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ANJOU

comtes d’anjou, ducs d’anjou

 

v4.0 Updated 18 April 2017

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                COMTES d'ANJOU. 2

A.         COMTE d´ANJOU 862-866 (CAPET) 2

B.         COMTES d´ANJOU 878-1060. 3

C.        COMTES d'ANJOU 1060-1189 (COMTES de GATINAIS) 22

D.        COMTES d'ANJOU (CAPET) 1246-1290, (VALOIS) 1290-1360. 37

E.         VICOMTES d'ANJOU.. 38

F.         SENECHAL d´ANJOU (ROCHES) 40

Chapter 2.                DUCS d'ANJOU. 44

A.         DUCS d'ANJOU 1360-1474 (VALOIS) 44

B.         SEIGNEURS de MEZIERES, MARQUIS de MEZIERES.. 54

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    COMTES d'ANJOU

 

 

 

A.      COMTE d´ANJOU 862-866 (CAPET)

 

 

1.         ROBERT "le Fort" (-killed in battle Brissarthe 2 Jul 866).  The question of the origin of Robert "le Fort" is discussed in full in the document FRANCE CAPETIAN KINGS.  A document issued by Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks dated Nov 853 names "Dodo episcopus, Hrotbertus et Osbertus" as missi in "Cinnomannio, Andegavensi, atque Turonico, Corboniso, et Sagiso"[1].  He rebelled against King Charles II in 858.  Robert submitted to the king's authority, when he was given command of the march of Neustria which had been confiscated from the Rorgonid family for supporting the revolt of King Charles´s son Louis (later King Louis II) against his father[2]Regino records that King Charles II "le Chauve" invested "Rodberto comiti" with "ducatum inter Ligerim et Sequanam adversum Brittones" in 861[3]The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rodbertus" attacked "Salomone duce" [duke of Brittany] in 862[4].  The Annales record that King Charles II´s son, the future King Louis II "le Bègue", rebelled against his father in 862 and, heading an army of Bretons, defeated "Rotbertum patris fidelem" in 862 and burned Angers yet again[5]Count in the march of Anjou [862/63]:  the creation of the "march" of Anjou is probably dated to the early 860s, as the Annales Bertiniani name "Rodberto, qui marchio in Andegavo fuerat" in 865[6].  However, this change of jurisdictional status must have been insufficient to control the Bretons and the Vikings as the mention of Robert in the Annales in 865 is in the context of King Charles imposing direct rule in the area by sending "Hludowicum filium suum" into "Neustriam" and granting him "comitatum Andegavensem et abbatiam Maioris-monasterii et quasdam villas illi", while Robert was compensated with "comitatum Autissiodorensem et comitatum Nivernensem".  Comte d'Auxerre and Comte de Nevers 865.  The Annales Bertiniani name "Rodbertus et Odo" as "præfecti" in the Seine valley area in 866 when recording that they repelled the Vikings who had sailed up river as far as "castrum Milidunum"[7].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Rotbertum et Ramnulfum, Godtfridum quoque et Heriveum comites" were defeated by the Vikings at "Brieserta" in 866, where Robert was killed[8].  The Adonis Continuatio records that "Robertus quoque atque Ramnulfus…inter primos ipsi priores" were killed by the Vikings in 866[9]

 

 

 

B.      COMTES d´ANJOU 878-1060

 

 

[TORQUATIUS [Tortulfus] .  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "vir quidam de Armorica Gallia nomine Torquatius…Tortulfus dictus fuit", recording that "genus eius olim ab Armorica iussu Maximi Imperatoris a Britonibus expulsum est"[10].  The Historia Comitum Andegavorum specifies that Charles II " le Chauve" King of the West Franks appointed Torquatius "forestæ qua Nidus Merulæ…forestarum constituit"[11].  The name Torquatius/Tortulfus does not have a convincing ring.  It is probable that he was not a historical person.] 

m ---.  The name of Torquatius's wife is not known. 

[Torquatius & his wife had one child:] 

1.         [TERTULLUS The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Torquatus sive Tortulfus genuit Tertullum", recording that he was granted property by Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks[12].  "Tertullus" is no more convincing than "Tortulfus" as the name of a historical figure in north-west France in the mid-9th century.  As is the case with his supposed father, it is probable that Tertullus was not a historical person.  m PETRONILLA, daughter of --- Duke of Burgundy & his wife ---.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the marriage of "Tertullus nobilem dux" and "ducis Burgundiæ filiam nomine Petronillam"[13].  The Chronico Turonensi names "Ingelgerius comes Andergavensis", the couple's son, as "nepos Hugonis Ducis Burgundiæ"[14]The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius…filius eius Fulco cognominatus Rufus", recording that "Hugo Dux Burgundiæ, filius alterius Hugonis" was "ex parte matris suæ [Fulco] consanguineus"[15].  The context suggests that "matris suæ" refers to Foulques, although according to other sources the connection was through the mother of Ingelger.  No other record has been found of any dukes of Burgundy who could have been related to Petronilla.  As with her husband, it is probable that Petronilla and her father were not historical persons.  Tertullus & his wife had one child:] 

a)         [INGELGER (-[888], bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius" as son of "Tertullus nobilem dux" & his wife[16].] 

-        see below

b)         [FOULQUES (-after 5 Jul 905).  "Ardradus" donated property "in pago Aurelianense" for the soul of "genitoris mei domni Attonis" with the consent of "frater meus Atto" to Saint-Martin d'Angers by charter dated 29 Sep 898, signed by "Ardradi, Attonis fratris sui vicecomitis…Fulconis vicecomitis"[17].  "Fulconis Turononum et Andecavorum vicecomitis…Guernagaudi vicecomitis vel graphionis…" subscribed a charter dated 5 Jul 905 under which "Archambaldus et uxor mea Ingilrada" donated property "in pago Turonico in vicaria Evenense" to Saint-Martin d'Angers[18].  It is unlikely that these two entries refer to Foulques "le Roux" (who was Vicomte de Tours et d'Anjou from [909] and was installed as Comte d'Anjou in 929), assuming that it is correct that he was born in [888] (see below).  Nevertheless, his name suggests a close family connection, as also do his titles which subsequently passed to the younger Foulques.  It is suggested here that Foulques senior was a younger brother of Ingelger, but this is no more than speculation.  It is also possible that he was the ancestor of the later Vicomtes d'Anjou, who are set in Chapter 3 of the present document.] 

 

 

INGELGER, son of [TERTULLUS & his wife Petronilla of Burgundy] (-[888], bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin).  Foulque I "le Roux" Comte d´Anjou names "Ingelgerio genitore meo…" in a charter dated to [929/30][19].  There is doubt whether the other references to Ingelger, which follow, accurately reflect the historical reality of his life.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius" as son of "Tertullus nobilem dux" and his wife[20].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius…iuvenis filius Tortulfi"[21].  The Chronico Turonensi names "Ingelgerius comes Andergavensis" as "nepos Hugonis Ducis Burgundiæ"[22]Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks gave him "a piece of a fief in the castle of Landonense".  He was installed as vicomte of the city of Orléans by Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, and appointed as royal representative at Tours.  The Historia Comitum Andegavorum records that Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks, therefore dated to [877/79], granted "dimidium Andegavis comitatum" to "Ingelgerius"[23].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that Ingelger died from "focositatem, phthisim et hydropisim"[24].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of "Ingelgerius" at "ecclesia beati Martini Castrinovi"[25]

m ADELAIS, niece of ADALHARD Archbishop of Tours and of RAINO Bishop of Angers, daughter of ---.  The Historia Comitum Andegavorum records that Ingelger married "Rursus Adelardus et Raymo ambo germani fratres, Turonensium et Andegavensium pontifices, neptem suam Aelindis" and that her dowry consisted of "alodiis suis…Ambazio, Busenciaco et Castellione"[26].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that Ingelger married "Landonensis castri sive Gastinensis pagi consul nomine Gaufredus…filiam unicam…Adelam", and thereby inherited "Landonensi castro" as she was the heir of her father who had no surviving male issue[27], but this text may confuse Ingelger's wife with the first wife of Comte Foulques II "le Bon" (see below).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that, after the death of her husband, Adelais was unjustly accused of adultery by a group of nobles led by "Guntrannus parens Ingelgerii" but later exonerated[28]

Comte Ingelger & his wife had one son:

1.         FOULQUES (-[Aug 941/942], bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius…filius eius Fulco cognominatus Rufus"[29].  [“Ademari comitis, Attonis vicecomitis...Guarnegaudi...Ragenaldi...Fulconis, Gauzfredi” subscribed the charter dated Apr 886 under which “Odo...comes et...abbas...Sancti Martini” returned property in Italy “Solarium...et Vallem Caumoniam” to the abbey[30]"Rotberti rerum Sancti Martini abbatis, Guarnegaudi vicecomitis, Burchardi comitis, Fulconis, Ardradi vicecomitis..." subscribed the charter dated 22 Mar [891/92] which records the judgment at Tours in favour of Saint-Martin against Ricbert who had mistreated serfs[31].  It is uncertain whether the subscriber of these two charters is the same person as the future Foulques I Comte d´Anjou.  The date of the earlier charter especially appears to be early for him to have been the same.]  Vicomte d´Anjou: "Ardradus" donated "villam...Bainam...in pago Aurelianense" to Saint-Martin de Tours, for the soul of “genitoris mei domni Attonis”, with the consent of “frater meus Atto”, by charter dated 29 Sep 898, subscribed by “Attonis fratris sui vicecomitis, Gunberti avunculi ipsorum, Fulconis vicecomitis...[32]...Attonis vicecomitis, Guarnegaudi vicecomitis, Fulconis vicecomitis” subscribed the charter dated 22 May 899 under which “Rotbertus...Sancti Martini abbas et comes” restored “cellam beati Clementis martyris” to Saint-Martin[33].  “...Attonis vicecomitis, Guarnegaudi vicecomitis, Fulconis vicecomitis, Rainaldi vicecomitis...” subscribed the charter dated 13 Sep 900 under which “Rotbertus...beati Martini abba...et comes” restored “cellulæ...Sancti Clementis”, previously donated by “predecessor noster domnus Odo germanus noster...tunc abbas deinde Francorum rex”, to Saint-Martin[34].  Vicomte de Tours: "Archambaldus et uxor mea Ingilrada" donated property "in pago Turonico in vicaria Evenense...in villa...Fontanas...in villa...Linarias" to Saint-Martin de Tours by charter dated 5 Jul 905, subscribed by “Fulconis Turonorum et Andecavorum vicecomitis, Gauzleni comitis et yppocomitis palatii...Guarnegaudi vicecomitis vel graphionis, Burchardi comitis vel graphionis...[35]FOULQUES I "le Roux" Comte d'Anjou: "Domni Fulconis Andecavorum comitis, Tedbaldi Turonorum vicecomitis" subscribed the charter dated 30 Oct 909 under which the testamentary executors of "domni Gauzuini" donated property to Saint-Martin de Tours[36]Domni Gauslini comitis, domni Ervei comitis, domni Gausberti comitis, domni Fulconis” subscribed the charter dated 13 Nov 912 under which “domnus Rotbertus Sancti Martini...atque...beati Martini Majoris...monastgerii...abba...et comes” confirmed the independence of Marmoutier abbey[37]"Fulconis abbatis atque vicecomitis" subscribed the charter dated Aug 924 under which "Fulculfus et conjux mea Eufrasia" donated property to Saint-Aubin d´Angers[38].  His lay abbacies are noted in the charter dated to [929/30] under which "Fulco Andecavorum comes abbas quoque Sancti Albini Sanctique Lizinii necnon et uxor mea Roscilla et filii mei Widdo ac Fulco" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers for the souls of "Ingelgerio genitore meo atque Ingelgerio filio meo necnon…Warnerio socro meo et uxore sua Tescenda"[39].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of "Fulco Rufus" at "ecclesia beati Martini iuxta patrem suum"[40]"Domni Fulconis et filii ipsius…quoque Fulconis" are named as present in a charter dated Aug 941 which records a lawsuit concerning land claimed by "sacerdos Sancti Martini…Tesmunnus"[41]m ROSCILLE [de Loches], daughter of GARNIER Seigneur de Loches, Villentrasti et Haia & his wife Tescenda ---.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the marriage of Comte Foulques and "de pago Turonico…Roscillam, Warnerii filiam", specifying that "Warnerius…filius Adalaudi" had three castles "in Turonico…Lochas atque Villentrasti et Haia" which Foulques later acquired[42]"Falco comes Andecavorum iuvenis" names "uxor mea Roscila et filii mei Guido et Fulco" in a donation of property "pro anima Ingelgerii patris mei et iterum Ingelgerii filii mei et Vuarnerii soceri mei et uxoris suæ Tescendæ" by charter dated 929[43]"Fulco Andecavorum comes abbas quoque Sancti Albini Sanctique Lizinii necnon et uxor mea Roscilla et filii mei Widdo ac Fulco" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers for the souls of "Ingelgerio genitore meo atque Ingelgerio filio meo necnon…Warnerio socro meo et uxore sua Tescenda" by charter dated to [929/30][44]Comte Foulques I & his wife had five children:

a)         INGELGER d'Anjou (-killed in battle [927]).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulco Rufus alium [filium] …Ingelgerium" was killed fighting the Normans[45].  Although he is discussed in the Gesta after his brother Guy, it is likely that he was the oldest son, the first-born rarely entering the church although ecclesiasts were given precedence in lists of children in contemporary texts due to their perceived superior rank.  "Falco comes Andecavorum iuvenis" names "uxor mea Roscila et filii mei Guido et Fulco" in a donation of property "pro anima Ingelgerii patris mei et iterum Ingelgerii filii mei et Vuarnerii soceri mei et uxoris suæ Tescendæ" by charter dated 929[46]"Fulco Andecavorum comes abbas quoque Sancti Albini Sanctique Lizinii necnon et uxor mea Roscilla et filii mei Widdo ac Fulco" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers for the souls of "…Ingelgerio filio meo…" by charter dated to [929/30][47]

b)         GUY d'Anjou (-[970]).  His father offered him as a hostage to the Normans in return for the release of Charles III "le Simple" King of the Franks in 922.  Bishop of Soissons 937.  Flodoard records in 937 the death of “Abbo Suessorum præsul” and the succession of “Wido filius Fulconis Andegavensis, sancti Martini Turonensis canonicus” to the bishopric[48]The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulco…filiosque…quorum unus Guido" was made Bishop of Soissons by "Hugonem Abba-Comitem"[49]

c)         FOULQUES d'Anjou (-11 Nov 958).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Fulco Rufus alium [filium] …tertium iuniorem…alter Fulco cognominatus Bonus" when recording that he succeeded his father[50].  He succeeded his father in 942 as FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d'Anjou  

-        see below

d)         ROSCILLE d'Anjou (-[943/51]).  A document, allegedly from a "Registre conservé à la Tour de Londres, composé par ordre de Foulque IV", records that "Comes Fulco et Tescendis comitissa" [presumably referring to Comte Foulques I and his wife Roscille] had "tres filios…et Roscillam Alani comitis dicti de Barbatorta uxorem", although this text does not form part of the surviving fragmentary history of the counts of Anjou which is attributed to Foulque IV "Réchin" Comte d´Anjou[51]m (943) as his first wife, ALAIN II "le Barbetorte" Duke of Brittany, son of MATHEDOI [I] Comte de Poher & his wife --- de Bretagne (in Brittany [before 919]-952). 

e)         [ADELA d'Anjou .  A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "…Walterius comes, Adela comitissa…"[52].  According to Europäische Stammtafeln[53], Adela was the possible daughter of Foulques I Comte d'Anjou.  The primary source which confirms her origin has not yet been identified.  It is possible that it is speculative, based on one of her sons being named Foulques.  m as his second wife, GAUTHIER [I] Comte de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin, son of --- ([925]-987).] 

 

 

FOULQUES d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES I "le Roux" Comte d'Anjou & his wife Roscille de "Loches" (-11 Nov 958).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Fulco Rufus alium [filium] …tertium iuniorem…alter Fulco cognominatus Bonus" when recording that he succeeded his father[54].  He succeeded his father as FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d'Anjou.  He made peace with the Normans. 

m firstly ([937]) GERBERGE, daughter of --- (-before 952).  "Gaufridus…Andecavorum comes" names "patris mei Fulconis, matris quoque meæ Gerbergæ" in his charter dated 19 Jun 966[55]Maurice Chaume suggested that she was Gerberge, daughter of Geoffroy Vicomte d'Orléans [Comte de Gâtinais], based on onomastic reasons only to explain the introduction of the name Geoffroy into the family of the Comtes d'Anjou[56]

m secondly (after 952) as her second husband, --- de Blois, widow of ALAIN II “Barbetorte” Duke of Brittany, daughter of THIBAUT [I] "l'Ancien" Comte de Blois & his [second wife Richilde ---]The Chronicle of Nantes records the marriage of "Theobaldus comes Blesensis…sororem suam relictam Alani Barbætortæ ducis" and "Fulconi comiti Andegavensi"[57]

Comte Foulques II & his first wife had four children: 

1.         GEOFFROY d'Anjou ([938/40]-21 Jul 987, bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "primogenitus Gofridus…Guido…episcopus Podii…tertius minor Drogo" as the three sons of "Fulco Pius"[58].  He succeeded his father in 958 as GEOFFROY I "Grisgonelle" Comte d'Anjou

-        see below

2.         GUY d'Anjou (-before 995)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "primogenitus Gofridus…Guido…episcopus Podii…tertius minor Drogo" as the three sons of "Fulco Pius"[59]The Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy refers to the bishop who was "frater germanus comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella", clarifying in a later passage that he was "dominus Guido sanctæ Vallavensis ecclesiæ…episcopus"[60]"Gaufridus…Andecavorum comes", with the consent of "fratre meo Widone abate", established the right of the comtes d'Anjou to appoint abbots of Saint-Aubin d'Angers, by charter dated 19 Jun 966[61]He was appointed Bishop of Le Puy in 975 by Lothaire King of the West Franks. 

3.         ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou ([940/50]-[29 May 1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles]).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Pierre du Puy which names "comes Gaufridus cognomento Grisogonella…Pontius et Bertrandus eius nepotes…matre eorum Adalaide sorore ipsius"[62], the brothers Pons and Bertrand being confirmed in other sources as the sons of Etienne de Brioude (for example the charter dated 1000 under which "duo germani fratres…Pontius, alter Bertrandus" donated property to Saint-Chaffre for the souls of "patris sui Stephani matrisque nomine Alaicis")[63].  Adelais's second and third marriages are confirmed by Richer who records the marriage of Louis and "Adelaidem, Ragemundi nuper defuncti ducis Gothorum uxorem" and their coronation as king and queen of Aquitaine[64].  The Chronicon Andegavensi names "Blanchiam filiam Fulconis Boni comitis Andegavensis" as wife of the successor of "Lotharius rex Francorum", but confuses matters by stating that the couple were parents of "filiam Constantiam" wife of Robert II King of France[65].  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Blanchiam" as the wife of "Lotharius rex…Ludovicum filium" but does not give her origin[66]She was crowned Queen of Aquitaine with her third husband on the day of their marriage.  The Libro de Otiis Imperialibus names "Blanchiam" as wife of "Ludovicus puer [filius Lotharii]"[67].  Rodulfus Glaber refers to the unnamed wife of "Ludowicum" as "ab Aquitanis partibus uxorem", recounting that she tricked him into travelling to Aquitaine where "she left him and attached herself to her own family"[68]Richer records her marriage with "Wilelmum Arelatensem" after her divorce from Louis[69]Her fourth marriage is confirmed by the Historia Francorum which names "Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis"[70].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as mother of "Constantia [uxor Robertus rex]", specifying that she was "soror Gaufridi Grisagonelli"[71].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Blanca sorore eius" ( "eius" referring incorrectly to Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou) as wife of "Guillelmi Arelatensis comitis" and as mother of Constance, wife of Robert II King of France[72].  "Adalaiz comitissa" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated 1003[73].  This charter is subscribed by "Emma comitissa…Wilelmus comes", the second of whom was presumably the son of Adelais but the first of whom has not been identified.  "Pontius…Massiliensis ecclesie pontifex" issued a charter dated 1005 with the consent of "domni Rodhbaldi comitis et domne Adalaizis comitisse, domnique Guillelmi comitis filii eius"[74].  "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018 (this document makes no mention of Adelais´s supposed fifth husband)[75].  No explanation has been found for her having been named Adelais in some sources and Blanche in others: it is difficult to interpret all these documents to mean that they referred to two separate individuals.  Adelais's supposed fifth marriage is deduced from the following: Count Othon-Guillaume's wife is named Adelais in several charters[76], and Pope Benedict VIII refers to "domnæ Adeleidi comitissæ cognomento Blanchæ" with "nuruique eius domnæ Gerbergæ comitissæ" when addressing her supposed husband in a document dated Sep 1016[77], Gerberga presumably being Count Othon-Guillaume's daughter by his first wife who was the widow of Adelais-Blanche d´Anjou's son by her fourth husband.  However, the document in question appears not to specify that "domnæ Adeleidi…" was the wife of Othon Guillaume and the extracts seen (the full text has not yet been consulted) do not permit this conclusion to be drawn.  It is perfectly possible that the Pope named Adelais-Blanche in the letter only in reference to her relationship to Othon Guillaume´s daughter.  If her fifth marriage is correct, Adelais would have been considerably older than her new husband, and probably nearly sixty years old when she married (Othon-Guillaume's first wife died in [1002/04]), which seems unlikely.  Another difficulty is presented by three entries dated 1018, 1024 and 1026 which appear to link Adelais to Provence while, if the fifth marriage was correct, she would have been with her husband (whose death is recorded in Sep 1026) in Mâcon.  These entries are: firstly, "Adalax comitissa mater Villelmi quondam Provintie comitis et Geriberga eque comitissa…eiusdem principis olim uxor" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille for the soul of their late son and husband respectively by charter dated 1018[78]; secondly, "Vuilelmus filius Rodbaldi" donated property "in comitatu Aquense in valle…Cagnanam" to Marseille Saint-Victor by charter dated 1024, signed by "Adalaiz comitissa, Vuilelmus comes filius Rodbaldi"[79]; and thirdly, a manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[80].  The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[81].  An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[82]m firstly ([950/60]) as his second wife, ETIENNE de Brioude, son of BERTRAND --- & his wife Emilgarde [Emilde] --- (-before [970/75]).  m secondly ([970/75]) RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND III Comte de Toulouse & his wife Gundinildis --- ([945/55]-killed "Carazo" [972/79]).  m thirdly (Vieux-Brioude, Haute-Loire 982, divorced 984) LOUIS associate King of the Franks, son of LOTHAIRE King of the Franks & Emma d'Arles [Italy] ([966/67]-Compiègne 21 May 987, bur Compiègne, église collégiale de Saint-Corneille).  Crowned King of Aquitaine the day of his marriage in 982.  He succeeded his father in 986 as LOUIS V King of the Franksm fourthly ([984/86]) as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] "le Libérateur" Comte d'Arles Marquis de Provence, son of BOSON [II] Comte d'Arles & his wife Constantia [de Vienne] ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).  [m fifthly (before 1016) as his second wife, OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon et de Nevers [Bourgogne-Comté], son of ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy & his wife Gerberge de Chalon ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026).]  

4.         DREUX d'Anjou (-998)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "primogenitus Gofridus…Guido…episcopus Podii…tertius minor Drogo" as the three sons of "Fulco Pius", specifying that Drogo succeeded his brother as Bishop of Le Puy[83]Bishop of Le Puy   

 

 

GEOFFROY d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([938/40]-Marso 21 Jul 987, bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "primogenitus Gofridus…Guido…episcopus Podii…tertius minor Drogo" as the three sons of "Fulco Pius"[84].  He succeeded his father in 958 as GEOFFROY I "Grisegonelle" Comte d'Anjou"Teutbaldi comitis, Teutbaldi junioris, Gausfredi comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum…" subscribed the charter dated Sep 960 under which "Aremburgis" donated property to Saint-Florent de Saumur[85]"Gaufridus…Andecavorum comes", with the consent of "fratre meo Widone abate", established the right of the comtes d'Anjou to appoint abbots of Saint-Aubin d'Angers, by charter dated 19 Jun 966[86].  He succeeded as Comte de Chalon from his second marriage until his death in 987.  The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records the death in 987 of "Gaufredus comes Andegavensis pater Fulconis"[87]The Chronica Rainaldi records that "Gaufridus Andecavorum comes, pater Fulconis comitis" was killed "XII Kal Aug in obsidione Marsonis super Odonem Rufinum facta"[88]The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XIV Kal Aug 987" of "Gaufridus Andegavensis comes, pater Fulconis in obsidione Marsonis"[89].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of Geoffroy "in ecclesia Beati Martini Castri Novi"[90].  The Annales Sancti Albini Andegavensis record the death "XII Kal Aug…in obsidione Narsonis super Odonem Rufinum facta" of "Gaufridus comes, pater Fulchonis"[91]

m firstly ([965] or before) ADELA de Meaux, daughter of ROBERT Comte de Meaux et de Troyes & his wife Adelais [de Bourgogne] ([950]-974 after 6 Mar).  A manuscript genealogy, dated to the early 12th century, records "Herbertus de Tricis, Robertus, Adela, Fulco, Gaufridus Martellus"[92]Her marriage date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of her oldest daughter.  "Adela" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 6 Mar 974 which names "seniore meo Gauzfredo comite" and is subscribed by "Gauzfredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius, Gauzfredi filii eius"[93]The Chronicæ Sancti Albini names "Adela comitissa…et marito suo Gaufrido" as present at the ordination of "Rainaldus episcopus" in 1074[94].  "Fulco Andecavorum comes" relinquished rights to the bishop of Angers "pro anima patris mei Gauffredi et matris Adelæ" by charter dated 17 Jan 1020[95]

m secondly (2 or 9 Mar 979) as her second husband, ADELAIS, widow of LAMBERT Comte de Chalon, daughter of --- (-after 18 Oct 984).  "Gausfredus comes [et]…Adeleidis uxor mea" jointly donated land in "pago Cabilonensi" by charter dated Mar 979, her first marriage being deduced from "Hugo filius Lanberti comitis" acting jointly with them and signing "Hugonis filii eius" directly after "Adeleidis" in the subscriptions[96].  "Gauzfredi comitis, Adaleidis comitissa" subscribed a charter dated 18 Oct 984[97].  The origin of Adelais has been the subject of much speculation.  Settipani has suggested[98] that she was the daughter of Hugues Comte en Bourgogne & his wife Willa von Thurgau.  Chaume suggested[99] that she was the daughter or granddaughter of Charles Constantin Comte de Vienne.  Bouchard sets out several different theories concerning Adelais's origin, with the aim mainly of explaining Lambert's succession to the county of Chalon by inheritance through his wife.  However, none appears to be based on any primary source and the author concludes that she prefers "to leave Adelaide's origins unknown"[100].  An earlier theory was that Adelais was the sister of "Wera" Ctss de Meaux[101], which would mean that she was Adelais, daughter of Giselbert Duke of Burgundy, Comte de Chalon-sur-Saône et de Troyes & his wife Ermengarde [of Burgundy]Duchesne[102] suggested that Adelais Ctss de Chalon was the daughter of Robert Comte de Meaux et de Troyes, although this would mean that the two wives of Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou were sisters, no mention of which has so far been found in contemporary sources.  Yet another suggestion is that Adelais Ctss de Chalon was the same person as Wera-Adelais Ctss de Meaux.  However, this is even more unlikely chronologically considering the estimated birth date of Wera-Adelais and the fact that Adelais de Chalon gave birth to at least one child by her second husband, Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou, after their marriage in 979.  It would also mean that Comte Geoffroy married, as his second wife, his first wife's mother which is unlikely to have been accepted by the church.  Finally, in 1619, Duchesne[103] suggested that Adelais was the sister of Guillaume I Comte d'Arles. 

Comte Geoffroy I & his first wife had four children:

1.         ERMENGARDE d'Anjou (before 965-after 982).  Rodulfus Glaber records that Conan married the sister of Foulques of Anjou but does not name her[104].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  She was presumably born before 965 if it is correct that her first child was born in 980.  m (973) CONAN Comte de Rennes, son of JUDICAËL BERENGAR Comte de Rennes & his wife Gerberge --- (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992).  He succeeded in 990 as CONAN I "le Tort" Duke of Brittany

2.         FOULQUES d'Anjou ([970]-Metz 21 Jun 1040, bur Beaulieu-lez-Loche, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre)The Historiæ Andegavensis, allegedly written by Foulques IV "Rechin" Comte d'Anjou, names "Goffridus Grisagonella pater avi mei Fulconis"[105]He succeeded his father in 987 as FOULQUES III "Nerra/the Black" Comte d'Anjou

-        see below

3.         GEOFFROY (-after 6 Mar 974).  "Adela" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 6 Mar 974 which names "seniore meo Gauzfredo comite" and is subscribed by "Gauzfredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius, Gauzfredi filii eius"[106]

4.         GERBERGE d'Anjou (974 or before-after 1 Apr 1040)The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "comes…Engolismæ Willelmus" and "Girberga sorore comitis Fulconis"[107].  The Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensis names "Giberta sorore comitis Guillermi Andegavensis" as wife of "Guillermus Comes Engolismensis"[108]"Gaufredus et uxor mea Petronilla" donated property "ecclesiam Sancti Pauli…in Sanctonensi territorio subter castrum…Botavilla" to Sauvigny on the advice of "Vuillelmi comitis Engolismensis et uxoris eius dominæ Girbergiæ patris…mei et matris et domini Elduini fratris mei" by charter dated before 1028[109]m (before 1000) GUILLAUME IV Comte d'Angoulême, son of ARNAULD "Mancer" Comte d'Angoulême & his first wife Raingarde --- ([978]-murdered 6 Apr 1028, bur Angoulême Saint-Cybard).  He was poisoned by his daughter-in-law Alaisia.    

Comte Geoffroy I & his second wife had one child:

5.         MAURICE d'Anjou ([980]-1012, bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin).  The cartulary of Paray-le-Monial includes a charter (undated) of "filius eius Hugo" which is subscribed by "Hugonis comitis et episcopi, Adelaidis com, Mauricii…"[110]"Hugo comes" donated property to Cluny "pro absolutione patris Lantberti" by charter dated to [988] which also names "mater mea Adelaydis et frater meus Mauricius"[111]"Cabilonensium comes domnus Hugo et mater eius Adeleidis et domnus Mauricius frater eius" donated property "in villa Paion" to Paray-le-Monial by undated charter[112].  The fact that he was his mother's son by her second marriage is confirmed by "Fulco comes Mauriciusque frater eius" accusing "Rainaldus Andecavorum episcopus" of corruption, recorded in a charter dated [24 Oct 996/12 Jun 1005] which names "patri eorum Goffrido"[113]"Domnus Hugo comes atque mater sua Adeleidis" donated property "in pago Cabilonensi" to the abbey of Paray-le-Moniale by an undated charter signed by "Hugo comes, Adeleidis matris suæ, Mauritii filii eius, Enrici ducis, Garlindis uxoris eius"[114].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Mauricius Gosfridi Grisæ Tunicæ filius" succeeded his father as Comte d'Anjou, and that Foulques "Nerra" was the son of Maurice and succeeded his father[115].  The Historia Comitum Andegavorum repeats these statements, which are chronologically impossible, concerning the alleged succession of Maurice to the county of Anjou and his succession by his supposed son Foulques "Nerra"[116].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of "Mauriciusin ecclesia Beati Martini Castri Novi iuxta patrem suum"[117]m --- de Saintes, daughter of AIMERY Comte de Saintes & his wife ---.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "de Alverniensi pago filiam Hamerici consulis Santonici, neptem Raimundi Pictavensis comitis" as wife of "Mauricius Gofridi Grisæ Tunicæ filius", stating (incorrectly) that "Fulconem Neram" was their son[118].  "Raimundis Pictavensis comitis" may refer to Raymond-Pons Comte de Toulouse, who was also for a time duke of Aquitaine, the Aquitainian title being closely associated with the county of Poitou.  This would also be chronologically acceptable, assuming that "neptem" in the Gesta can be translated as granddaughter.  Maurice & his wife had [two] children: 

a)         GEOFFROY (-killed Château de Langeais 1039).  A charter dated 1039 records that "miles…Walterius…filius Hamelini de Lingaiis" was sentenced to relinquish property held from Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d´Anjou for having killed "cognatum predicti comitis…Mauricium", Comte Geoffroy donating the property to La Trinité de Vendôme, witnessed by "Radulfo vicecomite, Guillelmo vicecomite, Erfredo vicecomite, Herveo vicecomite de Bleso, Haimerico de Rancono, Goffrido de Prulliaco, Roberto Burgundione, Adelardo de Castro-Gunterii…"[119].  "Gauterius quidam miles, filius Hamelini Lingiacum" granted two mills to Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d´Anjou after killing "cognatum comitis Gosfridi…Guasfridum filium Moricii comitis" by charter dated 1039, Comte Geoffroy donating the property to La Trinité de Vendôme[120]

b)         [OTGER (-after 1055).  "…Otgerii filii Mauricii Comitis…" witnessed the charter dated 1055 under which Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d´Anjou donated land in the forest of Gastine to Marmoutier[121].  It is not certain that Otger was the son of Maurice d´Anjou.  However, no other Comte Maurice has been identified who lived during the right time period.] 

 

 

FOULQUES d'Anjou, son of GEOFFROY I "Grisegonelle" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Adela de Meaux [Vermandois-Carolingian] ([970]-Metz 21 Jun 1040, bur Beaulieu-lez-Loche, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre)The Historiæ Andegavensis, allegedly written by Foulques IV "Rechin" Comte d'Anjou, names "Goffridus Grisagonella pater avi mei Fulconis"[122].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridi Grisagonelli" as father of "Fulconis Andegavensum comitis"[123].  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated 1037 which announces the birth in 1007 of "Gaufridus Martellus…pater eius Fulcho…comes Andecavorum filius Gaufridi Fortissimi comitis qui cognominatus est Grisia Gonella" and records donations to Saint-Aubin d'Angers[124].  These sources make it even more puzzling why both the Gesta Consulum Andegavorum and the Historia Comitum Andegavorum, as mentioned in the Introduction, record that Count Foulques III "Nerra" was the son of Maurice, youngest son of Count Geoffroy I "Grisegonelle"[125], which is chronologically impossible.  "Adela" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 6 Mar 974 which names "seniore meo Gauzfredo comite" and is subscribed by "Gauzfredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius, Gauzfredi filii eius"[126]He succeeded his father in 987 as FOULQUES III "Nerra/the Black" Comte d'Anjou.  He went on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1002[127]"Fulcho Andegavorum comes" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers for the souls of "patris mei Goffredi atque matris mei Adele…" by charter dated to [1007/26][128].  "Fulco Andegavorum comes atque Hildegardis conjunx mea" founded the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter signed by "…Goffridi Fulconis filii…"[129].  "Fulco Andecavorum comes et uxor mea Hildegardis filius quoque noster Goffridus" donated the bridge of Mayenne to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter[130].  He allied himself with Frederic II Duke of Upper Lotharingia against Eudes II Comte de Blois, fighting the latter at Pontlevoy and in Champagne[131]Rodulfus Glaber refers to the "perpetual quarrels and frequent wars" between "secundus Odo filius…prioris Odonis" and Foulques III Comte d'Anjou[132]Fulco comes Andegavensis, Iherosolimitanum iter aggrediens cum Audeardi comitissa et filii suo Goffredo Martello” donated property “in Genio...molendinum atque furnum” by undated charter[133]Rodolfus Glaber records his death at Metz and his burial place[134].  The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1040 XI Kal Jul" of "Fulco comes Andecavorum, pater Gaufridi"[135]The Chronicon Vindocinense records the death "XI Kal Jul" in 1040 of "Fulco comes"[136].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "XI Kal Jul" of "Fulco comes Andegavorum pater fundator nostri"[137].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records the burial of Comte Foulques at "Lucanse castrum"[138]

m firstly (before 989) ELISABETH de Vendôme, daughter of BOUCHARD [I] "le Vénérable" Comte de Vendôme & his wife Elisabeth [de Corbeil] (after 958-Angers Dec 999).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated to [1032] which records that Foulques "Nerra" Comte d´Anjou transmitted "honor Vindocinensis" to his only daughter by "sororem defuncti pontificis", who had four sons of whom "primogenitum…Burchardum"[139].  The Chronico Monasterii Sancti Albini Andegavensis records a fire in "urbis Andegavæ" a few days after the burning of "comitissæ Helisabeth"[140]

m secondly (after 1000) HILDEGARD, daughter of --- (-Jerusalem 1 Apr 1046, bur Jerusalem, Church of the Holy Sepulchre).  "Fulco Andegavorum comes atque Hildegardis conjunx mea" founded the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter signed by "…Goffridi Fulconis filii…"[141].  "Fulco Andecavorum comes et uxor mea Hildegardis filius quoque noster Goffridus" donated the bridge of Mayenne to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter[142]She became a nun at the Abbey of Sainte-Marie de Ronceray which she had founded in 1028.  Fulco comes Andegavensis, Iherosolimitanum iter aggrediens cum Audeardi comitissa et filii suo Goffredo Martello” donated property “in Genio...molendinum atque furnum” by undated charter[143]"Hildegardis comitissa" relinquished rights in favour of the oratory of Toussaint by charter dated [21 Jun 1040/1 Apr 1046][144]"Joffredus Andecavorum comes…michi matronis domna Hildgalde comitissa genitrice mea simulque conjuge mea Agnosze" donated "curte Petre" to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by charter 1 Oct (no year)[145]She died while on pilgrimage to Jerusalem[146]An undated charter records the death of "comitissa Hildegardis quando viam Jerosolimitane peregrinationis" and her donation of serfs to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou[147].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Apr" of "Ildegardis nobilis comitissa"[148]The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1046 Kal Apr" of "Hildegardis comitissa"[149].  A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restituted it to the abbey[150].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "Kal Apr" of "Hildegardis comitissa Andegavorum mater fundatoris nostri"[151].  The Chronicon Vindocinense records the death "Kal Apr" in 1046 of "Hildegardis religiosa comitissa Andegavensis"[152]

Comte Foulques III & his first wife had one child:

1.         ADELA d'Anjou (-26 Feb [1033/35])The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Gosfridum Martellum et filiam Adelam" as the children of "Fulco Nerra"[153].  The primary source which confirms her marriage precisely has not so far been identified, although the Historia Nivernensium Comitum records that the wife of "Bodonem [filium Landrici]" was "stirpis Andegavorum"[154].  She succeeded her maternal uncle in [1016/20] as Ctss de ½ Vendôme.  A charter dated to [1032] records that Foulques "Nerra" Comte d´Anjou transmitted "honor Vindocinensis" to his only daughter by "sororem defuncti pontificis", who had four sons of whom "primogenitum…Burchardum"[155].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Kal Mar" of "Addela comitissa"[156]m (before [1016/20]) BODON de Nevers, son of LANDRY de Monceau Comte de Nevers & his wife Mathilde de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] (-[1023]).  He succeeded his wife's maternal uncle in [1016/20] as BODON Comte de Vendôme, by right of his wife. 

Comte Foulques III & his second wife had two children:

2.         GEOFFROY d'Anjou (14 Oct 1006-14 Nov 1060)The Chronicon Vindocinense records the birth "II Id Oct" in 1006 of "Gosfridus comes"[157].  "Fulco Andegavorum comes atque Hildegardis conjunx mea" founded the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter signed by "…Goffridi Fulconis filii…"[158].  "Fulco Andecavorum comes et uxor mea Hildegardis filius quoque noster Goffridus" donated the bridge of Mayenne to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter[159].  A charter dated 1037 confirms the birth in 1007 of "Gaufridus Martellus…pater eius Fulcho…comes Andecavorum filius Gaufridi Fortissimi comitis qui cognominatus est Grisia Gonella" and records donations to Saint-Aubin d'Angers[160].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum cognomento Martellam" as son of "Fulco comes Andegavonium Gaufridi Grisagonelli filius"[161].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Gosfridum Martellum et filiam Adelam" as the children of "Fulco Nerra"[162].  The Chronico Andegavensi records that "Gosfredus Martellus comes" was born "pridie Id Oct"[163].  “Fulco comes Andegavensis, Iherosolimitanum iter aggrediens cum Audeardi comitissa et filii suo Goffredo Martello” donated property “in Genio...molendinum atque furnum” by undated charter[164]He succeeded his father in 1040 as GEOFFROY II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou.  Guillaume II Duke of Normandy helped Henri I King of France to defeat Comte Geoffroy II at Mouliherne in [1045/55][165].  "Joffredus Andecavorum comes…michi matronis domna Hildgalde comitissa genitrice mea simulque conjuge mea Agnosze" donated "curte Petre" to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by charter 1 Oct (no year)[166]"Gaufridi comitis Andegavensium…comitissæ Adelaidis Teutonicæ" subscribed the charter dated 1060 under which "Hugonis…et Arsendis uxoris suæ et filiorum suorum Hugonis…atque Teobaldi" founded the priory of Laudun, under the direction of Tournus abbey[167].  The Chronicon Turonensi records that "Gaufridus de Pruliaco" rebelled in Anjou in 1062 and was killed, commenting that he invented tournaments[168]"Gaufridus comes filius Fulconis" died "XVIII Kal Dec"[169].  The Chronicon Vindocinense records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" in 1060 of "Gaufredus comes, Fulconis filius" after having been invested as a monk by "domno Adraldo, abate S. Nicolai"[170]The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1061 XVIII Kal Dec" of "Gaufridus Martellus …ciu successit Fulgo…Rechin"[171]The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "XVIII Kal Dec" of "Godefridus comes huius monasterii fundator"[172].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Gosfridus Martellus filius Fulconis", being childless, appointed "nepotibus suis Gosfrido Barbato et Fulconi Rechin" as his heirs[173]m firstly (1 Jan 1032, divorced [1049/52]) as her second husband, AGNES de Mâcon, widow of GUILLAUME III "le Grand" Comte de Poitou [GUILLAUME V Duke of Aquitaine], daughter of OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] & his first wife Ermentrude de Roucy ([990/95]-10 Nov 1068).  Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[174].  Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[175].  "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][176]The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[177]The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[178].  Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[179]Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[180].  A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installing her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou.  Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044.  "Joffredus Andecavorum comes…michi matronis domna Hildgalde comitissa genitrice mea simulque conjuge mea Agnosze" donated "curte Petre" to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by charter 1 Oct (no year)[181].  She arranged her daughter's marriage to Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after that time.  "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[182]"Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[183]A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restored it to the abbey[184].  After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[185].  "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][186].  "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirmed in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[187].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[188].  [m secondly] ADELA, daughter of Comte EUDES & his wife ---.  A charter of Ronceray records that Geoffroy "Martel" failed to restore to the abbey property donated by his mother, but instead gave it to "suis eas concubinis…quam uxoribus…Agneti primo, deinde Grecie, postea Adele comitis filie Odonis, item denuo Grecie, postremo Adelaidi Theutonice"[189].  No other reference has been found to Adela.  She may have been the mistress rather than wife of Comte Geoffroy.  The only "count Eudes" identified at this time is Eudes II Comte de Blois, but no other record has been identified of his having a daughter named Adela.  m [secondly/thirdly]  (before 15 Aug 1052, divorced) as her second husband, GRACE, widow of BERLAY Seigneur de Montreuil, daughter of --- (-25 Apr ----).  The Historia sancti Florentii Salmurensis records the death of "Bellaius dominus Mosterolii castri", his burial in the abbey, and the donation by "huius coniux…Griscia postea Andegavensis comitissa" with the consent of "filiis suis Giraldo, Andegavis in Can Domini…interfecto, et Rainaldo multo post Remensium archiepiscopo"[190].  Although undated, this follows a passage recording an event in 1051.  A charter of Ronceray records that Geoffroy "Martel" failed to restore to the abbey property donated by his mother, but rather gave it to "suis eas concubinis…quam uxoribus…Agneti primo, deinde Grecie, postea Adele comitis filie Odonis, item denuo Grecie, postremo Adelaidi Theutonice"[191], which implies that Grace may have been the mistress of Geoffroy during the lifetime of her first husband.  "Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou [et] Grecie sa femme" were among those present at the freeing of a serf under charter dated 1052[192]The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "VII Kal Mai" of "Grecia primus comitissa uxor Gauffridi Martelli postea sanctimonialis"[193]m [thirdly/fourthly] (before 22 May 1060) ADELHEID "La Teutonne", daughter of --- (-after 1062).  A charter of Ronceray records that Geoffroy "Martel" failed to restore to the abbey property donated by his mother, but rather gave it to "suis eas concubinis…quam uxoribus…Agneti primo, deinde Grecie, postea Adele comitis filie Odonis, item denuo Grecie, postremo Adelaidi Theutonice" (presumably indicating a Germanic origin)[194].  "Gaufridi comitis Andegavensium…comitissæ Adelaidis Teutonicæ" subscribed the charter dated 1060 under which "Hugonis…et Arsendis uxoris suæ et filiorum suorum Hugonis…atque Teobaldi" founded the priory of Laudun, under the direction of Tournus abbey[195]"Goffridus comes" restored property donated by "avia mea bone memorie Hildegardis comitissa…filie sue matri mee…Ermengardi…Adelait Teotisca que fuerat postrema avunculi mei uxor…avunculi mei Goffredi comitis" to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter[196]

3.         ERMENGARDE d'Anjou ([1018]-[church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076])The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[197].  Considering that she gave birth to children by her second marriage, it is unlikely that Ermengarde was born earlier than [1018].  She must therefore have been considerably younger than her brother.  Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[198].  Her second marriage is dated from the letter written before [1050] by Jean Abbot of Fécamp to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[199].  The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[200].  This entry suggests that Ermengarde died on the same day as her husband, possibly at the same place and in the same circumstances, although it is not infrequent for medieval necrologies to record couples on the same day, maybe in commemoration of a joint donation to the religious institution in question.  m firstly ([1035]) GEOFFROY II "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais, son of HUGUES du Perche Comte de Gâtinais & his wife Beatrix de Mâcon (-30 Apr 1043).  m secondly (1049) as his second wife, ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1007]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d’Or). 

children of first marriage:

-        see below, Part C.  COMTES d'ANJOU (COMTES de GATINAIS)

 

 

 

C.      COMTES d'ANJOU 1060-1189 (COMTES de GATINAIS)

 

 

GEOFFROY [II] de Gâtinais, son of HUGUES du Perche Comte de Gâtinais & his wife Beatrix de Mâcon (-30 Apr [1043/45]).  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 26 May 1028 under which Francon Bishop of Paris agreed with "Albericum illius supradicti Gosfredi filium et heredum", concerning a prior grant by the bishop's predecessor to "Gosfrido comiti Landonensi castri", with the approval of "fratribus ipsius Alberici, filiis Hugonis Pertice…Gosfredo et Letoldo"[201]A genealogy presented by Foulques IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou to the bishop of Angers in [1085], justifying the annulment of his fourth marriage with the daughter of Gauthier Comte de Brienne, states that "ex Letaldo, Albericus natus est, ex Alberico, Beatrix, ex Beatrice, Gosfredus de Castello Landonensi, ex Gaufrido, Gaufridus et Fulco presens"[202].  His name is confirmed by a charter (undated?) under which [his son] Geoffroy III Comte d’Anjou donated fishing rights on the Mayenne river to Angers Saint-Serge, for the souls of “Geoffroy son père et de Geoffroy Martel son oncle[203]He succeeded his half-brother as Comte de Gâtinais, Seigneur de Château-Landon.  The fact that Aubry Comte de Gâtinais and Geoffroy [II] Comte de Gâtinais were two different individuals, the inevitable conclusion from the two sources cited, is somewhat clouded by the Historia Comitum Andegavorum which records that "Gaufridus Martellus…nepotibus suis" were "filiis Adhelæ sororis suæ et Alberici comitis de Gastinais"[204], by the Chronicle of Saint-Maxence which names "Alberici Contracti comitis de Gastina" as father of "Goffredus et Fulco Rechin"[205], and by Orderic Vitalis who records that “Goisfredus Martellus Andegavensium comes” died childless and left “Goisfredo nepoti suo Alberici Wastinensium comitis filio” as his heir[206]

m ([1035]) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, daughter of FOULQUES III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Hildegard [de Metz] ([1018]-[church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076])The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[207]She married secondly ([1049]) as his second wife, Robert I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy.  Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[208].  Her second marriage is dated from the letter written before [1050] by Jean Abbot of Fécamp to Pope Leo IX recording that "Tedbaldo comite et Burgundionum…duce R" had "abdicatis legitimi thori connumbiis" and had "in inhonestis et consanguinitate fœdatis thalamis"[209].  The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[210].  This entry suggests that Ermengarde died on the same day as her husband, possibly at the same place and in the same circumstances, although it is not infrequent for medieval necrologies to record couples on the same day, maybe in commemoration of a joint donation to the religious institution in question.

Comte Geoffroy & his wife had three children:

1.         [HILDEGARDE] de Château-Landon (-after 1060)The Historia of Monk Aimon records the marriage of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" and "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole" by whom he had one daughter[211]She is named in Burke´s Peerage but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified[212].   It may represent a misinterpretation of the genealogy quoted above which refers to “Hildegardis, de altero patre...”.  m ([1060]) as his first wife, JOSCELIN [I] Seigneur de Courtenay, son of ATHON Châtelain de Châteaurenard & his wife --- ([1034]-after 1065). 

2.         GEOFFROY de Château-Landon ([1040]-[1096/97])The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Gosfridus Martellus filius Fulconis", being childless, appointed "nepotibus suis Gosfrido Barbato et Fulconi Rechin" as his heirs[213].  The Historia Comitum Andegavorum records that "Gaufridus Martellus…nepotibus suis" were "filiis Adhelæ sororis suæ et Alberici comitis de Gastinais"[214].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Goisfredus Martellus Andegavensium comes” died childless and left “Goisfredo nepoti suo Alberici Wastinensium comitis filio” as his heir[215].  Both these sources appear to be in error.  "Gaufredus comitatus Andecavensis naturalis heres" made donations to Marmoutier dated 1055 in which he names "nepotibus meis…Fulcone vincocinensium comite naturali, Gaufredo et altero Fulcone"[216]He succeeded in 1060 as GEOFFROY III "le Barbu" Comte d'Anjou"Goffridi comitis et Agnetis comitissæ…" witnessed the charter dated 26 Feb 1062, recorded in the dating clause as "anno principatus Gaufredi comitis tertii IIo", which records an agreement of confraternity between Saint-Maurice d´Angers and La Trinité de Vendôme[217].  "Goffridus comes" restored property donated by "avia mea bone memorie Hildegardis comitissa…filie sue matri mee…Ermengardi…Adelait Teotisca que fuerat postrema avunculi mei uxor…avunculi mei Goffredi comitis" to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou by undated charter[218]The Chronicon Turonensi records that "Gaufridus Barbatus…Comes" destroyed "Turoniæ, Abbatiam Majoris-Monasterii", after which he was captured by his brother Foulques and held captive for thirty years "apud Chainonem"[219].  William of Malmesbury and Orderic Vitalis both record that he was deposed in 1068 and imprisoned by his brother at the castle of Chinon for more than thirty years[220]The Chronicon Vindocinense records that "Fulconi fratri Gaufridi comitis Andegavorum" captured "Salmuri castri…Kal Mar" in 1067 and "II Kal Apr" captured and imprisoned "fratrem suum…comes Gaufredus junior…Barbatum" until his death, although another paragraph of the Chronicon dates the capture to 1068[221]The Chronica Rainaldi records that "Goffridus junior…Barbatum" was betrayed by "Fulconi fratri suo…Non Apr" in 1067 and captured in 1068[222]m (before 1060) JULIENNE de Langeais, daughter of HAMELIN [II] Seigneur de Langeais & [his wife Helvise de Mondoubleau] (-after 7 Aug 1067).  "Geoffroi le Barbu…[et] Julienne son épouse" confirmed the donation by "Bouchard le Breton" to Saint-Nicolas d´Angers, by charter dated to after 14 Nov 1060[223].  Her parentage is confirmed by a charter dated to [1068/82] under which "Hugues de Langeais", with the consent of "ses frères Hamelin et Geoffroi le doyen…son suzerain Geoffroi de Mayenne", donated property to Bourgeuil, subscribed by "comtesse Hameline", as well as a line of commentary in the cartulary of Bourgeuil which states that the subscriber was "filia Hamelini de Langiaco, uxor Goffridi Barbati comitis Andegav"[224].  "Geoffroi le Barbu…Juliette femme de Geoffroi et Foulque frère de Geoffroi" subscribed the charter dated 7 Aug 1067 which records the donation by "Robert de Sablé et sa femme Avoie" to Marmoutier[225].  [m AGNES, daughter of --- (-after 26 Feb 1062).  "Goffridi comitis et Agnetis comitissæ…" witnessed the charter dated 26 Feb 1062, recorded in the dating clause as "anno principatus Gaufredi comitis tertii IIo", which records an agreement of confraternity between Saint-Maurice d´Angers and La Trinité de Vendôme[226].  The dating clause indicates that this document is correctly dated to 1062, and suggests that the witness was Geoffroy III Comte d´Anjou and therefore that "Agnetis comitissæ" was his wife.  This conclusion causes a considerable difficulty as Geoffroy´s wife Julienne is named in charters sated 1060 and 1067.  Another possibility is that "Agnetis comitissæ" was the first wife of Geoffroy´s predecessor, Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d´Anjou, although if this is correct it is suprising that she signed in place of Geoffroy III´s wife.] 

3.         FOULQUES de Château-Landon (1043-14 Apr 1109, bur Anjou Sainte-Trinité)The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[227].  "Gaufredus comitatus Andecavensis naturalis heres" made donations to Marmoutier dated 1055 in which he names "nepotibus meis…Fulcone vincocinensium comite naturali, Gaufredo et altero Fulcone"[228]He succeeded, after deposing his brother, as FOULQUES IV "le Rechin" Comte d'AnjouThe Chronicon Vindocinense records that "Fulconi fratri Gaufridi comitis Andegavorum" captured "Salmuri castri…Kal Mar" in 1067 and "II Kal Apr" captured and imprisoned "fratrem suum…comes Gaufredus junior…Barbatum" until his death, although another paragraph of the Chronicon dates the capture to 1068[229]He ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to Philippe I King of France in 1069 in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[230].  He expelled the Normans from Maine but peace was imposed by William I King of England[231]The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" of "Fulco…comes Andagavensis nepos Gaufridi prioris Martelli"[232].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" of "Fulco comes Andegavorum"[233].  A list of anniversaries of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" of "Fulconis comitis qui iacet in Aquaria"[234].  The Chronicon Vindocinense records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" in 1109 of "Fulco comes Andegavorum…frater comitis Gosfridi…Barbatus" and his burial "in monasterio nostro Andegavense S. Trinitatis"[235]m firstly ([1068]) HILDEGARDE de Baugency, daughter of LANCELIN [II] de Baugency & his wife --- (-before 1070).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum refers to the first wife of "Fulco Rechin" as "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco"[236].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m secondly (1070, divorced) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE de Bourbon, daughter of ARCHAMBAUD [IV] "le Fort" Seigneur de Bourbon & his wife Béliarde ---.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ermengardim filiam Archenbaldi Fortis de Borbone" as second wife of "Fulco Rechin", recording that he divorced her[237].  She married secondly Guillaume Seigneur de Jaligny.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names her second husband "Guillelmo Jalinniaci ortam" when recording the marriage of her daughter by this second marriage[238]m thirdly (21 Jan 1076, divorced 1080) ORENGARDE de Châtelaillon, daughter of ISEMBART Seigneur de Châtelaillon & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the dating clause of a charter dated 21 Jan "1070" (redated to 1076) which records this as the date of the marriage of "comes Fulco" and "Aurengarde, filia Isemberti de Castello Allione"[239].  Comte Foulque "Rechin" donated property to Saint-Nicolas d´Angers, for the salvation of "sa femme Orengarde", by charter dated 17 May 1076[240].  She became a nun after her divorce.  m fourthly (after 1080, divorced before 1089) --- de Brienne, daughter of GAUTHIER [I] Comte de Brienne & his wife Eustachie Ctss de Bar-sur-Saône .  A manuscript genealogy, dated to the early 12th century, records "Windesmode Ingelbertus et Witdo de Upione, ex Ingelberto Walterius comes de Brena, ex Walterio filia nata est ista quam Fulco comes noster uxorem duxerat"[241]A genealogy presented by Foulques IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou to the bishop of Angers in [1085], justifying the annulment of his fourth marriage with the daughter of Gauthier Comte de Brienne, lists "ex Letaldo, Albericus natus est, ex Alberico, Beatrix, ex Beatrice, Gosfredus de Castello Landonensi, ex Gaufrido, Gaufridus et Fulco presens"[242]m fifthly (1089, divorced [15 May 1092]) as her first husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON I Comte de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d'Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Remy-l’Honoré, Yvelines).  Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[243].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum refers to the "third wife" of "Fulco Rechin" as "sororem Amalrici de Monte Forti"[244].  She married secondly (15 May 1092, repudiated 1104) as his second wife, Philippe I King of France (-29 Aug 1108).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Bertrada...Andegavorum comitissa”, fearing that her husband was about to treat her like his previous two wives, sought protection from “Philippo regi Francorum” who repudiated his own wife and married her, the ceremony being conducted by “Odo Bajocensis episcopus[245].  In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records that King Philippe abducted Bertrade from her first husband and married her bigamously[246]The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe whom he abducted from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[247].  William of Tyre records this marriage[248]Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[249].  The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[250].  Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[251]"Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][252].  Comte Foulques IV & his first wife had one child:

a)         ERMENGARDE d'Anjou ([1068]-Jerusalem 1 Jun 1146, bur Redon)The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the daughter of "Fulco" as "comitissam Redonensem" but does not name her[253]"Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[254].  William of Tyre names her "Hermingerda", gives her father's name implying that she was born from his fifth marriage, and names her first husband "Pictaviensium comitis Willelmi", records her divorce and names her second husband "comes Brittaniæ"[255]The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "comitissa Brittaniæ" was the daughter of Foulques & his first wife "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco", adding that she became a nun at "Jerusalem in ecclesia Sanctæ Annæ" after her husband died[256].  The Chronicon Briocensi records the marriage of "Alanus filius primogenitus [Hoelli]" and "Ermengardem filiam Comitis Andegavensis"[257].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Fergannus comes" married “filiam comitis Andegavorum” after the death of his first wife[258]"Fulco Andecavorum comes nepos Goffridi Martelli…consulis" donated property to Angers with the consent of "Ermenjarde filia sua comitissa Brittaniæ" by charter dated 12 Apr 1109[259]"Conanus…Britaniaæ dux cum sorore mea Hidevis et matre mea Ermeniart" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Croix de Quimperlé by charter dated 1118, which names "pater meus Alanus et avus Hoel et attavus Alanus"[260].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Kal Jun" of "Ermengardis comitissa Britanniæ mater Conan ducis et soror Fulconis regis Hierosolymitani"[261].  The Annals of St Salvator Redon record that "Ermengardeque Alani conjugem, vere piam ac religiosam" was buried at the abbey of Redon[262]m firstly (1089, divorced 1090) GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou], son of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Audearde [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne [Capet] ([22 Oct 1071]-10 Feb 1127)m secondly ([1093]) as his second wife, ALAIN IV "Fergant" Duke of Brittany, son of HOËL de Cornouaïlle & his wife Havise de Bretagne (-13 Oct 1119).

Comte Foulques IV & his second wife had one child:

b)         GEOFFROY d'Anjou ([1073]-killed in battle Candé 19 May 1106, bur Anjou Saint-Nicholas)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Gosfridum Martellum" was the son of "Fulco Rechin" & his second wife[263]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum iuniorem Martellum et Fulconam" as the two sons of "Fulco"[264]"Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[265].  William of Tyre names him and his father, implying that he was born from his father's fifth marriage[266].  He was known as GEOFFROY IV "Martel" Comte d'Anjou, during the lifetime of his father but died before he could succeed in his own right.  "Goffridus…Andegavorum comes cognomine Martellus" issued a charter dated 1105 against "Mauricius dominus castelli…Credonium" concerning Saint-Clément, founded by "avunculo meo…comite Goffrido…patrem meum Fulconem"[267]The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Gosfridum Martellum" was killed in 1106 at "Cande castro" and buried "in ecclesie Beati Nicholai Andegavis"[268].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XIII Kal Jun 1106" of "Gaufridus Martellus iunior filius Fulconis interemptus sagitta in obsidione apud Candeium"[269]Betrothed to EREMBURGE du Maine, daughter and heiress of HELIE de la Flèche Comte du Maine & his first wife Mahaut de Château-du-Loir ([1096]-14 Jan 1126)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Gosfridum Martellum" was betrothed to "Helias comes unicam filiam", who later married his younger half-brother[270]

Comte Foulques IV & his fifth wife had one child:

c)         FOULQUES d'Anjou (1092-Acre 13 Nov 1144)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulco" was the son of "Fulco Rechin" and "sororem Amalrici de Monte Forti", referring to her as his third wife[271]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum iuniorem Martellum et Fulconam" as the two sons of "Fulco"[272]William of Tyre names him and states his parentage[273].  He succeeded his father in 1109 as FOULQUES V "le Jeune" Comte d'Anjou.   

-        see below

 

 

FOULQUES d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchiin" Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 10 or 13 Nov 1144)The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulco" was the son of "Fulco Rechin" and "sororem Amalrici de Monte Forti", referring to her as his third wife[274]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum iuniorem Martellum et Fulconam" as the two sons of "Fulco"[275]William of Tyre names him and states his parentage[276].  His parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis[277].  "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[278].  William of Tyre records that Foulques was imprisoned by the Comte de Poitou but released after the intervention of his mother, who was by then queen of France[279]He succeeded his father in 1109 as FOULQUES V "le Jeune" Comte d'Anjou"Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][280].  "Fulcho iunior comes Fulchonis comitis filius, frater Martelli Iunioris" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 4 Jan 1113[281]Orderic Vitalis records that Foulques swore fealty to Henry I King of England, who invested him with the county of Maine, at "Petra Peculata" near Alençon in late Feb 1113, the alliance being confirmed by the betrothal of Henry's son to Foulques's daughter[282].  He later fought with Henry I King of England over the inheritance of his first wife.  William of Malmesbury also records his dispute with King Henry over the latter's retention of the dowry of Foulques´s daughter Alice after her husband's death in the Blanche Nef [White Ship][283].  The quarrel finally ended with his son's marriage to the king's daughter in 1128.  Orderic Vitalis records that he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1120 and remained there "for some time attached to the Knights of the Temple"[284].  He left France in early 1129, resigning the county of Anjou to his older son by his first marriage, and landed at Acre in May 1129 before travelling to Jerusalem for his marriage[285]He was crowned FOULQUES King of Jerusalem 14 Sep 1131, by right of his second wife.  He imposed himself as regent of Antioch after his sister-in-law Alix Ctss of Antioch attempted to reassert her right to the regency after the death of her father.  He rescued Pons Count of Tripoli from the castle of Montferrand in 1133, where he had fled after being ambushed by Turkomans in the Nosairi Mountains.  He also relieved Antioch which was being threatened by Sawar Governor of Aleppo[286].  Zengi marched on Homs and besieged the castle.  King Foulques attempted to relieve the siege, but his army was massacred, and he was obliged to seek refuge in the castle which he was eventually obliged to surrender as the price for his own release[287].  He agreed an alliance with Unur of Damascus in 1139 against Zengi atabeg of Aleppo, who was threatening Damascus, and forced the latter's retreat to Aleppo[288].  King Foulques died after being thrown from his horse during a hunting party[289].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Fulco prius Andegavorum comes postea rex Hierusalem"[290]

m firstly (before 14 Apr 1109, 11 Jul 1110) EREMBURGE du Maine, daughter and heiress of HELIE de la Flèche Comte du Maine & his first wife Mathilde de Château-du-Loir ([1096]-14 Jan 1126).  Orderic Vitalis names “Eremburgem” as the daughter of “Helias [de Balgenceio]” and his wife “Gervasii de Castro Ligeri...filiam”, adding that she married “domini sui filio Fulconi Andegavorum comiti[291]The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulcone Richin filius eius Fulco" was married to "Helia Cenomannensi comite, unicam filiam suam" who had been betrothed to "Martellus frater suus"[292].  A charter dated 25 Apr 1120 records that "comes Andergavensis Fulco Fulconis et comitissa uxor eius Aremburgis filia comitis Helie" were present at the consecration of the church of Le Mans[293].  She succeeded her father in 1110 as Ctss du Maine.  "Arenburgim Andegavensem comitissam…vir meus Fulco Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud by charter dated 18 Aug, dated to [1109/15][294].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Haremburgis Andegavorum nobilis comitissa"[295].  The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death in 1126 of "Arenburgis comitissa"[296].  The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "15 Jan" of "Aremburgis comitissa"[297]

m secondly (Jerusalem 2 Jun 1129) MELISENDE of Jerusalem, daughter of BAUDOUIN II King of Jerusalem & his wife Morphia of Melitene (-11 Sep 1161).  She is named by William of Tyre who also records her parentage[298]In 1127, her father sent Guillaume de Bures and Guy Brisebarre to France to offer her hand in marriage to Foulques V Comte d'Anjou as part of his plan for her eventual succession to the throne of Jerusalem[299]"Milisenda filia regis…" subscribed the charter dated Mar 1128 under which "Balduinus…rex Iherusalem Latinorum secundus" granted privileges to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem[300].  She succeeded her father in 1131 as MELISENDE Queen of Jerusalem, crowned with her husband 14 Sep 1131.  She founded the convent of St Lazarus at Bethany in 1143, and installed her sister Yvette as abbess[301].  After her husband's death, she and her son Baudouin were crowned as king and queen together 25 Dec 1144, but Queen Melisende assumed the government of the kingdom herself.  She took as her adviser her first cousin Manassès de Hierges, Constable of Jerusalem[302].  She was in open breach with her son, after he was crowned again as an adult 2 Apr 1151 at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, without informing his mother.  A council agreed that he would rule in Galilee and the northern part of the kingdom, while Mélisende retained Jerusalem and Nablus.  King Baudouin demanded Jerusalem from her but she refused.  He captured Constable Manassès at his castle of Mirabel in 1152 and expelled him from Palestine, after which his mother was obliged to yield Jerusalem[303].  Queen Mélisende presided over a council of regency in 1157 while her son was absent from Jerusalem on campaign[304]

Comte Foulques V & his first wife had four children:

1.         ALICE [Isabelle] d'Anjou (Anjou [1110/11]-Fontevraud Abbey 1154, bur [Fontevraud Abbey]).  Her parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis, who calls her "Matilda"[305].  William of Tyre also names her, specifying that she was her father's second daughter[306], although it is more probable that he would have betrothed his older daughter to the son of the king of EnglandHer marriage was arranged, at "Petra Peculata" near Alençon in late Feb 1113, as part of the alliance between her father and her future father-in-law[307]The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records that Henry I King of England arranged the marriage of "filio suo Willelmo" and "comite Andegavensi…filia eius"[308]She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage.  Orderic Vitalis records that she became a nun at Fontevrault Abbey "ten years after her marriage"[309] and was elected abbess in 1150[310].  Her recent arrival as a nun at Fontevraud is confirmed by the charter dated 2 Feb 1129 under which "Conanus Britannie comes" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud after finding that "meam cognatam Fulconis comitis Andegavensis filiam noviter ibi factam monacham"[311].  Abbess of Fontevraud.  Henry Duke of Normandy confirmed a donation to Fontevraud abbey by "Raginaldus de Santo Walerico…sive filius eius Bernardus", in the presence of "patris mei et mea fratrisque mei Willelmi" and with the consent of "Bernardus eius filius", by charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] witnessed by "…Mathilde amita mea Fontis Ebraudi abbatissa"[312]m (Betrothed near Alençon late Feb 1113, Lisieux, Normandy Jun 1119) WILLIAM “Atheling” of England, son of HENRY I King of England & his first wife Matilda of Scotland (Winchester 5 Aug 1103-drowned off Barfleur, Normandy 25 Nov 1120). 

2.         GEOFFROY d’Anjou (24 Aug 1113-Château du Loire 7 Sep 1151, bur Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou)His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[313]He succeeded his father in 1129 as GEOFFROY V “Plantagenet” Comte d’Anjou

-        see below

3.         SIBYLLE d’Anjou ([1112/16]-Bethany 1165, bur Bethany, Abbey of St Lazarus).  She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and specifies that he arranged her (first) marriage as part of the support he gave to Guillaume de Normandie, on the suggestion of Amaury de Montfort, and that her dowry was the county of Maine[314].  According to Orderic Vitalis, King Henry broke off the marriage "making use of threats and pleas and an enormous quantity of gold and silver"[315]Both passages in Orderic Vitalis refer only to a betrothal, but a marriage must have taken place otherwise a papal annulment would have been unnecessary.  Her father supported her husband against his uncle Henry I King of England, indignant that the latter retained the dowry of his other daughter Alice, married to King Henry's son who had been drowned in the Blanche Nef [White Ship] in 1120[316].  Orderic Vitalis records Sibylle's second marriage[317], as does William of Tyre (who says she was her father's older daughter)[318]The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin records the marriage of "Sibillam comitis Andegavensis filiam" with Thierry after the death of his first wife[319]She left France with her second husband in Jun 1147 on the Second Crusade[320].  She accompanied her husband to Palestine in 1157 but refused to return with him to Europe in 1158.  She became a nun at the convent of St Lazarus at Bethany.  After the death of her stepmother Mélisende Queen of Jerusalem in 1161, Ctss Sibylle assumed a position of influence among the royal family of Jerusalem[321].  The Annales Aquicinctini record the death in 1165 of "Sibbilla comitissa Flandrie apud Sanctum Lazarum"[322]m firstly (1123, annulled by papal bull 26 Aug 1124[323]) as his first wife, GUILLAUME de Normandie, son of ROBERT Duke of Normandy & his wife Sibylle de Conversano (Rouen 1101-St Omer, Abbey of St Bertin 27 Jul 1128, bur St Omer, Abbey of St Bertin).  He succeeded in 1127 as GUILLAUME I "Clito" Count of Flanders.  He died from wounds received at the battle of Aalst.  m secondly (1134) THIERRY I Count of Flanders, son of THIERRY II Duke of Lorraine & his second wife Gertrude de Flandre ([1099/1101]-17 Jan 1168).

4.         HELIE d'Anjou (-15 Jan 1151).  His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[324]The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Gosfridum…alium filium Heliam" as the children of "Fulco" & his first wife[325]Comte du MaineThe necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "15 Jan" of "Elias miles, frater domini Mathildis abbatissæ"[326].  "…Helias frater ducis…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[327].  The Chronicon Vindocinense records the death in 1151 of "Helias frater…Gosfridi comitis"[328]m ([1120]) PHILIPPA du Perche, daughter of ROTROU [I] "le Grand" Comte du Perche & his wife Mathilde [illegitimate daughter of Henry I King of England].   William of Tyre names her and her father when he records her marriage[329].  "Perticensis comes Rotrocus" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron with the consent of "genere mei Helie filiique mee Philippe" by charter dated [1120] witnessed by "Juliane soror mea"[330].  Hélie & his wife had one child: 

a)         BEATRIX du MaineRobert of Torigny records the marriage of "Guillermus Talavercius comes Pontivi…Johannes comes filius eius" and "filiam comitis Heliæ fratris comitis Gaufridi Andegavorum et ducis Normannorum"[331]"Johannes filius Willelmi comitis Pontivi et Beatricia uxor mea atque Johannes filius meus" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe by charter dated [1158/71][332]m JEAN [I] Comte d'Alençon, son of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Hélie de Bourgogne (-24 Feb 1191). 

Comte Foulques V & his second wife had two children:

5.         BAUDOUIN of Jerusalem (1131-Beirut 10 Feb 1162).  His parentage is specified by William of Tyre, who records him as the older son aged 13 when his father died[333].  He succeeded his father in 1144 as BAUDOUIN III King of Jerusalem, jointly with his mother.     

6.         AMAURY of Jerusalem (1136-11 Jul 1174).  His parentage is specified by William of Tyre[334].  He succeeded his brother in 1162 as AMAURY I King of Jerusalem

-        KINGS of JERUSALEM

 

 

GEOFFROY d’Anjou, son of FOULQUES V Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Eremburge Ctss du Maine (24 Aug 1113-Château du Loire 7 Sep 1151, bur Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou)His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[335].  The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the birth "1113 IX Kal Sep" of "Gaufridus comes"[336]He succeeded in 1129, when his father abdicated and left for Jerusalem, as GEOFFROY V “le Bel/Plantagenet” Comte d’Anjou.  He invaded Normandy in 1137 in support of his wife's claim to succeed her father[337].  He was proclaimed Duke of Normandy 19 Jan 1144[338], but resigned the dukedom to his eldest son in 1150.  Robert of Torigny records the death "1151 VII Id Sep" of "dux Henricus…pater eius" at "apud Castrum Ledi" and his burial in "civitatis Cinomannicæ…in ecclesia sancti Juliani"[339].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "VII Id Sep 1151" of "Andegavorum comes Gaufridus tertius Martellus gener Henrici…regis Anglorum"[340]

m (Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou 17 Jun 1128) as her second husband, MATILDA [Maud] of England, widow of Emperor HEINRICH V, daughter of HENRY I King of England & his wife Matilda of Scotland (Winchester or London Feb/Aug 1102-Abbaye de Notre-Dame des Près, near Rouen 10 Sep 1167, bur Abbaye de Bec, Normandy, later moved to Rouen Cathedral).  Her second marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[341].  The Chronicle of Gervase records the second marriage of "filiam suam…viduam" to "Gaufrido comiti Andegaviæ"[342]"Goffridus comes filius Fulconis regis Jerusalem" renounced rights to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico et Goffrido" by charter dated [1136/1140] which also names "uxori meæ Mathildi"[343]Robert of Torigny records the death "1167…IV Id Sep Rothomagi" of "matris suæ [Henrici regis] Mathildis imperatricis" and her burial "Becci"[344].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "II Id Sep" of "Mathildis imperatrix filia Henrici regis uxor Goffredi comitis"[345]

Mistresses (1) to (3):  ---.  The names of the mistresses of Comte Geoffroy are not known. 

Comte Geoffroy & his wife had three children:

1.         HENRI d’Anjou (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault).  He succeeded his father in 1151 as HENRI Comte d’Anjou, Duke of Normandy.  He became Duke of Aquitaine by right of his wife 18 May 1152.  He succeeded King Stephen 19 Dec 1154 as HENRY II King of England, crowned in Westminster Abbey the same day.  m (Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) as her second husband, ELEONORE Dss of Aquitaine, divorced wife of LOUIS VII King of France, daughter of GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou & his first wife Eléonore de Châtellerault (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[346].  She was crowned Queen Consort of England with her husband 19 Dec 1154 at Westminster Abbey.  She supported the revolt of her sons against their father in 1173, was captured and imprisoned in the château de Chinon, later at Salisbury until 1179.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the burial of "uxor [regis Henrici] regina Alienordis" in the same abbey as her husband[347]

-        KINGS of ENGLAND

2.         GEOFFROY d’Anjou (Rouen, Normandy 1 Jun 1134-Nantes 26 Jul 1158, bur Nantes).  Robert of Torigny records the birth "1134 mense Maio in Pentecoste Rothomagi" of "Gaufridus secundus filius Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis", specifying that his mother "Matildis imperatrix" was "infirmata…propter difficultatem partus usque ad desperationem"[348]The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the birth "1134 Kal Jun" of "Gaufridus"[349].  William of Tyre names him as his parents' second son[350]"Goffridus comes filius Fulconis regis Jerusalem" renounced rights to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico et Goffrido" by charter dated [1136/1140] which also names "uxori meæ Mathildi"[351]His father intended him to succeed as Comte d'Anjou, but his brother Henri did not permit this.  Geoffroy revolted against his brother in 1152 and 1156, after which his castles of Chinon, Loudun and Mirebeau were confiscated.  He was appointed Comte de Nantes by his brother in 1157 after the expulsion of Comte Hoël[352].  Matthew of Paris specifies that Geoffroy was the brother of King Henry II when he records his death in 1158, after which Nantes was transferred to his brother[353].  Robert of Torigny records the death "1158 mense Julio" of "Gaufrido comite Nannetensi fratre Henrici regis Julio"[354]

3.         GUILLAUME d’Anjou (Argentan 22 Jul 1136-Rouen 30 Jan 1164, bur Rouen Cathedral).  Robert of Torigny records the birth "1136 mense Augusto apud Argentomagum" of "Guillermus tercius filius comitis Gaufridi"[355]The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the birth "1136 XI Kal Aug" of "Guillelmus"[356].  William of Tyre names him as his parents' third son "cognomento Longaspata"[357].  Comte de Poitou.  His brother granted him extensive lordships in fifteen English counties and the vicomté of Dieppe[358].  Robert of Torigny records the death "apud Rothomagum III Kal Feb…1164" of "Willermus frater Henrici regis" and his burial "in ecclesia Sanctæ Mariæ"[359]

Comte Geoffroy had three illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) to (3):

4.          HAMELIN d'Anjou (1130-7 May 1202, bur Chapter House, Lewes)Benedict of Peterborough names "Hamelinus frater regis Henrici comes Warennæ" among those present at the coronation of King Richard I in 1189[360].  Maybe Vicomte de Touraine.  Earl of Surrey in 1164 by right of his wife.   

-        EARLS of SURREY

5.          MARIE d'Anjou (-[1216]).  Henry II King of England donated revenue from “manerio de Ferne” to Shaftesbury abbey on the request of “sororis meæ Mariæ abbatissæ sancti Edwardi” by undated charter[361].  Her parentage is also indicated by an undated charter under which “Johannes comes de Morent” [the future John King of England] donated property “in foresta mea de Gellingeham” to Shaftesbury abbey at the request of “amicæ meæ Mariæ abbatissæ[362].  If her parentage is correctly shown here, the absence of references in other primary sources to Marie as daughter of Geoffroy Comte d´Anjou suggests that she must have been illegitimate.  King John confirmed the property of Shaftesbury abbey, naming “Maria abbatissa...amica mea”, by charter dated [1199/1200][363].  Abbess of Shaftesbury, Dorset. 

6.          EMMA d´Anjou .  A manuscript entitled "De Origine Comitum Andegavensium" records that "Gaufridus Plantagenet Comes Andegavensium" had an illegitimate daughter "Emmam quam David Norwallensium Princeps"[364]The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "king David married dame Emma the sister of the king of England" in 1175[365].  The 1173/74 Pipe Roll records "pannis et apparatu sororis reg q Dauid fil Oeni dux uxore" in London/Middlesex[366].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Emma quondam uxor David Regis Wallie" was granted "manerium de Hales" in Shropshire by King Henry II[367].  m ([1174]) DAFYDD I Prince of Gwynedd, son of OWAIN King of Gwynedd & his second wife Crisiant of Deheubarth (-1203). 

 

 

 

D.      COMTES d'ANJOU (CAPET) 1246-1290, (VALOIS) 1290-1360

 

 

CHARLES de France, son of LOUIS VIII King of France & his wife Infanta doña Blanca de Castilla y León (posthumously [21] Mar 1227-Foggia 7 Jan 1285, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).  His brother Louis IX King of France installed him as Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, at Melun in Aug 1246.  He was invested as CHARLES I King of Sicily at Rome 28 Jun 1265, confirmed by Pope Clement IV 4 Nov and crowned at St Peter’s Rome 6 Jan 1266. 

1.         CHARLES d’Anjou ([1252/54]-Palace of Poggioreale 6 May 1309, bur Naples Dominican church, transferred by order of his son King Roberto I to Aix-en-Provence, Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth, and again to église de Saint-Barthélemi Aix-en-Provence).  He succeeded his father as CHARLES II "le Boiteux" King of Naples, titular King of Jerusalem, Comte d’Anjou, while he was still in captivity. 

a)         CHARLES MARTEL of Sicily (early Sep 1271-Naples from the plague 12 Aug 1295, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).  He renounced his rights to the counties of Anjou and Maine 28 Jun 1295, which had become the dowry of his sister Marguerite[368]

b)         MARGUERITE of Sicily ([1273]-31 Dec 1299, bur Paris, église des Jacobins)m (contract 28 Dec 1289, Corbeil, Essonne 16 Aug 1290) as his first wife, CHARLES de France Comte de Valois et d’Alençon, son of PHILIPPE III “le Hardi” King of France & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Aragón (Vincennes 12 Mar 1270-Le Perray, Yvelines 16 Dec 1325, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).   Comte d’Anjou et du Maine: his father-in-law ceded him the counties of Anjou and Maine 18 Aug 1290, in return for his renouncing his right to the kingdoms of Aragon and Valencia, the king of Sicily hoping thereby to obtain the release of his three sons still held hostage at Barcelona[369]

i)          PHILIPPE de Valois (1293-Abbaye de Coulombs, near Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir 22 Aug 1350, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 20 May 1314.  He succeeded his father in 1325 as Comte de Valois.  He succeeded in 1328 as PHILIPPE VI "le Fortuné" King of France

(a)       JEAN de Valois (Château de Gué-de-Mauny, Le Mans, Sarthe 26 Apr 1319-Savoy Hotel, London 8 Apr 1364, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Called "Jean de France" from the accession of his father 1328.  Duc de Normandie, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 17 Feb 1332.  He succeeded his father in 1350 as JEAN II "le Bon" King of France, consecrated at Notre-Dame de Reims 26 Sep 1350. 

(1)       LOUIS de France (Château du Bois de Vincennes 23 Jul 1339-Biseglia Castle near Bari 20 Sep 1384, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  The Chronique Parisienne records the birth le mardi aprez la feste saint-Jasques et saint Cristofle au moys de juillet au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1339 of “Loys le segond filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normendie[370].  Comte de Poitiers.  Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 1351.  Duc d'Anjou at Calais Oct 1360. 

-         DUCS d’ANJOU

 

 

 

E.      VICOMTES d'ANJOU

 

 

1.         WARNEGAUD (-after 5 Jul 905).  "Fulconis Turononum et Andecavorum vicecomitis…Guernagaudi vicecomitis vel graphionis…" subscribed a charter dated 5 Jul 905 under which "Archambaldus et uxor mea Ingilrada" donated property "in pago Turonico in vicaria Evenense" to Saint-Martin de Tours[371]

 

2.         RENAUD (-after Jan 978).  "Griferius" leased property granted him by "domni Gosfridi comitis" by charter dated Apr 969, subscribed by "Rainaldi vicecomitis"[372]"Adela" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 6 Mar 974 which names "seniore meo Gauzfredo comite" and is subscribed by "…Reynaldi episcopi Andegavensis, Raynaldi vicecomitis patris eius"[373].  "Rainaldi vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated Jan 978 under which Geoffroy "Grisegonelle" Comte d´Anjou donated property to Tours Saint-Julien[374]m RICHILDIS, daughter of ---.  "Rainaldus Andegavensis Episcopus" donated property to "Andegavensis S Sergii Abbatiæ" for the souls of "patris sui æquivoci et matris suæ Richildis et fratris sui Hugonis…" by charter dated to [1004][375].  Renaud & his wife had three children: 

a)         FOULQUES (-after 17 Jan 1020).  "Gaufridus atque Burchardus comites" confirmed the donation by "collibertam nostram Ermengardam" at the request of "fidelis nostri Fulchardi vicecomitis" by charter dated 19 Jul 985, subscribed by "Gaufredi comitis, Fulconis filii eius"[376]"Fulco Andecavorum comes" granted immunity to cloisters dependant from Angers cathedral by charter dated Mar 993, subscribed by "Fulcoius vicecomes"[377]"Fulcho Andegavorum comes" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers for the souls of "patris mei Goffredi atque matris mei Adele…" by charter dated to [1007/26] subscribed by "Fulchoii vicecomitis"[378]"Fulco Andecavorum comes" relinquished rights to the bishop of Angers "pro anima patris mei Gauffredi et matris Adelæ" by charter dated 17 Jan 1020, subscribed by "Fulcoii vicecomitis"[379]

b)         RENAUD (-Embrun 11 Jun 1005, bur Embrun)Bishop of Angers"Adela" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 6 Mar 974 which names "seniore meo Gauzfredo comite" and is subscribed by "…Reynaldi episcopi Andegavensis, Raynaldi vicecomitis patris eius"[380]"Fulco comes Mauriciusque frater eius" accused "Rainaldus Andecavorum episcopus" of corruption, recorded in a charter dated [24 Oct 996/12 Jun 1005] which names "patrem meum [Rainaldi…episcopi] Rainaldum"[381]"Rainaldus Andegavensis Episcopus" donated property to "Andegavensis S Sergii Abbatiæ" for the souls of "patris sui æquivoci et matris suæ Richildis et fratris sui Hugonis…" by charter dated to [1004][382]A charter dated 13 Jun 1005 records the death "III Id Jun" of "Rainaldus secundus…Andecavensium episcopus", noting that he had started on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem with "Fulcoio vicecomite" but had died at Embrun where he was buried[383]

c)         HUGUES (-before [1004]).  "Rainaldus Andegavensis Episcopus" donated property to "Andegavensis S Sergii Abbatiæ" for the souls of "patris sui æquivoci et matris suæ Richildis et fratris sui Hugonis…" by charter dated to [1004][384]

 

 

 

F.      SENECHAL d´ANJOU (ROCHES)

 

 

1.         HERBERT des Roches .  He is named in the charter dated 1215 which names his son Baudouin (see below).  m ---.  The name of Herbert´s wife is not known.  Herbert & his wife had one child: 

a)         BAUDOUIN des Roches (-7 Feb ----).  His parentage is confirmed by a donation dated 1215 made by his son "Guillelmus de Rupibus Senescallus Andegavensis" to the abbey of Perseigne of property which had belonged to "Herberti de Rupibus patris Balduini de Rupibus patris sui"[385].  The obituary of Marmoutier records the death 7 Feb of "Balduini Rupium Corbonis domini"[386]m ---.  The primary source which confirms the identity of Baudouin’s wife has not been identified.   Baudouin & his wife had three children: 

i)          GUILLAUME des Roches ([1155/60]-15 Jul 1222, bur Bonlieu).  The Chronicle of Parcé records Guillaume as son of Baudouin des Roches en Poitou and his wife Alix de Châtellerault[387].  His parentage is confirmed by a donation dated 1215 made by "Guillelmus de Rupibus Senescallus Andegavensis" to the abbey of Perseigne of property which had belonged to "Herberti de Rupibus patris Balduini de Rupibus patris sui"[388].  Seigneur de Longué-Jumelles, de Château-du-Loir.  “Guillaume de Roches” donated property to the abbey of la Boissière, with the consent of “Philippe sa femme et par Hilaire mère de la dite Philippe”, by undated charter[389].  Seneschal of Anjou.  “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou” confirmed an agreement between the monks of Villeloin and “Tancrède” concerning “des bois de Chedon” by charter dated 1201[390].  “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou” confirmed the donation of “de la métaire de Perreria située à Château-du-Loir, ainsi que du moulin” to Louroux abbey made by “Beaudoin des Roches son fils” by charter dated Mar 1207 (O.S.?)[391]King Philippe II confirmed a charter dated 1218 under which Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d´Anjou partant pour l´Albigeois” established the rights in his succession of “Jeanne et Clémence ses deux autres [“autres” a mistake?] filles”, with the consent of “Marguerite de Sablé sa femme et d´Amauri de Craon mari de sa fille aînée”, by charter dated Mar 1219, which specifies that the former would receive Sablé, Briollai, Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe, Précigné et Brion and the latter Château-du-Loir, Maiet, la Suze and Louplande[392]The Chronicon Turonense Magnum records the death in 1222 of "Guillelmus de Rupibus senescallus Andigavensis" and his burial "in ecclesia monialium Cistercensis ordinis…Bonus Locus" which he had founded "juxta Castrum Lidi"[393]m firstly PHILIPPA, daughter of --- & his wife Hilaire ---.  “Guillaume de Roches” donated property to the abbey of la Boissière, with the consent of “Philippe sa femme et par Hilaire mère de la dite Philippe”, by undated charter[394]m secondly ([1190]) MARGUERITE de Sablé, daughter of ROBERT [IV] Seigneur de Sablé [Nevers] & his wife Clémence de Mayenne (-before 1 Dec 1246, bur Perray-aux-Nonnains).  The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Guillaume des Roces" married "la dame de Sabluel"[395].  "Margarita domina Sabolii" confirmed donations to Fontaine-Daniel by "avunculi mei domini Juhelli de Meduana" by charter dated 1205[396].  An enquiry dated to [1340] records that "Missires Robert de Sableuil" had two daughters married to "Messire Guillaume des Roches…l´ainznée…Misire Jeufroy Marciau…l´autre"[397].  "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][398].  Marguerite de Sablé donated property to Bonlieu abbey, with the consent of her sister "Philippa de Marstac", by charter dated 1227[399]A charter dated 1 Dec 1246 records the return by the monks of Marmoutier of documents given to them by "la feue dame" Marguerite[400]Guillaume & his first wife had one child: 

(a)       BAUDOUIN des Roches (-after Mar [1207/08]).  “Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d’Anjou” confirmed the donation of “de la métaire de Perreria située à Château-du-Loir, ainsi que du moulin” to Louroux abbey made by “Beaudoin des Roches son fils” by charter dated Mar 1207 (O.S.?)[401].  The date of this donation, when the donor must have been adult, suggests that he was born from his father’s first marriage.  same person as...?  BAUDOUIN des Roches m as her first husband, ADA Dame de Breains, aughter of ---.  She married secondly Geoffroy de la Ferté-BernardAda dame de Breains, veuve en première noces de Baudoin seigneur des Roches et en seconde noces de Geoffroy de la Ferté-Bernard” donated property to the monks of Bonlieu, for the souls of her two husbands, by charter dated 1220[402]

Guillaume & his second wife had three children: 

(b)       ROBERT des Roches (-[1204]). 

(c)       JEANNE des Roches (-28 Sep 1238)King Philippe II confirmed a charter dated 1218 under which Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d´Anjou partant pour l´Albigeois” established the rights in his succession of “Jeanne et Clémence ses deux autres [“autres” a mistake?] filles”, with the consent of “Marguerite de Sablé sa femme et d´Amauri de Craon mari de sa fille aînée”, by charter dated Mar 1219, which specifies that the former would receive Sablé, Briollai, Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe, Précigné et Brion and the latter Château-du-Loir, Maiet, la Suze and Louplande[403]"Amorricus de Credone et Johanna uxor eius et Clementia quondam comitis Blesensis" ratified the division of his fiefs made by "pater noster Guillelmus de Rupibus senescalus Andegavensis de consensu…matris nostre Margarite de Sabolio uxoris sue" by charter dated May 1219[404]"Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[405].  "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][406].  “Johanna de Credona, Andegavie senescalla” did homage to Louis IX King of France for “senescaltia Andegavie, Cenomannie et Turonie…bone memorie Guillelmus de Ruppibus, genitor noster…tenuit” by charter dated 27 Jan 1226[407].  She succeeded her father as Seneschale d´Anjou.  The Chronicon Savigniacense records the death "IV Kal Oct" in 1238 of "Iohanna uxor Amalrici de Creon"[408]m ([1212]) AMAURY [I] de Craon, son of MAURICE [II] Seigneur de Craon & his wife Isabelle de Meulan (-15 May 1226). 

(d)       CLEMENCE des Roches (-after Sep 1259).  "Clemencia uxore mea" consented to the donation by "Theobaldus Blesensis et Clarimontis comitis" to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun by charter dated Apr 1218[409]King Philippe II confirmed a charter dated 1218 under which Guillaume des Roches sénéchal d´Anjou partant pour l´Albigeois” established the rights in his succession of “Jeanne et Clémence ses deux autres [“autres” a mistake?] filles”, with the consent of “Marguerite de Sablé sa femme et d´Amauri de Craon mari de sa fille aînée”, by charter dated Mar 1219, which specifies that the former would receive Sablé, Briollai, Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe, Précigné et Brion and the latter Château-du-Loir, Maiet, la Suze and Louplande[410]"Amaury de Craon et Jeanne de Roches, Geoffroy de Châteaudun et Clémence des Roches" confirmed the donation of revenue made to Bonlieu abbey by “Guillaume des Roches et Marguerite de Sablé” by charter dated [16/31] Jul 1222[411].  "M[argarita] domina Sabolii [...quondam uxor domini Guillelmi], Amauricus de Credone senescallus Andegavensis [...Johenna uxore mea], G[aufridus] vicecomes Castriduni [...de assensu...Clementiæ uxoris meæ]" confirmed exemptions granted to the inhabitants of Cohémon by “dominus noster bonæ memoriæ G[uillelmus] de Rupibus seneschallus Andegavensis” by charter dated 1222 [after 15 Jul][412].  "Gaufridus vicecomes Castriduni" donated property to the donation to Hôtel-Dieu, Châteadun with the consent of "Clemencia quondam comitissa Blesensi uxore mea" by charter dated Oct 1226[413].  "Clementia Castriduni et Castrilidi domina...cum...filia mea Johanna quondam comitissa Montisfortis" donated harvest to the nuns of Bonlieu, for the souls of “...Gaufridi quondam vicecomitis Castriduni sponsi mei”, by charter dated Nov 1255[414]m firstly as his second wife, THIBAUT VI Comte de Blois, son of LOUIS Comte de Blois & his wife Catherine Ctss de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis (-16 or 22 Apr 1218)m secondly as his second wife, GEOFFROY [VI] Vicomte de Châteaudun, son of GEOFFROY [V] Vicomte de Châteaudun & his first wife Adela de Nevers (-6 Feb 1250, bur Ronceray). 

ii)         son .  m ---.  One child: 

(a)       BAUDOUIN des Roches (-after 1212).  His parentage is confirmed by a charter dated Mar 1203 under which "Guillelmus de Rupibus Senescallus Andegavensis" confirmed the donation to Marmoutier made by "Baudoinus de Rupibus nepos meus"[415]

iii)        LETICE .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m EMERY de la Jaille, son of ---. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    DUCS d'ANJOU

 

 

 

A.      DUCS d'ANJOU 1360-1474 (VALOIS)

 

 

The reconstruction of this family set out below is based largely on the information provided by Père Anselme[416] and Kerrebrouck (who cites numerous sources)[417]

 

 

LOUIS de France, son of JEAN II "le Bon" King of France & his first wife Bonne de Luxembourg (Château du Bois de Vincennes 23 Jul 1339-Biseglia Castle near Bari 20 Sep 1384, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice)The Chronique Parisienne records the birth le mardi aprez la feste saint-Jasques et saint Cristofle au moys de juillet au Boiz-de-Vincennes“ 1339 of “Loys le segond filz de mons. Jehan de France duc de Normendie[418]The Chronique des règnes de Jean II et de Charles V records that his father knighted “Loys son second filz” after his coronation in 1350[419].  Comte de Poitiers.  Comte d'Anjou et du Maine 1351.  Duc d'Anjou at Calais Oct 1360.  He was imprisoned in England but escaped in Oct 1363.  He was heir to the throne from the accession of his older brother King Charles V in 1364 until the birth in 1368 of the future King Charles VI.  Appointed Lieutenant of the King in Languedoc in Jun 1364, he supervised the reconquest from England of most of south-west France.  In 1367, he seized the county of Provence from the family of Anjou-Sicily.  Duc de Touraine at Vincennes 16 May 1370, in exchange for the county of Maine.  With his three brothers, he was regent during the minority of his nephew King Charles V, becoming president of the council of regency 30 Nov 1380.  Jeanne I Queen of Sicily adopted him and declared him as her heir at the Château de l'Œuf, Naples 29 Jun 1380, conferring on him the title Duca di Calabria, ratified by Pope Clement VII at Avignon 21/22 Jul 1380, confirmed 1 Mar 1382.  He left for Italy in 1382, using the title LOUIS I King of Sicily from 30 Aug 1383, but died before his plans could be fully implemented.  Jacques des Baux, Principe di Tarento, titular Prince of Achaia, Despot of Romania, Lord of Albania and Corfu, and titular Emperor of Constantinople named Duke Louis as his successor under his testament[420]

Betrothed (Perpignan 8 Feb 1351, Sep 1352) to Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón, daughter of PEDRO IV "el Ceremonioso" King of Aragon & his first wife Infanta doña María de Navarra (Poblet 1340-Catania Jul 1363)Père Anselme records marriage contracts dated 8 Feb 1351 and Sep 1352 between Louis and “Pierre IV roy d’Arragon...Constance d’Arragon, fille aînée de ce roy, et à son défaut...sa seconde fille Jeanne d’Arragon[421]

m (9 Jul 1360, contract Château de Saumur Aug 1360) MARIE de Blois-Châtillon, daughter of CHARLES de Blois-Châtillon Duke of Brittany & his wife Jeanne de Penthièvre (1343-Angers 12 Nov 1404, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  The marriage contract between “Louis fils de Roy de France Comte d´Anjou et du Maine Seigneur de Montpellier” and “Charles Duc de Bretagne, Comte de Richemont Vicomte de Limoges et Sire d´Avaugour de Guise et de Maine et Jehanne Duchesse, Comtesse, Vicomtesse et Dame desdits lieux...Marie de Bretagne nostre...fille” is dated Aug 1360[422]Comte Louis married without the consent of his father, thereby effectively terminating his betrothal contract.  After the death of her husband, Marie continued the war in Naples.  Pss di Tarento, by cession of her brother-in-law Jean Duc de Berry at Cavaillon 11 Sep 1385, in exchange for the counties of Etampes and Gien.  She used the title Queen of Sicily. 

Duke Louis & his wife had three children:

1.         MARIE d'Anjou (Oct 1370-before 26 Sep 1383).  Père Anselme states that “[le] compte de Jean Luissier“ records her birth in Oct 1370, and suggests that she predeceased her father as she is not named in his testament[423]

2.         LOUIS d'Anjou (Château d'Angers 5 Oct 1377-Château d'Angers 29 Apr 1417, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  Duca di Calabria 1383, when his father assumed the title king of Sicily.  He succeeded his father in 1384 as Duc d'Anjou King of Sicily, under the Regency of his mother.    

-        see below

3.         CHARLES d'Anjou (1380-Angers 17 May 1404)Père Anselme records that Charles received “[le] comté de Roucy, des terres de Guise, de Chilly, de plus des comtez d’Etampes et de Gien“ under the testament of his father[424]Comte de Roussillon, du Maine, d'Etampes et de Gien.  Adopted by Guillaume Roger Comte de Beaufort, who ceded his county to him.  Principe di Tarento.  Duca di Calabria.  Betrothed (13 Jun 1397) to --- di San Severino, daughter of TOMASO di San Severino Duca di Venosa & his wife ---.  Père Anselme records that his brother arranged Charles’s betrothal 13 Jun 1397 “avec la fille de Thomas de Saint Severin duc de Venouse[425]

 

 

LOUIS d'Anjou, son of LOUIS I de France Duc d'Anjou, titular King of Sicily, & his wife Marie de Châtillon-Blois (Château d'Angers 5 Oct 1377-Château d'Angers 29 Apr 1417, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  Duca di Calabria 1383, when his father assumed the title king of Sicily.  He succeeded his father in 1384 as Duc d'Anjou titular King of Sicily, Duc de Provence under the regency of his mother.  He was crowned King of Sicily and Jerusalem at Avignon, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame by Pope Clement VII 1 Nov 1389.  Leaving for Italy, he besieged Naples in 1389, and took control in 1390.  He was expelled from Naples in 1399 by King Ladislas.  After several further attempts to recapture Naples, King Ladislas finally defeated him at Roccasecca 19 May 1411.  Louis returned to France, taking control of the Royal Council.  He fought Savoy for control of the counties of Ventimiglia and Nice.  The Chronique Rouennaise records the death 1 May 1417 of “le roy Loys[426]. 

Betrothed (by proxy 20 Jul 1382, Milan 2 Aug 1384) to LUCIA Visconti, daughter of BERNABÒ Visconti Lord of Milan & his wife Beatrice [Regina] della Scala (1372-14 Apr 1424, bur Austin Friars, London).  A charter dated 20 Jul 1382 notifies the marriage by proxy between "dominum Ludovicum ducem Andegavie et Turonie et comitem Cenomanie…domino Ludovico eius primogenito" and "Luziam natam…Bernabos Vicecomes"[427]

m (Arles-en-Provence 2 Dec 1400) Infanta doña VIOLANTE de Aragón, daughter of JUAN I "el Cazador" King of Aragon & his second wife Yolande de Bar (1384[428]-Château de Tucé, Saumur 14 Nov 1443, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  She claimed to succeed her father 1396 as queen of Aragon, supported by her mother, but the Cortes offered the crown to her uncle King Martin I.  Her marriage formed part of the arrangements to settle Aragon's dispute with the house of Anjou over Sicily.  Lieutenant General in Provence 1410 during her husband's absence in Italy, she suppressed a rebellion there.  She claimed the throne of Aragon again in 1410 on the death of her uncle, in the name of her son Louis d'Anjou "Monsieur de Guise" titular Duca di Calabria.  She bought the baronies of Lunel, Berre, Martigues and Istre from Louis de Poitiers Comte de Valentinois at Avignon 19 Sep 1419.  At the French court 1424-1427/28, she actively supported the Dauphin, rallying support from the nobility.  Père Anselme notes her testament dated 11 May 1438[429]

Duke Louis II & his wife had five children:

1.         LOUIS d'Anjou (Angers 25 Sep 1403-Cosenza, Calabria 12 Nov 1434, bur Cosenza).  Called "Monsieur de Guise".  He succeeded his father in 1417 as Duc d'Anjou, titular King of Sicily and Jerusalem.  He was one of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon in 1410 on the death of King Martín I "el Humano".  His candidature was supported by Garcí Fernández de Heredia Archbishop of Zaragoza.  He left for Italy 24 Jul 1419 aiming to dispossess Jeanne II Queen of Sicily, encouraged by Pope Martin V.  He was invested as king of Sicily 4 Dec 1419 by the Pope.  After first adopting Alfonso V King of Aragon, Queen Jeanne annulled this adoption, and adopted Louis in his place 1423, appointing him Duca di Calabria.  Duc de Touraine 21 Oct 1424.  The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records the death 14 Nov 1434 of "il Re Lodovicho in Cosenza"[430].  He died of malaria.  Betrothed (contract 22 Oct 1407, contract repudiated Nov 1413) to CATHERINE de Bourgogne, demoiselle de Guise, daughter of JEAN "Sans Peur" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite de Hainaut (1391-Ghent 1414)m (contract 31 Mar 1431, contract Thonon-les-Bains, Savoie 22 Jul 1431, contract 31 Aug 1431) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Savoie, daughter of AMEDEE VIII Duke of Savoy & his wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] (Morges 7 Aug 1420-Stuttgart 30 Sep 1479, bur Stuttgart Stiftskirche).  The marriage contract between "Ludovicum Tertium…Jerusalem et Sicilæ Regem…" and "Margaretam de Sabaudia filiam…Amedei Ducis Sabaudiæ…" is dated 31 Mar 1431[431].  She married secondly (contract 21 Oct 1444, Heidelberg, Heiliges Geist 18 Oct 1445) Ludwig IV "der Sanftmüthige" Elector Palatine Pfalzgraf von der Pfalz, and thirdly (Stuttgart 9 Jul 1453) as his third wife, Ulrich V "der Vielgeliebte" Graf von Württemberg-Stuttgart

2.         MARIE d'Anjou (Angers 14 Oct 1404-Abbaye de Chateliers-en-Poitou, near Saint-Maxent, Deux-Sèvres 29 Nov 1463, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis)The Geste des Nobles records that, after the death in May 1416 of “le duc Jehan de Berry et d’Auvergne conte de Poitou”, the king gave “le duchié de Touraine et la fille du roy de Sécille” to “Charles son maisné filz conte de Ponthieu[432]Her mother transferred her rights to the crown of Aragon to her at Saumur 16 Feb 1440.  She claimed her rights to Aragon in 1446.  m (contract Palais du Louvre 18 Dec 1413, Tours 2 Jun 1422) CHARLES de France Dauphin de Viennois, son of Charles VI King of France & Elisabeth [Isabelle] von Bayern-Ingolstadt (Hôtel Royal de Saint-Pol, Paris 22 Feb 1403-Château de Mehun-sur-Yèvre, Cher 22 Jul 1461, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  He succeeded his father in 1422 as CHARLES VII King of France

3.         RENE d'Anjou (Château d'Angers 19 Jan 1409-Aix-en-Provence 10 Aug 1480, bur Angers Cathedral).  Called "Monsieur René".  Comte de Guise 1417, in succession to his older brother on the death of his father.  Duc de Bar 3 Aug 1419, by cession of his great uncle Cardinal Louis Duc de Bar.  He succeeded his father-in-law in 1431 as RENE Duc de Lorraine, by right of his wife.  He succeeded his brother in 1434 as Duc d'Anjou

-        see below

4.         YOLANDE d'Anjou (Arles 13 Aug 1412-Manoir de Plaisance, near Vannes, Morbihan 17 Jul 1440, bur Vannes église des Cordeliers)m (contract Redon, Ille-et-Vilaine 14 Mar 1431, contract Fougères 21 Mar 1431, Amboise 20 Aug 1431) as his first wife, FRANÇOIS de Bretagne Comte de Montfort, son of JEAN VI Duke of Brittany & his wife Jeanne de France (Vannes 11 May 1414-Château de l'Hermine, Vannes 17 Jul 1450, bur Redon Abbaye de St Sauveur, Ille-et-Vilaine).  He succeeded his father in 1442 as FRANÇOIS I Duke of Brittany

5.         CHARLES d'Anjou (Château de Montils-lès-Tours, Indre-et-Loire 14 Oct 1414-Neufvy-le-Roi en Touraine, Indre-et-Loire 10 Apr 1473, bur Le Mans Cathédrale Saint-Julien).  He was named Lieutenant General, later Governor, of Provence by his eldest brother in 1417, on the latter's departure for Naples.  Comte de Mortain at Poitiers in Jul 1425.  Lieutenant General du Roi in Anjou and Maine in 1430, in Limousin 1435 and in Saintonge 1438.  Governor and Captain of Paris at Chinon 29 Jan 1435.  Lieutenant General and Governor of Languedoc 5 Jul 1440.  Jean Chartier’s Chronique de Charles VII records that “Monseigneur Charles d’Anjou filz du roy de Sécille” swore homage to Charles VII King of France at Paris in Oct 1441 for the county of Maine which “son frère aisné...Regnier de Sécille lui avoit baillée pour son partaige d’héritage[433]Comte de Gien Feb 1443.  Comte de Guise, in right of his wife, registered 4 Jul 1444.  He adopted the title Comte du Maine 7 Apr 1445, entering in possession in 1448 when his brother ceased to use the title and the English left the county.  m firstly ([1432]) [as her second husband,] COVELLA Ruffo Ctssa di Montalto, Dss di Sessa, [divorced wife of GIOVANNI ANTONIO da Marzano Duca di Sessa,] daughter of [CARLO Ruffo Conte di Montalto & his wife Ceccarella/Francesca Sanseverino] (-[before Dec 1435]).  Villeneuve Bargemont records that Charles married “Cambello Ruffo duchesse de Sessa et comtesse de Montalto” in 1432[434]Père Anselme states that the testament of Louis III Duke of Anjou confirms that Charles married in 1434 “Cambelle Ruffo duchesse de Sesse[435].  The Italian Genealogical Society’s Libro Oro della Nobiltà Mediterranea calls her “Covella”, daughter of Carlo Ruffo Conte di Montalto and his wife “Caccarella/Francesca Sanseverino figlia di Ugone Conte di Potenza”, divorced wife of “Giovanni Antonio da Marzano 2nd Duca di Sessa” and sister of Polissena Ruffo (first wife of Francesco Sforza who succeeded in 1450 as Duke of Milan, see the document MILAN), but notes her death in Oct 1445 which is inconsistent with Charles’s second marriage[436].  No sources are cited so the reliability of this information cannot be verified.  Kerrebrouck notes a proposal in Dec 1435 for Charles to marry “la fille Armaignac[437].  If that information is correct, Covella was presumably deceased at the time if she was Charles’s first wife.  m secondly (contract 9 Jan 1444, Angers May 1444) ISABELLE de Luxembourg, daughter of PIERRE I de Luxembourg Comte de Saint-Pol, de Brienne et de Conversano & his wife Margherita del Balzo (-1472[438] or after).  Mistress (1): ---.  Comte Charles & his first wife had one child:

a)         JEAN-LOUIS MARIN d'Anjou ([1433]-after 27 Dec 1433).  Villeneuve Bargemont records that he is named in a charter of his paternal uncle Louis III dated 27 Dec 1433[439]

Comte Charles & his second wife had two children:

b)         CHARLES d'Anjou (-Marseille 11 Dec 1481, bur Aix-en-Provence église de Saint-Sauveur).  He succeeded his father in 1473 as Comte du Maine et de Guise.  Vicomte de Martigues 9 Oct 1473.  Duca di Calabria when his uncle René appointed him as his heir 22 Jul 1474.  He succeeded his uncle in 1480 as titular King of Sicily, Jerusalem and Aragon, Comte de Provence et de Forcalquier.  The testament of Mgr. Charles d’Anjou...Roi de Jérusalem, de Sicile...Comte de Provence et de Forcalquier”, dated 10 Dec 1481, requested burial “en l’eglise de St Sauveur à Aix”, bequeathed property to “Margueritte de Calabre, fille naturelle de feu Mre Nicolas Duc de Calabre et de Lorraine...Francois Sgr de Luxembourg son cousin...”, and named as executors “Louis Sgr batard du Maine son frère naturel...[440]m (contract Troyes, Aube 21 Jan 1474) JEANNE de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont & his wife Yolande d'Anjou (1458-Aix-en-Provence 25 Jan 1480, bur Aix-en-Provence, Saint-Jacques). 

c)         LOUISE d'Anjou (1445-Carlat, Cantal [1475])Père Anselme records her marriage contract dated 12 Jun 1462[441].  A charter dated Mar 1491 records that Louis XI King of France had arranged the marriage contract between “feu Jacques d’Armagnac” and “notre oncle Charles d’Anjou comte du Maine...Louise d’Anjou sa fille[442].  The Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI records that “le Duc de Nemours” married “[la] fille de Charles d’Anjou Comte du Maine”, adding that she gave birth to a child during the siege “du château de Carlat” in Mar 1465 (O.S.) [mistake for 1475?] and died[443]m (contract Poitiers 12 Jun 1462) JACQUES d'Armagnac Comte de Castres, son of BERNARD d'Armagnac Comte de Pardiac & his wife Eléonore de Bourbon (1437-beheaded Paris 4 Aug 1477, bur Paris église des Cordeliers).  Duc de Nemours.  He was found guilty of spying for England and condemned to death. 

Comte Charles had three illegitimate children by Mistress (1):  

d)         LOUIS d'Anjou (-[19 Mar/30 Apr] 1489).  Seigneur de Mézières by cession of his father at Poitiers 10 Mar 1465, ratified by his half-brother 10 Aug 1473.  Legitimated at Amboise May 1468. 

-           see below, Part B

e)         JEAN bâtard du Maine (-before 1498).  Seigneur de Charroux.  m (23 Apr 1493) as her first husband, FRANÇOISE de Blanchefort, daughter of JEAN de Blanchefort Seigneur de Saint-Clément [mayor of Bordeaux] & his wife Andrée de Noroy.  She married secondly (24 Sep 1498) Jacques Girard-Bazoges Seigneur de Pazy [en Nivernais]. 

f)          MARIE bâtarde du Maine Her brother Charles Comte du Maine awarded her a pension at Péronne 17 Feb 1470[444]She may have been the "Countess of Devonshire" captured with Queen Margaret (who would have been her cousin) after the battle of Tewskesbury in 1471[445][446]m firstly (after 9 Sep 1456) THOMAS de Courtenay, son of HUGH de Courtenay Earl of Devon & his wife Anne Talbot (1432-beheaded York 3 Apr 1461).  He succeeded his father in 1458 as Earl of Devon.  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Towton 29 Mar 1461 and beheaded, whereupon all his honours became forfeitedm secondly --- Seigneur d'Auricher, son of ---[447]

 

 

RENE d'Anjou, son of LOUIS II Duc d'Anjou & his wife Infanta doña Violante de Aragón (Château d'Angers 19 Jan 1409-Aix-en-Provence 10 Aug 1480, bur Angers Cathedral).  Called "Monsieur René".  Comte de Guise in 1417, in succession to his older brother on the death of their father.  Duc de Bar 3 Aug 1419, by cession of his great uncle Cardinal Louis Duc de Bar.  He succeeded his father-in-law in 1431 as RENE Duke of Lorraine, by right of his wife.  Antoine de Vaudémont claimed Lorraine, declared war on René 14 Apr 1431 and, with support from Burgundy, defeated him at Bulgnéville 2 Jul 1431.  The Burgundians took René to Dijon as a prisoner, releasing him 30 May 1432 in return for his two sons as hostages.  René and Antoine agreed the marriage of their children at Brussels 13 Feb 1433 to end their dispute.  Emperor Sigismund confirmed René's rights by imperial judgment at Basel 24 Apr 1434.  He succeeded his brother in 1434 as Duc d'Anjou, as well as his brother's rights to inherit the kingdom of Sicily from Queen Jeanne II.  After a further period of imprisonment at Dijon in 1435/36, René agreed to pay a ransom to the Burgundians under the Treaty of Lille 28 Jan 1437, in return for their recognition of him as Duc de Lorraine et de Bar.  Queen Jeanne having died 2 Feb 1435, once René was released he immediately left for Italy to claim his rights.  He entered Naples 22 May 1438 as RENE King of Sicily and Jerusalem.  The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records that "Re Ranieri…con lo figlio…don Ioan…Duca de Calabria" arrived in Naples 19 May 1438[448].  He was expelled by Alfonso V King of Aragon 2 Jun 1442.  Antoine de Vaudémont formally abandoned his claims to Lorraine at Reims 27 Mar 1441.  René appointed his son as Lieutenant General in Lorraine in 1445, and retired to Anjou.  Following the death of his first wife, he abdicated the duchy of Lorraine 26 Mar 1453 in favour of his son Jean.  After a further unsuccessful attempt to capture the kingdom of Sicily in 1453, he left Italy for the last time in early 1454.  During the civil war in Catalonia against Juan II King of Aragon, certain Catalan factions offered the Aragonese throne to René, as rightful heir through his mother, on 30 Jul 1466.  After initial successes, including the capture of Girona, René did not press his claim further.  Appointed Lieutenant General of Anjou, Maine and Brittany 9 Aug 1468 by his nephew Louis XI King of France, who, in return for his loyalty, also granted Duc René the right to use yellow wax on his seal, normally only the prerogative of the king of France.  He left Anjou in 1471 to live in Provence.  Following the death of his grandson Nicolas Duc de Lorraine, he appointed his nephew Charles d'Anjou Comte du Maine as his heir 22 Jul 1474. 

m firstly (contract Château de Foug, Meurthe-et-Moselle 20 Mar 1420, Nancy 24 Oct 1420) ISABELLE de Lorraine, daughter and heiress of CHARLES I Duke of Lorraine & his wife Margareta von Bayern ([1400]-Château d'Angers 28 Feb 1453, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records that "la regina Lisabetta mogliera de re Ranieri" arrived in Naples 15 Oct 1435[449].  

m secondly (Angers, Abbaye Saint-Nicolas 10 Sep 1454) JEANNE de Laval dite de Montfort, daughter of GUY [XIV] de Laval Comte de Laval & his wife Isabelle de Bretagne (10 Nov 1433-Château de Beaufort-en-Vallée, Maine-et-Loire 19 Dec 1498, bur Angers église des Cordeliers).  She was given Baux after her husband died, which she exchanged 18 Feb 1475 at Aix for Berre. 

Mistresses (1) - (3): ---. 

Duke René & his first wife had nine children:

1.         JEAN d'Anjou (Nancy 2 Aug 1424-Barcelona 16 Dec 1470, bur Barcelona Cathedral)Marquis de Pont-à-Mousson.  He was sent as a hostage to Dijon in 1432, together with his younger brother, in return for the release of their father.  Duca di Calabria 1437, as heir to the kingdom of Sicily.  The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records that "Re Ranieri…con lo figlio…don Ioan…Duca de Calabria" arrived in Naples 19 May 1438[450].  He was appointed Lieutenant General of Lorraine and Bar by his father 1 Jul 1445.  Marquis de Pont[à-Mousson] at Angers Château 21 Nov 1445.  He succeeded on the abdication of his father in 1453 as JEAN II Duke of Lorraine.  Appointed Governor of Genoa at Aix-en-Provence 7 Feb 1458 by Charles VII King of France.  He tried to reconquer the kingdom of Sicily, defeating Ferrante I King of Sicily at Sarno 7 Jul 1460, but was defeated in turn at Apulia 18 Aug 1462.  His father created him Principe de Girona in 1467, when he led the army which unsuccessfully attempted to assert his father's rights as king of Aragon.  m (contracts Lille 3 Feb 1437 and Angers 2 Apr 1437, Châlons-sur-Marne 1444) MARIE de Bourbon, daughter of CHARLES I Duc de Bourbon et d'Auvergne & his wife Agnès de Bourgogne [Valois] (1428-[Nancy] 7 Jul 1448, bur Nancy, église des Cordeliers).  Père Anselme records her marriage contract dated 2 Apr 1437[451]An epitaph at Stulzbron records the burial of Marie de Bourbon duchesse de Calabre et marquise du Pont” who died 1448[452]She died in childbirth.  Mistresses (1) - (x): ---.  Duke Jean II & his wife had five children: 

a)         RENE d'Anjou (-young). 

b)         JEAN d’Anjou (-[Dec 1470]).  Duca di Calabria.  Père Anselme names “Jean d’Anjou...duc de Calabre, mort peu de jours après son père” as the second son of Duke Jean[453]

c)         ISABELLE d'Anjou (-young). 

d)         MARIE d'Anjou (-young). 

e)         NICOLAS d'Anjou (Nancy [1/7] Jul 1448-Nancy 27 Jul 1473, bur Nancy Saint-Georges).  Marquis de Pont[à-Mousson].  He took the titles Duca di Calabria, Principe de Girona in 1470 on the death of his father.  He succeeded his father in 1470 as NICOLAS Duke of Lorraine, making his official entry at Nancy 7 Aug 1471.  The Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI records the death in Jul 1473 “de pestilence à Nancy” of “le Duc de Calabre[454]Betrothed (before May 1472, contract broken May 1472) to ANNE de France Vicomtesse de Thouars, Ctss de Gien, daughter of LOUIS XI King of France & his second wife Charlotte de Savoie (Château de Genappe Apr 1461-Château de Chantelle en Bourbonnais, Allier 14 Nov 1522, bur Priory of Souvigny).  Her betrothal is confirmed by the Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI which records that in May 1472 “le Duc de Calabre nepueu du Roy de Cecille et de Ierusalem”, to whom “le Roy avoit...donner sa fille aisnee en femme et espouse”, left “sa duchié de Lorraine” to visit “[le] Duc de Bourgongne pour traicter d’avoir et espouser sa fille”, abandoning “ladicte fille du Roy sa femme[455].  [Betrothed (May 1472, contract broken) to MARIE de Bourgogne, daughter of CHARLES Duke of Burgundy & his second wife Isabelle de Bourbon (Brussels 13 Feb 1457-Bruges 27 Mar 1482, bur Bruges)Her possible betrothal is confirmed by the Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI which records that in May 1472 “le Duc de Calabre nepueu du Roy de Cecille et de Ierusalem”, to whom “le Roy avoit...donner sa fille aisnee en femme et espouse”, left “sa duchié de Lorraine” to visit “[le] Duc de Bourgongne pour traicter d’avoir et espouser sa fille”, abandoning “ladicte fille du Roy sa femme[456].  It is uncertain from this text whether the negotiations ended in a betrothal.]  Illegitimate daughter by an unknown mistress: 

i)          MARGUERITE bâtarde de Calabre (-after 10 Dec 1481).  The testament of “Mgr. Charles d’Anjou...Roi de Jérusalem, de Sicile...Comte de Provence et de Forcalquier”, dated 10 Dec 1481, bequeathed property to “Margueritte de Calabre, fille naturelle de feu Mre Nicolas Duc de Calabre et de Lorraine...[457]m as his first wife, JEAN [IV] de Chabannes Comte de Dammartin, son of ANTOINE de Chabannes Comte de Dammartin & his wife Marguerite de Nanteuil Ctss de Dammartin (1462-1503). 

Duke Jean II had four illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) - (x): 

f)          JEAN bâtard de Calabre (-Nancy 4 Mar 1505, bur Nancy Saint-Georges).  He was appointed Lieutenant General in Aragon on the death of his father.  Comte de Briey en Lorraine, by donation of his paternal grandfather at Tarascon 4 Sep 1478.  He was appointed Lieutenant General in the kingdom of Sicily by René II Duc de Lorraine 30 Oct 1486.  An epitaph at Stulzbron records the burial of Jean --- de Conflans et de l’Avantgarde Capitaine de Preny” who died “le 4 du mois” [month not specified] 1504 [presumably O.S.][458].  Jean had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

i)          FERRY bâtard de Calabre (-before 27 Apr 1561).  Legitimated 14 Oct 1521.  Ennobled in Lorraine at Nancy 1 Jan 1529.  m ISABELLION Clerc, daughter of ---.  Ferry & his wife had one child: 

(a)        JEAN de Calabre

g)         AUBERT bâtard de Calabre .  Seigneur d'Essey.  m ---.  The name of Aubert´s wife is not known.  Aubert & his wife had one child: 

i)          MARIE de Calabrem CLAUDE de Rivière, son of --- (-26 Oct 1578).  Maître d'hôtel of Antoine Duke of Lorraine.  Bailli de Saint-Mihiel. 

h)         daughter .  m JEAN d'Ecosse, son of ---.     

i)           JEANNE bâtarde de Calabre dit d'Abancourt.  m ACHILLE bâtard de Beauvau, illegitimate son of JEAN [IV] Seigneur de Beauvau & his wife Jeanne de Manonville.  Grand maître d'hôtel of René II Duc de Lorraine. 

2.         LOUIS d'Anjou (Nancy 16 Oct 1427-1444 after 22 May, bur Pont-à-Mousson, église des Antonistes).  He was sent as a hostage to Dijon in 1432, together with his older brother, in return for the release of their father.  Marquis de Pont[-à-Mousson] [1438].  Lieutenant General of the duchy of Lorraine 1439/41. 

3.         NICOLAS d'Anjou (Bar-le-Duc, Meuse 2 Nov 1428-young).  Twin with Yolande.  

4.         YOLANDE d'Anjou (Bar-le-Duc, Meuse 2 Nov 1428-Nancy 23 Feb 1484, bur Joinville Saint-Laurent).  Twin with Nicolas.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Chronique Scandaleuse of Louis XI which records the death in Jul 1473 of “le Duc de Calabre” and that immediately afterwards “ung Alamant” who had led the army “dudit de Calabre” captured [her son] “le Conte de Vaudesmons heritier de ladicte Duchié de Lorraine[459]She took the title Duchess of Lorraine in 1473 on the death of her nephew, but abdicated at Vézelise 11 Aug 1473 in favour of her son René.  She called herself Queen of Jerusalem, Sicily and Aragon after the death of her father.  m (promise of marriage 13 Feb 1433, contract Bar-le-Duc 1 Jul 1433, Nancy 1445) FERRY Comte de Vaudémont, son of ANTOINE de Lorraine Comte de Vaudémont Seigneur de Joinville & his wife Marie d'Harcourt (1417-Joinville 31 Aug 1470, bur Joinville Saint-Laurent). 

5.         MARGUERITE d'Anjou (Pont-à-Mousson, Meurthe-et-Moselle 24 Mar 1430-Château de Dampierre-sur-Loire, Maine-et-Loire 25 Aug 1482, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice)The marriage contract between “Charles de Bourgogne comte de Nevers et de Rethel et baron de Donzy” and “Marguerite d’Anjou, fille de...René roi de Jérusalem et de Sicile, duc d’Anjou, de Bar et de Lorraine” is dated 28 Feb 1442[460]Jean Chartier’s Chronique de Charles VII records the marriage by proxy at Nancy in 1444 of “la fille [du] roy de Sécille...Marguerite” and “le roy d’Angleterre[461]The Annales of William Wyrcester record the marriage in 1444 “desponsata erat in abbatia de Tycchefeld in comitatu Suthampton” of “Henrici VI” and “dominam juvenem filiam regis Neapolis, Siciliæ, et Jerusalem...Margaretæ”, and her coronation “apud Westmonasterium” 30 May 1445[462]Crowned Queen of England 30 May 1445 at Westminster Abbey.  She returned to France definitively in Jan 1476.  A manuscript calendar records the death 3 Oct of “Margarete Regine[463]Betrothed (contract 28 Feb 1442) to CHARLES de Nevers Comte de Nevers et de Rethel, son of PHILIPPE de Bourgogne Comte de Nevers et de Rethel [Bourgogne-Valois] & his second wife Bonne d’Artois (1414-May 1464, bur Nevers St Cyr).  m (contract 22 May 1444, by proxy Nancy, Meurthe-et-Moselle Mar 1445, in person Titchfield, Hampshire 23 Apr 1445) HENRY VI King of England, son of HENRY V King of England & his wife Catherine de France (Windsor Castle 6 Dec 1421-murdered Tower of London 27 May 1471, bur Chertsey Abbey, Surrey, transferred 1485 to St George’s Chapel, Windsor).  He was deposed as king of England 4 Mar 1461.  Restored to the throne 30 Oct 1470, he was deposed again 11 Apr 1471.

6.         CHARLES d'Anjou (1431-1432).  Comte de Guise. 

7.         ISABELLE d'Anjou (-young). 

8.         RENE d'Anjou (-young). 

9.         ANNE d'Anjou (1437-young, bur Gardanne, Bouches-du-Rhône). 

Duke René had three illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) - (3): 

10.       BLANCHE bâtarde d'Anjou ([1438]-Aix-en-Provence 17 Apr 1471, bur Aix-en-Provence, église des Carmes)Dame de Mirebeau, confirmed 1467.  m (contract 28 Nov 1467) as his fourth wife, BERTRAND de Beauvau Baron de Précigné, son of JEAN [III] de Beauvau Seigneur de Précigné & his wife Jeanne de Tigné ([1400]-Angers 30 Sep 1474, bur Angers église des Augustins).  Counsellor and Chamberlain of Charles VII and Louis XI Kings of France.  He retired to Anjou after being implicated in the trial of Jacques Cœur, presiding over the ducal council and becoming one of Duc René's closest advisers. 

11.       JEAN bâtard d'Anjou (-Nancy 25 May 1536, bur Nancy église des Cordeliers).  Legitimated 1474.  Marquis de Pont-à-Mousson 17 Oct 1473, which was effectively confiscated [1485] by René II Duc de Lorraine.  After asserting his claims, he renounced his rights in 1507.  Père Anselme notes his testament dated 3 Apr 1536[464]m (contract 15 Oct 1500) MARGUERITE de Glandèves, daughter of RAYMOND de Glandèves Seigneur de Faucon [Grand Seneschal of Provence, Governor of Dauphiné, French ambassador to Spain] & his wife Baptistine de Fourbin.  Jean & his wife had three children:

a)         CATHERINE MARGUERITE d'Anjou (-9 Apr 1589).  Dame de Saint-Cannat et de Saint-Remy en Provence.  m (contract Marseille 7 Oct 1526) FRANÇOIS de Fourbin Seigneur de Solliès, du Luc et de Peyruis, son of LOUIS de Fourbin Seigneur de Solliès et du Luc & his wife Marguerite Grimaldi des Barons de Beuil (-1572 after 9 Aug). 

b)         FRANÇOISE d'Anjou (-after 3 Apr 1536).  Named in her father's testament. 

c)          BLANCHE d'Anjou .  Nun at Sainte-Claire, Pont-à-Mousson. 

12.       MADELEINE bâtarde d'Anjou (-after 1515).  Ctss de Montferrand.  m (contract Tours, Indre-et-Loire 11 Sep 1496) LOUIS JEAN Seigneur de Bellenave en Bourbonnais, son of ---.  Chamberlain of Charles VIII King of France. 

 

 

 

B.      SEIGNEURS de MEZIERES, MARQUIS de MEZIERES

 

 

The following descent is shown by Père Anselme[465]

 

 

LOUIS d'Anjou, illegitimate son of CHARLES d'Anjou Comte du Maine & his mistress --- (-[19 Mar/30 Apr] 1489).  Seigneur de Mézières by cession of his father at Poitiers 10 Mar 1465, ratified by his half-brother 10 Aug 1473.  Legitimated at Amboise May 1468.  Seneschal and Governor of Maine.  The testament of Mgr. Charles d’Anjou...Roi de Jérusalem, de Sicile...Comte de Provence et de Forcalquier”, dated 10 Dec 1481, named as executors “Louis Sgr batard du Maine son frère naturel...[466]Counsellor and Chamberlain of Charles VIII King of France 1482. 

m (26 Nov 1474) as her first husband, ANNE de La Trémoïlle, daughter of LOUIS [I] Seigneur de La Trémoïlle Vicomte de Thouars Prince de Talmont & his wife Marguerite d'Amboise.  She married secondly as his second wife, Guillaume de Rochefort Seigneur de Pleuvaut [Chancellor of France] (-12 Aug 1492), and thirdly (16 Jan 1494) as his second wife, Jacques de Rochechouart Seigneur de Charroux (-1501). 

Louis & his wife had four children: 

1.         ANNE d'Anjou (Mézières-en-Brenne, Indre 9 Mar 1478-young). 

2.         RENEE d'Anjou (Mézières-en-Brenne 16 Jun 1480-).  m (Chinon, Indre-et-Loire 25 Jan 1493) as his first wife, FRANÇOIS de Pontville Vicomte de Rochechouart et de Breuilhet, son of JEAN de Pontville Vicomte de Breuilhet & his wife Anne Vicomtesse de Rochechouart. 

3.         LOUIS d'Anjou (Mézières-en-Brenne 23 Oct 1482-young). 

4.         RENE d'Anjou (Mézières-en-Brenne 5 Oct 1483-Avignon 1521).  He succeeded his father in 1489 as Baron de Mézières.  Seneschal du Maine 3 Apr 1510.  m ANTOINETTE de Chabannes Dame de Saint-Fargeau, daughter of JEAN de Chabannes Comte de Dammartin & his second wife Suzanne de Bourbon (-30 Jun 1519).  Mistress (1): ---.  René & his wife had six children:

a)         LOUIS d'Anjou .  Abbé de Pontlevoy, Tours, resigned 1540.  Abbé de Nesle-la-Reposte, Marne. 

b)         NICOLAS d'Anjou (Château de Saint-Fargeau, Yonne 29 Sep 1518-after 18 Feb 1568).  Comte de Saint-Fargeau 1541.  Marquis de Mézières 1567.  m (contract 29 Sep 1541) GABRIELLE de Mareuil, daughter and heiress of GUY de Mareuil Seigneur de Mareuil et de Villebois en Angoûmois & his wife Catherine de Clermont (-1593).  Marquis Nicolas & his wife had five children:

i)          HENRIETTE d'Anjou (Château de Saint-Fargeau, Yonne 1543-young). 

ii)         ANTOINETTE d'Anjou (Mézières-en-Brenne, Indre 16 Aug 1544-young). 

iii)        NICOLAS d'Anjou (9 Feb 1545-before 1568). 

iv)       RENEE d'Anjou (Mézières-en-Brenne, Indre 21 Oct 1550-1597[467]).  She succeeded her father in 1568 as Marquise de Mézières, Ctss de Saint-Fargeau.  m (1566) FRANÇOIS de Bourbon "le prince-dauphin d'Auvergne", son of LOUIS II de Bourbon Duc de Montpensier & his first wife Jacqueline de Longwy Ctss de Bar-sur-Seine (1542-Lisieux, Calvados 4 Jun 1592, bur Champigny, Sainte-Chapelle).  Called "le prince-dauphin d'Auvergne" or "Monsieur le Prince-Dauphin".  Comte de Saint-Fargeau, by right of his wife.  Created Duc de Saint-Fargeau Apr 1575 (registered 28 Mar 1576).  He succeeded his father 1582 as Duc de Montpensier, souverain de Dombes.  Created Duc de Châtellerault 26 Nov 1583 (registered 13 Mar 1584). 

v)        JEANNE d'Anjou (Château de Pranzac, Charente 12 Dec 1553-young). 

c)         FRANÇOISE d'Anjou (-young). 

d)         FRANÇOISE d'Anjou .  Ctss de Dammartin, Dame de Courtenay.  m firstly (6 Oct 1516) PHILIPPE I de Boulainvilliers Seigneur de Boulainvilliers et de Verneuil, son of CHARLES de Boulainvilliers Seigneur de Boulainvilliers et de Verneuil & his wife Catherine Havart (-killed in battle siege of Péronne, Somme 1537).  Comte de Dammartin, in right of his wife.  m secondly (contract 9 Oct 1538) as his second wife, JEAN [III] de Rambures Seigneur de Rambures, son of ANDRE [III] de Rambures Seigneur de Rambures & his wife Jeanne d'Halluin.  Comte de Dammartin, in right of his wife. 

e)         RENEE d'Anjoum firstly HECTOR de Bourbon Vicomte de Lavedan, daughter of CHARLES bâtard de Bourbon Vicomte de Lavedan & his wife Louise du Lion (-killed in battle Pavia 24 Feb 1524).  m secondly GABRIEL OLIVIER Baraton Seigneur de la Roche et de Montgoger, son of FRANÇOIS Baraton Seigneur de la Brosse et de Montgoger & his wife Antoinette de Sainte-Maure. 

f)          ANTOINETTE d'Anjou (-before 1539)m (contract 1526 and 1529) as his first wife, JEAN de Bourbon Vicomte de Lavedan, son of CHARLES bâtard de Bourbon Vicomte de Lavedan & his wife Louise du Lion (-29 Mar 1549). 

René had [one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1)]: 

g)         [MARTHE [Marie] de Mézières-AnjouPère Anselme notes in relation to the parentage of Marthe/Marie that “cela demande preuve[468].  m [her nephew,] PHILIPPE de Boulainvilliers Comte de Courtenay, son of PHILIPPE [I] de Boulainvilliers et de Verneuil & his wife Françoise d'Anjou Ctss de Dammartin Dame de Courtenay.] 

 

 

 

 



[1] Karoli II Conventus Silvacensis, Missi…et pagi… 8, MGH LL 1, p. 426. 

[2] McKitterick (1983), p. 266. 

[3] Reginonis Chronicon 861, MGH SS I, p. 571. 

[4] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 456. 

[5] Annales Bertiniani 862, MGH SS I, p. 457. 

[6] Annales Bertiniani 865, MGH SS I, p. 470. 

[7] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 471. 

[8] Annales Bertiniani 866, MGH SS I, p. 473. 

[9] Adonis Continuatio Prima, Auctore Anonymo 866, MGH SS II, p. 324. 

[10] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 35. 

[11] Historia Comitum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 319. 

[12] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 36. 

[13] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 36, footnote 3 noting that 2 mss record her as "consanguinea" not "filia". 

[14] Chronico Turonensi, RHGF IX, p. 47. 

[15] Gestis Consulum Andegavensium, RHGF IX, p. 29. 

[16] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 36. 

[17] Reproduced in Chroniques d'Anjou, Introduction, II, p. xcii. 

[18] Reproduced in Chroniques d'Anjou, Introduction, III, p. xciv. 

[19] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 177, p. 203. 

[20] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 36. 

[21] Gestis Consulum Andegavensium, RHGF IX, p. 27. 

[22] Chronico Turonensi, RHGF IX, p. 47. 

[23] Chroniques d'Anjou, Historia comitum Andegavensium, p. 320. 

[24] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 41. 

[25] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 63. 

[26] Historia Comitum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 320. 

[27] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, pp. 40-1. 

[28] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, pp. 41-4. 

[29] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 63. 

[30] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes...’ (1869), Pièces Justificatives, V, p. 431. 

[31] Mabille (1871), p. lx. 

[32] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, II, p. xcii. 

[33] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes...’ (1869), Pièces Justificatives, VIII, p. 440. 

[34] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes...’ (1869), Pièces Justificatives, IX, p. 442. 

[35] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, III, p. xciv. 

[36] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, IV, p. xcvi. 

[37] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes...’ (1869), Pièces Justificatives, XII, p. 451. 

[38] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, p. lxii. 

[39] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 177, p. 203. 

[40] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 67. 

[41] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, VIII, p. civ. 

[42] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 65. 

[43] Angers 33, p. 74. 

[44] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 177, p. 203. 

[45] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 66. 

[46] Angers 33, p. 74. 

[47] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 177, p. 203. 

[48] Flodoard 937, MGH SS III, p. 385. 

[49] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 66. 

[50] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, pp. 66 and 67. 

[51] Borderie (1898), Tome II, p. 416, quoting Lobineau (1707), Tome I, p. 81. 

[52] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Eglise cathedrale de Paris, p. 1015. 

[53] ES III 657. 

[54] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, pp. 66 and 67. 

[55] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 2, p. 4. 

[56] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais aux X et XI siècles' (2000), p. 239, citing Chaume, M. (1925) Les origines du duché de Bourgogne (Dijon) Vol. I, p. 534. 

[57] Chronique de Nantes, XXXVII, pp. 107-8. 

[58] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 75. 

[59] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 75. 

[60] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152, and CCCCXV, p. 153. 

[61] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 2, p. 4. 

[62] Saint-Chaffre, Chronicon Monasterii Sancti Petri Aniciensis, CCCCXII, p. 152. 

[63] Saint-Chaffre CXLIV, p. 70. 

[64] Richer, III.XCII and XCIV, pp. 112 and 114. 

[65] Chronico Andegavensi 987, RHGF X, p. 271. 

[66] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d´Anjou, p. 382. 

[67] Libro Otiis Imperialibus, RHGF IX, p. 45. 

[68] Rodulfus Glaber, Historiarum I.7, p. 17. 

[69] Richer III.XCV, p. 116. 

[70] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***. 

[71] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780. 

[72] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 110. 

[73] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 653, p. 645. 

[74] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 15, p. 18. 

[75] Marseille Saint-Victor I, 630, p. 626. 

[76] Mâcon, 471, 490, pp. 271, 284-5, and Cluny, Tome IV, 2694, p. 721. 

[77] Benedict VIII, Letter 16, Patrologia Latina CXXXIX1603, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 270, and quoted in Manteyer (1908), p. 274. 

[78] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 630, p. 626. 

[79] Marseille Saint-Victor, Tome I, 225, p. 252. 

[80] Manteyer (1908), p. 273, quoting Bibl. nat. de Madrid, ms. Ee 40, fo 118 vo

[81] Obituaires de Lyon II, Prieuré Saint-Pierre de Mâcon, p. 482.       

[82] Manteyer (1908), p. 274, quoting Biblioth. Méjanes ms. 812, recueil Bouquier, t. 1, pp. 145-6, Catal. des mss. Départements, t. XVI, Aix, 1894 ms. 915. 

[83] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 75. 

[84] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 75. 

[85] Latouche, R. (1910) Histoire du comté du Maine pendant le X et le XI siècle (Paris), Pièces Justificatives 1, p. 161. 

[86] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 2, p. 4. 

[87] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF X, p. 175. 

[88] Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, Chronica domni Rainaldi archidiaconi sancti Mauricii Andegavensis, p. 9.  

[89] Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[90] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 87. 

[91] Halphen (1903), Annales Sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 2. 

[92] Genealogiæ comitum Andegavensium, VI, p. 249. 

[93] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 3, p. 7. 

[94] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 20.  

[95] Angers 22, p. 52. 

[96] Cluny Tome II, 1474, p. 528. 

[97] Cluny Tome II, 1701, p. 723. 

[98] Settipani 'Les origines maternelles d'Otte-Guillaume' (1994), pp 48-49. 

[99] Bouchard (1987), p. 309, citing Chaume, M. (1925-1931) Les origines du duché de Bourgogne 2 Vols. reprint 1977 (Dijon), Vol. 1, p. 447 n. 2. 

[100] Bouchard (1987), p. 309. 

[101] Lot (1891), pp. 323-34, and Poupardin (1907), pp. 206 and 417, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 309. 

[102] Duchesne, A. Histoire de Vergy, p. 46, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 307. 

[103] Bouchard (1987), p. 309, citing Duchesne, A. (1619) Histoire des roys, ducs et comtes de Bourgogne (Paris), p. 387. 

[104] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum II.4, p. 59. 

[105] Fragmentum Historiæ Andegavensis, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 376. 

[106] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 3, p. 7. 

[107] Adémar de Chabannes, III, 41, p. 163. 

[108] Historia Pontificum et Comitum Engolismensis, XXIV, p. 27. 

[109] Sauvigny, 633, p. 310.  

[110] Paray-le-Monial, 5, p. 6. 

[111] Cluny Tome III, 1794, p. 49. 

[112] Paray-le-Monial 180, p. 90. 

[113] Angers 25, p. 56. 

[114] Paray-le-Monial 193, p. 97. 

[115] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, pp. 87-8. 

[116] Historia Comitum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 320. 

[117] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 89. 

[118] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 88. 

[119] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, XVI, p. 34. 

[120] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, XVII, p. 36. 

[121] Marmoutier-Vendômois, CXVII, p. 183. 

[122] Fragmentum Historiæ Andegavensis, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 376. 

[123] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780. 

[124] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 1, p. 1. 

[125] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, pp. 87-8, and Historia Comitum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 320. 

[126] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 3, p. 7. 

[127] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 46.

[128] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 4, p. 10. 

[129] Anjou Charité, I, p. 3. 

[130] Anjou Charité, IV, p. 6. 

[131] Poull (1994), p. 21. 

[132] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 105. 

[133] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, VIII, p. 356. 

[134] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.26, pp. 213-5. 

[135] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 24.  

[136] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome IV, Chronicon Vindocinense 1040, p. 485. 

[137] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 202.       

[138] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 117. 

[139] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, VI, p. 14. 

[140] Chronico Monasterii Sancti Albini Andegavensis 1000, RHGF X, p. 274. 

[141] Anjou Charité, I, p. 3. 

[142] Anjou Charité, IV, p. 6. 

[143] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, VIII, p. 356. 

[144] Angers 44, p. 92. 

[145] Anjou Charité, V, p. 7. 

[146] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon' (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 399. 

[147] Anjou Charité, XXXIII, p. 27. 

[148] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[149] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 24.  

[150] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 72, p. 89. 

[151] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 201.       

[152] Chronicon Vindocinense 1046, p. 486. 

[153] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 100. 

[154] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF X, p. 258. 

[155] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, VI, p. 14. 

[156] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 201.       

[157] Chronicon Vindocinense 1006, p. 483. 

[158] Anjou Charité, I, p. 3. 

[159] Anjou Charité, IV, p. 6. 

[160] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 1, p. 1. 

[161] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1015, MGH SS XXIII, p. 781. 

[162] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 100. 

[163] Chronico Andegavensi, RHGF X, p. 176. 

[164] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, VIII, p. 356. 

[165] William of Poitiers, Book I, c. 11. 

[166] Anjou Charité, V, p. 7. 

[167] Chifflet (1644), Preuves, p. 319.  

[168] Ex Chronico Turonensi, RHGF XII, p. 462. 

[169] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, p. 249 footnote 3, quoting Mss. 12700, f. 258. 

[170] Chronicon Vindocinense 1060, p. 487. 

[171] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 25.  

[172] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 203.       

[173] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 117. 

[174] Flodoard Addit codex 1 (inserted after 966), MGH SS III, p. 407. 

[175] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.6, p. 107. 

[176] Cluny Tome III, 2742, p. 765. 

[177] Chronico Sancti Michaelis in periculo maris, RHGF X, p. 176. 

[178] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 23 and 24.  

[179] Chronica sancti Sergii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, pp. 135-6.  

[180] Château-du-Loir, 13, p. 5. 

[181] Anjou Charité, V, p. 7. 

[182] Angers 45, p. 93. 

[183] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas, 27, p. 32. 

[184] Angers Saint-Aubin 72, p. 89. 

[185] Szabolcs de Vajay ‘Berthe, reine d'Aragon' (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 398. 

[186] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 1, p. 5. 

[187] Poitiers Saint-Nicolas 5, p. 12. 

[188] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 203.       

[189] Ronceray, role 3e, pièce 33, quoted in Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 293 footnote 1. 

[190] Historia sancti Florentii Salmurensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 293.  

[191] Ronceray, role 3e, pièce 33, quoted in Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 293 footnote 1. 

[192] Tours Saint-Julien, Tome I, 23, p. 33. 

[193] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[194] Ronceray, role 3e, pièce 33, quoted in Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 293 footnote 1. 

[195] Chifflet (1644), Preuves, p. 319. 

[196] Anjou Charité, VIII, p. 10. 

[197] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203. 

[198] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247. 

[199] Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 257. 

[200] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386. 

[201] Devaux 'Comtes de Gâtinais' (1885), pp. 81-2, and Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, p. 326. 

[202] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais', p. 231, citing Poupardin, R. 'Généalogies angevines', Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome 20 (1900), p. 208, no. 6. 

[203] Père Anselme, Tome VI, p. 13, citing “Cartulaire de St Serge”. 

[204] Historia Comitum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 333. 

[205] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 402. 

[206] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92. 

[207] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203. 

[208] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), p. 247. 

[209] Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. 143, cols. 799-800, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 257. 

[210] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386. 

[211] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276. 

[212] Burke´s Peerage I, p. 833. 

[213] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 117. 

[214] Historia Comitum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 333. 

[215] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VI, p. 92. 

[216] Marmoutier CXVII, p. 183. 

[217] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CLIX, p. 276. 

[218] Anjou Charité, VIII, p. 10. 

[219] Ex Chronico Turonensi, RHGF XII, p. 462. 

[220] William of Malmesbury, III, 235, p. 224, and Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 307. 

[221] Chronicon Vindocinense 1067 and 1068, pp. 488-9. 

[222] Chronica domni Rainaldi archidiaconi sancti Mauricii Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 12.  

[223] Halphen (1906), Catalogue, 158, p. 290, citing Cartul. de Saint-Nicolas, fol. 14 v, Arch. du Maine-et-Loire, H 397, no. 22. 

[224] Halphen (1906), p. 135, footnote 1, and Catalogue, 240, p. 313, citing Coll. Baluze, vol. 38, fol. 183, d´après le Cartulaire de Bourgeuil, fol. 97. 

[225] Halphen (1906), Catalogue, 186, p. 298, citing Prou, Recueil des actes de Philippe I, no. 34. 

[226] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CLIX, p. 276. 

[227] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203. 

[228] Marmoutier CXVII, p. 183. 

[229] Chronicon Vindocinense 1067 and 1068, pp. 488-7. 

[230] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70. 

[231] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, pp. 307 and 309. 

[232] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[233] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, p. 201.       

[234] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Abbaye de la Trinité de Vendôme, List of anniversaries extracted from a lost necrology, p. 206.       

[235] Chronicon Vindocinense 1109, p. 492. 

[236] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[237] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[238] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 141. 

[239] Halphen (1906), p. 169, footnote 4, quoting a charter of Saint-Florent de Saumur, Arch. du Maine-et-Loire, fonds de la mense commune, domaine de Saumur, orig.. 

[240] Halphen (1906), Catalogue, 231, p. 310, citing citing Cartul. de Saint-Nicolas, fol. 123. 

[241] Halphen & Poupardin (1913), Genealogiæ comitum Andegavensium, V, p. 249. 

[242] Saint-Phalle 'Les comtes de Gâtinais', p. 231, citing Poupardin, R. 'Généalogies angevines', Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome 20 (1900), p. 208, no. 6. 

[243] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 167. 

[244] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[245] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XX, p. 386. 

[246] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book IX, p. 11. 

[247] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257. 

[248] William of Tyre, XIV.I, p. 606. 

[249] Runciman (1978), Vol. 1, p. 107. 

[250] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72. 

[251] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5. 

[252] Fontevraud, 156, p. 142. 

[253] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803. 

[254] Angers 65, p. 127. 

[255] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606. 

[256] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[257] Ex Chronico Briocensi, RHGF XII, p. 566. 

[258] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XVII, p. 291. 

[259] Angers 93, p. 171. 

[260] Morbihan, 192, p. 155. 

[261] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[262] Redon, Monasterii S. Salvatoris Rotonensis Annales, VII Sepulturæ Insigniores, p. 451. 

[263] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[264] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803. 

[265] Angers 65, p. 127. 

[266] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606. 

[267] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 96, p. 55. 

[268] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 142. 

[269] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[270] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 142. 

[271] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[272] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803. 

[273] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606. 

[274] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 140. 

[275] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1095, MGH SS XXIII, p. 803. 

[276] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606. 

[277] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 187. 

[278] Angers 65, p. 127. 

[279] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 606. 

[280] Fontevraud 156, p. 142. 

[281] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 84, p. 99. 

[282] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 181. 

[283] Malmesbury, 419, p. 365. 

[284] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 311.

[285] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 178. 

[286] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 195. 

[287] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 203. 

[288] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 227-8. 

[289] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 233.   

[290] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[291] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 332. 

[292] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 143. 

[293] Château-du-Loir 78, p. 44. 

[294] Fontevraud 165, p. 155. 

[295] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[296] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 33.  

[297] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 188.       

[298] William of Tyre Continuator XII.IV, p. 517. 

[299] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 177. 

[300] Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem, 44, p. 81. 

[301] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 231-2. 

[302] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 233.   

[303] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 334-5. 

[304] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 360. 

[305] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[306] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 607. 

[307] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 181. 

[308] Florentii Wigornensis Monachi Chronicon, Continuatio, p. 71. 

[309] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 331. 

[310] Domesday Descendants, p. 131. 

[311] Fontevraud 99, p. 87. 

[312] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XLIV, p. 49. 

[313] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[314] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 165, and Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 333. 

[315] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 167. 

[316] Malmesbury, 419, p. 365. 

[317] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 379. 

[318] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 607. 

[319] Saint-Bertin, II.11, p. 300. 

[320] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 262. 

[321] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 361. 

[322] Annales Aquicinctini 1165, MGH SS XVI, p. 504. 

[323] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, p. 166, citing Robert, U. (1891) Bullaire du Pape Calixte II 1119-1124 (Paris), ii, no. 507. 

[324] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[325] Chronica de Gesta Consulum Andegavorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 152. 

[326] Obituaires de Sens Tome IV, Prieuré de Fontaines, p. 188.       

[327] Actes Henri II, Tome I, XIV, p. 18. 

[328] Chronicon Vindocinense 1151, p. 494. 

[329] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 607. 

[330] Tiron Sainte-Trinité, Tome I, XXXIII, p. 53. 

[331] Robert de Torigny, Tome II, p. 28. 

[332] Notre-Dame de la Trappe, M.XLV, p. 348. 

[333] William of Tyre Continuator XV.XXVII, p. 702, and XVI.I, p. 704. 

[334] William of Tyre Continuator XV.XXVII, p. 702, and XVI.I, p. 704. 

[335] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[336] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 32.  

[337] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 483. 

[338] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1143, p. 177. 

[339] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1151, p. 256. 

[340] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[341] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. VI, Book XII, p. 391. 

[342] Gervase, p. 92. 

[343] Angers 138, p. 225. 

[344] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1167, p. 367. 

[345] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[346] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1152, MGH SS XXIII, p. 841. 

[347] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1189, MGH SS XXIII, p. 861. 

[348] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1134, pp. 192-3. 

[349] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 33.  

[350] William of Tyre XIV.I, p. 607. 

[351] Angers 138, p. 225. 

[352] Domesday Descendants, pp. 243 and 989. 

[353] Matthew Paris, Vol. II, 1158, p. 215. 

[354] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1158, p. 311. 

[355] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1136, p. 202. 

[356] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 34.  

[357] William of Tyre Continuator XIV.I, p. 607. 

[358] Domesday Descendants, pp. 989-990. 

[359] Robert de Torigny, Tome I, 1164, p. 350. 

[360] Benedict of Peterborough, Vol. 2 1189, p. 80.   

[361] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. II, Shaftesbury, XX, p. 484. 

[362] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. II, Shaftesbury, XII, p. 482. 

[363] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. II, Shaftesbury, p. 473, footnote t, quoting “Harl. MS 61 fol. 27”. 

[364] De Origine Comitum Andegavensium, RHGF XII, p. 536. 

[365] Brut y Tywysogion (Williams), p. 225. 

[366] Pipe Roll 20 Hen II (1173/74), London/Middlesex, p. 9. 

[367] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 146. 

[368] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 264. 

[369] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 253. 

[370] Chronique Parisienne, 313, p. 181. 

[371] Mabille (1871), Pièces justificatives, III, p. xciv. 

[372] Angers 21, p. 50. 

[373] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 3, p. 7. 

[374] Tours Saint-Julien (Fragments), XXVI, p. 69. 

[375] RHGF, Tome X, Roberti Regis Diplomata, XI, p. 583. 

[376] Chartes Vendômoises, XXIII, p. 33. 

[377] Angers 27, p. 60. 

[378] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 4, p. 10. 

[379] Angers 22, p. 52. 

[380] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, 3, p. 7. 

[381] Angers 25, p. 56. 

[382] RHGF, Tome X, Roberti Regis Diplomata, XI, p. 583. 

[383] Angers 28, p. 62. 

[384] RHGF, Tome X, Roberti Regis Diplomata, XI, p. 583. 

[385] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 201, quoting Registre de la Chambre des Contes

[386] Marmoutier-Tours, Obitus seu anniversaria, p. 144. 

[387] Port (1876), Tome II, p. 37, citing Mss. Baluze, 280. 

[388] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 201, quoting Registre de la Chambre des Contes

[389] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2129, p. 229, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de la Boissière’. 

[390] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2153, p. 232, citing ‘Cartul. de Villeloin fo. 72 v’. 

[391] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2181, p. 238, citing ‘Archiv. de la Boissière’. 

[392] Delisle (1856), 1885, p. 415. 

[393] Chroniques de Touraine, Chronicon Turonense Magnum, p. 153. 

[394] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2129, p. 229, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de la Boissière’. 

[395] Michel (1840), p. 93. 

[396] Fontaine-Daniel, XIX, p. 36. 

[397] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 176, citing Enqueste sur l´Usage des Contez d´Anjou, de Touraine et du Maine

[398] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104. 

[399] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, p. 134. 

[400] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, p. 141. 

[401] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2181, p. 238, citing ‘Archiv. de la Boissière’. 

[402] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, 2514, p. 293, citing ‘Archiv. de l’abbaye de Bonlieu’. 

[403] Delisle (1856), 1885, p. 415. 

[404] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 242 bis, p. 162. 

[405] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104. 

[406] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104. 

[407] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1915, p. 117. 

[408] Chronicon Savigniacense, Stephani Baluzii Miscellaneorum, Liber II, Collectio Veterum, p. 319. 

[409] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXVII, p. 80. 

[410] Delisle (1856), 1885, p. 415. 

[411] Château-du-Loir, 140, p. 104. 

[412] Château-du-Loir, 142, p. 104. 

[413] Châteaudun Hôtel-Dieu CXXXVI, p. 93. 

[414] Château-du-Loir, 180, p. 150. 

[415] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 203, quoting Cartulaire de Marmoutier

[416] Père Anselme, Tome I, pp. 227-38. 

[417] Kerrebrouck (1990), pp. 271-323. 

[418] Chronique Parisienne, 313, p. 181. 

[419] Delachenal (1910), Tome I, p. 25. 

[420] Sturdza (1999), p. 505. 

[421] Père Anselme, Tome I, pp. 227-8, citing “Trésor des chartres registre 81 du regne du roy Jean des années 1351, 52, 53, fol. 208”. 

[422] Morice (1742), Tome I, col. 1534. 

[423] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 229 (no citation reference). 

[424] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 229 (no citation reference). 

[425] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 229 (no citation reference). 

[426] Robillard de Beaurepaire (1870), Chronique Rouennaise, p. 340. 

[427] Documenti Diplomatici Milanesi, Vol. I, CLXVI, p. 228. 

[428] According to Kerrebrouck (1990), p. 285, she was born at Zaragoza 2 Dec 1380. 

[429] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 230 (no citation reference). 

[430] Gaspare Fuscolillo, I, p. 46. 

[431] State Archives, volume 102, page 86, fascicule 2, and Guichenon (Savoie), Tome IV, Preuves, p. 346. 

[432] Vallet de Viriville (1859), Fragments de la Geste des Nobles François, Chap. 148, p. 161. 

[433] Vallet de Viriville (1858) Chronique de Charles VII roi de France, par Jean Chartier (Pars), Tome II, Chap. 154, p. 33. 

[434] Villeneuve Bargemont (1825), Tome II, p. 344 (no citation reference). 

[435] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 235 (no citation reference). 

[436] Enciclopedia genealogica del Mediterraneo, “Libro d’Oro della Nobiltà Mediterranea”, Ruffo: Linee Antiche. 

[437] Kerrebrouck (1990), p. 319, footnote 16), citing “Le Mémoire du président Louvet”. 

[438] The date of her will. 

[439] Villeneuve Bargemont (1825), Tome II, p. 344 (no citation reference). 

[440] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome II, pp. 55-6. 

[441] Père Anselme, Tome III, p. 429. 

[442] Père Anselme, Tome III, p. 407. 

[443] Chronique scandaleuse (1611), p. 325. 

[444] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 236 (no citation reference). 

[445] CP XIV 260, citing Chronicle of Warkworth, p. 19. 

[446] CP XIV 259-60 citing Griffiths, R. (1981) The Reign of King Henry VI, p. 802. 

[447] Kerrebrouck (1990), p. 317, citing Griffiths (1981) who suggests that "Auricher" may have been a corruption of "Devonshire". 

[448] Gaspare Fuscolillo, I, p. 46. 

[449] Gaspare Fuscolillo, I, p. 46. 

[450] Gaspare Fuscolillo, I, p. 46. 

[451] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 308. 

[452] Calmet (1728), Tome I, Preuves, col. 578. 

[453] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 233 (no citation reference). 

[454] Chronique scandaleuse (1611), p. 250. 

[455] Chronique scandaleuse (1611), p. 221. 

[456] Chronique scandaleuse (1611), p. 221. 

[457] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome II, pp. 55-6. 

[458] Calmet (1728), Tome I, Preuves, col. 579. 

[459] Chronique scandaleuse (1611), p. 250. 

[460] Marolles (1873), col. 4. 

[461] Vallet de Viriville (1858), Tome II, Chap. 159, p. 45. 

[462] Stevenson (1864), Vol. II, Part II, Annales Wilhelmi Wyrcester, 1444, p. [764]. 

[463] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXVII (MS. Reg. 2 B. XV), p. 280. 

[464] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 232 (no citation reference). 

[465] Père Anselme, Tome I, pp. 235-6. 

[466] Dom Villevieille (Passier), Tome II, pp. 55-6. 

[467] Kerrebrouck (1990), p. 506.  According to Kerrebrouck (1987), p. 116, she died [1574]. 

[468] Père Anselme, Tome I, p. 236.