ENGLISH lords D - K

v4.11 Updated 12 mayo 2024

 

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LORDS DEINCOURT (AINCOURT) 2

A.         AINCOURT. 3

B.         AINCOURT in LINCOLNSHIRE.. 18

C.        AINCOURT/DEINCOURT in DERBYSHIRE.. 22

D.        AINCOURT of CUMBERLAND.. 36

E.         LORDS DEINCOURT. 37

ENGAINE. 51

A.         ORIGINS.. 51

B.         LORDS ENGAINE.. 61

LORDS FITZROGER (CLAVERING) 63

A.         ORIGINS.. 63

B.         LORDS FITZROGER, LORDS CLAVERING.. 67

FITZWALTER (of Woodham Walter, Essex) 69

A.         ORIGINS.. 69

B.         LORDS FITZWALTER.. 76

FITZWARIN. 79

A.         ORIGINS.. 79

B.         LORDS FITZWARIN.. 91

LORDS FITZWILLIAM.. 93

LORDS GIFFARD. 96

GIFFARD (of Fonthill, Wiltshire) 112

LORDS GRANDSON. 114

GREY (of CODNOR, WILTON, RUTHIN) 121

A.         ORIGINS.. 121

B.         LORDS GREY (of Codnor) 126

C.        LORDS GREY (of Wilton) 129

D.        LORDS GREY (of Ruthin) 133

GREY (of ROTHERFIELD) 137

A.         ORIGINS.. 137

B.         LORDS GREY (of Rotherfield) 143

GREYSTOKE. 144

A.         ORIGINS.. 144

B.         LORDS GREYSTOKE.. 153

HASTINGS. 155

A.         ORIGINS.. 155

B.         LORDS HASTINGS.. 171

HOLAND. 172

A.         ORIGINS.. 172

B.         LORDS HOLAND.. 174

 

 

 

LORDS DEINCOURT (AINCOURT)

 

 

The place of origin of this family in France is uncertain.  The Complete Peerage said that Aincourt is a village in “the Vexin normand[1] (observation later deleted[2]).  Loyd records that “Ancourt” is in the present-day French département of Seine-Maritime (previously Seine-Inférieure), arrondissement Dieppe, canton Offranville[3]

The Aincourt/Deincourt family held estates in Cumberland, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, and Yorkshire.  Their family name starting evolving from “de Aincourt/d’Aincourt” to “Deincourt” in the mid-13th century. 

A reliable reconstruction of this family is challenging, with many relationships unconfirmed, as will be seen below.  Reconstruction is also difficult because first names such as John, Ralph, Roger, Walter, and William are repeated in all branches of the family.  For ease of reference and to assist in suggesting connections, different family members with the same name have been numbered, in approximate chronological order, across the different branches.  The numbering has no historical significance whatsoever. 

 

 

A.      AINCOURT

 

 

1.         WALTER [I] de Aincourt (-[1103]).  The epitaph of his son William indicates that Walter was "consanguinei Remigii episcopi Lincolniensis": his precise relationship with Remy Bishop of Lincoln has not been ascertained.  Domesday Book records “Walter d'Aincourt” holding land in Derbyshire (Morton, Old Brampton, Pilsley, Holmesfield, Elmton and Stony Houghton), Nottinghamshire (Flawborough, Staunton-in-the-Vale, Cotham, East Stoke, Hockerton, Knapthorpe, Bulcote…Granby), Yorkshire West Riding (Wombwell, West Melton, Toftes and Rawmarsh), and in Lincolnshire (Belton and Great Gonerby Hundreds, in Old Somerby, Humby, Westhorpe, Houghton, Sudwelle, in the hundreds of Swinstead, Burton-le-Googles, and Branston, in Blankney, and in Potterhanworth Hundred)[4].  An undated charter of King Henry II confirmed the possessions of York St Mary and lists donations including “ecclesiam [in Beltona]…decimas suas de Hanawarda et de Blankanaie et de Coreby et de Cotes et de Turgaston et de Greneby et de Hikalinga et de Cnapthorp et de Cartune” made by “Walterus de Daincourt[5].  The source which indicates his date of death has not been identified.  m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  An undated charter of King Henry II confirmed the possessions of York St Mary and lists donations including those made by "Walterus de Daincourt" and “unam carucatam terræ quæ fuit Brutinæ in Corby et silvam…decimam de domino de Abbingtuna et de Lins et de Thudesham et decimam Ribaldi de Pikenham de altera Lins, et decimam de Herinthorp, decimam Normanni de Fliccaburh, decimam Gerrardi in Apelby et Gamesthorp et terram…Northuuda juxta Burtunam in Lincolschira” made by “Matildis uxor eius[6].  Richard Sharp suggests that she was Mathilde, [illegitimate] daughter of Alain "Rufus" de Bretagne Lord of Richmond & his mistress Gunhild ---[7].  This is based on her apparent royal ancestry which is indicated in the epitaph recording the death of her son William: the epitaph distinguishes between Walter’s relationship with the bishop of Lincoln and the deceased William being “regia styrpe progenitus”, suggesting the latter connection through his mother’s family.  In addition, some of the property which she donated to York St Mary was previously held by Alain "Rufus" (including Little Abington in Cambridgeshire, which he had acquired with the lands of "Eddeva Pulcra").  Walter [I] & his wife had three children: 

a)         RALPH [I] de Aincourt (-[5 Nov 1156/1158?]).  Throsby/Thoroton names “Raph de Aincurt, whom I suppose to be the son of…Walter[8].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.   King Henry I notified “…Radulfo de Haiencurt…” and others of his grant of the church of All Saints (Hungate, Lincoln) and the churches of [Great] Grimsby to the bishop of Lincoln[9].  The 1129/30 Pipe Roll records "Rad fil Walti" returning in Lincolnshire for "terra Godwini"[10]Radulfus de Ayncourt” founded Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire, for the souls of “meæ, filiorum, filiarumque mearum…Basiliæ mulieris meæ”, and donated lands and numerous named churches, by undated charter[11]: Dugdale dates the foundation “according to Thoroton, sometime in the reign of Henry the First; Tanner says about A.D. 1130[12].  An undated charter of King Henry II (issued “apud Clipston”), vidimus in a charter of King Edward III dated 8 May “anno regni nostri xvii” [1343], confirmed donations to Thurgarton, including (listed first) “ex dono Radulfi de Aincurt…[reciting the lands/churches from the earlier charter cited above]”[13].  [Throsby/Thoroton records that “Raph Dayncurt” donated “the Toft and Croft Acke in pure Alms” to Graneby All Saints by undated charter, witnessed by “his son Robert”, but adds that “I think this might be the Son or Grandchild to the former [indicating Ralph [I], founder of Thurgarton]”[14].  Pope Adrian IV confirmed grants to Rufford abbey, made by “Ralph de Ainecurt and Matilda his wife…in the territory of Scardecliue” by bull dated 5 Nov 1156[15].  The source which indicates his date of death has not been identified.  m firstly BASILIA, daughter of ---.  Radulfus de Ayncourt” founded Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire, for the soul of “Basiliæ mulieris meæ”, by undated charter[16]m secondly as her second husband, MATILDA, widow of RALPH FitzOdo, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants records her two marriages[17].  Yeatman records that “Ralf de Aincourt and the Lady Matilde his wife” donated land to Thurgarton, for “the soul of Ralf fil Edonis, and for the health of Hubert, his son”, by undated charter[18].  Yeatman & others suggest that “Matilde…was herself a co-heiress of Ralf fitz Hubert of Domesday (daughter or grand-daughter does not appear)”, shown by her donation of “quendam porcionem terre mee” in Scarcliff and in Languard to Rufford Abbey in the name of “Hubert, her son, and from him, for whoever would be her heir” (“a filio meo Hubert, et ab eo quodcunc erit heres meus”), for the souls of “Hubert, her son, and of Ralf fitz Eudo, her lord[19].  Pope Adrian IV confirmed grants to Rufford abbey, donated by “Ralph de Ainecurt and Matilda his wife…in the territory of Scardecliue” by bull dated 5 Nov 1156[20].  Yeatman records that “Hubert fitz Ralf…his mother Matilde…took the veil [at Thurgarton]”, when Hubert and his mother donated land in Scarcliff held by William FitzGregory[21]Ralph [I] & his first wife had seven children: 

i)          WALTER [III] de Aincourt (-[1168?]).  The primary source which confirms Walter’s parentage has not been found, but his inheritance of extensive property in Lincolnshire, as shown by the Red Book of the Exchequer entries cited below, suggests that he was the main heir to the Aincourt family. 

-        see below

ii)         HUGH [I] de Aincourt (-after 1140).  Walterus de Aencurt” donated land “quam Ricardus tenebat de me ad boscum de Chotes…” and other property to Kirkstead abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of “hæredum meorum Oliveri et Johannis”, by charter dated 1140, witnessed by “Hugone fratre meo de Aencurt[22]

iii)        ROBERT [I] de AincourtDomesday Descendants records Robert as “son of Ralph de Aincurt and brother of Walter II[23].  Yeatman records that “Hubert fitz Ralf called Robert Deincourt…his brother[24]

iv)        ROGER [I] de Aincourt (-[before 1160?]).  Domesday Descendants records Roger as “son of Ralph I d’Aincurt[25].  Roger [I] presumably died before the “before 1160” charter cited below under his son.  m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger [I] & his wife had [one child]: 

(1)       RALPH [II] de Aincourt ([1125/30?]-[after [1160])Walterum d’Aincurt et Johannem filium suum” released the service of a fourth knight to “Radulfo filio Rogeri d’Aincurt”, in dispute between them, in return for “Holmesfeld” [Holmesfield, Derbyshire], by charter dated to [1156/65], probably before 1160 in light of the probable date of death of his paternal grandfather Ralph [I][26].  It is likely that Ralph [II] was the son of Roger [I] as no other Roger has been identified in the Aincourt family at that time. 

-        AINCOURT in DERBYSHIRE

v)         WILLIAM [I] de AincourtDomesday Descendants names William as “brother of Walter II, and Matilda”, noting “Died c.1212[27].  The chronology suggests that he was the same person named in a charter dated to the middle of King Henry [II]’s reign which records an agreement between Kirkstead abbey and “William de Aincourt, about tithes in Blankney parish” in Lincolnshire[28]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants names “Agnes” as wife of William[29]

vi)        MATILDA de AincourtDomesday Descendants names William as “brother of Walter II, and Matilda[30]

vii)      ADA de AincourtDomesday Descendants records her parentage and marriage, noting that she was “mother of Ralph[31]m GUY de Rushdall (Rosedale), son of ---.

b)         WILLIAM de Aincourt (-30 Oct [1088/98]).  An epitaph records the death "III [Ka]l Nov", while at the court of King William II, of "Wi[llelmus] filius Walteri Aiencuriensis consanguinei Remigii episcopi Lincolniensis…prefatus Willelmus regia styrpe progenitus"[32]

c)         WALTER [II] de AincourtDomesday Descendants names Walter as “son of Walter I and brother of Ralph de Aincurt[33]

 

 

WALTER [III] de Aincourt, son of RALPH [I] de Aincourt & his first wife Basilia --- (-[1168?])Walterus de Aencurt” donated land “quam Ricardus tenebat de me ad boscum de Chotes [Cotes, parish Blankney, wapentake Langoe, Lincolnshire[34]]” and other property to Kirkstead abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of “hæredum meorum Oliveri et Johannis”, by charter dated 1140, witnessed by “Hugone fratre meo de Aencurt[35]…Waltero de Aiencurt…” witnessed the undated charter of King Stephen who confirmed various churches to the church of Lincoln[36].  “Walterum d’Aincurt et Johannem filium suum” released the service of a fourth knight to “Radulfo filio Rogeri d’Aincurt”, in dispute between them, in return for “Holmesfeld” [Holmesfield, Derbyshire], by charter dated to [1156/65], probably before 1160 in light of the probable date of death of Ralph [I] (father and grandfather of the grantors)[37].  Walter [II]’s donation of land “in Braunceton…” to Thurgarton priory is recorded in the undated charter quoted below under his son Oliver, presumably dated to soon after Oliver died: the corresponding charter has not been found.  “…Waltero de Aincurt…” witnessed the charter dated to [1160/63] under which “Robertus comes Lecestrie” notified that he held part “in manerio de Cnigtuna [Knighton, Leicestershire]” from the church of Lincoln[38].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1161/62, records knights’ fees of "Walterus de Aencort xxvi I, iii s, iii d" in Lincolnshire, in 1167/68 "Walterus de Aencort xxxiii l, vi s, viii d, de novo v m" in Lincolnshire[39].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "carta Walteri de Ainecurt" in Lincolnshire[40].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "Walterus de Daencurt ii milites" in Yorkshire[41].  Throsby/Thoroton records that Walter [III] “mort. 14 H.2.” (no source cited)[42].  The 1185 Inquest into the property of the Templars recorded “Walter d’Aincourt” as having donated land in Potter Hanworth, Blankney, Scopwick, Kirkby, and Potter Hanworth in Lincolnshire[43]

m (before 1125?) AGNES Basset, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants names her as wife of Walter [III], noting that she and their sons donated property to Stixwold priory for her husband’s soul (undated)[44].  The primary source which confirms her family origin and marriage has not been identified.   Agnes has not been identified in the Basset family, although the chronology suggests that she may have been one of the daughters of Ralph [I] Basset

Walter [III] & his wife had [seven] children: 

1.         OLIVER [I] de Aincourt ([before 1125?]-killed in battle Lincoln 2 Feb 1141).  It seems unlikely that Oliver was less than 15/16 years when he fought at Lincoln (see below).  Walterus de Aencurt” donated land “quam Ricardus tenebat de me ad boscum de Chotes…” and other property to Kirkstead abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of “hæredum meorum Oliveri et Johannis”, by charter dated 1140[45]: the name order in this charter suggests that Oliver was the older son.  Throsby/Thoroton records that Oliver “was slain in the Battle of Lincolne, in the Time of King Stephen” (no source cited)[46].  The following charter of his nephew Oliver [I] confirms his place of death: Oliverus de Aincurta” donated land “in Braunceton...sicut Walterus de Eyncaria avus meus dedit…pro anima Oliveri filii sui, quem idem Walterus [=”Waltero presbitero”], bello apud Lincoln, à captivitate et morte liberavit, sicut carta prædicti Walteri avi mei testatur [Walter’s charter not found]” to Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire (specifically to “Waltero presbitero”) by undated charter[47]

2.         JOHN [I] de Aincourt ([1125/27?]-6 Nov 1183)Walterus de Aencurt” donated land “quam Ricardus tenebat de me ad boscum de Chotes…” and other property to Kirkstead abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of “hæredum meorum Oliveri et Johannis”, by charter dated 1140[48] 

-        see below

3.         RALPH [III] de Aincourt (-1183)Domesday Descendants records his parentage and date of death[49].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "Radulfus de Ainecurt iii milites" holding in "carta Walteri de Ainecurt" in Lincolnshire[50]

-        AINCOURT in LINCOLNSHIRE

4.         WALTER [IV] de Aincourt (-after [1190/91?]).  Domesday Descendants names “Oliver, a monk, John, his successor, Walter” as sons of Walter [III], noting that his widow and their sons (not named in Domesday Descendants) donated property to Stixwold priory for his soul (undated)[51].  [The chronology suggests that this Walter could have been the same person named in the following documents.  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records “Walterus de Aiencurt” returning in Lincolnshire[52].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1186/87, records knights’ fees of "Walterus de Aencurt xx s" in Oxfordshire[53].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1190/91, records knights’ fees of "Walterus de Aencurt xvii l, X s – xxxv milites" in Lincolnshire[54].] 

5.         [OLIVER de Aincourt ([1141/42?]-[after 1168?]).  Domesday Descendants names “Oliver, a monk, John, his successor, Walter” as sons of Walter [III], noting that his widow and their sons (not named in Domesday Descendants) donated property to Stixwold priory for his soul (undated)[55].  It is not clear whether this Oliver was one of the sons in this charter.  Assuming that he existed, it is unlikely that he was the same son as Oliver who was killed in 1141 at Lincoln (see above).  Maybe he was a second son given the same name and born after his older brother was killed.] 

6.         OLIVA de AincourtDomesday Descendants names “Oliva, nun of Stixwold” as a daughter of Walter [III][56]

7.         --- de AincourtDomesday Descendants records an unnamed daughter of Walter [III] and her marriage[57]; it is not clear which of the sources cited relates to this daughter.  m RALPH of Worcester, son of ---. 

 

 

JOHN [I] de Aincourt, son of WALTER [III] de Aincourt & his wife Agnes Basset ([1125/27?]-6 Nov 1183)Walterus de Aencurt” donated land “quam Ricardus tenebat de me ad boscum de Chotes…” and other property to Kirkstead abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of “hæredum meorum Oliveri et Johannis”, by charter dated 1140[58]: the family chronology appears to suggest that Walter [III]’s two sons were adolescents at the time, suggesting John’s birth [1125/27?].  Walterum d’Aincurt et Johannem filium suum” released the service of a fourth knight to “Radulfo filio Rogeri d’Aincurt”, in dispute between them, in return for “Holmesfeld” [Holmesfield, Derbyshire], by charter dated to [1156/65], probably before 1160 in light of the probable date of death of Ralph [I] (father and grandfather of the grantors)[59]Johannes d’Aencurt, filius Walteri d’Aencurt” donated land “in campis de Branztun…Et de bosco meo…de Ramilia…” to Kirkstead abbey, Lincolnshire, with the consent of “Aeliciæ sponsæ meæ et hæredum meorum”, by charter dated 11 Sep 1169 at Nottingham, witnessed by “Philippo de Kima vicecomite…[60]Johannes de Daiencurt” confirmed the donation of land “in Grenebi…” to Belvoir, Lincolnshire, made by “pater meus Walterus”, for the souls of “patris mei Walteri, et Oliveri fratris mei”, by charter dated “die quo Henricus tertius fuit coronatus” [either 14/19 Jun 1170 or 27 Aug 1172 – see the document ENGLAND KINGS], witnessed by “…Radulfo de Daiencourt…Rogero de Daiencourt…Serlone de Pleseleche…[61]The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records “Iohannes de Aiencurt” returning in Lincolnshire and in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire[62]A final concord at Lincoln 9 Dec 1180, between the abbot of Bardenay and “Johannem de Einecurt”, concerned rights in “the pasture…in the marsh of Braunceton[63]His date of death is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “Oliverus filius Johannis de Eincurt xxiv annorum…nepos Radulfi Murdac”, adding that “Johannes de Eincurt obiit elapsis ii annis ad festum sancti Leonardi” and referring to the dower of "domina Aliz uxor Johannis de Eincurt…in Blangenia"[64]

m (before 1160?]) ALICE [Murdac], daughter of --- (-after 1185).  She is named (but her family origin not given) in her husband’s Sep 1169 charter cited above.  Her family origin is suggested by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “Oliverus filius Johannis de Eincurt xxiv annorum…nepos Radulfi Murdac”, adding that “Johannes de Eincurt obiit elapsis ii annis ad festum sancti Leonardi” and referring to the dower of "domina Aliz uxor Johannis de Eincurt…in Blangenia"[65]If the Rotuli used “nepos” to mean nephew, Ralph Murdac was the maternal uncle of Oliver [II] de Aincourt and, if that is correct, Oliver’s mother was Ralph’s sister.  It is, however, not impossible that “nepos” was used to indicate a more distant family relationship, maybe cousin.  This possibility appears supported by the difference in the marriage dates of Ralph (“before 1192”) and Alice (“before 1160?), which suggests that they were not siblings (unless Ralph was married earlier).  Until more information comes to light, Alice is shown for presenational purposes as a cousin of Ralph, in which case her family name may not have been Murdac. 

John [I] & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         OLIVER [II] de Aincourt ([1161/62]-[1201]).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Oliverus filius Johannis de Eincurt xxiv annorum…nepos Radulfi Murdac[66].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1186/87, records knights’ fees of "Oliverus de Aencurt xxxv l" in Lincolnshire[67].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1194/95 and 1196/97, records "Oliver de Aencurt" among "isti habuerunt quietantiam per brevia" in Lincolnshire[68]Oliverus de Aincurta” donated land “in Braunceton...sicut Walterus de Eyncaria avus meus dedit…pro anima Oliveri filii sui, quem idem Walterus [=”Waltero presbitero”], bello apud Lincoln, à captivitate et morte liberavit, sicut carta prædicti Walteri avi mei testatur [Walter’s charter not found]” to Thurgarton priory, Nottinghamshire (specifically to “Waltero presbitero”) by undated charter[69].  A charter of King Edward III dated 8 May “anno regni nostri xvii” [1343] confirmed donations to Thurgarton, including land “in villa de Boilestone” made by “Oliverus de Aencurt et Matildis Peche uxor ejus…[70]Throsby/Thoroton records that Oliver [II] “died 3 Joh.[71]m firstly ---.  Oliver [II]’s first marriage is indicated by the description of the lawsuit, extracts quoted below, which involved Oliver [II]’s wife Amabel and his son Oliver [III], which seem inconsistent with Amabel having been Oliver [II]’s mother.  This person was not “Matilda Pecche”, who was the second wife of his son Oliver [III] (see  below).  m secondly as her first husband, AMABEL, daughter of --- (-after 10 Feb 1219).  Amabel married secondly Henry Le Eueske: “Henry Le Eueske and Amabilla his wife” claimed parts of manors in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Buckinghamshire from “Oliver de Aincurt” on the basis that they were “of the inheritance of Oliver de Aincurt father of the said Oliver and late the husband of Amabilla, in Branston Lincolnshire”, dated 10 Feb 1219[72]Oliver [II] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         OLIVER [III] de Aincourt ([1190/91?]- [late 1246/early 1247]).  His parentage is confirmed by the 10 Feb 1219 document cited below. 

-        see below

2.         [WILLIAM de Aincourt .  Dugdale’s Baronage names “Oliver, William, and Nicholas” as the three sons of John [I] de Aincourt & his wife Alice[73].  He cites the the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which, in the editions consulted, only names Oliver (see above).  No other reference has been found to a son named William.] 

3.         NICHOLAS [I] de Aincourt ([1165/75?]-after 1220).  Throsby/Thoroton records that John [I] “had a Son called Nicolas, besides his Son Oliver, who was his Heir” (no source cited)[74].  A fine was levied 1220 between “Oliver de Aencurt plaintiff and John de Aencurt, tenant concerning [land] in Kyrkeby” and between “the same Oliver, plaintiff, and Matilda de Marton, tenant, concerning [other land] in the same vill”, Oliver admitting “the right of John as that which he had of the gift of Nicholas de Aencurt his brother…one third of a Knights fee in Kyrkeby, except the aforesaid [other  land] settled by the said Nicholas upon the said Matilda for Beatrice her daughter, wife of the said Nicholas”, Nicholas being present[75]m BEATRICE de Ormesby, daughter of RICHARD de Ormesby & his wife Matilda de Marton (-after 1220).  Her mother’s name and her marriage are confirmed by the 1220 fine quoted above under her husband.  Her father is identified by the agreement between Kirkstead and “Beatricem filiam Ricardi de Hormesby…in…viduitate sua…et heredibus suis” regarding her donation of “Huberdesdayle” to the abbey, witnessed by “…Domino Symone milite De Martun…[Sitwell speculates on the identity of this person[76]]”[77].  A fine dated “3 Hen III” records “Matillis who was the wife of Richard de Ormesbi, plaintiff” concernng “the advowson of the church of Oxecumbe[78].  A fine dated “3 Hen III” records “Matillis who was the wife of Richard de Ormesbi, plaintiff” concernng “the advowson of the church of Oxecumbe[79].  Sitwell says that Nicholas died childless[80]

4.         JOHN [III] de Aincourt ([1170/80?]-after [28 Oct 1245/27 Oct 1246]).  If all entries cited above under Nicholas de Aincourt refer to the same person, John was another son of John [I] de Aincourt (as he was recorded as brother of Nicholas in 1220).  The Pipe Roll “3 John” [3 May 1201/2 May 1202] at Derby records “John de Aincourt 5 m. for I fee…5 m for the Honour of Peverel[81].  The Feodary of “14 John” [3 May 1211/2 May 1212] records “…John Dayncourt [paying to] be allowed to enclose within [his] parks one acre of land…[82].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1201/12, records knights’ fees of "Johannes de Eyncurt et Hugo de Stiventone i militem" in Derbyshire "de honore de Tikehulle"[83].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1211/12, records "Johannes de Eyncurt et Radulfus de Willeby i militem, quilibet dimidium" in "honor de Tykehulle" in Derbyshire[84].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1219, in Nottingham by "Radulfo de Wileghby" against "Prior de Lentona athachiatus" concerning "advocacione ecclesie de Pleseleye", in which "idem Radulfus…cum Willelmus frater suus" claimed holding the church "ex dono suo et Johannis de Ayencanc [corrected to Aencurt] quidam Rogerus trahit eum in placita de ecclesia illa et petit eam ex dono Regis J", the Prior claiming that, "Rex J. tempore guerre”, the church was presented to “predictum Rogerum…racione terre ipsorum Radulfi et Johannis que tunc fuit in manum domini Regis” as they had been “contra dominum Regem"[85].  A fine was levied 1220 between “Oliver de Aencurt plaintiff and John de Aencurt, tenant concerning [land] in Kyrkeby” and between “the same Oliver, plaintiff, and Matilda de Marton, tenant, concerning [other land] in the same vill”, Oliver admitting “the right of John as that which he had of the gift of Nicholas de Aencurt his brother…one third of a Knights fee in Kyrkeby, except the aforesaid [other  land] settled by the said Nicholas upon the said Matilda for Beatrice her daughter, wife of the said Nicholas[86].  The Pipe Roll “5 Hen III” [28 Oct 1220/27 Oct 1221] at Derby records “John de Aincourt ½ fee I m…” accounting for scutage[87].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1235/36 payments "de feodo Johannis de Eyncurt in Essovere" in Derbyshire[88].  “…John Ayncourt…Oliver Deincourt…” contributed “Aid for the marriage of the sister of King Henry III” “21 Hen III” [28 Oct 1236/27 Oct 1237][89].  The Pipe Roll “29 Hen III” [28 Oct 1244/27 Oct 1245] at Derby records “Amerciaments by Roger de Turkilby: Oliver de Aincourt, his bail, Ph. de Darcy and John de Aincourt[90].  The Pipe Roll “30 Hen III” [28 Oct 1245/27 Oct 1246] at Derby records “Scutage de Canwick 40s. per knight’s fee. De Honore de Peverel…John de Aincourt ½…[91]m (before 6 Jul 1203) MATILDA [Amabilia] de Plesley, daughter of SERLO de Plesley Lord of Plesley [Pleasley] and Ashover, Derbyshire & his wife --- (-after [28 Oct 1248/27 Oct 1249]?).  Farrer records that King John confirmed lands “near Pledsley called Hill, now Baxterhill, Radmanthwaite and Moorhaigh, in accordance with the grant he had made to the said Serlo when he was count of Mortain” to “Johi de Haincurt et Rad de Wiluigby et Matild et Beatic uxoribus suis, heredibus Serlonis de Plesseleg” dated 6 Jul 1203[92].  “Andrew Marescallus, plaintiff” and “John de Ayncurt, defendant” settled their dispute concerning land “in Kirkeby and Scapwic” [28 Oct 1230/27 Oct 1231], “Amabilia wife of the said John was present and surrendered her right of dower[93].  Her parentage and marriage are also indicated by the 1584/85 Visitation of Yorkshire which records “Serlo de Plesley, temp. Johannis Regis Anglie” and his two daughters “Sara, nupta Roberto de Willoughby, temp. Rex. Hen. III”, parents of “Robertus de Willoughby”, and “Annabella postnata nupta Johanni de Eincourt” and her two daughters shown below, noting that the descent is confirmed “per record de quare impedit, ao 9 Ed. II-Rotulo C. ix.e po[94].  Although the Visitations are sometimes unreliable, the inclusion of the source reference suggests that this entry may be accurate, in part at least: the discrepancies regarding the Willoughby “daughter” and her husband have not been explained, while Farrer cites a source which indicates that she was not in fact Serlo’s daughter[95].  The existence of Serlo de Plesley is confirmed by “…Serlone de Pleseleche” witnessing the charter dated [14/19 Jun 1170/27 Aug 1172] issued by Johannes de Daiencurt [John [I] de Aincourt, see above, this John’s supposed father]”[96]Sitwell records that Serlo was “Lord of Plesley and Ashover in Derbyshire” and indicates that Isore de Reresby, husband of Serlo’s granddaughter Amice de Aincourt, “obtained lands in the soke of Ashover in free marriage[97].  [“Kirby’s Quest” (taken before 26 Henry III [28 Oct 1240/27 Oct 1241]?[98]) records in “Wapp. de Scaresdale” - “Glapwell – The heirs [not named] of Serlo de Plesley held the vill of Glapwell for one fee of the king in capite[99].]  The Pipe Roll “33 Hen III” [28 Oct 1248/27 Oct 1249] at Derby records “New Oblations…John de Littlebur and Margaret his wife, Isabella de Aincourt…[100]:  No other reference has been found to a widow named “Isabella de Aincourt” whose husband died shortly before the date of this entry: maybe “Isabella” was a mistranscription for “Amabilia”, considering the likely death date of John de Aincourt.  John [III] & his wife had two children: 

a)         AMICE de Aincourt .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter in which “Isorius filius Alexandri et Amicia uxor mea et Willelmus de Musters et Alicia uxor sua” confirmed selling “unam bovatam terre…quam Johannis D’Aincourt pater uxorem nostrarum…quam Willelmus filius Allini tenuit in villa de Plesley” to “Radulpho filio Sanson”, undated[101].  Sitwell notes that a copy of this charter was found in “the original visitation of 1584 in the Herald’s College[102]m ISORE de Reresby, son of ALEXANDER de Reresby & his wife Juliana ---.  His father’s name is confirmed by a lawsuit dated [1194/95] brought by “Isore” against “Ric de Ormesbi” for land “in M[or]eton…jus suu q ei descend de Alex patre suo[103].  His mother’s name is confirmed by the following: at Lincoln “Matilda Wesil” claimed “terciam partem ii Bovatarum terre…in Reresb ut dono suam que eam contingit ex dono Willelmi Wesel quondam viri sui” from “Ysoriam de Rerisb et Juliana matrem suam” dated at Bedford “die tercio post festum sancte Crucis” [no year][104]

b)         ALICE de Aincourt .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter quoted above under her sister Amice.  m WILLIAM de Musters, son of ---. 

 

 

OLIVER [III] de Aincourt, son of OLIVER [II] de Aincourt & his first wife --- ([1190/91?]- [late 1246/early 1247]).  His parentage is confirmed by the 10 Feb 1219 document cited below.  Throsby/Thoroton records that Oliver [III] “was in Minority 13 Joh.[105]: the second 1212 Testa de Nevill entry recorded below suggests that he had then reached the age of majority, which in turn suggests his birth [1190/91?].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1201/12, records knights’ fees of "Oliverus de Aencurt xl milites; in xiii, xxxv per episcopum Norwicensem" in Lincolnshire[106].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "Oliverus de Ainecurt ii milites" in Yorkshire[107].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "honor Oliveri de Encurt" in Lincolnshire[108].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "Oliverus de Aencurt ccv milites" in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire[109].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1212 "Heres Oliveri Dayncurt tenet feoda xxv militum per totum" in Nottingham/Derby and “Methernham…in eadem villa feodum ii militum quod Willelmus Basset tenet” in Lincolnshire[110].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1212 "Oliverus de Aincurt habet in Swafeld et in Swinamstede tenet terciam partem i militis quam Osbertus filius Nigelli tenet" in Lincolnshire[111].  “Henry Le Eueske and Amabilla his wife” claimed parts of manors in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Buckinghamshire from “Oliver de Aincurt” on the basis that they were “of the inheritance of Oliver de Aincurt father of the said Oliver and late the husband of Amabilla, in Branston Lincolnshire”, dated 10 Feb 1219[112].  The list of fees held from Philippe II King of France includes “terra Oliveri de Eincuria, unum feodum apud Eincuriam” among the “Ballivia Caletensis, alias domini Gaufridi de Capella[113].  A charter dated 29 Jan 1222 records an agreement between Hugh Bishop of Lincoln and “Oliverum de Aencurt tenentem de toto manerio de Woburn” concerning their respective rights in the manor, in the presence and with the consent of “Nicholaa uxor predicti Oliveri[114]; other charters dated 16 Apr 1228 and 29 May 1240 dealt with similar matters connecting Woburn manor with Oliver[115].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1235/36 payments "de v.m. de feodis Oliveri de Eyncurt" in Derbyshire and the tenants in “Baronia Oliveri de Aencurt” in Lincolnshire including “de i.m. de dimidio feodo Annore de Aencurt[116].  “…John Ayncourt…Oliver Deincourt…” contributed “Aid for the marriage of the sister of King Henry III” “21 Hen III” [28 Oct 1236/27 Oct 1237][117].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1242/43 “Oliverus de Eyncurt habet scutagium per breve” in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire, and tenants holding from “Oliverus de Ayncurd in comitatu Notingh * feoda militum” including holders “in Aslaeton unum feodum militis et dimidium de feodo Oliveri de Ayncurd, et Oliverus de rege de novo feoffamento” and “Oliverus de Ayncurd tenet unum feodum militis in Sutton et Graneby de rege de antiquo feoffamento…Oliverus de Aincurt tenet in Elmeton et Holmesfeld…feoda duorum militum de domino rege in capite de antiquo feoffamento[118].  The Pipe Roll “29 Hen III” [28 Oct 1244/27 Oct 1245] at Derby records “Amerciaments by Roger de Turkilby: Oliver de Aincourt, his bail, Ph. de Darcy and John de Aincourt[119].  As the Pipe Roll records that his son John paid his relief “31 Hen III” [28 Oct 1246/27 Oct 1247], Oliver probably died [late 1246/early 1247]. 

m firstly (before 29 Jan 1222) NICOLE, daughter of --- (-after 1231).  A charter dated 29 Jan 1222 records an agreement between Hugh Bishop of Lincoln and “Oliverum de Aencurt tenentem de toto manerio de Woburn” concerning their respective rights in the manor, in the presence and with the consent of “Nicholaa uxor predicti Oliveri[120].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, in which "Willelmus Longespei et Idonea uxor eius" were summoned by "Oliuero de Ayncurt et Nicholæ uxori eius" who claimed "manerium de Dudingtona", under "cartam Nicholæ de Haya avie ipsius Idonee cuius heres ipsa est", while recording the division of the inheritance between "filias et heredes Ricardi de la Haya, scil. Gerardum de Kaunuilla et Nicholaam uxorem eius Ricardum de Humaz et Juliam uxorem eius et Willelmum de Rullos et Isabellam uxorem eius"[121].  The precise family relationship, if any, between Oliver [III] and his wife, on the one hand, and the other persons named in the 1231 claim, on the other, is not specified.  However, Bracton’s summary also refers to an order of King Richard I relating to the La Haye inheritance, which was maybe the charter dated 1189 under which the king confirmed the inheritance by "Gerardo de Canuilla et Nicolæ uxori sue" of all her inheritance in England and Normandy from "Rob de Haia et R[ic] de Haia", including "constabularia castelli Lincoln" and land at Poupeville and Varreville[122].  As Gerard de Camville was Nicole de la Haye’s second husband, this 1189 order apparently excluded the potential rights of Nicole’s descendants by her first husband William FitzErneis: maybe the “cartam Nicholæ de Haya”, cited by Bracton, was Nicole’s attempt to remedy this omission.  If that is correct, it is possible that Oliver [III]’s first wife was the older Nicole’s only surviving descendant from her first marriage:  if that is correct, she was Nicole ---, daughter of ---.  Follow this hyperlink to see the descendants of William FitzErneis, including the wife of Robert de Meisy: could Robert and his wife have been Nicole’s parents? 

m secondly ([1240]) as her second husband, MATILDA Pecche, widow of WALTER de Ridware, daughter of NICHOLAS Pecche & his wife Alice [de Sifrewast?] (-after 27 Oct 1282).  “J.C.W.” [Josiah C. Wedgwood], in his review of Close Rolls, Henry III 1234-1237, records that they name “Matilda as wife of Walter de Ridware in 1237” and that “He died about 1240, and by collating the Plea Rolls we see that she afterwards married Oliver d’Eyncourt” (no sources cited)[123].  This recalls Throsby/Thoroton which records that Oliver [II] de Aincourt (see above) married “one Wife named Amabilis, and another Matildis Pecche, mother of Roger de Ridewar[124]: the dates of the documents cited here show that Matilda must have married Oliver [III] and not Oliver [II].  “Roger de Ridewar”, named by Throsby/Thoroton, was presumably Matilda’s son by her first marriage.  Her family origin and second marriage are confirmed by a charter of King Edward III dated 8 May “anno regni nostri xvii” [8 May 1343] which confirmed donations to Thurgarton, including land “in villa de Boilestone” made by “Oliverus de Aencurt et Matildis Peche uxor ejus…[125].  A roll dated 4 May 1242 records that “Oliver de Ayncurt and Matilda his wife” sued “Henry Malveysin [Mauvoisin]” for property in Hamstall, Staffordshire and Seyle, Leicestershire, and the abbot of Mirivall for woodland in Seyle, “as dower of Matilda”, and that the abbot “called to warranty William, son and heir of Walter de Ridware [by an earlier marriage?], who is within age, and in ward to the said Henry…and conceded the dower asked for[126].  Matilda’s parentage in the Pecche family and both marriages are confirmed by an undated charter under which “Matilda Peche, domina de Fridelsham, vidua” donated “all her land called La Hyde in Frilsham [Friddlesham, Berkshire]” to Reading St James, for the souls of “Dom. Nicholas Peche, her father, Alice Peche, her mother, Dom. Oliver Dencourt and Dom. Walter de Ridware, her husbands, Dom. Ralph Peche, [and] Hawisia his wife, Nicholas and John her [/>., Matilda’s] sons, Alice her daughter, Roger de Ridware and Alice his wife, and Richard le Valeis [whose relationship with the family has not been found]”[127]: the copy in the Rydeware Chartulary records pro animanbus Nicholai Pecche patris sui, Alicie Pecche matris sue, Olyveri Eyncurt et Willelmi (sic) de Rydeware virorum suorum deffunctorum” and (in a separate sentence) “pro animabus Radulphi Peche, Hawysie uxoris sue, Nicholai et Johannis filiorum dicte Matilde, Alicie filie sue, Rogeri de Rideware, Alicie (sic Aline) uxoris sue, et Ricardi le Waleys”, dated end-Jul 1270, while another copy names “…domini Walteri de Ridware…” and is undated[128].  This charter also confirms that Matilda survived her second husband.  A writ of King Henry III dated 27 Aug “56 Hen. III” [1272] confirmed the right of Matildis de Pecche” to hold property from “Edmundi filii sui de Tuttebury…in Draycote”, possession having been claimed by “Andrew de Jarkenuill and Matilda his wife, and Simon de Jarkenuill and Joan his wife[129].  King Edward I notified ballivis suis de Hundredo de Burghildeberi” of rights of “Matilda Pecche” in “Hundredum nostrum predictum” by order dated 27 Oct “anno regni nostro nono” [20 Nov 1281/19 Nov 1282][130]

Oliver [III] & his first wife had one child: 

1.         JOHN [IV] Deincourt of Blankney, Lincolnshire ([1222/25?]-before 14 Oct 1257).  His parentage is confirmed by the Pipe Roll “31 Hen III” [28 Oct 1246/27 Oct 1247] at Derby which records “New Oblations…John fil and heir Oliver Deincourt c. £ for his relief…[131].  This entry also appears to confirm that John [IV] was of age when his father died, so maybe was born [1222/25?]. 

-        see below, Part E

Oliver [III] & his second wife had three children:

2.         NICHOLAS [II] Deincourt ([1241/45?]-[after Jul 1270]).   …Nicholai et Johannis filiorum dicte Matilde, Alicie filie sue… are named in the [end-Jul 1270/undated] charter of Matilda Pecche which is cited above.  Their family name is not specified, but Nicholas and John are both Ainc        ourt family names:  It is possible therefore that Oliver [III] was the father of these three named children of Matilda. 

3.         JOHN [V] Deincourt ([1242/47?]-[after Jul 1270])…Nicholai et Johannis filiorum dicte Matilde, Alicie filie sue… are named in the [end-Jul 1270/undated] charter of Matilda Pecche which is cited above.  Their family name is not specified, but Nicholas and John are both Aincourt family names:  It is possible therefore that Oliver [III] was the father of these three named children of Matilda.  No record has been found which confirms that either Nicholas [II] or his brother John [V] married or had children, although as they survived into adulthood, as indicated by the [end-Jul 1270] document, this would be possible.  Two problems with reconstructing the Deincourt family suggest that at least one of these brothers may have left descendants.  Problem (1) relates to the parentage of the brothers Oliver (rector of Emley) and John [X] of Park Hall, John’s connection with Park Hall indicating their family relationship with Roger [V] de Aincourt of Morton/Park Hall (see Part C of the present document).  In Part C, these two brothers are shown as possible sons of --- Deincourt, a supposed grandson of Roger [V].  The difficulty is why the name Oliver, associated otherwise exclusively with the senior Aincourt/Deincourt line shown in this Part A, was given to one of these brothers.  One possibility is that Roger [V]’s supposed grandson married a member of the senior line.  If that is correct, the chronology suggests that she could have been an otherwise unrecorded child of one of the brothers Nicholas [II] or John [V].  Such a relationship could also account for Edmund Lord Deincourt naming the brothers Oliver and John [X] in his Third licence (see below Part E.), as they would have been grandsons of his paternal uncle.  Problem (2) is identifying the parentage of John [IX] Deincourt, supposed father of William Lord Deincourt whom Lord Edmund named as his successor in his Second and Third licences.  One of the possibilities is that John was also the child of either Nicholas [II] or John [V].  If that is right, the mother of Rector Oliver and John [IX] could have been siblings, while another possible sibling was Isabel wife of William FitzWilliam (whom Lord Edmund named in his Fourth licence, and who sponsored Oliver as rector of Emley).  These suggestions would best explain why Lord Edmund Deincourt named all these individuals in his four licences, which are otherwise difficult to explain.  In addition, Lord Edmund could have considered John [IX], a member of the senior Aincourt/Daincourt line, as a suitable candidate to marry his daughter (no Papal dispensation found, but it may have been lost), and in [1314] named John’s son William as his successor (considering that William would then have been the most senior male-line member of the family after Lord Edmund himself).  Although consistent with the limited amount of primary source material so far found, these suggestions should be considered speculative until confirmed or disproved by other documentation which may emerge in the future.  If these speculations are correct, one of the brothers Nicholas [II] or John [VII] would have married ---, the name of his wife being unknown, and had three children (follow their hyperlinks for detailed information): 

a)         [JOHN [IX] Deincourt ([1265/68?]-[31 Jul 1312/14 Feb 1314?]),] 

b)         [daughter ([1265/68?]-)m ([1279/83?]) --- Deincourt, son of ---.] 

c)         [ISABEL [Deincourt] ([1270/80?]-after Jul 1348, bur Sprotborough, St Thomas chapel)m ([1290/1300?]) WILLIAM FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM FitzThomas & his wife Agnes Metham (-[11 Apr 1340/1342]).] 

4.         ALICE Deincourt ([1241/1247?]-[after Jul 1270]).  …Nicholai et Johannis filiorum dicte Matilde, Alicie filie sue…  are named in the [end-Jul 1270/undated] charter of Matilda Pecche which is cited above.  Their family name is not specified, but Nicholas and John are both Aincourt family names:  It is possible therefore that Oliver [III] was the father of these three named children by Matilda. 

 

 

The parentage of Nicole has not been ascertained, but her name suggests a close connection with the first wife of Oliver [III] de Aincourt (see above).  The chronology suggests that she could have been Oliver [III]’s granddaughter. 

1.         NICOLE Deincourt (-after Aug 1294).  Sacristan at Elnstow St Mary: a document dated 31 Aug 1294 recorded “Clementia de Balliolo, precentrix, and Nicholaa Deyncurt, sacristan, of the monastery of St. Mery, Elnestowe by Bedford, bringing news of the death of Beatrice, their abbess” and granted “letters of licence to elect[132]

 

 

 

B.      AINCOURT in LINCOLNSHIRE

 

 

RALPH [III] de Aincourt, son of WALTER [III] de Aincourt & his wife Agnes Basset (-1183)Domesday Descendants records his parentage and date of death[133].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "Radulfus de Ainecurt iii milites" holding in "carta Walteri de Ainecurt" in Lincolnshire[134]Johannes de Daiencurt” confirmed the donation of land “in Grenebi…” to Belvoir, Lincolnshire, made by “pater meus Walterus”, for the souls of “patris mei Walteri, et Oliveri fratris mei”, by charter dated “die quo Henricus tertius fuit coronatus” [either 14/19 Jun 1170 or 27 Aug 1172 – see the document ENGLAND KINGS], witnessed by “…Radulfo de Daiencourt…Rogero de Daiencourt…Serlone de Pleseleche…[135]The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records “Radulfus de Aiencurt…de feodo i militis” returning in Lincolnshire[136].  The primary source which confirms his date of death has not been found. 

m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  Domesday Descendants records her marriage[137]

Ralph [III] & his wife had five children: 

1.         WILLIAM [II] de Aincourt of Hanworth [Potterhanworth[138]], Lincolnshire (-before 1249).  Ralph de Aincourt granted land “in frank marriage with his daughter [Basilia] to John the clerk of Mere”, confirmed by “William, Ralph’s son, to his nephew Joseph[139]: William’s confirmation presumably indicates that he was his father’s oldest son and was made after his father died.  [A final concord at Lincoln 6 Oct 1191, between the abbot of Bardenay and “Willelmum de Ainecurt”, concerned “the marsh of Hanewrd[140].  The common reference to Hanworth (Potterhanworth) suggests that William was William [II].]  Willelmo Daincurt de Hanew…” witnessed the charter dated to [1195/96 or 1198-1205] under which “Johannes de Beregates” donated property to the canons and church at Lincoln[141].  [“…Willelmo Deingcurt…” witnessed the charter dated to [1200] under which “Jacobus clericus de Willetun” donated “unum toftum…in villa Luburc [Ludborough]” to the church of Lincoln[142].  “Willelmo de Aencurt, Roberto de Aencurt…” witnessed the charter dated to [1206/12] under which “Robertus de Aresci” donated property to Lincoln[143]: the identity of the first witness is uncertain.]  The Testa de Nevill records in 1212 "Heres Oliveri de Eyncurt…habet feodum i militis in Hanewrthe quod Willelmus de Eyncurt tenet" in Lincolnshire[144].  He is named (deceased) in the Easter 1249 charter cited below under his daughters and heiresses.  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William [II] & his wife had two children: 

a)         EDELINA de Aincourt (-after 12 Apr 1249).  “Edelina et Johanna filie et heredes Willelmi de Ayncurt de Haneworthe…in libera viduitate nostra” relinquished their rights “in uno tofto et in une crofto…in Haneworth” in favour of the canons and church at Lincoln by charter dated Easter 1249[145].  The name of Edelina’s husband has not been found.  m --- (-before 12 Apr 1249). 

b)         JOAN de Aincourt (-after 12 Apr 1249).  “Edelina et Johanna filie et heredes Willelmi de Ayncurt de Haneworthe…in libera viduitate nostra” relinquished their rights “in uno tofto et in une crofto…in Haneworth” in favour of the canons and church at Lincoln by charter dated Easter 1249[146].  The name of Joan’s husband has not been found.  m --- (-before 12 Apr 1249). 

2.         ROBERT [II] de Aincourt of Hanworth [Potterhanworth] (-after [1206/12]).  Roberto de Aincurt de Hanewrthe…Roberto Bret…” witnessed the charter dated to [late 12th century] under which “Stephanus Barri” donated “unum toftum…in villa Lutheburc [Ludborough]” to the church of Lincoln[147].  “Willelmo de Aencurt, Roberto de Aencurt…” witnessed the charter dated to [1206/12] under which “Robertus de Aresci” donated property to Lincoln[148].  The chronology appears stretched for this Robert to have been the same person as Robert [III] de Aincourt who died “before [28 Oct 1268/27 Oct 1269]” (see below, Part C.). 

3.         [two other sons] .  Domesday Descendants records that Ralph [II] had four sons and one daughter, but does not name the sons (it is unclear whether they are named in the sources cited)[149]

4.         BASILIA de AincourtDomesday Descendants records her parentage and marriage, noting her children “Joseph, also clerk of Mere, and Roger[150].  Ralph de Aincourt granted land “in frank marriage with his daughter [Basilia] to John the clerk of Mere”, confirmed by “William, Ralph’s son, to his nephew Joseph[151]m (before 1183) JOHN, clerk of Mere, son of ---. 

 

 

The parentage of the following persons have not been ascertained.  The chronology suggests that they could have been descendants of Ralph [III] who is named above.  Another possibility is that they were the same persons as those shown in Part C. of the present document, assuming that they held property interests in Lincolnshire in addition to their Derbyshire holdings. 

 

1.         ROGER [III] de Aincourt (-after [1210/12]).  “Rogero de Eincurt…” witnessed the charter dated to “late 12th century” under which “Galfridus filius Roberti de Boytorp” granted land to “Osberto clerico de Witinton [Whittington, Lincolnshire]”[152].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1210/12, records "Rogerus de Eincurt ii milites" holding in "honor Oliveri de Encurt" in Lincolnshire[153].  The chronology suggests that Roger [III] could have been the same person as Roger [IV] de Aincourt [of Morton] who is shown below in Part C, a suggestion which supposes that he held properties in both Lincolnshire and Derbyshire. 

 

2.         WALTER [V] de Aincourt (-after [1224]).  “Waltero de Enecurt…” witnessed the charter dated to “probably 1224” under which “Rogerus Brito miles et Hugo filius Roberti de Waleton et ceteri parochiani de eadem villa” bound themselves to the church of Lincoln for a chantry in the chapel of Walton[154]

 

3.         RALPH [V] de Aincourt (-after [1220/24]).  “Radulfo de Aencurt…” witnessed the charter dated [1220/24] under which “Normannus filius Thome de Aresci” confirmed a donation to the church of Lincoln[155]

 

4.         --- de Aincourt (-[before 1235/36]).  The name of Annora’s husband has not been found, but the chronology suggests that he was one of the three persons named immediately above.  m ANNORA, daughter of --- (-after [1235/36]).  The Testa de Nevill records in 1235/36 the tenants in “Baronia Oliveri de Aencurt” in Lincolnshire including “de i.m. de dimidio feodo Annore de Aencurt[156]

 

 

In the 20 Jan 1256 record cited below, John [II] de Aincourt names “Ralph Deyncurt” as his “ancestor”, which suggests that Ralph was not John’s father but maybe his grandfather.  If that is correct, the chronology suggests that John may have been the grandson of Ralph [III] who is named above.  Branston was one of the Lincolnshire properties held by Walter [I] in Domesday (see above, Part A.). 

 

1.         JOHN [II] de Aincourt (-after 9 Dec 1256).  A plea at Westminster 20 Jan 1256 (N.S.) records a claim by the prior of Thurgerton against “John Denecurt…of the advowson of the church of Braunston”, the latter acknowledging the rights to the advowson of the church of Thurgerton “which they have of the gift of Ralph Deyncurt, John’s ancestor, whose heir he is[157].  “John de Eyncurt” was named in another claim dated 9 Dec 1256, in which the prior of Kime claimed that “William de Kyme…should acquit the prior of the service which John de Eyncurt demanded of him” and complained that “John, by default of William’s acquittance, distrained him for relief…to make his eldest son a knight and to marry his eldest daughter[158]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John [II] and his wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         [two or more sons] de Aincourt .  John’s eldest son is referred to in the 9 Dec 1256 claim cited above. 

b)         [two or more daughters] de Aincourt .  John’s eldest daughter is referred to in the 9 Dec 1256 claim cited above. 

 

 

1.         HUGH [II] de Aincourt (-after [1252]).  “…Hugone de Eyncurt…” witnessed the charter dated to [1252] under which “magister Thomas Crispin rector ecclesie de Byham” notified his agreement with “dominus Rogerus de Colevill” concerning land in Little Bytham [Lincolnshire] which he now leased to “domino Waltero filio predicti R.[159]

 

2.         RALPH [VII] de Aincourt (-after 9 Dec 1271).  A hearing dated at Lincoln 9 Dec 1271 related to the claim by “Peter de Retherfeuld and Albreda his wife” against “Ralph de Ayncurt” concerning land “in Misene[160]

 

 

 

C.      AINCOURT/DEINCOURT in DERBYSHIRE

 

 

The chronology suggests that the members of the Aincourt family shown in this Part C., whose main landholdings were in Derbyshire, were descended from Ralph [II] but no primary sources have been found which confirm their line of descent in the late-12th/early 13th century. 

 

1.         RALPH [II] de Aincourt, son of ROGER [I] de Aincourt & his wife --- ([1125/30?]-[after 1160]).  The family chronology, in particular the likely birth dates of his first cousins (sons of his father’s older brother), suggest Ralph’s birth in [1125/30?].  Walterum d’Aincurt et Johannem filium suum” released the service of a fourth knight to “Radulfo filio Rogeri d’Aincurt”, in dispute between them, in return for “Holmesfeld” [Holmesfield, Derbyshire], by charter dated to [1156/65], probably before 1160 in light of the probable date of death of his paternal grandfather Ralph [I][161]An undated charter of King Henry II (issued “apud Clipston”), vidimus in a charter of King Edward III dated 8 May “anno regni nostri xvii” [1343], confirmed donations to Thurgarton, including (named first) “ex dono Radulfi de Aincurt…[reciting the lands/churches from the earlier charter cited above]” and (named further down the list, so presumably dated later than the foundation charter) “ex dono Radulfi de Aincurt, filii Rogeri, ecclesiam de Winefield[162].  No indication has been found of when Ralph died. 

 

2.         ROGER [II] de Aincourt ([1150/55?]-after [1175/76].  The chronology suggests that Roger [II] was the successor of Ralph [II] in Derbyshire, maybe his son (maybe named after his paternal grandfather).  The 1175/76 Pipe Roll records “Iohannes de Aiencurt [probably John [I], see Part A.]…Rogerus de Aencurt” returning (for the king’s forests) in Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire[163].  No later references to Roger have been found, which suggests that he may have died young. 

 

 

The chronology suggests that Ralph [IV] may have been the son of Roger [II]. 

1.         RALPH [IV] de Aincourt ([1170/75?]-).  Throsby/Thoroton records that “Raph Dayncurt” donated “the Toft and Croft Acke in pure Alms” to “Graneby” All Saints [presumably Granby, Nottinghamshire) by undated charter, witnessed by “his son Robert”, but adds that “I think this might be the Son or Grandchild to the former [indicating Ralph [I], founder of Thurgarton, who is named above]”[164].  This thought seems supported by the reference to Robert, the name of one of the sons of Ralph [I] (see above).  No indication has been found of Ralph’s date of death.  m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  A relationship with the St. Michael family is suggested by the “24 Hen III” Pipe Roll entry cited below under her son.  Ralph [IV] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT [III] de Aincourt ([1195/1200?]-before [28 Oct 1268/27 Oct 1269]).  His marriage date suggests his birth in [1195/1200].  Throsby/Thoroton records that “Raph Dayncurt” donated “the Toft and Croft Acke in pure Alms” to “Graneby” All Saints [presumably Granby, Nottinghamshire) by undated charter, witnessed by “his son Robert[165].  The Pipe Roll “24 Hen III” [28 Oct 1239/27 Oct 1240] at Derby records “…Robert de Aincourt, Robert de Curzon, heirs of Lawrence de St. Michael…” under New Oblations[166].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1242/43 tenants holding from “Oliverus de Ayncurd in comitatu Notingh * feoda militum” including “Robertus de Ayncurd tenet feodum militis in Radeclive de eodem feodo de antiquo feoffamentoWalterus de Gousil et Robertus de Ayncurt tenent duo feoda militum in Hoveringham de eodem feodo et de veteri feoffamento[167].  Their joint holding suggests a family relationship with Walter de Gousil.  [A charter dated to “Temp. Hen. III” records “…Robert de Ennecurt, Roger de Ennecurt…” witnessing the grant from “Hugh de Linacre” of “land in Brampton” to “Geoffrey, clericus, de Bramton[168]: it is suggested that the witnesses were Robert [III] and Roger [V] (see below), who could have been first cousins.]  Robert died before the Pipe Roll “53 Hen III” [28 Oct 1268/27 Oct 1269] cited below under his wife.  m (before [28 Oct 1218/27 Oct 1219]) HAWISE, daughter of --- (-after [28 Oct 1268/27 Oct 1269]).  The Pipe Roll “3 Hen III” [28 Oct 1218/27 Oct 1219] at Derby records “New Oblations. Robert de Aincourt and Havis, his wife, v. Rad de Gousel and Walter his son…[169].  The Pipe Roll “53 Hen III” [28 Oct 1268/27 Oct 1269] at Derby records “New Oblations…Havise, widow of Robert Deincourt…[170]

 

 

The reference to Morton (see below) suggests that Walter was another member of this family; maybe he was another son of Roger [II]. 

1.         WALTER de Aincourt ([1170/80?]-after [1223/39]).  Rector of Morton: “…Waltero Deincourt persona de Morton…” witnessed the charter dated to [1200] under which “Stefphanus persona ecclesie de Cestrefeud filius Susanne” granted land beside his church to “Gilberto de Haselund” for repairing the church, while a charter dated to [1223/39] records “Johannes filius Sussanne” releasing rights in land “in Cestrefeld”, which “Walterus de Eyncurt” held from him, in favour of Lincoln church[171]

 

 

The chronology suggests that Roger [IV] was the son of Roger [II], and younger brother of Ralph [IV].  It is also possible that he was the same person as Roger [III], who is shown in Part B “Aincourt in Lincolnshire” assuming that he held properties in both Lincolnshire and Derbyshire, although no reference has been found to his descendants holding any Lincolnshire properties. 

Roger [IV] and his descendants are recorded holding Morton in Derbyshire, on the south-western outskirts of Pilsley, about 5 kilometres north of Alfreton and about 10 kilometres west of Mansfield[172].  Morton was one of the properties recorded in Domesday Book in the hands of Walter [I] de Aincourt (see Part A.)[173]

 

1.         ROGER [IV] de Aincourt of Morton ([1180?]-[28 Oct 1235/27 Oct 1238]).  His birth date is suggested based on the likely birth date of his son supposed Roger [V] shown below.  The Pipe Roll “5 Hen III” [28 Oct 1220/27 Oct 1221] at Derby records “…Roger Deincourt de Morton, Rad de Willoughby in Essover…[174].  It has not been confirmed whether “…Roger Deincourt de Morton…” was Roger [IV], but the chronology suggests that he was, as does the holding of Morton by his supposed descendants.  “…Roger Deincourt…” witnessed the charter dated [28 Oct 1235/27 Oct 1236] in which “Henry Brailsford granted land to Mary, widow of Ralf Brailsford” in Wingerworth manor, Derbyshire[175].  Roger [IV] presumably died before the Pipe Roll “22 Hen III” [28 Oct 1237/27 Oct 1238], which records his son Roger [V] under “New Oblations”.  m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger [IV] & his wife had [one child]: 

a)         [ROGER [V] de Aincourt of Morton ([1205/10?]-before [28 Oct 1250/27 Oct 1251]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been found, but the inheritance of Morton by his son suggests that Roger [V] was the son of Roger [IV].  His birth date is suggested from his being adult in the Pipe Roll “22 Hen III” [28 Oct 1237/27 Oct 1238], which records “…Roger de Aincourt…” in Derbyshire under “New Oblations” (suggesting that he had recently inherited the property)[176].] 

-        see below

 

 

The primary source which confirms Rector John’s parentage has not been identified, but the connection with the rectory of Wingfield (later held by Roger de Aincourt, son of William [III] [of Morton?], see below) suggests that he was descended from Roger [IV]. 

 

1.          JOHN de Aincourt (-before 14 Apr 1292).  Rector of Wingfield: “Dom John Deyncorte, then rector of the church of Wynnefelde, Roger Deyncorte…” witnessed the charter dated to “Temp. Edw. I” which records a grant from “Matthew de Knyvetone” to “Henry, his first-born son” of “the manor of Wodethorpe in Scharvisdale[177].  A charter dated to “Late 13th cent.” [inaccurate dating?] records “Roger de Eyncurt de Parco [Roger [VI], see below]” granting “his land in Aluinewode, with the cultures called Hungstubbing and Gernuncroft…” to “William de Eyncurt, his brother”, witnessed by “…Dom. John de Eyncurt, persona de Winnefeld…[178].  John presumably died before the following document which names “Robert” as rector of Wingfield (who has not been identified, although, as Robert was a Deincourt family name, it is possible that he was also a relative: Robert presumably died before 12 Mar 1297, when John’s supposed relative Roger de Aincourt was rector as shown below): “Robert, vicar of Winnefeud, Robert fil. Dom. Geoffrey de Dethek, John Deyncourt, Roger le Breton de Walton…” witnessed the charter dated 14 Apr 1292 under which “Walter fil. Will. de Hufton” granted “the manor of Hufton” to “Joanna fil. Dom. Johannis de Heriz[179]

 

 

As will be seen below, Roger [VI] de Aincourt of Morton is recorded as holding Park Hall, probably the mansion in North Wingfield parish, Derbyshire which, according to Bulmer’s 1895 History, Topography, and Directory of Derbyshire, “remained in [the Deincourt family’s] possession till the extinction of the male line in 1422 [referring to the later William Lord Deincourt, see Part E]”[180].  If Bulmer is correct, it is not known how and when Park Hall reverted to the senior Deincourt line.  Between the mid-13th to late-14th centuries, it was held successively by Roger [VI], Roger [VI]’s widow (dower interest 1381), gap in records until John [X] Deincourt (recorded 1317), Roger [VII] Deincourt (recorded early 1330s), and Roger’s heirs (lease granted 1371 to his granddaughter Maud).  The following reconstruction aims to provide an explanation for this transmission of Park Hall.  Although consistent with the limited amount of primary source material so far found, it should be considered speculative until confirmed or disproved by other documentation which may emerge in the future. 

 

ROGER [V] de Aincourt of Morton, son of [ROGER [IV] de Aincourt of Morton & his wife ---] ([1205/10?]-before [28 Oct 1250/27 Oct 1251]).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified, but the inheritance of Morton by his son suggests that Roger [V] was the son of Roger [IV].  His birth date is suggested from his being adult in the Pipe Roll “22 Hen III” [28 Oct 1237/27 Oct 1238], which records “…Roger de Aincourt…” in Derbyshire under “New Oblations” (suggesting that he had recently inherited the property)[181].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1242/43 tenants holding from “Oliverus de Ayncurd [Oliver [III] de Aincourt, see Part A.] in comitatu Notingh * feoda militum” including “Rogerus de Ayncurd tenet quartam partem feodi unius militis in Knapetorp de eodem feodo de veteri feoffamento…Rogerus de Ayncurd tenet in Morton feodum i militis de eodem et de veteri feoffamento[182].  Roger [V] presumably died before the Pipe Roll “35 Hen III” [28 Oct 1250/27 Oct 1251] Pipe Roll, cited below, which records “New Oblations…Roger de Eyncourt…[183], presumably referring to his son Roger [VI]. 

m ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Throsby/Thoroton names “Joane, the daughter of William de Thorpe” as wife of “Roger” (no source cited)[184], apparently indicating Roger [VI] whose wife was Alice de Harthill (see below).  No other reference to Joan de Thorpe has been found.  If the chronology fits, presumably Throsby/Thoroton may have mistaken her for the wife of Roger [V]. 

Roger [V] & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         ROGER [VI] de Aincourt of Morton and Park Hall ([1230/33?]-[1263/72][185]).  His parentage is confirmed by the first undated charter cited below under his wife.  The Pipe Roll “35 Hen III” [28 Oct 1250/27 Oct 1251] Pipe Roll records in Derbyshire “New Oblations…Roger de Eyncourt…[186], suggesting his recent succession to the property in question (which is unspecified). 

-        see below

2.         JOHN [VI] Deincourt ([1232/36?]-after Apr 1283).  Fould records that, during the minority of John [VIII] Deincourt, son of Roger [VI] (see below), his lands were held “by his uncle (also named John Deyncourt) until a final settlement was made in Apr 1283…” [this “final settlement” has not been seen][187].  “Kirby’s Quest” (Yeatman says taken before 26 Henry III [28 Oct 1240/27 Oct 1241]?[188], which seems incorrect if “Edmund Deincourt”, see below, was Edmund Lord Deincourt) records in “Wapp. de Scaresdale” - “Morton – John Deincourt [John [VIII]?] held M. Morton with its members of John Deincourt [John [VI]?], and he of Edmund Deincourt [presumably Edmund Lord Deincourt], and he in cap.[189].  No record has been found which confirms that John [VI] left descendants.  However, as will be seen below, it is suggested (speculatively) that one of the parents of John [X] Deincourt (recorded as holding Park Hall in 1317) may have been his child. 

3.         WILLIAM [III] de Aincourt [of Morton?] ([1234/38?]-before 14 Apr 1292).  A charter dated to “Late 13th cent.” records “Roger de Eyncurt de Parco [presumably Roger [VI], which suggests dating earlier than “Late 13th cent.”]” granting “his land in Aluinewode, with the cultures called Hungstubbing and Gernuncroft…” to “William de Eyncurt, his brother”, witnessed by “…Dom. John de Eyncurt, persona de Winnefeld [their probable brother, see below][190].  The family connection with the rectory of Wingfield (held successively by John de Aincourt and by William’s son Roger), suggests that William [III] was the same person as the husband of Mary.  If that is correct, William probably died before 14 Apr 1292 when his supposed son John [VII] witnessed the charter cited below (of which one of the other witnesses also witnessed the 12 Mar 1297 charter, cited below under his son Roger).  [m firstly ---.  This earlier marriage is suggested on the assumption that William [III]’s possible son John [VII] was the same person as John [IX], as suggested below, which suggests that he may have been somewhat older than his two brothers.]  m [secondly?]  MARY, daughter of --- (-after 12 Mar 1297).  She is named in the 12 Mar 1297 charter of her son Roger, cited below.  William [III] & his [first] wife had [one child]: 

a)         [JOHN [VII] de Aincourt (-after 12 Mar 1297).  “Robert, vicar of Winnefeud, Robert fil. Dom. Geoffrey de Dethek, John Deyncourt, Roger le Breton de Walton…” witnessed the charter dated 14 Apr 1292 under which “Walter fil. Will. de Hufton” granted “the manor of Hufton” to “Joanna fil. Dom. Johannis de Heriz[191].  He also witnessed the 12 Mar 1297 charter of his supposed brother Roger de Aincourt.  His acting as witness in both these charters suggests that John [VII] was closely related to William [III], maybe his oldest son (who would presumably have inherited the bulk of their father’s estates), as Roger granted rights to William (as a younger brother?) after their mother’s death.]  same person as…?  JOHN [IX] Deincourt ([1260?]-[31 Jul 1312/14 Feb 1314?]).  One possibility is that John [IX], son-in-law of Edmund Lord Deincourt and father of William Lord Deincourt, was the same person as John [VII] de Aincourt.  This co-identity, if correct, could explain how John [IX]’s son, William Lord Deincourt, acquired a half share in Morton (as recorded 1 Nov 1346[192], see below).  How Lord William acquired that interest has not been confirmed, but, assuming that William [III] de Aincourt had shared Morton with his brother Roger [V], this share could have been inherited by William’s supposed son John [VII].  Follow John [IX]’s hyperlink for discussion of other possibilities for his parentage.  Nevertheless, follow John [IX]’s hyperlink for discussion of another possible parentage, which seems more likely. 

William [III] & his [second] wife had two children: 

b)         ROGER de Aincourt (-after 20 Jan 1303).  Rector of Wingfield (previously held by his supposed uncle John de Aincourt, see below): “Roger de Deyncurt, rector of Wynnefeld” granted “all his land in Thopton [Tupton], which William his father had of the feoffment of Robert fil. Thome clerici de Thopton and William le Hil” to “Mary his mother, for her life, and to William his brother” by charter dated 12 Mar 1297, witnessed by “John de Deyncurt, William le Bret, Roger le Bretun, John de Braylisford[193].  Rector of Ashover, Derbyshire: “Dom Roger de Eincurt, rector ecclesie de Essovere, Will. le Bret, Roger le Breton, Ralph de Rerysby…” witnessed the charter dated 20 Jan 1302 (O.S.) which records a grant from “Maargery de Reysby…” to “Adam de Rerysby…” of “the manor of Essovere called le Newehalle[194]

c)         WILLIAM [IV] de Aincourt (-after 12 Mar 1297).  He is named in the 12 Mar 1297 charter of his brother Roger. 

4.         [WALTER Deincourt .  “Roger Deincourt, of Park” donated “a tenement in Chesterfield…” to Welbec, for the soul of “Alice his wife”, confirmed by “Walter fil Roger Deincourt”, undated[195].  The document does not identify the witness’s father, who could presumably be either the donor Roger [VI], or the latter’s father Roger [V].  “Walter fil Roger Deincourt” donated land “in Chesterfield” to Welbec, undated[196].] 

 

 

The primary source which confirms the parentage of the following person has not been identified.  However, his son John [X] was recorded in 1317 as “of Park Hall”, the property previously held by Roger [VI] de Aincourt of Morton (see above).  John [VIII] Deincourt, Roger [VI]’s oldest son, was a child under the guardianship of his paternal uncle John [VI] when his father died.  Maybe, after the guardianship of his nephew ended and Roger [VI]’s widow died, John [VI] acquired Park Hall by family arrangement  If that is correct, the following person may have been his son.  After the death of John [X], Park Hall reverted to Roger [VII] Deincourt, the son of John [VIII], as senior representative of Roger [V]’s descendants. 

 

1.         --- Deincourt, son of --- ).  As noted above, the inheritance of Park Hall by John [X] could be explained if his father was the grandson of Roger [V] de Aincourt.  No record has been found which indicates the name of this person or the identity of his father (maybe John [VI], see discussion above).  m ([1279/83?]) [--- Deincourt, daughter of --- ([1265/68?]-)].  No record has been found of the name and parentage of this person’s wife.  However, the name Oliver, given to one of their sons, was associated only with the senior line of the Aincourt/Deincourt family shown in Part A. of the present document.  It is therefore suggested that she may have belonged to that senior line.  If that is correct, the chronology suggests that she could have been an otherwise unrecorded daughter of either Nicholas [II] or John [V] Deincourt, the two sons of Oliver [III] de Aincourt by his second wife Matilda Pecche.  Such a relationship could also explain why Edmund Lord Deincourt named this person’s sons Oliver and John [X] in his Third licence (see below, and Part E), as they would have been the grandsons of his paternal uncle.  Follow John [V]’s hyperlink for the suggestion that this person’s brother may have been John [IX] Deincourt, whose son Willliam was named by Edmund Lord Deincourt as his heir, and their possible sister the wife of William FitzWilliam who sponsored Oliver as rector of Emley (see below).  --- & his wife had three children: 

a)         WILLIAM [V] Deincourt ([1280/85?]-after 24 Oct 1305).  [3 May 1313/15 May 1317]).  His family relationship is confirmed by the order dated 24 Oct 1305 granting “Safe-conduct, until Easter, for William Deyncurt and Master Oliver Deyncurt his brother, going to the court of Rome[197].  [same person as…?  WILLIAM Deincourt (-[3 May 1313/15 May 1317]).  Four other documents may refer to William [V].  A document dated 8 Mar 1312 records a Commission to “J. bishop of Norwich…William Deyncurt…knights…” to “treat with the prelates, earls and barons of the realm for…[correcting] such parts…of the ordinances as are hurtful or prejudicial to the king…[198].  An order dated 6 Oct 1315 recorded “Inspeximus and confirmation of a writing of John de Britannia, earl of Richmond, dated Boston, in the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, 6 Edward II [25 Jan 1313]” witnessed by “Sirs William Deyncourt and Bertrand de Montbocher, knights…[199].  An order dated 3 May 1313 instructed the sheriff of Northampton to cause “William de Eyncurt” to have “tallage of [his] tenants in…the town of Dodyngton[200]: the identity of William in this document might be clarified by more research into the manor of Doddington in Northamptonshire.  An order dated 3 May 1313 granting letters of protection to “…William de Eyncurt…” and others who “with [John de Britannia] earl of Richmond are going beyond seas [with the king] on the king’s service[201].  The Brittany connection indicates that the second and fourth documents certainly refer to the same person.  If this co-identity is correct, William [V] died before 15 May 1317 as he is not mentioned in Edmund Lord Deincourt’s licence cited below which names his brothers Oliver and John [X].] 

b)         OLIVER Deincourt ([1285/90?]-[15 May 1317/6 Jan 1327]).  An order dated 24 Oct 1305 granted “Safe-conduct, until Easter, for William Deyncurt and Master Oliver Deyncurt his brother, going to the court of Rome[202]: the journey was presumably connected with Oliver starting his ecclesiastical career.  If that is correct, Oliver was probably a young man at the time, hence his birth date suggested as [1285/90?].  No record has been found of the ecclesiastical position held by Oliver before his appointment to Emley.  Rector of Emley: “William FitzWilliam [Oliver’s possible brother-in-law, see below]” presented “Oliver de Eyncourt to the rectory of Emley” Dec 1313[203]: “Master Oliver de Eyncourt [Deyncourt], priest” was instituted to “the church of Emeley (Emelay), patron: Sir William FitzWilliam, knight”, 12 Dec 1313 at Scrooby, Nottinghamshire[204]By his Third licence dated 15 May 1317 (see Part E. under Edmund Lord Deincourt for full quotes from this document], Edmund Lord Deyncourt was authorised to grant specific properties to “Magistrum Oliverum Deyncourt et Johannem Deyncourt de Parkhalle…et heredibus suis”, and in addition Oliver and John of Park Hall were licensed to sub-grant certain of those specified properties to “prefato Emundo” for his life, and after Edmund’s death to “prefato Willielmo et heredibus suis de corpore suo legitime procreatis” with successive remainders to “prefato Johanni Deyncourt fratri ejusdem Willielmi et heredibus ipsius Johannis de corpore suo legitime procreatis…rectis heredibus prefati Edmundi[205].  Oliver being named “Magistrum” in this licence confirms his ecclesiastical status which means that he was unmarried.  It also means that Oliver may have been either John’s older or younger brother, if the latter, named first order out of respect for his ecclesiastical position.  No other documents have yet been found (except later documents reciting the transaction recorded in the Third licence) which name Oliver.  He presumably predeceased Edmund Lord Deincourt as no mention of him has been found after that date

c)         JOHN [X] Deincourt of Park Hall (-[15 May 1317/6 Jan 1327?]).  He is named “John Deyncourt of Parkhalle” in the Third licence (15 May 1317) cited above under Oliver.  As noted above, it is not known whether John was the older or younger brother of Oliver.  [The Pipe Roll “29 Edw I” [20 Nov 1300/19 Nov 1301] at Derby records “…John Aincourt, Robert de Stuteville[206]: it is uncertain to which John Deincourt this entry refers.]  John presumably predeceased Edmund Lord Deincourt as no mention of him has been found after 1317.  From the 1330s, Park is recorded with Roger [VII] Deincourt (see below), presumably John’s successor

 

 

ROGER [VI] de Aincourt of Morton and Park, son of ROGER [V] de Aincourt [of Morton] & his wife --- ([1230/33?]-[1263/72][207])His parentage is confirmed by the first undated charter cited below under his wife.  The Pipe Roll “35 Hen III” [28 Oct 1250/27 Oct 1251] Pipe Roll records in Derbyshire “New Oblations…Roger de Eyncourt…[208], suggesting his recent succession to the property in question (which is unspecified).  “…Roger de Eyncourt…” witnessed a charter dated 1252 issued by “Walter, Abbot of Darley” to “Ralf fil Ralf de Wistanton and Matilda, his wife[209].  An order dated 8 Jan 1253 granted exemption for life to “Roger de Eyncurt from being put on assizes, juries or recognitions”, repeated 29 Jul 1255[210].  “Dominis Rogero de Eyncort…militibus…” witnessed the charter dated to [1254/58] under which “Thomas filius Ricardi de Cestrefeld” relinquished rights in land in Chesterfield, which he had claimed “post obitum Sampsonis filii Nigelli quondam avunculi mei”, in favour of Lincoln church[211].  [A charter of King Edward III dated 8 May “anno regni nostri xvii” [1343] confirmed donations to Thurgarton, including “cum tenementis…in Senovere et Pillesleye” [Pilsley, Derbyshire?], held by named tenants, donated by “Rogerus de Aencurt per cartam suam[212]: the information is insufficient to date the original donation, which could have been made by either Roger [V], Roger [VI] or Roger [VII], considering that Pilsley is close to Morton.]  Throsby/Thoroton records that Roger donated “the Tythe of his Mill…at Granby” to Thurgarton St Peter, for the souls of himself “and his Wife’s Alice’s”, undated[213].  The following documents record Roger [VI] at Park.  “Roger Deincourt, of Park” donated “a tenement in Chesterfield…” to Welbec, for the soul of “Alice his wife”, confirmed by “Walter fil Roger Deincourt”, undated[214].  “…Dom. Roger de Aynescurt…” witnessed the charter dated to “Temp, Hen. III” which records the grant of land “in Leys and Wodehuses…[215].  “…Dom. Roger de Eynecurt…” witnessed the charter dated to “Temp, Hen. III.-Edw. I” which records the grant of land “near Williamthorpe and Normanton…[216].  A charter dated to “Late 13th cent.” [inaccurate dating?] records “Roger de Eyncurt de Parco” granting “his land in Aluinewode, with the cultures called Hungstubbing and Gernuncroft…” to “William de Eyncurt, his brother”, witnessed by “…Dom. John de Eyncurt, persona de Winnefeld…[217]

m ALICE de Harthill, daughter of ADAM de Harthill & his wife --- (-after [20 Nov 1280/19 Nov 1281]?).  Adam de Harthill” granted land “in Derlesthopr, et Dornthorp…” to “Rogero filio et hæredi Rogeri de Ayncourt, cum Alicia filia mea in liberum maritagium”, the grantee “et hæredibus suis” to hold “quos de Alicia filia mea habebit imperpetuum”, by undated charter[218]The following charter suggests that Alice’s father died before her marriage: “dominus Richardus de Herthill” granted land “quaæ habet de dono Adæ patris mei in villa de Dornthorp, et Colingham…”, while “prædicta Alicia uxor Rogeri de Dayncourt” donated “prædictam terram in Dornthorp et Colyngham” to Thurgarton, by undated charter[219].  The following document suggests that Alice made her donation after the death of her husband: a charter of King Edward III dated 8 May “anno regni nostri xvii” [1343] confirmed donations to Thurgarton, including “terra sua in Darnethorp et Colingham” made by “Alicia de Aincurt, quondam uxor Rogeri de Aincurt[220]Alice, widow of Roger Deincourt” sued the abbot of Welbeck (Nottinghamshire) for her dower “…in Hall Winfield”, Boythorpe hamlet, dated [20 Nov 1280/19 Nov 1281][221], suggesting that her husband had earlier donated certain rights in Park Hall to Welbeck (no donation charter found).  No indication has been found of when Alice died.  

Roger [VI] & his wife had one child: 

1.         JOHN [VIII] Deincourt of Morton ([before 1262]-[Sep 1321/18 Jun 1322]).  Fould records his parentage, noting that he was a minor when his father died [1263/72], that he held lands “in Morton, Hasland, Gildeford and Knapthorpe” which, during his minority, were held “by his uncle (also named John Deyncourt [=John [VI], see above]) until a final settlement was made in Apr 1283, at which time John must have been at least 21”, and that he was recorded in documents dated 1300, 1314, 1315, 1316, and 1320 (member of parliament for Derbyshire)[222].  “Kirby’s Quest” (Yeatman says taken before 26 Henry III [28 Oct 1240/27 Oct 1241]?[223], which seems incorrect if “Edmund Deincourt”, see below, was Edmund Lord Deincourt) records in “Wapp. de Scaresdale” - “Morton – John Deincourt [this John [VIII]?] held M. Morton with its members of John Deincourt [John [VI]?], and he of Edmund Deincourt [presumably Edmund Lord Deincourt], and he in cap.[224].  [A document dated 10 May 1300 records the appointment of “Giles de Meynill, Henry son of Herbert, John Deyncurt” to hear “complaints of transgressions against [Magna Carta and the Forest Charter of Henry III” in Derbyshire[225]The Pipe Roll “29 Edw I” [20 Nov 1300/19 Nov 1301] at Derby records “…John Aincourt, Robert de Stuteville[226]: it is uncertain to which John Deincourt these entries refer.]  The Book of Aids 1 Nov “20 Edw III” [1 Nov 1346] records in “Hundred de Scarsdale” - “Wm. Deincourt [William Lord Deincourt, see below], ½ Morton (John Deincourt [in 30 Edward I = 20 Nov 1301/19 Nov 1302]”[227].  Scutage taken “30 Edw I” [20 Nov 1301/19 Nov 1302] records in “Wapen of Scaredale” - “John de Eyncourt, ½ Moreton[228].  “Dom. John de Eyncurt…Hugh de Dokemanton” witnessed the charter dated 24 Aug 1317 which records a grant from “William Daniel of Tybeschelf” to “John de Weyteberhg”, and two similar charters dated [end] Sep 1321[229]Inquisitions after a writ dated 18 Jun "15 Edw II" [18 Jun 1322], following the death of "John Deyncourt", record manors in Nottingham “Knapthorp” and Derby “Morton”, both held “of Edmund Deyncourt [Edmund Lord Deincourt]”, and Derby (“Haseland”), and “Roger his son, aged 36 and more, is his next heir”)[230]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John [VIII] & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROGER [VII] Deincourt of Morton ([before 1286]-[23 Apr 1349/2 Jun 1364], maybe [1351]).  He is named as his father’s heir in the inquisitions cited above “aged 36 and more”.  “Roger Deyncourt…” is named in documents dated 20 Mar 1328 and 30 Apr 1328 as “the collectors of the twentieth in co. Derby[231].  A charter dated 18 Oct 1330 records “Roger Dayncurt, mil…” witnessing a release from “Laurence fil. Ricardi de Dukmantone” of a water-mill to “the Abbot of Welbeke[232].  Lord of Park Hall, presumably some time after the death of John Deincourt which is dated to [15 May 1317/6 Jan 1327?] (see below).  A charter dated 30 Nov 1334 at “Parkshale” records “Richard le Hunte of Essover” releasing “land called Henne Parke Medwe, in Dokemonton” to “Dom. Roger Deyncourt, mil.[233].  A charter dated 14 Feb 1337 records a release from “Roger fil. Rob. de Winfeld, of Essovere” to “Dom. Roger de Eyncourt, mil. Dominus de Parco” of rent from lands “in Esshovere”, a similar release “to Roger Deyncourt of lands…de Hasschovere” dated 23 Apr 1349 “apud le Parkehalle[234].  A charter dated 28 Oct 1341 records “Laurence de Dokmantune…” granting “rent…from lands in Dokmanton” to “Dom. Roger de Eyncourt, mil., dom. de Parco[235].  The Book of Aids 1 Nov “20 Edw III” [1 Nov 1346], recording in “Hundred de Scarsdale” - “Wm. Deincourt [William Lord Deincourt, see Part E.], ½ Morton (John Deincourt [in 30 Edward I = 20 Nov 1301/19 Nov 1302, presumably this Roger’s father]”[236], suggests that Roger divested his share in Morton in favour of the senior Deincourt line, maybe when he acquired Park Hall.  Rosie Bevan records that Roger [VII] died “about 1351, from a lingering illness which caused him to be relieved of the office of sheriff in 1348”, noting that his inheritance consisted of “the manors of Knapthorpe [Nottinghamshire], Park Hall in Morton, Hasland, Gildeford, Boythorpe, North Wingfield with the advowson [Derbyshire], and lands elsewhere" which were divided between his two daughters (no sources cited)[237].  Roger died before the 2 Jun 1364 document cited below.  m (before [8 Jul 1324/7 Jul 1325]) MATILDA Bugge, daughter of RALPH Bugge [“de Nottingham”] & his wife ---.  Rosie Bevan records her parentage, noting one source which names her father “Ralph de Nottingham”, and another which names her as “sister of Richard de Bingham of Nottinghamshire[238].  A document dated [8 Jul 1324/7 Jul 1325] records a lawsuit between “Roger Deyncourt, and Matilda his wife, quer. and Elena daughter of John Deyncourt, deforc.“ concerning “the manor of Knapthorp…[239].  “Roger de Ayncourt, Chev.” settled “half the Manor of Boythorpe [Derbyshire], with other property, upon Matilda his wife”, undated[240].  Roger [VII] & his wife had two children (inquisitions after a writ dated 7 Jun "38 Edward III" [7 Jun 1364], following the death of "William Deyncourt, or de Dencourt, the elder [William Lord Deincourt]", record property in Derby (specifying “Morton. One knight’s fee, held by the heirs of Roger Deynecourt” – the inquisitions do not name “Park Hall”) and Nottingham (specifying “Knapthorp.  A fourth part of a knight’s fee, held by the heirs of Roger Deyncourt”)[241]): 

i)          ALICE Deincourt (-after 1385).  Throsby records that “Roger Deyncourt“ had “two daughters and heirs, Alice the wife of Nicolas, son of sir Nicolas de Langford in Darbyshire, who by her had Nicolas, and William …” (no source cited)[242].  A charter dated late-Sep 1346 records a covenant between “Alice, wife of Mons. Nicholas de Longeford” and “Maude, wife of Sir Roger Deyncourt” for the marriage between “Nicholas, son of the said Mons. Nicholas” and “Alice, daughter of the said Roger…with lands in Dugmanton…[243].  “Roger Deyncourt” granted “lands in Dogmanton; rent, a rose” to “Nicholas, son of Nicholas de Longfforde, and Alice, his wife, daughter of the said Roger[244]m firstly ([late-Sep 1346/2 Apr 1347]) NICHOLAS de Longford, son of NICHOLAS de Longford & his second wife Alice le Botiller of Wem, Shropshire (-23 May 1373).  Rosie Bevan has studied his ancestry and descendants, in particular noting his parentage, his date of death, his wife’s second marriage, and her date of death as shown here[245]m secondly OLIVER de Barton, son of --- (-1390 or after). 

ii)         JOAN Deincourt ).  Throsby records that “Roger Deyncourt“ had “two daughters and heirs…his other daughter and heir, who was the wife of sir Robert Nevile lord of Scotton in Lincolnshire, who by her had sir Philip Neville, who on Sara his wife begot a daughter and heir named Maud, married to sir John Bussy, knight”, citing a fine under which “the moyety of the manor of Knapthorp was settled on John Bussy, and Maud his wife…[246], although the intervening generation “Philip Neville…” is incorrect.  m ROBERT Neville of Brampton and Scotton, Lincolnshire, son of PHILIP Neville of Brampton & his wife Isabella --- (-10 Aug 1353).  Baker shows his family and date of death[247].  Robert Neville & his wife had one child: 

(1)       MAUD Neville (-before 1399)Her maternal aunt Alice and her husband leased “their purparty of Le Parkhall manor…” and other property to their niece Maud for 40 years by charter dated 1371[248]The Complete Peerage records her three marriages (but not her parentage) and her date of death[249].  Sillem discusses the murder of her first husband, and reproduces the Michaelmas 1375/1376 documents which record the indictments and trials of the servants of “domini Willelmi de Cantilupo chiualer” and of “Matillis que fuit uxor Willelmi de Cantilupe chiualer” (who was acquitted of the charges)[250]m firstly WILLIAM [VIII] de Cauntelo, son of WILLIAM [VII] de Cauntelo & his wife Joan de Welle ([1344/47]-murdered 31 Mar 1375).  m secondly (before 24 Oct 1379) as his second wife, Sir THOMAS de Kydale of South Ferriby, Lincolnshire, son of --- (-before 30 Nov 1381).  m thirdly (before 27 Oct 1382) as his second wife, Sir JOHN Bussy of Hougham, Lincolnshire, son of --- (-beheaded Bristol 30 Jul 1399). 

b)         ELENA Deincourt (-after [8 Jul 1324/7 Jul 1325]).  A document dated [8 Jul 1324/7 Jul 1325] records a lawsuit between “Roger Deyncourt, and Matilda his wife, quer. and Elena daughter of John Deyncourt, deforc.“ concerning “the manor of Knapthorp…[251]

 

 

 

D.      AINCOURT of CUMBERLAND

 

 

A few isolated references have been found to an Aincourt family in Cumberland.  Their relationship with the main Aincourt family has not been ascertained.  In the case of Gervais, no other reference to anyone named Gervais de Aincourt has been found, which may suggest that he was unrelated. 

 

1.         GERVAIS de Aincourt (-after [1189]).  “Helewis filia Willelmi de Lancastr” confirmed to “Gileberto fratri meo...terras quas pater meus” had given him “Slegil...et Sockebroc et Tyrerhge...et totam terram de Paterickedale” by charter dated to [1189], witnessed by “......Roberto de Pinkenei...Gervas de Aencurt...[252]

 

2.         RALPH [VI] de Aincourt (-after [1225/26]).  The chronology suggests that Ralph [VI] could have been the same person as Ralph [V], of the Lincolnshire Aincourt family (see Part B.).  A charter dated to [1357] confirmed an agreement dated to [1225/26] between “dominum Willelmum de Lancastre” and “dominum Thomam filium Willelmi” [Greystoke] concerning fisheries “in essaveria de Ulleswatr”, and another agreement between “dominus Willus de Lancastre et Radulphus de Ayncurt et Rogerus de Lancastre et dominus Thomas filius Willelmi” concerning “stangno de Stayneton”, and also notes that “Ketell filius Aldred” donated “2 bovatas terre et molendinum de Barton” to the hospital of St. Nicholas and that “Wills filius Gilberti” confirmed the donation made by “predictus Ketel avunculus eius[253]

 

 

Ralph [VIII] may have belonged to either the Lincolnshire or Derbyshire Aincourt/Deincourt families, also holding interests in Cumberland: the chronology suggests that he could have been the same person as Ralph [VII], of the Lincolnshire Aincourt family (see Part B.). 

1.         RALPH [VIII] de Aincourt (-before 4 Dec 1310).  A writ of aid dated 9 Feb 1302 directed “John de Lucy, Thomas de Derewentwater, Ralph Deyncurt, Robert de Tymperon” in Cumberland “for speedy execution to collect the fifteenth in that county from all the temporalities of ecclesiastcis and seculars…[254]A document dated 4 Dec 1310 records the presentation of “Robert de Wodehouse to the church of Plomland, in the diocese of Carlisle, in the king's gift by reason of the lands of Ralph Deyncurt, deceased, tenant in chief, being in his hands[255]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph [VIII] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ELIZABETH Deincourt .  An order dated 12 Jan 1301 at Linlithgow refers to land “taken into the king’s hands for Robert [de Wessington]’s default before the justices of the Bench against Walter son of Elizabeth daughter of Ralph Daincurt[256].  The name of Elizabeth’s husband has not been found.  m ---. 

 

 

 

E.      LORDS DEINCOURT

 

 

The following reconstruction, in particular the family relationship between Edmund Lord Deincourt (d. 1327) and his successor William Lord Deincourt, son of John [IX] Deincourt, is different from what is shown in the Complete Peerage.  It is based on a closer reading of the primary sources relating to Lord Edmund and his other Deincourt relatives.  It appears to follow in part the interpretation of some of these sources proposed by Trevor Foulds in 1994[257].  The Complete Peerage, Addenda & Corrigenda, notes that “Foulds suggests that [John] was a distant cousin of Edmund, 1st Lord. His arguments are unconvincing[258].  Foulds’s work has not been seen but, if he follows similar arguments to those set out in the present document, his position on the Edmund/John/William family relationship deserves more consideration. 

 

JOHN [IV] Deincourt of Blankney, Lincolnshire, son of OLIVER [III] de Aincourt & his first wife Nicole --- ([1222/25?]-before 14 Oct 1257).  His parentage is confirmed by the Pipe Roll “31 Hen III” [28 Oct 1246/27 Oct 1247] at Derby which records “New Oblations…John fil and heir Oliver Deincourt c. £ for his relief…[259].  This entry also appears to confirm that John [IV] was of age when his father died, so maybe was born [1222/25?].  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[260].  The Pipe Roll “39 Hen III” [28 Oct 1254/27 Oct 1255] at Derby records “New Oblations…John de Aincourt…[261]: if this entry relates to John [IV], the explanation for his listing under “New Oblations” has not been found.  An order dated 14 Oct 1257 granted to the queen “the wardship of the lands late of John de Dencurt, tenant in chief, with the marriage of the heirs[262]

m firstly ---.  The Complete Peerage says that Agnes, shown below, was John [II]’s second wife (no source cited)[263].  This suggestion has not been confirmed. 

m secondly (before 12 Nov 1251) as her second husband, AGNES de Neville, widow of RICHARD de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire, daughter of GEOFFREY de Neville of Raby, co. Durham & his wife Joan --- (-[20 Nov 1291/20 Jul 1293]).  The Complete Peerage says that Agnes was “da. of Sir Geoffrey de Neville, of Raby, co. Durham” and “widow of Richard de Percy, of Topcliffe, co. York, who d. shortly before 18 Aug 1244 (citing “Fine Roll, 28 Hen. III, m. 3”)”[264]Her two marriages are indicated by a charter dated 8 Nov 1251 which records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[265]Agnes gave “the manor of Steeping, co. Lincoln” to “Edmund d’Eyncourt her s. and h., and his heirs” by deed dated “20 Edw. I” [20 Nov 1291/19 Nov 1292][266].  The Complete Peerage says that she died “before 20 July 1293[267]

John [IV] & his second wife had [two] children: 

1.         EDMUND Deincourt ([1250/52?]-6 Jan 1327).  His birth date is estimated assuming that he was still a minor in early 1269 and 25 Oct 1270, as noted below, but bearing in mind the chronology of his descendants.  The Pipe Roll “43 Hen III” [28 Oct 1258/27 Oct 1259] at Derby records “Scutage of Wales assessed at 40s. Of the Honour of Peverel…the following were excused:-…The Queen, custos of John de Eincourt (son and heir of Edmond)…[268], presumably a mistranscription for “Edmond…son and heir of John…”.  Inquisitions after a writ dated 4 Jan "49 Hen III" [4 Jan 1264], following the death of "Ralph Musard", record (with other properties) “Hinckreshill and Willamthorp, held of the heirs of John de Deyncurt for ¼ knight’s fee” in Derby[269].  The Complete Peerage cites numerous sources which name Edmund, including his homage on or before 8 Jan 1269 “though he was still a minor”, his 1299, 1300, and 1310 homage to three successive archbishops of York for land in Burnby, Yorkshire, and his mention 12 Feb 1301 as “Edmundus de Eyncourt dominus de Thurgerton[270]Inquisitions after a writ dated 25 Oct "54 Edw. III" [25 Oct 1270], following the death of "John de la Stock", record a writ of certiorari “for the wardship of the lands…of the said John…which had come to the hands of Queen Eleanor by reason of the wardship of the lands and heir of John de Eynecurt, which are in her hands by the king’s grant” and land in Buckingham “Woburn…held of the heirs of John de Eynecurt[271].  The Pipe Roll “7 Edw I” [20 Nov 1278/19 Nov 1279] at Derby records “Payments on account scutage of Wales…of the same in the county…Edmund de Aincourt ½ …[272].  The Pipe Roll “18 Edw I” [20 Nov 1289/19 Nov 1290] at Derby records “New Oblations…Edmond de Aincourt…[273]: the explanation for Edmund’s listing under “New Oblations” has not been found.  Agnes [Edmund’s mother] gave “the manor of Steeping, co. Lincoln” to “Edmund d’Eyncourt her s. and h., and his heirs” by deed dated “20 Edw. I” [20 Nov 1291/19 Nov 1292][274].  “Kirby’s Quest” (Yeatman says taken before 26 Henry III [28 Oct 1240/27 Oct 1241]?[275], which seems incorrect if “Edmund Deincourt”, see below, was Edmund Lord Deincourt) records in “Wapp. de Scaresdale” - “Elmton, Holmton – Edmund Deincourt held Elmton and Holmfield in cap. for I fee[276].  Edmund was summoned to Parliament from 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Deincourt.  Scutage taken “30 Edw I” [20 Nov 1301/19 Nov 1302] records in “Wapentake de Scaresdale” - “Edmund de Eyncourt, I Elmton and Holmfield[277].  “Dominis Eadmundo de Daymcourt, Roberto de Wilugby…militibus…” witnessed the charter dated 8 Jul 1310 under which “Philippus de Kyma” relinquished “iure patronatus prebende de Carletonkyme” in favour of the church of Lincoln[278].  Scutage taken “4 Edw II” [8 Jul 1310/7 Jul 1311] records in “Scarvedale Hundred” - “Edmund de Eyncourt, I in Elmton and Holmfield[279]

The present reconstruction of the Deincourt family is based mainly on four licences which dealt with Edmund’s succession and named several of his relatives.  Extracts are quoted here in full.  They are complex documents. 

First, a licence dated 23 Feb 1314 was granted to “Edmund Deyncurt [=Edmund Lord Deincourt]“, who had affirmed that “his surname and arms after his death will be lost from memory in the person of Isabella daughter of Edmund Deyncurt [=a second Edmund Deincourt], his heir apparent [the family relationships between these three persons (Lord Edmund, the second Edmund, and Isabel) are clarified by the Third and Fourth licences cited below]”, “to enfeoff whomsoever he wills of all his lands…which he holds in chief, to hold to the feoffee and his heirs“ and that “the persons whom he shall so enfeoff may bear the surname of the said Edmund Deyncurt [=Edmund Lord Deincourt] and his arms in memory of him[280].  As the Latin original of this First licence has not been found, the accuracy of the English summary in the Calendar of Patent Rolls has not been verified.  Bearing this in mind, some preliminary conclusions can be drawn from this First licence.  Firstly, “Isabella” bore Lord Edmund’s “surname and arms”, suggesting that she was his male line descendant (not necessarily a correct conclusion, see below for more discussion).  Secondly, the second Edmund Deincourt was presumably deceased at the time, or at least incapacitated in some way, otherwise he would have been named “heir apparent”, not his daughter.  Thirdly, Lord Edmund had no other surviving male-line descendants, otherwise his “surname and arms” would not have been “lost from memory” after his death and the possibility of his naming an heir who could bear his “surname…and his arms” would not need to have been expressed.  Fourthly, the document leaves open whether Lord Edmund had living female-line descendants at the time.  Fifthly, Lord Edmund had not then decided who “to enfeoff…of all his lands”. 

Second, King Edward II confirmed, by licence dated 23 Feb [no year stated: also “7 Edw II” = 1314?], that “Edmund Deyncurt [=Edmund Lord Deincourt]“ had stated that after his death his name and arms (“cognomen suum et ejus Arma post mortem suam”) would be lost to memory (“a memoria delebuntur”) in the person of “Isabelle filie Edmundi Deyncurt [=the second Edmund Deincourt] heredis ejus modo apparentis”, licenced “eidem Edmundo” [Lord Edmund] to enfeoff “quemcumque voluerit” [no reference to the nominee adopting Lord Edmund’s name and arms, as under the First licence], with his lands etc., that, after the death of the said Lord Edmund (“post decessum ejusdem Edmundi”), his lands etc. would pass (“remaneant”) to “Willielmo filio Johannis Deyncurt [the future William Lord Deincourt], et heredibus suis de corpore suo legitimè procreatis”, with as successive substitutes (if William died without heirs) “Johanni Deyncourt fratri ejusdem Willielmi et heredibus ipsius Johannis de corpore suo legitimè procreatis…” and (if the latter died without heirs) “rectis heredibus [unnamed] predicti Edmundi [=Edmund Lord Deincourt]”[281].  The Calendar of Patent Rolls includes a summary of a licence dated “Feb 33 (sic)” 1314, immediately following its record of the First licence, which appears to summarise the terms of this Second licence[282].  The conclusions from this Second licence are as follows.  Firstly, in contrast to the First licence, “Willelmo filio Johannis Deyncurt” is named as first heir, presumably replacing “Isabelle” as Lord Edmund’s heir.  Secondly, although no family relationship between them is specified, “Willelmo filio Johannis Deyncurt” was not one of Lord Edmund’s “rectis heredibus”, and was not a close enough relative to be classified as such, otherwise the drafting would have a circular result.  Thirdly, Lord Edmund excluded any of his possible female line descendants (see the third conclusion under the First licence, above) from his sucession in favour of “Willelmo filio Johannis Deyncurt”, which suggests that no such female line descendants existed.  Fourthly, it is likely that “Willelmo filio Johannis Deyncurt” already bore Lord Edmund’s name and arms, as the possibility of his adopting the name/arms was no longer included in this Second licence.  Fifthly, nothing in ths Second licence changes the second conclusion from the First licence (see above) that Lord Edmund had no other surviving male line descendants at the time besides Isabel.  Sixthly, it seems likely that William’s father was named to distinguish William from any other persons named William Deincourt who were alive at the time, while presumably his father was deceased (otherwise he would have been named as heir?), although maybe recently deceased as his memory was still alive. 

Third, King Edward II, by licence dated 15 May 1317, repeated that (1) “Edmundus Deyncourt [=Edmund Lord Deincourt]” had notified (“advertebat et conjecturabat”) that (nearly copying the wording of the Second licence, but not exactly) “cognomen suum et ejus Arma post mortem suam in personam Isabelle filie Edmundi Deyncourt heredis ejus apparentis a memoria delerentur”; (2) that, at his request, Lord Edmund had been permitted (presumably referring to the First licence) to enfeoff whomsoever he chose (“quemcumque vellet”) with his lands etc. held in chief; (3) that (presumably referring to the Second licence) “post decessum ejusdem Edmundi” his lands etc. will pass (“remanerent”) to “Willielmo filio Johannis Deyncourt, et heredibus suis de corpore suo legitimè procreatis” with successive substitutes [wording same as Second licence] “Johanni Deyncourt fratri ejusdem Willielmi…et…rectis heredibus predicti Edmundi [=Edmund Lord Deincourt]”; (4) Lord Edmund was now licensed to grant “manerio et Soka de Blaunkeneye…maneriis de Brannston et Mere…in Ballio Lincolnie, et advocacione capelle beate Marie de Blaunkeneye in Com. Lincoln. de manerio de Graneby cum…Prioratus de Thungartan et Hospitalis Sancti Leonardi de Stoke in Com. Notingh. et de maneriis de Homesfeld et Elmeton”, except specified land “in eodem manerio de Elmeton in Com. Derb.”, to “Magistrum Oliverum Deyncourt et Johannem Deyncourt de Parkhalle [Oliver Deincourt Rector of Emley and his brother John [X] Deincourt, see Part C]…et heredibus suis”; (5) Oliver and John Deincourt of Park Hall [i.e. those named in (4)] were now licensed to sub-grant certain of these specified properties to “prefato Emundo [=Edmund Lord Deincourt]” for his life, and after Lord Edmund’s death to “prefato Willielmo [=William Deincourt, son of John, named in (3)] et heredibus suis de corpore suo legitime procreatis” with successive remainders… [using the same wording as in the Second licence][283].  The Calendar of Patent Rolls summarises this Third licence in English, but inaccurately, for example by omitting (3), and misnaming Isabel as the daughter of Edmund Lord Deincourt (although that was corrected elsewhere to ”Isabella daughter of Edmund Deyncourt[284], indicating the second Edmund named in the First licence)[285].  The Complete Peerage also quotes incomplete parts of this Third licence in Latin[286].  The conclusions from this Third licence are as follows.  Firstly, as it repeats in (1), (2) and (3) the terms of the Second licence, so the conclusions noted above under that Second licence remain valid.  Secondly, it contains no indication what prompted the addition in (4) and (5) of provisions benefiting Oliver and John Deincourt of Park Hall, presumably Lord Edmund’s relatives but not considered close enough to replace “Willielmo filio Johannis Deyncourt” and his successive substitutes as Edmund’s main heirs, and therefore not sufficiently close relatives to be included among his “rectis heredibus”.  Thirdly, John was maybe named “of Park Hall” to distinguish him from other persons named John Deincourt who may have been living at the time. 

Fourth, King Edward II, by licence dated 18 Jun 1317, permitted “Edmund Deyncourt [=Edmund Lord Deincourt] to enfeoff William son of William de Elmeleye” [William FitzWilliam] with land “in Elmeton, co. Derby, held in chief”, and for the same William “to re-grant the same to the said Edmund for life, with successive remainders to Hamo de Masey and Joan, his wife, for her life, and upon her death to Isabella, daughter of Edmund [=the second Edmund Deincourt] son of John Deyncourt, and the heirs male of her body, and, failing such issue, to the said Edmund [presumably indicating Edmund Lord Deincourt, as the Second licence shows that the second Edmund was deceased] and his heirs[287].  As the Latin original of this Fourth licence has not been found, the accuracy of the English summary in the Calendar of Patent Rolls has not been verified.  Bearing this in mind, some preliminary conclusions can be drawn from this Fourth licence.  Firstly, it does not change the terms of the Second and Third licences, so the conclusions noted above under those Second and Third licences remain valid.  Secondly, in application of the Third licence anticipating a future exception for property in Elmeton, this Fourth licence granted the property to William FitzWilliam, but with no explanation why he was chosen (the connection between his wife and the Deincourt family is discussed under FitzWilliam in UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY D-K).  Thirdly, the father of the second Edmund Deincourt is named for the first time - “John Deyncourt”, leaving open whether he was the same person as the father of William Deincourt who was named in the Second and Third licences, and not specifying his family relationship to Lord Edmund (see below under John [IX] for discussion about his parentage). 

Lord Edmund left a will, as indicated by a document dated 27 Apr 1327 which records “William Deyncourt" [William Lord Deincourt, see below] owing money to “…Margaret, late the wife of Robert de Wilughby, and Thomas de Wilughby, executors of the will of Edmund Deyncourt [Edmund Lord Deincourt]”[288].  This will has not been found. 

Inquisitions dated 12/13 Jan 1327, after a writ dated 8 Jan "20 Edw II" [8 Jan 1327] following the death of "Edmund Deyncourt alias Dayncourt", record his manors in Nottingham (“Graneby…held for life of the king in chief…with remainder to William Dayncourt and the heirs of his body, by fine levied…between the said Edmund and Master Oliver Dayncourt and John Dayncourt of Parkhall [presumably referring to the third licence cited above, dated 15 May 1317]”, with “William Dayncourt [abovesaid] his kinsman [indicating the future William Lord Deincourt: as the original Latin document has not been seen, it is unclear what Latin term was represented by the translation “kinsman”], aged 26 and more, is his next heir”), Derby (“Holmesfeld and Elmeton…held for life of the king in chief…which manors by the fine levied as abovesaid ought to remain to the abovesaid William…, excepting a message…in Elmeton, which ought to remain to Hamond de Masey and Joan his wife for the life of the said Joan” [see the Fourth licence cited above]), and Lincoln (“Blaunkeneye and Braunceston…held for life of the king in chief…which ought to remain to the abovesaid William…”)[289].  These inquisitions appear to be in line with the earlier four licences cited above. 

m [firstly] ([1268/69?]) ISABEL de Mohun, daughter of REYNOLD [II] de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his second wife Isabel de Ferrers ([1245/53?]-[late 1260s/early 1270s?]).  The Complete Peerage records her parentage and marriage, citing “St. George’s extracts from the Mohun Chronicle”[290]Maxwell-Lyte’s History of Dunster also records Isabel’s parentage, adding that she “is said to have married Edmund Deyncourt” (also citing “St. George’s extracts from the Mohun Chronicle”), a comment which suggests some doubt raised in the extract in question[291]: unfortunately, Maxwell-Lyte does not quote the precise extract relating to Isabel.  Isabel’s birth date range is suggested based on her parents’ likely marriage date, but bearing in mind her husband’s possible birth date.  Her marriage date is suggested from the likely chronology of the Deincourt family shown here.  No indication has been found of Isabel’s date of death.  The “Complete Peerage (Proposed corrections)” suggests that Edmund had a second wife, assuming that in Apr 1327 “at least two of Edmund’s children were alive or had suriviving issue (his son John and his daughter Margaret [Willoughby]”[292].  However, this assumption does not appear correct if the revised Deincourt family reconstruction is correctly shown here.  Nevertheless, some doubt about this Mohun/Deincourt marriage persists as no obviously Mohun/Ferrers properties have been noted in the later documents in which Edmund Lord Deincourt is named, suggesting that the marriage (if it took place) was short-lived and also that Isabel may have died childless (no reference has been found to Edmund retaining properties for life “by Courtesy of England”). 

[m secondly --- (-[early 1270s?]).  No proof of this possible second marriage has been found.  However, the doubts discussed above concerning Edmund’s marriage to Isabel de Mohun suggest the possibility of a second wife who may have been the mother of his child(ren).] 

[m thirdly MILLICENT, daughter of --- (-after Jan 1327).  Dugdale’s Baronage says that the 1327 Inquisitions which followed Lord Edmund’s death recorded “the mannor of Graneby, which Milisent his Widow then held in dower[293].  The copy of these Inquisitions consulted (English translation/summary, see above) do not mention “Milisent”.  No other reference to her has been found, although the Latin original of the inquisitions should be consulted (if available).  The accuracy of Dugdale’s statement cannot be judged.  If Edmund did marry again, the licences cited above show that his last marriage would have been childless.] 

Edmund & his [first/second] wife had one child (the four licences cited above suggest that, at that time, Edmund had no other surviving children/descendants besides his great-granddaughter Isabel, the granddaughter of the child shown below.):

[The question of Lord Edmund’s child/children has been confused by Dugdale’s Baronage which, misinterpreting the licences cited above, names “one only Son, called Edmund, and he one only Daughter, Isabel” as the child of Lord Edmund (instead of naming this second Edmund as Lord Edmund’s grandson); in later passages, Dugdale contradicts this first statement by naming “William his Grandson (viz. Son to William his Son and Heir, who died in his lifetime)” as Lord Edmund’s successor, and adding that Lord Edmund “also had a Daughter called Margaret, married to Robert de Tibetot [=Willoughby? see below]” (citing for Margaret “Esc. de ad quod Damp. 17 E. 3. 41. Linc. Pat. 17 E. 3 p m 3”, which has not been deciphered[294].] 

a)         --- Deincourt ([1270/75?]-before [1297/98]).  The doubts about the identity of this person’s mother are discussed above under Edmund’s possible marriages.  The sources cited below confirm that this person was the grandparent of Isabel, great-granddaughter of Edmund Lord Deincourt, who was named in his four licences cited above.  The Complete Peerage, assuming that this person was Edmund’s son, names “John Deincourt…s. and h. ap. of…Lord [Edmund][295].  However, an early 1327 claim made by Isabel’s mother Joan (with her second husband Hamon de Masey) for her dower (quoted by the Complete Peerage) names Joan as “quondam uxor Edmundi filii Johannis Deyncourt consanguinei Edmundi Deyncourt [=Edmund Lord Deincourt] avi predicti Edmundi defuncti [=the second Edmund Deincourt named in the licences cited above]”[296].  In this extract, it is difficult to understand why Lord Edmund’s supposed son John would have been named his “consanguineus” instead of “filius” if John had indeed been his son.  A simple explanation is that this grandparent of Isabel was in fact Lord Edmund’s daughter, not his son, that her husband John was a member of one of the junior branches of the Deincourt family, and through that relationship was “consanguineus” of Lord Edmund.  No source has been found which names this daughter.  Her birth date is suggested from the likely birth date of her son Edmund, and bearing in mind the suggested birth date of her father.  Her date of death is estimated from her husband’s supposed second marriage, and from the supposition that he was the father of Lord Edmund’s successor (William Lord Deincourt) by his second wife (follow his hyperlink for the detailed discussion).  m ([1289/90?]) as his first wife, JOHN [IX] Deincourt, son of --- ([1265/68?]-[31 Jul 1312/14 Feb 1314?]). 

2.         [--- Deincourt .  As indicated below, it is not known whether this suggested person would have been the son or daughter of John [IV] Deincourt.  If a daughter, no indication has been found of her husband’s identity.  m ---.  One child]: 

a)         [MARGARET [Deincourt] ([1280/88?]-before 18 Oct 1333).  The Complete Peerage names “Margaret, da. of Edmund (Deincourt), 1st Lord Deincourt, by Isabel, da. of Sir Reynold de Mohun…” as the wife of Robert de Willoughby, and their marriage “in or before 1303[297].  However, as noted above, it is likely that Edmund Lord Deincourt had only one child who survived until adulthood.  Nevertheless, Margaret, as one of his executors (see below), was clearly one of Lord Edmund’s closest relatives.  The Second licence, cited above under Lord Edmund, named “heredibus predicti Edmundi” as his second substitute heirs, indicating that Edmund had indirect surviving heirs but probably no direct descendants besides his great-granddaughter Isabel (see above for fuller discussion of this point).  Maybe Margaret was among those unnamed indirect heirs.  If so, her being Edmund’s niece would be the closest family relationship after his descendants.  If that is correct, as none of the sources cited below name her “Deincourt”, her mother could have been Edmund’s sister.  Another possibility is that Margaret was born from the supposed second marriage of Lord Edmund, but this possibility seems inconsistent with his great-granddaughter Isabel being his sole heir, the fact which appears to have triggered the series of four licences which are cited above.  Margaret’s birth date is estimated on the assumption that she married in 1303, or only a short time before, which appears consistent with the birth date of her older son (“6 Jan 1303/4”, recorded in the Complete Peerage[298]): this estimated [1280/88?] birth date is late for Isabel de Mohun (Lord Edmund’s [first] wife, see above) to have been Margaret’s mother.  A document dated 10 Jul 1310 records that Anthony Bishop of Durham granted “the manor of Lyllesford, co. Northampton, and the advowson of its church” to “Robert de Wylgheby, his kinsman, and Margaret his wife[299].  “Margaret, late the wife of Robert de Wylughby” appointed proxies to receive her dower in chancery, dated [1 Jun] 1317, and an order dated 28 Oct 1317 named “Margaret, late the wife of Robert de Wylughby, Master Philip de Wylughby, Roger de Malberthorp, and Thomas de Wylughby, executors of the will of the said Robert[300].  A document dated 27 Apr 1327 records “William Deyncourt" [William Lord Deincourt, see below] owing money to “…Margaret, late the wife of Robert de Wilughby, and Thomas de Wilughby, executors of the will of Edmund Deyncourt [Edmund Lord Deincourt]”[301].  The Complete Peerage shows her date of death[302]m (1303 or before) [as his second wife?] ROBERT de Willoughby, son of WILLIAM de Willoughby & his wife Alice Beke ([1260/70]-before 25 Mar 1317).  The Complete Peerage estimates his date of birth “[1250/60]” based on inquisitions after a writ dated 3 Mar "4 Edw II" [3 Mar 1311], following the death of "Anthony Bishop of Durham", which name “Robert de Wyluby […each aged 40…Robert 50 and more] and John de Harecourt […each aged 40…John aged 34 and more] are his kinsman and next heirs, and of full age[303].  The different ages specified (which seem irreconcilable) suggest the possibility of an earlier marriage of William.  “Dominis Eadmundo de Daymcourt, Roberto de Wilugby…militibus…” witnessed the charter dated 8 Jul 1310 under which “Philippus de Kyma” relinquished “iure patronatus prebende de Carletonkyme” in favour of the church of Lincoln[304].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1313, whereby he is held to have become Lord Willoughby[305].] 

 

 

No primary source has been found which confirms the parentage of John [IX] Deincourt.  One possibility is that he was the same person as John [VII] de Aincourt, possible son of William [III] de Aincourt [of Morton] & his wife Mary ---, who was named 14 Apr 1292 and 12 Mar 1297.  This co-identity, if correct, could explain how John [IX]’s son, William Lord Deincourt, acquired a half share in Morton (as recorded 1 Nov 1346[306], see below).  Another possibility (which seems more likely) is that John [IX] was an otherwise unrecorded son of one of the sons of Oliver [III] de Aincourt by his second wife Matilda Pecche (either Nicholas [II] or John [V] Deincourt, see Part A.), in which case he would have been the most senior living male line descendant of the Deincourt family after Lord Edmund himself, who could therefore have considered John a suitable husband for his daughter.  In this second possibility, John [IX] would have been the first cousin of his first wife’s father Edmund Lord Deincourt, a relationship which would have required a Papal dispensation for the marriage (no dispensation has been found, although maybe it is now lost).  In addition, when in [1314] Lord Edmund named John’s son William as his successor, William would then also have been the most senior male-line member of the family after Lord Edmund. 

Follow the John [V] Deincourt hyperlink for discussion of how a daughter of either Nicholas [II] or John [V] could also have been the mother of Oliver Deincourt (rector of Emley) and his brother John [X] Deincourt of Park Hall (see Part C), who were named in Edmund Lord Deincourt’s Third licence which is cited above.  In addition, if, as suggested below, Isabel wife of William FitzWilliam was the sister of John [IX], she would have been the maternal aunt of Rector Oliver, which would explain why her husband sponsored his appointment as rector of Emley.  This suggested family relationship could also explain why Lord Edmund named William FitzWilliam in his Fourth licence (18 Jun 1317). 

 

Two possible siblings: 

1.         JOHN [IX] Deincourt ([1265/68?]-[31 Jul 1312/14 Feb 1314?]).  The different possibilities for his parentage are discussed above; follow his hyperlink here for the most likely possibility.  John [IX] Deincourt was named in Edmund Lord Deincourt’s Fourth licence, cited above, as the father of Edmund Deincourt who is named below.  John [IX] was also named in the early 1327 claim for her dower made by his daughter-in-law Joan, wife of John’s son Edmund, with her second husband Hamon de Masey, in which she was named “quondam uxor Edmundi filii Johannis Deyncourt consanguinei Edmundi Deyncourt avi predicti Edmundi defuncti[307].  Isabel therefore was the grandaughter of John, who was named “consanguineus” (not “filius”) of Lord Edmund in this extract.  Reading these documents together suggests that John was the son-in-law of Lord Edmund, married to Edmund’s daughter.  Lord Edmund’s Second and Third licences, cited above, name “Willielmo filio Johannis Deyncurt” as his heir.  Although those two licences do not explain the family relationship between “Willielmo…” and Lord Edmund, it is suggested that John [IX] was also the father of William, who was born from a second marriage because Lord Edmund’s First and Second licences suggest that he had no other direct descendants besides Isabel, daughter of John [IX]’s son Edmund.  The primary source which confirms that this suggestion is correct has not been identified, but no other likely explanation has been found in light of the sources which are cited in the present section, as well as the conclusions about Lord Edmund’s four licences which are discussed above in Lord Edmund’s section.  John [IX]’s date of birth is suggested consistent with the suggested date of his first marriage.  [The Pipe Roll “29 Edw I” [20 Nov 1300/19 Nov 1301] at Derby records “…John Aincourt, Robert de Stuteville[308]: it is uncertain to which John Deincourt this entry refers.]  A “list of tenants holding £40 (an entire knight’s fee) in land who ought to be knighted, but are not”, dated 31 Jul 1312 (“6 Edw II”), records in Nottingham/Derby “John Deincourt – pledges, Galf le Morton and Reginald fil Isabella. Nevertheless, the said John is detained in such sickness (infirmitate) that his life is despaired of[309].  John’s omission from the Second licence cited above suggests that he was deceased at the time, otherwise he would presumably have been named as Edmund Lord Deincourt’s heir in place of his son William.  m firstly ([1289/90?]) --- Deincourt, daughter of EDMUND Lord Deincourt & his [first wife Isabel de Mohun/second wife ---] ([1270/75?]-before [1297/98]).  Follow her hyperlink for discussion about her parentage and marriage.  m secondly ([1298/99]) ---.  The name of John’s supposed second wife is not known.  This second marriage is indicated by Lord Edmund’s Second licence as explained above.  John [IX] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         EDMUND Deincourt ([1290/92?]-[before 23 Feb 1314, before 20 Apr 1317]).  It is unlikely that Edmund was born much later than [1290/92], bearing in mind the likely birth date of his daughter Isabel.  He presumably died (or maybe was in some way incapacitated) before Lord Edmund’s First licence (23 Feb 1314) cited above which names his daughter (and not her father) as his grandfather’s “heir apparent” (see above).  Edmund was certainly deceased 20 Apr 1317 when an order granted custody “of the lands and tenements late of Edmund de Eyncurt, tenant in chief”, which were “in the king’s hands by reason of the heirs being minors”, to “Hugh le Despencer the younger[310]m ([1312/13?]) as her first husband, JOAN, daughter of --- ([8 Mar 1327/26 Jan 1328]).  The Complete Peerage says that Joan, wife of Edmund, “is said to have been sister of the Earl of Huntingdon, and therefore da. of Sir John de Clinton, of Maxstock, co. Warwick” (no source cited)[311].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been found.  She married secondly ([20 May/18 Jun] 1317) Hamon de MaseyThe Complete Peerage says that Joan married “Hamon de Masey, of Dunham Massey, co. Chester, in the interval[312], meaning the interval between the Third and Fourth licences of Edmund Lord Deincourt, dated 20 May 1317 and 18 Jun 1317 respectively, the latter licensing him “to enfeoff William son of William de Elmeleye [William FitzWilliam]” with land “in Elmeton, co. Derby, held in chief”, and for him “to re-grant the same to the said Edmund for life, with successive remainders to Hamo de Masey and Joan, his wife, for her life, and upon her death to Isabella, daughter of Edmund son of John Deyncourt, and the heirs male of her body, and, failing such issue, to the said Edmund and his heirs[313].  The Complete Peerage records that, in early 1327, Hamon de Masey and Joan his wife “quondam uxor Edmundi filii Johannis Deyncourt consanguinei Edmundi Deyncourt avi predicti Edmundi defuncti” claimed Joan’s dower “de terris et tenementis que fuerunt predicti Edmundi avi predicti Edmundi filii Johannis eidem Johanne per ipsum Edmundum avum ad ostium ecclesie ut dicitur assignatam” (no source citation)[314].  A document dated 8 Mar 1327 ordered the restoration of land “in Elmeton” to “Hamund de Masey and Joan his wife”, after inspection of a fine levied “before…the late king’s justices of the Bench between William son of William [William FitzWilliam] de Emeleye, demandant, and Edmund Deyncourt [Edmund Lord Deincourt], deforciant”, confirming that “William granted to Edmund Deyncourt the premises for life, with remainder to the said Hamund and Joan for the term of Joan’s life, with remainder to Isabella, daughter of John [presumably a mistake for Edmund] Deyncourt, and the heirs male of her body, with remainder to the right heirs of Edmund [Edmund Lord Deincourt]”, and that “William Deyncourt [William later Lord Deincourt], kinsman and heir of Edmund” confirmed that the fine was “levied in form aforesaid[315].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 26 Jan "2 Edw II" [26 Jan 1328], following the death of "Joan, late the wife of Hamo de Masey", record land in Derby “Elmeton…held for life of the king in chief…of the inheritance of William de Eynecourt [William Lord Deincourt]” (no heir stated)[316].  Joan is recorded as deceased in two documents dated 20 Feb 1328 which ordered “not to intermeddle further with…land…in Elmeton, and to deliver the issues thereof since the death of Joan, late the wife of Hamo de Masey, to William de Eynecourt [William Lord Deincourt][317]Edmund & his wife had one child: 

i)          ISABEL Deincourt ([1313/23 Feb 1314]-[18 Jun 1317/12 Jan 1327]).  The First and Second licences cited above declared that Edmund Lord Deincourt, Isabel’s great-grandfather, had stated that after his death his name and arms (“cognomen suum et ejus Arma post mortem suam”) would be lost to memory (“a memoria delebuntur”) in the person of “Isabelle filie Edmundi Deyncurt heredis ejus modo apparentis[318].  Isabel is also named in the Fourth licence (18 Jun 1317) cited above under her mother, so was then still alive.  Isabel presumably died before the inquisitions which followed the death of her great-grandfather Edmund Lord Deincourt, in which she was not named. 

John [IX] & his second wife had two children (the primary source which confirms that their father was the same John as John [IX] has not been identified, but this looks likely as explained above): 

b)         WILLIAM Deincourt ([1300]-2 Jun 1364).  He is named in the Second and Third licences cited above.  The Jan 1327 inquisitions following the death of Edmund Lord Deincourt record the deceased holding property “…with remainder to William Dayncourt…by fine levied…between the said Edmund and Master Oliver Dayncourt and John Dayncourt of Parkhall [of the “Park Hall” Deincourt family]” (which must refer to the 15 May 1317 order) and “William Dayncourt [abovesaid] his kinsman, aged 26 and more, is his next heir[319].  He succeeded Edmund Lord Deincourt as Lord Deincourt

-        see below

c)         JOHN Deincourt (-after 15 May 1317).  He is named as brother of William in the 15 May 1317 licence cited above.  No later reference to John has been found. 

2.         [ISABEL [Deincourt] ([1270/80?]-after Jul 1348, bur Sprotborough, St Thomas chapel).  As explained above, this represents the most likely family origin of the wife of William FitzWilliam, especially if she and her supposed brother John [IX] were children of one of the brothers Nicholas [II] or John [V] Deincourt, sons of Oliver [III] de Aincourt by his second wife Matilda Pecche as suggested above.  Nevertheless, Baildon suggested that William FitzWilliam married twice[320]: follow his hyperlink for the full discussion, as well as details of the documents which suggest a connection between his wife/wives and the Deincourt family.  If the Deincourt/FitzWilliam family connection is correct (which seems likely), but if Baildon is incorrect about the two marriages (which is possible) and William FitzWilliam married only once, the chronology suggests that his wife Isabel was the sister of John [IX] Deincourt, born [1270/80?]).  That suggestion would be consistent with Isabel bequeathing property under her end-Jul 1348 testament (follow her husband’s hyperlink for full quotes from that document) to “…domino Willielmo Deyncourt…Domino Johanni Deyncourt filiolo meo…”, who would have been her brother’s son William Lord Deincourt and the latter’s possible son John (see below).  m ([1290/1300?]) WILLIAM FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM FitzThomas & his wife Agnes Metham (-[11 Apr 1340/1342]).] 

 

 

WILLIAM Deincourt, son of JOHN [IX] Deincourt & his second wife --- ([1300]-2 Jun 1364).  He is named in the Second and Third licences of Edmund Lord Deincourt cited above: it is supposed that his father was John [IX] as explained above, although no primary source has been found which confirms that this is correct.  The Jan 1327 inquisitions following the death of Edmund Lord Deincourt record the deceased holding property “…with remainder to William Dayncourt…by fine levied…between the said Edmund and Master Oliver Dayncourt and John Dayncourt of Parkhall [of the “Park Hall” Deincourt family]” (which must refer to the 15 May 1317 order) and “William Dayncourt [abovesaid] his kinsman, aged 26 and more, is his next heir[321].  The Latin original has not been seen, so it is not known what Latin term was translated as “kinsman”.  He succeeded Edmund Lord Deincourt as Lord Deincourt.  Two documents dated 7 Feb 1327 ordered the restitution of “the manor of Blaunkeneye and Braunceston, co. Lincoln…the manor of Graneby, co. Nottingham…the manors of Holmesfield and Elmeton, co. Derby…” to “William Deyncourt”, reciting his rights to the land as recorded in the earlier licences cited above under Edmund Lord Deincourt[322].  A document dated 8 Mar 1327 ordered the restoration of land “in Elmeton” to “Hamund de Masey and Joan his wife”, after inspection of a fine [for details see above], and that “William Deyncourt, kinsman and heir of Edmund” confirmed that the fine was “levied in form aforesaid[323].  A document dated 27 Apr 1327 records “William Deyncourt" owing money to “…Margaret, late the wife of Robert de Wilughby, and Thomas de Wilughby, executors of the will of Edmund Deyncourt[324].  The Book of Aids 1 Nov “20 Edw III” [1 Nov 1346] records in “Hundred de Scarsdale” - “Wm. Deincourt [William Lord Deincourt], ½ Morton (John Deincourt [in 30 Edward I] =John [IX]?]”, and in another place “Hundred de Scarsdale” - “William Deincourt, I Elmton and Holmfield (Edmund Deincourt [in 30 Edward I] =Edmund Lord Deincourt)[325].  Lord John was captured by the French, maybe at Crécy: a muster roll “21 Edw III” [25 Jan 1346/24 Jan 1347] records “Wm. Deincourt is lord of 2 vlls.  He is not assessed, because he is in the custody of the King of France”, endorsed on the roll[326]The testament of “Isabella, quæ fui uxor Domini Willielmi filii Willielmi [William FitzWilliam] de Emelay militis”, dated end-Jul 1348, made bequests to “…domino Willielmo Deyncourt…Domino Johanni Deyncourt filiolo meo…[327]The Complete Peerage cites other sources dated 1332, 1336, 10 Dec 1340, 17 Oct 1346, 14 May 1347, 29 Jul 1359, and 24 May 1360 in which William was named, and records his death 2 Jun 1364[328].  Inquisitions after a writ dated 7 Jun "38 Edward III" [7 Jun 1364], following the death of "William Deyncourt, or de Dencourt, the elder", record in Northampton “Dodyngton. The town, held in joint feoffment with Millicent his wife, who survives”, that “He died on 2 June last”, name “William son of his son William […knight], aged 8 years and more at Christmas last […aged 7 years], is his heir”, and property in Buckingham, Lincoln, Nottingham, Derby (including “Morton. One knight’s fee, held by the heirs of Roger Deynecourt”, same holders of Knapthorp, Nottingham)[329]

m (before 26 Mar 1326) MILLICENT La Zouche, daughter of WILLIAM La Zouche Lord Zouche (of Harringworth, Northamptonshire) & his wife Maud Lovel of Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire (-22 Jun 1379).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a licence dated 26 Mar 1326 permitting “William la Zousche of Harringworth” to convey Totnes castle, Cornworthy manor, Devon and other stated manors to himself for life, remainders to “William s. of William la Zousche, to John br. of William s. of William, to Roger br. of John, to Thomas, br. of Roger, to John br. of Thomas, to Edmund br. of John, to William Dayncourt and Milicent his wife da. of the said William la Zousche, to Isabel sister of Milicent, and to Thomasine sister of Isabel, in successive tail general…[330].  She is named as living in the inquisitions cited above following her husband’s death. 

William & his wife had [two] children (other children recorded in secondary sources have not been copied here):

1.         WILLIAM Deincourt (-before 2 Jun 1364).  His parentage is confirmed by the inquisitions post mortem after the death of his father, which also confirm that William his son was deceased at the time (see above).  m (contract 9 Oct 1343) MARGARET de Welle, daughter of ADAM de Welle of Well, Lincolnshire, Lord Welle & his wife Margaret ---.  The Complete Peerage records an indenture of agreement dated 9 Oct 1343 between “Monsire Adam de Welle et Monsire Williem de Dyncourt qe Williel leisne fitz le dit Monsire Williem esposera Margarete la fille le dit monsire Adam[331].  The Complete Peerage records that, in his will dated 24 Feb 1344 (O.S.), Adam de Welle bequeathed payment ot “Margarete Deyncurt filie mee[332]William & his wife had one child (other children recorded in secondary sources have not been copied here)

a)         WILLIAM Deincourt ([1356/57]-15/16 Oct 1381).  The inquisitions following his grandfather’s death name William son of his son William […knight], aged 8 years and more at Christmas last […aged 7 years], is his heir.  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Deincourt.  The Complete Peerage records his date of death, and the subsequent Inquisitions[333]m ALICE Neville, of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Matilda Percy (-20 Jun 1433).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Alesiam uxorem domini de Bayncote, Matillidem nuptam Willelmo de Scrope, Radulphus, Ydoniam, Alienoram uxorem Radulphi de Lumley, Thomam dominum de Furnival" as the children of "Johannem dominum de Neuille" and his wife "Matillidem filiam Henrici domini de Percy"[334].  Scutage taken 2 Jan “13 Hen IV” [2 Jan 1411] records in “Scarvedale Hundred” - “Deincourt, Dna Alisia, 20 l.[335].  An inquest of knights’ fees taken at Chesterfield “Saturday before the Feast of the Nativity” “10 Hen VI” [late Dec 1431] records “Alesia, Lady of Deincourt, of Caythorpe, County Lincoln, widow, Holmsfield for ¼ fee. £6 rent in Dronfield from Lord Cromwell[336].  The Complete Peerage records her date of death, and the subsequent Inquisitions[337]William & his wife had two children: 

i)          RALPH Deincourt (24 Jun 1380-7 Nov 1384).  The Complete Peerage records his dates of birth and death (citing the corresponding primary sources)[338]

ii)         JOHN Deincourt (Middleham, Yorkshire 28 Feb 1382-11 May 1406)The Complete Peerage records his dates of birth and death (citing the corresponding primary sources)[339]Lord Deincourtm (before 17 Feb 1401) JOAN Grey, daughter and heiress of ROBERT Grey Lord Grey (of Rotherfield, Oxfordshire) & his first wife Joan --- (Rotherfield [20] Jul 1386-20 Nov 1408).  The Complete Peerage records her dates of birth and death (citing the corresponding primary sources)[340].  John & his wife had three children (all details copied from the Complete Peerage records his dates of birth and death, which the corresponding primary sources)[341].  : 

(a)       WILLIAM Deincourt ([1402/03]-5 Sep 1422)Lord Deincourtm (licence 3 Jan 1418) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Beaumont, daughter of HENRY de Beaumont Lord Beaumont & his wife Elizabeth Willoughby of Eresby (-[20 or 27] Jul 1447).  She married secondly (Papal mandate for dispensation 15 Jul 1427) as his second wife, Richard Hastinges of Newton Harcourt, Leicestershire.  She married thirdly as his second wife, Thomas Neville of Brancepeth, co. Durham. 

(b)       ALICE Deincourt (25 Feb 1404-10 Feb 1474).  m firstly (before 3 Nov 1423) WILLIAM Lovell Lord Lovell (of Titchmarsh), son of JOHN Lovel Lord Lovel & his wife [Eleanor Zouche of Haringworth] (-13 Jun 1455).  m secondly (Royal licence 8 Jan 1463) as his second wife, RALPH Boteler Lord Sudeley, son of --- (-2 May 1473). 

(c)       MARGARET Deincourt (21 Sep 1405-16 Sep 1454, bur Tattershall).  m (before 3 Nov 1423) RALPH Cromwell Lord Cromwell, son of ---. 

2.         [JOHN Deincourt .  The testament of “Isabella, quæ fui uxor Domini Willielmi filii Willielmi de Emelay militis”, dated end-Jul 1348, made bequests to “…domino Willielmo Deyncourt…Domino Johanni Deyncourt filiolo meo…[342].  Maybe John was the son of William, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not been found.] 

 

 

 

ENGAINE

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         RICHARD [I] Engaine (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Richard Engaine” holding land in Lillingstone Lovell in Oxfordshire [Buckinghamshire][343].  Domesday Book records “jurors in Huntingdon” who "say that 36 hides of land in Brampton which Richard Engaine claims belong to the forest were [part] of the king’s demesne farm"[344].  [m firstly/secondly ---.  The source quoted below refers to Richard [I]’s known wife as "ultimæ uxori suæ , suggesting that he had a previous wife or wives.]  "m [secondly/thirdly?] as her first husband, ---.  She married secondly Richard FitzUrse.  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "F[ulconis] de Lisuris" in Northamptonshire, referring to land which "Ricardus Engaine avus meus" gave to "ultimæ uxori suæ in dotem, scilicet uxori Ricardi filii Ursi"[345].  Richard [I] & his [first/second/third] wife had three children: 

a)         VITALIS [Viel] [I] Engaine (-after 1130).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Vitalis Engaine...Rogerus de Bennifeld" returning for “terre Willi de Lusor”, and “idem Vitalis” for “de censu Forest...terram suam de Laxetona”, in Northamptonshire[346]The Liber niger monasterii S. Petri de Burgo records "Viel Enganie en Torp iii virgæ et en Haragrava dimidia hida et en Pihtesle...i milite" among the “Descriptio militum de abbatia de Burgo”, marginal notes reading “iste fuit avus Ricardi Engaine qui modo est...Pater Fulconis de Lisures[347]m --- de Lisours, daughter of WILLIAM de Lisours & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Vitalis Engaine...Rogerus de Bennifeld" returning for “terre Willi de Lusor” in Northamptonshire[348].  The entry, as well as the name used by Vitalis’s son Fulk, suggest that Vitalis married the daughter of William de Lisours.  Vitalis [I] & his wife had two children: 

i)          RICHARD [II] Engaine (-before 1177).  The Liber niger monasterii S. Petri de Burgo records "Ricardus Engaine ii hidæ in Hamtonascira...i milite..." among the “Descriptio militum de abbatia de Burgo”, marginal notes reading “iste fuit filius Viel et pater Ricardi qui modo est[349]

-        see below

ii)         FULK de Lisours (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "F[ulconis] de Lisuris" in Northamptonshire, referring to land which "Ricardus Engaine avus meus" gave to "ultimæ uxori suæ in dotem, scilicet uxori Ricardi filii Ursi" and refers to land held by "duæ amitæ meæ"[350]The Liber niger monasterii S. Petri de Burgo records "Viel Enganie en Torp iii virgæ et en Haragrava dimidia hida et en Pihtesle...i milite" among the “Descriptio militum de abbatia de Burgo”, marginal notes reading “iste fuit avus Ricardi Engaine qui modo est...Pater Fulconis de Lisures[351]m ALIX d’Auberville, daughter of --- ([1135]-after 29 Sep 1189).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Alicia que fuit uxor Fulconis de Lisoriis et soror Willielmi de Auberville...L annorum et habet ii filios milites et ii alios et vi filias maritatas et iii filias maritandas” and specifies "terra sua in Glaptorn...in Abitone...et in Hundredo de Spelho"[352]Fulk & his wife had thirteen children: 

(1)       thirteen children .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Alicia que fuit uxor Fulconis de Lisoriis et soror Willielmi de Auberville...L annorum et habet ii filios milites et ii alios et vi filias maritatas et iii filias maritandas” and specifies "terra sua in Glaptorn...in Abitone...et in Hundredo de Spelho"[353]

b)         daughter .  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "-ugo de Auco" returning for “terra et filia Ric Ingaine et minist suo de Forest” in Northamptonshire[354].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "F[ulconis] de Lisuris" in Northamptonshire, referring to land which "Ricardus Engaine avus meus" gave to "ultimæ uxori suæ in dotem, scilicet uxori Ricardi filii Ursi" and refers to land held by "duæ amitæ meæ"[355]m HUGUES d’Eu, son of --- (-after 1129). 

c)         daughter .  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "F[ulconis] de Lisuris" in Northamptonshire, referring to land which "Ricardus Engaine avus meus" gave to "ultimæ uxori suæ in dotem, scilicet uxori Ricardi filii Ursi" and refers to land held by "duæ amitæ meæ"[356]

 

 

There is some chronological difficulty with the parentage of Robert de Lisours.  The name “Lisours” suggests a connection with Fulk de Lisours who is named above.  However, given the death of his daughter’s first husband in 1163 (see below), it is difficult to imagine Robert being born later than 1120 at the latest.  If that is correct, he could not have been Fulk’s son by his known wife Alix d’Auberville, given that the latter was declared as 50 years old in 1185 (see above).  This affiliation would only seem to work if Alix’s age was under-declared by at least 30 years, which seems impossible if she had three unmarried daughters still of marriageable age in 1185.  Three possible solutions are suggested:

(1) Robert was Fulk’s son by an earlier marriage, although that would mean that Fulk himself was born much earlier than appears consistent with the chronology of the Engaine family. 

(2) Robert was the son of Vitalis [I] Engaine. 

(3) Robert was a member of the previous Lisours family, maybe a relative of the supposed wife of Vitalis [I]. 

 

1.         ROBERT de Lisours ([before 1120?]-after 1167).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Lisures i m" in Huntingdonshire in [1167/68][357]m AUBREYE de Lacy, daughter of ROBERT de Lacy & his wife Matilda ---.  According to The Complete Peerage, Aubreye de Lisours, successor of Robert de Lacy was his cousin[358], implying that her mother was Robert’s paternal aunt.  This appears to be confirmed by the 1130 Pipe Roll which records "Robt de Lusor" in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and that he married "sorore Ilbti de Laci"[359].  An apparently different version of Aubreye’s parentage is provided by a manuscript history of the Lacy family which records that “Albreda vel Aubreia, filia Roberti Lisours, soror ex parte matris” succeeded on the death of “Robertus Lacy[360].  If this is correct, Aubreye’s father was the [first/second] husband of Robert de Lacy’s mother.  As the husband of Aubrey junior died in 1163, the chronology suggests that, if this version is correct, it is more probable that Aubreye was the daughter of her mother’s first marriage.  It appears from the 1130 Pipe Roll that the Complete Peerage version is to be preferred.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         AUBREYE de Lisours ([before 1145?]-after Sep 1200).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family records that “Albreda vel Aubreia, filia Roberti Lisours, soror ex parte matris” succeeded on the death of “Robertus Lacy” and that she married “Richardus constabularius Cestriæ[361]Her second marriage is confirmed by a note, added at the end of a charter under which “Fulk de Lisoriis and Aubrey his wife” donated lands at Billingley and elsewhere to Blyth priory, Nottinghamshire, which records that “Albreda filia supradicti Roberti de Lisoriis” confirmed the donation with the consent of “Willelmo de Clarofagio, viro suo[362]Her third marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 12 Nov 1177 under which the Templars and “Radulfum filium Stephani” settled a dispute concerning “unam carucatam terre in Roueston” which “Galfridus de Cauz” had given to “Albrede de Lisuriis uxori sue in dotem” and “terram que fuit Roberti fratris Gaufridi de Cauz in Ruueston[363].  "Willelmus filius Godrici" paid a fine for his marriage with "matre Johannis constabularii" in 1178[364].  A charter dated 1194 records a final agreement relating to a dispute between “Albredam de Lisores et Rogerum constabularium Cestrie nepotem suum” concerning the land of “Roberti de Lasci”, also naming “Roberti de Lisores patris ipsius Albrede” and “Willelmus filius prefate Albrede[365]m firstly RICHARD FitzEustache, son of EUSTACHE FitzJohn & his second wife Agnes --- (-1163).  m secondly as his second wife, WILLIAM de Clairfait, son of --- (-1168).  m thirdly GEOFFREY de Cauz, son of ROBERT [I] de Cauz & his wife Isabel de Ferrers (-[before 12 Nov 1177]).  m fourthly ([1178]) WILLIAM FitzGodric, son of GODRIC & his wife ---. 

 

 

The chronology suggests that the following two individuals were brothers of Richard [I] Engaine, but the relationship has not been confirmed. 

 

1.         WILLIAM Engaine (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “William Engaine” holding land in Gidding in Huntingdonshire[366]

 

2.         WALDIN Engaine (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Waldin Engain” holding Willoughton, Hackthorn, Keelby, Itterby, Thorganby, Ravendale, Beelsby, Wragby, Langton by Wragby and Kelstern in Lincolnshire[367]

 

 

1.         RALPH Engaine .  His donation to Wetherhal is noted in the charter quoted under his wife.  m as her first husband, EBRIA [Ebrea] de Trivers, daughter of ROBERT de Trivers [Trevers/Travers] & his wife ---.  J. E. Prescott (editor of the Wetherhal cartulary) shows her parentage, suggesting that her mother was “(?) sister of Ranulph Meschin” citing in an earlier passage the Testa de Nevill (quoted next) saying that the barony of Burgh-upon-Sands (named in the undated charter quoted below) was granted “by Ranulph Meschin ‘Lord of Cumberland’ [Vicomte du Bessin, later Earl of Chester] to Robert de Trivers (said to be his brother-in-law)[368].  Her parentage is indicated by the Testa de Nevill which records "Ricardus de Lucy et Ricardus Gernun" holding land previously held by “Hugonis de Morvill cum duabus filiis predicti Hugonis de domino rege”, noting that “comes Ranulfus quondam dominus Cumberland” had granted the land (as well as “custodiam foreste de Cumberland”) to “Roberto de Trivers antecessori predicti Hugonis de Morvill[369].  Her marriage is indicated by the undated charter under which [her granddaughter’s first husband] “Symon de Morvilla” confirmed donations to Wetherhal, land “in Croglyn” [Little Croglyn, parish of Kirkoswald[370]] donated by “domina Ybri”, and “duas salinas in parochia de Burgo” (one donated by “Radulphus Engahin”, the other by “Willelmus filius eius”)[371].  “Willelmus filius Elyæ de Croglyn”, with the consent of “Ysoudæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, renounced claims over “dimidiam partem villæ de Croglyn...” which had been donated to Wetherhal by “domina Ybri”, by undated charter[372].  She married secondly as his second wife, Orm.  Her second marriage is indicated by the following document: "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge…" to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "Alano filio Wallef, Willelmo Engaine, Gilberto fratre eius, Roberto filio Orm, Micaele fratre eius…Elgiva uxore ipsius Gospatricii, Ebrea matre eius…Thoma filio Gospatricii, Adam, Roberto fratribus eius...Rogero filio Orm"[373].  Michael Anne Guido, noting that “the identity of [the witness] Ebrea is not conclusively proven” by this document, suggests that “there is circumstancial evidence which allows the postulation that [Gospatrick’s mother was] probably Ebrea de Travers...whose first husband was Ranulf Engaine”: she suggests convincingly that the prominent position of “Willelmo Engaine, Gilberto fratre eius” in the witness list (before the donor’s brothers, wife and mother) indicates a close family relationship with the donor[374].  As the mother of the Engaine brothers was also called “Ebria” as noted here, their witness list position would be justified if they were the donor’s uterine half-brothers.  Ralph & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM Engaine .  His parentage is indicated by the undated charter quoted below under his daughter, under which his son-in-law confirmed donations to Wetherhal made by “domina Ybri” and “Radulphus Engahin [et]...Willelmus filius eius”.  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge", and confirmed "ecclesiam de Wirchingetona" and "ecclesiam de Halfringtuna" which "Elemerus clericus, cognatus meus" held during his lifetime, to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Willelmo Engaine, Gilberto fratre eius…"[375]m EUSTACHIE, daughter of ---.  J. E. Prescott records her name, citing “Regest. Lanercost[376].  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          ADA Engaine .  Her parentage and two marriages are shown in The Complete Peerage[377].  Her ancestry is indicated by the undated charter under which [her first husband] “Symon de Morvilla” confirmed land “in Croglyn”, donated by “domina Ybri”, and “duas salinas in parochia de Burgo” (one donated by “Radulphus Engahin”, the other by “Willelmus filius eius”) to Wetherhal[378]m firstly SIMON de Morville, son of ---.  m secondly ROBERT de Vaux, son of HUBERT de Vaux of Irthington, Cumberland & his wife Grace --- (-1194). 

b)         GILBERT Engaine .  "Gospatricius filius Orm" donated "villam de Salterge", and confirmed "ecclesiam de Wirchingetona" and "ecclesiam de Halfringtuna" which "Elemerus clericus, cognatus meus" held during his lifetime, to St Bees by undated charter (dated to before 1158), witnessed by "…Willelmo Engaine, Gilberto fratre eius…"[379]

 

 

RICHARD [II] Engaine, son of VITALIS [I] Engaine & his wife --- de Lisours (-before 1177).  The Liber niger monasterii S. Petri de Burgo records "Ricardus Engaine ii hidæ in Hamtonascira...i milite..." among the “Descriptio militum de abbatia de Burgo”, marginal notes reading “iste fuit filius Viel et pater Ricardi qui modo est[380]

m as her first husband, MARGERY, daughter of RICHARD FitzUrse & his wife Matilda de Boulers ([1134/35]-after 1185).  A plea at Westminster, dating to the ninth year of Henry III King of England [1226], records that "Vitalis Engaing" claimed land "in honore de Mungumery" which "Dominus Rex H, senex" had given "in maritagium Baldewino de Bollers cum Sibilla de Faleise, nepte ipsius H regis", and that "eadem Sibilla" had "unam filiam Matillidem de ipso Baldewino" who "dominus Rex" gave to "Ricardo filio Ursie" who by her had "unum filium et duas filias…Reginaldum filium Ursi et Margeriam primogenitam et Mabiliam"[381].  She married secondly Geoffrey Brito.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta Engaine”, that she was "in donatione Domini Regis intra hos viii annos", that she had married “Galfridus Brito”, her land in "hundredum de Wilebroc" in Northamptonshire, and also in "Cleile hundredum", the entry for the latter recording that she was "L annorum…filia Ricardi filii Ursi" and naming her heir "Ricardus Engaine"[382].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1220, recorded by Bracton, by "Vitalis Engaun et Rogerus Gernet" against "Willelmum de Cantelupo et Maziliam uxorem eius" which recites that "Ricardus filius Ursy antecessor eorum" had "unum filium…Reginaldum et duas filias Margeriam et Mabiliam", that Margery was "avie ipsius Vitalis"[383]

Richard [II] & his wife had one child: 

1.         RICHARD [III] Engaine (-Apr 1208).  The Liber niger monasterii S. Petri de Burgo records "Ricardus Engaine ii hidæ in Hamtonascira...i milite..." among the “Descriptio militum de abbatia de Burgo”, marginal notes reading “iste fuit filius Viel et pater Ricardi qui modo est[384]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta Engaine”, that she was "in donatione Domini Regis intra hos viii annos", that she had married “Galfridus Brito”, her land in "hundredum de Wilebroc" in Northamptonshire, and also in "Cleile hundredum", the entry for the latter recording that she was "L annorum…filia Ricardi filii Ursi" and naming her heir "Ricardus Engaine"[385].  “Ricardus Engayne” confirmed the foundation of "ecclesia sanctæ Mariæ de Castro-Hymel" and listed various donations, including the donation of "Richardi patris mei", for the souls of “meæ et uxoris meæ Sarræ”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Vitale Engaine, --- Engaine…Galfrido Engaine, Roberto Engaine…[386].  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records its foundation by “Ricardus Engaine senior…dominus de Blatherwick”, adding that he died "IX Kal Mai" 1208[387]m SARAH de Chesney, daughter of WILLIAM de Chesney of Horsford and Colne, Essex & his wife --- (-before Apr 1222).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that its founder “Ricardus Engaine senior…dominus de Blatherwick” married "Saram filiam comitis Oxenford"[388].  Lady of Colne.  “Ricardus Engayne” confirmed the foundation of "ecclesia sanctæ Mariæ de Castro-Hymel" and listed various donations, including the donation of "Richardi patris mei", for the souls of “meæ et uxoris meæ Sarræ”, by undated charter witnessed by “…Vitale Engaine, --- Engaine…Galfrido Engaine, Roberto Engaine…[389].  Richard [III] & his wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD [IV] Engaine (-[1208/16], bur Huntingdon).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Ricardum…et Vitalem" as the two sons of “Ricardus Engaine senior…dominus de Blatherwick” and his wife "Saram filiam comitis Oxenford", adding that Richard succeeded his father but died childless during the reign of King John without having married, and was buried "apud Huntington"[390]

b)         VITALIS [II] Engaine (-22 Oct 1248).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Ricardum…et Vitalem" as the two sons of “Ricardus Engaine senior…dominus de Blatherwick” and his wife "Saram filiam comitis Oxenford", adding that Vitalis succeeded his brother[391]

-        see below

2.         [WARNER Engaine .  The relationship between Warner and the other members of the Engaine family has not been ascertained.  The fact that his son’s name follows Vitalis Engaine in the record quoted below suggests that they were closely related, maybe first cousins.]  m ---.  The name of Warner’s wife is not known.  Warner & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Engaine (-[29 Sep 1223/25 Nov 1228]).  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Vitalis Engainne” followed immediately by “Willelmus f Garnerii Engainne” owing in Huntingdonshire[392]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          --- Engaine .  Henry III King of England granted "custodiam terre et heredis Willelmi Engayne" to "Willelmo de Ralegh clerico", and ordered the sheriff of Huntingdonshire to transfer the land and heir to him, dated 25 Nov 1228[393]

 

 

VITALIS [II] Engaine, son of RICHARD [III] Engaine & his wife Sarah de Chesney (-22 Oct 1248).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Ricardum…et Vitalem" as the two sons of “Ricardus Engaine senior…dominus de Blatherwick” and his wife "Saram filiam comitis Oxenford", adding that Vitalis succeeded his brother[394].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Vitalis Engainne” followed immediately by “Willelmus f Garnerii Engainne” owing in Huntingdonshire[395].  A plea at Westminster, dating to the ninth year of Henry III King of England [1226], records that "Vitalis Engaing" claimed land "in honore de Mungumery" which "Dominus Rex H, senex" had given "in maritagium Baldewino de Bollers cum Sibilla de Faleise, nepte ipsius H regis", and that "eadem Sibilla" had "unam filiam Matillidem de ipso Baldewino" who "dominus Rex" gave to "Ricardo filio Ursie" who by her had "unum filium et duas filias…Reginaldum filium Ursi et Margeriam primogenitam et Mabiliam"[396].  A charter in the Ramsey cartulary names "…Dominus Vitalis Engaine, Dominum Willelmum filium suum…" among knights in the service of King Henry III who served in Scotland [13 May/13 Aug] 1244[397].  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records the death "XI Kal Nov" 1264 of “Vitalem Engayne[398]

m ROHESE, daughter of ---.  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that “Vitalem Engayne” married "Roesiam, quæ fuit una trium sororum" who shared "hæreditatem feodi honoris de Montgomery in Wallia"[399]

Vitalis [II] & his wife had four children: 

1.         VITALIS [III] Engaine .  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Vitalem, Henricum, Willielmum et Johannem" as the four sons of “Vitalem Engayne” and his wife "Roesiam", adding that Vitalis died young[400]

2.         HENRY Engaine (-28 Jan 1272).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Vitalem, Henricum, Willielmum et Johannem" as the four sons of “Vitalem Engayne” and his wife "Roesiam", adding that Henry succeeded his father but died unmarried and childless "V Kal Feb 1261 et an. regni regis Henrici 51"[401]

3.         WILLIAM Engaine (-1244 or after).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Vitalem, Henricum, Willielmum et Johannem" as the four sons of “Vitalem Engayne” and his wife "Roesiam", adding that William predeceased his brother Henry[402].  A charter in the Ramsey cartulary names "…Dominus Vitalis Engaine, Dominum Willelmum filium suum…" among knights in the service of King Henry III who served in Scotland [13 May/13 Aug] 1244[403]

4.         JOHN Engaine of Laxton and Blatherwycke, Northamptonshire (-5 Jan 1297, bur Fineshade Priory).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Vitalem, Henricum, Willielmum et Johannem" as the four sons of “Vitalem Engayne” and his wife "Roesiam"[404].  By a writ of plenius certiorari dated 12 Jul “2 Edw I”, after the death of "Joyce (Jocosa) Montfichet alias Munfichet", "John Engaine and Joan his wife...daughter and heir of the said Joyce" complained that the escheator had detained the manor of Byfeld “fell to the said Joan[405].  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records the death "Non Jan" 1297 of “dominus Johannes Engaine[406]m JOAN de Greinville, daughter of GILBERT de Greinville of Hallaton, Leicestershire & his wife Joyce ---.  By a writ of plenius certiorari dated 12 Jul “2 Edw I”, after the death of "Joyce (Jocosa) Montfichet alias Munfichet", "John Engaine and Joan his wife...daughter and heir of the said Joyce" complained that the escheator had detained the manor of Byfeld “fell to the said Joan[407].  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that "dominum Johannem Engaine" married “Joh. filiam et heredem domini Henrici Gray[408]John & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN Engaine (-28 Sep 1322).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Johannem Engayne qui temporibus domini Johannis fratris sui moriebatur et Nicolaum Engaine" as the children of "dominum Johannem Engaine" and his wife “Joh. filiam et heredem domini Henrici Gray”, adding that John died "III Kal Oct" 1322[409].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Engaine.  "Johannes filius Johannis Engayne" confirmed the donation of "manerium de Wode-Newton" made to Fineshade priory by “dominus Henricus Engayne avunculus meus”, and donated land "in villa de Blatherwyk" for the souls of "Vitalis Engayne et Roesiæ uxoris eius", by undated charter[410]m ELLEN, daughter of ROBERT FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumberland and Clavering, Essex & his wife Margaret la Zouche (-before 2 Jun 1339).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that "Johannem Engayne" married "dominam Elenam filiam domino Roberti le Fitz-Roger" but was childless[411]

b)         NICHOLAS Engaine of Colne Engaine and Coton, Essex (-4 or 10 Dec 1322).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Johannem Engayne qui temporibus domini Johannis fratris sui moriebatur et Nicolaum Engaine" as the children of "dominum Johannem Engaine" and his wife “Joh. filiam et heredem domini Henrici Gray”, adding that Nicholas succeeded his brother but only survived 2 months and 2 days before he died "pridie Non Dec" 1322[412]m AMICE de Faucomberge, daughter of WALTER de Faucomberge of Skelton, Cleveland & his wife ---.  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that "dominum Nicolaum" married "dominam Amiciam filiam domini Walteri Fawcomberg"[413]Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN Engaine (30 May 1302-16 Feb 1357).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Johannem Engayne et Henricum Engaine" as the children of "dominus Nicolaus Engaine" and his wife “dominam Amiciam filiam domini Walteri Fawconberg”, adding that he died in 1357[414].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1355 whereby he is held to have become Lord Engaine

-        see below

ii)         HENRY Engaine .  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Johannem Engayne et Henricum Engaine" as the children of "dominus Nicolaus Engaine" and his wife “dominam Amiciam filiam domini Walteri Fawconberg[415]

c)         JOAN Engaine (-1 Jun 1315)m firstly WALTER FitzRobert, son of ROBERT FitzWalter Baron FitzWalter & his first wife Devorguilla de Burgh (Henham 1275-Dunmow Priory 1293).  m secondly ADAM de Welle of Well, Lincolnshire, son of --- (-1 Sep 1311).

 

 

 

B.      LORDS ENGAINE

 

 

JOHN Engaine, son of NICHOLAS Engaine & his wife Amice de Faucomberge (30 May 1302-16 Feb 1357).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names "Johannem Engayne et Henricum Engaine" as the children of "dominus Nicolaus Engaine" and his wife “dominam Amiciam filiam domini Walteri Fawconberg”, adding that he died in 1357[416].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1355 whereby he is held to have become Lord Engaine

m (after 12 Nov 1318) JOAN Peverell, daughter of ROBERT Peverell of Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire & his wife Alice --- (-after 19 Mar 1357).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that "Johannem Engayne" married "dominam Joannam filiam domini Roberti Peverell" by whom he had “duos filios et tres filias…Johannem Engaine, Thomam Engaine, Jocosam Engaine, Elizabetham et Mariam[417]

John & his wife had five children: 

1.         JOHN Engaine (-before 1357).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names “duos filios et tres filias…Johannem Engaine, Thomam Engaine, Jocosam Engaine, Elizabetham et Mariam” as the children of "Johannem Engayne" and his wife "dominam Joannam filiam domini Roberti Peverell"[418]m as her first husband, JOAN de St Quintin, daughter of WILLIAM de St Quintin of Harpham, Yorkshire & his wife ---.  She married secondly as his second wife, William Colville of Ingleby Arncliffe, Yorkshire (-14/15 Sep 1390). 

2.         THOMAS Engaine ([1334/35]-29 Jun 1367).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names “duos filios et tres filias…Johannem Engaine, Thomam Engaine, Jocosam Engaine, Elizabetham et Mariam” as the children of "Johannem Engayne" and his wife "dominam Joannam filiam domini Roberti Peverell", adding that Thomas succeeded his father and died in 1367 childless[419]Lord Engainem (before 18 Oct 1353) KATHERINE de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay Earl of Devon & his wife Margaret de Bohun (-31 Dec 1399).  A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names (in order) “Hugo et Margareta de Courtenay, Elizabeth, Thomas, Edwardus, Johannes, Alianore, Caterina, Guenevera, Willielmus, Humfredus, Johannes et Isabella” as the children of “domino Hugoni de Cortney…comitem de Devonschire” and his wife Margaret[420].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names ”Hugonem…quartum…Thomam, Edwardum, Johannem, Margaretam, Elizabetham, Catherinam” as the children of “Hugonem tertium” and his wife[421].  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that “Thomam Engaine” married "dominam Katerinam filiam comitis Devoniæ" but died childless[422].  The will of "Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Lord of Brecknock", dated 10 Oct 1361 and proved 20 Oct 1361, bequeathed property to “our...nephew Humphrey de Bohun...Elizabeth our niece of Northampton...our niece Dame Catherine d’Engayne...our sister Countess of Ormond, our brother Mons. Hugh de Courtenay Earl of Devonshire...our sister Countess of Devonshire...[423]

3.         JOYCE Engaine ([1336/37]-).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names “duos filios et tres filias…Johannem Engaine, Thomam Engaine, Jocosam Engaine, Elizabetham et Mariam” as the children of "Johannem Engayne" and his wife "dominam Joannam filiam domini Roberti Peverell", adding that Jocosa married "Johannem Goldington" by whom she had "filiam…Katerinam"[424]m JOHN de Goldington of Thele, Hertfordshire and Springfield, Essex, son of ---. 

4.         ELIZABETH Engaine ([1340/41]-1387 or before).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names “duos filios et tres filias…Johannem Engaine, Thomam Engaine, Jocosam Engaine, Elizabetham et Mariam” as the children of "Johannem Engayne" and his wife "dominam Joannam filiam domini Roberti Peverell", adding that Elizabeth married "Laurentium Pabenham militem" by whom she had "filiam…Katerinam" who married "Willielmum Cheney militem" and had "Laurentium et Armam"[425]m LAWRENCE de Pabenham of Pavenham, Bedfordshire, son of --- ([1334/45]-10 Jun 1399). 

5.         MARY Engaine ([1342/43]-19 May 1401).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, names “duos filios et tres filias…Johannem Engaine, Thomam Engaine, Jocosam Engaine, Elizabetham et Mariam” as the children of "Johannem Engayne" and his wife "dominam Joannam filiam domini Roberti Peverell", adding that Mary married "Willielmum Bernake militem" by whom she had "Johannem et Mariam"[426]m firstly WILLIAM Bernak of Saxlingham, Norfolk, Sudbrook and Ranby, Lincolnshire, and Beesthorpe, Nottinghamshire, son of ---.  m secondly THOMAS la Zouche of Westoning, Bedfordshire, son of --- (-30 Oct 1404). 

 

 

 

LORDS FITZROGER (CLAVERING)

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         ROGER FitzRichard Lord of Warkworth (-before 1185)m as her second husband, ADELISA de Vere, widow of ROBERT de Essex, daughter of AUBREY de Vere Lord of Hedingham & his wife Adelisa de Clare ([1105]-after 1185).  Leland quotes a Vere manuscript which names "Albericus de Ver pater meus…Adeliza filia Gilberti de Clare" and "Adeliza de Estsexa, filia Alberici Ver et Adelizæ" who married "Rogerus filius Richardi, nepos comitis Hugonis Bigot"[427].  “Roesia comitissa” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “patris mei Alberici et Gaufridi domini mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Willielmo de Veer, Adelisa de Veer, Adelisa de Essexa[428].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Arenho” held by “Alicia de Essex…lx annorum…amita comitis Willelmi et soror comitis Albrici”, adding that she had “ii filios milites et i filiam maritatam Johanni Constabulario Cestrie[429].  The same source, in another passage, records that “Alicia de Essex…est iiii.xx annorum” (presumably indicating "4 x 20 years" i.e. 80, which appears to be a more accurate assessment than the statement in the earlier passage that she was 60 years old, given the general chronology of these families) and held “Clavering sicut dotem suam, de feodo Henrici de Essex”, adding that she had “ii filios milites" and land "in comitatu Norhamton…de feodo comitis Willelmi"[430]Roger & his wife had [six] children: 

a)         ROBERT FitzRoger of Warkworth and Clavering (-22 Nov 1214).  A charter of King John confirmed that “Rogeri fil Rogeri” founded Thickhed Nunnery, Yorkshire, and confirmed donations by "Thomæ fil Rogeri…Emmæ sororis eiusdem Rogeri filii Rogeri", witnessed by "…Rob filio Rogeri…"[431].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Robertus filius Rogeri" holding "manerium de Wercwrth" in Northumberland held by "Rogerius filius Ricardi pater eius" from King Henry II, as well as "baroniam de Waltona…manerium de Robire…manerium de Neuburne…villam de Corebrige"[432]m as her second husband, MARGERY de Chesney, widow of HUGH de Cressy, daughter of WILLIAM de Chesney of Horsford and Cole, Essex & his wife --- (-7 Jan 1231).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “tres filias...Margaretam, Clementiam et Saram” as the children of “Willielmum de Caineto”, son of “domino Roberto filio Walteri fundatori domus sanctæ Fidis de Horsham”, adding that “Margareta” married firstly “cuidam Normanno Hugoni de Crescy”, by whom she had “filium...Rogerum” who married “Isabellam de Ry” and had “quatuor filios...Hugonem, Rogerum, Johannem et Stephanum” all of whom died childless, and secondly “Roberto filio Rogeri[433].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "uxor que fuit Roberti filii Rogeri" holding "vii milites…in Torpwidon et Andeg et Massingham et Anemere et Freinges et Wikinham vi milites quos Hugo filius Roberti tenet"[434].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Margarete que fuit uxor Robert f Rogeri...in Blieburg” n Norfolk/Suffolk[435]Robert & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN FitzRobert of Warkworth, co. Northumberland (-1240).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Johannem filium Roberti” as the son of “Roberto filio Rogeri” and his wife[436]

-        see below

ii)         ALICE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m (marriage settlement 28 Nov 1203) as his first wife, PIERS FitzHerbert of Blaenllyfni, son of HERBERT FitzHerbert & his wife Lucy of Hereford (-before 6 Jun 1235, bur Reading).  

b)         RICHARD FitzRoger .  “Richardus filius Rogeri” founded Lythom Priory, Northumberland, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Margaretæ”, and for the health of "domini mei Johannis comitis", by charter dated to the reign of King Richard I[437]m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  “Richardus filius Rogeri” founded Lythom Priory, Northumberland, with the consent of “uxoris meæ Margaretæ”, and for the health of "domini mei Johannis comitis", by charter dated to the reign of King Richard I[438].   

c)         ROGER FitzRoger .  A charter of King John confirmed that “Rogeri fil Rogeri” founded Thickhed Nunnery, Yorkshire, and confirmed donations by "Thomæ fil Rogeri…Emmæ sororis eiusdem Rogeri filii Rogeri", witnessed by "…Rob filio Rogeri…"[439]

d)         THOMAS FitzRoger .  A charter of King John confirmed that “Rogeri fil Rogeri” founded Thickhed Nunnery, Yorkshire, and confirmed donations by "Thomæ fil Rogeri…Emmæ sororis eiusdem Rogeri filii Rogeri", witnessed by "…Rob filio Rogeri…"[440]

e)         EMMA FitzRoger .  A charter of King John confirmed that “Rogeri fil Rogeri” founded Thickhed Nunnery, Yorkshire, and confirmed donations by "Thomæ fil Rogeri…Emmæ sororis eiusdem Rogeri filii Rogeri", witnessed by "…Rob filio Rogeri…"[441].

f)          [ALICE (-after 1185).  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Aliciam Vere uxorem Willielmi Mandevill” as the wife of “Johannes constabularium Cestriæ”, son of “Richardus constabularius Cestriæ[442].  Her parentage is clarified by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records property “Arenho” held by her mother “Alicia de Essex…amita comitis Willelmi et soror comitis Albrici”, adding that she has “ii filios milites et i filiam maritatam Johanni Constabulario Cestrie[443].  It is assumed that the reference to “Willielmi Mandevill” is somehow truncated and that he was not Alice’s first husband: he would in fact have been Alice’s first cousin, son of her maternal aunt.  The source, however, only confirms the name of Alice’s mother.  According to Domesday Descendants, Alice was the daughter of Adelisa de Vere by her second husband, Roger FitzRichard Lord of Warkworth[444].  The primary source on which this statement is based has not been identified.  Until the question is further clarified, Alice is shown here in square brackets.  m JOHN de Vesci, son of RICHARD FitzEustace de Vesci & his wife Aubreye de Lisours (-11 Oct 1183).]

 

 

JOHN FitzRobert of Warkworth, co. Northumberland, son of ROBERT FitzRoger of Warkworth & his wife Margery de Chesney (-1240).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Johannem filium Roberti” as the son of “Roberto filio Rogeri” and his wife[445]

m ADA de Balliol, daughter of HUGH Balliol [Bailleul] of Barnard Castle & his wife Cecilia de Fontaines (-Stokesley late Jul 1251).  A writ after the death of "Ada alias Eda de Baylliol alias de Baillol", dated "8 Sep 35 Hen III", and later inquisitions record that "Stokesley Manor was given by Hugh de Balloil in free marriage to Ada his daughter who, after the death of her husband, enfeoffed Hugh and Robert her sons thereof", that "the said Lady Ada died at Stokesley on Saturday after St James the Apostle, 35 Hen III" and that "the said Hugh took and held seisin of the said manor, in the name of himself and his brother, until expelled"[446]

John & his wife had three children: 

1.         ROGER FitzJohn of Warkworth, Northumberland, Horsford, Norfolk, and Clavering, Essex (-[May] 1249).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Rogerum” as the son of “Johannem filium Roberti”, son of “Roberto filio Rogeri[447].  Matthew Paris records the death in a 1249 tournament of "quidam de nobilioribus baronibus Borealibus Rogerus filius Johannis" and names his mother "Ada de Bailliol"[448].  [m firstly ---.  As noted below, the 9 Aug 1249 documents relating to land granted to Roger’s wife Isabella/Sibylla and the appointment of a custodian of the lands of his son Robert do not specify that Isabella/Sibylla was Robert’s mother.  It is possible therefore that he was born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage of his father.]  m [secondly] ISABELLA [Sibylla], daughter of --- (-after 9 Aug 1249).  A document dated 9 Aug 1249 grants “manerium de Eynho...manerium de Acclinton...tercia pars foreste de Robur” to “Isabelle [...predicte Sibille] que fuit uxor Rogeri filii Johannis in partem dotis sue de terris que fuerunt predicti Rogeri[449].  No document has been found which confirms Isabella/Sibylla’s family origin.  She is not named as mother of Roger’s son Robert in the document of the same date which appoints a custodian of Robert’s lands until he reached the age of majority.  Roger & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumberland and Clavering, Essex (after [1229]-before 29 Apr 1310).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” as the son of “Rogerum”, son of “Johannem filium Roberti”, adding that he inherited “post obitum Stephani de Crescy...in hereditate baronniæ de Horsford, quasi hæres dominæ Margeriæ de Cheny” [his paternal great-grandmother][450].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord FitzRoger

-        see below

2.         HUGH .  A writ after the death of "Ada alias Eda de Baylliol alias de Baillol", dated "8 Sep 35 Hen III", and later inquisitions record that "Stokesley Manor was given by Hugh de Balloil in free marriage to Ada his daughter who, after the death of her husband, enfeoffed Hugh and Robert her sons thereof", that "the said Lady Ada died at Stokesley on Saturday after St James the Apostle, 35 Hen III" and that "the said Hugh took and held seisin of the said manor, in the name of himself and his brother, until expelled"[451]

3.         ROBERT .  A writ after the death of "Ada alias Eda de Baylliol alias de Baillol", dated "8 Sep 35 Hen III", and later inquisitions record that "Stokesley Manor was given by Hugh de Balloil in free marriage to Ada his daughter who, after the death of her husband, enfeoffed Hugh and Robert her sons thereof"[452]

 

 

 

B.      LORDS FITZROGER, LORDS CLAVERING

 

 

ROBERT FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumberland and Clavering, Essex, son of ROGER FitzJohn of Warkworth & his [first/second wife ---/Isabella [Sibylla] ---] (after [1229]-before 29 Apr 1310).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” as the son of “Rogerum”, son of “Johannem filium Roberti”, adding that he inherited “post obitum Stephani de Crescy...in hereditate baronniæ de Horsford, quasi hæres dominæ Margeriæ de Cheny” [his paternal great-grandmother][453].  The following document shows that Robert was a minor when his father died: A document dated 9 Aug 1249 appoints “Willelmo de Valencia” as “custodiam terre que fuit...Rogeri [filii Johannis] usque ad legitimam etatem ipsius Rogeri [presumably error for “Roberti”]” except for property assigned to “Isabelle que fuit uxor predicti Rogeri[454].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord FitzRoger

m MARGARET la Zouche, daughter of ---.  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk records that “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” married “Margeriam de la Souche[455].  Her precise relationship to the Zouche family has not been ascertained. 

Robert & his wife had eight children: 

1.         JOHN FtzRobert of Costessey, Norfolk ([1265/66]-Aynhoe, Northamptonshire [1/23] Jan 1332, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[456].  He adopted the name Clavering.  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Claveringm (1278) HAWISE de Tibetot, daughter of ROBERT de Tibetot & his wife --- ([before 1266]-1345, before 14 Apr).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk records that “Johannem”, son of “Robertum filium Rogeri”, married “Hawisiam[457]John & his wife had one child: 

a)         EVA de Clavering (-30 Sep 1369, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “Evam...cognomen...Clavering” as the child of “Johannem”, son of “Robertum filium Rogeri”, adding that she had “filiam...Evam, quæ nunc se clamat advocatricem domus de Sibeton, de Langley, sanctæ Fidis et de Bliburg” who married firstly “Thomæ de Audele” who died childless and secondly “militi Radulfo de Ufford”, thirdly “Jacobo de Audele”, and fourthly “Roberto Benhalle militi” who died childless[458].  The passage suggests that there were two persons named Eva, mother and daughter.  However, from a chronological point of view this does not seem possible considering that Eva had children by her second husband who died in 1314.  Presumably there is some error in the manuscript.  After her second husband was killed at the battle of Bannockburn, Eva lived with, but did not marry, her first husband's first cousin.  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk records that Eva was buried “in monasterio de Langley[459]m firstly THOMAS Audley, son of NICHOLAS Audley & his wife Catherine Giffard (1288-[8 Jul/14 Dec] 1307, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  m secondly ( before 2 Dec 1308) THOMAS de Ufford, son of ROBERT de Ufford & his first wife Mary --- (-killed in battle Bannockburn 24 Jun 1314, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  Mistress of JAMES Audley of Stratton Audley, son of HUGH de Audley Lord Audley & his wife Isolda de Rous (-before 1 Mar 1334, bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  m thirdly (before 1342) ROBERT de Benhale, son of --- (-[1404], bur Langley Abbey, Norfolk).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1360, but not subsequently, whereby he may be held to have become Lord Benhale[460]

2.         ALEXANDER .  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[461]

3.         ROGER .  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[462]

4.         ROBERT .  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[463]

5.         ALAN .  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[464]

6.         HENRY .  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[465]

7.         EDMUND .  A manuscript genealogy of the founders of Horsham priory, Norfolk names “multos filios et filias...Johannem, Alexandrum, Rogerum, Robertum, Alanum, Henricum et Edmundum” as the children of “Robertum filium Rogeri, nunc patronum” and his wife “Margeriam de la Souche[466]

8.         ELLEN (-before 2 Jun 1339).  A manuscript concerning the history of Fineshade priory, Northamptonshire, dated 1376, records that "Johannem Engayne" married "dominam Elenam filiam domino Roberti le Fitz-Roger" but was childless[467]m JOHN Engaine, son of JOHN Engaine of Laxton and Blatherwycke, Northamptonshire & his wife Joan de Greinville (-28 Sep 1322).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Engaine. 

 

 

 

FITZWALTER (of Woodham Walter, Essex)

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare, son of RICHARD de Brionne Lord of Clare and Tonbridge [Normandy] & his wife Rohese Giffard (-[1134], bur Priory of St Neot).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus[468].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rogerium et Gislebertum, Gualterium et Rodbertum atque Ricardum” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filium] Ricardum” and his wife “Roaldem Gualterii Gifardi filiam[469].  Henry I King of England granted him the fiefdom of Little Dunmow, Essex[470]A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1134 of Robertus filius Ricardi, primus patronus canonicorum de Dunmawe” and his burial “apud Sanctum Neotum”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[471]

m ([1112]) as her first husband, MATILDA de Senlis, daughter of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Matilda of Huntingdon (-before 1163).  Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names "Simon, Waldev and Matilda" as the children of Simon Earl of Huntingdon and his wife Matilda, commenting that they "are still young and in their infancy"[472].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory records that “Symonis de Seynliz” had two sisters “quarum una…Matildis Seynliz” married “Robertus filius Ricardi”, but does not name the second sister[473]A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1112 of Robertus filius Ricardi” and “Matildam de Sancto Lisio”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[474].  She married secondly (1136) Saher de Quincy.  The Complete Peerage records her second marriage, citing Hatton’s Book of Seals for “proof of this marriage”, and in a later passage that “her charter of dower lands in Essex and London, bearing her seal, is witnessed by her sons Walter FitzRobert and Saher[475].  The 1157/58 Pipe Roll records "Matildi de Seinliz" in Essex and Hertfordshire under "Nova Placita & Noue Conuentiones", suggesting that this related to her dower land soon after the death of her husband[476]A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1140 of Matildis de Sancto Licio uxor Roberti filii Ricardi”, although the dating of events in this source appears shaky[477]

Robert FitzRichard & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         WALTER FitzRobert (-1198, bur Dunmow Priory).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory names “Walterum et Symoni fratri suo” as the two sons of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and his wife Matilda[478].  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated “terram de teia” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti filii Ricardi et matris mee Matildis et...Rohaise amite mee que ecclesiam Sancti Johannis fundavit et fratrum suorum”, to Colchester St. John by undated charter[479].  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated property to Daventre Priory, for the souls of “Roberti filii Ricardi patris mei et Matildis de Senliz matris meæ…et uxoris meæ Matildis de Lucy et filiorum et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter[480].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Walterus filius Roberti" paying "xxxi l xv s, lxiii milites et dimidium" in Essex, Hertfordshire[481].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Walterus filius Roberti" being granted delay to pay "per brevia" in Essex, Herefordshire[482]A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1198 of Walterus filius Roberti” and his burial at Dunmow[483]m firstly MATILDA de Lucy Lady of Diss, Norfolk, daughter of RICHARD de Lucy, justiciar & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Ricardo de Luce" granted "Disce" in Norfolk to "Waltero filio Roberti…in maritagio cum filia sua", adding that it was currently held by "Robertus filius Walteri"[484].  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated property to Daventre Priory, for the souls of “…uxoris meæ Matildis de Lucy et filiorum et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter[485].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[486][487]m secondly (after 1163) as her [third] husband, MATILDA de Bohun, widow [firstly] of HENRY d'Oilly, [and secondly of JUHEL de Mayenne], daughter of HUMPHREY de Bohun & his wife Margaret of Hereford ([1140/43]-after 9 Feb 1196).  Her parentage is established by a 1263 inquisition which confirms that Humphrey de Bohun, grandfather of Humphrey de Bohun Earl of Hereford at that time, gave Bradenham to his sister Maud[488].  Her first and [third] marriages are confirmed by a lawsuit recorded in 1194 in which "Matill uxor Walteri fil Robti" sued "Cecilia uxore Rad fil Wigain" over Swereford manor, Oxfordshire, given to her by "Henri de Oilli vir eius…in dote"[489].  Her possible second marriage is confirmed by the Feet of Fines which records the judgment dated 9 Feb 1196 in a claim by "Henricus de Bohon…pro Adam de Greiuill" against "Matill de Bohon" concerning land "villa de Waleton…villam de Blakemer" and "in villa de Niweton" given to Matilda "in maritagium quondam Iuhellus de Mee---e"[490].  It is supposed that Matilda was the plaintiff’s aunt, although this is not specifically stated in the document.  It is supposed that the name "de Mee---e" indicates Mayenne, but this is not beyond all doubt.  Walter & his first wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         ROBERT FitzWalter of Woodham Walter, Essex (-9 Dec 1235, Dunmow Priory)A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the succession of “Robertus filius Walteri” on the death of Walterus filius Roberti”, adding that in 1216 the dispute between the barons and King John was triggered in 1216 because the king desired “Matildis…filia domini Roberti filii Walteri[491].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus filius Walteri" holding 15 knights’ fees "Wodeham" in Essex in [1210/12][492].  He went with Saher de Quincy Earl of Winchester (his cousin through his paternal grandmother) to invite Louis de France to England in early 1216[493].  Matthew Paris records, in 1218, the arrival at Damieta in Egypt of “...Roberto filio Walteri...[494].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1225, by "Ricardus filius Reginaldi et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for part of "terre…in Lewes" inherited from "Roysia de Douera auia sua", the defendant stating that "Matillis mater sua et Aleisia mater Ricardi de Umframuilla et Auelina auia Ricardi de Muntfichet fuerunt sorores" all of whom inherited part of the land in question[495]A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the death in 1234 of “Robertus filius Walteri, patronus ecclesie de Dunmowe”, his burial at Dunmow, and the succession of Walterus filius eius”, the same source providing numerous details about his descendants[496].  Matthew Paris records the death "in Adventu Domini” 1235 of “Robertus filius Walteri[497]m firstly (after 1194) as her second husband, GUNNOR de Valoignes, widow of DURAND de Ostill, daughter of ROBERT de Valoignes & his wife Hawise --- (-after 1208).  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris", noting that "tres fratres fuerunt…Petrus, Robertus, Philippus ex parte patris et matris", that Robert was father of "Gunora mater predicte Cristiane"[498].  “Durandus de Steill camerarius domini regis et Gunnora de Valoniis uxor eius” confirmed donations made to Binham priory by “Rogerus de Valoniis” by undated charter[499].  Her first marriage is confirmed by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records property “Hortfurdburia et Hochwelle” held by her paternal grandmother “Agnes de Valeines…l annorum”, property “Hecham et Leic” held by “Agnes de Valuines…plusquam lx annorum”, and “Redefelde” held by “Agnes de Valuines…soror Pagani filii Johannis” adding that her heir is “filia eius et heres data est Durando de Ostili[500].  Round suggests that "filia eius" in this passage is an error for "neptis eius", as Gunnor was the senior heiress of her grandmother as only daughter of the latter’s second surviving son, and pointing out that "Durandus de Osteilli" paid scutage in Essex/Hertfordshire of £15/3/4 in the Pipe Roll 1190, equivalent to the 30 and one third knights’ fees on which the barony of Valoignes paid had paid in 1166, and on which "Gunnore de Valoniis" paid in 1194[501].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records that "Gunnore de Valoniis" paid "xx s, i militem" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and also paid in Essex, Hertfordshire[502].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Gunnore de Valoniis" paying "xxx l, xxx milites" in Essex, Hertfordshire[503].  "Rob fil Walteri et Gunnor ux eius" paid a fine for the inheritance of "Gaufri de Valon avunculi ipsius Gunnor", dated 1208[504]m secondly ROHESE, daughter of ---.  This second marriage is confirmed by Bracton who records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris"[505].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.   Robert & his first wife had three children: 

i)          MATILDA (-1212, bur Dunmow Priory).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Joffrois de Mandeville" married "la fille Robiert le fil Gautier"[506]m GEOFFREY de Mandeville, son of GEOFFREY FitzPiers & his first wife Beatrice de Say (-London 23 Feb 1216, bur Trinity Prior within Aldgate).  He succeeded his father in 1213 as Earl of Essex. 

ii)         CHRISTINE (-before 17 Jun 1232, bur Shouldham Priory).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Robiert le fil Gautier" had two daughters and one son, adding that the second daughter married "Guillaume de Mandeville, qui freres fu Joffroi"[507].  “Christiana de Maundeville...in mea...viduitate”, as successor of “Roberti de Valoniis avi mei et Roberti filii Walteri patris mei, Gunnore uxoris sue matris mee”, confirmed the donation of revenue from “ecclesia de Baketona in Suffolchia” to Binham priory made by “Robertus filius Walteri pater meus et Gunnora mater mea”, for the souls of “Willelmi de Maundeville comitis Essexie quondam mariti mei...Roberti filii Walteri patris mei et Gunnore uxoris sue matris mee”, by undated charter, witnessed by “...Gondreda de Warenne soror mea[508].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hubertus de Burgo…Remundus nepos eius” married “comitissam Essexiæ” in 1227[509].  An order dated [Nov] 1227 refers to "Reymundus de Burgo…et Christiana uxore eius"[510].  King Henry III granted "duos damos in foresta de Wauberg" to "Christiane uxori Remundi de Burgo”, dated 1229[511].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Cristiana uxore sua, comitissa Essexiæ” was buried with her (first) husband “apud Soldham[512]m firstly (before 18 Nov 1220) WILLIAM de Mandeville Earl of Essex, son of GEOFFREY FitzPiers & his first wife Beatrice de Say (-8 Jan 1227, bur Shouldham Priory).  m secondly ([9 Jan/15 May] 1227) RAYMOND de Burgh of Dartford, Kent, son of --- de Burgh & his wife --- (-drowned 1230, bur Dover). 

iii)        son .  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d’Angleterre records that "Robiert le fil Gautier" had two daughters and one son[513]

Robert & his second wife had one child: 

iv)        WALTER FitzRobert of Woodham Walter, Essex (-before 10 Apr 1258).  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris"[514]

-        see below

b)         ALICE (-1213 or after).  An order dated 21 Jul 1213 records that "Alic Pechie" gave "Aliciam filiam suam" as a hostage when "Roberti filii Walteri fratris sui" was freed[515]m GILBERT Pecche, son of HAMON Pecche & his wife Alice Peverel (-before 9 Jul 1212). 

c)         other children .  “Walterus filius Roberti” donated property to Daventre Priory, for the souls of “…uxoris meæ Matildis de Lucy et filiorum et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter[516]

Walter & his second wife had one child: 

d)         SIMON FitzWalter (-before 18 Jul 1218).  King John granted "unum mercatum apud Bareate" to "Simon filius Walteri" by charter dated 4 Sep 1199[517].  "Simon fil Walteri" made a fine for returning to the king’s support naming "Matillid filia sua…filius suus primogenitus…" among the hostages which were given, dated 1216[518].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234, by "Walterus filius Symonis" against "Thomam comitem de Warewyc" which records that "Matillis de Boun antecessor ipsius Symonis" was "uxor Henrici de Oylly" by whom she had "filium Henricum de Oylly" who died without heirs but had "sororem Margeriam" who was the mother of "Henricum…comitem de Warewyc et qui fuit pater ipsius Thome", and adds that "predicta Matillis" married secondly "Waltero filio Roberti avi istius Walteri" by whom she had "Symonem patrem ipsius Walteri"[519].  The date of his death is set by an order dated 18 Jul 1218 which records that "Robert fitz Walter, Simon’s brother…per the testament of his brother" had custody of "the land and heir of Walter of Carew"[520]m (1200 or after) as her second husband, SARAH, widow of THOMAS de Burgh, daughter of ---.  "Simon fil Walteri" paid a fine to marry "Sarra que fuit uxor Thome de Burgo" if she wishes and her property in Northamptonshire, dated 1200[521]Simon & his wife had two children: 

i)          WALTER FitzSimon (-after 1234).  "Simon fil Walteri" made a fine for returning to the king’s support naming "Matillid filia sua…filius suus primogenitus…" among the hostages which were given, dated 1216[522].  It is not known whether "filius suus primogenitus" refers to Walter FitzSimon or another otherwise unrecorded son.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234, by "Walterus filius Symonis" against "Thomam comitem de Warewyc" which records that "Matillis de Boun antecessor ipsius Symonis" was "uxor Henrici de Oylly" by whom she had "filium Henricum de Oylly" who died without heirs but had "sororem Margeriam" who was the mother of "Henricum…comitem de Warewyc et qui fuit pater ipsius Thome", and adds that "predicta Matillis" married secondly "Waltero filio Roberti avi istius Walteri" by whom she had "Symonem patrem ipsius Walteri"[523]

ii)         MATILDA (-after 1216).  "Simon fil Walteri" made a fine for returning to the king’s support naming "Matillid filia sua…filius suus primogenitus…" among the hostages which were given, dated 1216[524]

2.         SIMON FitzRobert .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Daventre priory names “Walterum et Symoni fratri suo” as the two sons of “Robertus filius Ricardi” and his wife Matilda[525]

3.         MATILDA de Senlis (-after 1185).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Sainlis que fuit filia Roberti filii Ricardi et mater Willelmi de Albineio” and “terra sua in Hungertone et in Winewelle[526].  "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[527]m WILLIAM de Albini Brito, son of WILLIAM de Albini Brito Lord of Belvoir, Lincolnshire & his wife Cecilia Bigod (-1168). 

4.         [--- .  The precise parentage of Matthew de Cruil has not been traced.  If “nepote”, in the document quoted below, is interpreted in the strict sense of nephew, his mother would have been the sister of Walter FitzRobert the donor.  However, the word could indicate a more remote family relationship.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         MATTHEW de Cruil .  “Matheo de Cruil nepote meo...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Walterus filius Roberti” donated “terram de teia” to Colchester St. John, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti filii Ricardi et matris mee Matildis et...Rohaise amite mee que ecclesiam Sancti Johannis fundavit et fratrum suorum”, to Colchester St. John[528]

 

 

 

B.      LORDS FITZWALTER

 

 

WALTER FitzRobert of Woodham Walter, Essex, son of ROBERT FitzWalter & his second wife Rohese --- (-before 10 Apr 1258).  Bracton records an inquiry, dated 1234/35, whether "Cristiana de Mandevilla soror Walteri filii Roberti" was seised of part of land "in Dersingham", which descended to her "ex parte Gunnore matris sue" and was inherited by "Henricus de Bailloil et Lora uxor eius" because "idem Walterus non fuit frater predicte Cristiane nisi ex parte patris"[529]

m (before 1247) IDA de Longespee, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela Ctss of Salisbury (-after 10 Apr 1262).  The Book of Lacock names “Isabellam de Vescy…Elam…Idam de Camyle” as the daughters of “Guillelmus Longespe ex…Ela”, adding that Ida married “Walterus filius Roberti” by whom she had “Catarinam et Loricam…velatæ…apud Lacock, Elam, quam duxit primo Guillelmus de Dodingseles, de qua genuit ---, Robertum, qui Dernogoill ---[530]

Walter & his wife had four children: 

1.         ROBERT FitzWalter (Henham 1247-18 Jan 1326).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord FitzWalterm firstly DEVORGUILLA de Burgh, daughter of JOHN de Burgh of Wakerley, Northamptonshire & his wife Cecily Balliol ([1255]-1284, bur Dunmow Priory)  A writ after the death of "John de Burgo", dated "3 Mar 8 Edw I", records that he held "Wakerle…with the barony of Launvaley…Thingdene" and names his "three daughters, Dervorguilla whom Robert son of Walter married, Hawis whom Robert de Grelee married, and Margery who is a nun at Chikessaunt…his next heirs and of full age"[531]m secondly (King’s Chapel, Westminster 1289) ELEANOR Ferrers, daughter of ROBERT de Ferrers Earl of Derby & his second wife Eleanor de Bohun (-before May 1308, bur Dunmow Priory).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Dunmow Priory records the marriage in 1289 of “Robertus filius Walteri” and Alienoram filiam comitis de Ferrariis, sororem comitis de Ferrers” in the King’s Chapel, Westminster[532]Robert & his first wife had two children: 

a)         WALTER FitzRobert (Henham 1275-Dunmow Priory 1293)m (Woodham 1286) as her first husband, JOAN Engaine, daughter of JOHN Engaine of Laxton and Blatherwycke, Northants & his wife Joan de Greinville of Hallaton, Leicestershire (-1 Jun 1315).  She married secondly Adam de Welle of Well, Lincolnshire (-1 Sep 1311).  Walter & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROBERT FitzWalter (1291-young). 

b)         CHRISTIAN (-before 6 Dec 1315)m WILLIAM Marshal of Hingham, Norfolk, son of JOHN Marshal & his wife Hawise --- ([24] Sep 1277-killed in battle Bannockburn 24 Jun 1314).  He became first Baron Marshal 1309. 

Robert & his second wife had one child: 

c)         ROBERT FitzWalter ([1300/01]-6 May 1328).  He succeeded his father as Lord FitzWalter

-        see below

2.         CATHERINE .  The Book of Lacock names “Isabellam de Vescy…Elam…Idam de Camyle” as the daughters of “Guillelmus Longespe ex…Ela”, adding that Ida married “Walterus filius Roberti” by whom she had “Catarinam et Loricam…velatæ…apud Lacock, Elam, quam duxit primo Guillelmus de Dodingseles, de qua genuit ---, Robertum, qui Dernogoill ---[533]

3.         LORICA .  The Book of Lacock names “Isabellam de Vescy…Elam…Idam de Camyle” as the daughters of “Guillelmus Longespe ex…Ela”, adding that Ida married “Walterus filius Roberti” by whom she had “Catarinam et Loricam…velatæ…apud Lacock, Elam, quam duxit primo Guillelmus de Dodingseles, de qua genuit ---, Robertum, qui Dernogoill ---[534]

4.         ELA .  The Book of Lacock names “Isabellam de Vescy…Elam…Idam de Camyle” as the daughters of “Guillelmus Longespe ex…Ela”, adding that Ida married “Walterus filius Roberti” by whom she had “Catarinam et Loricam…velatæ…apud Lacock, Elam, quam duxit primo Guillelmus de Dodingseles, de qua genuit ---, Robertum, qui Dernogoill ---[535]m firstly WILLIAM de Dodingsells, son of ---.  m secondly ---. 

 

 

ROBERT FitzWalter, son of ROBERT FitzWalter Lord FitzWalter & his second wife Eleanor Ferrers of the Earls of Derby ([1300/01]-6 May 1328).  He succeeded his father as Lord FitzWalter

m JOAN Multon, daughter of THOMAS de Multon of Egremont, Cumberland, Lord Multon & his wife Eleanor de Burgh of the Earls of Ulster ([1303/04]-16 Jun 1363, bur Dunmore Priory). 

Robert & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN FitzWalter ([1311/12]-18 Oct 1361, bur Dunmow Priory)Lord FitzWalterm ELEANOR de Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy Lord Percy & his wife Idoine Clifford (-before 18 Oct 1361, bur Dunmow Priory).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of “Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[536]John & his wife had children: 

a)         WALTER FitzWalter (Henham 31 May 1345-Galicia 26 Sep 1386)Lord FitzWalterm firstly (Licence 23 Jun 1362) ELEANOR Dagworth, daughter of THOMAS de Dagworth Lord Dagworth & his wife Eleanor de Bohun of the Earls of Hereford and Essex (-after 29 Nov 1375, bur Dunmow Priory).  m secondly (before 27 Jun 1385) as her first husband, PHILIPPA de Mohun, daughter of JOHN [V] de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset, Lord Mohun & his wife Joan de Burghersh (-Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight 17 Jul 1431, bur Westminster Abbey).  She married secondly (before 13 Nov 1389) John Golafre of Langley, Oxfordshire.  She married thirdly ([27 Feb 1397/7 Oct 1398]) Edward of Cambridge Earl of Rutland, Earl of Cork, who succeeded his father in 1402 as Duke of York, Earl of Cambridge.  The will of "Philippa Duchess of York and Lady of the Isle of Wight", dated 1430, proved 13 Nov 1431, chose burial “in the conventual church of Westminster”, bequeathed property to “my son Walter Lord Fitz-Walter...[537]

-        LORDS FITZWALTER[538]

b)         ALICE FitzWalter (-29 Apr 1401)m AUBREY de Vere, son of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Matilda Badlesmere ([1338/40]-23 Apr 1400, bur [Hadleigh]).  He was restored as Earl of Oxford in 1393. 

 

 

 

FITZWARIN

 

 

The exploits of the early generations of this family are recorded in the highly romanticised Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin, whose early passages are clearly legendary.  Many of the later genealogical details in the Legend are corroborated by charter evidence as noted below, although the Legend conflates Fulk FitzWarin [I] and Fulk FitzWarin [II] into one person.  The FitzWarin family’s extensive landholding interests in Shropshire are reviewed by Eyton in different parts of his History of Shropshire, as shown below. 

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         WARIN [de Metz] (-after [1115], before [1145]).  Eyton refers to the compositions known as the Fitz-Warin Chronicles, compiled from the songs of Trouvères, which purport to give an account of "Warin de Metz" and his descendants the FitzWarin families of Whittington and Alberbury in Shropshire[539].  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Guaryn de Meez, le vaylaunt" as "cosyn" of “Johun duc de la Petite Bretaigne” in a passage which is clearly anachronistic and legendary[540].  "Hamo Peverel" and "Warinus" are named among the 14 lay witnesses to the record of an Archidiaconal Chapter which sat at Castle Holgate in [1115] under the presidency of Richard Bishop of London, enquiring into the parochial jurisdiction of Wenlock Priory[541].  Warin was presumably deceased when his two sons witnessed the charter dated to [1145] quoted below.  m ---.  The name of Warin’s wife is not known.  The charter of Henry II King of England, dated 1154, which confirmed the gift by "Willelmus Peverel" of one Knight’s Fee in Tadlow, Cambridgeshire to "Fulconi filio Warini" suggests that Warin’s wife may have been related to the Peverel family[542].  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records the marriage of "Guaryn" and "Melette de la Blanche tour", niece of “Willam Peverel”, in a passage which appears just as legendary as the one quoted above in which Warin is first named[543]Warin & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         ROGER FitzWarin (-[1145/54]).  "Walcheline Maminoht" exchanged land with the abbot of Shrewsbury by charter dated to [1136/41], witnessed by "Roger Fitz Warin"[544].  "Walcheline Maminoht" granted Bradford Mill to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1145], witnessed by "Roger Fitz Warin and Fulk his brother"[545].  He died without issue before the accession of King Henry II[546]

b)         FULK FitzWarin [I] (-[1170/71]).  "Walcheline Maminoht" granted Bradford Mill to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1145], witnessed by "Roger Fitz Warin and Fulk his brother"[547].  Henry II King of England confirmed the gift by "Willelmus Peverel" of a Knight’s Fee in Tadlow, Cambridgeshire to "Fulconi filio Warini", by charter dated 1154, witnessed by "Ricardo de Humet, Constabulario, Willelmo filio Hamonis"[548].  Henry II King of England granted "Watebergam" to "Fulconi filio Guarini" by charter dated Jan 1156[549].  The 1155, 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Fulconi fil Warini" at "Aloestan" (Alveston) in Gloucestershire, yielding 10 p. a.[550].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Folc. fil War" in Shropshire[551].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Fulco filius Garin i m" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1167/68][552].  His date of death is fixed by the Pipe Roll recording the manor of Alveston to "Folcho fitz Warin" in Michaelmas 1170, but to "Fulko son of Fulko fitz Warin" in Michaelmas 1171[553]m EVA, daughter of --- (-after 1171).  Meisel records that Fulk [I]’s widow Eva donated a house in Whadborough to Launde after her husband died, that Eva “the mother of Fulk son of Fulk” later supplemented the donation with adjacent land, both donations confirmed by Fulk [II], once shortly after his father’s death and again (with the consent of Fulk [III]) shortly before his own death[554]Fulk & his wife had [seven] children: 

i)          FULK FitzWarin [II] (-[1195/98]).  The Pipe Roll records the manor of Alveston to "Fulko son of Fulko fitz Warin" in Michaelmas 1171[555]

-        see below

ii)         RALPH FitzWarin (-after [1180]).  Eyton names “Ralph fitz Warin, occurs c. 1180”, “Richard fitz Warin occurs 1203”, “Warin c. 1180” as the three brothers of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[556]

iii)        RICHARD FitzWarin (-after 1203).  Eyton names “Ralph fitz Warin, occurs c. 1180”, “Richard fitz Warin occurs 1203”, “Warin c. 1180” as the three brothers of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[557]

iv)        WARIN FitzWarin (-after [1180]).  Eyton names “Ralph fitz Warin, occurs c. 1180”, “Richard fitz Warin occurs 1203”, “Warin c. 1180” as the three brothers of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary sources on which this information is based[558]

v)         [daughter .  The precise relationship between Baldwin de Hodnet and the FitzWarin family has not been traced, but if “cosyn” in the source quoted below can be interpreted in its strictest sense his mother could have been the sister of Fulk FitzWarin [II].]  m --- de Hodnet, son of ---.  One child: 

(a)       BALDWIN de Hodnet (-after 1200).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records that King Richard I summoned "le v. fitz Fouke le Brun: Foket, Phelip le Rous, William, Johan e Aleyn, e lur cosyn Baudwyn de Hodenet" to Winchester and knighted them, dated from the context to before the death of Fulk FitzWarin [II], a later passage naming Baldwin with his cousins during the reign of King John[559]

vi)        [daughter .  The precise relationship between Audolf de Bracy and the FitzWarin family has not been traced, but if “cosyn” in the source quoted below can be interpreted in its strictest sense his mother could have been the sister of Fulk FitzWarin [II].]  m --- de Bracy, son of ---.  One child: 

(a)       AUDOLF de Bracy (-after [1210]).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records Fulk FitzWarin [III] "e ces quatre freres, Audolf de Bracy son cosyn, e Baudwyn de Hodenet son cosyn" during the early years of the reign of King John, a later passage recording his escape after being captured by the king[560]

vii)      [EMMELINE .  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records Fulk FitzWarin [III] visiting "a Huggeford, a mon sire Walter de Huggeford, qe avoit esposee dame Vyleyne, file Waryn de Meez. Mes son dreit noun fust Emelyne; e fust la aunte sire Fouke", during the early years of the reign of King John[561].  It appears chronologically impossible that Emmeline could have been the daughter of Warin [de Metz].  Bearing in mind the conflation in the Legend of Fulk FitzWarin [I] and Fulk FitzWarin [II], it appears possible that she was the sister of Fulk FitzWarin [II], assuming that the Legend correctly reports the family relationship.  m WALTER de Huggeford, son of --- (-after 1200).] 

c)         [WILLIAM FitzWarin of Burwardsley (-[1162/75]).  Henry II King of England directed that "William Fitz Warin may hod and have assarts in Salopesire", attested by Thomas à Becket, dated to [May 1162][562].  No primary source has been identified which confirms that William was the brother of Roger and Fulk FitzWarin [I].  "William Fitz Warin of Burwasley" witnessed the charter dated to [1161/72] under which "Hugh de Dover and Matilda his wife" restored property to Shrewsbury abbey[563].]  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had [two] children: 

i)          [WARIN de Burwardsley (-1212 or after).  "Warin de Burwardesl and Philip his brother" witnessed a charter of Wenlock priory dated to [1169/76][564].]  He and his descendants are shown in Eyton[565]m ---.  The name of Warin’s wife is not known.  Warin & his wife had five children: 

(a)       PHILIP de Burwardsley (-[1240]).  m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1259). 

(b)       ROGER de Burwardsley (-1243). 

(c)       MABEL (-after 1244).  "Adam de Beissin" paid a fine for marrying "Mabel le Strange of Burwardesley" without the king’s licence in 1194[566]m (1194 or before) ADAM de Beysin of Billingsley, son of --- (-1238). 

(d)       ALICEm JOHN de Eyton, son of --- (-1244 or before). 

(e)       MARGERY (-before 10 May 1259).  Margaret Bagot gave "half a mark for summoning Roger Martel before the Justices at Westminster to acquit her of the service which Milisent de Stafford demands of her for her freehold in Blumenhul and Brunton" in 1223/24[567].  A writ dated 10 May "43 Hen III", after the death of "Margery de Blumenhull", states that "Phelipe the wife of Geoffrey de Bromle, aged 30, is heir of 3 parts, and John son of William de Ipeston, aged 26, is heir of the fourth part"[568]m JOHN Bagot of Blymhill, Staffordshire, son of [WILLIAM Bagot of Blymhill & his wife ---] (-1224 or before). 

ii)         [PHILIP .  "Warin de Burwardesl and Philip his brother" witnessed a charter of Wenlock priory dated to [1169/76][569].] 

 

 

FULK FitzWarin [II], son of FULK FitzWarin [I] & his wife --- (-[1195/98]).  The Pipe Roll records the manor of Alveston to "Fulko son of Fulko fitz Warin" in Michaelmas 1171[570].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Fulco filio Garini" paying "x s, i militem" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire[571].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Fulcho f Warini et Hawisa uxor eius" in Wiltshire[572]

m ([1155/65] or later) HAWISE de Dinan, daughter and co-heiress of JOSCELIN de Dinan & his wife Sibylla de Lacy ([1140/50]-1226 or after).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Hawyse de Dynan" exchanged property donated by her father, that “Jozo de Plukenya" confirmed the donation of "Jazonis avi sui", that "Hugo de Plukenya" confirmed the donation of "Jazonis de Dynan" and donated further property, and that "Jozo de Plukeneya filius Hugonis" confirmed the foregoing[573].  Hawise’s suggested date of birth is estimated from the first marriage before 1125 of her mother, who was then presumably already of child-bearing age, and her mother’s second marriage after 1138.  If this estimate is correct, it is likely that Hawise was married [1155/65], although the first marriage of her son Fulk FitzWarin [III] in 1207 suggests the later part of this date range and even an extended period after her marriage before Fulk [III] was born.  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by two lawsuits recorded in 1194 in which, in the first, "Hawisia de Dinat…Fulkon fil Warin" and "--- Sibill de Dinat uxore" are named, and in the second "Fulko fil Warin…Hawiss uxor sue" and "Sibill uxor Hug de Plugenai"[574].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Fulcho f Warini et Hawisa uxor eius" in Wiltshire[575].  "Hawis de Dinan et Sibill soror eius" paid a fine for "de Bokeland, Corfton in Sumerset et de Hertilande in Devon…vs Oliverum de Dinan", dated 1204[576].  The primary source which confirms her date of death has not been identified. 

Fulk [II] & his wife had six children: 

1.         FULK FitzWarin [III] ([1170/75?]-[13 Aug 1257/5 Aug 1258]).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Fouke, Willam, Phelip le Rous, Johan e Alayn" as the five sons of "Fouke e Hauwyse"[577].  The likely birth date of his mother, the date of his own first marriage, and the limited date range within which Fulk FitzWarin [III] died, suggests that he was born several years after his parents’ marriage.  "…Fulcus filius Warini et Alanus frater eius…" subscribed a charter dated to [1198] under which "Robertus Corbet" donated property to Buildwas Abbey[578].  The 1201 Pipe Roll names "Sibil, widow of Hugh de Plugenai and Hawise, mother of Fulk Fitz Warin" as co-parceners in Lamborn, Berkshire[579].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Fulco filius Warini" holding one knight’s fee in Shropshire in [1210/12][580].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Fulco filius Warini" held land "in Alwesten i militis"[581].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Berkshire “qd statim visis literis cap in manu dni R totam terram Fulconis fil Warini et Eve de Trascy et sororis sue in bailla sua” for (“pp”) “fil et hede Thom London que dno R detinent qui ee debet in custodia dni R”, dated 10 Jan 1219[582] (mistranslated by the Fine Rolls Project: "take into the king’s hands" the lands of "Fulk fitz Warin and Eva de Tracy and her sister on account of the son [error for daughter] and heir of Thomas de London, who they detain from the king")[583].  A charter of Henry III King of England dated 12 Dec 1234 confirmed the foundation of Alberbury priory, Shropshire by "Fulconis filii Warini"[584].  By order dated 13 Nov 1251 the king confirmed rights of "Fulconi filio Warini seniori" in "foresta de Dene"[585].  “Fulco fil Warini et Claric ux eius” made a fine relating to a lawsuit in Kent in [Oct] 1250[586].  His son Fulk FitzWarin [IV] was named "Fulk son of Warin the younger" in an order dated 13 Aug 1257[587], suggesting that Fulk FitzWarin [III] was still alive at that date.  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records the death "a Blaunchevyle" of Fulk, after seven years of blindness, and his burial "a la Novele Abbeye"[588].  It is likely that Fulk FitzWarin [III] died before 5 Aug 1258, the date of a confirmation made by his son of a grant made by his father (see below).  m firstly ([22 Jul/1 Oct] 1207) as her second husband, MATILDA le Vavasour, widow of THEOBALD Walter Butler of Ireland, daughter of ROBERT le Vavasour & his wife --- (----, bur Priory of Sainte-Marie near "Alberburs").  King John ordered the restoration of the dower of "Matilda his daughter who was the wife of Theobald Walter" to "Robert le Vavasour" dated 20 Jul 1207[589].  King John ordered payment of her dower to "Fulk Fitz Warin and Matilda (who was the wife of Theobald Walter)" restoring to them what he "had previously granted to Robert le Vavasour", dated 1 Oct 1207[590].  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records the death of "dame Mahaud de Caus" and her burial in "une priorie en le honour de Nostre Dame Seinte Marie de le ordre de Grantmont pres de Alberburs, en le boschage, sur la rivere de Sauverne"[591]m secondly CLARICE [d’Auberville], daughter of --- (-[1258]).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records that "Fouke" married "dame Clarice de Auberville" after the death of his first wife[592].  “Fulco fil Warini et Claric ux eius” made a fine relating to a lawsuit in Kent in [Oct] 1250[593].  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records that "dame Clarice" died and was buried "a la Novele Abbeye" one year before the death of her husband[594]Fulk [III] & his first wife had five children: 

a)         HAWISE .  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Hauwyse, qe pus fust dame de Wemme" as the first daughter of "Fouke" and his wife "dame Mahaud de Caus"[595]m (before Jan 1226) WILLIAM [V] Pantulf of Wem, son of HUGH Pantulf & his wife Christiana FitzAlan (-[1232/4 Feb 1233]). 

b)         JOAN .  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records the birth of "Johane, qe pus fust mariee a sire Henre de Penebrugge" as the second daughter of "Fouke" and his wife "dame Mahaud de Caus"[596]m HENRY de Pembruge, son of ---. 

c)         FULK FitzWarin [IV] (-drowned after the battle Lewes 14 May 1264).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records the birth of "nee sur un montaigne de GalesJohan…et quant lenfant fust conferme de evesqe, yl fust apelee Fouke" as the first son of "Fouke" and his wife "dame Mahaud de Caus"[597].  King Henry III granted commissions relating to disputes between "Thomas Corbet" and “Fulk son of Warin the younger” concerning “lands in Balisleg” dated 1 Jul 1250[598].  King Henry III confirmed a lease made by "Fulk son of Warin the younger" dated 13 Aug 1257[599].  “Fulk filius Warini of Wytinthon” released to William FitzWarin rights in the manor of Waneting which William’s father Alan FitzWarin had been gifted by his father Fulk FitzWarin ([III]) by charter dated 5 Aug “42 Henry III[600].  Matthew Paris records “Fulke Fitz Warren...being drowned in the river” after the battle of Lewes[601]Betrothed (1226) to ANGHARAD, daughter of MADOG Prince of Northern Powys & his wife Isota ---.  A letter from "W. de Lascy" to Hubert de Burgh, Justiciar, dated to [1226] urges him to bring forward the marriage of "Angaretham filiam Maddoci filii Griffini neptem meam" and "Fulconem filium Fulconis filii Warini"[602].  The precise relationship between Angharad and Walter de Lacy Lord of Meath has not yet been ascertained.  The primary source which confirms that the marriage took place has not yet been identified.  [m firstly --- de Clifford, daughter of ROGER [II] de Clifford & his [first/second] wife [---/---] (-before 1250).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" records that her son "John Tresgoos" married "Mabill file a noble…chevalier Foulk Fitz-Warren qui avoit a feme le soer Sr Rog de Clifford"[603].  If this is correct, the member of the Clifford family must have been the first wife of Fulk FitzWarin [IV] as the date of the first marriage of his daughter Mabel suggests that she must have been older than her brother Fulk FitzWarin [V].  However, it is possible that this source is in error (it contains other mistakes) and that Mabel’s mother was Constance de Tosny, the known wife of Fulk FitzWarin [IV].  This is particularly likely because, if the source was correct, John de Tresgoz and his wife Mabel would have been very closely related, presumably first cousins, as Roger [II] de Clifford (who, from a chronological point of view, is the most likely candidate for the father of this Clifford daughter) and John de Tresgoz’s father were uterine brothers.  It should be noted that Constance de Tosny’s brother was also named Roger, which could account for any confusion in the source quoted above.]  m [secondly] CONSTANCE de Tosny, daughter of RALPH de Tosny of Castle Maud, Radnorshire & his wife Pernel de Lacy (-after 11 Feb 1266).  The Complete Peerage notes that the manor of Yarkhill, Herefordshire was given to Ralph de Tosny and Pernel his wife who, after her husband’s death, gave it in free marriage to Fulk FitzWarin [IV] and Constance[604].  Fulk FitzWarin [IV] & his [first/second] wife had [one child]: 

i)          [MABEL (-before 24 May 1297).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" records that her son "John Tresgoos" married "Mabill file a noble…chevalier Foulk Fitz-Warren qui avoit a feme le soer Sr Rog de Clifford"[605].  It is suggested that the last reference to Mabel’s mother as a member of the Clifford family represents an error.  If it is correct, John de Tresgoz and his wife would have been very closely related, presumably first cousins, as Roger [II] de Clifford and John de Tresgoz’s father were uterine brothers.  From a chronological point of view, it is likely that Mabel was the daughter of Fulk FitzWarin [IV], whose recorded wife was Constance de Tosny, although it is possible that she was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage to a member of the Clifford family.  A writ dated 24 May "25 Edw I", after the death of "Mabel late the wife of John Tregoz", records in relation to Weston that it was "held in free marriage of the barony of Averenchis…[by] Maud daughter of and heir of William de Averenchis the elder…Hamo le Creveker married her and they gave the manor to William their son and heir in free marriage with the said Mabel.  This William died without heir of his body", names as heirs of "[the said Maud] Juliana daughter of John son of Agnes one of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 23 and more, John de Lenham son of Iseut the second of the daughters of the said Hamo and Maud aged 60 and more"[606]m firstly WILLIAM de Crèvecœur, son of HAMON de Crèvecœur & his second wife Matilda d’Avranches (-before 6 Apr 1263).  m secondly as his first wife, JOHN de Tresgoz, son of ROBERT de Tresgoz & his wife Juliane de Cauntelo (-before 6 Sep 1300).] 

Fulk FitzWarin [IV] & his [second] wife had one child: 

ii)         FULK FitzWarin [V] (14 Sep 1251-24 Nov 1315).  An enquiry, dated “Thursday after St. Mark the Evangelist, 1 Edw. I”, into the age of "Fulk son of Warin" includes testimony that "he will be 22 on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross next" adding that at his birth his father was “much congratulated because all his other children were girls[607].  He was summoned to Parliament from 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord FitzWarin

-        see below

d)         FULK FitzWarin of Alberbury (-[Oct 1292/1311]). 

e)         EVA .  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin records that "Lowis le prince de Walys" married "sire Fouke…Eve sa file" after the death of his first wife "dame Johane…que fust la file le roi Henre de Engleterre"[608].  The Annales Cestrienses record in 1239 that “Lewelinus princeps Wallie” married “filiam Fulconis filii Warini[609]m (1239) as his third/fourth wife, LLYWELYN ap Iorwerth Fawr ("the Great") Prince of North Wales, son of IORWERTH Drwyndwyn ("flat nose") Prince of Gwynedd & his wife Marared of Powys ([1173]-11 Apr 1240, bur Aberconway). 

2.         WILLIAM FitzWarin (-1236 or after).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Fouke, Willam, Phelip le Rous, Johan e Alayn" as the five sons of "Fouke e Hauwyse"[610].  Eyton names “William fitz Warin occ. 1203-1236” as the second son of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary sources which correspond to these dates[611].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willelmus filius Warin" holding two knights’ fees "de eschaeta Normannorum…Mael de Gamage" in Hereford in [1210/12][612].  The sheriff of Lincolnshire was ordered to confiscate the lands of "William fitz Warin" for non-payment of a debt, dated to [1218/19][613].  "William fitz Warin and Agnes his wife" made a fine for "having the lands of Rose of Odell which fall to Agnes by hereditary right", dated 2 Sep 1221[614]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  "William fitz Warin and Agnes his wife" made a fine for "having the lands of Rose of Odell which fall to Agnes by hereditary right", dated 2 Sep 1221[615]

3.         PHILIP FitzWarin (-after 1203).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Fouke, Willam, Phelip le Rous, Johan e Alayn" as the five sons of "Fouke e Hauwyse"[616].  Eyton names “Philip fitz Warin occurs 1203” as the third son of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary source which corresponds to this date[617]

4.         JOHN [Ivo] FitzWarin (-after 1203).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Fouke, Willam, Phelip le Rous, Johan e Alayn" as the five sons of "Fouke e Hauwyse"[618].  Eyton names “John or Ivo fitz Warin occurs 1203” as the fourth son of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary source which corresponds to this date[619]

5.         RICHARD FitzWarin (-1196 or after).  Eyton names “Richard fitz Warin occurs c. 1195-6” as the fifth son of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary sources which correspond to these dates[620]

6.         ALAN FitzWarin (-1203 or after).  The Legend of Fulk Fitz Warin names "Fouke, Willam, Phelip le Rous, Johan e Alayn" as the five sons of "Fouke e Hauwyse"[621].  "…Fulcus filius Warini et Alanus frater eius…" subscribed a charter dated to [1198] under which "Robertus Corbet" donated property to Buildwas Abbey[622].  Eyton names “Alan fitz Warin occ. 1195-1203” as the sixth son of Fulk FitzWarin [II] but does not cite the primary sources which correspond to these dates[623]same person as...?  ALAN FitzWarinm ---.  The name of Alan’s wife is not known.  Alan & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM FitzWarin (-after 5 Aug 1258).  “Fulk filius Warini of Wytinthon” released to William FitzWarin rights in the manor of Waneting which William’s father Alan FitzWarin had been gifted by his father Fulk FitzWarin ([III]) by charter dated 5 Aug “42 Henry III[624]

 

 

The primary source which confirms the parentage of the following two sisters has not been identified.  The 10 Jan 1219 document cited below suggests their close family relationship with Fulk FitzWarin [III]: maybe they were his sisters.  Although the chronology would be tight, another possibility is that they were the daughters of his older sibling, most likely a sister considering that Fulk was his father’s successor.  Another connection with the FitzWarin family is provided by the Testa de Nevill which lists "Feuda Fulconis Filii Warini" in Wiltshire which includes "Eva de Bassingeburn [daughter of Eva [de Tracy] by her first husband] tenet in Westbur dimidium feudum i militis de Eva de Tracy, et ipsa de dicto Fulcone, et Fulco de rege in capite", dated to [1242/43][625].  Another curiosity is that Eva is consistently described in documents as “de Tracy”.  At first sight, she presumably adopted the family name of her first husband, although such practice was unusual at the time.  While other examples have been seen where married noble ladies abandoned their birth family name in favour of their husband’s name, they are maybe explained if the husband’s family was more prestigious than her own.  Another possibility is therefore presumably that the father of the two sisters (assuming that they were granddaughters of Fulk FitzWarin [II]) was a member of a different branch of the Tracy family from Eva’s first husband. 

 

1.         EVA [de Tracy] ([before [1180/82?]-[Godstow?] after [1242/43]).  Her birth date is suggested from a 28 Jan 1196 document of her first husband (follow his hyperlink for details), and is consistent with her sister being the mother of King John’s son Oliver (see below).  Indications about Eva’s possible birth family are discussed above.  Stapleton records that “Oliver, son of Henry de Tracy...survived till 12 Joh. 1211 [=1210/11], when Eva, his relict, wife first of Thomas de Londres, made proffer of 120 marks for assignation of dower and license of marrying at will” (no source citation)[626].  As noted above, Stapleton names Eva as “wife first of Thomas de Londres”.  This phrase does not appear in the original source: the 1210/11 Pipe Roll records that “Eva que fuit uxor Oliveri de Traci” made a fine “pro habenda dota sua...de tenemento quod fuit Oliveri viri sui, et pro habendo maritagio suo”, and in a later entry that “Eva que fuit uxor Oliveri de Traci” owed a debt “pro habenda custodia filii sui heredis Oliveri de Traci cum tota terra quam habuit die qua obiit...[627].  Thomas was therefore Eva’s second husband and Stapleton incorrect.  The Testa de Nevill lists landholdings, dated 1219, which include "Eva de Trascey est de donatione domini regis et non est maritata, et valet terra eius in Esgarestona quam tenet de domino rege" in Berkshire "Rotulus eschætarum... in hundredo de Launburn", and in Devonshire "terra sua de Bovy"[628].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Berkshire “qd statim visis literis cap in manu dni R totam terram Fulconis fil Warini et Eve de Trascy et sororis sue in bailla sua” for (“pp”) “fil et hede Thom London que dno R detinent qui ee debet in custodia dni R”, dated 10 Jan 1219[629] (mistranslated by the Fine Rolls Project: "take into the king’s hands" the lands of "Fulk fitz Warin and Eva de Tracy and her sister on account of the son [error for daughter] and heir of Thomas de London, who they detain from the king")[630].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Devon that, “[si] fil et heres Thom de Lond inventa fuerit in bailla sua” (unless in the custody of the king) or “si abducta fuerit a bailla sua”, he should take “in manu dni R...totam terram Eve de Trascy matris sue in bailla sua”, dated 26 Jan 1219[631].  "Eva de Tracy" paid a fine for "having a weekly market…at her manor of Bovey", dated 23 Oct 1219[632].  An undated document [between documents dated 26 Dec 1219 and 30 Dec 1219] records that “Willus Crassus primogenitus” made a fine to King Henry for “habiendo in uxorem filiam et heredem Thome de Lond”, payment guaranteed by ten named subscribers[633].  King Henry III notified the sheriff of Dorset and Somerset that “Willelmus Crassus” had made a fine for “habienda custodia terre q fuit Thome de London cum maritagio Hawisie filie et heredis ipsius Thome” and ordered him to transfer “eidem Willelmo omnibus terris...q fuerunt ipsius Thome in bailla tua plenariam saisinam”, dated 21 Jul 1220[634].  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to disseise “Eva de Trasey de terra sua q tenuit in dote in Baillia tua”, when he granted “saisina...Willo Crasso seniori de terris q fuerunt Thome de Lond in Bailla tua”, dated 7 Aug 1220[635].  King Henry III notified the sheriff of Wiltshire that “Eva de Trascy” had made a fine for “transgressione quam fecit erga nos eo qd maritavit Hawisiam filiam suam...sine licencia nostra”, dated 23 Jun 1222[636].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Eva de Tracy...quia maritavit Hawisam filiam suam sine licencia R. que fuit de donatione sue” owing in “Nova Oblata” in Devon[637].  The following document indicates that Hawise was Eva’s daughter by her first marriage:  “Paganus de Cadurcis filius et hæres dominæ Hawisiæ de Londonia” donated land to Whiteland, Carmarthenshire, for the souls of “dominorum Thomæ de Londonia, Patricii de Cadurcis, Will. et Mauricii de Londonia, Warini de Bassingburne, dominæ Evæ de Tracy, Aleys et Gundre defunctorum”, by charter dated May 1270, witnessed by “dominis Patricio et Hernico militibus, fratribus nostris[638].  “Eva de Tracy” is named in a document dated [1231/32][639].  The Testa de Nevill lists "Feuda Fulconis Filii Warini" in Wiltshire which include "Eva de Bassingeburn tenet in Westbur dimidium feudum i militis de Eva de Tracy, et ipsa de dicto Fulcone, et Fulco de rege in capite", dated to [1242/43][640].  An undated document records the request for “nobili matrona, domina Eva de Tracy” to stay at Godstow nunnery[641].  Some background to Eva’s earlier life is provided by inquisitions dated 5 Jan 1253 which record that “the manor of Bovy never paid sheriff’s aid in the time of Oliver de Tracy, father of the said Henry...[who] fell into the custody of King John and Eva his mother had her dower of the said money, and she dwelling in distant parts allowed her bailiffs to pay sometimes more, sometimes less...[642]m firstly (before 28 Jan 1196) [as his second wife,] OLIVER de Tracy, son of HENRY de Tracy & his [second] wife Hawise --- ([1140?]-[1209/10]).  m secondly ([1210/11?]) THOMAS [II] de London, son of WILLIAM [IV] de London & his wife --- (-[1211/15?]). 

2.         daughter (-after 10 Jan 1219).  King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Berkshire “qd statim visis literis cap in manu dni R totam terram Fulconis fil Warini et Eve de Trascy et sororis sue in bailla sua” for (“pp”) “fil et hede Thom London que dno R detinent qui ee debet in custodia dni R”, dated 10 Jan 1219[643] (mistranslated by the Fine Rolls Project: "take into the king’s hands" the lands of "Fulk fitz Warin and Eva de Tracy and her sister on account of the son [error for daughter] and heir of Thomas de London, who they detain from the king")[644]same person as...?  HAWISE ([1183/85?]-[2 Oct 1217/14 Mar 1218] or [after 10 Jan 1219?]).  Given-Wilson & Curteis name “Hawise” as the mother of King John’s son Oliver, adding that “she had some claim to land in Kent and it is possible that she was a Tracy” (no sources cited)[645].  The chronology of Oliver’s life suggests that he was born before the king ascended the throne, suggesting Hawise’s birth [1183/85?] (which would be consistent with her being Eva’s sister, see above).  The primary source which confirms Hawise’s land-holding in Kent has not been identified, although her relationship with John and the possible Tracy family connection (through her possible sster Eva) are indicated by the following document: King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to leave in peace (“in pace esse permittat”) “manerium de Hamedon ita qd Eva de Tracy et Hawis mater Oliveri fratris dni Reg...” (“...habebant inde ronable estuveriu suu sn wasto usq”?), in accordance with a council decision in London 29 Sep, dated 2 Oct 1217[646].  The joint holding of the property by Eva and Hawise suggests a close relationship between the two.  Maybe they were sisters, in which case Hawise could have been the same person as Eva’s unnamed sister recorded in the 10 Jan 1219 document cited above.  The family relationship is further indicated by another document: King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Wiltshire to grant “plenam seisinam de terra de Hanedon...q habuit de baillio Com W. Mar rectoris nostri...cui Wills de London eam invadiavit p sexaginta marc”, noting that “terram illam habebat done Eva de Trasey q clamat terram illam e.e dotem suam”, to [Hawise’s son] “Olivero fratri meo” who ”de predictis sexaginta marc satisfecit”, dated 14 Mar 1218[647].  The absence of Hawise from this second document is difficult to explain especially as, in contrast to the earlier document, Eva claimed the property in question in her sole name as “dotem suam”.  At first sight, this would suggest that Hawise died [2 Oct 1217/14 Mar 1218], which is inconsistent with her being Eva’s unnamed sister who was recorded in the 10 Jan 1219 document cited above.  One plausible explanation for Hawise surviving until 1219 could be her voluntary renunciation of her rights in favour of her son, but no confirmatory source has been found.  Mistress of JOHN of England Comte de Mortain, son of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore Dss d'Aquitaine (Beaumont Palace, Oxford 24 Dec 1166 or 1167-Newark Castle, Lincolnshire 18/19 Oct 1216, bur Worcester Cathedral).  He succeeded his brother in 1199 as JOHN King of England

 

 

 

B.      LORDS FITZWARIN

 

                           

FULK FitzWarin [V], son of FULK FitzWarin [IV] & his [second] wife Constance de Tosny (14 Sep 1251-24 Nov 1315).  An enquiry, dated “Thursday after St. Mark the Evangelist, 1 Edw I”, into the age of "Fulk son of Warin" includes testimony that "he will be 22 on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross next" adding that at his birth his father was “much congratulated because all his other children were girls[648].  He was summoned to Parliament from 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord FitzWarin

m (before 25 Feb 1277) MARGARET, daughter of GRUFFYDD ap Gwenwynwyn & his wife Hawise le Strange (-11 May 1336).  The Complete Peerage indicates inquisitions dated 25 Feb 1276 (O.S.) which records Fulk FitzWarin [IV] holding land at Bauseley [in Alberbury, county Montgomery] until “Gruffydd ap Wennonwen” occupied the premises following a dispute with Thomas Corbet, until transferring it to Fulk FitzWarin [V] who married his daughter, noting that FulkFitzWarin [V] was later dispossessed following other disputes[649].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 28 Jun “10 Edw III”, after the death of "Margaret late the wife of Fulk le Fitz Waryn", records "Alweston...held for life of the inheritance of Walter, son and heir of Walter de Gloucestre deceased, a minor" with “Walter son of the said Walter de Gloucestre deceased aged 21 years and more is his next heir[650]

Fulk [V] & his wife had children: 

1.         FULK FitzWarin [VI] (-before 6 Jun 1336)Lord FitzWarinm ELEANOR de Beauchamp, daughter of JOHN de Beauchamp of Somerset, Lord Beauchamp & his wife Cecile de Vivonne (-after 18 Nov 1341).  Fulk [VI] & his wife had children: 

a)         FULK FitzWarin [VII] (-25 Jul 1349).  Lord FitzWarinm ---.  The Complete Peerage states that he married “(it is said) Joan da. of Henry (de Beaumont) Earl of Buchan by Alice, da. of Alexander Comyn” but cites no evidence[651]Fulk [VII] & his wife had two children: 

i)          FULK FitzWarin [VIII] (Whittington 2 Mar 1341-12 Feb 1374)Lord FitzWarinm MARGERY Audley, daughter of JAMES Audley Lord Audley & his second wife Isabel ---.  Inquisitions dated 23 Nov 1392 relating to the manor of Tawstok name "Margaret the third sister of Nicholas [d’Audelee Chivaler]" and her grandson "Fulk Fitz Waryn son of Fulk" as heirs of Nicholas[652]Fulk [VIII] & his wife had children: 

(a)       FULK FitzWarin [IX] (Combe Martin, Devon 2 Mar 1362-8 Aug 1391, bur Whittington)Lord FitzWarin.  The will of "Fulk Fitzwarine Knight", dated 8 Aug 1391, chose burial “in...the church of Whittington”, bequeathed property to “Philip Fitzwarine my uncle” and appointed “Elizabeth my wife and the said Philip” as his executors[653]m firstly as her first husband, ELIZABETH Cogan, daughter of WILLIAM Cogan of Bampton, Devon & his second wife Isabel Loring of Chalgrave, Bedfordshire ([1373/74]-29 Oct 1397).  The will of "Fulk Fitzwarine Knight", dated 8 Aug 1391, bequeathed property to “Philip Fitzwarine my uncle” and appointed “Elizabeth my wife and the said Philip” as his executors[654].  She married secondly (pardon for marrying without royal licence 11 Feb 1393) as his first wife, Hugh de Courtenay of Goodrington and Stancombe, Devon

-        LORDS FITZWARIN[655]

ii)         PHILIP FitzWarin (-after 8 Aug 1391).  The will of "Fulk Fitzwarine Knight", dated 8 Aug 1391, bequeathed property to “Philip Fitzwarine my uncle” and appointed “Elizabeth my wife and the said Philip” as his executors[656]

2.         HAWISE (-2 Sep 1344, bur Dunstable Grey-Friars).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 30 Aug "22 Edw I", after the death of "Ralph de Gousehull", records that "he had a daughter by Hawis daughter of Sir Fulk son of Warin...who is his heir...[Margaret aged half a year at the feast of St. Martin next]"[657].  Her second marriage is confirmed by inquisitions following a writ regarding proof of age of "Margaret daughter and heir of Ralph de Goushull", which record "the manor of Goushull...(part) in the wardship of Robert de Hoo and Hawis his wife"[658]m firstly RALPH de Goushill, son of PETER de Goushill & his wife --- (-before 30 Aug 1294).  m secondly ROBERT Hoo, son of --- (-1 Nov 1340, bur Cowsell, All Souls). 

 

 

 

LORDS FITZWILLIAM

 

 

1.         WILLIAM FitzUlf (-[1125/29]).  Henry I King of England confirmed “in feodo et hereditate terram suam de Fangefosse et de Thorpe et de Meltemebia et de Geveldala” to “Willelmo filio Ulfi” by charter dated to [1120/29], witnessed by “Roberto de Ferrariis et Waltero Espec et Roger de Valoniis et Fornone filio Sigulfi[659].  A charter dated to [1142/54] confirmed that "Willelmus filius Ulfi" donated land "in Ghiualdala" to Hexham priory[660]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a)         RALPH FitzWilliam (-after [1129/30]).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Rad fili Willi" in Yorkshire[661]m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH FitzRalph of Grimthorpe, Yorkshire (-[1 Dec 1189/1197]).  "Radulphi filii Radulphi" confirmed land "in Geuld", donated by William FitzUlf, to Hexham priory by undated charter[662]m firstly ---.  The claim by Ralph’s known wife Emma for her dower from Ralph’s son William suggests that she may not have been William’s mother.  m secondly EMMA de Teise, daughter of ---.  Farrer states that “Emma de Teise, coheir of Neasham”, wife of Ralph FitzRalph, founded Neasham priory before 1158 with “Engelaise de Teise her sister[663].  “Emma qu fuit uxor Rad f Rad” claimed her dower “Nesham et Gri[mestorp]...” from “Willm fil Rad”, dated 1197[664]Ralph & his first wife had one child: 

(a)       WILLIAM FitzRalph (-before Aug 1218).  “Emma qu fuit uxor Rad f Rad” claimed her dower “Nesham et Gri[mestorp]...” from “Willm fil Rad”, dated 1197[665].  His date of death is ascertained from an order dated 26 Aug 1218 which granted his land to “filium et heredem Willi fil Radi[666]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(1)       RALPH FitzWilliam .  “Rad fil Willi” made a fine for the land of “Willi patris sui i Grimeston et Hothu” dated 9 Feb 1227[667]

-        see below

 

 

RALPH FitzWilliam, son of WILLIAM FitzRalph & his wife --- .  “Rad fil Willi” made a fine for the land of “Willi patris sui i Grimeston et Hothu” dated 9 Feb 1227[668]

m ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known. 

Ralph & his wife had one child: 

1.         WILLIAM FitzRalph (-after 1272).  “Willelmus filius Radi de Grimthorp et Johanna uxor eius” made a fine dated 1272[669]m JOAN de Greystoke, daughter of THOMAS FitzWilliam [de Greystoke] & his wife Christiana de Vipont (-after 1272).  Wilson records the Greystoke barony passing to “the son of Joan de Greystoke, wife of William fits Ralf lord of Grimthorp” but does not record her parentage [see the 1306 inquisition after the death of John de Greystoke, below][670].  The Complete Peerage records her parentage (no source cited)[671].  “Willelmus filius Radi de Grimthorp et Johanna uxor eius” made a fine dated 1272[672]William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM FitzWilliam (-after 1272).  “Willelmus filius Willelmi fil Radi” made a fine dated 1272[673]

b)         RALPH FitzWilliam of Grimthorpe and Hildreskelf, Yorkshire (-11 Feb 1317, bur Neasham Priory).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord FitzWilliam.  Lord of Greystoke: inquisitions dated "after the octave of St. Michael, 34 Edw I", after the death of "John son of William de Craystok...", note a writ of certiorari dated 18 Sep 1306 granting the deceased licence to "enfeoff Ralph son of William of the manor and barony of Craystock" and other specified properties[674].  An undated roll records the death in 1316 (O.S.?) of “Radulphus filius Willelmi” and his burial “apud Nesham[675]m firstly ---.  The name of Ralph’s wife is not known.  m secondly (royal licence 1 Nov 1281) as her second husband, MARGERY de Bolebec, widow of NICHOLAS Corbet, daughter of HUGH de Bolebec of Angerton, Northumberland & his wife Tiphaine --- ([1240/41]-before Feb 1301).  An undated roll records that, after the death of “Nicholaus Corbet”, “Margeria sine prole” married “Radulpho filio Willemi militi” by whom she had “duos filios Robertum et Willelmum[676]Ralph & his second wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM FitzRalph (-before 6 Jul 1297).  An undated roll records that, after the death of “Nicholaus Corbet”, “Margeria sine prole” married “Radulpho filio Willemi militi” by whom she had “duos filios Robertum et Willelmum[677].  “Willelmo filio...Radulphi et Katerinæ uxoris eius” donated property to Newminster by charter dated 15 May 1290[678].  An undated roll records that William and his wife died childless[679]m (before 15 May 1290) KATHERINE, daughter of ---.  “Willelmo filio...Radulphi et Katerinæ uxoris eius” donated property to Newminster by charter dated 15 May 1290[680]

ii)         ROBERT FitzRalph ([1276/77]-[11 Feb/15 Apr] 1317, bur Borthwick).  An undated roll records that, after the death of “Nicholaus Corbet”, “Margeria sine prole” married “Radulpho filio Willemi militi” by whom she had “duos filios Robertum et Willelmum[681].  An inquisition “die Veneris prox. ante festum Pentecostes anno regni regis Edwardi decimo” records the death of “dominus Robertus filius Radulphi” and listed his properties[682].  An undated roll records that “Robertus” was buried “apud Botyrwyk[683]m ELIZABETH, daughter of --- (-17 Nov 1346).  An inquisition “die Veneris prox. ante festum Pentecostes anno regni regis Edwardi decimo” records the death of “dominus Robertus filius Radulphi” noting that “dictus Robertus et Elizabeth uxor eius” were enfeoffed with half of these fiefs[684]Robert & his wife had children: 

(a)       RALPH de Greystoke of Greystoke (15 Aug 1299-Gateshead 14 Jul 1323, bur Newminster).  An inquisition “die Veneris prox. ante festum Pentecostes anno regni regis Edwardi decimo” records the death of “dominus Robertus filius Radulphi” naming “Radulphus filius ipsius Roberti...ætatis XIX annorum ad festum Assumpcionis Beatæ Mariæ prox. futurum” as his heir[685]

-        LORDS GREYSTOKE

 

 

 

LORDS GIFFARD

 

 

 

1.         OSBERT [I] [Osbern] Giffard of Elston in Orcheston St George, Wiltshire (-before 1096).  Domesday Book records land held by “Osbern Giffard” in Earley in Charldon Hundred in Berkshire; land in Wiltshire, including Elston, Orcheston and Stanton; in Dorset, Gold Hill; land in Bispesdone in Oxfordshire; Rockhampton Stoke Gifford Brimpsfield and Oldbury in Gloucestershire[686].  Osbert’s parentage is not known, but the proximity of his landholding to that of Walter Giffard (future Earl of Buckingham) in Berkshire suggests a close relationship, as does his name which is similar to “Osbern” who was Walter Giffard’s paternal grandfather (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY).  Maybe they were brothers.  m ---.  The name of Osbert’s wife is not known.  Osbert [I] & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         ELIAS [I] Giffard (-[1130]).  Elias [IV] Giffard recorded in 1221 that “Osbertus Giffard antecessor suus qui venit ad conquestum Angl’ tenmuit manerium de Brimesfeld…et post eum Elias filius suus…et post eum Elias filius illius Elie et pater suus”, the Complete Peerage noting that “At least one generation is here omitted” and adding that Elias [I] had succeeded his father “Before 1096[687].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "terram de Bocholt…" made in 1121 by "Helyas Gyffard et Ala uxor eius…et filius eorum Elyas"[688].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Elye Giff" in Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Northamptonshire[689]m ALA, daughter of --- (-after 1121).  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "terram de Bocholt…" made in 1121 by "Helyas Gyffard et Ala uxor eius…et filius eorum Elyas"[690]Elias [I] & his wife had one child: 

i)          ELIAS [II] Giffard (-after 1166).  Elias [IV] Giffard recorded in 1221 that “Osbertus Giffard antecessor suus qui venit ad conquestum Angl’ tenmuit manerium de Brimesfeld…et post eum Elias filius suus…et post eum Elias filius illius Elie et pater suus”, the Complete Peerage noting that “At least one generation is here omitted[691]

-        see below

b)         [WILLIAM Giffard (-after [1127]).  "…Will Giff…" witnessed the charter dated to [1127] which records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[692].] 

 

 

ELIAS [II] Giffard, son of ELIAS [I] Giffard & his wife Ala --- (-after 1166).  Elias [IV] Giffard recorded in 1221 that “Osbertus Giffard antecessor suus qui venit ad conquestum Angl’ tenmuit manerium de Brimesfeld…et post eum Elias filius suus…et post eum Elias filius illius Elie et pater suus”, the Complete Peerage noting that “At least one generation is here omitted[693].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "terram de Bocholt…" made in 1121 by "Helyas Gyffard et Ala uxor eius…et filius eorum Elyas"[694].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "Cronham" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179] by "Helias Giffard filius Heliæ senioris et Alæ uxoris eius"[695].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "ecclesiam Beatæ Mariæ de Boytone, ecclesiam Sancti Georgii de Orchestone cum capella Sancti Andreæ de Wyneterborne" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179] by "Helias Boy Gyffard", for the soul of "Bertæ uxoris suus", later confirmed by "Walterus Giffard filius Heliæ…tempore Hamelini abbatis"[696].  "Elyas Giffardus" donated "ecclesiam Sanctæ Mariæ de Boytona" to Gloucester St Peter, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Bertha", by undated charter[697]

m ([1127]) BERTHA, daughter RICHARD FitzPons & his wife Matilda --- (-after 1167).  A charter dated to [1127] records that "Ricard Pontii filii" granted the manor of "Lechia" to "Mathildi uxori mee in matrimoniu" in exchange for her original marriage portion, the manor of Ullingswick in Herefordshire, which he gave to "Helie Giff in mat-monu cum filia mea Berta"[698].  "Helyas Giffardus" recorded that "uxori meæ Bertæ medietatem totius manerii de Ullingwike maritagii sui" and donated the property to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated 18 Jul 1163[699].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Helias Giffard junior et Berta mater eius" donated "octo libratas terræ in Willyngwyke" in exchange for "Cronham quam pater eius dederat quando factus fuerat monachus", confirmed by "Helias filius eorum", and that "Berta uxor Heliæ Giffard" donated "terras in Wllingwuke…tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179][700].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "ecclesiam Beatæ Mariæ de Boytone, ecclesiam Sancti Georgii de Orchestone cum capella Sancti Andreæ de Wyneterborne" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179] by "Helias Boy Gyffard", for the soul of "Bertæ uxoris suus", later confirmed by "Walterus Giffard filius Heliæ…tempore Hamelini abbatis"[701].  "Elyas Giffardus" donated "ecclesiam Sanctæ Mariæ de Boytona" to Gloucester St Peter, for the souls of "…uxoris meæ Bertha", by undated charter[702]

Elias [II] & his wife had [five] children: 

1.         ELIAS [III] Giffard (-[1190]).  Elias [IV] Giffard recorded in 1221 that “Osbertus Giffard antecessor suus qui venit ad conquestum Angl’ tenmuit manerium de Brimesfeld…et post eum Elias filius suus…et post eum Elias filius illius Elie et pater suus”, the Complete Peerage noting that “At least one generation is here omitted”, adding that Elias [III] owed “£100 pro fine terre sue in 1166 and died before Michaelmas 1190, when William le Mareschal owed 1440 marks for the custody of the lands of Elis Giffard” and recording his parentage as shown here (no source citations for these added statements)[703].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Elias Giffard" held land from "comitis Patricii" in Wiltshire, also record the knights’ fees in Wiltshire held from "baroniæ Eliæ Giffardi", and that "Elias Giffard" held one knight’s fee from the bishop of Worcester in Worcestershire[704].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Helias Giffard junior et Berta mater eius" donated "octo libratas terræ in Willyngwyke" in exchange for "Cronham quam pater eius dederat quando factus fuerat monachus", confirmed by "Helias filius eorum", and that "Berta uxor Heliæ Giffard" donated "terras in Wllingwuke…tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179][705].  "Helyam Giffard" reached agreement with Gloucester St Peter concerning "ecclesiam Sanctæ Mariæ de Boytona" by charter dated to [1179/1205][706].  "Helyas Giffardus" donated land "in Ullingwika" to Gloucester St Peter, and confirmed the donation of land "in Ullingewike" donated by "mater mea", by undated charter[707].  "Helyas Giffardus" confirmed the donations of land "in Ullingewike" to Gloucester St Peter made by "Helyas Giffard pater meus et Berta mater meus" by undated charter[708]m MATILDA de Berkeley, daughter of MAURICE FitzRobert de Berkeley & his wife Alice de Berkeley (-after 1199).  Smyth states that "the daughter of…lord Maurice was married to Osbert Gifford kt, by whome hee had issue, Osbert Gifford and others, which Osbert became servant to King Henry the third in the eighth year of his raigne", citing a charter at Berkeley, close roll and fine roll records[709]The chronology of the Giffard family suggests that Matilda more probably married Elias [III].  This suggested identification of her husband appears corroborated by the charter dated to after 1220 under which “Thomas de Berkeley” granted “the reversion of the land in Foxcote which his wife Lucy holds in dower” to “Osbert Gyffard his nephew” [who is identified as Osbert [II] Giffard, son of Elias Giffard][710]: this document also confirms Matilda’s parentage, assuming that “nephew” (presumably “nepos” in the original) indicated sister’s son.  Moriarty records “Matilda Giffard holding half of Helidon, one of the manors of the Twyford Giffords in later times, in 1199”, identifying Matilda as the widow of Elias [III], “holding it as part of her dower[711]Inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated "2 Edw III", following the death of " John Gyffard of Brymesfeld…", record that Elias [III] married “Maud, of whom he begat a son named Elias and a daughter named B[erta][712]Elias [III] & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         ELIAS [IV] Giffard (-1247).  Elias [IV] Giffard recorded in 1221 that “Osbertus Giffard antecessor suus qui venit ad conquestum Angl’ tenmuit manerium de Brimesfeld…et post eum Elias filius suus…et post eum Elias filius illius Elie et pater suus”, the Complete Peerage noting that “At least one generation is here omitted[713].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Helias Giffard" holding nine knights’ fees "in Winterborne" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][714].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Elyas Giffard" owed "pro Brumesfeld et Rochamt…ix milites"[715].  Inquisitions following an undated writ, endorsed "32 Hen III", after the death of "Elias Giffard" names "--- his son aged 16 is his heir" and the manors of "Winterburne…Sernton…Ayston held of John Mautravers in free marriage" in Wiltshire[716]m firstly ISABEL de la Musarder, daughter of ---.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard (the younger), had two wives, Isabel de la Musarder the first, and Alice Mautravers the second…The said Isabel bore two sons and a daughter, names unknown, who all died without heirs "[717]m secondly ISOLDA [Alice] Mautravers, daughter of --- Mautravers & his wife ---.  The Complete Peerage names “his 2nd wife, Alice, sister of Sir John Mautravers, of Lytchet Matravers, Dorset” as the mother of Elias’s son John (no source cited)[718], presumably based on inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of [her grandson] "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", which record that "John de Mautravers by his charter granted the…manor [of Ascheton] and the advowson of the church of St. Peter, Chodeford, to Elias Giffard…in free marriage with Alice, sister of the same John Mautravers …"[719].  An undated writ, endorsed "32 Hen III", after the death of "Elias Giffard" names the manors of "…Ayston held of John Mautravers in free marriage" in Wiltshire[720].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "juratores presentant quod Johannes filius et heres Elie Giffard debet esse in custodia domini regis; et Isolde que fuit uxor predicti Elie habet custodiam eius..."[721].  No other source has been found which confirms the correct name of Elias’s second wife.  Elias [IV] & his first wife had three children: 

i)          two sons .  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard (the younger), had two wives, Isabel de la Musarder the first, and Alice Mautravers the second…The said Isabel bore two sons and a daughter, names unknown, who all died without heirs "[722]

ii)         daughter .  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard (the younger), had two wives, Isabel de la Musarder the first, and Alice Mautravers the second…The said Isabel bore two sons and a daughter, names unknown, who all died without heirs "[723]

Elias [IV] & his second wife had one child: 

iii)        JOHN Giffard ([1231/32]-Boyton, Wiltshire 29 May 1299, bur Malmesbury Abbey).  An undated writ, endorsed "32 Hen III", after the death of "Elias Giffard" names "--- his son aged 16 is his heir"[724].  An undated writ, regarding the proof of age of "John son of Elias Giffard", states that "he was 4 years old when he was contracted with Aubrey de Caumvill of Arewe, who was about 4 or 5 years old" but "declaiming against the marriage", that a witness states that he was "26 years old" and another that he was "28 and entering his 29th year…29 on the day of St Walstan"[725].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Giffard

-        see below

iv)        MATILDA Giffard .  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard had issue John Giffard of Bremesfeld, Maud, Isabel, and Mabel…the said Maud…espoused to Godfrey Escudamor…" (and name the couple’s daughter, her husband, and their grandson)[726].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", also records information about Elias [IV]’s daughters and their descendants[727]m GODFREY Scudamore, son of ---. 

v)         ISABEL Giffard .  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard had issue John Giffard of Bremesfeld, Maud, Isabel, and Mabel…Isabel…espoused to Thomas le Tabler…" (and name the couple’s son, his daughter and her husband, and their son)[728].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", also records information about Elias [IV]’s daughters and their descendants[729]m THOMAS Tabley, son of ---. 

vi)        MABEL Giffard .  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard had issue John Giffard of Bremesfeld, Maud, Isabel, and Mabel…Mabel…espoused to Richard Dansy…" (and name the couple’s son and grandsonn)[730].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", also records information about Elias [IV]’s daughters and their descendants[731]m RICHARD Dansy, son of ---. 

b)         OSBERT [II] Giffard of Winterborne Houghton, Dorset (-[23 Jun 1236/17 Oct 1237])His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter for St. Bartholomew cited below, and by the Gloucester Assize Roll 1221 which records “William Peitevin” granting “land of Side” [Syde, Gloucestershire] to “Osbert Giffard, brother of Elias”, read together with the Curia Regis Roll [28 Oct 1226/27 Oct 1227] which records “Osbert Gifford of Norfolk” [identified as Osbert [III], see below, by Moriarty who discusses in detail his family’s later connection with Syde] acknowledging owing “Osbert Gifford of Brimsfield” for “a quitclaim of the manor of Syde in Gloucestershire[732]"Osbert Gifford" was granted livery of "the manor of Winterburn" made to him by "Elias Gifford his brother" dated 11 May 1229[733]: Moriarty discusses whether “Winterburn” in this document was Winterbourne Hucton, Dorset or Winterbourne, Wiltshire[734].  “Hosbert Gifford, son of Elias” donated his land in the manor of Brimsfield to the Hospital of St, Bartholomew, for the souls of “William de Bruere (Briwere) and of Helias Gifford and Maud his wife, mother of the said Osbert…and of Osbert and Isabel his wife”, by undated charter[735].  Moriarty records that Osbert [II] “died shortly before 17 Oct 1237” (no source cited)[736]A writ dated 24 Jul "31 Hen III", after the deaths of "Osbert Giffard and Alice Murdac" names "Osbert son of the said Osbert, age variously stated as 12 ½, 13 ½ and 13 on the quinzaine before St John the Baptist last, is heir of the said Osbert and Alice" and his manors "…Hekebokel…sometime held by the said Osbert and Isabel his wife [Devon]…"[737]Moriarty records sources which confirm his date of death[738].  [Matthew Paris records the death in 1245 of "Osberti Giffard", although he does not specify his parentage[739]: presumably this entry refers to another Osbert.]  m ([1230/33?]) ISABEL de Bocland, daughter of ALAN de Bocland of Egg Buckland and Hooe & his wife Alice Murdac ([1203/15?]-before 8 Jul 1242).  Moriarty records her parentage, noting her birth “probably about 1203-1215”, her marriage “priory to 4 Jan 1226 (N.S.)”, and her death “shortly prior to 8 Jul 1242 when her mother Alice Murdac was made guardian to her infant grandchild Osbert Giffard”, and also lists the manors of which she was heiress[740].  She is named and her marriage confirmed, but her family origin not given, in the 24 Jul “31 Hen III” writ cited above under her husband.  The writ also confirms that her son was the heir of both Alice Murdac and Osbert [II] Giffard, which suggests that Isabel predeceased her husband and mother.  Her marriage date is suggested based on the age of her son in this writ.  Osbert [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          OSBERT [IV] Giffard ([1234/35]-after 12 Mar 1301).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 24 Jul "31 Hen III", after the deaths of "Osbert Giffard and Alice Murdac" name "Osbert son of the said Osbert, age variously stated as 12 ½, 13 ½ and 13 on the quinzaine before St John the Baptist last, is heir of the said Osbert and Alice" and record his manors "…Hekebokel…sometime held by the said Osbert and Isabel his wife [Devon]…"[741].  The Complete Peerage cites numerous documents which name Osbert [IV][742].  A fine was levied “On the morrow of All Souls’, 53 Henry III” [2 Nov 1268] between “Osbert Gifford, querant” and “Ralph de Wedon, deforciant” for “15 librates of land in Astwell and Faucate” (no source citation)[743].  In 1284, “Osbert Gifford held in Astwell and Faucote of Ralph de Wedon[744].  “Osbert Giffard” was sued [20 Nov 1290/19 Nov 1291] by “Sarah, who was the wife of his son Osbert, deceased, claiming her dower thirds in the manors of Astwell and Faucotes in Northants, Dadinton in Oxon, Winterburn in Dorset, and Foxcote and Theaumes in Somerset[745].  A suit brought by “Philip de Wilugby, the king’s clerk” against “Osbert Gifford, Senr.”, dated early 1291, shows that Sarah had recovered her dower in Astwell and Dadyngton and that “Osbert, son of Osbert, left a daughter Alice, who was his heir”, the same suit mentioning “tenements in Astwell, held by John Gifford, which were part of Sarah’s dower[746]m JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 16 Nov 1289).  Osbert [IV] & his wife had two children: 

(a)       OSBERT [V] Giffard ([1255/60?]-before [20 Nov 1290/19 Nov 1291]).  His parentage is confirmed by the [20 Nov 1290/19 Nov 1291] suit of his widow, which also confirms that he was deceased at the time.  m SARAH, daughter of --- (-after 1291).  “Osbert Giffard” was sued [20 Nov 1290/19 Nov 1291] by “Sarah, who was the wife of his son Osbert, deceased, claiming her dower thirds in the manors of Astwell and Faucotes in Northants, Dadinton in Oxon, Winterburn in Dorset, and Foxcote and Theaumes in Somerset[747].  Osbert [V] & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ALICE Giffard .  She is named in the early 1291 suit cited above under her grandfather.  “Richard de Arcy and wife Alice” claimed against “George, son of John Gifford, two parts of the manor of Astwell in right of Alice, by writ of “de forma donacionis”, and George pleaded that he held by the gift of John Gifford of Twyford and called on his son John to warrant”, dated “Trinity Term, 4-5 Edward II[748]m RICHARD de Arcy, son of ---. 

(b)       JOHN Giffard (-[1330?]).  Moriarty records documents which name “John brother of Osbert Giffard”, including a document dated 10 Mar 1268, and [1330][749]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

(1)       EDWARD Giffard (-after 28 Apr 1331).  Moriarty records documents dated “3 Edward III” [25 Jan 1329/24 Jan 1330], 28 Apr “5 Edward III” [1331] which name “Edward son of John Giffard”,[750]

Osbert [II] [& his wife had a second child] [or maybe illegitimate? – see below]:

ii)         JOHN Giffard “le Bœuf” of Twyford ([1236/37 or maybe earlier if illegitimate]-after 1276) .  Moriarty names “John Giffard le Boef of Twyford, born 1236-37” as the younger son of Osbert [II] Giffard and his wife[751].  From the sources cited below, Moriarty argues convincingly that John was the son of Osbert [II].  However, if that is correct, the absence of John’s later descendants from the inquisitions which followed the death of John Lord Giffard (see below) is surprising, particularly from the 26 Nov 1254 inquisitions which named the sisters Joan and Edith Giffard (descendants of Gilbert Giffard, see below).  One possible explanation for this omission is that John was illegitimate, although recognised as Osbert’s son by his half-brother Osbert [IV].  Moriarty records that “John Giffard le Boef of Twyford” was first named “in the Placita Quo Warranto in 12 Edward I when he first pleaded that he had been enfeoffed of two parts of the vill of Twyford by Robert FitzNicholas [who] died in the first years of Edward I’s reign[752].  His parentage is confirmed by a fine made “in the octave of the Holy Trinity, 4 Edward I” [early 1276] between “John Giffard, son of Osbert Gifford, querant, and Agnes Banzan, deforciant, for the moiety of the Manor of Helidon[753].  Moriarty records documents dated 21 Aug 1265, 10 Jan 1266, 10 Mar 1268 which name John[754]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       GEORGE Giffard .  He and his son are named in the “4-5 Edward II” suit cited above under his cousin Alice.  In 1428, “John Stokes (i.e., the second husband of Isabel, the widow of Roger Gifford of Twyford[755]) held in Astwell, Faucote and Syresham the lands formerly held by Robert Gifford and the Prior of Barkeley, of value of 3s. 4d.[756]

-        GIFFARD of Twyford[757]

c)         BERTHA GiffardInquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard…had a sister by the same father and mother named Berta, the great-grandmother of…John de Caillewe [Caylewe], who was espoused to Elias Caillewe, who of her begar Elias Caillewe, who begat John Caillewe, who begat the present John Caillewe”, adding that “The said John son of John Giffard has no other heir of the whole blood except the said John Caillewe” who is of the age of 40 years and more"[758].  Inquisitions after a writ of certiorari dated "2 Edw III", following the death of " John Gyffard of Brymesfeld…", also record information about this family[759]m ELIAS Caylewe, son of ---. 

d)         [GILBERT Giffard .  His parentage is indicated by inquisitions following a writ dated 26 Nov "28 Edw III" [1354] to enquire "as to the land and heir of the said John [Giffard]", which named “Joan aged 30 years and more, daughter of Alexander Giffard, and John, aged 23 years and more, son and heir of Edith, sister and co-heir of the said Joan, cousins (consanguinei) of the said John Giffard, are his heirs”, adding that “The said Joan and Edith were daughters of Alexander Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, brother of Ellis Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard"[760].  No other reference to Gilbert, son of Elias [IV], has been found.  If he did exist, the claim to John Giffard’s succession by John Caylewe (see above under Bertha) would have been without foundation.]  m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

i)          GILBERT Giffard .  His parentage is confirmed by inquisitions following a writ dated 26 Nov "28 Edw III" to enquire "as to the land and heir of the said John [Giffard]", which named “Joan aged 30 years and more, daughter of Alexander Giffard, and John, aged 23 years and more, son and heir of Edith, sister and co-heir of the said Joan, cousins (consanguinei) of the said John Giffard, are his heirs”, adding that “The said Joan and Edith were daughters of Alexander Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, brother of Ellis Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard"[761]m ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       ALEXANDER Giffard .  His parentage is confirmed by inquisitions following a writ dated 26 Nov "28 Edw III" to enquire "as to the land and heir of the said John [Giffard]", which named “Joan aged 30 years and more, daughter of Alexander Giffard, and John, aged 23 years and more, son and heir of Edith, sister and co-heir of the said Joan, cousins (consanguinei) of the said John Giffard, are his heirs”, adding that “The said Joan and Edith were daughters of Alexander Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, brother of Ellis Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard"[762]m ---.  The name of Alexander’s wife is not known.  Alexander & his wife had two children: 

(1)       JOAN Giffard .  Joan is named as co-heir of John Giffard in the inquisitions cited above under her father.  It is likely that her age is under-recorded, considering the age recorded in the same source for her nephew, and that Joan is named before her sister Edith. 

(2)       EDITH Giffard .  Edith’s son is named as co-heir of John Giffard in the inquisitions cited above under her father.  The name of Edith’s husband has not been found.  m ---. 

2.         WALTER Giffard (-after 1199).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus Giffard" used to hold one knight’s fee in Hampshire now held by "Walterus Giffard", and that "Walterus Giffard" held one and a half knight’s fees from "comes Patricii" in Wiltshire[763].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records the donation of "ecclesiam Beatæ Mariæ de Boytone, ecclesiam Sancti Georgii de Orchestone cum capella Sancti Andreæ de Wyneterborne" made "tempore Hamelini abbatis" [abbot from 1148 to 1179] by "Helias Boy Gyffard", for the soul of "Bertæ uxoris suus", later confirmed by "Walterus Giffard filius Heliæ…tempore Hamelini abbatis"[764].  "Walterius Giffard" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam Sanctæ Mariæ de Boytona" to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated 1177, a later charter confirmed that the donations in question were made by "Helyas Giffard et post eum Walterus filius eius"[765].  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Gilbertus Giffard" donated "duas virgatas terræ in Ullyngwyke quas habuit ex dono Walteri Giffard", confirmed by "Walterus Giffard", and that "Walterus Giffard" donated "partem quam habuit in Frydmore"[766].  "Walterus Giffardus" donated his part of land "in Fridmore apud Ullingwike" to Gloucester St Peter by charter dated 5 Aug 1192[767].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Walterus Giffard" holding two knights’ fees in Gloucestershire in [1199/1200][768]

3.         GILBERT Giffard .  The Historia sancti Petri Gloucestriæ records that "Gilbertus Giffard" donated "duas virgatas terræ in Ullyngwyke quas habuit ex dono Walteri Giffard", confirmed by "Walterus Giffard", and that "Walterus Giffard" donated "partem quam habuit in Frydmore"[769].  "Walterus Giffardus" granted land "in Ullingwike", including part "quæ fuit Roberti filii Walterii", to "Gilberto Giffardo fratri meo" by undated charter[770].  "Gilbertus Giffardus" donated land "in Ullingwike" granted to him by "præfatus dominus et frater meus Walterus" to Gloucester St Peter, with the consent of "domini et fratris mei Walteri Giffard", by undated charter[771]

4.         [GERARD FitzElias (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gerardus filius Elyæ" three and one half knights’ fees from "Henrici de Pomereia" in Devon[772].  It is not certain that Gerard’s father was Elias [II] Giffard, but this affiliation appears chronologically possible.] 

5.         [--- Giffard .  It is probable that the father of Richard [I] was one of the sons of Elias [II] Giffard who are named above.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         RICHARD [I] Giffard .  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1226, by "Willelmus de Huntercumba" against "Osbertum Giffard" for "quartam partem feodi…in Ispedena", the plaintiff claiming that it was granted to "Willelmus Perchaye avus suus", inherited by "Cristine filie sue" as his sons predeceased their father, and from her to "huic Willelmo…filio et heredi suo", while the defendant claimed (supported by "Eliam Giffarde") that "Elye avi predicti Elye" gave it to "Ricardo Giffarde nepote suo de Ispedena"[773]same person as...?  RICHARD [II] Giffard .  The primary source which confrims that Richard [II] was the same person as Richard [I] has not been identified.  However, the fact that Richard [II] named his son Osbert suggests that this co-identity may be correct.  Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[774]m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard [II] & his wife had four children: 

i)          OSBERT [III] Giffard (-[11 May /2 Sep] 1229).  Moriarty records documents dated 1207, 2 Dec 1215, 17 Mar and 1 Jun 1216 (his wife Isabel de Freville), 1226, 4 Sep 1227 which name Osbert [III][775]The lands of "Osbert Gifford, owed several debts to the king…dead" were taken into the king’s hands but a fine was agreed with "H. bishop of Rochester, Henry of Walpole, Isabella de Friville and Matilda Gifford, sister of Osbert Gifford", dated 2 Sep 1229[776].  King Henry III ordered the execution of the testament of "Osberti Giffard" dated 2 Sep 1229[777].  Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[778]m (before 1 Jun 1216) ISABEL de Freville, daughter of ---.  King John granted safe passage to "Isabell de Frievill uxor Osberti Giffard" for discussions with the king by order dated 1 Jun 1216[779].  The lands of "Osbert Gifford, owed several debts to the king…dead" were taken into the king’s hands but a fine was agreed with "H. bishop of Rochester, Henry of Walpole, Isabella de Friville and Matilda Gifford, sister of Osbert Gifford", dated 2 Sep 1229[780].  King Henry III granted "custodia terre et heredis Willelmi de Hasting" to “...Isabelle que fuit uxor Osberti Giffard et Matildi sorori ipsius Osberti”, dated 1229[781]

ii)         MABILIE Giffard (-after 1232).  Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[782]m ADAM de Cailly, son of --- (-after 1232). 

iii)        ISABEL Giffard (-after 1232).  Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[783]m --- de Freville, son of --- (-before 1232). 

iv)        MATILDA Giffard (-after 1232).  The lands of "Osbert Gifford, owed several debts to the king…dead" were taken into the king’s hands but a fine was agreed with "H. bishop of Rochester, Henry of Walpole, Isabella de Friville and Matilda Gifford, sister of Osbert Gifford", dated 2 Sep 1229[784].  King Henry III granted "custodia terre et heredis Willelmi de Hasting" to “...Isabelle que fuit uxor Osberti Giffard et Matildi sorori ipsius Osberti”, dated 1229[785].  Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne[786]

 

 

1.         WALTER Giffard (-after 22 Aug 1250).  Rector of Wickham, Salisbury: Pope Innocent IV granted indult to “Walter called ‘Giffard’ papal subdeacon and chaplain, kinsman of the bishop of Bath, to hold besides the rectory of Wikam in the diocese of Salisbury one other benefice...”, dated 22 Aug 1250[787]

 

 

JOHN Giffard, son of ELIAS [IV] Giffard & his wife Isolda [Alice] Mautravers ([1231/32]-Boyton, Wiltshire 29 May 1299, bur Malmesbury Abbey).  An undated writ, endorsed "32 Hen III", after the death of "Elias Giffard" names "--- his son aged 16 is his heir"[788].  An undated writ, regarding the proof of age of "John son of Elias Giffard", states that "he was 4 years old when he was contracted with Aubrey de Caumvill of Arewe, who was about 4 or 5 years old" but "declaiming against the marriage", that a witness states that he was "26 years old" and another that he was "28 and entering his 29th year…29 on the day of St Walstan"[789].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "Johannes filius Elie Gifford debet esse in donacione domini regis et fuit maritatus ante quam ---..."[790].  “Johannes Giffard dominus de Brimesfeild” donated property to Gloucester College, Oxford, for the soul of “Matildæ Longespee, quondam consortis meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “domino Johanne Giffard consanguineo meo[791].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1295 whereby he is held to have become Lord Giffard.  The Complete Peerage records his date and place of death, and place of burial[792]

[m firstly ([1247]?) ---.  An undated writ, regarding the proof of age of "John son of Elias Giffard", states that "he was 4 years old when he was contracted with Aubrey de Caumvill of Arewe, who was about 4 or 5 years old" but "declaiming against the marriage"[793].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Gloucester, dated 1247, which include "Johannes filius Elie Gifford debet esse in donacione domini regis et fuit maritatus ante quam ---..."[794].  The latter source suggests that the marriage may have taken place, which could also account for the apparently late date of John’s marriage with Matilda de Clifford.] 

m [firstly/secondly] ([1271]) as her second husband, MATILDA de Clifford, widow of WILLIAM Longespee, daughter and heiress of WALTER de Clifford of Clifford Castle, Herefordshire & his wife Margaret of Wales (-[Dec 1282/9 May 1285]).  The Book of Lacock names “Matildam filiam d’ni Walteri de Clifford” as wife of “Guill. Lungespee tertius, filius Guill. Lungespee secundi[795]The Complete Peerage records the circumstances surrounding Matilda’s second marriage[796]"Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford et Agnetis de Cundy" donated land in Cofham to Acornbury priory, Herefordshire, also donated by "Katherinæ filiæ Walteri de Lacy", for the souls of “Margaretæ uxoris meæ et dominæ Mathildis filiæ meæ” by undated charter[797].  “Matildis de Lungespe, filia et hæres domini Walteri de Clifford” confirmed donations of property to Shrewsbury abbey, by “patris mei…Walterus de Clifford filius Walteri de Clifford, et Agnetis de Cundy” witnessed by “Egidio de Clifford fratre meo”, by undated charter[798].  “Johannes Giffard dominus de Brimesfeild” donated property to Gloucester College, Oxford, for the soul of “Matildæ Longespee, quondam consortis meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “domino Johanne Giffard consanguineo meo[799]

m [secondly/thirdly] (1286) as her second husband, MARGARET, widow of JOHN Neville of Hallingbury, Wethersfield and Langham, Essex, daughter of --- (-before 13 Dec 1338).  The licence for the marriage of Johannes Giffardi dominus de Clifford” and “Margareta de Novavilla” is dated 1286[800].  The Complete Peerage cites two charters which confirm that the [second/third] wife of John Giffard was the same person as the widow of John Neville[801].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that John "married Maud de Longespeye…” and after her death “Margaret de Neville, of whom he begat John Giffard of Bremesfeld, who died last without an heir of his body"[802].  “Margareta que fuit uxor Johannis Giffard de Brymnesfeld” was named in a writ dated 8 Feb “13 Edw. III”, while the executors of the will of “Margaret, late the wife of John de Neville, kt” were named 13 Dec 1338[803]

John & his first wife had four children: 

1.         CATHERINE Giffard (1272-after 1322).  The Book of Lacock names “Catharinam filiam Johannis Giffard” as wife of “Nich’um de Audele”, son of “Jacobus de Audele[804]Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that John "married Maud de Longespeye, of whom he begat Katherine de Audele, afterwards espoused to Nicholas de Audele…"[805]She became a nun at Ledbury[806]m (1299 or before) NICHOLAS de Audley, son of JAMES de Audley of Heleigh, Staffordshire & his wife Ela Longespee (before 1258-28 Aug 1299). 

2.         ELEANOR Giffard (-before 1324).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that John "married Maud de Longespeye, of whom he begat…of his said wife…Eleanor la Estraunge, afterwards espoused to Fulk le Estraunge…"[807]m EBLES le Strange Lord Strange (of Blackmere), son of JOHN le Strange & his wife --- ([1266/67]-[23] Jan 1324). 

3.         MATILDA GiffardInquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that John and his wife "Maud de Longespeye [had]…issue four daughters, viz. – Katherine, Eleanor, Maud and Elizabeth…and the saif Maud and Elizabeth died without heir…"[808]

4.         ELIZABETH GiffardInquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard…of Brimmesfeld…", record that John and his wife "Maud de Longespeye [had]…issue four daughters, viz. – Katherine, Eleanor, Maud and Elizabeth…and the saif Maud and Elizabeth died without heir…"[809]

John & his second wife had children: 

5.         JOHN Giffard ([24 Jun 1287]-[Mar] or [end-Apr/early May] 1322)Lord Giffard.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "1 Edw III", after the death of "John Giffard or Gyffard, of Brimmesfeld, Brymesfelde or Bremesfeld, otherwise John de Brymmesfeld", record John "married Maud de Longespeye…” and after her death “Margaret de Neville, of whom he begat John Giffard of Bremesfeld, who died last without an heir of his body", and name "John […aged 19 years at Christmas last…age of 21 years at Christmas last] son of Fulk le Straunge and of Eleanor his wife, sister of the said John Giffard, and James […aged 14 years at Michaelmas last] son of Nicholas de Audeleye, son of Katherine, another sister of the said John Giffard, are his next heirs"[810].  Inquisitions after a writ dated "2 Edw III", following the death of " John Gyffard of Brymesfeld…", also record information about his family[811].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 26 Nov "28 Edw III" to enquire "as to the land and heir of the said John [Giffard]", record that John "died in the moth of March, 15 Edw II” and named “Joan aged 30 years and more, daughter of Alexander Giffard, and John, aged 23 years and more, son and heir of Edith, sister and co-heir of the said Joan, cousins (consanguinei) of the said John Giffard, are his heirs”, adding that “The said Joan and Edith were daughters of Alexander Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, son of Gilbert Giffard, brother of Ellis Giffard, grandfather of the said John Giffard"[812]m (before 6 Nov 1311) AVELINE de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon & his wife Eleanor Le Despencer (-27 Apr 1327).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Isabellam domini Johannis de St John uxorem, Avelinam domini Johannis Gifford militis uxorem, necnon Egelinam Roberti de Scales uxorem, et Margaretam Johannis de Mulis…uxorem” as the four daughters of “Hugonem de Courtnay primum” & his wife[813]Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Aug "1 Edw III", after the death of "Avelina, late the wife of John Gyffard of Brymmesfeld…", record that "Elias Giffard…had a sister by the same father and mother named Berta, the great-grandmother of…John de Caillewe [Caylewe], who was espoused to Elias Caillewe, who of her begar Elias Caillewe, who begat John Caillewe, who begat the present John Caillewe”, adding that “The said John son of John Giffard has no other heir of the whole blood except the said John Caillewe” who is of the age of 40 years and more"[814]

 

 

 

GIFFARD (of Fonthill, Wiltshire)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the relationships between the members of this family have not been identified, unless otherwise stated below, but the references to Fonthill indicate that they were closely related. 

 

1.         BERENGER Giffard (-after 1085).  Domesday Book records “Berengar Giffard” holding Fonthill Giffard in Wiltshire, and Bredy in Dorset[815].  The entries precede the ones which records the landholdings in Wiltshire and Dorset of Osbern Giffard, which suggests a close relationship.  Maybe they were brothers. 

 

2.         ROBERT Giffard of Fonthill, Wiltshire (-before 1166).  [The 1130 Pipe Roll records "--- Giffard" accounting for "terra q Ric de Holeweia clamat uers eu" in Devonshire[816].]  m ---.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         GERARD Giffard (-after 1172).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Giffard" used to hold one knight’s fee in Hampshire now held by "Gerardus filius eius", that "Girardus Giffard et Walterus de Calestone" held one knight’s fee in Wiltshire from the abbey of Wilton, and that "Gerardus Giffard" held one knight’s fee in "baroniæ Eliæ Giffardi" in Wiltshire[817]

 

3.         ANDREW Giffard (-before 1220).  “Andrew Giffard” granted land “in Sutton, which William Blund held of him” [in Wiltshire] to Stanley St. Mary, undated, witnessed by “...Peter Giffard...[818].  An order dated 1220 records that, whereas “Andrew Giffard, who held the Barony of Fontil by hereditary right, was dead and had resigned the Barony temp. King John...to Robert de Mandeville, Robert Mauduit, William Cumin and William de Fontibus, as right heirs of the Barony”, the “vavassoria” were now delivered to “Robert de Mandeville and the other heirs above named”, Round discussing “vavassoria[819]

 

4.         PETER Giffard .  “Andrew Giffard” granted land “in Sutton, which William Blund held of him” [in Wiltshire] to Stanley St. Mary, undated, witnessed by “...Peter Giffard...[820]

 

5.         WALERAN Giffard (-after 1166).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records "Waleram de Scodimore et Waleram Giffardus" holding "de antiquo feodo...duo feodati" in Wiltshire[821]

 

 

1.         HUGH .  He is named as father of Robert in the 1200 document cited below.  No source has been found in which he is named on his own account.  Domesday Descendants says that Robert Giffard was the son of Gerard Giffard, which appears incorrect assuming that the 1200 document is accurate[822]m ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT Giffard (-1209).  His parentage is confirmed by the order dated 1200 under which "Willelmus Cumin" paid a fine for the marriage of "juniore filia Rob fil Hug" and part of her inheritance in Northamptonshire[823].  "Rob Giffard" paid a fine "p passag suo…feudi i militi in capite de dño R" in Wiltshire, dated 1201[824].  Domesday Descendants notes the death of Robert Giffard (son of Gerard Giffard, which appears from the source dated 1200 to be a mistake for Hugh) in 1209 "when his heirs were daughters married to Robert Mauduit, Robert de Mandeville and William Comin", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[825]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          --- Giffard .  Domesday Descendants notes the death of Robert Giffard in 1209 "when his heirs were daughters married to Robert Mauduit, Robert de Mandeville and William Comin", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[826].  The information is confirmed by the sources cited under her husband.  The information is confirmed by the sources cited under her husband (follow the hyperlink).  m (before 1209) ROBERT de Mandeville, son of --- (-after 1232). 

ii)         --- Giffard .  Domesday Descendants notes the death of Robert Giffard in 1209 "when his heirs were daughters married to Robert Mauduit, Robert de Mandeville and William Comin", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[827].  The information is confirmed by the sources cited under her husband (follow the hyperlink).  m (before 1209) ROBERT Mauduit, son of --- (-[1232/42]). 

iii)        SARAH (-before 1210).  "Willelmus Cumin" paid a fine for the marriage of "juniore filia Rob fil Hug" and part of her inheritance in Northamptonshire, dated 1200[828].  Domesday Descendants notes the death of Robert Giffard in 1209 "when his heirs were daughters married to Robert Mauduit, Robert de Mandeville and William Comin", but does not cite the corresponding primary source[829].  The information is confirmed by the sources cited under her husband (follow the hyperlink).  m ([1200]) as his first wife, WILLIAM Comyn, son of RICHARD Comyn & his wife Hextilda of Tynedale (-1233 or after 12 Feb 1236). 

iv)        [--- Giffard .  Round indicates that the following document confirms her parentage, as a fourth daughter of Robert Giffard of Fonthill, and marriage (naming her husband “Robert de Fontibus...[who] is not heard of again”)[830]: the Testa de Nevill records [1242/43] "Johannes de Cantilupo heres Roberti Maudut" and “heres Willelmi de Fontibus” holding “feudum unius militis in Funtel de Galfrido de Mandevil” in Wiltshire[831].  An order dated 1220 records that, whereas “Andrew Giffard, who held the Barony of Fontil by hereditary right, was dead and had resigned the Barony temp. King John...to Robert de Mandeville, Robert Mauduit, William Cumin and William de Fontibus, as right heirs of the Barony”, the “vavassoria” were now delivered to “Robert de Mandeville and the other heirs above named”, Round discussing “vavassoria[832].  Presumably “William de Fontibus” was the son of Robert (whose death before [1209/10], leaving William a minor as his heir, could explain the absence of any “Fontibus” reference in the records quoted above dated between 1209 and 1212), and that William died before [1242/43] leaving heirs who were minors.  m ROBERTde Fontibus”, son of ---.] 

 

 

 

LORDS GRANDSON

 

 

GUILLAUME de Grandson, son of PIERRE [II] Seigneur de Grandson & his [second] wife Agnes de Neuchâtel ([after 1250]-27 Jun 1335)Under age in 1263: “Agnes domina de Grandisono, tutrix...liberorum nostrorum Petri et Willelmi, Girardus, Jaquetus et Henricus pro se et fratre suo Otonino, filii predicte domine” exchanged property with "Petro comiti Sabaudie" by charter dated 31 Aug 1263[833].  Wurstenberger reproduces an inaccurate version of the same charter reading "Agnetem dominam de Grandisono relictam domini Petri de Grandisono, tutricem filiorum suorum Petri, Willelmi, Girardi, Jaqueti, Henrici et Ottonini de Grandisono"[834]An order dated 15 Jul 1285: “William de Grandisono to have in the forest of Cipham two bucks, of the king’s gift[835].  An order dated 21 Jun 1288 named “William de Grandisono and Isabella his wife” in connection with land at Winchelsea[836]Of Ashperton, Herefordshire.  He was summoned to the English parliament from 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Grandson [Grandison][837]Pope John XXII, by bull dated 14 Dec 1327, “to William de Grandissono and Sibyl his wife, of the diocese of Hereford.  Indult [that their confessor shall give them plenary remission at the hour of death]...[838]

m firstly [([1275?]) JEANNETTE de Gruyère, daughter of PIERRE [II] Comte de Gruyère & his wife Ambrosie --- (-before 1284)].  The possible identification of Guillaume’s first wife was studied by David Williams[839].  His first marriage is indicated by the following document: Pope Clement V granted indult dated 1306 to “the wife of William de Grandison” to visit the monasteries of Dore and Flayley, Hereford “founded by her ancestors” to hold services for the souls of “the elder sons of her said husband[840].  Williams quite reasonably suggests that the indult “can only mean that these sons were dead, and were not Sibyl’s sons[841].  Her identity is suggested from the following.  Hisely notes that "suivant une opinion" [of A. L. de Watteville = Wattenwyl] Jeannette, daughter of Pierre [II] Comte de Gruyère, married “Guillaume de Grandson[842].  David Williams traced the citation to an undated mid-18th century manuscript genealogy, which he consulted in the Burgerbibliothek in Bern.  He notes the absence of any source reference for the marriage in the document, but highlights Wattenwyl’s use of primary source material and concludes that “there is no obvious reason to believe that Wattenwyl fabricated the marriage, and very probably he used otherwise unknown charter evidence or an earlier genealogy as his source[843].  If this marriage is correct, it must have taken place after Mar 1267 when Jeannette is named with her parents and siblings: "Petrus miles filius…Rodulfi comitis de Gruyeria" donated property to the abbey of Hauterive, with the consent of "domine Ambrosie uxoris nostre et Petri filii nostri et Willermete uxoris eiusdem Petri necnon filiarum nostrarum Ioannete, Perrete et Columbe", by charter dated Mar 1267[844].  Bearing in mind Guillaume’s likely birth date it is probable that the couple did not marry before [1275].  The possibility of this Grandson/Gruyère marriage seems good, especially as Jeannette’s older brother was already married to Guillaume’s sister.] 

m secondly (1285 or before) SIBYLLA de Tregoz, daughter of JOHN de Tresgoz & his wife Mabel FitzWarin (before 1270-21 Oct 1334, bur Dore Abbey).  "Dame Julian Tresgoze…espouse…a Sr Robert Tresgoos le Second" names "Sibill" as the second daughter of "John Tresgoos" and his wife, adding that she married "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon", by whom she had "6 fils, Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" and "les files Agnes, Mabil, Maud, Katherine, les deux eignes marry lun a Sr Joh Northwood, lauter a Sr Joh Patshull, le terce Maud un nonyne et prioresse de Acornbury, le quart Katherine Countess de Sarisbury"[845].  An order dated 21 Jun 1288 named “William de Grandisono and Isabella his wife” in connection with land at Winchelsea[846].  A writ dated 6 Sep "28 Edw I", after the death of "John Tregoz alias de Tregoz", names "John la Warre his grandson (nepos) […aged 24, son of Clarice la Warre his eldest daughter who is dead…married to Roger la War] and Sibyl the wife of William de Grauntcoun (alias de Grandissono) his […younger] daughter […aged 30 and more] both aged 21 and more are his next heirs"[847].  Pope Clement V, by bull dated 1306, granted “to the wife of William de Grandison.  Indult for five years to visit three times a year the Cistercian monasteries of Dora and Flayleye in the diocese of Hereford, founded by her ancestors...[for] divine service to be celebrated for the souls of the elder sons of her said husband...[848].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 14 Dec 1327, “to William de Grandissono and Sibyl his wife, of the diocese of Hereford.  Indult [that their confessor shall give them plenary remission at the hour of death]...[849]

Guillaume & his first wife had [two or more] children: 

1.         two or more sons.  Their existence is confirmed by the 1306 indult cited above granted to their stepmother to hold services for the souls of “the elder sons of her said husband”.  Besides the two possible sons named below, Williams discusses other possible children of Guillaume’s first marriage[850]

2.         [GERARD de Grandson (-[before 1306]).  Williams suggests that Gerard was the son of Guillaume by his first marriage[851], although the likely date of this marriage shown above appears incompatible with the date of the following documents.  An order dated 8 Mar 1282 (O.S.) records the archbishop of York granting “to Gerard de Grandison, nephew of Sir Otho de Grandison, counsellor of our lord the king...for his services to the see of York...an annual pension of 50 marks...until the archb. should be able to provide him to a prebend at York[852], while an order dated 9 Nov 1283 appointed “Sir Gerard de Grandisono” (“dominus Gerardus de Grandisono”) to “the prebend of Happlestorpe” [Apesthorpe, Yorkshire][853]Follow his hyperlink for other discussion about Gerard.] 

3.         [JOHN de Grandson (-[before 1306]).  Williams suggests that Guillaume’s sons by his first marriage (deceased in 1306 as noted above) may have included John de Grandison who is named in the following document[854], although if he is correct Guillaume would have had two sons named John, one from each marriage.  Another possibility is presumably that Jean was the son of Jacques de Grandson.  Letters dated 10 Feb 1303 record “Otto de Chaumpvent, going with [Otto de Grandisono...beyond the seas...] nominating John de Grandisono and John de Cusancia, clerks, his attorneys for two years[855].] 

4.         [AGNES ([1282/83]-Ruskington, Lincolnshire 11 Dec 1357, bur Ruskington All Saints).  Williams discusses Agnes wife of Thomas Lord Bardolf as another possible child of Guillaume de Grandson by his first wife[856].  Blomefield records that “the lord Bardolf” [indicating Thomas, son of Hugh Lord Bardolf] married “Agnes, daughter of the Lord Grandison[857].  Williams notes an order dated 8 Aug 1337 which confirms Agnes’s foreign birth in “Almain” (a term loosely used for Germany, which could have extended to include Grandson lands in modern-day Switzerland): protection granted to “Agnes, late the wife of Thomas Bardolf, who by birth of the parts of Almain[858].  Williams discusses background to her marriage and suggests the likely date as shown below[859].  Williams discusses the possibility of her second marriage (15 Feb 1329) with Sir Walter de Cokesey of Cooksey, Worcestershire, inferred in the Complete Peerage from a faulty Beauchamp pedigree, but points out that there appears to be no other evidence of it and that Agnes was always referred to as the widow of Lord Bardolf whilst she was ostensibly married to Sir Walter[860]m ([25 Nov/12 Dec] 1304) THOMAS Bardolf Lord Bardolf, son of HUGH Bardolf Lord Bardolf & his wife Isabel Aguillon (4 Oct 1282-15 Dec 1328).] 

Guillaume & his second wife had ten children: 

5.         EDMUND de Grandson .  "Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" are named as the six sons of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[861]

6.         PIERS de Grandson (-10 Aug 1358).  "Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" are named as the six sons of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[862].  He succeeded his father as Lord Grandsonm (before 10 Jun 1330) BLANCHE Mortimer, daughter of ROGER [V] de Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Joan de Geneville (-1347).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam… et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Blanche married “domino Petro de Graunson[863]

7.         JOHN de Grandson (Ashperton, Herefordshire [1291/92]-16 Jul 1369, bur Exeter Cathedral).  "Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" are named as the six sons of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[864].  Bishop of Exeter.  Pope Clement V, by bull dated 1306, permitted “a son [“John” handwritten added] of William de Grandison, knight, dispensation at his father’s request to hold benefices...besides a canonry and prebend of Wells and a canonry of York, with reservation of a prebend, notwithstanding defect of orders and age, he being about fourteen[865].  Pope Clement V, by bull dated 7 Jul 1312, granted “to John son of William de Grandisono.  Suppletion, at his father’s request, of the absence of mention of his defect of age in the letters of papal provision to him of the archdeaconry of Nottingham”, another (same date) “to John son of the same William de Grandisono, canon of York...dispensed...and obtained the church of Lanpaderwaur, in the diocese of St. Davids...”, and another (same date) “Indult, at his father’s request, to visit his archdeaconry of Nottingham by deputy for three years...[866].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 17 Aug 1317, “to John de Grandisono.  Provision of the canonry and prebend of Lincoln void by the death of his brother Thomas[867].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 7 Aug 1322, “to John de Grandissono, papal chaplain, canon of Lincoln.  Provision of the prebend of Stoke...notwithstanding that he is archdeacon of Nottingham, has canonry of York, and canonries and prebends of Wells and Lincoln and is perpetual vicar of Lampader...[868].  Pope John XXII, by bulls dated 9 Nov 1326, 27 Nov 1326, 11 Feb 1327, 21 Feb 1327, and 8 Aug 1327 named “John de Grandison, papal nuncio...archdeacon of Lincoln” recording his role in diplomatic initiatives between England and France[869].  He succeeded his brother as Lord Grandson. 

8.         OTTO de Grandson ([1292/93]-23 May 1359, bur [Ottery St Mary or Chelsfield St John]).  "Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" are named as the six sons of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[870]: his birth date is estimated on the assumption that the order of births was correct in this document, bearing in mind the estimated birth dates of his brothers John and Thomas.  The will of "Otho de Grandison Knt", dated [3 Sep] 1358, chose burial “in the Collegiate Church of St Mary de Ottery in the diocese of Exeter, if I should happen to die therein, if I die at Chellesfield, then to be buried in the chapel of St John at Chellesfield”, bequeathed property to “Thomas my son...Elizabeth my daughter...William my bastard son”, and appointed “Beatrix my wife and Theobold de Moatney” as executors[871]m (before 28 Oct 1340) BEATRIX, daughter of NICHOLAS Malemayn & his wife --- (-after Jun 1359).  The will of "Otho de Grandison Knt", dated [3 Sep] 1358, appointed “Beatrix my wife and Theobold de Moatney” as executors[872]Otto & his wife had two children: 

a)         THOMAS de Grandson (-1 Nov 1375).  The will of "Otho de Grandison Knt", dated [3 Sep] 1358, bequeathed property to “Thomas my son...Elizabeth my daughter...William my bastard son[873]He succeeded his uncle as Lord Grandsonm MARGARET de Caru, daughter of --- (-Oct 1394). 

b)         ELIZABETH de Grandson (-after [3 Sep] 1358).  The will of "Otho de Grandison Knt", dated [3 Sep] 1358, bequeathed property to “Thomas my son...Elizabeth my daughter...William my bastard son[874]

Otto had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

c)         WILLIAM (-after [3 Sep] 1358).  The will of "Otho de Grandison Knt", dated [3 Sep] 1358, bequeathed property to “Thomas my son...Elizabeth my daughter...William my bastard son[875]

9.         THOMAS de Grandson ([1293/94]-[11 May/13 Aug] 1317).  "Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" are named as the six sons of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[876].  Pope Clement V, by bull dated 1306, permitted “another son [“Thomas” handwritten added] of the same knight [=William de Grandison], about thirteen years of age, to whom the pope has provided a canonry of Lincoln, with reservation of a prebend.  A like dispensation[877].  Pope Clement V, by bull dated 7 Jul 1312, granted “to Thomas son of William de Grandisono, knight, not ordained, and under age.  Dispensation at his father’s request, to hold a canonry at Lincoln, with expectation of a dignity in the same”, and another (same date) “to Thomas son of William de Grandisono, canon of Lincoln.  Dispensation to retain the church of Chelesfield, in the diocese of Rochester[878].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 28 Mar 1317, “to Thomas de Grandisono, aged twenty-three.  Indult to accept a canonry and prebend of Lincoln, and also the archdeaconry of Northamton, if he wins the suit about it in which he is engaged[879].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 11 May 1317 named “Thomas de Grandissono canon of Lincoln”, and by bull dated 4 Aug 1317, “to cardinal Gaucelin.  Collation of whatever right Thomas de Grandissono had in the archdeaconry of Northampton, about which he was litigating at the papal court when he died...[880]

10.      WILLIAM de Grandson (-1350).  "Edmund, Peirs cheveleir, Joh clerk […evesq de Exeter], Otto chivaler, Tho clerk, Will clerk" are named as the six sons of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[881].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 28 Mar 1317, “to William de Grandisono.  Provision of a canonry of Salisbury, with reservation of a prebend[882].  Pope John XXII, by bull dated 14 Dec 1327, “to Master William de Grandissono.  Provision of the canonry and prebend of Wells...notwithstanding that he has a canonry and prebend of Salisbury[883]

11.      AGNES de Grandson (-1348).  "Agnes, Mabil, Maud, Katherine, les deux eignes marry lun a Sr Joh Northwood, lauter a Sr Joh Patshull, le terce Maud un nonyne et prioresse de Acornbury, le quart Katherine Countess de Sarisbury" are named as the daughters of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[884]m JOHN de Northwood, son of ---. 

12.      MABEL de Grandson .  "Agnes, Mabil, Maud, Katherine, les deux eignes marry lun a Sr Joh Northwood, lauter a Sr Joh Patshull, le terce Maud un nonyne et prioresse de Acornbury, le quart Katherine Countess de Sarisbury" are named as the daughters of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[885]m JOHN de Pateshull, son of ---. 

13.      MAUD de Grandson .  "Agnes, Mabil, Maud, Katherine, les deux eignes marry lun a Sr Joh Northwood, lauter a Sr Joh Patshull, le terce Maud un nonyne et prioresse de Acornbury, le quart Katherine Countess de Sarisbury" are named as the daughters of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[886]Prioress of Acornbury. 

14.      KATHERINE de Grandson (-23 Apr 1349).  "Agnes, Mabil, Maud, Katherine, les deux eignes marry lun a Sr Joh Northwood, lauter a Sr Joh Patshull, le terce Maud un nonyne et prioresse de Acornbury, le quart Katherine Countess de Sarisbury" are named as the daughters of "Sr Will de Grantson chivaller de Burgon" and his wife "Sibill…Tresgoze"[887].  A manuscript calendar records the death “IX Kal Maii” of “dñe Kat’ine Comitesse de Sarisbury, fil’ dñi Willi de Gandeson[888]m (1327 or before) WILLIAM de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu Lord Montagu & his wife Elisabeth de Montfort (Casington, Oxfordshire [1302/03]-30 Jan 1344, bur Bisham).  He was created Earl of Salisbury 16 Mar 1337. 

              

 

1.         OTTO de Grandson (-after 1392).  Clemensen notes “Otto [de Granson], king’s knight for life 1392”, suggesting that he was “probably descended from a natural son of Peter and half-brother of Thomas” [who are named above][889]

 

2.         WILLIAM de Grandson (-after 1415).  Clemensen notes “William [de Granson] fl. 1415 in armorials”, suggesting that he was “probably descended from a natural son of Peter and half-brother of Thomas” [who are named above][890]

 

 

 

GREY (of CODNOR, WILTON, RUTHIN)

 

 

The article by Moriarty, dealing with the early ancestors of the Grey family of Rotherfield (see the next section)[891], does not mention the Grey family of Codnor.  The Complete Peerage says that the ancestry of Henry de Grey, shown below, “remains doubtful[892]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         HENRY de Grey of Grays Thurrock, Essex (-1219)The Complete Peerage says that Henry de Grey “may be said with reasonable probability to have accounted in 1195 for the farm of the præpositura of Verneuil[893], and notes that King John “took upon himself the debt which Henry de Grey owed to the burgesses of Verneuil” 22 Apr 1203[894].  The Complete Peerage records two documents dated 1219, one naming Henry de Grey, the other Isolda as his widow[895]m as her first husband, ISOLDA, daughter of --- (-before 18 Jun 1246).  There are contrary indications concerning the parentage of Isolda.  “Jord Foliot Isold de Gray et Rad Paynel” swore homage for the lands of “Robti Bardulf avunculi sui”, and accepted security from “Robto Lupo loco Matild Bardulf matris sue que est una herederum predicti Roberti”, dated 1 Jul 1225[896].  This source suggests that Isolda de Grey was the daughter of the second sister of Robert Bardulf, and co-heir of her uncle.  On the other hand, Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that Henry de Grey married "Ysolda...daughter of Hugh Bardolf, sister and one of the co-heirs of Robert Bardolf", that in 1235 she was “remarried to...Reginald de Meandre”, and that in 1246 “Richard de Gray son and heir of Isolda de Gray” swore homage to King Henry III (no source citation)[897].  The birth date of Hugh [I] Bardolf (father of Robert Bardolf) is estimated to before 1135 (follow Isolda’s hyperlink).  Hugh’s children would presumably therefore have been born in [1160/80].  If that date range is correct, the date of Isolda’s second marriage, and also the chronology of the Grey family, suggest that Isolda was more probably Hugh’s granddaughter than his daughter.  Another possibility is that the wife of Henry de Grey was Robert’s sister and that “Isold de Gray” who is named in the 1 Jul 1225 source was the couple’s daughter.  However, in that case, it is unclear why Isolda’s son Richard would not have been named as the Grey representative of the heirs who are named in 1 Jul 1225.  On balance, it appears more likely that Isolda was Robert Bardolf’s niece, although if that is correct there is no indication of her father’s family.  She married secondly (before 25 Apr 1235) Reginald de Meaudre.  Reynold de Meudre and Iseude his wife had a grant of the gift made to them by Richard de Sandiacre of land in Sandiacre” dated 25 Apr 1235[898]Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter dated 2 Feb 1239 (N.S.) to “Richard de Grey and to Reynold de Meudre and Iseude, his wife, mother of the said Richard[899]Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Jun "30 Hen III", after the death of "Iseult de Grey”, name “Richard de Gray, her son, is her heir” and record her property in Kent “Hoo, a moiety of the manor held, by an exchange made with her four coparceners, by service of ½ knight’s fee, but only 1/5 of the manor came to her by inheritance[900].  Henry & his wife had children: 

a)         RICHARD de Grey of Codnor (-before 8 Sep 1271).  Thomas Stapleton, in his "Observations on the Great Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy", records that in 1246 “Richard de Gray son and heir of Isolda de Gray” swore homage to King Henry III (no source citation)[901].  This reference, if correct, suggests that Richard was his parents’ oldest son.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 18 Jun "30 Hen III", after the death of "Iseult de Grey”, name “Richard de Gray, her son, is her heir[902].  The Complete Peerage cites documents dated 13 Jul 1246, 1 Dec 1246, 2 May 1248, 9 Jan 1251 (with his son John), 1252, 4 Oct 1253, 1255, 1258, [Jul] 1259, 14 Mar 1258 to 23 May 1263, which name Richard de Grey, and records his death before 8 Sep 1271[903]m (1223 or before) LUCY de Humez, daughter of JOHN de Humez & his wife --- (-after 19 Nov 1242).  The Complete Peerage records her parentage and marriage “in or before 1223, when they had seisin of lands in Norfolk which had belonged to her father”, and documents dated 1240 and 19 Nov 1242 which name Lucy[904].  Richard & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Grey (-before 5 Jan 1272).  The Complete Peerage cites document dated 20 May 1244, 9 Jan 1251 (with his father), 1263, which name John de Grey, and his death before 5 Jan 1272[905]

-        LORDS GREY (of CODNOR)

b)         JOHN de Grey of Shirland, Derbyshire (-before 18 Mar 1266).  John de Grey is named with his brother Richard Oct 1224[906]m firstly EMMA de Glanville, daughter of GEOFFREY de Glanville & his wife ---.  The Complete Peerage says that “Sir John Grey appears to have married, 1stly, Emma, da. and coh. of Geoffrey de Glanville” (no source cited)[907].  The extent of the doubt about this supposed first marriage has not been ascertained.  m secondly (after 2 Nov 1230) as her second husband, EMMA de Cauz, widow of JOHN de Segrave, daughter of ROGER de Cauz & his wife ---.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, which involved "Johannem de Segraue et Emmam uxorem eius filiam et heredem…Rogeri de Cauz"[908].  King Henry III granted "maritagium Emme de Cauz que fuit uxor Johannis de Sedgrave, filii ipsius Stephani" to "Stephano de Sedgrave" dated 2 Nov 1230[909]m thirdly (London 17 Oct 1251) as her second husband, JOAN, widow of PAUL Peyvre or Piper, daughter of --- (-Leyham 1256, bur Woburn).  The Complete Peerage records her two marriages, date of death, and place of burial (various sources cited)[910]John & his first wife had two children: 

i)          REYNOLD de GreyThe Complete Peerage names “Reynold, who presumably died s.p.” as the son of John’s supposed first marriage (no source cited)[911]

ii)         EMMA de Grey .  The Complete Peerage names “Emma, who married William de Huntingfield and brought her husband the Glanville manor of Alderton” as the daughter of John’s supposed first marriage (no source cited)[912]m WILLIAM de Huntingfield, son of ---. 

John & his second wife had one child: 

iii)        REYNOLD de Grey of Ruthin, Denbighshire, and Wilton, Herefordshire (-5 Apr 1308).  He was summoned to Parliament 1290/1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Grey (of Wilton).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 5 Apr "1 Edw II", after the death of "Reginald de Grey alias Le Grey”, name “John his son, aged 40 and more [...aged 30 and more...aged 50], is his next heir [...aged 40 or more...aged 41 at the said feast...aged 30 and more...aged 50...aged 36 and more][913]m MATILDA de Longchamp, daughter of HENRY de Longchamp of Wilton, Herefordshire & his wife --- (-before 21 Nov 1302).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the  Pipe Roll “15 Edw. I” (Hereford), Second Scutage of Wales, assessed “10 Edw. I” which records “Reynold de Grey, whose wife is the dau. and heir of Henry de Longo Campo-40s. for one fee[914].  She is not named in the Inquisitions followed her husband’s death.  Reynold & his wife had children: 

(1)       JOHN de Grey of Wilton ([1257/58] or [1267/68]-[28 Oct] 1323).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 5 Apr "1 Edw II", after the death of "Reginald de Grey alias Le Grey”, name “John his son, aged 40 and more [...aged 30 and more...aged 50], is his next heir [...aged 40 or more...aged 41 at the said feast...aged 30 and more...aged 50...aged 36 and more][915]Lord Grey (of Wilton). 

-        LORDS GREY (of WILTON)

c)         WILLIAM de Grey of Sandiacre (-[1268]).  The Complete Peerage records his parentage and cites document dated 20 Jul 1254 (with his brothers Richard and John), and 1268 which name William[916]m ---.  William & his wife had children: 

i)          RICHARD de Grey of Sandiacre  (-before 26 May 1298).  The Complete Peerage records his parentage and cites document dated 1269 (homage for his father’s lands), 15 Dec 1276-26 Jun 1294, 28 Jun 1283, 30 Jan 1284, 1288, and 1294 (with his wife Lucy) which name Richard, and records Richard’s death before 26 May 1298[917]Inquisitions following a writ dated 26 May "26 Edw I", after the death of "Richard de Grey, alias le Gray, de Grei", name “Richard, son of William son of Richard de Grey, now aged 11 […aged 10 at the feast of the Annunciation last…in March, 26 Edw. I], is his next heir” and provide details about his Sandiacre properties[918]m LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 1294).  Richard de Grey and Lucy his wife settled “the manor of Erliston [Arleston] which was of her right on Lucy, da. of the said Richard de Grey…”, by charter dated 1294[919]Richard & his wife had children: 

(1)       WILLIAM de Grey of Sandiacre .  His parentage is confirmed by the Inquisitions following his father’s death, cited above, which also confirmed that William predeceased his father.  m JOAN, daughter of --- (-after 4 Apr 1301).  “Joan, late the wife of William de Grey and nearest friend to the heir of Richard de Grey” had “livery of the custody of [land] in Sandiacre”, 4 Apr 1301[920]William & his wife had children: 

(a)       RICHARD de Grey of Sandiacre ([25 Mar 1288]-before 12 Feb 1311).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 26 May "26 Edw I", after the death of "Richard de Grey, alias le Gray, de Grei", name “Richard, son of William son of Richard de Grey, now aged 11 […aged 10 at the feast of the Annunciation last…in March, 26 Edw. I], is his next heir[921].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "4 Edw II", after the death of "Richard de Grey of Saundyacre alias Sandiaker”, name “William his son, aged 4 [...aged 3 ½], is his next heir[922]m FELICIA, daughter of --- (-after 28 Jun 1311).  “Felicia was granted custody of the land of Richard Grey 28 Jun 1311, as nearest of kin to his s. and h., William[923]Richard & his wife had one child: 

(i)         WILLIAM de Grey of Sandiacre ([1307]-1369).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 12 Feb "4 Edw II", after the death of "Richard de Grey of Saundyacre alias Sandiaker”, name “William his son, aged 4 [...aged 3 ½], is his next heir[924].  “Felicia was granted custody of the land of Richard Grey 28 Jun 1311, as nearest of kin to his s. and h., William[925]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

1.         ALICE de Greym (before 14 Nov 1343) Sir EDWARD Hillary, son of HENRY Hillary & his wife Alice --- (-1362). 

(2)       LUCY de Grey .  Richard de Grey and Lucy his wife settled “the manor of Erliston [Arleston] which was of her right on Lucy, da. of the said Richard de Grey…”, by charter dated 1294[926]

 

 

1.         [ALICE de Grey (-before 15 Apr 1206)William Reedy, in the genealogical tables in the introduction to his collection of Basset charters, names "Alice de Gray" as the first wife of Alan Basset and mother of the children as shown below[927].  He does not cite the primary source which confirms that this is correct.  Alice has not been connected with the Grey families.  The similarity between “Alice de Gray” and “Aline de Gai” (Alan’s supposed second wife) is striking.  Unless another source emerges which confirms the separate identity of Alan’s two supposed wives, it appears likely that he had only a single wife.  In any case, the chronology of Alan’s sons, in particular the likely dates of the marriages of Gilbert and Philip, suggests that Aline de Gai (first named in 1206) was their mother[928]m as his first wife, ALAN Basset, son of THOMAS Basset [I] of Headington, Oxfordshire & his wife Alice de Dunstanville (-before 30 Sep 1230).] 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS GREY (of Codnor)

 

 

JOHN de Grey, son of RICHARD de Grey of Codnor & his wife Lucy de Humez (-before 5 Jan 1272).  The Complete Peerage cites document dated 20 May 1244, 9 Jan 1251 (with his father), 1263, which name John de Grey, and his death before 5 Jan 1272[929]Inquisitions following a writ dated 5 Jan "56 Hen III", after the death of "John de Grey alias le Grey", name “Henry his son age 14...15...17...is his next heir”, and name “Joan daughter of the said John aged 16” in connection with Barton, Yorkshire[930]

m LUCY de Mohun, daughter of REYNOLD de Mohun of Dunster, Somerset & his first wife Hawise de Mandeville (-after 25 Mar 1285).  The Complete Peerage names “Lucy, da. of Sir Reynold de Mohun, of Dunster, Somerset” as the wife of John de Grey, naming in a later passage her mother “Hawise, da. and h. of William Fleming” (citing Maxwell-Lyte)[931].  Maxwell-Lyte’s History of Dunster records Lucy’s parentage and marriage, citing “St. George’s extracts from the Mohun Chronicle”[932]: unfortunately, Maxwell-Lyte does not quote the precise extract relating to Lucy.  The Complete Peerage cites documents dated 12 Dec 1276 and 24 May 1282 which name Lucy, widow of John de Grey[933]By charter dated 2 Jan 1285, King Edward I confirmed the late holdings of “Johannis de Mohun, defuncti…in capite…senescallus noster in comitatibus Somerset et Dorset”, noting the dower of “Alianore que fuit uxor ipsius Johannis”; a separate list dated “die Lune in crastino Clausi Pasche” 1285 records in Dorset that “Osbertus [Gyffard] tenet unum feodum in [Wynterborn Huweton] de Lucia de Grey: eadem Lucia de Johanne de Mohun predicto defuncto…[934]

John & his wife had two children:                         

1.         HENRY de Grey of Codnor, Derbyshire, Grays Thurrock, Essex, and Aylesford and Hoo, Kent ([1254/58]-Sep 1308).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 5 Jan "56 Hen III", after the death of "John de Grey alias le Grey", name “Henry his son age 14...15...17...is his next heir[935]He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Grey (of Codnor).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 16 Sep "2 Edw II", after the death of "Henry de Grey alias de Gray”, name “Richard his son, aged 26 [...aged 26 ½…26 and more…27 and more], is his next heir[936]m firstly [ELEANOR, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay & his wife Eleanor Le Despencer] (-before 6 Jun 1301)According to the Complete Peerage, Henry de Grey was “said to have m 1stly Eleanor daughter of Hugh de Courtenay[937].  The same work suggests that “if this is correct” her father was Hugh who married Eleanor le Despencer.  However, this does not appear to be an ideal fit from a chronological point of view, assuming that Hugh le Despencer is identified as the Hugh who was killed at the battle of Evesham in 1265.  The Complete Peerage records that this Hugh le Despencer married “in or before 1260” Aline Basset, their son Hugh le Despencer being born 1 Mar 1261[938].  This would fit approximately with the estimated birth date of Hugh de Courtenay, son of Hugh de Courtenay and Eleanor, in [1275].  However, the wife of Henry de Grey would presumably have been born in the early 1260s, assuming that her marriage is correctly estimated to before [1281/82].  If that last date is correct, Eleanor, wife of Henry, would more likely have been born in the previous Courtenay generation.  The problem is that a “Hugh de Courtenay” has not yet been identified in that earlier generation.  m secondly (before 6 Jun 1301) as her second husband, JOAN, widow of RALPH de Cromwell, daughter of ---.  Henry & his first wife had children: 

a)         RICHARD de Grey ([1281/82]-before 10 Mar 1335).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 16 Sep "2 Edw II", after the death of "Henry de Grey alias de Gray”, name “Richard his son, aged 26 [...aged 26 ½…26 and more…27 and more], is his next heir[939]Lord Grey (of Codnor).  m JOAN FitzPayn, daughter of ROBERT FitzPayn Lord FitzPayn & his wife Isabel de Clifford (-after Mar 1335).  Richard & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Grey (-14 Dec 1392, bur Aylesford Kent)Lord Grey (of Codnor).  m firstly (before 4 Sep 1325) ELEANOR de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay [later Earl of Devon] & his wife Agnes de St John (-before 20 Oct 1330).  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names (in order) “Elianoram…et Elizabetham” as the two daughters of ”dominus Hugo secundus” & his wife, adding that Eleanor married “Johanni de Gray” but died childless[940]m secondly (before 20 Oct 1330) ALICE de Lisle, daughter of WARIN de Lisle of Kingston-Lisle & his wife Alice de Tyes.  John & his second wife had children: 

(1)       HENRY de Grey (-after 1371)m JOAN de Cobham, daughter of REGINALD de Cobham Lord Cobham (of Sterborough) & his wife Joan de Berkeley.  The will of "Joan de Cobham of Starburghe", dated 13 Aug 1369, chose burial “in the churchyard of St Mary Overhere in Southwark”, bequeathed property to “Henry Grey and Dame Joan his wife and to that Joane my daughter, to Joane daughter to that Joane” and a conditional bequest to “Reginald my son” relating to property “sold...to my husband in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father[941]Henry & his wife had children: 

(a)       RICHARD Grey ([1371]-1 Aug 1418, bur Aylesford)Lord Grey (of Codnor). 

-        see below

2.         JOAN de Grey ([1255/56]-).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 5 Jan "56 Hen III", after the death of "John de Grey alias le Grey", name “Joan daughter of the said John aged 16” in connection with Barton, Yorkshire[942]

 

 

RICHARD Grey, son of HENRY de Grey & his wife Joan de Cobham ([1371]-1 Aug 1418, bur Aylesford).  He succeeded his grandfather as Lord Grey (of Codnor). 

m ELIZABETH Basset, daughter of RALPH [IV] Basset Lord Basset [of Sapcote] & his second wife Alice Derby (Castle Bytham 1 Aug 1372-after 24 Aug 1446).  The Complete Peerage records her parentage, date of birth, and marriage[943]

Richard & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN Grey (1396 or before-14 Sep 1430)Lord Grey (of Codnor).  m as her first husband, ELIZABETH of Kildare, daughter of GERALD Earl of Kildare & his second wife Agnes Darcy (-6 Aug 1452).  She married secondly (1432) as his second wife, James Butler Earl of Ormond

2.         HENRY Grey ([1405]-17 Jul 1444)Lord Grey (of Codnor).  m (before 5 May 1434) as her first husband, MARGARET Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy of Atholl & his wife Elizabeth --- (-Sep 1464).  She married secondly Richard de Vere.  Henry & his wife had children: 

a)         HENRY Grey ([1424/25]-1496)Lord Grey (of Codnor).  m firstly (after 31 Aug 1454) CATHERINE Strangways, daughter of THOMAS Strangways & his wife Catherine Neville of the Earls of Westmoreland.  m secondly as her second husband, CATHERINE Stourton, widow of WILLIAM Berkeley of Beverston, Gloucestershire, daughter of WILLIAM Lord Stourton & his wife Margaret Chidiock (-London 25 Nov 1521).  She married thirdly William de la Pole

3.         ELIZABETH Greym JOHN Zouche, son of WILLIAM Zouche Lord Zouche & his wife ---. 

4.         ELEANOR Greym THOMAS Newport of High Ercall, Shropshire, son of ---. 

5.         LUCY Greym ROWLAND Lenthall of Lenthall and Hampton Court, Herefordshire, son of ---. 

 

 

 

C.      LORDS GREY (of Wilton)

 

 

JOHN de Grey of Wilton, son of REYNOLD de Grey Lord Grey (of Wilton) & his wife Matilda de Longchamp ([before?] [1267/68]-[28 Oct] 1323).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 5 Apr "1 Edw II", after the death of "Reginald de Grey alias Le Grey”, name “John his son, aged 40 and more [...aged 30 and more...aged 50], is his next heir [...aged 40 or more...aged 41 at the said feast...aged 30 and more...aged 50...aged 36 and more][944]Lord Grey (of Wilton).  ”Johannis de Grey, memoriæ celebris, quondam domini Reginaldi de Grey filius, dominusque Cantredi de Deffrencloyt diœcesi Bangorensi” founded the collegial church at Ruthin, Denbighshire, for the souls of “...domini Reginaldi de Gray prædicti, Matildis consortis suæ dudum et matris nostræ...”, and “pro anima quoque nostra, Matildis uxoris nostræ...”, by charter dated 7 Apr 1310[945].  His date of death is recorded by the Complete Peerage[946], although this date is rather early considering the writ following his death, such writs often being issued within a few days of the decease.  Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 Dec "17 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey”, name “Henry his son aged 42 at the feast of SS. Simon and Jude last [...aged 40 or more...aged 41 at the said feast...aged 30 and more...aged 36 and more] is his next heir”, name “Roger his son” in connection with land at Holewell, Hertford, “Roger his son...John son of Ralph Basset of Drayton” in connection with “Gilling and Hemigford Turbervill” Huntingdon and “Wrast and Brockeburwe” Bedford, “Roger his son...Roger son of John de Mules...” in connection with “Great Brichul” Buckingham[947]

[m firstly ANNE de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers of Groby, Leicestershire & his first wife Anne ---.]  The Complete Peerage says that John Lord Grey of Wilton married “(it is said) Anne da. of William de Ferrers of Groby Leicester by his 1st wife Anne...” but does not provide the basis for this speculation[948].  Douglas Richardson highlighted that this suggestion is based on the 1619 Visitation of Leicester[949].  Considering John de Grey’s date of birth, and his marriage to his known wife Maud dated to [1276/77], it is unlikely that, even if he contracted an earlier marriage to a daughter of William de Ferrers when he was a child, the marriage took place.  It should be noted that the 1619 Visitation misrecords the parentage of John’s wife Maud, which does not inspire confidence in its accuracy.] 

m [secondly] ([1276/77]) MAUD [Matilda] de Verdun, daughter of JOHN de Verdun [Butler] & his second wife Eleanor [de Bohun] (-[7 Apr 1310/Oct 1323]).  Eleanor “de Bohun” [named as such by Richardson, the name has not been checked against the original source which has not been identified], widow of John de Verdun, settled land in Debden, Essex on John de Grey, his wife Maud [her daughter], and the heirs of Maud, by charter dated 1276-77[950], presumably around the time the couple married.  The original of that document may be connected with the following: in three orders “John de Cobeham and Elias de Bekingham” were appointed “to take the assise of novel disseisin arraigned by John de Grey and Matilda his wife against Alianor late wife of John de Verdun [...and Geoffrey Brun], touching a tenement in [Debden]”, presumably dated to [1276][951].  A Court of Common Pleas document dated 1291 records that John de Grey and Maud his wife, with Walter de Lacy and Rose his wife, sued Humphrey [VII] de Bohun Earl of Hereford, relating to land in Debden, Essex which Maud and Rose claimed as heirs of Humphrey de Verdun their brother[952].  The record of Humphrey de Verdun’s earlier supposed disposal of the land in question (follow her hyperlink) suggests the basis for this dispute.  ”Johannis de Grey, memoriæ celebris, quondam domini Reginaldi de Grey filius, dominusque Cantredi de Deffrencloyt diœcesi Bangorensi” founded the collegial church at Ruthin, Denbighshire, “pro anima quoque nostra, Matildis uxoris nostræ...”, by charter dated 7 Apr 1310[953].  She is not named in the Inquisitions following her husband’s death, so presumably predeceased him. 

[The Complete Peerage says that John Lord Grey of Wilton married secondly “Maud, who is said to have been da. of Ralph Basset of Drayton by Margaret...de Somery[954]: “Maud, daughter of [Ralph Basset of Drayton, Staffordshire & his wife Margaret de Somery]”.  This suggested parentage of Maud, shown in the 1619 Visitation of Leicester[955], is disproved by the 1291 document cited above]. 

John & his [second] wife had three children (their parentage is confirmed by a claim by [the couple’s son] “Henry de Grey” against [their other son] “Roger de Grey” concerning “Manor of Weldebernes” [presumably Debden, Essex, their mother’s property, see above] after their father died[956].  It is also suggested by their parents’ marriage date and the estimated birth date of their son Henry.): 

1.         HENRY de Grey ([28 Oct or before?] [1280/81?]-10 or 16 Dec 1342).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 Dec "17 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey”, name “Henry his son aged 42 at the feast of SS. Simon and Jude last [...aged 40 or more...aged 41 at the said feast...aged 30 and more...aged 36 and more] is his next heir[957]Lord Grey (of Wilton).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Dec "16 Edw III", after the death of "Henry de Grey”, name “Reginald his son, aged 30 years and more [...28 years and more]”, and includes reference to “Essex, Depeden[958]m ANNE, daughter of [RALPH de Rockley & his wife Isabel de Clare].  The Complete Peerage states that John Lord Grey of Wilton married “(it is said) Anne da. and h. of Ralph de Rockley by Isabel da. of William de Clare[959].  Her parentage and marriage are shown in the 1619 Visitation of Leicester[960], whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed as noted above.  She is not named in the Inquisitions following her husband’s death.  Henry & his wife had children: 

a)         REYNOLD Grey ([1311/12 or before?]-Shirland 28 May or 4 Jun 1370).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Dec "16 Edw III", after the death of "Henry de Grey”, name “Reginald his son, aged 30 years and more [...28 years and more]”, and includes reference to “Essex, Depeden[961]Lord Grey (of Wilton).  m (10 Jan 1328) MATILDA, daughter of [Sir JOHN de Botetourt of Weoley, Worcestershire & his wife --- (-Shirland 14 Sep 1391).  The 1619 Visitation of Leicester, whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed as noted above, names her “Matilda, fil. et hær. Joh’is de Boutort Lo. of Weley[962].  Reynold & his wife had children: 

i)          HENRY Grey (-22 Apr 1396)Lord Grey (of Wilton). 

-        see below

b)         MATILDA Grey (-after 3 Jan 1376).  Pope John XXII issued a dispensation 16 Dec 1332 for “John, son of Robert de Insula, knight, and Matilda, daughter of Henry de Grey, knight, to remain in the marriage which they contracted in ignorance that they were related in the fourth degree[963].  The Complete Peerage records documents dated Jan 1352 (O.S.), 12 Feb 1355 (O.S.), 6 Apr 1356, and 3 Jan 1376 (O.SJ in which she was named[964]m (Papal dispensation 16 Dec 1332) JOHN de Lisle, son of ROBERT de Lisle Lord Lisle & his wife Margaret de Beauchamp ([1317?]-killed [Narbonne] 14 Oct 1355). 

2.         ROGER de Grey (-6 Mar 1353).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 Dec "17 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey”, name “Roger his son” in connection with land at Holewell, Hertford, “Roger his son...John son of Ralph Basset of Drayton” in connection with “Gilling and Hemigford Turbervill” Huntingdon and “Wrast and Brockeburwe” Bedford, “Roger his son...Roger son of John de Mules...” in connection with “Great Brichul” Buckingham[965].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1325 whereby he is held to have become Lord Grey (of Ruthin). 

-        LORDS GREY (of RUTHIN)

3.         JOAN de Grey (-1353, before 5 Apr).  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the following document: a document dated 31 Jan 1334 records that John Earl of Hereford and [their daughter] Margaret Basset discovered “after consummation of their marriage…that…[they] were related in the fourth degree”, and ordered a full report “the following witnesses to be cited : …Ralph Basset, Henry de Grey, Roger de Grey, John de Verduyn, Robert de Lylle…Oliver de Bohun…knights; Joan, wife of the said Ralph; Joan de Verduyn…[966]m (settlement 27 Mar 1304) RALPH Basset Lord Basset (of Drayton), son of RALPH Basset Lord Basset (of Drayton) & his wife Hawise --- (-25 Feb 1343). 

 

 

HENRY Grey, son of REYNOLD de Grey Lord Grey (of Wilton) & his wife Matilda --- (-22 Apr 1396)Lord Grey (of Wilton). 

m (before 3 Feb 1380) ELIZABETH, daughter of --- (-10 Jan 1402).  The 1619 Visitation of Leicester, whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed as noted above, names her “Elizab, fil. Tho. Talbot[967]

Henry & his wife had children: 

1.         RICHARD Grey (-[12 Aug 1442/5 Feb 1443], bur Bletchley)Lord Grey (of Wilton).  The will of "Richard Grey Lord of Wilton", dated 12 Aug 1442, chose burial “in the church of Our Lady at Blechelæ”, bequeathed property to “Margaret my wife[968]m firstly BLANCHE, daughter of ---.  m secondly (1427) as her first husband, MARGARET de Ferrers, daughter of WILLIAM de Ferrers Lord Ferrers of Groby & his [first/second wife Philippa de Clifford/Margaret de Montagu] (-16 Jan 1452).  The will of "Richard Grey Lord of Wilton", dated 12 Aug 1442, chose burial “in the church of Our Lady at Blechelæ”, bequeathed property to “Margaret my wife[969]She married secondly (before 14 Feb 1446) Thomas Grey of Richemount, Bedfordshire.  Richard & his first wife had children: 

a)         REGINALD Grey (1421-22 Feb 1494, bur Bletchley, Buckinghamshire)Lord Grey (of Wilton).  m TACINE [Jacinta or Thomasine], illegitimate daughter of JOHN Beaufort Duke of Somerset & his mistress --- ([1434]-after 1469)A document which sets out the order of the funeral of William Lord Grey (of Wilton) (who was buried 22 Dec 1562) records “the greate-graundfather and greate-graundmother to the defuncte...Reygnolde lorde Grey and Thomasyn or Thasyna base daughter to John duke of Somerset[970]Reginald & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Grey (-3 Apr 1499)Lord Grey (of Wilton).  m firstly ANNE Grey, daughter of EDMUND Grey Earl of Kent & his wife Katherine Percy of the Earls of Northumberland.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH Vaughan, widow of THOMAS Cokesey, daughter of THOMAS Vaughan & his wife --- (-15 Jan 1515).  She married thirdly (before 25 Nov 1501) Edward Stanley, afterwards Lord Mounteagle. 

-        LORDS GREY (of WILTON)[971]

 

 

D.      LORDS GREY (of Ruthin)

 

 

ROGER de Grey, son of JOHN de Grey Lord Grey of Wilton & his [second] wife Maud de Verdun (-6 Mar 1353).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 Dec "17 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey”, name “Roger his son” in connection with land at Holewell, Hertford, “Roger his son...John son of Ralph Basset of Drayton” in connection with “Gilling and Hemigford Turbervill” Huntingdon and “Wrast and Brockeburwe” Bedford, “Roger his son...Roger son of John de Mules...” in connection with “Great Brichul” Buckingham[972].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1325 whereby he is held to have become Lord Grey (of Ruthin). 

m ELIZABETH de Hastings, daughter of JOHN Hastings Lord Hastings & his first wife Isabelle de Valence [Lusignan].  The 1619 Visitation of Leicester, whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed, names “Elizab. filia et hær. Joh’is Dni Hastinges de Bergauenie” as the wife of Roger de Grey[973]

Roger & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN de Grey (-[25 Oct 1348/4 May 1350])m AGNES de Montagu, daughter of WILLIAM Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Catherine Grandson

2.         REYNOLD de Grey (-28 Jul or 4 Aug 1388).  Lord Grey (of Ruthin).  m ELEANOR Lestrange, daughter of ROGER Lestrange Lord Strange (of Knockin) & his wife --- (-20 Apr 1396).  The 1619 Visitation of Leicester, whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed as noted above, names her “Elinor, fil. D’ni Strange de Blackmore[974]

a)         REYNOLD Grey ([1361/62]-18 Oct 1440).  Lord Grey (of Ruthin).  m firstly (after 25 Nov 1378) MARGARET de Roos, daughter of THOMAS de Roos of Helmsley, Lord Roos & his wife Beatrice Stafford of the Earls of Stafford.  The 1619 Visitation of Leicester, whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed as noted above, names her “Margaret fil. Wm D’ni Roos de Hamlack[975]m secondly (before 7 Feb 1415) as her second husband, JOAN Asteley, widow of THOMAS Raleghe, daughter of WILLIAM Asteley of Astley, Warwickshire & his wife Joan --- (-2 Sep or 12 Nov 1448).  The 1619 Visitation of Leicester, whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed as noted above, names her “Jone fil. et hæres Will’i D’ni Astley[976].  Reynold & his first wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Grey (-27 Aug 1439)m (before 24 Feb 1413) as her second husband, CONSTANCE de Holand, widow of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, daughter of JOHN de Holand Duke of Exeter & his wife Elizabeth of Lancaster (1387-12 or 14 Nov 1437, bur London, St Katherine’s by the Tower).  The will of "John Holland Duke of Exeter", dated 16 Jul 1447, chose burial “in the church of St Katherine beside the Tower of London in a tomb there ordained for me and Anne my first wife, as also for my sister Constance and Anne my wife now living[977]John & his wife had two children: 

(1)       EDMUND Grey (-22 May 1490)Lord Grey (of Ruthin).  He was created Earl of Kent in 1465.  m KATHERINE Percy, daughter of HENRY Percy Earl of Northumberland & his wife Eleanor Neville (Leckonfield, Yorkshire 28 May 1423-).  Edmund & his wife had children: 

(a)       ANTHONY Grey of Ruthin (-[15 May/27 Nov] 1480, bur St Albans Abbey)m (1466) JOAN Wydeville, daughter of RICHARD Wydeville Earl Rivers & his wife Jacquette de Luxembourg.  The Annales of William Wyrcester record in 1466 that “Gray Ruffin filius et hæres comitis Kanciæ” married “aliam sororem reginæ[978]

(b)       GEORGE Grey (-Ampthill 16 Dec 1503).  He succeeded his father in 1490 as Earl of Kent, Lord Grey (of Ruthin).  m firstly (before 26 Jun 1480) as her third husband, ANNE Wydeville, widow firstly of WILLIAM Bourchier Viscount Bourchier and secondly of EDWARD Wingfield, daughter of RICHARD Wydeville Earl Rivers & his wife Jacquette de Luxembourg ([1438]-30 Jul 1489).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Anne Lady Bouchier" as daughter of "Richard Earl Rivers" and mother of "Henry Earl of Essex" and of "Lady Ferrers of Chartley"[979]m secondly ([1 Oct] 1490) CATHERINE Herbert, daughter of WILLIAM Herbert Earl of Pembroke & his wife Anne Devereux (-[1 Dec 1500/8 May 1504]). 

-        EARLS of KENT[980]

Reynold & his second wife had children: 

ii)         EDWARD Grey (-18 Dec 1457)

-        see below

3.         JULIANA de Grey (-1361).  m (1330) JOHN Talbot, son of RICHARD Talbot of Richard’s Castle & his wife Joan de Mortimer ([1319]-1355). 

 

 

EDWARD Grey, son of REYNOLD Grey Lord Grey (of Ruthin) & his second wife Joan Asteley (-18 Dec 1457)

m as her first husband, ELIZABETH Ferrers, daughter of HENRY Ferrers & his wife Isabel Mowbray ([1417/19]-[23] Jan 1483).  She succeeded her grandfather in 1445 as Lady Ferrers (of Groby).  She married secondly (before 2 May 1462) as his first wife, John Bourchier of Essex. 

Edward & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN Grey of Groby ([1431/32]-killed in battle St Albans 17 Feb 1461)m as her first husband, ELIZABETH Wydeville, daughter of RICHARD Wydeville Earl Rivers & his wife Jacquette de Luxembourg (Grafton Regis [1437]-St Saviour’s Abbey, Bermondsey 8 Jun 1492, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor)A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Queen Elizabeth" as daughter of "Richard Earl Rivers" and mother of "The Queen that now is" and of "Thomas Marquess of Dorset"[981]She married secondly (Manor of Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire 1 May 1464) Edward IV King of England. She was crowned Queen of England 26 May 1465 at Westminster Abbey.  Her second marriage was declared null and void 25 Jun 1483 by the Act of Parliament “Titulus Regius”, their children becoming illegitimate, but recognised as valid once more Oct 1485 by the first Parliament of King Henry VII.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         THOMAS Grey (-30 Aug 1501).  He succeeded his paternal grandmother as Lord Ferrers (of Groby).  He was created Earl of Huntingdon 1471.  He was created Marquess of Dorset 1475.  m firstly (Greenwich Oct 1466) ANNE de Holand, daughter of HENRY de Holand Duke of Exeter & his wife Anne of York (-[26 Aug 1467/6 Jun 1474]).  The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage in Oct 1466 “apud Grenewiche” of “Thomam Gray militem filium reginæ” and “dominam hæredem ducis Exoniæ neptem regis” to the great secret displeasure of “comitis Warrwici” who had previously arranged the marriage of “dictam dominam Annam” to “filium comitis Northumbriæ fratris dicti comitis Warrwici[982]m secondly (contract 18 Jul 1474) as her first husband, CECILY Bonville Baroness Harington and Baroness Bonville, daughter of WILLIAM Bonville Lord Harington & his wife Catherine Neville of Salisbury (-12 Apr 1530, bur Astley).  She married secondly as his second wife Henry Stafford Earl of Wiltshire.  Thomas & his second wife had children: 

i)          THOMAS Grey (22 Jun 1477-10 Oct 1530).  Marquess of Dorsetm (1509) as her second husband, MARGARET Wotton, widow of WILLIAM Medley, daughter of ROBERT Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, Kent & his wife Anne Belknap (-after 6 Oct 1535).  Thomas & his wife had children: 

(1)       HENRY Grey (17 Jan 1517-executed Tower Hill 23 Feb 1554, bur Royal Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London).  He succeeded his father in 1530 as Marquess of Dorset.  He was created Duke of Suffolk in 1551.  He was attainted for treason for his involvement in Wyatt’s rebellion against Queen Mary I and forfeited his titles and estates.  m firstly (before 1530, repudiated) KATHERINE FitzAlan, daughter of WILLIAM FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his second wife Anne Percy of the Earls of Northumberland (-after 1552).  m secondly ([Suffolk Place, Southwark, London] Mar or early May 1533) as her first husband, FRANCES Brandon, daughter of CHARLES Brandon Duke of Suffolk & his wife Mary of England (Bishop’s Hatfield, Hertfordshire [or Westhorpe Hall, Suffolk] 16 Jul 1517-Charterhouse, Sheen, Surrey 21 Nov 1559, bur 5 Dec Westminster Abbey).  She married secondly (9 Mar 1554) as his first wife, Adrian Stokes

(2)       CATHERINE Grey, daughter of THOMAS Grey Marquess of Dorset & his second wife Margaret Wotton (-1 May 1542)m as his first wife, HENRY FitzAlan Earl of Arundel, son of WILLIAM FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his second wife Anne Percy of the Earls of Northumberland (23 Apr 1512-Arundel House, Strand, London 24 Feb 1580, bur Arundel). 

2.         EDWARD Grey (-17 Jul 1492, bur Astley, Warwickshire)Lord Ferrers of Groby.  He was created Viscount Lisle 28 Jun 1483.  m firstly ELIZABETH Talbot Baroness Lisle of Kingston Lisle, daughter of JOHN Talbot Viscount Lisle & his wife Joan Chedder (1451-8 Sep 1487, bur Astley, Warwickshire).  m secondly as her third husband, JOAN, widow firstly of JOHN Treguran and secondly of ROBERT Drope, daughter of --- (-1500, after 8 Aug, bur St Michael’s Cornhill).  Edward & his first wife had four children: 

a)         JOHN Grey (Apr 1480-9 Sep 1504, bur Abingdon)Viscount Lislem as her first husband, MURIEL Howard, daughter of THOMAS Howard Earl of Surrey (later Duke of Norfolk) & his first wife Eizabeth Tylney (-Lambeth 14 Dec 1512, bur Lambeth).  She married secondly (before 9 Jul 1506) Thomas Knyvet of Buckenham, Norfolk.  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          ELIZABETH Grey ([25] Mar 1505-[31 Mar/12 May] 1519).  Baroness Lisle.  Betrothed (1513) to CHARLES Brandon, son of .  m (after Jun 1515) as his first wife, HENRY Courtenay Earl of Devon, son of WILLIAM de Courtenay Earl of Devon & his wife Katherine of York ([1498]-beheaded Tower Hill 9 Jan 1539). 

b)         ANNE Grey (-before 1523).  m (contract 2 Oct 1486) JOHN Willoughby of Wollaton, Northamptonshire, son of ---. 

c)         ELIZABETH Grey (-[1525/26], bur Jan 1538 Titchfield, Hampshire).  King Henry VIII granted “the manors of Fysshewyke and Eccleston, Lanc...” to “Arthur Plantagenet and Elizabeth his wife late the wife of Edmund Dudley” dated 13 Nov 1511[983].  Baroness Lisle 1519.  m firstly EDMUND Dudley, son of --- (-beheaded Tower Hill 18 Aug 1510).  m secondly (12 Nov 1511) as his first wife, ARTHUR Plantagenet, illegitimate son of EDWARD IV King of England & his mistress Elizabeth Lucy née Waite ([1461/64]-Tower of London 3 Mar 1542, bur [Tower of London]). 

d)         MARGARET Grey (-[8 Aug 1500/9 Sep 1504])m (settlement 3 Jul 1494) EDWARD Stafford Earl of Wiltshire, son of JOHN Stafford Earl of Wiltshire & his wife Constance Green (7 Apr 1470-Drayton, Northamptonshire 24 Mar 1499, bur Lowick, Northamptonshire).  . 

 

 

 

GREY (of ROTHERFIELD)

 

 

Moriarty says that “There can be no doubt that the [Grey] family derived its name from Graye-sur-Mer in the Canton of Ryes in the arrondissement of Bayeux”, indicating “an Arnulph sieur de Graye as early as 970, and a Nigel de Grai who witnessed a charter about 1020[984].  Moriarty records other supposed early members of the family from the late-11th to the mid-13th century, who are shown below[985]The successive references to properties in Oxfordshire, in particular Rotherfield and Cornwell, indicate that all the unconnected individuals in the early part of this section were members of the Grey family of Rotherfield.  No connection has been established between this family and Henry Grey of Greys Thurrock, Essex, who was ancestor of the other Grey families who are shown above. 

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         ANSCHETIL [I] de Grey (-after 1086).  Blomefield says that John de Grey Bishop of Norwich “was descended from Anschitel de Grey, a Norman, who came in with the Conqueror, and had large possessions of his gift[986].  Domesday Book records that “Ansketil...de Graye” held “land which belongs to Salford” from the bishop of Bayeux, and Rotherfield Greys, Black Bourton, Radeford, South Newington, Brighthampton, and Cornwell from William FitzOsbern, all in Oxfordshire[987]

 

2.         RICHARD de Grey (-after 1109).  Blomefield says that Richard de Grey was the son of Anschetil [I] but does not cite the primary source on which he bases this information[988].  The chronology suggests that this parentage may be correct.  Henry I King of England confirmed the properties of Eynsham abbey, including the donation of “decimam de Dærneford et de Wideli et de Corneuuella” donated by “Ricardus de Graio” when he sent “unum filium suum in eodem monasterio”, by charter dated 25 Dec 1109[989].  None of the names in the 1129 Pipe Roll for Oxfordshire suggest a connection with the Grey family.  m ---.  The name of Richard’s wife is not known.  Richard & his wife had three or more children: 

a)         other sons .  The existence of two or more other sons is indicated by the charter dated 25 Dec 1109 quoted below. 

b)         --- de Grey .  Monk at Evesham.  Henry I King of England confirmed the properties of Eynsham abbey, including the donation of “decimam de Dærneford et de Wideli et de Corneuuella” donated by “Ricardus de Graio” when he sent “unum filium suum in eodem monasterio”, by charter dated 25 Dec 1109[990]

 

3.         ANSCHETIL [II] de Grey .  His name, as well as the chronology, suggests that Anschetil [II] could have been the grandson of Anschetil [I] de Grey.  “Anschetillus de Grai” donated land at “Stanlache quod vocatur Langehurst et aliud...Wdefordhurst..” to Eynsham, with the consent of “filius meus Johannes”, by charter dated to [1150/60], witnessed by “Manasses Arsic, Hugo de Chesnei...Albericus Arsic[991]m ---.  The name of Anschetil’s wife is not known.  Anschetil [II] & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Grey .  “Anschetillus de Grai” donated land at “Stanlache quod vocatur Langehurst et aliud...Wdefordhurst..” to Eynsham, with the consent of “filius meus Johannes”, by charter dated to [1150/60][992]m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had one child: 

i)          EVA de Grey (-before Jun 1246).  "Radulfus Murdac" donated his part "in molendino de Clifton" to Eynsham abbey, for the soul of "...Eue de Grai uxoris mee”, by charter dated 1192, witnessed by “...Simone Murdac...[993].  King John confirmed land "juris eis descendit ex parte Roberti Basset et…in Tenford et Purston" to "Andr de Bellocampo et Eve de Gray uxoris eius" by charter dated 25 Apr 1200[994].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Johannes filius Andree de Bello Campo debet...esse in custodia domini regis et Eva de Gray mater eius habet custodiam eius et terre sue de Asington per dominum Falk...et ipsa Eva est maritanda"[995]Exemptions were granted to "Hawise mother of W. archbishop of York" which the king had also granted to "Robert de Gray and his heirs for the land of Rutherefeld which the said archbishop had of the gift of Eve de Gray and gave to the said Robert" dated 9 Mar 1240[996]Inquisitions (undated, dated to [1242][997]) following the death of "Eva de Gray" name "Beatrice Murdac late the wife of Robert Maudut, Alice the wife of Ralph Harang, Joan the wife of Ernald de Bosco and Julanus son of Jolland de Nevill and Maud his wife are her heirs"[998]: the precise relationships between the two last-named heirs and the deceased have not been ascertained, maybe they were descendants of her second marriage.  m firstly (before 1192) [as his second wife?] RALPH Murdac, son of [RALPH] Murdac & his wife [--- de Chesney] (-[1194/30 Sep 1198]).  m secondly (before 25 Apr 1200) ANDREW de Beauchamp, son of --- de Beauchamp & his wife Matilda de Limesey (-after 1210).   

 

4.         THOMAS de Grey .  He is named as father of Alice in the charter dated to [1151/73] quoted below.  From a chronological point of view, Thomas could have been a younger son of Anschetil [II] de Grey.  m ---.  The name of Thomas’s wife is  not known.  Thomas & his wife had one child: 

a)         ALICE de Grey (-after Oct 1201).  “Stephanus de Pontsold et Aeliza uxor mea filia Thome de Grai” donated “ecclesiam de Cornwella” to Eynsham by undated charter, dated to [1151-73], witnessed by “Roberto archidiacono Oxenfordie...Waltero de Cornwella[999].  Salter notes that the abbot of Evesham quitclaimed Cornwell church to “Alice de Gray” in Autumn 1201[1000]m STEPHEN de Pontsold, son of ---. 

 

 

[Three siblings], parents not known.  From a chronological point of view, they could have been children either of John or Thomas de Grey who are named above.  The reference in the document dated 9 Mar 1240, quoted below, to Eva de Grey granting property to Robert de Grey, son of Hawise, suggests that Eva held a position of seniority in the Grey family relative to Robert.  This could mean either (1) that Robert was her cousin, son of a younger brother of her father, or (2) that Robert’s mother Hawise was Eva’s younger sister.  The difficulty with case (2) is the absence of documentation which points to Eva and Hawise being co-heiresses of John de Gray.  Case (1) is therefore the more likely case.  Richard de Grey could not have been the father of these three children, as suggested by Blomefield: 

1.         --- de Grey .  The existence of this older son is suggested by Blomefield who names John de Grey Bishop of Norwich as “second son of Richard de Grey, son of the said Anschitel” but does not cite the primary source on which he bases this information[1001]

2.         JOHN de Grey (-Saint-Jean d’Angély 18 Oct 1214, bur Norwich Cathedral).  Blomefield names John de Grey Bishop of Norwich as “second son of Richard de Grey, son of the said Anschitel”, but he does not cite the primary source on which he bases this information[1002].  The chronology suggests at least one additional generation between Richard and John.  Bishop of Norwich 24 Sep 1200.  Blomefield says that he died “at St. John de Angelo near Poictiers Oct 18, 1214”, while travelling back to England from Rome, and was buried in Norwich cathedral[1003].  “Hawisia de Grey vidua” donated “ecclesiam de Cornewell” to Oseney abbey, for the souls of “Johannis de Grey fratris mei quondam Norwicensis Episcopi”, with the consent of “Dni. Roberti de Grey filii et heredis mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Dno. Waltero de Grey, Wygorniensi Episcopo filio meo[1004]

3.         [HAWISE [de Grey] (-after 9 Mar 1240).  Hawisia de Grey vidua” donated “ecclesiam de Cornewell” to Oseney abbey, for the souls of “Johannis de Grey fratris mei quondam Norwicensis Episcopi”, with the consent of “Dni. Roberti de Grey filii et heredis mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Dno. Waltero de Grey, Wygorniensi Episcopo filio meo” [which indicates dating to [19 Oct 1214/Feb 16][1005].  The word “fratris” in this document suggests that Hawise was the sister of John de Grey Bishop of Norwich.  If it were not for this charter, her transmission of the name Grey to her children would suggest that this name derived from her husband.  It is not unknown for noble mothers to transmit their own family name to their children, presumably in cases where their families were considered of nobler birth than their husbands’.  However, nor is it unknown for “frater” to be used in medieval documentation in the sense of brother-in-law, although such usage was infrequent[1006].  It is therefore uncertain whether it was Hawise or her husband who was the sibling of John Bishop of Norwich.  The Patent Rolls include an order in favour of “Hawisie matri…W. Eboracensis archiepiscopi” dated 9 Nov 1231[1007].  Exemptions were granted to "Hawise mother of W. archbishop of York" which the king had also granted to "Robert de Gray and his heirs for the land of Rutherefeld which the said archbishop had of the gift of Eve de Gray and gave to the said Robert" dated 9 Mar 1240[1008]m --- (-before [19 Oct 1214/Feb 16]).]  Two children: 

a)         WALTER de Grey (-1 May 1255).  Bishop of Worcester 20 Jan 1214.  Hawisia de Grey vidua” donated “ecclesiam de Cornewell” to Oseney abbey, for the souls of “Johannis de Grey fratris mei quondam Norwicensis Episcopi”, with the consent of “Dni. Roberti de Grey filii et heredis mei”, by undated charter, dated to [19 Oct 1214/Feb 16], witnessed by “Dno. Waltero de Grey, Wygorniensi Episcopo filio meo[1009]Archbishop of York 19 Feb 1216. 

b)         ROBERT de Grey of Rotherfield, Oxfordshire ([before 1195]-before 1 May 1246).  Hawisia de Grey vidua” donated “ecclesiam de Cornewell” to Oseney abbey, for the souls of “Johannis de Grey fratris mei quondam Norwicensis Episcopi”, with the consent of “Dni. Roberti de Grey filii et heredis mei”, by undated charter, dated to [19 Oct 1214/Feb 16][1010].  Robert’s giving consent in this charter indicates that he was of age, and therefore probably not born much later than [1195].  Exemptions were granted to "Hawise mother of W. archbishop of York" which the king had also granted to "Robert de Gray and his heirs for the land of Rutherefeld which the said archbishop had of the gift of Eve de Gray and gave to the said Robert" dated 9 Mar 1240[1011]m BEATRIX de Saint-Luce, daughter of WILLIAM de Saint-Luce & his wife Avice de Sculcoates.  The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire, names "Aviciam" as daughter of “Benedictus de Sculcottes”, adding that she married “Willelmus de Seynt Luce” by whom she had “Beatricem” who married “Robertus de Gray[1012]Robert & his wife had children: 

i)          WALTER de Grey of Rotherfield (-before 8 Jun 1267).  The Chronicle of Meaux names "Walterum" as the son of “Robertus de Gray” and his wife[1013]m ISABEL de Duston, daughter of WILLIAM de Duston of Duston, Northamptonshire & his wife --- (-after before 6 Dec 1304).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 19 Apr "55 Hen III", after the death of "William de Duston alias de Dustune", record that Ditton in Kent was given to “William de Duston, grandfather of Isabel de Grey, in free marriage...until it should come to the 4th degree”, noting that “the said William...had 3 daughters his heirs who were under age when their father died...Walter sometime archbishop of York...afterwards had the wardship of the heirs, married them and assigned to each her share of the inheritance” and that “Isabel the eldest daughter...married Walter de Grey [and] is in seisin of two parts...[1014].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Dec "33 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel de Grey ", name “John de Grey her nepos aged 30 is her next heir[1015]Walter & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ROBERT de Grey (-before 27 May 1295)The Chronicle of Meaux names “Robertum” as son of "Walterum", son of “Robertus de Gray” and his wife[1016].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 May "23 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Grey, alias de Gray, Le Gray", name “John his son aged 23 and more [...his first born son aged 28 and more] is his next heir[1017]m (before 1273) JOAN de Valoignes, daughter of THOMAS de Valoignes & his wife --- (-before 6 Sep 1312).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Sep "6 Edw II", after the death of "Joan de Grey ", name “the heir of John de Grey of Retherfeld who is under age...Robert de Grey sometime her husband” and “John, son of John de Grey aged 11 and in the king’s wardship is next heir of Robert and Joan”, record “Schobyngton [Buckinghamshire] [which] descended to the said Joan after the death of Thomas de Valoignes her father” and, in respect of land at Ikeford and East Claydon granted by “Robert de Laventon parson of the church of Estcleydon...to Joan de Grey for life, with remainders to Margaret her daughter for life...remainder to Thomas de Grey son of the said Joan”, a claim by “John de Rocheford and Joan his wife”, noting that Margaret and Thomas had predeceased their mother, in a later passage naming “Margaret their daughter late the wife of John le Fiz Bernard and Joan daughter of the said John and Margaret[1018]Robert & his wife had three children: 

(a)       JOHN de Grey ([1273/74]-17 Oct 1311)Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 May "23 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Grey, alias de Gray, Le Gray", name “John his son aged 23 and more [...his first born son aged 28 and more] is his next heir[1019]

-        see below

(b)       THOMAS de Grey (-before 1312).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Sep "6 Edw II", after the death of "Joan de Grey ", record land at Ikeford and East Claydon granted by “Robert de Laventon parson of the church of Estcleydon...to Joan de Grey for life, with remainders to Margaret her daughter for life...remainder to Thomas de Grey son of the said Joan”, claimed by “John de Rocheford and Joan his wife”, noting that Margaret and Thomas had predeceased their mother[1020]

(c)       MARGARET de Grey (-before 1312).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Sep "6 Edw II", after the death of "Joan de Grey ", record land at Ikeford and East Claydon granted by “Robert de Laventon parson of the church of Estcleydon...to Joan de Grey for life, with remainders to Margaret her daughter for life”, claimed by “John de Rocheford and Joan his wife”, noting that Margaret had predeceased her mother, in a later passage naming “Margaret their daughter late the wife of John le Fiz Bernard and Joan daughter of the said John and Margaret[1021]m JOHN FitzBernard, son of ---. 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS GREY (of Rotherfield)

 

 

JOHN de Grey of Rotherfield, son of ROBERT de Grey of Rotherfield & his wife Joan --- ([1273/74]-17 Oct 1311)Inquisitions following a writ dated 27 May "23 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Grey, alias de Gray, Le Gray", name “John his son aged 23 and more [...his first born son aged 28 and more] is his next heir[1022].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Dec "33 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel de Grey ", name “John de Grey her nepos aged 30 is her next heir[1023].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Oct "5 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey of Rotherfeld, alias John de Retherfeld”, note that he died “on the eve of St. Luke in the year abovesaid”, name “John his son, aged 10 and more [...aged 10 at the feast of SS. Simon and Jude in the same year…aged 10 at the feast of St. Michael in the year abovesaid…aged 12…aged 10 on 1 March, 5 (Edw. II), and married], is his next heir”, record “Scolcotes, Sutton and Dripol in Hold(erness), Suthburton”, Yorkshire “jointly held by the said John with Margaret his wife” and property in Warwickshire “held of the inheritance of Margaret his wife, of Sir John de Oddyngesel…[1024]

m MARGARET de Oddingeseles, daughter of WILLIAM de Oddingeseles of Solihull and Maxstoke, Warwickshire & his wife Ela --- (-after 17 Oct 1311).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Oct "5 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey of Rotherfeld, alias John de Retherfeld”, record “Scolcotes, Sutton and Dripol in Hold(erness), Suthburton”, Yorkshire “jointly held by the said John with Margaret his wife” and property in Warwickshire “held of the inheritance of Margaret his wife, of Sir John de Oddyngesel…[1025]

John & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN de Grey of Rotherfield ([1300?]-Rotherfield 1 Sep 1359).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 20 Oct "5 Edw II", after the death of "John de Grey of Rotherfeld, alias John de Retherfeld”, name “John his son, aged 10 and more [...aged 10 at the feast of SS. Simon and Jude in the same year…aged 10 at the feast of St. Michael in the year abovesaid…aged 12…aged 10 on 1 March, 5 (Edw. II), and married], is his next heir[1026].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 6 Sep "6 Edw II", after the death of "Joan de Grey ", name “the heir of John de Grey of Retherfeld who is under age...Robert de Grey sometime her husband” and “John, son of John de Grey aged 11 and in the king’s wardship is next heir of Robert and Joan[1027].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1338 whereby he is held to have become Lord Grey (of Rotherfield).  m firstly CATHERINE FitzAlan, daughter of BRIAN FitzAlan Lord FitzAlan & his second wife Maud ---.  m secondly AVICE Marmion, daughter of JOHN Marmion Lord Marmion & his wife --- (-20 Mar 1379).  John & his first wife had children: 

a)         JOHN de Grey (-4 Jun 1375)Lord Grey (of Rotherfield).  m MAUD, daughter of ---.  The Complete Peerage states that she was “possibly da. of Bartholomew de Burghersh the elder Lord Burghersh[1028]John & his wife had children: 

i)          BARTHOLOMEW de Grey ([1351]-12 Nov 1375).  Lord Grey (of Rotherfield).  m PHILIPPA, daughter of ---. 

ii)         ROBERT de Grey (-12 or 14 Jan 1388).  Lord Grey (of Rotherfield).  m firstly JOAN, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her second husband, ELIZABETH de la Plaunche, widow of JOHN de Bermingham, daughter of WILLIAM de la Plainche of Haversham, Buckinghamshire & his wife Elizabeth Hillary (-1423).  She married thirdly (before 24 Oct 1388) John de Clinton, Lord Clinton.  She married fourthly (after Sep 1398) John Russell.  Robert & his first wife had one child: 

(1)       JOAN de Grey (Rotherfield [20] Jul 1386-20 Nov 1408)The Complete Peerage records her dates of birth and death (citing the corresponding primary sources)[1029]m (before 17 Feb 1401) JOHN Deincourt Lord Deincourt, son of WILLIAM Deincourt Lord Deincourt & his wife Alice Neville (Middleham, Yorkshire 28 Feb 1382-11 May 1406)

iii)        MAUD de Grey m JOHN Botetourt, son of JOHN Botetourt Lord Botetourt & his second wife Joyce Zouche (-1369). 

b)         MAUD de Grey m as his first wife, JOHN Botetourt Lord Botetourt, son of THOMAS Botetourt & his wife Joan de Somery ([1317/18]-1385, bur Halesowen). 

 

 

 

GREYSTOKE

 

 

The Greystoke family was studied in the early 20th century by Wilson[1030].  In particular, he dismisses various theories about alternative origins of Forne, who is named below, and earlier reputed holders of the barony of Greystoke[1031]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         SIGULF .  He is named as father of Forne in the charters cited below.  Farrer says that “nothing whatever is known” about Sigulf, but speculates that he was “the son of an unnamed sochman of the East Riding contemporary with the Domesday Survey” (no source cited)[1032]m ---.  The name of Sigulf’s wife is not known.  Sigulf & his wife had one child: 

a)         FORNE (-[25 Dec 1128/29 Sep 1130]).  “...F[orne] son of Sigulf" witnessed the charter dated Feb [1108-14] under which King Henry I confirmed privileges to York St Peter[1033].  Wilson records that King Henry I granted “the barony of Greystoke” to Forne “when he took into his own hand the lordship of the land of Carlisle after the departure of Ranulf Meschin...about 1120[1034]: the primary source which records this grant has not been found.  King Henry I confirmed their possessions of lands held 16 May 1119 to “W[alter] Espec, For [son of Sigulf] and O[dard] the sheriff" by charter dated [1121, Mar?][1035].  “...Fornone filio Sigulfi” witnessed the charter dated to [1120/29] under which Henry I King of England confirmed “in feodo et hereditate terram suam de Fangefosse et de Thorpe et de Meltemebia et de Geveldala” to “Willelmo filio Ulfi” (see below)[1036].  Henry I King of England confirmed “terram de Torentona que est de feodo Robert Malet” [Thornton-le-Moor] to “Fornoni filio Sigulfi” by charter dated to [1114/23][1037].  King Henry I notified “Walter Espec and Eustace fitz John, Forne [son of Sigulf] and the sheriff...of Yorkshire" of his grant of land in “Nomintona” [Nunnington] to York St Mary by charter dated [Dec 25?] 1128[1038].  An undated charter, in the reign of King Stephen “unoquoque anno”,  records donations to Hexham, among which land donated by “Forno, et Ivo filius eius[1039].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Carlisle priory, including the donation of “terræ in Staintone, quas Ivo filius Forni et Agnes uxor eius, et Walterus pater eius...dederunt” made by "Rannulphi filii Walteri” by charter dated 4 Mar [no year][1040].  Forne died before the 1129/30 Pipe Roll in which his son is named (see below).  m ---.  The name of Forne’s wife is not known.  Forne & his wife had two children: 

i)          IVO (-before 1156).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ivo fil Forn" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[1041]

-        see below.   

ii)         EDITH (-after [1145/56]).  Symeon of Durham names "Rodberto filio Edæ et Henrici regis notho"[1042]The Complete Peerage identifies her as the probable daughter of Forn Sigurdson Lord of Greystoke, Cumberland, wife of Robert de Oilly[1043].  The suggestion is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Robertus Henrici regis filius” donated property to Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of "Henrici de Oleio fratris mei[1044].  However, “Editha, Roberto de Oilly conjugali copula juncta” donated property to Thame Abbey, for the souls of “Henrici et Gilberti filiorum meorum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Fulco de Oilly, Fulco Luval, Henrico filio Roberti filii Aumari[1045].  If Edith, wife of Robert de Oilly, was the same person as the mother of King Henry´s son Robert, it is unclear why she would not have named Robert in this charter.  An undated manuscript records that “Robertus de Oili filius Nigelli de Oili et Editha uxor” built "ecclesiam beatæ Mariæ in insula Oseneye” in 1129[1046].  "Robertus de Oilio" donated property to Eynsham abbey by charter dated to [1130/35], witnessed by "Roberto filio Reg[is] et Edida uxore mea et Fulcone fratre meo…"[1047].  “R. de Oileo” founded Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire, with the consent of “Editha uxore mea et filiis meis Henrico et Gilleberto”, by undated charter[1048].  “Edit uxor Roberti de Oyli et heredes mei” donated property “in Hugat et...terre...versus Wetewanghe” to York St Peter, for the souls of “patris at matris mee et Roberti de Oyli domini mei”, by charter dated to [1145/56][1049].  [Mistress ([before 1101]) of HENRY I King of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre (Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068-Château de Lyon-la-Forêt, near Rouen 1 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire).]  m ROBERT [II] de Oilly of Hook Norton, constable of Oxford Castle, son of NIGEL [III] de Oilly of Hook Norton, Oxfordshire & his wife Agnes --- (-1142).  . 

 

 

IVO, son of FORNE of Greystoke & his wife --- (-before 1156).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Ivo fil Forn" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[1050].  An undated charter, in the reign of King Stephen “unoquoque anno”,  records donations to Hexham, among which land donated by “Forno, et Ivo filius eius[1051].  Henry I King of England confirmed “totam terram patris sui quam tenuit de me in capite” to “Ivonis filio Fornonis” by charter dated to [1129/33][1052].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Carlisle priory, including the donation of “terræ in Staintone, quas Ivo filius Forni et Agnes uxor eius, et Walterus pater eius...dederunt” made by "Rannulphi filii Walteri” by charter dated 4 Mar [no year][1053].  Farrer records his death before 1156 when his nephew Henry de Oilly was pardoned payments in Yorkshire “apparently in respect of the Greystoke fee” and in Coniscliffe, Durham[1054]

m AGNES, daughter of ---.  King Henry II confirmed donations to Carlisle priory, including the donation of “terræ in Staintone, quas Ivo filius Forni et Agnes uxor eius, et Walterus pater eius...dederunt” made by "Rannulphi filii Walteri” by charter dated 4 Mar [no year][1055]

Ivo & his wife had five children: 

1.         WALTER (-before [1164/65]).  King Henry II confirmed donations to Carlisle priory, including the donation of “terræ in Staintone, quas Ivo filius Forni et Agnes uxor eius, et Walterus pater eius...dederunt” made by "Rannulphi filii Walteri” by charter dated 4 Mar [no year][1056].  His son’s 1164/65 Pipe Roll entry cited below suggests that he had succeeded his father.  m BEATRICE, daughter of ---.  “Beatrix uxor quondam Walteri filii Ivonis” confirmed the donation of land “in Folketunia” [Folkton] made to Rievaulx by “filii mei Rannulfi”, undated[1057].  The confirmation by Beatrice suggests that she had a direct interest in the land donated.  Farrer suggests the possibility that Beatrice was “a kinswoman of Scolland lord of Bedale”, noting her husband’s connection with Mickleton (he does explain his argument further), while suggesting an alternative possibility that Mickleton was brought to [Beatrice’s son] Ralph by “an unrecorded wife...who may have brought these lands to him in marriage[1058]Walter & his wife had one child: 

a)         RALPH (-[1190]).  “Rand fil Walti” was assessed for a payment in the 1164/65 Pipe Roll in Northumberland[1059].  “Rannulfus filius Walteri” confirmed land “in territorio Folktuniæ, quam tenuerunt de Waltero patre meo” [Folkton] to Rievaulx, undated[1060].  “Comes Symon” [Simon de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon], with the consent of “A[elizæ uxoris meæ” [so dated to before 1184], confirmed donations to Rievaulx, including the donation of land “in Folchetun” [Folkton] made by “Rannulfus filius Walteri”, undated[1061].  King Henry II confirmed donations to Carlisle priory, including the donation of “terræ in Staintone, quas Ivo filius Forni et Agnes uxor eius, et Walterus pater eius...dederunt” made by "Rannulphi filii Walteri” by charter dated 4 Mar [no year][1062].  “Henricus filius Roberti filii Yvonis” made payments for rights in “quodam bosco versus Randulfum filium Walteri” in Cumberland in 1180/81[1063].  “Henricus filius Roberti” claimed “recto de advocatione ecclesie de Wacra” from “Rannulfum filium Walteri” in 1184/85[1064].  Farrer suggests that Ralph died “in about the year 1190” when a debt “for the scutage of Wales was recorded against him and repeated yearly until 1198, when William de Stutevill paid it[1065]m as her first husband, AMABEL, daughter of --- (-after 1214).  Dodsworth named “Amabella” as Ralph’s wife[1066].  Wilson records that this “agrees with the abstracts of St. George’s MS. quoted by Mr. Howard” which state that “Ranulf son of Walter received Conniscliffe in dowry with Amabel, and that he gave Mikelton in free marriage with Alice his daughter[1067].  She married secondly Roger de Cowpen, son of Hugh de Cowpen (-1214).  “Rogerus filius Hugonis” donated pasture “de villa mea Standfordham” to Brinkburn by undated charter[1068].  Amabel as “relict of Roger son of Hugh” made a fine in 1214 “not to be compelled to marry[1069]Ralph & his wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM (-[1207/09]).  “William son of Ranulf” paid scutage for “land in Stainton” in 1203[1070]

-        see below

ii)         ALICE .  The “abstracts of St. George’s MS. quoted by Mr. Howard” state that “Ranulf son of Walter received Conniscliffe in dowry with Amabel, and that he gave Mikelton in free marriage with Alice his daughter[1071]m (before 1201) HENRY, son of HERVEY of Ravensworth & his wife ---.  .  King John confirmed “all the land towards the valley of Lune being of the grant and quit-claim of Robert de Rokeby and Agnes his wife...[and] land lying between Lonton and Crosthwaite...” to “Henry son of Hervey” in 1201[1072]

2.         ROBERT .  His parentage is confirmed by the 1180/81 source cited below under his son Henry.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child:

a)         HENRY (-after 1184/85).  “Henricus filius Roberti filii Yvonis” made payments for rights in “quodam bosco versus Randulfum filium Walteri” in Cumberland in 1180/81[1073].  “Henricus filius Roberti” claimed “recto de advocatione ecclesie de Wacra” from “Rannulfum filium Walteri” in 1184/85[1074]

3.         ADAM .  His parentage is confirmed by the 1180/81 source cited below under his son Robert.  m ---.  The name of Adam’s wife is not known.  Adam & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT (-after 1180/81).  “Robertus filius Ade filii Yvonis” made payments “pro recognitione de Hoton...versus Willelmum filium Willelmi filii Yvonis per plegium Radulfi filii Alani” in Cumberland in 1180/81[1075]

4.         WILLIAM .  His parentage is confirmed by the 1180/81 source cited below under his son William.  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child:

a)         WILLIAM (-after 1180/81).  “Robertus filius Ade filii Yvonis” made payments “pro recognitione de Hoton...versus Willelmum filium Willelmi filii Yvonis per plegium Radulfi filii Alani” in Cumberland in 1180/81[1076]

5.         ALICE .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1150/62] under which “Walterus filius Yvonis” confirmed the grant of property to “Edgaro filio Cospatrici comitis cum Aliz sorore mea” made by “pater meus Yvo et Agnes mater mea” for their marriage[1077]m EDGAR, [illegitimate] son of GOSPATRICK & [his wife ---/mistress ---]. 

 

 

WILLIAM FitzRalph, son of RALPH FitzWalter & his wife Amabel --- (-[1207/09]).  Farrer suggests that William may have been in ward to William de Stuteville “for a few years before 1194, when he had acquittance of...scutage, having served in person with his knights in the army of Normandy”, noting that he was named in various scutages “down to 1200” and in 1202 and 1207[1078].  “William son of Ranulf” paid scutage for “land in Stainton” in 1203[1079].  He died in 1209 or before, as indicated by the fine recorded below under his wife. 

m (after 1201) as her third husband, HELWISE de Stuteville, widow firstly of WILLIAM [II] de Lancaster and secondly of HUGH de Morville, daughter of ROBERT [III] de Stuteville & his [first/second] wife [---/Helwise ---] ([after 1170?]-after [1226/28]).  Her birth date is estimated from her having had children by all three husbands, bearing in mind her third marriage after 1201.  If the estimate is correct, Helwise was probably born from her father’s supposed second marriage.  Follow the hyperlinks for records which indicate her parentage and confirm her first two marriages.  Her third marriage is confirmed by Robert de Vipont paying a fine in 1209 for the custody of the land and heirs of “William son of Ranulf” and for the marriage of Helwise de Stuteville his widow[1080].  “Elewysa de Estuteuilla” set the boundaries of her land “in Herletona” [Ellerton, south of the Cottingwiths[1081]] with York St Mary, with the consent of “Thome filii Willelmi”, undated[1082].  Clay records documents dated 1219 and [1226/28] in which she was named[1083]

William & his wife had one child: 

1.         THOMAS FitzWilliam [de Greystoke] ([1203?]-1247).  Farrer indicates that Thomas “was in the last expedition of Poitou in the reign of John with Robert de Vieuxpont, his guardian”, dated to 1216 (no source cited), and in Nov 1222 was excused scutage for Poitou[1084].  “Elewysa de Estuteuilla” set the boundaries of her land “in Herletona” [Ellerton, south of the Cottingwiths[1085]] with York St Mary, with the consent of “Thome filii Willelmi”, undated[1086].  An order dated [10 Oct] 1229 relates to a claim, by “Willelmus de Joneby” against “Thomam filium Willelmi” relating to common pasture “in Crestoc[1087].  “Thomas son of William” was granted “a weekly market and a yearly fair at his manor Greystoke” in 1244[1088].  “...Thoma filio Willelmi de Graistoc...” witnessed the undated charter under which “Robertus de Castelkairoc” donated “calcem in territorio de Castelkairoc” to Wetherhal[1089].  He died in 1247 when his son did homage for his lands as noted below.  m (before 1219) CHRISTIANA de Vipont, daughter of ROBERT de Vipont & his wife ---.  The Testa de Nevill records that “Robert de Veteri Ponte has Thomas son of William son of Randolf and his land in ward” and that “to the same Thomas he married his daughter[1090].  Farrer dates this holding to 1219[1091].  Her family origin and marriage are indicated by inquisitions following a writ dated 28 Apr "17 Edw I", after the death of [her son] "William son of Thomas de Creystock...", which list Dufton in Westmoreland “held of his own inheritance of Lady Idonea de Leyburn, daughter and heir of Robert de Veteri Ponte[1092]Thomas & his wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT de Greystoke (-before 4 May 1264).  Robert de Greystoke did homage for his father’s lands in 1247[1093].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 May "38 Hen III", after the death of "Robert son of Thomas de Craystock", record that "William, son of Thomas de Craystock, aged 30, brother of the said Robert, is his next heir" and lists his property in Yorkshire and Cumberland[1094]m ELLEN, daughter of ---.  Ellen paid a fine in 1264 for freedom to marry as she pleased in 1264[1095]

b)         WILLIAM de Greystoke ([1233/34]-before 28 Apr 1289).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 4 May "38 Hen III", after the death of "Robert son of Thomas de Craystock", record that "William, son of Thomas de Craystock, aged 30, brother of the said Robert, is his next heir" and lists his property in Yorkshire and Cumberland[1096].  Robert de Greystoke did homage for his brother’s lands in 1264[1097].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 28 Apr "17 Edw I", after the death of "William son of Thomas de Creystock...", name as his heir "John de Craistoc his son aged 25 and more...aged 25 at the feast of St Michael 16 Edw I...aged 24 or more" and lists his properties in Westmoreland, Cumberland, and in Northumberland “held of the king in chief, together with a moiety of the dower of Margeru de Merley in Ulcham, Great Benton, Killyngworth and Horseley, which is now in the hand of the said Margery[1098]m as her second husband, ([1255/56]) as her second husband, MARGERY [Mary] de Merlay, widow of WALTER de Bolebec, daughter and co-heiress of ROGER [III] de Merlay Lorde of Morpeth & his wife Isabel --- ([1242]-after 6 May 1289).  An undated roll records “Maria et Johanna filiæ et hæredes Rogeri [tercii]”, noting that the former married “Thomas [error for Willelmus] baro de Graystok” by whom she had “Johannem de Graystok[1099].  Her parentage and two marriages are confirmed by an undated document which records that “Maria, uxor Willelmi de Craystok” appointed “Willelmum virum suum” as proxy against “Hugonem de Bolebek de placito dotis” and another document which relates that “Willelmus de Greystok et Margeria uxor eius...” claimed land “in Dodington et Nesebyt”, granted to her as dower by “Walterus de Bolebek filius et heres prædicti Hugonis quondam vir prædictæ Margeriæ” with the consent of “prædicti Hugonis patris sui” and as agreed 6 Feb 1253 with “Rogerum de Merlay patrem prædictæ Margeriæ, cujus heres ipsa est”, from “Hugonem de Bolebek[1100].  Wilson dates the claim to 1256[1101].  Inquisitions dated early Feb "52 Hen III", after the death of "Alice de Merlay", record that "her sisters Mary the wife of Sir William de Greystoke, aged 26, and Isabel de Merlay, aged 12, are her heirs" and lists her property in Northumberland[1102].  William de Greystoke did homage for these properties of his wife in 1268[1103].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 28 Apr "17 Edw I", after the death of "William son of Thomas de Creystock...", lists his properties in Northumberland “held of the king in chief, together with a moiety of the dower of Margery de Merley in Ulcham, Great Benton, Killyngworth and Horseley, which is now in the hand of the said Margery[1104]William & his wife had three children: 

i)          JOHN de Greystoke ([29 Sep 1263]-[18/29] Sep 1306).  An undated roll records “Maria et Johanna filiæ et hæredes Rogeri [tercii]”, noting that the former married “Thomas [error for Willelmus] baro de Graystok” by whom she had “Johannem de Graystok[1105].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 28 Apr "17 Edw I", after the death of "William son of Thomas de Creystock...", name as his heir "John de Craistoc his son aged 25 and more...aged 25 at the feast of St Michael 16 Edw I...aged 24 or more"[1106].  “Johannes de Graistok” confirmed the grant of rights to Newminster by “dominus Ranulphus de Merlay, antecessor meus et fundator...” by undated charter[1107].  Inquisitions dated "after the octave of St. Michael, 34 Edw I", after the death of "John son of William de Craystok...", note a writ of certiorari dated 18 Sep 1306 granting the deceased licence to "enfeoff Ralph son of William of the manor and barony of Craystock" and other specified properties, recording property the deceased acquired with “William de Craystock his brother...remainder to Margaret de la Wale [alias de la Vale] their sister” and noting that “the said William died without heir of his body[1108]m ISABEL, daughter of ---. 

ii)         WILLIAM de Greystoke (-before 1306).  Inquisitions dated "after the octave of St. Michael, 34 Edw I", after the death of "John son of William de Craystok...", record property the deceased acquired with “William de Craystock his brother...remainder to Margaret de la Wale [alias de la Vale] their sister”, noting that “the said William died without heir of his body[1109]

iii)        MARGARET de Greystoke (-after 1306).  Inquisitions dated "after the octave of St. Michael, 34 Edw I", after the death of "John son of William de Craystok...", record property the deceased acquired with “William de Craystock his brother...remainder to Margaret de la Wale [alias de la Vale] their sister[1110]m --- “de la Vale” [Laval?], son of ---. 

c)         JOAN de Greystoke (-after 1272).  Wilson records the Greystoke barony passing to “the son of Joan de Greystoke, wife of William fits Ralf lord of Grimthorp” but does not record her parentage [see the 1306 inquisition after the death of John de Greystoke, below][1111].  The Complete Peerage records her parentage (no source cited)[1112].  “Willelmus filius Radi de Grimthorp et Johanna uxor eius” made a fine dated 1272[1113]m WILLIAM FitzRalph, son of RALPH FitzWilliam & his wife --- (-after 1272). 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS GREYSTOKE

 

 

RALPH de Greystoke, son of ROBERT FitzRalph & his wife Elizabeth --- (15 Aug 1299-Gateshead 14 Jul 1323, bur Newminster).  An inquisition “die Veneris prox. ante festum Pentecostes anno regni regis Edwardi decimo” records the death of “dominus Robertus filius Radulphi” naming “Radulphus filius ipsius Roberti...ætatis XIX annorum ad festum Assumpcionis Beatæ Mariæ prox. futurum” as his heir[1114].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1322 whereby he is held to have become Lord Greystoke.  An undated roll records the circumstances of the death “apud Gatesheued” of “Radulphus” and his burial at Newminster[1115]

m (1317) as her first husband, ALICE de Audley, daughter of HUGH de Audley & his wife Isolda de Rous (-13 Jan 1375, bur Durham Cathedral Church).  A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulfum de Neuille" married "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[1116].  “Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[1117].  She married secondly (1327) Ralph Neville of Raby Lord Neville

Ralph & his wife had children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Greystoke (Grimthorpe 6 Jan 1321-Brancepeth 10 Jul 1359).  An undated roll names “Willelmus” as son and heir of “Radulphus[1118]Lord Greystokem firstly (repudiated) LUCY de Lucy, daughter of ANTHONY de Lucy of Cockermouth, Cumberland, Lord Lucy & his wife --- (-bur Neasham Priory).  An undated roll records that “Willelmus filius...Radulphi” married firstly “Luciam filiam domini de Lucy” whom he repudiated, died (“spreta et mortua”) and was buried “apud Nesham[1119]m secondly ([Oct 1351]) as her first husband, JOAN, daughter of HENRY FitzHenry of Ravensworth & his wife Joan de Fourneux (-Clerkenwell 1 Sep 1403, bur Clerkenwell).  An undated roll records that “Willelmus filius...Radulphi” married secondly “Johannam filiam Henrici Fitz Hugh domini de Rauenswath”, on the advice of “Alesiæ dominæ de Neuill matris eius”, by whom he had “Radulphum, Willelmum, Robertum et Alesiam...uxor Roberti de Haryngton’[1120].  She married secondly (pardon for marrying without royal licence 29 Apr 1366) Anthony de Lucy of Cockermouth, Cumberland, Lord Lucy.  An undated roll records that “Johanna” married “Antonio domino de Lucy, qui infra breve obiit in Terra Sancta[1121].  She married thirdly ([11 Jun] 1378) Matthew Redman.  An undated roll records that “circa festum Sancti Barnabæ Apostoli anno regni Regis Edwardi III LI...dominam Joannam” married “Matthæus de Redman miles”, noting their properties[1122]William & his second wife had four children:

a)         RALPH de Greystoke (Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire 18 Oct 1353-6 Apr 1418).  An undated roll records that “Willelmus filius...Radulphi” married secondly “Johannam filiam Henrici Fitz Hugh domini de Rauenswath”, by whom he had “Radulphum, Willelmum, Robertum et Alesiam...uxor Roberti de Haryngton’[1123]Lord Greystokem KATHERINE de Clifford, daughter of ROGER de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Matilda de Beauchamp (-23 Apr 1413).  An undated roll records that “Willelmo Radulpho filius” married “Katerinæ filiæ domini Rogeri de Clyfford[1124].  The obituary of Newminster records the death “IX Kal Mai” of “domina Catherina baronissa de Graystok[1125].  A manuscript narrating donations to Newminster records the death “IX Kal Mai” 1413 of “domina Catherina baronissa de Graystok[1126]Ralph & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Greystoke ([1388/89]-8 Aug 1436)Lord Greystoke.  The will of "John Lord Greystock", dated 10 Jul 1434, chose burial “in the Collegiate church of Greystock”, bequeathed property to “Ralph my son and heir...Elizabeth my wife...my other sons Thomas, Richard and William...[1127]A manuscript narrating donations to Newminster records the death “VI Id Aug” 1436 of “dominus Johannes baro de Graystok” and his donation[1128]m (contract 28 Oct 1407) ELIZABETH Ferrers, daughter of ROBERT Ferrers of Willisham & his wife Joan Beaufort ([1393]-after 10 Jul 1434, bur York Church of the Black Friars).  A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Joan, wife firstly of Ferrers Baron of Ousley, and secondly of Ralph Earl of Westmoreland" as daughter of "John Duke of Lancaster" and mother (by her first husband) of "Baroness of Greystoke" (together with two generations of her descendants) and (by her second husband of "Cecily Duchess of York"[1129].  Lady of Wem.  The will of "John Lord Greystock", dated 10 Jul 1434, bequeathed property to “Ralph my son and heir...Elizabeth my wife...my other sons Thomas, Richard and William...[1130]A manuscript narrating donations to Newminster records the death in 1434 of “domina Elizabetha baronissa de Grastoke” and her burial “in ecclesia fratrum prædicatorum Eboraci[1131]

-        LORDS GREYSTOKE[1132]

b)         WILLIAM de Greystoke .  An undated roll records that “Willelmus filius...Radulphi” married secondly “Johannam filiam Henrici Fitz Hugh domini de Rauenswath”, by whom he had “Radulphum, Willelmum, Robertum et Alesiam...uxor Roberti de Haryngton’[1133]

c)         ROBERT de Greystoke .  An undated roll records that “Willelmus filius...Radulphi” married secondly “Johannam filiam Henrici Fitz Hugh domini de Rauenswath”, by whom he had “Radulphum, Willelmum, Robertum et Alesiam...uxor Roberti de Haryngton’[1134]

d)         ALICE de Greystoke .  An undated roll records that “Willelmus filius...Radulphi” married secondly “Johannam filiam Henrici Fitz Hugh domini de Rauenswath”, by whom he had “Radulphum, Willelmum, Robertum et Alesiam...uxor Roberti de Haryngton’[1135]m ROBERT de Harrington, son of ---. 

 

 

 

HASTINGS

 

 

The Hastings family has been studied in detail by Andrew Lancaster[1136].  Readers are referred to his research for more information about the family and further discussion about sources, particularly those cited in more recent articles which have not been consulted during the preparation of the present chapter. 

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         RALPH de Hastings (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records “Ardleigh” in Essex held by “Roger de Rames”, in which manor “Ralph de Hastings holds 30 acres[1137]

 

2.         ROBERT FitzRalph de Hastings (-after 1086).  “Appropriations of the King[‘s land] in Essex” in Domesday Book includes “in Colchester...a certain church of St. Peter...of the king’s alms” of which “Robert fitzRalph of Hastings claims 3 parts and Eudo the steward holds the fourth[1138].  It is not known whether Robert’s father was Ralph de Hastings who is named above. 

 

3.         ROBERT de HastingsDomesday Book records Rye “land of the Church of Fecamp, in Guestling Hundred” in Essex, held by “the Abbot of Fecamp”, in which manor “Robert de Hastings” heled land of the abbot[1139]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Hastings (-after 1131).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Robti de Hasting" in Sussex in respect of "de Lestagio de Hasting et de Ria"[1140].  The reference to his father suggests that William may only recently have inherited the property.  m JULIANA, daughter of JOHN FitzWaleran & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Juliana uxor Willi de Hasting" in Essex "de veti aux militu de fedo Waleri Avi sui"[1141]

 

 

Two brothers, parents unknown.  Their names, especially Theoderic, suggest Flemish origin.  If that is correct, this family may have been unrelated to the other Hastings families in Domesday shown above, whose names are more typically Norman.  Andrew Lancaster on his website discusses possible connections between Theoderic and the Valognes family[1142]

 

1.         THEODERIC (-[before 1086]).  Domesday Book records that “Walter” held “2 hides of the land of Theodoric his brother” in Bowers, Barstable Hundred, in Essex[1143].  Domesday Book records “Midden [Two Hundreds of Babergh]...which Leofwine of Bacton a thegn of King Edward held” in Suffolk held by “Walter”, adding that “it belongs to the fief of Theodoric his brother”, and in Suffolk “1 free man over whom Theodoric the predecessor of Barthetona had half the commendation and Guthmund the predecessor of Hugh de Montfort had the other half” held by “William” who also held land “in Dagworth [Hundred of Stow]...Theodoric the predecessor of Walter the Deacon[1144].  It is not known whether “Theodoric the predecessor” was the same person as Theoderic, brother of Walter, although this appears likely.  The wording of these paragraphs suggests that Walter had inherited the lands in question from his recently deceased older brother. 

2.         WALTER “the Deacon” (-after 1108).  Domesday Book records land held by “Walter the Deacon” in Bowers, Purleigh, Easton, Colne, Wix, Bromley and Chesterford, in Essex[1145] and land in Suffolk[1146].  A charter of King Henry II records that "Walteri Mascherelli et Alexandri fratris eius et Edithæ sororis suæ et Walteri decani patris eorum" founded Wykes nunnery, witnessed by "domini sui Willielmi filii R."[1147].  Dugdale dates this foundation to "the reign of Henry the First"[1148].  The presence as witness of Walter’s grandson, William son of his deceased son Robert, suggests that Walter had resigned his lands in his favour due presumably to infirmity.  Clark cites a charter of King Henry I confirming the foundation which was witnessed by “Richard [de Belmis] Bishop of London” [bishop 1108-Jan 1128], which helps to narrow the dating of the document[1149].  No source has been found which enables a more precise assessment of the date of Walter’s death beyond “after 1108”, although the documentation appears to suggest that he may have survived well into King Henry I’s reign.  [m firstly ---.  William FitzRobert, son of Walter’s deceased son Robert, consented to the foundation of Wykes nunnery in the charter quoted below but was not listed among the nunnery’s founders.  This could suggest that Robert was born from a different mother from Walter’s younger children.]  m [secondly] ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter’s son’s Scottish name Alexander may provide an indication of a northern connection through his mother.  Walter & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT [de Hastings/de Windsor] (-before [1128]).  His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which [his son] “William the son of Robert” confirmed to the church of Wikes St Mary the donation made by “Walter Mascherel and Alexander his brother avunculi mei” (undated)[1150].  It is further confirmed by the lawsuit in 1199, against his grandson Ralph de Hastings, which names Robert as brother of Alexander (see below)[1151].  Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of land of which his father was seised to "Robert son of Walter of Windsor" and that he granted the same land to "William son of the said Robert", by charter dated 25 Dec [1128][1152].  An Inspeximus dated 2 Mar 1270 quotes the charter under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of “Robertus filius Walteri de Wyndesora...patris sui” to “Willelmo filio predicti Roberti” (the charter referred to above), the charter under which King Henry II reconfirmed the grant, the charter of King Richard I which confirmed to “Henrico de Cornhell, Aliciam filiam et heredem Roberti de Hasting...uxorem [suam]”, and “confirmation of the same in favour of Matthew de Loveyne cousin and heir of the said William, Henry and Alice and his heirs[1153].  The date of the original grant indicates that “Robertus” must be identified as the son of Walter “the Deacon”, but the reference to the latter as “de Wyndesora” is difficult to explain.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Keats-Rohan indicates that he married the daughter of Walter FitzOther de Windsor[1154].  However, this assumes that Walter and his wife were parents of Ralph de Hastings (died [1160/63]), the grandson of Walter FitzOther whose father’s identity is uncertain as shown below.  Robert & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          WILLIAM FitzRobert [de Hastings] (-[1162]).  Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of land of which his father was seised to "Robert son of Walter of Windsor" and that he granted the same land to "William son of the said Robert", by charter dated 25 Dec [1128][1155]

-        see below

ii)         [RICHARD de Hastings .  His parentage is indicated by Keats-Rohan[1156].] 

iii)        [ALICE de Hastings .  Her parentage is indicated by Keats-Rohan[1157].] 

iv)        [EMMA de Hastings .  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by Keats-Rohan[1158]m WALTER de Excestre, son of ---.] 

Walter & his [second] wife had [four] children: 

b)         WALTER MascherellA charter of King Henry II records that "Walteri Mascherelli et Alexandri fratris eius et Edithæ sororis suæ et Walteri decani patris eorum" founded Wykes nunnery, witnessed by "domini sui Willielmi filii R."[1159].  Clark records that [his nephew] “William the son of Robert” confirmed to the church of Wikes St Mary the donation made by “Walter Mascherel and Alexander his brother avunculi mei” (undated)[1160].  Dugdale dates this foundation to "the reign of Henry the First"[1161].  [m ERMENGARDE, daughter of --- (-after [1165]).  The Liber Niger Scaccarii records “Honor Boloniæ” in Essex, in which “Ermegard Malkrell” held 2 knights’ fees of which “in Essex Colun et Legre...et Bilcho et Horsheia in Hundredo de Tendringe”, dated to [1165][1162].  Clark suggests that Ermengarde was probably the widow of Walter Mascherell[1163].  Morant records that “Walter Makerell and Ermegard his wife” donated “the manor of Bircho in Kirby, Essex” to St Osyth abbey (undated)[1164].]  Clark provides details of this couple’s supposed descendants, linking with Hugh de Hastings ancestor of the Hastings Earls of Pembroke (see below)[1165].  This descent seems difficult to sustain from a chronological point of view. 

c)         ALEXANDER [de Waham] .  A charter of King Henry II records that "Walteri Mascherelli et Alexandri fratris eius et Edithæ sororis suæ et Walteri decani patris eorum" founded Wykes nunnery, witnessed by "domini sui Willielmi filii R."[1166].  Dugdale dates this foundation to "the reign of Henry the First"[1167].  Clark records that [his nephew] “William the son of Robert” confirmed to the church of Wikes St Mary the donation made by “Walter Mascherel and Alexander his brother avunculi mei” (undated)[1168].  Clark indicates that Alexander “having no issue by Ælia his wife” granted lands he had acquired in “Wikes et de Wenberge et Corneshere et Focheslande et...de Horishelle...in Hundredo de Tendring” Essex to [his great-nephew] “Ralph son of William son of Robert”, in return from payment from “William son of Robert the father of Ralph” (undated)[1169].  This assessment appears contradicted by the source quoted below which names Alexander’s son William.  [m AELIA, daughter of ---.  Clark indicates that Alexander “having no issue by Ælia his wife” granted lands he had acquired in “Wikes et de Wenberge et Corneshere et Focheslande et...de Horishelle...in Hundredo de Tendring” Essex to [his great-nephew] “Ralph son of William son of Robert”, in return from payment from “William son of Robert the father of Ralph” (undated)[1170].  It is not clear from Clark’s summary of this document whether it names Alexander’s wife.  If it does, she could have been the person named in the following document: the charter of King Henry II which records the foundation of Wykes nunnery by "Walteri Mascherelli et Alexandri fratris eius et Edithæ sororis suæ et Walteri decani patris eorum" also records that part of the property used was the dower of "Aelia uxor Alexandri de Waham"[1171].  This is the only part of the charter in which Alexander is described as “de Waham” so, without the indication provided by Clark, it would not be certain that he was the same person as the co-founder of the nunnery.]   Alexander & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM .  His parentage is confirmed by a lawsuit in 1199 in which “Sewall de Oseuill” claimed half the knight’s fee “in Wikes” against “Rad de Hasting”, which notes that after the death of Alexander “Will fil eius” held the property from “Will fil Rob[1172]Presumably he died childless soon after his father. 

d)         EDITH .  A charter of King Henry II records that "Walteri Mascherelli et Alexandri fratris eius et Edithæ sororis suæ et Walteri decani patris eorum" founded Wykes nunnery, witnessed by "domini sui Willielmi filii R."[1173].  Dugdale dates this foundation to "the reign of Henry the First"[1174]Andrew Lancaster discusses sources[1175] which indicate that Edith may have married Maurice de Windsor, son of [Walter FitzOther of Windsor & his wife Beatrice ---] (-after 25 May 1130), who is recorded in another source with a wife named “Edgidia”. 

e)         [daughter .  No confirmation has been found that this was the same person as the daughter named Edith above.  Her marriage is indicated by a lawsuit in 1199 in which [her descendant] “Sewall de Oseuill” claimed half the knight’s fee “in Wikes” against “Rad de Hasting” by right of ancestry, noting that “Rob de Hasting” had granted the land to “Alex fratrem suum” who, after the death of Robert, held it from “Willelmo filio predicti Roberti”, while “soror Alex” was “ava predicti Alex Sewall”, the defendant replying that the property was inherited by “fratrem primogenitum...filiam” who married “Rad de Cornhill[1176]m --- de Oseville, son of ---.] 

 

 

WILLIAM de Hastings, son of ROBERT FitzWalter [de Hastings/de Windsor] & his wife --- (-[1162]).  Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of land of which his father was seised to "Robert son of Walter of Windsor" and that he granted the same land to "William son of the said Robert", by charter dated 25 Dec [1128][1177].  An Inspeximus dated 2 Mar 1270 quotes the charter under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of “Robertus filius Walteri de Wyndesora...patris sui” to “Willelmo filio predicti Roberti” (the charter referred to above), the charter under which King Henry II reconfirmed the grant, the charter of King Richard I which confirmed to “Henrico de Cornhell, Aliciam filiam et heredem Roberti de Hasting...uxorem [suam]”, and “confirmation of the same in favour of Matthew de Loveyne cousin and heir of the said William, Henry and Alice and his heirs[1178].  Clark records that “William the son of Robert” confirmed to the church of Wikes St Mary the donation made by “Walter Mascherel and Alexander his brother avunculi mei” (undated)[1179]

m as her first husband, HELWISE de Guerres, daughter of --- (-after 1219).  Her family origin and three marriages are stated in Domesday Descendants, which does not cite the corresponding primary sources[1180].  She married secondly (after [1162]) Gilbert de Pinkeney, and thirdly ([1178/81]) William FitzRobert.  The Liber Niger Scaccarii records “Baronia Roberti de Hasting” in Essex, in which “Walterus de Windro” held 1 knight’s fee “in Suineland”; “Radulfus de Hasting” 1 knight’s fee in “Wikes in Essex”, and “Willelmus filius Roberti” 4 knights’ fees “in Godemaneston in Dorsett et in Bromleg in Essex. Et super dominium ipsius Roberti in Eiston in Essex...[et] in Bildeston in Sudf[1181].  The last named was presumably the third husband of the widow of William de Hastings.  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Suffolk “Hundredum de Cosford”, dated 1219, which names "Domina Helewisa de Gwerres bis dotata...primo Willelmo de Pynkiny, secundo Willelmo filio Roberti et domina Matillis de Flamvilla" [Helwise’s daughter-in-law] holding "manerium de Bildeston...de baronia Godefridi de Luvein per hereditatem uxoris sue" [Helwise’s granddaughter][1182]

William & his wife had five children: 

1.         ROBERT de Hastings (-before [1194/95]).  His parentage and ancestry are confirmed by an Inspeximus dated 2 Mar 1270 which quotes the charter under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of “Robertus filius Walteri de Wyndesora...patris sui” to “Willelmo filio predicti Roberti” (the charter referred to above), the charter under which King Henry II reconfirmed the grant, the charter of King Richard I which confirmed to “Henrico de Cornhell, Aliciam filiam et heredem Roberti de Hasting...uxorem [suam]”, and “confirmation of the same in favour of Matthew de Loveyne cousin and heir of the said William, Henry and Alice and his heirs[1183].  The Liber Niger Scaccarii records “Baronia Roberti de Hasting” in Essex, in which “Walterus de Windro” held 1 knight’s fee “in Suineland”; “Radulfus de Hasting” 1 knight’s fee in “Wikes in Essex”, and “Willelmus filius Roberti” 4 knights’ fees “in Godemaneston in Dorsett et in Bromleg in Essex. Et super dominium ipsius Roberti in Eiston in Essex...[et] in Bildeston in Sudf[1184]m MATILDA de Flamville, daughter of ROGER de Flamville & his wife Iveta de Arches (-after 1219).  "Hugo de Flamvill" confirmed donations to Old Malton "antequam sororem meam Matildem Flamvill Roberto de Hastinges in matrimonium dederam" by undated charter[1185].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Hugo Flammanuilla" owing "x li. pro habenda custodia sororis sue cum terra sua que fuit uxor Roberti de Aistan" in Norfolk & Suffolk[1186].  "Alanus de Flamville" paid a fine relating to a claim "inter Elyam patrem predicti Alani cujus heres ipse est" and "Hug de Flamvill cujus heredes Matill de Flamville et Agn soror eius sunt", dated 1214[1187].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Suffolk “Hundredum de Cosford”, dated 1219, which names "Domina Helewisa de Gwerres bis dotata...primo Willelmo de Pynkiny, secundo Willelmo filio Roberti et domina Matillis de Flamvilla" holding "manerium de Bildeston...de baronia Godefridi de Luvein per hereditatem uxoris sue" [Matilda’s daughter][1188]Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         ALICE de Hastings .  A lawsuit in 1199 confirmed that “Rad de Hasting...fratrem primogenitum...filiam” married “Rad de Cornhill[1189].  An Inspeximus dated 2 Mar 1270 quotes the charter under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of “Robertus filius Walteri de Wyndesora...patris sui” to “Willelmo filio predicti Roberti” (the charter referred to above), the charter under which King Henry II reconfirmed the grant, the charter of King Richard I which confirmed to “Henrico de Cornhell, Aliciam filiam et heredem Roberti de Hasting...uxorem [suam]”, and “confirmation of the same in favour of Matthew de Loveyne cousin and heir of the said William, Henry and Alice and his heirs[1190]m firstly RALPH de Cornhill, son of --- (-1199).  m secondly (after 1199) GODEFROI de Louvain, son of GODEFROI VII Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Duke of Louvain, Comte de Brabant & his second wife Imagina van Looz (-[2 Jan 1225/16 Apr 1226]).

2.         RALPH de Hastings (-after 24 Apr 1189).  Clark indicates that Alexander “having no issue by Ælia his wife” granted lands he had acquired in “Wikes et de Wenberge et Corneshere et Focheslande et...de Horishelle...in Hundredo de Tendring” Essex to [his great-nephew] “Ralph son of William son of Robert”, in return from payment from “William son of Robert the father of Ralph” (undated)[1191].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Radulfus de Hastinges" held one knight’s fee "in Wikes" in Essex from "Roberti de Hastinges"[1192].  The Liber Niger Scaccarii records “Baronia Roberti de Hasting” in Essex, in which “Walterus de Windro” held 1 knight’s fee “in Suineland”; “Radulfus de Hasting” 1 knight’s fee in “Wikes in Essex”, and “Willelmus filius Roberti” 4 knights’ fees “in Godemaneston in Dorsett et in Bromleg in Essex. Et super dominium ipsius Roberti in Eiston in Essex...[et] in Bildeston in Sudf[1193].  The Feet of Fines records the judgment dated 24 Apr 1189 in a claim by "Rad de Hastinges" against "Rad de Exon"[1194]

3.         ALEXANDER de HastingsDomesday Descendants names “Robert of Hastings...Alexander and John” as the sons of William de Hastings and his wife[1195]

4.         JOHN de Hastings (-after 1199).  Domesday Descendants names “Robert of Hastings...Alexander and John” as the sons of William de Hastings and his wife[1196].  In a lawsuit in 1199, Ralph de Hastings named “Johannem fratrem suum” as his representative[1197]

5.         BEATRICE de HastingsHer parentage and two marriages are shown in Domesday Descendants, which does not cite the relevant primary source[1198]m firstly GILBERT Carbonel, son of ---.  m secondly WILLIAM de Goldingham, son of ---. 

 

 

The relationship, if any, between the following family and the preceding Hastings families has not been ascertained, although the common use of the names Ralph and William does suggest a connection.  As noted above, Clark suggests a link through Walter Mascherell[1199], but this is difficult to sustain from a chronological point of view. 

 

1.         WILLIAM [I] de Hastings Dugdale’s Baronage records “William de Hastings, steward to King Henry the First”, an office he held “by Serjeantie, in respect of his Tenure of the Mannor of Ashele in Com. Norff.”, citing a charter in “the collection of Robert Glover Somerset Herald” (which presumably has since disappeared)[1200].  Eyton also names William de Hastings as possible father of Hugh and Ralph, named below[1201]m --- de Windsor, daughter of WALTER FitzOther de Windsor & his wife Beatrice ---.  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1155] under which Henry II King of England confirmed to "Ralph de Hastynges dapifero of the queen" the lands formerly belonging to Ralph steward of St Edmund’s and to "Maurice de Windsor maternal uncle of the said Ralph de Hastings" by charter dated to [1155][1202]William [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HUGH de Hastings (-1163 or before).  Dugdale’s Baronage names Hugh as son and heir of William de Hastings[1203].  Eyton names Hugh as brother of Ralph de Hastings[1204]The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Hugo de Hasting" in Leicestershire after his marriage to "nepte Rob de Flamenvilla"[1205]Lord of Fillongley, Warwickshire.  m (before 1130) ERNEBURGA, daughter of --- [de Flamville] & his wife ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Hugo de Hasting" in Leicestershire after his marriage to "nepte Rob de Flamenvilla"[1206]Dugdale’s Baronage records Erneburga as daughter of “Hugh Flamenvill” but he cites no primary source on which this information is based[1207]The inspeximus dated 10 May 1398, quoted below under Richard son of her son William, records her donation of Barwell church to Polesworth convent.  As noted below, the wording of the extract could imply that Erneburga survived her son William.  Hugh & his wife had two children:

i)          WILLIAM [II] de Hastings (-1182 or before).  A charter of Henry II King of England confirmed to "William de Hastings" his paternal and maternal heritage, naming "William de Hastings grandfather, Hugh de Hastings father…Erneburga de Flamville mother"[1208].  A charter of Henry II King of England dated to [1165/66] confirmed to "William de Hastyngs dispensatori" the "dapiferatum" of St Edmund’s which had belonged to "Ralph patruus"[1209]

-        see below

ii)         THOMAS de Hastings .  The Chronicle of Jocelin of Brakelond records that 1 Apr 1182 "Thomas de Hastings" brought “Henry his nephew...not yet a knight” to Bury and for him “demanded the office of steward”, according to his hereditary right, which was not accepted[1210]"Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1211].

b)         RALPH de Hastings (-[1160/63]).  Eyton names Hugh as brother of Ralph de Hastings[1212].  The relationship also appears confirmed by the inheritance of the stewardship of Bury St. Edmund’s, after Ralph died, by Hugh’s descendants.  Henry II King of England confirmed to "Ralph de Hastynges dapifero of the queen" the lands formerly belonging to Ralph steward of St Edmund’s and to "Maurice de Windsor maternal uncle of the said Ralph de Hastings" by charter dated to [1155][1213].  Steward of Bury St. Edmunds.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Hastinges de Etone vi m iii milites" in Gloucestershire in [1160/61][1214]m LESCELINE de Trailly, daughter of --- (-after 1163).  Her family origin and marriage are stated in Domesday Descendants, which does not cite the corresponding primary source[1215]

 

 

WILLIAM [II] de Hastings, son of HUGH de Hastings & his wife Erneburga --- (-1182 or before).  [The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmo de Hastinges vi m" in Warwick in [1158/59][1216].  This entry apparently relates to a different Hastings family[1217].]  A charter of Henry II King of England confirmed to "William de Hastings" his paternal and maternal heritage, naming "William de Hastings grandfather, Hugh de Hastings father…Erneburga de Flamville mother"[1218]Steward of Bury St Edmund’s.  A charter of Henry II King of England dated to [1165/66] confirmed to "William de Hastyngs dispensatori" the "dapiferatum" of St Edmund’s which had belonged to "Ralph patruus"[1219]Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Willelmus de Hastinges" held one third of one knight’s fee from "Willelmi comitis Gloucestriæ" in Gloucestershire[1220].  "…Willelmo de Hastingis…" subscribed the charter dated 1168 under which Henry II King of England confirmed the property "in manerio de Hinton" of "Roberto de Basoges" granted to him by "comes Conanus"[1221]Steward to Henry II King of England. 

m MATILDA, daughter of THURSTAN Banaster & his wife --- (-before 17 Jun 1222).  "William of Hastings" made a fine for "his relief of…land…in Aston, which Matilda Banaster, mother of the aforesaid William, held of the king in chief" in Shropshire, dated 17 Jun 1222[1222]

William [II] & his wife had three children: 

1.         RICHARD de Hastings .  An inspeximus dated 10 May 1398 records a charter of King Henry II granting the church of Barwell, as donated by “Erenburg’, mother of William de Hasting’, with the assent of Richard his son”, to Polesworth convent[1223].  This wording suggests that Richard was William’s oldest son, and maybe even implies that William had recently predeceased the grant.  same person as...?  RICHARD de Hastings"Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1224]

2.         HENRY de Hastings ([1168]-1194).  The Chronicle of Jocelin of Brakelond records that 1 Apr 1182 "Thomas de Hastings" brought “Henry his nephew...not yet a knight” to Bury and for him “demanded the office of steward”, according to his hereditary right, which was not accepted[1225]"Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1226].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Hastinges" owing "c m de relevio terre…Henrici fratris sui" in Norfolk & Suffolk[1227]

3.         WILLIAM [III] de Hastings (-[Jan 1226])"Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1228].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Willelmus de Hastinges" owing "c m de relevio terre…Henrici fratris sui" in Norfolk & Suffolk[1229]The Chronicle of Jocelin of Brakelond names "William de Hastings" among the knights of St Edmund in 1200[1230]"William of Hastings" made a fine for "his relief of…land…in Aston, which Matilda Banaster, mother of the aforesaid William, held of the king in chief" in Shropshire, dated 17 Jun 1222[1231].  [King Henry III granted "custodia terre et heredis Willelmi de Hasting" to “...Isabelle que fuit uxor Osberti Giffard et Matildi sorori ipsius Osberti”, dated 1229[1232].  This entry apparently relates to a different Hastings family[1233].]  m MARGERY Bigod, daughter of ROGER Bigod Earl of Norfolk & his wife Ida ---.  The Liber Vitæ of Durham lists (in order) "Comes Rogerus Bigot, Ida uxor eius, Henricus capellanus, Hugo, Willelmus, Rogerus, Johannes, Radulfus, G. G. dapifer, Basilia, Maria, Margareta, Ida pueri eius"[1234]She is named as wife of William de Hastings in Burke’s Dormant and Extinct Peerages[1235].  This is presumably an extrapolation from Dugdale’s Baronage which records her parentage, but marriage with William [II] de Hastings (see above)[1236], which appears incorrect from a chronological point of view.  The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified.  William [III] & his wife had two children: 

a)         HENRY de Hastings (-before 9 Aug 1250)King Henry III granted rights relating to "priori et sacriste Sancti Edmundi" to “Henrico de Hasting senescallo domus sue” as previously held by “Willelmus pater suus”, dated 1229[1237]

-        see below

b)         IDA de Hastings (-before 2 Mar 1289, bur London, Church of the Grey Friars).  The primary sources which confirm her parentage and two marriages have not been identified.  m firstly as his second wife, STEPHEN de Segrave, son of GILBERT de Segrave & his wife --- (-Leicester Abbey 1241)m secondly HUGH Pecche, son of HAMO Pecche & his wife Eva ---. 

 

 

The relationships, if any, between the following Hastings individuals and the main Hastings families have not been ascertained. 

 

1.         --- de Hastingsm --- de Alvestan, daughter of ALAN FitzThorfin de Alvestan & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter under which her son "Thomas de Hastinges" confirmed donations to Whitby made by "Thorphinus de Alverstain et Alanus filius eius, avus meus"[1238]One child. 

a)         THOMAS de Hastings"Thomas de Hastinges" confirmed donations to Whitby made by "Thorphinus de Alverstain et Alanus filius eius, avus meus" by undated charter witnessed by "…Philippo de Hasting…Henrico et Alano de Hasting…"[1239]

 

2.         ROBERT de Hastings (-after 1176).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Hastinges" held one half of a knights fee in Sussex under the Earl of Arundel, and also record the knights’ fees held from "Roberti de Hastinges" in Essex[1240].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Robertus de Hasting" in Essex and Hertfordshire[1241]

 

3.         JOHN de Hastings (-after 1194).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Johannes de Hastinges" paying "l s, v milites" in Gloucestershire[1242].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Johannes de Hastinges" being granted delay to pay "per brevia" in Berkshire[1243]

 

4.         ROBERT de Hastings (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Roberto de Hastinges" paying "i s, ii milites et dimidium" in Essex, Herefordshire[1244].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Robertus de Hastinges" paying "l s, ii milites et dimidium" in Essex, Hertfordshire[1245]

 

5.         GILBERT de Hastings .  "Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1246]same person as...?  GILBERT de Hastings (-[before 1212]).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing the knights of Bury St. Edmund’s abbey in [1201/12], records "Gillebertus de Hastinges, i militem de eodem", and under Norfolk/Suffolk “Honor Lancastriæ”, “Gilbertus de Hastinges, i feodum in Torp” in [1211/12][1247].  “Torp” was Thorpe-Morieux in Suffolk[1248].  [m MARGERY, daughter of ---.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Margeria de Hastinges" holding one knight’s fee "in Torp" in Lancashire in [1210/12][1249].  The connection with Thorpe-Morieux suggests that Margery may have been Gilbert’s widow.] 

 

6.         MILO de Hastings .  "Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1250]

 

7.         HUGH de Hastings (-before 1202).  "Henricus de Hastinges filius Willelmi de Hastinges" confirmed land at Odstone, Leicestershire to "Maheo de Charun filio Willelmi de Charun", by charter dated to the late 12th century, witnessed by "Thomas de Hastinges, Willelmo de Hastinges, Hogone de Nouilla, Ricardo de Hastinges…Gilleberto de Hastinges, Milone de Hastinges…Hugone de Hastinges…"[1251].  King John granted "custodia…terre et heredum Hugonis de Hasting…et maritagium Helene que fuit uxor ipsius Hugonis" to "Johannis Norwic episcopo" by charter dated 14 Jul 1204[1252]m (1194) as her second husband, HELEN, widow of ALAN de Valoignes, daughter of --- (-after 14 Jul 1204).  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Hugo de Hastinges" owing in Yorkshire "pro habenda uxore que fuit Alani de Valeines"[1253].  "Willelmus de Cantilupo" paid a fine for "pro Rogero de Cantilupo fratre nostro pro ux q fuit Hug de Hasting" and custody of her "iv filios et i filia…primogenit x ann", dated 1202[1254].  King John granted "custodia…terre et heredum Hugonis de Hasting…et maritagium Helene que fuit uxor ipsius Hugonis" to "Johannis Norwic episcopo" by charter dated 14 Jul 1204[1255]Hugh & his wife had five children: 

a)         children .  "Willelmus de Cantilupo" paid a fine for "pro Rogero de Cantilupo fratre nostro pro ux q fuit Hug de Hasting" and custody of her "iv filios et I filia…primogenit x ann", dated 1202[1256].  The date of this document, and the date of Hugh de Hastings’s marriage as shown above, shows that one or more of these children must have been born from their mother’s first marriage. 

 

8.         DAVID de Hastings .  Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "David de Hasting" dated 30 Jan 1217[1257]

 

 

HENRY de Hastings, of Ashil, Norfolk, son of WILLIAM [III] de Hastings & his wife Margery Bigod of Norfolk (-before 9 Aug 1250).  King Henry III granted "custodia terre et heredis Willelmi de Hasting" to “...Isabelle que fuit uxor Osberti Giffard et Matildi sorori ipsius Osberti”, dated 1229[1258].  King Henry III granted rights relating to "priori et sacriste Sancti Edmundi" to “Henrico de Hasting senescallo domus sue” as previously held by “Willelmus pater suus”, dated 1229[1259]

m (before 7 Jun 1237) ADA of Huntingdon, daughter of DAVID of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon & his wife Matilda [Matilda] of Chester (-after 1241).  The Annales Londonienses name "Margaretam, Isabellam, Matildam, et Aldam" as the four daughters of "comiti David", recording the marriage of "la tierce fille Davi" and "sire Henri de Hastinges"[1260]

Henry & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         HENRY de Hastings (-before 5 Mar 1269)The Annales Londonienses name "Henri" as son of "la tierce fille Davi" and "sire Henri de Hastinges"[1261].  "Henricus de Hastinges" confirmed the donation of "villam meam de Flandres in Garviach" to Lindores Abbey, made by "comitis David avi mei", by undated charter[1262].  A writ dated "53 Hen III", after the death of "Henry de Hastinges", names "John his son aged 6 on the day of St John ante Portam Latinam 52 Hen III, is his heir"[1263]m JOAN de Cauntelo, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] de Cauntelo of Calne, Wiltshire and Aston Cantlow, Warwickshire & his wife Eva de Briouse (-before Jun 1271).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Georgius" who died childless and "Johanna nupta Henrico de Hastings et Milisannt de Monte-alto…uxor Ivonis de la Zouch" as the children of "Willielmo de Cantilupo" and his wife[1264]Henry & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN Hastings (Allesley, Warwickshire 6 May 1262-10 Feb 1313)The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the birth "apud Alesle die S Johannis-ante-Portam-Latinam" 6 May [1262] of "Johannem" son of "Johanna uxor Henrici de Hasting"[1265].  He was summoned to parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Hastings

-        see below, LORDS HASTINGS

b)         EDMUND Hastings of Inchmahome (-killed in battle Bannockburn 1314).  He was summoned to parliament 29 Dec 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Hastings[1266]m ([1293]) as her second husband, ISABEL Russell, widow of WILLIAM Comyn, daughter of JOHN Russell & his wife Isabel Ctss of Menteith (-1306 or after). 

c)         AUDA Hastings Pope Martin IV granted dispensation for the marriage of “Rhys Mareduc” and “Auda de Hastings...they being related in the third and fourth degrees of kindred, and their respective progenitors R. and A. desiring the match as a