CYPRUS

  v2.0 Updated 10 February 2011

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 2

Chapter 1.            DESPOT of CYPRUS, EMPEROR 1185-1191. 2

Chapter 2.            KINGS of CYPRUS 1196-1267 (LUSIGNAN) 7

Lords of Cyprus: GUY 1192-1194, AMAURY 1194-1196. 7

AMAURY I 1196-1205. 10

HUGUES I 1205-1218, HENRI I 1218-1253, HUGUES II 1253-1267. 17

Chapter 3.            KINGS of CYPRUS 1267-1489 (LUSIGNAN-POITIERS) 25

A.       KINGS of CYPRUS 1267-1489. 25

HUGUES III 1267-1284, JEAN I 1284-1285, HENRI II 1285-1324. 25

HUGUES IV 1324-1359, PIERRE I 1358-1369, PIERRE II 1369-1382. 35

JACQUES I 1385-1398. 48

JANUS I 1398-1432. 53

JEAN II 1432-1458, CHARLOTTE 1458-1461. 56

JACQUES II 1461-1473, JACQUES III 1473-1474, CATERINA 1474-1489. 60

B.       DESCENDANTS of HARION [Henri] de LUSIGNAN.. 63

Chapter 4.            NOBILITY in CYPRUS. 66

A.       GIBLET. 66

B.       IBELIN - DESCENDANTS of BAUDOUIN IBELIN SENESCHAL of CYPRUS.. 68

C.      IBELIN - DESCENDANTS of GUY IBELIN, MARSHAL and CONSTABLE of CYPRUS.. 76

D.      RIVET. 83

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The Greeks and Arabs ruled Cyprus as a condominium until 965 when Byzantium assumed complete control.  The island started to prosper after the First Crusade, due to its position on the sea-trading route from the west to the newly established crusader states in the eastern Mediterranean.  In 1126, Venice obtained the first trading concessions on Cyprus[1].  The political instability in the Byzantine empire after the death of Emperor Manuel I in 1180 enabled Isaakios Dukas to establish himself as autonomous despot in Cyprus in 1184 and declare himself emperor a year later.  Richard I King of England conquered Cyprus in 1191 and deposed the self-styled Emperor Isaakios.  King Richard sold the island to the Knights Templar in late 1191[2].  The Knights suppressed local revolts against the new occupation, but failed to pay the agreed purchase price.  King Richard retook possession, and sold the island again (in 1192) to Guy de Lusignan ex-King of Jerusalem, whose descendants continued to rule the island until 1473.  Latin rule in Cyprus proved providential for the families of westerners who had been displaced from the mainland crusader states, most of whose territory was recaptured by Saladin towards the end of the 12th century.  Many prominent crusader families settled in Cyprus rather than return to western Europe and, as the island's prosperity increased, more settlers were attracted from the west.  From 1473, Cyprus was controlled by the Venetians who assumed complete control on the abdication of their nominee Queen Caterina Cornaro in 1489.  Cyprus remained in Venetian hands until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1571. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    DESPOT of CYPRUS, EMPEROR 1185-1191

 

 

ISAAKIOS Dukas, son of --- & his [wife] --- Komnene ([1155/60]-murdered [end 1195/early 1196])Niketas Choniates names "Isaacius (non Isaacius Angelus), Isaacii sebastocratoris, quem fratre fuisse Manuelis, ex filia nepos"[3].  The birth date range of Isaakios is estimated by Rüdt-Collenberg on the basis of his being described as "admodum iuvenis" on his appointment as Governor of Cilicia (in [1174/75]) by Nephytos[4].  The identity of the father of Isaakios Dukas is not known.  According to Sturdza, he was Andronikos Dukas Kamateros, drongarios of the fleet[5], who was executed in 1185 on the orders of Emperor Andronikos I.  Rüdt-Collenberg excludes his belonging to the Kamateros family[6], which Niketas Choniates described as "neither elegant nor well-off"[7] while stating that the family of Isaakios was "excellent", although it is not clear whether the latter reference was to Isaakios's paternal or maternal ancestors.  Rüdt-Collenberg also highlights the speculation by R. P. L. Stiernon of Paris that Isaakios may have been the illegitimate son of Emperor Manuel I by Eirene Komnene[8], but this is pure conjecture.  Concerning Isaakios's mother, she is named Eirene in Europäische Stammtafeln[9], but it appears that this is not based on any primary source[10].  Isaakios Dukas was appointed Governor of Cilicia in [1174/75] by Emperor Manuel I[11].  Isaakios attacked Rupen III Lord of the Mountains [Armenia-Rupenid] after the latter formed an alliance with the Seljuk Sultan following the Byzantine defeat at Myriokephalon in Sep 1176, but he was captured and imprisoned in Armenia.  He remained captive until 1182, when he and his children were transferred to Bohémond III Prince of Antioch as part of the terms negotiated for the release of Rupen III, whom Prince Bohémond had later captured.  Roger of Hoveden records that, after "quidam iuvenis…Ysaac, filius sororis Manuelis imperatoris defuncti" was released from Antioch (dated to 1182), "ipse filium et filiam suam" were left as hostages in Antioch and remained there for two years[12].  Isaakios was released on promise of payment of a substantial ransom, through the intervention of Theodora Komnene (widow of Baudouin III King of Jerusalem, and Isaakios's supposed maternal aunt), the mistress of Andronikos Komnenos who had recently been installed as co-emperor[13]. According to Runciman, Rupen III's capture occurred in 1185[14], but this date is inconsistent with Isaakios's arrival in Cyprus in [1183/84] and must be incorrect.  After his release, Isaakios sailed for Cyprus to raise the ransom, arriving there in 1183 or early 1184.  He proclaimed himself Despot [of Cyprus] in 1184, taking advantage of the confusion in Constantinople during the reign of Emperor Andronikos I[15].  After the overthrow of Emperor Andronikos by Isaakios Angelos in Sep 1185, Isaakios Dukas adopted the name "Komnenos" and, considering himself the only representative of the legitimate Komnenos dynasty, he assumed the title Emperor in 1185.  He was not "Emperor of Cyprus", but "Emperor" without any territorial qualification, in line with the contemporary convention that there was only one legitimate "Emperor" at any one time, as direct successor to the emperors at Rome.  Isaakios's claim was therefore broader than at first sight appears, although in practice it was without significance as Isaakios II Emperor in Constantinople continued to be generally recognised as the only holder of the title in the east.  Emperor Isaakios [Dukas Komnenos] entered an alliance with Guillaume II King of Sicily, maybe sealed by his marriage to the king's half-sister (see below).  In 1186, Emperor Isaakios II sent a fleet to recapture Cyprus but it was defeated by Margaritone, admiral of the Sicilian fleet[16].  When Richard I King of England landed in Cyprus in May 1191, en route to Palestine, Emperor Isaakios [Cyprus] gave him a belligerent reception.  King Richard conquered the island in revenge and defeated Isaakios at Tremithus[17].  Isaakios fled to Kantara, but surrendered and was imprisoned by King Richard[18].  Richard appointed Richard of Camville and Robert of Turnham as justiciars to administer the island of Cyprus, and sailed from Famagusta for Palestine 5 Jun 1191 with ex-Emperor Isaakios on board in captivity[19].  He was apparently held in chains made of silver as King Richard had promised not to put him in irons[20].  After landing at Acre, ex-Emperor Isaakios was handed to the Knights Hospitallers, who kept him in semi-captivity at Margat {Marciappo or Neophytos} in Syria but released him [end 1193/early 1194][21].  In 1195, after Emperor Isaakios II was deposed, Isaakios Dukas Komnenos claimed the throne of Constantinople.  He started plotting to achieve his end, but before he could put the plan into action he was poisoned on the orders of Emperor Alexios III[22]

m firstly ([1175/76]) --- of Armenia, daughter of THOROS II Lord of the Mountains [Armenia-Rupenid] & his first wife Isabelle de Courtenay (-before 1182).  The Continuator of Guillaume de Tyre records that Isaakios married "Toros de la Montaigne…sa fille"[23].  Rüdt-Collenberg suggests that the same daughter of Thoros II married Hethum of Lampron and Isaakios Dukas, highlighting that Armenian sources only mention one daughter[24] (the Chronicle of Sempad, which records the marriage of the unnamed daughter of Thoros with Hethum son of Oshin[25]).  This would not be impossible from a chronological point of view.  Rüdt-Collenberg dates the marriage to the start of the governorship of Isaakios in Cilicia and before the battle of Myriokephalon in Sep 1176, which marked the end of the brief alliance between Armenia and Byzantium[26].  According to Rüdt-Collenberg, she is not mentioned by the sources which describe the transfer of her husband and children to Antioch in 1182[27], suggesting that she had died by that date.  Benedict of Peterborough records that "Ysaac vero imperator de Cipre" killed his first wife[28] but corroboration for this has not yet been found in any other source. 

m secondly ([1185/86]) ---.  The identity of Isaakios's second wife is not known with certainty.  She is referred to by Finlay as --- di Sicilia, illegitimate daughter of Guillaume I King of Sicily & his mistress ---, but Rüdt-Collenberg highlights that he found no primary source which supports the Sicilian origin of Emperor Isaakios's second wife[29].  It may be based only on Snorre's Heimkringsla which records that "William king of Sicily…had three daughters…his second daughter married the Duke of Kipr"[30].  However, there is some confusion in this text as it comments that King William had no son and also records that "one of his [King William's] daughters he married to the Emperor Henry [who] killed both these brothers-in-law".  It cannot therefore automatically be assumed that "the Duke of Kipr" refers to Isaakios Dukas Komnenos.  Isaakios´s wife was captured by Guy King of Jerusalem [Lusignan], at Kyrenia where she had taken refuge after her husband's defeat[31].  She appears to have accompanied her step-daughter to Palestine in Jun 1191, and in Sep 1192 to Sicily, where she remained[32]

Emperor Isaakios & his first wife had two children: 

1.         son (before 1178-[1187/91]).  Roger of Hoveden records that, after "quidam iuvenis…Ysaac, filius sororis Manuelis imperatoris defuncti" was released from Antioch (dated to 1182), "ipse filium et filiam suam" were left as hostages in Antioch and remained there for two years[33].  This son must have died between 1187 and 1191 as his sister was reported as their father's sole heir when he was overthrown in 1191.  Benedict of Peterborough claimed that Emperor Isaakios killed his son because of the latter's sympathies with the Latins, but Rüdt-Collenberg is sceptical about this[34]

2.         daughter ([1177/78]-after 1204).  Roger of Hoveden records that, after "quidam iuvenis…Ysaac, filius sororis Manuelis imperatoris defuncti" was released from Antioch (dated to 1182), "ipse filium et filiam suam" were left as hostages in Antioch and remained there for two years[35].  She is referred to as "fille de l'empereor de Chypre" by William of Tyre (Continuator), when he records her first marriage with "li cuens de Saint Gile" who "come il l'ot tenue tant come il vost si la mist hors de sa terre" and her presence at Marseille where she met and married her second husband en route to the Crusade[36]The Historia Albigensis records the marriage of Comte Raymond and "filiam ducis Cipri", but places the marriage after his repudiation of Beatrix de Béziers and before his marriage to Joan of England[37].  This marriage is not mentioned by the Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens[38].  Her name is not recorded.  Rüdt-Collenberg[39] speculates that she was the same person as "Beatrice domicella" who received a substantial bequest under the will of Joan of England, dowager Queen of Sicily, Ctss de Toulouse, with whom "la Damsel de Chypre" spent many years.  After the release of their father by Bohémond III Prince of Antioch in 1182, she and her brother were left as hostages with Prince Bohémond at Antioch where they remained for at least two years before returning to Cyprus, as recorded by Roger of Hoveden (see above).  She was captured by Richard I King of England at Kyrenia in May 1191[40].  Matthew Paris records that, after her father's defeat in 1191, Isaakios's daughter (unnamed) was detained in the custody of two queens (identified as King Richard´s wife and sister)[41].  She sailed with the fleet of Richard King of England, as part of the court of the king's sister Joanna dowager Queen of Sicily, and arrived at Acre in Jun 1191, staying in Palestine until 29 Sep 1192 when they all left for Sicily[42].  After her betrothal to Leopold of Austria was arranged, she joined Eléonore de Bretagne (who was betrothed to Leopold's older brother) at Rouen or Chinon, and left for Vienna in Dec 1194 in the charge of Baudouin de Béthune, but they turned back on learning of the death of her prospective father-in-law Leopold V Duke of Austria[43].  She is referred to as "fille de l'empereor de Chypre" by William of Tyre (Continuator) when he records her presence at Marseille where she met and married her second husband en route to the Crusade[44].   She was known as "La Damsel de Chypre".  Betrothed (Feb 1194) to LEOPOLD of Austria, son of LEOPOLD V Duke of Austria & his wife Ilona of Hungary ([1176/77]-San Germano 28 Jul 1230, bur Lilienfeld).  This betrothal was agreed as part of the terms for the release of Richard I King of England from the custody of Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in Feb 1194[45].  He later succeeded as LEOPOLD VI Duke of Austriam firstly (1200, divorced [1202/03]) as his fourth wife, RAYMOND VI Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND V Comte de Toulouse & his wife Constance de France (27 Oct 1156-Toulouse 2 Aug 1222).  m secondly (Marseille 1203) THIERRY de Flandre, illegitimate son of PHILIPPE Count of Flanders & his mistress --- (-after Jul 1207).  Thierry was one of the leaders of the Flemish contingent in the Fourth Crusade.  Villehardouin records that "Comte Philippe de Flandre's son Thierry" left with the fleet from Flanders and arrived at Marseille end-1202[46]William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Bauduins chevalier d'Amienz qui estoit parent de l'empereor" when recording his departure on crusade and marriage at Marseille in 1203[47].  According to the Continuator of William of Tyre, when he arrived in Cyprus, Thierry requested Aimery I King of Cyprus to transfer the island to him, by right of his wife, but he was expelled and left for Armenia[48]Villehardouin records that "Emperor Henri" placed "his nephew Thierry de Flandre" in charge of a company at Constantinople to fight against the Bulgarians in Jul 1207[49]

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and Emperor Isaakios Dukas Komnenos has not been identified: 

1.         ---, son of --- (-executed [Jun or after] 1191).  A monk in Cyprus, he is described by Benedict of Peterborough as a "relative [consanguineus]" of Isaakios Emperor in Cyprus who was installed as emperor after the fall of Isaakios in 1191, but captured and hanged by the English[50]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    KINGS of CYPRUS 1196-1267 (LUSIGNAN)

 

 

Lords of Cyprus: GUY 1192-1194, AMAURY 1194-1196

 

Two sons of HUGUES VIII "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Bourgogne de Rancon (see the document POITOU): 

 

1.         AMAURY de Lusignan ([1145]-Acre 1 Apr 1205)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum [error for Haimericum] regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[51].  He succeeded his brother as AMAURY Lord of Cyprus in 1194, and was crowned as AMAURY I King of Cyprus in 1197.    

-        see below.   

2.         GUY de Lusignan (-1194 after 18 Aug, bur Nicosia)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[52].  William of Tyre names him as son of "Hugonis Bruni" when recording his arrival in Palestine in [1179] and marriage[53].  While still living in France, Guy was proposed by his brother Amaury, who had by then already acquired a position of influence in the kingdom of Jerusalem, as the husband of Sibylle heiress of Jerusalem after the death of her first husband.  Guy arrived in Palestine in 1179, and was installed as Count of Jaffa and Ascalon on his marriage[54].  King Baudouin IV appointed him as regent of Jerusalem in 1182 after the king fell ill at Nazareth, although the king retained personal control over the city of Jerusalem.  Dissatisfied with his performance, the king deposed Guy from the regency 23 Mar 1183 after a quarrel and attempted to bar him from succession to the throne[55].  Guy retired to his counties of Jaffa and Ascalon, throwing off his allegiance to the crown.  King Baudouin seized Jaffa, but Guy continued to defy the king at Ascalon[56].  His wife Sibylle succeeded as Queen of Jerusalem in 1186 after the death of her infant son King Baudouin V.  After her own coronation, she crowned her husband as GUY I King of Jerusalem.  After Saladin's invasion of Galilee in summer 1187, the Christian army was defeated at Hattin 4 Jul 1187, where King Guy was captured.  He was kept in prison at Nablus, later at Lattakieh.  Saladin moved on to capture Ascalon in Sep 1187 and Jerusalem 2 Oct 1187[57].  Saladin released King Guy in Jul 1188, after he promised to abandon the kingdom (an oath he later declared invalid for having been made under duress), and he joined Queen Sibylle at Tripoli[58].  Guy marched from Tripoli to Tyre, hoping to resume control of what remained of the kingdom of Jerusalem, but was refused entry to the city by Corrado di Monferrato.  He made another unsuccessful attempt to enter Tyre in Apr 1189, with help from Pisan and Sicilian forces, but in Aug 1189 marched to attack Acre[59].  After he was joined in the siege by Corrado di Monferrato, the pair settled their differences and Corrado agreed to recognise Guy as king while continuing to hold Tyre himself, together with Beirut and Sidon[60].  After his wife's death in 1190, King Guy's title to the crown was thrown into doubt.  Balian of Ibelin arranged the marriage of Guy's sister-in-law, Isabelle of Jerusalem, by then heir to the throne, to Corrado di Monferrato, but King Guy refused to abdicate.  After Acre finally capitulated to the Christian siege 12 Jul 1191[61], the European dignitaries decided that Guy should remain as king of Jerusalem for life, after which the crown would pass to Corrado di Monferrato, his wife Isabelle and their issue[62].  However, following further quarrels between the crusader leaders, Richard I King of England called a council in Apr 1192 which decided that Corrado should replace Guy as king[63].  King Richard agreed to sell Cyprus to King Guy, providing a convenient way of removing him from the scene.  Although King Corrado was murdered at the end of April, his widow remarried within a week.  It appears that Guy became involved in a plot with the Pisans to seize Tyre[64], but he left the mainland for Cyprus in early May 1192, installing himself as GUY Lord of Cyprus although he continued to claim the kingdom of Jerusalem until his death in late 1194[65].  Cyprus passed technically under the suzerainty of Emperor Heinrich VI in Feb 1194 when Richard I King of England swore allegiance to the emperor as part of the terms for his release from captivity, the island being considered at the time as an English possession[66].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death in 1194 of "Guido de Hierusalem" and his burial in "la madre chiesia di Nicossia"[67]m (Apr 1180) as her second husband, SIBYLLE of Jerusalem, widow of GUGLIELMO "Lungaspada" di Monferrato, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his first wife Agnès de Courtenay ([1160]-Acre [Sep/21 Oct] 1190[68]).  Her second marriage was proposed by Amaury de Lusignan, who was her mother's lover[69].  On the death of her son in 1186, she was proclaimed SIBYLLE Queen of Jerusalem by Joscelin III de Courtenay, and crowned at Jerusalem by Patriarch Heraclius[70].  She took refuge at Tripoli during Saladin's campaigns against the kingdom in 1187[71].  She died during the siege of Acre.  Guy de Lusignan & his wife had two [or four] children:

a)         ALICE de Lusignan (-Acre [Sep/21 Oct] 1190).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Aelis et Marie" as daughters of Queen Sibylle when recording their deaths during the same "season" as their mother[72].  She died during the siege of Acre, maybe from dysentery. 

b)         MARIE de Lusignan (-Acre [Sep/21 Oct] 1190).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names "Aelis et Marie" as daughters of Queen Sibylle when recording their deaths during the same "season" as their mother[73].  She died during the siege of Acre, maybe from dysentery.   

c)         [Note: reference to two other children.  Cafari refers to "mortuis quatuor eorum filiis" in relation to "rege Guidone et uxore eius Sibila"[74].  However, the accuracy of this passage is uncertain as the text was clearly written much later, as shown by its inclusion of a reference to the death of Konradin in 1268.] 

 

 

AMAURY I 1196-1205

 

AMAURY de Lusignan, son of HUGUES VIII "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Bourgogne de Rancon ([1145]-Acre 1 Apr 1205).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum [error for Haimericum] regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[75].  Amaury rebelled against his suzerain in Poitou, Henry II King of England, in 1168, probably leaving France for Palestine soon afterwards[76].  "…Aimericus de Lisenian…" subscribed a charter dated 13 Dec 1174 under which Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem donated property to the Knights Hospitallers[77], which appears to be the first mention of his name in the Levant.  King Baudouin IV appointed him as Constable of Jerusalem in 1181[78].  He supported the rebellion of the Pisans at Tyre in May 1192, was arrested by Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem, but retired to Jaffa on his release.  King Henri, considering that Amaury had thereby forfeited his office of Constable, appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable in his place[79].  Amaury's younger brother Guy Lord of Cyprus had bequeathed his authority in Cyprus to their older brother Geoffroy de Lusignan but, as the latter had returned to France in [1192], the Franks in Cyprus summoned Amaury to succeed as Lord of Cyprus in 1194[80].  The rivalry with the kingdom of Jerusalem was suspended when Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem visited Cyprus in 1194, the new alliance being sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Queen Isabelle's three young daughters[81].  "Aymericus de Lizinaco…dominus Cipri" donated property to the abbot of the Temple-Domini, with the consent of "uxoris mee Eschive", by charter dated 29 Sep 1195[82].  Amaury did homage to Emperor Heinrich VI, through his ambassador Renier of Jebail, at Gelnhausen in Oct 1195, in return being recognised by the emperor as AMAURY I King of Cyprus.  He was crowned in Sep 1197 at Nicosia, where he did homage once more to the emperor's representative Konrad von Querfurt Bishop of Hildesheim, who was present at the ceremony in his capacity as Imperial Chancellor[83].  On the death of Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem in Sep 1197, King Amaury was proposed by the German leaders, headed by Konrad von Wittelsbach Archbishop of Mainz, as the best candidate to become Queen Isabelle's fourth husband.  King Amaury arrived at Acre in Jan 1198, married Isabelle and was crowned with his wife a few days later as AMAURY II King of Jerusalem.  The two kingdoms were linked only by the person of the monarch, as each retained its own administrative identity[84].  After the collapse of the German crusade in early 1198, King Amaury opened negotiations with al-Adil (Saladin's brother) although the six year peace treaty was not signed until Sep 1204.  Under the terms of the agreement Beirut, Sidon, Jaffa and Ramleh were transferred back to the kingdom of Jerusalem[85].  "Aymericus…Jerusalem Latinorum rex nonus et rex Cypri" granted rights to the commune of Marseille, with the consent of "Ysabelis uxoris mee…quamdam regis Amalrici filia", by charter dated Oct 1198[86].  "Aymericus…Latinorum Jerusalem rex nonus et rex Cipri" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated Mar 1201 which names "frater meus rex Guido"[87].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death of "il re Almerico" at Acre[88].  The archbishop of Cæsarea records the death "c purificacionem B. Mariæ" of "regis Amalrici II filium" and the death 1 Apr of the king himself, by charter dated [May] 1205[89].  On the death of King Amaury in 1205, the two kingdoms of Jerusalem and Cyprus were separated once more. 

m firstly (before 29 Oct 1175) ESCHIVA of Ibelin, daughter of BAUDOUIN of Ibelin Lord of Rama & his first wife Richilde of Bethsan (-[1196/97]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Eschive et Estefenie" as the two daughters of "Baudoyn…seignor de Rames" and his wife "Richeut…fille de Gremont de Bessan", stating that Eschiva was the wife of "rei Heimeri"[90].  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and her father[91].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames" as the wife of "Almerico de Lusignan"[92].  "Aymericus de Lizinaco…dominus Cipri" donated property to the abbot of the Temple-Domini, with the consent of "uxoris mee Eschive", by charter dated 29 Sep 1195[93]

m secondly (Acre Jan 1198) as her fourth husband, ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem, formerly wife of HONFROY [IV] of Toron, widow of CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato King of Jerusalem and of HENRI II Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his second wife Maria Komnene (1172-[1206]).  She is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who records her parentage and, in a later passage, records her mother's statement at the time of the annulment of her first marriage that Isabelle was only eight years old when that marriage took place[94].  Her first marriage was arranged in 1180 by her half-brother King Baudouin IV in an attempt to heal the breach between the Ibelin and Courtenay families[95].  Raymond Count of Tripoli promoted her candidacy as queen in 1186, when he opposed the succession of her half-sister Queen Sibylle[96].  However, her husband submitted to Queen Sibylle, which put an end to the plan[97].  She became heir to the throne in 1190 after the death of Queen Sibylle.  Her first marriage was annulled against her wishes and she was married to her second husband on the advice of her mother[98].  She was crowned in [Jan] 1198 at Acre as ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem with her fourth husband.  "Aymericus…Jerusalem Latinorum rex nonus et rex Cypri" granted rights to the commune of Marseille, with the consent of "Ysabelis uxoris mee…quamdam regis Amalrici filia", by charter dated Oct 1198[99].  After the death of her fourth husband in Jan 1205, Queen Isabelle assumed personal authority over the government of Jerusalem[100]

[Possible mistress: AGNES de Courtenay, widow firstly of RENAUD of Marash, secondly of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem, thirdly of HUGUES of Ibelin Lord of Rama, daughter of JOSCELIN II Count of Edessa & his wife Béatrice --- ([1133]-1185).  According to Runciman[101], Agnes, Queen Mother of Jerusalem, was the mistress of Amaury de Lusignan.  The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified, and it looks unlikely to be correct considering the age difference, although it could explain Amaury's rapid rise in influence so soon after his arrival in Palestine.  Agnes married fourthly (1174) as his first wife, Renaud Lord of Sidon.  She returned to the court at Jerusalem when her brother was appointed Seneschal in [1176/77] and became a domineering influence over her two children[102].]   

King Amaury I & his first wife had six children:

1.         BOURGOGNE de Lusignan (-after 1205).  She is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also records her parentage, listing her first of the sisters, and names her husband[103].  The Chronicle of Amadi names (in order) "Borgogna, Alis et Chielvis" as the three daughters of "Almerico de Lusignan" and his wife "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames", specifying in a later passage that "Borgogna" married "Galtier de Mombeliart"[104].  [According to Europäische Stammtafeln[105], Bourgogne married firstly (1193, repudiated 1196) as his third wife, Raymond de Toulouse, son of Raymond V Comte de Toulouse & his wife Constance de France (27 Oct 1156-Toulouse 2 Aug 1222), who succeeded his father in 1194 as Raymond VI Comte de Toulouse, Duc de Narbonne, Marquis de Provence.  It is possible that this speculation originates from the Historia Albigensis which records the marriage of Comte Raymond and "filiam ducis Cipri" after his repudiation of Beatrix de Béziers and before his marriage to Joan of England[106].  It appears that there must be confusion with Comte Raymond's marriage to "la Damsel de Chypre" (see Chapter 1, above) and that later genealogists identified Bourgogne as the only Cypriot princess who might have been unmarried at that date and assumed therefore that she married Comte Raymond.  It is assumed that the Historia Albigensis has confused the order of the marriages of Comte Raymond and that it intended to refer to his marriage to "la Damsel de Chypre" which is recorded in other sources and must have taken place after the death of his wife Joan.]  m (before 1205) GAUTHIER de Montbéliard, son of AMEDEE de Montfaucon Comte de Montbéliard & his first wife Beatrix --- (-killed in battle 20 Jun 1212).  He joined the Fourth Crusade in 1199, but in 1201 he left the main body of crusaders in southern Italy to join Gauthier de Brienne.  He arrived in Palestine in [1205] and was appointed Constable of the kingdom of Jerusalem by King Amaury II in 1205[107].  He was appointed bailly of Cyprus for his brother-in-law Hugues I King of Cyprus in 1205[108].  He fled Cyprus after the end of his regency in 1210, allegedly taking with him a large part of the royal treasure, and sought refuge at Acre with his nephew Jean de Brienne who had recently married Marie Queen of Jerusalem[109].  Gauthier later complained to Pope Innocent III that King Hugues had treated him badly[110]

2.         GUY of Cyprus (-before 1205).  He is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also gives his parentage, listing him as first son when recording his betrothal arranged by his father[111].  The Chronicle of Amadi names (in order) "Guido, Joanne et Hugo" as the three sons of "Almerico de Lusignan" and his wife "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames"[112].  William of Tyre (Continuator) specifies that Guy and his brother Jean died before reaching the age of marriage[113].  The text is unclear about the precise dates of their deaths, but clearly their brother Hugues was the only surviving son when their father died.  Betrothed (1194[114]) to MARIE of Jerusalem, daughter of HENRI de Champagne King of Jerusalem & his wife Isabelle of Jerusalem (-before 1205).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her as the oldest daughter of Isabelle and her third husband[115].  In a later passage, he specifies that "des filles dou conte Henri estoit morte Marie qui estoit l'ains née", her death as well as that of her betrothed occurring before they reached the age of marriage[116].  The text is unclear about the precise date of her death, but implies that it was before the death of her stepfather.  Although she bore the same first name as her older half-sister, the two passages indicate unequivocally that they were two separate individuals, especially the latter text which is included in the chapter which follows the one which records the marriage of the older Marie with Jean de Brienne.  The Chronicle of Ernoul records that "li quens Henris…entre lui et se feme" had three daughters and the betrothal arranged between them and "III fieus que li connestables avoit, qui sires estoit de l'ille de Cypre"[117]

3.         JEAN of Cyprus (-before 1205).  He is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also gives his parentage, listing him as second son when recording his betrothal arranged by his father[118].  The Chronicle of Amadi names (in order) "Guido, Joanne et Hugo" as the three sons of "Almerico de Lusignan" and his wife "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames"[119].  The text suggests that the three daughters were betrothed to the three sons of Amaury in their order of age, which means that Alix would have been betrothed to Jean even though she later married the only surviving brother Hugues.  William of Tyre (Continuator) specifies that Guy and his brother Jean died before reaching the age of marriage[120].  The text is unclear about the precise dates of their death, but clearly their brother Hugues was the only surviving son when their father died.  Betrothed (1194[121]) as her first husband, ALIX of Jerusalem, daughter of HENRI de Champagne King of Jerusalem & his wife Isabelle of Jerusalem ([1195/96]-1247).  The Chronicle of Ernoul records that "li quens Henris…entre lui et se feme" had three daughters and the betrothal arranged between them and "III fieus que li connestables avoit, qui sires estoit de l'ille de Cypre"[122]

4.         ALIX de Lusignan (-young).  She is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also gives her parentage, listing her second of the sisters and specifying that she "fu mezele"[123].  The Chronicle of Amadi names (in order) "Borgogna, Alis et Chielvis" as the three daughters of "Almerico de Lusignan" and his wife "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames"[124].  She died of the plague. 

5.         HELOISE of Cyprus ([1185/93]-[7 Feb 1216/Mar 1219]).  She is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also gives her parentage, listing her as third sister, and names her (second) husband[125].  The Chronicle of Amadi names (in order) "Borgogna, Alis et Chielvis" as the three daughters of "Almerico de Lusignan" and his wife "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames", specifying that "Chielvis" married "Rupin nepote de Livon signor de Armenia"[126].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Borgoigne, et le rei Hugue, et Heloys" as the children of "Eschive [et]…rei Heimeri", stating that she was the wife of "prince Rupin"[127].  Her birth date range is estimated from her having given birth to one child by her first marriage before 1210.  Her first marriage is confirmed by a letter of Pope Innocent III which records her abduction by Rupen from her husband "milite Odone de Dampierre"[128].  The marriage was probably arranged by her brother-in-law Gauthier de Montbéliard[129].  Her name, origin and second marriage are confirmed by the charter dated Sep 1210 under which "uxoris mee domine Helwisie filie domini Hemerici regis Iherusalem et Cipri" consented to the confirmation by "Raymundus Rupinus…princeps Antiochie filius Raymundy primogeniti filii Boamundi principis Antiochie" of the privileges of the Knights Hospitaller[130].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "Rupini [filii Raimundi]" married "materteram…Henricus rex Cypri" but does not name her[131].  After her second husband's death, she returned to Cyprus with her daughters[132]m firstly ([1202/07], divorced before 1210) EUDES de Dampierre Seigneur de Chargey-les-Gray, son of EUDES [II] de Dampierre[-sur-Salon] & his wife Colombe --- (-after [1207/10]).  He took part in the Fourth Crusade[133].  He complained to Pope Innocent III about the break-up of his marriage and his wife's illicit union with Raymond Rupen of Antioch[134]m secondly (before Sep 1210) RAYMOND RUPEN of Antioch, son of RAYMOND of Antioch Count of Tripoli & Alix of Armenia heiress of Toron [Armenia-Rupenid] (posthumously late 1198-in prison 1222).  In 1216, King Lewon occupied Antioch while Prince Bohémond IV was at Tripoli and installed Raymond Rupen as RAYMOND RUPEN Prince of Antioch[135].  Prince Bohémond recaptured Antioch in 1219.  Raymond Rupen invaded Cilicia with his mother and installed himself at Tarsus, where he was captured in early 1221 by Constantine of Lampron [Armenia-Hethumid], regent of Armenia[136].  . 

6.         HUGUES of Cyprus ([1193/94]-Tripoli 10 Jan 1218, bur Tripoli, Church of the Hospital of St John, transferred to Cyprus, Church of the Hospital of St John).  He is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also gives his parentage, listing him as third son when recording his betrothal arranged by his father[137].  He succeeded his father in 1205 as HUGUES I King of Cyprus

-        see below

King Amaury I & his second wife had three children:

7.         SIBYLLE of Cyprus ([1199/1200]-after 1225).  The Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie of Constable Sempad records that King Lewon married "la sœur du souverain de [Chypre] Sibylle" in Cyprus in [28 Jan 1210/27 Jan 1211][138].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "uno filiolo…Almerico et due figlie…Sybilla…et…Melisena" as the children of "il re Almerico" and his queen, specifying that "Sybilla" married "Livon re de Armenia"[139].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Sebille, la fille dou rei Heymeri et de la reyne Ysabiau" as wife of "Livon" brother of "Rupin de la Montaigne qui estoit seignor d'Ermenie"[140].  She claimed the throne of Armenia for herself after the death of her husband, who had left the throne to their infant daughter, but was exiled by the regent Constantine Lord of Barba'ron and Partzerpert [Hethumid].  m (Cyprus [28 Jan 1210/27 Jan 1211]) as his second wife, LEWON I King of Armenia, son of RUPEN III Lord of the Mountains & his wife Isabelle Lady of Toron (1150-May 1219, bur Agner and Sis). 

8.         AMAURY of Cyprus ([1200]-2 Feb 1205).  He is named by William of Tyre (Continuator), who also specifies his parentage[141].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "uno filiolo…Almerico et due figlie…Sybilla…et…Melisena" as the children of "il re Almerico" and his queen[142].  The Archbishop of Cæsarea records the death "c purificacionem B. Mariæ" of "regis Amalrici II filium" and the death 1 Apr of the king himself, by charter dated [May] 1205[143]

9.         MELISENDE of Cyprus (after [1200/01]-after 1249).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her as sister of Hugues King of Cyprus when recording that the latter arranged her marriage[144].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "uno filiolo…Almerico et due figlie…Sybilla…et…Melisena" as the children of "il re Almerico" and his queen, specifying that "Melisena" married "Beimonte principe de Antiochia et conte de Tripoli"[145].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Melicent la princesse…fille dou rei Heymeri et de la reyne Ysabiau" as the second wife of "le prince Borgne"[146].  She protested at the succession of her nephew Henri I King of Cyprus as regent of Jerusalem on the death of her sister Alix in 1246[147]m ([1/10] Jan 1218) as his second wife, BOHEMOND IV Prince of Antioch, son of BOHEMOND III Prince of Antioch & his first wife Orgueilleuse [de Harenc] (-Mar 1233). 

 

 

HUGUES I 1205-1218, HENRI I 1218-1253, HUGUES II 1253-1267

 

HUGUES de Lusignan, son of AMAURY I King of Cyprus & his first wife Eschiva of Ibelin ([1193/94]-Tripoli 10 Jan 1218, bur Tripoli, Church of the Hospital of St John, transferred to Cyprus, Church of the Hospital of St John).  He is named by William of Tyre (Continuator) who also gives his parentage, listing him as third son when recording his betrothal arranged by his father[148].  The Chronicle of Amadi names (in order) "Guido, Joanne et Hugo" as the three sons of "Almerico de Lusignan" and his wife "Civa, figlia de Baduin de Ibelin signor de Rames"[149].  He succeeded his father in 1205 as HUGUES I King of Cyprus, under the regency of his brother-in-law Gauthier de Montbéliard until he reached the age of majority in Sep 1210.  "Hugo…rex Cypri" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated Nov 1210[150].  Gauthier left Cyprus suddenly after the end of his regency, maybe expelled by King Hugues and allegedly taking a large part of the royal treasure with him[151].  King Hugues negotiated a commercial agreement with the Seljuks to encourage trade between Cyprus and Asia Minor.  He also extended the rights and possessions of the Knights Hospitaller in Cyprus and, in 1214, sent a Cypriot force to join them on an expedition in Syria[152].  Relations between Cyprus and Jean de Brienne King of Jerusalem were strained, maybe because King Hugues had welcomed the brothers Jean and Philippe of Ibelin who may have rebelled against King Jean[153].  "Hugo…rex Cipri" confirmed the grant to the church of Nicosia by "Philippus de Ybellino" for the soul of "domine Marie regine, matris sue" by charter dated Oct 1217[154].  King Hugues joined the Fifth Crusade, landed at Acre in [Oct] 1217, but died suddenly at Tripoli where he was attending the wedding of his half-sister Mélisende of Jerusalem to Bohémond IV Prince of Antioch[155].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death of "re Hugo" in Tripoli, his burial "ne la chiesia del hospital de S. Zuane a Tripoli", and his transfer to Cyprus and reburial "nella chiesia del Hospital de S. Zuane"[156]

Betrothed (1194[157]) to PHILIPPA of Jerusalem, daughter of HENRI II Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem & his wife Isabelle Queen of Jerusalem.  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and gives her parentage, specifying that she was the third daughter of Isabelle when recording her betrothal[158].  The Chronicle of Ernoul records that "li quens Henris…entre lui et se feme" had three daughters and the betrothal arranged between them and "III fieus que li connestables avoit, qui sires estoit de l'ille de Cypre"[159].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Philippam" as younger daughter of "comes Campaniensis Henricus" and his wife Isabelle, and her husband "Erardus de Ramerut", specifying that the latter claimed the county of Champagne in her name[160].  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and her father, when recording her marriage[161].  The Chronicon of Robert canon of St Marie, Auxerre records the marriage in 1214 of "Airardus de Rameruco" and "Philippam filiam Henrici regis Iherosolimitani et comitis Trecensis"[162].  The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the marriage in 1216 of "filiam Henrici comitis Campanie" with "Airardus de Bregne"[163].  The cartulary of Tulle St Martin records the grant by "Erardus de Brena et Philippa uxor mea, Henrici…quondam comitis Trecensis filia" dated 21 Mar 1217[164].  The cartulary of Tulle St Martin records the grant by "Philippa domina Rameruci" for the soul of "maritus meus nobilis vir Erardus de Brena dominus Rameruci" dated Friday before 24 Jun 1247[165].  She married (15 Aug [1213/14]) as his second wife, Erard I de Brienne Seigneur de Ramerupt et de Vénizy.  

m (betrothed 5 Dec 1207, before Sep 1210) as her first husband, ALIX of Jerusalem Ctss of Jaffa, daughter of HENRI de Champagne King of Jerusalem & his wife Isabelle Queen of Jerusalem ([1195/96]-1247).  A charter dated 5 Dec 1207 records the agreement for the marriage between "Hugonem I regem Cypri" and "Aelidem majorem filiam Henrici comitis Campaniæ", or, if she died before the marriage was performed, "sororem minorem Philippam"[166].  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her and gives her parentage, specifying that she was the second daughter of Isabelle when recording her betrothal, dated to 1194[167], although this date is improbable.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the older daughter of "comes Campaniensis Henricus" and his wife Isabelle as "regina Ciprie uxor…Guidonis filii Heimerici"[168], "Guidonis" being an error for "Henrici".  Ctss of Jaffa 1205-1209.  Her first betrothal was arranged as part of the alliance between Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem and Amaury de Lusignan after the latter's succession as Lord of Cyprus in 1194167.  The text suggests that the three daughters were betrothed to the three sons of Amaury in their order of age, which means that Alix would first have been betrothed to Jean even though she later married the only surviving brother Hugues.  She acted as co-regent of Cyprus for her infant son from 1218, jointly with her uncle Philippe of Ibelin[169].  "Aeliys…regina Cipri" granted rights to the archbishop of Nicosia, for the soul of "domini mei Hugonis regis", by charter dated Mar 1220[170].  After a dispute with the latter in 1223, Alix left Cyprus for Tripoli where she married secondly (shortly before 5 Aug 1225, annulled by reason of consanguinity after 5 Jul 1227) as his first wife, Bohémond of Antioch, who later succeeded as Bohémond V Prince of Antioch.  The Lignages d'Outremer record that "Buemont" son of "le prince Borgne" and his wife Plaisance married "la reyne Aalis" who left him[171].  Pope Honorius III wrote to the archbishop of Nicosia about the marriage between "reginam Cypri" and "Boemundum filium comitis Tripolitani", dated 11 Aug 1225[172].  Still regarding herself as regent of Cyprus, she unsuccessfully attempted to appoint her second husband as bailly of Cyprus in 1225[173].  She also attempted unsuccessfully to dismiss Philippe of Ibelin and appoint Aimery Barlais as lieutenant in his place[174].  She maintained that her great-nephew Konrad von Hohenstaufen had forfeited the right to the kingdom of Jerusalem by failing to come to Palestine, and claimed the throne herself at Acre in autumn 1229, although the High Court rejected her claim[175].  "Dominus Georgius marchio de Ceua…et fratribus suis" agreed with "dominus Poncius de Duima nuncius comitis Campanie" to prohibit "reginam Cypri" from passing through his territory, by charter dated 9 Jan 1233[176].  She married thirdly (1241, divorced 1244) Raoul de Soissons Seigneur de Cœuvres.  The Chronicle of Philippe de Novare names "messier Raoul de Saissons, un haut baron de France" as husband of "la reyne Aalis"[177].  She and her third husband were nominated titular regents of the Kingdom in Jerusalem by an assembly at Acre 5 Jun 1243, in the continuing absence of her great nephew Konrad von Hohenstaufen[178].  She continued to rule as sole regent after her husband returned to France in 1244[179].  Jerusalem was invaded by the Khwarismians in Jul 1244, and surrendered 23 Aug 1244[180]

King Hugues I & his wfe had three children: 

1.         MARIE de Lusignan ([before 1215]-5 Jul [1251/53]).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her, gives her parentage and specifies that she was the older daughter as well as naming her husband[181].  The Thomas Tusci Gesta Imperatorum et Pontificum records that the wife of "Galteranus comes Iopensis" was "rex Cypri filiam"[182].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "sororem…Henrici [regis Cypri]" married "Galtherus comes Brenensis" in 1233 but does not name her[183].  Her children were passed over in the succession to the kingdom of Cyprus after the death of King Hugues II in 1267 in favour of the son of her younger sister.  The necrology of Saint-Etienne, Troyes records the death "5 Jul" of "Maria comitissa Brene"[184].  It is assumed that this refers to Marie de Lusignan as she is the only known Ctss de Brienne of that name.  Betrothed (before 21 Jul 1229) to PIERRE "Mauclerc" Duke of Brittany, son of ROBERT [II] Comte de Dreux et de Braine & his second wife Yolande de Coucy ([1187]-at sea off Damietta end-May 1250, bur Braine, église abbatiale de Saint-Ived).  A Papal prohibition on the marriage between "comes Britannie" and "filiam reginam Cypri", by reason of 4o consanguinity, is dated at Pérouse 21 Jul 1229[185].  It is not known which daughter was betrothed to the Duke of Brittany, but it is a reasonable assumption that she was the older daughter.  m (1233) GAUTHIER [IV] de Brienne Count of Jaffa, son of GAUTHIER [III] de Brienne Principe di Tarento & his wife Elvira of Sicily (1205-murdered Cairo [17 Oct 1244/47]).  His marriage in 1233 is recorded by William of Tyre (Continuator)[186].  He took part in the civil war in Cyprus against the supporters of Emperor Friedrich II.  He fought at the battle of Gaza 18 Oct 1244, but was captured and taken in chains to Cairo[187].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death [in 1250, from the context] of "Conte Galtier, marito della sorella del re Henrico de Cypro" who had been "in preson di Saracini, preso a la battaglia de Forbie"[188]

2.         ISABELLE of Cyprus ([before 1216]-1264 after Feb, bur Nicosia).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names her, gives her parentage and specifies that she was the younger daughter as well as naming her husband[189].  She was appointed de facto regent of Jerusalem at Acre in 1263[190].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records that she returned to Cyprus after her son was appointed bailly of Jerusalem in 1264[191].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death, at the end of 1263 (presumably old-style) from the context, of "madama Isabella, moglie del signor Henrico, figlio del principe de Antiochia et figlia del re Hugo de Cypro et sorella del re Henrico el grasso" and her burial "in la madre chiesia de Nicosia"[192]m (1233) HENRI of Antioch, son of BOHEMOND IV Prince of Antioch & his first wife Plaisance Embriaco of Jebail (-drowned [18/27] Jun 1276, bur Nicosia, Knights Hospitallers).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and his father[193].  His wife appointed him bailly of Jerusalem after her appointment as regent in 1263[194].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records his drowning at sea off Tyre 18 Jun 1276[195].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the drowning 18 Jun, 1276 from the context, of "Henrico padre de Hugo re de Hierusalem et Cypro" while travelling to Tripoli "con una nave di Alemani"[196].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that he was buried in Nicosia "a l'Hospital", stating that his body was taken from Tyre back to Nicosia at the same time as his son's body in early 1284[197].  Their descendants adopted the name Lusignan.  Isabelle & her husband had two children: 

a)         HUGUES of Antioch (before 1240-Tyre 24 or 27 Mar 1284, bur Nicosia St Sophia).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and gives his parentage[198].  He was appointed regent of Cyprus for his first cousin in 1261.  He was appointed regent of Jerusalem in 1264, in succession to his mother.  He succeeded his first cousin in 1267 as HUGUES III King of Cyprus.   

-        see Chapter 3.  KINGS of CYPRUS 1267-1489 (LUSIGNAN-POITIERS)

b)         MARGUERITE of Antioch ([1244]-30 Jan 1308, bur Nicosia, church of Notre-Dame of Tyre).  The Chronicle of Amadi names "madama Margarita…sorella del re Hugo" as wife of "signor Joan de Monforte, signor de Sur et de Thoron", commenting that she was childless when recording the death of her husband[199].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement IV for the marriage of "aliquis in Jerosolom et Cipri regnis" and "Marguerite de Lusignan soror regis" is dated 22 Sep 1268[200].  Her marriage was arranged by her brother King Hugues as part of his plan to heal the rifts between the various Frankish families in the Kingdom of Jerusalem[201].  Charles King of Sicily instructed Robert de Cornay to provide for "Margarite de Cypro, relicte quondam Joannis Marascotti militis et familiaris nostri" by charter dated 24 Feb [1278][202].  She grew extremely corpulent in later life[203].  Lady of Tyre 1284.  She gave the city to her nephew Amaury of Cyprus in 1291[204].  She became a nun in Cyprus.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 30 Jan, in 1308 from the context, of "madama Margarita de Lusignan princesa de Antiochia et contessa de Tripoli, dama de Sur et di Thoron…figlia de messer Henrico principe et sorella del re Hugo, relitta del signor de Sur messer Joan de Monforte" and her burial "in la città de Nicossia ne l'abatia della Nostra Donna mazore de Hierusalem, che si chiama in Cypro Nostra Dama de Sur", recording that she had become a nun before she died[205]m (general Papal dispensation 22 Sep 1268) JEAN de Montfort, son of PHILIPPE de Montfort Seigneur de la Ferté-Alais, Lord of Tyre & his second wife Maria of Antioch (-27 Nov 1283).  He succeeded his father in 1270 as Lord of Tyre. 

3.         HENRI of Cyprus (3 Mar 1217-Nicosia 18 Jan [1254], bur Nicosia Templar Church).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names him, gives his parentage and specifies that he was nine months old when his father died[206].  He succeeded his father in 1218 as HENRI I King of Cyprus, under the regency of his mother who appointed his great uncle Philippe of Ibelin as her lieutenant.  His mother quarrelled with Philippe of Ibelin, and attempted to replace him, but his authority was confirmed in 1226 by Pope Honorius III who placed King Henri under papal protection[207].  Henri was crowned King of Cyprus in 1225 by the Ibelin brothers who failed to consult Emperor Friedrich II, the suzerain of Cyprus[208].  When Philippe of Ibelin died in 1227, he was succeeded by his older brother Jean of Ibelin Lord of Beirut[209].  After Emperor Friedrich landed in Cyprus in Jul 1228, Jean refused the emperor's demand to surrender his fief of Beirut but agreed to accompany him to Palestine[210].  When the emperor returned to Cyprus in May 1229, he appointed five new baillis, Amaury Barlais, Gavinde Chenichy, Amaury of Beisan, Hugues of Jebail and Guillaume de Rivet, with instructions to evict all Ibelin supporters from the island[211].  Jean of Ibelin retaliated by invading Cyprus in Jun 1229.  He defeated the five baillis 14 Jul 1229 and resumed the government of Cyprus.  Amaury Barlais fled with King Henri and his sisters to the castle of Dieu d'Amour, where they were starved into surrender in summer 1230[212].  The ensuing civil war ended in 1232 when the Cypriots defeated the imperial forces at Agridi[213].  King Henri succeeded his mother in 1246 as regent of Jerusalem[214].  Pope Innocent IV placed Cyprus under the protection of the Papacy in 1247, declaring the end of any Cypriot suzerainty to the emperor.  King Henri took part with Louis IX King of France in the crusade in Egypt.  King Henri was a man of enormous corpulence[215].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records his death in 1253[216].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death at Nicosia 18 Jan [in 1253, from the context] of "Henrico re de Cypro" and his burial "al Tempio"[217].  Peter Edbury discusses the various sources which record the death of King Henri and concludes that the year was 1254 (new style)[218]m firstly (by proxy Limassol May 1229) ALASIA de Monferrato, daughter of GUGLIELMO VI Marchese di Monferrato & his second wife Berta di Clavesana (-Kirenia castle 1233 before Apr, bur Nicosia Santa Sofia).   She is named "Aalais" by William of Tyre (Continuator), who names her husband and specifies that she was "fille dou marquis de Monferrare"[219].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage of "re de Cypro Henrico" and "una donzella sua cugina, figlia del marchese de Monferatho Guielmo Longa Spada, che fo cugin del imperator"[220], although it is chronologically impossible for her to have been the daughter of the only member of the Monferrato family who is normally referred to as "Longo Spada".  This marriage was arranged by Emperor Friedrich II while he was in Cyprus in May 1229 en route back to Europe from Jerusalem, the bride's father being one of the emperor's strongest supporters in Italy[221].  She came to Cyprus with imperial troops in 1231 but it is unlikely that she ever met her husband who was in Palestine for most of the civil war in Cyprus.  She took refuge in the castle of Kirenia with the Lombards but died before the castle's surrender to the Ibelin troops in Apr 1233[222].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records that she had been crowned queen by her husband when he records the coronation of his second wife "come il avoit fait Alays la fille dou marquis de Monferrare"[223].  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records the death of the queen at Kerynia, and the return of her body to Nicosia for burial "nella chiesa cathedral"[224]m secondly (before 17 Nov 1237) STEPHANIE [Eneline] of Barba'ron, daughter of CONSTANTINE "the Grand Baron" Lord of Partzerpert and Barba'ron, Regent of Armenia [Armenia-Hethumids] & his second wife Alice of Lampron (1217-[1 Apr/Sep 1249]).  William of Tyre (Continuator) records that King Henri married "Estefenie la suer de Heyton le roi d'Ermenie et la fist coroner a reine"[225].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costans…connestable et…baill de la terre" and record that the daughters "dou baill" were married "l'une au rei Henri de Chipre…"[226]m thirdly (Sep 1250) as her first husband, PLAISANCE of Antioch, daughter of BOHEMOND V Prince of Antioch & his second wife Lucia di Caccamo-Segni ([1237/38]-[22/27] Sep 1261).  William of Tyre (Continuator) records the marriage in Sep 1250 of King Henri with "Plesance fille le prince d'Antioche"[227].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage in Sep [in 1250, from the context] of "Henrico re de Cypro" and "Piasenza, figlia di Beimonte principe de Antiochia et conte de Tripoli"[228].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "la royne Plaissence et Buemont qui puis fu prince" as the children of "Buemont" and his wife "la princesse Lucie"[229].  She was accepted as regent of Cyprus for her infant son in 1253.  She married secondly ([Apr/May] 1254, Papal dispensation before 7 Dec 1254, separated 1255, separation confirmed 27 Mar 1258) Balian Ibelin Lord of Arsur.  William of Tyre (Continuator) records her second marriage with "Balyan d'Ibelin filz du seignor" in 1254[230].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage, in 1254 from the context, of "Balian de Iblin figliolo del signor de Arsul" and "Piasenza regina de Cypro figliola del principe de Antiochia"[231].  The dispensation issued by Pope Innocent IV for the marriage of "Balian Ibelin n Johannis de Arsur" and "Plaisance regina Cipri relicta Henrici regis" is dated to before 7 Dec 1254[232].  She was recognised as regent of Jerusalem during her visit to Acre in 1258[233].  She became the mistress of Julien Lord of Sidon and Beaufort, which provoked a Papal Bull urging her to remarry[234].  According to Runciman[235], the mistress of Julien of Sidon was the daughter-in-law of Plaisance, Isabelle Ibelin, but Rüdt-Collenberg attributes the Papal Bull to Pope Urban IV in 1261, well before the time when Isabelle Ibelin could have been involved.  William of Tyre (Continuator) records her death 22 Sep 1261[236].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 27 Sep, in 1261 from the context, of "la regina Piasentia, que fo relitta de Henrico re de Cypro et madre de Hugeth herede de Cypro"[237].  The Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II records the death of "the queen of Cyprus, Blazhans" in [15 Jan 1261/14 Jan 1262][238].  King Henri I & his third wife had one child:

a)         HUGUES of Cyprus (Autumn 1252-Nicosia 5 Dec 1267).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and states his parentage, when recording his arrival with his mother and maternal uncle at Acre 1 Feb 1257[239].  He succeeded his father in 1253 as HUGUES II King of Cyprus, under the regency of his mother from 1253 and, after her death in 1261, that of his cousin Hugues of Antioch.  Lord of Jerusalem 1258.  William of Tyre (Continuator) records his death in Nov 1267 "hoirs du roiaume de Chipre"[240].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death "decembrio la vigilia de S. Nicolò", in 1267 from the context, of "Hughet el giovene re de Cypro"[241]m (Papal dispensation 12 May 1265) as her first husband, ISABELLE Ibelin Lady of Beirut, daughter of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his wife Alice of Athens ([1252]-[1282/before Nov 1283]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Yzabeau la fille dou seignor de Baruth" as the wife of unnamed person who died at the age of 14[242].  The paragraph in question deals with the family of the kings of Cyprus, and it is most likely that words have been omitted from the text which would clarify that the husband in question was Hugues II King of Cyprus.  This is confirmed by another manuscript of the Lignages which names "Ysabeau et Eschive" as the two daughters of Jean son of "Balian…sire de Baruth" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married firstly "Huge, le fis de Henri roy de Chipre, qui morut de 14 ans", secondly "un Englés…Heimon Lestrange" and thirdly "Guille Barlais" and died without heirs[243].  Isabelle returned from Cyprus to Beirut after the death of her first husband.  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement IV for the marriage of "Hugues rex Cypri" and "Isabella una ex filiabus quondam Johannis domini Berit" is dated 12 May 1265[244].  She married secondly (21 Mar 1272) Hamo le Strange of [Ellesmere, Shropshire] (-[1274/75]), and thirdly (1276) Nicolas Alaman titular Lord of Caesarea (-murdered Jun 1277).  After the death of her second husband, Hugues III King of Cyprus and Jerusalem took her to Cyprus to marry her third husband, but was obliged to return her to Beirut in 1277 in view of the deathbed agreement made by her second husband[245].  She married fourthly (after 1277) as his first wife, Guillaume Barlais, son of --- (-[1305/06]). 

 
 
 
 

Chapter 3.    KINGS of CYPRUS 1267-1489 (LUSIGNAN-POITIERS)

 
 
 

A.      KINGS of CYPRUS 1267-1489

 
 

HUGUES III 1267-1284, JEAN I 1284-1285, HENRI II 1285-1324

 

HUGUES of Antioch, son of HENRI of Antioch & his wife Isabelle of Cyprus (before 1240-Tyre 24 or 27 Mar 1284, bur Nicosia St Sophia).  William of Tyre (Continuator) names him and states his parentage[246].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records the appointment of "Hugue de Liseignen" as bailiff of Cyprus after the death of Queen Plaisance 22 Sep 1261[247].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the appointment, in 1261 from the context, of "Hugo de Lusignan, figlio de Henrico principe et de Isabella sorella del…re Henrico" as "baiulo del reame de Cypro"[248].  He was appointed regent of Jerusalem in 1264, in succession to his mother[249].  He arrived at Acre in Oct 1266, just after Sultan Rukn ad-Din Baibars Bundukdari had conquered Galilee.  He launched a counter-attack, but was ambushed at Safed and forced to retreat to Acre[250].  He succeeded his first cousin in 1267 as HUGUES III King of Cyprus, crowned 25 Dec 1267[251].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the coronation "al Nadal", in 1267 from the context, of "Hugo de Lusignan" as king of Cyprus after the death of his cousin[252].  He adopted the name Lusignan.  Regent of Jerusalem 1264-1267.  He succeeded as HUGUES King of Jerusalem on the death of Konradin von Hohenstaufen 29 Oct 1268.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the coronation 24 Sep, in 1269 from the context, of "Hugo de Lusignan" as king of Jerusalem "en la cità de Sur per man del vescovo de San Zorzi"[253].  His succession in Jerusalem was opposed by his cousin Marie of Antioch, but her claim was dismissed by the High Court of Jerusalem[254].  Hugues was crowned king of Jerusalem at Tyre 24 Sep 1269[255].  After his accession as king of Jerusalem, Hugues attempted to heal the rifts between the families of the Frankish knights, in particular by arranging the marriages of his sister to Philippe de Montfort's older son and of Eschiva Ibelin to Philippe's younger son[256].  "Hug…roy de Jherusalem latin et roi de Cipre" institued masses for the souls of "madame Yzabel nostre mere et de Johan d'Ibelin le jeusne jadis Seigneur de Baruth" by charter dated Oct 1270[257].  King Hugues joined Edward, son of Henry III King of England, who had taken the cross and landed at Acre 9 May 1271, although his Cypriot barons, led by Jacques Ibelin, refused to take part in any activity on the mainland until 1273[258].  Faced with their inability to make headway against the Mameluks due to insufficient resources, they signed a peace agreement with the Sultan at Caesarea 22 May 1272 which guaranteed the Franks continued possession of their existing territories for ten years and ten months[259].  King Hugues was actively opposed in Acre by the Knights Templars, and in Oct 1276 suddenly left the city for Tyre, from where he appointed Balian Ibelin as bailli at Acre, and returned to Cyprus[260].  After his departure, Acre came under the control of Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet], who had bought Marie of Antioch's titular rights to the kingdom of Jerusalem[261].  King Hugues made two unsuccessful attempts to reassert his authority over the kingdom of Jerusalem in 1279 and 1281[262].  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records that "Hugo de Luziniato rex Cypri cum filio suo" were poisoned by the "fratres militiæ Templi"[263], although no other indication has been found that this is correct or that any of the sons of King Hugues III died at the same time as his father.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 24 Mar, in 1284 from the context, of "el…re de Hierusalem et Cypro, Hugo de Lusignan", that his body was taken from Tyre back to Nicosia where he was buried in the church of St Sophia[264].  The "New Chronicle" records the death of King Hugues III 27 Mar 1284[265]

m (Papal dispensation 23 Jan 1255) ISABELLE Ibelin, daughter of GUY Ibelin, Marshal and Constable of Cyprus & his wife Isabelle Barlais ([1241/42]-2 Jun 1324, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau la fille Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre" as the wife of Hugues III King of Cyprus[266].  The dispensation issued by Pope Alexander IV for the marriage of "Huguetus f. Henrici de principe" and "Isabella Ibelin filia nobilis vir Guidonis" is dated 23 Jan 1255[267].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 2 Jun, in 1324 from the context, of "la regina Isabella, relitta del potente re Hugo et madre de Henrico re de Hierusalem et Cypro" and her burial "a San Francesco a Nicosia"[268]

King Hugues III & his wife had twelve children:

1.         JEAN of Cyprus ([1266][269]-Cyprus 20 May 1285).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Johan, Beymont, Henri, Amauri, Gui et Heimeri" as the six sons of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[270].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el re Hugo de Hierusalem" landed at Beirut 1 Aug, in 1283 from the context, with his three sons "Joanne, Beimonte et Henrico"[271].  He succeeded his father in 1284 as JEAN I King of Cyprus, crowned at Nicosia 11 May 1284, and as King of Jerusalem, crowned at Tyre May 1284.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "Joanne el primogenitor del…re Hugo" was crowned in Cyprus "il mese di mazo" in 1284[272].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 20 May, in 1285 from the context, of "Joanne re de Cypro, figliolo del re Hugo"[273].  The Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II records that "John king of Cyprus" died in [9 Jan 1285/8 Jan 1286][274]

2.         BOHEMOND of Cyprus (-Tyre 13 Nov 1283, bur Nicosia Franciscan Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Johan, Beymont, Henri, Amauri, Gui et Heimeri" as the six sons of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[275].  Another manuscript of the Lignages records that "Beimundo, figliolo del re Hugo" died without heirs[276].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el re Hugo de Hierusalem" landed at Beirut 1 Aug, in 1283 from the context, with his three sons "Joanne, Beimonte et Henrico"[277].  He died after accompanying his father and brother Henri to Palestine in an attempt to reassert control over the Kingdom of Jerusalem[278].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 3 Nov, in 1283 from the context, of "Beimonte…figliolo de re Hugo", recording that his body was taken back from Tyre to Nicosia with his father's body, and that he was buried "a li fratri menori"[279]

3.         HENRI of Cyprus (before Jun 1270-Strovolos 31 Mar 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Johan, Beymont, Henri, Amauri, Gui et Heimeri" as the six sons of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[280].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el re Hugo de Hierusalem" landed at Beirut 1 Aug, in 1283 from the context, with his three sons "Joanne, Beimonte et Henrico"[281].  He succeeded his brother in 1285 as HENRI II King of Cyprus, crowned 24 Jun 1285, and as King of Jerusalem.  "Henris…roi de Jherusalem latin et roi de Cipre" institued masses for the soul of "nostre…oncle Bauduin d'Ibelin conestable des roys jadis des roiaumes de Jherusalem et de Cipre" by charter dated Jan 1286[282].  He landed at Acre 4 Jun 1286, regained control of the kingdom of Jerusalem, and was crowned king of Jerusalem at Tyre 15 Aug 1286.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the coronation at Tyre 15 Aug, in 1286 from the context, of "re de Hierusalem, Henrico"[283].  He returned to Cyprus in [Sep/Oct] 1286, leaving Baudouin of Ibelin as his bailli[284].  King Henri returned to Acre in May 1289 and negotiated a ten year and ten months peace with Sultan Qalawun.  However, a riot in the city in Aug 1290 resulted in Muslim/Christian clashes, which provoked Sultan al-Ashraf's siege of Acre which lasted from 6 Apr 1291 until the city fell 18 May 1291[285].  After the fall of Acre, the kingdom of Jerusalem continued to maintain a fictive separate existence, with the kings of Cyprus appointing officers of this separate "state".  The town of Famagusta was assimilated into the state of Jerusalem, adopted its arms, and was the location for the coronation of each successive king of Cyprus as king of Jerusalem until it fell to the Genoese in 1373[286].  King Henri II permitted the Knights Templar and the Knights Hospitaller to base themselves in Cyprus after their expulsion from Palestine, although by refusing them the right to acquire new lands he hoped to avoid their becoming as powerful in Cyprus as they had been in Palestine.  The Knights Templar conspired with the king's brother Amaury, who seized power in 1306.  King Henri withdrew to the royal estate of Strovolos where he occupied himself with his falcons[287], but in Feb 1310 he was escorted to Cilician Armenia in exile[288].  After the assassination of Amaury in Jun 1310, Henri II was released from Armenia thanks to the intervention of his mother who negotiated his exchange for Zabel, the widow of Amaury, and landed at Famagusta 27 Aug 1310[289].  King Henri exacted revenge against the Knights Templar, drowning or burning their leaders.  He suffered from epilepsy.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 31 Mar, in 1324 from the context, in "suo casal, mesa liga lontan da Nicosia ditto Strovilo" of "il re Henrico"[290].  Lady of Coletta.  m (Nicosia 16 Oct 1317) as her first husband, CONSTANZA of Sicily, daughter of FEDERIGO II King of Sicily [Aragon] & his wife Eléonore of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] ([1307]-after 19 Jun 1344).  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival in Cyprus 4 Oct, in 1317 from the context, of "la regina Constanza…figlia del re Federico de Cicilia" and her marriage in Nicosia 16 Oct when she was also crowned queen[291].  "Petrus secundus…rex Sicilie…domini Friderici…patris sui regis eiusdem regni in ipsius administratione" wrote to Jaime King of Aragon "frater [patris nostris]" concerning the potential remarriage of "domine Constancie…regine Jerusalem et Cipris, sororis nostre" dated 16 Dec [1324][292].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "le regina Constanza relitta del re Henrico" left for Sicily from Famagusta 2 Mar, 1326 from the context[293].  Queen Constanza married secondly (Feb 1331) as his second wife, Lewon IV King of Armenia ([1308/09]-1341), and thirdly (1343 after 16 Apr) as his first wife, Jean de Lusignan, great-nephew of her first husband ([1329/30]-murdered 1375).  The Chronique du Royaume de la Petite Arménie of Constable Sempad records the marriage of "le roi d'Arménie Léon" and "[la] fille du roi de Sicile Frédéric II" in [29 Dec 1330/28 Dec 1331][294], which was accompanied by a grant of commercial privileges by her husband to his father-in-law[295].  The Chronicle of Jean Dardel records that King Lewon married "dame Constance, vefve de feu Henry, roy de Cyppre" stating that she was daughter of "Fredric, roy de Sezille"[296].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "la regina Costanza" as first wife of "Joanne, l'altro figliolo de re Hugo…principe d'Antiochia e contestabile de Cypro"[297].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement VI for the marriage of "Jean de Lusignan filius Hugonis regis" and "Constance d´Aragon filia quondam Frederici vidua Leonis regis Armeniæ et Henrici regis Cypri" is dated 16 Apr 1343[298]

4.         AMAURY of Cyprus ([1270/72]-murdered Nicosia 5 Jun 1310, bur Nicosia St Sophia).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Johan, Beymont, Henri, Amauri, Gui et Heimeri" as the six sons of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[299].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el re Henrico" returned to Cyprus 26 Sep, in 1288 from the context, and left "suo fratello messer Almerico signor de Sur et contestabile del reame" as baily at Acre[300].  His brother King Henri II sent him to help defend Tripoli from the attack by Sultan Qalawun in Feb 1289.  He escaped back to Cyprus after the city fell 26 Apr 1289[301].  Pope Honorius IV wrote to the bishop of Antarados requesting him to grant a dispensation for the marriage of "uno filio et una filia Hugonis regis Cypri…et…uno filio et una filia regis Armeniæ" dated 23 May 1286[302].  It is assumed that this dispensation refers to Amaury: if it had been his older brother Henri, it is felt that he would have been referred to as king of Cyprus.  If this is correct, the proposed marriage did not go ahead at that date.  His brother appointed him Constable of the kingdom of Jerusalem in 1289[303].  He was installed as ruler of Tyre by his aunt Marguerite de Montfort in early 1291, but the city was abandoned to the Mameluks without a struggle in May 1291[304].  He declared his brother King Henri II too ill to rule 26 Apr 1306 and adopted the title "gubernator et rector" of the kingdom of Cyprus[305].  He was murdered by Simon of Montolif, a member of his household The Chronicle of Amadi records his murder by Simon de Montolif and his burial "a Santa Sophia"[306].  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names his murderer "Symon de Montolipho, figliulo de Tomaso"[307][308]Betrothed (Papal dispensation 23 Jan 1291) to ESCHIVA Ibelin, widow of HONFROY de Montfort Lord of Tyre, daughter of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his wife Alice of Athens (1253-Nicosia 1312, bur Nicosia Cathedral), who later married his younger brother.  The dispensation issued by Pope Nicholas IV for the marriage of "Amaricus dominus Tyrensis, conest. regni, frater Henrici regis" and "Echive Ibelin, vidua Anfredi de Monteforti" is dated 23 Jan 1291[309]m ([7 Jan 1293/6 Jan 1294], Papal dispensation 1293) ZABEL of Armenia, daughter of LEWON II King of Armenia & his wife Kyr Anna [Theophano] of Lampron ([12 Jan 1276/11 Jan 1277]-murdered Sis before 9 Apr 1323).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Ysabeau, Ritta et Thefanon" as the three daughters of King Lewon II & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "Amauri le fis le roi Huge de Chipre"[310].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "sorella de Haeton re de Armenia…Isabella" as the wife of "Almerico…contestabile del reame de Hierusalem"[311].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Yzabeau la fille au roy Livon d'Ermenie" as the wife of "Amauri" son of Hugues III King of Cyprus[312].  The Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II record "King Hetum's sister was married to the brother of the king of Cyprus, Sir Amari" in [7 Jan 1293/6 Jan 1294][313].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "dama Isabella dama de Sur, sorella del re de Armenia" left for Armenia with four of her children 10 Oct, in 1309 from the context, to consult her relations[314].  She took refuge in Armenia after the assassination of her husband.  The Chronicle of Jean Dardel records that "le…baron Ossin" ordered the murder of "dame Ysabel, suer du…roy Ossin" and the imprisonment of her children[315]

-        KINGS of ARMENIA

5.         MARIE of Cyprus (1273-Tortosa [10/22] Apr 1319).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Marguerite, Aalis et Helvis" as the four daughters of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[316].  Another manuscript of the Lignages records that Marie married "nel re di Aragona"[317].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "l'altra sorella, dama Maria" was present in the royal palace with her brother Amaury Prince of Tyre in 1310[318].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of Jaime II King of Aragon and "la hermana del Rey de Chipre…Doña Maria", specifying that the marriage was childless[319].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the betrothal in 15 Jun, in 1315 from the context, of "la sorella del re Henrico, damisela Maria de Lusignan" and "il re de Aragona"[320].  "Martinus Petri de Ros, castellanus Emposte" wrote to Jaime King of Aragon relating to his betrothal "XV junii" to "domina Maria" dated 8 Nov [1315][321].  King Jaime agreed to this marriage on the understanding that Marie would be the heir to Cyprus after the death of her brother King Henry II as his closest living relative[322].  After her death, he complained that she had been too old and had not proved companionable[323]m (Betrothed 15 Jun 1315, Gerona 27 Nov 1315) as his third wife, don JAIME II King of Aragon, son of don PEDRO III King of Aragon & his wife Constanza di Sicilia [Hohenstaufen] (Valencia 10 Aug 1267-Barcelona 5 Nov 1327, bur Barcelona church of San Francisco, transferred to Monastery of Santa Cruz, prov Tarragona). 

6.         GUY of Cyprus (-[1302/03]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Johan, Beymont, Henri, Amauri, Gui et Heimeri" as the six sons of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[324].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "Guido" as the younger brother of Henri II King of Cyprus, and his appointment as Constable of Cyprus[325].  His appointment as Constable suggests that he was older than his brother Aimery, who succeeded him in the office.  He succeeded as Lord of Beirut on his marriage.  Constable of Cyprus 1292-1300.  m (Papal dispensation 7 Dec 1291) as her second husband, ESCHIVA Ibelin Lady of Beirut, widow of HONFROY de Montfort Lord of Tyre, daughter of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his wife Alice of Athens (1253-Nicosia 1312, bur Nicosia Cathedral).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Eschive, la dame de Baruth, qui fu feme Hanfroi dou Thoron" as the wife of "Gui" son of Hugues III King of Cyprus[326].  This is confirmed by another manuscript of the Lignages which names "Ysabeau et Eschive" as the two daughters of Jean son of "Balian…sire de Baruth" & his wife, stating that Eschiva married firstly "Anfroi de Monfort, fis de Phelippe de Monfort, seignor de Sur", and secondly "Gui, le fis au roy Hugue de Chipre…conestable"[327].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la signora de Barutho…relicta de Anfredo de Monforte fratello de monsignor Joan de Monforte signor de Sur et de Thoron" was the wife of "Guido", younger brother of Henri II King of Cyprus[328].  The dispensation issued by Pope Nicholas IV for the marriage of "Guido de Lusignan frater Henrici regis" and "Echive Ibelin Beyrouth" is dated 7 Dec 1291[329].  Lord Guy & his wife had two children:

a)         HUGUES of Cyprus ([1293/96]-Nicosia 10 Oct 1359).  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "Guido", younger brother of Henri II King of Cyprus, & his wife had one son "Hughet" and one daughter[330].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Hugue et Yzabeau" as the two children of Guy, son of Hugues III King of Cyprus, & his wife[331].  Constable of Jerusalem 1318-1324.  He succeeded his uncle in 1324 as HUGUES IV King of Cyprus, titular King of Jerusalem. 

-        see below.

b)         ISABELLE of Cyprus (-after 1340).  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "Guido", younger brother of Henri II King of Cyprus, & his wife had one son and one daughter[332].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Hugue et Yzabeau" as the two children of Guy, son of Hugues III King of Cyprus, & his wife[333].  Another manuscript of the Lignages records that Isabelle married "Heude de Dampiere, contestabile de Gerusalem" and had two sons and two daughters "Hugo, Galtier, Alisia e Maria"[334].  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Hudettus de Dampierre" and "nobilis domicella Isabella de Lusignan" is dated 27 Jul 1322[335]m (Papal dispensation 3o and 4o 21 Jul 1322) EUDES de Dampierre, son of GAUTHIER de Dampierre-sur-Salon & his wife Eschiva Ibelin Lady of St Nicholas (-1330 or after).  Constable of Jerusalem 1324. 

7.         AIMERY of Cyprus ([1275]-Kyrenia before 19 Apr 1316).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Johan, Beymont, Henri, Amauri, Gui et Heimeri" as the six sons of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[336].  Another manuscript of the Lignages records that "Almerico, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo" was "re de Cypro" (in error) and had neither wife nor children[337].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that Henri II King of Cyprus appointed "Amerin suo fratello minore" as Constable of Cyprus after the death of his brother Guy[338].  Constable of Cyprus [1302]-1310.  Regent of Cyprus 1310.  The Chronicle of Amadi records a letter from the Constable of Cyprus in 1310 to the knights of Famagusta, among whom "messer Ague de Bessan, capitanio de Famagusta in loco de monsignor el re, messer Ruppin de Monforte…Chemerin de Lusignan figliolo del potente re de Hierusalem et Cypro de la bona memorie, contestabile del ditto reame de Cypro, Balin de Iblim principe di Galilea et signor de Thabaria, Hugo de Iblim, Philippo de Iblim conte del Zapho, Galtier de Bessan, Philippo de Iblim…"[339].  He was imprisoned by his brother King Henri II in 1310[340].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Chamerin de Lusignan, contestabile de Cypro, fratello del re Henrico, et messer Balian de Iblim, principe di Galilea" were transferred from the prison of Kyrenia to "un castel…Buffavento" 16 Jan, in early 1312 from the context[341].  He was imprisoned by his brother King Henri II in 1310[342]

8.         MARGUERITE of Cyprus (-1296).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Marguerite, Aalis et Helvis" as the four daughters of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife, stating that Marguerite married "Thouros le fis au roy Livon de Ermenie"[343].  Pope Honorius IV wrote to the bishop of Antarados requesting him to grant a dispensation for the marriage of "uno filio et una filia Hugonis regis Cypri…et…uno filio et una filia regis Armeniæ" dated 23 May 1286[344].  The Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II records the marriage of "paron Toros" and the sister of the king of Cyprus in [9 Jan 1287/8 Jan 1288][345]m (general Papal dispensation 23 May 1286, 9 Jan 1288) as his first wife, THOROS of Armenia, son of LEWON II King of Armenia & his wife Kerin [Kyr Anna] of Lampron (1271-murdered Partzerpert 23 Jul 1298, bur Trazerg).  Crown Prince of Armenia 1289.  He succeeded in 1293 as THOROS King of Armenia

9.         ALIX of Cyprus ([1270]-after Mar 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Marguerite, Aalis et Helvis" as the four daughters of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife, stating that Alix married "Balian de Ybelin le prince de Galilee et seignore de Tabarie"[346].  "Aalis de Leseignian, princesse de Galilée et dame de Thabarie, et fille dou puissant roy de Jerusalem et de Chipre, de bone memoyre" wrote to Jaime King of Aragon dated 18 May [1316 or 1322][347].  She and her sister Helvis claimed the throne of Cyprus in 1324, but the High Court declared in favour of King Hugues IV[348]m ([1292/94]) BALIAN Ibelin titular Prince of Galilee, son of PHILIPPE Ibelin Constable of Cyprus & his wife Simonette de Montbéliard (-[1315/16]).  He led the revolt of the barons and the installation of the regency in Cyprus in 1306.  He was arrested by Henri II King of Cyprus in 1312 and imprisoned in the caves of Kerynia where he was allowed to die of starvation[349].  

10.      HELVIS of Cyprus (-after 1 Apr 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Marguerite, Aalis et Helvis" as the four daughters of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[350].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la damisella Chelvis, loro sorella" was present in the royal palace with her brother Amaury Prince of Tyre in 1310[351].  She is named as the king's youngest daughter and unmarried in 1311 by the Aragonese ambassadors[352].  "Helluis de Lisiniaco filia quondam bone memorie domini Hugonis Jerushalem et Cipri regis" wrote to Jaime King of Aragon "cognato eius" dated 26 May [1315/24][353].  She and her sister Alix claimed the throne of Cyprus in 1324, but the High Court declared in favour of King Hugues IV348

11.      [ISABELLE of Cyprus (-after 1310).  Rüdt-Collenberg refers to a daughter "Isabelle" mentioned in 1310, citing Mas de Latrie's Histoire de Chypre (although he does not give a precise page reference)[354].  However, no reference to her has been found in the Histoire, or in any other primary source so far consulted.  Until further information comes to light, it is suggested that her existence should be considered dubious.] 

12.      [LUCIE of Cyprus (-[1324/31 Jan 1330]).  Rüdt-Collenberg refers to a daughter "Lucie" who was alive in 1324 and died before 31 Jan 1330[355].  Hugues IV King of Cyprus refers to property in Nicosia which he bought from "la princesse Lucie…sa ante" in a charter dated 31 Jan 1330 which records the dowry of Marie de Clermont on her marriage to the king´s son[356].  The reference to her in 1324 has not yet been traced] 

13.      [daughter (-before 1319).  The identity of the wife of Constantine Lord of Partzerpert is not known with certainty.  Edward II King of England named "dominus Baudouinus, filius domini di Negrini, consobrinus vester" in a letter dated 1307 addressed to Lewon III King of Armenia[357].  As King Lewon III was the son of Marguerite, daughter of Hugues III King of Cyprus, this suggests that the wife of Constantine of Negjir Lord of Partzerpert was another daughter of King Hugues, assuming that "consobrinus" is interpreted correctly in its strict sense.  Rüdt-Collenberg concludes that she was the same person as Isabelle (see above), unless she was another daughter otherwise unrecorded[358].  One potential difficulty with this hypothesis is the unlikelihood that the English court would have had detailed knowledge of the relationships in the Armenian royal family.  If this is correct, it would not be surprising if the letter contained inaccuracies.  Until further information comes to light, it is preferable to show this possible daughter in square brackets, without attributing any name to her.  Rüdt-Collenberg records that the wife of Constantine was "defuncta" in 1319[359]m ([1285/90]) CONSTANTINE of Neghir Lord of Partzerpert, son of CONSTANTINE Lord of Barba'ron and Partzerpert & his third wife Beatrice --- (-1308).] 

 

 

HUGUES IV 1324-1359, PIERRE I 1358-1369, PIERRE II 1369-1382

 

HUGUES of Cyprus, son of GUY of Cyprus, Constable of Cyprus & his wife Eschiva Ibelin ([1293/96]-Nicosia 10 Oct 1359).  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "Guido", younger brother of Henri II King of Cyprus, & his wife had one son "Hughet" and one daughter[360].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Hugue et Yzabeau" as the two children of Guy, son of Hugues III King of Cyprus, & his wife[361].  He was appointed Constable of Cyprus in 1318 by his uncle King Henri II.  He succeeded his uncle in 1324 as HUGUES IV King of Cyprus, crowned 15 Apr 1324 in Nicosia Cathedral, and titular King of Jerusalem, crowned in Famagusta 13 May 1324[362].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the coronation 15 Apr, in 1324 from the context, of "messer Hugo de Lusignan figlio de messer Guido" as king of Cyprus in "la chiesia di Santa Sophia" with "sua moglie Alis de Iblim", and his coronation as king of Jerusalem at Famagusta 13 May[363].  He took part in the successful crusade organised by Pope Clement VI against the Emir of Smyrna in 1344[364].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 10 Oct, in 1359 from the context, of "il re Hugo"[365]

m firstly (general Papal dispensation 16 Jul 1307, [1307/10]) MARIE Ibelin, daughter of GUY Ibelin Count of Jaffa & his wife Marie Ibelin (1294-before 1318).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Maria, figliola de Guido de Iblin conte del Zappho" as first wife of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro", stating that she was childless[366].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement V for the marriage of "Philippe Ibelin filius quondam Guidonis comitis Joppensis" and "aliqua de Cipro vel Armeniæ", and of "aliquis de Cipro vel Armeniæ" and "Marie Ibelin, soror prædicti Philippi, Paphens", is dated 16 Jul 1307[367]

m secondly (Papal dispensation 18 Jun 1318) as her first husband, ALIX Ibelin, daughter of GUY Ibelin & his wife Isabelle Ibelin ([1304/06]-after 6 Aug 1386, bur Dominican Church).  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage 17 Sep, in 1317 or 1318 from the context, of "messer Hugo de Lusignan contestabile del regno de Cypro, nepote del…re" and "Alisia de Iblim, figlia de messer Guido, signor del castello de Nicosia"[368].  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Hugues de Lusignan connest. regis Cyprie nepos Henrici regis, viduus Mariæ" and "Alice Ibelin filia quondam Guidonis" is dated 18 Jun 1318[369].  If it is correct, as reported in the Lignages, that King Hugues's son Guy was the child of his second marriage, it is possible that the Papal dispensation was granted ex post facto.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Alis de Iblim, moglie del re" had "la lengua un poco impedita" and that she was cured by a miracle of the "la santa croce de Tochni" which was rediscovered in 1340[370].  She married secondly (after 1359, Papal dispensation 3o 29 May 1368) as his second wife, Philipp von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen.  The dispensation issued by Pope Urban V for the marriage of "Philippe de Brunswick dux viduus Alisiæ de Dampierre" and "Alice Ibelin vidua Hugonis regis" is dated 29 May 1368[371].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 4 Aug, in 1369 from the context, of "messer Philippo conte de Bresivie, qual era maridato con la regina Alis del re Hugo"[372]

King Hugues IV & his second wife had nine children:

1.         GUY of Cyprus (-before 24 Sep 1343).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Guido, Piero, Gioanne, Giacomo, Thomaso" as five sons of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife[373].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[374], Guy was the son of his father's first marriage, estimating his birth date "[end 1315/Jan 1316]", but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  The Chronicle of Amadi names "Guidone primogenitor del re Hugo" when recording his son's claim to succeed to the throne of Cyprus[375].  Constable of Cyprus 1338.  Prince of Galilee.  His date of death is established from a letter of condolence dated 24 Sep 1343 written by Pope Clement VI[376]m (contract Château de Bourbon 29 Nov 1328, by proxy 20 Dec 1328 or 24 Apr 1329, Nicosia, Cyprus 31 Jan 1330) as her first husband, MARIE de Clermont, daughter of LOUIS I de Clermont Duc de Bourbon & his wife Marie de Hainaut [Avesnes] ([1318]-Naples 1387, bur Naples Santa Chiara).  Hugues King of Cyprus appointed his proxies to negotiate the marriage between "primogenitum natum nostrum Guidonem" and "domicellam Mariam consanguineam…domini regis Francie et filiam…domini Ludovici comitis Clarimontis" by charter dated 2 Mar 1328[377].  The betrothal ceremony between "Hugue…roy…de Jerusalem et de Chipre…monseigneur Gui ainzné et premier fil dou dit monseigneur le roy" and "noble demoiselle Marie fille de…monseigneur Loys dux de Bourbonoys, comte de la Marche et chambarier de France" took place at the château de Bourbon 29 Nov 1328, the agreement stating that the marriage would take place "come il seront en aage de pouvoir faire les espousailles et complir le marriage"[378].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival at Famagusta in Jun, in 1329 from the context, of "la damisela Maria, figlia de monsignor Loys de Chiaramonte" and her marriage at Nicosia to "Jotin figlio de re Hugo…contestabile de Cypro"[379].  After her husband died, her father-in-law would not let Marie leave Cyprus until 1346[380].  She married secondly Robert di Tarento [Sicily-Anjou] Emperor of Constantinople.  The testament of "domine Marie de Borbonio, imperatricis Constantinopolitane" names "quondam domini Hugonis de Lisiniano, filii sui, principis Galilee" and appoints "dominum Ludovicum ducem de Borbonio, comitem Claromontis et Foresii…nepotem suum" as her sole heir[381].  Guy of Cyprus & his wife had one child:

a)         HUGUES of Cyprus ([1335]-[1385/86], bur Nicosia Dominican Church).  "Chevalier, fils de l'ainsné fils du roy de Cypre" wrote letters at Toulouse in 1358, the report of these letters by Ducange clarifying that he predeceased his mother and was buried "en l'église des frères Prescheurs de Nicossie"[382].  He lived in exile in Naples[383] with his mother from 1346 to 1365.  He challenged the succession of his uncle Pierre I King of Cyprus in 1359, and was compensated with an annual pension of 50,000 bezants[384].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "il signor Hugo de Lusignan principe de Galilea, figliolo de Guidone primogenitor del re Hugo" requested support from Pope Innocent[385].  Senator of Rome 1360.  After the death of his stepfather in 1364, he and his mother challenged the succession of Philippe di Tarento as titular Emperor of Constantinople and suzerain of the Principality of Achaia, of which his mother retained effective possession[386].  Hugues was created Prince of Galilee by his uncle King Pierre I in 1365.  Commanding a force of 12,000 mercenaries, he landed in Greece in 1366, triggering civil war in Morea which lasted until 1370 when his mother sold her rights to the Principality to Philippe di Tarento[387], although Hugues himself left Greece in 1369 on the murder of his uncle King Pierre I to claim the Cypriot succession[388]m (after autumn 1365) MARIE de Morpho, daughter of JEAN de Morpho Count of Rochas, Marshall of Cyprus & his wife Eschiva --- (-after 1383).  The Lignages d'Outremer name  "Maria, figliola de Joan de Monforte, conte de Rochas" as wife of "Hugo…principe de Galilea"[389].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el conte de Ruchas, messer Joan de Morpho" had married his older daughter to "el Principe de Galilea"[390]

2.         ESCHIVA of Cyprus ([1325]-[Mar] 1363).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Civa, Isabella e Marietta" as the three daughters of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife, stating that "Civa" married "Ferrando de Maiorca"[391].  The dispensation issued by Pope Benedict XII for the marriage of "Ferrand de Majorque" and "Echive de Lusignan filia Hugonis regis" is dated 5 Mar 1337[392].  "Sancie reine de Hierusalem et de Sicile" donated 50,000 gold florins to "Fernand de Majorques Vicomte d'Omelas, frère du roy de Majorque" by a document dated 15 Mar 1338, which states that he had recently married "Ecive, fille du roi de Cipre" whom she had brought up in her house[393].  She was imprisoned by her father in 1341, during the latter's dispute with her husband.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival of plague in Cyprus in early March, in 1363 from the context, and the death of "madama Eschiva, figliola del re Hugo"[394]m (Papal dispensation 5 Mar 1337, [5 Mar 1337/15 Mar 1338], separated 1341) Infante don FERNANDO de Mallorca, son of Infante don FERNANDO de Mallorca titular Prince of Achaia & his second wife Isabelle Ibelin (posthumously Cyprus 5 May 1317-Omélas [1343/47]).  Vicomte d'Omélas.  A bitter dispute erupted between him and his father-in-law, who accused the mother of Infante don Fernando of sorcery.  Fernando was expelled from Cyprus in 1341, seeking refuge in Omélas near Montpellier, while his wife was forcibly detained in Cyprus[395]

3.         PIERRE of Cyprus (9 Oct 1328-murdered 16 Jan 1369).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Guido, Piero, Gioanne, Giacomo, Thomaso" as five sons of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife[396].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "doi figlioli del re…Piero conte de Tripoli et Joanne principe de Antiochia et contestabile de Cypro" fled Cyprus for the west, in 1349 from the context, but that they were brought back and imprisoned at Kerynia before they were returned to Nicosia[397].  Titular Count of Tripoli 1347-1358.  He founded the Knights of the Sword, a new order of chivalry, whose single object was the recapture of Jerusalem from the Muslims[398].  He was crowned PIERRE I King of Cyprus during the lifetime of his father, dated to 24 Nov 1358 by the Chronicle of Amadi[399] and 24 Nov 1359 by the Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas[400], and 1359 by the "New Chronicle"[401].  He succeeded on the death of his father in 1359.  He was crowned King of Jerusalem at Famagusta 5 Apr 1360[402].  In 1361, he conquered the citadels of Satalia and Korikos in Armenia and obliged the Emirs of Karamania and Anatolia to pay him tribute.  He set out on a general tour in 1362 to solicit support from western governments for a new crusade to recapture Jerusalem, visiting Venice in early 1363, Genoa, Avignon 29 Mar 1363, Flanders, Brabant, the Rhineland, Paris Aug 1363, where it was decided with Jean II King of France that the crusade should leave in Mar 1364, London in Sep 1363, moving to Germany in May 1364, also visiting Prague and Krakow.  He arrived in Rhodes with a sizable fleet in Aug 1365, and set sail for Alexandria which he captured in Oct 1365 but he was unable to retain the city as so many of his crusading supporters abandoned the cause with their booty[403].  Embittered by his failures, King Pierre became more and more irrational.  His arbitrary actions included the confiscation of the assets and fief of the Gibelet family for refusing to give him some of their greyhounds.  He succeeded in 1368 as titular King of Armenia.  He was assassinated by a group of barons led by Philippe Ibelin, possibly with the connivance of his brothers Jean and Jacques de Lusignan[404]m firstly (Papal dispensation 28 Jun 1342) ESCHIVA de Montfort, daughter of [HONFROY de Montfort titular Lord of Beirut & his wife ---] (1324-before 1353).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Civa, figliola de Rupin de Monforte, signor de Barutho" as first wife of "Piero…re de Gierusalem e de Cypro"[405].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement VI for the marriage of "Pierre de Lusignan secundogenitus regis" and "Echive de Montfort filia quondam Rupeni militis consanguinea Johannis de Convenis card. Portuen." is dated 28 Jun 1342[406].  It is chronologically impossible for Eschiva to have been the daughter of Rupen.  It is therefore assumed that she was the daughter of Rupen's son Honfroy, but the primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified.  m secondly (Sep 1353) doña LEONOR de Aragón, daughter of Infante don PEDRO de Aragón Conde de Prades & his wife Jeanne de Foix ([1333]-Barcelona 26 Dec 1417).  The Lignages d'Outremer name  "Lionora, nezza del re d'Aragona" as second wife of "Piero…re de Gierusalem e de Cypro"[407].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "re Piero…et…la regina Alis de Catalognia sua moglie" were crowned king and queen of Jerusalem at Famagusta after the death of his father[408].  According to the Chronicle of Amadi, the was in love with "messer Joan de Morpho conte de Rochas"[409].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Lionora" wrote many letters to the Pope complaining of the conduct of the Cypriot nobles[410].  Her parentage is confirmed by a later passage in the Chronicle of Amadi which records that the father of the queen "fra Piero di Aragona" presented letters to the Pope at Avignon from his daughter which complained of the part played by Cypriot nobles in the murder of her husband, to gain his support for the Genoese invasion of Cyprus[411].  Motivated by a desire to avenge her husband's murder, and by hatred for his brothers Jean and Jacques de Lusignan, Queen Leonor at one point collaborated with the Genoese in their attack on Cyprus in 1373[412].  She ordered the murder of her brother-in-law Jean in 1375.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Lionora" was expelled by her daughter-in-law and sent back to Aragon, dated to after 1378 from the context[413]Mistress (1): JEANNE Alaman, widow of JEAN de Montolive de Choulou, daughter of ---.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that queen knew that "madona Joanna l'Alemana, dama de Chulu, relitta del quondam signor Thomas de Montolipho" was eight months pregnant by the king and took revenge by placing a slab of marble on her and then having her imprisoned in Kerinia, before forcing her to become a nun at the convent of St Clara[414]Mistress (2): ESCHIVA of Skandelion, wife of RENIER Le Petit, daughter of ---.  Her history is outlined in the Chronicle of Makhairas[415].  King Pierre I & his first wife had one child:

a)         ESCHIVA of Cyprus (-before 1369).  The Lignages d'Outremer name  "Civa" as the daughter of "Piero…re de Gierusalem e de Cypro" by his first wife, stating that she "morse donzella"[416]

King Pierre I & his second wife had two children:

b)         PIERRE of Cyprus ([1357]-13 Oct 1382, bur Nicosia Dominican Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name  "Piero e Marietta" as the children of "Piero…re de Gierusalem e de Cypro" by his second wife[417].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el…re Piero…figliolo de re Piero" succeeded after the death of his father[418].  He succeeded his father in 1369 as PIERRE II King of Cyprus, under the regency of his uncle Jean Prince of Antioch.  He was declared of age in Dec 1371[419].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "monsignor Piero de Lusignan" was crowned king of Cyprus 13 Jan 1372 at St Sophia in Nicosia and king of Jerusalem in the church of St Nicholas at Famagusta 2 Oct[420].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el conte de Ruchas, messer Joan de Morpho" hoped to marry his daughter "la seconda genita" to the king, and that "messer Zaco de Nores el Turcopulier" also hoped to marry his daughter to the king, the passage being dated to 1372 from the context[421].  The latter ceremony triggered violence between the Venetian and Genoese communities in the town, followed by part of the Genoese community evacuating the island.  In reprisal, the Genoese invaded Cyprus, pillaging Famagusta in May 1373.  During the course of negotiations aimed at staving off the attacks, King Pierre, his mother and uncle were captured.  Genoese forces entered Nicosia 4 Dec 1373.  An armistice was eventually signed in Mar 1374, with the Genoese inflicting severe financial penalties on the Cypriots.  The invading fleet left the island in Apr 1374, but the Genoese left a garrison in Famagusta which they retained there until 1464[422].  His marriage was arranged to counter-balance the influence of the Genoese.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 13 Oct, in 1382 from the context, of "re Piero" and his burial "a San Domenico"[423]m (by proxy Milan [2] Apr 1376, Nicosia Sep 1378) VALENTINA Visconti, daughter of BERNABÒ Visconti Lord of Milan & his wife Beatrice "Regina" della Scala of Verona (Milan [12 Aug 1367]-Cyprus before Sep 1393).  The Annales Mediolanenses record that "Domina Valentina filia Domini Bernabovis" left Milan in 1377 to join her husband "Regis Cypri"[424].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage of the king and "la figlia de messer Bernardo duca de Milan…Valentina" with a large dowry, the marriage being kept secret for a long time[425].  The context indicates that the marriage took place in 1372, but this is early in light of the following document.  A charter dated 4 Apr 1376 notifies the marriages by proxy between "domini Petri Jerusalem et Cipri regis" and "Valenziam natam…Bernabos" and between "Karolum natum…Bernabos" and "dominam Margaritam domini regis prelibati sororem"[426].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival in Cyprus of "la regina Valentina, nepote del signor Barnabo duca de Milan" with a great treasure, in 1377 from the context, stating that a great enmity was triggered between her and her mother-in-law[427].  She quarrelled with her mother-in-law, eventually expelling her from Cyprus.  After her husband died, she attempted to seize the crown for herself.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "Perrotto de Montolipho" was was in love with Queen Valentina and that he delayed the departure of the king's successor from Genoa[428].  Her death is reported in a letter from Heloise Queen of Cyprus to the duke of Milan which arrived 12 Sep 1393[429].  King Pierre II & his wife had one child: 

i)          daughter ([1379/80]-before Apr 1382).  The infant daughter of King Pierre II is referred to in the Chronique de Reggio[430]

c)         MARGUERITE of Cyprus ([1360]-[1397]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name  "Piero e Marietta" as the children of "Piero…re de Gierusalem e de Cypro" by his second wife, stating that Marietta married "Zaco figliolo de Zuan de Lusignan, principe d'Antiochia e de Alis de Iblin"[431].  A charter dated 4 Apr 1376 notifies the marriages by proxy between "domini Petri Jerusalem et Cipri regis" and "Valenziam natam…Bernabos" and between "Karolum natum…Bernabos" and "dominam Margaritam domini regis prelibati sororem"[432].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Lionora" had "una figlia donzella…Margarita" whom "il re Zacco" later married to "el conte de Tripoli, figliolo del principe de Antiochia"[433].  Pedro IV King of Aragon requested Pope Urban VI not to grant a dispensation for the marriage of "Margaritam…quondam Hugonis [error for Petri] regis Jherusalem et Cipri filiam…consanguineam nostram" other than as desired by "domina Alienora, Jherusalem et Cipri regina, matre sua, consanguinea nostra" dated 18 May 1383[434].  [Betrothed] ([2] Apr 1376) to CARLO Visconti Signore di Parma, son of BERNABÒ Visconti Lord of Milan & his wife Beatrice "Regina" della Scala of Verona (Sep 1359-Aug 1403).  m (1385 after May) her first cousin, JACQUES de Lusignan titular Count of Tripoli, son of JEAN de Lusignan titular Prince of Antioch [Regent of Cyprus] & his second wife Alice Ibelin (-before 1397). 

King Pierre I had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

d)         child (1363 or 1368-).  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records that this unnamed child was taken by the Queen and never seen again[435]

4.         JEAN of Cyprus ([1329/30]-murdered Nicosia 1375).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Guido, Piero, Gioanne, Giacomo, Thomaso" as five sons of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife[436].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "doi figlioli del re…Piero conte de Tripoli et Joanne principe de Antiochia et contestabile de Cypro" fled Cyprus for the west, in 1349 from the context, but that they were brought back and imprisoned at Kerynia before they were returned to Nicosia[437].  Titular Prince of Antioch 1345.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that King Hugues installed "suo figliolo Joanne" as Prince of Antioch and Constable of Cyprus in 1358 when his brother was crowned king[438].  Regent of Cyprus 1362-1365 and 1368.  "Pierre…roy de Jerusalem et de Chipre" wrote a letter dated 21 Apr 1363 to "nostre…frere Johan de Lezegnan prince d'Antioche, connestable, regent et gouverneur de nostre dit royaume de Chipre" in favour of the burgers of Montpellier[439].  He was appointed Regent of Cyprus in 1369 for his nephew King Pierre II.  He led the group of barons which murdered his brother Pierre I King of Cyprus in 1369.  He was murdered on the orders of his sister-in-law Queen Leonor, widow of King Pierre I.  m firstly (Papal dispensation 16 Apr 1343) as her third husband, CONSTANZA of Sicily, widow firstly of HENRI II King of Cyprus and secondly of LEWON IV King of Armenia, daughter of FEDERIGO II King of Sicily [Aragón] & his wife Eléonore of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] ([1307]-after 19 Jun 1344).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "la regina Costanza" as first wife of "Joanne, l'altro figliolo de re Hugo…principe d'Antiochia e contestabile de Cypro"[440].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement VI for the marriage of "Jean de Lusignan filius Hugonis regis" and "Constance d´Aragon filia quondam Frederici vidua Leonis regis Armeniæ et Henrici regis Cypri" is dated 16 Apr 1343[441]m secondly (Papal dispensation 14 Apr 1350) ALIX Ibelin, daughter of GUY Ibelin Seneschal of Cyprus & his wife Marguerite Ibelin ([1325/30]-after 1374).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Alisia, figliola de Guido de Iblin, synescalco de Cypro" as second wife of "Joanne, l'altro figliolo de re Hugo…principe d'Antiochia e contestabile de Cypro"[442].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement VI for the marriage of "Jean de Lusignan princeps Antiochenus filius Hugonis regis" and "Alice Ibelin filia Guidonis militis et seneschalli Cypri domicella" is dated 14 Apr 1350[443].  Her dowry was Alaminos, which belonged to her paternal grandfather[444]Mistress (1): ALIX Gibelet, widow of PHILIPPE de Costa, daughter of ---.  The Chronicle of Amadi names "dama Alis de Giblet, olim relitta de ser Philippo Costa" as mother of the illegitimate son of the prince of Antioch[445].  Regent Jean & his second wife had one child:

a)         JACQUES de Lusignan (before 1358-[16 Aug 1395/Aug 1397]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Jacomo" as the son of "Joanne, l'altro figliolo de re Hugo…principe d'Antiochia e contestabile de Cypro" and his second wife[446].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "Zaco conte de Tripoli" as son of the Prince of Antioch[447].  Titular Count of Tripoli 10 Oct 1372.  "Jacobus…rex Jerosolimitanus…et rex Cipri et Armenie" appointed "Johannis de Lusignano domini de Baruto, nepotis…nostri" as his ambassador by charter dated 16 Aug 1395, which names "nostrorum baronum…Johannis de Lusignano comitis Tripolitani…"[448]m (1385 after May) his first cousin, MARGUERITE of Cyprus, daughter of PIERRE I King of Cyprus & his second wife doña Leonor de Aragón (-[1397]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name  "Piero e Marietta" as the children of "Piero…re de Gierusalem e de Cypro" by his second wife, stating that Marietta married "Zaco figliolo de Zuan de Lusignan, principe d'Antiochia e de Alis de Iblin"[449].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Lionora" had "una figlia donzella…Margarita" whom "il re Zacco" later married to "el conte de Tripoli, figliolo del principe de Antiochia"[450].  Count Jacques & his wife had five children:

i)          JEAN de Lusignan (after 1386-[1406/13]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Piero, Gioanne, Lionora e Civa" as the children of "Zaco figliolo de Zuan de Lusignan, principe d'Antiochia e de Alis de Iblin" & his wife, stating that Jean died without heirs[451].  It is assumed that Jean was older than his brother Pierre, in view of his betrothal to the older daughter of King Jacques who, after Jean died, married Pierre.  Count of Tripoli.  Betrothed (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) to ISABELLE de Lusignan, daughter of JACQUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Helvis von Braunschweig. 

ii)         PIERRE de Lusignan (-7 Feb 1451, bur Nicosia Dominican Church)The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Piero, Gioanne, Lionora e Civa" as the children of "Zaco figliolo de Zuan de Lusignan, principe d'Antiochia e de Alis de Iblin" & his wife, stating that Pierre died 2 Feb 1451 and was buried "al monasterio di Predicatori"[452].  Titular Count of Tripoli from before 1432: King Jean II appointed "dominum Hugonem de Lucignano" to represent Cyprus at the Council of Basel, by charter dated 8 Jul 1432, witnessed by "dominorum Petri de Lucignano comitis Tripolensis, Jacobi de Caffrano marescalli regni Cipri…"[453].  Constable of Jerusalem 1415.  Regent of Cyprus 1432.  Seneschal of Jerusalem 1432.  The "New Chronicle" records his death 7 Feb 1451[454]Betrothed (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) to AGNES of Cyprus, daughter of JACQUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Helvis von Braunschweig ([1382]-Venasco, Piemonte 1 Mar 1459).  m firstly (Papal dispensation 29 Feb 1415) ISABELLE de Lusignan, daughter of JACQUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Helvis von Braunschweig (-12 May 1422).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marietta , Isabella, Civa e Agnese" as the four daughters of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "Piero de Lusignan contestabile de Hierusalem" and had "figlioli, e morseno picoli"[455].  The "New Chronicle" records her death 12 May 1422[456]m secondly (Nicosia 1 Nov 1439) --- (-6 Aug 1440).  The Lignages d'Outremer record the second marriage of "Piero de Lusignan contestabile de Hierusalem" with "altra moglie d'oltra mare"[457].  The "New Chronicle" records the date of Pierre's second marriage and the date of his second wife's death but does not name her[458].  The name of Pierre's second wife is not known.  Mistress (1): ---.  The name of Pierre's mistress is not known.  Pierre & his second wife had [two or more] children: 

(a)       sons (-young).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marietta , Isabella, Civa e Agnese" as the four daughters of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "Piero de Lusignan contestabile de Hierusalem" and had "figlioli, e morseno picoli"[459]

Count Pierre had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

(b)        FEBUS de Lusignan (-Rome after Jul 1485).  He was legitimated by Pope Martin V 13 Jul 1428, documenting his true parentage[460].  Marshall of Armenia 1432-[1461].  Lord of Arsephion 1461.  Lord of Sidon 1463.  m ([1435/40]) ISABELLE de Flory, [sister of JACQUES de Flory titular Count of Jaffa], daughter of ---.  She is named in a Papal document[461].  Febus & his wife had two children: 

(1)        HUGUES de Lusignan (-after 1468).  Canon at Nicosia, Paphos and Nimosia.  Apostolic protonotary, resigned before 1463.  Lord of Menico and Acaqui 1468: a document dated 7 Apr 1468 confirmed the grant of this land to "Hugue de Luzenia, fis de sire Febus de Luzenia"[462].  m firstly (before 25 Aug 1461) --- Babin, daughter of ---.  m secondly ISABEAU Placoton, daughter of ---.  Hugues & his first wife had two children:

a.          ISABELLE de Lusignanm VERY de Giblet Seigneur de Makrassika.  1500/10. 

b.          DOMENICO de Lusignan (-after 25 Jul 1525).  He was cited as a witness in Cyprus 25 Jul 1525[463]

Hugues and his second wife had one child:

c.          LUCRECE de Lusignanm OLIVIER de Flatre, son of PHILIPPE de Flatre & his wife ---. 

(2)        ELEONORE [Liénor] de Lusignan (-after 1472, bur Lisbon)"Nobilis domina Helyanora de Luxignano, filia magnifici domini Phebi de Luxignano, militis et marescalli Armenie…relicta quondam nobilis Sofretti Crispi et ad presens uxor nobilis militis Vaschi Egidii Moiny de Portugallia" sold a house in Rhodes to Louis de Magnac by charter dated 10 Feb 1459[464].  The Grand Master of Rhodes granted safe passage to "domino Valasco Gil Mony et Elionore de Lusignano conjugibus" by charter dated 22 Dec 1466[465].  m firstly ([1450/55]) SOFFREDUS Crispo or Calvus (-before 1457).  m secondly (before 1459) dom VASCO Egidio Moniz, son of --- (-Lisbon 1497).  He accompanied dom João de Portugal Duque de Coimbra to Cyprus at the time of his marriage to Charlotte heiress of Cyprus in 1456.  This couple's son, Febo Moniz de Lusinhan, was Alcalde mayor of Arrayolos, Repostero mayor and maestresala of dom Manoel I King of Portugal[466]

iii)        ELEONORE de Lusignan (-before 1414).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Piero, Gioanne, Lionora e Civa" as the children of "Zaco figliolo de Zuan de Lusignan, principe d'Antiochia e de Alis de Iblin" & his wife, stating that Eléonore died without heirs[467]m (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) HENRI de Lusignan Prince of Galilee, son of JACQUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Helvis von Braunschweig (-killed in battle Chirokhitia 7 Jul 1427). 

iv)       LOYSIA de Lusignan .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) EUDES de Lusignan, son of JACQUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Helvis von Braunschweig (-Palermo Jan 1421).  Seneschal of Jerusalem. 

v)        ESCHIVA de Lusignan (-young).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Piero, Gioanne, Lionora e Civa" as the children of "Zaco figliolo de Zuan de Lusignan, principe d'Antiochia e de Alis de Iblin" & his wife, stating that Eléonore died without heirs[468]

Regent Jean had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

b)         JEAN [Janotus] de Lusignan (-after 1410)The Chronicle of Amadi names "Joan de Lusignan" as bastard son of the Prince of Antioch by "dama Alis de Giblet, olim relitta de ser Philippo Costa"[469].  He was appointed (titular) Lord of Beirut by his uncle Jacques King of Cyprus in 1385.  "Jacobus…rex Jerosolimitanus…et rex Cipri et Armenie" appointed "Johannis de Lusignano domini de Baruto, nepotis…nostri" as his ambassador by charter dated 16 Aug 1395[470].  Governor of Zara, Sebenico and Trau 1403-1409.   Captain of Capua, for the King of Naples 1417.  He lived in Cyprus from 1426.  The "New Chronicle" records the death 17 Feb 1433 of "Febus" Lord of Beirut a bastard[471], which may refer to Jean.  m (1385 after May) MARGUERITE de Morpho, daughter of JEAN de Morpho Count of Rochas & his wife Eschiva ---.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage of "cavalier Joan de Lusignan" and "la fia de messer Joan de Morpho" after the arrival of his uncle King Jacques in Cyprus[472]  

5.         JACQUES of Cyprus ([1334]-Nicosia 20 Sep 1398, bur Nicosia San Domenico).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Guido, Piero, Gioanne, Giacomo, Thomaso" as five sons of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife[473].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that Pierre I King of Cyprus sent "suo fratello, messer Zaco de Lusignan, et Beimonte de Lusignan" to represent him to request help for a crusade against the infidels, in 1363 from the context[474].  Co-regent of Cyprus 1369-1375 for his nephew Pierre II.  He was captured by the Genoese in 1375 after their attack on Cyprus, and held a prisoner in Genoa.  On the death of his nephew Pierre II in 1385, the Supreme Court of Cyprus chose him to succeed as JACQUES I King of Cyprus

-        see below

6.         THOMAS of Cyprus (-15 Nov 1340).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Guido, Piero, Gioanne, Giacomo, Thomaso" as five sons of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife[475]

7.         ISABELLE de Lusignan (-Jun 1340).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Civa, Isabella e Marietta" as the three daughters of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife, stating that Isabelle died without heirs[476]

8.         MARGUERITE de Lusignan .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Civa, Isabella e Marietta" as the three daughters of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife, stating that Marietta married "Galtier de Dampierre" and died without heirs[477].  The dispensation issued by Pope Benedict XII for the marriage of "Philippe de Brusnwick filius Henrici ducis" and "Marguerite de Lusignan filia Hugonis regis" is dated 11 May 1337[478].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement VI for the marriage of "Gautier de Dampierre nepos regis miles, Paphensis" and "Marguerite de Lusignan filia regis domicella" is dated 14 Jun 1347[479]m (Papal dispensation 14 Jun 1347, before 10 May 1349]) GAUTHIER de Dampierre, son of EUDES de Dampierre-sur-Salon [Constable of Jerusalem] & his wife Isabelle de Lusignan (-after 1373).  Seneschal of Cyprus 1367. 

King Hugues IV had one [probably illegitimate son] by an unknown mistress: 

9.          PIERROT (-29 Jun 1353).  Pierrot son of Hugues King of Cyprus is named on a tombstone[480].  It is assumed that he was illegitimate as the king is already recorded as having a legitimate son named Pierre. 

 

 

JACQUES I 1385-1398

 

JACQUES de Lusignan, son of HUGUES IV King of Cyprus & his second wife Alix Ibelin ([1334]-Nicosia 20 Sep 1398, bur Nicosia San Domenico).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Guido, Piero, Gioanne, Giacomo, Thomaso" as five sons of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife[481].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that Pierre I King of Cyprus sent "suo fratello, messer Zaco de Lusignan, et Beimonte de Lusignan" to represent him to request help for a crusade against the infidels, in 1363 from the context[482].  Co-regent of Cyprus 1369-1375 for his nephew Pierre II.  He was forced into exile as part of the negotiations to end the Genoese invasion of Cyprus in 1374, but captured at Rhodes by the Genoese and taken to Genoa as a prisoner[483].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "el contestabile" was taken to Genoa and imprisoned at  "la Mal paga"[484].  On the death of his nephew King Pierre II in 1385, the Supreme Court of Cyprus chose him to succeed as JACQUES I King of Cyprus, crowned at Nicosia May 1385.  His release from Genoa was bought by the grant of commercial monopolies, the promise of payment of annual taxes and the permanent transfer of Famagusta to Genoese jurisdiction.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the details, specifying that his son "monsignor Janus", who had been born in Genoa, was left as a hostage while the king was accompanied by the queen and their two other sons[485].  He was crowned titular King of Jerusalem in Nicosia in 1389.  He was crowned as titular King of Armenia in 1393, after the death of King Lewon V, although the territory then controlled by the Armenians was limited to the fortress of Korikos (which was finally captured by the Turks in 1448).  The kingdom of Cyprus was financially ruined during his reign by the continuing demands of the Genoese.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 20 Sep, in 1396 from the context, of "el…re Zacho" and his burial "al monasterio di Predicatori"[486].  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records the death of King Jacques on 20 Sep[487]

m (Papal dispensation 1 May 1365) HELVIS von Braunschweig, daughter of PHILIPP Herzog von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen, Constable of Jerusalem & his first wife Alisia de Dampierre ([1353]-15 Jan 1421, bur Nicosia San Domenico).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Chielvis figliola de Philipo de Bresiny" as wife of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro"[488].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "madona Chelvis di Bresvig" as wife of the Constable of Cyprus[489].  The dispensation issued by Pope Urban V for the marriage of "Jacques de Lusignan filius quondam Hugonis regis et germanus Petri regis" and "Helvis de Brunswick filia Philippi ducis" is dated 15 May 1365[490].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "madama Chelvis de Bresivich, moglie del contestabile" was reduced to manual labour during her husband's imprisonment before joining him in his prison[491].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death of "la regina Chelvis madre del re" and her burial beside her husband, without stating either the day or the year but subsequent to the passage which records the death of her daughter-in-law Queen Charlotte (in 1422)[492]

King Jacques I & his wife had [twelve] children:

1.         daughter (1372-Rhodos 1374).  She is mentioned in the Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas[493]

2.         JANUS of Cyprus (Genoa [1374/75]-29 Jun 1432, bur Nicosia, Dominican church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife[494].  The Chronicle of Amadi specifies that King Jacques's son "monsignor Janus", who had been born in Genoa, was left as a hostage when the Genoese agreed to his father's release, a later passage recording that his father bought his release, in 1390 from the context[495].  He succeeded his father in 1398 as JANUS I King of Cyprus

-        see below

3.         PHILIPPE of Cyprus (-6 Oct 1417).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife[496].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the details, specifying that his son "monsignor Janus", who had been born in Genoa, was left as a hostage while the king was accompanied by the queen and their two other sons[497].  Constable of Cyprus 1401-1414.  The "New Chronicle" records the death 6 Oct 1417 of "Febus de Lusignan Constable" brother of the king[498], which presumably refers to Philippe.  Philippe had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:

a)         LANCELOT de Lusignan (-after 1450).  Legitimated 14 Jul 1428 "Lancelottus nobilis viri Filippi de Lusignan natus"[499].  Priest 1428.  Administrator of Limassol 1436-1438.  Administrator of Paphos 1438-1444.  Abbot of Santa Maria di Pinerolo 1443-1450.  Provost of San Pietro di Ferrania 1444.  Patriarch of Jerusalem 1444.  Cardinal 1446-1450.  Abbot of Fruttuaria 1450.   

4.         EUDES of Cyprus (-Palermo [Jan/Feb] 1421).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife[500].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the details, specifying that his son "monsignor Janus", who had been born in Genoa, was left as a hostage while the king was accompanied by the queen and their two other sons[501].  Seneschal of Jerusalem.  Count of Tripoli.  He was in the service of Alfonso V King of Aragon.  A contract to ship his body from Palermo names him as the deceased count of Tripoli[502]m (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) LOYSIA de Lusignan, daughter of JACQUES de Lusignan Count of Tripoli & his wife Marguerite of Cyprus.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  

5.         HUGUES of Cyprus (-Geneva Aug 1442).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that Hugues was "ecclesiastico e…cardinal de Santo Andrea" and died "in Savoia" without heirs[503].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "el monsignor cardinal, fratello del re"[504].  Administrator of Nicosia 1410.  Apostolic protonotary 1411.  Archbishop of Nicosia 1421.  Administrator of Limassol 1422-1436.  Cardinal 1426.  Regent of Cyprus 1427-1428 during the captivity of his brother King Janus in Egypt.  "Janus…Jherusalem, Cipri et Armenie rex" appointed "domini Hugonis de Lusignano…cardinalis" his regent by charter dated 25 Aug 1427[505].  During this time, he suppressed a revolt by the Greek population against the Latin government.  King Jean II appointed "dominum Hugonem de Lucignano" to represent Cyprus at the Council of Basel, by charter dated 8 Jul 1432[506], while "Hugo…episcopus Penestrinus…cardinalis de Cipro" subdelegated the appointment by "Johannes, Jherusalem, Cipri et Armenie rex, nepos noster" by charter dated 20 Mar 1433[507]

6.         HENRI [Charin] of Cyprus (-killed in battle Chirokhitia 7 Jul 1427).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that Henri was "principe de Galilea e Sinescalco del reame de Cypro", but died "nel 1426 nella Guerra di Saracini, al casal Cherochisia" without wife or children[508].  Titular Prince of Galilee.  He was a military leader fighting in Egypt 1425.  m (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) ELEONORE de Lusignan, daughter of JACQUES de Lusignan Count of Tripoli & his wife Marguerite of Cyprus (-before 1414).  Prince Henri had three illegitimate children by an unknown mistress:

a)         PHILIPPE de Lusignan (-before 11 Dec 1466).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m ESCHIVA [Ava] de Nores, daughter of LOYS de Nores [Marshall of Cyprus] & his wife Marie de Montolive (-after 1468).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   She was the mistress of Jacques II King of Cyprus.  Philippe & his wife had one child: 

i)          HARION [Henri] de Lusignan A document dated 15 Jul 1468 confirmed a grant to "Harion de Luzenian, fils de feu sire Philippe de Luzenian"[509]Signor di Chiti.   

-         see below, Part B

b)         HELVIS de LusignanThe primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m HECTOR de Quevides (-murdered Kerynia 1461).  He was at the court of Savoy 1435-1449. 

c)          MARIETTE de Lusignan (-after 1474).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m ONOFRIO de Requesens (-before 24 Feb 1474).  Lord of San Dimitrio, Chiti and Pallurocamp.  Seneschal of Cyprus. 

7.         MARIE of Cyprus (Genoa 1381-Naples 4 Sep 1404, bur Naples San Domenico).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marietta, Isabella, Civa e Agnese" as the four daughters of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that "Marietta" married "Lancilao re di Napoli"[510].  The Diarii di Monteleone records the marriage of "re Lansalao" and "re di Cipri…la sore…Maria", her arrival in Naples 12 Feb [1402] (presumably old style), her death 4 Sep [1404] and her burial "ad Santo Dominico de Napoli"[511].  Regent at Naples during her husband’s campaign in Hungary.  m ([13/28] Feb 1403) as his second wife, LADISLAS King of Sicily, son of CHARLES III King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Marguerite di Durazzo [Anjou-Capet] (14 Jul 1376 or 15 Feb 1377-Château de l'Œuf Naples 6 Aug 1414, bur Naples, San Giovanni a Carbonara). 

8.         ISABELLE of Cyprus .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marietta , Isabella, Civa e Agnese" as the four daughters of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "Piero de Lusignan contestabile de Hierusalem" and died without surviving heirs[512]Betrothed (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) to JEAN de Lusignan Count of Tripoli, son of JACQUES de Lusignan Count of Tripoli & his wife Marguerite of Cyprus (-[1406/13]).  m (Papal dispensation 19 Feb 1415) as his first wife, PIERRE de Lusignan Count of Tripoli, son of JACQUES de Lusignan Count of Tripoli & his wife Marguerite of Cyprus (-10 Feb 1451). 

9.         ESCHIVA of Cyprus (-[1396/98]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marietta, Isabella, Civa e Agnese" as the four daughters of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife[513]

10.      AGNES of Cyprus ([1382]-Venasco, Piemonte 1 Mar 1459)The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marietta, Isabella, Civa e Agnese" as the four daughters of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife, stating that Agnes died in 1458 "in Savoia" without heirs[514].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "madama Agnese…sorella [del re]"[515].  Member of the Council of Regency 1427 and 1439.  Citizen of Venice 1436.  Abbess of Wunstorf 1451.  Betrothed (Papal dispensation 19 Mar 1406) to PIERRE de Lusignan Count of Tripoli, son of JACQUES de Lusignan Count of Tripoli & his wife Marguerite of Cyprus (-(-7 Feb 1451). 

11.      GUY of Cyprus (-before 1396).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife[516]

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the main line of the family is not known. 

1.         HUGUES de Lusignan .  [Hugues de Lusignan Lord of Sidon] (not named in the document) recorded that 3 Jul 1432 "enfanta ma feme, dame Usabia Babina…filie…Gaca de Lezenian", baptised 16 Aug by "le roi Gaian, madame Anna, le counte de Triples…Fiebus de Luzenian…", and 28 Sep 1433 "filie…Lienor de Luzegnian"[517]m EUSABIA Babina, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Hugues & his wife had two children: 

a)         JAQUETTE de Lusignan (3 Jul 1432-).  [Hugues de Lusignan Lord of Sidon] (not named in the document) recorded that 3 Jul 1432 "enfanta ma feme, dame Usabia Babina…filie…Gaca de Lezenian", baptised 16 Aug by "le roi Gaian, madame Anna, le counte de Triples…Fiebus de Luzenian…"[518]

b)         ELEONORE de Lusignan (28 Sep 1433-).  [Hugues de Lusignan Lord of Sidon] (not named in the document) recorded that 28 Sep 1433 "enfanta ma feme, dame Usabia Babina…filie…Lienor de Luzegnian"[519]

 

 

The precise relationship between the following person and the main line of the family is not known.  It would be chronologically consistent for him to have been the illegitimate son of one of the brothers of Janus King of Cyprus. 

1.         GUY de Lusignan (-6 Dec 1477).  The "New Chronicle" records that he was taken prisoner with King Janus 7 Jul 1426[520].  He is named in later administrative documents from 1428 to his death, in one of which his son-in-law describes him as "nepos" of King Janus[521]m ---.  The name of Guy's wife is not known.  Guy & his wife had one child: 

a)         MARGARITA de LusignanThe primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m NICOLIN MamariTheir descendants adopted the name Lusignan de Mamari[522]

 

 

JANUS I 1398-1432

 

JANUS[523] of Cyprus, son of JACQUES I King of Cyprus & his wife Helvis von Braunschweig (Genoa [1374/75]-28 Jun 1432, bur Nicosia, Dominican church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Janus, che fu re de Hierusalem e de Cypro e d'Armenie…Philippo contestabile de Cypro, Audet synescalco de Cypro, Hugo, Henrico, Guido" as the six sons of "Giacomo, l'altro figliolo del re Hugo…re de Hierusalem e de Cypro" & his wife[524].  The Chronicle of Amadi specifies that King Jacques's son "monsignor Janus", who had been born in Genoa, was left as a hostage when the Genoese agreed to his father's release, a later passage recording that his father bought his release, in 1390 from the context[525].  He succeeded as titular Prince of Antioch 1392-1398.  He succeeded his father in 1398 as JANUS I King of Cyprus and Armenia, titular King of Jerusalem.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the coronation 11 Nov, in 1399 from the context, of "Janus de Lusignan, figliolo del…re Zacco" at Nicosia St Sophia[526].  The Mameluks invaded Cyprus from Egypt and defeated the Cypriots at Kherokitia in 1426.  King Janus was captured and taken back to Cairo.  His release was bought by the Knights of St John in 1428, after he agreed to recognise Egyptian suzerainty over Cyprus.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 28 Jun, in 1432 from the context, of "el re Zegno" and his burial "al monasterio delli Predicatori"[527].  The "New Chronicle" records the death of King Janus 28 Jun 1432[528]

m firstly (after Jan 1400, annulled [1407/09]) ELOISA Visconti, daughter of BERNABÒ Visconti Lord of Milan & his wife Beatrice "Regina" della Scala of Verona (-Reggio 12 Oct 1439).  A document dated 1 May 1404 at Naples, relating to the dowry of Marie de Lusignan, wife of Ladislas King of Naples, names "dominorum Jani et Eloysie, Cipri et Armenie regis et regine"[529].  Her parentage is confirmed by a letter to the ambassador of the king of Cyprus dated 12 Dec 1401 at Venice records that the queen of Cyprus was the sister of the duchess of Milan "domina ducissa Mediolani…sororem suam dominam reginam"[530]

m secondly (by proxy Melun 2 Aug 1409, in person Nicosia St Sophia 25 Aug 1411) CHARLOTTE de Bourbon, daughter of JEAN [I] de Bourbon Comte de la Marche et de Vendôme & his wife Catherine Ctss de Vendôme et de Castres (1388-Nicosia 15 Jan 1422, bur Nicosia, Dominican church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Carlotta de Borbon, figliola del conte de la Marca" as the wife of "Janus…re de Hierusalem, de Cypro e Armenia"[531]A document dated 10 Jan 1409 (presumably old-style) records the arrangements for the voyage of "domine sorori domini Marchie" from Venice to Cyprus[532].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival in Cyprus of "damisella Carlotta de Borbon, moglie de re Zegno" and her marriage 25 Aug, in 1411 from the context, "a Santa Sophia"[533].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 15 Jan, without specifying the year, of "la…regina Carlotta" and her burial "al monasterio di Predicatori"[534].  She died of the plague. 

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of King Janus's mistress is not known. 

King Janus I & his second wife had six children:

1.         JACQUES de Lusignan (-before 1416).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Jacomo e Joanne, Anna e Maria che morite fanciulla" as the four children of "Janus…re de Hierusalem, de Cypro e Armenia" and his wife "Carlotta de Borbon, figliola del conte de la Marca", stating that "Jacomo el primo figliolo de Jannus, medima ista, morse fanciullo"[535]

2.         JEAN de Lusignan (16 May [1414]- Nicosia 24 or 26 Jul 1458, bur Nicosia Dominican Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Jacomo e Joanne, Anna e Maria che morite fanciulla" as the four children of "Janus…re de Hierusalem, de Cypro e Armenia" and his wife "Carlotta de Borbon, figliola del conte de la Marca"[536].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the birth 16 Mar, without specifying the year, of "un figliolo…Joanne" and his installation as Prince of Antioch[537].  The "New Chronicle" records that Jean was created Prince of Antioch 12 May 1416[538].  He succeeded his father in 1432 as JEAN II King of Cyprus

-        see below

3.         --- de Lusignan (7 Nov 1415-young).  The "New Chronicle" records the birth of twins (unnamed) 7 Nov 1415[539].  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records the birth of unnamed twins who died young after the birth of their sister Anne[540]

4.         --- de Lusignan (7 Nov 1415-young).  The "New Chronicle" records the birth of twins (unnamed) 7 Nov 1415[541].  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records the birth of unnamed twins who died young after the birth of their sister Anne[542]

5.         ANNE de Lusignan (24 Sep [1416]-Geneva 11 Nov 1462)The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Jacomo e Joanne, Anna e Maria che morite fanciulla" as the four children of "Janus…re de Hierusalem, de Cypro e Armenia" and his wife "Carlotta de Borbon, figliola del conte de la Marca", stating that Anne married "duca de Savoia"[543].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the birth 24 Sep, without specifying the year, of "una fia Anna qual fu duchessa de Savoia", recorded in a passage which is later than the one which records the birth of her brother Jean[544].  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records the birth of Anne "24 Sep", after the birth of her brother Jean[545].  The marriage contract between "Anna di Cipro figlia Primogenita di Gianus Re di Cipro" and "Amedeo di Savoia Principe di Piemonte figlio Primogenito del Duca Amedeo di Savoia" is dated 9 Aug 1431[546].  The marriage contract between "Dom. Janus…Jerusalem, Cypri et Armeniæ Rex…Annam" and "Amedei Ducis Sabaudiæ…Ludovico de Sabaudia comiti Gebennarum…primogenito" is dated 1 Jan 1432[547]Betrothed (contract 9 Aug 1431[548]) to AMEDEE de Savoie Principe del Piemonte, son of AMEDEE VIII Duc de Savoie & his wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] (26 Mar 1412-17 Aug 1431).  m (Chambéry 12 Feb 1434) LOUIS de Savoie Principe di Piemonte, son of AMEDEE VIII Duc de Savoie & his wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] (Geneva 24 Feb 1413-Lyon 29 Jan 1465).  He succeeded on the abdication of his father in 1434 as LOUIS Duc de Savoie

6.         MARIE de Lusignan (-after 29 Apr 1437).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Jacomo e Joanne, Anna e Maria che morite fanciulla" as the four children of "Janus…re de Hierusalem, de Cypro e Armenia" and his wife "Carlotta de Borbon, figliola del conte de la Marca"[549]The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records the birth of an unnamed daughter who died young after the birth of their twin siblings[550].  The primary source which confirms her betrothal has not yet been identified.  Betrothed to PHILIPPE de Bourbon Seigneur de Beaujeu, son of CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon & his wife Agnès de Bourgogne [Valois] (11 Feb 1428[551]-after 1445). 

King Janus I had three illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

7.          ALOYSIUS de Lusignan (1408-after 1421).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Grand Commander in Cyprus of the Order of St John of Jerusalem 1413-[1414/21]. 

8.          GUY de Lusignan (-after 1428).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Legitimated by the Pope 13 Jul 1428. 

9.          CATERINA de Lusignan (-after 1439).  "Caterina de Lusignan admiratissa" is named in a document dated 1439[552]m (1427) GARCERAN Suárez de los Cernadilla, son of --- (-after 1458).  Admiral of Cyprus 1432.  Constable of Cyprus 1458.  The Chronicle of George Boustron records that "messier Carceran Suarès" constable of Cyrpus ensured the accession of Queen Charlotte on the death of her father King Jean in 1458[553]

 
 

JEAN II 1432-1458, CHARLOTTE 1458-1461

 

JEAN of Cyprus, son of JANUS I King of Cyprus & his second wife Charlotte de Bourbon (16 May [1414]-Nicosia 24 or 26 Jul 1458, bur Nicosia Dominican Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Jacomo e Joanne, Anna e Maria che morite fanciulla" as the four children of "Janus…re de Hierusalem, de Cypro e Armenia" and his wife "Carlotta de Borbon , figliola del conte de la Marca"[554].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the birth 16 May, without specifying the year, of "un figliolo…Joanne" and his installation as Prince of Antioch[555].  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records that Jean was born "Monday 16 May", following a record of an event in Sep 1413[556].  This has been interpreted as 1418, being the only year around the time when this date fell on a Monday.  However, the "New Chronicle" records that Jean was created Prince of Antioch 12 May 1416[557], which indicates that he must have been born in that year or earlier.  It is therefore assumed that the reference to the day of the week is incorrect.  The year 1414 appears to be the most likely year of his birth, for consistency with the record of the birth of his parents' other children in the various sources (see above).  He succeeded as titular Prince of Antioch 1418-1432.  He succeeded his father in 1432 as JEAN II King of Cyprus, crowned 24 Aug 1432[558].  King Jean II appointed "dominum Hugonem de Lucignano" to represent Cyprus at the Council of Basel, by charter dated 8 Jul 1432, witnessed by "dominorum Petri de Lucignano comitis Tripolensis, Jacobi de Caffrano marescalli regni Cipri…"[559].  The Armenian fortress of Korikos was captured in 1448 by the Turkish Emir of Karamania.  After the rebellion of his illegitimate son in 1457, he barricaded himself in the fortress of Nicosia with his wife.  He was mentally unstable towards the end of his life.  The Chronicle of Strambaldi records the death 24 Jul 1458 "in the same year as his wife" of "il buon re Zuane de Lusugnan" and his burial "a san Domenico"[560].  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records the death 26 Jul 1458 of "il re", about sixteen months after the death of his queen[561].  The "New Chronicle" records the death of King Jean 26 Jul 1458[562]

m firstly (by proxy Casale 17 Apr 1440, in person Nicosia 3 Jul 1440) AMADEA di Monferrato, daughter of GIAN GIACOPO Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Jeanne de Savoie ([1420]-Nicosia 13 Sep 1440, bur Nicosia Dominican Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Medea, figliola del marchese de Monferato" as the first wife of "Joanne, secondo figliolo de re Jannus", stating that she died childless[563].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival in Cyprus in 1440 of "madama Medea de Monferato, moglie del…re Joanne", their marriage 3 Jul, and her death 13 Sep[564].  The "New Chronicle" records the date and place of her marriage, and the date and place of her death[565].  The Chronicle of Leontios Makhairas records that she was crowned queen with her husband 3 Jul 1440[566].  The Chronicle of Strambaldi records that "re Zuanne con sua moglie Medea" were crowned 3 Jul 1440 "a Santa Sophia"[567].  The Chronicle of Strambaldi records the death 13 Sep 1440 of "la ditta regina Medea" and her burial "a San Domenico nel' arca della sua socera"[568]

m secondly (Nicosia Santa Sophia 3 Feb 1442) HELENE Palaiologina, daughter of THEODOROS Palaiologos Despot of Morea at Mistra & his wife Cleopha Malatesta ([1428]-17 Mar or 11 Apr 1457 or 1458, bur Nicosia Dominican Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Helena, figliola de chir Theodoro Paleologo signor de la Morea" as the second wife of "Joanne, secondo figliolo de re Jannus"[569].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival in Cyprus 2 Feb 1442 of "madama Helena Paleologo de la Morea" and her marriage 3 Feb to King Jean[570].  The Chronicle of Strambaldi records the arrival 2 Feb 1441 of "la signora Helena Paleologo, figliola della Morea" and her marriage 3 Feb 1441 "in santa Sophia"[571], the year presumably being old style.  She was an instrumental in reasserting the influence of the Greeks in Cyprus, welcoming many Byzantine refugees after the fall of Constantinople in 1453.  She poisoned her son-in-law.  She died in the fortress of Nicosia where she and her husband had barricaded themselves after the rebellion of his illegitimate son.  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records the death 11 Apr 1457 of "la regina"[572].  The "New Chronicle" records her death 17 Mar 1457[573].  The Chronicle of Strambaldi records the death in 1458 of "la signora regina Helena" and her burial "a san Domenico", later commenting that her husband died in the same year as his wife[574], which suggests that 1458 was the correct year of her death.  On the other hand, the Chronicle of Florio Bustron records the death 26 Jul 1458 of "il re", about sixteen months after the death of his queen[575]

Mistress (1): MARIETA, daughter of ---, from Patras (-Padua 12 Apr 1503, bur Padua San Agustino).  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names "Marietta da Patras dal Arcipelago, donna bellissima e savia" as the king's mistress [in 1441] on the arrival of Queen Helena who ordered her nose to be cut off[576].  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names "Marco de Patras, barba dell' eletto", referring to Jacques illegitimate son of King Jean who had been appointed archbishop of Nicosia[577].  On the death of her son, Marieta was taken to Venice and placed in semi-captivity.  A decision of the Council of Ten of Venice dated 22 Jan 1479 records that "Mariete, matris quondam regis Jacobi" was placed under the control of "Christophori Mutii…magistri puerorum regiorum"[578].  Her epitaph in the church of San Agostino in Padua records the death 12 Apr 1503 of "Marieta mater quondam Jacobi Cypri regis"[579]

King Jean II & his second wife had two children:

1.         CHARLOTTE de Lusignan (28 Jun 1444-Rome 16 Jul 1487).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Cleopa, che morite picola, e Carlotta, che fu la prima" as the two children of "Joanne, secondo figliolo de re Jannus" and his second wife, stating that Charlotte married firstly "Joan de Bortogalo, principe de Antiochia, e morite senza heredi alli 22 di zugno 1457" and secondly "Alvise figliolo del signor duca de Savoia e de dama Anna de Lusignan, el qual era suo cusin zerman"[580]The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names "due figlie Carlotta e Cleopa" as the children of King Jean, specifying that "Carlotta fu maritata in Gioanne di Portogallo, principe d'Antiochia"[581].  The "New Chronicle" records her birth 28 Jun 1444[582].  She succeeded as titular Pss of Antioch 1456-1458.  The "New Chronicle" records the date of her first marriage and the date and place of her second marriage[583].  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records that her mother arranged her second marriage to "Aluise duca di Savoia…suo cujino germano" before she died[584].  She succeeded her father in 1458 as CHARLOTTE Queen of Cyprus.  After her illegitimate half-brother captured Famagusta and Nicosia in Sep 1460 with Egyptian support, she was besieged at Kerynia.  She fled to Italy, being deposed in 1461 by her half-brother.  She made an unsuccessful military attempt to recapture her throne with Papal support.  She adopted as her son Alonso d'Aragona, illegitimate son of Ferrante II King of Naples [Aragon], who was betrothed to Charla de Lusignan, illegitimate daughter of Jacques de Lusignan (Queen Charlotte's half-brother).  "Charlotte reine de Chypre" agreed to transfer the crown of Cyprus to "Charles duc de Savoie", in return for an annual pension of 4,300 florins while she remained in Rome, by agreement dated 26 Feb 1485[585]m firstly (21 Dec 1456) dom JOÃO de Portugal 2nd Duque de Coimbra, son of Infante dom PEDRO de Portugal Duque de Coimbra & his wife doña Isabel de Urgel [Aragón] (1431-murdered 7 Oct 1457, bur Nicosia Franciscan Church).  Regent of Cyprus and Prince of Antioch 1456.  His arrival at court added a Catholic faction to the other divisions already present.  He was poisoned by his mother-in-law.  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records his burial "in San Francesco a Nicosia"[586]m secondly (Nicosia Santa Sophia 4 Oct 1459) as his second wife, LOUIS de Savoie Comte de Genève, son of LOUIS Duke of Savoy & his wife Anne Pss of Cyprus (5 Jun 1436-château-monastère de Ripaille 16 Jul 1482).  King of Cyprus by right of his wife 1459-1461, crowned 7 Oct 1459[587].  Queen Charlotte & her second husband had one child:

a)         son (b and d Jul 1464).  Queen Charlotte refers to the death of her infant son in a letter to her husband[588]

2.         CLEOPHA de Lusignan (-8 Jun 1448).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Cleopa, che morite picola, e Carlotta, che fu la prima" as the two children of "Joanne, secondo figliolo de re Jannus" and his second wife[589].  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names "due figlie Carlotta e Cleopa" as the children of King Jean, specifying that "Cleopa morì piccola"[590].  The "New Chronicle" records the date of her death[591]

King Jean II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):   

3.          JACQUES de Lusignan ([1440/41]-Famagusta 11 Jun 1473, bur Famagusta St Nikolaos)The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records that the king conferred the archbishopric of Nicosia on his illegitimate son [in 1456], when he was fifteen years old[592].  He succeeded in 1461 as JACQUES II King of Cyprus

-        see below

 

 

JACQUES II 1461-1473, JACQUES III 1473-1474, CATERINA 1474-1489

 

JACQUES de Lusignan, illegitimate son of JEAN II King of Cyprus & his mistress Marieta --- ([1440/41]-Famagusta 11 Jun 1473, bur Famagusta St Nikolaos).  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records that the king conferred the archbishopric of Nicosia on his illegitimate son [in 1456], when he was fifteen years old[593].  Apostolic protonotary 1457.  He rebelled against his father in 1458, with some support from the Greeks.  After the accession of his half-sister, he sought the military support of the Mameluk Sultan of Egypt (the suzerain lord of Cyprus).  He captured Famagusta and Nicosia in Sep 1460, and besieged the queen at Kerynia.  She was forced to flee the country, and he succeeded in 1461 as JACQUES II King of Cyprus.  He expelled the Genoese from Famagusta, massacred the Egyptian soldiers who had helped him to power, and turned to Venice as a new ally.  The Chronicle of George Bustronios records a detailed account of his illness at the end of May, his death on 11 Jun, and the fact that the news arrived at Nicosia on 6 Jul, although there is no explanation for the delay[594].  The Chronicle of George Boutron includes the testament of King Jacques dated 1473 which appoints his unborn legitimate child as his heir and, if the child died, "le bâtard Eugène [Tζένιος]", in case of the death of the latter "Janus [Tζίας]", and in the case of his death "ma bâtarde"[595].  The Chronicle of George Boutron records his death in Jun 1473 and his burial at Famagusta St Nikolaos[596]

m (by proxy Venice 10 Jun 1468, in person Famagusta Dec 1472) CATERINA Cornaro, daughter of MARCO Cornaro [Patrician of Venice] & his wife Fiorenza Crispo of Naxos (Venice [30 Apr/25 Nov] 1454-Venice 10 Jul 1510).  A document dated 1468 records the betrothal of "la fia de Marco Corner kavalier…Catherina" and "el re Zacco" at Venice, also naming "Andrea Corner…fradello de Marco Corner"[597].  On her marriage, she was adopted by the Venetian state under the name "Caterina Veneta".  Famed for her beauty, she was painted many times, including by Titian.  She was declared regent of Cyprus by Venice, her adoptive 'parent', on the death of her husband, continuing as such after the birth of her son.  Venice permitted her to succeed her son in 1474 as CATERINA Queen of Cyprus, Jerusalem and Armenia, but she was forbidden to remarry or exercise any real power.  She was finally obliged to abdicate as queen 24 Jun 1489 in favour of the republic of Venice, the Cornaro family receiving in recompense the hereditary Grand Commandership in Cyprus of the Order of St John and the right to quarter their arms with those of Lusignan[598].  She left Cyprus for Venice, where she was made Signora di Asolo. 

Mistress (1): --- de Flètre, daughter of ---. 

Mistress (2): ESCHIVA [Ava] de Nores, wife of PHILIPPE de Lusignan, daughter of LOYS de Nores, Marshall of Cyprus & his wife Marie de Montolive (-after 1468). 

King Jacques II & his wife had one child:

1.         JACQUES of Cyprus (posthumously Famagusta 28 Aug 1473-Famagusta 26 Aug 1474).  He succeeded his father from birth in 1473 as JACQUES III King of Cyprus, under the regency of his mother.  His birth is recorded 28 Aug 1473 in the Chronicle of Georgios Boustron[599].   

King Jacques II had four illegitimate children by Mistress (1): 

2.          JANUS [Eugène] de Lusignan (-Venice after 8 May 1536).  There is confusion about the names of the two illegitimate sons of King Jacques, both of whom appear to be referred to as "Janus" at different times in different contemporary sources.  The Chronicle of George Boutron includes the testament of King Jacques dated 1473 which appoints his unborn legitimate child as his heir and, if the child died, "le bâtard Eugène [Tζένιος]", in case of the death of the latter "Janus [Tζίας]", and in the case of his death "ma bâtarde"[600].  "Eugenius et Joanes condam domini Zachi regis Cypri" wrote to the Council of Ten from Padua 23 Oct 1502 requesting silk blankets[601].  He was imprisoned in Padua from before 1502, until after 1512.  The Diarii of Sanundo names "li doi signori Cyprioti, bastardo sono filioli di re Zacho…l'uno Janus, l'altro Genio" at Padua 4 Mar 1512[602].  "Uno delli fioli fù del quondam re Zacco, nominato Janus" is recorded at Rome 25 Apr 1517[603].  A letter from Rome dated 30 Jul 1518 names "D. Janus, che è uno de quelli Cipri che fugite da Venetia…[e] suo fratello D. Genus"[604].  The Pope granted a pension to "dominis Eugenio et Iohanni filiis regis Cipri" by document dated at Rome in Jan 1520[605].  Lived in Rome and then Vienna 1518-1523.  He apparently went to Constantinople.  Pretender to the throne of Cyprus.  Under his will dated 8 May 1536, he bequeathed everything to Ludovica Rossea, daughter of Michael Rossea of Constantinople[606]m (1509 or after) ---.  The Diarii of Sanundo imply that the older son of King Jacques was unmarried in 1509[607].  The name of Eugène's wife is not known.  Eugène & his wife had three children: 

a)         son (-after 11 Sep 1531). 

b)         son (-after 11 Sep 1531).   

c)          daughter (-after 11 Sep 1531).   

3.          JEAN [Janus] de Lusignan (-Venice 29 Nov 1552)There is confusion about the names of the two illegitimate sons of King Jacques, both of whom appear to be referred to as "Janus" at different times in different contemporary sources.  The Chronicle of George Boutron includes the testament of King Jacques dated 1473 which appoints his unborn legitimate child as his heir and, if the child died, "le bâtard Eugène [Tζένιος]", in case of the death of the latter "Janus [Tζίας]", and in the case of his death "ma bâtarde"[608].  "Eugenius et Joanes condam domini Zachi regis Cypri" wrote to the Council of Ten from Padua 23 Oct 1502 requesting silk blankets[609].  He was imprisoned in Padua from before 1502, until after 1512.  The Diarii of Sanundo names "li doi signori Cyprioti, bastardo sono filioli di re Zacho…l'uno Janus, l'altro Genio" at Padua 4 Mar 1512[610].  The Venetian ambassador in London wrote to the Council of Ten by letter dated 28 May 1518 announcing the arrival of "uno de li dui fioli del quondam re Zacho…Zuan de Lusignan" in London[611].  A letter from Rome dated 30 Jul 1518 names "D. Janus, che è uno de quelli Cipri che fugite da Venetia…[e] suo fratello D. Genus"[612].  The Pope granted a pension to "dominis Eugenio et Iohanni filiis regis Cipri" by document dated at Rome in Jan 1520[613].  He returned to Venice where he lived on a pension in 1530.  m firstly (before 20 May 1504) --- (-after 1514).  Paolo Trevisani announced the clandestine marriage of the younger son to the Council of Ten by letter dated at Padua 20 May 1504[614]m secondly as her second husband, VIRGINIA Cosaza, formerly wife of ---, daughter of GIOVANNI Cosaza & his wife --- (-after 1559).  Jean & his first wife had [one or more children]: 

a)         BERNARDINO de Lusignan .  1530. 

b)         sons (before 1509-).  The Diarii of Sanundo refers to "li do signori di Cypri, fo fioli di re Zacho naturali" at Padua 5 Jun 1509 specifying that "uno di lhoro è maridato et a fioli"[615].  Assuming that the date of Jean de Lusignan's first marriage is correctly reported as stated above, this passage shows that he had more than one son in 1509. 

4.          CHARLOTTE de Lusignan (-23 Mar 1468[616]).  The Chronicle of Florio Bustron records that "Re Giacomo" agreed the marriage of "una sua figlia naturale" and "capetano Sor di Naves", in [1463/64] from the context[617].  m ([1463/64]) SOR de Naves, from Sicily.  Constable of Cyprus. 

5.          CHARLOTTE [Charla] de Lusignan (1468-Padua 24 Jul 1480, bur Padua San Agostino)The Chronicle of George Boutron includes the testament of King Jacques dated 1473 which appoints his unborn legitimate child as his heir and, if the child died, "le bâtard Eugène [Tζένιος]", in case of the death of the latter "Janus [Tζίας]", and in the case of his death "ma bâtarde"[618].  She was the figurehead for a plot to replace Queen Caterina, but was captured and died in prison.  A copy of a letter of François Sanudo, made by Marino Sanudo "le jeune", dated at Padua 23 Jul 1480 records that "madona Zarla de Cypri" was near death[619].  Her epitaph in the church of San Agostino in Padua records the death 24 Jul 1480 aged 12 years and 3 months of "Zachi Cypri Regis Cerlota"[620]Betrothed (Naples Apr 1473) to ALONSO d'Aragona, illegitimate son[621] of FERRANTE II King of Naples [Aragon] & his mistress --- (1460-1510).  He was adopted by Charlotte Queen of Cyprus.  Titular Prince of Galilee.  Pretender to the throne of Cyprus.  In Egypt until [1486/87].  Bishop of Chisti [1487]-1497. 

 

 

Other members of the family, their exact relationship with the main Lusignan family is not known: 

 

1.         LUSIGNANA de Lusignan (-Rome 3 Sep 1549). 

 

2.         CHRISTOPHER de Lusignan .  "pronepos regis Cipri"[622]m ---.  Christopher & his wife had one child: 

a)         LUSIGNANA de Lusignan (-22 Mar 1600).  Nun 23 Feb 1595). 

 

 

 

B.      DESCENDANTS of HARION [Henri] de LUSIGNAN

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below. 

 

 

HARION [Henri] de Lusignan, son of PHILIPPE de Lusignan & his wife Eschiva [Ava] de Nores .  A document dated 15 Jul 1468 confirmed a grant to "Harion de Luzenian, fils de feu sire Philippe de Luzenian"[623].  Signor di Chiti. 

m (before 1465/70]) HELENE Chappes Lady of Psimiloffo and Tripi.

Harion & his wife had [five] children:

1.         PHILIPPE de Lusignan (-drowned 1546).  Lord of Simun and Psimiloffo. 

-        see below

2.         JEAN de Lusignan (-at the court of Savoy or Cyprus). 

3.         PONS de Lusignanm ([1500]) MEDEA Podocataro, daughter of ---.  Pons & his wife had three children: 

a)         HARION de Lusignan (-young).

b)         ORSOLA de Lusignanm LOUIS d'Acre, son of ---. 

c)         MELISENDE de Lusignan

4.         [MELISENDE de Lusignanm ([1490/95]) PAMPHILO d'Acre, son of ---.] 

5.         [MARIEm ([1500]) JACQUES Gonème Lord of Lapithos.] 

 

 

PHILIPPE de Lusignan, son of HARION [Henri] de Lusignan Signor di Chiti & his wife Hélène Chappes Lady of Psimiloffo (-drowned 1546).  Lord of Simun and Psimiloffo.  He was blinded. 

m ([1485]) ISABELLE Fabrice, daughter of JUAN Perez Count of Jaffa and Carpas & his wife Apollonia de Pendaya ([1468/73]-[1563/68]).

Lord Philippe & his wife had four children:

1.         PHOEBUS de Lusignan (-after 1546).  Lord of ¼ Knodara.  Captain at Limassol 1509/15.  m firstly --- de Verny, sister of LOUIS de Verny, daughter of --- (-before 1520).  m secondly (1521) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Zerban Dame de Menasy, daughter of BERTRAND de Zerban.  She married secondly Phoebus Chappes, and thirdly Aloysio Bombo, Patrician of Venice.  Phoebus & his [first/second] wife had one child: 

a)         AGNES de Lusignan (-after 1573)m GASPARD Palol, son of ---. 

2.         JASON de Lusignan (1497-[Nicosia 1570]).  Lord of ¼ Knodara.  Captain at Limassol 1509/15.  m ([1515/20]) LUCIE Flatre, daughter of BALIAN Flatre Lord of Platoni, Eptapodo and Tracona.  Jason & his wife had ten children: 

a)         PIERRE-ANTOINE de Lusignan (-after 1571)m MARIE Gonème Lady of Lapithos and Monagri, daughter of OLIVIER Gonème. 

b)         JEAN de Lusignan (-after 1580).  He became a monk of the Order of St Basil at Antiphoniti monastery as Hilarion. 

c)         JACQUES de Lusignan (-Paris [1590]).  He became a Jesuit as Père Etienne de Lusignan.  Bishop-Vicar of Limassol 1562-68.  He was in western Europe from 1568.  Historical and genealogical writer.   

d)         JEAN PHILIPPE de Lusignan (-[Famagusta 1 Aug 1571]). 

e)         HERCULE de Lusignan.  Living among the Turks in 1580. 

f)          LUSIGNANE de Lusignan (-after 1580).  Lived among the Turks in 1580.  m DOMENICO di San Andrea (Antruci) Lord of St George at Sparatico. 

g)         HELENE de Lusignan (-young). 

h)         ISABELLE de Lusignan.  She became Sister Athanasia in the Order of St Basil.  She was imprisoned by the Turks.  m NIKEPHOROS ---.  A tailor. 

i)          MARGUERITE de Lusignan (-young).

j)          HELENE de Lusignan.  In Cyprus 1580.  m DEMETRIOS Palaiologos Lord of Eglia.  Captain in Nicosia 1570. 

3.         HECTOR de Lusignan.  Lord of ¼ Knodara.  m firstly ([1520/25]) MARGUERITE d'Acre Lady of Psimiloffo (-after 1540).  m secondly (after 1540) MARGARITA [Mariette] Zorzalemi (Hieralemi).  Lord Hector & his first wife had four children:

a)         PHILIPPE de Lusignan (-Rome [1573]).  Canon in Nicosia 1552.  Prior of Poleni at Paphos 1558. 

b)         LOUIS de Lusignan (-after 1580).  A soldier. 

c)         JEROME de Lusignan.  Member of the Venetian and Roman nobility 1570.  He became a priest 1599.  [Canon at Paphos and archdeacon of Limassol]. 

d)         MARGUERITE de Lusignan.  1580.  m --- Crispo

Lord Hector & his second wife had six children:

e)         JEAN-PEREZ de Lusignan (-[1571/73]). 

f)          HERCULE de Lusignan (-after 1573). 

g)         AMBROISE de Lusignan (-killed in battle Cyprus [1570/71]). 

h)         LUCRECE de Lusignan (-Nicosia [1566/69]). 

i)          LAURE de Lusignan.  m --- Bustron, son of FLORIO Bustron.  Florio Bustron was the author of the Historia overo Comentarii de Cipro written in the mid-16th century.  He was employed by the Venetians in the administration of Cyprus at Nicosia[624]

j)          MARIE de Lusignanm PIERRE Provost, son of ---. 

4.         PIERRE de Lusignan.  Lord of ¼ Knodara.  m --- Bustron, daughter of ---.  Lord Pierre & his wife had six children: 

a)         GASPARD de Lusignan (-before 1573)m as her second husband, --- Muscorno, widow of JEAN Perez Sinclitio, sister of PIETRO Muscorno. 

b)         ALVISE [Louis] de Lusignanm --- de Ram[es].  Alvise & his wife had three children: 

i)          PIETRO de Lusignan (-Rome 1611 before 17 Nov)In Constantinople 1570/1602.  In Rome from 1603.  m (Constantinople before 1590) LUCHINA, daughter of --- (1568-Rome 25 Dec 1624).  Pietro & his wife had five children: 

(a)       GASPARO de Lusignan (Constantinople [1590/91]-Loreto 5 Jun 1660).  Canon of Santa Maria di Loreto 1622.  Archdeacon 1629. Vicar of the dioceses of Recanati and Loreto.  Apostolic protonotary. 

(b)       son (-after 1606). 

(c)       LUSIGNANA de Lusignan (-Rome 9 Nov 1627)m (Rome 17 Nov 1611) STEFANO Joii, son of --- (-Rome 22 Mar 1627).  A goldsmith from Gallese. 

(d)       ORTENSIA de Lusignan (Rome 1 Jan 1606-Rome 13 Jul 1625)m (Rome 19 Oct 1624) GIOVANNI BAPTISTA Seraglio, son of ---.  Perfumer. 

(e)       ORSOLA de Lusignan (Rome 14 Apr 1609-Rome 17 Aug 1609). 

ii)         HERCULE de Lusignan (-after 1573). 

iii)        daughterm (before 1570) --- Placca, son of ---. 

c)         PHILIPPE de Lusignan (-after 1573).  m --- di Milidoni, daughter of ---. 

d)         JEAN-PEREZ de Lusignan (-1570).  Augustine monk. 

e)         GUILLAUME de Lusignan .  Dominican monk. 

f)          PIERRE de Lusignan (-Constantinople after 1571).  m --- Muscorno, daughter of ---. 

g)         MARGUERITE de Lusignan

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    NOBILITY in CYPRUS

 

 

 

A.      GIBLET

 

 

The relationship between the following individuals and family groups and the Giblet families who lived in the county of Tripoli (see the document TRIPOLI) is not known.  However, it is likely that they were related and that the family left Palestine for Cyprus after Tripoli was recaptured by the Muslims in 1189.  The fief and fortune of the Giblet family were confiscated by Pierre I King of Cyprus after a dispute over greyhounds which the family refused to give to the king.  Marie de Gibelet was forced to marry a serf and, with her brother, condemned to forced labour. 

 

 

1.         ETIENNE Gibletm ---.  The name of Etienne's wife is not known.  Etienne & his wife had one child: 

a)         RENIER Giblet (-after 1197).  He subscribed a donation by Hugues Lord of Cæsarea to the Order of Saint-Lazare dated 1160[625].  "Reynerius de Biblio" subscribed an act of Amaury King of Cyprus dated 29 Sep 1195 and another dated 1 Nov 1197[626].  m ---.  The name of Renier's wife is not known.  Renier & his wife had four children: 

i)          AMAURY Giblet .  He received the fief of Piles on the death of his father[627]m ---.  The name of Amaury's wife is not known.  Amaury & his wife [one possible child]: 

(a)       [JEAN Giblet .  Lord of Piles.  Rey suggests that the common holding of the fief of Piles indicates that Jean was probably the son of Amaury[628].] 

ii)         ARNEIS Giblet

iii)        RENIER Giblet .  He received the fief of Pistachi on the death of his father[629]

iv)       JOSCELIN Giblet .  He received the fief of Avegore on the death of his father[630]

 

 

1.         HENRI Giblet (-after Jan 1369).  Viscount of Nicosia.  Amadi records a dispute in early Jan 1369 between Pierre I King of Cyprus and "Charion de Giblet" over his son's greyhounds which the family refused to give to the king[631].  Henri's sons were imprisoned by the king, but freed by a group of knights, Henri himself being one of the band who murdered the king 17 Jan 1369[632]m ---.  The name of Henri's wife is not known.  Henri & his wife had two children:  

a)         JACQUES Giblet .  Amadi names "Jachetto" as son of "un gintilhomo…messer Charion de Giblet", when recording the dispute with Pierre I King of Cyprus over his greyhounds which the family refused to give to the king[633]

b)         MARIE Giblet .  Amadi names "Maria, vedua" as daughter of "Charion de Giblet", when recording the dispute with Pierre I King of Cyprus over his greyhounds which the family refused to give to the king[634].  During the course of this dispute, the king ordered her marriage to "un staulier francese nominato Caras", although Amadi records her escape "al monasterio de Santa Chiara"[635]m firstly --- (-before Jan 1369).  m secondly (Jan 1369) --- Caras

 

 

 

B.      IBELIN - DESCENDANTS of BAUDOUIN IBELIN SENESCHAL of CYPRUS

 

 

BAUDOUIN Ibelin, son of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his second wife Mélisende of Arsur (-21 Feb 1267).  The Chronicle of Philippe de Novare names "messier Balian…conestable de Chipre et seignor de Baruth…[et] messier Bauduyn…ceneschal de Chipre" as the two sons of "monseignor de Baruth"[636].  He fought at the battle of Agridi in 1232.  He was appointed Seneschal of Cyprus in [1246].  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Mansurah in 1250[637].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 21 Feb, in 1266 (old-style, presumably) from the context, of "Baduin de Iblim senescalco de Cypro"[638]

m ([1230]) ALIX of Bethsan, daughter of GAUTHIER [II] Lord of Bethsan & his second wife Theodora Komnene.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Aalis la Seneschalece" as daughter of "Gautier" son of "Gremont le seignor de Bessan" and his wife "Latomena"[639].  Another manuscript of the Lignages names "Aalis et Femie" as the two daughters of Gauthier de Bethsan and his wife "une dame de Romanie, qui avoit nom Thodore Lathoumena", stating that Alix married "Bauduin de Ybelin seneschal de Chipre"[640]

Baudouin & his wife had six children: 

1.         JEAN Ibelin (-after 1250).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Johan, Phelippe, Gui, Balian et Hugo, et Melisent qui morut enfant" as the children of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre" & his wife[641]m (Papal dispensation 17 Jul 1247) ISABELLE Rivet, daughter of AIMERY Rivet & his wife Eschiva de Saint-Omer.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau, la fille de Heimeri de Rivet et de Eschive de Thabarie" as the wife of Jean son of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre"[642].  The dispensation issued by Pope Innocent IV for the marriage of "Jean Ibelin filius Balduini fratris domini Beritensis" and "Isabeau nata Aymerici de Rivet" is dated 17 Jul 1247[643].  This marriage was arranged as part of the reconciliation with the families who had supported Emperor Friedrich II King of Germany in the Cypriot civil war 1229/32[644].  Jean & his wife had two children: 

a)         BAUDOUIN Ibelin (-Limassol 10 Aug 1313, bur Nicosia Franciscan church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Bauduin et Gautier, qui morut enfant" as the children of Jean Ibelin & his wife[645].  Lord of Korakou and Vitzada.  He was exiled from Cyprus, and lived at Tarsus in Armenia [1308]-1310.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 10 Aug, in 1313 from the context, "a Limisso" of "messer Baduin de Iblim" and his burial "a Nicosia…a li Frati Menori"[646]m ([1280/85] MARGUERITE Embriaco, daughter of BERTRAND Embriaco & his wife Béatrice de Saint Siméon-Soudin.  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bertheleme, Guilliaume, Lucie et Marguerite" as the four children of Bertrand, son of Hugues, & his wife, stating that Marguerite married "Bauduin de Ybelin"[647].  Another passage of the Lignages names "Marguerite, la fille Bertram de Giblet" as the wife of Baudouin Ibelin[648].  Baudouin & his wife had one child: 

i)          ISABELLE [Marguerite] Ibelin ([1285/90]-1315, bur Nicosia Dominican church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau, qui espousa Gui de Ybelin, le fis de Balian de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" as the daughter of Baudouin Ibelin & his wife[649].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "madama Margarita de Iblim, figlia de messer Baduin de Iblim" as the wife of "messer Guido de Iblim"[650]The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names "madama Margarita de Iblin, figliuola del signor Badino e relitta de Guido de Iblin"[651]The dispensation issued by Pope Benedict IX for the marriage of "nobilis vir Guy Ibelin" and "Isabella Ibelin filia Balduini Nicosiensis" is dated 31 Dec 1303[652].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death, in 1315 from the context, of "dama Isabella de Iblim, figliola de messer Badin de Iblim, et moglie de messer Guido de Iblim" and her burial "a li frati Predicatori in NIcosia"[653]m (Papal dispensation 31 Dec 1303) GUY Ibelin, son of BALIAN Ibelin Seneschal & his wife Alice of Lampron [Armenia-Hethum] (-1308)

b)         GAUTHIER Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Bauduin et Gautier, qui morut enfant" as the children of Jean Ibelin & his wife[654]

2.         PHILIPPE Ibelin ([1235/40]-[1304/05]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Johan, Phelippe, Gui, Balian et Hugo, et Melisent qui morut enfant" as the children of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre" & his wife, stating that Philippe was "conestable de Chipre"[655].  Constable of Cyprus 1302.  m (Papal dispensation 13 Aug 1253) SIMONE de Montbéliard, daughter of EUDES de Montbéliard Constable of Jerusalem & his wife Eschiva [III] de Saint-Omer Pss of Galilee.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Marie, Johanne et Symone" as the three children of "Heude de Monbeliart" & his wife, stating that Simone married "Phelippe de Ybelin, le conestable de Chipre"[656].  Another section of the Lignages names "Symone de Thabarie, la fille Heude de Monbeliart et de Eschive de Thabarie" as the wife of Philippe Ibelin[657].  The dispensation issued by Pope Innocent IV for the marriage of "Philippe Ibelin filius Balduini" and "Simonetta de Montbéliard fil. iun. qu. Oddonis comest. Jerosol." is dated 13 Aug 1253[658].  Philippe & his wife had nine children: 

a)         BAUDOUIN Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Balian, Hugue et Gui" as the four sons of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Baudouin died young[659]

b)         BALIAN Ibelin ([1270]-Kerynia [7 Jun 1315/18 May 1316], bur Saint-Antoine).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Balian, Hugue et Gui" as the four sons of Philippe Ibelin & his wife[660].  He assumed the title Prince of Galilee as heir to his maternal grandmother.  He was one of the leaders of the revolt of the barons and the installation of the regency in Cyprus in 1306.  The Chronicle of Amadi records a letter from the Constable of Cyprus in 1310 to the knights of Famagusta, among whom "messer Ague de Bessan, capitanio de Famagusta in loco de monsignor el re, messer Ruppin de Monforte…Chemerin de Lusignan figliolo del potente re de Hierusalem et Cypro de la bona memorie, contestabile del ditto reame de Cypro, Balin de Iblim principe di Galilea et signor de Thabaria, Hugo de Iblim, Philippo de Iblim conte del Zapho, Galtier de Bessan, Philippo de Iblim…"[661].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Baglian de Iblim principe di Galilea et signor de Thabaria et il suo barba messer Hugo de Iblim et il suo socero messer Galtier de Bessan" requested the king's pardon in 1310 which was refused[662].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Chamerin de Lusignan, contestabile de Cypro, fratello del re Henrico, et messer Balian de Iblim, principe di Galilea" were transferred from the prison of Kyrenia to "un castel…Buffavento" 16 Jan, in early 1312 from the context[663].  He was arrested by Henri II King of Cyprus in 1312 and imprisoned in the caves of Kerynia where he was allowed to die of starvation[664].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Balian de Iblim principe di Galilea et signor de Thabaria" died in the caves of Kerynia, in 1315/16 from the context, and his burial "a Santo Antonio"[665]m ([1292/94]) ALIX of Cyprus, daughter of HUGUES III King of Cyprus & his wife Isabelle Ibelin ([1270]-after 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Marguerite, Aalis et Helvis" as the four daughters of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife, stating that Alix married "Balian de Ybelin le prince de Galilee et seignore de Tabarie"[666].  "Aalis de Leseignian, princesse de Galilée et dame de Thabarie, et fille dou puissant roy de Jerusalem et de Chipre, de bone memoyre" wrote to Jaime King of Aragon dated 18 May [1316 or 1322][667].  She and her sister Helvis claimed the throne of Cyprus in 1324, but the High Court declared in favour of King Hugues IV[668].  Balian & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          JACQUES Ibelin ([1300]-after 1319).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Jaque" as the son of "Balian de Ybelin le prince de Galilee et seignore de Tabarie" & his wife[669].  He received a legacy under the will of his maternal aunt Marie Queen of Aragon[670]

ii)         [JEAN Ibelinm (Papal dispensation 10 Apr 1323) ESCHIVA Le Borgne, daughter of PHILIPPE Le Borgne & his wife ---.  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Jean Ibelin filius Baliani Nicosiensis" and "Echive Le Borgne domicella filia Philippi, Paphens" is dated 10 Apr 1323[671].] 

iii)        [EUPHEMIE Ibelin .  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Johannetus le Bon Paphensis" and "Fenia Ibelin filia Baliani militis" is dated 18 Mar 1320[672]m (Papal dispensation 18 Mar 1320) JEAN le Bon, son of ---.] 

c)         HUGUES Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Balian, Hugue et Gui" as the four sons of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Hugues died young[673]

d)         GUY Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Balian, Hugue et Gui" as the four sons of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Guy died young[674]

e)         MARIE Ibelin ([1270/75]-after 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Aalis, Helvis, Eschive et Marguerite" as the five daughters of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Marie married "Gui, le conte de Japhe"[675].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la contessa del Zapho et de Ascalona et dama de Rames, madama Maria de Iblim" and "le sue doe sorelle…madama Alisa moglie di messer Galtier de Bessan, dama de Colletta, et madama Eschiva, dama di S. Nicolò, moglie de messer Galtier Dampiere" were "retained at the royal court…and imprisoned in the house of the Lord of Tyre"[676].  Lady of Ascalon and Naumachia.  m (before 1290) [as his second wife,] GUY Ibelin, son of JEAN Ibelin Count of Jaffa & his wife Maria of Barba'ron [Armenia-Hethum] (-14 Feb 1304). 

f)          ALIX Ibelin ([1270]-after 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Aalis, Helvis, Eschive et Marguerite" as the five daughters of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Alix married "Gautier de Bessan"[677].  According to another passage of the Lignages the husband of "Aalis la fille de Philippe de Ybelin conestable de Chipre" was Gauthier, son of Thibaut de Bethsan[678].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la contessa del Zapho et de Ascalona et dama de Rames, madama Maria de Iblim" and "le sue doe sorelle…madama Alisa moglie di messer Galtier de Bessan, dama de Colletta, et madama Eschiva, dama di S. Nicolò, moglie de messer Galtier Dampiere" were "retained at the royal court…and imprisoned in the house of the Lord of Tyre"[679].  Lady of Coletta.  m (before 1293) as his second wife, GAUTHIER of Bethsan, son of BAUDOUIN Lord of Bethsan & his wife Maria Visconti (-Kerynia 24 Jun 1315, bur Saint-Antoine).  He was allowed to die of starvation in the caves of Kerynia, where he was imprisoned[680]

g)         HELVIS Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Aalis, Helvis, Eschive et Marguerite" as the five daughters of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Helvis died young[681]

h)         ESCHIVA Ibelin ([1270/75]-after 1324).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Aalis, Helvis, Eschive et Marguerite" as the five daughters of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Eschiva married "Gautier de Dampierre"[682].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la contessa del Zapho et de Ascalona et dama de Rames, madama Maria de Iblim" and "le sue doe sorelle…madama Alisa moglie di messer Galtier de Bessan, dama de Colletta, et madama Eschiva, dama di S. Nicolò, moglie de messer Galtier Dampiere" were "retained at the royal court…and imprisoned in the house of the Lord of Tyre"[683].  Lady of Saint-Nicolas.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la dama de San Nicola, sorella del principe" (referring presumably to Balian Ibelin who had adopted the title Prince of Galilee) was the wife of "Hughet, figliuolo del signor de Sur", in 1310 from the context[684]m firstly ([1290]) GAUTHIER de Dampierre, son of EUDES [II] de Dampierre-sur-Salon & his wife Alix Ibelin (-before 1310).  m secondly (1310 or before) HUGUES de Lusignan Lord of Crusoche, son of AMAURY of Cyprus Lord of Tyre & his wife Zabel of Armenia (-in Armenia [1318/23]).  

i)          MARGUERITE Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Aalis, Helvis, Eschive et Marguerite" as the five daughters of Philippe Ibelin & his wife, stating that Marguerite died young[685]

3.         GUY Ibelin ([1235/40]-after 1270).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Johan, Phelippe, Gui, Balian et Hugo, et Melisent qui morut enfant" as the children of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre" & his wife[686]m firstly --- (-before 1266).  Guy's first marriage is referred to in the dispensation for his second marriage, which specified that his first wife was a cousin in the 3rd and 4th degrees of his second wife[687]m secondly (Papal dispensation 17 Mar 1266) MARIE of Armenia, daughter of HETHUM I King of Armenia & his wife Zabel Queen of Armenia (-Nicosia, convent of Notre-Dame of Tyre after 1310).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Sebile, Femie, Ritta, Ysabeau et Marie" as the five daughters of "Heiton le fis Constans qui estoit conestable et baill d'Ermenie" & his wife, stating that Marie married "Gui de Ybelin"[688].  Another passage in the Lignages clarifies that her husband was "Gui, le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre"[689].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement IV for the marriage of "N. filius Balduini Ibelin" and "Marie puella filia regis Armeniæ" is dated 17 Mar 1266[690].  Guy & his second wife had two children: 

a)         THOROS Ibelin (-after 1307).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Thoros et Ysabeau" as the two children of "Gui, le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[691]m ([1290]) ZABEL of Saravantikar, daughter of OSHIN Lord of Saravantikar [Armenia-Hethum] & his wife ---.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Sebile, la fille Oissim de la Roche" as the wife of Thoros, son of "Gui, le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre"[692].  Thoros & his wife had two children: 

i)          LEON Ibelin (before 1306-).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Livon et Ritta" as the two children of Thoros & his wife[693]

ii)         RITA Ibelin (before 1306-).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Livon et Ritta" as the two children of Thoros & his wife[694]

b)         ISABELLE Ibelin ([1270]-before 1306).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Thoros et Ysabeau" as the two children of "Gui, le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "Heiton le sire dou Coure"[695]m ([1285]) HETHUM "the Historian" Lord of Korikos, son of OSHIN Lord of Korikos [Armenia-Hethum] & his wife Alice of Lampron [Armenia-Hethum] (-[1314/18]). 

4.         BALIAN Ibelin ([1240]-[1284/98]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Johan, Phelippe, Gui, Balian et Hugo, et Melisent qui morut enfant" as the children of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre" & his wife[696].  He died heavily in debt, although Henri II King of Cyprus declared that he would repay his creditors[697]m MARGUERITE Visconte, daughter of RAYMOND Visconte & his wife Eschiva Gibelet.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Marguerite, la fille Reymont Visconte" as the wife of "Balian le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre"[698].  Balian & his wife had three children: 

a)         PHILIPPE Ibelin ([1280]-Kerynia 21 Jul 1315, bur Saint-Antoine).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Philippe, Johan et Aalis" as the three children of "Balian le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[699].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Philippo de Iblim figliolo de messer Balian…cognominato Collete" was one of the supporters of Amaury regent of Cyprus against his brother Henri II King of Cyprus[700].  The Chronicle of Amadi records a letter from the Constable of Cyprus in 1310 to the knights of Famagusta, among whom "messer Ague de Bessan, capitanio de Famagusta in loco de monsignor el re, messer Ruppin de Monforte…Chemerin de Lusignan figliolo del potente re de Hierusalem et Cypro de la bona memorie, contestabile del ditto reame de Cypro, Balin de Iblim principe di Galilea et signor de Thabaria, Hugo de Iblim, Philippo de Iblim conte del Zapho, Galtier de Bessan, Philippo de Iblim…"[701].  He tried to escape Cyprus after the murder of Amaury, but was arrested at Nimosia and imprisoned in the caves of Kerynia where he was allowed to starve to death[702].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Philippo de Iblim et messer Hugo, suo barba" were found dead 21 Jun, in 1315 from the context, in one of the caves of Kerynia, and their burial "a Santo Antonio"[703]m firstly --- (-before 1308).  m secondly (Papal dispensation 27 Feb 1308) as her first husband, GILLE Chappes, daughter of PIERRE Chappes & his wife Alice le Tor (1296-after 1326).  The Chronicle of Amadi names "la figlia de messer Piero Zappo la giovene" as the wife of "messer Philippo de Iblim"[704].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement V for the marriage of "Philippe Ibelin Coletta Nicosiensis" and "Gilles filia quondam Petri Cappe Nicosiensis" is dated 27 Feb 1308[705].  She married secondly (6 Aug 1318) Thomas Montolive, thirdly (before 1326) Raymond Milmars, and fourthly (4 Mar 1326) Pierre Milmars

b)         JEAN Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Philippe, Johan et Aalis" as the three children of "Balian le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[706]

c)         ALIX Ibelin (before 1306-).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Philippe, Johan et Aalis" as the three children of "Balian le fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[707]

5.         HUGUES Ibelin ([1255]-Kerynia 21 Jul 1315, bur Saint-Antoine).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Johan, Phelippe, Gui, Balian et Hugo, et Melisent qui morut enfant" as the children of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre" & his wife[708].  He was one of the leaders of the revolt of the barons and the installation of the regency in Cyprus in 1306.  He was arrested by Henri II King of Cyprus in 1312 and imprisoned in the caves of Kerynia where he was allowed to die of starvation[709].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "messer Philippo de Iblim et messer Hugo, suo barba" were found dead 21 Jun, in 1315 from the context, in one of the caves of Kerynia, and their burial "a Santo Antonio"[710]m (Papal dispensation 4 Aug 1304) ALICE Le Tor, daughter of JEAN Le Tor & his wife Stephanie de Soissons.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Aalis, la fille Jehan Le Tor" as the wife of "Huge, l'autre fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre"[711].  The dispensation issued by Pope Boniface VIII for the marriage of "Pierre dictus Cappe dominus Marciæ" and "Alice le Tor filia Johannis domini Peræ" is dated 23 Jul 1295[712].  The dispensation issued by Pope Boniface VIII for the marriage of "nobilis vir Hugues Ibelin" and "Alice le Tor vidua quondam Petri Chappe Nicosiensis" is dated 4 Aug 1303[713].  Hugues & his wife had three children: 

a)         BAUDOUIN Ibelin ([1304/07]-).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Marie et Marguerite" as the three children of "Huge, l'autre fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[714]

b)         MARIE Ibelin ([1304/07]-after 1347).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Marie et Marguerite" as the three children of "Huge, l'autre fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[715].  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Baudouin de Bethsan filius Aquæ, Paphens" and "nobilis mulier Marie Ibelin filia quondam Hugonis militis, Nicosiensis" is dated 19 Sep 1325[716].  Hers was one of the marriages arranged to reconcile the groups which previously supported Amaury of Cyprus Regent of Cyprus against Henri II King of Cyprus[717]m (Papal dispensation 29 Sep 1325) BAUDOUIN de Bethsan, son of AGNE de Bethsan. 

c)         MARGUERITE Ibelin ([1304/07]-after 1343).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bauduin, Marie et Marguerite" as the three children of "Huge, l'autre fis Bauduin de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" & his wife[718].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m ([1320]) BALIAN Ibelin, son of JEAN Ibelin & his wife Isabelle Ibelin (-28 Oct 1333, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church). 

6.         MELISENDE Ibelin (-young).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Johan, Phelippe, Gui, Balian et Hugo, et Melisent qui morut enfant" as the children of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre" & his wife[719]

 

 

 

C.      IBELIN - DESCENDANTS of GUY IBELIN, MARSHAL and CONSTABLE of CYPRUS

 

 

GUY Ibelin, son of JEAN Ibelin Lord of Beirut & his second wife Mélisende of Arsur ([1215/18]-after May 1255).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Bellian seignor de Baruth, et Baudoyn le Seneschau, et Hue le Fort, et Ysabiau qui fu nonain, et Johan de Ybelin…seignor d'Arsur, et Gui le conestable de Chypre" as the children of "Johan…de Ybelin…seignor de Baruth" and his wife Melisende[720].  The Chronicle of Philippe de Novare names "messier Bauduyn et messier Hue et messier Guy" as the three sons of "monseignor de Baruth"[721].  He fought at the battle of Agridi in 1232, being of age at the time.  Marshal of Cyprus [1248].  Constable of Cyprus [1250].  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Mansurah in 1250[722]

m ([1240]) PHILIPPA Barlais, daughter of AIMERY Barlais & his wife Agnès de Marqab.  The Lignages d'Outremer refers to the wife of "Gui de Ybelin, conestable de Chypre, mere de ces enfanz" as a daughter of "Haymeri Barlais" and his wife Agnes, daughter of "Bertran seignor dou Marguat" and his wife Raymonde of Beirut[723].  Another manuscript of the Lignages d'Outremer clarifies that she was "Phelippe, la fille Heimeri Barlais"[724]

Guy & his wife had ten children: 

1.         ISABELLE Ibelin ([1241/42]-2 Jun 1324, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Ysabeau, Aalis, Eschive, Melissent et Marie" as the five daughters of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "le roi Hugue de Chipre"[725].  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau la fille Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre" as the wife of Hugues III King of Cyprus[726].  The dispensation issued by Pope Alexander IV for the marriage of "Huguetus f. Henrici de principe" and "Isabella Ibelin filia nobilis vir Guidonis" is dated 23 Jan 1255[727].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 2 Jun, in 1324 from the context, of "la regina Isabella, relitta del potente re Hugo et madre de Henrico re de Hierusalem et Cypro" and her burial "a San Francesco a Nicosia"[728]m (Papal dispensation 23 Jan 1255) HUGUES of Antioch, son of HENRI of Antioch & his wife Isabelle of Cyprus (before 1240-Tyre 4 Mar 1284).  He was appointed Regent of Cyprus for his first cousin in 1261.  He was appointed Regent of Jerusalem in 1264, in succession to his mother.  He succeeded his first cousin in 1267 as HUGUES III King of Cyprus.  He adopted the name Lusignan.  He succeeded as HUGUES King of Jerusalem in 1268. 

2.         BALIAN Ibelin (-Feb 1302, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Balian, Bauduin, Johan, Heimeri, Phelippe" as the five sons of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[729].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that Henri II King of Cyprus had "doi barbani fratelli di sua madre…Balian de Iblim…siniscardo del reame de Cypro" who died in 1301[730].  Seneschal of Cyprus 1286.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death in Feb, in 1301 from the context, of "Balian sinescaldo del reame de Cypro" and his burial "a li frati Menori"[731]m ([1279]) ALIX of Lampron, daughter of HETHUM IV of Lampron [Armenia-Hethum] & his wife --- (-after 1312).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Aalis, la fille au seignour dou Lambron" as the wife of Balian son of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin…conestable de Chipre"[732].  Balian & his wife had four children: 

a)         MARIE Ibelin ([1285]-after 1340).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Marie, Ysabeau et Marguerite" as the four children of Balian son of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Marie married "Rupin de Monfort"[733]m firstly (Papal dispensation 22 Nov 1299) RUPEN de Montfort, son of HONFROY de Montfort & his wife Eschiva Ibelin of Beirut (-1313).  He succeeded his mother in 1312 as titular Lord of Beirut.  m secondly (before 1340) [JEAN] du Plessis. 

b)         ISABELLE Ibelin ([1285]-).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Marie, Ysabeau et Marguerite" as the four children of Balian son of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Isabelle married "Johan de Ybelin, sire d'Arsur"[734].  This is confirmed by another passage of the Lignages d'Outremer which names "Ysabeau, la fille Balian de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" as the wife of Jean Ibelin of Arsur[735]m (Papal dispensation 22 Nov 1299) JEAN Ibelin, son of BALIAN Ibelin of Arsur & his second wife Lucie de Chenechy (-10 Aug 1309). 

c)         GUY Ibelin ([1285/88]-8 Sep 1308, bur Convent of Bellapais).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Marie, Ysabeau et Marguerite" as the four children of Balian son of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[736].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 8 Sep, in 1308 from the context, of "messer Gui de iblim, fo de messer Balian de Iblhin synescalco de Cypro" and his burial "a la Piscopia de li frati, ch'è appresso Cerines"[737]m (Papal dispensation 31 Dec 1303) ISABELLE [Marguerite] Ibelin, daughter of BAUDOUIN Ibelin & his wife Marguerite ---.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau, qui espousa Gui de Ybelin, le fis de Balian de Ybelin, seneschal de Chipre" as the daughter of Baudouin Ibelin & his wife[738].  The Chronicle of Amadi names "madama Margarita de Iblim, figlia de messer Baduin de Iblim" as the wife of "messer Guido de Iblim"[739]The Chronicle of Florio Bustron names "madama Margarita de Iblin, figliuola del signor Badino e relitta de Guido de Iblin"[740]The dispensation issued by Pope Benedict IX for the marriage of "nobilis vir Guy Ibelin" and "Isabella Ibelin filia Balduini Nicosiensis" is dated 31 Dec 1303[741].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death, in 1315 from the context, of "dama Isabella de Iblim, figliola de messer Badin de Iblim, et moglie de messer Guido de Iblim" and her burial "a li frati Predicatori in NIcosia"[742].  Guy & his wife had [three] children: 

i)          ALIX Ibelin ([1304/06]-after 6 Aug 1386, bur Dominican Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Aalis" as the daughter of Guy Ibelin & his wife[743].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the marriage 17 Sep, in 1317 or 1318 from the context, of "messer Hugo de Lusignan contestabile del regno de Cypro, nepote del…re" and "Alisia de Iblim, figlia de messer Guido, signor del castello de Nicosia"[744].  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Hugues de Lusignan connest. regis Cyprie nepos Henrici regis, viduus Mariæ" and "Alice Ibelin filia quondam Guidonis" is dated 18 Jun 1318[745].  The dispensation issued by Pope Urban V for the marriage of "Philippe de Brunswick dux viduus Alisiæ de Dampierre" and "Alice Ibelin vidua Hugonis regis" is dated 29 May 1368[746][747]Betrothed (1310) to HENRI de Lusignan, son of AMAURY of Cyprus Lord of Tyre & his wife Zabel of Armenia (-murdered in Armenia [1322/9 Apr 1323]).  After the family of Amaury was exiled to Armenia, this betrothal was terminated.  m firstly (Papal dispensation 18 Jun 1318) as his second wife, HUGUES of Cyprus, son of GUY of Cyprus, Constable of Cyprus & his wife Eschiva Ibelin (-10 Oct 1359).  Constable of Jerusalem 1318-1324.  He succeeded in 1324 as HUGUES IV King of Cyprus, titular King of Jerusalem.  m secondly (after 1359, Papal dispensation 3o 29 May 1368) as his second wife, PHILIPP von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen, son of HEINRICH II "der Junge" Herzog von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen & his second wife Helvis Ibelin (1332-4 Aug 1369). 

ii)         MARGUERITE Ibelin (1307-).  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "nobilis vir Guy Ibelin" and "Marguerite Ibelin filia quondam Guidonis militis Nicosiensis" is dated 13 Nov 1319[748]m (Papal dispensation 13 Nov 1319) GUY Ibelin, son of PHILIPPE Ibelin, Seneschal of Cyprus & his second wife Zabel of Lampron [Armenia-Hethum] (-after 14 Apr 1350). 

d)         MARGUERITE Ibelin ([1290]-before 1320).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Marie, Ysabeau et Marguerite" as the four children of Balian son of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[749].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement V for the marriage of "Oshin de Korikos filius Hethonis, viduus" and "Marguerite Ibelin domicella de Cipro" is dated 22 Jun 1311[750]m ([1308], Papal dispensation 22 Jun 1311) as his second wife, OSHIN of Korikos, son of HETHUM "the Historian" Lord of Korikos [Armenia-Hethum] & his wife Isabelle Ibelin (-murdered 26 Feb 1329).  He was Regent of Armenia for King Lewon IV in 1320. 

3.         BAUDOUIN Ibelin ([1245]-after Aug 1286).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Balian, Bauduin, Johan, Heimeri, Phelippe" as the five sons of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[751].  He murdered Nicolas Alaman in 1277 in revenge for his having killed his brother Jean.  Constable of Cyprus[752].  Henri II King of Cyprus named him bailly of Jerusalem in Aug 1286 on leaving the kingdom for Cyprus[753].  "Henris…roi de Jherusalem latin et roi de Cipre" institued masses for the soul of "nostre…oncle Bauduin d'Ibelin conestable des roys jadis des roiaumes de Jherusalem et de Cipre" by charter dated Jan 1286[754]

4.         JEAN Ibelin (-murdered 1277).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Balian, Bauduin, Johan, Heimeri, Phelippe" as the five sons of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[755].  He was murdered by Nicolas Alaman[756]

5.         AIMERY Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Balian, Bauduin, Johan, Heimeri, Phelippe" as the five sons of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[757]

6.         PHILIPPE Ibelin ([1250/55]-25 Nov 1318, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Balian, Bauduin, Johan, Heimeri, Phelippe" as the five sons of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife[758].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the role of "monsignor Philippo de Iblim, barba del re Henrico de Hierusalem et Cypro" during the hostilities between Venetians and Genoese in 1292[759].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "suo fratello misser Philippo" was appointed Seneschal of Cyprus after the death of "Balian sinescaldo del reame de Cypro"[760].  Philippe Ibelin was one of the strongest supporters of Henri II King of Cyprus against his brother Amaury Lord of Tyre.  He was persecuted while the latter was in power in Cyprus, and imprisoned at Aminos, later at Tarsus, in Armenia.  He returned to Cyprus in 1310, assuming his old position and becoming an ever more powerful influence over King Henri[761].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 25 Nov, in 1318 from the context, of "messer Philippo de Iblim sinescalco del regno de Cypro" and his burial "a S. Francesco in Nicosia"[762]m firstly ([1280]) MARIE of Hamus, daughter of VAHRAN of Hamus & his wife Marie Ibelin ([1269/70]-before 1295).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Marie, la fille baron Vaheram" as the first wife of "Phelippe, l'autre fis de Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre"[763]m secondly (Papal dispensation 1 Sep 1295) MARIE de Giblet, daughter of GUY Giblet-Ibelin & his wife Marguerite of Sidon (-Nicosia 4 Sep 1331, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Piere, Sauve, Marie et Kateline" as the four children of "Gui…sire de Giblet" & his wife, stating that Marie married "Phelipppe de Ybelin, seneschau dou Chipre"[764].  Another passage of the Lignages names "Marie, la fille Gui le seignor de Giblet" as the second wife of "Phelippe, l'autre fis de Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre"[765]Her parentage is confirmed by the Chronicle of Amadi which names "madama Sur Fimia, sua ameda…monacha de la Nostra Donna mazore de Hierusalem, che si dice in Cypro Nostra Dame de Sur…signora de Saeto" and "suo nepote messer Alinac, che ottenne dal suo fratello messer Choyssin re de Armenia", specifying that she was "sorella del re Livon et ava della moglie del…messer Philippo de Iblim el sinescalco, la qual era figlia de la sua figlia"[766]The dispensation issued by Pope Boniface VIII for the marriage of "Philippe Ibelin avunculus regis" and "Marie de Gibelet filia quondam domini Byblii" is dated 1 Sep 1295[767].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 4 Sep, in 1331 from the context, of "madona Maria de Iblim, relicta del quondam messer Philippo de Iblim sinescalco de Cypro" and her burial "al loro capitulo a Nicosia"[768].  Philippe & his second wife had five children: 

a)         ISABELLE Ibelin (1300-after 1342).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Balian et Ysabeau" as the three children of "Phelippe, l'autre fis de Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre" and his wife "Marie, la fille Gui le seignor de Giblet"[769].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the betrothal 5 Oct, in 1315 from the context, of "la figlia del sinescardo de Cypro, messer Philippo de Iblim" and "il don Ferante, l'infante de Maiorca", and their marriage the following 7 Jun[770].  The contract of marriage between "infantis Ferrandi…domini Jacobi…regis Majoricarum filii, Moree, baronie Montispessulani et civitatis Cathanie domini" and "domincellam Isabellam filiam…domini Philippi de Ibelino, senescali regni Cypri" was dated 5 Oct 1315[771].  She was accused of sorcery by Hugues IV King of Cyprus during his bitter row with her son, his son-in-law don Fernando de Mallorca.  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "nobilis vir Huguetus comes Jaffensis" and "Isabella Ibelin filia Philippi quondam seneshalli Cypri" is dated 18 Mar 1320[772]m firstly (contract Nicosia 15 Oct 1315, by proxy 15 Oct 1315, in person in Morea 7 Jun 1316[773]) as his second wife, Infante don FERNANDO de Mallorca, son of don JAIME II de Aragón King of Mallorca & his wife Esclarmonde de Foix (Perpignan 1278-beheaded Manolada, Peloponese [Jul/19 Oct] 1316).  He claimed to be Prince of Achaia in right of his first wife.  He landed in Morea in 1315, he was proclaimed Prince of Achaia Jul 1315 with the support of certain barons in Morea, in opposition to Louis de Bourgogne, but was beaten by the latter in battle at Manolada.  m secondly (Papal dispensation 18 Mar 1320) HUGUES Ibelin titular Count of Jaffa, son of GUY Ibelin titular Count of Jaffa & his [second] wife Marie Ibelin (-after 1342). 

b)         JEAN Ibelin ([1301/02]-22 Oct 1317, bur Nicosia, Franciscan Church).  The Chronicle of Amadi records the death 22 Oct, in 1317 from the context, of "messer Joan de Iblim fiolo de messer Philippo el sinescalco de Cypro" at the age of 15 "cavalier novello" and his burial "a S. Francesco in Nicosia"[774]

c)         GUY Ibelin (before 1306-[14 Apr 1350/1360]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Balian et Ysabeau" as the three children of "Phelippe, l'autre fis de Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre" and his wife "Marie, la fille Gui le seignor de Giblet"[775].  He was appointed Seneschal of Cyprus in 1318, in succession to his father.  He became a citizen of Venice in 30 Dec 1334[776]m (Papal dispensation 13 Nov 1319) MARGUERITE Ibelin, daughter of GUY Ibelin & his wife Isabelle Ibelin (1307-).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Guy & his wife had three children: 

i)          ALIX Ibelin ([1325/30]-after 1374).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Alisia, figliola de Guido de Iblin, synescalco de Cypro" as second wife of "Joanne, l'altro figliolo de re Hugo…principe d'Antiochia e contestabile de Cypro"[777].  The dispensation issued by Pope Clement VI for the marriage of "Jean de Lusignan princeps Antiochenus filius Hugonis regis" and "Alice Ibelin filia Guidonis militis et seneschalli Cypri domicella" is dated 14 Apr 1350[778].  Her dowry was Alaminos, which belonged to her paternal grandfather[779]m (Papal dispensation 14 Apr 1350) as his second wife, JEAN of Cyprus, titular Prince of Antioch, son of HUGUES IV King of Cyprus & his second wife Alice Ibelin ([1329/30]-murdered 1375).  Constable of Cyprus 1358.  He was Regent of Cyprus 1362-1365, 1368, and 1369-1375. 

ii)         MARGUERITE Ibelin .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

d)         BALIAN Ibelin (before 1306-[1349]).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Gui, Balian et Ysabeau" as the three children of "Phelippe, l'autre fis de Gui de Ybelin conestable de Chipre" and his wife "Marie, la fille Gui le seignor de Giblet"[780]m (Papal dispensation 25 May 1323) MARGUERITE Ibelin, daughter of JEAN Ibelin of Arsur & his wife Isabelle Ibelin.  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Balian de Ybelin, Gui, Aalis, Marguerite et Lucie" as the children of Jean Ibelin of Arsur & his wife[781].  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "Balian Ibelin filius quondam Philippi senescalli Cipri" and "Marguerite Ibelin filia quondam Johannis de Arsur" is dated 25 May 1323[782]

e)         HELVIS Ibelin (1307-after 27 May 1347).  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival in Cyprus from Germany 23 Aug, in 1330 from the context, of "Henrico duca de Verzvic et signor della terra de Oro" for his marriage to "madona Chielvis de Iblim, figliola de messer Philippo, olim sinescalco de Cypro" whom he took back with him to Germany[783]m (Cyprus [23] Aug 1330) as his second wife, HEINRICH Herzog von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen, son of HEINRICH I Herzog von Braunschweig und Lüneburg in Grubenhagen und Salzderhelden & his wife Agnes von Meissen ([1289]-[10 Apr/8 Jun] 1351, bur Grubenhagen). 

7.         ALIX Ibelin ([1255]-).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Ysabeau, Aalis, Eschive, Melissent et Marie" as the five daughters of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Alix married "Heude de Dampierre"[784]m ([1270/75]) EUDES de Dampierre, son of RICHARD de Dampierre-sur-Salon & his wife Alix of Caesarea (-before 1291). 

8.         ESCHIVA Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Ysabeau, Aalis, Eschive, Melissent et Marie" as the five daughters of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Eschiva was a nun[785].  A nun. 

9.         MELISENDE Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Ysabeau, Aalis, Eschive, Melissent et Marie" as the five daughters of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Melisende and Marie died young[786]

10.      MARIE Ibelin .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Ysabeau, Aalis, Eschive, Melissent et Marie" as the five daughters of "Gui l'autre fis Johan de Ybelin, sire de Baruth…conestable de Chipre" & his wife, stating that Melisende and Marie died young [787]

 

 

1.         JEAN Ibelin (-after 1367).  Seneschal of Jerusalem 1363.  He fought for Edward III King of England against Charles V King of France [1363/66], returning to Cyprus in 1366[788]

 

 

 

D.      RIVET

 

 

1.         JACQUES de Rivetm ISABELLE de Soissons, daughter of RENAUD de Soissons & his wife Berthe of Beirut.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau, l'autre fille Renaut de Saissons" as the wife of "Jaque de Rivet"[789].  Jacques & his wife had four children: 

a)         AMAURY de Rivet (-1210 or after).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Heimeri, Gui, Guillaumin et Douce" as the four children of "Jaque de Rivet" & his wife[790].  Marshal of Cyprus 1197/1210.  m ESCHIVA of Tiberias, daughter of ODO of Tiberias & his wife Femie Garnier of Sidon.  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Oste et Eschive" as the children of "Oste" and his wife "Femie, la fille Renaut le sire de Saiete", stating that Eschiva married "Heimeri de Rivet"[791].  Aimery & his wife had one child:

i)          ISABELLE de Rivet .  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Ysabeau, la fille de Heimeri de Rivet et de Eschive de Thabarie" as the wife of Jean son of "Bauduin, fis Jehan de Ybelin, seignor de Barut…seneschau dou Chipre"[792].  The dispensation issued by Pope Innocent IV for the marriage of "Jean Ibelin filius Balduini fratris domini Beritensis" and "Isabeau nata Aymerici de Rivet" is dated 17 Jul 1247[793].  This marriage was arranged as part of the reconciliation with the families who had supported Emperor Friedrich II King of Germany in the Cypriot civil war 1229/32[794].  (Papal dispensation 17 Jul 1247) m JEAN Ibelin, son of BAUDOUIN Ibelin Seneschal of Cyprus & his wife Alix of Bethsan (-after 1250). 

b)         GUY de Rivet .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Heimeri, Gui, Guillaumin et Douce" as the four children of "Jaque de Rivet" & his wife, stating that "Gui fu ocis d'un quarrau qui fu trait de l'ospital des Alemans, si come il estoit devant son cousin le seignor de Cesaire"[795]

c)         GUILLAUME de Rivet .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Heimeri, Gui, Guillaumin et Douce" as the four children of "Jaque de Rivet" & his wife, stating that Guillaume died without heirs[796]

d)         DOUCE de Rivet .  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Heimeri, Gui, Guillaumin et Douce" as the four children of "Jaque de Rivet" & his wife, stating that Douce married "Hugue de Milmars, le seignor d'Asquie"[797]m HUGUES de Milmars Seigneur d'Asquie . 

 



[1] Edbury, P. W. (1994) The Kingdom of Cyprus and the Crusades 1191-1374 (Cambridge University Press), p. 3. 

[2] Runciman, S. (1951, 1952 and 1954) A History of the Crusades, Vol. 1 (Penguin Books, 1978), Vol. 3, p. 58. 

[3] Meineke, A. (ed.) (1835) Nicetæ Choniatæ Historia, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn), Imperiii Andronici Comneni, Liber 1, 4, p. 376. 

[4] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. (1968) 'L'Empereur Isaac de Chypre et sa fille (1155-1207)', Byzantion XXXVIII, reprinted in Familles de l'Orient latin XIIe-XIVe siècles (Variorum Reprints, London, 1983), I, p. 130, citing Nephytos 'Presbyter De Calamitatibus Cypri', Patrologia Græca, 135 (Paris, 1864), 4. 

[5] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople (2e edition Paris), p. 277. 

[6] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 127. 

[7] Niketas Choniates Chronikon, ed. Bekker (Bonn, 1835), 14. 

[8] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 128, footnote 1. 

[9] ES II 177.   

[10] Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[11] Niketas Choniates, 376, cited in Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 126 and 129. 

[12] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1868) Chronica, Magistri Rogeri de Houedene (London) (“Roger of Hoveden”), Vol. II, pp. 203-4. 

[13] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 133.   

[14] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 430. 

[15] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 135-6. 

[16] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 141. 

[17] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 44. 

[18] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 46. 

[19] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 46. 

[20] Edbury (1994), p. 7. 

[21] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 154. 

[22] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 154-5. 

[23] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer") (“WT”) XXV.XIX. 

[24] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 132. 

[25] Bedrosian, R. (trans.) (2005) Smbat Sparapet's Chronicle (Venice Manuscript) (New Jersey), 619 (7 Feb 1170/6 Feb 1171). 

[26] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 132. 

[27] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 135. 

[28] Stubbs, W. (ed.) (1847) Gesta Regis Henrici Secundi Benedicti Abbatis, The Chronicle of the reigns of Henry II and Richard I 1169-1192, known commonly under the name of Benedict of Peterborough (London) (“Benedict of Peterborough”) I 1183, p. 261.   

[29] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 145, citing Finlay, G. (1877) A History of Greece (Oxford), III, 237 and IV, 71. 

[30] Laing, S. (trans.) (1907) Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla: A History of the Norse Kings Snorre (Norroena Society, London), Saga of Sigurd the Crusader and his brothers Eystein and Olaf, 9, available at Online Medieval and Classical Library Release 15b, <http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/OMACL/Heimskringla/> (24 Jan 2003). 

[31] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 45. 

[32] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 157. 

[33] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. II, pp. 203-4. 

[34] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 143. 

[35] Roger of Hoveden, Vol. II, pp. 203-4. 

[36] WTC XXVIII.V, p. 256. 

[37] Petrus Vallis Caernaii Historia Albigensium, Patrologia Latina Vol. 213, Chap. IV, Col. 0552C. 

[38] Lagarde, C. (trans.) (1864) Chronique de Maître Guillaume de Puylaurens sur la guerre des Albigeois (1202-1272) (Béziers), Chap. V, p. 21. 

[39] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 174-5. 

[40] Edbury (1994), p. 7. 

[41] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1874) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora (London) (“MP”), Vol. II, 1191, p. 371, "filiam autem eius retinuit, cum duabus reginis in thalamo suo honorifice custoditam". 

[42] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 47, and Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 157.   

[43] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 163. 

[44] WTC XXVIII.V, p. 256. 

[45] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 160-2. 

[46] Shaw, M. R. B. (trans.) (1963) Joinville and Villehardouin, Chronicles of the Crusades (Penguin) (“Villehardouin”), p. 52.   

[47] WTC XXVIII.V, p. 256. 

[48] Le Continuateur de Guillaume de Tyr ("Eracles"), RHC, Occ. II, Livre 25, 28, V, quoted in Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 171-2.   

[49] Villehardouin, pp. 157-8. 

[50] Benedict of Peterborough, ed. Bouquet, XVII (Paris), B. 521, quoted in Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 129.  . 

[51] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876. 

[52] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876. 

[53] WT XXII.I, p. 1063. 

[54] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424. 

[55] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 434-6 and 439, and Edbury (1994), p. 25. 

[56] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 439-40. 

[57] Runciman (1978), Vol 2, pp. 462-5. 

[58] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 19 and 21. 

[59] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 21-2. 

[60] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 27. 

[61] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 50. 

[62] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 51. 

[63] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 64. 

[64] Edbury (1994), p. 28. 

[65] Edbury (1994), p. 29

[66] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 73, and Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 160-3. 

[67] Mas Latrie, R. de (ed.) (1891) Chroniques d'Amadi et de Strambaldi (Paris) (“Amadi”), p. 86. 

[68] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 30. 

[69] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424. 

[70] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 446. 

[71] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 20. 

[72] WTC XXV.X, p. 151. 

[73] WTC XXV.X, p. 151. 

[74] Cafari, Regni Ierosolymitani Historia, MGH SS XVIII, p. 55. 

[75] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1198, MGH SS XXIII, p. 876. 

[76] Edbury (1994), p. 23. 

[77] Röhricht, R. (ed.) (1893) Regesta Regni Hierosolymitani (Oeniponti) 518, p. 137. 

[78] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424. 

[79] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84. 

[80] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84. 

[81] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 84.  According to Edbury (1994), p. 32, the reconciliation took place in 1197. 

[82] Mas de Latrie, M. L. (1855) Histoire de l´Ile de Chypre (Paris), Vol. 3, p. 598. 

[83] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 85. 

[84] Edbury (1994), p. 33. 

[85] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 98 and 103. 

[86] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 24. 

[87] Rozière, E. de (ed.) (1849) Cartulaire de l'église de Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem (Paris) ("Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem"), 177, p. 316. 

[88] Amadi, p. 93. 

[89] Röhricht (1893), 803, p. 215. 

[90] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVI, pp. 60 and 61. 

[91] WTC XXVI.XXI, p. 208. 

[92] Amadi, p. 87. 

[93] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 598. 

[94] WTC XXIII.III, p. 6, and WTC XXV.XI, p. 152. 

[95] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424. 

[96] WTC XXIII.XVIII, p. 30. 

[97] WTC XXIII.XIX, p. 31, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 448-9. 

[98] WTC XXV.XI, pp. 152-3, and XXV.XII, p. 154. 

[99] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 24. 

[100] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 104. 

[101] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 424. 

[102] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 407. 

[103] WTC XXVI.XXI, p. 208. 

[104] Amadi, pp. 87 and 94. 

[105] ES III 764. 

[106] Petrus Vallis Caernaii Historia Albigensium, Patrologia Latina Vol. 213, Chap. IV, Col. 0552C. 

[107] Edbury (1994), p. 41. 

[108] WTC XXX.XI, p. 305. 

[109] WTC XXXI.V, pp. 315-6. 

[110] Edbury (1994), p. 45. 

[111] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[112] Amadi, p. 87. 

[113] WTC XXX.XV, p. 308. 

[114] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[115] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-10. 

[116] WTC XXX.XV, p. 308. 

[117] Mas Latrie, M. L. (ed.) (1871) Chronique d'Ernoul et de Bernard le Trésorier (Paris), Ernoul, 25, p. 293. 

[118] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[119] Amadi, p. 87. 

[120] WTC XXX.XV, p. 308. 

[121] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[122] Ernoul 25, p. 293. 

[123] WTC XXVI.XXI, p. 208. 

[124] Amadi, p. 87. 

[125] WTC XXVI.XXI, p. 208. 

[126] Amadi, p. 87. 

[127] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVI, p. 61, and see also CC.LXXXXI, p. 66. 

[128] Baluze, Innocent III Epistolæ no. 105, Vol. I (tome II, according to Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre, Vol. I, p. 167 footnote 4), p. 555, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007. 

[129] Edbury (1994), p. 43. 

[130] Langlois, V. (ed.) (1863) Le Trésor des Chartes d'Arménie (Venice) ("Chartes d´Arménie"), XII, p. 131. 

[131] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1233, MGH SS XXIII, p. 933. 

[132] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 173. 

[133] ES XI 144. 

[134] Edbury (1994), p. 43. 

[135] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 138. 

[136] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 171. 

[137] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[138] Sempad, 659, p. 643. 

[139] Amadi, p. 93. 

[140] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXI, p. 66. 

[141] WTC XXX,XI, p. 305. 

[142] Amadi, p. 93. 

[143] Röhricht (1893), 803, p. 215. 

[144] WTC XXXI.X, p. 322. 

[145] Amadi, p. 93. 

[146] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.XCII, p. 68. 

[147] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 230. 

[148] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[149] Amadi, p. 87. 

[150] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 176, p. 314. 

[151] L'Estoire de Eracles, pp. 315-6, quoted in Edbury (1994), p. 44. 

[152] Edbury (1994), p. 46. 

[153] Edbury (1994), pp. 46 and 48. 

[154] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 608. 

[155] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 147-9. 

[156] Amadi, p. 104. 

[157] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-9. 

[158] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-10. 

[159] Ernoul 25, p. 293. 

[160] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[161] WT XXXI.VIII, p. 319. 

[162] Roberti Canonici S Mariani Autissiodorensis Chronicon 1214, MGH SS XXVI, p. 277. 

[163] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 1216, MGH SS V, p. 49. 

[164] Champeval, J.-B. (ed.) (1903) Cartulaire des abbayes de Tulle et de Roc-Amadour (Brives) (“Tulle Saint-Martin”) no. 610, p. 355. 

[165] Tulle Saint-Martin no. 611, p. 356. 

[166] Röhricht (1893), 823, p. 221. 

[167] WTC XXVI.XXI, pp. 208-10. 

[168] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 874. 

[169] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 180. 

[170] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 611. 

[171] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.XCII, p. 67. 

[172] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 47. 

[173] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 180. 

[174] Edbury (1994), p. 50. 

[175] WTC XXXIII.XIII, p. 380, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 195. 

[176] Ferretto, A. (ed.) ´Documenti intorno alle relazioni fra Alba e Genova (1141-1270)´, Biblioteca della società storica subalpina, Vol. XXIII (Pinerolo, 1906) ("Alba Genova Relazioni"), XCVI, p. 114. 

[177] Kohler, C. (ed.) (1913) Philippe de Novare Mémoires 1218-1243 (Paris) ("Philippe de Novare"), p. 94. 

[178] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 221. 

[179] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 222. 

[180] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 224-5. 

[181] WTC XXXII.XXI, p. 360. 

[182] Thomas Tusci Gesta Imperatorum et Pontificum, MGH SS XXII, p. 498. 

[183] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1233, MGH SS XXIII, p. 933. 

[184] Troyes Necrologies, 2 Obituaire de Saint-Etienne, p. 219. 

[185] Broussillon, Comte Bernard de (ed.) (1900) Cartulaire de l'Evêché du Mans 936-1790 (Le Mans), no. 263, pp. 35-6. 

[186] WTC XXXIII.XXXVIII, p. 403. 

[187] Sturdza (1999), p. 507. 

[188] Amadi, p. 201. 

[189] WTC XXXII.XXI, p. 360. 

[190] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 289. 

[191] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 447. 

[192] Amadi, p. 206. 

[193] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 447. 

[194] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 289. 

[195] WTC XXXIV.XXVIII, p. 474. 

[196] Amadi, p. 213. 

[197] Amadi, p. 216. 

[198] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 447. 

[199] Amadi, p. 215. 

[200] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. ´Les dispenses matrimoniales accordées à l´Orient Latin selon les Registres du Vatican 1283-1385´, Mélanges de l´Ecole française de Rome. Moyen-Age, Temps modernes, Tome 89, no. 1, (1977), Tableau A, 11, p. 60. 

[201] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 329. 

[202] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 79. 

[203] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 330, footnote 1. 

[204] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 421. 

[205] Amadi, p. 271. 

[206] WTC XXXII.XXI, p. 360. 

[207] Edbury (1994), pp. 50-1. 

[208] Edbury (1994), p. 57. 

[209] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 180. 

[210] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 181-2. 

[211] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 192. 

[212] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 194. 

[213] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 201. 

[214] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 230. 

[215] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 230. 

[216] WTC XXXIV.II, p. 441. 

[217] Amadi, p. 202. 

[218] Edbury, P. 'Redating the death of King Henry I of Cyprus', Balard, M. (ed.) (2001) Dei gesta per Francos. Crusader studies in honour of Jean Richard (Grivaud), cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[219] WTC XXXIII.XXXVII, p. 402. 

[220] Amadi, p. 136. 

[221] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 192. 

[222] WTC XXXIII.XXXVII, p. 402, and Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 202. 

[223] WTC XXXIII.XLI, p. 408. 

[224] Chronique de l'Ile de Chypre par Florio Bustron, Mélanges Historiques (Paris, 1886), Tome V, ("Florio Bustron"), p. 99. 

[225] WTC XXXIII.XLI, p. 408. 

[226] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXI, p. 67. 

[227] WTC XXXIV.I, p. 439. 

[228] Amadi, p. 201. 

[229] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.XCII, p. 67. 

[230] WTC XXXIV.II, p. 441. 

[231] Amadi, p. 203. 

[232] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 7, p. 58. 

[233] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 285. 

[234] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 135, footnote 59. 

[235] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 342. 

[236] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 446. 

[237] Amadi, p. 205. 

[238] Bedrosian, R. (trans.) (2005) Chronicle attributed to King Hethum II (New Jersey) 710 A.E. [15 Jan 1261/14 Jan 1262]. 

[239] WTC XXXIV.III, p. 443. 

[240] WTC XXXIV.X, p. 456. 

[241] Amadi, p. 209. 

[242] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[243] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[244] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 9, p. 58. 

[245] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 342, and Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 136.  . 

[246] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 447. 

[247] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 446. 

[248] Amadi, p. 206. 

[249] WTC XXXIV.IV, p. 447. 

[250] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 321-2. 

[251] WTC XXXIV.X, p. 456. 

[252] Amadi, p. 209. 

[253] Amadi, p. 209. 

[254] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 328-9. 

[255] WTC XXXIV.XII, p. 457. 

[256] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 329. 

[257] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 660. 

[258] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 335-6. 

[259] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 335-7. 

[260] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 345. 

[261] Edbury (1994), p. 36. 

[262] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 389 and 393-4. 

[263] Thorpe, B. (ed.) (1849) Florentii Wigorniensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, Tomus II (London) (“Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon”), p. 233. 

[264] Amadi, p. 216. 

[265] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 323, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[266] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[267] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 8, p. 58. 

[268] Amadi, p. 403. 

[269] According to Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 394, King Jean I was about seventeen years old when he succeeded his father. 

[270] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[271] Amadi, p. 214. 

[272] Amadi, p. 216. 

[273] Amadi, p. 216. 

[274] Hethum II's Chronicle 734 A.E. [9 Jan 1285/8 Jan 1286]. 

[275] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[276] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 167. 

[277] Amadi, p. 214. 

[278] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 393-4. 

[279] Amadi, p. 215. 

[280] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[281] Amadi, p. 214. 

[282] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 669. 

[283] Amadi, p. 217. 

[284] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 396-7. 

[285] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 408-12. 

[286] Sturdza (1999), p. 621. 

[287] Edbury (1994), p. 117. 

[288] Edbury (1994), p. 124. 

[289] Edbury (1994), pp. 127-8. 

[290] Amadi, p. 401. 

[291] Amadi, pp. 398-9. 

[292] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 709. 

[293] Amadi, p. 403. 

[294] Sempad, 780, p. 671. 

[295] The charter is reproduced, with French translation, at RCH, Documents Arméniens, Vol. I, pp. 759-62. 

[296] RHC, Documents arméniens, II (1869) Chronique de Jean Dardel (Paris) XXIV, p. 20. 

[297] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 169. 

[298] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 88, p. 74. 

[299] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[300] Amadi, p. 218. 

[301] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 406-7. 

[302] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 85. 

[303] Edbury (1994), p. 98. 

[304] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 421. 

[305] Edbury (1994), p. 113. 

[306] Amadi, pp. 330-3. 

[307] Florio Bustron, p. 196. 

[308] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 137. 

[309] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 18a, p. 60. 

[310] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 92. 

[311] Amadi, p. 240. 

[312] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 91. 

[313] Hethum II's Chronicle 742 A.E. [7 Jan 1293/6 Jan 1294]. 

[314] Amadi, p. 302. 

[315] Chronique de Jean Dardel XXIII, p. 19. 

[316] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[317] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 167. 

[318] Amadi, p. 320. 

[319] Ximénez de Embún y Val, T. (ed.) (1876) Historia de la Corona de Aragón: Crónica de San Juan de la Peña: Part aragonesa, available at Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes <http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/FichaObra.html?Ref=12477> (3 Aug 2007), XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[320] Amadi, p. 397. 

[321] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 702. 

[322] Edbury (1994), p. 137. 

[323] Letter of King Jaime to the bishop of Tusculum written shortly after Queen Marie's death, cited in Edbury (1994), p. 138. 

[324] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90.  

[325] Amadi, p. 240. 

[326] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 91. 

[327] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[328] Amadi, p. 240. 

[329] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 18b, p. 60. 

[330] Amadi, p. 240. 

[331] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 91. 

[332] Amadi, p. 240. 

[333] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 91. 

[334] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 167. 

[335] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 50, p. 66. 

[336] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[337] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 167. 

[338] Amadi, p. 241. 

[339] Amadi, p. 362. 

[340] Edbury (1994), p. 137. 

[341] Amadi, p. 393. 

[342] Edbury (1994), p. 137. 

[343] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, pp. 90, 91 and 92. 

[344] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 85. 

[345] Hethum II's Chronicle 736 A.E. [9 Jan 1287/8 Jan 1288]. 

[346] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, pp. 90 and 91. 

[347] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 699. 

[348] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 167, footnote 212. 

[349] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), pp. 166-7. 

[350] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[351] Amadi, p. 320. 

[352] Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[353] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 700. 

[354] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. (1963) The Rupenides, Hethumides and Lusignans, The Structure of the Armeno-Cilician Dynasties (Paris, Librairie Klincksieck), p. 66, 113 bis. 

[355] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 66, 113 bis. 

[356] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 162. 

[357] Rymer, Fœdera I, IV, p. 110, quoted in Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 65 note 113 bis. 

[358] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 66, 113 bis, citing "Cod. Borgia 61". 

[359] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 66, 113 bis, citing "Cod. Borgia 61". 

[360] Amadi, p. 240. 

[361] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 91. 

[362] Edbury (1994), p. 141. 

[363] Amadi, p. 402. 

[364] The Knights of St John established their base at Smyrna after its capture. 

[365] Amadi, p. 408. 

[366] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[367] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 31, p. 64. 

[368] Amadi, p. 399. 

[369] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 38, p. 64. 

[370] Amadi, pp. 406-7. 

[371] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 136, p. 82. 

[372] Amadi, p. 427. 

[373] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[374] ES III 565. 

[375] Amadi, p. 410. 

[376] Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007. 

[377] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 140. 

[378] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 144. 

[379] Amadi, pp. 403-4. 

[380] Edbury (1994), p. 148. 

[381] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 407. 

[382] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 223. 

[383] Sturdza (1999), p. 500. 

[384] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 442. 

[385] Amadi, p. 410. 

[386] Miller, W. (1908) The Latins in the Levant.  A History of Frankish Greece (1204-1566) (Cambridge and New York), p. 287. 

[387] Sturdza (1999), p. 500. 

[388] Miller (1908), p. 289. 

[389] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[390] Amadi, p. 437. 

[391] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[392] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 75, p. 70. 

[393] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 179. 

[394] Amadi, p. 412. 

[395] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[396] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[397] Amadi, pp. 407-8. 

[398] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 441. 

[399] Amadi, p. 408. 

[400] Dawkins, R. (ed. and trans.) (1932) Leontios Makhairas. Recital Concerning the Sweet Land of Cyprus entitled Chronicle, p. 79, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[401] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 324, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[402] Edbury (1994), p. 148. 

[403] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 441-6, and Edbury (1994), pp. 164-7. 

[404] Edbury (1994), pp. 173-4. 

[405] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[406] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 87, p. 72. 

[407] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[408] Amadi, p. 408. 

[409] Amadi, p. 420. 

[410] Amadi, p. 430. 

[411] Amadi, p. 438. 

[412] Edbury (1994), pp. 206-8. 

[413] Amadi, p. 487. 

[414] Amadi, pp. 419-20. 

[415] Dawkins (1932), 238, p. 219, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 31 mar 2007. 

[416] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[417] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[418] Amadi, p. 429. 

[419] Edbury (1994), p. 199. 

[420] Amadi, p. 432. 

[421] Amadi, p. 437. 

[422] Edbury (1994), pp. 200 and 207-8. 

[423] Amadi, p. 490. 

[424] Annales Mediolanenses, Cap. CXL, RIS XVI, col. 771. 

[425] Amadi, p. 437. 

[426] Osio, L. (ed.) (1864) Documenti Diplomatici tratti dagli archivii Milanesi (Milan) ("Documenti Diplomatici Milanesi"), Vol. I, CXXIII, p. 180. 

[427] Amadi, p. 487. 

[428] Amadi, p. 491. 

[429] Osio, L. (1864/72) Doc. diploma. tratti degli archivio Milan Vol. II, p. 115n, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007.  . 

[430] Chronique de Reggio, Muratori, t. XVIII, col. 90 (not yet consulted), cited in Mas de Latrie, Généalogie, p. 28. 

[431] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[432] Documenti Diplomatici Milanesi, Vol. I, CXXIII, p. 180. 

[433] Amadi, p. 487. 

[434] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 770. 

[435] Dawkins (1932), pp. 215-7, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[436] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[437] Amadi, pp. 407-8. 

[438] Amadi, p. 408. 

[439] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 250. 

[440] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 169. 

[441] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 88, p. 74. 

[442] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 169. 

[443] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 106, p. 76. 

[444] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 195. 

[445] Amadi, p. 473. 

[446] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 169. 

[447] Amadi, p. 473. 

[448] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 428. 

[449] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[450] Amadi, p. 487. 

[451] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 168 and 171. 

[452] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 168 and 171. 

[453] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, XIV, p. 1. 

[454] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 331, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[455] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[456] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 329, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[457] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[458] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 330, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[459] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[460] Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007. 

[461] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. 'La généalogie des Lusignan', Addenda, Epeteris XI (1981/82), p. 508, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[462] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 257. 

[463] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. 'Ianus-Eugenio et Juan, les fils illégitimes du dernier roi de Chypre, Jacques II.  Les personages les plus tragiques de la dynastie', Actes du Colloque Les Lusignan et l'Outre-mer 1993, Mutafian, C. (ed.) (1995), p. 272, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[464] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 94. 

[465] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 146. 

[466] Binayan Carmona, N. 'Una princesa Armenia en Compostela en el siglo XI: su genealogía', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), 2 vols, Vol. 1, pp. 131-153, 136 footnote 9.   

[467] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 168 and 171. 

[468] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 168 and 171. 

[469] Amadi, p. 473. 

[470] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 428. 

[471] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[472] Amadi, p. 493. 

[473] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[474] Amadi, p. 413. 

[475] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[476] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[477] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[478] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 77, p. 70. 

[479] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 95, p. 74. 

[480] Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[481] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[482] Amadi, p. 413. 

[483] Edbury (1994), pp. 208-9. 

[484] Amadi, p. 476. 

[485] Amadi, p. 492. 

[486] Amadi, p. 496. 

[487] Dawkins (1932), cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[488] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[489] Amadi, p. 450. 

[490] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 135, p. 82. 

[491] Amadi, pp. 476-7. 

[492] Amadi, p. 499. 

[493] Dawkins (1932), cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[494] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[495] Amadi, pp. 492 and 494. 

[496] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[497] Amadi, p. 492. 

[498] Balard (2001), p. 329, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[499] Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007. 

[500] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[501] Amadi, p. 492. 

[502] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. 'La généalogie des Lusignan', Addenda, Epeteris XI (1981/82), p. 507, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[503] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[504] Amadi, p. 509. 

[505] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 518. 

[506] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, XIV, p. 1. 

[507] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, XIV, p. 11. 

[508] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[509] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 259. 

[510] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[511] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 465. 

[512] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[513] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[514] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, pp. 170 and 171. 

[515] Amadi, p. 509. 

[516] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[517] Mas Latrie, L. de (ed.) (1873) Nouvelles Preuves de l'Histoire de Chypre sous le règne des princes de la maison de Lusignan, Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des chartes, Tome XXXIV (Paris) ("Nouvelles Preuves II"), p. 40. 

[518] Nouvelles Preuves II, p. 40. 

[519] Nouvelles Preuves II, p. 40. 

[520] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 326, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[521] Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[522] Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[523] According to ES III 566, he was also known as 'Jean', 'Zegno' or 'Gajan'. 

[524] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[525] Amadi, pp. 492 and 494. 

[526] Amadi, p. 496. 

[527] Chronicle of Amadi I, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 78. 

[528] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 324, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[529] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre, Vol. II, p. 478. 

[530] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre, Vol. II, p. 459. 

[531] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[532] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 494. 

[533] Amadi, p. 496. 

[534] Amadi, p. 499. 

[535] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[536] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[537] Amadi, p. 496. 

[538] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 327, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[539] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 327, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[540] Dawkins (1932), p. 625, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[541] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 327, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[542] Dawkins (1932), p. 625, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[543] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[544] Amadi, p. 499. 

[545] Dawkins (1932), p. 625, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[546] Inventory of the State Archives of Turin (“State Archives”), volume 102, page 85.2, fascicule 3, consulted at <http://ww2.multix.it/asto/asp/inventari.asp> (14 Nov 2003). 

[547] State Archives, volume 102, page 88, fascicule 1, and Guichenon, S. (1780) Histoire généalogique de la royale maison de Savoie (Turin) ("Guichenon (Savoie)"), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 364. 

[548] State Archives, volume 102, 85.2, 3. 

[549] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[550] Dawkins (1932), p. 625, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[551] Frazy, M. Le Bourbonnais (Moulins, 1929), p. 79, cited in Kerrebrouck (Bourbon), p. 72 footnote 72. 

[552] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. 'La généalogie des Lusignan', Addenda, Epeteris XI (1981/82), p. 508, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[553] Chronicle of George Boustron 1458, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 82. 

[554] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[555] Amadi, p. 496. 

[556] Dawkins (1932), p. 625, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[557] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 327, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[558] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 324, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[559] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, XIV, p. 1. 

[560] Chronicle of Strambaldi II, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 81. 

[561] Florio Bustron, p. 384. 

[562] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 335, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[563] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[564] Chronicle of Amadi I, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 79. 

[565] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 326, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[566] Dawkins (1932), cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[567] Chronicle of Strambaldi II, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 80. 

[568] Chronicle of Strambaldi II, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 80. 

[569] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[570] Chronicle of Amadi I, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 80. 

[571] Chronicle of Strambaldi II, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 80. 

[572] Florio Bustron, p. 380. 

[573] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 334, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[574] Chronicle of Strambaldi II, Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 81. 

[575] Florio Bustron, p. 384. 

[576] Florio Bustron, p. 372. 

[577] Florio Bustron, p. 382. 

[578] Mas Latrie, L. de (ed.) (1873) Nouvelles Preuves de l'Histoire de Chypre sous le règne des princes de la maison de Lusignan, Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des chartes, Tome XXXIII (Paris) ("Nouvelles Preuves I"), p. 20. 

[579] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 17, citing Jac. Salomonii, Urbis Patavinæ inscriptiones, p. 98, Padua 1701.  . 

[580] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[581] Florio Bustron, p. 372. 

[582] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 328, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[583] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 334, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[584] Florio Bustron, p. 380. 

[585] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 151. 

[586] Florio Bustron, p. 372. 

[587] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 335, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[588] Guichenon, M. (1778) Histoire généalogique de la maison royale de Savoie, Vol. II, p. 393, cited by Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007. 

[589] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 170. 

[590] Florio Bustron, p. 372. 

[591] Balard (2001), pp. 317-38, 330, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[592] Florio Bustron, p. 372. 

[593] Florio Bustron, p. 372. 

[594] Dawkins, R. (trans.) (1964) The Chronicle of George Boustronios 1456-1489, 99, p. 202, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[595] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 345. 

[596] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 346. 

[597] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 182. 

[598] Sturdza (1999), p. 621. 

[599] Dawkins, R. (trans.) (1964) The Chronicle of George Boustronios 1456-1489, 129, p. 36, cited by Morris Bierbrier, in a private email to the author dated 31 Mar 2007. 

[600] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 345. 

[601] Nouvelles Preuves I, p. 30. 

[602] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 26, quoting Sanundo, Diarii, Ann. 1512. 

[603] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 33. 

[604] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 33. 

[605] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 37. 

[606] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. 'Ianus-Eugenio et Juan, les fils illégitimes du dernier roi de Chypre, Jacques II.  Les personages les plus tragiques de la dynastie', Actes du Colloque Les Lusignan et l'Outre-mer 1993, Mutafian, C. (ed.) (1995), pp. 260-75, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[607] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 18, citing Sanundo, Diarii, Ann. 1509.  . 

[608] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 345. 

[609] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 30. 

[610] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 26, quoting Sanundo, Diarii, Ann. 1512. 

[611] Nouvelles Preuves, I, pp. 34-5. 

[612] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 33. 

[613] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 37. 

[614] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 35. 

[615] Nouvelles Preuves, I, pp. 24-5, quoting Sanundo, Diarii, Ann. 1509.  . 

[616] Darrouzes, J. Kuriakai Soudai 23 (1959), no. 30, pp. 36 and 38, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[617] Florio Bustron, p. 411. 

[618] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 345. 

[619] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 20.  . 

[620] Nouvelles Preuves, I, p. 16, citing Jac. Salomonii, Urbis Patavinæ inscriptiones, p. 59, Padua 1701.  . 

[621] He is not in ES III 550. 

[622] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. 'Ianus-Eugenio et Juan, les fils illégitimes du dernier roi de Chypre, Jacques II.  Les personages les plus tragiques de la dynastie', Actes du Colloque Les Lusignan et l'Outre-mer 1993, Mutafian, C. (ed.) (1995), p. 271, cited by Morris Bierbrier in a private email to the author dated 15 Mar 2007. 

[623] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 259. 

[624] Bustron, Introduction, p. 3. 

[625] Marsy Cartulaire de Saint-Lazare, (Arch. Orient latin, t. II), p. 137; tir. à part, p. 19, cited in Rey 'Les Seigneurs de Giblet', Revue de l'Orient Latin, Tome III, 1895 (Paris), p. 418. 

[626] Mas Latrie, R. de Histoire de Chypre Vol. III, pp. 600 and 606. 

[627] Rey 'Les Seigneurs de Giblet', Revue de l'Orient Latin, Tome III, 1895 (Paris), p. 418. 

[628] Rey 'Les Seigneurs de Giblet', Revue de l'Orient Latin, Tome III, 1895 (Paris), p. 418. 

[629] Rey 'Les Seigneurs de Giblet', Revue de l'Orient Latin, Tome III, 1895 (Paris), p. 418. 

[630] Rey 'Les Seigneurs de Giblet', Revue de l'Orient Latin, Tome III, 1895 (Paris), p. 418. 

[631] Amadi, p. 422. 

[632] Amadi, pp. 425-6. 

[633] Amadi, p. 422. 

[634] Amadi, p. 422. 

[635] Amadi, p. 423. 

[636] Philippe de Novare, p. 7. 

[637] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 157. 

[638] Amadi, p. 208. 

[639] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXVII, p. 77. 

[640] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLVI, p. 110. 

[641] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[642] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98, and CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[643] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 5, p. 58. 

[644] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 158. 

[645] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[646] Amadi, p. 395. 

[647] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.L, pp. 115-16. 

[648] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[649] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[650] Amadi, p. 302. 

[651] Florio Bustron, p. 176. 

[652] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 28, p. 62. 

[653] Amadi, p. 397. 

[654] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[655] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, pp. 98 and 99. 

[656] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCCXXXVIII, p. 102. 

[657] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[658] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 6, p. 58. 

[659] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[660] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[661] Amadi, p. 362. 

[662] Amadi, pp. 385-6. 

[663] Amadi, p. 393. 

[664] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), pp. 166-7. 

[665] Amadi, p. 398. 

[666] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, pp. 90 and 91. 

[667] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 699. 

[668] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 167, footnote 212. 

[669] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 91. 

[670] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 168. 

[671] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 51, p. 66. 

[672] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 47, p. 66. 

[673] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[674] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[675] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[676] Amadi, p. 400. 

[677] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[678] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLVI, p. 110. 

[679] Amadi, p. 400. 

[680] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 164. 

[681] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[682] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[683] Amadi, p. 400. 

[684] Amadi, p. 361. 

[685] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[686] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[687] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 169. 

[688] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 92. 

[689] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[690] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 10, p. 60. 

[691] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[692] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[693] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[694] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[695] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99.  

[696] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[697] Amadi, p. 389, cited in Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 171. 

[698] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[699] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[700] Amadi, p. 261. 

[701] Amadi, p. 362. 

[702] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 172. 

[703] Amadi, pp. 397-8. 

[704] Amadi, p. 302. 

[705] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 32, p. 64. 

[706] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[707] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[708] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[709] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 174. 

[710] Amadi, pp. 397-8. 

[711] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[712] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 19, p. 60. 

[713] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 27, p. 62. 

[714] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[715] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[716] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 58, p. 68. 

[717] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 175. 

[718] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[719] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98. 

[720] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXVIII, p. 63. 

[721] Philippe de Novare, p. 65. 

[722] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 177. 

[723] Lignages d'Outremer, Marciana Ms Francese 20, CC.LXXXXVI, p. 74.  . 

[724] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[725] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[726] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[727] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 8, p. 58. 

[728] Amadi, p. 403. 

[729] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[730] Amadi, p. 241. 

[731] Amadi, p. 238. 

[732] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[733] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[734] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[735] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, pp. 99 and 100. 

[736] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[737] Amadi, p. 293. 

[738] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 99. 

[739] Amadi, p. 302. 

[740] Florio Bustron, p. 176. 

[741] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 28, p. 62. 

[742] Amadi, p. 397. 

[743] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[744] Amadi, p. 399. 

[745] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 38, p. 64. 

[746] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 136, p. 82. 

[747] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 161. 

[748] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 45, p. 66. 

[749] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[750] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 34, p. 64. 

[751] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[752] WTC XXXIV.XXXIV, p. 479. 

[753] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 181. 

[754] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 3, p. 669. 

[755] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[756] WTC XXXIV.XXXIV, p. 479. 

[757] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[758] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[759] Amadi, p. 230. 

[760] Amadi, p. 238. 

[761] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), pp. 190-1. 

[762] Amadi, p. 399. 

[763] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[764] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.L, p. 115. 

[765] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[766] Amadi, pp. 276-7. 

[767] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 20, p. 62. 

[768] Amadi, p. 405. 

[769] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[770] Amadi, p. 397. 

[771] Nouvelles Preuves I, p. 48. 

[772] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 46, p. 66. 

[773] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 192. 

[774] Amadi, p. 399. 

[775] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[776] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 194. 

[777] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 169. 

[778] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 106, p. 76. 

[779] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 195. 

[780] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[781] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[782] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 53, p. 66. 

[783] Amadi, p. 404. 

[784] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[785] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[786] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[787] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 100. 

[788] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 197. 

[789] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[790] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[791] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCCXXXVIII, p. 102, and CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[792] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXVII, p. 98, and CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[793] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 5, p. 58. 

[794] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 158. 

[795] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[796] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLII, p. 106. 

[797] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XLII, p. 106.