ENGLISH LORDS P - S

v4.1 Updated 24 November 2019

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

LORDS PECCHE. 2

PERCY. 9

A.         ORIGINS.. 9

B.         PERCY (LOUVAIN) 22

C.        LORDS PERCY.. 31

LORDS RIVERS. 34

ROS (of Helmsley) 37

A.         ORIGINS.. 37

B.         LORDS ROS (of Helmsley) 43

LORDS SAINT-AMAND. 47

SAY. 49

A.         ORIGINS.. 50

B.         LORDS SAY.. 56

C.        SAY of CLUN, SHROPSHIRE.. 58

D.        SAY (FITZHUGH) 59

SCROPE. 62

A.         ORIGINS.. 62

B.         LORDS SCROPE (of Bolton) 69

C.        LORDS SCROPE (of Masham) 72

SEGRAVE. 73

A.         ORIGINS.. 73

B.         LORDS SEGRAVE.. 75

SOMERY. 77

A.         ORIGINS.. 77

B.         LORDS SOMERY.. 87

STANLEY. 90

A.         ORIGINS.. 90

B.         LORDS STANLEY.. 92

ST JOHN (PORT) 93

A.         ORIGINS (PORT) 93

B.         LORDS ST JOHN.. 100

STRANGE (LE STRANGE) 102

A.         ORIGINS (LE STRANGE) 102

B.         LORDS STRANGE.. 110

SUDELEY. 113

 

 

 

LORDS PECCHE

 

 

1.         WILLIAM Pecche (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records “William Pecche” holding Gestingthorpe of Richard FitzGilbert [de Clare] in Essex[1].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Willelmo Peche", dated 17 Jun 1088, naming "uxor…eius quam hodie habet…Alfwen"[2].  A charter dated 28 May 1228 of "Hamo Pecche" names "Willelmus pater ipsius Hamonis…et Elwina uxor sua"[3]m firstly ---.  The wording of the Chronicon Rameseiensis which records the donations made by "Willelmo Peche" and names "uxor…eius quam hodie habet…Alfwen" suggests strongly that William was married previously[4]m secondly ÆLFWIN, daughter of ---.  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Willelmo Peche", dated 17 Jun 1088, naming "uxor…eius quam hodie habet…Alfwen"[5].  A charter dated 28 May 1228 of "Hamo Pecche" names "Willelmus pater ipsius Hamonis…et Elwina uxor sua"[6]m thirdly ISILIA, daughter of --- & his wife Jenita ---.  Hamo Pecche confirmed the donations to St Edmund’s abbey by his grandmother Jenita and his mother Isilia by charter dated to [1121/48], witnessed by Isilia[7].  William & his third wife had two children: 

a)         HAMO Pecche of Great Bealings, Suffolk (-[29 Sep 1178/29 Sep 1185]).  Hamo Pecche confirmed the donations to St Edmund’s abbey by his grandmother Jenita and his mother Isilia by charter dated to [1121/48], witnessed by Isilia[8].  A Ramsey charter dated 28 May 1228 of "Hamo Pecche" names "Willelmus pater ipsius Hamonis…et Elwina uxor sua"[9].  "Hamo Peeche and his wife and their son Geoffrey" donated a third part of Crugelton and Slepe to Shrewsbury abbey by charter dated to [1161/72][10].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hamo Peccatum" held three knights’ fees from the bishop of Ely in Suffolk, and also records the knights’ fees held from "Hamo Peccatum" in Cambridgeshire[11].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Hamo Peccatum xii l xiii s v d" in Cambridgeshire in [1167/68][12]m ALICE Peverel, daughter of ROBERT Peverel & his wife Adelicia --- (-after 29 Sep 1188).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barnwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Alice married “Hamonis Feche senioris” by whom she had “filii et filiæ, primogenitus…Gilbertus Pecche primus et secundus…Gaufridus Pecche” and lists their descendants[13].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Aelicia" as one of the three sisters of "Willelmi Peuerel" who inherited the share of their oldest sister Matilda, the text indicating that she was the oldest of the surviving sisters, adding that she married "Hamonis Peche senioris" by whom she had "filii et filie"[14].  Her parentage and marriage are further confirmed by Hamon, her husband, recording in 1166 that William Peverel “gave him two knights’ fees in frank marriage with his sister[15], and by the undated charter under which "Gilbertus Peccatum" confirmed donations of land "in Harcalua" held by "Matildis de Dovre amita mea"[16].  Hamo & his wife had three children: 

i)          GEOFFREY Pecche (-before 29 Sep 1188).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus Peche primus…secundus…Galfridus Pecche" as the sons of "Hamonis Peche senioris" and his wife, adding that Geoffrey donated "ecclesiam de Harlestone" to Barnwell priory[17].  A charter dated 28 May 1228, which records that "Hamo Pecche" requested land of "Gilbertus Pecche pater suus" from the abbot of Ramsey, and that "Hamo Pecche avus suus" had "duos filios…Gilbertum […post nato] et Galfridum", indicates that Geoffrey was the older son[18].  "Hamo Peeche and his wife and their son Geoffrey" donated a third part of Crugelton and Slepe to Shrewsbury abbey by charter dated to [1161/72][19]m as her second husband, ---, widow of RICHARD de Colechirche, daughter of ---.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “Gaufridus Pecche” married “Ricardus de Coleka…uxorem suam[20]

ii)         GILBERT Pecche (-before 9 Jul 1212).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus Peche primus…secundus…Galfridus Pecche" as the sons of "Hamonis Peche senioris" and his wife[21].  A charter dated 28 May 1228, which records that "Hamo Pecche" requested land of "Gilbertus Pecche pater suus" from the abbot of Ramsey, and that "Hamo Pecche avus suus" had "duos filios…Gilbertum […post nato] et Galfridum", indicates that Gilbert was the younger son[22]

-         see below

iii)        MATILDA Pecche ([1134/36]-after 1185).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Hamo Peccatum" gave two knights’ fees in Suffolk, which came to his wife as dowry, to "Baldewini de Rovecestria cum filia mea in maritagio"[23].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Haselingfeld” held by “Matillis Pecche que fuit filia Hamonis Pecche…XI infants de tribus maritus…L annorum” and "Radulfus de Rovecestria…heres eius"[24].  The names of her second and third husbands are not known.  m firstly BALDWIN de Rochester, son of ---.  m secondly ---.  m thirdly ---.  Matilda & her first husband had one child: 

(a)       RALPH de Rochester (-after 1186).  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Haselingfeld” held by “Matillis Pecche que fuit filia Hamonis Pecche…XI infants de tribus maritus…L annorum” and "Radulfus de Rovecestria…heres eius"[25]

Matilda & her [first/second/third] husbands had ten children: 

(b)       ten other children.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Haselingfeld” held by “Matillis Pecche que fuit filia Hamonis Pecche…XI infants de tribus maritus…L annorum” and "Radulfus de Rovecestria…heres eius"[26]

b)         BASILIA Pecche (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Basilia soror mea" held one knight’s fee in "Marcelay" [Martley] from "Hamo Peccatum" in Suffolk[27]

 

 

1.         SIMON Pecche (-after 1196).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Simone Peche" paying for "quartam partem militem" in Essex, Herefordshire[28].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Simon Peche" paying "v s, quartam partem militis" in Essex, Hertfordshire[29]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         NICHOLAS Pecche (-after 1204).  "Nicol Pecche" paid a fine for "Johannes filius Hugonis hat custodia Rad Pecche fratris predicti Nicol" in Berkshire, dated 1204[30]

2.         RALPH Pecche (-after 1204).  "Nicol Pecche" paid a fine for "Johannes filius Hugonis hat custodia Rad Pecche fratris predicti Nicol" in Berkshire, dated 1204[31]

 

 

GILBERT Pecche, son of HAMO Pecche & his wife Alice Peverel (-before 9 Jul 1212).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus Peche primus…secundus…Galfridus Pecche" as the sons of "Hamonis Peche senioris" and his wife[32].  A charter dated 28 May 1228, which records that "Hamo Pecche" requested land of "Gilbertus Pecche pater suus" from the abbot of Ramsey, and that "Hamo Pecche avus suus" had "duos filios…Gilbertum […post nato] et Galfridum", indicates that Gilbert was the younger son[33].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Gilbertus Peccatum" paying "ix l x s x d" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire and "feoda Gilberti Peccatum" paying "xl s, iv milites" in Norfolk, Suffolk[34].  "Gillb Peche" and Ramsey abbey are named in a lawsuit at Westminster in 1194[35].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Gilbertus Peche" paying "xix l xx d…[et] ii m et dimidiam de honore de Brunne" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire[36].  "Gilbt Pecche" paid a fine for "manerii de Chavel", dated 1199[37].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Gilbertus Peccatum" holding two knights’ fees in Kent, and four in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire "in Ramptone, Herlestone, Madinglega, Lellewarthe, Cotenham et Baintone", together with 17 others in the same counties, in [1210/12][38]

m ALICE FitzWalter, daughter of WALTER FitzRobert Lord of Dunmow, Essex & his first wife Matilda de Lucy (-after 1213).  An order dated 21 Jul 1213 records that "Alic Pechie" gave "Aliciam filiam suam" as a hostage when "Roberti filii Walteri fratris sui" was freed[39]

Gilbert & his wife had three children: 

1.         HAMO Pecche (-Palestine 1241, bur Barnwell).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Hamon Pecche" as son of "Gilberto"[40].  A charter dated 28 May 1228 records that "Hamo Pecche" requested land of "Gilbertus Pecche pater suus" from the abbot of Ramsey, and that "Hamo Pecche avus suus" had "duos filios…Gilbertum […post nato] et Galfridum" and names "Willelmus pater ipsius Hamonis…et Elwina uxor sua"[41].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Hamon Pecche" died "in terra sancta" and buried at Barnwell[42]m EVA, daughter of --- (-8 Jan [after 1241], bur Barnwell).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Hamon Pecche", son of "Gilberto", married "Euam, de partibus transmarinis oriundam" (without further specifying her place of origin)[43].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Eua senex" was buried at Barnwell, the wording suggesting that she outlived her husband[44].  A later passage in the same source records that she died "tercio die post Epiphaniam" and was buried next to her husband by three of her sons who tried to hide her will[45].  Hamo & his wife had six children: 

a)         GILBERT Pecche (-25 May 1291).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus primogenitus, Hamon, Hugo, Robertus, Thomas et Willelmus" as the children of "Hamon Pecche" and his wife[46].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records the death 25 May 1291 of "Gilbertus Pecche"[47]m firstly MATILDA de Hastings, daughter of [HENRY de Hastings & his wife Ada of Huntingdon] (-London [1264/65], bur Sainte-Marie ---).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Matildis de Hastinges" as the first wife of "dominus Gilbertus Pecche", adding that she died in London and was buried "in ecclesia canonicorum beate Marie ultra aquam" as burial in England was not possible because of "perturbacionem que tunc erat" (suggesting her death in [1264/65][48].  The Complete Peerage suggests that she was one of the three (unnamed) unmarried daughters of Henry de Hastings who are mentioned as living on Henry’s death in 1250[49]m secondly as her second husband, JOAN de Grey, widow of RICHARD de Chilham, daughter of SIMON de Grey & his wife ---.  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "filiam domini Symonis de Creye…Johanna" as the second wife of "dominus Gilbertus Pecche", adding that she had "filios et filias"[50].  Gilbert & his first wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN Pecche (-killed 1274).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Johannem…Pecche primogenitum et Eadmundum fratrem suum" as the children of "dominus Gilbertus Pecche"[51]

ii)         EDMUND Pecche .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Johannem…Pecche primogenitum et Eadmundum fratrem suum" as the children of "dominus Gilbertus Pecche"[52]

Gilbert & his second wife had one child: 

iii)        GILBERT Pecche (-before 26 Jun 1322).  He was summoned to Parliament from 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Pecchem ISEULT, daughter of ---. 

-         LORDS PECCHE (of Bourn)[53]

b)         HAMO Pecche .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus primogenitus, Hamon, Hugo, Robertus, Thomas et Willelmus" as the children of "Hamon Pecche" and his wife, adding that Hamo was "clericus ecclesiis"[54]

c)         HUGH Pecche .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus primogenitus, Hamon, Hugo, Robertus, Thomas et Willelmus" as the children of "Hamon Pecche" and his wife[55]m as her second husband, IDA Hastings, widow of STEPHEN de Segrave, daughter of WILLIAM [III] de Hastings & his wife Margery Bigod of Norfolk (-before 2 Mar 1289, bur London, Church of the Grey Friars). 

d)         ROBERT Pecche .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus primogenitus, Hamon, Hugo, Robertus, Thomas et Willelmus" as the children of "Hamon Pecche" and his wife[56]

e)         THOMAS Pecche .  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus primogenitus, Hamon, Hugo, Robertus, Thomas et Willelmus" as the children of "Hamon Pecche" and his wife[57]

f)          WILLIAM Pecche (-bur Barnwell).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle names "Gilbertus primogenitus, Hamon, Hugo, Robertus, Thomas et Willelmus" as the children of "Hamon Pecche" and his wife, adding that William was buried at Barnwell[58]

2.         ALICE Pecche (-after 21 Jul 1213).  An order dated 21 Jul 1213 records that "Alic Pechie" gave "Aliciam filiam suam" as a hostage when "Roberti filii Walteri fratris sui" was freed[59]

3.         MATILDA Pecche (-after 11 May 1226).  “Matildis de Lanualei” donated property “in villa de Herlestone...[et] in prato...Ham” to Colchester St. John by undated charter, witnessed by “Haumone Peche...[60].  “Hamo Pecche filius Gileberti Pecche” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanualei soror mea”, for his and her souls, by undated charter[61]King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Northamptonshire "to place in respite the demand of 29s that he makes from Matilda de Lanvallay for her assets in Wakerley", dated [Apr] 1223[62], and the king ordered the sheriff of Northamptonshire "to place in respite the demand for 29s that he makes by summons of the Exchequer from Matilda de Lanvallay", dated 11 May 1226[63].  “Johannes de Burgo et Hawise uxoris mee” confirmed the donation of property “in villa de Herlestune” made to Colchester St. John by “Matildis de Lanusely mater Hawise uxoris mee” by undated charter[64]m ([1212/14]) WILLIAM [IV] de Lanvalay, son of WILLIAM [II] de Lanvalay & his wife Hawise de Bocland ([after 1190]-[1214/18 May 1216]).  

 

 

 

PERCY

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

[Four] brothers, parents not known: 

1.         WILLIAM de Percy (-Jerusalem [1097/1100], bur Jerusalem).  The History of the foundation of Whitby Monastery records that ”Hugo comes Cestrensis” granted “villam de Whytteby” to “Willielmus de Percy” who came to England in 1067 and founded the monastery with “Serloni fratri suo[65].  Domesday Book records land held by “William de Percy” in Hambledon in Meonstoke Hundred in Hampshire; numerous properties in Yorkshire; numerous properties in Lincolnshire[66]"…William de Perci…" witnessed the charter dated to [1086] which notified a plea held by William I King of England concerning "William de Braiose" and Fécamp abbey[67].  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[68].  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records that ”Willielmus de Perci” left for Jerusalem where he died “apud Locum…Mons gaudii” and was buried[69].  No indication has been found of the precise date of William’s death but it is assumed that he died during the First Crusade.  m EMMA de Port, daughter of [HUGUES de Port & his wife ---] (-after 1107).  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery names ”Emma de Port” as wife of “Willielmus de Perci cognomento Algernuus[70].  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[71].  "Emma de Percy" held a house in Winchester in [1107/15][72].  William & his wife had [four] children: 

a)         ALAN de Percy (-[1130/35], bur [Reading/Whitby]).  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery names ”Alaneo de Perci” as son of “Willielmus de Perci cognomento Algernuus” & his wife[73]

          -        see below

b)         WALTER de Percy .  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[74].  "Walter de Gaunt" founded Bridlington priory, with the assent of Henry I King of England, by undated charter, witnessed by "Alan de Percy…Walter de Percy…"[75].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which two donations by “Alanus de Percy”, for the souls of “Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Emmæ de Porte matris meæ”, the first witnessed by “Willielmus et Ricardus fratres mei, Pyeot de Percy…” and the second by “Willielmus, Walterus et Ricardus de Percy fratres mei, Robertus de Bruse…Pycot de Percy…[76].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which a donation by “Willielmus de Percy”, confirming a donation by “Walterus frater meus[77]

c)         WILLIAM de Percy .  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[78].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which two donations by “Alanus de Percy”, for the souls of “Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Emmæ de Porte matris meæ”, the first witnessed by “Willielmus et Ricardus fratres mei, Pyeot de Percy…” and the second by “Willielmus, Walterus et Ricardus de Percy fratres mei, Robertus de Bruse…Pycot de Percy…[79].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which a donation by “Willielmus de Percy”, confirming a donation by “Walterus frater meus[80]

d)         RICHARD de Percy of Dunsley .  The History of the foundation of Whitby Monastery names ”Alanum de Percy et Richardum fratrum eius” as the children of “Willielmus de Percy[81].  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records a donation by “Richardi de Percy, de Dunesleia, filii Willielmi de Percy[82].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which two donations by “Alanus de Percy”, for the souls of “Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Emmæ de Porte matris meæ”, the first witnessed by “Willielmus et Ricardus fratres mei, Pyeot de Percy…” and the second by “Willielmus, Walterus et Ricardus de Percy fratres mei, Robertus de Bruse…Pycot de Percy…[83]m as her first husband, ADELISA, daughter of ---.  She married secondly Walter de Argenton.  Her two marriages are confirmed by the charter dated to [1160/70] under which “Willelmus de Perci” confirmed a donation of property to Whitby Abbey made by “mater mea Athaliza” for the soul of “Walteri de Argentum…eius sponsus legitimus”, for the soul of “patris mei Ricardi de Perci[84].  Richard & his wife had two children: 

i)          ALEXANDER de Percy .  “Ricardus de Perci et Alexander filius eius” witnessed a charter dated to [1120/35] which confirmed a donation of property to Whitby Abbey[85]

ii)         WILLIAM de Percy .  The History of the foundation of Whitby Monastery names ”Willilemus de Percy” as son of “Richardus de Percy”, adding that he founded “domum de Grendall (nunc vocatam Handall)” in 1133[86].  ”Willielmus de Percy filius Richardus de Percy de Dunesle” donated property to Whitby monastery by undated charter[87].  “Willelmus de Perci, filius Ricardi de Perci de Dunesleia” donated property to Whitby Abbey, for the souls of “Willelmi de Perci avi mei fundatoris abbatie et Ricardi de Perci filii eius, patris mei”, by charter dated to [1150/70][88].  “Willelmus de Perci” confirmed a donation of property to Whitby Abbey made by “mater mea Athaliza” for the soul of “Walteri de Argentum…eius sponsus legitimus”, for the soul of “patris mei Ricardi de Perci”, by charter dated to [1160/70][89]

2.         SERLON (-[1109]).  The History of the foundation of Whitby Monastery records that ”Hugo comes Cestrensis” granted “villam de Whytteby” to “Willielmus de Percy” who came to England in 1067 and founded the monastery with “Serloni fratri suo[90].  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records that ”Serlo de Perci frater…Willielmi de Perci” became a monk at Whitby and later succeeded as abbot[91].  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[92]

3.         --- de Percym ---.  One child: 

a)         WILLIAM (-[1127/43]).  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records that ”Serlo de Perci frater…Willielmi de Perci” remained as abbot of Whitby until succeeded by “dominus Willielmus nepos eorum[93]

4.         --- de Percym ---.  One child: 

a)         ALIX de Percy .  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records a donation by “Hugonis de Boytorp” and ”uxoris suæ Aalizæ de Percy, neptis Willielmi de Percy, et Serlonis prioris[94]m firstly REGINALD Buscel of Hutton Bushell, son of --- (-before Feb 1136).  m secondly HUGH de Boythorpe, son of ---.  Alix & her first husband had two children: 

i)          ALAN Buscel .  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records a donation by “Alani Bucell, filii…Aalizæ neptis Willielmi de Perci et Serlonis prioris[95].  “Alanus filius Reginaldi Buscel” donated property to the monks of Whitby, four the souls of “patris mei Reginaldi Buscel et matris mee Alicie de Perci”, by charter dated to [1135/55][96].  "Alanus Buscel et Gervasius frater meus" donated land "juxta Derewente…Westcroft" to Whitby by undated charter[97].  "Alanus Buscel" donated land "in Hotona", held by "Asza filius Wymundi", to Whitby by undated charter, witnessed by "…Alano de Perci…"[98]

ii)         GERVASE Buscel .  "Alanus Buscel et Gervasius frater meus" donated land "juxta Derewente…Westcroft" to Whitby by undated charter[99]

 

 

1.         WALTER de Percy .  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records a donation by “Walteri de Percy de Rugemund[100]

 

2.         ALAN de Percy “le Meschin” .  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records a donation by “Alani de Perci le Meschin[101]

 

3.         ALAN de Percym ---.  The name of Alan’s wife is not known.  Alan & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Percy .  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery records a donation by “Willielmi de Perci, filii Alani de Perci advocati nostri[102]

 

4.         GERBERT de Percy (-after [1172]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the knights fees held by "Gerbertus de Percy" from the king in Dorset[103].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Gerebertus de Perceio" with one knight "de honore de Gilleberville…in baillia de Tenerchebraio" and four knights in his own service[104]

 

 

1.         ERNALD de Percy (-after [1129/35]).  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “…Ernaldus de Perci…[105].  “Robertus de Brus” confirmed donations to the canons of Bridlington by charter dated to [1120/35], witnessed by “…Ernaldus de Perceio…Petrus de Brus…[106].  “Ernaldus de Percy” donated property to Gysburn priory by charter dated to [1129/35], witnessed by “Roberto de Brus…[107]m ---.  The name of Ernald’s wife is not known.  Ernald & his wife had two children: 

a)         ERNALD de Percy (-1170).  A charter dated to [1145/54] records the dowry granted by “Robertus de Brus” to “Agathe filie sue” on her marriage to “Radulfo Ribaldi filio”, witnessed by “…Petro de Brus, Ernaldo de Perci…Herveo Ribaldi filio…[108].  “Ernaldus de Percy” confirmed the donation to Gysburn priory by “patris mei”, by charter dated to [1154/65] which names “Rodberto fratre meo[109]

b)         ROBERT de Percy (-before 1165).  “Ernaldus de Percy” confirmed the donation to Gysburn priory by “patris mei”, by charter dated to [1154/65] which names “Rodberto fratre meo[110].  “Robertus de Perceio…et Agnete sponsa mea” issued a quit claim to St Peter’s, York by charter dated to [1160/65], witnessed by “…Radulfo de Percy…[111]m AGNES, daughter of ---.  “Robertus de Perceio…et Agnete sponsa mea” issued a quit claim to St Peter’s, York by charter dated to [1160/65], witnessed by “…Radulfo de Percy…[112].  Robert & his wife had one child:  

i)          WILLIAM de Percy of Kildale (-1202).  “Willelmus de Percy de Kildale” confirmed a donation by “Robertus de Brus…de feodo Ernulfi de Percy avi mei” to Gysborn priory, for the soul of “Agnetis uxoris mee”, by charter dated to [1171/95], witnessed by “…Hugone de Flamevilla…Henrico de Percy…[113].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Willelmus de Percy" paying "xv l, xxx milites" in Yorkshire[114]m as her first husband, AGNES de Flamville, daughter of ROGER de Flamwille & his wife Iveta de Arches (-after 1214).  “Willelmus de Percy de Kildale” confirmed a donation by “Robertus de Brus…de feodo Ernulfi de Percy avi mei” to Gysborn priory, for the soul of “Agnetis uxoris mee”, by charter dated to [1171/95], witnessed by “…Hugone de Flamevilla…Henrico de Percy…[115].  She married secondly John le Birkin.  Bracton records a claim, dated 1219, by "Walterus de Percy" against "Magistrum hospitalis Sancti Leonardi de Eboraco" concerning "terre…in Martona" of which "Agnes de Flamnanvilla mater sua…Joannem le Birkin quondam virum ipsius Agnetis" was seised[116].  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       WALTER de Percy (-[1232/43]).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1219, by "Walterus de Percy" against "Magistrum hospitalis Sancti Leonardi de Eboraco" concerning "terre…in Martona" of which "Agnes de Flamnanvilla mater sua…Joannem le Birkin quondam virum ipsius Agnetis" was seised[117]m ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

(1)       WILLIAM de Percym ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

a.         WILLIAM de Percy .  ”Dominus Willielmus de Percy miles, filius Domini Willielmi de Percy of Kildale, et Johanna uxor eius” donated property to Whitby monastery by undated charter[118]m JOAN, daughter of ---.  ”Dominus Willielmus de Percy miles, filius Domini Willielmi de Percy of Kildale, et Johanna uxor eius” donated property to Whitby monastery by undated charter[119]

c)         three daughters . 

 

 

1.         PICOT de Percy .  “…Picot de Perci” witnessed a charter dated to [1115/25] under which “Fulco filius Reimfredi” confirmed donations to the monks of Whitby[120].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which two donations by “Alanus de Percy”, the first witnessed by “Willielmus et Ricardus fratres mei, Pyeot de Percy…”, the second witnessed by “…Pycot de Percy…[121].  “Willielmus de Percy, filius Rodbert de Perci” donated property to Nostell Priory by undated charter which names “Picotus avus meus”, witnessed by “Henrico de Pusat…[122]m ---.  The name of Picot’s wife is not known.  Picot & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT Percy .  “Rodbertus de Perci filius Picott” granted property to the monks of Whitby by charter dated to [1148/70][123].  “Willielmus de Percy, filius Rodbert de Perci” donated property to Nostell Priory by undated charter which names “Picotus avus meus”, witnessed by “Henrico de Pusat…[124].  "Willelmus de Perci" confirmed property of Whitby by undated charter witnessed by "…Robertus filius Pichot de Perci…"[125].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated property to Sawley abbey by undated charter, dated to before 1174, witnessed by “Alano de Percy, filio eiusdem Willielmi de Perci…Robertus de Percy[126].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated property to Sawley abbey, with the consent of “Adelidæ uxoris meæ et Alani hæredis mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Roberto de Percy…[127].  It is not certain that the last two documents refer to the same Robert who is named in the others.  However, the chronology of all these charters is favourable to that possibility.  m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Percy (-after [1190/1209]).  “Willielmus de Percy, filius Rodbert de Perci” donated property to Nostell Priory by undated charter which names “Picotus avus meus”, witnessed by “Henrico de Pusat…[128], the presence of the latter enabling the document to be dated to [1190/1209]. 

 

 

2.         ROBERT de Percym ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHN de Percy .  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[129]

 

3.         WALTER de Percym ---.  The name of Walter’s wife is not known.  Walter & his wife had one child: 

a)         ROBERT de Percy .  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[130]

 

4.         HUGH de Percym ---.  The name of Hugh’s wife is not known.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         GILBERT de Percy .  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[131]

 

 

ALAN de Percy, son of WILLIAM de Percy & his wife Emma de Port (-[1130/Jul 1138], bur [Reading/Whitby]).  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery names ”Alaneo de Perci” as son of “Willielmus de Perci cognomento Algernuus” & his wife[132].  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[133].  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which two donations by “Alanus de Percy”, for the souls of “Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Emmæ de Porte matris meæ”, the first witnessed by “Willielmus et Ricardus fratres mei, Pyeot de Percy…” and the second by “Willielmus, Walterus et Ricardus de Percy fratres mei, Robertus de Bruse…Pycot de Percy…[134].  "…Alanus de Perci…" witnessed the charter, dated to the reign of Alexander I King of Scotland, under which "David predicti regis Scotie germanum…Cumbrensis regionis princeps" listed the lands of the church of Glasgow[135].  "…Alano de Perceio…" witnessed the charter dated 1126 under which Henry I King of England confirmed a donation to Worksop priory[136].  “Alanus de Perci et…Willelmus de Perci filius eius” granted property to “Haslat de Lecingfeld” by charter dated to [1130/38][137].  "Walter de Gaunt" founded Bridlington priory, with the assent of Henry I King of England, by undated charter, witnessed by "Alan de Percy…Walter de Percy…"[138].  The History of the foundation of Whitby Monastery names ”Alanum de Percy et Richardum fratrum eius” as the children of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Alan died without heirs and was buried at Whitby[139], but the fact that he died childless is contradicted by other charters quoted here.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Alan de Pci" in Yorkshire, Northumberland[140].  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records that Alanum de Percy”, son of “Willielmus de Percy”, was buried “apud Radinges[141]

m EMMA de Gant, daughter of [GILBERT van Gent & his wife Alice de Montfort-sur-Risle].  A charter dated to [1190/95] confirmed a donation of property to the canons of Bridlington by “Emma de Gant…et Willelmus de Percy filius eius[142].  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.   However, it is chronologically consistent for her to have been the daughter of Gilbert van Gent.  It should be noted that "Alan de Percy…" was the first witness in a charter under which his supposed brother-in-law "Walter de Gaunt" founded Bridlington priory, with the assent of Henry I King of England[143]

Alan & his wife had [six] children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire (-[1174/75], bur Whitby).  “Alanus de Perci et…Willelmus de Perci filius eius” granted property to “Haslat de Lecingfeld” by charter dated to [1130/38][144].  "Alanus de Perci" donated property "in Oxeneham et…in Hetune" to Whitby, for the souls of "Alani de Perci patris mei et…matris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willelmo de Perci et Henrico de Perci fratribus meis, Pichot de Perci"[145].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Percy xi l vi s viii d" in Yorkshire in [1161/62][146]The 1165/66 Pipe Roll records "Wills de Pci" accounting for ".cccc. m. p uxore Robti de Ross hnda" in Yorkshire[147]The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Percy xxx m" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][148].  A charter dated to [1190/95] confirmed a donation of property to the canons of Bridlington by “Emma de Gant…et Willelmus de Percy filius eius[149].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated property to Sawley abbey, with the consent of “Adelidæ uxoris meæ et Alani hæredis mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Roberto de Percy…[150].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated property to Sawley abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “Alano de Percy, filio eiusdem Willielmi de Perci…Robertus de Percy[151].  "Willelmus de Perci" confirmed property of Whitby, for the souls of "Willelmi de Perci avi mei et Alani de Perci patris mei et Emmæ de Gant matris meæ et pro Aliza uxore mea et pro hær. nostris", including donations by "Walterus de Perci frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "…Robertus filius Pichot de Perci…"[152].  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records that Willielmus de Percy”, son of “Alanus de Percy”, was buried “apud Whiteby[153]m firstly ALICE de Tonbridge, daughter of --- (-before 1166).  "Willelmus de Perci" confirmed property of Whitby, for the souls of "Willelmi de Perci avi mei et Alani de Perci patris mei et Emmæ de Gant matris meæ et pro Aliza uxore mea et pro hær. nostris", including donations by "Walterus de Perci frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "…Robertus filius Pichot de Perci…"[154].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated property to Sawley abbey, with the consent of “Adelidæ uxoris meæ et Alani hæredis mei”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…Roberto de Percy…[155].  “Mathildis de Percy comitissa de Warwic, filia Willielmi de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “…patris mei Willielmi de Percy et Adalidis de Tunbrige matris meæ…”, by undated charter[156].  The reference to Tonbridge suggests that she may have been Adelisa de Clare, daughter of Richard FitzGilbert de Clare & his wife Agnes [Adelisa] of Chester.  [157]m secondly ([1165/66]) as her second husband, SIBYLLA de Valoignes, widow of ROBERT de Ros, daughter of --- (-after 1212, bur Nun Appleton Priory).  Her first and second marriages are confirmed by the 1165/66 Pipe Roll which records "Wills de Pci" accounting for ".cccc. m. p uxore Robti de Ross hnda" in Yorkshire[158]Evidently William de Percy failed to pay the full amount at the time, as the 1169/70 Pipe Roll records "Wills de Pci" paying "L. m. p uxore Robti de Ross habenda" in Yorkshire[159].  “Willielmus de Percy” donated Topcliffe church to York Cathedral, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Sybillæ…filiorum quoque et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Sybilla de Valloniis…[160].  It is assumed that the first witness was the donor’s wife but this is not specified in the document.  She married thirdly ([1181/82]) Ralph de Albini BritoHer third marriage is confirmed by the 1181/82 Pipe Roll which records "Radulfus de Alben" accounting for ".cc. m pro ducenda matre Ebrardi de Ros" in Yorkshire[161].  A charter dated 4 Feb 1196 records a claim by “Sibillam de Vall et Agnetem de Percy” against the church of Beverley relating to “advocacione ecclesie de Lekenfeld[162]William & his first wife had [four or more] children: 

a)         ALAN de Percy (-before 1174).  “Willielmus de Percy” donated property to Sawley abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “Alano de Percy, filio eiusdem Willielmi de Perci…Robertus de Percy[163].  “Mathildis de Percy comitissa de Warwic, filia Willielmi de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Warwich quondam sponsi mei…patris mei Willielmi de Percy et Adalidis de Tunbrige matris meæ et Alani de Percy fratris mei et Agnetis sororis meæ”, by undated charter[164].  Alan had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

i)           WILLIAM de Percy (-after 20 Jul 1182).  A charter dated 20 Jul 1182 records an agreement between Agnetem de Percy” and “Willelmum de Percy nepotem suum filium Alani de Perci” relating to land “in Betmeslay...et...in Aystaneby...et...in Littona[165].  William must have been illegitimate as he did not inherit the Percy properties, which passed to his paternal aunt Agnes

b)         son or sons .  The fact that William had more than one son is demonstrated by the undated charter under which “Willielmus de Percy” donated Topcliffe church to York Cathedral, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Sybillæ…filiorum quoque et filiarum mearum[166].  

c)         MATILDA de Percy (-[Nov 1202/13 Oct 1204], bur Fountaine Abbey).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Matildem et Agnetem” as the daughters and heiresses of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Matilda married “Willielmo comiti Warrewyk” but died childless[167]Mathildis de Percy comitissa de Warwic, filia Willielmi de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Warwich quondam sponsi mei…patris mei Willielmi de Percy et Adalidis de Tunbrige matris meæ et Alani de Percy fratris mei et Agnetis sororis meæ”, by undated charter[168].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "comitissa de Warewyke" paying "xv l de parte sua de feodo Willelmi de Percy" in Yorkshire[169]m (before 28 Dec 1175) as his second wife, WILLIAM Earl of Warwick, son of ROGER Earl of Warwick & his wife Gundred de Warenne (-Palestine 15 Nov 1184). 

d)         AGNES de Percy (-[end 1202/13 Oct 1204]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Matildem et Agnetem” as the daughters and heiresses of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Agnes married “Goselino Lovayn fratri Ducis Brabantiæ[170]Mathildis de Percy comitissa de Warwic, filia Willielmi de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “…patris mei Willielmi de Percy et Adalidis de Tunbrige matris meæ et Alani de Percy fratris mei et Agnetis sororis meæ”, by undated charter[171].  "Agnes de Perci…in viduetatis meæ" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Samara" made by "Willelmus de Perci pater meus" to Whitby, for the soul of "Jocelini mariti mei defuncti", by undated charter[172].  “Agnes de Percy” confirmed donations of property by “Matildis comitissa de Warwicke soror mea” to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “Jocelini quondam sponsi mei et Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Adelidis de Tunebrigge matris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…W. de Percy…[173].  “Agnes de Percy” made a grant to the hospital of St Peter, York, after the death of “sponsi mei Jocelini de Luvain”, by charter dated to [1182/85][174]A charter dated 4 Feb 1196 records a claim by “Sibillam de Vall et Agnetem de Percy” against the church of Beverley relating to “advocacione ecclesie de Lekenfeld[175]m (after 1154) JOSCELIN de Louvain, [illegitimate] son of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & [his mistress ---] (-1180). 

William had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

e)         ADELISA de Percy .  Her family origin is indicated by the undated charter under which her son “Henricus de Putheaco” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the soul of “Adelidis de Perci matris meæ et Dionisiæ sponsæ meæ…Willielmi de Perci[176].  The primary source which confirms her parentage more precisely has not been identified.  m RICHARD de Morville, son of ---.  Mistress of HUGUES du Puiset Bishop of Durham, son of HUGUES [III] Seigneur du Puiset, Vicomte de Chartres, Comte de Corbeil & his wife Agnes de Blois (-3 Mar 1195). 

2.         WALTER de Percy (-after 1153).  “Walterus de Perci” granted property to “Hernisio filio Besing” by charter dated to [1142/54] which names “Willelmi de Perci fratris mei[177].  "Willelmus de Perci" confirmed property of Whitby, including the donation of land "in Newtune" made by "Walterus de Perci frater meus", by undated charter[178].  “Willelmus de Perci” granted property to Whitby Abbey, for the soul of “Walteri fratris mei”, by charter dated to [1142/54][179]m (before 1153) as her third husband, AVICE de Rumilly, widow firstly of WILLIAM de Courcy and secondly of WILLIAM Paynell, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf du Bessin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-after 1153).  “Amicia filia Cecilie de Rumilli” confirmed donations to the canons of St Mary, for the soul of “Willelmi de Curci filii mei”, by charter dated to [1138/50], witnessed by “Willelmo de Curci filio meo…[180].  An undated manuscript relating to Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire records that “Avicia de Romely domina de Bescaudeby” married ”Willielmum Paynel”, and had “filium Willielmum de Curci et filiam Aliciam[181].  “Avicia de Romelli” notified her donation to the canons of Drax, for the soul of “Willelmi Paganelli mariti mei”, with the consent of “domini Roberti de Gant et Adelicie filie mee uxoris eiusdem Roberti”, by charter dated to [1147/52], witnessed by “Robertus de Gant et Adelicia Paganella uxor eius et Adelicia soror Roberti de Gant…[182].  The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Avicia mater Willelmi de Curcy" held two knights’ fees from "Roberti de Gant" in Yorkshire[183]

3.         HENRY de Percy .  "Alanus de Perci" donated property "in Oxeneham et…in Hetune" to Whitby, for the souls of "Alani de Perci patris mei et…matris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willelmo de Perci et Henrico de Perci fratribus meis, Pichot de Perci"[184].  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[185].  "Gaufridus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxanham et…in Hetun" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus frater meus in vita sua", by undated charter witnessed by "Henricus de Perci, Robertus Tirel et eius frater Alanus…"[186]

4.         [GEOFFREY de Percy .  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[187].  "Gaufridus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxanham et…in Hetun" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus frater meus in vita sua", by undated charter witnessed by "Henricus de Perci, Robertus Tirel et eius frater Alanus…"[188].  It is not known whether Geoffrey was his father’s legitimate or illegitimate son.] 

5.         [ROBERT de Percy .  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[189].  It is not known whether Robert was his father’s legitimate or illegitimate son.] 

6.         [GODFREY de Percy .  "Henricus de Perci" confirmed the donation of property "in Oxenaham et…in Hetunia" to Whitby made by "D’nus Alanus de Perci frater meus…Gaufridus frater meus", by undated charter witnessed by "Gaufridus de Perci frater meus, Robertus frater meus de Perci, Johannes filius Rodberti de Perci, Gosfridus clericus frater meus, Robertus filius Walteri de Perci, Gilbertus filius Hugonis de Perci…"[190].  It is not known whether Godfrey was his father’s legitimate or illegitimate son.] 

Alan de Percy had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:

7.          ALAN de Percy (-before 1153).  Ailred of Rievaulx names “Alani de Perci magni Alani filius nothus” among those serving under David King of Scotland at the battle of the Standard in 1138[191]…Alanus filius Alani de Perci…” witnessed a charter dated to [1133/44] under which “Roberto filius Fulconis” donated property to the monks of Whitby[192].  "Alanus de Perci" donated property "in Oxeneham et…in Hetune" to Whitby, for the souls of "Alani de Perci patris mei et…matris meæ", by undated charter (dated to before 1153) witnessed by "Willelmo de Perci et Henrico de Perci fratribus meis, Pichot de Perci"[193]. 

 

 

 

B.      PERCY (LOUVAIN)

 

 

JOSCELIN de Louvain, [illegitimate] son of GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Comte de Louvain & [his mistress ---] (-1180).  His parentage is confirmed by a manuscript genealogy of the Percy family which names Matildem et Agnetem” as the daughters and heiresses of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Agnes married “Goselino Lovayn fratri Ducis Brabantiæ[194].  It appears likely that he was illegitimate.  If it is correct that he married after 1154, he would have been rather old at that date to have been born from Duke Godefroi’s first marriage.  On the other hand, Duke Godefroi’s second wife was probably too old to have given birth to children after her marriage with the duke.  Joscelin accompanied his half-sister Adelisa to England when she married King Henry I in 1121.  He was granted the honour of Petworth, Sussex by Queen Adelisa before 1151.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Jocelin de Lovein xv m et dimidiam" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][195].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Jocelinus frater Reginæ vi l" in Yorkshire in [1171/72][196]"…Jocelino fratre regine…" subscribed the charter dated to [Aug 1177/Jun 1181] under which Henry II King of England confirmed donations to the cathedral of Chartres[197]

m (after 1154) AGNES de Percy, daughter & co-heiress of WILLIAM de Percy & his first wife Alice de Tonbridge (-[end 1202/13 Oct 1204]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Matildem et Agnetem” as the daughters and heiresses of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Agnes married “Goselino Lovayn fratri Ducis Brabantiæ[198]Mathildis de Percy comitissa de Warwic, filia Willielmi de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “…patris mei Willielmi de Percy et Adalidis de Tunbrige matris meæ et Alani de Percy fratris mei et Agnetis sororis meæ”, by undated charter[199].  "Agnes de Perci…in viduetatis meæ" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Samara" made by "Willelmus de Perci pater meus" to Whitby, for the soul of "Jocelini mariti mei defuncti", by undated charter[200].  “Agnes de Percy” confirmed donations of property by “Matildis comitissa de Warwicke soror mea” to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “Jocelini quondam sponsi mei et Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Adelidis de Tunebrigge matris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “…W. de Percy…[201].  “Agnes de Percy” made a grant to the hospital of St Peter, York, after the death of “sponsi mei Jocelini de Luvain”, by charter dated to [1182/85][202].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Agnes de Percy" paying "xx s per Simonem de Kime, ii milites" in Lincolnshire[203].  The connection between Agnes de Percy and Simon de Kyme has not been established.  However, one explanation could be that he was her grandson, son of Agnes’s daughter, as discussed more fully below.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Agnes de Percy" among those granted delayed payment "per brevia" in Lincolnshire[204]A charter dated 4 Feb 1196 records a claim by “Sibillam de Vall et Agnetem de Percy” against the church of Beverley relating to “advocacione ecclesie de Lekenfeld[205]

Joscelin & his wife had [eight] children (who assumed the name “Percy” from their mother): 

1.         HENRY de Percy (-before Nov 1198, bur Saint-Lo, Rouen).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Henricum et Ricardum fratrem eius” as the children of “Goselino Lovayn fratri Ducis Brabantiæ” & his wife[206]The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Henricus de Percy" in Sussex[207].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Henricus de Percy" paying "xxii l xs" in Sussex[208]m ([1180]) as her first husband, ISABEL de Brus, daughter of ADAM de Brus of Skelton, Yorkshire & his wife Iveta de Arches ([1168/70]-after 1230).  A charter dated to [1190/96] notified that “Adam de Brus” granted property to “Henrico de Perci et Isabelle filie mee uxori sue” on their marriage[209].  This suggests that Isabel must have been only eleven years old at the most at the time of her marriage, assuming that her father’s dates of marriage and death are correctly stated above.  “Juetta de Arches” granted property to “Isabelle de Brus filie mee” by charter dated to 1192[210].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not been identified.   She married secondly Roger Mauduit.  Henry de Percy & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Percy ([1196/98]-shortly before 28 Jul 1245, probably bur Salley Abbey, his heart bur at Sandown Hospital with his first wife).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Willielmum” as son of “Henricum”, adding that he was born during the lifetime of his paternal grandmother[211]The Percy inheritance was split between him and his uncle Richard de Percy. 

-        see below

b)         HENRY de Percy of Heyshott ([1196/98]-).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  

2.         RICHARD de Percy (-1244).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Henricum et Ricardum fratrem eius” as the children of “Goselino Lovayn fratri Ducis Brabantiæ” & his wife[212].  “Agnes de Percy” granted the service of five knights to “Ricardo de Percy filio meo”, excluding land granted to “Johanni de Daiville cum filia mea in matrimonio”, by undated charter[213]The Percy inheritance was split between him and his nephew William de Percy (son of his older brother William).  Richard received those parts in the hands of his mother, but on his death this moiety reverted to William.  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Durham, dated to [1208/10]: "Ricardus de Percy" held "ereditario de…baronia in Het et in Cessai feodum i militis"[214].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Ricardus de Percy" holding 15 knights’ fees in Yorkshire in [1210/12][215].  He was one of the 25 Barons who enforced the provisions of Magna Carta 1215.  “Ricardus de Percy” confirmed the donation of Topcliffe church to York Cathedral by “Willielmi de Percy avi mei”, by charter dated 13 Apr 1226, witnessed by “…Henrico de Percy…[216]m firstly ALICE, daughter of ---.  m secondly as her first husband, AGNES de Neville, daughter of GEOFFREY de Neville of Raby in Northumberland & his wife Joan --- (-[16 Jun 1285/20 Jul 1293]).   The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not been identified.   She married secondly (before 12 Nov 1251) John [II] DeincourtA charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[217]Richard had one [illegitimate] son by [an unknown mistress]: 

a)         HENRY [de Percy] (-after 1267).  Probably illegitimate, as he did not inherit his father’s moiety of the Percy barony.  He may have been “…Henrico de Percy…” who witnessed the charter dated 13 Apr 1226 under which “Ricardus de Percy” confirmed the donation of Topcliffe church to York Cathedral by “Willielmi de Percy avi mei[218].  He was granted the manor of Settle by his father.  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[219].  m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had one child: 

i)           ALEXANDER .  “Henricus de Percy filius Ricardi de Percy” granted land “in villa de Erghum” to “Alexandro filio meo” by undated charter[220]

3.         JOSCELIN (-[1239], bur Priory Church Ludford, Lincoln).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  

4.         RADULF .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  

5.         ELEANOR .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not been identified.   Domesday Descendants records the marriage of William Pantulf and "Eleanor eldest daughter of Joscelin de Louvain before 1174", and his acquiring Hambledon, Hampshire on the marriage, but does not cite the corresponding primary source[221]m (before 1174) WILLIAM Pantulf, son of ---. 

6.         MATILDAAgnes de Percy” granted the service of five knights to “Ricardo de Percy filio meo”, excluding land granted to “Johanni de Daiville cum filia mea in matrimonio”, by undated charter[222]The primary source which confirms her name has not been identified.   m (before 1204) JOHN de Daiville, son of ---.  

7.         LUCY .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.   Nun at Stixwould. 

8.         [HAWISE (-after 1194).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Agnes de Percy" paying "xx s per Simonem de Kime, ii milites" in Lincolnshire[223].  It is assumed that "Simonem de Kime" can be identified as Simon, son of Philip de Kyme and his wife Hawise.  The connection between Agnes de Percy (presumably the widow of Joscelin de Louvain, see above) and Simon de Kyme has not been established.  However, it is highly unusual in the Red Book to find a widow recorded as paying scutage on behalf of another person (this is the only example which has been noted so far during the preparation of the present document).  The entry therefore suggests a close family relationship between the two.  Simon de Kyme was a minor in [1190/91] (a curia regis entry records that "Sim de Kima" replaced "Hawisie matris ipsius Sim" in a lawsuit relating to the dowry of "Agnete de Amundevill" in 1194[224], demonstrating that he must have acted through his mother as guardian until that date).  The death of his father is estimated in [1189].  In the normal course of events, one would have expected Simon’s mother to have acted on his behalf in transactions in [1190/91].  However, if she was temporarily unavailable for some reason (illness, childbirth…), it is possible that she would have been replaced by her own widowed mother, who would therefore have been Simon’s maternal grandmother.  The name of Simon’s mother is recorded in other sources as Hawise, for example the undated charter under which “Philippus de Kima et uxor eius Hahewissa” confirmed donations to Bullington priory, Lincolnshire by "Simon filius Willelmi pater meus"[225]m PHILIP de Kyme, son of SIMON de Kyme & his wife Agnes --- (-[1189]).] 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

WILLIAM de Percy, son of HENRY de Percy & his wife Isabel de Brus ([1196/98]-shortly before 28 Jul 1245, bur Sawley Abbey, his heart bur at Sandown Hospital with his first wife).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names Willielmum” as son of “Henricum”, adding that he was born during the lifetime of his paternal grandmother[226]The Percy inheritance was split between him and his uncle Richard de Percy.  William received those parts in the hands of his great aunt Matilda Ctss of Warwick, but on his uncle’s death the latter’s moiety reverted to William.  During his minority he was in the guardianship of William Briwere, one of whose daughters he married.  He attained full age between 1212 and 1214.  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Willemus de Percy" holding 15 knights’ fees "de honore de Tadecastre" in Yorkshire in [1210/12][227].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Willelmi de Percy cum filiabus suis...filiarum et heredum Johanne que fuit uxor Willelmi de Percy"[228].  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records that Willielmum”, son of “Henricum”, was buried “apud Sallay[229]

m firstly JOAN de Briwere, daughter of WILLIAM Briwere & his wife Beatrice --- (-before 12 Jun 1233, bur Sandown Hospital, Surrey).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of fees of William Briwere, dated 1234, records "porcio Willelmi de Percy cum filiabus suis...filiarum et heredum Johanne que fuit uxor Willelmi de Percy"[230]

m secondly ([1233/35]) ELLEN de Balliol heiress of Dalton (Percy), co. Durham, daughter of INGELRAN de Balliol & his wife --- (-shortly before 22 Nov 1281).  She is recorded as the daughter of Ingelran de Balliol[231]Willelmus filius Willelmi de Percy” granted “medietatem ville de Daulton in Herternesse”, which he had inherited “post mortem Ingrami de Percy fratris mei racione donacionis...Elena de Percy mater mea”, to “Waltero de Percy fratri meo” by undated charter[232]

William & his first wife had five children (who were co-heiresses of William Briwere the younger, their maternal uncle, who died shortly before Feb 1233):

1.         JOANm --- de Ferlington, son of ---.

2.         AGNES (-after 1276).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.   King Edward I confirmed the grant by "Agnes de Balliol to her son Ingeram de Balliol of her land at Foxton" for five years from 11 Jun 1275, by charter dated 5 May 1276[233]m EUSTACE de Balliol, son of EUSTACE de Balliol & his wife --- (-after Sep 1262).

3.         ALICEm RALPH Bermingham, son of ---.

4.         ANASTASIA A mid-15th century manuscript records that "Radulfum filium Ranulphi" married "Anastasia filia Wilelmi domini de Percy filii Henrici Percy primi"[234]m RALPH FitzRandulf, son of RANDULF FitzRobert of Middleham, Yorkshire & his wife Mary Bigod of the Earls of Norfolk (-31 Mar 1258). 

5.         daughter . 

William & his second wife had six children:

6.         HENRY de Percy ([1235]-29 Aug 1272, bur Sawley).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum de Percy, Walterum, Willielmum et Ingeramum” as children of Willielmus”, son of “Henricum”, adding that Henry was buried “juxta patrem suum apud Sallay[235].  A charter dated 8 Nov 1251 records an agreement between “Johannem de Eyncurt et Agnetem uxorem eius” and “Henricum filium Willelmi de Percy” (authorised by “Henricus filius Ricardi de Percy”) relating to land “in Herghum[236]m firstly ---.  The name of Henry’s first wife is not known.  The fact of this first marriage is dictated by the chronology of the life of Henry’s son William, given the date of Henry’s known marriage to Eleanor de Warenne.  m secondly (York 8 Sep 1268) ELEANOR de Warenne, daughter of JOHN de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Alice de Lusignan (1251-before 30 Nov 1282, bur Sallay).  A writ dated 30 Nov "10 Edw I", after the death of "Ellen de Percy late the wife of William de Percy", names "John son of Henry de Percy aged 11 is next heir” of the manor of “Donegheton” in Sussex which she held “in dower of the inheritance of the heir of Henry de Percy...which dower king Henry assigned to her after her husband’s death[237].  Henry & his first wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Percy (-before 30 Nov 1282).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Willielmum, Johannem et Henricum” as the children of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi”, adding that William died without heirs[238].  “Willelmus filius et heres Henrici de Percy” granted land “in villa de Levinton” to “Alano filio meo” by undated charter[239]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          ALAN de Percy (-before 30 Nov 1282).  “Willelmus filius et heres Henrici de Percy” granted land “in villa de Levinton” to “Alano filio meo” by undated charter[240]

          Henry & his second wife had two children: 

b)         JOHN de Percy ([1269/70]-[16 Jun 1285/20 Jul 1293]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Willielmum, Johannem et Henricum” as the children of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi”, adding that John died without heirs[241]A writ dated 30 Nov "10 Edw I", after the death of "Ellen de Percy late the wife of William de Percy", names "John son of Henry de Percy aged 11 is next heir” of the manor of “Donegheton” in Sussex which she held “in dower of the inheritance of the heir of Henry de Percy...which dower king Henry assigned to her after her husband’s death[242]

c)         HENRY de Percy (Petworth posthumously [25 Mar] 1273-2/10 Oct 1314, bur Fountains Abbey).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Willielmum, Johannem et Henricum” as the children of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi”, adding that Henry was buried “apud Fontes[243]Henricus filius et hæres domini Henrici de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey by charter dated “in festo nativitatis beatæ Mariæ virginis anno regni Regis Edwardi filii Regis Edwardi septimo” (1314)[244].  Summoned to Parliament from 6 Feb 1298/9, whereby he is held to have become Lord Percy.  Regent of England during the King’s absence abroad 1297/8.  ”Henricus filius Henrici de Percy” confirmed donations of property to Whitby by charter dated 20 Apr 1308, among which a donation by “Alanus de Percy”, for the souls of “Willielmi de Percy patris mei et Emmæ de Porte matris meæ”, witnessed by “Willielmus et Ricardus fratres mei, Pyeot de Percy…[245]m ([1294]) ELEANOR, sister of RICHARD de Arundel, daughter of --- (-Jul/Aug 1328, bur Beverley).  Henry & his wife had two children: 

i)          HENRY de Percy (1301-Warkworth end Feb 1352, bur Alnwick).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum et Willielmum” as the children of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi[246]He succeeded his father 1314 as Lord Percy

-         see below

ii)         WILLIAM (-after 13 Sep 1349).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum et Willielmum” as the children of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi[247]The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 names "Dominum Henricum de Percy filium meum, Dominum Willielmum de Percy fratrem meum, abbatem de Alnewyk…" among the executors[248]

7.         WALTER (-[1274]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum de Percy, Walterum, Willielmum et Ingeramum” as children of Willielmus”, son of “Henricum[249].  “Willelmus filius Willelmi de Percy” granted “medietatem ville de Daulton in Herternesse”, which he had inherited “post mortem Ingrami de Percy fratris mei racione donacionis...Elena de Percy mater mea”, to “Waltero de Percy fratri meo” by undated charter[250]"Walter de Percy of Kyldale" paid a fine of 80 marks for marrying "Cristiana widow of Walter de Lindeseye" without King Edward’s permission by charter dated 14 Jun 1275[251]m (before 23 Sep 1274) as her second husband, CHRISTIANA , widow of WALTER de Lindsay, daughter of ---.  Alexander III King of Scotland informed Edward I King of England that "with his assent Cristiana widow of Walter de Lyndesay had married Walter de Percy" by letter dated 23 Sep 1274[252]

8.         WILLIAM of Dalton Percy .  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum de Percy, Walterum, Willielmum et Ingeramum” as children of Willielmus”, son of “Henricum[253].  “Willelmus filius Willelmi de Percy” granted “medietatem ville de Daulton in Herternesse”, which he had inherited “post mortem Ingrami de Percy fratris mei racione donacionis...Elena de Percy mater mea”, to “Waltero de Percy fratri meo” by undated charter[254]m EVA, daughter of ---.  

9.         INGRAM of Dalton Percy (-before 24 Oct 1262).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum de Percy, Walterum, Willielmum et Ingeramum” as children of Willielmus”, son of “Henricum[255]The Annals of Dunstable record that “Ingelramus de Perci” died in 1262[256]m (1262) as her first husband, JEANNE de Vivonne, daughter of GUILLAUME de Vivonne "de Fortibus" & his wife Matilda de Ferrers ([1250/52]-1 Jun 1314[257]).  Henry III King of England granted, 2 Aug 1259, "the wardship of the lands late of William de Fortibus" to "Ingram de Percy, Peter de Chauuvent and Imbert de Muntferaunt" and the marriages of the deceased’s four daughters, the eldest to Ingram[258].  The fact of her first marriage is confirmed by the grant, 10 Oct 1262, of the marriage of "the eldest daughter and one of the heirs of William de Fortibus, late the wife of Ingram de Percy" to Queen Eleanor[259]She married secondly (before 15 Jul 1269) Aimery [XII] de Rochechouart, who later succeeded his father as Vicomte de Rochechouart, and thirdly Reynold FitzPiers.  Her second marriage is confirmed by the Somersetshire Pleas for 15 Jul 1269 which include a record that "Aunsell de Gurnay and his wife Sibyl" warranted "Emery de Roche Chaward, son of Emery de Roche Chaward, and Joan his wife, Sibyl, Mabel and Cecily, the daughters and heirs of William de Fortibus" relating to land in "Corfton"[260]Edward I King of England granted, 15 Dec 1290, "letters to Joan de Vivonia, going beyond the seas, nominating Henry de Somery and Roger de Essex her attorneys for one year"[261], which suggests that her second husband had died and that Jeanne had subsequently settled in England.  Edward I King of England granted, 4 Jul 1300, a licence for "Joan, late the wife of Reginald son of Peter" to grant the manor of Chuyton to "Peter son of Reginald"[262].  Edward I King of England granted, 4 Jul 1300, a licence for "Joan, late the wife of Reginald son of Peter" to grant the manor of Chuyton (Luyton) ("being her share of the inheritance of William de Fortibus") to "Peter son of Reginald"[263].  Her parentage and third marriage are confirmed by, firstly, a  licence granted by the sheriff of Bedford 10 Jun 1304 for "Joan, late the wife of Reginald son of Peter" to grant part of the manor of Luyton "being her purparty of the inheritance of Matilda de Kyme her mother" to "Reginald son of Peter", and a licence granted by the sheriff of Somerset 20 Jun 1304 for "Joan, late the wife of Reginald son of Peter" to grant part of the manor of Midsummer Norton "her purparty of the inheritance of William de Fortibus her father" to "Reginald son of Reginald"[264]

10.      JOSCELIN

11.      ALICE

 

 

 

C.      LORDS PERCY

 

 

HENRY de Percy, son of HENRY de Percy & his wife Eleanor --- (1301-Warkworth end Feb 1352, bur Alnwick).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum et Willielmum” as the children of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi[265]He succeeded his father 1314 as Lord Percy.  He was given custody of Alnwick Castle Oct 1318.  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349, requests burial "in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ de Salley", and makes bequests to "Henricus de Percy filius meus… Imaniæ uxori meæ…Mariæ uxori eiusdem Henrici…Thomæ de Percy filio meo…Rogero filio meo…Margaretæ filiæ meæ…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…Domino Johanni filio Walteri…Domino Willielmo de Aton…Domino Gilberto de Aton…Domino Willielmo de Percy…Domino Radulpho de Nevill…Domino Waltero de Creyk…" and names "Dominum Henricum de Percy filium meum, Dominum Willielmum de Percy fratrem meum, abbatem de Alnewyk…" among the executors[266]

m ([1321 or before]) IDONIA [Imania] de Clifford, daughter of ROBERT de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Matilda de Clare (-24 Aug 1365, bur Beverley Minster, under the “Percy Shrine”).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records that “Henricum”, son of Henricus hæres et primogenitus…Willielmi”, married “Idoniam de Clifford[267]The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Imaniæ uxori meæ…"[268]

Henry & his wife had nine children: 

1.         HENRY de Percy ([1321 or before]-[18 May] 1368, bur Alnwick).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum et Willielmum et Ricardum” as the sons of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[269]The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "Henricus de Percy filius meus…Mariæ uxori eiusdem Henrici…Thomæ de Percy filio meo…Rogero filio meo…" and names "Dominum Henricum de Percy filium meum, Dominum Willielmum de Percy fratrem meum, abbatem de Alnewyk…" among the executors[270].  He succeeded his father in 1352 as Lord Percym firstly (Tutbury Castle [Sep or before] 1334) MARY of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY Earl of Lancaster & his wife Matilda Chaworth ([1320/21]-1 Sep 1362, bur Alnwick, Northumberland).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records that “Henricus primogenitus”, son of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford”, married “Mariam filiam domini Henrici comitis Lancastriæ[271]The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "Henricus de Percy filius meus…Mariæ uxori eiusdem Henrici…Thomæ de Percy filio meo…Rogero filio meo…"[272]m secondly (May 1365 or before) as her first husband, JOAN Orreby, daughter & heiress of JOHN Lord Orreby & his wife Margaret --- (-end Jul 1369).  She married secondly Constantine Clifton.  Henry & his first wife had three children: 

a)         HENRY de Percy (10 Nov 1341-killed in battle Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster 19 Feb 1408, bur York Minster).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family records the birth 10 Nov 1341 of “Henricus primogenitus”, son of Henricus” and his wife “Mariam filiam domini Henrici comitis Lancastriæ[273].  Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, in his testament dated 25 May 1368, names "Thomas Percy and Henry Percy my nephews…" among his beneficiaries[274]He succeeded his father 1368 as Lord Percy.  Marshal of England 1376.  Created Earl of Northumberland at the coronation of King Richard II 16 Jul 1377.   

-        EARLS of NORTHUMBERLAND

b)         THOMAS de Percy ([1343]-beheaded 23 Jul 1403, bur Shrewsbury St Peter).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Thomas secundus filius” of Henricus” and his wife “Mariam filiam domini Henrici comitis Lancastriæ[275].  Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, in his testament dated 25 May 1368, names "Thomas Percy and Henry Percy my nephews…" among his beneficiaries[276]He was created Earl of Worcester in 1397.  Thomas had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress: 

i)           THOMAS Percy (-after 1418). 

c)         MATILDA de Percy Given-Wilson & Curteis state that John de Southeray was married in Jan 1377 to "Maud sister of Henry Lord Percy"[277].  The primary source on which this information is based has not been identified.  m (Jan 1377) JOHN de Southeray, illegitimate son of EDWARD III King of England & his mistress Alice Perrers née --- ([1364/65]-after 1383). 

Henry & his second wife had two children:

d)         son (-in infancy). 

e)         MARY (1367-York 25 Aug 1394)A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievall Abbey records that "Johannem", son of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ", married "Mariam de Orebe --- comitis Northumbriæ"[278]m (before 12 Jun 1382) JOHN de Ros, son of THOMAS de Ros Lord Ros (of Helmsley) & his wife Beatrice de Stafford ([1363/68]-Paphos, Cyprus 6 Aug 1393, bur Rievaulx).  He succeeded his father in 1384 as Lord Ros (of Helmsley). 

2.         THOMAS de Percy (-[25 May 1368/17 Nov 1369]).  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "Henricus de Percy filius meus…Mariæ uxori eiusdem Henrici…Thomæ de Percy filio meo…Rogero filio meo…"[279].  Bishop of Norwich 1356.  Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, in his testament dated 25 May 1368 and proved 17 Nov 1369, names "Thomas Percy and Henry Percy my nephews…Dame Margaret de Ferrers my sister…Matilda Nevill my sister…William d’Aton my nephew…Edward St John…Lady Wingfield" as his beneficiaries[280]

3.         ROGER de Percy .  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "Henricus de Percy filius meus…Mariæ uxori eiusdem Henrici…Thomæ de Percy filio meo…Rogero filio meo…"[281]

4.         ROBERT de Percy .

5.         WILLIAM de Percy .  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum et Willielmum et Ricardum” as the sons of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[282]

6.         RICHARD de PercyA manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Henricum et Willielmum et Ricardum” as the sons of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[283]

7.         ELEONOR (-before 18 Oct 1361, bur Dunmow Priory).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[284]m JOHN Lord FitzWalter, son of ROBERT FitzWalter of Woodham Walter, Essex & his wife Joan de Multon ([1311/12]-18 Oct 1361, bur Dunmow Priory). 

8.         MARGARET (-Gyng [Buttsbury], Essex 2 Sep 1375, bur [Chelmsford Church of the Friars Preachers]).  The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Margaretæ filiæ meæ…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…"[285]Her parentage is confirmed, and her second marriage indicated, by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…Dame Margaret de Ferrers my sister…Matilda Nevill my sister…" among his beneficiaries[286].  The order in which the sisters are named suggests that Margaret was the older.  However, this cannot be considered conclusive as the same document reverses the order of the testator’s nephews Thomas and Henry Percy.  The will of "William Ferrers Lord of Groby", dated 1 Jun 1368, proved 19 Jul 1372, chose burial “in the Conventual Church of our Lady at Ulvescroft”, bequeathed property to “Elizabeth my daughter a nun at the Minories, London...Margaret my wife...Philippa de Beauchamp my sister...Elizabeth d’Assells my sister...[287]The will of "Margaret widow of William de Ferrers Lord of Groby", dated 26 Apr 1374, and bequeathed property to “Ingram d’Umfraville[288]m firstly (licence 20 Jan 1340) ROBERT de Umfraville, son of GILBERT de Umfraville Earl of Angus & his first wife Joan Willoughby (-before 25 May 1368).  m secondly (before 25 May 1368) as his second wife, WILLIAM de Ferrers Lord Ferrers of Groby, son of HENRY de Ferrers Lord Ferrers of Groby & his Isabel de Verdon (Newbold Vernon, Leicestershire 28 Feb 1333-Stebbing 8 Jan 1371). 

9.         MATILDA (-before 18 Feb 1378).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[289].  Her marriage is indicated by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…Dame Margaret de Ferrers my sister…Matilda Nevill my sister…" among his beneficiaries[290].  The order in which the sisters are named suggests that Margaret was the older.  However, this cannot be considered conclusive as the same document reverses the order of the testator’s nephews Thomas and Henry Percy.  Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Radulphi de Nevill patris et Alesiæ matris…Johannis [de Nevill domini de Raby] et Matildæ quondam uxoris eiusdem Johannis”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[291]m as his first wife, JOHN Lord Neville of Raby, son of RALPH Lord Neville & his wife Alice de Audley (1341-1388).

10.      ISABEL (-[before 25 May 1368]).  A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Alianoram, Matildem…et Isabellam” as the daughters of Henricus” and his wife “Idoniam de Clifford[292]The testament of "Dominus Henricus de Percy Senior" is dated 13 Sep 1349 and makes bequests to "…Isabellæ filiæ meæ…Domino Willielmo de Aton…Domino Gilberto de Aton…"[293]Her marriage is suggested by the testament of Thomas Percy Bishop of Norwich, dated 25 May 1368, which names "…William d’Aton my nephew…" as one of his beneficiaries[294].  As the testator names his other two sisters, it is suggested that Isabel must have died before the date of the will.  m (after 1350) WILLIAM Aton, son of GILBERT Aton of West Ayton, Yorkshire & his wife --- (-before Mar 1389).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1371 whereby he is held to have become Lord Aton. 

 

 

 

LORDS RIVERS

 

 

1.         RICHARD de Rivers (-[4 Dec 1221/15 Mar 1222])m firstly (repudiated) [as her first husband,] --- (-after 1200).  "Rog de Planes" paid a fine to marry "uxorem quem prima habuit Ric de Riveriis cum terra sua", dated 1200[295]m secondly ([1200/01]) as her second husband, JOAN de Port, widow of JOHN "the Marshal", daughter of ADAM de Port Lord of Basing & his first wife Mabile d’Orval (-[1204/13]).  "Ric de Riveriis" paid a fine to marry "filia Ade de Port", dated [1200/01][296]m thirdly (after 19 Jan 1214) as her second husband, MATILDA de Beauchamp alias de Lucy, widow of GEOFFREY de Lascelles, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp & his wife Matilda de Lucy (-before 19 Jul 1243).  "Ricardus de Ripar" made a fine to marry "Matilld de Lucy dña de Angr", dated 19 Jan 1214[297].  King John granted a licence for "Matillid de Angr uxori Ric de Ripar" relating to her inheritance dated 17 Jun 1216[298].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Ricardus de Rupar cum Mathilde de Lucy" holding "iii milites in Hangr, Roing, Stanford, Cristeshal et in Codrelie in Herfordsir"[299].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Essex, dated 1219, which includes "Matillis de Lucy domina de Angre, maritata est Ricardo de Ripe per Regem Johannem..."[300].  An undated writ after the death of "Maud de Lucy" fails to decide whether her heir was "Sir B. de Ripariis her younger son" or "the son of Sir Richard de Ripariis who was the son of her elder son and who died before her decease", adding that "the son of the said Sir Richard was 4 years old on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary 27 [or 28?] Hen III"[301].  Richard & his third wife had two children: 

a)         RICHARD de Rivers (-before 25 Apr 1243).  An undated writ after the death of "Maud de Lucy" fails to decide whether her heir was "Sir B. de Ripariis her younger son" or "the son of Sir Richard de Ripariis who was the son of her elder son and who died before her decease", adding that "the son of the said Sir Richard was 4 years old on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary 27 [or 28?] Hen III"[302]m ([1237/39]) MARGARET Bisset, daughter of JOHN Bisset & his [second] wife Alice Basset (-Dec 1256 or before).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Hampshire, dated 1249, which include "dicunt quod Margeria de Ripariis filia Johannis Byseth est de donacione regis et est maritanda, et Elena et Isabella sorores sue sunt maritate per dominum Johannem de Plasetis..." with land in “Hundredum de Fordingebrigge[303].  Richard & his wife had three children: 

i)          JOHN de Rivers (9 Sep [1239/40]-before 1 Apr 1294).  An undated writ after the death of "Maud de Lucy" fails to decide whether her heir was "Sir B. de Ripariis her younger son" or "the son of Sir Richard de Ripariis who was the son of her elder son and who died before her decease", adding that "the son of the said Sir Richard was 4 years old on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary 27 [or 28?] Hen III"[304].  His name and parentage are confirmed by the charter dated 6 Feb 1255 under which "Sir Philip Basset" demised to "Sir Richard de Tany" the marriage of "John de Ripariis son of Richard de Ripariis and heir of lady Maud de Lucy"[305].  [m firstly] (Betrothed 6 Feb 1255) MARY de Tany, daughter of RICHARD de Tany & his wife Margery de Stapelford (-after Feb 1255).  Her betrothal is confirmed by a charter dated 6 Feb 1255 under which "Sir Philip Basset" demised to "Sir Richard de Tany" the marriage of "John de Ripariis son of Richard de Ripariis and heir of lady Maud de Lucy" for "one of the daughters of the said Richard" and "the marriage of Maud sister of the said John for…one of his sons", which also names "Sir Richard de Tany and Margery his wife, daughter and heir of Sir William son of Richard de Stapelford"[306].  No record has been found to indicate that this marriage was finalised.  m [secondly] MATILDA de Creye, daughter of --- de Creye & his wife ---.  [m] [thirdly] CHRISTIANA, daughter of --- (-after 1295).]  John & his [second] wife had two children: 

(a)       JOHN de Rivers ([1267/68]-after 1321).  He was summoned to parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Riversm ---.  John & his wife had one child: 

(1)       JOHN de Rivers (-[15 Oct/13 Dec] 1310).  m HELEN, daughter of --- (-after 1325).  John & his wife had one child: 

a.         JOHN de Rivers ([1304/05]-after 1347). 

(2)       EDMUND de Riversm ---.  The name of Edmund’s wife is not known.  Edmund & his wife had one child: 

a.         KATHERINE de Riversm firstly WILLIAM de Lekehull, son of ---.  m secondly JOHN Hall of Sussex, son of ---. 

(3)       CHRISTIANA de Riversm ROBERT de Bulkeley of Eaton, Cheshire, son of ---. 

(b)       JOAN de Riversm Sir WILLIAM de Tracy, son of ---. 

ii)         --- de Rivers (-before Feb 1255). 

iii)        MATILDA de Rivers (-after Feb 1255).  Her betrothal is confirmed by a charter dated 6 Feb 1255 under which "Sir Philip Basset" demised to "Sir Richard de Tany" the marriage of "John de Ripariis son of Richard de Ripariis and heir of lady Maud de Lucy" for "one of the daughters of the said Richard" and "the marriage of Maud sister of the said John for…one of his sons"[307].  No record has been found to indicate that this marriage was finalised.  Betrothed (6 Feb 1255) --- de Tany, son of RICHARD de Tany & his wife ---. 

b)         BALDWIN de Rivers (-1256).  An undated writ after the death of "Maud de Lucy" fails to decide whether her heir was "Sir B. de Ripariis her younger son" or "the son of Sir Richard de Ripariis who was the son of her elder son and who died before her decease", adding that "the son of the said Sir Richard was 4 years old on the morrow of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary 27 [or 28?] Hen III"[308]

 

 

 

ROS (of Helmsley)

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Rots in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Caen, canton Tilly-sur-Seulles, although he suggests that “it must not be supposed that all families of Ros or Roos came from this place; and it can scarcely be doubted that Roos of Helmsley, with its offshoot Roos of Ingmanthorpe, derived the name from Roos in Holderness”[309]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         HERBERT de Ros (-after 13 Jan 1103).  "…Herbertus de Ros…" witnessed the charter dated 13 Jan 1103 which records an agreement between “Philippus de Braosa” and the abbey of Fécamp[310]

 

2.         PIERS de Ros (-before 1129).  A charter of King Henry II, dated to [1156/57], confirmed donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land “in Gillinga Ridale” by “Petrus de Ros[311]m ADELINE Espec, daughter of WILLIAM Espec Lord of Helmsley, Yorkshire and Wark, Northumberland & his wife ---.  Grazebrook discusses the sources relating to the Espec family and concludes that William Espec, who died before 1110, was the father of one son and three daughters, of whom Walter and Adeline[312].  “Walterus Espec et Adelina uxor eius” founded Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire by undated charter, dated to the reign of King Henry I, witnessed by "Willielmo de Buyssy et Jordano de Buyssy et Rogero de Buyssy, filiis Hawisiæ sororis meæ primogenitæ, et Galfrido de Trailli et Willielmo de Trailli et Nicholao de Traille et Gilberto de Trailli, filiis Albredæ sororis meæ secundæ, et Everardo de Roos et Roberto de Ross, filiis Audelinæ sororis meæ junioris…"[313].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Walts Espec" in Yorkshire[314].  Piers & his wife had two children: 

a)         EVERARD de Ros (-1153 or before).  “Walterus Espec et Adelina uxor eius” founded Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire by undated charter, dated to the reign of King Henry I, witnessed by "…Everardo de Roos et Roberto de Ross, filiis Audelinæ sororis meæ junioris…"[315].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records that "Ebrard Dap Willi de Albamara" rendered account of 2 marcs that he may no longer act as steward of Guillaume de Aumâle in Yorkshire[316].  “Dominus Edbrardus filius Petri de Rossa” notified the archbishop of York that he had donated Atwick church to Bridlington priory, for the soul of "Eustachie uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1138/40][317]m EUSTACHIE, daughter of ---.  “Dominus Edbrardus filius Petri de Rossa” notified the archbishop of York of his donation to Bridlington priory, for the soul of "Eustachie uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1138/40][318]

b)         ROBERT de Ros (-[1162/63]).  “Walterus Espec et Adelina uxor eius” founded Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire by undated charter, dated to the reign of King Henry I, witnessed by "…Everardo de Roos et Roberto de Ross, filiis Audelinæ sororis meæ junioris…"[319].  "Robertus de Ros" confirmed donations to Rievaulx by "Walteri Espec avunculi mei", for the souls of "…fratris mei Everardi", by undated charter, dated to [1147/53], witnessed by "…Roberto clerico nepote domini Roberti de Ros…Stephano nepote domini Roberti de Ros…Thomas de Ros…"[320].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Ros ii m" in Yorkshire and "Robertus de Ros dimidiam marcam" in Warwickshire, Leicestershire in [1161/62][321].  The 1162/63 Pipe Roll names "Rob de Ross", with no further words and no payment, and on the following line "Euerard de Ross" paying £30/6/8 in Yorkshire[322].  This unusual arrangement of the names, as well as the large payment, suggest that it represents a record of the death of Robert de Ros and the payment by Everard de Ros of the fine for his inheritance.  [m firstly ---.  As noted Robert de Ros’s known wife Sibylle de Valoignes is recorded in a manuscript relating to the foundation of Rievaulz abbey as the mother of his son Everard.  Everard is named in the 1162/63 Pipe Roll, apparently having already reached the age of majority.  However, these two statements appear mutually incompatible because Sibylle de Valoignes is recorded as having had children by her third marriage which is dated to [1181/82].  The most likely explanation is that the Rievaulx abbey manuscript is incorrect and that Robert’s son Everard was born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage.]  m [secondly] as her first husband, SIBYLLA de Valoignes, daughter of --- (-after 1212, bur Nun Appleton Priory).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Robertum de Roos” married “Sibillam de Valoniis”, by whom he was father of “Willielmum de Roos et Robertum[323]She married secondly ([1165/66]) William de Percy of Topcliffe, Yorkshire.  Her first and second marriages are confirmed by the 1165/66 Pipe Roll which records "Wills de Pci" accounting for ".cccc. m. p uxore Robti de Ross hnda" in Yorkshire[324]Willielmus de Percy” donated Topcliffe church to York Cathedral, for the souls of “uxoris meæ Sybillæ…filiorum quoque et filiarum mearum”, by undated charter witnessed by “Sybilla de Valloniis…[325].  It is assumed that the first witness was the donor’s wife but this is not specified in the document.  She married thirdly ([1181/82]) Ralph de Albini BritoHer third marriage is confirmed by the 1181/82 Pipe Roll which records "Radulfus de Alben" accounting for ".cc. m pro ducenda matre Ebrardi de Ros" in Yorkshire[326]Robert & his [first] wife had one child: 

i)          EVERARD de Ros (before [1141/44]-1183)A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Robertum de Roos” married “Sibillam de Valoniis”, by whom he was father of “Everardum de Roos[327]The 1162/63 Pipe Roll names "Rob de Ross", with no further words and no payment, and on the following line "Euerard de Ross" paying £30/6/8 in Yorkshire[328].  This unusual arrangement of the names, as well as the large payment, suggest that it represents a record of the death of Robert de Ros and the payment by Everard de Ros of the fine for his inheritance, which in turn suggests that Everard (assumed to be Robert’s son) had already reached the age of majority at that time.  However, this dating appears impossible if Everard was the son of Sibylle de Valoignes, who is recorded as having three children by her third husband whom she married in [1181/82].  As discussed above, the best explanation for this apparent contradiction is that Everard was born from an otherwise unrecorded earlier marriage of his father.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Everard de Ros cxii s i d" in Yorkshire in [1167/68][329]m ROHESE Trussebut, daughter of WILLIAM Trussebut Lord of Warter, Yorkshire & his wife Albereda d’Harcourt ([1153/58]-[1194/29 Sep 1196]).  A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha[330].  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha", adding that Rohese was mother of "Robertus de Ros senior"[331]A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Everardum de Roos” married “Rosam”, by whom he was father of “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan[332]The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Everardi de Ros que fuit filia Willelmi Trussebut…xxxv” and her land “in Strowestone”, adding that she had "ii filios, primogenitus est xiii annorum et terra eius est in custodia Ranulfi de Glanville"[333].  Everard & his wife had two children: 

(a)       ROBERT de Ros "Fursan" ([1172/73]-before 23 Dec 1226)A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Everardum de Roos” married “Rosam”, by whom he was father of “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan[334]The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Everardi de Ros que fuit filia Willelmi Trussebut…xxxv” and her land “in Strowestone”, adding that she had "ii filios, primogenitus est xiii annorum et terra eius est in custodia Ranulfi de Glanville"[335].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Ros" paying "lx s x d" in Yorkshire[336].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Robertus de Ros" paying "vi l xviii s" in Yorkshire[337].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Ros" holding parts of one knight’s fee in "Hokintone" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and "baronium de Werc" with two knights’ fees in Northumberland, in [1210/12][338].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Robertus de Ros" holding "baroniam de Werke" in Northumberland which had been granted by King Henry I "vel datum per marritagium vel elemosinam vel aliquo modo"[339].  

-         see below

(b)       PIERS de Ros .  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Everardi de Ros que fuit filia Willelmi Trussebut…xxxv” and her land “in Strowestone”, adding that she had "ii filios, primogenitus est xiii annorum et terra eius est in custodia Ranulfi de Glanville"[340]

 

 

ROBERT de Ros "Fursan", son of EVERARD de Ros & his wife Rohese Trussebut ([1172/73]-before 23 Dec 1226, bur London).  The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha", adding that Rohese was mother of "Robertus de Ros senior"[341]A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Everardum de Roos” married “Rosam”, by whom he was father of “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan[342]The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “uxor Everardi de Ros que fuit filia Willelmi Trussebut…xxxv” and her land “in Strowestone”, adding that she had "ii filios, primogenitus est xiii annorum et terra eius est in custodia Ranulfi de Glanville"[343].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Ros" paying "lx s x d" in Yorkshire[344].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Robertus de Ros" paying "vi l xviii s" in Yorkshire[345].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Robertus de Ros" holding parts of one knight’s fee in "Hokintone" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and "baronium de Werc" with two knights’ fees in Northumberland, in [1210/12][346].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Robertus de Ros" holding "baroniam de Werke" in Northumberland which had been granted by King Henry I "vel datum per marritagium vel elemosinam vel aliquo modo"[347].  Bailiff of the royal castellany of Bonneville sur Toques in Normandy.  Sheriff of Cumberland 1213-1215.  He was one of the barons appointed to enforce Magna Carta.  He became a Templar, and retired from secular life in 1226[348].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan” became “Templarius” and was buried "Londini"[349]

m (Haddington early 1191) as her second husband, ISABEL, widow of ROBERT de Brus Lord of Annandale, illegitimate daughter of WILLIAM I "the Lion" King of Scotland & his mistress --- Avenal.  The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1183 of "William king of the Scots…his daughter Isabella" and "Robert de Brus"[350].  The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1191 of "the king of Scots…his daughter Ysembel (the widow of Robert de Brus)" and "Robert de Ross" at Haddington[351].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan” married “Isabellam filiam regis Scotiæ”, by whom he was father of “Willielmum de Roos et Robertum”, and also lists their descendants[352]

Robert & his wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Ros (-[1264]), bur Kirkham).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan” married “Isabellam filiam regis Scotiæ”, by whom he was father of “Willielmum de Roos et Robertum”, adding that William inherited "castrum de Hemmisley…et advocationem monasterium de Kirkham, Rievaulxe et de Wardona"[353]Henry III King of England notified the executors of the testament of "Roberti de Ros" of an arrangement with "Willelmum de Ros" concerning the payment of his father’s debts, dated 13 Nov 1228[354]The Liber Pluscardensis records that "dominus Willelmus de Ross" claimed the Scottish throne "de legittimacione Ysabellæ antecedentis suæ"[355].  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Willielmus de Roos” was buried in Kirkham monastery[356]m LUCY, daughter of --- (-after 1266).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Willielmus de Roos” married “Luciam[357]William & his wife had children: 

a)         ROBERT de Ros (-17 May 1285, bur Kirkham)A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Robertum de Roos" as the son of “Willielmus de Roos” and his wife “Luciam”, adding in a later passage that he was buried in Kirkham monastery[358]A writ dated 4 Jun "13 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Ros of Beuveyr alias Beuvayr", names "William his son aged 30 is his next heir" and "Isabel sometime his wife, daughter and heir of William de Aubeny who is 52 years of age"[359]m ([5 Jun 1243/17 May 1244]) ISABEL de Albini, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Brito de Albini Lord of Belvoir & his wife Isabel --- (-15 Jun 1301, bur Newstead, near Stamford).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Robertum de Roos" married “Isabellam hæredem D’Albany[360]"Robert de Ros and Isabel his wife" were granted rights "in the manor of Belver by all bounds by which William de Albiniaco, father of the said Isabel who is his heiress, held…" dated 3 Jul 1252[361].  A writ dated 4 Jun "13 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Ros of Beuveyr alias Beuvayr", names "Isabel sometime his wife, daughter and heir of William de Aubeny who is 52 years of age"[362]Robert & his wife had children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Ros (-[12 May/16 Aug] 1316, bur Kirkham).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum de Ros" as son of "Robertum de Roos" and his wife “Isabellam hæredem D’Albany”, adding that he was buried in Kirkham monastery[363].  He was summoned to parliament in 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Ros of Helmsley. 

-         see below

2.         ROBERT de RosA manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Robertum de Roos dictum Fursan” married “Isabellam filiam regis Scotiæ”, by whom he was father of “Willielmum de Roos et Robertum”, adding that Robert inherited "castrum de Warke…et…baronia in Scotia"[364]

 

 

 

B.      LORDS ROS (of Helmsley)

 

 

WILLIAM de Ros, son of ROBERT de Ros & his wife Isabel de Albini (-[12 May/16 Aug] 1316, bur Kirkham).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum de Ros" as son of "Robertum de Roos" and his wife “Isabellam hæredem D’Albany”, adding that he was buried in Kirkham monastery[365]A writ dated 4 Jun "13 Edw I", after the death of "Robert de Ros of Beuveyr alias Beuvayr", names "William his son aged 30 is his next heir"[366]He was summoned to parliament in 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Ros of Helmsley. 

m (before 1287) MATILDA de Vaux, daughter of JOHN de Vaux & [his wife Joan ---] ([1260/61]-[before 1316], bur Pentney Priory, Norfolk).  An undated manuscript names “Petronilla et Matilda” as the two daughters of John de Vaux, adding that Matilda married “domino Willielmo de Ros et genuit Willelmum primogenitum suum...[367]A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Willielmum de Ros" married "Matildam de Vaus hæredem medietatis terrarium Johannis de Vaux"[368]Inquisitions following a writ dated "15 Edw I" after the death of "John de Vallibus...on Thursday before the Exaltation of the Holy Cross 15 Edw I” name “Petronilla [...aged 28...[who married] William de Nerford] and Maud [...aged 26...[who] married William de Ros] his daughters are his next heirs and of full age[369]

William & his wife had four children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Ros (-3 Feb 1343, bur Kirkham).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum de Roos" as the son of "Willielmum de Ros" and his wife "Matildam de Vaus", adding that he was buried in Kirkham monastery[370]Lord Rosm as her first husband, MARGERY de Badlesmere, daughter of BARTHOLOMEW de Badlesmere Lord Badlesmere & his wife Margaret de Clare (-after 31 May 1356).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Willielmus de Roos" married "Margeriam de Badilsmere"[371].  She married secondly (royal licence 6 Mar 1351) Sir Thomas de Arundel.  She married thirdly as his third wife, Sir John AvenelThe will of "Elizabeth de Bohun Countess of Northampton", dated 31 May 1356, bequeathed property to “Humphrey my son...Elizabeth my daughter...my sister the Countess of Oxford...my sister Roos...Agnes Devereux, John Avenell, Richard Waldegrave[372]William & his wife had five children:    

a)         WILLIAM de Ros (Frieston, Lincolnshire 19 May 1329-before 3 Dec 1352).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum, Thomam, Margaretam et Matildam" as the children of "Willielmus de Roos" and his wife "Margeriam de Badilsmere", adding that William died childless "in terra sancta" and was buried there[373]Lord Rosm (before 8 May 1341) as her first husband, MARGARET Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville Lord Neville of Raby & his wife Alice de Audley (-May 1372).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Willielmum", son of "Willielmus de Roos" and his wife "Margeriam de Badilsmere", married "Margaretam filiam domini Radulphi de Nevill"[374].  She married secondly (royal licence 26 Feb 1358) as his first wife, Henry de Percy Lord Percy, who was created Earl of Northumberland. 

b)         THOMAS de Ros (Stoke Albany, Northamptonshire 13 Jan 1337-Uffington, Lincolnshire 8 Jun 1384).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum, Thomam, Margaretam et Matildam" as the children of "Willielmus de Roos" and his wife "Margeriam de Badilsmere", adding that he died "apud Uffington versus terram sanctam" and was buried "in monasterio Ryevallis"[375]Lord Rosm (royal licence 1 Jan 1359) as her second husband, BEATRICE de Stafford, widow of MORICE FitzThomas Earl of Desmond, daughter of RALPH de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Margaret de Audley of the Earls of Gloucester (-Apr 1415).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Thomas", son of "Willielmus de Roos" and his wife "Margeriam de Badilsmere", married "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ"[376].  She married thirdly (before 20 Aug 1385) Sir Richard de Burley.  Thomas & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN de Ros ([1364/1368]-Paphos, Cyprus 6 Aug 1393, bur Rievaulx).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ", adding that John died "sine hærede masculo apud Cypresse peregrinans versus terram sanctam" and was buried "apud Ryevallum"[377]Lord Rosm (before 22 Jun 1382) MARY de Percy, daughter of HENRY Lord Percy & his second wife Joan de Orreby (-York 25 Aug 1394).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that "Johannem", son of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ", married "Mariam de Orebe --- comitis Northumbriæ"[378]

ii)         WILLIAM de Ros ([1367/68]-Belvoir 1 Sep 1414).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ", and that William died “apud Belverum 1 Sep 1414” where he was buried[379]Lord Ros

-         see below

iii)        THOMAS de Ros .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ"[380]

iv)       ROBERT de Ros .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ"[381]

v)        ELIZABETH de Ros (-Mar 1424).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ"[382]m THOMAS de Clifford Lord Clifford, son of ROGER [V] de Clifford Lord Clifford & his wife Matilda de Beauchamp ([1362/63]-18 Aug 1391). 

vi)       MARGARET de Ros .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ"[383]

c)         MARGARET de Ros .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum, Thomam, Margaretam et Matildam" as the children of "Willielmus de Roos" and his wife "Margeriam de Badilsmere"[384]

d)         MATILDA de Ros .  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Willielmum, Thomam, Margaretam et Matildam" as the children of "Willielmus de Roos" and his wife "Margeriam de Badilsmere"[385]

e)         ELIZABETH de Ros (-after 16 May 1380)m (before 16 Jul 1334) WILLIAM la Zouche Lord Zouche (of Harrington), son of EON la Zouche & his wife Joan Inge (Dec 1321-23 Apr 1382). 

2.         JOHN de Ros .  His parentage is confirmed by the inquisitions following the death of his widow.  m as her second husband, MARGARET, widow of --- Le Despencer, daughter of --- (-22 Jul 1350).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 16 Aug "23 Edw III" after the death of "Margaret de Roos or de Ros...died 22 Jul last” name “Philip le Despencer who died 22 Aug last aged 22 years was her heir...” and notes that “John de Ros knight deceased, sometime husband of the said Margaret was...seized of the manor of Turnumhalle” which after Margaret’s death reverted to “William [error for Thomas?] de Ros a minor...son and heir of William de Ros of Hamelak deceased, brother and heir of the said John de Ros” and that “the said John de Ros...was seised of the manor [of Thornton in Craven]” which reverted to “Thomas son of William de Ros of Hamelak deceased, because the said William was brother and heir of the said John[386]

3.         MARGARET de Ros (-bur Walden Abbey).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Margareta le Roos” as the wife of “Edwardus de Boon” and records that she was buried at Walden with her husband[387]m EDWARD de Bohun, son of HUMatthew ParisHREY de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex & his wife Elizabeth of England (Caldecot [1312]-Low Malden castle, Scotland [10] Nov 1334, bur Walden Abbey). 

4.         AGNES de Ros (-before 1 Dec 1328)m firstly PAYN Tibetot, son of ---.  m secondly (before 17 Jun 1315) as his second wife, THOMAS de Vere, son of ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Margaret de Mortimer ([1280/84]-[1328/12 May 1329]).

 

 

WILLIAM de Ros, son of THOMAS de Ros Lord Ros & his wife Beatrice de Stafford of the Earls of Stafford ([1367/68]-Belvoir 1 Sep 1414).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey names "Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam et Robertum, Elizabetham et Margaretam" as the children of "Thomas de Roos" and his wife "Beatricem filiam Radulphi comitis Staffordiæ", and that William died “apud Belverum 1 Sep 1414” where he was buried[388]Lord Ros

m MARGARET d’Arundel, daughter of JOHN d’Arundel & his wife Eleanor Baroness Mautravers (-3 Jul 1438).  A manuscript narrating the foundation of Rievaulx Abbey records that “Willielmus de Roos” married “Margaretam filiam domini Johannis de Arundell”, by whom he was father of “Johannem, Willielmum, Thomam, Robertum et Ricardum, Beatricem, Aliciam, Margaretam et Elizabetham[389]

William & his wife had children: 

1.         THOMAS de Ros (Belvoir 26 Sep 1406-France 18 Aug 1430)Lord Rosm as her first husband, ELEANOR Beauchamp, daughter of RICHARD Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Elizabeth Berkeley (Wedgenock, Warwickshire 1407-Baynard’s Castle, London 6 Mar 1467).  She married secondly ([1431/35]) Edmund Beaufort Earl of Somerset, who was created  Duke of Somerset in 1448.  She married thirdly Walter Rokesley

 

 

 

LORDS SAINT-AMAND

 

 

1.         --- m --- de Verdun, daughter of ---.  Her parentage and marriage are indicated by the order dated 2 Sep 1231 under which Henry III King of England granted repayment terms to [her son] "Amauricus de Sancto Amando" for the debts of "Waltero de verdun avunculo suo cuius heres ipse est"[390].  Her connection with the Verdon family is also inidicated by the charter dated [Oct] 1230 quoted below.  One child: 

a)         AMAURY [I] de Saint-Amand (-[May/Sep] 1241).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[391].  "Aymer de Saint Amand" paid homage to the king "for the lands which Ralph de Verdun his kinsman whose heir he is and who died in parts overseas with the king, held of the king in chief in England" [in Kent], dated [Oct] 1230[392].  Henry III King of England granted repayment terms to "Amauricus de Sancto Amando" for the debts of "Waltero de Verdun avunculo suo cuius heres ipse est", dated 2 Sep 1231[393].  Matthew Paris records that "comes Ricardus" [Richard Earl of Cornwall] left for Jerusalem, a marginal note naming "…Aumauri de Sancto Amando senescallus curiæ domini regis…" among those who accompanied him, dated to 1241 "inter Ascensionem et Pentecosten"[394]m firstly ---.  The name of Amaury’s first wife is not known, but the chronology of his son dictates that he must have been born from an earlier marriage of his father.  m secondly as her fifth husband, ISOLDA Pantulf, widow firstly of HUGH de Montpinçon, secondly of WALTER de Tattershall, thirdly of WALTER de Baskerville, fourthly of HENRY Bisset, daughter of WILLIAM [IV] Pantulf of Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire & his wife Joan de Goldington (-after 1267).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1222, by "Almaricus de S. Amando et Isolda uxor eius" against "Ricardum de Cahannes et Sarram uxorem eius" concerning "tercie partis ville de Kideministro…dotem eiusdem Isolde…ad warantum Johannem Biset fratrem et heredem Willelmi [error for Henrici] Bisset quondam viri eiusdem Isolde"[395].  The Complete Peerage states that her son and heir Robert de Tattershall undertook payment of her debts and orders were made in 1223 and 1228 which would normally connote her death, but that in 1267 she was still prosecuting her rights of dower against her grandson Robert de Tattershall[396].  Amaury & his first wife had one child: 

i)          RALPH de Saint-Amand (-[Jan 1241/28 Jul 1245]).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Leicester, dated 1247, which include "villa de Sadington fuit terra Willelmi de Roulus, Normanni, et Paulinus Paiver tenet eam racione custodie heredis Radulfi filii Almarici de Sancto Amando..."[397]m (after 3 Jun 1234) ASCELINA de Albini, daughter of ROBERT de Albini & his wife --- (-after [Jan] 1241).  The marriage of Asceline d’Aubigny, sister of Robert deceased, was granted to Amaury de Saint-Amand, to the use of Ralph de Saint-Amand his son, dated 3 Jun 1234[398].  Half of land formerly of Joan de Beauchamp in Eastcotts” was granted to “Ralph de St Amand...and Ascelina his wife, one of Joan’s heirs”, dated [Jan] 1241[399].  Ralph & his wife had one child: 

(1)       AMAURY [II] de Saint-Amand (-before 12 Nov 1285).  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Leicester, dated 1247, which include "villa de Sadington fuit terra Willelmi de Roulus, Normanni, et Paulinus Paiver tenet eam racione custodie heredis Radulfi filii Almarici de Sancto Amando..."[400].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Devon, dated 1249, which include "Almaricus filius Radulfi de Sancto Amando debet esse in custodia domini regis et Palinus Peyvre habet custodiam ipsius..."[401].  The Fine Rolls record the king’s waiver of debts of “predicti Radi patris sui” to "Almarico de Sancto Amando filio et heredi Radi de Sancto Amando" in 1257[402].  A writ dated 12 Nov "13 Edw I", after the death of "Emery (Almaricus) de Sancto Amando" names "Guy his son aged 17 at the feast of the Purification is his next heir"[403]m ---.  The name of Amaury’s wife is not known.  Amaury [II] & his wife had four children: 

(a)       GUY de Saint-Amand (2 Feb [1267/68]-before 28 Oct 1287).  A writ dated 12 Nov "13 Edw I", after the death of "Emery (Almaricus) de Sancto Amando" names "Guy his son aged 17 at the feast of the Purification is his next heir"[404]m LUCY, daughter of ---. 

(b)       AMAURY [III] de Saint-Amand (Mar 1269-29 Jul 1310).  He was summoned to parliament in 1311 whereby he is held to have become Lord St Amand.  A writ dated 31 Jul "4 Edw II", after the death of "Amaury de Sancto Amando" names "John his brother aged 30 […32…27…34] and more is his next heir"[405]m as her first husband, MARY, daughter of --- (-before 11 Apr 1333).  She married secondly John Peyvre Lord Peyvre

(c)       JOHN de Saint-Amand ([1276/83]-before 25 Jan 1330).  A writ dated 31 Jul "4 Edw II", after the death of "Amaury de Sancto Amando" names "John his brother aged 30 […32…27…34] and more is his next heir"[406].  He was summoned to parliament in 1313 whereby he is held to have become Lord St Amand.  A writ dated 25 Jan "4 Edw III", after the death of "John de Sancto Amando" names "Aymer his son aged 15 years on Ash Wednesday last […aged 16 on Tuesday before St Peter in Cathedra last] is his next heir"[407]m (Dec 1313 or after) MARGARET Le Despencer, daughter of HUGH Le Despencer [later Earl of Winchester] & his wife Isabel de Beauchamp. 

-         LORDS ST AMAND[408]

(d)       HAWISE de Saint-Amand (-before May 1287).  Confirmation of charters in favour of the canons of Christchurch Twynham, dated 27 Nov 1313, includes a charter under which "Simon de Monte Acuto, son and heir of Sir William de Monte Acuto" confirmed a conveyance made by "William de Monte Acuto" of the town of Pideleton, for the souls of "William his father, and Hawise wife of the said Simon" dated May 1287[409]m ([1270]) as his first wife, SIMON de Montagu, son of WILLIAM de Montagu & his wife Berthe --- (after 1250-26 Sep 1316, bur Bruton Priory).  He was summoned to parliament 29 Dec 1299, whereby he is held to have become Lord Montagu. 

 

 

 

SAY

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Sai in the present-day French département of Orne, arrondissement Argentan, canton Argentan[410]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         GEOFFREY [I] de Say (-after 1084).  The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, names "le sire de Saye" among those who took part in the conquest of England in 1066[411].  "…Eudo, Adam brother of Eudo…Richard de Meri, Geoffrey de Sai, Robert de Oilli" witnessed the charter dated 1084 under which William I King of England confirmed a donation by Roger de Albini to Lessay Holy Trinity[412]

 

2.         EUSTACHIA de Say .  "Osbertus filius Hugonis et mater eius Eustachia" notified that the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory had agreed a cemetery at Cotheridge by charter dated to [1140][413].  An undated charter of Henry II King of England records the foundation of Westwood priory, Worcestershire by “Osbertus filius Hugonis et Eustachia de Say mater sua”, witnessed by “Ricardo de Lucy…Bernardo de S. Walerico, Willielmo de Bello-campo[414].  Nothing is known about the parentage of Eustachia de Say.  Her second son, whose descendants are shown in Part B of this Chapter, adopted the name Say.  m HUGH FitzOsbern, son of OSBERN FitzRichard & his wife Nesta of Wales (-before 1140). 

 

 

1.         WILLIAM de Say (-[1155]).  Empress Matilda made various grants of property by charter dated to [1141/42] including a grant of lands "quæ fuerunt patris sui" to "Willelmus de Sai"[415].  He fought with his brother-in-law at the siege of Burwell Castle in Aug 1144.  A manuscript listing of the abbots of Ramsey names "Walterus abbas", noting that he suffered many trials "in tempore Willelmi de Say et Galfredi de Mandeville, qui apud Borewelle interfecti fuerunt"[416]Domesday Descendants cites a charter of St Neots which shows that William de Say survived his brother-in-law Geoffrey de Mandeville "by a few years"[417]m as her second husband, BEATRIX de Mandeville, divorced wife of HUGH [III] Talbot, daughter of WILLIAM de Mandeville & his wife Marguerite de Rie ([1105]-[Rickling, Essex] 19 Apr [1197 or before], bur Walden Abbey).  A manuscript listing property of Walden abbey states, quoting a charter of Stephen King of England dated 1147, that “sororem suam…Beatricem” (referring to "Galfridus Essexiæ comes") married "Hugoni Talebot" from whom she was divorced and secondly "Willielmo de Saye"[418].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Willelmum de Say…et mater sua Beatrix", dated to [1150/60][419].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records that “Beatrix de Mandavilla domina de Say, soror Galfridi primi, fundatoris, et amita Willielmi” succeeded her nephew[420].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Beatricia de Say…iiii.xx. annorum” and “terra sua de Riklinge[421].  She was the heiress of her nephew William de Mandeville Earl of Essex, her son by her second husband, Geoffrey, being allowed to occupy her place in view of her age[422].  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey records the death in 1200 of “Beatrix de Say, soror fundatoris nostri et uxor Willielmi de Say” and her burial in the abbey[423].  William & his wife had two children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Say of Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire and Saham, Norfolk (-before 1 Aug 1177).  The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Willielmus de Say…et Gaufridus frater eius” as the two sons of “Beatrix de Mandavilla domina de Say, soror Galfridi primi, fundatoris, et amita Willielmi[424].  The Chronicon Rameseiensis records the donations made by "Willelmum de Say…et mater sua Beatrix", dated to [1150/60][425].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Say ii m" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1161/62][426]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          BEATRICE de Say (-before 19 Apr 1197, bur Chicksand Priory)The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Beatricem” as daughter of “Willielmus de Say”, son of “Beatrix de Mandavilla domina de Say, soror Galfridi primi, fundatoris, et amita Willielmi” and adds that she married “domino Galfrido filio Petri[427]She died in childbirth.  "Gaufridus filius Petri comes Essex" donated property to Winchester St Swithin, for the anniversaries of "…Petri de Lutegareshale patris mei…et Mathildis matris mee…et sponsarum mearum Beatricis et Aveline et liberorum meorum" by  undated charter[428]m (before 25 Jan 1185) as his first wife, GEOFFREY FitzPiers, son of PIERS de Ludgershall & his wife Matilda --- (-14 Oct 1213, bur Shouldham Priory).  He was created Earl of Essex in 1199. 

ii)         MATILDA de Say (-[1222])The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matildam” as younger daughter of “Willielmum de Say”, adding that she married “Willielmus de Bokeland[429].  “Matildis de Say, filia Willielmi de Say” confirmed donations to Waldon abbey “post mortem Willielmi de Bocland domini mei” by undated charter[430].  Bracton lists a claim by "Matillis de Say" against "Willelmum de Mandeuilla comitem Essexie", dated 1218, for "medietatem manerii de Plesseto [Essex]…et…Enefend…in Middlesexia…" seised of "Willelmus de Say pater ipsius Matillidis et Beatrice matris ipsius Gaufridi"[431].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Matildis de Say” died in 1222[432], although it is not known with certainty that this refers to the wife of William de Boclande.  m WILLIAM de Bocland, of Buckland, Berkshire, son of HUGH de Bocland & his wife Matilda --- (-1216). 

b)         GEOFFREY [II] de Say ([1135 or before]-[1212/14])The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Willielmus de Say…et Gaufridus frater eius” as the two sons of “Beatrix de Mandavilla domina de Say, soror Galfridi primi, fundatoris, et amita Willielmi[433].  "…Gaufrido de Sai…" subscribed the charter dated to [1179] under which Henry II King of England confirmed a donation by "Robertus de Fay" to "comiti Willelmo de Maundevilla"[434]He had seizin of the inheritance of his first cousin William de Mandeville Earl of Essex, in right of his mother, until it passed to Geoffrey FitzPiers, the husband of his niece, who was the senior claimant.  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Galfridus de Say" among those granted delay in payment "per brevis" in Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire and in Essex, Hertfordshire[435]m firstly ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s first wife is not known.  According to the Complete Peerage, she was "Alice, widow of Ralph de Cahaines, daughter of Hugh Maminot"[436].  From a chronological point of view, this cannot be correct given Geoffrey’s estimated birth date as the marriages of Hugh Maminot’s two known daughters took place during the reign of King Henry I.  The statement was presumably an attempt to explain the transmission of property between the Maminot and Say families.  However, the property in question was inherited from Alice de Chesney, wife of Geoffrey [III] de Say (see below).  m secondly ALICE de Vere, daughter of AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford & his [third wife Agnes de Essex] (-after 1214)Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by a charter dated to [10 Aug 1197/8 Mar 1198] which records the confirmation by "Geoffrey de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of William de Say" of a grant of "the manor of Rikeling" made by "his said father to Geoffrey de Say, his own younger brother, whom his father had by Alice de Ver" on the petition of "William de Say his eldest brother"[437]Geoffrey [II] & his first wife had two children: 

i)          WILLIAM de Say (-[10 Aug 1197/1 Jan 1198])A charter dated to [10 Aug 1197/8 Mar 1198] records the confirmation by "Geoffrey de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of William de Say" of a grant of "the manor of Rikeling" made by "his said father to Geoffrey de Say, his own younger brother, whom his father had by Alice de Ver" on the petition of "William de Say his eldest brother"[438]m AUFRICA, illegitimate daughter of WILLIAM “the Lion” King of Scotland & his mistress ---.  The proofs relating to the claim to the Scottish throne in 1291 made by "Rogeri de Mundeville" name "Austrid" as one of the daughters of King William, adding that she married "in Ulvester cuidam Willo de Say"[439]William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       WILLIAM de SayThe proofs relating to the claim to the Scottish throne in 1291 made by "Rogeri de Mundeville" name "Willelmus" as the son of "Willo de Say" and his wife "Austrid"[440]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(1)       AUFRICA de SayThe proofs relating to the claim to the Scottish throne in 1291 made by "Rogeri de Mundeville" name "Austik…qui nupta fuit Roberto de Waudone" as the daughter of "Willelmus", son of "Willo de Say" and his wife "Austrid", and her daughter "Agatha cujus filius et heres est iste Rogerus"[441]m ROBERT Wardone, son of ---. 

ii)         GEOFFREY [III] de Say ([1155]-after 1214)A charter dated to [10 Aug 1197/8 Mar 1198] records the confirmation by "Geoffrey de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of William de Say" of a grant of "the manor of Rikeling" made by "his said father to Geoffrey de Say, his own younger brother, whom his father had by Alice de Ver" on the petition of "William de Say his eldest brother"[442]

-         see below

Geoffrey [II] & his second wife had one child: 

iii)        GEOFFREY [IV] de Say .  A charter dated to [10 Aug 1197/8 Mar 1198] records the confirmation by "Geoffrey de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of William de Say" of a grant of "the manor of Rikeling" made by "his said father to Geoffrey de Say, his own younger brother, whom his father had by Alice de Ver" on the petition of "William de Say his eldest brother"[443].  “Galfridus de Say, filius Galfridi de Say et Aliciæ de Ver, dominus de Rikelyng” donated property to Waldon abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “domino Willielmo de Mandevilla comite Essexiæ…[444]m ---.  The name of Geoffrey’s wife is not known.  Geoffrey [IV] & his wife had one child: 

(a)       MATILDA de Crec (-after 1278).  Her parentage is recorded in the Complete Peerage which states that in 1278 she held land in Nosterfield, Cambridgeshire from the Honor of Richmond, land which her paternal grandmother had held before[445]

 

 

GEOFFREY [III] de Say, son of GEOFFREY [II] de Say & his first wife --- ([1155]-after 1214).  A charter dated to [10 Aug 1197/8 Mar 1198] records the confirmation by "Geoffrey de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of William de Say" of a grant of "the manor of Rikeling" made by "his said father to Geoffrey de Say, his own younger brother, whom his father had by Alice de Ver" on the petition of "William de Say his eldest brother"[446].  “Geoffrey de Sai and…Geoffrey son of the said Geoffrey and of Aeliza de Kaisneio" donated the wood of "Pirariis" to the hospital at Drincourt, for the souls of "the said Aeliza de Kaisneio and of William her son and of William earl of Magnavilla”, by charter dated 1 Jan 1198 [O.S.?][447].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Say junior" holding 7 knights’ fees "de honore Patricii" in Kent in [1210/12][448].  "Galfr de Say" made a fine for "terris q fuerunt G. de Say patris sui" in Sussex and Middlesex, dated 1214[449]

m ([1175/80]) as her second husband, ALICE de Chesney, widow of HUGH de Periers, daughter of JOHN de Chesney & his wife Sibylla --- (-before 1198).  Her first marriage and family origin are confirmed by the charter dated 1175 under which [her first husband] "Hugo de Piris" donated the reversion of "manerium de Dudintuna post decessum uxoris meæ Aliziæ de Clemez" to the prior of Wenlock[450].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1180 under which [her second husband] “Geoffry de Say with the consent of Adelisa de Chemey my wife” donated "my manor of Dudintun which is the dower of the aforesaid Adelisa my wife on the part of Hugh de Piris" to Wenlock priory[451]

Geoffrey [III] & his wife had one child: 

1.         GEOFFREY [V] de Say ([1180/82]-Poitou 1230 before 26 Aug, bur Dover, Hospital of St Mary)Geoffrey de Sai and…Geoffrey son of the said Geoffrey and of Aeliza de Kaisneio" donated the wood of "Pirariis" to the hospital at Drincourt, for the souls of "the said Aeliza de Kaisneio and of William her son and of William earl of Magnavilla”, by charter dated 1 Jan 1198 [O.S.?][452].  The Complete Peerage quotes an undated charter under which "Galfridus de Say filius Galfridi de Say et Alicie de Cheinnei uxoris sue" confirmed the donation to Bermondsey of the advowson of Birling church made by Walkelin Maminot (see above) and later by "Geoffrey de Say", followed by another confirmation by "William de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of Geoffrey"[453].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Galfridus de Say" holding 27 knights’ fees "de baronia Walkelini Maminot" in Kent in [1210/12][454].  “Galfridus de Say filius Galfridi de Say et Alicie de Chemunei uxoris suæ” confirmed the donation of “advocationem ecclesiæ de Berlinges” to Bermondsey, made by “Walchelinus Maminoth predecessor meus...et pater meus Galfridus de Say”, by undated charter[455].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death in 1230 of “Gaufridus de Sey” and his burial “apud Dovere[456]m [firstly] (divorced) as her third husband, MARGARET de Briwere, widow firstly of EUDES [IV] de Dammartin and secondly of WILLIAM de la Ferté, daughter of WILLIAM de Briwere & his wife Beatrice --- (-1237).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Rogero de Clare et Alicie uxori eius" against "Margeria de Feritate" accusing her of selling assets "in dotem de hereditate ipsius Alicie in Essingham ad exhereditacionem ipsius Alicie", the defendant stating that changes were made by "Galfridus de Say viri sui" before their divorce, and that the damage was caused by "Odon Danmartin primi viri sui"[457].  Bracton records a claim, dated 1233, by "Hugo Wack" against "Margeriam de Feritate et Willelmum de Percy" relating to an agreement "cum Alicia de Moun et predicto Hugone" concerning share of land which was held by "Willelmi Briwere"[458].  [m secondly as her second husband, BEATRICE [de Turnham], widow of RALPH de Fay, daughter of [STEPHEN de Turnham & his wife ---] (-after 1227).  Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Thomas de Bauelingeham…et Mabilia uxore sua…primogenita filia et heres Stephani de Thurneham" against "Beatriciam de Say…postnata", the defendant claiming that "Radulfus de Fay quondam vir suus" did service to "Dom. Galfrido de Say" for the land[459].  The wording of this document suggests, but does not state explicitly, that Beatrice was the younger sister of Mabilia.  If that is correct, presumably she was the wife of a Say, maybe the wife of Geoffrey [V] after the death of her first husband.]  Geoffrey [V] & his [first wife] had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Say (-before 12 Feb 1272).  The Complete Peerage quotes an undated charter under which "Galfridus de Say filius Galfridi de Say et Alicie de Cheinnei uxoris sue" confirmed the donation to Bermondsey of the advowson of Birling church made by Walkelin Maminot (see above), and cites a later confirmation by "William de Say, son of Geoffrey, son of Geoffrey"[460].  No proof has yet been found about the identity of William’s mother.  "Upon the death of Geoffrey de Say…William de Say his son and heir" paid homage to the king "for all that Geoffrey held of the king in chief" [in Bedfordshire], dated [Sep] 1230[461].  "Willelmus de Sai filius Galfredi de Sai" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Berlinges" to Bermondsey made by "Walkelinus Maminoth predecessor meus et Galfridus de Sai avus meus…et Galfridus de Sai pater meus", for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Sibille", by undated charter[462].  A writ dated 12 Feb "56 Hen III", after the death of "William de Sey" names "William de Say his son age variously stated as 18 on the feast of St Edmund the King last, and 19 on the same feast, is his heir"[463]m firstly SIBYLLA, daughter of --- (-after Oct 1250).  "Willelmus de Sai filius Galfredi de Sai" confirmed the donation of "ecclesiam de Berlinges" to Bermondsey made by "Walkelinus Maminoth predecessor meus et Galfridus de Sai avus meus…et Galfridus de Sai pater meus", for the souls of "mee et uxoris mee Sibille", by undated charter[464]m secondly as her first husband, MARY, daughter of --- (-after 10 Aug 1280).  She married secondly (before 12 May 1273) as his first wife, Robert de Ufford.  William & his [first] wife had one child.  As William’s second wife had children by her second husband, the chronology suggests that William’s son William must have been born from his first marriage, but this is not beyond all doubt: 

i)          WILLIAM de Say (20 Nov 1253-16 Sep 1295 or before).  A writ dated 12 Feb "56 Hen III", after the death of "William de Sey" names "William de Say his son age variously stated as 18 on the feast of St Edmund the King last, and 19 on the same feast, is his heir"[465]m ELIZABETH, daughter of --- (-after 1295).  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       GEOFFREY de Say ([1278/81]-before 3 Mar 1322).  He was summoned to parliament 1313/21, whereby he is held to have become Lord Say

-         see below

 

 

 

B.      LORDS SAY

 

 

GEOFFREY de Say, ([1278/81]-before 3 Mar 1322).  He was summoned to parliament 1313/21, whereby he is held to have become Lord Saym IDONIA de Leyburn, daughter of WILLIAM de Leyburn Lord Leyburn & his wife Juliane de Sandwich. 

Geoffrey & his wife had children: 

1.         GEOFFREY de Say ([1305]-26 Jun 1359)Lord Saym [as her first husband,] MATILDA de Beauchamp, of GUY de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Alice de Tosny (-28 Jul 1369, bur London Dominican Church).  The will of "Guy de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 28 Jul 1316, bequeathed property to "Alice my wife...Maud my daughter...Elizabeth my daughter...Thomas my son...John my son"[466]The will of "Dame Maud...late the wife of Sir Geoffrey Say", dated 30 Oct 1369, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Preachers of London, near Edmond my loving husband”, bequeathed property to “my son William de Say...John my son...[467].  It is unclear in this document whether “Edmond my loving husband” represents an error for Geoffrey or whether the testator had married a second time after the death of her first husband.  [She married secondly Edmund ---.]  Geoffrey & his wife had children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Say (Birling 17 Jun 1340-before 7 Aug 1375)Lord Say.  The will of "Dame Maud...late the wife of Sir Geoffrey Say", dated 30 Oct 1369, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Preachers of London, near Edmond my loving husband”, bequeathed property to “my son William de Say...John my son...[468]m BEATRICE de Brewes, daughter of THOMAS de Brewes Lord Brewes & his wife Beatrice Mortimer.  William & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN de Say ([1373]-27 Jul 1382).  Lord Say

ii)         ELIZABETH de Say (-8 Jul 1399).  Baroness Say, Baroness Leyburn.  The will of "William Heron", dated 30 Oct 1404, chose burial “in the church of that parish where I may depart this life”, instructed “feoffees of the lands of Brewose which fell to Elizabeth Lady Say my wife by inheritance [to] deliver [them] to her next heir on the side of the Brewose family[469]m firstly ([27 Jul/26 Sep] 1382) Sir JOHN de Falvesle of Fawsley, Northamptonshire, son of --- (-before Nov 1393).  m secondly (before 13 Nov 1393) Sir WILLIAM Heron, son of Sir JOHN Heron of Eppledon, co. Durham & his wife --- (-30 Oct 1404). 

b)         JOHN de Say (-after 30 Oct 1369).  The will of "Dame Maud...late the wife of Sir Geoffrey Say", dated 30 Oct 1369, chose burial “in the church of the Friars Preachers of London, near Edmond my loving husband”, bequeathed property to “my son William de Say...John my son...[470]

 

 

 

C.      SAY of CLUN, SHROPSHIRE

 

 

1.         ROBERT de Say "Picot" (-after 1086).  A charter dated to 1060 records the transactions of "Roberto de Sayo qui cognominabatur Ficot et Adaloye uxori…et…Roberto et Henrico filiis suis" with the monastery of Saint-Martin de Sees in Normandy, signed by "Rogeri comitis, Picot, Roberti filii eius, Henrici filii Picot, Adeloye uxoris Picot"[471].  "…Picotum vicecomitem…" witnessed the charter under which William I King of England confirmed the rights of Ely abbey[472]"…Ivonem Taillebois, Petrum de Valoines, Picotem vicecomitem, Ticlum de Helum, Hugonem de Hosdeng" witnessed the charter dated to [1080] under which William I King of England confirmed the customs of Ely monastery[473].  Orderic Vitalis records that “V Kal Mar” in 1083 “Rogerius comes” declared to “Guarinum vicecomitem et Picotem de Saia cæterosque proceres suos” his intention of founding the abbey of Saint-Pierre[474].  Domesday records 27 manors in Shropshire held by "Picot", including Clun[475]m ADELAIS, daughter of ---.  A charter dated to 1060 records the transactions of "Roberto de Sayo qui cognominabatur Ficot et Adaloye uxori…et…Roberto et Henrico filiis suis" with the monastery of Saint-Martin de Sees in Normandy, signed by "Rogeri comitis, Picot, Roberti filii eius, Henrici filii Picot, Adeloye uxoris Picot"[476].  Robert & his wife had two children: 

a)         ROBERT de Say .  A charter dated to 1060 records the transactions of "Roberto de Sayo qui cognominabatur Ficot et Adaloye uxori…et…Roberto et Henrico filiis suis" with the monastery of Saint-Martin de Sees in Normandy, signed by "Rogeri comitis, Picot, Roberti filii eius, Henrici filii Picot, Adeloye uxoris Picot"[477]

b)         HENRY de Say (-after [1129/30]).  A charter dated to 1060 records the transactions of "Roberto de Sayo qui cognominabatur Ficot et Adaloye uxori…et…Roberto et Henrico filiis suis" with the monastery of Saint-Martin de Sees in Normandy, signed by "Rogeri comitis, Picot, Roberti filii eius, Henrici filii Picot, Adeloye uxoris Picot"[478]

c)         [ELIAS de Say (-1160 or before).  Eyton suggests that Elias was the son of Henry de Say but he cites no primary source which suggests that this might be the case[479].  According to Domesday Descendants, Henry was "brother and successor" [1140] of Henry de Say of Clun[480].  Lord of Clun, Shropshire.  "…Brianum de Jai et Heliam patrem eius…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[481].]  m ---.  The name of Elias’s wife is not known.  Elias & his wife had two children: 

i)          BRIAN de Say .  "…Brianum de Jai et Heliam patrem eius…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[482]

ii)         ISABEL de Say (-[1199][483]).  “Willielmus de Boterell” confirmed the donation, for the soul of “Willielmi filii mei”, by “domina Isabella de Say uxor mea” of the church of St George, Clun to Wenlock Priory, by undated charter witnessed by “Brientio de Say…Hugone Peverell…[484]m firstly ([1153/54]) as his second wife, WILLIAM FitzAlan, son of ALAN FitzFlaald & his [second] wife Aveline d'Hesdin (-1160).  m secondly ([1160/66]) as his second wife, GEOFFREY de Vere, son of AUBREY de Vere & his wife Adelisa [Alice] de Clare (-1170).  Lord of Clun and Oswestry, Shropshire.  Sheriff of Shropshire 1167 to 1170[485]m thirdly ([1171]) as his first wife, WILLIAM Boterel [II] of Cornwall, son of WILLIAM Boterel [I] & his wife Alice Corbet (-[1211]). 

 

 

 

D.      SAY (FITZHUGH)

 

 

Hugh de Say [I] adopted the name Say from his mother’s family, as can be seen for example in the [1172/85] charter which is quoted below. 

 

 

HUGH de Say [I], son of HUGH FitzOsbern & his wife Eustachia de Say (-1190).  “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter[486].  "Osbertus filius Hugonis" confirmed the settlement of his dispute with the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory concerning the boundaries of their woods at Cornwood by charter dated to [1170], witnessed by "Hugone de Sai fratre meo…"[487].  "Osbern fitz Hugh" donated a virgate at Richard’s Castle to Haughmond Abbey by charter dated to [1172/85], witnessed by "Walter de Clifford, Walter his son, Hugh de Say and Lucie his wife"[488].  “Walterus de Clifford” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, for the souls of "uxoris meæ Margaretæ de Clifford et filiæ nostræ Rosamundæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Osbertus filius Hugonis, Hugo de Sey…"[489].  "Osbern de Say and…his brother Hugh" confirmed a charter of Baldwin Bishop of Worcester, dated to after Aug 1180[490]

m as her first husband, LUCY, daughter of WALTER Clifford & his wife Margaret ---.  "Hugh de Say and Lucia his wife, daughter of Walter de Clifford, son of Richard fitz Poncius" donated the mill of Rocheforde to Haughmond Abbey by undated charter, witnessed by "Walter de Clifford de Clifford junior, Richard de Clifford his brother", later confirmed by "Walter de Clifford, son of Walter, son of Richard fitz Poncius" who names Hugh de Say’s wife as his sister, witnessed by "Hugh de Say and Richard de Clifford"[491].  “Osbertus filius Hugonis” donated property to Godstow nunnery in Oxfordshire, at the request of “domini Walteri de Clifford” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[492].  "Osbern fitz Hugh" donated a virgate at Richard’s Castle to Haughmond Abbey by charter dated to [1172/85], witnessed by "Walter de Clifford, Walter his son, Hugh de Say and Lucie his wife"[493].  She married secondly Bartholomew de Mortimer.  "Lucia de Say daughter of Walter de Clifford" donated land in Rocheforde to Haughmond Abbey, with the consent of "her son Hugh de Say", by undated charter, witnessed by "Hugh de Say, Walter de Clifford", but later released claims of the abbey to land in Rochford with the consent of "Bartholomew de Mortimer her husband"[494]

Hugh & his wife had three children: 

1.         HUGH de Say [II] ([1165/70]-killed in battle ([1196]).  "Lucia de Say daughter of Walter de Clifford" donated land in Rocheforde to Haughmond Abbey, with the consent of "her son Hugh de Say", by undated charter, witnessed by "Hugh de Say, Walter de Clifford"[495].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Hugo de Say" paying "xxiii l, xxiii milites" in Herefordshire, and granted delay to pay in Berkshire[496]m as her first husband, MABEL, daughter of ROBERT [IV] Marmion & his wife ---.  She married secondly (before Mar 1200) Reginald ---.  Hugh & his wife had one child: 

a)         MARGERY de Say ([1190/96]-1230).  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.   Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166 (but added later), record that "Robertus de Mortuo mari" held 23 knights’ fees "in honore Castelli Ricardi" with "filia Hugonis de Say hærede Osberti filii Hugonis" in Herefordshire[497].  The sheriff of Essex was ordered to cause "Margaret de Say, who was the wife of Robert de Mortimer" to have "the rightful dower of the lands formerly of Robert her former husband", dated to [Jul] 1219[498].  "Margareta de Say filia Hugonis de Sai, quondam uxor Roberti de Mortuomari" quitclaimed to the monks of Worcester Cathedral priory certain services due to her from their manor of Boraston by charter dated 1219[499].  Henry III King of England consented to the marriage of "Margaretam que fuit uxor Roberti de Mortuo Mari" and "Willelmus de Stutevill" dated 23 Nov 1219[500].  "William de Stuteville" paid a fine to marry "Margaret who was the wife of Robert de Mortimer", dated to [Nov] 1219[501].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1230 of “Margerie de Say[502].  Inquisitiones dated 20 May 1259 record that "William de Scoteville" held the manors of Wychbold and Cotheridge in Worcestershire from "Margery his wife" and name "Sir Hugh de Mortuo Mari son of the said Margery" as her next heir and of full age[503]m firstly (1197 or after) HUGH de Ferrers of Lechlade, son of WALKELIN de Ferrers & his wife --- (-1204).  m secondly ([6 May 1209/Jun 1211]) ROBERT de Mortimer, son of ROGER [III] de Mortimer & his [second] wife Isabel de Ferrers (-before [Jul] 1219).  m thirdly (Royal licence 23 Nov 1219) WILLIAM de Stuteville, son of WILLIAM de Stuteville & his wife --- (-before 20 May 1259). 

2.         RICHARD de Say of Rochford (-after 1200).  "Richard de Say" donated property at Givele to Montacute priory, to keep the anniversary of "the lady Lucy the grantor’s mother", by undated charter which names "his brother Sir Gilbert"[504]

3.         GILBERT de Say (-after 1210).  "Richard de Say" donated property at Givele to Montacute priory, to keep the anniversary of "the lady Lucy the grantor’s mother", by undated charter which names "his brother Sir Gilbert"[505].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Gilbertus de Say" holding one knight’s fee "in Givele" in Dorset, Somerset in [1210/12][506]m MATILDA de Clivedon, daughter of MATTHEW de Clivedon & his wife --- de Montagu (-after 1223).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a claim dated 1223, noted by Bracton, by "Willelmus filius Drogonis de Monte Acuto…infra etatem" against "Matheum de Cliuedona" for "ecclesiam de Suttona…advocacionem", the defendant claiming that "Willelmus de Monte Acuto avus predicti Willelmi" gave the advocacy to "Gilberto de Say in…maritagium cum Matillide nepte sua filia eiusdem Mathei"[507]

 

 

Two siblings, parents not identified: 

1.         HUGH de Say (-before 1287). 

2.         ORABILIA de Say (-after 1287).  "Orabilla soror et heres domini Hugonis Say uxor quondam Reginaldi de Warennia" donated property "in territorio ville de Kyntulach", previously held by "prefato Hugone Say fratre meo", to Scone Abbey by charter dated 1287[508]m REGINALD de Warenne, son of --- (-before 1287). 

 

 

 

SCROPE

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         WALTER Scrope"Walter le Scrope" witnessed a dated charter, dated to the reign of King Henry I, under which "Walter de Gant" donated land to Bridlington priory[509]"…Walter Scrop…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Agnes daughter of Ernald de Marton in her widowhood…" donated property to Bridlington priory[510]

 

2.         HUGH Scrope .  An undated charter (dated to before 1156) of “Gilbertus de Gaunt comes Lincolniæ” confirmed property of Bridlington priory including in “Baemburgh…servitium Hugonis Escrop…” for the souls of "uxoris suæ Margaretæ et…Rosamundæ filiæ suæ", with the consent of "Hugonis fratris mei", by undated charter witnessed by "Waltero de Clifford, Ricardo filio suo et Lucia filia sua…"[511]

 

3.         SIMON Scrope .  "Simon de Scrope" witnessed an undated charter (dated to before 1156) under which "Gilbert de Gand" granted land to "William FitzRoger"[512].  [A charter of King Edward II dated 7 Mar 1312 confirmed property of Bridlington priory including the donation of land "in Flotemanbi" made by "Simon Escro"[513].  It is not known which Simon Scrope made this donation.] 

 

 

1.         RICHARD Scrope of Barton, Lincolnshire (-before 1166)m AGNES de Clare, daughter of RICHARD FitzGilbert de Clare & his wife Agnes [Alicia] of Chester.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to [1184/85] under which “Aliz de Gant comitissa filia Gilberti de Gant” confirmed land held by his ancestors in Barton (upon-Humber) to “Roberto Scrop de Barton, filio Ricardi Scrop et filio Agnetis matertere mee[514].  Richard & his wife had [five] children: 

a)         ROBERT de Scrope (-Acre 1190).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights’ fees held from "Robertus de Scrupa" in Gloucestershire[515].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Scrope i militem…feodati comitis Sy[monis]" in Lincolnshire in 1166[516].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Scrope xl s" in Gloucestershire in [1167/68][517].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Escrope xl s" in Gloucestershire in [1171/72][518].  “Aliz de Gant comitissa filia Gilberti de Gant” confirmed land held by his ancestors in Barton (upon-Humber) to “Roberto Scrop de Barton, filio Ricardi Scrop et filio Agnetis matertere mee” by charter dated to [1184/85], witnessed by “…Hugone Scrop, Jocelino Scrop, Ricardo decano, Johanne Scrop…[519]m ---.  The name of Robert’s wife is not known.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

i)          WALTER Scrope .  His parentage is confirmed by a writ dated 12 Dec "33 Edw I", after the death of his descendant "Joice le Scrop"[520]

b)         [HUGH Scrope (-after [1184/85]).  “Aliz de Gant comitissa filia Gilberti de Gant” confirmed land held by his ancestors in Barton (upon-Humber) to “Roberto Scrop de Barton, filio Ricardi Scrop et filio Agnetis matertere mee” by charter dated to [1184/85], witnessed by “…Hugone Scrop, Jocelino Scrop, Ricardo decano, Johanne Scrop…[521].] 

c)         [JOSCELIN Scrope (-after [1184/85]).  “Aliz de Gant comitissa filia Gilberti de Gant” confirmed land held by his ancestors in Barton (upon-Humber) to “Roberto Scrop de Barton, filio Ricardi Scrop et filio Agnetis matertere mee” by charter dated to [1184/85], witnessed by “…Hugone Scrop, Jocelino Scrop, Ricardo decano, Johanne Scrop…[522].] 

d)         [RICHARD Scrope (-after [1184/85]).  “Aliz de Gant comitissa filia Gilberti de Gant” confirmed land held by his ancestors in Barton (upon-Humber) to “Roberto Scrop de Barton, filio Ricardi Scrop et filio Agnetis matertere mee” by charter dated to [1184/85], witnessed by “…Hugone Scrop, Jocelino Scrop, Ricardo decano, Johanne Scrop…[523].] 

e)         [JOHN Scrope (-after [1184/85]).  “Aliz de Gant comitissa filia Gilberti de Gant” confirmed land held by his ancestors in Barton (upon-Humber) to “Roberto Scrop de Barton, filio Ricardi Scrop et filio Agnetis matertere mee” by charter dated to [1184/85], witnessed by “…Hugone Scrop, Jocelino Scrop, Ricardo decano, Johanne Scrop…[524].] 

 

2.         RICHARD de Scrope (-after 1194).  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Richardus de Scrupis" paying "xxx s, iii milites" in Gloucestershire[525].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Ricardus de Escropes" paying "lx s, iii milites" in Gloucestershire, also paying in Berkshire[526]

 

 

Four brothers, parents not yet identified: 

1.         PHILIP Scrope (-before Mar 1206).  "…Philippo Escrop…Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[527].  "Philip Escrop" acknowledged holding land in Flotemanby from Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Robert Escrop and Simon the grantor’s brothers…"[528]m firstly GRACE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Alice Escrop formerly wife of Ivo son of Walter de Staxton in her widowhood" issued a quitclaim to Bridlington priory respecting land at Flotemanby "which Grecia wife of Philip Escrop sometime held"[529]m secondly ALICE, daughter of --- (-after Mar 1206).  A fine dated Mar 1206 records an agreement between "Matilda and Alice daughters of Philip Escrop pet. and Simon Escrop ten." respecting land at Flotemanby, under which Simon paid money to Matilda, Alice and "Alice their mother"[530].  Philip & his second wife had two children: 

a)         MATILDA Scrope .  "Matilda and Alice her sister" granted land at Flotemanby to "Simon Scrop patrui nostro" with the service of "William Scrop of Barton" by undated charter[531].  A fine dated Mar 1206 records an agreement between "Matilda and Alice daughters of Philip Escrop pet. and Simon Escrop ten." respecting land at Flotemanby[532].  "Thomas de Willardby and Matilda his wife" issued a quitclaim to "Henry Lescorp son of Simon Lescorp patrui nostri" relating to land in Flotemanby formerly held by "Philip Le Scrop pater noster" from Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Walter Escrop…"[533].  "Thomas son of Adelard de Willar[by] and Matilda Escrop his wife" granted land "which Philip de Escrop sometime held in the territory of Willard[by]" by undated charter[534]m (after Mar 1206) THOMAS de Willardby, son of ADELARD de Willardby & his wife --. 

b)         ALICE Scrope .  "Matilda and Alice her sister" granted land at Flotemanby to "Simon Scrop patrui nostro" with the service of "William Scrop of Barton" by undated charter[535].  A fine dated Mar 1206 records an agreement between "Matilda and Alice daughters of Philip Escrop pet. and Simon Escrop ten." respecting land at Flotemanby, under which Simon paid money to Matilda, Alice and "Alice their mother"[536].  "Ivo de Willardby and Alice his wife" issued a quitclaim to "Henry Lescorp son of Simon Lescorp patrui nostri" relating to land in Flotemanby formerly held by "Philip Le Scrop pater noster" from Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Walter Escrop…"[537].  "Ivo son of Walter de Staxton and Alice Escrop his wife" granted land at Willardby to Bridlington priory by undated charter[538].  "Alice Escrop formerly wife of Ivo son of Walter de Staxton in her widowhood" issued a quitclaim to Bridlington priory respecting land at Flotemanby "which Grecia wife of Philip Escrop sometime held" by undated charter[539]m (after Mar 1206) IVO de Staxton, son of WALTER de Staxton & his wife ---. 

2.         ROBERT Scrope .  "Philip Escrop" acknowledged holding land in Flotemanby from Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Robert Escrop and Simon the grantor’s brothers…"[540]

3.         SIMON Scrope (-after Mar 1206).  "…Philippo Escrop…Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[541].  "Philip Escrop" acknowledged holding land in Flotemanby from Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Robert Escrop and Simon the grantor’s brothers…"[542].  "Matilda and Alice her sister" granted land at Flotemanby to "Simon Scrop patrui nostro" with the service of "William Scrop of Barton" by undated charter[543].  A fine dated Mar 1206 records an agreement between "Matilda and Alice daughters of Philip Escrop pet. and Simon Escrop ten." respecting land at Flotemanby[544]"Simon Scrop de Flotemanbi et Ingoliana uxor eius" granted land in Wenslay to "Henrico filio nostro et heredi" by undated charter[545]m INGOLIANA, daughter of ---.  "Simon Scrop de Flotemanbi et Ingoliana uxor eius" granted land in Wenslay to "Henrico filio nostro et heredi" by undated charter[546]Simon & his wife had one child: 

a)         HENRY Scrope (-bur Wenslay).  "Simon Scrop de Flotemanbi et Ingoliana uxor eius" granted land in Wenslay to "Henrico filio nostro et heredi" by undated charter[547]"Thomas de Willardby and Matilda his wife" issued a quitclaim to "Henry Lescorp son of Simon Lescorp patrui nostri" relating to land in Flotemanby formerly held by "Philip Le Scrop pater noster" from Bridlington priory by undated charter, witnessed by "…Walter Escrop…"[548].  "Henry son of Simon Scrop" issued a quitclaim to Bridlington priory respecting land at Flotemanby "which Grecia wife of Philip Scrop sometime held…[and] which Simon Scrop his father sometime [held]" by undated charter[549].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Gloucestershire, dated to [1211/13]: "Henricus de Scrupes" held "Wythington in dominico…regi"[550].  "Henricus Esscropp et Giliana uxor eius" donated land "de Northfiling" to Whitby by undated charter[551]m JULIANA, daughter of ROGER de Brun & his wife ---.  "Henricus Esscropp et Giliana uxor eius" donated land "de Northfiling" to Whitby by undated charter[552].  "Rogerus de Brun de Thorentona…consensu Ysabellæ uxoris meæ" confirmed the donation of land "de Northfiling" to Whitby made by "Henricus de Escrop et Juliana uxor sua, filia mea" by undated charter[553].  Henry & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM Scrope (-before 1 Feb 1312)"Willelmus le Skrop" confirmed a donation to Rievaulx made by "Reginaldi Chubbe et Ymanyæ uxoris suæ" by undated charter[554]

-         see below

4.         HUGH Scrope .  "…Philippo Escrop…Simone Escrop, Hugone fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th Century under which "Hugo de Nevilla" granted land at Lound near Bourne, Lincolnshire held by "Baldwinus de Saint Omer quam dedit comes Simon Alano fratri meo et post mortem predicti Alani michi confirmavit" to "Tome Peuerel"[555]

 

 

The parentage of Gilbert Scrope has not been ascertained but his close connection with the family is confirmed by the reference to Flotemanby in the source which is quoted below. 

1.         GILBERT Scropem ---.  The name of Gilbert’s wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM Scrope .  "Willelmus Scrop filius Gilberti Scrop" confirmed donations to Rievaulx of land "de Flotemanby super Waldik" made by "Symonis de Scrop de Flotemanby"[556]

 

 

WILLIAM Scrope, son of HENRY Scrope & his wife Juliana de Brun (-before 1 Feb 1312)"Willelmus le Skrop" confirmed a donation to Rievaulx made by "Reginaldi Chubbe et Ymanyæ uxoris suæ" by undated charter[557]

m CONSTANCE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1 Jan 1334 under which her son "Dominum Henricum le Scrop militem advocatum Abbathie sancte Agathe" donated property to Easby abbey, for the souls of "Willi le Scrop et Co’stancie uxoris eiusdem Willi patris et matris predicti domini Henrici…"[558].  Nicholas suggests that her father was Thomas, son of Gillo de Newsom, whose daughter Constance was heiress of lands in Newsom-upon-Tyne which were inherited by William Scrope’s son Henry Scrope[559]

William & his wife had four children: 

1.         HENRY Scrope (-7 Sep 1336, bur Easby Abbey).  "Dominum Henricum le Scrop militem advocatum Abbathie sancte Agathe" donated property to Easby abbey, for the souls of "Willi le Scrop et Co’stancie uxoris eiusdem Willi patris et matris predicti domini Henrici…et…heredum dicti domini Henrici et Margarete uxoris eius…et…domini Galfri le Scrop et Ivette uxoris eius…domini Henrici de Lasci quondam comitis Lincoln", by charter dated 1 Jan 1334[560]The Inquisitions dated 1336 confirm the death 7 Sep of "Henricus le Scrop" and name "Willielmo filio eiusdem Henrici…[…ætatis sexdecim annorum]…Stephano fratri eiusdem Willielmi"[561]m MARGARET, daughter of --- (-17 Oct 1357).  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1 Jan 1334 under which her husband "Dominum Henricum le Scrop militem advocatum Abbathie sancte Agathe" donated property to Easby abbey, for the souls of "…heredum dicti domini Henrici et Margarete uxoris eius…"[562].  Nicholas suggests that she was the daughter of "Lord FitzWalter" on the basis of "the effigies of the Scrope family in Wenslay church" where the arms of Henry Scrope are impaled with those of FitzWalter[563].  Henry & his wife had three children: 

a)         WILLIAM Scrope ([1320])-17 Nov 1344, bur Easby Abbey).  The Inquisitions dated 1336 confirm the death 7 Sep of "Henricus le Scrop" and name "Willielmo filio eiusdem Henrici…[…ætatis sexdecim annorum]…Stephano fratri eiusdem Willielmi"[564]The Inquisitions dated 1344 confirm the death 17 Nov of "Willielmus filius Henrici le Scrope…sine herede masculo" and name "Ricardus le Scrope frater predicti Willielmi…heres et etatis 17 annorum…Stephano fratri eiusdem Wilielmi defuncto"[565]m as her first husband, CECILY, daughter of ---.  Nicholas states that "the impalement of his [William Scrope’s] arms on his effigy in Wenslay church tends to prove that her name was Roos"[566].  She married secondly (before 23 Oct 1345) John de Clopton.  "The manors of East and West Bolton" were assigned in dower to "Ceceilie quæ fuit uxor Willielmi Lescrop defuncti quam Johannes de Clopton duxit in uxorem" within two years of the death of William Scrope[567]

b)         STEPHEN Scrope (-before 1344).  The Inquisitions dated 1336 confirm the death 7 Sep of "Henricus le Scrop" and name "Willielmo filio eiusdem Henrici…[…ætatis sexdecim annorum]…Stephano fratri eiusdem Willielmi"[568]The Inquisitions dated 1344 confirm the death 17 Nov of "Willielmus filius Henrici le Scrope…sine herede masculo" and name "Ricardus le Scrope frater predicti Willielmi…heres et etatis 17 annorum…Stephano fratri eiusdem Wilielmi defuncto"[569]

c)         RICHARD Scrope of Bolton, Wensleydale, Yorkshire ([1326/27]-30 May 1403, bur Easby Abbey)The Inquisitions dated 1344 confirm the death 17 Nov of "Willielmus filius Henrici le Scrope…sine herede masculo" and name "Ricardus le Scrope frater predicti Willielmi…heres et etatis 17 annorum…Stephano fratri eiusdem Wilielmi defuncto"[570].  He was summoned to Parliament from 1370 whereby he is held to have become Lord Scrope (of Bolton).  The Inquisitions dated 1344 confirm the death 17 Nov of "Willielmus filius Henrici le Scrope…sine herede masculo" and name "Ricardus le Scrope frater predicti Willielmi…heres et etatis 17 annorum…Stephano fratri eiusdem Wilielmi defuncto"[571].  He was summoned to Parliament from 1370 whereby he is held to have become Lord Scrope (of Bolton). 

-        see below

2.         GEOFFREY Scrope ([before 1285]-Gent Dec 1340, bur Coverham Abbey)

-        LORDS SCROPE (of Masham)[572]

3.         STEPHEN Scrope .  "Stephen le Scrope" transferred his manor of West Bolton to "his brother Sir Henry le Scrope" by undated charter[573]

4.         daughter .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated to [1300] under which "his uncle Sir Henry le Scrope" confirmed a grant of "the Hermitage" to "Harsculphus de Cleseby"[574]m WILLIAM de Cleseby of Marske, son of ---. 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS SCROPE (of Bolton)

 

 

RICHARD Scrope of Bolton, Wensleydale, Yorkshire ([1326/27]-30 May 1403, bur Easby Abbey)The Inquisitions dated 1344 confirm the death 17 Nov of "Willielmus filius Henrici le Scrope…sine herede masculo" and name "Ricardus le Scrope frater predicti Willielmi…heres et etatis 17 annorum…Stephano fratri eiusdem Wilielmi defuncto"[575].  He was summoned to Parliament from 1370 whereby he is held to have become Lord Scrope (of Bolton).  The testament of "Ricus Lescrop Dns de Bolton", dated 2 Aug 1401, chooses burial "in Mon Abbie sancte Agathe jux Richemond", bequeathes property to "Rogero filio meo…et heredi…Stephano Lescrop filio meo…Isabelle…filie mee…Margarete filie mee uxori Rogeri Lescrop filii mei…Milicente…filie mee…domino Stephano Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Archiepo Ebor…filio meo…domino Henrico Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Henri Fitz Hugh consanguineo meo…"[576]

m (before 21 Feb 1352) BLANCHE de la Pole, daughter of WILLIAM de la Pole & his wife Catherine de Norwich (-after 1378).  Michael de la Pole miles, dominus de Wingfeild” founded Kingston-upon-Hull priory, for the souls of “…Blanchiæ sororis nostræ nuper uxoris…domini Richardi le Scrop…”, by charter dated 18 Feb 1378[577]

Richard & his wife had children: 

1.         ROGER Le Scrope (-3 Dec 1403, bur Easby).  The testament of "Ricus Lescrop Dns de Bolton", dated 2 Aug 1401, bequeathes property to "Rogero filio meo…et heredi…Stephano Lescrop filio meo…Isabelle…filie mee…Margarete filie mee uxori Rogeri Lescrop filii mei…Milicente…filie mee…domino Stephano Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Archiepo Ebor…filio meo…domino Henrico Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Henri Fitz Hugh consanguineo meo…"[578]Lord Scrope (of Bolton).  The will of "Roger Scrope Lord of Bolton", dated 23 Sep 1403, chose burial “in the abbey of St Agatha near Richmond”, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...and in case Richard the son of Richard Lord Grey of Wilton and Shurland shall not consummate the marriage between Maud my daughter and him when he shall attain the age of 14 years...[579]m (before 23 Nov 1385) as her first husband, MARGARET Tibetot, daughter of ROBERT Tibetot Lord Tibetot & his wife Margaret Deincourt (-[13 Apr/14 May] 1431).  The testament of "Ricus Lescrop Dns de Bolton", dated 2 Aug 1401, bequeathes property to "Rogero filio meo…et heredi…Stephano Lescrop filio meo…Isabelle…filie mee…Margarete filie mee uxori Rogeri Lescrop filii mei…Milicente…filie mee…domino Stephano Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Archiepo Ebor…filio meo…domino Henrico Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Henri Fitz Hugh consanguineo meo…"[580]She married secondly ([1405/06]) John Niandser [Nixandser].  The will of "Lady Margaret Scrope wife of Sir Roger Le Scrope Knight and daughter of Robert Lord Tiptoft", dated 13 Apr 1431, proved 14 May 1431, chose burial “in the church of the Holy Trinity, Christ Church, London”, and appointed “Thomas Scrope my son and Guy Fairfax” as executors[581]Roger & his wife had three children: 

a)         RICHARD Le Scrope (31 May 1394-29 Aug 1420).  The will of "Roger Scrope Lord of Bolton", dated 23 Sep 1403, chose burial “in the abbey of St Agatha near Richmond”, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...and in case Richard the son of Richard Lord Grey of Wilton and Shurland shall not consummate the marriage between Maud my daughter and him when he shall attain the age of 14 years...[582]Lord Scrope (of Bolton).  The will of "Richard Scrope Knight Lord of Bolton", dated 24 Jan 1420, proved 8 Nov 1420, chose burial “in the abbey of St Agatha in Richmondshire”, bequeathed property to “my kinsman Mr Marmaduke Lumley...my cousin[583]m (before 31 Dec 1413) as her first husband, MARGARET Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his first wife Margaret Stafford of the Earls of Stafford (-[4 Mar 1463/3 Mar 1464], bur Clare, Suffolk, Church of the Austin Friars).  A mid-15th century manuscript names "Matillidem dominam de Maulay, Alesiam uxorem Thome Gray, Philippam dominam de Dacre, Johannem, Elizabetham minorissam, Annam uxorem Gilberti Vmfraville, Radulphum de Neuille militem, Margaretam uxorem Ricardi Lescrope de Bolton" as the children of "Radulphus dominus de Neuill et comes Westmorlandie" and "Margareta filia Hugonis comitis Stafford, uxor prima"[584].  She married secondly (before 5 Nov 1427) William Cressener of Sudbury, Suffolk. 

-        LORDS SCROPE (of BOLTON)[585]

b)         MATILDA Le Scrope .  The will of "Roger Scrope Lord of Bolton", dated 23 Sep 1403, chose burial “in the abbey of St Agatha near Richmond”, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...and in case Richard the son of Richard Lord Grey of Wilton and Shurland shall not consummate the marriage between Maud my daughter and him when he shall attain the age of 14 years...[586]

c)         THOMAS Le Scrope ([Sep 1403/May 1404]-after 13 Apr 1431).  Thomas is not named in his father’s 23 Sep 1403 will so was probably born posthumously.  The will of "Lady Margaret Scrope wife of Sir Roger Le Scrope Knight and daughter of Robert Lord Tiptoft", dated 13 Apr 1431, proved 14 May 1431, and appointed “Thomas Scrope my son and Guy Fairfax” as executors[587]

2.         STEPHEN Le Scrope (-after 6 Jan 1405).  The testament of "Ricus Lescrop Dns de Bolton", dated 2 Aug 1401, bequeathes property to "Rogero filio meo…et heredi…Stephano Lescrop filio meo…Isabelle…filie mee…Margarete filie mee uxori Rogeri Lescrop filii mei…Milicente…filie mee…domino Stephano Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Archiepo Ebor…filio meo…domino Henrico Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Henri Fitz Hugh consanguineo meo…"[588]The will of "Sir Stephen Scrope Knight", dated 6 Jan 1405, chose burial “in the abbey of St Agatha near Richmond”, bequeathed property to “Milisent my wife..:Stephen my son and heir...Elizabeth my daughter for her marriage[589]m MILLICENT, daughter of --- (-after 6 Jan 1405).  The testament of "Ricus Lescrop Dns de Bolton", dated 2 Aug 1401, bequeathes property to "Rogero filio meo…et heredi…Stephano Lescrop filio meo…Isabelle…filie mee…Margarete filie mee uxori Rogeri Lescrop filii mei…Milicente…filie mee…domino Stephano Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Archiepo Ebor…filio meo…domino Henrico Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Henri Fitz Hugh consanguineo meo…"[590]The will of "Sir Stephen Scrope Knight", dated 6 Jan 1405, bequeathed property to “Milisent my wife..:Stephen my son and heir...Elizabeth my daughter for her marriage[591].  Stephen & his wife had two children: 

a)         STEPHEN Scrope .  The will of "Sir Stephen Scrope Knight", dated 6 Jan 1405, bequeathed property to “Milisent my wife..:Stephen my son and heir...Elizabeth my daughter for her marriage[592]

b)         ELIZABETH Scrope .  The will of "Sir Stephen Scrope Knight", dated 6 Jan 1405, bequeathed property to “Milisent my wife..:Stephen my son and heir...Elizabeth my daughter for her marriage[593]

3.         ISABEL .  The testament of "Ricus Lescrop Dns de Bolton", dated 2 Aug 1401, bequeathes property to "Rogero filio meo…et heredi…Stephano Lescrop filio meo…Isabelle…filie mee…Margarete filie mee uxori Rogeri Lescrop filii mei…Milicente…filie mee…domino Stephano Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Archiepo Ebor…filio meo…domino Henrico Lescrop consanguineo meo…domino Henri Fitz Hugh consanguineo meo…"[594]

 

 

 

C.      LORDS SCROPE (of Masham)

 

 

GEOFFREY Scrope, son of WILLIAM Scrope & his wife Constance --- ([before 1285]-Gent Dec 1340, bur Coverham Abbey)

m IVETTE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 1 Jan 1334 under which "Dominum Henricum le Scrop militem advocatum Abbathie sancte Agathe" donated property to Easby abbey, for the souls of "…domini Galfri le Scrop et Ivette uxoris eius…"[595]

Geoffrey & his wife had children: 

1.         HENRY Le Scrope (19 Sep 1312-31 Jul 1392).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1350 whereby he is held to have become Lord Scrope (of Masham).  m JOAN [Agnes], daughter of ---.  Henry & his wife had children: 

a)         GEOFFREY Le Scrope ([1342]-killed in battle siege of Piskre Castle, Lithuania 1362, bur Königsberg Cathedral)m ELEANOR Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville Lord Neville of Raby & his wife Alice de AudleyA mid-15th century manuscript names "Margaretam, Johannem, Robertum de Neuille militem, Alexandrum archiepiscopum Eboraci, Thomam de Neuille electum de Ely, Willelmum de Neuille militem, Radulfum de Neuille de Condale, Katherinam uxorem domini de Dacre, Alienoram uxorem Galfridi Scrope, Eufemiam de Heslarton" as the children of "Radulfum de Neuille" and his wife "Alesia, filia Hugonis de Audeley"[596]

b)         STEPHEN Le Scrope ([1345]-25 Jan 1406, bur Scrope Chapel, York Minster).  Lord Scrope (of Masham).  m as her second husband, MARGERY, widow of JOHN de Huntingfield, daughter of [JOHN de Welles Lord Welles & his wife Maud de Ros] (-29 May 1422).  Stephen & his wife had children: 

i)          HENRY Le Scrope ([1373]-beheaded Southampton 5 Aug 1415)Lord Scrope (of Masham).  m firstly .  m secondly (licence 6 Sep 1410, [Faxflete Chapel, Yorkshire]) as her third husband, JOAN de Holand, widow firstly of EDMUND "of Langley" Duke of York, and secondly of WILLIAM de Willoughby Lord Willoughby de Eresby, daughter of THOMAS de Holand Earl of Kent & his wife Alice FitzAlan ([1380]-12 Apr 1434).  She married fourthly ([Nov 1415/27 Apr 1416]) as his first wife, Henry Bromflete of Londesborough, Yorkshire, who was summoned to Parliament in 1449 whereby he is held to have become Lord Vessy. 

-         LORDS SCROPE (of MASHAM)[597]

c)         Sir JOHN de Scrope (-[18] Dec 1405)m (before Nov 1391) as her second husband, ELIZABETH of Atholl, widow of Sir THOMAS Percy, daughter of DAVID of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl & his wife Elizabeth Ferrers (-after 1415).  She married thirdly Robert de Thorley

 

 

1.         Sir RICHARD Scropem ELEANOR Washbourne, daughter of ---.  Richard & his wife had children: 

a)         ELIZABETH Scrope (-26 Jun 1537, bur Wivenhoe)m firstly as his second wife, WILLIAM de Beaumont Viscount Beaumont, son of JOHN Beaumont Viscount Beaumont & his wife Elizabeth Philip (Edenham, Lincolnshire 23 Apr 1438-19 Dec 1507).  m secondly ([28 Nov 1508/10 Apr 1509]) as his second wife, JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of JOHN de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Elizabeth Howard (8 Sep 1442-Hedingham Castle 10 Mar 1513, bur Colne Priory)

 

 

 

SEGRAVE

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

HEREWARD of Segrave, Leicestershire. 

m ---.  The name of Hereward's wife is not known. 

Hereward & his wife had one child: 

1.         GILBERT de Segrave (-[before Nov 1201]).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Gilbertus de Segrave" held four parts of one knight’s fee from "Willelmi comitis de Warwico" in Warwickshire[598].  "…Gileberto de Satgraue…" witnessed the charter dated to the reign of King Henry II under which "Bertram de Verdum" granted land at Long Whatton, Leicestershire to "Wauchelino filio Baldewini et Aeliz uxori sue", which was held by "mater uxoris predicti Walchelini" during the reign of King Henry I[599]m ---.  The name of Gilbert's wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         STEPHEN de Segrave (-Leicester Abbey 1241).  Henry III King of England ordered "Stephano de Sedgrave" to surrender the manors of "Meleburne, Kirketone, Stauntone, Tingdene, Leland", as well as "Novum Castrum super Linam quod G. filius vester tenet", by letter dated 14 Jun 1234[600].  Matthew Paris names "…Stephanus de Segrave, specialis regis consiliarius et quasi Angliæ justitiarius…" among those who died in 1241[601].  The Annales Cestrienses record the death in 1241 of “Stephanus de Sagreve[602]m firstly ROHESE le Despencer, daughter of THOMAS le Despencer & his wife ---.  The Complete Peerage records her parentage and marriage[603]m secondly as her first husband, IDA Hastings, daughter of WILLIAM [III] de Hastings & his wife Margery Bigod of Norfolk (-before 2 Mar 1289, bur London, Church of the Grey Friars).  She married secondly Hugh Pecche.  Stephen & his [first/second] wife had three children:  

i)          JOHN de Segrave (-before Nov 1230).  King Henry III granted "maritagium Emme de Cauz que fuit uxor Johannis de Sedgrave, filii ipsius Stephani" to "Stephano de Sedgrave" dated 2 Nov 1230[604]m as her first husband, EMMA de Cauz, daughter of ROGER de Cauz & his wife --- (-after 2 Nov 1230).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1229, which involved "Johannem de Segraue et Emmam uxorem eius filiam et heredem…Rogeri de Cauz"[605].  King Henry III granted "maritagium Emme de Cauz que fuit uxor Johannis de Sedgrave, filii ipsius Stephani" to "Stephano de Sedgrave" dated 2 Nov 1230[606].  She married secondly (after 2 Nov 1230) as his second wife, John de Grey of Shirland, Derbyshire. 

ii)         STEPHEN de Segrave (-before 1241).  Henry III King of England issued letters of presentation of "ecclesie de Burneham" to "Stephanus filius Stephani de Segrave" dated 26 Dec 1222[607]

iii)        GILBERT de Segrave (-Pons, Poitou before 8 Oct 1254).  Bracton records a claim, dated 1234/35, relating to "manerium de Burtona" granted to "Gilbertus de Segraue…per consilium Stephani de Segraue patris sui"[608].  Henry III King of England ordered "Stephano de Sedgrave" to surrender "Novum Castrum super Linam quod G. filius vester tenet" by letter dated 14 Jun 1234[609].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “Gilbertus de Segrave” died in 1254 in the prison of “Reginaldi de Puns in partibus transmarinis[610].  An undated writ after the death of "Gilbert de Segrave" names "Nicholas his son, age variously stated as 16 and 17 as his heir"[611]m (before 30 Sep 1231) as her first husband, AMABIL, daughter of ROBERT de Chaucombe & his wife --- (-after 26 Aug 1273, bur Chaucombe Priory).  A charter dated 30 Sep 1231 records a final settlement between "Radulfum Basset et Milesantam uxorem eius" and "Robertum de Chaucumbe" relating to land at Strubby, Lincolnshire granted by Robert to Ralph "in liberum maritagium…habuerit quam Amabilem uxorem Gileberti de Segrave et predictam Milisantam" and providing for the future division of Robert’s lands between Melisende and Amabilis, "sine consilio Stephani de Segrave et Willelmi Basset"[612]She married secondly as his second wife, Roger [IV] de Somery.  Gilbert & his wife had two children: 

(a)       ALICE (-after 8 Jan 1268)m WILLIAM [V] Mauduit, son of WILLIAM [IV] Mauduit of Hanslope, Berkshire & his wife Alice of Warwick ([1220/21]-8 Jan 1267, bur Westminster Abbey).  He succeeded in 1263 as Earl of Warwick. 

(b)       NICHOLAS de Segrave ([1238]-before 12 Nov 1295, bur Chaucombe Priory).  An undated writ after the death of "Gilbert de Segrave" names "Nicholas his son, age variously stated as 16 and 17 as his heir"[613].  He was summoned to Parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Segrave

-         see below

 

 

 

B.      LORDS SEGRAVE

 

 

NICHOLAS de Segrave, son of GILBERT de Segrave & his wife Amabil de Chaucombe ([1238]-before 12 Nov 1295, bur Chaucombe Priory).  An undated writ after the death of "Gilbert de Segrave" names "Nicholas his son, age variously stated as 16 and 17 as his heir"[614].  He was summoned to Parliament 24 Jun 1295, whereby he is held to have become Lord Segrave

m MATILDA, daughter of ---. 

Lord Nicholas & his wife had two children: 

1.         JOHN de Segrave ([1256]-before 4 Oct 1325, bur Chaucombe Priory).  He succeeded his father as Lord Segravem CHRISTIAN du Plessis, daughter of HUGH du Plessis Lord Plessis & his wife --- (-after 8 May 1331).  Lord John & his wife had two children: 

a)         STEPHEN de Segrave (-before 12 Dec 1325, bur Chaucombe Priory).  He succeeded his father in [1325] as Lord Segravem ALICE FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alasia di Saluzzo (-7 Feb 1340).  Lord Stephen & his wife had one child:

i)          JOHN de Segrave ([1315]-1 Apr 1353).  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Lord Segravem (after 3 Mar 1327, probably [1337/38]) as her first husband, MARGARET of Norfolk, daughter of THOMAS "of Brotherton" Earl of Norfolk & his first wife Alice Halys ([1320/22]-24 Mar 1399, bur Charterhouse, Smithfield, London or Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London).  She succeeded her father in 1338 as Ctss of Norfolk, suo iure.  She was created Duchess of Norfolk for life 29 Sep 1397.  Lord John & his wife had three children:

(a)       ELIZABETH de Segrave (Croxton Abbey 25 Oct 1338-before 1368).  A manuscript record of the Mowbray family states that “Johannes filius [Johannis]” married “filiam et hæredem domini de Segrave…Elizabetha[615]m (1349) JOHN Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Joan of Lancaster (Epworth 25 Jun 1340-killed in battle [Palestine] 1368).  He succeeded his father as Lord Mowbray. 

(b)       JOHN de Segrave (1340-before 1353)m (1349) as her first husband, BLANCHE Mowbray, daughter of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Joan of Lancaster (-1409). 

(c)       ANNE de Segrave (-[1377]).  Abbess of Barking. 

b)         CHRISTIAN de Segrave m (contract May 1305) JOHN de Mohun, son of JOHN de Mohun Lord Mohun & his first wife Ada --- (-before 1330). 

2.         ELEANOR de Segrave .  The Book of Lacock records that “Alanus de la Souch” married “Alianoram filiam Nicholai de Segrave” by whom he had “Elam, Matildam, Elizabetham, Rogerum de la Souche[616]m ALAN [III] la Zouche, son of ROGER [II] la Zouche & his wife Ela de Longespee (9 Oct 1266-[1313/14]).  

 

 

1.         NICHOLAS de Segrave .  Baron of Stowe, Staffordshire.  m ---.  The name of Nicholas's wife is not known.  Nicholas & his wife had one child: 

a)         MATILDA de Segrave m EDMUND de Bohun, son of JOHN de Bohun of Haresfield & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

SOMERY

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

1.         ROGER [I] de Somery (-after 1129).  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Sumeri" in Kent for holdings "tra Matis uxoris sue"[617].  An undated charter records donations to Rochester, including the donation of “redditus in Vanna” made by “Rogerus de Sumeri et Christiana uxor eius[618].  A charter of King Henry II records donations to York St Mary, including the donation of land in “Heselingfeld…et ecclesiam” by “Rogerus de Sumeri[619].   m CHRISTIANA, daughter of --- & his wife Matilda --- (-after 1139).  An undated charter records donations to Rochester, including the donation of “redditus in Vanna” made by “Rogerus de Sumeri et Christiana uxor eius[620].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Roger de Sumeri" in Kent for holdings "tra Matis uxoris sue"[621].  King Stephen confirmed a donation to Stratford-at-Bow priory of land at Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire by "Cristiana de Sumeri et filii sui" by charter dated to [1139/54][622].  Roger [I] & his wife had one child: 

a)         ADAM de Somery (-after 1166).  Domesday Descendants says that Adam was the son of Roger de Somery (and suggests that he was a minor when his father died) but does not cite the corresponding primary source[623].  King Stephen confirmed property to Geoffrey de Mandeville Earl of Essex, including "servicium Ade de Sum[er]i de feodo de Elmedona pro iii militibus", by charter dated Christmas 1141[624].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Adam de Sumery ii m i militem" in Cambridgeshire & Huntingdonshire in [1160/61][625].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Adam de Sumeri" held 7 knights’ fees from "Willelmi comitis Gloucestriæ" in Gloucestershire[626]

 

 

1.         HENRY de Somery (-after 21 Oct 1166).  "William de Sumery and Cecilia his wife" donated property to Walden abbey, for the soul of Geoffrey Earl of Essex on the day of his burial, by charter dated 21 Oct 1166 witnessed by "his father Henry, his brother Helias and his nephew Philip"[627]m ---.  The name of Henry’s wife is not known.  Henry & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         WILLIAM de Somery (-after 21 Oct 1166).  "William de Sumery and Cecilia his wife" donated property to Walden abbey, for the soul of Geoffrey Earl of Essex on the day of his burial, by charter dated 21 Oct 1166 witnessed by "his father Henry, his brother Helias and his nephew Philip"[628]m CECILIA, daughter of --- (-after 21 Oct 1166).  "William de Sumery and Cecilia his wife" donated property to Walden abbey, for the soul of Geoffrey Earl of Essex on the day of his burial, by charter dated 21 Oct 1166 witnessed by "his father Henry, his brother Helias and his nephew Philip"[629]

b)         ELIAS de Somery (-after 21 Oct 1166).  "William de Sumery and Cecilia his wife" donated property to Walden abbey, for the soul of Geoffrey Earl of Essex on the day of his burial, by charter dated 21 Oct 1166 witnessed by "his father Henry, his brother Helias and his nephew Philip"[630]same person as…?  ELIAS de Somery (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Helias Sumeri" held one knight’s fee from "Eudonis dapiferi" in Essex[631]m ---.  The name of Elias’s wife is not known.  Elias & his wife had one child: 

i)          ADAM de Somery .  King Henry II confirmed the property of St. Bartholomew, Smithfield, including the donation of land “in villa de Shenle” made by “Adæ filii et heredis Eliæ de Somery, et Saeri filii Henrici” by undated charter[632].  Farrer records that Adam de Somery donated the manor of Holmes, Hertfordshire to Smithfield St. Bartholomew[633]

c)         [--- .  m ---.]  One child: 

i)          PHILIP (-after 21 Oct 1166).  "William de Sumery and Cecilia his wife" donated property to Walden abbey, for the soul of Geoffrey Earl of Essex on the day of his burial, by charter dated 21 Oct 1166 witnessed by "his father Henry, his brother Helias and his nephew Philip"[634]

 

 

1.         --- de Somery m --- de Lucy, daughter of ROBERT de Lucy & his wife ---.  Her family origin and marriage are confirmed by an order dated [Feb] 1222 under which "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne"[635].  One child: 

a)         MILO de Somery (-[29 Sep 1223/1228]).  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from the king in Hertfordshire, dated to [1204/12]: "Milo de Sumery" held land "in Brikendon…[et] in Bygrave de honore Gloucestrie"[636].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumeri" holding one knight’s fee "de honore Gloucestriæ" in Norfolk, Suffolk, and one "in Naselingefeude" in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire in [1210/12][637].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neville, Letitia de Pinkeyni, Serlo de Marcy" holding one knight’s fee each "in Elmedene" in Essex, Hertfordshire in [1210/12][638].  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in the honour of Boulogne, dated to [1217/18], which includes "Leticia de Lucy, Milo de Sumery, Rogerus de Neovill, Ema de Marcy" holding "iv milites…in Heaumedon, Dubenhog, La Lee, Crawell"[639].  "Robert de Picquigny, Milo de Somery and Beatrice de Lucy" made a fine for "their relief of the land formerly of Emma de Lucy, sister of Beatrice and aunt of Robert and Miles, whose heirs they are, in Elmdon…honour de Boulogne", dated [Feb] 1222[640].  The Pipe Roll 1223 records “Robertus de Pinkeinni Milo de Sumeri et Beatricia de Lucy” owing in Essex[641]m ---.  The name of Milo’s wife is not known.  Milo & his wife had six children: 

i)          ROGER [II] de Somery (-[1235/8 Jan 1236]).  "Roger de Somery, son and heir of Milo de Somery" paid homage for "all the lands that Milo held of the king in chief of the honour of Boulogne", dated [Apr] 1229[642].  Matthew Paris records the death "in annis suæ florentis juventutis” 1235 of “Rogerus de Sumerico[643]

ii)         STEPHEN de Somery (-before [28 Oct 1238/27 Oct 1239]).  The king took the homage of “Stephen de Somery, brother and heir of Roger de Somery for the lands...of the aforesaid Roger which fall to Stephen by hereditary right”, Berkshire, order dated 8 Jan 1236[644].  An order was made, dated [28 Oct 1238/27 Oct 1239], permitting “the executors of the testament of Stephen de Somery to have free administration of the goods formerly of the said Stephen”, counties not specified[645].  A writ dated 31 May "31 Hen III", after the death of "Stephen de Sumery" notes that "he died seven years ago" and "was not seised of 4 l rent of a moiety of the manor of Wysheleg which Roger de Sumery his elder brother demised at fee farm to Robert de Briwes" (in Surrey)[646].  Inquisitions following a writ of certiorari dated 7 Feb "17 Edw I" after the death of "Stephen de Sumery” record that “the inheritance of the said Stephen in Schenleye [Hertford] was parted between Maud de Bacheswrth, Amabel de Montiniaco, Muriel Picot and Ela de Monte Caniso sisters and heirs of the said Stephen[647]m JOAN, daughter of --- (-before 14 Aug 1281).  Inquisitions in Cambridge after a writ dated 14 Aug "10 Edw I" following the death of "Henry Joan de Somery" record “Haslygfeud, a manor held of the heirs of Stephen de Somery in dower”, add “she had no heir of the said manor because she held in dower of the said heirs, viz. Roger de Bachewrthe, Robert de Munteny, Peter Pykot and John de Monte Caniso who are the next heirs and of full age...the youngest of whom is aged 40 and more[648]

iii)        MATILDA de Somery .  Inquisitions following a writ of certiorari dated 7 Feb "17 Edw I" after the death of "Stephen de Sumery” record that “the inheritance of the said Stephen in Schenleye [Hertford] was parted between Maud de Bacheswrth, Amabel de Montiniaco, Muriel Picot and Ela de Monte Caniso sisters and heirs of the said Stephen”, and add that “the service of Adam de Somery fell to the pourparty of Roger de Backeswrth, son and heir of the said Maud...Ranulph de Montiniaco son and heir of the said Amabel, John Picot heir of the said Muriel, and John de Monte Caniso heir of the said Ela[649]m --- de Backsworth, son of ---. 

iv)       AMABEL de Somery .  Inquisitions following a writ of certiorari dated 7 Feb "17 Edw I" after the death of "Stephen de Sumery” record that “the inheritance of the said Stephen in Schenleye [Hertford] was parted between Maud de Bacheswrth, Amabel de Montiniaco, Muriel Picot and Ela de Monte Caniso sisters and heirs of the said Stephen”, and add that “the service of Adam de Somery fell to the pourparty of Roger de Backeswrth, son and heir of the said Maud...Ranulph de Montiniaco son and heir of the said Amabel, John Picot heir of the said Muriel, and John de Monte Caniso heir of the said Ela[650]m --- de Montigny, son of ---. 

v)        MURIEL de Somery .  Inquisitions following a writ of certiorari dated 7 Feb "17 Edw I" after the death of "Stephen de Sumery” record that “the inheritance of the said Stephen in Schenleye [Hertford] was parted between Maud de Bacheswrth, Amabel de Montiniaco, Muriel Picot and Ela de Monte Caniso sisters and heirs of the said Stephen”, and add that “the service of Adam de Somery fell to the pourparty of Roger de Backeswrth, son and heir of the said Maud...Ranulph de Montiniaco son and heir of the said Amabel, John Picot heir of the said Muriel, and John de Monte Caniso heir of the said Ela[651]m --- Picot, son of ---. 

vi)       ELA de Somery .  Inquisitions following a writ of certiorari dated 7 Feb "17 Edw I" after the death of "Stephen de Sumery” record that “the inheritance of the said Stephen in Schenleye [Hertford] was parted between Maud de Bacheswrth, Amabel de Montiniaco, Muriel Picot and Ela de Monte Caniso sisters and heirs of the said Stephen”, and add that “the service of Adam de Somery fell to the pourparty of Roger de Backeswrth, son and heir of the said Maud...Ranulph de Montiniaco son and heir of the said Amabel, John Picot heir of the said Muriel, and John de Monte Caniso heir of the said Ela[652]m --- de Munchensy, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         RALPH [I] de Somery (-after [1161]).  “G. Painel”, considering the proposal of “Radulfi Painel patris mei”, founded Dudley priory, for the salvation of “Isabellæ uxoris meæ et Roberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated by Dugdale to "before 1161"), witnessed by "…Radulpho de Sumeri…"[653]

 

2.         JOHN de Somery (-[1191/92]).  The connection with Dudley and the Paynell family suggests that John de Somery may have been the son of Ralph [I] de Somery, who witnessed the foundation charter of Dudley priory (see above).  m as her first husband, HAWISE Paynell, daughter of RALPH Paynell of Dudley & his wife --- (-after 1210).  “Hawys Paganella” confirmed donations to Tykford Priory by "Johannes de Sumeri vir meus" by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Sumeri filio meo[654].   She married secondly ([1196/97]) Roger de Berkeley.  “Hawis Paynel” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “domini mei Rogeri de Berkele”, for the soul of “Gervasii Paynel fratris mei”, by undated charter[655].   Hawise must have survived her son Ralph [II] de Somery, as shown by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240 which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", and passed from her to her grandsons: "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[656].  John & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         RALPH [II] de Somery (-[Jan/Jul] 1210).  “Hawys Paganella” confirmed donations to Tykford Priory by "Johannes de Sumeri vir meus" by undated charter, witnessed by “Radulfo de Sumeri filio meo[657].   The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Radulfus de Sumery" paying "iv l vi s viii d, iv milites et tertiam" in Worcestershire and "vii.l. xiii.s. de Radulfo de Sumeri" among "de hiis qui non habent capitales honores in hoc comitatu" in Berkshire[658].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Radulfus de Sumeri" paying "xx s in Chiselhamtone, i militem" in Oxfordshire, "Radulfus de Somery" among "isti sunt quieti per breve" in Berkshire, and “Radulfo de Sumery 1.l de feodo Gervasii Paganelli” in Staffordshire[659].  A later note added to Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records that King John granted "maneria de Mere Suneforde et Clentes" to "Radulfus de Sumery" in Staffordshire[660].  The Pipe Roll [1207/08] records “Radulphus de Sumeri r.c. de x.li. de Cremento de Swineford et Clent et Mera[661].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Radulfus de Sumeri" holding 14 knights’ fees "de honore de Neu[port]" in Buckinghamshire, and three knights’ fees and parts "in Framkelega, Wormelega, Belewe, Pesemore, Swinforde, Hagele et Credelega" in Worcestershire, in [1210/12][662].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land in Northamptonshire, dated to [1208/09]: "Radulfus de Somery" held land "unde caput est in Warr"[663].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1212 that "Rogerus de Sumervill" held "manerium de Alrewas" in Staffordshire and that the manor was then “in custodia magistri Radulfi de Stok cum filio ipsius Rogeri” and also that “comes de Salesbir” held “maneria de Swinford et de Clent et de Mere cum filio et herede Radulfi de Sumeri in custodia[664].  m (before 1194) as her first husband, MARGARET Crassus, daughter of WILLIAM [III] Crassus & his wife [--- Marshal] (-after 14 Jun 1247).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by a charter [dated to before 1194] under which “William le Gros” gave land at Little Dalby to “Ralph Somery” as part of the marriage contract for his daughter Margaret[665].  [The Complete Peerage names “Margaret m 1stly Ralph de Somerey, 2ndly Maurice de Gaunt” as the first daughter of John FitzGilbert “the Marshal” and his second wife[666].  If right, this would mean that she was Margaret Marshal, daughter of John Marshal & his second wife Sibyl of Salisbury.  From a chronological point of view, it cannot be correct.  The births of the children of John FitzGilbert and his second wife can be dated to [1145/55].  Concerning Margaret’s first marriage, the chronology suggests that the children of Ralph de Somery and his wife were born in the late 1190s or the early years of the 13th century.  Concerning the second marriage, Maurice de Gant’s wife is recorded as living in 1247.  As can be seen, none of these dates is compatible with Margaret having been the daughter of John FitzGilbert.]  The Pipe Roll 1210 records that "Margareta que fuit uxor Radulfi de Sumeri" arranged to pay an instalment of her fine for the assignment of her dower in Berkshire in midsummer[667].  Margaret married secondly ([1220/21]) as his second wife, Maurice de Gant.  This second marriage is indicated by two sources relating to Staffordshire, where Ralph [II] de Somery had been granted land by King John (see above).  Firstly, King Henry III ordered the sheriff of Staffordshire to permit “Maurice de Gant” to collect scutage from knights’ fees he holds in his bailiwick of the land “he holds in dower of Margaret his wife”, dated [Sep] 1224[668].  Secondly, the Assize Rolls for 1228 record that eight persons were summoned to show cause why they intruded into “a carucate of land which Alan de Englefeld held, the custody of whose lands after his death belonged to Maurice de Gant and Margaret his wife...the land formed part of the dower of Margaret[669].  Alan de Englefield was Margaret’s son-in-law (see below).  Several other sources have been identified which name Margaret, none of which makes the connection between Ralph de Somery and Maurice de Gant.  Three of these sources clearly refer to the widow of Ralph de Somery: (1) “Roger de Sumeri” confirmed an agreement between “Margaret his mother” and “William de Englefeld” [his nephew, son of his sister Isabel] concerning a grant and exchange of lands “at Bradfield”, Berkshire[670], undated, but presumably dateable to after Roger’succession to the family estates following the death of his nephew Nicholas (before 4 Jul 1229); (2) and (3) two sets of entries in the Testa de Nevill, Berkshire fees in [1235/36] which include " i.m de i. feodo in Englefeud de feodo de Sumeri et...quarta parte unius feodi Nicholai le Butiler de eodem honore [=honore de Walingeford?] et i.m de i. feodo Margerie de Sumery in Cumton Beucamp de eodem honore et i.m. de i. feodo eiusdem Margerie in Idesleg...et...in Adecote...Watindeden...Stanford...Yngelpenne de eodem honore"[671], and Berkshire fees in [1242/43] which name "Rogerus de Sumery in Bradefeld i. feodum...Margareta de Sumeri in Bradefeld unum feodum predicti Rogeri...Willelmus de Englefeld in Englefeld unum feodum de eodem feodo"[672].  Two further sources clearly refer to the wife of Maurice de Gant: firstly, Henry III King of England ordered the sheriff of Somerset, notwithstanding the order of seisin in favour of "Walter de Everm", to give seisin of "maneriis de Cantokesheved et de Hivis [Quantockshead and Huish]...que fuerunt Mauricii de Gant quondam viri sui" to "Margarete de Sumery" as dower, by order dated 1231[673], and secondly “Margaret de Somery” reached agreement with “Henry de Gaunt rector of the almonry of St Mark’s Hospital, Billeswick” on the tithes of the mill of East Quantoxhead, Somerset and other matters by charter dated 14 Jun 1247[674].  Two more sources are inconclusive: the Plea Rolls for 1233 include a claim in Oxfordshire by “John de Beauchamp” against “Margery de Sumery, in a plea of land and wardship[675], and an undated order, in 1237, records “Assizes taken...in...Worcestershire” from “Margaret de Somery[676].  Thomas Stapleton made a detailed study of the life of Maurice de Gant in the mid-19th century but all the sources to which he refers are inconclusive regarding the parentage of Maurice de Gant’s second wife[677].  It is somewhat surprising that Maurice would have married the widow of Ralph [II] de Somery who, although she had proven her child-bearing capacity, must have been nearly 40 years old by [1220].  Stapleton dates the Margaret de Somery/Maurice de Gant marriage to “prior to the fifth year of Henry III [Nov 1220/Nov 1221] when Maurice de Gaunt paid scutage of Byham for the manor of Bradfield in Berkshire to Percival de Sumery[678].  Ralph [II] & his wife had [five] children: 

i)          RALPH [III] de Somery (-[Feb] 1220).  His parentage is confirmed by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240, P. R. O. Assise Roll 1174, which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", from her by "Radulpho…filio et heredi, et de Radulpho cuidam alii Radulpho filii et heredi, et de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua", although the list appears to insert an extra "Ralph" in the generational list[679].  The Testa de Nevill records in 1212 that “comes de Salesbir” held “maneria de Swinford et de Clent et de Mere cum filio et herede Radulfi de Sumeri in custodia[680].  The Pipe Roll [1214/15] records “heres Radulphi de Sumeri. l.s. de cremento de Swinford et de Clent et de Mere[681].  “Ralph [de] Somery and Alice his wife” made a fine to sue “Ralph Mangefer” concerning “a message...in Cliffe”, Sussex, order dated 11 Feb 1220[682]m IDA de Longespee, daughter of WILLIAM Longespee Earl of Salisbury & his wife Ela Ctss of Salisbury (after 1206-after 1260).  William Earl of Salisbury granted the manor of Belcham to "William de Beauchamp…with Ida his daughter, who was the wife of Ralph de Sumeri" dated 1220[683].  It is likely that Ida was still a child at the time of her first marriage.  Ida’s mother’s birth can be dated with reasonable accuracy to [1191/92], as Gilbert Crispin who was the second husband of Ida’s maternal grandmother died in 1190.  If that is correct, it is unlikely that Ida was born before 1206, assuming that she was the oldest child of her parents (of which there is no proof).  “Ralph [de] Somery and Alice his wife” made a fine to sue “Ralph Mangefer” concerning “a message...in Cliffe”, Sussex, order dated 11 Feb 1220[684].  The difference of name Alice/Ida has not been explained.  She married secondly ([1220]) William de Beauchamp

ii)         WILLIAM Perceval de Somery (-before 20 Jun 1222).  His parentage is confirmed by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240, P. R. O. Assise Roll 1174, which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", from her by "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[685]m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

(a)       NICHOLAS de Somery (-before 4 Jul 1229).  The Testa de Nevill records in Staffordshire that “Nicholaus de Sumery est in custodia comitis Cestrie...” in [1226/28][686].  "Rogeri de Sumery fratris Willelmi Percevall de Sumery" swore homage to the king for "terra quam predictus Willelmus Perceval de rege tenuit", adding that he was heir to “Nicholaus filius ipsius Willelmi”, dated 10 Jul 1229[687].  His parentage is confirmed by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240, P. R. O. Assise Roll 1174, which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", from her by "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[688]

iii)        ROGER [IV] de Somery (-before 26 Aug 1273).  His parentage is confirmed by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240, P. R. O. Assise Roll 1174, which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", from her by "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[689]

-         see below

iv)       [JOAN (-after 1273)Smyth records that Thomas married "Jone daughter of Sr Raph de Somery lord of Campden in Gloucestershire necce to Willm Marshall Earle of Pembrooke", and that she died during the reign of King Edward I, but the precise primary sources on which he bases his statements are not obvious from his citations[690]"Joan de Berkele…and…Maurice de Berkele her son" were granted rights in "their manors of Wutton and Kamme, co Gloucester" dated 2 Aug 1252[691]m THOMAS de Berkeley, son of MAURICE de Berkeley & his wife Alice de Berkeley ([1170]-29 Nov 1243, bur Bristol St Augustine).] 

v)        ISABEL de SomeryHer parentage and marriage are confirmed by the undated charter under which Roger de Sumery” quitclaimed “William de Englefield” for service of one knight’s fee “in Humeleye and...in Englefield which Isabella the grantor’s sister held in dower”, in accordance with a charter which “Ralph de Sumery the grantor’s father made to Alan de Englefeld, father of the grantee[692].  The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Berkshire, dated [1235/36], which include "i.m de i. feodo in Englefeud de feodo de Sumeri et...quarta parte unius feodi Nicholai le Butiler de eodem honore et...de feodo Margerie de Sumery...de eodem honore"[693]The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Berkshire, dated [1242/43], which include "Rogerus de Sumery in Bradefeld i. feodum...Margareta de Sumeri in Bradefeld unum feodum predicti Rogeri...Willelmus de Englefeld in Englefeld unum feodum de eodem feodo"[694] m ALAN de Englefield, son of --- (-before 1228).  

b)         [AGNES de Somery .  Pope Lucius III confirmed the possessions of Dudley priory, including the donation of “villam de Chyrchille” by "Agnetis de Somery" and donations by “Gervasii Paganelli”, by bull dated 16 Jun 1190[695].  The parentage of Agnes is unknown.  However, the linking of her name with Gervase Paynell in this charter suggests a family relationship, as Gervase was the brother of her supposed mother.] 

 

 

1.         ROGER [III] de Somerym ---.  The name of Roger’s wife is not known.  Roger [III] & his wife had one child: 

a)         AGNES de Somery .  Bracton records a claim, dated 1231, by "Hamoni de Valoniis" against "Jeruasius de Aldermannebiria", the latter stating that "Rogerus de Sumery" gave "terram de Cristehale…in maritagium Hamoni patri istius Hamonis cum Agnete filia sua", that the couple were later divorced and the maritagium returned, while the claimant replied that Agnes lived for thirty years after her divorce and requested nothing from his father or from "Thoma fratre suo qui per v annos fuit in seisina tocius hereditatis patris sui"[696]m (divorced) as his second wife, HAMON de Valognes, son of ---. 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS SOMERY

 

 

ROGER [IV] de Somery, son of RALPH [II] de Somery & his wife Margaret Crassus (-before 26 Aug 1273).  "Rogeri de Sumery fratris Willelmi Percevall de Sumery" swore homage to the king for "terra quam predictus Willelmus Perceval de rege tenuit", adding that he was heir to “Nicholaus filius ipsius Willelmi”, dated 10 Jul 1229[697].  An undated order, [28 Oct 1237/27 Oct 1238], records a fine made by “the men of Alrewas”, Shropshire, against “Roger de Somery their lord[698].  His parentage is confirmed by a plea in Staffordshire dated 1240 which records that certain land was inherited from "Gervasio Paenel cuidam Hawisie sorori et heredi", from her by "…de iste Radulpho cuidam Willelmi et fratri et heredi, et de Willelmo cuidam Nicholao…filii et heredi, et de Nicholao isti Rogero ut avunculo quia non habuit heredem de corpore sua"[699]The Testa de Nevill lists fees in Berkshire, dated [1242/43], which include "Rogerus de Sumery in Bradefeld i. feodum...Margareta de Sumeri in Bradefeld unum feodum predicti Rogeri...Willelmus de Englefeld in Englefeld unum feodum de eodem feodo"[700] A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" names "Roger his son aged 18 at the Nativity of St John the Baptist in the said year is his next heir", provides for "lands…whereof Lady Anabel late his wife ought to be dowered", and records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife"[701]

m firstly NICOLE de Albini, daughter of WILLIAM de Albini Earl of Arundel & his wife Mabel of Chester.  The Annales Londonienses name "Mabiliam, Nicholaam, Ceciliam et Isabellam" as the four daughters of "secunda…Mabillia…uxor comitis de Arundelle", specifying that "Nicholaa" married "Rogeri de Someri" and had "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune"[702]

m secondly (1254 or before) as her second husband, AMABIL, widow of GILBERT de Segrave, daughter of ROBERT de Chaucombe of Chaucombe, Northamptonshire & his wife --- (-after 26 Aug 1273, bur Chaucombe Priory).  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" names "Roger his son aged 18 at the Nativity of St John the Baptist in the said year is his next heir", provides for "lands…whereof Lady Anabel late his wife ought to be dowered", and records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife"[703]

Roger [IV] & his first wife had five children: 

1.         RALPH [IV] de Somery (-[before 1253]).  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa"[704]

2.         MARGARET de Somery (-before 18 Sep 1289).  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Margaret married "Radulpho de Basset juniori"[705]Radulfus Basset filius Isabel” confirmed donations to Canwell priory, for the souls of “…Margaretæ uxoris meæ et hæredum meorum”, by undated charter[706].  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[707]m firstly RALPH Basset, son of RALPH Basset & his wife (-4 Aug 1265).  m secondly (before 26 Jan 1271) RALPH de Cromwell of Cromwell, Nottinghamshire and West Hallam, Derbyshire, son of ---. 

3.         JOAN de Somery .  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Joan married "Johanni Lestrange"[708].  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[709]m JOHN [IV] le Strange, son of JOHN [III] le Strange & his wife Lucy [Tresgoz] (-before 28 Dec 1275[710]). 

4.         ELIZABETH [Mabel] de Somery .  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Elizabeth married "Waltero de Souli"[711].  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[712]m WALTER de Soulis, son of . 

5.         MATILDA de Somery .  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Matilda married "Henrico de Erdyntoune"[713].  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[714]m HENRY de Erdington, son of . 

Roger [IV] & his second wife had two children: 

6.         ROGER [V] de Somery (24 Jun 1255-before 11 Oct 1291).  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" names "Roger his son aged 18 at the Nativity of St John the Baptist in the said year is his next heir"[715].  "Rogerus de Somery filius Domini Rogeri de Somery" consented to the donation of "manerium meum de Pendeford" made to the priory of St Thomas, near Stafford by "Johannes dominus de Pendeford…" by charter dated to [1277/78], witnessed by "…Persevallo de Somery fratre meo…"[716].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 11 Oct "19 Edw I" after the death of "Roger de Somery...” name “John his son aged 12 and more [...13 on Monday before St Chad in March next 20 Edw I] is his next heir[717]m AGNES, daughter of --- (-23 Nov 1308 or before).  Roger [V] & his wife had three children: 

a)         JOHN de Somery (Mar [1279/80]-1 Jul or 1 Aug 1322).  Inquisitions following a writ dated 11 Oct "19 Edw I" after the death of "Roger de Somery...” name “John his son aged 12 and more [...13 on Monday before St Chad in March next 20 Edw I] is his next heir[718].  He was summoned to parliament in 1308, whereby he is held to have become Lord Somerym LUCY, daughter of --- (-[1325/42]). 

b)         MARGARET de Somery ([1289/90]-).  She inherited the castle of Dudley and was ancestor of the Lords Dudley[719]m JOHN de Sutton, son of ---. 

c)         JOAN de Somery ([1291/92]-after 18 Jan 1327)m THOMAS de Botetourt, son of JOHN Lord Botetourt & his wife Maud FitzOtes (-1322). 

7.         PERCEVAL Somery (-after [1277/78]).  "Rogerus de Somery filius Domini Rogeri de Somery" consented to the donation of "manerium meum de Pendeford" made to the priory of St Thomas, near Stafford by "Johannes dominus de Pendeford…" by charter dated to [1277/78], witnessed by "…Persevallo de Somery fratre meo…"[720]

 

 

 

STANLEY

 

 

A.      ORIGINS

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

1.         ROBERT de Stanley (-after 1129).  Sheriff of Staffordshire [1123] to [1128].  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Robt de Stanlega" owing a balance of money for "having the county for up to 5 years" ("per comitatu habend usque ad v ann") [presumably indicating the shrievalty] in Staffordshire[721]

 

 

Brother and sister: 

1.         ADAM de Stanleym ---.  The name of Adam’s wife is not known.  Adam & his wife had one child: 

a)         WILLIAM de Stanley .  Adam, son of Liulf de Audley, granted Stanley, Staffordshire to William de Stanley, son of Adam de Stanley the grantor’s avunculus, in exchange for Talk o’ the Hill, undated but during the reign of King Stephen[722]

2.         daughter .  Adam, son of Liulf de Audley, granted Stanley, Staffordshire to William de Stanley, son of Adam de Stanley the grantor’s avunculus, in exchange for Talk o’ the Hill, undated but during the reign of King Stephen[723].  If avunculus is interpreted strictly in this source, Adam de Audley’s mother was the sister of Adam de Stanley.  m LIULF de Audley, son of ---.  One child: 

 

 

Brothers, presumably descendants of William de Stanley (above) although the family relationship has not been confirmed. 

1.         WALTER de Stanley (-before [May] 1285).  He was heir to the land in Stanley[724].

a)         WILLIAM de Stanley .  He was heir to his uncle John de Stanley[725]m (Astbury, Cheshire 27 Sep 1282) JOAN, daughter and co-heiress of PHILIP de Baumville & his wife Agnes de Stourton (-after 1326).  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN de Stanley (-after 1314)

-         see below

2.         JOHN de Stanley (-before 1292).  Rector of Astbury. 

 

 

JOHN de Stanley, son of WILLIAM de Stanley & his wife Joan de Baumville (-after 1314)

m [726][MABEL, daughter of JAMES Hawkset of Stourton Parva & his wife ---]. 

John & his wife had two children: 

1.         WILLIAM de Stanley (-after 1362).  m [727][ALICE, daughter of HAMON [Hugh] de Mascy of Timperley, Cheshire & his wife ---]. 

a)         WILLIAM de Stanley (-1398).  m ---.  The name of William’s wife is not known.  William & his wife had one child: 

i)          WILLIAM de Stanley ([1368]-).  His lands were forfeited for his participation in the rebellion of Henry Percy "Hotspur" in 1403[728].  Ancestor of the STANLEY family of Wirral[729]

b)         ALICE de Stanleym (1340) RANDLE le Roter of Kingsley, Staffordshire, son of ---. 

c)         JOHN de Stanley (-before 28 Jan 1414).  He was deputy in Ireland for Robert de Vere Marquess of Dublin 1386-1388, and was Lieutenant of Ireland 1399 to 1401[730]m (1385 or before, dispensation 24 Dec 1398[731]) ISABEL, daughter of THOMAS de Lathom of Lathom and Knowsley, Lancashire & his first wife ---.  John & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN de Stanley (-27 Nov 1437).  m ISABEL, daughter of JOHN de Haryngton of Hornby Castle, Lancashire & his wife ---.  John & his wife had one child: 

(a)       THOMAS Stanley of Lathom and Knowsley, Lancashire (1405 or before-11 Feb 1459).  He was summoned to parliament 15 Jan 1456, whereby he is held to have become Lord Stanley

-         see below

ii)         THOMAS Stanley of Elford, Staffordshire .  Ancestor of the STANLEY family of Elford Pipe, Staffordshire[732]

2.         JOHN Stanley of Greswithin, Cumberland (-after 1347).  Ancestor of the STANLEY family of Ponsonby Hall, Cumberland[733]

 

 

 

B.      LORDS STANLEY

 

 

THOMAS Stanley of Lathom and Knowsley, Lancashire, son of JOHN de Stanley & his wife Isabel de Haryngton (1405 or before-11 Feb 1459).  He was summoned to parliament 15 Jan 1456, whereby he is held to have become Lord Stanley

m JOAN Goushill, daughter and co-heiress of ROBERT Goushill of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire & his wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (-after 1459). 

Thomas & his wife had three children: 

1.         THOMAS Stanley ([1435]-Lathom 29 Jul 1504, bur Burscough Priory, Lancashire).  He succeeded his father in 1459 as Lord Stanley and Sovereign Lord of the Isle of Man.  He was created Earl of Derby 27 Oct 1485 by his stepson King Henry VII. 

-        EARLS of DERBY

2.         WILLIAM Stanley (-executed Tower Hill 16 Feb 1495).  He was beheaded for participating in the Perkin Warbeck plot[734]m firstly ---.  m secondly (before 7 Dec 1471) as her third husband, ELIZABETH Hopton, widow firstly of ROGER Corbet of Moreton Corbet, Shropshire and secondly of JOHN Tiptoft Earl of Worcester, daughter of THOMAS Hopton of Hopton, Shropshire & his wife Eleanor Lucy of Newington, Kent and Richard's Castle, Herefordshire (-22 Jun 1498). 

3.         JOHN Stanley .  Ancestor of the Barons STANLEY of Alderley[735]m ELISABETH Weever, daughter of THOMAS Weever of Weever, Cheshire & his wife ---. 

 

 

 

ST JOHN (PORT)

 

 

Loyd indicates that this family originated in Port-en-Bessin in the present-day French département of Calvados, arrondissement Bayeux, canton Ryes[736]The list of fees held from the church of Bayeux in 1133 includes “feodum Henrici de Port, feodum trium militum[737]

 

 

A.      ORIGINS (PORT)

 

 

[Two possible brothers]: 

1.         HUGUES de Port {Port-en-Bessin, Calvados, arr. Bayeux, cant. Ryes} (-1096 or after).  "…Hugo de Portu…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[738].  "…Hugo de Portu…" witnessed the charter dated to [1066] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy donated "terram…Brenerias" to the church of Bayeux[739]"…Roger Bigot, Henry de Ferrars, Bernard de Neufmarché…Hugo de Port, Richard Goiz, Eudo dapifer…Robert fitz Tetbald, William de Perci, Robert of Rhuddlan, Nigel de Torp, Roger de Corcella, Alured of Lincoln, William de Falaise, William Malconduit, Godfrey his brother…" witnessed the charter dated to [1086] which notified a plea held by William I King of England concerning "William de Braiose" and Fécamp abbey[740].  Domesday Book records that “Hugh de Port” held land in Milton Regis, Ash, Tunstall, Upchurch and Tonge in Milton Hundred, Kent, Hawley in Axton Hundred, Paddlesworth, Ryarsh and Offham in Larkfield Hundred, Norton and Herste in Faversham Hundred, Poison and Pineham in Bewsbury Hundred, of the bishop of Bayeux in Kent, Abbotstone in Bountisborough, part of St Clair’s in Droxford in Droxford Hundred from the bishop of Winchester, land from the abbot of St Peter Winchester, and his own landholdings in Hampshire, Great Shefford in Eagle Hundred and Purley in Reading Hundred in Berkshire[741]"…Hugo de Portu…" witnessed the charter dated 27 Jan 1091 under which William II King of England confirmed the status of Bath abbey[742].  “…Hugonis de Port…” witnessed the charter dated [May 1092] under which William II King of England confirmed previous grants to Lincoln cathedral[743].  “…Hugonis de Port…” witnessed the charter dated Sep 1093 under which William II King of England donated property to Lincoln cathedral[744].  The History of Gloucester St Peter records that "Hugo de Portu factus monachus vicarious Wyntoniæ" donated "Lyteltone in Hamptaschire" to Gloucester St Peter in 1096, adding that "Henricus filius Hugonis de Portu" confirmed his father’s donation, and that "Adam de Portu" also later confirmed it "tempore Serlonis abbatis"[745]m ORENCE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by the Liber Vitæ of the New Minster of Winchester which names "Hugo de Port, Orence coniunx eius"[746].  Hugues & his wife had [three] children: 

a)         HENRY de Port (-after 1133).  The History of Gloucester St Peter records that "Hugo de Portu factus monachus vicarious Wyntoniæ" donated "Lyteltone in Hamptaschire" to Gloucester St Peter in 1096, adding that "Henricus filius Hugonis de Portu" confirmed his father’s donation[747].  Henry de Port gave a rent to Rochester cathedral priory, with the consent of "his wife Hawise and his son Hugh", by charter dated 1108[748].  Henry de Port founded the priory of Sherborne as the cell of the abbey of Saint-Vigor de Cérisy by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Hawise and his sons William and John"[749].  "Henricum de Port" held three knights` fees in Bayeux in 1133[750]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Henry de Port gave a rent to Rochester cathedral priory, with the consent of "his wife Hawise and his son Hugh", by charter dated 1108[751].  Henry de Port founded the priory of Sherborne as the cell of the abbey of Saint-Vigor de Cérisy by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Hawise and his sons William and John"[752].  Henry & his wife had [four] children: 

i)          HUGH de Port (-after 1108).  Henry de Port gave a rent to Rochester cathedral priory, with the consent of "his wife Hawise and his son Hugh", by charter dated 1108[753]

ii)         WILLIAM de Port .  Henry de Port founded the priory of Sherborne as the cell of the abbey of Saint-Vigor de Cérisy by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Hawise and his sons William and John"[754]

iii)        JOHN de Port (-1168 before 29 Sep).  Henry de Port founded the priory of Sherborne as the cell of the abbey of Saint-Vigor de Cérisy by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Hawise and his sons William and John"[755]

-         see below

iv)       [ADAM de Port (-after 1160).  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Adam de Port xl vii milites et dimidium" in Hereford in [1160/61][756].  This appears too early for the entry to refer to Adam de Port, son of John de Port, assuming that his birth date is correctly estimated below.  This would suggest that Adam belonged to an earlier generation of the family.  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Adam de Port xv l ii s" in Hereford in [1167/68][757].] 

b)         ADELAIDE de Port (-after 1107).  "Adelidis soror Henrici de Port" held a house in Winchester in [1107/15][758]

c)         [EMMA de Port (-after 1107).  A charter listing the property of Whitby Monastery names ”Emma de Port” as wife of “Willielmus de Perci cognomento Algernuus[759].  “Willelmus de Perci” donated property to the monks of Whitby “et Serloni priori fratri meo”, for the souls of “…Emma de Port uxore mea et Alano de Perci filio meo”, by charter dated to [1090/96], witnessed by “Emma de Port uxor mea, Alanus, Walterus et Willielmus filii mei, Ernaldus de Perci…[760].  "Emma de Percy" held a house in Winchester in [1107/15][761]m WILLIAM de Percy, son of --- (-Jerusalem [1097/1100], bur Jerusalem). 

2.         [HUBERT de Port (-after 1086).  Domesday Book records land held by “Hubert de Port” in Mapledurwell in Basingstoke Hundred in Hampshire[762].  This holding is recorded following the main holding of Hugues de Port in Hampshire, which suggests a close family connection: maybe they were brothers.] 

 

3.         ADAM de Port (-after 1114).  "…Ada de Port…" witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Henry I King of England granted the land of Roger de Worcester to Walter de Beauchamp[763]

 

 

Two brothers, parents not known: 

1.         ADAM de Port .  "Adam de Port" notified the bishop of Lincoln of his grant to the church of "Hattele" by undated charter, witnessed by "Herndaldo de Mandeville et domina Alicia uxore sua, domina Matiltide uxore dicti Adæ de Port, Henrico de Port fratre eiusdem, Galfrido de Mandeville"[764]m MATILDA de Mandeville, daughter of ERNULF de Mandeville & his wife Alice d’Oilly.  "Adam de Port" notified the bishop of Lincoln of his grant to the church of "Hattele" by undated charter, witnessed by "Herndaldo de Mandeville et domina Alicia uxore sua, domina Matiltide uxore dicti Adæ de Port, Henrico de Port fratre eiusdem, Galfrido de Mandeville"[765]

2.         HENRY de Port .  "Adam de Port" notified the bishop of Lincoln of his grant to the church of "Hattele" by undated charter, witnessed by "Herndaldo de Mandeville et domina Alicia uxore sua, domina Matiltide uxore dicti Adæ de Port, Henrico de Port fratre eiusdem, Galfrido de Mandeville"[766]

 

 

JOHN de Port, son of HENRY de Port & his wife Hawise --- (-1168 before 29 Sep).  Henry de Port founded the priory of Sherborne as the cell of the abbey of Saint-Vigor de Cérisy by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Hawise and his sons William and John"[767].  John de Port confirmed his father’s donations to Sherborne by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Maud and his sons Adam and Hugh", in which he requests burial at the abbey[768].  "John son of Henry de Port" donated land "of Warneford…Weleg" to Montacute priory by undated charter[769].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Henricus de Port" used to hold two knights` fees in Hampshire now held by "Johannes de Port"[770]

m MATILDA, daughter of ---.  John de Port confirmed his father’s donations to Sherborne by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Maud and his sons Adam and Hugh"[771]

John & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         ADAM de Port ([1150/55]-[25 Jun/28 Jul] 1213)John de Port confirmed his father’s donations to Sherborne by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Maud and his sons Adam and Hugh"[772].  "Adam de Portu" confirmed the donation of land "of Warneford…Weleg" to Montacute priory, made by "Henry his grandfather and John his father", by undated charter[773].  The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Adam de Port filius Johannis de Port lv l, de novo xl s" in Hampshire in [1171/72][774].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Adam de Port filius Iohannis" in Hampshire[775].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Adam de Port" paying "xxvii l x s, lv milites" in Hampshire, and "feoda Adam de Port de Kinetone" paying "xi l vi s vi d" in Herefordshire[776].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "feodum Adæ de Port" paying "xxii l, xiii milites" in Herefordshire, and also in Hampshire and Berkshire[777].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Adam de Port" among those granted delay for payment "per brevia" in Kent[778].  The Testa de Nevill lists knights who held land from the king in Hertfordshire, dated to [1204/12]: "Adam de Portu" held land "in Clahall"[779].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Adam de Portu" holding one knight’s fee and one half "in Chesingebiria" in Wiltshire in [1210/12][780]m firstly MABILE d’Orval, daughter of RENAUD d’Orval & his wife Muriel de Saint-Jean.  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Mabiliam" as the daughter of “Willielmum et Robertum se sancto Johanne…Murielem sororem suam” and her husband “Reginaldo de Aurea-valle”, adding that she married "Adæ de Port"[781]m secondly as her second husband, [SIBYL, widow of WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl [of Derby],] daughter of WILLIAM de Briouse Lord of Bramber & his wife Bertha of Hereford.  A charter of John King of England relating to Briouse properties, dated 1212, recites the history of the king’s turbulent relationship with the family and includes a record that “Willielmus de Breosa...Matildis de Heya uxor sua et W. comes de Ferar. nepos suus et Adam de Porter qui sororem suam habuit in uxorem” petitioned the king (presumably in [1209/10])[782].  This source confirms the parentage of Adam’s second wife, but no source has yet been identified which confirms that her name was Sibyl and therefore that she was the same daughter of William de Briouse who had earlier married Earl William de Ferrers.   Adam & his first wife had [four] children: 

a)         WILLIAM de St John (-1239)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Willielmum secundum" as the son of "Adæ de Port" and his wife[783].  "William de Sancto Johanne, son of Adam de Portu" confirmed the donation of land "of Warneford…Weleg" to Montacute priory, made by "Henry his triavus, John his grandfather and Adam his father", by undated charter[784].  “Willielmus de sancto Johanne, filius et heres Adæ de Port” confirmed donations to Boxgrove priory by “Robertus de Haia, Rogerus, et Willielmus et Robertus de sancto Johanne, antecessores mei", by undated charter, signed by "Philippo de Tresgoz, Richardo filio suo, Rogero Hay…", by undated charter[785]m as her first husband, GODEHOLDE Paynell, daughter of ---.  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Godehelda filia N. Pagnell" as the wife of “Willielmum secundum”, son of "Adæ de Port"[786].  She married secondly (1242 or before) Richard de Lucy.  William & his wife had five children: 

i)          GEOFFREY de St John

ii)         ROBERT de St John (-[11/25] Mar 1267)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Robertum" as the son of “Willielmum secundum”, son of "Adæ de Port"[787]m as her first husband, AGNES de Cauntelo, daughter of WILLIAM [III] de Cauntelou & his [first] wife Mélisende de Gournay (-after 1279).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Agneta filia Willielmi de Cantilupo" as the wife of “Robertum”, son of "Willielmum secundum"[788].  She married secondly (before 4 Jun 1271) John de Turville.  Robert & his wife had one child: 

(a)       JOHN de St John (-[20/29] Sep 1301)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Johannem" as the son of “Robertum [de sancto Johanne]” and his wife[789].   

-         see below

iii)        ADAM de St John

iv)       WILLIAM de St John

v)        GODEHOLDE de St John .  An order dated 24 Jan 1234 pardoned debts of “Willelmo de Sancto Johanne” and “Willelmo de Ros, qui filiam predicti Willelmi duxit in uxorem” for not having served in Wales[790].  She married secondly Hugh de Wyndlesores.  “Geoffrey de Percy, Matilda his wife, and Lore widow sister of the said Matilda” granted the manor of Northcraye to “Hugh de Wyndlesores and Godeholda his wife...late the wife of William de Ros (brother of the said Matilda and Lora)”, undated[791]m firstly ([1230/Jan 1234]) WILLIAM [IV] de Ros of Kent, son of WILLIAM [III] de Ros & his wife Alice --- (-before 1243).  m secondly HUGH de Wyndleshores, son of ---. 

b)         [ROGER de St John .  The parentage of Roger de St John has not been confirmed but it would fit from a chronological point of view if he was the son of Adam de Port.  m (before 1212) --- de Lucy, sister of RICHARD de Lucy, daughter of --- de Lucy & his wife ---.  Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the Testa de Nevill which includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Richard de Lucy" gave "Wolenested…medietatem…hundredum de Tenhrigg" in Surrey to "Rogero de Sancto Johanne cum sorore sua in maritagium"[792].]  

c)         [JOHN de St John (-after 1219).  The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Yorkshire, dated 1219, which includes "Johannes de Sancto Johanne" holding land in "hundredo de Bulenden et de Soteleu" in Oxfordshire[793].  The parentage of John de St John has not been confirmed but from a chronological point of view he could have been the son of Adam de Port.  m as her first husband, EMMA d'Harcourt, daughter of RICHARD d'Harcourt & his wife --- (-after 1265).  .  She married secondly Geoffrey le Despencer.  Henry III King of England granted custody of land of "Johannis de Sancto Johanne", during the minority of his heirs, to "Galfrido Dispensario" and granted the marriage of "dictorum heredum" to "Hugoni Dispensario fratri ipsius Galfridi" dated [Apr] 1230[794].  King Henry III granted custody of lands of "Johannis de Sancto Johanne" to "Galfrido Dispensario…et Emma uxor eius", until the majority of his heirs, dated 21 Dec 1231[795].] 

d)         JOAN de Port (-[1204/13]).  The early 13th century Histoire de Guillaume le Maréchal records that "la fillie sire Adam de Port" married "son frére" (indicating the brother of William Marshal Earl of Pembroke)[796]"Ric de Riveriis" paid a fine to marry "filia Ade de Port", dated [1200/01][797]m firstly JOHN "the Marshal", son of JOHN FitzGilbert "the Marshal" & his second wife Sibyl of Salisbury ([1144/45]-Mar 1194, bur Bradenstoke).  m secondly ([1200/01]) as his second wife, RICHARD de Rivers, son of --- (-[4 Dec 1221/15 Mar 1222]).   

2.         HUGH de Port .  John de Port confirmed his father’s donations to Sherborne by undated charter witnessed by "his wife Maud and his sons Adam and Hugh"[798]

3.         THOMAS .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Tomas filius Matildis de Port" in Hampshire[799]

4.         [GILBERT de Port (-after 1212).  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Gilbertus de Port" held "Thornton …hundredum de Gillingeham" in Dorset, adding that it was "per servicium…de excæta de feodo qui fuit Ade de Port fugitivi"[800].  The relationship between Adam de Port and Gilbert de Port has not been ascertained.  They could not have been father and son, as Adam’s descendants adopted the name St John.  It is possible that they were brothers.] 

 

 

 

B.      LORDS ST JOHN

 

 

JOHN de St John, son of ROBERT de St John & his wife Agnes de Cantelou (-[20/29] Sep 1301)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Johannem" as the son of “Robertum [de sancto Johanne]” and his wife[801]

m (before 29 Jun 1256) ALICE, daughter of REGINALD FitzPiers & his first wife Alice --- (-after 1305).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Alicia filia Reginaldi filii Petri" as the wife of “Johannem [de sancto Johanne][802]

John & his wife had two children: 

1.         JOHN de St John ([1271/74]-before 4 Apr 1329)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Johannem" as the son of “Johannem [de sancto Johanne]” and his wife[803].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord St Johnm firstly ISABEL de Courtenay, daughter of HUGH de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon & his wife Eleanor le Despencer (-after Feb 1323)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Isabellam filiam nobilis viri Hugonis de Cortenay" as the wife of “Johannes secundus [de sancto Johanne][804]m secondly as her first husband, ALICE, daughter of ---.  She married secondly (after 22 Jun 1333) as his second wife, Sir Reynold de Pavely.  John & his first wife had [three] children: 

a)         WILLIAM de St John (14 Jun 1309-).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "W. et Hugonem" as the sons of “Johannes secundus [de sancto Johanne]” and his wife, adding the former was born "XVIII Kal Jul" in 1309 but died childless[805]

b)         HUGH de St John (-before 25 Oct 1335).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "W. et Hugonem" as the sons of “Johannes secundus [de sancto Johanne]” and his wife[806].  He succeeded his father as Lord St John, but was never summoned to Parliament.  m as her first husband, MIRABEL, daughter of ---.  She married secondly (before 10 Mar 1337) Thomas de Aspale of Kent.  Hugh & his wife had three children: 

i)          EDMUND de St John ([1332/33]-Calais 18 Aug 1347).  A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex names "Edmundum" as the son of “Hugonem [de sancto Johanne]”, adding that he died childless and was succeeded by his sisters who divided "baroniam de Halnak"[807].  He succeeded his father as Lord St Johnm as her first husband, ELIZABETH, daughter of --- (-[14/16] Sep 1362).  She married secondly (before 3 Jul 1354) as his second wife, Gerard de Lisle Lord Lisle of Kingston Lisle, and thirdly Sir Richard Pembrugge

ii)         MARGARET de St John (-19 Oct 1361).  m ---. 

iii)        ISABEL de St John (-[16/17] Oct 1393)A manuscript recording the founding of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex records that "Isabella" one sister of “Edmundus [de sancto Johanne]” married "Bartholomeo Burghersh juniori", divided "baroniam de Halnak" with her sister after their brother died, but died childless by her first husband and married secondly "nobilis vir dominus Lucas de Poinings, qui genuit Thomam de Poininges, qui Thomas genuit Hugonem ex domina Johanna Strange, qui Hugo genuit filios et filias"[808]m firstly (Aug 1347 or before) HENRY de Burghersh, son of BARTHOLOMEW de Burghersh Lord Burghersh & his wife Elizabeth de Verdun (-Nov 1348).  m secondly (before 29 Jan 1349) LUKE de Poynings, son of THOMAS de Poynings Lord Poynings & his wife Agnes de Rokesle (-[5 Jun/4 Jul] 1376). 

c)         [MARGARET (-19 Nov 1361).  The Complete Peerage states that Margaret, wife of John Lord Beauchamp, was “most probably da. of John St John [1st Lord St John of Basing] by Isabel, da. of Sir Hugh Courtenay” but does not explain the basis for this statement[809]m JOHN Beauchamp, son of JOHN Beauchamp Lord Beauchamp [of Somerset] & his wife Joan [Chenduit] ([after 4 Oct 1304]-19 May 1343).  He succeeded his father in 1336 as Lord Beauchamp.] 

2.         AGNES de St John ([1274/75]-Tiverton 11 Jun 1345, bur 27 Jun 1345 Cowick, near Exeter)The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that ”dominus Hugo secundus” married “dominæ Agnetæ sorori sororii sui domini Johannis de St. John” when she was 17 years old[810].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records the death “1340 die Dominica in festo sanctæ Trinitatis et sancti Barnabæ Apostoli…apud Tiverton” of “domina Agneta de Courtnay comitissa Devoniæ” and her burial “apud Cowick prope Exon.[811]m (1292) HUGH de Courtenay, son of HUGH de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon & his wife Eleanor le Despencer ([1275]-23 Dec 1340, bur Cowick, near Exeter).  He was declared Earl of Devon in 1335. 

 

 

 

STRANGE (LE STRANGE)

 

 

A.      ORIGINS (LE STRANGE)

 

 

1.         RIVALLON [Ruald] le Strange .  “Alan son of Flaald” granted Sporle Priory, Norfolk to Saumur Saint-Florent by charter, dated to before 1122, witnessed by “…Rivallonus Extraneus…[812]

 

2.         ROLAND le Strangem MATILDA, daughter of [RALPH FitzHerluin alias RALPH de Hunstanston & his wife Heloise de Plaiz].  Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1157/60] in which her son "Johannes Extraneus" donated land to Castle Acre priory, for the souls of "patris mei Rollandi et Matildæ matris meæ et Hamonis fratris mei"[813].  Her parentage is suggested by the charter dated to [before 1174] in which her son "Johannes cognomento Le Strange" donated "villa de Egeffel", held by "Radulfus de Hunestaneston…et filius eius Simon post eum, deinde frater ipsius Reginaldus le Brun" of whom "ego…legitimus heres iure hereditario successi"[814].  Roland & his wife had four children: 

a)         JOHN [I] le Strange (-before 29 Sep 1178).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1157/60] in which "Johannes Extraneus" donated land to Castle Acre priory, for the souls of "patris mei Rollandi et Matildæ matris meæ et Hamonis fratris mei"[815].  "Radulfus Lestrange" granted land in Wormgay, Norfolk to St Katherine’s, Blackburgh by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "..:Widone Lestrange…Iohe Lestrange"[816].  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[817].  The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Johi Extaneo" in Shropshire with revenue ₤7/10s[818].  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Johannes Lestrange" took one knight’s fee "Cheswrtha" [Cheswardine] from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire[819]m HAWISE, daughter of ---.  Her marriage is confirmed by one copy of a charter dated to [1177/80] in which "Johannes Extraneus" confirmed a donation of land in Webblescowe to Haughmond abbey, for the soul of "Hawise his wife", witnessed by "Wido my brother, Ralph his son, Hugh le Strange, Marescote, and Henry his son"[820].  John & his wife had two children: 

i)          JOHN [II] le Strange (-before 20 Jan 1234).  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[821]

-         see below

ii)         WILLIAM le Strange .  “Johannes Extraneus filius Johanni Extranei” donated “ecclesiam de Hulmo” to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo Extraneo fratre meo[822]

iii)        HAMO le Strange (-before 1203).  Eyton records that John [II] le Strange was fined 60 merks "to have custody of Wrockwardine manor, formerly held by his brother Hamo, till the king should return into England" (dated to [1201/03])[823]

b)         GUY le Strange (-[1179/80]).  "Radulfus Lestrange" granted land in Wormgay, Norfolk to St Katherine’s, Blackburgh by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "..:Widone Lestrange…Iohe Lestrange"[824].  The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Widoni Extaneo" in Shropshire[825].  Sheriff of Shropshire 1170.  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[826].  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Guido Extraneus" in Shropshire[827]m firstly ---.  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 names Guy’s widow but does not specify the number of her children, unlike other entries for widows with children, which suggests that all of Guy’s children were born from this presumed first marriage of which no information is otherwise known.  m secondly as her third husband, MARY, widow firstly of --- and secondly of ---, daughter of ---.  Guy le Strange and his wife Mary donated their mills at Stretton-upon-Avon and Alveley to Haughmond abbey by charter dated to [1171][828].  The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in dote Rungeton de feodo de Wermegai” held by “Maria uxor Gwidonis Extraney”, adding that she was 40 years old and had three husbands[829].  Guy & his [first] wife had six children: 

i)          GUY le Strange (-after 1196).  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[830].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Guido Extraneus, Johannes Extraneus" paying "vvv s, i militem et dimidiam" each in Shropshire[831].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1196/97], records "Guido Extraneus" paying "xxx s, i militem et dimidium" in Shropshire[832]

ii)         HAMO le Strange .  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[833]

iii)        MARGARET le Strange (-[Feb] 1222).  Her parentage and two marriages are noted by Eyton who also refers to her daughters by her first husband and their descendants[834].  "Alice de Harcourt and Joan her sister, daughters and heiresses of Margaret Lestrange" made a fine for "their relief of half a knight’s fee…that Margaret held of the king in chief in Alveley and Weston" in Shropshire, dated 15 Apr 1222[835]m firstly ([1175 or before]) THOMAS Noel, son of ROBERT FitzNoel & his wife --- (-[1206]).  m secondly (1207) THOMAS de Blancminster, son of --- (-after 1222). 

iv)       JOAN le Strange .  Her parentage and marriages are noted by Eyton who also refers to her daughters by her first husband and their descendants[836]m RICHARD de Wappenbury, son of --- (-[1209/16]). 

v)        MATILDA le Strange (-1242 or after).  Her parentage and marriages are noted by Eyton who also refers to her daughters by her first husband and their descendants[837].  She held Alveley jointly with her sister Margaret: The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Shropshire, dated to [1226/28], which includes "Matildis le Estrange et Alicia de Harecurt et Johanna Noel tenent de domino rege manerium de Alvitheleg"[838]m GRIFFIN de Sutton, son of --- (-[Jan 1221]). 

vi)       RALPH le Strange (-mid 1195).  His parentage is confirmed by one copy of a charter dated to [1177/80] in which "Johannes Extraneus" confirmed a donation of land in Webblescowe to Haughmond abbey, for the soul of "Hawise his wife", witnessed by "Wido my brother, Ralph his son, Hugh le Strange, Marescote, and Henry his son"[839].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Radulfo f Widonis Extranei…in Aluedelega" in Shropshire[840]

c)         HAMO le Strange (-1160 or before).  The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Hamoni Extaneo" in Shropshire with revenue of ₤4[841].  "Willielmus filius Alani" confirmed a donation of Nagington to Haughmond abbey, for the soul of "Hamonis Extranei", by charter dated to [1160], witnessed by "Johanne Extraneo, Widone Extraneo, Engelardo, Willielmo filio Odonis"[842].  "Johannes Extraneus" donated land to Castle Acre priory, for the souls of "patris mei Rollandi et Matildæ matris meæ et Hamonis fratris mei", by charter dated to [1157/60][843]

d)         RALPH le Strange (-before Jun 1194).  "Radulfus Lestrange" granted land in Wormgay, Norfolk to St Katherine’s, Blackburgh by charter dated to [1150], witnessed by "..:Widone Lestrange…Iohe Lestrange"[844].  "Radulfus Extraneus" confirmed the donation of Nagington to Haughmond abbey by "Willielmus filius Alani", for the soul of "Hamonis fratris mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "Johanne Extraneo, Widone Extraneo…"[845].  "Radulphus Extraneus" donated the mill of Hunstanston to Haughmond abbey, for the souls of "…Johannis fratris mei qui feudum mihi dedit et filii mei Rolandi", by undated charter[846]m [--- de Cressy, daughter of HUGH de Cressy & his wife ---.  A charter extract, undated, records that "Radulfus Extraneus" gave two knights’ fees to "Hugonis de Creissio…quod tenet de eo de dote suæ uxoris" and that "Willelmus de Waltun" have "c s…dominæ Alæ…et illa comiti de Warenna"[847].  This text is difficult to interpret with certainty but could refer to the wife of Ralph le Strange, son of Roland le Strange.]  Ralph & his wife had three children: 

i)          ROLAND le Strange .  "Radulphus Extraneus" donated the mill of Hunstanston to Haughmond abbey, for the souls of "…Johannis fratris mei qui feudum mihi dedit et filii mei Rolandi", by undated charter[848]

ii)         MATILDA .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a lawsuit pending in 1198 between "Fulk de Oirri and Philip de Burnham as husbands of Matilda and Emma, daughters of Ralph le Strange" relating to their shares of Ralph’s inheritance[849]m FULK de Oirri, son of ---. 

iii)        EMMA .  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a lawsuit pending in 1198 between "Fulk de Oirri and Philip de Burnham as husbands of Matilda and Emma, daughters of Ralph le Strange" relating to their shares of Ralph’s inheritance[850]m PHILIP de Burnham, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ADAM le Strange .  The 1176/77 Pipe Roll names "Ade Extraneo" in Shropshire[851]

 

 

JOHN [II] le Strange, son of JOHN le Strange & his wife --- (-before 20 Jan 1234).  “Johannes Extraneus et Wido frater eius, Johannes filius Johannis Extranei, Wido et Hamo filii Widonis Extranei, Thomas filius Roberti filii Noelli…” witnessed the undated charter under which “Willielmus filius Willielmi filii Alani” donated “villam…Parva Buldewas” to Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire[852].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Guido Extraneus, Johannes Extraneus" paying "vvv s, i militem et dimidiam" each in Shropshire[853].  “Johannes Extraneus filius Johanni Extranei” donated “ecclesiam de Hulmo” to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter, witnessed by “Willielmo Extraneo fratre meo[854].  The 1194/95 Pipe Roll records "Johanni f Johannis Extranei…in Nesse et Chessewurdin" in Shropshire[855].  The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Johannes Extraneus" holding one knight’s fee "in Nesse et Chesworthin" in Shropshire in [1210/12][856]

m AMICE, daughter of ---.  John le Strange names Amice as his wife in the Lilleshall cartulary[857]

John [II] & his wife had three children: 

1.         JOHN [III] le Strange (-before 26 Mar 1269).  Henry III King of England ordered "…Johannes Extraneus junior" to enquire into the state of the forests "de comitatu Salopie" dated [Jul] 1219[858]m LUCY, daughter of ---.  There is some suggestion that she was Lucy Tregoz[859].  John [III] & his wife had four children: 

a)         JOHN [IV] le Strange (-before 28 Dec 1275[860]).  A writ dated 26 Feb "4 Edw I", following the death of "John L’Estrange alias Le Estraunge" names "John his son believed to be 22 and more is his next heir...aged 28[861]m JOAN de Somery, daughter of ROGER [IV] de Somery & his first wife Nicole de Albini of the Earls of Arundel.  The Annales Londonienses name "filium Radulphum qui mortuus erat ante patrem suum et quatuor filias, Margaretam, Johannam, Elizabetham et Matildam, Margareta nupsit Radulpho de Basset juniori, Johanna nupsit Johanni Lestrange, Elizabetha Waltero de Souli, Matillda Henrico de Erdyntoune" as the children of "Rogeri de Someri" and his wife "Nicholaa", adding that Joan married "Johanni Lestrange"[862].  A writ dated 26 Aug "1 Edw I", after the death of "Roger de Somery" records details of "the inheritance of Nicholaa de Albiniaco his first wife" and names "Margaret the wife of Ralph de Cromwelle, Joan the wife of John le Strange, Mabel the wife of Walter de Suyllye and Maud the wife of Henry de Erdinton" as her heirs[863].  John [IV] & his wife had one child: 

i)          JOHN [V] le Strange ([1252/53]-8 Aug 1309 or before).  A writ dated 26 Feb "4 Edw I", following the death of "John L’Estrange alias Le Estraunge" names "John his son believed to be 22 and more is his next heir...aged 28[864].  The Chronicle of Peterborough names "dominus Rogerus le Estrange capitaneus…dominus Johannes le Estrange" among those sent to fight Llywelyn Prince of Wales in 1282[865].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Knokyn). 

-         see below

b)         HAMO le Strange (-[1274/75]).  "Hamo Extraneus with consent of Sir John his father" donated his part of the wood at Wombridge to Wombridge priory by charter dated to [1247/59])[866].  He may have accompanied Edward, son of Henry III King of England, on his crusade to Palestine in 1271.  Rüdt-Collenberg says that Hamo Lestrange of Ellesmere went to Palestine in 1270/71[867].  According to the Complete Peerage, Hamo was "prominent in the king's service until his death, probably in the Holy Land, early in 1274/5"[868].  On his deathbed, he placed his wife and the fief of Beirut under the protection of the Mameluk Sultan Baibars[869]m (21 Mar 1272) as her second husband, ISABELLE Ibelin Lady of Beirut, widow of HUGUES II King of Cyprus, daughter of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his wife Alice of Athens ([1252]-[1282/before Nov 1283])The Lignages d'Outremer name "Yzabeau la fille dou seignor de Baruth" as the wife of an unnamed person who died at the age of 14[870].  The paragraph in question deals with the family of the kings of Cyprus, and it is most likely that words have been omitted from the text which would clarify that the husband in question was Hugues II King of Cyprus.  This is confirmed by another manuscript of the Lignages which names "Ysabeau et Eschive" as the two daughters of Jean son of "Balian…sire de Baruth" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married firstly "Huge, le fis de Henri roy de Chipre, qui morut de 14 ans", secondly "un Englés…Heimon Lestrange" and thirdly "Guille Barlais" and died without heirs[871].  Isabelle returned from Cyprus to Beirut after the death of her first husband.  She married thirdly (1276) Nicolas Alaman titular Lord of Caesarea (-murdered Jun 1277).  After the death of her second husband, Hugues III King of Cyprus and Jerusalem took her to Cyprus to marry her third husband, but was obliged to return her to Beirut in 1277 in view of the deathbed agreement made by her second husband[872].  She married fourthly (after 1277) as his first wife, Guillaume Barlais, son of --- (-[1305/06]). 

c)         ROGER le Strange (-after [1270]).  "Dominis Rogero Extraneo, Roberto fratre suo" witnessed the charter dated to [1270] under which "Hawise" kept the manor of Stretton for "frater suus dominus Hamo Extraneus" when he left for Palestine, with the consent of "mariti sui…domini Griffini"[873].  Lord of Cheswardine and Ellesmere[874]

d)         ROBERT le Strange (-[12] Oct 1276).  "Dominis Rogero Extraneo, Roberto fratre suo" witnessed the charter dated to [1270] under which "Hawise" kept the manor of Stretton for "frater suus dominus Hamo Extraneus" when he left for Palestine, with the consent of "mariti sui…domini Griffini"[875].  "John le Strange Lord of Knokyn" gave Wrockwardine manor to "Robert le Strange his brother" dated 23 May 1275[876].  Eyton gives some details about his descendants in Shropshire[877]m ELEANOR de Blancminster, daughter of WILLIAM de Blancminster & his wife --- (-after Oct 1276).  Robert & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN le Strange (-[18] Jun 1289).  m ---.  The name of John’s wife is not known.  John & his wife had children: 

(a)       EBLES le Strange ([1266/67]-[23] Jan 1324).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1309 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Blackmere). 

-         see below

e)         ALICE (-after [1260/61]).  John le Strange gave half his manor of Lytcham, Norfolk to his daughter Alice, towards her marriage in [1260/61][878]

f)          HAWISE (-1310).  "Griffin son of Wenunewin" was granted "the manor of Eshford, co Derby" to give as dower to "Hawyse daughter of John Lestrange his wife", dated 24 Feb 1242[879].  "Hawise" kept the manor of Stretton for "frater suus dominus Hamo Extraneus" when he left for Palestine, with the consent of "mariti sui…domini Griffini", by charter dated to [1270], witnessed by "Dominis Rogero Extraneo, Roberto fratre suo"[880]m (before 24 Feb 1242) GRUFFYDD ap Gwenwynwyn, son of GWENWYNWYN Prince of Southern Powys & his wife Mary Corbet (-1286). 

2.         HAMO le Strange

3.         MARGERY .  Eyton suggests her parentage and marriage to explain the charter, dated to [1238/55], under which "Nicholas de Willilegh" sold to Sir John le Strange land at Lytcham, Norfolk "which the father of the said John gave for the frank marriage of Ralph de Pichford and Margery his daughter"[881]m RALPH de Pichford, son of ---. 

 

 

1.         ROGER Le Strange (-1311)m as her first husband, MATILDA de Beauchamp, widow of ROGER de Mowbray, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford & his wife Ida de Longespee of the Earls of Salisbury (-before Apr 1273).  A manuscript which recites the Mowbray ancestry records that “Rogerus”, son of “Willielmus de Molbray”, married “Matildam, filiam Willielmi de Bello-campo[882].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  

 

 

 

B.      LORDS STRANGE

 

 

JOHN [V] le Strange, son of JOHN [IV] le Strange & his wife Joan de Somery ([1252/53]-8 Aug 1309 or before).  A writ dated 26 Feb "4 Edw I", following the death of "John L’Estrange alias Le Estraunge" names "John his son believed to be 22 and more is his next heir...aged 28[883].  The Chronicle of Peterborough names "dominus Rogerus le Estrange capitaneus…dominus Johannes le Estrange" among those sent to fight Llywelyn Prince of Wales in 1282[884].  Eyton gives some details about his descendants in Shropshire[885].  He was summoned to Parliament in 1299 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Knokyn). 

m firstly ELEANOR, daughter of --- & his wife Joan [de Somery]. 

m secondly MAUD, daughter of --- (-after 30 Oct 1309). 

John [V] & his [second] wife had children: 

1.         JOHN [VI] le Strange ([1281/82]-[6] Feb 1311).  Lord Strange (of Knokyn).  m ISOLDA, daughter of --- (-after 18 May 1324).  John [VI] & his wife had children: 

a)         JOHN le Strange ([1296/97]-[28] May 1323).  Lord Strange of Knokyn.  m MAUD, daughter of --- (-after 1 Apr 1324). 

b)         ROGER le Strange (15 Aug 1301-Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire 29 Jul 1349).  m firstly MAUD, daughter of ---.  m secondly (before 25 Mar 1344) JOAN de Ingham, daughter of OLIVER de Ingham Lord Ingham & his wife --- (-before 12 Dec 1365, bur Ingham).  Roger & his first wife had children: 

i)          ROGER Le Strange ([1326/27]-Keneyleswode [Kenwick’s Wood, Ellesmere parish, Shropshire?] 23 Aug 1382).  He succeeded his father in 1349 as Lord Strange (of Knokyn)[886]m (1338 or before) ALINE FitzAlan, daughter of EDMUND FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his wife Alice de Warenne of Surrey (-20 Jan 1386).  The will of "Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey", dated 5 Dec 1375, bequeathed property to “Richard my son...my son Thomas Bishop of Ely...John my son...Joane my daughter [...Countess of Hereford]...Alice my daughter...the eldest daughter of my said son John...Henry and Edward the younger sons of my said son John...William another son of my said son John...my nephews and nieces sons and daughters of Sir Roger le Strange and to my sister Dame Alaine le Strange wife to the said Roger...my...uncle Sir John Arundell[887]

-         LORDS STRANGE (of KNOKYN)[888]

ii)         [ISABEL (-after 1366)m (before Dec 1351) as his second wife, JAMES Lord Audley, son of NICHOLAS Lord Audley & his wife Joan Martin (Knesale, Nottinghamshire 8 Jan 1313-Heleigh 1 Apr 1386, bur Hulton Abbey).] 

2.         Sir EBLES Le Strange (-Scotland 8 Sep 1335, bur Barlings Abbey, Birling, Kent).  He was the squire of the Earl of Surrey who abducted Ctss Alice in 1317, triggering her divorce from her first husband.  He was summoned to Parliament in 1326 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange.  m (before 10 Nov 1324) as her second husband, ALICE de Lacy, divorced wife of THOMAS Earl of Lancaster, daughter of HENRY de Lacy Earl of Lincoln & his first wife Margaret Longespee Ctss of Salisbury ([Denbigh Castle] 25 Dec 1281-2 Oct 1348, bur Barlings Abbey, Birling, Kent).  The Book of Lacock names “Alesiam” as the daughter of “d’no Henrico de Lacy comiti Lincolniæ” and his wife Margaret, adding that she married “comiti de Lancaster, Leicester et de Ferrers, Thomæ[889].  A manuscript narrating the descent of Hugh Earl of Chester to Alice Ctss of Lincoln names “Edmundum…et filiam Aleseiam” as children of “Henricum Lacy comitem Lincolniæ”, adding that Alice married “domino Thomæ comiti Lancastriæ et Leicestriæ” and after his death “domino Ebuloni de Strange[890].  A manuscript history of the Lacy family names “Alicia” as daughter of “Henricus de Lacy comes Lincolniæ”, adding that she married “Thomæ filio comitis Lancastriæ[891]She succeeded her mother as Ctss of Salisbury before 16 Jun 1310, and her father 5 Feb 1311 as Ctss of Lincoln.  She married thirdly (before 23 Mar 1336) Sir Hugh de Frene Lord Frene

 

 

 

EBLES le Strange, son of JOHN le Strange & his wife --- ([1266/67]-[23] Jan 1324).  He was summoned to Parliament in 1309 whereby he is held to have become Lord Strange (of Blackmere). 

m ELEANOR Giffard, daughter of JOHN Giffard of Brimsfield & his wife --- (-before 1324). 

Ebles & his wife had children: 

1.         JOHN Le Strange (-21 Jul 1349)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m as her first husband, ANKARET Boteler, daughter of WILLIAM Boteler of Wem, Shropshire & his wife --- (-( Oct 1361).  She married secondly Sir Thomas de Ferrers.  John & his wife had children: 

a)         FULK Le Strange ([1330/31]-30 Aug 1349)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Stafford, daughter of RALPH de Stafford Earl of Stafford & his second wife Margaret de Audley (1333 or after-7 Aug 1375).  She married secondly John Lord Ferrers.  She married thirdly as his first wife, Sir Reginald de Cobham (Lord Cobham of Sterborough). 

b)         JOHN Le Strange (Whitchurch [Easter] 1332-12 May 1361)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m MARY [Isabel] FitzAlan of Arundel, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his first wife Isabel le Despencer (-29 Aug 1396).  John & his wife had children: 

i)          JOHN Le Strange (-3 Aug 1375)Lord Strange (of Blackmere).  m (after 6 Sep 1369) as her first husband, ISABEL de Beauchamp, daughter of THOMAS Beauchamp Earl of Warwick & his wife Katherine de Mortimer (-29 Sep 1416, bur Campsey Priory)The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 6 Sep 1369, chose burial “in the quire of the Collegiate Church of our Lady at Warwick”, bequeathed property to “my two sons Thomas and William...Isabel my daughter...to her marriage...Margaret my daughter a nun at Shouldham...Katherine the daughter of my son Guy a nun at Shouldham...my daughter Alice...my daughter Clifford...Sir John Beauchamp...Sir Roger Beauchamp...Sir Guy de Brienne...[892].  Her marriage is recorded in the Complete Peerage[893]She married secondly (12 Jun 1376 or before) as his second wife, William de Ufford Earl of SuffolkShe became a nun 21 Mar 1382.  The will of "Thomas Beauchamp Earl of Warwick", dated 1 Apr 1400, bequeathed property to “Richard my son and heir...my daughter Beauchamp...my brother of Bergavenny...my sisters of Suffolk and Clifford and...my niece Katherine Beauchamp the nun at Shouldham[894].  John & his wife had one child: 

(1)       ELIZABETH Le Strange ([1374]-23 Aug 1383)Baroness Strangem as his first wife, THOMAS Mowbray, son of JOHN Mowbray Lord Mowbray & his wife Elizabeth de Segrave (22 Mar 1366-Venice 22 Sep 1399, bur Venice, abbey of St George).  He succeeded his brother in 1383 as Lord Mowbray, Lord Segrave.  Earl of Nottingham 1383.  He was created Duke of Norfolk 29 Sep 1397, and succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk in 1399 on the death of his maternal grandmother. 

ii)         ANKARET Le Strange ([1361]-1 Jun 1413).  She succeeded her father 23 Aug 1383 as Baroness Strange, suo iurem firstly (before 23 Aug 1383) RICHARD Talbot, son of GILBERT Talbot Lord Talbot & his first wife Pernel Butler ([1361]-London 8/9 Sep 1395).  He was summoned to Parliament 3 Mar 1384, in consequence of his marriage to the heiress of Strange, whereby he is held to have become Lord Talbot[895]m secondly ([8 Mar/4 Jul] 1401) as his second wife, THOMAS Neville Lord Furnivalle, son of JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his first wife Matilda Percy (-14 Mar 1407, bur Worksop Priory). 

c)         [MATILDA m BRIAN de Cornwall, son of Sir EDMUND Cornwall of Kinlet & his wife Elizabeth de Brampton.] 

 

 

 

SUDELEY

 

 

JOHN de Sudeley, son of HAROLD de Ewias & his wife --- (-before 1166).  "Haraldus de Ewyas" donated "ecclesiam Sancti Michaelis de Ewyas…decimam de domino castelli de Ewyas…" to Gloucester St Peter, confirmed by "Roberto herede meo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogerus, Johannes, Alexander et Willelmus filii mei…"[896].  Lord of Sudely Castle and Toddington, Gloucestershire.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Johs de Sulleia" accounting for his (unnamed) wife’s property in Gloucestershire[897]

m (before 1130) ---.  The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Johs de Sulleia" accounting for his (unnamed) wife’s property in Gloucestershire[898].  The primary source which confirms the name and parentage of the wife of John de Sudeley has not been identified.  Indeed, it is not even certain that his two sons were born from the same marriage: their adoption of the different names Sudeley/Tracy may indicate different mothers.  Secondary sources commonly show John’s wife as Grace de Tracy, daughter of William de Tracy, an illegitimate son of Henry I King of England.  This appears to be the assumption of many writers, for example the Complete Peerage[899]Frank Barlow comments that "William [de Tracy], the second son of John de Sudeley…chose to take his name from the family of his mother, Grace daughter and heir of William (I) de Tracy, lord of Bradninch in Devon and illegitimate son of King Henry I"[900]However, I have not yet found any writer who provides a precise primary source citation which can be followed up to confirm this marriage.  Her existence has been doubted by Professor Nicholas Vincent, who states that he could "find no reliable evidence to suggest that the royal bastard fathered a daughter named" Grace and suggests that Grace "seems to have been invented, perhaps in comparatively recent times, to explain certain irregularities in the Sudeley descent, and to justify the claims of the Hanbury-Tracy family of Toddington in Gloucestershire to be descended both from the blood royal of Henry I and from William de Tracy, the murderer of Thomas Becket"[901].  Until more information comes to light, it appears safer to note John de Sudeley’s wife as unknown. 

John & his wife had two children: 

1.         RALPH [I] de Sudeley (-before 29 Sep 1192).  "Radulphus de Suthleie" donated "Thanewordam villam meam" {Yaneworthe} to Gloucester St Peter, the same place also being donated by separate charter by "Rainaldus de Chockes", by undated charter[902].  "Willelmus de Traceio" confirmed the donation of "Thanewordam villam meam" {Yaneworthe} to Gloucester St Peter made by "Radulfus de Suthleia frater meus", and with the consent of "Radulfo fratre meo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Henricus de Traceio…"[903].  "Radulphus de Sudlla" donated property to Winchecombe, donated by "[pater] meus Iohannes de Sudleia", for the souls of "…Emme uxoris mee", by undated charter which names "Otueli filii et heredis mei et Radulphi filii mei"[904].  “Radulphus de Sudle” donated the churches of Dercet and Chilverdescote to Erdbury, for the souls of "Emmæ uxoris meæ et Hotveli filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Will de Traci, Ricardo de Sudle…"[905]m EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1192, bur Winchecombe Abbey).  "Radulphus de Sudlla" donated property to Winchecombe, donated by "[pater] meus Iohannes de Sudleia", for the souls of "…Emme uxoris mee", by undated charter which names "Otueli filii et heredis mei et Radulphi filii mei"[906].  “Radulphus de Sudle” donated the churches of Dercet and Chilverdescote to Erdbury, for the souls of "Emmæ uxoris meæ et Hotveli filii mei", by undated charter[907].  According to Dugdale[908], she was Emma de Beauchamp, daughter of William de Beauchamp of Elmley & his wife Bertha de Briouse, but the primary source on which this information is based has not been traced.  The name of her son Otuel suggests a family relationship with Ottiwell [Otuel], illegitimate son of Hugh Earl of Chester (see the document ENGLAND; EARLS CREATED 1067-1122).  Another possibility is that the wife of Ralph [I] de Sudely was --- de Stafford, daughter of Nicholas de Stafford & his wife Matilda ---.  This hypothesis depends exclusively on two charters dated to the end 12th century under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", the second charter clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[909].  No other record has yet been found of a "Suleya/Suleye" family.  It is uncertain which English surname is represented by the Latin "Suleya".  However, it is similar to "Sudeley" and one possibility is that "Radulfus de Suleya" senior was the same person as Ralph [I] de Sudeley, both persons being recorded with a son named Ralph.  The chronology appears favourable for this co-identity, but its likelihood depends on establishing a connection between the Sudeley family and Theddlethorpe.  No such connection has yet been identified.  Ralph [I] & his wife had two children: 

a)         OTUEL de Sudeley (-1198, bur Winchecombe).  "Radulphus de Sudlla" donated property to Winchecombe, donated by "[pater] meus Iohannes de Sudleia", for the souls of "…Emme uxoris mee", by undated charter which names "Otueli filii et heredis mei et Radulphi filii mei"[910].  “Radulphus de Sudle” donated the churches of Dercet and Chilverdescote to Erdbury, for the souls of "Emmæ uxoris meæ et Hotveli filii mei", by undated charter[911].  The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Otuel de Sudlega" paying "lx s, iii milites" in Gloucestershire[912]m MARGARET, daughter of ---.  Margaret wife of Otuel de Sudeley is named in a charter of Winchecombe abbey[913]

b)         RALPH [II] de Sudeley (-before 26 Feb 1222).  "Radulphus de Sudlla" donated property to Winchecombe, donated by "[pater] meus Iohannes de Sudleia", for the souls of "…Emme uxoris mee", by undated charter which names "Otueli filii et heredis mei et Radulphi filii mei"[914].  "Ralph son and heir of Ralph de Sudeley" made a fine for "his relief of the lands formerly of Ralph his father" in Gloucestershire, dated 26 Feb 1222[915]m ISABELLA, daughter of --- (-after 1242).  A fine dated 1242 names "Imenie que fuit ux Radi de Suthleg" and "Isabella que fuit ux Radi de Suthleg patris pdci Radi"[916].  Isabella’s family origin is not known.  Several so-called "genealogy" websites published on the internet call her "Isabella de Stafford".  This speculation presumably finds its origin in the charters relating to Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire which are quoted above in relation to the possible origin of the wife of Ralph [I] de Sudeley.  As discussed further above, it is not certain that the name "Suleya" in those documents is the same as "Sudeley".  In any case, the daughter of Nicholas de Stafford who married "Radulfus de Suleya" was the wife of the older person of that name in those documents who, the chronology suggests, would be identified with Ralph [I] de Sudeley if the names "Suleya" and Sudeley were in fact the same. 

-        LORDS SUDELEY[917]

2.         WILLIAM de Tracy of Toddington, Gloucestershire (-after [1192]).  "Willelmus de Traceio" confirmed the donation of "Thanewordam villam meam" {Yaneworthe} to Gloucester St Peter made by "Radulfus de Suthleia frater meus", and with the consent of "Radulfo fratre meo", by undated charter, witnessed by "Henricus de Traceio…"[918]

-        TRACY

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Domesday Translation, Essex, XXIII, p. 998. 

[2] Chronicon Rameseiensis, 239, p. 233. 

[3] Hart, W. H. and Lyons, P. A. (ed.) (1884) Cartularium monasterii de Ramseia, 3 Vols. (London) ("Ramsey"), Vol. I, p. 128. 

[4] Chronicon Rameseiensis, 239, p. 233. 

[5] Chronicon Rameseiensis, 239, p. 233. 

[6] Ramsey, Vol. I, p. 128. 

[7] CP X 331, citing Douglas Feudal documents from Bury St Edmunds, no. 179. 

[8] CP X 331, citing Douglas Feudal documents from Bury St Edmunds, no. 179. 

[9] Ramsey, Vol. I, p. 128. 

[10] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 70, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 29. 

[11] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 364 and 366. 

[12] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 48. 

[13] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[14] Clark (1907), I, 22, p. 47. 

[15] Red Book of the Exchequer, p. 367, cited in CP X 332, footnote e. 

[16] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 72, quoting Newport Evidences

[17] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[18] Ramsey, Vol. I, p. 128. 

[19] Eyton (1859), Vol. IX, p. 70, citing Salop Chartulary, no. 29. 

[20] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norfolk, Hundredum de Happinges, p. 29. 

[21] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[22] Ramsey, Vol. I, p. 128. 

[23] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 367. 

[24] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, Hundredum de Werle, p. 45. 

[25] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, Hundredum de Werle, p. 45. 

[26] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli X, Cantebrigesire, Hundredum de Werle, p. 45. 

[27] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 366. 

[28] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 95. 

[29] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, p. 98. 

[30] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 200. 

[31] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 6 John, p. 200. 

[32] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[33] Ramsey, Vol. I, p. 128. 

[34] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, pp. 75 and 76. 

[35] Curiæ Regis Rolls, Vol. I, 6 Ric I, p. 2. 

[36] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 82. 

[37] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, p. 2. 

[38] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 475, 524 and 527. 

[39] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 15 John, p. 101. 

[40] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 48. 

[41] Ramsey, Vol. I, p. 128. 

[42] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[43] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 48. 

[44] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[45] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, III, 108, p. 176. 

[46] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[47] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, II, 23, p. 86. 

[48] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 25, p. 50. 

[49] CP X336, footnote a, citing Close Rolls, 1247-51, pp. 388, 452. 

[50] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 25, p. 50. 

[51] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 25, p. 50. 

[52] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 25, p. 50. 

[53] CP X 336-8, extinct in the male line 1360. 

[54] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[55] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[56] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[57] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[58] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 23, p. 48. 

[59] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 15 John, p. 101. 

[60] Colchester St John, Vol. I, p. 203. 

[61] Colchester St John, Vol. I, p. 204. 

[62] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/18, 7 Hen III, 126. 

[63] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/24, 10 Hen III, 168. 

[64] Colchester St John, Vol. I, p. 205. 

[65] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire I, De Fundatione Monasterii per Guil. de Percy, p. 409.   

[66] Domesday Translation, Hampshire, XXV, p. 111, Yorkshire, XIII, pp. 832-6, Lincolnshire, XXII, pp. 918-20. 

[67] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1913), Vol. I, 220, p. 59. 

[68] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[69] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[70] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[71] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[72] CP XI 317 footnote j, quoting Liber Winton 1107/15, Domesday Book, Vol. IV, Additamenta, p. 540. 

[73] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[74] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[75] Bridlington Priory, p. 12. 

[76] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 417.   

[77] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 418.   

[78] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[79] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 417.   

[80] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 418.   

[81] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire I, De Fundatione Monasterii per Guil. de Percy, p. 410.   

[82] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[83] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 417.   

[84] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 900, p. 243. 

[85] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1073, p. 379. 

[86] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire I, De Fundatione Monasterii per Guil. de Percy, p. 410.   

[87] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XVIII, p. 414.   

[88] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 898, p. 241. 

[89] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 900, p. 243. 

[90] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire I, De Fundatione Monasterii per Guil. de Percy, p. 409.   

[91] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[92] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[93] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[94] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[95] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 411.   

[96] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  377, p. 295, other charters which name his descendants feature in the subsequent pp. 296-299. 

[97] Whitby, Vol. I, LXVIII, p. 63. 

[98] Whitby, Vol. I, LXXV, p. 69. 

[99] Whitby, Vol. I, LXVIII, p. 63. 

[100] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[101] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[102] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[103] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 216. 

[104] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 640. 

[105] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[106] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  647, p. 1. 

[107] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  746, p. 89. 

[108] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  650, p. 3. 

[109] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  747, p. 91. 

[110] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  747, p. 91. 

[111] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  749, p. 92. 

[112] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  749, p. 92. 

[113] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  750, p. 93. 

[114] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 77. 

[115] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  750, p. 93. 

[116] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 22, p. 21. 

[117] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 22, p. 21. 

[118] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XVI, p. 414.   

[119] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XVI, p. 414.   

[120] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  530, p. 410. 

[121] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 417.   

[122] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Nostell Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 93. 

[123] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  331, p. 252. 

[124] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Nostell Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 93. 

[125] Whitby, Vol. I, XXVI, p. 29. 

[126] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 512.   

[127] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire IX, p. 513.   

[128] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Nostell Priory, Yorkshire, III, p. 93. 

[129] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[130] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[131] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[132] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire II, De Dotatione Monasterii, p. 410.   

[133] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  855, p. 197. 

[134] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 417.   

[135] Glasgow Bishopric, Tome I, 1, p. 5. 

[136] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, Appendix, CLXXXV, p. 356. 

[137] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 970, p. 300. 

[138] Bridlington Priory, p. 12. 

[139] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire I, De Fundatione Monasterii per Guil. de Percy, p. 410.   

[140] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, Northumberland, p. 25. 

[141] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 515.   

[142] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1207, p. 484. 

[143] Bridlington Priory, p. 12. 

[144] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 970, p. 300. 

[145] Whitby, Vol. I, LIX, p. 59. 

[146] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 28. 

[147] Pipe Roll 12 Hen II (1165/66), p. 41. 

[148] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 40. 

[149] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1207, p. 484. 

[150] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire IX, p. 513.   

[151] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 512.   

[152] Whitby, Vol. I, XXVI, p. 29. 

[153] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[154] Whitby, Vol. I, XXVI, p. 29. 

[155] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire IX, p. 513.   

[156] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire V, p. 512.   

[157] Domesday Descendants, p. 631. 

[158] Pipe Roll 12 Hen II (1165/66), p. 41. 

[159] Pipe Pipe Roll 16 Hen II (1169/70), Lincolnshire, p. 37. 

[160] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, St Peter’s Cathedral, York, Yorkshire LXXVIII, p. 1190.   

[161] Pipe Roll 28 Hen II (1181/82), p. 46. 

[162] Percy Chartulary, V, p. 5. 

[163] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire III, p. 512.   

[164] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire V, p. 512.   

[165] Percy Chartulary, XLI, p. 25. 

[166] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, St Peter’s Cathedral, York, Yorkshire LXXVIII, p. 1190.   

[167] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[168] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire V, p. 512.   

[169] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 87. 

[170] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[171] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire V, p. 512.   

[172] Whitby, Vol. I, CCXVIII, p. 178. 

[173] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire VI, p. 513.   

[174] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  231, p. 189. 

[175] Percy Chartulary, V, p. 5. 

[176] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXI, p. 515.   

[177] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1201, p. 481. 

[178] Whitby, Vol. I, XXVI, p. 29. 

[179] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1202, p. 482. 

[180] Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. III, 1862, p. 467. 

[181] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Croxton Abbey, Leicestershire V, p. 878.   

[182] Early Yorkshire Charters III, 1864, p. 473. 

[183] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 433. 

[184] Whitby, Vol. I, LIX, p. 59. 

[185] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[186] Whitby, Vol. I, LXI, p. 60. 

[187] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[188] Whitby, Vol. I, LXI, p. 60. 

[189] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[190] Whitby, Vol. I, LX, p. 60. 

[191] CP X 439 footnote e, quoting Ailred of Rievaulx Relatio de Standardo, p. 190. 

[192] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  531, p. 411. 

[193] Whitby, Vol. I, LIX, p. 59. 

[194] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[195] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 40. 

[196] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 53. 

[197] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DLVII, p. 137. 

[198] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[199] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire V, p. 512.   

[200] Whitby, Vol. I, CCXVIII, p. 178. 

[201] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire VI, p. 513.   

[202] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  231, p. 189. 

[203] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 75. 

[204] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 85. 

[205] Percy Chartulary, V, p. 5. 

[206] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[207] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 72. 

[208] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 92. 

[209] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II,  668, p. 24. 

[210] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I,  548, p. 428. 

[211] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[212] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[213] Percy Chartulary, XIV, p. 13. 

[214] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 24. 

[215] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 490. 

[216] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, St Peter’s Cathedral, York, Yorkshire LXXIX, p. 1190.   

[217] Percy Chartulary, III, p. 4. 

[218] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, St Peter’s Cathedral, York, Yorkshire LXXIX, p. 1190.   

[219] Percy Chartulary, III, p. 4. 

[220] Percy Chartulary, XXVII, p. 21. 

[221] Domesday Descendants, p. 1059. 

[222] Percy Chartulary, XIV, p. 13. 

[223] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 75. 

[224] Curiæ Regis Rolls, Vol. I, 6 Ric I, p. 82. 

[225] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Bullington Priory, Lincolnshire, IX, p. 953. 

[226] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[227] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 490. 

[228] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 398. 

[229] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[230] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 398. 

[231] CP V 133-4 footnote f. 

[232] Percy Chartulary, XVI, p. 14. 

[233] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 72, p. 19. 

[234] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’ (1886), p. 33. 

[235] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[236] Percy Chartulary, III, p. 4. 

[237] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 434, p. 248. 

[238] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[239] Percy Chartulary, XXVI, p. 20. 

[240] Percy Chartulary, XXVI, p. 20. 

[241] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[242] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 434, p. 248. 

[243] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[244] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire IV, p. 512.   

[245] Dugdale Monasticon I, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire XXXII, p. 417.   

[246] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[247] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[248] Surtees Society (1836) Testamenta Eboracensia (London), Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[249] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[250] Percy Chartulary, XVI, p. 14. 

[251] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 52, p. 12. 

[252] Calendar of Documents Scotland (Bain), Vol. II, 23, p. 6. 

[253] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[254] Percy Chartulary, XVI, p. 14. 

[255] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[256] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 219. 

[257] CP V 465 footnote c. 

[258] Patent Rolls, Henry III, Vol. 5, p. 36.  [Margaret Schooling]

[259] Patent Rolls, Henry III, Vol. 6, p. 735.  [Margaret Schooling]

[260] Somersetshire Pleas (1923), Roll no. 1205, pp. 96-7, [41 end, Henry III Vol. 36 500 (O62)].  [Margaret Schooling]

[261] Patent Rolls, Edward I, Vol. 2, p. 409.  [Margaret Schooling]

[262] Patent Rolls, Edward I, Vol. 3, p. 524.  [Margaret Schooling]

[263] Patent Rolls, Edward I, Vol. 3, p. 524.  [Margaret Schooling]

[264] Patent Rolls, Edward I, Vol. 4, p. 231, and Edward I, Vol. 4, p. 232.  [Margaret Schooling]

[265] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[266] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[267] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[268] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[269] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[270] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[271] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[272] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[273] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[274] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 84. 

[275] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[276] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 84. 

[277] Given-Wilson & Curteis (1988), p. 138. 

[278] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievall Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[279] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[280] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 84. 

[281] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[282] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[283] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[284] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[285] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[286] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 84. 

[287] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 76. 

[288] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 90. 

[289] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[290] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 84. 

[291] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[292] Dugdale Monasticon V, Sawley Abbey, Yorkshire XXII, Genealogia Perciorum, p. 516.   

[293] Testamenta Eboracensia, Part I, XLVI, p. 57. 

[294] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 84. 

[295] Rotuli Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. 39. 

[296] Rotuli Normanniæ, Vol. I, p. 43. 

[297] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 15 John, p. 517. 

[298] Rotuli Litterarum Patentium, 18 John, p. 187. 

[299] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 241. 

[300] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 275. 

[301] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 18, p. 6. 

[302] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 18, p. 6. 

[303] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1417. 

[304] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 18, p. 6. 

[305] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 440. 

[306] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 440. 

[307] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 440. 

[308] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 18, p. 6. 

[309] Loyd (1951), p. 86, citing Lancaster, W. T. (1918) The Early History of Ripley and the Ingilby Family, p. 37n, cited by Douglas, D. C. (1944) Domesday Monachorum of Christ Church, Canterbury (London), p. 29n. 

[310] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Fécamp, II, p. 1083. 

[311] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. I, 354, p. 269. 

[312] Grazebrook ‘Family of Grazebrook from 1065’ (London, Mar 1908), pp. 79-81. 

[313] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 208. 

[314] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, p. 32. 

[315] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 208. 

[316] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Yorkshire, p. 32. 

[317] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. III, 1330, p. 52. 

[318] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. III, 1330, p. 52. 

[319] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire, I, p. 208. 

[320] Rievaulx, XLIII, p. 21. 

[321] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, pp. 29 and 30. 

[322] Pipe Roll 9 Hen II (1162/63), p. 58. 

[323] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[324] Pipe Roll 12 Hen II (1165/66), p. 41. 

[325] Dugdale Monasticon VI.3, St Peter’s Cathedral, York, Yorkshire LXXVIII, p. 1190.   

[326] Pipe Roll 28 Hen II (1181/82), p. 46. 

[327] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[328] Pipe Roll 9 Hen II (1162/63), p. 58. 

[329] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 40. 

[330] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Barnwell Priory, Cambridgeshire, II, De Morte Pagani Peverell, pp. 86-7. 

[331] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[332] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[333] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, p. 1. 

[334] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[335] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, p. 1. 

[336] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 77. 

[337] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 88. 

[338] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 527 and 562. 

[339] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 200. 

[340] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, p. 1. 

[341] Liber Memorandum Ecclesie de Bernewelle, I, 22, p. 47. 

[342] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[343] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli I, Lincolnscir, p. 1. 

[344] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 77. 

[345] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 88. 

[346] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 527 and 562. 

[347] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 200. 

[348] CP XI 93. 

[349] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[350] Stevenson, J. (trans.) (1991) A Medieval Chronicle of Scotland: The Chronicle of Melrose (Llanerch Press) ("Chronicle of Melrose"), 1183, p. 22. 

[351] Chronicle of Melrose, 1191, p. 27, the reference being in the early part of the annal for that year. 

[352] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[353] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[354] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 124. 

[355] Liber Pluscardensis, Vol. I, Liber VIII, CVIII, p. 128. 

[356] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[357] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[358] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[359] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 580, p. 343. 

[360] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[361] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 393. 

[362] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 580, p. 343. 

[363] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[364] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[365] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[366] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 580, p. 343. 

[367] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Pentney Priory, Norfolk, III, p. 70. 

[368] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[369] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IX, Edward I, 653, p. 402. 

[370] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[371] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[372] Testamenta Vetusta, Vol. I, p. 60. 

[373] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[374] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[375] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[376] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[377] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[378] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[379] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[380] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[381] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[382] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[383] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[384] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[385] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[386] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward III, 216, p. 190. 

[387] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 141.   

[388] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, III, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 281. 

[389] Dugdale Monasticon V, Rievaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, II, Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia, p. 280. 

[390] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 566. 

[391] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1580, p. 458. 

[392] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/30, 15 Hen III, 2a. 

[393] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 566. 

[394] Matthew Paris, Vol. IV, 1241, p. 44. 

[395] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1580, p. 458. 

[396] CP XI 296 footnote b. 

[397] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1393. 

[398] The ‘Lands of the Normans’in England (1204-1244), available at <www.hrionline.ac.uk/normans/search.shtml> (14 Nov 2011). 

[399] Fine Roll C 60/37, 25 Henry III, 144.  

[400] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1393. 

[401] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, Appendix, p. 1426. 

[402] Excerpta e Rotulis Finium in Turri Londinensi asservatis (1836), Vol. II, p. 248. 

[403] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 592, p. 350. 

[404] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 592, p. 350. 

[405] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 272, p. 148. 

[406] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. V, Edward II, 272, p. 148. 

[407] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. VII, Edward III, 286, p. 208. 

[408] CP XI 299-303. 

[409] Calendar of Charter Rolls, Vol. III, p. 228. 

[410] Loyd (1951), p. 96. 

[411] Extrait de la Chronique de Normandie, RHGF XIII, p. 237. 

[412] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1913), Vol. I, 63, p. 17. 

[413] Worcester Cathedral, I, 144, p. 81. 

[414] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Westwood Priory, Worcestershire, I, p. 1004. 

[415] Round (1892), p. 169. 

[416] Chronicon Rameseiensis, Appendix II, Nomina Abbatum Ramesiæ, p. 347, from Cotton MS. Vesp. A. xviii. 

[417] Domesday Descendants, p. 681, citing Clay, C. (ed.) Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VII, p. 33, which cites BL Cotton Faustina A iv, fol. 54. 

[418] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, II, p. 142.    

[419] Chronicon Rameseiensis, 378, p. 305. 

[420] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 139.   

[421] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, p. 40. 

[422] CP V 120-1. 

[423] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 140.   

[424] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 139.   

[425] Chronicon Rameseiensis, 378, p. 305. 

[426] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 35. 

[427] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 139.   

[428] CP V 122 footnote c, quoting Cartulary of St Swithun’s, Addit. MSS, no. 29436, f 31 v. 

[429] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 140.   

[430] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, IX, Fundationis Historia, p. 150.   

[431] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 8, p. 6. 

[432] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 76. 

[433] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, I, Fundationis Historia, p. 139.   

[434] Actes Henri II, Tome II, DXLVII, p. 124. 

[435] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 91 and 95. 

[436] CP XI 467. 

[437] Ancient Deeds PRO, Vol. II, C. 2287, p. 503. 

[438] Ancient Deeds PRO, Vol. II, C. 2287, p. 503. 

[439] Palgrave (1837), Vol. I, 9, p. xi. 

[440] Palgrave (1837), Vol. I, 9, p. xi. 

[441] Palgrave (1837), Vol. I, 9, p. xi. 

[442] Ancient Deeds PRO, Vol. II, C. 2287, p. 503. 

[443] Ancient Deeds PRO, Vol. II, C. 2287, p. 503. 

[444] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Walden Abbey, Essex, XII, Fundationis Historia, p. 151.   

[445] CP XI 468 footnote o, continued from previous page.  

[446] Ancient Deeds PRO, Vol. II, C. 2287, p. 503. 

[447] Round (1899), 280, p. 95. 

[448] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 475. 

[449] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 16 John, p. 535. 

[450] Eyton (1856), Vol. III, p. 331. 

[451] Dugdale Monasticon V, Wenlock Priory, Shropshire, p. 73, footnote y, I, quoting Stevens Continuation of Dugdale, Vol. II, p. 14.   

[452] Round (1899), 280, p. 95. 

[453] CP XI 467, quoting Thorpe, J. (1769) Registrum Roffense, p. 169 [not yet consulted]. 

[454] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 475. 

[455] Registrum Roffense, p. 169. 

[456] Annales de Theokesberia, p. 77. 

[457] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 574, p. 445. 

[458] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 796, p. 611. 

[459] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1765, p. 594. 

[460] CP XI 467, quoting Thorpe, J. (1769) Registrum Roffense, p. 169 [not yet consulted]. 

[461] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/29, 14 Hen III, 456. 

[462] Registrum Roffense, p. 169. 

[463] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 813, p. 281. 

[464] Registrum Roffense, p. 169. 

[465] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 813, p. 281. 

[466] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 53. 

[467] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 83. 

[468] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 83. 

[469] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 163. 

[470] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 83. 

[471] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 225, quoting Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, pp. 152-3. 

[472] Liber Eliensis, Vol. I, II, 117, p. 252. 

[473] Dugdale Monasticon I, Ely Monastery, Cambridgeshire, X, p. 477.   

[474] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber V, XIV, p. 420. 

[475] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 227. 

[476] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 225, quoting Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, pp. 152-3. 

[477] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 225, quoting Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, pp. 152-3. 

[478] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 225, quoting Gallia Christiana, Vol. XI, pp. 152-3. 

[479] Eyton (1860), Vol. XI, p. 228. 

[480] Domesday Descendants, p. 679, citing Rees (1975) Shrewsbury Cartulary, no. 350b. 

[481] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[482] Caux Saint-Victor, II, p. 370. 

[483] Domesday Descendants, p. 680. 

[484] Dugdale Monasticon V, Wenlock Priory, Shropshire, V, p. 76. 

[485] CP X Appendix J, p. 113. 

[486] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XIII, p. 366.   

[487] Worcester Cathedral, I, 145, p. 81. 

[488] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 307, citing Haughmond Chartulary, tit. Racheforde. 

[489] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XV, p. 366.   

[490] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 306. 

[491] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 307, citing Haughmond Chartulary, tit. Richard’s Castell. 

[492] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Godestow Nunnery, Oxfordshire, XIII, p. 366.   

[493] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 307, citing Haughmond Chartulary, tit. Richard’s Castell. 

[494] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 308, citing Haughmond Chartulary, tit. Racheford. 

[495] Eyton (1857), Vol. IV, p. 308, citing Haughmond Chartulary, tit. Racheford. 

[496] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 86 and 94. 

[497] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 287. 

[498] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/11, 3 Hen III, 321. 

[499] Worcester Cathedral, I, 158, p. 87. 

[500] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 223. 

[501] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/12, 4 Hen III, 19. 

[502] Annales de Wigornia, p. 421. 

[503] Inquisitiones Worcestershire, VII, p. 4, 43 Hen III, no. 23. 

[504] Montacute, 35, p. 135. 

[505] Montacute, 35, p. 135. 

[506] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 545. 

[507] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1635, p. 496. 

[508] Scone, 87, p. 55. 

[509] Nicholas (1832), Vol. II, p. 5, citing Chartulary of Bridlington Priory.

[510] Bridlington Priory, p. 31. 

[511] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Bridlington Priory, Yorkshire, II, p. 286.   

[512] Nicholas (1832), p. 5, citing "Deposition, p. 106".  

[513] Bridlington Priory, p. 4. 

[514] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1217, p. 492. 

[515] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 295. 

[516] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 384. 

[517] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42. 

[518] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 57. 

[519] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1217, p. 492. 

[520] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. IV, Edward I, 294, p. 198. 

[521] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1217, p. 492. 

[522] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1217, p. 492. 

[523] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1217, p. 492. 

[524] Early Yorkshire Charters Vol. II, 1217, p. 492. 

[525] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 73. 

[526] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 92 and 94. 

[527] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[528] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[529] Bridlington Priory, p. 82. 

[530] Bridlington Priory, p. 81. 

[531] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[532] Bridlington Priory, p. 81. 

[533] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[534] Bridlington Priory, p. 111. 

[535] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[536] Bridlington Priory, p. 81. 

[537] Bridlington Priory, p. 81. 

[538] Bridlington Priory, p. 111. 

[539] Bridlington Priory, p. 82. 

[540] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[541] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[542] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[543] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[544] Bridlington Priory, p. 81. 

[545] Nicolas (1832), p. 66.

[546] Nicolas (1832), p. 66.

[547] Nicolas (1832), p. 66.

[548] Bridlington Priory, p. 80. 

[549] Bridlington Priory, p. 82. 

[550] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 50. 

[551] Whitby, Vol. I, CLVIII, p. 127. 

[552] Whitby, Vol. I, CLVIII, p. 127. 

[553] Whitby, Vol. I, CLVIII, p. 127. 

[554] Rievaulx, CXLV, p. 97. 

[555] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 469, p. 345. 

[556] Rievaulx, CCCXL, p. 239. 

[557] Rievaulx, CXLV, p. 97. 

[558] Nicolas (1832), p. 67.

[559] Nicolas (1832), p. 10 footnote 7.

[560] Nicolas (1832), p. 67.

[561] Nicolas (1832), p. 68.

[562] Nicolas (1832), p. 67.

[563] Nicolas (1832), p. 15, and p. 82, citing sketches of the effigies in Sir William Dugdale’s MS in the College of Arms entitled "Yorkshire Arms".

[564] Nicolas (1832), p. 68.

[565] Nicolas (1832), p. 69.

[566] Nicolas (1832), p. 16, and p. 82, citing Sir William Dugdale’s MS in the College of Arms entitled "Yorkshire Arms".

[567] Nicolas (1832), p. 17 footnote 1, quoting Claus. 20 Edw III, p. 1 in dorso m. 1 and Rot. Orig. II. 196.

[568] Nicolas (1832), p. 68.

[569] Nicolas (1832), p. 69.

[570] Nicolas (1832), p. 69.

[571] Nicolas (1832), p. 69.

[572] CP XI 554-72. 

[573] Nicolas (1832), p. 11, citing Archives at Bolton Hall.

[574] Nicolas (1832), p. 11, citing Archives at Bolton Hall.

[575] Nicolas (1832), p. 69.

[576] Nicolas (1832), p. 30.

[577] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Kingston upon Hull, II, p. 20.   

[578] Nicolas (1832), p. 30.

[579] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 160. 

[580] Nicolas (1832), p. 30.

[581] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 220. 

[582] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 160. 

[583] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 201. 

[584] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 109. 

[585] CP XI 543-54. 

[586] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 160. 

[587] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 220. 

[588] Nicolas (1832), p. 30.

[589] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 168. 

[590] Nicolas (1832), p. 30.

[591] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 168. 

[592] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 168. 

[593] Nicolas (1826), Vol. I, p. 168. 

[594] Nicolas (1832), p. 30.

[595] Nicolas (1832), p. 67.

[596] FitzHerbert ‘Tailbois and Neville’, p. 107. 

[597] CP XI 564-72. 

[598] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 326. 

[599] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 464, p. 342. 

[600] Letters Henry III, Vol. I, CCCLXXII, p. 444. 

[601] Matthew Paris, Vol. IV, 1241, p. 174. 

[602] Annales Cestrienses, p. 62. 

[603] CP XI 601, cting Nichols (1795), Vol. II, Part I, Appendix, p. 113 [not yet consulted]

[604] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 412. 

[605] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 332, p. 276. 

[606] Patent Rolls Henry III 1225-1232 (1903), p. 412. 

[607] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 359. 

[608] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. III, 1106, p. 123. 

[609] Letters Henry III, Vol. I, CCCLXXII, p. 444. 

[610] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 193. 

[611] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 334, p. 89. 

[612] Basset Charters, 137, p. 82. 

[613] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 334, p. 89. 

[614] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 334, p. 89. 

[615] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, VI, Progenies Moubraiorum, hujus Abbatiæ Fundatorum, p. 321. 

[616] Annals of Lacock Abbey, Appendix I, Book of Lacock, p. v. 

[617] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Kent, p. 63. 

[618] Registrum Roffense, p. 116. 

[619] Dugdale Monasticon III, York St Mary, V, p. 548. 

[620] Registrum Roffense, p. 116. 

[621] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Kent, p. 63. 

[622] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 842, p. 310. 

[623] Domesday Descendants, p. 726. 

[624] Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (1968), Vol. III, 276, p. 103. 

[625] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 26. 

[626] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 288. 

[627] Domesday Descendants, p. 727, citing BL Harley 2697, fol. 132. 

[628] Domesday Descendants, p. 727, citing BL Harley 2697, fol. 132. 

[629] Domesday Descendants, p. 727, citing BL Harley 2697, fol. 132. 

[630] Domesday Descendants, p. 727, citing BL Harley 2697, fol. 132. 

[631] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 355. 

[632] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, St. Bartholomew Priory, Smithfield, II, p. 295. 

[633] Farrer (1925), Vol. III, p. 198, citing “Bodleian ch. (Turner and Coxe), 163”. 

[634] Domesday Descendants, p. 727, citing BL Harley 2697, fol. 132. 

[635] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/16, 6 Hen III, 95. 

[636] Testa de Nevill, Part I, pp. 14 and 15. 

[637] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 479 and 527. 

[638] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 500. 

[639] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 240. 

[640] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/16, 6 Hen III, 95. 

[641] Pipe Roll 7 Henry III, p. 32. 

[642] Fine Rolls Henry III, Roll C 60/28, 13 Hen III, 171. 

[643] Matthew Paris, Vol. III, 1235, p. 334. 

[644] Calendar Fine Rolls, C 60/35, 20 Henry III, 95. 

[645] Calendar Fine Rolls, C 60/36, 23 Henry III, 85. 

[646] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 83, p. 20. 

[647] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 726, p. 448. 

[648] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 424, p. 243. 

[649] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 726, p. 448. 

[650] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 726, p. 448. 

[651] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 726, p. 448. 

[652] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 726, p. 448. 

[653] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dudley Priory, II, p. 83. 

[654] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, VI, p. 204. 

[655] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, V, p. 204. 

[656] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608, P.R.O. Assize Roll 1174. 

[657] Dugdale Monasticon V, Tykford Priory, Buckinghamshire, VI, p. 204. 

[658] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, pp. 85 and 93. 

[659] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VIII regis Ricardi scutagium Normanniæ ad XXs, pp. 100, 108 and 113. 

[660] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 271. 

[661] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. II (1881), Pipe Roll 10 and 11 John, p. 147. 

[662] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, pp. 537 and 567. 

[663] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 18. 

[664] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 142. 

[665] Hunt, J. (1994) Lordship and the Landscape, p. 34, citing Brooksby cartulary [available in Google Book, snippet view].  I am grateful to Douglas Richardson for drawing my attention to this source. 

[666] CP X Appendix G, p. 95 footnote f. 

[667] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 16 footnote 4, quoting Pipe Roll, 12 John, Berks. 

[668] Calendar Fine Rolls, C 60/21, 8 Henry III, 384. 

[669] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1884), Assize Rolls, 12 Henry III, pp. 55-6. 

[670] National Archives, Exchequer, King’s Remembrancer, Ancient Deeds, E 210/2932, available at  <http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATLN=6&CATID=7031101> (28 Mar 2012). 

[671] Testa de Nevill, Part 1, p. 458. 

[672] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, p. 845. 

[673] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 504. 

[674] Hoskin (1997) English Episcopal Acts 13, p. 152 [not yet consulted, information provided by Douglas Richardson in a private email to the author dated 27 Mar 2012].

[675] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. IV (1884), Plea Rolls, Roll no. 50, p. 83. 

[676] Calendar Fine Rolls, E 371/4, 21 Henry III, 225. 

[677] Stapleton ‘Holy Trinity York’ (1848), pp. 78-9. 

[678] Stapleton ‘Holy Trinity York’ (1848), p. 79 (no source citation reference). 

[679] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608. 

[680] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 142. 

[681] Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. II (1881), Pipe Roll 17 John, p. 167. 

[682] Calendar Fine Rolls, C 60/12, 4 Henry III, 86. 

[683] Kirk (1899), Vol. I, 69, p. 58. 

[684] Calendar Fine Rolls, C 60/12, 4 Henry III, 86. 

[685] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608. 

[686] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 384. 

[687] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 190. 

[688] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608. 

[689] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608. 

[690] Berkeleys Lives, Vol. I, p. 117. 

[691] Charter Rolls Henry III 1226-1257, p. 401. 

[692] National Archives, Exchequer, King’s Remembrancer, Ancient Deeds, E 210/7057, available at  <http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATLN=6&CATID=7545758&j=1> (28 Mar 2012). 

[693] Testa de Nevill, Part 1, p. 458. 

[694] Testa de Nevill, Part 2, p. 845. 

[695] Dugdale Monasticon V, Dudley Priory, Worcestershire, I, p. 83. 

[696] Bracton’s Note Book, Vol. II, 550, p. 425. 

[697] Close Rolls Henry III 1227-1231 (1902), p. 190. 

[698] Calendar Fine Rolls, E 371/5, 22 Henry III, 74a. 

[699] CP XII.1 111, footnote e quoting Dugdale Warwickshire, p. 608, P.R.O. Assize Roll 1174.