaster (-after 1256).  An agreement dated 1256 settled a dispute between “Rogerum de Lancastre” and “Gilbertum de Lancastre” concerning “manerio de Herteshop[329].  Gilbert’s parentage has not been confirmed, but he was presumably closely related to Roger as the 1256 agreement suggests that they jointly held the manor in question. 

 

 

 

 

LANGETOT

 

 

1.         RALPH [I] de Langetot (-after [1087/1100]).  Domesday Book records “Ralph de Lanquetot holds of Walter Giffard” holding land in Dunton and Campton in Biggleswade Hundred, Bedfordshire[330].  "Eudone dapifero, per Radulfum de Languetot, apud Legam" witnessed a charter dated to [1087/1100] under which William II King of England confirmed the lands of Abingdon abbey[331]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [RALPH [II] de Langetot (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Iuliana filia Ric Wint" rendering account for land in Buckinghamshire, and “Rad de Langetot” acquitted her of 40 silver marks towards the king for “terra quam pater suus tenet de feodo suo” until she could pay, and “Rad de Langetot” owing for regaining “terra sua quam Ric Wint et Juliana filia sua” held[332].]  m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [EMMA de Langetot ([1124/25]-after 1185).  Domesday Descendants says that the “principal heir [of Ralph [II] de Langetot] seems to have been Emma de Langetot, probably his daughter” adding that “she was the niece of Matilda sister of ‘Ranulf’ de Langetot - an error for Ralph - according to a Thetford charter of her daughter Muriel[333].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Emme de Langetot” with land “Esintone et Singelberge in dote...de feodo Roesie de Auberville” in Buckinghamshire and in another passage that “--- Langetot...lx annorum” held “in hundredo de Holt feodum i militis et iii partes feodi i militis...in Binetre...in hundredo de Eineford...ii milites fefatos et ii partes i militis” in Norfolk[334].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that [her daughters] “uxor Alani de Dunstanville…xxx annorum et uxor Alardi filii Willelmi…xxiv annorum” were the heirs of “Emme de Langetot…lx annorum…de genere illarum de Chedney et Joscelini Crispini” in Buckinghamshire[335].  Emma’s relationship with Joscelin Crispin has not been traced.  “Chedney” presumably indicates the Chesney family of Oxfordshire, who was descended from Emma’s supposed paternal aunt (see below).]  m ---.  The name of Emma’s husband is not known.  Two children: 

(1)       MURIEL ([1154/55]-after 10 Oct 1200).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “uxor Alani de Dunstanville…xxx annorum et uxor Alardi filii Willelmi…xxiv annorum” were the heirs of “Emme de Langetot…lx annorum…de genere illarum de Chedney et Joscelini Crispini” in Buckinghamshire[336].  An order of King John dated 10 Oct 1200 relates to "heredem Alani de Dunstanvill qui est in custodia matris sue uxoris quondam predicti Alani", addressed to "Willelmo de Cantilupo"[337]Domesday Descendants says that the “principal heir [of Ralph [II] de Langetot] seems to have been Emma de Langetot, probably his daughter” adding that “she was the niece of Matilda sister of ‘Ranulf’ de Langetot - an error for Ralph - according to a Thetford charter of her daughter Muriel[338].  The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified.  m ALAN de Dunstanville, son of [ALAN de Dunstanville & his wife ---] (-before 10 Oct 1200). 

(2)       CECILIA ([1161/62]-).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “uxor Alani de Dunstanville…xxx annorum et uxor Alardi filii Willelmi…xxiv annorum” were the heirs of “Emme de Langetot…lx annorum…de genere illarum de Chedney et Joscelini Crispini” in Buckinghamshire[339]Domesday Descendants names her Cecilia but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified[340]m ALARD FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM & his wife ---. 

b)         [MATILDA de Langetot .  Domesday People records that “Matilda wife of Ranulf fitz Walter” was the daughter of Ralph de Langetot, adding that she “occurs as sister of Ranulf de Langetoth in a confirmation charter for Thetford by Walter Giffard[341].  “Willielmus Bigot, dapifer regis Anglorum” donated property to Thetford Priory, and confirmed the donation of “ecclesiam sancti Egidii de Wadetona” made by “Ranulfus filius Walteri concedente uxore sua Matilda”, by undated charter dated to the reign of King Henry I[342].  An undated charter of King Henry II confirmed the possessions of Thetford, including the donation of “Glamham et Stretford” made by “Randulfi filii Walteri et Matildis uxoris suæ[343].]  m RANULF FitzWalter, son of WALTER & his wife ---.  Domesday Book records “Ranulf fitzWalter” holding land in Yaxham in Midford Hundred, Norfolk[344].  Henry I King of England confirmed the property of Thetford, including the donation made by “Ranulfus filius Walteri concedente filio suo Gisleberto cum uxore sua" by charter dated to [1121] [marked “spurious?” in the compilation][345].  Ranulf & his wife had one child: 

i)          GILBERT FitzRanulf (-after [1121]).  Henry I King of England confirmed the property of Thetford, including the donation made by “Ranulfus filius Walteri concedente filio suo Gisleberto cum uxore sua" by charter dated to [1121] [marked “spurious?” in the compilation][346]

c)         [ALICE de Langetot (-13 Jan, after Dec 1148)Her parentage is indicated by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which lists [her granddaughter] “Matillis de Kaineto” with “terra sua in Kameltone...vii libris annuatim[347], presumably the same as Campton in Bedfordshire which was held by her supposed father in Domesday Book (see above).  "Walterium de Chaisneto" confirmed the donation of "molendinum de Dailointona" to Eynsham abbey made by "Rogerus de Cheisneto", with the consent of “Eua uxor mea”, by charter dated to [1141/48][348].  "Aliz de Langetot" donated land "in Sumertona" to Eynsham abbey, for the souls of "mea et filiorum et filiarum mearum Hugonis...Willelmi et Roberti, Haewise et Beatricie et Isabel” and for “domini mei Rogeri de Chaisnei et filiorum meorum Radulfi et Rogerii et filiarum”, with the consent of “Willelmus de Chesnei et Hugo et Robertus”, by charter dated to [1142/48][349].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “Id Jan” of “Adeliza mater episcopi Roberti[350].]  m ROGER [I] de Chesney, son of --- (-after 25 Dec 1109). 

 

 

1.         MILO [I] de Langetot (-after 1131).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Miloni de Langetot" in Sussex[351].  Henry I King of England confirmed the property of Saint-Georges de Boseherville, including revenue from “terra Milonis de Languetot de quodam hostagio suo de Ulterinus Portibus", by charter dated 1131[352]same person as...?  MILO de Langetot .  William de Chesney recorded that he obtained Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire from "domino et fratre meo Roberto de Caisneto Lincolniensi episcopo" by two undated charters, one issued at Lincoln witnessed by “Ralf de Chesney and William his brother my nephews, Alexander de Chesney and Ralf his brother my cognati”, the other at Verneuil witnessed by “Marg de Luci uxore mea, Rad. de Caisneto et Willelmo fratre suo nepotibus meis, Milone de Langetot et Milone filio suo...[353].  The names of some of the witnesses suggest that this charter should be dated towards the end of the donor’s life, maybe in the 1160s.  If that is correct, it is late for Milo de Langetot to have been the son of Ralph [I] de Langetot who is named above.  Maybe he was the son of Ralph [II], although if that is correct he must have died soon after his father without surviving issue as Ralph [II]’s supposed daughter Emma was probably his heir.  m ---.  The name of Milo’s wife is not known.  Milo & his wife had one child: 

a)         MILO [II] de Langetot .  William de Chesney recorded that he obtained Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire from "domino et fratre meo Roberto de Caisneto Lincolniensi episcopo" by two undated charters, one issued at Lincoln witnessed by “Ralf de Chesney and William his brother my nephews, Alexander de Chesney and Ralf his brother my cognati”, the other at Verneuil witnessed by “Marg de Luci uxore mea, Rad. de Caisneto et Willelmo fratre suo nepotibus meis, Milone de Langetot et Milone filio suo...[354]

 

 

 

 

LANVALAY

 

 

Successful reconstruction of the following family is complicated by the duplication of the names William, Ranulf and Geoffrey, and the indication in the records, at least in the case of William and Geoffrey, of more than one individual with the same name at the same time.  The following is an attempt to reconcile the information available, but is not necessarily the final answer to the reconstruction of the family. 

 

 

[Four possible brothers]: 

1.         WILLIAM [I] de Lanvalay (-before 1185)"Manasse Biset dapifero, Henrico de Oilleo, W[illelmo] de Lanvaleio..." witnessed the charter dated [Jan 1158] under which King Henry II confirmed the donation to the nuns of Neasham, Durham made by "Emma de Teisa"[355].  “Willelmus de Lanvalei” confirmed the donation of “decimis...in terris...quas Eudo dapifer eis dedit vel alii antecessores mei...Hamo de Sancto Claro et Willelmus frater eius...terram in Berle que dicitur Adgareslau et Grenestede et ecclesiam de Hamertune” made to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Willelmus clericus nepos domini Willelmi de Lanvalei, Radulfus de Lanvalui...[356].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[357].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[358].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “Clementia de Sancto Claro” held "Haiam" from “Willelmo de Lanvalei[359].  An undated charter of King Richard I confirmed possessions of Colchester St John, including the donation of “ecclesiam de Hamertona” made by “Willelmus de Lanualay[360]m GUNNORA de Saint-Clair, daughter of HUBERT de Saint-Clair & his wife Clementia --- ([1140/50]-before 1185).  Domesday Descendants names "Gunnora daughter and heiress of Hubert de St Clair" as the wife of William de Lanvallay, but does not cite a specific source reference for this information[361].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that the age of her mother is accurately stated in the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185.  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[362].  William [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         WILLIAM [II] de Lanvalay of Walkern, Northamptonshire ([1168/73]-[20 Jun 1207/1209]).  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[363].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[364].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus de Lanvalle...in custodia domini Regis” and holds all his land, of unknown value, in "Hundredum de Lexedene" in Essex and “in Hallingeburia” in Essex[365].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei” confirmed “decimis...in terris...quas Eudo dapifer eis dedit vel alii antecessores mei scilicet Hamo de Sancto Claro et Willelmus frater eius videlicet terram de Berleia que dicitur Edgareslawe et Grenestede et Belkerne et ecclesiam de Hamertune” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[366].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei miles” donated “terram...ad Galweidone in Lexedene...pro dimidia virgata terre quam Clementia avia mea...pro anima matris mee Gunnore de maritagio suo in Westone donaverat” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[367].  King John confirmed "villam de Bromeleg cum advocatione ecclesie", donated by "Willelmus de Lanval…in maritagium cum Gunnora sorore ipsius Willelmi de Lunval", to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" by charter dated 20 Jun 1207[368].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/09], including "heres Willelmi de Lanvelay tenet Wakerle"[369].  m HAWISE de Bocland, daughter of HUGH de Bocland & his wife Matilda --- (-before 19 Jul 1233).  Her parentage and marriage are shown in The Complete Peerage[370].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi” donated “terre in manerio meo de Walcra...” to Colchester St. John, for the salvation of “mea et Hawisie uxoris mee” and the souls of “patris mei Willelmi et matris mee Gunnore”, by undated charter[371].  “Hawisa de Lanualei filia Hugonis de Boclonde in...viduitate mea” donated property “in villa de Tatcheworde” to Colchester St. John by undated charter[372].  “Cristiana de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Westlega” made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawisie sororis Galfridi filii Petri quondam justiciarii Anglie” by undated charter[373].  “Reimundus de Burgo” confirmed the donation of property made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawise uxoris eiusdem”, confirming the confirmation made by “Cristina de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe sponsa mea in...viduitate sua", by undated charter[374].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[375].  “Johannes de Burgo” confirmed a donation to Colchester St. John made by “Hawisa de Lamualei filia Hugonis de Boclonde” by undated charter[376].  William [II] & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          WILLIAM [IV] de Lanvalay ([after 1190]-[1214/18 May 1216]).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/09], including "heres Willelmi de Lanvelay tenet Wakerle"[377].  Although he is not named in this record, it must refer to William [IV] who was presumably still a minor at the time.  William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, states that Alan Basset paid a fine to marry his daughter to the son and heir of William de Lanvalay in [1212/14][378].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “advocacionem ecclesie Sancte Marie de Walcra et terram...Godithehythe in campo de Sanweie” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido fratre meo...[379].  William Bishop of Lincoln confirmed the donation of “ecclesie de Walcre”, held by “Galfridus de Boclanda” during his lifetime, to Colchester St. John made by “Willelmi de Lanvalei filii Willelmi de Lanvalei” by undated charter[380].  The reference to the Bocland family suggests that William [IV] de Lanvalay was the donor in this charter.  The Patent Roll 1217 records an order to "baillivis suis in quorum bailliis Willelmus de Lanvalay terras habuit" in respect of the lands “que fuerunt Willelmi de Lanvalay[381], which is consistent with the recent death of William [IV].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset, dated 1219, which includes "filia et heres Willelmi de Lamvale est in custodia H. de Burgo justiciarii...et terra sua de Kingestan valet x.l...", in Kent “in hundred de Schamele dominus H. de Burgo habet custodiam cuiusdam puelle que est heres Willelmi de Lanvalai cum maneriis de Chauk et de Henneherst...”, and in Essex “terra...in hundredo de Lexeden[382].  [Betrothed ([1212/14]) --- Basset, daughter of ALAN Basset of Wycombe & his second wife Aline de Gai.  William Reedy, in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, states that Alan Basset paid a fine to marry his daughter to the son and heir of William de Lanvalay in [1212/14][383].  It does not appear that this marriage was completed.]  m ([1212/14]) MATILDA Pecche, daughter of GILBERT Pecche & his wife (-after 11 May 1226).  “Matildis de Lanualei” donated property “in villa de Herlestone...[et] in prato...Ham” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Haumone Peche...[384].  “Hamo Pecche filius Gileberti Pecche” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanualei soror mea”, for his and her souls, by undated charter[385].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Northamptonshire "to place in respite the demand of 29s that he makes from Matilda de Lanvallay for her assets in Wakerley", dated [Apr] 1223[386], and secondly the king ordered the sheriff of Northamptonshire "to place in respite the demand for 29s that he makes by summons of the Exchequer from Matilda de Lanvallay", dated 11 May 1226[387].  “Johannes de Burgo et Hawise uxoris mee” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanusely mater Hawise uxoris mee” by undated charter[388].  William [IV] & his wife had one child:

(1)       HAWISE de Lanvalay ([1213/16]-after 1235).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset, dated 1219, which includes "filia et heres Willelmi de Lamvale est in custodia H. de Burgo justiciarii...et terra sua de Kingestan valet x.l...", in Kent “in hundred de Schamele dominus H. de Burgo habet custodiam cuiusdam puelle que est heres Willelmi de Lanvalai cum maneriis de Chauk et de Henneherst...”, and in Essex “terra...in hundredo de Lexeden[389].  The Pipe Roll 1223 includes land of “Huberto de Burgo cum herede Willelmi de Lanvalet...in Schaftebir” [Shaftesbury] in Dorset[390].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Dorset "to take into the king’s hands the lands of Emedeswurth and Morden which Peter Russell holds of the fee of William de Lanvallay", dated [Mar] 1224[391].  “Johannes de Burgo et Hawise uxoris mee” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanusely mater Hawise uxoris mee” by undated charter[392].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[393].  A charter dated 1235 records a dispute a claim “Johannem de Burgo et Hawisiam uxorem eius” against the abbot of Colchester relating to revenue from “molendino de Nordmilne” and the agreed settlement which refers to “Johannes et Hauuisia et heredes ipsius Hauuisie”, the latter being unnamed[394].  A writ dated 1 Dec “3 Edw I”, after the death of "John de Burgo the elder", names "Sir John de Burgo the younger...aged 40 and more is his next heir", records "Hallingebyri...manor...held of the king in chief of tyhe barony of Launvaly...of the inheritance of Hawis his wife", and names “Sir Hubert de Burgo father of Sir John de Burgo the elder[395]m (before 1232) JOHN de Burgh, son of HUBERT de Burgh Earl of Kent & his first wife Beatrice de Warenne (-before 1 Dec 1274). 

ii)         GEOFFREY de Lanvalay (-after 1227).  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “advocacionem ecclesie Sancte Marie de Walcra et terram...Godithehythe in campo de Sanweie” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido fratre meo...[396].  “Willelmus de Lamualey” donated “terram...Eddrihichescroft de feodo de Stanweia...” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido de Boclond, Brienno Arsic, Johanne de Lamualei, Willelmo de Lamualei...Galfrido fratre meo......[397].  The Patent Roll 1223 records "Gaufridus de Lanvalay de familia comitis W. Essexie. Teste et c. apud Westmonasterium xxv die Augusti"[398].  “Cristiana de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Westlega” made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawisie sororis Galfridi filii Petri quondam justiciarii Anglie” by undated charter[399].  “Reimundus de Burgo” confirmed the donation of property made to Colchester St. John by “Galfrido de Lanualay filio Willelmi de Lanualey et Hawise uxoris eiusdem”, confirming the confirmation made by “Cristina de Mandevilla comitissa Essexe sponsa mea in...viduitate sua", by undated charter[400].  “Galfridus de Lanualay” donated “dimidium totius manerii mei de Westle...” to Colchester St. John by undated charter[401]

b)         GUNNORA de Lanvalay (-before [1220]).  King John confirmed "villam de Bromeleg cum advocatione ecclesie", donated by "Willelmus de Lanval…in maritagium cum Gunnora sorore ipsius Willelmi de Lunval", to "Willelmo de Bello Campo" by charter dated 20 Jun 1207[402].  “Willielmus de Bellocampo, filius Simonis de Bellocampo” confirmed his father’s donations to Chicksand priory, for the souls of “patris mei Simonis…et matris meæ Isabellæ et uxoris meæ Gunnoræ et fratrum…meorum”, by undated charter[403].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1232, by "Johannes de Burgo et Hawisia uxor eius" against "Willelmum de Bello Campo" claiming the return of "manerium de Brumlegha…hereditatem ipsius Hawisie" which had not been transferred to her after the death of "Gunnoram de Lanualay quondam uxorem suam" and which "Hawisia de Lamualay quondam uxor Willelmi de Lanualay…avie ipsius Hawisie" was granted as "dotem…de dono ipsius Willelmi quondam viri sui"[404]m ([20 Jun] 1207) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford, son of JOHN de Beauchamp & his wife --- (-1260). 

c)         RANULF de Lanvalay (-after 1185).  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[405].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei” confirmed “decimis...in terris...quas Eudo dapifer eis dedit vel alii antecessores mei scilicet Hamo de Sancto Claro et Willelmus frater eius videlicet terram de Berleia que dicitur Edgareslawe et Grenestede et Belkerne et ecclesiam de Hamertune” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[406].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei miles” donated “terram...ad Galweidone in Lexedene...pro dimidia virgata terre quam Clementia avia mea...pro anima matris mee Gunnore de maritagio suo in Westone donaverat” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[407].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi” donated “terre in manerio meo de Walcra...” to Colchester St. John, for the salvation of “mea et Hawisie uxoris mee” and the souls of “patris mei Willelmi et matris mee Gunnore”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei...[408].  Ranulf may have died before the charter witnessed by his supposed brother John (see below). 

d)         [JOHN de Lanvalay (-after [Jul] 1199).  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei” donated “ecclesiam de Walcra” to Colchester St. John, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris mee Hauuis” and the souls of “patris mei Willelmi et matris mee Gunnore”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Johanne de Lamualei...[409].  A claim by “Johe de Lanualai” against “Sim le Bret” is recorded in [Jul] 1199[410].  “Willelmus de Lamualey” donated “terram...Eddrihichescroft de feodo de Stanweia...” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido de Boclond, Brienno Arsic, Johanne de Lamualei, Willelmo de Lamualei...Galfrido fratre meo......[411].] 

2.         [brother .  m ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Lanvalay (-after 1185).  “Willelmus de Lanvalei” confirmed the donation of “decimis...in terris...quas Eudo dapifer eis dedit vel alii antecessores mei...Hamo de Sancto Claro et Willelmus frater eius...terram in Berle que dicitur Adgareslau et Grenestede et ecclesiam de Hamertune” made to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Willelmus clericus nepos domini Willelmi de Lanvalei, Radulfus de Lanvalui...[412].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[413].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[414].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei” confirmed “decimis...in terris...quas Eudo dapifer eis dedit vel alii antecessores mei scilicet Hamo de Sancto Claro et Willelmus frater eius videlicet terram de Berleia que dicitur Edgareslawe et Grenestede et Belkerne et ecclesiam de Hamertune” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[415].  “Willelmus de Lamualei filius Willelmi de Lamualei miles” donated “terram...ad Galweidone in Lexedene...pro dimidia virgata terre quam Clementia avia mea...pro anima matris mee Gunnore de maritagio suo in Westone donaverat” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Lamualei...Guillelmo clerico...[416]

3.         RANULF [I] de Lanvalay .  “Willelmus de Lanvalei” confirmed the donation of “decimis...in terris...quas Eudo dapifer eis dedit vel alii antecessores mei...Hamo de Sancto Claro et Willelmus frater eius...terram in Berle que dicitur Adgareslau et Grenestede et ecclesiam de Hamertune” made to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Willelmus clericus nepos domini Willelmi de Lanvalei, Radulfus de Lanvalui...[417].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[418].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[419].  The Testa de Nevill’s list of Berkshire landholdings in 1212 includes [his grandson] “Willelmus de Lanvalei tenet c solidatas terre in Blacgrave sine servicio nominato quam Rex Henricus pater dedit Radulfo avo suo[420].  m ---.  The name of Ranulf’s wife is not known.  Ranulf [I] & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         [RANULF [II] de Lanvalay (-[3 Sep 1199/1212]).  “Robertus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus de Valoniis avus meus et Rogerus pater meus et Petrus de Valoniis frater meus et domina Agnes mater mea”, with the advice of "dominæ Agnetis matris meæ et Hadæwisæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lanvalei...[421].  An order dated 3 Sep 1199 relates to land of “Willo de Lanuallai et Rad de Lanualai” in Huntingdonshire and Berkshire[422].  The chronology suggests that Ranulf [II] de Lanvalay was another son of Ranulf [I] de Lanvalay, maybe his older son as the entry referring to his daughter precedes that in which his supposed brother William is named in the Testa de Nevill for Berkshire dated 1212 (quoted below).]  m ---.  She was heiress of Eastbury, Berkshire, as shown by the extract from the Testa de Nevill dated 1212 which is quoted below.  An indication of her family origin may be provided by another holder of Eastbury who is named in the Testa de Nevill list of fees in Berkshire, dated [1242/43], which includes "Gilbertus de Marisco in Estbir dimidium feodium, Henricus de Hynton in Estbir iii partes feodi"[423].  It is possible that her name was HAWISE:  an order dated 16 May 1221 records that "Hawise de Lanvallay gives the king the third part of 23 for summoning William de Hastings before the justices...order to the sheriff of Oxfordshire"[424].  The Pipe Roll 1223 includes land of “Hawise de Lanval...de fine suo. Ricardus Walensis...de fine suo” in Essex and Hertfordshire[425].  It is unlikely that this entry relates to Hawise, daughter and heiress of William [IV] de Lanvalay (see above), who is referred to elsewhere in the same Pipe Roll as being in the guardianship of Hubert de Burgh (“Huberto de Burgo cum herede Willelmi de Lanvalet...in Schaftebir” in Dorset).  The entry for Hawise in Essex/Hertfordshire is followed directly by Richard le Waleys, who is recorded elsewhere in the same Pipe Roll as having custody of the heir of Ranulf [II] de Lanvalay and who later married his daughter Matilda (see below), which suggests a close connection between this Hawise and Ranulf [II], possibly as his widow.  Another entry in the Pipe Roll 1223 includes “Hawisa de Lanval debet terciam partem de xxiii li. pro summonendo Willelmo [named “Willelmus f. Tustani” in a similarly phrased record in the previous entry but one] sicut continetur ibidem” in Essex and Hertfordshire[426].  Ranulf [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          MATILDA de Lanvalay .  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Berkshire, dated 1212, which includes "x libratas terre in Estbir cum filia Radulfi de Lanvalei et herede, per finem quem fecit cum domino Rege Johanne sine servicio nominato, quam Henricus Rex pater dedit antecessoribus uxoris sue"[427].  The Pipe Roll 1223 includes land of “Ricardo Walensi...in Estbir cum filia et herede Radulfi de Lanvalet. Et Willelmo de Lanvalet...in Blakegrave...” in Berkshire[428].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Berkshire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Matildis de Langvalay est de donatione domini regis et est maritata Ricardo Walensi; terra eius in [Lamburne] hundredo valet per annum x.l"[429].  Henry III King of England pardoned "Gilbertus de Marisco" for marrying "Matildem de Lannvaley, que fuit de dono regis" and ordered the sheriff of Berkshire to transfer “terra sua...de hereditate predicte Matildis in Estbir” to him, dated 1231[430]The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees in Berkshire, dated 1234, which includes "dimidia marco de dimidio feodo Radulfi de Lanvaleye in Estbere...et dimidia marca de feodo Gileberti de Mariscis in Estbery"[431]m firstly (before [1226/28]) RICHARD le Waleys, son of [ROBERT le Waleys & his wife ---].  m secondly (1231 or before) GILBERT de Mareis, son of --- (-after [1242/44]).

b)         WILLIAM [III] de Lanvalay (-after 29 Sep 1223).  An order dated 3 Sep 1199 relates to land of “Willo de Lanuallai et Rad de Lanualai” in Huntingdonshire and Berkshire[432].  His parentage is confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which lists landholdings in Berkshire, dated 1212, including “Willelmus de Lanvalei tenet c solidatas terre in Blacgrave sine servicio nominato quam Rex Henricus pater dedit Radulfo avo suo[433].  “Willelmus de Lamualey” donated “terram...Eddrihichescroft de feodo de Stanweia...” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “...Galfrido de Boclond, Brienno Arsic, Johanne de Lamualei, Willelmo de Lamualei...Galfrido fratre meo......[434].  The Pipe Roll 1223 includes “Willelmus de Lanval” among those owing “de prestito Pictavie” in Essex and Hertfordshire, and land of “Ricardo Walensi...in Estbir cum filia et herede Radulfi de Lanvalet. Et Willelmo de Lanvalet...in Blakegrave...” in Berkshire[435]

c)         [GEOFFREY de Lanvalay (-after 27 Jun 1223).  The Patent Roll 1223 records a claim by "Galfridum de Laumvaley" against “Galfridum Arsyc” relating to land “in Blaggrave” in Berkshire, dated 27 Jun “anno nono[436].  William [III] de Lanvalay is also named in connection with the same place (see above), which suggests a close relationship between him and this Geoffrey.  If that is correct, this Geoffrey was a different person from Geoffrey de Lanvalay (who is named elsewhere in the same Patent Roll) who was the brother of William [IV] (see above).] 

4.         [OLIVER de Lanvalay .  “Willelmus de Lamualei” donated “terram quam tenuit Ædgarus Treissolz extra muros Colecestrie et in Balkerne gardinum” to Colchester St. John, with the consent of “uxoris mee Gunnore et heredis mei Willelmi”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Robertus de Valuines, Radulfus de Lamualei, Oliuer de Lamualei, Radulfus filius Pain, Willelmus de Lamualei clericus...[437].  “Willelmus de Lamualei” granted “Hamertonam post decessum domine Clementie” to “Radulfo de Lamualei filio meo juniori”, to hold “de Guillelmo de Lamualei filio meo”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulfo de Lamualei, Olivero...Guillelmo clerico...[438].] 

 

 

 

 

LAVAL

 

 

HUGUES [II] de Laval, son of [HUGUES [I] de Laval & his wife ---] (-before 1130).  The chronology suggests that there must have been two persons named Hugues de Laval in the late-11th and early 12th centuries.  Hugues de Laval (named Hugues [I] de Laval, above), son of Hamon Sire de Laval, is named in a charter dated 11 Nov 1039.  It is therefore extremely unlikely that he could have been the same person as Hugues [II] de Laval whose death is dated to before 1130.  It is possible that Hugues [II] was the son of Hugues [I].  An undated charter, dated to the early 12th century, under which the nuns of Ronceray confirmed an agreement, is witnessed by "Hugues de Laval, qui nunc dominium tenebat"[439], which suggests that Hugues acted as regent during the minority of Guy [III] Sire de Laval.  The Lindsey Survey, dated to [1115/18], records "Hugh de Laval" holding land in Great and Little Coates, Hackthorn and other places[440].  "Hugo de la Val" confirmed the donation by "Robertus de Laceio tempore regis Willilmi secundi" and added his own donation to Pontefract abbey, for the salvation of "conjugis meæ et liberorum meorum", by charter dated to [1121/29][441].  According to Dugdale’s Monasticon, Henry I King of England granted Pontefract castle to "Hugo de la Val" after Robert de Lacy was banished, and "Empress" Matilda restored the castle to Robert’s son, so dated to the early 1140s[442].  If Robert de Lacy’s death is correctly estimated to [1093/99], his banishment must have occurred during the reign of King William II.  The timing of King Henry I’s granted to Hugues de Laval is therefore uncertain. 

m as her first husband, DAMETA, daughter of --- (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll names "Wido de Laval" followed immediately by "Willo Maltverso" in Northumberland, and in another passage records that "Wills Maltvers" owed money to the king for "uxore Hug de Laval" and for the latter’s land[443].  The 1130 Pipe Roll names "Damete" in Oxfordshire[444].  She married secondly (1129) William Maltravers.  "Willelmus Maltravers" donated property to Pontefract abbey, with the consent of "uxore mea Dalmeta", by charter dated to [1130/36][445]

Hugues & his wife had [two or more] children: 

1.         [GUY de Laval (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll names "Wido de Laval" followed immediately by "Willo Maltverso" in Northumberland[446].  This suggests a close family relationship between the two, probably that Guy was William’s stepson.  The fact that Hugues de Laval did have children is shown by the charter dated to [1121/29] under which "Hugo de la Val" confirmed the donation by "Robertus de Laceio tempore regis Willilmi secundi" and added his own donation to Pontefract abbey, for the salvation of "conjugis meæ et liberorum meorum"[447].  Domesday Descendants says that Guy was the same person as Guy [III] de Laval[448].  However, the later references to the name Laval in England suggests that this may not be the case.  same person as…?  GUY de Laval (-after 1167).  The Red Book of the Exchequer 1166 names "Wido de Lanval" as one of the forty knights` fees of "Henricus de Lascy" who held "veteri feodo Pontis Fracti" from the king, and lists the ten knights who held from him[449].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Guido de Laval xx m" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][450]m ---.  The name of Guy’s wife is not known.  Guy & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         [GUY de Laval (-after 1212).  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Guido de Valle xxl" among those who paid scutagium in "Everwiksira" in 1171/72[451].  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Guido de Laval xl" with "xx milites" among those who paid scutagium in "Eboracsira" in 1190/91[452].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "de his qui non habent capitales honores…Guidone de Lanval" paying "x s" in Oxfordshire[453].  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Guido de Laval xxl" with "xx milites" among those who paid scutagium in "Eboracsira" in 1194/95 and 1196/97, "Guido de Laval xl m" in 1199/1200, and "Wido de la Val xx milites" in 1201/02[454].  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Guido de Laval" among "isti habent quietantiam per brevia" in 1196/97[455].  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Wido de Laval iim et dimidium marcam" in "Lincolnesira" in 1196/97[456].  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Guido de Laval, i feodum et dimidium, per Vicecomitatum" in "Oxoneforddschira" in 1199/1200[457].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Wido de la Val" held "Haskebi et Ravendale et Wada et Brichisle" in Lincolnshire[458].] 

b)         [GILBERT [I] de Laval (-after [1171/72]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer 1166 names "Gilbertus de Lanval" declared to Henry II King of England that "antecessores mei" held two knights` fees in Northumberland "tempore Regis H avi vestri" and that he still held them, and in other passages "Gilbertus de La Val, Calverdone" with two knights, and "Gillebertus de Laval" with two fees in "honor et wardæ Novi Castri"[459].  The Red Book of the Exchequer names "Gilbertus de Laval xls" among those who paid scutagium in "Northumberlande" in 1171/72[460].] 

2.         other children .  "Hugo de la Val" confirmed the donation by "Robertus de Laceio tempore regis Willilmi secundi" and added his own donation to Pontefract abbey, for the salvation of "conjugis meæ et liberorum meorum", by charter dated to [1121/29][461]

 

 

1.         GILBERT [II] de Laval (-[30 Sep 1219/29 Jan 1229]).  It is not known whether Gilbert [II] de Laval was the same person as Gilbert [I] de Laval named above.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Gillebertus de Laval" holding "baroniam de Calverdona" in Northumberland which had been held by "omnes antecessores sui…post conquestum Anglie"[462].  Henry III King of England ordered "Gillebertus de Laval…" to enquire into the state of the forests "Norhumberland" dated [Jul] 1219[463].  "Gilbert de la Val" paid a fine for "having a pone" concerning his claim relating to services from "Roger of Holywell", dated 30 Sep 1219[464]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had two children: 

a)         EUSTACE de Laval (-before 16 Mar 1258).  "Eustace de la Val" paid homage to the king "for the two knights’ fess that Gilbert de la Val his father held of the king in chief in Callerton, Dissington and Seaton" in Northumberland, dated 29 Jan 1229[465].  A writ dated 16 Mar "42 Hen III", after the death of "Eustace de la Val alias de Laval" names "Henry de Laval his brother, aged 60 and more, is his heir" and manors in Northumberland "Calverdon, Discington and Seton…Halywell held of Sir John Balliol in free marriage without service, Hertelawe…Echewic town" and "bound to John de Laval in 7 marks rent for life"[466]

b)         HENRY de Laval ([1197/98]-after 1258).  A writ dated 16 Mar "42 Hen III", after the death of "Eustace de la Val alias de Laval" names "Henry de Laval his brother, aged 60 and more, is his heir"[467]

 

2.         JOHN de Laval (-after 1258).  A writ dated 16 Mar "42 Hen III", after the death of "Eustace de la Val alias de Laval" states that he was "bound to John de Laval in 7 marks rent for life"[468]

 

3.         HUGH de Laval (-after 1275)m ([Oct 1262/1267]) MATILDA de Bolebec, (Sep 1249-).  A writ dated 23 Oct "46 Hen III", after the death of "Hugh de Bolebek alias de Bolebech" records "his daughters…and Maud aged 13 and 1 month who is at Angerton with lady Teffan alias Thephan her mother…are his heirs"[469].  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa, from Margery issued Hugh de Bolebek, who had four daughters married to Roger de Lacastre, Nicholas Corbet, Hugh de Laval and Walter de Huntercumbe"[470].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[471]

 

 

 

 

LESTRANGE

 

 

1.         RIVALLON [Ruald] le Strange .  “Alan son of Flaald” granted Sporle Priory, Norfolk to Saumur Saint-Florent by charter, dated to before 1122, witnessed by “…Rivallonus Extraneus…[472]

 

2.         ROLAND le Strangem MATILDA, daughter of [RALPH FitzHerluin alias RALPH de Hunstanston & his wife Heloise de Plaiz].  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1157/60] in which her son "Johannes Extraneus" donated land to Castle Acre priory, for the souls of "patris mei Rollandi et Matildæ matris meæ et Hamonis fratris mei"[473].  Her parentage is also suggested by the charter dated to [before 1174] in which her son "Johannes cognomento Le Strange" donated "villa de Egeffel", held by "Radulfus de Hunestaneston…et filius eius Simon post eum, deinde frater ipsius Reginaldus le Brun" of whom "ego…legitimus heres iure hereditario successi"[474].  Roland & his wife had four children: 

a)         JOHN [I] le Strange (-before 29 Sep 1178).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1157/60] in which "Johannes Extraneus" donated land to Castle Acre priory, for the souls of "patris mei Rollandi et Matildæ matris meæ et Hamonis fratris mei"[475].  "Radulfus Lestrange" granted land in Wormgay, Norfolk to St Katherine’s, Blackburgh by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "..:Widone Lestrange…Iohe Lestrange"[476].  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[477].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Johi Extaneo" in Shropshire with revenue ₤7/10s[478].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Johannes Lestrange" took one knight’s fee "Cheswrtha" [Cheswardine] from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[479]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by one copy of a charter dated to [1177/80] in which "Johannes Extraneus" confirmed a donation of land in Webblescowe to Haughmond abbey, for the soul of "Hawise his wife", witnessed by "Wido my brother, Ralph his son, Hugh le Strange, Marescote, and Henry his son"[480].  John & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN [II] le Strange (-before 20 Jan 1234).  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[481]

-         see below

ii)         WILLIAM le Strange .  “Johannes Extraneus filius Johanni Extranei” donated “ecclesiam de Hulmo” to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo Extraneo fratre meo[482]

iii)        HAMO le Strange (-before 1203).  Eyton records that John [II] le Strange was fined 60 merks "to have custody of Wrockwardine manor, formerly held by his brother Hamo, till the king should return into England" (dated to [1201/03])[483]

b)         GUY le Strange (-[1179/80]).  "Radulfus Lestrange" granted land in Wormgay, Norfolk to St Katherine’s, Blackburgh by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "..:Widone Lestrange…Iohe Lestrange"[484].  The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Widoni Extaneo" in Shropshire[485].  Sheriff of Shropshire 1170.  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[486].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Guido Extraneus" in Shropshire[487]m firstly ---.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 names Guy’s widow but does not specify the number of her children, unlike other entries for widows with children, which suggests that all of Guy’s children were born from this presumed first marriage of which no information is otherwise known.  m secondly as her third husband, MARY, widow firstly of --- and secondly of ---, daughter of ---.  Guy le Strange and his wife Mary donated their mills at Stretton-upon-Avon and Alveley to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1171][488].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in dote Rungeton de feodo de Wermegai” held by “Maria uxor Gwidonis Extraney”, adding that she was 40 years old and had three husbands[489].  Guy & his [first] wife had six children: 

i)          GUY le Strange (-after 1196).  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[490].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Guido Extraneus, Johannes Extraneus" paying "vvv s, i militem et dimidiam" each in Shropshire[491].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Guido Extraneus" paying "xxx s, i militem et dimidium" in Shropshire[492]

ii)         HAMO le Strange .  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[493]

iii)        MARGARET le Strange (-[Feb] 1222).  Her parentage and two marriages are noted by Eyton who also refers to her daughters by her first husband and their descendants[494].  "Alice de Harcourt and Joan her sister, daughters and heiresses of Margaret Lestrange" made a fine for "their relief of half a knight’s fee…that Margaret held of the king in chief in Alveley and Weston" in Shropshire, dated 15 Apr 1222[495]m firstly ([1175 or before]) THOMAS Noel, son of ROBERT FitzNoel & his wife --- (-[1206]).  m secondly (1207) THOMAS de Blancminster, son of --- (-after 1222). 

iv)       JOAN le Strange .  Her parentage and marriages are noted by Eyton who also refers to her daughters by her first husband and their descendants[496]m RICHARD de Wappenbury, son of --- (-[1209/16]). 

v)        MATILDA le Strange (-1242 or after).  Her parentage and marriages are noted by Eyton who also refers to her daughters by her first husband and their descendants[497].  She held Alveley jointly with her sister Margaret: The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Shropshire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Matildis le Estrange et Alicia de Harecurt et Johanna Noel tenent de domino rege manerium de Alvitheleg"[498]m GRIFFIN de Sutton, son of --- (-[Jan 1221]). 

vi)       RALPH le Strange (-mid 1195).  His parentage is confirmed by one copy of a charter dated to [1177/80] in which "Johannes Extraneus" confirmed a donation of land in Webblescowe to Haughmond abbey, for the soul of "Hawise his wife", witnessed by "Wido my brother, Ralph his son, Hugh le Strange, Marescote, and Henry his son"[499].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Radulfo f Widonis Extranei…in Aluedelega" in Shropshire[500]

c)         HAMO le Strange (-1160 or before).  The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Hamoni Extaneo" in Shropshire with revenue of ₤4[501].  "Willielmus filius Alani" confirmed a donation of Nagington to Haughmond abbey, for the soul of "Hamonis Extranei", by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "Johanne Extraneo, Widone Extraneo, Engelardo, Willielmo filio Odonis"[502].  "Johannes Extraneus" donated land to Castle Acre priory, for the souls of "patris mei Rollandi et Matildæ matris meæ et Hamonis fratris mei", by charter dated to [1157/60][503]

d)         RALPH le Strange (-before Jun 1194).  "Radulfus Lestrange" granted land in Wormgay, Norfolk to St Katherine’s, Blackburgh by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "..:Widone Lestrange…Iohe Lestrange"[504].  "Radulfus Extraneus" confirmed the donation of Nagington to Haughmond abbey by "Willielmus filius Alani", for the soul of "Hamonis fratris mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "Johanne Extraneo, Widone Extraneo…"[505].  "Radulphus Extraneus" donated the mill of Hunstanston to Haughmond abbey, for the souls of "…Johannis fratris mei qui feudum mihi dedit et filii mei Rolandi", by undated charter[506]m [--- de Cressy, daughter of HUGH de Cressy & his wife ---.  A charter extract, undated, records that "Radulfus Extraneus" gave two knights’ fees to "Hugonis de Creissio…quod tenet de eo de dote suæ uxoris" and that "Willelmus de Waltun" have "c s…dominæ Alæ…et illa comiti de Warenna"[507].  This text is difficult to interpret with certainty but could refer to the wife of Ralph le Strange, son of Roland le Strange.]  Ralph & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROLAND le Strange .  "Radulphus Extraneus" donated the mill of Hunstanston to Haughmond abbey, for the souls of "…Johannis fratris mei qui feudum mihi dedit et filii mei Rolandi", by undated charter[508]

ii)         MATILDA .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a lawsuit pending in 1198 between "Fulk de Oirri and Philip de Burnham as husbands of Matilda and Emma, daughters of Ralph le Strange" relating to their shares of Ralph’s inheritance[509]m FULK de Oirri, son of ---. 

iii)        EMMA .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a lawsuit pending in 1198 between "Fulk de Oirri and Philip de Burnham as husbands of Matilda and Emma, daughters of Ralph le Strange" relating to their shares of Ralph’s inheritance[510]m PHILIP de Burnham, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ADAM le Strange .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ade Extraneo" in Shropshire[511]

 

 

JOHN [II] le Strange, son of JOHN le Strange & his wife --- (-before 20 Jan 1234).  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[512].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Guido Extraneus, Johannes Extraneus" paying "vvv s, i militem et dimidiam" each in Shropshire[513].  “Johannes Extraneus filius Johanni Extranei” donated “ecclesiam de Hulmo” to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo Extraneo fratre meo[514].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Johanni f Johannis Extranei…in Nesse et Chessewurdin" in Shropshire[515].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Johannes Extraneus" holding one knight’s fee "in Nesse et Chesworthin" in Shropshire in [1210/12][516]

m AMICE, daughter of ---.  John le Strange names Amice as his wife in the Lilleshall cartulary[517]

John [II] & his wife had three children: 

1.         JOHN [III] le Strange (-before 26 Mar 1269).  Henry III King of England ordered "…Johannes Extraneus junior" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Salopie" dated [Jul] 1219[518]m LUCY, daughter of ---.  There is some suggestion that she was Lucy Tregoz[519].  John [III] & his wife had four children: 

a)         JOHN [IV] le Strange (-before 28 Dec 1275[520]).  A writ dated 26 Feb "4 Edw I", following the death of "John L’Estrange alias Le Estraunge" names "John his son believed to be 22 and more is his next heir...aged 28[521]m JOAN de Somery, daughter of ROGER [IV] de Somery & his first wife Nicole de Albini of the Earls of Arundel.  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Joan married "Johanni Lestrange"[522].  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[523].  John [IV] & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN [V] le Strange ([1252/53]-8 Aug 1309 or before).  A writ dated 26 Feb "4 Edw I", following the death of "John L’Estrange alias Le Estraunge" names "John his son believed to be 22 and more is his next heir...aged 28[524].  The Chronicle of Peterborough names "dominus Rogerus le Estrange capitaneus…dominus Johannes le Estrange" among those sent to fight Llywelyn Prince of Wales in 1282[525].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Knokyn). 

-         see below

b)         HAMO le Strange (-[1274/75]).  "Hamo Extraneus with consent of Sir John his father" donated his part of the wood at Wombridge to Wombridge priory by charter dated to [1247/59])[526].  He may have accompanied Edward, son of Henry III King of England, on his crusade to Palestine in 1271.  Rüdt-Collenberg says that Hamo Lestrange of Ellesmere went to Palestine in 1270/71[527].  According to the Complete Peerage, Hamo was "prominent in the king's service until his death, probably in the Holy Land, early in 1274/5"[528].  On his deathbed, he placed his wife and the fief of Beirut under the protection of the Mameluk Sultan Baibars[529]m (21 Mar 1272) as her second husband, ISABELLE Ibelin Lady of Beirut, widow of HUGUES II King of Cyprus, daughter of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his wife Alice of Athens ([1252]-[1282/before Nov 1283]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Yzabeau la fille dou seignor de Baruth" as the wife of an unnamed person who died at the age of 14[530].  The paragraph in question deals with the family of the kings of Cyprus, and it is most likely that words have been omitted from the text which would clarify that the husband in question was Hugues II King of Cyprus.  This is confirmed by another manuscript of the Lignages which names "Ysabeau et Eschive" as the two daughters of Jean son of "Balian…sire de Baruth" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married firstly "Huge, le fis de Henri roy de Chipre, qui morut de 14 ans", secondly "un Englés…Heimon Lestrange" and thirdly "Guille Barlais" and died without heirs[531].  Isabelle returned from Cyprus to Beirut after the death of her first husband.  She married thirdly (1276) Nicolas Alaman titular Lord of Caesarea (-murdered Jun 1277).  After the death of her second husband, Hugues III King of Cyprus and Jerusalem took her to Cyprus to marry her third husband, but was obliged to return her to Beirut in 1277 in view of the deathbed agreement made by her second husband[532].  She married fourthly (after 1277) as his first wife, Guillaume Barlais, son of --- (-[1305/06]). 

c)         ROGER le Strange (-after [1270]).  "Dominis Rogero Extraneo, Roberto fratre suo" witnessed the charter dated to [1270] under which "Hawise" kept the manor of Stretton for "frater suus dominus Hamo Extraneus" when he left for Palestine, with the consent of "mariti sui…domini Griffini"[533].  Lord of Cheswardine and Ellesmere[534]

d)         ROBERT le Strange (-[12] Oct 1276).  "Dominis Rogero Extraneo, Roberto fratre suo" witnessed the charter dated to [1270] under which "Hawise" kept the manor of Stretton for "frater suus dominus Hamo Extraneus" when he left for Palestine, with the consent of "mariti sui…domini Griffini"[535].  "John le Strange Lord of Knokyn" gave Wrockwardine manor to "Robert le Strange his brother" dated 23 May 1275[536].  Eyton gives some details about his descendants in Shropshire[537]m ELEANOR de Blancminster, daughter of WILLIAM de Blancminster & his wife --- (-after Oct 1276).  Robert & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN le Strange ([18] Jun 1289).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had children: 

(a)       EBLES le Strange [1266/67]-[23] Jan 1324).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1309 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  

-         see below

e)         ALICE (-after [1260/61]).  John le Strange gave half his manor of Lytcham, Norfolk to his daughter Alice, towards her marriage in [1260/61][538]

f)          HAWISE (-1310).  "Griffin son of Wenunewin" was granted "the manor of Eshford, co Derby" to give as dower to "Hawyse daughter of John Lestrange his wife", dated 24 Feb 1242[539].  "Hawise" kept the manor of Stretton for "frater suus dominus Hamo Extraneus" when he left for Palestine, with the consent of "mariti sui…domini Griffini", by charter dated to [1270], witnessed by "Dominis Rogero Extraneo, Roberto fratre suo"[540]m (before 24 Feb 1242) GRUFFYDD ap Gwenwynwyn, son of GWENWYNWYN Prince of Southern Powys & his wife Mary Corbet (-1286). 

2.         HAMO le Strange

3.         MARGERY .  Eyton suggests her parentage and marriage to explain the charter, dated to [1238/55], under which "Nicholas de Willilegh" sold to Sir John le Strange land at Lytcham, Norfolk "which the father of the said John gave for the frank marriage of Ralph de Pichford and Margery his daughter"[541]m RALPH de Pichford, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ROGER Le Strange (-1311)m as her first husband, MATILDA de Beauchamp, widow of ROGER de Mowbray, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford & his wife Ida de Longespee of the Earls of Salisbury (-before Apr 1273).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Matildam, filiam Willielmi de Bello-campo[542].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

JOHN [V] le Strange, son of JOHN [IV] le Strange & his wife Joan de Somery ([1252/53]-8 Aug 1309 or before).  A writ dated 26 Feb "4 Edw I", following the death of "John L’Estrange alias Le Estraunge" names "John his son believed to be 22 and more is his next heir...aged 28[543].  The Chronicle of Peterborough names "dominus Rogerus le Estrange capitaneus…dominus Johannes le Estrange" among those sent to fight Llywelyn Prince of Wales in 1282[544].  Eyton gives some details about his descendants in Shropshire[545].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Knokyn). 

m firstly ELEANOR, daughter of --- & his wife Joan [de Somery]. 

m secondly MAUD, daughter of --- (-after 30 Oct 1309). 

John [V] & his [second] wife had children: 

1.         JOHN [VI] le Strange ([1281/82]-[6] Feb 1311).  Lord Strange (of Knokyn).  m ISOLDA, daughter of --- (-after 18 May 1324).  John [VI] & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN le Strange ([1296/97]-[28] May 1323).  Lord Strange of Knokyn.  m MAUD, daughter of --- (-after 1 Apr 1324). 

b)         ROGER le Strange (15 Aug 1301-Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire 29 Jul 1349).  m firstly MAUD, daughter of ---.  m secondly (before 25 Mar 1344) JOAN de Ingham, daughter of OLIVER de Ingham Lord Ingham & his wife --- (-before 12 Dec 1365, bur Ingham).  Roger & his first wife had children: 

i)          ROGER Le Strange ([1326/27]-Keneyleswode [Kenwick’s Wood, Ellesmere parish, Shropshire?] 23 Aug 1382).  He succeeded his father in 1349 as Lord Strange (of Knokyn)[546].  m (1338 or before) ALINE FitzAlan, daughter of EDMUND FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alice de Warenne of Surrey (-20 Jan 1386).  The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 5 Dec 1375, bequeathed property to “Richard my son...my son Thomas Bishop of Ely...John my son...Joane my daughter [...Countess of Hereford]...Alice my daughter...the eldest daughter of my said son John...Henry and Edward the younger sons of my said son John...William another son of my said son John...my nephews and nieces sons and daughters of Sir Roger le Strange and to my sister Dame Alaine le Strange wife to the said Roger...my...uncle Sir John Arundell[547]

-         LORDS STRANGE (of KNOKYN)[548]

ii)         [ISABEL (-after 1366)m (before Dec 1351) as his second wife, JAMES Lord Audley, son of NICHOLAS Lord Audley & his wife Joan Martin (Knesale, Nottinghamshire 8 Jan 1313-Heleigh 1 Apr 1386, bur Hulton Abbey).] 

2.         Sir EBLES Le Strange (-Scotland 8 Sep 1335, bur Barlings Abbey, Birling, Kent).  He was the squire of the Earl of Surrey who abducted Ctss Alice in 1317, triggering her divorce from her first husband.  He was summoned to Parliament in 1326 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange.  m (before 10 Nov 1324) as her second husband, ALICE de Lacy, divorced wife of THOMAS Earl of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY de Lacy Earl of Lincoln & his first wife Margaret Longespee Ctss of Salisbury ([Denbigh Castle] 25 Dec 1281-2 Oct 1348, bur Barlings Abbey, Birling, Kent).  The Book of Lacock names “Alesiam” as the daughter of “d’no Henrico de Lacy comiti Lincolniæ” and his wife Margaret, adding that she married “comiti de Lancaster, Leicester et de Ferrers, Thomæ[549].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln names “Edmundum…et filiam Aleseiam” as children of “Henricum Lacy comitem Lincolniæ”, adding that Alice married “domino Thomæ comiti Lancastriæ et Leicestriæ” and after his death “domino Ebuloni de Strange[550].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Alicia” as daughter of “Henricus de Lacy comes Lincolniæ”, adding that she married “Thomæ filio comitis Lancastriæ[551].  She succeeded her mother as Ctss of Salisbury before 16 Jun 1310, and her father 5 Feb 1311 as Ctss of Lincoln.  She married thirdly (before 23 Mar 1336) Sir Hugh de Frene Lord Frene

 

 

 

EBLES le Strange, son of JOHN le Strange & his wife --- ([1266/67]-[23] Jan 1324).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1309 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Blackmere). 

m ELEANOR Giffard, daughter of JOHN Giffard of Brimsfield & his wife --- (-before 1324). 

Ebles & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN Le Strange (-21 Jul 1349)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m as her first husband, ANKARET Boteler, daughter of WILLIAM Boteler of Wem, Shropshire & his wife --- (-( Oct 1361).  She married secondly Sir Thomas de Ferrers.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         FULK Le Strange ([1330/31]-30 Aug 1349)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Stafford, daughter of RALPH de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his second wife Margaret de Audley (1333 or after-7 Aug 1375).  She married secondly John Lord Ferrers.  She married thirdly as his first wife, Sir Reginald de Cobham (Lord Cobham of Sterborough). 

b)         JOHN Le Strange (Whitchurch [Easter] 1332-12 May 1361)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m MARY [Isabel] FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his first wife Isabel le Despencer (-29 Aug 1396).  John & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Le Strange (-3 Aug 1375)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m (after 6 Sep 1369) as her first husband, ISABEL de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer (-29 Sep 1416, bur Campsey Priory)The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 6 Sep 1369, chose burial “in the quire of the Collegiate Church of our Lady at Warwick”, bequeathed property to “my two sons Thomas and William...Isabel my daughter...to her marriage...Margaret my daughter a nun at Shouldham...Katherine the daughter of my son Guy a nun at Shouldham...my daughter Alice...my daughter Clifford...Sir John Beauchamp...Sir Roger Beauchamp...Sir Guy de Brienne...[552].  Her marriage is recorded in the Complete Peerage[553]She married secondly (12 Jun 1376 or before) as his second wife, William de Ufford Earl of SuffolkShe became a nun 21 Mar 1382.  The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 1 Apr 1400, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...my daughter Beauchamp...my brother of Bergavenny...my sisters of Suffolk and Clifford and...my niece Katherine Beauchamp the nun at Shouldham[554].  John & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ELIZABETH Le Strange ([1374]-23 Aug 1383)Baroness Strangem as his first wife, THOMAS Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Elizabeth de Segrave (22 Mar 1366-Venice 22 Sep 1399, bur Venice, abbey of St George).  He succeeded his brother in 1383 as Lord Mowbray, Lord Segrave.  Earl of Nottingham 1383.  He was created Duke of Norfolk 29 Sep 1397, and succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk in 1399 on the death of his maternal grandmother. 

ii)         ANKARET Le Strange ([1361]-1 Jun 1413).  She succeeded her father 23 Aug 1383 as Baroness Strange, suo iurem firstly (before 23 Aug 1383) RICHARD Talbot, son of GILBERT Talbot Lord Talbot & his first wife Pernel Butler ([1361]-London 8/9 Sep 1395).  He was summoned to Parliament 3 Mar 1384, in consequence of his marriage to the heiress of Strange, whereby he is held to have become Lord Talbot[555]m secondly ([8 Mar/4 Jul] 1401) as his second wife, THOMAS Neville Lord Furnivalle, son of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Matilda Percy (-14 Mar 1407, bur Worksop Priory). 

c)         [MATILDA m BRIAN de Cornwall, son of Sir EDMUND Cornwall of Kinlet & his wife Elizabeth de Brampton.] 

 

 

 

 

LIMESEY

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Limésy in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Rouen, canton Pavilly[556]

 

 

1.         RALPH [I] de Limesey .  "…Edward Sheriff of Wilts., Hugo Sheriff of Hants, Robert de Oilli, Constable, Ralph de Mortimer, Robert Malet, Roger de Ivry pincerna, Walter de Lacy, Ralph de Limesey, Humphrey the Chamberlain, the dapifer of the count of Ponthieu, Geoffrey son of Hersendis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1078/87] under which William I King of England notified the grant of land by the bishop of Winchester to the king’s cook[557].  Domesday Book records “Ralph de Limesy” with land-holdings in Somerset; holding Caldecote and Pirton in Odsey Hundred and Amwell in Hertford Hundred in Hertfordshire; land in Collyweston in Northamptonshire; several properties in Nottinghamshire[558].  “Radulfus de Limesey” founded Hertford priory, with the consent of “uxore sua et filiis suis”, by undated charter, dated to the late 1080s[559]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph [I] & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         RALPH [II] de Limesey .  “Radulfus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, with the consent of “Hadwisiæ uxori suæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by "Raerus filius domini, Robertus de Statford nepos domini…"[560].  Henry I King of England confirmed the donation to Hertford priory by "Radulphi de Limsey" by charter dated to [1100/07][561]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  “Radulfus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, with the consent of “Hadwisiæ uxori suæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by "Raerus filius domini, Robertus de Statford nepos domini…"[562].  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

i)          RAHER de Limesey .  “Radulfus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, with the consent of “Hadwisiæ uxori suæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by "Raerus filius domini, Robertus de Statford nepos domini…"[563]

ii)         ALAN de Limesay (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alan de Limesei…tra patris sui" in Hertfordshire[564].  “Alanus de Limesey” confirmed donations to Hertford priory by “pater meus Radulphus de Limesy…pro animæ uxoris suæ Hadewisæ matris meæ”, for the souls of "filii mei", by undated charter[565]

-         see below

b)         [ .  The identity of the mother of "Robert de Statford" is not known.  Domesday Descendants suggests that the wife of Nicholas de Stafford, son of Robert [I] de Stafford & his wife [Avice de Clare], was "probably the daughter of Ralph I de Limesey"[566].  This speculation is presumably based on the undated charter quoted below, on the assumption that "Robertus de Statford" was the same person as Robert [II] de Stafford, son of Nicholas de Stafford and his wife Matilda ---.  It is not certain that the name "Statford" was the same as "Stafford".  Other possible family origins of Matilda are discussed more fully in the document ENGLAND, EARLS created 1207-1466.]  m ---.  One child: 

i)          ROBERT de Statford .  “Radulfus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, with the consent of “Hadwisiæ uxori suæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by "Raerus filius domini, Robertus de Statford nepos domini…"[567]

 

 

ALAN de Limesey, son of RALPH de Limesey & his wife Hawise --- (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alan de Limesei…tra patris sui" in Hertfordshire[568].  “Alanus de Limesey” confirmed donations to Hertford priory by “pater meus Radulphus de Limesy…pro animæ uxoris suæ Hadewisæ matris meæ”, for the souls of "filii mei", by undated charter[569]

m ---.  The name of Alan’s wife is not known. 

Alan & his wife had two children: 

1.         GERARD de Limesey (-after 1161).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Girard de Limesye ii m" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][570].  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "Halen. de Bidun, Amicia uxore mea, Trianno fratre meo…"[571]m AMICE de Bidun, daughter of HALENALD de Bidun & his wife --- ([1124/25]-after 1185).  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Trianno fratre meo…"[572].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Amicia de Limesia…lx annorum…filia Haveladi de Bid[une]”, adding that she has “ii filios milites quorum primogenitus…Johannes de Limesia…[et] plures…filias[573].  Gerard & his wife had [five or more] children: 

a)         JOHN de Limesey (-1193).  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Trianno fratre meo…"[574].  “Johannes de Limeisi” confirmed donations to Hertford priory by “Radulfus de Limeisi avus patris mei…pater meus Girardus…Alanus de Limesi avus meus”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Alano de Limeisi fratre meo…"[575].  Lord of Cavendish, Suffolk.  m as her first husband, ALICE de Harcourt, daughter of ROBERT de Harcourt of Bosworth, Leicestershire & his wife Millicent de Camville of Stanton, Oxfordshire (-after Sep 1212).  She married secondly ([1196/98]) as his second wife, Waleran Earl of Warwick.  The 1198/99 Pipe Roll records "Robert de Harcurt" in Warwick and Leicestershires and “the Earl of Warwick accounts for 100 marks for having to wife Robert de Harecurt’s daughter, widow of John de Limesi[576]

b)         ALAN de Limesey .  “Johannes de Limeisi” confirmed donations to Hertford priory by “Radulfus de Limeisi avus patris mei…pater meus Girardus…Alanus de Limesi avus meus”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Alano de Limeisi fratre meo…"[577].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Amicia de Limesia…lx annorum…filia Haveladi de Bid[une]”, adding that she has “ii filios milites quorum primogenitus…Johannes de Limesia…[et] plures…filias[578]

c)         BASILIA de Limesey (-after [1 Jun] 1225).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by a document dated [29 Oct] 1223 which  records a claim against "Hugh de Hoddingesele and Basilia his wife...along with David de Lindesi” relating to charters of “Alan de Lymesia and Gerard his son father of said Basilia and grandfather of said David[579].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Basilia de Limisi est de donatione domini regis et est maritata Hugoni de Hodesell per dominum Regem Johannem et valet terra eius in Kavenedis c.s"[580].  Court papers dated [1 Jun] 1225 record a claim by the prior of Hertford against "Hugh de Oddingesele and Basilia his wife” concerning “the advowson of the church of Kavenedisse whereof the K. [Henry III] claims by reason of the heir of David de Limesi, who was in the K’s custody and a coparcener of Basilia in John de Limesi’s heritage””[581]m HUGH de Odingselles, son of --- (-1239). 

d)         ELEANOR de Limesey (-before 1223).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by a document dated [29 Oct] 1223 which  records a claim against "Hugh de Hoddingesele and Basilia his wife...along with David de Lindesi” relating to charters of “Alan de Lymesia and Gerard his son father of said Basilia and grandfather of said David[582]m as his second wife, WILLIAM de Lindsay, son of WALTER de Lindsay & his wife --- (-after [1200]). 

e)         one or more daughter .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Amicia de Limesia…lx annorum…filia Haveladi de Bid[une]”, adding that she has “ii filios milites quorum primogenitus…Johannes de Limesia…[et] plures…filias[583]

2.         TRIAN de Limesey .  “Gerardus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Amiciæ et Johannis filii mei”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Trianno fratre meo…"[584]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Limesey (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Limesia" in Hampshire (twice)[585]

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY de Limeseym ---.  Geoffrey & his wife had two children: 

a)         BEATRICE de Limesey .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that Beatrice married "Reginaldus"[586]m REYNOLD FitzUrse, son of RICHARD FitzUrse & his wife Matilda de Boullers (-[1171/75]). 

b)         MATILDA de Limesey .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Gaufridus de Limeseia" had "unum filium Walterum…et duas filias Beatriciam et Matillidem", that "Eliam de Bello Campo" was "filium et heredum ipsius Matillidis"[587]m --- de Beauchamp, son of ---. 

 

2.         AMABILIS de Limesey (-after 27 May 1205).  "Amabil q fuit ux Hug Bard" paid a fine to marry where she will without licence of the king "quamdiu sit vidua pro morte Johannis de Braosa quondam viri sui" in Warwickshire, dated 1205[588].  King John confirmed "Amabli de Limisy [q fuit ux H Bard]" freedom to marry whom she will, naming "Johis de Breos quondam viri sui", by charter dated 27 May 1205[589].  "Amable de Limesie…post obitum Johannis de Brawose quondam viri mei" confirmed grants of land to "Benedicto filio Murielis", in accordance with earlier grants made by "Gaufridi de Limesie et Johannis de Limesie antecessorum meorum" to "Alexandro filio Thony" who held the land "tempore Radulfi de Limesie et predictorum Gaufridi et Johannis de Limesie", by charter dated to [1224/Jun 1225][590]m firstly [as his second wife,] HUGH Bardolf, son of --- (-[1200]).  m secondly JOHN de Briouse, son of --- (-before 1224). 

 

 

1.         --- de Limesey (-before 1225).  m [as her --- husband,] ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-after [1 Jun] 1225).  Court papers dated [1 Jun] 1225 record a claim by "Ralf de Limesi” against “Walter Cumin and Margery his wife” for “three parts of a knight’s fee in Saperton” and that “Isabella, mother of the said Ralf and Margery, acknowledges that she claims nothing therein but dower[591].  The disputes between her two children suggest that they may have been half-siblings, born from different marriages of their mother.  [Two] children: 

a)         RALPH de Limesey (-after [1 Jun] 1225).  "Hameria wife of Walter Cumin of Hunderschete in the county of Somerset" made a claim against “Ralf de Limesie”, dated [19 Jun] 1221, which also names her husband[592].  Court papers dated [1 Jun] 1225 record a claim by "Ralf de Limesi” against “Walter Cumin and Margery his wife” for “three parts of a knight’s fee in Saperton” and that “Isabella, mother of the said Ralf and Margery, acknowledges that she claims nothing therein but dower[593]

b)         [MARGERY (-after [1 Jun] 1225).  "Hameria wife of Walter Cumin of Hunderschete in the county of Somerset" made a claim against “Ralf de Limesie”, dated [19 Jun] 1221, which also names her husband[594].  Court papers dated [1 Jun] 1225 record a claim by "Ralf de Limesi” against “Walter Cumin and Margery his wife” for “three parts of a knight’s fee in Saperton” and that “Isabella, mother of the said Ralf and Margery, acknowledges that she claims nothing therein but dower[595].  As noted above, the legal disputes between Margery and her brother suggest that they may not have been full siblings, maybe born from two marriages of their mother.  m WALTER Comyn, son of --- (-after [1 Jun] 1225).] 

 

 

1.         --- de Limeseym ---.  [Four or more] children: 

a)         AMABILIS de Limesey (-before 23 Nov 1224).    A document dated to [1225/26] records that "the heirs of Amabilis de Limesi owe...of her fine not to be compelled to marry”, that “Hugh de Oddingseles and Basilia his wife” owe a debt, and that “David son and heir of David de Lindesi, who has one of Amabilis’s sisters” owes part[596]m ---.  The name of Amabilis’s husband has not been ascertained.  Two children: 

i)          son .  A document dated 23 Nov 1224 records that "the heirs of Amabilis de Limesi owe...for their mother that she may not be constrained to marry”, noting that “the K. of Scotland has one of the heirs...Hugh de Oddingeseles has another[597].  A document dated 1 Feb [1225?] records that "the heir of Amabilis de Limesi owes...for his mother” and that “David son of David de Lindesi another heir of Mabilia de Limesi owes...[598]

ii)         --- (-[23 Nov 1224/1 Feb 1225]).  A document dated 23 Nov 1224 records that "the heirs of Amabilis de Limesi owe...for their mother that she may not be constrained to marry”, noting that “the K. of Scotland has one of the heirs...Hugh de Oddingeseles has another[599].  The document dated 1 Feb [1225?] quoted above indicates that there was only one surviving child of Amabilis at that date. 

b)         CHRISTIANA de Limesey (-after [25 Jun] 1241).  Her family origin and marriage are indicated by a document dated to [1225/26] which records that "the heirs of Amabilis de Limesi owe...of her fine not to be compelled to marry”, that “Hugh de Oddingseles and Basilia his wife” owe a debt, and that “David son and heir of David de Lindesi, who has one of Amabilis’s sisters” owes part[600].  A document dated to [15 Apr] 1241 records that "Christiana widow of David de Lindesye, who had a writ for her dower versus Gerard de Doddingeseles in Bradefelde...is not present[601].  Her second marriage is indicated by the following document, assuming that “Bradewelle” is the same as “Bradefelde” which is named in the document dated [15 Apr] 1241.  "Robert de Pinkeny and Cristiana his wife” sued several individuals concerning rights of land, including “Simon the clerk of Bradewelle” relating to land “in Bradewelle in Oxfordshire which...they claim as Cristiana’s dower”, dated 13 May 1241[602].  The marriage is also indicated by a document dated 16 May 1241 which records a claim by "Robert de Pinkeny and Cristiana his wife” against “Gerard de Oddingeseles[603], who is also named in the [15 Apr] 1241 document.  "Robert de Pinkeny and Cristiana his wife” sued “Henry de Pinkeny” relating to land “in Whichinton which...they claim as Cristiana’s dower”, dated [25 Jun] 1241[604]m firstly DAVID de Lindsay, son of DAVID de Lindsay & his wife Margery --- (-before [15 Apr] 1241).  m secondly ([Apr/13 May] 1241) ROBERT de Pinkeney, son of ---. 

c)         daughters .  The existence of two or more other daughters is indicated by a document dated to [1225/26] which records that "the heirs of Amabilis de Limesi owe...of her fine not to be compelled to marry”, that “Hugh de Oddingseles and Basilia his wife” owe a debt, and that “David son and heir of David de Lindesi, who has one of Amabilis’s sisters” owes part[605]

 

 

1.         NICHOLAS de Limesey (-after 1220).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in the honour of Tickhill, dated to [1208/13]: "Nicholaus de Limessi" held "terram que fuit Willelmi de Lund cum herede Willelmi per ostriceriam"[606].  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to a claim by "Nicholaus de Limese et Margareta uxor eius, Dionisia et Florencia sorores ipsius Margarete" against "priorem de Bergeveni" dated [Aug] 1220[607].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Nicholaus de Limesia et Margeria uxore sua et…sororibus uxoris sue" against "Johannem de Balun" who failed to appear[608]m MARGARET de Murdac, daughter of RICHARD de Murdac & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in the honour of Tickhill, dated to [1208/13]: "Nicholaus de Limessi" held "terram que fuit Willelmi de Lund cum herede Willelmi per ostriceriam"[609].  It is not known from this document whether the heiress of William de Lund was his daughter or a more remote relation.  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to a claim by "Nicholaus de Limese et Margareta uxor eius, Dionisia et Florencia sorores ipsius Margarete" against "priorem de Bergeveni" dated [Aug] 1220[610].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Nicholaus de Limesia et Margeria uxore sua et…sororibus uxoris sue" against "Johannem de Balun" who failed to appear[611].

 

 

 

 

LINCOLN

 

 

 

1.         COLSWEIN of Lincoln (-8 Jan ----).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “VI Id Jan” of “Colsuanus pater Picoti[612]m ---.  The name of Colswein’s wife is not known.  Colswein & his wife had one child: 

a)         PICOT [Ansfrid?] (-[24 Apr], after May 1111).  “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery, in the presence of "ipso Pichoto uxore eius Beatrice…", by charter dated May 1111[613].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “VIII Kal Mai” of “Ansfridus qui cognominatur Picotus[614].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Lincoln ecclesiam sancti Petr” by “Picotus[615].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Lincolnia…et le Hevedland” by “Picotus filius Colsuanni[616]m BEATRICE, daughter of --- (-7 Mar ----, after May 1111).  “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery, in the presence of "ipso Pichoto uxore eius Beatrice…", by charter dated May 1111[617].  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “Non Mar” of “Beatrix uxor Picoti[618].  Picot & his wife had one child: 

i)          MURIEL .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated May 1111 which records that “Picotus filius Colwani Linc. cum uxore et quodam nepote…Ricardi et quadam nepte…Cecilia” donated revenue from "villa…Suttona et Luttona" to Spalding Monastery, in the presence of "ipso Pichoto uxore eius Beatrice…"[619].  Henry I King of England confirmed the possessions of Holy Trinity, Lessay, including the donations by "Robertus de Haia Ricardus et Eudonis nepos" [which appears to be garbled] with the advice of "Muriele uxoris sue et filiorum suorum Ricardi…Radulfi", by charter dated 1126[620].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Turstini Haldup et Eudonis filii eius" confirmed by "Roberti de Haia et Murielis uxoris sue et Richardi et Radulfi filiorum eorum", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][621]m [as his second wife,] ROBERT de la Haye, son of RANULF & his wife --- ([1075/80]-[1150]). 

 

 

1.         --- [de Lincoln] .  According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy (wife firstly of Ivo Taillebois) was the niece of Robert Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln, as well as kinswoman of Thorold "the Sheriff"[622]m ---, relative of Lucy (wife firstly of Ivo Taillebois).  [One child]: 

a)         [ALAN de Lincoln (-[1129/30]).  "…Alan de Lincola…Turald Papelleon…" witnessed the charter dated to [1094] under which William II King of England notified an agreement between William Bishop of Durham and Robert Earl of Northumberland[623].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Alanus de Lincolnia" previously held property "in Catebi et in Kaillestorp…et in Wicham…in Kaillesterna…" in Lincolnshire and that "Ranulfus de Baiocis heres Alani de Lincolnia" granted part of it to "Rogero Punchardon" whose heirs still held it[624].]  m ---.  Alan & his wife had two children: 

i)          MARGARET de Lincoln .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Hugo de Bajocis, filius Randolphi de Bajocis” confirmed the donations to Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire by "Randulphi patris mei et matris meæ Margaretæ", for the soul of "Alani de Lincolnia avi mei"[625].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rann Baioc" declaring returns for "filia Alani Linc" in Lincolnshire[626].  “Petrus de Golsa” founded Newhouse abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "dominis meis Randulfo de Bajocis et uxore eius Margareta et filiis eorum Hugone et Alano", by charter dated to [1143/46], witnessed by "Acardo de Lincolnia…"[627].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Alanus de Lincolnia" previously held property "in Catebi et in Kaillestorp…et in Wicham…in Kaillesterna…" in Lincolnshire and that "Ranulfus de Baiocis heres Alani de Lincolnia" granted part of it to "Rogero Punchardon" whose heirs still held it[628].  m (before 1129) RANULF de Bayeux, son of --- (-1154). 

ii)         daughter .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alan de Linc" returning for the dowry he gave to "Unfr de Albin cum filia sua" in Lincolnshire[629]m HUMPHREY de Albini, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ALURED de Lincoln of Wareham, Dorset (-after 1129).  Domesday Book records “Alvred of Lincoln” holding land in Wymington in Bedfordshire; numerous properties in Lincolnshire[630].  "…Alured of Lincoln…" witnessed the charter dated to [1086] which notified a plea held by William I King of England concerning "William de Braiose" and Fécamp abbey[631].  "…Alveradus de Lincoln…" witnessed the charter dated 27 Jan 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the status of Bath abbey[632].  "…Aluuredi [de] Lincoln…" witnessed the charter dated to [1103/06] [marked "A forgery" in the compilation] under which Henry I King of England confirmed the status of Durham abbey[633].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alur Linc" in Dorsetshire[634].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alvredus senior de Lincolnia" used to hold five knights` fees from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) and that "Alvredus" now held the same[635]m ---.  The name of Alured’s wife is not known.  She may have been MARGARET, daughter of --- (-10 Feb ----): The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “IV Id Feb” of “Margareta uxor Alueredi[636].  Alured & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         ROBERT FitzAlured (-after 1138).  "…Rotberti de Belmont, Rodulfi de Bec, Willelmi filii Girardi, Rogerii fratris Rodulfi, Gisleberti Crispini, Rotberti filii Alvuardi, Rotberti Marmion, Rodulfi Taisson, Rotberti Herneis, Ricardi de Baiocas…" witnessed the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[637].  "Robert de Lincolnia…my wife Benza and my son Alvred" donated "my land…Holne" to Montacute priory by undated charter[638]m BENZA, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants cites the Life of Wulfric of Haselbury which names "Benza" as the wife of Robert FitzAlured[639].  There is some possibility that she may have been the sister of Samson de Lincoln: the History of the foundation of Haselbury priory, Somerset records that Sampson de Lincolnia...avunculus Aluredi de Lincolnia” was “frater...uxoris Gulielmi domini de Haselberge[640].  This passage suggests that Samson may have been the maternal uncle of Alured de Lincoln, and maybe half-brother of the wife of William de Haselbury: if Samson had been Alured’s paternal uncle, there would seem no reason to mention him at all as William’s wife would have been Alured’s aunt.  "Robert de Lincolnia…my wife Benza and my son Alvred" donated "my land…Holne" to Montacute priory by undated charter[641].  Robert & his wife had [five] children: 

i)          ALURED de Lincoln (-1198).  "Robert de Lincolnia…my wife Benza and my son Alvred" donated "my land…Holne" to Montacute priory by undated charter[642]

-         see below

ii)         [ROBERT FitzAlured (-after 1167).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus filius Alvredi Camerarii, dimidiam marcam" in Northamptonshire in [1167/68][643].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Roberto filio Aluredi" in Oxfordshire[644].] 

iii)        ANDREW .  "Alvred de Lincoln" confirmed the donation of "the church and place of Holne" to Montacute priory made by "my father and Lady Benza my mother", for the soul of "my wife Albreda…my father Robert de Lincoln", by undated charter, witnessed by "Andrew my brother, Samson de Lincoln, Robert de Bosco, Robert de Antiochia, Peter my brother…"[645]

iv)       PETER .  "Alvred de Lincoln" confirmed the donation of "the church and place of Holne" to Montacute priory made by "my father and Lady Benza my mother", for the soul of "my wife Albreda…my father Robert de Lincoln", by undated charter, witnessed by "Andrew my brother, Samson de Lincoln, Robert de Bosco, Robert de Antiochia, Peter my brother…"[646]

v)        ALBREDA .  “Aluredus de Lincolnia…cum Albreda sorore mea facienda moniali” donated property to Clerkenwell St Mary’s by undated charter[647]

b)         RALPH FitzAlured (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad fil Alur" in Wiltshire[648]

c)         [SAMSON de Lincoln (-after 1166).  The History of the foundation of Haselbury priory, Somerset records that Sampson de Lincolnia...avunculus Aluredi de Lincolnia” was “frater...uxoris Gulielmi domini de Haselberge[649].  This passage suggests that Samson may have been the maternal uncle of Alured de Lincoln, and maybe half-brother of the wife of William de Haselbury: if Samson had been Alured’s paternal uncle, there would seem no reason to mention him at all as William’s wife would have been Alured’s aunt.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Samson de Lincolnia" held one knight’s fee, and "ex novo feffamento…dimidium", from "Alvredi de Lincolnia" in Dorset[650].] 

 

 

ALURED de Lincoln, son of ROBERT FitzAlured & his wife Benza --- (-1198).  "Robert de Lincolnia…my wife Benza and my son Alvred" donated "my land…Holne" to Montacute priory by undated charter[651].  "Alvred de Lincoln" confirmed the donation of "the church and place of Holne" to Montacute priory made by "my father and Lady Benza my mother", for the soul of "my wife Albreda…my father Robert de Lincoln", by undated charter, witnessed by "Andrew my brother, Samson de Lincoln, Robert de Bosco, Robert de Antiochia, Peter my brother…"[652].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alvredus senior de Lincolnia" used to hold five knights` fees from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) and that "Alvredus" now held the same[653].  The document does not state that "Alvredus" was the son of "Alvredus senior", although entries in the same record in which a father/son relationship is proved by other sources suggest that this is probably correct.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Alvredus de Lincolnia" held one knight’s fee in Dorset from the abbot of Cerne unjustly claimed by "Jordanus", and also list the other knights` fees he held in Dorset[654].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Alvredo de Lincolnia v m" in Somerset in [1161/62] and in [1167/68][655].  “Aluredus de Lincolnia…cum Albreda sorore mea facienda moniali” donated property to Clerkenwell St Mary’s by undated charter[656].  "Edgar surnamed Aquilinus" donated rent to Montacute priory made, in the presence of "Sir Alvred de Lincoln the patron of Holne and of the lady Albereda his wife", by undated charter, witnessed by "Sir Alvred de Lincoln, the lady Albreda his wife, and his son Sir Alvred the younger…"[657].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Alvredus de Lincolnia" among those granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Dorset, Somerset[658]

m AUBREYE, daughter of ---.  "Alvred de Lincoln" confirmed the donation of "the church and place of Holne" to Montacute priory made by "my father and Lady Benza my mother", for the soul of "my wife Albreda…my father Robert de Lincoln", by undated charter[659].  "Edgar surnamed Aquilinus" donated rent to Montacute priory made, in the presence of "Sir Alvred de Lincoln the patron of Holne and of the lady Albereda his wife", by undated charter, witnessed by "Sir Alvred de Lincoln, the lady Albreda his wife, and his son Sir Alvred the younger…"[660].  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", records that "Norton manor [Somerset] was given in free marriage with Aubrey, grandmother of the said Alfred"[661]

Alured & his wife had two children: 

1.         ALURED de Lincoln (-1240).  "Edgar surnamed Aquilinus" donated rent to Montacute priory made, in the presence of "Sir Alvred de Lincoln the patron of Holne and of the lady Albereda his wife", by undated charter, witnessed by "Sir Alvred de Lincoln, the lady Albreda his wife, and his son Sir Alvred the younger…"[662].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Alvredus de Lincolnia" holding 34 and a half knights’ fees in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][663]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", records that "Celes [Zeals] manor [Wiltshire] was given in free marriage with Maud, mother of the said Alfred"[664].  Alured & his wife had four children: 

a)         ALURED de Lincoln (-before 8 Jun 1264).  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", names "Robert son of Payn, son of Margery his eldest sister, Beatrice de Gouiz his second sister, and Albreda de Lincoln his youngest sister, all of full age, are his heirs"[665]m JOAN de Nichol, daughter of ---.  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", records that "the wife of the said Alfred […Joan…Lady Joan de Nichole] shall have the manors of --- and Duntisse…Stafford [Dorset]"[666]

b)         MARJORY de Lincoln (-before 1264).  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", names "Robert son of Payn, son of Margery his eldest sister, Beatrice de Gouiz his second sister, and Albreda de Lincoln his youngest sister, all of full age, are his heirs"[667]m PAYN, son of ---. 

c)         BEATRICE de Lincoln .  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", names "Robert son of Payn, son of Margery his eldest sister, Beatrice de Gouiz his second sister, and Albreda de Lincoln his youngest sister, all of full age, are his heirs"[668]m WILLIAM de Govis, son of ---. 

d)         AUBREYE de Lincoln .  A writ dated 8 Jun "48 Hen III", after the death of "Alfred de Lincoln", names "Robert son of Payn, son of Margery his eldest sister, Beatrice de Gouiz his second sister, and Albreda de Lincoln his youngest sister, all of full age, are his heirs"[669]

2.         GEOFFREY

 

 

 

LISLE

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Lisle (-after 1129).  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Scamston” by “Robertus de Insula et uxor eius Albreda[670].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Insula" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[671]m ALBREDA, daughter of ---.  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Scamston” by “Robertus de Insula et uxor eius Albreda[672]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Lislem ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         --- .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Red Book of the Exchequer which records three knights’ fees escheated from "Thomas Dispensator cum filia et hærede Hugonis de Insula" in "[Ly]bernby in Norhamtesira…in Lubestorp in Leyecestresira…in Torp in Notinghamsira…[de honore] Piperelli de Notingham" in [1211/12][673]m THOMAS Le Despencer, son of THOMAS Le Despencer & his wife --- (-before 1218). 

 

 

1.         JOHN de LisleLord Lislem PERNEL, daughter of ---.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         BARTHOLOMEW de Lisle ([1307/08]-15 Aug 1345).  He succeeded his father in 1331 as Lord Lisle.  m (1329 or before) ELIZABETH de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay [later Earl of Devon] & his wife Agnes de St John (-after Apr 1364).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names (in order) “Elianoram…et Elizabetham” as the two daughters of ”dominus Hugo secundus” & his wife, adding that Elizabeth married “domini Bartholomei de Lydell[674]

 

 

 

LUCY

 

 

The Complete Peerage says that “this family appears to have taken its name from Lucé, a commune in the département of Orne, about six kilometres south-east of Domfront, and in the bailiwick of Passeis”, commenting that “Lucé lies geographically in Maine, and its real connection with Normandy dates from the occupation in 1092 of Domfront, the castle of Robert Bellême, by Henry Beauclerc, then Count of the Cotentin”[675].  The Red Book of the Exchequer lists fees "De Baillia de Basseis/Passeis" in Normandy in 1172, including "Ricardus de Lusceio i militem, et sibi xvii milites"[676]

 

 

1.         --- de Lucym AVELINE, daughter of ---.  A charter of King Henry IV records donations by “Ricardi de Lucy…Avelinam matrem præfati Ricardi de Lucy” of their property “Newenthon…Rypen et in insula de Scapeye et in insula de Gryen[677].  Children: 

a)         RICHARD de Lucy (-[1179/80]).  A charter of King Henry IV records donations by “Ricardi de Lucy…Avelinam matrem præfati Ricardi de Lucy” of their property “Newenthon…Rypen et in insula de Scapeye et in insula de Gryen[678].  "Ricardo de Lucy et Gaufrido Martel et Osberto Martel" witnessed the charter dated to [1149/54] under which King Stephen confirmed liberties of Abbotsbury abbey[679].  Justiciar of England.  The 1155 Pipe Roll record "Ric de Luci" in London, Norfolk, Suffolk and many other places[680]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had five children: 

i)          GEOFFREY de Lucy (-before [1179/80]).  His parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[681].  The 1155 Pipe Roll record "Gaufr de Luceio" in Essex[682].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Lucy" holding "i militis" in Devonshire[683]m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had six children: 

(a)       MATILDA de Lucy (-after 1230).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised, noting that "predicta Roeisie de Douera filia…Galfridi de Lucy" had "tres sorores…Matillidem…primogenita et maritata Willelmo de Bello Campo…aliam Mabiliam…que obiit sine herede et Auelinam…maritata…Radulfo Patric"[684].  Her parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[685]m WILLIAM de Beauchamp, son of ---. 

(b)       ROHESE de Lucy (-after 1194).  Her parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[686].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Rohesia de Doure" in Kent "pro habenda medietate terrarum que fuerunt Ricardi de Luci avi sui et quas postea Ricardus frater ipsius Rohesie habuit tam in Anglia quam in Normannia" and "pro licenctia maritandi se ubi voluerit"[687].  "Willelmus Briwer" paid a fine for "custodia terre et heredum Fobti de Dovr…et…custodia dotis Roes de Dovr", dated 1204[688].  "Nicol fil Alan et Roes de Dovr ux eius" paid a fine for "dote ipsius Roes" in Essex and Kent, dated 1205[689].  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1223, into "terre…Newetona" disputed between "Henricum de Cobbeham" and "Wilhelmus Briwere", which found that "Roheysia de Douere filia Gaufridi de Lucy primogeniti filii Ricardi de Lucy" held the land which, after confiscation, was restored to "predicta Roeysia" who with "Nicholas vir suus" gave it to "Willelmo Briwere"[690]m firstly JOHN de Dover, son of WILLIAM de Dover & his wife --- (-1194).  m secondly (1205) NICHOLAS FitzAlan, son of ALAN & his wife ---. 

(c)       MABILIA de Lucy .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised, noting that "predicta Roeisie de Douera filia…Galfridi de Lucy" had "tres sorores…Matillidem…primogenita et maritata Willelmo de Bello Campo…aliam Mabiliam…que obiit sine herede et Auelinam…maritata…Radulfo Patric"[691]

(d)       AVELINE de Lucy .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised, noting that "predicta Roeisie de Douera filia…Galfridi de Lucy" had "tres sorores…Matillidem…primogenita et maritata Willelmo de Bello Campo…aliam Mabiliam…que obiit sine herede et Auelinam…maritata…Radulfo Patric"[692]m RALPH Patrick, son of ---. 

(e)       RICHARD de Lucy (-[1183]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", reciting that "Ricardo de Lucy…Gaufrido filio suo" had "duos filios Ricardum et Herbertum et unam filiam Roesiam predictam aviam suam", both sons dying without direct heirs[693]

(f)        HERBERT de Lucy ([1170/71]-1190).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “Herbertus de Luci…xiv annorum” was in the custody of “Godefridi de Luci”, referring to land “quod comes Glovecestrie dedit Ricardo de Lucy[694].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", reciting that "Ricardo de Lucy…Gaufrido filio suo" had "duos filios Ricardum et Herbertum et unam filiam Roesiam predictam aviam suam", both sons dying without direct heirs[695].  His parentage is confirmed by a claim, dated 1230, recorded by Bracton, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", recording that "Ricardus de Lucy antecessor ipsarum Matillidis et Royse" was seised of the property, and after him "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isi Royse…filie et heredi suo"[696]

ii)         GODFREY de Lucy .  Bishop of Winchester.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “Herbertus de Luci…xiv annorum” was in the custody of “Godefridi de Luci”, referring to land “quod comes Glovecestrie dedit Ricardo de Lucy[697]

iii)        MATILDA de Lucy .  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardo de Luce" granted "Disce" in Norfolk to "Waltero filio Roberti…in maritagio cum filia sua", adding that it was currently held by "Robertus filius Walteri"[698].  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated property to Daventre Priory, for the souls of “…uxoris meæ Matildis de Lucy et filiorum et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter[699].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[700]m as his first wife, WALTER FitzRobert of Dunmow, son of ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare & his wife Maud de Senlis (-1198, bur Dunmow Priory). 

iv)       ALICE de Lucy .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[701]m ODINEL [II] de Umfraville, son of --- (-1182). 

v)        AVELINE de Lucy .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[702].  A charter of King Henry III, dated 16 Aug 1257, records donations to Ankerwyke Nunnery, including the donations of "partum…Wymede" by "Gilberti de Munfichet et Avelinæ uxoris eius"[703]m GILBERT de Montfichet, son of WILLIAM de Montfichet & his wife Margaret de Clare (-[1186/87]).  

b)         WALTER de Lucy .  Abbot of Battle. 

c)         ROBERT de Lucy (-before 1205).  m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  "Marger de Lucy" paid a fine for "dote sua…de terra q fuit Rob de Lucy quondam viri sui" in Dorset, dated 1205[704].  "Margareta de Lucy" paid a fine for "hereditate sua de Kerchel et de Hammes q Rob de Lucy quondam vir eius" pawned to the Jews during his lifetime, in Dorset, dated 1208[705].  Robert & his wife one child: 

i)          --- de Lucy .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Willelmus filius Galfridi de Tresgoz”, 17 years old, under the guardianship of "Roberti de Luci" whose daughter he had married, with land "de honore Peverelli…terra…de Toleshunt"[706]m (1185 or before) WILLIAM [III] de Tresgoz, son of GEOFFREY de Tresgoz & his wife --- de Gresley ([1167/68]-after [1210/12]). 

 

 

1.         MARGARET de Lucy It has not yet proved possible to identify the parentage of Margaret de Lucy.  William de Chesney recorded that he obtained Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire from "domino et fratre meo Roberto de Caisneto Lincolniensi episcopo" by two undated charters, one issued at Lincoln witnessed by “Ralf de Chesney and William his brother my nephews, Alexander de Chesney and Ralf his brother my cognati”, the other at Verneuil witnessed by “Marg de Luci uxore mea, Rad. de Caisneto et Willelmo fratre suo nepotibus meis, Milone de Langetot et Milone filio suo...[707]m WILLIAM de Chesney, son of ROGER de Chesney & his wife Alice de Langetot (-[1164/70]). 

 

 

1.         REYNOLD de Lucy (-[Jan 1199/1200]).  The chronology suggests that Reynold was another brother of Richard de Lucy, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not been identified.  Keeper of Nottingham castle when it was burnt by Earl Ferrers in the rebellion of 1174[708]m (before 1162) AMABEL, daughter of WILLIAM FitzDuncan [of Scotland] & his second wife Alice Le Meschin (-before 1201).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “prima…Cecilia…secunda Amabilla…tertia Alicia” as the three daughters of “Willielmus”, son of “Doncani comes de Murrayse”, and his wife Alice, adding that Amabel received the honor of Egremont and married “Reginaldo de Lucy”, by whom he fathered “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon”, the latter being succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[709].  Co-heiress of her brother.  Lady of Egremont and Copeland.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Robertus de Stutevill" held "villam de Thorpennoi de domino rege" in Cumberland which was "de baronia Alicie de Rumill" and that "Reginaldus de Lucy" had held the land "cum sorore predicte Alicie" and refused homage to "Philippi de Valoines, antecessoris predicti Roberti et uxoris sue"[710].  Reynold & his wife had three children: 

a)         RICHARD de Lucy (-early 1213, bur St Bees priory).  "Ric de Luci fil Reginaldi de Luci" paid a fine for "terra sua de Copland et in Cautebige" relating to a claim against "B. com Albemarl et uxore sua et versus Rob de Curtenay et Alic uxorem suam", dated 1200[711].  "Ricardus de Lucy" donated land "in villa de Louswater", and confirmed the donation of "prato et capellam eiusdem ville" donated by "Rann[ulfi] de Lyndesey et Hetrede sponse sue", to St Bees, for the salvation of "Ade uxoris mee", by undated charter[712].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Ricardus de Lucy" holding "Coupland" in Cumberland, adding that King Henry I had first granted it to "Willelmo Messchin antecessori predicti Ricardi"[713].  m (before [1205/06]) as her first husband, ADA de Morville, daughter of HUGH de Morville & his wife Helwise de Stuteville (-after 20 Feb 1227).  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Luci accounts for 900 marks and five palfreys for having Alda his wife’s reasonable share...of Hugh de Moreville her father’s land"[714].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[715].  "Ada q fuit uxor Ricardi de Lucy de Egremunt" paid a fine for "hereditate sua [et] dote sua…q fuerunt predicti Ricardi quondam viri sui" in Cumberland, dated 1213[716].  She married secondly (before 13 Aug 1218) as his second wife, Thomas de Multon of Multon, near Spalding, Lincolnshire.  Henry III King of England noted that "Thomas de Muleton" married "Adam de Morevill, que fuit uxor Ricardi de Luci" without royal licence, and ordered the seizure of "omnibus terris ipsius Ade in Cumberlande et Westmerilande et de omnibus terris ipsius Thome in Coplande, cum castro suo de Egremunde", dated 13 Aug 1218[717].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Thomas de Muleton” owing “de pluribis debitis Ricardi de Lucy...et...pro Alda que fuit uxor eiusdem Ricardi” in Essex[718].  A royal licence granted the right to construct fisheries to "Thomas de Muleton and Ada his wife" dated 20 Feb 1227[719].  Richard & his wife had two children: 

i)          AMABEL de Lucy .  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[720].  "Lambertus de Moleton" donated rights in land "in Couplandia" to St Bees, for the soul of "Amabilie uxoris mee", by undated charter[721]m LAMBERT de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his first wife --- (-1246). 

ii)         ALICE de Lucy (-before 24 Mar 1288)The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[722]m (1219 or before) ALAN de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his first wife --- (-after 1250).  Their children adopted the name Lucy.  "Thomam de Lucy filium quondam Alani de Multon" and St Bees settled their dispute over "Lowswater" dated 10 May 1286[723]

b)         --- de Lucy .  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Richard de Lucy" gave "Wolenested…medietatem…hundredum de Tenhrigg" in Surrey to "Odoni de Dammartin cum sorore sua in maritagium"[724]m EUDES de Dammartin, son of [EUDES de Dammartin & his wife ---] (-after 1212). 

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY de Lucym (1204) as her second husband, ---, widow of SIMON de Tilleul, daughter of ---.  "Gaufr de Lucy" paid a fine for "maritage uxoris q fuit Sim de Tilloll" in Cumberland, dated 1204[725]

 

2.         PHILIP de Lucy (-after 1205).  "Philippus de Lucy" paid a fine for "custodia Ric de Warewic cum terram suam" in Yorkshire, dated 1205[726]

 

3.         ROGER de Lucy (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Rogerus de Lucy" holding "xv l in Iclinton"[727].  

 

4.         REYNOLD de Lucy (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Reginaldus de Lucy" holding "Wolcnestede…Langeho"[728].  

 

5.         LETITIA (-after 1217).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Leticia de Lucy, Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neovill, Ema de Marcy" holding "iv milites…in Heaumedon, Dubenhog, La Lee, Crawell"[729].  

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Lucym ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had four children: 

a)         EMMA de Lucy (-before [Feb] 1222).  "Henry de Pinkeni and Leticia his wife" and "Serlo de Marci and Emma his wife" granted land "in Cristehale" to "William Barun", dated [1198/99][730].  "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne", dated [Feb] 1222[731]m SERLO de Marcy, son of ---. 

b)         BEATRICE de Lucy (-after 29 Sep 1223).  "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne", dated [Feb] 1222[732].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni Milo de Sumeri et Beatricia de Lucy” owing in Essex[733]

c)         LETITIA de Lucy (-[1210/22])Domesday Descendants names "Letitia daughter and co-heir of Robert de Lucy, possibly the nephew of Richard de Lucy the justiciar" as the wife of Henry de Pinkeney, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[734].  "Henry de Pinkeni and Leticia his wife" and "Serlo de Marci and Emma his wife" granted land "in Cristehale" to "William Barun", dated [1198/99][735].  If this is correct, the precise family relationship has not yet been traced.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neville, Letitia de Pinkeyni, Serlo de Marcy" holding one knight’s fee each "in Elmedene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][736].  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by an order dated [Feb] 1222 under which "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[737]m HENRY de Pinkeney, son of GILBERT de Pinkeney & his first wife Eustachia --- (-1209). 

d)         --- de Lucy (-before 1222).  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by an order dated [Feb] 1222 under which "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[738]m --- de Somery, son of ---. 

 

 

ALAN de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon & his first wife Sarah de Flete (-after 1250).  Their children adopted the name Lucy.  "Thomam de Lucy filium quondam Alani de Multon" and St Bees settled their dispute over "Lowswater" dated 10 May 1286[739]

m ALICE de Lucy, son of RICHARD de Lucy & his wife Ada de Moreville (-before 24 Mar 1288).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[740]

Alan & his wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Lucy (-before 9 Apr 1305).  m ISABEL de Bolteby, daughter of ADAM de Bolteby & his wife Philippa de Tyndal.  Thomas & his wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS de Lucy ([1280/81]-before 24 Aug 1308).  m CHRISTIAN, daughter of --- (-after 1319). 

b)         ANTHONY de Lucy ([1282/83]-before 10 Jun 1343).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1321 whereby he is held to have become Lord Lucy

-        see below

 

 

ANTHONY de Lucy, son of THOMAS de Lucy & his wife Isabel de Bolteby ([1282/83]-before 10 Jun 1343).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1321 whereby he is held to have become Lord Lucy

m ELIZABETH, daughter of ---. 

Anthony & his wife had children:

1.         THOMAS de Lucy (-London 5 Dec 1365)Lord Lucym firstly ([Nov 1329]) MARGARET de Multon, daughter of THOMAS de Multon of Egremont & his wife --- ([1309/10]-after Sep 1341).  m secondly ([Jul 1343) AGNES de Beaumont, daughter of HENRY Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Alice Ctss of Buchan (-after 1359).  Thomas & his first wife had children: 

a)         ANTHONY de Lucy ([1340/41]-19 Aug or 16 Sep 1368)Lord Lucym (pardon for marrying without royal licence 29 Apr 1366) as her second husband, JOAN, widow of WILLIAM de Greystoke Lord Greystoke, daughter of HENRY FitzHenry of Ravensworth & his wife Joan de Fourneux (-Clerkenwell 1 Sep 1403, bur Clerkenwell).  She married thirdly (before 6 May 1378) Sir Matthew Redman.  Anthony & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOAN de Lucy (1366- 30 Sep 1369). 

b)         REGINALD de Lucy (-[1362/65])m (early 1347) as her first husband, EUPHEMIA Neville, widow of ROBERT Clifford Lord Clifford, daughter of RALPH Neville Lord Neville of Raby & his wife Alice de Audley (-[Oct/Nov] 1393).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[741].  She married thirdly Sir Walter de Heslarton

c)         MATILDA de Lucy (-18 Dec 1398).  Baroness Lucy.  m firstly as his second wife, GILBERT de Umfraville Earl of Angus, son of ROBERT de Umfraville Earl of Angus & his wife Lucy de Kyme ([1310]-6 Jan 1381).  m secondly (15 Dec 1381 or before) as her second husband, HENRY de Percy Earl of Northumberland, son of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his first wife Mary of Lancaster (10 Nov 1341-killed in battle Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster 19 Feb 1408, bur York Minster). 

2.         JOAN de Lucym WILLIAM de Melton, son of ---. 

3.         LUCY de Lucy (-bur Neasham Priory)m as his first wife, WILLIAM de Greystoke Lord Greystoke, son of RALPH de Greystoke Lord Greystoke & his wife Alice de Audley (Grimthorpe 6 Jan 1321-Brancepeth 10 Jul 1359). 

 

 

 

 

MALET

 

 

Keats-Rohan records that the Malet family was established at Graville-Sainte-Honorine, now a suburb of Le Havre in the present-day French département of Seine-Inférieure, in the Pays de Caux in Normandy by the beginning of the 11th century and also held land near Caen[742].  The family’s importance in the area is gauged by their construction of a castle there in the early decades of the 11th century, one of only a small group built in the Pays de Caux before 1066[743].  The family holdings which are recorded in Domesday Book show that the participation of Guillaume Malet in the invasion of England was rewarded with extensive land in the north of Suffolk, which eventually formed the honour of Eye which passed to his son Robert [I]. 

 

 

1.         --- m [ESILIA, daughter of GILBERT Crispin & his wife Gunnora ---.  The De nobili genere Crispinorum names "Emmam, Petri de Condeto genetricem, atque Esiliam, matrem Willelmi Malet" as the two daughters of "Gislebertus…Crispini cognomen" and his wife[744].  However, the wife of her supposed son Guillaume Malet is recorded in a later primary source with the same name so it is possible that the De nobili genere confuses Guillaume’s mother with his wife.]  The Carmen de Hastingæ Prœlio by Guy d’Amiens records that "quidam partim Normannus et Anglus compatit/competit Heraldi" was charged with the temporary burial of the body of King Harold II after the battle of Hastings[745].  As noted below, Orderic Vitalis names Guillaume Malet as this person.  If the Carmen can be believed, the mother of Guillaume [I] Malet was therefore English.  From this information, Keats-Rohan conjectures that the father of Guillaume Malet may have been one of the men who accompanied Emma of Normandy to England in 1002 for her marriage to King Æthelred II, noting that it has been suggested that such men may have continued to hold land in England until 1066[746].  Brown suggests that the English origin of Guillaume’s mother is corroborated by the Domesday Book reference implying that Guillaume held Alkborough in Lincolnshire before the conquest (see below), by Guillaume’s son Robert [I] being described as "avunculus" of Lucy, mother of Ranulf Earl of Chester, who had English antecedents (also see below), and by Lucy’s first husband Ivo de Taillebois holding Alkborough in 1086[747].  One child: 

a)         GUILLAUME [I] Malet (-[Bec Abbey] before 1086).  Domesday Book records that "William Malet had 5 carucates of land to the geld" in Alkborough, Lincolnshire, and that "Ivo" (identified as Ivo Taillebois, first husband of Lucy, relative of the Malet family see below) was the current holder[748].  Brown indicates that the reference to assessment "to the geld" suggests that Guillaume may have been the holder of the land before the conquest[749].  A history of the Crispin family names "Esiliam matrem Willelmi Malet" as daughter of Gilbert Crespin, adding that Guillaume ended his life at Bec abbey[750].  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Guillaume de Malet" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[751].  Orderic Vitalis names "Guillelmo agnomine Maleto" was charged with the temporary burial of the body of King Harold II on the shore after the battle of Hastings[752].  “…Willielmus Maleit…” witnessed the charter dated to [1067] under which William I King of England confirmed the privileges of Peterborough abbey[753].  Sheriff of York: Simeon of Durham records that "Willelmo Malet qui tunc vicecomitatum gerebat cum sua coniuge et duobus liberis" were made prisoner by the Danes after the capture of the city of York by King William’s forces, dated to 1069[754].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus Ricardi filius Eboracensis præsidii custos” was killed, that “Marius Suenus, Gaius Patricius, Edgarus Adelinus, Archillus et quatuor filii Karoli” attacked “munitionem regis in Eboraco”, and that “Willelmus cognomento Maletus, præses castrensis regi” announced to the king that he would be forced to withdraw unless reinforcements were sent, dated to 1069[755].  The cartulary of Préaux Saint-Pierre includes a document which records that "William Maleth" approved a donation to the monastery by "a certain knight Ralf" and donated property at Butot-en-Caux "that he might be made a monk, which was done", and that "when William was dead, Robert his son" confirmed his father’s gift[756].  Freeman suggests that William Malet died on campaign in Ely, dated to [1070/71], on the basis of two passages in Domesday Book which record land held "in die quo pater R. Malet ivit in servitium Regis…ubi mortuus est" and "pater suus…tenuit quando ivit in maresc [marshland]" (in Happisburgh, Norfolk)[757].  Round suggests that the interpretation of the passage in question is too precise and in any case that the word "maresc" may in any case represent a mistranscription for "Eurvic", indicating York, which, if correct, would negate the theory entirely[758].  It appears that the most that can definitively be concluded from these passages is the Guillaume Malet died while on the king’s service, some time before 1086.  This conclusion appears to be contradicted by the history of the Crispin family which states that Guillaume ended his life at Bec abbey[759]m ESILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1086).  “Robertus Malet” founded Eye priory, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Malet et matris meæ Hesiliæ” who became a nun there, by undated charter dated to the reign of William I King of England[760].  Domesday Book records “Robert Malet’s mother” holding land from Robert Malet in Suffolk[761].  [same person as…?  ESILIA, daughter of GILBERT Crispin & his wife Gunnora ---.  The De nobili genere Crispinorum names "Emmam, Petri de Condeto genetricem, atque Esiliam, matrem Willelmi Malet" as the two daughters of "Gislebertus…Crispini cognomen" and his wife[762].  However, the wife of her supposed son Guillaume Malet is recorded in a later primary source with the same name so it is possible that the De nobili genere confuses Guillaume’s mother with his wife.]  Simeon of Durham records that "Willelmo Malet qui tunc vicecomitatum gerebat cum sua coniuge et duobus liberis" were made prisoner by the Danes after the capture of the city of York by King William’s forces, dated to 1069[763].  Guillaume [I] & his wife had [five] children: 

i)          ROBERT [I] Malet of Eye (-after 13 Feb 1105).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that King William I granted "honorem de Eya" to "Roberto Malet" but that King Henry I acquired the honour and held it for seven years before granting it to "comiti Stephano nepoti suo"[764].  “Robertus Malet” founded Eye priory, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Malet et matris meæ Hesiliæ” who became a nun there, by undated charter dated to the reign of William I King of England[765].  “…Roberti Malet…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[766].  Domesday Book records land held by “Robert Malet” in Sutton in Woking Hundred, Surrey; Bradmore and Ruddington in Nottinghamshire; numerous properties in Yorkshire, numerous properties in Norfolk, and in Suffolk[767].  “Beatrix soror Roberti Malet” donated property to Eye priory, for the souls of “fratrum meorum Roberti Maleth et Gilberti Malet”, by undated charter[768].  "…Robertus Maleth…Willielmus Malet…" subscribed a charter dated Sep 1101 under which Bishop Herbert donated property to Norwich priory[769].  "…Robert Malet camerarius…" witnessed the charter dated 13 Feb 1105 under which Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Cluny and Thetford made by Roger Bigod[770].  According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln, as well as kinswoman of Thorold "the Sheriff"[771].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Malet" used to hold ten knights’ fees from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) and that "Hubertus de Sancta Susanna" now held two of these and "Willelmus Malech" now held twelve[772].  "Hubertus de Sancta Susanna" has not been identified with certainty but the likelihood is that he was the son of Hubert de Beaumont, son of Hubert Vicomte de Maine and Ermengarde de Nevers, who is recorded as holding lands in England during the reign of King Henry I (see MAINE).  The fact that Hubert held two of the knights’ fees previously held by Robert Malet may indicate a family relationship, possibly that Hubert was the husband or son (the latter being more likely from a chronological point of view) of Robert’s daughter.  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Bec, including donations by "Roberti Malet", by charter dated to [1181/89][773]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Brown records that Robert’s wife Matilda is named in a charter under which Robert granted lands in Bulmer and Little Belstead to Hugh of Goldingham, although pointing out the document is a later copy in France and appears spurious in its surviving form although the substance of the charter appears genuine enough[774].  Robert [I] & his wife had [two children]: 

(a)       [WILLIAM [II] Malet (-after [1117/21]).  "…Robertus Maleth…Willielmus Malet…" subscribed a charter dated Sep 1101 under which Bishop Herbert donated property to Norwich priory[775].  Brown suggests that William [II] Malet was the brother of Robert [I] Malet and therefore the son of Guillaume [I] Malet[776].  Keats-Rohan says that "this idea must be firmly rejected" as "all the evidence for this William belongs to the period 1100 to [1121], whereas Robert [I] was of age by 1066"[777].] 

-         see below

(b)       [ROBERT [III] Malet (-[before 1117]).  Robert Malet donated a mill "in Maisnillo Goscelini" {Mesnil-Joscelin} to Bec, with the consent of Gilbert Crespin, by charter dated to before 1077, and William Malet donated "terram…Maisnillum Joscelini" to Bec for "filio suo Willelmo qui factus est monachus Becci", for the souls of "patris et matris suæ et fratris sui Roberti", by charter dated 1117[778].  The wording of this extract suggests that Robert [III] was deceased at the time.] 

ii)         GILBERT Malet .  “Beatrix soror Roberti Malet” donated property to Eye priory, for the souls of “fratrum meorum Roberti Maleth et Gilberti Malet”, by undated charter[779].  Ancestor of the Malet family of Curry Malet, and Enmore, Somerset, and the Baronets Malet[780]

iii)        BEATRIX Malet .  “Beatrix soror Roberti Malet” donated property to Eye priory, for the souls of “fratrum meorum Roberti Maleth et Gilberti Malet”, by undated charter[781].  Brown indicates that Beatrix donated Redlingfield to Eye by undated charter which confirms her as husband of "William vicomte of Arques"[782].  “Willielmus de Abrincis miles dominus de Folkestan” confirmed donations to Folkestone priory, including the donations made by "Beatrix post mortem domini sui Willielmi de Archis" of "terram dotis suæ de Newenton" by undated charter[783]m (before 1086) GUILLAUME Vicomte d’Arques, son of GODEFROI Giffard Vicomte d’Arques & his wife --- de Rouen (-[1090]). 

iv)       [two children (-after 1069).  Simeon of Durham records that "Willelmo Malet qui tunc vicecomitatum gerebat cum sua coniuge et duobus liberis" were made prisoner by the Danes after the capture of the city of York by King William’s forces, dated to 1069[784].  Presumably the children in question were still young as they were living with their parents.  It is not known whether these children were the same as those who are named above, although it is unlikely that Guillaume’s son Robert was one of the captured children as the chronology suggests that he must have been adult at the time.] 

 

 

1.         DURAND Malet (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records that "Durand holds…from Robert Malet" Cransford, Plumesgate Hundred, Suffolk[785].  Domesday Book records “Durand Malet” holding Burton on the Wolds and land in Wymeswold in Leicestershire; Owthorpe in Nottinghamshire; several properties in Lincolnshire[786]

 

2.         THURSTAN Malet .  "Turstin Malet" witnessed a grant to Sainte-Trinité de Caen made by "Papillon" by charter dated to before 1082[787].  "Turstin Malet" witnessed a grant to Saint-Etienne de Caen made by Humphrey d’Adeville by charter dated to early 12th century[788]

 

3.         THOROLD "Papillon" .  "Turstin Malet" witnessed a grant to Sainte-Trinité de Caen made by "Papillon" by charter dated to before 1082[789].  "…Alan de Lincola…Turald Papelleon…" witnessed the charter dated to [1094] under which William II King of England notified an agreement between William Bishop of Durham and Robert Earl of Northumberland[790].  According to Keats-Rohan, "Turold Papillon" was the son of Thurstan Malet but she does not cite the primary source on which this statement is based[791]

 

 

1.         ROBERT [II] Malet .  Keats-Rohan suggests that Robert [II] Malet was the same person as Robert [I] Malet[792].  Richard I King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Saint-Taurin, Evreux, including donations made by "Robert Malet and Emelina his wife", by charter dated 15 Jan 1195[793]m EMMELINE, daughter of ---.  Richard I King of England confirmed donations to the abbey of Saint-Taurin, Evreux, including donations made by "Robert Malet and Emelina his wife", by charter dated 15 Jan 1195[794].  Robert & his wife had children: 

a)         HUGH Malet .  Keats-Rohan records that a document related to the charter dated 15 Jan 1195 quoted above records that Robert Malet donated additional land to enable his son Hugh to become a monk at the monastery[795]

 

2.         IVO Maletm MARGARET, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Hugo Malet" donated "dominium meum in Rouuelle", held by "pater meus Ivo Malet…matre mea Margareta"[796].  Ivo & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUGH Malet (-after 1147).  "Hugo Malet" donated "dominium meum in Rouuelle", held by "pater meus Ivo Malet…matre mea Margareta", by undated charter, dated to [1092/1123] or [1147/68][797]same person as…?  HUGH Malet (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hugo Malet" held seven knights’ fees "ex baronia Willelmi Meschin ex parte matris suæ" from "Willelmi de Curcy dapiferi" in Somerset[798]same person as...?  HUGH Maletm LESCELINE, daughter of --- (-24 Aug ----).  The obituary of Lincoln Cathedral records the death “IX Kal Sep” of “Licellina uxor Hugonis Malet[799]

 

3.         HERVE Malet (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Urveius Malet" holding one and one half knights’ fees in the honour of Wallingford in Berkshire[800]

 

 

Relatives of the Malet family, the exact connections have not yet been established: 

1.         [--- .  According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert [I] Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln: "H. dux Norm. et comes And." granted land to "Ranulfo comiti Cestrie", including "totum honorem de Eia sicut Robertus Malet avunculus matris sue" had held and "foeudum Alani de Lincol…qui fuit avunculus matris sue", by charter dated to [Jan/Apr] 1153[801].  The precise relationships between all these individuals has not yet been ascertained.  m [--- de Lincoln, son of ---].] 

2.         [--- .  m ---.]  [Three] children: 

a)         THOROLD de Bukenhale (-after [1076/79]).  Sheriff of Lincolnshire.  The Annals of Peterborough record that “Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivæ comitissæ Leycestriæ” founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[802].  “Thoroldus de Bukenhale…vicecomiti” donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names “domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestriæ et…comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea…et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hæredis eorum[803].  Herman’s De miraculis sancti Eadmundi names “…Lincolniensis Turoldus…” among those present when Herfast Bishop of Thetford visited Baldwin Abbot of St Edmund’s to be cured of an injury to his eye, dated to [1076/79] by Round[804]

b)         GODGIFU (-after [1054/57]).  She is named as wife of Earl Leofric by Florence of Worcester, who specifies that she and her husband founded monasteries at Leominster, Wenlock, Chester and Stowe[805].  The Annals of Peterborough record that “Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivæ comitissæ Leycestriæ” founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[806].  Her family origin is also indicated by the undated charter under which “Thoroldus de Bukenhale…vicecomiti” donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names “domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestriæ et…comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea…et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hæredis eorum[807].  The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis names "Aediva trinepta Oslaci ducis" as wife of "Lefricus de Brunne, nepos comitis Radulfi cognominati Scalre", when recording that they were parents of "Herwardus"[808].  "Oslaci ducis" could be "Oslac" recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as "earl [of Northumbria]" in 966[809], but any precise relationship has not been identified.  ”Leofricus comes…et conjux mea Godgyve” donated property to Evesham Monastery by undated charter which names “frater meus Normannus[810].  Godgifu wife of Leofric granted property to St Mary's, Stow by charter dated [1054/57][811].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Elfgarus comes” had founded “Coventrense cœnobium” and that “Godiova...comitissa” donated “omnem thesaurum suum” to the church[812].  She was the Lady Godiva of legend.  m LEOFRIC Earl of Mercia, son of LEOFWINE Ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia (-Bromley 30 Oct 1057, bur Coventry). 

c)         [daughter .  The source quoted below which names Thorold as "avunculus" of Lucy suggests that he was her maternal uncle, assuming that the word was used in its strict sense (which cannot be beyond doubt).  m ---.  It is unlikely that the sources quoted below, which name Lucy as daughter of "Algari comitis Leicestriæ", are reliable.  It is assumed that they all refer to Ælfgar Earl of Mercia (see ANGLO-SAXON NOBILITY), which would mean that Lucy was the sister of Earls Edwin and Morcar.  However, such a relationship appears chronologically impossible, even if Lucy was born very late in the life of Earl Ælfgar (whose death is dated to 1062), considering that she apparently had four children by her third husband who she married in 1098.]  One child: 

i)          LUCY (-1138, bur Spalding).  According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert [I] Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln: "H. dux Norm. et comes And." granted land to "Ranulfo comiti Cestrie", including "totum honorem de Eia sicut Robertus Malet avunculus matris sue" had held and "foeudum Alani de Lincol…qui fuit avunculus matris sue", by charter dated to [Jan/Apr] 1153[813].  The precise relationships between all these individuals has not yet been ascertained.  Domesday Descendants suggests that Thorold was her father[814].  Keats-Rohan expands her arguments in another article, based primarily on the presence of both Thorold and his wife as "antecessores" of Lucy and her first husband in the charter under which the couple donated Spalding monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas, Anjou (see below)[815].  The Complete Peerage also discusses whether Thorold could have been Lucy’s father and that her mother could have been the daughter of Guillaume [I] Malet[816].  An alternative origin is suggested by Ingulph's potentially spurious Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland, which records that William I King of England arranged the marriage of "Ivo Taillebois" and "Lucia sister of Edwin and Morcar", her dowry consisting of their land at Hoyland[817].  The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery also names “Luciam postea comitissam” as daughter of “Algarus tertius”, adding that she married firstly “Yvoni Taylboys” by whom she was childless, secondly “Rogero filio Geroldi Romara”, thirdly “Ranulfo comiti Cestriæ”, and was buried “apud Spalding[818].  The Chronicon Angliæ Petriburgense records "Luciæ comitissæ…filiæ Algari comitis Leicestriæ" as husband of "Ivo Tailbois comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldingiæ et totius Hollandiæ" and "Toraldus avunculus eiusdem Luciæ"[819].  Lastly, the Annals of Peterborough name “Yvo Taylboys, comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldynge et totius Holandiæ…maritus Luciæ, filiæ Algari comitis Leicestriæ” and "Toraldus avunculus…Luciæ" when recording his donation to Spalding Monastery in 1074[820].  This relationship with Earls Edwin and Morcar is impossible from a chronological point of view, in particular because Lucy gave birth to children by her third husband at a time when she would have been over fifty if she has been their sister.  It is also extremely unlikely that their sister would have been given a name derived from the Romance languages.  “Ivo Taleboys” donated Spalding Monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas Anjou, for “conjugis suæ Luciæ et antecessorum Toraldi, scilicet uxoris eius, requie” by undated charter[821].  Peter of Blois's Continuation of the Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the death of Ivo and his burial at the priory of Spalding, and the remarriage of his widow "hardly had one month elapsed after his death" with "Roger de Romar the son Gerald de Romar"[822].  A manuscript recording the foundation of Spalding monastery records that “Yvo Talboys” married "Thoroldo…hærede Lucia" who, after the death of Ivo, married (in turn) "Rogerum filium Geroldi" and "comitem Cestriæ Ranulphum"[823].  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "his wife the lady Lucia" married "Roger de Romar the son of Gerald de Romar" when "hardly had one month elapsed after the death" of her first husband "Ivo Taillebois"[824].  She is named as wife of Ranulf by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her first husband, but does not state her origin[825].  “Ranulfus Meschinus Richerio Vicecomiti Karlioli” donated property for the foundation of Wetherhal priory, Cumberland, for the souls of “…mea et uxoris meæ Luciæ…”, by undated charter[826].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Lucia comitissa Cestr…tra patis sui" in Lincolnshire[827].  “Lucia cometissa” donated “manerium de Spallingis...cum quibus melius tenui et liberalius tempore Ivonis de Thallebos et Rogeri filii Geroldi et cometis Rannulfi” by charter dated to [1135][828]m firstly as his second wife, IVO Taillebois Lord of Kendal, son of --- (-after 1094, bur Spalding).  “Ivo Talliebois” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Luciæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois…[829]m secondly (after 1094) ROGER FitzGerold, son of GEROLD "Miles Christi" Châtelain de Neufmarché & his wife Aubreye (-[1096/98]).  m thirdly (1098) RANULF "Meschin" Vicomte du Bessin, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Maud] d'Avranches (-17 or 27 Jan 1129, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh).  He was appointed Vicomte d'Avranches in 1120 and Earl of Chester. 

 

 

WILLIAM [II] Malet, son of [ROBERT [I] Mallet & his wife Matilda ---] (-after [1117/21]).  "…Robertus Maleth…Willielmus Malet…" subscribed a charter dated Sep 1101 under which Bishop Herbert donated property to Norwich priory[830].  Brown suggests that William [II] Malet was the brother of Robert [I] Malet and therefore the son of Guillaume [I] Malet[831].  Keats-Rohan says that "this idea must be firmly rejected" as "all the evidence for this William belongs to the period 1100 to [1121], whereas Robert [I] was of age by 1066"[832].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Philippus de Brausa et Willelmus Malet et Willelmus Barnard et Helias comes Cenomanniæ” were deprived of their lands in 1110[833].  Brown records that Robert Malet donated a mill in Mesnil-Joscelin to Bec, with the consent of Gilbert Crespin, by charter dated to before 1077, that William Malet donated land at Mesnil-Joscelin to Bec with his son William who was to become a monk, for the souls of his unnamed parents and his brother Robert, by charter dated 1117[834]

m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  Domesday Descendants names "Oliva de Tancarville, daughter of Rabel and Theophania de Richmond" as the wife of William [II] Malet[835].  If this is correct, she was Olive de Tancarville, daughter of Rabel de Tancarville & his first wife Thiphaine de Penthièvre.  However, the chronology for this marriage is not ideal.  The birth of Olive’s maternal grandfather is estimated to [1058/62].  His daughter was therefore probably born in [1080/1100], and Olive in [1095/1115].  On the other hand, William [II] Malet is first named in a charter dated Sep 1101 when he was presumably already adult, and no mention of him has been found after [1117/21].  Stapleton suggests that Olive may have been the mother of Guillaume Malet de Graville (see below) which appears to provide a better chronological fit[836]

William [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM Malet (-after 1117).  Brown records that Robert Malet donated a mill in Mesnil-Joscelin to Bec, with the consent of Gilbert Crespin, by charter dated to before 1077, that William Malet donated land at Mesnil-Joscelin to Bec with his son William who was to become a monk, for the souls of his unnamed parents and his brother Robert, by charter dated 1117[837].  The Chronicon Becense records that a gift of land at Mesnil-Joscelin was made by William [III] Malet in 1117 and confirmed by "Henricus primus rex Anglie…et Willelmus pater prefati Willelmi"[838].  King Henry I confirmed the donation of Conteville to Bec made by "William Malet" by charter dated 1121[839]

 

 

 

MALET of GRAVILLE (NORMANDY)

 

 

1.         MATTHEW de Graville (-after 1172).  Domesday Descendants says that Matthew was "presumably son of William [II] and Oliva de Tancarville, daughter of Rabel and Theophania de Richmond"[840].  A charter dated 25 Mar 1159 records an agreement between the abbey of Fécamp and "Matheo de Gerarvilla" concerning "dominio inter Gerartvillam et Harefluet" {Graville and Harfleur}, sworn by "…Robertus frater ipsius Mathei…"[841].  The Liber Niger Scaccarii records the "carta Mathæi de Gerardivilla" among the certificates for knight-service in Hertfordshire in 1168[842].  "Mattheus de Gerardivilla" accounted for "iv mil. et ad suum servitium xii mil. et dim" in the Pays de Caux in 1172[843].  Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Valmont abbey, including the donation made by "Mathei de Gerarvilla et Willelmi filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/83][844]m ---.  The name of Matthew’s wife is not known.  Stapleton suggests that the mother of Guillaume Malet de Graville was Olive de Tancarville, daughter of Rabel de Tancarville & his first wife Tiphaine de Penthièvre[845].  As noted above, Domesday Descendants suggests that Olive was the wife of William [II] Malet, but a marriage with Matthew de Greville would provide a better chronological fit.  Matthew & his wife had children: 

a)         GUILLAUME [III] Malet de Graville (-[Sep 1214/Oct 1215])Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Valmont abbey, including the donation made by "Mathei de Gerarvilla et Willelmi filii sui", by charter dated to [1181/83][846].  "Will Malet" accounted for land at "Criketot" in the Pays de Caux in 1195[847].  "William Malet de Girardivilla" founded the church of Sainte-Honorine at Graville[848].  "…Willelmus Malet…" is listed among those who swore to uphold a treaty between John King of England and the count of Flanders dated 18 Aug 1199[849].  “…Willelmus Malet…" witnessed the treaty between John King of England and Philippe II King of France dated Sep 1214[850]m (after [1198]) as her second husband, PHILIPPA d'Alençon, widow of WILLIAM de Roumare Earl of Lincoln, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte d'Alençon & his wife Beatrix de Maine [Anjou] (-before [1220]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and three marriages has not yet been identified.  Her second marriage is indicated by two charters.  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi, Ala uxor quondam Roberti filii Ernesii, et Robertus Malet" relinquished "castrum de Esseio" in return for "terram et redditus apud Escocheium" by charter dated to [1220][851].  The family relationship between the three participants is explained in another charter dated to [1220] which records that “Hemerico vicecomiti Castri-Eraudi, Alæ uxori Roberti Ernesii et Roberto Malet, Roberti comitis Alenconii heredibus" assigned property for "castri de Esseio"[852].  She married thirdly (before Oct 1215) as his [first] wife, Guillaume de Préaux.  Guillaume [III] & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Malet de Graville (-[1242/43]).  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi, Ala uxor quondam Roberti filii Ernesii, et Robertus Malet" relinquished "castrum de Esseio" in return for "terram et redditus apud Escocheium" by charter dated to [1220][853].  The family relationship between the three participants is explained in another charter dated to [1220] which records that “Hemerico vicecomiti Castri-Eraudi, Alæ uxori Roberti Ernesii et Roberto Malet, Roberti comitis Alenconii heredibus" assigned property for "castri de Esseio"[854].  “Hemericus vicecomes Castri-Eraudi et Hela soror Roberti quondam comitis de Alencon et Robertus Malet" relinquished "forestam…Escoves et hayam de Ferraria et forestam de Chaumont et forestam de Ruppe-Heolydis, usque in Sarton…de dominio de Alenconio" by charter dated Jan 1220 (probably O.S.)[855]

2.         ROBERT (-after 25 Mar 1159).  A charter dated 25 Mar 1159 records an agreement between the abbey of Fécamp and "Matheo de Gerarvilla" concerning "dominio inter Gerartvillam et Harefluet" {Graville and Harfleur}, sworn by "…Robertus frater ipsius Mathei…"[856]

 

 

 

MALET of SOMERSET

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Malet (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo Maled" in Hampshire[857]

 

2.         ROBERT [III] Malet (-[before 1155]).  Robert [III] Malet may have been the same person as Robert [II] Malet who is shown in Part A of the present chapter.  The 1130 Pipe Roll accounts for land in Oxfordshire "p recto de terra de Warministra de Rob Malet"[858].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Malet" used to hold ten knights’ fees from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) and that "Hubertus de Sancta Susanna" now held two of these and "Willelmus Malech" now held twelve, another section recording the knights’ fees held from "Willelmi Malech" in Somerset[859]

 

3.         WILLIAM Malet (-1169).  According to Domesday Descendants, William was the son of Robert Malet (see above)[860].  A close relationship is indicated by the Red Book of the Exchequer entry which indicates that William had succeeded Robert in landholdings, but they could have been brothers or father and son.  Steward of Henry II King of England.  The 1155 Pipe Roll records "Willo Malet" in Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire[861].  The 1156 Pipe Roll records "Willo Malet" in Kent[862].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Will. Maled" in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire, and in Northamptonshire, both under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones"[863].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmo Malet viii l" in Somerset in [1161/62][864].  It is not certain that all these entries refer to the same person.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Malet" used to hold ten knights’ fees from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) and that "Hubertus de Sancta Susanna" now held two of these and "Willelmus Malech" now held twelve, another section recording the knights’ fees held from "Willelmi Malech" in Somerset[865].  "Roberto …Willelmo Malet dapifero…" subscribed the charter dated 1168 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property "in manerio de Hinton" of "Roberto de Basoges" granted to him by "comes Conanus"[866]m firstly ---.  The name of William’s first wife is not known.  The fact of this first marriage is confirmed by the marriage of William’s son Gilbert with the sister of William’s own second wife.  m secondly (1165 or before) as her first husband, EUGENIA Picot, daughter of RALPH Picot & his wife --- ([1154/55]-after 1194).  She married secondly Thomas FitzBernard.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Ewgenia Picot…filia Radulfi Picot de Kancia et uxor Thome filii Bernardi…xxx annorum”, her property “in hundredo de Redefeld…de feodo Gileberti Malet" given to her by "Willelmus Malet…in dotem”, adding that she had three sons, aged 10, 8 and 3, and one daughter, given by "Dominus Rex, filio Johannis de Bidun", by her second husband[867].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Eugenia Picot x s" in Kent in [1186/87][868].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Eugenia Pikot…pro custodia Johannis f sue et terre sue" in Kent[869].  William & his first wife had [two] children: 

a)         GILBERT Malet (-1194).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.   Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Malet (-before 20 Dec 1215).  "…Willelmo Malet…" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/89] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the prebends of Saint-Nicolas de Bayeux[870].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus Malet de Gerardville" paying "x s, i militem" in Essex, Hertfordshire[871].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Willelmus Malet" being granted delay to pay "per brevia" in Essex, Herefordshire[872].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Willelmus Malet" among those granted delay in payment "per brevia" in Dorset, Somerset[873].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Malet" holding one knight’s fee in "Fineberge" in Norfolk, Suffolk in [1210/12][874].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus Malet" holding one half of one knight’s fee "in Aldeham" and one "in Lullingestone" in Kent in [1210/12][875].  King John granted "totam terram que fuit Willelmi Malet" to "Hug de Vivon" by order dated 20 Dec 1215[876].  [m firstly ---.  The dates of the first marriages of William Malet’s daughters, together with the fact that his known wife Alice Basset had three children by her third husband, suggests that William’s two daughters must have been born from an otherwise unrecorded first marriage.]  m [secondly] as her first husband, ALICE Basset, daughter of THOMAS Basset [II] of Headington & his wife Philippa Malbank (-[1263]).  She married secondly (before 1221, annulled) H--- de Chaceporc, and thirdly (1223 or before) John Bisset.  William & his [first] wife had two children: 

(a)       MABEL Malet .  Her second marriage is confirmed by an order dated 18 Nov 1223 placing "in respite…the demand…from Hugh de Vivonne…for the debt that William Malet, father of the wife of Vivon, owed the king"[877]m firstly NICHOLAS Avenell, son of --- (-[1221/22]).  m secondly (before 18 Nov 1223) HUGUES de Vivonne, son of --- (-1249). 

(b)       HAWISE Malet .  Henry III King of England made an order related to property "apud Exoniam" of "Hawisie que fuit uxor Hugonis Poinz", which she received from "Willelmi Malet patris vestri", dated 26 Aug 1220[878]m firstly HUGH Poinz, son of --- (-before 26 Aug 1220).  m secondly ROBERT de Mucegros, son of ---. 

b)         [BALDWIN Malet (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Baldewinus Malet" held two knights’ fees and three parts from "Willelmi Malech" [Malet] in Somerset[879].] 

 

 

1.         ROBERT Malet (-after 10 Mar 1216).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Malet" holding one quarter of one knight’s fee "in Stanpelte" in Kent in [1210/12][880].  "Robertus Malet" paid a fine for returning to the king’s service, security given by "Falkes de Breaut", dated 10 Mar 1216[881]

 

2.         RALPH Malet (-after 1212).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus Malet" holding "viii l in Norcure…de dominico Rege" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][882].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Radulfus Malet" held "viii libratas terre in [manerio] de Wuttheham de dono Henrici Regis, patris Johannis Regis [per servicium]…quod facit Willelmo Malet" in Somerset[883].  

 

 

 

 

MAMINOT

 

 

The list of fees held from the church of Bayeux in 1133 includes “feodum Maminoth est feodum quinque militum in Surrehain et Bazenville et apud Filgerias juxta Nulleyum et apud Taun et apud Noers et apud Froigneium juxta Laceyum[884]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Courbépine .  Orderic Vitalis names "Roberti de Curvaspina" when recording his son’s election as bishop of Lisieux[885]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         GILBERT Maminot (-Aug 1101).  "…Gilbert Maminot…" witnessed the charter dated Apr 1067 under which William I King of England donated the church of Saint-Jacques de Beuvron to Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire[886].  Bishop of Lisieux: Orderic Vitalis records that "Gislebertus cognomento Maminotus, regis archiater et capellanus…filius Roberti de Curvaspina" was elected bishop of Lisieux and held the position for 23 years, dated to 1077[887].  Domesday Book records that “Gilbert Maminot” held Cudhamin and Keston, in Helmestrei Hundred of the bishop of Bayeux in Kent, Leckhampstead in Stotfold Hundred from the same bishop in Buckinghamshire[888].  Orderic Vitalis records the death of "Gislebertus senex cognomento Maminotus, Luxoviensis episcopus", dated to 1101[889]

b)         [RALPH de Courbépine (-after 1086).  The Domesday book records "Berfrestone" {Barfreston, Kent}, "Berlinge" {Birling, Kent}, Burham {Burham, Kent}, houses in Canterbury, "Colret" {Coldred, Kent}, and "Danetone" {Denton near Barham, Kent}, held by "Ralph de Courbepine"[890].  The Domesday book records "Fereburne" {Fairbourne, Kent}, held by "Ralph de Courbepine"[891].  The Domesday book records "Piventone" {Pivington, Kent}, "Turneham" {Thurnham, Kent}, and Walwalesere {Waldershare, Kent}, held by "Ralph de Courbepine"[892].] 

 

 

1.         HUGH Maminot (-before 1130).  Domesday Book records “Hugh Maminot” holding Rodmarton, Lasborough and Little Sodbury in Gloucestershire of Gilbert Bishop of Lisieux[893].  Eyton calls "Emma Peverel supposed wife of Hugh Maminot" parents of Walkelin Maminot but does not cite the primary source which confirms their names[894].  His name is confirmed by an undated charter which records donations to Rochester, including the donation of “decimam de Bertrea” made by “Hugo pater Walkelini Maminot[895]m [EMMA] Peverel], daughter of --- (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Emme Maminet" in Kent[896].  Her relationship to William Peverel (presumably William Peverel of Dover) is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Walchelinus Maminot" restored “terram de Lega” (near Ellesmere), unjustly taken by “avunculus meus Willielmus Peverel”, to Shrewsbury abbey[897].  Hugh & his wife had three children: 

a)         WALKELIN Maminot (-[1155/57]).  "…Waucelinus Mamot…" witnessed the charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] which records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone"[898].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Gualchelinus…cognomento Maminot" held Dover in a rebellion against King Stephen, dated to 1138, but later made peace[899].  "Walchelinus Maminot" restored “terram de Lega” (near Ellesmere), unjustly taken by “avunculus meus Willielmus Peverel”, to Shrewsbury abbey by undated charter[900].  "Walch Maminot" witnessed the charter dated to [May/Jun] 1141 under which Empress Matilda granted land to Miles of Gloucester which had belonged to "Gregorii Dapiferi" at Westminster[901].  "Walkelinus Maminot" donated Bradford mill to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1141/48], witnessed by "Rogerio filio Warini et Fulcone fratre suo, Stephano de Haia et Michaele fratre suo", and "Willielmus Peverel de Dovera" also donated Bradford mill, donated by "dominus Walchelinus Maminot" for the soul of "Rogeri de Haia", witnessed by "…Matilla mea conjuge, Matilla de Dovera mea sorore, Acelina mea sorore…"[902].  "Walchelinus Maminot…" witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus Peverellus de Douria” donated property “Wlurunton, Einardeseiam, Crugelton” granted to him by “Hamo Peverell patruus meus” to Shrewsbury abbey[903].  "Walcheline Maminoht" exchanged land with the abbot of Shrewsbury by charter dated to [1136/41], witnessed by "Roger Fitz Warin"[904].  "Walcheline Maminoht" granted Bradford Mill to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1145], witnessed by "Roger Fitz Warin and Fulk his brother"[905].  "…Wachelino Maminot…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" donated property to the abbey of Mortemer[906].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Walchel. Mamin." in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire, "Walch. Mam." in Northamptonshire, and "Walch. Maminot" in Kent, all under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones"[907]m as her second husband, JULIANE de Vere, formerly wife of HUGH Bigod later Earl of Norfolk, daughter of AUBREY de Vere Lord of Hedingham & his wife --- ([1110/22]-after 1185).  “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…[908].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Duvercurt” held by “comitissa Juliana…soror comitis Albrici[909].  The Complete Peerage says that “for the souls of her father and mother and of her husbands Hugh Bigoth and Walkelin Maminot she granted Begham Abbey land in Brockley” but does not quote the original[910].  According to the Complete Peerage, she was still living in 1185, citing a grant by “Juliana comitissa” at Dovercourt to Colne Priory, witnessed by “Alberico comite et Alberico filius eius”, adding “which being notified to Gilbert Bishop of London was not later than 1189[911].  Walkelin & his wife had one child: 

i)          WALKELIN Maminot ([1125/38]-[1190]).  The Annals of Bermondsey record that “Walkelinus Mammynot filius Walkelini Mammynot” donated revenue “de molendino de Depforde” to Bermondsey in 1157[912].  The Bermondsey Chronicle records that “Walkelinus Mammynot filius Walkelini Mammynot” donated revenue “de molendino de Depford” to Bermondsey in 1157[913].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the names of those providing knights for military service with "Walkelini Mamignot" in Kent[914].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Walkelin Mamignot xviii l, et de novo i m" in Kent in [1167/68][915].  The Bermondsey Chronicle records that “Walkelinus Maymynot filius Walkelini Mammynot” donated revenue “de dominio de Cippenham in Dilleherst…etiam ecclesiam de Berlyng” to Bermondsey in 1168[916].  The Annals of Bermondsey record the same donation, adding that it was confirmed by Kings Henry II, Edward III, Richard II and Henry IV[917].  A later passage in the same source records the confirmation in 1174 by King Henry II of the donation of "ecclesiam de Bierlyng" by "Walkelinus Mammynot"[918].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Wakelin Mamignot xxvii l, de novo xx s" in Kent in [1171/72][919].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Walkelinus Maminot" in Kent[920].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "heredes Walkelini Mamignot" paying "xiv l x s, xxvii milites" in Kent[921]

b)         ALICE Maminot .  The cartulary of Merton Priory records that Hugh Maminot gave the manor of Petham, Kent to "Ralph de Chesney in marriage with his daughter Alice"[922].  The Complete Peerage has confused the marriages of Alice Maminot, stating that she married firstly "Ralph de Cahaines" and secondly Geoffrey [II] de Say[923].  The supposed first marriage results from confusion between the Chesney and Cahaignes families, members of both of which (both named Ralph) married daughters of Hugh Maminot, as shown in the present document).  As justification for the supposed second marriage, the Complete Peerage quotes an undated charter under which "Galfridus de Say filius Galfridi de Say et Alicie de Cheinnei uxoris sue" of the donation to Bermondsey of the advowson of Birling church made by Walkelin Maminot (see above) and later by "Geoffrey de Say", followed by another confirmation by "William de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of Geoffrey"[924], presumably to provide a purported explanation for the transmission of interests from the Maminot family to the Say family.  In fact the transmission was through the granddaughter of Alice Maminot and Ralph [II] de Chesney who married Geoffrey [III] de Say.  m (before 1130) [as his second wife,] RALPH [II] de Chesney, son of RALPH [I] de Chesney & his wife Matilda ---. 

c)         --- Maminot .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 recording that "Willelmum de Kaines" held "manerium de Tarent in hundredo de Langeber…iii militum…" in Dorset which had been given to "Radulfo de Kaines in maritagio cum filia Hugonis Maminot per dominum Henricum Regem primum"[925].  The wording of this document suggests that the marriage took place after the death of the bride’s father.  m ([before 1130/1135]) RALPH de Cahaignes [Keynes], son of ---.  A manuscript which records donations to Lewes priory includes in Kent land “in Langenia” donated by “Willielmus de Cahaynnes” for the souls of "filiorum suorum Ricardi et Willielmi", of land "ad Ramegingas, de feodo Hugonis de Cahaennis", land "ad Duclintunam" donated y "Adeleidis" for the soul of "Willielmi de Chaennis viri sui" and confirmed by "Hugo filius eius", land "ad Sidenoram" donated by "Hugo de Cahaines" confirmed by "Ricardus filius eius"[926]

 

 

 

 

MARMION

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Fontenay-le-Marmion in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Bourguébus[927].  Vautier suggests that the Marmion family held the seigneurie de Fontenay "dès le principe, elle fut probablement créée pour eux", but that part was transferred to the FitzErneis family with the marriage of Gersende Marmion, daughter of Robert Marmion [I], to Robert [II] FitzErneis[928]

 

 

1.         GUILLAUME Marmion (-after 29 Aug 1060).  "…Willelmo Marmio…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[929]

 

2.         ROGER Marmion .  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "Rogier Marmion" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[930]

 

3.         ROBERT Marmion [I] (-after 1066).  Vaultier states that Robert Marmion was granted Tamworth for his part in the conquest of England and the lordship of "Scrivelsbye" in Lincolnshire[931]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after[932].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of la Trinité de Caen, including the donation by "Haudvise uxoris Roberti Marmion" of land "in Sancto Georgio et in Jurkis et molendinum de la Boista et le Parket", by charter dated to [1180/82][933].  Robert [I] & his wife had four children: 

a)         ROGER Marmion (-after [1115/18]).  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after[934].  The Descriptio militum de Abbatia de Burgo records "Roger Marmiun" with "ii milites" held from "abbatia de Burch" [in Hampshire][935]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT Marmion [II] of Tamworth, Staffordshire (-killed in battle [1143/44]).  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[936]

-         see below

b)         HELTON Marmion .  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after[937]

c)         MANASSES Marmion .  Vaultier states that "Hadvise veuve de Robert seigneur de Fontenay le Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Caen, with the consent of "ses fils Roger, Helton et Manassès", by charter dated to 1066 or soon after[938]

d)         GERSENDE Marmion .  She is named in a charter dated 1217 under which "Robertus filius Erneisi sextus" confirmed donations to Fontenay by "antecessore meo bonæ memoriæ Roberto filio Erneisi secundo", which quotes the donation by "Robertus…et Gersendis uxor mea filia Roberti Marmionis"[939].  Vaultier dates this donation quoted in the charter to after 1087[940]m ([before 1087]) ROBERT [II] FitzErneis, son of ROBERT [I] FitzErneis & his wife ---. 

 

4.         ROBERT Marmion [II] (-after 1091).  "…Rotberti Marmion…" consented to the donation of "decimam Ansfredi Villæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by "Gernagois et Albereda uxor eius, cum filiis suis Willelmo et Rotberto" by charter dated 1091[941].  "…Robert Marmion…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[942]

 

5.         WALTER Marmion .  “Baderon de Monemue” donated property in Monmouth to Monmouth Priory, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Gileberti et Jacobi”, by undated charter witnessed by "…Waltero Marmiun…"[943]

 

6.         GEOFFREY Marmion (-after 1158).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Galfrido Marmion" in Warwick in [1158/59][944]

 

 

ROBERT Marmion [III] of Tamworth, Staffordshire, son of ROGER Marmion & his wife --- (-killed in battle [1143/44]).  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[945].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt Marmion" in Lincolnshire[946].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barbery, including donations by "Roberti Marmium, concessione Roberti filii sui et uxoris sue et filiarum suarum", by charter dated to [1182/89][947]

m as her first husband, MELISENDE, daughter of ---.  A kinswoman of Queen Adelisa, who gave her the manor of Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire on her second marriage[948].  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[949].  She married secondly Richard de Camville

Robert [III] & his wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT Marmion [IV] (-before Oct 1181).  King Stephen granted the land of "Rogeri avi sui et Roberti Marmium patris sui" to "Roberto Marmium" by charter dated to [1144][950].  "[Rodbertus] Marmiun" donated land in Roughton to Kirkstead abbey by charter dated 1163[951].  [The 1164/65 Pipe Roll records "Rob fil Milesent" accounting for land in Yorkshire[952].  It is not certain that this entry relates to Robert [IV] Marmion, but this looks probable because Melisende was not a common name in England at that time.]  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus Marmion vii l xii s viii d, de novo lxx s" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1167/68][953].  "…Simon de Tornebu, Robertus Marmion et Willelmus de Glanvilla" reported the results of an enquiry into rights to the church of Surrain by charter dated Jan 1176[954].  "…Roberto Marmion…" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the freedoms of the town of Rouen[955].  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barbery, including donations by "Roberti Marmium, concessione Roberti filii sui et uxoris sue et filiarum suarum", by charter dated to [1182/89][956]m ELISABETH de Rethel, daughter of GERVAIS de Rethel & his wife Elisabeth de Namur ([1121/23]-).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that her stepfather "Clarenbaldus de Roseto" alienated her lands and married her to "nobili Roberto Marmioni de Normannia", without giving her name[957].  Robert [IV] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT Marmion [V] (-after 1196).  "Robert Marmion, fils de Robert" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Barberie made by his father by charter dated Oct 1181[958]

-        see below

2.         daughters .  Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Barbery, including donations by "Roberti Marmium, concessione Roberti filii sui et uxoris sue et filiarum suarum", by charter dated to [1182/89][959]

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY Marmion (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Galfridus Marmiun" held one knight’s fee from "Roberti Marmiun" in Warwickshire[960]

 

2.         ALBREDA Marmion (-after 1220).  King John confirmed "castellum et villam de Landesteph" to "G. de Camvill fil Will de Kamvill", naming "Albred Marmion matre ipsius Gaufridi", by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[961].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1220, by "Albreda Marmiun" against "Henricum de Aldithelega" for "ecclesiam de Cliftona", adding that she had custody of "terram…Gaufrido de Camuilla filio suo"[962]m WILLIAM de Camville, son of --- (-before 25 Apr 1200). 

 

 

ROBERT Marmion [V], son of ROBERT Marmion [IV] & his wife Elisabeth de Rethel (-after 1196).  "Robert Marmion, fils de Robert" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Barberie made by his father by charter dated Oct 1181[963].  "Raoul Taisson, fils de Jourdain Taisson" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and confirmed the donations by "Robert Marmion" by undated charter[964].  Henry II King of England confirmed the franchise of pleas for the land of "Roberti Marmium" by charter dated to [1172/89][965].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Marmion" paying "cxiv s vi d" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire[966].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Robertus Marmiun" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire[967].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus Marmion" paying "x s, dimidium militem" in Northamptonshire[968]

m firstly MATILDA de Beauchamp, daughter of WALTER [I] de Beauchamp of Elmley & his wife [Emmeline] de Abitot.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Robert Marmion, neveu de Guillaume de Beauchamp" made a declaration concerning a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie and the charter dated 1224 under which "Robert Marmion le jeune, fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp" donated property to the same abbey[969]

m secondly PHILIPPA, daughter of --- (-after 1223).  Henry III King of England issued an order relating to a claim by "Philippa Marmiun" against "Robertum Marmiun seniorem filium et heredum Roberti Marmiun" relating to "tenemento in Tamewurth et in Middeltun…dotis [sue]" dated 6 Jan 1221, received by "Roberto Marmiun juniori…et ipsam matrem suam secum"[970]

Robert [V] & his first wife had two children: 

1.         ROBERT Marmion [VI] (-1241).  "Robert Marmion, neveu de Guillaume de Beauchamp" made a declaration concerning a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by undated charter[971].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Marmyun" holding one knight’s fee in "Scrivelby" in Lincolnshire in [1210/12][972].  He was disinherited during the early part of the reign of King Henry III, as shown by the fine paid by "Robert Marmion juniorfor having custody of Tamworth castle and of the lands formerly of Robert his father…", subject to "his brother Robert senior [coming] to the king’s peace", dated to [1217/18][973].  Henry III King of England ordered that the lands of "Roberti Marmiun" be granted to "Robertum Marmiun filium suum primogenitum", except for agreements with "Robertum Marmiun juniorem fratrem suum", dated 25 Nov 1220[974].  "Robert Marmion le jeune, fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1224[975].  "Robertus Marmion, filius Matillis de Bello Campo" granted property to "Radulfo Porto Aloe de Roquancourt" for his loyal service by charter dated 1233[976].  Matthew Paris names "…Robertus Marmiun…" among those who died in 1241[977]m JULIANA, daughter of PHILIP de Vassy & his wife ---.  "Philippus Marmion" names "Roberti Marmiun patris mei, et Willelmi Marmiun patrui mei…Juliane de Vauceio matris mee" in a charter dated 22 Oct 1246 which records the sale of Fontenay le Marmion[978].  Robert [VI] & his wife had one child: 

a)         PHILIP Marmion (-[20 Apr 1290/5 Dec 1291]).  "Philip son of Robert Marmiun" was granted lands by his father dated 10 Dec 1239[979].  "Philippus Marmion" sold Fontenay le Marmion, previously held by "Roberti Marmion patris mei, et Willelmi Marmion patrui mei" to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated 2 Nov 1245[980].  "Philippus de Marmiun filius et hæres Roberti le Marmiun" recalls the donation of “Buteyate” to Bardney by “Robertus Marmiun…et Milesent uxor mea et Robertus filius meus” by charter dated Jun 1248[981]m firstly (1247 or before) JOAN, daughter of HUGH de Kilpeck & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "dicunt quod Hugo de Kilpe[k] tenuit manerium de Parva Teynton...habuit duas filias...heredes, quarum Philippus Marmiun desponsavit unam et Willelmus de Cantilupo habet custodiam alterius..."[982]. m secondly MARY, daughter of --- (-before 26 Sep 1313).  Philip & his first wife had three children: 

i)          JOAN (-before 13 Aug 1295).  m WILLIAM de Morteyn, son of ---. 

ii)         MAZERA (-before 1291).  m RALPH de Cromwell, son of ---. 

iii)        MATILDAm RALPH le Butler, son of ---. 

Philip & his second wife had one child: 

iv)       JOANm firstly THOMAS de Ludlow, son of ---.  m secondly HENRY Hillary, son of ---. 

Philip had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

v)         ROBERTm ISABEL, daughter of GILES FitzRalph & his wife ---.  

2.         MABEL m firstly HUGH de Say [II], son of HUGH de Say [I] & his wife Lucy Clifford ([1165/70]-killed in battle ([1196]).  m secondly (before Mar 1200) REGINALD, son of ---. 

Robert [V] & his second wife had two children: 

3.         ROBERT Marmion [VII] (-before 23 Oct 1242).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Robertus Marmiun junior" dated 1216[983].  Henry III King of England granted "castri de Tamewurth et terrarum que fuerunt Robert patris sui" to "Robertus Marmium junior" dated 16 May 1218[984].  "Robert Marmion junior" paid a fine for "having custody of Tamworth castle and of the lands formerly of Robert his father…", default to "William brother of Robert junior", subject to "his brother Robert senior [coming] to the king’s peace", dated to [1217/18][985].  Henry III King of England ordered that the lands of "Roberti Marmiun" be granted to "Robertum Marmiun filium suum primogenitum", except for agreements with "Robertum Marmiun juniorem fratrem suum", dated 25 Nov 1220[986].  “Radulfus Basset” confirmed donations to Canwell priory by “Geua Ridel et pater meus Radulfus Basset”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Roberto Marmion, Willielmo Marmion filio suo…"[987]m AVICE, daughter of HUGH de Tanfield & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Robert [VII] & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Marmion (-27 Jul 1275).  “Radulfus Basset” confirmed donations to Canwell priory by “Geua Ridel et pater meus Radulfus Basset”, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Roberto Marmion, Willielmo Marmion filio suo…"[988].  "Guillaume Marmion, clerc, fils de Robert Marmion, fils du fondateur de Barberie" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie, for the soul of "son jeune frère Robert", by charter dated 1238, confirmed by "Robert Marmion fils de Mathilde de Beauchamp"[989].  He supported the Barons against King Henry III, was summoned to Parliament by Simon de Montfort, and pardoned by the king 1 Jul 1267[990]m (1248) LORETTE, daughter of [RICHARD FitzJohn [FitzRoy] & his wife Rohese de Dover] (-after 1248).  In the Complete Peerage, she is described as the daughter of "Royce, daughter and heiress of Robert of Dover" who granted the manor of Luddington in 1248 to her daughter and son-in-law[991].  An assize of last presentation brought by the king in 1261 against "William Marmion and Lauretta" shows that "Lauretta was the daughter of Richard FitzRoy"[992]. 

-        LORDS MARMION[993]

b)         ROBERT Marmion .  "Guillaume Marmion, clerc, fils de Robert Marmion, fils du fondateur de Barberie" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie, for the soul of "son jeune frère Robert", by charter dated 1238[994]

4.         WILLIAM Marmion (-after Oct 1257).  "Robert Marmion junior" paid a fine for "having custody of Tamworth castle and of the lands formerly of Robert his father…", default to "William brother of Robert junior", subject to "his brother Robert senior [coming] to the king’s peace", dated to [1217/18][995].  "Philippus Marmion" sold Fontenay le Marmion, previously held by "Roberti Marmion patris mei, et Willelmi Marmion patrui mei" to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated 2 Nov 1245[996].  "Willelmus Marmion" sold property to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated Oct 1257[997]

 

 

1.         MAURICE Marmion .  "Mauricius Marmion miles" sold property to "domine Johanne de Tureio" by charter dated Apr 1245[998]

 

2.         THOMAS Marmionm ---.  The name of Thomas’s wife is not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Marmion .  "Guillaume Marmion, fils de Thomas Marmion, chevalier" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1248[999]

 

3.         ROBERT Marmionm ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER Marmion .  "Roger Marmion chevalier, fils de Robert Marmion" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1258[1000]

 

 

1.         GEOFFROY Marmion .  "Geoffroy Marmion" confirmed a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by undated charter[1001]

 

2.         GUILLAUME Marmion d’Urvillem ---.  The name of Guillaume’s wife is not known.  Guillaume & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROGER .  "Roger fils de Guillaume Marmion d’Urville" confirmed a donation of property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by undated charter[1002].  "Roger Marmion chevalier, fils de Guillaume Marmion" donated property to the abbey of Fontenay by charter dated 1225[1003]

 

3.         --- Marmionm JEANNE, daughter of --- & his wife Marguerite de May.  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1237 under which her son "Roger Marmion fils de Jeanne Marmion, fille de Marguerite de May" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie[1004].  One child: 

a)         ROGER Marmion .  "Roger Marmion fils de Jeanne Marmion, fille de Marguerite de May" donated property to Sainte-Marie-de-Barberie by charter dated 1237[1005]

 

4.         JEAN Marmion (-before 15 Dec 1282).  m ---.  The name of Jean’s wife is not known.  Jean Marmion & his wife had one child: 

a)         JEAN Marmion .  "Johannes Marmion armiger, filius quondam Johannis Marmion militis defuncti" donated property "in feodo Nicolai Marmion, in feodo Guillelmi Marmion, in feodo Laurencie Marmion, in feodo Roberti de Urvilla, in feodo Roberti de Touschet, armigeri defuncti" by charter dated 15 Dec 1282[1006]

 

 

 

 

MARTEL

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Bacqueville-en-Caux in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Dieppe, canton Bacqueville, as confirmed by the charter dated 15 May 1134 which is quoted below[1007]

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY Martel (-after 13 Jan 1103).  "…Galfridus Martel…" witnessed the charter dated 13 Jan 1103 which records an agreement between “Philippus de Braosa” and the abbey of Fécamp[1008].  Henry II King of England, by undated charter, confirmed donations to Clerkenwell St Mary, including the donation of “Bleneford” by "Willielmi Martelli et filii eius Galfridi et Alberedæ matris eiusdem Galfridi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, adding that the land had been donated by "G. Martell, pater Willielmi Martelli" to Winchester St Mary "cum filia sua"[1009]m ALBREDA, daughter of --- (-after 15 May 1134).  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134[1010].  Geoffrey & his wife had six children: 

a)         WILLIAM Martel (-after 1162, bur Bacqueville).  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1011].  “Willelmus Martel dapifer regis” donated “ecclesiam de Aldeburch et de Haselwde” to Colchester St. John, when “corpus Rogeris fratris mei fuit sepultum in illo monasterio”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Walterus Martel, Baldricus Martel[1012].  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel, Johannes de Port, Rogerus et Eudo et Walt. et Eustachius, et Rogerus tunc constabularius Eyæ, filii domini…"[1013].  Henry II King of England, by undated charter, confirmed donations to Clerkenwell St Mary, including the donation of “Bleneford” by "Willielmi Martelli et filii eius Galfridi et Alberedæ matris eiusdem Galfridi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, adding that the land had been donated by "G. Martell, pater Willielmi Martelli" to Winchester St Mary "cum filia sua"[1014]m ALBREDA, daughter of --- (-after 1162).  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel…"[1015].  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which her grandson “Willielmus Martel” confirmed the donation of "hæredem meorum Parvam Blenford" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s made by "Galfridus Martel pater meus…cum Albreda matre sua"[1016].  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1017].  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          GEOFFREY Martel (-1180).  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1018].  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel…"[1019].  "Ricardo de Lucy et Gaufrido Martel et Osberto Martel" witnessed the charter dated to [1149/54] under which King Stephen confirmed liberties of Abbotsbury abbey[1020].  Henry II King of England confirmed donations to Clerkenwell St Mary, including the donation of “Bleneford” by "Willielmi Martelli et filii eius Galfridi et Alberedæ matris eiusdem Galfridi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, which land had been donated by "G. Martell, pater Willielmi Martelli" to Winchester St Mary "cum filia sua", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto filio Walteri, Saero de Quenci comite Wintoniæ, Henrico de Boun…"[1021].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the knights` fees held by "Galfridus Martel" from the king in Dorset, states that "antecessores mei" did not hold the lands "plus tempore Henrici regis" (presumably indicating King Henry I), and that the king (presumably indicating King Henry II) granted "quartam partem servitii i militis" to "Rogero fratri meo" and another part to "Simoni filio Roberti"[1022]m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey & his wife had [five] children: 

(a)       WILLIAM Martel .  "W[illelmus] Martel...post obitum Willelmi Martel avi mei" donated “capellam Sancti-Leonardi de Basquevilla” to Bacqueville priory by charter dated 1188, witnessed by “Goffredus Martel, Alanus Martel fratres mei...[1023].  “Willielmus Martel” confirmed the donation of "hæredem meorum Parvam Blenford" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s made by "Galfridus Martel pater meus…cum Albreda matre sua" by undated charter, witnessed by "Johanne Martel…"[1024].  "W[illelmus] Martel" confirmed the donations made by “W[illelmus] Martel avus meus” to “ecclesia Beate-Marie de Baschevilla” where he was buried by charter dated 25 Mar 1192 (O.S.), witnessed by “Alanus Martel frater meus...[1025].  “Willelmus Martel filius Gaufridus Martel” confirmed the donation of “manerio de Snapes et de manerio de Aldeburch” made to Colchester St. John by “Willelmus Martel avus meus et Albreda uxor eius assensu...Gaufridi patris mei heredis ipsius Willelmi” by undated charter, witnessed by “Alanus Martel...[1026]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(1)       GEOFFREY Martel .  “Gaufridus Martel” donated revenue from land "apud Wincestriam quam Johannes frater Willielmi filii Martin tenuit de me" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Philippæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Eustachio Martel, Johanne Martel…"[1027]m PHILIPPA, daughter of ---.  “Gaufridus Martel” donated revenue from land "apud Wincestriam quam Johannes frater Willielmi filii Martin tenuit de me" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Philippæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[1028].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Galfridus Martel et uxor ipsius soror…Cecilie [de Alwardesbi]" in Gloucestershire[1029]

(b)       GEOFFREY Martel .  "W[illelmus] Martel...post obitum Willelmi Martel avi mei" donated “capellam Sancti-Leonardi de Basquevilla” to Bacqueville priory by charter dated 1188, witnessed by “Goffredus Martel, Alanus Martel fratres mei...[1030]

(c)       ALAN Martel .  “Willelmus Martel filius Gaufridus Martel” confirmed the donation of “manerio de Snapes et de manerio de Aldeburch” made to Colchester St. John by “Willelmus Martel avus meus et Albreda uxor eius assensu...Gaufridi patris mei heredis ipsius Willelmi” by undated charter, witnessed by “Alanus Martel...[1031].  "W[illelmus] Martel...post obitum Willelmi Martel avi mei" donated “capellam Sancti-Leonardi de Basquevilla” to Bacqueville priory by charter dated 1188, witnessed by “Goffredus Martel, Alanus Martel fratres mei...[1032].  "W[illelmus] Martel" confirmed the donations made by “W[illelmus] Martel avus meus” to “ecclesia Beate-Marie de Baschevilla” where he was buried by charter dated 25 Mar 1192 (O.S.), witnessed by “Alanus Martel frater meus...[1033]

(d)       [JOHN Martel .  “Willielmus Martel” confirmed the donation of "hæredem meorum Parvam Blenford" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s made by "Galfridus Martel pater meus…cum Albreda matre sua" by undated charter, witnessed by "Johanne Martel…"[1034].  “Gaufridus Martel” donated revenue from land "apud Wincestriam quam Johannes frater Willielmi filii Martin tenuit de me" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Philippæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Eustachio Martel, Johanne Martel…"[1035].] 

(e)       [EUSTACE Martel .  “Gaufridus Martel” donated revenue from land "apud Wincestriam quam Johannes frater Willielmi filii Martin tenuit de me" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, for the soul of "Philippæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter, witnessed by "Eustachio Martel, Johanne Martel…"[1036].] 

ii)         ROGER .  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1037].  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel, Johannes de Port, Rogerus et Eudo et Walt. et Eustachius, et Rogerus tunc constabularius Eyæ, filii domini…"[1038].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the knights` fees held by "Galfridus Martel" from the king in Dorset, states that "antecessores mei" did not hold the lands "plus tempore Henrici regis" (presumably indicating King Henry I), and that the king (presumably indicating King Henry II) granted "quartam partem servitii i militis" to "Rogero fratri meo" and another part to "Simoni filio Roberti"[1039]

iii)        EUDES Martel .  "Will[elm]o Mart[el] et Eud[one] Mart[el]…" witnessed the undated charter under which King Stephen confirmed the donation of land at North Baddesley to the abbey of St Denis, Southampton by "Rob de Limesia"[1040].  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel, Johannes de Port, Rogerus et Eudo et Walt. et Eustachius, et Rogerus tunc constabularius Eyæ, filii domini…"[1041]

iv)       WALTER Martel (-after [Nov 1137/Jan 1138]).  "Emma filia Grimbaldi medici" granted her rights to her father’s lands to "Waltero Mart[el]", as did "Atselina uxor ipsius Grimbaldi", by charter dated to [Nov 1137/Jan 1138][1042].  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel, Johannes de Port, Rogerus et Eudo et Walt. et Eustachius, et Rogerus tunc constabularius Eyæ, filii domini…"[1043]

v)        EUSTACHE Martel .  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel, Johannes de Port, Rogerus et Eudo et Walt. et Eustachius, et Rogerus tunc constabularius Eyæ, filii domini…"[1044]

vi)       ROGER Martel .  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel, Johannes de Port, Rogerus et Eudo et Walt. et Eustachius, et Rogerus tunc constabularius Eyæ, filii domini…"[1045]

b)         EUDES Martel (-after 15 May 1134).  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1046]

c)         WALTER Martel (-after 15 May 1134).  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1047].  “Willelmus Martel dapifer regis” donated “ecclesiam de Aldeburch et de Haselwde” to Colchester St. John, when “corpus Rogeris fratris mei fuit sepultum in illo monasterio”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Walterus Martel, Baldricus Martel[1048]

d)         BALDRIC Martel (-after 15 May 1134).  "Willermus Martel" donated Bacqueville church to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, with the consent of "matris mee Albereye et uxoris mee similiter Albereye et Eudonis fratris mei", by charter dated 15 May 1134, witnessed by “Goffredus, Rogerius filii mei, Eudo, Gauterius, Baldricus fratres mei[1049].  “Willelmus Martel dapifer regis” donated “ecclesiam de Aldeburch et de Haselwde” to Colchester St. John, when “corpus Rogeris fratris mei fuit sepultum in illo monasterio”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Walterus Martel, Baldricus Martel[1050]

e)         ROGER Martel (-bur Colchester St. John).  “Willelmus Martel dapifer regis” donated “ecclesiam de Aldeburch et de Haselwde” to Colchester St. John, when “corpus Rogeris fratris mei fuit sepultum in illo monasterio”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Walterus Martel, Baldricus Martel[1051]

f)          daughter .  Henry II King of England, by undated charter, confirmed donations to Clerkenwell St Mary, including the donation of “Bleneford” by "Willielmi Martelli et filii eius Galfridi et Alberedæ matris eiusdem Galfridi" to Clerkenwell St Mary’s, adding that the land had been donated by "G. Martell, pater Willielmi Martelli" to Winchester St Mary "cum filia sua"[1052]

 

 

1.         OSBERT Martel (-after 1149).  “Willielmus Martel et Albreda uxor eius et Gaufridus Martel filius eius” donated “manerium suum de Snape et de Aldeburc” to Colchester monastery by undated charter, witnessed by "…Osbernus Martel…"[1053].  "Ricardo de Lucy et Gaufrido Martel et Osberto Martel" witnessed the charter dated to [1149/54] under which King Stephen confirmed liberties of Abbotsbury abbey[1054]

 

2.         WILLIAM Martel (-after 1138).  "W[illelmo] Mart[el]" witnessed the undated charter under which King Stephen granted freedom from tolls to abbey[1055].  "Will[elm]o Mart[el] et Eud[one] Mart[el]…" witnessed the undated charter under which King Stephen confirmed the donation of land at North Baddesley to the abbey of St Denis, Southampton by "Rob de Limesia"[1056]

 

 

 

 

MAUDUIT

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Saint-Martin-du-Bosc in the present-day French département of Eure, arrondissement Les Andelys, canton Etrepagny[1057].  Philippe II King of France granted “la terre de Guillaume Mauduit à Saint-Martin” to “Jean fils d’Athon” by charter dated [Oct] 1207[1058], although as noted below the precise relationship between Guillaume Mauduit and the main Mauduit family has not been traced. 

 

 

[Two possible brothers:]

1.         WILLIAM [I] Mauduit (-before [1105]).  Domesday Book records land held by “William Mauduit” in Rowner (Titchfiedl Hundred), Hartley Mauditt and Bessete (Neatham Hundred), Portchester (Portchester Hundred), Preston Candover (Bermondspit Hundred), and Shalden (Odiham Hundred), in Hampshire[1059].  "…Will. Malusconductus…" witnessed the charter dated 13 Jan 1103 which records an agreement between “Philippus de Braosa” and the abbey of Fécamp[1060]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Henry I King of England granted "totam dotem suam…Sceldedenam et Herleiam et dominicum managium de Wincestr extra portam civitatis" to "Hadewise uxori Willelmi Malduit" by charter dated to [1102/05][1061].  William [I] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT [I] Mauduit (-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120).  Orderic Vitalis names "Rodbertus Malconductus" among those who drowned in the White Ship in 1120[1062].  Henry I King of England granted "totam dotem matris sue…terram de Sceldedena et de Herleia et dominicum managium suum de Wintonia extra portam civitatis" to "Willelmo Maledocto", and also confirmed to him the lands which "Robertus Maledoctus suus frater a me tenuit", by charter dated 1121[1063].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Mauduit" used to hold one knights fee in Hampshire now held by "Robertus de Ponte Arche"[1064]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          CONSTANCE Mauduit .  The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Robertum filium Hildebrandi" fell in love with "Willelmus de Ponte Arcarum…uxorem", imprisoned her husband, but died from a painful illness, dated from the context to [1142][1065]m GUILLAUME de Pont de l’Arche, son of --- (-after 1142). 

b)         WILLIAM [II] Mauduit (-[1153/Aug 1158]).  Henry I King of England granted "totam dotem matris sue…terram de Sceldedena et de Herleia et dominicum managium suum de Wintonia extra portam civitatis" to "Willelmo Maledocto", and also confirmed to him the lands which "Robertus Maledoctus suus frater a me tenuit", by charter dated 1121[1066]

-        see below

c)         daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Sep [1131/57] under which [her brother] "Willemus Maled camerarius regis" notified "hominibus Sancti Martini" that he had restored to "Johanni nepoti meo" land which "Johannes avus suus et Huonus pater suus et Willelmo de Sancto Martino patruus suus" had held "in Sancto Martino"[1067]m HUGH de Saint-Martin, son of JOHN de Saint-Martin & his wife ---. 

2.         [GUNFRID Mauduit (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Gunfrid Mauduit” holding Calstone Wellington in Wiltshire[1068].]  

 

 

The precise relationship between the following individuals and the main Mauduit family has not been traced. 

 

1.         ROGER Mauduit .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records Robert d’Oilly sheriff of Oxfordshire accounting for "terre Rogeri Maledocti que habuit in custodia" in Oxfordshire[1069].  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Rogerus Maledoctus cum sua coniuge…Odelina" donated land and houses in Oxford to the monastery of Abingdon undated, witnessed by "Raineri medici, Turstini Basset"[1070]m ODELINE, daughter of ---.  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Rogerus Maledoctus cum sua coniuge…Odelina" donated land and houses in Oxford to the monastery of Abingdon undated, witnessed by "Raineri medici, Turstini Basset"[1071]

 

2.         daughter (-after [Nov 1183/Nov 1184]).  Her marriage and relationship with the Mauduit family are indicated by the charter dated to [Nov 1183/Nov 1184] under which [her son] "Robertus de Ousbravill filius Fulconis" granted "civitatem meam de Ousbravill", except land which "mea mater tenet in doario", to "Willelmo Mauduit camerario domini regis Anglie, cognato meo et Roberto filio suo"[1072].  As she was still alive at the date of this charter, it is unlikely that she was the daughter of William [I] Mauduit.  It is also unlikely that she was the daughter of William [II] Mauduit as, in that case, William [III] Mauduit would have been the grantor’s uncle, a relationship which would probably have been referred to more specifically in the document.  m FOULQUES d’Ouville, son of ---. 

 

 

WILLIAM [II] Mauduit, son of WILLIAM [I] Mauduit & his wife Hawise --- (-[1153/Aug 1158]).  Henry I King of England granted "totam dotem matris sue…terram de Sceldedena et de Herleia et dominicum managium suum de Wintonia extra portam civitatis" to "Willelmo Maledocto", and also confirmed to him the lands which "Robertus Maledoctus suus frater a me tenuit", by charter dated 1121[1073].  Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Michaelis de Hamslap…cum Matilda filia ipsius…in uxorem" to "Willelmo Maledocto camerario meo pro servicio suo" by charter dated to [1131][1074].  Empress Matilda granted "Bergedunam" {Barrowden, Rutland} to "Will[el]mo Maledocto camerario meo" which "Mich[ael] de Hameslapa antecessor suus habuit", by charter dated [5/7] May 1141[1075].  "H[enricus] dux Normann[orum] et Aquit[anorum] et comes Andeg[avorum]" restored "Will[el]mo Maledocto cam[erario] meo" to his office and lands in Normandy and England, including what "Rob[er]tus Maledoctus frater suus" held from King Henry I, by charter dated [7 Jun] 1153, witnessed by "…Joh[ann]e Maledocto…"[1076]

m ([1131]) MATILDA de Hanslope, daughter of MICHAEL de Hanslope & his wife ---.  Henry I King of England granted "totam terram Michaelis de Hamslap…cum Matilda filia ipsius…in uxorem" to "Willelmo Maledocto camerario meo pro servicio suo" by charter dated to [Aug 1131/Jul 1133][1077]

William [II] & his wife had [five] children: 

1.         WILLIAM [III] Mauduit (-2 Oct 1194, bur Waverley Abbey).  Henry II King of England confirmed "baroniam totam quam pater suus de me tenuit, tan in Anglia quam in Normannia" to "Willelmo Malduit filio Willelmi Mald camerarii mei" by charter dated to [Dec 1154/Aug 1158][1078].   Chamberlain.  "Comes Simon" confirmed to "Willelmo Malduit camerario domini regis et Isabelle uxori sue" the land "in Grendon…" which "comes Simon pater meus dedit Willelmo Malduit et Isabelle uxori sue in libero maritagio" by charter dated to [1158/74][1079].   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knight feeholders from "Willelmus Malduit camerarius" in Buckinghamshire[1080].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus Maudut, camerarius xxiii s iv d, et de novo xxxvi s viii d" in Buckinghamshire in [1167/68][1081].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus Mauduit camerarius" paying "xvii s vi d, i militem et tres partes" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1082].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Willelmus Mauduit camerarius" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1083].  The Annals of Waverley record the death “VI Non Oct” in 1194 of “Willelmus Maldut” and his burial “apud Waverleiam[1084]m ISABELLE de Senlis, daughter of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon & his wife Isabelle de Beaumont.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1158/74] under which [her brother] "Comes Simon" confirmed to "Willelmo Malduit camerario domini regis et Isabelle uxori sue" the land "in Grendon…" which "comes Simon pater meus dedit Willelmo Malduit et Isabelle uxori sue in libero maritagio"[1085].   William [III] & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         ROBERT [II] Mauduit (-[1217/Jun 1222]).  "Robertus de Ousbravill filius Fulconis" granted "civitatem meam de Ousbravill", except land which "mea mater tenet in doario", to "Willelmo Mauduit camerario domini regis Anglie, cognato meo et Roberto filio suo" by charter dated to [Nov 1183/Nov 1184][1086]

-        see below

b)         [GUILLAUME Mauduit (-after 1204).  Philippe II King of France granted “la terre de Guillaume Mauduit à Saint-Martin” to “Jean fils d’Athon” by charter dated [Oct] 1207[1087].] 

2.         [JOHN Mauduit (-[after 1204]).  "H[enricus] dux Normann[orum] et Aquit[anorum] et comes Andeg[avorum]" restored "Will[el]mo Maledocto cam[erario] meo" to his office and lands in Normandy and England, including what "Rob[er]tus Maledoctus frater suus" held from King Henry I, by charter dated [7 Jun] 1153, witnessed by "…Joh[ann]e Maledocto…"[1088].  It is possible that the witness was the son of the grantee.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record "Johannem Malduit" holding one knight’s fee from "Willelmus Malduit camerarius" in Buckinghamshire[1089]Domesday Descendants notes that he died after 1178 "leaving issue" but gives no further details[1090].  Philippe II King of France granted “la terre que Jean et Robert Mauduit avaient possédée à Saint-Martin” to “Baudouin de Lihus” by charter dated [22 Apr 1207/5 Apr 1208][1091].] 

3.         SIBYLLA Mauduit (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Westone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Galfridi Ridel, et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that she has “ii filios et i filiam”, but that “Ricardus Basset, qui fuit de prima uxore viri sui” was the heir[1092].  Another passage in the same source records property “in Frixtone” held by “Sibilla que fuit uxor Gaufridi Ridel et soror Willelmi Mauduit”, adding that “Gaufridus Basset ei dedit in dotem” and that “Ricardus Basset” is heir[1093]m as his second wife, GEOFFREY Ridel, son of RICHARD Basset & his wife Matilda Ridel (-before 1185). 

4.         MATILDA Mauduit (-after 1184).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Wulrintone” held by “Hamo filius Hamonis filii Meinfelin…xx annorum”, adding that his father died “die Veneris ante Ascensionem”, that he is “nepos Willelmi Mauduit ex parte matris[1094].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Stokes” held by “Matilda que fuit uxor Hamonis Meinfelini[1095]m HAMON, son of MEINFELIN & his wife --- (-May 1184). 

5.         ALICE Mauduit ([1134]-after 1184).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Morcote” held by “Alizia de Bidune, soror Willelmi Mauduit...L annorum”, adding that she has “iv filias” and naming their husbands[1096].  Another section of the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “domina de Lateburia que fuit uxor Johannis de Bidune et soror camerarii de Hameslepe” and “terra sua in Lateberia”, with “iv filias maritatas et i est maritanda[1097]m JOHN de Bidun, son of HALENALD de Bidun & his first wife Sara --- (-before 1184). 

 

 

1.         ANSELM Mauduit (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Anselinus Mauduit" held one knights fee in Dorset from the abbot of St Edward’s[1098]

 

 

ROBERT [II] Mauduit, son of WILLIAM [III] Mauduit & his wife Isabelle de Senlis (-[1217/Jun 1222]).  "Robertus de Ousbravill filius Fulconis" granted "civitatem meam de Ousbravill", except land which "mea mater tenet in doario", to "Willelmo Mauduit camerario domini regis Anglie, cognato meo et Roberto filio suo" by charter dated to [Nov 1183/Nov 1184][1099].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus Mauduit xx s de feodo i militis in Wermunstre" in Wiltshire in [1186/87][1100].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus Malduit" paying "xxv s, i militem et tres partes" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1101].  Philippe II King of France granted “la terre que Jean et Robert Mauduit avaient possédée à Saint-Martin” to “Baudouin de Lihus” by charter dated [22 Apr 1207/5 Apr 1208][1102].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "Robertus Mauduit camerarius" held "Hamslap…"[1103].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus Maudut" holding land "Berewedone per camerarium" in Rutland in [1210/12][1104].  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Willelmus Maudut" to "comitem W. Marescallum, ad loquendem cum eo de deliberacione R. patris sui" dated [early] 1217[1105].  Henry III King of England granted "honorem de Hamslape…que fuerunt Roberti Mauduit […camerarii]" to "Henrico de Brayboef" dated to [Mar] 1217[1106]

m as her first husband, ISABELLA Basset, daughter of THURSTAN Basset & his wife --- (-[24 Oct/11 Dec] 1225).  "Isabella who was the wife of Robert Mauduit, who is one of the heirs of Thurstan Basset…" made a fine "for having her rightful portion…of lands formerly of Thurstan her father" in the honour of Wallingford, dated 8 Jan 1223[1107].  She may have married secondly (after 24 Oct 1225) Thomas de Venuz.  "Thomas de Venuz" made a fine for marrying "Isabella, who was the wife of Robert Mauduit…if she will consent to this", dated 24 Oct 1225[1108].  It is not certain that this second marriage took place as Isabella died soon after the date of the document. 

Robert [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM [IV] Mauduit of Hanslope, Berkshire (-before 14 Feb 1257).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Willelmus Maudut" to "comitem W. Marescallum, ad loquendem cum eo de deliberacione R. patris sui" dated [early] 1217[1109].  "William Mauduit" gave pledges for "full seisin…of all lands…of which Robert Mauduit his father was seised on the day he died" in Hampshire, dated [Jun] 1222[1110].  "William Mauduit" paid homage to the king for "the lands that Isabella Basset, mother of the said William, whose heir he is, held in chief in his bailiwick", dated 11 Dec 1225[1111].  A charter dated 3 Feb 1247 records a final agreement between "Johannem de Plesseto" and "Willelmum Mauduyt et Aliciam uxorem eius", relating to "maneriis Warwyk…pertientibus ad comitatum Warr, unde Thomas frater Margerie uxoris eiusdem Johannis, cuius heres ipsa est", agreeing the succession of the latter if the wife of the former died without heirs[1112].   m ([30 Nov] 1208) ALICE of Warwick, daughter of WALERAN Earl of Warwick & his second wife Alice d'Harcourt (-[3 Feb 1247/1263]).  King John confirmed "manerio de Wauton", granted to "Alic fil com Walann de Warewic" by "predictus com Walann ad se maritand", by charter dated 30 Nov 1208[1113].  A charter dated 3 Feb 1247 records a final agreement between "Johannem de Plesseto" and "Willelmum Mauduyt et Aliciam uxorem eius", relating to "maneriis Warwyk…pertientibus ad comitatum Warr, unde Thomas frater Margerie uxoris eiusdem Johannis, cuius heres ipsa est", agreeing the succession of the latter if the wife of the former died without heirs[1114].   William [IV] & his wife had three children: 

a)         RICHARD Mauduit (-after [1212/13]).  A charter dated to [1212/13] confirmed that "Thom Maudut" had freed "Ric fil Willi Maudut" from being a hostage to the king[1115]

b)         WILLIAM [V] Mauduit ([1220/21]-8 Jan 1267, bur Westminster Abbey).  He succeeded his father in [1257] in his lands and as joint hereditary Chamberlain of the Exchequer.  He succeeded in 1263 as Earl of Warwick on the death of Earl John du Plessis, second husband of his first cousin Margery Ctss of Warwick.  A writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", names "William de Bello Campo the younger, son of hs sister Isabel deceased who was married to William de Bello Campo the elder, age variously stated as 26 and more, and 30 and more,, is his heir"[1116]m ALICE de Segrave, daughter of GILBERT de Segrave & his wife Amabil de Chaucombe (-after 8 Jan 1268).  A writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", records that "Alice late his wife seeks her dower"[1117]

c)         ISABEL Mauduit (-after 7 Jan 1269).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 20 Jan "52 Hen III", after the death of "William Maudut…earl of Warwick", which names her son "William de Bello Campo the younger, son of his sister Isabel deceased who was married to William de Bello Campo the elder, age variously stated as 26 and more, and 30 and more,, is his heir"[1118].  "Dominum Willelmum de Bello Campo, vicecomitem Wygorn et Isabellam uxorem eius" granted "totam terram suam…in Uplodecoumbe" to "dominam Isabellam de Mortuo Mare" by charter dated [24 Jun 1250], witnessed by "…domino Jacobo de Bello Campo…"[1119].  The will of "William de Beauchamp", dated 7 Jan 1268, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Minors of Worcester”, requested a daily mass there for the souls of “Isabel my wife, Isabel de Mortimer”, bequeathed property to "Walter my son...Joane my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Sibill my daughter...Sarah my daughter...William my eldest son...my daughter the countess his wife...Isabel my wife..."[1120]m WILLIAM [IV] de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire, son of WALTER [III] de Beauchamp of Elmley & his wife Joan Mortimer (-[7 Jan/21 Apr] 1269). 

 

 

2.         ROBERT Mauduit (-after 1209)m (before 1209) --- Giffard, daughter of ROBERT Giffard & his wife ---.  Domesday Descendants notes the death of Robert Giffard in 1209 "when his heirs were daughters married to Robert Mauduit, Robert de Mandeville and William Comin", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[1121].  The Robert Mauduit in question could not have been Robert, father of William Mauduit of Hanslope, whose mother Isabella Basset survived her husband.  It is possible that he was the son of that Robert. 

 

 

1.         GODFREY Mauduit (-after 24 Apr 1200).  King John confirmed "villas de Hesset et de Bekenfeld…qs habeat ex dono Constanc fil Walt filii Willelmi" to "Godfr Mauduit" by charter dated 24 Apr 1200[1122]

 

2.         JOHN Mauduit (-before 1219).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had three children: 

a)         AGNES Mauduit (-after 1219).  Bracton records a summons, dated 1219, to "Roberto Morin et Agneti uxori eius et Thome le Sauuage et Auicie uxori et Roberto de la Legha et Flandr uxori eius" concerning "ecclesiam de Andrintona" which was donated by "Johannes Maudut pater ipsarum Agnetis, Auicie et Flandr"[1123]m ROBERT Morin, son of ---. 

b)         HAWISE Mauduit (-after 1219).  Bracton records a summons, dated 1219, to "Roberto Morin et Agneti uxori eius et Thome le Sauuage et Auicie uxori et Roberto de la Legha et Flandr uxori eius" concerning "ecclesiam de Andrintona" which was donated by "Johannes Maudut pater ipsarum Agnetis, Auicie et Flandr"[1124]m THOMAS le Savage, son of ---. 

c)         FLANDRINA Mauduit (-after 1219).  Bracton records a summons, dated 1219, to "Roberto Morin et Agneti uxori eius et Thome le Sauuage et Auicie uxori et Roberto de la Legha et Flandr uxori eius" concerning "ecclesiam de Andrintona" which was donated by "Johannes Maudut pater ipsarum Agnetis, Auicie et Flandr"[1125]m ROBERT de la Legh, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ROGER Mauduit (-after 1198)m as her second husband, ISABEL de Brus, widow of HENRY de Percy, daughter of ADAM de Brus of Skelton, Yorkshire & his wife Jueta de Archis ([1168/70]-after 1230).  A charter dated to [1190/96] notified that “Adam de Brus” granted property to “Henrico de Perci et Isabelle filie mee uxori sue” on their marriage[1126].  This suggests that Isabel must have been only eleven years old at the most at the time of her marriage, assuming that her father’s dates of marriage and death are correctly stated above.  “Juetta de Arches” granted property to “Isabelle de Brus filie mee” by charter dated to 1192[1127].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  

 

2.         THOMAS Mauduit (-after [Nov] 1222).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas Mauduit" holding one knight’s fee "in Werministre" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][1128].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Thomas Mauduit et Willelmus de Kantilupo" holding five knights’ fees in Shropshire in [1210/12][1129].  A charter dated to [1212/13] confirmed that "Thom Maudut" had freed "Ric fil Willi Maudut" from being a hostage to the king[1130].  "Thomas Mauduit" paid the king "for having a weekly market…at Castle Holdgate" in Shropshire, dated [Nov] 1222[1131]

 

3.         ROBERT Mauduit m BEATRICE Murdac, daughter of RALPH Murdac & his wife Eva de Gray. 

 

 

 

 

LORDS of MIDDLEHAM, YORKSHIRE

 

 

RIBALD, illegitimate son of EUDES de Bretagne Comte de Penthievre & his mistress --- .  “Ribaldus frater comitis” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “Alani comitis et Beatricis uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[1132].  “Comes Alanus Rufus” donated property to Swavesey Abbey, Cambridgeshire, for the soul of “patris sui Eudonis comitis”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Ribaldus et Bardulfus fratres comitis…[1133]

m BEATRIX, daughter of IVO Taillebois & his first wife --- de Bardulf.  “Ribaldus frater comitis” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “Alani comitis et Beatricis uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[1134].  Her origin is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Ivo Talliebois” donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Luciæ”, by undated charter witnessed by “Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois…[1135]

Ribald & his wife had four children: 

1.         RALPH .  A charter dated to [1145/54] records the dowry granted by “Robertus de Brus” to “Agathe filie sue” on her marriage to “Radulfo Ribaldi filio”, witnessed by “…Petro de Brus, Ernaldo de Perci…Herveo Ribaldi filio…[1136].  A mid-15th century manuscript lists "Radulphum, Heruey…dictum Tailbois, Raynaldum…dictum Taylboys, Willelmum…dictum Tailbois" as the sons of "Ribaldus frater comitis" and his wife "Beatrix uxor Ribaldi"[1137]m AGATHA de Brus, daughter of ROBERT [I] de Brus of Skelton & his wife Agnes Paynell.  A charter dated to [1145/54] records the dowry granted by “Robertus de Brus” to “Agathe filie sue” on her marriage to “Radulfo Ribaldi filio”, witnessed by “…Petro de Brus, Ernaldo de Perci…Herveo Ribaldi filio…[1138].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Robertum" as the son of "Radulphum filium Ribaldi" and his wife "Agatha…filia Roberti de Bruys de Skelton"[1139]m HELOISE de Glanville, daughter of RANDULF de Glanville & his wife --- (-1 Mar 1195).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Robertum filium Radulphi" married "Helwisia filia Ranulphi Glamuille"[1140].  An undated manuscript names “Matildem, Amabillam et Helwisiam” as the three daughters of “Ranulphus de Glanville quondam justiciarius Angliæ et fundator domus de Buttele” and his wife, adding that Heloise was granted “ex dono patris sui...medietatem villæ de Baudeseye et medietatem villæ de Finbergh” and married “Robertum filium Roberti” by whom she had “Radulphus filius et hæres” (listing his descendants)[1141]Robert & his wife had three children: 

i)          WALERAN .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Walranum filium primum qui obiit sine prole, Radulphumobiit sine prole, Ranulphum" as the sons of "Robertum filium Radulphi" and his wife "Helwisia filia Ranulphi Glamville"[1142]

ii)         RALPH .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Walranum filium primum qui obiit sine prole, Radulphumobiit sine prole, Ranulphum" as the sons of "Robertum filium Radulphi" and his wife "Helwisia filia Ranulphi Glamville"[1143].  An undated manuscript names “Matildem, Amabillam et Helwisiam” as the three daughters of “Ranulphus de Glanville quondam justiciarius Angliæ et fundator domus de Buttele” and his wife, adding that Heloise was granted “ex dono patris sui...medietatem villæ de Baudeseye et medietatem villæ de Finbergh” and married “Robertum filium Roberti” by whom she had “Radulphus filius et hæres” (listing his descendants)[1144]

iii)        RANDULF (-1251, bur Coverham).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Walranum filium primum qui obiit sine prole, Radulphumobiit sine prole, Ranulphum" as the sons of "Robertum filium Radulphi" and his wife "Helwisia filia Ranulphi Glamville"[1145]

-         see below

2.         HERVE "Taillebois" .  A charter dated to [1145/54] records the dowry granted by “Robertus de Brus” to “Agathe filie sue” on her marriage to “Radulfo Ribaldi filio”, witnessed by “…Petro de Brus, Ernaldo de Perci…Herveo Ribaldi filio…[1146].  A mid-15th century manuscript lists "Radulphum, Heruey…dictum Tailbois, Raynaldum…dictum Taylboys, Willelmum…dictum Tailbois" as the sons of "Ribaldus frater comitis" and his wife "Beatrix uxor Ribaldi"[1147]

3.         RAYNAUD "Taillebois" .  A mid-15th century manuscript lists "Radulphum, Heruey…dictum Tailbois, Raynaldum…dictum Taylboys, Willelmum…dictum Tailbois" as the sons of "Ribaldus frater comitis" and his wife "Beatrix uxor Ribaldi"[1148]

4.         WILLIAM "Taillebois" .  A mid-15th century manuscript lists "Radulphum, Heruey…dictum Tailbois, Raynaldum…dictum Taylboys, Willelmum…dictum Tailbois" as the sons of "Ribaldus frater comitis" and his wife "Beatrix uxor Ribaldi"[1149]

 

 

RANDULF, son of ROBERT FitzRalph & his wife Heloise de Glanville (-1251, bur Coverham).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Walranum filium primum qui obiit sine prole, Radulphumobiit sine prole, Ranulphum" as the sons of "Robertum filium Radulphi" and his wife "Helwisia filia Ranulphi Glamville"[1150]

m MARY Bigod, daughter of ROGER Bigod Earl of Norfolk & his wife Ida ---.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[1151].  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Ranulphum filium Roberti" married "Maria filia Rogeri Bigod comitis Norfolk"[1152]

Randulf & his wife had three children: 

1.         RALPH (-31 Mar 1258, bur Coverham).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Radulphum, Bertam…Ranulphum…" as the children of "Ranulphum filium Roberti" and his wife "Maria filia Rogeri Bigod comitis Norfolk"[1153]m ANASTASIA de Percy, daughter of WILLIAM de Percy & his first wife Joan de Briwere.  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulfum filium Ranulphi" married "Anastasia filia Wilelmi domini de Percy filii Henrici Percy primi"[1154].  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         MARY (-1320).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Mariam, Johannam" as the children of "Radulphum filium Ranulphi" and his wife "Anastasia filia Wilelmi domini de Percy", adding that Mary married "Roberti domini de Neuile et de Raby"[1155].  A manuscript relating to Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire records that “Roberti de Novavilla junioris” married “Maria…domina de Midelham” who was eldest sister of “domina de Welle et de Snape…uxor Roberti de Tatershall”, daughters of “Radulfus filius Ranulfi[1156]m ([1260]) ROBERT de Neville, son of ROBERT de Neville & his first wife --- (-6 Aug 1271, bur Coverham). 

b)         JOAN (-before 1 Apr 1310).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Mariam, Johannam" as the children of "Radulphum filium Ranulphi" and his wife "Anastasia filia Wilelmi domini de Percy", adding that Joan married "domini Roberti Tateshale" but died childless[1157]m ([before 1268]) ROBERT de Tattershall, son of ROBERT de Tattershall & his wife Nicole --- (5 Dec 1248-before 8 Sep 1298). 

2.         BERTHA .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Radulphum, Bertam uxorem domini Rogeri Ingoldeby…Ranulphum…" as the children of "Ranulphum filium Roberti" and his wife "Maria filia Rogeri Bigod comitis Norfolk"[1158]m ROGER de Ingoldeby, son of ---. 

3.         RANDULF .  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Radulphum, Bertam…Ranulphum…juniorem de Spenythorn" as the children of "Ranulphum filium Roberti" and his wife "Maria filia Rogeri Bigod comitis Norfolk"[1159]

 

 

 

 

MOHAUT

 

 

1.         NORMANm ---.  The name of Norman’s wife is not known.  Norman & his wife had three children: 

a)         HUGH (-before 1130).  “Comes Ricardus” confirmed donations to Chester St. Werburgh, including the donation of “Gosetre [Goostrey] et Lautonam [Lawton]” made by “Hugo filius Normanni”, witnessed by “Hugone de Lasci et Radulfo et Rogero filiis Normanni”, by charter dated 1119[1160].  m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Hug fil Normani" owing in Suffolk for “terra patris sui q Rad dapif com Hug tenet” and for “p recto de hereditate matris sue[1161]

b)         RALPH de Mohaut (-before 1130).  “Comes Ricardus” confirmed donations to Chester St. Werburgh, including the donation of “Gosetre [Goostrey] et Lautonam [Lawton]” made by “Hugo filius Normanni”, witnessed by “Hugone de Lasci et Radulfo et Rogero filiis Normanni”, by charter dated 1119[1162].  “...Radulfus dapifer...” witnessed the charter dated to [1121/25] under which “Ranulfus comes de Cestria” donated “ecclesiam sancti Martialis de Crusillis” to Saint-Evroul[1163].  “...Radulfo dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1121/29] under which “Ranulfus comes Cestrie” confirmed the donation of a fair and its revenues to Chester St. Werburgh made by his father[1164].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo[1165]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT de Mohaut (-before [1177/82]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo[1166]

-         see below

c)         ROGER .  “Comes Ricardus” confirmed donations to Chester St. Werburgh, including the donation of “Gosetre [Goostrey] et Lautonam [Lawton]” made by “Hugo filius Normanni”, witnessed by “Hugone de Lasci et Radulfo et Rogero filiis Normanni”, by charter dated 1119[1167]

 

 

ROBERT de Mohaut, son of RALPH [I] de Mohaut & his wife --- (-[1166/73]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo[1168].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt fil Rad fil Norm" in Lincolnshire under the agreement between him and “Willm gocnatu suu[1169].  The Annales Cestrienses record that “Robertus dapifer” killed “multa millia [Welshmen]...apud Wichum [Nantwich] III Non Sep” in 1146[1170].  “Roberto dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1141/50] under which “Ranulphus comes Cestrie” donated rents from Chester to St. Werburgh[1171].  “...Roberto dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1150] under which “Ranulfus comes Cestrie” granted Drayton Basset to Geoffrey Ridel and Ralph Basset[1172].  “...Roberto dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1154/57] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed donations made by his father to Minting priory[1173].  “Robertus de Monte Alto...” witnessed the charter dated to [1162/66] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” granted rights in the river Dee to Trentham priory[1174].  “Hugo comes Cestrie” confirmed the donation of “dimidiam partem de Pultona” to found an abbey made by “Robertus pincerna” by charter dated to [1162/70], witnessed by “Roberto dapifero...[1175].  “Roberto dapifero de Monte Alto...” witnessed the charter dated to [1166] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” donated “stagnum meum de Dunintona” to Bullington priory[1176]

m LEUCA, daughter of --- (-after 1177/82]).  “Radulfus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, for the souls of “Roberti patris mei et Leuche matris mei”, with the consent and advice of “Leuche matris mee in cuius dote ipsa ecclesia...et W[illelmi] de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1177/82][1177]

Robert & his wife had four children: 

1.         RALPH de Mohaut (-[1191/1194]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo”, from him to “Radulfo filio suo”, and from him to “eidem Rogero...filio et heredi suo[1178].  “Radulfo dapifero...” witnessed the charter dated to [1164/73] under which “Hugo comes Cestrie” notified that William Venables had made a fine to hold [serfs] Dilred Hog and Artusius of the earl[1179].  “Radulfus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, for the souls of “Roberti patris mei et Leuche matris mei”, with the consent and advice of “Leuche matris mee in cuius dote ipsa ecclesia...et W[illelmi] de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1177/82][1180].  “...Radulfo seneschallo de Monte Alto...” witnessed the charter dated to [3 Feb 1188/15 Nov 1189] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie comes Cestrie et Richmondie” confirmed his predecessors’ donations to Bordesley abbey[1181].  “...Radulfo de Monte Alto senescallo Cestrie...” witnessed the charter dated to [1191/94] under which “Rannulfus comes Cestrie” confirmed the donation of half a salt-house to St. Werburgh[1182]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Farrer states that Matilda was Ralph’s wife[1183].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

a)         [--- .  His parentage is indicated by a plea dated 13 Jun 1227 which records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord”, while the plaintiff claimed that “Ralph his ancestor had made the last presentation[1184].  As Ralph is described in this plea as “ancestor” of Roger, not his father, it is likely that there was an intervening generation between the two, although the chronology would be tight.  It should be noted that this generation is not included in Bracton’s record of the claim dated 1222 which is summarised below.  One possibility is that this son predeceased his father, leaving an infant son who was still too young to succeed as “dapifer” on the death of Ralph, the office passing to Ralph’s brother Robert, and that Bracton ignored this step in the descent.  m ---.  One child:] 

i)          ROGER de Mohaut (-1232).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis", from whom it descended to “Roberto filio suo”, from him to “Radulfo filio suo”, and from him to “eidem Rogero...filio et heredi suo[1185].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Rogerus senescallus de Monte Alto" held "feodum jus militis in Calswah [Calceworth] de comite Cestrie"[1186].  “Rogero de Monte Alto dapifero meo...” witnessed the charter dated to [1210/15] under which “Ranulphus comes Cestrie” confirmed “villam de Wynlatona” to “Henrico dispensario militi meo[1187].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Rogerus Mahaut" against "Agnetem de Gretingeham" relating to "advocacionem ecclesie de Gretingeham" of which "Radulfus de Mohaut antecessor suus fuit seisitus tempore Henrici Regis senis"[1188].  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord”, while the plaintiff claimed that “Ralph his ancestor had made the last presentation[1189].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1232 of “Roger de Monte Alto senescallus de Hawerthin[1190]m NICOLA, daughter of ---.  Farrer states that “Nicolaa” was Roger’s wife[1191].  Roger & his wife had two children:

(a)       ROGER de Mohaut (-Castle Rising 28 Jun 1260).  Steward of Chester. 

-         see below

(b)       --- de Mohaut m Sir HUGH Ferrers of Bugbrooke, son of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his wife Agnes of Chester (-[1257]). 

2.         WILLIAM de Mohaut .  “Radulfus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” donated “ecclesiam de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, for the souls of “Roberti patris mei et Leuche matris mei”, with the consent and advice of “Leuche matris mee in cuius dote ipsa ecclesia...et W[illelmi] de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1177/82][1192]

3.         ROBERT de Mohaut (-[1208/12]).  “...Roberto senescallo de Moalto...” witnessed the charter dated to [1190/94] under which “Ranulfus dux Britannie et comes Cestrie et Richemondie” confirmed donations to the Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem[1193].  “Robertus dominus Moaldie et senescaldus comitis Cestrie” donated “villam de Gorestre” to Chester St. Werburgh by charter dated to [1192/1208], witnessed by “Radulfo de Menilw[arin]...Roberto de Menilwarin, Brito Pantun...[1194].  “Robertus de Montealto dapifer comitis Cestrie” confirmed the donation of “patronatus ecclesie de Neston” to Chester St. Werburgh, as recorded by the charter of “Radulphi de Montealto fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1208/11], witnessed by “...Rannulfo de Montealto...[1195]

4.         ROGER de Mohaut (-after 1203).  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord”, while the plaintiff claimed that “Ralph his ancestor had made the last presentation[1196].  “Rogerus de Mohaut” was represented at an assize at Lichfield in 1203[1197]m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger & his wife had one child: 

a)         LEUCA de Mohaut (-before 13 Jun 1227).  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord[1198].  Leuca’s husband has not yet been identified.  m ---.  One child: 

i)          AGNES --- ([after 1212]-).  A plea dated 13 Jun 1227 records that “Roger de Montealto” claimed Elford church against Philip de Oreby, who stated that “Ralph de Monhaut” gave the manor to “Roger de Monhaut his brother...[in Elleford and in Cassingland]”, after whose death it passed to “Leuca his daughter” and from her to “Agnes daughter of Leuca who is in the ward of the said Philip by gift of Roger de Monhaut the capital lord[1199]

 

 

ROGER de Mohaut, son of ROGER de Mohaut & his wife --- (-Castle Rising 28 Jun 1260).  A charter dated to [1258] records that “dominus Rogerus de Montealto cuius predecessores ius patronatus in ipsa ecclesia olim optinebant” forcibly entered “ecclesiam de Nestona” after the death of “Ricardi clerici” and presented “Radulphum de Montealto clericum” to the diocesis for institution in the church[1200].  The episode is recorded in the Annales Cestrienses in 1258, adding that Roger died “infra eundem annum miserabiliter[1201].  A charter dated to [1258] records the settlement of the dispute, under which “dominus Rogerus de Montealto” donated “terre in Nestona...[et] in advocacione ecclesie de Nestona” to Chester St. Werburgh, in return for “manerium de Brocton” and revenue for “Radulpho de Montealto[1202].  He inherited the manor of Kenninghall, Castle of Rising, Norfolk, on the death of his brother-in-law.   The Annales Cestrienses record the death “circa nativitatem beate Johannis” 1260 of “Roger de Monte Alto apud Rysinges[1203]

m CECILY de Albini, daughter of WILLIAM de Albini Earl of Arundel & his wife Mabel of Chester.  The Annales Londonienses name "Mabiliam, Nicholaam, Ceciliam et Isabellam" as the four daughters of "secunda…Mabillia…uxor comitis de Arundelle", specifying that "Cecilia" married "Rogero de Monte Alto"[1204]

Roger & his wife had children: 

1.         ROBERT de Mohaut (-before 16 Sep 1275).  The Annales Cestrienses record that “Robertus de Monte Alto” was delivered from captivity after an agreement between King Henry III and “Lewelinum principem Wallie” in 1267[1205]m ([1261]) JOAN Mowbray, daughter of ROGER de Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Matilda de Beauchamp.  Robert & his wife had children: 

a)         ROGER de Mohaut [1261/62]-2 Dec 1296).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohautm JULIANE de Clifford, daughter of ROGER de Clifford & his wife ---. 

b)         ROBERT de Mohaut of Mold (25 Mar 1274-26 Dec 1329).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohautm (royal licence 25 Jan 1301) as her second husband, EMMA, widow of RICHARD FitzJohn of Shere, daughter of --- (-26 Jan 1332, bur Stradsett, Norfolk). 

2.         [RALPH de Mohaut .  A charter dated to [1258] records that “dominus Rogerus de Montealto cuius predecessores ius patronatus in ipsa ecclesia olim optinebant” forcibly entered “ecclesiam de Nestona” after the death of “Ricardi clerici” and presented “Radulphum de Montealto clericum” to the diocesis for institution in the church[1206].  The parentage of “Radulphum de Montealto clericum” is not specified in the document, but it is reasonable to suppose that he was closely related to Roger, maybe his son.  A charter dated to [1258] records the settlement of the dispute, under which “dominus Rogerus de Montealto” donated “terre in Nestona...[et] in advocacione ecclesie de Nestona” to Chester St. Werburgh, in return for “manerium de Brocton” and revenue for “Radulpho de Montealto[1207].] 

 

 

1.         JOHN de Mohaut (-after Oct 1265)m (before Nov 1254) as her first husband, MILLICENT de Cauntelo, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] de Cauntelo of Calne, Wiltshire & his wife Eva de Briouse (-before 7 Jan 1299).  She married secondly (before 13 Dec 1273) Eon la Zouche. The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch" as the children of "Willielmo de Cantilupo" and his wife[1208].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 Nov "1 Edw I" after the death of "George de Cantilupo" name “Milisanda the wife of Eudo la Zuche of full age and John son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges who is under age an in the king’s wardship are his next heirs...the said Milisanda and Joan being sisters of the said George[1209].   

 

 

 

 

MOHUN

 

 

According to Maxwell-Lyte, this family took its name from "Moyon near St Lo in Normandy"[1210].  Richard III Duke of Normandy granted property including "…curtem…Moion…" to his wife Adela as her future dower by charter dated Jan 1027[1211]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known. 

1.         WILLIAM de Mohun (-after 1090).  Leland quotes "Un Role de ceux queux veignont in Angleterre ovesque roy Wm le Conquereur" (without indicating its date) which names "monseir Willim de Moion"[1212].  Domesday Book records “William de Moyon” holding Sutton Veny in Wiltshire, Todber, Spetisbury and Winterborne Houghton in Dorset, numerous holdings in Somerset[1213].  He built the castle of Dunster.  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[1214]m ADELISE, daughter of --- (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[1215].  William & his wife had four children: 

a)         GEOFFREY de Mohun (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[1216]

b)         ROBERT de Mohun (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[1217]

c)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-1155 or before).  A charter of King Henry I confirmed the foundation and possessions of Bridlington priory, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Wicheforda" made by "Willielmus de Moion et uxor eius Agnes"[1218].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Moiont" in Warwickshire[1219].  Henry of Huntingdon names "William de Mohun" among the "traitors" who supported Empress Matilda in 1138, adding that he held "the castle at Dunster" against the king[1220].  The Gesta Stephani Regis names "Willelmus de Mohun quem comitem ibi statuit Dorsetiæ" among the supporters of Empress Matilda in the English civil war[1221].  He was created Earl [of Somerset/Dorset] by Empress Matilda in [Apr/Jun] 1141: "…com W[illelmo] de Moion…" subscribed the charter dated to midsummer 1141 under which Empress Matilda granted property to Geoffrey de Mandeville[1222].  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1223]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1224].  "Willelmus de Mohun" confirmed a grant to "Willelmo filio Durandi" by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "Eudone fratre meo…"[1225]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  A charter of King Henry I confirmed the foundation and possessions of Bridlington priory, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Wicheforda" made by "Willielmus de Moion et uxor eius Agnes"[1226].  The parentage of Agnes is not known.  Maxwell-Lyte suggests "with some confidence" that she was Agnes de Gand, daughter of Walter de Gant & his wife Mathilde de Penthièvre[1227].  He bases this on the possession by Gilbert de Gand of Whichford, Warwickshire (then in Northamptonshire) in 1086, Gilbert’s son Walter’s foundation of the priory at Bridlington, and the donation by William de Mohun and Agnes his wife of the church of Whichford to Bridlington.  William & his wife had six children: 

i)          RALPH de Mohun (-before [1142]).  William de Mohun donated land at Avelham to the church of Dunster, for the benefit of the soul of Ralph his son, by undated charter[1228].  He was not mentioned in his father’s foundation charter for Bruton, and so presumably died before 1142 if the document is correctly dated to that year. 

ii)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-1176).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1229]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1230]

-         see below

iii)        HENRY de Mohun (-after 1166).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1231]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1232].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Henricus de Moiun i m" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][1233].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Mohun" held one knight’s fee from "Gervasii Paganelli" in Staffordshire[1234]

iv)       IWAN de Mohun .  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1235]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1236].  "William de Moyun juvenis" confirmed his father’s donations to Bruton, for the souls of "William his father, Agnes his mother", by  undated charter, witnessed by "…Juvano filio comitis"[1237]

v)        PETER de Mohun .  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1238]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1239]

vi)       RICHARD de Mohun (-after 1176).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1240]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1241].  “William de Moyon” confirmed the donation of the church of Lyon to Troarn abbey by "William de Moyon his father" by undated charter, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Moyon…"[1242].  A charter dated to [1170] records that “Richard de Moyon” had resigned property of the church of Lyon to the bishop of Bayeux[1243].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[1244]

d)         EUDES de Mohun (-after [1150]).  "Willelmus de Mohun" confirmed a grant to "Willelmo filio Durandi" by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "Eudone fratre meo…"[1245]

2.         WILMUND (-after 1090).  "William de Moione" donated the church of St George of Dunestore to the church of St Peter of Bath, by consent of "my wife Adelisa", by undated charter, dated to [1090/1100], witnessed by "…Geoffrey and Robert my sons and Wilmund my brother…"[1246]

 

 

WILLIAM de Mohun, son of WILLIAM de Mohun & his wife Agnes de Gand (-1176).  "Willielmus de Moyne comes Somersetensis" founded Bruton priory in Somerset by undated (but dated to 1142 by Maxwell-Lyte[1247]) charter witnessed by "Willielmo filio meo, Henrico, Juwanno, Petro, et Ricardo clericis…"[1248].  "William de Moyun juvenis" confirmed his father’s donations to Bruton, for the souls of "William his father, Agnes his mother", by  undated charter, witnessed by "…Juvano filio comitis"[1249].  “William de Moyon” donated tithes to Troarn abbey by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "God[eholda] uxore mea et Willelmo filio meo…"[1250].  “William de Moyon” confirmed the donation of the church of Lyon to Troarn abbey by "William de Moyon his father" by undated charter, witnessed by "…Ricardo de Moyon…"[1251].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Willelmi de Moiun" in Somerset[1252].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Moyn xli m, de nov ii m" in Dorset, Somerset in [1167/68][1253].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willelmus de Moiun" with 5 knights and eleven knights in his own service[1254]

m GODEHOLDE, daughter of --- (-before 1186).  “William de Moyon” donated tithes to Troarn abbey by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "God[eholda] uxore mea et Willelmo filio meo…"[1255].  "William de Moion" granted tithes of his mills of Moion, Tesseium and Belcodreium to the Holy Trinity of Luzerne, for the soul of "his mother Godeheut", by charter dated 1186, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Sancto Johanne, Gaufrido et Johanne et Roberto de Moion…"[1256]

William & his wife had seven children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Mohun (-Oct 1193).  “William de Moyon” donated tithes to Troarn abbey by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "God[eholda] uxore mea et Willelmo filio meo…"[1257].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton made by "his grandfather Earl William, his father William" by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea…"[1258].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[1259].  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[1260].  “William de Moyon” donated the churches of Moyon and Taissy to the canons of Briweton to hold "after the decease of his brother Thomas" by charter dated to [1177/94][1261].  "William de Moion" granted tithes of his mills of Moion, Tesseium and Belcodreium to the Holy Trinity of Luzerne, for the soul of "his mother Godeheut", by charter dated 1186, witnessed by "…Willelmo de Sancto Johanne, Gaufrido et Johanne et Roberto de Moion…"[1262]m LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 1203).  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton made by "his grandfather Earl William, his father William" by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea…"[1263].  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[1264].  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[1265].  "Reginald de Moyun" donated the church of Liun in Normandy and land at Bruwham to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia matre mea…"[1266].  "Will de Traceio…Lucia de Moon" both paid rent on part of "terre de Moon", dated 1198[1267].  "Lucea de Moyun" paid a fine for "feud vii mil" in Cambridgeshire, dated 1201[1268].  "Lucia de Moon […terre de Moon]…Will de Traceio…versus Oliv de Traceio" all paid rent in "Ballia Constancien" in Normandy, dated 1203[1269].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-[before 1193]).  "William de Moyun the younger" confirmed donations to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmo filio meo et herede, Ricardo de Moyun, Roberto filio Ricardi, Henrico Corbet, Willelmo fratre eius…"[1270].  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[1271]

b)         REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset (-1213).  "Reginald de Moyun" donated the church of Liun in Normandy and land at Bruwham to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia matre mea…"[1272].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Reginaldus de Moun" holding one knight’s fee in Warwickshire in [1210/12][1273].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Reginaldus de Moiun" held "Dunestorre…in capite domino rege per servicium xl militum et dimidii de conquestu Anglie…in hundredo de Karenton" in Somerset[1274].  m as her first husband, ALICE Briwere, daughter of WILLIAM Briwere & his wife Beatrice --- (-after 24 Jul 1236).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[1275].  She married secondly William Paynell of Bampton, Devon.  Her parentage and second marriage are confirmed by a writ dated 2 Jan "33 Hen III", after the death of her son "William Paynel alias Painel" which names the manor of "…Huffeculm…with 10 l land which Fulk Painel gave to William Briwer the elder…but afterwards William Brewer the younger…bestowed the said land upon William Painel, father of this one, in free marriage with Alice his sister" in Devon[1276].  "William Paynel" assigned "Alice de Mohun his wife and Hugh de Samford" to make part payments of debts "in each of the three years after starting out on his pilgrimage to the Holy Land" with the manor of Bampton as security, dated 27 Sep, although listed in the roll among other fines dated [Feb/Mar] 1228[1277].  Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Devon to release "dotem suam...Willelmum filium et heredi predicti Willelmi" to "Alicia de Moyun que fuit uxor Willelmi Paynel", and confirmed the custody granted to “Hereberto filio Mathei”, dated 1228[1278].  The king granted custody of "the land and heir of William Paynel to Herbert son of Matthew", saving to "Alice who was William’s wife…her…dower", dated 18 Nov 1228[1279].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Alicie de Moyun"[1280].  King Henry III commanded "Alicia de Moyun” not to dispose of “the ward of the land which William Cumin held of her as the heritage of Margery his wife” because of the disputed succession, dated 24 Jul 1236[1281].  King Henry III, seeing that "Alicia de Moyun has deceived him by the suggestion that there was another lawful heir to the manor of Sturton than Margery daughter of William Cumin”, ordered the sheriff of Warwick “to give Alicia seizin as custodian to cause John de Cantilupe and the said Margery his wife to have such seizin”, dated 24 Jul 1236[1282].  Reynold & his wife had three children: 

i)          REYNOLD de Mohun (-Tor Mohun, Devon 20 Jan 1258, bur Newenham).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified. 

-         see below

ii)         WILLIAM de Mohun (-Norton, Cornwall, 1265, bur Newenham).  “Reginaldus de Mohun” donated “terra de Stortmanforde” to Clive abbey, for the soul of “piæ memoriæ Havisiæ de Mohun”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Mohun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1283].  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1284].  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator” and in 1265 of “Willelmus de Moun fundator huius monasterii et frater germanus supradicti Reginaldi, qui apud Nortun in Cornubia in manerio huius domus moriebatur[1285].  A manuscript records the burial at Newenham of “Willielmus de Moun, frater Reginaldi et alter fundator dictæ abbathiæ[1286]

iii)        ALICE de Mohun m ROBERT de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, son of SIMON de Vautort & his wife --- de Beauchamp of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset (-1251). 

2.         GEOFFREY de Mohun .  "William de Moyun" confirmed the right of free election of their priors to Bruton by undated charter, witnessed by "Lucia uxore mea, Willelmus filius meus et heres, Galfridus de Moyun frater meus, Robertus filius Ricardi senescallus meus…"[1287]

3.         JOHN de Mohun .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

4.         THOMAS de Mohun .  “William de Moyon” donated the churches of Moyon and Taissy to the canons of Briweton to hold "after the decease of his brother Thomas" by charter dated to [1177/94][1288]

5.         ROBERT de Mohun .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

6.         AGNES de Mohun .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m WILLIAM de Windsor, son of ---. 

7.         YOLANDE de Mohun .  Maxwell-Lyte notes that "Yolenta daughter of William de Mohun the Third" married "Ralph son of William son of Durand de Mohun, who may have been a distant cousin", who was the principal military tenant of the honour of Dunster and gave his name to Brompton Ralph[1289].  "Ralph son of William de Bruneton" donated land in "Sudhei in his manor of Brunne" to Bruton, with the consent of "Yolenta his wife", by undated charter[1290]m RALPH, son of WILLIAM de Bruneton & his wife ---. 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Mohun (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Willelmus de Moyun" paying "xli l…xli milites" in Dorset, Somerset[1291].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus de Moyun" holding three knights’ fees from "honor d’Eu" in Sussex in [1210/12][1292]

 

 

REYNOLD de Mohun, son of REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his wife Alice Briwere (-Tor Mohun, Devon 20 Jan 1258, bur Newenham).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  “Reginaldus de Mohun” donated “terra de Stortmanforde” to Clive abbey, for the soul of “piæ memoriæ Havisiæ de Mohun”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Mohun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1293].  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1294].  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator[1295].  A manuscript records the burial at Newenham of “Reginaldus de Moun principalis fundator[1296]

m firstly HAWISE [de Mohun], daughter of ---.  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1297].  “Reginaldus de Mohun” donated “terra de Stortmanforde” to Clive abbey, for the soul of “piæ memoriæ Havisiæ de Mohun”, with the consent of “Willielmi de Mohun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1298]

m secondly (1243 or before) as her second husband, ISABEL de Ferrers, widow of GILBERT Basset [II] of Wycombe, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshall of the Earls of Pembroke (-before 26 Nov 1260).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that Isabel married "Reginaldo de Monteminori", by whom she was mother of "Willihelmus de Monte" who died childless, "filiam…Alianore" who married "Johanni filio Nicholai de Carrew", "Margareta soror eius" who died childless, and "Maria soror eius" who married "Johanni Meriot" but died childless[1299].  The Annals of Ireland record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “secunda, Isabella Basset…[1300].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[1301].  “Reginaldus de Moun” founded Newenham abbey, Devonshire, for the souls of “Willelmi Briwer senioris et Willelmi Briwer junioris et uxorum suarum...Hawisiæ de Moun et Isabellæ Basset uxorum mearum et Willielmi de Moun fratris mei”, by undated charter[1302].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[1303].  A manuscript records the death “III Kal Feb” 1257 of “dominus Reginaldus de Mohun fundator” and in 1260 of “Isabella Basset uxor Reginaldi prædicti[1304].  A writ dated 26 Nov "45 Hen III", after the death of "Isabel Basset" names "William son of Reginald de Moun and the said Isabel, age variously stated as 6 and 7, is her heir"[1305]

Reynold & his first wife had children:

1.         JOHN de Mohun of Dunster (-Gascony [29 Jul 1253/1254])m as her first husband, JOAN de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his first wife Sibyl Marshall of the Earls of Pembroke (-[Oct 1267]).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Agnes, secunda Isabella, tertia Matilda, quarta Sibilla, quinta Johanna, sexta Alianora, septima Agatha" as the seven daughters of "Willielmo de Ferrers comiti Derbiæ" and his wife "quarta filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Sibilla", adding that "Johanna quinta filia" married "Johanni de Mohun", by whom she was mother of "Johannes de Mohun, de quo Johannes, de eo Johannes"[1306].  The Annals of Ireland record that “Sibilla comitissa de Ferreys” had seven daughters (in order) “tertia, Johanna Mohun, uxor domini Johannis de Mohun, filii domini Reginaldi…[1307].  A charter dated 28 Jun 1248 records that "Margaret late Countess of Lincoln…recovered her dower out of the lands in Ireland of W[alter] Marshall late Earl of Pembroke her husband" and that the dower was "taken out of the portions of the inheritance which accrued to William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, Matilda de Kyme, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, and Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife"[1308].  A charter dated 26 May 1250 records the restoration of property, granted to "Margaret Countess of Lincoln", to "William de Vescy and Agnes his wife, Reginald de Moun and Isabel his wife, William de Fortibus and Matilda his wife, Francis de Boun and Sibil his wife, William de Vallibus and Alienor his wife, John de Moun and Joan his wife, Agatha de Ferrers in the king’s custody, Roger de Mortimer and Matilda his wife, and William de Cantilupe and Eva his wife"[1309].  She married secondly (Aug 1256 or before) as his first wife, Sir Robert Aguillon of Watton and Perching.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN de Mohun (-11 Jun 1279)m as her first husband, ELEANOR, daughter of Sir REYNOLD FitzPiers & his first wife Alice --- (-after Jan 1283).  She married secondly William Martin Lord Martin.  John & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Mohun (-25 Aug 1330, bur Dunster Priory).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohun

-         see below

Reynold & his second wife had children: 

2.         ISABEL de Mohun m EDMUND Deincourt, son of JOHN [II] Deincourt of Blankney, Lincolnshire & his second wife Agnes de Neville (-6 Jan 1327).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Deincourt. 

3.         LUCY de Mohun m JOHN Grey, son of RICHARD de Grey of Codnor & his wife Lucy de Humez. 

 

 

JOHN de Mohun, son of JOHN de Mohun & his wife Eleanor (-25 Aug 1330, bur Dunster Priory).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Mohun

m firstly (1299 or before) ADA, daughter of --- (-1324 or before). 

m secondly ([1325]) as her second husband, SIBYL, widow of HENRY de Lorty, daughter of --- (-Nov 1337). 

John & his first wife had children: 

1.         JOHN de Mohun (-before 1330).  m (contract May 1305) CHRISTIAN de Segrave, daughter of Sir JOHN de Segrave Lord Segrave & his wife Christian du Plessis.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN Mohun ([1319/20]-15 Sep 1375)Lord Mohunm (before Sep 1342) JOAN Burghersh, daughter of Sir BARTHOLOMEW Burghersh Lord Burghersh & his wife Elizabeth de Verdun (-4 Oct 1404, bur Canterbury Cathedral).  John & his wife had three children: 

i)          ELIZABETH Mohun (1343-[14/16] Jan 1415).  The will of "William Montacute Earl of Sarum, Lord of Man and of the Isle of Wight", dated 20 Apr 1397, bequeathed property to “Elizabeth my wife[1310].  The will of "Elizabeth Montacute Countess of Salisbury", dated 24 Nov 1414, chose burial “in the conventual church of Bustleham Montacute[1311]m as his second wife, WILLIAM de Montagu Earl of Salisbury, son of WILLIAM de Montagu Lord Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katharine de Grandson (Donyatt, Somerset 20 Jun 1328-3 Jun 1397, bur Bisham). 

ii)         PHILIPPA de Mohun (-Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight 17 Jul 1431, bur Westminster Abbey).  The will of "John Golafre Knight", dated 19 Jan 1393, chose burial “in the chancel of the church of the Friars Minors of Exeter”, bequeathed property to “...Philippa my wife...Dame Elizabeth Golafre...Dame Alice Golafre my sister...William and John Golafre my cousins...[1312].  The will of "Edward Duke of York", dated 22 Aug 1415, proved 30 Nov 1415, bequeathed property to “my...wife Philippa[1313].  The will of "Philippa Duchess of York and Lady of the Isle of Wight", dated 1430, proved 13 Nov 1431, chose burial “in the conventual church of Westminster”, bequeathed property to “my son Walter Lord Fitz-Walter...[1314]m firstly WALTER FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter, son of JOHN FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter & his wife Eleanor de Percy (Henham 31 May 1345-Galicia 26 Sep 1386).  m secondly (before 13 Nov 1389) Sir JOHN Golafre of Langley, Oxfordshire, son of --- (-Wallingford Castle 18 Nov 1396, bur Westminster Abbey).  m thirdly ([27 Feb 1397/7 Oct 1398]) EDWARD of Cambridge Earl of Rutland, Earl of Cork, son of EDMUND of Langley Earl of Cambridge [later Duke of York] & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Castilla ([Norwich] 1373-25 Oct 1415, bur Fotheringhay).  He succeeded his father in 1402 as Duke of York, Earl of Cambridge. 

iii)        MAUD de Mohun (-1401)m JOHN le Strange Lord Strange (of Knokin), son of ROGER le Strange Lord Strange (of Knokin) & his wife Aline FitzAlan of the Earls of Arundel ([1351/52]-28 Jul 1397). 

 

 

 

 

MONTFICHET

 

 

The origins of the Montfichet family are uncertain.  An undated manuscript records that “dominus Gilbertus de Montefixo...genere Romanus...de stirpe Romanorum...qui in palacio regis Romanorum exstitit” was “Willielmus bastardus dux Normaniæ...consanguineus” and accompanied him in his conquest of England where he established himself[1315].  However, the statement is anachronous as, judging from the description of his supposed descendants, the author has confused him with Gilbert, son of William de Montfichet, whose death is estimated to [1186/87] (see below).  It is assumed that the account has been romanced and is not factual. 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Montfichet .  A charter of Henry II King of England records donations to St Alban’s, including the donation by “Willielmi de Muntfichet et Rohais uxoris suæ et Willielmi filii eorum” of “ecclesiam de Lecchewortha[1316]m ROHESE, daughter of ---.  A charter of Henry II King of England records donations to St Alban’s, including the donation by “Willielmi de Muntfichet et Rohais uxoris suæ et Willielmi filii eorum” of “ecclesiam de Lecchewortha[1317].  William & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Montfichet .  A charter of Henry II King of England records donations to St Alban’s, including the donation by “Willielmi de Muntfichet et Rohais uxoris suæ et Willielmi filii eorum” of “ecclesiam de Lecchewortha[1318]same person as…?  WILLIAM de Montfichet (-1137).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Montefichet" in Cambridgeshire, Surrey, and Essex[1319].  “Willielmus de Montefichet" donated "dominum meum de Hamma", with the consent of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ", by undated charter, witnessed by “Willelmo de Montefichet nepote meo[1320]m MARGARET de Clare, daughter of GILBERT FitzRichard de Clare Lord of Clare & his wife Adelisa de Clermont (-1189).  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "de Fogelmara Margerie de Muntfichet" in Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire[1321].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Barentone” held by “Margareta de Muntfichet, que fuit filia Gilberti filii Ricardi de Clara”, adding that “Gilebertus de Muntfichet est eius filius et heres” and that she has “iii infantes[1322].  “Willielmus de Montefichet" donated "dominum meum de Hamma", with the consent of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ", by undated charter, witnessed by “Willelmo de Montefichet nepote meo[1323].  William & his wife had three children: 

i)          GILBERT de Montfichet (-[1186/87]).  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stratford Lanthorne Abbey, Essex, including those made by “Willielmi de Mountfichet…et Gilberti filii sui…" and of "terram de Fuilmere" donated by "Richardus de Muntfichet", by undated charter, witnessed by “…Godefrido de Lucy…[1324]

-         see below

ii)         RICHARD de Montfichet (-[after 1185]).  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stratford Lanthorne Abbey, Essex, including those made by “Willielmi de Mountfichet…et Gilberti filii sui…" and of "terram de Fuilmere" donated by "Richardus de Muntfichet", by undated charter, witnessed by “…Godefrido de Lucy…[1325].  It is assumed that Richard was another son of William de Montfichet and his wife Margaret de Clare. 

iii)        one child (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Barentone” held by “Margareta de Muntfichet, que fuit filia Gilberti filii Ricardi de Clara”, adding that “Gilebertus de Muntfichet est eius filius et heres” and that she has “iii infantes[1326]

b)         [--- de Montfichetm ---.]  One child: 

i)          WILLIAM de Montfichet (-after 1166).  “Willielmus de Montefichet" donated "dominum meum de Hamma", with the consent of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ", by undated charter, witnessed by “Willelmo de Montefichet nepote meo[1327].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record knights’ fees held from "Willelmi de Montefichet" in Essex[1328]

 

2.         ALEXANDER de Montfichet .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Alexander de Munfichet" in Hampshire[1329]

 

 

GILBERT de Montfichet, son of WILLIAM de Montfichet & his wife Margaret de Clare (-[1186/87]).  A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stratford Lanthorne Abbey, Essex, including those made by “Willielmi de Mountfichet…et Gilberti filii sui…" and of "terram de Fuilmere" donated by "Richardus de Muntfichet", by undated charter, witnessed by “…Godefrido de Lucy…[1330].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Gilbert de Montfichet xxxi l x s, de novo ix s iv d" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1167/68][1331].  A manuscript names “Gilbertus et Richardus Muntfichet milites" as founders of Ankerwyke Nunnery in Buckinghamshire[1332].  A charter of King Henry III, dated 16 Aug 1257, records donations to Ankerwyke Nunnery, including the donations of "partum…Wymede" by "Gilberti de Munfichet et Avelinæ uxoris eius"[1333].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Barentone” held by “Margareta de Muntfichet, que fuit filia Gilberti filii Ricardi de Clara”, adding that “Gilebertus de Muntfichet est eius filius et heres” and that she has “iii infantes[1334]

m AVELINE de Lucy, daughter of RICHARD de Lucy & his wife ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[1335].  A charter of King Henry III, dated 16 Aug 1257, records donations to Ankerwyke Nunnery, including the donations of "partum…Wymede" by "Gilberti de Munfichet et Avelinæ uxoris eius"[1336]

Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

1.         RICHARD de Montfichet (-1210).  A charter of King Henry III, dated 16 Aug 1257, records donations to Ankerwyke Nunnery, including the donations of "terram…Morelaund…insulam in Thamis…Tyngeyt" by “Ricardi filii Gilberti de Munfichet[1337].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Ricardus de Muntfichet" paying "xxxiii l xii s vi d de veteri" in Essex, Hertfordshire[1338].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Ricardus de Montfichet" being granted delay to pay "per brevia" in Essex, Herefordshire[1339].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Richardus de Montfichet" holding 36 knights’ fees at "Stanstede" in Essex, and holding "xxxvi libratas terræ in Barntone et Fulemere per ii milites…de serjanteriis et terris sine servitio" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, in [1210/12][1340].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, dated to [1208/10]: "heres Ricardi de Munfichet" held "Langeley"[1341].  m [as her first husband,] MILLICENT, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Milicenta de Muntfichet" dated 12 Jun 1217[1342].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Domina Milisenta de Mumfichet est de donacione domini regis et est maritanda et valet terra eius in Esthamme c.s"[1343].  [She married secondly ---.  It is not known whether the pending marriage, referred to in the previous source, went ahead.]  Richard & his wife had five children: 

a)         MILLICENT de Montfichet (-[before 1210]).  The chronology suggests that Millicent must have been one of her parents’ older children.  She probably died childless soon after her husband, maybe before her father, as she is not named in the documents relating to her father’s heirs.  King Henry III commanded the Sheriff of Norfolk to inquire "what knights’ fees were assigned to Milesent de Muntfichet, widow of William de Warenne in dower...as H. de Burgo who married the daughter and heir of the said William has placed himself coram Rege in said inquiry”, dated 18 Mar 1235[1344]m as his second wife, WILLIAM de Warenne, son of RAINALD de Warenne & his wife Alice de Wormgay (-after 24 Jan 1191). 

b)         RICHARD de Montfichet (-1267).  “Ricardus de Muntfichet filius Ricardi de Muntfichet” donated land “in Stansted” to Thremhale priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulpho de Munfichet...Warino de Muntfichet...[1345].  A charter of King Henry III, dated 16 Aug 1257, records donations to Ankerwyke Nunnery, including the donations in "villam de Tyngeyt" by "Ricardi filii Ricardi de Munfichet" and of "terram…Morelaund…insulam in Thamis…Tyngeyt" by “Ricardi filii Gilberti de Munfichet[1346].  Henry III King of England ordered "Ricardus de Muntfichet…" to enquire into the state of the forests "Essexie" dated [Jul] 1219[1347].  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa…"[1348]m firstly AGNES, daughter of --- (-after 12 Jun 1217).  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Agnes uxor Ricardi de Muntfichet" dated 12 Jun 1217[1349]m secondly as her second husband, JOYCE, widow of Sir GILBERT de Greinville, daughter of --- (-before 12 Jul 1274).  An undated manuscript records that “dominus Ricardus secundus [de Montefixo]” married “relicta domini Thomæ Engayne...Jocosa[1350].  The narrative of this manuscript is inconsistent with the reconstruction of the Montfichet family from primary sources, but it appears to be referring in this passage to the marriage of Richard de Montfichet who died in 1267.  By a writ of plenius certiorari dated 12 Jul “2 Edw I”, after the death of "Joyce (Jocosa) Montfichet alias Munfichet", "John Engaine and Joan his wife...daughter and heir of the said Joyce" complained that the escheator had detained the manor of Byfeld “fell to the said Joan[1351]

c)         MARGERY de Montfichet .  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa, from Margery issued Hugh de Bolebek, who had four daughters married to Roger de Lancastre, Nicholas Corbet, Hugh de Laval and Walter de Huntercumbe"[1352].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters, the first sister Margery married Hugh de Bulebec, and from them issued Hugh de Bulebec who had four daughters, Philippa married to Roger de Lancastre, Margery married to Nicholas Corbet, Alice married to Walter de Huntercumbe, and Maud married to Hugh de la Valle…"[1353]m firstly HUGH de Bolebec, son of HUGH de Bolebec & his wife Cecilia de Vescy.  m secondly as his first wife, PIERS de Faucomberge, son of WALTER de Faucomberge of Rise, Withernwick, Catwick & his wife Agnes --- (-after Apr 1230). 

d)         AVELINE de Montfichet (-[Nov] 1239, bur Thornton Abbey).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Melsa Abbey records that “Willielmum de Forz secundum” married “Avelinam…filiam…Ricardi de Munfichet[1354].  Matthew of Paris records the death in 1239 of "Aveline de Forz Ctss d'Aumâle"[1355].  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa…from Avelina issued William de Fortibus earl of Albemarle whose heirs are under age and in the king’s wardship"[1356].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters…the second sister Avelina married William de Forz earl of Albemarle, and from them issued William de Forz the last earl of Albemarle, who had two sons Thomas and William who died without heirs of their bodies…" and the declaring the descendants of the sisters of Aveline de Montfichet as heirs of Aveline de Forz[1357]m (1214) WILLIAM de Forz, son of GUILLAUME de Forz Comte d’Aumâle & his wife Hawise Ctss d’Aumâle (-29 Mar 1241). 

e)         PHILIPPA de Montfichet .  An undated manuscript (which, in other parts, is confused in its narrative) records that “secunda soror...Ricardi de Montefixo” married “domino Ricardo de Plays”, by whom she had “Ægidium Plays” who was the father of “dominum Iohannem Plays” whose son was “dominus Iohannes Plays [qui] genuit dominum Iohannem Plays” whose daughter married “domino Iohanni Haward[1358].  An undated writ "52 Hen III", after the death of "Richard de Muntfichet", records that "he had 3 sisters, Margery, Avelina and Philippa…from Philippa issued Richard de Playz…who is 40 years of age"[1359].  A writ dated 20 Feb "3 Edw I", after the death of "Avelina late the wife of Edmund the king’s brother", names as heirs of "Richard de Munfichet…his three sisters…the third sister Philippa married Hugh de Pleys, and from them issued Richard de Pleys, from whom issued Ralph de Pleys now aged 9 and in the wardship of Sir Robert Aiguilun…"[1360]m HUGH de Plaiz, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         RALPH de Montfichet .  “Ricardus de Muntfichet filius Ricardi de Muntfichet” donated land “in Stansted” to Thremhale priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulpho de Munfichet...Warino de Muntfichet...[1361]

 

2.         WARIN de Montfichet .  “Ricardus de Muntfichet filius Ricardi de Muntfichet” donated land “in Stansted” to Thremhale priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by “...Radulpho de Munfichet...Warino de Muntfichet...[1362]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Montfichet (-after 5 Feb 1241).  Sheriff of Perth.  "Johannes clericus filius Mathei Lorimarii de Perth" confirmed the settlement of a dispute with Scone abbey by charter dated 5 May 1240, sealed by "domini Willelmi de Muntfichet vicecomitis de Perth, domini Walteri de Rothven, domini Willelmi de Blar et domini Willelmi Olifarth"[1363].  "…Willo de Munifichet…" witnessed the charter dated 5 Feb 1241 under which Alexander II King of Scotland confirmed the rights of Scone Abbey over "duas acre in territorio de Scona ubi molendinum…"[1364]

 

4.         PHILIP de Montfichet .  "Philippus de Monte fichett et Anna uxor filia et heres dñi Colini hostiarii defuncti" donated "ecclesiam de Loychel" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter[1365]m ANNE, daughter of COLIN & his wife Ada ---.  "Colinus hostiarius" donated "ecclesiam de Loychel" to St Andrew’s priory, for the soul of "mee et Ade uxoris mee", by undated charter[1366].  "Philippus de Monte fichett et Anna uxor filia et heres dñi Colini hostiarii defuncti" donated "ecclesiam de Loychel" to St Andrew’s priory by undated charter[1367]

 

 

 

 

MONTFORT

 

 

The following family is recorded in Preston, Rutland and Beaudesert, Warwickshire.  Their names suggest a connection with the Seigneurs de Montfort-sur-Risle in Normandy, descendants of Thurstan de Basembourg, in which the names Thurstan, Robert and Hugues were used repeatedly (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY).  The Complete Peerage points out that Montfort-sur-Risle "is about 15 miles distant from Beaumont-le-Roger", which was the base of the Beaumont family who were Earls of Warwick in England and from whom the English Montfort family held Beaudesert[1368].  Domesday Book records “Hugh de Montfort”, who is identified as Hugues [II] Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle, holding numerous properties in Essex, in Norfolk and in Suffolk[1369].  Hugues [II]’s son Robert [I] was banished from England in 1107 following accusations of treason.  Robert [I]'s younger brother Hugues [III] was recorded at Haughley, but Hugues [III]'s son Robert [II] was also banished in the early years of the reign of King Henry I.  Turning to the family which is shown below, from a chronological point of view it is possible that Thurstan [I] de Montfort was a younger brother of Hugues [II] Seigneur de Montfort-en-Risle who is unrecorded in the Norman sources.  It is also clear from the 1130 Pipe Roll, that the father of Robert [I] de Montfort of Preston, Rutland had held Preston before his son. 

 

 

1.         THURSTAN [I] de Montfort (-after [1087/1100]).  "…Turstini de Mundford…" is named as subscriber to a document, included in the Chronicle of Abingdon, which records Henry Earl of Warwick’s donation of "terrarum Turkilli de Ardene" (Chesterton and Hill) to the monastery of Abingdon during the reign of King William II and while Renaud was abbot[1370]

 

 

Three brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ROBERT [I] de Montfort of Preston, co. Rutland (-before [1136/39]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Montef" accounting that his men “de Prestetona” in Rutland should pay him what they paid to “patr suo[1371].  Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirmed donations to Thorney, including the donation of “medietatem villæ de Wenga cum medietate ecclesiæ eiusdem villæ et cum molendino” made by “Roberti de Muntfort et Turstini fratris sui”, by undated charter[1372].  He presumably died before [1136/39], the estimated date of the charter under which King Stephen confirmed to his brother Thurstan the donation to Thorney made by Robert (see below). 

2.         THURSTAN [II] de Montfort of Beaudesert, Warwickshire (-1170 or after).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Turst de Montef" among “Nova Placita et Novæ Conventiones” in Berkshire[1373].  Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirmed donations to Thorney, including the donation of “medietatem villæ de Wenga cum medietate ecclesiæ eiusdem villæ et cum molendino” made by “Roberti de Muntfort et Turstini fratris sui”, by undated charter[1374].  King Stephen confirmed to “Thurstino de Montfort” the donation of land "de molendino de Wenga" made to Thorney abbey by "Robertus frater tuus" by charter dated to [1136/39][1375].  “Thurstanus de Monteforti” confirmed the earlier donations to Thorney, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum et...fratris mei Roberti de Monteforti”, by undated charter witnessed by “Robertus filius meus...[1376].  Empress Matilda granted "mercatum die dominica ad castellum suum de Bellodeser[to]" to "Turstino de Mont[eforti]" by charter dated 2/3 Mar 1141[1377].  King Stephen confirmed to “Thurstino de Montfort” the donation of land made to Thorney abbey by "Robertus frater tuus" by charter dated to [1148/54][1378].  “Turstinus de Mundeford” donated revenue from his mills at Ayton to Guisborough, for the soul of “fratris mei Henrici”, with the consent of “conjugis mee et heredis mei”, by charter dated to [1155/70] witnessed by “Roberto filio et herede ipsius Turstini...[1379]m JULIANA Murdac, daughter of GEOFFREY Murdac & his wife ---.  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[1380].  Thurstan [II] & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT [II] de Montfort (-before 1185).  “Thurstanus de Monteforti” confirmed the earlier donations to Thorney, for the souls of “meæ et uxoris meæ et filiorum meorum et...fratris mei Roberti de Monteforti”, by undated charter witnessed by “Robertus filius meus...[1381].  Henri Duke of Normandy addressed “Arnulpho episcopo Lexoviensi et Roberto de Monteforti” ordering an inquest to decide which holdings of "Thomas de Ponte-Episcopi" belonged to the priory of Saint-Ymer by charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153][1382].  “Turstinus de Mundeford” donated revenue from his mills at Ayton to Guisborough, for the soul of “fratris mei Henrici”, with the consent of “conjugis mee et heredis mei”, by charter dated to [1155/70] witnessed by “Roberto filio et herede ipsius Turstini...[1383].  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[1384]m ALICE de Harcourt, daughter of [IVO] de Harcourt & his wife [Rohese Peverel] (-after 1189).  The Complete Peerage records her marriage and family origin.  Her parentage has not been confirmed.  From a chronological point of view, she could have been either a daughter of Rohese Peverel who married one of the Harcourt brothers. 

b)         HENRY [II] de Montfort (-before Apr 1199).  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[1385].  The estimated date of birth of his son suggests that Henry [II] may have been considerably younger than his brother Robert [II] or that the mother of Henry [II] was not her husband’s first wife.  "Henry de Monteforti" donated property to Castellion abbey, for the souls of "his father Turstin and his mother Juliana", by undated charter, witnessed by "Roberto de Offurd et Roberto filio eius...Henrico de Monteforte…"[1386]m (before [1183/87]) --- (-after 1199).  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  The estimated date of birth of his son suggests that Henry [II] may have been considerably younger than his brother Robert [II] or that the mother of Henry [II] was not her husband’s first wife.  Henry [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          THURSTAN [III] de Montfort ([1183/87]-1216, before 21 Nov).  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[1387]

-         see below

c)         HUGH de Montfort .  “Henr[icus] de Monte Forti” confirmed that he had granted “terras meas de Pychauilla et de Gouteuilla et de Cleuilla” to “Hugoni de Monte Forti fratri meo” by charter dated to [1178/99][1388]

3.         HENRY [I] de Montfort .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robert de Widuilla et Henri de Montf" accounting for “terre Rogeri de Molbrai” in Pembroke[1389].  “Turstinus de Mundeford” donated revenue from his mills at Ayton to Guisborough, for the soul of “fratris mei Henrici”, with the consent of “conjugis mee et heredis mei”, by charter dated to [1155/70] witnessed by “Roberto filio et herede ipsius Turstini...[1390]

 

 

Two possible brothers: 

1.         WILLIAM de Montfort .  “Aytrop Hasteng, Willelmo et Waltero de Monte Forti...” witnessed the charter dated to [1178/99] under which “Henr[icus] de Monte Forti” confirmed that he had granted “terras meas de Pychauilla et de Gouteuilla et de Cleuilla” to “Hugoni de Monte Forti fratri meo[1391]

2.         [WALTER de Montfort .  “Aytrop Hasteng, Willelmo et Waltero de Monte Forti...” witnessed the charter dated to [1178/99] under which “Henr[icus] de Monte Forti” confirmed that he had granted “terras meas de Pychauilla et de Gouteuilla et de Cleuilla” to “Hugoni de Monte Forti fratri meo[1392].  The contiguity of the two names suggests that William and Walter may have been brothers.] 

 

 

It is not known whether the following persons, who were presumably all related to each other as they are named together in the same source, were members of the main Montfort family who is set out in the present chapter. 

 

1.         HUGH de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[1393]

 

2.         RALPH de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[1394]

 

3.         WILLIAM de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[1395]

 

4.         HENRY de Montfort (-after 31 Jan 1200).  John King of England notified "Hugo de Monteforti" that “honor de Monteforti” was a fief of the king when King Henry II died and that King John received it from “Willi fil Rad seu Norm in custodia” dated 31 Jan 1200, witnessed by “...Rad de Monteforti, Willo de Monteforti, Hnr de Monteforti[1396].  . 

 

 

Three brothers, parents not known.  It is not known whether they were related to the main Montfort family who is set out in the present chapter. 

1.         HENRY de Montfort .  “Ivor de Teveleford” granted land in Chatley to “Robert de Berkelai” by charter dated to the reign of King John, witnessed by “Dom. Roger de Berkele, Henry de Monteforti, Roger and Hubert his brothers...[1397]

2.         ROGER de Montfort .  “Ivor de Teveleford” granted land in Chatley to “Robert de Berkelai” by charter dated to the reign of King John, witnessed by “Dom. Roger de Berkele, Henry de Monteforti, Roger and Hubert his brothers...[1398]

3.         HUBERT de Montfort .  “Ivor de Teveleford” granted land in Chatley to “Robert de Berkelai” by charter dated to the reign of King John, witnessed by “Dom. Roger de Berkele, Henry de Monteforti, Roger and Hubert his brothers...[1399]

 

 

THURSTAN [III] de Montfort, son of HENRY [II] de Montfort & his wife --- ([1183/87]-1216, before 21 Nov).  King John received the homage of "Tustan de Montiforti" and granted him his land on condition that he demised it for two years to "Willo de Cantilupo" by order dated 1205[1400].  This confirmation, about six years after the death of his father, suggests that Thurstan [III] must have been a minor when his father died.  The demise to William de Cauntelo suggests that Thurstan [III] may have been declared of age before the usual time and that it was considered that he required help in managing his estates.  “Turstinus de Monteforti” claimed, from Eustace de Vesci, half Langeton in Yorkshire which descended from “Geoffrey Murdac...ad Julianam filiam suam...ad Robertum filium suum...ad Henricum fratrem eiusdem Roberti patrem prædicti Turstini[1401]

m ---.  The name of Thurstan’s wife is not known.  The reference in the source quoted above to the demise of Thurstan [III]’s land to William de Cauntelo (presumably identified as William [II] de Cauntelo) suggests a close relationship between the two.  Maybe William was Thurstan’s father-in-law or brother-in-law (the chronology of the Cauntelo family is insufficiently clear to decide between these two possibilities), in which case his wife may have been --- de Cauntelo, daughter of [Walter de Cauntelo/William [II] de Cauntelo] & his wife ---.  The fact that King John granted the marriage of Thurstan’s older son to William de Cauntelo, and that Thurstan [III] named his younger son William, are also suggestive of a connection between the two families. 

Thurstan [III] & his wife had two children: 

1.         PIERS [I] de Montfort of Preston, co. Rutland ([1205/07]-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265)The Complete Peerage records that King John granted the wardship and marriage of Piers to William de Cauntelo in 1216[1402].  “Petrus de Monteforti filius Turstini de Monteforti” confirmed the donation of land "in villa de Wenge cum advocatione ecclesiæ eiusdem villæ" to St Neot’s by charter dated 29 Aug 1245[1403].  This confirmation presumably relates to the donation of the same place to Thorney priory which is quoted earlier in this chapter.  The Patent Rolls record that "Peter de Monte Forti" claimed rights to forests in Rutland of which he alleged "Thurstan de Monte Forti great grandfather of the said Peter was seised in his demesne", orders dated 14 Jul 1253, 11 Sep 1253 and 25 Feb 1255[1404].  "P. de Monte Forti" wrote to Henry III King of England, dated to [Dec 1262], reporting that he "found the Welsh march in great confusion" and names "dominorum Humfridi de Boun, Reginaldi filii Petri…"[1405]m (1228) ALICE de Audley, daughter of HENRY de Audley & his wife Bertred Mainwaring (after 1217-after 1265).  An order dated 1228 notified that the king had granted "scutagium feodroum i militis et dimidii", held by "Petrus de Monte Forti qui filiam suam duxit in uxorem", to “Henrico de Aldithel[1406].  Piers & his wife had three children: 

a)         PIERS [II] de Montfort of Beaudesert, Warwickshire (-before 4 Mar 1287).  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Simon de Monteforti junior, Petrus de eodem” were in Northampton when it was captured by the king in 1264[1407].  The Annals of Waverley name “dominus Gudo filius domini Symonnis de Monteforti…duo filii domini Petri de Monteforti…dominus Petrus et dominus Robertus de Munfort” were among those captured at the battle of Evesham in 1265[1408]m ([1260]) MATILDA de la Mare, daughter of MATTHEW de la Mare & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are recorded in The Complete Peerage which does not cite a primary source[1409].  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto...Petri de Monte Forti patris, domine Matildis matris eiusdem domine...”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[1410].  Piers & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN de Montfort (-[24 Jun 1295/11 May 1296]).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Montfort. 

-         LORDS MOUNTFORT[1411]

ii)         ELIZABETH de Montfort (-Aug 1354, bur Oxford, Priory of St Frideswide).  John Bishop of Lincoln authorised the substitution of two regular canons at Oxford St Frideswide, for the souls of “domine Elizabeth de Monte Acuto ac domini Willelmi de Monte Acuto mariti eiusdem domine E, Iohannis Lincoln episcopi, Petri de Monte Forti patris, domine Matildis matris eiusdem domine, Iohannis de Monte Acuto, Willelmi de Monte Acuto nuper comitis Sar., Simonis Elien episcopi, Edwardi de Monte Acuto, Alicie de Aubeneye, domine Marie Cogan, Elizabeth priorisse de Haliwell, domine Hawise Bauent, domine Matildis abbatisse de Berkyng, domine Isabelle sancte monialis de Berkyng, liberorum dictorum dominorum W. & E., domini Thome de Furneuall secundi mariti dicte domine, Petri Lymyseye militis et consanguinei eiusdem domine, Simonis de Islep”, charter dated 1 Mar 1380[1412]m firstly ([1292]) WILLIAM de Montagu, son of SIMON de Montagu Lord Montagu & his first wife Hawise de Saint-Amand (-Gascony 18 Oct 1319).  m secondly (8 Jun 1322) Sir THOMAS de Furnivalle of Sheffield, Worksop. 

b)         ROBERT de Montfort (-1274).  The Annals of Waverley name “dominus Gudo filius domini Symonnis de Monteforti…duo filii domini Petri de Monteforti…dominus Petrus et dominus Robertus de Munfort” were among those captured at the battle of Evesham in 1265[1413]m (before 14 Jan 1270) as her first husband, PETRONILLA de Dunstanville, daughter of WALTER de Dunstanville & his first wife Dionisia --- (22 Feb 1248-[1284/92]).  A writ dated 28 Jan "53 Hen III", after the death of "Walter de Dunstanvil", names "Petronilla his daughter aged 22 on the day of St Peter in Cathedra next, whom Roberti de Monteforti married, is his heir"[1414].  She married secondly ([1275/76]) as his first wife, John de la Mare.  Robert de Montfort & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Montfort (-[1309/Dec 1313]). 

ii)         ROBERT de Montfort

c)         WILLIAM de Montfort .  Pope Alexander IV issued an indult to “William clerk son of Peter de Montfort of the diocese of Worcester to hold benefices...”, dated 19 Dec 1258[1415]

2.         WILLIAM de MontfortThe Complete Peerage records that Thurstan [III] de Montfort left a younger son William "who had from his brother a life interest in property at Ringwood"[1416]

 

 

1.         PIERS [III] de MontfortLord Montfortm [MARGARET de Furnivalle], daughter of ---.  Piers [III] & his wife had children: 

a)         GUY de Montfort (-before 1370)m (Papal dispensation Jul 1347) MARGARET de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer.  The will of "Katherine Countess of Warwick", dated 4 Aug 1369, bequeathed property to “the Earl my husband...Thomas my son...William my other son...Maud de Clifford my daughter...Philippa de Stafford my daughter...my daughter Alice...Margaret Montfort my daughter...Isabel my daughter...Elizabeth the daughter of my son Guy...[1417].  Nun at Shouldham, Norfolk.  The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 6 Sep 1369, chose burial “in the quire of the Collegiate Church of our Lady at Warwick”, bequeathed property to “my two sons Thomas and William...Isabel my daughter...to her marriage...Margaret my daughter a nun at Shouldham...Katherine the daughter of my son Guy a nun at Shouldham...my daughter Alice...my daughter Clifford...Sir John Beauchamp...Sir Roger Beauchamp...Sir Guy de Brienne...[1418]

 

 

The will of "Peter de Mountfort Lord of Beaudesert Knight", dated [12] Dec 1367, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Preachers of Warwick”, bequeathed property to “the nuns of Penley...the Lady Lora Astley a nun there...my cousin Sir Baldwin de Freville...my son Richard de Montfort[1419]

 

 

 

MORVILLE

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Morville in the present-day French département of Manche, arrondissement Valognes, canton Bricquebec[1420].  The list of fees held from Philippe II King of France includes “Herbertus de Morevilla...sextam partem unius feodi apud Morevillam” among “feoda Ricardi de Vernone” in “Ballivia Constantini[1421]

 

 

1.         GUHER de Morville (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Guhero de Morevilla" in Surrey[1422]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Morville .  "William de Moreville" donated property to Montebourg abbey, for the souls of "his wife Mathildis and his son Eudo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Mathillis uxor mea, Eudo filius meus, Willelmus gener meus, Eustacius Wac……"[1423].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Morevilla" in Devonshire[1424]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  "William de Moreville" donated property to Montebourg abbey, for the souls of "his wife Mathildis and his son Eudo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Mathillis uxor mea, Eudo filius meus, Willelmus gener meus, Eustacius Wac…"[1425].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         EUDES de Morville .  "William de Moreville" donated property to Montebourg abbey, for the souls of "his wife Mathildis and his son Eudo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Mathillis uxor mea, Eudo filius meus, Willelmus gener meus, Eustacius Wac……"[1426].  "Eudes de Moreville" confirmed his father’s donations to Montebourg abbey by charter dated to before 1174, witnessed by "Hawis uxor mea, Willelmus filius meus et Rogerus frater eius, Rogerus de Stotvilla…"[1427]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  "Eudes de Moreville" confirmed his father’s donations to Montebourg abbey by charter dated to before 1174, witnessed by "Hawis uxor mea, Willelmus filius meus et Rogerus frater eius, Rogerus de Stotvilla…"[1428].  Eudes & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Morville .  "Eudes de Moreville" confirmed his father’s donations to Montebourg abbey by charter dated to before 1174, witnessed by "Hawis uxor mea, Willelmus filius meus et Rogerus frater eius, Rogerus de Stotvilla…"[1429]

ii)         ROGER de Morville .  "Eudes de Moreville" confirmed his father’s donations to Montebourg abbey by charter dated to before 1174, witnessed by "Hawis uxor mea, Willelmus filius meus et Rogerus frater eius, Rogerus de Stotvilla…"[1430]

b)         --- de Morville .  "William de Moreville" donated property to Montebourg abbey, for the souls of "his wife Mathildis and his son Eudo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Mathillis uxor mea, Eudo filius meus, Willelmus gener meus, Eustacius Wac……"[1431].  m WILLIAM, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         HERBERT de Morville .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Herbt de Morevilla…de custodia forestar" in Yorkshire[1432]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants notes that "a confirmation charter of…Richard [son of Herbert de Morville] for Montebourg shows that Herbert was father by his wife Agnes also of Herbert and Roger, a priest"[1433].  Herbert & his wife had three children: 

a)         RICHARD de Morville (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ricardus de Moreville" held five knights’ fees from "Rogeri de Munbray" in Yorkshire[1434]

b)         HERBERT de MorvilleDomesday Descendants notes that "a confirmation charter of…Richard [son of Herbert de Morville] for Montebourg shows that Herbert was father by his wife Agnes also of Herbert and Roger, a priest"[1435]

c)         ROGER de MorvilleDomesday Descendants notes that "a confirmation charter of…Richard [son of Herbert de Morville] for Montebourg shows that Herbert was father by his wife Agnes also of Herbert and Roger, a priest"[1436]

 

2.         SIMON de Morville m as her first husband, ADA Engaine, daughter of WILLIAM Engaine & his wife Eustachie.  She married secondly Robert de Vaux.  Her parentage and two marriages are shown in The Complete Peerage[1437]

 

 

1.         HUGH de Morville (-[1162]).  "…Hugone de Moruilla…" witnessed the charter dated to [1119/24] under which "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso[1438].  "…Hugo de Morvilla…" witnessed the charter, dated to the reign of Alexander I King of Scotland, under which "David predicti regis Scotie germanum…Cumbrensis regionis princeps" listed the lands of the church of Glasgow[1439].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Hug de Morevilla" in Huntingdonshire, Northamptonshire, and Rutland[1440].  "Hugo de Moravilla…et Beatrix de Bello-campo sponsa eius" donated property to Dryburgh monastery by undated charter[1441].  Constable of Scotland [1140].  "…Hug de Morevill…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Apr 1141 under which David King of Scotland donated "terram de Eldune…Dernewic" to Melrose abbey[1442].  "…Hugone de Morvilla…" witnessed the undated charter under which David I King of Scotland donated "toftam in Beruwic" to the priory of the Isle of May[1443].  "…Hugo de Morevill et Hugone de Morevill filio eio…" witnessed the undated charter under which Malcolm IV King of Scotland confirmed the donation of "terram de Kenelekin" to St Andrew’s priory[1444].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which names "Roberto de Trivers, antecessori…Hugonis de Morvill" in relation to the land in Cumberland which was granted to Hugh’s two sons-in-law[1445].  m BEATRICE de Beauchamp, daughter of --- (-after 1162).  "Hugo de Moravilla…et Beatrix de Bello-campo sponsa eius" donated property to Dryburgh monastery by undated charter[1446]Domesday Descendants states that the wife of Hugh de Morville was Beatrice de Beauchamp, but does not identify her parents (no primary source cited)[1447].  "Beatrix de Bello campo" donated "decimam molendini de Rogesburgh" to Dryburgh monastery, naming "Rogero [error for Richardo?] de Morevilla filio suo", by undated charter[1448].  Hugh & his wife had three children: 

a)         HUGH de Morville (-after 1153).  "…Hugo de Morevill et Hugone de Morevill filio eio…" witnessed the undated charter under which Malcolm IV King of Scotland confirmed the donation of "terram de Kenelekin" to St Andrew’s priory[1449].  Pleas taken in Westmoreland 14 Dec 1279 record the claim to "the moiety of the manors of Wyntone, Kingesmedburne, Appelby, Burgh and Kyrkeby Stephan" made by "Derverguilla widow of John de Balliol, Margaret de Ferrers countess of Derby, Elena widow of Alan la Zusche, Alexander Comin earl of Buchan and Elizabeth his wife" against "Roger de Clifford and Isabella his wife…and…Roger de Leyburne and Idonea his wife", and recites the inheritance of the manors from "one Hugh" [Hugh de Morville] to "Richard his brother and heir"[1450]

b)         RICHARD de Morville (-1189).  Pleas taken in Westmoreland 14 Dec 1279 record the claim to "the moiety of the manors of Wyntone, Kingesmedburne, Appelby, Burgh and Kyrkeby Stephan" made by "Derverguilla widow of John de Balliol, Margaret de Ferrers countess of Derby, Elena widow of Alan la Zusche, Alexander Comin earl of Buchan and Elizabeth his wife" against "Roger de Clifford and Isabella his wife…and…Roger de Leyburne and Idonea his wife", and recites the inheritance of the manors from "one Hugh" [Hugh de Morville] to "Richard his brother and heir"[1451].  Constable of Scotland [1162].  "…Ricardo de Morevill constabulario…" witnessed the undated charter under which William King of Scotland directed Scone Abbey concerning the rights of "Nar hominem abbatis de Scone"[1452].  "…Ricardo de Morevilla constabulario…" witnessed the undated charter under which William King of Scotland confirmed donations to the priory of the Isle of May[1453].  "Ricardus de Morevill constabularius regis Scottie" donated "totam terram de Blanesleye" to Melrose abbey, with the consent of "Willi de Morevill filii et heredis mei", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Auicie et Willi filii mei", by undated charter[1454].  "Ricardus de Morevilla constabularius domini regis Scotie" confirmed the donation of "terram de Langelaw" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "Malcolmi fratris mei", by undated charter[1455]m (after 1155) [as her second husband,] HAWISE de Lancaster, [widow of WILLIAM Peveril,] daughter of --- (-after [1188/89]).  "Ricardus de Morevill constabularius regis Scottie" donated "totam terram de Blanesleye" to Melrose abbey, with the consent of "Willi de Morevill filii et heredis mei", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Auicie et Willi filii mei", by undated charter[1456].  "Will de Morev" confirmed the donation of "totam terram de Bleyneslei" to Melrose abbey, made by "pater meus Ric de Moreuill", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Ric de Morv patre meo, Auice de Loncastre matre…"[1457].  There is uncertainty surrounding this "Hawise de Lancaster".  Her marriage to William Peveril is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Avisia de Lancastria, uxor Willielmi Peverel” donated property to Derley Priory by undated charter[1458].  Her marriage to Richard de Moreville is confirmed by the 1169/70 Pipe Roll which records "Ric de Moreuill" owing ".cc. m p recto hndo de tra q clamat c filia Willi de Lancastr" in Lancashire[1459].  The primary source which confirms that the widow of William Peverel was the same person who remarried Richard de Morville has not yet been identified.  There is also difficulty concerning Hawise’s parentage.  Domesday Descendants states that the wife of Richard de Morville was Hawise de Lancaster, daughter of William de Lancaster (no corresponding primary source cited)[1460].  As can be seen from the chronology of William de Lancaster’s known wife Gundred de Warenne, this affiliation would only be possible if Hawise had been born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage.  On the other hand, the onomastics are favourable for this affiliation, as each succeeding generation of the "de Lancaster" family included a Hawise de Lancaster.  A different affiliation is suggested by the Complete Peerage which speculates that the wife of William Peverel was Hawise, daughter of Roger de Montgommery Lord of Lancaster & his wife Almodis Ctss de la Marche[1461].  This is not an ideal fit.  Her supposed father Roger was banished from England in 1102 and retired to La Marche, so it is unclear why Hawise would have been described as “de Lancastria” in a charter which must have been dated about 40 years later.  In any case, the chronology is unfavourable.  It is unlikely that the wife of Roger de Montgommery, Almodis de la Marche, was born much later than 1070, given the known chronology of her family, which means that her children would have been born before 1110 at the latest.  On the other hand, it is likely that William Peverel’s second marriage should be dated to the early 1140s at the earliest, as his first wife is named in one of the charters of Stephen King of England (who succeeded in 1135).  Such a marriage date is late if his second wife was born in the early 1100s, and impossible assuming that his widow was the same person who married Richard de Morville and had children by him in the late 1150s.  "Avicia de Lonc spouse of Richard de Morevilla, with the consent of William her heir and her other heirs" confirmed a donation to Furness St. Mary by charter dated to [1188/89][1462].  Richard & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Morville (-1196).  Pleas taken in Westmoreland 14 Dec 1279 record the claim to "the moiety of the manors of Wyntone, Kingesmedburne, Appelby, Burgh and Kyrkeby Stephan" made by "Derverguilla widow of John de Balliol, Margaret de Ferrers countess of Derby, Elena widow of Alan la Zusche, Alexander Comin earl of Buchan and Elizabeth his wife" against "Roger de Clifford and Isabella his wife…and…Roger de Leyburne and Idonea his wife", and recites the inheritance of the manors from "one Hugh" [Hugh de Morville] to "Richard his brother and heir", to "William his son and heir…who died without heir of his body", and to "Elena…his sister and heir"[1463].  "Avicia de Lonc spouse of Richard de Morevilla, with the consent of William her heir and her other heirs" confirmed a donation to Furness St. Mary by charter dated to [1188/89][1464].  "Ricardus de Morevill constabularius regis Scottie" donated "totam terram de Blanesleye" to Melrose abbey, with the consent of "Willi de Morevill filii et heredis mei", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee Auicie et Willi filii mei", by undated charter[1465].  "Will de Morev" confirmed the donation of "totam terram de Bleyneslei" to Melrose abbey, made by "pater meus Ric de Moreuill", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Ric de Morv patre meo, Auice de Loncastre matre…"[1466].  The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records that "Rotholand lord of Galloway" married "William de Morville…[his] sister" who was her brother’s heir[1467].  "…Willelmo de Morevill……" witnessed the undated charter which William King of Scotland confirmed rights of Scone Abbey[1468]m ---.  "Will de Morev" confirmed the donation of "totam terram de Bleyneslei" to Melrose abbey, made by "pater meus Ric de Moreuill", for the souls of "mee et…uxoris mee", by undated charter witnessed by "Ric de Morv patre meo, Auice de Loncastre matre…"[1469].  The name of William’s wife is not known. 

ii)         HELEN de Morville (-11 Jun 1217[1470]).  Pleas taken in Westmoreland 14 Dec 1279 record the claim to "the moiety of the manors of Wyntone, Kingesmedburne, Appelby, Burgh and Kyrkeby Stephan" made by "Derverguilla widow of John de Balliol, Margaret de Ferrers countess of Derby, Elena widow of Alan la Zusche, Alexander Comin earl of Buchan and Elizabeth his wife" against "Roger de Clifford and Isabella his wife…and…Roger de Leyburne and Idonea his wife", and recites the inheritance of the manors from "one Hugh" [Hugh de Morville] to "Richard his brother and heir", to "William his son and heir…who died without heir of his body", and to "Elena…his sister and heir"[1471].  The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records that "Rotholand lord of Galloway" married "William de Morville…[his] sister" who was her brother’s heir[1472].  The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records that "Rothonaldus…dominus Galuidie, pater magni Alani" succeeded "Willelmo de Moreuilla constabulario Scocie" and married his sister[1473].  "Rodland de Galloway gives the K. 500 marks to have a recognizance by twelve free men of the vicinage of Bosiate, whether Richard de Moreville father of his wife Helena was seized of a knight’s fee in Bosiaute" in Northampton, dated [Dec] 1200[1474].  "Elena de Morevilla" donated "elemosinam quondam patre mee in territorio de Killebeccokestun", and "de Widhope…ubique avia mea et avia hoinum meorum", to Melrose abbey for the souls of "…Willi fratris mei et Rollandi sponsi mei", by undated charter[1475]m ROLAND Lord of Galloway, son of UHTRED Lord of Galloway & his wife Gunhild of Dunbar (-1200). 

c)         MALCOLM de Morville .  "Ricardus de Morevilla constabularius domini regis Scotie" confirmed the donation of "terram de Langelaw" to Dryburgh monastery, for the soul of "Malcolmi fratris mei", by undated charter[1476]

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Morville .  “Uchtredus filius Ketelli” confirmed to “Gileberto de Lancastro quartam partem tocius terre quam Willelmus de Loncastr” had given to “patri meo Ketello” in “Stirkeland” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Willo filio Ketelli, Roberto de Morvill...Bernardo filio Ketell[1477]

 

2.         RICHARD de Morville m ADELISA de Percy, illegitimate daughter of WILLIAM de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire & his mistress ---.  Mistress of HUGUES du Puiset Bishop of Durham

 

 

1.         HUGH de Morville (-1201).  Ralph de Diceto’s Ymagines Historiarum record that “Willelmus de Traci, Reginaldus filius Ursi, Hugo de Morevilla, Ricardus Brito” murdered the archbishop at Canterbury in 1171 and relate the subsequent events in detail[1478].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "militum…Richardus Brito, Hugo de Morevilla, Renaldus Ursus et Guillelmus de Traci" as the murderers of Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury[1479].  "Hug de Morevill" paid a fine for the marriage "inter filiam suam et Ric de Egremunt" in Cumberland, dated 1200[1480].  "Hug de Morevill et Helew uxor eius" paid a fine relating to "dote ipsi Helewis" in Westmoreland, dated 1200[1481].  "Willelmus de Briwerr" paid a fine for "heritenda filia Hug de Morevill cum tota hereditate sua qu id Hugo tenuit die q fuit vivus et mortuus" and for the marriage of "ipsie file ad op Ric filii sui […Ric Briwerr fil ipsius Willmi] vel si parentes ipsi puelle ad h assensint ad op Ric Gernon nepotis sui si eid Willo placuit", dated 1201[1482]m HELWISE de Stuteville, daughter of --- (-after [1204]).  "Hug de Morevill et Helew uxor eius" paid a fine relating to "dote ipsi Helewis" in Westmoreland, dated 1200[1483].  "William Briewere and Helewisa de Stuteville, defendant" reached agreement "regarding the admeasurements of her dower from Hugh de Moreville her late husband" relating to “the manor of Chircoswarde and the manor of Lesingebi...the manor of Hisale”, dated to [1204][1484].  Hugh & his wife had two children: 

a)         ADA de Morville (-after 20 Feb 1227).  "Hug de Morevill" paid a fine for the marriage "inter filiam suam et Ric de Egremunt" in Cumberland, dated 1200[1485].  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Luci accounts for 900 marks and five palfreys for having Alda his wife’s reasonable share...of Hugh de Moreville her father’s land"[1486].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[1487].  "Ada q fuit uxor Ricardi de Lucy de Egremunt" paid a fine for "hereditate sua [et] dote sua…q fuerunt predicti Ricardi quondam viri sui" in Cumberland, dated 1213[1488].  Henry III King of England noted that "Thomas de Muleton" married "Adam de Morevill, que fuit uxor Ricardi de Luci" without royal licence, and ordered the seizure of "omnibus terris ipsius Ade in Cumberlande et Westmerilande et de omnibus terris ipsius Thome in Coplande, cum castro suo de Egremunde", dated 13 Aug 1218[1489].  A royal licence granted the right to construct fisheries to "Thomas de Muleton and Ada his wife" dated 20 Feb 1227[1490]m firstly ([1200]) RICHARD de Lucy, son of REYNOLD de Lucy & his wife Amabel of Scotland (-early 1213, bur St Bees priory).  m secondly (before 13 Aug 1218) as his second wife, THOMAS de Multon of Multon, near Spalding, Lincolnshire, son of ---. 

b)         JOAN de Morville .  "Willelmus de Briwerr" paid a fine for "heritenda filia Hug de Morevill cum tota hereditate sua qu id Hugo tenuit die q fuit vivus et mortuus" and for the marriage of "ipsie file ad op Ric filii sui […Ric Briwerr fil ipsius Willmi] vel si parentes ipsi puelle ad h assensint ad op Ric Gernon nepotis sui si eid Willo placuit", dated 1201[1491].  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Gernon accounts for 600 marks for having Johanna the younger daughter of Hugh de Moreville, with the reasonable share falling to her of her father’s land"[1492].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[1493].  m ([1201/05]) RICHARD Gernon, son of --- (-after 1212). 

 

2.         WILLIAM de Morville (-after 1219).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus de Morvile debet summonere quoddam hundredum" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][1494].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Somerset and Dorset, dated 1219, which includes "Willelmus de Morevill" holding "manerium de Bradepole"[1495].  

 

3.         ROGER de Morville (-after 1210).  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Rogerus de Moreville" holding one knight’s fee "de feodo Bussellorum" in Lancashire in [1210/12][1496]

 

4.         WILLIAM de Morvillem ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         ALICE de Morville .  "Malcolmus filius David Dunne de Conestablestun et Alicia filia Willi de Morevill eius sponsa" donated land "in territorio de Edulsistun" to the church of Glasgow by undated charter[1497]m MALCOLM Dunn, son of DAVID Dunn & his wife ---. 

 

5.         --- .  m JOAN [de Morville], daughter of --- (-before 11 Mar 1248).  A writ dated 11 Mar "31 Hen III", after the death of "Joan de Morvill" names "Helewisia and Ada are her heirs and of full age", noting that "the said Joan gave to Sir Richard de Wennun her daughter Helewisia in marriage and with her 6 carucates of land in Neucraye…and she gave to Sir Ralph de Leventon with Ada her daughter in marriage 6 carucates of land in Kircosewal and 3 carucates in Laysingbi", and her land in "Burgh on the Sands town…and in Ayketon town" in Cumberland[1498].  Two children: 

a)         HELEWISE .  A writ dated 11 Mar "31 Hen III", after the death of "Joan de Morvill" names "Helewisia and Ada are her heirs and of full age", noting that "the said Joan gave to Sir Richard de Wennun her daughter Helewisia in marriage and with her 6 carucates of land in Neucraye…"[1499]m (before Mar 1248) RICHARD de Wennun, son of ---. 

b)         ADA .  A writ dated 11 Mar "31 Hen III", after the death of "Joan de Morvill" names "Helewisia and Ada are her heirs and of full age", noting that "the said Joan gave…to Sir Ralph de Leventon with Ada her daughter in marriage 6 carucates of land in Kircosewal and 3 carucates in Laysingbi"[1500]m (before Mar 1248) RALPH de Leventon, son of ---. 

 

 

 

 

MULTON

 

 

1.         THOMAS de Multon of Multon, near Spalding, Lincolnshire m firstly ([1190]) SARAH de Flete, daughter of RICHARD de Flete of Fleet, Lincolnshire & his wife Juliane ---.  m secondly (before 13 Aug 1218) as her second husband, ADA de Morville, widow of RICHARD de Lucy, daughter of HUGH de Morville & his wife Helwise de Stuteville (-after 20 Feb 1227).  The Pipe Roll 1205/06 records that "Richard de Luci accounts for 900 marks and five palfreys for having Alda his wife’s reasonable share...of Hugh de Moreville her father’s land"[1501].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernon" held land in Cumberland which was held by "Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis"[1502].  "Ada q fuit uxor Ricardi de Lucy de Egremunt" paid a fine for "hereditate sua [et] dote sua…q fuerunt predicti Ricardi quondam viri sui" in Cumberland, dated 1213[1503].  Henry III King of England noted that "Thomas de Muleton" married "Adam de Morevill, que fuit uxor Ricardi de Luci" without royal licence, and ordered the seizure of "omnibus terris ipsius Ade in Cumberlande et Westmerilande et de omnibus terris ipsius Thome in Coplande, cum castro suo de Egremunde", dated 13 Aug 1218[1504].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Thomas de Muleton” owing “de pluribis debitis Ricardi de Lucy...et...pro Alda que fuit uxor eiusdem Ricardi” in Essex[1505].  A royal licence granted the right to construct fisheries to "Thomas de Muleton and Ada his wife" dated 20 Feb 1227[1506].  Thomas & his first wife had two children:

a)         LAMBERT de Multon (-before 16 Nov 1246)

-        see below

b)         ALAN de Multon (-after 1250).  His children adopted the name Lucy. 

-        LUCY

Thomas & his second wife had one child: 

c)         THOMAS de Multon (-1271)m MATILDA de Vaux, daughter of HUBERT de Vaux & his wife --- (-19 May 1293).  A manuscript recording “baronum et dominorum…baronia Gilleslandiæ” names “Matildis de Vallibus filia Huberti de Vallibus Ob. 23 Edw I” as wife of “Thomas de Multon…Ob. 25 Hen III[1507].  “Matildis de Vallibus Domina de Gillesland” donated property to Wetherhal priory, for the soul of "Domini mei Thomæ de Multon", by charter dtaed 29 Jun 1270, witnessed by "…Ranulpho de Vallibus…"[1508].  The Chronicle of Lanercost records the death "die sancti Dunstani" (dated to 1294 or 1295 from the context) of "domina Matildis de Multona domina de Gilleslande, mater predictæ Thomæ" (whose death is recorded just before this entry)[1509].  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[1510].  Thomas & his wife had three children: 

i)          THOMAS de Multon ([1262/63]-).  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[1511]

ii)         JAMES de Multon .  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[1512]

iii)        HUBERT de Multon .  A writ dated 28 May "21 Edw I", after the death of "Maud de Multon alias de Muleton, de Molton", records "Thomas son of Thomas de Moleton aged 30 or more is her next heir" and "manors held of James de Muleton her son…for life of Sir Hubert her son"[1513]

 

 

LAMBERT de Multon, son of THOMAS de Multon of Multon, Lincolnshire & his first wife Sarah de Flete (-before 16 Nov 1246)

m firstly AMABEL de Lucy, son of RICHARD de Lucy & his wife Ada de Moreville.  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[1514].  "Lambertus de Moleton" donated rights in land "in Couplandia" to St Bees, for the soul of "Amabilie uxoris mee", by undated charter[1515]

m secondly as her second husband, IDA, widow of GEOFFREY d’Oyly, daughter of ---.  She married thirdly Geoffrey de Millers

Lambert & his first wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Multon of Egremont (4 May 1225-before 29 Apr 1294).  The Cronicon Cumbriæ names “Amabillam et Aliciam, et successit Amabillæ Lambertus de Multon” as the children of “Reginaldo de Lucy” and his wife, adding that Lambert was succeeded by “Thomas de Multon de Egremond[1516]m firstly IDA, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH, widow of JOHN de Munemuth, daughter of --- ([1276/78]).  m thirdly (before 1288) MARGARET, daughter of --- (-after Dec 1313).  Thomas & his wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS de Multon (-before 24 Jul 1287).  m EMOINE Le Botiller, daughter of JOHN Le Botiller of Ireland & his wife --- ([Sep 1284/Jul 1287]).  Thomas & his wife had children:

i)          THOMAS de Multon (21 Feb 1276-[May 1321/8 Feb 1322]).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Multon of Egremont.  m (St Peter’s Priory, Ipswich 3 Jan 1297) ELEANOR de Burgh, daughter of RICHARD de Burgh Earl of Ulster & his wife Margaret de Burgh of Lanvalley.  Thomas & his wife had four children:  

(a)       JOAN Multon ([1303/04]-16 Jun 1363, bur Dunmore Priory)m ROBERT FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter, son of ROBERT FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter & his second wife Eleanor Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1300/01]-6 May 1328). 

(b)       ELIZABETH de Multon ([1305/06]-).  m firstly ROBERT de Harington, son of JOHN de Harington Lord Harington & his wife ---.  m secondly WALTER de Birmingham, son of ---. 

(c)       JOHN de Multon (Oct 1308-[19 Jul 1333/23 Nov 1334])Betrothed (25 May 1317) to JOAN de Gavaston, daughter of PIERS de Gavaston Earl of Cornwall & his wife Margaret de Clare ([1310]-Amesbury Priory 14 Jan 1325).  The marriage contract between “monsieur Thomas de Multon Seignur de Egremond...Johan einez filz et heir le dit monsieur Thomas” and “Johane la feile monsieur Piers de Gavaston jadys counte de Cornwall” is dated 25 May 1317 and provides for the marriage “si tost come les ditz enfauntz venuz a age convenable[1517].  The Complete Peerage states that Joan died “aged 15 in Amesbury Priory14 Jan 1325[1518]m as her first husband, ALICE, daughter of --- (-before 25 Oct 1339).  She married secondly (before Jul 1338) Edmund de Ufford

(d)       MARGARET de Multon ([1309/10]-after Sep 1341).  m ([Nov 1329]) as his first wife, THOMAS de Lucy, son of ANTHONY de Lucy Lord Lucy & his wife Elizabeth --- (-London 5 Dec 1365).  He succeeded as Lord Lucy

 

 

 

 

MUNCHENSY

 

 

1.         DREUX de Munchensy .  "…Droco de Munchi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1121] [marked "Spurious?" in the compilation] under which Henry I King of England confirmed the property of Thetford St Mary’s[1519]

 

2.         HUBERT [I] de Munchensy (-before 1120).  Domesday Book records “Hubert de Mont-Canisy” holding Wyverstone in Suffolk[1520]m firstly ---.  This first marriage is confirmed by Domesday Descendants which states that Hubert de Munchensy was the son of Hubert by his first wife (no corresponding primary source cited)[1521]m secondly as her second husband, MURIEL de Valoignes, widow of --- de Backton, daughter of ---.  Muriel wife of Hubert de Munchensy donated land at Rushworth to Thetford abbey on making her son Hugh a monk there, confirmed by her sons "William de Bachetone and Roger de Munchensy, her brother Roger de Valoignes and his son Piers", by undated charter[1522].  Hubert [I] & his [first] wife had two children: 

a)         GILBERT de Munchensy (-after [Feb 1120/Feb 1121]).  The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Gillbertus filius Huberti de Munte Kanesi" confirmed the donation of "ecclesia Eaduuardestune" to the monastery of Abingdon made by "patre suo", dated to "anno IV post obitum abbatis Faritii" [dated to [Feb 1120/Feb 1121][1523]][1524]

b)         HUBERT [II] de Munchensy (-after 1166).  Domesday Descendants states that Hubert de Munchensy was the son of Hubert by his first wife (no corresponding primary source cited)[1525].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Hub de Montecanesi" holding land in Norfolk from Hugo Bigod and "ubt de Monte Canesi" land in Suffolk[1526].  "W comes Cicestrie…et regina Adelide" granted land at Wymondham, Norfolk to the church of St Lazarus of Jerusalem by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "…Hub de Montechan…"[1527].  “Comes Hugo Bigott, Hubertus de Monte Canisi…Warinus de Monte-Canisi…” witnessed the charter under which "Willielmus…comes Cicestriæ" founded Old Buckenham Priory, Norfolk, dated to the reign of King Stephen (dated to [1151/52] in The Complete Peerage[1528]), quoted in an Inspeximus of King Edward II[1529].  Hubert de Munchensy confirmed his (unnamed) father’s donation of tithes of Clay and Holkham to Castelacre priory by undated charter, witnessed by "Roger de Munchensy, Warin de Munchensy fratre meo"[1530].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hubert de Montechanesi" held 11 knights’ fees from "honore de Eye" in Suffolk[1531]m ---.  The name of Hubert’s wife is not known.  Hubert & his wife had one child: 

i)          --- de Munchensy (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "filius Huberti de Muntchensi" held one knight’s fee from the bishop of Ely in Cambridgeshire[1532]

Hubert & his [first/second] wife had [one child]: 

c)         [SARAH de Munchensy (-1185 or before).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Hubertus Blundus filius Willelmi Blundi…xx annorum…nepos Huberti de Muntchenesy”, adding that “terra sua de Yxewurth venit in manum Episcopi [Eliensis] ad festum Sancti Michaelis post mortem Sarre de Muntchenesy[1533].  It is unclear from this text whether the mother of Hubert Blount (presumably Sarah de Munchensy) was (i) the daughter of Hubert [I] de Munchensy, (ii) the daughter of Hubert [II] de Munchensy, or (iii) the sister of Hubert [II].  m WILLIAM Blount, son of --- (-before 1185).] 

Hubert & his second wife had three children: 

d)         [HUGH .  Monk at Thetford Abbey.  Muriel wife of Hubert de Munchensy donated land at Rushworth to Thetford abbey on making her son Hugh a monk there, confirmed by her sons "William de Bachetone and Roger de Munchensy, her brother Roger de Valoignes and his son Piers", by undated charter[1534].  It is not known whether Hugh was born from his mother’s first or second marriage.]  same person as…?  HUGH de Munchensy (-before 29 Sep 1187).  Assuming that Hugh, installed as a monk at Thetford, was the son of Muriel de Valoignes by her second marriage, it is possible that he was the same person as Hubert [I]’s son Hugh, maybe withdrawn from holy orders if his older half-brothers had no male heirs.  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[1535]

-        see below

e)         ROGER [I] de Munchensy .  Muriel wife of Hubert de Munchensy donated land at Rushworth to Thetford abbey on making her son Hugh a monk there, confirmed by her sons "William de Bachetone and Roger de Munchensy, her brother Roger de Valoignes and his son Piers", by undated charter[1536].  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[1537].  It is assumed that Roger was the brother of the donor, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified.  Hubert de Munchensy confirmed his (unnamed) father’s donation of tithes of Clay and Holkham to Castelacre priory by undated charter, witnessed by "Roger de Munchensy, Warin de Munchensy fratre meo"[1538]m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants cites charters of Colne which name Matilda as the wife of Roger de Munchensy[1539].  Roger & his wife had two children: 

i)          ROGER [II] de Munchensy .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

ii)         JOAN de Munchensy .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m WALTER de Colchester, son of ---. 

f)          WARIN [I] de Munchensy (-before 1162).  “Comes Hugo Bigott, Hubertus de Monte Canisi…Warinus de Monte-Canisi…” witnessed the charter under which "Willielmus…comes Cicestriæ" founded Old Buckenham Priory, Norfolk, dated to the reign of King Stephen (dated to [1151/52] in The Complete Peerage[1540]), quoted in an Inspeximus of King Edward II[1541].  Hubert de Munchensy confirmed his (unnamed) father’s donation of tithes of Clay and Holkham to Castelacre priory by undated charter, witnessed by "Roger de Munchensy, Warin de Munchensy fratre meo"[1542].  As Warin’s name follows Roger (who is confirmed above as the son of Hubert [I] by his second marriage) in the witness list, it is assumed that Warin [I] was a younger son of Hubert by Muriel de Valoignes. 

-        see below

 

 

1.         HUBERT [III] de Munchensy (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Hubertus de Munchensey…in custodia Eliensis episcopi” and “terra sua de Stretford…de Baronia Henrici de Essex[1543]

 

 

HUGH de Munchensy, son of HUBERT [I] de Munchensy & his [second wife Muriel de Valoignes] (-before 29 Sep 1187).  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[1544].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo de Mauchensi" with half a knight "in baillia Willelmi de Malepalet"[1545]

m ALICE, daughter of ---.  The Complete Peerage names "Alice sister and coh. of Roger, brother and h. of Miles of Stoke near Ipswich" as the wife of Hugh de Minchensy[1546]

Hugh & his wife had three children: 

1.         ROBERT de Munchensy (-after 1154).  The Complete Peerage records that Robert "early in the reign of Henry II…was joined with his father in the charge of having done damage to Colne Abbey" as the wife of Hugh de Minchensy[1547]

2.         STEPHEN de Munchensy (-1199 before 29 May).  “Hugo de Montecanisio…et Stephanus filius et hæres meus” donated "ecclesiam de Edwardeston", previously donated by "pater meus Hubertus" to Abingdon, to Colne Priory, Essex by undated charter, witnessed by "comes Albricus [which dates the document to after 1142], Willielmus de Veer, Rogerus de Montecanis…Rogerus de Bellocampo, Gaufridus de Veer, novissime superveniens, Johannes Brito"[1548].  Stephen de Munchensy confirmed donations to Abingdon abbey made by "his father Hugh and grandfather Hubert" by undated charter (dated to before 1194 from the first witness) witnessed by "Earl Aubrey and Aubrey his son, William de Ver, Hugh de Muntikanesy, and Hubert the grantor’s brother"[1549]m ---.  The name of Stephen’s wife is not known.  Stephen & his wife had one child: 

a)         HUBERT de Munchensy (-after 1220).  Bracton records that in 1220 “Hubertum de Monte Canisio” still owed £49 in respect of a claim made against “Stephanum de Monte Canisio patrem ipsius Huberti” by “Willelmum de Godingeham patrem...Johannis” in respect of Staverton[1550]m ---.  The name of Hubert’s wife is not known.  Hubert & his wife had [one child]: 

i)          [WILLIAM [I] de Munchensy (-before Jun 1263).]  m JOAN, daughter of GEOFFREY de Crek & his wife ---.  William [I] & his wife had one child: 

(1)       WILLIAM [II] de Munchensy ([1229/30]-[27 Apr/14 May] 1302).  A writ dated 30 Jan "38 Hen III", after the death of "Ralph de la Haye alias de Haya" names "William son of Sir William de Munchenesi alias Munkanesey aged 24 is his heir"[1551]m (before Jun 1278) as her second husband, BEATRICE de Beauchamp, widow of THOMAS FitzOtes of Mendlesham, Suffolk, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford & his second wife Ida Longespée of Salisbury (-before 30 Sep 1285).  A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the manor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon, Joan the wife of Ralph Paynel, aged 30, daughter of Ela sister of the said Simon, Isabel the wife of Simon de Pateshulle aged 24, daughter of Ida daughter of the same Ela, and Elizabeth the wife of John de Horbur aged 34, daughter of the same Ela, are parceners with the heirs of the body of Beatrice sometime sister of the said Simon", adding that Beatrice had married "first to Thomas son of Otto, who had by her a son named Otto now deceased, and a daughter named Maud now aged 26 years and the wife of John Botetourte…after the death of the said Thomas she was married to Sir William de Montecanyso of Edwardestone who had by her a son named William, who if he survives as the jury believe, is 12 years old and more"[1552]

-         MUNCHENSY[1553]

3.         HUBERT de Munchensy .  Stephen de Munchensy confirmed donations to Abingdon abbey made by "his father Hugh and grandfather Hubert" by undated charter (dated to before 1194 from the first witness) witnessed by "Earl Aubrey and Aubrey his son, William de Ver, Hugh de Muntikanesy, and Hubert the grantor’s brother"[1554]

 

 

WARIN [I] de Munchensy, son of HUBERT [I] de Munchensy & his second wife Muriel de Valoignes (-before 1162).  “Comes Hugo Bigott, Hubertus de Monte Canisi…Warinus de Monte-Canisi…” witnessed the charter under which "Willielmus…comes Cicestriæ" founded Old Buckenham Priory, Norfolk, dated to the reign of King Stephen (dated to [1151/52] in The Complete Peerage[1555]), quoted in an Inspeximus of King Edward II[1556].  Hubert de Munchensy confirmed his (unnamed) father’s donation of tithes of Clay and Holkham to Castelacre priory by undated charter, witnessed by "Roger de Munchensy, Warin de Munchensy fratre meo"[1557].  As Warin’s name follows Roger (who is confirmed above as the son of Hubert [I] by his second marriage) in the witness list, it is assumed that Warin [I] was a younger son of Hubert by Muriel de Valoignes. 

m as her first husband, AGNES, daughter of PAYN FitzJohn of Ewyas, co. Hereford, Sheriff of Hereford and Shropshire & his wife Sibyl de Lacy (-after 1190).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1558].  She married secondly Halenald de Bidun.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Agnes de Montchanesi" paying "xiii s" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire[1559]

Warin [I] & his wife had seven children: 

1.         RALPH de Munchensy (-[1187/90]).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1560]

2.         WILLIAM de Munchensy (-before 7 May 1204).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1561].  King John confirmed "custodiam terre et heredum Willelmi de Mutkanes" to "Willelmo com Arundell", as well as "maritagium Aveline que fuit uxor ipsius Willelmi", by charter dated 7 May 1204[1562]m as her first husband, AVELINE de Clare, daughter of ROGER de Clare Earl of Hertford & his wife Matilda de Saint-Hilaire (-(-[22 Nov 1220/4 Jun 1225).  King John confirmed "custodiam terre et heredum Willelmi de Mutkanes" to "Willelmo com Arundell", as well as "maritagium Aveline que fuit uxor ipsius Willelmi", by charter dated 7 May 1204[1563].  Her parentage and first marriage are indicated by the order dated 23 Dec 1213 under which her son "Guarinus de Munchainesy" paid a fine for "hereditarie" with "W. com Arundell avunculus ipsius Warini" acting as guarantor[1564], William Earl of Arundel being the son of the second husband of Warin’s paternal grandmother.  She married secondly (before 29 May 1205) as his second wife, Geoffrey FitzPiers Earl of Essex.  "Gaufridus filius Petri comes Essex" donated property to Winchester St Swithin, for the anniversaries of "…Petri de Lutegareshale patris mei…et Mathildis matris mee…et sponsarum mearum Beatricis et Aveline et liberorum meorum" by  undated charter[1565].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Munchensy (-before 1212).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Willelmus de Mondchanesi" held "Wieham pro servicio i hide"[1566].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "hæres Willelmi de Muntchanesy" holding two knights’ fees "de honore Britanniæ" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and one "in Bike, Greibye in Kecestefene" in Lincolnshire and "Cleis" in Norfolk in [1210/12][1567].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "comes de Arundel" held five knights’ fees and parts in Staffordshire "in custodia cum herede Willelmi de Muntchanesey"[1568].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Warinus de Monte Canisio" against "Walterum de Godarduilla" requesting "feodum…in Wicham" which had been held by "Willelmo de Monte Canisio fratre eiusdem Warini cuius heres ipse est dum fuit infra etatem"[1569]

b)         WARIN [II] de Munchensy (-after 21 Oct 1242).  "Guarinus de Munchainesy" paid a fine for "hereditarie" with "W. com Arundell avunculus ipsius Warini" acting as guarantor, dated 23 Dec 1213[1570].  William Earl of Arundel was the son of the second husband of Warin’s maternal grandmother. 

-        see below

3.         HUBERT de Munchensy .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1571]

4.         --- de Munchensy .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1572]m STEPHEN de Glanville, son of ---. 

5.         --- de Munchensy .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel[1573]m WILLIAM Paynell, son of ---.  This William Paynell has not yet been identified. 

6.         ALICE de Munchensy (-after 1192).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter of Agnes [FitzPayn] [widow of Warin de Munchensy] which is witnessed by her son-in-law Robert de Mortimer and her daughter Alice[1574]m ROBERT de Mortimer, son of WILLIAM de Mortimer & his wife --- (-[13 Apr 1216/21 Sep 1217]). 

 

 

WARIN [II] de Munchensy, son of WILLIAM de Munchensy & his wife Aveline de Clare (-[20 Jul 1255]).  "Guarinus de Munchainesy" paid a fine for "hereditarie" with "W. com Arundell avunculus ipsius Warini" acting as guarantor, dated 23 Dec 1213[1575].  William Earl of Arundel was the son of the second husband of Warin’s maternal grandmother.  "…Warinus de Muntchenesi…" witnessed a document dated 25 Aug 1223[1576].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Warinus de Monte Canisio" against "Walterum de Godarduilla" requesting "feodum…in Wicham" which had been held by "Willelmo de Monte Canisio fratre eiusdem Warini cuius heres ipse est dum fuit infra etatem"[1577].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1224, by "Prior de Suwere" against "Warinum de Monte Canisio" for "ecclesiam de Suanescamp…advocacionem" which "comitissa Cecilia avia sua" [Cecilia Countess of Hereford, Warin’s great-aunt not his grandmother] granted to "Jacobum le Sauuage"[1578].  Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[1579].  "Warin de Montechanes and Denise his wife" were granted rights "in the demesne lands of Rodewell" dated 21 Oct 1242[1580]

m firstly JOAN Marshal, daughter of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare Ctss of Pembroke.  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Matilda…Johanna…Isabella” as the daughters of “Willielmi Marescalli comitis Penbrochiæ[1581].  The same source records in a later passage that "secunda filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Johanna" married "Warino de Montecaniso" by whom she was mother of "Johannem de Montecaniso" who died childless and "Johannam sororem eius" who married "domino Willihelmo de Valentia"[1582]