AUSTRIA

  v3.0 Updated 15 June 2014

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 1

Chapter 1.                MARKGRAFEN of the EAST MARCH (MARKGRAFEN of PANNONIA) 2

Chapter 2.                MARKGRAFEN of AUSTRIA, DUKES from 1156 (BABENBERG) 5

A.         MARKGRAFEN of AUSTRIA 976-1156 (BABENBERG) 5

B.         DUKES of AUSTRIA 1156-1246 (BABENBERG) 23

Chapter 3.                DUKE of AUSTRIA 1251-1276 (PŘEMYSL) 35

Chapter 4.                DUKES of AUSTRIA 1276-1493 (HABSBURG) 36

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The eastern march, along the south bank of the river Danube between the Enns and the Wienerwald, was established by the Franks after the collapse of the Avar state[1].  Some of the Markgrafen of the East March, from the mid- to late-9th century, are set out in Chapter 1, although it has not yet been possible to establish a full chronological list of holders of the title.  It is not known how long this March remained in existence. 

 

A new march along the Hungarian frontier was established in 976 by Emperor Otto II, who installed Liutpold as Markgraf (see Chapter 2).  This new march developed into Austria.  The name "Babenberg" was first applied to the first dynasty of Austrian Markgrafen and Dukes probably in the 12th or 13th centuries.  This was due to a tradition that the first Markgrafen were descended from the "alte Babenberger" family who are set out in the document FRANCONIA.  This descent does not appear to have been based on any primary source proof.  More recently, it has been suggested that Markgraf Liutpold was the son of Arnulf Duke of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger] but this theory appears to be based solely on onomastics[2].  In fact, there are few typically "Liutpoldinger" names among Markgraf Liutpold's children, in particular Eberhard, Berthold and Arnulf are absent.  Reuter says that Markgraf Liutpold was "related both to the Liutpoldinger and indirectly to the Babenberger"[3] but the basis for this statement is not known. 

 

The March of Austria was part of the territory of the duchy of Bavaria until 1156, when it was elevated to the status of a separate duchy in order to compensate Heinrich II Markgraf of Austria for the loss of Bavaria when Emperor Friedrich I "Barbarossa" returned it to the Welf family[4].  The duchies of Austria and Styria were partially integrated into imperial administration after the death in 1246 of Friedrich II Duke of Austria[5].  Following the accession of the Habsburg dukes in 1276, the history of Austria became closely identified with that of the whole Holy Roman Empire, as the majority of emperors after that date were Habsburgs, the appointment becoming exclusive to the dynasty from 1452 until the dissolution of the empire by Napoleon in 1806. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    MARKGRAFEN of the EAST MARCH (MARKGRAFEN of PANNONIA)

 

 

 

1.         WILHELM [I] (-after 18 Jan 853).  "Uuilihelmus…comes" donated property "in loco…Bersnicha" to Regensburg St Emmeram by charter dated 834 which names "coniux eius Engilrada"[6].  Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks confirmed donations to Kloster St Emmeran by "Uuilihelmus comes" of property "inter Agastam et Nardinam ubi ipsa in Danubium fluent…et…in Nortuualt" which "Engilrade coniugi suæ" had granted during her life, by charter dated 18 Jan 853[7].  The tenor of the document suggests that Graf Wilhelm was near death at the time.  m (before 834) ENGILRAD, daughter of --- (-before 18 Jan 853).  "Uuilihelmus…comes" donated property "in loco…Bersnicha" to Regensburg St Emmeram by charter dated 834 which names "coniux eius Engilrada"[8].  Graf Wilhelm [I] & his wife had [two possible children]: 

a)         [WILHELM [II] (-killed in battle Moravia [871]).  No proof has been found that Wilhelm [II] was the son of Wilhelm [I] but this appears likely.  Markgraf in the Pannonian March.  The Annales Fuldenses record that "duo fratres Willihelmus et Engilscalcus" were granted "terminum regni Baioariorum in Oriente" by Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and that they held the territory against the Moravians, were killed in battle, but that their sons were not confirmed as their successors, the land being granted to "Erbo"[9].  The Annales Fuldenses record that the forces of Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks fought "Engilscalcum et Willihelmum, duces Carlmanni" in 871[10].]  m ---.  The name of Wilhelm's wife is not known.  Wilhelm [II] & his wife had one child: 

i)          MEGINGOZ (-drowned Hraba river 884).  The Annales Fuldenses record that "filii Willihelmi et Engilscalchi qui maiores natu erant, Megingoz et Papo" were forced to flee and were drowned in "flumine…Hraba" in 884[11].  The Gesta regum Francorum records the same event in 884[12].  These texts appear to indicate that Megingoz was the son of Wilhelm and Poppo the son of Engilschalk, but this is not without doubt. 

b)         [ENGELSCHALK [I] (-killed in battle Moravia [871]).  No proof has been found that Engelschalk [I] was the son of Wilhelm [I] but this appears likely.  Markgraf in the Pannonian March.  The Annales Fuldenses record that "duo fratres Willihelmus et Engilscalcus" were granted "terminum regni Baioariorum in Oriente" by Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and that they held the territory against the Moravians, were killed in battle, but that their sons were not confirmed as their successors, the land being granted to "Erbo"[13].  The Annales Fuldenses record that the forces of Ludwig II " der Deutsche" King of the East Franks fought "Engilscalcum et Willihelmum, duces Carlmanni" in 871[14].]  m ---.  The name of Engelschalk's wife is not known.  Engelschalk [I] & his wife had four children:

i)          POPPO (-drowned Hraba river 884).  The Annales Fuldenses record that "filii Willihelmi et Engilscalchi qui maiores natu erant, Megingoz et Papo" were forced to flee and were drowned in "flumine…Hraba" in 884[15].  The Gesta regum Francorum records the same event in 884[16].  These texts appear to indicate that Megingoz was the son of Wilhelm and Poppo the son of Engilschalk, but this is not without doubt. 

ii)         three other children.  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Werinhario" captured "septentrionali parte Histri fluminis" from "pueris Engilscalch, qui tres habuit" in 884 and mutilated "Vezziloni quoque comiti, qui illorum propinquus erat" by cutting off his right hand, tongue and genitals[17]

iii)        [WILHELM [III] (-executed Moravia 893).  No proof has been found that Wilhelm [III] was the son of Engelschalk [I] but this appears likely.  If this is correct, he was one of the three children expelled from "septentrionali parte Histri fluminis" in 884.  The Gesta regum Francorum names "Willihelmus filius patruelis eius [=Arnulfi regis]" when recording that he was sent as missus to Moravia but beheaded in 893[18].  The Annales Fuldenses record the same event in 893[19].  The Annales Alamannicorum record in 893 "Wilhelm occisus, Engilscalch obcecatur"[20].  King Arnulf granted property "quicquid Uuillihelmus et Engilscalchus germani fratres comites" to Kloster Kremsmünster by charter dated 22 Oct 893[21].] 

iv)       [ENGELSCHALK [II] .  No proof has been found that Engelschalk [II] was the son of Engelschalk [I] but this appears likely.  If this is correct, he was one of the three children expelled from "septentrionali parte Histri fluminis" in 884.  The Gesta regum Francorum names "Engilscalcus iuvenili audatia vir, qui post, rapta de concubina filia regis" when recording his exile in Moravia, his being invested with "marcensis in Oriente" on his return, but his arrest and blinding in 893[22].  The Annales Fuldenses record the same event in 893[23].  The Annales Alamannicorum record in 893 "Wilhelm occisus, Engilscalch obcecatur"[24].  King Arnulf granted property "in comitatu Ruodperti in regno Carantano iuxta flumen Gurza in loco Selizna" to "Reginhardo" at the request of "Engilscalchi comitis" by undated charter, placed in the compilation with charters dated 892[25].  King Arnulf granted property "quicquid Uuillihelmus et Engilscalchus germani fratres comites" to Kloster Kremsmünster by charter dated 22 Oct 893[26]Mistress (1): [ELLINRAT], illegitimate daughter of Emperor ARNULF & his concubine [Ellinrat] (-after ).  The Gesta regum Francorum records in 893 that "Engilscalcus iuvenili audatia vir" later "rapta de concubina filia regis"[27].  The passage does not name the king's daughter.  Ellinrat is the only daughter who is named elsewhere, but the text may refer to an otherwise unknown daughter of Emperor Arnulf.]  

 

 

1.         ARIBO, son of --- ([835/45]-after 909).  The Annales Fuldenses record that "duo fratres Willihelmus et Engilscalcus" were granted "terminum regni Baioariorum in Oriente" by Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and that they held the territory against the Moravians, were killed in battle, but that their sons were not confirmed as their successors, the land being granted to "Erbo"[28]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    MARKGRAFEN of AUSTRIA, DUKES from 1156 (BABENBERG)

 

 

 

A.      MARKGRAFEN of AUSTRIA 976-1156 (BABENBERG)

 

 

1.         LIUTPOLD, son of --- ([950/55]-murdered Würzburg 10 Jul 994, bur Würzburg).  The origin of Liutpold is unknown.  According to early tradition, he was descended from the "alte Babenberger" family whose genealogy is set out in the document FRANCONIA NOBILITY, accounting for the later attribution of this name to the dynasty.  This descent does not appear to have been based on any primary source proof.  More recently, it has been suggested that Markgraf Liutpold was the son of Arnulf Duke of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger] but this theory appears to be based solely on onomastics[29].  In fact, there are few typically "Liutpoldinger" names among Markgraf Liutpold's children, in particular Eberhard, Berthold and Arnulf are absent.  Reuter says that Markgraf Liutpold was "related both to the Liutpoldinger and indirectly to the Babenberger"[30] but the basis for this statement is not known.  His birth date is estimated on the basis that he was a young adult when installed as Markgraf.  Graf in der Nordgau[31].  He was installed by Emperor Otto II in 976 as LIUTPOLD I Markgraf der Bayerischen Ostmark, the newly created march bordering Hungary.  Graf im Traungau 977.  Graf im Sundergau 979.  Graf im Donaugau 983.  The necrology of Fulda records the death in 994 of "Liutbold marchio"[32].  Thietmar records that "Leopold Markgraf of the East" was murdered on 10 Jul at Würzburg by an individual who wrongly blamed him for blinding his brother, and that he was buried at Würzburg[33].  The Liber Anniversariorum of Einsiedeln records the death in Jul of "Lupoldus com et marchio in Orientali Baioaria"[34].  The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "VI Id Jul" of "Liutpolt marchio com"[35]m RICHWARA, daughter of [ERNST Graf im Sualafeld & his wife ---] (-bur Stift Melk).  A continuator of the Gesta Treverorum records "domnus Poppo" and "patri eius Luopaldi…qui regionis Austriæ marcam tenebat, mater…Richeza…ducis Germaniæ Franciæ filia"[36].  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[37], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[38], the wife of Markgraf I was the daughter of Graf Ernst.  The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  It is possible that it is based solely on onomastic speculation, because of the transmission of the name Ernst into the Babenberg family with her son.  Markgraf Liutpold I & his wife had [eight] children: 

a)         [JUDITH .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[39], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  If this is correct, it is unclear why Judith should be listed before her supposed brothers.  Another possibility is that Judith in this list was the second wife of Markgraf Liutpold.] 

b)         HEINRICH ([970/73]-23/24 Jun 1018, bur Melk).  The Auctarium Vindobonense names "marchiam Austriam…Heinricus secundus, filius Liupoldi"[40].  His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was at least a young adult when succeeding his father.  If this is correct, he must have been considerably older than his brothers shown below.  This does suggest that they may have been born from different mothers, although it is not considered that this speculation is sufficiently definite to show these possible two marriages of Markgraf Liutpold, even in square brackets, above.  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[41], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  He succeeded his father in 994 as HEINRICH I Markgraf der Ostmark.  The Altahense Annales record the sudden death in 1018 of "Heinricus marchio Austria" and specify that he was succeeded by "Adalbertus filius eius"[42].  Thietmar records the death on 24 Jun 1018 of "Heinrich [who] held the march between the Hungarians and the Bavarians"[43].  The necrology of Melk records the death "IX Kal Jul" of "Heinricus marchio fundator unus h l…"[44].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IX Kal Jul" of "Heinricus marchio"[45]

c)         ERNST von Babenberg ([985/90]-31 Mar 1015, bur Würzburg).  Thietmar names "Ernst son of Markgraf Leopold" when recording that he was among those sent by Heinrich II King of Germany to Lombardy after his election to quell unrest[46].  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[47], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  The Chronicle of Otto von Freising, interpolated in the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Ernesto duci Suevorum, fratri Alberti superioris Pannonis marchionis et archiepiscopi Treverensis Popponis" as first husband of "Gisila [imperatrix]"[48], although he was in fact her second husband.  His birth date range is estimated on the basis of his marriage in [1012].  He succeeded in 1012 as ERNST I Duke of Swabia.  Thietmar records that "Duke Ernst of Swabia" died on 31 Mar after a hunting accident and was buried in Würzburg next to his father "Markgraf Leopold"[49]

          -        DUKES of SWABIA

d)         POPPO (-14 Feb or 16 Apr 1047, bur Trier St Simeon, transferred 1803 to St Gervasius).  The Annales Zwetlenses name "Popponem episcopum Traverensem" as brother of "Heinricus marchio Austrie [et] frater eius Leupoldus"[50], although the reference to "Leupoldus" appears incorrect.  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[51], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  Wipo names "Poppo frater Ernesti ducis", when recording the former as Archbishop of Trier[52].  Provost of Bamberg cathedral after 1007.  The Gesta Treverorum records that Heinrich II King of Germany installed "Popponem in Babenberch educatum" as archbishop of Trier in succession to "Megingaudo" in 1015[53].  A continuator of the Gesta Treverorum records "domnus Poppo" and "patri eius Luopaldi…qui regionis Austriæ marcam tenebat, mater…Richeza…ducis Germaniæ Franciæ filia"[54].  Thietmar records the installation of "Poppo…son of Markgraf Leopold and provost of the church of Bamberg" as Archbishop of Trier in 1016[55].  Wipo, in his description of the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024, calls Poppo a "pious and humble man", says he was the brother of Duke Ernst, and that he was the guardian of the latter's son Ernst[56].  The necrology of Melk records the death "XVI Kal Mar" of "Poppo archieps Treverensis fr Heinrici marchionis"[57].  The Annales Necrologici Prumienses record the death in 1047 of “Boppo archiepiscopus[58]

e)         [LIUTPOLD .  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[59], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  No other reference has yet been found to a son named Liutpold.] 

f)          KUNIGUNDE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[60], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children. 

g)         ADALBERT ([990/994]-26 May 1055, bur Stift Melk).  A list of names in the Verbrüderungsbuch of Reichenau abbey reads "Luitpold marches, Rihuuar, Iudita, Heinrich, Ernust, Poppo, Luitpold, Cunigurrt, Adalbr"[61], which appears to refer to Markgraf Liutpold, his wife and children.  The primary sources are contradictory regarding the parentage of Markgraf Adalbert.  The Auctarium Vindobonense names "Adalbertus tertius marchio Austria", but does not specify his relationship with his predecessor[62].  The Altahense Annales record the sudden death in 1018 of "Heinricus marchio Austria" and specify that he was succeeded by "Adalbertus filius eius"[63].  However, the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines name "Ernesto duci Suevorum, fratri Alberti superioris Pannonis marchionis et archiepiscopi Treverensis Popponis"[64].  As shown above, Thietmar records both Ernst Duke of Swabia and Poppo Archbishop of Trier as sons of Markgraf Liutpold[65].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VII Kal Jun" of "Adalbertus marchio filius Heinrici marchionis"[66], apparently confirming the parentage set out in the Atahense Annales.  On the other hand, the necrology of Melk records the death "XVI Kal Mar" of "Poppo archieps Treverensis fr Heinrici marchionis"[67].  On balance, more primary sources indicate that Adalbert was the son of Markgraf Liutpold rather than of Markgraf Heinrich.  His estimated birth date range is based on the birth date range estimated for his older son, with the death of Markgraf Liutpold in 994 representing the later limit of this range on the assumption that Adalbert was his son.  Just to confuse the question of Adalbert's parentage even further, it should be noted that this range would not be inconsistent with Adalbert having been the son of Markgraf Heinrich.  Graf im Schweinach 1010.  Graf im Künzig 1011.  He succeeded his brother in 1018 as ADALBERT "der Siegreiche" Markgraf der Ostmark [of Austria].  The necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert records the death "VII Kal Jun" of "Adalpreht marchio"[68].  The necrology of Melk records the death "VII Kal Jun" of "Adalbertus marchio"[69]m firstly (before [1020/25]) --- (-before 1041).  Markgraf Adalbert's first marriage is deduced from the estimated birth date range of his older son Liutpold.  The identity of this first wife of Markgraf Adalbert is unknown.  She has been identified as Glismod ---, daughter of Immed Graf in Utrecht & his wife Adela [von Hamaland][70].  This is presumably based on the Annales Stadenses which name "Lippoldo filio domine Glismodis" as husband of "Ida [de Elsthorpe]"[71].  "Lippoldo" has been assumed to be Liutpold Margraf der Ungarischen Mark, son of Markgraf Adalbert, but this appears to be impossible if Ida von Elstorf had four children by her first husband[72].  The only definite information concerning Glismod's husband is found in the Vita Meinwerci which names "Thiedericum, Meinwercum, Glismod et Azelam" as children of Immed and Athela and specifies that Glismod married "nobilis principis in Baioaria"[73].  Another possibility is that her name was Adelheid.  The necrology of Melk records the death "VII Kal Feb" of "Adalheida marchionissa ux Adalberti marchionis Austrie"[74].  At first sight, "Adalberti" has assumed to be an error for "Ernesti" as the latter's wife is the only known "marchionissa" of that name.  However, the entry may alternatively refer to the otherwise unknown first wife of Markgraf Adalbert.  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg also records the death "VII Kal Feb" of "Adelheidis marchionissa"[75] but does not name her husband.  m secondly (shortly before 1041) FROIZZA [Frowila] Orseolo, daughter of PIETRO OTTONE Orseolo Doge of Venice & his wife [Grimelda or Maria] of Hungary ([1015]-17 Feb 1071, bur Melk).  Herimannus refers to "sororis suæ [=Peterum regem]" as wife of "marchionem nostrum Adalbertum" when recording her marriage in 1041[76].  She is named in three imperial charters, although these are not consistent about the spelling of her name.   "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property "in circuitu duorum fluminum…Zaiouua" to "marchioni Adalberto et coniugi suæ (Froiza)" by charter dated 21 Apr 1048[77].  "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property to "Adelberti marchionis [et] uxorique sue Froize" dated 12 Nov 1051"[78].  "Heinricus…rex" granted property "in locis Ortvvinesdorf et Pirchehe…in marcha Osterriche et in comitatu Ernestes marchionis" to "Frovvilæ Adeberti marchionis viduæ" by charter dated 1 Oct 1058[79].  The necrology of Melk records the death "XIII Kal Mar" of "Frouza marchionissa"[80].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIII Kal Mar" of "Fruoza marchionissa"[81].  Markgraf Adalbert & his first wife had two children:

i)          LIUTPOLD ([1020/25]-Ingelheim 9 Dec 1043, bur Trier)Herimannus names "Adalberto marchione et filio eius Liutpaldo" when recording their jointly leading part of the army to the southern Danube area in 1042[82].  His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adult or late adolescent at this time.  He was installed as Markgraf der Ungarischen Mark in Dec 1043 at Ingelheim[83]Herimannus records his installation as marchio, but also his death a few days later[84].  The Chronicon of Bernold records the death in 1043 of "Liutpaldus Adalberti marchionis filius" at Ingelheim after the marriage of Heinrich III King of Germany and Agnes de Poitou[85].  The necrology of Melk records the death "V Id Dec" of "Liupoldus fortis mil fil Alberti marchionis"[86].  The first husband of Ida von "Elstorf", daughter of Liudolf Markgraf in Friesland [Braunschweig] & his wife Gertrud von Egisheim, is identified as Liutpold Markgraf der Ungarischen Mark in Europäischen Stammtafeln[87].  Presumably this is based firstly on the Annales Stadenses which name "Lippoldo filio domine Glismodis" as husband of "Ida [de Elsthorpe]"[88], and secondly on the Vita Meinwerci which names "Thiedericum, Meinwercum, Glismod et Azelam" as children of Immed and Athela, specifying that Glismod married "nobilis principis in Baioaria"[89], although there is no evidence linking the second with the first.  The fact that Ida von Elstorf had children by her first husband, if correct, also indicates that that this co-identity cannot be right[90].  She married secondly Dedo Graf von Dietmarschen, and thirdly Etheler Graf von Dietmarschen. 

ii)         ERNST (-killed in battle near Homburg/Unstrut 9 Jun 1075, bur Melk).  The Auctarium Vindobonense names "Ernust filius eius [=Adalbertus] quartus marchio Austrie" when recording that he succeeded his father[91].  He succeeded his father in 1055 as ERNST Markgraf of Austria.   

          -        see below

h)         CHRISTINA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Nun at Trier.

i)          HEMMA .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m RATPOTO [III] Graf von Diessen, son of RATPOTO [II] Graf im oberen Traungau & his wife --- (-18 Jun [1050]). 

2.         [---.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         HEINRICH .  Thietmar records that "Leopold Markgraf of the East and Heinrich his nephew" were invited to attend mass by the Bishop of Würzburg 8 Jul [994][92].  Wegener states[93] that Heinrich was the same person as Heinrich von Schweinfurt Markgraf auf dem Nordgau (d. 1017), which accords with his theory (based only on onomastics) that both Markgraf Liutpold I and Berthold Markgraf auf dem Nordgau, father of Heinrich, were sons of Arnulf Duke of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger]. 

 

 

The precise relationship between the following small family sub-group and the Markgrafen of Austria has not been established: 

1.         AZZO . The Annales Zwetlenses name "Aizonem cognatum" of "Heinricus marchio Austrie [et] frater eius Leupoldus", and in the following entry record that "Aizo iste genuit tres filios, Anshelmum, Nytzonem et Adalberonem"[94], none of whom has been identified.  m ---.  The name of Azzo's wife is not known.  Azzo & his wife had three children: 

a)         ANSELM .  The Annales Zwetlenses name "Aizonem cognatum" of "Heinricus marchio Austrie [et] frater eius Leupoldus", and in the following entry record that "Aizo iste genuit tres filios, Anshelmum, Nytzonem et Adalberonem"[95]

b)         NIZO .  The Annales Zwetlenses name "Aizonem cognatum" of "Heinricus marchio Austrie [et] frater eius Leupoldus", and in the following entry record that "Aizo iste genuit tres filios, Anshelmum, Nytzonem et Adalberonem"[96]

c)         ADALBERO .  The Annales Zwetlenses name "Aizonem cognatum" of "Heinricus marchio Austrie [et] frater eius Leupoldus", and in the following entry record that "Aizo iste genuit tres filios, Anshelmum, Nytzonem et Adalberonem"[97]

 

 

ERNST von Babenberg, son of ADALBERT Markgraf der Ostmark [Austria] & his first wife --- (-killed in battle near Homburg/Unstrut 9 Jun 1075, bur Melk).  The Auctarium Vindobonense names "Ernust filius eius [=Adalbertus] quartus marchio Austrie" when recording that he succeeded his father[98].  He succeeded his father in 1055 as ERNST Markgraf of Austria.  Heinrich IV King of Germany granted property to "marchione Ernest in marcha Osterreiche" by charter dated 22 Mar 1074[99].  The Annales Gotwicenses record the death in 1075 of "Ernist marchio"[100].  The Chronicon Garstense records that "Ernust marchio Austrie et Gebehardus pater Lotharii postea imperatoris" were killed in the Saxon wars in 1075 "iuxta fluvium…(Unstrutt)"[101].  The Annales Wormatienses name "domni Eberhardi de Eberstein et domni E. filii sui, comitis de Sein et domni Ottonis de Eberstein" in 1249[102].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "V Id Jun" of "Ernsto marchio"[103]

m firstly ADELHEID von Wettin, daughter of DEDO II Markgraf der Ostmark-Lausitz [Wettin] & his first wife Oda der Ostmark (after 1039-[26 Jan] 1071, bur Melk).  The Genealogica Wettinensis names "Adelhidis…[et] Agnes" as the two daughters of "secundus filius [comitis Tiderici] Dedo" and his wife Oda, naming "Hernesto marchioni de Bavaria" as wife of Adelheid and "Luppoldum marchionem" as their son[104].  The Annales Gotwicenses record the death in 1071 of "Adalheit marchionissa"[105].  The necrology of Melk records the death "VII Kal Feb" of "Adalheida marchionissa ux Adalberti marchionis Austrie"[106].  At first sight, "Adalberti" has assumed to be an error for "Ernesti" as the latter's wife is the only known "marchionissa" of that name.  However, the entry may alternatively refer to the otherwise unknown first wife of Markgraf Adalbert.  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg also records the death "VII Kal Feb" of "Adelheidis marchionissa"[107] but does not name her husband. 

m secondly (1071 or after) SUANAHILD, daughter of ---.   The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.   According to Europäische Stammtafeln[108], she was Suanahild, daughter of Sieghard [VII] or [VIII] Graf [Sieghardinger] & his wife Pilihild ---, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. 

Markgraf Ernst & his first wife had [three] children:

1.         LIUTPOLD ([1058/63]-12 Oct 1095, bur Gars).  The Auctarium Vindobonense names "Liutpoldus filius eius [=Ernust] quintus marchio"[109].  His birth date range is estimated from the estimated birth dates of his mother and his son Markgraf Leopold.  He succeeded his father in 1075 as LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria.  The Chronica Boemorum records that "dux Wratislaus et sui fratres Chounradus atque Otto" fought against "orientalem marchionem Lupoldum filium Lucz", the passage being undated with the date 1082 inserted in the margin of the edition[110].  It is assumed that this refers to Markgraf Liutpold II, although the reference to "filium Lucz" is unexplained.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1095 of "Liupoldus marchio"[111].  The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1095 of "Liupoldus marchio"[112].  The necrology of Melk records the death "IV Id Oct" of "Liupoldus marchio qui monachum vitam hic instituit"[113].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Id Oct" of "Liupoldus prior marchio"[114]m IDA, daughter of --- (-Asia Minor [Sep] 1101 or after).  The parentage of Markgräfin Ida is uncertain.  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[115], she was Ida von Ratelberg, daughter of Thiemo [II] Graf [Formbach] & his wife ---, although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  Wegener quotes a 12th century document concerning travel tolls at Schärding dated [1060/70] which names "filios Tiemonis Ekkebertum et Henricum et dominam Itam" as participating in the foundation of Suben monastery but he does not make the connection between this Ita and the Margräfin of Austria[116].  The chronology is not favourable for Ida having been the daughter of Graf Thiemo [II], whose death is recorded in 1040.  If this paternity was correct, Ida would therefore have been about twenty years older than her husband, and at least in her early to mid-forties when she gave birth to her son Liutpold, which seems improbable.  The primary source which confirms her name "von Ratelberg" has not yet been identified.  The Auctarium Mariaecellense in 1100 records that "Ita marchionisse Austrie, Liupoldi marchionis relicta" left for Jerusalem[117].  Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus comes et princeps Pictaviensium, de sanguine et origine Henrici tertii imperatoris Romanorum" crossed Hungary peacefully with "duce Bawariorum Welfone et…comitssa…Ida de marchia Osterrich", entered the territory of the Bulgars in which "duce Bulgarorum Guz" refused their passage into Adrianople, but that Guillaume captured "ducem Bulgarorum" who was forced to allow the pilgrims to continue, undated but in a passage adjacent to text which records events in 1101[118].  The army was scattered after being defeated by the Turks near Tarsus in Asia Minor in [Sep] 1101.  It is not known what happened to Markgräfin Ida, but she was presumably killed.  Albert of Aix says that the fate of Ida is completely unknown, but adding that "some say that she was taken into permanent exile in the kingdom of Khorazan among the thousand women who were taken"[119].  According to later legend, she ended her days in a harem where she gave birth to the Muslim hero Zengi (which is chronologically impossible): the Historia Welforum records that "Itam comitissam, matrem Leopaldi marchionis orientalis" was kidnapped by "unus de principibus Sarracenorum…ex eaque Sanguinem illum sceleratissumum, ut aiunt, progenuit"[120].  Markgraf Liutpold II & his wife had seven children: 

a)         ELISABETH (-9 Oct [1107-1111]).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis refers to three (unnamed) sisters of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie", specifying that one married "Otakarus marchio Styriæ"[121].  The Genealogia Marchionum de Stire names "Elyzabet sororem marchionis Austrie Liupoldi" as wife of "Otachyr marchionem"[122].  The Altahense Annales name "Elysabeth" as the wife of "Otakarus marchio de Styria" when recording their joint foundation in 1107 of "monasterium in Gaersten"[123].  Her marriage date is estimated from the fact that the children of Markgraf Liutpold II must have been born in the period [1080/90].  The necrology of Melk records the death "VII Id Oct" of "Elisabeth marchionissa de Stiro sor Liupoldi III marchionis de Austria"[124]m ([1090/1100]) [as his second wife,] OTAKAR II Markgraf of Styria, son of OTAKAR I Markgraf der Kärnter Mark [Styria] & his wife Willibirg of Carinthia [Eppensteiner] (-28 Nov 1122). 

b)         JUDITH (6 Aug ----, bur Melk).  The necrology of Melk records the death "VIII Id Aug" of "Iudita puella filia Liupoldi marchionis"[125]

c)         IDA .  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis refers to three (unnamed) sisters of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie", specifying that the second daughter married "comes Liutoldus de Znoym"[126].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m LUPOLD Markgraf of Moravia, son of KONRAD II Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Willibirg [of Carniola and Istria] (-15 Mar 1112). 

d)         GERBERGA [Helbirg] (-13 Jul 1142).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis refers to three (unnamed) sisters of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie", specifying that the third daughter married "dux Boemiæ Pozwaius"[127].  The Chronica Boemorum records the marriage "XV Kal Nov 1100" of "Borivoy, frater ducis Bracizlai" with "Helbirk, orientalis marchionis Lupoldi sororem"[128].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ records the death "III Id Iul 1142" of "Kerberk coniunx Boriwoy"[129]m BOŘIWOJ of Bohemia, son of VRATISLAV II Duke of the Bohemians & his third wife Swiętoslawa [Svatana] of Poland ([1065]-2 Feb 1124).  He succeeded in 1101 as BOŘIWOJ II Duke of the Bohemians

e)         LIUTPOLD [Leopold] ([1080/86]-15 Nov 1136, bur Stift Klosterneuburg).  The Auctarium Vindobonense records in 1096 that "Liutpoldus successit dictus pius, sextus marchio" but does not specify his relationship with his predecessor[130].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his father in 1095 as LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria

-        see below.   

f)          SOPHIE (-2 or 10 May 1154, bur Stift Melk).  Wegener quotes the Landbuch von Österreich und Steier [1255] which records that "der marchgrave Liupolt von Osterrich het zwo tochter…die andern tochter gab er dem graven Sighart der daz Scharsa hiez und gab im zu der tochter Schala"[131].  Her first marriage is confirmed by the Codex Traditionum of Formbach monastery which records a donation by "Sirus qui et Sigehardus Comes de Scala et eius consors…domna Sophia…cum filio suo Henrico", for the soul of "prioris mariti sui Karinthiorum quondam ducis Heinrici"[132].  "Sirus qui et Sigehardus comes de Scala et eius consors…domna Sophia…cum filio suo Heinrico" donated property to Kloster Formbach, for the soul of "prioris mariti sui Karinthiorum quondam ducis Heinrici", by charter dated to before 1142[133].  The Annales Mellicenses record the death in 1154 of "Sophia soror nostra ducissa de Scala"[134].  The necrology of Melk records the death "VI Non May" of "Sophia ducissa de Scala sor na"[135].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Id May" of "Sophia com de Scalach sor fundatoris S Crucis"[136].  The necrology of Michaelbeuern records the death "VI Non May" of "Sophia ducissa"[137]m firstly (after [1106]) as his third wife, HEINRICH II Duke of Carinthia, son of MARKWART IV Graf von der Kärtner Mark [Eppenstein] & his wife Liutbirg --- [Wilhelme] (-4 Dec 1122).  m secondly (1128) SIEGHARD [XI] Graf von Burghausen und Schala, son of SIEGHARD [X] Graf von Tengling [Sieghardinger] & his wife Ida von Süpplingenburg (-19 Apr 1142). 

g)         EUPHEMIA (-[1130]).  Wegener quotes the Landbuch von Österreich und Steier [1255] which records that "der marchgrave Liupolt von Osterrich het zwo tochter…den graven Chunrat…gab im der tochter ein, unt gab im zu der tochter Peilstein"[138].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m as his first wife, KONRAD von Tengling, son of FRIEDRICH [II] Graf von Tengling [Sieghardinger] & his wife [Mathilde von Lechsgemünd] (-15/16/17 Mar [1168]).  Graf von Peilstein. 

2.         [JUSTIZIA (-30 Jan ----, bur Thanning)Europäische Stammtafeln[139] suggests that Justizia, wife of Otto II Graf von Wolfratshausen, was the daughter of Ernst Markgraf of Austria [Babenberg] & his first wife.  The basis for this speculation is not known, although the transmission of the name Liutpold (Justizia's son) into the family of the Grafen von Diessen does suggest that a connection is possible.  m OTTO II Graf von Wolfratshausen, son of BERTOLD II Graf von Diessen & his wife --- (-12 Apr [1122]).  Graf von Diessen before 1107.] 

3.         [daughter .  Wegener suggests that Graf Hermann married twice, his second wife being the daughter of Ernst I Markgraf of Austria in order to explain the transmission of the names Ernst and Adalbert to his two younger sons[140]m [as his second wife,] HERMANN [I] Graf von Poigen, son of [GEBHARD [I] Graf von Sulzbach & his first wife ---] .]

 

 

LIUTPOLD von Babenberg, son of LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria & his wife Ida [von Ratelberg] ([1080/86]-15 Nov 1136, bur Stift Klosterneuburg).  The Auctarium Vindobonense records in 1096 that "Liutpoldus successit dictus pius, sextus marchio" but does not specify his relationship with his predecessor[141].  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records that "Liupoldus marchio Austrie accinctus est gladio" in 1104[142], an event recorded in 1099 in the Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium[143].  It is assumed that this knighting ceremony was performed around the age of 18, which means that Liutpold was born in the range [1080/86].  This appears corroborated by the same ceremony being recorded for Liutpold's oldest son Adalbert in 1125 (see below).  He succeeded his father in 1095 as LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria.  He founded the Cistercian monastery of Heiligenkreuz in 1133.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death "1136 XVII Kal Dec" of "Liupoldus marchio Austriæ"[144].  The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "XVII Kal Dec" of "Liupoldus marchio"[145].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XVII Kal Dec 1136" of "Liupoldus marchio fundator huius templi"[146].  He was killed while hunting.  Canonised 2 Feb 1485[147]

m firstly --- von Perg, daughter of WALCHUN von Perg & his wife --- (-before 1105).  This first marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[148], but the primary source on which it is based has not yet been identified. 

m secondly ([early] 1106) AGNES of Germany, widow of FRIEDRICH von Staufen Duke of Swabia, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH IV & his first wife Berthe de Savoie ([Summer 1072/early 1073]-28 Sep 1143, bur Klosterneuburg).  The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the marriage of "filiam unicam" of King Heinrich IV and "Fridericus dux Suevorum", naming her Agnes in a later passage[149].  In a subsequent passage, the Gesta records the second marriage of Agnes to "Leopaldo Orientali marchioni"[150].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the marriage of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that the couple had seven children who died in infancy and eleven who survived into adulthood, six sons and five daughters[151].  The marriage presumably took place early in the year if it is correct, as stated by Haverkamp, that it was arranged by Agnes's brother, the future Emperor Heinrich V, to obtain her future husband's support for his rebellion against their father[152].  The Auctarium Mellicense records that Agnes, wife of "Leopoldus marchio", gave birth to 18 children[153].  The Annales Magdeburgenses record the death in 1143 of "Agnes marchionissa mater Cuonradi regis"[154].  The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa"[155].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa fundatrix h e"[156]

Markgraf Leopold III & his [first/second] wife had one child:

1.         ADALBERT ([1107]-8/9 Nov [1138], bur Klosterneuburg).  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[157], Adalbert was Markgraf Leopold's son by his first marriage, although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  On the other hand, the Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Adalbertus primogenitus", implies (although does not specifically state) that he was the son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifies that he was "advocatus Niwenburgensis ecclesiæ" and was buried "in claustro Niwenburgensi" with his parents[158].  Markgraf 1119.  The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that "Adelbertus filius Leupoldi marchionis Austrie accingitur gladio cum 120 consertiis" in 1125[159].  Assuming, as postulated above in the case of his father, that this knighting ceremony took place around the age of eighteen, this would place Adalbert's birth date in [1107], after his father's second marriage.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1136 of "Adelbertus filius pii marchionis", recorded in the same paragraph after the death of his father but also after the statement that his brother Leopold succeeded their father[160], which confuses the conclusion about the order in which the three of them died.  The necrology of Melk records the death "VI Id Nov" of "Adalbert fil Liutpaldi marchionis"[161].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Id Nov" of "Albertus marchio fil fundator S Crucis" and his burial "in Neuenbuerch"[162].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "V Id Nov" of "Adelbertus Liupoldi marchionis fil advocatus"[163]m firstly ([1128/29]) ADELHEID, daughter of --- (-before 1132).  An undated charter confirms, among many donations, the earlier donation by "Adelbertus marchionis Lopoldi filius" of property "villa…Adelrichestorf" to Kloster Neuburg for the soul of "uxoris sue Adelhait"[164]m secondly (before 1132) HEDWIG of Hungary, daughter of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev.  The Chronicle of Otto of Freising refers to the wife of "Alberto Leopaldo marchionis filio" as sister of King Bela but does not name her[165].  She is named Hedwig in Europäische Stammtafeln[166], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. 

Markgraf Leopold & his second wife had eighteen children:

2.         LEOPOLD (-Niederalteich 18 Oct 1141, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Liupoldus" as third son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that he was made Duke of Bavaria and was buried "apud Sanctam Crucem"[167].  The Continuatio states that Leopold was younger than his brother Heinrich, although if this is correct it is unclear why Leopold not Heinrich should have succeeded first as Markgraf.  He succeeded his grandfather in 1136 as LEOPOLD IV Markgraf of Austria.  His uterine half-brother Konrad III King of Germany invested him as LEOPOLD Duke of Bavaria in 1139 after depriving Heinrich "der Stolze" [Welf] of the duchy.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis for 1142 records the death of "Liupoldus dux et marchio filius Liupoldi marchionis", specifying that his brother Heinrich succeeded him[168].  The Auctarium Sancrucense specify that he was the founder of "Sancte Crucis" and that he was buried there[169].  The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Liupoldus dux"[170].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Leupoldus dux Bawarie et marchio Austrie fil fundatoris S Crucis" and his burial "in S Cruce"[171].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Liupoldus Liupoldi marchionis fil, dux Bowarie" and his donation[172].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XV Kal Nov 1141" of "dux et marchio Leopaldus…quintus fil s Leopoldi fundatoris" and his burial "in capitulo montii no"[173]m (Sep 1138) as her first husband, MARIA of Bohemia, daughter of SOBĚSLAV I UDALRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Adelaida of Hungary.  The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records the marriage in 1138 of "dux Sobezlaus filiam suam Mariam" with "filio Leupoldi orientalis marchionis" specifying that it was celebrated in "Moravia in Olomucensi parte"[174].  The primary source which names her husband has not yet been identified.  However, it appears that Leopold is the only son to whom the text can refer.  She married secondly Hermann III Markgraf von Baden and Verona.  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. 

3.         HEINRICH (-13 Jan 1177, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Heinricus" as second son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[175].  The Continuatio states that Heinrich was older than his brother Leopold, although if this is correct it is unclear why Leopold not Heinrich should have succeeded first as Markgraf.  He succeeded his brother in 1141 as HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Markgraf of Austria

-        see below.

4.         BERTA (-9 Apr [1150], bur St Emmeran).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Perhta" first daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Heinricus purcravius Ratisponensis"[176].  The Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ record the marriage of "purcravius" and "sororem ducis Heinrici [de Austria]"[177].  "Ratisbonensis Comes Heinricus et uxor eius Pertha" donated property to St Nikolas by charter dated to [1145][178].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "V Id Apr" of "Berhta filia Liupoldi marchionis Austrie"[179].  The necrology of the Obermünster, Regensburg records the death "V Id Apr" of "Berhta com"[180].  The necrology of Admunt records the death "V Id Apr" of "Berhta com"[181]m HEINRICH [III] Burggraf von Regensburg, son of OTTO [I] Burggraf von Regensburg & his wife Adelheid von Plötzkau (-27 Nov [1174], bur St Emmeran).

5.         AGNES ([1108/1113]-Altenburg/Thür 24/25 Jan or 26 Sep [1160/63], bur Kloster Pforte/Saale).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Agnes" as second daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Poleslaus dux de Polan"[182], although there appears to be no "Bolesław" at the time to whom this could refer.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as "Leopoldis marchio et Henricus…sororem germanam" and wife of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia"[183].  Her origin is further confirmed by a charter dated Jan 1150 in which Cardinal-deacon Guido informs Konrad III King of Germany of the steps he took against "ducis Poloniæ et coniugis eius sororis vestræ…ducis W"[184].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Agnes ducissa Polonie filia marchionis"[185].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Kal Oct" of "Agnes ux Wlaslai ducis Zlezorum filia fundatoris S Crucis"[186]m ([1120/25]) WŁADYSŁAW of Poland, son of BOLESŁAW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his first wife Zbislava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev (1105-30 May 1159).  He succeeded in 1138 as WŁADYSŁAW II "Wygnaniec/the Exile" Prince of Krakow and Silesia

6.         OTTO (1112-Morimond 22 Sep 1158, bur Morimond).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Otto" as fifth son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[187].  Provost at Klosterneuburg in [1126].  He studied in France under Hugues de Saint-Victor.  In 1133, he became a monk with the Cistercian Order at Morimond, diocese of Langres.  Abbot of Morimond.  He was elected Bishop of Freising in 1138.  He took part in the Second Crusade in 1147.  He wrote the work of historical theology Chronica sive Historia de duabus civitatibus between 1143 and 1146.  Between 1157 and 1158, he wrote the first two books of the Gesta Friderici, dealing with the history of the kings of Germany since Heinrich IV[188].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1158 of "Otto Frisingensis episcopus, Liupoldi pii marchionis filius"[189].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "X Kal Sep" of "Otto Liupoldi marchionis Austrie fil, Frisingensis eps"[190]

7.         KONRAD (1116-Admont 28 Sep 1168, bur Admont).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Chunradus" as sixth son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[191].  The Annales Mellicenses record the installation in 1164 of "Pataviensis episcopus Chunradus, frater Chunradi imperatoris" as Archbishop of Salzburg and his death in 1168[192].  Canon at Köln cathedral 1139.  Provost at Utrecht cathedral 1142, at Hildesheim cathedral 1143.  Bishop of Passau 1148-1164.  Archbishop of Salzburg and Primate of Germany 1164.  The necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Chonradus Iuuauensis archiep patruus Friderici imperatoris"[193].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Kal Oct 1168" of "Chunradus Liupoldi marchionis fil, Saltzburgensis archieps"[194]

8.         ELISABETH (-20 May 1143).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Elisabeth" as fourth daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Hermannus…lancravius de Saxonia"[195].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIII Kal Jun" of "Elizabet filia marchionis"[196]m (1142) as his first wife, HERMANN [II] Graf von Winzenburg, son of HERMANN [I] Graf von Windberg, Ratelberg und Winzenburg, Markgraf von Sachsen [Formbach] & his second wife Hedwig --- (-murdered Winzenburg 29 Jan 1152). 

9.         JUDITH (-after 1178).  The wife of Marchese Guglielmo is recorded by William of Tyre as sister of Konrad III King of Germany[197].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Iuta" as fifth daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "marchio de monte Phetran Regengerus"[198], although this appears chronologically impossible and should presumably refer to Marchese Guglielmo.  The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis refers to the wife of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" as "sororem domini Conradi regis Romanorum et domini Frederici ducis Suevorum"[199].  "Guilelmus marchio filius quondam Rainerii…marchionis et Julita jugalis filia quondam marchionis Leopoldi de Austria" donated property to the monastery of Grassano by charter dated [15/16] Mar 1156[200]m (before 28 Mar 1133) GUGLIELMO di Monferrato, son of RANIERI III Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Gisèle de Bourgogne-Comté (1110-1191).  He succeeded his father in [1137] as GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato

10.      ERNST ([1118]-23 Jan 1137, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Ensto" as fourth son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that he was buried "apud Sancto Crucem"[201].  His description as "fourth son" is inconsistent with his estimated birth date, calculated from the age specified in the entry for his death in the necrology of Heiligenkreuz (see below), which is consistent with his being described as "adolescent" when he died.  The necrology of Melk records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Ernust fil Liupaldi marchionis"[202].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Ernestus marchio fil fundatoris S Crucis"[203].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Ernestus fil marchionis Austrie Liupoldi"[204].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "X Kal Feb 1137" of "adolescens Ernestus s Leopoldi fundatoris fil quarto genitus 18 annos vixit" and his burial "in capitulo no"[205]

11.      GERTRUD (1120-4 Aug 1150).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Gerdrudis" as third daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Lazlau duci Boemiæ"[206].  She founded Kloster Doxan in 1143[207].  The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ records the death in 1150 of "Gertrudis ducissa Boemiæ"[208].  The Annales Palidenses record the death in 1150 of "Agnes soror Conradi regis uxor Bohemia ducis"[209], "Agnes" being an error for "Gertrud".  The necrology of Windberg records the death "Non Aug" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Boemie"[210].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "Non Aug" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Boemie"[211]m (1140) as his first wife, VLADISLAV II Duke of Bohemia, son of VLADISLAV I Duke of Bohemia & his wife Richinza [Richsa] von Berg (-18 Jan 1174, bur Strahow).  He was crowned King of Bohemia at Regensburg 18 Jan 1158. 

12.      [UTA (-22 Nov before 1170, bur Stift Göttweig).  Wegener states that Uta, wife of Graf Liutold [I], was the daughter of Leopold III Markgraf of Austria, basing this on the transmission of the names Liutpold and Berta into the family of the Grafen von Plain.  It is, however, inconsistent with the Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis stating that Markgraf Leopold and his second wife had five daughters[212]m [as his second wife,] LIUTOLD Graf von Plain, son of WERIGAND Graf von Plain & his wife --- (-22/23 Jan 1164).  The Salzburg Annals record the death in 1164 of "Liutoldus de Plein comes"[213].] 

13.      [7 children died young.  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis specifies that Markgraf Leopold & his second wife had seven children who died in infancy[214].  Considering the number of children attributed to Agnes by her first husband, it is unlikely that this number can be correct as it would mean that she had approaching thirty children altogether.]

 

 

 

B.      DUKES of AUSTRIA 1156-1246 (BABENBERG)

 

 

HEINRICH von Babenberg, son of LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria & his second wife Agnes of Germany [Staufen] (-Vienna 13 Jan 1177, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Heinricus" as second son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[215].  The Continuatio states that Heinrich was older than his brother Leopold, although if this is correct it is unclear why Leopold not Heinrich should have succeeded first as Markgraf.  "…Heinricus marchionis Luibaldi filius…" witnessed the charter dated 1132, after 13 Sep, under which Adalbert Archbishop of Mainz donated property "in pago…Weitereibia…in comitatu Sigefridi comitis de Nuringes" to Mainz cathedral[216].  He was appointed HEINRICH Pfalzgraf von Lothringen in 1140 to replace Otto von Salm Graf von Reineck.  He resigned as Pfalzgraf in 1141 when he succeeded his brother in 1141 as HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Markgraf of Austria.   His uterine half-brother Konrad III King of Germany installed him as HEINRICH XI Duke of Bavaria in 1143, after retaining the duchy in his own hands for more than a year after Heinrich's death[217].  After Duke Heinrich's first wife died, the Welf family renewed its claim to the duchy of Bavaria.  Markgraf Heinrich was a candidate for the imperial throne in 1152.  He founded Schottenkloster at Vienna in 1155:  the Auctarium Sancrucense specify that he was the founder of "Scotorum"[218].  He was deprived of Bavaria in 1156 by Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, who granted the duchy to the Welf Duke Heinrich "der Löwe" in order to settle the German kings' longstanding dispute with the Welf family[219].  By way of compensation, Heinrich II was invested, jointly with his wife, at Regensburg 8 Sep 1156 with the march of Austria which was elevated to the status of duchy, Heinrich thereby becoming Duke of Austria[220].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1177 in Vienna of "Heinricus dux Austriæ" and his burial "in monasterio Scotorum"[221].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "Id Jan" of "Heinricus dux Austrie"[222].  The necrology of Seccovi records the death "Id Jan" of "Hainricus dux Austrie"[223].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "Id Jan 1177" of "Henricus dux Austriæ fil fundatoris"[224].  He died after falling from his horse. 

m firstly (1 May 1142) as her second husband, GERTRUD von Süpplingenburg, widow of HEINRICH X "der Stolze" Duke of Saxony and Bavaria [Welf], daughter of Emperor LOTHAR III King of Germany, Graf von Süpplingenburg & his wife Richenza von Northeim (18 Apr 1115-18 or 20 Apr 1143, bur Klosterneuburg).  The Annalista Saxo names "filiam suam [=Lothar] Gertrudem", when recording her marriage in 1127 to "Bawaie duci Heinrico, ducis Heinrici et Wulfilde Magni ducis filio"[225].  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1142 of "Marchio Heinricus " and "Gerdrudam, filiam Lotharii imperatoris"[226].  This marriage was agreed as part of the temporary settlement of the dispute between Konrad III King of Germany and the Welf family agreed in 1142[227].  The necrology of Melk records the death "XII Kal May" of "Gerdrut ducissa"[228].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XII Kal May" of "Gerdrudis ducisse Heinrici ducis Austrie ux"[229].  She died in childbirth. 

m secondly (betrothed early 1148, [Sep] 1148) THEODORA Komnene, daughter of ANDRONIKOS Komnenos, sébastocrator & his wife Eirene [Aineiadissa] (-2 Jan 1184, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).  Niketas Choniates names "Alexius, Andronicus et…Isaacius" as the three brothers of Emperor Manuel, stating that Andronikos left daughters "Mariam, Theodoram et Eudociam"[230].  The Annales Mellicenses in 1149 record the marriage of "dux Heinricus, filius Liupaldi marchionis" and "filiam…fratris regis Grecorum Theodora"[231].  It is likely that Theodora, daughter of Andronikos, married Markgraf Heinrich as Andronikos's brother Isaakios is recorded with a daughter named Theodora and his brother Alexios is only recorded as having one child.  The marriage was arranged by Konrad III King of Germany, her husband's half-brother, while he was staying with Emperor Manuel I recuperating from ill-health.  The marriage took place during a second visit after King Konrad had left Palestine and was on his way home to Germany[232].  She was invested jointly with her husband with the march of Austria in 1156[233].  She adopted the name GERTRUD in Austria.  The Annales Mellicenses in 1185 record the death of "Theodora que et Gerdrudis ducissa"[234].  The Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera records the death "1184 IV Non Ian" of "Theodora ducissa Austrie"[235].  The necrology of Seccovi records the death "IV Non Jan" of "Theodora ducissa Austrie"[236].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Non Jan" of "Theodora ux Heinrici ducis"[237]

Duke Heinrich & his first wife had one child:

1.         RICHARDIS (1143 before 18 Apr-24/25 Feb 1200, bur Klosterneuburg, later transferred to Heiligenkreuz).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Wegener refers to a source dated [1185] which names "Rickardis" as wife of "Heinricus comes provincialis" but does not give her origin[238].  The necrology of Vorau records the death "VI Kal Mar" of "Rickardis lantgravia"[239].  The necrology of Salzburg Cathedral records the death "V Kal Mar" of "Reichgardis lantgravia"[240]m HEINRICH [V] Landgraf von Stefling, son of OTTO [II] Burggraf von Regensburg, Landgraf von Stefling & his wife Adelheid von Wittelsbach (-1 May, after 1190). 

Duke Heinrich & his second wife had three children:

2.         AGNES ([1154]-13 Jan 1182, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).  A manuscript Genealogia marchionum Austrie, written [1181/92], names "Liupoldum et Hainricum filios et filiam Agnetem" as the children of "Hainricus dux ex coniuge Theodora Greca", adding that Agnes married firstly "Stephano regi Ungarorum" and secondly "Herimanno duci Karinthie"[241].  The Continuatio Admuntensis for 1166 records the marriage of "filia Heinrici ducis Austria" and "Stephano regi Ungariæ"[242].  She returned to Vienna with her father, who arrived at the Hungarian court at Esztergom, en route to Palestine, the day after her first husband died[243].  "Domine Agnetis ducisse…cum filio suo Wdalrico adhuc infantulo" donated property to Kloster St Paul, as planned by "mariti sui domini…Hermanni", by charter dated Dec 1181[244]m firstly (1168) ISTVÁN III King of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1147-murdered 4 Mar 1172).  m secondly (after 1172) HERMANN II Duke of Carinthia, son of ULRICH I Duke of Carinthia & his wife Judith von Baden (-4 Oct 1181).

3.         LEOPOLD (1157-Graz 31 Dec 1194, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the birth in 1157 of "Heinrico duci Austriæ filius…Liupoldus"[245].  The Annales Mellicenses name "Liupoldus et frater eius Heinricus, filii ducis Heinrici de Austria", recording that they "gladium acceperunt" in 1174[246].  He succeeded his father in 1177 as LEOPOLD V Duke of Austria

-        see below

4.         HEINRICH "der Ältere" (1158-31 Aug 1223, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the birth in 1158 of "Heinricus frater Liupoldi…filius Heinrici ducis Austriæ"[247].  The Annales Mellicenses name "Liupoldus et frater eius Heinricus, filii ducis Heinrici de Austria", recording that they "gladium acceperunt" in 1174[248].  Herzog von Mödling.  Vogt of St Emmeran 1179/1182.  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "II Kal Sep 1223" of "Heinricus…tertius dux Medlicensis nepos s Leopoldi" and his burial "in capitulo montii no"[249]m (Eger 1179) RICHZA of Bohemia, daughter of WLADISLAW II King of Bohemia & his second wife Jutta of Thuringia (-19 Apr 1182, bur Klosterneuburg).  The Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera in 1177 records the marriage of "Heinricus frater [Liupoldus]" and "Richzam filiam Wazlay regis Boemorum", and the death in 1182 of "Richza, uxor Heinrici ducis"[250].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "VII Id Jan" of "Reiza regis Boemiæ filia, Henrici tertii ducis Mellicensis ux" and her burial with her husband "in capitulo no"[251].  The necrology of St Andreas records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Richza ducissa"[252].  The Auctarium Sancrucense records that "Reiza uxore sua [=Heinricus dux de Medlico]" was buried in "Sancte Crucis" with her husband[253].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Reihtza filia regis Boemie" and her donation of "Roreinwisen"[254].  Duke Heinrich & his wife had one child: 

a)         HEINRICH "der Jüngere" (-[22 May] 1236, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Herzog von Mödling. 

 

 

LEOPOLD von Babenberg, son of HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Duke of Austria & his second wife Theodora Komnene (1157-Graz 31 Dec 1194, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the birth in 1157 of "Heinrico duci Austriæ filius…Liupoldus"[255].  The Annales Mellicenses name "Liupoldus et frater eius Heinricus, filii ducis Heinrici de Austria", recording that they "gladium acceperunt" in 1174[256].  He succeeded his father in 1177 as LEOPOLD V Duke of Austria.  He arrived in Palestine from Venice in early spring 1191, and tried to assume leadership of the German army after the death of Friedrich Duke of Swabia [Hohenstaufen][257].  He left for home a few days after the final capitulation of Acre 12 Jul 1191, after a dispute with Richard I King of England about the assignment of quarters in the town[258].  He was created Duke of Styria (Steiermark) 24 May 1192 at Worms.  The Annales Mellicenses in 1195 record the death "II Kal Ian" of "Liupoldus dux Austriæ et Stiriæ apud Graeze"[259].  He died from injuries received when he fell from his horse during a tournament[260].  The Auctarium Sancrucense specify that he was buried in "Sancte Crucis"[261]

m (12 May 1174) ILONA of Hungary, daughter of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev ([1158]-25 May 1199).  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1174 of "Helenam sororem regis Avarorum" and "Liupoldus…de Austria"[262].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "dux Austrie Leopoldus" as "sorore regis Bele Hungarie"[263].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1199 of "Helena ducissa Austrie"[264].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Jan" of "Helena ducissa Austrie"[265], although this date is inconsistent with other records. 

Duke Leopold V & his wife had [four] children: 

1.         FRIEDRICH (-Palestine on crusade 16 Apr 1198, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis name "Fridericus et Leupoldus" as sons of "Leopoldus dux"[266].  He succeeded his father in 1195 as FRIEDRICH I "der Katholische" Duke of Austria.  The Continuatio Admuntensis for 1197 records the death "in peregrinatione sancte crucis" of "Fridericus dux Austrie"[267].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XVI Kal 1198" of "Fridericus…primus pronepos s Leopoldi fundatoris" and his burial "in capitulo no"[268]Betrothed (Feb 1194) to ELEONORE de Bretagne, daughter of GEOFFROY of England Duke of Brittany & his wife Constance Dss of Brittany (1184-Corfe Castle, Dorset or Bristol 10 Aug 1241, bur Bristol, St James, transferred to Amesbury convent).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Arturum iuvenum et filiam unam Alienordem" as children of "Gaufridus dux Britannie comes Richemontis filius Henrici regis Anglie natu tertius" & his wife[269].  She is named as daughter of "Galfridi comitis Britanniæ" by Matthew of Paris[270].  The primary source which confirms her betrothal has not yet been identified.  This betrothal was agreed as part of the terms for the release of Richard I King of England from the custody of Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in Feb 1194, together with that of Friedrich's younger brother to the daughter of Isaakios Dukas Komnenos ex-Emperor of Cyprus[271].  The two brides left for Vienna from Normandy in Dec 1194 in the charge of Baudouin de Béthune, but turned back when they learnt of the death of Leopold V Duke of Austria[272]

2.         LEOPOLD ([1176/77]-San Germano 28 Jul 1230, bur Lilienfeld).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis name "Fridericus et Leupoldus" sons of "Leopoldus dux"[273].  He succeeded his father in 1195 as Duke of Styria[274], and his brother in 1198 as LEOPOLD VI "der Glorreiche" Duke of Austria

-        see below.   

3.         AGNES (-4 Aug ----).  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "II Non Aug" of "Agnes filia ducis Liupoldi"[275].  It is assumed that this refers to a daughter of Duke Leopold V as the death of Agnes, daughter of Duke Leopold VI is recorded in the same document under 29 Aug. 

4.         [BERTA (-5 Mar ----).  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "III Non Mar" of "Perhta filia Liupoldi ducis"[276].  It is not certain that Berta was the daughter of Duke Leopold V.  However, this appears probable as the children of Duke Leopold VI are better documented in the sources and so are less likely to have been overlooked.] 

 

 

LEOPOLD von Babenberg, son of LEOPOLD V Duke of Austria & his wife Ilona of Hungary ([1176/77]-San Germano 28 Jul 1230, bur Lilienfeld).  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis name "Fridericus et Leupoldus" sons of "Leopoldus dux"[277].  He succeeded his father in 1195 as Duke of Styria, and his brother in 1198 as LEOPOLD VI "der Glorreiche" Duke of Austria.  He set sail from Split for Palestine on crusade in Sep 1217 and landed at Acre sixteen days later.  He helped with the reconstruction of Caesarea, and the siege of Damietta in Egypt 1218/19[278].  The Continuatio Admuntensis records the death "1230 V Kal Aug" of "Liupoldus secundus dux Austrie Stirieque"[279].  The necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert records the death "V Kal Aug" of "Liupoldus dux Austrie et Stirie"[280].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "V Kal Aug 1230" of "Liupoldus dux Austrie et Stirie"[281]

Betrothed (Feb 1194) to --- "la Damsel de Chypre", daughter of ISAAKIOS Dukas Komnenos ex-Emperor [of Cyprus] & his first wife --- of Armenia ([1177/78]-after 1204).  Her name is not recorded.  Rüdt-Collenberg[282] speculates that she was "Beatrice domicella" who received a substantial bequest under the will of Joan of England, dowager Queen of Sicily, Ctss de Toulouse, with whom "la Damsel de Chypre" spent many years.  This betrothal was agreed as part of the terms for the release of Richard I King of England from the custody of Emperor Heinrich VI King of Germany in Feb 1194, along with that of his older brother to Eléonore de Bretagne, the object being that Leopold should subsequently found a new dynasty of Kings of Cyprus with the heir to the island[283].  The two brides left for Vienna from Normandy in Dec 1194 in the charge of Baudouin de Béthune, but turned back when they learnt of the death of Leopold V Duke of Austria[284]

m (Vienna 1203) THEODORA, daughter of --- & his wife --- Angelos of Byzantium ([1180/85]-Kahlenberg 21 or 23 Jun 1246, bur Klosterneuburg).  Theodora is shown as the possible daughter of Ioannes Angelos in Europäische Stammtafeln[285].  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1203 of "Liupoldus dux Austriæ et Styriæ" and "Theodoram filiam regis Grecorum"[286].  The Continuatio Admuntensis is more specific, stating that she was "Constantinopolitani imperatoris ex filia neptem", and specifying that her marriage was celebrated in Vienna[287].  She became a nun at Kahlenberg.  The necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert records the death "II Kal Jun" of "Theodora ducissa Austrie et Styrie"[288].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "XI Kal Jul" of "Theodora ducissa ux fundatoris ni Leupoldi"[289].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IX Kal Jul" of "Theodora ducissa Austrie et Stirie sor na"[290]

Duke Leopold VI & his wife had seven children: 

1.         MARGARETA (-Burg Krumau am Kamp 2 or 29 Oct 1267, bur Lilienfeld).  The Annales Mellicenses in 1226 record the marriage of "Margaretam filiam Liupoldi ducis Austrie" and "Heinricus filius imperatoris Friderici"[291].  The Notæ Sancti Emeranni record the marriage in 1225 at Nürnberg of "Heinricus rex" and "Constantiam filiam Liupoldi ducis Austrie"[292].  She was crowned Queen of Germany 28 Mar 1227 at Aachen.  She lived in a Dominican convent at Trier after the death of her first husband[293].  The Continuatio Garstensis records the second marriage "apud Heimburch" of "Margaretam viduam regis Heinrici, filiam ducis Leupoldi" and "Otakarus marchio Moravie"[294].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ records the marriage "in Henburk III Id Feb 1252" of "Prziemysl filius regis Wenceslai" and "Margaretham viduam filiam Leupoldi ducis Austriæ"[295].  The Chronicon Francisci records the marriage in 1252 of "Ottakarus Rex Boemiæ" and "Margaretham, quondam Romanorum Regina"[296].  The Altahenses Annales record that "Otaker rex" repudiated his first wife "sine iudicio ecclesie"[297].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ records that "regina Margareta" left Bohemia for Austria "XV Kal Nov 1261"[298].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "IV Kal Nov" of "Margareta quondam regina Romanorum filia ducis Leupoldi" and her burial next to her father "in Campo Liliorum"[299].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Kal Nov" of "Margareta filia ducis Liupoldi regina Romanorum ducissa Austrie et Stirie"[300]m firstly (Nürnberg 29 Nov 1225) HEINRICH VII King of Germany, son of Emperor FRIEDRICH II [Hohenstaufen] & his first wife Infanta doña Constanza de Aragón (1211-near Martorano [12] Feb 1242, bur Cosenza).  m secondly (Hainburg 11 Feb 1252, dispensation 5 Jul 1253, repudiated 1261) OTAKAR PŘEMYSL II King of Bohemia, son of WENZEL I King of Bohemia & his wife Kunigunde von Hohenstaufen (1233-killed in battle Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278, bur Znaim Minoriten).  He succeeded in 1251 as OTAKAR Duke of Austria.  He lost Austria in 1276 to Rudolf Graf von Habsburg. 

2.         AGNES (1206-29 Aug 1226).  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1222 of "filiam Liupoldi ducia Austrie et Stirie, Agnetem" and "Albertus dux Saxonie"[301].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis specifies that the marriage was celebrated in Vienna[302].  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "IV Kal Sep" of "Agnes filia ducis Leupoldi fundatoris"[303].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Kal Sep" of "Agnes ducissa Saxonia filia Liupoldi ducis Austrie"[304]m (Vienna 1222) as his first wife, ALBRECHT I Duke of Saxony, son of BERNHARD I Duke of Saxony, Graf von Aschersleben und von Anhalt & his wife Judyta of Poland (-[27 Sep/7 Nov] 1260, bur Lehnin). 

3.         LEOPOLD (25 Mar 1207-Klosterneuburg 13 Aug 1216, bur Kloster Neuburg).  The Continuatio Admuntensis records the birth "VIII Kal Apr 1207" of "Liupoldo Austriæ Styriæque duci filius eiusdem nomine"[305].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1216 of "Liupoldus dux puer, filius ducis Liupoldi"[306].  The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium specifies that he died "apud Naumburch"[307].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "Id Aug" of "Liupoldus, Liupoldi ducis Austrie fil fr n" and his burial at Kloster Neuburg[308].  He died after falling from a tree[309]

4.         HEINRICH "der Grausame" (1208-3 Jan 1228, bur Klosterneuburg).  The Annales Mellicenses name "Heinricus filius Liupoldi ducis" when recording his marriage[310].  The Continuatio Scotorum in 1227 records the death of "Heinricus iuvenis dux, filius ducis Liupoldi II"[311], the Continuatio Sancrucensis confirming the date as 1228[312].  The Continuatio Zwetlensis names him "Henrici de Medlico" when recording his daughter's marriage with "Henricus marchio de Paden"[313].  The Auctarium Sancrucense records that "Heinricus dux de Medlico" was buried in "Sancte Crucis" with his wife "Reiza"[314].  The necrology of Melk records the death "II Non Jan" of "Hainricus fil Liupoldi ducis"[315].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VI Kal Jan" of "Heinricus Liupoldi ducis Austrie fil"[316], although this date is inconsistent with other records.  m (Nürnberg 20 Nov 1225) as her first husband, AGNES von Thüringen, daughter of HERMANN I Landgraf of Thuringia & his second wife Sophie von Wittelsbach ([1204]-24 Feb before 1244, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Annales Mellicenses in 1226 record the marriage of "Heinricus filius Liupoldi ducis" and "Agnetem filiam langravii de Duringia"[317].  The Cronica Reinhardsbrunnensis names "Agnes" as second daughter of "Hermannus" & his second wife, specifying that she married "ducis Austrie"[318].  She married secondly as his second wife, Albrecht I Duke of Saxony.  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "VI Kal Mar" of "ducissa Richardis sor Ludovici Thuringiæ lantgravii mariti s Elizabethæ, ux Henrici…quinti cognomento Crudelis" and her burial "in capitulo no", specifying that her husband was last of the line and that their child was named Gertrud[319].  Although the other details are correct, the name "Richardis" is a mistake for "Agnes", resulting from confusion with the wife of Heinrich Duke of Mödling, paternal uncle of Duke Heinrich "der Grausame".  Duke Heinrich & his wife had one child: 

a)         GERTRUD ([1228]-24 Apr 1288).  Herzogin von Mödling.  She succeeded her uncle in 1246 as GERTRUD Titular Dss of Austria and Styria, although the duchies had escheated to the emperor after her uncle's death and came under direct imperial administration[320].  The Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ records that "Wladislao filio regis Bohemiæ" married "filia…Henrici quondam ducis Austriæ" in 1246[321].  The Annales Mellicenses in 1246 record the marriage of "Gerdrudem, filiam ducis Heinrici" and "filius regis Boemorum" and in 1248 her marriage to "Hermannus marchio de Badem"[322].  The Continuatio Garstensis records her third marriage in 1252 with "rex Ruscie", specifying that it was arranged by Béla King of Hungary[323].  The Continuatio Florianensis names her third husband "Romanus rex Russie"[324].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal May" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Austrie filia ducis Henrici et nepta Leupoldi ducis"[325]m firstly (dispensation 8 Dec 1244, 1246 shortly after 15 Jun) VLADISLAV Markgraf of Moravia, son of WENZEL I King of Bohemia & his wife Kunigunde von Hohenstaufen (-3 Jan 1247).  Duke of Austria, in right of his wife, 1246-1247.  Herzog von Troppau.  m secondly (mid 1248) HERMANN VI Markgraf von Baden, son of HERMANN V Markgraf von Baden & his wife Irmgard von der Pfalz (-4 Oct 1250, bur Klosterneuburg).  Duke of Austria, in right of his wife, 1248-1250.  The Annales Mellicenses record the death in 1250 of "Hermannus marchio de Badem"[326].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Non Oct" of "Hermannus dux Austrie et com de Paden"[327]m thirdly (27 Jul 1252, divorced 1253) as his first wife, ROMAN Danilovich Prince of Slonim, son of DANIIL Romanovich Prince [later King] of Galich & his first wife Anna Mstislavna of Novgorod (1230-after 1260).  Duke of Austria, by right of his wife, 1251-1252. 

5.         FRIEDRICH ([1210]-killed in battle an der Leitha 15 Jun 1246, bur Heiligenkreuz).  The Annales Mellicenses names "Fridericus filius Liuopoldi ducis" when recording his marriage[328].  He succeeded his father in 1230 as FRIEDRICH II "der Streitbare" Duke of Austria and Styria.  Lord of Carniola 1232.  His policy of territorial expansion triggered a mass of complaints against him at the imperial diets.  Emperor Friedrich II was forced to act when Wenzel of Bohemia and others expressed reluctance, in light of Duke Friedrich's hostility, to divert troops from domestic protection for an imperial expedition against the Lombards[329].  The emperor imposed an imperial ban on Duke Friedrich in Jun 1236, troops from neighbouring territories intervened to execute the order and the duke was forced to flee Vienna for Neustadt[330].  Duke Friedrich defeated the opposition at Steinfeld, and the emperor was forced to intervene and occupy Vienna where he installed Ecbert Bishop of Bamberg as imperial regent and proclaimed the annexation of Austria and Styria to the empire[331].  This move, unpopular with the original complainants, impelled King Wenzel to negotiate an alliance with Duke Friedrich, in opposition to the emperor, under which Austria transferred territories north of the Danube to Bohemia[332].  The emperor was obliged to lift the ban in 1237[333].  The Auctarium Sancrucense records that "Fredericus dux Austrie et Stirie" was killed in battle "XVI Kal Iul 1246" and buried in "Sancte Crucis"[334].  After the death of Duke Friedrich, Austria escheated to the emperor, although a general uprising against the imperial procurator, Otto von Eberstein, diminished the value of this acquisition[335].  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XVII Kal Jul 1246" of "Fridericus dux Austrie Stirie"[336].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Fridericus secundus cognomento Bellicosus abnepos s Leopoldi fundatoris" and his burial "in capitulo monasterii no", specifying that he was fifth Duke of Austria and last of the line[337]Betrothed (1226, contract broken 1229) to [EVDOKIA] Laskarina, daughter of THEODOROS I Emperor in Nikaia & his first wife Anna Angelina ([1210/12]-[1247/53]).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "dux Austrie" married one of the daughters (mentioned second) of "Lascarum Grecum" and that the fourth daughter married "Anselmus de Kiev, de Pontivo natus"[338].  No other source records that Emperor Theodoros Lascaris had four daughters.  It therefore appears likely that the daughter who was betrothed to the duke of Austria was the same daughter as Eudokia who later married Anseau de Cayeux.  m (1229, divorced 1240) as her first husband, AGNES von Andechs-Merano, daughter of OTTO I Duke of Merano, Comte Palatin de Bourgogne [Andechs] & his first wife Beatrix de Bourgogne-Comté (-[1 Nov 1260/7 Jan 1263], bur Sittich).  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1229 of "Fridericus filius Liuopoldi ducis" and "filiam ducis Meranie"[339].  The Continuatio Garstensis names "Fridericus dux Austrie Agnetem uxorem suam de Merania", when recording the couple's separation[340].  The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that her husband repudiated her in 1244[341].  She married secondly (Papal dispensation 23 Dec 1248) as his first wife, Ulrich III Duke of Carinthia [Sponheim].  Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation for the marriage of “Ulricum natum ducis Corinthie” and “Agnetem neptem patriarchæ Aquilegiensis relictam quondam ducis Austræ”, related “tertio affinitatis gradu”, dated 23 Dec 1248[342]

6.         KONSTANZE (1212-1243, before 5 Jun, bur Altzelle).  The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1235 of "soror ducis Austrie" and "Marchio de Meissen"[343].  She is named "Constanciam" in the Continuatio Admuntensis[344].  The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium specifies that the marriage took place "aput Ringlinse ubi multi principes convenerant"[345]m (1 May 1234) as his first wife, HEINRICH "der Erlauchte" Markgraf von Meissen, son of DIETRICH "der Bedröngte" Markgraf von Meissen und der Niederlausitz [Wettin] & his wife Jutta von Thüringen ([21 May/23 Sep]1218-1288, before 8 Feb, bur Altzelle).  Landgraf of Thuringia and Pfalzgraf von Sachsen 1247.  

7.         GERTRUD (-1241).  The Annales Mellicenses in 1239 record the marriage of "sororem Friderici ducis Austrie ac Stirie" and "Lantgravius Duoringie"[346].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m (Wiener Neustadt Feb 1238) as his second wife, HEINRICH RASPE von Thüringen, son of HERMANN I Pfalzgraf von Sachsen Landgraf of Thuringia & his second wife Sophie von Wittelsbach ([1204]-Wartburg 19 Feb 1247, bur Eisenach St Katharinenkloster).  He succeeded his nephew in 1241 as HEINRICH RASPE IV Landgraf of Thuringia.  Anti-King of Germany 22 May 1246. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    DUKE of AUSTRIA 1251-1276 (PŘEMYSL)

 

 

PŘEMYSL OTAKAR of Bohemia, son of WENZEL I King of Bohemia & his wife Kunigunde von Hohenstaufen (1233-killed in battle Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278, bur Znaim Minoriten).  Associate king of Bohemia 31 Jul 1248-Nov 1249.  Markgraf of Moravia 1251.  OTAKAR Duke of Austria and Steiermark 1251.  He succeeded his father in 1253 as OTAKAR PŘEMYSL II King of Bohemia.  Crowned 1261.  His possession of the duchies of Austria and Styria was legalised in 1262 by Richard of Cornwall King of Germany[347].  King Richard appointed Otakar as protector of the royal domains east of the Rhine 7 Jan 1267[348].  He succeeded in 1269 as OTAKAR Duke of Carinthia.  In 1274, King Otakar ignored demands for the return to imperial jurisdiction of the duchies of Austria, Carinthia and Styria, made in line with the policy of Rudolf I King of Germany which was promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274 and under which all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245 were to be returned to the empire.  In accordance with the procedures established, the duchies were deemed forfeited after a year and a day[349].  King Rudolf declared war on Bohemia, and King Otakar was obliged to abdicate under the temporary peace of 21 Nov 1276, confirmed by treaty 6 May 1277.  Rudolf's position was confirmed definitively after he defeated King Otakar at the battle of Marchfeld near Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4.    DUKES of AUSTRIA 1276-1493 (HABSBURG)

 

 

RUDOLF von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT IV "der Weise" Graf von Habsburg & his wife Heilwig von Kiburg (Burg Limburg, Upper Rhine 1 May 1216-Germersheim near Speyer 15 Jul 1291, bur Speyer Cathedral).  The Ellenhardi Chronicon names "Ruodolfus rex Romanorum" as son of "Alberti comitis in Habichburg…lantgravius Alsatie superioris"[350].  The Chronicon Colmarense records the birth "1218 Kal Mai" of "comes Rudolfus de Habisburch", specifying that he was "de progenie ducis Zeringie"[351].  He succeeded his father in 1240 as Graf von Habsburg, Landgraf von Thurgau, at which time the family’s territories extended from the left bank of the Rhine at Lake Constance to the Vosges.  He was one of the few Swabian noblemen who remained loyal to Konrad IV King of Germany against the papal party and the anti-king Willem II Count of Holland, but defected to the papal side in 1251[352].  Landgraf von Kiburg, after the death of his maternal uncle Graf Hartmann in 1264.  He was elected RUDOLF I King of Germany 1 Oct 1273 at Frankfurt-am-Main, with the support especially of Werner von Eppenstein Archbishop of Mainz and of Friedrich Burggraf von Nürnberg, defeating the rival candidate Přemysl Otakar II King of Bohemia and Duke of Austria.  He was crowned at Aachen 24 Oct 1273.  King Rudolf immediately implemented the policy of return to the empire of all properties unlawfully appropriated since the deposition of Emperor Friedrich II in 1245, promulgated at the Diet of Nürnburg 19 Nov 1274[353].  This included the return of the duchies of Austria and Styria from Přemysl Otakar II King of Bohemia, against whom Rudolf declared war.  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[354].  Rudolf became Duke of Austria and Steiermark (Styria) after King Otakar’s abdication under the temporary peace of 21 Nov 1276, confirmed by treaty 6 May 1277.  Rudolf's position was confirmed definitively after he defeated King Otakar at the battle of Marchfeld near Dürnkrut 26 Aug 1278.  Duke Rudolf abdicated in Austria and Styria in favour of his sons Albrecht I and Rudolf II in Dec 1282.  Negotiations were underway with Pope Gregory X for Rudolf’s coronation as emperor 2 Feb 1276, but these were suspended by the Pope’s death 10 Jan 1276.  The premature deaths of the three succeeding Popes prevented finalisation of the negotiations, although Rudolf renounced all claims over the Romagna 14 Feb 1279 as part of the deal proposed with Pope Nicolas III.  Pope Honorius IV set 2 Feb 1287 for the ceremony but Rudolf postponed the date as he was unable to arrive in Rome in time.  German/Papal rivalry over the extent of the papal powers over the German clergy resulted in further postponements.  King Rudolf died during the papacy of Nicolas IV without the coronation ever having taken place.  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "Id Jul 1290" of "dominus Ruod Romanorum rex"[355].  The Gesta Alberti Regis, ducis Austriæ records that King Rudolf was buried at Speyer[356]

m firstly (1243 or 1245) GERTRUD [Anna] von Hohenberg, daughter of BURCHARD V Graf von Hohenberg [Zollern] & his wife Mechtild von Tübingen ([1230/35]-Vienna 16 Feb 1281, bur Basel Münster).  The Chronicon Colmarense records that "comitissa uxor regis Rudolfi" was "filia comitis Burkardi de Hohenberg"[357].  The Annales Sindelfingenses record that "regina Rudolfi" was "filia sororis comitis Rudolfi de Tuwingen"[358].  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Feb 1271 under which her husband "Rudolfus…de Kiburch et de Hapsburch comes nec non Alsacie Lantgravius" sold property "pro dote nobilis mulieris Gerdrudis uxoris nostre" to Kloster St Märgen auf dem Schwarzwald, with the consent of "fratrum suorum Alberti, Burchardi et Ulrici Comitum de Hohinberg", by charter dated 27 Feb 1271[359].  The Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses name "Anna uxor domini Rudolfi regis de Hapsburg" as sister of "comitem de Heigerloch"[360].  Heiress of Schlettstadt in Alsace.  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[361].  The Ratisponensis Annales record the death in 1281 of "uxor Rudolfi Romanorum regis Anna"[362].  The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record the death in 1281 of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis" in Bohemia and her burial "in Basilea"[363].  The Annales Sindelfingenses record the death "1281 in vigilia Matthiæ" of "regina uxor Rudolfi regis in Wina" and her burial "in Basilea"[364].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIII Kal Mar" of "Anna regina Romanorum consors…Ruodolfi Romanorum regis"[365]

m secondly (Rumarico monte 5 Feb 1284 or Basel [28 May/24 Jun] 1284 or [5 Feb or 6 Mar] 1285) AGNES [Isabelle] de Bourgogne, daughter of HUGUES IV Duke of Burgundy & his second wife Béatrice de Champagne (-after 20 Nov 1294).  The Ellenhardi Chronicon records the marriage in 1284 "in civitate Basilicasi…intra festum Pentecostes et festum Iohannis baptiste" of King Rudolf and "Elisabetam filiam ducis Ottonis senioris Burgundie dicti de Tygun apud Rymilisberg"[366].  The Annales Colmarienses record the marriage "in Rumarico monte in festo sancte Agate" of "rex Ruodolphus" and "uxorem Gallicam" in 1284[367].  She adopted the name AGNES in 1284.  The testament of “Hugo de Burgundia, dominus Montis Regalis” dated 1 Apr 1285 names “filiam meam Beatricem…uxor mea Margarita…Ysabellam Romanorum reginam, B. comitissam Marchie, et Marguaritam dominam Allaii uxorem Johannis de Cabilone militis, sorores meas[368].  Dame de Vieux-Château et d´Aigney-le Duc by grant 20 Nov 1294[369].  According to Du Chesne, Isabelle married “Pierre de Chambly le jeune seigneur de Chambly[370].  This statement is proved incorrect by a document dated May 1321 which records that “Pierre de Chambli seigneur de Neaufle fils de Pierre seigneur de Chambli” had married “Isabeau fille de Jean de Bourgogne fils de Hugues de Vienne et d´Alis de Méranie comtesse palatine de Bourgogne” and that Isabelle “sœur de Henri de Bourgogne fils du susdit Jean” was present when the latter reached agreement with Jeanne Queen of France regarding “le château de Montrond près de Besançon[371]

Mistress (1): ITA, daughter of --- (-before 1287).  Her relationship with King Rudolf is confirmed by the charter dated 1287 under which [her son] “Albertus comes de Lewenstein” donated “jus patronatus ecclesie in Erstetten Spirensis diœceseos” to Kloster Lichtenstern in return for a mass on the anniversary of “matris nostre domine Ite prie memorie[372], read together with the source quoted below which names Albrecht Graf von Löwenstein as King Rudolf´s son. 

King Rudolf & his first wife had eleven children:

1.         MECHTILD (Rheinfelden [1253]-Munich 22 or 23 Dec 1304, bur Fürstenfeld Cistercian Convent).  The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses name "rex Rudolfus filiam suam…Mechthildam" as third wife of Duke Ludwig[373].  This third marriage was arranged to secure Duke Ludwig’s support for her father’s election as King of Germany, with a dowry of 10,000 marks.  The Hermanni Altahenses Annales record that "1302…in vigilia Iohannis baptiste Rudolfus" captured "Mechtildem matrem suam, relictam Ludwici ducis…et Conradum de Oteling" at "castro Schilperg" and took them to Munich where Konrad von Oteling was beheaded "in die sancte Margarete…propter quondam infamiam"[374].  The Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses record the death "1304 X Kal Ian" of "Mechthildis mater Rudolfi et Ludovici" and her burial at Fürstenfeld[375].  The Notæ Diessenses record the death "1305 XI Kal Ian" of "Methildis ducissa Bawaie"[376].  The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "XII Kal Jan" of "domina Mehtildis uxor Ludwici ducis Bawarie"[377]m (Aachen 24 Oct 1273) as his third wife, LUDWIG II Duke of Upper Bavaria and Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, son of OTTO II "dem Erlauchten" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Agnes von Braunschweig (Heidelberg 13 Apr 1229-Heidelberg 1/2 Feb 1294, bur Fürstenfeld).

2.         ALBRECHT (Jul 1255-murdered near Brugg-an-der-Reuß 1 May 1308, bur Wettingen Cistercian convent, removed 1309 to Speyer Cathedral).  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[378].  He succeeded in 1282 as ALBRECHT I joint-Duke of Austria, Steiermark, Carniola (Krain) and the Windische Mark, ruling jointly with his brother Rudolf II.   

-        see below

3.         KATHARINA (1256-Landshut 4 Apr 1282, bur Kloster Seligenthal near Landshut).  The Chonicon Colmariense records the betrothal in 1276 of a daughter of King Rudolf I to "filius ducis Bavariæ" but does not name her[379].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Her marriage was arranged after her future father-in-law swore allegiance to her father in 1276, with a dowry of 40,000 marks.  The support of Lower Bavaria was decisive in Rudolf I’s struggle with Otakar Přemysl II King of Bohemia over Austria.  The alliance broke down shortly after the marriage took place, the dowry being underpaid by 3,000 marks[380].  The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "II Non Apr" of "Katharina filia regis Romanorum"[381]m (Betrothed 1276, Vienna Jan 1279) as his first wife, OTTO von Bayern-Niederbayern, son of HEINRICH I Duke of Lower Bavaria & his wife Elisabeth of Hungary (11 Feb 1261-Landshut 9 Sep 1312, bur Seligenthal).  He succeeded his father in 1290 as OTTO III Joint-Duke of Lower Bavaria.  He emerged as a rival candidate for the throne of Hungary, supported by the Hungarian nobility after the departure of Wenzel of Bohemia, and was elected at Székesfehérvár 6 Dec 1305 as BÉLA V King of Hungary.  He was captured in 1308 by supporters of Charles Robert and released only when he agreed to abandon his claim to Hungary[382].  No surviving issue.

4.         AGNES [Gertrud] ([1257]-Wittenberg 11 Oct 1322, bur Wittenberg Franciscan Monastery, removed 1883 to Wittenberg Schloßkirche).  The Chonicon Colmariense records that one daughter of King Rudolf I married "ducis Saxonie" in 1273[383].  The Cronica Principum Saxonie refers to the wife of "Albertum [filium Alberti dux]" as "filiam Rodolphi regis Romanorum"[384].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  Her marriage was arranged to secure her future father-in-law’s support for her father’s election as King of Germany.  m (Oct 1273) ALBRECHT II Duke of Saxony Burggraf von Magdeburg, son of ALBRECHT I Duke of Saxony [Askanier] & his third wife Helene von Braunschweig (-in battle near Acre, Palestine 25 Aug 1298, bur Wittenberg, Franciscan Monastery, removed 1883 Wittenberg Schloßkirche). 

5.         HEDWIG (-[26 Jan 1285/27 Oct 1286], bur Kloster Lehnin).  Pulcawa's Bohemian Chronicle records the marriage of "Ottoko, filius Ottonis tercii et frater Ottonis longi" and "filiam Rudolphi regis Romanorum"[385].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m (Vienna Feb 1270, confirmed Vienna Dominikanerkirche 1279) OTTO VI "der Kleine" Markgraf von Brandenburg, son of OTTO III Markgraf von Brandenburg [Askanier] & his wife Beatrix [Božena] of Bohemia ([3/17] Nov 1264-Lehnin 6 Jul 1303, bur Kloster Lehnin).  After his wife died, he entered the Order of the Templars, and shortly after became a Cistercian monk at Lehnin.   No issue.

6.         KLEMENTIA von Habsburg ([1262]-end-Aug 1295, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).  The Annales Colmarienses record that "filia regis Ruodolphi" was sent to Lombardy for her marriage to "filio regis Caroli" in 1281[386].  The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "Karolum Marcellum" married "filia imperatoris Rodolphi Clemencia"[387].  Her marriage was planned between her father and Pope Gregory X Oct 1275 to confirm her father’s alliance with Charles I King of Sicily, her future husband’s grandfather.  m (Vienna Jan 1281) CHARLES MARTEL of Sicily, son of CHARLES Principe di Salerno [later CHARLES II King of Sicily] & his wife Maria of Hungary (early Sep 1271-Naples from the plague 12 Aug 1295, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).  He styled himself KAROLY King of Hungary from 20 Mar 1292, but it does not seem that he was ever crowned or indeed ruled in his kingdom. 

7.         HARTMANN von Habsburg (Rheinfelden 1263-between Breisach and Strasbourg 21 Dec 1281, bur Basel Münster).  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[388].  Graf von Kiburg, Landgraf in Alsace.  His father proposed Hartmann as ruler of a newly-formed kingdom of Burgundy at the same time as his betrothal to the King of England's daughter.  He drowned when his ship sank on the Rhine.  The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record that "comes Hartmannus [filius reginæ uxoris Rudolfi Regis]" was drowned "apud Rinougiam" specifying that he was 17 years old and betrothed to "filia regis Anglie"[389].  The Annales Sindelfingenses record that "filius regis Rudolfi" was drowned in the Rhine "in vigilia Thomæ apostoli"[390].  The necrology of Wettingen records the death "XII Kal Jan 1281" of "Hartmannus com de Habsburg in Reno submersus"[391].  The Annales Colmarienses record that "Herimannus filius regis Alemanniæ", betrothed to "filiam regis Anglie", was drowned[392].  The Necrology of Basel records the death "XIII Kal Jan" in 1281 of "Hartmannus filius R. Romanorum regis de Habchsburg" and his burial "in choro huius ecclesie…"[393]Betrothed ([1276]) to KUNIGUNDE of Bohemia, daughter of PŘEMYSL OTAKAR II King of Bohemia & his second wife Kunigunde [Kunguta] Rostislavna of Mačva (Jan 1265-27 Nov 1321).  The Chonicon Colmariense records the betrothal in 1276 of a daughter of the King of Bohemia to "filio regis Ruodolphi"[394].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records that "filia Regis…Chungundis" became a nun "ad sanctum Franciscum" in 1276, but that she was later taken from the monastery by her brother and married to "Duci Mazouiæ", after whose death she became "Abbatissa ad sanctum Georgium in castro Pragensis"[395]Betrothed (1276) to JOAN of England "of Acre", daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Acre, Palestine Spring 1272-Clare Manor, Suffolk 23 Apr 1307, bur 26 Apr 1307 Priory Church of the Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk).  The Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses record that "comes Hartmannus [filius reginæ uxoris Rudolfi Regis]" was betrothed to "filia regis Anglie"[396].  This betrothal was arranged by King Rudolf to exploit Anglo/French rivalry.   Two charters dated 1276 record negotiations for the marriage between “dominus rex Alemaniæ...filium suum Hartmannum” and “filiam regis Angliæ Johannam[397].  A charter dated Dec 1278 records the agreement that the marriage between “R. Romanorum rex...Hartmannum comitem de Habspurg et de Kyburg, Alsatiæ langravium natum suum” and “Johannæ...Edwardi...regis Angliæ...filiæ”, already betrothed, should be celebrated[398].   

8.         RUDOLF (1270-Prague 10 May 1290, bur Prague, transferred 1293 to St Veit’s Cathedral).  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[399].  The Chonicon Colmariense names "Rudolfus puer quinque annorum filius regis Rudolfi" in 1276 when recording that he recovered from fever[400].  He succeeded his father in Dec 1282 as RUDOLF II joint-Duke of Austria, Steiermark, Carniola (Krain) and the Windische Mark, ruling jointly with his brother Albrecht I until removed by the Rheinfeldene Hausordnung of 1 Jun 1283.  His father intended him as his successor as king of Germany, in view of the unpopularity of his older son Albrecht I.  The Annales Colmarienses record the death in 1290 of "dux Alsatiæ Rudolphus, filius regis Rudolphi" and his burial in Prague[401]m (Contract Iglau 1278, Mar 1289) AGNES of Bohemia, daughter of PŘEMYSL OTAKAR II King of Bohemia & his second wife Kunigunde [Kunguta] Rostislavna of Mačva (5 Sep 1269-Prague 17 May 1296, bur Prague, Clarissan convent).  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1278 of "Wencezslaus filius regis Boemiæ" and "filiam Domini Rudolphi Electi" and of "filius Electi filiam Regis Boemiæ"[402].  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ record that "rex Rudolfus…filium suum dominum Hartmudum [error for Rudolfum]" married "sororem regis Bohemie"[403].  The Chronicon Francisci records the death "XVI Kal Jun" in 1296 of "Domina Agnes soror Regis Boemiæ, Ducissa Austriæ, relicta Ducis Rudolphi Romanorum Regis filii" and her burial "in Ecclesia sanctæ Claræ ordinis fratrum minorem apud sanctum Franciscum in Praga"[404].  After her husband died, she lived at Schloß Brugg im Aargau until 1295, thereafter becoming a nun at the Clarissan convent of Prague.  Duke Rudolf II & his wife had one child: 

a)         JOHANN “Parricida” (posthumously 1290-13 Dec 1313, bur Pisa, Monastery of San Niccolò).  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ names "Johannes" as son of "rex Rudolfus…filium suum dominum Hartmudum [error for Rudolfum]" and his wife[405].  The Necrologium Austriacum names "patruele suo duce Iohannis dicto Alant" as the murderer of Albrecht I King of Germany[406].  He considered that his uncle King Albrecht I had deprived him of his right to succeed to the throne of Bohemia, and murdered him in 1308.  He fled first to Speyer from where he was exiled 18 Sep 1309 by Heinrich VII, the new king of Germany.  In early 1312, he sought Heinrich VII’s mercy in Pisa. 

9.         GUTA (13 Mar 1271-Prague 18 Jun 1297, bur Prague, St Veit’s Cathedral).  The Chonicon Colmariense records the betrothal in 1278 of a daughter of King Rudolf I to "regina Bohemiæ…filius"[407].  The Chronicon Francisci records the birth "circa festum beatæ Gerdrudis" in 1271 of "Dominam Gutam Reginam Boemiæ"[408].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1278 of "Wencezslaus filius regis Boemiæ" and "filiam Domini Rudolphi Electi" and of "filius Electi filiam Regis Boemiæ"[409].  It appears that Guta used her good influence to try to improve relations between her husband and her brother Albrecht I.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the death "XIV Kal Jul" in 1297 of "Domina Guta Regina" in childbirth and her burial "in Ecclesia Pragensi circa sepulchrum Regis Ottakari"[410]m (Betrothed Iglau 1278, Eger 24 Jan 1285) as his first wife, WENZEL II King of Bohemia, son of OTAKAR PŘEMYSL II King of Bohemia & his second wife Kunguta [Kunigunde] Rostislavna of Mačva [Rurikid] (17 Sep 1271-21 Jun 1305, bur Prague Königsaal).  King of Poland 1300. 

10.      SAMSON (before 19 Oct 1275-).  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[411].  Samson presumably died young as no other reference to him has yet been found. 

11.      KARL (Rheinfelden 14 Feb 1276-Rheinfelden 16 Aug 1276, bur Basel Münster).  The Annales Basilienses record that "regina regis Rudolfi" gave birth to a son "in Rinfeldia festo Valentini" but that he only lived a short time, in a later passage recording that "Carolus Ruodolphi regis filius natus festo Valentini hoc anno" was buried "in medio chori maioris ecclesiæ Basiliensis"[412]

King Rudolf had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):.

12.       ALBRECHT von Schenkenberg (-1304 before 6 Jul)"Rudolfus… Romanorum Rex" granted "decimas in Heylicprunne" to "Albertum comitem de Loewenstein filium nostrum" by charter dated 23 May 1283[413].  Graf von Löwenstein 1287.  

           -       GRAFEN von LÖWENSTEIN

 

 

ALBRECHT von Habsburg, son of RUDOLF I King of Germany, Duke of Austria & his first wife Gertrud [Anna] von Hohenberg [Zollern] (Jul 1255-murdered near Brugg-an-der-Reuß 1 May 1308, bur Wettingen Cistercian convent, removed 1309 to Speyer Cathedral).  A charter dated 19 Oct 1275 confirmed the consecration of the church of Lausanne, recording as present "Rodulfo Rege Alemaniæ…regina Anna uxor dicti Regis cum liberis eorundem Alberto, Hartmanno, Rodulfo et Samsone cum aliis quatuor filiabus dicti regis"[414].  He was installed as Statthalter in Austria in 1281 by his father, whom he succeeded in Dec 1282 as ALBRECHT I joint-Duke of Austria, Styria, Carniola (Krain) and the Windische Mark, ruling jointly with his brother Rudolf II until the latter was removed by the Rheinfeldene Hausordnung of 1 Jun 1283.  Unpopular in Austria, he repressed the winter 1287/88 uprising in Vienna and the Feb 1292 revolt of Styria.  An unsuccessful candidate to succeed his father as king of Germany in 1292, Albrecht was elected to succeed as ALBRECHT I King of Germany at Mainz 24 Jun 1298 when King Adolf was deposed.  King Adolf refused to accept the ruling and was killed in battle by Albrecht at Göllheim 2 Jul 1298.  Albrecht's election was confirmed at Frankfurt-am-Main 27 Jul 1298.  Crowned at Aachen 24 Aug 1298.  He reversed his predecessor's anti-French policy, confirmed in 1299 by the betrothal of his son Rudolf to the French king's sister[415].  He was murdered by his nephew Johann, who felt himself cheated of his inheritance, on the site where the monastery of Königsfelden was later built by his widow and daughter Agnes[416].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "Kal May 1308 occisus" of "Albertus Romanorum rex conthoralis domine Elizabeth regine"[417]

m (Vienna [20 Dec] 1274) ELISABETH von Görz-Tirol, daughter of MEINHARD IV Graf von Görz und Tirol [later MEINHARD II Duke of Carinthia] & his wife Elisabeth von Bayern (before 1262-Vienna 28 Oct 1313, bur 1316 Königsfelden).  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ record that "rex Rudolfus filio suo domino Alberto duci Austrie" married "filiam Einhardi ducis Karintie"[418].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "V Kal Nov 1313" of "Elizabet Romanorum regina fundatrix nostra in Chungsvelt"[419]

Albrecht I & his wife had twenty one children: 

1.         ANNA ([1275/80]-Breslau 19 Mar 1327, bur Breslau, Kloster St Anna/St Klara).  The Necrologium Austriacum records "Annam ducissam Bratislavie" third in its list of the daughters of King Albrecht & his wife, after "Agnetam reginam Ungarie, Elyzabet ducissam Lotharingie"[420].  This appears improbable assuming that the birth date of her sister Agnes is correct as shown below.  Considering that Anna gave birth to her fourth child by her first marriage in 1302, it is unlikely that she could have been born after 1282.  If this is correct, it is probable that she was her parents' first child.  Pulcawa's Bohemian Chronicle records the marriage of "Hermannus filius Ottonis longi" and "filiam Alberti Regis Romanorum, quondam ducis Austrie"[421].  An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee names "Hermanni et Anne uxoris eius" among donors to the monastery[422].  The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Heinrico" married "filia ducis Austrie, que fuit quondam marchionissa Brandenburgensis"[423].  "Anna…ducissa Slesie dominaque Wratizlauensis et Arneborch" donated property to Kloster Arendsee by charter dated 31 May 1320[424].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "Anna ducissa Preslavie, soror dominarum duci Austrie et Styrie"[425]m firstly (Graz Oct 1295) HERMANN II Markgraf von Brandenburg, son of OTTO V Markgraf von Brandenburg & his wife Judith von Henneberg ([1275/80]-Eldenburg, Priegnitz 1 Jan 1308, bur Kloster Lehnin).  m secondly (1310, dispensation Avignon 28 May 1322) HEINRICH VI Duke of Breslau, son of HEINRICH V "the Fat" Duke of Liegnitz [Piast] & his wife Elźbieta of Poland [Piast] (18 Mar 1294-24 Nov 1335).

2.         AGNES (18 May 1281-Königsfelden 10 Jun 1364, bur Königsfelden).  Her parentage is confirmed by the necrology of Königsfelden which records the death "XIX Kal Feb" of "Andreas rex Ungarie…conthoralis domine Agnetis, Alberti regis Romanorum filia et domine Elizabeth…"[426].  After the death of her husband, she returned to Austria.  She founded Kloster Königsfelden with her mother, in memory of her murdered father, and lived there[427].  The mid-14th century Königsfelden chronicle depicts Agnes as a humble and pious individual.  On the other hand, according to the 16th century Chronicon helveticum of Aegidius Tschudi, she avenged her father's murder by ordering the execution and expulsion of 1000 people (families and followers of his murderers), but it appears this report was to a large extent based on Swiss anti-Habsburg propaganda[428].  It appears that Agnes acted as adviser to her brothers the Dukes of Austria and was politically active, in particular settling a conflict between Duke Albrecht II and the Swiss confederation[429].  The necrology of Feldbach records the death "IV Id Jun" of "Agnes regina Ungario"[430].  The necrology of Wettingen records the death "IV Id 1364" of "Agnes quondam regina Ungarie, fundatrix monasterii in Campo Regis, inclite mater pauperum et religiosorum, celebratur in Künigsfelden"[431]m (Vienna 13 Feb 1296) as his second wife, ANDRÁS III King of Hungary, son of ISTVÁN of Hungary Duke of Slavonia & his second wife Tomasina Morosini (Venice [1265]-Ofen 14 Jan 1301, bur Ofen Minoritenkirche).  No issue. 

3.         RUDOLF ([1282]-Heerlager/Horazdiowitz/Horaždovice an der Otava/Mottawa 4 Jul 1307, bur Prague, St Veit’s Cathedral).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis names "Rudolfum primogenitum…Fridericum…Lupoldum…Henricum, Albertum et Ottonem" as the six sons of "Alberti regis"[432].  He succeeded in 1298 as RUDOLF III Duke of Austria and Styria, on his father’s election as King of Germany.  After Wenzel III King of Bohemia was murdered 1306, Rudolf’s father forced his succession as RUDOLF King of Bohemia, at which time he abdicated as Duke of Austria and Steiermark in favour of his younger brother.  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "V Non Jul 1307" of "Ruodolfus rex Boemie filius regis Alberti"[433].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1307 die s Udalrici" of "Rudolfus rex Bohemie fil regis Alberti" and his burial in Prague[434]m firstly (by treaty Aug 1299, Paris 19 or 29 May 1300) BLANCHE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France & his second wife Marie de Brabant (1278-Vienna 19 Mar 1306, bur Vienna, Minoritenkirche).  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis names "Ludovicum comitem Ebroiciæ civitatis, Margaretamque reginam Angliæ ac Blancham ducissam Austriæ" as the three children of King Philippe III and his second wife, recording in a later passage the marriage of Blanche and "regis Romanorum Alberti filius Radulfus dux Austriæ" in 1299 "apud Parisius"[435]This marriage was arranged to confirm King Albrecht's new alliance with France[436]The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Mar 1306 of "ducissa Austriæ Blancha, regis Franciæ soror ex patre...cum filio suo unico", poisoned[437]The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "domina Blanka" without giving further details to identify her[438].  The necrology of Feldbach records the death "XIV Kal Apr" of "Blanka relicta Ruodolfi quondam regis Boemie"[439], although this implies, wrongly it appears, that her husband predeceased her.  The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIV Kal Apr 1305" of "Blanka filia regis Francie, ducissa Austrie et Styrie"[440].  The necrology of Minoritenkirche, Vienna records the death "XIV Kal 1305" of "Blanka ducissa Austrie filia Philippi regis Francie consors Rudolfi ducis Austrie hic sepulta"[441].  The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Non Mar" of "Planca ducissa Austrie et Stirie"[442], although this date is inconsistent with other sources.  m secondly (shortly after 8 Sep 1306, maybe 6 Oct 1306) as her second husband, RYKSA ELŹBIETA of Poland, widow of WENZEL II King of Bohemia, daughter of PRZEMYSŁ I Prince of Poznan, Kalisch and Gniezien [Piast] & his wife Rikissa of Sweden (1 Sep 1288-Königgrätz 19 Oct 1335, bur Brno, Cistercian Kloster Marienkirche).  The Annales Polonorum record the birth "1288 in die sancti Egidii" of a daughter to "ducissa Polonie nomine Richca, uxor ducis Primislii secundi"[443].  The Chronica principum Polonie names "Elizabet filia ducis Kalisiensis" as the second wife of "Wenczeslai regis Bohemie"[444].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the betrothal in 1300, and the marriage three years later, of King Wenzel and "Elizabeth filia Regis Poloniæ", aged 13[445].  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the marriage of "Albertus Rex Romanorum…Rudolphus filius suus" and "Elizabeth relictam Regis Wencezslai"[446].  She [married] thirdly (1319) [as his second wife,] Heinrich de Lipa.  The Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci) records the relationship in 1319 between "Henricus de Lipa" and "Dominam Elizabeth novercam…Reginæ", adding that they caused much scandal[447].  Duke Rudolf III & his first wife had one child: 

a)         son (-Mar 1306).  The Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis records the death in Mar 1306 of "ducissa Austriæ Blancha, regis Franciæ soror ex patre...cum filio suo unico", poisoned[448]

4.         ELISABETH (-19 May 1353, bur Nancy St Georges, transferred to St Paul im Lavanttal, Königsfelden).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis records that "aliam [filiam]…Alberti regis" married "duci Lotharingie"[449].   She was known as ISABELLE in Lorraine.  Regent of Lorraine 1329-1331 during the minority of her son.  m (contract Saint-Dié 6 Aug 1306, before 18 May 1307) FERRY de Lorraine, son of THIBAUT II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Isabelle de Rumigny (Gondreville 15 Apr 1282-Paris 21 May 1329, bur Abbaye de Beaupré).  He succeeded his father in 1312 as FERRY IV Duke of Lorraine

5.         FRIEDRICH (1289-Gutenstein, Lower Austria 13 Jan 1330, bur Carthusian Mauerbach, near Vienna, transferred 1783/1789 Vienna St Stephan).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis names "Rudolfum primogenitum…Fridericum…Lupoldum…Henricum, Albertum et Ottonem" as the six sons of "Alberti regis"[450].  He succeeded on the abdication of his brother in 1306 as FRIEDRICH I "der Schöne"[451] Duke of Austria & Steiermark.  He unsuccessfully claimed the throne of Bavaria when his brother died in 1307.  Elected FRIEDRICH I King of Germany 19 Oct 1314 at Sachsenhausen, in opposition to Ludwig Duke of Upper Bavaria who was elected in Frankfurt-am-Main.  Crowned 25 Nov 1314 at Bonn by the Archbishop of Köln.  After several years of war with his rival, Friedrich was defeated at Mühldorf 1322.  He was imprisoned at Burg Trausnitz (Oberpfalz) until 1325, when Ludwig finally recognised Friedrich as joint-King.  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "Id Jan 1330" of "Fridericus rex Romanorum regis Alberti filius et regine Elizabeth…"[452].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1330 in octava epiphanye" of "Fridericus Romanorum rex…in Guetenstain", his foundation of Mauerbach and his burial there[453]m (by proxy Barcelona 1313 in person Judenburg Jan 1314/15) Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón, daughter of don JAIME II King of Aragon and Sicily & his second wife Blanche of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] (Barcelona 1300-12 Jul 1330, bur Vienna Minoritenkirche, St Ludwigskapelle).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Doña Maria…la segunda Doña Costança…la tercera…Doña Isabel…la quarta…Doña Blancha…la quinta…Doña Violante" as the five daughters of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Isabel was the wife "del Duch Daustria"[454].  She was known as ELISABETH in Austria.  Crowned Queen of the Romans at Basel in 1315.  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "IV Id Jul 1330" of "domina Elizabeth regina relicta regis Friderici Romanorum regis, filia domini Iacobi regis Arragonie, sepulta in choro Fratrum Minorum in Wienna"[455].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1330 in die S Margarete virginis" of "Elyzabeth filia regis Arroganie ac regis Friderici conthuralis", her blindness during the last six years of her life and her burial in "Wienne in domo frum Minorum[456]Mistresses (1) to (3): ---.  The names of Duke Friedrich's mistresses are not known.  Duke Friedrich & his wife had three children: 

a)         FRIEDRICH (1316-1322, bur Königsfelden).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

b)         ELISABETH (1317-23 Oct 1336, bur Mauerbach, transferred 1783 Vienna St Stephan).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1326 X Kal Nov" of "puella Elyzabeth filia regis Friderici" and her burial at Mauerbach[457]

c)         ANNA (1318-Vienna 14 Dec 1343, bur Vienna, Convent of St Klara).  The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not so far been identified.  Nun at Convent of St Klara Vienna 1340, later Abbess.  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1343 XIX Kal Ian" of "Anna filia Friderici regis Romanorum coma de Goertz", specifying that she entered "ordinem S Clare in Wienna" after the death of her husband, and her burial there[458].  No issue by either marriage.  m firstly ([4 Jul 1326/21 Sep 1328]) HEINRICH III "der Natternberger" Duke of Bavaria in Niederbayern, son of OTTO III Duke of Bavaria in Niederbayern & his second wife Agnes von Glogau [Piast] (Schloß Natternberg 26 Aug 1312-Schloß Natternberg 18 Jun 1333, bur Seligenthal).  m secondly (29 Sep 1336) JOHANN HEINRICH Graf von Görz, son of HEINRICH II Graf von Görz (-Trieste 17 Mar 1338). 

Duke Friedrich had three illegitimate sons by Mistresses (1) to (3):

d)         FRIEDRICH senior.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Priest at Groß-Weikersdorf 1331.

e)         FRIEDRICH junior.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  In Bologna 1333/4.  Priest at Mödling 1334.

f)          OFFMEI (bur Tulln).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Priest at Tulln.  1319/27.

6.         LEOPOLD (4 Aug 1290-Strasbourg 28 Feb 1326, bur Königsfelden).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis names "Rudolfum primogenitum…Fridericum…Lupoldum…Henricum, Albertum et Ottonem" as the six sons of "Alberti regis"[459].  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ names "dominus Lupoldus dux Swevie, dominus Heinricus, dominus Albertus et dominus Otto duces Austrie et Stirie" as the four brothers of "dominum Fridericum ducem Austrie"[460].  He succeeded in 1306 as LEOPOLD I Duke of Austria and Steiermark.  He led the Austrian troops which were routed by the Swiss confederates at the Pass of Morgarten 15 Nov 1315, which preceded the declaration of renewal of the Eidgenossen 9 Dec 1315[461].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "II Kal Mar 1326" of "Lupoldus dux Austrie et Styrie filius Alberti regis Romanorum hic sepultus cum matre sua…regine Elizabeth nostre fundatricis"[462].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1326 II Kal Mar" of "Leupoldus dux Austrie et Styrie" and his burial in Königsfelden[463]m (Contract 20 Apr 1310, Basel 26 May 1315) CATHERINE de Savoie, daughter of AMEDEE V Comte de Savoie & his second wife Marie de Brabant ([1300/03][464]-Rheinfelden 30 Sep 1336, bur Königsfelden).  The contract of marriage between "Amedeus comes Sabaudiæ…Catherinam filiam" and "Lupoldus…dux Austriæ et Styriæ", with the approval of "Maria de Brabancia comitissa Sabaudiæ", is dated 20 Apr 1310, and names "dominæ Elisabeth quondam Romanorum reginæ genetrici suæ…frater noster Fridericus Dux Austriæ…Henricus, Albertus et Otto fratres nostri duces Austriæ et Goritiæ"[465].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death "pridie Kal Oct 1336" of "Katherina, relicta ducis Austrie Leupoldi, filia comitis Sabaudie", specifying that she was buried "in Chunigsveld"[466].  The necrology of Wettingen records the death "II Kal Oct 1337" of "Katharina duceyssa Austrie uxor ducis Lupoldi"[467].  Duke Leopold I & his wife had two children: 

a)         KATHARINA (9 Feb 1320-28 Sep 1349, bur Königsfelden).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.   The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1336 II Kal Oct" of "Katherina filia coma de Saphoy relicta Leopoldi ducis Austrie" and her burial at Königsfelden[468].  The date so recorded is inconsistent with her two marriages shown below, although the way in which her mother is referred to in the entry does suggest that the latter was alive when Katharina died.  It is also surprising that there is no reference to Katharina's second husband in the source, which is the practice in other entries.  As all other events are apparently recorded accurately in this source, one possibility is that the wife of the two husbands was another, as yet unidentified, daughter of Duke Leopold I who is otherwise unnamed in the sources.  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis records the death in 1349 of "domina de Kussi, filia quondam Lupoldi ducis Austrie" and "Conradus de Megdburg maritus eius"[469].  She died of plague.  m firstly (contract Vincennes 25 Nov 1338) ENGUERRAND [VI] Seigneur de Coucy, son of GUILLAUME de Coucy Seigneur de Coucy et de Marle [Guines] & his wife Isabelle de Châtillon-Saint-Pol (-killed in battle 25 Aug 1346, bur Ourecamp).  m secondly (1348) KONRAD Burggraf von Magdeburg, son of --- (-25 Sep 1349).

b)         AGNES ([1321/26]-Schweidnitz 2 Feb 1392, bur Schweidnitz Minoritenkirche).  The Chronica principum Polonie records that "Bolkonem ultimum Swidnicensem, filium fratris sui ducis Bernhardi" married "domina Agnes…filiam Lupoldi ducis Austrie"[470]m (after 1 Jun 1338) BOLKO II Duke of Schweidnitz, son of BERNHARD Duke of Schweidnitz [Piast] & his wife Kunigunde of Poland [Piast] ([1309/12]-28 Jul 1368, bur Grüssau).  No children. 

7.         KATHARINA (Oct 1295-Naples 18 Jan 1323, bur Naples San Lorenzo Maggiore).  Her first betrothal is referred to in the Turin State Archives "Matrimonio tra Filippo di Savoia Principe d'Acaia e Catterina d'Hasbourg (non ebbe effetto)"[471].  It must be dated to early 1312 between the death of Philippe de Savoie's first wife and the date of his second marriage.  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "XV Kal Feb 1323" of "domina Kath ducissa Calabrie filia…Alberti Romanorum regis…sepulta in Pulle apud S Laurentium domus Fratrum Minorem"[472].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1324 feris secunda proxima ante Mathie apostoli" of "Katharina ducissa Calabrie sor ducum Austrie" and her burial "Neapolim aput S Laurencium in domo Frum Minorum"[473]The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death 7 Jan 1323 of "la Duchessa , que venne d´Alemagnia, moglie che fu di Carlo Duca di Calabria figlio del Re Roberto"[474]Betrothed ([23 Jan/7 May] 1312) to PHILIPPE de Savoie Signore del Piemonte, titular Prince of Achaia, son of THOMAS de Savoie Conte [Marchese] del Piemonte & his wife Guye de Chalon [Bourgogne-Comté] (Susa 1278-23 Sep 1334).  [Betrothed (1313) to Emperor HEINRICH VII, King of Germany, Comte de Luxembourg, son of HENRI III Comte de Luxembourg & his wife Béatrice d'Avesnes (12 Jul 1274-Buonconvento near Siena 24 Aug 1313, bur Pisa Cathedral).  The Chronicon Elwacense records the betrothal of "soror ducum Austriæ" and "imperatori Hainrico", specifying that the marriage did not take place because of the emperor's death[475].  It is not known to which sister of Duke Friedrich this refers.  However, his older sister Agnes was probably too old and may have been too actively involved in the government of Austria to have been allowed to leave in order to marry.  His youngest sister Jutta was probably too young.  This leaves Katharina as the most likely candidate, immediately after the termination of her betrothal to the Lord of Piemonte.]  m (23 Jun 1316/end 1316) as his first wife, CHARLES of Sicily Duca di Calabria, son of ROBERT I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his first wife Infanta doña Violanta de Aragón ([28 May] 1298-Naples 9 Nov 1328, bur Naples Santa Chiara).  No issue. 

8.         ALBRECHT (Habsburg 12 Dec 1298-Vienna 20 Jul 1358, bur Gaming).  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ names "dominus Lupoldus dux Swevie, dominus Heinricus, dominus Albertus et dominus Otto duces Austrie et Stirie" as the four brothers of "dominum Fridericum ducem Austrie"[476].  He succeeded his brother in 1330 as ALBRECHT II “der Weise” Duke of Austria and Steiermark, Duke of Carinthia, Krain and South Tirol. 

          -        see below

9.         HEINRICH (1299-Bruck an der Mur 3 Feb 1327, bur Graz Minoritenkirche, removed to Königsfelden).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis names "Rudolfum primogenitum…Fridericum…Lupoldum…Henricum, Albertum et Ottonem" as the six sons of "Alberti regis"[477].  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ names "dominus Lupoldus dux Swevie, dominus Heinricus, dominus Albertus et dominus Otto duces Austrie et Stirie" as the four brothers of "dominum Fridericum ducem Austrie"[478].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "III Non Feb 1327" of "Hainricus dux Austrie et Styrie filius Alberti Romanorum regis, sepultus hic in ecclesia cum domina Elizabeth matre suo et cum frare suo domino Lupoldo"[479].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1327 in die S Blasii" of "Hainricus dux Austrie et Styrie" and his burial in Königsfelden[480]m (contract 24 Sep 1314, Oct 1314) ELISABETH von Virneburg, daughter of ROBERT [II] Graf von Virneburg & his wife Kunigunde von Neuenahr (-Königsfelden 14 Sep 1343, bur Königsfelden).  "Lupoldus…dux Austrie et Styrie…" promised support for imperial candidates, part of the arrangement being the marriage of "Henricum ducem Austrie fratrum nostrum" and "Ruperto comiti de Virnemburg…Elisabeth sorore comitis de Virnenburg predicti" by charter dated 24 Sep 1314[481]

10.      MEINHARD ([1300]-young, bur Tulln).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

11.      OTTO (Vienna 23 Jul 1301-Vienna 26 Feb 1339, bur Vienna Augustinerkirche, transferred to Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis names "Rudolfum primogenitum…Fridericum…Lupoldum…Henricum, Albertum et Ottonem" as the six sons of "Alberti regis"[482].  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ names "dominus Lupoldus dux Swevie, dominus Heinricus, dominus Albertus et dominus Otto duces Austrie et Stirie" as the four brothers of "dominum Fridericum ducem Austrie"[483].  He succeeded in 1330 as OTTO Duke of Austria and Steiermark.  Duke of Carinthia 1335.  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven records the death "in Wienna XIV Kal Mar", in 1339 from the context, of "duce Ottone"[484].  The necrology of Wettingen records the death "XIII Kal Mar 1339" of "Otto dux Austrie"[485].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the foundation "II Id Mar" by "Otto dux Austriæ…archidux postea inaugurate dux Carinthiæ cognomento Mirabilis" of "mon Novi Montis" and his burial there with his first wife and son Leopold[486]m firstly (Straubing 15 May 1325) ELISABETH von Bayern, daughter of STEFAN I Duke of Lower Bavaria & his wife Jutta von Schweidnitz [Piast] (1306-Vienna 25 Mar 1330, bur Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery).  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "II Kal May 1331" of "domina Elizabet ducissa Austrie relicta quondam ducis Ottonis"[487], implying, it appears incorrectly, that her husband predeceased her.  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1330 in die annunciacionis S Marie virginis" of "Elyzabeth ducissa Austrie conthuralis Ottonis ducis Austrie et filia Stephani ducis Babarie" and her burial "in Novo Monte"[488].  The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "VIII Kal Apr" of "domina Elizabeth iunior, inclita ducissa Bawarie et Austrie"[489], although the reason for her being called "iunior" in this entry is not clear.  m secondly (Znaim 16 Feb 1335) ANNA of Bohemia, daughter of JAN I King of Bohemia [JEAN I Comte de Luxembourg] & his first wife Eliska [Elisabeth] of Bohemia [Přemyslid] (Cham 27 Mar 1323-2/3 Sep 1338, bur Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery).  The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Non Sep" of "Anna ducisse Austrie et Stirie"[490].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1338 III Non Sep" of "Anna ducissa Austrie, Stirie et Karinthie conthuralis ducis Ottonis, necnon filia Iohannis regis Bohemie" and her burial "in Novo Monte"[491]Mistresses (1) to (4):  ---.  The names of Duke Otto's mistresses are not known.  Duke Otto & his first wife had two children:

a)         FRIEDRICH [II] (10 Feb 1327-11 or 16 Dec 1344, bur Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the birth "1327 Scolastice virginis" of "ducem Fridericum", older son of Duke Otto & his wife[492].  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Fridericum…et Lüpoldum" as "duobus filiis inpuberibus" of "duce Ottone"[493].  The necrology of Rein records the death "XVII Kal Jan" of "Fridericus fil Ottonis ducis Austrie et Stirie"[494].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1344 III Id Dec" of "dux Fridericus iuvenis fr predicti ducum Luipoldi" and his burial with his father and brother "in Novo Monte"[495], the entry following immediately that related to the death of his brother Duke Leopold in 1344.  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "III Id Dec" of "Fridericus fil ducis Ottonis"[496]Betrothed (contract 12 Jun 1341) to JOAN of England, daughter of EDWARD III King of England & his wife Philippa de Hainaut (Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire [Feb] [1334/35]-Loremo, Bordeaux of the Black Death 2 Sep 1348, bur Loremo or Bordeaux or Bayonne Cathedral).  The marriage contract between “Rex...Johannæ filiæ nostræ” and “Alberto...Duci Austriæ, Tiroliæ et Karinthiæ, domino Carniolæ, Marchiæ, ac Portusuaonis, comiti in Habepurth necnon Lantgrave Alsatiæ, dominoque Phirrettarum...Duci Friderico fratrueli vestro” and “Rex...Johannæ filiæ nostræ” is dated 12 Jun 1341[497]

b)         LEOPOLD [II] (1328-10 Aug 1344, bur Neuberg im Mürztal, Cistercian Monastery).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the birth in 1328 of "ducem Leopoldum", younger son of Duke Otto & his wife[498].  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Fridericum…et Lüpoldum" as "duobus filiis inpuberibus" of "duce Ottone"[499].  The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Id Aug" of "dux Leopoldus fil Ottonis ducis"[500].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1344 IV Id Aug" of "Lepoldus iuvenis fil ducis Ottonis ducis Austrie" and his burial "in Novo Monte"[501]

Duke Otto had four illegitimate sons by Mistresses (1) to (4):

c)          OTTO (-after 6 Dec 1330).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

d)         LEOPOLD (-after 6 Dec 1330).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

e)         JOHANN (-after 6 Oct 1338).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

f)          LEOPOLD (-after 6 Oct 1338).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

12.      JUTTA (-Vienna 5 Mar 1329, bur Königsfelden).  The Chronicon Elwacense records the marriage of "Ludwicus de Oettingen" and "filia regis Alberti" at Vienna in 1319, but does not give her name[502].  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis records that "soror ducem Austrie" married "Ludowico seniori de Oetingen"[503].  The necrology of Königsfelden records the death "III Non Mar 1329" of "Guota com de Oetingen, soror dominorum ducum Austrie et Styrie, filia…Alberti Romanorum regis, hic sepulta in ecclesie cum matre sua domine Elizabet regine…"[504].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1329 in vigilia S Mathie apostoli" of "Ieutha comitissa de Oettinge sor ducum Austria" and her burial at Königsfelden[505]m (Baden 26 Apr 1319) as his third wife, LUDWIG [VI] Graf von Oettingen, son of LUDWIG V Graf von Oettingen & his wife Maria von Nürnberg (-Vienna 29 Sep 1348, bur Kloster Zwettl). 

13.      Nine other children (-young).  The primary source which confirms their parentage has not yet been identified. 

 

 

ALBRECHT von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT I Duke of Austria, King of Germany & his wife Elisabeth von Görz-Tirol (Habsburg 12 Dec 1298-Vienna 20 Jul 1358, bur Gaming).  The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis names "Rudolfum primogenitum…Fridericum… Lupoldum…Henricum, Albertum et Ottonem" as the six sons of "Alberti regis"[506].  The Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ names "dominus Lupoldus dux Swevie, dominus Heinricus, dominus Albertus et dominus Otto duces Austrie et Stirie" as the four brothers of "dominum Fridericum ducem Austrie"[507].  Graf von Pfirt 1324, by right of his wife.  He succeeded his brother 1330 as ALBRECHT II “der Weise” Duke of Austria and Steiermark, Duke of Carinthia, Krain and South Tirol.  He was paralysed in the legs from Mar 1330.  The necrology of Wettingen records the death "X Kal Aug 1358" of "Albertus dux Austrie et Stirie"[508].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XIII Kal Sep" of "dux Albertus fr ducis Ottonis fundatoris monii Novi Montis filiæ h m S Crucis"[509].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

m (15 Feb 1324) JEANNE de Ferrette, daughter & heiress of ULRIC III Comte de Ferrette [Pfirt] & his wife Jeanne de Montbéliard [Bourgogne-Comté] ([1300/1310]-Vienna 15 Nov 1351, bur Kloster Gaming).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "filia comitis Phirretarum" as wife of "dux Albertus"[510].  Genealogies such as Europäische Stammtafeln[511] state that Jeanne was born in 1300.  This seems unlikely given that her youngest son was born in 1351.  It also does not fit with her parents’ marriage (1303 before 28 Jul), and the birth dates of her mother’s immediate family (younger sister born around 1295).  It is more reasonable to suppose that she was born around 1310.  She succeeded her father as Comtesse de Ferrette [Pfirt] 11 Mar 1324.  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven records the death in 1351 of "domine Iohanne ducisse…filia comitis Phiretarum"[512].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1351 XVII Kal Dec" of "Iohanna ducissa Austria in Phyrt quidam genta hic sepulta"[513].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XVI Kal Oct" of "Iohanna ux ducis Alberti"[514].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

Duke Albrecht II & his wife had [nine or more] children: 

1.         sons (b and d before 1337).  The primary source which confirms their parentage has not yet been identified.  It is not known how many sons there were. 

2.         RUDOLF (Vienna 1 Nov 1339-Milan 27 Jul 1365, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven records the birth, in 1339 from the context, of "dux Albertus…filium…Rudolfum", adding in a later passage that he was born in Nov[515].  He succeeded his father in 1358 as RUDOLF IV Duke of Austria, Steiermark, Carinthia and Krain.  Graf von Tirol 1363.  Giovanni di Musso´s Chronicon Placentinum records the death in Jul 1365 of "Rodulphus Dux Austriæ" who had come to Milan for the marriage of "suo fratre" and "filiam Domini Bernabovis Vicecomitis"[516].  He died from the plague.  The necrology of Wettingen records the death "V Kal Aug 1365" of "Ruodolfus dux Austrie Stirie Karinthie"[517].  The Necrologium Austriacum names Rudolf as eldest son of Duke Albrecht II, records his death in "1362 sontags nach sant Jacobstag" in Milan and his burial in Vienna St Stephan[518].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1365 Kal Aug" of "dux Ruedolfus primogenitus fundatoris"[519]m (Vienna 13 Jul 1356) as her first husband, KATHARINA of Bohemia, daughter of Emperor KARL IV King of Germany, King of Bohemia & his first wife Blanche [Marguerite] de Valois (Prague Aug 1342-Perchtoldersdorf 26 Apr 1395, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage in 1353 of "Rudolfus Dux Austriæ" and "Katherina, filia Domini Karoli"[520].  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Rudolf as "kayser Karls tochter des vierten"[521].  She married secondly (Prague 19 Mar 1366) Otto V "der Paule" Herzog in Bayern Markgraf von Brandenburg.  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage "feria quinta ante Iudica" in 1366 of "Dominus Imperator filiam suam seniorem…ex Domina Blancza…Katherinam, relictam olim Rudolfi Ducis Austriæ" and "Ottoni Marchioni Brandenburgensi"[522]

3.         KATHARINA (1342-Vienna 10 Jan 1381, bur Vienna St Klara).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Katharina as second daughter of Duke Albrecht II, specifying that she was Abbess of St Klara in Vienna[523]

4.         MARGARETA (Vienna 1346-Brno 14 Jan 1366, bur Brno Kloster St Thomas).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.  m firstly (Passau 4 Sep 1359) MEINHARD Duke in Bavaria in Oberbayern, son of LUDWIG V Duke of Bavaria in Oberbayern Duke of Carinthia & his second wife Margarata "Maultasch" Gräfin von Tirol (Landshut 9 Feb 1344-Schloß Tirol 13 Jan 1363).  He succeeded his father in 1361 as MEINHARD Duke of Upper Bavaria, and as MEINHARD III Graf von Tirolm secondly (Vienna Feb 1364) as his third wife, JOHANN Heinrich of Bohemia Markgraf of Moravia, son of JAN King of Bohemia [Luxembourg] & his first wife Elisabeth [Eliska] of Bohemia [Přemyslid] (Melnik 12 Feb 1322-12 Nov 1375, bur Brno Kloster St Thomas). 

5.         FRIEDRICH [III] (Vienna 31 Mar 1347-Vienna 10 Dec 1362, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Rudolfo primogenito…Friderico, Lupoldo et Alberto" as the four sons of "domini Alberti Austrie Stirie ac Karinthie ducis" and his wife "domine Iohanne ducisse…filia comitis Phiretarum"[524].  He died while hunting.  The Necrologium Austriacum names Friedrich as second son of Duke Albrecht II, records his death in 1362 and his burial in Vienna St Stephan[525].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1362 IV Id Dec" of "dux Fridricus fil fundatoris ni"[526]

6.         ALBRECHT (Vienna 9 Sep 1348-Laxenburg 29 Aug 1395, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Rudolfo primogenito…Friderico, Lupoldo et Alberto" as the four sons of "domini Alberti Austrie Stirie ac Karinthie ducis" and his wife "domine Iohanne ducisse…filia comitis Phiretarum"[527].  He succeeded his brother in 1365 as ALBRECHT III "mit dem Copfe" Duke of Austria and Steiermark. 

-        see below

7.         LEOPOLD (Vienna 1 Nov 1351-killed in battle Sempach 9 Jul 1386, bur Königsfelden).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Rudolfo primogenito…Friderico, Lupoldo et Alberto" as the four sons of "domini Alberti Austrie Stirie ac Karinthie ducis" and his wife "domine Iohanne ducisse…filia comitis Phiretarum"[528].  He succeeded his brother in 1365 as LEOPOLD III Duke of Austria and Steiermark. 

-        see below, after his brother ALBRECHT III Duke of Austria

 

 

ALBRECHT von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT II "Dem Weise" Duke of Austria & his wife Jeanne de Ferrette (Vienna 9 Sep 1348-Laxenburg 29 Aug 1395, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Rudolfo primogenito…Friderico, Lupoldo et Alberto" as the four sons of "domini Alberti Austrie Stirie ac Karinthie ducis" and his wife "domine Iohanne ducisse…filia comitis Phiretarum"[529].  He succeeded his brother in 1365 as ALBRECHT III "mit dem Copfen" Duke of Austria and Steiermark.  In Inner-Istria and the Windische Mark 1374.  Under the Treaty of Neuburg-im-Mürztal 25 Sep 1379, he became Duke of Austria ob und unter der Enns mit Steyr Hallstatt und Salzkammergut.  The Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ records the death in 1395 of "dux Albertus Austrie"[530].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1380 IV Kal Sep" of "Albertus dux Austrie fil…fundatoris"[531].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "VI Kal Sep" of "Albertus archidux Austræ Styriæ fil ducis Alberti"[532].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

m firstly (after 19 Mar 1366) ELISABETH of Bohemia, daughter of Emperor KARL IV King of Germany, King of Bohemia & his third wife Anna von Schweidnitz und Jauer [Piast] (Prague 19 Mar 1358-Vienna 4 Sep 1373, bur Kloster Gaming, North Austria).  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the marriage "feria quinta ante Iudica" in 1366 of "Dominus Imperator filiam suam secundam Elizabeth…ex Domina Anna Swidnicensi filia" and "Alberto Duci Austriæ seniori"[533].  The Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon records the death "circa festum Nativitatis beatæ Virginis" in 1373 of "filia Domini Imperatoris…Elizabeth" wife of "Albertus Dux Austriæ" childless[534].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1373 XIII Kal Oct" of "Elizabeth ducissa Austrie…filia imperatoris Karuli hic sepultus"[535]

m secondly (Contract Passau 11 Dec 1374, Vienna 4 Mar 1375) BEATRIX von Nürnberg, daughter of FRIEDRICH V Burggraf von Nürnberg & his wife Elisabeth von Meissen (Nürnberg [1362]-Perchtoldsdorf 10 Jun 1414, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 

Duke Albrecht III & his second wife had one child:

1.         ALBRECHT (Vienna 19 Sep 1377-Klosterneuburg 14 Sep 1404, bur Vienna St Stephan).  He succeeded his father in 1395 as ALBRECHT IV "das Weltwunder" Duke of Austria im Land ob und unter der Enns.  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death in 1404 "zu Neuwnberg" of "hertzog Albrecht…hertzog Albrechts sun" and his burial in Vienna St Stephan[536]m (Vienna 24 Apr 1390) JOHANNA [Sophia] von Bayern, daughter of ALBRECHT I Duke of Bavaria in Niederbayern und Straubing, ALBERT Count of Holland, Comte de Hainaut & his first wife Margareta von Brieg [Piast] ([10 Jun/13 Sep] 1377 chr Le Quesnoy, Hainaut 13 Sep 1377-Vienna 17 Oct 1410, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The Oude Kronik van Brabant records that the fourth (unnamed) daughter of "Albertus palatinus Reni, dux Bavarie" and his wife "Margaretam filiam Ludovici ducis de Briga ex Polonia" married "duci Austrie"[537].  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Albrecht as "ein fuerstin von Holland"[538].  Duke Albrecht IV & his wife had two children: 

a)         MARGARETA (Vienna 26 Jun 1395-Burghausen am Obb 24 Dec 1447, bur Raitenhaslach).  The necrology of Raitenhaslach records the death "IX Kal Jan 1447" of "Margaretha ducissa Wauarie ux di Hainrici hic sepulta"[539].  The necrology of Seligenthal records the death "IX Kal Jan 1447" of "domina Margareta uxor domini Heinrici ducis de Bavarie, de Austria et ducissa Bavarie"[540]m (dispensation 12 Nov 1409, Landshut 25 Nov 1412) HEINRICH IV "der Reiche" Duke of Bavaria in Landshut, son of FRIEDRICH Duke of Bavaria in Landshut & his second wife Maddalena Visconti (1386-Landshut 30 Jul 1450, bur Seligenthal).

b)         ALBRECHT Archduke of Austria (Vienna 10 Aug 1397-Langendorf/Neczmély near Esztergom 27 Oct 1439, bur Stuhlweissenburg).  He succeeded his father in 1404 as ALBRECHT V Duke of Austria im Land ob und unter der Enns.  Designated by his father-in-law as his successor in both Hungary and Bohemia, he was elected ALBERT King of Hungary 18 Dec 1437, crowned 1 Jan 1438 at Székesfehérvár, and ALBRECHT King of Bohemia 27 Dec 1437 at Prague, crowned 29 Jun 1438 at Prague.  Elected ALBRECHT II King of the Romans at Frankfurt-am-Main 18 Mar 1438.  He was organising an army for a campaign against the Ottomans when he died from dysentery.  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death of Duke Albrecht "sant Simon und Judetag"[541]m (Esztergom 28 Sep 1421) ELISABETH of Hungary and Bohemia, daughter of Emperor SIGMUND King of Hungary and Bohemia & his second wife Barbara von Cilli (Prague 28 Feb 1409-Raab/Györ 19 Dec 1442, bur Székesfehérvár).  The Necrologium Austriacum names "kaysers Sigmund und kunig zu Ungarn and Behem tochter Elisabeth" as wife of Duke Albrecht[542].  Duke Albrecht V & his wife had four children: 

i)          GEORG Archduke of Austria (1431-16 February 1435, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The Necrologium Austriacum names "Jorg in der klainhait gestorben" as older son of Duke Albrecht[543]

ii)         ANNA Adss of Austria (Vienna 12 Apr 1432-Eckartsberga 14 Nov 1462, bur Reinhardsbrunn).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Anna as older daughter of Duke Albrecht[544].  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records that one daughter of "Albertus dux Austrie" married "Wilhelmo lantgravio Thuringie"[545]m (Jena 20 Jun 1446) as his first wife, WILHELM III "Der Tapfere" von Sachsen Landgraf of Thuringia, son of FRIEDRICH I "dem Streitbaren" Elector of Saxony & his wife Katharina von Braunschweig (Meissen 30 Apr 1425-Weimar 17 Sep 1482, bur Weimar Franziskanerkirche). 

iii)        ELISABETH Adss of Austria ([1435/36]-Krakow 30 Aug 1505, bur Krakow Cathedral).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Elisabeth as younger daughter of Duke Albrecht[546].  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records that one daughter of "Albertus dux Austrie" married "Kazimiro regi Polonie"[547]m (Krakow 10 Feb 1454) KAZIMIERZ IV "the Great" King of Poland, son of WŁADISŁAW II King of Poland & his fifth wife Zofia [Sonka] Holczańska (30 Nov 1427-Grodno 7 Jun 1492, bur Krakow Cathedral). 

iv)        LADISLAUS Archduke of Austria (posthumously Komarón, Hungary 22 Feb 1440-Prague 23 Nov 1457, bur Prague St Veit).  The Necrologium Austriacum names "Laszla" as younger son of Duke Albrecht[548].  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium names "filium…Ladislaum, adhuc in cunabulis jacentem" as the heir of "Albertus dux Austrie", adding that he was "sub tutela Friderici ducis Austrie patrui sui"[549].  He succeeded at birth as LADISLAUS Duke of Austria im Land ob und unter der Enns, under the Regency of his mother.  She also succeeded in getting him crowned as ULÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary at Székesfehérvár with support from the Bohemian warlord Giskra who occupied north-west Hungary[550].  However, after the arrival in Buda of his rival, Władisław III King of Poland who had already been elected King of Hungary, László and his mother left (with the Hungarian crown) for the court of Friedrich III Duke of Austria.  The resulting civil war was mediated by the church, which resulted in the acceptance of the King of Poland as king.  He succeeded 1444 after the death of Władisław King of Poland, as King of Hungary, under the regency of Jan Hunyadi.  He remained under the tutelage of Friedrich III Duke of Austria, who was forced to release him in 1452.  He was crowned King of Hungary 1453, still under the de facto regency of Jan Hunyadi.  He was crowned LADISLAUS King of Bohemia 28 Oct 1453.  He allowed himself to fall under the influence of Ulric Count of Cilli, a relative of his maternal grandmother, who was a rival of the Hunyady family and was murdered.  In Mar 1457 King László ordered the execution of László Hunyadi for his involvement in the murder of Ulric Count of Cilli[551].  He died of plague.  Betrothed (Sep 1457) to MADELEINE de France, daughter of CHARLES VII King of France & his wife Marie d'Anjou (Tours, Indre-et-Loire 1 Dec 1443-Pamplona 24 Jan 1495, bur Pamplona Cathedral).  Betrothed (Sep 1457), who later married GASTON de Foix Principe de Viana. 

 

 

LEOPOLD von Habsburg, son of ALBRECHT II "Dem Weise" Duke of Austria & his wife Johanna von Pfirt (Vienna 1 Nov 1351-killed in battle Sempach 9 Jul 1386, bur Königsfelden).  The History of Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven names "Rudolfo primogenito…Friderico, Lupoldo et Alberto" as the four sons of "domini Alberti Austrie Stirie ac Karinthie ducis" and his wife "domine Iohanne ducisse…filia comitis Phiretarum"[552].  He succeeded his brother in 1365 as LEOPOLD III Duke of Austria & Steiermark.   Under the Treaty of Neuburg-im-Mürztal 25 Sep 1379, he became Duke of Steiermark, Carinthia, Carniola and Istria, Graf von Tirol.  Herr von Terst 1382.  The necrology of Wilten records the death "VII Id Jul 1386" of "Leopoldi archiducis Austriæ"[553].  The Necrologium Austriacum names Leopold as fourth son of Duke Albrecht II, records his death "1386 9 Jun…erschlagen…von der Sweitzern und Zuerich" and his burial at Königsfelden[554].  The necrology of Gaming records the death "1386 VII Id Iul" of "Leupaldus fil fundatoris"[555]

m (Vienna 23 Feb 1365) VERDE [Viridis] Visconti, daughter of BERNABÒ Visconti Signor of Milan & his wife Beatrice [Regina] della Scala ([1350]-Sittich, Carniola before 1 Mar 1414, bur Sittich).  The Annales Mediolanenses record the marriage 13 Jan 1366 of "Dominus Barnabos…Dominam Viridem filiam suam" and "Domino Leopoldo Duci Austriæ"[556].  Giovanni di Musso´s Chronicon Placentinum records the death in Jul 1365 of "Rodulphus Dux Austriæ" who had come to Milan for the marriage of "suo fratre" and "filiam Domini Bernabovis Vicecomitis"[557].  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Leopold as "herrn Barlaba tochter von Mayland"[558]

Duke Leopold III & his wife had seven children: 

1.         WILHELM (1370-Vienna 14/15 Jul 1406, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ names "Wilhelmus filius Leopoldi fratris ducis [Alberti Austrie]" when recording that he succeeded his paternal uncle in 1395[559].  He succeeded his father in 1386 as WILHELM Duke of Styria and Inner-Austria, minor until 1395.  Resigned 1404 as Duke of Styria.  Graf von Tirol 1404.  The necrology of Rein records the death "II Id Jul" of "Wilhelmus dux Austrie et Styrie"[560].  The Necrologium Austriacum names Wilhelm as eldest son of Duke Leopold III, records his death in 1406 and his burial in Vienna St Stephan[561].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "Id Jul" of "Guilhelmus dux Austriæ"[562].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology.  Betrothed (contract Buda 29 Jul 1385) to JADVIGA of Hungary Queen of Poland, daughter of LAJOS I King of Hungary & his second wife Jelisaveta Kotromanić of Bosnia (Krakow 18 Feb 1373-Krakow 12 Jun 1400, bur Krakow, Cathedral St Stanislas).  The Chronica principum Polonie name "seniorem Mariam…aliam Hedwigim" as the two daughters of "Ludwicum regem Ungarie", adding that Jadviga was betrothed to "filio Lewpoldi ducis Austrie" but that he married another bride[563].  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records that "filia minor regis Ungarorum" was betrothed to "duci Austrie" but later married "Poloni…duci…Vladislao vel Wolislao"[564]m (Vienna [13 Oct/13 Nov] 1401) as her first husband, JEANNE di Durazzo, daughter of CHARLES III King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Marguerite di Durazzo [Anjou-Capet] (Zara 25 Jun 1373-Naples 2 Feb 1435, bur Naples, Santas Annunziata).  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Wilhelm as "kunig Karl tochter von Pulan"[565].  She succeeded in 1414 as JEANNE II Queen of Sicily.  She married secondly (10 Aug 1415) as his second wife, Jacques II de Bourbon Comte de la Marche et de Castres.  

2.         LEOPOLD (1371-Vienna 3 Jun 1411, bur Vienna St Stephan).  Graf von Tirol 1396-1406.  He succeeded his brother in 1404 as LEOPOLD IV "der Stolze" Duke of Styria, and 1406 as Duke of Inner Austria.  Duke of Austria im Land ob und unter der Enns 1406.  The Necrologium Austriacum names Leopold as second son of Duke Leopold III and records his death in 1411[566]m (Dijon May 1392, Vienna 15 Aug 1393) as her first husband, CATHERINE de Bourgogne, daughter of PHILIPPE "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy [Valois] & his wife Marguerite III Ctss of Flanders (Montbard Apr 1378-Grey-sur-Saône 24 Jan 1425, bur Dijon).  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Leopold as "ein fuerstin von Burgund"[567].  She married secondly (before 8 Mar 1414, separated 1421) Smassmann Herr von Rappoltstein (-[25 Feb/5 Mar] 1451). 

3.         daughter (-8 Aug 1376, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death "1376 8 Aug…junkfraw…des fuersten vorgenant tochter", immediately after the entry recording the death of Duke Leopold III, and her burial at Vienna St Stephan[568]

4.         ERNST (Bruck an der Mur 1377-Bruck an der Mur 10 Jun 1424, bur Rein, Steiermark).  His parentage is confirmed by the Necrologium Austriacum which names Ernst as third son of Duke Leopold III, records his death 10 Jun 1424 and his burial "in den kloster zu Rein"[569].  He succeeded 1402-1406 and from 1411 as ERNST I "der Eiserne" Duke of Inner Austria.  Duke of Styria, Carinthia, Carniola and Tyrol 1406. 

-        see below

5.         ELISABETH (1378-Dornitz 17 Aug 1392, bur Vienna St Stephan).  The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "XVI Kal Sep" of "Elizabeth filia Leupoldi ducis Austrie et Styrie in oppido Duernicz" and her burial in "Wienne ad sanctum Stephanum"[570]

6.         FRIEDRICH (1382-Innsbruck 24 Jun 1439, bur Stams).  He succeeded in 1402 as FRIEDRICH IV "mit den leeren Tasche" Graf von Tirol.  Graf in Laufenburg 1408.  The necrology of Wilten records the death "VIII Kal Jul 1439" of "Friderici archiducis Austriæ"[571].  The Necrologium Austriacum records the death in 1435 of Friedrich and his burial "Crembs in den kloster"[572]m firstly (Innsbruck 24 Dec 1407) ELISABETH Pfalzgräfin, daughter of RUPRECHT III Elector Palatine, Pfalzgraf bei Rheina, King of the Romans & his wife Elisabeth von Nürnberg (Amberg before 27 Oct 1381-Innsbruck 31 Dec 1409, bur Stams).  The necrology of Stams records the death "II Kal Jan" of "domina Elizabeth filia regis Romanorum Ruperti, contoralis…principis et domini Friderici ducis Austriæ, et Elizabeth filia eorum"[573].  The necrology of Wilten records the death "Kal Jan 1409" of "Elisabethæ ducissæ Austriæ"[574]m secondly (Innsbruck before 11 Jun 1411) ANNA von Braunschweig-Lüneburg, daughter of FRIEDRICH Herzog von Braunschweig-Lüneburg & his wife Anna von Sachsen-Wittenberg (1390-Innsbruck 10 Aug 1432, bur Stams).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  The necrology of Wilten records the death "II Id Aug 1432" of "Annæ ducissæ Austriæ"[575].  Duke Friedrich IV & his first wife had one child: 

a)         ELISABETH (27 Dec 1408-28 Dec 1408, bur Stams).  The necrology of Stams records the death "II Kal Jan" of "domina Elizabeth filia regis Romanorum Ruperti, contoralis…principis et domini Friderici ducis Austriæ, et Elizabeth filia eorum"[576]

          Duke Friedrich IV & his second wife had four children:

b)         MARGARETE (1423-6 Jul 1424, bur Stams).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

c)         HEDWIG (1424-21 Feb 1427, bur Stams).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

d)         WOLFGANG (b and d 26 Feb 1426, bur Stams).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

e)         SIGISMUND (Innsbruck 26 Oct 1427-Innsbruck 4 Mar 1496, bur Stams).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Sigmund as son of Duke Friedrich[577].  He succeeded his father in 1439 as SIGISMUND "der Münzreiche" Graf von Tirol, minor until 1446.  He inherited 1450 the family territories in Swabia and Switzerland.  The necrology of Weingarten records the death "Kal Mar 1496" of "Sigismundus archidux Austrie sepultus in monasterio S Iohannis Stamms" and names his wives "primam reginam Schocie Helena, aliam ducissam Saxonie Katherina"[578]Betrothed (contract Innsbruck 22 Jul 1430) RADEGONDE de France, daughter of CHARLES VII King of France & his wife Marie d'Anjou  (Chinon, Indre-et-Loire 1425 before 29 Aug-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 19 Mar 1444, bur Tours, Cathédrale Saint-Gatien).  m firstly (12 Feb 1449) ELEANOR of Scotland, daughter of JAMES I King of Scotland & his wife Joan Beaufort (Dunfermline 1433-Innsbruck 20 Nov 1480, bur Stams).  The necrology of Wilten records the death "XI Kal Dec 1480" of "Helenæ ducissæ Austriæ"[579].  m secondly (Innsbruck 24 Feb 1484) as her first husband, KATHARINA von Sachsen, daughter of ALBRECHT "dem Beherzten" Duke of Saxony & his wife Zdenka von Podiebrad [Bohemia] (Meissen 24 Jul 1468-Göttingen 10 Feb 1524, bur Münden St Blasii).  She married secondly ([29 Jun 1497]) as his first wife, Erich I Herzog von Braunschweig-Calenberg.  Duke Sigismund & his first wife had one child: 

i)          WOLFGANG (b and d 1480, bur Stams).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

7.         KATHARINA (1385-).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbess of St Klara in Vienna. 

 

 

ERNST von Habsburg, son of LEOPOLD III Duke of Austria & his wife Verde Visconti (Bruck an der Mur 1377-Bruck an der Mur 10 Jun 1424, bur Rein, Steiermark).  His parentage is confirmed by the Necrologium Austriacum which names Ernst as third son of Duke Leopold III, records his death 10 Jun 1424 and his burial "in den kloster zu Rein"[580].  He succeeded 1402-1406 and from 1411 as ERNST I "der Eiserne" Duke of Inner Austria.  Duke of Steiermark, Carinthia, Carniola and Tyrol 1406.  The necrology of Rein records the death "IV Id Jun 1424" of "Ernestus dux Austrie et Styrie his sepultus"[581].  The necrology of Wilten records the death "V Id Jun 1424" of "Ernesti archiducis Austriæ"[582].  The Necrologium Austriacum names Ernst as third son of Duke Leopold III, records his death 10 Jun 1424 and his burial "in den kloster zu Rein"[583].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "II Id" of "Ernestus dux Austriæ et Styriæ"[584].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

m firstly (Bruck an der Mur [14 Jan] 1392) MARGARETA of Pomerania, daughter of BOGISLAW V Duke of Pomerania in Hinterpommern & his second wife Adelheid von Braunschweig (1366-Bruck an der Mur 30 Apr 1407 or 12 Jun 1410, bur Rein).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  The necrology of Rein records the death "II Kal Mai" of "Margaretha ducissa Austrie et Styrie"[585]

m secondly (Krakow 25 Jan 1412) CIMBURKA of Masovia, daughter of SIEMOWIT IV Prince of Plock and Kujavia [Piast] & his wife Aleksandra of Lithuania (Warszawa [1394/97]-Türnitz 28/29 Sep 1429, bur Lilienfeld Stiftskirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum refers to the wife of Duke Ernst as "des hertzog von der Nasaw tochter…fraw Cinburga von Polen", records her death in 1426 and her burial at Lilienfeld[586].  The necrology of Rein records the death "III Kal Oct" of "Cimburga ducissa Austrie et Stirie"[587]

Mistress (1): ---.  The name of Duke Ernst's mistress is not known. 

Duke Ernst I & his second wife had nine children:

1.         FRIEDRICH (Innsbruck 21 Sep 1415-Linz 19 Aug 1493, bur Vienna St Stephan).  His parentage is confirmed by the necrology of Heiligenkreuz which records the death "XIV Kal Sep" of "Fridericus IV Romanorum imperator, Ernesti Austriæ archiducis ex Cimburga Lithuaniæ ducissa fil"[588].  He succeeded in 1435 as FRIEDRICH V Duke of Inner-Austria.  Elected FRIEDRICH III King of the Romans 2 Feb 1440 at Frankfurt-am-Main, crowned at Aachen 17 Jun 1442.  Crowned King of Italy 16 Mar 1452 at Rome.  Crowned Holy Roman Emperor 19 Mar 1452 at Rome.   Archduke of Austria from 1453. 

-        see below

2.         MARGARETE (Wiener Neustadt [1416/17]-Altenburg 12 Dec 1486, bur Altenburg Schloßkirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Margarete as the eldest surviving daughter of Duke Ernst[589]m (Leipzig 3 Jun 1431) FRIEDRICH II "der Sanftmütige" Elector of Saxony, son of FRIEDRICH I "der Streitbare" Elector of Saxony & his wife Katharina von Braunschweig (Leipzig 1412-Leipzig 1464, bur Meissen Cathedral).  Markgraf von Meissen 1445.

3.         ALBRECHT (Vienna 18 Dec 1418-Vienna 3 Dec 1463, bur Vienna St Stephan).  He succeeded in 1435 as ALBRECHT VI "der Freigebige" Duke of Inner-Austria.   Archduke of Austria 6 Jan 1453.  The Necrologium Austriacum names Albrecht as second surviving son of Duke Ernst, and records his death in 1463 "frets vor sant Niclastag" and his burial at Vienna St Stephan[590].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "III Non Dec" of "dux Albertus de Austriæ fr Friderici imperatoris"[591]m (Böblingen Aug 1452) as her second husband, MECHTILD Pfalzgräfin, widow of LUDWIG I "der Ältere" Graf von Württemberg, daughter of LUDWIG III Pfalzgraf bei Rhein Kfst von der Pfalz & his second wife Mathilde de Savoie (Heidelberg 7 Mar 1419-Heidelberg 22 Aug 1482, bur Güterstein, transferred 1554 to Tübingen Stiftskirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the wife of Duke Albrecht as "ein pfaltzgrafin von Rein ir vatter Ludwig"[592]

4.         ALEXANDRA (-1420, bur Vienna Neustadt).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the deaths of "die fuerstin junckfraw Alexandria, darnach der fuerst Rudolff, danach der hertzog Leupold" before the death of their father Duke Ernst[593]

5.         RUDOLF (-before 1424, bur Vienna Neustadt Cathedral).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the deaths of "die fuerstin junckfraw Alexandria, darnach der fuerst Rudolff, danach der hertzog Leupold" before the death of their father Duke Ernst[594]

6.         LEOPOLD (-before 1424, bur Vienna Neustadt Cathedral).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the deaths of "die fuerstin junckfraw Alexandria, darnach der fuerst Rudolff, danach der hertzog Leupold" before the death of their father Duke Ernst[595]

7.         ERNST II (-10 Aug 1432, bur Vienna Neustadt Cathedral).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Ernst as the third surviving son of Duke Ernst, recording his death "1432 sant Lorentzentag" and his burial with his sister Alexandra and his brothers Rudolf and Leopold[596]

8.         KATHARINA (Vienna Neustadt 1424-Schloß Hohenbaden 11 Sep 1493, bur Baden-Baden Stiftskirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Katharina as the second surviving daughter of Duke Ernst[597]m (contract Konstanz 3 Jan 1446, Papal dispensation 4o 24 Jan 1446, Pforzheim 15 Jul 1447) KARL von Baden, son of JAKOB I Markgraf von Baden & his wife Catherine de Lorraine (-Pforzheim 24 Feb 1475, bur Baden-Baden Stiftskirche).  He succeeded his father in 1453 as KARL I Markgraf von Baden

9.         ANNA (-13 Apr 1426 or 1429, bur Vienna Neustadt Cathedral).  The Necrologium Austriacum names Anna as the third surviving daughter of Duke Ernst, recording her death "eodem anno sant Mertentag" and her burial with her sister Alexandra and her brothers Rudolf and Leopold[598].  Her death is recorded in the entry which directly follows the record of her mother's death.  Unfortunately as the latter is incorrectly dated in the source to 1426, it is unclear whether Anna died in 1426 or 1429. 

Duke Ernst I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

10.       ERNST (-after 8 Feb 1429).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Messenberger 1423.  Canon at Brixen Cathedral and Archdeacon at Trient 1423.  Canon at Laibach Cathedral 1429. 

 

 

FRIEDRICH von Habsburg, son of ERNST "Dem Eisernen" Duke of Inner Austria & his second wife Cimburka of Mazovia (Innsbruck 21 Sep 1415-Linz 19 Aug 1493, bur Vienna St Stephan).  His parentage is confirmed by the necrology of Heiligenkreuz which records the death "XIV Kal Sep" of "Fridericus IV Romanorum imperator, Ernesti Austriæ archiducis ex Cimburga Lithuaniæ ducissa fil"[599].  He succeeded in 1435 as FRIEDRICH V Duke of Inner-Austria.  Elected FRIEDRICH III King of Germany 2 Feb 1440 at Frankfurt-am-Main, crowned at Aachen 17 Jun 1442.  Crowned King of Italy 16 Mar 1452 at Rome.  Crowned Holy Roman Emperor FRIEDRICH III 19 Mar 1452 at Rome.   Archduke of Austria from 1453.  He succeeded his remote cousin in 1458 as Duke of Austria im Land unter der Enns.  Titular King of Hungary at Neustadt 24 Jul 1463.  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XIV Kal Sep" of "Fridericus IV Romanorum imperator, Ernesti Austriæ archiducis ex Cimburga Lithuaniæ ducissa fil"[600].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "III Id Jan 1493" of "Fridericus tertius Romanorum imperator Lintzii" and his burial at Vienna St Stefan[601].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

m (Rome 16 Mar 1452) Infanta dona LEONOR de Portugal, daughter of dom DUARTE King of Portugal & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Aragón (Torres Novas Vedras 18 Sep 1434-Wiener Neustadt 3 Sep 1467, bur Wiener Neustadt Kloster St Trinitatis).  The Catalogus abbatum Sanganensium records that "Fridericus dux Austrie" married "filiam regis Portugalie"[602].  The Necrologium Austriacum names "eines konigs tochter von Portugall Leonora" as wife of Emperor Friedrich III[603].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "III Non 1464" of "Leonora conthoralis Friderici imperatoris" and her burial "in monii S Trinitatis in Nova Civitate"[604].  The year in this entry is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

King Friedrich & his wife had five children: 

1.         CHRISTOPH (Wiener Neustadt 16 Nov 1455-21 Mar 1456, bur Wiener Neustadt Neuklosterkirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum names "Kristoff…gestorben in klainhait 1456" as eldest son of Emperor Friedrich III & his wife and records his burial in Kloster Neustadt[605].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XII Kal Apr" of "dux Christophorus primogenitus Friderici imperatoris"[606]

2.         MAXIMILIAN (Burg zu Neustadt 22 Mar 1459-Wels 12 Jan 1519).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the birth "1459 an sant Ruprechtstag" of Maximilian second son of Emperor Friedrich & his wife[607].  Duke of Burgundy 20 Aug 1477 in right of his wife.  Elected MAXIMILIAN I King of the Romans 16 Feb 1486 at Nürnberg, crowned 9 Apr 1486 at Aachen.  He succeeded his father in 1493 as MAXIMILIAN I Archduke of Austria.  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "II Id Jan 1519" of "Maximilianus I imperator Romanorum fil Friderici III"[608]

          -        ARCHDUKES of AUSTRIA.

3.         HELENE (3 Nov 1460-28 Feb 1461, bur Wiener Neustadt, Neuklosterkirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum names "Elena…gestorben in der klainhait 1461" as daughter of Emperor Friedrich III & his wife and records her burial in Kloster Neustadt[609]

4.         KUNIGUNDE (Burg zu Wiener Neustadt 16 Mar 1465-Munich 6 Aug 1520, bur Munich Unsere Liebe Frau).  The Necrologium Austriacum records the birth "1465 an sant Ruprechtstag" of Kunigunde, daughter of Emperor Friedrich III & his wife[610]m (Innsbruck 3 Jan 1487) ALBRECHT IV "der Weise" Duke of Bavaria, son of ALBRECHT III "der Fromme" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Anna von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen (Munich 15 Dec 1447-Munich 18 Mar 1508, bur Munich Unsere Liebe Frau). 

5.         JOHANN (9 Aug 1466-10 Feb 1467, bur Wiener Neustadt, Neuklosterkirche).  The Necrologium Austriacum names "Hans gestorben in klainhait 1457 an montag vor dem Vaschangtag" as third son of Emperor Friedrich III & his wife and records his burial in Kloster Neustadt[611].  The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "V Id Feb 1464" of "dux Ioannes filius Friderici imperatoris"[612].  This date is not corroborated by other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. 

 

 

 



[1] Reuter, T. (1991) Germany in the early middle ages c.800-1056 (Longman), p. 79. 

[2] Wegener, W. (1965/67) Genealogischen Tafeln zur mitteleuropäischen Geschichte (Verlag Degener), p. 77. 

[3] Reuter (1991), p. 176. 

[4] Fuhrmann, H., trans. Reuter, T. (1995) Germany in the high middle ages c.1050-1200 (Cambridge University Press), pp. 140 and 150. 

[5] Haverkamp, A. (1988) Medieval Germany 1056-1273 (Oxford University Press), p. 257. 

[6] Ried, T. (ed.) (1816) Chronologico Diplomaticus Episcopatus Ratisbonensis, Tomus I Diplomata Sæculi VIII-XIII (Regensburg) (“Regensburg Cartulary”), Section I, no. XXX, p. 32. 

[7] D LD 64, p. 87. 

[8] Regensburg Cartulary, Section I, no. XXX, p. 32. 

[9] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 884, MGH SS I, p. 399. 

[10] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 871, MGH SS I, p. 383. 

[11] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 884, MGH SS I, p. 401. 

[12] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum, pars quinta 884, MGH SS I, p. 400. 

[13] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 884, MGH SS I, p. 399. 

[14] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 871, MGH SS I, p. 383. 

[15] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 884, MGH SS I, p. 401. 

[16] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum, pars quinta 884, MGH SS I, p. 400. 

[17] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 884, MGH SS I, p. 399. 

[18] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum, pars quinta 893, MGH SS I, p. 403. 

[19] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 893, MGH SS I, pp. 408-9. 

[20] Annales Alammanicorum Continuatio Sangallensis altera 893, MGH SS I, p. 53. 

[21] D Arn 120, p. 175. 

[22] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum, pars quinta 893, MGH SS I, p. 403. 

[23] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 893, MGH SS I, pp. 408-9. 

[24] Annales Alammanicorum Continuatio Sangallensis altera 893, MGH SS I, p. 53. 

[25] D Arn 109, p. 161. 

[26] D Arn 120, p. 175. 

[27] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum, pars quinta 893, MGH SS I, p. 403. 

[28] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 884, MGH SS I, p. 399. 

[29] Wegener (1965/67), p. 77. 

[30] Reuter (1991), p. 176. 

[31] Reuter (1991), p. 176. 

[32] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123. 

[33] Warner, D. A. (trans.) The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg (2001) (Manchester University Press) 4.21, pp. 166-7. 

[34] Fragmenta Libri Anniversariorum Einsiedlenses, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 212. 

[35] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301. 

[36] Gesta Treverorum, Additamentum et Continuatio Prima, 1, MGH SS II, p. 175. 

[37] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[38] ES I.1 84. 

[39] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[40] Auctarium Vindobonense 988, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[41] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[42] Ekkehardi, Altahense Annales 1018, MGH SS XVII, p. 364. 

[43] Thietmar 8.18, p. 374. 

[44] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[45] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[46] Thietmar 5.24, p. 222. 

[47] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[48] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1024, MGH SS XXIII, p. 782. 

[49] Thietmar 7.14, pp. 316-7. 

[50] Annales Zwetlenses 1076, MGH SS IX, p. 679. 

[51] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[52] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 2, MGH SS XI, p. 256. 

[53] Gesta Treverorum, 30-31, MGH SS VIII, p. 172. 

[54] Gesta Treverorum, Additamentum et Continuatio Prima, 1, MGH SS VIII, p. 175. 

[55] Thietmar 7.26, p. 325. 

[56] Mommsen, T. E. and Morrison, K. F. (trans.) (1962) Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York), "Wipo, On the election and consecration of Conrad II (1024)", from "The Deeds of Conrad II (Gesta Chuonradi II imperatoris)", reproduced in Hill, pp. 192-201.  . 

[57] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[58] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 220. 

[59] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[60] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[61] Autenrioth, J. (1979) Das Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau (Hannover), p. 146, available at <http://www.dmgh.de/> (31 Dec 2006). 

[62] Auctarium Vindobonense 1042, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[63] Ekkehardi, Altahense Annales 1018, MGH SS XVII, p. 364. 

[64] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1024, MGH SS XXIII, p. 782. 

[65] Thietmar 5.24, p. 222, and 7.26, p. 325. 

[66] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[67] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[68] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 91. 

[69] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[70] ES I.1 84. 

[71] Annales Stadenses 1112, MGH SS XVI, p. 319. 

[72] Hucke, Richard G. (1956) Die Grafen von Stade 900-1144 (Stade), pp. 68-71, cited in Vajay 'Mathilde', p. 257. 

[73] Vita Meinwerci Episcopi Paderbornensis 2, MGH SS XI, p. 108, footnote 10 quoting her death "Non Feb" in necrologium Abdinhofense

[74] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[75] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[76] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1041, MHG SS V, p. 123. 

[77] D H III 215, p. 287. 

[78] D H III 278, p. 379. 

[79] D H IV 40, p. 49. 

[80] Necrologium Mellicense Antiqu issimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[81] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[82] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1042, MHG SS V, p. 124. 

[83] ES I.1 84. 

[84] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1043, MHG SS V, p. 124. 

[85] Bernoldi Chronicon 1043, MGH SS V, p. 425. 

[86] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[87] ES I.1 84. 

[88] Annales Stadenses 1112, MGH SS XVI, p. 319. 

[89] Vita Meinwerci Episcopi Paderbornensis 2, MGH SS XI, p. 108, footnote 10 quoting her death "Non Feb" in necrologium Abdinhofense

[90] Hucke, Richard G. (1956) Die Grafen von Stade 900-1144 (Stade), pp. 68-71, cited in Vajay 'Mathilde', p. 257. 

[91] Auctarium Vindobonense 1050, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[92] Thietmar 4.21, p. 166. 

[93] Wegener (1965/67), p. 78. 

[94] Annales Zwetlenses 1076 and 1086, MGH SS IX, p. 679. 

[95] Annales Zwetlenses 1076 and 1086, MGH SS IX, p. 679. 

[96] Annales Zwetlenses 1076 and 1086, MGH SS IX, p. 679. 

[97] Annales Zwetlenses 1076 and 1086, MGH SS IX, p. 679. 

[98] Auctarium Vindobonense 1050, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[99] D H IV 271, p. 347. 

[100] Annales Gotwicenses 1075, MGH SS IX, p. 601. 

[101] Rauch, A. (ed.) (1793) Rerum Austriacum Scriptores Vol. I (Vienna), Chronicon Garstense, p. 13. 

[102] Annales Wormatienses 1249, MGH SS XVII, p. 51. 

[103] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[104] Genealogica Wettinensis, MGH SS XXIII, p. 227. 

[105] Annales Gotwicenses 1071, MGH SS IX, p. 601. 

[106] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[107] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[108] ES I.1 84. 

[109] Auctarium Vindobonense 1075, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[110] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum II.35, MGH SS IX, p. 89. 

[111] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1095, MGH SS IX, p. 609. 

[112] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562. 

[113] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[114] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.  

[115] ES XVI 37. 

[116] Vornbacher Traditionskodex, OÖ UB 1, p. 779, quoted in Wegener (1965/67), p. 137. 

[117] Auctarium Mariaecellense 1100, MGH SS IX, p. 647. 

[118] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber VIII, Caps. XXXIV and XXXV, p. 579. 

[119] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber VIII, Cap. XXXIX, p. 581. 

[120] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 13, MGH SS XXI, p. 462. 

[121] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[122] Genealogia Marchionum de Stire, MGH SS XXIV, p. 72. 

[123] Ekkehardi, Altahense Annales 1107, MGH SS XVII, p. 365. 

[124] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[125] Fragmenta Necrologii Mellicensis Alterius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 560. 

[126] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[127] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[128] Cosmæ Pragensis Chronica Boemorum III.12, MGH SS IX, p. 106. 

[129] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 159. 

[130] Auctarium Vindobonense 1096, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[131] Landbuch von Österreich und Steier DChr 3, p. 716, quoted in Wegener (1965/67), p. 103. 

[132] Codex Traditionum Monasterii Formbacensis, CVII, Urkundenbuch des Landes ob der Enns, Vol. I, p. 657. 

[133] Jaksch, A. von (ed.) (1904) Monumenta historica ducatus Carinthiæ, Band III, Die Kärntner Geschichtsquellen 811-1202 (Klagenfurt) ("Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1904)"), 739, p. 288. 

[134] Annales Mellicenses 1154, MGH SS IX, p. 425. 

[135] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[136] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[137] Necrologium Michaelburanum, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 212. 

[138] Landbuch von Österreich und Steier DChr 3, p. 716, quoted in Wegener (1965/67), p. 103. 

[139] ES I.1 84. 

[140] Wegener (1965/67), p. 199. 

[141] Auctarium Vindobonense 1096, MGH SS IX, p. 723. 

[142] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1104, MGH SS IX, p. 609. 

[143] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1099, MGH SS, p. 725.  

[144] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1136, MGH SS IX, p. 613. 

[145] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61. 

[146] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[147] ES I.1 84. 

[148] ES I.1 84. 

[149] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I. 8 and 9, MGH SS XX, pp. 357 and 358. 

[150] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.10, MGH SS XX, p. 358. 

[151] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[152] Haverkamp (1988), p. 125. 

[153] Auctarium Mellicense 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 536. 

[154] Annales Magdeburgenses 1143 6, MGH SS XVI, p. 187. 

[155] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61. 

[156] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[157] ES I.1 84. 

[158] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[159] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1125, MGH SS, p. 725. 

[160] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1136, MGH SS IX, p. 613. 

[161] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[162] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[163] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[164] Fischer, M. (ed.) (1851) Codex Traditionem Ecclesiæ Collegiatæ Claustroneoburgensis, Donationes 1108-1260 (Fontes Rerum Austriacarum, Zweite Abteilung Diplomataria et Acta, IV Band) (Wien) (“Kloster Neuburg”) I (40), p. 10. 

[165] Chronicon Ottonis Frisingensis VII. 21, MGH SS XX, p. 259. 

[166] ES II 154. 

[167] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[168] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 614. 

[169] Auctarium Sancrucense 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[170] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61. 

[171] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[172] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[173] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[174] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 144, the date "Sep 29" being inserted in the margin by the editor. 

[175] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[176] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, pp. 611-12. 

[177] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 76. 

[178] Monumenta San-Nicolaitana, Codex Traditionem XXIV, Monumenta Boica Vol. IV, p. 235. 

[179] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[180] Necrologium Monasterii Superioris Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 334. 

[181] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287. 

[182] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[183] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834. 

[184] Schlesisches Urkundenbuch I 971-1230, 20, p. 15. 

[185] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[186] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[187] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[188] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 136-7. 

[189] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1158, MGH SS IX, p. 615. 

[190] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[191] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 611. 

[192] Annales Mellicenses 1164 and 1168, MGH SS IX, p. 504. 

[193] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 91. 

[194] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[195] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[196] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[197] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”) XXI.XIII, p. 1026. 

[198] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[199] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2. 

[200] Hoffman, G. (ed.) (1731) Nova scriptorum ac monumentorum collectio, Tome I, Sam. Guichenoni Bibliothecam Sebusianam et Paridis de Crassis diarium cur. rom (Leipzig) ("Bibliotheca Sebusiana"), Centuria I, XCIV, p. 170. 

[201] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[202] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[203] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[204] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[205] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[206] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612. 

[207] ES I.2 177. 

[208] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ 1150, MGH SS IX, p. 160. 

[209] Annales Palidenses 13, 1150, MGH SS XVI, p. 85. 

[210] Necrologium Windbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 383. 

[211] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[212] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[213] Annales Sancti Rudberti Salisburgenses 1164, MGH SS IX, p. 776. 

[214] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[215] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610. 

[216] Menzel, K. & Sauer, W. (eds.) (1885) Codex diplomaticus Nassoicus, Band I, Part 1 (Wiesbaden), 188, p. 128. 

[217] Haverkamp (1988), p. 142. 

[218] Auctarium Sancrucense 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[219] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 140. 

[220] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 150. 

[221] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1177, MGH SS IX, p. 617. 

[222] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[223] Necrologium Seccoviense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 403. 

[224] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[225] Annalista Saxo 1127. 

[226] Annales Mellicens es 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 503. 

[227] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 127. 

[228] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[229] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[230] Niketas Choniates, Liber III Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 2, p. 135. 

[231] Annales Mellicenses 1149, MGH SS IX, p. 504. 

[232] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 2, p. 270. 

[233] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 150. 

[234] Annales Mellicenses 1185, MGH SS IX, p. 505. 

[235] Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera 1184, MGH SS IX, p. 542. 

[236] Necrologium Seccoviense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 403. 

[237] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[238] OO UB 1, p. 366, cited in Wegener (1965/67), p. 169. 

[239] Monumenta Necrologica Voroviensia, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 436. 

[240] Necrologium Seccoviense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 403. 

[241] Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1904), 1164, p. 436. 

[242] Continuatio Admuntensis 1166, MGH SS IX, p. 583. 

[243] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), p. 151. 

[244] Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1904), 1282, p. 482. 

[245] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1157, MGH SS IX, p. 615. 

[246] Annales Mellicenses 1174, MGH SS IX, p. 504. 

[247] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1158, MGH SS IX, p. 615. 

[248] Annales Mellicenses 1174, MGH SS IX, p. 504. 

[249] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[250] Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera 1177 and 1182, MGH SS IX, pp. 541 and 542. 

[251] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[252] Necrologiæ Canoniæ ad Sanctum Andream, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 347. 

[253] Auctarium Sancrucense 1223, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[254] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[255] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1157, MGH SS IX, p. 615. 

[256] Annales Mellicenses 1174, MGH SS IX, p. 504. 

[257] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 32. 

[258] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, p. 51. 

[259] Annales Mellicenses 1195, MGH SS IX, p. 506. 

[260] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. (1968) 'L'Empereur Isaac de Chypre et sa fille (1155-1207)', Byzantion XXXVIII, reprinted in Familles de l'Orient latin XIIe-XIVe siècles (Variorum Reprints, London, 1983), p. 164.  

[261] Auctarium Sancrucense 1193, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[262] Annales Mellicenses 1174, MGH SS IX, p. 504.  The Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera, p. 541, specifies that she was "sororem Bele regis Avarerum".  

[263] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1195, MGH SS XXIII, p. 872. 

[264] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1199, MGH SS IX, p. 620. 

[265] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[266] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis III 1193, MGH SS IX, p. 634. 

[267] Continuatio Admuntensis 1197, MGH SS IX, p. 587. 

[268] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[269] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1185, MGH SS XXIII, p. 859. 

[270] Luard, H. R. (ed.) Matthæi Parisiensis, Monachi Sancti Albani, Chronica Majora, Vol. II 1067-1216 (1874) (“MP”), Vol, IV, 1241, p. 163, although he specifies neither the place nor the exact date. 

[271] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 160-2. 

[272] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), p. 163. 

[273] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis III 1193, MGH SS IX, p. 634. 

[274] Annales Mellicenses 1195, MGH SS IX, p. 506. 

[275] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[276] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[277] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis III 1193, MGH SS IX, p. 634. 

[278] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 147-52. 

[279] Continuatio Admuntensis 1230, MGH SS IX, p. 593. 

[280] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 91. 

[281] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[282] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 174-5. 

[283] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 160-2. 

[284] Rüdt-Collenberg (1968), pp. 163-. 

[285] ES II 179. 

[286] Annales Mellicenses 1203, MGH SS IX, p. 506. 

[287] Continuatio Admuntensis 1203, MGH SS IX, p. 590. 

[288] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 91. 

[289] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[290] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[291] Annales Mellicenses 1226, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[292] Notæ Sancti Emeranni 1228, MGH SS XVII, pp. 574 and 575. 

[293] Haverkamp (1988), p. 262. 

[294] Continuatio Garstensis 1253, MGH SS IX, p. 600. 

[295] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1252, MGH SS IX, p. 173. 

[296] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 6. 

[297] Hermanni Altahenses Annales 1261, MGH SS XVII, p. 402. 

[298] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1261, MGH SS IX, p. 178. 

[299] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[300] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[301] Annales Mellicenses 1222, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[302] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1222, MGH SS IX, p. 623. 

[303] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[304] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[305] Continuatio Admuntensis 1207, MGH SS IX, p. 591. 

[306] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1216, MGH SS IX, p. 622. 

[307] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1208, MGH SS, p. 726. 

[308] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[309] ES I.1 85. 

[310] Annales Mellicenses 1226, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[311] Continuatio Scotorum 1227, MGH SS IX, p. 624.  Footnote 64 specifies that the "Necr Mell" records "3 Non Ian" as the precise date, presumably 1228. 

[312] Continuatio Sancrucensis I, 1228, MGH SS IX, p. 627. 

[313] Continuatio Zwetlenses III 1252, MGH SS IX, p. 655. 

[314] Auctarium Sancrucense 1223, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[315] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522. 

[316] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[317] Annales Mellicenses 1226, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[318] Cronica Reinhardsbrunnensis 1200, MGH SS XXX.1, p. 564. 

[319] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[320] Bayley, C. C. (1949) The Formation of the German College of Electors in the mid-Thirteenth Century (Toronto), p. 21. 

[321] Canonicorum Pragensium Continuationes Cosmæ, Annalium Pragensium Pars I, 1246, MGH SS IX, p. 172. 

[322] Annales Mellicenses 1246 and 1248, MGH SS IX, p. 508. 

[323] Continuatio Garstensis 1252, MGH SS IX, p. 599. 

[324] Continuatio Florianensis , MGH SS IX, p. 747. 

[325] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[326] Annales Mellicenses 1250, MGH SS IX, p. 508. 

[327] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[328] Annales Mellicenses 1229, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[329] Bayley (1949), p. 7. 

[330] Waitz, G. (ed.) (1880) Chronica regia Coloniensis (Hannover), p. 269, cited in Bayley (1949), p. 7. 

[331] Böhmer-Ficker Regesta Imperii, I, 2237, and Huillard-Bréholles Historia diplomatica Friderici secundi, V, 13, 55, 59, cited in Bayley (1949), p. 7. 

[332] Bayley (1949), pp. 8-9. 

[333] Haverkamp (1988), p. 253. 

[334] Auctarium Sancrucense 1246, MGH SS IX, p. 732. 

[335] Bayley (1949), p. 21. 

[336] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[337] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[338] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1221, MGH SS XXIII, p. 911. 

[339] Annales Mellicenses 1229, MGH SS IX, p. 507. 

[340] Continuatio Garstensis 1243, MGH SS IX, p. 597. 

[341] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1244, MGH SS, p. 727. 

[342] Berger, E. (1897) Les registres d´Innocent IV (Paris), Tome II, 4302, p. 36. 

[343] Annales Mellicenses 1235, MGH SS IX, p. 508. 

[344] Continuatio Admuntensis 1234, MGH SS IX, p. 593. 

[345] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1234, MGH SS, p. 727. 

[346] Annales Mellicenses 1239, MGH SS IX, p. 508. 

[347] Haverkamp (1988), p. 262. 

[348] Bayley (1949), p. 193. 

[349] Leuschner, J. (1980) Germany in the Late Middle Ages (North Holland Publishing Company), pp. 94-5. 

[350] Ellenhardi Chronicon, Gesta Invictissim domini Rudolfi Romanorum regis, MGH SS XVII, p. 123. 

[351] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 240. 

[352] Bayley (1949), pp. 32 and 34. 

[353] Leuschner (1980), pp. 94-5. 

[354] Gingins-la-Sarra, F. de and Forez, F. (eds.) (1846) Recueil des Chartes, Statuts et Documents concernant l'ancien évêché de Lausanne (Lausanne) (“Lausanne Bishopric”) XXVI, p. 60. 

[355] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[356] Gesta Alberti Regis, ducis Austriæ, MGH SS XVII, p. 134. 

[357] Chronicon Colmarense, MGH SS XVII, p. 244. 

[358] Annales Sindelfingenses 1277, MGH SS XVII, p. 302. 

[359] Monumenta Hohenbergica 60, p. 37. 

[360] Annales Sancti Udalrici et Afræ Augustenses 1297, MGH SS XVII, p. 434. 

[361] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60. 

[362] Eberhardi Archidiaconi Ratisponensis Annales 1294, MGH SS XVII, p. 594. 

[363] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104. 

[364] Annales Sindelfingenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 302. 

[365] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[366] Ellenhardi Chronicon, Gesta Invictissim domini Rudolfi Romanorum regis 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 127. 

[367] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1284, MGH SS XVII, p. 211. 

[368] Prost, B. and Bougenot, S. (eds.) (1904) Cartulaire de Hugues de Chalon (1220-1319) (Lon-le-Saunier) (“Hugues de Chalon”), 547, p. 414. 

[369] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 580. 

[370] Du Chesne, A. (1628) Histoire géneálogique des ducs de Bourgogne de la maison de France (Paris), p. 84. 

[371] Depoin, J. ‘La maison de Chambly sous les capétiens direct’, Bulletin philologique et historique (1914), available at <http://fmg.ac/FMG/Scanned_Sources/Depoin/S-0823.pdf> (25 Feb 2013), p. 153, quoting analysis by Dom Villevieille, Ms. fr. 31908, fol. 76. 

[372] Kremer, C. J. ´Abhandlung von den graven von Loewenstein´, Acta Academiæ Theodoro-Palatinæ (1766), Vol. I, Urkunden, IV, p. 355. 

[373] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75. 

[374] Hermanni Altahensis continuation tertia 1302, MGH SS XXIV, p. 56. 

[375] Notæ Fuerstenfeldenses de Ducibus Bavariæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 75. 

[376] Notæ Diessenses 1305, MGH SS XVII, p. 325. 

[377] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360. 

[378] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60. 

[379] Chronicon Colmariense 1276, MGH SS XVII, p. 247. 

[380] Hamann, B. (1988) Die Habsburger, Ein biographisches Lexikon (Ueberreuter, Vienna), p. 232. 

[381] Necrologia Saeldentalense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 473. 

[382] Fine, J. V. A. (1994) The Late Medieval Balkans, A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest (Ann Arbour, University of Michigan Press), p. 209. 

[383] Chronicon Colmariense 1273, MGH SS XVII, p. 244. 

[384] Cronica Principum Saxonie , MGH SS XXV, p. 476. 

[385] Riedel, Dr. A. F. (1862) Novus Codex diplomaticus Brandenburgensis, Vierter Haupttheil, Band 1, (Berlin), Bruchstücke einer Brandenburgischen Chronik in Pulcawa's Böhmischer Chronik, p. 15. 

[386] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1280, MGH SS XVII, p. 207. 

[387] Florianus, M. (ed.) (1884) Chronicon Dubnicense, Historiæ Hungaricæ fontes domestici, Pars prima, Scriptores, Vol. III (Lipsia) ("Chronicon Dubnicense"), p. 111. 

[388] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60. 

[389] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104. 

[390] Annales Sindelfingenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 302. 

[391] Necrologium Wettingense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 588. 

[392] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 208. 

[393] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Kalendarium Necrologicum Basiliense, p. 147. 

[394] Chronicon Colmariense 1276, MGH SS XVII, p. 248. 

[395] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 29. 

[396] Annales Hospitalis Argentinenses 1281, MGH SS XVII, p. 104. 

[397] Rymer, T. (1745) Fœdera, Conventiones, Literæ 3rd Edn (London), Tome I, Pars II, p. 154. 

[398] Rymer (1745), Tome I, Pars II, p. 164. 

[399] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60. 

[400] Chronicon Colmariense, MGH SS XVII, p. 244. 

[401] Annales Colmarienses Maiores 1290, MGH SS XVII, p. 217. 

[402] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 28. 

[403] Boehmer, J. F. (1853) Fontes rerum Germanicarum Band II (Stuttgart) Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 475. 

[404] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 12. 

[405] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 475. 

[406] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[407] Chronicon Colmariense, MGH SS XVII, p. 252. 

[408] Chronicon Francisci, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 11. 

[409] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput III, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 28. 

[410] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 54. 

[411] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60. 

[412] Annales Basileenses 1276, MGH SS XVII, p. 199. 

[413] Schoepflin, J. D. (1765) Historia Zaringo Badensis, Tome V, Codex Diplomaticus (Karlsruhe) ("Zaringo Badensis Codex"), CLXIX, p. 278. 

[414] Lausanne Bishopric XXVI, p. 60. 

[415] Leuschner (1980), p. 100. 

[416] Honemann, Volker 'A Medieval Queen and her Stepdaughter: Agnes and Elizabeth of Hungary', Duggan, A. (ed.) (1997) Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe (The Boydell Press), p. 110. 

[417] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[418] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 475. 

[419] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[420] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[421] Riedel, Dr. A. F. (1862) Novus Codex diplomaticus Brandenburgensis, Vierter Haupttheil, Band 1, (Berlin), Bruchstücke einer Brandenburgischen Chronik in Pulcawa's Böhmischer Chronik, p. 18. 

[422] Codex Brandenburgensis, Dritte Abteilung - Die Altmark, Band 22, XXIV Kloster Arendsee, I, p. 1. 

[423] Stenzel, G. A. (ed.) (1835) Scriptores Rerum Silesiacarum, Erster Band (Breslau) (“Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores“) I, p. 130. 

[424] Codex Brandenburgensis, Dritte Abteilung - Die Altmark, Band 22, XXIV Kloster Arendsee, XLIV, p. 26. 

[425] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[426] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[427] Honemann, Volker 'A Medieval Queen and her Stepdaughter', p. 110. 

[428] Honemann, Volker 'A Medieval Queen and her Stepdaughter', p. 112. 

[429] Honemann, Volker 'A Medieval Queen and her Stepdaughter', pp. 114-15. 

[430] Necrologium Feldbacense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 389. 

[431] Necrologium Wettingense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 588. 

[432] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[433] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[434] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[435] RHGF XX, Chronicon Guillelmi de Nangiaco, pp. 571 and 582. 

[436] Leuschner (1980), p. 100. 

[437] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 591. 

[438] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[439] Necrologium Feldbacense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 389. 

[440] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3. 

[441] Necrologium Patrum Minorum ad S Crucem Vindobonæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 166. 

[442] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[443] Annales Polonorum I 1288, MGH SS XIX, p. 650. 

[444] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 123. 

[445] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 58. 

[446] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber I, Caput XVIII, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 73. 

[447] Chronica Pragensis (Chronicon Francisci), Liber II, Caput IV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, pp. 121-2. 

[448] RHGF XX, Continuatio Chronici Guillelmi de Nangiaco, p. 591. 

[449] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[450] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[451] Not a contemporary nickname, it was first attributed to Friedrich in the 16th century.

[452] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[453] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[454] Ximénez de Embún y Val, T. (ed.) (1876) Historia de la Corona de Aragón: Crónica de San Juan de la Peña: Part aragonesa (“Crónica de San Juan de la Peña“), XXXVIII, p. 231, available at Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes <http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/FichaObra.html?Ref=12477> (3 Aug 2007). 

[455] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[456] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[457] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[458] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[459] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[460] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 479. 

[461] Ludwig IV King of Germany confirmed their freedom within the Empire in 1316, see Leuschner (1980), p. 142. 

[462] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[463] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[464] Birth date range estimated from the birth of Catherine de Savoie's elder daughter in early 1320. 

[465] State Archives, volume 102, page 38, fascicule 1, and Guichenon, S. (1780) Histoire généalogique de la royale maison de Savoie (Turin) ("Guichenon (Savoie)"), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 155. 

[466] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis VII 1336, MGH SS IX, p. 756. 

[467] Necrologium Wettingense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 588. 

[468] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[469] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 274. 

[470] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 123. 

[471] State Archives, volume 102, page 40.2. 

[472] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[473] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[474] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 221. 

[475] Chronicon Elwacense 1314, MGH SS X, p. 39.  

[476] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 479. 

[477] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[478] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 479. 

[479] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[480] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[481] Lacomblet, T. J. (ed.) (1853) Urkundenbuch für die Geschichte des Niederrheins, Band III (Düsseldorf) ("Niederrheins Urkundenbuch"), 137, p. 102. 

[482] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[483] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 479. 

[484] Boehmer, J. F. (1868) Fontes Rerum Germanicarum, Band IV (Stuttgart), Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 31. 

[485] Necrologium Wettingense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 588. 

[486] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[487] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[488] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[489] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360. 

[490] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[491] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[492] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[493] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 31. 

[494] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[495] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[496] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[497] Rymer (1740), Tome II, Pars IV, p. 103. 

[498] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[499] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 31. 

[500] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[501] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[502] Chronicon Elwacense 1319, MGH SS X, p. 39.  

[503] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 191. 

[504] Necrologium Habsburgicum Monasterii Campi Regis, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 357. 

[505] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Prius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 123. 

[506] Matthias Nuewenburgensis, p. 172. 

[507] Burkardi de Hallis et Dytheri de Helmestat Notæ Historicæ 1273-1325, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 479. 

[508] Necrologium Wettingense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 588. 

[509] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[510] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 33. 

[511] ES I.1 41 and ES I.2 226. 

[512] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 83. 

[513] Notæ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[514] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[515] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, pp. 31 and 33. 

[516] Chronicon Placentinum, RIS XVI, col. 508. 

[517] Necrologium Wettingense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 588. 

[518] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[519] Notæ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[520] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 358. 

[521] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[522] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 388. 

[523] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[524] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 83. 

[525] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[526] Notæ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[527] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 83. 

[528] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 83. 

[529] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 83. 

[530] Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ 1395, MGH SS XXV, p. 627. 

[531] Notæ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[532] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[533] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 388. 

[534] Benessii de Weitmil Chronicon Ecclesiæ Pragensis, Caput XIV, Scriptores Rerum Bohemicarum, Tomus II, p. 420. 

[535] Notæ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[536] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[537] Oude Kronik van Brabant, Codex Diplomaticus Neerlandicus, Second Series (Utrecht 1855), deerde deel, Part 1, p. 80. 

[538] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[539] Necrologium Raitenhaslacense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 260. 

[540] Necrologium Sældentalense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 360. 

[541] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[542] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[543] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[544] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[545] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 310. 

[546] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[547] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 310. 

[548] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[549] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 310. 

[550] Macartney, C. A. (1962) Hungary: A Short History (Edinburgh University Press), Chapter 3, consulted at Corvinus Library of Hungarian History, <http://www.hungary.com/corvinus/lib/> (20 Jul 2003). 

[551] Fine (1994), p. 553. 

[552] Henricus Dapifer de Diessenhoven 1316-1361, p. 83. 

[553] Necrologium Wiltinense, Brixen Necrologies, p. 60. 

[554] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[555] Notæ de Inclita Stirpe Habsburgica Necrologicæ, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 122. 

[556] Annales Mediolanenses, Cap. CXXVIII, RIS XVI, col. 736. 

[557] Chronicon Placentinum, RIS XVI, col. 508. 

[558] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[559] Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ 1395, MGH SS XXV, p. 627. 

[560] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[561] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[562] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[563] Chronica principum Poloniæ, Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 155. 

[564] Stenzel, G. A. (ed.) (1835) Scriptores Rerum Silesiacarum, Erster Band (Breslau) ("Silesiacarum Scriptores I"), p. 218. 

[565] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[566] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[567] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[568] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[569] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[570] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368. 

[571] Necrologium Wiltinense, Brixen Necrologies, p. 60. 

[572] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[573] Necrologium Stamsense , Brixen Necrologies, p. 47. 

[574] Necrologium Wiltinense, Brixen Necrologies, p. 60. 

[575] Necrologium Wiltinense, Brixen Necrologies, p. 60. 

[576] Necrologium Stamsense , Brixen Necrologies, p. 47. 

[577] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[578] Necrologium Weingartense, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 221. 

[579] Necrologium Wiltinense, Brixen Necrologies, p. 60. 

[580] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[581] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[582] Necrologium Wiltinense, Brixen Necrologies, p. 60. 

[583] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[584] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[585] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[586] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[587] Necrologium Runense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 341. 

[588] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[589] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[590] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[591] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[592] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[593] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[594] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[595] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[596] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[597] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[598] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[599] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[600] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[601] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[602] Silesiacarum Scriptores I, p. 311. 

[603] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[604] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[605] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[606] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[607] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[608] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112. 

[609] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[610] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[611] Necrologium Austriacum Gentis Habsburgicæ Alterum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 124. 

[612] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112.