ARAGON, kings

  v2.2 Updated 08 December 2012

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

INTRODUCTION. 2

Chapter 1.            CONDES de ARAGÓN [809]-1035. 3

Chapter 2.            KINGS of ARAGON 1035-1137. 10

RAMIRO I 1035-1063. 10

SANCHO I 1063-1094, PEDRO I 1094-1104, ALFONSO I 1104-1134, RAMIRO II 1134-1157, PETRONILA 1157-1164. 16

Chapter 3.            KINGS of ARAGON (CONDES de BARCELONA) 25

A.       KINGS of ARAGON 1137-1410. 25

PETRONILA 1137-1164. 25

ALFONSO II 1164-1195, PEDRO II 1195-1213. 30

JAIME I 1213-1276. 36

PEDRO III 1276-1285, ALFONSO III 1285-1291. 43

JAIME II 1291-1327. 49

ALFONSO IV 1327-1336. 54

PEDRO IV 1336-1387, JUAN I 1387-1396, MARTÍN I 1396-1410. 57

B.       KINGS of MALLORCA 1276-1343. 63

JAIME II 1276-1311, SANCHO 1311-1324. 63

JAIME III 1324-1343. 70

C.      CONDES de PRADES 1341-[1441], MARQUESES de VILLENA 1366-1434, DUQUES de GANDÍA1399-1425  72

D.      MARQUESES de VILLENA 1366-1434, DUQUES de GANDÍA1399-1425. 74

Chapter 5.            KINGS of ARAGON 1412-1516 (TRASTÁMARA) 76

FERNANDO I 1412-1416, ALFONSO V 1416-1458. 76

JUAN II 1458-1479. 81

FERNANDO II 1479-1516. 84

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

The kingdom of Aragon started from small beginnings.  The original county of Aragon evolved in the early 9th century in a small area, covering about 600 square kilometres, in the valley of the river Aragon around Jaca, in the extreme north of what later became the Aragonese kingdom.  It lay east of the kingdom of Pamplona/Navarre, west of the county of Sobrarbe, and north of the so-called “Frontera Superior” of the Muslim controlled area of the Iberian peninsular.  As suggested below in Chapter 1, there are indications in primary source documentation that the first known count Aznar Galíndez may have been installed as ruler in the territory by the Carolingian Franks.  This suggestion is corroborated by the dating clauses of the earliest Aragonese charters referring to the regnal years of the Carolingian kings/emperors[1].  By 867, the Frankish influence had started to wane, as shown by the charter of Siresa dated 867 which records “regnante Karlo rege in Franza, Aldefoso filio Ardonis in Gallia Comata, Garsia Enneconis in Pampilona[2].  By the early 10th century, no further references to the French kings are found in Aragonese charters which refer exclusively to the reigns of the kings of Pamplona/Navarre who by that time presumably enjoyed suzerainty over the county of Aragon.  The main religious centre of Aragon was the Benedictine monastery of San Pedro de Siresa, founded in the early ninth century, although the monastery of San Juan de la Peña became the most important Aragonese religious institution in the tenth century[3].  The see of the bishop of Aragon was established in 922 in the valley of Borau.  The early counts of Aragon are recorded in the Codex de Roda[4], a series of texts probably written shortly before 992 almost certainly in Navarre.  A second manuscript of the Codex is dated to the early 12th century and contains additional information, although it is not known whether this originated from another earlier manuscript which no longer survives[5].  The family origin is not known, but it is supposed that the early counts were local chiefs who managed to impose their authority over their rivals.  The names of the early counts do not suggest a family relationship with either the neighbouring kings of Navarre or the kings of León and Asturias, nor are they similar to the names of the earlier Visigothic kings and nobles.  It is assumed that they were not descended from the Visigothic nobility which was driven north after the Muslim invasion of Spain in the early 8th century. 

 

Autonomous counts are recorded in Aragon, power alternating between two different families, between the early 9th and the early 10th centuries.  No reference has been found in primary source documentation which indicates who was their suzerain, but the number of marriages with the Navarrese royal family suggest that it may have been the king of Navarre.  In about [930], the Aragonese heiress Andregoto married García III King of Navarre.  The couple´s descendants ruled both as kings of Navarre and counts of Aragon until the death of Sancho III "el Mayor" King of Navarre in 1035.  When King Sancho's territories were divided between his sons after he died, Aragon was elevated into a kingdom and awarded to Sancho's illegitimate son Ramiro, while the neighbouring counties of Sobrarbe and Ribagorza to the east of Aragon formed the fleeting kingdom which was granted to Ramiro's half-brother Gonzalo.  Subscription lists of charters dated to the early years of the Aragonese kingdom appear not to refer to señoríos which lay outside the area of the original county, which suggests that the kingdom was not territorially more significant than its predecessor.  Ramiro I King of Aragon defeated his half-brother Gonzalo in 1045 and annexed his territories to Aragon, representing the first notable increase in the kingdom´s territorial area.  King Ramiro constructed a series of fortifications/fortress towns along the southern frontier of his kingdom to protect from Muslim incursions (described in more detail in Chapter 5.A of the document ARAGON NOBILITY).  Ramiro's son and successor, Sancho I King of Aragon exacted tribute from the Muslim leaders of Huesca, Tudela and Zaragoza, and conquered territory in the valley of the river Cinca, around Alquezar (1085), Estada (1087) and Monzón (1089) to the south of Sobrarbe in the eastern part of his kingdom.  He also acquired land to the west of his kingdom which was formerly under the jurisdiction of the kingdom of Navarre.  In 1076, Sancho also succeeded as king of Navarre, after the murder of his cousin Sancho IV King of Navarre. 

 

King Sancho's sons Kings Pedro I and Alfonso I made substantial further territorial conquests from the Moors.  The expeditions of King Pedro conquered territory around By the 1120s, the kingdom of Aragon was established as a major political force in the Iberian peninsula.  The succession of King Alfonso's younger brother, Ramiro II, as king of Aragon in 1134 marked a reversal.  Navarre refused to accept his authority, and a descendant of the previous dynasty was installed as king of Navarre.  Alfonso VII King of Castile claimed sovereignty over many recent Aragonese conquests and obliged King Ramiro to accept Castilian suzerainty.  In an attempt to safeguard his position, Ramiro arranged the betrothal of his infant daughter Petronila to Ramón Berenguer IV Count of Barcelona, agreeing that the latter should inherit the Aragonese throne even if his daughter should die.  Count Ramón Berenguer became effective ruler of Aragon from 1137, initiating a period of nearly four centuries during which the kingdom of Aragon and the Catalonian counties to the west were united in a loose federal state which became a major political force throughout the Mediterranean basin and whose history is well known. 

 

 

 

Chapter 1.    CONDES de ARAGÓN [809]-1035

 

 

1.         GARCÍA, son of ---.  He is known only from references to his son.  m ---.  The name of García's wife is not known.  García & his wife had one child: 

a)         GALINDO GarcíaConde [de Aragón].  An undated charter lists the possessions of the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa, including the donation made by "domnus Galindo...commes" of "terram ubi domus que dicitur [casa] fundata est"[6].  Ubieto Arteta dates this charter to [808/21], his most telling argument being that the document lists donations (23 in total) none of which are recorded in later charters which are included in the cartulary of Siresa[7].  “Garsias Semenonis rex Pampilonensium...cum comite Galindone de Aragon” donated “monasteriolum Sancti Martini de Ciella cum villa sua de Ciella” to San Juan de la Peña by charter dated Aug 828, the dating clause of which records “Oriol in Boltana, senior Mancius de Eril in Petra fita...[8].  "Galindo comes, filius Garsiani…et coniux mea Guldreguth" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 25 Nov "regnante domno nostro Lodovico imperatore"[9].  This document is dated to [828/33] by Ubieto Arteta[10].  If correct, this indicates the chronological impossibility that this Galindo García was the son of conde García Galíndez "el Malo", as shown in many secondary sources.  It is possible that he was the father of Conde Aznar Galíndez, although this is not without all doubt.  m GULDREGUT, daughter of ---.  "Galindo comes, filius Garsiani…et coniux mea Guldreguth" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 25 Nov "regnante domno nostro Lodovico imperatore"[11]

 

 

1.         AZNAR Galíndez (-after [838]).  No document has been found which indicates his parentage.  It is possible that he was the son of Galindo García, shown above, on the basis of his patronymic.  However, the name García is not common among the known descendants of Aznar Galíndez which suggests that his father may have been another Galindo.  The name of his son “Centulio” suggests a connection with the family of the vicomtes de Béarn (see the document GASCONY).  [The Royal Frankish Annals record that “counts Aeblus and Asinarius had been sent to Pamplona with Basque forces” in 824 (presumably in an attempt to reassert Carolingian authority over the fledging Navarrese state - see the Introduction to the document NAVARRE KINGS)[12].  The same source continues by stating that “when they had completed their assignment and were on their march back, they were lured into an ambush by the treachery of the mountain people, surrounded and taken prisoner”, that “Aeblus was sent to Cordova, but Asinarius, being a relative of his captors, was mercifully permitted to return home”.  The name “Asinarius” suggests that the Carolingian envoy may have been the same person as Aznar Galíndez, who, if this suggestion is correct, had settled at the Carolingian imperial court and could later have been installed as ruler in the county of Aragon under Carolingian Frankish sponsorship.  This suggestion is consistent with Aznar Gálindez´s choosing France as his place of refuge (returning to his Carolingian sponsors) after he was expelled from Aragon by his son-in-law (see below).]  Conde [de Aragón].  The Codex de Roda records that "Asnari Galindones" was expelled from his county by his son-in-law García "el Malo" and went to France, stating that "Carli Magni" (presumably a mistake for Emperor Louis I) granted him "Cerretania et Oriello", where he was buried[13].  His expulsion is confirmed by the charter dated 26 Aug 863, which is a judgment given by “Salomon comis in vico Alle”, and records that “Witisclus” was given “villa...Settereto” by “amita mea...Aylone” and that she inherited the property “de patre suo Asenari Galindonis comite per sua ruptura et aprisione per preceptum domni imperatoris[14].  However, it is unlikely that Aznar was count of Cerdanya and Urgell, which were conquered in the 830s by Seniofredo, later Marquis [of Septimania], who was the father of Guifré [I] Comte de Barcelona (see the document CATALONIA).  m ---.  The name of Aznar Galindez's wife is not known.  The early 12th century manuscript of the Codex de Roda states that "Aznarius Galindi" married “domnam Onnecam filiam Garsiez Enneconis filii Enneconis Ariste” and names their three oldest children as shown below[15], but the document evidently confuses this Aznar Galíndez with Conde Aznar Galíndez who died in 893 (see below).  Conde Aznar Galindez & his wife had [five] children:

a)         CENTULIO Aznárez (-murdered [838]).  The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones", recording that Centulio was murdered by his brother-in-law García "el Malo"[16]

b)         GALINDO [I] Aznárez (-[after 867]).  The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones"[17].  He succeeded as Conde de Aragón, Pallars, Ribagorza with support from García I Iñíguez King of Pamplona, confirmed by the marriage of his son to the king's daughter. 

-        see below

c)         MATRONA Aznárez .  The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones", stating that Matrona married "Garsie Malo filium Galindi Belascotenes et domne Fakilo" who repudiated her after he killed her brother[18]m (repudiated [838]) as his wife, GARCÍA Galíndez "el Malo", son of GALINDO Velázquez & his wife Faquilo --- (-before 858).  He deposed his father-in-law and succeeded in [838] as Conde de Aragón

d)         AILO Aznárez .  A charter dated 26 Aug 863, which is a judgment given by “Salomon comis in vico Alle”, records that “Witisclus” stated that “villa...Settereto” was given to him by “amita mea...Aylone” and came to her “de patre suo Asenari Galindonis comite per sua ruptura et aprisione per preceptum domni imperatoris[19]

e)         [son .  If “amita” is used in the document quoted below in its strict sense of paternal aunt, the father of Witisclo was the son of Conde Aznar Galíndez.  If this is correct, it is assumed that he was not the same son as Galindo Aznárez as the document makes no mention of Witisclo´s father holding the comital title.]  m ---.  One child: 

i)          WITISCLO (-after 26 Aug 863).  A charter dated 26 Aug 863, which is a judgment given by “Salomon comis in vico Alle”, records that “Witisclus” stated that “villa...Settereto” was given to him by “amita mea...Aylone” and came to her “de patre suo Asenari Galindonis comite per sua ruptura et aprisione per preceptum domni imperatoris[20]

 

 

VELASCO ---, son of ---.  His name is known only from the patronymic of his son Galindo.  Settipani speculates that he may have been the brother of Galindo, father of Aznar Galíndez Conde de Aragón[21]

m ---.  The name of Velasco's wife is not known. 

Velasco & his wife had [two] children: 

1.         GALINDO Velásquez .  The Codex de Roda names "Garsie Malo filium Galindi Belascotenes et domne Fakilo"[22]m FAQUILO, daughter of ---.  The Codex de Roda names "Garsie Malo filium Galindi Belascotenes et domne Fakilo"[23]Galindo & his wife had one child: 

a)         GARCÍA Galíndez "el Malo" (-before 858)The Codex de Roda names "Garsie Malo filium Galindi Belascotenes et domne Fakilo" when recording his first marriage and that he killed his wife's brother[24].  He deposed his first wife's father in [838], murdered his brother-in-law, and succeeded as Conde de Aragónm firstly (repudiated [838]) MATRONA de Aragón, daughter of AZNAR [I] Galíndez Conde de Aragón & his wife ---.  The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones", stating that Matrona married "Garsie Malo filium Galindi Belascotenes et domne Fakilo" who repudiated her after he killed her brother[25]m secondly (after [838]) --- de Pamplona, daughter of ÍÑIGO "Arista" King of Pamplona & his wife [Oneca ---].  The Codex de Roda names "Garsea Enneconis et domna Assona…et domna ---" as the children of "Enneco cognomento Aresta", stating that the unnamed daughter married "Garsea Malo" as his second wife[26].  García & his [first] wife had [one child]: 

i)          [VELASCO García (-after 843).  Ibn Hayyan records in 843 that “un groupe des principaux personnages de Pampelune passèrent à l´émir Abd al-Rahman, parmi eux Balask ibn Garsiya avec 60 de ses hommes[27].  Settipani suggests that Velasco García was the son of Conde García Galíndez “el Malo”[28]If that is correct, Velasco must have been born from García´s first marriage.  However, that assumes that García was married firstly at least 20 years before he repudiated his first wife, given that Velasco must have been adult in 843.  The chronology for that assumption to be correct does not appear to be evident.] 

2.         [VELASCO Velásquez (-after 816)Señor de Pamplona.  Settipani speculates that “Velasco chef de Pampelune en 816” was the brother of García Galíndez “el Malo” Conde de Aragón[29]He bases his speculation on the following text: Ibn Hayyan records a campaign in 816 led by “[el] hayib Abd al-Karim ibn Abd al-Wahid ibn Mugit” against “Balask al-Yalasqi señor de Pamplona”, during the course of which “Garsiya ibn Lubb, hijo de la hermana de Barmud, el tío materno de Idfuns, Sanyo, el mejor caballero de Pamplona, Saltan, el mejor caballero de los Mayus” were killed[30].  However, the chronology is not ideal.  In addition, “Balask al-Yalasqi” presumably indicates “Velasco Velásquez” rather then “Velasco Galíndez”.  If Velasco Señor de Pamplona belonged to the same family as García Galíndez, it is therefore more probable that he was García´s paternal uncle.] 

 

 

GALINDO [I] Aznárez, son of AZNAR Galíndez Conde de Aragón & his wife --- (-[after 867]).  The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones"[31].  ["Dato Donati comite, Garsia vice comite, Galindo Azenarii" subscribed the charter dated Oct 833 under which "Azenario Sancius comes" instructed two priests to restore "la terre de Cazaux" to the abbey of Pessan[32].  From a chronological point of view, it is not certain that “Galindo Azenarii” could be the same person as the future Galindo Aznárez Conde de Aragón.]  He succeeded as Conde de Aragón, Pallars, Ribagorza, with support from García I Iñíguez King of Pamplona, confirmed by the marriage of his son to the King's daughter.  "Galindo…comes" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated to [840/67], which states that he founded the monastery[33].  The dating clause of a charter for San Martín de Cillas dated 858 records "sub reimine Garssia Scemenonis rege in Pampilona et comite Galindo in Aragone"[34].  "Galindo Isinari comes" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated to [before 867], witnessed by "Scemeno Scemenonis…Alaricus Isinari, Mancio Galindonis, Fortunio Galindonis, Isinari Salomonis, Isinari Dacconis, Galindo Isinari…"[35].  "Galindo Asinarii comes" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 867[36].  The dating clause of this charter states "regnante Karlo rege in Franza, Aldefoso filio Ardonis in Gallia Comata, Garsia Enneconis in Pampilona", which is consistent with this date.  However, the text includes "ego Galindo Asinari comes deprecor Sancium regem generum meum…", which casts doubt on the authenticity of the document.  The likely kings named Sancho to whom this could relate are the kings of Navarre, although none is known to have been the son-in-law of a count named Galindo Aznar. 

m ---.  The name of Galindo Azn ar's wife is not known. 

Galindo Aznar & his wife had one child: 

1.         AZNAR Galíndez (-893).  The Codex de Roda names "Asnari Galindones" as the son of "Galindo Asnari" and his unnamed wife[37].  He succeeded his father as Conde de Aragónm ONECA García de Pamplona, daughter of GARCÍA I Iñíguez King of Pamplona & his first wife Urraca ---.  The Codex de Roda names "Fortunio Garseanis et Sanzio Garseanis et domna Onneca" as the children of "Garsea Enneconis " and his unnamed wife, stating that Oneca married "Asnari Galindones de Aragone"[38].  Aznar Galindez & his wife had three children: 

a)         GALINDO [II] Aznar (-923).  The Codex de Roda names "Galindo Asnari et Garsea Asnari et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Galindones" and his wife[39].  He succeeded his father in 893 as Conde de Aragón.  “Rex Fortunio Garcianes” reviewed the territories of the monastery of San Julián de Labasal, at the request of “comite Galindo Asnar”, by charter dated 893, whose dating clause records “...Garcia Sanz in Gallias, Raimundus in Paliares, pagani...Mohomet Ebenlupu in Balleterra et Mohomet Atauel in Osca...[40].  “Comes domnus Galindo” established the area of the monastery of San Martín de Cercito by charter dated 920[41]m firstly ACIBELLA de Gascogne, daughter of GARCÍA I "el Curvo" Duke of Gascony & his wife [Aimena de Périgord].  The Codex de Roda names "domna Acibella, Garsea Sanzionis comitis Guasconie filia" as the first wife of "Galindo Asnari"[42]m secondly (after 905) as her second husband, SANCHA García de Pamplona, widow of ÍÑIGO Fortún de Pamplona, daughter of GARCÍA II Jimenez King of Pamplona & his first wife Oneca ---.  The Codex de Roda names "domna Sanzia, filia de Garsea Scemenonis" as the wife of "Enneco Furtuniones", specifying that she later married "domno Galindo comes de Aragone"[43].  Galindo Aznar & his first wife had three children:

i)          TOTA Galindónez (-after Apr 941).  The Codex de Roda names "domna Tota…domnus Redemtus episcopus et domno Miro" as the children of "Galindo Asnari" and his first wife Acibella, stating that Toda married "Uernardi comitis"[44].  The end 13th century “Crònica d´Alaó Renovada” names “Totam filiam Galindonis comitis Aragonensis” as wife of “Bernardus comes Ripacurcie”, adding that they built the monastery of Ovarra where they were both buried[45]m BERNARDO [I] Conde de Ribagorza, son of RAIMUNDO [I] Conde de Ribagorza & his wife --- (-[Mar 950/Nov 956]). 

ii)         REDEMPTUS .  The Codex de Roda names "domna Tota…domnus Redemtus episcopus et domno Miro" as the children of "Galindo Asnari" and his first wife Acibella, stating that Toda married "Uernardi comitis"[46].  Bishop.

iii)        MIRÓN .  The Codex de Roda names "domna Tota…domnus Redemtus episcopus et domno Miro" as the children of "Galindo Asnari" and his first wife Acibella, stating that Toda married "Uernardi comitis"[47]

Galindo Aznar & his second wife had three children: 

iv)       AZNAR Galindez .  One manuscript of the Codex de Roda names "Aznarium Galindonis et domna Andregoto regina et domna Belasquita" as the children of "domno Galindo comes de Aragone" and his wife "domna Sanzia"[48]

v)        ANDREGOTO Galíndez (-972).  One manuscript of the Codex de Roda names "Aznarium Galindonis et domna Andregoto regina et domna Belasquita" as the children of "domno Galindo comes de Aragone" and his wife "domna Sanzia"[49].  She succeeded her father in 922 as Condesa de Aragon.  As Andregoto is not named in her husband's charter dated 9 Mar 933[50], it is assumed that they married after that date.  However, this charter, confirming donations to San Pedro de Siresa by Andregoto's ancestors, suggests that the marriage may have been planned already at that time.  Caliph Abd al-Rahman III imposed the repudiation by King García III of his wife under the peace terms negotiated with Sunyer Conde de Barcelona in 940, as part of his strategy of dividing the alliances between the various Christian kingdoms and counties in the peninsula[51].  "Endregoto Galindonis et prole eius Sancio Garseanis rex et uxor eius Urraca Fredenandizi" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 29 Jun 971[52]m (repudiated 940) as his first wife, her first cousin, GARCÍA III Sánchez King of Navarre, son of SANCHO I García King of Navarre & his second wife Toda Aznárez de Larraún ([919]-[25 May/13 Oct] 970).  He became Conde de Aragón by right of his wife, thus uniting Aragon with Navarre. 

-         see below

vi)       VELASQUITA .  One manuscript of the Codex de Roda names "Aznarium Galindonis et domna Andregoto regina et domna Belasquita" as the children of "domno Galindo comes de Aragone" and his wife "domna Sanzia", recording that Velasquita was the wife of "Enneco Lopiz de Estigi et de Zillegita"[53]m ÍÑIGO López, de Estigi y Zillegita, son of ---. 

Galindo Aznar had five illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:    

vii)       GUNTISLOThe Codex de Roda names "domno Guntislo ac domno Sanzio vel domno Belasco atque domno Banzo, seu domno Asnario" as the children of "Galindo Asnari…de aliis anzillis"[54].  Conde de Aragón [923-933].  Rege Gartia Sancionis et regina dona Tota et suos barones Galindo Ysinari et Scemeno Galindones, iudicantes Aragon” confirmed to “Fortunio Scemenonis comite” a judgment relating to “alode de Sancti Ihoannis monasterio” which had been donated by “comites domnus Gusticulus et domnus Galindo comis” by charter dated 948[55].  m AUREA, daughter of QUINTILO & his wife ---.  The Codex de Roda names "domna Oria, Scemeno Galindonis de Berale seu domne Comitisse soror, domni Quintile filia" as the wife of "domno Guntislo"[56].  Guntislo & his wife had two children: 

(a)        JIMENO Galíndez .  The Codex de Roda names "Xemeno Galindones de Perale et domnam --- Comitissa sororem eius" as the children of "domno Guntislo" and his wife[57]

(b)        COMITISA .  The Codex de Roda names "Xemeno Galindones de Perale et domnam --- Comitissa sororem eius" as the children of "domno Guntislo" and his wife[58]

viii)      SANCHOThe Codex de Roda names "domno Guntislo ac domno Sanzio vel domno Belasco atque domno Banzo, seu domno Asnario" as the children of "Galindo Asnari…de aliis anzillis"[59]. 

ix)        VELASCOThe Codex de Roda names "domno Guntislo ac domno Sanzio vel domno Belasco atque domno Banzo, seu domno Asnario" as the children of "Galindo Asnari…de aliis anzillis"[60]. 

x)         BANCIOThe Codex de Roda names "domno Guntislo ac domno Sanzio vel domno Belasco atque domno Banzo, seu domno Asnario" as the children of "Galindo Asnari…de aliis anzillis"[61]m ---.  The name of Bancio's wife is not known.  Bancio & his wife had one child: 

(a)        GALINDO (-after 958). 

xi)        AZNAR.  The Codex de Roda names "domno Guntislo ac domno Sanzio vel domno Belasco atque domno Banzo, seu domno Asnario" as the children of "Galindo Asnari…de aliis anzillis"[62]. 

b)         GARCÍA Aznar.  The Codex de Roda names "Galindo Asnari et Garsea Asnari et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Galindones" and his wife[63]

c)         SANCHA Aznar.  The Codex de Roda names "Galindo Asnari et Garsea Asnari et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Galindones" and his wife, stating that Sancha married "regis Atoele mauro"[64].  m MUHAMMAD "Atauil/al-Tawil" Wali of Huesca, son of ABD al-MALIK bin Xabrit (-[913/14]). 

 

 

Three references have been found to Fortún Jiménez as conde de Aragon dated 947 and 948.  No information has been found regarding his appointment to the county of Aragon, although all three charters suggest that he was the vassal of the king of Navarre.  It is possible that he was the same person as one of the individuals of the same name and patronymic who are recorded in Navarre around the same time (see the document NAVARRE NOBILITY) and that he was appointed by the Navarrese king as his deputy in Aragon for a limited period. 

 

1.         JIMENONo information has been found about Jimeno apart from the indication of his existence from the patronymic of his son.  m ---.  Jimeno & his wife had one child: 

a)         FORTÚN Jiménez (-after 948).  Conde de Aragón.  “Garsia Sanciones rex Pampilone cum voluntate comitis Fortunionis de Aragone” donated the monastery of Lavasal to San Juan de la Peña by charter dated 947[65].  “Tota regina matre de rege Garcia Sangonis” donated property to the monastery of Lavasal by charter dated 947, confirmed by “comes Fortunio Scemenones de Aragon[66].  “Rege Gartia Sancionis et regina dona Tota et suos barones Galindo Ysinari et Scemeno Galindones, iudicantes Aragon” confirmed to “Fortunio Scemenonis comite” a judgment relating to “alode de Sancti Ihoannis monasterio” which had been donated by “comites domnus Gusticulus et domnus Galindo comis” by charter dated 948[67]

 

 

On his marriage to Andregoto Condesa de Aragón, García III King of Navarre also became Conde de Aragón by right of his wife, thus uniting Aragon with Navarre for about a century.  The succeeding Condes de Aragón, also Kings of Navarre, are shown in outline form below to demonstrate how Aragon eventually regained its autonomy from Navarre.  For full details, see the document NAVARRE KINGS

 

 

ANDREGOTO Galíndez, daughter of GALINDO II Aznar Conde de Aragón & his second wife Sancha de Pamplona (-972).  One manuscript of the Codex de Roda names "Aznarium Galindonis et domna Andregoto regina et domna Belasquita" as the children of "domno Galindo comes de Aragone" and his wife "domna Sanzia"[68].  She succeeded her father in 922 as Condesa de Aragon.  Caliph Abd al-Rahman III obliged her husband to repudiate her under the peace terms negotiated with Sunyer Conde de Barcelona in 940, as part of his strategy of dividing the alliances between the various Christian kingdoms and counties in the peninsula[69]

m (repudiated) as his first wife, GARCÍA III Sánchez King of Navarre, son of SANCHO I Garces King of Navarre & his second wife Toda Aznárez de Larraún ([919]-[25 May/13 Oct] 970).   

1.         SANCHO Garces Abarca de Navarra ([after 935]-Dec 994).  He succeeded his father in 970 as SANCHO II Garcés Abarca King of Navarre, and his mother in 972 as SANCHO Garcés Conde de Aragón

a)         GARCÍA Sánchez de Navarra ([964]-after 8 Dec 999).  He succeeded his father in 994 as GARCÍA IV Sánchez King of Navarre, GARCÍA Sánchez Conde de Aragón

i)          SANCHO de Navarra ([990/92]-murdered 18 Oct 1035).  He succeeded his father in 999 as SANCHO III "el Mayor" King of Navarre, SANCHO Conde de Aragón.  On his death, he divided his territories between his sons. 

(a)       GARCÍA Sánchez Infante de Navarra ([after 1020]-killed in battle Atapuerca 1 Sep 1054).  Under the division of territories organised by his father, he received Navarre, succeeding in 1035 as GARCÍA V "él de Nájera” King of Navarre

-         KINGS of NAVARRE

(b)       FERNANDO Infante de Navarra ([1016/18]-27 Dec 1065).  Under the division of territories organised by his father, he received Castile, succeeding in 1035 as FERNANDO I "el Magno" King of Castile.   

-         KINGS of CASTILE

(c)       RAMIRO Sánchez (Aibar [1008]-killed in battle Graus 8 May 1063, bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  Under the division of territories organised by his father, he received Aragon, succeeding in 1035 as RAMIRO I King of Aragon

-         see Chapter 2.  KINGS of ARAGON

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2.    KINGS of ARAGON 1035-1137

 

 

RAMIRO I 1035-1063

 

RAMIRO Sánchez, illegitimate son of SANCHO III King of Navarre & his mistress Sancha de Aibar (Aibar [1008]-killed in battle Graus 8 May 1063, bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  “Ranimirus proles regis, Garseanes frater eius, Gundisaluus frater eius, Ferdinandus frater eius” confirmed the charter dated 17 Apr 1014 under which “Sancius…rex…cum coniuge mea regina domina Maiora” donated property to the monastery of Leire, although the absence of the brother Bernardo suggests that this charter should be redated to approximately ten years later[70].  "Sancius…rex" recommended the rule of St Benedict to the monastery of Leire by charter dated 21 Oct 1022, subscribed by "Eximina regina mater regis, Regina domna Muma, Garsia et Ranimirus, Gundesalbus et Fernandus"[71].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Raimirus filius Sancii Regis Navarrorum…ex…nobilissima domina de castro…Ayunarum" when specifying that he inherited Aragon on the death of his father[72].  The charter of "Sancius Hispaniarum rex" dated 26 Jun 1033 relating to concessions to the monastery of Oriense was confirmed by his sons (in order) "Ranimirus…Garsea…Fredinandus"[73].  Under the division of territories organised by his father prior to his death, Ramiro received Aragon, succeeding in 1035 as RAMIRO I King of Aragon.  The Historia Silense records that King Sancho granted "Haragon" to "Raymiro quem ex concubina habuerat"[74].  Although considered "king" by contemporaries, he was named in documentation "Ranimirus Sancioni regis filius"[75], although this description was not consistently used as demonstrated by the charter dated 22 May 1035 [must be misdated, probably 22 May 1055], which records the king´s donation of the churches of San Martín de Arasanz, San Pedro de Tou, San Felix y San Juan de Aínsa to Sobrarbe San Victorián, the dating clause of which specifies "regnante me Ranimiro rege in Aragone et in Suprarbi et in Ripacurtia et ultra"[76].  He expanded his authority southwards to include territories formerly controlled by the kingdom of Navarre, in return for conceding Navarrese supremacy[77].  He defeated his half-brother Gonzalo and expanded Aragon eastwards by annexing Sobrarbe and Ribagorza in 1044.  With this expansion, Ramiro I had assumed leadership in the struggle against the Moors on his frontiers[78].  King Ramiro I donated the church of San Miguel "prope Calonica Baasa" to Sobrarbe San Victorián by charter dated 1035 [must be misdated] "regnante Ranimiro rege in Ripacorza, in Suprarb et in Aragon", subscribed by "Ermesenda regina…Sancio Ranimiri regis filio primogenito, Sancio Ranimiri regis filio proles Ermesendis regina…Senior Sancio Galinz in Boltania, Senior Ennecho Lobez in Buil, Senior Guelmi Serui Dei in Toleto, Senior Fortung Blaschez in Elesone"[79].  In 1054, he is alleged to have fled the battle of Atapuerca, in which his half-brother García V King of Navarre was killed by his other half-brother Fernando I King of Castile, "having lost his boots, on a horse guided only by a halter"[80].  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 29 Jul 1059, bequeathed property to filio meo Sancio filius Ermesendis...Sancio primogenito meo, Garsea filio meo, filia mea Taresa”, and to “domina mea Sancta Maria...super Sancte Cruçe filia mea Urraka[81]The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 15 Mar 1061, bequeathed property to Sancio filio meo filius Ermisindis qui vocata est per baptismum Gilberga...Aibar et Exabirri Iateri [ad] filio meo Sancio...filia mee Urraka cui est in Sancta Cruce...Garsea filio meo[82]He died in battle against the Moors near Barbastro.  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that King Ramiro was killed aged 63 in 1062 and was buried in "el monasterio de Sant Iohan de Peña" after reigning for thirty eight years[83].  The "Corónicas" Navarras record that "el rey don Romiro" died "en Grados", in 1107[84]

m firstly (Jaca 22 Aug 1036) GERBERGE de Foix, daughter of BERNARD ROGER de Carcassonne Comte de Cousserans, de Foix et de Bigorre & his wife Gersende Ctss de Bigorre ([1015]-1 Dec 1049, bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Ramiro married "la filla del Comte de Bigorra nombrada Hermissenda et por baptismo Gelberda"[85]The marriage contract between "Ranimirus…prolis Sanctioni regis" and "Gilberga filiam comitis Bernardi-Rodegari et comitissæ matris eius…Garsinde" is dated 22 Aug 1036 and lists her dowry as "castellum…Atheres", judged spurious by the Histoire Générale de Languedoc[86].  She adopted the name ERMESENDA as Queen of Aragon[87].  King Ramiro I donated the church of San Miguel "prope Calonica Baasa" to Sobrarbe San Victorián by charter dated 1035 [must be misdated], subscribed by "Ermesenda regina…"[88].  [Her daughter] "Sancia comitissa Ranimiri regis filia et Armissende regina" donated property to the monastery of Santa Cruz de la Serós by charter dated Oct 1076[89]

m secondly ([1054]) AGNES d’Aquitaine, daughter of [GUILLAUME VI "le Gros" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME IV Comte de Poitou & his wife Eustachie de Montreuil-Berlay].  Agnes was the daughter of Duke Guillaume VI according to Szabolcs de Vajay, although he cites no source for this[90].  According to Richard, Duke Guillaume VI died childless[91].  Agnes is shown as the possible daughter of Duke Guillaume VII "l'Aigret" in Europäische Stammtafeln[92], marrying Pierre I Comte de Savoie as her second husband although she would have been only about six years at the time of her supposed first marriage.  From an onomastic point of view, it is surprising that a daughter of Duke Guillaume VI would have been named Agnes, a name which appears to have been introduced into the family of the Comtes de Poitou only after the third marriage of Duke Guillaume V with Agnes de Mâcon. 

Mistress (1): MUNIA, daughter of ---.  Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1067 under which “Sancio Ranimiri, Ranimirus regis filio et domna Amunna” donated property to San Andrés de Fanlo[93]

King Ramiro I & his first wife had five children:

1.         Infanta doña TERESA de Aragón (1037-after 29 Jul 1059).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Sancha…et…Teresa" as the two daughters of King Ramiro and his wife "la filla del Comte de Bigorra nombrada Hermissenda et por baptismo Gelberda", stating that Teresa married "el Comte de Provença clamado Guillen Bertran"[94].  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 29 Jul 1059, bequeathed property to “filio meo Sancio filius Ermesendis...Sancio primogenito meo, Garsea filio meo, filia mea Taresa”, and to “domina mea Sancta Maria...super Sancte Cruçe filia mea Urraka[95]m as his first wife, GUILLAUME [VI] BERTRAND Comte de Provence, son of FOULQUES BERTRAND [I] Marquis et Comte de Provence & his wife Hildegarde --- (-after 1067).  Marquis 1065. 

2.         Infante don SANCHO Ramírez de Aragón ([1042/43]-Huesca 4 Jun 1094 bur Montearagón, transferred to Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Sancium" as son of "Raimirus filius Sancii Regis Navarrorum…ex…nobilissima domina de castro…Ayunarum"[96]He succeeded his father in 1063 as SANCHO I King of Aragon.   

-        see below

3.         Infante don GARCÍA de Aragón (-Anzanigo 17 Jul 1086).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Sancho et…García" as the two sons of King Ramiro and his wife "la filla del Comte de Bigorra nombrada Hermissenda et por baptismo Gelberda", stating that García was bishop of Jaca[97].  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 29 Jul 1059, bequeathed property to “filio meo Sancio filius Ermesendis...Sancio primogenito meo, Garsea filio meo, filia mea Taresa”, and to “domina mea Sancta Maria...super Sancte Cruçe filia mea Urraka[98].  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 15 Mar 1061, bequeathed property to “Sancio filio meo filius Ermisindis qui vocata est per baptismum Gilberga...Aibar et Exabirri Iateri [ad] filio meo Sancio...filia mee Urraka cui est in Sancta Cruce...Garsea filio meo[99]Sancius...Rex filius Ranimiri Regis” donated property to Roda, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris ac filiorum”, by charter dated 18 Aug 1068, witnessed by “Sancio fratre suo de Rex Sancio, Garcia similiter...[100].  "Garsias…Aragonensium episcopus" introduced the rule of St Augustine to the cathedral of San Pedro de Jaca by charter dated to [1076/79], confirmed by "Sancius Aragonensium rex…per fratrem meum Garsiam episcopum"[101].  Bishop of Jaca 1076/1086.  Bishop of Pamplona 1078/1083.  "Sancius…rex Aragonensium" granted privileges to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 4 Sep 1082, the dating clause of which refers to "regnante rege Sancio…in Aragone…domno Garsia fratre regis episcopo in Iaca…"[102]

4.         Infante doña URRACA de Aragón (-[1077/78] or alter).  "Sancia commitissa, Ranimiri regis filia" donated property to the monastery of San Juan de la Peña, for the souls of "…regis Sancii fratris mei…et Urrachæ sororis meæ", by charter dated 4 Apr 1096[103].  Nun at Santa Cruz de la Serós.  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 29 Jul 1059, bequeathed property to filio meo Sancio filius Ermesendis...Sancio primogenito meo, Garsea filio meo, filia mea Taresa”, and to “domina mea Sancta Maria...super Sancte Cruçe filia mea Urraka[104]The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 15 Mar 1061, bequeathed property to Sancio filio meo filius Ermisindis qui vocata est per baptismum Gilberga...Aibar et Exabirri Iateri [ad] filio meo Sancio...filia mee Urraka cui est in Sancta Cruce...Garsea filio meo[105]"Ranimirus rex Sancius regis prolis" commended "filiam meam Urracam" to the monastery of Santa Cruz de la Serós by charter dated 15 Mar 1061[106].  The testament of "Urracha ancilla Dei filia Ranimiri regis" is dated to [1077/78][107]

5.         Infanta doña SANCHA de Aragón (-[5 Apr/16 Aug] 1097, bur Monastery of Santa Cruz, transferred 1622 to Benedictine convent of Jaca[108]).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Sancha…et…Teresa" as the two daughters of King Ramiro and his wife "la filla del Comte de Bigorra nombrada Hermissenda et por baptismo Gelberda", stating that Sancha married "al Comte de Tolosa"[109].  This marriage has not been confirmed by other primary sources.  The Crónica is an unreliable source regarding many genealogical details and it is suggested the marriage be treated with caution until it can be corroborated elsewhere.  "Sancius Ranimiri…rex Aragonensium et Pampilonensium" granted property to "dompna Sancia comitissa soror mea" by charter dated 15 Aug 1058[110].  The fact that Sancha is named "comitissa" in this document does suggest that she must have married a "comes" before the date of the document.  Her [second] marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 27 Jul [1067/68] under which "Sanctia comitissa" donated "castrum de Pilzano" to "domno Raymundo comiti Barchinonensi et domne Almodi comitisse", specifying that the property came to her from "viri mei Ermengaudi comitis Urgelensis"[111], read together with a charter dated 23 Apr [1072/73] under which (her stepson) "Ermengaudus comes Urgelensis et Luciana comitissa uxor eius" confirmed that "castro de Pilzano" had been given by "pater meus Ermengaudus comes" to "Sanctiæ comitissæ filiæ Ranimiri regis"[112].  "Dona Sancha, filla del Rey do Ramiro et de dona Ermessende regina" donated property which she was given by "frater meus rex Sancius" to the monastery of Santa Cruz by charter dated Oct 1065[113].  Her paternal grandmother "domina Sancia, mater Ranimiri regis" granted the monastery of Santa Cecilia de Aibar "quam dedit michi illa regine domna Eximina mater Sancionis regis" to "nepte mea domna Sancia", in the presence of "abbatissa domne Mennose soror episcopi domni Sancii Aragonensium", by charter dated 27 Oct 1070[114].  "Sancia comitissa Ranimiri regis filia et Armissende regina" donated property to the monastery of Santa Cruz de la Serós by charter dated Oct 1076[115].  "Sancius…rex Aragonensium" granted privileges to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 4 Sep 1082, the dating clause of which refers to "regnante rege Sancio…in Aragone…domna Sancia comitissa atque sorore regis presidente in Siresia…"[116].  "Sancia comitissa" granted property to "Acenar Garces" by charter dated 1083[117].  "Sancia, filia regis Ranimiri et Ermesendis regine" donated property to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated Oct 1095[118].  The testament of "Sancia filia regis Ranimiri et Ermesendis regina" is dated Oct 1095[119].  "Sancia commitissa, Ranimiri regis filia" donated property to the monastery of San Juan de la Peña, for the souls of "…regis Sancii fratris mei…et Urrachæ sororis meæ", by charter dated 4 Apr 1096[120]A charter dated 17 Dec 1096 records a donation made by the bishop of Huesca with the consent of “Petro rege et princibus eius et Sancia comitissa[121].  Pedro I King of Aragon donated “casas que illa comitissa Sancia tenuit...in vita sua in Monte Aragone cum...in Terz et in Kizena” to Santa Cruz de la Serós by charter dated 16 Aug 1097[122]If Sancha's marriage to Armengol [III] Conde de Urgel is correct, it is surprising that she is not referred to as his widow in any of these charters, even the one dated shortly after his death in 1065.  The only hint that she married, and that her husband had comital status, is the reference to her as "comitissa" in the charters dated 1076 and 1096.  [m firstly as his [third] wife, PONS Comte de Toulouse, son of GUILLAUME III "Taillefer" Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Emma de Provence ([991]-1060, bur Toulouse, Saint-Sernin).]  m [secondly] (before [Feb/Mar] 1065) as his third wife, ARMENGOL [III] "él de Barbastro" Conde de Urgel, son of ARMENGOL [II] "el Pelegrino" Conde de Urgel & his second wife Constanza --- ([1031/33]-killed in battle [Feb/Mar] 1065, bur San Pedro de Ager). 

King Ramiro I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

6.          SANCHO Ramírez (-after 1117)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Sancho" as "un fillo bort" of King Ramiro, stating that his father gave him "Ayuar et Xauierre Alatre" and the title count[123].  King Ramiro I donated the church of San Miguel "prope Calonica Baasa" to Sobrarbe San Victorián by charter dated 1035 [must be misdated], subscribed by "…Sancio Ranimiri regis filio primogenito, Sancio Ranimiri regis filio proles Ermesendis regina… "[124].  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 29 Jul 1059, bequeathed property to filio meo Sancio filius Ermesendis...Sancio primogenito meo, Garsea filio meo, filia mea Taresa”, and to “domina mea Sancta Maria...super Sancte Cruçe filia mea Urraka[125]The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 15 Mar 1061, bequeathed property to Sancio filio meo filius Ermisindis qui vocata est per baptismum Gilberga...Aibar et Exabirri Iateri [ad] filio meo Sancio...filia mee Urraka cui est in Sancta Cruce...Garsea filio meo[126]"Infante Sancio Ramirez in Fonte Toba et Banabarre, Senior Sanxo Acenarez in Sancto Stephano et in Petra Ruba, Dompno Guillem Serue Dei in Capella, Dompno Remon Suiner in Monte Mesma" are named in the dating clause of the charter dated 5 Jan 1066 under which Sancho I King of Aragon donated "caput mansum…Iohan de Pui de Sus" to Santo Tomás de Torre de Ésera[127].  Señor in Aibar.  The dating clause of a charter dated 1 Nov 1066 under which “domna Tota” donated property to Leire monastery names “rege domino Sancio in Aragone et Suprarve, et suo germano Sancio in Aibare[128].  Sancius...Rex filius Ranimiri Regis” donated property to Roda, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris ac filiorum”, by charter dated 18 Aug 1068, witnessed by “Sancio fratre suo de Rex Sancio, Garcia similiter...[129].  "Senior Sancio Galindez in Boltania, senior Ato Galindez in --- et in Civitate, Senior Garcia Fortuniones in Montecluso, Domino Bernaldus Miro in Obisguarre, Sancio Redemirez meo germano in Benavarre et Fontetoba, Domino Remon seniore in Castella Galez, Senior Sancio Aznares in Petrapubea, Senior Enecho Açnareç in Girostano, et domino Guillermus Servi Dei in Capella, Don Roger Dato judice in Ripacurça" subscribed the charter dated 29 Oct 1069 under which Sancho I King of Aragon granted rights to settlement at "castellanum de Sirag"[130].  Sancio Ranimiri, Ranimirus regis filio et domna Amunna” donated property to San Andrés de Fanlo by charter dated 1067[131]A charter dated Jan 1078, under which "Sancius…Aragonensium rex" granted property, names "…Infante Sancio Ranimiriz in Banabar" in the dating clause[132].  "Sancius Raymiro regis filio" granted property to "Gonbal Exmentz" by charter dated May 1081, the dating clause naming "…Dompnus Sancius germanus regis in Benauarre…"[133].  Conde"Sancius…rex Aragonensium" granted privileges to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 4 Sep 1082, the dating clause of which refers to "regnante rege Sancio…in Aragone et in Pamplona et in Superarbi sive in Ripacorza…domno Sancio Ranimiri comite in Ripacorza…"[134].  The dating clause of a charter dated Jul 1087, under which "Petrus Sancii regis filii" granted "camium in Tronceto" to “Sanzio Galinz de Oso” in exchange for the church of San Miguel, records “comes Sancius in Banabarri...[135]Señor de Aibar.  A charter dated Sep 1091, under which "Sancius…Aragonensium rex" granted property, names "…Comite Sancio Ranimiriz in Exabarre et in Aibar…" in the dating clause[136].  Señor in Montcluso: “Tota filia de s[enior] Sangu Acenariz et de domna Entregoto qui fui uxor de Petro Brocardi” donated “terciam partem de villa Muro Maiore” to Sobrarbe San Victorián by charter dated Jun 1108, subscribed by “comes Sancius senior in Montecluso, S[enior] don Calueth in Auizanla, S[enior] Exemen Galinz in Sancto Martino, Barbatorta in Araoste[137]m [firstly] BEATRIZ, daughter of --- (-after 24 Nov 1110).  "Sancho Ranimirez et uxor mea Beatriz" confirmed a donation of property, "que fuerunt de senior domno Iohannes et postea venit Petrus filius noster", to Santa María de Uncastillo by charter dated 1100[138].  At first sight the dating of this charter would seem suspect, in light of the marriage date attributable to the daughter of Sancho Ramírez by his reported second marriage.  However, the dating clause of the document refers to "regnante Pedro…in Aragon", which is consistent with the date.  This date therefore appears to cast doubt on the order of the marriages of Sancho Ramírez, or whether in fact his two supposed wives were one person.  This suggestion is supported by the charter dated 24 Nov 1110 under which “Beatrix…comitissa” donated property to the monastery of Roda, for the soul of “senioris mei domni Sancii comitis”, which states that “Grasias Sanz” supported the donation of “matris meæ[139].  [m secondly --- de Montaner, daughter of ARNAUD Vicomte de Montaner & his wife ---.  Her marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[140] and by Jaurgain[141].  The latter quotes the charter dated to [1085] under which "Ar. de Mont Aner" provided guarantors to Centule de Béarn Comte de Bigorre for the marriage of his granddaughter to Centule´s son Gaston[142], but the extract does not provide a clue about the parentage of the bride´s mother.  No more precise primary source has yet been identified which confirms her parentage and marriage.  In addition, the charters quoted above suggest that Sancho´s known wife Beatriz survived well into the 12th century.  The conclusion must be that this reported second marriage of Sancho is incorrect, or that at least the parentage of his supposed second wife is reported inaccurately.]  Sancho Ramirez & his [first] wife had two children:

a)         PEDRO Sánchez"Sancho Ranimirez et uxor mea Beatriz" confirmed a donation of property, "que fuerunt de senior domno Iohannes et postea venit Petrus filius noster", to Santa María de Uncastillo by charter dated 1100[143]

b)         GARCÍA Sánchez .  Señor in Aibar, Atarés y Javierre.  Garsias Infans [...in Athares et in Exabierre] filius Sanctii Ramiri comitis et Margareta uxor mea cum filiis nostris Lupo Sanchez et Petro Atharesa” donated “nostras proprias casas in Hosca” to “Galindo Garces de Atrosella” by charter dated Jun 1110[144].  “Beatrix…comitissa” donated property to the monastery of Roda, for the soul of “senioris mei domni Sancii comitis”, by charter dated 24 Nov 1110 which states that “Grasias Sanz” supported the donation of “matris meæ[145]m MARGARITA [Teresa], daughter of --- (-after 8 Feb 1146).  “Garsias Infans [...in Athares et in Exabierre] filius Sanctii Ramiri comitis et Margareta uxor mea cum filiis nostris Lupo Sanchez et Petro Atharesa” donated “nostras proprias casas in Hosca” to “Galindo Garces de Atrosella” by charter dated Jun 1110[146]Petrus Tharesa cum matre mea” donated “Verolam” to the abbot of Escala “Galindo Garces de Atrosella” by charter dated 8 Feb 1146[147].  [same person as...? TERESA [García], daughter of GARCÍA --- & his wife ---.  Her name and parentage is confirmed by the charter dated Oct 1133, which records donations made by "Fertunio Garceç Kaixal et uxor mea Tota", the dating clause of which specifies that the month was “...quando Kaxal divisit suum honorem suis nepotibus...Lope Kaxal [Nagara e Begéra e Monte Reale]...Forti Enecones e...Sanc Enecones [Belforato e Granione]...Petro Teresa [Berroza][148].  The charter dated to [1134], quoted in the document NAVARRE NOBILITY under Teresa´s cousin Lope “Cajal” Señor in Nájera, confirms that “nepotibus” should be interpreted as nephews and not grandsons in the charter dated Oct 1133.  Petro Teresa” could be identified as Pedro García: if correct, Teresa´s husband was García Sánchez.]  García Sanchez & his wife had two children: 

i)          LOPE SánchezGarsias Infans [...in Athares et in Exabierre] filius Sanctii Ramiri comitis et Margareta uxor mea cum filiis nostris Lupo Sanchez et Petro Atharesa” donated “nostras proprias casas in Hosca” to “Galindo Garces de Atrosella” by charter dated Jun 1110[149]Señor in Estella and Aibar. 

ii)         PEDRO García (-21 Mar 1151).  Garsias Infans [...in Athares et in Exabierre] filius Sanctii Ramiri comitis et Margareta uxor mea cum filiis nostris Lupo Sanchez et Petro Atharesa” donated “nostras proprias casas in Hosca” to “Galindo Garces de Atrosella” by charter dated Jun 1110[150].  ["Fertunio Garceç Kaixal et uxor mea Tota" donated “in Zaragoça et in Tutela et in Tarazona...quando filius noster Garcias est mortuus” to the Knights Hospitallers by charter dated Oct 1133 “quando Garcia Kaxal obiit...et quando Kaxal divisit suum honorem suis nepotibus...Lope Kaxal [Nagara e Begéra e Monte Reale]...Forti Enecones e...Sanc Enecones [Belforato e Granione]...Petro Teresa [Berroza][151]It is assumed that “Petro Teresa” was Pedro García, on the basis that his mother was the daughter of Fortún García “Cajal”.]  Señor in Atarés, Borja y Javierre.  Petrus Tharesa cum matre mea” donated “Verolam” to the abbot of Escala “Galindo Garces de Atrosella” by charter dated 8 Feb 1146[152]

Sancho Ramirez & his [second] wife had [two] children:

c)          TALESA Sánchez (-after Nov 1155).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter dated early 1134 under which "Talesa vicecomitissa Bearnensis cum filio suo Centullo" donated "hereditatem suam quam habebat in Aierb ex patre suo…Sancius comes" to the abbey of Sauvelade, the document also naming "frater eius [= Sancho] Ranimirus rex"[153]A charter dated to [1119/1136] records a donation of property to the abbey of Saint-Jean de Sorde "coram vicecomitissa Bearnensi…Atelesa"[154].  Señora in Unocastello: Ramiro II King of Aragon granted "casas...de...mauro...Mahomat filio de Paloru" to “Fortunio Date de Boleia” by charter dated Jul 1135, the dating clause of which records “...vicecomitissa domna Taresa de Bearne in Uno Castello...[155].  "Talesa vicecomitissa" donated property to her servant by charter dated Nov 1155[156].  m ([1085]) GASTON [IV] Vicomte de Béarn, son of CENTULE [IV] Vicomte de Béarn & his first wife Gisla --- (-killed in battle near Valencia 1130). 

d)         BEATRIZ Sánchez

 

 

SANCHO I 1063-1094, PEDRO I 1094-1104, ALFONSO I 1104-1134, RAMIRO II 1134-1157, PETRONILA 1157-1164

 

Infante don SANCHO Ramírez de Aragón, son of RAMIRO I King of Aragon & his first wife Gerberge [Ermesenda] de Foix ([1042/43]-Huesca 4 Jun 1094, bur Montearagón, transferred to Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Sancium" as son of "Raimirus filius Sancii Regis Navarrorum…ex…nobilissima domina de castro…Ayunarum"[157].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Sancho et…García" as the two sons of King Ramiro and his wife "la filla del Comte de Bigorra nombrada Hermissenda et por baptismo Gelberda", stating in a later passage that Sancho was eighteen years old when he succeeded his father[158].  "Sancii regis Ranimiri filio prolis Ermisende regina…Sanz Galinz tenente Boltania, Fertung Blasch cum suo fratre Galin Blasch, Guillermi Serui Dei" subscribed the charter dated 22 May 1035 [must be misdated] which records the donation of the churches of San Martín de Arasanz, San Pedro de Tou, San Felix y San Juan de Aínsa to Sobrarbe San Victorián made by Ramiro I King of Aragon[159].  King Ramiro I donated the church of San Miguel "prope Calonica Baasa" to Sobrarbe San Victorián by charter dated 1035 [must be misdated], subscribed by "…Sancio Ranimiri regis filio primogenito, Sancio Ranimiri regis filio proles Ermesendis regina… "[160].  The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 29 Jul 1059, bequeathed property to filio meo Sancio filius Ermesendis...Sancio primogenito meo, Garsea filio meo, filia mea Taresa”, and to “domina mea Sancta Maria...super Sancte Cruçe filia mea Urraka[161]The testament of King Ramiro I, dated 15 Mar 1061, bequeathed property to Sancio filio meo filius Ermisindis qui vocata est per baptismum Gilberga...Aibar et Exabirri Iateri [ad] filio meo Sancio...filia mee Urraka cui est in Sancta Cruce...Garsea filio meo[162]He succeeded his father in 1063 as SANCHO I King of Aragon.  Like his father, in the early years of his reign he did not use the title "king" but was referred to in documentation as "Sancius Ranimiro regis filius".  From Jan 1072, he appears as "Sanctius gratia Dei Aragonense"[163].  He gained Barbastro from the Moors in 1064, although lost it the following year, and Alquezar in 1065[164].  He was able to impose tribute on the Moors of Huesca, Tudela and Zaragoza, thereby greatly expanding Aragon's wealth[165].  “Sancius...Rex filius Ranimiri Regis” donated property to Roda, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris ac filiorum”, by charter dated 18 Aug 1068, witnessed by “Sancio fratre suo de Rex Sancio, Garcia similiter, Senior Sancio Galim de Boltania, Senior Ato Galin in Abinzalla, Senior Fortung Belasch in santo Martino, suo fratre Galindo Belasch in Froceto, Senior Sancio Azenar in Petra-rubea, Guillermus servi Dei in Cabella...[166].  After the murder of Sancho IV King of Navarre in 1076, he succeeded as SANCHO V King of Navarre.  The precise circumstances under which the throne of Navarre passed to Sancho I King of Aragon have not been ascertained.  The earliest (apparently reliably dated) charter so far identified which names Sancho as king of Navarre is dated Mar 1077: the dating clause of a charter dated Mar 1077, under which King Sancho I granted “kasas de Lope filio de donna Pura” to “Banzo Ezones de Biele”, records “ego Sancio Ranimirez...rex in Pampilona et in Aragona et in Superabi sive in Ripacorza...regnante rex Adefonsu in Castella...[167].  Evidently some difference persisted between Aragon and Castile about the succession in Navarre as the dating clause of a charter dated 14 May 1081, under which "domna Onneca" sold "media vinea in plano de Leiva" to “domno Iohanne”, records “regnante Aldefonsus rex in Legione et in Castella et in Pampilona...[168].  Aragon became the crossing point for pilgrims and merchants from France into Spain, Jaca in particular expanding into a city which was granted a charter of liberties in 1077 and became the Episcopal see.  The death of al-Muqtadir of Zaragoza in 1081 was followed by a new wave of Aragonese conquests led by Sancho's eldest son Pedro[169].  "Sancius…rex Aragonensium" granted privileges to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 4 Sep 1082, the dating clause of which refers to "regnante rege Sancio cum uxore sua Felicia et filio suo Petro in Aragone et in Pamplona et in Superarbi sive in Ripacorza…domno Garsia fratre regis episcopo in Iaca…domno Sancio Ranimiri comite in Ripacorza, domna Sancia comitissa atque sorore regis presidente in Siresia…Raimundo Beringerii et Beringerii Raimundi fratribus comitibus in Barcelona"[170].  "Sancius rex Pampilonensium et Aragonensium…cum filio meo Petro" confirmed the rights of the bishop of Pamplona to the town of Pamplona by charter dated 28 Oct [1087][171].  Sancho I became the vassal of the Pope in 1088[172].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that King Sancho died at Huesca in 1094 and was buried in the "monasterio de San Iohan de la Peña"[173].  The "Corónicas" Navarras record that King Sancho was buried "en Mont aragón" but transferred to "Sant Johan de la Peyna por miedo de los moros"[174].  The Annales Compostellani record the death “pridie Non Jul” in 1094 of “Sancius Rex[175]

m firstly ([1065], separated/annulled [1070]) as her first husband, ISABEL de Urgell, daughter of ARMENGOL [III] Comte de Urgell [Barcelona] & his [first wife Adelaida de Besalú] ([1052]-1071 before 20 Dec, bur Monastery of San Miguel de Cuxà).  Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by a testament of Armengol [IV] Comte de Urgell, cited by Monfar, under which the testator bequeathes his county "al infante don Pedro su sobrino hijo del rey d´Aragon" if his own son and brothers died[176].  She married secondly ([1071]) as his third wife, Guillem Ramón [I] Conde de Cerdanya.  Her second marriage is indicated by a document addressed by "comes Ermengaudus" to the comte de Cerdanya under which he promises that if he dies childless his property would be inherited by "germanam meam Elisabet coniugem tuam"[177].  “Willelmus Ceritanensis...comes” donated property to Cuxà, for the soul of “quondam uxoris meæ Elizabeth”, by charter dated 20 Dec 1071[178].  No primary source has been identified which confirms conclusively that the first wife of King Sancho of Aragon was the same daughter of Comte Armengol [III] as the wife of Comte Guillem Ramon de Cerdanya.  Nevertheless, this co-identity provides the best explanation of the documents cited, on the basis of the following argument.  Firstly, the undated document (quoted above), under which Comte Armengol [IV] promised his county to his sister Isabel if he died childless, must be dated to before 20 Dec 1071 when Isabel is recorded as deceased.  Secondly, Pedro, son of Sancho I King of Aragon by his first wife, issued charters in his own name in 1086, which indicates that he had reached the age of majority and therefore places his birth to before 1070 at the latest and so probably before the issue of that undated document (another source enables the dating of his birth more precisely to [1068/69]).  Thirdly, it is most likely that King Sancho (of obviously superior rank to Comte Guillem Ramon) would have married the oldest sister of Comte Armengol [IV].  Fourthly, if that is correct, the wife of Comte Guillem Ramon (if a separate person) would have been a younger sister, junior in rank to any descendants of her older sister the wife of King Sancho, and therefore an unlikely choice as successor to Urgell if Pedro de Aragón was already alive.  Fifthly, Pedro´s suitability as a candidate to succeed to Urgell is demonstrated by Comte Armengol [IV]´s testament which names him as fallback choice if the testator´s son and brothers all predeceased him.  If the co-identity is correct, Isabel´s first marriage must have been annulled or she and her first husband otherwise separated but the circumstances of, or justification for, this annulment/separation are not known. 

m secondly (1076[179] or before) FELICIE de Ramerupt, daughter of HILDUIN [IV] Comte de Montdidier et de Roucy Seigneur de Ramerupt & his wife Adelaide de Roucy ([1060]-3 May 1123[180], bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the first of the seven daughters of Count Hilduin as, inaccurately, wife of "regi Galicie Sanctio" but does not name her[181].  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis is somewhat more accurate in referring to, but still not naming, "septima filia…Hilduini" as wife of "Sanctio regi Hispanie" by whom she had "Hildefonsum regem et fratrem eius, qui ei successit in regnum.  Cuius filiam cum regni gubernaculis comes inclitus Barcinonensis, qui paganos impugnare non desinit, duxit uxorem"[182].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that King Sancho married "muller Doña Felicia"[183]The Monumenta Historiæ Tornacensis names "Feliciæ materteræ vestræ filium" as wife of "in Hispaniam regem Hildefonsum"[184].  "Sancius…rex Aragonensium" granted privileges to the monastery of San Pedro de Siresa by charter dated 4 Sep 1082, the dating clause of which refers to "regnante rege Sancio cum uxore sua Felicia et filio suo Petro in Aragone et in Pamplona et in Superarbi sive in Ripacorza…"[185].  "Sancius rex Aragonensium…cum filio meo Petro et uxore mea regina…Felicia" granted the monastery of Sauve-Majeure, Gironde to the church of Pamplona by charter dated to [1086/94][186]

King Sancho I & his first wife had [two or more] children: 

1.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón ([1066/18 Aug 1068]-Valle de Aran 27 Sep 1104, bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña)The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Petrum et Ildefonsum…Raimirum" as the sons of "Sancium", recording that Pedro succeeded his father[187].  His mother´s identity is confirmed by a first testament of Armengol [IV] Comte de Urgell, cited by Monfar, under which the testator bequeathes his county "al infante don Pedro su sobrino hijo del rey d´Aragon" if his own son and brothers died[188].  His birth date is estimated from the Crónica de San Juan de la Peña recording that he died aged 35[189], but bearing in mind the charter dated 18 Aug 1068 under which “Sancius...Rex filius Ranimiri Regis” donated property to Roda, for the salvation of “mea et uxoris ac filiorum[190] which shows that the king had more than one child at that date.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, in a curious mixture of information about the contemporary kings of Castile and Aragon, names "Sanctium qui aliam matrem habuit, Petrum cognomento Alfunsem sive Hildefonsum et Fernandum" as the three sons of "rex…in Galicia Sanctus sive Fernandus"[191].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Alfonso et Remiro" as the three sons of King Sancho and his wife "muller Doña Felicia"[192], although if Pedro's birth date is correct as shown above he must have been the son of his father's first marriage.  His father installed him in Sobrarbe and Ribagorza in 1085: the dating clause of a charter dated 13 Jun 1085, under which the abbot of San Victorián granted “castello...de Valle Magna...et...in castro de Gradus” to “Bita Garcez de Chavallera”, records “iste anno quando...dedit rex ad filio suo Petro Sangiz Suprarbi et Ripacurcia[193].  His father installed him in Monzón in 1089[194].  "Sancius rex Pampilonensium et Aragonensium…cum filio meo Petro" confirmed the rights of the bishop of Pamplona to the town of Pamplona by charter dated 28 Oct [1087][195].  He captured Estada (1087), Montearagón (1088), Monzón (1089), and Almenar (1093).  The dating clause of a charter dated Jun 1091, under which the bishop of Roda confirmed exemptions of Sobrarbe San Victorián, records “rex Sancius in Aragona et in Pampilonia, rex...Petrus...in Suprarui et in Ripacrucia...ambos in Montson...[196].  He succeeded his father in 1094 as PEDRO I King of Aragon and King of Navarre.  He captured Huesca (27 Nov 1096), and Barbastro (1100).  He allied himself with Don Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar "El Cid Campeador" against the Almoravides in 1097.  "Petrus Sangiz…Aragonensium et Pampilonensium rex" granted property "villa de Arguiñáriz" to "Senior Didaco Albarez" by charter dated Dec 1099[197].  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death in 1104 of "rex Petrus Aragundiæ" and the succession of "Ildefonsus frater eius"[198].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records that Pedro ruled in Aragon for eleven years and died childless in 1104[199].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death "III Kal Oct" of King Pedro aged 35 and his burial in the monastery of San Juan de la Peña[200].  The Annales Compostellani record the death “IV Kal Oct” in 1104 of “Petrus Rex[201].  The "Corónicas" Navarras record the death "V Kal Oct" of "Petrus, filius eius [regis Sancii]", in 1104[202].  His place of death is confirmed by an undated charter, which records the sale by “senior Azenar Sans de Ristan” of land to Toulouse Saint-Saturnin, whose dating clause records “in anno quo mortuus est rex Petrus, ultra portos, in terra Gastonis[203]m firstly (betrothed 1081, Jaca Jan 1086) AGNES d’Aquitaine, daughter of GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Hildegarde de Bourgogne [Capet] (end 1072-6 Jun 1097[204], bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "filia Goffredo duci" & his third wife, born after her brother Guillaume, was betrothed to "Petrus filius Sancii regis Aragundiæ"[205].  The Annales Compostellani record the death “VIII Id Jun” in 1098 of “Regina Agnes[206]m secondly (Huesca 16 Aug 1097) BERTA, daughter of --- ([1075]-before 1111).  The origin of Berta is unknown.   Berta is named in charters in Aragon from 16 Aug 1097 to 1105[207].  Szabolcs de Vajay[208] suggests that she was Berthe de Savoie, daughter of Pierre Comte de Savoie & his wife Agnès d’Aquitaine, although there appears to be no direct proof that this is correct.  He further suggests that, when Emperor Heinrich IV captured Tuscany in 1092, Berthe could have taken refuge at her mother's court at Poitiers from where her marriage was arranged, her future husband's first wife having been her mother's first cousin.  This suggested origin appears to originate with Zurita who, while in relation to Queen Berta stating that “no se escrive cuya hija fuesse”, comments that “en las historias de Castilla...el Rey Don Alonso que ganó a Toledo tuvo...una [muger] llamada Berta que era natural de Toscana” [third wife of Alfonso VI King of Castile, see the document CASTILE KINGS for the primary sources on which this statement is based], that “el Emperador Henrico avia casado con Berta hija de Otho Marques de Italia”, and that “parece verisimil que esta Reyna Berta sucediesse de aquella casa de los Marqueses de Italia[209].  “Berta...regina” donated “tres campos...et uno orto” in Huesca to “don Bruno mea magistro” by charter dated Jul [1101][210]Ubieto Arteta points out that “Bruno” was “[un] nombre completamente desconocido en la omomástica aragonesa del siglo XI e importado indudablemente de Italia o de Francia” and suggesting that this could suggest an Italian origin for Queen Berta, although recognising that “el argumento...apenas tiene fuerza, pues se da el nombre de Bruno en el Midi y en las poblaciones de francos[211]Szabolcs de Vajay identifies the grantee Bruno as the son of Friedrich Graf, Herr von Lützelburg (see the document BAR) and his wife Agnes de Savoie (who was recorded as the daughter of Pierre Comte de Savoie and therefore would have been the sister of Queen Berta if her Savoy affiliation was correct)[212].  This may appear unlikely considering that the son of Graf Friedrich cannot have been born much earlier than [1086] and therefore would have been no more than 10 years old at the most at the time of King Pedro's marriage in 1097.  Pedro I King of Aragon donated “villa...Buniales” to “abbate don Galindo”, at the request of “uxoris mee Berta regina”, by charter dated Jan 1103[213].  “Berta regina” granted “in Sangarren...kasas que fuerunt domni Hormat Ibn Motert Ibn Alabe” to “Enneco Banzones” by charter dated 1105, the dating clause of which records “cognatum meum rege domni Antefonso, me sub gratia domnum meum rege domno Petro...et cum amore...cognatum meum in Auguero et in Moriello, in Arrigolis et in Merquerlo, in Aiierve et in Sangarren et in Kalgen” [Agüero, Murillo, Riglos, Marcuello, Ayerbe, Sangarren and Callén][214].  “Berta regina” donated “almunia...inter Berbegal et Monte Rog” to the monastery of Alaon by charter dated to [1105], the dating clause of which records “Antefonso cognato meo in Pampilona et in Aragona, in Superarvi et in Ripacurcia, me autem regnante in Murello et in Auvero et in Aierb...[215]Ubieto Arteta refers to the areas named in these two charters as governed by Queen Berta as “el ‘reino’ que llamamos de los Mallos”, adding that “la existencia del pequeño Estado...fué efimera” and that “antes de 1111...estaba a punto de desaparecer” (he does not cite the primary source on which he bases this date)[216]Szabolcs de Vajay assumes that it disappeared when the queen died[217].  Although the area is called “reino” and “Estado” by Ubieto Arteta, there appears no reason to suppose from the wording of these two charters that the territory was anything other than a señorío granted by King Pedro as dower for his wife, and that it was governed in the same way as any other señorío in the kingdom of Aragon.  Berta would have continued to bear the title queen after her husband´s death, and the phrase “me autem regnante” in the second document should not be interpreted other than as the normal way in which administration of a territory by a queen could be described without implying that the area had become a “kingdom”.  King Pedro I & his first wife had two children: 

a)         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón y Navarra (-1 Feb 1104, bur 18 Aug 1104 Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).  “Petrus Sancii...rex...cum filio meo Petro” donated annual revenue to “albergaria de sancta Christina de Summo portu” by charter dated Mar [1100][218]Pedro I King of Aragon donated the church of Barbastro Santa Eulalia to sancto Egidia de Proventia”, for the salvation of “filii mei Petri”, by charter dated Sep 1101[219]The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that "los hijos del Rey" died "XV Kal Sep 1025"[220]An epitaph at San Juan de la Peña records the burial of “Petrus infans qui...cum Isabela sorore teneris annis et ante patris mortem[221].  [m (1098) as her first husband, MARÍA [Sol] Rodríguez, daughter of RODRIGO Díaz de Vivar "El Cid Campeador" & his wife Jimena Díaz (-[4 Aug 1104/before 1 Nov 1106]).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name "dona Cristiana…dona Maria" as the two daughters of "este meo Çid" and his wife, stating that María married "el conte de Barçalona"[222].  Her supposed first marriage is indicated by the Cantar de mio cid which records the annulment of the marriages of “los infantes de Carrión” and “Ruy Díaz...mis hijas...doña Elvira y doña Sol” upon which negotiations took place for their marriages “con los de Navarra y Aragón[223].  The date of death of her supposed first husband appears incompatible with the date of the first charter in which she appears with her [second] husband.  Unless further primary source information comes to light, María´s supposed first marriage should be treated with caution.  She married [secondly] as his first wife, Ramón Berenguer III Conde de Barcelona.  Ramon Berenguer and his wife Maria granted property to a vassal by charter dated 1103[224].  Ramon Berenguer and his wife Maria donated property to the church of San Adrian "inmediata al rio Besós" by charter dated 4 Aug 1104[225]

b)         Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón (-1104, bur 18 Aug 1104 Monastery of San Juan de la Peña[226]).  Zurita states that “tuvo el Rey Don Pedro de la Reyna su muger una hija que se llamó Doña Isabel”, adding that “en la historia de Sant Iuan de la Peña se afirma aver fallecido el mismo dia que fallecio el Infante Don Pedro su hermano[227]According to Briz Martínez, an epitaph at San Juan de la Peña records the burial of “Petrus infans qui...cum Isabela sorore teneris annis et ante patris mortem[228].  Moret clarifies that the actual inscription records the burial of “Elisabet filia regis Petri Sanz quæ obiit Era MCXLI[229]The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that "los hijos del Rey" died "XV Kal Sep 1025"[230]

2.         [other child/children ([1066/18 Aug 1068]-).  The charter dated 18 Aug 1068, under which “Sancius...Rex filius Ranimiri Regis” donated property to Roda for the salvation of “mea et uxoris ac filiorum[231], shows that the king had more than one child at that date.] 

King Sancho I & his second wife had three children:

3.         Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón (-1086 or after).  A charter dated Nov 1086 records an agreement between “Petrus Sancii” and “Fredenando meo iermano” relating to property in “Ripacurcia que fuit data in dote domne Felicie regine”, also naming “frater meus et suus Adefonsus”, as well as other donations made by “Santius...rege” to “Fredenando filio meo[232].  The reference to the dower of Queen Felicia suggests that Fernando was born from his father´s second marriage.  The rather curious reference to the king´s son Alfonso as “frater meus et suus”, rather than “frater noster”, may also indicate that Pedro was half-brother of Fernando and Alfonso. 

4.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón (Jaca [1082/83]-Almuniente 7 Sep 1134, bur Montearagón, Monastery of Jesus de Nazareth, transferred 1845 to San Pedro el Viejo, Huesca)The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Petrum et Ildefonsum…Raimirum" as the sons of "Sancium", recording that Alfonso succeeded his brother[233].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Alfonso et Remiro" as the three sons of King Sancho and his wife "muller Doña Felicia"[234].  His birth date is estimated from the Crónica de San Juan de la Peña recording his death aged 61[235].  Pedro I King of Aragon donated the church of Chia to Sobrarbe San Victorián by charter dated Mar 1099, the dating clause of which records "...Adefonsus frater meus in Bel, S[enior] Exemen Garcez in Monteson, S[enior] Petro Sanz in Boltania"[236].  He succeeded his half-brother in 1104 as ALFONSO I “el Batallador” King of Aragon and King of Navarre.  Far from achieving union with Castile by marrying Urraca Queen of Castile and León, the country experienced a period of anarchy during their marriage due to their constant marital disputes.  Alfonso I reconquered large parts of the territories held by the Almoravides in northeast Spain, capturing Zaragoza (which surrendered in Dec 1118 after a long siege), Tudela and Tarragona (1119), Soria (1120), Calatayud (1121) and Daroca (1122), and established Aragon as a major political force in Spain.  Almoravid rule was by this time considerably weakened in Spain, King Alfonso I being able to launch raids as far south as Motríl and into Valencia.  He settled lands south of the River Ebro, in what was known as the "new Extremadura".  He lost the battle of Fraga 1134, dying a few weeks later.  The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records the death of King Alfonso at the monastery of San Juan de la Peña in Aragon 25 Aug 1134, after the battle of Fraga[237].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records that "Ildefonsum" reigned for 31 years and died childless in 1135 "apud Fragam", where he was wounded in battle "cum Arabibus", and was buried "apud Montem Aragonem"[238].  The Chronicon Burgense records the death in 1134 of “Alfonsus Rex Aragoniæ[239].  The "Corónicas" Navarras record the death "VI Id Sep" in 1134 of "Aldefonsus frater eius [regis Petri] rex Pampilonensis et Aragonensis"[240].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death of King Alfonso aged 61[241].  Under his 1131 testament (confirmed in 1134), he bequeathed the kingdom of Aragon to the three military orders of the Sepulchre of Christ, the Hospital of the Poor and the Temple of the Lord, but this was set aside by the lords of Aragon who supported the accession of his brother Ramiro as king.  m (Monzón early Oct 1109, separated 1114, annulled 1115) as her second husband, URRACA Queen of Castile and León, widow of RAIMOND de Bourgogne [Comté], daughter of ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León & his third wife Constance de Bourgogne [Capet] (1081-Saldaña 8 Mar 1126, bur León, Monastery of San Isidoro).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the marriage of "Ildefonsum" and "filiam Alfonsi Regis Castellæ…Urracam"[242].  Intermittent warfare between Castile and Aragon resulted from the deep enmity between Queen Urraca and her second husband.  The marriage was annulled on the grounds of consanguinity. 

5.         Infante don RAMIRO de Aragón (1086-Huesca 16 Aug 1157, bur Monastery of San Pedro el Viejo, Huesca)The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Petrum et Ildefonsum…Raimirum" as the sons of "Sancium", recording that Ramiro was "in Monasterio sancti Pontii de Tomeriis…Monachus et Sacerdos"[243].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Alfonso et Remiro" as the three sons of King Sancho and his wife "muller Doña Felicia", stating that Ramiro was monk at "Sant Ponz de Torneras"[244].  King Sancho I offered "Rainimirum filium meum" to the monastery of San Ponce de Tomeras by charter dated 3 May 1093[245].  He was installed as Abbot of Sahagún by his brother in 1112, but was obliged to flee the abbey when it was captured by the forces of Queen Urraca[246].  He was elected Bishop of Burgos in 1114.  He was resident at the monastery of San Pedro el Viejo in Huesca in 1130, and elected Bishop of Roda and Barbastro in Aug 1134[247].  He succeeded in 1134 as RAMIRO II “el Monje” King of Aragon, proclaimed king at Jaca.  Alfonso VII King of Castile claimed sovereignty over many of the recent conquests of Ramiro II's predecessor, seized Zaragoza end-1134 and forced Ramiro II to seek refuge in the Pyrenees.  Although Alfonso VII was forced to retreat, he required Ramiro to recognise Castilian suzerainty.  King Ramiro was also obliged to accept the separation of the crown of Navarre, agreeing the succession of King García Ramírez and the boundaries of the two kingdoms under the Pact of Vadoluongo in Jan 1135[248].  Ramiro arranged the betrothal of his infant daughter to Ramón Berenguer IV Count of Barcelona to save Aragon from domination by Castile.  Under the terms of the arrangement, the count of Barcelona would inherit the crown of Aragon even if Petronilla died before the marriage could be consummated[249].  Within Aragon itself, Ramiro II was also obliged to recognise the right of seigneurial domain for the landed aristocracy[250].  He conceded the government of Aragon 13 Nov 1137 to Ramón Berenguer IV Conde de Barcelona, betrothed to his infant daughter, but retained the title king[251].   Although he resided at the monastery of San Pedro el Viejo at Huesca from 1137 until his death in 1157 he does not appear to have resumed the monacal habit[252].  The year of his death is fixed by the charter dated Dec 1157 under which Fortún Aznar Señor de Trazona and his wife Teresa Ortiz sold property to the monastery of Santa María de Fitero and which is dated "in anno illo quando finivit Adefonsus imperator Hispanie et rex Raimirus regis Aragonie"[253]m (Jaca [Nov/Dec] 1135, separated [Oct 1136/Jan 1137]) as her second husband, AGNES [Mathilde], widow of AIMERY [VI] Vicomte de Thouars, daughter of --- ([late 1103]-8 Mar [1160 or before]).  Robert of Torigny records the marriage of "Remelium monachum [filim Santii regis Arragonem]" and "Mathildem matrem Willermi vicecomitis Toarci"[254], although charters refer to her as Agnes.  A fragmentary chronicle of the dukes of Aquitaine records the second marriage of "Mahauda…Agnes dicta" and "Ramelino cum successisset Regibus Aragoniæ"[255].  "Ranimirus…rex…cum coniuge mea regina Angnes" donated property to San Pedro de Antefruenzo by charter dated Oct 1136[256].  Primary sources assign two different parentages to the widow of Vicomte Aimery [VI] who married King Ramiro.  The first possible origin is suggested by the Chronicle of Saint-Maxence, which records that "Willelmo comiti…" (indicating Guillaume VII Comte de Poitou) & his wife had five daughters, one of whom married "vicecomiti Toarcensi"[257].  Although this source does not name the Vicomte de Thouars in question, it suggests that the wife of Aimery [VI] was AGNES de Poitou, daughter of GUILLAUME IX Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME VII Comte de Poitou] & his second wife Philippa de Toulouse.  However, as there were several individuals in the Thouars family who bore the title "Vicomte de Thouars" at the same time, it is possible that this marriage refers to a different Vicomte from Aimery [VI].  Nevertheless, the Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium apparently corroborates this Aquitainian origin when it records that "Raimirus" (referring to Ramiro II King of Aragon) married "sororem comitis Pictaviensis" after leaving his monastery following his accession[258]The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña states that "Don Ramiro el monje" married "la filla del conde de Piteus"[259]The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris also records the marriage of Ramiro and "the sister of the count of Poitou"[260].  It should be noted that Europäische Stammtafeln[261] refers to Agnes as the illegitimate daughter of Duke Guillaume IX by his mistress Amauberge, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.  The second possible origin is provided by a fragmentary chronicle of the dukes of Aquitaine which specifically records the marriage of "Aimericus de Theofagiis vicecomes…de Thoarcio" and "Mahaudam [Agnes dicta] ex prosapia sua [=Willelmus Pictaviensis comes]…filia Willelmi de Podio-Fagi qui Franciæ camerarius erat in vita Regis Philippi"[262].  If correct, this would mean that she was AGNES [Mathilde] du Puy-du-Fou, daughter of GUILLAUME du Puy-du-Fou & his wife Adela ---, although the dubious nature of the Puy-du-Fou genealogy is discussed in the document AQUITAINE DUKES.  Another possible explanation for this confusion is that Aimery [VI] married twice, although if this is correct, it would not be clear which of the above named individuals was his widow who married King Ramiro.  Whatever her correct parentage, Agnès appears with her first husband for the first time in a document dated 9 Jan 1117[263].  "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcii Agnesque uxor illius" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité de Tiron by charter dated to [1130] in this compilation but this is incorrect considering the known date of death of Vicomte Aimery[264].  Her son Guillaume de Thouars ceded rights to her before leaving on crusade in 1147[265].  Her son Geoffroi de Thouars made a donation in 1160 stipulating prayers for his deceased mother[266].  King Ramiro II & his wife had one child: 

a)         Infanta doña PETRONILA de Aragón ([Jul] 1136-Barcelona 17 Oct 1174, bur Barcelona, Church of the Holy Cross and Santa Eulalia).  The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ records the marriage of "Berengarius primogenitus filius…" of "Raymundus-Berengarii vulgo Cap-De stoupes…dictus, Comes Barcinonæ in Catalonia" & his wife and "Petronillæ filiæ Ranemiri primo monachi…Aragonum regis"[267].  She succeeded her father in 1157 as PETRONILA Queen of Aragon.  She abdicated in 1164 in favour of her son.  m (Barbastro 11 Aug 1137, consummated early 1151) RAMON BERENGUER IV Conde de Barcelona, son of RAMÓN BERENGUER III "el Grande" Conde de Barcelona & his third wife Dulce de Gevaudan Ctss de Provence (1113-San Dalmacio near Turin 6 Aug 1162, bur Monastery of Santa María de Ripoll). 

-        see Chapter 3.  KINGS of ARAGON (CONDES de BARCELONA)

King Sancho I had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:

6.          GARCÍA Sánchez.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Bishop of Jaca. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3.    KINGS of ARAGON (CONDES de BARCELONA)

 

 

 

A.      KINGS of ARAGON 1137-1410

 

 

The dynastic union achieved by the marriage of Ramón Berenguer IV Conde de Barcelona to the heiress of Aragon created a federal state in which the two parts each continued to enjoy a largely separate existence, with their own systems of government and laws.  The ruler continued to use both titles 'King of Aragon' and 'Conde de Barcelona'. 

 

 

PETRONILA 1137-1164

 

Infanta doña PETRONILA de Aragón, daughter of RAMIRO II “el Monje” King of Aragon and Navarre & his wife Agnès d’Aquitaine ([Jul] 1136-Barcelona 17 Oct 1174, bur Barcelona, Church of the Holy Cross and Santa Eulalia).  The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ records the marriage of "Berengarius primogenitus filius…" of "Raymundus-Berengarii vulgo Cap-De stoupes…dictus, Comes Barcinonæ in Catalonia" & his wife and "Petronillæ filiæ Ranemiri primo monachi…Aragonum regis"[268].  She succeeded her father in 1157 as PETRONILA Queen of Aragon.  She made a donation of the kingdom of Aragon to her son Alfonso I in 1164[269]

m (Barbastro 11 Aug 1137, consummated early 1151) RAMON BERENGUER IV Comte de Barcelona, son of RAMON BERENGUER III "el Grande" Comte de Barcelona & his third wife Dulce Ctss de Provence (1113-San Dalmacio near Turin 6 Aug 1162, bur Monastery of Santa María de Ripoll).  "Raymondi comes Barchinonensis, Dulciæ comitissæ uxoris eius, Raimundi et Berengarii filiorum suorum…" subscribed the charter dated [4/12] Feb 1114 under which "Bernardus Wilelmi…comes Ceritaniensis" donated property to the abbey of la Grasse[270].  “Raymundus Berengarii…comes Barchinonæ” donated “monasterium…sancti Petri de Gallicant” in Girona to “monasterio Crassensi” by charter dated 20 Jan 1117, subscribed by “Raimundi comitis Barchinonensis, Raimundi Berengerii, Berengerii et Bernardi filiorum eius, Dulciæ comitissæ uxoris eius…[271].  The testament of "Raimundus Berengarii…Barchinonensis comes et marchio" dated [8 Jul] 1130 names "Raimundo Berengarii filio meo…"[272].  He succeeded his father in 1131 as Comte de Barcelona, Cerdanya, Besalú, Girona i Ausona.  Barcelona's territorial stability was threatened by Aragonese advances on Lérida and Tortosa, cut short by the death of Alfonso I King of Aragon in 1134.  After his betrothal to the heiress of Aragon, he successfully negotiated settlements with the military orders of the Holy Land to whom Alfonso I had bequeathed his kingdom.  The Orders of the Hospital and the Holy Sepulchre renounced their claims in Sep 1140.  By a charter Nov 1143 (agreement confirmed by the Pope), the Templars accepted compensation (six Aragonese castles, a tenth of royal revenues plus 1000 sous a year from those from Zaragoza, a fifth of all lands conquered from the Moors, and exemption from land tolls).  His father-in-law conceded the government of Aragon to him 13 Nov 1137[273].   He accepted the suzerainty of the Pope over Aragon and Barcelona.  He allied himself with his brother-in-law Alfonso VII King of Castile, conducting a joint expedition against the Moors of Murcia in 1144 and conquering Almería in 1147.  He conquered Tortosa in Dec 1148, and Lérida and Fraga 24 Oct 1149.  He styled himself Marques de Tortosa y Lérida.  In 1154, Pope Anastasius IV revived the supremacy of the archbishopric of Tarragona over the sees of Girona, Barcelona, Urgel, Osona, Lérida, Tortosa, Zaragoza, Huesca, Pamplona, Tarragona and Calahorra.  Ramon Berenguer established the monastery of Poblet in 1150-53.  He regained the tribute of Valencia, and by the treaty of Tudillén (1151) confirmed Castile’s recognition of a sphere of prospective influence over Valencia and Murcia.  He was elected lord and tutor of the infant Gaston V Vicomte de Béarn in 1154.  He died while travelling to meet Emperor Friedrich "Barbarossa" at Turin.  The Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses record the death in 1162 of "Raimundus comes Barchinonensis princeps Aragonensis et marchio Provincie seu Tortuose"[274].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records his death "apud Burgum S Dalmatii iuxta Januensem urbem in Italia…1162 VIII Id Aug" and his burial "in Rivipullensi Monasterio"[275].  An epitaph records the death "1162 VIII Id Aug" of "Marchio…Dominus Raymundus Berengarii Comes Barchinonensis Princeps et Rex Aragonensis et Dux Provinciæ…in Italia apud Vicum Sancti Dalmatii" and his burial in "Monasterium Rivipullense"[276]

Queen Petronila & conde Ramón Berenguer IV had five children:

1.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (Barcelona 4 May 1152-young Huesca).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[277]His year of birth is confirmed by the testament of his mother Petronilla, dated 4 Apr 1152, in which she names as heir to Aragon her child to be born, assuming it was a son[278]

2.         Infante don RAMÓN de Aragón (Villamayor del Valle, Huesca 1/25 Mar 1157-Perpignan 25 Apr 1195, bur Poblet, monastery of Nuestra Señora).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[279]The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ names "Ildefonsum primogenitum" as son of "Berengarius comes Barchinonæ et Provinciæ, maritus Petronillæ"[280].  He succeeded his father in 1162 as RAMÓN Conde de Barcelona, Girona, Osona, Besalú, Cerdagne/Cerdaña and Roussillon.  He founded Teruel 1169-72.  He secured the vassalage of Marie Ctss de Béarn 1170.  Comte de Roussillon (including the see of Elne) in 1172 on the death of Guinard II Comte de Roussillon without heirs.  He succeeded his mother in 1174 as ALFONSO II “el Casto” King of Aragon

          -        see below

3.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón ([1158]-murdered Montpellier 5 Apr 1181, bur Melgueil).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[281].  The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ names "Raymundum filium…secundo-genitum" as son of "Berengarius comes Barchinonæ et Provinciæ, maritus Petronillæ", recording that he succeeded as Comte de Provence[282].  Conde de Cerdagne/Cerdaña.  He succeeded his cousin in 1166 as RAYMOND BERENGER III Comte de Provence.  The Gestis Comitum Barcinone nsium records the death in 1181 of "Raimundo-Berengarii fratri suo [=Ildefonsi]" and his burial "in Magalonensi sede"[283]

4.         Infanta doña DULCIA de Aragón ([1160]-Coimbra 1 Sep 1198, bur Church of the Cross Coimbra)The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[284]The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the marriage of "unam filiam…Dulciam [=Raimundi Berengarii quarti]" and "Regi Sancio Portugallensi"[285].  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes records the marriage of "Sancius" and "Dulcem filiam Raimundi Comitis Barcinonæ et Urracæ [error for Petronillæ] Aragonensis"[286].  The Chronicon Lusitanum records the marriage in 1212 (1174) of “Rex Sancius” and “filia D. Raymundi, Comitis de Barcinona Donna Dulcia, sorore Regis Aragonensium D. Alfonsi[287].  “Sancius...Portugalensium Rex et uxor mea Dona Dulcia...cum filiis nostris Rege Domno Aldphonso et Rege Domno Petro et Rege Domno Fernando et filiabus nostris Regina Dona Therasia et Regina Domna Sancia” donated “paludem de Otta” to Alcobaça monastery by charter dated Mar “Era 1228” [1189 or 1190 if O.S.][288].  “Sancius...Portugalliæ et Algarb. Rex...cum uxore mea Regina D. Dulcia et filiis et filiabus meis” confirmed the privileges of the monastery of Grijó, for the love of “vassali nostri D. Alvari Martini qui...apud Sylvium interfectus est a Sarracenis”, by charter dated 27 Jul “Era 1228” [1190][289].  The Breve Chronicon Alcobacense records that "rex Sancius bonus" was buried "in monasterio Sancte Crucis cum Regina Dulcia de Aragona uxore sua"[290]m (1175) Infante dom SANCHO Martino de Portugal, son of AFONSO I King of Portugal & his wife Mathilde de Savoie (Coimbra 11 Nov 1154-Coimbra 26 Mar 1212, bur Church of the Cross Coimbra).  He succeeded his father 1185 as SANCHO I “o Pobledor” King of Portugal

5.         Infante don SANCHO de Aragón ([1161]-1226).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[291]The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ names "Sanxium…filium tertio-genitum" as son of "Berengarius comes Barchinonæ et Provinciæ, maritus Petronillæ", recording that he succeeded his brother as Comte de Provence[292].  He succeeded in 1167 as Comte de Roussillon et de Cerdagne/Cerdaña.  He succeeded his brother in 1181 as SANCHO Comte de Provence, but was deprived of this in 1185.  "Ildefos…rex Aragonensis, comes Barchinonensis et marchio Provincie…et Sancius eadem…comes Provincie" confirmed a donation to Foulques Bishop of Marseille by charter dated Feb 1183[293], Sancho presumably being the king's brother although this is not specified in the act.  He was Regent and Procurator General of Aragon 1214 until 1218, when he resigned.  m firstly ERMESINDA [Garsenda] de Rocaberti, daughter of JOFRE [I] Vizconde de Rocaberti & his wife Ermesinda de Vilademuls (-before [1185]).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m secondly SANCHA Núñez de Lara, daughter of NUÑO Pérez Conde de Lara & his wife Teresa Fernández de Traba (-1210).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the marriage of "filium [=Raimundi Berengarii quarti]…Sancium" and "Sanciam filiam Nunii comitis ex Castella"[294]Comitissa domna Sancia...cum filio meo Nuno Sancii” donated “quinta parte ville...Sarantis in terra Trasancos” to Sobrado by charter dated 11 Nov 1204[295]Infante Sancho & his second wife had two children:

a)         NUÑO Sánchez ([1185]-1242).  The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ names "Vinione filio…Sanxii"[296].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Nunius" as son of "filium [=Raimundi Berengarii quarti]…Sancium" and "Sanciam filiam Nunii comitis ex Castella", stating that he died childless[297].  His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 13 Aug 1214 under which "Hunon Sanche" promised the agreement of "le comte Sanche son père et son neveu Raymond-Bérenger" to "Hugues de Baux" concerning help in the war of Arles[298]Comitissa domna Sancia...cum filio meo Nuno Sancii” donated “quinta parte ville...Sarantis in terra Trasancos” to Sobrado by charter dated 11 Nov 1204[299]"Nuno Sancii dominus Rossilionis, Confluentis, Cerritaniæ et Vallispirii" issued a charter dated 2 Oct 1217[300].   “Nunnus Sancii” confirmed protection for “Arnaldo de Castrobono vicecomiti", except against "fide domini regis Aragoniæ et domini comitis Sancii patris mei et domine Alvire Urgellensis comitisse…", by charter dated 17 Dec 1218[301].  He succeeded his father in 1226 as Comte de Roussillon et de Cerdagne/Cerdaña.  He fought a war with Guillem de Moncada 1223-25, allegedly following a dispute over a goshawk.  m firstly (1215, annulled before 6 Nov 1216) as her second husband, PETRONILLE de Comminges Ctss de Bigorre, widow of GASTON VI de Moncada Vicomte de Béarn, daughter of BERNARD IV Comte de Comminges et de Bigorre & his wife Béatrice de Marsan Vicomtesse de Marsan, Ctss de Bigorre (-1251).  She married thirdly (Tarbes 6 Nov 1216) Guy de Montfort-l’Amaury, fourthly ([1221/23]) Aymar de Rancon, and fifthly (1228) Boson de Mastas Seigneur de Cognacm secondly ([1220]) as her first husband, TERESA López de Haro, daughter of LOPE Díaz “Cabeza bravo” Señor de Vizcaya, Señor de Haro & his Urraca Alfonso de León.  She married secondly ([31 Mar 1243]) as his second wife, Rodrigo González Girón

b)         SANCHA SánchezThe primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m GUERAU d'Aniort, son of ---.    

Ramón Berenguer IV had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

6.          RAMÓN BERENGUER de Aragón (-[1212]).  "Berengario abate Montis Aragonis fratre meo" is named in a charter dated 1171 among those present when Alfonso II King of Aragon reached agreement at Girona with Guillaume de Montpellier[302].  Assuming that Ramón Berenguer was adult at the date of this charter, he must have been born before his brothers and must therefore have been illegitimate.  He is not named in the testament of his father dated 4 Aug 1162[303]Abbot at Montearagón.  Bishop of Lérida 1176-1191.  Archbishop of Narbonne.

 

 

ALFONSO II 1164-1195, PEDRO II 1195-1213

 

Infante don RAMÓN de Aragón, son of RAMÓN BERENGUER IV Conde de Barcelona & his wife Petronilla Queen of Aragon (Villamayor del Valle, Huesca 1/25 Mar 1157-Perpignan 25 Apr 1195, bur Poblet, monastery of Nuestra Señora).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name (in order) "don Pedro…el rey don Alfonso, que ovo nombre Remón Belenguer et el conte don Pedro de Provença et el conte don Sancho et a la muller del rey don Sancho de Portugal" as the children of the "conte de Barçalona…en esta su muller [dona Peyronela]", stating that the first named Pedro died in Huesca[304]The Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ names "Ildefonsum primogenitum" as son of "Berengarius comes Barchinonæ et Provinciæ, maritus Petronillæ"[305].  He succeeded his father in 1162 as RAMÓN Conde de Barcelona, Girona, Osona, Besalú, Cerdagne/Cerdaña and Roussillon.  "Ildefonsus…rex Aragonensis, comes Barchinonensis, duc Provinciæ" granted "vicecomitatu de Carlades", held by "avus patris mei Guilbertus…comes", to "Hugonem comitem Rutenensem" by charter dated 1167[306].  He founded Teruel 1169-72.  He secured the vassalage of Marie Ctss de Béarn 1170.  Comte de Roussillon (including the see of Elne) in 1172 on the death of Guinard II Comte de Roussillon without heirs.  He succeeded his mother in 1174 as ALFONSO II “el Casto” King of Aragon.  He secured the vassalage of Centule Comte de Bigorre 1175, by granting him the Val d’Aran.  He conceded Murcia to Castile under the treaty of Cazola Mar 1179, retaining Valencia within the Aragonese sphere of influence.  Roger II Vicomte de Béziers-Carcassonne confirmed his vassalage Nov 1179.  He succeeded his brother in 1185 as ALFONSO I Comte de Provence (declaring himself Marquis de Provence), appointing Roger Bernard Comte de Foix as procurator.  He acquired Pallars Jussà 1192 by cession of Dolça de So.  He ordered the compilation (completed 1194) of the Great Book of Fiefs (liber feudorum maior), an administrative register of property, under the direction of Ramón de Caldes, dean of Barcelona cathedral.  Betrothed to Matilda or Teresa, daughter of Afonso I King of Portugal (-1218).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death of "Hildefonsum rex Arragonum" and his burial "in abbatio de Populato"[307].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the death in 1196 of "Ildefonsus" and his burial "in Monasterio Populeti" which he had founded[308].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death of King Alfonso in 1196 aged 42 and his burial "al monasterio de Poblet"[309]The "Corónicas" Navarras record that "el rey don Alfonso de Aragón, fijo de conte de Barçalona" died "al yssient de abril", in 1234[310]The Anales Toledanos record the death in Apr 1195 of “el Rey D. Alfonso de Aragon[311]The Thalamus de Montpellier records the death in Apr 1196 of "Namfos rei dAragon a Perpinhan"[312]

Betrothed ([30 Jan 1160]) to Infanta dona MAFALDA de Portugal, daughter of AFONSO I King of Portugal & his wife Mathilde de Savoie ([1149]-1173/4).  A Chronica Breve names "dona Mafalda" first among the daughters of King Afonso I, adding that she married "comde Reymon de Barcelona" (although this source is inaccurate in other details)[313]

m (Zaragoza 18 Jan 1174) Infanta doña SANCHA de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VII "el Emperador" King of Castile and León & his second wife Ryksa of Poland (1155-Monastery of Sijena 9 Nov 1208).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium records the marriage of "Ildefonsus" and "Sanciam…filiam Imperatoris Magni Ildefonsi de Castellæ"[314]The "Corónicas" Navarras name "la filla del Emperador dona Sancha" as the wife of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón"[315]She founded the Hospitaller priory of nuns of Nuestra Señora at San Juan de Sijena in 1188, and became a nun there herself in 1197.  Her name is confirmed in the charter dated 24 Feb 1212 under which Pedro II King of Aragon "filio Sanctiæ…Reginæ Aragonum" granted property to "Guillelmo de Montepessulano…filius Agnetis feminæ"[316].  The Anales Toledanos record the death in 1208 of “la Reyna Doña Sancha Daragon, filla del Emperador” and her burial “en Sixena[317]

King Alfonso II & his wife had nine children:

1.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón ([1174/76]-killed in battle Muret 14 Sep 1213, bur priory of San Juan de Sijena).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name "al yfant don Pedro, rey d'Aragón, et al marqués de Provença don Alfonso, et a don Ferrando, abbat de Mont aragón, et una filla que casaron en Ongría" as the children of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón" and his wife[318].  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Petrus…Alfonsus" as the oldest two of the three sons of "Ildefonsi", specifying that Pedro succeeded his father in "regnum Aragoniæ et Comitatus Barchinonæ, Bisuldini, Cerritaniæ et Rossilionis, ac Palearensem"[319].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro…Alfonso…y Fernando" as the three sons of King Alfonso II[320].  He succeeded his father in 1195 as PEDRO II "el Católico" King of Aragon, Conde de Barcelona, Gerona, Osona, Besalú, Comte de Cerdagne/Cerdaña et de Roussillon.  He was crowned at Rome by Pope Innocent III [1205].  He received possession of the County of Urgel 1209 on the death of Armengol VIII without male heirs, in return for guaranteeing the rights of his daughter (to whom King Pedro’s son Don Jaime was betrothed).  He vanquished the Almohades at Las Navas de Tolosa 1212.  He was defeated in battle by Simon de Montfort.  The Annales Compostellani record that “Petrus Rex Aragoniæ” was killed “a Gallis apud Castrum…Muret II Id Sep” in 1213[321].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death in 1214 of Pedro II King of Aragon aged 40 years and his burial "en el monasterio de Sijena"[322]m (Montpellier 15 Jun 1204) as her third husband, MARIE de Montpellier Dame de Montpellier, widow (firstly) of RAYMOND GEOFFROY "Barral" Vicomte de Marseille and divorced wife (secondly) of BERNARD [IV] Comte de Comminges, daughter of GUILLAUME [VIII] Seigneur de Montpellier & his wife Eudoxia Komnene (-Rome 21 Apr 1213).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Maria Guilelmi Montepessulano filia" as wife of "rege Petro Arragonum"[323]The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Pedro II King of Aragon married "la filla del noble princep Don Guillem de Montpeller…Maria, nieta del Emperador de Costantin noble"[324]The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified.  "Guillelmus…Montispessulani, filius quondam Mathildis ducisse" agreed the marriage of "filiam meam Mariam" and "Bernardo, comitis Convenarum" by charter dated Dec 1197, under which Marie also agreed to renounce her rights to Montpellier in favour of "Guillelmo Montispessulani patri meo, et tibi Guillelmo filio ejus et domine Agnetis, fratri meo"[325].  However, after a revolt of the citizens of Montpellier against young Guillaume [IX], Marie recovered her inheritance 15 Jun 1204[326].  In his testament dated 4 Nov 1202, her father bequeathed money to "filiæ meæ Mariæ…et comes Convenarum maritus eius"[327].  The marriage contract between "Maria filia quondam domini Montispessulani" and "Petro Regi Aragoniæ, et comiti Barchinonis" is dated 1204, and names "comes Santius…Ildefunsus comes Provinciæ frater domini regis, Guillelmus de Balcio, Hugo de Balcio frater eius, Rocelinus vicecomes et dominus Massiliæ, Guido de Cabilione…"[328].  "Maria filia quondam domini Montispessulani…Regina Aragoniæ, comitissa Barchinonis" granted Montpellier to "Petro…Regi Aragoniæ, comiti Barchinonis marito meo" by charter dated Sep 1205, witnessed by "…Domina Clementia…"[329].  Under her first testament of 1209, she designated the Templars as guardians of her son.  Under her last testament of 1213, she designated the Pope as his guardian.  The Thalamus de Montpellier records the death "xviii jorns dins abril" in 1213 at Rome of "madona Maria de Montpellier molher del rei dAragon"[330]King Pedro II & his wife had two children: 

a)         Infanta doña SANCHA de Aragón (1205-[1206])"Petrus…Rex Aragoniæ et comes Barchinoniæ et dominus Montispessulani" and "Raimundo…Duci Narbonæ, Comiti Tolosæ et Marchioni Provinciæ" arranged the marriage of "filiam meam…et dominæ Mariæ uxoris…Sanciæ" and "Raimundo filio tuo et Reginæ Joannæ", by charter dated Oct 1205[331]Betrothed (1205) to RAYMOND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND VI Comte de Toulouse & his third wife Joan of England (Beaucaire, Gard Jul 1197-Millau, Aveyron 27 Sep 1249, bur Fontevraud).  He succeeded his father in 1222 as RAYMOND VII Comte de Toulouse

b)         Infante don JAIME de Aragón (Montpellier 1 Feb 1208-Valencia 27 Jul 1276).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Jaime" as son of Pedro II King of Aragon and his wife "la filla del noble princep Don Guillem de Montpeller…Maria, nieta del Emperador de Costantin noble"[332].  He succeeded his father in 1213 as JAIME I "el Conquistador" King of Aragon, Conde de Barcelona, Gerona, Osona, Besalú, Comte de Cerdagne/Cerdaña et de Roussillon.  His year of birth is confirmed by the testament of his mother Petronilla, dated 4 Apr 1152, in which she names as heir to Aragon her child to be born, assuming it was a son[333]

-        see below

King Pedro II had [three] illegitimate children by unknown mistresses: 

c)          PEDRO del Rey (-1 Sep 1254).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   A priest at Lérida.

d)         CONSTANZA de Aragón (-shortly after 1250)The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Zurita records the marriage “en Tahuste” 7 Nov 1212 of “el Rey...una hija suya....Doña Costança” and “Don Guillen Ramon de Moncada”, adding that her father granted “los castillos y villas de Seros y Aytona y Sosez...” to the couple[334].  The last point suggests that, at some time, there must have been surviving documentary evidence of the marriage and the grant.  m (Pratella, near Taúst 7 Nov 1212) as his second wife, GUILLEM RAMON [III] de Montcada, son of RAMON [I] de Montcada Señor de Tortosa i Lérida & his wife Ramona de Tornemira ([1175]-1228).  Seneschal of Catalonia.  A strong supporter of Pedro II King of Aragon, Conde de Barcelona, he fought against the Moors at Las Navas de Tolosa in 1212.  King Pedro granted him rights to the castles and towns of Serós, Aitona and Soses, in the Segrià at the time of his marriage[335]

e)         [MARÍA de AragónThe primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m HUG JOFRE I de Rocaberti Vizconde de Rocaberti Barón de Vilademuls, son of DALMAU [II] Vizconde de Rocaberti & his first wife Ermesende de Montpellier (-[1250]).] 

2.         Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón ([1179]-Catania 23 Jun 1222, bur Palermo Cathedral)The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Constantia" as oldest of the three daughters of "Ildefonsi", specifying that she married "Regi Ungariæ" but returned childless to Aragon after his death[336].  The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "Emericus" married "Constancia filia regis Aragonie Cesari Friderico"[337].  The "Corónicas" Navarras name "al yfant don Pedro, rey d'Aragón, et al marqués de Provença don Alfonso, et a don Ferrando, abbat de Mont aragón, et una filla que casaron en Ongría" as the children of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón" and his wife[338].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Constantia regina" as wife of "Hemericus filius [regis Hungarie Bela]", specifying that she later married "Frederico imperatori"[339].  The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Constancia soror…Iacobi regis Aragonum" as the first wife of "dominus Fridericus secundus…Romanorum…imperator"[340].  The Continuatio Admuntensis records that she took her son to Vienna and, after his death, Leopold Duke of Austria arranged her repatriation to "fratri suo Hyspaniarum regi"[341].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Pedro II King of Aragon arranged the marriage of his sister Constanza to "Fredrico Rey de Sicilia"[342].  The Ryccardus de Sancti Germano Annales record the marriage in 1209 of "Fredericus rex Sicilie" and "Constantiam sororem regis Arragonum"[343].  The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the marriage of "Fridericus rex Apulie" and "filiam regis Arragonis, relictam regis Ungarie"[344].  Named Regent of Sicily by her husband in 1212, during his absence in Germany until 1220.  She was crowned Empress at Rome with her husband 22 Nov 1220[345].  The monk Conrad´s Brevis Chronica records the death "apud Cataniam" in 1222 of "domina Constantia imperatrix…prima uxor Frederici imperatoris"[346]m firstly (1198) IMRE King of Hungary, son of BÉLA III King of Hungary & his first wife Agnès [Anna] de Châtillon-sur-Loing (1174-30 Nov 1204, Eger Cathedral).  m secondly (Feb 1210) as his first wife, FRIEDRICH King of Sicily, son of Emperor HEINRICH VI King of Germany [Hohenstaufen] & his wife Constanza of Sicily (Iesi, Ancona 26 Dec 1194-Castel Fiorentino near Lucera, Foggia, of dysentery 13 Dec 1250, bur 25 Feb 1251 Palermo Cathedral).  He was elected FRIEDRICH II King of Germany 5 Dec 1212 at Frankfurt-am-Main, crowned at Mainz 9 Dec 1212 and at Aachen 25 Jul 1215.  Crowned Emperor in Rome 22 Nov 1220. 

3.         Infante don ALFONSO BERENGUER de Aragón ([1180]-Palermo Feb 1209).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name "al yfant don Pedro, rey d'Aragón, et al marqués de Provença don Alfonso, et a don Ferrando, abbat de Mont aragón, et una filla que casaron en Ongría" as the children of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón" and his wife[347]The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Petrus…Alfonsus" as the oldest two of the three sons of "Ildefonsi", specifying that Alfonso succeeded his father in "Ducatum Provinciæ"[348].  "…Ildefunsus comes Provinciæ frater domini regis…" witnessed the marriage contract dated 1204 between "Maria filia quondam domini Montispessulani" and "Petro Regi Aragoniæ, et comiti Barchinonis"[349].  He succeeded his father in 1195 as ALFONSO II Comte de Provence, Millau & Razès. 

-        COMTES de PROVENCE

4.         Infanta doña LEONOR de Aragón ([1182]-Feb 1226)The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Helienor" as second of the three daughters of "Ildefonsi"[350].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Pedro II King of Aragon arranged the marriage of his "segunda hermana Elionor" to "Remon conte de Tolosa", stating that their marriage was childless[351].  William of Tyre (Continuator) records that "li cuens de Saint Gile" married the sister of the king of Aragon after repudiating the "fille de l'empereor de Chypre"[352]m (Jan 1203) as his fifth wife, RAYMOND VI Comte de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND V Comte de Toulouse & his wife Constance de France (27 Oct 1156-Toulouse 2 Aug 1222).  No issue. 

5.         Infante don RAMÓN BERENGUER de Aragón (-young).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 

6.         Infante doña SANCHA de Aragón ([1186]-shortly after 1241).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Sanxa" as third of the three daughters of "Ildefonsi"[353].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Pedro II King of Aragon arranged the marriage of his "tercera hermana Sancha" to "al hijo del conde de Tolosa", by whom she was mother of "una hija que fué mujer de Alfonso conde de Poitiers, hermano de Luis rey de Francia"[354].  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that "Raymond-le-Jeune" married "dona Sancha sœur du roi Pierre d´Aragon", dated to 1211 from the context[355]A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the marriage in Jan 1203 (although the year must be incorrect) of "Raymundum comes Tholosanus filius regine Constancie" and "sororem regis Aragonum"[356]"Sancia soror quondam...regis Aragoniæ, et uxor Raymundi filii domini Raymundi...ducis Narbonæ, comitis Tolosæ, marchionis Provinciæ" confirmed the privileges of Nîmes by charter dated 13 Nov 1218[357]m (Jan [1211], divorced 1241) as his first wife, RAYMOND de Toulouse, son of RAYMOND VI Comte de Toulouse & his third wife Joan of England (Beaucaire, Gard Jul 1197-Millau, Aveyron 27 Sep 1249, bur Fontevraud).  He succeeded his father in 1222 as RAYMOND VII Comte de Toulouse

7.         Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón ([1190]-1249).  The "Corónicas" Navarras name "al yfant don Pedro, rey d'Aragón, et al marqués de Provença don Alfonso, et a don Ferrando, abbat de Mont aragón, et una filla que casaron en Ongría" as the children of "el rey don Alfonso d'Aragón" and his wife[358].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro…Alfonso…y Fernando" as the three sons of King Alfonso II[359]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Fernandus [frater rege Petro de Arragonum"[360].  Cistercian monk.  Abbot of Montearagón.  He resented being excluded from the Regency in 1214 on the succession of his nephew King Jaime I.  He was a member of the league of magnates which organised opposition to King Jaime in Aragon, and was finally defeated in 1227.

8.         Infanta doña DULCIA de Aragón ([1192]-).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Zurita names “Doña Dulce que fue monja del monasterio de Xixena de la Orden de S. Juan” as the fourth daughter of King Alfonso[361].  A nun at Sijena. 

 

 

JAIME I 1213-1276

 

Infante don JAIME de Aragón, son of PEDRO II King of Aragon & his wife Marie de Montpellier (Montpellier 1 Feb 1208-Valencia 27 Jul 1276, bur Poblet, monastery of Nuestra Señora)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Jaime" as son of Pedro II King of Aragon and his wife "la filla del noble princep Don Guillem de Montpeller…Maria, nieta del Emperador de Costantin noble"[362]The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner names "Jacques…roi d´Arragon…fils [de] Pierre roi d´Arragon et de…madame Marie de Montpellier"[363].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "rex Iacobus Arragonensis" as son of "rege Petro Arragonum" & his wife[364]The Thalamus de Montpellier records the birth 1 Feb 1207 (probably O.S.) of "Jacme rei dAragon lo fill de la regina dona de Montpellier"[365].  A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the birth in 1208 of "Jacmes Peire reis d´Arago"[366]His father gave him into the custody of Simon de Montfort, who governed Béziers and Carcassonne in the King of Aragon’s name after their conquest in 1209, at Carcassonne.  He succeeded his father in 1213 as JAIME I "el Conquistador" King of Aragon, Conde de Barcelona, Gerona, Osona, Besalú, Comte de Cerdagne/Cerdaña et de Roussillon.  After his release from Carcassonne and return to Catalonia was negotiated, the Templars of Monzón took charge of him, with his great uncle Sancho acting as Regent.  He conquered Mallorca from the Moors, the city of Mallorca falling 31 Dec 1229 after a prolonged siege.  The Chronicle of Narbonne Saint-Paul records that "insula Majoricarum" was captured in 1230 by "dominum Jacobum"[367].  He proclaimed himself King of Mallorca 1230, deposing the wali Abu Yahya Hiqem.  He launched the conquest of Valencia from Monzón Oct 1236, the city finally surrendering to a siege 28 Sep 1238.  Proclaimed King of Valencia 1238.  The Moors of Alicante offered to submit to him 1240, but Jaime refused on the grounds of his agreements with the King of Castile.  He renounced all his rights in Occitania (except Montpellier and the Carladès) by the treaty of Corbeil May 1258 with Louis IX King of France.  He besieged and captured Murcia Jan 1266, before turning the city over to Castile.  He recorded the events of his life in his Book of Deeds (“Llibre dels feyts”).  The testament of "Jac. Reg. Arag. et Maioric. et Valentiæ…Comitis Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Domini Montpessulani" was published at Perpignan 28 Sep 1299 on behalf of "Jacobo…Rege Majorie, comite Rossilionis et Ceritanuæ ac domino Montispessulani" at the request of "Henrici…Comitis Rutenensis", with the seals of "domini Petri bonæ memoriæ et…domini Jacobi fratris sui"[368].  Under this testament, the king bequeathed the kingdoms of Aragon and Valencia, the county of Barcelona to "Infanti Petro filio nostro", the kingdom of Mallorca and Menorca, the lordship of Montpellier, "Comitatum Rossilionis et Cauquoliberum et…Conflent et comitatum Ceritaniæ et Vallem Aspirii" to "Infanti Jacobo filio nostro".  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "filius noster Infans Jacobus…filium nostrum primogenitum Infantem P…filiam nostram Domnam Yolant…filios…Philippi…Regis Franciæ et Domnæ Elizabet bonæ memoriæ Regina Franciæ filiæ nostræ, nepotes nostras…filios nostros Jacobum et Petrum quos legitime…ex Domna Teresia Ægidii de Bidaure…filios Infantis Domnæ Constantiæ quondam filiæ nostræ et Infantis domini Emanuelis fratris…Regis Castellæ, nepotes nostros"[369]The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death 3 Jul 1276 of King Jaime aged 72 and his burial "cerca el altar de Senyora Santa Maria en la Seu de Valencia"[370]The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the death "6 Jul 1276" of "le roi Jacques" and his burial at Poblet[371]

Betrothed (1209) to AUREMBIAIX Ctss de Urgel, daughter and heiress of ARMENGOL VIII Conde de Urgel & his wife Elvira Núñez de Luna ([1196][372]-Balaguer Aug 1231, bur San Hilario de Lérida).  On the death of her father she was betrothed to Jaime, infant son of Pedro II King of Aragon, but the contract was cancelled.  She concluded a secret protocol of concubinage with Jaime I King of Aragon 23 Oct 1228, under which he confirmed her rights to Urgel and the succession to the county of any son born from their union, nullified shortly afterwards by her second marriage.  "Aurembiax…conmitissa Urgelensi filia…Hermengaudi comitis Urgelensis et dominæ Alviræ matris nostræ…commitissimæ" swore allegiance to the Order of Santiago, referring to her contracts to marry "Petrum Infantem Portugaliæ" and "Iacobo…Rege Aragoniæ", by charter dated 6 May 1229[373]

m firstly (Agreda 6 Feb 1221, separated end Apr 1229 on grounds of consanguinity) Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla, daughter of ALFONSO VIII “el Noble” King of Castile & his wife Eleanor of England ([1202]-Burgos 1244, bur monastery of Santa María la Real at Las Huelgas).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of Jaime I King of Aragon and "la filia del Rey de Castiella…Elionor", stating that the couple was separated on grounds of consanguinity and that Leonor was buried "en el monasterio de Beruela"[374].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricum qui iuvenis obiit et quinque sorores, prima Berengaria…secunda Urraca, tertia regina Francie, quarta Alienor, quinta Constantia monialis" as children of "sorore regis Anglie Richardi…Alienor…soror ex alio patre comitisse Marie Campaniensis", specifying that Leonor was "Arragonum regina"[375].  She became a nun at Las Huelgas after her separation from her husband. 

m secondly (Barcelona 8 Sep 1235) IOLANDA of Hungary, daughter of ANDRÁS II King of Hungary & his second wife Yolande de Courtenay ([1215]-Huesca 12 Oct 1251).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the second marriage of Jaime I King of Aragon and "la filla del Rey de Vngria…Ardeura la qual depues huuo nombre Violant nieta del Emperador de Constantin noble"[376]She was known as VIOLANT in Catalonia.  The Anales Toledanos record the death “IV Non Oct” in 1251 of “Dña Yoles, Regina Aragonum[377]The Chronicle of the Hôtel de Ville de Montpellier records the death in 1251 "D. Yoles regina Aragoniæ"[378].  The Thalamus de Montpellier records the death in Sep 1251 at Lérida of "la dona Yoles regina dAragon molher del rei Jacme"[379]

m thirdly (in secret) TERESA Gil de Vidaure, daughter of JUAN de Vidaure & his wife ---.  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Jayme de Xérica et…Pedro de Ayerue" as the children of King Jaime and "Doña Teresa Gil de Bidaure"[380].  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filios nostros Jacobum et Petrum quos legitime…ex Domna Teresia Ægidii de Bidaure…"[381]

Mistress (1): BLANCA de Antillón, daughter of barón SANCHO de Antillón & his wife ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and relationship with King Jaime has not yet been identified.  

Mistress (2): BERENGUELA Fernández, daughter of ---.  Zurita names “Doña Berenguela Fernandez” as the mother of “D. Pedro Fernandez” who his father granted “la baronia de Ixar[382] 

Mistress (3): ---.  The name of King Jaime's third mistress is not known. 

Mistress (4): ---.  The name of King Jaime's fourth mistress is not known. 

Mistress (5): ([1260]-1270]) BERENGUELA Alfonso, Señora de Melgoso and Caldelas, widow of GONZALO Ramírez Froilaz, illegitimate daughter of Infante don ALFONSO de León Señor de Molina y Mesa & his mistress Teresa Pires de Bragança ([1230/35]-Narbonne 17 Jul 1272, bur Narbonne, convent of Saint-François).  The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Teresa Perez" as the mother of "D. Berenguela, amiga del Rey D. Jaime de Aragon…algunos dizen fue su muger", the daughter of "El Infante don Alonso"[383]

King Jaime I & his first wife had one child:

1.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón (before Feb 1228-Calatayud 26 Mar 1260, bur Santa María de Veruela)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Alfonso" as the son of King Jaime and his first wife[384].  The Aragonese swore allegiance to him Feb 1228 at a general court at Daroca.  Under the projected partition of 1244, Alfonso would receive only Aragon on the death of his father.  "Don Alfonso, yffante primero fijo del rey d´Aragon" consented to any alliance between "mio padre don Jagme…rey d´Aragon" and "dona Margarita…reyna de Navarra, de Campayna et de Bria condessa palatina, et con vuestro fijo don Thibalt rey de Navarra", by charter dated 1 Aug 1253[385]Infante Alfonso sided with Castile against his father.  Zurita records the death “dentro de breves dias despues de ser concluydo su matrimonio” of “el Infante Don Alonso” and his burial “en el monasterio de Santa Maria de Veruela”, in 1260[386]m (Calatayud 23 Mar 1260) as her first husband, CONSTANCE de Béarn, daughter of GASTON VII Vicomte de Béarn & his first wife Mathe [Amata] de Marsan [Mastas] Ctss de Bigorre ([1245/50]-25 Apr 1310).  Zurita records the marriage of “el Infante Don Alonso” and “Doña Costança hija primogenita de Don Gaston Vizconde de Bearne, que fue hijo de Don Guillen de Moncada”, in 1260[387]She succeeded her mother as Comtesse de Bigorre, Vicomtesse de Marsan.  She married secondly (Windsor Castle 5 or 15 May 1269) Henry of Cornwall, son of Richard Earl of Cornwall King of Germany, and thirdly (Jun/Aug 1279) Aimon II Comte de Genève

King Jaime I & his second wife had ten children:

2.         Infanta doña VIOLANTE de Aragón ([1236]-Roncevalles 1301, bur Seville).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Violant…la otra Costancia…et Isabel…la quarta…Maria" as the four daughters of King Jaime and his second wife, stating that Violante married "Don Alfonso filio primogenitor del Rey de Castiella"[388]Pope Innocent IV issued a dispensation for the marriage of “Alfonsus...regis Castellæ...primogenitus” and “Iole” dated 23 Jan 1240[389].  The betrothal contract of “dominus Infans Alfonsus...regis Castellæ...primogenitus” and “domina Violante filia domini Jacobi...regis Aragonum” is dated 26 Nov 1246[390].  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filiam nostram Domnam Yolant…"[391].  After her eldest son died, she fled with his infant children to Aragon.  She died returning from a pilgrimage to Rome.  The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos records that "la Reina D. Violante" was buried "en Sevilla" with her husband[392].  m (Papal dispensation 23 Jan 1240, betrothed 26 Nov 1246, Valladolid 26 Nov 1248) Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla, son of FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile & his first wife Elisabeth von Hohenstaufen (Toledo 23 Nov 1221-Seville 4 Apr 1284, bur Seville, Cathedral Santa María).  He succeeded his father in 1252 as ALFONSO X “el Sabio” King of Castile and León. 

3.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (1239-Villafranca del Penedés 2 or 11 Nov 1285, bur Monasterio de Santa Cruz)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Jayme et Sancho" as the three sons of King Jaime and his second wife[393].  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filium nostrum primogenitum Infantem P…"[394].  He succeeded his father in 1276 as PEDRO III "el Grande" King of Aragon.   

          -        see below

4.         Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón ([1240]-before 1266, bur Uclés).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Violant…la otra Costancia…et Isabel…la quarta…Maria" as the four daughters of King Jaime and his second wife, stating that Constanza married "Don Manuel hermano del…Alfonso rey de Castiella"[395]The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos records that "El Infante D. Manuel" married "D. Costança de Aragon"[396]Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filios Infantis Domnæ Constantiæ quondam filiæ nostræ et Infantis domini Emanuelis fratris…Regis Castellæ, nepotes nostros"[397]m (Calatayud 1260) as his first wife, Infante don MANUEL de Castilla, Señor de Escalona, Peñafiel y Villena, son of FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile & his first wife Elisabeth von Hohenstaufen (Carrión de los Condes 1234-Peñafiel 25 Dec 1283, bur Uclés, Santiago convent). 

5.         Infante don JAIME de Aragón (Montpellier 31 May 1243-Palma de Mallorca 29 May 1311)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Jayme et Sancho" as the three sons of King Jaime and his second wife[398]The Chronicle of the Hôtel de Ville de Montpellier records the birth in 1243 "in vigilia Pentecosti" of "D. rex Jacobus et regina eius uxor...Jacobus filius" in Montpellier[399]Under the projected partition of 1244, Jaime [Jaume] would receive the Balearic Islands, Valencia, and Montpellier.  Under the further projected partition of 1262, Jaume would receive the Balearic Islands, Montpellier, Roussillon and Cerdaña.  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "filius noster Infans Jacobus…"[400].  He succeeded his father in 1276 as JAIME II King of Mallorca, Comte de Roussillon et de Cerdagne/Cerdaña, Sire de Montpellier, Barón de Ompelas. 

-        see below, Part B.  KINGS of MALLORCA 1276-1343

6.         Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón ([1245]-1250).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

7.         Infante don SANCHO de Aragón ([1246]-the Holy Land 1251).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

8.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón (1243-Cosenza, Calabria 28 Jan 1271, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Violant…la otra Costancia…et Isabel…la quarta…Maria" as the four daughters of King Jaime and his second wife, stating that Isabel married "Phelip filio primogenito del Rey de Francia"[401]The marriage contract between "Ludovicus…Francorum Rex…filium nostrum Philippum" and "Isabellam filiam…Jacobi…Regis Aragonum, Maioricarum et Valentiæ, comitem Barchinonensem et Urgelli et dominum Montispessulani" is dated 11 May 1258[402].   The Flores historiarum of Adam of Clermont records the marriage "in civitate Claromontensi" in 1262 of "Philippus regis Franciæ filius" and "filiam regis Aragonum...Ysabellam neptem beatæ Helizabeth Teutonicæ", adding that his father-in-law granted Philippe his property "in civitate Bituricensi, Carcassona et in diœcesi Mimatensi" in exchange for property "in comitatibus de Besaudu et Rossilionis et Cataloniæ"[403]The “Visitation” of Rigaud Archbishop of Rouen records “II Non Jul” 1262 that he conducted the marriage (“desponsavimus”) “in majori ecclesia dicti loci” (suggested in the edition consulted to be “Clari Montis”) of “dominum Philippum primogenitum domini regis Francorum” and “domicella Ysabelli filia...regis Aragonum[404].  The Gesta Sancti Ludovici records “circa Pentecosten” 1262 the marriage “apud Claromontem in Avernia” of “Ludovicus rex Franciæ...Philippo filio suo primogenito” and “Ysabellam filiam regis Aragoniæ[405].  She died, 6 months pregnant, after a fall from a horse on returning from the crusade in Tunis.  The necrology of Sainte-Chapelle records the death "V Kal Feb" of "dominis Ysabellis de Aragonis quondam Francie regine"[406].  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filios…Philippi…Regis Franciæ et Domnæ Elizabet bonæ memoriæ Regina Franciæ filiæ nostræ, nepotes nostras…"[407]m (contract Corbès near Montpellier 11 May 1258, Clermont-en-Auvergne 6 Jul 1262) as his first wife, PHILIPPE de France, son of LOUIS IX King of France & his wife Marguerite de Provence (Poissy, Yvelines 1 May 1245-Perpignan 5 Oct 1285, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  Heir to the throne in 1260 on the death of his older brother.  He succeeded his father in 1270 as PHILIPPE III "le Hardi" King of France

9.         Infanta doña MARÍA de Aragón ([1248]-Zaragoza 1267).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Violant…la otra Costancia…et Isabel…la quarta…Maria" as the four daughters of King Jaime and his second wife, stating that María was unmarried[408].  Nun at Sijena.

10.      Infante don SANCHO de Aragón ([1250]-killed in battle Martos 21 Oct 1275).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Jayme et Sancho" as the three sons of King Jaime and his second wife, stating that Sancho was archbishop of Toledo[409].  Archdeacon at Belchite 1263.  Abbot at Valladolid 1263.  "Infante don Sancho, fijo del…Rey de Aragon, et Abbad de Valladolit" granted rights to the council of Tovilla by charter dated 28 Feb 1265[410].  Archbishop of Toledo 21 Aug 1266.  The Anales Toledanos record the death “XII Kal Nov” in 1275 of “Dñs Sanctius filius Regis Aragonum et Archiepiscopus Toletanus[411].  He was killed in battle against the Moors. 

11.      Infanta doña LEONOR de Aragón ([1251]-young).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  

King Jaime I & his third wife had two children:

12.      JAIME Fernández de Aragón ([1255/60]-1285).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Jayme de Xérica et…Pedro de Ayerue" as the children of King Jaime and "Doña Teresa Gil de Bidaure"[412]Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filios nostros Jacobum et Petrum quos legitime…ex Domna Teresia Ægidii de Bidaure…"[413].  Barón de Ejérica.   

-        BARONES de EJÉRICA

13.      PEDRO de Aragón ([1259]-1318).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Jayme de Xérica et…Pedro de Ayerue" as the children of King Jaime and "Doña Teresa Gil de Bidaure"[414]Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filios nostros Jacobum et Petrum quos legitime…ex Domna Teresia Ægidii de Bidaure…"[415].  Señor de Ayerbe. 

-        BARONES de AYERBE, BARONI di PATERNOY

King Jaime I had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

14.       FERNÁN Sánchez (before 1241-murdered Rio Cinca 1275).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Ferrant Sanchez de Castro et…Pedro Ferrandez de Ixar" as the children of King Jaime by "otras dueñas"[416].  Señor de Castro y Pomar.  He and his half-brother Pedro Fernández sailed with their father from  Barcelona for Palestine 1 Sep 1269.  Although King Jaime and a large part of the fleet was obliged to turn back by storms, the brothers arrived at Acre end Dec 1269, but soon after returned to Aragon having achieved nothing[417]m ---.  The name of Fernán´s wife is not known.  Fernán & his wife had one child: 

a)         FELIPE Fernández (-before 1304).  Señor de Castro.  Zurita records the part played by “Felipe de Castro...yerno de D. Iuan Alonso de Haro” in the recapture of Albarracín from “Don Iuan Nuñez” in 1300[418].  m as her first husband, MARÍA Alfonso de Haro, daughter of JUAN Alfonso de Haro, Señor de Los Cameros & his wife Constanza Alfonso de Meneses.  Her first marriage is confirmed by Zurita who names “Felipe de Castro...yerno de D. Iuan Alonso de Haro” when recording his part in the recapture of Albarracín from “Don Iuan Nuñez” in 1300, although he considers that this was a different daughter from the wife of Ramón Folch de Cardona as he adds in the same passage that “Don Iuan Alonso estava muy emparentado en Aragon y casó otra hija en Cataluña...Doña Maria Aluarez con Don Ramon Folch Vizconde de Cardona[419].  She married secondly Ramón Folch Cardona Vizconde de CardonaThe Crónica del Rey Fernando IV records that “Remon Falque señor de Cardena” was married to “doña Mari Álvarez fija de don Juan Alfonso de Haro”, dated to 1304[420]Felipe & his wife had two children: 

i)          FELIPE Fernández (-[1328/30]).  Señor de Castro.  m ELEONORA di Saluzzo, daughter of FILIPPO di Saluzzo, Governor of Sardinia & his first wife Sibilla di Peralta (-1330).  Felipe & his wife had two children: 

(a)        daughter.  m RAMÓN Vizconde de Canet

(b)        FELIPE de Castro (-1354).  Señor de Castro y Peralta.  m FRANCISCA Alemany Señora de Guimerá.  Felipe & his wife had three children: 

(1)        FELIPE de Castro (-hanged 1371).  Barón de Castro, Peralta y Guimerá.  A supporter of Enrique de Trastámara in his rebellion against Pedro I "el Cruel" King of Castile, the former created him Señor de Paredes de Nava, Medina de Rioseco y Tordehumos in April 1366, ratified on Enrique's accession in 1369.  He was killed by the townspeople of Paredes de Nava who revolted against the fiscal burden he imposed on them: this event is recorded in Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II[421].  m (1366) as her third husband, JUANA Alfonso de Castilla, divorced wife firstly of FERNANDO Ruiz de Castro Señor de Lemos y Sarría, widow secondly of TAMARIT de Listera, illegitimate daughter of ALFONSO XI King of Castile & his mistress Leonor de Guzmán.  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records that “Doña Juana su hermana del Conde [Enrique], muger que fuera de Don Ferrando de Castro” later married “un Rico ome de Aragon...Don Felipe de Castro[422]Felipe & his wife had one child: 

a.          LEONOR de Castro y Castilla.  Señora de Tordehumos y Medina de Rioseco.  The testament of “Don Enrique...Rey de Castilla...”, dated at Burgos 29 May 1374, transferred “las villas de Tordehumos é Medina de Rioseco” which belonged to “Doña Leonor de Castro nuestra sobrina, fija de Doña Juana nuestra hermana” to “Don Fadrique mi fijo[423]

(2)        RAMÓN de Castro (-1355). 

(3)        ALDONZA de Castro (-before 1379).  Baronesa de Castro, Peralta y Guimerá.  m BERNARDO Galcerán de Pinós Barón de Pinós.

ii)         ALDONZA Fernández de Castro

King Jaime I had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2): 

15.       PEDRO Fernández ([1245/49]-[1297])The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Ferrant Sanchez de Castro et…Pedro Ferrandez de Ixar" as the children of King Jaime by "otras dueñas"[424].  Zurita names “Doña Berenguela Fernandez” as the mother of “D. Pedro Fernandez” who his father granted “la baronia de Ixar[425].  Barón de Hijar.  He accompanied his brother Fernán Sánchez to Palestine in 1269, returning the following year[426]

-        FERNÁNDEZ de HIJAR, BARONES de HIJAR

King Jaime I had one illegitimate child by Mistress (3):

16.       PEDRO del Rey (-after 1307).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Bishop of Lérida. 

King Jaime I had one illegitimate child by Mistress (4):

17.       JAIME Sarroca (-after 1289).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Bishop of Huesca.

 

 

PEDRO III 1276-1285, ALFONSO III 1285-1291

 

Infante don PEDRO de Aragón, son of JAIME I "el Conquistador" King of Aragon & his second wife Iolanda of Hungary (1239-Villafranca del Penedés 2 or 11 Nov 1285, bur Monasterio de Santa Cruz).  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "…filium nostrum primogenitum Infantem P…"[427].  He was promised the succession of the Balearic Islands, Valencia and Montpellier 1241, and received Roussillon and Cerdaña after the death of Nuño Sancho de Aragón in 1242.  A new projected partition was agreed 1244, under which Pedro would receive Catalonia on the death of his father.  Appointed procurator of Catalonia 1257.  Under a further projected partition 1262, Aragon, Catalonia and Valencia were destined for Pedro.  He succeeded his father in 1276 as PEDRO III "el Grande" King of Aragon, Conde de Barcelona and King of Valencia, crowned at Zaragoza Nov 1276.  He suppressed the revolt in Valencia, ending with the capture of Montesa in 1277.  He confirmed his protectorate over Tunis.  He landed at Trapani in Sicily 31 Aug 1282, after the Sicilian revolt against the Angevins, and declared himself PIETRO I King of Sicily.  He was excommunicated by Pope Martin IV, who supported the Angevins, in Nov 1282.  In the course of the escalating dispute, Philippe III King of France was persuaded to accept the Kingdom of Aragon for his second son Charles in Feb 1284.  In Sep 1284, Pedro crushed the rebellion of Juan Núñez de Lara who attempted to establish an independent lordship of Albarracín.  King Philippe III invaded Aragon in early 1285 and briefly captured Girona 7 Sep 1285.  The French retreated to Perpignan (where King Philippe III died 5 Oct) after their fleet was destroyed in the Bay of Roses 3-4 Sep by admiral Ruggiero di Loria.  On his deathbed, Pedro renounced Sicily as the price of his peace with the church.  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death "III Id Nov" in 1285 of King Pedro and his burial "en el monasterio de Santas Cruçs del Orden de Cistells"[428]The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the death "le jour de Saint-Martin" in 1285 of "le roi Pierre" and his burial "au monastère de Sainte-Croix"[429]A manuscript chronicle records the death "circa festum S. Martini" in 1285 of "Petrus rex Aragonum" and his burial "in ecclesia beatæ Mariæ sanctarum Crucum ordinis Cisterciensis"[430]

m (Montpellier 15 Jul 1262) CONSTANZA of Sicily, daughter of MANFREDO [von Hohenstaufen] King of Sicily & his first wife Béatrice de Savoie (1249-Barcelona 1302).  The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Constancia" as the daughter of "Manfredus" and his wife "dominam Beatricem", adding that she married "Petro regi Aragonum"[431].  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the marriage of "le seigneur infant Pierre" and "la fille de Mainfroi roi de Sicile…Constance", adding that the bride was aged 14[432].  "Infans Petrus filius…Jacobi…Regis Aragonum, Majoricarum et Valentiæ, Comitis Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et domini Montispessulani" granted dowry to "dominæ Constantiæ filiæ…Manfredi Regis Siciliæ…uxori nostræ" by charter dated 13 Jun 1262, which names "domino Bonifacio de Anglano…Comite Montisalbani…avunculo dicti domini Regis Siciliæ", countersigned 13 Nov 1264[433]

Mistress (1): MARÍA Nicolau, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and relationship with King Pedro has not yet been identified. 

Mistress (2): INÉS Zapata, daughter of ---.  The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Ines Zapata" as the mother of "D. Pedro de Aragon", son of "el Rey D. Pedro"[434]. 

King Pedro III & his wife had six children:

1.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón (Valencia 4 Nov 1265-Barcelona 18 Jun 1291, bur Barcelona Franciscan Monastery).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero Alfonso et el otro Jayme et el otro Frederico" as the sons of King Pedro and his wife Constanza[435]The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Alfonsus, Elisabeth regina Portugalli…Rex Iacobus, Dominus Fridericus, domina Violanta et dominus Petrus" as the children of "Petro regi Aragonum" and his wife[436].  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner names "Alfonse, Jacques, Frédéric et Pierre" as the four sons of "le seigneur infant Pierre" and "la fille de Mainfroi roi de Sicile…Constance"[437].  He succeeded his father in 1285 as ALFONSO III "el Liberal" King of Aragon and Valencia, Count of Barcelona.  After he succeeded, he continued his father’s campaign against the Balearic Islands to punish his uncle Jaime II King of Mallorca, for the latter’s support of the French during the dispute over Sicily.  He recaptured  Mallorca city and Ibiza 1286, and captured Minorca from the Moors Jan 1287.  However, diplomatic tensions with France and the Papacy worsened, and eventually Alfonso was forced to withdraw his support for his brother at Tarascon Feb 1291 as the price for lifting sanctions.  He was forced to grant further privileges to the Aragonese Union 1287 (“el privilegio de la unión”), after the latter invaded Valencia and placed an embargo on royal revenues.  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death in 1292 of King Alfonso agred 27 and his burial "en el monasterio de los frayres menores de Barchinona"[438]The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the death of King Alfonso, dated to 1291, his burial "à l´ordre des frères mineurs à Barcelona", and adds that "il était parfaitement vierge, n´ayant jamais approché de femme"[439]m (Betrothed [1286], by proxy Westminster Abbey 15 Aug 1290, not consummated) as her first husband, ELEANOR of England, daughter of EDWARD I King of England & his first wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Windsor Castle [17 Jun] 1264 or 1269-Ghent 12 Oct 1297, bur Westminster Abbey).  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records that Edward I King of England sent "Jean d´Agrilli" to Barcelona to negotiate the marriage of his daughter to Alfonso III King of Aragon, dated to 1286, and records the betrothal later the same year[440].  She married secondly (20 Sep 1393) Henri III Comte de Bar

2.         Infante don JAIME de Aragón (Valencia 10 Aug 1267-Barcelona 5 Nov 1327, bur Barcelona church of San Francisco, transferred to Monastery of Santa Cruz, prov Tarragona)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero Alfonso et el otro Jayme et el otro Frederico" as the sons of King Pedro and his wife Constanza[441]The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner names "Alfonse, Jacques, Frédéric et Pierre" as the four sons of "le seigneur infant Pierre" and "la fille de Mainfroi roi de Sicile…Constance"[442].  He succeeded his father in 1285 as GIACOPO King of Sicily.  He succeeded his brother in 1291 as JAIME II King of Aragon and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona. 

-        see below

3.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón (Zaragoza 4 Jan 1271-Estremos 4 Jul 1336, bur Coimbra)The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Alfonsus, Elisabeth regina Portugalli…Rex Iacobus, Dominus Fridericus, domina Violanta et dominus Petrus" as the children of "Petro regi Aragonum" and his wife[443].  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the Chronicon Conimbricensi which names “Rex Aragoniæ…Dñs Joannes filius Regis Domni Petri” as “frater…Dñæ Elizabeth Reginæ Portugaliæ[444]The marriage by proxy of Dionysius...Rex Portugalliæ et Algarbii” and “P...Rege Aragon...Elisabeth filiam maiore” is dated 11 Feb 1282[445]The first testament of Dona Isabel...Rainha de Portugal e do Algarve”, dated 19 Apr 1314, chose burial “em Alcobaça”, and names “Infante D. Affonço meu filho primeiro herdeiro...Dom Pedro meu irmão...[446]Her husband banished her to a fortress when she supported her son in his revolt against his father.  The testament of D. Diniz...Rey de Portugal e do Algarve”, dated 20 Jun 1322, appointed “a Raynha Donna Isabel minha mulher e Affonso Sanches meu Filho...” among his executors[447]After her husband died she retired to a house at Coimbra near a Poor Clare convent which she had founded and devoted her life to good works.  The second testament of Dona Isabel...Rainha de Portugal e do Algarve”, dated 22 Dec 1327, chose burial “em o meu mosteiro de Santa Clara e de Sancta Isabel de Coimbra” with “Ifante Dona Isabel minha neta”, made bequests to “Rainha Dona Breatis minha filha...Ifanta Dona Maria sa filha...Iffanta Dona Maria minha neta...Iffanta Dona Leanor minha neta...minha sobrinha Dona Izabel...Dom Affonso filho de Dõ Pedro meu irmaõ...el Rey meu filho...Dona Vataça”, and appointed “El Rey Dom Affonço meu filho e a Rainha Dona Breatis minha filha sa mulher,e o Ifante Dom Pedro meu neto filho primeiro herdeiro do dito Rey Dom Affonço e a Ifanta Dona Maria minha neta...Dona Vataça” as her executors[448]The Breve Chronicon Alcobacense records that "rex Dyonisius…Elisabeth uxor sua Regina" was buried "Colimbrie in monasterio Sancte Clare quod ipsa construxit"[449].   She was canonised 25 May 1625, feast day 8 July[450]m (by proxy Barcelona 2 Feb 1282, in person Trancosa 24 Jun 1282) DINIZ King of Portugal, son of AFONSO III "o Restaurador" King of Portugal & his second wife Beatriz de Castilla (Lisbon 9 Oct 1261-Santarem 7 Jan 1325, bur Odivelas).

4.         Infante don FADRIQUE de Aragón (1272-near Pamplona 25 Jun 1337).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero Alfonso et el otro Jayme et el otro Frederico" as the sons of King Pedro and his wife Constanza[451]The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Alfonsus, Elisabeth regina Portugalli…Rex Iacobus, Dominus Fridericus, domina Violanta et dominus Petrus" as the children of "Petro regi Aragonum" and his wife[452].  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner names "Alfonse, Jacques, Frédéric et Pierre" as the four sons of "le seigneur infant Pierre" and "la fille de Mainfroi roi de Sicile…Constance"[453].  His brother appointed him Viceroy in Sicily when the former succeeded to the crown of Aragon 1291.  Ignoring the peace signed between his father and Carlo II King of Naples, Infante don Fadrique occupied Sicily.  As a condition of his betrothal to Catherine de Courtenay, he promised to renounce his rights to Sicily and give help to reconquer the Latin Empire of Constantinople, but this proposal was opposed by Philippe IV King of France and the betrothal was terminated[454].  Don Fadrique was proclaimed Lord at Palermo 12 Dec 1295, and recognised as FEDERIGO I King of Sicily by the Parliament-General at Catania 15 Jan 1296, crowned at Palermo 25 Mar 1296.  He was confirmed King of Trinacria [Sicily] for life by the Treaty of Caltabellotta Aug 1302, under which Carlo II King of Naples confirmed Sicily as the dowry of his daughter Eleonora for the life of her husband, to return to Carlo’s heirs after Federigo’s death.  War broke out again with the Angevins of Naples 1313.  Federigo had the Sicilian parliament recognise his son Pietro as his successor 12 Jun 1314.  He retook the title King of Sicily 9 Aug 1314.  Sicily reswore allegiance to Federigo’s son Pietro in 1322.  Betrothed ([Jun] 1295) to CATHERINE de Courtenay, daughter of PHILIPPE de Courtenay titular Emperor of Constantinople & his wife Beatrice of Sicily (1274-Paris 11 Oct 1307 or 2 Jan 1308, bur Paris).  She later married Charles de France Comte de Valois.  m (Messina May 1303) as her second husband, ELEONORE of Sicily, former wife of PHILIPPE de Toucy titular Prince of Antioch, daughter of CHARLES II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary (1289-Monastery of San Nicolo di Arena 9 Aug 1341, bur Catania, Franciscan monastery).  Her second marriage was arranged by the Treaty of Caltabellotta 31 Aug 1302, under which her father gave her Sicily as dowry during her husband’s life, after which the Kingdom would return to her father King Charles II and his heirs[455]

-        KINGS of SICILY

5.         Infanta doña VIOLANTE de Aragon (1273-Termini 19 Aug 1302, bur Marseille église des Frères mineurs)The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Alfonsus, Elisabeth regina Portugalli…Rex Iacobus, Dominus Fridericus, domina Violanta et dominus Petrus" as the children of "Petro regi Aragonum" and his wife[456].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Jaime II King of Aragon arranged the marriage of "su hermana Doña Violant" and "Rubert fillo del rey Carlos"[457]m (Rome Mar 1297) as his first wife, ROBERT of Sicily, son of CHARLES II King of Naples & Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary (Royal Palace of the Torre de San Erasmo, near Capua 1278-Château-Neuf, Naples 16/20 Jan 1343/4, bur Naples Santa Chiara).  Named in 1297 as heir to Sicily by Pope Boniface VIII.  Appointed perpetual Vicar-General in the island of Sicily by his father 24 Jun 1299.  Principe di Salerno 5 May 1304.  Comte de Piémont 17 Feb 1309.  He succeeded his father in 1309 as ROBERT I "le Bon" King of Sicily

6.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón ([1275]-Tordehumos 30 Aug 1296)The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner names "Alfonse, Jacques, Frédéric et Pierre" as the four sons of "le seigneur infant Pierre" and "la fille de Mainfroi roi de Sicile…Constance"[458].  The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Alfonsus, Elisabeth regina Portugalli…Rex Iacobus, Dominus Fridericus, domina Violanta et dominus Petrus" as the children of "Petro regi Aragonum" and his wife[459].  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the death of "l´infant Pierre…ainsi que Raimond d´Anglesola" at the siege of León and their burial in adjacent graves in Aragon[460]m (28 Aug 1291) GUILLELMA de Béarn, daughter of GASTON [VII] de Moncada Vicomte de Béarn & his first wife Mathe [Amata] de Marsan [Mastas] Ctss de Bigorre ([1245/55]-1309).  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the marriage of "l´infant Pierre" and "madame Guillelmine de Muncada, fille de Gaston de Béarn", dated to 1295[461].  She had previously been betrothed to Alfonso Manuel, and later to the latter's first cousin the future Sancho IV King of Castile

King Pedro III had three illegitimate children by Mistress (1): 

7.          JAIME de Aragón (-after 22 May 1285)Zurita records that “el Rey” granted “la ciudad de Segorbe” to “Don Jayme Perez su hijo natural” and married him to “Doña Sancha Fernandez hija de Don Hernando Diaz” in Nov 1279[462].  Señor de Segorbe.  m (Nov 1279) SANCHA Fernández, daughter of FERNANDO Díaz & his wife ---.  Zurita records that “el Rey” granted “la ciudad de Segorbe” to “Don Jayme Perez su hijo natural” and married him to “Doña Sancha Fernandez hija de Don Hernando Diaz” in Nov 1279[463].  Jaime & his wife had one child: 

a)         CONSTANZA de AragónZurita records the marriage in Mar 1299 of “Artal de Luna hijo de Don Lope” and “D. Jayme Perez señor de Segorbe y Doña Sancha Fernandez Diaz su muger...Doña Costança hija[464].  Señora de Segorbe.  m (Mar 1299) as his first wife, ARTAL [II] de Luna Señor de Luna, son of LOPE Ferranch de Luna & his wife --- (-Sardinia 1323).

8.          JUAN de Aragón.  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

9.          BEATRIZ de Aragón.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   m RAMÓN de Cardona Señor de Torá, son of --- (-after 1340).

King Pedro III had four illegitimate children by Mistress (2):

10.       FERNANDO de AragónThe primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Señor de Albarracín.

11.       PEDRO de AragónThe Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Pedro de Aragon" as the son of "el Rey D. Pedro" and "D. Ines Zapata"[465]m (Portugal) CONSTANZA Mendez Pelita de Silva, daughter of SUERO Mendez de Silva & his wife María Annes Brochardo.  The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos records that "D. Pedro de Aragon", son of "el Rey D. Pedro" and "D. Ines Zapata", married "D. Constança Mendez Petite"[466]Pedro & his wife had four children: 

a)         PEDRO de AragónThe Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Pedro de Aragon, D. Fernando que fue asaz bueno, i casó" as the sons of "D. Pedro de Aragon" and his wife "D. Constança Mendez Petite"[467]

b)         FERNANDO de AragónThe Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Pedro de Aragon, D. Fernando que fue asaz bueno, i casó" as the sons of "D. Pedro de Aragon" and his wife "D. Constança Mendez Petite"[468]m MARÍA Núñez, daughter of NUÑO Fernández Cogominho & his wife Margarita de Albarnaz.

c)          CONSTANZA de AragónThe Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Constança. D. Teresa Alonso" as the daughters of "D. Pedro de Aragon" and his wife "D. Constança Mendez Petite"[469]m GONZALO Annes Pimentel, son of ---. 

d)         TERESA Alfonso de AragónThe Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Constança. D. Teresa Alonso" as the daughters of "D. Pedro de Aragon" and his wife "D. Constança Mendez Petite"[470]m GONZALO Mendez Vasconcellos Señor de Penela.

12.       SANCHO de Aragón (-1341).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Castellán de Amposta. 

13.       TERESA de AragónZurita names “el Rey...Doña Teresa Perez su hija” as the wife of “D. Artal de Alagon[471].  The primary source which confirms her first and third marriages has not yet been identified.   m firstly GARCÍA Romeu [III], son of GARCÍA Romeu [II] & his first wife ---.  Ricohombre de Aragón.  m secondly ARTAL de Alagón Señor de Sástago y Pina.  m thirdly PEDRO López de Oteiza

 

 

JAIME II 1291-1327

 

Infante don JAIME de Aragón, son of PEDRO III "el Grande" King of Aragon & his wife Constanza of Sicily [Hohenstaufen] (Valencia 10 Aug 1267-Barcelona 5 Nov 1327, bur Barcelona church of San Francisco, transferred to Monastery of Santa Cruz, prov Tarragona)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero Alfonso et el otro Jayme et el otro Frederico" as the sons of King Pedro and his wife Constanza[472]The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "Alfonsus, Elisabeth regina Portugalli…Rex Iacobus, Dominus Fridericus, domina Violanta et dominus Petrus" as the children of "Petro regi Aragonum" and his wife[473].  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner names "Alfonse, Jacques, Frédéric et Pierre" as the four sons of "le seigneur infant Pierre" and "la fille de Mainfroi roi de Sicile…Constance"[474].  He succeeded his father in 1285 as GIACOPO King of Sicily.  He succeeded his brother in 1291 as JAIME II King of Aragon and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona.  The agreement reached at Tarascon to lift the sanctions immediately broke down, and Jaime was obliged to renegotiate with the Papacy.  Under the Treaty of Anagni 20 Jun 1295, he agreed to transfer Sicily to the Pope for onward transfer back to the Angevins in return for Sardinia and Corsica (which were invested in him at Rome 1297), and to marry the daughter of Charles II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet].  He also agreed to restore his uncle as King of Mallorca, but as vassal to the crown of Aragon.  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records that “Rex Aragonum” captured “Regnum Murciæ” and invaded Castile in 1297[475].  After the Sicilians elected his younger brother Fadrique King of Sicily contrary to the terms of the 1295 treaty, Jaime II campaigned against his brother.  A compromise was eventually reached at Caltabellotta Aug 1302, under which Sicily would remain with Fadrique for life but thereafter revert to Charles II King of Sicily.  He signed a treaty of protection with Tunis 1301.  He conquered Murcia from Castile, but retained only Alicante and other places north of the river Segura under the peace of Agreda 1304.  Jaime unsuccessfully invaded Granada in 1308, negotiating peace with the emir Ismail 1323.  He annexed the counties of Urgel (1314) and Ampurias (1322).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death "en la ciudad de Barchinona la vigilia de Todos Santos" in 1327 of King Jaime aged 66 and his burial "en el monasterio de Santas Cruzes"[476].  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the death in Nov 1327 of “Dns Jacobus Rex Aragonum[477]

m firstly (Soria 1 Dec 1291 or Dec 1293, unconsummated, annulled Aug 1295) as her first husband, Infanta doña ISABEL de Castilla, daughter of SANCHO IV "el Bravo" King of Castile & his wife María Alfonso de Molina [Castilla] (Toro 1283-24 Jul 1328).  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the marriage in Dec 1293 of “Regem Aragonum” and “Infantissam Dnam Elisabeth, filiam Regis Dni Sancii, in Soria[478].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of King Jaime and "el Rey de Castiella…su filla…Maria" (presumably an error for Isabel) despite their consanguinity, commenting that the marriage was never consummated and was annulled[479].  Señora de Guadalajara 1312-1314.  Vicomtesse de Limoges by grant of her second husband 1317.  She married secondly (Burgos 1310) Jean de Bretagne, who succeeded his father in 1312 as Jean III "le Bon" Duke of Brittany.  . 

m secondly (Villabertrán 29 Oct 1295) BLANCHE of Sicily, daughter of CHARLES II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary ([1280]-Barcelona 14 Oct 1310, bur Santa Croce).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of King Jaime and "Doña Blanca filia del…rey Carlos" at "Villabeltran en el dia Todos-Santos" in 1295[480]She was crowned Queen of Aragon at Zaragoza in 1296.  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death in 1309 of "la reyna Doña Blanca"[481]

m thirdly (Gerona 27 Nov 1315) MARIE of Cyprus, daughter of HUGUES III King of Cyprus & his wife Isabelle d’Ibelin (1273-Tortosa [10/22] Apr 1319).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Marie, Marguerite, Aalis et Helvis" as the four daughters of Hugues III King of Cyprus & his wife[482].  Another manuscript of the Lignages records that Marie married "nel re di Aragona"[483].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of Jaime II King of Aragon and "la hermana del Rey de Chipre…Doña Maria", specifying that the marriage was childless[484].  The Chronicle of Amadi records the betrothal in 15 Jun, in 1315 from the context, of "la sorella del re Henrico, damisela Maria de Lusignan" and "il re de Aragona"[485].  "Martinus Petri de Ros, castellanus Emposte" wrote to Jaime King of Aragon relating to his betrothal "XV junii" to "domina Maria" dated 8 Nov [1315][486].  King Jaime agreed to this marriage on the understanding that Marie would be the heir to Cyprus after the death of her brother King Henry II as his closest living relative[487].  After her death, he complained that she had been too old and had not proved companionable[488]

m fourthly (Tarragona 25 Dec 1322) ELISENDA de Moncada, daughter of PEDRO de Moncada, Señor de Aitona y Soses & his wife Elisenda de Pinós (-Clarisas de Pedralbes 1364).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and relationship with King Jaime has not yet been identified. 

Mistress (1): LUCRECIA, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her relationship with King Jaime has not yet been identified. 

Mistress (2): GEROLDA, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her relationship with King Jaime has not yet been identified. 

King Jaime II & his second wife had ten children:

1.         Infante don JAIME de Aragón (1296-Tarragona 20 May 1334)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el secundo Don Alfonso…el tercero Don Johan…el quarto Don Pedro…el quinto Don Ramon Berenguer" as the five sons of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Jaime renounced the throne during the lifetime of his father and did not wish to consummate his marriage[489].  Procurator General of Catalonia until 1319 when he fled from his wife on their wedding day, and renounced his rights to the throne.  He became a Knight, later Grand Master, of the Order of St John of Jerusalem.  m (Gandesa 18 Oct 1319, unconsummated) as her first husband, Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla, daughter of FERNANDO IV “el Ajurno” King of Castile & his wife Infanta dona Costança de Portugal (1307-murdered Castillo de Castrojeriz [Mar/Apr] 1359).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of "infant Don Jayme filio primogénito del rey Don Jayme" and "el Rey de Castiella…su filla", in a later passage naming her "Alienor" and recording that her husband refused to consummate their marriage[490].  She married secondly (Tarragona 5 Feb 1329) as his second wife, Alfonso IV King of Aragon, her first husband’s brother. 

2.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón (Naples [Jan/Feb] 1299-Barcelona 24 Jan 1336, bur Barcelona Franciscan Monastery, transferred to Lérida Franciscan Monastery)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the birth in Naples of Alfonso, son of Jaime II King of Aragon and his wife Blanca[491].  He succeeded his father in 1327 as ALFONSO IV "el Benigne" King of Aragon and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona. 

-        see below

3.         Infanta doña MARÍA de Aragón (1299-Sijena 1327).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Doña Maria…la segunda Doña Costança…la tercera…Doña Isabel…la quarta…Doña Blancha…la quinta…Doña Violante" as the five daughters of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that María was the wife "del infant Don Po de Castiella"[492].  The Livro Velho records that "o infante D. Pedro…filho delrey D. Sancho e da raynha D. Maria" married "a infante D. Maria d´Aragam"[493].  Nun at Sijena.  Alfonso XI King of Castile defended the monastery of Las Huelgas de Burgos against claims relating to the debts of "Inffante Donna Maria Sennora de las Huelgas, mugier que fue del Inffante don Pedro mio tio" by charter dated Oct 1331[494]m (Calatayud 1311) Infante don PEDRO de Castilla, Señor de los Cameros, son of SANCHO IV "el Bravo" King of Castile & his wife María Alfonso de Molina [Castilla] (Valladolid 1290-killed in battle Vega de Granada 25 Jun 1319, bur Burgos Las Huelgas).  Mayordomo mayor of his brother King Fernando IV 25 Feb 1310-29 Jan 1311.  Tutor of his nephew Alfonso XI.  He was killed fighting the Moors. 

4.         Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón (Valencia 1 Apr 1300-Castillo de Garci-Múñoz 19 Aug 1327).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Doña Maria…la segunda Doña Costança…la tercera…Doña Isabel…la quarta…Doña Blancha…la quinta…Doña Violante" as the five daughters of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Constanza was the wife "Don Juan fillo del infant Don Manuel"[495]The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the marriage in Apr 1312 of “Dns Joannes cum Infantissa Dna Constantia in Xativa[496].  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the death in Aug 1327 of “Infantissa Dna Constantia in Castella[497]m (Játiva 2 Apr 1312) as his second wife, JUAN Manuel "el Scritor", Señor de Villena y Escalona, son of Infante don MANUEL de Castilla y León Señor de Villena y Escalona & his second wife Béatrice de Savoie (Escalona 5 May 1282-Córdoba 13 Jun 1348, bur Peñafiel, monastery of San Pablo). 

5.         Infante don JUAN de Aragón (1304-Pobo, Zaragoza 19 Aug 1334).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el secundo Don Alfonso…el tercero Don Johan…el quarto Don Pedro…el quinto Don Ramon Berenguer" as the five sons of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Juan was Archbishop of Toledo, and later Patriarch of Jerusalem and Archbishop of Tarragona[498].  Pope John XXII records that "Johanni olim archiepiscopo Toletano" was elected "in patriarcham Alexandrinum…administratori ecclesie Tarraconensis" in a document dated 22 Aug 1328 at Avignon, and another document records that he died 19 Aug 1334 aged 33[499]

6.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón (Barcelona 1300-12 Jul 1330, bur Vienna Minoritenkirche, St Ludwigskapelle).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Doña Maria…la segunda Doña Costança…la tercera…Doña Isabel…la quarta…Doña Blancha…la quinta…Doña Violante" as the five daughters of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Isabel was the wife "del Duch Daustria"[500]Her father planned her betrothal to the King of Armenia in exchange for religious relics of St Thecla, located at Sis in Armenia, which he was anxious to acquire for the cathedral of Tarragona.  Negotiations for the marriage broke down in the face of Armenian opposition to increased close ties with the Catholic western powers.  After her marriage, Infanta Isabel was known as ELISABETH in Austria.  Crowned Queen of the Romans at Basel in 1315.  Betrothed ([1312/13]) to OSHIN King of Armenia, son of LEO II King of Armenia & his wife Kyr Anna [Theophano] of Lampron (1282-murdered 20 Jul 1320, bur Trazarg).  m (by proxy Barcelona 1313 in person Judenburg Jan 1315) FRIEDRICH I Duke of Austria King of the Romans, son of ALBRECHT I Duke of Austria King of Germany & his wife Elisabeth von Görz-Tirol (1289-Gutenstein, Lower Austria 13 Jan 1330, bur Carthusian Mauerbach, near Vienna, transferred 1783/1789 Vienna St Stefan). 

7.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (1305-Pisa 4 Nov 1381).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el secundo Don Alfonso…el tercero Don Johan…el quarto Don Pedro…el quinto Don Ramon Berenguer" as the five sons of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Pedro was "conte de Ribagorça et de Ampurias" but later exchanged Ampurias for Prades with his brother Ramón Berenguer[501].  Conde de Ribagorza y Ampurias 1323-1341.  Conde de Prades, Señor de Denia y Gandía 1341-1381.  Seneschal of Catalonia.   

-        see below, Part C. CONDES de PRADES 1341-[1441], MARQUESES de VILLENA 1366-1434, DUQUES de GANDÍA 1399-1425

8.         Infanta doña BLANCA de Aragón ([1307]-Barcelona 1348).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Doña Maria…la segunda Doña Costança…la tercera…Doña Isabel…la quarta…Doña Blancha…la quinta…Doña Violante" as the five daughters of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Blanca was "prioresa de Xixena"[502]A nun at Sijena. 

9.         Infante don RAMÓN BERENGUER de Aragón ([1308]-Barcelona 1364).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el secundo Don Alfonso…el tercero Don Johan…el quarto Don Pedro…el quinto Don Ramon Berenguer" as the five sons of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Ramón Berenguer was "Conte de Pradas" but later exchanged Prades for Ampurias with his brother Pedro[503]Conde de Prades 1324-1341.  Conde de Ampurias 1341-1364. 

-        CONDES de AMPURIAS

10.      Infanta doña VIOLANTE de Aragón (Barcelona Oct 1310-Pedrola, Aragon after 19 Jul 1353).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Doña Maria…la segunda Doña Costança…la tercera…Doña Isabel…la quarta…Doña Blancha…la quinta…Doña Violante" as the five daughters of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Violante was the wife "del fillo del Princep de la Morera et de Taranto"[504]m firstly (Feb 1328) her first cousin, PHILIPPE di Tarento, Despot of Romania, son of PHILIPPE of Sicily Principe di Tarento [Anjou] & his first wife Thamar [Caterina] Angela Comnena Despota of Epirus (1297-17 May 1330).  m secondly (Lérida Jul 1339) LOPE de Luna Señor de Segorbe, son of --- (-Pedrola 19 Jun 1360). 

King Jaime II had two illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

11.       SANCHO de Aragón .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  

12.       JAIME de Aragón (Mazzara 1291-1350/1).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   m firstly JAUMETTA Guerau, from Mallorca.  m secondly RUCCIA ---, from Sardinia. 

King Jaime II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):

13.       NAPOLEÓN (Sicily 1288-).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.   Señor de Joyosa Guarda.  m (1332) ----, daughter of GUILLERMO Robert, from Mallorca. 

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the following members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

ALFONSO IV 1327-1336

 

Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón, son of JAIME II King of Aragon & his second wife Blanche of Sicily (Naples [Jan/Feb] 1299-Barcelona 24 Jan 1336, bur Barcelona Franciscan Monastery, transferred to Lérida Franciscan Monastery).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the birth in Naples of Alfonso, son of Jaime II King of Aragon and his wife Blanca[505].  He invaded Sardinia in 1323 to enforce Aragon’s rights.  Cagliari fell 12 Jul 1324, but new uprisings organised by the Genoese and the Pisans postponed final settlement until Jun 1326 when Pisa renounced all rights to Sardinia.  He succeeded his father in 1327 as ALFONSO IV "el Benigno" King of Aragon and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona.  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the death "en la ciudat de Barçalona…vigilia de la conversion de San Paulo…XX Kal Feb" in 1335 of King Alfonso aged 37 and his burial "en el monasterio de los freyres Menores de la dita ciudat" and subsequent transfer "en el monesterio de los freyres Menores de la ciudad de Lérida"[506]

m firstly (Lérida 10 Nov 1314) TERESA de Entenza Condesa de Urgel, Vizcondesa de Ager Baronesa de Entenza y Antillón, daughter of GOMBALDO Barón de Entenza Señor de Alcolea & his wife Constanza de Antillón Señora de Antillón[507] ([1300]-Zaragoza 20 Oct 1327, bur Zaragoza Franciscan Church).  The testament of "don Gombalt d´Entenca senyor d´Alcolea", dated 12 Sep 1304, bequeathes property to "…Tharesa fillya mía que finqua con dona Teresa hermana mía…por a su casamento…" and appoints "Tharesa d´Entiença filla mía e de dona Gostança d´Antillyon muller mía" as his heir, and his daughter Urraca in default "no haviendo otros fillos de la dita muller mía"[508].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of Alfonso and "la filla del noble Don Gombalt Datença et nieta de Don Armengon conte de Urgel"[509].  The marriage contract of "Theresia filia comunis…Gombaldi d´Entença domini de Alcolegia quondam et domine Constancie quondam uxoris eiusdem Gombaldi" and "Infanti Aldefonso…comiti Urgellensis et vicecomitti Agerensis, filio secundo genito…domini Iacobi…regis Aragonum" is dated 11 Nov 1314, with the consent of "domini Elvire de Anteyllo…abatisse de Casves tie nostre et…domini Guillelmi d´Entença et dompni Guillelmi de Montecateno, dompni Guillelmi de Angularia, dompni Poncii de Ripellis, dompni Othoni de Monthecateno et dompni Raymundi Bernardi de Ripellis consanguineorum seu atinencium nobis in linea parentele…"[510].  She succeeded her great uncle, Armengol X de Cabrera Conde de Urgel, in 1314 as Condesa de Urgel de iure[511].  The testament of "Infantissa Theresia…domini infantis Alfonsi consors ac comitissa Urgelli", dated 23 Oct 1327, appoints "dominum infantem Alfonsum virum et dominum nostrum…" among her executors, chooses burial "in monasterio fratrum minorum civitatis Ilerdensis", appoints as her heir "infantem Sanccium filium comunem prefati viri…et nostri", and bequeathes property to "infantibus Petro et Iacobo…filiis nostris…domine Constancie regine Maioricarum…filie…nostre…Urache d´Entiença sorori nostre…Castellane uxor quondam Emanuelis de Entiença de domo nostra…Sanccie Roderici de domo nostra…Mayllete d´Entiença…Teresie filie Emanuelis d´Entiença…domicellabus nostris…Teresie Gombaldi sorori nostre moniali monasterii de Casvis…Poncio Ugonis fratri nostro naturali…Guillelmi d´Entiença fratri nostro naturali…Iohanni Martini d´Entiença…"[512].  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the death "dans la ville de Sarragosse le dernier mardi d´octobre" in 1327 of the wife of "Infant Anfos", who was "la fille du très noble Gonbaud d´Entença", and her burial "dans l´église des frères mineurs de Sarragosse"[513]

m secondly (Betrothed Agreda Jan 1329, Tarragona 5 Feb 1329) as her second husband, Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla, formerly wife of Infante don JAIME de Aragón, daughter of FERNANDO IV “el Ajurno” King of Castile & his wife Infanta dona Costança de Portugal (1307-murdered Castellón de Castrojeriz [Mar/Apr] 1359).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records the marriage of Alfonso IV King of Aragon and "la filla de Don Ferrando rey de Castiella…Alionor", stating that she had previously been married to "su hermano el infant Don Jayme"[514].  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the contract in Jan 1329 for the marriage of “Rex Dns Alfonsus Aragonum cum Infantissa Dna Heleonora filia Regis Castellæ Dni Fernandi, in Agreda[515].  Her marriage was arranged as part of Aragon's renewed alliance with Castile, formed with the aim of reconquering Granada.  She became a disruptive influence in Aragon, plotting to advance the interests of her own sons over those of her stepson Infante don Pedro.  After her second husband's death, Pedro IV King of Aragon at first moved to confiscate her revenues and prosecute her protector Pedro de Ejérica, but in 1338 he confirmed her and her sons in possession of their domains, not wishing to antagonise Castile at a time when Spain was threatened by a new Moorish invasion.  She continued to plot against her stepson, eventually returning to Castile where she was also a disruptive influence.  Her nephew Pedro I "el Cruel" King of Castile imprisoned her with Juana de Lara and ordered her murder.  The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Fernando, D. Juan" as the sons of "D. Alonso Rey de Aragon" and his wife "D. Leonor", adding that Juan was "vassallo del Rey D. Pedro de Castilla, que le mato juntamente con la Reina D. Leonor su madre"[516]. 

King Alfonso IV & his first wife had seven children: 

1.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón ([1315]-Balaguer [1317]).

2.         Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón ([1318]-Montpellier 1346)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Costancia" as the daughter of Alfonso IV King of Aragon and his wife Teresa, stating that she was the wife "del rey Don Jayme de Mallorquas"[517].  The testament of "Infantissa Theresia…domini infantis Alfonsi consors ac comitissa Urgelli", dated 23 Oct 1327, bequeathes property to "infantibus Petro et Iacobo…filiis nostris…domine Constancie regine Maioricarum…filie…nostre…"[518]m (Perpignan 24 Sep [1336]) as his first wife, JAIME III King of Mallorca Infante de Aragón, son of FERNANDO Infante de Mallorca & his first wife Isabelle de Sabran Dame de Matagriphon (Catania 15 Apr 1315-killed in battle Lluchmayor 25 Oct 1349). 

3.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (Balaguer 5 Sep 1319-Barcelona 5 Jan 1387, bur Nuestra Señora de Poblet).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Pedro…el otro Don Jayme" as the two sons of Alfonso IV King of Aragon and his wife Teresa[519]He succeeded his father in 1336 as PEDRO IV "el Ceremonioso" King of Aragon and Valencia, PERE III Conde de Barcelona. 

-        see below

4.         Infante don JAIME de Aragón (1321-Barcelona 15 Nov 1347).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Pedro…el otro Don Jayme" as the two sons of Alfonso IV King of Aragon and his wife Teresa, stating that Jaime was "Comte de Urgel et viaconte de Ager"[520]The testament of "Infantissa Theresia…domini infantis Alfonsi consors ac comitissa Urgelli", dated 23 Oct 1327, bequeathes property to "infantibus Petro et Iacobo…filiis nostris…domine Constancie regine Maioricarum…filie…nostre…"[521].  He succeeded his mother in 1328 as Conde de Urgel, Vizconde de Ager, Barón de Entenza y Antillón. 

-        CONDES de URGEL

5.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón (Zaragoza 1323-1327). 

6.         Infante don FADRIQUE de Aragón ([1325]-young).

7.         Infante don SANCHO de Aragón (Zaragoza [before 23 Oct] 1327-[Nov/Dec] 1327).  The testament of "Infantissa Theresia…domini infantis Alfonsi consors ac comitissa Urgelli", dated 23 Oct 1327, appoints as her heir "infantem Sanccium filium comunem prefati viri…et nostri"[522]

King Alfonso IV & his second wife had two children:

8.         Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón (11 Dec 1329-murdered Burriana 16 Jul 1363)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Ferrando…et el otro Don Joan" as the two sons of King Alfonso and his second wife, stating that Fernando was "Marques de Tortosa"[523].  The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Fernando…[Marques de Tortosa], D. Juan" as the sons of "D. Alonso Rey de Aragon" and his wife "D. Leonor"[524].  He was created Marqués de Tortosa by his father, at the instigation of his mother, the creation being revoked shortly afterwards following pressure from his step-brother Infante Pedro.  Señor de Albarracín y Fraga.  After the death of his half-brother Infante don Jaime's in 1347, Fernando assumed leadership of the opposition movement, encouraged by his maternal uncle Alfonso XI King of Castile.  He inflicted a military defeat on Pedro IV's Valencian supporters and obliged Pedro IV to recognise him as his heir and appoint him Governor of Valencia.  In July 1348, Pedro IV defeated Fernando, who was wounded and taken to Castile.  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I names “el Infante Don Ferrando Marqués de Tortosa e Señor de Albarrazin, su sobrino, fijo del Rey Don Alfonso de Aragon e de la Reyna Doña Leonor su hermana” among those present with Alfonso XI King of Castile at Gibraltar in 1350[525]Pedro IV tempted him back to Aragon and appointed him Procurator-General in 1357.  Fernando proved a troublesome ally throughout Pedro IV's war with Pedro I "el Cruel" King of Castile, whose throne Fernando claimed.  Eventually he was murdered on the orders of the King of Aragon.  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records the murder of “el Infante Don Ferrando Marques de Tortosa” in 1363[526].  m (Evora 3 Feb 1354, contract 30 Jan 1355) Infanta dona MARIA de Portugal, daughter of PEDRO I King of Portugal & his second wife Constanza Manuel de Castilla (Evora 6 Apr 1343-Aveiro after 16 Jan 1367, bur Santarem São Francisco)The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Fernando, D. Maria" as the children of "D. Pedro Rey de Portugal" and his wife "D. Constança", an earlier passage recording that "D. Fernando…Marques de Tortosa", son of "D. Alonso Rey de Aragon" and his wife "D. Leonor", married "la Infanta D. Maria"[527].  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records the marriage in Evora in 1354 of “el Infante D. Ferrando de Aragon Marques de Tortosa” and “la Infanta Doña Maria fija del Infante Don Pedro heredero de Portogal[528]The marriage contract of “Dom Fernando Iffante Daragam” and “Dom Affonço...Rey de Portugal e do Algarve...Iffante Dona Maria minha netta” is dated 30 Jan 1355[529]Senhora de Aveiro 1363.  She became a nun at Santorem after her husband died.  The testament of “Rey D. Pedro...”, dated 16 Jan 1367, made bequests to “...Infante Donna Maria nossa filha que ora he em Aragom...Infante D. Beatriz nossa filha per cazamento...Infante Dom Joam nosso filho...Infante D. Diniz outro si nosso filho...[530]

9.         Infante don JUAN de Aragón (1334-murdered Bilbao 12 Jun 1358)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Ferrando…et el otro Don Joan" as the two sons of King Alfonso and his second wife[531]The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Fernando, D. Juan" as the sons of "D. Alonso Rey de Aragon" and his wife "D. Leonor", adding that Juan was "vassallo del Rey D. Pedro de Castilla, que le mato juntamente con la Reina D. Leonor su madre"[532].  Señor de Elche, Biel y Bolsa.  Alférez mayor of Pedro I "el Cruel" King of Castile 25 Feb 1355 to Jun 1358.  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records that “el Infante Don Juan” died 12 Jun 1358[533]m (Castojeriz Jul 1354[534]) ISABEL Díaz de Haro, daughter of JUAN Núñez de Lara [Castilla] Señor de Vizcaya & his wife María Díaz de Haro ([1335]-murdered Castillo de Jérez 1361).  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I the marriage in 1354 of “[el] Infante Don Juan de Aragon” and “Doña Isabel fija de Don Juan Nuñez de Lara”, adding that King Pedro granted “las tierras de Vizcaya é de Lara” to the husband after depriving Tello [who had married Isabel´s older sister] of them[535]Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II records in 1373 the reply of Enrique II King of Castile to “Doña Maria de Lara fija de Don Ferrando de la Cerda”, who claimed “las tierras de Lara é de Vizcaya”, which names “Don Nuño...Doña Juana...Doña Isabel” as the children of “Don Juan Nuñez de Lara Señor de Vizcaya” and his wife “Doña Maria”, all of whom died childless, adding that Isabel married “el Infante Don Juan de Aragon[536].  She succeeded her sister in 1359 as Señora de Lara, Señora de Vizcaya.  Imprisoned by Pedro I King of Castile, first at Castrojeriz, subsequently at Jérez where she shared a cell with Queen Blanca.  Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records the death “en Xeréz de la Frontera con hierbas que le fueron dadas” in 1361 of “Doña Isabel de Lara, fija de Don Juan Nuñez de Lara é de Doña Maria de Vizcaya su muger”, killed on the orders of the king[537]Infante don Juan had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:    

a)         FLORENCIA de Aragón ([1358]-)m (separated[538]) PIERRE bâtard de Foix dit de Béarn, illegitimate son of GASTON [II] Comte de Foix Vicomte de Béarn & his mistress ---.  

 

 

PEDRO IV 1336-1387, JUAN I 1387-1396, MARTÍN I 1396-1410

 

Infante don PEDRO de Aragón, son of ALFONSO IV "el Benigne" King of Aragon & his first wife Teresa de Entenza Condesa de Urgel (Balaguer 5 Sep 1319-Barcelona 5 Jan 1387, bur Nuestra Señora de Poblet)The testament of "Infantissa Theresia…domini infantis Alfonsi consors ac comitissa Urgelli", dated 23 Oct 1327, bequeathes property to "infantibus Petro et Iacobo…filiis nostris…domine Constancie regine Maioricarum…filie…nostre…"[539].  He succeeded his father in 1336 as PEDRO IV "el Ceremonioso" King of Aragon, PERE III Conde de Barcelona, PEDRO II King of Valencia, crowned at Zaragoza 1336.  He crowned himself, the first king of Aragon since 1204 not to have been crowned by the Papal representative[540].  After his accession, his stepmother dowager Queen Leonor continued to plot to advance the interests of her own sons.  Pedro IV was obliged to confirm his stepbrothers in their possessions in 1338, not wishing to antagonise Castile when Sultan Abu al-Hassan was threatening a new invasion of the peninsular.  Following a lengthy dispute with his brother-in-law Jaime III King of Mallorca, Pedro IV annexed Mallorca 29 Mar 1343, declaring himself PEDRO I King of Mallorca, Comte de Roussillon & Cerdanya.  He successfully invaded Mallorca in May 1343 and conquered Roussillon and Cerdanya in 1344.  His brother Infante don Jaime Conde de Urgel became the leader of an opposition movement in Aragon, was joined by his half-brothers, and forced compromises from Pedro IV at a Cortes in Zaragoza in late summer 1347.  After Infante don Jaime's death later in 1347, his half-brother Infante don Fernando assumed leadership of the opposition encouraged by his maternal uncle Alfonso XI King of Castile.  Fernando inflicted a military defeat on Pedro IV's Valencian supporters and obliged Pedro IV to recognise him as his heir.  In July 1348, Pedro IV defeated Fernando and reaffirmed his power.  Aragonese relations with Castile continued to be tense, with war breaking out in March 1357 when Pedro I "el Cruel" King of Castile captured Tarragona.  Pedro IV supported Enrique de Trastámara in his rebellion in Castile, confirming the alliance at Binéfar in October 1363 when Pedro agreed to transfer the Kingdom of Murcia to Enrique.  However, when Enrique succeeded to the throne of Castile, Pedro IV allied himself with Fernando I King of Portugal to oppose him, continuing to retain Murcia.  Hostilities were successively suspended by peace treaties signed at Alcañiz in 1371, at Almazán 12 Apr 1374 and at Lérida 10 May 1375, under which Molina and Murcia were transferred to Castile and Pedro IV's daughter Infanta Leonor betrothed to Enrique II's son Juan. 

m firstly (contract 6 Jan 1337, Alagón 23 Jul 1338) Infanta doña MARÍA de Navarra, daughter of FELIPE III King of Navarre Comte d’Evreux [Capet] & his wife Juana II Queen of Navarre [Capet] ([1335]-Valencia 29 Apr 1347, bur Valencia San Vicente, transferred to Nuestra Señora de Poblet).  A document dated 23 Jul 1338 at Alagón certifies that "Pedro…Rey de Aragon de Valencia de Cerdennya de Corcegua e comte de Barçalona" married "dona Maria filla del…princep e sennyor don Phelip…Rey de Navarra conte de Euroux de Engolesme de Morentayn e de Longauilla et de la…sennyora dona Johannya…Reyna del dicto Reyno"[541].  She died in childbirth. 

m secondly (by proxy Santarem 11 Jun 1347 in person Barcelona 15 Nov 1347) Infanta dona LEONOR de Portugal, daughter of AFONSO IV King of Portugal & his wife Infanta doña Beatrix de Castilla (1328-Teruel 29 Oct 1348, bur Nuestra Señora de Poblet).  She died of plague. 

m thirdly (Valencia 13 Jun 1349) LEONOR of Sicily, daughter of PIETRO II King of Sicily [Aragon] & his wife Elisabeth of Carinthia [Görz] ([1325]-Lérida 20 Apr 1375).  She became a powerful influence at court, replacing Bernat de Cabrera as King Pedro IV's chief adviser.  In 1357, faced with mounting opposition in Sicily, her brother King Federigo proposed that Athens and Neopatras be transferred to Queen Leonor in return for military help from her husband in Sicily, a proposal which was refused[542]

m fourthly (Barcelona 11 Oct 1377) as her second husband, SIBILLA de Fortià, widow of ARTAL de Foces, daughter of BERNAT de Fortià & his wife --- (-Barcelona 4 or 24 Nov 1406).  Daughter of a minor baron in the Empordà, she became King Pedro IV's mistress before marrying him.  She established her family in positions of power at court, her brother Bernat de Fortià becoming Pedro IV's chamberlain.  Crowned Queen at Zaragoza Jan 1381.  After fleeing to Sant Martí Sarroca after her husband died, she was captured but allowed a pension in return for giving up her endowments. 

King Pedro IV & his first wife had four children:

1.         Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón (Poblet 1340-Catania Jul 1363)Her father unsuccessfully proposed her as heir to the throne in early 1347, in the absence of a male heir.  Betrothed (Perpignan 8 Feb 1351) to LOUIS de France Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, son of JEAN II "le Bon" King of France & his first wife Bonne de Luxembourg (Château du Bois de Vincennes 23 Jul 1339-Biseglia Castle near Bari 20 Sep 1384, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice).  m (Catania 11 Apr 1361) as his first wife, FEDERIGO II "il Simplo" King of Sicily, son of PIETRO II King of Sicily [Aragon] & his wife Elisabeth of Carinthia [Görz] (1 Sep 1341-Messina 27 Jul 1377). 

2.         Infanta doña JUANA de Aragón (Barcelona 7 Nov 1344-Castellón de Ampurias 1385, bur Monastery of Poblet)Ayala´s Crónica de Pedro I records the Aragonese proposal in 1363 for the marriage of Pedro I King of Castile and “una fija del Rey de Aragon...Doña Juana, que oviera de una Reyna...hermana del Rey de Navarra”, rejected by King Pedro of Castile[543].  The testament of "Infantissa Johanna…Petri…Regis Aragonum filia, consorsque…domini Johannis comitis Impuriarum" is dated 12 Aug 1384, appoints as her executors "Dominum Regem patrem nostrum…infantem Johannem ducem Gerunde et comitem Cervarie fratrem nostrum et…infantem Martinum fratrem nostrum…", elects her burial "in Monasterio Poupuleti", and names "Petrum filium nostrum…Johanni filio nostro"[544]m (19 Jun 1373) JUAN de Aragón Conde de Ampurias, son of Infante don RAMÓN BERENGUER de Aragón Conde de Ampurias & his second wife María Álvarez de Ejérica (1338-Castellví de Rosanes 1398). 

3.         Infanta doña MARÍA de Aragón ([1345/46]-Montblanc 3 Jun 1348). 

4.         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (b and d Valencia 28 Apr 1347). 

King Pedro IV & his third wife had four children:

5.         Infante don JUAN de Aragón (Perpignan 27 Dec 1350-Foixa 19 May 1396)The testament of "Infantissa Johanna…Petri…Regis Aragonum filia, consorsque…domini Johannis comitis Impuriarum", dated 12 Aug 1384, appoints as her executors "Dominum Regem patrem nostrum…infantem Johannem ducem Gerunde et comitem Cervarie fratrem nostrum et…infantem Martinum fratrem nostrum…"[545].  Duque de Gerona 1351.  Appointed Lieutenant General of the Kingdom 1364.  He refused to marry his niece Maria I Queen of Sicily after the death of his first wife, proposed by his father as part of the latter's plan to conquer Sicily.  He succeeded his father in 1387 as JUAN I "el Cazador" King of Aragon and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona.  A passionate huntsman all his life, he suffered from constant ill health maybe due to epilepsy.  He died after falling from his horse while hunting[546]Betrothed (contract 16 Jul 1370) to JEANNE de France, daughter of PHILIPPE VI King of France & his second wife Blanca Infanta de Navarra (May 1351-Béziers 16 Sep 1371, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  She died on the way to meet her future husband.  m firstly ([Barcelona[547]] 24 Jun 1373) MATHE d’Armagnac, daughter of JEAN [I] Comte d'Armagnac & his second wife Beatrix de Clermont (after 18 Feb 1347-Zaragoza 23 Oct 1378).  She is not named in the testament of "domini Johannis comitis Armaniaci", dated 18 Feb 1347, so must have been born subsequently[548].  A second testament of "Johannes…comes Armaignaci, Fesensiaci et Ruthene, vicecomesque Leomaniæ et Altivillaris ac dominus terre Ripparie", dated 5 Apr 1373, names "…Mathe filie nostre…ducisse Gerunde, uxorique…principis domini Johannis, ducis Gerunde, primogeniti domini regis Aragonie"[549]m secondly (Montpellier [Perpignan[550]] 2 Feb 1380) YOLANDE de Bar, daughter of ROBERT I Duc de Bar & his wife Marie de France ([1364[551]]-Barcelona 13 Jul 1431).  She played an active political role at court after her marriage, which brought her into conflict with her father-in-law's fourth wife Sibilla de Fortià before her husband's accession.  In the face of her husband's unwillingness or inability to act in the face of demands for reorganisation of the royal household and other administrative reforms from urban deputies in the Cortes which met at Monzón in Nov 1388, she made compromise proposals which averted the crisis.  King Juan I & his first wife had five children:

a)         Infante don JAIME de Aragón (Valencia 24 Jun 1374-Valencia 1374).

b)         Infanta doña JUANA de Aragón (Daroca Oct 1375-Valencia Sep 1407)The 15th century Chronicle of Esquerrier records that "Mossen Mathieu" married "Madona Johana infanta de Arago, filha del rey En Johan"[552]m (Barcelona 4 Jun 1392) MATHIEU Comte de Foix, Vicomte de Béarn et de Castelbon, son of ROGER BERNARD II Vicomte de Castelbon & his wife Gérarde Dame de Navailles (-Aug 1398).  On the death of his father-in-law, he organised an invasion of Aragon to enforce his wife's claim to the throne but was repelled by Pere Conde de Urgel.  No issue. 

c)         Infante don JUAN de Aragón (b and d Barcelona Jul 1376). 

d)         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón (b and d 1377). 

e)         Infanta doña LEONOR de Aragón (b and d 1378). 

King Juan I & his second wife had six children:

f)          Infante don JAIME de Aragón (1382-1388).  Duque de Gerona, Conde de Cervera 1387. 

g)         Infanta doña VIOLANTE de Aragón (1384[553]-Château de Tucé, Saumur 14 Nov 1443, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice)Her marriage was part of the arrangements to settle Aragon's dispute with the house of Anjou over Sicily.  She claimed to succeed her father 1396 as Queen of Aragon, supported by her mother, but the Cortes offered the crown to her uncle King Martin I.  Lieutenant General in Provence 1410 during her husband's absence in Italy, she suppressed a rebellion there.  She claimed the throne of Aragon again in 1410 on the death of her uncle in the name of her son Louis d'Anjou "Monsieur de Guise" titular Duca di Calabria.  She bought the baronies of Lunel, Berre, Martigues and Istre from Louis de Poitiers Comte de Valentinois at Avignon 19 Sep 1419.  At the French court 1424-1427/28, she actively supported the Dauphin, rallying support from the nobility.  m (Arles-en-Provence 2 Dec 1400) LOUIS II Duc d'Anjou titular King of Sicily and Jerusalem, son of LOUIS I Duc d'Anjou King of Sicily & his wife Marie de Châtillon-Blois (Château d'Angers 5 Oct 1377-Château d'Angers 29 Apr 1417, bur Angers Cathédrale Saint-Maurice). 

h)         Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón ([1389]-Monzón Oct 1389).  Duque de Gerona, Conde de Cervera. 

i)          Infanta doña JUANA de Aragón ([1392-Barcelona 4 Aug 1396). 

j)          Infanta doña ANTONIA de Aragón (b and d 1392). 

k)         Infante don PEDRO de Aragón ([1394]-1394).  Duque de Gerona, Conde de Cervera. 

6.         Infante don MARTÍN de Aragón (Gerona 1356-Barcelona 31 May 1410)The testament of "Infantissa Johanna…Petri…Regis Aragonum filia, consorsque…domini Johannis comitis Impuriarum", dated 12 Aug 1384, appoints as her executors "Dominum Regem patrem nostrum…infantem Johannem ducem Gerunde et comitem Cervarie fratrem nostrum et…infantem Martinum fratrem nostrum…"[554].  Conde de Besalú.  Seneschal of Catalonia 1368.  His father installed him as Viceroy of Sicily in 1378, after unsuccessfully attempting to seize power from Queen Maria I.  Created Duque de Montblanc by his brother.  He led a Catalan fleet to Sicily in 1392 capturing Trapani and Palermo but failed to break the resistance until 1398 when he secured the island for his son and daughter-in-law.  He succeeded his brother in 1396 as MARTÍN I "el Humano" King of Aragon, Valencia and Mallorca, MARTÍ I Conde de Barcelona, Gerona, Osona, Besalú, y Urgel, Comte de Roussillon & Cerdanya.  After his absence in Sicily, he returned to Barcelona in May 1397.  He annexed the county of Ampurias 1401 on the death of Juan II [de Aragón] Conde de Ampurias.  He succeeded his son 1409 as King of Sicily.  He failed to designate a successor after the death of his son.  A two-year interregnum followed his death until a successor was chosen from among the five candidates[555]m firstly (Barcelona 13 Jun 1372) MARÍA de Luna, daughter of LOPE de Luna Señor de Luna & his wife Brianda d’Agoult (-Villareal 29 Dec 1406).  On her husband's accession, she assumed power in Barcelona as Regent because of his absence in Sicily.  Even after her husband's return, she continued politically active.  m secondly (Bellreguart 17 Sep 1409) MARGARITA de Prades, daughter of PEDRO de Prades [Aragón] Barón de Entenza & his wife Juana de Cabrera ([1395]-1422).  King Martín & his first wife had four children: 

a)         Infante don MARTÍN de Aragón (25 Jul 1374-Cagliari 25 Jul 1409, bur Cagliari).  Conde de Luna, Señor de Segorbe y Ejérica.  Duke of Athens and Neopatrai 1391-1394.  He succeeded in 1392 as MARTIN I "el Joven" King of Sicily, under the Regency of his father.  After the death of his first wife, the legitimate heir to Sicily, there was no movement to replace Martin as King of Sicily.  He led a major campaign in Sardinia in 1409, beating the rebels at Sanduri 30 Jun 1409, but died from malaria within a month.  The testament of "Martinus…rex Sicilie Athenarum et Neopatrie dux…domini regis Aragonum primogenitus", dated 25 Jul 1409, names "filium nostrum don Fredericum natum ex…Tarsie muliere…Blanca consors nostra…filiam nostrum naturalem…Violanti… Agatuciam matrem dicte Violantis"[556]m firstly (24 Jun 1389) his first cousin, MARIA I Queen of Sicily, daughter of FEDERIGO II “il Simplo” King of Sicily [Aragon] & his first wife Infanta doña Constanza de Aragón ([1362/63]-25 Mar 1401).  Betrothed (1401) to Infanta doña JUANA de Navarra, daughter of CARLOS III "el Noble" King of Navarre & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (1382-Béarn Jul 1413).  m secondly (by proxy Catania 21 May 1402) as her first husband, Infanta doña BLANCA de Navarra, daughter of CARLOS III "el Noble" King of Navarre & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Pamplona 1385-Santa María de Nieva 3 Apr 1441, bur Tudela, église des Cordeliers).  The testament of "Martinus…rex Sicilie Athenarum et Neopatrie dux…domini regis Aragonum primogenitus", dated 25 Jul 1409, names "…Blanca consors nostra…"[557].  Declared Regent of Sicily by her father-in-law, after the death of her first husband.  She was recognised as heiress to the throne of Navarre at Olite 28 Oct 1416.  She succeeded her father in 1425 as BLANCA I Queen of Navarre, crowned with her second husband at Pamplona 15 May 1429.  Charles VII King of France created her Dss de Nemours 15 Feb 1437.  She married secondly (by treaty 5 Nov 1419, contract Olite 5 Dec 1419, Pamplona 18 Jun 1420) as his first wife, Infante don Juan de Aragón, who later proclaimed himself Juan II King of Navarre, by right of his wife, and succeeded in 1458 as Juan II King of Aragon.  Mistress (1): AGATHE de Pesce, daughter of ---.  The testament of "Martinus…rex Sicilie Athenarum et Neopatrie dux…domini regis Aragonum primogenitus", dated 25 Jul 1409, names "…filiam nostrum naturalem…Violanti… Agatuciam matrem dicte Violantis"[558]Mistress (2): TARSIA Rizzari, daughter of ---.  The testament of "Martinus…rex Sicilie Athenarum et Neopatrie dux…domini regis Aragonum primogenitus", dated 25 Jul 1409, names "filium nostrum don Fredericum natum ex…Tarsie muliere…"[559].  Martín & his first wife had one child:

i)          Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (17 Nov 1394-1400). 

Martín & his second wife had one child:

ii)         Infante don MARTÍN de Aragón (1403-Valencia Aug 1407). 

Martín had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): 

iii)        VIOLANTE de Aragon (-before 1428)The testament of "Martinus…rex Sicilie Athenarum et Neopatrie dux…domini regis Aragonum primogenitus", dated 25 Jul 1409, names "…filiam nostrum naturalem…Violanti… Agatuciam matrem dicte Violantis"[560]m firstly (1405) ENRIQUE Pérez de Guzmán Conde de Niebla Señor de Sanlúcar de Barrameda, son of JUAN Alfonso de Guzmán Conde de Niebla & his wife Beatriz de Castilla Señora de Niebla (-1436).  m secondly MARTÍN de Guzmán, son of ÁLVARO de Guzmán 6th Señor de Orgáz & his wife Beatriz de Silva. 

Martín had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):

iv)        FADRIQUE de Aragón ([1400/03]-Urena 29 May 1438)The testament of "Martinus…rex Sicilie Athenarum et Neopatrie dux…domini regis Aragonum primogenitus", dated 25 Jul 1409, names "filium nostrum don Fredericum natum ex…Tarsie muliere…"[561].  Conde de Luna y Ejérica, Señor de Segorbe.  He was one of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon in 1410 on the death of King Martín I "el Humano".  m VIOLANTE LUISA de Mur, daughter of ---.

b)         Infante don JAIME de Aragón ([1378]-young).

c)         Infante don JUAN de Aragón ([1380]-young).

d)         Infanta doña MARGARITA de Aragón (1384/8-young).

7.         Infanta doña LEONOR de Aragón (Santa María del Puig 20 Feb 1358-Cuellar 13 Sep 1382, bur Toledo Cathedral)Her marriage was arranged as part of the arrangements for peace with Castile agreed at Almazán 12 Apr 1374 and at Lérida 10 May 1375: Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II records the betrothal in 1374 of “el Rey Don Enrique...[el] Infante Don Juan su fijo” and “[el] Rey Don Pedro de Aragon...la Infanta Doña Leonor su fija”, and the marriage in Soria in May 1375[562]She died in childbirth.  Ayala´s Crónica de Juan I records that “la Reyna Doña Leonor” died “en la villa de Cuellar de parto de una fija...la qual vivió poco tiempo despues” and that she was buried in “la cibdad de Toledo...en la Iglesia de Sancta Maria[563]m (Betrothed 12 Apr 1374, Soria 18 Jun 1375) as his first wife, Infante don JUAN de Castilla, son of ENRIQUE II "él de las Mercedes" King of Castile & his wife Juana Manuel de Castilla Señora de Villena, Peñafiel y Escalona (Epila 24 Aug 1358-Alcalá de Henares 9 Oct 1390, bur Toledo Cathedral).  He succeeded his father in 1379 as JUAN I King of Castile and León.  King Juan & his wife had three children: 

a)         Infante don ENRIQUE de Castilla y León (Burgos 4 Oct 1379-Toledo 25 Dec 1406, bur Toledo Cathedral)He succeeded his father in 1390 as ENRIQUE III "el Doliente" King of Castile and León.   

-        KINGS of CASTILE

b)         Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla y León (Medina del Campo 27 Nov 1380-Igualada, near Barcelona 22 Apr 1416)Duque de Peñafiel, Señor de Lara.  Regent of Castile for his nephew Juan II King of Castile in 1406.  Following the death in 1410 of Martin I "el Humano", last King of Aragon of the House of the counts of Barcelona, Infante don Fernando was one of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon.  He became the preferred successor, and under the Compromise of Caspe 25 Jun 1412 was chosen as FERNANDO I "él de Antequera" King of Aragon, Sicily, Mallorca and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona, Urgel, Cerdanya and Roussillon, and crowned at Zaragoza Jan 1414. 

-        see below, Chapter 5.  KINGS of ARAGON (House of Trastámara)

c)          Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla y León (Cuellar 13 Sep 1382-young).

8.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón (Barcelona [May/Jun] 1362-Montblanc 1364). 

King Pedro IV & his fourth wife had three children:

9.         Infante don ALFONSO de Aragón ([1376]-young).  Legitimated 1377.  Conde de Morella. 

10.      Infante don PEDRO de Aragón (b and d Apr 1379). 

11.      Infanta doña ISABEL de Aragón ([1380]-1424)m (Valencia 29 Jul 1407) JAIME de Urgel, son of PEDRO de Aragón Conde de Urgel & his second wife Margherita di Monferrato (Balaguer, Lérida 1380-Játiva 1 Jun 1433).  He succeeded his father in 1408 as JAIME II Conde de Urgel.  He was one of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon in 1410 on the death of King Martín I "el Humano", being the most senior legitimate male heir, and was supported by the Vilaragut family of Valencia and by the Luna family. 

 

 

 

B.      KINGS of MALLORCA 1276-1343

 

 

JAIME II 1276-1311, SANCHO 1311-1324

 

Infante don JAIME de Aragón, son of JAIME I "el Conquistador" King of Aragon & his second wife Iolanda of Hungary (Montpellier 31 May 1243-Palma de Mallorca 29 May 1311).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Pedro, Jayme et Sancho" as the three sons of King Jaime and his second wife[564]The Chronicle of the Hôtel de Ville de Montpellier records the birth in 1243 "in vigilia Pentecosti" of "D. rex Jacobus et regina eius uxor...Jacobus filius" in Montpellier[565]Under the projected partition of 1244, Jaime [Jaume] would receive the Balearic Islands, Valencia, and Montpellier.  Under the further projected partition of 1262, Jaume would receive the Balearic Islands, Montpellier, Roussillon and Cerdaña.  Under the testament of "Jacobus…Rex Aragoniæ, Majoricarum et Valenciæ, Comes Barchinonæ et Urgelli, et Dominus Montispessulani", dated 26 Aug 1272, the king made bequests to "filius noster Infans Jacobus…"[566].  He succeeded his father in 1276 as JAIME II King of Mallorca, Comte de Roussillon, Conde de Cerdanya, Sire de Montpellier, Barón de Ompelas, but his older brother Pedro III King of Aragon reopened the issue, with Jaime being obliged to pay homage to him 20 Jan 1279.  In order to strengthen his position, King Jaime supported the French in their war against his brother Pedro, following the latter’s invasion of Sicily.  He was deposed in Mallorca in 1286 by his nephew Alfonso III King of Aragon, but restored by the Treaty of Anagni 20 Jun 1295, although as a vassal of the King of Aragon. 

Betrothed (1263, contract broken before 11 Aug 1266) to BEATRIX de Savoie, daughter of AMEDEE IV Comte de Savoie & his second wife Cécile des Baux ([1245]-23 Feb 1292).  Zurita records the betrothal of “Infante Don Iayme” and “una hija del Conde Amadeo de Saboya...Beatriz” in 1263[567]Pope Clement IV wrote 11 Aug 1266 to "Jacobo…filii…Regis Aragonum" requiring him to comply with the marriage contract with "filiam B. natam bonæ memoriæ Comitis Sabaudiæ"[568].  Although this document does not name the Comte de Savoie in question, Comte Amé dée IV was the only one who was recently deceased ("bonæ memoriæ") at the date of the letter.  If this is correct, the betrothed must have been his daughter Beatrix, the only one whose name began with the letter b. 

m (contract 1 Sep 1275, 12 Oct 1275) ESCLARMONDE de Foix, daughter of ROGER IV Comte de Foix Vicomte de Castelbon & his wife Brunisenda Folch de Cardona (-after 22 Nov 1299).  The Chronicle of Ramon Muntaner records the marriage of "l´ infant Jacques" and "la fille du comte de Foix", adding that the bride was aged 14[569].  "Gaufridus Vicecomes de Rocabertino" signed a contract dated 1 Sep 1275, in the presence of "domini Rogerii Bernardi…Comitis Fuxensis et Vicecomitis Castriboni et dominæ Brunissendis…Comitissæ Fuxensis matris eiusdem domini Comitis, necnon et dominæ Esclarmundæ sororis dicti domini Comitis et filiæ dictæ dominæ Comitissæ", as proxy for "domini Infantis Jacobi filii…domini Regis Arag." for the latter's marriage with Esclarmonde, the document naming her father "Rogerii quondam Comitis Fuxensis"[570].  A charter dated 15 Oct 1275 notes the marriage between "domina Sclarmunda filia quondam domini Rogerii…Comitis Fuxensis et Vicecomitis Castri-boni" and "dominum infantem Jacobum…Regis Aragonum filium, heredem Majoricarum, Montispessulani, Rossilionis, Ceritaniæ et Confluentis", also naming "fratis nostri domini Rogerii Bernardi…Comitis Fuxensis et Vicecomitis Castri-boni et dominiæ Brunissendis matris nostræ Comitissæ Fuxensis et Vicecomitissæ Castri-boni"[571].  The testament of "Sclarmunda…regina Majoricæ" dated 24 Mar 1312 provides bequests to "Infanti Ferrando…nostro…filio…fratri Jacobo de Ordine Fratrum Minorum…nostro…filio…Dominum Sancium Regem Majoricæ filium nostrum…Sanciæ…Reginæ Siciliæ…filiæ nostræ…Philippo Thesaurario sancti Martini Turonensis…nostro…filio"[572]

Mistress (1): ---.  Rüdt-Collenberg suggests that the mother of Saura de Mallorca may have been Saura de Monreal[573]

King Jaime & his wife had six children: 

1.         Infante don JAIME de Mallorca ([1274]-[1330])The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el otro…Don Sancho…et el otro Don Ferrando et el quarto…Don Phelip" as the four sons of Jaime King of Mallorca, stating that Jaime renounced the throne during the lifetime of his father to enter "la Orden de los frayres Menores"[574].  He renounced his rights of succession to the kingdom of Mallorca in 1299 and became a Franciscan monk.  The testament of "Sclarmunda…regina Majoricæ" dated 24 Mar 1312 provides bequests to "…fratri Jacobo de Ordine Fratrum Minorum…nostro…filio…"[575]Betrothed to CATHERINE de Courtenay, daughter of PHILIPPE de Courtenay titular Emperor of Constantinople & his wife Beatrice of Sicily (1274-Paris 11 Oct 1307 or 2 Jan 1308, bur Paris).  She later married Charles de France Comte de Valois. 

2.         Infante don SANCHO de Mallorca ([1276]-Formigueras 4 Sep 1324).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el otro…Don Sancho…et el otro Don Ferrando et el quarto…Don Phelip" as the four sons of Jaime King of Mallorca, stating that Sancho succeeded his father[576]The testament of "Sclarmunda…regina Majoricæ" dated 24 Mar 1312 provides bequests to "…Dominum Sancium Regem Majoricæ filium nostrum…"[577].  He succeeded his father in 1311 as SANCHO I King of Mallorca, Comte de Roussillon et de Cerdagne/Cerdaña.  He did homage to his cousin Jaime II King of Aragon in 1321, confirming Aragon’s suzerainty over Mallorca.  m (by proxy 9 Feb 1304 in person 1309) as her first husband, MARIE of Sicily, daughter of CHARLES II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary (1290-[end Apr 1346/Jan 1347]).  She married secondly (1326) Jaime III de Ejérica [Aragón] Barón de Ejérica (-1335).  Mistress (1): BLANCA de Montreal, daughter of ---.  Mistress (2): SANCHA de Puigbach, daughter of GUILLEM de Puigbach de San Felíu de Torelló & his wife ---.  King Sancho had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

a)         NICOLESAm BERENGUER Burguet, son of ---. 

King Sancho had two illegitimate children by Mistress (2):

b)         daughterRüdt-Collenberg states that Sancho King of Mallorca had three illegitimate daughters, married respectively to Galcerán de Pinos, Gilabert de Cruïlles and Pierre de Talarn[578]m firstly GALCERÁN de Pinos, son of [GALCERAN de Pinos & his wife Berengaria de Moncada].  m secondly (before 1322) [as his first wife[579]], GILABERT de Cruïlles Barón de Peratalada, son of --- (-1348).

c)          daughter.  Rüdt-Collenberg states that Sancho King of Mallorca had three illegitimate daughters, married respectively to Galcerán de Pinos, Gilabert de Cruïlles and Pierre de Talarn[580]m PIERRE de Talarn, son of ---.  Chevalier. 

3.         Infante don FERNANDO de Mallorca (Perpignan 1278-beheaded Manolada, Peloponnesos [Jul/19 Oct] 1316).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el otro…Don Sancho…et el otro Don Ferrando et el quarto…Don Phelip" as the four sons of Jaime King of Mallorca[581]The testament of "Sclarmunda…regina Majoricæ" dated 24 Mar 1312 provides bequests to "Infanti Ferrando…nostro…filio…"[582].  He was appointed leader of the Catalan Grand Company[583].  In [1306], he was captured at Halmyros, Thessaly by Thibaut de Cepoy, and imprisoned in the castle of St Omer by Guy II Duke of Athens, later sent to Naples and after another year in prison was released and returned to Mallorca[584].  He claimed the Principality of Achaia, on behalf of his infant son by his first marriage, and landed near Glarentza in Morea in summer 1315.  He captured the castle of Beauvoir [Pontikokastro] and the plain of Elis, adopting the title "Lord of the Morea" in Jul 1315[585].  He was defeated by his rival Louis de Bourgogne at Manolada 5 Jul 1316, and beheaded after the battle[586]m firstly (Messina Feb 1314) ISABELLE de Sabran, daughter of ISNARD de Sabran & his wife Marguerite de Villehardouin of Achaia (1297-Catania 7 May 1315).  The charter dated Feb 1313 between "Ferrandi Infantis, filii…quondam domini Regis Jacobi Reg is Majoricarum bonæ memoriæ" and "dominæ Margaritæ filiæ quondam domini Guillelmi Ackay Principis dominæ Matagriffoni" provides for the marriage of the former with "dominam Isabellam eiusdem dominæ Margaritæ et dicti quondam domini Guillelmi filiam"[587].  Her marriage was arranged by her mother to obtain the support of the Catalans for her claim to the principality of Achaia and encouraged by Federigo I King of Sicily [Aragon] in order to increase his influence in Greece.  Her dowry was the barony of Akova [Matagrifon] and her mother's "fifth part" of the principality of Achaia[588].  Isabelle died from the after-effects of childbirth, after bequeathing her rights to Achaia to her new-born son[589]m secondly (contract Nicosia 15 Oct 1315, by proxy 15 Oct 1315, in person in Morea 7 Jun 1316[590]) as her first husband, ISABELLE Ibelin, daughter of PHILIPPE Ibelin, Seneschal of Cyprus & his second wife Marie de Giblet (1300-after 1342).  The Chronicle of Amadi records the betrothal 5 Oct, in 1315 from the context, of "la figlia del sinescardo de Cypro, messer Philippo de Iblim" and "il don Ferante, l'infante de Maiorca", and their marriage the following 7 Jun[591].  The contract of marriage between "infantis Ferrandi…domini Jacobi…regis Majoricarum filii, Moree, baronie Montispessulani et civitatis Cathanie domini" and "domincellam Isabellam filiam…domini Philippi de Ibelino, senescali regni Cypri" was dated 5 Oct 1315[592].  She returned to Cyprus after the death of her husband[593].  She was accused of sorcery by Hugues IV King of Cyprus during his bitter row with his son-in-law Fernando de Mallorca.  She married secondly (Papal dispensation 18 Mar 1320) Hugues Ibelin titular Count of Jaffa.  The dispensation issued by Pope John XXII for the marriage of "nobilis vir Huguetus comes Jaffensis" and "Isabella Ibelin filia Philippi quondam seneshalli Cypri" is dated 18 Mar 1320[594].  Fernando & his first wife had one child: 

a)         Infante don JAIME de Mallorca (Catania 15 Apr 1315-killed in battle Lluchmayor 25 Oct 1349).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Sancho King of Mallorca left his kingdom to "Don Jayme fillo de su hermano Don Ferrando qui murió en Grecia"[595].  He succeeded his uncle in 1324 as JAIME III King of Mallorca

-        see below

Fernando & his second wife had one child:

b)         Infante don FERNANDO de Mallorca (posthumously Cyprus 5 May 1317-Omélas [1343/47]).  Vicomte d'Omélas.  A bitter dispute erupted between him and his father-in-law, who accused the mother of Infante don Fernando of sorcery.  Fernando was expelled from Cyprus in 1341, seeking refuge in Omélas near Montpellier, while his wife was forcibly detained in Cyprus[596]m ([5 Mar 1337/15 Mar 1338], separated 1341) ESCHIVA of Cyprus, daughter of HUGUES IV King of Cyprus [Lusignan-Poitou] & his second wife Alice d'Ibelin (-in Cyprus [Mar] 1363).  The Lignages d'Outremer name (in order) "Civa, Isabella e Marietta" as the three daughters of "Hugo, figliolo de Guido de Lusignan…re de Gerusalem e Cypro" and his second wife, stating that "Civa" married "Ferrando de Maiorca"[597].  The dispensation issued by Pope Benedict XII for the marriage of "Ferrand de Majorque" and "Echive de Lusignan filia Hugonis regis" is dated 5 Mar 1337[598].  "Sancie reine de Hierusalem et de Sicile" donated 50,000 gold florins to "Fernand de Majorques Vicomte d'Omelas, frère du roy de Majorque" by a document dated 15 Mar 1338, which states that he had recently married "Ecive, fille du roi de Cipre" whom she had brought up in her house[599].  She was imprisoned by her father in 1341, during the latter's dispute with her husband.  The Chronicle of Amadi records the arrival of plague in Cyprus in early March, in 1363 from the context, and the death of "madama Eschiva, figliola del re Hugo"[600].  Fernando & his wife had one child: 

i)          ALICIA de Mallorca ([1341]-after 1376)The Lignages d'Outremer name "Alisia" as the daughter of "Ferrando de Maiorca" & his wife[601].  The dispensation issued by Pope Innocent VI for the marriage of "Philippe Ibelin dominus de Arsur consanguineus regis miles" and "Alice de Majorque filia quondam Ferrandi et neptis regis domicella" is dated 26 Aug 1353[602].  She was obliged to remain in Cyprus in 1358 when her husband was banished[603].  She became the mistress of Jean de Moustry, Grand Admiral of Cyprus, in 1370[604]m (Papal dispensation 26 Jul 1355) as his second wife, PHILIPPE Ibelin, son of BALIAN Ibelin titular Lord of Arsur & his wife Marguerite d'Ibelin (-in prison Genoa [Apr 1374/Mar 1376]).  He murdered Pierre I King of Cyprus in 1369, after which he became Seneschal of Cyprus.  He was imprisoned in 1373 and sent to Genoa. 

Fernando had four illegitimate children by unknown mistresses: 

c)          SANCHO de Mallorcam LAURA de Rosellón, daughter of FERRER de Rosellón & his wife ---.  Sancho & his wife had two children: 

i)          CONSTANZA (-after 1407).  m BERENGUER de Vilaragut, Vizconde de Subirata. 

ii)         ESCLARAMUNDA (-1371).  m ARTAL de Foces, châtelain de Cabrera. 

d)         FERNANDO de Mallorca.

e)         PAGANO de Mallorca (-killed in battle Lluchmayor 25 Oct 1349).  m BLANCA de Salellas, daughter of ---.

f)          ESCLARAMUNDA de Mallorca.  Nun at St Clara, Perpignan. 

4.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Mallorca ([1280]-Alicante after 10 Oct 1301 or Escalona Dec 1301)The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Isabel…la otra Sancha" as the two daughters of Jaime King of Mallorca, stating that Isabel was the wife of "Don Johan Manuel"[605].  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the marriage in Jan 1300 of “Dns Joannes” and “Infantissa Dna Elisabeth filia Regis Majoricarum, in Requena[606].  The Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis records the death in Dec 1301 of “Dna Infantissa in Escalona[607]m (contract Perpignan 21 Nov 1299, Requena Jan 1300) as his first wife, JUAN Manuel de Castilla "el Scritor" Señor de Villena, Escalona y Peñafiel, son of Infante don MANUEL de Castilla Señor de Villena y Escalona & his second wife Béatrice de Savoie (Escalona 5 May 1282-Córdoba 13 Jun 1348, bur Peñafiel, monastery of San Pablo). 

5.         Infanta doña SANCHA de Mallorca ([1285]-convent of Santa Maria della Croce, Naples 28 Jul 1345, bur convent of Santa Maria della Croce, transferred to Santa Chiara, Naples).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "la primera…Isabel…la otra Sancha" as the two daughters of Jaime King of Mallorca, stating that Sancha was the wife "del rey Rubert"[608].  The testament of "Sclarmunda…regina Majoricæ" dated 24 Mar 1312 provides bequests to "…Sanciæ…Reginæ Siciliæ…filiæ nostræ…"[609].  Her husband gave her the Lordships of Potenza, Venosa, Lanciano, Alessa and San Angelo 2 Aug 1311.  She was named regent for her husband’s granddaughter Queen Jeanne I, under the will of her husband, but forced to flee the court and became a nun at the convent of Santa Maria della Croce, Naples.  m (by proxy Perpignan 17 Jun 1304 in person Chapelle des Hospitaliers, Palais royal de Collioure, Pyrénées-Orientales 20 Sep 1304) as his second wife, ROBERT of Sicily Duca di Calabria, Principe di Salerno, son of CHARLES II King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Maria of Hungary (Royal Palace of the Torre de San Erasmo, near Capua 1278-Château-Neuf, Naples 16/20 Jan 1344, bur Naples Santa Chiara).  He succeeded his father in 1309 as ROBERT I "le Bon" King of Sicily

6.         Infante don FELIPE de Mallorca ([1288]-Naples [1340/43]).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el otro…Don Sancho…et el otro Don Ferrando et el quarto…Don Phelip" as the four sons of Jaime King of Mallorca, stating that Felipe "fué santo hombre et murió deuotamente estando freyre Menor"[610]The testament of "Sclarmunda…regina Majoricæ" dated 24 Mar 1312 provides bequests to "…Philippo Thesaurario sancti Martini Turonensis…nostro…filio"[611].  Canon at Elna.  Archdeacon at Conflent.  Abbot of St Paul, Narbonne.  Regent of Mallorca 1324-1329. 

King Jaime had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

7.          SAURA de Mallorca (-1333)The contract of marriage between "Saura", with the consent of "Jacobi…Regis Majoricarum, Comitis Rossilionis et Ceritaniæ et domini Montispessulani patris mei", and "nobilem virum Petrum Gaucerandi de Pinosio, filium et heredem nobilis viri Gaucerandi de Pinosio quondam", with the consent of "dominæ Berengeriæ matris meæ uxoris dicti patris mei quondam, et Domini fratris Guillelmi…Urgellitani Episcopi avunculi mei" is dated 10 Oct 1299[612].  m firstly (contract 10 Oct 1299) PERE [I] de Pinos, son of GALCERÁN de Pinos & his wife Berengaria de Moncada (-before 2 Feb 1312).  m secondly (betrothed Jun 1313, [1315/16], papal dispensation 4o 11 Nov 1319) as his second wife, BERENGUER de Vilaragut Señor de Sanmartí y Subirats, son of --- (-after 1358). 

 

 

JAIME III 1324-1343

 

Infante don JAIME de Mallorca, son of Infante don FERNANDO de Mallorca, Prince of Achaia & his first wife Isabelle de Sabran (Catania 15 Apr 1315-killed in battle Lluchmayor 25 Oct 1349).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Sancho King of Mallorca left his kingdom to "Don Jayme fillo de su hermano Don Ferrando qui murió en Grecia"[613].  He succeeded his uncle in 1324 as JAIME III King of Mallorca, Comte de Roussillon, Conde de Cerdanya, Sire de Montpellier, Barón de Ompelas.  His succession was at first not recognised by Jaime II King of Aragon.  He claimed the principality of Achaia, based on the dubious rights inherited from his mother, called himself Prince of Achaia but did nothing to press his claim[614].  After reluctantly swearing allegiance to his brother-in-law Pedro IV King of Aragon in 1339, King Jaime III allied himself with Abu al-Hassan Sultan of Morocco during the latter's invasion 1340.  King Jaime III also disputed French suzerainty over Montpellier, antagonising Philippe VI King of France, who threatened to attack.  Calling on Pedro IV's help, Jaime III refused Pedro's summons to attend a Cort in Barcelona.  Declaring Mallorca, Roussillon and Cerdanya confiscated in Feb 1343, Pedro IV King of Aragon annexed these territories 29 Mar 1343 and invaded Mallorca in May.  King Jaime III surrendered to King Pedro in 1344, was imprisoned but subsequently escaped.  Having retained Montpellier (for which he was still vassal of the King of France), he sold the town to France in 1349 for 12,000 gold talaris.  With the proceeds of sale, he financed an attack on Mallorca but was killed in battle and his wife and children captured by the Aragonese[615]

m firstly (Perpignan 24 Sep 1336) Infanta doña CONSTANZA de Aragón, daughter of ALFONSO IV King of Aragon & his first wife Teresa de Entenza Condesa de Urgel ([1318]-Montpellier 1346).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "Costancia" as the daughter of Alfonso IV King of Aragon and his wife Teresa, stating that she was the wife "del rey Don Jayme de Mallorquas"[616]

m secondly (contract 10 Nov 1347) as her first husband, VIOLANTE de Vilaragut, daughter of BERENGUER de Vilaragut & his second wife Saura de Mallorca (-before 1372).  She was captured by Pedro IV King of Aragon after the battle in which her husband was killed, and confined to the convent of the Clarissans at Valencia with her stepdaughter[617].  She was released, or escaped, in 1352.  She married secondly (1352) as his first wife, Otto Herzog von Braunschweig-Grubenhagen, the marriage being arranged by Jean II King of France, her new husband's friend, who also gave her the town of Omélas as her dowry[618].  She lived at Casale with her second husband, at the court of Giovanni II Paleologo Marchese di Monferrato, who married her stepdaughter.   She lost Omélas in 1362. 

King Jaime III & his first wife had two children:

1.         Infante don JAIME de Mallorca (24 Aug 1336-Soria Feb 1375, bur Soria Monastery of San Francisco).  He succeeded his father in 1349 as JAIME IV titular King of Mallorca.  He was captured with his sister and stepmother after the battle in which his father was killed, and imprisoned for 14 years by his uncle Pedro IV King of Aragon in an iron cage, an experience which left him mentally deranged[619].  He escaped in May 1362 and fled to Pope Urban V at Avignon, where his marriage was arranged.  Excluded from any role in the government of Naples by his marriage contract, he left Naples for Spain end-Jan 1366 and made an unsuccessful attempt to recapture Mallorca.  He was captured by Enrique II King of Castile, who transferred him to Du Guesclin who held him captive in Montpellier, from where he was ransomed by his wife in 1370.  He failed in an attempt to recapture Roussillon and Cerdanya in 1375, and fled to Castile where he died shortly after.  Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II records that “el Infante de Mallorcas (sobrino del Rey de Aragon, fijo de su hermana é de Don Jaymes”, who called himself “Rey de Napol” because he had married “Doña Juana Reyna de Napol”, and “la Marquesa de Monferrat su hermana” invaded Aragon in 1374 in pursuit of his claim to Mallorca, but that Jaime died in Soria “de su dolencia” and was buried “en el Monesterio de Sant Francisco de Soria[620]m (by proxy Naples 14 Dec 1362 in person Château-Neuf May 1363) as her third husband, JEANNE I Queen of Sicily, daughter of CHARLES of Sicily Duca di Calabria [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Marie de Valois (Naples [1328]-strangled Castello San Fele/Muro, Basilicate 22 May 1382, bur Naples Santa Chiara). 

2.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Mallorca (1337-Château de Gallargues after 1403)The Chronicon of Pietro Azario records that "Johannes Marchio Montis-ferrati" married secondly "nepta…Regis Aragonum, filiæ…Regis Majoricarum"[621].  She was "una donna de statura gigantesca"[622].  She was captured with her brother and stepmother by Pedro IV King of Aragon after the battle in which her father was killed, and confined to the convent of the Clarissans at Valencia with her stepmother.  She was freed in 1358/59, thanks to the efforts of her stepmother[623], on condition of renouncing her rights to Mallorca[624].  Her marriage was arranged by her stepmother, who was then living at the court of Monferrato.  After the death of her husband, she supported her brother in his military enterprises: Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II records that “el Infante de Mallorcas (sobrino del Rey de Aragon, fijo de su hermana é de Don Jaymes”, who called himself “Rey de Napol” because he had married “Doña Juana Reyna de Napol”, and “la Marquesa de Monferrat su hermana” invaded Aragon in 1374 in pursuit of his claim to Mallorca[625].  She succeeded her brother in 1375 as ISABEL titular Queen of Mallorca[626].  Benvenuto di San Giorgio quotes a charter dated 27 Jan 1376 under which "Princeps D. Otto Dux Brunsvicensis Gubernator et administrator ac tutor…D. Secundiottonis Marchionis Montis ferrati necnon Joannis, Theodori et Guilielmi fratrum ipsius D. Marchionis" settled matters relating to the testament of Marchese Giovanni II, naming "D. Elisabeth filia quondam D. Jacobis Regis Majoricarum uxor ipsius D. Marchionis"[627].  She sold her rights to Mallorca, Cerdanya, the principality of Achaia and the lordship of Klarentza to Louis Duc d'Anjou in 1378/79, in exchange for the Châtellenie de Gaillargues and an annual pension[628]m firstly (Montpellier 1358) as his second wife, GIOVANNI II Marchese di Monferrato, son of TEODORO I Paleologo Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Argentina Spinola (-20 Mar 1372).  m secondly (in secret [1375/76], separated) KONRAD von Reischach zu Jungnau, son of --- (-[1417/before 16 Jan 1418]). 

King Jaime III & his second wife had one child:

3.         Infanta doña ESCLARAMUNDA de Mallorca (1348-1349).

King Jaime III had two illegitimate children by unknown mistresses: 

4.          JUAN de Mallorca ([1335]-after 1374)m CONSTANZA de Eslava, daughter of ---.

5.          CONSTANZA de Mallorca ([1337]-)m JUAN ALFONSO de Lloria [Lauria], illegitimate son of ALFONSO de Lauria Señor de Cocentaina [Ejérica-Aragón] & his wife Teresa del Puerto ([1330]-after 1369).

 

 

 

C.      CONDES de PRADES 1341-[1441], MARQUESES de VILLENA 1366-1434, DUQUES de GANDÍA1399-1425

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

Infante don PEDRO de Aragón, son of JAIME II King of Aragon & his second wife Blanche of Sicily (1305-Pisa 4 Nov 1381).  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña names "el primero…Don Jayme…el secundo Don Alfonso…el tercero Don Johan…el quarto Don Pedro…el quinto Don Ramon Berenguer" as the five sons of King Jaime II and his wife Blanca, stating that Pedro was "conte de Ribagorça et de Ampurias" but later exchanged Ampurias for Prades with his brother Ramón Berenguer[629]Conde de Ribagorza y Ampurias 1323-1341.  Conde de Prades, Señor de Denia y Gandía 1341-1381.  Seneschal of Catalonia. 

Betrothed to BEATRIZ de la Cerda, daughter of JUAN Alfonso de la Cerda, Señor de Gibraleón & his first wife Maria de Portugal (in Portugal [1311]-early 1325). 

m (Castellón de Ampurias May 1331) JEANNE de Foix, daughter of GASTON I Comte de Foix & his wife Jeanne d'Artois [Capet] (-1357/58).  Pedro & his wife had three children: 

1.         ALFONSO de Aragón "el Viejo" ([1332]-Gandía 5 Mar 1412, bur Gandía).  Conde de Denia 1355.  Created 1st Marqués de Villena [in Castile] 1366, confirmed 1382.  Created 1st Duque de Gandía 1399.  He was one of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon in 1410 on the death of King Martín I "el Humano".  

-        see below, Part D.  MARQUESES de VILLENA 1366-1434, DUQUES de GANDÍA 1399-1425

2.         LEONOR de Aragón ([1333]-Barcelona 26 Dec 1417)The Chronicle of Amadi records that "re Piero…et…la regina Alis de Catalognia sua moglie" were crowned king and queen of Jerusalem at Famagusta after the death of his father[630].  According to the Chronicle of Amadi, the was in love with "messer Joan de Morpho conte de Rochas"[631].  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Lionora" wrote many letters to the Pope complaining of the conduct of the Cypriot nobles[632].  Her parentage is confirmed by a later passage in the Chronicle of Amadi which records that the father of the queen "fra Piero di Aragona" presented letters to the Pope at Avignon from his daughter which complained of the part played by Cypriot nobles in the murder of her husband[633].  Co-regent of Cyprus 1369-1379 during the minority of her son Pierre II King of Cyprus, with her two brothers-in-law Jean and Jacques de Lusignan.  Motivated by hatred of her co-regents, in 1373 she conspired with the Genoese to capture the fortress of Satalia, the base of her brothers-in-law, but the latter abandoned the fortress to the Turks.  The Genoese destroyed the Cypriot fleet in revenge, captured Famagusta and Nicosia, and imprisoned Jacques de Lusignan.  She ordered the murder of her other co-regent, and acted as sole regent from 1375.  The Chronicle of Amadi records that "la regina Lionora" was expelled by her daughter-in-law and sent back to Aragon, dated to after 1378 from the context[634]m (Sep 1353) as his second wife, PIERRE of Cyprus Titular Count of Tripoli, son of HUGUES IV King of Cyprus & his second wife Alice d'Ibelin (9 Oct 1328-murdered 16 Jan 1369).  He succeeded his father in 1359 as PIERRE I King of Cyprus.   

3.         JUAN de Aragón ([1335]-1414).  He succeeded his father in 1381 as Conde de Prades, Barón de Entenza.  Seneschal of Catalonia. 

-        see below

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

JUAN de Aragón, son of Infante don PEDRO de Aragón Conde de Prades & his wife Jeanne de Foix ([1335]-1414)He succeeded his father in 1381 as Conde de Prades, Barón de Entenza.  Seneschal of Catalonia. 

m SANCHA Ximénez de Arenós, daughter of GONZALO Ximénez & his wife Timbor de Bellpuig.  

Juan & his wife had five children: 

1.         PEDRO de Prades (1352-Sicily 1395).  Barón de Entenza.  m (1385) JUANA de Cabrera, daughter of BERNARDO [III] de Cabrera Vizconde de Cabrera y Bas & his wife Marguerite de Foix (-18 Sep 1419).  Pedro & his wife had five children: 

a)         LEONOR de Prades (-after 1422).  m FRANCISCO de Villanova

b)         ISABEL de Prades (-1403). 

c)         JUANA de Prades ([1392]-[1441/45]).  She succeeded her father in 1414 as Condesa de Prades, Baronesa de Entenza, Señora de Arenós.  Vizcondesa de Villamur.  m ([1414]) JUAN RAMÓN Folch de Cardona y Aragón, son of JUAN RAMÓN Folch de Cardona y Luna 2nd Conde de Cardona & his wife Juana de Aragón (1400-1471).  He succeeded his father in 1442 as 3rd Conde de Cardona. 

d)         MARGARITA de Prades ([1395]-1422)m (Bellreguart 17 Sep 1409) as his second wife, MARTÍN I "el Humano" King of Aragon, son of PEDRO IV "el Ceremonioso" King of Aragon & his third wife Eleonora of Sicily [Aragón] (Gerona 1356-Barcelona 31 May 1410).  No issue.

e)         TIMBOR de Prades (-after 1408).

2.         CONSTANZA de Prades (-young).

3.         LEONOR de Prades (-after 1424).

4.         TIMBOR de Prades ([1370]-before 1425)m (1385) as his first wife, BERNARDO [IV] de Cabrera Vizconde de Cabrera y Bas 2nd Conde de Módica, son of BERNARDO [III] de Cabrera Vizconde de Cabrera y Bas 1st Conde de Módica & his wife Marguerite de Foix (10 Aug 1352-Sep 1423).

5.         JAIME de Prades ([1375]-25 Aug 1408).  Barón de Cáccamo y Esclafani, Señor de Jurtino.  Constable of Sicily.  m firstly JUANA de Moncada, daughter of MATEO de Moncada Conte d'Aderno ed Agosta [Viceroy of Sicily] & his wife Juana de Peralta Saluzzo (-after 1391).  m secondly ([1393]) his first cousin, LEONOR [Violante] de Aragón, daughter of ALFONSO de Aragón 1st Marqués de Villena & his wife Violante Jiménez de Arenós.  Jaime & his first wife had two children: 

a)         ISABEL de Pradesm FRANCISCO di Ventimiglia Comte di Collesano. 

b)         AGATA de Pradesm GIOVANNI de Ventimiglia Marchese di Gerace. 

Jaime & his second wife had one child:

c)         VIOLANTE de Prades ([1395]-Barcelona 18 Feb 1471).  She succeeded her father in 1408 as Baronesa de Cáccamo, Accamo y Esclafani, Señora de Jurtino.  m (Blanes [1409/19]) BERNARDO [V] de Cabrera Vizconde de Cabrera y Bas Conde de Módica y Osona, son of BERNARDO [IV] de Cabrera Vizconde de Cabrera y Bas Conde de Módica y Osona & his first wife Timbor de Prades [Aragón] (-14 May 1466).

6.         LUIS de Prades (-1429).  Bishop of Mallorca and Tortosa. 

 

 

 

D.      MARQUESES de VILLENA 1366-1434, DUQUES de GANDÍA1399-1425

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

ALFONSO de Aragón "el Viejo", son of Infante don PEDRO de Aragón Conde de Prades & his wife Jeanne de Foix ([1332]-Gandía 5 Mar 1412, bur Gandía)Conde de Denia 1355.  Conde de Ribagorza 1358.  Don Enrique de Trastámara granted him the lands previously held by Don Juan Manuel "el Scritor" de Castilla in April 1366, in return for his support, creating him Señor de Villena.  This was ratified in 1369 on Enrique's accession as King of Castile.  He succeeded his father 1381 as Señor de Denia.  Created 1st Marqués de Villena [in Castile] 1366, confirmed 1382, although he presumably resigned this title in favour of his son Pedro before 1385.  Condestable of Castile 6 Jul 1382 to 1391.  Created 1st Duque de Gandía 1399.  One of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon in 1410 on the death of King Martín I "el Humano". 

m (1355) VIOLANTE Jiménez Señora de la baronía de Arenós, daughter of GONZALO Díaz Señor de la baronía de Arenós & his wife María Cornel. 

Alfonso & his wife had five children: 

1.         JUAN de Aragón (-young).

2.         JAIME de Aragón.  Señor de la baronía de Arenós. 

3.         ALFONSO de Aragón "el Joven" (after 1358-29 Nov 1425)He succeeded his father in 1412 as 2nd Duque de Gandía, Conde de Denia y Ribagorza, Barón de Arenós, and also as one of the candidates for the throne of Aragon.  Betrothed (before 29 May 1374) to LEONOR de Castilla, illegitimate daughter of ENRIQUE II “él de las Mercedes” King of Castille & his mistress Leonor Álvarez (-after 26 Jun 1409).  m firstly (Tudela 20 Jan 1393) Infanta doña MARÍA de Navarra, daughter of CARLOS II "el Malo" King of Navarre & his wife Jeanne de France (Puente la Reina [1355]-after 1420).  Carlos II King of Navarre committed a dowry of "30.000 florines de oro" to his daughter María for her marriage by contract dated 25 Nov 1396[635].  The date of the marriage is not known.  m secondly (after 1420) ALDONZA March y Vilarig, daughter of mosén JUAN March & his wife Violante Vilarig.  Alfonso had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:   

a)         JAIME de Aragón (-in jail in Játiva 1465).  m ---, daughter of BERNAT de Vilaragut.  Jaime & his wife had four children: 

i)          JAIME de Aragón (-executed Barcelona 1477).

ii)         JUAN de Aragón.

iii)        PEDRO de Aragón.

iv)        --- de Aragónm ANTONIO Navarra

4.         BLANCA de Aragón (-young).

5.         PEDRO de Aragón ([1362]-killed in battle Aljubarrota 15 Aug 1385).  He succeeded his father [before 1385] as 2nd Marqués de Villena.  Ayala´s Crónica de Juan I names “Don Pedro fijo del Marques de Villena” among those killed in 1385 at the battle of Aljubarrota”[636]m (Betrothed before 29 May 1374, 1378) JUANA de Castilla, illegitimate daughter of ENRIQUE II "él de las Mercedes" King of Castile & his mistress Elvira Iñíguez de la Vega ([1357]-).  The testament of “Don Enrique...Rey de Castilla, de Leon, de Toledo, de Galicia, de Sevilla, de Cordoba, de Murcia, de Jaén, del Algarbe, de Algecira, é Señor de Molina”, dated at Burgos 29 May 1374, bequeathed property to “...Don Alonso mi fijo...Doña Juana mi fija (in case her marriage with “Don Pedro fijo del Marques de Villena”, to whom she is betrothed, does not take place)...Doña Elvira Iñiguez madre de los dichos Don Alonso é Doña Juana mis fijos...[637].  Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II records the marriage in 1378 of “Don Pedro fijo del Marques de Villena” and “Doña Juana fija del Rey Don Enrique[638]Pedro & his wife had two children: 

a)         ENRIQUE de Villena "el Astrólogo" (1378-Madrid 15 Dec 1434).  He succeeded his father in 1385 as 3rd Marqués de Villena.  He was the last legitimate male descendant of the Kings of Aragon, House of Counts of Barcelona.  m (before 1403) MARÍA de Albórnoz Señora de Albórnoz Torralba y Moya, daughter of JUAN de Albórnoz Señor de Albórnoz Torralba y Moya & his wife Constanza de Castilla.  Enrique & his wife had two children: 

i)          BEATRIZ de Villena

ii)         ISABEL [Leonor] de Villena (-1490).  Abbess at la Trinidad de Valencia.

b)         ALFONSO de Villena (-young).

Pedro had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

c)          GALVAN de Villena (-[1424]).  Señor de Ayora y Cortes.  m CATALINA de VilarasaGalván & his wife had two children: 

i)          PEDRO de Villena.

ii)         CATALINA de Villena (-[1489]).  She succeeded her father as Señora de Ayora.  m JUAN Ruiz de Corella Conde de Cocentaina. 

6.         JUANA de Aragón m ([1392]) JUAN RAMÓN Folch de Cardona y Luna, son of HUGO II Folch de Cardona 1st Conde de Cardona & his second wife Beatriz de Luna y Aragón (1375-1442).  He succeeded his father in 1400 as 2nd Conde de Cardona.

7.         LEONOR [Violante] de Aragónm ([1393]) as his second wife, her first cousin, JAIME de Prades, Barón de Caccamo y Esclafani, Señor de Jurtino, son of JUAN de Aragón Conde de Prades & his wife Sancha Ximénez de Arenós ([1375]-25 Aug 1408).  Constable of Sicily. 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5.    KINGS of ARAGON 1412-1516 (TRASTÁMARA)

 

 

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise stated below. 

 

FERNANDO I 1412-1416, ALFONSO V 1416-1458

 

Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla y León, son of JUAN I King of Castile & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Aragón (Medina del Campo 27 Nov 1380-Igualada, near Barcelona 22 Apr 1416).  Ayala´s Crónica de Juan I records the birth 27 Nov 1380 at Medina del Campo of “un fijo...el Infante Don Ferrando, que es agora Señor de Lara, é Duque de Peñafiel, é Conde de Mayorga” to “[el] Rey Don Juan...de la Reyna Doña Leonor su muger...[639]Duque de Peñafiel, Señor de Lara.  Regent of Castile for his nephew Juan II King of Castile in 1406.  Following the death in 1410 of Martin I "el Humano", last King of Aragon of the House of the counts of Barcelona, Infante don Fernando was one of the five candidates for the throne of Aragon.  He recaptured Antequera from the Moorish Kingdom of Granada.  Fernando became the preferred successor, with the support of Pope Benedict XIII, and under the Compromise of Caspe 25 Jun 1412 was chosen as FERNANDO I "él de Antequera" King of Aragon, Mallorca and Valencia, Conde de Barcelona, Cerdanya and Roussillon.  He was invested as FERRANTE I King of Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica by Pope Benedict XIII 21 Nov 1412.  In October 1413, he crushed the rebellion of Jaime de Urgel.  Crowned at Zaragoza Jan 1414.  He declared the perpetual union of Aragon and Sicily end-January 1414.  Sardinia, under Guillaume II Vicomte de Narbonne (judge of Arborea), rebelled against him in 1412 and 1415.  Fernando's withdrawal of Aragonese support for the anti-pope Benedict XIII in December 1415 signalled the end of the schism in the Catholic church. 

Betrothed (Aug 1382) to Infanta dona BRITES de Portugal, daughter of FERNANDO I King of Portugal & his wife Leonor Téllez de Meneses (Coimbra end 1372-Madrigal after 1406 maybe [1409], bur Toledo Cathedral).  This betrothal was arranged under the Peace of Elvas.  Ayala´s Crónica de Juan I records the betrothal in 1382 of “la Infanta Doña Beatriz fija heredera del Rey Don Ferrando de Portogal” and “el Infante Don Ferrando fijo segundo del Rey de Castilla” as part of the peace arrangements agreed between Castile and Portugal[640].  She subsequently married Juan I King of Castile and León, the father of Infante don Fernando.  She succeeded her father in 1383 as BRITES Queen of PortugalDeposed 1383. 

m (Betrothed 1390, Valladolid 1395) LEONOR URRACA de Castilla "la Ricahembra", Condesa de Alburquerque, daughter of SANCHO Alfonso de Castilla Conde de Alburquerque & his wife Infanta dona Brites de Portugal (Sep 1374-Medina del Campo 16 Dec 1435).  Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique II records the birth in Sep 1374 of “una fija...Doña Leonor que es agora muger del Infante Don Ferrando” after the death of her father[641].  Ayala´s Crónica de Enrique III records the betrothal in 1390 of “Doña Leonor Condesa de Alburquerque, fija del Conde Don Sancho hermano del Rey Don Enrique...la Señora mejor heredada que se fallaba en España” (listing all her lands) and “el Infante Don Ferrando hermano del Rey”, and in a later passage the couple´s marriage in 1395[642]

King Fernando I & his wife had seven children:

1.         Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla y León (Villaverde, near Medina del Campo 1394-Naples 26 Jun 1458)Created Infante de Aragón on his father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  Created Duque de Girona by his father at his coronation Jan 1414.  He succeeded his father in 1416 as ALFONSO V "el Magnánimo" King of Aragon, ALFONS IV Conde de Barcelona, ALFONSO I King of Sicily.  Leaving his Queen as Regent, he left Spain for Italy in May 1420, first landing at Alghero in June 1420 to crush the Sardinian revolt.  In Sep 1420, he captured Calvi and besieged Bonifaci, but was obliged to withdraw from Corsica by the Genoese.  Offered the succession of Naples in return for military help in August 1420, he sailed for Naples in July 1421 and was received as son and heir of Giovanna II Queen of Sicily [Naples] 8 Jul 1421, although the appointment was revoked in June 1423.  Returning to Spain, Alfonso V found himself embroiled in the conflicts between his brothers and their cousin Juan II King of Castile.  He returned to Sicily in May 1432, was reappointed heir to Naples in 1433, but when Queen Giovanna II died in 1435 she left her kingdom to René d'Anjou.  Alfonso V's military intervention to capture was Naples was thwarted by the Genoese 5 Aug 1435 at Ponza, where he and his brothers were captured.  He was released after making an alliance with Filippo Maria Visconti in Oct 1435, and fought from 1436 to 1442 to impose himself as King of Naples against Angevin opposition, finally occupying the town of Naples 2 Jun 1442.  In 1442, he declared Sicily and Naples united to form the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, and was recognised as ruler of Naples in June 1443 by Pope Eugene IV.  On his death, Sicily reverted to the crown of Aragon, while his illegitimate son Ferrante succeeded in Naples.  The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records the death 26 Jun 1458 in Naples of "Re Alfonso primo" and that he was body was taken "ad sancto Dominicho de Napoli"[643].  m (Valencia Jun 1415) his first cousin, Infanta doña MARÍA de Castilla y León, daughter of ENRIQUE III King of Castile and León & his wife Katherine of Lancaster (Segovia 14 Sep 1401-Valencia 7 Sep 1458).  The testament of “don Henrique...Rey de Castilla...”, dated 24 Dec 1406, bequeathed property to “...la Infanta doña Maria mi hija [...desposada con don Alonso mi sobrino, hijo del Infante don Fernando mi hermano]...la otra Infanta doña Catalina mi hija[644]Regent during her husband's absences in Italy 1420-1423, and from May 1432 until he died, although her area of government was reduced to Catalonia in 1436 when King Alfonso appointed his brother Juan as regent in Aragon and Valencia.  Mistress (1): MARGARITA de Hijar, daughter of JUAN Fernández de Hijar Barón de Hijar, Señor de Belchite & his second wife Timbor de Cabrera.  Mistress (2): GIRALDONA Carlino, daughter of [645]ENRIQUE Carlino & his wife Isabel ---.  King Alfonso V had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1) or by Mistress (2):

a)         FERRANTE de Aragón (1423 or [1424/31]-Naples 25 Jan 1494).  His father designated him as successor in Naples immediately after entering the city 26 Feb 1443.  He succeeded his father 1458 as FERRANTE I King of Naples.   

-        KINGS of NAPLES & SICILY

King Alfonso V had two illegitimate children by Mistress (2):

b)         MARÍA de Aragón (-9 Dec 1449, bur Ferrara Santa Maria degli Angeli)The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the marriage 13 Apr 1444 of "Madama Maria figliola del Re d´Aragona" and "al Marchese di Ferrara"[646].  m (20 May 1444) as his second wife, LEONELLO d'Este Signor di Ferrara, Modena e Reggio, illegitimate son of NICCOLÓ d'Este Signor di Ferrara e Modena & his mistress Stella dei Tolomei dell'Assassino (Ferrara 21 Sep 1407-Palazzo di Belriguardo 1 Oct 1450, bur Ferrara Santa Maria degli Angeli).  No issue. 

c)          LEONORA de Aragónm ([1443] or May 1444) MARIANO Marzano 1st Principe di Rossano, 3rd Duca di Sessa e Squillace, Conte di Montalto, son of GIOVANNI ANTONIO Marzano 2nd Duca di Sessa & his wife Cobella Ruffo Dss di Sessa Signora di Montalto (-murdered Ischia 1494).

2.         Infanta doña MARÍA de Castilla y León (1396-Villacastin 18 Feb 1445)Created Infanta de Aragón on her father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  m (Avila 4 Aug 1420) as his first wife, her first cousin, JUAN II King of Castile, son of ENRIQUE III King of Castile and León & his wife Katherine of Lancaster (Toro 6 Mar 1405-Valladolid 20 Jul 1454, bur Burgos).

3.         Infante don JUAN de Castilla y León (Medina del Campo 29 Jun 1398-Barcelona 19 Jan 1479, bur Nuestra Señora de Poblet)Created Infante de Aragón on his father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  Created Duque de Peñafiel by his father at his coronation Jan 1414.  Conde de Mayorga, Señor de Lara.  His father appointed him Viceroy of Sicily and Sardinia in March 1415.  Joint regent of Castile, with his brother Infante don Enrique, from the death in 1418 of the Queen Mother Katharine, until King Juan II was declared of age 7 March 1419.  Regent of Aragon, alternately with his sister-in-law María Queen of Aragon, during his brother's frequent absences in Italy.  On the death of his father-in-law, he proclaimed himself JUAN King of Navarre, by right of his wife, crowned 18 May 1425.  His Castilian titles and assets were confiscated by the Treaty of Majano July 1430, which ended Aragon's invasion of Castile.  He seized power in Navarre, setting aside the rights of his son, on his first wife's death in 1441.  He succeeded his brother in 1458 as JUAN II King of Aragon

-        see below

4.         Infante don ENRIQUE de Castilla y León (1400-Calatayud 15 Jun 1445)Elected Grand Master of the Order of Santiago 1409.  Created Infante de Aragón on his father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  Conde de Alburquerque, ceded to him by his mother 18 May 1418.  Joint regent of Castile, with his brother Juan, from the death in 1418 of the Queen Mother Katharine, until King Juan II was declared of age 7 March 1419.  Even after this, he exerted a powerful influence over his first cousin the King of Castile, going so far as to sequestrate him by taking over the royal palace of Tordesillas in 1419.  He reinforced his power by marrying the King's sister in 1420, when he was created Duque de Villena by Juan II.  As a result of the machinations of Álvaro de Luna, working with Enrique's brother Infante don Juan, he was arrested in Madrid in June 1422 and forfeited his possessions in Castile.  He was imprisoned for 2 years firstly in the Alcazar in Madrid, later in the fortress of Mora.  King Alfonso V threatened to invade Castile to release his brother, who was eventually released in 1427 and compensated.  His Castilian titles and assets were confiscated by the Treaty of Majano July 1430, which ended Aragon's invasion of Castile, and he was expelled from the Kingdom.  In the course of his campaigns in Italy, he was captured at the battle of the Isle of Ponza 25 Aug 1435, but released through the influence of Francesco Sforza Duke of Milan.  His brother King Alfonso V created him Conde de Ampurias 13 Jan 1436, with land to compensate him for the loss of his Castilian territories.  He had a passionate disposition and rebellious nature.  Returning to Castile, more disputes followed culminating in his imprisoning the King again.  He was imprisoned and expelled for a second time.  He fought and lost to Castilian troops 19 May 1445 at Olmedo, where he was mortally wounded.  m firstly (Torre de Alamin 12 Jul 1420) his first cousin, Infanta doña CATALINA de Castilla y León, Duquesa de Villena, daughter of ENRIQUE III King of Castile & his wife Katharine of Lancaster (1403-Zaragoza 19 Oct 1439).  She died in childbirth.  m secondly (Medina del Campo 7 Apr 1443) BEATRIZ Pimentel, daughter of RODRIGO Pimentel Conde de Benavente & his wife Leonor Enríquez ([1416]-1490).  Enrique & his first wife had one child: 

a)         son stillborn (Zaragoza before 19 Oct 1439). 

Enrique & his second wife had one child:

b)         Infante don ENRIQUE "Fortuna" de Aragón (posthumously Calatayud 11 Nov 1445-Castellón de Ampurias after 2 Jul 1522)He succeeded his father in 1445 as Conde de Ampurias.  Created Duque de Segorbe 1476.  Took part in military campaigns in Catalonia and Valencia, in particular suppressing revolts in Segorbe and Valencia 1478.  m (1488) GUYOMAR de Portugal-Noronha, daughter of AFONSO de Portugal [Bragança] Conde de Faro & his wife María de Castilla-Noroña 2nd Condesa de Odemira ([1468]-Castillo de Segorbe 1 Aug 1516, bur Poblet).  Enrique & his wife had three children: 

i)          JUAN de Aragón (1488-Mora 1 Sep 1490).

ii)         ALFONSO de Aragón (Segorbe 1489-Puig shortly before 16 Oct 1562).  He joined the court of Aragon, taking part in the conquest of Navarre 1512.  He succeeded his father 1522 as 2nd Duque de Segorbe, Conde de Ampurias.  Captain-General of Valencia.  m (Castillo de Segorbe 30 Apr 1516) JUANA Folch de Cardona 3rd Duquesa de Cardona, daughter of FERNANDO Folch de Cardona 2nd Duque de Cardona & his wife Francisca Manrique de Lara ([1500]-Castillo de Segorbe 16 Feb 1564).  Alfonso & his wife had thirteen children: 

(a)       FERNANDO de Aragón (1533-young).

(b)       ALFONSO de Aragón ([1536]-Arbeca 23 Jan 1550).

(c)       JUAN de Aragón (1537-young).

(d)       FRANCISCO de Aragón (Segorbe 1539-12 May 1575)He succeeded his father in 1562 as 3rd Duque de Segorbe.  He succeeded his mother in 1564 as 4th Duque de Cardona.  m ANGELICA de Cárdenas, daughter of BERNARDO de Cárdenas 2nd Duque de Maqueda & his wife Isabel de Velasco (-Cardona 1576).

(e)       GUIOMAR de Aragón ([1540]-Mora 27 Jan 1557)m as his first wife, FADRIQUE de Toledo Marqués de Coria (-3 Sep 1585).  He succeeded as 4th Duque de Alba de Tormes. 

(f)        JUANA de Aragón (Segorbe 1542-Barcelona 16 Aug 1608).  She succeeded her brother 1575 as 4th Duquesa de Segorbe, 5th Duquesa de Cardona, Marquesa de Pallars, Condesa de Ampurias y Prades, Vizcondesa de Villamur, Gran Condestable de Aragón, Señora de Solsona, Baronesa de Entenza, Arbeca y Juneda.  m as his second wife, DIEGO "de Africa" Fernández de Córdoba 3rd Marqués de Comares 9th Alcalde de los Donceles 8th Señor de Lucena, Espejo y Chillón, son of LUIS Fernández de Cordoba & his wife Francisca Fernández de Córdoba [de los Condes de Cabra] (-Arbeca 26/27 Sep 1601).

(g)       ANA de Aragón (-1637)m as his second wife, VESPASIANO Gonzaga Duca di Sabionetta, son of LUIGI Gonzaga Conte di Sabionetta Principe di Bozol & his wife Isabella Colonna Dss di Trajeto Ctss di Fundi (1522-1 May 1593).  Viceroy of Navarre and Valencia. 

(h)       FRANCISCA de Aragón (-young).

(i)         BEATRIZ de Aragón (-young).

(j)         ISABEL de Aragónm JUAN Ximénez de Urrea 3rd Conde de Aranda, son of HERNANDO Ximénez de Urrea & his wife Juana de Toledo (-1576).

(k)       MAGDALENA de Aragón (-1623)m DIEGO Hurtado de Mendoza 1st Principe de Melito Duque de Francavilla, son of DIEGO Hurtado de Mendoza Conde de Melito & his wife Ana de la Cerda Señora de Miedes y Mandayona (-19 Mar 1578).

(l)         MARÍA de Aragón (-young).

(m)     JERÓNIMA de Aragón (-young).

Alfonso had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:   

(n)        PEDRO de Aragón (-Lérida 12 Jan 1597).  Bishop of Jaca 1584.  Bishop of Lérida 1592.

iii)        ISABEL de Aragón (1491-)m (contract Guadalajara 10 Oct 1513) ÍÑIGO López de Mendoza de la Vega y Luna 4th Duque de El Infantado, son of DIEGO de Mendoza de la Vega Duque de El Infantado & his wife María Pimentel (-18 Sep 1566).  

5.         Infanta doña LEONOR de Castilla y León ([1400]-Toledo 19 Feb 1445, bur 1456 Batalla)Created Infanta de Aragón on her father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  Joint Regent of Portugal for her son 1438-1445.  m (Coimbra 4 Nov 1420) Infante dom DUARTE de Portugal, son of JOÃO I King of Portugal & his wife Philippa of Lancaster (Viseu 31 Oct 1391-Thomar 9 Sep 1438, bur Batalla).  He succeeded his father in 1433 as DUARTE King of Portugal

6.         Infante don PEDRO de Castilla y León ([1406]-killed in battle Naples 17 Oct 1438).  Created Infante de Aragón on his father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  Duca di Noto. 

7.         Infante don SANCHO de Castilla y León ([1410]-Medina del Campo Mar 1416).  Created Infante de Aragón on his father's assumption of power in Aragon in 1412.  Grand Master of the Orders of Calatrava and Alcántara.

 

 

JUAN II 1458-1479

 

Infante don JUAN de Castilla y León, son of Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla [later FERNANDO I "él de Antequera" King of Aragon] & his wife Leonor Urraca de Castilla "la Ricahembra" Condesa de Alburquerque (Medina del Campo 29 Jun 1398-Barcelona 19 Jan 1479, bur Nuestra Señora de Poblet)Created Infante de Aragón on his father's assumption of power in Aragon 1412.  Created Duque de Peñafiel by his father at his coronation Jan 1414.  Conde de Mayorga, Señor de Lara.  His father appointed him Viceroy of Sicily and Sardinia in March 1415.  Joint regent of Castile, with his brother Infante don Enrique, from the death in 1418 of the Queen Mother Katharine, until Juan II was declared of age 7 March 1419.  Regent of Aragon, alternately with his sister-in-law María Queen of Aragon, during his brother's frequent absences in Italy.  On the death of his father-in-law, he proclaimed himself JUAN King of Navarre, by right of his wife, and was crowned 18 May 1425.  His Castilian titles and assets were confiscated by the Treaty of Majano July 1430, which ended Aragon's invasion of Castile.  He seized power in Navarre, setting aside the rights of his son, on his first wife's death in 1441.  He succeeded his brother in 1458 as JUAN II King of Aragon, and immediately excluded his older son from the succession.  He was forced to release his son and restore his rights in 1461.  After the death of his son in 1461, a general civil war broke out triggered by the revolt of the remença peasants in Feb 1462.  Juan II sought help from Louis XI King of France, agreeing to pay 200,000 écus and cede Roussillon and Cerdanya to France under the treaties of Sauveterre and Bayonne in May 1462.  This worsened the situation, fighting intensified, and the Catalans proclaimed Enrique IV King of Castile Count of Barcelona in Aug 1462.  Other Catalan factions summoned Pedro de Portugal Constable of Portugal as rightful heir to the throne, as grandson and heir of Jaime [II] Conde de Urgel one of the unsuccessful claimants in 1410, but Juan II defeated him near Prats de Rei in Feb 1465.  René d'Anjou Duc de Provence was summoned as a third claimant, as the son of Violante daughter of Juan I King of Aragon, 30 Jun 1466, captured Girona in Jun 1469 but died the following year before he could press his claim further.  Juan II recaptured Girona in Oct 1471 and Barcelona in Oct 1472, the Capitulation of Pedralbes 10 Oct 1472 marking the end of the civil war.  After recovering Cerdanya and Roussillon from France in early 1473, the French recaptured the territories in 1474/75, and extended their raids into Catalonia as far as Girona.  Ever ambitious to gain control of Castile, Juan II successfully negotiated the marriage of his son Fernando to Isabel heiress of Castile in 1469, but was obliged to fight another Castilian war in 1475/76 to guarantee his daughter-in-law's succession. 

Betrothed (1403) to Infanta doña ISABEL de Navarra, daughter of CARLOS III "el Noble" King of Navarre & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla y León (1396-after 31 Aug 1435 or [1450]).  Under her testament dated 27 Jul 1414, Leonor Queen of Navarre bequeathed money to "su hija Doña Isabel" for her marriage to "el infante D. Juan, hijo secundo del rey D. Fernando de Aragon"[647]. 

Betrothed (Valencia 4 Jan 1415) to JEANNE di Durazzo, widow of WILHELM Duke of Styria and Inner Austria, daughter of CHARLES III King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] & his wife Marguerite di Durazzo [Anjou-Capet] (Zara 25 Jun 1373-Naples 2 Feb 1435, bur Naples, Santa Annunziata).  She succeeded her brother in 1414 as JEANNE II Queen of Sicily

m firstly (by treaty 5 Nov 1419, contract Olite 5 Dec 1419, Pamplona 18 Jun 1420) as her second husband, Infanta doña BLANCA de Navarra, widow of MARTIN I King of Sicily [Aragón], daughter of CARLOS III "el Noble" King of Navarre & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Castilla (Pamplona 1385-Santa María de Nieva 3 Apr 1441, bur Tudela, église des Cordeliers).  She succeeded her father in 1425 as BLANCA I Queen of Navarre, crowned with her second husband at Pamplona 15 May 1429. 

m secondly (Torrelobatón 1 Apr 1444) JUANA Enríquez, Señora de Casarrubios del Monte y Arroyojolinos, daughter of FADRIQUE Enríquez Conde de Melba y Rueda [Admiral of Castile] & his wife Mariana de Córdoba Señora de Casarrubios del Monte (1425-[Zaragoza/Barcelona] 13 Feb 1468).  She took an active part in negotiations with the remença to end the civil war in 1462, but was besieged in Girona with her son Fernando by the forces of the Generalitat led by the count of Pallars.  Rescued by French forces led by Gaston de Foix 23 Jul 1462. 

Mistress (1): LEONOR de Escobar, daughter of ALFONSO Rodríguez de Escobar.

Mistress (2): --- de Ansa, daughter of ---.

Mistresses (3) to (5): ---.  The names of the other mistresses of King Juan II are unknown.

King Juan II & his first wife had four children:

1.         Infante don CARLOS de Aragón y Navarra (Peñafiel 29 May 1421-Barcelona 23 Sep 1461)"Carlos…rey de Navarra duque de Nemoux" granted "al infante D. Cárlos", son of "el infante D. Juan de Aragon y la reina Doña Blanca", "nuestra villa y castillo de Viana…" and the title "Principe de Viana", by charter dated 20 Jan 1423[648]Principe de Viana.  Although designated heir to Navarre from birth by the Cortes, his father was already trying in 1427 to change the order of succession in favour of his youngest daughter Infanta doña Leonor.  Yanguas records that Queen Blanca, under her testament dated 17 Feb 1439, appointed "su hijo el principe D. Carlos" as her universal heir, asking that he abstain from adopting the title king of Navarre after her death in favour of her husband[649].  Carlos left Navarre in 1451 for Guipúzcoa, supported by the Beaumont clan [family of Navarra-Evreux].  He was imprisoned 1453-1455.  After a brief reconciliation in 1460, Carlos was incarcerated at Lérida.  This crystallised opposition to the king in Aragon, where a special council was formed which secured Infante don Carlos's release 25 Feb 1461 and imposed a capitulation on the king enacted at Vilafranca del Penedès 21 Jun 1461 requiring him to recognise his older son's right to succeed.  Carlos died soon after, maybe from tuberculosis, though there were rumours of poisoning.  m (Olite 30 Sep 1439) AGNES von Kleve, daughter of ADOLF I Herzog von Kleve, Graf von la Marck und Ravenstein & his second wife Marie de Bourgogne [Valois-Capet] (24 Mar 1422-Olite 6 Apr 1448).  Betrothed to Infanta dona CATARINA de Portugal, daughter of DUARTE I King of Portugal & his wife Infanta doña Leonor de Aragón (Lisbon 26 Nov 1436-Lisbon 17 Jun 1463, bur Lisbon São Eloy).  Mistress (1): MARÍA de Armendáriz, daughter of ---.  By charter dated 27 May 1457, Carlos Principe de Viana granted "los lugares de Pueyo y Berbinzana" to "la bien amada nuestra Doña María de Armendariz…et bien amada fija nuestra Doña Ana de Navarra" for her marriage to "el secretario del Principe D. Francisco Balbastro" to whom he granted "la alcaidía del castillo del Pueyo"[650]She married (alter 27 May 1457) Francisco BalbastroMistress (2): BRIANDA Vaca, daughter of ---.  Mistress (3): MARGARITA Cappa, daughter of ---.  Carlos had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

a)         ANA de Navarra (-after 3 Mar 1477)By charter dated 27 May 1457, Carlos Principe de Viana granted "los lugares de Pueyo y Berbinzana" to "la bien amada nuestra Doña María de Armendariz…et bien amada fija nuestra Doña Ana de Navarra" for her marriage to "el secretario del Principe D. Francisco Balbastro" to whom he granted "la alcaidía del castillo del Pueyo"[651].  Legitimated 26 Oct 1477.  m (after 3 Aug 1470) LUIS de la Cerda y Mendoza Conde de Medinaceli, son of GASTON II de la Cerda Conde de Medinaceli [Foix] & his wife Leonor de Mendoza Señora de Cogolludo (-Écija 25 Nov 1501).  Created 1st Duque de Medinaceli 1479. 

Carlos had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):

b)         FELIPE de Navarra (1456-killed in battle Baeza 1488).  Conde de Beaufort.  Archbishop of Palermo.

Carlos had one illegitimate child Mistress (3):

c)         JUAN ALONSO de Navarra (Palermo 1459-Huesca 13 Dec 1526).  Abbot of San Juan de La Pena 1460.  Bishop of Huesca 1482.  Juan had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress: 

i)          CARLOS d'Aragona.  Knight of the Order of Santiago 1523. 

2.         Infanta doña JUANA de Aragón y Navarra (1423-Olite 22 Aug 1425).

3.         Infanta doña BLANCA de Aragón y Navarra (Olite 1424-poisoned Orthez 2 Dec 1464)She succeeded her brother in 1461 as Pss de Viana, but was disinherited by her father in favour of her younger sister.  m (Valladolid 15 Sep 1440, annulled 1453) as his first wife, her first cousin, Infante don ENRIQUE de Castilla y León, son of JUAN II King of Castile and León & his first wife Infanta doña María de Aragón (Valladolid 4 Jan 1425-Madrid 11 Dec 1474, bur Madrid).  He succeeded his father in 1454 as ENRIQUE IV "el Impotente" King of Castile and León.  No issue.

4.         Infanta doña LEONOR de Aragón y Navarra (2 Feb 1425-Tudela 12 Feb 1479)Her father named her Lieutenant General of the Kingdom of Navarre 1464.  She succeeded her father in 1479 as LEONOR I Queen of Navarrem (30 Jul 1436) GASTON [IV] de Grailly Comte de Foix et de Bigorre Vicomte de Béarn, son of JEAN [III] de Grailly Comte de Foix et de Bigorre Vicomte de Béarn & his wife Jeanne d'Albret (1423-Roncevalles 25 Jul 1472). 

-        KINGS of NAVARRE.

King Juan II & his second wife had four children:

5.         Infanta doña LEONOR de Aragón ([1446/48]-young). 

6.         Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón (Soa 10 Mar 1452-Madrigalejo 25 Jan 1516)King of Sicily 1468.  He succeeded his father in 1479 as FERNANDO II “el Católico” King of Aragon

-        see below

7.         Infanta doña JUANA de Aragón (Barcelona [1454]-Naples 9 Jan 1517)The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records the arrival in Naples 1 Sep 1477 of "la Regina Joanna Maria de Aragona" to marry "Re Ferrante primo"[652].  Faced with the French capture of Naples 22 Feb 1494, she encouraged her son King Alfonso II not to abdicate.  When he finally left the country, he appointed her Lieutenant General of the kingdom of Naples.  The mid-16th century Chronicle of Gaspare Fuscolillo records that "la regina Joanna vedua mogliera di re Ferrante primo" left Naples 1 Sep 1499 for Spain to "el suo fratello…re Ferrante de Aragona et de Spagnia"[653].  m (14 Sep 1476) as his second wife, FERRANTE I King of Naples, illegitimate son of ALFONSO V King of Aragon, Naples and Sicily & his mistress [Margarita de Hijar or Giraldona Carlino] ([1424/31]-Naples 25 Jan 1494).

8.         Infanta doña MARÍA de Aragón ([1455]-young). 

King Juan II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

9.          ALFONSO de Aragón (1417-1495).  1st Duque de Villahermosa 1476. 

-        DUQUES de VILLAHERMOSA, DUQUES de LUNA

King Juan II had four illegitimate children by Mistress (2): 

10.       JUAN de Aragón (1429-Albalate de Cinca 19 Nov 1475).  Archbishop of Zaragoza 1460.

11.       LEONOR de Aragónm (Tarragona 22 Jan 1468) LUIS [II] de Beaumont 2nd Conde de Lerín [Constable of Navarre], son of LUIS [I] de Beaumont Conde de Lerín [Navarra] & his wife Juana de Navarra (1430- Aranda 6 Nov 1508, bur Lerín). 

12.       FERNANDO de Aragón (-Oct 1452). 

13.       MARÍA de Aragón (-young). 

King Juan II had three illegitimate children by Mistresses (3) to (5): 

14.       FERNANDO de Aragón.  Grand Master of the Order of St John in Spain. 

15.       ALFONSO de Aragón (-young). 

16.       ENRIQUE de Aragón.  Legitimated.  Bishop of Cefalù. 

 

 

FERNANDO II 1479-1516

 

Infante don FERNANDO de Aragón, son of JUAN II King of Aragon & his second wife Juana Enríquez Señora de Casarrubios del Monte y Arroyojolinos (Soa 10 Mar 1452-Madrigalejo 25 Jan 1516)King of Sicily 1468.  He succeeded his father in 1479 as FERNANDO II “el Católico” King of Aragon.  Rarely visiting Aragon during his reign, his centre of activity was transferred to Castile.  After initial military setbacks in his campaign against the Moors, his reforms of the army contributed to his success, with the towns of Ronda, Loja, Malaga, Baza and finally Granada falling in turn.  Pushing the advantage, he went on to capture Melilla and the Canary Islands.  While reforming the nobility, the orders of chivalry and the church, he reinforced the powers of the monarchy by centralising administration.  The power of the Cortes declined, meeting only once between 1488 and 1497.  Under the Treaty of Barcelona 1493 France returned Roussillon and Cerdanya to Aragon, in return for Aragonese/Castilian neutrality in France's war in Italy.  However, with France's expulsion of his cousins from Naples, Fernando allied himself with the Habsburgs to reverse the situation.  After agreeing a partition of Naples 1502 with Louis XII King of France, Fernando taking the southern part of the Kingdom, he conducted a surprise attack culminating in the French expulsion from Naples 16 May 1503, and from Gaeta 1 Jan 1504.  After the death of his first wife in 1504, Fernando was obliged to leave Castile to his son-in-law Philipp of Austria, and retire to Naples.  However, Philipp's death immediately afterwards prompted Fernando to return to Spain.  In the course of his political manoeuvres against France, he was able to use English troops to conquer Navarre, declaring himself King of Navarre 1512. 

m firstly (Valladolid 19 Oct 1469) Infanta doña ISABEL de Castilla y León, daughter of JUAN II King of Castile and León & his second wife Infanta dona Isabel de Portugal (Madrigal de las Altas Torres 22 Apr 1451-Castillo de la Mota, Medina del Campo 26 Nov 1504).  She succeeded her father in 1474 as ISABEL I Queen of Castile

m secondly (Blois 19 Oct 1505) as her first husband, GERMAINE de Foix, daughter of JEAN V de Foix-Grailly Vicomte de Narbonne Comte d'Etampes & his wife Marie d'Orléans [Valois] ([1490/93]-Liria 15 Oct 1538).  She married secondly (17 Jun 1517) Johann Markgraf von Brandenburg-Ansbach, and thirdly (Seville Aug 1526) as his first wife, Fernando de Aragón Duca di Calabria Principe di Tarento. 

Mistress (1): ALDONZA Ruiz de Iborre i Alemany, daughter of ---.

Mistress (2): JUANA Nicolau, daughter of ---. 

Mistress (3): TODA de Larrea, daughter of ---.

Mistress (4): --- de Pereira, daughter of ---. 

King Fernando II & his first wife had six children:

1.         Infanta doña ISABEL de Castilla y Aragón (Duenas 2 Oct 1470-Zaragoza 23 Aug 1498, bur Toledo)Susceptible to melancholy, probably inherited from her maternal grandmother, she experienced a period of profound depression and religious fervour after the death of her first husband.  She was recognised as heir to the throne of Castile 29 Apr 1498, and declared Pss de Asturias.  m firstly (by proxy Seville 18 Apr 1490, in person Lisbon 22 Nov 1490) Infante dom AFONSO de Portugal, son of JOÃO II King of Portugal & his wife Infanta dona Leonor de Portugal (Lisbon 18 May 1475-near Santarem 13 Jul 1491, bur Batalla).  He died after falling from his horse.  m secondly (Valencia de Alcántara 30 Sep 1497) as his first wife, MANOEL I King of Portugal, son of Infante dom FERNANDO de Portugal Duque de Viseu & his wife Infanta dona Brites de Portugal (Alcocheta, Tago 1 Jun 1469-Lisbon, Royal Palace of Rive 13 Dec 1521, bur Belem, Monastery of São Geronimo).  Infanta Isabel & her second husband had one child:

a)         Infante dom MIGUEL da Paz de Portugal (Zaragoza 23 Aug 1498-Gránada 19 Jul 1500, bur Zaragoza).  Principe de Asturias from birth, as heir to the throne of Spain. 

2.         Infante don JUAN de Castilla y Aragón (Seville 30 Jun 1478-Salamanca 4 Oct 1497)Principe de Asturias.  m (Burgos 3 Apr 1497) as her first husband, MARGARETA Adss of Austria, daughter of Emperor MAXIMILIAN I Archduke of Austria & his wife Marie Dss de Bourgogne (Brussels 10 Jan 1480-Mechelen 30 Nov 1530).  Infante Juan & his wife had one child: 

a)         daughter (b and d Alcalá de Henares early 1498).

3.         Infanta doña JUANA de Castilla y Aragón (Toledo 6 Nov 1479-Tordesillas 11 Apr 1555)Lived in Flanders with her husband.  She replaced her nephew Miguel Infante de Portugal as heir to the throne on the former's death in 1500, returning to Spain briefly from Mar-Dec 1502.  She succeeded her mother in 1504 as JUANA “la Loca” Queen of Castile, arriving in Spain 26 Apr 1506.  Her father left the Government of Spain to her husband, retiring to Naples.  Having shown signs of mental instability from an early age, Queen Juana descended into insanity after her husband's death, and was restrained at Tordesillas from 14 Sep 1509 for the rest of her life.  She succeeded her father in 1516 as Queen of Aragon, but the Cortes accepted the succession of her son Carlos 7 Feb 1518, on condition of his abdication should his mother recover her reason.  A brief insurgence in her favour took place Aug/Sep 1519, but it was crushed by King Carlos.  m (Lille 20 Oct 1496) PHILIPP Archduke of Austria, son of Emperor MAXIMILIAN I Archduke of Austria & his wife Marie Dss de Bourgogne (Bruges 22 Jul 1478-Burgos 25 Sep 1506).  He is sometimes referred to as FELIPE I King of Castile

-        KINGS of SPAIN

4.         Infanta doña MARÍA de Castilla y Aragón (Córdoba 29 Jun 1482-Lisbon 7 Mar 1517, bur Belem, Monastery of São Geronimo)Twin with her stillborn sister.  She was not affected by the family's mental instability.  m (Alcazar de Sal 30 Oct 1500) as his second wife, her older sister's second husband, MANOEL I King of Portugal, son of Infante dom FERNANDO de Portugal Duque de Viseu & his wife Infanta dona Brites de Portugal (Alcocheta, Tago 1 Jun 1469-Lisbon, Royal Palace of Rive 13 Dec 1521, bur Belem, Monastery of São Geronimo).

5.         daughter stillborn (Córdoba 30 Jun 1482).  Twin with María. 

6.         Infanta doña CATALINA de Castilla y Aragón (Alcalá de Henares 16 Dec 1485-Kimbolton Castle, Huntingdonshire 7 Jan 1536, bur Peterborough Cathedral)She was not affected by the family's mental instability.  A manuscript calendar records the marriage “XVIII Kal Dec” in 1501 of “p´ncipe Arthuru p´mogeitu He´rici septi et dñam Katherina regis Hispanos filia[654].  She probably died of cancer.  m firstly (by proxy Manor of Bewdley, Worcestershire May 1499, by proxy Bewdley 19 May 1501, in person St Paul’s Cathedral, London 14 Nov 1501) ARTHUR Prince of Wales, son of HENRY VII King of England & his wife Elizabeth Pss of York (St Swithun’s Priory, Winchester 20 Sep 1486-Ludlow Castle, Shropshire 2 Apr 1502, bur Worcester Cathedral).  m secondly (Greenwich Palace, Kent 11 Jun 1509, annulled 23 May 1533) as his first wife, her brother-in-law, HENRY VIII King of England, son of HENRY VII King of England & his wife Elizabeth Pss of York (Greenwich Palace, Kent 28 Jun 1491-Whitehall Palace, London 28 Jan 1547, bur St George's Chapel, Windsor). 

King Fernando II & his second wife had one child:

7.         Infante don JUAN de Aragón (b and Valladolid 3 May 1509).  Principe de Gerona. 

King Fernando II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

8.          ALONSO de Aragón (Cervera [1470]-Lécera 1520).  Abbot of Montearagón.  Archbishop of Zaragoza and Valencia.  Regent of Aragon 1516/1517.  Alonso had seven illegitimate children by ANA de Gurrea Señora de Argabieso, daughter of JUAN de Gurrea Señor de Argabieso & his wife Catalina de Gurrea y Entenza (-Zaragoza 1527). 

a)         JUANA de Aragón (-1520).  m (Valladolid 31 Jan 1509) as his first wife, JUAN de Borja Duque de Gandía, 2nd Duque de Sesa 2nd Principe di Teano e Tricario, son of JUAN de Borja 2nd Duque de Gandia & his wife María Enríquez de Luna (1494-Gandía 9 Jan 1543).

b)         MARTÍN de Aragón.  Señor de Argabieso.  m JUANA de la CaballeríaMartín & his wife had one child: 

i)          MARTÍN de Gurrea y Aragón (-1544).  Señor de Argabieso.

c)          JUAN de Aragón (1492-Madrid 1530).  Archbishop of Zaragoza 1520/1530. 

d)         ANTONIO de Aragón (-1552).  Señor de Quinto. 

e)         ANA de Aragónm firstly ALONSO Pérez de Guzmán "el Bueno" 5th Duque de Medina Sidonia, .  m secondly (1518) JUAN ALONSO Pérez de Guzmán "el Bueno" 6th Duque de Medina Sidonia, (-Sanlucar de Barrameda 26 Nov 1559).  Grandee of Spain 1520. 

f)          FERNANDO de Aragón (Zaragoza 25 Jul 1498-Zaragoza 29 Jan 1577).  Archbishop of Zaragoza 1530-1577.  Fernando had one illegitimate child by MARÍA Jiménez Cerdán

i)          PEDRO de Aragón.  Señor de Ballobar.  m firstly RAFAELA Fernández de Hijar, daughter of JUAN Fernández de Hijar 4th Conde de Belchite & his wife Isabel de Espés (-before 1569).  m secondly (Zaragoza 11 Jun 1569) LEONOR LUISA de Gurrea y Castro, daughter of FRANCISCO de Gurrea Barón de Gurrea & his wife Leonor de Castro de Pinós (-Ballobar 22 Jan 1592).  Pedro & his second wife had four children:

(a)        JUAN de Aragón (29 Jan 1575-1598).  Señor de Ballobar.  m (1586) JULIANA de Aragón, daughter of MARTÍN de Aragón y Gurrea, 3rd Duque de Luna, 5th Duque de Villahermosa, Grandee of Spain 1st Class & his second wife María Pérez de Pomar. 

(b)        AGUSTINA de Gurream PEDRO de Altarriba Barón de El Huerto. 

(c)        MARÍA de Gurrea.  Señora de Ballobar.  m ALFONSO Celdrán

(d)        JOSÉ de Aragón y Gurrea.  Señor de Ballobar.

g)         ALFONSO de Aragón (-Monzón 19 Aug 1552).  Abbot of Montearagón.

King Fernando II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):

9.          JUANA de Aragón ([1471]-before 1522).  m BERNARDINO Fernández de Velasco 1st Duque de Frias ([1451]-1512).  2nd Constable of Castile, 3rd Conde de Haro.  Viceroy of Granada. 

King Fernando II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (3):

10.       MARÍA de Aragón (-after 1530).  Nun at the Augustine convent of Madrigalejo.

King Fernando II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (4):

11.      MARÍA de Aragón (-Madrigal 1550).  Nun at the Augustine convent of Madrigalejo. 

 

 

 



[1] See, for example, Ubieto Arteta, A. (ed.) (1986) Cartulario de Siresa (Zaragoza) (“Siresa”), 2 ([828/33]: “regnante domno nostro Lodovico imperatore”) and 4 ([840/67]: “regnum...domni nostri Karoli regis”), pp. 17, and 20. 

[2] Siresa, 6, p. 25. 

[3] Bisson, T. N. (1986) The Medieval Crown of Aragon (Clarendon Press, Oxford), pp. 10-11. 

[4] Lacarra, J. M. 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. I (Zaragoza, 1945), pp. 193-283. 

[5] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', p. 220. 

[6] Siresa, 1, p. 13. 

[7] Siresa, p. 6. 

[8] Ubieto Arteta, A. (1962) Cartulario de San Juan de la Peña (Valencia) (“San Juan de la Peña”), Vol. I, 3, p. 21. 

[9] Siresa, 2, p. 16. 

[10] Siresa, p. 7. 

[11] Siresa 2, p. 16. 

[12] Scholz, B. W. with Rogers, B. (2000) Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories (University of Michigan Press) (“Royal Frankish Annals”), 824, p. 117. 

[13] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 20, p. 242. 

[14] Traggia, J. ‘Discurso histórico sobre el origén y succesión del reyno pirenaico hasta don Sancho el Mayor’, Memorias de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tomo IV (Madrid, 1805), Documentos Justificativos, III, p. 56. 

[15] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 18, p. 240. 

[16] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 18 and 19, pp. 240 and 241. 

[17] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 18, p. 240. 

[18] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 18 and 19, pp. 240 and 241. 

[19] Traggia ‘Discurso sobre el reyno pirenaico’ (1805), Documentos Justificativos, III, p. 56. 

[20] Traggia ‘Discurso sobre el reyno pirenaico’ (1805), Documentos Justificativos, III, p. 56. 

[21] Settipani, C. (2004) La Noblesse du Midi Carolingien. Etudes sur quelques grandes familles d'Aquitaine et du Languedoc du IXe au XIe siècles (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Oxford), p. 88. 

[22] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 19, p. 241. 

[23] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 19, p. 241. 

[24] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 19, p. 241. 

[25] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 18 and 19, pp. 240 and 241. 

[26] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 1 and 19, pp. 229 and 241. 

[27] Settipani (2004), p. 88, quoting Levi-Provencal, E, and García Gómez, E. 'Textos inéditos del 'Muqtabis' de Ibn Hayyân sobre los origenes del Reino de Pamplona', Al Andalus 19 (1954), pp. 295-307, 301. 

[28] Settipani (2004), p. 88. 

[29] Settipani (2004), p. 88. 

[30] Levi-Provencal & García Gómez 'Textos inéditos del 'Muqtabis' de Ibn Hayyân' (1954), p. 297, reproduced in Textos históricos al-Ándalus. Conquista, Emiratos y Califato, IES Isidra de Guzmán, consulted at <http://www.educa.madrid.org/web/ies.isidradeguzman.alcala/departamentos/geografia/historia_2bac/al_andalus.pdf> [3 Nov 2012]. 

[31] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 18, p. 240. 

[32] Jaurgain, J. de (1898) La Vasconie, étude historique et critique, première partie (Pau), p. 162, quoting Brugeles, L. C. (1736) Chroniques ecclésiastiques du diocèse d´Auch, Preuves de la IIe partie, p. 34. 

[33] Siresa 4, p. 20. 

[34] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', p. 243, footnote 21 (continuation from p. 242), quoting “Lib. Gótico, fol. 80 r”. 

[35] Siresa 5, p. 22. 

[36] Siresa 6, p. 23. 

[37] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 21, p. 242. 

[38] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 2 and 22, pp. 230 and 243. 

[39] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 22, p. 243. 

[40] San Juan de la Peña, 7, p. 31. 

[41] San Juan de la Peña, 11, p. 41. 

[42] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[43] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 6, p. 232. 

[44] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24 and 26, pp. 244 and 246. 

[45] D´Abadals i Vinyals, R. (2009) Els Comtats de Pallars i Ribagorça, Catalunya Carolíngia, Vol. III (Barcelona), Part 1, 24, and Fragmentum historicum, Ex cartulario Alaonis, España Sagrada XLVI, XXXVI, p. 325. 

[46] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[47] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[48] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 6, p. 232. 

[49] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 6, p. 232. 

[50] Siresa 8, p. 27. 

[51] Del Pino, J. L. 'El Califato Omeya de Córdoba (Génesis y consolidación política)', Álvarez Palenzuela, V. A. (coord.) (2002) Historia de España de la Edad Media (Barcelona, Ariel Historia), p. 160. 

[52] Siresa 10, p. 30. 

[53] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 6, p. 232. 

[54] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[55] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. I, 18, p. 55. 

[56] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[57] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[58] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[59] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[60] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[61] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[62] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 24, p. 244. 

[63] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 22, p. 243. 

[64] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 22, p. 243. 

[65] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. I, 16, p. 51. 

[66] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. I, 17, p. 53. 

[67] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. I, 18, p. 55. 

[68] Lacarra 'Textos navarros del Códice de Roda', 6, p. 232. 

[69] Del Pino (2002), p. 160. 

[70] Martín Duque, A. J. (1983) Documentación medieval de Leire (siglos IX a XII) (Pamplona) (“Leire”), 15, p. 33. 

[71] Gaztambide, J. G. (ed.) (1997) Colección diplomatica de la catedral de Pamplona, Tome I 829-1243 (Gobierno de Navarra) (“Pamplona”), 7, p. 29. 

[72] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[73] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny (Paris) Tome IV, 2891, p. 89. 

[74] Pérez de Urbel, J. and González Ruiz-Zorrilla, A. (eds.) (1959) Historia Silense (Madrid), 75, p. 179. 

[75] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Ramire II le Moine, roi d'Aragon, et Agnès de Poitou dans l'histoire et dans la légende', Mélanges offerts à René Crozier à l'occasion de son soixantedixième anniversaire, t. II (Poitiers, 1966), pp. 727-50, 728. 

[76] Martín Duque, A. J. (ed.) (2004) Colección diplomática del monasterio de San Victorián de Sobrarbe (1000-1219) (Zaragoza) ("Sobrarbe San Victorián"), 12, p. 20, and 31, p. 50. 

[77] Bisson (1986), p. 11. 

[78] Bisson (1986), p. 13. 

[79] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 13, p. 22. 

[80] Historia Silense, p. 42. 

[81] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 150, p. 177. 

[82] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 159, p. 199. 

[83] Ximénez de Embún y Val, T. (ed.) (1876) Historia de la Corona de Aragón: Crónica de San Juan de la Peña: Part aragonesa, available at Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes <http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/FichaObra.html?Ref=12477> (3 Aug 2007), XVI, p. 47. 

[84] Ubieto Arteta, A. (ed.) (1989)"Corónicas" Navarras (Zaragoza) 6.14, p. 60. 

[85] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVI, p. 45. 

[86] Devic, Dom C., Dom Vaissete, Dulaurier, E. (1875) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. (Toulouse), Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 207.VI, col. 422. 

[87] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 396. 

[88] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 13, p. 22. 

[89] Ubieto Arteta, A. (ed.) (1966) Cartulario de Santa Cruz de la Serós (Valencia) (“Santa Cruz de la Serós”), 6, p. 18. 

[90] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon', p. 396. 

[91] Richard, A. (1903) Histoire des Comtes de Poitou (republished Princi Negue, 2003), Tome II, p. 122. 

[92] ES II 58 and ES II 76. 

[93] Canellas, A. (ed.) (1963) Colección diplomática de San Andrés de Fanlo (958-1270), (“San Andrés de Fanlo”), 47, p. 367. 

[94] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVI, p. 45. 

[95] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 150, p. 177. 

[96] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[97] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVI, p. 45. 

[98] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 150, p. 177. 

[99] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 159, p. 199. 

[100] España Sagrada, Tomo XLVI (1836), V, p. 232. 

[101] Pamplona 31, p. 56. 

[102] Siresa 13, p. 35. 

[103] González Miranda, M. 'La condesa doña Sancha y el monasterio de Santa Cruz de la Seros', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. VI (Zaragoza, 1956) 4, p. 201. 

[104] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 150, p. 177. 

[105] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 159, p. 199. 

[106] Santa Cruz de la Serós 3, p. 15. 

[107] Santa Cruz de la Serós 7, p. 22. 

[108] González Miranda 'La condesa doña Sancha y el monasterio de Santa Cruz de la Seros', Vol. VI (Zaragoza, 1956), p. 194. 

[109] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVI, p. 45. 

[110] Santa Cruz de la Serós 4, p. 16. 

[111] Libro primero de los Feudos, fol. 147, quoted in Monfar y Sors, D. (1853) Historia de los Condes de Urgel (Barcelona) Tomo I, p. 330. 

[112] Monfar y Sors (1853) Tomo I, p. 331. 

[113] González Miranda 'La condesa doña Sancha y el monasterio de Santa Cruz de la Seros', 1, p. 195. 

[114] Santa Cruz de la Serós 4, p. 16. 

[115] Santa Cruz de la Serós 6, p. 18. 

[116] Siresa 13, p. 35. 

[117] Siresa 15, p. 39. 

[118] González Miranda 'La condesa doña Sancha y el monasterio de Santa Cruz de la Seros', 3, p. 199. 

[119] Santa Cruz de la Serós 15, p. 33. 

[120] González Miranda 'La condesa doña Sancha y el monasterio de Santa Cruz de la Seros', 4, p. 201. 

[121] Ubieto Arteta, A. (1951) Colección diplomática de Pedro I de Aragón y Navarra (Zaragoza), 24, p. 241. 

[122] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 35, p. 258. 

[123] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVI, p. 45.  

[124] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 13, p. 22. 

[125] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 150, p. 177. 

[126] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 159, p. 199. 

[127] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 53, p. 76. 

[128] Leire 78, p. 119. 

[129] España Sagrada, Tomo XLVI (1836), V, p. 232. 

[130] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 60, p. 86. 

[131] San Andrés de Fanlo 47, p. 367. 

[132] Lacarra, J. M. 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. V (Zaragoza, 1952) 287, p. 514. 

[133] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Vol. V (1952) 288, p. 515. 

[134] Siresa 13, p. 35. 

[135] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 79, p. 110. 

[136] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Vol. V (1952) 289, p. 516. 

[137] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 140, p. 163. 

[138] Martín Duque, A. J. 'Cartulario de Santa María de Uncastillo (siglo XII)', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. VII (Zaragoza, 1962) 2, p. 665. 

[139] Roda (Abad), LXXXVII, p. 314. 

[140] ES II 76. 

[141] Jaurgain, J. de (1898) La Vasconie, étude historique et critique, deuxième partie (Pau), pp. 218 and 417. 

[142] Jaurgain (1902), p. 416, quoting Archives des Basses-Pyrénées, E. 368, Cartulaire de Bigorre, xv siècle, fo. 18 vo

[143] Martín Duque 'Cartulario de Santa María de Uncastillo (siglo XII)', 2, p. 665. 

[144] Yepes, A. de (1609) Coronica General de la Orden de San Benito, Tomo VII, Apendix, XII, p. 13. 

[145] Roda (Abad), LXXXVII, p. 314. 

[146] Yepes (1609), Tomo VII, Apendix, XII, p. 13. 

[147] Yepes (1609), Tomo VII, Apendix, XIII, p. 14. 

[148] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Vol. III (1947/48) 175, p. 568. 

[149] Yepes (1609), Tomo VII, Apendix, XII, p. 13. 

[150] Yepes (1609), Tomo VII, Apendix, XII, p. 13. 

[151] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Vol. III (1947/48) 175, p. 568. 

[152] Yepes (1609), Tomo VII, Apendix, XIII, p. 14. 

[153] Jaurgain (1902), p. 219, quoting Marca, P. de (1640) Histoire de Béarn, p. 434. 

[154] Raymond, P. (ed.) (1873) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint Jean de Sorde (Paris/Pau) (“Sorde Saint-Jean”), LXXXVI, p. 71. 

[155] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Vol. V (1952) 339, p. 561. 

[156] Balaguer, F. 'La vizcondesa del Bearn y la rebellion contra Ramiro II', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. V (Zaragoza, 1952), p. 113. 

[157] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[158] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVI and XVII, pp. 45 and 47. 

[159] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 12, p. 20. 

[160] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 13, p. 22. 

[161] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 150, p. 177. 

[162] San Juan de la Peña, Vol. II, 159, p. 199. 

[163] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 729. 

[164] Kennedy, H. (1996) Muslim Spain and Portugal (Longman), p. 150. 

[165] Bisson (1986), p. 13, and Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 729. 

[166] España Sagrada, Tomo XLVI (1836), V, p. 232. 

[167] Canellas López, A. (1993) La colección diplomática de Sancho Ramírez (Zaragoza), 42, p. 56. 

[168] San Millán de la Cogolla II, 35, p. 35. 

[169] Bisson (1986), p. 14. 

[170] Siresa 13, p. 35. 

[171] Pamplona 46, p. 67. 

[172] Kehr, Paul 'Cómo y cuándo se hizo Aragón feudatario de la Santa Sede?', Estudios de la Edad Media de la corona de Aragón t. I (Zaragoza, 1945), pp. 285-326. 

[173] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVII, p. 55. 

[174] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.5, p. 28. 

[175] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 321. 

[176] Monfar y Sors, D. (1853) Historia de los condes de Urgel (Barcelona) Tomo I, p. 357, citing Zurita, J. (1669) Anales de la Corona de Aragon (Zaragoza), Tome I, lib. I, cap. XXX, p. 31. 

[177] Feudos del real archivo de Barcelona, fol. 87, quoted in Monfar y Sors (1853) Tomo I, p. 356, a footnote commenting that the original document has since disappeared. 

[178] Marca, P. de (1688) Marca Hispanica (Paris), Appendix, CCLXXXI, col. 1162. 

[179] The first date at which Queen Felicia is referred to with her husband in documentation, Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 730 footnote 24. 

[180] Necrologio de San Victorián, quoted in Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 730. 

[181] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794. 

[182] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 20, MGH SS XIII, p. 256. 

[183] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVII, p. 51. 

[184] Monumenta Historiæ Tornacensi, MGH SS XIV, p. 268. 

[185] Siresa 13, p. 35. 

[186] Pamplona 38, p. 63. 

[187] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[188] Monfar y Sors (1853) Tomo I, p. 357, citing "Zurita, lib. 1, cap. 30". 

[189] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVIII, p. 64. 

[190] España Sagrada, Tomo XLVI (1836), V, p. 232. 

[191] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1063, MGH SS XXIII, p. 793. 

[192] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVII, p. 51. 

[193] Ubieto Arteta, A. (1951) Colección diplomática de Pedro I de Aragón y Navarra (Zaragoza), p. 46 footnote 24, quoting “APB, leg. 870, Cartulario de San Victorián, fol. 2, siglo XVIII”. 

[194] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Contribution à l'histoire de l'attitude des royaumes pirénéens dans la querelle des investitures: de l'origine de Berthe, reine d'Aragon et de Navarre', Estudios Genealógicos, Heráldicos y Nobiliarios, en honor de Vicente de Cadenas y Vicent (Hidalguía, Madrid, 1978), Vol. 2, pp. 375-402, 381. 

[195] Pamplona 46, p. 67. 

[196] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 81, p. 112. 

[197] Pamplona 75, p. 96. 

[198] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 422. 

[199] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[200] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVIII, p. 64. 

[201] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 321. 

[202] "Corónicas" Navarras 7.3, p. 72. 

[203] Douais, C. (ed.) (1887) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Saint-Sernini de Toulouse (844-1200) (Paris/Toulouse) (“Toulouse Saint-Saturnin”), 464, p. 328.  

[204] Szabolcs 'Berthe reine d'Aragon', p. 377 footnote 11. 

[205] Marchegay, P. and Mabille, E. (eds.) (1869) Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou (Paris) Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, (“Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou”), p. 405.  

[206] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 321. 

[207] Szabolcs 'Berthe reine d'Aragon', p. 379 footnote 14. 

[208] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon', p. 389.   

[209] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. I, MCI, p. 33 (second page). 

[210] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 100, p. 351. 

[211] Ubieto Arteta (1951), p. 33. 

[212] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe reine d'Aragon', p. 393. 

[213] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 122, p. 383. 

[214] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 149, p. 416. 

[215] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 151, p. 418. 

[216] Ubieto Arteta (1951), pp. 34-5. 

[217] Szabolcs 'Berthe reine d'Aragon', pp. 384-5 footnote 31. 

[218] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 82, p. 326. 

[219] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 101, p. 352. 

[220] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVIII, p. 64. 

[221] Ubieto Arteta (1951), p. 33, footnote 10 (continued from p. 32) quoting Briz Martínez, J. (1620) Historia de la Fundación y antigüedad de San Juan de la Peña y de los reyes de Aragón (Zaragoza), p. 650. 

[222] "Corónicas" Navarras 2.23, p. 45. 

[223] Montaner Frutos, A. Canta de mio Cid - versión modernizada, Cantar Tercero, lines 3717-3725, consulted at <http://www.caminodelcid.org/Camino_ElCantarenPDF.aspx> [27 Oct 2012]. 

[224] Bofarull y Mascaró, P. de (1836) Los Condes de Barcelona Vindicados (Barcelona) Tomo II, p. 158, citing Archivo de la Camareria del monasterio de Ripoll. 

[225] Bofarull y Mascaró (1836) Tomo II, p. 158, citing Archivo del Priorato de Sta Maria de Tarrasa, publicado por Marca, n. 335 del apéndice. 

[226] Szabolcs 'Berthe reine d'Aragon', p. 377 footnote 9. 

[227] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. I, MCI, p. 33 (second page). 

[228] Ubieto Arteta (1951), p. 33, footnote 10 (continued from p. 32) quoting Briz Martínez, J. (1620) Historia de la Fundación y antigüedad de San Juan de la Peña y de los reyes de Aragón (Zaragoza), p. 650. 

[229] Moret, P. J. (1756) Investigaciones históricas de las antigüedades del Reyno de Navarra (Pamplona), lib. III, Cap. II, 61, p. 627. 

[230] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVIII, p. 64. 

[231] España Sagrada, Tomo XLVI (1836), V, p. 232. 

[232] Ubieto Arteta (1951), 2, p. 212. 

[233] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[234] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVII, p. 51. 

[235] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XIX, p. 78. 

[236] Sobrarbe San Victorián, 96, p. 133. 

[237] Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester U. P.), Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 58, p. 188. 

[238] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[239] Chronicon Burgense, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 309. 

[240] "Corónicas" Navarras 7.4, p. 72. 

[241] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XIX, p. 78. 

[242] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[243] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 378. 

[244] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XVII, p. 51. 

[245] Lacarra 'Documentos para la reconquista del valle del Ebro', Vol. II (1946) 3, p. 473. 

[246] Reilly, B. F. (1982) The Kingdom of León-Castilla under Queen Urraca 1109-1126 (Princeton University Press), in the Library of Iberian Resources Online, available at <http://libro.uca.edu/urraca/urraca.htm> (7 Dec 2002), Chapter 2, p. 80, and Vajay 'Ramire II, pp. 735-6. 

[247] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 736. 

[248] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 735. 

[249] Payne, S. G. (1973) A History of Spain and Portugal, Volume 1 - Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century (University of Wisconsin Press), in the Library of Iberian Resources Online, consulted at http://libro.uca.edu/payne1/spainport1.htm (15 Dec 2002), Chapter 5, p. 93. 

[250] Payne, Chapter 5, p. 91. 

[251] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 743. 

[252] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 744. 

[253] Ubieto Arteta, A. 'La fecha de la muerte de Ramiro II de Aragón', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. III (Zaragoza, 1947-8), p. 475, quoting from Arigita y Lasa (1900) Colección de documentos inéditos para la historia de Navarra t. I (Pamplona), no. 112, p. 72. 

[254] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Tome I, 1159, p. 318. 

[255] Ex Fragmentis Chronicorum Comitum Pictaviæ, Ducum Aquitaniæ, RHGF XII, p. 409. 

[256] Balaguer, F. 'Notas documentales sobre el reinado de Ramiro II', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. III (Zaragoza, 1947-8) V, p. 18, quoted from the Cartulario de Montearagón, leg. 487, núm. 36 (R. 44). 

[257] Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou, p. 419. 

[258] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 379. 

[259] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XX, p. 84. 

[260] Chronica Adefonsi imperatoris I, 62, p. 190. 

[261] ES II 58, ES II 76, and ES III 810. 

[262] Ex Fragmentis Chronicorum Comitum Pictaviæ, Ducum Aquitaniæ, RHGF XII, p. 409. 

[263] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 749. 

[264] Merlet, L. (ed.) (1883) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, Tome I (Chartres) CXLVII, p. 171. 

[265] Cartulaire de Fontevrault, cited in Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 743 footnote 113. 

[266] Cartulaire de Turpenay-lèz-Chinon, quoted in Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 743 footnote 114. 

[267] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 361. 

[268] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 361. 

[269] Shideler, J. C. (1999) A Medieval Catalan noble family: the Montcadas 1000-1230, in the Library of Iberian Resources on-line, consulted at http://libro.uca.edu/montcada/montcada.htm (7 Dec 2002), Chapter 4, p. 108. 

[270] Grasse 194, p. 255. 

[271] Merino, A. (1819) España Sagrada Tomo XLIII (Madrid), XXXVIII, p. 453. 

[272] Els Testaments, 11, p. 92. 

[273] Vajay 'Ramire II', p. 743. 

[274] Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses 1162, MGH SS XXIII, p. 3. 

[275] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 377. 

[276] España Sagrada Tomo. XLIII, p. 466. 

[277] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31. 

[278] Bofarull y Mascaró (1836) Tomo II, p. 205, citing Real Archivo, n. 250 de la colección de pergaminos con data de este Condado, antes armario de testamentos reales, saco R, n. 60. 

[279] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31. 

[280] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 363. 

[281] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31. 

[282] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 363. 

[283] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 379. 

[284] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31. 

[285] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 377. 

[286] Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ, Liber IX, VII, 5, RHGF XII, p. 382. 

[287] Chronicon Lusitanum, España Sagrada, Tomo XIV, p. 428. 

[288] Sousa, A. C. de (1739) Provas da Historia Genealogica da Casa Real Portugueza (Lisbon), Tomo I, 9, p. 16. 

[289] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 8, p. 15. 

[290] Breve Chronicon Alcobacense, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, p. 21. 

[291] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31. 

[292] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 363. 

[293] Gallia Christiana Novissima, Marseille, Col. 85, no. 182, the title in this edition confirming that Sancho was son of Alfonso, although this is not apparent from the text of the charter. 

[294] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 377. 

[295] Loscertales de García de Valdeavellano, P. (ed.) (1976) Tumbos del monasterio de Sobrado de los monjes (Madrid) (“Sobrado”), Vol. II, 366, p. 352. 

[296] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 363. 

[297] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 377. 

[298] Barthélemy, L. (ed.) (1882) Inventaire chronologique des chartes de la famille de Baux, 164, p. 45, citing Ch. orig. avec Sceaux, L. B. 308, B.-du-R.        

[299] Sobrado, Vol. II, 366, p. 352. 

[300] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 587. 

[301] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes V, 241, p. 82. 

[302] Bofarull y Mascaró (1836) Tomo II, p. 190, citing Real Archivo, n. 105 de la colección de D. Alfonso. 

[303] Bofarull y Mascaró (1836) Tomo II, p. 191. 

[304] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.10, p. 31. 

[305] Ex Brevi Historia Comitum Provinciæ e familia comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 363. 

[306] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 539.  

[307] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 873. 

[308] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380. 

[309] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIII, p. 135. 

[310] "Corónicas" Navarras 6.47, p. 70. 

[311] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 393. 

[312] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at <http://www3.webng.com/lengadoc/talamus.htm> (23 Apr 2008). 

[313] Chronica Breve do Archivo Nacional, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, II, p. 25. 

[314] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 379. 

[315] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32. 

[316] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 576. 

[317] Anales Toledanos I, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 394. 

[318] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32. 

[319] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380. 

[320] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIII, p. 132. 

[321] Annales Compostellani, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 323. 

[322] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 144. 

[323] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898. 

[324] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 136. 

[325] Liber Montpellier, CCIV, p. 349 [J.-C. Chuat] and Spicilegium, Tome III, p. 558. 

[326] Baumel, J. (1980) Histoire d'une seigneurie du Midi de la France. Naisance de Montpellier (985-1213) (Montpellier, Causse), p. 231 ff.  [J.-C. Chuat]

[327] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 561.    

[328] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 565.    

[329] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 566.    

[330] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at <http://www3.webng.com/lengadoc/talamus.htm> (23 Apr 2008). 

[331] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 567.    

[332] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 137. 

[333] Bofarull y Mascaró (1836) Tomo II, p. 205, citing Real Archivo, n. 250 de la colección de pergaminos con data de este Condado, antes armario de testamentos reales, saco R, n. 60. 

[334] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. II, LXI, p. 99. 

[335] Shideler, Chapter 5, p. 131. 

[336] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380. 

[337] Florianus, M. (ed.) (1884) Chronicon Dubnicense, Historiæ Hungaricæ fontes domestici, Pars prima, Scriptores, Vol. III (Lipsia) ("Chronicon Dubnicense"), p. 100. 

[338] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32. 

[339] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1196, MGH SS XXIII, p. 873. 

[340] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, Re, G. del (ed.) (1868) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 2 (Naples), p. 413. 

[341] Continuatio Admuntensis 1205, MGH SS IX, p. 591. 

[342] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 136. 

[343] Ryccardus de Sancti Germano Annales 1209, MGH SS XIX, p. 334. 

[344] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis III 1208, MGH SS IX, p. 634. 

[345] Runciman, S. (1954) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books, 1978), Vol. 3, p. 166. 

[346] Epistola fratres Conradi…Panormitana ad episcopum Cathanensem, sive Brevis Chronica 1027-1083, RIS I.2, p. 278. 

[347] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32. 

[348] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380. 

[349] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 565.    

[350] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380. 

[351] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 136. 

[352] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”)  XXVIII.V, p. 256. 

[353] Ex Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium, RHGF XII, p. 380. 

[354] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 136. 

[355] Lagarde, C. (trans.) (1864) Chronique de Maître Guillaume de Puylaurens sur la guerre des Albigeois (1202-1272) (Béziers), Chap. XVIII, p. 82. 

[356] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 680. 

[357] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, XCI, p. 603. 

[358] "Corónicas" Navarras 1.11, p. 32. 

[359] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIII, p. 132. 

[360] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898. 

[361] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. II, XLVII, p. 88. 

[362] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIV, p. 137. 

[363] Buchon, J. A. (trans.) (1827) Chronique de Ramon Muntaner (Paris), Tome I, II, p. 7. 

[364] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1213, MGH SS XXIII, p. 898. 

[365] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at <http://www3.webng.com/lengadoc/talamus.htm> (23 Apr 2008). 

[366] Vic, Dom C. de and Dom Vaissete (1840) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. (Paris), Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 679. 

[367] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chroniques, Chronicon ecclesiæ Sancti Pauli Narbonensis, col. 40. 

[368] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 638. 

[369] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[370] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 161. 

[371] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XXVIII, p. 78. 

[372] Salazar y Acha, J. (2000) La casa del Rey de Castilla y León en la Edad Media (Centro de Estudios Políticos y Constitucionales Madrid), p. 428. 

[373] Salazar y Castro (Lara), Pruebas, p. 13. 

[374] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[375] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1212, MGH SS XXIII, p. 895. 

[376] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[377] Anales Toledanos II, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 418. 

[378] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, III, "Chronique de l´hôtel de ville de Montpellier", p. 531. 

[379] Société Archéologique de Montpellier (1841) Le petit Thalamus de Montpellier, extracts available at <http://www3.webng.com/lengadoc/talamus.htm> (23 Apr 2008). 

[380] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[381] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[382] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. III, CI, p. 227. 

[383] Faria i Sousa, F. & Alarcon, F. A. de (eds.) (1641) Nobiliario del Conde de Barcelos Don Pedro (Madrid) ("Pedro Barcelos"), Tit. IV, Reyes de Castilla, 23, p. 15, and 11 p. 17. 

[384] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[385] Brutails, J. A. (ed.) (1890) Documents des Archives de la Chambre des Comtes de Navarre (1196-1384) (Paris) XVI, p. 17. 

[386] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. III, LX, p. 175. 

[387] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. III, LX, p. 175. 

[388] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[389] Memorial Histórico Español, Tomo I (Madrid, 1851), Documentos de la época de D. Alfonso el Sabio (“Alfonso el Sabio (1851), Tomo I”), II, p. 3. 

[390] Alfonso el Sabio (1851), Tomo I, I, p. 1. 

[391] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[392] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. IV, Reyes de Castilla, 15 p. 10. 

[393] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[394] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[395] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[396] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. IV, Reyes de Castilla, 18, p. 16. 

[397] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[398] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[399] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, III, "Chronique de l´hôtel de ville de Montpellier", p. 531. 

[400] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[401] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[402] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 634. 

[403] RHGF XXI, E floribus historiarum auctore Adamo Claromontensi, p. 79. 

[404] E visitationibus Odonis Rigaudi archiepiscopi Rothomagensis, RHGF XXI, p. 587. 

[405] Gesta Sancti Ludovici, RHGF XX, p. 414. 

[406] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Sainte-Chapelle, p. 815. 

[407] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[408] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[409] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[410] Mañueco Villalobos, M. & Zurita Nieto, J. (1920) Documentos de la Iglesia Colegial de Santa María la Mayor de Valladolid (Valladolid) ("Valladolid Santa María"), Tome II, LVIII, p. 341. 

[411] Anales Toledanos II, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 418. 

[412] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[413] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[414] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[415] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[416] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[417] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 330-1. 

[418] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. V, XL, p. 390. 

[419] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. V, XL, p. 390. 

[420] Rosell, C. (ed.) (1875) Crónicas de los Reyes de Castilla, Tome I (Madrid), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Fernando IV, Cap. XIV, p. 149. 

[421] López de Ayala, P. (1780) Crónicas de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Sexto, Cap. V, p. 24. 

[422] López de Ayala, P. (1779) Crónicas de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Catorceno, Cap. VII, p. 374. 

[423] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, p. 106. 

[424] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 149. 

[425] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. III, CI, p. 227. 

[426] Runciman (1978), Vol. 3, pp. 330-1. 

[427] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[428] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVI, p. 201. 

[429] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, CXLVI, pp. 440 and 442. 

[430] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd. Edn. Tome V, Preuves, IV, "Chronique tirée d´un ancien manuscrit de l´Abbaye de Berdoüez, au diocèse d´Auch", p. 532. 

[431] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, Re, G. del (ed.) (1868) Cronisti e scrittori sincroni Napoletani, Vol. 2 (Naples), p. 415. 

[432] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, pp. 33-5. 

[433] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 644. 

[434] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[435] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVI, p. 175. 

[436] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, p. 415. 

[437] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, p. 35. 

[438] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVII, p. 208. 

[439] Ramon Muntaner, Tome II, CLXXIV, p. 60. 

[440] Ramon Muntaner, Tome II, CLVIII and CLXVI, pp. 23 and 40. 

[441] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVI, p. 175. 

[442] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, p. 35. 

[443] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, p. 415. 

[444] Chronicon Conimbricensi, España Sagrada XXIII, p. 339.  

[445] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 13, p. 111. 

[446] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 15, p. 114. 

[447] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 11, p. 99. 

[448] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 16, p. 117. 

[449] Breve Chronicon Alcobacense, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, p. 21. 

[450] D. Attwater (1970) The Penguin Dictionary of Saints (Penguin Books), pp. 113-14. 

[451] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVI, p. 175. 

[452] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, p. 415. 

[453] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, p. 35. 

[454] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 464. 

[455] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 253. 

[456] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, p. 415. 

[457] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 218. 

[458] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, p. 35. 

[459] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, p. 415. 

[460] Ramon Muntaner, Tome II, CLXXXIX, p. 96. 

[461] Ramon Muntaner, Tome II, CLXXXIII, p. 84. 

[462] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. IV, VIII, p. 233. 

[463] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. IV, VIII, p. 233. 

[464] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. V, XXXVII, p. 388. 

[465] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[466] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[467] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[468] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[469] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[470] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 10 p. 25. 

[471] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. IV, LXXI, p. 299. 

[472] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVI, p. 175. 

[473] Bartholomæi de Neocastro Historia Sicula, p. 415. 

[474] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, p. 35. 

[475] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 210. 

[476] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 242. 

[477] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 215. 

[478] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 210. 

[479] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 210. 

[480] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 214. 

[481] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 230. 

[482] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIII, p. 90. 

[483] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 167. 

[484] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[485] R. de Mas Latrie (ed.) (1891) Chroniques d'Amadi et de Strambaldi (Paris) (“Amadi”), p. 397. 

[486] Mas de Latrie, M. L. (1855) Histoire de l´Ile de Chypre (Paris) Vol. 3, p. 702. 

[487] Edbury, P. W. (1994) The Kingdom of Cyprus and the Crusades 1191-1374 (Cambridge University Press), p. 137. 

[488] Letter of King Jaime to the bishop of Tusculum written shortly after Queen Marie's death, cited in Edbury (1994), p. 138. 

[489] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 230. 

[490] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, pp. 226 and 230. 

[491] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 221. 

[492] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 231. 

[493] Os Livro de Linhagens, I, Livro Velho, Portugaliæ Monumenta Historica, Scriptores, Vol. I, Fasc. II, p. 157. 

[494] Rodríguez López, A. (1907) El Real Monasterio de las Huelgas de Burgos y el Hospital del Rey (Burgos) ("Las Huelgas de Burgos"), Tome I, 141, p. 539. 

[495] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 231. 

[496] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 212. 

[497] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 214. 

[498] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 230. 

[499] Mas-Latrie, L. de ´Les patriarches latins d´Alexandrie´, Revue de l´Orient Latin, Tome IV, (Paris, 1896), p. 2, citing Le Quien, M. (1740) Oriens christianus, (Paris), Tome III, col. 1144. 

[500] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 231. 

[501] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, pp. 230 and 231. 

[502] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 231. 

[503] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, pp. 230 and 231. 

[504] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 231. 

[505] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 221. 

[506] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIX, p. 245. 

[507] Doña Constanza de Antillón was heiress of Urgel through her mother Leonor de Cabrera, sister of don Armengol X de Cabrera Conde de Urgel. 

[508] Pastor i Madalena, M. (ed.) (2004) El cartulari de Xestalgar: memòria escrita d´un senyoriu valencià (Barcelona) ("Xestalgar"), 10, p. 123. 

[509] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 230. 

[510] Xestalgar, 11, p. 142. 

[511] The kings of Aragon had become de facto rulers of the county of Urgel following Pedro III King of Aragon's defeat of conde Armengol X in 1276. 

[512] Xestalgar, 14, p. 150. 

[513] Ramon Muntaner, Tome II, CCXCI, p. 411. 

[514] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIX, p. 243. 

[515] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 216. 

[516] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 11 p. 25. 

[517] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 240. 

[518] Xestalgar, 14, p. 150. 

[519] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, pp. 239-40. 

[520] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, pp. 239-40. 

[521] Xestalgar, 14, p. 150. 

[522] Xestalgar, 14, p. 150. 

[523] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIX, p. 244. 

[524] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 11 p. 25. 

[525] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Primo, Cap. I, p. 8. 

[526] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Catorceno, Cap. VII, p. 374. 

[527] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 12 p. 25, Tit. VII, Reyes de Portugal, 17 p. 35. 

[528] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Quinto, Cap. VI, p. 124. 

[529] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 35, p. 285. 

[530] Sousa (1739) Provas, Tomo I, 32, p. 279. 

[531] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXIX, p. 244. 

[532] Pedro Barcelos, Tit. V, Reyes de Aragon, 11 p. 25. 

[533] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Noveno, Cap. VI, p. 247. 

[534] ES II 71 (Die Könige von Aragon 1285-1387).  Salazar y Acha (2000), p. 438, gives 1355 as the date of the marriage. 

[535] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Quinto, Cap. XIII, p. 130. 

[536] López de Ayala, P. (1780) Crónicas de los Reyes de Castilla (Madrid), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Octavo, Cap. X, p. 51. 

[537] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Doceno, Cap. III, p. 330. 

[538] Pauphilet (ed.) (1952) Froissart, Chroniques (Paris, Gallimard, Coll. La Pléiade), p. 539.   

[539] Xestalgar, 14, p. 150. 

[540] Bisson (1986), p. 104. 

[541] Castro, J. R. 'El matrimonio de Pedro IV de Aragón y María de Navarra', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. III (Zaragoza, 1947-8) V, p. 147. 

[542] Miller, W. (1908) The Latins in the Levant.  A History of Frankish Greece (1204-1566) (Cambridge and New York), p. 278. 

[543] López de Ayala (1779), Tome I, Crónica del rey don Pedro, Año Catorceno, Cap. VI, p. 371. 

[544] Javierre Mur, A. 'Testamento y codicilo de la Infanta Juana de Aragón, condesa de Ampurias', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. VI (Zaragoza, 1956), p. 452. 

[545] Javierre Mur, A. 'Testamento y codicilo de la Infanta Juana de Aragón, condesa de Ampurias', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. VI (Zaragoza, 1956), p. 452. 

[546] ES I.2 228. 

[547] Bisson (1986), p. 121. 

[548] Quoted by Barrois (2004) Jean I Comte d´Armagnac, son action et son monde (University of Lille), Appendice, pièce IV, available at <http://documents.univ-lille3.fr/files/pub/www/recherche/theses/barrois-dominique/html/these_body.html> (22 Jun 2008), citing Bibliothèque nationale, collection Doat 184 fol. 296-337.   

[549] Quoted by Barrois (2004), Appendice, pièce XVII, citing Archives nationales Trésor des Chartes J 777, no. 9 and Bibliothèque nationale, n.a. fr. 7280, fol. 272-301v. 

[550] Bisson (1986), p. 121. 

[551] Bisson (1986), p. 122.

[552] Pasquier, F. & Courteault, H. (eds.) (1895) Chroniques romanes des comtes de Foix composées au XV siècle par Arnaud Esquerrier et Miégeville (Foix, Toulouse) ("Esquerrier"), p. 63. 

[553] ES II 72 (Die Könige von Aragon 1387-1410).  According to Kerrebrouck, P. van (1990) Les Valois (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 285, Infante doña Violante was born at Zaragoza 2 Dec 1380. 

[554] Javierre Mur, A. 'Testamento y codicilo de la Infanta Juana de Aragón, condesa de Ampurias', Estudios de Edad Media de la Corona de Aragón Vol. VI (Zaragoza, 1956), p. 452. 

[555] The five candidates were Jaime II de Aragón Conde de Urgel, Louis d'Anjou Duca di Calabria (in the name of his mother Violante Infanta de Aragón Dss d'Anjou Titular Queen of Naples), Alfonso de Aragón Duque de Gandía, Fernando "de Antequera" Infante de Castilla, and Fadrique de Aragón Conde de Luna y Ejérica Señor de Segorbe (illegitimate son of Martín "el Joven" King of Sicily). 

[556] Bofarull y Mascaré, P. (ed.) (1847) Colección de documentos inéditos del archivo general de la corona de Aragón (Barcelona) ("Archivo corona de Aragón") Tomo I, XXV, p. 120. 

[557] Archivo corona de Aragón Tomo I, XXV, p. 120. 

[558] Archivo corona de Aragón Tomo I, XXV, p. 120. 

[559] Archivo corona de Aragón Tomo I, XXV, p. 120. 

[560] Archivo corona de Aragón Tomo I, XXV, p. 120. 

[561] Archivo corona de Aragón Tomo I, XXV, p. 120. 

[562] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Nono, Caps. X, XI, XII, pp. 68-73, Año Decimo, Cap. II, pp. 75-6. 

[563] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Juan I, Año Cuarto, Cap. III, p. 160. 

[564] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXV, p. 148. 

[565] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, III, "Chronique de l´hôtel de ville de Montpellier", p. 531. 

[566] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 673. 

[567] Zurita (1669), Tome I, Lib. III, LXIV, p. 177. 

[568] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 659. 

[569] Ramon Muntaner, Tome I, XI, p. 35. 

[570] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 680. 

[571] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 681. 

[572] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 702. 

[573] W. H. Rüdt-Collenberg (1963) 'Yolande de Vilaragut reine de Majorque, princesse de Brunswick et sa parenté' (Toulouse, Edouard Privat) Annales du Midi, tome LXXV no 1 1963, p. 88.  

[574] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[575] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 702. 

[576] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[577] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 702. 

[578] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 90. 

[579] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 90, suggests that he married [presumably secondly] Constanza de Cardona, daughter of Bernat Amat de Cardona & Constanza de Pinos. 

[580] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 90. 

[581] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[582] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 702. 

[583] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. (1979) 'Les Ibelins aux XIIIe et XIVe siècles, Généalogie compilée principalement selon les registres du Vatican', Epeteris tou Kentrou Epistemonikon Ereunon IX, 1977-1979 (Nicosia), reprinted in Familles de l'Orient latin XIIe-XIVe siècles (Variorum Reprints, London, 1983), IV, p. 192. 

[584] Miller (1908), pp. 216-7. 

[585] Miller (1908), p. 254. 

[586] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople 2nd Edn. (Paris), p. 501.  According to Miller (1908), p. 255, he was beheaded on the field of battle. 

[587] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 704. 

[588] Miller (1908), p. 253. 

[589] Miller (1908), p. 254. 

[590] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 192. 

[591] Amadi, p. 397. 

[592] Mas Latrie, L. de (ed.) (1873) ´Nouvelles Preuves de l'Histoire de Chypre sous le règne des princes de la maison de Lusignan´, Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des chartes, Tome XXXIV (Paris) (“Nouvelles Preuves”) I, p. 48. 

[593] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 192. 

[594] Rüdt-Collenberg, W. H. ´Les dispenses matrimoniales accordées à l´Orient Latin selon les Registres du Vatican 1283-1385´, Mélanges de l´Ecole française de Rome. Moyen-Age, Temps modernes, Tome 89, no. 1, (1977), Tableau A, 46, p. 66. 

[595] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 240. 

[596] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[597] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[598] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 75, p. 70. 

[599] Mas de Latrie, Histoire de Chypre Vol. 2, p. 179. 

[600] Amadi, p. 412. 

[601] Lignages d'Outremer, Le Vaticanus Latinus 7806, El parentado de Lusignan 8, p. 168. 

[602] Rüdt-Collenberg (1977), Tableau A, 116, p. 78. 

[603] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 148. 

[604] Rüdt-Collenberg (1979), p. 150, where the author casts doubt on the story that she was the mistress of Pietro di Campo Fregoso, Genoan admiral, and involved in her husband's death. 

[605] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[606] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 210. 

[607] Chronicon Domini Joannis Emmanuelis, España Sagrada Tomo II, p. 210. 

[608] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[609] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 702. 

[610] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 232. 

[611] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 702. 

[612] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 696. 

[613] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 240. 

[614] Miller (1908), p. 276. 

[615] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[616] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, p. 240. 

[617] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 89. 

[618] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[619] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[620] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Nono, Cap. VII, p. 64. 

[621] Petri Azarii Chronicon, Cap. XVI, RIS XVI, col. 422. 

[622] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 90. 

[623] Rüdt-Collenberg (1963), p. 90. 

[624] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[625] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Nono, Cap. VII, p. 64. 

[626] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[627] Ragionamento familiare dell´origine…de…Marchesi di Monferrato…per Benvenuto di S. Giorgio ("Benvenuto di San Giorgio"), RIS XXIII, col. 567. 

[628] Sturdza (1999), p. 502. 

[629] Crónica de San Juan de la Peña XXXVIII, pp. 230 and 231. 

[630] Amadi, p. 408. 

[631] Amadi, p. 420. 

[632] Amadi, p. 430. 

[633] Amadi, p. 438. 

[634] Amadi, p. 487. 

[635] Yanguas y Miranda, J. (1840) Diccionario de antigüedades del reino de Navarra (Pamplona), Tomo II, p. 307, quoting "caj. 73, n. 18". 

[636] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Juan I, Año Septimo, Cap. XV, p. 235. 

[637] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, p. 106. 

[638] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Treceno, Cap. I, p. 89. 

[639] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Juan I, Año Secundo, Cap. VII, p. 137. 

[640] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Juan I, Año Cuarto, Cap. II, p. 159. 

[641] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique II, Año Nono, Cap. II, p. 61. 

[642] López de Ayala (1780), Tome II, Crónica del rey Enrique III, 1389, Cap. II, Año Tercio, Cap. XXV, Año Quinto, Cap. IX, pp. 347, 500 and 556. 

[643] Capasso, B. (ed.) ´Le chronache de li antique ri del regno di Napoli di D. Gaspare Fuscolillo´, Archivio storico per le province Napoletane, Anno Primo, Fascicolo I (Naples, 1876) ("Gaspare Fuscolillo"), I, p. 49. 

[644] González Dávila, G. (1638) Historia de la vida y hechos del rey don Henrique tercero de Castilla (Madrid), p. 208. 

[645] Salazar y Castro, L. de (1697) Historia genealogica de la Casa de Lara (Madrid), Tomo III, Libro XVII, cap. IV, p. 229. 

[646] Annales Ludovici de Raimo, RIS XXIII, col. 231. 

[647] Yanguas, Tomo II, p. 191, quoting "caj. 104, n. 8". 

[648] Yanguas, Tomo I, p. 178, quoting "caj. 122, n. 5". 

[649] Yanguas, Tomo I, p. 145, quoting "caj. 161, n. 4". 

[650] Yanguas, Tomo I, p. 186, quoting "caj. 158, n. 7". 

[651] Yanguas, Tomo I, p. 186, quoting "caj. 158, n. 7". 

[652] Gaspare Fuscolillo, I, p. 51. 

[653] Gaspare Fuscolillo, I, p. 64. 

[654] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXVII (MS. Reg. 2 A. XVIII.a), p. 280.