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MAINE

  v4.1 Updated 19 November 2017

 

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RETURN TO MAINE, VENDÔME INTRODUCTION

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Chapter 1.                COMTES du MAINE. 1

A.         COMTES du MAINE.. 1

B.         COMTES du MAINE (BAUGENCY-la FLECHE) 23

Chapter 2.                VICOMTES du MAINE et de BEAUMONT-sur-SARTHE. 28

A.         VICOMTES du MAINE, VICOMTES de BEAUMONT-sur-SARTHE.. 28

B.         VICOMTES de BEAUMONT (BRIENNE) 51

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    COMTES du MAINE

 

 

 

A.      COMTES du MAINE

 

 

Primary sources have not been identified which confirm the family relationships, if any, between the comtes du Maine during the 9th century.  Onomastics suggest that some of family groups shown below were related.  However, considering the frequency with which counties were reassigned between different nobles in the Carolingian kingdom of the West Franks in the late 8th and 9th centuries, an unbroken succession of counts from the same family is unlikely. 

 

 

1.         ROTHGARComte [du Maine].  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis names "Rothgarius quidam comes et filius eius Karivius" as holding power [in Maine], probably from the early 720s[1].  No other source has been identified which names Rothgar, and the dating of his death cannot be assessed with any confidence.  [same person as...?  ROTHGAR (-after 752).  "Pippinus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to Fulrad Abbot of Saint-Denis by charter dated 1 Mar 752 which names "fidelibus nostris…Milone, Rotgario, Cheimgaudo, Crothardo, Gerichardo, Autgario et Wiberto comite palatii nostri"[2].  This co-identity is possible but not certain.]  m ---.  The name of Rothgar's wife is not known.  Rothgar & his wife had two children: 

a)         HERVE .  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records "illuster vir Charivius" [presumably Hervé] as holding the bishopric of Le Mans, in a paragraph dated 5 Mar 723[3].  The same source in a later paragraph records that, after the death of “domni Herlemundi” (recorded as bishop earlier and whose death is dated by Gallia Christiana to “IX Kal Nov” 724[4]), the bishopric was vacant for some years due to conspiracies and quarrels (“annos aliquos, propter imminentes seditiones et rixas”) during which time "Rothgarius quidam comes et filius eius Karivius" held power in the bishopric[5].  It is unclear from the wording whether this “Karivius” was the same person as “Charivius” who was named on 5 Mar 723.  If this co-identity is correct, the wording of the extracts suggests that “Karivius” was not an ecclesiast. 

b)         GAUSLIN (-[760/71?])Bishop of Le Mans .  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that, during the period when "Rothgarius quidam comes et filius eius Karivius" held power in the bishopric, against the wishes of the people they sent "quendam...clericum inlitteratum et indoctum, qui filius erat Rothgarii et frater Hervei...Gauziolenum" to Rouen to be invested with the bishopric[6].  The chronology suggests that Gauslin was considerably younger than his brother, maybe even a child or young adolescent (which could explain why he was “inlitteratum et indoctum”).  If that is correct, the two brothers may have been born from different marriages of their father.  The same source records the appointment of a second “domnus Herlemundus” as bishop, temporarily replacing Gauslin for a limited period the dating of which is uncertain[7].  For those interested in the details, Gallia Christiana assigns dates to these appointments, although the precise source on which this dating is based is unclear[8].  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records the death "in villa...Silviacus" of "Guaziolenus" after holding the bishopric for 50 years [appears exaggerated] and his burial “in æcclesia...apostolorum Petri et Pauli[9].  The editor of this source quotes an 13th/14th century inscription in that church (La Couture) which dates the death of “Gosselinus episc. Cœnoman" to 771[10].  The dating of these events is shaky. 

 

 

Records show the appointment of two “dukes” in Maine during the 8th century, dated to [748/49] and [790].  The appointees in both cases were members of the Frankish royal family.  It is unclear whether (1) the county of Maine (or the town of Le Mans) was elevated to ducal status, with a duke overseeing an existing local count, or (2) whether the ducal title was used by new appointees to the county because they had each already been appointed dukes elsewhere.  Considering later examples of the increase in status of some seigneuries into counties, without any formal grants, after they were acquired by individuals who already enjoyed comital status elsewhere (a good example being Alençon in Normandy), the second possible explanation appears more likely.  In both cases the appointments were short-lived, which also suggests that no permanent elevation to ducal status took place.  If that is correct, it is unlikely that in the case of Maine each short-lived period of ducal status was linked to a military governorship normally associated during the earlier Merovingian Frankish period with “march” frontier areas (see the document FRANKS, MEROVINGIAN NOBILITY).  It is suggested therefore that these two “dukes” ruled the county of Maine in the same way as earlier and later counts. 

 

1.         GRIFO, son of CHARLES "Martel" maiordomus of Austrasia and Neustria [Carolingian] & his second wife Suanachildis [Suanhilde] [of Bavaria] ([726]-killed in battle Saint Jean de Maurienne 753)Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death, specifying that "Grifo…minor natu…matrem habuit Swannhilde neptem Odilonis ducis Baioariorum"[11].  His father bequeathed to Grifo the central part of his territory, but his stepbrothers Carloman and Pépin deprived him of this inheritance and divided the land between themselves.  Einhard records that his mother incited Grifo to rebel against his half-brothers, during the course of which Carloman imprisoned Grifo "in Novo-castello...juxta Arduennam", adding that it was said that Grifo remained imprisoned there until Carloman left for Rome (dated to late 747, see below)[12].  The Royal Frankish Annals also record that Grifo rebelled, incited by his mother, but was defeated at Laon and imprisoned by Carloman at Neufchâtel in the Ardennes[13].  He was released in 747 by his brother Pépin and fled to Saxony, where he raised an army although armed conflict was avoided[14].  The Annalium Petavianorum Continuatio records that “Grippo” fled “in Saxoniam” in 748 and returned from exile in 749[15].  He invaded Bavaria where he was recognised as duke in 748 in succession to Duke Odilo, but was deposed by Pépin who installed their nephew Tassilo III as duke.  Comte [duc?] du Mans [748/49]: according to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 748 Pépin granted Grifo the duchy of Mans and twelve counties in Neustria, although the source does not identify these counties more precisely[16].  The Annales Mettenses also record that Pepin granted “Cinomannicum urbem cum duodecim comitatibus” to “Gripponi”, adding that he fled to Gascony “ad Waifarium ducem perfidem Aquitaniorum[17].  The Continuator of Fredegar records that in 748 "germanus ipsius rege…Gripho" fled once more and allied himself with Waifar Duke of the Aquitanians[18].  Grifo rebelled yet again, in alliance with the Bretons.  He fled to Lombardy to join Aistulf King of the Lombards but was caught and killed while he was passing the Alps by "Theudoeno comite Viennense…et Frederico Ultraiurano comite"[19], two of Pépin's supporters.  His escape to Italy, capture and death at the hands of "Theodoino comite in valle Maurienna" is also recorded in the Annales Laurissenses[20].   

 

 

1.         CHARLES, son of CHARLES I King of the Franks & his second wife Hildegard --- ([772/73]-in Bavaria 4 Dec 811[21]).  He is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was his parents' first son[22]His father associated Charles in the government of Francia and Saxony in 790[23]Comte [duc?] du Mans [790]: the Annales Laurissenses record that "rex Carolus" installed "primogenitum filium suum Carolum" in "ultra Sequaname…ducatum Cenomannicum" but that this reverted to his father in the summer of the same year[24]

 

 

No source has been identified which names successors in the county of Maine until Guy and Rorico, who are named in the 830s. 

 

1.         GUY, son of --- (-killed in battle Jun [834])Comte du MaineThe Actus pontificum Cenomannis reproduces a charter of Emperor Louis I dated 29 Dec 832 which names "fidelis nostrum Widonem" as holding power [in Maine][25]The Miracula Sancti Bernardi names "Odonem fratremque illius Guillelmum, comitem Blesensium, Teutonem denique abbatem Sancti Martini, Guidonem comitem Cenomanensem" among those killed in battle against Lambert Comte de Nantes[26]The Chronica Rainaldi records that "Odo comes Aurelianensium, Willelmus frater eius comes Blesensium, Guido comes Cenomanensium" died in battle fighting "Lambertum" in 835[27].  It is more likely that this battle took place in 834, assuming that it is correct that Count Lambert was established in Italy later that year. 

 

 

Rorico’s father’s name suggests a connection with the family of Rothgar which is shown above. 

 

GAUSLIN, son of --- .  He is named as father of Rorico in the charter dated 1 Mar 839, quoted below. 

m ADELTRUDIS, daughter of ---.  She is named as mother of Comte Rorico in the following charter: Rorgo comes” donated “predium...in pago Andecavo in condita Maciacense...in Valegia...loco...Maisnisias”, which “genitor meus Gauzlinus et mater mea Adeltrudis habuerunt”, to the abbey of Saint-Maur-sur-Loire, confirmed by Dodon Bishop of Anjou by charter dated 1 Mar 839[28].  Her inclusion in the document suggests that she had a direct interest in the property donated in her own right, which if correct indicates that Adeltrudis originated in the county of Anjou. 

Gauslin & his wife had two children: 

1.         RORICO [Rorgo] [I] (-16 Jun [839/40], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maur de Glanfeuil, Anjou).  His relationship with one of the daughters of Emperor Charlemagne suggests that Rorico probably lived at the emperor's court in the early 9th century, but no confirmation of this suggestion has been found in contemporary documentation.  Comte du MaineThe Actus pontificum Cenomannis names "Cenomannis…comite eiusdem parrochie Rorigone", in a passage which records the enthronement of bishop Aldric in 832[29].  Considering that Guy was named as comte du Maine in [832/34], one possibility is that this enthronement was incorrectly dated in this source.  Another possibility is that two counts held power in the county at the same time, although no other primary source indication has been identified which suggests that this is correct.  Emperor Louis I confirmed the donation made by "comes Rorigo…cum sue coniuge Bilechilde" to "cœnobium Glannafoliense Fossatensi in pago Andegavo" by charter dated 833[30].  “Rorgo comes” donated “predium...in pago Andecavo in condita Maciacense...in Valegia...loco...Maisnisias”, which “genitor meus Gauzlinus et mater mea Adeltrudis habuerunt”, to the abbey of Saint-Maur-sur-Loire (later known as Glanfeuil) in which “germanus noster Gausbetus...et filium nostrum Gauslinum” followed the religious life, confirmed by Dodon Bishop of Anjou by charter dated 1 Mar 839, signed by “Rortgonis comitis, Bilechildis uxoris eius, Gausberti fratris eius...[31]m (after 800) BILICHILDIS, daughter of --- (-after 1 Mar 839).  Emperor Louis I confirmed the donation of "comes Rorigo…cum sue coniuge Bilechilde" to "cœnobium Glannafoliense Fossatensi in pago Andegavo" by charter dated 833[32].  “Rorgo comes” donated property to the abbey of Saint-Maur-sur-Loire, confirmed by Dodon Bishop of Anjou by charter dated 1 Mar 839, signed by “Rortgonis comitis, Bilechildis uxoris eius...[33]Mistress (1): ([800]) HROTHRUDIS [Rotrud], daughter of Emperor CHARLES I King of the Franks & his second wife Hildegard [Udalrichinger] ([775]-6 Jun 810[34]).  "Hruodrudem et Bertham et Gislam" are named as daughters of King Charles and Hildegard by Einhard[35]Rotrud's relationship with Rorico [I] is confirmed by the Annales Bertiniani which record the death "867 V Id Ian" of "Hludowicus abbas monasterii et nepos Karoli imperatoris ex filia maiori natu Rohtrude"[36], read together with an earlier part of the same source in which her son Louis is named "Ludowicum abbatem monasterii Sancti Dyonisii cum fratre ipsius Gauzleno"[37], Gauzlin being named in other sources cited below as the son of Rorico.  The Gesta Francorum records the death "810 VIII Id Iun" of "Hruoddrud filia imperatoris quæ natu maior erat"[38]Einhard records the death "VIII Id Iun 810" of "Hruodtrud filia imperatories"[39].  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Non Jun" of "Rotrudis filia Karoli imperatoris"[40]Comte Rorico & his wife had [five] children (the order of birth of these children is approximate):

a)         RORICO [II] (-866).  His parentage is confirmed by reading the two references to the parentage of his brothers Gauzlin and Geoffroy [Gauzfrid] (see below), together with the Annales Bertiniani which record the death of "Rorigus frater Gauzfridi"[41]Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks entrusted the administration of ducatus Cenomannicus to Rorico, but the latter instigated the revolt of the king's son Louis ("le Bègue") in 862, resulting in the confiscation of the appointment which was awarded to Robert "le Fort" [Capet][42].  It is not clear whether this appointment amounted to Rorico's installation as Comte du Maine or whether it was an administrative delegation, with rights and duties similar to those of a vicomte.  The Annales Bertiniani record that King Charles II pardoned "Gozfridum et Roricum atque Heriveum" in 863[43], but no record has been found of Rorico’s reappointment in Maine.  The Annales Bertiniani record that the Vikings killed "Rorigus frater Gauzfridi" in 866[44]

b)         GEOFFROY [Gauzfrid] (-[878]).  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Guntfridus et Gozfridus" defected to "Salomonem, Britonum ducem" in 861, and persuaded Louis ("le Bègue"), son of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, to join them in 862, although they also record that King Charles II pardoned "Gozfridum et Roricum atque Heriveum" in 863[45].  The Annales Bertiniani record that "Hugo abba et Gauzfridus cum Transsequanis" fought "Nortmannis in Ligeri" in 869, and that "Hugo abba monasterii sancti Martini et Gozfridus cum ceteris Trans-Sequanis" attacked “Nortmanni” at their stronghold in “insulam Ligeris” in 871 but were defeated[46].  No record has yet been identified which links Geoffroy with the administration of the county of Maine or accords him the title count.  The Annales Bertiniani record that in 878 "filii Gozfridi" attacked "castellum et honores filii Odonis" which King Louis “le Bègue” granted to "isdem Gozfridus...[et] filios suos" who abandoned “partem Brittonibus” and swore allegiance to the king[47].  Flodoard's Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ names "Gozlino…Bernardo nepote ipsius…fratrem…suum Gozfridem", referring to Bernard Marquis of Septimania and his rebellion dated to [877], from the context implying that Gauzfrid had recently died[48]m ---.  The name of Geoffroy’s wife is not known.  Geoffroy & his wife had children: 

i)          sons .  The Annales Bertiniani record that in 878 "filii Gozfridi" attacked "castellum et honores filii Odonis" which King Louis “le Bègue” granted to "isdem Gozfridus...[et] filios suos" who abandoned “partem Brittonibus” and swore allegiance to the king[49].  No further information has been found concerning these sons. 

c)         [BILICHILDIS].  The origin of the wife of Comte Bernard is deduced from the Historia Inventionis Sanctii Baudelli which names "Gothorum princeps Bernardus cum avunculo suo Gauzleno tunc inclito Abbate, futuro autem episcopo"[50].  Flodoard's Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ also names "Gozlino…Bernardo nepote ipsius", referring to Bernard Marquis of Septimania and his rebellion dated to [877][51].  She is named in the record of the excommunication by Pope John VIII of "Bernardum filium Bernardi et Belihildis" in 879[52]m BERNARD Comte, son of --- (-killed in battle [844/45]). 

d)         [daughter .  Abbo's De Bellis Parisiacæ names "Ebolus…Abba" as nepos of "Gauzlinus…pontificis"[53], the latter being reported in other sources as the son of Comte Rorico [I] (see below).  It is possible that the wife of Comte Rainulf was the same person as the daughter named [Bilichildis] (see above), who would have been recently widowed at the time of Rainulf's marriage.  m ([845]) as his second wife, RAINULF I Comte de Poitou, son of GERARD I Comte d'Auvergne & his first wife --- ([815]-near Brissarthe Jul 866).] 

e)         GAUSLIN (-16 Apr 886[54]).  “Rorgo comes” donated property to the abbey of Saint-Maur-sur-Loire in which “germanus noster Gausbetus...et filium nostrum Gauslinum” followed the religious life, confirmed by Dodon Bishop of Anjou by charter dated 1 Mar 839[55]The Annales Bertiniani record that "Ludowicum abbatem monasterii Sancti Dyonisii cum fratre ipsius Gauzleno" captured a Viking force in 858[56] Abbé de Saint-Germain, Paris.  Bishop.  The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XVI Kal Apr" of "Gauzlinus episcopus"[57]

Comte Rorico had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 

f)          LOUIS ([800]-9 Jan 867).  Abbot of Saint-Denis Oct 840.  Arch-Chancellor (Protonotar) of Charles II “le Chauve” King of the Franks from 840 until his death[58]His parentage is confirmed by the Annales Bertiniani which record that "Ludowicum abbatem monasterii Sancti Dyonisii cum fratre ipsius Gauzleno" captured a Viking force in 858[59].  The Annales Bertiniani record the death "867 V Id Ian" of "Hludowicus abbas monasterii et nepos Karoli imperatoris ex filia maiori natu Rohtrude"[60]

2.         GAUSBERT (-after 1 Mar 839).  “Rorgo comes” donated property to the abbey of Saint-Maur-sur-Loire in which “germanus noster Gausbetus...et filium nostrum Gauslinum” followed the religious life, confirmed by Dodon Bishop of Anjou by charter dated 1 Mar 839, signed by “Rortgonis comitis, Bilechildis uxoris eius, Gausberti fratris eius...[61]

 

 

The precise relationship between Gausbert and the family shown above has not yet been ascertained, although his name suggests that there was a connection.  The reference to “iuvenis” in one of the sources which record his death suggests that he must not have been aged more than in his twenties when he died. 

 

1.         GAUSBERT (-killed [851/53]).  Comte du MaineThe Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Lanbertus comes Nannetansium" was killed by "Gauzberto Cenomannensium comite", the event being dated from the context to the early 850s[62].  The Fragmentum Chronicæ Lemovicensis records that “Lambertus comes” was killed “Kal Mai” 852 by “Gauzberto Cenomanensium comite[63]The Annales Engolismenses record that "Gausberto" killed "Lambertus…852 Kal Mai" and was himself killed "mense martio"[64].  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "Lambertus comes Namnetensium" was killed fighting "Gauberto comite Cenomannensium" in 852, who was himself killed later in the same year[65]The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Gauzbertus comes Cenomannensis" was killed "insidiis Nannetensium circumventus", the event being dated from the context to the early 850s[66].  The Chronicon Fontanellensis names “Gausbertus iuvenis...et Hilmeradus comes palatii” among those killed in Brittany in 851[67].  The Fragmentum Chronicæ Lemovicensis records that “Gauzbertus comes” was killed in Mar 852 (O.S. from the context)[68]Regino names "Lambertus qui ducatum tenebat inter Ligerim et Sequanam" recording in 860 that he killed "Vivianum", but was himself killed by "Gauzbertus comes", the latter being beheaded by "iussi Caroli"[69], although these events should be dated earlier.  The Annales Fuldenses record that "Hludowicus filius Hludowicus regis" fled to Aquitaine in 854 after "Karolus" took offence because he killed "Gozberti eorum propinqui"[70]

 

 

1.         RAGENOLD (-after 885).  Comte [duc?] du Mans [885]: the Annales Vedastini record in 885 that “Ragnoldum ducem Cinomannicum cum paucis” took part in a Viking attack on Rouen but returned “ad loca sua cum magna tristitia; nil actum utile[71].  The entry suggests that during this period Maine/Le Mans had been conquered by Viking forces.  No other reference to this invasion has been found nor any indication how long the occupation lasted, although considering the Viking successes during the 870s reported earlier such an occupation would not be surprising.  This Ragenold has not yet been linked to any other reference.  The dating appears early for him to have been identified with Ragenold Comte de Roucy but he could have been the same person as "Ragenoldus princeps Nortmannorum" who was recorded in 923 by Flodoard[72] (assuming that he was different from Ragenold Comte de Roucy, see the document NORTHERN FRANCE NOBILITY). 

 

 

1.         BERENGER, son of --- (-13 Dec [892 or after]).  [Comte du Maine].  A notice of Saint-Martin de Tours records that officials of the church went to Le Mans 13 Jun 892 demanding justice from "Beringerium comitem"[73].  The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "Id Dec" of "Beringerius comes"[74]

 

 

1.         GAUSLIN, son of --- (-[895/98 or after).  Comte du Maine.  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Robertus comes" installed "Gauzlino" in Maine, during the period of the attacks by "Rotgario"[75].  His name suggests a relationship with the family of Rorico [I] Comte du Maine, one of whose sons was named Gauslin (see above).  Maybe he was one of the unnamed sons of Geoffroy.  same person as...?  GAUSLIN (-after 13 Nov 912).  Comte.  “Domni Gauslini comitis, domni Ervei comitis, domni Gausberti comitis, domni Fulconis” signed the charter dated 13 Nov 912 under which “domnus Robertus Sancti Martini...abba...et comes” confirmed the independence of Marmoutier abbey[76]

 

2.         GAUSBERT (-after 13 Nov 912).  Comte.  “Domni Gauslini comitis, domni Ervei comitis, domni Gausberti comitis, domni Fulconis” signed the charter dated 13 Nov 912 under which “domnus Robertus Sancti Martini...abba...et comes” confirmed the independence of Marmoutier abbey[77].  Gausbert has not yet otherwise been identified, nor his county ascertained, but his name suggests a connection with the comtes du Maine. 

 

 

The relationship, if any, between the following family and the earlier comtes du Maine has not yet been identified, although the similarity of the names "Rotger" and "Rothgar" suggests a connection: 

1.         --- m --- [de Bourges], sister of Hugues Comte de Bourges, daughter of ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by Abbo who names "Rotgaire, comte et neveu de Hugues" as one of the supporters of "Hugues…prince et gouverneur de Bourges", on the assumption that this passage means that the sister of Hugues was the mother of Rotger, dated to 889 from the context[78].  One child: 

a)         ROGER [Rotger] ([855/65]-before I Nov 900).  His birth date range is estimated from the estimated date of his marriage which, assuming that his wife's origin is correctly shown below, must be reasonably accurate.  Abbo names "Rotgaire, comte et neveu de Hugues" as one of the supporters of "Hugues…prince et gouverneur de Bourges" in his war against Guillaume "le Pieux" Comte d´Auvergne, dated to 889 from the context[79]Comte du Maine 897.  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records the attacks on the bishopric of Le Mans by "Rotgario", while Gunherius was bishop (from 890 to 913)[80].  His marriage, and the appointment of his rival Gauslin by the Capet family (see above), indicate that Roger must have been a Carolingian supporter.  His date of death is estimated based on the charter dated 1 Nov 900 which names his presumed son and widow (see below).  m ([890]) ROTHILDIS, daughter of Emperor CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his second wife Richildis [de Provence] ([871]-[928/29]).  Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks confirmed donations of property "in comitatu quoque Cœnomannico" made by "Hugo comes et mater sua Rothildis", at the request of "genitrix nostra Adeleidis et…comes Hugo consanguineus, necnon et…comes Ecfridus" by charter dated 1 Nov 900[81].  The charter dated 929 subscribed by "Hugonis comitis filii Rotgerii comitis" suggests that Rothildis must have been the wife of Roger[82].  Flodoard names "Rothildis, amitæ suæ [regis Karoli], socrus autem Hugonis" when recording that the king deprived her of "abbatiam…Golam" [Chelles] in favour of his favourite Haganon, the context dictating that "Hugonis" was "Hugo filius Rotberti"[83].  As the paternal aunt of King Charles III, chronology determines that she must have been the daughter of her father's second marriage, although no source has yet been identified which confirms that this is correct.  She acquired the monasteries of Chelles, and Notre-Dame and Saint-Jean at Laon.  She retreated to Chelles in 922 but was deprived of the monastery by her nephew Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks in favour of his favourite Haganon, an event which led to the rebellion of Robert Marquis en Neustrie who was the father of Rothildis's son-in-law (Hugues, later "le Grand" Duc des Francs)[84].  Her death is dated to [late 928/early 929] as Flodoard names "Rothildis…nuper defunctæ" when recording that "Heribertus et Hugo comites" (specifying that "Hugo" was "gener ipsius Rothildis") attacked "Bosonem Rodulfi regis frater" in 929 over the property of Rothildis[85].  Comte Rotger & his wife had two children:

i)          HUGUES [I] du Maine ([890]-[26 Mar 931/Sep 960]).  Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks confirmed donations of property "in comitatu quoque Cœnomannico" made by "Hugo comes et mater sua Rothildis", at the request of "genitrix nostra Adeleidis et…comes Hugo consanguineus, necnon et…comes Ecfridus" by charter dated 1 Nov 900[86].  This presumably indicates that Hugues's father was already dead at the time, and that Hugues himself was still a minor under the guardianship of his mother.  If his mother's origin is correctly identified as shown above, Hugues could have been no more than ten years old at the time.  It is assumed that "comes Hugo consanguineus" and "Hugo comes…" named in this charter were the same person, although this is not beyond all doubt.  If it is correct, the consanguinity would have been through Hugues's mother who was King Charles's paternal aunt as shown above.  He succeeded his father in [900] as Comte du Maine.  His parentage is further confirmed by the charter dated 3 May 929 under which Hugues, future duc des Francs, returned property to Saint-Martin de Tours, subscribed by "Hugonis comitis filii Rotgerii comitis"[87].  Flodoard records that in 924 Raoul King of France granted Maine to "Hugoni filio Rotberti"[88] who, as noted below, was married to the sister of Hugues [I] Comte du Maine.  It is not known whether this grant resulted in Comte Hugues [I] being temporarily dispossessed, or whether the appointment amounted to replacing Hugues (future Duc des Francs) as suzerain over Maine instead of the king.  The latter is more probable as Comte Hugues [I] subscribed the charter of [Duc] Hugues dated 929, which indicates a continuing relationship between the two.  ["Willelmi comitis, Hugoni comitis, item Hugoni, Savarici vicecomitis, Kadeloni vicecomitis, Adraldi vicecomitis, Radulfi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated [936/37] ("anno I Ludovico regnante") under which "Senegundis" donated "alodem suum in pago Alienense, in vicaria Basiacinse in villa…Fornax…" to St Cyprien, Poitiers[89].  Settipani suggests that "Hugonis comitis" can reasonably identified as Hugues [I] Comte du Maine[90].]  "Hugonis ducis, filiorum eius Othonis et Hugonis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum, Hervei comitis Mauritaniæ, Lamberti vicecomitis" subscribed the charter dated 25 Jun 954 under which "Lambertus filius Ansberti cum Girberga sorore mea…" donated property "in territorio Corbonensi" to Chartres Saint-Père[91]"Teutbaldi comitis, Teutbaldi junioris, Gausfredi comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum…" subscribed the charter dated Sep 960 under which "Aremburgis" donated property to Saint-Florent de Saumur[92].  "Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum" in these two documents could either refer to Hugues [I] or Hugues [II].  m ---.  The name of Hugues´s wife is not known.  Hugues [I] & his wife had [one possible child]: 

(a)       [HUGUES (-after [936/37]).  "Willelmi comitis, Hugoni comitis, item Hugoni, Savarici vicecomitis, Kadeloni vicecomitis, Adraldi vicecomitis, Radulfi vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated [936/37] ("anno I Ludovico regnante") under which "Senegundis" donated "alodem suum in pago Alienense, in vicaria Basiacinse in villa…Fornax…" to St Cyprien, Poitiers[93].  If, as noted above, Settipani is correct in suggesting that "Hugonis comitis" in the list of subscribers in this charter can reasonably identified as Hugues [I] Comte du Maine[94], it is possible that "item Hugoni" was his son or other close relative.  If this is correct, the chronology suggests that he may have been the same person as [David/Hugues] du Maine who is shown below.] 

ii)         [JUDITH] du Maine ([before 900]-925).  The marriage of Hugues Comte de Paris with the daughter of Roger Comte du Maine is deduced from Flodoard naming "Rothildis, amitæ suæ [regis Karoli], socrus autem Hugonis" when recording that the king deprived Rothilde of "abbatiam…Golam" [Chelles] in favour of his favourite Hagano, the context dictating that "Hugonis" was "Hugo filius Rotberti"[95].  The source which names her father has not yet been identified, but it appears reasonably certain from the sources quoted above that Rothilde's husband was Roger.  She is named Judith in Europäische Stammtafeln[96], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  According to Settipani her name is not known[97]m ([914]) as his first wife, HUGUES, son of ROBERT Marquis en Neustrie, Comte de Paris [later ROBERT I King of France] & his second wife Béatrix de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([898]-Dourdan, Essonne Jun 956, bur Saint-Denis).  He was installed as HUGUES "le Grand" Duc des Francs in 936. 

 

 

1.         [DAVID/HUGUES] du Maine, son of --- ([915/30]-).  The only reasonably certain information concerning the father of Comte Hugues [II] is his estimated birth date range, as explained further below, which indicates that he could have been the son of Comte Hugues [I] (see above).  His name is the subject of controversy.  A series of apparently spurious charters names "David" as the father of Hugues [II] Comte du Maine, for example "Hugo, David filius, comes Cenomannorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans for the soul of "meique genitoris David et genitricis mee E" by charter dated to [971/997], subscribed by "Hugo filius meus"[98].  In addition, Robert de Torigny records that "Gaufridus comes Perticensis et David comes Cenomannensis" rebelled against "Roberto regi Francorum", after which the king granted Maine to "Gaufrido Grisagonella"[99].  According to Latouche[100], this alleged incident is based on a recital contained in De majoratu et senescalcia Franciæ[101], written in [1158] by Hugue de Clers possibly to add legitimacy to the possession of the county of Maine at that time by the counts of Anjou.  The story is anachronistic as Geoffroy "Grisegonelle" was comte d'Anjou from 958 to 987, whereas Robert II King of France succeeded in 996 (installed as associate king in Dec 987).  It is also difficult to identify "Gaufridus comes Perticensis".  It is of course possible that the report contains some essence of truth but is garbled, and that the alleged rebellion (if it did take place) was against Hugues Capet King of France (father of King Robert II).  In any case, it would be bold to assert the complete impossibility of the text being based on an earlier source, and insufficient detail is known about all events in Maine and Anjou during the 10th century to dismiss the report entirely.  The existence of David has generally been treated with scepticism[102].  Charters dated 929, 931, 955, 960, 967, 971, 976 and 994 all name "Hugues" as comte du Maine[103], referring presumably to Comte Hugues [I] and Comte Hugues [II] although the date of the transition from the one to the other is not known.  The intervals between any of these dates, during which a "Comte David" could have ruled Maine, are short, although it is not impossible that David died soon after succeeding to the county.  The other difficulty is deciding the parentage of the father of Comte Hugues [II].  An interesting possibility emerges if we assign estimated birth date ranges to the known counts of Maine in the line from Hugues [I] (who was born in [890], a relatively certain date as shown above) to Hugues [IV] (born [1018/22], also relatively certain).  Working backwards from Hugues [IV], his father must have been born in [990/1000], and his grandfather in [960/75].  The possible ranges widen the further back we work through Hugues [IV]'s ancestors, but it can be seen that Hugues [II], who was Hugues [IV]'s great-grandfather, could have been born during the period [930/50].  This is rather later than would be expected assuming that Hugues [II] belonged to the generation which followed Hugues [I].  A missing generation is therefore possible in the generally proposed genealogy of the 10th century counts of Maine.  The supposed count David would fill this gap, possibly as the son either of Hugues [I] or of an otherwise unknown brother of the latter.  If David did not exist, the generational gap still applies, which suggests the alternative possibility that there were three counts named Hugues during the period 929/994 not two as has been generally accepted.  If the documentation relating to David is a complete fabrication, the name is an odd choice to convince contemporary readers of its authenticity, as "David" was unusual in France during the 10th century.  Nevertheless, if David had existed, it would be expected that his name would be repeated among Hugues's descendants, which is not the case among those family members who can be identified from primary source documentation (although the same could also be said of the name "Roger", the name of Hugues [I]'s father).  It is unlikely that this puzzle can ever be unravelled completely to everyone's satisfaction, but at least this discussion shows that something does not fit in the generally accepted genealogy of the 10th century counts of Maine, the existence of David as a historical individual being one solution to fill the gap.  m [E---, daughter of ---].  "Hugo, David filius, comes Cenomannorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans for the soul of "meique genitoris David et genitricis mee E" by charter dated to [971/997], subscribed by "Hugo filius meus"[104].  The authenticity of this document is dubious.  [David/Hugues] & his wife had [one possible child]:

a)         [HUGUES [II] du Maine ([930/50]-before Dec 992).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified, apart from the probably spurious documentation highlighted above in relation to the alleged David Comte du Maine.  He succeeded as Comte du Maine.]   

-        see below

 

 

HUGUES [II] du Maine, son of [DAVID/HUGUES [Comte] du Maine & his wife E---] ([930/40]-before Dec 992).  It is clear from the dates of the documents in which Hugues [II] is named that he must have been a different person from Hugues [I].  The parentage of Hugues [II] is not known with certainty.  A series of dubious documents names "David" as his father, for example "Hugo, David filius, comes Cenomannorum" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans for the soul of "meique genitoris David et genitricis mee E" by charter dated to [971/997], subscribed by "Hugo filius meus"[105].  The arguments for and against the existence of this person are set out above.  If David did not exist, it is likely that Comte Hugues [II] was either the son of Comte Hugues [I] or of another otherwise unidentified Comte Hugues, as explained above.  He succeeded as Comte du Maine.  ["Hugonis ducis, filiorum eius Othonis et Hugonis, Odonis comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum, Hervei comitis Mauritaniæ, Lamberti vicecomitis" subscribed the charter dated 25 Jun 954 under which "Lambertus filius Ansberti cum Girberga sorore mea…" donated property "in territorio Corbonensi" to Chartres Saint-Père[106]"Teutbaldi comitis, Teutbaldi junioris, Gausfredi comitis, Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum…" subscribed the charter dated Sep 960 under which "Aremburgis" donated property to Saint-Florent de Saumur[107].  "Hugonis comitis Cenomannorum" in these two documents could either refer to Hugues [I], Hugues [II] or the otherwise unidentified Comte Hugues.]  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis names "Hugonem, Cenomanensium comitem" during the bishopric of "Segenfridi" (from 971 to 997)[108]"Sigefredus Cinnomannicæ….episcopus" donated property to Tours-Saint-Julien, with the consent of "senioris nostri Hugonis…ac filiorum eiusdem…Hugonis et Fulchonis", by charter dated Feb 971[109].  "Hugo comes Cenomannus cum filiis meis ac filiabus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans by charter dated to [971/997], subscribed by "Hugonis filii eius"[110].  The date of his death is set by the charter dated Dec 992 under which Guillaume Comte de Poitou and his wife Emma donated property to Saint-Maixent held by "Fulcho frater Hugonis comitis Cinnomanensis"[111], showing that the brothers' father was deceased at the time. 

m ---.  The name of Hugues's wife is not known. 

Hugues [II] & his wife had [five or more] children: 

1.         HUGUES [III] du Maine ([960/75]-[1014/6 Jul 1016]).  "Sigefredus Cinnomannicæ….episcopus" donated property to Tours-Saint-Julien, with the consent of "senioris nostri Hugonis…ac filiorum eiusdem…Hugonis et Fulchonis", by charter dated Feb 971[112].  Hugues [III]'s birth date range is estimated by working back from the birth date range estimated for his grandson Comte Hugues [IV], which is reasonably robust as shown below.  "Hugo comes Cenomannus cum filiis meis ac filiabus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans by charter dated to [971/997], subscribed by "Hugonis filii eius"[113].  He succeeded as Comte du Maine.  “Hugo comes Cenomannus” [one manuscript reading “Hugo David”, a curious echo of the shady figure of David discussed above] donated “terras...Bernationum” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture “cum...filiis meis ac filiabus” by charter dated to 990, subscribed by “Hugonis comitis, Hugonis filii eius...[114].  "Hugo Cinomannensis comes" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans with the consent of "Hugonis filii Herbrannis" (not yet identified), by charter dated to [1000/15] which is subscribed by "Herbertus frater comitis"[115].  Guillaume of Jumièges recounts that "comitibus Hugone...Cenomanensi ac Waleranno Mellendesi" were among those who joined the army of Eudes Comte de Blois in attempting to capture the château de Tillières {Verneuil, Eure} from Richard II Duke of Normandy, and that Hugues escaped after hiding in a sheep's stable and disguising himself as a shepherd before regaining Le Mans, an event dated to the early 1000s[116].  "Hugo Cenomannensis comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel by charter dated 1014, witnessed by "Roscelini vicecomitis, Hameli de Leido Castello, Haymonis de Medano, Herberti fratris comitis, Droci filii Milonis, Odilarii Drudi"[117].  He is assumed to have died before 6 Jul 1016, the date of a charter in which "Herbertus Evigilans canem cognomine" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans[118]m ---.  The name of Hugues's wife is not known.  Hugues [III] & his wife had [four or more] children:

a)         HUGUES du Maine (-[1013/14]).  Hugues Doubleau donated the priory of Tuffé to the church of Château-du-Loir by charter dated [1013], subscribed by "Hugonis Cenomannensis civitatis comitis, Avesgaudi episcopi ipsius civitatis…Hugonis ipsius militis qui hoc preceptum fieri iussit, Hugonis filii eius…"[119].  “Hugo comes Cenomannus” [one manuscript reading “Hugo David”] donated “terras...Bernationum” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture “cum...filiis meis ac filiabus” by charter dated to 990, subscribed by “Hugonis comitis, Hugonis filii eius...[120].  It is assumed that Hugues predeceased his father. 

b)         HERIBERT [I] "Evigilans Canis/Eveille-chien" du Maine ([990/1000]-15 Feb [1032/35]).  “Widdo Lononis filius” donated “Gaudiacus” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, with the consent of “dominis meis Hugone atque Herberto comitibus et vice comite Radulpho eiusque filii” by undated charter dated to [1000/15][121].  He succeeded his father in [1014/15] as Comte du Maine

-        see below.

c)         daughters .  “Hugo comes Cenomannus” [one manuscript reading “Hugo David”] donated “terras...Bernationum” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture “cum...filiis meis ac filiabus” by charter dated to 990, subscribed by “Hugonis comitis, Hugonis filii eius...[122].  It is not known how many daughters were involved. 

2.         FOULQUES du Maine ([960/65]-after Dec 992).  "Sigefredus Cinnomannicæ….episcopus" donated property to Tours-Saint-Julien, with the consent of "senioris nostri Hugonis…ac filiorum eiusdem…Hugonis et Fulchonis", by charter dated Feb 971[123].  A charter dated Dec 992 records a donation by Guillaume Comte de Poitou and his wife Emma of property to Saint-Maixent which was held by "Fulcho frater Hugonis comitis Cinnomanensis"[124]

3.         HERIBERT "Baco" du Maine ([965/75]-after 1 Apr 1046).  Hugues Comte du Maine donated land at Voivres to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel by charter dated 1014, subscribed by "Herberti fratris comitis"[125].  "Hugo Cinomannensis comes" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans with the consent of "Hugonis filii Herbrannis" (not yet identified), by charter dated to [1000/15] which is subscribed by "Herbertus frater comitis"[126].  "Hugo Cenomannensis comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel by charter dated 1014, witnessed by "Roscelini vicecomitis, Hameli de Leido Castello, Haymonis de Medano, Herberti fratris comitis, Droci filii Milonis, Odilarii Drudi"[127].  He was regent for his great nephew Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine [1032/35]-1046.  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis names "Herbertus comes, cognomento Baco, avunculus Herberti" when recording his disputes with "Avesgaudi episcopi"[128]He was deposed as regent and sent to a monastery[129]

4.         daughters .  The charter dated to [971/997] under which "Hugo comes Cenomannus cum filiis meis ac filiabus" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans[130] shows that Hugues [II] had more than one daughter, but no information has been found to indicate how many daughters there were or whether they married. 

 

 

HERIBERT [I] "Evigilans Canis/Eveille-chien" du Maine, son of HUGUES [III] Comte du Maine & his wife ---  ([990/1000]-15 Feb [1032/35]).  “Widdo Lononis filius” donated “Gaudiacus” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, with the consent of “dominis meis Hugone atque Herberto comitibus et vice comite Radulpho eiusque filii” by undated charter dated to [1000/15][131].  He succeeded his father in [1014/15] as Comte du MaineThe Gesta Ambaziensium names "comes pernimium iuvenis Herbertus cognomento Evigilans Canem" as ruler of "Cenomannicum consulatum" during the life of Lizois de Basauges (see the document ANJOU)[132], which if correct suggests that Héribert must have been born during the later part of 10th century (which is consistent with the birth date range attributed to his son Hugues [IV], see below).  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis names "Herberto, comite Cenomanensi" during the bishopric of "Avesgaudi" (from [997] to [1036]) and records disputes between the two[133]Orderic Vitalis records that "Herbertus Cenommanorum comes ex prosapia (ut fertur) Caroli Magni originem", known as "Evigilans-Canem" because of his merit, after the death of “Hugonis patris sui”, whom “Fulco senior” [Foulques III Comte d´Anjou] had subjugated, attacked Anjou[134].  "Herbertus Evigilans canem cognomine" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans after defeating "Odone Campaniensi…comite" by charter dated Jul 1016[135], which shows that Héribert must have reversed his father's policy of support for Eudes Comte de Blois (see above).  The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou captured "Arbertum, Cenomannis comitem" at Saintes, "prima quadregismæ dominica post cœnam nocte" (7/8 Mar) according to a later passage, in 1029 according to the editor of the version consulted[136].  The Martyrologe de la Couture records the death "XV Kal Mar" of "Herbertus comes Cenom"[137]

m --- (-after 8 Mar [1029]).  The name of Héribert's wife is not known.  The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that the wife of Foulques "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou attempted to capture "uxorem Arberti" on the same day her husband was captured but that she was able to escape[138]

Comte Héribert [I] & his wife had four children:

1.         HUGUES [IV] du Maine ([1018/22]-26 Mar 1051)The Actus pontificum Cenomannis names "Hugonem…Herberti filium" when recording that "Herbertus Baccho" tried to disinherit him[139]He succeeded his father in [1032/35] as Comte du Maine, minor until 1036.  The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "VII Kal Apr" of "Hugo comes, Herberti filius"[140]m (after 14 Apr 1046) as her second husband, BERTHE de Blois, widow of ALAIN III Duke of Brittany, daughter of EUDES II Comte de Blois & his second wife Ermengarde d'Auvergne ([[11/13] Apr 1085).  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that Bishop Gervais arranged the marriage of "Hugonem…Herberti filium" and "Bertam…Alani Britannorum comitis olim coniugem"[141]Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti", after the death of "Alannus Britannorum comes" who was poisoned “a Normannis in Normania”, married “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem[142].  Her second marriage is confirmed by the Chronicon Ruyensis Cœnobii which records the death in 1062 of "Herbertus Cenomannensium Comes et frater uterinus Conani ducis"[143]The Flandria Generosa names "Berta comitissa" as daughter of "altera Ermengardis comitissa", when outlining the basis for the consanguinity between Baudouin VII Count of Flanders and his wife [Hawise] de Bretagne which provided the grounds for the couple's separation[144].  After the death of her second husband, Berthe was expelled from Le Mans by the inhabitants who invited Geoffroy "Martel" Comte d'Anjou to enter the town.  "Comitis Tedbaldi sorori…Berte" donated property by charter dated 12 May 1069[145].  The Chronicon Britannico records the death in 1084 of "Bertha Comitissa mater Conani"[146].  The Chronicon Britannico Alter records the death in 1085 of "Bertha religiosa Comitissa", stating that she restored "Monasterium S. Melanii"[147].  The Chronicon Ruyensis Cœnobii records the death in 1085 of "Berthæ comitissæ"[148].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "II Id Apr" of "Berta comitissa"[149]The Chronicon Kemperlegiensis records the death "Kal Jun" in 1085 of "Bertha Comitissa Britanniæ, mater Conani Ducis, soror Fulconis"[150], although no other record has been found which confirms that Berthe had a brother named Foulques.  Comte Hugues [IV] & his wife had two children:

a)         HERIBERT [II] du Maine (-9 Mar 1062).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias” (two of which he confuses with the sisters of Comte Hugues [IV])[151].  He succeeded his father in 1051 as Comte du Maine.  The dating clause of a charter dated 15 Nov 1058, which records a donation by Gervaise Bishop of Le Mans to Saint-Vincent du Mans, names "…Herberto puerulo comite…"[152]The Chronicon Ruyensis Cœnobii records the death in 1062 of "Herbertus Cenomannensium Comes et frater uterinus Conani ducis"[153].  The necrology of the Abbaye du Pré records the death “VII Id Mar” of “Habertus comes filius Hugonis juvenis[154]

b)         MARGUERITE du Maine ([1047/51]-Fécamp 13 Dec [1063], bur Fécamp).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that ”Robertus” was betrothed to “Margareta filia Herberti quondam Cenomannensis comitis” who died “apud Fiscannum” before the marriage[155].  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias” (two of which he confuses with the sisters of Comte Hugues [IV]) of whom “Margarita” who was betrothed to “Rodberto filio Guillelmi ducis Neustriæ” but died “virgo in tutela eiusdem ducis[156].  The same source records in another passage that “Herberti juvenis Cenomanensium comitis...Margaritam sororem suam” was betrothed to “Willermus dux...Rodberto eiusdem ducis filio” who was granted “comitatum...Cenomannensem”, and adds that Marguerite was consigned to “Stigando...viro de Mansione Odonis” but died before reaching marriageable age[157]Betrothed (before [1063]) to ROBERT de Normandie, son of GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy [later WILLIAM I King of England] & his wife Mathilde de Flandre (Normandy [1052/54]-Cardiff Castle 3/10/15 Feb 1135, bur Gloucester Cathedral)

2.         GERSENDE du Maine ([1025/35]-).  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Atho marchisius" left Maine in the hands of "Gaufridi de Meduana", also naming "uxor eiusdem marchisii Garcendis…filia Herberti Cenomannorum…comitis…Evigila Canem" and specifying that she had married firstly "Theobaldo duci Campanie" and that he had repudiated her[158]The same source comments that "Gaufredi de Meduana" was "tutor et quasi maritus", implying that Gersende was his mistress.  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom one married “Azsoni marchiso Liguriæ” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters)[159]m firstly (repudiated 1048) as his first wife, THIBAUT III Comte de Blois, son of EUDES II Comte de Blois & his second wife Ermengarde d'Auvergne ([1010]-29/30 Sep 1089, bur Epernay).  m secondly ([1049/51]) as his second wife, ALBERTO AZZO [II] d'Este, son of ALBERTO AZZO [I] d'Este & his first wife Valdriada Candriada ([996]-Vangadizza monastery 1097).  Comte du Maine [1069/70].  Mistress of: ([1070/71]) GEOFFROY de Mayenne, son of HAYMON & his wife --- (-[May/Dec] 1098).  Gersende du Maine & her second husband had two children:

a)         UGO d'Este (-1131).  His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who states that he was younger than his brother Folco (see below).  He succeeded in 1070 as Comte du Maine.  "Heinricus…rex" confirmed "nostri dilecti cancellarii Ugoni et Fulconi germanis Azonis marchionis filiis" in all their possessions "in comitatu Gauolli, Rodigum, Cederniano, Sarzano, Maretiniago…in comitatu [Pata]uiensi Este" by undated charter placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1077[160].  He and his brother made no attempt to claim their inheritance but in 1090 were contacted in Italy by the men of Maine who had rebelled against the Normans: Orderic Vitalis records the rebellion in 1090 of “Cenomanni contra Normannos” and their sending a deputation to “filiis Azsonis marchisi Liguriæ” inviting him to come to Maine as their leader, adding that it was agreed between “filiis Azsonis” that “Fulco...major natu” should retain “patris honorem in Italia” while “Hugo...frater eius” should claim “Cenomannensem principatum ex matris hereditate[161].  The same source records that Hugues arrived in Maine and was helped by “Gaufridus Madeniensis et Helias aliique cives et oppidoni” to secure his inheritance[162]According to Orderic Vitalis, when "the men of Maine discovered that their new count had neither riches nor judgment and courage to commend him, the hotheads began to regret their action"[163].  He betrayed Matilda Ctss of Tuscany (married to his half-brother's son) in early 1091, frustrating her plan to capture Emperor Heinrich IV during the latter's journey to Italy[164]Orderic Vitalis records that “Helias consobrinus eius” suggested to Hugues that he returned “in patriam tuam” and sold him the county, which he did for “x milia solidorum”, dated to [1090][165]The dating clause of a charter dated to [1093], which records a dispute between "Herbertus [de Wirchia]" and the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans, refers to the year in which "Longobardus…Helie comiti" sold "Cenomannicum comitatum"[166]m (1078, repudiated) [ERIA] of Apulia, daughter of ROBERT "Guiscard/Weasel" Duke of Apulia & his second wife Sichelgaita di Salerno.  Orderic Vitalis records that “Hugo” had married “filiam Roberti Wiscardi” but had repudiated her, for which Pope Urban II had excommunicated him[167]Her father's insistance that his principal vassals meet the cost of her wedding caused considerable resentment, triggering the revolt against Robert Guiscard in autumn 1078.  Amatus records the marriage of Duke Robert's (unnamed) daughter, endowed "with a very fine dowry", and the (unnamed) son of Marquis Azzo[168].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. 

b)         other child: see ESTE

3.         PAULE du Maine ([1025/35]-).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom the third married “Johanni domino castri...Flecchia” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters) and had three children “Goisbertum, Heliam et Enoch[169].  Her father is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage to "Lancelin de Beaugency"[170].  However, in another passage the same source names "Helias, Johannis et Paulæ filius, Hugonis Cenomannorum consulis consobrinus"[171].  From a chronological point of view, it is more likely that Jean, son of Lancelin de Baugency, was the husband of Paule du Maine.  m JEAN de la Flèche, son of LANCELIN de Baugency & his wife --- (-before [1097]), bur Angers, Saint-Aubin). 

-        see below, Part B.  

4.         BIOTE du Maine ([1025/35]-poisoned Falaise 1063).  Guillaume de Poitiers names "la sœur de Hugues" as wife of "Gautier comte de Mantes"[172].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Walterius Pontesiensium comes filius Drogonis comitis” (who had accompanied “Rodberto seniore Normannorum duce in Jerusalem”) married “Biotam Hugonis Cenomannensium comitis filiam...amita [Herberti juvenis Cenomanensium comitis]” and claimed “totum comitatum Cenomannensem” and occupied a part, but that “prædictus comes Walterius et Biota conjux eius” died “(ut ferunt) lethali veneno” while Guillaume II Duke of Normandy was attacking the rebels[173]m GAUTHIER [III] Comte de Mantes, son of DREUX [Drogo] Comte de Mantes & his wife Godgifu [Goda] of England (before [29 Mar 1030/10 Apr 1031]-poisoned Falaise [2 Aug] 1063).  Orderic Vitalis records that “Walterius Pontesiensium comes filius Drogonis comitis” (who had accompanied “Rodberto seniore Normannorum duce in Jerusalem”) married “Biotam Hugonis Cenomannensium comitis filiam...amita [Herberti juvenis Cenomanensium comitis]” and claimed “totum comitatum Cenomannensem” and occupied a part, but that “prædictus comes Walterius et Biota conjux eius” died “(ut ferunt) lethali veneno” while Guillaume II Duke of Normandy was attacking the rebels[174]

 

 

 

B.      COMTES du MAINE (BAUGENCY-la FLECHE)

 

 

JEAN de la Flèche, son of LANCELIN [I] de Baugency & his wife --- (-[1097], bur Angers, Saint-Aubin).  Son of Lancelin according to Orderic Vitalis, who says that his mother was the daughter of the Comte du Maine[175], which appears to result from confusion with his wife.  "Domna Agnes comitissa" [wife of Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d´Anjou] bought "ecclesiam Sancti-Beati…juxta…castrum Vindocini" from "Lancelino dominico vasso de castro Balgentiaco" and "apud Castrum-Dunum alteram ecclesiam" from "filiis eiusdem Lancelino…Johanne et Lancelino" by charter dated to before 1040[176].  A charter dated 13 Feb 1087 records donations to Angers Saint-Aubin by "Johannes de Fissa", with the consent of "Helias filius eius"[177].  A charter dated to [1097] records that "Johannes de Fissa" became a monk after falling ill at Château-Gonthier and died soon after[178].  A charter dated to [1097] records confirmation of donations to Angers Saint-Aubin by "Elias…filius eius…et frater eius Gaufridus" after the burial of their father[179]

m PAULE du Maine, daughter of HERIBERT [I] "Eveille-chien" Comte du Maine & his wife --- ([1025/35]-).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom the third married “Johanni domino castri...Flecchia” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters) and had three children “Goisbertum, Heliam et Enoch[180].  Her father is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage to "Lancelin de Beaugency"[181].  However, in another passage the same source names "Helias, Johannis et Paulæ filius, Hugonis Cenomannorum consulis consobrinus"[182].  From a chronological point of view, it is more likely that Jean, son of Lancelin de Baugency, was the husband of Paule du Maine. 

Jean de la Flèche & his wife had [eight] children:

1.         GAUSBERT de la Flèche (-after [1097]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom the third married “Johanni domino castri...Flecchia” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters) and had three children “Goisbertum, Heliam et Enoch[183].  In a later passage, Orderic Vitalis also relates "Huie sex fratres fuerunt, quorum duo priores: Goisbertus et Enoch, post militiam monachi facti sunt; reliqui vero quatuor: Joffredus et Lancelinus, Milo et Guillelmus, immaturata morte præventi sunt", referring from the context to the brothers of Helias[184].  A charter dated to after 1097 records that "Gausbertus filius Johannis de Fissa major natu" had objected to donations to Angers Saint-Aubin made by "pater eius" with the consent of "frater", and that after he died the donations were confirmed[185]

2.         HELIE de la Flèche (-11 Jul 1110, bur Saint-Pierre de la Couture[186])Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom the third married “Johanni domino castri...Flecchia” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters) and had three children “Goisbertum, Heliam et Enoch[187].  Orderic Vitalis names "Helias, Johannis et Paulæ filius, Hugonis Cenomannorum consulis consobrinus"[188].  A charter dated 13 Feb 1087 records donations to Angers Saint-Aubin by "Johannes de Fissa", with the consent of "Helias filius eius"[189]Orderic Vitalis records that, after Ugo d´Este arrived in Maine, and was helped by “Gaufridus Madeniensis et Helias aliique cives et oppidoni” to secure his inheritance, dated to 1090, adding that “Helias de Flechia” captured “Hoellus antistes” who opposed them and held him in chains until the newly arrived count was received “in urbe Cenomannica[190].  Orderic Vitalis records that “Helias consobrinus eius”, noting his legitimate claim to Maine because “filia Herberti comitis” had married “Lancelinum de Balgenceio” by whom she had “Lancelinum Radulfi patrem et Johannem meum genitorem” [an inaccurate description of the descent], suggested to Hugues that he returned “in patriam tuam” and sold him the county, which he did for “x milia solidorum”, dated to [1090][191].  He succeeded as Comte du MaineOrderic Vitalis records that “Helias [de Balgenceio]” was “heres...soceri sui Gervasii de Castro Ligeri” whose daughter he had married[192]"Comes Helyas qui totius patrie dominus est" donated property “quia de patrimonio uxoris sue Mahildis fuit, etenim Elisabeth, matris Gervasii, patris Mahildis, conjugis sue” to Château-du-Loir by charter dated to [1095][193].  A charter dated to [1097] records confirmation of donations to Angers Saint-Aubin by "Elias…filius eius…et frater eius Gaufridus" after the burial of their father[194].  "Gener suus...Cenomanice civitatis Helyas" confirmed a donation made to Saint-Guingalois “in castro...Ledi fondato” by “supradicti castri dominum Gervasium” to Château-du-Loir on the death of “uxor sua Eremburgis” by charter dated to [1097], subscribed by “...Garsendis uxor eiusdem Gervasii...[195].  He delayed his departure on the First Crusade in 1097 because William II King of England threatened to capture Maine in his absence, and attacked Robert de Bellême in 1098, but was captured and handed to King William at Rouen[196].  The town of Le Mans was captured by Robert, son of Hugues de Montfort, and handed to Guillaume Comte d'Evreux and Gilbert de Laigle.  Helias was released, and returned to la Flèche and the castles he owned de iure uxoris[197].  Helias recaptured the city in late 1100 after the death of King William II[198].  "Helias comes Cenomanensis" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Pierre de Couture, for the soul of "monachatu Enoch fratris mei", by undated charter dated to [1109][199].  The Annals of Waverley record that “Philippus de Brausa et Willelmus Malet et Willelmus Barnard et Helias comes Cenomanniæ” were deprived of their lands in 1110[200]The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "V Id Jul" of "Cenomannorum comes Helias"[201].  The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the death "1110 V Id Jul" of "Helias comes"[202]The Annales Sancti Albini Andegavensis record the death "V Id Jul" in 1110 of "Helias comes"[203]m firstly MATHILDE de Château-du-Loir, daughter of GERVAIS de Château-du-Loir & his first wife Eremburgis --- (-[10/25] Mar 1099).  Orderic Vitalis names "Mathildem filiam Gervasii…qui Rodeberti Brochardi filius fuit" as wife of Helias[204].  The same source records that her dowry consisted of the castles of Château-du-Loir, Mayet, Lucé-le-Grand and Outillé[205].  "Comes Helyas qui totius patrie dominus est" donated property “quia de patrimonio uxoris sue Mahildis fuit, etenim Elisabeth, matris Gervasii, patris Mahildis, conjugis sue” to Château-du-Loir by charter dated to [1095][206].  "Helias comes Cenomanensis" donated his chapel at the foot of la Tour de Château-du-Loir to Saint-Guingalois for the soul of "uxoris suæ Mathildis, ante paucos dies defunctæ" by charter dated 27 Mar 1099[207]m secondly (after 1099) as her second husband, [AGNES d’Aquitaine, divorced wife of ALFONSO VI King of Castile and Leon, daughter of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his second wife Mathilde ---] ([1059]-[1077/93] or after 1099, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo)].  Orderic Vitalis refers to this second marriage of Comte Hélie and "Agnetem filiam Guillelmi Pictavorum ducis relictam Hildefonsi senioris Galiciae regis"[208].  However, there are indications (which are not conclusive) that King Alfonso´s wife Agnes died before his second marriage (see the document CASTILE & LEON KINGS for full details).  Another possibility is that Orderic´s passage misstates the name "Agnetem" for "Beatricem", and that the second wife of Comte Hélie was King Alfonso VI´s widow Beatrix whose family origin is not otherwise recorded and who could therefore have been Beatrix, daughter of Guillaume VIII Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet], this parentage being the most probable from a chronological point of view if she was the daughter of one of the dukes of Aquitaine.  Comte Hélie & his first wife had one child:

a)         EREMBURGE du Maine ([1096]-14 Jan 1126)Orderic Vitalis names “Eremburgem” as the daughter of “Helias [de Balgenceio]” and his wife “Gervasii de Castro Ligeri...filiam”, adding that she married “domini sui filio Fulconi Andegavorum comiti[209]The Gesta Consulum Andegavensium records that "Gosfridum Martellum" was betrothed to "Helias comes unicam filiam", who later married his younger half-brother[210].  A charter dated 25 Apr 1120 records that "comes Andergavensis Fulco Fulconis et comitissa uxor eius Aremburgis filia comitis Helie" were present at the consecration of the church of Le Mans[211].  She succeeded her father in 1110 as Ctss du Maine.  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Feb" of "Haremburgis Andegavorum nobilis comitissa"[212]Betrothed to GEOFFROY IV Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Ermengarde de Bourbon ([1073]-19 May 1106).  m (betrothed before 14 Apr 1109, 11 Jul 1110) as his first wife, FOULQUES V Comte d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 13 Nov 1144)

3.         ENOCH de la Flèche (-after [1109]).  Orderic Vitalis records that "Hugo filius Herberti" and his wife “Bertam ipsius relictam, Tedbaldi Blesensium comitis sororem” had “filium...Herbertum et tres filias”, of whom the third married “Johanni domino castri...Flecchia” (which would be difficult to sustain chronologically and confuses the children of Hugues [IV] Comte du Maine with his sisters) and had three children “Goisbertum, Heliam et Enoch[213].  In a later passage, Orderic Vitalis also relates "Huie sex fratres fuerunt, quorum duo priores: Goisbertus et Enoch, post militiam monachi facti sunt; reliqui vero quatuor: Joffredus et Lancelinus, Milo et Guillelmus, immaturata morte præventi sunt", referring from the context to the brothers of Helias[214].  Monk at la Couture.  "Helias comes Cenomanensis" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Pierre de Couture, for "monachatu Enoch fratris mei", by undated charter dated to [1109][215]

4.         GEOFFROY de la Flèche (-after [1097]).  Orderic Vitalis relates "Huie sex fratres fuerunt, quorum duo priores: Goisbertus et Enoch, post militiam monachi facti sunt; reliqui vero quatuor: Joffredus et Lancelinus, Milo et Guillelmus, immaturata morte præventi sunt", referring from the context to the brothers of Helias164.  A charter dated to [1097] records confirmation of donations to Angers Saint-Aubin by "Elias…filius eius…et frater eius Gaufridus" after the burial of their father[216]

5.         LANCELIN de la Flèche .  Orderic Vitalis relates "Huie sex fratres fuerunt, quorum duo priores: Goisbertus et Enoch, post militiam monachi facti sunt; reliqui vero quatuor: Joffredus et Lancelinus, Milo et Guillelmus, immaturata morte præventi sunt", referring from the context to the brothers of Helias164

6.         MILON de la Flèche .  Orderic Vitalis relates "Huie sex fratres fuerunt, quorum duo priores: Goisbertus et Enoch, post militiam monachi facti sunt; reliqui vero quatuor: Joffredus et Lancelinus, Milo et Guillelmus, immaturata morte præventi sunt", referring from the context to the brothers of Helias164

7.         GUILLAUME de la Flèche .  Orderic Vitalis relates "Huie sex fratres fuerunt, quorum duo priores: Goisbertus et Enoch, post militiam monachi facti sunt; reliqui vero quatuor: Joffredus et Lancelinus, Milo et Guillelmus, immaturata morte præventi sunt", referring from the context to the brothers of Helias164

8.         [daughter .  It is assumed that "comitis" referred to in the charter quoted below was Hélie Comte du Maine (although this is not without doubt considering the vague dating of the document).  If this is correct, the precise relationship between Rainard and Comte Hélie is not known but, if "nepos" is interpreted literally in the charter quoted below, he would have been the son of one of Hélie´s siblings.  If this is correct, it is more likely that he was the son of an otherwise unrecorded sister of the count as no record has been found that Rainard or any of his descendants claimed the county of Maine after Comte Hélie´s death in 1110.  m ---.]  One child: 

a)         RAINARD .  A charter dated to end-11th century records the accusations made by "Rainardus nepos comitis…cum uxore sua Adelide matre…Alberici pueri de Miletia" relating to a donation of property by "Winebaudus" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans[217]m as her second husband, ADELAIDE, widow of --- [de Miletia], daughter of ---.  A charter dated to end-11th century records the accusations made by "Rainardus nepos comitis…cum uxore sua Adelide matre…Alberici pueri de Miletia" relating to a donation of property by "Winebaudus" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans[218]

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    VICOMTES du MAINE et de BEAUMONT-sur-SARTHE

 

 

A.      VICOMTES du MAINE, VICOMTES de BEAUMONT-sur-SARTHE

 

 

The earliest reference to a vicomte in the city of Le Mans and county of Maine dates to the mid-10th century.  His name suggests that the family of the vicomtes du Maine descended from this Raoul [I], although no proof of the descent has been found in primary sources.  The chronology suggests that he was a different person from Vicomte Raoul [II], who is named in charters which can probably be dated to the early 11th century.  

 

Sainte-Suzanne was one of the important castles held by the vicomtes du Maine, although it is not known whether it was originally constructed by the family or inherited by marriage.  It was located due west of the town of Le Mans.  The earliest reference to Sainte-Suzanne appears to be included in the Gesta Ambaziensium which attributes the title "Radulfi vicecomitis de Sancto Susanna" to Raoul [II] de Beaumont Vicomte du Maine[219], whose active career is dated to the late 10th/early 11th centuries.  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England unsuccessfully besieged Hubert Vicomte du Maine et de Beaumont in the castle of Sainte-Suzanne for three years, probably dated to around 1083, emphasising the impregnability of the fortress because of its rocky position[220]

 

Angot reviews the family of the Vicomtes de Maine in an article which is sufficiently detailed to inspire some confidence, but has the disadvantage of failing to cite primary sources, although he summarises Beaumont charters in a later section[221]

 

 

Two brothers:

1.         --- (-after 951).  Vicomte du MansThis unnamed vicomte ("germanus vicecomitis Cenomanicæ civitatis") is referred to in the Actus pontificum Cenomannis as brother of "Mainardus episcopus"[222].  The chronological information is insufficient to be certain that he was the vicomte who witnessed charters in 967 and 971.  same person as...?  RAOUL [I] (-after Feb 971).  Vicomte [du Maine].  "…Rodulfi vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated Mar 967 under which "Girardus" donated property to Tours Saint-Julien[223].  "Hugonis comitis, Hugonis et Fulchonis filiorum eius…Rodulfi vicecomitis…" witnessed the charter dated Feb 971 under which Sigefroid Bishop of Le Mans donated property to Tours Saint-Julien[224]

2.         MAINARD (-[971])The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Mainardus episcopus" was "germanus vicecomitis Cenomanicæ civitatis"[225]Bishop of Le Mans [951].  m ---.  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Mainardus episcopus" had at first devoted himself to secular life ("primum sæcularibus deditus rebus") and had “filios et filias multas[226], so was presumably married. 

a)         children .  The Actus pontificum Cenomannis records that "Mainardus episcopus" had at first devoted himself to secular life ("primum sæcularibus deditus rebus") and had “filios et filias multas[227]

 

 

1.         RAOUL [II] (-before [1010])Vicomte du Maine.  "Rodulfus…Cenomannus vicecomes…mee bone coniugis Godehelt…filio Rodulfo" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans by charter dated to [994][228].  "Rodulfus Cenomanensium vicecomes" donated two serfs to the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur, in the presence of "conjuge mea Widenore et filiis meis Rodulfo, Gosfrido, Ivelino et Huberto" by undated charter, signed by "Ivelini clerici, primogeniti sui, Gosfridi et Rodulfi et Huberti filiorum eius"[229].  [Vicomte de Sainte-Suzanne: the Gesta Ambaziensium names "Radulfi vicecomitis de Sancto Susanna" when recording the marriage of his daughter Odeline[230].]  Widdo Lononis filius” donated “Gaudiacus” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, with the consent of “dominis meis Hugone atque Herberto comitibus et vice comite Radulpho eiusque filii...Yvo archidiaconus, vice comes Radulphus atque Gaufridus” by undated charter dated to [1000/15][231]m firstly GODEHILDIS, daughter of ---.  "Rodulfus…Cenomannus vicecomes…mee bone coniugis Godehelt…filio Rodulfo" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans by charter dated to [994][232].  It is possible that she was Godehildis de Bellême, widow of Albert [I] de la Ferté-en-Beauce, daughter of Yves de Bellême & his wife Godeholt ---. although the primary source which confirms this has not yet been identified.  m secondly GUINOR, daughter of ---.  "Rodulfus Cenomanensium vicecomes" donated two serfs to the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur, in the presence of "conjuge mea Widenore et filiis meis Rodulfo, Gosfrido, Ivelino et Huberto" by undated charter, signed by "Ivelini clerici, primogeniti sui, Gosfridi et Rodulfi et Huberti filiorum eius"[233]Raoul [II] & his first wife had three children: 

a)         YVES .  "Rodulfus Cenomanensium vicecomes" donated two serfs to the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur, in the presence of "conjuge mea Widenore et filiis meis Rodulfo, Gosfrido, Ivelino et Huberto" by undated charter, signed by "Ivelini clerici, primogeniti sui, Gosfridi et Rodulfi et Huberti filiorum eius"[234].  Archdeacon at Le Mans.  “Widdo Lononis filius” donated “Gaudiacus” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, with the consent of “dominis meis Hugone atque Herberto comitibus et vice comite Radulpho eiusque filii...Yvo archidiaconus, vice comes Radulphus atque Gaufridus” by undated charter dated to [1000/15][235]

b)         RAOUL [III] (-after [1010]).  "Rodulfus…Cenomannus vicecomes…mee bone coniugis Godehelt…filio Rodulfo" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Victeur du Mans by charter dated to [994][236].  "Rodulfus Cenomanensium vicecomes" donated two serfs to the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur, in the presence of "conjuge mea Widenore et filiis meis Rodulfo, Gosfrido, Ivelino et Huberto" by undated charter, signed by "Ivelini clerici, primogeniti sui, Gosfridi et Rodulfi et Huberti filiorum eius"[237].  “Widdo Lononis filius” donated “Gaudiacus” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, with the consent of “dominis meis Hugone atque Herberto comitibus et vice comite Radulpho eiusque filii...Yvo archidiaconus, vice comes Radulphus atque Gaufridus” by undated charter dated to [1000/15][238]Vicomte du Maine"…Radulphi vicecomitis, Odonis fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1010] under which "Gaufridus de Sabolio" founded the priory of Solesmes[239].  [m EREMBURGIS, daughter --- (-1 Jan [1028/1049]).  The necrology of La Charité records the deaths “Kal Jan” of Eremburgis vicecomitissa et monacha, et Odilo abbas[240].   Depoin suggests that Eremburgis was vicomtesse du Maine (the chronology suggests that, if this is correct, she was the wife of Raoul [III]), and dates her death from the foundation of La Charité in 1028 and the death of Odilon Abbot of Cluny 1 Jan 1049[241].   He identifies her as Eremburgis, sister (he incorrectly says “daughter”) of Ives (see ALENÇON, in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY) who founded Abbayette Saint-Michel by charter dated 10 Oct 997[242].   This appears to be pure speculation.  If Depoin is correct, and if the origin of Godehildis (first wife of Vicomte Raoul [II]) is correct as suggested above, Raoul [III] and his wife would have been second cousins.] 

c)         GEOFFROY de Sablé (-after [1015]).  "Rodulfus Cenomanensium vicecomes" donated two serfs to the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur, in the presence of "conjuge mea Widenore et filiis meis Rodulfo, Gosfrido, Ivelino et Huberto" by undated charter, signed by "Ivelini clerici, primogeniti sui, Gosfridi et Rodulfi et Huberti filiorum eius"[243].  The chronology of the documents associated with this family suggests that Geoffroy must have been born from his father´s first marriage:  his father´s first wife is named in a document dated to [994] (see above) and Geoffroy must presumably have been adult when he issued the charter dated to [1010].  "Gaufridus de Sabolio" founded the priory of Solesmes, confirmed by "Adelays uxor mea et filius noster Drogo", by charter dated to [1010], signed by "…Radulphi vicecomitis, Odonis fratris eius…"[244].  “Widdo Lononis filius” donated “Gaudiacus” to Saint-Pierre de la Couture, with the consent of “dominis meis Hugone atque Herberto comitibus et vice comite Radulpho eiusque filii...Yvo archidiaconus, vice comes Radulphus atque Gaufridus” by undated charter dated to [1000/15][245]

-        SEIGNEURS de SABLE

Raoul [II] & his [first/second] wife had three children: 

d)         HUBERT .  "Rodulfus Cenomanensium vicecomes" donated two serfs to the abbey of Saint-Florent, Saumur, in the presence of "conjuge mea Widenore et filiis meis Rodulfo, Gosfrido, Ivelino et Huberto" by undated charter, signed by "Ivelini clerici, primogeniti sui, Gosfridi et Rodulfi et Huberti filiorum eius"[246]

e)         EUDES (-after [1010]).  "…Radulphi vicecomitis, Odonis fratris eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1010] under which "Gaufridus de Sabolio" founded the priory of Solesmes[247]. 

f)          ODELINE [Emmeline] .  Dame de Basoges et de Sainte-Christine.  The Gesta Ambaziensium names "Odelinam filiam Radulfi vicecomitis de Sancto Susanna" as the second wife of "vir illustris…Hugo", specifying that her dowry was "Basogerium oppidum et terram Sanctæ Christinæ"[248]m as his second wife, HUGUES de Lavardin, son of ---. 

 

 

The parentage of Vicomte Roscelin has not been confirmed.  Latouche suggests that "Roscelinus" was a diminutive form of "Rodulfus" and that he was the same person as Raoul [III] or Raoul [IV][249].  If that is correct, from a chronological point of view Raoul [III] is the more likely possibility.  The fact that Vicomte Raoul [VI] (see below) named two of his sons Roscelin and Raoul suggests that Latouche was incorrect and the two names were distinct.  Depoin proceeds under the assumption that Vicomte Raoul [III] and Vicomte Roscelin were different persons[250].  

 

1.         ROSCELIN (-[after 947]).  Vicomte du Maine.  "Hugo Cenomannensis comes" donated property to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel by charter dated 1014, witnessed by "Roscelini vicecomitis, Hameli de Leido Castello, Haymonis de Medano, Herberti fratris comitis, Droci filii Milonis, Odilarii Drudi"[251].  "Roscelini vicecomitis..." witnessed the charter dated to [1035/55] under which "Odo, a pueritia militari disciplina instructus" donated ”ecclesiam Sancti Petri de Noviomo” to Le Mans Saint-Vincent[252].  “Roscelini vicecomitis, Rodulfi filii sui...” subscribed the charter under which “Isembardus miles” donated a serf to Bourgueil, undated but specifying that “quando Gaufridus comes venit de Imperatore Romæ” (dated to [1047])[253].   Depoin dates the latter event to [1047].  If the donation is so dated, the presence of Roscelin is inconsistent with his son Raoul [IV] being named as vicomte in the charter dated 1039 which is quoted below.  Presuambly one of the documents is incorrectly dated.  m ---.  The name of Roscelin’s wife is not known.  Roscelin & his wife had two children: 

a)         RAOUL [IV] (-[11 Jun] [after 1070]).  His parentage is confirmed by reading together the two documents which firstly confirm that Geoffroy was the son of "Roscelini vicecomitis"[254] and secondly name "…Gaufridi fratris Radulfi vicecomitis…"[255]Vicomte du Maine

-        see below

b)         GEOFFROY (-after [1080/95], presumably before 1096)"Gaufridus filius Roscelini vicecomitis" sold "ecclesias de Sogona" to Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [1060][256].  "Hugo de Braietello" donated "ecclesiam…in…Sanctæ Trinitatis in parochial Sancti Celerini", now called "ex nomine patris mei…Capella Guillelmi", to Marmoutier, with the consent of "uxore sua Erma", by charter dated to [1064/76], which also records the donation by "Gaufredus gener suus et Hervisa filia eiusdem Hugonis, uxor Gauffredi"[257].  "…Gaufridi fratris Radulfi vicecomitis…" consented to the purchase of "ecclesiam Sancti Petri que dicitur Curtis Laboris" by Saint-Vincent du Mans by charter dated to [1050/60][258]

-        SEIGNEURS de BRAITEL

 

 

RAOUL [IV], son of ROSCELIN Vicomte du Maine & his wife --- (-[11 Jun] [after 1070]).  His parentage is confirmed by reading together the two documents which firstly confirm that Geoffroy was the son of "Roscelini vicecomitis"[259] and secondly name "…Gaufridi fratris Radulfi vicecomitis…"[260]Vicomte de Beaumont-sur-Sarthe, de Grand-Montrevault et du Lude.  Roscelini vicecomitis, Rodulfi filii sui...” subscribed the undated charter under which “Isembardus miles” donated a serf to Bourgueil[261].  The problem with the dating of this charter is discussed above.  Vicomte du MaineSeigneur de Preuilly.  "Radulfo vicecomite, Guillelmo vicecomite, Erfredo vicecomite, Herveo vicecomite de Bleso…" witnessed a charter dated 1039 which records that "miles…Walterius…filius Hamelini de Lingaiis" was sentenced to relinquish property held from Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d´Anjou for having killed "cognatum predicti comitis…Mauricium", Comte Geoffroy donating the property to La Trinité de Vendôme[262].  "De hominibus Rodulfi vicecomitis Cenomannensis..." witnessed the charter dated 1061 under which a serf "Johannem arte piscatorum" was donated to Marmoutier[263].  "Radulfus vicecomes" donated "la foire de Notre-Dame" to La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated to after 1070, witnessed by "Goffridus de Chamiliaco frater Berengarii…Tetbertus telonearius, Fulbertus teleonarius, Hubertus filius eius…"[264].  Although Hubert is named eighth in the list of witnesses, it is likely that "filius eius" applies to the donor not to the person whose name precedes Hubert´s in the list.  If this is correct, the donor was Vicomte Raoul [IV].  The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "III Id Jun" of "Radulphus vicecomes"[265], although it is not known to which Vicomte Raoul this refers. 

m firstly (before 3 Mar 1048) EMME de Montrevrault Dame du Lude, daughter of ETIENNE de Montrevrault {Grand-Montrevault, Cholet, Maine-et-Loire} & his wife Adelberge de Vendôme (-12 Sep 1058, bur Saint-Serge d'Angers).  "Huberti Andegavensium episcopi…et neptis illius Emme atque Radulfi vicecomitis Cenomannensium mariti eius filiorumque eorum" consented to the donation to the monastery of La Charité Sainte-Marie d´Anjou made by "Aremburgis relicta vidua Thetuini Strabonis…et filiam suam Hildegardem" by undated charter[266].  "Radulfus vicecomes cum uxore sua Amelina" sold the church of Luché to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated to [1057][267].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "II Id Sep" of "Emma vicecomitissa Cenomanensis neptis Huberti episcopi"[268]

m secondly CANA, daughter of GELDUIN Seigneur de Pontlevoie & his wife ---.  [1060].  She is named as the mother of Savari by Orderic Vitalis, without giving her origin or the name of her husband[269].  It is possible that this is the same person as Cana, daughter of Gelduin Seigneur de Saumur & his [first] wife Gerberge du Perche, who is recorded in the Gesta Ambaziensium which names "Gosfridum…Puella vocatus…sororem Chanam" as children of "Gelduinus vir nobilis ex genere Danorum", specifying that Cana married "Frangalo Filgeriarum dominus" and had many sons and daughters[270].  If this is correct, her marriage to Vicomte Raoul would probably have been her second marriage.  "Radulfus vicecomes et Cana eius uxor" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] by which "Robertus filius Frogerii" donated "terram de Mosteriolo" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for "fratre suo Geroico", with the consent of "Gaufridus frater vicecomitis"[271]

Raoul [IV] & his first wife had three children: 

1.         HUBERT (-5 Dec before 1095).  His parentage is confirmed by reading together the documents which confirm that Geoffroy was the son of "Roscelini vicecomitis"[272] and which name Geoffroy as "patruus" of "Hubertus vicecomes"[273]"Hucberto filio Radulfi vicecomitis de Lusdo" withdrew his claim to the church of Luché to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated to [1062], signed by "Radulfus ipse, pater eius…et Fulco de Vindocino"[274].  "Hubertus filius Rodulfi vicecomitis" is listed in a charter dated 1065 as one of the sellers of property to Marmoutier[275].  "Radulfus vicecomes" donated "la foire de Notre-Dame" to La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated to after 1070, witnessed by "Goffridus de Chamiliaco frater Berengarii…Tetbertus telonearius, Fulbertus teleonarius, Hubertus filius eius…"[276].  Although Hubert is named eighth in the list of witnesses, it is likely that "filius eius" applies to the donor not to the person whose name precedes Hubert´s in the list.  If this is correct, the donor was Vicomte Raoul [IV].  Vicomte du Maine"Huberti vicecomitis, Gaufridi avunculi sui…" witnessed a charter dated to [1067/69] which records a donation by "Willelmus cognomento Osoenus" to Saint-Vincent du Mans[277].  "Hubertus vicecomes" donated "capellam…Sancti Floscelli martiris…in urbe Cenomannica" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for the souls of "uxoris Ermengardis et filiorum suorum Radulfi, Huberti atque Guillelmi", by charter dated to [1080/95], recorded as being three days before "vicecomes in Angliam terram" went, witnessed by "uxor eius Armengardis et filii eorum Radulfus, Hubertus atque Willelmus, Goffridus suus patruus…", and adding that "post mortem patris in tempore quadragesimo…Radulfus cum matre Ermingarde et fratre Huberto Cennomannis" confirmed the donation[278]Orderic Vitalis records that he quarrelled with William I King of England after 1083, abandoned his castles of Beaumont-le-Vicomte and Fresnay-sur-Sarthe, and withdrew with his wife to the castle of Sainte-Suzanne where he was besieged by the king "for three years"[279].  "Hucbertus…Cenomannensium vicecomes" confirmed the possession of the chapel of Saint-Aubin at Lude by the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, with the consent of "Hermengardis vicecomitisse, Radulfi, Herberti, Guillelmi, Dionisii", by charter dated to [1090][280]m (6 Dec 1067) ERMENGARDE de Nevers, daughter of GUILLAUME I Comte de Nevers & his wife Ermengarde Ctss de Tonnerre (-[14 Oct 1090/1095]).  "Hubertus vicecomes" donated "capellam…Sancti Floscelli martiris…in urbe Cenomannica" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for the souls of "uxoris Ermengardis et filiorum suorum Radulfi, Huberti atque Guillelmi", by charter dated to [1080/95], witnessed by "uxor eius Armengardis et filii eorum Radulfus, Hubertus atque Willelmus, Goffridus suus patruus…", and adding that "post mortem patris in tempore quadragesimo…Radulfus cum matre Ermingarde et fratre Huberto Cennomannis" confirmed the donation[281]Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by Orderic Vitalis who names [her husband] “Hubertus...vicecomes, gener Willermi Nivernensis comitis[282].  "Hucbertus…Cenomannensium vicecomes" confirmed the possession of the chapel of Saint-Aubin at Lude by the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, with the consent of "Hermengardis vicecomitisse, Radulfi, Herberti, Guillelmi, Dionisii", by charter dated to [1090][283].  Hubert & his wife had five children: 

a)         RAOUL [VI] de Beaumont (-14 Jan [1120/25], bur Etival)"Hubertus vicecomes" donated "capellam…Sancti Floscelli martiris…in urbe Cenomannica" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for the souls of "uxoris Ermengardis et filiorum suorum Radulfi, Huberti atque Guillelmi", by charter dated to [1080/95], witnessed by "uxor eius Armengardis et filii eorum Radulfus, Hubertus atque Willelmus, Goffridus suus patruus…", and adding that "post mortem patris in tempore quadragesimo…Radulfus cum matre Ermingarde et fratre Huberto Cennomannis" confirmed the donation[284]Vicomte de Beaumont, de Fresnay et de Sainte-Suzanne. 

-        see below

b)         HUBERT de Beaumont"Hubertus vicecomes" donated "capellam…Sancti Floscelli martiris…in urbe Cenomannica" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for the souls of "uxoris Ermengardis et filiorum suorum Radulfi, Huberti atque Guillelmi", by charter dated to [1080/95], witnessed by "uxor eius Armengardis et filii eorum Radulfus, Hubertus atque Willelmus, Goffridus suus patruus…", and adding that "post mortem patris in tempore quadragesimo…Radulfus cum matre Ermingarde et fratre Huberto Cennomannis" confirmed the donation[285]"Hucbertus…Cenomannensium vicecomes" confirmed the possession of the chapel of Saint-Aubin at Lude by the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, with the consent of "Hermengardis vicecomitisse, Radulfi, Herberti, Guillelmi, Dionisii", by charter dated to [1090][286].  The reference to "sca Susanna" suggests that Hubert de Beaumont may have been "Hubto de sca Susanna" who is recorded in the 1130 Pipe Roll in Oxfordshire, Dorsetshire and Wiltshire[287]

c)         GUILLAUME de Beaumont (-[1090/95]).  "Hucbertus…Cenomannensium vicecomes" confirmed the possession of the chapel of Saint-Aubin at Lude by the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, with the consent of "Hermengardis vicecomitisse, Radulfi, Herberti, Guillelmi, Dionisii", by charter dated to [1090][288]"Hubertus vicecomes" donated "capellam…Sancti Floscelli martiris…in urbe Cenomannica" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for the souls of "uxoris Ermengardis et filiorum suorum Radulfi, Huberti atque Guillelmi", by charter dated to [1080/95], witnessed by "uxor eius Armengardis et filii eorum Radulfus, Hubertus atque Willelmus, Goffridus suus patruus…", and adding that "post mortem patris in tempore quadragesimo…Radulfus cum matre Ermingarde et fratre Huberto Cennomannis" confirmed the donation[289].  Guillaume´s absence from the confirmation suggests that he had predeceased his father. 

d)         DENIS de Beaumont .  "Hucbertus…Cenomannensium vicecomes" confirmed the possession of the chapel of Saint-Aubin at Lude by the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, with the consent of "Hermengardis vicecomitisse, Radulfi, Herberti, Guillelmi, Dionisii", by charter dated to [1090][290]

e)         GODEHILDIS de Beaumont (-13 Apr ----).  "Radulfus vicecomes et dominus Bellimontis" installed "sororem suam…Godechildem" as abbess of Etival by charter dated 1109[291].  Abbess of Etival 1109.  Nun at Cluny. 

2.         RAOUL [V] (-1095 or after).  A charter dated 1071 records that "Radulfus vicecomes filius vicecomitis Radulfi de Lusdio" took property from Marmoutier and that he and "ipse uxor sua Agathes" were paid not to take more[292].  Vicomte de Lude, Vicomte de Montrevault.  "Radulfus vicecomes et uxor eius Agatha" witnessed the charter dated to [1077] which records the settlement of a dispute between La Trinité de Vendôme and "Herveo castelli Lavarzini domino"[293].  "Radulfus vicecomes" confirmed donations in his fief to La Trinité de Vendôme, with the consent of "Agatha uxore sua, filia Fulconis comitis Vindocinensis", by charter dated 5 Jan 1079[294].  A charter dated 28 Oct 1084 records the reparations made by "comes Burchardus filius Fulconis Vindocinensis" to La Trinité de Vendôme for a judgment against the abbey, witnessed by "Radulfus vicecomes, Fulcherius de Fractavalle, Paganus de Montedublello…"[295]m (before 1071) AGATHA de Vendôme, daughter of FOULQUES Comte de Vendôme & his wife Pétronille de Château-Renard.  A charter dated 1071 records that "Radulfus vicecomes filius vicecomitis Radulfi de Lusdio" took property from Marmoutier and that he and "ipse uxor sua Agathes" were paid not to take more[296].  "Radulfus vicecomes et uxor eius Agatha" witnessed the charter dated to [1077] which records the settlement of a dispute between La Trinité de Vendôme and "Herveo castelli Lavarzini domino"[297].  Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 5 Jan 1079 under which her husband "Radulfus vicecomes" confirmed donations in his fief to La Trinité de Vendôme, with the consent of "Agatha uxore sua, filia Fulconis comitis Vindocinensis"[298]"Radulfus vicecomes" donated the church of St Nicholas built at his castle of Montrevault to the cathedral of Angers St Maurice, with the consent of "uxore mea Agatha et filiis meis Fulchone, Radulfo, Burchardo", by charter dated 15/29 Jul 1095[299].  Raoul [V] & his wife had three children: 

a)         FOULQUES "Radulfus vicecomes" donated the church of St Nicholas built at his castle of Montrevault to the cathedral of Angers St Maurice, with the consent of "uxore mea Agatha et filiis meis Fulchone, Radulfo, Burchardo", by charter dated 15/29 Jul 1095[300]1086.  Vicomte de Montrevault.  Brenner suggests[301] that he was the same person as  Folke "den Digre" Jarl in Sweden, although the latter is named "Fulko grossus, son of Ingewaldus, son of Fulko Fölbythe the pagan" in a 14th century genealogy compiled at Varnem Abbey[302]m ---.  The name of Foulques's wife is not known.  Foulques & his wife had one child: 

i)          ROSCELINLe vicomte Roscelin” confirmed his ancestors’ donations to Angers Saint-Serge, with the consent of “sa femme Pernelle, fille d’Ouri de Beaupréau”, by undated charter[303].  Vicomte de Montrevault.  m PERNELLE de Beaupréau, daughter of OURI de Beaupréau & his wife ---.  Le vicomte Roscelin” confirmed his ancestors’ donations to Angers Saint-Serge, with the consent of “sa femme Pernelle, fille d’Ouri de Beaupréau”, by undated charter[304].   

b)         RAOUL"Radulfus vicecomes" donated the church of St Nicholas built at his castle of Montrevault to the cathedral of Angers St Maurice, with the consent of "uxore mea Agatha et filiis meis Fulchone, Radulfo, Burchardo", by charter dated 15/29 Jul 1095[305]

c)         BOUCHARD"Radulfus vicecomes" donated the church of St Nicholas built at his castle of Montrevault to the cathedral of Angers St Maurice, with the consent of "uxore mea Agatha et filiis meis Fulchone, Radulfo, Burchardo", by charter dated 15/29 Jul 1095[306]

3.         daughter .  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus cognomento Talavatius” married secondly “filiam Rodulfi vicecomitis de Bellomonte[307]m as his second wife, GUILLAUME [II] "Talvas" Seigneur d'Alençon, son of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Seigneur d'Alençon & his wife Mathilde --- (-after [1050/54]). 

Raoul [IV] & his second wife had one child: 

4.         SAVARY FitzCana ([1065/70]-).  He is named as son of Cana by Orderic Vitalis[308]"…Savaricus filius vicecomitis Radulfi…" witnessed a charter dated to [1067/80] relating to the donation by "Johannes de Guirchia" of "ecclesia sancti Cornelli de Banniolo" to the church of Saint-Vincent du Mans[309]"Savericus filius Cane…" witnessed a charter dated to [1087/94] under which Robert son of William I King of England donated property to Holy Trinity, Caen[310].  Of Midhurst and Easebourne, Sussex.  m MURIEL de Bohun, daughter of RICHARD de Méry Seigneur de Bohun & his wife Lucie ---.  Domesday Descendants states that Savary de Beaumont married "Muriel daughter of Richard de Meri, the Norman heir of Humphrey de Bohun" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[311].  Her family origin is indicated by a charter of King Richard I dated 31 Mar 1190 confirming "Ford, Climpling, Rustinton, Presteton and Lovinto…in the county of Sussex" to "Francus de Bohun", to hold in the same way as "Savaric son of Savaric, heir of Enjulger de Bohon" had held[312].  "Savaric son of Cana and Muriel his wife" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees by charter dated to [1105], witnessed by "…Radulfus et Savarico filii ipsius Savarici"[313].  Savari & his wife had four children: 

a)         RADULF FitzSavary (-before 1157[314]).  "Savaric son of Cana and Muriel his wife" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees by charter dated to [1105], witnessed by "…Radulfus et Savarico filii ipsius Savarici"[315].  Of Midhurst and Easebourne, Sussex.  Radulfus filius Savari…” subscribed the undated charter under which “Wilielmus Cicestriæ comes” donated property “ecclesiæ de Bisintona quam Radulphus de Haia dedit ecclesiæ sanctæ Trinitatis” to Boxgrove Priory, dated the day “ipse Radulphus” was betrothed to “uxorem suam Olivam sororem…meam[316]m [AGNES de Albini, daughter of WILLIAM Earl of Arundel & his wife Adelisa de Louvain].  Domesday Descendants records that William Earl of Arundel donated property to Boxgrove Priory for the soul of Agnes, wife of Radulf FitzSavaric, by charter dated [1173] which does not specify the relationship between the two[317].  Considering that she gave birth to a daughter before her husband's death before 1157, Agnes was probably the first child of her parents, assuming that William 1st Earl of Arundel was her father.  Radulf & his wife had one child: 

i)          AGATHA (-young).  William Earl of Arundel and his wife Queen Adelisa made a grant to Wymondham Priory for her soul[318]

b)         SAVARY FitzSavary (-[1157/68]).  "Savaric son of Cana and Muriel his wife" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin, Sees by charter dated to [1105], witnessed by "…Radulfus et Savarico filii ipsius Savarici"[319].  He succeeded in 1180 to the estates of his maternal uncle Engelger Seigneur de Bohon[320] and became Seigneur de Bohon.  This succession is indicated by a charter of King Richard I dated 31 Mar 1190 confirming "Ford, Climpling, Rustinton, Presteton and Lovinto…in the county of Sussex" to "Francus de Bohun", to hold in the same way as "Savaric son of Savaric, heir of Enjulger de Bohon" had held[321].  Of Ford, Sussex. 

c)         GELDUIN FitzSavary (-before 1187).  Of Midhurst, Easebourne and Hustington, Sussex.  m ESTRANGIA, daughter of ---, "a Burgundian related to the German kings"[322].  Gelduin & his wife had two children: 

i)          FRANCO de Bohun (-after 31 Mar 1190)King Richard I confirmed "Ford, Climpling, Rustinton, Presteton and Lovinto…in the county of Sussex" to "Francus de Bohun", to hold in the same way as "Savaric son of Savaric, heir of Enjulger de Bohon" had held, by charter dated 31 Mar 1190[323].  His descendants were the Bohun family of Midhurst, Ford and Hustington in Sussex, which is set out in Europäische Stammtafeln[324].  The family became extinct in the senior male line in 1492 and in a junior male line (the Bohun family of Westhall, Suffolk) in 1780. 

-         BOHUN of MIDHURST, SUSSEX

ii)         SAVARIC (-8 Aug 1205).  Bishop of Bath and Wells. 

d)         LUCY .  Orderic Vitalis records that Robert de Grantmesnil, son of “Hugo de Grentemaisnilio” and his wife, married thirdly “Luciam Savarici filii Cani filiam[325].  Given the likely chronology of Robert´s wife Agnes, it is probable that Lucy was his second rather than his first wife.  m as his [second] wife, ROBERT de Grantmesnil, son of HUGUES de Grantmesnil & his wife Adelisa [Aelis] de Beaumont-sur-Oise (-1 Jun [1136], bur Saint-Evroul). 

 

 

The reference to Sainte-Suzanne suggests that the following person was related to the family of the vicomtes de Beaumont.  The likelihood is that he was the son of Hubert de Beaumont, son of Hubert Vicomte du Maine and Ermengarde de Nevers, who is recorded as holding lands in England during the reign of King Henry I.  The fact that he held two of the knights’ fees previously held by Robert Malet (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY) may indicate a family relationship, possibly that he was the husband or son (the latter being more likely from a chronological point of view) of Robert´s daughter. 

 

1.         HUBERT de Sainte-Suzanne (-after 1166).  Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus Malet" used to hold ten knights´ fees from the abbot of Glastonbury in Somerset "tempore Regis Henrici" (presumably indicating King Henry I) and that "Hubertus de Sancta Susanna" now held two of these and "Willelmus Malech" now held twelve[326]

 

 

RAOUL [VI] de Beaumont, son of HUBERT Vicomte du Maine et de Beaumont & his wife Ermengarde de Nevers (-14 Jan [1120/25], bur Etival)"Hubertus vicecomes" donated "capellam…Sancti Floscelli martiris…in urbe Cenomannica" to Saint-Vincent du Mans, for the souls of "uxoris Ermengardis et filiorum suorum Radulfi, Huberti atque Guillelmi", by charter dated to [1080/95], witnessed by "uxor eius Armengardis et filii eorum Radulfus, Hubertus atque Willelmus, Goffridus suus patruus…", and adding that "post mortem patris in tempore quadragesimo…Radulfus cum matre Ermingarde et fratre Huberto Cennomannis" confirmed the donation[327]"Hucbertus…Cenomannensium vicecomes" confirmed the possession of the chapel of Saint-Aubin at Lude by the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, with the consent of "Hermengardis vicecomitisse, Radulfi, Herberti, Guillelmi, Dionisii", by charter dated to [1090][328]Vicomte de Beaumont, de Fresnay et de Sainte-Suzanne.  "Radulfus vicecomes" restored "canonicatum Frederniaci castri" to Angers Saint-Aubin by charter dated to [1082/1107][329]Vicecomes Radulfus” recognised the rights of Angers Saint-Aubin over “ecclesia S. Leonardi”, with the consent of “Roscelinus, Radulfus, Gervasius filii vicecomitis”, by charter dated 1112[330]The necrology of Le Mans Cathedral records the death "XVII Kal Feb" of "R[adulfus] vicecomes Bellimontis"[331]

m (1095) --- de Laval, daughter of [GUY [II] Seigneur de Laval] & his [first/second] wife [---/Denise de Mortain].  A charter of the monks of Saint-Vincent du Mans dated 24 May 1095 records the donation by "bonæ memoriæ Huberti vicecomitis…filius…Radulfus", adding that this was the year in which he married "sororem Widonis de Valle"[332].  In that year Guy [II] is recorded as Seigneur de Laval.  However, he would then have been too old to have had a sister of marriageable age, assuming that the 11 Nov 1039 charter in which he is named is correctly dated.  It is therefore more likely that the wife of Raoul [VII] Vicomte du Maine was the daughter not sister of Guy [II].  It is also possible that the charter in question was written later than 1095.  If that is correct, Guy [III] may by then have been sire de Laval and Raoul´s wife could have been described as "sororem Widonis de Valle" to indicate the current sire de Laval rather than the sire de Laval when she married.  If Raoul´s wife was the daughter of Guy [II], she must have been born from either his first or second marriage. 

Raoul [VI] & his wife had five children: 

1.         ROSCELIN de Beaumont (-[1173/76])Vicecomes Radulfus” recognised the rights of Angers Saint-Aubin over “ecclesia S. Leonardi”, with the consent of “Roscelinus, Radulfus, Gervasius filii vicecomitis”, by charter dated 1112[333].  He succeeded his father as Vicomte de Beaumont.  "Roscelinus vicecomes Bellimontis…cum Radulpho fratre suo" donated revenue from a mill to the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, for "filiis suis Richardo et Guillelmo", by charter dated 1156[334]"Rosselinus vicecomes Cenomannus…et Richardus filius eius" donated property to Cluny, with the support of "Constantia vicecomitissa", by charter dated 1173[335].  m CONSTANCE [Matilda], illegitimate daughter of HENRY I King of England & his mistress --- (-after 1173).  Robert of Torigny names "Mathildem filiam notham primi Henrici regis Anglorum" as wife of "Roscelini vicecomitis Cenomannensis"[336].  Orderic Vitalis records the marriage of Roscelin Vicomte du Mans and Constance illegitimate daughter of King Henry I[337]"Rosselinus vicecomes Cenomannus…et Richardus filius eius" donated property to Cluny, with the support of "Constantia vicecomitissa", by charter dated 1173[338]Roscelin & his wife had four children: 

a)         RICHARD [I] de Beaumont (-25 Jan [1197/1199], bur Etival)Robert of Torigny names "Ricardum…et Guillermum" as children of "Roscelini vicecomitis Cenomannensis" & his wife[339].  "Roscelinus vicecomes Bellimontis…cum Radulpho fratre suo" donated revenue from a mill to the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, for "filiis suis Richardo et Guillelmo", by charter dated 1156[340].  "Roscelinus vicecomes Cenomannis et Sancte Suzanne" donated "basilicam de Ponto Novo…supra Sartam" to Cluny by charter dated [1161/72] which names "Ricardus filius eius"[341].  He succeeded his father as Vicomte de Beaumont.  "Ricardus vicecomes Sancte Susanne" granted rights to the hospice of Raillon, with the consent of "Lucie uxoris mee et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1165/77][342].  The necrology of Le Mans cathedral records the death VIII Kal Feb” of “Richardus bone memorie vicecomes Bellimontis[343].  His death in 1199 is suggested by his son’s donation for his father’s soul dated to [1200] (see below).  However, Hucher records that Richard’s son Raoul [VII] sealed an exchange of property between the nuns of Etival and “Robert de Chemiré” by charter dated 1197[344] which, if correct, suggests that Richard died a few years earlier.  m (before 1177) [as her first husband,] LUCIE de Laigle, daughter of RICHER [II] Seigneur de Laigle & his wife Edelina --- (-1 Apr after 1217).  "Ricardus vicecomes Sancte Susanne" granted rights to the hospice of Raillon, with the consent of "Lucie uxoris mee et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1165/77][345].  Angot records the wife of Richard [I] as “Lucia de Aquila ou Aquilana” (implying, but not specifying, that these names are found in a primary source), daughter of “Richer II baron de Laigle et de Béatrix [error?]” but does not cite the primary source on which this information is based[346]The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified.  "Radulfus vicecomes Sancte Suzanne" donated the chapel of Raillon to the abbey of Angers Saint-Aubin, for the soul of "patris mei Richardi", with the consent of "matre mea Lucia vicecomitissa", by charter dated to [1200][347].  [According to Angot, Lucie married secondly as his second wife, Thibaut [III] Seigneur de Mathefelon, without citing any primary source on which this information is based[348].  He dates this supposed second marriage to “avant 1205”, although his basis for this date is unclear and, if the marriage is correct, would seem incorrect in light of the charter dated 1208 in which her supposed second husband is not named (see below).  Europäische Stammtafeln names “Luce de l’Aigle dame de Loué et de Loiron” as the second wife of Thibaut [III] but does not specify her parentage or supposed first marriage[349].  A difficulty is that Europäische Stammtafeln dates the death of Thibaut’s second wife to “16 Dec” (implying that this date is based on a necrology entry, which has not yet been identified), while the necrology of Notre-Dame de Beauport dates the death of Richard [I]’s widow to 1 Apr, as noted below.  Until more information comes to light, it is suggested that this supposed second marriage be treated with caution.]  "Lucia vicecomitissa Sancte Suzanne" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe for the soul of "domini R viri mei" with the consent of "R vicecomitis Belli Montis filii sui" by charter dated 1208[350]The necrology of Notre-Dame-de-Beauport records the death "Kal Apr" of "matris prime uxoris comitis Alani fundatoris nostri" [Alain [I] d´Avaugour, husband of Lucie´s daughter Petronille, see below][351]Richard [I] & his wife had seven children: 

i)          RAOUL [VII] de Beaumont (-[13 Apr or 11 Aug] [1237]).  "Ricardus vicecomes Sancte Susanne" granted rights to the hospice of Raillon, with the consent of "Lucie uxoris mee et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1165/77][352]Vicomte de Beaumont

-         see below

ii)         RICHARD de Beaumont (-before 1202, bur Marmoutier).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.  Angot names Richard as second son of Richard [I], and records his death in 1202, adding that his father planned to found an anniversary for him according to a charter of Marmoutier “citée par D. Villevieille” (no source citation reference)[353]

iii)        GEOFFROY de Beaumont (-after 1241).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Angot records that Geoffroy, third son of Richard [I], donated property to Tiron abbey in 1241 (no source citation reference)[354]

iv)       GUILLAUME de Beaumont ([1177]-2 Sep 1240).  His parentage is confirmed by the necrology of Angers Cathedral which records the death "Id Apr" of "Radulphus vicecomes de Bellomonte frater Guillelmi…episcopi Andegavensis"[355].   Bishop of Angers 1202.  Angot states that Guillaume, fourth son of Richard [I], was born in 1177 but does not cite the primary source on which this date is based[356]

v)        CONSTANCE de Beaumont (-2 Oct 1236 or after).  “Rogerus de Tony” donated property to Flamstead Abbey, Hertfordshire, for the souls of “…uxoris meæ Constantiæ”, by undated charter[357].  King John confirmed the grant of "Aielrichescote…in Devonia in parochia de Sustauton", made by King Henry I to "Constancie filie sue et avie…predicte Constancie in liberum maritagium", to "Constancie de Toen filie Ric vic de Bellomonte consanguinee nostre" by charter dated 22 Sep 1199[358].  The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that "Constancia de Touny" held "manerium de Suthtaut" in Devon, which King Henry I had granted to "Roscelino de Bello Monte in maritagium cum Constancia filia sua", adding that later "Ricardus de Bello Monte filius Roscelini" had granted the manor to "Rogero de Tony in maritagium cum Constancia filia sua"[359].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "VI Non Oct" of "Constantia de Togné soror Guillelmi de Bellomonte episcopi nostri et mater Richardi de Togné thesaurarius nostri"[360]m (before 22 Sep 1199) ROGER [V] Seigneur de Tosny, son of RAOUL [V] Seigneur de Tosny & his wife Marguerite de Beaumont of Leicester (-after 29 Dec 1208). 

vi)       ERMENGARDE de Beaumont (-11 Feb 1233, bur Balmerino Abbey, Fife).  Benedict of Peterborough records that "Ricardus vicecomes de Bellomonte et uxor sua…filiam" brought their daughter to be married to "Willelmo regis Scotiæ" at "Wdestoke Non Sep…1186"[361].  The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1186 of "William king of the Scots" and "a relation of Henry king of England…Ermengarda…daughter of the count of Beaumont who was the son of the daughter of the elder son of William the Bastard"[362].  The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records the death of "Queen Ermengarde" in 1233 and her burial at "the abbey of St Edward of Balmurinath"[363].  The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records the death "III Id Feb", 47 years after her marriage, of "Edmergerda regina Scocia" and her burial "apud Balmurynot" which she had founded[364]m (Woodstock Palace, Oxford 5 Sep 1186) WILLIAM "the Lion" King of Scotland, son of HENRY of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland & his wife Ada de Warenne (1143-Stirling 4 Dec 1214, bur Arbroath Abbey). 

vii)      PETRONILLE de Beaumont (-19 Aug [1203]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   "Alanus Henrici comitis filius" founded the abbey of Saint-Rion, with the consent of "P. uxoris mee, Ste. et Con. fratrum meorum", by charter dated to [1184/86][365]A charter dated Jul 1219 records donations to Beauport abbey made by "Alanus Henrici comitis filius" dated “anno quo rex Ricardus promotus fuit in regem” [1189] witnessed by “...domina Petronilla uxor domini Alani, Aliena sponsa domini Conani[366]"Alanus, dominus de Goellou, Henrici comitis filius" founded the abbey of Notre-Dame-de-Beauport, for the souls of "Henrici comitis patris mei et Mathildis matris mee…", with the consent of "P. uxoris mee et Stephani et Conani fratrum meorum", by charter dated 1202[367].  The necrology of Notre-Dame-de-Beauport records the death "XIV Kal Aug" of "Petronille comitisse; Merhaute prime uxoris fundatoris nostri"[368]m (before 1186) ALAIN [I] d'Avaugour Comte de Tréguier et de Penthièvre, son of HENRI de Bretagne Comte de Tréguier & his wife Mathilde de Vendôme (-29 Dec 1212). 

b)         GUILLAUME de BeaumontRobert of Torigny names "Ricardum…et Guillermum" as children of "Roscelini vicecomitis Cenomannensis" & his wife[369].  "Roscelinus vicecomes Bellimontis…cum Radulpho fratre suo" donated revenue from a mill to the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, for "filiis suis Richardo et Guillelmo", by charter dated 1156[370]m --- de Rieux, daughter and heiress of ROLAND de Rieux & his wife ---.  Robert of Torigny names "Ricardum…et Guillermum" as children of "Roscelini vicecomitis Cenomannensis" & his wife, stating that Henry II King of England arranged the marriage of Guillaume and "in Brittania filiam Rolandi de Reus cum terra ipsius"[371]. 

c)         RAOUL de Beaumont (-13 Mar 1197)Robert of Torigny records that "Radulfus frater vicecomitis de Bello Monte cognatus germanus Henrici regis Anglorum" was elected Bishop of Angers in 1179[372]Bishop of Angers 1177.  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "III Id Mar" of "Radulphus de Bellomonte…Andegavensis episcopus"[373]

d)         CONSTANCE de Beaumont .  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.   1194. 

2.         RAOUL de Beaumont (-after 1156).  Vicecomes Radulfus” recognised the rights of Angers Saint-Aubin over “ecclesia S. Leonardi”, with the consent of “Roscelinus, Radulfus, Gervasius filii vicecomitis”, by charter dated 1112[374].  "Roscelinus vicecomes Bellimontis…cum Radulpho fratre suo" donated revenue from a mill to the abbey of Saint-Aubin d´Angers, for "filiis suis Richardo et Guillelmo", by charter dated 1156[375]

3.         GERVAIS de Beaumont (-after 1112).  Vicecomes Radulfus” recognised the rights of Angers Saint-Aubin over “ecclesia S. Leonardi”, with the consent of “Roscelinus, Radulfus, Gervasius filii vicecomitis”, by charter dated 1112[376]

4.         GODEHILDIS de BeaumontDupoin cites a charter which confirms that Raoul [VI]’s daughter Godehildis became a nun at La Charité[377].  Nun at La Charité.  

5.         TIPHANIE de Beaumont (-after 1160).  Radulfus vicecomes” donated property to La Charité when “filiam suam Theophaniam” entered the abbey as a nun by undated charter[378].  Abbess of La Charité [1154]. 

 

 

RAOUL [VII] de Beaumont, son of RICHARD [I] Vicomte de Beaumont & his wife Lucie de Laigle (-[13 Apr or 11 Aug] [1237]).  "Ricardus vicecomes Sancte Susanne" granted rights to the hospice of Raillon, with the consent of "Lucie uxoris mee et Radulfi filii mei", by charter dated to [1165/77][379]Vicomte de Beaumont.  Hucher records that Raoul sealed an exchange of property between the nuns of Etival and “Robert de Chemiré” by charter dated 1197[380].  Vicomte de Sainte-Suzanne.  "Radulfus vicecomes Sancte Suzanne" granted rights to the hospice of Raillon by charter dated to [1200][381].  "Radulfus vicecomes Sancte Suzanne" donated the chapel of Raillon to the abbey of Angers Saint-Aubin, for the soul of "patris mei Richardi", with the consent of "matre mea Lucia vicecomitissa", by charter dated to [1200][382]"Lucia vicecomitissa Sancte Suzanne" donated property to Notre-Dame de la Trappe for the soul of "domini R viri mei" with the consent of "R vicecomitis Belli Montis filii sui" by charter dated 1208[383]Raoul VI[I] vicomte de Beaumont” approved the donation of “[le] parc d’Orques” to “sa nièce fille de sa sœur Constance de Thooneio dame de Conches”, with the approval of “ses fils Richard et Guillaume”, by charter dated 1235[384].  Depoin notes a charter of Raoul [VII] dated 11 Aug 1237[385].   The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "Id Apr" of "Radulphus vicecomes de Bellomonte frater Guillelmi…episcopi Andegavensis"[386].  Angot states that Raoul [VII] died “(1237)”, that “l’obituaire des Chartreux” records his death “11 Aug”, and that he was buried at Etival, but he cites none of the primary sources on which this information is based[387].  The charter of his son Guillaume dated 12 Aug 1237 (see below) shows that Richard [II] was no longer living on that date. 

There is doubt concerning the marriage(s) of Vicomte Raoul [VII], considering what appears to be the chronological impossibility of his son Richard [II] Vicomte de Beaumont and his (supposed) daughter Agnes being born from the same marriage, as noted below.  The explanation could be that Raoul [VII] married more than once, maybe even three times:   

[m firstly ---.  If Raoul’s known wife Agnes was the mother of all three of his sons named below, she must have married in the late 12th/early 13th century.  As the dates of the documents shown below suggest that Guillaume was considerably younger than his two brothers, it is possible that he was not born to the same mother and therefore that Richard and Raoul were sons of an otherwise unrecorded earlier wife.] 

m [secondly] (before 1212) AGNES, daughter of --- (-30 Aug [after 1226], bur Etival).  Rodulfus vicecomes Bellimontis” renounced rights in favour of the monks of Ebron, for the soul of “mee necnon Agnetis uxoris mee”, by charter dated 1212[388].   The necrology of Ronceray records the death 30 Aug of Agnes vicecomitissa Bellimontis[389].   According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Agnes died “before 1218”[390].  No indication has been found for the basis of this statement.  “Raoul VI[I] de Beaumont” granted exemptions to Vivoin priory, for the salvation of “Agnès sa femme”, by charter dated 1226[391].  On balance, the wording of Angot’s summary of this charter suggests that Agnes was alive at that date, although that is not beyond all doubt.  The full text of the original document has not been seen. 

[m thirdly --- (-[1237/42]).  As noted below, there is doubt about the parentage of Agnes de Beaumont, wife of Louis de Brienne Vicomte de Beaumont.  One possibility is that she was the daughter of Raoul [VII], in which case the chronology of her life indicates the unlikelihood that she was born to his known wife Agnes.  If that is correct, the absence of any reference to Agnes’s mother in later documents suggests that this possible third wife of Raoul [VII] would have died around the same time as her husband or soon afterwards.] 

Raoul [VII] & his [first/second] wife had two children: 

1.         RICHARD [II] de Beaumont (-after Sep 1242, maybe 17 Sep 1242, before 1249)Ricardus, Radulfi vicecomitis Sancte Susanne primogenitus" swore homage for "castella de Ambazia et de Monterichardi…de Fresneio, de Bellomonte et de Sancta Susanna, salva vita patris mei", and refers to "omnes illos, qui mihi debent hominagia de escheeta que mihi accidit ex parte uxoris mee, de terra Ambazie et Montistrichardi", by charter dated [11/30] Apr 1221[392]Seigneur de Chaumont et de Montrichard 1222.  “Richard fils aîné de Raoul VI[I] vicomte de Beaumont” approved rights to Vivoin priory renounced by his father by charter dated 1226[393].  Seigneur d'Amboise 1228.  "Ricardus de Bellomonte et Matildis uxor eius" confirmed the donation by "matris et domine Isabelle…comitisse Carnotensis" to the abbey of Lieu-Notre-Dame-lès-Romorantin by charter dated 1232[394].  “Raoul VI[I] vicomte de Beaumont” approved the donation of “[le] parc d’Orques” to “sa nièce fille de sa sœur Constance de Thooneio dame de Conches”, with the approval of “ses fils Richard et Guillaume”, by charter dated 1235[395].  “Richard de Beaumont seigneur du Lude et de Chaumont” donated serfs to la Boissière abbey, with the consent of “Mahaud sa femme”, by charter dated Aug 1236[396].  Vicomte de Sainte-Suzanne 1235.  Vicomte de Beaumont.  Depoin notes a charter dated Jul 1239 under which Richard [II] Vicomte de Beaumont donated property to Etival[397].   Depoin notes a charter dated Sep 1242 as the last known act of Richard [II][398].   Hucher states that Richard [II] was dead from illness “dès 1249” but does not cite the source on which this date is based[399].  On the other hand, Depoin records 17 Sep 1242 as “la date certaine” of Richard’s death noting the necrology of Saint-Martin de Tours which records the anniversary on that date of “Richardi de Bellomonte vicecomitis Sancte Suzanne[400].  While it is uncertain whether this entry commemorates the anniversary of his death or of an important donation, the following document appears to confirm Richard [II]’s death during this time-frame: “Mathilde veuve de Richard vicomte de Beaumont, dame de Beaumont, de Montrichard, d’Amboise” donated revenue “sur les festages de Montrichard” to “la maison des Chartreux” by charter dated May 1243[401]m (before 4 Apr 1219) as her first husband, MATHILDE d'Amboise Dame d'Amboise et de Montrichard, daughter of SULPICE [IV] Seigneur d'Amboise & his wife Isabelle de Blois Ctss de Chartres (-12 May 1256).  “Richard de Beaumont et Mahaud sa femme” donated “la roche qui est sous leur château de Montrichard” to Pontlevoy abbey by charter dated 4 Apr 1219 (N.S.)[402].  "Ricardus de Bellomonte et Matildis uxor eius" confirmed the donation by "matris et domine Isabelle…comitisse Carnotensis" to the abbey of Lieu-Notre-Dame-lès-Romorantin by charter dated 1232[403].  Her family origin is confirmed by the charter dated 1235 under which [her husband] “Richard de Beaumont seigneur d’Amboise, de Montrichard et de Chaumont” ratified a donation to Tours Saint-Martin made by “Mathilde sa femme”, and confirmed a donation of part of “[les] péages de Montrichard” made by “Guillaume d’Amboise son oncle[404].  “Richard de Beaumont seigneur du Lude et de Chaumont” donated serfs to la Boissière abbey, with the consent of “Mahaud sa femme”, by charter dated Aug 1236[405].  “Mathilde veuve de Richard vicomte de Beaumont, dame de Beaumont, de Montrichard, d’Amboise” donated revenue “sur les festages de Montrichard” to “la maison des Chartreux” by charter dated May 1243[406].  Ctss de Chartres 1250.  She married secondly as his second wife, Jean [II] de Nesle Comte de Soissons, who succeeded as Comte de Chartres, Seigneur d'Amboise.  “Mathilde d’Amboise veuve de Richard (de Beaumont), femme de Jean comte de Soissons” made an agreement with Tours Saint-Julien by charter dated Apr 1254 (N.S.)[407].  The necrology of Notre-Dame du Parc records the death 11 May 1256 of “Mahaut vicomtesse de Beaumont, dame d’Amboise, de Montrichart, et de Raoul vicomte de Beaumont...[408]

2.         RAOUL de Beaumont (-after 1218, [after 1237]).  Angot names him as Raoul’s second son, refers to a charter dated 1218 for Vallon which names “Radulfus filius vicecomitis Sancte Suzanne”, and says that he died young[409].  This date and his death “young”, as reported by Angot, appear consistent with Raoul being younger than his brother Richard [II] who, as noted above, married in Apr 1221.  However, Raoul was old enough in 1218 to make a donation in his own name, which suggests the likelihood that he was of a similar age to Richard [II] and therefore that the two brothers were born to the same mother.  That Raoul was a younger son of his father is confirmed by the charter dated 1226 under which “Richard fils aîné de Raoul VI[I] vicomte de Beaumont” approved rights to Vivoin priory which has been renounced by his father[410].  Angot also records a charter dated 1239 under which Guillaume de Beaumont confirmed “les dons de son frère Raoul, alors défunt[411].  His absence from the charter dated 1235, quoted above and below, which names his two brothers, suggests that Raoul was deceased at that time.  However, this speculation is inconsistent with the following charter: “Raoul VI[I] vicomte de Beaumont” confirmed fiefs to “Hugues de Juillé”, with the consent of “Richard et Raoul ses fils”, by charter dated 1237[412].  Maybe this last charter was misdated. 

Raoul [VII] & his [second] wife had one child: 

3.         GUILLAUME de Beaumont (-[1241/42]).  “Raoul VI[I] vicomte de Beaumont” approved the donation of “[le] parc d’Orques” to “sa nièce fille de sa sœur Constance de Thooneio dame de Conches”, with the approval of “ses fils Richard et Guillaume”, by charter dated 1235[413].  No earlier charter has been identified which names Guillaume, which suggests that he was younger than his brothers Richard [II] and Raoul.  If that is correct, he could have been the son of Raoul [VII]’s known wife Agnes.  "Guillelmus de Bello Monte miles" confirmed the donation by "Rodulphus vicecomes Belli Montis vivens pater meus" to the abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour du Mans by charter dated to 12 Aug 1237[414].  Angot names Guillaume as Raoul [VII]’s third son and records his confirmation to Ronceray of “des dîmes du moulin de Masidor, près du Lude, fait par son frère Richard” (source no citation reference)[415]m (1239 or before) MARIE, daughter of --- (-after 1239).  Angot records that Guillaume’s wife Marie was named in a charter dated 1239 under which Guillaume confirmed “les dons de son frère Raoul, alors défunt[416]

 

 

 

The following person is shown separately because of doubts about her precise parentage:

1.         AGNES de Beaumont ([1236/38] or before-[9 May 1301 or 28 Nov after 1304], bur Etival).  There is doubt about Agnes’s parentage[417].  Her name, family origin, and marriage are confirmed by the marriage contract dated 22 Jun 1305 between [her son] "monsour Johan de Beaumont" and “noble dame Mahoust de Malines dame de Chantocé” which names “madame Agnès de Beaumont mère doudit monsour Jouhan...[418]It is clear that Agnes was heiress of Beaumont which she brought to her husband on their marriage, but the primary source which confirms her precise parentage has not been identified.   There appear to be three possibilities: (1) she was Raoul [VII]’s daughter by an otherwise unrecorded late marriage; (2) she was the daughter of Raoul’s son Guillaume de Beaumont; (3) she was the daughter of Raoul’s son Raoul.  Looking first at (1), the date of Agnes’s marriage suggests her birth around the end of Raoul [VII]’s life, considering the numerous cases of noble ladies marrying around 14 years old at that time.  If that is correct, Agnes was unlikely to have shared the same mother as Richard [II] Vicomte de Beaumont (whose marriage is dated to Apr 1221 as shown above) or to have been the daughter of Raoul’s known wife Agnes (who was named in 1212).  Concerning case (2), no information is known except that it would be chronologically possible for Agnes to have been Guillaume’s daughter, and that Guillaume was married and could reasonably be expected to have had children before he died.  In addition, assuming that Guillaume was the son of Raoul [VII]’s wife Agnes, the younger Agnes would have been named after her paternal grandmother.  As far as (3) is concerned, information about Raoul [VII]’s son Raoul is shadowy.  He was old enough to make donations in his own name in 1218 (so maybe was a full brother of Richard [II]) and appears to have been alive in 1237 (see above).  On that basis, it is reasonable to assume in his case too that he was married, despite secondary sources asserting that he died young, and therefore that he could have had children.  Incidentally, it appears impossible for Agnes to have been the daughter of Vicomte Richard [II] and his wife as there is no evidence that Agnes’s descendants claimed succession to Amboise (to which Richard’s wife was heiress).  It is also unlikely that Agnes was descended from the Beaumont family in the female line as she was named “Agnès de Beaumont” in the 22 Jun 1305 document quoted above.  Two other factors may be significant, although neither swings the balance in favour of any of the three possible parentages discussed above.  Firstly, after the death of Vicomte Richard [II] no reference has been found to any person holding the title vicomte before Louis de Brienne, which is consistent with the absence of any surviving male heir with a claim superior to Agnes’s.  Secondly, no reference has been found to any of Agnes’s maternal relatives playing any part in her guardianship or in the administration of Beaumont before her marriage, which is unexpected if any were alive at the time.  [The following document adds no further information and is somewhat dubious: Pope Nicholas IV granted dispensation for the continued marriage of “John [error for Louis?] de Beaumund layman and Agnes his wife, who intermarried in ignorance that they were related in the fourth degree of kindred and have sons” and declared “their past and future [error] offspring legitimate”, dated 26 Apr 1287 [error for 1288][419], the original reading “Johanne de Beaumundo et Agnete dictæ diœcesis” granting retrospective dispensation for their marriage “in quo filios procrearunt...ignorarent se quarto gradu consanguinitatis” dated 26 Apr 1288[420].  Which diocesis is indicated by “dictæ diœcesis” is unclear.  The previous entry in the compilation relates to a dispensation in York diocesis, although this post-dates the 26 Apr 1288 dispensation being dated 1 May 1288.  The different husband’s name and the unusual Latin “Beaumundo” for Beaumont (usually “Bellomonte” or variants) suggests some doubt whether the document relates to the marriage of Louis de Brienne Vicomte de Beaumont.  If the dispensation does relate to Agnes de Beaumont and Louis de Brienne, the number of unknowns in Agnes’s ancestry renders speculation on the couple’s precise relationship to each other futile.]  Louis fils de Jean roi de Jérusalem et Agnès sa femme” granted privileges to the monks of Vivoin by charter dated 1253[421].  “Louis vicomte de Beaumont fils du roi de Jérusalem et Agnès vicomtesse héréditaire de Beaumont sa femme” settled various disputed matters with the monks of Vivoin by charter dated Feb 1254 (N.S.)[422]Europäische Stammtafeln records Agnes’s married “12 Feb 1253”[423].  Angot’s cartulaire of the Beaumont family includes no document with that date.  One possibility is that the reference represents an extrapolation from the charter dated Feb 1254 (N.S.).  “Louis vicomte de Beaumont, et Agnès sa femme” donated revenue from Lude to Etival by charter dated 1285[424].  One table in Europäische Stammtafeln records Agnes’s death “9 May 1301”, another “28 Nov after 1304, bur Etival”[425].  The primary sources on which these dates are based have not been identified.  m (1253 or before) LOUIS de Brienne dit d'Acre, son of JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem & his third wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla y León (-14 Sep after 1285 [after 1 Sep 1297]).  He succeeded as Vicomte de Beaumont, de iure uxoris

 

 

 

B.      VICOMTES de BEAUMONT (BRIENNE)

 

 

LOUIS de Brienne "d'Acre", son of JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem & his third wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla y León (-14 Sep after 1285, after 1 Sep 1297)The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1244 that Jean Emperor of Constantinople sent "ses trois fils, Alphonse, Jean et Louis, encore enfants" to Louis IX King of France[426]He succeeded as Vicomte de Beaumont, de iure uxoris.  “Louis fils de Jean roi de Jérusalem et Agnès sa femme” granted privileges to the monks of Vivoin by charter dated 1253[427].  “Louis vicomte de Beaumont fils du roi de Jérusalem et Agnès vicomtesse héréditaire de Beaumont sa femme” settled various disputed matters with the monks of Vivoin by charter dated Feb 1254 (N.S.)[428].  “Louis vicomte de Beaumont, et Agnès sa femme” donated revenue from Lude to Etival by charter dated 1285[429].  The necrology of Etival records the death 14 Sep of “Louis vicomte de Beaumont” and his burial at Etival[430].  One table in Europäische Stammtafeln records Louis’s death “after Sep 1297”, another “1285”[431].  The primary source which confirms the former date has not yet been identified. 

m (1253 or before) AGNES de Beaumont, daughter of --- de Beaumont-au-Maine & his wife --- ([1236/38] or before-[9 May 1301 or 28 Nov after 1304], bur Etival).  There is doubt about Agnes’s parentage[432].  Her name, family origin, and marriage are confirmed by the marriage contract dated 22 Jun 1305 between [her son] "monsour Johan de Beaumont" and “noble dame Mahoust de Malines dame de Chantocé” which names “madame Agnès de Beaumont mère doudit monsour Jouhan...[433]It is clear that Agnes was heiress of Beaumont which she brought to her husband on their marriage, but the primary source which confirms her precise parentage has not been identified.   There appear to be three possibilities: (1) she was Raoul [VII]’s daughter by an otherwise unrecorded late marriage; (2) she was the daughter of Raoul’s son Guillaume de Beaumont; (3) she was the daughter of Raoul’s son Raoul.  Looking first at (1), the date of Agnes’s marriage suggests her birth around the end of Raoul [VII]’s life, considering the numerous cases of noble ladies marrying around 14 years old at that time.  If that is correct, Agnes was unlikely to have shared the same mother as Richard [II] Vicomte de Beaumont (whose marriage is dated to Apr 1221 as shown above) or to have been the daughter of Raoul’s known wife Agnes (who was named in 1212).  Concerning case (2), no information is known except that it would be chronologically possible for Agnes to have been Guillaume’s daughter, and that Guillaume was married and could reasonably be expected to have had children before he died.  In addition, assuming that Guillaume was the son of Raoul [VII]’s wife Agnes, the younger Agnes would have been named after her paternal grandmother.  As far as (3) is concerned, information about Raoul [VII]’s son Raoul is shadowy.  He was old enough to make donations in his own name in 1218 (so maybe was a full brother of Richard [II]) and appears to have been alive in 1237 (see above).  On that basis, it is reasonable to assume in his case too that he was married, despite secondary sources asserting that he died young, and therefore that he could have had children.  Incidentally, it appears impossible for Agnes to have been the daughter of Vicomte Richard [II] and his wife as there is no evidence that Agnes’s descendants claimed succession to Amboise (to which Richard’s wife was heiress).  It is also unlikely that Agnes was descended from the Beaumont family in the female line as she was named “Agnès de Beaumont” in the 22 Jun 1305 document quoted above.  Two other factors may be significant, although neither swings the balance in favour of any of the three possible parentages discussed above.  Firstly, after the death of Vicomte Richard [II] no reference has been found to any person holding the title vicomte before Louis de Brienne, which is consistent with the absence of any surviving male heir with a claim superior to Agnes’s.  Secondly, no reference has been found to any of Agnes’s maternal relatives playing any part in her guardianship or in the administration of Beaumont before her marriage, which is unexpected if any were alive at the time.  [The following document adds no further information and is somewhat dubious: Pope Nicholas IV granted dispensation for the continued marriage of “John [error for Louis?] de Beaumund layman and Agnes his wife, who intermarried in ignorance that they were related in the fourth degree of kindred and have sons” and declared “their past and future [error] offspring legitimate”, dated 26 Apr 1287 [error for 1288][434], the original reading “Johanne de Beaumundo et Agnete dictæ diœcesis” granting retrospective dispensation for their marriage “in quo filios procrearunt...ignorarent se quarto gradu consanguinitatis” dated 26 Apr 1288[435].  Which diocesis is indicated by “dictæ diœcesis” is unclear.  The previous entry in the compilation relates to a dispensation in York diocesis, although this post-dates the 26 Apr 1288 dispensation being dated 1 May 1288.  The different husband’s name and the unusual Latin “Beaumundo” for Beaumont (usually “Bellomonte” or variants) suggests some doubt whether the document relates to the marriage of Louis de Brienne Vicomte de Beaumont.  If the dispensation does relate to Agnes de Beaumont and Louis de Brienne, the number of unknowns in Agnes’s ancestry renders speculation on the couple’s precise relationship to each other futile.]  Louis fils de Jean roi de Jérusalem et Agnès sa femme” granted privileges to the monks of Vivoin by charter dated 1253[436].  “Louis vicomte de Beaumont fils du roi de Jérusalem et Agnès vicomtesse héréditaire de Beaumont sa femme” settled various disputed matters with the monks of Vivoin by charter dated Feb 1254 (N.S.)[437]Europäische Stammtafeln records Agnes’s married “12 Feb 1253”[438].  Angot’s cartulaire of the Beaumont family includes no document with that date.  One possibility is that the reference represents an extrapolation from the charter dated Feb 1254 (N.S.).  “Louis vicomte de Beaumont, et Agnès sa femme” donated revenue from Lude to Etival by charter dated 1285[439].  One table in Europäische Stammtafeln records Agnes’s death “9 May 1301”, another “28 Nov after 1304, bur Etival”[440].  The primary sources on which these dates are based have not been identified. 

Louis & his wife had seven children: 

1.         JEAN de Beaumont (-1306, bur Etival)Vicomte de Beaumontm firstly (26 Sep 1285) JEANNE de la Guerche, daughter of GEOFFROY Seigneur de la Guerche & his wife Emma Dame de Château-Gonthier (-after 19 Jan 1290).  Dame de la Guerche, de Pouancé, et de Château-Gonthier.  The marriage contract of Philippe...Rois de France...Robert de Beaumont son neveu...Jehan de Beaumont chevalier pere dudit Robert” and “damoiselle Marie de Craon” is dated Aug 1299, recording that “Jehanne de Poencé jadis mere dudit Robert et fame audit Jehan” had bequeathed all her inheritance to her husband[441]m secondly (contract 22 Jun 1305) as her second husband, MATHILDE Berthout Dame de Chantocé, widow of MAURICE [V] Seigneur de Craon, daughter of WALTER [VI] Berthout Heer van Mechelen & his wife Marie d'Auvergne (-28 Sep 1306, bur Angers Cordeliers).  The marriage contract between "monsour Johan de Beaumont" and “noble dame Mahoust de Malines dame de Chantocé”, naming “madame Agnès de Beaumont mère doudit monsour Jouhan...monsour Robert de Beaumont fiz dou dit monsour Jouhan”, is dated 22 Jun 1305, in the presence of “monsour Amauri de Craon” who notes agreements with “la dite madame Mahaut sa mère[442]A manuscript of the Cordeliers d’Angers lists members of the Craon family buried "dans la chapelle Saint-Jean", the first being “monsieur Morice de Craon” who founded the chapel and died 11 Feb 1292 (O.S.) and “Madame Mahault de Maslines dame de Craon femme dudit monsieur Maurice sire de Craon” who died 28 Sep 1306[443]Jean & his first wife had three children: 

a)         ROBERT de Beaumont (-20 Sep 1327).  Ménage names "Robert, Isabelle femme de Geoffroi d´Ancenis, et Anne femme de Païen de Chourches" as the children of "Janne de la Guerche...[et] Jan de Brienne de Beaumont I du nom Viconte de Beaumont et de la Flèche" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[444].  He is named in the contract for the second marriage of his father (see above).  Vicomte de Beaumont

-        see below

b)         ISABELLE de Beaumont .  Ménage names "Robert, Isabelle femme de Geoffroi d´Ancenis, et Anne femme de Païen de Chourches" as the children of "Janne de la Guerche...[et] Jan de Brienne de Beaumont I du nom Viconte de Beaumont et de la Flèche" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[445]m GEOFFROY d´Anceny, son of ---. 

c)         ANNE de Beaumont ([1290]-after 1323).  Ménage names "Robert, Isabelle femme de Geoffroi d´Ancenis, et Anne femme de Païen de Chourches" as the children of "Janne de la Guerche...[et] Jan de Brienne de Beaumont I du nom Viconte de Beaumont et de la Flèche" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[446].  Cars & Ledru record that “Amete de Beaumont dame de Clinchamp veuve de Payen de Sourches chevalier” brought a lawsuit “en son nom et en celui de ses enfants” against “Guiart de Manchecourt” dated 1323[447]m PAYEN de Sourches Seigneur de Clinchamp, son of --- (-before 1323). 

2.         LOUIS de Beaumont (-25 Sep 1333).  "Ludovicus filius vicecomitis Bellimontis" took possession of a house in the chapter of the bishopric of Mans 27 Aug 1281[448]Pope Nicholas IV granted dispensation to “Lewis son of Lewis Beaumont, kinsman of Queen Eleanor, aged 20 [presumably an error] to hold one benefice...together with canonries and prebends of Salisbury, Le Mans, Tork, Wells and Northon, in the diocese of Durham”, dated 30 Sep 1291[449]Bishop of Durham. 

3.         MARGUERITE de Brienne (-9 Apr 1328, bur Abbaye de Maubuisson).  The Lignages d'Outremer name "Marguerite la fille de Louis de Beaumont" as wife of Prince Bohémond[450].  The marriage contract between "Boemundi VII principis Antiocheni et comitis Tripolitani" and "domicella Margarita filia quondam Lodoyci vicecomitis Bellimontis, filii quondam regis Johannis Hierosolymitani" is recorded in the charter dated 20 Jan 1278 at "castro Ovi prope Neapolim"[451].  The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "V Id Apr" of "domina Margareta de Beaumont quondam Antiochie principissa"[452]m (contract Naples 2 Jan 1278) BOHEMOND VII Count of Tripoli and titular Prince of Antioch, son of BOHEMOND VI Prince of Antioch & his wife Sibylle of Armenia (1260-19 Oct 1287). 

4.         MARIE (-18 Mar 1328, bur Guingamp).  The Chronicon Britannicum records the death die veneris ante festum B. Gregorii” 1328 of “domina Maria de Belomonte domina de Avalgoria...fuerat uxor domini Henrici de Avaugour” and her burial “in...convento fratrum minorum de Guengampo[453]The necrology of Notre-Dame-de-Beauport records the death "XV Kal Apr" in 1328 of "Marie de Baumont uxoris domini Henrici d´Avalgor filii Alani fundatoris nostri"[454]m (before 27 Apr 1283) HENRI [III] d'Avaugour Seigneur de Mayenne, son of ALAIN d'Avaugour Baron de Mayenne Vicomte de Dinan & his wife Clémence de Dinan (-11 Feb or Nov 1301, bur Dinan). 

5.         ISABELLE (-before 1 Nov 1334).  “Henry de Bello Monte Earl of Buchan [Boghane] and Murref and Constable of Scotland and Isabella, who was the wife of Dom. John de Vescy” issued an undated charter which recites earlier donations to Bridlington priory[455].  Inquisitions following a writ dated 2 Apr "17 Edw I" after the death of "John de Vescy” name “William de Vescy his brother aged 40 and more is his next heir...Lady Agnes de Vescy his mother...William de Vescy the said John´s father...Isabel his wife[456]m ([3 Jan 1279/26 Dec 1280]) as his second wife, JOHN de Vescy Lord of Alnwick, son of WILLIAM de Vescy & his second wife Agnes de Ferrers of Derby (18 Jul 1244-Montpellier 10 Feb 1289, bur Alnwick Abbey). 

6.         JEANNE de Beaumont (-1323, bur Abbaye de Clermont)Dame de Loué.  m (contract 11 Nov 1286) as his second wife, GUY [VIII] Seigneur de Laval et de Vitré, son of GUY [VII] de Montmorency Seigneur de Laval & his first wife Philippa de Vitré ([1240]-L'Isle-Jourdain 22 Aug 1295, bur Abbaye de Clermont). 

7.         HENRY de Beaumont (-before 10 Mar 1340).  Lord Beaumont 1309.  Constable of England 1322.  He was summoned to parliament in England in 1334 as Earl of Buchan, although this was never recognised in Scotland. 

-        LORDS BEAUMONT, VISCOUNTS BEAUMONT

 

 

ROBERT de Beaumont, son of JEAN de Beaumont Vicomte de Beaumont & his first wife Jeanne de la Guerche (-20 Sep 1327).  Ménage names "Robert, Isabelle femme de Geoffroi d´Ancenis, et Anne femme de Païen de Chourches" as the children of "Janne de la Guerche...[et] Jan de Brienne de Beaumont I du nom Viconte de Beaumont et de la Flèche" but does not cite the corresponding primary source[457].  He is named in the contract for the second marriage of his father (see above).  Vicomte de Beaumont

m MARIE de Craon, daughter of MAURICE [V] Seigneur de Craon & his wife Mathilde Berthout van Mechelen (-21 Aug 1322, bur Angers Cordeliers).  The marriage contract of Philippe...Rois de France...Robert de Beaumont son neveu...Jehan de Beaumont chevalier pere dudit Robert” and “damoiselle Marie de Craon” is dated Aug 1299, recording that “Jehanne de Poencé jadis mere dudit Robert et fame audit Jehan” had bequeathed all her inheritance to her husband[458]The testament of "Marie de Craon Dame de Poencé", dated 14 Apr 1317, made bequests to "aus heirs Agnes du Tertre qui nourrit Jahn nostre filz...Ysabeau qui nourrit Robert...a Marot la nourrice Guillaume...aus heirs Thomasse qui nourrit Amaury...a Jouhanne nourrice Jouffrey..."[459].  A manuscript of the Cordeliers d’Angers lists members of the Craon family buried "dans la chapelle Saint-Jean", including “Madame Marie de Craon fille de monsieur Morice sire de Craon et de...Mahault, et femme de monsieur Robert de Beaumont sire de Pouancé” who died 21 Aug 1322[460]

Robert & his wife had children: 

1.         JEAN [II] de Beaumont (1302-before 21 Jan 1355, bur Mélinais).  The testament of "Marie de Craon Dame de Poencé", dated 14 Apr 1317, made bequests to "aus heirs Agnes du Tertre qui nourrit Jahn nostre filz..."[461]Vicomte de Beaumontm firstly ISABELLE d´Harcourt, daughter of JEAN Seigneur d´Harcourt & his wife Alix de Brabant (-before 1330).  Père Anselme records her parentage and marriage but cites no source on which this information is based[462]m secondly (contract 31 Dec 1330) MARGUERITE de Poitiers, daughter of AYMAR [V] de Poitiers Comte de Valentinois & his second wife Sibylle de Baux (-Feb 1380, bur Mélinais).  The marriage contract between "[le] Vicomte de Beaumont" and "Marguerite de Poitiers" is dated 31 Dec 1330[463].  The testament of "dominus Aimarus de Pictavia Comes Valentinensis et Diensis", dated 12 Aug 1339, makes bequests to "...Margaritæ filiæ suæ Vicecomitissæ Bellimontis..."[464]Letters dated 21 Feb 1355 record the division of territories agreed between "dame Marguerite de Poitiers tant en son nom que comme ayant le bail de Loys Vicomte de Beaumont son fils" and "dame Jeanne de Bauçay veuve de feu Messire Geofroy de Beaumont sire du Lude"[465]An order dated 25 Apr 1374 records an agreement between "Pierre Comte d´Alençon Vicomte de Beaumont et Marie sa femme" and "dame Marguerite de Poitiers veuve de feu Jehan Vicomte de Beaumont" regarding properties[466].  Jean [II] & his first wife had one child: 

a)         MARIE de Beaumont (-1372).  Dame de Beaumont-le-Vicomte, de Fresnay, d´Argentan, de Nogent-le-Rotrou, de Sainte-Suzanne, de la Flèche, de Châteaugonthier et de Pouancé.  m (before 1340) GUILLAUME de Chamaillart Seigneur d´Anthenaise et de Sourches, son of --- (-1391).  One child: 

i)          MARIE Chamaillart (-Château d’Argentan 18 Nov 1425, bur Argentan, Saint-Thomas)Dame de Beaumont-le-Vicomte.  m (20 Oct 1371) PIERRE Comte d'Alençon, son of CHARLES de Valois Comte d´Alençon et du Perche & his second wife doña María de la Cerda Dame de Lunel (-Argentan, Orne 20 Sep 1404, bur Perche. église des Chartreux du Val-Dieu). 

Jean [II] & his second wife had children: 

b)         LOUIS [II] de Beaumont (-killed in battle Cocherel 23 May 1364, bur Chartreuse de Notre-Dame du Parc, Maine)Vicomte de Beaumontm (Lyon 31 Nov 1362) as her first husband, ISABELLE de Bourbon, daughter of JACQUES I de Bourbon [Capet] Comte de La Marche & his wife Jeanne de Châtillon-sur-Marne Dame de Leuze et de Condé (1340-1371 before Sep, bur Notre-Dame du Parc).  She married secondly (1364) Bouchard [X] Comte de Vendôme et de Castres. 

c)         MARGUERITE de Beaumont (-after 1373).  She and her first husband are named in the arrêt of parliament dated 2 Apr 1365, cited below under her sister Jeanne.  A charter dated 20 Aug 1382 records that Dame Marguerite de Beaumont” was “femme en premiere nopces de Monsieur Bouchard de Vendosme”, by whom she had “Monsieur Jehan de Vendosme Sire de Froullet, fils aisné principal héritier”, and married secondly “Messire Jehan Gaudin chevalier” by whom she has “entr´autres Monsieur Robert Gausdin fils aisné de ce second lit[467]m firstly BOUCHARD de Vendôme Seigneur de Feuillet et de Segré, son of BOUCHARD [IX] Comte de Vendôme & his wife Alix de Bretagne (-after 6 Mar 1373).  m secondly JEAN Gaudin, son of ---. 

d)         JEANNE de Beaumont (-after 15 May 1408).  Nun at Etival.  The following details of her parentage, marriage and claim to share in the Beaumont inheritance were discussed by two authors in the 1960s[468].  An arrêt of parliament dated 2 Apr 1365 granted her half of the seigneurie de Martigné-Ferchaud in indivision with her sister Marguerite, wife of Bouchard de Vendôme seigneur de Segré.  Under a family agreement dividing the succession dated 25 Feb 1373, she received nothing, but by charter dated 13 May 1374 her niece Marie Chamaillart vicomtesse de Beaumont, comtesse d’Alençon granted the châtellenies of Champagne au Maine and Vauvineux au Perche to “Madame Jehanne de Beaumont fame du seigneur du Hommet, seur de ladite Marguerite...” as compensation.  Jeanne swore hommage to the comte de Laval 15 May 1408, as did her son Jean de Villiers in 1444.  m (before 13 May 1374) GUILLAUME de Villiers Seigneur du Hommet, Connétable de Normandie, capitaine et châtelain de Carentan, son of ---(-1396). 

2.         ROBERT de Beaumont .  The testament of "Marie de Craon Dame de Poencé", dated 14 Apr 1317, made bequests to "aus heirs Agnes du Tertre qui nourrit Jahn nostre filz...Ysabeau qui nourrit Robert...a Marot la nourrice Guillaume...aus heirs Thomasse qui nourrit Amaury...a Jouhanne nourrice Jouffrey..."[469]

3.         GUILLAUME de Beaumont .  The testament of "Marie de Craon Dame de Poencé", dated 14 Apr 1317, made bequests to "aus heirs Agnes du Tertre qui nourrit Jahn nostre filz...Ysabeau qui nourrit Robert...a Marot la nourrice Guillaume...aus heirs Thomasse qui nourrit Amaury...a Jouhanne nourrice Jouffrey..."[470]

4.         AMAURY de Beaumont .  The testament of "Marie de Craon Dame de Poencé", dated 14 Apr 1317, made bequests to "aus heirs Agnes du Tertre qui nourrit Jahn nostre filz...Ysabeau qui nourrit Robert...a Marot la nourrice Guillaume...aus heirs Thomasse qui nourrit Amaury...a Jouhanne nourrice Jouffrey..."[471]

5.         GEOFFROY de Beaumont (-before 1355).  The testament of "Marie de Craon Dame de Poencé", dated 14 Apr 1317, made bequests to "aus heirs Agnes du Tertre qui nourrit Jahn nostre filz...Ysabeau qui nourrit Robert...a Marot la nourrice Guillaume...aus heirs Thomasse qui nourrit Amaury...a Jouhanne nourrice Jouffrey..."[472]Seigneur de Lude.  m as her first husband, JEANNE de Baussay, daughter and heiress of HUGUES Seigneur de Baussay & his wife Alix de Doncelles (-Mar 1402).  She married secondly Charles d´Artois, who was invested as Comte de Longueville on his marriage.  She succeeded her father before 31 Aug 1357 as Dame de Baussay [en-Loudunois] et de Champigny-sur-Veude.  She sold her lands to Louis Duc d'Anjou. 

6.         JEANNE de Beaumont (-after 23 Oct 1347, bur Roches).  The testament of [her son] Hugues d’Amboise sgr de Chaumont et de Saint-Verain”, dated 8 Jun 1396, chose burial “en l’abbaye de Roches, jouxte la sépulture de Jeanne de Beaumont sa mère jadis dame de Saint-Verain[473]m (contract Oct 1331) JEAN d´Amboise Seigneur de Chaumont-sur-Loire et de Saint-Verain, son of HUGUES [I] d’Amboise Seigneur de Chaumont-sur-Loire & his wife Jeanne de Saint-Verain (-[28 Aug 1346/23 Oct 1347]). 

7.         MARGUERITE de Beaumont (-after 8 Mar 1391)"Marguerite de Beaumont veuve de Bernard comte de Ventadour" donated property “au duc de Bourbonnais” from items due to her from “Robert comte de Ventadour et par Guillaume archidiacre de Rouen ses enfants” by charter dated 8 Mar 1391 (N.S.)[474]m (17 May 1338) BERNARD Vicomte de Ventadour, son of EBLES [VIII] Vicomte de Ventadour & his wife Marguerite de Montpensier (-2 May after 1390).  Comte de Ventadour 1350. 

 

 

 

 



[1] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 244. 

[2] DD Kar. 1, 1, p. 3. 

[3] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 242. 

[4] Gallia Christiana, Tome XIV, col. 354. 

[5] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 244. 

[6] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 245. 

[7] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, pp. 257-8. 

[8] Gallia Christiana, Tome XIV, cols. 354-6. 

[9] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 262. 

[10] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 262. 

[11] Annales Einhardi 741, MGH SS I, p. 135. 

[12] Annales Einhardi 741, MGH SS I, p. 135. 

[13] RFA 741, p. 37. 

[14] RFA 747, p. 38. 

[15] Annalium Petavianorum Continuatio, 748, 749, MGH SS I, p. 11. 

[16] RFA 748, p. 39. 

[17] Annales Mettenses 749, MGH SS I, p. 331. 

[18] RFA 748, p. 39. 

[19] Fredegar (Continuator), 35, MGH SS rer Merov, Tome II, p. 183. 

[20] Annales Laurissenses minores 755, 14, MGH SS I, p. 116. 

[21] RFA 811, p. 94. 

[22] Pauli Gesta Episcop. Mettensium, MGH SS II, p. 265. 

[23] McKitterick (1983), p. 266. 

[24] Annales Laurissenses 790, MGH SS I, p. 176. 

[25] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 244. 

[26] Certain (1858), auctore Adrevaldo Monacho Floriacensi, Liber I, XXI, p. 51. 

[27] Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, Chronica domni Rainaldi archidiaconi sancti Mauricii Andegavensis, p. 5.  

[28] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, XXXIV, p. 378. 

[29] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 299. 

[30] RHGF, Tome VI, CLXXXVIII, p. 593. 

[31] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, XXXIV, p. 378

[32] RHGF, Tome VI, CLXXXVIII, p. 593. 

[33] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, XXXIV, p. 378

[34] RFA, 810, p. 91. 

[35] Einhardi Vita Karoli Imperator 19, MGH SS II, p. 453. 

[36] Annales Bertiniani III 867. 

[37] Annales Bertiniani II 858. 

[38] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 810, MGH SS I, p. 354. 

[39] Einhardi Annales 810, MGH SS I, p. 197. 

[40] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 318.       

[41] Annales Bertiniani III 866. 

[42] McKitterick (1983), p. 266. 

[43] Annales Bertiniani III 863. MGH SS I, p. 459. 

[44] Annales Bertiniani III 866. 

[45] Annales Bertiniani III 861, 862 and 863. MGH SS I, pp. 455, 456 and 459. 

[46] Annales Bertiniani III 869, 871, MGH SS I, pp. 486, 492. 

[47] Annales Bertiniani III 878, MGH SS I, p. 506. 

[48] Flodoardi Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III, 24, p. 536. 

[49] Annales Bertiniani III 878, MGH SS I, p. 506. 

[50] Historia Inventionis et Translationis reliquiarium Sancti Baudelli martyris 878, RHGF, Tome IX, p. 111. 

[51] Flodoardi Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III, 24, p. 536. 

[52] Conventu Compendiensi IV, RHGF, Tome IX, p. 304. 

[53] Abbonis Monachi S. Germani Parisiensis, De Bellis Parisiacæ urbis et Odonis comitis, post Regis II, line 68, RHGF, Tome VIII, p. 5. 

[54] Richard (1903) Tome I, p. 60 footnote 30. 

[55] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, XXXIV, p. 378

[56] Annales Bertiniani II 858. 

[57] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 314.       

[58] Settipani (1993), p. 204 footnote 91. 

[59] Annales Bertiniani II 858. 

[60] Annales Bertiniani III 867. 

[61] Saint-Maure-sur-Loire, XXXIV, p. 378

[62] Adémar de Chabannes, III, 18, p. 135. 

[63] RHGF, Tome VII, Ex Chronico Aquitanico, p. 223. 

[64] Annales Engolismenses 852, MGH SS XVI, p. 486. 

[65] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 366. 

[66] Adémar de Chabannes III, 18, p. 136. 

[67] Fragmentum Chronici Fontanellensis, 851, MGH SS II, p. 303. 

[68] RHGF, Tome VII, Ex Chronico Aquitanico, p. 223. 

[69] Reginonis Chronicon 860, MGH SS I, p. 570. 

[70] Annales Fuldenses 849, MGH SS I, p. 366. 

[71] Annales Vedastini, 885, MGH SS I, p. 522. 

[72] Flodoard 923, MGH SS III, p. 372. 

[73] Favre (1892), Pièces Justificatives, V, p. 242. 

[74] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 329. 

[75] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 344. 

[76] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes dans la Loire’ (1869), Pièces Justificatives, XII, p. 451. 

[77] Mabille ‘Les invasions normandes dans la Loire’ (1869), Pièces Justificatives, XII, p. 451. 

[78] Abbo, Liber II, p. 63.

[79] Abbo, Liber II, p. 63.

[80] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 342. 

[81] RHGF, Tome X, p. 489. 

[82] Latouche (1910), p. 15 footnote 4, quoting 'Catalogue des actes des évêques du Mans jusqu'à la fin du XIII siècle', Revue historique et archéologique du Maine, t. 63 (1908) 2, pp. 32-63 and 144-185. 

[83] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[84] Settipani (1993), p. 406. 

[85] Flodoard 929, MGH SS III, p. 378. 

[86] RHGF, Tome IX, p. 489. 

[87] Latouche (1910), p. 15 footnote 4, quoting 'Catalogue des actes des évêques du Mans jusqu'à la fin du XIII siècle', Revue historique et archéologique du Maine, t. 63 (1908) 2, pp. 32-63 and 144-185. 

[88] Flodoardi Annales 924, MGH SS III, p. 373. 

[89] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien, 549, p. 325. 

[90] Settipani (2004), p. 233. 

[91] Chartres Saint-Père, Tome I, 73, p. 199. 

[92] Latouche (1910), (1910), Pièces Justificatives 1, p. 161. 

[93] Poitiers Saint-Cyprien 549, p. 325. 

[94] Settipani (2004), p. 233. 

[95] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370. 

[96] ES II 10. 

[97] Settipani (1993), p. 410. 

[98] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907) II, p. 3. 

[99] Robert de Torigny, Tome II, p. 11. 

[100] Latouche (1910), (1910), p. 110. 

[101] Chronique des Comtes d'Anjou, p. 389. 

[102] See for example the discussion in Latouche (1910), pp. 16-17. 

[103] These charters are all summarised in Latouche (1910), pp. 137-39. 

[104] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), II, p. 3. 

[105] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), II, p. 3. 

[106] Chartres Saint-Père I, 73, p. 199. 

[107] Latouche (1910), Pièces Justificatives 1, p. 161. 

[108] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 352. 

[109] Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des Chartes Tome 47 (1886) XXIII, p. 231. 

[110] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), I, p. 1. 

[111] Saint-Maixent, LXI, p. 77. 

[112] Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des Chartes Tome 47 (1886) XXIII, p. 231. 

[113] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), I, p. 1. 

[114] Couture Saint-Pierre, V, p. 7. 

[115] Le Mans Saint-Victeur, III, p. 4. 

[116] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, X, p. 253. 

[117] Le Mans Saint-Victeur IV, p. 5. 

[118] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), IV, p. 5. 

[119] Château-du-Loir, 3, p. 2. 

[120] Couture Saint-Pierre, V, p. 7. 

[121] Couture Saint-Pierre, IV, p. 7, and Latouche (1910), 16, p. 141. 

[122] Couture Saint-Pierre, V, p. 7. 

[123] Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des Chartes Tome 47 (1886) XXIII, p. 231. 

[124] Saint-Maixent LXI, p. 77. 

[125] Château-du-Loir 4, p. 2. 

[126] Le Mans Saint-Victeur III, p. 4. 

[127] Le Mans Saint-Victeur IV, p. 5. 

[128] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 363. 

[129] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 365. 

[130] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), I, p. 1. 

[131] Couture Saint-Pierre, IV, p. 7, and Latouche (1910), 16, p. 141. 

[132] Chroniques d'Anjou Tome I, Gesta Ambaziensium Dominorum, p. 161. 

[133] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 355. 

[134] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[135] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour IV, p. 5. 

[136] Adémar de Chabannes 64, pp. 189 and 206. 

[137] Martyrologe de la Couture, Bibl. du Mans, ms. 238, fol. 5, quoted in Latouche (1910), p. 26 footnote 4. 

[138] Adémar de Chabannes 64, p. 189. 

[139] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 365. 

[140] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 72. 

[141] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 365. 

[142] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[143] Ex Chronico Ruyensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 563. 

[144] Flandria Generosa 25, MGH SS IX, p. 323.   

[145] Chartres Saint-Père I, Liber Septimus, Cap. LXXXVI, p. 210. 

[146] Ex Chronico Britannico, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 557. 

[147] Ex Chronico Britannico Altero, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 559. 

[148] Ex Chronico Ruyensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 563. 

[149] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 10.       

[150] Ex Chronico Kemperlegiensis, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 562. 

[151] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[152] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 15, p. 18. 

[153] Ex Chronico Ruyensis Cœnobii, RHGF, Tome XII, p. 563. 

[154] Ex Martyrologio monasterii de Prato in suburbio Cenomannensi, p. 466. 

[155] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, II, p. 293. 

[156] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[157] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VIII, pp. 102 and 104. 

[158] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 377. 

[159] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[160] D H IV 289, p. 377. 

[161] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 327. 

[162] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 328. 

[163] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 193. 

[164] Poull (1994), p. 57. 

[165] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, pp. 330-2. 

[166] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 117, p. 79. 

[167] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 329. 

[168] Amatus, VIII.34, p. 204. 

[169] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[170] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 197. 

[171] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 305. 

[172] William of Poitiers, p. 362. 

[173] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VIII, p. 102. 

[174] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, VIII, p. 102. 

[175] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 197. 

[176] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, XXII, p. 42. 

[177] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCXLVI, p. 237. 

[178] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCXLVIII, p. 239. 

[179] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCXLIX, p. 240. 

[180] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[181] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 197. 

[182] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 305. 

[183] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[184] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[185] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCL, p. 241. 

[186] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 307. 

[187] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[188] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. II, Book IV, p. 305, although in Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 197, Orderic says that the daughter of the Comte du Maine was his paternal grandmother. 

[189] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCXLVI, p. 237. 

[190] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 328. 

[191] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, pp. 330-2. 

[192] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 332. 

[193] Château-du-Loir, 64, p. 32. 

[194] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCXLIX, p. 240. 

[195] Château-du-Loir, 66, p. 32. 

[196] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229-39. 

[197] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, pp. 247 and 251. 

[198] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 303. 

[199] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 459. 

[200] Annales de Waverleia, p. 214. 

[201] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 163. 

[202] Chronicæ sancti Albini Andegavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 31.  

[203] Halphen (1903), Annales Sancti Albini Andegavensis, p. 4. 

[204] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[205] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[206] Château-du-Loir, 64, p. 32. 

[207] Château-du-Loir 67, p. 33. 

[208] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 307.  The marriage is discussed in Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon' (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 377-8 footnote 12. 

[209] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XI, p. 332. 

[210] Gestis Consulum Andegavensium, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 142. 

[211] Château-du-Loir 78, p. 44. 

[212] Urseau Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[213] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber IV, XII, p. 252. 

[214] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, Book X, p. 229. 

[215] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 459. 

[216] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCXLIX, p. 240. 

[217] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 95, p. 66. 

[218] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 95, p. 66. 

[219] Gesta Ambaziensium Dominorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 160. 

[220] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 47, which the event is described as taking place after the death of Queen Mathilde (in 1083). 

[221] Angot ‘Les Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), pp. 180-217, and pp. 404-24. 

[222] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 350. 

[223] Tours Saint-Julien (Fragments), XXI, p. 60. 

[224] Tours Saint-Julien (Fragments), XXIII, p. . 

[225] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 350. 

[226] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 350. 

[227] Actus pontificum Cenomannis, p. 350. 

[228] Le Mans Saint-Victeur I, p. 1. 

[229] Saint-Florent, Saumur (Chartes mancelles), III, p. 354. 

[230] Gesta Ambaziensium Dominorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 160. 

[231] Couture Saint-Pierre, IV, p. 7, and Latouche (1910), 16, p. 141. 

[232] Le Mans Saint-Victeur I, p. 1. 

[233] Saint-Florent, Saumur (Chartes mancelles), III, p. 354. 

[234] Saint-Florent, Saumur (Chartes mancelles), III, p. 354. 

[235] Couture Saint-Pierre, IV, p. 7, and Latouche (1910), 16, p. 141. 

[236] Le Mans Saint-Victeur I, p. 1. 

[237] Saint-Florent, Saumur (Chartes mancelles), III, p. 354. 

[238] Couture Saint-Pierre, IV, p. 7, and Latouche (1910), 16, p. 141. 

[239] Piolin (1856), Tome III, Pièces justificatives XIII, p. 639. 

[240] Depoin, J. ‘Recherches sur la chronologie des vicomtes du Maine’, Bulletin Historique et Philologique (Paris, 1909), p. 128. 

[241] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 129. 

[242] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 129, citing Abbayette Saint-Michel, 1, p. 7. 

[243] Saint-Florent, Saumur (Chartes mancelles), III, p. 354. 

[244] Piolin (1856), Tome III, Pièces justificatives XIII, p. 639. 

[245] Couture Saint-Pierre, IV, p. 7, and Latouche (1910), 16, p. 141. 

[246] Saint-Florent, Saumur (Chartes mancelles), III, p. 354. 

[247] Piolin (1856), Tome III, Pièces justificatives XIII, p. 639. 

[248] Gesta Ambaziensium Dominorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 160. 

[249] Latouche (1910), p. 129 footnote 6. 

[250] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 129. 

[251] Le Mans Saint-Victeur IV, p. 5. 

[252] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 363, p. 216. 

[253] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 129. 

[254] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 590, p. 337. 

[255] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 548, p. 316. 

[256] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 590, p. 337. 

[257] Menjot d’Elbenne (1876), Appendice, II, p. 49. 

[258] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 548, p. 316. 

[259] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 590, p. 337. 

[260] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 548, p. 316. 

[261] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 129. 

[262] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, XVI, p. 34. 

[263] Grandmaison (1865), XVI, p. 18. 

[264] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CCXXIII, p. 356. 

[265] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 136. 

[266] Anjou Charité, CCCXCI, p. 239. 

[267] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, CCCLV, p. 411. 

[268] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[269] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 231. 

[270] Gesta Ambaziensium Dominorum, Chroniques d'Anjou, p. 166. 

[271] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 488, p. 281. 

[272] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 590, p. 337. 

[273] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[274] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome I, CCCLVI, p. 414. 

[275] Marmoutier-Vendômois, XC, p. 142. 

[276] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CCXXIII, p. 356. 

[277] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 23, p. 24. 

[278] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[279] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VII, p. 47, which the event is described as taking place after the death of Queen Mathilde (in 1083). 

[280] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXIII, p. 302. 

[281] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[282] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, X, p. 194. 

[283] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXIII, p. 302. 

[284] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[285] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[286] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXIII, p. 302. 

[287] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Oxfordshire, pp. 3, 14, and 20. 

[288] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXIII, p. 302. 

[289] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[290] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXIII, p. 302. 

[291] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 22, quoting Cartulaire d’Etival

[292] Marmoutier-Vendômois, XCIV, p. 150. 

[293] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CCLXIII, p. 413. 

[294] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CCLXXI, p. 422. 

[295] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome II, CCCXIX, p. 25. 

[296] Marmoutier-Vendômois, XCIV, p. 150. 

[297] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CCLXIII, p. 413. 

[298] Vendôme La Trinité, Tome I, CCLXXI, p. 422. 

[299] Angers 63, p. 122. 

[300] Angers 63, p. 122. 

[301] Brenner (1978), pp. 8 and 250-51.  . 

[302] Saxo Grammaticus (Christiansen), p. 256 footnote 79. 

[303] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 137, citing Cartulaire de Saint-Serge, fol. 147. 

[304] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 137, citing Cartulaire de Saint-Serge, fol. 147. 

[305] Angers 63, p. 122. 

[306] Angers 63, p. 122. 

[307] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, X, p. 271. 

[308] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 231. 

[309] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 115, p. 77. 

[310] Round (1899), 423, p. 142. 

[311] Domesday Descendants, p. 876. 

[312] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. xxxii. 

[313] Round (1899) 669, p. 237. 

[314] Domesday Descendants, p. 956. 

[315] Round (1899) 669, p. 237. 

[316] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. IV, Boxgrave Priory, I, p. 645. 

[317] Domesday Descendants, p. 956, citing Fleming, L. (1960) The Cartulary of Boxgrove Priory, Sussex Record Society 59, 40. 

[318] Domesday Descendants, p. 956. 

[319] Round (1899) 669, p. 237. 

[320] Domesday Descendants, p. 331 and 956. 

[321] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. xxxii. 

[322] Domesday Descendants, p. 74. 

[323] Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ, Vol. II, p. xxxii. 

[324] ES III 688. 

[325] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, XVI, p. 360. 

[326] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 222. 

[327] Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 36, p. 32. 

[328] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXIII, p. 302. 

[329] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCLXV, p. 255. 

[330] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 139, quoting Ms lat. 17126, fol. 236. 

[331] Nécrologe du Mans, p. 10. 

[332] Veterum Scriptorum I, col. 565, and Le Mans Saint-Vincent, Liber primus, 626, p. 361. 

[333] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 139, quoting Ms lat. 17126, fol. 236. 

[334] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXII, p. 307. 

[335] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria I, XIV, p. 52. 

[336] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 3. 

[337] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. V, p. 45, cited in Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 3 footnote 3. 

[338] Bibliotheca Sebusiana, Centuria I, XIV, p. 52. 

[339] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 3. 

[340] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXII, p. 307. 

[341] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1878) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny ( Paris) Tome IV, 4206, p. 552. 

[342] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXIII, p. 307. 

[343] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 140. 

[344] Hucher ‘Vicomtes de Beaumont au Maine’ (1882), p. 349, and Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CLXX, p. 404, citing ‘Bilard, Arch. de la Sarthe, t. I, no. 639’. 

[345] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXIII, p. 307. 

[346] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 204. 

[347] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXLV, p. 315. 

[348] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 204. 

[349] ES XIII 129 B. 

[350] Notre-Dame de la Trappe, M.XVI, p. 327. 

[351] Geslin de Bourgogne (1864) Tome IV, Nécrologe de Beauport, p. 223. 

[352] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXIII, p. 307. 

[353] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 204. 

[354] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 205. 

[355] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[356] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 205. 

[357] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Flamstead Abbey, Hertfordshire, I, p. 300. 

[358] Rotuli Chartarum, 1 John, p. 20. 

[359] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 98. 

[360] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[361] Benedict of Peterborough, Tome ,I 1186, p. 350.   

[362] Chronicle of Melrose, 1186, p. 24. 

[363] John of Fordun, Annals, XLVI, p. 288. 

[364] Turnbull, W. B. (1842) Extracta e Variis Cronicis Scocie, from the Ancient Manuscript in the Advocates Library at Edinburgh (Edinburgh) ("Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie"), p. 94. 

[365] Geslin de Bourgogne (1864) Tome IV, I, p. 8. 

[366] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 843. 

[367] Geslin de Bourgogne (1864) Tome IV, I, p. 45. 

[368] Geslin de Bourgogne (1864) Tome IV, Nécrologe de Beauport, p. 226. 

[369] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 3. 

[370] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXII, p. 307. 

[371] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 3.  

[372] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, pp. 79-80. 

[373] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[374] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 139, quoting Ms lat. 17126, fol. 236. 

[375] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXII, p. 307. 

[376] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 139, quoting Ms lat. 17126, fol. 236. 

[377] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 139, citing Cartulaire de Ronceray, cap. 56. 

[378] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 139, quoting D. Housseau, t. XII, no. 7755. 

[379] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXXXIII, p. 307. 

[380] Hucher ‘Vicomtes de Beaumont au Maine’ (1882), p. 349, and Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CLXX, p. 404, citing ‘Bilard, Arch. de la Sarthe, t. I, no. 639’. 

[381] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXLIV, p. 314. 

[382] Angers Saint-Aubin, Tome II, DCCCXLV, p. 315. 

[383] Notre-Dame de la Trappe M.XVI, p. 327. 

[384] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCLX, p. 416, citing ‘Bibl. nat. f. lat. 17048, p. 269’. 

[385] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 143 (no citation reference). 

[386] L'Obituaire de la Cathédrale d'Angers

[387] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 212. 

[388] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 142, quoting Ms. lat. 17124, fol. 177. 

[389] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 143. 

[390] ES III.4 687. 

[391] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCXLVII, p. 415. 

[392] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes I, 1443, p. 516. 

[393] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCXLVIII, p. 415. 

[394] Lieu-Notre-Dame-lès-Romorantin, 24, p. 24. 

[395] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCLX, p. 416, citing ‘Bibl. nat. f. lat. 17048, p. 269’. 

[396] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCLXIX, p. 417. 

[397] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 143. 

[398] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 145 (no citation reference). 

[399] Hucher ‘Vicomtes de Beaumont au Maine’ (1882), p. 357. 

[400] Depoin ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1909), p. 146, citing “Baluze, t. LXXVII, p. 433”. 

[401] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCIII, p. 422. 

[402] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCXXXIV, p. 413. 

[403] Lieu-Notre-Dame-lès-Romorantin, 24, p. 24. 

[404] Mabille ‘Collection Dom Housseau’ (1864), Tome XIV, Tome XIV, 2794, p. 334, citing ‘St. Martin - Pancarte blanche, fo. 119 v’. 

[405] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCLXIX, p. 417. 

[406] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCIII, p. 422. 

[407] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCIX, p. 423. 

[408] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCXI, p. 423. 

[409] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 213, and Cartulaire, CCXXXI, p. 413, citing “Cart. de la Couture, p. 409” [not yet checked]. 

[410] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCXLVIII, p. 415. 

[411] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 213. 

[412] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCLXXXI, p. 419, citing ‘Ledru Maison de Faudoas, t. II, p. 153’. 

[413] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCLX, p. 416, citing ‘Bibl. nat. f. lat. 17048, p. 269’. 

[414] Le Mans Saint-Pierre-de-la-Cour (1907), LXVII, p. 81. 

[415] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 213. 

[416] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine’ (1914), p. 213. 

[417] I am grateful to Bert M. Kamp for highlighting this problem in a private email dated 13 Jun 2016. 

[418] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 393, pp. 278, 308. 

[419] Bliss (1893), Vol. I, p. 491. 

[420] Langlois (1886) 1 fascicule, 62, p. 11. 

[421] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCVII, p. 422, citing ‘Denis, Cart. de Vivoin, p. 25 et p. 265, pris de dom Le Michel; Villevieille, Chartes de Vivoin’. 

[422] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCVIII, p. 422, citing ‘Villevieille. Arch. de Marmoutier’. 

[423] ES III.4 687. 

[424] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCXV, p. 423, citing ‘Bilard, Arch. de la Sarthe, t. I, p. 142’. 

[425] ES III.4 687, 683 respectively. 

[426] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 153. 

[427] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCVII, p. 422, citing ‘Denis, Cart. de Vivoin, p. 25 et p. 265, pris de dom Le Michel; Villevieille, Chartes de Vivoin’. 

[428] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCVIII, p. 422, citing ‘Villevieille. Arch. de Marmoutier’. 

[429] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCXV, p. 423, citing ‘Bilard, Arch. de la Sarthe, t. I, p. 142’. 

[430] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCXVII, p. 424, citing ‘Obituaire d’Etival-en-Charnie’. 

[431] ES III.4 684, 687. 

[432] I am grateful to Bert M. Kamp for highlighting this problem in a private email dated 13 Jun 2016. 

[433] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 393, pp. 278, 308. 

[434] Bliss (1893), Vol. I, p. 491. 

[435] Langlois (1886) 1 fascicule, 62, p. 11. 

[436] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCVII, p. 422, citing ‘Denis, Cart. de Vivoin, p. 25 et p. 265, pris de dom Le Michel; Villevieille, Chartes de Vivoin’. 

[437] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCVIII, p. 422, citing ‘Villevieille. Arch. de Marmoutier’. 

[438] ES III.4 687. 

[439] Angot ‘Vicomtes du Maine, Cartulaire’ (1914), CCCXV, p. 423, citing ‘Bilard, Arch. de la Sarthe, t. I, p. 142’. 

[440] ES III.4 687, 683 respectively. 

[441] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1135. 

[442] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 393, pp. 278, 308. 

[443] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 366, p. 229. 

[444] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 104. 

[445] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 104. 

[446] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 104. 

[447] Cars & Ledru (1887), p. 42 footnote 5, citing Boutaric Actes du Parlement de Paris, nos. 989, 7175, 7972 [not yet consulted]. 

[448] Cartulaire du Mans, no. 754, pp. 164-5. 

[449] Bliss (1893), Vol. I, p. 544. 

[450] Lignages d'Outremer, Matenadaran Machtots, MS 1898, p. 145. 

[451] Röhricht (1893) 1422, p. 371. 

[452] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Abbaye de Maubuisson, p. 655. 

[453] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, Chronicon Britanicum, col. 112. 

[454] Geslin de Bourgogne (1864) Tome IV, Nécrologe de Beauport, p. 223. 

[455] Bridlington Priory, p. 422. 

[456] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 723, p. 445. 

[457] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 104. 

[458] Morice (1742) Preuves, Tome I, col. 1135. 

[459] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 379. 

[460] Broussillon (1893), Tome I, 366, p. 230. 

[461] Ménage, G. (1683) Histoire de Sablé (Paris), Tome I, p. 379. 

[462] Père Anselme, Tome V, p. 130. 

[463] Du Chesne (Valentinois), Preuves, p. 43. 

[464] Duchesne (Valentinois), Preuves, p. 37. 

[465] Du Chesne (Valentinois), Preuves, p. 43. 

[466] Du Chesne (Valentinois), Preuves, p. 43. 

[467] Morice (1744) Preuves, Tome II, col. 426. 

[468] Coulange (1964), and Bulletin de la Société d’agriculture, sciences et arts de la Sarthe, Vol. 69-70 (1963). Information provided by Jean Bunot in a private email to the author dated 19 Jun 2016. 

[469] Ménage, G. (1683) Histoire de Sablé (Paris), Tome I, p. 379. 

[470] Ménage, G. (1683) Histoire de Sablé (Paris), Tome I, p. 379. 

[471] Ménage, G. (1683) Histoire de Sablé (Paris), Tome I, p. 379. 

[472] Ménage (1683), Tome I, p. 379. 

[473] Marolles (1873), col. 265. 

[474] Huillard-Bréholles (1874), Tome II, 3825, p. 44.